3Com 1005 Switch User Manual

®
Part No. DUA1840-0AAA01
Published June 1996
MSH SWITCH 1005
USER GUIDE
3Com Corporation
■
5400 Bayfront Plaza
■
Santa Clara, California
■
95052-8145
© 3Com Ireland, 1996. All rights reserved. No part of this documentation may be reproduced in any form or by
any means or used to make any derivative work (such as translation, transformation, or adaptation) without
permission from 3Com Ireland.
3Com Ireland reserves the right to revise this documentation and to make changes in content from time to time
without obligation on the part of 3Com Ireland to provide notification of such revision or change.
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but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. 3Com may
make improvements or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this documentation at any
time.
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If you are a United States government agency, then this documentation and the software described herein are
provided to you subject to the following restricted rights:
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United Kingdom.
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Restricted Rights Legend: Use, reproduction or disclosure is subject to restrictions set forth in subparagraph (a)
through (d) of the Commercial Computer Software - Restricted Rights Clause at 48 C.F.R. 52.227-19 and the
limitations set forth in 3Com Corporation’s standard commercial agreement for the software. Unpublished rights
reserved under the copyright laws of the United States.
If there is any software on removable media described in this documentation, it is furnished under a license
agreement included with the product as a separate document, in the hard copy documentation, or on the
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and a copy will be provided to you.
Unless otherwise indicated, 3Com registered trademarks are registered in the United States and may or may not
be registered in other countries.
3Com, LinkBuilder and Transcend are registered trademarks of 3Com Corporation. SuperStack II, PACE, VLT,
Virtual LAN Trunk and 3TECH are trademarks of 3Com Corporation. 3ComFacts is a service mark of 3Com
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CompuServe is a registered trademark of CompuServe, Inc..
Other brand and product names may be registered trademarks or trademarks of their respective holders.
CONTENTS
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Introduction 1
How to Use This Guide 1
Conventions 2
Related Publications 3
1 GETTING STARTED
About the LinkBuilder MSH 1-1
About the MSH Switch 1005 1-1
Summary of Features 1-2
Port Connections 1-3
10BASE-T Switch Ports 1-3
Internal Switch Ports 1-3
Transceiver Module Ports 1-4
The Backbone Port 1-4
Adding an Expansion Module 1-4
Switch Operation and Features 1-5
How the Switch Compares to a Bridge 1-5
Forwarding of Packets 1-5
Intelligent Flow Management 1-7
Full Duplex 1-8
Security 1-8
Resilient Links 1-8
Virtual LANs (VLANs) 1-8
PACE 1-9
MSH Switch 1005 on Your Network 1-11
Server Connections 1-11
Network Configuration Examples 1-11
Configuration Rules for Fast Ethernet 1-15
Configuration Rules with Full Duplex 1-15
Switch Overview — Front Panel 1-16
LEDs 1-17
Transceiver Module slot 1-18
10BASE-T Ports 1-18
Switch Overview — PCB View 1-19
Transceiver Module Connector [1] 1-19
Expansion Module Fixing Posts [2] 1-20
Links LK 1 to LK 5 [3] 1-20
Expansion Module Socket [4] 1-20
Backplane Connectors [5] 1-20
Switch Defaults 1-20
Setting Up the MSH Switch 1005 for Management
1-21
2 INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
Safety Information 2-1
Pre-installation Configuration 2-2
Setting the Links on the Switch 1005 2-2
Advice for Setting Backplane Connections and Avoiding Loops
Fitting a Transceiver Module 2-5
Fitting an Expansion Module 2-5
Switch 1005 Installation and Removal 2-6
Installing the Switch 1005 2-6
Removing the Switch 1005 2-7
Operation after Power-up 2-7
In an Unmanaged System 2-7
In a Managed System 2-8
Setting up the Switch 1005 2-9
Using the VT100 Interface 2-9
Using Telnet 2-12
Using an SNMP Network Manager 2-12
Accessing the Switch 1005 VT100 Interface 2-13
2-4
Logging On 2-14
After Logging On 2-15
Switch 1005 Management Setup
Logging Off 2-19
Auto Logout 2-19
Setting Up Users 2-20
Creating a New User 2-21
Deleting a User 2-22
Editing User Details 2-23
Assigning Local Security 2-24
2-17
3 SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Choosing a Switch Management Level 3-1
Switch 1005 Setup 3-4
Port Setup 3-7
Specifying the Backbone Port 3-11
The Switch Database (SDB) 3-12
Configuring the Switch Database 3-14
Searching the Switch Database 3-15
By MAC Address 3-15
By Port 3-15
Adding an Entry into the SDB 3-16
Deleting an Entry from the SDB 3-16
Resilient Links 3-17
Viewing Resilient Setup 3-18
Configuring Resilient Links 3-20
Creating a Resilient Link 3-22
Deleting a Resilient Link 3-22
Setting Up Traps 3-23
Resetting the Switch 1005 3-25
Initializing the Switch 1005 3-26
Upgrading Software 3-28
4 ADVANCED MANAGEMENT
Virtual LANs (VLANs) 4-1
What are VLANs? 4-1
Benefits of VLANs 4-2
An Example 4-3
VLANs and the Switch 1005 4-4
The Default VLAN 4-4
Connecting VLANs to a Router 4-4
Connecting Common VLANs Between Switches 4-5
Using Non-routable Protocols 4-5
Using Unique MAC Addresses 4-5
VLAN Configurations 4-6
Example 1 4-6
Example 2 4-8
Example 3 4-10
Setting Up VLANs on the Switch 4-12
Assigning a Port to a VLAN 4-15
Specifying a Backbone Port 4-15
Specifying that a Backbone Port is Part of a VLT 4-15
5 STATUS MONITORING AND STATISTICS
Summary Statistics 5-2
Port Statistics 5-4
Port Traffic Statistics 5-6
Port Error Analysis 5-9
Status Monitoring 5-11
Remote Polling 5-13
6 PROBLEM SOLVING
Spot Checks 6-1
Identifying Fault Conditions with the LEDs
VT100 Problems 6-3
Switch 1005 Operation Problems 6-4
6-2
A SCREEN ACCESS RIGHTS
B TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
C TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Online Technical Services C-1
3Com Bulletin Board Service C-1
Access by Modem C-1
Access by ISDN C-2
World Wide Web Site C-2
3ComForum on CompuServe C-3
3ComFacts Automated Fax Service C-3
Support from Your Network Supplier C-4
Support from 3Com C-5
Returning Products for Repair C-6
GLOSSARY
INDEX
LIMITED WARRANTY
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Introduction
This guide describes how to install and configure the MSH Switch 1005.
If the information in the release notes shipped with your product differs
from the information in this guide, follow the release notes.
How to Use This Guide
The following table shows where to find specific information in this
guide.
If you are looking for:
Turn to:
A description of all the Switch 1005 features and a guide to making a
quick start with management
Chapter 1
Important safety information, a brief overview of the installation process Chapter 2
and a complete guide the initial setup required
Information and steps telling you how you can manage the Switch 1005 Chapter 3
using the VT100 screens
Information on the more advanced functionality you can manage using
the VT100 screens
Chapter 4
Details on viewing Switch 1005 statistics using the VT100 screens
Chapter 5
Ideas on solving problems should they arise
Chapter 6
A list of user access rights for the VT100 screens
Appendix A
Technical information about the Switch 1005
Appendix B
Technical support information
Appendix C
A list of terms and definitions used in this Guide
Glossary
A comprehensive Index
Index
2
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Conventions
Table 1 and Table 2 list text and icon conventions that are used
throughout this guide:
Table 1 Notice Icons
Icon
Type
Description
Information Note
Information notes call attention to
important features or instructions.
Caution
Cautions alert you to personal safety risk,
system damage, or loss of data.
Warning
Warnings alert you to the risk of severe
personal injury.
Table 2 Text Conventions
Convention
Description
“Enter” vs. “Type”
When the word “enter” is used in this guide, it means type
something, then press the Return or Enter key. Do not press
the Return or Enter key when an instruction simply says “type.”
Text represented as
screen
display
This typeface is used to represent displays that
appear on your terminal screen, for example:
Text represented as
commands
This typeface is used to represent commands that
you enter, for example:
NetLogin:
SETDefault !0 -IP NETaddr = 0.0.0.0
Keys
When specific keys are referred to in the text, they are called
out by their labels, such as “the Return key” or “the Escape
key,” or they may be shown as [Return] or [Esc].
If two or more keys are to be pressed simultaneously, the keys
are linked with a plus sign (+), for example:
Press [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[Del].
Italics
Italics are used to denote new terms or emphasis.
Related Publications
3
Related Publications
This User Guide is not intended to answer all your questions
concerning the MSH. While using the MSH Switch 1005, you may need
to refer to the following publications:
■
LinkBuilder MSH User Guide, part number DUA1800-0AAA0x.
■
LinkBuilder MSH Management Module User Guide, part number
DUA1850-0AAA0x.
4
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
1
GETTING STARTED
About the LinkBuilder MSH
The LinkBuilder MSH is an extremely versatile, chassis-based hub that
allows you to connect and manage large, mixed-technology,
mixed-media LANs.
The basis of the MSH is the chassis into which you can install a series of
network-specific modules. Modules within the chassis connect to a
number of backplanes allowing communication between the various
LANs and LAN segments connected to the MSH.
About the MSH Switch 1005
The MSH Switch 1005 is designed to be installed into the MSH chassis,
so that you can extend your network beyond the limits of a repeater
and provide your users with greater bandwidth, faster throughput, and
high speed connections.
The MSH Switch 1005 is an intelligent module with its own on-board
management agent. This means that even in an unmanaged MSH
chassis, you can access the manageable features of the Switch using a
Telnet application or an SNMP Network Manager and configure internal
port connections using the five links located on the Switch.
With a Management Module installed into your MSH chassis, you have
access to the VT100 interface of the Switch. This interface provides a
series of ASCII character-based forms which allow you to configure the
manageable features of the Switch. You can find further information
about Switch management in “Setting up the Switch 1005” in
Chapter 2.
1-2
CHAPTER 1: GETTING STARTED
Summary of Features
■
8 switched 10BASE-T ports
■
Slot for optional Fast Ethernet or 10BASE-T Transceiver Module
■
Switched connections to all 3 internal Ethernet backplanes
■
Internal Fast Ethernet backplane
■
Ability to add Expansion Module adding up to three further Transceiver
Modules
■
Support for up to 500 end-stations, unlimited stations on backbone
port
■
Forwarding modes for packets
■
Low latency in fast forward mode
■
No runts in fragment free mode
■
No runts/errors in store-and-forward mode
■
Low latency or no runts/errors in intelligent mode
■
Intelligent Flow Management when packet buffers are full
■
Prevents packets being discarded
■
Suppresses transmissions at source
■
Full duplex on Fast Ethernet Transceiver Modules
■
Security
■
Resilient Links
■
Port-based Virtual LANs (VLANs)
■
Support for up to 16 VLANs on a single Switch 1005
■
Eases the movement of devices on IP networks
■
Controls traffic
■
Provides extra security
■
PACE (Priority Access Control Enabled)
■
Supports multimedia applications over Ethernet
■
Increased Ethernet predictability
■
Full use of network bandwidth
DUA1840-0AAA01
About the MSH Switch 1005
■
1-3
SmartAgent support
■
SNMP with IP and IPX protocols
■
RMON
■
Repeater and Bridge MIB
■
Broadcast storm control
■
Easy software upgrades
■
BOOTP
■
Local management
Port Connections
10BASE-T Switch Ports
Eight fixed ports each configured as MDIX provide 10Mbps bandwidth
to each attached end-station. Maximum segment length is 100m
(328ft) over grade 3, 4 or 5 twisted pair cable.
Internal Switch Ports
As well as switch ports located on the front panel of the Switch 1005,
internal backplane connections provide an additional four switch
ports. These ports are enabled and disabled through management or
using the set of links LK1 to LK5 located on the Switch 1005.
Three of these ports provide switched connections to the three
10Mbps repeater backplanes located in the MSH chassis, and therefore
to any modules connected to the same backplane.
The fourth internal switched port provides a connection to the Fast
Ethernet backplane, and therefore to any other Switch 1005 modules
installed in the chassis.
Locating and setting links is described in “Setting the Links on the
Switch 1005” in Chapter 2.
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1-4
CHAPTER 1: GETTING STARTED
Transceiver Module Ports
A slot on the front of the Switch 1005 allows you to install any of the
Transceiver Modules available for this product. You can find more
details in “Transceiver Module slot” on page 1-18.
The Backbone Port
The MSH Switch 1005 requires that the port connecting it to the rest of
your network is configured as a backbone port. This is the port to which
all frames arriving at a switch port with an unknown destination
address will be forwarded. Addresses received on the backbone port
are not stored in the switch database of the Switch 1005.
When you first install a Switch 1005 into your MSH chassis, it will
configure its backbone port to be the first Fast Ethernet port it finds
either on the Switch, or on the Expansion Module if fitted. You can
change your designated backbone port to be any switch port (internal
or external). Changing the default backbone port is described in
“Specifying the Backbone Port” in Chapter 3.
You can only have one backbone port per Switch 1005, unless you
have implemented multiple VLANs on one Switch; in this case you can
configure one backbone port per VLAN. You can find more information
about VLANs in Chapter 4.
Adding an Expansion Module
The MSH Switch 1005 also has provision for installing an Expansion
Module. The Expansion Module has three slots for installing any
combination of the Transceiver Modules described in “Transceiver
Module slot” on page 1-18.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Switch Operation and Features
1-5
Switch Operation and Features
How the Switch Compares to a Bridge
The table below shows how Switch 1005 operation compares to that of
an IEEE 802.1D bridge:
IEEE 802.1D Bridge
Switch 1005
Address Learning
All ports
All ports except backbone.
Forwarding Mode
Store-and-forward
Fast Forward, Fragment
Free, Store and Forward, or
Intelligent
Operation when packet
buffers full
Discard packets
Invoke Intelligent Flow
Management to suppress
transmissions at source
Spanning Tree
Supported
Not supported
Action on Unknown
Destination Address
Flood all ports
Forward to backbone port
only
Database size
Variable
500 addresses
In all other ways, MSH Switch 1005 and bridge operation is identical.
Forwarding of Packets
The table below shows how a packet is processed when it arrives at the
Switch 1005:
DUA1840-0AAA01
Packet Source
Destination Address
Action
Any port EXCEPT backbone port
(Unicast packet)
Unknown
Forward to backbone
port only
Any port EXCEPT backbone port
(Unicast packet)
Same port as source
address
Filter (discard)
Any port EXCEPT backbone port
(Unicast packet)
Another port (not
backbone port)
Forward to specific port
only
1-6
CHAPTER 1: GETTING STARTED
Packet Source
Destination Address
Action
Any port EXCEPT backbone port
(Multi/Broadcast packet)
Not applicable
Forward to all ports
(including backbone
port) within same VLAN
as source port
Backbone port (Unicast packet)
Unknown
Filter (discard)
Backbone port (Unicast packet)
Known on a port (not
backbone port)
Forward to specific port
only
Backbone port
(Multi/Broadcast packet)
Not applicable
Forward to all ports
within specific VLAN
To best suit your networking requirements, the Switch 1005 allows you
to set one of four frame forwarding modes:
■
Fast Forward — In this mode, frames are forwarded as soon as the
destination address is received and verified. The forwarding delay, or
latency, for all frames in this mode is just 40µs but with the lack of
checking time, any collision fragments or error frames received are
propagated through the switch.
■
Fragment Free — In this mode, a minimum of 64 bytes of the
received frame is buffered prior to the frame being forwarded. This
ensures that collision fragments are not propagated through the
network, however, CRC errors are forwarded. The forwarding delay, or
latency, for all frames in this mode is 64µs.
■
Store and Forward — In this mode, received packets are buffered in
their entirety prior to forwarding. This ensures that only good frames
are passed to their destination. The forwarding delay for this mode
varies between 64µs and 1.2ms, depending on frame length. In Store
and Forward mode, latency is measured as the time between receiving
the last bit of the frame, and transmitting the first bit. For the Switch
1005, this is 8µs.
■
Intelligent — In this mode, the Switch 1005 monitors the amount of
error traffic on the network and changes the forwarding mode
accordingly. If the Switch 1005 detects less than 18 packets per second
with errors, it will operate in Fast Forward mode. As soon as the Switch
1005 detects more than 18 packets per second with errors, it will
operate in Store and Forward mode until the error count returns to 0.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Switch Operation and Features
1-7
Intelligent Flow Management
Intelligent Flow Management (IFM) is a congestion control mechanism
built into the Switch 1005. Congestion is caused by one or more
devices sending traffic to a Switch port which is already busy. The
Switch 1005 contains both input and output packet buffers and while
congestion is rare, IFM is designed to alleviate problems during those
moments when packet buffers in the Switch 1005 are full. IFM will
prevent packet loss by inhibiting the transmitting device from sending
any further packets until the port is no longer congested.
If a packet arrives at a conventional switch that does not operate IFM,
and that port is congested, the transmitting device is unaware of this
until it times out and decides that the receiving station is not going to
respond to the message. This can take as long as 30 seconds, and
depending on the protocol you are running, may not happen until
many packets have been sent. The transmitting device then has to
retransmit the packets, effectively wasting bandwidth.
