Technical data | 3Com 3500 Switch User Manual

Command Reference Guide
®
CoreBuilder® 3500
CoreBuilder 9000
CoreBuilder 9400
SuperStack® II Switch 3900
SuperStack II Switch 9300
http://www.3com.com/
Part No. 10013505
Published November 1999
3Com Corporation
5400 Bayfront Plaza
Santa Clara, California
95052-8145
Copyright © 1999, 3Com Corporation. All rights reserved. No part of this documentation may be reproduced
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adaptation) without written permission from 3Com Corporation.
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please contact 3Com and a copy will be provided to you.
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT LEGEND
If you are a United States government agency, then this documentation and the software described herein are
provided to you subject to the following:
All technical data and computer software are commercial in nature and developed solely at private expense.
Software is delivered as “Commercial Computer Software” as defined in DFARS 252.227-7014 (June 1995) or
as a “commercial item” as defined in FAR 2.101(a) and as such is provided with only such rights as are
provided in 3Com’s standard commercial license for the Software. Technical data is provided with limited rights
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You agree not to remove or deface any portion of any legend provided on any licensed program or
documentation contained in, or delivered to you in conjunction with, this User Guide.
Unless otherwise indicated, 3Com registered trademarks are registered in the United States and may or may
not be registered in other countries.
3Com, the 3Com logo, CoreBuilder, DynamicAccess, NETBuilder II, PACE, SmartAgent, SuperStack, and
Transcend are registered trademarks of 3Com Corporation. 3Com Facts is a service mark of 3Com
Corporation.
PostScript is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems, Inc. AppleTalk is a registered trademark of Apple
Computer, Incorporated. Banyan and VINES are registered trademarks of Banyan Worldwide. DEC, DECnet,
and PATHWORKS are registered trademarks of Compaq Computer Corporation. OpenView is a registered
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All other company and product names may be trademarks of the respective companies with which they are
associated.
CONTENTS
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Using This Book 20
Finding Specific Information in This Guide 20
Command Information 22
Recommendations for Entering Commands
Conventions 23
Documentation Comments 25
Year 2000 Compliance 25
23
PART I GETTING STARTED
1
ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW
Administration Console Overview 29
CoreBuilder 9000 System Management Overview
Management and Data Channels 31
CoreBuilder 9000 Management Features 33
EME Overview 33
Configuration Tasks 34
Accessing the Administration Console 35
Password Access Levels 35
Accessing Your System 36
Access Examples 37
Using Menus to Perform Tasks 39
Selecting Menu Options 40
Entering Values 41
Navigating Through the Menus 42
30
2
COMMAND SUMMARY
PART II SYSTEM-LEVEL FUNCTIONS
3
SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
Menu Structure 68
system display 69
system fileTransfer 70
system console webHelpConfig 71
system console webAccess 72
system console consoleAccess 73
system console ctlKeys 74
system console password 75
system console screenHeight 76
system console security display 77
system console security define 78
system console security remove 80
system console security access 81
system console security message 82
system console timeout timeOut 83
system console timeout interval 84
system snapshot summary 85
system snapshot detail 86
system snapshot save 87
system softwareUpdate 89
system baseline display 90
system baseline set 91
system baseline requestedState 92
system serialPort terminalSpeed 93
system serialPort modemSpeed 95
system serialPort baudRate 96
system serialPort serialPortMode 98
system serialPort configModem 99
system serialPort enableModem 100
system name 101
system time 102
system time datetime 103
system time timezone 104
system time dst 106
system nvData save 107
system nvData restore 110
system
system
system
system
system
system
system
system
system
system
system
system
script
logout
4
nvData examine 112
nvData reset 113
clearDiagBlock 114
diagErrLog 115
sntp display 116
sntp define 117
sntp modify 118
sntp remove 119
sntp state 120
sntp pollInterval 121
sntp tolerance 122
reboot 123
124
126
MODULE ENVIRONMENT
Menu Structure 128
module display 129
module snapshot summary 130
module snapshot detail 131
module baseline display 132
module baseline set 133
module baseline requestedState 134
module redundancy 135
module name 136
module time 137
module screenHeight 138
module nvData reset 139
module nvData emergencyDownload 140
module nvData displayDownload 141
module nvData staging 142
module clearDiagBlock 143
module diagErrLog 144
module reboot 145
disconnect 146
PART III ESTABLISHING MANAGEMENT ACCESS
5
OUT-OF-BAND MANAGEMENT
Menu Structure 150
management summary 151
management detail 153
management ip interface summary 156
management ip interface define 157
management ip interface modify 158
management ip interface remove 159
management ip route display 160
management ip route static 162
management ip route remove 163
management ip route flush 164
management ip route default 165
management ip route noDefault 166
management ip route findRoute 167
management ip arp display 168
management ip arp static 169
management ip arp remove 170
management ip arp flushAll 171
management ip arp flushDynamic 172
management ip rip display 173
management ip rip mode 174
management ip rip statistics 176
management ip ping 177
management ip advancedPing 179
management ip traceRoute 182
management ip advancedTraceRoute 184
management ip statistics 186
6
SIMPLE NETWORK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL (SNMP)
Menu Structure
190
snmp display 191
snmp community 192
snmp trap display 193
snmp trap addModify 194
snmp trap remove 196
snmp trap flush 197
snmp trap smtProxyTraps 198
snmp rmonConfiguration 199
snmp writeDisable 200
PART IV PHYSICAL PORT PARAMETERS
7
ETHERNET PORTS
Menu Structure 203
ethernet summary 204
ethernet detail 207
ethernet autoNegotiation 212
ethernet portMode 213
ethernet flowControl 215
ethernet paceAccess 217
ethernet paceInteractiveAccess 218
ethernet label 219
ethernet portState 220
ethernet monitoring summary 221
ethernet monitoring mode 222
8
FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
Menu Structure 223
fddi station display 224
fddi station connectPolicy 225
fddi station tNotify 227
fddi station statusReporting 228
fddi path display 229
fddi path tvxLowerBound 230
fddi path tmaxLowerBound 231
fddi path maxTreq 232
fddi mac summary 233
fddi mac detail 234
fddi mac frameErrorThreshold 237
fddi mac notCopiedThreshold 238
fddi mac llcService 239
fddi mac path 240
fddi port display 241
fddi port lerAlarm 242
fddi port lerCutoff 243
fddi port label 244
fddi port path 245
fddi stationMode display 246
fddi stationMode modify 247
PART V BRIDGING PARAMETERS
9
BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
Menu Structure 251
bridge display 252
bridge ipFragmentation 255
bridge ipxSnapTranslation 256
bridge addressThreshold 257
bridge agingTime 258
bridge spanningTree stpState 259
bridge spanningTree stpPriority 261
bridge spanningTree stpMaxAge 262
bridge spanningTree stpHelloTime 263
bridge spanningTree stpForwardDelay 264
bridge spanningTree stpGroupAddress 265
bridge gvrpState 266
bridge cos enable 267
bridge cos summary 268
bridge cos modify 269
bridge multicast igmp summary 270
bridge multicast igmp snoopMode 271
bridge multicast igmp queryMode 272
bridge multicast igmp queryIpAddress 273
bridge multicast igmp vlans 274
bridge multicast igmp groups 275
bridge multicast igmp desQuerier 276
bridge multicast igmp rPorts 277
bridge multicast igmp qPort 278
10
BRIDGE PORT PARAMETERS
Menu Structure 279
bridge port summary 280
bridge port detail 283
bridge port multicastLimit 288
bridge port stpState 289
bridge port stpCost 290
bridge port stpPriority 291
bridge port gvrpState 292
bridge port address list 293
bridge port address add 294
bridge port address remove 295
bridge port address find 296
bridge port address flushAll 297
bridge port address flushDynamic 298
11
TRUNKS
Menu Structure 300
bridge trunk autoMap summary 301
bridge trunk autoMap enable/disable 302
bridge trunk autoMap test 303
bridge trunk summary 304
bridge trunk detail 305
bridge trunk define 307
bridge trunk modify 312
bridge trunk remove 318
12
MULTIPOINT LINK AGGREGATION (MPLA)
Menu Structure 321
bridge mpla summary 322
bridge mpla detail 323
bridge mpla mode 324
bridge mpla peerMacAddress
13
326
RESILIENT LINKS
Menu Structure 327
bridge link summary 328
bridge link detail 329
bridge link define 330
bridge link linkState 332
bridge link activePort 333
bridge link modify 334
bridge link remove 336
14
VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
Menu Structure 337
bridge vlan summary 338
bridge vlan detail 341
bridge vlan define (3500/9000 Layer 3) 345
bridge vlan define (3900/9300/9400/ 9000 Layer 2)
352
bridge
bridge
bridge
bridge
bridge
bridge
15
vlan modify (3500/9000 Layer 3) 355
vlan modify (3900/9300/9400/ 9000 Layer 2)
vlan remove 363
vlan mode 364
vlan stpMode 365
vlan vlanAwareMode 366
360
PACKET FILTERS
Menu Structure 370
bridge packetFilter list 371
bridge packetFilter display 372
bridge packetFilter create portGroup 373
bridge packetFilter create custom 374
bridge packetFilter delete 376
bridge packetFilter edit 377
bridge packetFilter load 379
bridge packetFilter assign 382
bridge packetFilter unassign 384
bridge packetFilter portGroup list 386
bridge packetFilter portGroup display 387
bridge packetFilter portGroup create 388
bridge packetFilter portGroup delete 390
bridge packetFilter portGroup addPort 391
bridge packetFilter portGroup removePort 392
PART VI ROUTING PROTOCOLS
16
INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
Menu Structure 396
ip interface summary 398
ip interface detail 400
ip interface define (3500/9000 Layer 3) 403
ip interface define (3900/9300/9400/ 9000 Layer 2)
ip interface modify 407
ip interface remove 408
ip interface arpProxy 409
ip interface broadcastAddress 411
ip interface directedBroadcast 412
ip interface icmpRedirect 413
ip interface icmpRouterDiscovery 415
406
ip interface statistics 418
ip route display 420
ip route static 422
ip route remove 423
ip route flush 424
ip route default 425
ip route noDefault 426
ip route findRoute 427
ip arp display 428
ip arp static 429
ip arp remove 430
ip arp flushAll 431
ip arp flushDynamic 432
ip arp age 433
ip arp statistics 434
ip dns display 436
ip dns domainName 437
ip dns define 438
ip dns modify 439
ip dns remove 440
ip dns nslookup 441
ip udpHelper display 442
ip udpHelper define 443
ip udpHelper remove 444
ip udpHelper hopCountLimit 445
ip udpHelper threshold 446
ip udpHelper interface first 447
ip udpHelper interface even 448
ip udpHelper interface sequential 449
ip routing 450
ip rip display 451
ip rip mode 453
ip rip compatibilityMode 455
ip rip cost 456
ip rip poisonReverse 457
ip rip routeAggregation Mode 458
ip rip password 459
ip rip addAdvertisement 460
ip rip remove Advertisement 462
ip rip policy summary 463
ip rip policy detail 464
ip rip policy define 465
ip rip policy modify 469
ip rip policy remove 471
ip rip statistics 472
ip ping 473
ip advancedPing 475
ip traceRoute 478
ip advancedTraceRoute
ip statistics
482
17
480
VIRTUAL ROUTER REDUNDANCY (VRRP)
Menu Structure 485
ip vrrp summary 486
ip vrrp detail 488
ip vrrp define 492
ip vrrp modify 495
ip vrrp remove 498
ip vrrp mode 499
ip vrrp neighbor 500
ip vrrp statistics 501
18
IP MULTICAST
Menu Structure 504
ip multicast dvmrp interface summary 505
ip multicast dvmrp interface detail 506
ip multicast dvmrp interface mode 507
ip multicast dvmrp interface metric 508
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels summary 509
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels define 511
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels remove 513
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels address 514
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels threshold 515
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels metric 516
ip multicast dvmrp routeDisplay 517
ip multicast dvmrp cacheDisplay 518
ip multicast dvmrp default 520
ip multicast igmp interface summary 521
ip multicast igmp interface detail 522
ip multicast igmp interface TTL 523
ip multicast igmp snooping 524
ip multicast igmp querying 525
ip multicast cache 526
ip multicast traceRoute 528
19
OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
Menu Structure 530
ip ospf areas display 531
ip ospf areas defineArea 532
ip ospf areas modifyArea 533
ip ospf areas removeArea 534
ip ospf areas addRange 535
ip ospf areas modifyRange 536
ip ospf areas removeRange 537
ip ospf defaultRouteMetric display 538
ip ospf defaultRouteMetric define 539
ip ospf defaultRouteMetric remove 540
ip ospf interface summary 541
ip ospf interface detail 542
ip ospf interface statistics 544
ip ospf interface mode 548
ip ospf interface priority 549
ip ospf interface areaID 550
ip ospf interface cost 551
ip ospf interface delay 552
ip ospf interface hello 553
ip ospf interface retransmit 554
ip ospf interface dead 555
ip ospf interface password 556
ip ospf linkStateData databaseSummary 557
ip ospf linkStateData router 558
ip ospf linkStateData network 560
ip ospf linkStateData summary 561
ip ospf linkStateData external 563
ip ospf neighbors display 564
ip ospf neighbors add 565
ip ospf neighbors remove 566
ip ospf routerID 567
ip ospf partition display 569
ip ospf partition modify 570
ip ospf stubDefaultMetric display 571
ip ospf stubDefaultMetric define 572
ip ospf stubDefaultMetric remove 573
ip ospf virtualLinks summary 574
ip ospf virtualLinks detail 575
ip ospf virtualLinks statistics 577
ip ospf virtualLinks define 581
ip ospf virtualLinks remove 582
ip ospf virtualLinks areaID 583
ip ospf virtualLinks router 584
ip ospf virtualLinks delay 585
ip ospf virtualLinks hello 586
ip ospf virtualLinks retransmit 587
ip ospf virtualLinks dead 588
ip ospf virtualLinks password 589
ip ospf policy summary 590
ip ospf policy detail 591
ip ospf policy define 593
ip ospf policy modify 598
ip ospf policy remove 602
ip ospf statistics 603
20
IPX
Menu Structure 606
ipx interface display 607
ipx interface define 608
ipx interface modify 610
ipx interface remove 612
ipx interface SAPadvertising 613
ipx interface RIPadvertising 614
ipx route display 615
ipx route secondary 617
ipx route static 618
ipx route remove 620
ipx route flush 621
ipx server display 622
ipx server static 624
ipx server remove 626
ipx server flush 627
ipx server secondary 628
ipx forwarding 629
ipx rip mode 630
ipx rip triggered 631
ipx rip policy summary 632
ipx rip policy define 633
ipx rip policy modify 635
ipx rip policy remove 637
ipx sap mode 638
ipx sap triggered 639
ipx sap policy summary 640
ipx sap policy detail 641
ipx sap policy define 642
ipx sap policy modify 645
ipx sap policy remove 648
ipx output-delay 649
ipx statistics summary 650
ipx statistics rip 651
ipx statistics sap 652
ipx statistics forwarding 653
ipx statistics interface 655
ipx oddLengthPadding 657
ipx NetBIOS 658
ipx secondary 659
21
APPLETALK
Menu Structure 662
appletalk interface summary
663
appletalk interface detail 664
appletalk interface define 665
appletalk interface modify 667
appletalk interface remove 669
appletalk interface statistics 670
appletalk route display 672
appletalk route flush 673
appletalk aarp display 674
appletalk aarp remove 675
appletalk aarp flush 676
appletalk zone display network 677
appletalk zone display zone 678
appletalk forwarding 679
appletalk checksum 680
appletalk sourceSocket 681
appletalk ping 682
appletalk statistics ddp 683
appletalk statistics rtmp 684
appletalk statistics zip 685
appletalk statistics nbp 686
PART VII TRAFFIC POLICY
22
QUALITY
OF
SERVICE (QOS)
AND
Menu Structure 690
qos classifier summary 691
qos classifier detail 692
qos classifier define 694
qos classifier modify 701
qos classifier remove 706
qos control summary 707
qos control detail 708
qos control define 710
qos control modify 718
qos control remove 724
qos ldap display 725
qos ldap enable 726
qos ldap disable 727
qos rsvp summary 728
qos rsvp detail 729
qos rsvp enable 730
qos rsvp disable 732
qos bandwidth display 733
qos bandwidth modify 734
qos excessTagging display 735
qos excessTagging enable 736
qos excessTagging disable 737
qos statistics interval 738
qos statistics receive 739
qos statistics transmit 741
PART VIII MONITORING
23
EVENT LOG
Menu Structure 748
log display 749
log devices 750
log services 752
RSVP
24
ROVING ANALYSIS
Menu Structure 756
analyzer display 757
analyzer add 758
analyzer remove 760
analyzer start 761
analyzer stop 763
PART IX REFERENCE
A
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Online Technical Services 767
World Wide Web Site 767
3Com Knowledgebase Web Services 767
3Com FTP Site 768
3Com Bulletin Board Service 768
3Com Facts Automated Fax Service 769
Support from Your Network Supplier 769
Support from 3Com 769
Returning Products for Repair 771
INDEX
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
This Command Reference Guide provides information about the
commands that you use to configure and manage your system or module
after you install it. Before you use this guide, you should have already
consulted documents such as your system Getting Started Guide or
module Quick Start Guide and physically installed your system or module.
Several CoreBuilder® and SuperStack® II platforms are documented in this
book. Table 1 lists the specific platforms and the current software release
level of that platform as it relates to the information contained in this
book:
Table 1 Platforms Covered in This Document
Platform
Release
®
CoreBuilder 3500
®
3.0
SuperStack II Switch 3900
3.0
CoreBuilder 9000
3.0
SuperStack II Switch 9300
3.0
CoreBuilder 9400
3.0
This guide is intended for the system or network administrator who is
responsible for configuring, using, and managing the system. It assumes
a working knowledge of local area network (LAN) operations and
familiarity with communications protocols that are used on
interconnected LANs.
If the information in the release notes that are shipped with your product
differs from the information in this guide, follow the instructions in the
release notes.
20
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Using This Book
This guide contains information for every command for the platforms
listed at the beginning of this chapter. It includes specific information
about command syntax, field descriptions, default values, and the
possible range of values. Some command descriptions include a section
called “Important Considerations” that contains additional information
to be aware of when using the command. Where appropriate, examples
help you to understand the commands.
This guide does not contain troubleshooting information or instructional
material about why or when to use a particular command. For
information about troubleshooting and networking tasks, see the
Implementation Guide that is shipped with your system on a CD-ROM.
Finding Specific
Information
in This Guide
Use this chart to help you find information about specific tasks:
If you are looking for information about
Turn to
System administration and configuration tasks
Part I: Getting Started
Using command abbreviations
Summary of commands for all platforms
Displaying the system or module configuration
Using the snapshot feature
Part II: System-Level
Functions
Baselining statistics
Configuring system parameters, such as name, date/time,
and passwords
Configuring system security
Establishing system access through a Web browser
Saving, restoring, and resetting nonvolatile data
Running scripts of Console tasks
Setting up the system for out-of-band management access Part III: Establishing
through serial ports or using IP and setting up SNMP
Management Access
Administering the IP management interface
Configuring SNMP community strings
Administering trap reporting
Administering Ethernet ports
Displaying statistics for and labelling Ethernet ports
Administering Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) ports
Part IV: Physical Port
Parameters
Finding Specific Information in This Guide
If you are looking for information about
Turn to
Configuring bridge parameters such as bridge display,
agingTime, stpState, and Class of Service
Part V: Bridging
Parameters
21
Managing trunks
Configuring bridge port parameters such as listing
addresses, setting the port priority, and controlling the
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) on a bridge
Displaying MultiPoint Link Aggregation (MPLA) parameters
Configuring resilient links
Configuring virtual LANs (VLANs)
Configuring packet filters
Configuring IP interfaces and IP protocol parameters
Configuring Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP)
parameters
Part VI: Routing
Protocols
Configuring IP multicast routing and filtering
Configuring Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing
Configuring IPX routing
Configuring AppleTalk routing
Configuring Quality of Service (QoS) classifiers, controls,
Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP), bandwidth,
and excess tagging
Part VII: Traffic Policy
Viewing statistics
Administering the event log
Part VIII: Monitoring
Administering roving analysis
Technical support
Part IX: Reference
Quickly locating information on tasks and topics
Index
22
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Command
Information
Each software command has its own description in this guide. Each
command description begins at the top of a page. A command
description begins with these items:
■
The full command name
■
Platforms on which this command is valid
Under the command name is a list of 3Com switch platforms. The
command is valid on every platform that has a check mark (✓) next
to it.
Sample platform list
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
■
A short description of the purpose of the command
Some command descriptions begin with a sentence similar to this one:
“For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer n switching modules only.”
where n is either 2 or 3. Because the CoreBuilder 9000 system can house
both Layer 2 modules and Layer 3 modules, this sentence alerts you to
the fact that this particular command is valid only on Layer 2 modules or
Layer 3 modules.
The command description continues with one or more of the following
sections:
■
Valid Minimum Abbreviation — This section lists the shortest
number of characters that you can type to issue the command.
■
Important Considerations — These usage notes identify potential
problems before you use the command.
■
Options — If the command begins a configuration process or other
procedure, this section presents each prompt that you see, its
description, the possible values that you can enter, and the default
value.
■
Fields — If the command prompts the system to display information,
this section lists the display parameters and their definitions.
Conventions
Recommendations
for Entering
Commands
23
■
Procedure — Numbered steps walk you through complex commands.
■
Example — Examples show the interactive display when the system
provides additional useful information.
Before you enter any command, 3Com recommends that you:
■
Examine the system menu carefully for the full command string:
■
Consult the documentation for the valid minimum abbreviation for
the command string.
If you are unfamiliar with a particular system, always enter the entire
command, even though the system accepts abbreviated commands. If
you abbreviate commands, you may make errors or omissions that have
undesirable consequences.
For example, on the CoreBuilder 9000, to list all addresses for a port, you
use the bridge port address list all command. If you mistakenly
enter bridge port address all, the system interprets it as an
abbreviated version of the bridge port address flushAll command,
which flushes the entire address table for the port and does not request
that you confirm the command.
Conventions
Table 2 and Table 3 list icon and text conventions that are used
throughout this guide.
Table 2 Notice Icons
Icon
Notice Type
Description
Information note
Information that describes important features or
instructions
Caution
Information that alerts you to potential loss of data
or potential damage to an application, system, or
device
Warning
Information that alerts you to potential personal
injury
24
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Table 3 Text Conventions
Convention
Description
Screen displays This typeface represents information as it appears on the
screen.
Command
The word “command” means that you enter the command
exactly as shown in the text and then press Return or Enter.
Commands appear in bold. Example:
To set flow control, enter the following command:
ethernet flowControl
This guide always gives the full form of a command.
However, you can abbreviate commands by entering just
enough characters to distinguish one command from
another similar command, as shown in “Valid Minimum
Abbreviations” under each command description.
Commands are not case sensitive.
The words “enter”
and “type”
When you see the word “enter” in this guide, you must type
something, and then press the Return or Enter key. Do not
press Return or Enter when an instruction simply says
“type.”
Keyboard key names
If you must press two or more keys simultaneously, the key
names are linked with a plus sign (+). Example:
Press Ctrl+C.
Words in italics
Italics are used to:
■
Emphasize a point
■
Denote a new term when it is defined in text
Documentation Comments
Documentation
Comments
25
Your suggestions are very important to us. They help us to make our
documentation more useful to you.
Please send e-mail comments about this guide to:
sdtechpubs_comments@ne.3com.com
Include the following information when commenting:
■
Document title
■
Document part number (found on the front or back page of each
document)
■
Page number (if appropriate)
Example:
Command Reference Guide
Part Number 10013505
Page 347
Year 2000
Compliance
For information on Year 2000 compliance and 3Com products, visit the
3Com Year 2000 Web page:
http://www.3com.com/products/yr2000.html
26
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
GETTING STARTED
I
Chapter 1
Administration Overview
Chapter 2
Command Summary
1
ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW
This chapter introduces the Administration Console software that is
supplied with your system, the types of commands that you use to
perform network tasks, the valid syntax for command abbreviations, and
some shortcuts to help you navigate through the menus. It also provides
an overview of the management software that is specific to the
CoreBuilder® 9000 Enterprise Switch. It introduces the EME (Enterprise
Management Engine) Management Console for the CoreBuilder 9000
and describes its relationship to the Administration Console software.
The following topics are covered in this chapter:
Administration
Console Overview
■
Administration Console Overview
■
CoreBuilder 9000 System Management Overview
■
CoreBuilder 9000 Management Features
■
Configuration Tasks
■
Accessing the Administration Console
■
Using Menus to Perform Tasks
The Administration Console software is installed at the factory in flash
memory on the system processor. Because this software boots
automatically from flash memory when you power on your system, the
system is immediately ready for use in your network. However, you may
need to:
■
Configure certain parameters before the system can operate
effectively in your networking environment.
■
Connect to the Administration Console, if you have a
CoreBuilder 9000.
■
View important MAC, port, bridge, virtual LAN (VLAN), and IP
statistics while you manage your system.
30
CHAPTER 1: ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW
You use the Administration Console software to configure your system
parameters (or, on the CoreBuilder 9000, to configure your module
parameters) and display statistics and counters.
For more complete network management, you can use an external
application, such as 3Com’s Transcend® Network Control Services tool
suite.
On the CoreBuilder 3500, CoreBuilder 9000, and CoreBuilder 9400, and
on the SuperStack® II Switch 3900 and Switch 9300, you can also
configure parameters and view statistics using the Web Management
suite of HTML-based applications. See the Web Management User Guide
for your system for additional information.
CoreBuilder 9000
System
Management
Overview
The CoreBuilder 9000 comes in a 7-slot, 8-slot, or 16-slot chassis in which
you install switch fabric modules and interface modules. Before you begin
to manage your CoreBuilder 9000 system, review the
management-related information in this section.
The CoreBuilder 9000 system supports the following management
interfaces:
■
EME Management Console
Use the EME Management Console to manage EME and Enterprise
Management Controller (EMC) functions, such as login table
management, IP connectivity, event and trap logs, and software
downloads to all modules. The EME Management Console also
manages chassis functions, such as system inventory and power
management features.
■
Administration Console
Use the Administration Console to manage the CoreBuilder 9000
switch fabric modules and intelligent interface modules. These
modules contain an on-board network management agent that allows
this direct management.
■
ATM Local Management Application (LMA)
Use the ATM LMA to manage the ATM Enterprise Switch, ATM Switch
Fabric Module, and ATM interface modules. These modules contain an
on-board network management agent to allow this direct
management.
Management and Data Channels
31
ATM LMA management of ATM switch fabric modules and ATM
interface modules is outside of the scope of this guide. To learn about
managing the ATM Enterprise Switch and ATM modules using the
ATM LMA, see the CoreBuilder 9000 ATM Enterprise Switch
Management Guide.
You cannot manage the EME using the ATM LMA, and you cannot
manage ATM Switch Fabric Modules or ATM interface modules using
the EME Management Console.
■
Web Management
The Web Management suite of applications are an embedded part of
the CoreBuilder 9000 system software image. They include the
WebConsole and DeviceView applications. Additional installable
applications include online Help. After you have set up your IP address
for your system, you can access the Web Management applications
directly from your Web browser by entering its IP address.
See the Web Management User Guide for the CoreBuilder 9000
Enterprise Switch for additional information about Web Management.
You manage the EME from a command line interface using EME
management commands. You manage the switch fabric modules or
interface modules through the Administration Console using module
management commands or through the Web Management interface.
Management and
Data Channels
The CoreBuilder 9000 system uses separate channels for network traffic
and management traffic:
■
The private management LAN (MLAN) handles management traffic.
Management traffic travels to and from the EME, which acts as the
single point of contact for all management traffic in the chassis.
■
Switch fabric module backplane channels handle network traffic. Each
interface module has one or two backplane ports that connect to the
switch fabric module backplane, which allows network traffic to pass
through the CoreBuilder 9000 system.
Figure 1 illustrates the MLAN channel and the switch fabric module
backplane channels in the CoreBuilder 9000 16-slot chassis.
32
CHAPTER 1: ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW
Figure 1 System Data Channels in the16-slot Chassis
1
2 3
4 5 6
7
8
9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
5 traces - each
verified to 1.25GHz
5 redundant traces
Primary and redundant switch fabric modules
PSU
PSU
PSU
PSU
Primary interconnect
Backup interconnect
Management LAN (MLAN)
EME Overview
CoreBuilder 9000
Management
Features
EME Overview
33
You can manage the CoreBuilder 9000 system through a terminal
interface, through the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP),
®
and through the 3Com Transcend Network Control Services. The EME is
the primary communication mechanism into the chassis and modules.
You manage other intelligent modules within the chassis through the
EME.
The EME is an SNMP-based network management module that manages
and controls the 3Com CoreBuilder 9000 chassis and its modules. The
EME has the following features:
■
■
Chassis Management Architecture — Provides a cost-efficient
management architecture that:
■
Provides a central point of contact for chassis management
■
Provides all controller functions, as well as EME functions
Intelligent Power Management — Manages power use in the
chassis by:
■
■
■
Preventing newly installed modules from receiving power when
there is not enough power available
Allowing you to prioritize the order in which modules power off (if
there is insufficient power available)
Allowing you to implement fault-tolerant power, which allows the
chassis to reserve some of its power capacity to protect against a
power supply failure
In the chassis:
■
The EME exchanges information with all modules through the MLAN.
■
Interface modules pass data through the switch fabric module.
■
On modules that include their own agent, the EME “connects” to that
module and then you can use the Administration Console
management interface to manage that module.
34
CHAPTER 1: ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW
Configuration Tasks
To help you configure your system, the top-level menu of the
Administration Console groups the commands into types for certain
tasks, as listed in Table 4.
Not all menus and tasks are available on all systems.
Table 4 Types of Commands Associated with Configuration Tasks
Type of
Command
General
Top-Level Menus Tasks
system
module
Set system or module parameters, handle
nonvolatile (NV) data, set security, reboot
script
Run scripts
logout, disconnect Leave the Administration Console
Management
setup
management
Set up the out-of-band management
interface
snmp
Set up the system for SNMP and trap
reporting
Port-based
management
ethernet
Manage Ethernet ports
fddi
Manage Fiber Distributed Data Interface
(FDDI) ports
Bridging
bridge
Set bridge parameters for the entire system,
including for Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)
and Class of Service (CoS)
Manage trunking of bridge ports
Set and display MultiPoint Link Aggregation
(MPLA) parameters
Manage resilient links
Set bridge parameters for specific bridge
ports
Manage virtual LANs (VLANs)
Manage packet filtering for port groups
Routing
ip
Set up IP, IP multicast, and IP Open Shortest
Path First (OSPF) routing
ipx
Set up IPX routing
appletalk
Set up AppleTalk routing
Password Access Levels
35
Table 4 Types of Commands Associated with Configuration Tasks (continued)
Type of
Command
Accessing the
Administration
Console
Top-Level Menus Tasks
Quality of Service qos
management
Set up classifiers and controls for
traffic-policy-based services
Monitoring
log
Set severity levels and services for event
logging
analyzer
Monitor the network using a network
analyzer
Depending on which system you are managing, you access the
Administration Console in either two steps (for the CoreBuilder 9000) or
one step (for all other systems). See “Accessing Your System” later in this
section for details.
For all systems, the Administration Console supports three password
levels, allowing you to provide different levels of access for a range of
users.
Password Access
Levels
Your access level determines which types of menu commands you can
use, as described in Table 5.
Table 5 Password Access Levels
Access
Level
For users who need to
Allows users to
Administer
Perform system or module
setup and management tasks
(usually a single network
administrator)
Perform system-level or
module-level administration (such
as resetting the module or changing
passwords)
Write
Perform active network
management
Configure network parameters
(such as setting the aging time for a
bridge)
Read
Only view system or module
parameters
Access only “display” menu items
(like display, summary, and detail)
36
CHAPTER 1: ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW
Accessing Your
System
You access the Administration Console for your system in one of two
ways:
■
For all systems except the CoreBuilder 9000 — Access the
Administration Console for the first time at the Administer level and
press Return at the password prompt (the initial password is null).
Subsequently, every time that you access the Administration Console,
it prompts you for an access level and password, as shown here:
Select access level (read, write, administer):
Password:
The passwords are stored in nonvolatile (NV) memory. You must enter
the password correctly before you can continue.
■
For the CoreBuilder 9000 — On this system, the Enterprise
Management Engine (EME) controls passwords and access levels to
manage the chassis and its installed modules.
To access a module in a CoreBuilder 9000 system, follow these steps:
1 Log in to the EME.
2 Access the module that you want to manage using the EME connect
command.
Example: To connect to a module in slot 10, subslot 1, enter:
connect 10.1
All modules use subslot 1.
The system displays a prompt similar to the following:
CB9000@slot10.1 [20-E/FEN-TX-L2]
When you have connected to a module, you manage the module from
the Administration Console with the same level of access that you have
on the EME. For example, if you have logged in to the EME with
administer privileges, you also have administer privileges for the module
to which you are connected.
For additional information about the EME, see the CoreBuilder 9000
Enterprise Switch Getting Started Guide and the CoreBuilder 9000
Enterprise Management Engine User Guide.
Access Examples
Access Examples
37
The examples in this section show how the top-level menu structure of
the Administration Console changes. The menus that you see in the
Administration Console vary depending on:
■
Which 3Com system you are viewing (as described in “Accessing Your
System” earlier in this chapter).
■
Your level of access.
■
The optional interface modules, switch fabric modules, and other
hardware options that you configure into your system. For example,
you see the fddi menu only if you have installed the FDDI module on
your CoreBuilder 3500 system.
These examples show the CoreBuilder 3500 menus. Menus for other
platforms may differ. See the Command Quick Reference for your system
for the list of commands on your system.
Administer Access Example
When you enter the Administration Console with Administer access, each
menu contains all of the options for the system. Here is an example of a
system menu for users with Administer access on the CoreBuilder 3500:
Select menu option: system
Menu options (CoreBuilder-2B4200): --------------------------------------------display
- Display the system configuration
console
- Administer console-level functions
fileTransfer
- Set the file transfer protocol
snapshot
- Display all configuration and status information
softwareUpdate
- Load a new revision of system software
baseline
- Administer a statistics baseline
serialPort
- Administer the terminal and modem serial ports
name
- Set the system name
time
- Set the date and time
nvData
- Save, restore, or reset nonvolatile data
clearDiagBlock
- Clear the diagnostic block
diagErrLog
- Display Diagnose Error Log
sntp
- Administer the Simple Network Time Protocol
reboot
- Reboot the system
Type "q" to return to the previous menu or ? for help.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------Select menu option (system):
38
CHAPTER 1: ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW
Write Access Example
When you enter the Administration Console with write access, the
system menu contains a subset of the complete menu, focusing on the
network, as shown in this example on the CoreBuilder 3500:
Select menu option: system
Menu options (CoreBuilder-2B4200): -----------------------------------------display
- Display the system configuration
console
- Administer console-level functions
fileTransfer
- Set the file transfer protocol
snapshot
- Display all configuration and status information
baseline
- Administer a statistics baseline
serialPort
- Administer the terminal and modem serial ports
name
- Set the system name
diagErrLog
- Display Diagnose Error Log
sntp
- Administer the Simple Network Time Protocol
Type "q" to return to the previous menu or ? for help.
Read Access Example
When you enter the Administration Console with read access, the
system menu contains the fewest options, as shown in this example on
the CoreBuilder 3500:
Select menu option: system
Menu options (CoreBuilder-293300): --------------------------------------------display
- Display the system configuration
snapshot
- Display all configuration and status information
baseline
- Administer a statistics baseline
diagErrLog
- Display Diagnose Error Log
sntp
- Administer the Simple Network Time Protocol
Type "q" to return to the previous menu or ? for help.
Access Examples
Using Menus to
Perform Tasks
39
When you access the Administration Console, the top-level menu
appears. You perform administrative tasks by selecting options from this
menu and its submenus. A brief description accompanies each option in
the display. The commands that you can use depend on the system that
you have, your level of access, and the types of modules and other
hardware options that are configured for your system. The “Menu
Structure” diagrams at the beginning of most chapters show the
complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at the
beginning of each command description in each chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
The following example shows the CoreBuilder 9000 top-level menu when
a Layer 2 switching module is installed:
Menu options:
-----------------------------------------------------------------module
- Administer module-level functions
ethernet
- Administer Ethernet ports
bridge
- Administer bridging/VLANs
snmp
- Administer SNMP
disconnect
- Disconnect and return to the Management Console
Type ? for help.
----------------------------------------------------------------------Select a menu option:
These examples show the CoreBuilder 9000 menu options for a Layer 2
switching interface module. Menus on other platforms may differ. See
the Command Quick Reference for the list of commands on your system.
40
CHAPTER 1: ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW
Selecting Menu
Options
To select a menu option, at the prompt enter the menu option or enough
of the name to uniquely identify it within the particular menu. Example:
to access the module menu from the top level of the Administration
Console on a module in the CoreBuilder 9000, enter:
Select a menu option: module
Menu options are not case sensitive.
When you enter a menu option or command correctly, either you move
to the next menu in the hierarchy, or the Administration Console displays
information (a prompt or a screen display) for the option that you
entered.
If you enter the menu option incorrectly, a message indicates that your
entry is not valid or is ambiguous. Reenter the option from the point at
which it became incorrect or expand a truncated command until it
becomes unambiguous.
When a new menu appears, the selection prompt (with its choices in
parentheses) changes to reflect your progression through the menus.
Example: If you enter bridge at the top-level menu and then agingTime
at the module prompt, the prompt changes to reflect the current level:
Select a menu option (bridge/agingTime):
Entering a Command String
After you become familiar with the menu structure, you can enter a string
of menu options or commands to move immediately to a task. Example:
The command string for setting the path cost for a port on a module
looks like this:
Select a menu option: bridge port stpCost
Entering Values
41
Entering Abbreviated Commands
You can abbreviate command strings by typing only as much of the
command as is necessary to make it unique:
Select a menu option: b po stpc
When you correctly enter either a full or an abbreviated command string,
you move to the last menu level or option that is specified in the string.
Information that is relevant to that option appears as a menu, a prompt,
or a display.
If you enter a command string incorrectly, the Administration Console
displays a message indicating that your entry was not valid or was
ambiguous. Reenter the command from the point at which it became
incorrect, or expand a truncated command until it becomes
unambiguous.
Entering Values
When you reach the level at which you perform a task, the
Administration Console prompts you for a value. The prompt usually
shows all valid values (if applicable) and typically suggests a default value.
The default may be the factory default value or the current value that you
have defined for that parameter.
The Administration Console displays the valid values in parentheses and
the default or current value in brackets. For example:
Enter a new value (disabled,enabled) [enabled]:
To accept the default or current value, press Enter.
Entering Values in Command Strings
A command string can also contain the value of a command parameter. If
you enter a value at the end of a command string, the Administration
Console executes the task and the previous menu appears on the screen.
For example, to set the path cost to the root through a port, from the top
level of the Administration Console, enter:
bridge port stpcost 20
or
b po stpc 20
42
CHAPTER 1: ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW
Navigating
Through the Menus
The Administration Console provides several shortcuts:
■
Press Esc (the Escape key) — To move quickly to the top-level menu
without backtracking through each intermediate menu. The top-level
menu immediately appears.
■
Enter q —
■
■
To move up through the hierarchy, that is, to move to the menu
that is one level higher in the hierarchy
To cancel an operation that is currently in progress. The previous
menu appears.
2
COMMAND SUMMARY
Table 6 gives an overview of all the commands in this book.
Table 6 Command Summary
3500
Commands
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
3900
9300
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PART II: System-Level Functions
Chapter 3 System Environment
system display
system fileTransfer
system console webHelpConfig
system console webAccess
system console consoleAccess
system console ctlKeys
system console password
system console screenHeight
system console security display
system console security define
system console security remove
system console security access
system console security message
system console timeout timeOut
system console timeout interval
✓
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44
CHAPTER 2: COMMAND SUMMARY
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
system snapshot summary
system snapshot detail
system snapshot save
system softwareUpdate
system baseline display
system baseline set
system baseline requestedState
system serialPort terminalSpeed
system serialPort modemSpeed
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
system serialPort baudRate
system serialPort serialPortMode
system serialPort configModem
system serialPort enableModem
system name
system time dateTime
system time timezone
system time dst
system nvData save
system nvData restore
system nvData examine
system clearDiagBlock
system diagErrLog
system sntp display
system sntp define
✓
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9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
3900
9300
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45
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
system sntp modify
system sntp remove
system sntp state
system sntp pollInterval
system sntp tolerance
system reboot
script
logout
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
✓
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Ch 4 Module Environment
module display
module snapshot summary
module snapshot detail
module baseline display
module baseline set
module baseline requestedState
module redundancy display
module redundancy reset NonRedundant
module name
module time
module screenHeight
module nvData reset
module nvData emergencyDownload
module nvData displayDownload
module nvData staging
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46
CHAPTER 2: COMMAND SUMMARY
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
module clearDiagBlock
✓
module diagErrLog
✓
✓
module reboot
disconnect
3900
9300
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PART III: Establishing Management Access
Ch 5 Out-of-Band Management
management summary
management detail
management ip
management ip interface summary
management ip interface define
management ip interface modify
management ip interface remove
management ip route display
management ip route static
management ip route remove
management ip route flush
management ip route default
management ip route noDefault
management ip route findRoute
management ip arp display
management ip arp static
management ip arp remove
management ip arp flushAll
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47
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
3900
9300
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Commands
management ip arp flushDynamic
management ip rip display
management ip rip mode
management ip rip statistics
management ip ping
management ip advancedPing
management ip traceRoute
management ip advancedTraceRoute
management ip statistics
✓
✓
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Ch 6 SNMP
snmp display
snmp community
snmp trap display
snmp trap addModify
snmp trap remove
snmp trap flush
snmp trap smtProxyTraps
snmp rmonConfiguration
snmp writeDisable
Part IV Physical Port Parameters
Ch 7 Ethernet Ports
ethernet summary
ethernet detail
ethernet autoNegotiation
✓
✓
✓
48
CHAPTER 2: COMMAND SUMMARY
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
ethernet portMode
ethernet flowControl
ethernet paceInteractiveAccess
✓
✓
✓
ethernet paceAccess
ethernet label
ethernet portState
✓
✓
ethernet monitoring summary
ethernet monitoring mode
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
3900
9300
✓
✓
✓
✓
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Ch 8 FDDI
fddi station display
fddi station connectPolicy
fddi station tNotify
fddi station statusReporting
fddi path display
fddi path tvxLowerBound
fddi path tmaxLowerBound
fddi path maxTreq
fddi mac summary
fddi mac detail
fddi mac frameErrorThreshold
fddi mac notCopiedThreshold
fddi mac IIcService
fddi mac path
fddi port display
✓
✓
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49
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
fddi port IerAlarm
fddi port IerCutoff
fddi port label
fddi port path
fddi stationMode display
fddi stationMode modify
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
✓
✓
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3900
9300
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Part V Bridging Parameters
Ch 9 Bridge-wide Parameters
bridge display
bridge ipFragmentation
bridge ipxSnapTranslation
bridge addressThreshold
bridge agingTime
bridge spanningTree stpState
bridge spanningTree stpPriority
bridge spanningTree stpMaxAge
bridge spanningTree stpHelloTime
bridge spanningTree stpForwardDelay
bridge spanningTree stpGroupAddress
bridge gvrpState
bridge cos enable
bridge cos summary
bridge cos modify
bridge multicast igmp summary
✓
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50
CHAPTER 2: COMMAND SUMMARY
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
bridge multicast igmp snoopMode
bridge multicast igmp queryMode
bridge multicast igmp queryIpAddress
bridge multicast igmp vlans
bridge multicast igmp groups
bridge multicast igmp desQuerier
bridge multicast igmp rPorts
bridge multicast igmp qPort
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
3900
9300
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Ch 10 Bridge Ports
bridge port summary
bridge port detail
bridge port multicastLimit
bridge port stpState
bridge port stpCost
bridge port stpPriority
bridge port gvrpState
bridge port address list
bridge port address add
bridge port address remove
bridge port address find
bridge port address flushAll
bridge port address flushDynamic
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51
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
3900
9300
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Ch 11 Trunks
bridge trunk autoMap summary
bridge trunk autoMap enable
bridge trunk autoMap disable
bridge trunk autoMap test
bridge trunk summary
bridge trunk detail
bridge trunk define
bridge trunk modify
bridge trunk remove
✓
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Ch 12 MultiPoint Link Aggregation
✓
✓
✓
✓
bridge mpla summary
bridge mpla detail
bridge mpla mode
bridge mpla peerMacAddress
Ch 13 Resilient Links
bridge link summary
bridge link detail
bridge link define
bridge link linkState
bridge link activePort
bridge link modify
bridge link remove
✓
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52
CHAPTER 2: COMMAND SUMMARY
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
3900
9300
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Ch 14 Virtual LANs (VLANs)
bridge vlan summary
bridge vlan detail
bridge vlan define
bridge vlan modify
bridge vlan remove
bridge vlan mode
bridge vlan stpMode
bridge vlan vlanAwareMode
✓
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Ch 15 Packet Filters
bridge packetFilter list
bridge packetFilter display
bridge packetFilter create
bridge packetFilter delete
bridge packetFilter edit
bridge packetFilter load
bridge packetFilter assign
bridge packetFilter unassign
bridge packetFilter portGroup list
bridge packetFilter portGroup display
bridge packetFilter portGroup create
bridge packetFilter portGroup delete
bridge packetFilter portGroup addPort
bridge packetFilter portGroup removePort
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53
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
3900
9300
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Part VI Routing Protocols
Ch 16 IP
ip interface summary
ip interface detail
ip interface define
ip interface modify
ip interface remove
ip interface arpProxy
ip interface broadcastAddress
ip interface directedBroadcast
ip interface icmpRedirect
ip interface icmpRouterDiscovery
ip interface statistics
ip route display
ip route static
ip route remove
ip route flush
ip route default
ip route noDefault
ip route findRoute
ip arp display
ip arp static
ip arp remove
ip arp flushAll
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54
CHAPTER 2: COMMAND SUMMARY
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
ip arp flushDynamic
ip arp age
ip arp statistics
ip dns display
ip dns domainName
ip dns define
ip dns modify
ip dns remove
ip dns nslookup
ip udpHelper display
ip udpHelper define
ip udpHelper remove
ip udpHelper hopCountLimit
ip udpHelper threshold
ip udpHelper interface first
ip udpHelper interface even
ip udpHelper interface sequential
ip routing
ip rip display
ip rip mode
ip rip compatibilityMode
ip rip cost
ip rip poisonReverse
ip rip routeAggregationMode
✓
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9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
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9300
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55
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
ip rip password
ip rip addAdvertisement
ip rip removeAdvertisement
ip rip policy summary
ip rip policy detail
ip rip policy define
ip rip policy modify
ip rip policy remove
ip rip statistics
ip ping
ip advancedPing
ip traceRoute
ip advancedTraceRoute
ip statistics
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
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Ch 17 VRRP
ip vrrp summary
ip vrrp detail
ip vrrp define
ip vrrp modify
ip vrrp remove
ip vrrp mode
ip vrrp neighbor
ip vrrp statistics
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
3900
9300
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56
CHAPTER 2: COMMAND SUMMARY
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
Ch 18 IP Multicast
ip multicast dvmrp interface summary
ip multicast dvmrp interface detail
ip multicast dvmrp interface mode
ip multicast dvmrp interface metric
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels summary
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels define
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels remove
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels address
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels threshold
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels metric
ip multicast dvmrp routeDisplay
ip multicast dvmrp cacheDisplay
ip multicast dvmrp default
ip multicast igmp interface summary
ip multicast igmp interface detail
ip multicast igmp interface TTL
ip multicast igmp snooping
ip multicast igmp querying
ip multicast cache
ip multicast traceRoute
✓
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3900
9300
57
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
Ch 19 OSPF
ip ospf areas display
ip ospf areas defineArea
ip ospf areas modifyArea
ip ospf areas removeArea
ip ospf areas addRange
ip ospf areas modifyRange
ip ospf areas removeRange
ip ospf defaultRouteMetric display
ip ospf defaultRouteMetric define
ip ospf defaultRouteMetric remove
ip ospf interface summary
ip ospf interface detail
ip ospf interface statistics
ip ospf interface mode
ip ospf interface priority
ip ospf interface areaID
ip ospf interface cost
ip ospf interface delay
ip ospf interface hello
ip ospf interface retransmit
ip ospf interface dead
ip ospf interface password
ip ospf linkStateData databaseSummary
✓
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3900
9300
58
CHAPTER 2: COMMAND SUMMARY
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
ip ospf linkStateData router
ip ospf linkStateData network
ip ospf linkStateData summary
ip ospf linkStateData external
ip ospf neighbors display
ip ospf neighbors add
ip ospf neighbors remove
ip ospf routerID
ip ospf partition display
ip ospf partition modify
ip ospf stubDefaultMetric display
ip ospf stubDefaultMetric define
ip ospf stubDefaultMetric remove
ip ospf virtualLinks summary
ip ospf virtualLinks detail
ip ospf virtualLinks statistics
ip ospf virtualLinks define
ip ospf virtualLinks remove
ip ospf virtualLinks areaID
ip ospf virtualLinks router
ip ospf virtualLinks delay
ip ospf virtualLinks hello
ip ospf virtualLinks retransmit
ip ospf virtualLinks dead
✓
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9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
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3900
9300
59
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
ip ospf virtualLinks password
ip ospf policy summary
ip ospf policy detail
ip ospf policy define
ip ospf policy modify
ip ospf policy remove
ip ospf statistics
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
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Ch 20 IPX
ipx interface display
ipx interface define
ipx interface modify
ipx interface remove
ipx interface SAPadvertising
ipx interface RIPadvertising
ipx route display
ipx route secondary
ipx route static
ipx route remove
ipx route flush
ipx server display
ipx server static
ipx server remove
ipx server flush
ipx server secondary
3900
9300
60
CHAPTER 2: COMMAND SUMMARY
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
ipx forwarding
ipx rip mode
ipx rip triggered
ipx rip policy summary
ipx rip policy define
ipx rip policy modify
ipx rip policy remove
ipx sap mode
ipx sap triggered
ipx sap policy summary
ipx sap policy detail
ipx sap policy define
ipx sap policy modify
ipx sap policy remove
ipx output-delay
ipx statistics summary
ipx statistics rip
ipx statistics sap
ipx statistics forwarding
ipx statistics interface
ipx oddLengthPadding
ipx NetBIOS
ipx secondary
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9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
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3900
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61
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
Ch 21 AppleTalk
appletalk interface summary
appletalk interface detail
appletalk interface define
appletalk interface modify
appletalk interface remove
appletalk interface statistics
appletalk route display
appletalk route flush
appletalk aarp display
appletalk aarp remove
appletalk aarp flush
appletalk zone display network
appletalk zone display zone
appletalk forwarding
appletalk checksum
appletalk sourceSocket
appletalk ping
appletalk statistics ddp
appletalk statistics rtmp
appletalk statistics zip
appletalk statistics nbp
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62
CHAPTER 2: COMMAND SUMMARY
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
Part VII Traffic Policy
Ch 22 Quality of Service and RSVP
qos classifier summary
qos classifier detail
qos classifier define
qos classifier modify
qos classifier remove
qos control summary
qos control detail
qos control define
qos control modify
qos control remove
qos ldap display
qos ldap enable
qos ldap disable
qos rsvp summary
qos rsvp detail
qos rsvp enable
qos rsvp disable
qos bandwidth display
qos bandwidth modify
qos excessTagging display
qos excessTagging enable
qos excessTagging disable
✓
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63
Table 6 Command Summary (continued)
3500
Commands
qos statistics interval
qos statistics receive
qos statistics transmit
9000: 9000: 9400
Layer Layer
2
3
✓
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3900
9300
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Part VIII Monitoring
Ch 23 Event Log
log display
log devices
log services
✓
✓
✓
Ch 24 Roving Analysis
analyzer display
analyzer add
analyzer remove
analyzer start
analyzer stop
✓
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64
CHAPTER 2: COMMAND SUMMARY
SYSTEM-LEVEL FUNCTIONS
II
Chapter 3
System Environment
Chapter 4
Module Environment
3
SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
use system commands to:
■
Set and modify general system parameters. Important considerations
and options are also provided where applicable
■
Configure management access to the system (through one of two
serial connection types)
■
Configure management access through the serial port. (For
information about commands for configuring an out-of-band
management interface, see Chapter 5.)
For more information about administering your system environment, see
the Implementation Guide for your system.
68
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware that
are configured for your system. The following diagram shows the
complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at the
beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether your
system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
➧ system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
system menu
console menu
display
➧ console
fileTransfer
➧ snapshot
softwareUpdate
➧ baseline
➧ serialPort
name
➧ time
➧ nvData
clearDiagBlock
diagErrLog
➧ sntp
reboot
webHelpConfig
webAccess
consoleAccess
ctlKeys
password
screenHeight
➧ security
➧ timeout
security menu
display
define
remove
access
message
timeout menu
timeOut
interval
snapshot menu
summary
detail
save
baseline menu
display
set
requestedState
serialPort menu
terminalSpeed
modemSpeed
baudRate
serialPortMode
configModem
enableModem
time menu
dateTime
timezone
dst
nvData menu
save
restore
examine
sntp menu
display
define
modify
remove
state
pollInterval
tolerance
In addition, this chapter describes the script and logout options from
the top-level menu.
system display
system display
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
69
Generates a system configuration display that includes software and
hardware revision numbers, module status information, and warning
messages for certain system conditions.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy d
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Consideration
■
A message appears in the display if any module fails a diagnostic test
at start-up.
Fields in the System Display
Field
Description
Diagnostics
Whether a module has passed or failed diagnostics
Memory size (AP, FP,
Flash, and Buffer)
Memory capacities of the system processors
POV
Power on verification
SysBoot
Boot software revision
ExtDiags
Extended diagnostics version number
Part number
Each module’s 3Com part identification number
Product number
Each module’s 3Com 3C product identification number
Rev
Unique number assigned to the hardware build by 3Com
Serial number
Each module’s unique serial number
Slot number
Slot position of each hardware module
System ID
Unique number that is assigned to the system by 3Com
System name
64-character (maximum) user-defined alphanumeric name
that uniquely identifies the system on your network
System up time
Time since the last system reboot
Time in service
Total operational time since the system was manufactured
Type of module
Type of physical ports
Version, build date, and System software version number, and date and time
time
when the software was built
You configure the system parameters for the CoreBuilder® 9000 system
through the Enterprise Management Engine (EME). See the
CoreBuilder 9000 Enterprise Management Engine User Guide for a
complete list and detailed explanation of the CoreBuilder 9000 system
commands.
70
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system fileTransfer
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
Sets the file transfer protocol to either Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP)
or File Transfer Protocol (FTP). Use this protocol to retrieve or store files
across the network for system functions such as scripts, snapshots,
software updates, and nvData save and restore.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy f
Options
Prompt
Description
File transfer
protocol
File transfer protocol for the
system
Possible Values
■
TFTP
■
FTP
[Default]
TFTP
system console webHelpConfig
system console
webHelpConfig
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
71
Sets the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) for access to the Web
Management Help system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy co wh
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
Enter Web
help
installation
URL
URL where the Web
–
Management Help system files
are located
[Default]
–
72
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system console
webAccess
Enables or disables access to the Web Management software.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
sy co w
✓ 9400
Options
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Prompt
Description
Web
management
Whether remote access to the
Web Management system is
allowed
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
enabled
system console consoleAccess
system console
consoleAccess
Controls remote access via Telnet or modem to the system console.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
sy co co
Options
Prompt
Description
Console
access
Whether remote access to the
system console is allowed
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
enabled
73
74
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system console
ctlKeys
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Enables or disables the control key combination (default: Ctrl+X) that
allows you to reboot the system from the Administration Console.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy co ct
Options
Prompt
Description
Control keys Whether you want to enable or
disable the reboot control key
combination
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
enabled
system console password
system console
password
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
75
Sets one of the password levels for the Administration Console. There are
three levels of password for the Administration Console.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy co p
Important Considerations
■
The Administration Console supports three levels of access:
■
One for only browsing or viewing (read)
■
One for configuring network parameters (write)
■
One for full system administration (administer)
■
When you log on for the first time, press Return or Enter at the
password prompt because the initial passwords that are stored in the
nonvolatile memory of the system are null for all access levels.
■
To change passwords, you must enter the Console at the administer
access level.
■
The system does not display the password in the field as you type.
■
Set a password for each access level that you want to configure.
Options
Prompt
Description
Access level
Level of access for the person
logging on to the system
Password
Text string typed by the person
logging on
Possible Values
■
read
■
write
■
administer
■
■
A string of up
to 32
case-sensitive
characters
Enter (for a null
password)
[Default]
read
–
76
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system console
screenHeight
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Changes the Administration Console’s screen height to increase or
decrease the space available for displaying information.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy co sc
Important Considerations
■
The setting controls the way that the system displays statistical
summaries or other information that results from your use of the
menus, not the way that the system displays the menus themselves.
■
Each time that the screen output reaches the designated screen
height, the system prompts you to press a key to display more
information. Set the screen height to infinite (0) if you do not want
the system to display this prompt. At 0, however, the screen output
can scroll beyond the screen, depending on your screen size.
■
Most terminal screens are 24 lines high.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
New screen
height
New screen height in lines
■
Default
value
Default screen height for
future Administration Console
sessions
■
20 – 200
[Default]
24
0 (to receive no
prompts)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
y
system console security display
system console
security display
Displays a summary of trusted IP client information.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
sy co se di
Important Consideration
■
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
If you do not have any trusted IP clients configured, this command
displays only the first two fields.
Fields in the System Console Security Display
Field
Description
Trusted client access
only
Whether the trusted IP client feature is enabled or
disabled
Deny message
Text of the current message that is sent to a user who is
not a trusted client
Index
Index number that is associated with the trusted IP client
Trusted IP address
IP address of the trusted IP client
Mask
Subnet mask that is associated with the trusted IP address
77
78
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system console
security define
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Gives a client trusted access to your system by adding the client IP address
and subnet mask to an access list.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy co se de
Important Considerations
CAUTION: Be careful when you define trusted IP clients. If you specify an
incorrect IP address or subnetwork address when you define a trusted IP
client, you can affect your own ability to access the system. See the
Implementation Guide for your system.
■
Configure trusted IP clients in this order:
■
■
■
Define the trusted IP clients using system console security
define.
Display the list of configured trusted IP clients using system
console security display to verify that you have configured the
trusted IP clients correctly.
Enable the system to verify trusted IP clients using system console
security access.
■
You can configure up to five IP addresses or five subnetwork addresses
as trusted IP clients.
■
An IP address or subnetwork address can be used to access the system
only if it is on the trusted IP client list.
■
Use the subnet mask to allow trusted access to all addresses on a
particular subnetwork. Examples: The IP address 158.99.112.219
with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 allows trusted access to all
addresses on the 158.99.112 subnetwork. The IP address
158.99.112.219 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.255 allows
access only by the single IP address 158.99.112.219.
■
The trusted IP client information is retained after a system reboot; that
is, it is saved in nvData.
system console security define
79
Options
Prompt
Description
IP address
IP address of the interface,
Any valid IP address –
chosen from the range of
addresses that are assigned to
your organization. This address
is specific to your network and
system.
Possible Values
[Default]
Subnet
mask
32-bit number that uses the
same format and
representation as an IP address.
The subnet mask determines
which bits in the IP address are
interpreted as the network
number, the subnet number,
and the host number. Each IP
address bit that corresponds to
a 1 in the subnet mask is in the
network/subnet part of the
address. Each IP address bit
that corresponds to a 0 is in
the host part of the IP address.
A valid subnet
Depends on
mask in accordance specified IP
with the bits used address
for network
number, subnet,
and host number
80
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system console
security remove
Removes an IP address from the trusted IP client access list.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
sy co se r
Important Considerations
■
If you remove a trusted IP client definition through the Administration
Console, the definition is also removed in the Web Management
Console, and vice versa.
■
This command takes effect immediately. You are not prompted to
confirm the deletion.
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Options
Prompt
Description
Trusted IP
client index
One or more index numbers of
the IP addresses that you want
to remove
Possible Values
■
1–5
■
all
■
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
[Default]
1 (if only one
client)
system console security access
system console
security access
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
81
Enables or disables whether the system verifies trusted IP clients on your
system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy co se a
Important Considerations
CAUTION: Be careful when you define trusted IP clients. If you specify an
incorrect IP address or subnetwork address when you define a trusted IP
client, you can affect your own ability to access the system. See the
Implementation Guide for your system.
■
Configure trusted IP clients in this order:
■
■
■
Define the trusted IP clients using system console security define.
Display the list of configured trusted IP clients using system
console security display to verify that you have configured the
trusted IP clients correctly.
Enable the system to verify trusted IP clients using system console
security access.
Options
Prompt
Description
Trusted
Whether you want to allow or
client access disallow your system to restrict
only
access according to your list of
trusted IP clients
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
disabled
82
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system console
security message
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Defines the text that is displayed to a prospective user when access to
your system is denied.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy co se m
Important Consideration
■
Use system console security display to view the text of the
current deny message.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Deny
message
Text that is displayed to a
prospective user whose IP
address does not appear on
the list of trusted users
Alphanumeric text
of up to 85
characters and
spaces
“You are not
considered a
trusted user.
Please see your
network
administrator.”
system console timeout timeOut
system console
timeout timeOut
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
83
Configures the system to disconnect remote sessions after a specified
interval of no activity.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy co t t
Important Considerations
■
The default inactive time interval is 30 minutes.
■
To change the timeout interval value before the system disconnects
remote sessions, see “system console timeout interval” next for
details.
Options
Prompt
Description
Timeout
state
Whether you want to enable or
disable the timeout state
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
disabled
84
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system console
timeout interval
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Sets the remote timeout interval to a value from 1 minute through 60
minutes.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy co t i
Important Consideration
■
To enable or disable the inactive timeout interval for remote sessions,
see the preceding command, “system console timeout timeOut” for
details.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Telnet
timeout
interval
Timeout interval
1 – 60 minutes
30
system snapshot summary
system snapshot
summary
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
85
Captures an image of all system summary display screens. This display
reflects each application’s status at the time that you use the snapshot
feature.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy sn su
86
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system snapshot
detail
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Captures an image of all system detail screens. The display reflects the
current values of all fields and counters at the time that you use the
snapshot feature.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy sn d
system snapshot save
system snapshot save
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
87
Sends detail screens to a file on the host machine that you specify.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy sn sa
Important Considerations
■
The CoreBuilder 3500 uses the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) or
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) to transfer the files to the host, depending
on the setting for the system fileTransfer option. The
SuperStack ® II Switch 3900, Switch 9300, and the CoreBuilder 9400
use TFTP to transfer files.
Before you transfer files:
■
You must create the file to receive the snapshot images on an FTP or
TFTP server before you send the images to the file.
■
You supply the IP address of the host and specify the file according to
the requirements of your TFTP or FTP implementation.
■
Some TFTP implementations require that you store the file in the same
directory in which the TFTP daemon (server) is running on the remote
host.
■
Because TFTP provides no user authentication, give the file loose
permissions to make it publicly readable and writable. TFTP servers do
not grant requests for file access.
■
On the CoreBuilder 3500, if you use FTP for system fileTransfer,
you must enter a login name and password if you are sending a file to
an FTP server.
TFTP Procedure
1 Create an empty file with open write permissions on the host to store the
system display images.
2 From the top level of the Administration Console, enter:
system snapshot save
3 Enter the IP address of the host on which you want to save the display
images.
4 If your TFTP implementation requires a full path name, enter the full path
of the file that is designated to contain the display images. (Some
implementations allow you to specify only the file name and the system
uses the default TFTP directory.)
88
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
While the system sends the files to the host, it displays the name of each
display image that it transfers. When the transmission is complete, the
system displays a message that the transfer is complete and displays the
file name and the name of the host on which it stored the file.
FTP Procedure (3500 Only)
1 Create an empty file with open write permissions on the host to store the
system display images.
2 From the top level of the Administration Console, enter:
system snapshot save
3 Enter the IP address of the host on which you want to save the display
images.
4 Enter the full pathname of the file that you designated.
5 Enter your username and password.
While the system sends the files to the host, it displays the name of each
display image that it transfers. When the transmission is complete, the
system displays a message that the transfer is complete and displays the
file name and the name of the host on which it stored the file.
system softwareUpdate
system
softwareUpdate
89
Loads a new revision of system software.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
sy so
Important Considerations
■
The CoreBuilder 3500 uses the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) or
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) to transfer the files to the host, depending
on the setting for the system fileTransfer option. The SuperStack II
Switch 3900, Switch 9300, and the CoreBuilder 9400 use TFTP to
transfer files.
■
Before you attempt to install the system software, make sure that you
have extended memory installed on your system.
■
You can load the system software into flash memory while the system
is operating. The system does not have to be powered down.
■
Make sure that the FTP server or TFTP server software is running on the
device from which you are installing the software.
■
Make sure that you have defined an IP address on your system.
■
Some FTP servers or TFTP servers do not accept the full pathname. If
this is true on your server, enter the image filename only.
■
On the CoreBuilder 3500, if you are using the FTP file transfer
protocol, you must enter a login name and password.
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Options
Prompt
Description
Host IP
address
IP address of the machine from Any valid IP address –
which to load the software
update
Possible Values
Install file
name
Name of the image to be
loaded
–
[Default]
–
90
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system baseline
display
Displays when the current baseline was last set.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
sy b d
Important Considerations
■
Use this command to determine if you need a newer baseline for
viewing statistics.
■
The system also indicates if you have not yet set a baseline on the
system.
system baseline set
system baseline set
Resets the baseline counters to zero.
✓ 3500
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
✓ 9400
sy b s
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
Baselining is automatically enabled when you set a baseline.
■
The system maintains the accumulated totals since power-up.
■
The baseline is time-stamped.
91
92
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system baseline
requestedState
Enables or disables a baseline.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
sy b r
Important Considerations
■
When you reenable a baseline, the counters return to the values that
have accumulated since the most recent baseline that you set.
■
Disabling a baseline returns the counters to the total accumulated
values since the last power-up.
Options
Prompt
Description
New value
Whether you want to enable or
disable the baseline
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
enabled
system serialPort terminalSpeed
system serialPort
terminalSpeed
✓ 3500
93
Sets the terminal speed of your system serial port. The terminal speed is
set by changing the terminal connection port baud rates.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
sy se t
3900
9300
■
When you change the terminal port baud rate to something other
than 9600, the new setting becomes the new default, even after you
use the system nvData reset option.
■
You must adjust the baud setting of your terminal or terminal
emulator to match your system serial port’s baud rate before you can
reestablish communication using the terminal port.
■
You can use this command through the terminal serial port or through
a Telnet session. However, if you change the terminal speed while you
are in a Telnet session, you must reboot the system for the change to
take effect.
Important Considerations
Options
Prompt
Description
Terminal
speed
Signal speed for the terminal
connection
Confirmation Confirmation of terminal speed
change
Possible Values
■
19200
■
9600
■
4800
■
2400
■
1200
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
[Default]
9600
–
Procedure (Local Connection)
1 To set the terminal speed for the serial port, from the top level of the
Administration Console, enter:
system serialPort terminalSpeed
94
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
2 Enter the terminal speed setting for the serial port. See the Options table
for supported terminal speed rates.
The system response depends on the cable status.
The terminal speed is referred to as baud rate in the following messages.
If the cable is connected to the terminal port when you set the terminal
speed for that port, the system displays the following message:
Changing the baud rate may cause a loss of communication
since you are currently connected via the serial port.
Are you sure you want to change the baud rate? (y/n):
■
If you respond y (yes), the serial port’s baud rate is changed
immediately, and you lose the ability to communicate with any devices
connected to the port until you adjust the device baud setting to
match.
■
If you respond n (no), the rate does not change, and the display
returns to the previous menu.
Procedure (IP Interface)
1 From the top level of the Administration Console, enter:
system serialPort terminalSpeed
2 Enter the terminal speed setting for the terminal port.
The terminal speed is referred to as baud rate in the following messages.
After you select the new terminal speed rate, the system displays the
following message:
The baud rate will not change until the system is rebooted.
To have your change take effect without rebooting, perform
this command via the serial port.
Are you sure you want to change the baud rate? (y/n):
■
If you respond y (yes), the rate is not changed until you reboot.
■
If you respond n (no), the rate does not change, and the display
returns to the previous menu.
system serialPort modemSpeed
system serialPort
modemSpeed
✓ 3500
95
Sets the port speed for the modem port to match your external modem
baud setting.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
sy se m
3900
9300
■
After you use this command, you must establish a connection
between your current Console session and the modem port before
you dial in. (See “system serialPort configModem” later in this chapter
for details.)
■
Be sure that the baud setting of the modem port matches that of your
external modem.
■
The system immediately changes the modem port baud setting.
Important Considerations
Options
Prompt
Description
Modem
speed
Signal speed for the
connection
Possible Values
■
19200
■
9600
■
4800
■
2400
■
1200
[Default]
9600
96
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system serialPort
baudRate
Sets the baud rate of your system serial port.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3500
9000
✓ 9400
sy se b
Important Considerations
■
The default setting for the serial port is 9600. You can change the
setting to match the port speed on your terminal or modem.The
default setting for the serial port is 9600. You can change the setting
to match the port speed on your terminal or modem.
■
When you change the baud rate to something other than 9600, the
new setting becomes the new default, even after you use the
system nvData reset option.
■
You must adjust the baud rate setting of your terminal or terminal
emulator’s terminal interface processor (tip) to match your system
serial port’s speed before you can reestablish communication using the
terminal port.
■
You can use this command through the terminal serial port or through
a Telnet session. However, if you change the terminal speed while you
are in a Telnet session, you must reboot the system for the change to
take effect.
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Options
Prompt
Description
New value
Baud rate for the serial port
connection
Confirmation Confirmation of baud rate
change
Possible Values
■
19200
■
9600
■
4800
■
2400
■
1200
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
[Default]
9600
–
Procedure (Local Connection)
1 To set the baud rate for the serial port, from the top level of the
Administration Console, enter:
system serialPort baudRate
system serialPort baudRate
97
2 Enter the baud setting for the serial port. The system supports the
following baud rates:
■
19200
■
9600
■
4800
■
2400
■
1200
The system response depends on the cable status. If the cable is
connected to the terminal port when you set the baud rate for that port,
the system displays the following message:
Changing the baud rate may cause a loss of communication
since you are currently connected via the serial port.
Are you sure you want to change the baud rate? (y/n):
■
If you respond y (yes), the serial port’s baud rate is changed
immediately, and you lose the ability to communicate to any devices
connected to it until you adjust the device baud setting to match.
■
If you respond n (no), the rate does not change, and the display
returns to the previous menu.
Procedure (IP Interface)
1 From the top level of the Administration Console, enter:
system serialPort baudRate
2 Enter the baud setting for the terminal port.
After you select the new baud, the system displays the following
message:
The baud rate will not change until the system is rebooted.
To have your change take effect without rebooting, perform
this command via the serial port.
Are you sure you want to change the baud rate? (y/n):
■
If you respond y (yes), the rate is not changed until you reboot the
system.
■
If you respond n (no), the rate does not change, and the display
returns to the previous menu.
98
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system serialPort
serialPortMode
Configures the system serial port to establish either a terminal connection
or a modem connection.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3500
9000
✓ 9400
sy se s
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Prompt
Description
Serial port
Type of serial port
configuration that you want
Options
Possible Values
■
console
■
modem
[Default]
console
Procedures
To change the serial port configuration from console to modem, perform
the following steps:
1 Change the serial port configuration from console to modem.
2 Disconnect the console cable.
3 Connect the modem cable.
The system is ready for you to establish a modem connection. See
“system serialPort configModem” next for details.
To change the serial port configuration from modem to console, perform
the following steps:
1 Change the serial port configuration from modem to console.
2 Disconnect the modem cable.
3 Connect the console cable.
The system is ready for you to establish a console connection. (See
“system serialPort baudRate” earlier in this chapter.)
system serialPort configModem
system serialPort
configModem
99
Configures the external modem from the Administration Console.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
sy se c
Important Considerations
■
The system transmits characters that you have entered as output on
the modem port. The system echoes characters that it receives as
input on the modem port to the current Console session. Thus, the
Console appears to be directly connected to the external modem.
■
You may need to change the baud of the modem to match that of
your modem port.
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Procedure
1 From the top level of the Administration Console, enter:
system serialPort configModem
You can now enter commands that support the appropriate parameters
for your network. All characters that you enter are transmitted to the
modem port until you type the escape sequence in step 2.
2 When the modem is configured, enter the escape sequence ~] with no
intervening characters or spaces.
Entering the escape sequence breaks the connection to the modem serial
port and returns you to the previous Administration Console menu.
100
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system serialPort
enableModem
Enables the external modem from the Administration Console.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
sy se e
Important Consideration
■
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
You must configure the external modem before you can enable it. See
the configModem command description on the previous page.
system name
system name
✓ 3500
101
Assigns or changes the name of the system. The system name identifies
the system to users on other systems in the network.
9000
✓ 9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
sy na
■
Assign an easily recognizable and unique name for each system. For
example, name the system according to its physical location, as in
PARIS-ENGLAB1.
■
Use quotation marks (“) around any string that has embedded spaces.
■
Use double quotation marks (““) to enter an empty string.
■
The new system name appears the next time that you display the
system configuration.
Options
Prompt
Description
New string
New or changed name for the
system
Possible Values
■
■
A string of up
to 64
case-sensitive
characters
? (to get
information
about the
naming
guidelines)
[Default]
–
102
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system time
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Displays and changes the system’s current date and time, timezone, and
daylight saving time.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy t
Important Considerations
■
The system’s internal clock is set at the factory. You may want to reset
the system date and time to match the system’s physical location.
■
00 specifies the year 2000 for all 3Com products. See the 3Com Web
site for more details.
Options
Field
Description
DateTime
Starting date and time in the following format:
yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss
Timezone
dst
User-configured time zone (for example, GMT for Greenwich
Mean Time)
■
■
If you enter y to the prompt, a sub-menu appears that
lists the Daylight Savings Time around the world and a
user specified option for start and end dates
If you enter n, you are returned to the Time menu
system time datetime
system time datetime
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
103
Sets the system’s date and time.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy t d
Important Considerations
■
The system’s internal clock is set at the factory. You may want to reset
the system date and time to match the system’s physical location.
■
00 specifies the year 2000 for all 3Com products. See the 3Com Web
site for more details.
Procedure
1 To change the system date or time, enter:
da
The system displays the current date and time and then prompts you to
change the time.
2 Enter y (yes) or n (no) at the prompt.
If you respond n, the top-level menu appears.
If you respond y, the system prompts you for the correct date and time.
3 Enter the correct date and time in this format:
ccyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss
Format
Description
yyyy
century and last two digits of the year
(00-99)
first mm
date (1 – 31)
dd
month (1 – 12)
T
Time designator
hh
hour (1 – 12)
second mm
minute (00 – 59)
ss
second (00 – 59)
104
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system time timezone
✓ 3500
Configures the local time zone and daylight savings time values.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
sy t timez
3900
9300
■
Displays the current time zone table, with time zone indexes and the
time zone identifiers before it prompts you to select a time zone index.
■
The local time zone value adjusts the server reply universal time to
local time properly.
■
The default time zone is Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).
Important Considerations
Options
Prompt
Description
Time zone
index
Index number of the time zone
that you want to configure
Possible Values
■
■
1 – 28*
[Default]
1 (GMT)
? (lists the
default
selection and
selectable
values)
* Index number 28 prompts for an offset from the GMT in the following time format: ±hh:mm.
system time timezone
105
System Time Timezone Example (3500)
Select menu option (system/sntp): timez
Index
Time Zone
1
[GMT+0:00] GMT/WET/UT
2
[GMT-1:00] WAT
3
[GMT-2:00] AT
4
[GMT-3:00] Brasilia/Buenos Ar/GeorgeTown
5
[GMT-4:00] AST
6
[GMT-5:00] EST
7
[GMT-6:00] CST
8
[GMT-7:00] MST
9
[GMT-8:00] PST
10
[GMT-9:00] YST
11
[GMT-10:00] AHST/CAT/HST
12
[GMT-11:00] NT
13
[GMT-12:00] IDLW
14
[GMT+1:00] CET/FWT/MET/MEWT/SWT
15
[GMT+2:00] EET
16
[GMT+3:00] BT
17
[GMT+4:00] ZP4
18
[GMT+5:00] ZP5
19
[GMT+5:30] Bombay/Calcutta/Madras/New
Dehli/Colombo
20
[GMT+6:00] ZP6
21
[GMT+7:00] WAST
22
[GMT+8:00] CCT
23
[GMT+9:00] JST
24
[GMT+9:30] Darwin/Adelaide
25
[GMT+10:00] EAST/GST
26
[GMT+11:00] Magadan/Solomon Is/N. Caledonia
27
[GMT+12:00] IDLE/NZST/NZT
28
Input an offset from GMT
Select timezone index {1-28|?} [1]:
106
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system time dst
✓ 3500
Sets daylight savings time.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
sy t ds
3900
9300
■
Important Consideration
Displays the daylight savings time periods for various parts of the
world.
Procedure
1 To set daylight savings time, enter:
ds
The system displays the following prompt:
Do you want to set the Daylight Saving Time?(n,y)[n]:
2 Enter y (yes) or n (no) at the prompt.
If you respond n, the Time menu appears.
If you respond y, the system displays the following:
1 First Sunday in April to last Sunday in October (North
America)
2 Last Sunday in March to last Sunday in October (Europe,
parts of Asia)
3 Last Sunday in October to last Sunday in March (Parts of
Australia)
4 Last Sunday in October to the Sunday on/after March 15th
(New Zealand, parts of Australia)
5 Enter a start and an end dates for the current year
Select daylight saving time option {1-5|?} [1]:
The format for option 5 is: ccyy-mm-ssThh:mm:ss
Example: 1999-05-20T12:30:34
3 Enter a daylight saving time option.
system nvData save
system nvData save
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
107
Stores nonvolatile (NV) data on a server. The CoreBuilder 3500 uses the
Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) or File Transfer protocol (FTP) to transfer
the files to the host, depending on the setting for the system
fileTransfer option. The SuperStack II Switch 3900, Switch 9300, and
the CoreBuilder 9400 use TFTP to transfer files.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy nv s
Important Considerations (TFTP)
■
To store NV data, you must first create two files on the TFTP server
before you send the data:
■
■
Control file — Use any filename that is meaningful to you.
Example: ctrlfile
NV data file — Use the control filename plus the .nvd extension.
Example: ctrlfile.nvd
■
When the system saves NV data, it writes it to a disk file on a host
computer (that is, a server) using TFTP or FTP. You can then retrieve the
data from the disk file with the restore option.
■
Some TFTP implementations require that you store the files in the
same directory in which the TFTP daemon (server) is running on the
remote host.
■
Some TFTP implementations require a full path, while other
implementations allow you to specify only the file name, and the
system saves the file to the default TFTP directory. Consult your
network administrator or TFTP documentation for details about your
host system’s TFTP implementation.
■
Because TFTP provides no user authentication, give loose permissions
to the control file and the NV data file on the remote host (that is,
make the files publicly readable and writable). TFTP servers do not
grant requests for file access.
108
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
Important Consideration (FTP and TFTP)
■
During the save procedure, the current configuration can be altered.
To detect this event, the software runs checksum on the NVRAM
before and after the save.
If the checksum is different, you are notified and prompted to save the
configuration again. In abnormal situations, this reiteration can
continue indefinitely, so you are given the option to terminate the
save. You are also prompted for a retry request after a network (TFTP)
I/O failure.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Host IP
address
IP address of the host on which Any valid IP address Previous IP
you want to store the data file
address used
NV control
file
Full path of the file where you
want to store the NV data
–
–
File label
(optional)
Meaningful description of the
file
32-character text
string
–
Procedure
1 To save NV data, from the top level of the Administration Console, enter:
system nvData save
The system prompts you for information about saving the data. To accept
the value in brackets, press Return. Any entry for IP address, filename,
and user name becomes the new default.
2 Enter the IP address of the TFTP or FTP server.
3 If you are using TFTP and your implementation requires a full path, enter
the full pathname of the control file. (Some implementations allow you to
specify only the file name, and the server uses the default TFTP directory.)
The system prompt says NV Control file, so enter the name of the
control file without the NVD extension.
4 Optionally, enter a label for the file.
Example:
Host IP Address [158.101.100.1]: 158.101.112.34
NV Control file (full pathname): nvdata
Enter an optional file label: Labdata
system nvData save
109
If the information is incorrect or if a connection cannot be made with the
specified host, the system displays a message similar to this one:
Login incorrect.
Error: Transfer Timed Out
Error - I/O error while writing nonvolatile data
If a session is successfully opened, a system message notifies you of the
success or failure of your save, as in the following examples:
Success
Failure
System NV data successfully stored on host 158.101.112.34.
Saving system...transfer timed out.
Error - I/O error while writing nonvolatile data. Do you wish
to retry the save using the same parameters? (n,y) [y].
5 To save the data as proposed, enter y
If you enter n, the NV data is not saved and the previous menu appears.
The text of the failure message depends on the problem that the system
encountered while it saved the NV data.
At the end of a successful save, the system display returns to the previous
menu.
110
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system nvData
restore
Restores the NV data that was previously saved to a file.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
sy nv r
Important Considerations
■
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Before you attempt to restore the data to a system that has a different
system ID, be aware that the following types of NV data may cause
problems when they are restored:
■
■
Management IP addresses (defined in IP interface configurations)
are saved as NV data and restored. To avoid duplicate IP address
problems, you may need to change the IP address of defined
interfaces before you connect the restored system to the network.
Statically configured Ethernet addresses are saved as NV data.
Verify that you have no duplicate addresses when you restore the
NV data.
