MIDAIR
25/37
Wireless USB MIDI Controller
User Guide
Wireless Technology by
D E S I G N�
GROUP
English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2 What’s in the Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3 MidAir Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
4 About MidAir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
5 Installation for Advanced Windows XP Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
6 Minimum System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
7 Controls and Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
8 Hardware Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Scenario 1: MidAir as a Wireless, Host-Based Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Scenario 2: MidAir as a Wireless, Standalone Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Scenario 3: MidAir as a Wired, Standalone Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
9 Using the MidAir Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Shifting the Octave Range of the Keyboard . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Program Change Up/Down buttons . . . . . . . .
About Program Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Mode Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loading and Saving MidAir Keyboard Presets . . . . . . . . .
Programming the MIDI Controller Knobs . . . . . . . . . .
Programming the MIDI Controller Sliders (MidAir 37 Only) .
Setting the Sustain Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Data Entry Slider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sending Program Change Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other Functions in Program Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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.10
.10
.10
.11
.11
.12
.12
.12
.12
.13
.14
10 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
11 Appendices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Appendix A: Presets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix B: MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART . . . . . . .
Appendix C: Useful MIDI Data Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix D: General MIDI Controller Numbers (MIDI CC's)
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.16
20
.21
23
12 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
13 Technical Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
14 Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
15 Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Thank you for purchasing the M-Audio MidAir 25/37. Please register your product today to ensure full warranty coverage and receive free product
updates. Register online at www.m-audio.com/register.
1
Introduction
Thank you for choosing the MidAir 25 or MidAir 37 wireless MIDI controller. MidAir 25/37 combines a powerful MIDI
controller keyboard with a high-performance wireless linking system. This allows you to control your MIDI hardware or
software without cumbersome cables and gives you the freedom to place the lightweight, ultra-portable keyboard anywhere
that best suits your needs—you no longer have to worry about cable lengths, wiring clutter, or accidents caused by cables on
your stage or studio floor.
The MidAir keyboard is an extremely versatile MIDI controller. Its 25 or 37 full-sized keys can be easily transposed to play
any octave range you desire, and its pitch wheel, modulation wheel, and assignable knobs and sliders* give you limitless control
possibilities over your virtual instruments and hardware. Furthermore, the MidAir keyboard’s compact footprint and batterypowered operation make it the ideal travel companion for when you’re on the road.
Setting up wireless operation is simple. Just connect the MidAir receiver to your computer’s USB port, power up the keyboard,
and you’re ready to go. There are no complicated setup procedures or software applications—your audio software treats the
MidAir keyboard just like any other wired controller you may have in your studio. Furthermore, your MidAir keyboard has a
5-pin MIDI output and can be used as a standard wired controller at any time, should the need arise.
Whether you’re looking for untethered live performance, or the flexibility to set up and record MIDI tracks anywhere in the
studio, MidAir is your wireless MIDI solution.
* Only available on MidAir 37
2
3
What’s in the Box
<
MidAir 25 or 37 wireless MIDI controller
<
MidAir receiver
<
MidAir Series CD-ROM containing documentation
<
CD-ROM containing Ableton Live Lite 5 M-Audio Enhanced Edition
<
Printed quick start guide
<
Power adapter
<
USB cable
MidAir Features
<
25 or 37 full-sized, velocity sensitive keys
<
Pitch Bend wheel
<
Modulation wheel
<
Octave and Preset up/down buttons
<
Three-digit LED display
<
Assignable Data Entry slider
<
Eight assignable controller knobs
<
Nine assignable controller sliders*
<
Program change up/down buttons
<
Sustain button
<
Sustain pedal input
<
Standalone operation—no computer required
<
10 memory presets
* Only available on the MidAir 37
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
»
3
4
About MidAir
Wireless devices have become increasingly commonplace over the last few years. For example, many people now use wireless
keyboards and mice with their computers. Lots of college campuses and coffee shops offer wireless Internet access and some
concert venues have switched to wireless microphones and in-ear monitoring systems.All of these developments have improved
the lives of end-users by reducing cabling clutter, allowing people to move about freely and work more comfortably. And now,
MidAir technology extends this level of convenience to musicians working in the studio as well as performing onstage.
MidAir establishes a one-way 2.4GHz wireless link and delivers a dependable MIDI connection at distances of up to 10 meters
(30 feet). This proprietary linking technology constantly monitors the wireless signal and automatically changes frequencies
when interference is detected, thereby ensuring a robust connection between the transmitter (keyboard) and the receiver. In
cases where extreme interference or battery failure cause the keyboard and receiver units to lose contact, a full MIDI reset
(including an all-notes-off “panic” message) is issued to prevent stuck MIDI notes. In short, MidAir frees you from your MIDI
cabling, allowing you to work from anywhere in your studio or on stage.
The MidAir receiver is class-compliant—no drivers are required. Simply connect it to your Windows XP or Mac computer and
it’s ready to go. Its simple USB connectivity eliminates the need to open your computer to install hardware. Furthermore, your
MidAir 25 or 37 keyboard can be powered by six AA batteries for use as a portable MIDI controller—no “strings” attached.
Finally, the MidAir keyboard’s assignable knobs and controls allow you to output all types of MIDI messages on any channel. This
lets you manipulate all kinds of hardware and software with ease. The keyboard’s lightweight, compact, and durable design let
you travel and work from anywhere.
5
Installation for Advanced Windows XP Users
The MidAir receiver is class compliant. This means that on Windows XP and Mac OS X computers, you can simply connect
the receiver to the computer with a USB cable and you’re ready to go. The operating system already has the drivers required
to communicate with the receiver.
However, advanced Windows XP users who intend to (1) use MidAir 25/37 with more than one application at the same time,
(2) use long SysEx (system exclusive) commands, or (3) simultaneously use other class-compliant USB devices with audio
capabilities, should install the special M-Audio drivers for optimum performance.
Installation instructions can be found in the printed Quick Start Guide.
6
Minimum System Requirements
When used with a host computer, a USB 1.1 or USB 2.0 port is required.
Windows*
Mac OS*
Pentium 3 600 MHz
Macintosh G3** 600/G4** 667 MHz
256 MB RAM
OS X 10.3.9 with 256 MB RAM,
DirectX 9.0c or higher
OS X 10.4.5 or greater with 512 MB RAM
Windows XP (SP2) or higher
(Mac OS 9 or earlier not supported)
(Windows 98, Me, NT or 2000 not supported)
* Please check the minimum system requirements of your DAW software as they may be higher.