Switch modules implementing IFM are aware of congestion, and
prevent packet loss by inhibiting the transmitting device from
transmitting the packet in the first place. It does this by forcing the
device to retransmit the packet later. This “back-off” and retransmission
happens very quickly (typically less than one second) and is much
faster than waiting for the transmitting device to time-out. There are
two benefits:
■
the packet is transmitted quickly and successfully
■
the packet is only transmitted once, thereby saving bandwidth.
IFM is designed to be enabled on ports connected to a single network
device. If IFM is enabled on a port connected to multiple devices
through a repeater, packet congestion within the Switch 1005 could
result in packet transmission between two devices connected to the
repeater being inhibited.
DUA1840-0AAA01
1-8
CHAPTER 1: GETTING STARTED
Full Duplex
The MSH Switch 1005 provides full duplex support for any Fast Ethernet
Transceiver Modules you may have installed. Full duplex allows frames
to be transmitted and received simultaneously and, in effect, doubles
the bandwidth available on the link. Full duplex also supports
100BASE-FX cable runs of up to 2km.
Security
The MSH Switch 1005 contains advanced security features which
guard against users connecting unauthorized stations onto your
network. When security is enabled on a port, that port enters into a
single address learning mode. This port is then permitted to learn just a
single Ethernet address and once this is learned, if a different address is
then seen on that port, the port will be disabled. Until security is
disabled, no other address can be learned.
Resilient Links
The Resilient Link feature in the Switch 1005 enables you to protect
critical links and prevent wasteful network downtime should that link
fail. Setting up resilience ensures that should a main communication
link fail, a standby duplicate link will immediately and automatically
take over the task of the main link. Each main and standby link pair is
referred to as a resilient link pair. The main and standby links must be
set up on the same Switch 1005.
Virtual LANs (VLANs)
The Switch 1005 has a Virtual LAN (VLAN) feature which allows you to
build your network segments without being restricted by physical
connections. A VLAN is defined as a group of location- and
topology-independent devices that communicate as if they are on the
same physical LAN.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Switch Operation and Features
1-9
Implementing VLANs on your network has three main advantages:
■
Network administration personnel are required to make less physical
intervention when a workstation has to be moved. Within the VLAN
setup, a group of devices on different floors in a building can be
configured into a common communications group. If a workstation is
moved from VLAN 1 to VLAN 2 for example, the network administrator
only needs to know address information for that device; the physical
location of the port is irrelevant.
■
Use of network resources becomes much more efficient. Each VLAN
can be set up to contain only those devices which need to
communicate with each other. In this way, broadcast storms, the most
common cause of network congestion, can also be avoided.
■
Network security is enhanced. Devices within each VLAN can only
communicate with member devices in the same VLAN. If a device in
VLAN 1 for example, needs to communicate with devices in VLAN 2, it
must be configured to cross the router between them.
Further information can be found in Chapter 4.
PACE
PACE (Priority Access Control Enabled) technology allows multimedia
applications using voice and video traffic to be carried over standard
Ethernet and Fast Ethernet Local Area Networks (LANs). PACE provides
the quality of service that these applications require, reducing latency
to a minimum and prioritizing the multimedia traffic.
Both multimedia and data traffic are improved considerably by
introducing an Ethernet switch into the LAN and attaching each
end-station to its own dedicated 10Mbps switch port. This removes any
contention between different end-stations for the Ethernet bandwidth.
However, when two-way traffic is passing between an end-station and
the switch port, access to the bandwidth can still be unfairly allocated
to traffic in one direction, resulting in poor quality video display. PACE
allocates the available bandwidth fairly to traffic in each direction. In
this way, existing Ethernet adapters and cabling can be used to run
high-quality multimedia sessions across the LAN.
DUA1840-0AAA01
1-10
CHAPTER 1: GETTING STARTED
You can enable PACE on the whole Switch 1005 module or on an
individual port. Before configuring PACE, you should refer to sections
“Switch 1005 Setup” and “Port Setup” in Chapter 3.
DUA1840-0AAA01
MSH Switch 1005 on Your Network
1-11
MSH Switch 1005 on Your Network
Server Connections
When integrating the Switch 1005 into your network, the following
notes on server connections will ensure that it is operating at
maximum efficiency:
■
Ideally ...
... any local server should be connected to the Switch 1005 using a
100Mbps port.
■
If that is not possible ...
... connect the local server to a dedicated 10Mbps port.
■
If that’s not possible and the local server is connected to a repeated
segment where the traffic is mainly local to that segment ...
... disable Intelligent Flow Management (IFM) on the port to which the
repeater is connected.
Whenever you have multiple workstations connected to a single port of
the Switch 1005, we recommend that you disable IFM on that port.
Network Configuration Examples
The following illustrations show some examples of how the Switch
1005 can be used on your network.
DUA1840-0AAA01
1-12
CHAPTER 1: GETTING STARTED
Figure 1-1 Workgroup Switch I
Figure 1-1 shows how the Switch 1005 fits into a large corporate
network with a Fast Ethernet infrastructure. A Switch is positioned on
each floor and servers are centralized in the basement.
DUA1840-0AAA01
MSH Switch 1005 on Your Network
1-13
Figure 1-2 Workgroup Switch II
Figure 1-2 shows the Switch 1005 in a second workgroup situation. This
setup could be that of a small office within a large corporation, or part
of a larger corporate network. Each switch port has mainly muliple
end-stations.
DUA1840-0AAA01
1-14
CHAPTER 1: GETTING STARTED
Figure 1-3 Desktop Switch
Figure 1-3 shows the Switch 1005 used for a group of heavy-traffic
users in a large corporate network. Here, switching is brought to the
desktop with a single end-station per switch port. Local servers are
connected via a 100Mbps Fast Ethernet link.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Configuration Rules for Fast Ethernet
1-15
Configuration Rules for Fast Ethernet
The topology rules for Fast Ethernet (100Mbps) are slightly different to
those for 10Mbps Ethernet. The key topology rules are:
■
Maximum UTP cable length is 100m (328ft) over category 5 cable.
■
A 412m (1352ft) fiber run is allowed for connecting switch to switch, or
end-station to switch, using standards-compliant half-duplex
100BASE-FX.
■
A total network span of 325m (1066ft) is allowed in single-repeater
topologies (one hub stack per wiring closet with a fiber run to the
collapsed backbone); for example, a 225m (738ft) fiber downlink from a
repeater to a router or switch, plus 100m (328ft) UTP run from a
repeater out to the desktops.
Configuration Rules with Full Duplex
The MSH Switch 1005 provides full duplex support for any Fast Ethernet
Transceiver Modules that are installed. Full duplex allows frames to be
transmitted and received simultaneously and, in effect, doubles the
bandwidth available on a link.
With full duplex, the topology rules are:
■
Maximum UTP cable length is still 100m (328ft) over category 5 cable.
■
A 2km (6562ft) fiber run is allowed for connecting switch to switch, or
end-station to switch.
DUA1840-0AAA01
1-16
CHAPTER 1: GETTING STARTED
Switch Overview — Front Panel
Figure 1-4 Switch 1005 front view
DUA1840-0AAA01
Switch Overview — Front Panel
1-17
LEDs
LED
Color
Indicates ...
PWR
(Power)
Green
The Switch is powered up and operating
normally.
Green flash
(slow, 0.5 Hz)
Power On Self Test (POST) in operation.
Green flash
(fast, 1Hz)
Software download in progress
Amber
Fault occurred on this Switch
Green
One or more of the internal Ethernet (10Mbps)
backplanes are enabled.
Green flash
All three internal Ethernet backplanes are
disabled.
Yellow
There is network activity on the enabled
backplane(s).
Green
Connection to the internal Fast Ethernet
(100Mbps) backplane is enabled.
Green flash
Connection to the internal Fast Ethernet
(100Mbps) backplane is disabled.
Yellow
There is network activity on the Fast Ethernet
backplane.
Green
Link connected; port enabled.
Green flash
Link connected; port disabled.
Yellow
Traffic being transmitted/received on this port.
Off
Link not connected.
Backplane
E
FE
1 - 12
(External port
status)
Ports 1 - 4 relate to any Transceiver Module installed into the
slot. If you have installed a Fast Ethernet Transceiver Module,
LED 1 will be lit, all others are unused.
For information on using the LEDs for fault diagnosis, please see
“Identifying Fault Conditions with the LEDs” in Chapter 6.
DUA1840-0AAA01
1-18
CHAPTER 1: GETTING STARTED
Transceiver Module slot
Allows you to install an Transceiver Module. Transceivers available
include:
■
100BASE-TX Transceiver Module (3C18407) — This Fast Ethernet,
100Mbps, twisted pair port provides the Switch with a single,
high-speed connection to, for example, your network infrastructure.
Maximum segment length is 100m (328ft) over grade 5 twisted pair
cable.
■
100BASE-FX Transceiver Module (3C18408) — This Fast Ethernet,
100Mbps, fiber port provides the Switch with a single, high-speed
connection to, for example, your network infrastructure. Use 62.5/125
micron fiber optic cable with SC connectors. The maximum supported
distance is 412m (1352ft) or 2km (6562ft) if the devices at both ends of
the link support full duplex.
■
4 Port 10BASE-T Transceiver Module (3C18409) — Adds an
additional four 10BASE-T ports to your Switch 1005 with the same
operating conditions as the eight fixed ports described below.
You should contact your supplier for further details on these and any
further Transceiver Modules available from 3Com.
10BASE-T Ports
Eight fixed ports each configured as MDIX provide the full 10Mbps
bandwidth to each attached end-station. Maximum segment length is
100m (328ft) over grade 3, 4 or 5 twisted pair cable.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Switch Overview — PCB View
1-19
Switch Overview — PCB View
Figure 1-5 Switch 1005 PCB view
Transceiver Module Connector [1]
2x20 pin connector for any of the Transceiver Modules listed in
“Transceiver Module slot” on page 1-18. Installation of the Transceiver
Modules is described in the documentation that accompanies them.
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1-20
CHAPTER 1: GETTING STARTED
Expansion Module Fixing Posts [2]
The two threaded posts provide fixing points for an Expansion Module
should you choose to attach one to this Switch.
Links LK 1 to LK 5 [3]
Allow you to configure internal backplane connections for the Switch
1005. See “Setting the Links on the Switch 1005” in Chapter 2.
Expansion Module Socket [4]
This socket provides the connection point for an Expansion Module
should you choose to fit one to this Switch.
Backplane Connectors [5]
These connectors engage with the backplane located in the MSH chassis.
Switch Defaults
The following table shows factory defaults for the MSH Switch 1005:
Port Status
Enabled
Forwarding Mode
Fast Forward
Intelligent Flow Management
(IFM)
Enabled on external ports
Disabled on internal ports
PACE
Disabled (module)
VLANs
All ports in the Default VLAN (VLAN 1)
Power On Self Test (POST)
Normal
RMON
1 Ethernet Statistics session per port/VLAN.
3 Stats History sessions on the backbone port and
3 on the Default VLAN
1 Host Table session on the Default VLAN
4 Matrix Table sessions; 1 on the Default VLAN, 1
on port 25, 1 on port 26 and 1 on port 27
4 default alarms per port
Default events for use with the alarm system
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Setting Up the MSH Switch 1005 for Management
1-21
Setting Up the MSH Switch 1005 for Management
This section describes how to get started if you wish to use an SNMP
manager. It assumes you are already familiar with SNMP management.
■
If you are using IP and you have a BOOTP server setup correctly on your
network, the IP address for the Switch 1005 will be detected
automatically and you can start managing the Switch 1005 without any
further configuration.
■
If you are using the IPX protocol, the Switch 1005 will be allocated an
IPX address automatically. You can start the SNMP Network Manager
and begin managing the Switch 1005.
■
If you are using IP without a BOOTP server, you will need to enter the IP
address of the Switch 1005 before the SNMP Network Manager can
communicate with the device. To do this, perform the following steps:
1 Ensure your MSH Management Module is running v4.2 or higher of the
management agent software.
2 Connect a terminal to the serial port located on the MSH front panel.
You can find instructions for doing this in the LinkBuilder MSH
Management Module User Guide, part number DUA1850-0AAA0x.
3 Press [Return] one or more times until the MSH Main Banner appears.
The serial port will detect the terminal line speed (baud rate) and
default to:
■
■
■
8 data bits
1 stop bit
no parity
You cannot modify these settings. If your terminal is already setup with
these values, the MSH Main Banner will appear as soon as power-up is
complete. Press [Return] to display the MSH Main Menu.
4 At the MSH Main Menu, select SERVICE SELECTION. From the Service
Selection list, select Switch 1005. From the Address Table screen,
choose the required Switch 1005 and select MANAGE. The Switch Main
Banner screen appears.
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CHAPTER 1: GETTING STARTED
5 At the Switch 1005 Main Banner, press [Return] to display the Logon
screen. Logon using the default name security, and password security.
Select OK.
6 The Switch Main Menu is displayed. From this menu, select the
Management Setup option. The Switch Management Setup screen is
displayed.
7 On the Management Setup screen, fill in the following fields:
■
■
■
Device IP Address
Device SubNet Mask (if necessary)
Default Router (if necessary)
For further information on the Management Setup screen, see “Switch
1005 Management Setup” in Chapter 2.
8 If you need the Switch to send SNMP traps to the network manager,
you may need to setup the address of the network manager in the Trap
Table. See “Setting Up Traps” in Chapter 3.
3Com Network Managers such as Transcend WorkGroup Manager for
Windows may automatically configure intelligent modules to send traps
to them. Please read the documentation supplied with your network
management software.
9 When you have finished with the Management Setup screen, select OK.
Once the module’s IP parameters are specified, you can continue
management using:
■
In-band management via any SNMP-based Network Manager
application.
■
Out-of-band management via the Switch 1005’s own VT100
management interface.
■
In-band management via the Switch 1005’s own VT100 management
interface.
DUA1840-0AAA01
2
INSTALLATION AND INITIAL
SETUP
Safety Information
Before installing the MSH Switch 1005 into your MSH chassis, you
should consider the following safety information:
■
Installation and removal of the Switch 1005 should be carried out by
qualified personnel only.
■
The Switch 1005 operates under SELV conditions (Safety Extra Low
Voltage) according to IEC 950, the conditions of which are met only if
the equipment to which it is connected is also operational under SELV.
■
The MSH chassis must be earthed.
■
Switch 1005 modules can easily be damaged by static:
■
Do not remove the Switch 1005 from its anti-static packaging until
you are ready to install it into the MSH chassis.
■
Do not touch the pins, leads, connections or any components on
the Switch 1005.
■
Always handle the Switch 1005 by its edges only.
■
Always wear an anti-static wristband connected to a suitable earth
point.
■
Always store and transport the Switch 1005 in anti-static packaging.
■
The MSH chassis can be powered up during Switch 1005 installation.
2-2
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
Pre-installation Configuration
Before installing the Switch 1005 into the chassis, ensure it is
configured to suit your particular requirements. Procedures that must
be carried out prior to installation include:
■
Setting links located on the Switch 1005.
■
Fitting a Transceiver Module if required.
■
Fitting an Expansion Module if required.
Setting the Links on the Switch 1005
Five links located on the Switch 1005 allow you to set up its backplane
connections.
The links are located on the Switch 1005 PCB as shown in Figure 2-1.
Figure 2-1 Locating links LK1, LK2, LK3, LK4, LK5
DUA1840-0AAA01
Pre-installation Configuration
2-3
Table 2-1 shows possible configurations for LK1 - LK5. You may have
any combination of backplane connections enabled at any one time.
In a managed MSH chassis, these links will be overridden by any
changes made through management software. This is the case, even if
the chassis is reset or powered off/on, or if the Switch 1005 module is
replaced with another one.
Table 2-1 Setting LK1 - LK5 for internal port connections
Position and Link Number
Connection Provided
LK1 ENABLED
Switch port 25 connected to
10Mbps Ethernet backplane E1.
LK2 ENABLED
Switch port 26 connected to
10Mbps Ethernet backplane E2.
LK3 ENABLED
Switch port 27 connected to
10Mbps Ethernet backplane E3.
LK1, LK2, LK3 DISABLED
None
LK4 DISABLED, LK5 DISABLED Switch port 28 disabled
DUA1840-0AAA01
LK4 DISABLED, LK5 ENABLED
Switch port 28 connected to
100Mbps Fast Ethernet backplane.
This allows you to interconnect
multiple Switch 1005 modules.
LK4 ENABLED, LK5 DISABLED
Reserved for future use.
LK4 ENABLED, LK5 ENABLED
Reserved for future use.
2-4
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
Advice for Setting Backplane Connections and Avoiding Loops
Considerable care should be taken when setting backplane
connections if there is more than one Switch 1005 installed in your
MSH chassis. If more than one module has multiple connections
enabled on the same VLAN, a network loop can occur, severely
affecting network operation.
For example, consider a pair of Switch modules where all four
backplane connections are enabled and in the same VLAN. If a packet
with a unicast destination address arrives on the backplane E1,
destined for an end-station on backplane E2, both Switch modules will
independently switch the packet onto E2, resulting in duplication.
