McDATA | Intrepid 6064 Director | Specifications | McDATA Intrepid 6064 Director Specifications

Front cover
Getting Started with
the McDATA Intrepid
FICON Director
Product, planning, and implementation
information
Realistic considerations and
suggestions
Helpful configuration
examples
Bill White
Wolfgang Fries
Manfred Lindenau
ibm.com/redbooks
International Technical Support Organization
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON
Director
April 2003
SG24-6857-00
Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on page v.
First Edition (April 2003)
This edition applies to firmware version 4.1.0 (Build 12) of McDATA Intrepid FICON Director.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2003. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule
Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .v
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The team that wrote this redbook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Become a published author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 1. Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1 Basic Fibre Channel terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2 FICON overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2.1 FICON channel architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2.2 FICON channel support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3 FICON channel topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3.1 Switched point-to-point configuration . . . . . . . .
1.3.2 Cascaded FICON Director configuration. . . . . .
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Chapter 2. Technical description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1 Introduction to the FICON Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.1 FICON Director overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.2 Management capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.3 EFC Server hardware requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.4 Hardware components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.5 FICON Director configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.6 FICON SANtegrity feature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.7 Control Unit Port (CUP). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 3. Pre-installation planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1 Planning recommendations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Physical port layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 IP addressing and connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4 Switch numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5 Binding and Insistent Domain ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6 Zoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.7 Cables and connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8 FICON channel support for zSeries and 9672 G5/G6 servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.1 FICON channel distances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.2 FICON channel to control unit characteristics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 4. Setting up the EFC Server environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.1 Installation and setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2 Usage options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.1 Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.2 Fabrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.3 Users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2.4 Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
5.1 Setting up a FICON Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
iii
5.2 Activating the High Integrity feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3 Enabling the Control Unit Port (CUP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4 Building a fabric. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.1 Switch Binding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5 Port configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.1 Defining Nicknames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.2 Defining port names and blocking ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.3 Configuring a port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6 Zoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.1 Creating a zone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.2 Creating a zone set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.3 Activating a zone set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7 Verifying and backing up the configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
48
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Appendix A. Useful procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up a HyperTerminal session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Altering an IP address in a CTP card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing EFC Manager server software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing EFC Management client software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upgrading Director firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Appendix B. Port location and mapping . . . .
Intrepid port numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Intrepid 6064 port address mapping . . . . . . . . .
Intrepid 6140 port address mapping . . . . . . . . .
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Appendix C. FICON Director configuration worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Referenced Web sites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to get IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Redbooks collections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
iv
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Notices
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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
v
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,
other countries, or both:
ESCON®
FICON™
IBM®
IBM eServer™
OS/390®
Perform™
Redbooks™
Redbooks(logo)™
S/390®
SP™
Wave®
z/OS™
zSeries™
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The following terms are trademarks of other companies:
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SET, SET Secure Electronic Transaction, and the SET Logo are trademarks owned by SET Secure Electronic
Transaction LLC.
Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.
vi
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Preface
This IBM Redbook discusses how to install, tailor, and configure the McDATA Intrepid FICON
Director, in conjunction with the FICON topologies supported by zSeries and 9672
Generation 5 and Generation 6 servers. It focuses on the hardware installation as well as the
software definitions needed to provide connectivity for supported FICON environments.
This redbook provides planning information and FICON Director setup information. Also
included are helpful utilities for monitoring and managing the McDATA Intrepid FICON
Director environment.
This document is intended for system engineers, SAN administrators, and system
programmers who will plan and install McDATA Intrepid FICON Directors. A good background
in systems planning, hardware and cabling infrastructure planning, and zSeries I/O definitions
(HCD or IOCP), as well as Fibre Channel or FICON Directors is assumed.
The team that wrote this redbook
This redbook was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at the
International Technical Support Organization, Poughkeepsie Center.
Bill White is a Project Leader and Senior Networking Specialist at the International
Technical Support Organization, Poughkeepsie Center.
Wolfgang Fries is a Senior Consultant in the zSeries Support Center in Germany. He has 25
years of experience in supporting large zSeries and S/390 customers. His area of expertise
include zSeries servers and connectivity.
Manfred Lindenau is a S/390 and zSeries specialist in Germany. He has 23 years of
experience in IBM Large Systems Technical Support and currently works in the German
Support Center in Mainz. His areas of expertise include S/390 and zSeries channel
subsystems and Parallel, ESCON, and FICON interfaces.
Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:
Robert Haimowitz
International Technical Support Organization, Raleigh Center
Dan Elmendorf
IBM zSeries Planning
Charles Hubert
Brian Jacobs
IBM FICON Development
Ron Peck
IBM FICON Director Program Manager
Dean Armand, Neal Fausett, Guy McConnell, Jesus Perez, Barbara Sewell, Larry Shane
McDATA Corporation
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
vii
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viii
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
1
Chapter 1.
Introduction
McDATA Intrepid FICON Directors are a product of a reseller agreement between IBM and
McDATA Corporation. They are designed to provide enterprise-class availability and Fibre
Channel connectivity for IBM servers and storage products supporting Fibre Channel (FC)
and FICON protocols.
The intent of this chapter is to provide background information about the zSeries FICON
environment in which McDATA Intrepid FICON Directors are deployed. In the subsequent
sections, you will find the following:
 Basic FICON and Fibre Channel terms
 FICON overview
– FICON channel support
 Supported FICON Director topologies:
– Switched point-to-point
– Cascaded FICON Directors
– High integrity
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
1
1.1 Basic Fibre Channel terminology
This section discusses some general terms used in the Fibre Channel (FC) environment.
These terms are also used in FICON environments when installing, configuring, and
operating in a switched point-to-point or cascaded FICON Director configuration, therefore,
you will find these terms throughout this document.
Node
A node is an endpoint that contains or uses information. It can be a computer (host), a device
controller, or a peripheral device (such as disk or tape drives). A node has a unique 64-bit
identifier known as the Node_Name. The Node_Name is typically used for management
purposes.
Port
Each node must have at least one port (hardware interface) to connect the node to the FC
topology. This node port is referred to as an N_Port.
Each N_Port has a Port_Name which is a unique 64-bit identifier that is assigned when it is
manufactured. The N_Port associates an access point to a node’s resources.
Other port types present in an FICON switched environment include:
E_Port
F_Port
G_Port
An expansion port is used to interconnect switches and build a switched fabric.
A fabric port is used to connect a N_Port to a switch that is not loop-capable.
A generic port is a port that has not assumed a role in the fabric.
Switched fabric
One or more FC switches (FC-SW) can be interconnected to create a fabric, to which N_Ports
are connected. A switched fabric takes advantage of aggregated bandwidth via switched
connections between N_Ports using packet-switching. FC switches (FICON Directors) allow
multiple concurrent I/O operations (read and write) between multiple FICON-capable servers
and multiple FICON-capable control units (devices).
FC link
The port connects to the topology through an FC link (see Figure 1-1). The transmission
medium for the FC link (FICON interface) is a fiber optic cable. Physically, it is a pair of optical
fibers that provide two dedicated, unidirectional, serial-bit transmission lines. Information in a
single optical fiber flows, bit by bit, and always in the same direction. At any link interface, one
optical fiber is used to receive data while the other is used to transmit data. Full duplex
capabilities are exploited for data transfer. The Fibre Channel Standard (FCS) specifies that
for normal I/O operations, frames flow serially in both directions, allowing several concurrent
read and write I/O operations on the same link.
2
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
FC port
FC port
Tx
Rx
Outbound
Inbound
Outbound
Tx
Inbound
Rx
Fibre Channel link
Figure 1-1 Fibre Channel Link
An FC link (port-to-port connection) can be:
 Node-to-node (N_Port-to-N_Port)
 Node-to-switch (N_Port-to-F_Port)
 Switch-to-switch (E_Port-to-E_Port)
The FC link data rate is 1 Gbps (100 MBps) for zSeries and 9672 G5/G6 FICON feature
ports, and 1 Gbps or 2 Gbps (200 MBps) for zSeries FICON Express feature ports. The
2 Gbps link capability is auto-negotiated between the zSeries server and FICON Director, as
well as the Director and devices, and is transparent to the operating system and application.
With devices in general, the zSeries FICON Express, FICON Director, and/or device
communicate and agree upon either a 1 Gbps or 2 Gbps (100 MBps or 200 MBps) link speed.
This speed determination is based upon the adapter speeds in the zSeries server, FICON
Director, and device, as well as the fiber optic cable infrastructure capabilities. For those parts
of the I/O infrastructure that are not 2 Gbps link-capable, the link speed will be
auto-negotiated to 1 Gbps (100 MBps).
Note: The 2 Gbps line speed is the theoretical maximum unidirectional bandwidth
capability of the fiber link. The actual throughput potential of the 2 Gbps link (whether it is
measured in I/O operations per second, or MBps) will depend on the type of workload,
fiber infrastructure, and storage devices in place.
World-Wide Names (WWN)
As mentioned, nodes and ports have unique 64-bit addresses that identify them in an FC or
FICON topology. These addresses are assigned by the manufacturer, with a vendor-specific
portion defined by the IEEE standards committee. These addresses (in the FC standard) are
called Node_Names and Port_Names, and when they are world-wide unique, they are
referred to as:
 World-Wide Node_Name (WWNN)
 World-Wide Port_Name (WWPN)
A WWN (any WWNN or WWPN) is usually written in sets of two hex digits, separated by
colons (for example, 08:45:12:56:43:00:D5:A0). Figure 1-2 illustrates the use of WWNs.
Chapter 1. Introduction
3
Server (Node)
WWNN1
Controller (Node)
WWNN3
WWPN11
WWPN31
Switch (Node)
WWNN2
N_Port
N_Port
WWPN22
WWPN21
F_Port
F_Port
F_Port
F_Port
WWPN23
WWPN24
N_Port
WWPN12
N_Port
WWPN32
Figure 1-2 Example of World-Wide Names
1.2 FICON overview
There are a number of characteristics and functional areas that need to be understood in
designing an I/O configuration that exploits FICON technology. This section introduces the
basics of these areas for the FICON channel.
1.2.1 FICON channel architecture
The FICON channel architecture consists of the following Fibre Channel (FC) protocols:
 FC-0 level: Interface and Media
The Fibre Channel physical interface (FC-0), specified in FC-PI, consists of the
transmission media, transmitters, receivers, and their interfaces. The physical interface
specifies a variety of media and associated drivers and receivers capable of operating at