** Native USB port required; G3/G4 accelerator cards are not supported.
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
»
4
7
Controls and Connectors
Keyboard
The MidAir 25 and 37 keyboards are identical except that the MidAir 37 contains an addition octave of keys and 9 MIDI control
sliders. For identification purposes, the MidAir 37 keyboard is shown below:
1.
Pitch Bend Wheel (Pitch) – This wheel lets you create expressive changes in your performances by raising and
lowering pitch. Rolling the Pitch Bend wheel upward will raise an instrument’s pitch whereas rolling it downward will
lower the pitch.The upper and lower pitch bend limit is determined by settings on your hardware or software synthesizer,
not by the Pitch Bend wheel on the MidAir keyboard. Typically, this can be either a half note or an octave up/down. This
wheel is spring-mounted and will return to the center detent position when released.
2.
Modulation Wheel (Modulation) – This wheel is used to add expressivity to your performance by changing the
intensity of certain effects. By default, most synthesizers assign this wheel to control vibrato (change in intonation) or
tremolo (change in volume) although it is usually possible to reassign the function of this wheel through the instrument’s
control panel.
The MIDI data range of the Modulation wheel is 0 to 127, with 0 being the note-unchanged position. Like the Pitch Bend
wheel, the amount of actual modulation that takes place depends on your instrument’s settings.
3.
Sustain Button (Sustain) – Performers who move around with the wireless keyboard may find it impractical to
attach a sustain pedal. Therefore, this button toggles the sustain parameter (MIDI controller #64) on and off, emulating a
sustain pedal.
The button is illuminated when the switch is engaged.
Note that this button can be reassigned to toggle any MIDI controllable parameter in Program mode. To learn how to do this,
see the section titled “Setting the Sustain Button” in chapter 9.
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
»
5
4.
Wireless Connection Status LED (Connect) – This green LED displays the current state of the wireless link:
< On – Connected
< Off – Not connected
< Blinking – Connection in progress
5.
Octave Up/Down, Preset Select Buttons (Down, Up) – The Octave up/down buttons select the octave range
of the keyboard. Press both buttons simultaneously to center the keyboard.
The MidAir keyboard can store 10 presets in memory. These presets can be accessed by pressing the MIDI Select button
(8) and using the Octave up/down buttons to step through the memory banks. Once a preset is located, press the MIDI
Select button again to load the preset and to return the up/down buttons to their regular function.
6.
Data Entry Slider (Data Entry) - The Data Entry slider sends out MIDI controller data and is used to control MIDI
devices and DAW components in real-time. By default, this slider controls volume (MIDI controller #7) although it can
be reassigned in Program mode to affect one of five available MIDI controllers (Velocity Offset, Reverb Depth, Aftertouch,
Pan and Volume) or to send out program change messages. To learn how to reprogram this slider, see the section titled
“Setting the Data Entry Slider” in Chapter 9.
7.
LED Screen - The LED screen displays MIDI functions and data selections. It also displays a warning message when the
batteries are low.
8.
MIDI Select (MIDI/Select) – This button lets you alternate between MIDI Performance and Program modes on the
MidAir keyboard. MIDI Performance mode is where you’ll spend most of your time as you play the keyboard. Program
mode allows you to select and change settings such as Data Entry slider (6) and MIDI Controller knob (10) assignments.
See chapter 9 of this manual to learn more about Program Mode.
9.
Program Change Up/Down (Down, Up) – The Program Change up/down buttons can be used to cycle through
your MIDI instrument’s preset sounds. These buttons step through the instrument’s presets one at a time.
Note that this is one of the three ways that you can send program change messages from the MidAir keyboard. All three
methods are discussed in detail in chapter 9.
10. MIDI Controller Knobs (1-8) – These eight MIDI Controller knobs give you real time control over your MIDI
hardware and software through MIDI Continuous Controller (CC) messages. Each knob is assignable and can be configured
to send out many kinds of control data. See the section entitled “Programming the MIDI Controller Knobs” in chapter 9
to learn how to set these knobs.
11. MIDI Controller Sliders* (9-17) – The MidAir 37 keyboard has nine fully assignable sliders that can send out MIDI
control data, just like the MIDI Controller knobs (see above). See the section entitled “Programming the MIDI Controller
Sliders” in chapter 9 to learn how to program these sliders.
12. Keyboard – MidAir 25 and 37 have two- and three-octave keyboards, respectively. Both units feature velocity-sensitive
keys that can also be used to enter program numbers and other information when the controller is in Program mode. See
chapter 9 of this manual for more about the function of these keys during programming.
13. Sustain Input (Sustain Switch) – Connect your sustain pedal’s 1⁄4” connector to this jack. The MidAir keyboard
supports all sustain pedal polarities by auto-sensing the pedal’s orientation during startup.
14. MIDI Output (MIDI Out) – If you wish to use the MidAir keyboard as a wired controller, simply connect this output
to a MIDI device using a standard 5-pin MIDI cable. This output remains active regardless of whether a wireless link is
available or not.
15. Wireless Connect Button (Connect) – The MidAir keyboard and receiver will usually establish a wireless connection
automatically. Under some circumstances, excessive interference, distance, or other factors may cause the controller and
receiver units to lose contact. If the wireless connection fails and the keyboard and receiver are within a range of 30 feet,
press the wireless connect buttons on the transmitter (keyboard) and receiver units to re-establish connection.
If you’re using more than one MidAir wireless setup, you might find yourself in a situation where you’ve inadvertently linked
a keyboard to the wrong receiver unit. This will result in your MIDI data being routed to the wrong destination. If this
happens, you can simply press the wireless connect buttons on both devices to “re-introduce” them to each other.
This button is recessed to avoid accidental activation. Use a bent paperclip, pen, or other small object to press
the button.
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
»
6
16. Power Switch – This switch powers the unit on and off. If both AC and battery power are available, the keyboard
will opt for AC power in order to preserve battery life. When not in use, be sure to turn off the unit to preserve
battery life.
17. Power Jack (DC in 9V) – Connect the optional 9V DC, 500mA external power supply to this jack.
18. Battery Compartment (on bottom) – Accommodates six AA batteries.To avoid damage to the keyboard, observe
proper polarity when inserting batteries.
* Only available on MidAir 37
Receiver
1.