Options
Prompt
Description
Host IP
address
IP address of the host on which Any valid IP address Previous IP
the NV data file resides
address that
was used
NV control
file
Location of the NV data file
Do you wish Confirmation of the operation.
to
(You may not want to reboot
continue?
because resetting nonvolatile
data may leave the system in
an inconsistent state, so the
system reboots after each
reset.)
Possible Values
■
file name
■
full path
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
[Default]
Previous nv
control file that
was used
y
Procedure
1 To restore the NV data, from the top level of the Administration Console,
enter:
system nvData restore
The system prompts you to enter information for restoring the NV data
that was saved to a file.
system nvData restore
111
Press Return at any prompt to accept the current or default value in
brackets.
2 Enter the IP address of the host on which the NV data file resides.
3 If you are using TFTP and your implementation requires a full path name,
enter the full NV data file path and filename. Some implementations
allow you to specify only the file name; the system uses the default TFTP
directory.
When you restore system NV data, the software compares the system IDs,
module types, and module revisions (if applicable) between the saved
configuration and the system on which you are restoring the image.
■
If the system finds an exact match between system IDs, module types,
and module revisions, the system displays a reminder message and
prompts you for verification before performing the restoration (see
step 4).
■
If there is not an exact match between system IDs, module types, and
module revisions, the system displays a warning message and prompts
you as follows:
WARNING - mismatch between saved system IDs (27DA00) and
current system (28E100)
Do you want to disregard this and continue the restore (n,y)
[y]:
If you want to continue the restoration, enter y (yes). If you do not
want to continue, enter n (no).
4 At the next prompt, to have the system NV data restored as requested,
enter y (yes). To terminate the restoration, enter n (no).
For example:
Restoring nonvolatile data may leave the system
in an inconsistent state and therefore a reboot is necessary
after each restore.
Do you wish to continue? (y/n): y
■
If you enter y, the system displays the following messages:
Restoring nonvolatile data...done
Nonvolatile data successfully restored
The system automatically reboots itself after it restores the NV data.
■
If you enter n, the restoration ends and the previous menu appears.
112
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system nvData
examine
Displays the header information of the NV data file.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
sy nv e
Important Considerations
■
Some TFTP implementations allow you to specify only the file name,
and the system uses the default TFTP directory.
■
If a session is successfully opened, the system displays the header
information that corresponds to the file name that you entered.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
Host IP
address
IP address of the host on which Any valid IP address Previous IP
the NV data file resides
address used
NV control
file
Location of the NV data file
■
file name
■
full path
[Default]
System NV data
file
system nvData reset
system nvData reset
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
113
Resets the system values to the factory defaults. You can then reconfigure
the system from its original settings.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy nv rese
Important Considerations
■
You are not permitted to perform an NV data reset from a Telnet
session. An NV data Reset over Telnet clears all of your configurable
information, including the IP interface of the box, and prevents you
from managing the system without a direct console connection.
■
If you enter n (no) when you are prompted to confirm the reset, the
system displays the previous menu.
CAUTION: As a precaution, consider saving the existing NV data to a file
before you reset all values to the factory defaults. Resetting NV data
means that NV memory is set back to the factory defaults (except for the
serial port baud rate, modem baud rate, and system boot parameters).
Before you proceed, be sure that you want to reset your NV data.
Options
Prompt
Description
Do you wish Confirmation of the reset
to
operation. (You may not want
continue?
to reboot because resetting
nonvolatile data may leave the
system in an inconsistent state,
so the system reboots after
each reset.)
Possible Values
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
[Default]
y
114
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system
clearDiagBlock
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Prevents diagnostic information about failed modules from appearing in
system display screens.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy cl
Important Consideration
■
After you enter this command, the system immediately removes
diagnostic information about failed modules from the SNMP MIB
swSysDiagnosticsGroup.
Options
Prompt
Description
Clear the
diagnostic
block
Confirmation of your decision
to clear the diagnostic
information
Possible Values
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
[Default]
y
system diagErrLog
system diagErrLog
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
115
Displays hardware diagnostic errors that have been saved in the flash
memory. When the system is initializing, if the diagnostic software detects
errors, and if the system completes initializing, the detected errors are
written to flash memory and stored in a dynamic error log.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo dia
Important Consideration
■
The error messages are saved to flash memory until you power down
the system or clear the error log with the system clearDiagBlock
command.
116
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system sntp display
Displays Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) information.
✓ 3500
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
✓ 9400
sy snt di
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
SNTP handles the synchronization of system clocks in the network to
the national time standards via distributed time servers.
■
Your system provides the SNTP client.
■
The display has two types of information:
■
■
Configuration information — User configurable parameters
appear.
Servers information — Information returned by the server
appears if you have defined SNTP servers. Otherwise, the No
Servers are defined message appears.
Fields in the System SNTP Display
Field
Description
Configuration Information
State
SNTP state. It is either enabled or disabled
PollInterval
Interval for the client to send requests to a specific
server
Tolerance
Threshold for updating the local system time
Servers Information
Server
Server IP address
Mode
Client’s SNTP operating mode. This field always
displays Unicast.
Version
Version number of the responding server (for
example, 4 represents version 4, which is suitable for
IPv4, IPv6, and OSI). The client version number is 3.
Stratum
8-bit integer that indicates the stratum level of the
local clock (for example, a stratum value of 3
indicates a secondary reference via SNTP).
Poll
Maximum interval between successive messages
Delay
Roundtrip propagation delay from the server’s reply
LastPktRcv
Date and time stamp of the last packet that was
received from the specific server.
system sntp define
system sntp define
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
117
Specifies up to three Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) server IP
addresses.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy snt de
Important Considerations
■
You can define up to three SNTP servers for backup purposes.
■
Your system provides the SNTP client.
■
The system indicates that it is adding the IP address to the SNTP
database. The server is assigned an index number.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
Server’s IP
address
IP address of a server to add to Valid IP address
the SNTP database
(except 0.0.0.0)
[Default]
–
118
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system sntp modify
✓ 3500
Replaces an existing Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) server IP
address.
9000
✓ 9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Options
sy snt m
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Index
Index number of the server that
you want to modify
Available Server
index number
–
Server
address
IP address of each configured
server
Valid IP address
–
system sntp remove
system sntp remove
✓ 3500
119
Removes a Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) server IP address from
the SNTP server list.
9000
✓ 9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Options
sy snt r
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Index
Index number of the server
that you want to remove
Available Server
index number
–
Server
address
IP address of each configured
server
Valid IP address
–
120
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system sntp state
✓ 3500
Enables or disable the Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) state for the
system.
9000
✓ 9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Options
sy snt s
Prompt
Description
SNTP state
Whether you want to
implement SNTP on the system
Possible Values
■
disabled
■
enabled
[Default]
disabled
system sntp pollInterval
system sntp
pollInterval
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
121
Sets a poll interval value. This value determines how often the Simple
Network Time Protocol (SNTP) client sends a request to the SNTP server.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy snt p
Important Consideration
■
The default pollInterval value is once an hour (3600 seconds). The
value 86400 (the pollInterval limit) is the number of seconds in a day.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Request poll
interval
In seconds, the poll interval
64 – 86400 seconds
3600
122
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
system sntp tolerance
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Sets a tolerance threshold that is used to update the local system time.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sy snt to
Important Consideration
■
If the difference between the server time and the local time exceeds
the specified tolerance threshold, the client drops the server time and
maintains the current local system time unchanged.
Options
Prompt
Description
Time
tolerance
Time threshold value, in
0 – 3600 seconds
seconds, that is used to update
the local system time
Possible Values
[Default]
900
system reboot
system reboot
Reboots the system.
✓ 3500
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
✓ 9400
sy r
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
123
Important Considerations
■
This command disconnects the present Administration Console
session and starts another session whether your system is connected
to the Administration Console by an external modem or through an
rlogin or Telnet session.
■
To view diagnostic information during reboots, connect your system
through the Console serial port.
Options
Prompt
Description
Reboot the
system?
Confirmation that you want to
reboot
Possible Values
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
[Default]
–
124
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
script
✓ 3500
Executes a command file that you have written to expedite and automate
Administration Console tasks.
9000
✓ 9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
sc
■
Any command that you can enter in the Administration Console can
be part of a script. You can even script your entire system setup so that
you can repeat the exact setup on other systems.
■
You create scripts in an ASCII-based line editor, such as EMACS or vi.
Scripts must be stored on the TFTP server. For the CoreBuilder 3500,
you can select TFTP or FTP as the file transfer method. See “system
fileTransfer” earlier in this chapter for more details.
■
Some TFTP implementations require that you store the script file in the
same directory in which the TFTP daemon (server) is running on the
remote host.
■
Because TFTP provides no user authentication, make the file
permissions loose so that the public can read and write to the file.
TFTP servers do not grant requests for file access.
Procedure
1 From the top level of the Administration Console, enter:
script
The system prompts you for information about where you have stored
the script that you want to run: host IP address and file path
Press Return at any prompt to accept the current or default value in
brackets.
2 Enter the path name to the script file. If you are using TFTP, see “system
snapshot save” earlier in this chapter for more details about pathname
requirements.
The task that you scripted runs in the Administration Console.
script
125
Example Script (3500)
This example scripts these tasks to initially configure your system:
■
Changes the modem port baud
■
Sets the system name
■
Assigns an IP address for management
■
Verifies the IP connection by pinging the system
■
Enables Spanning Tree
■
Sets up SNMP trap reporting
# This script performs some start-up configurations.
#
# Set the modem serial port baud.
#
system serialPort modemSpeed
4800
# modem serial port baud
#
# Set the system name
#
system name
Eng_CoreBuilder_4
#
# Assign an IP address to the system.
#
ip interface define
158.101.112.99 # IP address for the system
255.255.0.0
# subnet mask
1
# VLAN interface index
ip interface summary all
#
# Validate access to management workstation
#
ip ping
158.101.112.26 # management workstation address
#
# Enable the Spanning Tree Protocol
#
bridge stpState enabled
#
# Configure my node as an SNMP trap destination
#
snmp trap add
158.101.112.26 # management workstation address
all
# turn on all traps
q
# no more trap destinations
#
snmp trap display
#
126
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT
logout
✓ 3500
Terminates a Telnet session or returns control to the password prompt in a
serial port session.
9000
✓ 9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Consideration
logo
■
Press Escape to return to the top level before you log out.
4
MODULE ENVIRONMENT
This chapter describes how to use module commands for modules
that are installed in the CoreBuilder® 9000 7-slot, 8-slot, and 16-slot
chassis to:
■
Display the module configuration and status
■
Administer a statistics baseline and module redundancy
■
Set the module name and the console screen height
■
View the date and time
■
Manage nonvolatile data (nvData)
■
Clear the module diagnostic block
■
Reboot a module
For more information about administering your module parameters, see
the CoreBuilder 9000 Implementation Guide.
128
CHAPTER 4: MODULE ENVIRONMENT
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
➧ module
management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
module menu
display
➧ snapshot
➧ baseline
➧ redundancy
name
time
screenHeight
➧ nvData
clearDiagBlock
diagErrLog
reboot
snapshot menu
summary
detail
baseline menu
display
set
requestedState
redundancy menu
display
reset NonRedundant
nvData menu
reset
emergencyDownload
displayDownload
staging
The redundancy option appears if you have a CoreBuilder 9000 8-slot
and 16-slot chassis and if you have one or two GEN Switch Fabric
Modules installed.
In addition to the module options, you must also use the disconnect
option from the top-level menu to return to the Enterprise Management
Engine (EME).
module display
module display
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
129
Generates software and hardware revision numbers, module status
information, and warning messages for certain module conditions.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo d
Important Considerations
■
The module display provides the configuration information for the
module to which you are currently connected. To display configuration
information for another module, disconnect from the current module
through the Enterprise Management Engine (EME) and then connect
to the module that you want to display.
■
After you have logged in to the EME, you can access the module that
you want to manage.
■
Diagnostic messages appear in the display only if a module fails any of
the tests at start-up.
Fields in the Module Display
Field
Description
24 port Gigabit
Switching Fabric
32-character alphanumeric name that uniquely identifies
this module
3C number
Each module’s 3Com 3C product identification number
Built
Date and time when this software version was built
Diagnostics
Whether a module has passed or failed diagnostics.
Additional diagnostic messages describe a failure.
Memory size (AP, FP,
Flash, Buffer)
Memory capacities of the processors
Module ID
ID number that the system assigns to that module
Rev
Unique number assigned to the hardware build by 3Com
Serial
Each module’s unique serial number
Slot
Location of the module in the chassis (slot.subslot)
System name
Name of the system
System up time
Time that this module has been up and running
Time in service
Total operational time since the module was
manufactured
Version
Software release number
130
CHAPTER 4: MODULE ENVIRONMENT
module snapshot
summary
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Captures an image of all the module’s display screens. The values in each
screen reflect the current values of all fields and counters at the time that
you use the snapshot feature.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo sn su
Important Consideration
■
If a feature or protocol has only one display option (display), the
module includes the same image in the snapshot of both the summary
and the detail display images.
module snapshot detail
module snapshot
detail
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
131
Captures an image of all module detail display screens. The display
screens contain the current values of all fields and counters at the time
that you use the snapshot feature.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo sn de
Important Consideration
■
If a feature or protocol has only one display option (display), the
module includes that image with both the summary and detail display
images.
132
CHAPTER 4: MODULE ENVIRONMENT
module baseline
display
Displays when the current baseline was last set.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
mo ba dis
Important Considerations
■
Use this command to determine if you need a newer baseline for
viewing statistics.
■
The display indicates if you have not set the baseline on a module.
module baseline set
module baseline set
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
133
Resets the baseline counters to zero and time-stamps the baseline.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo ba set
Important Considerations
■
Baselining is automatically enabled when a baseline is set.
■
The module maintains the accumulated totals since power-on.
■
After you disconnect from a module on which you set a baseline, the
baseline is disabled. You must reconnect to that module and use the
module baseline requestedState option to reenable the baseline.
134
CHAPTER 4: MODULE ENVIRONMENT
module baseline
requestedState
Enables or disables a baseline.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
mo ba req
Important Considerations
■
When you reenable a baseline, the counters return to the values that
have accumulated since the most recent baseline that you set.
■
Disabling a baseline returns the counters to the total accumulated
values since the last power on.
■
After you disconnect from a module on which you set a baseline, the
baseline is disabled. You must reconnect to that module and use the
module baseline requestedState option to reenable the baseline.
Options
Prompt
Description
Baseline
Whether you want to enable or
disable the baseline
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
disabled
module redundancy
module redundancy
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
135
Establishes a fault-tolerant environment for your CoreBuilder 9000
system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo red
Important Considerations
■
You must be using a CoreBuilder 9000 8-slot or 16-slot chassis.
■
The Redundancy option appears on the module menu if you have one
or two switch fabric modules installed. If you only have one switch
fabric module installed in the chassis, the status of the second switch
fabric slot is Not Responding.
Options
Possible
Values
[Default]
–
–
Whether the module’s
–
non-redundant indicator resets
–
Prompt
Description
Display
Module redundancy
configuration and status
reset
nonRedundant
136
CHAPTER 4: MODULE ENVIRONMENT
module name
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Assigns or changes an easily recognizable and unique module name to
help you manage it.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo nam
Important Considerations
■
Assign an easily recognizable and unique name for each module. For
example, name the module according to its physical location, such as
CB9000-ENGLAB1.
■
Use quotation marks (“) around any string with embedded spaces.
■
The new module name appears the next time that you display the
configuration.
Options
Prompt
Description
New name
New or changed name for the
module
Possible Values
■
■
A string of up
to 32
case-sensitive
characters
? (for
information
about the
naming
guidelines)
[Default]
Current system
and module
name
module time
module time
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
137
Displays the module’s current date and time.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo ti
Important Considerations
■
You cannot change the system time from the module. You can only
change the date and time from the Enterprise Management Engine
(EME).
■
The CoreBuilder 9000 module’s internal clock is initialized when the
module is shipped from the factory. You may want to reset the EME
date and time to match the system’s physical location.
Module Time Example
CB9000@slot10.1 [12-E/FEN-TX-L3] (module): time
The current module time is 05/20/98 04:37:57 PM.
138
CHAPTER 4: MODULE ENVIRONMENT
module screenHeight
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Changes the Administration Console’s screen height to increase or
decrease the space available for displaying information.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo scr
Important Considerations
■
The setting controls the way that the module displays statistical
summaries and other information that results from your use of the
menus, not the way that the module displays the menus themselves.
■
Each time that the screen output reaches the designated screen
height, the module prompts you to press a key to display more
information. Set the screen height to infinite (0) if you do not want the
modules to display this prompt. At 0, however, the screen output can
scroll beyond the screen, depending on your screen size.
■
Most terminal screens are 24 lines.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
New screen
height
New screen height in lines
■
Set this
Default screen height for
value as the future Administration Console
default?
sessions
■
1 – 200
[Default]
24
0 (for infinite
height)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
y
module nvData reset
module nvData reset
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
139
Resets the module’s nonvolatile data (NV) values to the factory defaults.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo nv res
Important Considerations
■
At times you may want to reset the values to the factory defaults so
that you can reconfigure the module from its original settings.
■
Resetting the NV data means that all NV memory is set back to the
factory defaults. Before you proceed, be sure that you want to reset
your NV data. Rebooting a module returns you to the Enterprise
Management Engine (EME) prompt, so that you must reconnect to the
module.
Prompts
Prompt
Description
Do you wish Confirmation prompt.
to
Resetting nonvolatile data may
continue?
leave the module in an
inconsistent state; a reboot is
necessary after each reset.
Possible Values
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
[Default]
y
140
CHAPTER 4: MODULE ENVIRONMENT
module nvData
emergencyDownload
Performs an emergency download.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3500
✓ 9000
9400
mo nv sta
Important Consideration
■
3900
9300
If you hot swap a module and the staging flag is set to off, the new
module uses the module default settings for the new module.
Options
Prompt
Description
Staging
setting
Whether you want to enable or
disable the NV staging flag
Possible Values
■
off
■
on
[Default]
off
module nvData displayDownload
module nvData
displayDownload
Displays emergency download information for your module.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3500
✓ 9000
9400
mo nv dis
Important Consideration
■
3900
9300
The download display shows the following information:
■
File Type
■
File Name
■
Server IP
141
142
CHAPTER 4: MODULE ENVIRONMENT
module nvData
staging
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Enables either default module settings or retention of nonvolatile data
settings when you hot swap a module.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo nv sta
Important Considerations
■
If you hot swap a module and the staging flag is set to on, the new
module adopts the nonvolatile data settings from the old module.
■
If you hot swap a module and the staging flag is set to off, the new
module uses the module default settings for the new module.
Options
Prompt
Description
Staging
setting
Whether you want to enable or
disable the NV staging flag
Possible Values
■
off
■
on
[Default]
off
module clearDiagBlock
module
clearDiagBlock
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
143
Prevents diagnostic information about failed modules from accumulating
in module display screens.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo cle
Important Considerations
■
The module immediately removes diagnostic information about failed
modules from the SNMP MIB swSysDiagnosticsGroup.
■
If you enter y (yes), the module immediately removes the diagnostic
information about failed modules from the SNMP MIB
swSysDiagnosticsGroup.
■
If you enter n (no), the module displays the previous menu.
144
CHAPTER 4: MODULE ENVIRONMENT
module diagErrLog
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Displays hardware diagnostic errors that have been saved in the flash
memory. When the system is initializing, if the diagnostic software detects
errors, and if the system completes initializing, the detected errors are
written to flash memory and stored in a dynamic error log.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo dia
Important Consideration
■
The error messages are saved to flash memory until you power down
the system or clear the error log with the system clearDiagBlock
command.
module reboot
module reboot
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
145
Reboots the specified module.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
mo reboot
Important Considerations
■
Rebooting a module returns you to the Enterprise Management
Engine (EME) prompt, so that you must reconnect to the module.
■
If you enter y, the module reboots.
■
If you enter n, the previous menu appears on the screen.
146
CHAPTER 4: MODULE ENVIRONMENT
disconnect
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Disconnects you from the Administration Console and returns you to the
Enterprise Management Engine (EME) module.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
disc
Important Consideration
■
Disconnecting from the Administration Console does not disconnect
you from a Telnet session.
ESTABLISHING MANAGEMENT
ACCESS
III
Chapter 5
Out-of-Band Management
Chapter 6
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
5
OUT-OF-BAND MANAGEMENT
The Internet Protocol (IP) is a standard networking protocol that is used
for communications among various networking devices. To gain access to
the system using the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP) or to manage the system using the Simple Network Management
Protocol (SNMP), you must set up an IP interface to manage your system,
either in-band (with your regular network traffic) or out-of-band (with a
dedicated network).
■
In-Band Management — Set up an IP routing interface and at least
one virtual local area network (VLAN). See Chapter 14 for information
about how to define a VLAN.
■
Out-of-Band Management — Assign an IP address and subnet
mask for the out-of-band Ethernet port on your system through the
management menu. This chapter focuses on out-of-band
management. The out-of-band Ethernet port is the 10BASE-T port on
the system processor module. It is not associated with a port number.
(See Chapter 16 for background information about IP addresses and
subnet masks.)
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
set up an out-of-band management interface for your system.
The CoreBuilder® 9000 and SuperStack® II Switch 3900 use in-band
management only. For more information about management interfaces,
see the Implementation Guide for your system.
150
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
➧ management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
management menu
summary
detail
➧ ip
ip menu
➧ interface
➧ route
➧ arp
➧ rip
ping
advancedPing
traceRoute
advancedTraceRoute
statistics
interface menu
summary
define
modify
remove
route menu
display
static
remove
flush
default
noDefault
findRoute
arp menu
display
static
remove
flushAll
flushDynamic
rip menu
display
mode
statistics
management summary
management
summary
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
3900
✓ 9300
151
Displays Ethernet summary information about the out-of-band system
management port.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
m sum
Important Considerations
■
The management summary and management detail displays contain
the same fields as the Ethernet summary and Ethernet detail displays.
■
Fields that do not apply to the management port contain n/a in the
management summary and management detail displays.
Fields in the Management Summary Display
Field
Description
actualFlowControl
Actual flow control setting (for Gigabit Ethernet ports).
When autonegotiation is completed, the value is the
autonegotiated setting. When autonegotiation is
disabled, the value is the user-selected flow control value.
actualPortMode
Actual operating port mode. When autonegotiation is
completed, the value shown is the autonegotiated setting.
When autonegotiation is disabled, the value is the
user-selected port mode.
autoNegMode
Autonegotiation mode configured for port. Possible
values are enabled or disabled.
autoNegState
Current negotiation state. Possible values are disabled,
configuring, completed, and failed.
linkStatus
Boolean value indicating the current state of the physical
link status for this port (either enabled or disabled)
macAddress
MAC address of this port
noRxBuffers
Number of frames that were discarded because no buffer
space was available
portLabel
User-defined label name. The maximum length of the
string is 32 characters, including the null terminator.
portState
Current software operational state of this port. Possible
values are on-line and off-line.
portType
Specific description of this port’s type. Value for port type:
10/100BASE-TX (RJ-45)
reqFlowControl
If autonegotiation is disabled, a configurable parameter
that sets the flow control option on the ports. If
autonegotiation is enabled, flow control values are
ignored.
152
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
Field
Description
reqPortMode
If autonegotiation is disabled, a configurable parameter
that sets the port mode on Ethernet ports that have port
mode options. If autonegotiation is enabled, port mode
values are ignored.
rxBytes
Number of bytes received by this port, including framing
characters
rxErrs
Sum of all receive errors that are associated with this port
(summary report only)
rxFrames
Number of frames that were copied into receive buffers
by this port
txBytes
Number of bytes that were transmitted by this port,
including framing characters
txErrs
Sum of all transmit errors that are associated with this
port (summary report only)
txFrames
Number of frames that were transmitted by this port
txQOverflows
Number of frames that were lost because transmit queue
was full
management detail
management detail
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
3900
✓ 9300
153
Displays Ethernet detailed information about the out-of-band system
management port.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
m det
Important Considerations
■
The management summary and management detail displays contain
the same fields as the Ethernet summary and Ethernet detail displays.
■
Fields that do not apply to the management port contain n/a in the
management summary and management detail displays.
Fields in the Management Detail Display
Field
Description
actualFlowControl
Actual flow control setting for the port. When
autonegotiation is completed, the value is the
autonegotiated setting. When autonegotiation is
disabled, the value is the user-selected flow control value.
actualPortMode
Actual operating port mode. When autonegotiation is
completed, the value shown is the autonegotiated setting.
When autonegotiation is disabled, the value is the
user-selected port mode.
alignmentErrs
Number of frames received by this port that are not an
integral number of octets in length and do not pass the
FCS check
autoNegMode
Autonegotiation mode configured for port. Possible
values are enabled or disabled.
autoNegState
Current negotiation state. Possible values are disabled,
configuring, completed, and failed.
carrierSenseErr
Number of frames discarded because the carrier sense
condition was lost while attempting to transmit a frame
from this port
collisions
Number of collisions detected on this port
excessCollision
Number of frames that could not be transmitted on this
port because the maximum allowed number of collisions
was exceeded
excessDeferrals
Number of frames that could not be transmitted on this
port because the maximum allowed deferral time was
exceeded
fcsErrs
Number of frames received by this port that are an
integral number of octets in length but do not pass the
FCS check
154
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
Field
Description
lateCollisions
Number of times that a collision was detected on this port
later than 512 bit-times into the transmission of a frame
lengthErrs
Number of frames received by this port that are longer
than 1518 bytes or shorter than 64 bytes
linkStatus
Boolean value indicating the current state of the physical
link status for this port (either enabled or disabled)
macAddress
MAC address of this port
multiCollisions
Number of times that multiple collisions were detected on
this port.
noRxBuffers
Number of frames that were discarded because no buffer
space was available
portLabel
User-defined label name. The maximum length of the
string is 32 characters, including the null terminator.
portState
Current software operational state of this port. Possible
values are on-line and off-line.
portType
Specific description of this port’s type. Values for each
port type: 10/100BASE-TX (RJ-45), 100BASE-FX
(SC), 1000BASE-SX (SC), 1000BASE-LX (SC).
reqFlowControl
If autonegotiation is disabled, a configurable parameter
that sets the flow control option on the port. If
autonegotiation is enabled, flow control values are
ignored.
reqPortMode
If autonegotiation is disabled, a configurable parameter
that sets the port mode on Ethernet ports that have port
mode options. If autonegotiation is enabled, port mode
values are ignored.
requestedState
Configurable parameter that enables or disables this port.
The default is enabled.
rxByteRate
Average number of bytes received per second by this port
during the most recent sampling period
rxBytes
Number of bytes received by this port, including framing
characters
rxDiscards
Number of received frames that were discarded because
there was no higher layer to receive them or because the
port was disabled
rxErrs
Sum of all receive errors that are associated with this port
(summary report only)
rxFrameRate
Average number of frames that were received per second
by this port during the most recent sampling period.
Sampling periods are 1 second long and not configurable.
rxFrames
Number of frames that were copied into receive buffers
by this port
management detail
155
Field
Description
rxInternalErrs
Number of frames that were discarded because of an
internal error during reception
rxMulticasts
Number of multicast frames that were delivered to a
higher-level protocol or application by this port
rxPeakByteRate
Peak value of ethernetPortByteReceiveRate for this port
since the station was last initialized
rxPeakFrameRate
Peak value of ethernetPortFrameReceiveRate for this port
since the station was last initialized
rxUnicasts
Number of unicast frames that were delivered by this port
to a higher-level protocol or application
txByteRate
Average number of bytes transmitted per second by the
port during the most recent sampling period
txBytes
Number of bytes that were transmitted by this port,
including framing characters
txDiscards
Number of transmitted frames that were discarded
because the port was disabled
txErrs
Sum of all transmit errors that are associated with this
port (summary report only)
txFrameRate
Average number of frames transmitted per second by this
port during the most recent sampling period. Sampling
periods are 1 second long (not configurable).
txFrames
Number of frames that were transmitted by this port
txInternalErrs
Number of frames that were discarded because of an
internal error during transmission
txMulticasts
Number of multicast frames that are queued for
transmission by a higher-level protocol or application,
including those not transmitted successfully
txPeakByteRate
Peak value of ethernetPortByteTransmitRate for this port
since the station was last initialized
txPeakFrameRate
Peak value of ethernetPortFrameTransmitRate for this port
since the station was last initialized
txQOverflows
Number of frames that were lost because transmit queue
was full
txUnicasts
Number of unicast (nonmulticast) frames that are queued
for transmission by a higher-level protocol or application,
including frames not transmitted successfully
156
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip
interface summary
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
Displays a summary table about the out-of-band system IP management
interface configuration, including parameter settings.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
m ip i sum
Fields in the Management IP Interface Summary Display
Field
Description
Index
Unique number that identifies the out-of-band interface
IP address
IP address of the out-of-band interface, chosen from the
range of addresses that the central agency assigned to
your organization. This address is specific to your network
and system.
IP routing status
Whether the interface is available to route IP traffic
(enabled) or not (disabled)
RIP status
Whether RIP is dynamically configuring its routing tables
(active) or on request (passive)
State
State of the IP interface, indicating whether the interface
is available for communications (up) or unavailable
(down).
Subnet mask
32-bit number that uses the same format and
representation as an IP address. The subnet mask
determines which bits in the IP address are interpreted as
the network number, the subnet number, and the host
number. Each IP address bit that corresponds to a 1 in the
subnet mask is in the network/subnet part of the address.
Each IP address bit that corresponds to a 0 is in the host
part of the IP address.
Type
Type of device that is connected to the interface
management ip interface define
management ip
interface define
157
Defines the IP address of the IP management out-of-band port.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
m ip i d
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
IP address
IP address of the out-of-band
Any valid IP address –
interface, chosen from the
range of addresses that the
central agency assigned to your
organization. This address is
specific to your network and
system.
Subnet
mask
32-bit number that uses the
same format and
representation as an IP address.
The subnet mask determines
which bits in the IP address are
interpreted as the network
number, the subnet number,
and the host number. Each IP
address bit that corresponds to
a 1 in the subnet mask is in the
network/subnet part of the
address. Each IP address bit
that corresponds to a 0 is in
the host part of the IP address.
Any subnet mask
valid for use with
the current IP
address
[Default]
255.255.0.0, or
the subnet
mask value
currently stored
in the system
158
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip
interface modify
✓ 3500
Changes the configuration of an IP management interface that you have
already defined.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
m ip i m
3900
9300
■
Important Consideration
Use the management ip statistics command to periodically
monitor IP activity for your system. The statistics can help determine
whether you need to change the IP management interface using the
management ip interface modify command.
management ip interface remove
management ip
interface remove
159
Removes an IP management interface if you no longer need it.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
m ip i r
Important Consideration
■
3900
9300
Use the management ip statistics command to periodically
monitor IP activity for your system. The statistics can help determine
whether you need to remove the IP management interface using the
management ip interface remove command.
160
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip route
display
Displays the system’s routing table to determine which routes to other IP
networks are configured and whether the routes are operational.
✓ 3500
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
m ip ro di
3900
9300
■
The system prompts you for an IP address and subnet mask. This
information enables you to display only a subset of routes instead of
all routes. To see all entries in the table, press Return at the prompts.
■
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether IP routing
is enabled (in-band only):
Important Considerations
■
■
IP interface options (such as ICMP router discovery) appear under
ip interface detail and are set on a per-interface basis.
The route table display includes a range for the routing table entries as
follows:
There are n of m possible Routing Table entries.
Where n is the minimum and m is the maximum number of entries.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP address
IP address that
A valid IP address
directs the system to
display only those
routes that match
the bits set in the
specified IP address
(and its
corresponding
subnet mask)
Possible Values
[Default]
0.0.0.0
Press Enter to take
the default, which
displays all entries
Subnet mask
Subnet mask that
A valid subnet mask
directs the system to
display only those
routes that match
the bits set in the
subnet mask for the
specified IP address
Based on
specified IP
address
management ip route display
161
Fields in the Management IP Route Display
Field
Description
Destination
IP address of the destination network, subnetwork, or host. This
field can also identify a default route, which the system uses to
forward packets that do not match any other routing table
entry. You may want to use the default route in place of routes
to numerous destinations that all have the same gateway IP
address.
Gateway
Address that directs the router how to forward packets whose
destination addresses match the route’s IP address and subnet
mask. The system forwards such packets to the indicated
gateway.
Metric
Number of networks through which a packet must pass to reach
a given destination. The system includes the metric in its RIP
updates to allow other routers to compare routing information
that is received from different sources.
Status
Status of the route. See the following route status table.
Subnet mask
Subnet mask that is associated with the IP address of the
destination network, subnet, or host.
Status for Routes
Value
Description
Direct
Route is for a directly connected network
Learned
Route was learned using indicated protocol
Learned RIP
Route was learned using RIP-1 protocol
Learned
RIP-Zombie
Route was learned but is partially timed out
Learned RIP2
Route was learned using RIP-2 protocol
Local
Actual interface address
Static
Route was statically configured
Timed out
Route has timed out and is no longer valid
162
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip route
static
Defines a static route.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
m ip ro s
Important Considerations
■
Before you can define static routes, you must define at least one IP
interface. See “ip interface define (3500/9000 Layer 3)” in Chapter 16
for more information.
■
You can define up to 128 static routes.
■
Static routes remain in the table until you remove them or the
corresponding interface.
■
Static routes take precedence over dynamically learned routes to the
same destination.
■
Static routes are not included in periodic Routing Information Protocol
(RIP) updates sent by the system.
3900
9300
Options
Prompt
Description
Destination IP
address
IP address of the
A valid IP address
destination network,
subnet, or host for
this route
Possible Values
[Default]
–
Subnet mask
Subnet mask for the A valid subnet mask
specified IP address
Based on
specified IP
address
Gateway IP
address
IP address of the
A valid router address
gateway used by this
route
–
management ip route remove
management ip route
remove
163
Deletes an existing route.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
m ip ro r
Important Consideration
■
3900
9300
When you enter the command, the system deletes the route
immediately from the routing table. You are not prompted to confirm
the deletion.
Options
Prompt
Description
Destination IP
address
IP address associated A valid IP address
with the route that
you want to delete
Possible Values
[Default]
–
Subnet mask
Subnet mask for the A valid subnet mask
specified IP address
Based on
specified IP
address
164
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip route
flush
Deletes all learned routes from the routing table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
m ip ro fl
Important Considerations
■
The system deletes all learned routes from the routing table
immediately. You are not prompted to confirm the deletion.
■
Flushing the routing table causes Routing Information Protocol (RIP) to
regenerate the routing table. The system repopulates the routing table
a few seconds after you flush it.
management ip route default
management ip route
default
165
Adds a default route to the routing table immediately.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
m ip ro de
Important Considerations
■
If you define a default route, the system uses it to forward packets
that do not match any other routing table entry. The system can learn
a route using the Routing Information Protocol (RIP), or you can
statically configure a default route.
■
If the routing table does not contain a default route, the system
cannot forward a packet that does not match any other routing table
entry. When the system drops the packet, it sends an ICMP
destination unreachable message to the host that sent the packet.
3900
9300
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Gateway IP
address
IP address that is
associated with the
default route that
you want to add
(for example,
158.101.112.253)
A valid IP address
–
166
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip route
noDefault
Deletes the default route.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
m ip ro n
Important Consideration
■
3900
9300
The system deletes the default route from the routing table
immediately after you enter the command. You are not prompted to
confirm this deletion.
management ip route findRoute
management ip route
findRoute
167
Searches for a route in the routing table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
m ip route fi
Important Considerations
■
This command enables you to find a route using an IP address or a
host name, as long as Domain Name System (DNS) is configured.
■
When you enter this command with a valid IP address or host name,
the system displays the routing table entry.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
IP address (or
host name)
IP address that is
associated with the
route you that want
to find, or a host
name, if DNS is
configured
A valid IP address or host 0.0.0.0
name
168
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip arp
display
✓ 3500
Display the contents of the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache for
each interface on the system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
m ip ar d
3900
9300
■
The system uses the ARP cache to find the MAC addresses that
correspond to the IP addresses of hosts and other routers on the same
subnets. Each device that participates in routing maintains an ARP
cache, which is a table of known IP addresses and their corresponding
MAC addresses.
■
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether IP routing
is enabled (in-band only):
Important Considerations
■
IP interface options (such as ICMP router discovery) appear under
ip interface detail and are set on a per-interface basis. The
second status line indicates the number of entries in the ARP
cache.
Fields in the Management IP ARP Display
Field
Description
Hardware address
MAC address that is mapped to the IP address
IP address
IP address of the interface
Type
Type of entry, static or dynamic
management ip arp static
management ip arp
static
Defines a static ARP cache entry on the system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
m ip ar s
Important Consideration
■
3900
9300
You can define up to 128 static ARP entries.
Options
Prompt
Description
Interface index Index number of the
interface for which
you want to define a
static ARP entry
Possible Values
■
■
A valid index number
[Default]
–
? (for a list of
selectable indexes)
IP address
IP address to use in
the entry
A valid IP address
MAC address
Hardware address to A valid MAC address
use in the entry
(in the format
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx)
Management IP ARP Static Example
Select interface index {1-2|?} 2
Enter IP address: 158.101.12.12
Enter MAC address: 00-00-00-00-00-01
–
–
169
170
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip arp
remove
✓ 3500
Deletes an entry from the ARP cache (for example, if the MAC address
has changed).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
m ip ar rem
3900
9300
■
When you enter the command, the system deletes the entry
immediately from the cache. You are not prompted to confirm the
deletion.
■
If necessary, the system subsequently uses ARP to find the new MAC
address that corresponds to that IP address.
Important Considerations
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
IP address
IP address that is
associated with the
entry that you want
to delete
A valid IP address
–
management ip arp flushAll
management ip arp
flushAll
171
Deletes all entries from the ARP cache.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
m ip ar flushA
Important Considerations
■
This command applies to the CoreBuilder 3500 only; other platforms
use ip arp flush. To flush dynamic entries only, see the
“management ip arp flushDynamic” command next.
■
When you enter the command, the system deletes all entries
immediately from the cache. You are not prompted to confirm the
deletions.
3900
9300
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CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip arp
flushDynamic
Deletes all dynamic (automatically learned) entries from the ARP cache.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
m ip ar flushD
Important Considerations
■
This command applies to the CoreBuilder 3500 only; other platforms
use ip arp flush. To flush all entries, static and dynamic, see the
previous “management ip arp flushAll” command.
■
When you enter the command, the system deletes all dynamic entries
immediately from the cache. You are not prompted to confirm the
deletions.
3900
9300
management ip rip display
management ip rip
display
✓ 3500
9000
9400
173
Displays information about the Routing Information Protocol (RIP)
interfaces on the system. RIP is one of the IP Interior Gateway Protocols
(IGPs). When enabled, RIP allows the system to dynamically configure its
routing tables.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
m ip ri d
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether IP routing
is enabled (in-band only):
■
■
IP interface options (such as ICMP router discovery) appear under
ip interface detail and are set on a per-interface basis. The
rest of the output contains more RIP interface information.
The two available RIP modes are as follows:
■
■
Disabled — The system ignores all incoming RIP packets and does
not generate any RIP packets of its own.
Learn — The system processes all incoming RIP packets, but it
does not transmit RIP updates.
Fields in the Management IP RIP Display
Field
Description
Index
Index number of the interface
RIP-1 mode
Mode for RIP-1. If you disable RIP-1, the output lists
the state as off. Other modes are learn
(default), advertise, and enabled.
RIP-2 mode
Mode for RIP-2. If you disable RIP-2, the output lists
the state as off. Other modes are learn
(default), advertise, and enabled.
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CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip rip
mode
✓ 3500
On a per-interface basis, sets one of four RIP Version 1 (RIP-1) modes and
one of four RIP Version 2 (RIP-2) modes on the system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
m ip ri m
3900
9300
■
The CoreBuilder 3500 supports RIP Version 1 as well as RIP Version 2.
For each interface, you select a RIP Version 1 mode and a RIP Version 2
mode. The default RIP Version 1 mode for all platforms is learn. The
default RIP Version 2 mode for the CoreBuilder 3500 is disabled.
■
The four available RIP modes are as follows:
Important Considerations
■
■
■
■
Disabled — The interface ignores all incoming RIP packets and
does not generate any RIP packets of its own.
Learn — The interface processes all incoming RIP packets, but it
does not transmit RIP updates. This is the default RIP mode.
Advertise — The interface broadcasts RIP updates, but it does not
process incoming RIP packets.
Enabled — The interface broadcasts RIP updates and processes
incoming RIP packets.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the interface for
which you want to set the RIP
mode
Possible Values
[Default]
Selected
interfaces
Previous
entry, if
applicable
■
■
■
RIP mode,
Version 1
RIP mode,
Version 2
Selected RIP Version 1 mode that
determines how the interface
handles RIP 1 packets and
updates
How the interface handles RIP 2
packets and updates
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
■
disabled
■
learn
■
advertise
■
enabled
■
disabled
■
learn
■
advertise
■
enabled
learn, or
current
value
disabled, or
current
value
management ip rip mode
175
Management IP RIP Mode Example
Select menu option (management/ip/rip): mode
Select IP interfaces (1|all|?) [1]: 1
Interface 1 - Enter RIP Version 1 mode (disabled,learn) [learn]: disabled
Interface 1 - Enter RIP Version 2 mode (disabled,learn) [learn]: disabled
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CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip rip
statistics
Displays general RIP statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
m ip rip s
Fields in the Management IP RIP Statistics Display
Field
Description
queries
Number of queries
routeChanges
Number of route changes
management ip ping
management ip ping
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
177
Tries to reach or “ping” a specified destination using the default ping
options.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
m ip p
Important Considerations
■
■
This tool is useful for network testing, performance measurement,
and management. It uses the Internet Control Message Protocol
(ICMP) echo facility to send ICMP echo request packets to the IP
destination that you specify.
If you need to change the default ping options, use management ip
advancedPing.
■
You can either supply the host name or IP address as part of the
command string, or you can supply the information at the prompt.
■
When you specify a host name, the host name and its associated IP
address must be configured on a network name server. Also, you must
add the IP address on the name server to the list of name server
addresses that are associated with the network domain name. See “ip
dns define” in Chapter 16 for more information.
■
When the system sends an echo request packet to an IP station using
ping, the system waits for an ICMP echo reply packet. Possible
responses:
■
■
■
■
If the host is reachable, the system displays information about the
ICMP reply packets and the response time to the ping.
If the host does not respond, the system displays the ICMP packet
information and this message: Host is Not Responding. You may
not have configured your gateway IP address.
If the packets cannot reach the host, the system displays the ICMP
packet information and this message: Host is Unreachable. A
host is unreachable when there is no route to that host.
To interrupt the command, press Enter.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Host name or
IP address
Host name or IP address of the
destination that you want to
ping
A valid host name
or IP address
0.0.0.0
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CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
Management IP Ping Example
Select menu option (ip): ping
Enter host name/IP address [0.0.0.0]: 158.101.111.50
Press "Enter" key to interrupt.
PING 158.101.111.50: 64 byte packets
64 bytes from 158.101.111.50: icmp_seq=0.
64 bytes from 158.101.111.50: icmp_seq=1.
64 bytes from 158.101.111.50: icmp_seq=2.
time=16. ms
time=19. ms
time=24. ms
---- 158.101.111.50 PING Statistics ---3 packets transmitted, 3 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 16/20/24
management ip advancedPing
management ip
advancedPing
✓ 3500
179
Tries to reach or “ping” a host with one or more of the advanced ping
options.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
m ip advancedP
3900
9300
■
When you specify a host name, the host name and its associated IP
address must be configured on a network name server. Also, you must
add the IP address on the name server to the list of name server
addresses that are associated with the network domain name. See the
ip dns commands in Chapter 16 for more information.
■
The Burst option, when enabled, overrides the value that is set in the
Quiet or Wait option.
■
The Burst option floods the network with Internet Control Message
Protocol (ICMP) echo packets and can cause network congestion. Do
not use the Burst option during periods of heavy network traffic. Use
this option only as a diagnostic tool in a network that has many
routers to determine if one of the routers is not forwarding packets.
For example, you can set a high count value (1000 packets), and then
observe the run lights on the units: the run lights blink rapidly on
routers that are forwarding packets successfully, but remain unlit, or
blink slowly, on routers that are not forwarding packets successfully.
■
To interrupt the command, press Enter.
Important Considerations
Options
Possible
Values
Prompt
Description
Host name or
IP address
Host name or IP address of the
destination that you want to ping.
A valid host
name or IP
address
[Default]
0.0.0.0
Number of
ICMP Request
packets
Number of ICMP echo request
packets that are sent to ping a host.
If the destination host does not
respond after it is pinged by the
number of packets that you specify,
the system displays a Host is
Unreachable or Host is not
Responding message.
1 – 9999
packets
3
180
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
Prompt
Description
Packet size
Number of bytes in each ICMP echo
request packet. The packet size
includes both the IP and the ICMP
headers.
Burst Transmit
Ping mode
When enabled, sends out the
ICMP echo request packets as rapidly
as possible. The system displays a
period (.) upon receiving an ICMP
echo replay packet. Use this display
to determine how many packets are
being dropped during the burst. This
is unique to the Burst option.
Quiet mode
How much packet information the
system displays after a ping. When
enabled, the system displays
information about the number of
packets that the system sent and
received, any loss of packets, and the
average time that it took a packet to
travel to and from the host. When
disabled, the system displays
more detailed status information
about each ICMP echo request
packet.
Time between
sending each
packet (wait)
Number of seconds that the system
waits before it sends out successive
ICMP echo request packets. Set this
option to a high value if network
traffic is heavy and you do not want
to add to the network traffic with
pings in fast succession.
ICMP
sourceAddress
Forces the source address of the
ICMP packets to be something other
than the IP address of the interface
from which the packet originated.
You can use this option if you have
more than one IP interface defined.
Interface index Index number of the ICMP source IP
address that you want to use.
Possible
Values
28 – 4096
bytes
■
disabled
■
enabled
■
disabled
■
enabled
1 – 20
seconds
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
Currently
defined
interfaces
and their
indexes
[Default]
64
disabled
disabled
1
y
0 (the
router
picks the
best
interface)
management ip advancedPing
Management IP Advanced Ping Example
Select menu option (ip): advancedPing
Enter host IP address [0.0.0.0]: 158.101.112.56
Enter number of ICMP request packets (1-9999) [3]:
Enter packet size (bytes) (28-4096) [64]:
Enter Burst Transmit Ping mode (disabled,enabled) [disabled]:
Enter Quiet mode (disabled,enabled) [disabled]:
Enter time (sec) waits between sending each packet (1-20) [1]: 2
Configure ICMP sourceAddress? (n,y) [y]:
Index
Interface address
0
Best interface (default)
1
158.101.117.151
2
158.101.10.1
Select interface index {0-2|?} [0]: 1
Press "Enter" key to interrupt.
PING 158.101.112.56 from 158.101.117.151: 64 byte packets
64 bytes from 158.101.112.56: icmp_seq=0. time=26. ms
64 bytes from 158.101.112.56: icmp_seq=1. time=18. ms
64 bytes from 158.101.112.56: icmp_seq=2. time=18. ms
---- 158.101.112.56 PING Statistics ---3 packets transmitted, 3 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 18/21/26
181
182
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip
traceRoute
Traces a route to a destination using the default traceRoute options.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
9000
9400
m ip t
Important Considerations
■
3900
9300
■
TraceRoute information includes all of the nodes in the network
through which a packet passes to get from its origin to its destination.
It uses the IP time-to-live (TTL) field in User Datagram Protocol (UDP)
probe packets to elicit an Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)
Time Exceeded message from each gateway to a host.
To change the default traceRoute options, use the management ip
advancedTraceRoute command.
■
You can either supply the host name or IP address as part of the
command string, or you can supply the information at the prompt.
■
When you specify a host name, the host name and its associated IP
address must be configured on a network name server. Also, you must
add the IP address on the name server to the list of name server
addresses that are associated with the network domain name. See
Chapter 16 for more information about ip dns commands.
■
To track the route of an IP packet, traceRoute launches UDP probe
packets with a small TTL value and then listens for an ICMP Time
Exceeded reply from a gateway. Probes start with a small TTL of 1 and
increase the value by 1 until one of the following events occurs:
■
■
■
The system receives a Port Unreachable message, indicating that
the packet reached the host.
The probe exceeds the maximum number of hops (default 30).
At each TTL setting, the system launches three UDP probe packets,
and the traceRoute display shows a line with the TTL value, the
address of the gateway, and the round-trip time of each probe. If a
probe answers from different gateways, the traceRoute feature prints
the address of each responding system. If no response occurs in the
3-second timeout interval, traceRoute displays an asterisk (*) for that
probe.
management ip traceRoute
183
Other characters that can be displayed include the following:
■
!N — Network is unreachable
■
!H — Host is unreachable
■
!P — Protocol is unreachable
■
!F — Fragmentation is needed
■
!<n> — Unknown packet type
To interrupt the command, press Enter.
■
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
Host name or
IP address
Host name or IP address of the
A valid host name
destination to which you want to or IP address
trace a route
[Default]
0.0.0.0
Management IP Trace Route Example
Select menu option (ip): traceRoute
Enter host name/IP address [0.0.0.0]: 158.101.101.40
Press "Enter" key to interrupt.
Traceroute to 158.101.101.40: 30 hops max, 28 bytes packet
1
2
3
4
158.101.117.254
158.101.112.254
158.101.96.22
158.101.101.40
9
8
7
7
ms
ms
ms
ms
22
22
22
23
ms
ms
ms
ms
5
8
7
6
ms
ms
ms
ms
184
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip
advancedTraceRoute
✓ 3500
Traces a route to a host with one or more of the advanced traceRoute
options.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
m ip advancedT
3900
9300
■
When you specify a host name, the host name and its associated IP
address must be configured on a network name server. Also, you must
add the IP address on the name server to the list of name server
addresses that are associated with the network domain name. See “ip
dns define” in Chapter 16 for more information.
■
To interrupt the command, press Enter.
Important Considerations
Options
Prompt
Description
Host name or
IP address
Host name or IP address of the
destination that you want to ping
Possible
Values
■
■
A valid
host
name
[Default]
0.0.0.0
IP
address
Maximum ttl
Maximum number of hops that
the system can use in outgoing
probe packets
1 – 255
hops
Destination
port
Destination (or base) UDP port
30000 –
number that the system uses in
65535
probe packets. Set the destination
UDP port number to be very high
to ensure that an application at
the destination is not using that
port.
33434
probeCount
Maximum number of probes that 1 – 10
the system sends at each TTL level
3
Wait
Wait interval (in seconds) that
1 – 10
determines the maximum amount seconds
of time that the system waits for a
response to a probe
3
packetSize
Number of bytes that the system
sends in each UDP probe packet
28
28 – 4096
bytes
30
management ip advancedTraceRoute
Possible
Values
Prompt
Description
sourceAddress
Source address other than the
one from which the probe
packets originate. This option is
available if you have more than
one IP interface defined on the
system.
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
185
[Default]
y
Interface index Index number of the ICMP source A selectable
IP address that you want to use.
interface
The system lists defined interfaces
and their indexes.
0 (the router
picks the
best
interface)
Numeric mode Whether the system shows hop
addresses numerically or
symbolically.
default
■
disabled
■
enabled
Management IP Advanced Trace Route Example (TTL value of 10):
Select menu option (ip): advancedTraceRoute
Enter host IP address [158.101.101.27]:
Enter maximum Time-to-Live (ttl) (1-255) [30]: 10
Enter Destination Port number (30000-65535) [33434]:
Enter the number of probes to be sent at each ttl level (1-10) [3]:
Enter time (sec) to wait for a response (1-10) [3]:
Enter the packet size (bytes) (28-4096) [28]:
Configure TRACEROUTE sourceAddress? (n,y) [y]:
Index
Interface address
0
Best interface (default)
1
158.101.117.151
2
158.101.10.1
Select interface index {0-2|?} [0]:
Enter Numeric mode (disabled,enabled) [disabled]:
Press "Enter" key to interrupt.
Traceroute to 158.101.101.27: 10 hops max, 28 bytes packet
1
2
3
4
158.101.117.254
158.101.112.254
158.101.96.22
158.101.101.27
12
51
21
18
ms
ms
ms
ms
7
9
15
90
ms
ms
ms
ms
5
7
6
80
ms
ms
ms
ms
186
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
management ip
statistics
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
Displays different types of IP statistics: general statistics and those specific
to the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) or the Internet Control Message
Protocol (ICMP).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
m ip sta
Options
Prompt
Description
Statistics
Type of IP statistics that you want
to display
Possible Values
■
ip
■
udp
■
icmp
■
all
[Default]
ip
Fields in the Management IP Statistics Display
Field
Description
forwDatagrams
Number of datagrams that the IP station tried to forward
fragCreates
Number of IP datagram fragments that were generated as a
result of fragmentation on this system
fragFails
Number of IP datagrams that were discarded because they
needed to be fragmented but could not be (for example,
because their Don’t Fragment bit was set)
fragOks
Number of IP datagrams that were successfully fragmented
inAddrErrors
Number of datagrams that the IP station discarded because of
an error in the source or destination IP address
inDelivers
Number of datagrams that the IP station delivered to local IP
client protocols
inDiscards
Number of packet receive discards
inHdrErrors
Number of datagrams that the IP station discarded because
the IP header contained errors
inReceived
Total number of IP datagrams that were received, including
those with errors
osReceives
Number of packets received that are destined to higher-level
protocols such as Telnet, DNS, TFTP, and FTP
osTransmits
Number of packets that were sent through the router by
higher-level protocols such as Telnet, DNS, TFTP, and FTP
outDiscards
Number of packet transmit discards
management ip statistics
187
Field
Description
outNoRoutes
Number of datagrams that the IP station discarded because
there was no route to the destination
outRequests
Number of datagrams that local IP client protocols passed to IP
for transmission
reasmFails
Number of packet reassembly failures
reasmReqs
Number of packet reassembly requests
reasmOks
Number of successful packet reassemblies
rtDiscards
Number of packets that were discarded due to system
resource errors
unkProtos
Number of packets whose protocol is unknown
Fields in the Management UDP Statistics Display
Field
Description
inDatagrams
Number of UDP packets that were received and addressed to
the router or broadcast address
inErrors
Number of received UDP or ICMP packets that contain header
errors
noPorts
Number of UDP packets that were received but addressed to
an unsupported UDP port
outDatagrams
Number of UDP packets that were sent by the router
Fields in the Management ICMP Statistics Display
Field
Description
inAddrMaskReps
Number of ICMP address mask reply frames that were
received
inAddrMasks
Number of ICMP address mask request packets that were
received
inDestUnreach
Number of ICMP destination unreachable packets that were
received
inEchoReps
Number of ICMP echo reply packets that were received
inEchos
Number of ICMP echo request packets that were received
inParmProbs
Number of ICMP parameter problem frames that were
received
inRedirects
Number of ICMP redirect packets that were received
inSrcQuenchs
Number of ICMP source quench packets that were received
inTimeExcds
Number of ICMP time exceeded packets that were received
188
CHAPTER 5: OUT-O F-BAND MANAGEMENT
Field
Description
inTimeStamps
Number of ICMP time stamp request packets that were
received
inTimeStampsReps
Number of ICMP time stamp reply packets that were received
messages
Number of ICMP packets that were received
outAddrMaskReps
Number of ICMP address mask reply packets that were sent
outAddrMasks
Number of ICMP address mask request packets that were sent
outDatagrams
Number of UDP packets that the router sent
outDestUnreach
Number of ICMP destination unreachable packets that were
sent
outEchoReps
Number of ICMP echo reply packets that were sent
outEchos
Number of ICMP echo request packets that were sent
outErrors
Number of ICMP packets sent that were dropped due to
system resource errors
outMsgs
Number of ICMP packets that were sent
outParmProbs
Number of ICMP parameter problem packets that were sent
outRedirects
Number of ICMP redirect packets that were sent
outSrcQuenchs
Number of ICMP source quench packets that were sent
outTimeExcds
Number of ICMP time exceeded packets that were sent
outTimeStampReps Number of ICMP time stamp reply packets that were sent
outTimeStamps
Number of ICMP time stamp request packets that were sent
6
SIMPLE NETWORK
MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL
(SNMP)
You can manage the system using a Simple Network Management
Protocol (SNMP)-based external management application (called the
SNMP manager) that sends requests to the system.
The SNMP agent provides access to the collection of information about
the system, called Management Information Bases (MIBs). Your views of
MIB information differ depending on the SNMP management method
that you choose. In addition, you can configure an SNMP agent to send
traps to an SNMP manager to report significant events. Access to system
information through SNMP is controlled by community strings. You can
use either an in-band or an out-of-band IP interface to manage the
system with SNMP.
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
set up SNMP in your system.
To configure SNMP for system management with SNMP:
1 Assign an IP address to either the system processor out-of-band Ethernet
port or an in-band Ethernet port.
2 Set the destination IP address to which the traps are forwarded by the
system agent.
For more information about setting up SNMP, see the Implementation
Guide for your system.
To set community strings, snmp authentication_trap, and snmp
extensions on a CoreBuilder® 9000 Enterprise Switch, see the
CoreBuilder 9000 Enterprise Management Engine User Guide.
You can access the Remote Monitoring (RMON) capabilities of the
CoreBuilder 3500 through SNMP applications such as Transcend®
Network Control Services software.
190
CHAPTER 6: SIMPLE NETWORK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL (SNMP)
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
➧ snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
snmp menu
display
community
➧ trap
rmonConfiguration
writeDisable
trap menu
display
addModify
remove
flush
smtProxyTraps
snmp display
snmp display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
191
Displays the current SNMP configurations for the community strings.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sn d
Fields in the SNMP Display
Field
Description
community string
Community strings setting that controls access to the
system:
■
■
Read-only community strings with the default public
Read-write community strings with the default
private
192
CHAPTER 6: SIMPLE NETWORK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL (SNMP)
snmp community
✓ 3500
9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Sets two SNMP community strings: read-only and read-write.
To set the community strings for the CoreBuilder 9000, see the
CoreBuilder 9000 Enterprise Management Engine User Guide.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sn c
Important Considerations
■
When an SNMP agent receives an SNMP request, the agent compares
the community string in the request with the community strings that
are configured for the agent:
■
■
SNMP get, get-next, and set requests are valid if the community
string in the request matches the agent’s read-write community.
SNMP get and get-next requests are valid if the community string
in the request matches the agent’s read-only community string or
read-write community string.
■
You can specify any string value up to 48 characters long. Do not use
embedded spaces or the # symbol.
■
If you do not want to change the value of a community string, press
Return or Enter at either prompt.
Options
Prompt
Description
Read-only
Octet string, included in each
SNMP message, that provides
read-only access to system
information
Read-write
Octet string, included in each
SNMP message, that controls
read-write access to system
information
Possible Values
■
■
■
■
public
[Default]
public
A string up to
48 characters
long
private
private
A string up to
48 characters
long
SNMP Community Example (3500)
Select menu option (snmp): community
Enter new read-only community [public]:our_app
Enter new read-write community [private]: my_mail
snmp trap display
snmp trap display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
193
Displays the SNMP traps and their currently configured destinations.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sn t d
Fields in the SNMP Trap Display
Field
Description
Trap description
Description of the system event that triggers the trap
Trap destinations
configured
IP address of the system that is to receive event
notification
Trap number
Identifying number of the trap that is associated with a
system event
Trap numbers enabled
Traps that are active
194
CHAPTER 6: SIMPLE NETWORK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL (SNMP)
snmp trap addModify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
Adds or modifies trap reporting destination configurations. When an
event occurs, the system sends the trap that you specify here to the
destination address.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sn t a
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
You can define up to 10 destination addresses and the set of traps
that are sent to each destination address.
■
No unlisted traps are transmitted.
■
Specify a range of more than two trap numbers with a hyphen (-) and
nonsequential trap numbers with commas.
■
If the destination address that you entered is not a valid end station, if
a valid IP interface is not defined on the system, or if the agent does
not have a route to the destination, the agent displays this message:
Trap address invalid or unreachable
If you see this message, verify the IP address of the end station, that it
is online, and that a route exists to the intended management station.
■
See the “Device Monitoring” chapter in the Implementation Guide for
your system for an explanation of what the individual traps mean.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Trap
destination
address
Destination IP address of the
SNMP manager
A valid destination
IP address
–
Trap
numbers to
enable
Traps that you want to direct
to the SNMP Manager
■
■
■
A valid trap #,
range, or
sequence of
valid trap #s
all
? (for a list of
available trap
numbers)
–
snmp trap addModify
195
Procedure
1 From the top level of the Administration Console, enter:
snmp trap addModify
The system displays the list of traps.
2 Enter the IP address of the SNMP manager (destination address).
3 Enter one or more trap numbers for that destination, all, or ? to get a
list of selectable values.
SNMP Trap addModify Example (3500)
Select menu option (snmp/trap): addModify
Trap Descriptions:
Trap #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
32
33
35
Description
MIB II: Coldstart
MIB II: Link Down
MIB II: Link Up
MIB II: Authentication Failure
Bridge MIB: New Root
Bridge MIB: Topology Change
3C System MIB: System Overtemperature
3C System MIB: Power Supply Failure
3C System MIB: Address Threshold
3C System MIB: System Fan Failure
3C FDDI MIB: SMT Hold Condition
3C FDDI MIB: SMT Peer Wrap Condition
3C FDDI MIB: MAC Duplicate Address Condition
3C FDDI MIB: MAC Frame Error Condition
3C FDDI MIB: MAC Not Copied Condition
3C FDDI MIB: MAC Neighbor Change
3C FDDI MIB: MAC Path Change
3C FDDI MIB: Port LER Condition
3C FDDI MIB: Port Undesired Connection
3C FDDI MIB: Port EB Error Condition
3C FDDI MIB: Port Path Change
RMON MIB: Rising Alarm
RMON MIB: Falling Alarm
POLL MIB: Response Received
POLL MIB: Response Not Received
VRRP MIB: New Master
VRRP MIB: Authentication Failure
QOS MIB: QOS INTRUDER Trap
Enter the trap destination address: 158.102.31.22
Enter the trap numbers to enable (1-8,13-29,32-33,35|all|?)
[1-8,13-29,32-33,35]: 35
196
CHAPTER 6: SIMPLE NETWORK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL (SNMP)
snmp trap remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Removes a destination, so that no SNMP traps are reported to that
destination.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sn t r
Important Consideration
■
When the system removes the destination address, it displays the
previous menu.
snmp trap flush
snmp trap flush
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
197
Removes all SNMP trap reporting destinations.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sn t f
Important Consideration
■
When you flush the SNMP trap reporting destinations, you remove all
trap destination address information for the SNMP agent.
198
CHAPTER 6: SIMPLE NETWORK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL (SNMP)
snmp trap
smtProxyTraps
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Controls SNMP’s ability to alert you, by means of an SNMP-to-SMT proxy,
that a significant event is occurring in the Fiber Distributed Data Interface
(FDDI) station statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sn t s
3900
9300
Options
Prompt
Description
SNMP-to-SMT
proxy mode
Whether the SMT proxy
agent is enabled or disabled
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
disabled
snmp rmonConfiguration
snmp
rmonConfiguration
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
199
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Configures the transmit and receive mode to monitor Ethernet and Fiber
Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) statistics as follows:
■
receive — Monitors incoming port data
■
transmitAndReceive — Monitors incoming and outgoing port data
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sn r
Options
Prompt
Description
Transmit/receive Whether RMON is
mode
configured for only
incoming port data, or for
both incoming and
outgoing port data
Possible Values
■
receive
■
transmitAndReceive
[Default]
Current
setting
200
CHAPTER 6: SIMPLE NETWORK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL (SNMP)
snmp writeDisable
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Allows or disallows SNMP write requests.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
sn w
Options
Prompt
Description
SNMP write
request
mode
Whether SNMP write access is
enabled or disabled
Possible Values
■
off
■
on
[Default]
off
PHYSICAL PORT PARAMETERS
IV
Chapter 7
Ethernet Ports
Chapter 8
Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI)
7
ETHERNET PORTS
Before you configure your system, become familiar with the physical port
numbering scheme on the system. Understanding the port numbering
scheme enables you to:
■
Manage your bridge ports (especially if you use trunking), as described
in the Implementation Guide for your system
■
Accurately define your virtual LANs (VLANs), as described in the
Implementation Guide for your system
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
configure Ethernet ports in your system.
For more information about port numbering and how to configure
Ethernet ports, see the Implementation Guide for your system.
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on your system, your level of
access, and the modules and other hardware options that are configured
for your system. The following diagram shows the list of commands for
all systems. The checklist at the beginning of each command description
in this chapter shows whether your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
➧ ethernet
fddi
bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
ethernet menu
summary
detail
autoNegotiation
portMode
flowControl
paceAccess
paceInteractiveAccess
label
portState
➧ monitoring
monitoring menu
summary
mode
204
CHAPTER 7: ETHERNET PORTS
ethernet summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
Displays a summary of Ethernet port information. The summary shows
the port’s label and status, as well as the most pertinent statistics about
general port activity and port errors.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
e s
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
Port numbering is consecutive, regardless of module type (if you are
using a system that has modules).
■
Depending on the system, numbering may or may not skip an empty
slot and continue with the ports that are associated with the next
occupied slot. (See the Implementation Guide for your system for
specific information about port numbering.)
■
Numbering includes unused ports.
■
Only one port number is assigned to a Gigabit Ethernet module in
switches that use Gigabit Ethernet modules.
■
The system no longer assigns port number 1 to the out-of-band
management port, which does not receive a port number.
■
The rxFrames value that the Ethernet summary command reports for
a bridge port may differ from the value that the bridge port summary
command reports. The Ethernet summary command counts all frames
that are delivered to the port while the bridge port summary
command reports only valid frames that are passed to the port.
Therefore, the Ethernet summary value should exceed the bridge port
summary value by the number of receive errors (rxErrs).
■
At some prompts, you can specify the ? option to list Ethernet ports
and port numbers. The ? option displays Selection, Port, and Port
Label columns. The Selection column and Port column contain the
same port numbers because they represent your physical ports.
ethernet summary
205
Fields in the Ethernet Summary Display
Field
Description
actualFlowControl
Actual flow control setting. When autonegotiation is
completed, the value is the autonegotiated setting. When
autonegotiation is disabled, the value is the user-selected
flow control value.
actualPortMode
Actual operating port mode. When autonegotiation is
completed, the values shown are the autonegotiated
settings. When autonegotiation is disabled, the value is
the user-selected port mode.
autoNegMode
Autonegotiation mode configured for port. Possible
values are enable or disable.
autoNegState
Current negotiation state. Possible values are disabled,
configuring, completed, and failed.
linkStatus
Boolean value that indicates the current state of the
physical link for this port (either enabled or disabled).
macAddress
MAC address of this port.
noRxBuffers
Number of frames that were discarded because no buffer
space was available.
portLabel
User-defined label name. The maximum length of the
string is 32 characters, including the null terminator.
portState
Current software operational state of this port. Possible
values are on-line, off-line, partitioned,
tx-fault, and config-error. The value on-line
appears when the port is both enabled and connected to
a cable. The value partitioned appears when the port
has been disabled by the ethernet port monitoring
feature.
portType
Specific description of this port’s type. Values for each
port type: 10/100BASE-T(RJ45), 100BASE-FX
(SC), 1000BASE-SX (SC), 1000BASE-LX (GBIC),
1000BASE-SX (GBIC), Backplane (9000).
reqFlowControl
Configurable parameter that sets the flow control option
(when autonegotiation is disabled). When
autonegotiation is enabled, flow control values are
ignored.
reqPortMode
Configurable parameter that sets the port mode on
Ethernet ports that have port mode options (when
autonegotiation is disabled). When autonegotiation is
enabled, port mode values are ignored.
rxBytes
Number of bytes received by this port, including framing
characters.
rxErrs
Total of all receive errors that are associated with this
port.
206
CHAPTER 7: ETHERNET PORTS
Field
Description
rxFrames
Number of frames that were copied into receive buffers
by this port.
slot:channel
(9000 switch fabric
module)
Maps a CoreBuilder® 9000 switch fabric module port to
an interface module backplane link. The “channel”
designation is just a backplane trace number. For
example, to troubleshoot a problem with switch fabric
module port 5 (slot:channel 3:1), look at the first
backplane link for slot 3.
slot:port
(9000)
Module slot and port number in the CoreBuilder 9000
system.
txBytes
Number of bytes that were transmitted by this port,
including framing characters.
txErrs
Sum of all transmit errors that are associated with this
port (summary report only).
txFrames
Number of frames that were transmitted by this port.
txQOverflows
Number of frames that were lost because transmit queue
was full.
vendorName
(3500)
Vendor name for a GBIC module. Other modules display
n/a.
To display Ethernet port statistics relative to a baseline, see the
Implementation Guide for your system.
Procedure
1 To display summary information about Ethernet ports, enter:
ethernet summary
2 At the prompt (for example, (1-24|all|?)), select the ports whose
information you want to display, or to display a port summary, specify ?
Indicate a range of ports with a hyphen (-). Separate nonconsecutive
ports with a comma.
The system displays port information based on the ports that you
specified.
ethernet detail
ethernet detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
207
Displays detailed Ethernet port information including the information in
the summary and additional Ethernet port statistics, such as collision
counters.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
e d
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
Port numbering is consecutive, regardless of module type (if you are
using a system that has modules).
■
Depending on the system, numbering may or may not skip an empty
slot and continue with the ports that are associated with the next
occupied slot. (See the Implementation Guide for your system for
specific information about port numbering.)
■
Numbering includes unused ports.
■
Only one port number is assigned to a Gigabit Ethernet module in
switches that use Gigabit Ethernet modules.
■
The system no longer assigns port number 1 to the out-of-band
management port, which does not receive a port number.
■
The rxFrames value that the Ethernet detail command reports for a
bridge port may differ from the value that the bridge port detail
command reports. The Ethernet detail command counts all frames
that are delivered to the port while the bridge port detail command
reports only valid frames that are passed to the port. Therefore, the
Ethernet detail value should exceed the bridge port detail value by the
number of receive errors (rxErrs).
■
At some prompts, you can specify the ? option to list Ethernet ports
and port numbers. The ? option displays Selection, Port, and Port
Label columns. The Selection column and Port column contain the
same port numbers because they represent your physical ports.
208
CHAPTER 7: ETHERNET PORTS
Fields in the Ethernet Detail Display
Field
Description
actualFlowControl
Actual flow control setting. When autonegotiation is
completed, the value is the autonegotiated setting. When
autonegotiation is disabled, the value is the user-selected flow
control value.
actualPortMode
Actual operating port mode. When autonegotiation is
completed, the value shown is the autonegotiated setting.
When autonegotiation is disabled, the value is the port mode.
alignmentErrs
(3500, 3900 and
9000)
Number of frames received by this port that are not an integral
number of octets in length and do not pass the FCS check.
autoNegMode
Autonegotiation mode configured for port. Possible values are
enable or disable.
autoNegState
Current negotiation state. Possible values are disabled,
configuring, completed, and failed.
carrierSenseErr
(3500, 3900 and
9000)
Number of frames that were discarded because the carrier
sense condition was lost while transmitting a frame from this
port.
excessCollision
(3500, 3900 and
9000)
Number of frames that have been dropped because they
experienced 15 consecutive collisions when sent from this port.
This value is incremented by 1 each time that a frame
experiences 15 consecutive collisions.
excessDeferrals
(3500 and 9000
Layer 3)
Number of frames that were not transmitted on this port
because the maximum allowed deferral time was exceeded.
fcsErrs
Number of frames received by this port that are an integral
number of octets in length but do not pass the frame check
sequence (FCS) test.
fragments
(3900, 9000
Layer 2, 9300 and
9400)
Number of frames received by this port that were shorter than
64 bytes and had CRC or alignment errors.
jabbers
(3900, 9000
Layer 2, 9300 and
9400)
Number of frames received by this port that were longer than
1518 bytes and had CRC or alignment errors.
lateCollisions
(3500, 3900 and
9000)
Number of times that a collision was detected on this port later
than 512 bit-times into the transmission of a frame.
lengthErrs
(3500 and 9000
Layer 3)
Number of frames received by this port that are longer than
1518 bytes or shorter than 64 bytes.
ethernet detail
209
Field
Description
linkStatus
Boolean value that indicates the current state of the physical
link for this port (either enabled or disabled).
macAddress
MAC address of this port.
multiCollisions
(3500, 3900 and
9000 Layer 3)
Number of frames that have experienced from 2 to 15
consecutive collisions before successful transmission from this
port. If a frame also experiences a collision on the 15th attempt,
it is dropped and the excessCollision count is increased by 1.
noRxBuffers
Number of frames that were discarded because no buffer space
was available.
oversized
(3900, 9000
Layer 2, 9300 and
9400)
Number of frames received by this port that were longer than
1518 bytes.
paceAccess
(3900 and 9000
Layer 2)
Whether PACE® Interactive Access is enabled or disabled
for this port.
portLabel
User-defined label name. The maximum length of the string is
32 characters, including the null terminator.
portState
Current software operational state of this port. Possible values
are on-line, off-line, partitioned, tx-fault, and
config-error. The value on-line appears when the port
is both enabled and connected to a cable. The value
partitioned appears when the port has been disabled by
the ethernet port monitoring feature.
portType
Specific description of this port’s type. Values for each port
type: 10/100BASE-T(RJ45), 100BASE-FX (SC),
1000BASE-SX (SC), 1000BASE-LX (GBIC),
1000BASE-SX (GBIC), Backplane (9000).
reqFlowControl
Configurable parameter that sets the flow control option (when
autonegotiation is disabled). When autonegotiation is enabled,
flow control values are ignored.
reqPortMode
Port mode on Ethernet ports that have port mode options
(when autonegotiation is disabled). When autonegotiation is
enabled, port mode values are ignored.
requestedState
Configurable parameter that is used to enable and disable this
port. The default is enabled.
runts
(3900, 9000
Layer 2, 9300 and
9400)
Number of frames received by this port that were shorter than
64 bytes.
rxBroadcast
(3900, 9000
Layer 2, 9300 and
9400)
Number of broadcasts received by this port.
210
CHAPTER 7: ETHERNET PORTS
Field
Description
rxByteRate
Average number of bytes received per second by this port
during the most recent sampling period.
rxBytes
Number of bytes received by this port, including framing
characters.
rxDiscards
(3500 and 9000
Layer 3)
Number of received frames that were discarded because there
was no higher layer to receive them or because the port was
disabled.
rxFrameRate
Average number of frames that were received per second by
this port during the most recent sampling period. Sampling
periods are 1 second long and not configurable.
rxFrames
Number of frames that were copied into receive buffers by this
port.
rxInternalErrs
Number of frames that were discarded because of an internal
error during reception.
rxMcastsOnly
(3900, 9000
Layer 2, 9300 and
9400)
Number of multicast frames received by this port.
rxMulticasts
Number of multicast frames that were delivered to a
higher-level protocol or application by this port.
rxPeakByteRate
Peak value of ethernetPortByteReceiveRate for this port since
the station was last initialized.
rxPeakFrameRate
Peak value of ethernetPortFrameReceiveRate for this port since
the station was last initialized.
rxUnicasts
Number of unicast (nonmulticast) frames that were delivered by
this port to a higher-level protocol or application.
singleCollision
(3500, 3900 and
9000)
Number of frames that have experienced only one collision
before successful transmission from this port on the second
attempt.
slot:port
(9000)
Module slot and port number.
txBroadcasts
(3900, 9000
Layer 2, 9300 and
9400)
Number of frames that were queued for transmission from this
port by a higher-level protocol or application, including frames
not transmitted successfully.
txByteRate
Average number of bytes that were transmitted per second by
this port during the most recent sampling period.
txBytes
Number of bytes that were transmitted by this port, including
framing characters.
txDiscards
Number of transmitted frames that were discarded because the
port was disabled.
ethernet detail
211
Field
Description
txFrameRate
Average number of frames that were transmitted per second by
this port during the most recent sampling period. Sampling
periods are 1 second long and not configurable.
txFrames
Number of frames that were transmitted by this port.
txInternalErrs
Number of frames that were discarded because of an internal
error during transmission.
txMcastsOnly
(3900, 9000
Layer 2, 9300 and
9400)
Number of multicast frames transmitted by this port.
txMulticasts
Number of multicast frames that were queued for transmission
from this port by a higher-level protocol or application,
including frames not transmitted successfully.
txPeakByteRate
Peak value of ethernetPortByteTransmitRate for this port since
the station was last initialized.
txPeakFrameRate
Peak value of ethernetPortFrameTransmitRate for this port since
the station was last initialized.
txQOverflows
Number of frames lost because transmit queue was full.
txUnicasts
Number of unicast (nonmulticast) frames that are queued for
transmission by a higher-level protocol or application, including
frames not transmitted successfully.
vendorName
(3500)
Vendor name for a GBIC module. Other modules display n/a.
212
CHAPTER 7: ETHERNET PORTS
ethernet
autoNegotiation
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Enables or disables autonegotiation of port attributes such as duplex
mode and port speed on ports that support autonegotiation.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
e a
Important Considerations
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
■
When you enable autonegotiation, the system ignores your requested
portMode information for 10/100BASE-TX ports and your requested
flowControl information for 1000BASE-SX ports. When you disable
autonegotiation, the system recognizes the requested portMode
values for ports that have portMode options and the requested
flowControl values for 1000BASE-SX ports. (100BASE-FX ports and
backplane ports do not support autonegotiation.)
Therefore, it is extremely important that you understand how to
implement flowcontrol and portMode in your network. See the
Implementation Guide for your system for more information.
Options
Prompt
Description
Port
Port numbers for which you
want to enable or disable
autonegotiation
Possible Values
■
■
■
■
Autonegotiation Whether to enable or
setting
disable autonegotiation on
each of the ports that you
selected
A single port
[Default]
–
A range of
ports
all
? (to display a
port summary)
■
enable
■
disable
enable
ethernet portMode
ethernet portMode
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
✓ 3900
9300
213
Sets the port speed (10 Mbps or 100 Mbps) and the duplex mode
(full-duplex or half-duplex) on individual ports.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
e portm
Important Considerations
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
■
The device that is connected to each port must be configured for the
same port mode. If the port speeds differ, the link does not come up.
If the duplex modes differ, link errors occur.
■
Gigabit Ethernet ports do not support mode options. The value all
refers only to ports that support port mode options.
■
If you change to full-duplex mode on the port, a message indicates
that collision detection will be disabled unless you configure the
connected device to the same duplex mode.
■
Disable autonegotiation on any port on which you are setting a
specific port mode.
■
10/100BASE-TX supports the following modes and speeds:
■
■
10 Mbps, full-duplex mode
■
10 Mbps, half-duplex mode
■
100 Mbps, full-duplex mode
■
100 Mbps, half-duplex mode
100BASE-FX supports the following modes and speeds:
■
100 Mbps, full-duplex mode
■
100 Mbps, half-duplex mode
214
CHAPTER 7: ETHERNET PORTS
Options
Prompt
Description
Port
Ports for which you want to
change the portMode values
Possible Values
■
■
■
■
Port mode
setting
Speed and duplex mode for
each of the ports that you
selected
A single port
[Default]
–
A range of
ports
all
? (to display a
port summary)
See “Important
Considerations,”
earlier in this
section
10half
(10/100BASE-TX)
100half
(100BASE-FX)
Procedure
1 To change the port speed or duplex mode for 10/100BASE-TX ports or
the duplex mode for 100BASE-FX ports, enter:
ethernet portMode
2 At the prompt (for example, (1-24|all|?)), enter the ports whose
portMode values you want to change, or to display a port summary,
specify ?
After you have selected the ports, the system prompts you to enter the
port mode for the ports that you selected.
ethernet flowControl
ethernet flowControl
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
215
Controls whether a Fast Ethernet or Gigabit Ethernet port can respond to
or generate flow control packets.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
e f
Important Considerations
■
Flow control allows a port to:
■
■
■
Decrease the frequency with which it sends packets to a receiving
device, if packets are being sent too rapidly.
Send flow control packets to a sending device, to request that the
device slow its speed of transmission to the port.
The system does not count flow control packets in either receive or
transmit statistics.
Options
Prompt
Description
Port
selection
Ports for which you want to set
flow control characteristics
Possible Values
■
A single port
■
A range of ports
■
all
■
Flow control Flow control characteristics for
setting
each of the ports that you
selected
[Default]
–
? (to display a
port summary)
■
on
■
off
■
rxOn
■
txOn
off
216
CHAPTER 7: ETHERNET PORTS
Flow Control Settings
Available on
Port Type
Setting
Description
on
Port recognizes flow control packets and
responds by pausing transmission. The port can
generate flow control packets as necessary to
slow incoming traffic.
Gigabit Ethernet
Port ignores flow control packets and does not
generate them.
Gigabit Ethernet
rxOn
Port recognizes flow control packets and
responds by halting transmission. The port does
not generate flow control packets.
Gigabit Ethernet
txOn
Port ignores flow control packets, but it can
generate them, if necessary.
Gigabit Ethernet
off
Fast Ethernet
Fast Ethernet
ethernet paceAccess
ethernet paceAccess
217
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
3500
✓ 9000
9400
Configures the Ethernet ports on your system to support the PACE®
Interactive Access feature, which ensures reliable timing by preventing
excessive Ethernet network jitter (the variation in the timing of packet
delivery that can cause garbled sound, jerky images, and delays).
✓ 3900
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9300
e pa
Important Considerations
■
PACE technology is 3Com’s method to provide reliable timing, optimal
LAN bandwidth utilization, and data prioritization for time-sensitive
multimedia and real-time applications, and data-only applications.
■
PACE Interactive Access employs a “back-off” algorithm that enables
your system to control traffic flow on a point-to-point link with an end
station. When the network experiences congestion, the switch holds
packets. PACE Interactive Access prevents an end station from
“monopolizing” the link.