various speeds.
ANSI NCITS xxx-200x FC-PI T11/Project 1235D
 FC-1 level: Transmission Protocol
This is a link control protocol that performs a conversion from the 8-bit EBCDIC code into
a 10-bit transmission code; a unique bit-pattern is assigned to each known hexadecimal
character. Encoding is done by the N_Port when sending the character stream over the
fiber and decoding back to 8-bit code is performed by the receiving N_Port.
 FC-2 level: Signaling Protocol
Fibre Channel physical framing and signaling interface (FC-PH) describes the
point-to-point physical interface, transmission protocol, and signaling protocol of
high-performance serial links for support of higher-level protocols associated with HIPPI,
IPI, SCSI, FC-SB2 (FICON) and others.
– Fibre Channel - Framing and Signalling (FC-FS)
ANSI X3.230-1994
4
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Describes the signaling protocol of the high-performance serial link for support of
higher-level protocols associated with HIPPI, IPI, FC-FCP (SCSI), FC-SB2 (FICON)
and others.
This architecture covers the Fibre Channel levels FC-1, FC-2, and some parts of the
FC-3 level.
The FC-FS architecture consolidates the relevant clauses of FC-PH (the initial Fibre
Channel architecture), its amendments 1 and 3, and FC-PH-2 and FC-PH-3 protocols,
but does not replace those protocols. In this redbook the FC-FS architecture is referred
to as the zSeries and 9672 G5/G6 processors, which comply with the FC-FS functions.
These functions are described in more detail in the FC-FS architecture.
 FC-3 level: Common Services
This level is reserved for future functions.
 FC-4 level: Mapping
Channels Upper Level Protocol (ULP) as part of FC-4 and describes IPI/FC-FCP (SCSI)/
HIPPI/SB/IP and FC-SB-2 (FICON) protocols.
Other standards used in the Fibre Channel architecture, and their references:
– Fibre Channel - Switch Fabric (FC-SW)
ANSI X3T11/Project 959-D/Rev 3.3
– Single-Byte Command Code Sets Connection Architecture (SBCON)
ANSI X3.296-199x
– Fibre Channel Fabric Generic Requirements (FC-FG)
Describes minimum requirements for a topology-independent interconnecting fabric to
support FC-PH.
ANSI X3.289-199x
– Fibre Channel Switch Fabric (FC-SW)
Specifies tools and algorithms for interconnection and initialization of FC switches to
create a multi-switch Fibre Channel Fabric.
ANSI X3T11/Project 959-D/Rev 3.3
FC-SB-2 (FICON) architecture information and all other documentation mentioned can be
obtained from the following Web site:
http://www.t11.org
1.2.2 FICON channel support
FICON channel support in the zSeries and 9672 G5/G6 servers can operate in one of three
modes:
 A FICON channel in FICON Bridge (FCV) mode allows access to ESCON control units
with ESCON interfaces by the channel connected to a FICON Bridge adapter in a 9032-5
ESCON Director. This mode is applicable only to the FICON LX features.
 A FICON channel in FICON native (FC) mode allows access to FICON native interface
control units either directly by a FICON channel in FC mode (point-to-point), or from a
FICON channel in FC mode connected in series through one or two Fibre Channel
switches (FICON Directors). Channel-to-channel (FCTC) is also supported in this mode.
Chapter 1. Introduction
5
Note: The 9672 G5/G6 processors only support a single switch topology, known as
switched point-to-point, whereas, the zSeries processors support single and dual
switch topologies. A two-switch configuration is known as cascaded FICON Directors.
 A FICON channel in Fibre Channel Protocol (FCP) mode can access FCP devices in one
of two ways:
– Through a FICON channel in FCP mode through a single Fibre Channel switch or
multiple switches to an FCP device
– Through a FICON channel in FCP mode through a single Fibre Channel switch or
multiple switches to a Fibre Channel-to-SCSI bridge
Note: The 9672 G5/G6 processors do not support FICON channels in FCP mode.
Point-to-point and arbitrated loop topologies are not supported as part of the zSeries
FCP enablement. This mode is only supported in conjunction with Linux environments.
1.3 FICON channel topology
A FICON channel in FICON native (FC) mode uses the Fibre Channel communication
infrastructure supported by the zSeries and 9672 G5/G6 servers to transfer channel
programs (CCWs) and data via its FICON and FICON Express features to another
FICON-capable node, such as a storage device, printer or server (channel-to-channel).
A FICON channel (in conjunction with the McDATA FICON Director) can operate in two
topologies:
 Switched point-to-point (through a single FICON Director to FICON-capable control units)
 Cascaded FICON Directors (through two FICON Directors to FICON-capable control
units)
The FICON channel in FICON native (FC) mode supports multiple concurrent I/O
connections. Each concurrent I/O operation can be to the same FICON control unit (but to
different devices/CU images), or to different FICON control units.
1.3.1 Switched point-to-point configuration
In a switched point-to-point connection, at least two Fibre Channel (FC) links are needed in
the channel-control unit path. One is between the FICON channel card (N_Port) and the
FICON Director port (F_Port), then internally within the switch (through the backplane) to
another port (F_Port) and then via the second link to a FICON adapter card in the control unit
(N_Port).
The FICON channel determines whether the associated link is in a point-to-point or switched
topology. It does this by logging into the fabric, fabric login (FLOGI ELS), and checking the
accept response to the fabric login (ACC ELS). The FLOGI-ACC (accept) response indicates
if the channel N_Port is connected to another N_Port (point-to-point) or an F_Port (fabric
port).
An example of a switched point-to-point topology is shown in Figure 1-3.
Multiple channel images and multiple control unit images can share the resources of the Fibre
Channel link and the Fibre Channel switch, such that multiplexed I/O operations can be
performed.
6
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Channels and control unit links can be attached to the Fibre Channel switch in any
combination, depending on configuration requirements and available resources in the Fibre
Channel switch.
Sharing a control unit through a Fibre Channel switch means that communication from a
number of channels to the control unit can take place over one switch to CU link (in the case
where a control unit has only one link to the Fibre Channel switch), or over multiple link
interfaces (in the case where a control unit has more than one link to the Fibre Channel
switch).
Just one Fibre Channel link is attached to a FICON channel in a FICON switched
point-to-point configuration, but from the FC switch (FICON Director) that FICON channel can
communicate with a number of FICON CUs on different FC switch ports. Once at the control
unit, the same control unit and device addressing capability exists as for a point-to-point
configuration. However, the communication and addressing capability is increased for the
channel when the channel is connected to a FC switch with the ability to use the domain and
port address portion of the 24-bit N_Port address (8 bits for the domain and 8 bits for the port)
to access multiple control units.
Server
Fabric
Storage
Fabric Login (FLOGI)
Determine fabric connection
(Point-to-Point or Switched)
FICON
Channel
FC
Switch
FC Links
Control Unit
FICON Port
FC Links
FICON
Channel
Control Unit
FICON Port
Fibre
Channel
zSeries and 9672 G5/G6 Configuration Definition - Path Addressing
Processor
Channel Image
Channel N_Port
1-Byte Link Address (Port @)
Storage Unit
CU Image
CU N_Port
Figure 1-3 Switched point-to-point configuration
The communication path between a channel and a control unit is composed of two different
parts: the physical channel path and the logical path.
In a FICON switched point-to-point topology (with a single switch) the physical paths are the
FC links, or interconnection of two FC links connected by a FC switch that provides the
physical transmission path between a channel and a control unit.
A FICON (FC-SB-2) logical path is the relationship established between a channel image and
a control unit image for communication during execution of an I/O operation and presentation
of status.
Chapter 1. Introduction
7
1.3.2 Cascaded FICON Director configuration
In a cascaded FICON Director connection, at least three Fibre Channel (FC) links are needed
in the channel-control unit path. One is between the FICON channel card (N_Port) and the
FICON Director port (F_Port), then internally within the switch (through the backplane) to
another port (E_Port) that connects to the second FICON Director E_Port via the second FC
link, and then to a FICON adapter card in the control unit (N_Port) via the third FC link. With
this configuration, the connection between sites can consist of multiple FC links.
An example of cascaded FICON Directors is shown in Figure 1-4.
Multiple channel images and multiple control unit images can share resources of the Fibre
Channel link and Fibre Channel switches, such that multiplexed I/O operations can be
performed.
Channels and control unit links can be attached to the Fibre Channel switches in any
combination, depending on configuration requirements and on available switch ports.
Sharing a control unit through a Fibre Channel switch means that communication from a
number of channels to the control unit can take place either over one switch-to-CU link (in the
case where a control unit has only one link to the Fibre Channel switch), or over multiple link
interfaces in the case where a control unit has more than one link to the Fibre Channel switch.
Just one Fibre Channel link is attached to a FICON channel in a cascaded FICON Director
configuration. However, from the FC switch (FICON Director) the FICON channel can
communicate with a number of FICON CUs on different ports of the second FC switch. Once
at the control unit, the same control unit and device addressing capability exists as for a
point-to-point configuration. However, the communication and addressing capability is greatly
increased for the channel when connected to a FC switch with the ability to use the domain
and port address portion of the 24-bit N_Port address (8 bits for the domain and 8 bits for the
port) to access multiple control units. Note the domain address portion of the FC 24-bit port
address is different since there are two FC switches in the channel-to-control unit path.
Site A
Site B
Server
Storage
Fabric
Fabric Login (FLOGI)
Determ ine fabric connection
(Point-to-Point or Switched)
FICON
Channel
FC Links
FC
Switch
Control Unit
FICON Port
FC
FC
Switch
Links
FICON
Channel
Fibre
FC Links
Control Unit
FICON Port
Channel
zSeries Configuration Definition - Path Addressing
Processor
Channel Image
Channel N_Port
Switch (entry Switch@)
Figure 1-4 Cascaded FICON Directors configuration
8
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Link (Switch@ Port@ )
2-Byte Link Address
Storage Unit
CU Image
CU N_Port
The communication path between a channel and a control unit is composed of two different
parts, the physical channel path and the logical path.
In a cascaded FICON Director topology, the physical paths are the FC links that provide the
physical transmission path between a FICON channel and a control unit.
A FICON (FC-SB-2) logical path is the relationship established between a FICON channel
image and a control unit image for communication during execution of an I/O operation and
presentation of status.
Note: The cascaded FICON Director configuration is only supported by the zSeries (z800
and z900) servers.
High-integrity data path
Another important value of FICON support of cascaded Directors is its ability to provide
high-integrity data paths. The high integrity function is an integral component of the FICON
architecture when configuring FICON channel paths through a cascaded fabric.
To support the introduction of FICON cascaded switching, IBM has worked with McDATA to
ensure robustness in the channel-to-control unit path is maintained to the same high standard
of error detection, recovery, and data integrity that has existed for many years with both
ESCON and the initial implementation of FICON.
End-to-end data integrity is designed to be maintained through the cascaded Director fabric.
Data integrity ensures any changes to the customer's data streams are always detected, and
the data frames (data streams) are delivered to the correct end point; an end point being a
FICON channel port or a FICON Control Unit port. For FICON channels, Cyclical
Redundancy Checking (CRC) and Longitudinal Redundancy Checking (LRC) are bit patterns
added to the customer data streams to allow for detection of any bit changes in the data
stream. With FICON support of cascaded switching, new integrity features are introduced
within the FICON channel and the FICON cascaded switch fabric to ensure detection and
reporting of any miscabling actions occurring within the fabric during operational use that may
cause a frame to be delivered to the wrong end point.
A FICON channel, when configured to operate with a cascaded switch fabric, requires the
switch fabric supports high integrity. During initialization, the FICON channel queries the
switch fabric to determine that it supports high integrity. If it does, the channel completes the
initialization process, allowing the channel to operate with the fabric.
Once a FICON switched fabric is customized to support FICON cascaded Directors and the
required World-Wide Node Name (WWNN) and Domain IDs have been added in the fabric
membership list, the Director checks that its Inter-Switch Links (ISLs) are attached to the
correct Director before they are made operational. If an accidental cable swap occurs, the
Director invokes logical path testing, reporting, isolation, and recovery. The high-integrity
fabric feature for cascaded FICON Directors protects against mis-cabling and mis-directing of
data streams.
High-integrity fabric architecture support includes:
 Fabric binding support
The ability of the fabric to prevent a switch from being added to the fabric that is not
configured to support the “high integrity fabric”; for example, all switches must be defined
to all other switches via a fabric membership list.
 Insistent Domain IDs support
Chapter 1. Introduction
9
This support will not allow a switch address to be automatically changed when a duplicate
switch address is added to the enterprise fabric. It requires overt operator action to change
a switch address.
Note: FICON Directors in a cascaded configuration require the High-Integrity feature .
For more detailed information about FICON planning, implementation, and architecture, refer
to FICON Native Implementation and Reference Guide, SG24-6266.
10
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
2
Chapter 2.
Technical description
This chapter provides a technical description for the McDATA Intrepid FICON Directors;
included are:




McDATA Intrepid FICON Director overview
Hardware components
Model configurations
Software features:
– Enterprise Fabric Connectivity Manager
– High Integrity feature
– Control Unit Port
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
11
2.1 Introduction to the FICON Director
This section provides an overview of the McDATA Intrepid FICON Directors and discusses the
hardware components, models, configuration, and software.
2.1.1 FICON Director overview
The McDATA Intrepid models implement Fibre Channel technology that provides
high-performance scalable bandwidth, high available operation, and redundant switched data
paths that support FICON-attached servers and storage devices.
The Intrepid 6064 FICON Director is an enterprise class Director that provides switch fabric
connectivity for to up 64 ports. The Intrepid 6140 is the newest addition and provides up to
140 ports.
Both models have the following characteristics:






Scalable design
Automatic failover of critical components
Based on a Serial Crossbar (SBAR) switching element
Low latency, non-blocking architecture
Consistent latency of 2 microseconds
Software based zoning
The Directors provide a modular design that enables quick removal and replacement of Field
Replacable Units (FRUs), including a:
 Cable management assembly and front bezel
 Power module assembly (with AC power switch), redundant fan modules and redundant
power supplies
 Redundant processor (CTP) cards and serial crossbar (SBAR) assembly logic cards
 A minimum configuration of six fiber port module (FPM) cards or universal port module
(UPM) cards for both Intrepid Directors, to a maximum configuration of 16 FPM/UPM
cards for the Intrepid 6064 and a maximum configuration of 35 UPM cards for the Intrepid
6140.
Each FPM card provides four 1 Gbps Fibre Channel port connections through LC-Duplex
small form factor (SFF) fiber-optic transceivers. Each UPM card provides four 2 Gbps
Fibre Channel port connections through SFF fiber-optic transceivers.
The Intrepid 6140 is only offered with 2 Gbps UPM and CTP cards.
For both FPM and UPM cards, short wavelength (SX) laser transceivers are available for
transferring data over either 50 micron or 62.5 micron multimode fiber cable. Long
wavelength (LX) laser transceivers are available for transferring data over 9 micron single
mode fiber cable. Fiber optic cables attach to Director port transceivers with LC-Duplex
connectors.
 The power module assembly at the rear of the Director also provides a 9-pin, D-type
subminiature maintenance port for connection to a local terminal or remote terminal.
Protocol intermix
The McDATA Intrepid Directors support Fibre Channel Protocol (FCP) and FICON protocol
intermix at the port level. If protocol intermix is used on the same Director, FCP and FICON
ports should be isolated by zoning.
12
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Note: Protocol intermix is not supported by zSeries servers at this time. However, it is
expected to be available during the first half of 2003.
Interconnection
With firmware version 4.1.0 (Build 12) and above, the McDATA Intrepid FICON Directors
support High-Integrity Fabric (Feature Code 6006 for the Intrepid 6064 or Feature Code 6007
for the Intrepid 6140), which is required for cascaded FICON Directors configuration.
2.1.2 Management capabilities
Fabrics can be managed using different communication methods:
 Enterprise Fabric Connectivity Manager (EFC Manager), IP based client/server
configuration management software
 Simple network management protocol (SNMP)
 Serial interface (RS232, dedicated for McDATA and IBM engineers)
 Call home (modem connection for notification purposes)
 Command line interface (CLI)
The most commonly used interface with the McDATA Intrepid Directors are the EFC Server
and the Product Manager applications.
The EFC manager is a Java-based graphical user interface (GUI) that enables the user to
administer users and products, and monitor products and the interface with the Product
Manager applications.
The EFC Manager and Product Manager applications are separate applications; however, the
Product Manager is only accessible through the EFC Manager.
The EFC Manager and Product Managers are installed on the EFC Server to provide local
access to managed products. These applications can also be installed on remote user
workstations to provide access to managed products. A maximum of four concurrent remote
users (in addition to the local EFC Server user) can log in to the EFC Manager application.
One EFC Server can support up to 48 McDATA FICON Directors.
An example of a Hardware view (default view of a product manager) is shown in Figure 2-1.
Chapter 2. Technical description
13
Maintenance port
FPM or UPM card
SBAR Assembly
CTP or CTP2 cards Power Supply
Figure 2-1 Example of EFC Manager Hardware view of an Intrepid 6064 Director
2.1.3 EFC Server hardware requirements
The following list summarizes hardware specifications for the EFC Server notebook platform.
Current platforms may ship with more enhanced hardware such as a faster processor,
additional random-access memory (RAM), or a higher-capacity hard drive or removable disk
drive.
 Notebook PC with color monitor, keypad, keypad-mounted track-ball (mouse)
 Intel processor with 650 Mhz or greater clock speed, running the Microsoft Windows NT
4.0 operating system
 2 GB or greater internal hard drive
 128 MB or greater RAM
 CD-ROM drive
 1.44 MB 3.5-inch floppy disk drive
 56 k external modem
 Two 10/100 Mbps Ethernet adapters with RJ-45 connectors:
– Ethernet adapter 1 - Built in the EFC Server motherboard
– Ethernet adapter 2 - Ethernet adapter card
The EFC Server and external modem are mounted in a slide-out drawer in the Fabricenter
cabinet. The EFC Server and managed Directors connect through a 10/100 BaseT Ethernet
hub. The 24-port hub is installed at the top of the Fabricenter cabinet. Cabinets can be
daisy-chained through the hub.
14
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
An EFC Server failure does not affect port connections or functions of an operational Director.
The only operating affect of a server failure is loss of remote access, configuration,
management, and monitoring functions.
Chapter 4, “Setting up the EFC Server environment” on page 35, and Chapter 5, “Configuring
the FICON Director” on page 45 discuss the EFC Manager functions in more detail.
2.1.4 Hardware components
Fiber Port Module (FPM) and Universal Port Module (UPM) cards
The port cards (FPM and UPM) are to provide the physical connectivity between the McDATA
Intrepid Director and the external connected devices.
 FPM
Each FPM card provides four full-duplex generic ports (G_ports) that transmit or receive
data at 1 Gbps. Single mode or multimode fiber optic cables attach to pluggable SFF
transceivers with LC-Duplex connectors.
 UPM
Each UPM card provides full-duplex generic ports that transmit or receive data at 1 Gbps
or 2 Gbps. UPM cards use non-open fiber control (OFC).
Each FPM or UPM faceplate contains a number of LEDs, as follows:
– An amber light (at the top of the card) illuminates if any port or other card circuitry fails,
or blinks if FRU beaconing is enabled.
– One amber LED and one green LED above each port, indicate port status as follows:
•
The green LED illuminates (or blinks if there is active traffic) and the amber LED
goes out to indicate normal operation.
•
The amber LED illuminates and the green LED goes out to indicate a port failure.
•
Both LEDs extinguish to indicate a port is operational but not communicating with
an N_Port (no cable attached, loss of light, port blocked or link recovery in process).
•
The amber LED flashes and the green LED either remains on, goes out or flashes
to indicate a port beaconing or running online diagnostics.
Control Processor (CTP)
The Directors are delivered with two CTP cards. The active card initializes and configures the
Director after power on and contains the microprocessor and associated logic that coordinate
Director operation. A CTP card provides an initial program load (IPL) button on the faceplate.
When the button is pressed and held for three seconds, the Director reloads firmware and
resets the CTP card without switching off power or affecting operational fiber-optic links
Each CTP card also provides a 10/100 megabit per second (Mbps) RJ-45 connector on the
faceplate that attaches to an Ethernet local area network (LAN) to communicate with the EFC
Server or a simple network management protocol (SNMP) management station. Each CTP
card must have a separate Ethernet connection to the EFC Server.
Each CTP card provides system services processor (SSP) and embedded port (EP)
subsystems. The SSP subsystem runs Director applications and the underlying operating
system communicates with Director ports and controls the RS-232 maintenance port and the
10/100 Mbps Ethernet port. The EP subsystem provides class F and exception frame
processing, and manages frame transmission to and from the SBAR assembly. In addition, a
CTP card provides nonvolatile memory for storing firmware, Director configuration
information, persistent operating parameters, and memory dump files.
Chapter 2. Technical description
15
Note: Director firmware is upgraded concurrently (without disrupting operation).
The backup CTP card takes over operation if the active card fails. Failover from a faulty card
to the backup card is transparent to attached devices.
Each card faceplate contains a green LED that illuminates if the card is operational and
active, and an amber LED that illuminates if the card fails. Both LEDs are extinguished on an
operational backup card. The amber LED blinks if FRU beaconing is enabled.
Power supply
Redundant, load-sharing power supplies step down and rectify input power to provide 48-volt
direct current (DC) power to Director FRUs. The power supplies also provide overvoltage and
overcurrent protection. Either power supply can be replaced while the Director is powered on
and operational.
Each power supply has a separate backplane connection to allow for different AC power
sources. The power supplies are input rated at 85 to 264 volts alternating current (VAC). The
faceplate of each power supply provides the following status LEDs:
 A green PWR OK LED illuminates if the power supply is operational and receiving AC
power
 An amber FAULT LED illuminates if the power supply fails
 An amber TEMP LED illuminates if the power supply shuts down due to an over
temperature condition
 An amber I LIM LED illuminates if the power supply is overloaded and operating at the
current limit which is 15.6 amperes.
RFI shield
The RFI shield covers and provides RFI protection for all rear-access FRUs, except the power
module assembly. The RFI shield is concurrent and can be removed or replaced while the
Director is powered on and operating.
Power Module Assembly
The power supply assembly is located at the bottom rear of the Director.
Important: The module is a non-concurrent FRU and the Director must be powered off
prior to removal or replacement.
The module provides the following:
 Two single-phase AC power connectors. Each connector’s input rated is 85 to 264 VAC.
 A power switch (circuit breaker) that controls AC power distribution to both power supplies.
The breaker is set manually or is automatically tripped by internal software if thermal
sensors indicate the Director is overheated.
 A 9-pin maintenance port that provides a connection for a local terminal or dial-in
connection for a remote terminal. The port is used by maintenance personnel to configure
network addresses
 An input filter and AC system harness (internal to the FRU) that provides the wiring to
connect AC power connectors to the power switch and power supplies (through the
backplane).
16
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Fan Module
Two Fan Modules, each containing three fans, provide cooling for the Director FRUs, as well
as redundancy for continued operation if a fan fails.
A Fan Module can be replaced while the Director is powered on and operating. An amber
LED illuminates if one or more fans fail or rotate at insufficient angular velocity.
Attention: A failing Fan Module must be replaced within ten minutes after its removal,
otherwise, internal software will power off the Director.
SBAR assembly
The Director is delivered with two SBAR assemblies. The active SBAR is responsible for Fibre
Channel frame transmission from any Director port to any other Director port. Connections
are established without software intervention. The assembly accepts a connection request
from a port, determines if a connection can be established, and establishes the connection if
the destination port is available. The assembly also stores busy-source connections and error
status for each Director port.
The backup SBAR takes over operation if the active assembly fails and provides the ability to
maintain connectivity and data frame transmission without interruption. Failover to the backup
assembly is transparent to the attached devices.
Each SBAR assembly consists of a card and steel carriage that mounts flush on the
backplane. The carriage provides protection for the back of the card, distributes cooling air
flow, and assists in aligning the assembly during installation. The rear of the carriage contains
a green LED that illuminates if the assembly is operational and active, and an amber LED that
illuminates if the assembly fails. Both LEDs are extinguished on an operational backup
assembly. The amber LED blinks if FRU beaconing is enabled.
Backplane
The backplane provides 48 VDC power distribution and connections for all logic cards.
Important: The backplane is a non-concurrent FRU. The Director must be powered off
prior to FRU removal and replacement.
2.1.5 FICON Director configurations
McDATA FICON Directors can be configured in 4-port increments, and are available in two
different models (see Figure 2-2):
 Intrepid 6064, which supports a minimum of 24 ports and a maximum of 64 ports
 Intrepid 6140, which supports a minimum of 64 ports and a maximum of 140 ports
The Intrepid 6040 supports FPM and UPM cards, however, the Intrepid 6140 only supports
UPM cards. All port cards (FPM or UPM) are hot-pluggable.
Chapter 2. Technical description
17
McDATA Intrepid FICON Directors
Intrepid 6064
Intrepid 6140
Figure 2-2 McDATA Intrepid FICON Director models
The Directors come standard with all high-availability features in the base unit. You need only
to select the number and type of port cards, the rack-mounting brackets (for factory or field
installation in an FC-512 cabinet), and the power cord.
The Director’s high-availability configuration offers redundancy and maintenance capabilities
such as:






All active components are redundant.
Active components provide support for automatic failover.
Redundant power and cooling
Hot swapping of all FRUs
Automatic fault detection and isolation
Non-disruptive firmware updates
Any unused FICON port or entire card can be used as a spare to take over operation for a
failed port or card. To continue operation, fiber cables from the failed ports have to be
reconnected to the unused operating ports.
2.1.6 FICON SANtegrity feature
If you intend to establish a FICON cascaded Director environment, it is mandatory that the
two Directors are put into a High Integrity Fabric. To do this, Feature Code 6006 for the
Intrepid 6064 or Feature Code 6007 for the Intrepid 6140 (known as FICON SANtegrity), must
be enabled. This feature includes Fabric Binding and Insistent Domain ID functions, as part of
Enterprise Fabric Mode.
Note: Be aware that the FICON Directors used for a cascaded environment must be from
the same vendor, and both must be on the same firmware level.
18
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
During channel initialization (if connected to a cascaded environment) the high integrity
feature will be checked to ensure Enterprise Fabric Mode is enabled, by using a new
command (Query Security Attributes). If this feature is not present or enabled, channel
initialization will not continue.
Section 5.2, “Activating the High Integrity feature” on page 48, describes how to establish
Fabric Binding.
2.1.7 Control Unit Port (CUP)
The CUP is supported by the McDATA Intrepid FICON Directors, and is known as FICON
Management Server (Feature Code 6302 for the Intrepid 6064 or Feature Code 6003 for the
Intrepid 6140). The CUP function allows z/OS or OS/390 to manage the Director with the
same level of control and security as it is known from an ESCON switch. Host communication
includes control functions like blocking/unblocking ports, as well as monitoring and error
reporting functions.
Note: The McDATA FICON Director must also be defined in the IOCP as device type 2032
for this function to work.
System Automation (SA) I/O-Ops V2.1 includes support for FICON Native (FC) channels and
FICON Directors. APAR OW47972 is required to correct a problem with the FICON Director
support.
SA I/O-Ops V1.3 adds support for FICON Native (FC) channels and FICON Directors with
APAR OW40040 (PTFs UW69057 for RA30 and UW69058 for RA3U). APAR OW48434 is
also recommended.
Before using I/O-Ops within a FICON configuration, check the latest maintenance
recommendations in the product’s PSB buckets.
Table 2-1 SA OS/390 I/O-Ops PSP buckets
Upgrade
Subset
HKYS100
HKYS100
JKYS103
JKYS103
For additional z/OS and OS/390 information, refer to the FICON Native Implementation and
Reference Guide, SG24-6266.
Chapter 2. Technical description
19
20
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
3
Chapter 3.
Pre-installation planning
This chapter provides information and recommendations for planning the installation of a
McDATA Intrepid FICON Directors for attachment to FICON or FICON Express channels on
zSeries and 9672 G5/G6 servers.
The following topics are discussed and/or described in this chapter:








Planning considerations
Physical port layout
IP addressing
Switch numbering
Fabric binding and Insistent Domain IDs
Zoning
Cables and connectors
zSeries and 9672 G5/G6 FICON channel support
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
21
3.1 Planning recommendations
The following items should be considered during the installation planning phase of the
McDATA Intrepid FICON Directors:
 Which topology will be implemented?
– Switched point-to-point topology. For a more detailed explanation of this topology refer
to 1.3.1, “Switched point-to-point configuration” on page 6.
– Cascaded FICON Directors topology. For a more detailed explanation of this topology
refer to 1.3.2, “Cascaded FICON Director configuration” on page 8.
– Mix of both switched point-to-point and cascaded FICON Directors
 How many channels and control unit (CU) ports will be connected to each FICON
Director?
– The number of channels and CU ports to be connected to each Director depends on
the number of FICON channels on the server(s) and CU ports on the devices, as well
as the individual performance, availability, and growth requirements.
 How should the channels, CU ports, and/or Inter-Switch Links (ISLs) be distributed among
the FPM/UPM cards in the Director(s)?
– Each FICON Director layout should satisfy all availability, performance, and growth
requirements. Refer to 3.3, “IP addressing and connectivity” on page 23.
 Should the Switch IDs in the IOCP definitions and switch addresses in the FICON
Directors match?
– We recommend using the same IDs/addresses in both places to avoid any potential
errors that could be caused by having two different values.
 Should zoning be used to separate specific channels and CU ports from other connected
channels and CU ports?
– Zoning is recommended if there is a requirement to prevent random access to
confidential data (see 3.6, “Zoning” on page 30).
Important: Zoning is highly recommended in a mixed environment with FICON and
FCP devices connected to the same Director. Protocol intermix is expected to be
available for zSeries servers during the first half of 2003.
 Should the FICON Director(s) and the Enterprise Fabric Connectivity (EFC) Sever be
connected to a separate LAN or to the corporate network?
– The Director(s) and EFC Manage workstation should always be interconnected on a
separate LAN, known as the service LAN to isolate Director management traffic from
other IP traffic. However, if remote access is required to operate and maintain the
FICON Director(s), then we recommend that the EFC Sever be connected to the
corporate network via a second LAN adapter. Refer to 3.3, “IP addressing and
connectivity” on page 23.
 What are my fiber optic cabling requirements?
– Can the existing fiber optic cables, patch panels, and trunk cables be reused?
– Are Mode Conditioning Patch (MCP) cables and/or conversion kits required?
– Is there a link distance constraint?
Refer to 3.7, “Cables and connectors” on page 31, and 3.8, “FICON channel support for
zSeries and 9672 G5/G6 servers” on page 32 for more information.
22
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
3.2 Physical port layout
Before installing the FICON Director, consider where to connect your FICON channels from
the server and the control unit ports, as well as the ISLs (if applicable), based on your
requirements.
 Distribute the channels among different FPM/UPM cards.
If two channels are defined to access the same CU, plug both fiber optic cables into
different FPM/UPM cards in the Director.
 Distribute the CU ports among different FPM/UPM cards.
If two paths are defined to attach the CU to the server via a Director, connect both fiber
optic cables to ports on different FPM/UPM cards.
 Distribute the ISLs across different FPM/UPM cards.
If two or more ISLs are to be attached between the Directors, then connect the fiber optic
cables to ports on different FPM/UPM cards.
Following these simple rules will assure that there is always one path available between the
server and the CU in case of a defective FPM/UPM card in the Director.
Refer to Appendix B., “Port location and mapping” on page 79 for physical port locations, and
port numbering and port addresses on the FPM/UPM cards.
In Appendix C, “FICON Director configuration worksheet” on page 85, you will find a
worksheet to help with documenting the physical layout of your FICON Director(s).
3.3 IP addressing and connectivity
For controlling and maintaining the McDATA FICON Director, both CTP cards in each Director
have connectivity to the EFC Sever via an Ethernet LAN, known as the service LAN. An
Ethernet hub is installed in each cabinet, which is used to connect all the CTP cards and the
EFC Manager workstation.
Although two CTP cards are installed in each Director, only one IP address is required for
both CTP cards. The Ethernet port on the backup CTP card is deactivated, and only the port
on the currently active CTP card is activated. In case of a failure of the active CTP card, the
Ethernet port of the backup CTP is automatically activated.
The default IP address for the CTP card is 10.1.1.10, and for the EFC Manager it is 10.1.1.1
with a default subnet mask of 255.0.0.0. The default gateway address is 0.0.0.0.
If the Director and the EFC Sever are to be connected to a corporate network instead of the
service LAN, then their IP addresses and subnetwork mask have to conform to the IP
addressing standard used in the corporate network.
A minimum of two IP addresses are required; one address for the CTP cards, and one
address for the EFC Sever.
If it is required to alter the IP address and/or subnetwork mask of a Director, for example,
when multiple Directors are on the same service LAN, refer to Appendix , “Altering an IP
address in a CTP card” on page 74.
The recommended network configuration for the Director, the EFC Sever, and client
workstation is shown in Figure 3-1.
Chapter 3. Pre-installation planning
23
Service LAN
EFC Manager
Client
EFC Server
Cabinet 1
C
T
P
Corporate Network
DHCP or
Fixed IP address
C
T
P
10.1.8.1
10.1.8.3
10.1.8.2
C
T
P
C
T
P
IP Network
Cabinet 2
Figure 3-1 Recommended network connections
In this configuration, the EFC Sever has two Ethernet adapters installed; one to connect the
FICON Director and EFC Sever via the service LAN, and the second to provide connectivity
for the client workstation via the corporate network.
Figure 3-2 shows EFC Manager display of the actual IP address of our FICON Directors.
Select Network Address
CTP IP address
Figure 3-2 Display IP address of a Director
Chapter 4, “Setting up the EFC Server environment” on page 35 describes the necessary
steps for setting up the EFC Manager environment.
24
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
3.4 Switch numbering
Each FICON Director in a fabric must have a unique switch address (Domain ID) and a
unique Switch ID. This Switch ID is used in IOCDS to define the link between the FICON
channel and CU. The Switch ID can be any value between x’00” to x’FF’, while the switch
address range may be restricted by the FICON Director firmware.
The valid switch address range for a McDATA Director is between x‘61’ to x’7F’. When
defining the switch number and link addresses in the IOCP definitions, ensure that you use
values within this range.
The switch address is built for the Director by adding an offset of x’60’ to the switch Domain
ID, which is entered as a decimal value when the Director is configured.
While 0 is an invalid Domain ID, the switch ID number can range between 1 to 31. So, a total
of 31 Domain IDs is available.
This means, defining a Domain ID of 1 in the Director builds a switch address of x’61’ and a
Domain ID of 31 results in a switch address of x’7F’.
It is important to point out that some definition terms used in the IOCP and HCD are carried
over from the ESCON environment. An example of the terms used, and how they relate to the
FICON environment are shown in Figure 3-3.
LP1-1
LP2-2
LP3-3
zSeries
/
CP
IO
FICON
Channel
D
HC
Entry switch
FICON
Switch
Switch ID 13
Switch @ 13
ISL
Control
Unit
Cascaded switch
FICON
Switch
Link address
Switch configuration
Switch ID 14
Switch @ 14
Port @ 27
Control
Unit
Port address
Port
Port ID
Port @
Switch/Director number
Switch
Switch ID
Switch #
Director
Director #
LSN (Logical Switch Number)
Switch/Director address
Switch address
Switch @
Director address
Director @
Domain ID
Domain
Fibre Channel switch address
Switch CUP Device (FICON switch)
Switch Device Number
Figure 3-3 Term usage with FICON Directors
 The Switch ID has to be assigned by the user, and must be unique within the scope of the
definitions (IOCP and HCD).
 The switch address is assigned by the manufacturer, and may be customized to a different
value and must be unique within the fabric.
We recommend that the Switch ID be set to the same value as the switch address of the
FICON Director, which is defined to the FICON Director at installation time. This will simplifies
the configuration and reduce confusion by having a common designation across all
definitions.
Chapter 3. Pre-installation planning
25
Note: These rules should be followed not only for a cascaded FICON Director
configuration, but also for a switched-point-to-point configuration. If any single switch is to
be merged into a fabric in the future, there will be no need to change the switch address
(Domain ID) setting, which is a disruptive action.
While the Switch ID in the CHPID statement is a logical switch number and defines the entry
point to the fabric, the link address in the CNTLUNIT statement points to the exit port of the
fabric.
In a switched point-to-point configuration shown in Figure 3-4, the logical switch number is
used in IOCP to define the entry point to the fabric. This is done using the SWITCH keyword.
For the exit port, a 1-byte destination link address value must be defined with the LINK
keyword. This value is the FICON Director port address of the physical port that the CU is
attached to.
Important: It is possible to define a 2-byte link address (switch address and port address).
However, the FICON Director must have the Fabric Binding and Insistent Domain ID
feature installed and configured. Refer to 3.5, “Binding and Insistent Domain ID” on
page 28 for more details.
Also, once a 2-byte link address is defined to a channel path, all link addresses defined to
be accessed from that same channel path must be 2-byte link addresses.
Sample FICON IOCP
A8-1
CU 8000-8700
A10-3
zSeries
ID (no change in ID statement for FICON)
RESOURCE PARTITION=((A8,1),(A9,2),(A10,3))
CHPID PATH=(5E),SHARED,TYPE=FC,SWITCH=62
CHPID PATH=(5F),SHARED,TYPE=FC,SWITCH=62
CHPID PATH=(60),SHARED,TYPE=FC,SWITCH=62
CHPID PATH=(61),SHARED,TYPE=FC,SWITCH=62
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=8000,PATH=(5E,5F,60,61),
UNITADD=((00,256)),LINK=(0A,0E,12,16),
CUADD=0,UNIT=2105
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=8100,PATH=(5E,5F,60,61),
UNITADD=((00,256)),LINK=(0A,0E,12,16),
CUADD=1,UNIT=2105
*
*
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=8700,PATH=(5E,5F,60,61),
UNITADD=((00,256)),LINK=(0A,0E,12,16),
CUADD=7,UNIT=2105
A9-2
CHPIDs
5E,5F,60,61
Switch keyword
Logical switch number or
Entry switch ID
Link Keyword
1 byte
destination port address
(one for each switched path)
FICON
Switch ID 62
Switch @ 62
Output Ports
0A,0E,12,16
CU 8000
LCU-0
CU 2100
LCU-1
CU 2700
LCU-7
Devices
Devices
8000-80xx
Devices
2100-21xx
2700-27xx
IODEVICE (no change for FICON)
Figure 3-4 Sample IOCP coding for switched point-to-point configuration
For a cascaded switch configuration refer to Figure 3-5 for the relation between Switch IDs
and link address definitions in the IOCDS, and the switch address settings in the FICON
Director. For the exit port, you must define a 2-byte link address value (destination switch
address and port address) in the LINK keyword.
26
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Sample FICON IOCP
A8-1
CU 8000-8700
A9-2
A10-3
zSeries
ID (no change in ID statement for FICON)
RESOURCE PARTITION=((A8,1),(A9,2),(A10,3))
CHPID PATH=(5A),SHARED,SWITCH=61,TYPE=FC
CHPID PATH=(5B),SHARED,SWITCH=61,TYPE=FC
CHPID PATH=(5C),SHARED,SWITCH=61,TYPE=FC
CHPID PATH=(5D),SHARED,SWITCH=61,TYPE=FC
Switch keyword
Logical switch number
Channel Entry switch.ID
required for FICON (FC mode)
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=8000,PATH=(5A,5B,5C,5D),
UNITADD=((00,256)),LINK=(6208,620C,6210,6214),
CUADD=0,UNIT=2105
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=8100,PATH=(5A,5B,5C,5D),
UNITADD=((00,256)),LINK=(6208,620C,6210,6214),
CUADD=1,UNIT=2105
*
*
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=8700,PATH=(5A,5B,5C,5D),
UNITADD=((00,256)),LINK=(6208,620C,6210,6214),
CUADD=7,UNIT=2105
Link Keyword
2 byte
destination port address
(one for each switched path)
Switch.address + 1-byte
Port-address
CHPIDs
5A,5B,5C,5D
FICON
Switch ID 61
Switch @ 61
ISL
FICON
Switch ID 62
Switch @ 62
Output Ports
08, 0C, 10, 14
CU 8000
LCU-0
CU D100
LCU-1
CU D700
LCU-7
Devices
Devices
8000-80xx
Devices
D100-D1xx
D700-D7xx
IODEVICE (no change with FICON)
Figure 3-5 Sample IOCP coding for cascaded FICON Directors configuration
During installation of the FICON Director, a valid switch address has to be assigned. The
Director has a defined switch address, which can be altered to match the customer
requirements.
Figure 3-6 shows the system configuration panel where the switch address (Director Domain
ID) can be altered. This value has to be entered as a decimal value, and is then calculated to
hexadecimal value by the firmware.
Select Domain ID
Domain ID
Figure 3-6 Domain ID screen
Chapter 3. Pre-installation planning
27
Inter-Switch Links (ISLs) defined to HCD
If HCD is used to build the IOCDS, we suggest the ports used for ISLs be marked as
“occupied” in HCD. This prevents accidental attempts to define these ports to channels or
CUs.
If you are not familiar with HCD, refer to Input/Output Configuration Program Users Guide,
SB10-7029 at:
http://www.ibm.com/servers/resourcelink
An example for this new function in HCD is shown in Figure 3-7.
Port List
Row 1 of 256
Command ===> ____________________________________________ Scroll ===> CSR
Select one or more ports, then press Enter.
Switch ID . . . . : 61
Address : 61
---------------Connection--------------/ Port H Name +
Unit ID
Unit Type
O
_ 00
N ________________________
_
_ 01
N ________________________
_
_ 02
N ________________________
_
_ 03
N ________________________
_
Y
_ 04
Y ISL sw 61 to sw 62
_ 05
Y ________________________
N
HCD switch Port List
_ 06
Y ________________________
Port = the 1-byte port address on the switch N
_ 07
Y ________________________
Name = recommended to enter the ports in N
_ 08
Y ________________________
N
the name field
_ 09
Y ________________________
Occupied = recommended to be specified a Y N
_ 0A
Y ________________________
N
for ISL ports
F1=Help
F2=Split
F3=Exit
F4=Prompt
F5=Reset
F7=Backward
F8=Forward
F9=Swap
F10=Actions F12=Cancel
F13=Instruct F22=Command
Figure 3-7 Mark ISL ports as “occupied” in HCD
3.5 Binding and Insistent Domain ID
Insistent Domain IDs prohibit the use of dynamic Domain IDs to ensure predictable Domain
IDs are enforced within the fabric. For example, if a switch has this feature enabled, and a
new switch is connected to it (via an ISL) without the preferred Domain ID, then the new
switch is segmented into a separate fabric and user data will not flow.
Binding is a method used in the switch to prevent devices and/or other switches from
attaching to the switch, based on WWNs that are defined to a membership list. The McDATA
FICON Director supports three levels of binding:
Port binding
This limits the N_Port that can be attached to an F_Port on the FICON Director by WWN.
Port binding requires a Bound WWN, which is the device’s N_Port WWN (WWPN) that
connects to a particular F_Port on the FICON Director.
28
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Attaching an unauthorized N_Port to the FICON Director puts the F_Port into an “Invalid
Attachment” state, and renders the port unusable until the assigned N_Port is attached.
Since an N_Port is mapped directly to an F_Port within the FICON Director, there are some
flexibility limitations with port binding. For example, port swapping within a FICON Director
requires modifying the Bound WWN. See 5.5.3, “Configuring a port” on page 61 for an
example.
Switch binding
This limits the nodes that can be attached to a FICON Director by WWN.
Switch binding requires a switch membership list that contains all nodes’ WWNs (WWNNs),
of switches or devices that can attach to the FICON Director.
Attaching unauthorized nodes puts the FICON Director’s port (F_Port) into an “Invalid
Attachment” port state, because their WWNNs are not in the switch membership list.
This type of binding allows for more flexibility since an N_Port is not bound to an F_Port, and
so port swapping can be done without changes to the switch membership list. However,
moving a device from one FICON Director to another requires changes to the switch
membership lists.
Fabric binding
FICON Directors that are allowed to connect to the fabric must be added to the fabric
membership list of each FICON Director within the fabric. The fabric membership list is
composed of the WWNN and Domain ID of each FICON Director permitted to communicate
within the fabric.
Exchanging fabric membership data is a Switch Fabric Internal Link Service (SW_ILS). The
fabric membership list is exchanged between connected switches in the fabric before path
selection is started.
If an unauthorized FICON Director port (E_Port) is attached to another Director, then the port
between the two switches will be placed in an “Invalid Attachment” state.
Fabric binding is a software-enforced security feature that permits an administrator to control
the switch composition of a fabric by explicitly defining which switches are capable of forming
a fabric. Thus, an operator is able to prevent non-authorized switches access to a fabric. A
non-authorized switch attempting to gain entry to a fabric becomes isolated by embedded
software.
Fabric binding also validates that the formation about any inter-switch link (ISL) between
previously unconnected switches is not restricted. If the establishment of the ISL is not
authorized the link is isolated and the state of the associated E_Port is updated to reflect the
“Invalid Attachment.”
In addition to ISL verification, fabric binding provides in-band propagation of fabric
membership data updates to all switches within a fabric, thus ensuring a consistent and
unified behavior across all potential fabric access points.
When an ISL becomes available the switch on either end of the fiber may verify that fabric
binding and insistent Domain ID are supported and enabled on the adjacent switch. If both
sides of the ISL support fabric binding, each switch verifies that the newly-connected
neighbor switch and all switches in the adjacent fabric (of which the neighbor switch is a
member) are authorized to form a fabric, or expand the current fabric. If authorization is not
granted, the switch on which the authorization check failed isolates the link and sets the
corresponding port state to “Invalid Attachment.”
Chapter 3. Pre-installation planning
29
Figure 3-8 shows a cascaded FICON Director environment with high integrity. The FICON
Director prevents FC frames (user-data streams) from being delivered to the wrong
destination if cables are incorrectly connected.
LP1-1
LP2-2
zSeries
LP3-3
Channel
initialization
completes
(Fabric Binding
operational)
LP1-1
2
LP2-2
zSeries
FICON Channel
Port-06
Port-06
3
6
Switch-13
Switch-13
ISL
The I/O
operation
times out in
the channel
7
FICON
Switch
Incorrect
cable swap
LP1-1
I/O request
to CU 9000
5
FICON Channel
FICON
Switch
LP3-3
FC frames (users-data
stream) are discarded by
the FC switch (no route to
switch 14)
ISL
Switch-14
Switch-14
FICON
Switch
4
FICON
Switch
Port enters
"Invalid
attachment
state"
Function of fabric binding
Port-27
Port-27
1
CU-8000
CUI-0
UA-00
Control
Unit
CU-9000
CUI-0
UA-00
Control
Unit
FC fabric
with high-integrity
(fabric binding)
Figure 3-8 Cascaded FICON Directors with Fabric Binding and Insistent Domain IDs
Restriction: Fabric binding is required for FICON support of cascaded Director, and
switched point-to-point configuration when a 2-byte link address is used.
3.6 Zoning
Zoning is a method to enable or disable communication between different ports and between
attached devices (based on WWN). You can put a group of ports or WWNs into the same
zone to enable communication only between those ports or WWNs. There are good reasons
to zone, for example:




To prevent non-FICON-capable devices from seeing FICON-capable devices
To limit the access to devices with confidential data to specific servers
To control the amount of paths between servers and devices
In an intermixed environment, restrict FCP traffic from accessing FICON-capable devices
Several zones can be included in one zone set. An active zone set is valid for all switches
belonging to the same fabric.
Only one zone set can be active in a fabric at a time, although more than one zone set can be
defined in a switch.
For a better understanding of zoning, refer to the configuration example in Figure 3-9.
30
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
zSeries
LPAR1
zSeries
LPAR2
CHP(5A)
LPAR3
CHP(60)
CHP(5F)
LPAR4
CHP(61)
Zone2
Zone1
05
Zone3
0D
11
11
ISL
SW61
10
14
CU1
SW62
Zoneset1
CU2
08
CU3
Figure 3-9 Configuration example of zoning
In this example, we have several LPARs with paths to different CUs via two FICON Directors.
Each LPAR must get access only to a specific CU, and no access to CUs belonging to other
partitions.
To prevent intended access by others, we have grouped the ports belonging to the path
between an LPAR and CU into a zone. There are three zones defined as follows:
Zone1
Zone1 has all ports for the path between LPAR1 and CU1, which are
Ports 05 and 14 in SW61.
Zone2
Zone2 has all ports for the path between LPAR2 and CU2, which are
port 11 in SW61 and port 10 in SW62.
Zone3
Zone3 has all ports for the path between LPAR3 and LPAR4 and CU3
which are port 0D, 11 and 08 in SW62
All three zones are added into Zoneset1.
The link between both switches (ISL) is transparent in the path between LPAR2 and CU2.
3.7 Cables and connectors
Considerations for fiber optic cables and connectors depend on the environment. If there are
existing fiber optic cables in the environment, consider about reusing these cables rather than
installing new.
Chapter 3. Pre-installation planning
31
The required distance between the FICON channel and the FICON CU has to be considered.
Refer to Table 3-3 on page 33 for zSeries and 9276 G5/G6 FICON Channel distance
specifications.
Conversion kits may be required if the connectors are of differing types (LC Duplex, SC
Duplex, or ESCON Duplex).
When connecting a single mode port of the Director to an existing multimode cable, mode
conditioning patch (MCP) cables are required at both ends of the existing multimode fiber
optic cable. Verify the MCP cable type (connector, receptacle, and fiber (50 or 62.5 micron)),
needed.
Note: With a FICON channel, MCP cables can only be used with a link data rate of 1 Gbps
(100 MBps). Hence, a link data rate of 2 Gbps is not supported with MCP cables.
3.8 FICON channel support for zSeries and 9672 G5/G6 servers
There are two types of FICON features available: FICON and FICON Express. Both types
support a long wavelength (LX) laser version and a short wavelength (SX) laser version for
the transceiver.
The z900 is the only server that supports both types of FICON features. However, for new
z900 configurations only the FICON Express features is orderable. The z800 family only
supports the FICON Express features, whereas the 9672 G5/G6 servers only support the
FICON features.
FICON and FICON Express features
Table 3-1 lists the FICON and FICON Express feature codes with the appropriate laser type
(short wavelength (SX) or long wavelength (LX)), number of ports per card, and the server
type that supports them.
Table 3-1 FICON and FICON Express feature codes
Feature Code
Ports per adapter
9672 G5/G6
FC 2314 (FICON LX)
one
X
FC 2316 (FICON SX)
one
X
z900a
z800b
LX)c
two
X
FC 2318 (FICON SX)c
two
X
FC 2319 (FICON Express LX)
two
X
X
FC 2320 (FICON Express SX)
two
X
X
FC 2315 (FICON
a. Can intermix FICON and FICON Express cards at driver level 3C or later.
b. Only supports FICON Express cards.
c. Can no longer be ordered.
Table 3-2 maps the supported FICON topologies to their corresponding FICON and FICON
Express feature codes.
Table 3-2 FICON topologies with supported FICON and FICON Express feature codes
32
FICON topology
FC 2314
FC 2316
FC 2315
FC 2318
FC 2319a
FC 2320a
Switched point-to-point
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
FICON topology
FC 2314
FC 2316
FC 2315
FC 2318
FC 2319a
FC 2320a
Cascaded FICON Directors
No
No
Yesb
Yesb
Yesc
Yesc
a. Auto-negotiate (2 Gbps) support
b. LIC CC needed to be enabled
c. DRV3G with MCL(J11206) or later must be applied
Check with your local service representative to ensure your zSeries or 9672 G5/G6 server
has the required code levels.
3.8.1 FICON channel distances
The distance supported by the zSeries FICON features is dependent upon the transceiver
(LX or SX), the fiber being used (9 micron single mode, or 50 micron or 62.5 micron
multimode), and the speed at which the feature is operating. A FICON Express feature
supports a link data rate of 1 Gbps or 2 Gbps. A FICON feature supports a link data rate of
1 Gbps. Table 3-3 shows the distance impacts and the link budget impacts of high data rates.
In Table 3-3, a link is a physical connection over a transmission medium (fiber) used between
an optical transmitter and an optical receiver. The Maximum Allowable Link Loss, or link
budget, is the maximum amount of link attenuation (loss of light), expressed in decibels (dB),
that can occur without causing a possible failure condition (bit errors). Note that as the link
data rate increases, the unrepeated distance and link loss budget decreases when using
multimode fiber.
These numbers reflect the Fibre Channel Physical Interface specification. The link budget is
derived from combining the channel insertion loss budget with the unallocated link margin
budget. The link budget numbers have been rounded to the nearest tenth of a dB.
Table 3-3 FICON channel distance specifications
1 Gbps link
2 Gbps link
Fiber type
Light source
(nanometers)
Unrepeated
distance
Link
budget
Unrepeated
distance
Link
budget
9 micron
single mode
LX laser
(1300 nm)
10 kma
(6.2 miles)
7.8 dB
10 kmb
(6.2 miles)
7.8 dB
50 micronc
multimode
LX laser
(1300 nm)
550 meters
(1804 feet)
5 dB
Not
supported
N/A
62.5 micronc
multimode
LX laser
(1300 nm)
550 meters
(1804 feet)
5 dB
Not
supported
N/A
50 micron
multimode
SX laser
(850 nm)
500 meters
(1640 feet)
3.8 dB
300 meters
(984 feet)
2.8 dB
62.5 micron
multimode
SX laser
(850 nm)
250 meters
(820 feet)
2.8 dB
120 meters
(394 feet)
2.2 dB
a. An RPQ is available to extend the maximum unrepeated distance up to 20 km
b. An RPQ is available to extend the maximum unrepeated distance up to 12 km
c. Mode conditioning patch (MCP) cables are required
For more information refer to Fiber Optic Link Planning, GA23-0367.
Chapter 3. Pre-installation planning
33
For all FICON features using repeaters, the end-to-end distance between the FICON channel
and the FICON Director port can be up to 100 km. The same end-to-end distance is also
available between the FICON Director port and the control unit port. However, the overall
end-to-end distance between the FICON channel and control unit should not exceed 100 km.
3.8.2 FICON channel to control unit characteristics
The control unit vendor must provide all the control unit addressing and connectivity
characteristics, as these affect how the control unit can be configured in a FICON
environment. The control unit vendor should also provide connectivity recommendations to
allow the full exploitation of the control unit capability in a FICON environment.
The following items are dependent on the control unit characteristics:
 Number of installed FICON adapters at the control unit
 Number of logical paths supported by the control unit at each FICON adapter
 Number of logical paths supported by the control unit, when there is only one control unit
function within the physical control unit
 Number of logical paths supported by each logical control unit within a physical control unit
 Number of logical control units supported and the LCU address for each LCU
 Number of concurrent I/O transfers per physical control unit
 Number of concurrent I/O transfers per logical control unit
 Number of devices and device unit addresses (UAs) supported per logical control unit
Some devices may be supported by more than one unit address (UA), each device unit
address being supported by a different device number (this is the case for the IBM ESS
control unit that supports Base and Alias device addresses). This function is known as
Parallel Access Volumes (PAV).
 For each LCU, the base device unit address (UA) and address range per LCU
34
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
4
Chapter 4.
Setting up the EFC Server
environment
This chapter describes how to set up the Enterprise Fabric Connectivity (EFC) Server
environment.
The following topics are covered:







Installing the EFC Server
Checking and altering the FICON Director IP address
Checking the version of EFC Manager application
Connecting the FICON Directors and EFC Manager
Defining the FICON Directors to the EFC Manager
Checking the firmware version of FICON Director
Examples of EFC Manager use
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
35
4.1 Installation and setup
The first steps to install the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director are described in the installation
instructions shipped with the machine. The instructions guide you through the following steps:
1. Unpacking the FICON Director
2. Connecting the FICON Director to power
3. Unpacking and installing the EFC Server
Once these steps are completed, the following steps can be used to help you through the
setup process of the Enterprise Fabric Connectivity Manager environment.
Step 1. Checking and altering the IP address
Before connecting the FICON Director and the EFC Manger console to the service LAN,
check the defined IP addresses.
If multiple Directors are connected to the same service LAN, check to ensure the IP
addresses match your requirements and each CTP card has a unique IP address.
Use a HyperTerminal session a described in “Setting up a HyperTerminal session” on
page 72 to get the current IP address of the Director. The default IP address of the Director is
10.1.1.10 and 255.255.0.0 is the default subnetwork mask.
If it is necessary to alter an IP address and subnetwork mask, follow the procedure in
“Altering an IP address in a CTP card” on page 74.
Important: Changing the CTP card’s IP address may also require changing the EFC
Server IP address to allow connectivity between them.
Step 2. Logging into the EFC Server
On the EFC Server, double click the McDATA EFC Manager icon and the EFC Manager login
will be displayed. Type in the user ID (Administrator) and password (password), then press
Enter. Note that the user ID and password are case sensitive.
Step 3. Checking the EFC Server version
Once logged into the EFC Manager, click the Help tab, then the About tab. The current
version of the EFC Server application will appear (see Figure 4-1).
Figure 4-1 EFC Server version display
If a newer version is available, it should be installed at this time. See “Installing EFC Manager
server software” on page 75 for the proper procedure.
Step 4. Connecting the FICON Director and EFC Server
36
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Connect the CTP, and the EFC Server to the Ethernet hub (known as the service LAN), using
UTP cables with RJ-45 connectors.
If remote access to the EFC Server is also required, then we suggest using the configuration
depicted in Figure 3-1 on page 24.
Step 5. Defining EFC Manager-to-FICON Director communication
The Director has to be defined in EFC Server to initiate communication between the server
and Director. Each Director, which should be managed by the server, has to be defined. The
EFC Server supports up to 48 Directors.
Click Product - New to define a new Director to the EFC Server. In the New Product panel
(shown in Figure 4-2) type in the IP address of the Director, then select the product type. Click
OK to finish.
Repeat above steps for each Director you want to define on this EFC Server.
Figure 4-2 Defining new Director
A new icon appears in the EFC Manager for each Director defined via the New Product panel.
In the example in Figure 4-3 two Directors with IP address 10.1.8.1 and 10.1.8.2 are defined
to the EFC Manager.
Figure 4-3 Directors added to EFC Manager
If connecting a Director to the EFC Manager was unsuccessful, recheck the current IP
address of the Director by selecting the Network Address option. Also, check the physical
Ethernet connection of the Director and the EFC Server.
Adding Directors to the EFC Manager only means the Directors are managed by this EFC
Manager. Configuring the Directors and a fabric is discussed in Chapter 5, “Configuring the
FICON Director” on page 45.
Step 6. Verifying the Director firmware version
Chapter 4. Setting up the EFC Server environment
37
Double-click the Director icon for the Director you just added in the EFC Manager window. A
new window opens displaying the hardware status of the Director.
Click Product - Properties... and notice the firmware level of the Director. This is the
currently installed and activated firmware in the Director.
Click Maintenance - Firmware Library... to display firmware versions available in the
Director. Notice the firmware version from the Firmware library panel shown in Figure 4-4.
Figure 4-4 Director firmware version
If a newer version of Director firmware is available, it should be installed at this time. See
“Upgrading Director firmware” on page 76 for the procedure.
Ready to configure
At this time, the basic installation of the FICON Director and the EFC Server are finished. If
you want to access the EFC Server via a separate workstation, then the EFC Manager client
has to be installed with the same version level as the EFC Server version level (see “Installing
EFC Management client software” on page 76).
You are now ready to configure your FICON Directors and fabrics, however, we suggest that
you get familiar with the EFC Manager application, and try some basic functions described in
the next section.
4.2 Usage options
Double-click the EFC Manager icon and enter the user ID and password in the Logon window
to start the session. The Products view opens, as shown in Figure 4-3.
Two view options are available at the top left side of the EFC Manager window:
 Products (default)
 Fabrics
4.2.1 Products
The Products view shows the hardware products managed by the EFC Manager, such as a
Director.
For a further breakdown, double-click a Director icon. You will find current configuration
information of that Director by selecting the tabs at the top of the display:
38
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director