Power Jack – If you plan to use the MidAir receiver as a standalone device (without a computer), connect the optional
9V DC, 500mA power supply here.
2.
USB Connector – Connect a USB cable from this output to the host computer’s USB port. When using the USB
connection, the receiver unit is powered via the host computer and a power adapter is not required.
3.
MIDI In (In) – You can connect a MIDI device (such as a keyboard or electronic drum kit) to this input. Note that this
input varies in function depending on whether your MidAir setup is in standalone mode or connected to a computer:
< When used in standalone mode, either the wireless signal from the MidAir keyboard or from the MIDI input is
routed to the MIDI output port of the receiver. The Standalone Mode switch (8) determines which source is
routed.
< When the receiver is used with a computer, the computer sees this port as a separate USB MIDI device that is
unrelated to the MidAir keyboard. Data received at this port is treated as an independent MIDI input, and is not
merged with incoming MIDI data from the MidAir keyboard.
4.
MIDI Out (Out) – Connect this output to other MIDI devices using a standard 5-pin MIDI cable. The function of this
port varies depending on whether you are using the MidAir receiver in standalone mode or with a computer:
< Standalone mode – When operating in Standalone mode, the Standalone Mode switch (8) determines the
source of this output.
5.
6.
< Host Based – When the MidAir receiver is connected to a computer, this port appears as an independent MIDI
out, available for sending MIDI messages from your software to an external MIDI device. In host mode, this MIDI
output port has no relation to the MidAir keyboard. In this setup, the Standalone Mode switch is ignored and does
not affect operation in any way.
Wireless Connect Button – This button operates in exactly the same way as the Wireless Connect button found on
the MidAir keyboard. See the description in the previous section for more information about this button.
Wireless Connection Status LED – This green LED functions in the same way as the Wireless Connection Status
LED found on the MidAir keyboard. Refer to the description in the previous section for more about this LED.
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
»
7
7.
Activity LEDs – The MidAir receiver’s three LEDs indicate the operational status of the unit:
< Yellow – The yellow LED illuminates whenever incoming wireless MIDI data is detected by the receiver unit.
< Red – The red LED illuminates whenever data is received at the wired, 5-pin MIDI input port on the receiver.
Note: When you are in Standalone mode, only the active input source’s LED will illuminate. In other words, only the yellow or
red LED can be on at any given time. If your Standalone Mode switch is set to “Wireless” then the yellow LED will light when
there is wireless MIDI activity and the red LED will remain off. If the Standalone Mode switch is set to “MIDI” then the red LED
will illuminate when there is activity at the wired MIDI port and the yellow LED will remain off. If the Standalone Mode switch
is set to “Auto” then the LED for whichever source that is currently being routed to the MIDI out port will illuminate.
When the MidAir receiver is connected to a computer through USB, two separate streams of MIDI data can be sent to the
computer. Therefore, both yellow and red LEDs can illuminate at the same time.
8.
Standalone Mode Switch – This switch only affects the signal routing when using MidAir as a standalone (non-USB)
device. It selects the source of the receiver’s MIDI output port.
The Standalone Mode switch can be set in the following three ways:
< MIDI In
– Data from the receiver’s 5-pin MIDI In port is sent to its MIDI Out port. Any data received from
the wireless input is ignored.
< Wireless
– Data from the receiver’s wireless input is sent to its MIDI Out port. Any data received from the
wired MIDI In port is ignored.
< Auto – The receiver monitors both the MIDI In port and wireless input and selects whichever input is currently
active. On this setting, the following rules are observed:
< The wireless and 5-pin MIDI In port data streams are never merged—when MIDI data is being received from the
receiver’s MIDI In port, any data received at its wireless input is ignored.
< If no MIDI data is received from the receiver’s wired MIDI In port for 250 milliseconds and incoming MIDI data
is detected at the wireless input, the receiver unit will automatically switch to output the incoming wireless MIDI
data stream.
< If the receiver switches from one stream to another, a set of “Note Off” and other MIDI reset commands will be
sent to the MIDI Out port. This prevents any notes that are currently playing from becoming “stuck.”
IMPORTANT: If the Standalone
Mode switch is set to “Auto,” it is
important to plan your MIDI input
sources carefully. For example, if you
attempt to drive a synth or other
MIDI device by sending an ongoing
stream of MIDI data to the receiver’s
wired MIDI In port (e.g. MIDI Time
Code (MTC) from a sequencer), any
MIDI data received at the wireless
MIDI input will be ignored.
Additionally, use caution when
switching between the wireless
input and the MIDI In port as this
can sometimes cause notes to
stop abruptly.
Wireless Bridge
Wireless In
MidAir 25/37
MIDI In
MIDI Out
IN
MIDI In
OUT
MIDI Out
MIDI Keyboard / Synthesiser
sound
module
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
»
8
8
Hardware Connections
MidAir can be used in three basic configurations. Please take a look at the scenarios outlined below to find the one that best
works for you.
Scenario 1: MidAir as a Wireless, Host-Based Controller
If you plan to use your MidAir system in a computerbased recording studio, this setup should best serve your
needs. In this configuration, the MidAir keyboard operates
wirelessly while the receiver communicates with the
keyboard and provides an extra set of wired MIDI inputs
and outputs to your computer. You can use these extra
inputs and outputs to connect another MIDI device in your
studio.
PC / Mac
Wireless Bridge
The MidAir keyboard can be powered by batteries or the
AC adapter. The wireless receiver draws its power from
the USB bus and does not require any AC power.
NOTE: In this configuration, your audio software will detect two
MidAir MIDI input ports and one MIDI output. The first input is
from your wireless MidAir keyboard whereas the second input is
the wired 5-pin MIDI input (i.e., any MIDI device you connect to
the 5-pin input). The output port lets you send out MIDI data
to any device that is connected to the MidAir receiver.
MidAir 25/37
OUT
IN
MIDI In
MIDI Out
MIDI Keyboard/Synthesizer
Scenario 2: MidAir as a Wireless, Standalone Controller
Live performers who want to use their MidAir system
wirelessly on stage will most likely use this scenario. In
this configuration, the MidAir keyboard transmits MIDI
commands to the wireless receiver which then relays that
information (via MIDI cable) to sound modules or other
MIDI devices.
AC Adapter
The wireless receiver must be powered by AC adapter
whereas the MidAir keyboard can be powered by either
batteries or AC power.