Options
Prompt
Description
Port
Ports for which you want to set
the PACE® feature
Possible Values
■
■
■
PACE
setting
Whether the PACE feature is
on or off for each of the ports
that you selected
A range of port
numbers
[Default]
–
all
? (to display a
port summary)
■
enable
■
disable
disable
218
CHAPTER 7: ETHERNET PORTS
ethernet
paceInteractiveAccess
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Configures the Ethernet ports on your system to support the PACE
Interactive Access feature, which ensures reliable timing by preventing
excessive Ethernet network jitter (the variation in the timing of packet
delivery that can cause garbled sound, jerky images, and delays).
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
e pa
Important Considerations
■
PACE technology is 3Com’s method to provide reliable timing, optimal
LAN bandwidth utilization, and data prioritization for time-sensitive
multimedia and real-time applications, and data-only applications.
■
PACE Interactive Access employs a “back-off” algorithm that enables
your system to control traffic flow on a point-to-point link with an end
station. When the network experiences congestion, the switch holds
packets. PACE Interactive Access prevents an end station from
“monopolizing” the link.
Options
Prompt
Description
Port
Ports for which you want to set
the PACE® feature
Possible Values
■
■
■
PACE
setting
Whether the PACE feature is
on or off for each of the ports
that you selected
A range of port
numbers
[Default]
–
all
? (to display a
port summary)
■
enable
■
disable
disable
ethernet label
ethernet label
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
219
Labels the Ethernet ports to help identify the kind of device that is
attached to each port (for example, LAN, workstation, or server).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
e l
Important Considerations
■
Label Ethernet ports so that you can easily identify the devices that are
attached to them (such as LANs, workstations, or servers). For
example: engineeringserver
■
A new port label appears in system displays the next time that you
display information for that port.
Options
Prompt
Description
Port
selection
Ports for which you want to
define a port label
Possible Values
■
■
■
Port label
Labels that appear the next
time that you display
information for the ports that
you selected
A range of port
numbers
[Default]
–
all
? (to display a
port summary)
String of up to 32
ASCII characters,
including the null
terminator
–
220
CHAPTER 7: ETHERNET PORTS
ethernet portState
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Enables or disables Ethernet ports, controlling whether the ports send or
receive frames.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
e ports
Important Consideration
■
When an Ethernet port is enabled, frames are transmitted normally
over that port. When an Ethernet port is disabled, the port neither
sends nor receives frames.
Options
Prompt
Description
Port
Ports that you want to enable
or disable
Possible Values
■
■
■
■
Port state
Value shown in the summary
and detail displays reports:
on-line for all enabled ports
displayed and off-line for
all disabled ports displayed
Individual ports
[Default]
–
A range of port
numbers
all
? (to display a
port summary)
■
enabled
■
disabled
enabled
Procedure
1 To enable or disable an Ethernet port, from the top level of the
Administration Console, enter:
ethernet portState
2 At the prompt (for example, (1-24|all|?)), enter the ports whose port
state values you want to set, or to display a port summary, specify ?
3 Enter enabled or disabled for each Ethernet port.
The portState value shown in the summary and detail displays reports
on-line for all enabled ports that are displayed and off-line for all
disabled ports. The Port Status LED for each disabled port on the module
indicates the disabled status.
ethernet monitoring summary
ethernet monitoring
summary
3500
✓ 9000
9400
221
Displays the status of 10/100 Mbps Ethernet ports that are being
monitored. The display shows the status of port statistics that are being
monitored, including:
■
error count
■
excessive collisions
■
multiple collisions
✓ 3900
■
late collisions
9300
■
runts
■
fcsErrs
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
e m s
Important Consideration
■
The Ethernet monitoring feature in enabled by default, and performs
these functions:
1 Monitors 10/100Mbps Ethernet ports for excessive collisions,
multiple collisions, late collisions, runts, and FCS errors
2 Compares these error counters against user-defined thresholds
3 Disables a port that reaches an error threshold
4 Reports the reason that a port is disabled to the Administration
Console, MIB databases, and SNMP traps
5 Reenables the port after an initial backoff time interval
6 Continues monitoring
222
CHAPTER 7: ETHERNET PORTS
ethernet monitoring
mode
Enables or disables port monitoring on 10/100 Mbps Ethernet ports on
the switch.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3500
✓ 9000
9400
e m m
✓ 3900
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
■
You can determine when a monitored port is in error and has been
disabled by these port statistics:
Important Considerations
9300
■
■
■
The status value shown in the ethernet monitoring summary
display reports partitioned.
The portState value shown in the ethernet summary and
ethernet detail displays reports partitioned.
The linkStatus value shown in the ethernet summary and
ethernet detail displays reports disabled.
When the monitoring feature reenables the port, port statistics
resume normal values.
■
The Ethernet monitoring feature in enabled by default, and performs
these functions:
1 Monitors 10/100Mbps Ethernet ports for excessive collisions,
multiple collisions, late collisions, runts, and FCS errors
2 Compares these error counters against user-defined thresholds
3 Disables a port that reaches an error threshold
4 Reports the reason that a port is disabled to the Administration
Console, MIB databases, and SNMP traps
5 Reenables the port after an initial backoff time interval
6 Continues monitoring
8
FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA
INTERFACE (FDDI)
Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) is a standards-based solution that
provides fast and reliable data transfer on a local area network. This
chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
configure FDDI parameters in your system.
For more information about implementing FDDI in your network, see the
Implementation Guide for your system.
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
➧ fddi
bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
fddi menu
➧ station
➧ path
➧ mac
➧ port
➧ stationMode
station menu
display
connectPolicy
tNotify
statusReporting
path menu
display
tvxLowerBound
tmaxLowerBound
maxTreq
mac menu
summary
detail
frameErrorThreshold
notCopiedThreshold
llcService
path
port menu
display
lerAlarm
lerCutoff
label
path
stationMode menu
display
modify
224
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
fddi station display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
Displays FDDI station information. The system display shows the station
configuration, status reporting, and the most pertinent statistics about
general station activity and errors.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd station d
3900
9300
Fields in the FDDI Station Display
Field
Description
configuration
Attachment configuration for the station or concentrator.
Values can be Thru, Isolated, Wrap_A, and Wrap_B.
connectPolicy
Bit string that represents the connection policies in effect
on a station. How connection policies translate into bits is
described in “fddi station connectPolicy” in this chapter.
This value is user-defined.
ecmState
Current state of the ECM state machine.
ports
Ports numbers assigned to the FDDI module. The FDDI
port numbers change depending on the configuration of
your system.
remoteDisconnect
Flag indicating that the station was remotely disconnected
from the network as a result of receiving an
fddiSMTAction with the value of disconnect in a
Parameter Management Frame (PMF). A station requires a
Connect Action to rejoin the network and clear the flag.
stationID
Unique identifier for the FDDI station.
statusReporting
Whether a station generates Status Report Frames (SRFs)
to report events and conditions to network management
stations. This value is user-defined.
tnotify
Timer used in the Neighbor Notification protocol to
indicate the interval of time between generation of
Neighbor Information Frames (NIF). This value is
user-defined.
traceMaxExp
Maximum propagation time for a trace on an FDDI
topology. Places a lower bound on the detection time for
an unrecovering ring.
fddi station connectPolicy
fddi station
connectPolicy
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
225
Sets the connectPolicy attribute string that represents the connection
policies in effect on a station. A connection’s type is defined by the types
of the two ports involved in the connection.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd station c
Important Considerations
■
Port types can be A, B, M, or S.
■
The system FDDI ports are type A or type B for Dual Attachment
Station (DAS) ports and type M for Single Attachment Station (SAS)
ports.
■
By default, all connections to the system ports are valid. M-M
connections are accepted so that one CoreBuilder® 3500 port can be
connected to another system port.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
Ports
One or more FDDI station ports
for which you want to set the
connection policies
■
■
connectPolicy
Any of the
available ports
on the installed
FDDI modules
[Default]
–
all
Bit string that represents the
See next table
connection policies in effect on
that station
–
Bit to Set for Rejecting a Station Connection
This
Connection
Is Rejected If This Bit Is Set
Connection Rules
A-A
0
Undesirable peer connection that creates
twisted primary and secondary rings; notify
station management (SMT).
A-B
1
Normal trunk ring peer connection.
A-S
2
Undesirable peer connection that creates a
wrapped ring; notify SMT.
226
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
This
Connection
Is Rejected If This Bit Is Set
Connection Rules
A-M
3
Tree connection with possible redundancy. The
node may not go to Thru state in Configuration
Management (CFM). In a single MAC node,
Port B has precedence (with defaults) for
connecting to a Port M.
B-A
4
Normal trunk ring peer connection.
B-B
5
Undesirable peer connection that creates
twisted primary and secondary rings; notify
SMT.
B-S
6
Undesirable peer connection that creates a
wrapped ring; notify SMT.
B-M
7
Tree connection with possible redundancy. The
node may not go to Thru state in CFM.
In a single MAC node, Port B has precedence
(with defaults) for connecting to a Port M.
M-A
12
Tree connection with possible redundancy.
M-B
13
Tree connection with possible redundancy.
M-S
14
Normal tree connection.
M-M
15
Connection that allows one system port to be
connected to another system port.
fddi station tNotify
fddi station tNotify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
227
Sets the timer used in the Neighbor Notification protocol to indicate the
interval of time between generation of Neighbor Information Frames
(NIF).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd station t
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
If you set the T-notify value low, your network reacts quickly to station
changes, but uses more bandwidth.
■
If you set the T-notify value high, less bandwidth is used, but your
network does not react to station changes as quickly.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station ports
for which you want to set the
neighbor notification timer
Possible Values
■
■
tnotify
Timer (in seconds) used in the
Neighbor Notification protocol
to indicate the interval of time
between generation of
Neighbor Information Frames
(NIF)
Any of the
available ports
on the installed
FDDI modules
[Default]
–
all
2 – 30 seconds
30
228
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
fddi station
statusReporting
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Controls whether a station generates Status Report Frames (SRFs) to
report events and conditions to network management stations.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd station s
Important Consideration
■
If you do not have an SMT management station listening to these
event reports or if you use SNMP to monitor FDDI events on all FDDI
end stations, set this attribute to disabled so that the station does
not generate SRFs.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station ports
for which you want to set
statusReporting
statusReporting Parameter that controls
whether a station generates
Status Report Frames (SRFs) to
report events and conditions to
network management stations
Possible Values
■
Any of the
available ports
on the installed
FDDI modules
■
all
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
–
enabled
fddi path display
fddi path display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
229
Displays FDDI path information.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd pa d
Important Consideration
■
The path display changes slightly when ports are configured as DAS
ports.
Fields in the FDDI Path Display
Field
Description
maxTReq
Maximum time value of fddiMACT-Req that any MAC
that is configured in this path uses. This value can be
user-defined.
path
Current selected path.
ports
Ports numbers that are assigned to the FDDI module. The
FDDI port numbers change depending on the
configuration of your system.
ringLatency
Total accumulated latency of the ring that is associated
with this path.
tmaxLowBound
Minimum time value of fddiMACT-Max that any MAC
that is configured in this path uses. This value can be
user-defined.
traceStatus
Current trace status of the path.
tvxLowBound
Minimum time value of fddiMACTvxValue that any MAC
that is configured in this path uses. This value can be
user-defined.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station ports
for which you want to set the
path display
Path
Path that you want to set.
■
■
A DAS port has primary and
secondary paths.
A SAS port has only a
primary path.
Possible Values
■
Any of the
available ports
on the installed
FDDI modules
■
all
■
p (primary)
■
s (secondary)
■
all
[Default]
–
–
230
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
fddi path
tvxLowerBound
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Specifies the minimum time value (in microseconds) of fddiMAC tvxValue
that any MAC that is configured in this path uses.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd pa tv
Important Considerations
■
A MAC uses its valid transmission timer (TVX) to detect and recover
from certain ring errors. If a valid frame has not passed through a
MAC during the time indicated by fddiMACTvxValue, the MAC
reinitializes the ring.
■
By adjusting the tvxLowerBound value, you specify how quickly the
ring recovers from an error. The lower you set this value, the faster the
network reacts to problems, but the ring might be reinitialized when
there is no problem.
■
The higher you set this value, the less chance of frequent
reinitializations, but the network takes longer to recover from errors.
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station ports
for which you want to set the
tvxLowerBound
Path
Path that you want to set:
■
■
A DAS port has primary and
secondary paths.
Possible Values [Default]
■
Any of the
–
available
ports on the
installed FDDI
modules
■
all
■
p (primary)
■
s (secondary)
■
all
–
A SAS port has only a
primary path.
tvxLowerBound Minimum time value of
fddiMAC tvxValue that any
MAC that is configured onto
this path uses
0 – 4294967295 2500
microseconds
fddi path tmaxLowerBound
fddi path
tmaxLowerBound
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
231
Specifies the minimum time value (in microseconds) of fddiMAC T-Max
that any MAC that is configured in this path uses. This value specifies the
boundary for how high T-Req (the requested token rotation time) can be
set.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd pa tm
3900
9300
Important Consideration
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station
ports for which you want to
set the tmaxLowerBound
Path
Path that you want to set.
■
■
A DAS port has primary
and secondary paths.
Possible Values [Default]
■
Any of the
–
available
ports on the
installed FDDI
modules
■
all
■
p (primary)
■
s (secondary)
■
all
–
A SAS port has only a
primary path.
tmaxLowerBound Minimum time value of
0 – 4294967295 16500
fddiMAC T-Max that any
microseconds
MAC that is configured onto
this path uses
232
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
fddi path maxTreq
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Specifies the maximum time value (in microseconds) of fddiMACT-Req
that is used by any MAC that is configured in this path. T-Req is the value
that a MAC bids during the claim process to determine a ring’s
operational token rotation time, T_Opr. The lowest T-Req bid on the ring
becomes T_Opr.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd pa m
Important Considerations
■
When you set T_Opr low, the token rotates more quickly, so token
latency is reduced. However, more of the ring’s available bandwidth is
used to circulate the token.
■
Higher values of T_Opr use less bandwidth to circulate the token, but
they increase token latency when the ring is saturated.
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station ports
for which you want to set the
path maxTreq
Path
Path that you want to set.
■
■
maxTreq
A DAS port has primary and
secondary paths.
Possible Values
■
Any of the
available ports
on the installed
FDDI modules
■
all
■
p (primary)
■
s (secondary)
■
all
[Default]
–
–
A SAS port has only a
primary path.
Value that a MAC bids during 0 – 4294967295
the claim process to determine microseconds
a ring’s operational token
rotation time, T_Opr
16500
fddi mac summary
fddi mac summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
233
Displays a summary of FDDI MAC information. A summary report displays
various FDDI MAC statistics, including information about the MAC,
received and transmitted frames, and received and transmitted bytes.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd m s
3900
9300
Important Consideration
■
The MAC summary display changes slightly when ports are configured
as DAS ports.
Fields in the FDDI MAC Summary Display
Field
Description
currentPath
Path on which this MAC is currently located (primary,
secondary, or isolated)
downstream
MAC address of this MAC’s downstream neighbor
Errors
Sum of errorCount, lateCount, lostCount, and
tvxExpiredCount
noRxBuffers
Number of frames discarded because no buffer space was
available
port
Port numbers assigned to the FDDI module. The FDDI port
numbers change depending on the configuration of your
system.
rxBytes
Number of bytes that this MAC received
rxErrors
Number of errors that this MAC received
rxFrames
Number of frames that this MAC received
station
Unique identifier for the FDDI station.
smtAddress
Address of the MAC that was used for SMT frames
txBytes
Number of bytes that this MAC transmitted
txFrames
Number of frames that this MAC transmitted. This
number does not include MAC frames.
txQOverflows
Number of frames that were discarded because the
transmit queue was full
upstream
MAC address of this MAC’s upstream neighbor
234
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
fddi mac detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Displays detailed FDDI MAC information. A detail report displays various
FDDI MAC statistics, including information about the MAC, received and
transmitted frames, and received and transmitted bytes, as well as
additional FDDI MAC statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd m d
Important Consideration
■
The MAC summary display changes slightly when ports are configured
as DAS ports.
Fields in the FDDI MAC Detail Display
Field
Description
currentPath
Path on which this MAC is currently located primary or
secondary, isolated, concatenated, or thru
downstream
MAC address of this MAC’s downstream neighbor
downstreamType
PC type of this MAC’s downstream neighbor
dupAddrTest
Pass or fail test for a duplicate address
duplicateAddr
Whether this address is duplicated on the FDDI ring
errorCount
Number of SMT MAC errors
frameCount
Number of frames that this MAC received
frameErrCond
Active when the frameErrorRatio is greater than or equal
to frameErrorThresh.
frameErrorRatio
Ratio of the number lostCount plus the frameErrorCount
divided by the frameCount plus lostCount
frameErrThresh
Threshold for determining when a MAC condition report
is generated
lateCount
Number of token rotation timer expirations since this
MAC last received a token
llcAvailable
Whether this MAC can send or receive LLC frames
llcService
Setting of the Logical Link Control service
lostCount
Number of frames and tokens that this MAC lost during
reception
noRxBuffers
Number of frames discarded because no buffer space was
available
notCopiedCond
Active when the notCopiedRatio is greater than or equal
to notCopiedThresh.
fddi mac detail
235
Field
Description
notCopiedCount
Number of frames that were addressed to this MAC but
were not copied into its receive buffers
notCopiedRatio
Ratio of notCopiedCount divided by the quantity
copiedCount plus notCopiedCount
notCopiedThresh
Threshold for determining when a MAC condition report
is generated
oldDownstream
Previous value of the MAC address of this MAC’s
downstream neighbor
oldUpstream
Previous value of the MAC address of this MAC’s
upstream neighbor
ringOpCount
Number of times that this MAC has entered the
operational state from the nonoperational state
rmtState
State of the ring management as defined in SMT
rxByteRate
Average number of bytes per second that this MAC
received during the most recent sampling period
rxBytes
Number of bytes that this MAC received
rxDiscards
Number of good frames that this MAC received and
discarded before being delivered to a higher-level protocol
or application. Does not include frames that were not
received into receive buffers, such as missed frames.
rxFrameRate
Average number of frames per second that this MAC
received during the most recent sampling period
rxFrames
Number of frames that this MAC received
rxInternalErrs
Number of frames discarded because of an internal
hardware error during reception
rxMulticasts
Number of multicast frames that this MAC delivered to a
higher-level protocol or application
rxPeakByteRate
Peak value of fddiMACByteReceiveRate for this MAC since
the station was last initialized
rxPeakFrameRate
Peak value of fddiMACFrameReceiveRate for this MAC
since the station was last initialized
rxUnicasts
Number of unicast (nonmulticast) frames that this MAC
delivered to a higher-level protocol or application
smtAddress
Address of the MAC used for SMT frames
tMax
Maximum value of the target token rotation time
tMaxCapab
Maximum supported target token rotation time that this
MAC can support
tNeg
Target token rotation time negotiated during the claim
process
tokenCount
Number of tokens that this MAC received
236
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
Field
Description
tReq
Target token rotation time that this MAC requested
tvxCapab
Maximum time value of the valid transmission timer that
this MAC can support
tvxExpiredCount
Number of times that this MAC’s valid transmission timer
has expired
tvxValue
Value of the valid transmission timer that this MAC uses
txByteRate
Average number of bytes that this MAC transmitted per
second during the most recent sampling period
txBytes
Number of bytes that this MAC transmitted
txDiscards
Number of frames discarded because LLC service was not
enabled or the FDDI ring was not operational
txFrameRate
Average number of frames that this MAC transmitted per
second during the most recent sampling period
txFrames
Number of frames that this MAC transmitted. This
number does not include MAC frames.
txInternalErrs
Number of frames discarded because of an internal
hardware error during transmission
txMulticasts
Number of multicast frames queued for transmission by a
higher-level protocol or application, including frames not
transmitted successfully
txPeakByteRate
Peak value of fddiMACByteTransmitRate for this MAC
since the station was last initialized
txPeakFrameRate
Peak value of fddiMACFrameTransmitRate for this MAC
since the station was last initialized
txQOverflows
Number of frames discarded because the transmit queue
was full
txUnicasts
Number of unicast frames queued for transmission by a
higher-level protocol or application, including frames not
transmitted successfully
upstream
MAC address of this MAC’s upstream neighbor
upstreamDupAddr
Whether the address upstream of this address is
duplicated on the ring
fddi mac frameErrorThreshold
fddi mac
frameErrorThreshold
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
237
Determines when the system generates a MAC condition report because
too many frame errors have occurred.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd m f
Important Considerations
■
A frame error occurs when a frame becomes corrupted.
■
A high frame error rate often indicates a faulty station on the FDDI
ring or a dirty FDDI connector.
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station
ports for which you want
to set the mac
frameErrorThreshold
Possible Values [Default]
■
■
frameErrorThreshold Time value set to
value
determine when the
system generates a MAC
condition report because
too many frame errors
have occurred
Any of the
–
available
ports on the
installed FDDI
modules
all
0 – 4294967295 655
microseconds
238
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
fddi mac
notCopiedThreshold
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Sets the timing when the system generates a MAC condition report
because too many frames could not be copied.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd m n
Important Considerations
■
Not-copied frames occur when there is no buffer space available in the
station (which in turn indicates congestion in the station).
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station
ports for which you want
to set the mac
notCopiedThreshold
Possible Values [Default]
■
■
notCopiedThreshold Time value set to
determines when the
system generates a MAC
condition report because
too many frames could
not be copied
Any of the
–
available
ports on the
installed FDDI
modules
all
0 – 4294967295 6550
microseconds
fddi mac llcService
fddi mac llcService
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
239
Sets the Logical Link Control (LLC) service so that LLC frames are sent and
received on the MAC. LLC frames are all data frames that are transmitted
on the network.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd m l
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
If there is something wrong on your network, you may want to turn
off data (user) traffic for a MAC by disabling LLC service. Although
you have disabled data traffic from the MAC, the MAC still
participates in neighbor notification and is visible to network
management.
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station ports
for which you want to set the
mac llcService
llcService
Whether LLC frames are sent
and received on the MAC
Possible Values
■
Any of the
available ports
on the installed
FDDI modules
■
all
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
–
enabled
240
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
fddi mac path
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Sets the path assignment for MACs.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd m p
Important Considerations
■
The fddiMAC path selections depend on the stationMode
configuration (DAS or SAS).
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station ports
for which you want to set the
MAC path
Possible Values
■
■
MAC path
Path assignments for MACs
Any of the
available ports
on the installed
FDDI modules
[Default]
–
all
For DAS ports:
■
primary
■
secondary
■
isolated
For SAS ports:
■
primary
■
isolated
primary
fddi port display
fddi port display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
241
Displays information about FDDI ports, including the type, path, and port
label, as well as other FDDI port statistics, such as error counters.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd po d
Fields in the FDDI Port Display
Field
Description
connectState
Connect state of this port (disabled, connecting,
standby, or active)
currentPath
Path on which this port is currently located
ebErrorCond
Whether an elasticity buffer error has been detected
during the past 2 seconds
ebErrorCount
Number of elasticity buffer errors that have been detected
lctFailCount
Number of consecutive times that the link confidence test
(LCT) has failed during connection management
lemCount
Number of link errors that this port detected
lemRejectCount
Number of times that the link error monitor rejected the
link
lerAlarm
Link error rate estimate at which a link connection
generates an alarm
lerCondition
Whether the lerEstimate is less than or equal to lerAlarm
lerCutoff
Link error rate estimate at which a link connection is
broken
lerEstimate
Average link error rate. It ranges from 10-4 to 10-15 and is
reported as the absolute value of the exponent of the link
error estimate
lineState
Line state of this port
myType
Type of port connector on the port (A, B, S, M)
neighborType
Type of port connector at the other end of the physical
connection (A, B, S, M)
pcmState
Current Physical Connection Management (PCM) state
defined in SMT
pcWithhold
Reason for withholding the connection
pmdClass
Type of PMD entity that is associated with this port
port
Ports numbers that are assigned to the FDDI module. The
FDDI port numbers change depending on the
configuration of your system.
portLabel
32-character string of a user-defined name for the port
242
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
fddi port lerAlarm
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Sets the link error rate (LER) value at which a link connection generates an
alarm.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd po lerA
Important Considerations
■
The lerAlarm value is expressed as the absolute value of the exponent
(such as 1 x 10-10). A healthy network has an LER exponent between
1 x 10-10 and 1 x 10-15 .
■
If the LER value is greater than the alarm setting, then SMT sends a
Status Report Frame (SRF) to the network manager software
indicating a problem with a port.
■
Set the lerAlarm value below these values so that you receive alarms
only if your network is in poor health. The SMT Standard
recommended value is 8.
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station ports
for which you want to set the
port lerAlarm
lerAlarm value
Link error rate (LER) value at
which a link connection
generates an alarm
Possible Values
■
■
Any of the
available ports
on the installed
FDDI modules
[Default]
–
all
4 – 15
7
fddi port lerCutoff
fddi port lerCutoff
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
243
Sets the link error rate estimate at which a link connection is disabled.
When the lerCutoff value is reached, the PHY that detected a problem is
disabled.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd po lerC
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
The lerCutoff value must be lower than the lerAlarm value so that the
network management software is alerted to a problem before the PHY
(port) is actually removed from the network.
■
Set the lerCutoff below these values so that a port is removed only as
a last resort. The SMT Standard recommended value is 7.
■
■
The lerCutoff value is expressed as an exponent (such as 1 x 10-10). A
healthy network has an LER exponent between 1 x 10-10 and 1 x 10-15.
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station ports
for which you want to set the
port lerCutoff
lerCutoff
Link error rate estimate at
which a link connection is
disabled
Possible Values
■
■
Any of the
available ports
on the installed
FDDI modules
[Default]
–
all
4 – 15
4
244
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
fddi port label
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Assigns a unique name to your FDDI ports for easy identification of the
devices that are attached to them (for example, workstation, server, FDDI
backbone). Port labels serve as useful reference points and as an accurate
means of identifying your ports for management.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd po label
Important Consideration
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station ports
for which you want to set the
port label
Possible Values
■
■
Label
Name of the FDDI port used for –
identification
Any of the
available ports
on the installed
FDDI modules
[Default]
–
all
–
fddi port path
fddi port path
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
245
Sets the one or more FDDI ports to be either part of the primary path or
isolated from the ring.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd po p
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
One or more FDDI station ports
for which you want to set the
path
Path
Sets the type of path used by
the port:
■
■
isol — isolates the port
from the ring
pri — sets the port to be
part of the primary ring
Possible Values
■
Any of the
available ports
on the installed
FDDI modules
■
all
■
isol
■
pri
[Default]
–
pri
246
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
fddi stationMode
display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Generates a display of FDDI stationMode information. The display shows
the station mode, DAS (Dual Attachment Station) or SAS (Single
Attachment Station), for each FDDI port.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd stationM d
Important Consideration
■
Before the new stationMode takes effect, you must reboot your
system.
Fields in the FDDI Station Mode Display
Field
Description
Ports
Ports numbers that are assigned to the FDDI module. The
FDDI port numbers change, depending on the
configuration of your system.
stationMode
Current FDDI stationMode, DAS or SAS, that is assigned
to a specific port.
fddi stationMode modify
fddi stationMode
modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
247
Modifies the stationMode, DAS or SAS, that is assigned to a specific port
number.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
fd stationM m
Important Considerations
■
You cannot modify the stationMode when any of the ports in the pair
are part of a trunk.
■
Before the new stationMode takes effect, you must reboot your
system.
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
FDDI station port for which you
want to set the stationMode
stationMode
reboot
Mode of the FDDI port pair
selected to change
Prompt to reboot the system if
you want the stationMode
changes to take effect
Possible Values
■
Any of the
available ports
on the installed
FDDI modules
■
all
■
DAS
■
SAS
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
[Default]
–
SAS
–
248
CHAPTER 8: FIBER DISTRIBUTED DATA INTERFACE (FDDI)
BRIDGING PARAMETERS
V
Chapter 9
Bridge-Wide Parameters
Chapter 10
Bridge Port Parameters
Chapter 11
Trunks
Chapter 12
MultiPort Link Aggregation (MPLA)
Chapter 13
Resilient Links
Chapter 14
Virtual LANs (VLANs)
Chapter 15
Packet Filters
9
BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how
use the Administration Console to configure bridge-wide parameters.
This chapter addresses the commands in the bridge menu, except
port, packetFilter, vlan, trunk, mpla, and link, which other
chapters in this Command Reference Guide address.
For more information about configuring bridging and related features,
see the Implementation Guide for your system.
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
➧ bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
bridge menu
display
ipFragmentation
ipxSnapTranslation
addressThreshold
agingTime
➧ spanningTree
gvrpState
➧ cos
port
➧ multicast
packetFilter
vlan
trunk
mpla
link
spanningTree menu
igmp menu
stpState
stpPriority
stpMaxAge
stpHelloTime
stpForwardDelay
stpGroupAddress
summary
snoopMode
queryMode
queryIpAddress
vlans
groups
desQuerier
rPorts
qPort
cos menu
enable
summary
modify
multicast menu
➧ igmp
252
CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
bridge display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Displays bridge statistics and configuration information including
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) parameter values.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b d
Fields in the Bridge Display
Field
Description
addressCount
Number of addresses in the bridge address table at the
point in time in which you are viewing it. This value
fluctuates but the highest value reached is recorded in the
PeakAddrCount field.
addrTableSize
Maximum number of addresses that can be stored in the
bridge address table. For CoreBuilder® switches, the value
is 32K. For SuperStack® II Switches, the value is 16K.
addrThreshold
Configurable reporting threshold for the total number of
addresses known on this bridge. When this threshold is
reached, the system generates the SNMP trap
addressThresholdEvent. The range of valid values for
setting this object is between 1 and 1 plus the maximum
table size. To configure this value for the 3500 and 9000
L3 modules, see “bridge addressThreshold” later in this
chapter. This option is not available for the 3900, 9300,
9400 and 9000 L2 modules at this release.
agingTime
Configurable time period in seconds that the bridge uses
to age out dynamic addresses except when a topology
change has occurred. (After a topology change, the
bridge uses the value shown in the forwardDelay field
instead until it receives configuration messages without
the topology change flag set). The default value for
agingTime is 300 seconds. The acceptable range is
10 – 1,000,000. You can also enter 0 to disable aging. To
configure this value, see “bridge agingTime” later in this
chapter.
bridgeFwdDelay
Configurable time period in seconds that the bridge
spends in each of two states — listening and learning —
before it transitions to the forwarding state, provided that
the bridge is the root bridge. (If the bridge is not the root
bridge, the bridge uses the value shown in the fwdDelay
field that is assigned to it by the root bridge.) The default
value is 15 seconds. The acceptable range is 4 – 30
seconds. To configure the bridge forward delay, see
“bridge spanningTree stpForwardDelay” later in this
chapter.
bridge display
253
Field
Description
bridgeHelloTime
Configurable time period in seconds that elapses between
configuration messages when the bridge is the root
bridge. (If the bridge is not the root bridge, the bridge
uses the value shown in the helloTime field which is
assigned to it by the root bridge.) The default value is 2
seconds. The acceptable range is 1 – 10 seconds. To
configure the bridge hello time, see “bridge spanningTree
stpHelloTime” later in this chapter.
bridgeIdentifier
Unique bridge identification that includes the bridge
priority value and the MAC address of port 1.
bridgeMaxAge
Configurable time period in seconds that the bridge uses
to discard the stored configuration message when it is
operating as the root bridge. (If the bridge is not the root
bridge, it uses the value shown in the maxAge field
instead which is assigned to it by the root bridge.) The
default value is 20 seconds. The acceptable range is 6 – 40
seconds. To configure the bridge maximum age, see
“bridge spanningTree stpMaxAge” later in this chapter.
designatedRoot
Identity of the root bridge. It includes the root bridge’s
priority value and the MAC address of port 1 on that
bridge.
forwardDelay
Time period in seconds that the bridge spends in each of
two states — listening and learning — as assigned by the
root bridge. Compare with the bridgeFwdDelay field.
gvrpState
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Status of GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) for the
entire bridge. You configure GVRP as a bridge state as
well as individual port states. To configure GVRP for the
bridge, see “bridge gvrpState” later in this chapter. To
configure GVRP on ports, see “bridge port gvrpState” in
Chapter 10.
helloTime
Time period in seconds that elapses between the
configuration messages that the bridge receives from the
root bridge. Compare with the bridgeHelloTime field.
holdTime
Minimum delay time the bridge uses between topology
change BPDUs that it sends.
ipFragmentation
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Shows configuration state of the IP fragmentation option.
The default setting is enabled. To configure this option,
see “bridge ipFragmentation” later in this chapter.
ipxTranslation
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Shows configuration state of IPX SNAP translation. The
default setting is disabled. To configure this option, see
“bridge ipxSnapTranslation” later in this chapter.
lowLatency
(Not available at this release)
254
CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
Field
Description
maxAge
Time period in seconds that the bridge uses to discard
stored configuration messages. The value is determined
by the root bridge. Compare with the bridgeMaxAge
field.
mode
Reflects that the bridge operates as a transparent bridge.
peakAddrCount
Reflects the highest number of addresses that have been
counted since the last address table flush. For the current
size of the address table, see the addressCount field.
priority
Configurable STP priority value for the bridge. The default
value is 0x8000. (0x signifies that 8000 is a hexadecimal
number.) The acceptable range is 0x0 – 0xffff (0 – ffff). To
configure a value, see “bridge spanningTree stpPriority”
later in this chapter. The bridge priority is included in the
bridge identifier and is considered the most significant
portion because it influences root bridge selection. A
lower priority increases the odds that the bridge will
become the root bridge.
rootCost
Value that reflects the total cost of the best path (lowest
value) from the bridge root port to the root bridge. The
value sums individual port path costs. To configure path
costs for ports on the bridge, see “bridge port stpCost” in
Chapter 10.
rootPort
Logical port with the best path from the bridge to the root
bridge.
stpGroupAddress
Address to which the bridge listens to receive
configuration messages and other STP information. To
modify the STP group address, see “bridge spanningTree
stpGroupAddress” later in this chapter.
stpState
Whether the Spanning Tree Protocol is enabled or
disabled for the bridge. The default value is disabled for all
switches except CoreBuilder 9000 modules. To configure
the bridge STP state, see “bridge spanningTree stpState”
later in this chapter. (STP is also configured on a
port-by-port basis. See “bridge port stpState” in
Chapter 10.)
timeSinceLastTopology
Change
Time elapsed (in hours, minutes, and seconds) since STP
last reconfigured the network topology.
topologyChangeCount
Number of times that STP has reconfigured the network
topology since you enabled STP or rebooted the system
(whichever is less).
topologyChangeFlag
Whether the bridge topology is currently changing
(true) or not changing (false)
bridge ipFragmentation
bridge
ipFragmentation
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
255
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Determines whether the Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) and
Ethernet stations that are connected to your system can communicate
using IP when FDDI stations transmit packets that are too large for
Ethernet. IP fragmentation divides such large FDDI packets into smaller
packets that can be bridged to Ethernet LANs.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b ipf
Options
Prompt
Description
ipFragmentation
value
Whether large FDDI packets
can be divided into smaller
packets so that they can be
bridged to Ethernet
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
enabled
256
CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
bridge
ipxSnapTranslation
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Translates 802.3_RAW IPX packets to FDDI_SNAP packets when they are
forwarded from Ethernet to FDDI links, and vice versa when packets are
forwarded from FDDI to Ethernet.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b ipx
3900
9300
Important Consideration
■
When IPX SNAP Translation is disabled, the system uses standard
IEEE 802.1H bridging to translate 802.3_RAW packets to FDDI_RAW
packets when they are forwarded from Ethernet to FDDI, and vice
versa from FDDI to Ethernet.
Options
Prompt
Description
ipx
SnapTranslation
Whether the system uses IPX
SNAP Translation when
forwarding packets between
Ethernet and FDDI links
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
disabled
bridge addressThreshold
bridge
addressThreshold
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
257
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the reporting threshold for the number of Ethernet addresses that
are known. When this threshold is reached, the system generates the
SNMP trap called addressThresholdEvent.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b ad
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
The bridge address table size on CoreBuilder switches is 32K; that is,
the bridge can store a maximum of 32768 addresses.
■
The range of valid values for this parameter is between 1 and 1 plus
the address table size. Setting the address threshold to the highest
possible value prevents the system from generating the trap, because
the value can never be reached.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
address
threshold
Threshold for the total number 1 – 32769
of addresses that are known
on this bridge
[Default]
29491 (factory
default), or
current value
258
CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
bridge agingTime
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Sets the maximum period (in seconds) for aging out (deleting) dynamic
addresses from the address table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b ag
Important Considerations
■
Use this parameter to configure the system to age addresses in a
timely manner, without increasing packet flooding.
■
To disable the bridge aging function, set the value to 0.
■
This parameter does not affect statically configured addresses.
Options
Prompt
Description
aging time
Maximum period (in
seconds) for aging out
dynamically learned
forwarding information
Possible Values
■
0 to disable
■
10 – 1,000,000 seconds
[Default]
300
bridge spanningTree stpState
bridge spanningTree
stpState
259
Enables or disables the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) on your system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
b sp stps
Important Considerations
■
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
The state of STP is configured in two places: the entire bridge (this
command) and individual bridge ports. (See Chapter 10.) The
combination of the states determines the forwarding behavior of each
port, as shown in the following table:
Bridge STP State
Port STP State
Port Participates
in STP?
Port Forwards
Frames?
Disabled
Disabled
No
Yes, if link state is up.
Enabled
No
Yes, if link state is up.
Removed
No
Yes, if link state is up.
Disabled
No
No
Enabled
Yes
Determined by STP,
provided that the link
state is up.
Removed
No
Yes, if link state is up.
Enabled
■
After you enable STP, the system takes several seconds to process the
command before the Administration Console menu reappears.
■
Although bridge-wide STP is initially disabled, default values exist for
the following STP bridge parameters: priority, max age, hello time,
forward delay, and group address. These values do not function until
STP is enabled.
■
■
CoreBuilder® 3500 and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 modules include an
ignore STP mode option. See Chapter 14 in this guide or see your
system Implementation Guide for more information.
Bridge-wide STP must be disabled on a CoreBuilder 9400 switch if you
configure it as a MultiPoint Link Aggregation (MPLA) core switch. For
more information about MPLA, see the CoreBuilder 9400
Implementation Guide.
260
CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
Options
Prompt
Description
stpState
(3500, 3900,
9300, 9400)
Whether the Spanning Tree
Protocol is enabled or
disabled for the system
stpState
Whether the Spanning Tree
(9000 L2 and L3) Protocol is enabled or
disabled for the module
Possible Values [Default]
■
enabled
■
disabled
■
enabled
■
disabled
disabled (factory
default), or
current value
enabled (factory
default), or
current value
bridge spanningTree stpPriority
bridge spanningTree
stpPriority
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
261
Modifies the bridge priority, which influences the choice of the root and
designated bridges.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b sp stpp
Important Considerations
■
The bridge priority is expressed as a hexidecimal value. The characters
Ox signify this.
■
The lower the bridge’s priority value, the more likely it is that the
bridge is chosen as the root bridge or a designated bridge.
■
You can change the value while STP is disabled or enabled. If you
change the value while STP is disabled, the value is retained when you
enable STP.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
STP priority
Bridge-wide STP parameter
0x0 – 0xffff
0x8000 (factory
default), or
current value
262
CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
bridge spanningTree
stpMaxAge
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Determines when the stored CPDU configuration message is discarded
from the bridge’s memory if the bridge is the root bridge. The current
value is shown in the bridgeMaxAge field of the bridge display.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b sp stpm
Important Considerations
■
If the value is too small, the STP may reconfigure the topology too
often, causing temporary loss of connectivity in the network.
■
If the value is too large, the network may take longer than necessary
to adjust to a new STP configuration after a topology change such as
the restarting of a bridge.
■
A conservative value assumes a delay variance of 2 seconds per hop.
The recommended and default value is 20 seconds.
■
Although the possible range for stpMaxAge is 6 – 40, the available
range is constrained by the following inequalities:
■
2 x (stpForwardDelay - 1 second) >= stpMaxAge
■
stpMaxAge >= 2 x (stpHelloTime + 1 second)
Options
Prompt
Description
STP max age Value (in seconds) when the
stored configuration message
information is deemed too old
and is discarded
Possible Values
[Default]
6 – 40 seconds
20 (factory
default), or
current value
bridge spanningTree stpHelloTime
bridge spanningTree
stpHelloTime
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
263
Sets the time between configuration messages that the bridge generates
if it is operating as the root bridge. The current value is shown in the
bridgeHelloTime field of the bridge display.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b sp stph
Important Considerations
■
If the probability of losing configuration messages is high, shorten the
time to make the protocol more robust.
■
If the probability of losing configuration messages is low, lengthen the
time to lower the overhead of the algorithm.
■
The recommended Hello time is 2 seconds.
■
Although the possible range for stpHelloTime is 1 – 10, the available
range is constrained by the following inequality:
stpMaxAge >= 2 x (stpHelloTime + 1 second)
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
STP hello time
Time (in seconds) between
configuration messages from
the root bridge
1 – 10 seconds
2 (factory
default), or
current value
264
CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
bridge spanningTree
stpForwardDelay
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Sets the amount of time that the bridge spends in each of the listening
and learning states if it is the root bridge. The current value is shown in
the bridgeFwdDelay field of the bridge display.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b sp stpf
Important Considerations
■
This value temporarily prevents a bridge from starting to forward data
packets to and from a link until news of a topology change has spread
to all parts of a bridged network.
■
The recommended and default value is 15 seconds.
■
Setting the value too low can result in temporary loops while STP
reconfigures the topology.
■
Setting the value too high can lead to a longer wait while STP
reconfigures the topology.
■
If the configuration was not successful, the system notifies you that
your changes failed, and you can try to reenter the changes.
■
Although the possible range for stpForwardDelay is 4 – 30, the
available range is constrained by the following inequality:
2 x (stpForwardDelay - 1 second) >= stpMaxAge
Options
Prompt
Description
STP forward delay Time (in seconds) that a
bridge spends in the listening
state and the learning state
Possible Values [Default]
4 – 30 seconds
15 (factory
default), or
current value
bridge spanningTree stpGroupAddress
bridge spanningTree
stpGroupAddress
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
265
Sets the single address to which a bridge listens to receive Spanning Tree
Protocol (STP) information. Each STP bridge on the network sends STP
packets to the group address. Every STP bridge on the network receives
STP packets that were sent to the group address, regardless of which
bridge sent the packets. The current value is shown in the
stpGroupAddress field of the bridge display.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b sp stpg
Important Considerations
■
Because there is no industry standard for a group address, products
from different vendors may respond to different group addresses. If
STP does not seem to be working in a mixed-vendor environment,
other vendors’ products may use different group addresses as their
defaults. If that is true, set the STP group address to be the same
across all bridges in the network.
■
Before you can modify the STP group address, you must disable STP (if
it is not already disabled) on the bridge. (See “bridge spanningTree
stpState” earlier in this chapter.)
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
STP group
address
Single address to which a
bridge listens for STP
information
A valid STP
group address
01-80-C2-00-00-00
(factory default), or
current value
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CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
bridge gvrpState
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables or disables the GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP), which
can help simplify management of VLAN configurations in larger
networks, and determines whether the virtual LAN (VLAN) origin for a
port-based VLAN is dynamic (with GVRP) or static (without GVRP).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b g
Important Considerations
■
To activate GVRP in your system, you first enable it for the entire
bridge (this command) and then enable it on appropriate individual
bridge ports (see Chapter 10).
■
To maximize the effectiveness of GVRP, it should be enabled in as
many end stations and network devices as possible.
■
VLANs that are created dynamically with GVRP exist only as long as a
GVRP-enabled device is sending updates. If the devices no longer send
updates, or if GVRP is disabled, or if the system is rebooted, all
dynamic VLANs are removed.
■
If you disable GVRP after it has been enabled for a period of time, the
system deletes all VLAN interfaces that were learned through GVRP
and leaves unchanged all VLANs that were statically configured
through the Administration Console or through the Web
management software.
Options
Prompt
Description
GVRP state
Whether the system uses GVRP
for the entire bridge
Possible Values
■
enable
■
disable
[Default]
disabled
bridge cos enable
bridge cos enable
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
267
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Enables or disables IEEE 802.1p Class of Service (CoS) on the bridge. Use
this feature to help prioritize business-critical or time-sensitive traffic in
your network.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
b c e
Important Considerations
■
The opportunity to be processed in the high priority queue exists only
for IEEE 802.1Q tagged packets (provided that CoS is enabled) with
priority values that match the high priority queue configuration.
Non-tagged packets are always processed in the low priority queue,
along with tagged packets with priority values that match the low
priority queue configuration.
■
CoS is enabled by default and initial queue assignments conform with
IEEE 802.1p recommendations — that is, priorities 0 – 3 are assigned
to the low priority queue and priorities 4 – 7 are assigned to the high
priority queue. To modify queue assignments, see “bridge cos modify”
later in this chapter.
■
If you disable CoS, all tagged and non-tagged traffic is processed
through the low priority queue and its buffers. (The high priority
queue and buffers are shut off.)
Options
Prompt
Description
CoS setting
Whether all bridge ports in the
system implement Class of
Service
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
enabled (factory
default), or
current value
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CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
bridge cos summary
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Displays whether Class of Service (CoS) is enabled or disabled; shows how
the eight possible priority values are assigned (or, if CoS is disabled, how
they were last assigned) to the two queues; and shows the rate limit that
exists on the high priority queue (queue 1).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b c s
Important Considerations
■
By default, CoS is enabled and the eight priority values (traffic classes
0 – 7) are divided between the two queues in accordance with IEEE
802.1p recommendations — that is, queue 1 (high priority) has classes
4, 5, 6, and 7 and queue 2 (low priority) has classes 0, 1, 2, and 3.
■
If CoS is disabled (indicated at the top of the display), the display
reflects the most recent configuration even though it is no longer
active.
Options
Prompt
Description
Queue
index
number
Number of the queue for
which you want to see
information
Possible Values
■
1
■
2
■
all
[Default]
–
Fields in the Bridge CoS Summary Display
Field
Description
Queue
Number of the queue. Queue 1 is always the high priority
queue. Queue 2 is always the low priority queue.
Rate limit
Percentage of traffic allowed on the high priority queue.
See the Implementation Guide for your system for more
information about the rate limit option.
Traffic classes
Priority values assigned to each queue. The IEEE 802.1p
standard specifies eight possible values (0 – 7), each of
which is intended to signify a certain kind of traffic.
bridge cos modify
bridge cos modify
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
269
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Changes how the eight priority values (0 – 7) are assigned to each of the
two hardware queues and changes the optional rate limit on queue 1
(the high priority queue).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
b c m
Important Considerations
■
Because you cannot configure a rate limit for queue 2, the
Administration Console prompts you to enter a rate limit only if you
select queue 1.
■
When you assign priority values to a given queue, the system
automatically assigns the remaining priority values to the other queue.
■
If CoS is disabled, you can still modify the queue settings; however,
they do not affect traffic until CoS is enabled.
Options
Prompt
Description
Queue
index
Number of the device
queue whose settings you
want to modify
Possible Values
■
1
■
2
■
Rate limit
Throughput limit that
applies only to queue 1
and is expressed as a
percentage
Class of
service tags
IEEE 802.1p priority values
that you want to assign to
the selected queue. Use
commas to separate
multiple values.
–
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Whole numbers
from 1 – 100
■
0–7
■
all
■
[Default]
? (for a list of
possible values)
100 (factory default),
or current value
For queue 1, values
4, 5, 6, 7 (factory
default), or current
values
For queue 2, values
0, 1, 2, 3 (factory
default), or current
values
270
CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
bridge multicast igmp
summary
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Displays a summary of parameters related to the Internet Group
Management Protocol (IGMP) which conserves network bandwidth by
directing IP multicast application traffic only to the ports that require it.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b mu i su
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Consideration
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500 system and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3
modules, IGMP commands exist under the ip multicast igmp
menu.
Fields in the Bridge Multicast IGMP Summary Display
Field
Description
igmp snooping
Whether the IGMP snooping function is enabled or
disabled for the entire system.
igmp querying
Whether the system is enabled to operate as an IGMP
querier. IGMP snooping must be enabled for the querying
function to operate.
igmp query source IP
address
Source IP address used by the system or module in query
messages if it is elected as the IGMP querier.
bridge multicast igmp snoopMode
bridge multicast igmp
snoopMode
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
271
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Enables or disables the snooping (listening) function of the Internet
Group Management Protocol (IGMP).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b mu i sn
Important Considerations
■
The value that you select applies to the entire system or module.
■
IGMP snooping must be disabled on a CoreBuilder 9400 switch if you
configure it as a MultiPoint Link Aggregation (MPLA) core switch. For
more information about MPLA, see the CoreBuilder 9400
Implementation Guide.
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500 system and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3
modules, IGMP commands exist under the ip multicast igmp
menu.
Options
Prompt
Description
IGMP
snooping
Whether your system
implements IGMP snooping
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
enabled (factory
default), or
current value
272
CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
bridge multicast igmp
queryMode
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Enables or disables the querying function of the Internet Group
Management Protocol (IGMP). From all IGMP-capable devices on a given
subnetwork, the one with the lowest IP address is elected as the querier.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b mu i querym
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
The value that you select applies to the entire system.
■
If you enable igmp querymode, but disable igmp snoopmode, the
system or module cannot operate as an IGMP querier.
■
To prevent IP multicast traffic from occupying unnecessary bandwidth,
the best device to operate as the querier is the one closest to the
source of IP multicast traffic. You can disable querying on select
devices or manipulate IP addresses with the bridge multicast igmp
queryIpAddress command to force this configuration.
■
IGMP querying must be disabled on a CoreBuilder 9400 switch if you
configure it as a MultiPoint Link Aggregation (MPLA) core switch. For
more information about MPLA, see the CoreBuilder 9400
Implementation Guide.
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500 system and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3
modules, IGMP commands exist under the ip multicast igmp
menu.
Options
Prompt
Description
IGMP
querying
Whether the system can
operate as the IGMP querier if
so elected
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
enabled (factory
default), or
current value
bridge multicast igmp queryIpAddress
273
bridge multicast igmp
queryIpAddress
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
Configures the source address that is inserted in IGMP query packets.
b mu i queryi
Important Considerations
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
■
For the CoreBuilder 9400 and SuperStack II Switch 9300 and 3900
systems, you do not need to used this command as long as you have
one in-band IP interface configured; the system uses its IP address as
the source IP address of query packets. Use this command only if you
want the system to use a different source IP address for query packets.
If there are no in-band IP interfaces configured and you want to
enable querying, you must enter an IP address with this command.
■
For a CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 2 switching module to offer itself as a
querier, you must enter an IP address with this command.
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500 system and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3
modules, IGMP commands exist under the ip multicast igmp
menu.
Options
Prompt
Description
IGMP Query Source address that the
Source IP
system uses in its IGMP
Address
queries
Possible Values
[Default]
Any unique IP
address in dotted
decimal format
0.0.0.0, first in-band
IP interface index, or
current value
(3900, 9300, 9400)
0.0.0.0, or current
value (9000 L2)
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CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
bridge multicast igmp
vlans
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
If IGMP snooping is enabled, lists the VLAN IDs of VLANs that are carrying
IP multicast traffic.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b mu i v
Important Consideration
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500 system and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3
modules, IGMP commands exist under the ip multicast igmp
menu.
bridge multicast igmp groups
bridge multicast igmp
groups
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
275
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Displays IP multicast group and associated port information for a selected
VLAN.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b mu i g
Important Considerations
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500 system and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3
modules, IGMP commands exist under the ip multicast igmp
menu.
■
If no IP multicast group traffic is present on the selected VLAN, you see
this message: No groups exist for this VLAN
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN ID
ID number of the VLAN
for which you want to
display group and port
information
Possible Values
■
■
[Default]
A valid VLAN ID 1 (Default VLAN)
(VID) number
? (for a list of
selectable VIDs)
Fields in the Bridge Multicast IGMP Groups Display
Field
Description
VLAN ID
ID number of the selected VLAN.
Group
Hexidecimal equivalent of the IP multicast group address
shown in the IpAddress column.
IpAddress
IP multicast group address of the traffic that the system or
module has observed on the selected VLAN.
Ports
Ports that lead to group members.
276
CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
bridge multicast igmp
desQuerier
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Determines whether the system or module is the designated querier for
the selected VLAN.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b mu i d
Important Considerations
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500 system and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3
modules, IGMP commands exist under the ip multicast igmp
menu.
■
If the system or module is not functioning as the querier, you see this
message: Device IS NOT designated querier on VLAN
■
If the system or module is functioning as the querier, you see this
message: Device IS designated querier on VLAN
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN ID
ID number of the VLAN
for which you are
requesting information
Possible Values
■
■
[Default]
A valid VLAN ID 1 (Default VLAN)
(VID)
? (for a list of
selectable VIDs)
bridge multicast igmp rPorts
277
bridge multicast igmp
rPorts
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
Lists the ports in the selected VLAN that lead to IP multicast routers.
b mu i r
Important Considerations
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
■
The system determines which ports in a VLAN lead to multicast routers
by snooping on advertisements from the following routing protocols:
Distance-Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP), Multicast Open
Shortest Path First (MOSPF), and Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM).
■
Router port entries age out after 100 seconds. Routing protocol
advertisements are usually sent every few seconds.
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500 system and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3
modules, IGMP commands exist under the ip multicast igmp
menu.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN ID
ID number of the VLAN
for which you want to list
ports that lead to IP
multicast routers
Possible Values
■
■
[Default]
A valid VLAN ID 1 (Default VLAN)
(VID)
? (for a list of
selectable VIDs)
278
CHAPTER 9: BRIDGE-WIDE PARAMETERS
bridge multicast igmp
qPort
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Displays the number of the port that receives incoming IGMP queries for
the selected VLAN.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b mu i qp
Important Considerations
■
If no query packets have been received within the last five minutes
(approximately) when you enter this command, the system responds:
No queries are heard by the switch
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500 system and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3
modules, IGMP commands exist under the ip multicast igmp
menu.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN ID
ID number of the VLAN
for which you want to
display the port that last
received query packets
Possible Values
■
■
[Default]
A valid VLAN ID 1 (Default VLAN)
(VID)
? (for a list of
selectable VIDs)
10
BRIDGE PORT PARAMETERS
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
manage bridge ports in your system.
This chapter covers bridge port options only. For information about
other bridge menu options, use the Table of Contents to find the
appropriate chapter in this Command Reference Guide.
For more information about configuring bridge ports in your network,
see the Implementation Guide for your system.
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
➧ bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
bridge menu
display
ipFragmentation
ipxSnapTranslation
addressThreshold
agingTime
spanningTree
gvrpState
cos
➧ port
multicast
packetFilter
vlan
trunk
mpla
link
port menu
summary
detail
multicastLimit
stpState
stpCost
stpPriority
gvrpState
➧ address
address menu
list
add
remove
find
flushAll
flushDynamic
280
CHAPTER 10: BRIDGE PORT PARAMETERS
bridge port summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Displays a summary of bridge port information, including the Spanning
Tree Protocol (STP) configurations for selected bridge ports.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b po su
Important Considerations
■
The port numbering that is displayed is always sequential, although it
depends on the placement of the modules that you have configured
into your system. See the Implementation Guide for your system for
more information about port numbering.
■
For resilient links, the main and standby ports are shown in ascending
order.
■
When you are prompted to select ports, you can enter ? to see a
matrix of information about the bridge ports. This matrix is useful, for
example, if you have trunks configured but forget which port is the
anchor port. You must use the anchor port number to display a port
summary for a trunk.
Fields in the Bridge Port Summary Display
Field
Description
fwdTransitions
Number of times that the port has entered the forwarding
state since you enabled STP or rebooted the system. This
value is useful for determining the relative stability of the
topology.
gvrpState
(3500, 9000 L3)
Whether GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GARP) is
enabled or disabled on the port. For GVRP to function on
the port, you must enable it on the port as well as the
entire bridge. To configure GVRP on a port, see “bridge
port gvrpState” later in this chapter. To configure GVRP
on the bridge, see “bridge gvrpState” in Chapter 9.
linkState
State of the link (up or down), that is, whether it is
available for communication.
portId
Port identification, which includes the port priority value
(first 2 digits after “0x”) and the logical port number (last
2 digits). Both are shown as hexidecimal values.
bridge port summary
Field
Description
portNumber
Logical index number that the system assigns to the
bridge port, which may not correspond with the physical
port number depending on your system configuration.
(For example, when you define a trunk, only the anchor
port receives a portNumber.) As you add and remove
logical ports, portNumbers are reassigned so that they
remain consecutive.
rxDiscards
Total number of frames received on the bridge port that
have been discarded. This value reflects a summary of all
statistics that end with Discs, Discards, or Filters.
rxFrames
Total number of frames that this bridge port received
from its segment. However, unlike the rxFrames field in
the Ethernet display which counts all frames, this field
does not count frames in error. Thus, this value may be
lower than the value shown in the rxFrames field in the
Ethernet display.
state
Current operating state of the port:
■
■
■
■
■
Blocking — The bridge continues to run STP on the
port, but the bridge does not receive packets from the
port, learn locations of station addresses from it, or
forward packets onto it.
Listening — The bridge continues to run STP and
to transmit configuration messages on the port, but it
discards packets that are received on the port and does
not transmit packets that are forwarded to the port.
Learning — STP operating state in which the bridge
receives packets on the port to learn the location of
some of the stations that are located on the port.
Forwarding — The bridge receives packets on the
port and forwards or does not forward them,
depending on address comparisons with the bridge’s
source address list. Provided that the link state is up,
this state field indicates forwarding even if STP is
disabled for the bridge.
Disabled — Management has disabled the port or
the link state is down.
281
282
CHAPTER 10: BRIDGE PORT PARAMETERS
Field
Description
stp
Configurable status of STP on a port. If bridge-wide STP is
enabled, the port STP configuration options are:
■
■
■
enabled — STP sets the operating state of the port
(blocking, listening, etc.) according to network
topology characteristics. This is the default
configuration for all ports.
disabled — STP is disabled and the port is disabled.
The port does not participate in STP decisions, frame
reception, or frame transmission.
removed — STP is disabled on the port but the port
can still receive or transmit frames if its link state is up.
If bridge-wide STP is disabled, the port STP setting has no
effect; as long as its link state is up, the port forwards all
valid frames. To see a matrix of port and bridge STP
settings, see “bridge port stpState” in this chapter.
txFrames
Number of frames that this port has transmitted. This
object counts a frame transmitted on the interface that
corresponds to this port only if the frame is for a protocol
that the local bridging function is processing (includes
bridge management frames).
bridge port detail
bridge port detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
283
Displays detailed information about bridge ports, including the Spanning
Tree Protocol (STP) configurations for the bridge port.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b po d
Important Considerations
■
The port numbering that is displayed for your ports is always
sequential, although it depends on the placement of the modules that
you have configured into your system. See the Implementation Guide
for your system for more information about port numbering.
■
For resilient links, the main and standby ports are shown in ascending
order.
■
When you are prompted to select ports, specify the ? option to see a
list of information about your bridge ports. This matrix is useful, for
example, if you have trunks configured but forget which port is the
anchor port. You must use the anchor port number to display a port
summary for a trunk.
Fields in the Bridge Port Detail Display
Field
Description
designatedBridge
Identity of the designated bridge of the LAN to which the
port is attached. It is an STP port parameter.
designatedCost
Cost through this port to get to the root bridge. The
designated cost of the root port is the same as the cost
that is received in incoming BPDUs from the designated
bridge for that LAN. It is an STP port parameter.
designatedPort
Identity of the designated port on the designated bridge.
designatedRoot
Identity of the root bridge in the LAN, which includes the
root bridge’s priority value and the MAC address of port 1
on that bridge.
fwdTransitions
Number of times that the port has entered the forwarding
state since you enabled STP or rebooted the system. This
value is useful for determining the relative stability of the
topology.
gvrpState
(3500, 9000 L3)
Whether the GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) is
enabled or disabled on the port. For GVRP to function on
the port, you must enable it on the port as well as the
entire bridge. To configure GVRP on a port, see “bridge
port gvrpState” in this chapter. To configure GVRP on the
bridge, see “bridge gvrpState” in Chapter 9.
284
CHAPTER 10: BRIDGE PORT PARAMETERS
Field
Description
linkState
State of the link (up or down), that is, whether it is
available for communication.
pathCost
Cost to add to the total path cost when this port is the
root port. To configure a port’s STP cost, see “bridge port
stpCost” in this chapter.
portNumber
Logical index number that the system assigns to the
bridge port, which may not correspond with the physical
port number depending on your system configuration.
(For example, when you define a trunk, only the anchor
port receives a portNumber.) As you add and remove
logical ports, portNumbers are reassigned so that they
remain consecutive.
portId
Port identification, which includes the port priority value
(first 2 digits after “0x”) and the logical port number (last
2 digits). Both are shown as hexidecimal values.
priority
Configurable STP port priority value. The default value is
0x80. (0x signifies that the value to follow is a
hexadecimal number.) The acceptable range is 0x0 – 0xff.
To configure port priority values, see “bridge port
stpPriority” in this chapter.
The port priority is included in the port ID and is
considered the most significant portion because it is the
first factor that determines if a port is to be the
designated port when more than one bridge port is
attached to the same LAN. The lowest priority is chosen. If
all ports in a bridge have the same priority, then the port
number is used as the determining factor.
rxAllFilters
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Number of frames that the bridge port discarded due to a
user-defined packet filter on its “receive all” path.
rxBlockedDiscs
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Number of frames that the bridge port discarded because
the receiving bridge port was not in the forwarding state.
rxErrorDiscs
Number of frames that the bridge port discarded because
of internal bridge system errors (such as hardware and
software address table discrepancies).
rxForwards
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Total number of frames (all types) that the bridge port
received and forwarded to another bridge port.
rxForwardMcasts
(3900, 9300, 9400, and
9000 L2)
Number of multicast frames that the bridge port received
and forwarded to another bridge port.
rxForwardUcasts
(3900, 9300, 9400, and
9000 L2)
Number of unicast frames the bridge port received and
forwarded to another bridge port.
rxFloodUcasts
Number of unicast frames that the port received and
flooded to one or more ports.
bridge port detail
285
Field
Description
rxFrames
Total number of frames that this bridge port received
from its segment. However, unlike the rxFrames field in
the Ethernet display which counts all frames, this field
does not count frames in error. Thus, this value may be
lower than the value shown in the rxFrames field in the
Ethernet display.
rxInternalFilters
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Number of frames discarded due to customer filters on
the rxInternal path.
rxMcastExcDiscs
Number of multicast frames that were discarded when
rxMcastLimit was exceeded.
rxMcastExceeds
Amount of time that rxMcastLimit has been exceeded.
rxMcastFilters
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Number of frames that were discarded due to a
user-defined packet filter on the “receive multicast” path
of this port.
rxMcastLimit
Configurable parameter that limits the rate of multicast
frames that are forwarded from a bridge port. The default
value is 0, which means there is no limit. To configure this
option, see “bridge port multicastLimit” in this chapter.
rxMcastLimitType
(3900, 9300, 9400, and
9000 L2)
Configurable parameter that selects the type of frames on
which the multicast limit operates (both multicast and
broadcast frames, or broadcast frames only). The default
value is McastBcast. To configure this option, see “bridge
port multicastLimit” in this chapter.
rxNoDestDiscs
(3900, 9300, 9400, and
9000 L2)
Number of frames that this port discarded because of an
unknown VLAN ID or because the port was in a
non-forwarding Spanning Tree state.
rxNoRescrDiscs
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Number of frames that this port discarded due to
insufficient resource availability (buffer space).
rxOtherDiscs
(3900, 9300, 9400,
9000 L2, 9000 L3)
Number of frames that this port discarded because they
contained either invalid (group) source addresses or
source addresses that belong to this bridge (indicates
network loops).
rxOtherDiscards
(3500)
Number of frames that this port discarded because they
contained either invalid MAC source addresses or source
addresses that belong to this bridge.
rxSameSegDiscs
Number of frames that this port discarded because the
destination address is known on the same network
segment as the source address and, thus, the frame does
not need to be bridged.
rxSecurityDiscs
Number of frames that this port discarded because they
contained source addresses that were statically configured
on another bridge port.
SRRingNumber
(3500 and 9000 L3)
(Not available at this release)
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CHAPTER 10: BRIDGE PORT PARAMETERS
Field
Description
SRHopLimit
(3500 and 9000 L3)
(Not available at this release)
state
Current operating state of the port:
■
■
■
■
■
stp
Blocking — The bridge continues to run STP on the
port, but the bridge does not receive packets from the
port, learn locations of station addresses from it, or
forward packets onto it.
Listening — The bridge continues to run STP and
to transmit configuration messages on the port, but it
discards packets that are received on the port and does
not transmit packets that are forwarded to the port.
Learning — Similar to listening, but the bridge
receives packets on the port to learn the location of
some of the stations that are located on the port.
Forwarding — The bridge receives packets on the
port and forwards or does not forward them,
depending on address comparisons with the bridge’s
source address list. Provided that the link state is up,
this state field indicates forwarding even if STP is
disabled for the bridge.
Disabled — Management has disabled the port or
the link state is down.
Configurable status of STP on a port. Provided that
bride-wide STP is enabled, the port STP configuration
states function as follows:
■
■
■
enabled — STP sets the operating state of the port
(blocking, listening, etc.) according to network
topology characteristics. This is the default
configuration for all ports.
disabled — STP is disabled and the port is disabled.
The port does not participate in STP decisions, frame
reception, or frame transmission.
removed — STP is disabled on the port but the port
can still receive or transmit frames if its link state is up.
If bridge-wide STP is disabled, this port STP setting is
meaningless; as long as its link state is up, the port
forwards all frames. To configure STP on a port, see
“bridge port stpState” in this chapter.
txAllFilters
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Number of frames that the bridge port discarded because
of a user-defined packet filter on its “transmit all” path.
txBlockedDiscs
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Number of frames that this bridge port discarded because
the transmitting bridge port was not in the forwarding
state.
bridge port detail
287
Field
Description
txFrames
Number of frames that this port transmitted to its
segment. This object counts a frame transmitted on the
interface that corresponds to this port only if the frame is
for a protocol that the local bridging function is
processing (includes bridge management frames).
txMcastFilters
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Number of frames that this port discarded because of a
user-defined packet filter on its “transmit multicast” path.
txMtuExcDiscs
(3500 and 9000 L3)
Number of frames that this port discarded because of
excessive size.
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CHAPTER 10: BRIDGE PORT PARAMETERS
bridge port
multicastLimit
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Sets a threshold value on a bridge port that affects the per-second
forwarding rate of multicast or broadcast traffic that originates on the
segment connected to that port.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b po m
Important Considerations
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
■
A value of zero indicates that no limit is configured.
■
If you want to configure a limit for a trunk, be sure to apply it to the
trunk’s anchor port (lowest-numbered port) only. However, be aware
that the limit that you specify applies separately to each link in the
trunk, even though you only enter it once — that is, it is not an
aggregate.
■
For a larger array of similar options in the CoreBuilder 3500 and 9000
Layer 3 modules, see the Quality of Service (QoS) chapter in this guide
(Chapter 22) and in the appropriate Implementation Guide.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Bridge ports
Bridge ports for which
you want to set the
multicastLimit
One or more valid bridge
port numbers
–
Frame type
Frame type to which
(3900, 9300,
the limit shall apply
9400, 9000 L2)
Multicast
Configurable
threshold value parameter that limits
the per-second receive
rate of specified traffic.
■
■
■
■
BcastOnly
(broadcasts only)
McastBcast
McastBcast
(multicasts and
broadcasts)
0 – 200 (K frames/sec)
(3500 and 9000 L3)
0 – 200000 (frames/sec)
(3900, 9300, 9400, and
9000 L2)
0
bridge port stpState
bridge port stpState
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
289
Sets the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) state for one or more bridge ports.
The selection is effective only if STP is enabled for the system or module.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b po stps
Important Considerations
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
■
The following table explains the forwarding behavior of a port based
on its bridge and port STP states:
Bridge STP State
Port STP State
Port Participates
in STP?
Port Forwards
Frames?
Disabled
Disabled
No
Yes, if link state is up.
Enabled
No
Yes, if link state is up.
Removed
No
Yes, if link state is up.
Disabled
No
No
Enabled
Yes
Determined by STP,
provided that the
port link state is up.
Removed
No
Yes, if link state is up.
Enabled
Options
Prompt
Description
Ports
Ports for which you want
to control the STP setting
Possible Values
■
■
STP state
Spanning Tree Protocol
state that you assign to
specified ports
One or more
valid port
numbers
[Default]
–
? (to display a
port summary)
■
enabled
■
disabled
■
removed
enabled (factory
default), or current
value
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CHAPTER 10: BRIDGE PORT PARAMETERS
bridge port stpCost
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Sets the path cost that the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) adds to the root
cost field in a configuration message that the port receives. The system
uses this value to determine the path cost to the root through the port.
The current value is shown in the pathCost field of the bridge port
detail display.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b po stpc
Important Considerations
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
■
A larger path cost value makes the LAN that is reached through the
port more likely to be low in the Spanning Tree topology. The lower
the LAN is in the topology, the less through traffic it carries. For this
reason, you may want to assign a large path cost to a LAN that has a
lower bandwidth or to one on which you want to minimize traffic.
■
If your configuration is successful, the previous menu appears. If the
configuration is not successful, the system notifies you that your
changes failed, and you can try to reenter your changes.
■
See the IEEE 802.1D MAC Bridges standard for recommended path
cost settings.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Bridge ports Bridge ports for which you
want to set the path cost
One or more valid
bridge port
numbers
–
STP cost
1 – 65535
Configurable bridge port STP
parameter that specifies the
cost to add to the total path
cost when this port is the root
port
■
■
■
100
(Ethernet)
10 (Fast
Ethernet)
1 (Gigabit
Ethernet)
bridge port stpPriority
bridge port
stpPriority
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
291
Sets the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) bridge port priority. This value
influences the choice of port when the bridge has two or more ports that
have the same path cost and that are connected to the same LAN, which
creates a loop. STP selects the bridge port with the lowest priority and
places the remaining ports in the blocking state. The current value is
shown in the priority field of the bridge port detail display.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b po stpp
Important Considerations
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
■
Port priority is a 1-octet value written in hexidecimal format.
■
If all ports in a bridge have the same priority value, then the port
number is used as the determining factor.
■
If your configuration is successful, the previous menu appears. If the
configuration is not successful, the system notifies you that your
changes failed, and you can try to reenter your changes.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Bridge ports Bridge ports for which you
want to set the STP port
priority
A valid bridge port
number
–
STP priority
0x0 – 0xff, where
0x precedes a
hexidecimal value
0x80
One-octet value that
determines which port is the
designated port when there is
more than one port attached
to the same LAN
292
CHAPTER 10: BRIDGE PORT PARAMETERS
bridge port gvrpState
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
Allows the port to participate in sending and receiving GARP VLAN
Registration Protocol (GVRP) updates, which can help you simplify the
management of IEEE 802.1Q VLAN configurations.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
b po g
Important Considerations
■
You can use this command to configure the same setting on multiple
ports simultaneously. When you specify multiple port numbers, the
system prompts you to choose the setting and then applies it to all of
the ports.
■
To activate GVRP in your system, you must enable it for the entire
bridge (see “bridge gvrpState”in Chapter 9) as well as on individual
bridge ports (this command). If you enable GVRP on a port but you
have not enabled it for the bridge, GVRP does not function.
■
To maximize the effectiveness of GVRP, it should be enabled in as
many end stations and network devices as possible.
■
GVRP updates are not sent to any blocked Spanning Tree Protocol
(STP) ports. GVRP operates only on ports that are in the forwarding
state.
■
If GVRP is enabled on the bridge and on a given port which changes
to the STP forwarding state, the port automatically begins to
participate in GVRP.
■
VLANs that are created dynamically with GVRP exist only as long as a
GVRP-enabled device is sending updates — if the devices no longer
send updates, GVRP is disabled, or the system is rebooted, all dynamic
VLANs are removed, but the system leaves unchanged all VLANs that
were statically configured through a management interface.
Options
Prompt
Description
Bridge ports
Bridge ports for which you
wish to enable or disable the
GVRP state
Possible Values
■
enable
■
disable
[Default]
disable
bridge port address list
bridge port address
list
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
293
Displays the MAC addresses (canonical addresses) that are currently
associated with selected bridge ports, as well as the address type (static or
dynamic).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b po a l
Important Consideration
■
If you have multiple ports that are associated with a trunk, the display
groups ports that are associated with a trunk on one line (for example,
3,4,6) and lists the addresses that are associated with the trunk.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
indexes
(only if in
allClosed
mode)
Index numbers of the VLANs to
which the desired bridge ports
belong
Bridge ports Bridge ports for which you
want to display MAC addresses
Possible Values
■
■
■
■
■
■
One or more
valid VLAN
indexes
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
VLANs)
One or more
valid bridge
port numbers
all
? (to display a
port summary)
–
294
CHAPTER 10: BRIDGE PORT PARAMETERS
bridge port address
add
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Adds new MAC addresses to the selected bridge ports as statically
configured addresses.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b po a a
Important Considerations
■
If you have multiple ports that are associated with a trunk, the display
groups ports that are associated with a trunk on one line (for example,
3,4,6) and lists the addresses that are associated with the trunk.
■
A statically configured address is never aged out of the address table
and cannot be learned on a different port. You must first remove it
from its former port.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
indexes
(only if in
allClosed
mode)
Index numbers of the VLANs to
which the desired bridge ports
belong
Possible Values
■
■
■
Bridge ports Bridge ports to which you want
to add certain MAC addresses
■
■
MAC
address
One or more
valid VLAN
indexes
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
VLANs)
One or more
valid bridge
port numbers
–
? (to display a
port summary)
MAC address that you want to A valid MAC
add to the selected port
address
–
bridge port address remove
bridge port address
remove
295
Removes individual MAC addresses from the address table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
b po a r
Important Consideration
■
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
This command is typically used to remove only static MAC addresses,
because the bridge could relearn a dynamic MAC address shortly after
you remove it.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
indexes
(only if in
allClosed
mode)
Index numbers of the VLANs to
which the desired bridge ports
belong
Possible Values
MAC
address
MAC address that you want to A valid MAC
remove
address
■
■
■
One or more
valid VLAN
indexes
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
VLANs)
–
296
CHAPTER 10: BRIDGE PORT PARAMETERS
bridge port address
find
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Displays the bridge port (as well as the vlan index number if the system is
in allClosed mode) that is associated with a specified MAC address.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b po a fi
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
MAC
address
MAC address (canonical
address) that you want to find
on the system
A valid MAC
address
–
bridge port address flushAll
bridge port address
flushAll
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
297
Removes all static and dynamic MAC addresses from the bridge ports
that you select. Static MAC addresses are those that you specified using
the bridge port address add option. Dynamic MAC addresses are
those that the bridge learned automatically.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b po a flusha
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Consideration
■
If the bridge is power cycled, reset, or rebooted, the address table is
automatically flushed.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
indexes
(only if in
allClosed
mode)
Index numbers of the VLANs to
which the desired bridge ports
belong
Bridge ports Bridge ports for which you
want to remove all addresses
Possible Values
■
■
■
■
■
One or more
valid VLAN
indexes
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
VLANs)
One or more
valid bridge
port numbers
? (to display a
port summary)
–
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CHAPTER 10: BRIDGE PORT PARAMETERS
bridge port address
flushDynamic
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Removes all dynamic MAC addresses from the bridge ports that you
select. Dynamic MAC addresses are those that the bridge learned by
receiving and processing packets.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b po a flushd
Important Consideration
■
If the bridge is power cycled, reset, or rebooted, the address table is
automatically flushed.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
indexes
(only if in
allClosed
mode)
Index numbers of the VLANs to
which the desired bridge ports
belong
Bridge ports Bridge ports for which you
want to remove all addresses
Possible Values
■
■
■
■
■
One or more
valid VLAN
indexes
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
VLANs)
One or more
valid bridge
port numbers
? (to display a
port summary)
–
11
TRUNKS
You can configure a system to aggregate multiple network links into a
single trunk. With trunking you can create high-speed point-to-point or
multipoint connections without changing or replacing existing cabling. In
addition, trunking provides automatic point-to-point redundancy
between two devices. Redundant links normally have one link disabled by
Spanning Tree (to prevent looping); trunking utilizes both links.
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
configure trunking in your system.
The system treats trunked bridge ports in the same way that it treats
normal individual bridge ports. Also, all higher-level network functions —
including Spanning Tree algorithms, virtual LANs (VLANs), and Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP) management — do not
distinguish a trunk from any other network port. Unlike for any other
network port, the system automatically distributes traffic across the ports
that are associated with a trunk. If any of the trunk’s ports go down or
up, the system automatically redistributes traffic across the new
arrangement of operational ports.
For more trunking information, see the Implementation Guide for your
system.
Trunks can work with MultiPoint Link Aggregation (MPLA). MPLA is a
feature for the CoreBuilder® 9400 that increases the capacity and
availability of campus LAN cores without using complex, meshed router
networks. Functioning at Layer 2, MPLA provides both dual-homed link
resiliency and automatic load sharing over point-to-multipoint backbone
connections. MPLA increases network availability using scalable Gigabit
Ethernet connections among multiple campus switches. For more
information about MPLA and trunking, see the CoreBuilder 9400
Implementation Guide.
300
CHAPTER 11: TRUNKS
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
management
ethernet
fddi
➧ bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
bridge menu
display
ipFragmentation
ipxSnapTranslation
addressThreshold
agingTime
spanningTree
gvrpState
cos
port
multicast
packetFilter
vlan
➧ trunk
mpla
link
trunk menu
➧ autoMap
summary
detail
define
modify
remove
automap menu
summary
enable
disable
test
bridge trunk autoMap summary
bridge trunk
autoMap summary
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
301
Displays a list of slot numbers that have been selected to support
automatic backplane trunking.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b t a
Important Considerations
■
Automatic backplane trunking is supported only through the switch
fabric modules and managed interface modules.
■
The Gigabit Ethernet (GEN) Switch Fabric Module (Model
Number 3CB9FG24T) has 24 non-blocking Gigabit Ethernet ports that
connect to the chassis backplane to provide high-speed, low-latency
connectivity between CoreBuilder 9000 interface modules.
■
The GEN Switch Fabric Module supports port trunking for 12 groups,
with up to six ports in a group.
Fields in the Bridge Trunk autoMap Summary Display
Field
Description
Slot number
Port numbers selected to be in the trunk.
AutoMap status
Whether the autoMap on the slot is enabled or
disabled
302
CHAPTER 11: TRUNKS
bridge trunk
autoMap
enable/disable
Dynamic backplane trunking provides automatic backplane trunking on
the switch fabric modules and managed interface modules.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
b t a e
Important Considerations
■
You can enable or disable the autoMap function on slots.
■
All trunking is performed through the switch fabric module.
■
Do not perform backplane trunking through the interface modules.
■
When you enable autoMap on a module in a specific slot, the switch
fabric module verifies that the switch fabric module and the interface
module’s backplane configuration support dynamic backplane
mapping.
■
When you disable autoMap on a module in a specific slot, the switch
fabric module verifies that the interface module’s backplane
configuration is compatible with that of the switch fabric module’s
backplane.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Slot number
Slot number to choose to
enable or disable autoMap
function
One slot number
–
bridge trunk autoMap test
bridge trunk
autoMap test
3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
303
Indicates what happens when you do a reset on the switch fabric module
when autoMap is enabled.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b t a t
Important Consideration
■
After you enable or disable a module for automatic backplane
trunking, the switch fabric module verifies that the interface module’s
backplane configuration is compatible or not compatible to the switch
fabric’s configuration.
■
If autoMap is enabled on the desired interface module, then the
switch fabric module verifies that the switch fabric and interface
module’s backplane configuration satisfies the requirements of
automatic backplane trunking. If the switch fabric module and
interface module satisfy requirements, then no reset is required. If
not, then the switch fabric module determines if the interface
module must reconfigure to support backplane configuration
requirements. If the switch fabric module or interface module must
reconfigure, then a message is sent to the user that a reset is
required:
Fabric reset required for trunk configuration to be
effective for the module in slot x.
■
If autoMap is disabled, the switch fabric module verifies that the
interface module’s backplane configuration is compatible to the
switch fabric’s configuration. If the interface module is compatible
to the switch fabric module’s backplane configuration, then no
reset is required. If not, then the switch fabric module determines if
the interface module can support the defined switch fabric
module’s backplane configuration.
If the interface module can, then a message is sent to the interface
module with the desired backplane port configuration. Otherwise,
the switch fabric module will modify its configuration and a
message is sent to the user that a reset is required:
Fabric reset required for trunk configuration to be
effective for the module in slot x.
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CHAPTER 11: TRUNKS
bridge trunk
summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Displays summary information about configured trunks on your system.
In a summary report, the system displays the trunk name and index
number, the ports defined in that trunk, whether the Trunk Control
Message Protocol (TCMP) is enabled or disabled, and whether the port
link is up or down.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b t s
Fields in the Bridge Trunk Summary Display
Field
Description
Index
Identifying number that the system assigned to the trunk.
You can select all or one trunk.
Name
Trunk name that you defined.
Ports
Port numbers in the trunk.
State
Whether the trunk is up or down
TCMP
Whether the Trunk Control Message Protocol (TCMP) is
enabled or disabled.
bridge trunk detail
bridge trunk detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
305
Displays detailed trunk information in addition to the summary
information.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b t det
Fields in the Bridge Trunk Detail Display
Field
Description
FlowC
For Gigabit Ethernet trunks, the flow control setting (on,
off, rxOn, txOn). For other media types, the field
contains n/a to indicate that flow control does not apply.
Index
Identifying number for the system or module that the
system assigned to the trunk.
Missing
Number of ports that are configured for the trunk, but are
missing because an interface module is inaccessible.
Mode
Operating mode: 100half or 100full for Fast
Ethernet and 1000full for Gigabit Ethernet.
Name
Trunk name that you defined.
Node trunk id
TCMP identifier that the system assigned to the trunk.