Packets with broadcast destination addresses will loop continuously
between the two Switch modules. You can avoid this situation by
following these guidelines:
■
If all ports on your network are in the same VLAN, you should connect
all Switch 1005 modules via the Fast Ethernet connection, but only
connect the internal Ethernet backplanes on one Switch 1005.
■
Alternatively, balance the load on your Switch 1005 modules more
effectively by connecting one internal Ethernet connection to each
Switch 1005.
■
If you have implemented multiple VLANs, put each internal Ethernet
connection in a different VLAN on each Switch.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Pre-installation Configuration
2-5
Fitting a Transceiver Module
The MSH Switch 1005 has a slot for one Transceiver Module. You should
fit the Transceiver Module before you fit the Expansion Module and
before you install the Switch 1005 into the MSH chassis. Fitting the
Transceiver Module is described in the User Guide that accompanies it.
If you have an Expansion Module fitted to your Switch 1005 and you
install four 4 Port 10BASE-T Transceiver Modules with all backplane
connections enabled, Ethernet backplane E3 (port 27) will automatically
disable and you will lose the ability to configure it. Removing one of the
Transceiver Modules will reinstate port 27.
Fitting an Expansion Module
Fitting an Expansion Module allows you to increase the number of
ports for your Switch 1005; you should fit it to the Switch 1005 before
installing the pair into the MSH chassis. The Expansion Module provides
three locations for Transceiver Modules. You should fit these before you
fit the Expansion Module. Fitting the Expansion Module is described in
the User Guide that accompanies it.
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CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
Switch 1005 Installation and Removal
The following steps give a brief guide to installing the Switch 1005 into
the chassis and removing it. For detailed instructions, refer to the
LinkBuilder MSH User Guide, part number DUA1800-0AAA0x.
Installing the Switch 1005
1 If you have a Management Module installed, ensure that both the MSH
chassis and the Management Module are powered on.
If you do not have a Management Module installed, the Switch 1005
can be installed whether the MSH chassis is powered on or off.
2 Undo the screws from the locking bar of the MSH chassis and lift the
bar away from the chassis.
3 Undo the screws from the blanking plate of the slot of your choice.
Keep the blanking plate in a safe place. If you remove the Switch 1005,
you must cover any open slot with a blanking plate to maintain the
circulation of cooling air and prevent the entry of dust and debris into
the MSH.
4 Holding the Switch 1005 by the front panel, insert it into the guides
and push in fully.
5 Operate the ejectors to secure the Switch 1005.
6 Replace the locking bar and secure it with the screws you removed
earlier.
Once it is correctly installed in the MSH chassis and the chassis is
powered up, the Switch 1005 will run through its Power On Self Test
(POST) sequence. The LEDs on the front panel will flash during the
POST; see “LEDs” in Chapter 1 for more information.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Switch 1005 Installation and Removal
2-7
Removing the Switch 1005
You do not need to power off the MSH chassis before removing the
Switch 1005. However, you should warn any users attached to the
Switch of the disruption in operation.
1 Undo the screws from the locking bar of the MSH chassis and lift the
bar away from the chassis.
2 Operate the module ejectors correctly, as shown in the MSH User Guide
referenced above. Store the removed Switch safely to avoid damage.
Note that the ejectors on the Expansion Module are dummy.
3 If you are not going to install a replacement module in the vacated slot
immediately, cover with a blanking plate.
4 Replace the locking bar and secure with the screws removed earlier.
Operation after Power-up
In an Unmanaged System
The links LK1 to LK5 are used to set the Switch’s backplane connections
in an unmanaged MSH chassis. These settings are used when the MSH
chassis containing the Switch is first powered-up. Subsequent changes
made to the settings directly through the Switch’s onboard
management software, either via an SNMP Network Manager or using
the VT100 interface, will be backed-up in non-volatile memory, and
will override the manual link settings if the Switch is subsequently
reset. If, however the Switch detects that the link settings have
changed since the last reset, the new link setting is applied and any
configuration stored in memory is deleted.
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CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
In a Managed System
In a managed MSH chassis, operation of the Switch 1005 is the same,
but the Management Module may itself override the link settings. This
will occur if:
■
The Management Module has a stored configuration for a Switch 1005
in that slot, and the stored backplane settings are different from the set
on the Switch 1005
■
The Management Module derives default backplane settings that are
different from the set on the Switch 1005
If the Management Module has no stored configuration data for the
Switch 1005, it will apply the following default backplane settings:
■
the first Switch 1005 detected in the chassis will have all backplane
ports enabled.
■
subsequent Switch 1005 modules will have only the Fast Ethernet
backplane enabled.
To ensure that the Management Module can see and configure new
Switch 1005 modules correctly when they are inserted, you must insert
them when the MSH chassis and Management Module are powered on.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Setting up the Switch 1005
2-9
Setting up the Switch 1005
You can manage the Switch 1005 using any of the following methods:
■
Access the VT100 interface by connecting a VT100 terminal (or
workstation with terminal emulation software) to the serial port located
on the front panel of a managed MSH chassis.
■
Access the VT100 interface over a TCP/IP network using a workstation
running VT100 terminal emulation and Telnet.
■
Use an SNMP Network Manager (such as 3Com’s Transcend Enterprise
Manager) over a network running either the IP or IPX protocol. Each
Network Manager provides its own user interface to the management
facilities.
You can find further information on connecting equipment to the MSH
serial port in the user documentation that accompanies the MSH
Management Module.
Using the VT100 Interface
The menu-driven interface built into the Switch 1005 is known as the
VT100 or Local Management interface. This interface gives a
forms-based structure with pre-defined security levels enabling access
to be restricted to particular users. The Switch 1005 can support up to
four management user sessions concurrently (for example, one serial
port and three telnet connections). You can find more information
about the VT100 interface in the user documentation that accompanies
the Management Module, but for quick reference, Table 2-2 and
Table 2-3 list the types of information found on a VT100 screen and the
key sequences you can use to navigate the screens.
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CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
:
Table 2-2 VT100 screen components
Type of
information
Shown on
screen as...
Choice Field
*text*
Text enclosed with markers is a list from which
you can select one option only. Press [Space] to
cycle through the options. Press [Down Arrow] or
[Return] to move to the next field.
Entry Field
[text]
Text enclosed in square brackets on the screen is
a text entry field. An entry field allows you to
enter different types of data from the keyboard.
This may be text, numeric data or hexadecimal
data. Password fields are hidden, meaning the
text you type, is not shown on the screen. In
some cases an Entry Field will have a default
entry. If you wish to replace the default, simply
type in a new value for this field; the default
entry will be erased. Press [Down Arrow] or
[Return] to move to the next field.
Button
OK
Text for a button is always shown in uppercase
letters. A button carries out an action. For
example OK or CANCEL. To operate a button
move the cursor to the button and press [Return].
List Box
monitor
A List Box allows you to select one or more items
from a list. There are several keys that allow you
to use a List Box:
manager
security
Description
■
[Return] moves the cursor to the next field and
actions your selections.
■
[Space Bar] toggles through the options in a
choice field or selects and deselects an entry in
the list box. List box selections will be
highlighted.
■
[Down Arrow] moves item by item down the
list box until it reaches the end of the list. At
the end of the list it moves the cursor to the
next field.
■
[Ctrl] + [U] moves the cursor one page Up the
List Box.
■
[Ctrl] + [D] moves the cursor one page Down
the List Box.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Setting up the Switch 1005
2-11
.
Table 2-3 Keyboard shortcuts
Use this key
sequence...
To do this...
[Tab]
move from one field to the next, on any screen without making any changes.
[Return]
move to the next field on a form after you have made
changes to the data in a field.
[Left Arrow]
move to the previous field on the screen or the next character in an editable field.
[Right Arrow]
move to the next field on the screen or the previous character in an editable field.
[Ctrl] + [R]
refresh the screen.
[Ctrl] + [B]
move the cursor to the next Button.
[Ctrl] + [P]
abort the current screen and return to the previous screen.
[Ctrl] + [N]
action the inputs for the current screen and move to the
next screen.
[Ctrl] + [K]
display a list of the available key strokes.
[Delete] or
[Backspace]
move the cursor one space to the left and delete a character. To
delete several characters, press the key several times.
If you are using Telnet or a terminal emulation program you may find
that some of the Control keys do not operate or that they activate other
functions. Check carefully in the manual accompanying your Telnet or
terminal emulation software before using the Control keys.
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CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
Using Telnet
Once you have specified the module’s IP parameters, you can use any
Telnet application that emulates a VT100 terminal to communicate with
it over the network. To open a Telnet session, specify the IP address of
the Switch 1005. For example:
telnet 191.120.131.6
For further information on using Telnet, refer to the documentation
supplied with the application.
Up to three active Telnet sessions can access the Switch 1005
concurrently. If a connection to a Telnet session is lost inadvertently, the
connection is closed by the Switch 1005 after 2 to 3 minutes of
inactivity.
Using an SNMP Network Manager
Once you have set up the IP parameters of the Switch 1005, you can
use any SNMP Network Manager for in-band management, provided
the Management Information Base (MIB) is correctly installed at your
network management station.
3Com provides the Transcend range of SNMP Network Managers, the
use of which is not described in this User Guide; refer to the User
Guides that accompany the software. To manage the Switch 1005 with
a Network Manager from another vendor, you will need to ensure you
have the correct MIB. Contact your local support representative for
advice.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Accessing the Switch 1005 VT100 Interface
2-13
Accessing the Switch 1005 VT100 Interface
The following sections explain how to access the VT100 management
screens for the Switch 1005. You may find it useful to refer to Figure 2-2
when locating the screens you require.
Figure 2-2 VT100 screen map
DUA1840-0AAA01
2-14
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
Logging On
1 Logon to the LinkBuilder MSH. This is described fully in the LinkBuilder
MSH Management Module (3C18500) User Guide, part number
DUA1850-0AAA0x.
2 When you have successfully logged on to the MSH, you will see the
3Com LinkBuilder Main Menu. From the list of options, select SERVICE
SELECTION.
3 From the list of services available for this MSH, select Switch 1005; the
LinkBuilder MSH Address Table appears. Choose the Switch 1005 you
wish to setup and select the MANAGE button. The Switch Main Banner
screen appears.
4 From the Switch 1005 Main Banner screen, press [Return] to display the
Logon screen shown in Figure 2-3.
5 Enter your user name and password. Note that they are both
case-sensitive.
Figure 2-3 Switch 1005 Logon screen
DUA1840-0AAA01
Accessing the Switch 1005 VT100 Interface
2-15
■
If you are logging on for the first time (after installation or initialization),
use a default user name and password to match your access
requirements. We recommend you that you use the default user
security so that you can access all functions. The defaults are shown in
Table 2-4 below.
■
If you have been assigned a user name, access level and password,
enter those details.
Table 2-4 Default Users
User Name
Default
Password
monitor
monitor
monitor - this user can view but not
change, a subset of the manageable
parameters
manager
manager
manager - this user can access and
change the operational parameters
but not special/security features
security
security
security - this user can access and
change all manageable parameters
Access Level
After Logging On
When you have successfully logged on to the Switch 1005, the Main
Menu appears as shown in Figure 2-4.
Figure 2-4 Switch 1005 Main Menu
DUA1840-0AAA01
2-16
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
From here, you can select the options needed to manage the module.
Access to options depends on the access level you have been assigned.
Access rights to the VT100 screens for the Switch 1005 are listed in
Appendix A.
If you are a user with security access level, and are using the
management facility for the first time, we suggest that you:
■
Assign a new password for the security access level as described in
“Editing User Details” on page 2-23.
■
Assign new passwords for the other default users as described in
“Editing User Details” on page 2-23.
■
Set up user names and passwords for any other users, and assign each
user an appropriate security level as described in “Creating a New User”
on page 2-21.
You should select the MANAGEMENT SETUP option to assign IP
parameters. This is described in the following section.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Accessing the Switch 1005 VT100 Interface
2-17
Switch 1005 Management Setup
The Switch Management Setup screen allows you to configure IP and
IPX parameters for the Switch 1005. This screen also allows you to
display a screen for setting up traps.
If you change the IP parameters using this screen, the changes will not
take effect until you reset the Switch 1005. Refer to “Resetting the
Switch 1005” in Chapter 3.
To access the Setup screen, from the Switch Main Menu screen, select
the MANAGEMENT SETUP option. The Setup screen appears as shown
in Figure 2-5.
Figure 2-5 Switch Management Setup screen
The screen shows the following:
MAC Address The Switch 1005 MAC address required for
management.
Power On Self Test (POST) Type Normal/Extended Use this field to
determine the type of self-test that the Switch 1005 carries out when it
is powered up. If this field is set to Normal, a basic confidence check
lasting approximately 10 seconds is carried out. If this field is set to
Extended, a full set of tests are carried out which may take up to 90
seconds to complete.
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2-18
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
Device IP Address If using IP, a unique IP address must be specified in
this field. If you do not know your IP address, consult your network
administrator. You can change the IP address using this field; for the
change to take effect, you must reset the Switch 1005.
Device SubNet Mask If using IP, type in a suitable network mask. For a
class B IP address, 255.255.0.0 is suitable. For more information, see
your network administrator. You can change the Device SubNet Mask
using this field; for the change to take effect, you must reset the
Switch.
Default Router If a default router exists on your network, type in the IP
address here. You can change the Device Router IP address using this
field; for the change to take effect, you must reset the Switch 1005.
BOOTP Select Enabled/Disabled If BOOTP is enabled and you have a
BOOTP server on your network, an IP address will be automatically
mapped to the Switch when it is first powered up. In addition to
mapping an IP address, BOOTP can assign the subnet mask and
default router. Using a BOOTP server avoids having to configure devices
individually.
There are four entries under the following four fields; one for each data
link layer protocol that can be used by IPX.
IPX Network This field shows the address of the network for this
protocol. This address is learned automatically from the local IPX
router or Netware file server, and you do not need to change it.
Node This read-only field shows the node address of the Switch
1005 which is learned automatically.
Status Enabled/Disabled If this field is set to Enabled, the Switch
1005 supports SNMP over IPX. For security, set this field to Disabled
if you do not require SNMP over IPX.
Data Link Protocol This field shows the name of the IPX data link
layer protocol.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Accessing the Switch 1005 VT100 Interface
2-19
SETUP TRAPS Select this button to display the setup screen for trap
parameters. Trap Setup is described in “Setting Up Traps” in Chapter 3.
Logging Off
If you have finished using the facility, select the Logoff option from the
bottom of the main menu. If you accessed the facility using a Telnet
session or modem connection, the connection will be closed
automatically.
Auto Logout
There is a built-in security timeout on the VT100 interface. If you do not
press any keys for three minutes, the management facility will warn
you that the inactivity timer is about to expire. If you do not press a key
within 10 seconds, the timer will expire and the screen will be locked;
any displayed statistics will continue to be updated. When you next
press a key, the display changes to the Auto Logout screen shown in
Figure 2-6.
Figure 2-6 Auto Logout screen
The Auto Logout screen requests you to enter your password again. If
the password is correctly entered, the screen that was active when the
timer expired is displayed. If you make a mistake entering your
password, you will be returned to the Logon screen.
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CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
If you connected to the Switch 1005 via the MSH Management Module
screens, the LinkBuilder MSH Address Table screen is displayed once you
have entered the correct password.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Setting Up Users
2-21
Setting Up Users
From the Main Menu, select USER ACCESS LEVELS. The User Access
Levels screen appears as shown in Figure 2-7.
Figure 2-7 User Access Levels screen
From this screen you can access:
■
LOCAL SECURITY screen — Lets you set up access levels for users on
the Switch 1005.
■
CREATE USER screen — In addition to the default users set up on the
Switch 1005, you can add up to ten new users.
■
DELETE USERS screen — Lets you delete users from the Switch 1005.
The default users cannot be deleted.
■
EDIT USER screen — Lets you change your own password and
community string. You cannot change details for other users.
DUA1840-0AAA01
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CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
Creating a New User
These steps assume the User Access Levels screen is displayed.
1 Select the CREATE USER option. The Create User screen appears as
shown in Figure 2-8.
Figure 2-8 Create User screen
2 Fill in the fields and assign an access level for the new user.
3 When the form is completed, select OK
The Create User screen shows the following fields:
User Name Type in the name of this new user. The name can consist of
up to 10 characters and is case-sensitive.
Password Type in the password for this new user. The password can
consist of up to 10 characters and is case-sensitive. For security reasons,
the password is not displayed on screen.
Access Level Assign an access level for this new user, as follows:
■
■
monitor — access to view, but not change a subset of the
manageable parameters of the Switch 1005
secure monitor — as monitor
DUA1840-0AAA01
Setting Up Users
■
■
■
2-23
manager — access to all the manageable parameters of the Switch
1005, except security features
specialist — as manager
security — access to all manageable parameters of the Switch 1005
Community String By default a community string identical to the user
name is generated. You can change this to any text string of 32
characters or less. The community string is only needed for SNMP
access. If you are using a remote SNMP network manager, the
community string specified in the Network Manager’s database must
be the same as that for the device.
Deleting a User
These steps assume the User Access Levels screen is displayed.
1 Select the DELETE USER option. The Delete Users screen appears as
shown in Figure 2-9.