Wireless Bridge
Note that in this configuration, the Standalone Mode
switch should be set to “Wireless” or “Auto” so that the
receiver will relay the MidAir keyboard’s commands out of
the MIDI output port.
MidAir 25/37
IN
OUT
MIDI
Sound Module
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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9
Scenario 3: MidAir as a Wired, Standalone Controller
If you are using your MidAir keyboard as a wired, standalone controller, simply use a MIDI cable to connect the keyboard’s MIDI
Out to the input of another device (such as a sound module) and you’re ready to go.
The keyboard can be powered by batteries or the AC adapter and the wireless receiver is not required in this configuration.
MIDI
Sound Module
MidAir 25/37
9
Using the MidAir Keyboard
The MidAir keyboard can transmit all kinds of MIDI data and can be set up to control any MIDI-compatible musical instrument
(i.e., synthesizers, samplers, virtual instruments, recording software, etc.) To do this, you’ll need to know how to configure the
keyboard and access its various features.
Shifting the Octave Range of the Keyboard
To change the MidAir keyboard’s range, use the Octave Up or Octave Down buttons (5). Each time you press one of these
buttons, the keyboard will be shifted up or down by one octave (up to four octaves each way). The display will read “d 4”, “d 3”,
“d 2”, “d 1”, “--0”, “U 1”, “U 2”, “U 3”, or “U 4”, as you shift from the lowest selection to the highest. To quickly re-center the
keyboard, simultaneously press the up and down buttons.
Note that shifting the keyboard’s range does not affect any transposition you may have set using the sharp and flat keys in Program Mode
(see the section titled “Transposing the Keyboard,” below).
Using the Program Change Up/Down buttons
Program Change up/down buttons can be used to cycle through your MIDI instrument’s preset sounds. These buttons step
through the instrument’s presets one at a time.
Note that this is one of the three ways that you can send program change messages from the MidAir keyboard. All three methods are
discussed in detail later in this chapter.
About Program Mode
Pressing the MIDI Select button (8) illuminates the button and places the MidAir keyboard into Program mode. This mode
allows you to configure the controller’s assignable button, sliders, and knobs; transpose the keyboard; set MIDI transmit channels;
and more.
Navigating Program mode is easy. The following section first explains the general concept and then gives specific examples.
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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10
Program Mode Overview
< The MidAir keyboard has two modes of operation: Program mode and Performance mode. Most of the time,
the controller stays in Performance mode so you can play regularly—Program mode is only used when you
need to configure various parameters like knob assignments. Use the MIDI Select button to enter and exit
Program mode.
< Once you have entered Program mode, you can select different parameters to edit by pressing one of the keys on
the left half of the keyboard. The function of each key is written directly above the key:
< Certain parameters will require you to enter additional information such as MIDI channel or CC numbers. Use
the 0-9 keys (on the right hand of the keyboard) to set these values.
< If you’ve entered a number, use the Enter key to confirm the entry. If you’ve changed your mind, press the Cancel
key located to the left of the Enter key to keep the current setting.
< Once you are done editing parameters, press the MIDI Select button again to exit Program mode and return
to Performance mode.
Loading and Saving MidAir Keyboard Presets
The MidAir keyboard lets you store 10 presets in memory.This allows you to configure the controller for various scenarios (i.e.,
full studio, live performance, portable studio setup, etc.) for quick recall.
Loading presets: Presets can be accessed by pressing the MIDI Select button (8) and using the Octave up/down buttons (5)
to step through the memory banks. Once a preset is located, press the MIDI Select button again to load the preset and to return
the up/down buttons to their regular function.
Saving your own presets: Storing your presets on
the MidAir keyboard is easy. Any changes you make to the
assignments are automatically saved to the active preset. Make
sure to load the preset you would like to modify BEFORE changing
controller assignments.
Your MidAir keyboard ships with presets that
have already been mapped for 10 popular
audio applications. A list of these programs
and their knob and slider mappings are
included in Appendix A.
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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11
Programming the MIDI Controller Knobs
The MIDI Controller knobs can be reassigned by doing the following:
1. Press the MIDI Select button.
2. Press the Set CTRL key. The display will show a small “n” to indicate that the desired Controller knob “number”
should be entered next.
3. Choose the number of the desired Controller knob using the 0-9 keys. Then press the Enter key. The display will
show a “P” in anticipation of the “parameter” number.
4. Use the 0-9 keys to select the desired MIDI continuous controller parameter and press Enter. The display will
now show a “C” in anticipation of the MIDI “channel” number.
5. Assign the MIDI channel number for the knob using the 0-9 keys and press Enter. Note that the MIDI channel
setting only affects the currently selected knob—each knob can be assigned to a different channel.
This assignment has now been applied to the selected Controller knob. Repeat this process if you wish to assign
a different knob or press the MIDI Select button again to exit Program mode.
Note that Appendix A contains complete knob mapping information for each of MidAir’s default presets. Please
see that section to see how each knob is assigned.
Programming the MIDI Controller Sliders (MidAir 37 Only)
MidAir 37’s nine MIDI Control sliders (11) can be reassigned like the MIDI Controller knobs. The procedure is as follows:
1. Press the MIDI Select button.
2. Press the Set CTRL key. The display will show a small “n” to indicate that the desired Control slider “number”
should be entered next. The sliders are numbered 9 through 17 as you move from left side of the keyboard to
the right.
3. Choose the number of the desired slider number using the 0-9 keys. Then press the Enter key. The display will
show a “P” in anticipation of the “parameter” number.
4. Use the 0-9 keys to select the desired MIDI continuous controller parameter and press Enter. The display will
now show a “C” in anticipation of the MIDI “channel” number.
5. Assign the MIDI channel number for the knob using the 0-9 keys and press Enter. Like the Controller knobs
above, this MIDI channel setting only affects the currently selected slider—each slider can be assigned to a
different MIDI channel.
This assignment has now been applied to the selected slider. Repeat this process if you wish to assign a different
slider or press the MIDI Select button again to exit Program mode.
Setting the Sustain Button
By default, the Sustain button is set to toggle the MIDI sustain controller (MIDI CC #64). To change the assignment of the
Sustain button, follow the instructions below. Keep in mind that this button sends out only two MIDI CC values: 0 (when the
switch is turned off) and 127 (when the switch is engaged). This makes it useful for “toggle” parameters (such as sustain) but
it may be less useful in situations requiring precise control (such as filter cutoff). A knob will be more useful for parameters
requiring precise control.