Node trunk id list
Node trunk identifications that each port has detected on
the trunk.
Ports
Ports in the trunk. The second half of the display lists each
individual port in each trunk.
Present
Number of ports that participate in the trunk.
rxBadType
Number of TCMP messages received that contain a bad
TCMP Type field.
rxBadVersion
Number of TCMP messages received that contain a bad
TCMP version number.
rxFrames
Number of TCMP messages that were received on each
port.
rxHellos
Number of TCMP helloMessages that were received on
each port.
rxOverflow
Number of times that TCMP has detected a TCMP trunk
configuration that exceeds the eight-node maximum.
rxSameTrunkId
Number of times that TCMP has received a helloMessage
that contains the TCMP agent’s own Node trunk id (an
illegal configuration).
Selected node trunk id
list
Node trunk identifications that are selected for use on the
trunk.
State
Whether the trunk is up or down.
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CHAPTER 11: TRUNKS
Field
Description
TCMP
Whether TCMP is enabled or disabled for the trunk.
Tcmpstate
TCMP state for each port in the trunk:
■
■
■
notInUse — Not selected for use in the trunk
selected — Selected for use in the trunk, but not
yet active in the trunk
inUse — Active in the trunk
Trunk state
State (up or down) of each port link in the trunk.
txFrames
Number of TCMP messages that were transmitted on
each port.
txHellos
Number of TCMP helloMessages that were transmitted on
each port.
Type
The network type that you assigned to the ports in the
trunk (for example, FDDI, Fast_Ethernet, or
Gigabit_Ethernet).
bridge trunk define
bridge trunk define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
307
Defines one or more trunks on the system. When you define a trunk, you
specify ports and characteristics for the trunk.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b t def
Important Considerations
■
If you have more than one media type on your system (for example,
Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI), Fast Ethernet, and Gigabit
Ethernet), you are prompted for a media type before you are
prompted for the trunk information.
■
All links to be trunked must be homogeneous. For example, you
cannot mix Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet links in a trunk.
■
If you have already defined other trunks on your system, you cannot
select ports that are part of an existing trunk.
■
In general, create trunks before you define your virtual LANs (VLANs).
If you create a trunk whose ports are part of existing VLANs, the VLAN
bridge port configuration changes. For example, if you have the
default VLAN as well as IP VLANs and you then define a trunk with
ports in one of the IP VLANs, the system removes those ports from
that VLAN and places them in the default VLAN. You must modify the
VLAN and add the new bridge ports to the appropriate VLAN. This
situation does not apply if you have only the default VLAN (all ports
are part of the default VLAN).
■
When you define a VLAN to include trunk ports, specify the anchor
port (lowest-numbered port) that is associated with the trunk.
■
Do not use Gigabit Ethernet (GEN) Interface modules (such as the
2-port 1000BASE-SX Gigabit Ethernet (GEN) Interface Module) when
defining trunks.
■
Enter ? to see the port summary (for example, to indicate whether
there are ports associated with FDDI Dual Attach Station (DAS) pairs),
and then enter the appropriate port numbers. To specify an FDDI DAS
pair, specify the lowest-numbered port in the DAS pair.
■
The number of trunk groups and the number of ports within a trunk
group depend on your system. See the Options table.
The 3CB9FG24T switch fabric module supports up to 12 trunk groups
on the CoreBuilder 9000.
308
CHAPTER 11: TRUNKS
■
If you are working with Gigabit Ethernet modules in a SuperStack II
Switch, keep in mind that each Gigabit Ethernet module uses an
internal trunk resource towards the limit of four. You can trunk Gigabit
Ethernet modules together (each with one port) to consolidate the
Gigabit trunk resources. If you have four trunks defined and you add a
Gigabit Ethernet module to the system, after a boot, the system
reports that the configuration is incompatible. You must delete one of
the existing trunks.
■
You must reboot the module at the end of the trunk definition
process. (You can define multiple trunks in one bridge trunk define
operation.) On the CoreBuilder® 9000, rebooting a module returns
you to the EME prompt, which requires you to reconnect to the
module.
■
The following considerations apply to the trunk clustering function,
MultiPoint Link Aggregation (MPLA), in the CoreBuilder 9400 system:
■
■
When you configure a new switch, define multipoint aggregated
links and reboot the system before you define other trunks and
VLANs on the switch.
On a reboot, existing trunks and VLANs are deleted, and the
default VLAN is restored. Trunked ports that were part of a VLAN
before reboot are moved to the default VLAN. You must then
redefine trunks or VLANs that you want to continue to use. See
Chapter 11.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Mac type
Media type for the trunk.
(if you
have more
than one)
Depends on your
configuration:
–
■
FDDI
■
Fast_Ethernet
■
Gigabit_Ethernet
■
10/100BASE-TX
■
100BASE-FX
■
1000BASE-SX
■
? (for a list of selectable
media types)
bridge trunk define
Prompt
Description
Ports
Total number of the bridge 9000:
–
ports that you want to be
Layer 2 modules support up
■
part of the trunk.
to 4 trunk groups with up
to 6 ports per trunk
Possible Values
■
Layer 3 modules support up
to 3 trunk groups with up
to 6 ports per trunk
The 6-port SAS (3-port
DAS) FDDI Layer 3 supports
3 trunk groups. In SAS
mode the trunks can
contain up to 6 ports. In
DAS mode, the trunks can
contain up to 3 ports.
■
The FGA24 switch fabric
module supports up to
4 trunk groups with up to
6 ports per trunk and the
FGA24T and GA9 switch
fabric modules support up
to 12 trunk groups with up
to 6 ports per trunk
(The GA9 cannot support
12 trunk groups because
there are not enough ports
on this module.)
3500:
■
Supports up to 4 trunk
groups with up to 8 ports
per trunk
3900:
■
Supports up to 4 trunk
groups with up to 6 ports
per trunk
9300 and 9400:
■
■
■
Supports up to 12 trunk
groups with up to 6 ports
per trunk
all
? (for a list of selectable
ports)
309
[Default]
310
CHAPTER 11: TRUNKS
Prompt
Description
Mode
Operating mode for the
trunk.
Possible Values
■
■
Flow
control
Trunk
name
TCMP
Flow control setting
(Ethernet only)
on
■
off
■
rxOn (Gigabit Ethernet)
■
txOn (Gigabit Ethernet)
■
Use quotation marks (")
around any string with
embedded spaces.
■
■
■
[Default]
–
10half, 10full, 100half,
100full (for platforms that
support 10 Mbps Ethernet)
■
Name of the trunk.
Trunk Control Message
Protocol (TCMP). Performs
the following functions:
100half, 100full (for Fast
Ethernet)
off
Maximum 32 alphanumeric –
characters
? (for a list of selectable
names)
■
enabled
■
disabled
enabled
Detects and corrects
trunks that violate
trunk configuration
rules
Ensures orderly
activation and
deactivation of trunk
ports
Procedure
You can define all trunks in one bridge trunk define operation and
then reboot. At the end of each trunk definition, the system prompts you
to define another trunk.
1 If you have more than one media type on your system, enter the media
type (for example, Fast_Ethernet or Gigabit_Ethernet).
2 Enter the ports that you want to be part of the trunk.
To get information about the selectable ports, enter ?
3 Enter the correct operating mode for 10/100 Ethernet ports.
If you are configuring a Fast Ethernet trunk, select the Fast Ethernet port
mode (100half, 100full).
4 For an Ethernet trunk, enter the flow control setting (on, off, rxOn, or
txOn).
bridge trunk define
311
5 Enter the trunk name, or to get information about specifying the trunk
name, enter ?
6 Specify whether TCMP is enabled or disabled.
The system indicates that the trunk definition is complete and allows you
to define additional trunks until you reach the system trunk limit.
7 At the system prompt, to define another trunk enter y (yes) or to end the
trunk sequence, enter n (no).
You must then reboot to enable the trunks to take effect.
Bridge Trunk Define Example (9000)
The example shows a define operation that creates two trunks.
Select menu option: bridge trunk define
Select mac type {Fast_Ethernet,Gigabit_Ethernet|?}: Fast_Ethernet
Select ports (14-19|all|?): 14-18
Enter mode {100half,100full|?}: 100full
Enter trunk name {?} []: “Trunk_1”
Enter TCMP state (disabled,enabled) [enabled]: enabled
Trunk definition complete
Define another trunk? (y,n) [n]: y
Select mac type {Fast_Ethernet,Gigabit_Ethernet|?}: Fast_Ethernet
Select up to 8 ports (1-12|?): 1-6
Enter trunk name {?} []: Trunk2
Enter TCMP state (disabled,enabled) [enabled]:enabled
Trunk definition complete
The configuration of the ports will be modified.
The system must be rebooted to complete trunk configuration.
This may take a few minutes.
Are you sure you want to reboot the system? (n,y) [y]: y
312
CHAPTER 11: TRUNKS
bridge trunk modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Changes a trunk in either of two ways:
■
Modifies a trunk’s characteristics (for example, a Fast Ethernet
operating mode or the Trunk Control Message Protocol (TCMP) state).
■
Adds or removes a port from the trunk, as long as you maintain at
least one of the original ports in the trunk.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b t m
Important Considerations
■
Keep at least one port that you defined in the original trunk. To
completely redefine a trunk configuration, remove the trunk and
define a new one.
■
You cannot modify, add, or remove ports that are part of different
trunks from the trunk that you are modifying.
■
To avoid configuration errors, do not modify Fiber Distributed Data
Interface (FDDI) station mode port pairs when any of the ports in the
pair are members of a trunk.
■
If you have more than one media type on your system (for example,
Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet), you are prompted for a media
type before you are prompted for the trunk information.
■
Any changes that you make to the trunk’s characteristics take effect
immediately and do not interrupt trunk operations. If you add or
remove a port, however, you must reboot the system to implement
the change.
bridge trunk modify
■
313
In an FDDI trunk:
■
■
You cannot modify FDDI station mode port pairs when any of the
ports in the pair are in a trunk.
When you modify the station mode, any FDDI ports that are
associated with virtual LANs (VLANs) or a trunk are removed from
the VLAN or trunk.
■
Within a trunk, you cannot change certain port characteristics, such as
FDDI station mode. For example, in an FDDI trunk, you cannot change
a trunked DAS (dual attach station) port to an SAS (single attach
station) port or an SAS port to a DAS port.
■
If you change an FDDI port pair from SAS to DAS, you select the pair
using just the lower of the two port numbers, just as with a trunk
anchor port.
Options
Prompt
Description
Trunk index
Index number of the trunk
that you want to modify
Possible Values
■
■
One or more trunks
? (for a list of selectable
trunk indexes)
[Default]
–
314
CHAPTER 11: TRUNKS
Prompt
Description
Ports
Total number of the bridge 9000:
Currently
ports that you want to be
configured
Layer 2 modules support
■
part of the trunk
ports
up to 4 trunk groups
with up to 6 ports per
trunk
Possible Values
■
Layer 3 modules support
up to 3 trunk groups
with up to 6 ports per
trunk
The 6-port SAS (3-port
DAS) FDDI Layer 3
supports 3 trunk groups.
In SAS mode the trunks
can contain up to 6
ports. In DAS mode, the
trunks can contain up to
3 ports.
■
The FGA24 switch fabric
module supports up to
4 trunk groups with up
to 6 ports per trunk and
the FGA24T switch
fabric module supports
up to 12 trunk groups
with up to 6 ports per
trunk
(The GA9 cannot
support 12 trunk groups
because there are not
enough ports on this
module.)
3500:
■
Supports up to 4 trunk
groups with up to 8
ports per trunk
3900:
■
Supports up to 4 trunk
groups with up to 6
ports per trunk
9300 and 9400:
■
■
Supports up to 12 trunk
groups with up to 6
ports per trunk
all
[Default]
bridge trunk modify
Prompt
Description
Mode
Operating mode for a
10/100 Ethernet trunk
Possible Values
■
■
Flow control Flow control setting for a
(Gigabit
Gigabit Ethernet trunk
Ethernet
only)
Trunk name Name of the trunk.
Use quotation marks (")
around any string with
embedded spaces.
TCMP
Trunk Control Message
Protocol (TCMP). Performs
the following functions:
■
■
Detects and corrects
trunks that violate
trunk configuration
rules
Ensures orderly
activation and
deactivation of trunk
ports
10half, 10full, 100half,
100full (for platforms
that support 10 Mbps
Ethernet)
on
■
off
■
rxOn
■
txOn
■
[Default]
100half, 100full (for Fast Current
Ethernet)
mode
■
■
315
Current
value
Maximum 32
Current
alphanumeric characters trunk name
? (for a list of selectable
trunk names)
■
enabled
■
disabled
enabled
(factory
default), or
current
TCMP state
316
CHAPTER 11: TRUNKS
Procedure
To modify trunk information for a bridge, follow these steps:
1 Enter the trunk index number, or to display the selectable trunks, enter ?
The system shows the media type for the trunk (for example,
Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, or FDDI).
2 At the prompt, enter the ports that you want to be part of the trunk, or
to display a port summary, enter ?
The maximum number of ports per trunk is 8 (for the CoreBuilder 3500
and the CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 modules).
3 To change the 10/100 operating mode, enter the new operating mode,
or to display information about the selectable values, enter ?
For Fast Ethernet, you can select 100 Mbps, running in half-duplex or
full-duplex mode. All ports in the trunk are set to the specified operating
mode.
4 To change the flow control setting for a Gigabit Ethernet trunk only, enter
a new flow control setting
5 To change the name of the trunk, enter the new name, or to view
information on how to specify a trunk name, enter ?
The name can have up to 32 characters. Use quotation marks around any
character string that has embedded spaces.
6 Enter the TCMP state. The system default is enabled.
If you modified the port information, the system displays a message to
inform you that the port configuration will change and then displays a
reboot prompt.
7 At the system prompt, to reboot the system, enter y (yes) and implement
the new trunk information, or to return to the previous menu, enter
n (no).
Entering n (no) cancels the trunk changes. The system reports that it is
unable to continue with the trunk configuration.
bridge trunk modify
Bridge Trunk Modify Example (9000)
Select menu option: bridge trunk modify
Select trunk index {1-3|?}: ?
Selectable trunks
selection
1
2
3
ports
7,8,12
1,2,4,19
3,14,17,18
name
trunk1
trunk2
trunk3
Select trunk index {1-3|?}: 2
Fast Ethernet
Select ports (1,2,5,6,15,16,19|all|?) [1,2,19]: 1,2
Enter trunk name {?} [trunk2]:
Enter TCMP state (disabled,enabled) [enabled]:
The configuration of the ports will be modified.
Are you sure you want to reboot the system? (n,y) [y]:
317
318
CHAPTER 11: TRUNKS
bridge trunk remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Removes a previously defined trunk. You can remove one or more trunks
with this command.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b t r
Important Considerations
■
The number of trunk groups and the number of ports within a trunk
group depend on your system. See the Options table. However,
because each Gigabit Ethernet module uses an internal trunk resource
towards the limit of four (Gigabit Ethernet only), keep in mind how
many trunk resources you have when you remove trunks. For example,
if you have a trunk with two Gigabit Ethernet ports (which
consolidates two Gigabit trunk resources into one) as well as three
other trunks, and you then try to remove the Gigabit Ethernet trunk,
you will exceed the trunk resource limit. (The Gigabit Ethernet ports
use two trunk resources.) The system reports that it is unable to
remove the trunk because the trunk resource limit would be exceeded.
■
Removing a trunk requires a module reboot. For CoreBuilder 9000
modules, rebooting a module returns you to the EME prompt, which
requires you to reconnect to the module.
Options
Prompt
Description
Trunk index
Index number of the trunk that
you want to remove
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
valid trunk
index number
all
? (for a list of
selectable trunk
indexes)
[Default]
–
bridge trunk remove
319
Bridge Trunk Remove Example (9000)
Select menu option: bridge trunk remove
CB9000@slot10.1 [12-E/FEN-TX-L3] (bridge/trunk) remove
Select trunk index(s) {1-2|all|?}: 2
The configuration of the ports will be modified.
The module must be rebooted to complete trunk configuration.
This may take a few minutes.
Are you sure you want to reboot the system? (n,y) [y]:y
320
CHAPTER 11: TRUNKS
12
MULTIPOINT LINK AGGREGATION
(MPLA)
MultiPoint Link Aggregation (MPLA) increases the capacity and availability
of campus LAN cores without using complex, meshed router networks.
Functioning at Layer 2, MPLA provides both dual-homed link resiliency
and automatic load sharing over point-to-multipoint backbone
connections. MPLA increases network availability using scalable Gigabit
Ethernet connections among multiple campus switches.
For more information about MPLA and trunking, see the
CoreBuilder 9400 Implementation Guide.
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
➧ bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
bridge menu
display
ipFragmentation
ipxSnapTranslation
addressThreshold
agingTime
spanningTree
gvrpState
cos
port
multicast
packetFilter
vlan
trunk
➧ mpla
link
mpla menu
summary
detail
mode
peerMacAddress
322
CHAPTER 12: MULTIPOINT LINK A GGREGATION (MPLA)
bridge mpla summary
Describes the state of the multipoint aggregated link.
3500
9000
✓ 9400
b mp s
3900
9300
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
Fields in the Bridge MPLA Summary Display
Field
Description
Mode
Whether MPLA is enabled on the switch. Possible values
are enabled and disabled. The default is disabled.
Peer Switch Interface
State
The state (up or down) of the out-of-band management
port on the other (peer) switch in the MPLA core.
bridge mpla detail
bridge mpla detail
3500
9000
✓ 9400
3900
9300
323
Displays the trunk state and node trunk IDs for the switch ports.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b mp d
Fields in the Bridge MPLA Detail Display
Field
Description
Mode
Whether MPLA is enabled on the switch. Possible values
are enabled and disabled. The default is disabled.
324
CHAPTER 12: MULTIPOINT LINK A GGREGATION (MPLA)
bridge mpla mode
3500
9000
✓ 9400
3900
9300
Enables or disables the MultiPoint Link Aggregation feature on the
switch.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b mp m
Important Considerations
■
Use only CoreBuilder 9400 systems as MPLA core switches.
The core of a multipoint aggregated link must contain two 9400
switches, whose out-of-band management ports also must be directly
connected.
■
Use only Switch 3900 devices as edge switches.
Each MPLA edge switch must have at least one physical link to each
core switch. Multiple trunked links may connect an edge and core
switch, for added bandwidth
■
Use only Gigabit Ethernet links between MPLA core switches and
edge switches.
■
All links from an edge switch to the MPLA core switches must be
aggregated (trunked) at the edge switch.
■
While the Trunk Control Message Protocol (TCMP) is optional in
point-to-point trunks, you must configure it to run on all of the
point-to-multipoint links between MPLA edge switches and core
switches.
■
You can enable these features in MPLA edge switches, but not in
MPLA core switches:
■
■
Spanning Tree
■
IGMP snooping
■
Resilient links
■
Roving analysis port
When you configure a new MPLA core switch, define MPLA
configurations and reboot the switch before you define other trunks
and VLANs on the switch.
bridge mpla mode
325
Procedure
1 To enable MultiPoint Link Aggregation on the switch, use the bridge
mpla mode enable command.
To disable MultiPoint Link Aggregation on the switch, use the bridge
mpla mode disable command.
2 Select the ports that you want to be part of the multipoint aggregated
link using the bridge trunk define command, as described in
Chapter 11.
3 Reboot the switch to implement the multipoint aggregated link selection.
On reboot, existing trunks and VLANs are deleted, and the default VLAN
is restored.
326
CHAPTER 12: MULTIPOINT LINK A GGREGATION (MPLA)
bridge mpla
peerMacAddress
3500
9000
✓ 9400
3900
9300
Specifies the MAC address of the out-of-band management port of the
attached CoreBuilder 9400 switch in the MPLA core (the peer core
switch).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b mp p
Important Considerations
■
You execute this command on each of the two CoreBuilder 9400
switches in the MPLA core.
■
In each core switch, you use this command to specify the MAC
address for the out-of-band management port of the attached peer
switch.
You must use this management port to connect a crossover Ethernet
cable to the out-of-band management port on the switch you are
presently configuring.
■
The input format for this MAC address is 00-00-00-00-00-00
13
RESILIENT LINKS
Resilient links protect your network against the failure of an individual
link or device by providing a secondary backup link that is inactive until it
is needed.
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
configure resilient links in your system.
For more information about resilient links, see the Implementation Guide
for your system.
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
➧ bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
bridge menu
display
ipFragmentation
ipxSnapTranslation
addressThreshold
agingTime
spanningTree
gvrpState
cos
port
multicast
packetFilter
vlan
trunk
mpla
➧ link
link menu
summary
detail
define
linkState
activePort
modify
remove
328
CHAPTER 13: RESILIENT LINKS
bridge link summary
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Displays summary information about configured resilient links on your
system. In a summary report, the system displays the index number, link
name, and whether the link is up or down.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
b l s
Fields in the Bridge Link Summary Display
Field
Description
Index
Number that the system assigned to the resilient link pair.
You can select all resilient link pairs or one resilient link
pair.
Name
Name of the defined resilient link pair.
State
Whether the resilient link pair is up or down.
bridge link detail
bridge link detail
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
329
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Displays detailed link information in addition to the summary
information.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b l det
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Fields in the Bridge Link Detail Display
Field
Description
Active Port
Port that carries network traffic
Enable State
Whether the resilient pair is enabled or disabled
Index
Number that the system assigned to the resilient link pair.
You can select all resilient link pairs or one resilient link
pair.
Main Link
Link state (up or down) of the main link
Main Port
Main resilient link port
Name
Name of the defined link
Standby Link
Link state (up or down) of the standby link
Standby Port
Standby resilient link port to which traffic shifts if the
main resilient link port fails
State
Whether the resilient link pair is up or down
330
CHAPTER 13: RESILIENT LINKS
bridge link define
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Defines one or more links on the system. When you define a link, you
specify ports and characteristics for the link.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b l def
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
Connect the network cable to the resilient link ports after you reboot
the system; failure to do so may create a bridge loop in your network.
■
In general, create resilient links before you define your virtual LANs
(VLANs). If you plan to create resilient links for part of a VLAN, create
the resilient links before you create the VLAN.
■
When you create a resilient link that includes ports that are part of a
VLAN, those ports are removed from the VLAN. You must modify the
VLAN and add the new bridge port to the appropriate VLAN. This
situation does not apply to the default VLAN (all ports are part of the
default VLAN).
■
If you have already defined other resilient links or trunks on your
system, you cannot select ports that are part of an existing resilient
link pair or a trunk.
■
You must reboot the system at the end of the link definition process.
(You can define multiple links in one define operation.)
■
The resilient link port pair uses a single MAC address for frames
sourced by this pair.
■
The resilient link name can be up to 32 alphanumeric characters.
bridge link define
331
Options
Prompt
Description
Resilient link Name of the link. Use
name
quotation marks around any
character string that contains
spaces
Possible Values
[Default]
Maximum 32
–
alphanumeric characters
Main Port
Main port that you want to be Any of the available
part of the link.
ports on the system
–
Standby
Port
Standby port that you want to Any of the available
be part of the link.
ports on the system
–
Define
another
link?
Whether you want to define
another link.
n
Reboot the
system?
Resilient links that you define
do not take effect until you
reboot the system.
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
y
Procedure
You can define all links in one bridge link define operation and then
reboot. At the end of each link definition, the system prompts you to
define another link.
1 Enter the link name, or to get information about specifying the link
name, enter ?
2 Select the port that you want to be the main port.
To get information about the selectable ports, enter ?
3 Select the port that you want to be the standby port.
To get information about the selectable ports, enter ?
4 At the system prompt, to define another link enter y (yes), or to end the
link define sequence, enter n (no).
You must reboot for the links to take effect.
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CHAPTER 13: RESILIENT LINKS
bridge link linkState
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Sets the linkState value (enabled or disabled) for a specific resilient link.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b l l
Important Considerations
■
When the bridge link linkState option is enabled, the resilient link
transmits or receives frames.
■
When the bridge link linkState option is disabled, the resilient
link no longer transmits or receives frames.
Options
Prompt
Description
Resilient link Index number of the resilient
index
link that you want to modify
Possible Values
■
■
■
linkState
value
Whether you want the resilient
link for the selected link index
to transmit and receive frames
[Default]
Depends on
–
configured links
? (for a list of
selectable link
indexes)
A valid link
number
■
all
■
enable
■
disable
–
bridge link activePort
bridge link activePort
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Sets either the main port or the standby port as the active port. The active
port carries the network traffic.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b l a
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
333
Options
Prompt
Description
Resilient link Index number of the link
index
whose active port you want to
set
Possible Values
■
■
■
Active port
state
Port that you want to carry
network traffic
[Default]
Depends on
–
configured links
? (for a list of
selectable link
indexes)
A valid link
number
■
all
■
main
■
standby
–
334
CHAPTER 13: RESILIENT LINKS
bridge link modify
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Modifies the link name, as well as the main port and standby port, of a
defined resilient link.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b l m
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
Connect the network cable to the resilient link port after you reboot
the system.
■
In general, create links before you define your Virtual LANs (VLANs). If
you plan to create resilient links for part of a VLAN, create the resilient
links before you create the VLAN.
■
When you create a resilient link that includes ports that are part of a
VLAN, those ports are removed from the VLAN. You must modify the
VLAN and add the new bridge port to the appropriate VLAN. This
situation does not apply to the default VLAN (all ports are part of the
default VLAN).
■
If you have already defined other links or trunks on your system, you
cannot select ports that are part of an existing link or a trunk.
■
You must reboot the system at the end of the link definition process.
(You can define multiple links in one define operation.)
■
The resilient link port pair uses a single MAC address for frames
sourced by this pair.
■
The resilient link name can be up to 32 alphanumeric characters.
bridge link modify
335
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Resilient link New resilient link name. Use
name
quotation marks around any
character string that has
embedded spaces.
Maximum 32
–
alphanumeric characters
Main port
New port to be the main port
of the defined resilient link.
Any of the available
ports on the system
–
Standby
port
New port to be the standby
port of the defined resilient
link.
Any of the available
ports on the system
–
Define
another
link?
Whether you want to define
another link.
Reboot the
system?
Resilient links that you define
do not take effect until you
reboot the system.
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
n
y
336
CHAPTER 13: RESILIENT LINKS
bridge link remove
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 2 switching modules only.
Removes a previously defined resilient link pair. You can remove one or
more resilient link pairs with this command.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b l r
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Consideration
■
Removing a link requires that you reboot the system.
Options
Prompt
Description
Resilient link Index number of the resilient
index
link pair that you want to
remove
Possible Values
■
■
[Default]
Depends on
–
configured links
? (for a list of
selectable link
indexes)
Bridge Link Remove Example
Select menu option: bridge link remove
Select link index(s) (1-2|all|?): 2
The configuration of the ports will be modified.
The system must be rebooted to complete resilient link
configuration.
This may take a few minutes.
Are you sure you want to reboot the system? (n,y) [y]: y
14
VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
A virtual LAN (VLAN) is a logical definition of a network work group. It is
roughly equivalent to a broadcast domain. A VLAN interface is your
system’s point of attachment to a given VLAN. A VLAN and a VLAN
interface are analogous to an IP subnetwork and an IP interface.
For more information about VLANs, see the Implementation Guide for
your system.
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
➧ bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
bridge menu
display
ipFragmentation
ipxSnapTranslation
addressThreshold
agingTime
spanningTree
gvrpState
cos
port
multicast
packetFilter
➧ vlan
trunk
mpla
link
vlan menu
summary
detail
define
modify
remove
mode
stpMode
vlanAwareMode
The bridge vlan stpMode command is available only when you enable
allClosed mode on the CoreBuilder® 3500 system or the
CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 switching modules. The command does not
appear when you are using the default VLAN mode (allOpen) or when
you use allClosed mode on a Layer 2 system or module.
338
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
bridge vlan summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Displays a summary of VLAN information. In a summary report, the
system displays the ports and protocols that are assigned to each VLAN.
Valid Minimum Abbreviations
b v s (in allOpen mode on Layer 2 or Layer 3 switches and modules)
b v su (in allClosed mode on Layer 3 switches and modules)
Important Considerations
■
The summary display lists the physical ports that are associated with
each VLAN interface. It does not indicate bridge port characteristics
(for example, trunked ports). See “bridge vlan detail” next for this
information.
■
The VLAN mode (shown in the Type field) affects VLANs as follows:
■
■
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500, CoreBuilder 9400, SuperStack® II
Switch 3900, and SuperStack II Switch 9300, the VLAN mode
affects all configured VLANs on the system. For the entire system,
the default VLAN mode is allOpen.
For the CoreBuilder 9000, the VLAN mode affects all VLANs that
are associated with a particular module (the switch fabric module,
or all VLANs on a switching module). For each module, the default
VLAN mode is allOpen.
As of Release 3.0.0, the CoreBuilder 3500 system and
CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 modules support one of three origins for a
VLAN:
■
■
■
If you explicitly create the VLAN with a bridge vlan define
operation, the origin of the VLAN is static.
If you create a router port IP interface (for which the system
automatically creates a router port VLAN), the origin of the router
port VLAN is router.
If you enable dynamic port-based VLAN configuration via the
GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP), the origin is GVRP.
bridge vlan summary
339
■
GVRP is based on IEEE 802.1Q and allows for dynamic configuration
of port-based VLANs. GVRP can help you simplify the management of
VLAN configurations in larger networks. Use the command
bridge port gvrpState to explicitly enable GVRP on the
participating bridge ports and use the command bridge gvrpState
to enable the bridge GVRP state for the entire system. The bridge
GVRP state enables you to control GVRP on the system without losing
the per-port GVRP state. By default, the GVRP state for the entire
system is disabled and the GVRP state for each bridge port is
disabled.
■
The system prompts you for a VLAN interface index number before it
displays the summary information.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN interface Index numbers
index
of the VLAN
interfaces for
which you want
summary
information
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more selectable VLAN
interface index numbers
all
[Default]
1 (if you
have only
one VLAN)
? (for a list of selectable
indexes)
Fields in the Bridge VLAN Summary Display
Field
Description
Index
System-assigned index number that identifies a VLAN of the
identified origin. Statistics appear in the display for the VLAN that
you specify.
Name
Character string of from 0 through 32 bytes that identifies the
VLAN. The default VLAN always uses the name Default.
340
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
Field
Description
Origin
For all Layer 2 systems or switching modules, the VLAN origin is
always static, which indicates that the user created the VLAN.
For the CoreBuilder® 3500 or CoreBuilder 9000, the origin
indicates one of the following:
■
■
■
Ports
static — The VLAN was created statically (user-configured
by using the bridge vlan define command).
router — The VLAN was created automatically by a outer port
IP interface (of router origin). You create a router port IP
interface using the ip interface define command with
the interface type port. You cannot modify or remove a router
port VLAN.
GVRP — The VLAN was created dynamically from a GVRP
update (GVRP). You must enable the GVRP state for the entire
system as a bridge-wide parameter and for the participating
bridge ports as a bridge-port parameter.
Index numbers of the bridge ports that belong to the VLAN, or the
bridge port that belongs to the router port IP interface.
On the CoreBuilder 9000, the list of ports includes the front-panel
ports and the appropriate backplane ports. Example: On a 12-port
Layer 3 module, the list of ports includes ports 1 – 12 and port 13,
which is the module’s backplane port.
Type (VLAN
mode)
Either allOpen or allClosed. VLANs in allOpen mode share a
single address table for all configured VLANs; in allClosed mode,
each VLAN has its own unique address table. Standard bridging
rules apply based on the table addresses that are assigned to the
specific VLAN. A router port IP interface requires that you put the
system in allClosed mode.
VID
Unique, user-defined integer (VLAN ID) that identifies this VLAN. It
is used by management operations. You can assign or modify a VID
that is associated with a static VLAN; you cannot modify the VID
selected automatically after you define a router port IP interface,
nor can you change the VID of the default VLAN. The default VLAN
requires a VID of 1.
VLAN Aware
Mode
Whether the VLAN aware mode (tagging mode) is allPorts or
taggedVlanPorts. The default for CoreBuilder 3500 Release
2.0 or later is allPorts; allPorts is also the default as of
(3500 and
CoreBuilder 9000 software Release 3.0. The value
9000 Layer 3)
taggedVlanPorts is a compatibility mode for VLANs configured
prior to CoreBuilder 3500 Release 2.0 and for VLANs configured on
CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 modules prior to CoreBuilder 9000
Release 3.0.
bridge vlan detail
bridge vlan detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
341
Displays per-port information such as tagging in addition to the VLAN
summary information. For the CoreBuilder 3500 and the
CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 switching modules, this command also displays
VLAN statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b v det
Important Considerations
■
The default VLAN always uses VLAN ID (VID) 1 and the name Default.
For Layer 3 systems and modules, it also uses the protocol type
unspecified.
■
The VLAN ID (VID) is used as the 802.1Q tag if tagging is enabled for a
port.
■
The VLAN statistics for the CoreBuilder 3500 and CoreBuilder 9000
Layer 3 switching modules are valid only under one of the following
conditions:
■
■
■
If the VLANs are defined for the same protocol type (or for the type
called unspecified) and do not share any ports. Example: IP
VLAN1 has ports 1 through 6 and IP VLAN2 has ports
7 through 12.
If the VLANs are explicitly defined for different protocol types. In
this case, the VLANs may share ports. Example: An IP VLAN and an
IPX VLAN both use ports 2 through 4.
As of Release 3.0.0, the CoreBuilder 3500 system and
CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 modules support one of three origins for a
VLAN:
■
■
■
If you explicitly create the VLAN with a bridge vlan define
operation, the origin of the VLAN is static.
If you create a router port IP interface (for which the system
automatically creates a router port VLAN), the origin of the router
port VLAN is router.
If you enable dynamic port-based VLAN configuration via the
GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP), the origin is GVRP.
342
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
■
GVRP is based on IEEE 802.1Q and allows for dynamic configuration
of port-based VLANs. GVRP can help you simplify the management of
VLAN configurations in larger networks. Use the command
bridge port gvrpState to explicitly enable GVRP on the
participating bridge ports and use the command bridge gvrpState
to enable the bridge GVRP state for the entire system. The bridge
GVRP state enables you to control GVRP on the system without losing
the per-port GVRP state. By default, the GVRP state for the entire
system is disabled and the GVRP state for each bridge port is
disabled.
■
The system prompts you for a VLAN interface index number before it
displays the detail information.
■
Either you can use network-based IP VLANs (by supplying Layer 3
address information when you configure a VLAN for IP), or you create
the IP VLAN and then define multiple IP interfaces per VLAN. See
Chapter 16.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN interface Index numbers of
index
the VLAN interfaces
for which you want
detailed information
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
selectable VLAN
interface index
numbers
[Default]
1 (if you
have only
one VLAN)
all
? (for a list of
selectable indexes)
Fields in the Bridge VLAN Detail Display
Field
Description
Ignore STP mode
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Whether a VLAN can ignore STP blocked ports and let
routing traffic pass through. Possible values: enabled
and disabled.
Index
System-assigned index number that identifies a VLAN.
Statistics appear for the VLAN that you specify.
Layer 3 addresses
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Information that is used to set up flood domains for
overlapping IP VLAN subnetworks (network-based
VLANs).
Name
Character string 0 through 32 bytes that identifies the
VLAN. The default VLAN always uses the name
Default.
bridge vlan detail
343
Field
Description
Origin
For all Layer 2 systems or switching modules, the VLAN
origin is always static, which indicates that the VLAN
was created by the user. For the CoreBuilder® 3500 or
CoreBuilder 9000, the origin indicates one of the
following:
■
■
■
Ports/Port
static — The VLAN was created statically
(user-configured by using the bridge vlan
define command).
router — The VLAN was created automatically by
the router port IP interface (of router origin). You
create a router port IP interface using the ip
interface define command with the interface
type port. You cannot modify or remove a router
port VLAN.
GVRP — The VLAN was created dynamically from a
GVRP update (GVRP). You must enable the GVRP
state for the entire system as a bridge-wide
parameter and for the participating bridge ports as a
bridge-port parameter.
Index numbers of the bridge ports that belong to each
VLAN. In the second part of the detail display, the Port
column lists the ports for the VLAN individually and
indicates ports that are trunked or have tagging.
On the CoreBuilder 9000, the list of ports includes the
front-panel ports and the appropriate backplane ports.
Example: On a 12-port Layer 3 module, the list of ports
includes ports 1 – 12 and port 13, which is the module’s
backplane port.
Protocol
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Protocol suites for the VLAN. VLANs that are associated
with router port IP interfaces always have IP as the
protocol type. The default VLAN always uses the
protocol type unspecified.
rxBcastBytes
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Number of received broadcast bytes
rxBcastFrames
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Number of received broadcast frames
rxMcastBytes
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Number of received multicast bytes
rxMcastFrames
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Number of received multicast frames
rxUcastBytes
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Number of received unicast bytes
rxUcastFrames
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Number of received unicast frames
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CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
Field
Description
Tag type
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Whether tagging is set to none or 802.1Q (IEEE
802.1Q tagging)
txBcastBytes
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Number of transmitted broadcast bytes
txBcastFrames
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Number of transmitted broadcast frames
txMcastBytes
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Number of transmitted multicast bytes
txMcastFrames
(3500 and 9000 Layer 3)
Number of transmitted multicast frames
Type (VLAN Mode)
Either allOpen or allClosed. VLANs in allOpen
mode share a single address table for all configured
VLANs. In allClosed mode, each VLAN has its own
unique address table. Standard bridging rules apply
based on the table addresses that are assigned to the
specific VLAN. Router port IP interfaces require
allClosed mode.
VID
Unique, user-defined integer (VLAN ID) that identifies
this VLAN. It is used by management operations. You
can assign or modify a VID that is associated with a
static VLAN; you cannot modify the VID selected
automatically after you define a router port IP interface,
nor can you change the VID of the default VLAN. The
default VLAN requires a VID of 1.
VLAN Aware Mode
(Layer 3 only)
Whether the VLAN aware mode (tagging mode) is
allPorts or taggedVlanPorts. The default for
CoreBuilder 3500 Release 2.0 or later is allPorts;
allPorts is also the default as of CoreBuilder 9000
software Release 3.0. The value taggedVlanPorts is
a compatibility mode for VLANs configured prior to
CoreBuilder 3500 Release 2.0 and for VLANs configured
on CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 modules prior to
CoreBuilder 9000 Release 3.0.
bridge vlan define (3500/9000 Layer 3)
bridge vlan define
(3500/9000 Layer 3)
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
345
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Creates a VLAN on the CoreBuilder 3500 system or a CoreBuilder 9000
Layer 3 module. When you explicitly configure a VLAN on the system, you
assign information such as a VLAN ID (VID), a set of bridge ports, and,
optionally, a protocol type and IEEE 802.1Q tagging.
9400
3900
9300
For details about this command on the SuperStack II Switch 3900, the
Switch 9300, the CoreBuilder 9400, and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 2
modules, see “bridge vlan define (3900/9300/9400/ 9000 Layer 2)” next.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b v def
Important Considerations
■
If you have previously defined your IP VLANs with Layer 3 address
information (that is, network-based VLANs), you can redefine your IP
VLANs without Layer 3 address information. To define multiple IP
interfaces per IP VLAN, use the ip interface define command. (See
Chapter 16.)
■
The VLAN that you create with this command is a static VLAN. To
establish routing between static IP VLANs, define your IP VLANs and
then use the ip interface define command to define an IP routing
interface. As of Release 3.0, you can also specify the interface type
vlan to create one or more IP routing interfaces for a static IP VLAN.
■
If you have a router port IP interface on the system, you cannot specify
the port that belongs to the router port IP interface when you
explicitly define an IP VLAN (or a VLAN that includes the IP protocol). A
router port IP interface is an alternative to static VLANs and allows
routing versus bridging. You create a router port IP interface by
entering the ip interface define command with the interface type
port and a single bridge port. A router port IP interface requires
allClosed mode. See Chapter 16 for more information.
346
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
■
You must specify a VID in the range from 2 through 4094. You can no
longer define a VLAN other than the default VLAN with a VID of 1.
VID 1 is reserved for the default VLAN only as of Release 3.0.0. (As of
Release 3.0.0, the default VLAN always uses the name Default and
the protocol type unspecified.) If you delete the default VLAN, you
can redefine it with VID 1 only.
■
You cannot delete a VLAN that has a routing interface associated with
it.
■
If you plan to use the trunking feature or the MPLA feature, define the
appropriate trunks before you define your VLANs. See Chapter 11 for
more information.
■
If you plan for your VLAN to include trunk ports, specify the anchor
port (lowest-numbered port) that is associated with the trunk. For
example, if ports 1 through 3 are associated with a trunk, specify 1 to
define the VLAN to include all of the physical ports in the trunk (ports
1 through 3). If you have not defined trunks, specify one or more port
numbers, or all to assign all ports to the VLAN interface.
■
If a port is shared by another VLAN, verify that if tagging is the only
distinguishing characteristic between the VLANs, the specified tag
type is not in conflict with the port’s tag type in another VLAN (that is,
there is only one port that is tagged none).
■
Do not use this command if you want GVRP to dynamically create
IEEE 802.1Q port-based VLANs. Instead, explicitly enable the GVRP
state for the participating ports and enable the GVRP state for the
entire system. To set the per-port GVRP state, use the bridge port
gvrpState. (See Chapter 10.) To set the bridge-wide GVRP state, use
the bridge gvrpState command. (See Chapter 9.)
■
Whether you are bridging or routing, you can select more than one
protocol suite per VLAN and specify one protocol at each of the
prompts. Use the protocol type of unspecified to create a port-based
VLAN.
■
The IPX protocol type IPX-802.2-SNAP is available for both the
CoreBuilder 3500 system and the CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 switching
modules.
■
For the CoreBuilder 9000, keep the following considerations in mind:
■
When you define a VLAN on a switching module (and other
switching modules in the system also define this VLAN), you must
define the VLAN on both the switching module and on the switch
fabric module.
bridge vlan define (3500/9000 Layer 3)
■
■
■
347
When you define the VLAN on the Layer 3 switching module, you
must specify any front-panel ports in the VLAN as well as the
module’s backplane port. The specified backplane port must also
be tagged if you have more than one VLAN and plan to
communicate with VLANs on other modules on the
CoreBuilder 9000 through the switch fabric module.
When you define the VLAN on the switch fabric module, you must
specify which switch fabric module backplane port is connected to
the module backplane port. The switch fabric module backplane
port must also be tagged if you have more than one VLAN.
When you use a Layer 3 switching module to establish routing
between VLANs on other switching modules, you can configure
the backplane port of the Layer 3 switching module as part of the
VLANs and then define a routing interface for each VLAN. One
VLAN equals one network or subnetwork.
■
For configurations that include FDDI ports, if you plan for your VLAN
to include FDDI DAS ports, you must specify the lowest-numbered
port in the DAS pair when defining the ports in the VLAN. See
Chapter 8.
■
Specify ? to see the port summary (for example, to see whether ports
are associated with a trunk), and then enter the appropriate port
numbers.
■
The VID is used as the IEEE 802.1Q tag if tagging is enabled for a port.
Options
Prompt
Description
VID
Unique, user-defined integer
used by management
operations
Possible Values
■
■
If the default
VLAN exists,
2 – 4094
If the default
VLAN does not
exist, 1 to
redefine the
default VLAN,
or 2 – 4094 for
other VLANs
[Default]
Next available
VID
348
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
Prompt
Description
Bridge ports
Index numbers of the bridge
ports that belong to the
VLAN. If you include trunked
ports, specify the anchor port
of the trunk. On the
CoreBuilder 9000, the list of
ports includes the front-panel
ports and the module’s
backplane port.
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more of
the ports that
are available to
be assigned to
the VLAN
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable ports)
When you define a VLAN that
includes the IP protocol type,
you cannot specify a port that
is owned by a router port IP
interface.
Protocol
suite
(for VLANs
other than
the default)
One or more protocol suites
that you want to specify for
the VLAN
The default VLAN always uses
the protocol type unspecified.
■
IP
■
IPX
■
Apple (for
AppleTalk)
■
XNS
■
DECnet
■
SNA
■
Vines
■
X.25
■
NETBEUI
■
unspecified
(Default VLAN
or a port-based
VLAN)
■
IPX-II
■
IPX-802.2
■
IPX-802.3
■
IPX-802.2-SNAP
unspecified
(factory default)
bridge vlan define (3500/9000 Layer 3)
Prompt
Description
Layer 3
address
configuration
(IP VLAN
only)
Whether you want to define
Layer 3 information for the IP
VLAN
Possible Values
Layer 3
address and
mask
(IP VLAN
only)
Fields (IP network address and Any valid IP
subnet mask) you can use to network address
set up flood domains for
and subnet mask
overlapping IP VLAN
subnetworks.
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
[Default]
y
Since this is the last release to
support Layer 3 address
information in IP VLANs, avoid
this mechanism and instead
define multiple IP interfaces
for the VLAN with ip
interface define
commands.
–
This is the last release to
support Layer 3 address
information in IP VLANs.
Per-port
tagging
Whether you want to
configure IEEE 802.1Q VLAN
tagging. You are prompted to
answer for each port that you
selected.
Tag type
Whether you want to
configure no tagging or IEEE
802.1Q tagging (the VID) for
each port.
VLAN name
(for VLANs
other than
the default)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
none
■
802.1Q
Unique, user-defined name
Up to 32 ASCII
that identifies members of the characters or
VLAN. If you use spaces, put
spaces
quotation marks around the
VLAN name.
y
none
–
Procedure
1 Enter the VLAN identification (VID) number in the range 2 – 4094.
2 Select the bridge ports.
3 Select one or more protocol suites.
If you select an IP protocol suite, proceed with step 4. If you did not
choose an IP protocol suite for this interface, proceed to step 5.
349
350
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
4 Specify whether you want to specify Layer 3 address information (n or y).
The default is y. Specify n if possible and instead define multiple IP
interfaces for this VLAN using ip interface define commands. (See
Chapter 16.) If you still want to specify Layer 3 address information for an
IP VLAN:
a Enter y for Layer 3 addressing.
b Enter the Layer 3 network address.
c Enter the Layer 3 subnet mask. To accept the default or current value
in brackets [ ], press Return or Enter.
5 Specify whether you want per-port tagging (n or y). The default is y.
6 If you specified per-port tagging, enter the tag type for the indicated port
(none or 802.1Q).
7 If you have defined more than one port, you are prompted again for a tag
type for each port.
8 Enter the VLAN name.
Bridge VLAN Define Example (9000 Layer 3)
This example shows the steps necessary to define a protocol-based VLAN
for IPX 802.3 on a Layer 3 switching module. In this example, only the
backplane port (port 13) of the module has IEEE 802.1Q tagging; the
front-panel ports in this VLAN are not tagged. Because you have tagged
the module’s backplane port, you must also tag the corresponding switch
fabric module port of the switch fabric module for that VLAN. (Use the
EME to connect to the switch fabric module and configure the VLAN.)
CB9000@slot2.1 [12-E/FEN-TX-L3] (bridge/vlan): define
Enter VID (2-4094) [5]: 5
Select bridge ports (1-13|all|?): 1-3,13
Enter protocol suite
(IP,IPX,Apple,XNS,DECnet,SNA,Vines,X25,NetBEUI,unspecified,
IPX-II,IPX-802.2,IPX-802.3): IPX-802.3
Enter protocol suite ('q' to quit)
(IP,Apple,XNS,DECnet,SNA,Vines,X25,NetBEUI,IPX-II,IPX-802.2,
IPX-802.3): q
Configure per-port tagging? (n,y) [y]: y
Enter port 1 tag type (none,802.1Q): none
Enter port 2 tag type (none,802.1Q): none
Enter port 3 tag type (none,802.1Q): none
Enter port 13 tag type (none,802.1Q): 802.1Q
Enter VLAN Name {?} [ ]: IPX1
bridge vlan define (3500/9000 Layer 3)
351
Bridge VLAN Define Example (3500)
This example shows the steps necessary to define an IP VLAN with IEEE
802.1Q tagging on some ports. (Instead of supplying Layer 3 address
information when you define the VLAN, you can define multiple IP
interfaces for this VLAN.) This VLAN has trunk ports.
Select menu option: bridge vlan define
Enter VID (1-4094) [2]: 2
Select bridge ports (1-4,6,9-13|all|?) [3,6]: ?
Default selection: [3,6]
Selectable bridge ports
selection
ports
label
1
1
2
2
3
3,5
CampusLk1
4
4
6
6-8
CampusLk2
9
9
10
10
11
11
12
12
13
13
Select bridge ports (1-4,6,9-13|all|?) [3,6]: 3,6,9
Enter protocol suite
(IP,IPX,Apple,XNS,DECnet,SNA,Vines,X25,NetBEUI,unspecified,IPX-II,IPX-802.2
IPX-802.3,IPX-802.2-SNAP): IP
Enter protocol suite ('q' to quit)
(IPX,Apple,XNS,DECnet,SNA,Vines,X25,NetBEUI,IPX-II,IPX-802.2,IPX-802.3,
IPX-802.2-SNAP): q
Configure layer 3 address? (n,y) [y]: n
Configure per-port tagging? (n,y) [y]: y
Enter port 3,5 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: none
Enter port 6-8 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: 802.1Q
Enter port 9 tag type (none,802.1Q): none
Enter VLAN Name {?} [ ]: IP1
352
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
bridge vlan define
(3900/9300/9400/
9000 Layer 2)
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Creates a port-based VLAN on standalone systems or the
CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 2 modules. When you configure a port-based
VLAN, you assign a VLAN ID (VID), a set of bridge ports, and, optionally,
IEEE 802.1Q tagging.
For details about this command on the CoreBuilder 3500 and
CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 modules, see “bridge vlan define (3500/9000
Layer 3)” earlier in this chapter.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b v def
Important Considerations
■
On the SuperStack II Switch 3900 or 9300, you can define a maximum
of 127 port-based VLANs on a single system.
■
By default, all ports are defined to be part of the default VLAN, which
always uses a VID of 1 and the name Default as of Release 3.0.0. If
you delete the default VLAN, you can redefine it with VID 1 only.
■
You cannot delete a VLAN that has an IP interface associated with it.
■
The VID is used as the IEEE 802.1Q tag for a port if tagging is enabled.
■
On the CoreBuilder 9000, the list of ports includes the front-panel
ports and both backplane ports (even though only the
lower-numbered backplane port is enabled by default). On the
SuperStack II Switch 3900, the list of ports includes the 24 or 36
10/100 ports and any Gigabit Ethernet ports in use.
■
For the CoreBuilder 9000, keep the following considerations in mind:
■
■
■
When you define a VLAN on a switching module and other
switching modules in the system also define this VLAN, you must
define the VLAN on both the switching module and on the switch
fabric module.
When you define the VLAN on the Layer 2 switching module, you
must specify any front-panel ports in the VLAN as well as the
module’s lower-numbered backplane port. The specified backplane
port must also be tagged if you have more than one VLAN.
When you define the VLAN on the switch fabric module, you must
specify the switch fabric module backplane port that is connected
to the switching module’s backplane port. The switch fabric
module port must also be tagged if you have more than one VLAN.
bridge vlan define (3900/9300/9400/ 9000 Layer 2)
353
Options
Prompt
Description
VID
Unique, user-defined integer
used by global management
operations
Possible Values
■
■
Bridge ports Index numbers of the bridge
ports that belong to the VLAN. If
you include trunked ports,
specify the anchor port of the
trunk. See “Important
Considerations” for information
about the list of ports.
■
■
■
Per-port
tagging
Whether you want to configure
802.1Q VLAN tagging. You are
prompted to answer for each
port that you selected.
Tag type
Whether you want no tagging or
IEEE 802.1Q tagging (the VID).
For a port shared by another
VLAN, verify that the specified
tag type is not in conflict with the
port’s tag type in another VLAN.
VLAN name Unique, user-defined name that
identifies members of the VLAN.
(for VLANs
If you use spaces, put quotation
other than
marks around the VLAN name.
the default)
If the default
VLAN exists,
2– 4094
[Default]
Next available
VID
If the default
VLAN does not
exist, 1 to
redefine the
default VLAN,
or 2–4094 for
other VLANs
One or more of
the ports that
are available to
be assigned to
the VLAN
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable ports)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
none
■
802.1Q
Up to 32 ASCII
characters or
spaces
y
none
–
Procedure
Press Return or Enter to accept the default or existing values that appear
in brackets [ ].
1 Enter the VLAN identification (VID) number.
2 Enter one or more port numbers. To assign all ports to the VLAN, enter
all
3 Configure the per-port tagging.
354
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
4 Enter the tag type for each port in the VLAN.
5 Enter the VLAN name.
Bridge VLAN Define Example (9000 Layer 2)
This example shows a port-based VLAN that includes tagged front-panel
ports and a tagged backplane port (port 21). These ports are tagged
because they overlap with ports that belong to other VLANs:
■
Because the front-panel ports are tagged, any attached devices must
be IEEE 802.1Q enabled.
■
Because the backplane port is tagged, the corresponding switch fabric
module port must also be tagged in the VLAN definition on the switch
fabric module. (You connect to the switch fabric module and define
the VLAN to include the appropriate tagged switch fabric module
port, based on the slot that contains the switching module.)
CB9000@slot 10.1 [20-E/FEN-TX-L2] (bridge/vlan): define
Enter VID (2-4094) [3]: 3
Select bridge ports (1-22|all|?): 1-5,21
Configure per-port tagging? (n,y) [y]: y
Enter port 1 tag type (none,802.1Q): 802.1Q
Enter port 2 tag type (none,802.1Q): 802.1Q
Enter port 3 tag type (none,802.1Q): 802.1Q
Enter port 4 tag type (none,802.1Q): 802.1Q
Enter port 5 tag type (none,802.1Q): 802.1Q
Enter port 21 tag type (none,802.1Q): 802.1Q
Enter VLAN Name {?} [ ]: vlantag3
Bridge VLAN Define Example (3900)
This example shows a port-based VLAN that includes tagged ports.
Select menu option (bridge/vlan): define
Enter VID (2-4094) [2]: 2
Select bridge ports (1-39|all|?): 3-5
Configure per-port tagging? (n,y) [y]: y
Enter port 3 tag type (none, 802.1Q) [none]: 802.1Q
Enter port 4 tag type (none, 802.1Q) [none]: 802.1Q
Enter port 5 tag type (none, 802.1Q) [none]: 802.1Q
Enter VLAN name {?} [ ]: Sales
bridge vlan modify (3500/9000 Layer 3)
bridge vlan modify
(3500/9000 Layer 3)
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
355
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Changes an existing port-based, protocol-based, or network-based VLAN
definition on the CoreBuilder 3500 system or CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3
module.
To use this command on the SuperStack II Switch 3900 or Switch 9300,
the CoreBuilder 9400, and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 2 modules, see
“bridge vlan modify (3900/9300/9400/ 9000 Layer 2)” next.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b v modi
Important Considerations
■
Before you modify the port assignments for a VLAN, always enter ? to
review the system port summary. If the VLAN includes trunk ports, you
must specify the anchor (lowest numbered) port in each trunk. If there
are no trunk ports, enter one or more port numbers, or enter all to
assign all ports to the VLAN.
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500, if you want to modify your VLAN to include
FDDI DAS ports, you must specify the lowest-numbered port in the
DAS pair.
■
If you modify the default VLAN, you can only change the member
ports or the tag status. You cannot change the name or the VID or the
protocol type of unspecified.
■
If you modify the tagging type of a backplane port on a switching
module, make sure that you modify the tagging type of the
corresponding port on the switch fabric module.
■
To modify a VLAN to support more than one protocol suite for the
VLAN, specify one protocol at each of the prompts.
■
Select the bridge ports that you want to be part of the modified
VLAN, or specify ? to display a port summary with the selectable
bridge ports.
■
If tagging is enabled for a port, the software uses the VID as the
802.1Q tag.
356
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
■
If you modify the tagging for a port shared by another VLAN, and
tagging is the only distinguishing characteristic between the VLANs,
verify that the new tag type does not conflict with the port’s tag type
in another VLAN. (A shared port can use a tag type of none for only
one of its VLANs; for all other VLANs to which it belongs, the shared
port must use IEEE 802.1Q tagging.)
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
index
System-assigned index number
that identifies a VLAN
Possible Values
■
■
■
VID
(for VLANs
other than
the default)
Unique, user-defined integer
used by global management
operations
Bridge ports Index numbers of the bridge
ports that belong to the VLAN.
To add trunked ports, specify
the anchor port of the trunk.
You cannot add a port owned
by a router port IP interface.
Selectable VLAN 1 (if you have
index
only the default
VLAN)
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
2 – 4094
■
■
■
[Default]
Current VID
One or more
Current ports in
index numbers the VLAN
of the ports that
are available to
be assigned to
the VLAN
all
? (for a list of
selectable ports)
bridge vlan modify (3500/9000 Layer 3)
Prompt
Description
Protocol
suite
One or more protocol suites
that you want to specify for the
VLAN
(for VLANs
other than
the default)
Possible Values
■
IP
■
IPX
■
[Default]
Current
protocol type
Apple (for
AppleTalk)
■
XNS
■
DECnet
■
SNA
■
Vines
■
X.25
■
NETBEUI
■
unspecified
■
IPX-II
■
IPX-802.2
■
IPX-802.3
■
357
IPX-802.2-SNAP
(3500 only)
Modify
Layer 3
address
(IP VLAN)
Whether you want to modify
the Layer 3 information for the
VLAN
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
y
Layer 3
address and
mask
(IP VLAN)
Optional fields (IP network and Any valid IP
mask) used to set up flood
network address
domains for overlapping IP
and mask
VLAN subnetworks
Current address
and mask
Per-port
tagging
Whether you want to modify
the per-port 802.1Q VLAN
tagging. You are prompted to
answer for each port that you
specified.
y
Tag type
Either no tagging or
IEEE 802.1Q tagging (the VID)
Avoid this mechanism and
instead define multiple IP
interfaces per VLAN with ip
interface define
commands.
VLAN name Unique, user-defined name
that identifies members of the
(for VLANs
VLAN. If you use spaces, put
other than
quotation marks around the
the default)
VLAN name.
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
none
■
802.1Q
Up to 32 ASCII
characters or
spaces
Current tag
type for each
port
Current name
358
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
Procedure
To modify information for a VLAN, follow these steps:
1 Select the VLAN interface index.
2 For a VLAN other than the default VLAN, enter the VLAN identification
(VID) number.
3 Specify the index numbers of the bridge ports.
4 For a VLAN other than the default VLAN, specify one or more protocol
suites.
If you have selected the IP protocol suite, proceed with step 5. If you did
not define an IP protocol suite for this VLAN, proceed to step 7.
5 Specify whether you want to modify Layer 3 address information (n or y).
Since this is the last release to support Layer 3 address information,
specify n if possible and instead define multiple IP interfaces for this VLAN
using ip interface define commands. (See Chapter 16.) If you still
want to modify Layer 3 address information for an IP VLAN:
a Enter y for Layer 3 addressing.
b Enter the Layer 3 network address.
c Enter the Layer 3 subnet mask. To accept the default or current value
in brackets [ ], press Return or Enter.
6 Specify whether you want to modify per-port tagging.
7 If you want to modify per-port tagging, enter the new tag type for the
port (none or 802.1Q).
8 If you have specified that you want to modify more than one port, enter a
tag type for each port.
9 For a VLAN other than the default VLAN, enter a new VLAN name or
keep the current name.
The VLAN name can include up to 32 ASCII characters, including spaces.
If you include spaces, put quotation marks around the VLAN name.
Bridge VLAN Modify Example (9000 Layer 3)
This example shows the steps to modify the per-port tagging for a
protocol-based VLAN on a Layer 3 module. In this example, front-panel
port 5 is changed to have IEEE 802.1Q tagging, and its associated device
is IEEE 802.1Q enabled.
CB9000@slot2.1 [12-E/FEN-TX-L3] (bridge/vlan): modify
Select VLAN interface index {1-5|?}: 5
bridge vlan modify (3500/9000 Layer 3)
359
Enter VID (2-4094) [5]: 5
Select bridge ports (1-13|all|?) [1-5,13]: 1-5,13
Enter protocol suite
(IP,IPX,Apple,XNS,DECnet,SNA,Vines,X25,NetBEUI,unspecified,
IPX-II,IPX-802.2,IPX-802.3) [IPX-802.3]: IPX-802.3
Enter protocol suite ('q' to quit) (IP,IPX, Apple, XNS,
DECnet,SNA,Vines,X25,NetBEUI,IPX-II,IPX-802.2): q
Modify per-port tagging? (n,y) [y]: y
Enter port 1 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: none
Enter port 2 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: none
Enter port 3 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: none
Enter port 4 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: none
Enter port 5 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: 802.1Q
Enter port 13 tag type (none,802.1Q) [802.1Q]: 802.1Q
Enter VLAN Name {?} [IPX]: IPX1
Bridge VLAN Modify Example (3500)
This example shows the steps to modify the member ports and per-port
tagging for an IP VLAN.
Select menu option: bridge vlan modify
Select VLAN interface index {1-2|?}: 2
Enter VID (2-4094) [2]: 2
Select bridge ports (1-4, 6, 9-13|all|?) [3,6,9]: 9,11
Enter protocol suite
(IP,IPX,Apple,XNS,DECnet,SNA,Vines,X25,NetBEUI,unspecified,
IPX-II,IPX-802.2,IPX-802.3, IPX-802.2-SNAP) [IP]: IP
Enter protocol suite ('q' to quit)
(IPX,Apple,XNS,DECnet,SNA,Vines,X25,NetBEUI,IPX-II,
IPX-802.2, IPX-802.3, IPX-802.2-SNAP): q
Modify layer 3 address? (n,y) [y]:n
Modify per-port tagging? (n,y) [y]: y
Enter port 9 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: 802.1Q
Enter port 11 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: 802.1Q
Enter VLAN Name {?} [IP1]: IP1
360
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
bridge vlan modify
(3900/9300/9400/
9000 Layer 2)
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Changes a port-based VLAN definition on the indicated system Layer 2
module. See “Important Considerations” for information on when
changes take effect.
To use this command on the CoreBuilder 3500 or CoreBuilder 9000
Layer 3 modules, see the “bridge vlan modify (3500/9000 Layer 3)”
earlier in this chapter.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b v modi
Important Considerations
■
You need not reboot the system for the changes to take effect.
However, depending on the number of VLANs that are affected, the
system may take several minutes to return control to you.
■
If you modify the tagging type of a backplane port on a switching
module, make sure that you modify the tagging type of the
corresponding port on the switch fabric module.
■
If tagging is enabled for a port, the software uses the VID as the
802.1Q tag.
■
If you modify the default VLAN, you can only change the member
ports or the tag status. You cannot change the name or the VID.
■
If you modify the tagging for a port shared by another VLAN, verify
that the new tag type does not conflict with the port’s tag type in
another VLAN. (A shared port can use a tag type of none for only one
of its VLANs; for all other VLANs to which it belongs, the shared port
must use IEEE 802.1Q tagging.)
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
index
System-assigned index number that
identifies a VLAN
Possible Values
■
■
■
[Default]
Selectable VLAN 1 (if you
index
have only
the default
all
VLAN)
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
bridge vlan modify (3900/9300/9400/ 9000 Layer 2)
361
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
VID
Unique, user-defined integer used
by management operations
2 – 4094
Current
VID
(for VLANs
other than
the default)
Bridge ports Index numbers of the bridge ports
that belong to the VLAN. To add
trunked ports, specify the anchor
port of the trunk.
■
■
■
Per-port
tagging
Whether you want to configure
802.1Q VLAN tagging. You are
prompted to answer for each port
that you selected.
Tag type
Either no tagging or IEEE 802.1Q
tagging (the VID)
VLAN name Unique, user-defined name that
identifies members of the VLAN. If
(for VLANs
you use spaces, put quotation
other than
marks around the VLAN name.
the default)
One or more
Current
index numbers ports in
of the ports that VLAN
are available to
be assigned to
the VLAN
all
? (for a list of
selectable ports)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
none
■
802.1Q
Up to 32 ASCII
characters or
spaces
y
Current
tag type
for each
port
Current
name
Procedure
1 Enter the VLAN interface index.
2 For a VLAN other than the default VLAN, enter a VLAN identification
(VID) number or keep the default in brackets.
3 Specify the index numbers of the bridge ports.
4 Specify whether you want to modify per-port tagging.
5 If you modify per-port tagging, enter the new tag type for the port (none
or 802.1Q).
6 If you have defined more than one port, enter a tag type for each port.
7 For a VLAN other than the default VLAN, enter a new VLAN name or
keep the current name.
The VLAN name can include up to 32 ASCII characters, including spaces.
If you include spaces, put quotation marks around the VLAN name.
362
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
Bridge VLAN Modify Example (9000 Layer 2)
This example shows the removal of two ports from a port-based VLAN
that includes tagged front-panel ports and a tagged backplane port
(port 21).
CB9000@slot 10.1 [20-E/FEN-TX-L2] (bridge/vlan): modify
Select VLAN interface index {1-3|?}: 3
Enter VID (2-4094) [3]: 3
Select bridge ports (1-22|all|?) [1-5,21]: 1-3,21
Configure per-port tagging? (n,y) [y]: y
Enter port 1 tag type (none,802.1Q) [802.1Q]: 802.1Q
Enter port 2 tag type (none,802.1Q) [802.1Q]: 802.1Q
Enter port 3 tag type (none,802.1Q) [802.1Q]: 802.1Q
Enter port 21 tag type (none,802.1Q) [802.1Q]: 802.1Q
Enter VLAN Name {?} [vlan3]: vlantag3
Bridge VLAN Modify Example (3900)
This example shows default VLAN changes in the ports and per-port
tagging type.
Select menu option (bridge/vlan): modify
Select VLAN interface index {1-2|?}: 1
Select bridge ports (1-27|all|?) [1-27]: 2-6
Modify per-port tagging? (n,y) [y]:
Enter port 2 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: 802.1Q
Enter port 3 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: 802.1Q
Enter port 4 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: 802.1Q
Enter port 5 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: 802.1Q
Enter port 6 tag type (none,802.1Q) [none]: 802.1Q
bridge vlan remove
bridge vlan remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
363
Deletes a VLAN definition.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b v r
Important Considerations
■
When you remove a VLAN on a CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 2 or Layer 3
module, the system prompts you to verify that you want to wait the
several minutes that it may take for the removal to be complete.
■
You cannot remove a VLAN that is associated with any type of routing
interface (for example, a router port VLAN created by a router port IP
interface or a protocol-based VLAN associated with a particular router
interface).
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
index
System-assigned index number that
is associated with the VLAN
Possible Values [Default]
■
■
■
Continue
verification
(9000
Layer 2 and
Layer 3)
Whether you want to continue with
the VLAN removal, even though the
removal may take a few minutes to
complete
A selectable
VLAN index
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
Bridge VLAN Remove Example (3500)
Select menu option: bridge vlan remove
Select VLAN interface indexes (1-2|all|?): ?
Selectable vlans
selection
1
2
VID
1
2
ports
1-13
3,5-9,11
–
name
Default
IP1
Select VLAN interface indexes (1-2|all|?):2
y
364
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
bridge vlan mode
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Determines whether data with a unicast MAC address can be forwarded
between VLANs.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b v mode
Important Considerations
■
Select a VLAN mode as follows:
■
■
allOpen — Use this less restrictive mode if you do not have
security issues concerning the forwarding of data between VLANs.
It is the default VLAN mode for all VLANs that you create. It permits
data with a unicast MAC address to be forwarded between VLANs.
The allOpen mode implies that the system uses a single bridge
address table for all of the VLANs on the system.
allClosed — Use this restrictive mode if you are concerned about
security between VLANs. Data cannot be forwarded between
VLANs but can still be routed between VLANs. This mode implies
that each VLAN that you create has its own address table.
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500 system and CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3
modules, if you are using allClosed mode and STP (with multiple
routes to a destination), you can also use the command “bridge vlan
stpMode” to disable STP blocking for a specified VLAN.
■
For the CoreBuilder 9000, set a VLAN mode for each switching
module and the switch fabric module.
■
Changing this mode removes all VLANs and redefines the default
VLAN.
■
Before you issue this command to change the mode, you must remove
all routing interfaces, including router port IP interfaces. If routing
interfaces are defined, the system displays this message:
could not change configured VLAN mode - interface in
use by client.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN mode Selected VLAN mode for the entire
system
Possible Values [Default]
■
allOpen
■
allClosed
allOpen
(factory
default), or
current value
bridge vlan stpMode
bridge vlan stpMode
365
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
If allClosed mode is enabled, allows the system to ignore the Spanning
Tree Protocol (STP) state for a specified VLAN interface or all interfaces,
for either routing or bridging.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
b v st
Important Considerations
■
This mode is valid only if the VLAN mode is set to allClosed.
■
To disable the STP state on a per-port basis with either allOpen or
allClosed mode, use the bridge port stpState command. See
Chapter 10.
■
If you have configured router port IP interface (and therefore have a
router port VLAN), the ignore STP mode is enabled and cannot be
changed. You cannot select a router port VLAN with this command.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
VLAN
interface
index
System-assigned index number that
is associated with the VLAN
■
■
■
STP state
Whether you want to ignore the STP
state for the VLAN index
Any
selectable
VLAN index
number
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
■
disabled
■
enabled
disabled
Bridge VLAN STP Mode Example (3500)
selection
1
2
VID
1
2
ports
1-13
3,5-9,11
name
Default
IP1
Select VLAN interface index(es) (1-2|all|?):2
Ignore STP state for VLAN index: 2 (disabled,enabled) [disabled]:enabled
366
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
bridge vlan
vlanAwareMode
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
For compatibility purposes, allows the system to observe previous VLAN
resource usage and tagged-frame ingress rules for CoreBuilder 3500
serial-port upgrades from Release 1.2.0 to 2.1.0 or 3.0.0 (or
CoreBuilder 9000 upgrades from Release 2.0.0 to 3.0.0).
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
b v v
Important Considerations
■
Use this command only if you upgrade your system and the system
reports an error after reaching the VLAN resource limit during a power
up with a serial-port console connection. During the upgrade, the
difference in resource usage and modes of tagging could cause the
later release to use more VLAN resources than did the earlier release,
thereby causing a decrease in the total number of allowable VLANs.
■
If the system reaches the VLAN resource limit during the upgrade, it
displays an error message to identify the index of the VLAN that it was
unable to create. The system removes all bridge ports from the VLAN
that it could not restore from NV data but does maintain the
previously stored NV data.
■
The difference in VLAN resource usage is based on the following:
■
■
In CoreBuilder 3500 Release 1.2.0 (and CoreBuilder 9000
Release 2.0.0), all bridge ports were not VLAN aware (tagging
aware) unless they were assigned to a VLAN that has one or more
tagged ports. This behavior is associated with the VLAN aware
mode of taggedVlanPorts. If you see the VLAN resource error
message, you can restore your VLANs by issuing this command and
setting the VLAN aware mode to taggedVLANPorts. If VLANs are
already defined, the system prompts you to reboot the system to
put the new mode into effect.
As of CoreBuilder 3500 Release 2.0.0, (and CoreBuilder 9000
Release 3.0.0), all bridge ports become VLAN aware after a
software update or after an NV data reset and do not have to be
explicitly tagged in order to forward tagged frames. This behavior
is associated with the default VLAN aware mode of allPorts. If
you do not see the VLAN internal resource error message, maintain
the VLAN aware mode of allPorts.
bridge vlan vlanAwareMode
■
367
The VLAN aware mode reflects the difference in tagged-frame ingress
rules between releases. Therefore, even if the system can
accommodate the number of VLANs from the earlier release, be aware
that it begins using different ingress rules for tagged frames.
■
■
The CoreBuilder 3500 tagged-frame ingress rules vary for 1.2.0,
2.0.0, and 3.0.0. For more information, see the CoreBuilder 3500
Implementation Guide.
The CoreBuilder 9000 tagged-frame ingress rules vary for 2.0.0 to
3.0.0. For more information, see the CoreBuilder 9000
Implementation Guide.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN aware Whether all ports are tagging
mode
aware or only tagged ports are
tagging aware
Reboot
system?
Since changing the mode
requires you to reboot, whether
you want to reboot the system
or cancel the request
Possible Values
■
allPorts
■
taggedVlanPorts
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
[Default]
allPorts
y (yes)
Bridge VLAN Aware Mode Example (3500)
Select menu option (bridge/vlan): vlanAwareMode
VLAN-aware mode (taggedVlanPorts,allPorts) [allPorts]:
taggedVLANPorts
Changing the VLAN-aware mode will reboot the system continue? (n,y) [y]: y
368
CHAPTER 14: VIRTUAL LANS (VLANS)
15
PACKET FILTERS
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
administer bridge packet filters in your system, including the following
tasks:
■
Listing and displaying packet filters
■
Creating, deleting, editing, and loading packet filters
■
Assigning and unassigning packet filters
■
Managing port groups
Independently configurable packet filtering is provided for the packet
processing paths on each bridge port of the system. After you create a
packet filter, you can assign the filter to the transmit or the receive paths
of any bridge port or group of bridge ports.
The filter executes a series of test operations on the packet’s contents
and, if the result is zero, it stops (filters) the packet. If the end result is
non-zero, the filter lets the packet pass.
For more information about implementing packet filters on your network,
see the Implementation Guide for your system.
For the CoreBuilder® 9000 platform, the commands in this chapter apply
to Layer 3 switching modules only.
370
CHAPTER 15: PACKET FILTERS
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
➧ bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
bridge menu
display
ipFragmentation
ipxSnapTranslation
addressThreshold
agingTime
spanningTree
gvrpState
cos
port
multicast
➧ packetFilter
vlan
trunk
mpla
link
packetFilter menu
list
display
➧ create
delete
edit
load
assign
unassign
➧ portGroup
create menu
portGroup
custom
portGroup menu
list
display
create
delete
addPort
removePort
bridge packetFilter list
bridge packetFilter
list
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
371
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Lists the currently defined packet filters.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa li
Bridge Packet Filter List Example (3500)
3900
9300
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter): list
Packet Filter 1 - rejdiffportgrp
Port 11, txA, rxA
In the example, the system has one packet filter, with a filter id of 1 and a
defined name of rejdiffportgrp. This filter is loaded onto port 11. The
filter is assigned to both the transmit all (txA) path and the receive all
(rxA) path.
372
CHAPTER 15: PACKET FILTERS
bridge packetFilter
display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the contents of the specified packet filter.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa di
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
Possible values for filters (n) depend on the number of created or
loaded filters on the system.
■
The packet filter id and name are displayed, followed by a list of the
packet filter instructions.
Options
Prompt
Description
Select filter
Identifier (id number) of the
filter that you want to display
Possible Values
■
■
1–n
[Default]
Current filter id
? (for a list of all
filters)
Sample Bridge Packet Filter Display (3500)
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter): display
Select filter {1|?} [1]:
Packet Filter 1 - rejdiffportgrp
name
“rejdiffportgrp”
pushDPGM
pushSPGM
and
pushLiteral.l
0x00000000
ne
bridge packetFilter create portGroup
bridge packetFilter
create portGroup
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
373
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Creates the portGroup (rejdiffportgroup) standard hardware filter.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa c p
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
The portGroup (rejdiffportgroup) packet filter rejects a frame if the
destination and source ports are not in the same group.
■
“Creating” a hardware filter means that the code for the filter is
copied from firmware into non-volatile memory.
■
To verify that the filter has been created, use the bridge
packetFilter list command. To see the contents of the portGroup
filter, use the bridge PacketFilter display command.
■
The system only creates the packet filter definition. You must still
assign ports and masks to port groups, as described for “bridge
packetFilter portGroup create” later in this chapter, and assign the
standard filter to ports and filtering paths, as described for “bridge
packetFilter assign” later in this chapter.
■
At present, portGroup is the only filter supported in hardware.
Bridge Packet Filter Create Port Group Example
This example shows the user creating the portGroup filter.
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter): create portgroup
Packet filter 1 stored.
374
CHAPTER 15: PACKET FILTERS
bridge packetFilter
create custom
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Creates a custom packet filter using the built-in editor.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa c c
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
You can create custom filters to add filtering logic based on the
content of the packet.
■
The built-in editor is a simple one-line-at-a-time editor that supports a
short list of EMACS-style editing commands.
■
Save your work periodically with Ctrl+w. When you press Esc to exit
the built-in editor, the system examines the filter’s syntax. If the syntax
is correct, the filter is loaded into the switch’s non-volatile memory.
Incorrect syntax filters are not loaded into non-volatile memory and
are not saved across editor sessions.
■
After you create the filter, edit it using “bridge packetFilter edit” as
described later in this chapter.
■
The alternative to creating a custom packet filter using the built-in
editor is to create the packet filter on an external system and transfer
it across the network into the switch. See “bridge packetFilter load”
later in this chapter.
■
You can also use the Filter Builder component of the Web
Management application to create custom filters.
■
■
■
On CoreBuilder 3500 systems, you can load the filter on to the
switch directly from Filter Builder.
On CoreBuilder 9000 system, you must save the filter to an ASCII
file and then download the file to the switch manually using TFTP
and the “bridge packetFilter load” command described later in this
chapter.
The system only creates the packet filter definitions. You must still
assign the standard filter to ports and filtering paths, as described for
“bridge packetFilter assign” later in this chapter.
bridge packetFilter create custom
375
Create Custom Bridge Packet Filter Example (3500)
After you enter the custom filter editor, the system displays the editor
commands, as shown here.
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter): create custom
Editor Commands
Buffer:
Line:
Cursor:
Insert:
Delete:
Mode:
Save:
Exit:
list = Ctrl-l
next = Ctrl-n, previous = Ctrl-p
start = Ctrl-a, end = Ctrl-e, left = Ctrl-b, right = Ctrl-f
line = Enter
previous = Ctrl-h (BSP), current = Ctrl-d (DEL), line = Ctrl-k
insert/overstrike toggle = Ctrl-o
Ctrl-w
Esc
You now enter packet filter language statements that define the packet
filter algorithm. See the Implementation Guide for your system for
information about developing the packet filters.
376
CHAPTER 15: PACKET FILTERS
bridge packetFilter
delete
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes the selected packet filter.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa de
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
You cannot delete a filter if it is assigned. Before you can delete the
filter, you must unassign the filter from the assigned ports.
■
Possible values for filters (n) depend on the number of created or
loaded filters on the system.
■
To find the id of the filter, list the filters using the bridge
packetFilter list command.
Options
Prompt
Description
Select filter
Identifier (id number) of the
filter that you want to delete
Delete
packet
filter?
Whether you want to delete
the selected packet filter
Possible Values
■
■
1–n
? (for a list of all
identifiers)
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
[Default]
Current filter
number
y
Bridge Packet Filter Delete Examples (3500)
Select
Select
Delete
Packet
menu option (bridge/packetFilter): delete
filter {1|?} [1]: 1
packet filter (n,y) [y]: y
filter 1 has been deleted.
If the filter is assigned, it cannot be deleted. The system responds as
follows to the delete command:
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter): delete
Select filter {1|?} [1]: 1
The selected filter is assigned
This problem prevents the deletion of this filter.
bridge packetFilter edit
bridge packetFilter
edit
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
377
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies an existing packet filter using the built-in editor.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa e
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
The built-in editor is a simple one-line-at-a-time editor that supports a
short list of EMACS-style editing commands.
■
The system displays the editor commands that you use to edit the
packet filters. You can edit packet filter language statements that
define the packet filter algorithm. See the Implementation Guide for
your system for information about developing the packet filters.
■
Save your work periodically with Ctrl+w. To complete the editing
process, press Esc. The system replaces the filter or creates a new filter,
depending on your response to the prompts.
■
When you exit, the system examines the filter’s syntax. If the syntax is
correct, the filter is loaded into the switch’s non-volatile memory.
■
Possible values for filters (n) depend on the number of created or
loaded filters on the system.
Options
Prompt
Description
Select filter
Identifier (id) number of the
filter that you want to edit
Replace
existing
filter?
Whether to replace the
selected filter
Store as
new filter?
Whether to create a new filter
Possible Values
■
■
1–n
? (for a list of all
identifiers)
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
[Default]
Most recent
filter edited
y
y
378
CHAPTER 15: PACKET FILTERS
Replace Existing Filter Example (3500)
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter): edit
Select filter {1|?} [1]:
Editing packet filter 1.
Editor Commands
Buffer:
Line:
Cursor:
Insert:
Delete:
Mode:
Save:
Exit:
list = Ctrl-l
next = Ctrl-n, previous = Ctrl-p
start = Ctrl-a, end = Ctrl-e, left = Ctrl-b, right = Ctrl-f
line = Enter
previous = Ctrl-h (BSP), current = Ctrl-d (DEL), line = Ctrl-k
insert/overstrike toggle = Ctrl-o
Ctrl-w
Esc
Edit buffer has been saved
name
"rejdiffportgrp"
Replace existing filter (n,y) [y]: y
Packet filter 1 has been replaced.
Store as New Filter Example (3500)
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter): edit
Select filter {1-2|?} [1]: 1
Editing packet filter 1.
Editor Commands
Buffer:
Line:
Cursor:
Insert:
Delete:
Mode:
Save:
Exit:
list = Ctrl-l
next = Ctrl-n, previous = Ctrl-p
start = Ctrl-a, end = Ctrl-e, left = Ctrl-b, right = Ctrl-f
line = Enter
previous = Ctrl-h (BSP), current = Ctrl-d (DEL), line = Ctrl-k
insert/overstrike toggle = Ctrl-o
Ctrl-w
Esc
Edit buffer has been saved
name
"BlockGeoB"
Replace existing filter (n,y) [y]: n
Store as new filter (n,y) [y]: y
Packet filter 3 stored.
bridge packetFilter load
bridge packetFilter
load
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
379
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Transfers a packet filter file from another host machine to the switch to
which you are currently connected.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa lo
Important Considerations
■
On the CoreBuilder 3500, before you use the packetFilter load
command, select the required file transfer protocol (TFTP or FTP) using
the system fileTransfer command.
■
On the CoreBuilder 3500, this single command transfers a file from
another host and loads it in a one-step process.