Hardware (default)
Port List
Node List
Performance
FRU List
Figure 4-5 shows a sample display when the Hardware tab is selected.
Figure 4-5 Product (Director) display
Product information
Table 4-1 on page 39 lists the various types of information that can be found under the
Product information tabs. This information is very useful when configuring the Director, as
well as for fault isolation.
Table 4-1 Product information
Port list
Node list
Performance
X
Port name
X
Port number
(decimal)
X
X
Port address
(hexadecimal)
X
X
Unit type
Alert
FRU type
FRU list
X
X
X
Chapter 4. Setting up the EFC Server environment
39
Port list
Node list
Performance
FRU list
FRU position
X
FRU status
X
FRU serial #
X
FRU part #
X
Block config
X
Port WWN
X
Port state
X
Port speed
X
Port type
X
B_to_B credit
X
X
Port statistics
X
Link utilization
X
Error statistics
X
4.2.2 Fabrics
The Fabrics view displays information about your fabrics, and the Directors and ports within a
given fabric (see Figure 4-6).
Figure 4-6 Fabric information display
40
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
The area to the left is known as the Fabric Tree, and the area to the right is displayed as either
the Topology view or the Zone Set view, by selecting tabs at the bottom of the Fabrics view
area.
The Topology view shows Directors in fabrics and the Inter-Switch Links (ISLs) between the
Directors as solid black lines.
Options available through the menu bar and right-click menus in the Topology view area allow
you to manipulate the fabric view, determine routes between Directors, configure fabric-wide
zoning, and display fabric, node, and product properties.
4.2.3 Users
This option is located under the Configuration tab, and it allows you to add or delete users.
You have to be logged on with a user ID that has administrator rights to be able to add or
delete a user.
Figure 4-7 Users example
While adding a new user, rights for this user can be selected (see Figure 4-8).The activities of
all users can be displayed by the Audit log option.
Figure 4-8 New user ID
4.2.4 Logs
Logs are records of events that are stored on the EFC Server’s hard drive. Various log types
are available under the Logs tab while in Products view or Fabrics view. Each log allows the
user to print and/or Export the log. In the following sections are some examples:
Chapter 4. Setting up the EFC Server environment
41
Audit log
The Audit log shows a history of all user activities performed through the EFC Manager (see
Figure 4-9).
Figure 4-9 Audit log example
Fabric log
The Fabric log shows all changes that occurred to the fabric (see Figure 4-10).
Figure 4-10 Fabric log example
Event log
The Event log provides information about the events in your fabric or products (Directors).
See Figure 4-11 for a sample Event log display.
42
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Figure 4-11 Event log example
Link incident log
The link incident log displays the most recent link incidents occurring on Director ports. All link
incidents are recorded in this log, regardless of whether LIN alerts are configured through the
Configure Ports dialog box. See Figure 4-12 for an example of the link incident log.
Figure 4-12 Link incident log example
Chapter 4. Setting up the EFC Server environment
43
44
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
5
Chapter 5.
Configuring the FICON Director
This chapter provides information about how to configure the McDATA Intrepid FICON
Director in a switched point-to-point configuration or a cascaded FICON Director
configuration.
The following topics will be discussed in detail:









Setting up a FICON Director
Activating High Integrity Fabric feature
Enabling the CUP feature
Building a High Integrity fabric
Port configuration
Port WWN Device Names configuration
Switch Binding
Zoning
Verifying the configuration
Note: All tasks described in this chapter require administrator authority. See 4.2.3,
“Users” on page 41 for an example.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
45
5.1 Setting up a FICON Director
After installing the FICON Director and establishing connectivity to the EFC Server (as
described in Chapter 3, “Pre-installation planning” on page 21), only a few initial steps must
be performed.
The following steps are required for each FICON Director, regardless of whether it will be
used in a switched point-to-point configuration or cascaded FICON Director configuration,
and should be based on your planned configuration:
Double-click on a Director
to get the Hardware view
Figure 5-1 Products view of the FICON Directors
1. The Director must be in an offline state to be able to perform the required settings. On the
product view screen (which shows all available Directors) double-click the Director you
want to set up (see Figure 5-1). The next screen is the Hardware view (default display),
which provides all option that can be done for the selected Director. From here select the
Maintenance tab, then from the drop-down select Set Online State. Here you can vary
the Director offline.
Figure 5-2 shows the Hardware view of the Director, and that it is now in an OFFLINE
state.
46
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Verify Offline state
Figure 5-2 Hardware view of the selected Director
2. Click the Configure tab -> Operating Parameters -> Switch Parameters (see
Figure 5-3).
Figure 5-3 Director parameters selection
Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director
47
3. On the Configure Switch Parameters menu perform the following settings:
– Define preferred Domain ID. Notice that each FICON Director must be set up with a
unique Domain ID. It is recommended to be the same as the Switch ID used in
IOCP/HCD. Enter the required Domain ID into the Preferred field of the menu.
Entering a 1 into this field results in a Domain ID of x’61” and so on.
– Check Insistent (only if this Director is in a cascaded topology).
This option is not supported unless the SANtegrity feature is installed (see 5.2,
“Activating the High Integrity feature” on page 48).
– Select S/390 Operating Mode.
– From the Director Speed box choose the 2 Gb/sec.
Note that the speed for each Director port can be set individually to 1 Gbps, 2 Gbps, or
Auto Negotiate from the Configure -> Ports list.
Figure 5-4 FICON Director operating parameters
4. Once the settings are completed, click the Activate button, then vary the Director online.
5.2 Activating the High Integrity feature
Establishing a High-Integrity fabric is mandatory for FICON Directors when implemented in a
cascaded environment. Both Directors must have the SANtegrity feature installed. The
SANtegrity feature is installed by activating the feature key purchased for each Director. The
SANtegrity feature (FC 6006 for the Intrepid 6040 or FC 6007 for the Intrepid 6140) is ordered
separately.
48
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Important: If the you decide to use 2-byte link addresses in your switched point-to-point
configuration, then the Director must have the SANtegrity feature installed. See 3.5,
“Binding and Insistent Domain ID” on page 28 for details.
The following steps describe how to activate the SANtegrity feature:
1. Double-click the Director to activate the SANtegrity feature. Click the Configure tab, then
the Features option, as shown in Figure 5-5.
Note: Both FICON Directors must be at the same firmware level before being merged
into a High Integrity fabric.
Figure 5-5 Feature key installation
2. On the drop-down select New, then enter the feature key in the entry field. Click OK (see
Figure 5-6).
Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director
49
Figure 5-6 Feature Key entry
The installed SANtegrity feature allows E_Port functionality when operating in S/390 mode,
which is required for a FICON cascaded topology.
5.3 Enabling the Control Unit Port (CUP)
If the Management Server or CUP feature, FC 6302 (Intrepid 6064) or FC 6003
(Intrepid 6140) has to be activated, these steps have to be performed:
1. Click the Configuration tab on the Hardware view, then select Features.
2. The Configure Feature Key window is displayed which shows all installed features. If not
already in the list, click New and enter the McDATA provided key for the FICON
Management Server.
Figure 5-7 shows the window with the installed and enabled features.
50
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Figure 5-7 List of enabled features
To enable the FICON Management Server feature, do the following:
1. Select Management Server from the Configure menu. Enable the management server by
clicking the Enable Management Server option.
Note: The following options are not required, and should be set to satisfy your
requirements.
2. Click Director Clock Alert Mode. If this is enabled, the following occurs when users set
the date and time through the Configure Date and Time dialog box.
– If you enable Periodic Date/Time Synchronization, an error message displays, saying
Clock Alert Mode must be cleared to enable automatic date and time synchronization.
– If you manually set the date and time (Periodic Date/Time Synchronization is not
enabled), a confirmation dialog box appears. You must click OK on that dialog box to
continue manual date and time configuration.
3. Click Host Control Prohibited to prohibit a host management program from changing
configuration and connectivity parameters on the Director. In this case, the host program
has only read access to these parameters. When a check mark is not displayed, the host
program can change configuration and connectivity parameters.
4. Click the Programmed offline state control to enable a host management program to
control the Director offline and online state. When a check mark is not displayed, a host
program cannot set the Director online or offline.
5. Click the Active=Saved option to enable the active=saved function for the IPL address
configuration.
Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director
51
– If Active=Saved is enabled (check mark), the IPL and the active address configuration
are maintained as identical configurations. If a new configuration is activated through
the Configure Addresses - "Active" dialog box, that configuration becomes the IPL
address configuration. If the feature is enabled, the IPL file is locked to modification
through the Configure Addresses - "Active" dialog box.
– If Active=Saved is disabled (no check mark), the IPL address configuration and the
active configuration are not maintained as identical and may, in fact, be different
configurations. If the feature is disabled, you can modify the IPL configuration through
the Configure Addresses - "Active" dialog box.
6. Select a code page from the Code Page list to determine the language for displaying port
names or the CUP name when assigned from a host. For example, if the code page for
Germany/Austria is selected and a port name is assigned in German by the host
management program, then the German language port name appears in the Product
Manager.
Figure 5-8 Configuring the FICON Management Server
7. Once all required options are set (for example, as in Figure 5-8), click the Activate button.
5.4 Building a fabric
To establish a cascaded fabric (two FICON Directors are merged together), several steps are
required. Before starting the merging process perform the following:
1. Verify that the appropriate setup has been completed according to the procedure in 5.1,
“Setting up a FICON Director” on page 46.
Important: If the Directors are already configured and in use, make sure that S/390
Operating Mode is selected. The merge into a cascaded fabric can then be done
concurrent to normal operation.
2. Double-click the first Director, which will be part of the fabric, then click Configure,
Operating Parameters, Fabric Parameters.
3. Check the following settings as shown in Figure 5-9:
– The BB_Credit can be between 1 and 60 buffers. This becomes the value for all ports,
except those configured for extended distance buffering (10-100 Km). The default
value is 16.
– The R_A_TOV and E_D_TOV time-out values must be the same for both Directors,
otherwise they cannot be merged into a cascaded fabric.
– McDATA Fabric 1.0 is the Interop Mode used, since a cascaded FICON configuration
requires that both Directors must be from the same vendor.
52
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Figure 5-9 Verify settings of FICON Directors
We used the default values for our configuration. However, the BB_Credit was changed for
certain ports when we enabled long distance buffering, as shown in 5.5.3, “Configuring a
port” on page 61.
4. Verify/apply settings on the second Director that will be included in the fabric.
If you wish to use Switch Binding, ensure all the devices are attached to the Directors. The
devices (WWNs) are automatically placed in the Switch Binding membership list when
Enterprise Fabric Mode is enabled. Switch Binding is described under 5.4.1, “Switch Binding”
on page 56.
5. Identify and connect the ISLs based on your configuration requirements.
Note: Blocking the E_Ports used for ISLs is recommended when connecting the ISLs
between the Directors. This ensures that the fabric remains stable during the cabling
process. Unblock the ports one-by-one after connecting the cables, and check for errors
in the logs (see “Fabric log” on page 42, “Event log” on page 42, and “Link incident log”
on page 43).
Activating Enterprise Fabric Mode enables the features (Fabric Binding and Insistent
Domain ID), necessary to support FICON cascaded Directors.
6. Select Fabrics from the Products view screen and choose Enterprise Fabric Mode as
shown in Figure 5-10.
Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director
53
Figure 5-10 Enterprise Fabric Mode
7. Click Start. This enables all listed features as shown in Figure 5-11. Ensure the operation
completes successfully, which indicates Enterprise Fabric is established.
Figure 5-11 Features enabled with Enterprise Fabric Mode
8. After clicking OK to enable Enterprise Fabric Mode, wait for the message: Enterprise
Fabric Mode update complete, then click the Close button to finish.
54
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
When Enterprise Fabric Mode is activated, a fabric membership list is automatically
created containing the Domain ID and WWN of both Directors.
9. Verify the membership list by selecting Fabrics -> Fabric Binding -> Next ->
Membership list. The list is shown in Figure 5-12.
Figure 5-12 Membership List containing Directors included in the fabric
Note: If any Director that is not in the membership list is connected to this Director, the ISL
link will segment. An “invalid attachment” is reported on the isolated E_Port.
10.After verifying the fabric settings, change to the Fabrics view, which will show the complete
fabric as seen in Figure 5-13. Right-click the ISL to display details about ISL connection.
Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director
55
Figure 5-13 Established fabric with ISL link
5.4.1 Switch Binding
If additional security is required, Switch Binding can be established to allow only specific
devices (based on WWN or Nickname) to connected to a Director.
As mentioned earlier, all devices which were connected during the Enterprise Fabric Mode
enabling process will be automatically put into the membership list for Switch Binding. You
can add devices at any time using the Configuration tab for a selected Director, or by using
the Edit Membership List option (see Figure 5-14).
56
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Figure 5-14 Switch Binding selection
Figure 5-15 shows a membership list for Switch Binding. You can add or delete devices based
on WWN or Nicknames. A check box indicates if the devices are in the membership list.
Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director
57
Checked after adding
Figure 5-15 Add device to Switch Binding membership list
The last step is to activate the changes by selecting the Activate button.
To remove a device from the list, Switch Binding must first be disabled.
Note: Switch Binding cannot be disabled while Enterprise Fabric Mode is active and the
Director is online.
5.5 Port configuration
This section describes how to configure ports, port names, port binding, port type, port
speed, blocked or unblocked, state and enable, or disable long-distance buffering.
5.5.1 Defining Nicknames
Each port is initially identified by a WWN, which is an 8-byte hexadecimal number. Assigning
a meaningful Nickname to a port or node makes it easier to identify a device when it is
connected to the port:
1. In the EFC Manager window double-click the icon of the Director where you want to
configure the ports.
2. A new window opens displaying the Hardware view of the Director. Click the Node List
tab. A list of all connected devices is displayed as shown in Figure 5-16. The WWN and
the Unit Type are automatically retrieved from the device connected to the port.
58
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Figure 5-16 Node List WWN display
3. Right-click the port and select Define Nickname... from the menu. In the Define Nickname
window, the WWN of the device is shown, and there is a blank field to enter the nickname
for the device. See the example in Figure 5-17.
Figure 5-17 Enter Device nick Name
4. In the Nickname field, type in a meaningful Nickname describing the device connected to
the port.
Attention: Nicknames must be unique within the Director.
5. Repeat above steps for all devices connected to the switch. The Node List shows the
Nickname in the WWN column instead of the WWN. See the example in Figure 5-18.
Figure 5-18 Display Nicknames in the WWN column
If it is necessary to display the WWN of a device, right-click any port, then select Display
Options and World Wide Name from the menu. The WWN of the devices appear in the Port
WWN column.
5.5.2 Defining port names and blocking ports
While the Nicknames entered in the Node List belong to the devices connected to the
Director, the ports in the Director will have there own names for describing the port:
Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director
59
1. From the Hardware view of the Director, click Configure - Addresses - Active... (see
Figure 5-19).
Figure 5-19 Configure dialog menu
2. The Configure Addresses panel opens. On this panel you can enter your port names,
block ports, and prohibit communication between ports if required. To enter a name for a
port double-click the Port Name field of the port.
3. Type in a meaningful name for that port in the Port Name field.
4. Click i the check box in the Blocked column if you want to block a port. Blocked ports still
transmit offline sequences (OLS), but can not communicate to an attached device.
5. Prohibit port-to-port communication (if required). Click the intersection of the ports in
which you want to prohibit communication.
See Figure 5-20 for an example of port names, blocked ports, and prohibited port-to-port
communication.
Prohibit port-to-port
communication
Blocked ports
Port names entered
Figure 5-20 Configure Addresses panel
In this example, several port names are entered, ports 06 and 07 are blocked, and
communication between port 04 and 09 is suppressed.
60
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
5.5.3 Configuring a port
This section describes how to configure port options such as, long distance buffering, port
binding, and speed.
If the 10-100 km feature is enabled, more buffer-to-buffer credits are provided to a port in
support of long distance links. The speed for each port should be set to the speed supported
by the attached device:
1. Click Configure from the Products view of a Director, then select Ports from the menu.
The Configure Ports panel is displayed, as shown in Figure 5-21.
Figure 5-21 Configure ports
2. Check the check box in the 10-100 km column for ports that require the long distance
feature.
With this option, the buffer-to-buffer credit will automatically to changed to 60 for the port,
overriding the buffer-to-buffer credit defined for the Director, as shown in 5.4, “Building a
fabric” on page 52.
3. If the speed of the port should not be negotiated, click the Speed field of a given port and
select the speed from the pull-down.
4. If port binding is required, click the check box and add the WWPN of the device in the
Bound WWN field that will be attached to that particular port.
5. Once all ports are configured, click the Activate button to activate and save changes.
5.6 Zoning
Zoning is required to group several ports or WWNs into a zone. Several zones can be created
holding different ports or WWNs. All zones are then grouped into a zone set. The zone set
has to be activated in a Director, and is automatically propagated to all other Directors in the
fabric.
Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director
61
5.6.1 Creating a zone
1. From the Fabrics view (as shown in Figure 5-22 on page 62), do the following:
ŒSelect Fabrics.
Select Zone Set.
ŽSelect Configure.
Select Zoning Library...
ŽSelect Configure
Select Zoning Library...
ŒSelect Fabrics
Select Zone Set
Figure 5-22 EFC Manager Zoneset display
Initially, the Zoning Library window (shown in Figure 5-23), will have no zone sets nor
zones listed.
Figure 5-23 Zoning Library
2. Click on the Zones tab, then on File - New to create a new Zone.
In the next window all Directors belonging to the selected fabric and their attached ports
are shown in the left-hand column. To select another fabric click the Fabric pull-down
menu to choose another fabric.
62
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
On the New Zone window shown in Figure 5-24 do the following to add new members to
the zone:
ŒType in a name for this zone. A zone name may have up 64 characters.
Choose the option to add members by WWN or by Port. If Add by WWN is selected
and a nickname for this port has been previously defined, the nickname is displayed.
ŽClick the port you want to add to the zone.
Click the Add>> button to get the selected port into the member list in the right column.
The port just added should now appear in the member list in the right column.
Repeat above steps for all ports you want to group into the zone.
Restriction: A zone can group up to a maximum of 4096 members.
Œ
Type in a
Zone name
Ž