1. Press MIDI Select button to enter Program Mode.
2. Press the Set CTRL key. The display will show a small “n” to indicate that the desired controller knob “number”
should be entered next.
3. Press the ”0” key and then press the Enter key. The display will show a “P” in anticipation of the
“parameter” number.
4. Assign the desired MIDI controller parameter number using the 0-9 keys and press Enter. The display will show a
“C” in anticipation of the MIDI “channel” number.
5. Assign the MIDI channel using the 0-9 keys and press Enter. Note that this channel assignment will apply only to
the Sustain button and will not affect the channel setting of any knobs or sliders.
Your Sustain button has now been reassigned. You can now edit other parameters or press the MIDI Select
button to exit Program mode.
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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12
Setting the Data Entry Slider
By default, the Data Entry slider is set to control volume (MIDI Continuous Controller #7), but it can also be used to send MIDI
controller information for pan, aftertouch, reverb depth or to set a velocity offset.
You can reassign this slider by doing the following:
1. Press the MIDI Select button.
2. Use the labels above the keys to locate the parameter you’d like to
assign to the Data Entry slider. Press the corresponding key to assign
this parameter to the slider.
The slider has now been set. You can now assign other parameters or
press the MIDI Select button again to exit Program mode.
Sending Program Change Messages
Program change messages are some of the most common MIDI commands used by
keyboard players. These commands instruct a MIDI device (sound module, virtual
instrument, etc.) to switch to another one of its preset sound patches. The MidAir
keyboard offers three different ways of issuing program change messages, and each
method offers different advantages. They are as follows:
Method 1: Program Change Up/Down Buttons
The Program Change up/down buttons (9) can be used to cycle through your MIDI instrument’s sounds. These
buttons step through the instrument’s presets one at a time and are useful, for example, if you want to explore the
sounds of a MIDI module by going through them one by one.
Method 2: Using the Data Entry Slider
You can assign the Data Entry slider (6) to send Program Change messages by pressing both Program Change
up/down buttons simultaneously. Now you can use the Data Entry slider to quickly scroll through the various
presets contained in your MIDI device. This method is useful if you need to quickly reach a preset without having to
repeatedly press the Program Change up/down buttons.
Note: This method reassigns the Data Entry slider to control program change messages. Thus, if you were using the Data
Entry slider to control another parameter, you’ll need to assign it back to its original purpose once you’ve located your
sound preset.
Method 3: Directly Calling Up Sounds by Number
If you know the number of a specific patch that you’d like to play, you can access it directly through Program mode.
This is done by entering Program mode, pressing the Program key, the patch number (between 1 and 128), and finally
the Enter key. For example, if you wanted to switch to patch number 67 on your MIDI device:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press the MIDI Select button to enter Program mode.
Press the Program key.
Now press the number keys 6 and 7, in that order.
Press the Enter key.
Note that after you press the enter key, the LED display will show
“—” which will not disappear until you press the MIDI Select
button to exit Program mode. If you decide to cancel the program
change by pressing the Cancel key, the LED will still display “—”
until you exit Program mode.
The MidAir keyboard issues standard, General
MIDI-compatible, program change messages.
Most common MIDI devices (such as sound
modules), will receive and interpret these
messages without any problems. However,
certain MIDI products (particularly older
devices) may not be able to use these
messages or may require special non-standard
MIDI commands to change presets. If your
equipment falls into this category, refer
to its user manual to see if there are any
workaround solutions.
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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13
Other Functions in Program Mode
All notes off: Pressing the MIDI Select button followed by the Reset key will send an “All Notes Off” message on all channels
and will return all external MIDI instruments to their default settings. This function is known as the “panic button” and is useful
if you experience stuck notes on a MIDI instrument. Once you have completed this action, press the MIDI Select button again
to exit Program Mode.
If the MidAir keyboard ever loses contact with the receiver, even momentarily, the receiver will automatically send out these
messages to ensure there are no stuck notes.
Transposing the keyboard: By pressing the MIDI Select button followed by the flat or sharp keys, you can transpose the keyboard
in half-step increments. For example, if you want to lower the keyboard’s tuning by two half-steps (one whole step), press the
MIDI Select button, then press the flat key twice, and press the MIDI Select button again. The keyboard will now be transposed
by two half-steps.
Changing the keyboard’s MIDI channel: By default, the MidAir keyboard’s keys transmit data on MIDI
channel 1. To change this channel:
1.
Press the MIDI Select button.
2.
Press the MIDI Channel key.
3.
Select a channel using the 0-9 keys on the right side of the keyboard.
4.
Press the Enter key when finished.
The MidAir keyboard will now transmit on your chosen channel. Press the MIDI Select button to exit Program
mode.
Note that the knobs, sliders, and Sustain button are independent of the keyboard and can send MIDI data on any channel of
your choosing.
Sending Control Change MIDI messages: The MidAir keyboard allows you to send specific MIDI Control
Change (CC) messages by using the “CC No.” and “CC Data” keys together while in Program Mode. These commands
are very useful if you understand the inner workings of MIDI and need to issue specific commands to your MIDI
hardware. As an example, if you need to send out data value 123 on CC controller 7:
1.
Press the MIDI Select button.
2.
Press the CC No. key.
3.
Press number key 7.
4.
Press the Enter key. At this point, you’ve specified that you’d like to change CC controller number 7.
5.
Now press the CC Data key.
6.
Press the number keys 1, 2 and 3, in that order.
7.
Press the Enter key. This sends out data value 123 on the previously specified controller number 7.
Your MIDI Control Change message has now been sent. Press the MIDI Select button to exit Program mode.
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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14
10 Troubleshooting
MidAir is a professional-grade wireless MIDI system that has been tested under a wide variety of conditions. But in the event that you
experience difficulty with your MidAir keyboard, this section covers some common issues and tips to remedy these problems.
I’ve installed and set up all of the software correctly, but the MidAir receiver does not seem to be receiving any data
from the keyboard.
< The first time you use your MidAir system, you may need to press the Wireless Connect buttons on the
MidAir keyboard (15) and receiver unit (5) to allow the two units to establish a wireless link. Once a
wireless connection is established, the green Wireless Connect Status LEDs on the keyboard and receiver
will illuminate, and you’re ready to go.
My MidAir keyboard’s wireless range seems limited.