■
On the CoreBuilder 9000, loading a filter from another host is a twostep process. You must first download the packet filter source file to
the Enterprise Management Engine (EME) using TFTP, then connect to
the Layer 3 module, then enter this bridge packetFilter load
command.
The syntax of the EME download command is:
download module <slot.subslot> filter <IP address> <filename>
You must use TFTP to download on the CoreBuilder 9000. FTP does
not work.
When you enter bridge packetFilter load, the CoreBuilder 9000
does not prompt you for any options. Instead, the module simply
looks for the downloaded filter on the EME. If it finds it, it loads it. If it
does not find it, it prints the message Filter not found.
■
TFTP or FTP hosts may place restrictions on which files and pathnames
are valid. See your host administrator or host documentation for TFTP
and FTP information.
■
bridge packetFilter load verifies the syntax of the filter. If the
syntax is correct, it stores the filter into non-volatile memory. If the
syntax is incorrect, you are prompted to enter the built-in editor so
that you can fix the filter.
380
CHAPTER 15: PACKET FILTERS
Options (3500)
Prompt
Description
Host IP
address
IP address of the machine from Any valid IP address current IP
which you want to transfer the
address
filter
Possible Values
File
pathname
Path and file name of the filter
to transfer
■
■
? (for a list of
criteria for
entering the
pathname)
[Default]
path and file
name last
loaded
Up to 128
characters
Bridge Packet Filter Load Example (3500)
The system transfers the specified filter and displays a confirmation
message:
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter): load
Host IP address: 158.101.112.191
File pathname {?}: /tftpboot/srackley/joe.fil
Packet filter 2 stored.
Bridge Packet Filter Load Example (9000)
The user has copied the source text for the “reject multicast traffic” filter,
rejmulticast.fil, from the Filter Builder application to the TFTP application’s
root directory on host 159.101.8.112. (You must use TFTP; FTP does not
work.)
The user then logs on to the CoreBuilder 9000 EME and issues the
download command to transfer the filter file to the EME. Note that the
user specifies the type of download (filter) and for which module (6.01)
the filter is destined.
CB9000> download module 6.01 filter 159.101.8.112 rejmulticast.fil
File transfer request pending.
Downloading file from external file server to eme - 000000289
Downloading file from eme to module 6.1 - 000000289
File transfer completed successfully.
bridge packetFilter load
381
The user next connects to the module and loads the filter.
CB9000> connect 6.01
Menu options (Corebuilder 9000-94DC8): -------------------------------list
- List all packet filters
display
- Display a packet filter
create
- Create a packet filter
delete
- Delete a packet filter
edit
- Edit a packet filter
load
- Load a packet filter
assign
- Assign a packet filter
unassign
- Unassign a packet filter
portGroup
- Administer port groups
Type "q" to return to the previous menu or ? for help.
----------------------------------------------------------------------CB9000@slot6.1 [12-E/FEN-TX-L3] (): bridge packetFilter load
Packet filter 1 stored.
Lastly, the user lists the loaded filters with bridge packetfilter list
and confirms the contents of the filter with bridge packetfilter
display.
CB9000@slot6.1 [12-E/FEN-TX-L3] (bridge/packetFilter): list
Packet Filter 1 - rejMulticast
No port assignments
Menu options (Corebuilder 9000-94DC8): ---------------------------------------list
- List all packet filters
display
- Display a packet filter
create
- Create a packet filter
delete
- Delete a packet filter
edit
- Edit a packet filter
load
- Load a packet filter
assign
- Assign a packet filter
unassign
- Unassign a packet filter
portGroup
- Administer port groups
Type "q" to return to the previous menu or ? for help.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------CB9000@slot6.1 [12-E/FEN-TX-L3] (bridge/packetFilter): display 1
Packet Filter 1 - rejMulticast
name
"rejMulticast"
pushField.b
0
pushLiteral.b
0x01
and
not
382
CHAPTER 15: PACKET FILTERS
bridge packetFilter
assign
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Assigns a selected packet filter to a port or set of ports (port group).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa a
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
When you assign a packet filter to one or more ports, you must assign
a processing path. The path (transmit all, transmit multicast, receive
all, receive multicast, or receive internal) of a port can have only one
packet filter assigned to it; however, you can assign a single packet
filter to multiple paths and ports.
■
If you try to assign a filter to a port that already has a filter assigned,
the system displays a warning message and the assignment fails.
■
After you assign the filter, ports and paths are removed from the list of
possible values (which are listed in the Options table).
■
Possible values for filters (n) depend on the number of created or
loaded filters on the system.
■
Possible values for bridge ports (n) depend on the number of existing
bridge ports on the system.
Options
Prompt
Description
Select filter
Identifier (id
number) of the
filter that you want
to assign
Select bridge ports
Number of the
bridge port to
which you want to
assign the selected
filter
Possible Values
■
■
1–n
? (for a list of valid
filter identifiers)
■
1–n
■
all
■
? (for a list of valid
ports)
[Default]
Current valid
selected filter
Current valid
selected bridge
port
bridge packetFilter assign
Prompt
Description
Select path(s)
Identifier of the
path to which you
want to assign the
selected filter
Possible Values
■
txA
■
txM
■
rxA
■
rxM
■
rxI
■
all
■
383
[Default]
Current valid
selected path
? (for a list of valid
paths)
Bridge Packet Filter Assign Examples (3500)
Select
Select
Select
Select
menu option (bridge/packetFilter): assign
filter {1|?} [1]:
bridge port(s) (1-12|all|?) [4-6]: all
path(s) (txA,txM,rxA,rxM,rxI|all|?): txA
To specify multiple ports, use the hyphen (-) to indicate ranges, and
commas to indicate individual, non-contiguous ports. To specify multiple
paths, separate the paths with commas.
Select
Select
Select
Select
menu option (bridge/packetFilter): assign
filter {1|?} [1]:
bridge port(s) (1-6|all|?): 1-3,6
path(s) (txA,txM,rxA,rxM,rxI|all|?): txA,rxA,rxI
384
CHAPTER 15: PACKET FILTERS
bridge packetFilter
unassign
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Unassigns selected packet filter from one or more ports.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa u
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
The packet filter that you want to unassign must have been assigned
to at least one port.
■
Possible values for filters (n) depend on the number of created or
loaded filters on the system.
■
Possible values for bridge ports (n) depend on the number of existing
bridge ports on the system.
■
After you unassign the filter, ports and paths are added to the list of
possible values (which are listed in the Options table).
Options
Prompt
Description
Select filter
Identifier (id
number) of the
filter that you want
to unassign
Select bridge ports
Select path(s)
Numbers of one or
more bridge ports
from which you
want to unassign
the selected filter
Identifiers of one or
more paths from
which you want to
unassign the
selected filter
Possible Values
■
■
1–n
? (for a list of valid
filter identifiers)
■
1–n
■
all
■
Current valid
selected filter
Current valid
selected bridge
port
? (for a list of valid
ports)
■
txA
■
txM
■
rxA
■
rxM
■
rxI
■
all
■
[Default]
? (for a list of valid
paths)
Current valid
selected path
bridge packetFilter unassign
Bridge Packet Filter Unassign Examples (3500)
The unassignment is from the transmit all (txA) paths on port 1.
Select
Select
Select
Select
menu option (bridge/packetFilter): unassign
filter {1|?} [1]: 1
bridge port [1]: 1
path(s) (txA,rxA|all|?) [txA,rxA]: txA
385
386
CHAPTER 15: PACKET FILTERS
bridge packetFilter
portGroup list
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays a list of currently defined port groups.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa p l
Bridge Packet Filter Port Group List Example
3900
9300
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter/portGroup): list
Port Group 1 - Marketing
Port group mask - bit 15
Port Group 2 - Sales
Port group mask - bit 32
In the example, the system has two port groups defined: Marketing and
Sales. The display shows the group id, group name (if any), and group
mask.
bridge packetFilter portGroup display
bridge packetFilter
portGroup display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
387
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays a port group.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa p di
Important Consideration
3900
9300
■
Possible values for port groups (n) depend on the number of
user-defined port groups on the system.
Options
Prompt
Description
Select port
group
Number of the port group to
display
Possible Values
■
■
1–n
? (for a list of
valid port
groups)
[Default]
Current port
group
Sample Bridge Packet Filter Port Group Display (3500)
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter/portGroup): display
Select port group {1-2|?} [2]: 2
Port Group 2 - Sales
Port 5
Port 6
388
CHAPTER 15: PACKET FILTERS
bridge packetFilter
portGroup create
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Creates a port group.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa p c
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
You can create up to 32 port groups, one for each bit in the 32-bit
port group mask.
■
The portGroup create command only creates port group
associations. You must create and assign a filter to a port group to
affect filtering. See “bridge packetFilter create portGroup” and
“bridge packetFilter assign” earlier in this chapter.
■
Possible values for bridge ports (n) depend on the number of bridge
ports on the system.
Options
Prompt
Description
Select port Mask that you want to assign
group mask to the port group
Select port Name of the port group that
group name you want to create
Use quotation marks around
any string with embedded
spaces. Use ““ to enter an
empty string
Select
bridge port
Number of the bridge port that
you want to add to the new
group
Possible Values
■
■
■
1 – 32
–
? (for a list of
masks)
Up to 32
alphanumeric
characters
■
? (for name criteria)
■
1–n
■
all
■
[Default]
? (for a list of valid
ports)
–
–
bridge packetFilter portGroup create
389
Bridge Packet Filter Port Group Create Example (3500)
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter/portGroup): create
Select port group mask {1-32|?}: 15
Select port group name {?}[]: Marketing
Port Group 1 - Marketing - has been created
Select bridge port(s) (1-6|all|?): 1,3,4
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter/portGroup): create
Select port group mask {1-14,16-32|?}: 32
Select port group name {?} []: Sales
Port Group 2 - Sales - has been created
390
CHAPTER 15: PACKET FILTERS
bridge packetFilter
portGroup delete
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes a selected port group.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa p de
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
When you delete port groups from the system, those groups are no
longer available for use in packet filters.
■
When you delete a port group, the remaining port group IDs are
automatically renumbered to maintain consecutive numbering.
■
Possible values for port groups (n) depend on the number of userdefined port groups on the system.
Options
Prompt
Description
Select port
group
Number of the port group to
delete
Delete port
group?
Whether to delete the selected
port group
Possible Values
■
■
1–n
? (for a list of
groups)
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
[Default]
Current port
group
y
Bridge Packet Filter Port Group Delete Example
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter/portGroup): delete
Select port group {1-2|?} [2]: 1
Delete port group (n,y) [y]: y
Port Group 1 - Marketing - has been deleted.
bridge packetFilter portGroup addPort
bridge packetFilter
portGroup addPort
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
391
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Adds ports to an existing port group.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa p a
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
You add ports to an existing group by entering port identifiers at the
prompts. At least one port group must exist before you can add ports.
■
The maximum number of ports that a port group can contain is 32,
which is the maximum number of ports on a switching system.
■
Possible values for port groups (m) depend on the number of userdefined port groups on the system.
■
Possible values for bridge ports (n) depend on the number of existing
bridge ports on the system.
Options
Prompt
Description
Select port
group
Number of the port group to
which you want to add a
bridge port
Select
bridge port
Number of the bridge port that
you want to add to the
selected port group
Possible Values
■
■
1–m
? (for a list of
groups)
■
1–n
■
all
■
[Default]
Current port
group
–
? (for a list of
groups)
Bridge Packet Filter Port Group Add Port Examples
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter/portGroup): add
Select port group {1-2|?} [2]: 2
Select bridge port(s) (1-6|all|?): 2
When you display port group 2, the display shows that port 2 is added:
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter/portGroup): display
Select port group (1-2|all|?) [2]:
Port Group 2 - Sales
Port 2
Port 6
Port 5
392
CHAPTER 15: PACKET FILTERS
bridge packetFilter
portGroup
removePort
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes ports from a port group.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
b pa p r
Important Considerations
■
At least one group must exist before you can remove a port from a
port group.
■
Possible values for port groups (m) depend on the number of userdefined port groups on the system.
■
Possible values for bridge ports (n) depend on the number of existing
bridge ports on the system.
Options
Prompt
Description
Select port
group
Number of the port group
from which you want to
remove a bridge port
Select
bridge port
Number of the bridge port that
you want to remove from the
selected port group
Possible Values
■
■
1–m
? (for a list of
groups)
■
1–n
■
all
■
? (for a list of ports)
[Default]
Current port
group
–
Bridge Packet Filter Port Group Remove Port Examples
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter/portGroup): remove
Select port group {1-2|?} [2]: 2
Select bridge port(s) (1-6|all|?): 6
Displaying port group 2 shows that port 6 is removed:
Select menu option (bridge/packetFilter/portGroup): display
Select port group (1-2|all|?) [2]:
Port Group 2 - Sales
Port 2
Port 5
VI
ROUTING PROTOCOLS
Chapter 16
Internet Protocol (IP)
Chapter 17
Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP)
Chapter 18
IP Multicast
Chapter 19
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)
Chapter 20
IPX
Chapter 21
AppleTalk
16
INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
To route packets using the Internet Protocol (IP), you:
■
Establish an IP routing interface
■
Decide which IP options and routing protocols you want to use
■
Enable IP routing
An IP routing interface defines the relationship between an IP virtual LAN
(VLAN) and the subnetworks in the IP network. Each routing IP VLAN
interface is associated with one VLAN that supports IP. The system has
one interface defined for each subnet that is directly connected to it.
You can also choose between two different routing models when you
establish an IP routing interface:
■
VLAN-based routing
Because bridging is faster in normal circumstances, the system first
tries to determine if it can bridge the frame before routing it.
■
Router port-based routing
The system first tries to route packets that belong to recognized
protocols, and then bridges all other packets. If the network or a
portion of the network is devoted to routing IP frames, this model
makes network traffic more efficient.
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
configure IP in your system. This chapter addresses the commands in the
ip menu except for multicast and ospf, which other chapters in this
Command Reference Guide explain.
For information about IP multicast, see Chapter 18. For information
about Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing using IP, see Chapter 19.
For more information about IP routing, see the Implementation Guide for
your system.
396
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
397
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
➧ ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
ip menu
➧ interface
➧ route
➧ arp
multicast
➧ dns
vrrp
➧ udpHelper
routing
ospf
➧ rip
ping
advancedPing
traceRoute
advancedTraceRoute
statistics
interface menu
summary
detail
define
modify
remove
arpProxy
broadcastAddress
directedBroadcast
icmpRedirect
icmpRouterDiscovery
statistics
route menu
display
static
remove
flush
default
noDefault
findRoute
arp menu
display
static
remove
flushAll
flushDynamic
age
statistics
dns menu
display
domainName
define
modify
remove
nslookup
udpHelper menu
display
define
remove
hopCountLimit
threshold
➧ interface
rip menu
display
mode
compatibilityMode
cost
poisonReverse
routeAggregationMode
password
addAdvertisement
removeAdvertisement
➧ policy
statistics
interface menu
first
even
sequential
policy menu
summary
detail
define
modify
remove
398
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip interface summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays summary information about the IP interfaces that are configured
on the system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip i su
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
When you enter the command, you are prompted for an interface
index number even if you have only one interface defined.
■
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether IP routing
is enabled:
■
■
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500, IP interface options (such as ICMP router
discovery) appear under “ip interface detail” and are set on a
per-interface basis.
The Type field differs according to platform:
■
■
■
For CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 modules, it also indicates whether
ICMP router discovery is enabled on the system.
In the CoreBuilder 3500, which provides port-based routing and
VLAN-based routing, the Type field displays whether the IP
interface is VLAN-based or router port-based.
In all other platforms, which provide VLAN-based routing, the Type
field displays whether the IP interface is used for VLAN traffic or for
system management.
The last (rightmost) field in the display differs according to platform:
■
■
In the CoreBuilder 3500, the ID field displays either the logical port
number that is associated with a router port-based IP interface, or
the VLAN interface index number that is associated with the IP
interface.
In all other platforms, the VLAN index field displays the VLAN
interface index number that is associated with the IP interface.
ip interface summary
399
Options
Prompt
Description
Interface index Index number of the
IP interface whose
summary
information you
want to display
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
selectable interface
indexes
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable interface
indexes)
Fields in the IP Interface Summary Display
Field
Description
Index
Index number of the IP interface whose
summary information you want to display
IP address
IP address of the interface, chosen from the
range of addresses that the central agency
assigned to your organization. This address is
specific to your network and system.
Subnet mask
32-bit number that uses the same format and
representation as an IP address. The subnet
mask determines which bits in the IP address
are interpreted as the network number, the
subnetwork number, and the host number.
Each IP address bit that corresponds to a 1 in
the subnet mask is in the
network/subnetwork part of the address.
Each IP address bit that corresponds to a 0 is
in the host part of the IP address.
State
State of the IP interface. It indicates whether
the interface is available for communications
(up) or unavailable (down).
Type
■
■
ID (3500)
VLAN index (3900, 9000, 9300,
9400)
■
■
Type of interface: VLAN-based or router
port-based (3500)
Type of interface: VLAN or system (all
other platforms)
Logical port number of the router
port-based IP interface or the VLAN index
that is associated with the IP interface
VLAN index number that is associated
with the IP interface
400
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip interface detail
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
Displays detailed information about the specified interfaces or all
interfaces.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip i det
Important Consideration
■
When you enter the command, you are prompted for an interface
index number even if you have only one interface defined.
Options
Prompt
Description
Interface index Index number of the
IP interface whose
summary
information you
want to display
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
configured indexes
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable indexes)
Fields in the IP Interface Detail Display
Field
Description
ARP proxy
Whether ARP proxy is enabled or disabled for the
specified interface.
Broadcast address
Broadcast address for the specified interface.
Directed broadcast
Whether the forwarding of a directed broadcast (all 1s
in the host portion of the address) is enabled or
disabled for the specified interface. (A directed
broadcast is a packet that is sent to a specific network
or series of networks.)
ICMP redirect
Whether ICMP redirect is enabled or disabled for the
specified interface.
ICMP router discovery
Whether the ICMP Router Discovery is enabled or
disabled for the specified interface
Index
Index number that is associated with the interface.
IP address
IP address of the interface, chosen from the range of
addresses that the central agency assigned to your
organization. This address is specific to your network
and system.
ip interface detail
401
Field
Description
Preference
Whether there is a preference being used for the
specified interface. If ICMP router discovery is enabled,
the system uses the routing interface with the highest
preference level.
State
State of the IP interface. It indicates whether the
interface is available for communications (up) or
unavailable (down).
Subnet mask
32-bit number that uses the same format and
representation as an IP address. The subnet mask
determines which bits in the IP address are interpreted
as the network number, the subnetwork number, and
the host number. Each IP address bit that corresponds
to a 1 in the subnet mask is in the network/subnetwork
part of the address. Each IP address bit that corresponds
to a 0 is in the host part of the IP address.
Type
Type of interface: VLAN-based (VLAN) or router
port-based (port).
Index
Index number of the IP VLAN that is associated with the
IP interface.
MaxAdvInterval
Maximum advertisement interval between ICMP router
discovery advertisements (in seconds).
MinAdvInterval
Minimum advertisement interval between ICMP router
discovery advertisements (in seconds).
Holdtime
Length of time that ICMP router discovery
advertisements are held valid.
State
State of the IP interface. It indicates whether the
interface is available for communications (up) or
unavailable (down).
ID
■
■
Logical port number of the IP interface (if the Type
field displays port)
VLAN index number that is associated with the IP
interface (if the Type field displays VLAN)
402
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
IP Interface Detail Example (3500)
Select menu option (ip/interface): detail
Select IP interfaces (1|all|?) [1]: 1
IP routing is disabled
Index
1
IP address
158.101.31.21
Subnet mask
255.255.255.0
Index
1
ARP proxy
enabled
Index
1
ICMP router discovery
disabled
Broadcast address
255.255.255.255
State
Down
Type
Port
ID
Directed broadcast
enabled
1
ICMP redirect
enabled
Preference MaxAdvInterval MinAdvInterval Holdtime
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
ip interface define (3500/9000 Layer 3)
ip interface define
(3500/9000 Layer 3)
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
403
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines an IP interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip i def
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
When you define an IP interface, you must decide whether you want
the interface to use router port-based routing or VLAN-based routing.
■
Router port-based routing directs the system to attempt to route
the frame before it attempts to bridge the frame.
When you set up a router port-based IP interface, the system
automatically creates a virtual LAN (VLAN) for the interface. The
system assigns the next available VLAN index number to this VLAN.
■
VLAN-based routing directs the system to attempt to bridge the
frame before it attempts to route the frame.
When you set up a VLAN-based IP interface, you must first define a
VLAN and select IP as a protocol supported by the VLAN, as
described in Chapter 14.
If you define a router port, you do not have to define the VLAN first; the
corresponding single-port VLAN is automatically defined.
■
Port-based routing uses allClosed mode; VLAN-based routing uses
either allClosed or allOpen mode. If you attempt to set up a router
port-based IP interface in allOpen mode, the system notifies you with
a message that it will change the VLAN mode to allClosed and
recreate the default VLAN, clearing your existing VLANs in the process.
Then the system prompts you to continue. (See the port-based router
example at the end of this command description.)
■
You cannot define a port-based IP interface on a port that is already a
member of a VLAN-based IP interface. To change from one type of
interface to another, you must redefine all IP interfaces and VLANs
that are associated with that port.
CAUTION: Using different routing models (port-based or VLAN-based) in
the same network without careful planning can adversely affect your
network operations. Be sure that you understand the potential effects of
router port-based and VLAN-based routing on your network. See the
Implementation Guide for the CoreBuilder 3500 and for the
CoreBuilder 9000 for detailed information about IP interfaces and VLANs.
404
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
IP address
IP address of the interface, chosen
from the range of addresses that
the central agency assigned to your
organization. This address is specific
to your network and system.
A valid IP address –
in the range of
addresses that
are assigned to
your
organization
Subnet mask
32-bit number that uses the same
format and representation as an IP
address. The subnet mask
determines which bits in the IP
address are interpreted as the
network number, the subnetwork
number, and the host number.
Each IP address bit that corresponds
to a 1 in the subnet mask is in the
network/subnetwork part of the
address. Each IP address bit that
corresponds to a 0 is in the host
part of the IP address.
A valid subnet
mask in
accordance with
the bits that are
used for network
number,
subnetwork, and
host number
Interface type
Whether to use router port-based
routing or VLAN-based routing.
VLAN mode
(for router
port-based
routing)
Whether the system removes all
VLANs and recreates the default
VLAN to enable port-based routing.
Bridge port (for Port to use for port-based routing
router
(may designate only one port).
port-based
routing)
VLAN interface
index (for
VLAN-based
routing)
Index number of the IP VLAN that is
associated with the IP interface; for
a VLAN-based IP interface, you
must assign this number. (Not
applicable if you have more than
one VLAN)
■
port
■
vlan
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
■
1–n
■
■
■
Depends
on
specified IP
address
vlan
y
–
? (for a list of
selectable
ports)
A selectable
VLAN index
Next
available
index
? (for a list of
number
selectable
VLAN
indexes)
ip interface define (3500/9000 Layer 3)
405
IP Interface Define Example (Port-based Routing)
Enter IP address: 158.101.1.1
Enter subnet mask [255.255.0.0]: 255.255.255.0
Enter interface type (vlan/port) [vlan]: port
VLAN mode must be changed to allClosed to support this
interface.
This removes all VLANs, then re-creates the Default VLAN.
continue? (n,y) [y]: y
Select bridge port (1-6|?): 1
IP Interface Define Example (VLAN-based Routing)
Enter
Enter
Enter
Enter
IP address: 158.101.1.1
subnet mask [255.255.0.0]: 255.255.255.0
interface type (vlan/port) [vlan]:vlan
VLAN interface index {3|?} [3]: 3
406
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip interface define
(3900/9300/9400/
9000 Layer 2)
Defines an IP interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip i def
3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Consideration
■
Before you define the IP (routing) interface, first define a virtual LAN
(VLAN) and select IP as a protocol that the VLAN supports, as
described in Chapter 16.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
IP address
IP address of the interface,
chosen from the range of
addresses that the central agency
assigned to your organization.
This address is specific to your
network and system.
A valid IP address –
in the range of
addresses that
are assigned to
your
organization
Subnet mask
32-bit number that uses the
same format and representation
as an IP address. The subnet
mask determines which bits in
the IP address are interpreted as
the network number, the
subnetwork number, and the
host number. Each IP address bit
that corresponds to a 1 in the
subnet mask is in the
network/subnetwork part of the
address. Each IP address bit that
corresponds to a 0 is in the host
part of the IP address.
A valid subnet
Depends on
mask in
specified IP
accordance with address
the bits that are
used for network
number,
subnetwork, and
host number
VLAN interface Index number of the IP VLAN
index
that is associated with the IP
interface.
(Not applicable if you have more
than one VLAN)
■
■
A selectable
VLAN index
? (for a list of
selectable
VLAN
indexes)
IP Interface Define Example
Enter IP address: 158.101.1.1
Enter subnet mask [255.255.0.0]: 255.255.255.0
Enter VLAN interface index {2|?}[2]:2
Current
value
ip interface modify
ip interface modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
407
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Changes the configuration of an interface that you have already defined.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip i m
Important Consideration
■
On the CoreBuilder 3500, you cannot modify the port number (router
port-based routing) after it has been defined because of the
associated virtual LAN (VLAN); you must remove the interface and
then redefine it.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number that is associated
with the interface that you want
to modify.
Possible Values
■
■
(Not applicable if you have more
than one interface)
A selectable IP
interface index
[Default]
Current
value
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
IP address
IP address of the interface that
you want to modify.
A valid IP address
in the range of
addresses that are
assigned to your
organization
Current IP
address
Subnet mask
Subnet mask for the interface
that you want to modify.
A valid subnet
mask in
accordance with
the bits that are
used for network
number,
subnetwork, and
host number
Current
subnet
mask
VLAN interface
index (for
VLAN-based
routing)
Index number of the IP VLAN
that is associated with the IP
interface; for a VLAN-based IP
interface, you must assign this
number.
A selectable
VLAN index
Current
value
(Not applicable if you have more
than one VLAN)
■
■
? (for a list of
selectable
VLAN indexes)
408
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip interface remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes an IP interface from the system’s routing table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip i re
Important Considerations
■
Before you remove the interface, remove any static entries in the
routing table or the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache.
■
On the CoreBuilder 3500, if you remove a router port-based IP
interface, the system removes the virtual LAN (VLAN) that is associated
with it as well.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number that is associated
with the interfaces that you want
to remove
(Not applicable if you have more
than one interface)
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
selectable
interface
indexes
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
[Default]
Current
value
ip interface arpProxy
ip interface arpProxy
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
409
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
On a per-interface basis, enables or disables ARP proxy, which helps end
stations on a subnetwork reach remote subnetworks that do not have
routing capabilities or a default gateway configured.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ip i a
Important Considerations
■
When ARP proxy is enabled and an end station sends an Address
Resolution Protocol (ARP) request for a remote network, the system
determines if it has the best route and then answers the ARP request
by sending its own MAC address to the end station. The end station
then sends the frames for the remote destination to the system, which
uses its own routing table to reach the destination on the other
network.
■
When an interface is defined, the default ARP proxy state is enabled.
■
The end stations must view the entire network configuration as one
network (that is, by using a smaller subnet mask).
■
Evaluate prolonged use of ARP proxy because it has some drawbacks,
including increased ARP traffic and a need for larger ARP tables to
handle the mapping of IP addresses to MAC addresses.
Options
Prompt
Description
Interface
Index number for the interface
for which you want to enable or
disable ARP proxy.
(Not applicable if you have more
than one interface)
Possible Values
■
■
■
ARP proxy
state
Whether you want to implement
ARP proxy on an interface. The
system prompts you for a state
for each interface.
One or more
selectable
interface
indexes
[Default]
Current
value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
■
enabled
■
disabled
Current
value
410
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
IP Interface ARP Proxy Example (3500)
Select menu option (ip/interface): arpproxy
Select IP interfaces (1,2|?|all):2
Interface 2 - Enter proxy state (disabled, enabled)
[enabled]: enabled
ip interface broadcastAddress
ip interface
broadcastAddress
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
411
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
On a per-interface basis, assigns the broadcast address that the system
uses to forward the received directed broadcasts and advertise Routing
Information Protocol (RIP) packets.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip i b
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
You assign the broadcast address on a per-interface basis.
■
When an IP interface is configured, its default broadcast address is
255.255.255.255.
■
The broadcast address that you specify affects the RIP advertisement
address that is used for the RIP interface. You see the specified
broadcast address as the advertisement address under the RIP menus.
See “ip rip display” later in this chapter for information about the RIP
interface display.
■
You cannot change the broadcast address for an interface if you have
added any RIP advertisement addresses to that interface. See “ip rip
addAdvertisement” later in this chapter for more information.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the
interfaces to which you
want to assign a broadcast
address
(Not applicable if you have
more than one interface)
Broadcast
address per
interface
Broadcast address that
you want to assign to an
interface
Possible Values [Default]
■
■
■
One or more
interface
indexes
Current value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
A valid address
Current address
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CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip interface
directedBroadcast
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Specifies whether the forwarding of a directed broadcast (all 1s in the
host portion of the address) is enabled or disabled for a specified
interface. A directed broadcast is a packet that is sent to a specific
network or series of networks.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ip i di
Important Considerations
■
You define the directed broadcast state on a per-interface basis.
■
When the state is enabled and the system determines that the
destination is different from the interface that is receiving the directed
broadcast, the system uses the broadcast address that is defined for
this interface to forward the directed broadcast.
■
You can disable the forwarding of a directed broadcast if security is an
issue.
■
By default, the directed broadcast state is enabled.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index numbers of the interfaces
to which you want to enable or
disable the forwarding of a
directed broadcast.
(Not applicable if you have more
than one interface)
Directed
Whether you want to implement
broadcast state direct broadcast on an interface.
The system prompts you for a
state for each interface.
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
selectable
interface
indexes
[Default]
Current
value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
■
enabled
■
disabled
Current
value
IP Interface Directed Broadcast Example (3500)
Select menu option (ip/interface): directedBroadcast
Select IP interfaces (1,2|all|?):2
Interface 2 - Enter directed broadcast state
(disabled, enabled) [enabled]:
ip interface icmpRedirect
ip interface
icmpRedirect
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
413
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables or disables the transmission of an Internet Control Message
Protocol (ICMP) redirect to the sender of a frame to indicate that there is
a better gateway available to handle the frame than this routing
interface.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ip i icmpre
Important Considerations
■
The software determines whether there is a better path for the frame
by determining whether the source interface is the same as the
destination interface and whether the frame’s sender is on a directly
connected network. If the software determines that a received frame
has a better path available through another gateway:
■
■
It sends an ICMP redirect message back to the originator of the
frame indicating the better gateway to use in the future
It routes the frame to the gateway
■
ICMP redirect can be set on a per-interface basis.
■
For better performance or if you have applications that ignore ICMP
redirects, disable the ability of the interface to send ICMP redirects.
■
If you have two interfaces that belong to virtual LANs (VLANs) that
share a given port and you want to completely disable ICMP redirects
for that port, disable the redirects for each interface that shares that
port. If you disable it for only one interface and enable it for the other,
you may not get the performance improvement that you want.
414
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the interfaces
to which you want to enable or
disable the transmission of an
ICMP redirect to the sender of
a frame.
(Not applicable if you have
more than one interface)
ICMP redirect
state
Whether you want to
implement ICMP redirect state
on an interface. The system
prompts you for a state for
each interface.
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
selectable
interface indexes
[Default]
Current
value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface indexes)
■
enabled
■
disabled
disabled, or
current
value
ip interface icmpRouterDiscovery
ip interface
icmpRouterDiscovery
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
415
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables or disables Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) router
discovery, which enables hosts that are attached to multicast or broadcast
networks to discover the IP addresses of their neighboring routers and
determine which router to use for a default gateway.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ip i icmpro
Important Considerations
■
ICMP router discovery can be set on a per-interface basis.
■
When you enable the state for an interface, the system prompts you
for a preference. (See RFC 1256.) By default, this preference level is 0.
Use the preference to control the use of certain routers as the default
router. The host uses the router with the highest preference level.
■
An appropriately configured end station can locate one or more
routers on the LAN to which it is attached. The end station then
automatically installs a default route to each of the routers that are
running Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) router discovery.
You do not need to manually configure a default route. ICMP redirect
messages subsequently channel the IP traffic to the correct router.
■
You can configure only certain end stations to work with the ICMP
router discovery protocol. See the documentation for your
workstation to determine whether you can configure it to work with
this protocol.
■
You can configure and display three timers for ICMP router discovery
on the CoreBuilder 3500:
■
■
■
Maximum advertisement interval — The maximum time
interval between advertisements.
Minimum advertisement interval — The minimum time interval
between advertisements.
Advertisement holdtime — The length of time that
advertisements are held valid.
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CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
The ranges for minimum advertisement interval depend on the set values
for maximum advertisement interval and the holdtime range depends on
the input values for both the maximum and minimum advertisement
intervals.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the interfaces
for which you want to enable or
disable ICMP router discovery.
(Not applicable if you have more
than one interface)
Router
Whether you want to implement
discovery state ICMP router discovery on an
interface. The system prompts
you for a state for each interface.
Possible Values
■
■
■
[Default]
One or more
Current
selectable
value
interface indexes
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
■
enabled
■
disabled
disabled,
or current
value
Preference
If you select enabled, the host minimum value
interprets an unsigned integer as (hex 80000000)
a 32-bit signed
-231 to 231
twos-complement integer that
represents the preference level to
associate with the interface.
Higher values produce higher
preference levels. The minimum
value is reserved so that the
address is not used as a default
router address, only for specific
IP destinations.
0
Maximum
advertisement
interval
Maximum interval between
advertisements.
4 – 1800 seconds
600
Minimum
advertisement
interval
Minimum interval between
advertisements.
3 – 600 seconds
450
Advertisement
holdtime
Length of time that
advertisements are held valid.
600 – 9000 seconds 1800
ip interface icmpRouterDiscovery
417
IP Interface ICMP Router Discovery Example (3500)
Select menu option (ip/interface): icmprouterdiscovery
Select IP interfaces (1|all|?) [1]: 1
Interface
Interface
Interface
Interface
Interface
1
1
1
1
1
-
Enter
Enter
Enter
Enter
Enter
router discovery state (disabled,enabled) [disabled]: enabled
router discovery preference [0]:
maximum advertisement interval (4-1800) [600]:
minimum advertisement interval (3-600) [450]:
advertisement holdtime (600-9000) [1800]:
418
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip interface statistics
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays IP interface statistics on a per-interface basis.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip i st
Important Consideration
■
The system prompts you for an interface index number even if you
have only one interface defined.
Options
Prompt
Description
Interface index Index number of the
interface whose
statistics you want to
display
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
configured interface
indexes
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable interface
indexes)
Fields in the IP Interface Statistics Display
Field
Description
inAddrErrors
Number of datagrams that the IP station discarded because of an
error in the source or destination IP address
inCsumErrors
Number of datagrams that were dropped because of a checksum
error
inDelivers
Number of datagrams that the IP station delivered to local IP client
protocols
inDiscards
Number of packet receive discards
inForwards
Total number of packets that were forwarded (that is, routed
through hardware or software or both)
inHdrErrors
Number of datagrams that the IP station discarded because the IP
header contained errors
inReceives
Total number of IP datagrams that were received, including those
with errors
inSameSegment Number of packets that were received on an interface and that
need to be forwarded out on the same interface
ip interface statistics
419
Field
Description
inTtlExceeds
Number of packets that were received on an interface and that
need to be forwarded, but that have an IP header TTL value of less
than 2
outDiscards
Number of packet transmit discards
outForwards
Total number of packets that a router has forwarded to an
outbound interface (that is, routed through hardware or software
or both)
420
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip route display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the system’s routing table to determine which routes to other IP
networks are configured and whether the routes are operational.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip route di
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500 only, the system prompts you for an IP
address and subnet mask. As a result, you can display only a subset of
routes instead of all routes. To see all entries in the table, simply press
Enter at these prompts.
■
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether IP routing
is enabled:
■
■
For the CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 module, it also indicates whether
Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) router discovery is
enabled on the system.
For the CoreBuilder 3500, IP interface options (such as ICMP router
discovery) appear under “ip interface detail” earlier in this chapter
and are set on a per-interface basis.
Options (3500 only)
Prompt
Description
IP address
IP address (and its
corresponding
subnet mask) for
which to display only
those routes that
match the bits set
in it
Subnet mask
Possible Values
■
■
A valid IP address
[Default]
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0 (displays all
entries)
Subnet mask for the A valid subnet mask of a
specified IP address specified IP address
for which to display
only those routes
that match the bits
set in it
Current
value
ip route display
421
Fields in the IP Route Display
Field
Description
Destination
IP address of the destination network, subnetwork, or host. This
field can also identify a default route, which the system uses to
forward packets that do not match any other routing table entry.
You may want to use the default route in place of routes to
numerous destinations that all have the same gateway IP
address.
Subnet mask
Subnet mask that is associated with the IP address of the
destination network, subnetwork, or host.
Metric
Associated cost of sending a packet to the destination. The
system includes the metric in its RIP and OSPF updates to allow
other routers to compare routing information received from
different sources.
Gateway
Address that directs the router how to forward packets whose
destination addresses match the route’s IP address and subnet
mask. The system forwards such packets to the indicated
gateway.
Status
Status of the route. See the following status table.
TTL
Time To Live — Time remaining before the route expires or is
reset.
Status for Routes
Field
Description
Direct
Route is for a directly connected network
Learned
Route was learned using indicated protocol
Learned
RIP-Zombie
Route was learned but is partially timed out. This condition is
applied to all learned routes reached by an interface gateway
which is in the down state.
Learned RIP2
Route was learned using RIP-2 protocol
Local
Actual interface address
Static
Route was statically configured
Timed out
Route has timed out and is no longer valid
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CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip route static
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
Defines a static route.
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip route s
■
Before you can define static routes, you must define at least one IP
interface. See “ip interface define (3500/9000 Layer 3)” earlier in this
chapter for more information.
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500, you can define up to 256 static routes.
■
For the other platforms, you can define up to 64 static routes.
■
Static routes remain in the table; you must remove them before you
can remove the corresponding interface.
■
Static routes take precedence over dynamically learned routes to the
same destination
■
Static routes are included in periodic Routing Information Protocol
(RIP) updates that the system sends.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
Destination IP
address
IP address of the
A valid IP address
destination network,
subnetwork, or host
for this route
–
Subnet mask
Subnet mask for the A valid subnet mask
specified IP address
Based on
specified IP
address
Gateway IP
address
IP address of the
gateway that this
route uses
–
A valid router address
[Default]
ip route remove
ip route remove
423
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
Deletes an existing route.
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Consideration
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip route r
■
When you enter the command, the system deletes the route
immediately from the routing table. You are not prompted to confirm
the deletion.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Destination IP
address
IP address of the
route that you want
to delete
A valid IP address
–
Subnet mask
Subnet mask for the A valid subnet mask
specified IP address
Based on
specified IP
address
424
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip route flush
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes all learned routes from the routing table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip route fl
Important Considerations
■
The system flushes all learned routes from the routing table
immediately. You are not prompted to confirm the deletion.
■
Flushing the routing table does not cause the Routing Information
Protocol (RIP) to update the routing table. You must change the metric
to update the routing table.
ip route default
ip route default
425
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
Adds a default route to the routing table immediately.
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip route de
■
If you define a default route, the system uses it to forward packets
that do not match any other routing table entry. The system can learn
a route through the routing protocol, or you can statically configure a
default route.
■
The system can learn a default route.
■
If the routing table does not contain a default route, the system
cannot forward a packet that does not match any other routing table
entry. When the system drops the packet, it sends an Internet Control
Message Protocol (ICMP) destination unreachable message to the
host that sent the packet.
■
On the CoreBuilder 3500 or the CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 module,
you establish a static sink default route, so that the system can
advertise itself as a default router. The static sink default route is not
used in any of the system’s forwarding decisions because it does not
have a valid next-hop gateway, but it can be advertised to all of the
system’s neighbors (unless you establish IP policies to prevent the
advertisement).
Defining a static sink default route causes the route to be advertised
through any IP protocols that you have configured on the system (for
example, Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) and RIP). For more
information about static sink default routes, see the Implementation
Guide for the CoreBuilder 3500 or for the CoreBuilder 9000.
Options
Prompt
Description
Gateway IP
address
IP address of the
route that you want
to add as the default
Possible Values
■
■
A valid IP address
0.0.0.0 (static sink
default route)
[Default]
–
426
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip route noDefault
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
Deletes the default route.
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Consideration
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip route n
■
The system deletes the default route from the routing table
immediately after you enter the command. You are not prompted to
confirm the deletion.
ip route findRoute
ip route findRoute
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
427
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Searches for a route in the routing table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip route fi
Important Considerations
■
This command enables you to find a route using an IP address or a
host name, as long as the Domain Name System (DNS) is configured.
■
When you enter this command with a valid IP address or host name,
the system displays the routing table entry.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP address (or
host name)
IP address of the
route that you want
to find, or a host
name, if DNS is
configured
Possible Values
■
A valid IP address
■
A valid host name
[Default]
0.0.0.0, or
current
value
428
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip arp display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the contents of the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache for
each interface on the system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ar d
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
The system uses the ARP cache to find the MAC addresses that
correspond to the IP addresses of hosts and other routers on the same
subnetworks. Each device that participates in routing maintains an
ARP cache, which is a table of known IP addresses and their
corresponding MAC addresses.
■
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether IP routing
is enabled:
■
■
For the CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 module, it also indicates whether
Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) router discovery is
enabled on the system.
For the CoreBuilder 3500, IP interface options (such as ICMP router
discovery) appear under “ip interface detail” earlier in this chapter
and are set on a per-interface basis. The second status line
indicates the number of entries in the ARP cache.
Fields in the IP ARP Display
Field
Description
Circuit
Circuit identifier
Hardware address
MAC address that is mapped to the IP address
I/F
Index number of the associated interface
IP address
IP address of the interface
Type
Type of entry — static or dynamic
ip arp static
ip arp static
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
429
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines a static Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache entry on the
system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ar s
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500, you can define up to 128 static ARP entries.
■
For the other platforms, you can define up to 64 entries.
Options
Prompt
Description
Interface index Index number of the
interface for which
you want to define a
static ARP entry
Possible Values
■
■
A selectable interface
index
[Default]
–
? (for a list of
selectable interface
indexes)
IP address
IP address to use in
the entry
A valid IP address
MAC address
Hardware address to A valid MAC address in
use in the entry
the format
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx
IP ARP Static Example
Select interface index {1-2|?} 2
Enter IP address: 158.101.12.12
Enter MAC address: 00-00-00-00-00-01
–
–
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CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip arp remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes an entry from the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache (for
example, if the MAC address has changed).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ar rem
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
When you enter the command, the system deletes the entry from the
cache immediately. You are not prompted to confirm the deletion.
■
If necessary, the system subsequently uses ARP to find the new MAC
address that corresponds to that IP address.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
IP address
IP address for the
entry that you want
to delete
A valid IP address
–
ip arp flushAll
ip arp flushAll
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
431
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes all entries from the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ar flushA
Important Considerations
■
To flush dynamic entries only, see “ip arp flushDynamic” next in this
chapter.
■
When you enter the command, the system deletes all entries from the
cache immediately. You are not prompted to confirm the deletion.
432
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip arp flushDynamic
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes all dynamic (learned) entries from the Address Resolution Protocol
(ARP) cache.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ar flushD
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
To flush all entries, static and dynamic, see the previous “ip arp
flushAll” option.
■
When you enter the command, the system deletes all dynamic entries
from the cache immediately. You are not prompted to confirm the
deletion.
ip arp age
ip arp age
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
433
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the age time for dynamic Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache
entries.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ar a
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
The age time determines how long, in minutes, that the dynamic
entries remain in the ARP cache before they are removed.
■
By default, the system flushes the entry from the cache when it
reaches the age time.
■
A value of 0 indicates no age time, and the entry remains in the table
until you remove it with the ip arp remove option or flush the ARP
cache with the appropriate flush option.
Options
Prompt
Description
Age time
Time that dynamic
entries remain in the
ARP cache
Possible Values
■
1 – 1440 minutes
■
0 (to disable aging)
[Default]
15 (factory
default), or
current value
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CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip arp statistics
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays detailed information about the specified interfaces or all
interfaces.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ar status
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
Your system tracks the number of times that a particular Address
Resolution Protocol (ARP) event occurs.
■
If a port that has multiple IP interfaces associated with it receives an
ARP frame that is discarded because of an address mismatch, the
inReceives and inDiscards statistics are incremented for the first
interface of all the interfaces that are associated with the port.
■
The system supports baselining for ARP statistics.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
IP interface
Index number of the
IP interface from
which to select ARP
statistics
■
■
■
One or more
selectable interface
indexes
[Default]
1
all
? (for a list of
selectable interface
indexes)
Fields in the IP ARP Statistics Display
Field
Description
inDiscards
Received ARP frames that have been discarded due
to one of the following reasons:
■
inReceived
Frame had a source address that did not match
any directly connected IP interface that was
associated with the port on which it was
received
■
Frame contained an invalid header
■
Frame was not an ARP request or an ARP reply
ARP frames (requests, replies, and discards) that
were received on an IP interface
ip arp statistics
Field
Description
inReplies
ARP reply frames that were received on an IP
interface
inRequests
ARP request frames that were received on an IP
interface
outIfdown
Failure of the system to send one of the following
three frames because the state of the IP interface
was down:
■
ARP request
■
ARP reply
■
IP frame to be forwarded (pending ARP
resolution)
outMemErrors
Failure of the system to allocate memory to
transmit either an ARP request or an ARP reply
outReplies
ARP replies that were transmitted from an IP
interface
outRequests
ARP requests that were transmitted from an IP
interface
435
436
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip dns display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the current domain name and the name servers that are
associated with it.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip d di
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
The Domain Name System (DNS) client provides DNS lookup
functionality to the CoreBuilder IP ping and traceRoute features. You
can specify a host name rather than an IP address when you perform
various operations (for example, when you use ping or traceRoute to
contact an IP station).
■
With the DNS commands, you specify one or more name servers that
are associated with a domain name. Each name server maintains a list
of IP addresses and their associated host names. When you use ping
or traceRoute with a host name, the DNS client attempts to locate
the name on the name servers that you specify. When the DNS client
locates the name, it resolves it to the associated IP address.
■
See UNIX Network File System (NFS) documentation for information
about how to create and maintain lists of domain names and IP
addresses on the name servers.
Fields in the IP DNS Display
Field
Description
Domain name
Name of the domain name (up to 79 alphanumeric
characters)
Name server
Name server that is associated with the domain
ip dns domainName
ip dns domainName
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
437
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Changes the name of a currently defined domain.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip d do
Important Considerations
■
You can specify a domain name with up to 79 alphanumeric
characters.
■
Use single quotation marks (‘ ‘) around any string that has embedded
spaces. Use double quotation marks (“ “) to enter an empty string.
Options
Prompt
Description
Domain name
Name of the
domain. The name
can be up to
79 characters long.
Possible Values
■
■
A valid domain name
? (to get information
about specifying a
domain name)
[Default]
– (or current
name)
438
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip dns define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines a new name server IP address to associate with the current
domain name.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip d de
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
When the system accepts the new IP address, it displays a message
like the following:
Server’s IP address xxxxx is added to the DNS database
■
The system assigns an index number to the new IP address. Use this
index number to modify or remove this IP address.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
Name server IP IP address of the
A valid IP address
address
name server that you
want to define
[Default]
–
ip dns modify
ip dns modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
439
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies a currently defined name server IP address.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip d m
Important Considerations
■
When you enter the command, the system displays the list of name
server addresses and the index number that is associated with each.
■
The system assigns an index number to the new IP address. Use this
index number to modify this IP address.
Options
Prompt
Description
Index
Index number of the
name server IP
address that you
want to modify
Possible Values
■
■
A selectable server
index number
[Default]
–
? (for a list of
selectable server
indexes)
Name server IP New IP address of
A valid IP address
address
the name server that
you want to use
–
440
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip dns remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes a previously defined name server IP address.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip d r
Important Consideration
■
When you enter the command, the system displays the list of name
server addresses and the index number that is associated with each.
Options
Prompt
Description
Index
Index number of the
name server IP
address that you
want to remove
Possible Values
■
■
A selectable server
index number
? (for a list of
selectable server
indexes)
[Default]
–
ip dns nslookup
ip dns nslookup
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
441
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Maps an IP address to a host name or a host name to an IP address on a
name server.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip d n
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
Specify a host name or IP address at the prompt.
■
Enter a string of up to 255 characters.
■
Use single quotation marks (‘ ‘) around any string with embedded
spaces. Use double quotation marks (“ ”) to enter an empty string.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP address or
host name
IP address or host
name that you want
to map
Possible Values
■
■
A host name of up to
255 characters
A valid IP address
[Default]
–
442
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip udpHelper display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the BOOTP (bootstrap protocol) hop count and the threshold
configuration. Also lists the ports with their IP forwarding addresses that
are defined in your system.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ip u di
Important Considerations
■
With UDP Helper, you can send User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packets
between routed networks. UDP Helper provides support for UDP
services such as BOOTP and DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol), which rely on the BOOTP relay agent.
■
When you configure the logical BOOTP port, you can boot hosts
through the router. UDP Helper also provides a relay agent for DHCP
broadcasts. UDP packets that rely on the BOOTP relay agent are
modified and then forwarded through the router.
■
BOOTP (including DHCP) uses UDP port 67.
■
With UDP Helper, you can configure the amount of time that a UDP
packet is forwarded between subnetworks. The system discards UDP
packets based on the hop count and the seconds value only for
BOOTP and DHCP.
Fields in the IP udpHelper Display
Field
Description
UDP port
UDP port number — usually the value 67
Forwarding address
Forwarding address that is used for UDP packets
ip udpHelper define
ip udpHelper define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
443
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines port numbers or IP forwarding addresses for the UDP Helper.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip u de
Important Considerations
■
You can have up to 63 combinations of port numbers and IP
forwarding addresses per router.
■
You can have multiple IP address entries for the same ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
UDP port
number
Port number for UDP 1 – 65535
67 (factory
default), or
current
value
IP forwarding
address
Forwarding
addresses that are
used for UDP
packets
–
A valid IP address
[Default]
444
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip udpHelper remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes a port number or IP forwarding address that has been defined
for UDP Helper.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip u r
3900
9300
Important Consideration
■
The system immediately removes the port numbers and IP forwarding
addresses that you specified. You are not prompted to confirm the
deletion.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
UDP port
number
UDP port number
that you want to
remove
1 – 65535
67 (factory
default), or
current
value
IP forwarding
address
Forwarding
addresses that you
want to remove
A valid IP address
–
ip udpHelper hopCountLimit
ip udpHelper
hopCountLimit
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
445
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the maximum hop count to specify how many steps the system uses
to forward a packet through the router.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip u h
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
BOOTP hop
count limit
Maximum number
of hops to allow for
UDP packet
forwarding
0 – 16
4 (factory
default), or
current
value
446
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip udpHelper
threshold
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the maximum number of times that the system forwards a packet to
the network.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip u t
Important Consideration
■
By default, there is no threshold (0).
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
BOOTP relay
threshold
Maximum number
of times that the
system forwards a
packet to the
network
0 – 65535
0 (factory
default), or
current
value
ip udpHelper interface first
ip udpHelper
interface first
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
447
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Configures UDP Helper to support overlapped IP interfaces by using the
first interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip u i f
Important Considerations
■
Overlapped IP interfaces are multiple logical interfaces that are defined
for a single physical port. You can specify how UDP Helper forwards
packets from overlapped IP interfaces with one of three interface
options (first, even, or sequential).
■
The value first directs the system to use the first overlapped IP
interface as the source network for forwarded packets.
■
The system implements your selection immediately. You can view the
UDP Helper configuration when you configure the forwarding
address.
448
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip udpHelper
interface even
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Configures UDP Helper to support overlapped IP interfaces by evenly
distributing interfaces.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip u i e
Important Considerations
■
The value even directs the system to hash the client’s MAC address to
determine the source network for forwarded packets. This
arrangement evenly distributes the interface among those on the
network.
■
The system implements your selection immediately. You can view the
UDP Helper configuration when you configure the forwarding
address.
ip udpHelper interface sequential
ip udpHelper
interface sequential
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
449
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Configures UDP Helper to support overlapped IP interfaces by distributing
the interfaces sequentially.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip u i s
Important Considerations
■
The value sequential directs the system to assign each overlapped IP
interface, in turn, as the source network for forwarded packets.
■
The system implements your selection immediately. You can view the
UDP Helper configuration when you configure the forwarding
address.
450
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip routing
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Controls whether the system forwards or discards IP packets that are
addressed to other hosts.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip routi
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
When you enable IP routing, the system acts as a standard IP router: it
forwards IP packets from one subnetwork to another when required.
■
When you disable IP routing, the system discards any IP packets that
are not addressed directly to one of its defined IP interfaces.
■
By default, IP routing is disabled on the system.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP routing state Whether IP routing is
implemented on the
system
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
disabled
ip rip display
ip rip display
451
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
Displays information about the Routing Information Protocol (RIP)
interfaces on the system. RIP is one of the IP Interior Gateway Protocols
(IGPs). When RIP is enabled, the system dynamically configures its routing
tables.
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ri d
Important Considerations
■
The output for this display differs according to platform.
■
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether IP routing
is enabled:
■
■
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500, IP interface options (such as ICMP router
discovery) appear under “ip interface detail” earlier in this chapter
and are set on a per-interface basis. The rest of the output contains
more RIP interface information.
The four available RIP modes are as follows:
■
■
■
■
■
For the CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 3 module, it also indicates whether
Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) router discovery is
enabled on the system.
Disabled — The system ignores all incoming RIP packets and does
not generate any RIP packets of its own.
Learn — The system processes all incoming RIP packets, but it
does not transmit RIP updates.
Advertise (3500 and 9000 only) — The system broadcasts RIP
updates, but it does not process incoming RIP packets.
Enabled (3500 and 9000 only) — The systems broadcasts RIP
updates and processes incoming RIP packets.
An advertising router sends a RIP message every 30 seconds with both
the IP address and a metric (the distance to the destination from that
router) for each destination. Each router through which a RIP packet
must travel to reach a destination equals one hop.
452
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
Fields in the IP RIP Display
Field
Description
Advertisement Addresses List of available advertisement addresses. The list is used
(3500 and 9000 only)
for RIP-2 updates only if the RIP-1 compatibility mode is
enabled. RIP-1 always uses advertisement addresses.
Compatibility Mode
(3500 only)
Whether RIP 1 compatibility mode is enabled or
disabled (by default, disabled).
Cost
(3500 and 9000 only)
RIP cost for the interface (by default, 1).
Index
Index number of the interface.
Poison Reverse
(3500 and 9000 only)
Whether poison reverse mode is enabled or disabled
(by default, enabled).
RIP-1 Mode
Mode for RIP-1. If you disable RIP-1, the output lists the
state as off. Other modes are learn (default),
advertise, and enabled.
RIP-2 Mode
Mode for RIP-2. If you disable RIP-2, the output lists the
state as off. Other modes are learn (default),
advertise, and enabled.
Route Aggregate
(3500 only)
Whether Route Aggregation mode is enabled or
disabled
ip rip mode
ip rip mode
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
453
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
On a per-interface basis, sets one of four RIP Version 1 (RIP-1) modes on
the system. For all platforms except the CoreBuilder 9000, also allows you
to set RIP Version 2 (RIP-2) modes.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
ip ri m
Important Considerations
■
Platforms except the CoreBuilder 9000 support RIP Version 1 as well
as RIP Version 2. For each interface, you select a RIP Version 1 mode
and a RIP Version 2 mode. The default RIP Version 1 mode for all
platforms is learn. The default RIP Version 2 mode is learn.
■
The four available RIP modes are as follows:
■
■
■
■
Disabled — The interface ignores all incoming RIP packets and
does not generate any RIP packets of its own.
Learn — The interface processes all incoming RIP packets, but it
does not transmit RIP updates. This is the default RIP mode.
Advertise (3500 and 9000 only) — The interface broadcasts RIP
updates, but it does not process incoming RIP packets.
Enabled (3500 and 9000 only) — The interface broadcasts RIP
updates and processes incoming RIP packets.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the interfaces
for which you want to set the RIP
mode
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
selectable
interface
indexes
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
[Default]
Previous
entry, if
applicable
454
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
Prompt
Description
RIP mode,
Version 1
Selected RIP Version 1 mode that
determines how the interface
handles RIP 1 packets and
updates
Possible Values
■
disabled
■
learn
■
■
RIP mode,
Version 2
(not 9000)
Selected RIP mode that
determines how the interface
handles RIP 2 packets and
updates
advertise
(3500/9000)
disabled
■
learn
■
learn
(factory
default), or
current
value
enabled
(3500/9000)
■
■
[Default]
advertise
(3500 only)
learn
(factory
default), or
current
value
enabled
(3500 only)
IP RIP Mode Example
Select IP interfaces (1,2|all|?): 1
Interface 1 - Enter RIP Version 1 mode
(disabled,learn,advertise,enabled) [learn]: disabled
Interface 1 - Enter RIP Version 2 mode
(disabled,learn,advertise,enabled) [learn]: enabled
ip rip compatibilityMode
ip rip
compatibilityMode
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
455
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
On a per-interface basis, sets the RIP Version 1 compatibility mode.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ri com
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
The RIP-1 compatibility mode determines how the software sends
periodic RIP-2 updates. (For RIP-1, the software never uses the
multicast address; it uses the advertisement list.)
■
■
When the system is configured to advertise RIP-2 packets and
compatibility mode is disabled, the software uses the multicast
address of 224.0.0.9 when sending periodic updates. This latest
industry recommendation reduces the load on hosts that are not
configured to listen to RIP-2 messages.
When the system is configured to advertise RIP-2 packets and
compatibility mode is enabled, the software uses the
advertisement list for RIP-2 updates.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the interfaces
for which you want to set the RIP
compatibility mode
Possible Values
■
■
■
RIP-1
compatibility
mode
Selected RIP Version 1
compatibility mode that
determines how the system
handles RIP-2 updates
One or more
selectable
interface
indexes
[Default]
Previous
entry, if
applicable
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
■
disabled
■
enabled
disabled
456
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip rip cost
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
On a per-interface basis, sets the RIP cost.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ri cos
Important Considerations
■
The default cost value is 1, which is appropriate for most networks.
■
The system uses the cost number, between 1 and 15, to calculate
route metrics. Unless your network has special requirements, assign a
cost of 1 to all interfaces.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the interfaces
for which you want to set the RIP
cost
Possible Values
■
■
■
RIP cost
One or more
selectable
interface
indexes
[Default]
Previous
entry, if
applicable
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
Selected RIP cost for the interface 1 – 15
1 (factory
default), or
current
value
ip rip poisonReverse
ip rip poisonReverse
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
457
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables or disables RIP Poison Reverse mode on the system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ri poi
Important Considerations
■
Your system always implements Split Horizon, a scheme that aims to
avoid the problems that are associated with reverse-route updates
(that is, the updates that are sent to a neighboring router that include
the routes that are learned from that router). The scheme omits the
routes that are learned from one neighbor in the updates that are sent
to that neighbor (the reverse routes). Poison reverse works with Split
Horizon as follows:
■
■
When you enable Poison Reverse for use with the Split Horizon
scheme (the default), the system advertises reverse routes in
updates, but sets the metrics to 16 (infinity). Setting the metric to
infinity breaks the loop immediately when two routers have routes
that point to each other.
When you disable Poison Reverse for the Split Horizon scheme,
reverse routes are simply not advertised.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the interfaces
for which you want to set the
poison reverse mode
Possible Values
■
■
■
Poison Reverse Whether you want to
mode
implement poison reverse for
the selected interface
[Default]
One or more
Previous
selectable
entry, if
interface indexes applicable
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
■
disabled
■
enabled
Current
value
458
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip rip
routeAggregation
Mode
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the route aggregation mode.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ri ro
Important Considerations
■
3900
9300
Route aggregation mode determines which route table entries are
sent during a RIP Version 2 update.
■
■
If route aggregation mode is enabled, RIP-2 can function like RIP-1
and “collapse” route table entries for all subnets of a directly
connected network. For example, if route aggregation is enabled,
and the system is advertising subnets 150.100.31.0 and
150.100.32.0, only the entry for network 150.100.0.0 is sent in
the update. With RIP Version 2, you must enable route aggregation
mode if you want the interface to collapse the route table entries
and function like RIP-1.
If route aggregation mode is disabled (the default), a RIP-2
update sends all routing table entries.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the interfaces
for which you want to set the
route aggregation mode
Possible Values
■
■
■
Route
aggregation
mode
Whether you want to
implement route aggregation
on the selected interface
[Default]
One or more
Previous
selectable
entry, if
interface indexes applicable
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface indexes)
■
disabled
■
enabled
Current
value
ip rip password
ip rip password
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
459
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the IP RIP-2 password so that you can choose the IP interfaces that
can put RIP-2 updates into their routing tables.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ri pa
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
If the sending interface has an IP RIP-2 password, the receiving
interface must have the same IP RIP-2 password. If the receiving
interface has a different password or a null password, its routing table
is not updated.
■
If you are using RIP-1, do not use the password option.
■
You cannot use the ASCII string none as the password. This string is
reserved to indicate the default password, which is a null value.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the IP interfaces
that you want to allow to receive
route updates
Possible Values
■
■
■
Password
Combination of characters that
you set as the RIP-2 password
■
■
[Default]
One or more
–
selectable
interface indexes
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
up to 16
alphanumeric
characters
null password
IP RIP Password Example
Select menu option (ip/rip): password
Select IP interfaces (1,2|all|?): 1
Interface 1 - Enter password {?} [none]: wings
null
password
460
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip rip
addAdvertisement
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Adds an advertisement address to an IP RIP interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ri a
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
The system uses the specified advertisement address to advertise
routes to other stations on the same network. It uses this address for
sending updates. (RIP-2 updates depend on the setting of RIP
compatibility mode.)
■
Advertisement addresses are handled differently based on RIP-1 and
RIP-2.
■
■
For the CoreBuilder 3500, each interface that you define initially
uses the default broadcast address (255.255.255.255) as the
advertisement address. With RIP-1 updates, the address that you
specify becomes the new RIP-1 advertisement address if you
change the broadcast address. If you subsequently use RIP-2
(configure the interface to send RIP-2 advertisements) and have the
RIP-1 compatibility mode disabled, the multicast address is used for
updates.
For the CoreBuilder 9000, each interface that you define initially
uses the directed broadcast address as the RIP advertisement
address (all 1s in the host field).
■
You can specify up to 64 advertisement addresses in separate
iterations.
■
On the CoreBuilder 3500:
■
■
■
After you add an advertisement address, you cannot subsequently
change the broadcast address.
If you are using RIP-2 for the interface, you must enable RIP
compatibility mode if you want the system to use the
advertisement list instead of the multicast address for RIP updates.
See “ip rip compatibilityMode” earlier in this chapter for more
information.
To add an advertisement address on other platforms, you must remove
the directed broadcast address if you only want the address that you
added to be used for RIP advertisements.
ip rip addAdvertisement
461
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the interfaces
for which you want to add the
advertisement address
Possible Values
■
■
Advertisement
address
One or more
selectable
interface
indexes
[Default]
Previous
entry, if
applicable
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
Selected IP address to add to the A valid IP address
list of advertisement addresses
–
462
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip rip remove
Advertisement
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes an advertisement address from the list of RIP advertisement
addresses for an interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ri re
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the interfaces
for which you want to remove
the advertisement address
Possible Values
■
■
Advertisement
address
Advertisement address that you
want to remove
One or more
selectable
interface
indexes
[Default]
Previous
entry, if
applicable
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
An address from
the advertisement
list
–
ip rip policy summary
463
ip rip policy summary
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
Displays summary information about RIP routing policies.
9400
3900
9300
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ri pol s
Important Considerations
■
Your system has one unified IP routing table. Route policies enable you
to control the flow of routing information between the network, the
protocols, and the unified routing table on your system.
■
Route policies are classified as follows:
■
■
■
Import policies import routing information from what RIP learns
from a router/neighbor to the unified routing table. (You can also
import routing information from Open Shortest Path First (OSPF).)
Export policies send information from the routing table to RIP and
RIP routers, which controls what is going out on the wire to the RIP
domain. (You can also export from the routing table to OSPF.)
The system tracks policies that you define in both RIP and OSPF, so the
indexes that are assigned to your policies may have gaps (for example,
if you have RIP policies 1 and 2 and OSPF policies 3-6, the next policy
that is available for RIP or OSPF is 7).
Fields in the IP RIP Policy Summary Display
Field
Description
Action
Action for the route — accept or reject
Index
Index number of the policy
Protocol
Protocol (for example, RIP)
Route
Route affects the policy
Source
Source router (all is from all routers)
Type
Whether the policy is an import or export policy
Weight
Administrative weight — 1 through 16
464
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip rip policy detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays detailed information about RIP routing policies.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ri pol det
Important Considerations
■
This display contains the summary information and two additional
fields: Interface and Metric.
■
Route policies are classified as follows:
■
■
Import policies import routing information from what RIP learns
from a router/neighbor to the unified routing table. (You can also
import routing information from Open Shortest Path First (OSPF).)
Export policies send information from the routing table to RIP and
RIP routers, which controls what is going out on the wire to the RIP
domain. (You can also export from the routing table to OSPF.)
Fields in the IP RIP Policy Detail Display
Field
Description
Action
Action for the route — accept or reject
Index
Index number of the policy
Interface
Interface that is associated with the policy (all applies to
all interfaces)
Metric
Assigned metric, a value 0 through 16 for RIP-1 or RIP-2
(metrics can use options +, -, /, *, and %)
Protocol
Protocol (for example, RIP)
Route
Route that the policy affects
Source
Source router (all is from all routers)
Type
Whether the policy is an import or export policy
Weight
Administrative weight — 1 through 16
ip rip policy define
ip rip policy define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
465
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines an import or export route policy for RIP.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ri pol def
Important Considerations
■
Route policies are classified as follows:
■
■
Import policies import routing information from what RIP learns
from a router/neighbor to the unified routing table. (You can also
import routing information from Open Shortest Path First (OSPF).)
Export policies send information from the routing table to RIP and
RIP routers, which controls what is going out on the wire to the RIP
domain. (You can also export from the routing table to OSPF.)
■
The system assigns an index number to each policy and takes into
account all route policies set on the system, RIP and OSPF (You can
define up to 128 routing policies total, shared between OSPF and RIP
policies).
■
Certain conditions are associated with import and export policies. See
the import and export policy tables that follow the Options table for
lists of the conditions.
■
You can set up an IP RIP or OSPF import or export policy to accept or
advertise the default route, as long as the default route exists in the
routing table. When you define a policy, you are always prompted for
the route subnet mask after the route address, regardless of whether
you specify the wildcard route address of 0.0.0.0. For more
information about the default route and routing policies, see the
CoreBuilder 3500 Implementation Guide or the CoreBuilder 9000
Implementation Guide.
466
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
Options
Prompt
Description
Policy type
Type of policy
Origin
protocols
Which protocol advertises the
route (for export policies only)
Source address Router’s IP address
Route address
Associated route IP address
Route subnet
mask
Subnet mask for the route (for
example, 255.255.0.0)
IP interfaces
Index number of the interface
indexes for which you want to
define a routing policy
Possible Values
■
import
■
export
■
directory
■
static
■
rip
■
ospf
■
all
■
A valid IP address
■
0.0.0.0
■
all
■
A valid IP address
■
0.0.0.0
■
all
A valid mask
■
■
■
Policy action
Metric
adjustment
Whether to accept or reject the
route
For accept conditions only,
increase or decrease in the
converted route metric by the
specified value. Options:
+ (add)
- (subtract)
* (multiple metric by value)
/ (use new metric as divisor)
% (modulus, remainder of
division operation as integer)
One or more
selectable
interface indexes
all
[Default]
import
static
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
Based on
route
all, or
previous
entry, if
applicable
? (for a list of
selectable
interface indexes)
■
accept
■
reject
0 – 16, with or
without options
accept
0, which
does not
change
the metric
ip rip policy define
467
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Administrative
weight
Metric value for this policy
(higher values have higher
priority)
1 – 16
1
RIP Import Policy Conditions for Specified Interfaces
Source
Router
Route
(address/mask) Action
Specified
router
Specified
route/mask
accept
Accept specified route from specified
source router on specified interfaces
with or without metric adjustments
(+, -, *, /, %).
Specified
router
all (0.0.0.0)
accept
Accept all routes from specified router
on specified interfaces with or without
metric adjustments (+, -, *, /, %).
all (all
routers)
Specified
route/mask
accept
Accept specified route on specified
interfaces with or without metric
adjustments (+, -, *, /, %).
all
all
accept
Accept all routes on specified
interfaces with or without metric
adjustments (+, -, *, /, %).
Specified
router
Specified
route/mask
reject
Reject specified route from specified
router on specified interfaces. (Metrics
are not applicable.)
Specified
router
all
reject
Reject all routes from specified router
on specified interfaces.
all
Specified
route/mask
reject
Reject specified route from all routers
on specified interfaces.
all
all
reject
Reject all routes on specified
interfaces.
Description
468
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
RIP Export Policy Conditions for Specified Interfaces
Protocol
Source
Router
Route
Action
Description
RIP, OSPF,
static
Specified
router or
all routers
Specified
route/mask
accept
Advertise RIP/OSPF/static
specified route from
specified source router on
specified interfaces with or
without metric
adjustments (+, -, *, /, %).
RIP, OSPF,
static
Specified
router or
all routers
all (0.0.0.0)
accept
Advertise all
RIP/OSPF/static routes from
specified router on
specified interfaces with or
without metric
adjustments (+, -, *, /, %).
RIP, OSPF,
static
Specified
router or
all routers
Specified
route/mask
reject
Do not advertise the
RIP/OSPF/static specified
route on specified
interfaces.
RIP, OSPF,
static
Specified
routers or
all routers
all
reject
Do not advertise all
RIP/OSPF/static routes on
specified interfaces.
Example of Import Policy
Select menu option (ip/rip/policy): define
Enter policy type (import,export) [import]: import
Enter source address [0.0.0.0]:
Enter route address [0.0.0.0]: 158.101.135.40
Enter route subnet mask [255.255.0.0]:
Select IP interfaces (1,2|all|?) [1]: 1
Enter policy action (accept,reject) [accept]:
Enter metric adjustment ([+,-,*,/,%]0-16) [0]:
Enter administrative weight (1-16) [1]:
Example of Export Policy
Select menu option (ip/rip/policy): define
Enter policy type (import,export) [import]: export
Enter origin protocols (dir,sta,rip,ospf|all|?) : rip
Enter source address [0.0.0.0]:
Enter route address [0.0.0.0]:
Select IP interfaces (1,2|all|?) [1]: all
Enter policy action (accept,reject) [accept]:
Enter metric adjustment ([+,-,*,/,%] 0-16) [0]:
Enter administrative weight (1-16) [1]:
ip rip policy modify
ip rip policy modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
469
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies an existing route policy for RIP.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip ri pol m
Important Considerations
■
Route policies are classified as follows:
■
■
■
Import policies import routing information from what RIP learns
from a router/neighbor to the unified routing table. (You can also
import routing information from Open Shortest Path First (OSPF).)
Export policies send information from the routing table to RIP and
RIP routers, which controls what is going out on the wire to the RIP
domain. (You can also export from the routing table to OSPF.)
The system assigns an index number to each policy that you define.
This index takes into account all route policies set on the system, RIP
and OSPF, so the assigned index can be higher than you may expect.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
Policy type
Type of policy
■
import
■
export
■
RIP
■
OSPF
■
all
Origin
protocols
(export)
Whether or not the route is a
static route (for export policies
only)
Source address IP address of the source router
Route address
Route subnet
mask
Route that is associated with the
source network
Subnet mask that is associated
with the route
■
A valid IP
address
■
0.0.0.0
■
all
■
A valid IP
address
■
0.0.0.0
■
all
A valid mask
import
–
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
Based on
source
network (for
example,
255.255.0.0)
470
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces
Index number of the interface for
which you want to define a
routing policy.
Possible Values [Default]
■
■
■
Policy action
Metric
adjustment
Whether the route is accepted or
rejected
Used with accept, increase or
decrease in the converted route
metric by the specified value
One or more
selectable
interface
indexes
Previous
entry, if
applicable
all
? (for a list of
selectable
interface
indexes)
■
accept
■
reject
0 – 16
Options include:
accept
0, which
does not
change the
metric
+ (add)
- (subtract)
* (multiple metric by value)
/ (use new metric as divisor)
% (modulus, take remainder of
division operation expressed as
an integer)
Administrative
weight
Metric value for this policy
1 – 16
(higher values have higher
priority over lower-numbered
values associated with the route)
1
ip rip policy remove
ip rip policy remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
471
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes a previously defined route policy.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip rip pol r
Important Considerations
■
The system assigns an index number to each policy that you define.
This index takes into account all route policies that are set on the
system, RIP and OSPF, so the assigned index can be higher than you
may expect.
■
When you remove a policy, the associated index is available for
future use.
Options
Prompt
Description
Policy index
Index number that is associated
with the policy that you want to
delete
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
selectable
policy indexes
all
? (for a list of
selectable
policy indexes)
[Default]
–
472
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip rip statistics
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
Displays general RIP statistics.
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Fields in the IP RIP Statistics Display
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip rip s
Field
Description
queries
Number of queries
routeChanges
Number of route changes
ip ping
ip ping
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
473
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Tries to reach or “ping” a specified destination using the default ping
options.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip p
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Important Considerations
■
This tool is useful for network testing, performance measurement,
and management. It uses the ICMP echo facility to send Internet
Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echo request packets to the IP
destination that you specify.
■
If you need to change the default ping options, use the ip
advancedPing option. (The command description for ip
advancedPing lists the default ping options.)
■
You can either supply the host name or IP address as part of the
command string, or you can supply the information at the prompt.
■
When you specify a host name, the host name and its associated IP
address must be configured on a network name server. Also, you must
add the IP address on the name server to the list of name server
addresses that are associated with the network domain name. See “ip
dns domainName” earlier in this chapter for more information.
■
When the system sends an echo request packet to an IP station using
ping, the system waits for an ICMP echo reply packet. Possible
responses:
■
■
■
■
If the host is reachable, the system displays information about the
ICMP reply packets and the response time to the ping.
If the host does not respond, the system displays the ICMP packet
information and this message: Host is Not Responding. You may
not have configured your gateway IP address.
If the packets cannot reach the host, the system displays the ICMP
packet information and this message: Host is Unreachable. A
host is unreachable when there is no route to that host.
To interrupt the command, press Enter.
474
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
Options
Prompt
Description
Host name or
IP address
Host name or IP address of the
destination that you want to
ping
Possible Values
■
■
A valid host
name
IP address
[Default]
0.0.0.0, or
current
value
IP Ping Example
Select menu option (ip): ping
Enter host name/IP address [0.0.0.0]: 158.101.111.50
Press "Enter" key to interrupt.
PING 158.101.111.50: 64 byte packets
64 bytes from 158.101.111.50: icmp_seq=0.
64 bytes from 158.101.111.50: icmp_seq=1.
64 bytes from 158.101.111.50: icmp_seq=2.
time=16. ms
time=19. ms
time=24. ms
---- 158.101.111.50 PING Statistics ---3 packets transmitted, 3 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 16/20/24
ip advancedPing
ip advancedPing
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
475
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Tries to contact a host with one or more of the advanced ping options.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip advancedP
Important Considerations
■
When you specify a host name, the host name and its associated IP
address must be configured on a network name server. Also, you must
add the IP address on the name server to the list of name server
addresses that are associated with the network domain name. See “ip
dns domainName” earlier in this chapter for more information.
■
The burst option, when enabled, overrides the value set in the quiet
or wait option.
■
The burst option floods the network with Internet Control Message
Protocol (ICMP) echo packets and can cause network congestion. Do
not use the burst option during periods of heavy network traffic. Use
this option only as a diagnostic tool in a network that has many
routers to determine if one of the routers is not forwarding packets.
For example, you can set a high count value (1000 packets), and then
observe the run lights on the units: the run lights blink rapidly on
routers that are forwarding packets successfully, but remain unlighted,
or blink slowly, on routers that are not forwarding packets successfully.
■
To interrupt the command, press Enter.
Options
Prompt
Description
Host name or
IP address
Host name or IP address of the
destination that you want to ping.
Possible
Values
■
■
Number of
ICMP Request
packets
Number of ICMP echo request
packets that are sent to ping a host.
If the destination host does not
respond after it is pinged by the
number of packets that you specify,
the system displays a Host is
Unreachable or Host is not
Responding message.
[Default]
A valid host 0.0.0.0
name
IP address
1 – 9999
packets
3
476
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
Prompt
Description
Packet size
Number of bytes in each ICMP echo
request packet. The packet size
includes both the IP and the ICMP
headers.
Burst Transmit
Ping mode
How rapidly to send out ICMP echo
request packets. When enabled,
sends out the ICMP echo request
packets as rapidly as possible. The
system displays a period (.) upon
receiving an ICMP echo replay
packet. Use this display to determine
how many packets are being
dropped during the burst. This is
unique to the burst option.
Quiet mode
How much packet information to
display after a ping. When
enabled, the system displays
information about the number of
packets that the system sent and
received, any loss of packets, and the
average time that it took a packet to
travel to and from the host. When
disabled, the system displays
more detailed status information
about each ICMP echo request
packet.
Time between
sending each
packet (wait)
Number of seconds that the system
waits before it sends out successive
ICMP echo request packets. Set this
option to a high value if network
traffic is heavy and you choose not
to add to the network traffic with
pings in fast succession.
ICMP
sourceAddress
Whether to force the source address
of the ICMP packets to be something
other than the IP address of the
interface from which the packet
originated. You can use this option if
you have more than one IP interface
defined.
Interface index Index number of the ICMP source IP
address that you want to use.
The system lists currently defined
interfaces and their indexes.
Possible
Values
28 – 4096
bytes
■
disabled
■
enabled
■
disabled
■
enabled
[Default]
64
disabled
disabled
1 – 20 seconds 1
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
y
A selectable
0 (the
interface index router
picks the
best
interface)
ip advancedPing
IP Advanced Ping Example
Select menu option (ip): advancedPing
Enter host IP address [0.0.0.0]: 158.101.112.56
Enter number of ICMP request packets (1-9999) [3]:
Enter packet size (bytes) (28-4096) [64]:
Enter Burst Transmit Ping mode (disabled,enabled) [disabled]:
Enter Quiet mode (disabled,enabled) [disabled]:
Enter time (sec) waits between sending each packet (1-20) [1]: 2
Configure ICMP sourceAddress? (n,y) [y]:
Index
Interface address
0
Best interface (default)
1
158.101.117.151
2
158.101.10.1
Select interface index {0-2|?} [0]: 1
Press "Enter" key to interrupt.
PING 158.101.112.56 from 158.101.117.151: 64 byte packets
64 bytes from 158.101.112.56: icmp_seq=0. time=26. ms
64 bytes from 158.101.112.56: icmp_seq=1. time=18. ms
64 bytes from 158.101.112.56: icmp_seq=2. time=18. ms
---- 158.101.112.56 PING Statistics ---3 packets transmitted, 3 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 18/21/26
477
478
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip traceRoute
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Traces a route to a destination using the default traceRoute options.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip t
Important Considerations
■
TraceRoute information includes all of the nodes in the network
through which a packet passes to get from its origin to its destination.
It uses the IP time-to-live (TTL) field in UDP probe packets to elicit an
Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) Time Exceeded message
from each gateway to a host.
■
To change the default traceRoute options, use ip
advancedTraceRoute. (The command description for “ip
advancedTraceRoute” lists the default traceRoute options.)
■
You can either supply the host name or IP address as part of the
command string, or you can supply the information at the prompt.
■
When you specify a host name, the host name and its associated IP
address must be configured on a network name server. Also, you must
add the IP address on the name server to the list of name server
addresses that are associated with the network domain name. See “ip
dns domainName” earlier in this chapter for more information.
■
To track the route of an IP packet, traceRoute launches User Datagram
Protocol (UDP) probe packets with a small TTL value and then listens
for an ICMP Time Exceeded reply from a gateway. Probes start with a
small TTL of 1 and increase the value by 1 until one of the following
events occurs:
■
■
The system receives a Port Unreachable message, which indicates
that the packet reached the host.
The probe exceeds the maximum number of hops (default 30).
ip traceRoute
■
479
At each TTL setting, the system launches three UDP probe packets,
and the traceRoute display shows a line with the TTL value, the
address of the gateway, and the round-trip time of each probe. If a
probe answers from different gateways, the traceRoute feature prints
the address of each responding system. If no response occurs in the
3-second timeout interval, traceRoute displays an asterisk (*) for that
probe.
Other characters that can be displayed include the following:
■
■
!N — Network is unreachable
■
!H — Host is unreachable
■
!P — Protocol is unreachable
■
!F — Fragmentation is needed
■
!<n> — Unknown packet type
To interrupt the command, press Enter.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
Host name or
IP address
Host name or IP address of the
destination to which you want to
trace a route
■
■
A valid host
name
[Default]
0.0.0.0
IP address
IP Trace Route Example
Select menu option (ip): traceRoute
Enter host name/IP address [0.0.0.0]: 158.101.101.40
Press "Enter" key to interrupt.