Figure 2-9 Delete Users screen
2 Use the spacebar to highlight the user that you want to delete. Note
that you cannot delete default users or the current user (that is,
yourself).
3 Select DELETE USERS.
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CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
Editing User Details
These steps assume the User Access Levels screen is displayed.
1 Select the EDIT USER option. The Edit User screen appears as shown in
Figure 2-10.
Figure 2-10 Edit User screen
2 Fill in the fields as required.
3 When you have completed the changes, select OK.
The Edit User screen shows the following fields:
User Name This read-only field shows the name of the user. This field
cannot be changed; if you need to change the user name, you must
delete this user and create a new one.
Old Password Type in the old password for this user.
New Password Type in a new password for this user.
Confirm Password Retype the new password into this field.
Community String Type a new community string into this field.
If you forget your password while logged out of the Switch 1005 VT100
interface, contact your local technical support representative who will
advise on your next course of action.
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Setting Up Users
2-25
Assigning Local Security
The local security screen shows a matrix of options for access method
(Serial Port, Remote Telnet, Community-SNMP) and access level.
These steps assume the User Access Levels screen is displayed.
1 Select the LOCAL SECURITY option. The Local Security screen appears
as shown in Figure 2-11.
Figure 2-11 Switch Local Security screen
2 Fill in the fields as required.
3 When you have filled in the form, select OK.
Options for the access methods are:
Serial Port Enabled/Disabled To prevent access to the management
facilities via the serial port, disable access to the facility for each access
level. Serial Port access for Security is enabled and cannot be changed.
This prevents accidental disabling of all access levels from
management.
Remote Telnet Enabled/Disabled Telnet is an insecure protocol. You
may want to disable all access to the management facilities via Telnet if
there is important or sensitive data on your network.
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CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND INITIAL SETUP
Community SNMP Enabled/Disabled The Switch 1005 can be managed
via SNMP using a remote network manager. Community SNMP does
have some simple security features, but it is an insecure protocol. You
may want to disable all access to the management facilities if there is
important or sensitive data on your network.
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Setting Up Users
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2-27
3
SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Choosing a Switch Management Level
The Switch Management screen lets you:
■
Choose between managing a port, the Switch module or a VLAN.
■
Display screens showing statistical information.
■
Display the Switch Database configuration screen.
■
Display the Switch Unit Resilience Summary screen.
■
Display Setup screens for the Switch 1005.
From the Main Menu, select SWITCH MANAGEMENT. The Switch
Management screen appears as shown in Figure 3-1.
Figure 3-1 Switch Management screen — port level
3-2
CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Management Level Module/Port/VLAN If you choose Module, the
screen that appears is similar to the example shown in Figure 3-2 and
all options at the foot of the screen relate to the Switch 1005. If you
choose Port, the screen that appears is similar to that shown in
Figure 3-1 and all options relate to an individual port. If you choose
VLAN, the screen that appears is similar to that shown in Figure 3-3 and
all options relate to VLANs.
Figure 3-2 Switch Management screen — module level
Figure 3-3 Switch Management screen — VLAN level
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Choosing a Switch Management Level
3-3
Port ID 1 ... 28 When managing a Switch 1005 port, type the port
number into this field before selecting the next screen:
■
■
■
■
■
Ports 1 to 4 represent ports on any Transceiver Module you may
have installed
Ports 5 to 12 are the eight fixed 10BASE-T port
Ports 12 to 24 are additional ports you may have if you have
installed an Expansion Module
Ports 25 to 27 are internal Ethernet backplane ports (10Mbps)
Port 28 is the internal Fast Ethernet backplane (100Mbps)
STATISTICS Use this button to display statistics screens for the level of
management you have chosen (module, port or VLAN). See Chapter 5.
SDB Use this button to display the Switch Database Configuration
screen. See “Configuring the Switch Database” on page 3-14.
RESILIENCE Use this button to display the resilience screen for the
module or specified port. See “Resilient Links” on page 3-17.
SETUP Use this button to display configuration screens for the level of
management you have chosen (module, port or VLAN). For information
about the Switch Module Setup and Port Setup screens, see “Switch
1005 Setup” and “Port Setup” later in this chapter. Setting up VLANs is
described in Chapter 4.
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Switch 1005 Setup
With the Switch Management screen displayed, choose to setup the
module, then select the SETUP button.
The Switch Module Setup screen is displayed as shown in Figure 3-4.
Figure 3-4 Module Setup screen
The screen shows the following:
Module Type A read-only field showing the type of device.
sysName This field takes its name from the MIB II System Group object.
You can edit the first 30 characters of this field to make the name more
meaningful. This name is displayed on the Main Banner when you first
access the VT100 screens, and is also accessible to an SNMP Network
Manager.
Forwarding Mode Fast Forward/Fragment Free/Store and
Forward/Intelligent This field allows you to set the forwarding mode:
■
Fast Forward — In this mode, frames are forwarded as soon as the
destination address is received and verified. The forwarding delay or
latency for all frames in this mode is 40µs, but with no checking
time any collision fragments or error frames are propagated onto
the network.
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Switch 1005 Setup
■
■
■
3-5
Fragment Free — In this mode, a minimum of 64 bytes of the
received frame is buffered prior to the frame being forwarded. This
ensures that collision fragments are not propagated through the
network, however, CRC errors are forwarded. The forwarding delay
or latency for all frames in this mode is 64µs.
Store and Forward — In this mode, received packets are buffered in
their entirety prior to forwarding. This ensures that only good frames
are passed to their destination. The forwarding delay for this mode
varies between 64µs and 1.2ms, depending on frame length. In this
mode the latency, measured as the time between receiving the last
bit of the frame and transmitting the first bit, is 8µs.
Intelligent — In this mode, the Switch 1005 monitors the amount of
error traffic on the network and changes the forwarding mode
accordingly. If the Switch 1005 detects less than 18 error packets per
second, it will operate in Fast Forward mode. If the Switch 1005
detects more than 18 packets per second it will operate in Store and
Forward mode until the number of error packers per second returns
to 0.
PACE Enable/Disable This field allows you to enable or disable PACE
(Priority Access Control Enabled) for all ports on the Switch 1005.
Enabling PACE on a port increases network performance, especially if
you are running multimedia applications. The rules for enabling PACE
are:
■
■
■
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PACE should only be enabled on ports that connect to a single
end-station, switch, bridge or router
You should not enable PACE on a port connected to a repeater
If you have PACE-equipped devices at both ends of a link, PACE
should only be enabled on one of the devices
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Ageing Time This field allows you to specify the ageing time
(hours:minutes) for all non-permanent entries in the Switch Database
of the module You can set an ageing time in the range 0 minutes to
277 hours with a default of 30 minutes. If you enter 00:00, the database
entries are non-ageing; non-ageing entries do not age but will be
deleted from the database if the Switch 1005 is reset or a power-off/on
cycle occurs.
Fixed 10BaseT Port Capacity This read-only field shows how many
non-removable Ethernet ports (10Mbps) are on this module.
Internal 100Mbps Ports This read-only field shows how many internal
connections to the Fast Ethernet (100Mbps) backplane are available for
this module.
Internal 10Mbps Ports This read-only field shows how many internal
connections to the Ethernet backplane (10Mbps) are available for this
module.
Transceiver Module This read-only field shows the type of Transceiver
Module installed into the module, or states Not Fitted.
Expansion Card This read-only field shows the type of Expansion
Module fitted onto this module, or states Not Fitted.
Transceiver Module 1, Transceiver Module 2, Transceiver Module 3
These three read-only fields show the type of Transceiver Modules
installed into your Expansion Module (if fitted), or state Not Fitted.
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Port Setup
3-7
Port Setup
With the Switch Management screen displayed, choose to setup the
port, then select the SETUP button.
The Switch Port Setup screen is displayed as shown in Figure 3-5.
Figure 3-5 Port Setup screen
The screen shows the following:
Port ID This read-only field shows the ID of the port you have chosen
to setup.
Media Type This read-only field shows the media type of the link
connected to the port.
Port Speed This read-only field shows the speed of the link.
Link State Present/Not Available For twisted pair and fiber ports only,
this read-only field shows the state of the link:
■
■
Present — The port is operating normally.
Not Available — The link has been lost.
Port State Enable/Disable This option allows you to enable/disable the
port. To prevent unauthorized access, we recommend that you disable
any unused ports.
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Lost Links The number of times the link has been lost since the Switch
1005 was last reset. If this field displays a number other than 0, you
should check your cables and replace any that may be damaged.
If the port is directly connected to an end-station, this counter
increments each time the end-station goes through a power off/on
cycle and is not a result of faulty cabling.
Intelligent Flow Management (IFM) Enable/Disable This option
allows you to enable or disable IFM. IFM minimizes packet loss which
can occur with conventional switches.
Intelligent Flow Management (IFM) should be disabled if the port is
connected to a repeated segment where the traffic is local to that
segment.
Security Enable/Disable When Security is enabled, the port enters a
single address learning mode. The Switch 1005 removes all addresses
currently stored against the port in the Switch Database. The Switch
1005 then learns the source address from the first packet it receives on
the port since security was enabled. The port then enters a secure
mode. Once security is enabled, no other station with a different
address is permitted to access the network through the secure port. If a
station with a different address attempts to transmit packets through
onto the network through the port, the port is automatically disabled
and a trap is generated. The port remains disabled until it is enabled
using this screen or an SNMP Network Manager.
Security is not available on backbone ports. If the port has been defined
as a backbone port, the Security field will not be displayed.
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Port Setup
3-9
PACE Enable/Disable/Unit Default This field allows you to enable or
disable PACE (Priority Access Control Enabled) on the port:
■
■
■
Enable — Enabling PACE increases network performance particularly
if you are using multimedia applications. You should only enable
PACE on a port if it is connected to a single end-station, switch,
bridge or router. Setting this field overrides the PACE configuration
specified for the port using the Module Setup screen, see “Switch
1005 Setup” starting on page 3-4.
Disable — You should disable PACE if the port connects to a
repeater.
Unit Default — The PACE mode for the port is determined by the
unit setting configured on the Module Setup screen, see “Switch
1005 Setup” on page 3-4.
Select VLT Mode Enable/Disable This field allows you to specify
whether the port forms part of a Virtual LAN Trunk (VLT). A Virtual LAN
Trunk is a connection which carries traffic for multiple VLANs between
Switch 1005 modules. You can find more information about VLANs in
Chapter 5.
Duplex Mode Half Duplex/Full Duplex This field allows you to enable
full duplex on Fast Ethernet ports:
■
■
Full Duplex — Full duplex allows packets to be transmitted and
received simultaneously and, in effect, doubles the bandwidth
available on a Fast Ethernet link. For 100BASE-FX links, full duplex
also allows cable runs of up to 2km. You should only enable full
duplex on a point to point link between the Switch and another
device with full duplex support.
Half Duplex — You should use half duplex if the port connects to a
shared Ethernet LAN segment, or if the device at the other end of a
point to point link does not support full duplex.
Intelligent Flow Management (IFM) will not work on a port which uses
full duplex, therefore the Intelligent Flow Management field will be
disabled if full duplex is enabled.
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Broadcast Storm Control The Switch 1005 automatically creates an
alarm on each of its ports to monitor the level of broadcast traffic on
each port. The Broadcast Storm Control fields allow you to specify
thresholds for the level of broadcast traffic on a port. In addition, you
can specify an action to take place if the threshold is exceeded.
Rising Threshold% The value entered here is the percentage
bandwidth of traffic using a broadcast address that will be reached
before you are notified. The default is 20%.
Falling Threshold% The value entered here is the percentage
bandwidth of traffic using a broadcast address at which the alarm
trigger will be reset. This prevents the rising threshold events being
triggered continuously. The default is 10%.
Rising Action none / event / disable port / disable port/notify / blip / blip
port/notify Use this field to specify the action for the alarm to take
when it reaches the rising threshold:
■
■
■
■
■
■
none — no action takes place
event — an SNMP trap is generated
disable port — the port is disabled
disable port/notify — the port is disabled and an SNMP trap is
generated
blip — the port is disabled, then enabled after 5 seconds
blip port/notify — the port is disabled, then enabled after 5 seconds
and an SNMP trap is generated
Falling Action none/event/enable/event + enable Use this field to
specify the action for the alarm to take when it reaches the falling
threshold:
■
■
■
■
none — no action takes place
event — an SNMP trap is generated
enable — the port is enabled
event + enable — the port is enabled and an SNMP trap is generated
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Port Setup
3-11
You should be aware of the following points when using Broadcast
Storm Control:
■
The Switch takes 5-7 seconds to recognize that a broadcast storm is
occurring.
■
Broadcast Storm Control calculates the average broadcast bandwidth over
the previous 20 second interval. The average is based on 4 samples which
are taken at 5 second intervals.
■
When the average value exceeds the rising threshold value, the rising action
is triggered. The action will not be triggered again until the average
broadcast bandwidth falls below the falling threshold level.
Specifying the Backbone Port
Specifying the backbone port for your Switch 1005 is carried out
through the VLAN Setup screen. Refer to “Specifying a Backbone Port”
in Chapter 4
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
The Switch Database (SDB)
The Switch 1005 maintains a database of all addresses received on all
of its local ports. It uses the information in this database to decide
whether a frame should be forwarded or filtered. The database holds
up to a maximum of 500 entries, each entry consists of the MAC
address of the device and an identifier for the port on which it was
received.
If you have set up Traps for the Switch 1005, notification that the
database is becoming full is provided by two traps:
■
Database is 90% full
■
Database is 100% full
These traps indicate that the maximum number of devices which can
be attached to the Switch 1005 has been reached. You cannot connect
any more devices to the Switch 1005, however, additional devices can
be connected to the rest of the network infrastructure.
Entries are added into the SDB in two ways:
■
The module can learn entries, that is, the unit updates the SDB with the
source MAC address and the port identifier on which the source MAC
address is seen.
■
The system administrator can enter and update entries using a MIB
browser, an SNMP Network Manager, or the Switch Database screen
described over the following pages.
There are two types of entries in the SDB:
■
Ageing entries — Initially, all entries in the database are of type
Ageing. Entries in the database are removed (aged) if, after a period of
time (ageing time), the device has not transmitted. This prevents the
database from becoming full with obsolete entries by ensuring that
when a device is removed from the network, its entry is deleted from
the database. Ageing entries are deleted from the database if the
Switch 1005 is reset or a power off/on cycle occurs. For more
information about setting an ageing time, see “Switch 1005 Setup” on
page 3-4.
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The Switch Database (SDB)
3-13
■
Non-ageing entries — If the ageing time is set to 00:00, all ageing
entries in the database are defined as non-ageing entries. This means
that they do not age, but they are still deleted if the Switch 1005 is
reset. For more information about setting an ageing time, see see
“Switch 1005 Setup” on page 3-4.
■
Permanent entries — Permanent entries are retained in the database
if the Switch 1005 is reset or a power off/on cycle occurs. It is up to the
system administrator to make entries permanent. You can do this with
single addresses or all addresses in the database using an SNMP
Network Manager. All entries entered via the switch database are
stored as permanent.
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Configuring the Switch Database
The Switch Module Database View screen, shown in Figure 3-6, allows
you to display and configure the contents of the Switch 1005 database.
Figure 3-6 Switch Module Database View screen
To access the screen, make sure the Switch Management screen is
displayed, see “Choosing a Switch Management Level” on page 3-1.
From the foot of the screen select the SDB button.
The screen shows the following:
Database Entries This read-only field shows the number of entries
currently in the SDB. The database holds a maximum of 500 addresses.
MAC Address If an entry in the listbox is highlighted and you press
[Return], this field shows the device MAC address for this entry.
Port Number If an entry is highlighted in the listbox, this field shows
the port identifier for this entry.
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The Switch Database (SDB)
3-15
A listbox containing the following three fields:
Port The port ID for this entry.
MAC Address The MAC address for the port currently stored in the
database.
Permanent Shows Yes if this entry is permanent, or No if this entry
is ageing. See the previous section “The Switch Database (SDB)” for
a description of permanent and ageing entries.
FIND This button lets you locate an entry in the database.
REFRESH This button refreshes the database so that it displays the
latest information.
INSERT This button lets you insert an entry into the database.
DELETE This button allows you to delete entries from the database.
Searching the Switch Database
You can search the switch database in two ways; by MAC address or
port number.
By MAC Address
To locate the port number against which a particular MAC address is
entered in the SDB:
1 In the MAC Address field, type in the MAC address you are trying to
locate.
2 Select FIND. The port ID is displayed in the Port Number field and the
entry in the listbox is highlighted with a star (*).
By Port
To locate the MAC addresses entered against a particular port in the
SDB:
1 Clear the MAC Address field by moving into the field and pressing the
[Space] bar.
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
2 In the Port Number field, enter the port ID for which you want MAC
addresses displayed.
3 Select FIND. The listbox will show entries in the database for that port
only.
Adding an Entry into the SDB
1 In the MAC Address field, type in the MAC address of the device.
2 In the Port Number field, type in the port identifier for this device.
3 Select INSERT. Entries inserted this way are permanent entries.
Deleting an Entry from the SDB
1 In the listbox, highlight the entry you want to delete and press
[Return], or type the MAC address into the MAC Address field.