< Certain kinds of building materials and household items (i.e., thick walls, concrete, steel, microwave ovens,
cordless phones, etc.) can reduce or block the keyboard’s 2.4GHz radio-frequency transmission to the
receiver. For best results, place the receiver high above the ground in a location where it can be seen
throughout the room. By minimizing the physical obstructions between the keyboard and the receiver, you
will maximize the wireless range.
If you have a microwave oven or cordless phone within 10 feet of your MidAir keyboard or receiver, try
moving these items farther away to see if your wireless range improves.
I am using multiple MidAir products and my wireless keyboard seems to be linked to the wrong receiver.
< If you are using multiple wireless MIDI products, it may be possible to accidentally cross-link the wrong
remote and receiver units. To resolve this issue, simply press the Wireless Connect buttons on the MidAir
keyboard (15) and the receiver unit (5) at the same time to allow the two units to establish a wireless link.
Connect your wireless devices one at a time until everything is linked properly.
My MidAir system suddenly stopped working after having worked well since installation.
< Switch off the keyboard and leave it off for 10 seconds. Restart your computer and try again.
My drivers are listed in the Device Manager and are said to be working, but the keyboard is not recognized in
any software.
< Windows XP has a limitation to how many MIDI device drivers you can have installed at any one time.
Unfortunately, the operating system does not indicate that you are using the maximum number of drivers. To
fix this problem, go to http://www.m-audio.com and search for this problem in the Knowledge Base. You will
find a link to an executable (.exe) file that will solve this problem for you.
I have plugged a sustain pedal into my M-Audio keyboard, but its operation is reversed (i.e., it sustains when the pedal
is up instead of down).
< The polarity of the sustain pedal is determined by the keyboard when it is being powered up. On startup,
the sustain pedal is assumed to be in the up position. For proper operation, make sure the pedal is plugged
in during startup and that it is not pressed down. The keyboard should determine the pedal’s polarity and
function normally.
I have changed several parameters and assignments and would like to go back to the keyboard’s default settings.
< Your MidAir keyboard can be reset to its factory settings by holding down the MIDI/Select button as the unit
is switched on. Note that all assignments and modified presets will be lost once you perform this action, so
use this function with caution.
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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15
11 Appendices
Appendix A: Presets
MidAir 25 Presets
Preset 1 - GM Preset
Preset 6 – Drum & Bass Rig/Key Rig
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
91
93
5
10
71
74
84
2
71
74
91
93
73
72
2
10
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
7
64
Preset 2 - Oddity
Preset 7 – Digidesign Xpand
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
20
22
86
73
72
8
74
71
73
75
72
74
10
91
93
79
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
Data Entry
Slider
7
64
7
Preset 3 – ImpOSCar
Sustain
Button
64
Preset 8 – Digidesign Hybrid
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
71
74
52
83
32
33
5
6
36
37
40
38
20
23
25
28
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
7
64
Preset 4 – Minimonsta:Melohman
Preset 9 - Reason 3
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
74
71
70
91
5
73
15
14
8
9
10
12
13
14
15
16
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
7
64
Preset 5 - TimewARP 2600
Preset 10 - Ableton Live Set (unassigned CC’s)
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
82
83
28
29
74
71
2
3
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
7
64
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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16
MidAir 37 Presets
Preset 1 - GM Preset
Fader
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
74
71
91
93
73
72
5
84
11
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
2
12
13
75
76
92
95
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
Preset 2 - Oddity
Fader
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
20
22
86
21
23
87
73
72
8
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
74
71
24
102
75
76
77
78
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
Preset 3 – ImpOSCar
Fader
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
71
74
52
47
48
49
50
51
93
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
5
6
40
43
32
33
82
83
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
Preset 4 – Minimonsta:Melohman
Fader
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
74
71
70
20
21
22
73
72
15
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
5
12
13
91
75
76
77
14
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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17
MidAir 37 Presets (continued)
Preset 5 - TimewARP 2600
Fader
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
82
83
28
29
81
74
71
2
3
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
91
93
5
7
72
73
84
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
Preset 6 – Drum & Bass Rig/Key Rig
Fader
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
75
76
5
84
12
13
14
15
7
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
71
74
91
93
73
72
2
10
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
Preset 7 – Digidesign Xpand
Fader
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
16
17
18
19
80
81
73
75
72
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
65
5
74
79
91
93
6
10
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
Preset 8 – Digidesign Hybrid
Fader
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
36
37
40
38
20
23
25
28
47
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
85
86
89
87
69
72
74
77
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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18
MidAir 37 Presets (continued)
Preset 9 - Reason 3
Fader
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
8
9
10
12
13
14
15
16
7
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
Preset 10 - Ableton Live Set
Fader
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
Assignable MIDI Controller Knobs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
Data Entry
Slider
Sustain
Button
7
64
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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19
Appendix B: MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART
Function
Transmitted
Recognized
Basic
Default
1
X
Channel
Changed
1-16
X
Mode
Default
Mode 3
X
Messages
0
Altered
*****
Note
0-127
X
Number
True Voice
*****
Velocity
Note ON
0
X
Note OFF
X
X
After
Key’s
X
X
Touch
Channel
X
X
Pitch Bend
0
X
Control
0-119
0
X
Change
120-127
0
X
0-127
X
Program
Change
True Number
Remarks
With Octave Change
1-128
System Exclusive
X
X
System
Song Position Pointer
X
X
Common
Song Sel
X
X
Tune Request
X
X
System
Clock
X
X
Real Time
Commands
X
X
Aux
All Sounds Off
0
X
Messages
Reset All Controllers
0
X
Local ON/OFF
0
X
All Notes OFF
0
X
Active Sensing
0
X
System Reset
X
X
Notes
Mode 1: OMNI ON, POLY
Mode 2: OMNI ON, MONO
0:Yes
Mode 3: OMNI OFF, POLY
Mode 4: OMNI OFF, MONO
X: No
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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20
Appendix C: Useful MIDI Data Tables
C1 - General MIDI Instruments – Program Change Numbers
The following table lists all General MIDI patch names using numbers from 1 – 128. Please be advised that some GM modules
count their sound patches from 0 – 127 instead. Both methods are common. As a result, and depending on the sound module
you use, there may be an offset of -1 between the sent program change number and the recalled sound patch.