Traceroute to 158.101.101.40: 30 hops max, 28 bytes packet
1
2
3
4
158.101.117.254
158.101.112.254
158.101.96.22
158.101.101.40
9
8
7
7
ms
ms
ms
ms
22
22
22
23
ms
ms
ms
ms
5
8
7
6
ms
ms
ms
ms
480
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip
advancedTraceRoute
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Traces a route to a host with one or more of the advanced traceRoute
options.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip advancedT
Important Considerations
■
When you specify a host name, the host name and its associated IP
address must be configured on a network name server. Also, you must
add the IP address on the name server to the list of name server
addresses that are associated with the network domain name. See “ip
dns domainName” earlier in this chapter for more information.
■
To interrupt the command, press Enter.
Options
Prompt
Description
Host name or
IP address
Host name or IP address of the
destination that you want to ping.
Possible
Values
■
■
[Default]
A valid host 0.0.0.0
name
IP address
Maximum ttl
Maximum number of hops that the
system can use in outgoing probe
packets.
Destination
port
Destination (or base) UDP port
30000 –
number that the system uses in probe 65535
packets. Set the destination UDP port
number to be very high to ensure that
an application at the destination is
not using that port.
33434
Probe count
Maximum number of probes that the 1 – 10
system sends at each TTL level.
3
Wait
Maximum amount of time that the
system waits for a response to a
probe.
1 – 10 seconds 3
Packet size
Number of bytes that the system
sends in each UDP probe packet.
28 – 4096
bytes
Source address Source address other than the one
from which the probe packets
originate. This option is available if
you have more than one IP interface
defined on the system.
1 – 255 hops
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
30
28
y
ip advancedTraceRoute
Prompt
Possible
Values
Description
Interface index Index number of the ICMP source IP
address that you want to use
The system lists defined interfaces
and their indexes
Numeric mode Whether the system shows hop
addresses numerically or symbolically
481
[Default]
A selectable
0 (the
interface index router
picks the
best
interface)
■
disabled
■
enabled
disabled
IP Advanced Trace Route Example (TTL value of 10):
Select menu option (ip): advancedTraceRoute
Enter host IP address [158.101.101.27]:
Enter maximum Time-to-Live (ttl) (1-255) [30]: 10
Enter Destination Port number (30000-65535) [33434]:
Enter the number of probes to be sent at each ttl level (1-10) [3]:
Enter time (sec) to wait for a response (1-10) [3]:
Enter the packet size (bytes) (28-4096) [28]:
Configure TRACEROUTE sourceAddress? (n,y) [y]:
Index
Interface address
0
Best interface (default)
1
158.101.117.151
2
158.101.10.1
Select interface index {0-2|?} [0]:
Enter Numeric mode (disabled,enabled) [disabled]:
Press "Enter" key to interrupt.
Traceroute to 158.101.101.27: 10 hops max, 28 bytes packet
1
2
3
4
158.101.117.254
158.101.112.254
158.101.96.22
158.101.101.27
12
51
21
18
ms
ms
ms
ms
7
9
15
90
ms
ms
ms
ms
5
7
6
80
ms
ms
ms
ms
482
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
ip statistics
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays different types of IP statistics: general statistics and those specific
to the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) or the Internet Control Message
Protocol (ICMP).
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ip sta
Options
Prompt
Description
Statistics
Type of IP statistics that you want
to display
Possible Values
■
ip
■
udp
■
icmp
■
all
[Default]
ip
Fields in the IP Statistics Display
Field
Description
forwDatagrams
Number of datagrams that the IP station tried to forward
fragCreates
Number of IP datagram fragments that were generated as a
result of fragmentation on this system
fragFails
Number of ip datagrams that were discarded because they
needed to be fragmented but could not be (for example,
because their Don’t Fragment bit was set)
fragOks
Number of IP datagrams that were successfully fragmented
inAddrErrors
Number of datagrams that the IP station discarded because of
an error in the source or destination IP address
inDelivers
Number of datagrams that the IP station delivered to local IP
client protocols
inDiscards
Number of packet receive discards
inHdrErrors
Number of datagrams that the IP station discarded because
the IP header contained errors
inReceived
Total number of IP datagrams that were received, including
those with errors
osReceives
Number of packets that were received that are destined to
higher-level protocols such as Telnet, DNS, TFTP, and FTP
osTransmits
Number of packets that were sent through the router by
higher-level protocols such as Telnet, DNS, TFTP, and FTP
outDiscards
Number of packet transmit discards
ip statistics
483
Field
Description
outNoRoutes
Number of datagrams that the IP station discarded because
there was no route to the destination
outRequests
Number of datagrams that local IP client protocols passed to IP
for transmission
reasmFails
Number of packet reassembly failures
reasmReqs
Number of packet reassembly requests
reasmOks
Number of successful packet reassemblies
rtDiscards
Number of packets that were discarded due to system
resource errors
unkProtos
Number of packets whose protocol is unknown
Fields in the UDP Statistics Display
Field
Description
inDatagrams
Number of UDP packets that were received and addressed to
the router or broadcast address
inErrors
Number of received UDP packets that contain header errors
noPorts
Number of UDP packets that were received but addressed to
an unsupported UDP port
outDatagrams
Number of UDP packets that the router sent
Fields in the ICMP Statistics Display
Field
Description
inAddrMaskReps
Number of ICMP address mask reply frames that were
received
inAddrMasks
Number of ICMP address mask request packets that were
received
inDestUnreach
Number of ICMP destination unreachable packets that were
received
inErrors
Number of received ICMP packets that contain header errors
inEchoReps
Number of ICMP echo reply packets that were received
inEchos
Number of ICMP echo request packets that were received
inParmProbs
Number of ICMP parameter problem frames that were
received
inRedirects
Number of ICMP redirect packets that were received
inSrcQuenchs
Number of ICMP source quench packets that were received
484
CHAPTER 16: INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP)
Field
Description
inTimeExcds
Number of ICMP time exceeded packets that were received
inTimeStamps
Number of ICMP time stamp request packets that were
received
inTimeStampsReps
Number of ICMP time stamp reply packets
messages
Number of ICMP packets that were received
outAddrMaskReps
Number of ICMP address mask reply packets that were sent
outAddrMasks
Number of ICMP address mask request packets that were sent
outDestUnreach
Number of ICMP destination unreachable packets that were
sent
outEchoReps
Number of ICMP echo reply packets that were sent
outEchos
Number of ICMP echo request packets that were sent
outErrors
Number of ICMP packets that were sent that were dropped
due to system resource errors
outMsgs
Number of ICMP packets that were sent
outParmProbs
Number of ICMP parameter problem packets that were sent
outRedirects
Number of ICMP redirect packets that were sent
outSrcQuenchs
Number of ICMP source quench packets that were sent
outTimeExcds
Number of ICMP time exceeded packets that were sent
outTimeStampReps Number of ICMP time stamp reply packets that were sent
outTimeStamps
Number of ICMP time stamp request packets that were sent
17
VIRTUAL ROUTER REDUNDANCY
(VRRP)
Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) provides fault-tolerant routing
on a LAN by eliminating the single point of failure that exists when hosts
are configured with a static default gateway. This chapter provides
guidelines and other key information about configuring VRRP on your
system.
For more information about VRRP, see the Implementation Guide for your
system.
For the CoreBuilder® 9000 platform, the commands in this chapter apply
to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
➧ ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
ip menu
interface
route
arp
multicast
dns
➧ vrrp
udpHelper
routing
ospf
rip
ping
advancedPing
traceRoute
advancedTraceRoute
statistics
vrrp menu
summary
detail
define
modify
remove
mode
neighbor
statistics
486
CHAPTER 17: VIRTUAL ROUTER REDUNDANCY (VRRP)
ip vrrp summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays summary information about configured virtual routers on your
system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip v s
3900
9300
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
index
Index number of the virtual
LAN (VLAN) for which you
want to display virtual router
information
Possible Values
■
■
■
Virtual
router ID
ID of the virtual router for
which you want to display
summary information
■
■
One or more
valid IP VLAN
index numbers
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Valid virtual
router ID
(1 – 255)
? (for list of
selectable IDs)
ID of virtual
router that is
defined on the
VLAN
Fields in the IP VRRP Summary Display
Field
Description
Address
IP address of the virtual router
Auth
Whether the VRRP router uses simple password
authentication. If password authentication is configured,
the VRRP router discards any VRRP packet that does not
have a matching authentication string.
Error
Last type of invalid advertisement received, or none.
Interval
Time, in seconds, between virtual router advertisements.
The Master router advertises all IP addresses that are
associated with the virtual router. Backup routers on the
VRID consider the Master down if two advertisement
intervals pass with no advertisement from the Master.
Ports
Ports that are defined on the virtual LAN (VLAN) and that
are associated with the virtual router
Preempt
Whether a backup virtual router preempts a Master with a
lower priority. Yes allows preemption; no prohibits it.
ip vrrp summary
487
Field
Description
Pri
Priority of the the virtual router. Represented by a value
from 0 through 255. Used in Master router election.
Value of 255 indicates that the router owns the IP
addresses that are associated with the virtual router. 0
indicates that the current Master has stopped
participating in VRRP.
State
Current state of the VRRP router. One of the following:
■
■
■
Master — In this state, the router is the active
forwarding router for all IP addresses that are
associated with the virtual router.
Backup — In this state, the router monitors the
availability of the Master router. If the Master router
fails, the Backup router assumes forwarding
responsibility for all IP addresses that are associated
with the virtual router.
Initialize — Transitional state between Backup
and Master states. Typically indicates that the virtual
router has been configured but not enabled, or that
the virtual router mode has been set to disabled.
In this state, the router waits for a Startup event.
When the router receives the Startup event, it
broadcasts an ARP request that contains the virtual
router MAC address for all IP addresses that are
associated with the virtual router and transitions to the
Master state. If the Startup event is not received, it
transitions to the Backup state.
Type
Type of virtual router: primary or backup
VLAN Index
Index number of the virtual LAN (VLAN) on which the
virtual router is defined
VRID
Virtual Router ID (0 – 255) . Must be unique on the LAN
Sample IP VRRP Summary Display
Select menu option (ip/vrrp): summary
Enter VLAN interface index (2|?) [2]:
Enter virtual router ID (1|?) [1]:
VLAN Index: 2 Ports: 7-12,14
VRID Address
Type
State
1
158.101.175.228 Primary Master
Interval
1 sec.
Pri
255
Preempt
Yes
Auth
pass
Error
none
488
CHAPTER 17: VIRTUAL ROUTER REDUNDANCY (VRRP)
ip vrrp detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays summary information and detailed statistics for the specified
virtual router.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip v det
3900
9300
Important Consideration
■
Displays both summary information and the VRRP router statistics
table for locally configured virtual routers, whether they are in the
Master, Backup, or Initialize state.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
index
Index number of the virtual
LAN (VLAN) for which you
want to display virtual router
information
Possible Values
■
■
■
Virtual
router ID
ID of the virtual router for
which you want to display
summary information
■
■
One or more
valid IP VLAN
index numbers
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Valid
ID of virtual
virtual router ID router that is
(0 – 255)
defined on the
VLAN
? (for list of
selectable IDs)
Fields in the IP VRRP Detail Display
Field
Description
Address
IP address of the virtual router
addrListErrors
Total number of VRRP advertisements that were received
that do not match the address list defined for the virtual
router
advertReceived
Total number of VRRP advertisements that this virtual
router has received
advIntErrors
Total number of VRRP advertisement packets that were
received for which the advertisement interval is different
than the one that is configured for the virtual router
ip vrrp detail
489
Field
Description
Auth
Whether the VRRP router uses simple password
authentication. If password authentication is configured,
the VRRP router discards any VRRP packet that does not
have a matching authentication string.
authFailures
Total number of VRRP advertisements that this virtual
router has received that did not have the correct simple
text authentication password
becomeMaster
Total number of times that this virtual router has changed
to the Master state
Error
Last type of invalid advertisement received, or none.
Interval
Time, in seconds, between virtual router advertisements.
The Master router advertises all IP addresses that are
associated with the virtual router. Backup routers on the
VLAN consider the Master down if two advertisement
intervals pass with no advertisement from the Master.
InvalidAuthType
Total number of VRRP advertisements that the virtual
router has received with the Authentication Type not
equal to the locally configured authentication method
invalidPktTypeRx
Number of VRRP advertisements with an invalid value in
the Type field that this virtual router has received
ipTtlErrors
Total number of VRRP advertisements with IP TTL
(Time-to-Live) not equal to 255 that this virtual router has
received
MasterIpAdd
IP address of the Master for this virtual router.
Ports
Ports that are defined on the virtual LAN (VLAN) and that
are associated with the virtual router
Preempt
Whether the router preempts a Master with a lower
priority. Yes allows preemption; no prohibits it.
Pri
Priority of the virtual router. Represented by a value from
0 through 255. Used in Master router election. Value of
255 indicates that the router owns the IP addresses that
are associated with the virtual router. 0 indicates that the
current Master has stopped participating in VRRP.
PrimaryIpAddr
IP address which VRRP advertisements use as the source
of the IP packet.
priorityZeroRx
Total number of VRRP advertisements with a priority of 0
that this virtual router has received. The priority of zero (0)
indicates that the current Master has stopped
participating in VRRP. Used to trigger Backup routers to
quickly transition to Master without having to wait for the
current Master to time out.
490
CHAPTER 17: VIRTUAL ROUTER REDUNDANCY (VRRP)
Field
Description
priorityZeroTx
Total number of VRRP advertisements with a priority of 0
that this virtual router has sent. The priority of zero (0)
indicates that this virtual router was acting as Master but
stopped participating in VRRP. Used to trigger backup
routers to quickly transition to Master without having to
wait for the current Master to time out.
State
Current state of the VRRP router. One of the following:
■
■
■
Master — In this state, the router is the active
forwarding router for all IP addresses that are
associated with the virtual router.
Backup — In this state, the router monitors the
availability of the Master router. If the Master router
fails, the Backup router assumes forwarding
responsibility for all IP addresses that are associated
with the virtual router.
Initialize — Transitional state between Backup
and Master states. Typically indicates that the virtual
router has been configured but not enabled, or that
the virtual router mode has been set to disabled.
In this state, the router waits for a Startup event.
When the router receives the Startup event, it
broadcasts an ARP request that contains the virtual
router MAC address for all IP addresses that are
associated with the virtual router and transitions to the
Master state. If the Startup event is not received, it
transitions to the Backup state.
Type
Type of virtual router: primary or backup
versionErrors
Total number of VRRP advertisements with an unknown
or unsupported version number that this virtual router has
received
VLAN Index
Index number of the virtual LAN (VLAN) on which the
virtual router is defined
VRID
Virtual Router ID. Number that identifies the virtual router
on the LAN
ip vrrp detail
491
Sample IP VRRP Detail Display
Select menu option (ip/vrrp): detail
Enter VLAN interface index (2|?) [2]:
Enter virtual router ID (1|?) [1]:
VLAN Index: 2 Ports: 7-12,14
VRID Address
Type
State
1
158.101.175.228 Primary Master
Interval
1 sec.
Pri
255
Preempt
Yes
Auth
pass
Error
none
VIDX
2
VRID
1
becomeMaster
1
advertReceived
0
ckSumErrors
0
versionErrors
0
VIDX
2
VRID
1
advIntErrors
0
securViolations
0
ipTtlErrors
0
priorityZeroRx
0
VIDX
2
VRID
1
priorityZeroTx invalidPktTypeRx
0
0
VIDX
2
VRID
1
authTypeErrors
0
addrListErrors unknownAuthType
0
0
492
CHAPTER 17: VIRTUAL ROUTER REDUNDANCY (VRRP)
ip vrrp define
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines a virtual router on the system.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9400
ip v def
Important Considerations
3900
9300
Primary Routers
Backup Routers
Address Mode
■
Authentication passwords can be up to eight alphanumeric
characters.
■
You can define one Primary router per VLAN.
■
Primary routers own the IP addresses that you associate with a virtual
router.
■
When you define a Primary virtual router, the possible VLANs that you
can select are the IP VLANs on the router that have no virtual routers
configured.
■
The virtual router ID (VRID) must be unique across all locally attached
LAN segments and unique for the local router.
■
When you define a Primary virtual router, you cannot use the VRID of
a virtual router that is already defined on the system or the VRID of a
neighboring VRRP router.
■
Backup routers back up the primary router of a specified virtual router
and assume Master state responsibilities for the virtual router should
the primary router fail.
■
When you define a Backup virtual router, you cannot use the VRID of a
primary router that is defined on the system. You cannot define a
Primary and Backup VRRP router for the same virtual router on the
same routing device.
■
In auto-learn mode, systems learn the IP addresses to associate
with the specified VRID.
■
In IP address mode, the system prompts you to select the interface
index from a list.
■
After a reboot, the address learning process restarts for each virtual
router in auto-learn address mode.
■
When you define a Primary virtual router, selecting auto-learn as
the address mode automatically adds all IP addresses that are
associated with the selected VLAN to the primary virtual router.
ip vrrp define
Advertisement
Intervals
493
■
When you define a Primary router on a VLAN that contains a single
interface, the single interface is automatically chosen as the primary
address when you select IP-address as the Address mode.
■
When you define a Backup virtual router, selecting auto-learn as
the address mode configures the Backup router to learn the IP
addresses that are associated with the virtual router by means of VRRP
advertisements from the Primary router. The Primary router must be up
for backup routers to auto-learn the addresses that are associated
with the specified VRID.
■
When you define Backup virtual routers, the auto-learn address mode
option enables auto address learning for the specified VRID. If a new
interface is added to the VLAN on a primary virtual router, the new IP
address is sent out in VRRP advertisements so that the Backup routers
in auto-learn mode can learn the new address without having to
manually add the new address to each backup router.
■
The smaller the advertisement interval, the smaller the failover time if
the master fails.
■
The advertisement interval must be the same across the set of VRRP
routers that are associated with a single VRID. Backup routers must
have the same advertisement interval as the Master router.
Options
Prompt
Description
Virtual router type Type of virtual router
that you want to
define
VLAN interface
index
Index number of the
virtual LAN (VLAN) on
which you want to
define the virtual
router
VRID
Virtual router
identifier. Identifies
the virtual router that
you want to define on
the LAN.
Address mode
Method by which the
virtual router you
want to define learns
its IP addresses
Possible Values
■
Primary
■
Backup
■
■
Index number of an IP
virtual LAN (VLAN) that
is defined on the
system.
? (for a list of selectable
indexes)
1 – 255
■
auto-learn
■
IP address
[Default]
Primary
Index
number of
first
available
VLAN
1
auto-learn
494
CHAPTER 17: VIRTUAL ROUTER REDUNDANCY (VRRP)
Prompt
Description
Advertise interval
Time between virtual 1 – 255 seconds
router advertisements.
Possible Values
1
Preempt mode
Whether a higher
priority backup router
may preempt a lower
priority master
y
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
■
none
■
pass
Authentication
type
Whether a password
is needed to access
the virtual router
Password
Character string to
up to eight alphanumeric
authenticate access to characters
virtual router
[Default]
none
–
IP VRRP Define Example
Select menu option (ip/vrrp): define
Enter virtual router's type (Primary,Backup) [Primary]:
Enter VLAN interface index {2-5|?}: 2
Enter VRID (1-255) [1]: 2
Enter address mode (auto-learn,IP-address) [auto-learn]:
Enter the advertise interval in sec (1-255) [1]:
Enter virtual router preempt mode (no,yes) [yes]:
Enter Authentication Type (none,pass) [pass]: pass
Enter 8 characters password {?}: echoe
ip vrrp modify
ip vrrp modify
495
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies an existing virtual router.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9400
ip v modi
Important Considerations
3900
9300
Primary Routers
Backup Routers
Address Mode
■
Authentication passwords can be up to eight alphanumeric
characters.
■
You can define one Primary router per VLAN.
■
Primary routers own the IP addresses that you associate with a virtual
router.
■
When you define a Primary virtual router, the possible VLANs that you
can select are the IP VLANs on the router that have no virtual routers
configured.
■
The virtual router ID (VRID) must be unique across all locally attached
LAN segments and unique for the local router.
■
When you define a Primary virtual router, you cannot use the VRID of
a virtual router that is already defined on the system or the VRID of a
neighboring VRRP router.
■
Backup routers back up the primary router of a specified virtual router
and assume Master state responsibilities for the virtual router should
the primary router fail.
■
When you define a Backup virtual router, you cannot use the VRID of a
primary router that is defined on the system. You cannot define a
Primary and Backup VRRP router for the same virtual router on the
same routing device.
■
In auto-learn mode, systems learn the IP addresses to associate
with the specified VRID.
■
In IP address mode, the system prompts you to select the interface
index from a list.
■
After a reboot, the address learning process restarts for each virtual
router in auto-learn address mode.
■
When you define a Primary virtual router, selecting auto-learn as
the address mode automatically adds all IP addresses that are
associated with the selected VLAN to the primary virtual router.
496
CHAPTER 17: VIRTUAL ROUTER REDUNDANCY (VRRP)
Advertisement
Intervals
■
When you define a Primary router on a VLAN that contains a single
interface, the single interface is automatically chosen as the primary
address when you select IP-address as the Address mode.
■
When you define a Backup virtual router, selecting auto-learn as
the address mode configures the Backup router to learn the IP
addresses that are associated with the virtual router by means of VRRP
advertisements from the Primary router. The Primary router must be up
for backup routers to auto-learn the addresses that are associated
with the specified VRID.
■
When you define Backup virtual routers, the auto-learn address mode
option enables auto address learning for the specified VRID. If a new
interface is added to the VLAN on a primary virtual router, the new IP
address is sent out in VRRP advertisements so that the Backup routers
in auto-learn mode can learn the new address without having to
manually add the new address to each backup router.
■
The smaller the advertisement interval, the smaller the failover time if
the master fails.
■
The advertisement interval must be the same across the set of VRRP
routers that are associated with a single VRID. Backup routers must
have the same advertisement interval as the Master router.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
index
Index number of the
virtual LAN (VLAN) on
which you want to
define the virtual
router
VRID
Virtual router
identifier. Identifies
the virtual router that
you want to define on
the LAN.
Virtual
router type
Type of virtual router
that you want to
define
Address
mode
Method by which the
virtual router you
want to define learns
its IP addresses
Possible Values
■
■
Index number of an IP
virtual LAN (VLAN) that is
defined on the system.
? (for a list of selectable
indexes)
1 – 255
■
Primary
■
Backup
■
auto-learn
■
IP address
[Default]
Index
number of
first available
VLAN
1
Primary
auto-learn
ip vrrp modify
Prompt
Description
Advertise
interval
Time between virtual 1 – 255 seconds
router advertisements.
1
Preempt
mode
Whether a higher
priority backup router
may preempt a lower
priority master
y
Authenticati Whether a password
on type
is needed to access
the virtual router
Password
Possible Values
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
■
none
■
pass
Character string to
up to eight alphanumeric
authenticate access to characters
virtual router
497
[Default]
none
–
IP VRRP Modify Example
Select menu option (ip/vrrp): modify
Enter VLAN interface index {2-3|?}: 2
Enter virtual router ID {1|?} [1]:
Enter virtual router's type (Primary,Backup) [Primary]:
Enter address mode (auto-learn,IP-address) [auto-learn]: IP-address
Old Ip Association address list:
VRID
VIDX
Address
1
2
158.101.175.228
Interface 158.101.175.228 will be selected as your primary address.
Enter the advertise interval in sec (1-255) [1]:
Enter virtual router preempt mode (no,yes) [yes]: no
Enter Authentication Type (none,pass): none
Enter virtual router state (enabled,disabled) [enabled]:
498
CHAPTER 17: VIRTUAL ROUTER REDUNDANCY (VRRP)
ip vrrp remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes one or more existing virtual routers from the system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip v r
Important Consideration
■
If you attempt to remove a virtual router that is in the Master state,
you are prompted to confirm the operation:
■
■
If you enter no, the system does not remove the virtual router.
If you enter yes, the system removes the virtual router, which
sends an advertisement to the other virtual routers that one of
them must assume Master responsibilities immediately.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
index
Index number of the virtual
LAN (VLAN) on which you
want to define the virtual
router
Possible Values
■
■
VRID
Index number of a IP
virtual LAN (VLAN)
defined on the
system
? (for a list of
selectable indexes)
Virtual router identifier.
1 – 255
Identifies the virtual router
that you want to define on the
LAN
IP VRRP Remove Example
Select menu option (ip/vrrp): remove
Enter VLAN interface index (2-3|all|?): 2
Enter virtual router ID (1|?) [1]:
[Default]
Index
number
of first
available
VLAN
1
ip vrrp mode
ip vrrp mode
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
499
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables or disables a configured virtual router.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip v mode
Important Considerations
■
You must configure the virtual router before you can enable it.
■
You cannot modify or remove a virtual router that is enabled; you
must disable the virtual router before you can change or delete the
virtual router.
Options
Prompt
Description
VLAN
interface
index
Index number of the virtual
LAN (VLAN) on which you
want to define the virtual
router
Possible Values
■
■
■
VRID
Index number of a IP
virtual LAN (VLAN)
defined on the
system
all
Index
number
of first
available
VLAN
? (for a list of
selectable indexes)
Virtual router identifier.
1 – 255
Identifies the virtual router
that you want to define on the
LAN
Virtual
Explicitly turns on or turns off
router mode a configured virtual router
[Default]
■
enabled
■
disabled
1
disabled
IP VRRP Mode Example
Select menu option: ip vrrp mode
Enter VLAN interface index (2-3|all|?): all
Enter virtual router ID (1-2|all|?): all
Vrid 1 - Enter virtual router mode (enabled,disabled)
[disabled]: enabled
Vrid 2 - Enter virtual router mode (enabled,disabled)
[disabled]: enabled
500
CHAPTER 17: VIRTUAL ROUTER REDUNDANCY (VRRP)
ip vrrp neighbor
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays a list of neighboring virtual routers.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip v n
Important Considerations
■
Any locally defined virtual router is not displayed.
■
If the Address and MasterRouterAddr fields contain the same IP
address, the listed virtual router is in the Master state.
Fields in the IP VRRP Neighbor Display
Field
Description
VLAN Index
Index number of the VLAN on which the virtual router is
defined
VRID
Virtual Router ID. Number that identifies the virtual router
on the LAN
Address
IP address of the neighbor virtual router, which may be a
Master or Backup router
MasterRouterAddr
IP address of the Master virtual router
Interval
Time, in seconds, between virtual router advertisements
Priority
Priority among the backup routers to become the Master
virtual router
Auth
Authentication type: whether a password is needed to
access the virtual router
Config
Whether the virtual router has been locally configured
ip vrrp statistics
ip vrrp statistics
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
501
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays general VRRP statistics for the virtual router.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip v st
Fields in the IP VRRP Statistics Display
Field
Description
ckSumErrors
Total number of VRRP advertisements with an invalid
VRRP checksum value that this virtual router has received
versionErrors
Total number of VRRP advertisements with an unknown
or unsupported version number that this virtual router has
received.
vriderrors
Total number of VRRP advertisements with an invalid VRID
number that this virtual router has received
502
CHAPTER 17: VIRTUAL ROUTER REDUNDANCY (VRRP)
18
IP MULTICAST
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
configure and manage IP multicast routing commands from the
Administration Console of the CoreBuilder® 3500 and CoreBuilder 9000
Layer 3 switching modules.
For the CoreBuilder 9000 platform, the commands in this chapter apply
to Layer 3 switching modules only.
For more information about IP multicast technology, concepts, and
implementation procedures, see the Implementation Guide for your
system.
For IGMP commands in Layer 2 switching systems (CoreBuilder 9400,
CoreBuilder 9000 Layer 2 switching modules, SuperStack® II Switch 3900,
and SuperStack II Switch 9300), see Chapter 9.
504
CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured on your system. The following diagram shows
the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at the
beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether your
system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
➧ ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
ip menu
multicast menu
interface
➧ dvmrp
route
➧ igmp
arp
cache
traceRoute
➧ multicast
dns
vrrp
udpHelper
routing
ospf
rip
ping
advancedPing
traceRoute
advancedTraceRoute
statistics
dvmrp menu
➧ interface
➧ tunnels
routeDisplay
cacheDisplay
default
interface menu
summary
detail
mode
metric
tunnels menu
igmp menu
➧ interface
snooping
querying
summary
define
remove
address
threshold
metric
interface menu
summary
detail
TTL
ip multicast dvmrp interface summary
ip multicast dvmrp
interface summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
505
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays summary information about IP interfaces that may or may not be
operating as IP multicast routing interfaces using the Distance-Vector
Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m d i s
3900
9300
Fields in the IP Multicast DVMRP Interface Summary Display
Field
Description
Index
Number associated with the interface for identification
purposes
Address
IP address of the interface
Metric
Numeric DVMRP metric or “cost” that you assign to the
interface
State
Role that the interface plays in IP multicast delivery. One
or more of the following descriptors may appear:
■
■
■
■
querier — The interface is functioning as the IGMP
Querier for its subnetwork.
non-querier — The interface is not functioning as
the IGMP Querier for its subnetwork.
leaf — There are no routers downstream of this
interface; IP multicast group members may reside on
this subnetwork.
non-leaf — The interface is a branch in the IP
multicast delivery tree. There are one or more IP
multicast routing interfaces downstream of this
interface.
■
one-way — Traffic is moving downstream only.
■
disabled — DVMRP is disabled on the interface.
■
■
up — The IP interface is available to support network
communication.
down — The IP interface is not available to support
network communication.
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CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
ip multicast dvmrp
interface detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays information about IP interfaces that run the Distance-Vector
Multicast Routing Protocol.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m d i s
Fields in the IP Multicast DVMRP Interface Detail Display
Field
Description
Index
Number associated with the interface for identification
purposes
Address
IP address of the interface
Metric
Numeric DVMRP metric or “cost” that you assign to the
interface
State
Role that the interface plays in IP multicast delivery. One
or more of the following descriptors may appear:
■
■
■
■
querier — The interface is functioning as the IGMP
Querier for its subnetwork.
non-querier — The interface is not functioning as
the IGMP Querier for its subnetwork.
leaf — There are no routers downstream of this
interface; IP multicast group members may reside on
this subnetwork.
non-leaf — The interface is a branch in the IP
multicast delivery tree. There are one or more IP
multicast routing interfaces downstream of this
interface.
■
one-way — Traffic is moving downstream only.
■
disabled — DVMRP is disabled on the interface.
■
■
up — The IP interface is available to support network
communication.
down — The IP interface is not available to support
network communication.
Group
IP multicast group addresses of the traffic that is being
received and forwarded on that interface.
Peer, Port
IP address of the upstream router. The additional
information to the right relates to the version of DVMRP
that is running and the port in the local interface that
connects to the peer router.
ip multicast dvmrp interface mode
ip multicast dvmrp
interface mode
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
507
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables or disables the Distance-Vector Multicast Routing Protocol
(DVMRP) per routing interface. This protocol facilitates router-to-router
communication for building source-rooted spanning trees that deliver IP
multicast traffic to IP multicast group members.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ip m d i m
Important Considerations
■
When DVMRP is enabled on an interface, the interface is configured
with the default value of 1 for the metric, which you can modify at
any time. See “ip multicast dvmrp interface metric” later in this
chapter.
■
If DVMRP is enabled on any interface, IGMP snooping should also be
enabled in the system. See “ip multicast igmp snooping” later in this
chapter.
■
If DVMRP is disabled, the interface cannot participate in building
spanning trees for IP multicast. However, as long as IGMP snooping is
enabled, the interface forwards appropriate IP multicast traffic to
downstream group members. If IGMP snooping is disabled, then the
interface only forwards IP multicast traffic with addresses in the
reserved range.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of the interface
for which you want to enable
or disable DVMRP
Possible Values
■
■
■
DVMRP
mode
Whether DVMRP mode is
enabled or disabled
A valid IP
interface index
number
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
■
enabled
■
disabled
disabled (factory
default), or
current value
508
CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
ip multicast dvmrp
interface metric
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies the DVMRP metric on an interface for which DVMRP is enabled.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m d i m
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
Use this command if you want to modify the metric value of 1 that the
system assigns to an interface when you define it, even if DVMRP is
not yet enabled.
■
The metric affects the shape of the IP multicast spanning tree when
there are multiple paths to the same downstream destination. The
lower cost path is the preferred path.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of the
routing interface for
which you want to
modify the default
metric
metric
DVMRP cost for the
interface
Possible Values
■
■
■
[Default]
A valid IP interface index –
number
? (for a list of selectable
index numbers)
1 – 32
1 (factory
default), or
current
value
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels summary
ip multicast dvmrp
tunnels summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
509
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Summaries key information about DVMRP tunnels that you have
configured in your system. Tunnels enable IP multicast spanning trees to
be constructed through and beyond areas of the network (routers) that
do not support IP multicast routing. The two tunnel end points must lie in
different systems and subnetworks.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m d t s
Important Considerations
■
The index number shown in the DVMRP tunnel summary display is the
tunnel index number. When you define a DVMRP tunnel, the system
assigns a tunnel index number to it, which is different from the
routing interface index number. Tunnel index numbers provide a way
to identify individual tunnels, which is necessary because multiple
tunnel end points can be configured on the same routing interface.
Tunnel index numbers are also needed so that you can remove tunnels
without removing the interface with which it is associated.
■
When you remove a tunnel, the system does not dynamically re-order
remaining tunnels in the DVMRP tunnel summary display. For
example, if you had three tunnels with tunnel index numbers 1, 2, and
3 and you then removed tunnel 2, the display lists the remaining
tunnels with their original tunnel index numbers (1 and 3, in this
example). The system assigns tunnel index 2 to the next new tunnel
that you define. After 2 is used, the system can assign tunnel index 4
for the next new tunnel, and so on.
■
You can define multiple IP multicast tunnel end points on the same
local routing interface, but each must lead to a different remote
interface. You cannot define multiple IP multicast tunnels between the
same two end points (interfaces).
510
CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
Fields in the IP Multicast DVMRP Tunnels Summary Display
Field
Description
Index
Tunnel index number, which is different from the routing
interface index number that is shown under Index in
other displays.
Local address
IP address of the local interface that serves as one of two
multicast tunnel end points.
Remote address
IP address of the remote interface (a different system, a
different subnetwork) that serves as the other multicast
tunnel end point.
Metric
DVMRP cost of the tunnel. The system assigns a value of 1
when you define the tunnel, but you can modify that
value at any time (see “ip multicast dvmrp tunnels
metric”). This value can be different from the metric that
you assigned to the interface itself (see “ip multicast
dvmrp interface metric”).
TTL
Time-to-live (TTL) threshold of the tunnel. The system
assigns a value of 1 when you define the tunnel, but you
can modify that value at any time (see “ip multicast dvmrp
tunnels threshold”). This value can be different from the
TTL threshold that you assigned to the interface itself (see
“ip multicast igmp interface TTL”).
State
Role that the interface in the multicast delivery tree. For
possible entries and definitions, see “ip multicast dvmrp
interface summary” earlier in this chapter.
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels define
ip multicast dvmrp
tunnels define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
511
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines one end point of a DVMRP tunnel. The other tunnel end point lies
on an IP multicast routing interface on a different system and
subnetwork. One or more unicast routers lie between these tunnel end
points.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ip m d t d
Important Considerations
■
IP multicast tunnels are not required in all networks. Configure a
tunnel only if you need to have IP multicast traffic forwarded through
one or more routers that do not understand IP multicast protocols and
would therefore filter IP multicast packets. Because IP multicast
packets are encapsulated in unicast format at the tunnel entrance
point, the interim routers in the tunnel forward the packets onward
toward the other tunnel exit point.
■
Think of an IP multicast tunnel end point as being layered on top of a
regular DVMRP routing interface. Therefore, before you can define a
multicast tunnel end point in your system, you must first define at
least one IP virtual LAN (VLAN), define at least one IP interface, and
enable DVMRP on the interface.
■
The remote tunnel end point must lie on a different system and
subnetwork.
■
You must define the tunnel on both end points — that is, on both the
local system and the remote system — even though you specify the
address of the remote interface in the local system.
■
When you define a tunnel with local and remote addresses, the
system automatically assigns the value 1 as both the tunnel metric and
the tunnel TTL threshold, as shown in the IP multicast DVMRP tunnel
summary display. You can change these values through menu options.
■
IP multicast interfaces and tunnels have similar characteristics, such as
TTL threshold and metric. The characteristics of a tunnel do not have
to match the characteristics of the interface on which it is configured.
■
You can define multiple tunnel end points on the same local routing
interface in your system, but these tunnels must lead to different
remote routing interfaces.
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CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
Options
Prompt
Description
interface
Index number of the
interface on which you
want to create a DVMRP
tunnel end point
Remote
address
IP address of the remote
multicast tunnel end
point. Use standard
dotted decimal notation.
Possible Values
■
■
A valid IP interface
index number
[Default]
–
? (for a list of
selectable indexes)
A valid IP interface on a
different system and
subnetwork
–
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels remove
ip multicast dvmrp
tunnels remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
513
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes a DVMRP tunnel end point from the system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m d t r
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
To remove a tunnel, specify its tunnel index number. This number is
different from the routing interface index number. Reference the
DVMRP tunnel summary display prior to deleting a tunnel.
■
If you try to remove an IP interface in your system, and you have a
DVMRP tunnel defined on that interface, the system warns you with
an error message. Before you can remove the IP interface, you must
remove the DVMRP tunnel.
■
When you remove a tunnel, the system does not dynamically re-order
remaining tunnels in the DVMRP tunnel summary display. For
example, if you had three tunnels with tunnel index numbers 1, 2, and
3 and you then removed tunnel 2, the display lists the remaining
tunnels with their original tunnel index numbers (1 and 3, in this
example). The system assigns tunnel index 2 to the next new tunnel
that you define. After 2 is used, the system can assign tunnel index 4
for the next new tunnel, and so on.
Options
Prompt
Description
Multicast
tunnel index
Index number of the
multicast tunnel that you
want to remove from the
system
Possible Values
■
■
A valid DVMRP tunnel
index number
? (for a list of selectable
tunnel index numbers)
[Default]
–
514
CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
ip multicast dvmrp
tunnels address
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies the remote IP address that is defined in an existing DVMRP
tunnel.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m d t a
Important Consideration
■
The remote address that you specify must represent a routing
interface on a different system and subnetwork.
Options
Prompt
Description
tunnel
Index number of the tunnel for
which you modify the remote
tunnel end point
Possible Values
■
■
remote
address
A valid DVMRP
tunnel index
number in the
system
[Default]
–
? (for a list of
selectable
tunnel index
numbers)
A valid IP address on a different A valid IP address
system and subnetwork. Use
the 0.0.0.0 format.
current value
ip multicast dvmrp tunnels threshold
ip multicast dvmrp
tunnels threshold
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
515
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies the time-to-live (TTL) threshold on an existing DVMRP tunnel.
Valid Minimum Configuration
ip m d t t
Important Consideration
3900
9300
■
When you first define a tunnel, the system automatically assigns the
value 1 as the TTL threshold for the tunnel (which is different from the
interface TTL threshold). Use this command to modify the TTL
threshold value on any existing tunnel.
Options
Prompt
Definition
tunnel
Index number of the existing
DVMRP tunnel on which you
want to modify the TTL
threshold
threshold
Possible Values
■
■
A valid DVMRP
tunnel index
number
[Default]
–
? (for a list of
selectable
tunnel index
numbers)
Value that determines whether 1 – 32
IP multicast packets are
forwarded. The interface
compares the packet TTL to the
TTL threshold
1 (factory
default), or
current value
516
CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
ip multicast dvmrp
tunnels metric
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies the metric or “cost” of an existing DVMRP tunnel.
Valid Minimum Configuration
ip m d t m
Important Consideration
3900
9300
■
When you first define a tunnel, the system automatically assigns the
value 1 as the metric or “cost” of the tunnel (which is different from
the interface metric). Use this command to modify the metric value on
any existing tunnel.
Options
Prompt
Definition
tunnel
Index number of the existing
DVMRP tunnel on which you
want to modify the metric
Possible Values
■
■
metric
DVMRP cost for the tunnel.
This value affects the shape of
the IP multicast spanning tree
when there are multiple paths
to the same downstream
destination. The lower cost
path is chosen first.
A valid DVMRP
tunnel index
number
[Default]
–
? (for a list of
selectable
tunnel index
numbers)
1 – 32
1 (factory
default), or
current value
ip multicast dvmrp routeDisplay
ip multicast dvmrp
routeDisplay
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
517
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays IP multicast route information that your system has learned from
using the Distance-Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP). The
system uses this information to forward IP multicast traffic that it receives.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m d r
3900
9300
Fields in the IP Multicast DVMRP Route Display
Field
Description
Origin
IP address of the subnetwork that contains an IP multicast
source, followed by a forward slash and subnetwork
mask.
Gateway
IP address of the routing interface that lies upstream of
the local system on the path back towards an IP multicast
source. If the source subnetwork is connected directly to
your system, this field contains a dash (--).
Metric
Number of hops from your system back to the origin
subnetwork. This value is not the DVMRP interface or
tunnel metric, which are shown under Metric in other
displays.
Occasionally, instead of a numeric value, you may see NR,
meaning “network unreachable.” Your system may have
trouble computing the hop count because of factors such
as an upstream router being temporarily congested. This
condition is usually resolved in a short period of time.
Tmr
Amount of time (in seconds) since each entry was last
reset.
Parent
The interface that connects to the upstream router
(Gateway). Because DVMRP forms a loopless spanning
tree to reach all hosts for a given IP multicast group, your
system always chooses a single parent interface. Either an
I or a T precedes the index number. An I indicates that
the index is an interface index number. A T indicates that
the index is a tunnel index number.
Children
Interfaces that communicate with downstream routers or
local subnetworks. The system forwards incoming IP
multicast traffic through these interfaces. Either an I or a
T precedes each index number. An I precedes an
interface index number. A T precedes a tunnel index
number.
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CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
ip multicast dvmrp
cacheDisplay
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the DVMRP cache, which is a collection of information about the
IP multicast packets that have traveled through the system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m d c
Options
Prompt
Description
Multicast
Source for which you
source address want to view cache
information
Multicast
group address
Multicast group for
which you want to
view cache
information
Possible Values
■
■
■
■
Depends on your
network
255.255.255.255
for all sources
Depends on your
network
255.255.255.255
for all groups
[Default]
255.255.255.255
(factory default),
or current value
255.255.255.255
(factory default),
or current value
Fields in the IP Multicast DVMRP Cache Display
Field
Description
Source
Information about IP multicast sources:
■
■
Entries preceded by angle brackets (>) are
subnetworks that contain sources.
Entries without angle brackets are the IP addresses of
source devices.
Group
IP multicast group address of packets coming from the
source and subnetwork to the left.
CTmr
Time since the cache entry was originally recorded. Time is
noted in hours (h), minutes (m), and seconds (s).
Age
Value that indicates the remaining life for the cache entry.
Time is recorded in minutes (m) and seconds (s). The
system assigns a life of approximately 7 minutes to each
entry. When the age if the entry decreases to zero, the
entry either disappears or is refreshed.
PTmr
Time remaining before the system sends a prune message
to an upstream router. Time is shown in minutes (m) and
seconds (s). When traffic is actively flowing, a dash (-)
indicates that no prune message has been sent upstream.
ip multicast dvmrp cacheDisplay
519
Field
Description
inVif
Interface that receives incoming IP multicast traffic from
the spanning tree for the source, subnetwork, and group
listed on the left.
The interface is presented as an index number and either
an I or a T precedes the index number. An I precedes a
routing interface index number. A T precedes a tunnel
index number.
A P after the index number indicates that a prune
message has been sent to an upstream router.
The entry <none> may appear if the system is not able to
build the cache entry correctly. This temporary condition
corrects itself quickly.
outVif
Interfaces to which traffic from the inVif is being
forwarded.
Each interface is presented as an index number and either
an I or a T precedes each index number. An I precedes
a routing interface index number. A T precedes a tunnel
index number.
A p after an index number indicates that the upstream
router has pruned this branch of the delivery tree and no
multicast packets are being forwarded through this local
interface. Eventually this entry disappears from the cache
display.
Either no entry or <none> appears in this column if the
system is not able to build the cache entry correctly. This
temporary condition corrects itself quickly.
Ports
Physical ports that correspond to the interfaces that are
listed in the outVifs field. The Ports field shows a dash (--)
when there are no outgoing interfaces and when the
outgoing interfaces are tunnels.
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CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
ip multicast dvmrp
default
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Configures a default route for IP multicast traffic on a DVMRP interface.
This interface advertises itself as a default route to neighboring DVMRP
routers.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m d d
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
A default route metric of 0 means that the default route function is
not activated on the interface (interface does not advertise 0.0.0.0 to
DVMRP routers). Values other than 0 means that the default route
function is activated and these values represent the “cost” of the
default route.
■
Definitions of default route modes:
■
■
all — The interface advertises the default route plus all other
known routes to neighboring DVMRP routers.
only — The interface advertises only the default route to
neighboring DVMRP routers.
If the system learns a default route, it propagates it no matter which
mode is set on a given interface.
■
The system allows you to configure an interface as a DVMRP default
route, even when DVMRP is disabled on the interface. If DVMRP is
disabled, the interface does not advertise itself as a default route.
Options
Prompt
Definition
interface
Index number of the routing
interface on which you want to
configure a default route
default
Value that you assign to the
route metric default route as the “cost” of
that route
default
route
advertise
mode
Routes that the interface
advertises to neighboring
DVMRP routers
Possible Values
■
■
[Default]
A valid interface 1 (factory
index number
default), or
current value
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
0 – 32
■
all
■
only
0 (factory
default), or
current value
all (factory
default), or
current value
ip multicast igmp interface summary
ip multicast igmp
interface summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
521
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Summarizes key information about IGMP interfaces.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m i i s
Fields in the IP Multicast IGMP Interface Summary Display
3900
9300
Field
Description
Index
Number assigned to the routing interface to its right.
Address
IP address of a routing interface in the system
TtlThreshold
Time-to-live (TTL) threshold that is assigned to the
interface. This threshold affects IP multicast packets only.
Protocol
Multicast routing protocol that registers with IGMP. In
release 3.0 software, there is one supported routing
protocol (DVMRP).
Querier
IP address of the IGMP querier in the subnetwork to
which the interface belongs. If the interface is functioning
as the IGMP querier, this field shows Self.
522
CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
ip multicast igmp
interface detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Supplements the IP multicast IGMP interface summary display with group
and port information.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m i i d
Fields in the IP Multicast IGMP Interface Detail Display
Field
Description
Index
Number assigned to the routing interface to its right for
identification purposes.
Address
IP address of a routing interface in the system that is
identified by the index number to its left.
TtlThreshold
Time-to-live (TTL) threshold that is assigned to the
interface. This threshold affects IP multicast packets only.
Protocol
Multicast routing protocol that registers with IGMP. In
release 3.0 software, there is one supported routing
protocol (DVMRP).
Querier
IP address of the IGMP querier in the subnetwork to
which the interface belongs. If the interface is functioning
as the IGMP querier, this field shows Self.
group
IP multicast group address for which packets have been
received or forwarded
port(s)
Physical port numbers that are associated with the
interface listed in the Address field that see incoming or
outgoing traffic.
ip multicast igmp interface TTL
ip multicast igmp
interface TTL
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
523
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies the time-to-live (TTL) threshold of a given routing interface. The
interface compares the TTL value in each IP multicast packet against its
TTL threshold. If the packet TTL is greater than the threshold TTL, the
interface decrements the packet TTL by 1 and forwards the packet,
provided that no other restrictions exist.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m i i t
Important Considerations
■
Because IGMP is enabled by factory default, the system assigns a TTL
threshold value of 1 as soon as you create an IP interface.
■
This TTL threshold affects IP multicast packets only.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interfaces Index numbers of the
interfaces for which you want
to modify the TTL threshold
Possible Values
■
■
TTL
threshold
Value you want to assign to
the specified interfaces
One or more
valid interface
index numbers
[Default]
–
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
0 – 255
1 (factory
default), or
current value
524
CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
ip multicast igmp
snooping
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables or disables the system’s ability to understand the Internet Group
Management Protocol (IGMP) and snoop on IGMP packets to determine
if IP multicast group members exist downstream from routing interfaces
and therefore if the system should forward group traffic on those
interfaces.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip m i s
Important Considerations
■
Your selection applies to all interfaces in the system.
■
3Com recommends that you keep IGMP snooping enabled at all
times. It adds little processing overhead to the system and enhances
the efficiency of your network if IP multicast traffic is present.
Options
Prompt
Description
snooping
mode
Whether the system
can observe, record,
and react to IGMP
packets and set
filters on appropriate
ports in an interface
Possible Values [Default]
■
enabled
■
disabled
enabled (factory default),
or current value
ip multicast igmp querying
ip multicast igmp
querying
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
525
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables or disables the system’s ability to operate as the Internet Group
Management Protocol (IGMP) querier if so elected by other IGMP-capable
devices in the subnetwork. The IGMP querier is always the device with
the lowest IP address.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ip m i q
Important Considerations
■
Your selection applies to all interfaces in the system.
■
The most efficient bandwidth usage is achieved by having the device
that is closest to the source of IP multicast traffic operate as the
querier for a given subnetwork.
Options
Prompt
Description
query mode
Whether the system
can offer itself as a
candidate for
election as the IGMP
querier
Possible Values [Default]
■
enabled
■
disabled
enabled (factory default),
or current value
526
CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
ip multicast cache
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays information about IP multicast traffic that has been observed on
the system. For more detailed information, review the DVMRP cache. (See
“ip multicast dvmrp cacheDisplay” earlier in this chapter.)
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ip m c
Important Consideration
■
Although the Administration Console menu description is protocol
independent multicast cache, this cache is not related to the
multicast routing protocol called Protocol Independent Multicast
(PIM).
Options
Prompt
Description
Multicast Source for which you
source
want to view cache
address
information
Multicast Multicast group for which
group
you want to view cache
address
information
Possible Values
■
■
■
■
Depends on your
network
255.255.255.255
for all sources
Depends on your
network
255.255.255.255
for all groups
[Default]
255.255.255.255
(factory default),
or current value
255.255.255.255
(factory default),
or current value
ip multicast cache
527
Fields in the IP Multicast Cache Display
Field
Description
source
Subnetwork that contains a source device that is sending traffic
addressed to the IP multicast group listed in the group field.
group
IP multicast group address of packets coming from the
subnetwork listed to its left.
inVif
Index number of the interface that receives incoming IP multicast
group traffic. Either an I or a T precedes the index number. An
I indicates a regular IP multicast interface. A T indicates that
the interface also operates as a DVMRP tunnel.
outVif
Index numbers of the interfaces to which traffic from the inVif is
being forwarded.
inPorts
Physical port that corresponds to the interface that is listed in the
inVifs field.
outPorts
Physical ports that correspond to the interfaces that are listed in
the outVifs field.
528
CHAPTER 18: IP MULTICAST
ip multicast
traceRoute
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Provides a method for tracing the path that an IP multicast packet takes
from a source to a particular receiver. Unlike unicast IP traceroute,
multicast traceroute works in the reverse and requires a special packet
type and implementation in routing devices.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ip m t
Important Considerations
■
This command traces the path backwards from a specific receiving
device to a specific source device. When you use this command, the
receiver is assumed to be the system to which you are connected.
■
This command produces a display that shows IP addresses of the
interfaces that span from your system back to the source that you
specify. The display also shows the number of hops back to those
interfaces, the multicast routing protocols used, and the amount of
time it takes to reach each hop from the receiver.
■
All interim devices must support IP multicast traceroute for you to see
a complete path on the display.
Options
Prompt
Description
source IP
address
IP address of the source device Any valid IP address –
that sends traffic to a specific IP for IP multicast
multicast group address
source devices in
your network
Possible Values
multicast
group
address
The IP multicast group address
that the source is using for a
particular application. This is
useful when all applications
come from the same source.
Any valid IP
multicast group
address used by
source devices in
your network
[Default]
–
19
OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST
(OSPF)
This chapter describes commands that you can use to configure Open
Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing on your system.
For more information about administering OSPF routing on your network,
see the Implementation Guide for your system.
®
For the CoreBuilder 9000, the commands in this chapter apply to
Layer 3 switching modules only.
530
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
➧ ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
ip menu
interface
route
arp
multicast
dns
vrrp
udpHelper
routing
➧ ospf
rip
ping
advancedPing
traceRoute
advancedTraceRoute
statistics
ospf menu
➧ areas
➧ defaultRouteMetric
➧ interface
➧ linkStateData
➧ neighbors
routerID
➧ partition
➧ stubDefaultMetric
➧ virtualLinks
➧ policy
statistics
areas menu
display
defineArea
modifyArea
removeArea
addRange
modifyRange
removeRange
defaultRouteMetric menu
display
define
remove
interface menu
summary
detail
statistics
mode
priority
areaID
cost
delay
hello
retransmit
dead
password
linkStateData menu
databaseSummary
router
network
summary
external
neighbors menu
display
add
remove
partition menu
display
modify
stubDefaultMetric menu
display
define
remove
virtualLinks menu
summary
detail
statistics
define
remove
areaID
router
delay
hello
retransmit
dead
password
policy menu
summary
detail
define
modify
remove
ip ospf areas display
ip ospf areas display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
531
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays a list of existing OSPF areas.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o a di
Fields in the IP OSPF Areas Display
Field
Description
Advertise
Whether the network range is advertised (y) or
not (n)
AreaID
Area identifier
Indx
Entry index number for the area
IP Address
Network portion of IP address range
Mask
IP address range subnet mask
Stub
Whether the area is a stub area (y) or not (n)
532
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf areas
defineArea
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines an OSPF area.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o a de
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
The backbone area 0.0.0.0 is configured by default.
■
The area ID must be unique for the autonomous system.
■
On the CoreBuilder 3500, you can define a maximum of eight areas.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Area ID
In the form n.n.n.n (where
0 <= n <= 255); functions as
an area identification number
to the OSPF autonomous
system
Up to
255.255.255.255
–
Stub area
Whether this area is a stub area
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
n (factory
default), or
current value
ip ospf areas modifyArea
ip ospf areas
modifyArea
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
533
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies an existing OSPF area.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o a modifya
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
Area
Index number of the area that
you want to modify
Possible Values
■
■
Area ID
In the form n.n.n.n (where
0 <= n <= 255); functions as
an area identification number
to the OSPF autonomous
system
Stub area
Whether this area is a stub area
[Default]
Valid area index –
number
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Up to
255.255.255.255
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
–
n (factory
default), or
current value
534
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf areas
removeArea
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes an existing OSPF area.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o a removea
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
Area
Index number of the area that
you want to remove
Possible Values
■
■
■
[Default]
Valid area index First available
number
index number
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
ip ospf areas addRange
ip ospf areas
addRange
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
535
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Adds a range to an existing OSPF area.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o a a
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
Area
Index number of the area to
which you want to add the
range
Possible Values
■
■
[Default]
Valid area index –
number
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
IP address
IP address of the range that
you want to add to the area
Up to
255.255.255.255
Subnet
mask
Subnet mask of the range that Variable, based on Variable, based
you want to add to the area
address range class on address
range class
Advertise
range
Whether to advertise area
range
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
–
y
536
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf areas
modifyRange
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies an OSPF area range.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o a modifyr
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
Area
Index number of the area that
contains the range that you
want to modify
Possible Values
■
■
[Default]
Valid area index –
number
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
IP address of Existing range that you want to Up to
range
modify (in the form of an IP
255.255.255.255
address)
–
IP address
Range (in the form of an IP
address)
Current value
Subnet
mask
Subnet mask of the range that Variable, based on Current value
you want to modify
address range class
Advertise
range
Whether to advertise the area
range
Up to
255.255.255.255
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
IP OSPF Areas Modify Range Example
Select area {1-2|?}: 1
Enter IP address of range to modify: 3.3.3.1
Enter IP address [3.3.3.1]: 2.2.2.2
Enter subnet mask [255.0.0.0]: 255.255.0.0
Advertise this area range (yes,no) [yes]: y
Current value
ip ospf areas removeRange
ip ospf areas
removeRange
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes an OSPF area range.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o a remover
Options
3900
9300
537
Prompt
Description
Area
Index number of the area that
contains the range that you
want to delete
IP address
IP address of the range that
you want to delete
Possible Values
■
■
[Default]
Valid area index –
number
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Up to
255.255.255.255
–
538
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf
defaultRouteMetric
display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the cost of a default route.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o d di
Important Considerations
■
If a default metric is not defined, the router does not advertise itself as
the default router.
■
By default, the default route metric is not defined.
Field in the IP OSPF Default Route Metric Display
Field
Description
Default route metric
Cost (metric) that is associated with the default route. A
higher cost indicates a slower route, for example, because
it entails more hops or less bandwidth.
ip ospf defaultRouteMetric define
ip ospf
defaultRouteMetric
define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
539
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines the default route metric for the router.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o d de
Important Considerations
■
If a default metric is not defined, the router does not advertise itself as
the default router.
■
By default, the default route metric is not defined.
■
Defining is default route metric is useful when the configuration
supports multiple paths to the same destination. It provides a way to
signify which of the paths is to be preferred.
Options
Prompt
Description
Default
Cost (metric) that is associated
route metric with the default route
Possible Values
[Default]
1 – 65535
–
540
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf
defaultRouteMetric
remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes the default route metric.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o d r
Important Considerations
■
If a default metric is not defined, the router does not advertise itself as
the default router.
■
By default, the default route metric is not defined.
■
The default route metric is removed immediately after you enter the
command. You are not prompted to confirm the deletion.
ip ospf interface summary
ip ospf interface
summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
541
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays summary information for the system’s OSPF interface
configuration.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o i su
Fields in the IP OSPF Interface Summary Display
Field
Description
AreaID
OSPF area to which the interface belongs
Dead Intvl
Time interval (in seconds) before OSPF declares that a
neighbor is dead
Hello Intvl
OSPF Hello packet transmit interval (in seconds) for the
interface
Indx
Interface entry index; same number as the IP interface
index
Password
Password that is associated with the OSPF interface
Pri
OSPF router priority for the interface
Rxmit Intvl
LSA retransmit interval (in seconds)
Xmit Cost
Interface transmit cost
Xmit Delay
Interface transmit delay (in seconds)
542
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf interface
detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays summary and detailed information for the system’s OSPF
interface configuration.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o i det
Important Consideration
■
The display also indicates whether IP routing and Internet Control
Message Protocol (ICMP) router discovery are enabled and gives the
OSPF router ID.
Fields in the IP OSPF Interface Detail Display
Field
Description
AreaID
OSPF area to which the interface belongs
BDR
IP interface of the backup designated router (BDR)
Dead Intvl
Time interval (in seconds) before OSPF declares that a
neighbor is dead
DR
IP interface of the designated router (DR)
Hello Intvl
OSPF Hello packet transmit interval (in seconds) for the
interface
Indx
Index number that corresponds to the IP interface for which
OSPF information is displayed
IP address
IP address of the OSPF interface
Notes
When RouterID appears, the interface address is being
used as the OSPF router ID
Password
Password that is associated with the OSPF interface
Pri
OSPF router priority for the interface
Rxmit Intvl
LSA retransmit interval (in seconds)
ip ospf interface detail
Field
Description
State
Interface state:
543
■
Disabled — OSPF is not enabled on the interface.
■
Down — Interface is down, but OSPF is enabled on it.
■
Loopback — Interface is a loopback interface.
■
■
■
■
■
Waiting — Router is trying to determine the identity of
the DR and BDR on the network.
PTP — Interface is operational and connects to either a
point-to-point network or a virtual link. The router
attempts to form adjacency with the neighboring router.
DRother — Interface is on a multiaccess network where
this router is not the designated router or backup
designated router.
BDR — Router is the backup designated router on the
attached network.
DR — Router is the designated router on the attached
network.
Xmit Cost
Interface transmit cost
Xmit Delay
Interface transmit delay (in seconds)
544
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf interface
statistics
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays statistics that are associated with specified OSPF interfaces.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o i st
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of the interface
for which you want to display
statistics
Possible Values
■
■
■
Valid interface
index number
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Fields in the IP OSPF Interface Statistics Display
Field
Description
adjacencyDown
Number of times that OSPF adjacencies have gone down
adjacencyUp
Number of times that OSPF adjacencies have been formed
authError
Number of packets discarded due to OSPF authentication errors
Interpretation:
■
A non-zero value is bad and means that packets from some
OSPF routers are being discarded due to authentication
errors.
This statistic is incremented under the following circumstances:
■
■
■
If the OSPF packet authentication type is something other
than simple password (i.e., cryptographic authentication is
not supported in the current implementation).
If the OSPF packet contains a password but the interface
does not have a password configured.
If the OSPF packet has a simple password that does not
match the password defined for the OSPF interface.
computeDR
Number of times that the designated router has been
computed
lsaXsumError
Number of LSA checksum errors that were detected
mismatchAreaID
Number of interface area ID mismatches that were detected
mismatchAreaType Number of interface area type mismatches that were detected
ip ospf interface statistics
545
Field
Description
mismatchDead
Number of router dead interval mismatches that were detected
Interpretation:
■
A non-zero value is bad and means that some OSPF routers
on the interface are configured with a different dead
interval than this router. This prevents the router from
becoming a neighbor with these other routers.
This statistic is incremented under the following circumstances:
■
When an OSPF Hello packet is received and the dead interval
it defines is different from the dead interval configured on
the OSPF interface.
mismatchHello
Number of Hello packet interval mismatches that were detected
mismatchMask
Number of subnet mask mismatches that were detected
packetXsumError
Number of packet checksum errors since interface has come up
receiveDD
Number of database description packets that were received
from valid OSPF neighbors.
Interpretation:
■
A non-zero value is OK.
Database description packets are sent when forming
adjacencies with valid neighbors. A large number of
receiveDD packets in a network whose configuration has
not changed could indicate that adjacencies are being torn
down and re-established.
This statistic is incremented under the following circumstances:
■
receivedUnknown
When an OSPF database descriptor packet from a valid OSPF
neighbor is received.
Number of unknown LSAs that were received
546
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
Field
Description
receiveError
Number of general receive errors.
Interpretation:
■
A non-zero value indicates that OSPF packets are being
dropped and that this could be causing routing problems.
This statistic is incremented under the following circumstances:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
When an OSPF Hello packet is received and the packet
length is too short.
When an OSPF Hello packet is received that has the same
router ID as the router receiving the packet.
When an OSPF database descriptor packet is received and
the packet length is too short.
When an OSPF link state request (LSR) packet is received and
the packet length is too short.
When processing an LSR packet, if the area is not
configured on the interface.
When an OSPF link state update (LSU) packet is received and
the packet length is too short.
When processing an LSU packet, if there are more than 500
advertisements the packet is not processed.
When an OSPF link state acknowledgement (LSAck) packet
is received and the packet length is too short.
When processing an LSAck packet, if the area described by
the packet is not known by the router receiving the packet.
When processing any OSPF packet, if the packet length is
less than the OSPF header length then it must have been
truncated and the packet is dropped.
When an OSPF packet is received on an interface that is not
running OSPF.
When an OSPF packet is received over a virtual link, but the
virtual link is down or not configured.
When an OSPF packet is received (over a non-virtual link)
from a source whose IP network does not match the IP
network of the interface on which it was received.
When an OSPF packet is received on a Non-Broadcast
Multiple Access network from an unknown neighbor.
When an OSPF packet is received whose version is not OSPF
version 2.
receiveHello
Number of Hello packets that were received
receiveLsAck
Number of LSA acknowledgments that were received
receiveLSR
Number of LSA request packets that were received
ip ospf interface statistics
547
Field
Description
receiveLSU
Number of link state update packets that were received
transmitDD
Number of database description packets that were transmitted
Interpretation:
■
A non-zero value is OK.
Database description packets are sent when forming
adjacencies with valid neighbors. A large number in a
network whose configuration has not changed could
indicate that adjacencies are being torn down and
re-established.
This statistic is incremented under the following circumstances:
■
transmitError
When an OSPF database descriptor packet is transmitted.
Number of general transmit errors
Interpretation:
■
A non-zero value indicates that an OSPF packet could not be
sent either out a particular interface, or to a particular
destination. This could prevent OSPF from running properly
within the autonomous system and lead to routing
problems.
This statistic is incremented under the following circumstances:
■
When an OSPF Hello, LSU, or LSAck is being sent as a
multicast packet on a non-broadcast multiple access
network.
transmitHello
Number of Hello packets that were transmitted
transmitLsAck
Number of LSA acknowledgments that were transmitted
transmitLSR
Number of LSA request packets that were transmitted
transmitLSU
Number of link state update packets that were transmitted
548
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf interface
mode
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables or disables OSPF on specified IP interfaces.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o i m
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of one or more
IP interfaces on which you
want to enable or disable OSPF
Possible Values
■
■
■
OSPF mode
Whether to disable or enable
OSPF on the specified IP
interface
[Default]
One or more
all (factory
valid IP interface default), or
index numbers current value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
■
disabled
■
enabled
disabled
(factory
default), or
current value
ip ospf interface priority
ip ospf interface
priority
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
549
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Assigns interface priority to the OSPF router.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o i pr
Important Consideration
3900
9300
■
The interface priority of an OSPF router determines its status as a
designated router.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of one or more
IP interfaces to which you want
to assign a priority
Possible Values
■
■
■
Priority
Interface priority:
■
■
If 0, router will not be the
default router.
If 1 – 255, the highest
priority becomes the
designated router.
■
[Default]
One or more
all (factory
valid IP interface default), or
index numbers current value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
0 – 255
1
550
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf interface
areaID
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Associates an interface with an OSPF area.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o i a
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
Set the area ID to the same value for all routers on the network
segment because they are in the same area.
■
0.0.0.0 indicates the OSPF backbone area.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of one or more
interfaces that you want to
associate with the area
Possible Values
■
■
■
Area ID
ID of area, in the form n.n.n.n
(where 0 <= n <= 255) with
which you want to associate
the specified interfaces
[Default]
One or more
all (factory
valid IP interface default), or
index numbers current value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Valid area ID
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
ip ospf interface cost
ip ospf interface cost
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
551
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Assigns a cost to an OSPF interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o i c
Important Consideration
■
The interface cost reflects the line speed of the port. Although the
system calculates a default cost value based on the module media
type, you can use this command to manually change the cost to a
different value.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of one or more
interfaces to which you want
to assign a cost
Possible Values
■
■
■
Cost
[Default]
One or more
all (factory
valid IP interface default), or
index numbers current value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Cost that you want to assign to 1 – 65535
the specified interface (Higher
values are slower ports.)
Cost of slowest
port (usually 1)
552
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf interface
delay
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the OSPF interface transmit delay.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o i del
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
The system adds the value of the transmit delay to all link state
advertisements (LSAs) that it sends out to the network. Set the
transmit delay according to the link speed: use a longer transmit delay
time for slower link speeds.
■
The transmit delay must be consistent throughout the autonomous
system.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of one or more
interfaces for which you want
to set the transmit delay
Possible Values
■
■
■
Transmit
delay
Delay (in seconds) that you
want to assign to the specified
interface
[Default]
One or more
all (factory
valid IP interface default), or
index numbers current value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
1 – 65535 seconds 1 (factory
default), or
current value
ip ospf interface hello
553
ip ospf interface hello
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
Sets the interface Hello interval.
9400
3900
9300
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o i he
Important Considerations
■
Hello packets inform other routers that the sending router is still active
on the network.
■
If a router does not send Hello packets for a period of time specified
by the dead interval, the router is considered inactive by its neighbors.
■
The Hello packet interval must be consistent throughout the
autonomous system.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of one or more
interfaces for which you want
to set the Hello interval
Possible Values
■
■
■
Hello packet Interval (in seconds) at which
interval
the interface transmits Hello
packets
[Default]
One or more
all (factory
valid IP interface default), or
index numbers current value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
1 – 65535 seconds 10 (factory
default), or
current value
554
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf interface
retransmit
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Specifies the OSPF link state advertisement (LSA) retransmit interval for an
interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o i r
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of one or more
interfaces on which you want
to set the LSA retransmit
interval
Possible Values
■
■
■
LSA
retransmit
time
Interval at which the specified
interface retransmits LSAs
[Default]
One or more
all (factory
valid IP interface default), or
index numbers current value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
1 – 65535 seconds 5 (factory
default), or
current value
ip ospf interface dead
555
ip ospf interface dead
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
Specifies the dead interval for an interface.
9400
3900
9300
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o i dea
Important Consideration
■
Set the dead interval to the same value for all routers on the network.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of one or more
interfaces on which you want
to set the dead interval
Possible Values
■
■
■
Dead
interval
[Default]
One or more
all (factory
valid IP interface default), or
index numbers current value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Maximum duration (in
1 – 65535 seconds 40 (factory
seconds) that neighbor routers
default), or
wait for a Hello packet before
current value
they determine that the
transmitting router is inactive
556
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf interface
password
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets password security for an OSPF interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o i pa
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
To remove a previously assigned password, set the password to none.
■
The password must be consistent throughout the autonomous
system.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of one or more
interfaces for which you want
to assign or remove a
password
Possible Values
■
■
■
Password
Password for the specified
interface
The none option removes a
previously assigned password.
■
[Default]
One or more
all (factory
valid IP interface default), or
index numbers current value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Up to eight
none (factory
ASCII characters default), or
current value
ip ospf linkStateData databaseSummary
ip ospf linkStateData
databaseSummary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
557
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Summarizes link state advertisements (LSAs) in the link state database.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o l d
Important Consideration
3900
9300
■
To view link state database information, OSPF must be
active (enabled).
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
Area ID
Area ID (in the form
Valid area ID
n.n.n.n where 0 <= n <= 255)
that corresponds to the OSPF
area for which you want to
view LSA summary information
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
Area mask
Subnet mask of OSPF area for
which you want to view LSA
summary information
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
Valid area mask
[Default]
Fields in the IP OSPF Link State Data Database Summary Display
Field
Description
Checksum summation
Total of all LSA checksums
External LSAs
Number of external link LSAs
LSA count
Number of LSAs
Network LSAs
Number of network link LSAs
Router LSAs
Number of router link LSAs
Summary LSAs
Number of summary link LSAs
558
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf linkStateData
router
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays router link state advertisements (LSAs) in the link state database.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o l r
Important Consideration
3900
9300
■
To view link state database information, OSPF must be
active (enabled).
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Area ID
Area ID (in the form
n.n.n.n where 0 <= n <= 255)
that corresponds to the OSPF
area for which you want to
view router link state
advertisement information
Valid area ID
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
Area mask
Subnet mask of OSPF area for Valid area mask
which you want to view router
link state advertisement
information
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
LSID
Link State ID: router ID of the
originating router (in the form
of an IP address)
Router ID
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
LSID mask
Link State ID bit mask
(Example: 255.0.0.0)
Link State ID bit
mask
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
Fields in the IP OSPF Link State Data Router Display
Field
Description
Flags
■
■
■
V — Router is the endpoint of an active virtual link that
is using the area as a transmit area.
ASBR — Router is an autonomous system boundary
router.
ABR — Router is an area border router.
ip ospf linkStateData router
Field
Description
Link Data
■
Link Type
PTP — MIB II index value for an unnumbered
point-to-point interface.
■
Transit Net — IP address of the router’s interface
■
Stub Net — Network IP address mask
■
Link ID
559
Virtual link — IP interface address of neighboring
router
■
PTP — Neighboring router’s router ID
■
Transit Net — Address of designated router
■
Stub Net — IP network/subnetwork number
■
Virtual link — Neighboring router’s router ID
■
PTP — Connection is point-to-point to another router.
■
■
■
Transit Net — Connection is to a transit network
(one that has more than one OSPF router on it).
Stub Net — Connection is to a stub network.
Virtual link — Connection is to a far-end router
that is the endpoint of a virtual link.
LS Age
Time (in seconds) since LSA was originated
LS Seq
Sequence number of the LSA (used to detect older
duplicate LSAs)
LSID
ID number of the router that originated the LSA
Metric
Cost of the link
Router ID
Originating router ID
560
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf linkStateData
network
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays network link state advertisements (LSAs) in the link state
database.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o l n
Important Consideration
■
To view link state database information, OSPF must be
active (enabled).
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Area ID
Area ID (in the form
n.n.n.n where 0 <= n <= 255)
that corresponds to the OSPF
area for which you want to
view network LSA information
Valid area ID
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
Area Mask
Subnet mask of OSPF area for
which you want to view
network LSA information
Valid area mask
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
LSID
Link State ID: interface address Valid IP address
of the designated router
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
LSID mask
Link State ID bit mask
(Example: 255.0.0.0)
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
Link State ID bit
mask
Fields in the IP OSPF Link State Data Network Display
Field
Description
Attached routers List of routers that are fully adjacent to the designated router
(DR); also the DR
LS Age
Time (in seconds) since the LSA was originated
LS Seq
Sequence number of the LSA (used to detect older duplicate
LSAs)
LSID
Interface address (in the form of an IP address) of the designated
router
Network mask
IP address mask for the network
Router ID
Originating router ID
ip ospf linkStateData summary
ip ospf linkStateData
summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
561
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays summary link state advertisements (LSAs) in the link state
database.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o l s
Important Consideration
■
To view link state database information, OSPF must be
active (enabled).
Options
Prompt
Description
Area ID
Area ID (in the form
Valid area ID
n.n.n.n where 0 <= n <= 255)
that corresponds to the OSPF
area for which you want to
view summary LSA information
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
Area mask
Subnet mask of the OSPF area
for which you want to view
summary LSA information
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
LSID
Link State ID:
■
■
LSID mask
Possible Values
Valid area mask
■
For type 3 summary LSAs,
this is the IP address of the
destination network
For type 4 summary LSAs,
this is the autonomous
system boundary router’s
Router ID (in the form of an
IP address)
Link State ID bit mask
(Example: 255.0.0.0)
■
For type 3
summary LSAs,
a valid IP
address
[Default]
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
For type 4
summary LSAs,
a valid router ID
Link State ID bit
mask
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
562
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
Fields in the IP OSPF Link State Data Summary Display
Field
Description
LS Age
Time (in seconds) since LSA was originated
LS Seq
Sequence number of the LSA (used to detect older
duplicate LSAs)
LSID
■
Type 3 — Destination network’s IP address
■
Type 4 — ASBR’s OSPF router ID
Metric
Cost to reach the network
Network mask
■
For Type 3 — destination network’s IP address mask
■
For Type 4 — Not used, must be 0 (--)
Router ID
Originating router ID
ip ospf linkStateData external
ip ospf linkStateData
external
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
563
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays external network link state advertisements (LSAs) in the link state
database.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o l e
Important Consideration
■
To view link state database information, OSPF must be
active (enabled).
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
LSID
Link State ID (in the form of the Valid IP address
destination network’s IP
address)
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
LSID mask
Link State ID bit mask
(Example 255.0.0.0)
0.0.0.0 (factory
default), or
current value
Link State ID bit
mask
[Default]
Fields in the IP OSPF Link State Data External Display
Field
Description
Fwd Address
Forwarding address for data traffic to the advertised
destination
LS Age
Time (in seconds) since LSA was originated
LS Seq
Sequence number of the LSA (used to detect older
duplicate LSAs)
LSID
IP network number
Metric
Cost to reach advertised destination
Network Mask
IP address mask for the advertised destination
Router ID
Originating router ID
RouteTag
Not used by OSPF; these 32 bits may be used to
communicate other information between boundary
routers. Tag contents are defined by applications.
Type
■
■
Type 1 — normal link state metric
Type 2 — metric is larger than any local link state
path
564
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf neighbors
display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays information about currently defined neighbors in an OSPF area.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o n d
Fields in the IP OSPF Neighbors Display
3900
9300
Field
Description
Flags
Neighbor identification flags:
■
D — Dynamic neighbor
■
S — Static neighbor
■
BDR — Backup designated router
■
DR — Designated router
Example: [S, BDR] + [D, DR] is a static neighboring backup
designated router and a dynamic neighboring designated router
Indx
Interface index that corresponds to the interface to which a
neighbor belongs
Neighbor Addr
Interface address of neighbor
Pri
Neighbor’s OSPF router priority
ReqQ
Number of LSAs being requested from neighbor
Router ID
Neighbor’s OSPF router ID
RxQ
Number of LSAs in local retransmit queue to the neighbor
State
Neighbor’s adjacency:
■
■
■
■
■
SumQ
Down — No recent data received from neighbor, connection
is down.
Attempt — Only used on nonbroadcast networks. No recent
data received from neighbor (will attempt to contact).
Init — Have recently seen Hello packet from neighbor;
however, two-way communication has not been established.
Two-way — Bidirectional communication has been
established.
ExStart — Taking initial step to create adjacency between
neighboring routers.
■
Exchange — Database descriptions are being exchanged.
■
Loading — LSA databases are being exchanged.
■
Full — Neighboring routers are fully adjacent.
Number of LSAs in LSA summary queue for the neighbor
ip ospf neighbors add
565
ip ospf neighbors add
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
Adds a neighbor static IP address to an existing interface.
9400
3900
9300
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o n a
Important Consideration
■
The system learns neighbor addresses dynamically on interfaces that
support multicast routing. Define static neighbors only on
nonmulticast interfaces.
Options
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of the interface
to which you want to add a
neighbor
Static
neighbor
address
Address of neighbor that you
want to define
Possible Values
■
■
Valid interface
index number
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Valid IP address on
interface
subnetwork
[Default]
First available
(factory
default), or
current value
–
566
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf neighbors
remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes a static neighbor from an existing interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o n r
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
IP interface
Index number of the interface
from which you want to
remove a neighbor
Neighbor
address
Address of neighbor that you
want to remove
Possible Values
■
■
Valid interface
index number
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Valid IP address on
interface
subnetwork
[Default]
First available
(factory
default), or
current value
–
ip ospf routerID
ip ospf routerID
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
567
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the OSPF router ID.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o r
Important Considerations
■
The OSPF router ID identifies the router to other routers within an
autonomous system. Three types of router identifiers are available; all
three take the form of an IP address:
■
Default — A unique ID that the system generates and uses as the
default router ID
■
Interface — The index of an IP interface on the router
■
Address — An ID that you define in the form of an IP address
■
OSPF routing must be inactive (disabled) before you can add or modify
an OSPF router ID. To set the OSPF mode to disabled, see “ip ospf
interface mode” earlier in this chapter. After you modify the router ID,
you can set the OSPF mode to enabled on the interface
■
The router ID must be unique from all other router IDs and ip
interfaces in the autonomous system for OSPF to operate correctly.
Choose the default setting to ensure unique router IDs.
■
The resulting prompt depends on the router ID type that you choose.
568
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
Options
Prompt
Description
Router ID
type
Type of router identifier
that you want to define
IP interface
Router ID
For interface router ID
type only. Index number
of IP interface to use as
router ID.
Possible Values
■
default
■
interface
■
address
■
Valid IP interface
■
[Default]
default (factory
default), or current
value
First available
(factory default), or
? (for a list of
current value
selectable indexes)
User-defined router
For address router ID
type only. Identifier that ID
is assigned to router in
the form of an IP address
0.0.0.0 and
255.255.255.255 are
invalid and will be
rejected
Unique router ID
generated by the
system (factory
default), or current
value
IP OSPF Router ID Example (Interface Type)
Current OSPF router id = 0.43.66.0 (default)
Enter router ID type {default,interface,address|?} [default]: interface
Select IP interface {1-3|?}: 1
IP OSPF Router ID Example (Address Type)
Current OSPF router id = 24.23.11.23 (address)
Enter router ID type {default,interface,address|?} [address]: address
Enter router ID [24.23.11.23]: 101.89.2.4
ip ospf partition display
ip ospf partition
display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
569
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays OSPF memory allocation.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o pa d
Important Consideration
3900
9300
■
See “ip ospf partition modify” later in this chapter for information on
how OSPF memory allocation works and how to modify it.
Fields in the IP OSPF Partition Display
Field
Description
Current partition OSPF memory partition upper limit as implemented at the last
maximum size
system reboot.
Configured
partition
maximum size
Last value that you entered, which will become the current
partition maximum size after the next system reboot.
■
■
■
Allocated
partition size
0 means that OSPF has been set to use the system memory
partition at the next reboot.
1 means that OSPF has been set to use the default memory
allocation scheme, deriving its partition size from the
maximum size of the IP routing table at the next reboot.
Any other value that does not equal the current partition
maximum size means that OSPF has been manually set to use
a specific maximum partition size at the next reboot.
Module’s current working memory. OSPF dynamically allocates
memory in 100,000-byte chunks, up to the current partition
maximum size.
OSPF is using the The administrator used the ip ospf partition modify
system partition command to set a partition value of 0. The OSPF protocol is using
the system memory partition instead of its own partition, and
there is no specified OSPF memory limit.
570
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf partition
modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies the maximum memory that OSPF can allocate.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o pa m
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
There are three choices for memory allocation:
■
■
■
■
Have the system intelligently determine the maximum OSPF
memory partition size (partition size = 1). This is the default.
Have OSPF be part of system memory, growing as needed and
without limit (partition size = 0).
Configure the maximum OSPF memory partition size manually
(partition size = 4096 - <maximum available memory>).
You typically do not have to modify the OSPF memory allocation.
However, if the softRestarts statistic shown by the ip ospf
statistics option begins to climb, it means that OSPF is thrashing
for memory and you must increase the maximum memory.
For a complete description of OSPF memory allocation, see the “OSPF
Memory Partition” section in the OSPF chapter of the Implementation
Guide.
■
The partition size option that you enter takes effect after a system
reboot.
Options
Prompt
Description
New
partition
maximum
size
Maximum memory size (in
bytes) to allocate to OSPF
system operations
Possible Values
■
■
■
4096 to
<maximum
available size>
0 (to specify system
memory partition)
1 (to specify a size
based on amount
of memory and the
maximum routing
table size. On
extended memory
systems, this is
4,200,000.)
[Default]
1 (factory
default), or
current OSPF
partition size
ip ospf stubDefaultMetric display
ip ospf
stubDefaultMetric
display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
571
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the stub default metric value for an area border router.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o stu di
Important Considerations
■
3900
9300
The stub default metric value determines if the router generates the
default route into the stub areas of the network. This value applies to
area border routers (ABRs) that have attached stub areas.