2 Select DELETE.
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Resilient Links
3-17
Resilient Links
Switch 1005 ports can be configured to provide resilient links. A
resilient link consists of a main link and a standby link. Under normal
network operating conditions, the main link carries your data. The fiber
Receive Idle signal or the Test Pulse on twisted pair links is continually
monitored by the management software. If a signal loss is detected,
management software immediately enables the standby port so that it
carries the data and network disruption is minimized. In addition, the
main port is disabled.
When setting up resilient links, you should note the following:
■
Up to 12 resilient link pairs can be configured on the Switch 1005.
■
The main and standby ports must be set up on the same Switch 1005
or module pair (main module with fitted expansion module).
■
Resilient links can be set up on any of the external ports.
■
Resilient links can only be set up on fiber or twisted pair links. The main
and standby links in the same pair however, can use any combination
of these media or speed (10Mbps/100Mbps).
■
A backbone port can be configured as a main port in a resilient link
pair. If a resilient backbone port fails, the standby port is immediately
configured as a backbone port before it is enabled. A backbone port
cannot be configured as a standby port.
■
Both ports must have an identical security setup.
■
Both ports must belong to the same VLAN.
■
You cannot disable any port that is part of a resilient link pair.
■
The resilient link must only be defined at one end of the link.
■
A resilient link can only be set up if neither of the ports already form
part of another resilient link pair.
■
If an active standby link fails and there is a link on the main port, the
main port will be enabled and the standby port will be disabled.
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Viewing Resilient Setup
With the Switch Management screen displayed, choose to set up the
module and select the RESILIENCE button.
The Switch Module Resilience Summary screen is displayed as shown in
Figure 3-7. This screen shows the current resilient link configuration for
the module.
Figure 3-7 Module Resilience Summary screen
The following read-only information is displayed:
MAIN Port The ID of the port configured as the main port for this
resilient link pair.
STANDBY Port The ID of the port configured as the standby port for
this resilient link pair.
Pair State Active/Both Failed/Unknown/Not Available The current
operating state of this resilient link pair:
■
■
Active — The resilient link pair is enabled and operating normally
with both main and standby port capable of carrying traffic.
Both Failed — Although the resilient link is correctly configured,
both links have failed. This could be due to loose connections or
cable damage.
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Resilient Links
■
■
3-19
Unknown — The network configuration has changed and the
resilient link pair no longer conforms to the rules.
Not Available — This resilient link pair is disabled.
Active Port Main/Standby/Both Failed Shows which port in the resilient
link pair is currently carrying traffic:
■
■
■
Main — The pair is operating in its normal state with the main port
carrying traffic.
Standby — The main port has failed and the standby port is
carrying the traffic. You should rectify the fault and switch
operation back to the main link as soon as possible. Swapping the
main and standby ports is not carried out automatically. Use the
Port Resilience screen described in the next section to swap the
main and standby ports.
Both Failed — Both ports of the resilient link pair have failed. This
could be due to loose connections or cable damage.
Pair Enable Enabled/Disabled States whether this resilient link pair is
currently enabled or disabled. You enable or disable a resilient link pair
using the Switch Port Resilience screen described in the following
section.
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Configuring Resilient Links
With the Switch Management screen displayed, choose the port that
will be set up as the main port in the resilient link pair, then select the
RESILIENCE button.
The Port Resilience screen is displayed as shown in Figure 3-8. This
screen allows you to setup, edit and delete resilient link pairs.
Figure 3-8 Port Resilience screen
The screen shows the following:
Main Port ID The identifier for the main port.
Media Type Twisted Pair/Fiber This read-only field shows the media
type connected to the main port.
Link State Available/Not Available/Not Present This read-only field shows
the connection state of the main port in the link:
■
■
■
Available — The port is operating normally
Not Available — The resilient link pair is disabled.
Not Present — The port is not present in the current hardware.
Standby Port ID This field shows you the current standby port ID and
allows you to enter a new ID.
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Resilient Links
3-21
Media Type Twisted Pair/Fiber This read-only field shows the standby
port media type.
Link State Available/Not Available/Not Present This read-only field hows
the connection state of the standby port in the link:
■
■
■
Available — The port is operating normally.
Not Available — The resilient link pair is disabled.
Not Present — The port is not present in the current hardware.
Standby Links Available This listbox shows the ports that are available
to set up as standby.
Pair State Active/Both Failed/Unknown/Not Available This read-only
field shows the current operating state of the resilient link pair:
■
■
■
■
Active — The resilient link pair is enabled and operating normally
with both main and standby port capable of carrying traffic.
Both Failed — Although the resilient link is correctly configured,
both links have failed. This could be due to loose connections or
cable damage.
Unknown — The network configuration has changed and the
resilient link pair no longer conforms to the rules.
Not Available — The resilient link pair is disabled.
Active Port Main/Standby If your main link fails and the standby link
takes over the traffic, the link will not automatically switch back when
the main link is reinstated. Use this field to manually switch traffic back
to the main link.
Pair Enable Enabled/Disabled Use this field to enable or disable the
resilient link pair. If you disable the resilient link pair, you must remove
cabling from the ports to avoid creating loops in your network
configuration.
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Creating a Resilient Link
1 Ensure that the port nominated as the standby port is not physically
connected to the unit.
2 Ensure both ports have an identical port security mode configuration
and that they are members of the same VLAN.
3 At the Switch Management screen, select the port to be configured as
the main port in the link. Select the RESILIENCE button at the foot of
the screen.
4 Select the standby port from the Standby Links Available listbox or enter
the port ID in the Standby Port ID field.
5 Enable the pair in the Pair Enabled field. Select APPLY.
6 Connect the cabling for the standby port.
Deleting a Resilient Link
To delete the resilient link pair set up on the port, select the DELETE
button at the foot of the screen. The Port Resilience screen closes and
the Switch Management screen is displayed.
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Setting Up Traps
3-23
Setting Up Traps
Traps are messages sent across the network to an SNMP Network
Manager. They alert the network administrator to faults or changes at
the Switch 1005.
Your Network Manager may automatically set up traps in the Switch
1005 Trap Table. Check the documentation accompanying the network
management software.
To access the Trap Setup screen, from the Switch 1005 Management
Setup screen (described in “Setting up the Switch 1005” in Chapter 2),
select the SETUP TRAPS button. The Trap Setup screen is shown in
Figure 3-9.
Figure 3-9 Trap Setup screen
The screen shows the following:
IP or IPX Address Type into this text field the IP or IPX address of the
remote network management station to which traps should be sent.
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Community String The community string allows a very simple method
of authentication between the Switch 1005 and the remote Network
Manager. The text string can be of 32 characters or less. If you want a
Network Manager to receive traps generated by the device, you must
enter the community string of the remote Network Manager into the
trap table. The default community string is public.
Throttle To prevent a remote Network Manager receiving too many
traps at once, you can configure the Switch 1005 to transmit traps with
a delay between them. If several traps are generated at one time, they
will be transmitted with the specified delay between them. The unit of
throttle is one thousandth of a second. The default value is 100, which
gives a minimum delay of one tenth of a second between each
transmission.
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Resetting the Switch 1005
3-25
Resetting the Switch 1005
If you suspect a problem with the Switch 1005, you can perform a
reset.
1 From the Switch Main Menu, select the RESET option.
The Reset screen appears as shown in Figure 3-10.
2 Select OK.
Figure 3-10 Reset screen
CAUTION: Resetting the Switch 1005 in this way is similar to performing
a power off/on cycle. No setup information is lost. Performing a reset
however, may cause some of the data being transmitted at that
moment to be lost and statistic counters will be reset to zero.
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Initializing the Switch 1005
This screen allows you to perform a reset as described in the previous
section, and in addition, returns non-volatile data stored on the unit to
its factory defaults. Note that the IP address is not cleared. You should
only initialize the Switch 1005 if:
■
The configuration of the device no longer suits your network.
■
Other efforts to solve problems have not succeeded.
To initialize the Switch:
1 From the Main Menu, select the INITIALIZE option.
The Initialization screen appears as shown in Figure 3-11.
2 Select OK.
Figure 3-11 Initialization screen
CAUTION: Use Initialize with great care. The Switch 1005 configuration
is cleared from memory and cannot be recovered. After initialization, all
user information is lost and only default users are available. All ports are
set to their default values, and are therefore enabled and available to all
users. When initializing the Switch, take particular note of the following:
■
Network loops will occur if you have set up resilient links. Before initializing
the Switch, ensure you have disconnected the cabling for all your standby
links.
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Initializing the Switch 1005
3-27
■
Network loops may occur if you are not careful when configuring your
backplane connections. See “Advice for Setting Backplane Connections and
Avoiding Loops” on page 2-4.
■
Ports which form part of a VLT will fail and you will not be able to manage
the Switch if your management station communicates via the VLT. To avoid
this:
a Remove the VLT configuration from both ends of the VLT link before you
initialize the Switch. Note that the port furthest from your management
station should have its VLT configuration removed first.
b Reconfigure the VLT once the initialization is complete.
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
Upgrading Software
When 3Com issues a new version of the software image for the Switch
1005, you can obtain it from the 3Com Bulletin Board Service, see
Appendix C.
You use the Software Upgrade screen to download new software
images. The protocol used for downloading software images is TFTP
running over UDP/IP or IPX and will only work over the network, not via
the serial port.
If a software download over IPX fails, you should enter the MAC address
and port ID of your server into the switch database via the Database
View screen and then attempt the download again.
1 From the Main Menu, select the SOFTWARE UPGRADE option.
The Software Upgrade screen is displayed as shown in Figure 3-12.
Figure 3-12 Software Upgrade screen
2 In the File Name field, type the name of the file that contains the
software image to be downloaded to the Switch 1005. You must place
the image file where it is accessible to the TFTP load request. Check
with your system administrator if you are unsure of where to place the
image file.
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Upgrading Software
3-29
3 In the Server Address field, type the IP or IPX address of the host
containing the software image to load.
4 Select OK.
During the download, the MGMT LED flashes green (fast flash, 1Hz) and
the screen is locked. When the download is complete, the module is
reset.
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CHAPTER 3: SWITCH CONFIGURATION
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4
ADVANCED MANAGEMENT
Virtual LANs (VLANs)
Setting up Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) on the MSH Switch
1005 provides you with less time-consuming network administration
and more efficient network operation.
The following sections explain more about the concept of VLANs and
explain how they can be implemented on the Switch 1005.
What are VLANs?
A VLAN is defined as a group of location- and topology- independent
devices that communicate as if they are on the same physical LAN. This
means that LAN segments are not restricted by the hardware which
physically connects them; the segments are defined by flexible user
groups that you create using software.
With VLANs, you can define your network according to:
■
Organizational groups — for example, you can have one VLAN for
the Marketing department and one for the Finance department.
Alternatively, you can have one VLAN for users with managerial status
and one for users of director status.
■
Application groups — for example, you can have one VLAN for users
of email, and another VLAN for users of multimedia.
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CHAPTER 4: ADVANCED MANAGEMENT
Benefits of VLANs
Implementing VLANs on your network has three main advantages:
■
It eases the change and movement of devices on IP networks
With traditional IP networks, network administrators spend much of
their time dealing with moves and changes. If users move to a different
IP subnet, the IP addresses of each workstation must be updated
manually.
With a VLAN setup, if a workstation on VLAN 1 is moved to a port in
another part of the network, the network administrator only needs to
configure the new port to belong to VLAN 1.
■
It helps to control broadcast traffic
With traditional networks, congestion can be caused by broadcast
traffic which is directed to all network devices whether they require it
or not. VLANs increase the efficiency of your network because each
VLAN can be set up to contain only those devices which need to
communicate with each other.
■
It provides extra security
Devices within each VLAN can only communicate with devices in the
same VLAN. If a device in VLAN 1 needs to communicate with devices
in VLAN 2, the traffic must cross a router.
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4-3
An Example
Figure 4-1 shows a network configured with port-based VLANs, where a
VLAN consists of a set of switch ports. There are three VLANs — one for
each of the departments who access the network. The membership of
VLAN 1 is restricted to ports 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 of Switch A; membership of
VLAN 2 is restricted to ports 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 of Switch B while VLAN 3
spans both Switches containing ports 6, 7, 8 of Switch A and 1, 2, 3 of
Switch B.
In this simple example, each of these VLANs can be seen as a
’broadcast domain’ — physical LAN segments that are not constrained
by their physical location.
Specific configurations using the Switch are shown later in this chapter.
Figure 4-1 The concept of VLANs
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CHAPTER 4: ADVANCED MANAGEMENT
VLANs and the Switch 1005
The Switch 1005 supports port-based VLANs, where a VLAN consists of
a set of switch ports. Each switch port can only belong to one VLAN at
a time, regardless of the device to which it is attached.
Each Switch 1005 can support up to 16 VLANs. However, you can have
more than 16 VLANs in your entire network by connecting the 16
Switch VLANs to other VLANs using a router.
The Default VLAN
In any network setup, VLAN 1 is the Default VLAN. The Default VLAN is
the only VLAN which allows an SNMP Network Manager to access the
management agent of the unit. On a new Switch, all the ports belong
to VLAN 1. If the devices attached to a port should belong to another
VLAN, you need to use the VLAN Setup screen to place the port in that
VLAN. For more information about the VLAN Setup screen, see “Setting
Up VLANs on the Switch” on page 4-12.
Connecting VLANs to a Router
If the devices in a VLAN need to talk to devices in a different VLAN,
each VLAN requires a connection to a router. Communication between
VLANs can only take place if they are all connected to the router. A
VLAN not connected to a router is isolated.
In the Switch 1005, VLANs are typically connected to routers using
backbone ports. Backbone ports have the following attributes:
■
Addresses received on backbone ports are not stored in the Switch
Database.
■
Frames with unknown addresses are forwarded to the backbone ports.
If you connect a Switch 1005 to a router using backbone ports, you
need to specify one backbone port for each VLAN connected to the
router.
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Virtual LANs (VLANs)
4-5
Connecting Common VLANs Between Switches
In the Switch 1005, VLANs are typically connected to other Switch 1005
modules, SuperStack II Switch 1000 units and SuperStack II Switch 3000
units using backbone ports. Similar to the router connections, you
normally require one backbone port per VLAN. However, to make the
Switch-to-Switch connections more cost-effective, the Switch 1005
allows you to specify that one backbone port forms part of a Virtual
LAN Trunk (VLT). A VLT is a connection which carries traffic for multiple
VLANs between Switch modules and units. If you configure both ends
of a Switch-to-Switch connection as part of a VLT, you only need that
one connection for all the VLANs.
VLTs can only be used for links between Switch 1005 modules,
SuperStack II Switch 1000 units and SuperStack II Switch 3000 units. You
cannot use VLTs for Switch-router links.
If you specify that a backbone port on one VLAN is part of a VLT, that
backbone port will become a backbone port for all the VLANs on the
Switch — even if they had no backbone port before. If you then
disable the VLT function on that port, the port becomes the backbone
port for the Default VLAN (VLAN 1) and all other VLANs lose their
backbone ports.
Using Non-routable Protocols
If you are running non-routable protocols on your network (for
example, DEC LAT or NET BIOS), devices within one VLAN will not be
able to communicate with devices in a different VLAN.
Using Unique MAC Addresses
If you connect a server with multiple network adapters to the Switch,
we recommend that you configure each network adapter with a
unique MAC address.
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CHAPTER 4: ADVANCED MANAGEMENT
VLAN Configurations
Example 1
The example shown in Figure 4-2 illustrates a simple VLAN
configuration comprising a single Switch 1005 with a 10Base-T
Transceiver Module. The ports are divided between two VLANs; VLAN 1
is able to talk to VLAN 2 using the backbone port connection between
each VLAN and the router.
To set up this configuration:
1 Use the VT100 screens to:
a Place ports 1-6 in VLAN 1.
b Place ports 7-12 in VLAN 2.
2 Connect a port in VLAN 1 to the router.
3 Use the VT100 screens to specify that the VLAN 1 port connected to
the router is a backbone port.
4 Repeat steps 2 and 3 for VLAN 2.
You can set up this configuration more easily using 3Com’s Transcend
Enterprise Manager applications.
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Virtual LANs (VLANs)
Figure 4-2 VLAN configuration with a single Switch 1005 module
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CHAPTER 4: ADVANCED MANAGEMENT
Example 2
The example shown in Figure 4-3 illustrates two VLANs spanning two
Switch 1005s, each with a Fast Ethernet Transceiver Module as port 1.
VLAN 1 is able to talk to VLAN 2 using the backbone port connection
between each VLAN and the router. Ports within the same VLAN which
span the two Switches communicate using a VLT on the Fast Ethernet
backplane.
To set up this configuration:
1 Use the VT100 screens to:
a Place ports 5-8 of both Switch 1005s in VLAN 1.
b Place ports 9-12 of both Switch 1005s in VLAN 2.
2 Connect port 1 of the right Switch 1005 to Server 1.
3 Connect port 1 of the left Switch 1005 to Server 2.
4 Use the VT100 screens to:
a Place port 1 of the right Switch 1005 in VLAN 2.
b Place port 1 of the left Switch 1005 in VLAN 1.
5 Connect port 28 on the right Switch 1005 to port 28 in the left Switch
1005.