Piano
1 Acoustic Grand Piano
2 Bright Acoustic Piano
3 Electric grand Piano
4 Honky Tonk Piano
5 Electric Piano 1
6 Electric Piano 2
7 Harpsichord
8 Clavinet
Chromatic Percussion
9 Celesta
10 Glockenspiel
11 Music Box
12 Vibraphone
13 Marimba
14 Xylophone
15 Tubular bells
16 Dulcimer
Organ
17 Drawbar Organ
18 Percussive Organ
19 Rock Organ
20 Church Organ
21 Reed Organ
22 Accordion
23 Harmonica
24 Tango Accordion
Guitar
25 Nylon Acoustic
26 Steel Acoustic
27 Jazz Electric
28 Clean Electric
29 Muted Electric
30 Overdrive
31 Distorted
32 Harmonics
Bass
33 Acoustic Bass
34 Fingered Bass
35 Electric Picked Bass
36 Fretless Bass
37 Slap Bass 1
38 Slap Bass 2
39 Syn Bass 1
40 Syn Bass 2
Strings/Orchestra
41 Violin
42 Viola
43 Cello
44 Contrabass
45 Tremolo Strings
46 Pizzicato Strings
47 Orchestral Harp
48 Timpani
Ensemble
49 String Ensemble 1
50 String Ensemble 2
51 Syn Strings 1
52 Syn Strings 2
53 Choir Aahs
54 Voice Oohs
55 Syn Choir
56 Orchestral Hit
Brass
57 Trumpet
58 Trombone
59 Tuba
60 Muted Trumpet
61 French Horn
62 Brass Section
63 Syn Brass 1
64 Syn Brass 2
Reed
Synth Effects
65 Soprano Sax
66 Alto Sax
67 Tenor Sax
68 Baritone Sax
69 Oboe
70 English Horn
71 Bassoon
72 Clarinet
97 SFX Rain
98 SFX Soundtrack
99 SFX Crystal
100 SFX Atmosphere
101 SFX Brightness
102 SFX Goblins
103 SFX Echoes
104 SFX Sci-Fi
Pipe
Ethnic
73 Piccolo
74 Flute
75 Recorder
76 Pan Flute
77 Bottle Blow
78 Shakuhachi
79 Whistle
80 Ocarina
105 Sitar
106 Banjo
107 Shamisen
108 Koto
109 Kalimba
110 Bag Pipe
111 Fiddle
112 Shanai
Synth Lead
Percussive
81 Syn Square Wave
82 Syn Sawtooth Wave
83 Syn Calliope
84 Syn Chiff
85 Syn Charang
86 Syn Voice
87 Syn Sawtooth Wave
88 Syn Brass & Lead
Synth Pad
89 New Age Syn Pad
90 Warm Syn Pad
91 Polysynth Syn Pad
92 Choir Syn Pad
93 Bowed Syn Pad
94 Metal Syn Pad
95 Halo Syn Pad
96 Sweep Syn Pad
113 Tinkle Bell
114 Agogo
115 Steel Drums
116 Woodblock
117 Taiko Drum
118 Melodic Tom
119 Syn Drum
120 Reverse Cymbal
Sound Effects
121 Guitar Fret Noise
122 Breath Noise
123 Seashore
124 Bird Tweet
125 Telephone Ring
126 Helicopter
127 Applause
128 Gun Shot
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
»
21
C2 - General MIDI Note Numbers
Octave
Note Numbers
C
C#
D
D#
E
F
F#
G
G#
A
A#
B
-2
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
-1
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
0
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
1
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
2
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
3
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
4
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
5
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
6
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
7
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
8
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
C3 – GM2 Reverb Types
C4 - GM2 Chorus Types
0: Small Room
0: Chorus 1
1: Medium Room
1: Chorus 2
2: Large Room
2: Chorus 3
3: Medium Hall
3: Chorus 4
4: Large Hall
4: FB Chorus
8: Plate
5: Flanger
C5 – General MIDI Drums – Note assignments
MIDI
Note
Drum Sound
MIDI
Note
Drum Sound
MIDI
Note
Drum Sound
35
Acoustic Bass
Drum
52
Chinese Cymbal
69
Cabasa
36
Bass Drum 1
53
Ride Bell
70
Maracas
37
Side Stick
54
Tambourine
71
Short Whistle
38
Acoustic Snare
55
Splash Cymbal
72
Long Whistle
39
Hand Clap
56
Cowbell
73
Short Guiro
40
Electric Snare
57
Crash Cymbal 2
74
Long Guiro
41
Low Floor Tom
58
Vibraslap
75
Claves
42
Closed Hi-Hat
59
Ride Cymbal 2
76
Hi Wood Block
43
High Floor Tom
60
Hi Bongo
77
Low Wood Block
44
Pedal Hi-Hat
61
Low Bongo
78
Mute Cuica
45
Low Tom
62
Mute Hi Conga
79
Open Cuica
46
Open Hi-Hat
63
Open Hi Conga
80
Mute Triangle
47
Low-Mid Tom
64
Low Conga
81
Open Triangle
48
Hi-Mid Tom
65
High Timbale
49
Crash Cymbal 1
66
Low Timbale
50
High Tom
67
High Agogo
51
Ride Cymbal 1
68
Low Agogo
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
»
22
Appendix D: General MIDI Controller Numbers (MIDI CC's)
00
Bank Select
49
Gen Purpose 2 LSB
98
Non-Reg Param LSB
01
Modulation
50
Gen Purpose 3 LSB
99
Non-Reg Param MSB
02
Breath Control
51
Gen Purpose 4 LSB
100
Reg Param LSB
03
Controller 3
52
Controller 52
101
Reg Param MSB
04
Foot Control
53
Controller 53
102
Controller 102
05
Porta Time
54
Controller 54
103
Controller 103
06
Data Entry
55
Controller 55
104
Controller 104
07
Channel Volume
56
Controller 56
105
Controller 105
08
Balance
57
Controller 57
106
Controller 106
09
Controller 9
58
Controller 58
107
Controller 107
10
Pan
59
Controller 59
108
Controller 108
11
Expression
60
Controller 60
109
Controller 109
12
Effects Controller 1
61
Controller 61
110
Controller 110
13
Effects Controller 2
62
Controller 62
111
Controller 111
14
Controller 14
63
Controller 63
112
Controller 112
15
Controller 15
64
Sustain Pedal
113
Controller 113
16
Gen Purpose 1
65
Portamento
114
Controller 114
17
Gen Purpose 2
66
Sostenuto
115
Controller 115
18
Gen Purpose 3
67
Soft Pedal
116
Controller 116
19
Gen Purpose 4
68
Legato Pedal
117
Controller 117
20
Controller 20
69
Hold 2
118
Controller 118
21
Controller 21
70
Sound Variation
119
Controller 119
25
Controller 25
74
Cut-off Frequency
Channel Mode Messages
26
Controller 26
75
Controller 75
120
All Sound Off
27
Controller 27
76
Controller 76
121
Reset all Controllers
28
Controller 28
77
Controller 77
122
Local Control
29
Controller 29
78
Controller 78
123
All Notes Off
30
Controller 30
79
Controller 79
124
Omni Off
31
Controller 31
80
Gen Purpose 5
125