Click on the
port you want
to add
List of members
added to Zone1

Click here to
add new member

Choose here if you
want to add members
by WWN or port #
‘
Click here to
save Zone
Figure 5-24 Define New Zone
3. Once all ports have been put into the zone, check the member list in the right column for
completion. In the example above, two ports are added to the member list for Zone1.
‘Click OK to save the zone.
Repeat above steps to create more zones and add members to the zone as required.
Restriction: A maximum of up to 1024 zones can be defined in zone set.
5.6.2 Creating a zone set
Zones created in the previous section are grouped into Zone Sets. Although, several zone
sets can be created to group zones, only one zone set can be active at a time. A maximum of
Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director
63
64 zone sets can be defined in the zoning library and each zone set can group up to 1024
zones.
1. In the Zoning Library window (see Figure 5-23) click the Zone Sets tab.
2. On the menu bar, click File - New... to open the New Zone Set window.
All zones defined in the zoning library are listed in the left column. See Figure 5-25 for the
New Zone Set screen.
3. Type a name for the zone set. The name can have a maximum of 64 characters; then click
the zone you want to add to the zone set.
4. Click the Add button to add the zone into the right column.
Figure 5-25 Create a zoneset
To verify that the right zone is selected for adding to the zone set, click the zone, and then
click View Members. This shows the members belonging to that specific zone.
5. Once all the zones grouped into the zone set are added to the right column, click the OK
button to save this zone set.
6. Now you have a new zone set in the zoning library. See Figure 5-26 for a sample zone set
in the zoning library.
64
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Figure 5-26 Zonesets in zoning library
Restriction: Up to 64 zone sets can be defined in the zoning library.
To verify that zones and zone members are correctly added to the zone set, click the zone set
and select File - Properties from the menu bar. The complete zone set members and the
zone members are displayed, as shown in Figure 5-27.
Figure 5-27 Zoneset properties
Once all your zone definitions are correct, close the zone set properties window.
5.6.3 Activating a zone set
Several zone sets can exist in the zoning library and can be activated any time. There is one
zone which cannot be defined manually, that is the default zone. All ports not being grouped
into the current active zone are automatically grouped into the default zone. If no zone set is
active, then all devices belong to the default zone.
Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director
65
Important: If you deactivate the active zoneset and the default zone feature is enabled,
then all nodes in the fabric will be able to communicate with all other nodes. This could in
turn lead to violations of your security policies.
If you want to disable the default zone feature, select Configure - Advanced Zoning Configure Default Zone from the menu bar. On the next panel you can enable or disable the
default zone feature.
It is not necessary to deactivate the current active zoneset. Activation of a new zoneset
replaces the current active zone set. Deactivating the current active zone set causes the
default zone to be activated if the default zone feature is enabled.
To deactivate the current zone set, select from the menu bar Configure - Advanced Zoning
- Deactivate Zone Set. On the next panel click the Start button to deactivate the current zone
set and update the fabric.
At installation time there is no current active zone set. To activate a zone set, do the following:
1. In the EFC Manager window click the Fabrics tab.
2. Click the Zone Set tab.
3. Select Configure on the menu bar.
See Figure 5-28 for an example of the above steps.
Select Configure
Click on Activate Zone Set
Select Fabrics
Select Zone Set
Figure 5-28 Activate Zone Set
4. On the pull-down, click Activate Zone Set...
5. The next screen shows a list of all defined zone sets. Select a zone set from the list, then
click Next.
66
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
6. On the next screen the name of the fabric and a list of the affected Directors is displayed.
Ensure you have chosen the correct fabric and Directors for zone set activation. Applying
the zoneset to an other fabric may impact the performance of these switches.
7. Click Next and Start to continue the zoneset activation, and wait for message: Activate
zone set complete, then close the window.
8. On the EFC Manager window click the Zone Set tab.
The current active zone set and the zone members are listed in the window. An example of
an activated zone set is shown in Figure 5-29.
In this example Zoneset1 is the current active zone set. Zone1 and Zone2 are assigned to
Zoneset1 and the members of these zones are listed.
Because some of the devices are not defined in any of the zones, they are automatically
grouped into the default zone.
Figure 5-29 Current active zone set and zone members
Compare the listed devices with your configuration documentation (worksheet). If everything
is correct you can save these zone settings in a new zone set by clicking Save Active Zone
Set as... and entering a new name for the current zoneset. This zone set is added to the zone
library.
To save defined zones and zonesets go to the Zoning Library, select from the menu bar File Export Zone Sets... On the next panel select a subDirectory on the EFC Manager
workstation to store the export file, and enter a file name.
From the File menu in the Zoning Library there is also an Import Zone Set.. function available,
which allows you to import a zoneset file previously saved.
Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director
67
5.7 Verifying and backing up the configuration
You should have finished the following installation and configuration steps in this chapter:













Enter Director Domain ID
Connect ISLs to build a fabric
Select S/390 operation mode
Enable Control Unit Port (CUP)
Enable High Integrity Feature
Add Directors to membership list
Enable fabric binding
Enable Switch Binding
Configure ports
Define port names and block ports
Define Zones and zone sets
Add ports to zones
Activate zone set
The current configuration information should be saved and printed. Some export options are
available to export configuration data into a file on the EFC Manager workstation:





Export Configuration Report for each Director
Export Logs for each Director
Export Fabric Topology for each fabric
Export Zone Set for each fabric
Export Logs for each fabric
Check logs for all Directors and fabrics for any unresolved error occurred during installation
and configuration tasks. It there are any errors they should be fixed now.
Export Fabric topology for each fabric. Select Fabrics - Export Fabric Topology... from the
menu bar. In the next displayed window select the subDirectory where the file should be
stored and type a file name. Click Save to start the export function. The data are stored in
XML format and can be viewed by any editor program as shown in Figure 5-30.
Figure 5-30 Fabric Topology export file view (xml format)
Export zone set for each fabric. Open the Zoning Library window and select File - Export
Zone Set... from the menu bar. In the next displayed window select the subDirectory where
the file should be stored and type in a file name. Click Export. The data are stored in XML
format and can be viewed by any editor program, as shown in Figure 5-31.
68
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Figure 5-31 Zone Set export file display (xml format)
Export and print the Configuration report for each switch. Select Configure - Export
Configuration Report... from the menu bar. In the next displayed window select the
subDirectory where the file should be stored and type in a filename. Click Save. The data is
stored in txt format and can be viewed by any editor program, as shown in Figure 5-32.
Figure 5-32 Configuration Report export file view (txt format)
The Configuration Report contains the following configuration parameter:





Product Identification
Operating Parameters
Port Parameters
SNMP Parameters
Active Zoning Configuration
Chapter 5. Configuring the FICON Director
69
Print this file and compare the configuration parameter for the fabric, Directors and ports with
the configuration data in your worksheet.
Back up of your configuration data. On each Director select Maintenance - Backup & Restore
Configuration from the menu bar. Click Backup on next panel. The configuration data for the
Director is saved on the EFC Server.
70
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
A
Appendix A.
Useful procedures
This appendix provides procedures needed to supplement configuration tasks described in
this document.
In subsequent sections, you will find the following:
 Setting up a HyperTerminal Session
 Altering the IP address of a CTP card
 Installing EFC Management software
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
71
Setting up a HyperTerminal session
For some special functions in the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director, it is required to set up a
HyperTerminal session. The communication is established via the Maintenance Connector on
the rear of the director and a COM port in the workstation PC.
1. Select Start -> Programs -> Accessories -> HyperTerminal from your desktop (see
Figure A-1).
Intrepid
Select Icon
Figure A-1 HyperTerminal connection description
2. Enter a name (such as Intrepid) in the name field, select an icon and click OK. The
Connect To window appears (see Figure A-2).
Intrepid
Figure A-2 HyperTerminal Connect to panel
72
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
3. Select COM1 and click OK. Ensure the null modem cable is connected to this port. The
Port Settings window is displayed.
Figure A-3 COM1 properties panel
4. On the COM1 properties screen set the following parameters:
–
–
–
–
–
Bits per second: 57600
Data Bits: 8
Parity: None
Stop Bits: 1
Flow control: Hardware
5. Press Enter until the prompt > appears. Type in the password to establish the terminal
session and to execute other commands.
Password to be entered: password
A typical log from a HyperTerminal session is shown in Figure A-4.
Appendix A. Useful procedures
73
>xxxxxxxx
C>ipconfig
MAC Address: 08 00 88 A0 DC DA
IP Address:
10.1.8.8
Subnet Mask: 255.255.0.0
Gateway Address: 0.0.0.0
C>help ipconfig
[] = optional | = or
^ = optional space
() = required + = and/or ... = repetition
IPCONFIG Configure IP parameters: [ <ipAddress> [ <ipMask> [ <ipGateway> ] ] ]
C>ipconfig 10.1.8.2 255.0.0.0 0.0.0.0
IP address
Mask
Gateway
Request Completed: OK
C>ipconfig
MAC Address: 08 00 88 A0 DC DA
IP Address:
10.1.8.2
Subnet Mask: 255.0.0.0
Gateway Address: 0.0.0.0
C>exit
>
Figure A-4 HyperTerminal session
Altering an IP address in a CTP card
There are no restrictions for the IP address range used for the McDATA Intrepid. To change
an IP address, the following steps must be performed:
1. If the HyperTerminal window is displayed, press Enter and type in the password as
described under “Setting up a HyperTerminal session” on page 72.
2. Type in the command ipconfig to display the current settings.
3. If changes are necessary, type in ipconfig ,and then separated by a blank, type in the
new IP address.
If more than one parameter has to be changed, you can enter the values in one string, but
each field has to be separated by a blank.
4. Entering the command ipconfig again displays the new value to verify the setting is
correct.
5. To terminate the session, type exit.
74
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Installing EFC Manager server software
This section describes how to install the EFC Manager server application on a workstation. In
the EFC Manager server workstation both the server and the client component of the
application have to be installed. On all other workstations, it is recommended to install only
the client component of the application:
1. On the PC you want to install the EFC Server, exit and close all applications.
2. Run the McDATA server installation.exe file from the CD-ROM you received with the new
EFC Management Server version. This installs both the client and server components.
3. After clicking Next the License Agreement screen opens. Click the radio button to accept.
4. Read Important Information before you continue with the installation.
5. If you have made your decision related to the shortcut folder, the installation will start.
Figure A-5 Installation of the EFC Management Software
After the installation has finished, there will be two more icons on the PCs desktop.
Figure A-6 EFC desktop icons
Appendix A. Useful procedures
75
Installing EFC Management client software
To install the EFC Management client application on a workstation, do the following:
1. Open a browser, and enter the host name or IP address of your EFC Manager server. The
McDATA Enterprise Fabric Connectivity Management page appears as shown in
Figure A-7.
2. To install the client software, follow the instructions supplied in this page for your
workstation platform.
Figure A-7 Installing EFC Manager client
Upgrading Director firmware
You can download the latest firmware for the Intrepid models from the McDATA home page
(http://www.mcdata.com). The upgrade can then be performed from the workstation where
the file is stored, by doing the following:
1. Log into the EFC manager, and select the Director you want to upgrade.
2. Click the Firmware Library from the Maintenance menu on the menu bar, then click
New (see Figure A-8).
76
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Figure A-8 New firmware version
The New Firmware Version dialog box appears.
3. Select the appropriate file from its storage location and click New.
4. When the New Firmware Description dialog box displays, enter a description for the new
firmware and click OK.
Note: Use a date or some other text that identifies the new firmware. The Firmware
Library dialog box displays with the version and description of the new firmware added
to the text area.
5. After the new firmware version is loaded, select it in the New Firmware Version dialog
box, then click Send.
6. When the warning box displays to confirm sending the firmware, click Yes to proceed.
Appendix A. Useful procedures
77
78
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
B
Appendix B.
Port location and mapping
This appendix provides information about the physical layout of McDATA Intrepid FICON
Director models. These models allow for a wide range of configuration options. The basic
building block is the port module, which contains four Fibre Channel/FICON ports using 1
Gbps and/or 2 Gbps technology. For more configuration details go to 2.1.4, “Hardware
components” on page 15.
In the subsequent sections, you will find diagrams depicting the following:
 Port mapping of the Intrepid 6064
 Port mapping of the Intrepid 6140
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
79
Intrepid port numbering
For the Intrepid (6064 and 6140) FICON Directors, the physical port numbers are the same
as the port addresses. The Hardware Configuration Definition (HCD) and Input Output
Configuration Program (IOCP) use port address information to define control unit link
addresses. The physical port number is indicated either by a decimal or hexadecimal value,
which can be found in the ECF Manager logs as identification for a given port. See Figure B-1
for physical port number and port address mapping information.
Note: A port number may have a different port address assigned if a port swap was
performed.
31
Port Address hexadecimal
2D 45
Physical Port number decimal
Physical Port number hexadecimal
Figure B-1 Port numbering
This example shows a decimal port number of 45 (x’2D’) and the port address is 31, which is
the address used for HCD and IOCP definitions.
Intrepid 6064 port address mapping
Figure B-2 on page 81 shows the port layout for Intrepid 64-port FICON Director with the
assigned port ranges. Port numbering starts at the left, and continues to the right of the
Director. Notice that the counting of ports starts in slot 0 from the bottom of the card.
80
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
CTP Cards
FPM/UPM Cards
FPM/UPM Cards
43 3F 3B 37
33 2F 2B 27
23 1F 1B 17 13 0F 0B 07
3F 63 3B 59 37 55 33 51 2F 47 2B 43 27 39 23 35
42 3E 3A 36
32 2E 2A 26
3E 62 3A 58 36 54 32 50 2E 46 2A 42 26 38 22 34
41 3D 39
35
31 2D 29
25
3D 61 39 57 35 53 31 49 2D 45 29 41 25 37 21 33
40 3C 38
34
1F 31 1B 27 17 23 13 19 0F 15 0B 11 07 07 03 03
30 2C 28
24
22 1E 1A 16 12 0E 0A 06
A
C
T
I
V
E
B
A
C
K
U
P
3C 60 38 56 34 52 30 48 2C 44 28 40 24 36 20 32
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
1E 30 1A 26 16 22 12 18 0E 14 0A 10 06 06 02 02
21 1D 19
15 11 0D 09
05
1D 29 19 25 15 21 11 17 0D 13 09 09 05 05 01 01
20 1C 18
14 10 0C 08
04
1C 28 18 24 14 20 10 16 0C 12 08 08 04 04 00 00
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Slot
Numbers
Figure B-2 Port mapping for the Intrepid FICON Director
Intrepid 6140 port address mapping
Figure B-3 on page 82 shows the port layout for Intrepid 140-port FICON Director with the
assigned port ranges. Notice that on this Director, there are 128 ports in the front. The
remaining 12 ports are available in the rear.
In a cascaded FICON topology, it is recommended to use the rear ports for the Inter-Switch
Links.
Port numbering starts at the left lower part of the Director, continuing to the right lower part,
and then to the upper left part through the upper right part.
Notice that the counting of ports starts in slot 0 from the top of the card.
Appendix B. Port location and mapping
81
Slot
Numbers
UPM Cards
UPM Cards
CTP Cards
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
83
7F 7B 77
73
6F 6B 67
23
24
75
62 5E 5A 56
72 6E 6A 66
71 6D 69
74
70 6C 68
65
64
7C 124 78 120 74 116 70 112 6C 108 68 104 64 100 60 96
40 3C 38
34
30 2C 28
24
3C 60 38 56 34 52 30 48 2C 44 28 40 24 36 20 32
41 3D 39
35
31 2D 29
61 5D 59
A
C
T
I
V
E
B
A
C
K
U
P
25
3F 3B 37
14
13
12
11
9
54
53 4F 4B 47
52 4E 4A 46
51 4D 49
45
50 4C 48
44
5C 92 58 88 54 84 50 80 4C 76 48 72 44 68 40 64
20 1C 18
14
10 0C 08
04
1C 28 18 24 14 20 10 16 0C 12 08 08 04 04 00 00
15
23
1F 1B 17
11 0D 09
05
12 0E 0A 06
13
0F 0B 07
1F 31 1B 27 17 23 13 19 0F 15 0B 11 07 07 03 03
7
8
6
5
4
Slot
Numbers
Figure B-3 Port Mapping for the Intrepid 6140 FICON Director
The remaining 12 ports in the rear are identified as shown in Figure B-4.
82
16
1E 30 1A 26 16 22 12 18 0E 14 0A 10 06 06 02 02
2F 2B 27
10
55
22 1E 1A 16
3F 63 3B 59 37 55 33 51 2F 47 2B 43 27 39 23 35
15
17
1D 29 19 25 15 21 11 17 0D 13 09 09 05 05 01 01
32 2E 2A 26
33
60 5C 58
21 1D 19
3E 62 3A 58 36 54 32 50 2E 46 2A 42 26 38 22 34
43
18
5D 93 59 89 55 85 51 81 4D 77 49 73 45 69 41 65
3D 61 39 57 35 53 31 49 2D 45 29 41 25 37 21 33
42 3E 3A 36
19
5E 94 5A 90 56 86 52 82 4E 78 4A 74 46 70 42 66
7D 125 79 121 75 117 71 113 6D 109 69 105 65 101 61 97
80 7C 78
20
5F 95 5B 91 57 87 53 83 4F 79 4B 75 47 71 43 67
7E 126 7A 122 76 118 72 114 6E 110 6A 106 66 102 62 98
81 7D 79
21
63 5F 5B 57
7F 127 7B 123 77 119 73 115 6F 111 6B 107 67 103 63 99
82 7E 7A 76
22
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
3
2
1
0
Slot 34
Slot 35
93
92
8F 143
8E 142
91
90
8D 141 8C 140
8C
8D
8E
8F
88 136
89 137
8A 138
8B 139
Slot 33
8B
8A
89
88
87 135
86 134
85 133
84 132
SBAR1
SBAR0
Figure B-4 Intrepid 6140 rear port mapping
Appendix B. Port location and mapping
83
84
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
C
Appendix C.
FICON Director configuration
worksheet
This appendix contains a worksheet, which aids in documenting the layout of your FICON
Director. It can be applied as a tool to help understand how the ports are allocated for
configuration and problem determination purposes.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
85
86
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Slot
Number
Port
Number
Port
Address
Laser
Type:
LX / SX
FICON Director Ports
HCD defined Switch ID
_____
FICON Director Domain ID _____
Port Name
(Switch ID)
(Switch @)
Model: ____ S/N _____________
Node Type
CU / CHNL
Machine
Type
Model
Serial
Number
ISL
CU I/F
CPC CHPID
Attached N_Ports / E_Ports (CU, CPC or ISL)
Cascaded Directors
No ___ Yes ___
Corresponding cascaded Director Domain ID _______
Fabric name ________________________________
FICON Director Manufacturer: ______________ Type: ______
FICON Director Configuration Worksheet
Related publications
The publications listed in this section are considered particularly suitable for a more detailed
discussion of the topics covered in this redbook.
IBM Redbooks
For information on ordering these publications, see “How to get IBM Redbooks” on page 87.
 FICON Native Implementation and Reference Guide, SG24-6266
Other resources
These publications are also relevant as further information sources:





McDATA Enterprise Fabric Connectivity Manager, 620-005001-600
McDATA Products in a SAN Environment Planning Manual, 620-000124-000
McDATA Intrepid 6064 Director Installation and Service Manual, 620-000108-500
McDATA SNMP Support Manual, 620-000131-200
McDATA Intrepid 6064 Director Product Manager User Manual, 620-000120-200
Referenced Web sites
These Web sites are also relevant as further information sources:
 McDATA Intrepid documentation and information
http://www.mcdata.com/ibm
 IBM offerings for McDATA Intrepid
http://http://www.ibm.com/storage/mcdata
How to get IBM Redbooks
You can order hardcopy Redbooks, as well as view, download, or search for Redbooks at the
following Web site:
ibm.com/redbooks
You can also download additional materials (code samples or diskette/CD-ROM images) from
that site.
IBM Redbooks collections
Redbooks are also available on CD-ROMs. Click the CD-ROMs button on the Redbooks Web
site for information about all the CD-ROMs offered, as well as updates and formats.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
87
88
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Index
A
arbitrated loop 6
architecture
website 5
Audit log 42
auto-negotiate 3
B
Backplane 17
BB_Credit 52
Bound WWN 28
C
communication methods 13
Control Processor (CTP) 15
Control Unit Port (CUP) 50
conversion kit 22, 32
CTP 36
CTP cards 23
D
definition terms 25
Director characteristics 12
Director configuration
Intrepid 6064 17
Intrepid 6140 17
Domain ID 25, 55
E
E_D_TOV 52
E_Port 2
EFC Manager
software installation 75
EFC Server 14
Enterprise Fabric mode 54
Event log 42
export 69
export zoneset 68
F
F_Port 2
fabric binding 9, 29
Fabric log 42
fabric membership 55
Fabrics view 40
Fan Module 17
FC link 2
data rate 3
FC-1 level 5
FC-2 level 5
FC-3 level 5
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved.
FC-FCP 5
FC-FG
architecture 5
FC-FS
architecture 4
FC-PH 5
amendments 5
architecture 5
FC-SB-2 5
FC-SW 5
architecture 5
Feature Code 6003 19
Feature Code 6006 18
Feature Code 6007 18
Feature Code 6302 19
feature codes
FICON 32
FICON Express 32
Fiber Port Module (FPM) 15
Fibre Channel
framing and signalling 4
Fibre Channel (FC) protocols 4
FICON
channel 4
CU characteristics 34
distances 33
FICON channel
topologies 6
FICON channel mode
bridged (FCV) 5
Fibre Channel Protocol (FCP) 6
native (FC) 5
FICON Management Server 19
FICON SANtegrity 18
firmware 76
firmware version 13, 37
FPM cards 23
G
G_Port 2
H
High integrity 9
high integrity fabric 9
high-availabiltiy features 18
HIPPI 5
HyperTerminal 36, 72
I
initial program load (IML) 15
Insistent 48
Insistent Domain IDs 28
Insistent domain IDs 9
89
interconnection 13
Interop Mode 52
Inter-Switch Link (ISL) 22
IP address 23, 36
IPI 5
ISL 23
Redbooks Web site 87
Contact us viii
redundancy 12
RFI shield 16
S
Management Server Function 50
membership list 28, 57
Mode Conditioning Patch (MCP) 22
mode conditioning patch (MCP) 32
multimode 33
S/390 Operating Mode 48
SANtegrity 48
SBAR Assembly 17
SBCON 5
SCSI 5
service LAN 23, 37
short wavelength (SX) 12, 32
single mode 33
small form factor (SFF) 12
Speed 48
supported distances 33
switch address range 25
switch binding 29
Switch ID range 25
SWITCH keyword 26
Switched fabric 2
N
T
L
link attenuation 33
link budget 33
LINK keyword 26
long distance buffering 61
Long wavelength (LX) 12
long wavelength (LX) 32
M
Network Address option 37
network configuration 23
New Product panel 37
nickname 59
Node 2
Topology view 41
transmission
media 4
transmitter 4
U
O
occupied 28
offline state 46
offset 25
Universal Port Module (UPM) 15
UPM cards 23
User options 41
W
P
Parallel Access Volumes (PAV) 34
physical port numbers 80
Port 2
port address 26
port addresses 80
port binding 28, 61
port layout 80–81
Power Module Assembly 16
Power Supply 16
preferred Domain ID 48
Product Managers 13
Products view 38
prohibit 60
protocol intermix 12
worksheet 85
World-Wide Names (WWN) 3
World-Wide Node_Name (WWNN) 3
World-Wide Port_Name (WWPN) 3
Z
zone set 64–65
zoning 61
zoning library 62, 65
Q
Query Security Attributes 19
R
R_A_TOV 52
receiver 4
90
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
Getting Started with the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director
(0.2”spine)
0.17”<->0.473”
90<->249 pages
Back cover
®
Getting Started with
the McDATA Intrepid
FICON Director
Product, planning,
and implementation
information
Realistic
considerations and
suggestions
Helpful configuration
examples
This IBM Redbook discusses how to install, tailor, and
configure the McDATA Intrepid FICON Director, in
conjunction with the FICON topologies supported by
zSeries and 9672 Generation 5 and Generation 6 servers.
It focuses on the hardware installation as well as the
software definitions needed to provide connectivity for
supported FICON environments.
This redbook provides planning information and FICON
Director setup information. Also included are helpful utilities
for monitoring and managing the McDATA Intrepid FICON
Director environment.
This book is intended for system engineers, SAN
administrators, and system programmers who will plan and
install McDATA Intrepid FICON Directors. A good
background in systems planning, hardware and cabling
infrastructure planning, and zSeries I/O definitions (HCD or
IOCP), as well as Fibre Channel or FICON Directors is
assumed.
INTERNATIONAL
TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
ORGANIZATION
BUILDING TECHNICAL
INFORMATION BASED ON
PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
IBM Redbooks are developed
by the IBM International
Technical Support
Organization. Experts from
IBM, Customers and Partners
from around the world create
timely technical information
based on realistic scenarios.
Specific recommendations
are provided to help you
implement IT solutions more
effectively in your
environment.
For more information:
ibm.com/redbooks
SG24-6857-00
ISBN 0738428426
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