6 Use the VT100 screens to specify that port 28 on the right Switch 1005
is a backbone port and part of a VLT.
7 Connect a VLAN 1 port on the left Switch 1005 to the router.
8 Use the VT100 screens to specify that the VLAN 1 port connected to
the router is a backbone port.
9 Repeat steps 7 and 8 for VLAN 2.
10 Use the VT100 screens to specify that port 28 on the left Switch 1005 is
part of a VLT.
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Virtual LANs (VLANs)
4-9
You can set up this configuration more easily using 3Com’s Transcend
Enterprise Manager applications.
Figure 4-3 VLAN configuration with two Switch 1005s
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CHAPTER 4: ADVANCED MANAGEMENT
Example 3
The example shown in Figure 4-4 illustrates two VLANs spanning three
Switch 1005s (each with a 100FX Transceiver Module as port 1) and a
basement SuperStack II Switch 3000 FX with a 100FX Downlink Module.
Each Switch 1005 connects into the basement Switch 3000 FX using a
VLT. The attached router allows the two VLANs to communicate with
each other.
To set up this configuration:
1 Use the VT100 screens to:
a Place ports 5-8 of all the Switch 1005s in VLAN 1.
b Place ports 9-12 of all the Switch 1005s in VLAN 2.
2 Connect port 1 on each Switch 1005 to a port in the Switch 3000 FX.
3 Use the VT100 screens to:
a Specify that port 1 on each Switch 1005 is a backbone port.
b Specify that port 1 on each Switch 1005 is part of a VLT.
c Specify that each Switch 3000 FX port connected to a Switch 1005 is
part of a VLT.
4 Connect port 1 of the Switch 3000 FX to Server 1.
5 Connect port 2 of the Switch 3000 FX to Server 2.
6 Use the VT100 screens to:
a Place port 1 of the Switch 3000 FX in VLAN 1.
b Place port 2 of the Switch 3000 FX in VLAN 2.
7 Connect two spare ports on the Switch 3000 FX to the router.
8 Use the VT100 screens to specify that one Switch 3000 FX port
connected to the router is placed in VLAN 1, and the other is placed in
VLAN 2.
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Virtual LANs (VLANs)
4-11
You can set up this configuration more easily using 3Com’s Transcend
Enterprise Manager applications.
Figure 4-4 VLAN configuration with a Switch 3000 FX as a basement switch
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CHAPTER 4: ADVANCED MANAGEMENT
Setting Up VLANs on the Switch
The VLAN Setup screen allows you to set up and manage VLANs on the
Switch. To access the VLAN Setup screen:
1 From the VT100 Main Menu, select SWITCH MANAGEMENT. The Switch
Management screen appears.
2 In the Management Level field, choose VLAN.
3 Choose the SETUP button. The VLAN Setup screen appears as shown in
Figure 4-5.
Figure 4-5 VLAN Setup screen
The screen shows the following:
Port ID 1,2,3 ... 26, 27, 28 This field allows you to enter the ID of the port
that you want to set up.
VLAN ID 1,2,3 ... 14,15,16 This field allows you to enter the ID of the
VLAN to which the specified port is to be assigned. By default, all ports
belong to the Default VLAN (VLAN 1).
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Virtual LANs (VLANs)
4-13
Select Port Type Port/Backbone Port This field allows you to specify
whether the port specified in the Port ID field is a backbone port. A
backbone port is used to connect each VLAN to the backbone of your
network, and has the following attributes:
■
■
Addresses received on the port are not stored in the Switch
Database.
Frames with unknown addresses received by the Switch are
forwarded to the port.
Any port in a VLAN can be designated as the backbone port for that
VLAN, but you can only have one backbone port per VLAN. By default,
all ports belong to the Default VLAN (VLAN 1); because of this, an
unconfigured Switch module can only have one backbone port.
If the Switch 1005 has a Fast Ethernet Transceiver Module installed, this
automatically becomes the backbone port for the Default VLAN when
you initialize the Switch. If the Switch has more than one Fast Ethernet
Transceiver Module, the Transceiver Module with the lowest port
number automatically becomes the backbone port for the Default
VLAN. If the Switch has no Fast Ethernet Transceiver Module, but it uses
port 28 to connect to the Fast Ethernet backplane, port 28
automatically becomes the backbone port for the Default VLAN.
A listbox containing the following fields:
Port The port ID for the entry.
VLAN The ID of the VLAN(s) that the port belongs to.
VLT Shows * if the port forms part of a Virtual LAN Trunk (VLT). A
Virtual LAN Trunk is a connection which carries traffic for multiple
VLANs between Switch units. For more information about VLTs in
general, see “VLANs and the Switch 1005” on page 4-4. To specify
that a port is a VLT, see “Port Setup” on page 3-7.
BP The backbone port for the VLAN specified in the VLAN field.
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CHAPTER 4: ADVANCED MANAGEMENT
ResBP This field displays the resilient backbone port for the VLAN, if
one exists. For more information about creating resilient links, see
“Resilient Links” on page 3-17.
APPLY This button applies any changes to the VLAN database.
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Virtual LANs (VLANs)
4-15
Assigning a Port to a VLAN
1 In the Port ID field, type the ID of the required port.
2 In the VLAN ID field, type the ID of the required VLAN.
3 Select APPLY.
CAUTION: Initially, all Switch ports belong to the Default VLAN (VLAN
1). This VLAN is the only VLAN which allows an SNMP Network Manager
to access the management agent of the unit. If you remove all ports
from VLAN 1, then an SNMP Network Manager cannot manage the
Switch.
Specifying a Backbone Port
1 In the Port ID field, type the ID of the required port.
2 In the VLAN ID field, type the ID of the required VLAN.
3 In the Select Port Type field, select Backbone Port.
4 Select APPLY.
Specifying that a Backbone Port is Part of a VLT
1 From the BP field, note the ID of the backbone port. Refer to “Port
Setup” in Chapter 3.
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5
STATUS MONITORING AND
STATISTICS
This chapter describes how to view the current operating status of the
Switch 1005 and how to carry out a remote poll to check the response
of another network device. It also describes the Statistics screens for
the Switch 1005, and advises you on actions to take if you see
unexpected values for the statistics. Please note however, that as all
networks are different, any actions listed are only suggestions.
Viewing statistics on a regular basis allows you to see how well your
network is performing. If you keep simple daily records, you will see
trends emerging and notice problems arising before they cause major
network faults. Statistics can also help you get the best out of your
network.
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CHAPTER 5: STATUS MONITORING AND STATISTICS
Summary Statistics
With the Switch Management screen displayed, choose to view
statistics for the Switch 1005 module, then select the STATISTICS button.
A typical Switch Summary Statistics screen is displayed as shown in
Figure 5-1.
Figure 5-1 Switch Summary Statistics screen
The screen lists values for the current counter against every port on the
Switch 1005 and it is refreshed approximately every two seconds. Once
values have reached approximately 4.2 billion, they are reset to zero.
To view values for a particular counter, select the first button displayed
at the foot of the Summary Statistics screen. Pressing the Space bar
toggles through the available counters and as soon as you move away
from the button, the screen is refreshed to show values for that
counter.
FRAMES RECEIVED Displays the total number of frames that have
been received by each port, including fragments and frames with
errors.
FRAMES TRANSMITTED Displays the total number of frames that
have been successfully transmitted by each port.
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Summary Statistics
5-3
FRAMES FORWARDED Displays the total number of frames that were
received by each port and forwarded to other ports.
FRAMES FILTERED Displays the total number of frames that were
filtered because the destination station was on the same segment
(port) as the source station.
MULTI/BROADCAST (RX) Displays the total number of frames received
by each port that are addressed to a multicast or broadcast address.
MULTI/BROADCASTS (TX) Displays the total number of frames
transmitted by each port that are addressed to a multicast or broadcast
address.
ERRORS Displays the total number of errors that have occurred on
each port. See the field description for Errors on page 5-7.
CLEAR SCREEN COUNTERS Use this button to set all counters shown
on the screen to zero. Use this button for analysis if you wish to see
changes in counters over a short period of time. This button does not
clear the counters on the device. To zero actual device counters, you
need to reset the Switch 1005, refer to “Resetting the Switch 1005” in
Chapter 3.
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CHAPTER 5: STATUS MONITORING AND STATISTICS
Port Statistics
With the Switch Management screen displayed, choose to view
statistics for a Switch 1005 port, then select the STATISTICS button.
A typical Switch Port Statistics screen is displayed as shown in
Figure 5-2.
Figure 5-2 Switch Port Statistics screen
As well as showing statistics for the port, this screen allows you access
to traffic and error counter screens.
The Port Statistics screen shows the following:
Port ID The ID of the port you are currently managing.
Bandwidth Used This counter provides a running average of the
occupied bandwidth and is expressed as a percentage of the
theoretical maximum bandwidth available. A sampling period of 1
minute is used. The value gives an indication of the general traffic level
of the network. A high utilization for single station segments is an
indication that your network is operating efficiently. However, if
multiple end-stations are connected to this port and you see values of
around 40% you should reconsider the topology of your network
because each user will see degraded network performance.
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Port Statistics
5-5
Frames Forwarded This counter provides a running average of the
proportion of the received frames that are forwarded and is expressed
as a percentage of all received frames. A sampling period of 1 minute is
used.
Broadcast Frame Bandwidth This counter provides a running average
of the Broadcast frame bandwidth in use and is expressed as a
percentage of a theoretical maximum bandwidth. A sampling period of
5 seconds is used.
Error Frames This counter provides a running average of the number
of errors per 10,000 frames received and is expressed as a percentage.
See the field description for Errors on page 5-7.
TRAFFIC STATISTICS Select this button to access traffic counters for
this port.
ERROR ANALYSIS Select this button to access error counters for this
port.
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CHAPTER 5: STATUS MONITORING AND STATISTICS
Port Traffic Statistics
With the Port Statistics screen displayed, select the TRAFFIC STATISTICS
button.
A typical Port Traffic Statistics screen is displayed as shown in
Figure 5-3.
Figure 5-3 Port Traffic Statistics screen
The screen shows the following:
Port ID The ID of the port you are currently managing.
Frames Received The number of valid frames received by the port,
including fragments and frames with errors.
Frames Transmitted The number of frames that have been
successfully transmitted by the port.
Octets Received The number of octets received by the port. The
calculation includes the MAC header and Cyclical Redundancy Check
(CRC), but excludes preamble/Start-of-Frame-Delimiter (SFD). Octet
counters are accurate to the nearest 256 octet boundary.
Octets Transmitted The number of octets transmitted by the port. The
calculation includes the MAC header and CRC, but excludes
preamble/SFD. Octet counters are accurate to the nearest 256 octet
boundary.
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Port Traffic Statistics
5-7
Multicasts Received The number of frames successfully received that
have a multicast destination address. This does not include frames
directed to a broadcast address or frames received with errors.
Broadcasts Received The number of frames received that have a
broadcast destination address. This does not include frames with errors.
Collisions An estimate of the total number of collisions that occurred
when transmitting from the unit. Collisions are a normal part of
Ethernet operation that occur when two devices attempt to transmit
at the same time. A sudden sustained increase in the number of
collisions may indicate a problem with a device or cabling on the
network, particularly if this is not accompanied by an increase in
general network traffic.
Fragments The total number of packets received that were not an
integral number of octets in length or that had a bad Frame Check
Sequence (FCS), and were less than 64 octets in length (excluding
framing bits but including FCS octets).
Frames Forwarded The total number of frames which were received
by the port and forwarded to their destination address.
Frames Filtered The total number of frames that were filtered because
the destination address was on the same segment (port) as the source
station.
Errors The total number of errors which have occurred on the port.
Errors can be one of the following:
■
■
■
■
■
CRC Alignment Errors
Short Events
Long Frames
Late Events
Jabbers
The value shown should be a very small proportion of the total data
traffic.
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CHAPTER 5: STATUS MONITORING AND STATISTICS
IFM Count The total number of times Intelligent Flow Management
(IFM) has had to operate to minimize packet loss.
Frame Size Analysis The number of frames of a specified length as a
percentage of the total number of frames of between 64 and 1518
octets. This indicates the composition of frames on the network. The
frame size ranges are:
■
■
■
■
■
■
64 octets
65 to 127 octets
128 to 255 octets
256 to 511 octets
512 to 1023 octets
1024 to 1518 octets
The composition of frames on your network may help you to analyze
the efficiency of your network layer protocol.
CLEAR SCREEN COUNTERS Select this button to set all counters
shown on the screen to zero. It is useful for trend analysis if you wish to
see changes in counters over a short period of time. This button does
not clear the counters on the device or affect counters at the network
management station.
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Port Error Analysis
5-9
Port Error Analysis
With the Port Statistics screen displayed, select the ERROR ANALYSIS
button.
A typical Port Error Analysis screen is displayed as shown in Figure 5-4.
Figure 5-4 Port Error Analysis screen
The screen shows the following:
Port ID The ID of the port you are currently managing.
CRC Align Errors This counter is incremented by one for each frame
with an CRC error or an alignment error. A CRC occurs if a frame of
legal length has an invalid CRC and does not have a framing error. An
alignment error occurs if a frame has a CRC error and does not contain
an integral number of octets.
Alignment errors may be caused by a fault at the transmitting device.
Change the transceiver or adapter card of the device connected to the
port at the source of the problem. If this does not solve the problem,
check cables and connections for damage.
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CHAPTER 5: STATUS MONITORING AND STATISTICS
Short Events This counter is incremented by one for each carrier event
whose duration is less than the short event maximum time. Short
events are error frames smaller than the minimum size defined for
802.3 frames. They may indicate externally generated noise causing
problems on the network. Check the cabling routing and re-route any
cabling which may be affected by external noise sources.
Late Events This counter is incremented by one each time a collision
occurs after the valid packet minimum time. A late event is an
out-of-window collision that may occur if your 802.3 LAN exceeds the
maximum size as defined in the IEEE standard. A late event is also
counted as a collision.
Long Frames This counter is incremented by one each time a frame is
received whose octet count is greater than the maximum frame size
but less than Jabber frame size. Long Frames are frames that exceed
the maximum size defined for 802.3 frames (1518 octets). If you see a
high number of long frames on your network, you should isolate the
source of these frames and examine the transceiver or adapter card at
the device. Some protocols may generate these frames.
Jabbers The total number of packets received that were longer than 8K
octets (excluding framing bits, but including FCS octets).
CLEAR SCREEN COUNTERS Select this button to set all counters
shown on the screen to zero. It is useful for trend analysis if you wish to
see changes in counters over a short period of time. This button does
not clear the counters on the device or affect counters at the network
management station.
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Status Monitoring
5-11
Status Monitoring
The status screen provides read-only information about the Switch
1005. To access the screen, from the Main Menu, select the STATUS
option.
The Status screen is displayed as shown in Figure 5-5.
Figure 5-5 Status screen
The screen shows the following:
System Up Time (seconds) The number of seconds this unit has been
running since the last reset or power off/on cycle.
Number Of Resets The total number of system resets since the Switch
1005 was first installed or initialized; either power-on, manual reset or a
watchdog expiry. If you have a problem, this information may be useful
for your technical support representative.
Last Reset Type other/command/watchdog/power- reset/system-error
This field indicates the cause of the last reset. It may be due to
management command, watchdog timeout expiry, power interruption,
a manual reset or a system error. If you have a problem, this
information may be useful for your technical support representative.
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CHAPTER 5: STATUS MONITORING AND STATISTICS
Hardware Version The hardware version number of the Switch 1005.
You should note this number in case you need to quote it to your
technical support representative.
Upgradable Software Version The version number of the software
image stored in Flash EPROM. This version number is automatically
updated when you download new software. You should note this
number in case you need to quote it to your technical support
representative.
Boot Software Version This is the version number of the Boot
software stored on the Switch 1005. You should note this number in
case you need to quote it to your technical support representative.
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Remote Polling
5-13
Remote Polling
The Remote Poll screen allows you to send a single frame to a remote
device to see if that device is responding. This can help to locate the
source of a network problem. It is also particulary helpful in locating
devices that support IP, IPX and ping but are not manageable by SNMP.
1 To access the Remote Poll screen, from the Main Menu, select Remote
Poll. The screen is displayed as shown in Figure 5-6.
Figure 5-6 Remote Poll screen
2 In the Target Address field, type in the IP or IPX address of the device
you want to poll.
3 Select the POLL button at the foot of the screen.
When the poll is complete, the Round Trip Time field shows the interval
in milliseconds between sending the frame to the target device and
receiving a response at the Switch 1005. If the target device does not
respond after approximately 10 seconds, this field will display no reply.
You can use an SNMP Network Manager to configure the Switch to send
regular IP or IPX ping packets to a maximum of ten other network
devices. If a device fails to respond to four consecutive ping requests, a
trap is sent by the Switch to the management station.
DUA1840-0AAA01
5-14
CHAPTER 5: STATUS MONITORING AND STATISTICS
DUA1840-0AAA01
6
PROBLEM SOLVING
Spot Checks
This chapter explains how to check for problems and solve them. It is
good practice to carry out regular checks of your MSH equipment and
it could allow you spot a potential problem before it occurs.
Check the following:
■
LEDs — Press the Lamp Test button located on the MSH display panel.