Omni On
32
Bank Select LSB
81
Gen Purpose 6
126
Mono On (Poly Off)
33
Modulation LSB
82
Gen Purpose 7
127
Poly On (Mono Off)
34
Breath Control LSB
83
Gen Purpose 8
35
Controller 35
84
Portamento Control
36
Foot Control LSB
85
Controller 85
37
Porta Time LSB
86
Controller 86
38
Data Entry LSB
87
Controller 87
39
Channel Volume LSB
88
Controller 88
40
Balance LSB
89
Controller 89
41
Controller 41
90
Controller 90
42
Pan LSB
91
Reverb Depth
43
Expression LSB
92
Tremelo Depth
44
Controller 44
93
Chorus Depth
45
Controller 45
94
Celeste (De-tune)
46
Controller 46
95
Phaser Depth
47
Controller 47
96
Data Increment
48
Gen Purpose 1 LSB
97
Data Decrement
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
»
23
12 Specifications
Wireless Operation
2.4 GHz radio frequency (ISM band)
Operating Range
Under Typical Conditions:
30 feet (10 meters)
Power Requirements:
Receiver – 9V DC, 500 mA (via PSU or USB bus)
MidAir 25/37 – 6 AA batteries or 9V DC, 500 mA (via PSU)
Battery life (typical)
20 hours
Dimensions:
MidAir 25: 16.5 x 9 x 2 (inches); 41.9 x 22.9 x 5.1 (cm)
MidAir 37: 22.36 x 8.78 x 2.49 (inches); 56.8 x 22.3 x 6.314 cm
13 Technical Information
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
(1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including
interference that may cause undesired operation.
This product has been found to comply with the FCC’s RF Exposure requirements.
This device should not be collocated or operating in conjunction with any other antenna or transmitter.
Note:This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the
FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation.
This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not
occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can
be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more
of the following measures:
< Re-orient or relocate the receiving antenna.
< Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
< Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
< Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/ TV technician for help.
Caution: Electro Static Discharge, Electrical Fast Transient and Conducted RF interference may cause the unit malfunctioning.
In such case, unplug the unit and plug it in again to restore normal operation.
Note:Your M-Audio product has been tested to comply with FCC Standards FOR HOME OR OFFICE USE. Modifications not
authorized by the manufacturer may void users authority to operate this device.
ASIO is a trademark of Steinberg Soft– und Hardware GmbH.
VST is a trademark of Steinberg Soft– und Hardware GmbH
WARNING: This product contains chemicals, including lead, known to the State of California to cause cancer, and birth
defects or other reproductive harm. Wash hands after handling.
© 2006 Avid Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Product features, specifications, system requirements and availability are subject to
change without notice. Avid, M-Audio and MidAir 25/37 are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Avid Technology, Inc. All other
trademarks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.
MidAir 25/37
Tested to comply with
FCC standards
Wireless Technology by
D E S I G N�
GROUP
FOR HOME OR STUDIO USE
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
»
24
14 Contact Us
M-Audio USA
M-Audio Germany
5795 Martin Rd., Irwindale, CA 91706
Kuhallmand 34, D-74613 Ohringen, Germany
Technical Support
Technical Support
web:
www.m-audio.com/tech
e-mail:
support@m-audio.de
tel (pro products):
(626) 633-9055
tel:
+49 (0)7941 - 9870030
tel (consumer products):
(626) 633-9066
fax:
+49 (0)7941 98 70070
fax (shipping):
(626) 633-9032
Sales
Sales
e-mail:
info@m-audio.de
e-mail:
sales@m-audio.com
tel:
+49 (0)7941 98 7000
tel:
1-866-657-6434
fax:
+49 (0)7941 98 70070
fax:
(626) 633-9070
Web
www.m-audio.de
Web
www.m-audio.com
M-Audio U.K.
Floor 6, Gresham House, 53 Clarenden Road, Watford
WD17 1LA, United Kingdom
Technical Support
M-Audio Canada
1400 St-Jean Baptiste Ave. #150, Quebec City,
Quebec G2E 5B7, Canada
Technical Support
email:
techcanada@m-audio.com
e-mail:
support@maudio.co.uk
phone:
(418) 872-0444
tel:(Mac support):
+44 (0)1765 650072
fax:
(418) 872-0034
tel: (PC support):
+44 (0)1309 671301
Sales
Sales
e-mail:
infocanada@m-audio.com
tel:
+44 (0)1923 204010
phone:
(866) 872-0444
fax:
+44 (0)1923 204039
fax:
(418) 872-0034
Web
www.maudio.co.uk
Web
www.m-audio.ca
M-Audio France
Floor 6, Gresham House, 53 Clarenden Road, Watford
WD17 1LA, United Kingdom
Renseignements Commerciaux
tel :
0 810 001 105
e-mail :
info@m-audio.fr
Assistance Technique
PC :
0 0820 000 731
MAC :
0 0820 391 191
Assistance Technique
e-mail :
support@m-audio.fr
mac@m-audio.fr
fax :
+33 (0)01 72 72 90 52
Site Web
www.m-audio.fr
15 Warranty
Warranty Terms
M-Audio warrants products to be free from defects in materials and workmanship, under normal use and provided that the
product is owned by the original, registered user. Visit www.m-audio.com/warranty for terms and limitations applying to your
specific product.
Warranty Registration
Thank you for registering your new M-Audio product. Doing so immediately both entitles you to full warranty coverage and
helps M-Audio develop and manufacture the finest quality products available. Register online at www.m-audio.com/register to
receive FREE product updates and for the chance to win M-Audio giveaways.
060614_MidAir_UG_EN01
MidAir 25/37 User Guide
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25