If a stub default metric is not defined, the router does not advertise a
default route into the attached stub area.
■
By default, the stub default metric is not defined.
Field in the IP OSPF Stub Default Metric Display
Field
Description
Stub default
metric
Currently defined OSPF stub default metric
572
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf
stubDefaultMetric
define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines the stub default metric value for an OSPF area border router.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o stu de
Important Considerations
■
3900
9300
The stub default metric value determines if the router generates the
default route into the stub areas of the network. This value applies to
area border routers (ABRs) that have attached stub areas.
If a stub default metric is not defined, the router does not advertise a
default route into the attached stub area.
■
By default, the stub default metric is not defined.
Options
Prompt
Description
Stub default Stub default metric value to
metric
define for the area border
router. Higher numbers are
slower.
Possible Values
[Default]
1 – 65535
Current stub
default metric
ip ospf stubDefaultMetric remove
ip ospf
stubDefaultMetric
remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
573
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Disables the stub default metric on an OSPF area border router.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o stu r
Important Considerations
■
The system removes the current stub default metric value immediately
after you enter the command.
■
The stub default metric value determines if the router generates the
default route into the stub areas of the network. This value applies to
area border routers (ABRs) that have attached stub areas.
If a stub default metric is not defined, the router does not advertise a
default route into the attached stub area.
■
By default, the stub default metric is not defined.
574
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf virtualLinks
summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays summary information about a virtual link.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o v su
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
Virtual link
Index number of the virtual link
for which you want to display
summary information
Possible Values
■
■
■
Index number
of a currently
defined virtual
link
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Fields in the IP OSPF Virtual Links Summary Display
Field
Description
Dead Intvl
Number of seconds before the area border router’s neighbors
declare it down, when they stop hearing the router’s Hellos
Hello Intvl
Length of time (in seconds) between Hello packets
Indx
Index number of the virtual link
Password
Password for the virtual link
Rxmit Intvl
Length of time (in seconds) between link state advertisement
retransmissions
Target Router
End-point area border router where the virtual link terminates
Transit Area
Common area that the virtual link uses to reach the target router
Xmit Delay
Estimated number of seconds that it takes to transmit a link state
update packet over the virtual link
ip ospf virtualLinks detail
ip ospf virtualLinks
detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
575
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays detailed information about a virtual link.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o v det
Important Consideration
3900
9300
■
This display also contains virtual link detail and neighbor information.
Options
Prompt
Description
Virtual link
Index number of the virtual link
for which you want to display
detail information
Possible Values
■
■
■
Index number
of a currently
defined virtual
link
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Fields in the IP OSPF Virtual Links Detail Display
Field
Description
Dead Intvl
Number of seconds before the area border router’s neighbors
declare it down, when they stop hearing the router’s Hellos
Hello Intvl
Length of time (in seconds) between Hello packets
Indx
Index number of the virtual link
Password
Password for the virtual link
Rxmit Intvl
Length of time (in seconds) between link state advertisement
retransmissions
Target Router
End-point area border router where the virtual link terminates
Transit Area
Common area that the virtual link uses to reach the target router
Xmit Delay
Estimated number of seconds that it takes to transmit a link state
update packet over the virtual link
576
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
Fields in the IP OSPF Virtual Links Detail Display
Field
Description
Cost
Cost of sending a packet over the virtual link, expressed in the
link state metric
Indx
Index number of the virtual link
Local Address
Address of the local router
Remote Address
Address of the remote router
State
State of the virtual link
Fields in the IP OSPF Virtual Links Neighbor Display
Field
Description
Indx
Index number for the interface to which a neighbor belongs
ReqQ
Number of LSAs that are being requested from the neighbor
RxQ
Number of LSAs that are in the local retransmit queue to the
neighbor
State
Neighbor’s adjacency:
■
■
■
■
■
SumQ
Down — No recent data received from neighbor, connection
is down.
Attempt — Only used on nonbroadcast networks. No recent
data received from neighbor (will attempt to contact).
Init — Have recently seen Hello packet from neighbor;
however, two-way communication has not been established.
Two-way — Bidirectional communication has been
established.
ExStart — Taking initial step to create adjacency between
neighboring routers.
■
Exchange — Database descriptions are being exchanged.
■
Loading — LSA databases are being exchanged.
■
Full — Neighboring routers are fully adjacent.
Number of LSAs in LSA summary queue for the neighbor
ip ospf virtualLinks statistics
ip ospf virtualLinks
statistics
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
577
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays statistics that are associated with virtual links.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o v st
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
Virtual link
Index number of the virtual link
for which you want to display
statistics
Possible Values
■
■
■
Valid interface
index number
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Fields in the IP OSPF Virtual Links Statistics Display
Field
Description
adjacencyDown
Number of times that OSPF adjacencies have gone down
adjacencyUp
Number of times that OSPF adjacencies have been formed
authError
Number of packets discarded due to OSPF authentication errors
Interpretation:
■
A non-zero value is bad and means that packets from some
OSPF routers are being discarded due to authentication
errors.
This statistic is incremented under the following circumstances:
■
■
■
If the OSPF packet authentication type is something other
than simple password (that is, cryptographic authentication
is not supported in the current implementation).
If the OSPF packet contains a password but the interface
does not have a password configured.
If the OSPF packet has a simple password that does not
match the password defined for the OSPF interface.
computeDR
Number of times that the designated router was computed
lsaXsumError
Number of LSA checksum errors that have been detected
mismatchAreaID
Number of interface area ID mismatches that have been
detected
mismatchAreaType Number of interface area type mismatches that have been
detected
578
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
Field
Description
mismatchDead
Number of router dead interval mismatches that were detected
Interpretation:
■
A non-zero value is bad and means that some OSPF routers
on the interface are configured with a different dead
interval than this router. This prevents the router from
becoming a neighbor with these other routers.
This statistic is incremented under the following circumstances:
■
When an OSPF Hello packet is received and the dead interval
it defines is different from the dead interval configured on
the OSPF interface.
mismatchHello
Number of Hello packet interval mismatches that have been
detected
mismatchMask
Number of subnet mask mismatches that have been detected
packetXsumError
Number of packet checksum errors since the interface has
come up
receiveDD
Number of database description packets that were received
from valid OSPF neighbors.
Interpretation:
■
A non-zero value is OK.
Database description packets are sent when forming
adjacencies with valid neighbors. A large number of
receiveDD packets in a network whose configuration has
not changed could indicate that adjacencies are being torn
down and reestablished.
This statistic is incremented under the following circumstances:
■
receivedUnknown
When an OSPF database descriptor packet from a valid OSPF
neighbor is received.
Number of unknown LSAs that have been received
ip ospf virtualLinks statistics
Field
Description
receiveError
Number of general receive errors.
579
Interpretation:
■
A non-zero value indicates that OSPF packets are being
dropped and that this could be causing routing problems.
This statistic is incremented under the following circumstances:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
When an OSPF Hello packet is received and the packet
length is too short.
When an OSPF Hello packet is received that has the same
router ID as the router receiving the packet.
When an OSPF database descriptor packet is received and
the packet length is too short.
When an OSPF link state request (LSR) packet is received and
the packet length is too short.
When processing an LSR packet, if the area is not
configured on the interface.
When an OSPF link state update (LSU) packet is received and
the packet length is too short.
When processing an LSU packet, if there are more than 500
advertisements the packet is not processed.
When an OSPF link state acknowledgement (LSAck) packet
is received and the packet length is too short.
When processing an LSAck packet, if the area described by
the packet is not known by the router receiving the packet.
When processing any OSPF packet, if the packet length is
less than the OSPF header length then it must have been
truncated and the packet is dropped.
When an OSPF packet is received on an interface that is not
running OSPF.
When an OSPF packet is received over a virtual link, but the
virtual link is down or not configured.
When an OSPF packet is received (over a non-virtual link)
from a source whose IP network does not match the IP
network of the interface on which it was received.
When an OSPF packet is received on a Non-Broadcast
Multiple Access network from an unknown neighbor.
When an OSPF packet is received whose version is not OSPF
version 2.
receiveHello
Number of Hello packets that have been received
receiveLsAck
Number of LSA acknowledgments that have been received
receiveLSR
Number of LSA request packets that have been received
580
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
Field
Description
receiveLSU
Number of link state update packets that have been received
transmitDD
Number of database description packets that were transmitted
Interpretation:
■
A non-zero value is OK.
Database description packets are sent when forming
adjacencies with valid neighbors. A large number in a
network whose configuration has not changed could
indicate that adjacencies are being torn down and
re-established.
This statistic is incremented under the following circumstances:
■
transmitError
When an OSPF database descriptor packet is transmitted.
Number of general transmit errors
Interpretation:
■
A non-zero value indicates that an OSPF packet could not be
sent either out a particular interface, or to a particular
destination. This could prevent OSPF from running properly
within the autonomous system and lead to routing
problems.
This statistic is incremented under the following circumstances:
■
When an OSPF Hello, LSU, or LSAck is being sent as a
multicast packet on a non-broadcast multiple access
network.
transmitHello
Number of Hello packets that have been transmitted
transmitLsAck
Number of LSA acknowledgments that have been transmitted
transmitLSR
Number of LSA request packets that have been transmitted
transmitLSU
Number of link state update packets that have been
transmitted
ip ospf virtualLinks define
ip ospf virtualLinks
define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
581
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Creates a new virtual link to a destination router.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o v def
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
All areas of an OSPF routing domain must connect to the backbone
area. In cases where an area border router does not have direct,
physical access to the backbone, you must configure a virtual link to
act as a logical link to the backbone area.
■
You can define up to 32 virtual links per router.
Options
Prompt
Description
Transit area
Area ID (in the form
Currently defined
n.n.n.n where 0 <= n <= 255) area ID
through which the link is going
Possible Values
[Default]
–
Target
router
ID of the target router, which is Valid IP address of
the router where the virtual
OSPF area border
link terminates
router
–
582
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf virtualLinks
remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes a virtual link.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o v rem
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
Virtual link
Index number of the virtual link
that you want to remove
Possible Values
■
■
■
Index number
of a currently
defined virtual
link
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
[Default]
–
ip ospf virtualLinks areaID
ip ospf virtualLinks
areaID
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
583
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies the transit area that is associated with a virtual link.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o v a
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
Virtual link
Index number of the virtual link
for which you want to specify a
new area ID
Possible Values
■
■
■
Target area
Index number
of a currently
defined virtual
link
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Area ID (in the form
ID of a currently
n.n.n.n where 0 <= n <= 255) defined area
of the transit area through
which the virtual link must pass
to reach the target router
Current value
584
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf virtualLinks
router
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies the target router that is associated with a virtual link.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o v ro
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
Virtual link
Index number of the virtual link
for which you want to specify a
new target router
Possible Values
■
■
■
Target
router
IP address of the new
destination area border router
where the virtual link
terminates
Index number
of a currently
defined virtual
link
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Valid IP address of
an OSPF area
border router
Current value
ip ospf virtualLinks delay
ip ospf virtualLinks
delay
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
585
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the virtual link transmit delay, in seconds.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o v del
Important Consideration
3900
9300
■
The virtual link transmit delay must be consistent throughout the
autonomous system.
Options
Prompt
Description
Virtual link
Index number of the virtual link
for which you want to specify
the transmit delay
Possible Values
■
■
■
Transmit
delay
New virtual link transmit delay
(in seconds)
Index number
of a currently
defined virtual
link
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
1 – 65535 seconds 1 (factory
default), or
current value
586
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf virtualLinks
hello
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the virtual link Hello interval, in seconds.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o v he
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
Hello packets inform other routers that the sending router is still active
on the network.
■
If a router does not send Hello packets for a period of time specified
by the dead interval, the router is considered inactive by its neighbors.
■
The virtual link Hello interval must be consistent throughout the
autonomous system.
Options
Prompt
Description
Virtual link
Index number of the virtual link
for which you want to specify
the Hello interval
Possible Values
■
■
■
Hello packet Interval (in seconds) at which
interval
the area border router
transmits Hello packets
Index number
of a currently
defined virtual
link
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
1 – 65535 seconds 10 (factory
default), or
current value
ip ospf virtualLinks retransmit
ip ospf virtualLinks
retransmit
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
587
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the virtual link retransmit interval, in seconds.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o v ret
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
Virtual link
Index number of the virtual link
for which you want to specify
the retransmit interval
Possible Values
■
■
■
LSA
retransmit
time
Interval (in seconds) at which
the area border router
retransmits LSAs over the
virtual link
Index number
of a currently
defined virtual
link
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
1 – 65535 seconds 50 (factory
default), or
current value
588
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf virtualLinks
dead
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the virtual link dead interval, in seconds.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o v dea
Important Consideration
3900
9300
■
Set the dead interval to the same value for all routers on the network.
Options
Prompt
Description
Virtual link
Index number of the virtual link
for which you want to specify
the dead interval
Possible Values
■
■
■
Dead
interval
Index number
of a currently
defined virtual
link
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Maximum duration (in
1 – 65535 seconds 40 (factory
seconds) that neighbor routers
default), or
wait for a Hello packet before
current value
they determine that the
transmitting router is inactive
ip ospf virtualLinks password
ip ospf virtualLinks
password
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
589
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets password security for a virtual link.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o v p
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
Set the virtual link password to none to remove a previously assigned
password.
■
The password must be consistent throughout the autonomous
system.
Options
Prompt
Description
Virtual link
Index number of the virtual link
for which you want to specify a
password
Possible Values
■
■
■
Virtual link
password
Password for the specified
virtual link
Valid IP
interface index
number
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Up to eight ASCII
characters
none (factory
default), or
current value
590
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf policy
summary
Displays summary information about OSPF routing policies.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
ip o po s
Important Considerations
■
Your system has one unified IP routing table. Routing policies allow
you to control the flow of information among the network, the
protocols, and the routing tables on your system.
■
There are two classes of routing policies:
3900
9300
■
■
■
Import policies — Control which OSPF non-self-originated
external routes are stored in the routing table. OSPF import policies
control only what the local router uses. They do not affect the
propagation of non-self-originated external routes to other routers.
Export policies — Used on OSPF boundary routers to control
which self-originated external routing updates are placed in the
link-state database for propagation over the network. In this way,
export policies govern what other routers learn with regard to the
local boundary router’s self-originated information.
The system tracks policies that you define in both OSPF and Routing
Information Protocol (RIP), so the indexes that are assigned to your
policies may have gaps. For example, if you have OSPF policies 1 and
2, and RIP policies 3 through 6, the next policy is 7.
Fields in the IP OSPF Policy Summary Display
Field
Description
Action
Action for the route (accept or reject)
Idx
Index number of the interface
Protocol
Protocol (for example, OSPF)
Route
Source network
Source
Source router
Type
Whether the policy is an import or export policy
Wt
Administrative weight (range of values: 1 through 16)
ip ospf policy detail
ip ospf policy detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
591
Displays summary and detailed information about OSPF routing policies.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o po det
Important Considerations
■
This display contains the summary information plus three additional
fields: interface, metric, and ASEType.
■
Your system has one unified IP routing table. Routing policies allow
you to control the flow of information among the network, the
protocols, and the routing tables on your system.
■
There are two classes of routing policies:
■
■
■
Import policies — Control which OSPF non-self-originated
external routes are stored in the routing table. OSPF import policies
control only what the local router uses. They do not affect the
propagation of non-self-originated external routes to other routers.
Export policies — Used on OSPF boundary routers to control
which self-originated external routing updates are placed in the
link-state database for propagation over the network. In this way,
export policies govern what other routers learn with regard to the
local boundary router’s self-originated information.
The system tracks policies that you define in both OSPF and Routing
Information Protocol (RIP), so the indexes that are assigned to your
policies may have gaps. For example, if you have OSPF policies 1 and
2, and RIP policies 3 through 6, the next policy is 7.
Fields in the IP OSPF Policy Detail Display
Field
Description
Action
Action for the route (accept or reject)
ASEType
Type of external metric — Type 1 or Type 2 — specified in
the AS external link advertisement. OSPF boundary routers use
Type 1 as default. Only applicable to export policies.
Index
Index number of the policy
Interface
Origin interface (only applicable when specifying direct as
Origin Protocol)
Metric
Adjustment to the cost metric of routes that match the policy
Protocol
Origin protocol (for export policies only). Can also specify a
direct or static route.
592
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
Field
Description
Route
Route against which the policy is applied
Source
Source router (only applicable to export policies that do not
specify direct as Origin Protocol)
Type
Whether the policy is an import or export policy
Weight
Administrative weight (range of values: 1 through 16)
ip ospf policy define
ip ospf policy define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
593
Defines import and export OSPF routing policies.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o po def
Important Considerations
■
The system assigns an index number to each policy and takes into
account all route policies, Routing Information Protocol (RIP) and OSPF,
that are set on the system.
■
There are certain conditions associated with import and export
policies. See the “OSPF Routing Policies” section in the OSPF chapter
of your product’s Implementation Guide for more information.
■
Your system has one unified IP routing table. Routing policies allow
you to control the flow of information among the network, the
protocols, and the routing tables on your system.
■
There are two classes of routing policies:
■
■
■
Import policies — Control which OSPF non-self-originated
external routes are stored in the routing table. OSPF import policies
control only what the local router uses. They do not affect the
propagation of non-self-originated external routes to other routers.
Export policies — Used on OSPF boundary routers to control
which self-originated external routing updates are placed in the
link-state database for propagation over the network. In this way,
export policies govern what other routers learn with regard to the
local boundary router’s self-originated information.
You can set up an IP RIP or OSPF import or export policy to accept or
advertise the default route, as long as the default route exists in the
routing table. When you define a policy, you are always prompted for
the route subnet mask after the route address, even though you
specify the wildcard route address of 0.0.0.0.
Specify a route subnet mask as follows:
■
■
■
If you want the wildcard subnet mask for all routes, use the default
subnet mask (0.0.0.0).
If you want the default route (not all routes), use
255.255.255.255.
For more information about IP routing policies, see the
Implementation Guide for your system.
594
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
Options
Prompt
Description
Policy type
Type of policy
Origin
protocols
For export policies only. Defines
from which protocol the route
originated
Source address Source router from which the
route was learned. Not
applicable to the following:
■
■
Possible Values
■
import
■
export
■
direct
■
sta (static)
■
rip
[Default]
import
sta, rip
Any valid IP
address
0.0.0.0 (all)
Import policies
Export polices that define
direct as the Origin
Protocol
Route address
Route IP address. Not applicable
to export policies that define
direct as the Origin Protocol.
Any valid IP
address
0.0.0.0 (all)
Route subnet
mask
Subnet mask for the route (for
example, 255.255.0.0). Not
applicable to export policies that
define direct as the Origin
Protocol.
Any valid subnet
mask
0.0.0.0 (all)
IP interfaces
Index number of the interface for
which you want to define a
routing policy. Only applicable
when specifying direct as the
origin protocol when defining an
export policy.
Policy action
Metric
adjustment
Accept or reject the route
For accept conditions only,
increases or decreases the
converted route metric by the
specified value. Options:
+ (add)
- (subtract)
* (multiply metric by value)
/ (divide metric by value)
% (modulo, remainder of
division operation as integer)
■
■
■
Valid interface all (factory
index
default), or
current
all
value
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
■
accept
■
reject
accept
0 – 65535 with or 0, which
without options
does not
change the
metric
ip ospf policy define
Prompt
Description
ASE type
Type of external metric that is
used in the AS external
advertisement (ASE), defined as:
■
■
Administrative
weight
Possible Values
■
Type 1
■
Type 2
595
[Default]
1
Type 1 — External metric is
directly comparable (without
translation) to the link state
metric.
Type 2 — External metric is
larger than any link state
path.
Metric value for this policy.
(Higher values have higher
priority.)
1 – 16
1
OSPF Import Policy Conditions
Route
(address/mask) Action
Description
Specified
route/mask
accept
Add specified non-self-originated external route
with or without metric adjustments (+, -, *, /, %) to
the routing table.
all (0.0.0.0)
accept
Add all non-self-originated external routes with or
without metric adjustments (+, -, *, /, %) to the
routing table.
Specified
route/mask
reject
Do not add specified non-self-originated external
route to the routing table.
all
reject
Do not add any external routes to the routing table;
reject all non-self-originated external routes.
596
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
OSPF Export Policy Conditions
Protocol
Source
Router
Route
Action
Description
RIP or static
Specified
router or all
routers
Specified
route/mask
accept
Advertise in external LSAs
specified RIP/static route from
specified router with or
without metric adjustments
(+, -, *, /, %).
RIP or static
Specified
router or all
routers
all (0.0.0.0)
accept
Advertise in external LSAs all
RIP/static routes from
specified router with or
without metric adjustments
(+, -, *, /, %).
RIP or static
Specified
router or all
routers
Specified
route/mask
reject
Do not advertise in external
LSAs RIP/static routes from
specified routers.
RIP or static
Specified
router or all
routers
all (0.0.0.0)
reject
Do not advertise in external
LSAs any RIP/static route
from specified routers.
Export Policy Conditions for Direct Routes
Protocol
Interface
Action
Description
Direct
Specified
non-OSPF
interface or
All non-OSPF
interfaces
accept
Advertise in external LSAs all direct
routes off of specified interfaces.
Direct
Specified
non-OSPF
interface or
All non-OSPF
interfaces
reject
Do not specify in external LSAs any direct
routes off of specified interfaces.
ip ospf policy define
597
Example of Import Policy
Select menu option (ip/ospf/policy): define
Enter policy type (import,export) [import]: import
Enter route address [0.0.0.0]: 204.201.89.9
Enter route subnet mask [255.255.255.0]:
Enter policy action (accept,reject) [accept]: accept
Enter metric adjustment ([+,-,*,/,%]0-65535) [0]:
Enter administrative weight (1-16) [1]: 2
Example of Export Policy
Select menu option (ip/ospf/policy): define
Enter policy type (import,export) [import]: export
Enter origin protocols (dir,sta,rip|all|?) [dir,sta,rip]: sta
Enter source address [0.0.0.0]: 204.243.30.4
Enter route address [0.0.0.0]: 22.32.4.2
Enter route subnet mask [255.0.0.0]:
Enter policy action (accept,reject) [accept]: accept
Enter metric adjustment ([+,-,*,/,%]0-65535) [0]:
Enter ASE type (type1,type2) [type1]: 2
Enter administrative weight (1-16) [1]: 3
Example of Export Policy for a Directly Connected Interface
Select menu option (ip/ospf/policy): define
Enter policy type (import,export) [import]: export
Enter origin protocols (dir,sta,rip|all|?) [dir,sta,rip]: dir
Select IP interfaces (1|all|?) [1]:
Enter policy action (accept,reject) [accept]: accept
Enter metric adjustment ([+,-,*,/,%]0-65535) [0]: 3
Enter ASE type (type1,type2) [type1]: 2
Enter administrative weight (1-16) [1]: 4
598
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf policy modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Modifies an existing OSPF routing policy.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o po m
Important Considerations
■
The system assigns an index number to each policy and takes into
account all route policies, Routing Information Protocol (RIP) and OSPF,
that are set on the system.
■
There are certain conditions associated with import and export
policies. See the Implementation Guide for your system for more
information.
■
Your system has one unified IP routing table. Routing policies allow
you to control the flow of information among the network, the
protocols, and the routing tables on your system.
■
There are two classes of routing policies:
■
■
■
Import policies — Control which OSPF non-self-originated
external routes are stored in the routing table. OSPF import policies
control only what the local router uses. They do not affect the
propagation of non-self-originated external routes to other routers.
Export policies — Used on OSPF boundary routers to control
which self-originated external routing updates are placed in the
link-state database for propagation over the network. In this way,
export policies govern what other routers learn with regard to the
local boundary router’s self-originated information.
You can set up an IP RIP or OSPF import or export policy to accept or
advertise the default route, as long as the default route exists in the
routing table. When you define a policy, you are always prompted for
the route subnet mask after the route address, even though you
specify the wildcard route address of 0.0.0.0.
Specify a route subnet mask as follows:
■
■
■
If you want the wildcard subnet mask for all routes, use the default
subnet mask (0.0.0.0).
If you want the default route (not all routes), enter
255.255.255.255.
For more information about IP routing policies, see the
Implementation Guide for your system.
ip ospf policy modify
599
Options
Prompt
Description
Policy
Index number of the policy that
you want to modify
Possible Values
■
■
Origin
protocols
For export policies only. Defines
from which protocol the route
originated
Source address Source router from which the
route was learned. Not
applicable to the following:
■
■
Valid policy
index number
[Default]
–
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
■
direct
■
sta (static)
■
rip
Current
value
Any valid IP
address
Current
value
Import policies
Export polices that define
direct as the Origin
Protocol
Route address
Route IP address. Not applicable
to export policies that define
direct as the Origin Protocol.
Any valid IP
address
Current
value
Route subnet
mask
Subnet mask for the route (for
example, 255.255.0.0). Not
applicable to export policies that
define direct as the Origin
Protocol.
Any valid mask
Current
value
IP interfaces
Index number of the interface for
which you want to define a
routing policy. Only applicable
when you specify direct as the
origin protocol when defining an
export policy.
Policy action
Accept or reject the route.
■
■
■
Valid IP
Current
interface index value
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
■
accept
■
reject
Current
value
600
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
Metric
adjustment
For accept conditions only,
increases or decreases the
converted route metric by the
specified value. Options:
0 – 16, with or
without options
Current
value
+ (add)
- (subtract)
* (multiply metric by value)
/ (divide metric by value)
% (modulo, remainder of
division operation as integer)
ASE type
Type of external metric used in
the AS external advertisement
(ASE), defined as:
■
■
Administrative
weight
■
Type 1
■
Type 2
Current
value
Type 1 — External metric is
directly comparable (without
translation) to the link state
metric.
Type 2 — External metric is
larger than any link state
path.
Metric value for this policy.
(Higher values have higher
priority.)
1 – 16
Current
value
OSPF Import Policy Conditions
Route
(address/mask) Action
Description
Specified
route/mask
accept
Add specified non-self-originated external route
with or without metric adjustments (+, -, *, /, %) to
the routing table.
All (0.0.0.0)
accept
Add all non-self-originated external routes with or
without metric adjustments (+, -, *, /, %) to the
routing table.
Specified
route/mask
reject
Do not add specified non-self-originated external
route to the routing table.
All
reject
Do not add any external routes to the routing table;
reject all non-self-originated external routes.
ip ospf policy modify
601
OSPF Export Policy Conditions
Protocol
Source
Router
Route
Action
Description
RIP or static
Specified
router or all
routers
Specified
route/mask
accept
Advertise in external LSAs
specified RIP/static route from
specified router with or
without metric adjustments
(+, -, *, /, %).
RIP or static
Specified
router or all
routers
all (0.0.0.0)
accept
Advertise in external LSAs all
RIP/static routes from
specified router with or
without metric adjustments
(+, -, *, /, %).
RIP or static
Specified
router or all
routers
Specified
route/mask
reject
Do not advertise in external
LSAs RIP/static routes from
specified router(s).
RIP or static
Specified
router or all
routers
all (0.0.0.0)
reject
Do not advertise in external
LSAs any RIP/static route from
specified router(s).
Export Policy Conditions for Direct Routes
Protocol
Interface
Action
Description
Direct
Specified
non-OSPF
interface or
All non-OSPF
interfaces
accept
Advertise in external LSAs all direct
routes off of specified interfaces.
Direct
Specified
non-OSPF
interface or
All non-OSPF
interfaces
reject
Do not specify in external LSAs any direct
routes off of specified interfaces.
IP OSPF Policy Modify Example
Select menu option (ip/ospf/policy): modify
Select policy {1|?} [1]:
Enter origin protocols (dir,sta,rip|all|?) [rip]:
Enter source address [0.0.0.0]:
Enter route address [0.0.0.0]:
Enter policy action (accept,reject) [accept]:
Enter metric adjustment ([+,-,*,/,%]0-65535) [0]:
Enter administrative weight (1-16) [1]:
Enter ASE type (type1,type2) [type1]:
602
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
ip ospf policy remove
Deletes OSPF routing policies.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
ip o po r
9400
3900
9300
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
Important Considerations
■
The system assigns an index number to each policy that you define.
This index number takes into account all route policies that are set on
the system, Routing Information Protocol (RIP) and OSPF, so the
assigned index may be higher than you expect.
■
When you remove a policy, the associated index number is available
for future use.
Options
Prompt
Description
Policy index
Index number of the policy that
you want to delete
Possible Values
■
■
■
Valid policy
index number
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
[Default]
–
ip ospf statistics
ip ospf statistics
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
603
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays general OSPF statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ip o sta
Fields in the IP OSPF Statistics Display
Field
Description
extLsaChanges
Number of external LSA changes that have been made to the
database
LSAsReceived
Number of link state advertisements that have been received
LSAsTransmitted
Number of link state advertisements that have been transmitted
memoryFailures
Number of nonfatal memory-allocation failures
recvErrors
Number of general receive errors
routeUpdateErrors Number of nonfatal routing table update failures
softRestarts
Number of OSPF router soft restarts due to insufficient memory
resources (implies a fatal memory-allocation failure). To fix this
problem, use ip ospf partition modify to change the
OSPF memory partition, add memory, or reconfigure the
network topology to generate smaller OSPF databases.
SPFComputations
Number of shortest-path-first computations that have been
made
604
CHAPTER 19: OPEN SHORTEST PATH FIRST (OSPF)
20
IPX
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
use the Internet Packet eXchange (IPX) protocol routing commands to
route packets from your system to an external destination.
The IPX protocol is a NetWare LAN communications protocol that moves
data between servers and workstation programs running on various
network nodes. IPX is a User Datagram Protocol (UDP) that is used for
connectionless communications. IPX packets are encapsulated and
carried by Ethernet packet and Token Ring frames.
To route packets using the IPX protocol, you:
1 Define an IPX routing interface
2 Decide which IPX routing and server options you want to use
3 Enable IPX forwarding.
An IPX routing interface defines the relationship between an IPX virtual
LAN (VLAN) and the subnetworks in the IPX network. Each routing IPX
VLAN interface is associated with a VLAN that supports IPX. The system
has one interface defined for each subnetwork that is directly connected
to it. You must first define a VLAN, as described in Chapter 14, before
you define an associated IPX VLAN interface.
For more information about IPX, see the Implementation Guide for your
system.
For the CoreBuilder® 9000, the commands in this chapter apply to
Layer 3 switching modules only.
606
CHAPTER 20: IPX
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware that
are configured for your system. The following diagram shows the
complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at the
beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether your
system supports the command.
Top-Level menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
ip
➧ ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
ipx menu
➧ interface
➧ route
➧ server
forwarding
➧ rip
➧ sap
interface menu
display
define
modify
remove
SAPadvertising
RIPadvertising
output-delay
➧ statistics
oddLengthPadding
NetBIOS
secondary
route menu
display
secondary
static
remove
flush
server menu
display
static
remove
flush
secondary
rip menu
mode
triggered
➧ policy
sap menu
mode
triggered
➧ policy
statistics menu
summary
rip
sap
forwarding
interface
policy menu
summary
define
modify
remove
policy menu
summary
detail
define
modify
remove
ipx interface display
ipx interface display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
607
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays information about the IPX parameters and IPX interfaces that are
configured on the system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx i di
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether:
■
IPX forwarding is enabled.
■
RIP is active.
■
SAP is active.
■
RIP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
SAP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
Secondary route/server option is enabled.
Fields in the IPX Interface Display
Field
Description
Format
Frame encapsulation format.
Index
System-assigned index number for the interface.
IPX address
Unique 4-byte network address.
State
Status of the IPX interface. It indicates whether the
interface is available for communications (up) or
unavailable (down).
Ticks
Number that the system uses to calculate route
time. (A tick is an estimate of how long a packet
takes to reach the network segment.) There are
18.21 ticks in a second. The possible values are
1 – 65534 and are defined as:
VLAN index
■
1 = FDDI
■
4 = Ethernet
■
10+ = Serial Links
Index number of the VLAN that is associated with
the IPX interface. When the system prompts you
for this option, the menu identifies the available
VLAN indexes.
608
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx interface define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines an IPX interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx i de
Important Considerations
■
An IPX interface defines the relationships among an IPX virtual LAN
(VLAN), the IPX router, and the IPX network. The IPX router has one
IPX interface defined for each network than is directly connected to it.
■
When you define an interface, you define the interface’s IPX address,
cost, format, and any associated IPX VLAN index.
■
Before you define the IPX (routing) interface, you must specify a VLAN
and select IPX, IPX-II, IPX-802.2, IPX 802.2 LLC, IPX-802.3, or
IPX-802.2-SNAP as a protocol that the VLAN supports, as described in
Chapter 14. (For routing, a VLAN can now support multiple protocols.)
■
Unless your network has special requirements such as the need for
redundant paths, assign a cost of 1 to each interface.
■
The two Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) encapsulation formats
correspond to the Ethernet 802.2 LLC and 802.3 SNAP encapsulation
formats. If you select either of these Ethernet encapsulation formats,
the corresponding FDDI encapsulation format is automatically selected
for shared Ethernet and FDDI ports.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
IPX network
address
4-byte IPX address of the
interface. The address must be
unique within the network.
0x1 – 0xfffffffe
Ticks
Number that the system uses to 1 – 65534
calculate route time. (A tick is an
estimate of how long a packet
takes to reach the network
segment.) There are 18.21 ticks
in a second.
–
1
ipx interface define
Prompt
Description
Frame format
Frame encapsulation format for
the interface. IPX uses four
Ethernet and two FDDI formats:
Ethernet Type II, Novell 802.3
RAW, 802.2 LLC, and
802.3 SNAP. The FDDI formats
are available with 802.2 and
SNAP.
VLAN Interface Index number of the VLAN to
Index
associate with the IPX interface.
609
Possible Values [Default]
■
Ethernet_II
■
802.2
■
802.2 LLC
■
RAW_802.3
■
SNAP
■
802.3_SNAP
■
■
A selectable
VLAN
interface
–
–
? (to view a
list of
selectable
indexes)
IPX Interface Define Example
Select menu option: ipx interface define
Enter IPX Address (0x1-0xfffffffe): 0x45468f30
Enter Ticks (1-65534) [1]:1
Enter Frame Format (Ethernet_II,802.2,Raw_802.3,SNAP): 802.2
Enter VLAN interface index {4|?} [4]: 4
610
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx interface modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Changes the characteristics of an existing IPX interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx i m
Important Considerations
■
An IPX interface defines the relationships among an IPX virtual LAN
(VLAN), the IPX router, and the IPX network. The IPX router has one
IPX interface defined for each network that is directly connected to it.
■
When you modify an interface, you can change the interface’s IPX
address, ticks, format, and the associated IPX VLAN index.
■
Unless your network has special requirements (for example, a need for
redundant paths), do not change the cost value of 1 that is assigned
by default to each interface.
Options
Prompt
Description
Index
Number associated with the interface
that you want to modify.
Possible Values
■
■
One or more
selectable IPX
interfaces
[Default]
1 (if only 1
interface)
? (to view a list
of selectable
interfaces)
IPX
network
address
4-byte IPX address of the interface.
The address must be unique within
the network.
0x1 – 0xfffffffe
Current
address
Ticks
Number that the system uses to
calculate route ticks. (A tick is an
estimate of how long a packet takes
to reach the network segment.)
There are 18.21 ticks in a second.
1 – 65534 where:
Current
setting
■
1 = FDDI
■
4 = Ethernet
■
10+ = Serial Link
ipx interface modify
Prompt
Description
Frame
format
Frame encapsulation format for the
interface. IPX uses four Ethernet and
two FDDI formats: Ethernet Type II,
Novell 802.3 RAW, 802.2 LLC, and
802.3 SNAP. The FDDI formats are
available with 802.2, SNAP, and
802.3/SNAP.
VLAN
interface
index
Index number of the VLAN that is
associated with the IPX interface.
Possible Values
■
Ethernet_II
■
802.2
■
802.2 LLC
■
RAW_802.3
■
SNAP
■
802.3_SNAP
■
■
A selectable
VLAN interface
? (to view a list
of selectable
indexes)
611
[Default]
Current
format
Current
VLAN
index
612
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx interface remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes an IPX interface if you no longer perform routing on the ports
that are associated with the interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx i r
3900
9300
Options
Prompt
Description
Index
Index number for the interface
that you want to remove
Possible Values
■
■
One or more
selectable IPX
interface
indexes
? (to view a list
of selectable
indexes)
[Default]
1 (if only 1
interface)
ipx interface SAPadvertising
ipx interface
SAPadvertising
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
613
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Controls whether the system advertises IPX services.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx i s
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
IPX SAP
Whether the system advertises
IPX services
advertising
state
Possible Values
■
enable
■
disable
[Default]
disable
614
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx interface
RIPadvertising
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Controls whether the system advertises IPX routes.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx i r
Options
3900
9300
Prompt
Description
IPX RIP
advertising
state
Whether the system advertises
IPX services
Possible Values
■
enable
■
disable
[Default]
disable
ipx route display
ipx route display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
615
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the routing tables for the system. The routing tables include all
configured routes.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ro d
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
Your system maintains a table of routes to other IPX networks. You
can:
■
■
■
Use the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) to exchange routing
information automatically.
Make static entries in this table using the Administration Console.
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether:
■
IPX forwarding is enabled.
■
RIP is active.
■
SAP is active.
■
RIP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
SAP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
Secondary route/server option is enabled.
■
For a CoreBuilder 3500 system, the route table display shows the
range for the routing table primary entries in the format n – m, where
n is the current number of entries and m is the maximum number of
primary entries.
■
The maximum number of hops, or routers, that a packet can cross, is
16 (except NetBIOS packets, which can cross no more than 7 routers).
Options (3500 only)
Prompt
Description
Start of
address range
First address in a range for which 0x0 – 0xffffffff
you want to display routes
Possible Values
End of address Last address in a range for which 0x0 – 0xffffffff
range
you want to display routes
[Default]
0x0
0xffffffff
616
CHAPTER 20: IPX
Fields in the IPX Route Display
Field
Description
Address
Unique 4-byte network address of a segment in
the system’s routing table.
Age
Number of seconds that have elapsed since the last
time the router sent a packet.
Hops
Number of hops, or the number of routers that
must be crossed to reach the network segment.
Interface
System-assigned number for the interface.
Node
6-byte MAC address of the router that can forward
packets to the segment. A node address of all
zeroes (00-00-00-00-00-00) means that the
route is connected directly to the router.
Ticks
Number of ticks, which is an estimate of time in
seconds, that the packet takes to reach the
network segment. There are 18.21 ticks in a
second.
ipx route secondary
ipx route secondary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
617
Displays any secondary routes that are available.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ro se
Important Considerations
■
To see entries for any secondary routes, you must:
■
■
Establish alternate paths to the same IPX network.
Enable the IPX secondary route/server option. See “ipx secondary”
at the end of this chapter.
■
A secondary route entry can replace a primary route entry when the
primary route is removed from the routing table for any reason (for
example, if the route reaches its age limit).
■
For a CoreBuilder 3500 system, the route table display shows the
range for the routing table primary entries in the format n – m, where
n is the current number of entries and m is the maximum number of
primary entries.
Fields in the IPX Secondary Route Display
Field
Description
Address
Unique 4-byte network address of a segment in
the system’s routing table.
Age
Number of seconds that have elapsed since the last
time the router sent a packet.
Hops
Number of hops, or the number of routers that
must be crossed to reach the network segment.
Interface
System-assigned number for the interface.
Node
6-byte MAC address of the router that can forward
packets to the segment. A node address of all
zeroes (00-00-00-00-00-00) means that the
route is connected directly to the router.
Ticks
Number of ticks, which is an estimate of time in
seconds, that the packet takes to reach the
network segment. There are 18.21 ticks in a
second.
618
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx route static
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines a static route.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ro st
Important Considerations
■
Before you define static routes on the system, define at least one IPX
interface. See “ipx interface define” earlier in this chapter for more
details.
■
Static routes remain in the routing table until you remove them or
until you remove the corresponding interface.
■
If an interface goes down, routes are temporarily removed from the
routing table until the interface comes back up.
■
Static routes take precedence over dynamically learned routes to the
same destination. You can have a maximum of 32 static routes.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
IPX network
address
4-byte IPX address of the
interface. The address must be
unique within the network.
0x1 – 0xfffffffe
–
Hops
Number of hops, or number of
routers that must be crossed to
reach the network segment.
1 – 15
1
Interface
number
Interface number to associate
with the route. Depends on
number of configured IPX
interfaces.
Node address
6-byte MAC address of the
router that can forward packets
to the segment. A node address
of all zeroes
(00-00-00-00-00-00) means
that the route is connected
directly to the router.
■
■
A selectable
IPX interface
number
–
? (for a list of
selectable IPX
interfaces)
A node address
in the format
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx
–
ipx route static
IPX Static Route Example
Select menu option: ip route static
Enter IPX address (0x1-0xfffffffe): 0x44648f30
Enter Hops (1-15): 1
Enter interface number (1-32) [1]: 1
Enter node address: 08-00-3e-21-14-78
619
620
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx route remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes a route from the IPX routing table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ro r
Important Considerations
■
The route is immediately deleted. You are not prompted to confirm
the deletion.
■
All servers that depend upon this route are removed from the server
table, including static servers.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
[Default]
IPX network
address
4-byte IPX network address
0x1 – 0xfffffffe
–
ipx route flush
ipx route flush
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
621
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes all dynamically learned routes from the IPX routing table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ro f
Important Considerations
■
All learned routes are immediately deleted. You are not prompted to
confirm the deletion.
■
All dynamic servers that depend on these routes are removed from the
server table.
622
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx server display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the server table for the system to determine which servers are
learned.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ser d
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
Your system maintains a table of servers that reside on other IPX
networks. You can:
■
■
■
■
Use the Service Advertising Protocol (SAP) to exchange server
information automatically.
Make static entries in this server table.
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether:
■
IPX forwarding is enabled.
■
RIP is active.
■
SAP is active.
■
RIP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
SAP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
Secondary route/server option is enabled.
For a CoreBuilder 3500 system, the route table display shows the
range for the routing table primary entries in the format n – m, where
n is the current number of entries and m is the maximum number of
primary entries.
ipx server display
623
Options (3500 only)
Prompt
Description
Service type
Number for the type of service
that the server performs.
Possible Values
■
*
■
0x1 –0xfffff
■
*
[Default]
*
Enter up to 6 hex characters. For
example, 0x4 = file server
For more details, consult your
Novell documentation.
Use quotation marks (") around
any string with embedded
spaces.
Use double quotes ("") to enter
an empty string.
Service name
pattern
Pattern for the service name.
Use quotation marks (") around
any string with embedded
spaces.
■
*
Up to 79
alphanumeric
characters
Use double quotes ("") to enter
an empty string.
Fields in the IPX Server Display
Field
Description
Age
Number of seconds that have elapsed since the last
time a server in the table sent a packet.
Hops
Number of networks that must be crossed to reach
the server. The maximum number is 15.
Interface
Index number of the interface.
Name
Name for the server that you define.
Network
4-byte IPX network address of the server.
Node
6-byte MAC address of the server that forwards
packets to the segment.
Socket
2-byte socket address of the server that receives
service requests.
Type
Type of service that the server provides. The IPX
protocol defines various types of services. One
common type is 0x4, which is for a file server. For
more information on IPX type values, consult your
Novell documentation.
624
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx server static
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines a static IPX server.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ser st
Important Considerations
■
Static servers remain in the table until you remove them, until you
remove the corresponding interface, or until you remove the route to
the corresponding network address.
■
A static server must have an IPX network address that corresponds to
a configured interface or to a static route. If an interface goes down,
any static servers on that interface are permanently removed from the
server table until the interface comes back up.
■
Static servers take precedence over dynamically learned servers to the
same destination. You can have a maximum of 32 static servers.
■
Before you define static servers on the system, first define at least one
IPX interface. See “ipx interface define”earlier in this chapter for more
details.
Options
Prompt
Description
Interface index Interface index number for the
server
Possible Values
■
■
Service type
Service name
Number for the type of service
that the server performs
Service name of the server, up to
79 characters
A selectable IPX –
interface index
? (for a list of
selectable IPX
interfaces)
■
*
■
0x1 – 0xffff
■
■
[Default]
Any selectable
service name
*
–
? (for a list of
selectable
names)
IPX network
address
IPX network address of the server 0x0 – 0xfffffffe
–
Socket value
Socket value of the server
–
Node address
Node address of the server
Hops
Number of hops to the server
0x0 – 0xffff
–
0 – 15
–
ipx server static
IPX Static Server Example
Enter
Enter
Enter
Enter
Enter
Enter
Enter
Interface index {1|?} [1]: 1
service type {0x1-0xFFFF}: 0x4
service name {?}: gb201
IPX address (0x0-0xfffffffe): 0x8c14a228
socket (0x0-0xffff): 0x8059
node address : 00-00-2e-f3-56-02
hops (0-15): 2
625
626
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx server remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes a server from the IPX server table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ser r
Important Consideration
■
The server is immediately deleted. You are not prompted to confirm the
deletion.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
Service name
Service name of the server
■
■
Service type
Number for the type of service
that the server performs.
[Default]
A selectable
service name
? (for a list of
selectable
names)
■
*
■
0x1 – 0xffff
*
ipx server flush
ipx server flush
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
627
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes all dynamically learned servers from the server table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ser f
Important Consideration
■
All learned servers are immediately deleted. You are not prompted to
confirm the deletion.
628
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx server secondary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
Displays any secondary servers that are available.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ser se
Important Considerations
■
To see entries for any secondary server, you must:
■
■
Establish alternate paths to the same IPX server.
Enable the IPX secondary route/server option. See “ipx secondary”
at the end of the chapter.
■
A secondary server entry can replace a primary server entry when the
primary server is removed from the server table for any reason (for
example, if the associated interface goes down, or the primary entry
reaches its age limit).
■
For a CoreBuilder 3500 system, the route table display shows the
range for the routing table primary entries in the format n – m, where
n is the current number of entries and m is the maximum number of
primary entries.
Fields in the IPX Secondary Server Display
Field
Description
Age
Number of seconds that have elapsed since the last
time a server in the table sent a packet.
Hops
Number of networks that must be crossed to reach the
server. The maximum number is 15.
Interface
Index number of the interface.
Name
Name for the secondary server.
Network
4-byte IPX network address of the server.
Node
6-byte MAC address of the server that forwards
packets to the segment.
Socket
2-byte socket address of the server that receives service
requests.
Type
Type of service that the server provides. The IPX
protocol defines various types of services. One type is
0x4, which is for a file server. For more information on
IPX type values, consult your Novell documentation.
ipx forwarding
ipx forwarding
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
629
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Controls whether the system forwards or discards IPX packets.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx f
Important Considerations
■
When you enable IPX forwarding, the system acts as a normal IPX
router, forwarding IPX packets from one network to another when
required.
■
When you disable IPX forwarding, the system discards all IPX packets.
Options
Prompt
Description
IPX forwarding Whether the system forwards or
state
discards IPX packets
Possible Values
■
disabled
■
enabled
[Default]
disabled
(factory
default), or
current
value
630
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx rip mode
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Selects the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) mode that is appropriate
for your network.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ri m
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
RIP allows the exchange of routing information on a NetWare
network. IPX routers use RIP to create and maintain their dynamic
routing tables.
■
The system has three RIP modes:
■
■
■
Off — The system processes no incoming RIP packets and
generates no RIP packets of its own.
Passive — The system processes all incoming RIP packets and
responds to RIP requests, but it does not broadcast periodic or
triggered RIP updates.
Active — The system processes all incoming RIP packets, responds
to explicit requests for routing information, and broadcasts
periodic and triggered RIP updates.
Options
Prompt
Description
RIP mode
Whether the system
processes RIP packets
Possible Values
■
off
■
passive
■
active
[Default]
disabled
(factory
default), or
current value
ipx rip triggered
ipx rip triggered
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
631
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the RIP Triggered update mode, which dictates when the IPX
protocol broadcasts newly learned routes.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ri t
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
The system has two RIP triggered modes:
■
Disabled — Broadcasts IPX routes 3 seconds after learning them.
■
Enabled — Broadcasts IPX routes immediately after learning them.
Options
Prompt
Description
Triggered
update mode
Mode that determines when IPX
broadcasts newly learned routes
Possible Values
■
disabled
■
enabled
[Default]
enabled
632
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx rip policy
summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Display a list of IPX RIP (Routing Information Protocol) policies.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ri p s
Fields in an IPX RIP Policy Summary Display
3900
9300
Field
Description
Idx
Index number of the IPX RIP policy.
Origin
Source of the route to which this policy applies. If the
policy type is set to Export, the possible values of this
parameter are RIP or Static. This parameter is not
applicable if the policy type is set to Import.
Type
Import (apply the policy to received routes) or Export
(apply the policy to advertised routes).
Route
One or more IPX network addresses where this policy
applies.
Interface
One or more IP interfaces on this router associated with
the RIP policy.
Source
6-byte MAC address of the router that can forward
packets to the network. A source node address of all
zeroes (00-00-00-00-00-00) means that the route is
connected directly to the router.
Action
Whether this router accepts or rejects a route that
matches the policy.
Metric
Value the system uses to increase or decrease a route
metric. (This parameter is valid only if the Policy Action is
set to Accept.)
Weight
Metric value of this policy.
ipx rip policy define
ipx rip policy define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
633
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Define a RIP (Routing Information Protocol) policy.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ri p d
Important Considerations
■
Every router maintains a table of current routing information in a
routing table.
■
Routing protocols receive or advertise routes from the network.
■
Routing Policies control the flow of routing information between the
network, the protocols, and the routing table manager.
Prompt
Description
Type
Type of the policy: Import
(apply the policy to received
routes) or Export (apply the
policy to advertised routes).
Route
Origin
Route
address
Origin of the route to which
this policy applies. This
parameter is valid only if the
policy Type is set to Export.
Route to which this policy
applies.
IP interfaces One or more IP interfaces on
this router associated with the
RIP policy.
Source node 6-byte MAC address of the
address
router that can forward
packets to the network. A
node address of all zeroes
(00-00-00-00-00-00)
means that the route is
connected directly to the
router.
Policy action Whether this router accepts or
rejects a route that matches
the policy.
Possible Values
■
Import
■
Export
■
Dir
■
Static
■
RIP
■
All
■
0x1-0fffffffe
■
All
One or more IP
interface numbers
■
[Default]
Import
All
All
All
A node address in All
the format
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx
■
All
■
Accept
■
Reject
Accept
634
CHAPTER 20: IPX
Prompt
Description
Metric
adjustment
Increase or decrease a route
metric by a value that you
specify. Specify an integer and
an operand (+,-,*,/,%) to
adjust the metric value. This
parameter is valid only if the
Policy Action is set to Accept.
Possible Values
■
0-16
■
+ (add)
■
- (subtract)
■
* (multiply)
■
/ (divide)
■
Weight
[Default]
0 (does not
change the
metric)
% (modulo remainder of
integer division)
Metric value of this policy. This 1 – 16
parameter specifies the order
of precedence for policies that
match the same route. A
higher value takes precedence
over a lower value.
1
IPX RIP Policy Define Example
Select menu option (ipx/rip/policy): define
Enter policy type (import,export) [import]:export
Enter route origin (dir,static,rip,all) [all]:rip
Enter route address (0x1-0x1fffffffe|all) [all]:all
Select IP interfaces (2|all?) [all]:
Enter the source node address [all]:
Enter the policy action (accept, reject) [accept]: accept
Enter the metric adjustment ([+,-,*,/]0-16) [0]:
Enter the administrative weight (1-16) [1]:2
ipx rip policy modify
ipx rip policy modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
635
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modify an existing RIP (Routing Information Protocol) policy.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ri p m
Important Considerations
■
Every router maintains a table of current routing information in a
routing table.
■
Routing protocols receive or advertise routes from the network.
■
Routing Policies control the flow of routing information between the
network, the protocols, and the routing table manager.
Prompt
Description
Policy
Index number of the policy you
want to modify.
Route
Origin
Route
address
Origin of the route to which
this policy applies. This
parameter is valid only if the
policy Type is set to Export.
IPX route to which this policy
applies.
IP interfaces One or more IP interfaces on
this router associated with the
RIP policy.
Source node 6-byte MAC address of the
address
router that can forward
packets to the segment. A
node address of all zeroes
(00-00-00-00-00-00)
means that the route is
connected directly to the
router.
Policy action Whether this router accepts or
rejects a route that matches
the policy.
Possible Values
■
■
1
? (to view a list
of selectable
policies)
■
Static
■
RIP
■
All
■
0x1-0xfffffffe
■
All
One or more IP
interface numbers
■
A node address
in the format
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx
■
All
■
Accept
■
Reject
[Default]
1 (if only one
policy)
All
All
All
All
Accept
636
CHAPTER 20: IPX
Prompt
Description
Metric
adjustment
Increase or decrease a route
metric by a value that you
specify. Specify an integer and
an operand (+,-,*,/,%) to
adjust the metric value, This
parameter is valid only if the
Policy Action is set to Accept.
Possible Values
■
0-16
■
+ (add)
■
- (subtract)\
■
* (multiply)
■
/ (divide)
■
Weight
[Default]
0 (does not
change the
metric)
% (modulo remainder of
integer division)
Metric value of this policy. This 1 – 16
parameter specifies the order
of precedence for policies that
match the same route. A
higher value takes precedence
over a lower value.
1
IPX RIP Policy Modify Example
Select menu option (ipx/rip/policy): modify
Select policy {1|?}:1
Enter route origin (static,rip,all) [all]:rip
Enter route address (0x1-0x1fffffffe|all) [all]:
Select IP interfaces (2|all?) [all]:
Enter the source node address [all]:
Enter the policy action (accept, reject) [accept]:
Enter the metric adjustment ([+,-,*,/]0-16) [0]:
Enter the administrative weight (1-16) [1]:
ipx rip policy remove
ipx rip policy remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
637
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Remove an existing RIP (Routing Information Protocol) policy.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx ri p r
Options
Prompt
Description
Policy
Index number of the policy you
want to remove
Possible Values
■
■
1
? (to view a list
of selectable
policies)
Default
1 (if only one
policy)
638
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx sap mode
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Selects a Service Advertising Protocol (SAP) mode that is appropriate for
your network.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx sa m
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
SAP provides routers and servers that contain SAP agents with a
means of exchanging network service information.
■
The system has three SAP modes:
■
■
■
Off — The system does not process any incoming SAP packets and
does not generate any SAP packets of its own.
Passive — The system processes all incoming SAP packets and
responds to SAP requests, but it does not broadcast periodic or
triggered SAP updates.
Active — The system processes all incoming SAP packets,
responds to explicit requests for routing information, and
broadcasts periodic and triggered SAP updates.
Options
Prompt
Description
SAP mode
Whether the system processes
SAP packets
Possible Values
■
off
■
passive
■
active
[Default]
disabled
(factory
default), or
current
value
ipx sap triggered
ipx sap triggered
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
639
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the SAP Triggered Update mode, which dictates when the IPX
protocol broadcasts newly learned SAP server addresses.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx sa t
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
The system has two SAP triggered modes:
■
■
Disabled — Broadcasts IPX SAP server addresses 3 seconds after
learning them.
Enabled — Broadcasts IPX SAP server addresses immediately after
learning them.
Options
Prompt
Description
Triggered
update mode
Setting for IPX SAP broadcast
timing
Possible Values
■
disabled
■
enabled
[Default]
enabled
640
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx sap policy
summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Display a list of IPX SAP (Service Advertising Protocol) policies.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx sa p s
Fields in an IPX SAP Policy Summary Display
3900
9300
Field
Description
Idx
Index number of the IPX SAP policy.
Origin
Source of the service to which this policy applies. If the
policy type is set to Export, the possible values of this
parameter are SAP, Static, or All. This parameter is not
applicable if the policy type is set to Import.
Type
Policy type. Import (apply the policy to received services)
or Export (apply the policy to advertised services).
Name
Object name that assigned to the server.
Type
Service type, represented by a one-digit number. Refer to
Novel documentation for a complete list of service types.
Network
IPX network address for the server, or All, which implies
all routes.
Node
6-byte MAC address of the router that can forward
packets to the network. A node address of all zeroes
(00-00-00-00-00-00) means that the route is
connected directly to the router.
Action
Whether this router accepts or rejects a route that
matches the policy.
ipx sap policy detail
ipx sap policy detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
641
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Display information about IPX SAP (Service Advertising Protocol) policies.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx sap p det
Fields in an IPX SAP Policy Detail Display
Field
Description
Idx
Index number of the IPX SAP policy.
Interface
Index number of the IP interface associated with this
policy.
Weight
Metric value of this policy. This parameter specifies the
order of precedence for policies that match the same
service. A higher value takes precedence over a lower
value.
642
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx sap policy define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Define a SAP (Service Advertising Protocol) policy.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx sa p def
Important Considerations
■
Every router maintains a table of current configured services in a
service table.
■
The SAP running on the router receives and advertises services from
the network.
■
Service policies control the services in the service table and those that
the router advertises.
■
Novell defines several different service types using specific numbers for
the server advertising the service. You enter a Novell service type when
you define a SAP policy. Some of the most common service types are:
0x0004
File Server
0x0005
Job Server
0x0007
Print Server
0x0009
Archive Server
0x000A
Job Queue
0x0047
Advertising Print Server
0x0098
NetWare Access Server
For a complete list of Novell service types, consult your Novell
documentation.
Options
Prompt
Description
Policy Type
Type of the policy: Import
(apply the policy to received
services) or Export (apply the
policy to advertised services).
Service
Origin
Origin of the service to which
this policy applies. This
parameter is valid only if the
policy Type is set to Export.
Possible Values
■
Import
■
Export
■
Static
■
SAP
■
All
[Default]
Import
All
ipx sap policy define
Prompt
Description
Service Type Number for the type of service
that the server performs.
Possible Values
■
0x1 – 0xfffff
■
All
■
Server name
■
All
■
0x0 – 0xfffffffe
■
All
[Default]
All
Enter up to 6 hex characters.
For example, 0x4 = file server
For more details, consult your
Novell documentation.
Server
Name
Name of the server providing
the services.
IPX Address
IPX network address of the
network where the server
resides.
Node
Address
Interface
Index
6-byte MAC address of the
router that can forward
packets to the network. A
node address of all zeroes
(00-00-00-00-00-00)
means that the route is
connected directly to the
router.
Index number of the IP
interface associated with this
policy.
■
■
■
■
■
Policy action Whether this router accepts or
rejects a service that matches
the policy.
Weight
All
All
A node address in All
the format
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx
All
One or more
interface
numbers
All
All
? (to view a list of
selectable
interfaces)
■
Accept
■
Reject
Metric value of this policy. This 1 – 16
parameter specifies the order
of precedence for policies that
match the same service. A
higher value takes precedence
over a lower value.
643
Accept
1
644
CHAPTER 20: IPX
IPX SAP Policy Define Example
Select menu option (ipx/rip/policy): define
Enter policy type (import,export) [import]:
Enter service origin (static,sap,all) [all]:sap
Enter the service type (0x1-0x1ffff|all) [all]:0x0004
Enter the server name (?) [all]:
Enter the IPX address (0x0-0xfffffffe|all) [all]:
Enter the node address [all]:
Select interface index (2|all?) [all]:
Enter the policy action (accept, reject) [accept]: accept
Enter the administrative weight (1-16) [1]:2
ipx sap policy modify
645
ipx sap policy modify
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
Modify a SAP (Service Advertising Protocol) policy.
9400
3900
9300
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx sa p m
Important Considerations
■
Every router maintains a table of current configured services in a
service table.
■
The SAP running on the router receives and advertises services from
the network.
■
Service policies control the services in the service table and those that
the router advertises.
■
Novell defines several different service types using specific numbers for
the server advertising the service. You can change the Novell service
type when you modify a SAP policy. Some of the most common
service types are:
0x0004
File Server
0x0005
Job Server
0x0007
Print Server
0x0009
Archive Server
0x000A
Job Queue
0x0047
Advertising Print Server
0x0098
NetWare Access Server
For a complete list of Novell service types, consult your Novell
documentation.
Options
Prompt
Description
Policy
Index number of the policy you
want to modify.
Service
Origin
Origin of the service to which
this policy applies. This
parameter is valid only if the
policy Type is set to Export.
Possible Values
■
■
1
? (to view a list
of selectable
policies)
■
Static
■
SAP
■
All
[Default]
1 (if only one
policy)
All
646
CHAPTER 20: IPX
Prompt
Description
Service Type Number for the type of service
that the server performs.
Possible Values
■
0x1 – 0xfffff
■
All
■
Server name
■
All
■
0x0 – 0xfffffffe
■
All
[Default]
All
Enter up to 6 hex characters.
For example, 0x4 = file server
For more details, consult your
Novell documentation.
Server
Name
Name of the server providing
the services.
IPX Address
IPX network address of the
network where the server
resides.
Node
Address
Interface
Index
6-byte MAC address of the
router that can forward
packets to the network. A
node address of all zeroes
(00-00-00-00-00-00)
means that the route is
connected directly to the
router.
Index number of the IP
interface associated with this
policy.
■
■
■
■
■
Policy action Whether this router accepts or
rejects a service that matches
the policy.
Weight
A node address
in the format
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-x
x
All
All
All
All
One or more
interface
numbers
All
All
? (to view a list
of selectable
interfaces)
■
Accept
■
Reject
Metric value of this policy. This 1 – 16
parameter specifies the order
of precedence for policies that
match the same service. A
higher value takes precedence
over a lower value.
Accept
1
ipx sap policy modify
647
IPX SAP Policy Modify Example
Select menu option (ipx/rip/policy): modify
Select policy {1|?}:1
Enter service origin (static,sap,all) [all]:sap
Enter the service type (0x1-0x1ffff|all) [all]:all
Enter the server name (?) [all]:
Enter the IPX address (0x0-0xfffffffe|all) [all]:
Enter the node address [all]:
Select interface index (2|all?) [all]:
Enter the policy action (accept, reject) [accept]: accept
Enter the administrative weight (1-16) [1]:2
648
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx sap policy remove
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
Remove an existing SAP (Service Advertising Protocol) policy.
9400
3900
9300
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx sa p r
Options
Prompt
Description
Policy
Index number of the policy you
want to remove
Possible Values
■
■
1
? (to view a list
of selectable
policies)
Default
1 (if only one
policy)
ipx output-delay
ipx output-delay
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
649
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the IPX output-delay option for RIP (Routing Information Protocol)
and SAP (Service Advertising Protocol) packets. This option delays the
updating of the RIP and SAP server information table.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ipx i o
Options
Prompt
Description
Output-delay
mode
Whether you want to enable or
disable the output-delay option
Possible Values
■
enable
■
disable
[Default]
disable
650
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx statistics
summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays IPX summary statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx st su
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether:
■
IPX forwarding is enabled.
■
RIP is active.
■
SAP is active.
■
RIP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
SAP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
Secondary route/server option is enabled.
Fields in the IPX Statistics Summary Display
Field
Description
Forwarded
Number of IPX packets that were forwarded
Fwd Received
Number of IPX packets that were received to be forwarded
Fwd Transmitted Number of IPX forwarded packets that were successfully
transmitted
Host Delivers
Number of IPX packets that were delivered to the IPX host's
RIP and SAP applications
Host Dropped
Number of IPX packets to or from the IPX hosts's RIP and SAP
applications that were dropped
Host Tx
Number of IPX packets from the IPX host's RIP and SAP
applications that were successfully transmitted
ipx statistics rip
ipx statistics rip
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
651
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays IPX RIP (Routing Information Protocol) statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx st r
Important Considerations
■
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether:
■
IPX forwarding is enabled.
■
RIP is active.
■
SAP is active.
■
RIP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
SAP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
Secondary route/server option is enabled.
Fields in the IPX RIP Statistics Display
Field
Description
RIP Dropped
Number of IPX RIP packets that have been dropped
RIP Entries
Number of routes in the routing table (including local routes)
Routes Aged
Number of times the system marked a route entry
unreachable, because it did not receive an update for that
entry during the timeout period
RIP Received
Number of IPX RIP packets that have been received
RIP Requests
Number of IPX RIP requests that have been processed
RIP Responses
Number of IPX RIP responses that have been processed
RIP Transmitted
Number of IPX RIP packets that have been transmitted
Metric Changed
Number of times the metric changed on a route entry
652
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx statistics sap
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays IPX SAP (Service Advertising Protocol) statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx st sa
Important Considerations
■
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether:
■
IPX forwarding is enabled.
■
RIP is active.
■
SAP is active.
■
RIP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
SAP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
Secondary route/server option is enabled.
Fields in the IPX SAP Statistics Display
Field
Description
SAP Dropped
Number of IPX SAP packets that have been dropped
SAP Entries
Number of servers in the server table
Servers Aged
Number of times the system marked a server entry
unreachable, because it did not receive an update for that
entry during the timeout period
SAP GNS Requests
Number of IPX SAP Get Nearest Service Requests that have
been processed
SAP GNS Responses Number of IPX SAP Get Nearest Service Responses that have
been received
SAP Received
Number of IPX SAP packets that have been received
SAP Requests
Number of IPX SAP Requests that have been processed
SAP Responses
Number of IPX SAP Responses that have been processed
SAP Transmitted
Number of IPX SAP packets that have been transmitted
Metric Changed
Number of times the metric changed on a server entry
ipx statistics forwarding
ipx statistics
forwarding
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
653
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays IPX forwarding statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx st f
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
The first line in the output (the status line) indicates whether:
■
IPX forwarding is enabled.
■
RIP is active.
■
SAP is active.
■
RIP Triggered updates are enabled.
■
SAP Triggered Updates are enabled.
■
Secondary route/server option is enabled.
Fields in the IPX Forwarding Statistics Display
Field
Description
Addr Errors
Number of IPX packets that were dropped that due to
IPX address errors in network layer header
Forwarded
Number of IPX packets that were forwarded
Fwd Discards
Number of IPX packets to be forwarded that could not
be forwarded
Fwd Received
Number of IPX packets that were received to be
forwarded
Fwd Transmitted
Number of IPX forwarded packets that were
successfully transmitted
Hdr Errors
Number of IPX packets that were dropped due to IPX
Network layer header errors
Hop Count Errors
Number of IPX packets that were dropped due to
exceeded maximum transport control
Host Delivers
Number of IPX packets that were delivered to the IPX
host's RIP and SAP applications
Host In Discards
Number of IPX packets that were received for the IPX
host's RIP and SAP applications that were dropped
Host Rx
Number of IPX packets that were delivered to the IPX
host’s RIP and SAP applications
Host Tx
Number of IPX packets that were transmitted from the
IPX host’s RIP and SAP applications
654
CHAPTER 20: IPX
Field
Description
Host Tx Discards
Number of IPX packets from the IPX host's RIP and
SAP applications that were dropped on transmission
Host Tx Request
Number of IPX packets from the IPX host's RIP and
SAP applications to be transmitted
NetBIOS Max Hops
Number of IPX NetBIOS packets that exceeded the
transport control maximum
NetBIOS Rx
Number of IPX NetBIOS packets that were received
NetBIOS Tx
Number of IPX NetBIOS packets that were transmitted
No Routes
Number of IPX packets that were dropped because the
IPX route is unknown
Total Received
Number of IPX packets that were received
Tx Discards
Number of IPX packets that were forwarded but not
successfully transmitted
Tx MTU Exceeded
Number of IPX packets that were forwarded but
dropped because the MTU was exceeded
ipx statistics interface
655
ipx statistics interface
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
Displays IPX interface statistics.
9400
3900
9300
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx st i
Fields in the IPX Interface Statistics Display
Field
Description
Addr Errors
Number of IPX packets that were dropped due to IPX address
errors in the network layer header
Forwarded
Number of IPX packets that were forwarded
Fwd Discards
Number of IPX packets to be forwarded that were not
Fwd Received
Number of IPX packets that were received to be forwarded
Fwd Transmitted
Number of IPX forwarded packets that were successfully
transmitted
Hdr Errors
Number of IPX packets that were dropped due to IPX Network
layer header errors
Hop Count Errors
Number of IPX packets that were dropped due to exceeded
maximum transport control
Host In Discards
Number of IPX packets that were received for the IPX host's
RIP and SAP applications that were dropped
Host Rx
Number of IPX packets that were received for the IPX host's
RIP and SAP applications
Host Tx
Number of IPX packets that were transmitted from the IPX
host’s RIP and SAP applications
Host Tx Discards
Number of IPX packets from the IPX host's RIP and SAP
applications that were dropped on transmission
Index
Index number that is assigned to the IPX interface
NetBIOS Max Hops
Number of IPX NetBIOS packets that exceeded the transport
control maximum
NetBIOS Rx
Number of IPX NetBIOS packets that were received
NetBIOS Tx
Number of IPX NetBIOS packets that were transmitted
No Routes
Number of IPX packets that were dropped because the IPX
route is unknown
Total Received
Number of IPX packets that were received
Tx Discards
Number of IPX packets that were forwarded but not
successfully transmitted
Tx MTU Exceeded
Number of IPX packets that were forwarded but dropped
because the MTU was exceeded
656
CHAPTER 20: IPX
Field
Description
Routes Aged
Number of times the system marked a route entry
unreachable, because it did not receive an update for that
entry during the timeout period
Servers Aged
Number of times the system marked a server entry
unreachable, because it did not receive an update for that
entry during the timeout period
Rip Metric Changed Number of times the metric changed on a route entry
Sap Metric
Changed
Number of times the metric changed on a server entry
ipx oddLengthPadding
ipx
oddLengthPadding
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
657
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets the compatibility mode for older network interface cards (NICs). This
mode enables an interface to pad IPX packets that have an odd number
of bytes. (Older NICs discard IPX packets that have an odd number of
bytes.)
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ipx od
Important Considerations
■
This feature supports 10 MB switching modules only.
■
If you use this feature, be careful to select only those interfaces that
require odd-length padding. Enabling this feature for every interface
slows network performance.
Options
Prompt
Description
Interface index Index number of the interface for
which you want to set the
oddLengthPadding state
IPX odd-length State for odd-length padding for
padding state the specified interface
Possible Values
■
■
[Default]
A selectable IPX 1 (if only 1)
interface index
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
■
disabled
■
enabled
disabled
658
CHAPTER 20: IPX
ipx NetBIOS
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
Determines whether the system handles IPX Type 20 packet forwarding
on a per-interface basis.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ipx n
Options
Prompt
Description
Interface index index number of the interface for
which you want to set the
NetBIOS forwarding state
Possible Values
■
■
■
IPX NetBIOS
forwarding
state
State for NetBIOS forwarding for
the specified interface
One or more
selectable IPX
interface
indexes
[Default]
1 (if only 1)
all
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
■
disabled
■
enabled
IPX NetBIOS Example (3500)
Select menu option (ipx): netBIOS
Select interface index(es) (1-6|all|?): 1
Interface 1 - Enter state for NetBIOS packets
(disabled,enabled) [enabled]: disabled
enabled
(factory
default), or
current
value
ipx secondary
ipx secondary
✓ 3500
659
Determines whether the system enables secondary routes and servers.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
ipx sec
3900
9300
■
This option allows the system to learn about secondary routes and
secondary servers.
■
With this option, a secondary route/server entry can replace a primary
route/server entry when the primary route/server is removed from the
routing/server table for any reason (for example, if the associated
interface goes down, or if the primary entry reaches its age limit).
■
For this option to have any effect, you must establish alternate paths
to the same IPX network or server.
■
After you enable the IPX secondary route/server option, you can
display entries for any secondary routes or servers. (See “ipx route
secondary” and “ipx server secondary” earlier in this chapter.)
Important Considerations
Options
Prompt
Description
IPX secondary
route/server
state
How to handle secondary routes
and servers
Possible Values
■
disabled
■
enabled
[Default]
enabled
(factory
default), or
current
value
IPX Secondary Example
Select menu option (ipx): secondary
Enter secondary route/server state (disabled,enabled)
[disabled]: enabled
660
CHAPTER 20: IPX
21
APPLETALK
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about
commands that you can use to configure AppleTalk routing on your
system. Configuring and managing AppleTalk routing involves these
tasks:
■
Administering AppleTalk interfaces
■
Administering routes
■
Administering the AARP cache
■
Displaying the Zone Table
■
Configuring forwarding
■
Configuring checksum
■
Enabling DDP Source Socket Verification
■
Pinging an AppleTalk node
■
Viewing AppleTalk statistics
For more information about administering AppleTalk routing on your
network, see the Implementation Guide for your system.
For the CoreBuilder® 9000, the commands in this chapter apply only to
Layer 3 switching modules.
662
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
ip
ipx
➧ appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
appletalk menu
➧ interface
➧ route
➧ aarp
➧ zone
forwarding
checksum
SourceSocket
ping
➧ statistics
interface menu
summary
detail
define
modify
remove
statistics
route menu
display
flush
aarp menu
display
remove
flush
zone menu
network
zone
statistics menu
ddp
rtmp
zip
nbp
appletalk interface summary
appletalk interface
summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
663
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays summary information for all AppleTalk interfaces.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap i su
Fields in the AppleTalk Interface Summary Display
3900
9300
Field
Description
Address
AppleTalk interface address, which is based on the
network range and the network node
(Example: 20301.7)
Index
Index number of the AppleTalk interface
Network range
Range of numbers that are assigned to the interface
(Example: 20301 – 20310)
State
Status of the AppleTalk interface, which indicates whether
the interface is available (enabled) or unavailable (down)
VLAN index
Index number of the virtual LAN (VLAN) that is associated
with the AppleTalk interface
664
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
appletalk interface
detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays detailed information for all AppleTalk interfaces.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap i det
Fields in the AppleTalk Interface Detail Display
3900
9300
Field
Description
Address
AppleTalk interface address, which is based on the
network range and the network node.
(Example: 20301.7)
Index
Index number of the AppleTalk interface
Network Range
Range of numbers that are assigned to the interface
Example: (20301 – 20310)
Seed
Whether the interface is configured as a seed (y) or
non-seed (n) interface
State
Status of the AppleTalk interface, that is, whether the
interface is available (enabled) or unavailable (down)
VLAN index
Index number of the virtual LAN (VLAN) that is associated
with the AppleTalk interface
Zone List
All zone names that are associated with the AppleTalk
interface
appletalk interface define
appletalk interface
define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
665
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines an AppleTalk interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap i def
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
An AppleTalk interface defines the relationship between a virtual LAN
(VLAN) and an AppleTalk network:
■
■
■
Every AppleTalk interface has one VLAN associated with it.
For routing purposes, you define a range of network numbers that
are assigned to the AppleTalk interface. Example: 20301 – 20310
You can configure the interface to be a seed or nonseed interface:
■
■
Seed interface — Initializes (“seeds”) the network with your
configuration information. This information includes the network
range and zone name list.
Nonseed interface — Listens for a seed router and then takes the
zone and network range information from the first seed interface
that it detects. After a nonseed interface obtains this information,
it can participate in AppleTalk routing.
■
Before you define the AppleTalk interface, you must define a VLAN
and select AppleTalk as a protocol that the VLAN supports.
■
Clients that have not been configured to use a particular zone use the
default zone name.
■
You can enter up to 16 zone names per interface.
Options
Prompt
Description
Seed
Interface
Whether an interface is
configured as an AppleTalk
seed (y) or non-seed interface
(n).
Possible Values
Start of
network
range
Start of the network range that 1 – 65279
is associated with the seed
interface. Seed interfaces only.
–
End of
network
range
End of the network range that 1 – 65279
is associated with the seed
interface. Seed interfaces only.
Value specified
for start of
network range,
or current value
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
[Default]
y (factory
default), or
current value
666
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
Prompt
Description
Default
zone name
User-defined default AppleTalk Up to 32 ASCII
zone name. Clients that have
characters
not been configured to use a
particular zone use the default
zone name. Seed interfaces
only.
–
Zone name
AppleTalk zone that is
associated with the interface.
You are prompted to enter up
to 15 additional zone names.
Seed interfaces only.
–
VLAN
interface
index
Index number of the VLAN that
you want to associate with the
AppleTalk interface.
Possible Values
■
■
■
■
Up to 32 ASCII
characters
[Default]
q (to quit
specifying zone
names)
Available valid
VLAN index
number
? (for a list of
available VLAN
indexes)
–
appletalk interface modify
appletalk interface
modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
667
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies an existing AppleTalk interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap i m
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
An AppleTalk interface defines the relationship between a virtual LAN
(VLAN) and an AppleTalk network:
■
■
■
Every AppleTalk interface has one VLAN associated with it.
For routing purposes, you define a range of network numbers that
are assigned to the AppleTalk interface. Example: 20301 – 20310
You can configure the interface to be a seed or nonseed interface:
■
■
Seed interface — Initializes (“seeds”) the network with your
configuration information. This information includes the network
range and zone name list.
Nonseed interface — Listens for a seed router and then takes the
zone and network range information from the first seed interface
that it detects. After a nonseed interface obtains this information,
it can participate in AppleTalk routing.
■
Before you define the AppleTalk interface, you must define a VLAN
and select AppleTalk as a protocol that the VLAN supports.
■
Clients that have not been configured to use a particular zone use the
default zone name.
■
You can enter up to 16 zone names per interface.
Options
Prompt
Description
Interface
Index number of the AppleTalk
interface that you want to
modify
Possible Values
■
■
Seed
Interface
Whether you want to
configure the interface as an
AppleTalk seed (y) or nonseed
interface (n)
AppleTalk
interface index
number
[Default]
–
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
Current value
668
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
Prompt
Description
Start of
network
range
Start of the network range that 1 – 65279
is associated with the seed
interface. Seed interfaces only.
Current value
End of
network
range
End of the network range that 1 – 65279
is associated with the seed
interface. Seed interfaces only.
Current value
Default
zone name
User-defined default AppleTalk Up to 32 ASCII
zone name. Clients that have
characters
not been configured to use a
particular zone use the default
zone name. Seed interfaces
only.
Current value
Zone name
First AppleTalk zone that is
associated with the interface.
You are then prompted to
enter up to 15 additional zone
names. Seed interfaces only.
Current value
VLAN
interface
index
Interface
down time
Index number of the VLAN that
you want to associate with the
AppleTalk interface. When the
system prompts you for a
VLAN interface index, it
indicates the available VLANs
that you can associate with a
new AppleTalk interface.
Possible Values
■
■
■
■
Up to 32 ASCII
characters
[Default]
q (to quit
specifying zone
names and
move on to the
VLAN interface
index prompt)
Available valid
VLAN index
number
Current value
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
Number of minutes that you
1 – 120 minutes
want to bring down the
AppleTalk interface after you
change zone information. This
prompt appears only when you
modify the zone information
that is associated with the
interface.
–
appletalk interface remove
appletalk interface
remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
669
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes an existing AppleTalk interface.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap i r
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
You can specify a single interface, multiple AppleTalk interfaces, or all
AppleTalk interfaces.
■
If only one AppleTalk interface exists on the system, the interface is
immediately removed after you enter this command.
■
The system prompts you to select an interface number only if more
than one AppleTalk interface exists on the system.
Options
Prompt
Description
Interface
Index number of one or more
interfaces that you want to
remove
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
valid AppleTalk
interface index
numbers
? (for a list of
selectable
indexes)
all
[Default]
–
670
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
appletalk interface
statistics
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays statistics for each AppleTalk interface. You can specify a single
AppleTalk interface, multiple interfaces, or all interfaces. If you have
multiple interfaces and you do not specify one of them, the system
prompts you to specify the appropriate interface index number.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
ap i st
Important Consideration
■
The display includes statistics for the AppleTalk Address Resolution
Protocol (AARP), Datagram Delivery Protocol (DDP), Routing Table
Maintenance Protocol (RTMP), Zone Information Protocol (ZIP), Name
Binding Protocol (NBP), and AppleTalk Echo Protocol (AEP).
Fields in the AppleTalk Interface Statistics Display
Field
Description
aarpInProbes
Number of AARP probes that have been received
aarpInReqs
Number of AARP requests that have been received
aarpInResp
Number of AARP responses that have been received
aarpOutProbes
Number of AARP probes that have been sent
aarpOutReqs
Number of AARP requests that have been sent
aarpOutResp
Number of AARP responses that have been sent
ddpForwRequests
Total number of packets for which an attempt was made
to forward them to their final destination
ddpInChecksumErrors
Number of DDP datagrams that were dropped because of
a checksum error
ddpInLocals
Number of DDP datagrams for which this entity was the
final DDP destination
ddpInReceives
Total number of packets that have been received,
including those with errors
ddpInTooLongs
Number of input DDP datagrams that have been dropped
because they exceeded the maximum DDP datagram size
ddpInTooShorts
Number of input DDP datagrams that have been dropped
because the received data length was less than the data
length that was specified in the DDP header, or the
received data length was less than the length of the
expected DDP header
ddpNoProtoHandlers
Number of DDP datagrams without protocol handlers
echoInReplies
Number of echo replies that have been received
appletalk interface statistics
671
Field
Description
echoInRequests
Number of echo requests that have been received
echoOutReplies
Number of echo replies that have been sent
echoOutRequests
Number of echo requests that have been sent
nbpInBroadcastReqs
Number of NBP broadcast requests that have been
received
nbpInErrors
Number of NBP packets that have been received and
rejected for any error
nbpInForwardReqs
Number of NBP forward requests that have been received
nbpInLookupReqs
Number of NBP lookup requests that have been received
rtmpInDataPkts
Number of RTMP data packets that have been received
rtmpInRequestPkts
Number of RTMP request packets that have been received
rtmpOutDataPkts
Number of good RTMP data packets that have been sent
rtmpRouteDeletes
Number of times that RTMP has deleted a route that was
aged out of the table
zipAddressInvalids
Number of times that this entity had to broadcast a ZIP
GetNetInfo reply because the GetNetInfo request had an
invalid address
zipInErrors
Number of ZIP packets that have been received and
rejected for any error
zipInExReplies
Number of ZIP extended replies that have been received
zipInGniRequests
Number of ZIP GetNetInfo request packets that have been
received
zipInZipQueries
Number of ZIP queries that have been received
zipInZipReplies
Number of ZIP replies that have been received
zipOutGniReplies
Number of ZIP GetNetInfo reply packets that have been
sent
zipOutInvalids
Number of ZIP GetNetInfo replies that have been sent with
the indication that the previous client zone name was
invalid
672
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
appletalk route
display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays AppleTalk routes that are listed in the system’s routing table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap r d
Important Consideration
3900
9300
■
Your system maintains a table of local and remote routes to all
reachable AppleTalk networks. The Routing Table Maintenance
Protocol (RTMP) automatically generates the routing table. RTMP
defines rules for:
■
■
Information that is contained within each routing table
Exchanging information between routers so that the routers can
maintain their routing tables
Fields in the AppleTalk Route Display
Field
Description
Distance
Distance in hops to the destination network
Interface
Interface that is used to reach the destination network
Network Range
Range of numbers that identify a network
Next Hop
Next hop Internet router to which the packet must be sent
State
Status of each route. One of the following:
■
good
■
suspect
■
bad
■
really bad
appletalk route flush
appletalk route flush
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
673
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes all dynamically learned AppleTalk routes from the routing table.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap r f
Important Consideration
■
The system deletes all dynamically learned AppleTalk routes
immediately after you enter the command. You are not prompted to
confirm the deletion.