All yellow LEDs should light continuously and all bi-color LEDs should
flash their two colors alternately.
■
Cabling — Check that all external cabling connections are secure and
that no cables are pulled taut.
■
Modules — Check that all modules are secured in position and that
their ejectors are locked. All modules should be flush in the chassis
with each other.
If individual LEDs do not respond to the Lamp Test, the LEDs are faulty.
If, however, all LEDs on a single module fail to light, and all other
checks are satisfactory, there is a fault with the module or the MSH
chassis. Refer to “Identifying Fault Conditions with the LEDs” later in this
chapter.
6-2
CHAPTER 6: PROBLEM SOLVING
Identifying Fault Conditions with the LEDs
The following table shows how you can identify possible fault
conditions that may occur during normal operation. It also describes
actions that may resolve the problem:
LED
Color
Indicates
Try the following actions
PWR
(Power)
Off
Power is not reaching the module
■
Check that the Power LED on the
MSH chassis is not lit red. If it is,
refer to your chassis user
documentation.
■
Ensure the MSH chassis is
powered-up correctly with all
power leads securely connected.
■
Ensure the module is fully
engaged into the chassis.
■
Contact your supplier for advice.
■
Test LEDs to confirm.
Faulty LED
BACKPLANE
E, FE
1 - 12
(External port
status)
Amber
Fault occurred on this module
during POST or normal operation
Off
Fault
■
Ensure module is fully engaged
into chassis and the backplane
connectors are fully mated.
Faulty LED
■
Test LEDs to confirm.
Fault
■
Check all connections are secure.
■
Check all cables and connectors
for signs of damage.
Off
If you cannot solve the problem, contact your local supplier, or proceed
as described in Appendix C.
DUA1840-0AAA01
VT100 Problems
6-3
VT100 Problems
The SNMP Network Manager cannot access the device:
Check the device's IP address, subnet mask and default router are
correctly configured, and that the device has been reset. Check
that the device's IP address is correctly recorded by the SNMP
Network Manager (refer to the user manual for the Network
Manager).
The Telnet workstation cannot access the device:
Check that your terminal or terminal emulator is correctly
configured to operate as a VT100 terminal.
Check the device's IP address, subnet mask and default router are
correctly configured, and that the device has been reset. Ensure that
you enter the IP address correctly when invoking the Telnet facility.
Traps are not received by the SNMP Network Manager:
Check the SNMP Network Manager's IP address and that the
community string is correctly configured.
The SNMP Network Manager or Telnet workstation can no longer
access the device:
Check that Remote Telnet access or Community-SNMP access is
enabled.
Check that the port through which you are trying to access the
device has not been disabled, see “Port Setup” in Chapter 3. If it is
enabled, check the connections and network cabling at the port.
Check that the port though which you are trying to access the
device is still in VLAN 1 (the Default VLAN). See “Setting Up VLANs
on the Switch” in Chapter 4.
Try accessing the device through a different port. If you can now
access the device, a problem with the original port is indicated.
Re-examine the connections and cabling.
Possibly there is a network problem preventing you accessing the
device over the network. Try accessing the device through the serial
port.
DUA1840-0AAA01
6-4
CHAPTER 6: PROBLEM SOLVING
You forget your password and cannot log in:
If you are not one of the default users (monitor, manager or
security), another user having ‘security' access level can log in,
delete your user name, and create a new user name for you, with a
new password.
Alternatively, another user having ‘security' access level can log in
and initialize the device. This will return all configuration
information, including passwords, to the initial values.
In the case where no-one knows a password for a security level
user, contact your supplier.
Switch 1005 Operation Problems
You see network problems and the Packet LED is on continuously
with constant collisions (viewed using the Port Traffic Statistics
screen, see “Port Traffic Statistics” in Chapter 5).
You are using PACE equipped devices and have PACE enabled at
both ends of the link. PACE must only be enabled at one end of the
Switch-device link. Disable PACE on the Switch port as described in
“Port Setup” in Chapter 3.
Changing links LK1 to LK5 has no effect on external port
configuration.
Link settings and internal port settings are not synchronized. Link
settings can be overridden by management and these overrides are
retained through power off/on cycles. It may be that internal ports
were configured for a different Switch 1005 previously installed
into this slot.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Switch 1005 Operation Problems
6-5
You cannot see internal backplane connection E3 (port 27) on any
screen.
Backplane connection E3 (port 27) disappears from all screens if
there is an expansion module fitted to your Switch 1005 and you
have four 4 Port 10BASE-T Transceiver Modules installed. Port 27 will
reappear and will be fully manageable if you remove one 4 Port
10BASE-T Transceiver Module.
You have added the Switch 1005 to an already busy network, and
response times and traffic levels have increased.
You may have added a group of users to one of the Switch 1005
ports via a repeater or switch, and not turned off IFM. Turn off IFM
on any port that is connected to multiple devices. See “Port Setup”
in Chapter 3.
You have a chassis with a Management Module and at least one
Switch 1005 module installed, and you have just installed another
Switch module. One or more of the backplane LEDs are
continuously lit.
You have installed the latest Switch 1005 into the chassis when the
chassis and the Management Module were powered off, and due to
the way the Management Module behaves when it is powered on
(see “Operation after Power-up” in Chapter 2), this has caused a
network loop on the chassis backplane. With the chassis and
Management Module powered on, remove the latest Switch 1005
and insert it into another slot. If there are no spare slots, insert a
module of a different type into the slot vacated by the Switch
module for 30 seconds, and then replace that module with the
Switch module.
You have more than one Switch 1005 in your chassis. The network
does not appear to pass traffic, and one or more of the backplane
LEDs are continuously lit.
You may have caused a network loop on the chassis backplane.
See “Advice for Setting Backplane Connections and Avoiding Loops”
in Chapter 2.
DUA1840-0AAA01
6-6
CHAPTER 6: PROBLEM SOLVING
DUA1840-0AAA01
A
SCREEN ACCESS RIGHTS
The following table lists the rights assigned to each level of user for
accessing and editing Switch 1005 screens via the VT100 interface.
The access rights granted to Monitor level are all read-only. All other
access rights are read-and-write.
Screen
Available to...
Logon
Monitor
Manager
Security
Main Menu
Monitor
Manager
Security
Switch Management
Monitor
Manager
Security
Port Statistics
Monitor
Manager
Security
Port Statistics (Traffic)
Monitor
Manager
Security
Port Statistics (Errors)
Monitor
Manager
Security
A-2
APPENDIX A: SCREEN ACCESS RIGHTS
Screen
Available to...
Unit Statistics
Monitor
Manager
Security
Switch Database View
Monitor
Manager
Security
Unit Setup
Monitor
Manager
Security
Port Setup
Monitor
Manager
Security
Unit Resilience
Monitor
Manager
Security
Port Resilience
Monitor
Manager
Security
Remote Poll
Manager
Security
Security Menu
Monitor
Manager
Security
Create User
Security
Delete User
Security
Local Security
Security
Change User
Monitor
Manager
Security
DUA1840-0AAA01
A-3
Screen
Available to...
Status
Monitor
Manager
Security
Setup
Monitor
Manager
Security
Trap Setup
Monitor
Manager
Security
Software Upgrade
Security
Initialize
Security
Reset
Manager
Security
DUA1840-0AAA01
A-4
APPENDIX A: SCREEN ACCESS RIGHTS
DUA1840-0AAA01
B
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
Physical Dimensions
Height: 283mm (11.1 inches) x Width: 25mm (1 inch) x
Depth 312mm (12.3 inches)
Weight: 560g (1.2lbs)
Environmental Requirements
Operating Temperature
0° to 50° C (32° to 122°F)
Operating Humidity
10 to 95% relative humidity, non-condensing
Standards
EN60068 (IEC68)
Safety
Agency Certifications
Electromagnetic Emissions
(Agency Certification)
UL 1950, EN60950, CSA 22.2 No. 950, ECMA 97
Note that to comply with these standards, shielded cables
must be used.
EN55022 Class B, FCC Part 15 Class A, C108.8-M1983 Class A,
EN 50082-1 (IEC801 Parts 2-5)
Heat Dissipation
24 watts maximum
B-2
APPENDIX B: TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
Standards Supported
SNMP
■
SNMP protocol
(RFC 1157)
■
MIB-II
(RFC 1213)
■
Bridge MIB
(RFC 1286)
■
Repeater MIB
(RFC 1516)
■
VLAN MIB
(RFC 1573)
■
RMON MIB
(RFC 1271)
■
BOOTP
(RFC 951)
Terminal Emulation
■
Telnet (RFC 854)
Protocols Used for
Administration
■
UDP (RFC 768)
■
IP (RFC 791)
■
ICMP (RFC 792)
■
TCP (RFC 793)
■
ARP (RFC 826)
■
TFTP (RFC 783)
DUA1840-0AAA01
C
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
3Com provides easy access to technical support information through
the variety of services described in this appendix.
Online Technical Services
3Com offers worldwide product support seven days a week, 24 hours a
day, through the following online systems:
■
3Com Bulletin Board Service (3ComBBS)
■
World Wide Web site
■
3ComForum on CompuServe®
■
3ComFactsSM automated fax service
3Com Bulletin Board Service
3ComBBS contains patches, software, and drivers for all 3Com products,
as well as technical articles. This service is available via modem or ISDN
seven days a week, 24 hours a day.
Access by Modem
To reach the service by modem, set your modem to 8 data bits, no
parity, and 1 stop bit.
C-2
APPENDIX C: TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Call the telephone number nearest you:
Country
Data Rate
Telephone Number
Australia
up to 14400 bps
(61) (2) 9955 2073
France
up to 14400 bps
(33) (1) 69 86 69 54
Germany
up to 9600 bps
(49) (89) 627 32 188 or (49) (89) 627 32
189
Hong Kong
up to 14400 bps
(852) 2537 5608
Italy (fee required)
up to 14400 bps
(39) (2) 273 00680
Japan
up to 14400 bps
(81) (3) 3345 7266
Singapore
up to 14400 bps
(65) 534 5693
Taiwan
up to 14400 bps
(886) (2) 377 5838
U.K.
up to 28800 bps
(44) (1442) 278278
U.S.
up to 28800 bps
(1) (408) 980 8204
Access by ISDN
ISDN users can dial-in to 3ComBBS using a digital modem for fast
access up to 56 Kbps. To access 3ComBBS using ISDN, dial the
following number:
(408) 654 2703
World Wide Web Site
Access the latest networking information on 3Com’s World Wide Web
site by entering our URL into your Internet browser:
http://www.3Com.com/
This service features news and information about 3Com products,
customer service and support, 3Com’s latest news releases, selected
articles from 3TECH™ (3Com’s award-winning technical journal) and
more.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Online Technical Services
C-3
3ComForum on CompuServe
3ComForum is a CompuServe-based service containing patches,
software, drivers, and technical articles about all 3Com products, as well
as a messaging section for peer support. To use 3ComForum, you need
a CompuServe account.
To use 3ComForum:
1 Log on to CompuServe.
2 Enter go threecom .
3 Press [Return] to see the 3ComForum main menu.
3ComFacts Automated Fax Service
3Com Corporation’s interactive fax service, 3ComFacts, provides data
sheets, technical articles, diagrams, and troubleshooting instructions on
3Com products 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
Call 3ComFacts using your touch-tone telephone. International access
numbers are:
Country
Telephone Number
Hong Kong
(852) 2537 5610
U.K.
(44) (1442) 278279
U.S.
(1) (408) 727 7021
Local numbers are available within the following countries:
DUA1840-0AAA01
Country
Telephone Number
Country
Telephone Number
Australia
800 123853
Netherlands
06 0228049
Belgium
0800 71279
Norway
800 11062
Denmark
800 17319
Portugal
0505 442607
Finland
98 001 4444
Russia (Moscow only)
956 0815
France
05 90 81 58
Spain
900 964445
Germany
0130 8180 63
Sweden
020 792954
Italy
1678 99085
U.K.
0800 626403
C-4
APPENDIX C: TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Support from Your Network Supplier
If additional assistance is required, contact your network supplier.
Many suppliers are authorized 3Com service partners who are qualified
to provide a variety of services, including network planning, installation,
hardware maintenance, application training, and support services.
When you contact your network supplier for assistance, have the
following information ready:
■
Diagnostic error messages
■
A list of system hardware and software, including revision levels
■
Details about recent configuration changes, if applicable
If you are unable to contact your network supplier, see the following
section on how to contact 3Com.
DUA1840-0AAA01
Support from 3Com
C-5
Support from 3Com
If you are unable to receive support from your network supplier,
technical support contracts are available from 3Com.
In the U.S. and Canada, call (800) 876-3266 for customer service.
If you are outside the U.S. and Canada, contact your local 3Com sales
office to find your authorized service provider:
Country
Telephone Number
Country
Telephone Number
Japan
(81) (3) 33457251
(61) (3) 653 9515
Mexico
(525) 531 0591
0800 71429
Netherlands*
06 0227788
Brazil
(55) (11) 546 0869
Norway*
800 13376
Canada
(416) 498 3266
Singapore
(65) 538 9368
Denmark*
800 17309
South Africa
(27) (11) 803 7404
Finland*
0800 113153
Spain*
900 983125
France*
05 917959
Sweden*
020 795482
Germany*
0130 821502
Taiwan
(886) (2) 577 4352
Hong Kong
(852) 868 9111
United Arab
Emirates
(971) (4) 349049
Ireland*
1 800 553117
U.K.*
0800 966197
Italy*
1678 79489
U.S.
(1) (408) 492 1790
Australia (Sydney) (61) (2) 959 3020
(Melbourne)
Belgium*
* These numbers are toll-free.
DUA1840-0AAA01
C-6
APPENDIX C: TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Returning Products for Repair
A product sent directly to 3Com for repair must first be assigned a
Return Materials Authorization (RMA) number. A product sent to 3Com
without an RMA number will be returned to the sender unopened, at
the sender’s expense.
To obtain an RMA number, call or fax:
Country
Telephone Number
Fax Number
U.S. and Canada
(800) 876 3266, option 2
(408) 764 7120
Europe
31 30 60 29900, option 5
(44) (1442) 275822
Outside Europe, U.S., and Canada
(1) (408) 492 1790
(1) (408) 764 7290
DUA1840-0AAA01
GLOSSARY
10BASE-T
The IEEE 802.3 specification for Ethernet over Unshielded Twisted Pair
(UTP).
100BASE-FX
100Mbps Ethernet implementation over fiber.
100BASE-TX
100Mbps Ethernet implementation over Category 5 and Type 1 Twisted
Pair cabling.
ageing
The automatic removal of dynamic entries from the Switch Database
which have timed-out and are no longer valid.
backbone
The part of a network used as the primary path for transporting traffic
between network segments.
backbone port
A port which does not learn device addresses, and which receives all
frames with an unknown address. Backbone ports are normally used to
connect the Switch to the backbone of your network.
backplane
The internal path between modules within the MSH chassis.
bandwidth
Information capacity, measured in bits per second, that a channel can
transmit. The bandwidth of Ethernet is 10Mbps, the bandwidth of Fast
Ethernet is 100Mbps.
8
GLOSSARY
baud rate
The switching speed of a line. Also known as line speed.
BOOTP
The BOOTP protocol allows you to automatically map an IP address to a
given MAC address each time a device is started. In addition, the
protocol can assign the subnet mask and default gateway to a device.
bridge
A device that interconnects local or remote networks no matter what
higher level protocols are involved. Bridges form a single logical
network, centralizing network administration.
broadcast
A message sent to all destination devices on the network.
broadcast storm
Multiple simultaneous broadcasts that typically absorb available
network bandwidth and can cause network failure.
CSMA/CD
Channel access method used by Ethernet and IEEE 802.3 in which
devices transmit only after finding the data channel clear for some
period of time. When two devices transmit simultaneously, a collison
occurs and the colliding devices delay their retransmissions for a
random length of time.
data center switching
The point of aggregation within a corporate network where a switch
provides high-performance access to server farms, a high-speed
backbone connection and a control point for network management
and security.
Ethernet
A LAN specification developed jointly by Xerox, Intel and Digital
Equipment Corporation. Ethernet networks operate at 10Mbps using
CSMA/CD to run over cabling.
DUA1840-0AAA01
GLOSSARY
9
Fast Ethernet
100Mbps technology based on the Ethernet/CD network access
method.
forwarding
The process of sending a frame toward its destination by an
internetworking device.
full duplex
A system which allows frames to be transmitted and received
simultaneously and, in effect, doubles the bandwidth available on a
link.
IFM
Intelligent Flow Management. A means of holding packets back at the
transmit port of the connected end-station. Prevents packet loss at a
congested switch port.
IPX
Internetwork Packet Exchange. A protocol allowing communication in
a NetWare network.
IP address
Internet Protocol address. A unique identifier for a device attached to a
network using TCP/IP. The address is written as four octets separated
with full-stops (periods), and is made up of a network section, an
optional subnet section and a host section.
LAN
Local Area Network. A network of connected computing resources
(such as PCs, printers, servers) covering a relatively small geographic
area (usually not larger than a floor or building). Characterized by high
data rates and low error rates.
latency
The delay between the time a device receives a frame and the time the
frame is forwarded out of the destination port.
DUA1840-0AAA01
10
GLOSSARY
line speed
See baud rate.
main port
The port in a resilient link that carries data traffic in normal operating
conditions.
MIB
Management Information Base. Stores a device’s management
characteristics and parameters. MIBs are used by the Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP) to contain attributes of their managed
systems. The Switch contains its own internal MIB.
multicast
Single packets copied to a specific subset of network addresses. These
addresses are specified in the destination-address field of the packet.
PACE
Priority Access Control Enabled. 3Com’s innovative technology which
works in conjunction with a switch to control the latency and jitter
associated with the transmission of multimedia traffic over Ethernet
and Fast Ethernet.
protocol
A set of rules for communication between devices on a network. The
rules dictate format, timing, sequencing and error control.
resilient link
A pair of ports that can be configured so that one will take over data
transmission should the other fail. See also main port and standby port.
RJ-45
Standard 8-wire connectors for IEEE 802.3 10BASE-T networks.
RMON
Remote Monitoring. Subset of SNMP MIB II allows monitoring and
management capabilities by addressing up to ten different groups of
information.
DUA1840-0AAA01
GLOSSARY
11
server farm
A cluster of servers in a centralized location serving a large user
population.
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol. A protocol originally designed
to be used in managing TCP/IP internets. SNMP is presently
implemented on a wide range of computers and networking
equipment and may be used to manage many aspects of network and
end-station operation.
SmartAgent
Intelligent management agents in devices and logical connectivity
systems that reduce the computational load on the network
management station and reduce management-oriented traffic on the
network.
standby port
The port in a resilient link that will take over data transmission if the
main port in the link fails.
switch
A device which filters, forwards and floods frames based on the frame’s
destination address. The switch learns the addresses associated with
each switch port and builds tables based on this information to be
used for the switching decision.
TCP/IP
A layered set of communications protocols providing Telnet terminal
emulation, FTP file transfer, and other services for communication
among a wide range of computer equipment.
Telnet
A TCP/IP application protocol that provides virtual terminal service,
letting a user log in to another computer system and access a host as if
the user were connected directly to the host.
DUA1840-0AAA01
12
GLOSSARY
TFTP
Trivial File Transfer Protocol. Allows you to transfer files (such as
software upgrades) from a remote device using your Switch’s local
management capabilities.
Transcend
3Com’s network management system used to manage all of 3Com’s
networking solutions.
UDP
User Datagram Protocol. An Internet standard protocol that allows an
application program on one device to send a datagram to an
application program on another device.
VLAN
Virtual LAN. A group of location- and topology-independent devices
that communicate as if they are on a common physical LAN.
VLT
Virtual LAN Trunk. A connection which carries traffic for multiple VLANs
between Switch 1005 modules, SuperStack II Switch 1000 units and
SuperStack II Switch 3000 units.
VT100
A type of terminal which uses ASCII characters. VT100 screens have a
text-based appearance.
DUA1840-0AAA01
INDEX
Numerics
100BASE-FX Transceiver Module 1-18
100BASE-TX Transceiver Module 1-18
10BASE-T Transceiver Module 1-18
3Com Bulletin Board Service (3ComBBS) C-1
3Com sales offices C-5
3Com World Wide Web site C-2
3ComFacts C-3
3ComForum C-3
4 Port 10BASE-T Transceiver Module 1-18
A
access levels
assigning 2-21
access rights B-1
address
learning 1-8
ageing entries 3-12
Auto Logout screen 2-19
B
backbone port 1-4, 4-4
specifying 4-13, 4-15
backplane connections
avoiding loops 2-4
enabling/disabling 2-3
backplane connectors 1-20
Backplane LEDs 1-17
boot software version number 5-12
BOOTP
enabling/disabling 2-18
bridges vs Switch 1005 1-5
broadcast storm control 3-10
bulletin board service C-1
C
cable
maximum length 1-15
community SNMP
enabling/disabling 2-25
community strings
and traps 3-24
changing 2-23
entering 2-22
CompuServe C-3
counters
resetting to zero 5-3, 5-8, 5-10
Create User screen 2-21
D
database. See switch database
default
passwords 2-15
settings 1-20
users 2-15
default router 1-22, 2-18
Default VLAN 4-4, 4-13
Delete Users screen 2-22
disabling. See enabling/disabling
Duplex Mode
specifying 3-9
E
E LED 1-17
Edit User screen 2-23
enabling/disabling
BOOTP 2-18
community SNMP 2-25
full duplex 3-9
Intelligent Flow Management 3-8
internal ports 2-3
2
CHAPTER : INDEX
PACE 3-5, 3-9
ports 3-7
remote telnet 2-24
security 3-8
serial port 2-24
error analysis statistics
accessing 5-5
Expansion Module 1-4
fixing posts 1-20
installing 2-5
socket 1-20
extended POST 2-17
when to disable 1-11
internal ports 1-3
IP
addresses 1-21
configuring parameters 2-17
IP address
assigning 1-21
device 2-18
entering 1-21
IPX
addresses 1-21
configuring parameters 2-17
F
K
falling action 3-10
falling threshold 3-10
Fast Ethernet
configuration rules 1-15
fax service. See 3ComFacts
FE LED 1-17
field types 2-10
forwarding
default mode 1-20
modes 1-6, 3-4
operation 1-5
full duplex
definition 1-8
enabling/disabling 3-9
keyboard shortcuts 2-11
H
hardware version number 5-12
L
LEDs 1-17
link state 3-7
resilient 3-20
LinkBuilder MSH 1-1
links LK1 to LK5 1-20
locating 2-2
overriding 2-3
setting 2-3
local management. See VT100 interface
Local Security screen 2-24
logging off 2-19
logging on 2-14
for the first time 2-15
Logon screen 2-14
loops, avoiding 2-4
lost links 3-8
I
IFM. See Intelligent Flow Management
Initialization screen 3-26
initializing the Switch 3-26
installing
Expansion Module 2-5
Switch 1005 2-6
Transceiver Modules 2-5
Intelligent Flow Management
default state 1-20
definition 1-7
enabling/disabling 3-8
M
MAC address
for database entry 3-14
unit 2-17
Main Menu screen 2-15
management level
choosing 3-2
Management Setup screen 2-17
manager username 2-15
Module Database View screen 3-14
CHAPTER : INDEX
Module Resilience Summary screen 3-18
Module Setup screen 3-4
monitor username 2-15
MSH 1-1
MSH Switch 1005. See Switch 1005
N
network supplier support C-4
non-ageing entries 3-13
Non-routable protocols 4-5
normal POST 2-17
O
on-line technical services C-1
P
PACE
default state 1-20
definition 1-9
enabling/disabling on a port 3-9
enabling/disabling on the module 3-5
packets
processing 1-5
passwords
changing 2-23
default 2-15
forgetting 2-23
new 2-21
permanent entries 3-13
port
speed 3-7
state 3-7
port connections 1-3
10BASE-T 1-3, 1-18
backbone 1-4, 4-4, 4-13
default state 1-20
enabling/disabling 3-7
internal 1-3, 2-3
Transceiver Module 1-4
Port Error Analysis screen 5-9
port LEDs 1-17
port number
for database entry 3-14
Port Resilience screen 3-20
Port Setup screen 3-7
Port Statistics screen 5-4
Port Traffic Statistics screen 5-6
POST. See Power On Self Test
Power On Self Test
default setting 1-20
setting type 2-17
problem solving 6-1
PWR LED 1-17
R
Remote Poll screen 5-13
remote polling 5-13
remote telnet
enabling/disabling 2-24
Reset screen 3-25
resets
number of 5-11
type 5-11
resetting the Switch 3-25
resilient links 3-17
configuring 3-20
creating 3-22
definition 1-8
deleting 3-22
rules 3-17
viewing 3-18
returning products for repair C-6
rising action 3-10
rising threshold 3-10
RMON
default sessions 1-20
S
safety information 2-1
screens
access rights B-1
Auto Logout 2-19
Create User 2-21
Delete Users 2-22
Edit User 2-23
Initialization 3-26
Local Security 2-24
Logon 2-14
Main Menu 2-15
3
4
CHAPTER : INDEX
Management Setup 2-17
map 2-13
Module Database View 3-14
Module Resilience Summary 3-18
Module Setup 3-4
Port Error Analysis 5-9
Port Resilience 3-20
Port Setup 3-7
Port Statistics 5-4
Port Traffic Statistics 5-6
Remote Poll 5-13
Reset 3-25
Software Upgrade 3-28
Status 5-11
Summary Statistics 5-2
Switch Management 3-1
Trap Setup 3-23
User Access Levels 2-20
VLAN Setup 4-12
security
definition 1-8
enabling/disabling 3-8
security username 2-15
serial port
enabling/disabling 2-24
servers
connecting 1-11
SNMP 2-25
SNMP Network Managers
using 2-12
Software Upgrade screen 3-28
specifications
system C-1
standards supported C-2
statistics
port 5-4
port error analysis 5-9
port traffic 5-6
summary 5-2
Status screen 5-11
subnet mask
assigning 1-22
device 2-18
Summary Statistics screen 5-2
Switch 1005
assigning an IP address 1-21
connecting servers 1-11
default settings 1-20
description 1-1
dimensions C-1
features 1-2
front panel 1-16
installing 2-6
LEDs 1-17
logging off 2-19
logging on 2-14
management setup 1-21, 2-17
operation 1-5
PCB 1-19
ports 1-3
removing 2-7
resilient links 1-8
security 1-8
size C-1
standards supported C-2
upgrading software 3-28
vs bridge 1-5
weight C-1
switch database 3-12
adding an entry 3-16
ageing entries 3-12
configuring 3-14
deleting an entry 3-16
non-ageing entries 3-13
permanent entries 3-13
searching 3-15
traps 3-12
Switch Management screen 3-1
sysName 3-4
system specifications C-1
System Up Time 5-11
T
technical support C-1
telnet
maximum number of sessions 2-9
using 2-12
traffic statistics
accessing 5-5
Transceiver Module
connector 1-19
installing 2-5
ports 1-4
slot 1-18
Trap Setup screen 3-23
CHAPTER : INDEX
traps
community strings 3-24
setting up 3-23
throttle 3-24
trouble-shooting 6-1
navigating screens 2-10
screen map 2-13
W
World Wide Web site C-2
U
upgradeable software version number 5-12
upgrading software 3-28
User Access Levels screen 2-20
users
access levels 2-20, 2-24
changing names 2-23
creating 2-21
default 2-15
deleting 2-22
editing 2-23
names 2-21
setting up 2-20
V
version number
boot software 5-12
hardware 5-12
upgradable software 5-12
Virtual LAN Trunks. See VLTs
Virtual LANs. See VLANs
VLAN Setup screen 4-12
VLANs 4-1
assigning ports 4-15
Default 4-4, 4-13
default membership 1-20
definition 1-8
setting up 4-12
using Non-routable protocols 4-5
using unique MAC addresses 4-5
VLT mode
enabling/disabling 3-9
VLTs 3-9, 4-5, 4-13
VT100 interface
accessing 2-13
definition 2-9
field types 2-10
keyboard shortcuts 2-11
logging on 2-14
Z
zeroing screen counters 5-3, 5-8, 5-10
5
6
CHAPTER : INDEX
LIMITED WARRANTY
HARDWARE: 3Com warrants its hardware products to be free from defects in workmanship and materials,
under normal use and service, for the following lengths of time from the date of purchase from 3Com or its
Authorized Reseller:
Internetworking products
Network adapters
Ethernet stackable hubs and unmanaged Ethernet fixed port repeaters
One year
Lifetime
Lifetime*
(One year if not registered)
*Power supply and fans in these stackable hubs and unmanaged repeaters One year
Other hardware products
One year
Spare parts and spares kits
90 days
If a product does not operate as warranted during the applicable warranty period, 3Com shall, at its option and
expense, repair the defective product or part, deliver to Customer an equivalent product or part to replace the
defective item, or refund to Customer the purchase price paid for the defective product. All products that are
replaced will become the property of 3Com. Replacement products may be new or reconditioned. Any
replaced or repaired product or part has a ninety (90) day warranty or the remainder of the initial warranty
period, whichever is longer.
3Com shall not be responsible for any software, firmware, information, or memory data of Customer contained
in, stored on, or integrated with any products returned to 3Com pursuant to any warranty.
SOFTWARE: 3Com warrants that the software programs licensed from it will perform in substantial
conformance to the program specifications therefor for a period of ninety (90) days from the date of purchase
from 3Com or its Authorized Reseller. 3Com warrants the magnetic media containing software against failure
during the warranty period. No updates are provided. 3Com's sole obligation hereunder shall be (at 3Com's
discretion) to refund the purchase price paid by Customer for any defective software products, or to replace
any defective media with software which substantially conforms to 3Com's applicable published specifications.
Customer assumes responsibility for the selection of the appropriate applications program and associated
reference materials. 3Com makes no warranty that its software products will work in combination with any
hardware or applications software products provided by third parties, that the operation of the software
products will be uninterrupted or error free, or that all defects in the software products will be corrected. For
any third party products listed in the 3Com software product documentation or specifications as being
compatible, 3Com will make reasonable efforts to provide compatibility, except where the non-compatibility is
caused by a “bug” or defect in the third party's product.
STANDARD WARRANTY SERVICE: Standard warranty service for hardware products may be obtained by
delivering the defective product, accompanied by a copy of the dated proof of purchase, to 3Com's Corporate
Service Center or to an Authorized 3Com Service Center during the applicable warranty period. Standard
warranty service for software products may be obtained by telephoning 3Com's Corporate Service Center or an
Authorized 3Com Service Center, within the warranty period. Products returned to 3Com's Corporate Service
Center must be pre-authorized by 3Com with a Return Material Authorization (RMA) number marked on the
outside of the package, and sent prepaid, insured, and packaged appropriately for safe shipment. The repaired
or replaced item will be shipped to Customer, at 3Com's expense, not later than thirty (30) days after receipt by
3Com.
WARRANTIES EXCLUSIVE: IF A 3COM PRODUCT DOES NOT OPERATE AS WARRANTED ABOVE, CUSTOMER’S
SOLE REMEDY SHALL BE REPAIR, REPLACEMENT, OR REFUND OF THE PURCHASE PRICE PAID, AT 3COM’S
OPTION. THE FOREGOING WARRANTIES AND REMEDIES ARE EXCLUSIVE AND ARE IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER
WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, EITHER IN FACT OR BY OPERATION OF LAW, STATUTORY OR OTHERWISE,
INCLUDING WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. 3COM NEITHER
ASSUMES NOR AUTHORIZES ANY OTHER PERSON TO ASSUME FOR IT ANY OTHER LIABILITY IN CONNECTION
WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE OR USE OF ITS PRODUCTS.
3COM SHALL NOT BE LIABLE UNDER THIS WARRANTY IF ITS TESTING AND EXAMINATION DISCLOSE THAT THE
ALLEGED DEFECT IN THE PRODUCT DOES NOT EXIST OR WAS CAUSED BY CUSTOMER'S OR ANY THIRD
PERSON'S MISUSE, NEGLECT, IMPROPER INSTALLATION OR TESTING, UNAUTHORIZED ATTEMPTS TO REPAIR, OR
ANY OTHER CAUSE BEYOND THE RANGE OF THE INTENDED USE, OR BY ACCIDENT, FIRE, LIGHTNING, OR OTHER
HAZARD.
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY: IN NO EVENT, WHETHER BASED IN CONTRACT OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE)
SHALL 3COM BE LIABLE FOR INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR PUNITIVE DAMAGES OF
ANY KIND, OR FOR LOSS OF REVENUE, LOSS OF BUSINESS, OR OTHER FINANCIAL LOSS ARISING OUT OF OR IN
CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE, USE, PERFORMANCE, FAILURE, OR INTERRUPTION
OF ITS PRODUCTS,EVEN IF 3COM OR ITS AUTHORIZED RESELLER HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
SUCH DAMAGES.
Some states do not allow the exclusion of implied warranties or the limitation of incidental or consequential
damages for consumer products, so the above limitations and exclusions may not apply to you. This warranty
gives you specific legal rights which may vary from state to state.
GOVERNING LAW: This Limited Warranty shall be governed by the laws of the state of California.
3Com Corporation
5400 Bayfront Plaza
Santa Clara, CA 95052-8145
(408) 764-5000
1/1/94
ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY STATEMENTS
FCC Statement
This equipment has been tested with a class A computing device and has been found to comply with part 15
of FCC Rules. Operation in a residential area may cause unacceptable interference to radio and TV receptions
requiring the operator to take whatever steps are necessary to correct the interference.
CSA Statement
This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-causing Equipment
Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du
Canada.
Information To The User
If this equipment does cause interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning
the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the
following measures:
■
Reorient the receiving antenna.
■
Relocate the equipment with respect to the receiver.
■
Move the equipment away from the receiver.
■
Plug the equipment into a different outlet so that equipment and receiver are on different branch circuits.
If necessary, the user should consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for additional
suggestions. The user may find the following booklet prepared by the Federal Communications Commission
helpful:
How to Identify and Resolve Radio-TV Interference Problems
This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, Stock No.
004-000-00345-4.
In order to meet FCC emissions limits, this equipment must be used only with cables which comply with IEEE
802.3.