674
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
appletalk aarp
display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol (AARP) cache.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap a d
Fields in the AppleTalk AARP Display
3900
9300
Field
Description
AARP address
AppleTalk protocol address
Age (secs)
Age of the ARP entry (in seconds)
Interface
Index number of the interface on which the address was
learned
MAC address
Hardware address that corresponds to the AppleTalk
address
appletalk aarp remove
appletalk aarp
remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes an AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol (AARP) cache entry.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap a r
Options
3900
9300
675
Prompt
Description
AARP
address
AARP address that you want to Any valid AARP
remove from the system’s
address
AARP cache
Possible Values
[Default]
–
676
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
appletalk aarp flush
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Deletes all AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol (AARP) entries from the
system’s AARP cache.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap a f
3900
9300
Important Consideration
■
The system deletes all AARP entries immediately after you enter the
command. You are not prompted to confirm the deletion.
appletalk zone display network
appletalk zone
display network
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
677
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the AppleTalk Zone table, indexed by network numbers.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap z d n
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
AppleTalk routers use the Zone Information Protocol (ZIP) to map
network numbers to Zones.
■
Each AppleTalk router maintains a Zone Information Table (ZIT), which
lists the zone-to-network mapping information.
678
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
appletalk zone
display zone
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the AppleTalk Zone table indexed by zones.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap z d z
Important Considerations
3900
9300
■
AppleTalk routers use the Zone Information Protocol (ZIP) to map
network numbers to Zones.
■
Each AppleTalk router maintains a Zone Information Table (ZIT), which
lists the zone-to-network mapping information.
appletalk forwarding
appletalk forwarding
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
679
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables and disables AppleTalk Data Delivery Protocol (DDP) forwarding.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap f
Options
Prompt
Description
Forwarding
state
Whether to enable or disable
AppleTalk forwarding
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
disabled
(factory
default), or
current value
680
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
appletalk checksum
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables Data Delivery Protocol (DDP) checksum error detection for the
AppleTalk protocol.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap c
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
The AppleTalk protocol uses checksums to detect errors in data
transmissions. A checksum totals all data bytes and adds the sum to
the checksum field of the data packet. The receiving station computes
a verification checksum from the incoming data and compares the
new checksum with the value that is sent with the data. If the values
do not match, the transmission contains an error.
■
Disabled is the preferred setting. Enabling the checksum generation
or verification significantly impacts the router’s performance.
Options
Prompt
Description
Checksum
generation
state
Whether to enable or disable
generation of checksums for
AppleTalk packets
Checksum
verification
state
Whether to enable or disable
verification of checksums for
AppleTalk packets
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
disabled
(factory
default), or
current value
disabled
(factory
default), or
current value
appletalk sourceSocket
appletalk
sourceSocket
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
681
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables and disables AppleTalk Data Delivery Protocol (DDP) source socket
verification.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap so
Options
Prompt
Description
source
Socket
Whether to enable or disable
source socket verification
Possible Values
■
enabled
■
disabled
[Default]
disabled
(factory
default), or
current value
682
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
appletalk ping
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Pings an AppleTalk node using the AppleTalk Echo Protocol (AEP).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap p
Options
Prompt
Description
Destination
AARP
address
AppleTalk node that you want Valid AARP address –
to test for network connectivity
Possible Values
[Default]
appletalk statistics ddp
appletalk statistics
ddp
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
683
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays AppleTalk Datagram Delivery Protocol (DDP) statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap s d
Fields in the AppleTalk DDP Statistics Display
3900
9300
Field
Description
inBcastErrors
Number of dropped DDP datagrams for which the system was
not their final destination and that were sent to the broadcast
MAC address
inCsumErrors
Number of DDP datagrams that were dropped because of a
checksum error
inDiscards
Number of DDP Datagrams that were discarded during routing
inForwards
Total number of packets that were forwarded, including those
with errors
inLocals
Number of DDP datagrams for which an attempt was made to
forward them to their final destination
inNoClients
Number of DDP datagrams that were dropped for unknown
DDP types
inNoRoutes
Number of DDP datagrams that were dropped for unknown
routes
inReceives
Total number of packets that were received, including those
with errors
inShortDdps
Number of input DDP datagrams that were dropped because
the system was not their final destination and their type was
short DDP
inTooFars
Number of input datagrams that were dropped because the
system was not their final destination and their hop count
would exceed 15
inTooLongs
Number of input DDP datagrams that were dropped because
they exceeded the maximum DDP datagram size
inTooShorts
Number of input DDP datagrams that were dropped because
the received data length was less than the data length that was
specified in the DDP header, or the received data length was less
than the length of the expected DDP header
outLocals
Number of host-generated DDP datagrams
684
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
appletalk statistics
rtmp
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays AppleTalk Routing Table Maintenance Protocol (RTMP) statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap s r
Fields in the AppleTalk RTMP Statistics Display
3900
9300
Field
Description
inDatas
Number of good RTMP data packets that were received
inOtherErrs
Number of RTMP packets that have been received and rejected for
an error other than a version mismatch
inRequests
Number of good RTMP request packets that were received
inVersionErrs
Number of RTMP packets that have been received and rejected
due to a version mismatch
outDatas
Number of RTMP data packets that were sent
outRequests
Number of RTMP request packets that were sent
routeDeletes
Number of times that RTMP deleted a route that was aged out of
the table
routeEqChgs
Number of times that RTMP changed the Next Internet Router in a
routing entry because the hop count that was advertised in a
routing table was equal to the current hop count for a particular
network
routeLessChgs
Number of times that RTMP changed the Next Internet Router in a
routing entry because the hop count that was advertised in a
routing table was less than the current hop count for a particular
network
routeOverflows
Number of times that RTMP attempted to add a route to the RTMP
table but failed because of lack of space
appletalk statistics zip
appletalk statistics
zip
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
685
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays AppleTalk Zone Information Protocol (ZIP) statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap s z
Fields in the AppleTalk ZIP Statistics Display
3900
9300
Field
Description
inErrors
Number of ZIP packets that have been received and rejected for any
error
inExReplies
Number of ZIP extended replies that have been received
inGniReplies
Number of ZIP GetNetInfo reply packets that have been received
inGniRequests
Number of ZIP GetNetInfo request packets that have been received
inLocalZones
Number of ZIP GetLocalZones requests packets that have been
received
inObsoletes
Number of ZIP Takedown or ZIP Bringup packets that have been
received
inQueries
Number of ZIP queries that have been received
inReplies
Number of ZIP replies that have been received
inZoneCons
Number of times that a conflict has been detected between this
system’s zone information and another entity’s zone information
inZoneInvs
Number of times that this system has received a ZIP GetNetInfo
reply with the zone invalid bit set because the corresponding
GetNetInfo request had an invalid zone name
inZoneLists
Number of ZIP GetZoneLists requests packets that have been
received
outAddrInvs
Number of times that this system had to broadcast a ZIP GetNetInfo
reply because the GetNetInfo request had an invalid address
outExReplies
Number of ZIP extended replies that have been sent
outGniReplies
Number of ZIP GetNetInfo reply packets that have been sent out of
this port
outGniRequests Number of ZIP GetNetInfo packets that have been sent
outLocalZones
Number of transmitted ZIP GetLocalZones reply packets
outQueries
Number of ZIP queries that have been sent
outReplies
Number of ZIP replies that have been sent
outZoneInvs
Number of times that this system has sent a ZIP GetNetInfo reply
with the zone invalid bit set in response to a GetNetInfo request
with an invalid zone name
outZoneLists
Number of transmitted ZIP GetZoneList reply packets
686
CHAPTER 21: APPLETALK
appletalk statistics
nbp
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays AppleTalk Name Binding Protocol (NBP) statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
ap s n
Fields in the AppleTalk NBP Statistics Display
3900
9300
Field
Description
inBcastReqs
Number of NBP Broadcast Requests that have been received
inErrors
Number of NBP packets that have been received and rejected for
any error
inFwdReqs
Number of NBP Forward Requests that have been received
inLkupReplies
Number of NBP Lookup Replies that have been received
inLkupReqs
Number of NBP Lookup Requests that have been received
VII
Chapter 22
TRAFFIC POLICY
Quality of Service (QoS) and RSVP
22
QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS)
AND RSVP
Quality of Service (QoS) and the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) are
advanced features that provide policy-based services. Policy-based
services establish various grades of network services to accommodate the
needs of different types of traffic (for example, multimedia, video, and file
backups). QoS software relies on RSVP to provide admission control.
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
configure QoS and RSVP in your system.
QoS and RSVP features include classifiers, controls, and RSVP parameters.
Configure these features in the following order:
1 You first enter the command qos
2 to define how the system groups packets so that it can schedule them
with the appropriate service level.
3 You then enter the command qos control define to assign rate
limits and priorities to the packets that are associated with one or more of
your classifiers. A classifier has no effect until you associate it with a
control.
The system provides predefined classifiers and controls that are suitable
for many configurations, or you can define your own classifiers, apply
controls to the classifiers, and then decide whether to use RSVP. For more
information about QoS and RSVP, see the Implementation Guide for your
system.
For the CoreBuilder® 9000, the commands in this chapter apply only to
Layer 3 switching modules.
690
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
➧ qos
snmp
analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
qos menu
➧ classifier
➧ control
➧ ldap
➧ rsvp
➧ bandwidth
➧ excessTagging
➧ statistics
classifier menu
summary
detail
define
modify
remove
control menu
summary
detail
define
modify
remove
ldap menu
display
enable
disable
rsvp menu
summary
detail
bandwidth menu
display
modify
excessTagging menu
display
enable
disable
statistics menu
interval
receive
transmit
qos classifier summary
qos classifier
summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
691
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays summary information about the QoS classifiers on your system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q cl s
Fields in the QoS Classifier Summary Display
3900
9300
Field
Description
802.1p
For nonflow classifiers, IEEE 802.1p tag value
Cast
Cast type for the classifier:
Classifier
■
Flow classifiers: unicast, multicast, or all
■
Nonflow classifiers: unicast, multicast, broadcast, or all
Number of the flow or nonflow classifier:
■
■
Flow classifiers in the range of 1 – 399 (Note: 20 and 23 are
predefined.)
Nonflow classifiers in the range of 400 – 498
(Note: 401 – 407, 420, 430, 440, 450, 460, 470,
480, and 490 are predefined, but you can modify or remove
them.)
Control
Control number that you assign to the classifier
Name
Name that you assign to the classifier
Protocol
Protocol type, if applicable, that is associated with the
classifier/control:
■
Flow classifiers: IP protocol type TCP, UDP, or all
■
Nonflow classifiers: TCP, IP, IPX, AppleTalk, or any
692
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos classifier detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays detailed information about one or more QoS classifiers.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q cl det
Options
Prompt
Description
Classifier
number
Number of the classifier for
which you want detail
information
Possible Values [Default]
■
■
■
One or more
numbers of
configured
classifiers
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
classifiers)
Fields in the QoS Classifier Detail Display
Field
Description
802.1p
For nonflow classifiers, IEEE 802.1p tag value (any
combination of priority tag values in the range 0 – 7)
Cast
The Cast type for the classifier:
■
■
Classifier
Flow classifiers: unicast, multicast, or all
Nonflow classifiers: unicast, multicast,
broadcast, or all
Number of the flow or nonflow classifier:
■
■
Flow classifiers in the range of 1 – 399 (Note: 20 and
23 are predefined.)
Nonflow classifiers in the range of 400 - 498 (Note:
401 - 407, 420, 430, 440, 450, 460, 470,
480, and 490 are predefined, but you can modify or
remove them.)
qos classifier detail
Field
Description
Classifier – Filters
(flow classifiers only)
Filters (address and port patterns):
■
Source IP address
■
Source IP address mask
■
Destination IP address
■
Destination IP address mask
■
693
Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or User Datagram
Protocol (UDP) port range
Destination Port range
(flow classifiers only)
Beginning and end of the TCP or UDP destination port
range
Source Port range
(flow classifiers only)
Beginning and end of the TCP or UDP source port range
Classifier – Installed
Flows (if flows exist)
Actual flows seen on the system, with the following data:
■
Port
■
Source IP address/source port
■
Destination IP address /destination port
■
Protocol type
■
Number of flow cache misses
Control
Control number that you assign to the control
Name
Name that you assign to the classifier
Protocol
Protocol type, if applicable, that is associated with the
classifier and control
694
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos classifier define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines a flow or nonflow classifier.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q cl def
Important Considerations
■
Classifiers define how the system groups packets so that it can
schedule them with the appropriate service level. QoS supports flow
and nonflow classifiers:
■
■
Flow classifiers apply to routed IP multicast and IP unicast packets.
You can define up to 100 flow classifiers. Each filter (address and
port pattern) in a flow classifier counts toward the limit.
Nonflow classifiers apply to bridged or routed traffic that is
associated with a specific protocol (IP, TCP/IP, IPX, and AppleTalk) or
to a custom protocol (Ethertype or Destination Service Access
Point/Source Service Access Point (DSAP/SSAP). You can also use
them to apply IEEE 802.1p tag values to forwarded frames. You
can define up to 16 nonflow classifiers. All 16 nonflow classifiers
are in use by default.
■
The default classifier number is 499. You cannot remove or modify
this default classifier. However, you can remove any of the predefined
classifiers (for example, if you need another nonflow classifier). See
“qos classifier remove” later in this chapter for more information.
■
When you define a filter (address and port pattern) for a flow
classifier, select a source and destination start and end port ranges
that are as small as possible (for example, a single port). If the classifier
applies to a wide range of Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or User
Datagram Protocol (UDP) ports, you increase the amount of classified
traffic on the system and consume valuable QoS resources.
■
A classifier can have only one control applied to it.
■
If you select custom when you define a nonflow classifier, you are
prompted to select the protocol by Ethertype or DSAP/SSAP. After you
select a protocol, you are prompted to provide the hexidecimal ranges.
Depending on the number of VLANs defined, you can define a maximum
of 3 custom protocols that can have controls applied to them. This
limitation does not apply to non-controlled custom protocols.
qos classifier define
695
Options
Prompt
Description
Classifier
number
Number of the flow
or nonflow classifier
in the range of
1 – 498
Possible Values
■
■
Classifier name Name that you
assign to the
classifier
■
■
Cast type
Cast type for the
flow or nonflow
classifier
■
■
■
Protocol type
IP or other protocol
type, if applicable,
that you want to
associate with the
flow or nonflow
classifier
■
■
■
Source IP
address
For flow classifiers
only, IP address of
the source
[Default]
Flow classifiers: 1 – 399 –
(except 20 and 23, which
are predefined flow
classifiers)
Nonflow classifiers:
400 – 498, (except
401 – 407, 420, 430,
440, 450, 460, 470, 480,
and 490. 401 – 407 are
predefined nonflow
classifiers with applied
controls and IEEE 802.1p
tag values of 1 – 7.)
Unique name with up to
32 characters (Use "
around any string with
embedded spaces. Use
"" to enter an empty
string.)
–
? (for a list of selection
criteria)
Flow classifiers: unicast,
multicast, or all
–
Nonflow classifiers:
unicast, multicast,
broadcast, or all
? (for a list of selectable
cast types)
Flow classifiers: IP
protocol type with TCP,
UDP, or all
–
Nonflow classifiers: TCP,
IP, IPX, AppleTalk,
custom, or any
? (for a list of selectable
protocol types)
Up to 255.255.255.255
0.0.0.0
(factory
default,
wildcard
match)
696
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
Prompt
Description
Source IP
address mask
For flow classifiers
Up to four portions
only, source IP
(255.255.255.255)
address mask, or
how many portions
of the IP address you
want to match
(Example:
255.255.255.0
matches the first
three portions of the
specified IP address.)
Possible Values
0.0.0.0
(factory
default)
Destination IP
address
For flow classifiers
only, destination IP
address
Up to 255.255.255.255
0.0.0.0
(factory
default,
wildcard
match)
Destination IP
address mask
For flow classifiers
only, destination IP
address mask, or
how many portions
of the address you
want to match
Up to four portions
(255.255.255.255)
0.0.0.0
(factory
default,
wildcard
match)
Start and end
of TCP or UDP
source port
range
For flow classifiers
only, start and end
of the TCP or UDP
source port range.
The start value
determines the end
value.
■
0 – 65535 (start)
■
2049 – 65535 (end)
0 and
65535
(factory
defaults)
Start and end
of TCP or UDP
destination
port range
For flow classifiers
0 – 65535 (start)
■
only, start and end
2049 – 65535 (end)
■
of the TCP or UDP
destination port
See “QoS Classifier Define
range. The start
Example (Flow Classifier)”.
value determines the
end value.
0 and
65535
(factory
defaults)
Additional
filter
(address/port
pattern)
For flow classifiers
only, additional
source, destination,
and port information
for this classifier
no (factory
default)
Custom
protocol type
(custom
nonflow
classifiers only)
For nonflow
classifiers with the
custom protocol
type
See “QoS Classifier Define
Example (Flow Classifier)”.
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
Ethertype
■
DSAP/SSAP
[Default]
–
qos classifier define
Prompt
Description
Custom
protocol
hexidecimal
value (custom
nonflow
classifiers only)
Hex values for
nonflow classifiers
with the protocol
custom type
Possible Values
■
■
■
802.1p tag
For nonflow
classifiers only, IEEE
802.1p tag values
■
■
■
Ethertype hex value of
0x0 – 0xfffe
DSAP hex value of
0x0 – 0xff
Note: You cannot enter
0xaa - 0xaa
697
[Default]
0x0
–
0x0
SSAP hex value of
0x0 – 0xff
Note: You cannot enter
0xaa - 0xaa
Any combination of
priority tag values in the
range of
0–7
–
all
? (for a list of possible
values)
Flow Classifier Procedure
To accept the default or current values that appear in brackets [ ], press
Enter.
1 Enter a classifier number in the range of from 1 through 399.
Flow classifiers 20 and 23 are predefined for FTP and Telnet.
2 Enter the classifier name (a unique name of up to 32 characters).
3 Enter a cast type.
For a flow classifier, the options are unicast, multicast, and all.
4 Enter the IP protocol type of TCP, UDP, or all.
5 Enter the source IP address. The default value is 0.0.0.0.
6 Enter the source IP address mask. The default value is 0.0.0.0.
7 Enter the destination IP address.
8 Enter the destination IP address mask.
9 Enter the start of the TCP or UDP source port range, in the range of from
0 through 65535. The default is 0.
10 Enter the end of the TCP or UDP source port range using a value of up to
65535.
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CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
The value that you enter for the start of the range determines the default
for the end of the range. The end value must be greater than or equal to
the start value.
To avoid severely affecting applications using the network, select a port
range that is as small as possible (for example, a single port).
11 Enter the start of the TCP or UDP destination port range, in the range of
from 0 through 65535. The default is 0.
12 Enter the end of the TCP or UDP destination port range using a value of
up to 65535. The end value must be greater than or equal to the start
value.
13 At the prompt, specify whether you want any other filters (address and
port patterns) with this classifier (yes or no). The default is no.
If you specify yes, the system prompts you for additional information,
beginning with the source IP address.
Flow classifiers classify traffic only at the network layer and therefore
affect only traffic that is being routed from one subnetwork to another.
qos classifier define
699
QoS Classifier Define Example (Flow Classifier)
Select menu option (qos/classifier): define
Enter classifier number (1-498): 26
Enter classifier name {?}: IPFilter1
Select cast type (unicast,multicast|all|?): all
Select IP protocol type (TCP,UDP|all|?): all
Enter source IP address [0.0.0.0]:168.20.30.0
Enter source IP address mask [255.255.0.0]:255.255.255.0
Enter destination IP address [0.0.0.0]:192.1.0.0
Enter IP address mask [255.255.255.0]:255.255.0.0
Enter start of UDP source port range (0-65535) [0]:0
Enter end of UDP source port range (0-65535) [65535]:65535
Enter start of UDP destination port range (0-65535) [0]:0
Enter end of UDP destination port range (0-65535)
[65535]:65535
Enter another filter (yes,no) [no]: n
700
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
Nonflow Classifier Procedure
To accept the default or existing values that appear in brackets [ ], press
Return.
1 Enter a classifier number in the range of from 400 through 498.
Numbers 401 through 407 are predefined nonflow classifiers with
applied controls; numbers 420, 430, 440, 450, 460, 470, 480, and 490
are predefined nonflow classifiers without controls. If you have not
removed any of the predefined nonflow classifiers, you need to remove
them before you can define another nonflow classifier. (With the default
classifier, there is a limit of 16 predefined nonflow classifiers.)
2 Enter the classifier name (a unique name of up to 32 characters long).
3 Enter a cast type.
For a nonflow classifier, the options are unicast, multicast,
broadcast, and all.
4 Enter one or any protocols.
The options are TCP/IP, IP, IPX, Appletalk, any, or custom.
5 If you choose custom, enter the protocol type (ethernet or
DSAP/SSAP).
■
■
For ethernet type enter the hexidecimal value.
For DSAP/SSAP type, enter the DSAP and SSAP hexidecimal
values.
6 Enter one or all IEEE 802.1p tags. Specify any combination of values in
the range of from 0 through 7, or all.
QoS Classifier Define Example (Nonflow Classifier)
Select menu option (qos/classifier): define
Enter classifier number (1-498): 481
Enter classifier name {?}: AppleBcast
Select cast type (unicast,multicast,broadcast|all|?):
broadcast
Select protocols {TCP/IP,IP,IPX,Appletalk,any,custom|?}:
Appletalk
Select IEEE 802.1p tag(s) (0-7|all|?): all
qos classifier modify
qos classifier modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
701
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies a previously defined classifier.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q cl m
Important Consideration
■
If the classifier that you want to modify is associated with a control,
you must remove the control before you can modify the classifier. See
“qos classifier remove” later in this chapter for more information.
Options
Prompt
Description
Classifier
number
Number of the flow or
nonflow classifier that
you want to modify.
Existing classifiers are
shown in braces.
Possible Values
■
■
■
Classifier name Name of the classifier
that you want to modify
■
■
Cast type
Cast type for the flow or
nonflow classifier
■
■
Flow classifiers:
1 – 399 (except 20
and 23, which are
predefined flow
classifiers)
[Default]
–
Nonflow classifiers:
400 – 498, (except
401 – 407, 420, 430,
440, 450, 460, 470,
480, 490. 401 – 407
are predefined
nonflow classifiers
with applied
controls.)
? (for a list of
selectable values)
Unique name with up Current
to 32 characters (Use name
" around any string
with embedded
spaces. Use "" to
enter an empty
string.)
? (for a list of
selection criteria)
Flow classifiers:
unicast, multicast, or
all
Nonflow classifiers:
unicast, multicast,
broadcast, or all
Current
cast type
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CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
Prompt
Description
Protocol type
IP or other protocol
type, if applicable, that
is associated with the
flow or nonflow
classifier.
Possible Values
■
■
■
Flow classifiers: IP
protocol type with
TCP, UDP, or all
[Default]
Current
protocol
type
Nonflow classifiers:
TCP, IP, IPX,
AppleTalk, any, or
custom
? (for a list of
selectable values)
Source IP
address
For flow classifiers only, Up to 255.255.255.255
IP address of the source.
0.0.0.0
(factory
default,
wildcard
match), or
current
value
Source IP
address mask
For flow classifiers only, Up to four portions
source IP address mask, (255.255.255.255)
or how many portions of
the IP address you want
to match. (Example:
255.255.255.0 matches
the first three portions
of the specified IP
address.)
0.0.0.0
(factory
default,
wildcard
match), or
current
value
Destination IP
address
For flow classifiers only,
destination IP address.
Up to 255.255.255.255
0.0.0.0
(factory
default), or
current
value
Destination IP
address mask
For flow classifiers only,
destination IP address
mask, or how many
portions of the IP
address you want to
match.
Up to four portions
(255.255.255.255)
0.0.0.0
(factory
default), or
current
value
Start and end
of TCP or UDP
source port
range
For flow classifiers only, 0 – 65535
start and end of the TCP
or UDP source port
range.
Specify as small a range
as possible. The start
value determines the
end value.
0 and
65535
(factory
defaults),
or current
values
qos classifier modify
Prompt
Description
Start and end
of TCP or UDP
destination
port range
For flow classifiers only, 0 – 65535
start and end of the TCP
or UDP destination port
range.
Possible Values
Specify as small a range
as possible. The start
value determines the
end value.
Additional
filters
(address/port
patterns)
For flow classifiers only,
additional source,
destination, and port
information for this
classifier. Each set of
information counts
toward the classifier
limit.
Custom
For nonflow classifiers
protocol type
with the custom
(custom
protocol type.
nonflow
classifiers only)
Custom
Hex values for nonflow
protocol
classifiers with the
hexidecimal
custom protocol type.
value (custom
nonflow
classifiers only)
802.1p tag
For nonflow classifiers
only, the IEEE 802.1p
tag value
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
Ethertype
■
DSAP/SSAP
■
■
■
■
■
■
Ethertype hex value
of 0x0 – 0xffff
DSAP hex value of
0x0 – 0xff
703
[Default]
0 and
65535
(factory
defaults),
or current
values
no (factory
default)
–
0x0
–
SSAP hex value of
0x0 – 0xff
0x0
Any combination of
priority tag values in
the range of 0 – 7
Current
value, if
any
all
? (for a list of
selectable values)
Procedure (Flow Classifier)
1 Enter the number of the classifier that you want to modify. The current
numbers are shown in braces { }.
2 To modify the name, enter the new name for the classifier.
The name that is associated with the classifier number that you specified
is shown in brackets.
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CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
3 To modify the cast type, enter a new cast type.
For a flow classifier, the options are unicast, multicast, and all.
To accept the default or current value that appears in brackets, press
Enter.
4 To modify the IP protocol type, enter another IP protocol type (TCP,UDP,
or all).
5 To modify the current source IP address, enter a new source IP address.
6 To modify the current source IP address mask, enter a new source IP
address mask.
7 To modify the current destination IP address, enter a new destination IP
address.
8 To modify the current destination IP address mask, enter a new
destination IP address mask.
9 To modify the TCP or UDP source port range, enter the new start of the
TCP or UDP port range (in the range of from 0 through 65535).
Limit the source port range as much as possible.
10 Enter the new end of the TCP or UDP source port range (in the range of
from 0 through 65535).
11 To modify the TCP or UDP destination port range, enter the new start of
the TCP or UDP port range (in the range of from 0 through 65535).
12 Enter the new end of the TCP or UDP destination port range (in the range
of from 0 through 65535).
Limit the destination port range as much as possible.
13 At the prompt, specify whether you want any other address and port
patterns (filters) with this classifier: yes or no; the default is no.
If you specify yes, the system prompts you for additional filtering
information, beginning with the source IP address.
If you have several existing address and port patterns, you must specify all
of them again during the modification process. Any address and port
patterns that you do not reenter are deleted.
qos classifier modify
705
Nonflow Classifier Procedure
1 To modify the cast type, enter a new cast type.
For a nonflow classifier, the options are unicast, multicast,
broadcast, and all
2 To modify the associated protocols, enter another protocol.
The options are TCP/IP, IP, IPX, Appletalk, any, or custom.
3 If you choose custom, select the protocol type (ethernet or
DSAP/SSAP).
■
For the ethernet type, enter the hexidecimal value
■
For the DSAP/SSAP type, enter the DSAP and SSAP hexidecimal
values
4 To modify the handling of IEEE 802.1p tags, enter the appropriate tags
using a value in the range of 0 through 7, or enter all
QoS Classifier Modify Example (Flow Classifier)
Select menu option (qos/classifier): modify
Enter classifier number
{20,23,26,401-407,420,430,440, 450, 460, 470,480,490|?}:26
Enter classifier name {?} [IPFilter1]:
Select cast type (unicast,multicast|all|?)
[unicast,multicast]:
Select IP protocol type (TCP,UDP|all|?) [TCP,UDP]:
Enter source IP address [168.20.30.0]:
Enter source IP address mask [255.255.0.0]:
Enter destination IP address [192.1.1.0]:
Enter destination IP address mask [255.255.255.0]:
Enter start of TCP source port range (0-65535) [0]:
Enter end of TCP source port range (0-65535) [65535]:
Enter start of TCP destination port range (0-65535) [0]:
Enter end of TCP destination port range (0-65535) [65535]:
Enter another filter (yes,no) [no]: n
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CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos classifier remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes a previously defined classifier.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q cl r
Important Considerations
■
If the classifier that you want to remove is associated with a control,
you must remove the control before you can remove the classifier. See
“qos control remove” later in this chapter for more information.
■
When you enter the command, specify the number that represents
the classifier that you want to remove, or specify ? to view the
selectable classifiers.
Options
Prompt
Description
Classifier
number
Number for the classifier that
you want to remove
Possible Values [Default]
■
■
Any
selectable
classifier
number
–
? (for a list of
selectable
classifiers)
QoS Classifier Remove Example (3500)
Select menu option: qos classifier remove
Enter classifier number
{20,23,26,401-407,420,430,440,450,460,470,480,490|?}:26
qos control summary
qos control summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
707
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays summary information about QoS controls.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q co s
Fields in the QoS Control Summary Display
T
Field
Description
802.1p Tag
For controls for nonflow classifiers, the IEEE 802.1p tag value
(0 – 7).
Classifiers
controlled
Classifiers that this control affects.
Control
number
Number of the control.
Control name
Name of the control.
Excess loss
eligible
For receivePort or aggregate rate limit types, whether excess
packets are loss eligible.
Excess service
For receivePort or aggregate rate limit types, the service level for
excess packets.
Loss eligible
Whether conforming packets are loss eligible. If a packet is loss
eligible, it can be dropped if the transmit queue for which it is
destined exceeds its threshold.
Service
Service level for the conforming packets.
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CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos control detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays detailed information about the QoS controls that you specify.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q co det
Options
Prompt
Description
Control
number
Number of the control for
which you want detail
information
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
configured
controls
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable
controls)
Fields in the QoS Control Detail Display
Field
Description
802.1p tag
IEEE 802.1p priority tag value (0 – 7)that is applied to
forwarded frames. Can be defined for both flow and
nonflow classifiers.
Burst
Burst size in KBytes.
Classifiers controlled Classifiers that this control affects.
Control (number)
Number of the control.
Control name
Name that you assign to the control.
End time
Control end time.
Excess loss eligible
For receivePort or aggregate rate limit types, whether excess
packets are loss eligible.
Excess service
For receivePort or aggregate rate limit type, service level for
excess packets.
Limit
Rate limit in KBytes/sec or percentage.
Loss eligible
Whether conforming packets are loss eligible. A loss-eligible
packet can be dropped if the transmit queue for which it is
destined is over its threshold.
Ports
Receive ports for which you want to enable the rate limit.
Rate limits control
Number of the control that the rate limit affects.
Service
Service level for the conforming packets (high, best, low,
or drop).
qos control detail
709
Field
Description
Source Port range
Beginning and end of the source port range.
Start time
Control start time
TCP drop control
Whether TCP drop control filtering is enabled.
Time control type
Time control type (specific, daily, weekdays, and
so forth).
Type
Rate limit type, none (no rate limit), receivePort, or
aggregate.
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CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos control define
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Defines a control for one or more existing classifiers.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q co def
Important Considerations
■
A control can assign multiple rate limit values and an IEEE 802.1p
priority tag value to the packets that are associated with one or more
classifiers.
■
The system prompts you according to the rate limit type that you
select. You can only use one rate limit type (none, receivePort, or
aggregate) per control. For a type of receivePort or
aggregate, you can specify multiple rate-limit values for groups of
ports or individual ports. The aggregate rate limit type can only be
applied to flow classifiers.
■
Loss-eligible packets are conforming packets that are discarded
instead of queued when transmit queues back up beyond a threshold.
You can specify whether conforming packets (as well as
nonconforming excess packets) are loss eligible when you define the
control. Marking packets loss eligible is useful for an intelligent discard
of traffic in a congestion situation. Nonconforming excess packets are
packets that exceed the specified rate limit.
■
With the QoS timer control, you can configure QoS control sessions
with starting and ending times (similar to using a VCR).
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
Control
number
Number of the control.
■
Control numbers 1 – 4 are
predefined controls.
■
5 – 50
? (for a list of
selectable
values)
[Default]
1 (factory
default)
qos control define
Prompt
Description
Control name
Name that you assign to the
control. Predefined names are
as follows:
■
■
■
■
Rate limit type
■
■
Service level
Background (for control 2)
Business Critical (for
control 3)
Controlled Load (for
control 4)
none (no rate limit)
receivePort (a rate limit on
the specified ports)
Excess packet
service
Excess loss
eligible
■
[Default]
Unique name Default/Best
with up to 32 Effort
characters (Use
" around any
string with
embedded
spaces. Use ""
to enter an
empty string.)
? (for a list of
selection
criteria)
■
none
■
receivePort
■
aggregate
none (factory
default)
aggregate (the bandwidth
for all ports chosen for the
associated classifier). For
flow classifiers only.
Service level for the
conforming packets (a transmit
priority that corresponds to a
transmit queue).
Drop causes the system to drop
all traffic on all ports that are
associated with the classifier
and control.
Loss eligible
■
Default/Best Effort (for
control 1)
Type of rate limit:
■
Possible Values
711
Whether conforming packets
are loss-eligible. A loss-eligible
packet can be dropped if the
transmit queue for which it is
destined exceeds its threshold.
For receivePort or aggregate
rate limit types, the service
level for excess packets
(packets that exceed the rate
limit).
For receivePort or aggregate
rate limit types, whether excess
packets are loss-eligible.
■
■
For rate limit
best (factory
receivePort or default)
aggregate:
high, best
(best effort), or
low
For a rate limit
of none: high,
best, low, or
drop
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
high
■
best
■
low
■
drop
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
no (factory
default)
best (factory
default)
yes (factory
default)
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CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
Prompt
Description
How rate limit
is expressed
For receivePort or aggregate
rate limit types, in KBytes/sec
or percentage.
Rate limit value For receivePort or aggregate
rate limit types, in KBytes/sec
or percentage.
Possible Values
[Default]
■
KBytes/sec
■
percentage
KBytes/sec
(factory
default)
■
■
0 makes all packets excess
packets.
Burst size
For receivePort or aggregate
rate limit types, the maximum
amount of data in Kbytes that
you can transmit at the line
rate before the transmission is
policed.
Bridge ports
Receive ports for which you
want to enable the rate limit. If
you specify a subset of ports,
you can specify multiple rate
limit values.
On the CoreBuilder® 9000, the
list of ports includes the
front-panel ports and any
enabled backplane ports.
802.1p tag
Apply another
rate limit?
IEEE 802.1p priority tag value
to apply to forwarded frames
(for both flow and nonflow
classifiers).
If you specified a subset of
available ports, whether you
want to define another rate
limit for other ports.
TCP drop
Whether one-way filtering is
control
used so that drop packets
enabled
establish a TCP connection.
(flow classifiers
only)
Start and end
times
Whether you want to set
starting and ending times for a
control.
0 – 65434
KBytes/sec
–
0 – 100
percent
16 – 8192 KBytes Determined
by your
specified rate
limit
■
■
■
Any subset of
selectable
ports
all
? (for a list of
selectable
ports)
■
0–7
■
none
■
Selectable
ports
none (factory
default)
? (for a list of
selectable
values)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
n
n
n
qos control define
Prompt
Description
Input time type Type of time control that you
want to establish.
See Table 7 for a complete
listing of input time type
options.
Classifiers to
be controlled
Classifiers for this control to
affect. See “qos control
summary” for a list of defined
classifiers that are associated
with controls.
Possible Values
■
specific
■
daily
■
dayoftheweek
■
[Default]
specific
everydayoftheweek
■
weekdays
■
weekends
■
everyweekdays
■
everyweekends
Selectable
classifiers (that is,
those not already
associated with a
control)
713
–
714
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
Table 7 lists the options for the input time types. The key to the prompts
are:
■
mm/dd = month–day
■
hh:mm = hour:minute
Table 7 Input Time Type Options
Input Time Type
Options
Specific (default)
Starting day (mm–dd)
Starting time (hh:mm)
Ending day (mm–dd)
Ending time (hh:mm)
Daily
Starting day (mm–dd)
Starting time (hh:mm)
Ending day (mm–dd)
Ending time (hh:mm)
The Ending day and time cannot exceed 24 hours from
the Starting day and time.
Day of the week
Starting day (Monday = 1, Tuesday = 2, Wednesday = 3,
Thursday = 4, Friday = 5, Saturday = 6, Sunday = 7)
Starting time (hh:mm)
Ending day (Monday = 1, Tuesday = 2, Wednesday = 3,
Thursday = 4, Friday = 5, Saturday = 6, Sunday = 7)
Ending time (hh:mm)
The Ending day and time cannot exceed 24 hours from
the Starting day and time.
Every day of the week
Starting day (Monday = 1, Tuesday = 2, Wednesday = 3,
Thursday = 4, Friday = 5, Saturday = 6, Sunday = 7)
Starting time (hh:mm)
Ending day (mm–dd)
Ending time (hh:mm)
The Ending day and time cannot exceed 24 hours from
the Starting day and time.
Weekdays
Starting time (hh:mm)
Ending time (hh:mm
Weekends
Starting time (hh:mm)
Ending time (hh:mm
qos control define
Input Time Type
Options
Every weekday
Starting time (hh:mm)
715
Ending time (hh:mm)
Every weekend
Starting time (hh:mm)
Ending time (hh:mm)
Procedure
1 Enter a control number.
The valid range is 5 through 50, with the next available number as the
default.
2 Enter a control name.
3 Enter the rate limit type: none, receivePort, or aggregate.
The default is none. To drop all conforming packets for a set of ports, use
receivePort or aggregate, set the rate limit to 0, and specify the
appropriate set of ports.
You can apply aggregate rate limits only to flow classifiers.
4 For the receivePort or aggregate limit type, enter the service level
for conforming packets as high, best, or low.
For the none rate limit type, enter the service level for conforming
packets as high, best, low, or drop.
The default is best (best effort).
If you use drop, the system drops all traffic on all ports for the classifier
that is associated with the control. Ping packets are ICMP, not UDP/TCP, so
they are not dropped.
5 Specify whether the conforming packets are loss eligible (yes or no).
The default is no.
6 If you have selected receivePort or aggregate for the rate limit
type, you are prompted for the following information:
a Enter the service level for excess packets (high, best, low, or drop).
The default is best.
b Specify whether excess packets are loss eligible (yes or no).The
default is yes.
c Specify how the rate limit is expressed (percentage of port
bandwidth or KBytes/sec. KBytes/sec is the default.
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CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
d If you specified KBytes/sec for the rate limit, enter the value for the
rate limit in KBytes/sec (0 through 65434).
If you specify that you want a percentage for the rate limit, specify
the percentage in the range of from 0 through 100 percent. These
numbers are rounded to the nearest 16 KBytes/sec. A value of 0
makes all packets excess packets.
e Enter the burst size in KBytes (16 through 8192, with the default
value depending on your specified rate limit). The burst size is the
maximum amount of data that you can transmit at the line rate before
the transmission is policed.
f
Specify the receive ports for which you want to enable the rate limit
(specific bridge ports or all bridge ports).
If you apply the rate to only one or a subset of the bridge ports, you
are prompted to specify whether you want to define another rate limit
for another set of bridge ports. If you specify yes, you are prompted
to enter another rate limit and burst size for another set of ports. This
sequence of prompting continues until you specify n, meaning that
you do not want to define another rate limit for another set of ports.
If the receive port is the anchor port for a trunk, the rate limit applies to
each port that is associated with the trunk. For example, a rate limit of
1000 KBytes on a three-port trunk means that each port in the trunk has
the 1000-KByte limit.
7 Enter an IEEE 802.1p tag value in the range of from 0 through 7 or none
(the default) to apply to forwarded frames.
8 Specify whether drop packets used to establish a TCP connection
(yes, no). The default is no.
9 Set the start and end time for the control (yes, no). The default is no.
a If you specified a start and end time, enter the time type.
Time type selections are variations on days of the week and weekends
or it can be specific day (or range of days) and time. See Table 7 for a
complete listing of input time type options.
b Enter the starting day and/or time.
c Enter the ending day and/or time.
qos control define
717
10 Enter the classifiers that are subject to this control.
The system displays the available classifiers in parentheses. If you select
aggregate as the rate limit type, or if you said yes to the drop TCP
connection packets option, only flow classifiers appear in parentheses.
QoS Control Define Example (3500)
This example shows a control for a nonflow classifier. Because the control
has a rate limit of none, the system does not prompt you for information
that applies to the other rate limit types.
Select menu option (qos/control): define
Enter control number {5-50|?} [5]:
Enter control name {?}: definetest
Enter rate limit type (none,receivePort,aggregate) [none]:
Enter service for conforming packets (high,best,low,drop)
[best]:
Are conforming packets loss eligible (yes,no) [no]:
Select IEEE 802.1p tag to apply to forwarded frames.
Tag {0-7|none|?} [none]:
Drop packets used to establish a TCP connection (yes,no)
[no]:
Set start and end time for the control (yes,no) [no]: yes
Enter input time type
(specific,daily,dayoftheweek,everydayoftheweek,weekdays,
weekends,everyweekdays,everyweekends) [specific]: weekdays
Enter the Qos control starting time (hh:mm): 09:00
Enter the Qos control ending time (hh:mm): 17:00
Select classifiers which are subject to this control.
Enter classifiers (20,23,420,430,440,450,4...: 450
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CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos control modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Modifies the characteristics of a previously defined control (including
controls 1 through 4, which the system provides by default).
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q co m
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
The software prompts you according to the rate limit type that you
select.
■
If the existing control has a rate limit type of receivePort or
aggregate with multiple rate limits, you can now change one rate
limit without affecting the other defined rate limits.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
Control
number
Number of the control
that you want to modify.
Existing control numbers
appear in braces.
5 – 50
Control numbers 1-4 are
predefined.
Control name
Name of the control that
you want to modify.
■
■
No default, but the
next sequential
number is
automatically
entered
Unique name Current name for
with up to 32 specified control
characters
(Use "
around any
string with
embedded
spaces. Use
"" to enter
an empty
string.)
? (for a list of
selection
criteria)
qos control modify
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
Rate limit type
Type of rate limit:
■
none
■
receivePort
■
aggregate
■
■
■
Service level
none (no rate limit)
receivePort (a rate limit
on the specified ports)
Service level for the
conforming packets.
■
■
Excess packets
service
Current rate limit
type
aggregate (the
bandwidth for all ports
specified for the
associated classifier)
Drop causes the system to
drop all traffic on all ports
that are associated with
the classifier/control.
Loss eligible
719
Whether conforming
packets are loss-eligible. A
loss-eligible packet can be
dropped if the transmit
queue for which it is
destined exceeds its
threshold.
For receivePort or
aggregate rate limit types,
service level for excess
packet.
Excess loss
eligible
For receivePort or
aggregate rate limit types,
whether excess packets
are loss-eligible.
How rate limit
is expressed
For receivePort or
aggregate rate limit types,
format of the rate limit.
Rate limit value For receivePort or
aggregate rate limit types,
number of Kbytes/sec or a
percentage.
0 makes all packets excess
packets.
For a rate
Current service
limit of
level
receivePort or
aggregate:
high, best
(best effort),
or low
For a rate
limit of none:
high, best,
low, or drop
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
high
■
best
■
low
■
drop
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
KBytes/sec
■
percentage
■
■
0 – 65434
KBytes/sec
0 – 100
percent
Current value
Current value
Current value
KBytes/sec
–
720
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
Prompt
Description
Burst size
For receivePort or
16 – 8192
aggregate rate limit types, KBytes
maximum amount of data
(in Kbytes) that you can
transmit at the line rate
before the transmission is
policed.
Possible Values [Default]
Determined by
your specified rate
limit
Bridge ports
For receivePort or
aggregate rate limit types,
the receive ports for which
you want to enable the
rate limit.
Current bridge
ports
■
■
■
802.1p tag
TCP drop
control
enabled
(flow classifiers
only)
Start and end
times
IEEE 802.1p priority tag
value that you want to
apply to forwarded frames
(for flow or nonflow
classifiers).
Whether one-way filtering
is used so that drop
packets establish a TCP
connection.
Whether you want to set
starting and ending times
for a control.
Input time type Type of time control that
you want to establish.
See Table 7 for a complete
listing of input time type
options.
Classifiers
controlled
Classifiers that this control
affects. See “qos control
summary” for a list of
defined classifiers
associated with controls.
One or more
selectable
ports
all
? (for a list of
selectable
ports)
■
0–7
■
none
■
? (for a list of
selectable
values)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
■
specific
■
daily
■
dayoftheweek
■
Current value
n
n
specific
everydayofthe
week
■
weekdays
■
weekends
■
everyweekdays
■
everyweekends
Selectable
Current classifier
classifiers (that is, or classifiers for
those not already the control
associated with a
control)
qos control modify
721
Procedure
1 Enter the control number that you want to modify. The existing controls
are displayed in braces { }.
2 To modify the name, enter the new name for the classifier.
The name that is associated with the specified control number appears in
brackets [ ].
3 Enter the rate limit type (for example, none, receivePort, or
aggregate).
The available values depend on how the control was defined; the current
limit appears in brackets.
4 For the receivePort or aggregate rate limits, enter the service level
for conforming packets as high, best, or low.
For the none rate limit, enter the service level for conforming packets as
high, best, low, or drop. If you use drop, the system drops all traffic
on all ports for the classifier that is associated with the control. The
current value appears in brackets.
5 Specify whether the conforming packets are loss eligible (yes or no).
6 If you have selected receivePort or aggregate for the rate limit
type, you are prompted for the following information:
a Enter the service level for excess packets (high, best, low, or drop).
b Specify whether excess packets are loss eligible (yes or no). Your
current value is the default.
c Specify whether you want to modify the existing rate limits (yes or
no).
If you enter no, the system maintains the existing values for all
associated rate limits. If you enter yes, specify how the first rate limit
should be expressed (percentage of port bandwidth or KBytes/sec).
KBytes/sec is the default. If the control has multiple per-port rate
limits, you can change one rate limit without affecting the others.
d If you specified KBytes/sec for the first (or only) rate limit, enter the
value for the rate limit in KBytes/sec (0 through 65434).
If you specified percentage for the rate limit, specify the percentage in
the range of from 0 through 100 percent.
e Enter the burst size in KBytes (in the range of from 16 through 8192).
The default value depends on your specified rate limit.
722
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
f
Specify the bridge ports for which you want to enable the new rate
limit (for example, 1-13, or all).
If you modify the rate limit and apply it to only one or a subset of the
bridge ports, you are prompted to specify whether you want to
modify or define another rate limit for another set of bridge ports. If
you specify yes, you are prompted to enter another rate limit and
burst size. This sequence of prompting continues until you specify n,
meaning that you do not want to modify or define another rate limit
for another set of ports. The rate limit applies only to those ports that
you explicitly specified; any ports that you did not specify are not
associated with your rate limit.
7 Select an IEEE 802.1p tag value in the range of from 0 through 7 or the
value none to apply to forwarded frames.
8 Specify whether drop packets are used to establish a TCP connection
(yes, no). The default is no.
9 Set the start and end time for the control (yes, no). The default is no.
a If you specified a start and end time, enter the time type.
Time type selections are variations on days of the week and weekends
or it can be specific day (or range of days) and time. See Table 7 for a
complete listing of input time type options.
b Enter the starting day and/or time.
c Enter the ending day and/or time.
10 Enter the classifiers that are subject to this control. The system displays
the associated classifiers in brackets. (If you select aggregate as the rate
limit type, or select the drop packets use to establish a TCP connection
option, the system displays only flow classifiers.)
qos control modify
723
QoS Control Modify Example (3500)
This example shows modifications to a predefined control (4) for a
predefined classifier (405).
Select menu option: qos control modify
Enter control number {1-5}: 4
Enter control name {?} [Controlled Load]:
Interactive_Multimedia
Enter rate limit type (none,receivePort,aggregate) [none]:
receivePort
Enter service for conforming packets (high,best,low) [high]:
Are conforming packets loss eligible (yes,no) [no]:
Enter service for excess packets (high,best,low,drop) [low]:
drop
How should rate limit be expressed (percentage,KBytes/sec)
[KBytes/sec]:
Enter rate limit in KBytes/sec (0-65434): 2048
Enter burst size in KBytes (16-8192) [181]:
Select bridge ports (1-13|all|?) [1-13]:
Select IEEE 802.1p tag to apply to forwarded frames.
Enter IEEE 802.1p tag {0-7|none|?} [none]:
Drop packets used to establish a TCP connection (yes,no) [no]:
Do you want to modify/add the start and end time for the control (yes,no) [no]
y
Do you want to have any time control (yes,no) [no]: y
Enter input time type (specific,daily,dayoftheweek,everydayoftheweek,weekdays,
weekends,everyweekdays,everyweekends) [specific]:
Enter the Qos Control starting day (mm-dd): 06-02
Enter the Qos control starting time (hh:mm): 09:00
Enter the Qos Control ending day (mm-dd): 06-02
Enter the Qos control ending time (hh:mm): 17:00
Select classifiers which are subject to this control.
Enter classifiers (20,23,404-407,420,430,4...[404-407]: 405
724
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos control remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Removes a previously defined control.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q co r
Important Consideration
■
When you remove a control, the associated classifiers are no longer
controlled and no longer have a set rate limit, service level, or 802.1p
tag.
Options
Prompt
Description
Control
number
Number for the control that
you want to remove
Possible Values [Default]
■
■
One or more
selectable
control
numbers
–
? (for a list of
the selectable
controls)
QoS Control Remove Example (9000 Layer 3)
CB9000@slot2.1 [12-E/FEN-TX-L3] (qos/control): remove
Enter control number {2-5|?}: 5
qos ldap display
qos ldap display
✓ 3500
725
Displays Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) status information.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
q l disp
3900
9300
■
When LDAP is enabled, displays server IP address and polling period.
■
When LDAP is disabled, displays QOS, Resource Reservation Protocol
(RSVP), and LDAP status.
Important Considerations
Fields in the QoS LDAP Display
Field
Description
LDAP server
address
The IP address of the LDAP server
Poll period
Selected poll period
726
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos ldap enable
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
Enables QoS parameter directory services which are located on the
Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) server.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q l e
Important Considerations
■
An LDAP server must be configured.
■
Before you enable LDAP, the LDAP server must have a directory group
configured with QoS parameters in an ldif file.
■
Parameter changes for a specific group may affect more than one
system. If you know that a change will affect more than one system,
disable LDAP to test the change. After you are sure you want the
change, you can then enable LDAP.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
Enable
Connects your system to the
LDAP server
–
Disabled
600 – 2000
–
–
–
Poll period
LDAP server
address
The IP address of the LDAP
server you have configured
LDAP group
name
Name of an LDAP entry on the –
LDAP server that indexes other
entries containing QoS
classifier and control
information.
Wildcard
qos ldap disable
qos ldap disable
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
Disables QoS parameter directory services, which are located on the
Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) server.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q l disa
Important Considerations
■
By default, LDAP is disabled.
■
If LDAP is disabled, you do not receive automatic updates.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
Disabled
Removes the connection to the –
LDAP server
Disabled
727
728
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos rsvp summary
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays summary Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) information
when RSVP is enabled.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q r s
3900
9300
Fields in the QoS RSVP Summary Display
Field
Description
Excess loss
eligible
Whether excess packets are loss-eligible.
Excess service
Service level for excess/policed traffic (best or low).
Per resv
bandwidth
Largest reservation that RSVP attempts to install.
Policing option When to drop excess packets. Edge policing causes excess
packets to be dropped only at the edge (that is, when the traffic
has not yet passed through any network device that has already
performed policing for that flow). Options are edge, always,
or never.
Total resv
bandwidth
Admission control policy. RSVP begins to refuse reservations
when the requested bandwidth on an output link exceeds the
total reservable bandwidth.
qos rsvp detail
qos rsvp detail
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
729
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays detailed RSVP information when RSVP is enabled.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q r de
Important Consideration
■
If no flows are installed on the system or on a Layer 3 module, the
command displays only the summary information.
Options
Prompt
Description
Level of RSVP
information
(when flows
are installed)
If RSVP flows are available to report,
the amount of RSVP information
you want
Possible Values [Default]
■
all
■
session
■
IP
–
Fields in the QoS RSVP Detail Display
Field
Description
Excess loss eligible
Whether excess packets are loss-eligible.
Excess service
Service level for excess/policed traffic (best or low).
Per resv bandwidth Largest reservation that RSVP attempts to install.
Policing option
When to drop excess packets. Edge policing causes excess
packets to be dropped only at the edge (that is, when the
traffic has not yet passed through any network device that has
already performed policing for that flow).
Session
Session numbers, destination IP addresses and ports, protocols,
number of senders, receivers, and RSVP reservations.
Session – receiver
and session
reservation
Port numbers, an RSVP style (ST) of fixed filter (FF), shared
explicit (SE), or wildcard filter (WF), next hop addresses, LIH
values, TTD values, bandwidth values, burst values, and filters.
Session – sender
Port numbers, source IP addresses, previous hop addresses,
Logical Interface Handle (LIH) values, Time To Die (TTD) values,
bandwidth values, burst size values, and output ports.
Session –
installed flows
Actual flow that was installed on the system (shown in the last
portion of the output).
Total resv
bandwidth
Admission control policy. RSVP begins to refuse reservations
when the requested bandwidth on an output link exceeds the
total reservable bandwidth.
730
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos rsvp enable
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Enables RSVP on the system RSVP settings that you specify.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q r e
Important Considerations
■
By default, RSVP is disabled.
■
In general, when you enable RSVP, use the default settings.
■
You are allowing RSVP to reserve this amount of bandwidth in the
system. You can oversubscribe (over 100) and specify a value of up to
200.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
Maximum total Admission control policy. RSVP 0 – 200 percent
reservable
begins to refuse reservations
bandwidth
when the requested
bandwidth on an output link
exceeds the total reservable
bandwidth.
50 (factory
default)
Maximum per- Largest reservation that RSVP
reservation
attempts to install.
bandwidth
50 (factory
default)
Policing option When to drop excess packets.
Edge policing drops excess
packets only at the edge (that
is, when traffic has not yet
passed through any network
device that has already
performed policing for that
flow).
■
■
■
With edge, the system
polices the flow when RSVP
requests it.
With always, the system
polices the flow regardless
of whether RSVP requests
it.
With never, the system
never polices the flow even
if RSVP requests it.
0 – 100 percent
■
edge
■
always
■
never
edge (factory
default)
qos rsvp enable
Prompt
Description
Service level
for excess
/policed traffic
Service level for excess/policed
traffic. Low is recommended.
Excess Loss
Eligible
Whether excess packets are
loss-eligible
731
Possible Values [Default]
■
best
■
low
■
yes
■
no
low (factory
default)
This setting applies to the
excess traffic with the reserved
bandwidth (that is, which
queue it should be placed in).
no (factory
default)
Procedure
1 Enter the maximum total reservable bandwidth, using a percentage of
the output link (a value of from 0 through 200, with 50 as the default).
2 Enter the maximum per-reservation bandwidth, using a percentage of the
output link (a value of from 0 through 100, with 50 as the default).
3 Enter the policing option (edge, always, or never, with edge as the
default).
4 Enter the service level for excess/policed traffic (best or low, with low
as the default).
5 Specify whether excess packets are loss eligible (yes or no, with no as
the default).
732
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos rsvp disable
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Disables RSVP on the system.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q r di
Important Considerations
■
By default, RSVP is disabled.
■
This command does not verify that RSVP has been disabled.
qos bandwidth display
qos bandwidth
display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays the link bandwidth as the ratio of bandwidth that is allocated to
high priority traffic versus best effort traffic. Link bandwidth is the total
link bandwidth less the bandwidth that RSVP and network control traffic
use.
9400
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
3900
9300
733
q b d
Important Consideration
■
By default, 75 percent of bandwidth is allocated to high-priority
traffic.
734
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos bandwidth
modify
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets how to weigh the high priority and best effort transmit queues, and
sets RSVP bandwidth for the control queue. Low priority packets do not
have bandwidth explicitly allocated.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q b m
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
When you enter the command, the system prompts you to enter the
percentage of bandwidth to use for high-priority traffic on the output
link.
■
The value 75 specifies that three high-priority packets are transmitted
for each best effort packet.
■
The value 50 sets equal priority for high priority and best effort
packets.
■
The value 100 is strict prioritization; it allows best effort packets to be
sent only when no high priority packets need to be sent.
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values [Default]
Percentage of
bandwidth
Percentage of bandwidth that
you want to be used for
high-priority traffic on the
output link
0 – 100 percent
75
qos excessTagging display
qos excessTagging
display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
735
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays status information about whether excess packets are tagged
with a special IEEE 802.1p tag value.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q e disp
736
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos excessTagging
enable
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Tags or retags excess packets with a special 802.1p tag value. This special
value refers to any packets that are marked as excess that you want to
tag.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q e e
3900
9300
Important Considerations
■
Excess tagging is disabled by default.
■
When you enter this command, you are prompted to enter an IEEE
802.1p tag value for excess packets in the range of 0 through 7, with
0 as the default. For example, if you specify 1, excess packets become
background traffic.
Options
Prompt
Description
IEEE 802.1p
tag value
Tag value to use to tag or retag 0 – 7
excess packets
Possible Values [Default]
0
qos excessTagging disable
qos excessTagging
disable
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Disables the tagging of excess packets with a special 802.1p tag value.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q e disa
Important Consideration
3900
9300
737
■
Excess tagging is disabled by default.
738
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
qos statistics interval
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Sets a sampling interval for gathering QoS statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q s i
Important Considerations
■
The default interval is 5 seconds.
■
When you enter this command, the system prompts you to enter the
appropriate interval. The existing value appears in brackets.
■
A nonzero value shows the byte or packet-count-per-interval period. A
zero value shows byte or packet counters.
Options
Prompt
Description
Interval
Interval, in seconds, during
0 – 60 seconds
which you want to gather QoS
statistics
Possible Values [Default]
5 (factory
default), or
current value
qos statistics receive
qos statistics receive
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
9400
3900
9300
739
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
Displays QoS receive statistics.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q s r
Important Considerations
■
The system displays the statistics at the interval that you specified. The
default interval is 5 seconds.
■
The receive statistics shows the effect of the traffic control services
that you configured.
Options
Prompt
Description
Bridge ports
Port numbers whose receive
statistics you want to display.
On the CoreBuilder® 9000, the
list of ports includes the
front-panel ports and any
enabled backplane ports.
Possible Values
■
■
■
One or more
port numbers
[Default]
–
all
? (for a list of
selectable ports)
Fields in the QoS Receive Statistics Display
Field
Description
droppedPackets
Number of packets that were dropped when they were
received
droppedPacketsPeak
Highest number of packets that were dropped on receipt
up to this point
flowExcess
Number of flow classifier bytes that are excess
flowExcessPeak
Highest number of flow excess bytes that have been
received up to this point
flowReserved
Number of conforming flow classifier bytes that have
been received
flowReservedPeak
Highest number of flow classifier bytes that have been
received up to this point
nonFlowExcess
Number of nonflow classifier bytes that have been
received that are excess
nonFlowExcessPeak
Highest number of nonflow excess bytes that have been
received up to this point
740
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
Field
Description
nonFlowReserved
Number of conforming non-flow classifier bytes that
have been received
nonFlowResvPeak
Peak count: The highest number of conforming nonflow
classifier bytes that have been received up to this point
port
If you display statistics for multiple ports, the port
number that is associated with the statistics
qos statistics transmit
741
qos statistics transmit
For CoreBuilder 9000: Applies to Layer 3 switching modules only.
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
Displays QoS transmit statistics.
9400
3900
9300
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
q s t
Important Considerations
■
The transmit statistics help you track bandwidth utilization and packet
loss by physical port and queue (reserved, high, best, and low).
■
The RSVP and network control packets go out on the reserved queue.
■
When you mark any packet (conforming or excess) as loss
eligible, the packet is dropped if the transmit queue for which it is
destined is over its threshold. A packet that is marked loss-eligible falls
into one of the two highLoss statistic categories:
■
■
■
If the transmit queue is over its threshold, it is dropped and
counted as a highLossDropped packet.
If you do not mark a packet as loss-eligible, it falls into one of the
three lowLoss statistics.
■
■
■
■
If the transmit queue is not over its threshold, the packet is sent
and counted as a highLossSent packet.
If the queue is not over the threshold, it is counted as a
lowLossSent.
If the queue is over its threshold, it is counted as
lowLossDelayed.
If the queue is full, it is counted as lowLossDropped.
Loss-eligible packets are conforming packets that are discarded
instead of queued when transmit queues back up beyond a threshold.
You can specify whether conforming packets (as well as
nonconforming excess packets) are loss-eligible when you define a
control. Marking packets loss-eligible is useful to enable intelligent
discard of traffic in a congestion situation. When the system is
congested, you can decide which traffic can be discarded and mark
that traffic as loss eligible.
742
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
Options
Prompt
Description
Bridge ports
Port numbers of ports for which
you want to display transmit
statistics.
On the CoreBuilder® 9000, the
list of ports includes the
front-panel ports and any
enabled backplane ports.
Queues
Transmit queues (types of
service) whose statistics you
want to display.
Possible Values
■
■
■
all
? (for a list of
selectable ports)
■
reserved
■
high
■
best
■
low
■
all
■
[Default]
One or more port –
numbers
–
? (for a list of
selectable values)
Fields in the QoS Transmit Statistics Display
Field
Description
highLossDropped
Number of loss-eligible packets that were discarded and
were over the threshold
highLossDroppedPeak
Current highest count of loss-eligible packets that were
discarded and were over the threshold
highLossSent
Number of loss-eligible packets that were sent and were
under the threshold (at low latency)
highlossSentPeak
Current highest count of loss-eligible packets that were
sent and were under the threshold
lowLossDelayed
Number of non-loss-eligible packets that were sent and
over the threshold (that is, the transmit queues were
backing up but not overflowing)
lowLossDelayedPeak
Current highest count of non-loss-eligible packets that
were sent and were over the threshold
lowLossDropped
Number of packets that were discarded because they
exceeded the length of the transmit queue
lowLossDroppedPeak
Current highest count of packets that were discarded
because they exceeded the length of the transmit queue
lowLossSent
Number of non-loss-eligible packets that were sent and
were under the threshold (at low latency)
qos statistics transmit
743
Field
Description
lowLossSentPeak
Current highest count of non-loss-eligible packets that
were sent and were under the threshold
port
Port number that is associated with the statistics
queue
Queue that is associated with the statistics
744
CHAPTER 22: QUALITY OF SERVICE (QOS) AND RSVP
VIII
MONITORING
Chapter 23
Event Log
Chapter 24
Roving Analysis
23
EVENT LOG
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
administer event logs in your system, including the following tasks:
■
Display the event log configuration
■
Configure the output devices
■
Configure the services
Use event logging to capture different types of log messages from various
services (applications) and send them to the Administration Console. The
log messages display real-time information about the state of the system
or a specific service, and can help you diagnose site-specific problems.
On CoreBuilder® 9000 systems, event logging is controlled entirely
through the Enterprise Management Engine (EME), not through the
Administration Consoles of individual modules as described here. See the
CoreBuilder 9000 Enterprise Management Engine User Guide for
information on how to keep logs of switch events.
For more information about implementing event logging on your
network, see the CoreBuilder 3500 Implementation Guide.
748
CHAPTER 23: EVENT LOG
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
analyzer
➧ log
script
logout
disconnect
log menu
display
devices
services
log display
log display
✓ 3500
749
Displays the current log settings.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
9000
9400
log di
3900
9300
■
Important Consideration
The CoreBuilder 3500 by default enables logging to the serial port
session and disables logging to any Telnet or modem session.
However, you can toggle the current logging state on the
CoreBuilder 3500 from serial port to Telnet or modem by entering
Ctrl+L.
Fields in the Log Display
Field
Description
consoleOut
Administration Console output device. You can enable or
disable the Console to display event log messages for each
severity level.
Logging message
Whether logging to this console session is enabled or
disabled.
Supported Event Log Services
AppleTalk
Appletalk log service. Enabled or disabled for each
severity level.
IPX
IPX log service. Enabled or disabled for each severity
level.
System
System log service. Enabled or disabled for each
severity level.
Severity Levels
Config
Configuration changes.
Error
Application-specific error. Default: enabled
Info
Severity level of changes in the state of the system that are
not caused by events at any other severity level
Warning
Nonfatal problem. Default: enabled
750
CHAPTER 23: EVENT LOG
log devices
✓ 3500
9000
9400
3900
9300
Configures severity levels for event logging on the Administration
Console.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
log de
Important Considerations
■
You can set the console to log events for one or more of the four
severity levels.
■
To specify multiple severity levels, separate the levels with a comma
(for example, warning,config).
Options
Prompt
Description
Levels for
console
Event logging severity level for
console output
Possible Values
■
error
■
warning
■
config
■
info
■
all
■
Selected
levels
Whether selected event
logging for console output is
enabled or disabled
[Default]
–
? (for a list of valid
severity levels)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
y
Log Devices Examples (3500)
Select menu option (log): devices
Select levels for console (error,warning,config,info|all|?): ?
Selectable values
error,warning,config,info
Select levels for console (error,warning,config,info|all|?): all
Enable the selected levels (n,y) [y]: y
log devices
751
To disable the config and info severity levels:
Select menu option (log): devices
Select levels for console (error,warning,config,info|all|?): config,info
Enable the selected levels (n,y) [y]: n
The display now indicates that the error and warning severity levels
remain enabled and the config and info levels are disabled.
752
CHAPTER 23: EVENT LOG
log services
Enables the logging of messages that pertain to the following services:
✓ 3500
■
System level
9000
9400
■
AppleTalk
■
IPX
3900
9300
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
log s
Important Considerations
■
For a specific service or all services, you can configure up to four
severity levels.
■
Use a comma to separate multiple service names and severity levels
(for example, system, appletalk and error, warning).
Options
Prompt
Description
Possible Values
Services
Services to configure
■
system
■
ipx
■
appletalk
■
all
■
Levels
Severity levels to enable
Selected
services/levels
Whether the selected services
and severity levels are enabled
or disabled
–
? (for a list of
valid services to
configure)
■
error
■
warning
■
config
■
info
■
all
■
[Default]
–
? (for a list of
valid severity
levels to enable)
■
y (yes)
■
n (no)
y
log services
753
Log Services Examples
To enable all severity levels for the AppleTalk service:
Select menu option (log): services
Select services (system,ipx,appletalk|all|?): ?
Selectable values
system,ipx,appletalk
Select services (system,ipx,appletalk|all|?): appletalk
Select levels (error,warning,config,info|all|?): all
Enable the selected services/levels (n,y) [y]: y
To show that all severity levels are enabled for the AppleTalk service, enter
log display
To disable the warning and info severity levels for the AppleTalk service,
follow this example:
Select
Select
Select
Enable
menu option (log): services
services (system,ipx,appletalk|all|?): appletalk
levels (error,warning,config,info|all|?): warning,info
the selected services/levels (n,y) [y]: n
To show that the AppleTalk service is associated with only the error and
config severity levels, enter log display
754
CHAPTER 23: EVENT LOG
24
ROVING ANALYSIS
This chapter provides guidelines and other key information about how to
set up roving analysis in your system, including the following tasks:
■
Display roving analysis configuration
■
Add and remove analyzer
■
Start and stop monitoring
Roving analysis is the mirroring of traffic on one port to another port of
the same media type.
■
The port being monitored is called the monitor port.
■
The port that receives the mirrored traffic is called the analyzer port.
The analyzer port typically has a network analyzer or RMON probe
attached through which you can watch the network traffic.
Use roving analysis to monitor Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, or Fiber
Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) port traffic for network management
and troubleshooting purposes. You use the Administration Console to
choose any network segment that is attached to a system and monitor its
activity.
You can monitor a designated roving analysis port to:
■
Analyze traffic loads on each segment so that you can continually
optimize your network loads by moving network segments
■
Troubleshoot network problems (for example, to find out why a
particular segment has so much traffic)
For more information about implementing roving analysis on your
network, see the Implementation Guide for your system.
756
CHAPTER 24: ROVING ANALYSIS
Menu Structure
The commands that you can use depend on the system that you have,
your level of access, and the types of modules and other hardware
options that are configured for your system. The following diagram
shows the complete list of commands for all systems. See the checklist at
the beginning of each command description in this chapter for whether
your system supports the command.
Top-Level Menu
system
module
management
ethernet
fddi
bridge
ip
ipx
appletalk
qos
snmp
➧ analyzer
log
script
logout
disconnect
analyzer menu
display
add
remove
start
stop
analyzer display
analyzer display
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
757
Displays the roving analysis configuration, showing which ports are
designated as analyzer ports and which bridge ports are currently being
monitored.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
an d
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Fields in the Analyzer Display
Field
Description
Ports configured as
analyzer ports
List of analyzer ports on the system, including the port
number and MAC address. These are the ports that can
accept traffic that is mirrored from a monitored port.
Analyzer ports are typically connected to a network
analyzer or probe. There may be multiple analyzer ports
defined on the switch.
Port
Analyzer port number
Type
Media type and Port Speed (FDDI, Fast Ethernet, or
Gigabit Ethernet)
Address
MAC address of the analyzer port
Ports being monitored
List of ports that the system is monitoring. Includes the
MAC address of the analyzer port to which the monitored
port traffic will be forwarded.
Port
Monitored port number
Type
Media type and Port Speed (FDDI, Fast Ethernet, or
Gigabit Ethernet)
Analyzer Address
MAC address of the analyzer port to which the monitored
port traffic will be forwarded and to which your network
analyzer or probe is attached. There may be multiple
analyzer ports defined on the switch.
Analyzer Display Example (3500)
Select menu option (analyzer): display
Ports configured as analyzer ports:
Port
Type
8
Fast Ethernet
Address
00-80-3e-2b-42-08
Ports being monitored:
Port
12
Type
Fast Ethernet
Analyzer Address
00-80-3e-2b-42-08
758
CHAPTER 24: ROVING ANALYSIS
analyzer add
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Defines a bridge port to serve as a dedicated analyzer port.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
an a
Important Considerations
■
On CoreBuilder® 3500 and CoreBuilder 9000 systems, you can
connect as many as 16 network analyzers to a system. On other
platforms, you can connect one network analyzer. For more accurate
analysis, attach the analyzer to a dedicated port instead of through a
repeater.
■
After a port is selected to serve as an analyzer port, it cannot receive
or transmit any other data. Instead, it receives only the data from the
ports to be monitored. If you have enabled the Spanning Tree Protocol
(STP) on the port, STP is automatically disabled.
■
If the physical port configuration changes in the system (that is, if you
remove or rearrange modules), the MAC address of the analyzer port
remains fixed. If you replace the module with the analyzer port with a
module of a different media type, the roving analysis port (RAP)
configuration for that port is cleared.
■
When you configure a port that is part of a virtual LAN (VLAN) as an
analyzer port, a warning is displayed because adding the port removes
the port from all VLANs. When the port is restored (when you remove
the analyzer port), it becomes a member of the default VLAN.
■
If the probe is attached to a 10 Mbps Ethernet analyzer port and the
roving analysis port (RAP) is monitoring a 100 Mbps Ethernet port
with a sustained traffic rate greater than 10 Mbps, the analyzer may
not see all of the frames.
■
After you enter a bridge port number, the system displays the MAC
address of the analyzer port. Record this information for setting up the
port that you want to monitor.
■
On the CoreBuilder 9000, the port to which the analyzer is attached
and the port you wish to monitor must be on the same blade.
■
Trunked ports and resilient link ports can not be configured as analyzer
ports.
analyzer add
Options
Prompt
Description
Bridge port
Number of the bridge port to
which you want to attach the
analyzer
n varies by platform. Only valid
port number choices are
displayed.
Possible Values
■
■
1–n
? (for a list of
available bridge
ports)
Analyzer Add Example (9000 1000BASE-SX module)
CB9000@slot 3.1 [9-GEN-SX-L2] (): analyzer add
Select bridge port {1-9|?}: 9
Warning: Port being removed from Vlan: Default
Analyzer port address is 00-20-9c-0d-e1-2a
[Default]
–
759
760
CHAPTER 24: ROVING ANALYSIS
analyzer remove
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
Restores the port to be a regular bridge port. Restores the Spanning Tree
state to its state before the port was configured as an analyzer port.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
an r
Important Considerations
■
Use this command when you no longer need the bridge port for the
analyzer.
■
The analyzer port can not be removed if it still has monitor ports.
■
The port becomes a member of the default virtual LAN (VLAN) when it
is restored (when you remove it as an analyzer port).
■
The port will not be automatically restored to any VLAN it might have
been a member of before it was configured as an analyzer port — you
must do this yourself.
Options
Prompt
Description
Bridge port
Number of the bridge port to
which the analyzer is attached
n varies by platform. Only
active analyzer port numbers
are displayed.
Possible Values
■
■
1–n
? (for a list of
available bridge
ports)
Analyzer Remove Example (3500)
Select menu option (analyzer): remove
Select bridge port {2,7|?}: 7
[Default]
–
analyzer start
analyzer start
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
761
Starts port monitoring activity on the selected bridge port.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
an sta
Important Considerations
■
You must already have an analyzer port configured. First designate a
bridge port to serve as the analyzer port and connect the analyzer to
that port. See “analyzer add” earlier in this chapter for details.
■
On the CoreBuilder 9000, the analyzer port and the monitor port
must be on the same module.
■
The MAC address of the analyzer port is displayed when you configure
that port, and when you display the roving analysis configurations on
the system to which the analyzer is attached.
■
The media type of the analyzer port must match the media type of the
port being monitored. Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet are the
same media type.
■
You can use a Fast Ethernet (10 Mbps) port to monitor a Gigabit
Ethernet (100 Mbps) port, but a warning message will be printed. If
the sustained traffic load is greater than 10 Mbps, the analyzer on the
slower port may not see all the frames on the faster port.
■
When you successfully configure a bridge port to be monitored, all the
data that the monitored port receives and transmits is copied to the
selected analyzer port.
■
Once a port is selected to serve as a monitor port, the RMON data that
it can record is limited to the RMON groups (statistics, history, alarm,
event, protocolDir, and probeConfig) that do not require hardware
sampling.
■
If you replace the module that the monitored port resides on with a
module of a different media type, the roving analysis port (RAP)
configuration for the monitored port is reset.
762
CHAPTER 24: ROVING ANALYSIS
Options
Prompt
Description
Bridge port
Number of the bridge port to
be monitored
n varies by platform.
Target
MAC address of the port to
analyzer
which the analyzer is attached
port address
Possible Values
■
■
1–n
[Default]
–
? (for a list of
available bridge
ports)
A valid MAC
address of an
analyzer port
–
Analyzer Start Example (9000 1000BASE-SX module)
CB9000@slot 3.1 [9-GEN-SX-L2] (analyzer): start
Select bridge port {1-8,10-12|?}: 1
Enter the target analyzer port address: 00-20-9c-0d-e1-2a
analyzer stop
analyzer stop
✓ 3500
✓ 9000
✓ 9400
✓ 3900
✓ 9300
763
Stops port monitoring activity on the selected bridge port.
Valid Minimum Abbreviation
an sto
Important Consideration
■
Port data is no longer copied and forwarded to the selected analyzer
port from the port that you specify. See “analyzer start” earlier in this
chapter for details.
Options
Prompt
Description
Bridge port
Number of the bridge port that
is being monitored
Possible Values
■
■
n varies by platform.
Analyzer Stop Example (3500)
Select menu option (analyzer): stop
Select bridge port {3,4|?}: 3
1–n
? (for a list of
available bridge
ports)
[Default]
–
764
CHAPTER 24: ROVING ANALYSIS
IX
Appendix A
REFERENCE
Technical Support
A
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
3Com provides easy access to technical support information through a
variety of services. This appendix describes these services.
Information contained in this appendix is correct at time of publication. For
the most recent information, 3Com recommends that you access the
3Com Corporation World Wide Web site.
Online Technical
Services
World Wide Web Site
3Com offers worldwide product support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week,
through the following online systems:
■
World Wide Web site
■
3Com Knowledgebase Web Services
■
3Com FTP site
■
3Com Bulletin Board Service (3Com BBS)
■
3Com Facts Automated Fax Service
SM
To access the latest networking information on the 3Com Corporation
World Wide Web site, enter this URL into your Internet browser:
http://www.3com.com/
This service provides access to online support information such as technical
documentation and software, as well as support options that range from
technical education to maintenance and professional services.
3Com
Knowledgebase Web
Services
This interactive tool contains technical product information compiled by
3Com expert technical engineers around the globe. Located on the World
Wide Web at http://knowledgebase.3com.com, this service gives all
3Com customers and partners complementary, round-the-clock access to
technical information on most 3Com products.
768
APPENDIX A: TECHNICAL SUPPORT
3Com FTP Site
Download drivers, patches, software, and MIBs across the Internet from the
3Com public FTP site. This service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
To connect to the 3Com FTP site, enter the following information into
your FTP client:
■
Hostname: ftp.3com.com
■
Username: anonymous
■
Password: <your Internet e-mail address>
You do not need a user name and password with Web browser software
such as Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer.
3Com Bulletin Board
Service
The 3Com BBS contains patches, software, and drivers for 3Com products.
This service is available through analog modem or digital modem (ISDN)
24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
Access by Analog Modem
To reach the service by modem, set your modem to 8 data bits, no parity,
and 1 stop bit. Call the telephone number nearest you:
Country
Data Rate
Telephone Number
Australia
Up to 14,400 bps
61 2 9955 2073
Brazil
Up to 28,800 bps
55 11 5181 9666
France
Up to 14,400 bps
33 1 6986 6954
Germany
Up to 28,800 bps
4989 62732 188
Hong Kong
Up to 14,400 bps
852 2537 5601
Italy
Up to 14,400 bps
39 2 27300680
Japan
Up to 14,400 bps
81 3 5977 7977
Mexico
Up to 28,800 bps
52 5 520 7835
P.R. of China
Up to 14,400 bps
86 10 684 92351
Taiwan, R.O.C.
Up to 14,400 bps
886 2 377 5840
U.K.
Up to 28,800 bps
44 1442 438278
U.S.A.
Up to 53,333 bps
1 847 262 6000
Support from Your Network Supplier
769
Access by Digital Modem
ISDN users can dial in to the 3Com BBS using a digital modem for fast
access up to 64 Kbps. To access the 3Com BBS using ISDN, call the
following number:
1 847 262 6000
3Com Facts
Automated Fax
Service
The 3Com Facts automated fax service provides technical articles,
diagrams, and troubleshooting instructions on 3Com products 24 hours a
day, 7 days a week.
Call 3Com Facts using your Touch-Tone telephone:
1 408 727 7021
Support from Your
Network Supplier
If you require additional assistance, contact your network supplier. Many
suppliers are authorized 3Com service partners who are qualified to
provide a variety of services, including network planning, installation,
hardware maintenance, application training, and support services.
When you contact your network supplier for assistance, have the
following information ready:
■
Product model name, part number, and serial number
■
A list of system hardware and software, including revision levels
■
Diagnostic error messages
■
Details about recent configuration changes, if applicable
If you are unable to contact your network supplier, see the following
section on how to contact 3Com.
Support from 3Com
If you are unable to obtain assistance from the 3Com online technical
resources or from your network supplier, 3Com offers technical telephone
support services. To find out more about your support options, call the
3Com technical telephone support phone number at the location nearest
you.
770
APPENDIX A: TECHNICAL SUPPORT
When you contact 3Com for assistance, have the following information
ready:
■
Product model name, part number, and serial number
■
A list of system hardware and software, including revision levels
■
Diagnostic error messages
■
Details about recent configuration changes, if applicable
Here is a list of worldwide technical telephone support numbers:
Country
Telephone Number
Country
Telephone Number
Asia, Pacific Rim
Australia
Hong Kong
India
Indonesia
Japan
Malaysia
New Zealand
Pakistan
Philippines
1 800 678 515
800 933 486
+61 2 9937 5085
001 800 61 009
0031 61 6439
1800 801 777
0800 446 398
+61 2 9937 5085
1235 61 266 2602
P.R. of China
10800 61 00137 or
021 6350 1590
800 6161 463
Singapore
S. Korea
From anywhere in S. Korea:
From Seoul:
Taiwan, R.O.C.
Thailand
00798 611 2230
(0)2 3455 6455
0080 611 261
001 800 611 2000
Europe
From anywhere in Europe, call: +31 (0)30 6029900 phone
+31 (0)30 6029999 fax
Europe, South Africa, and Middle East
From the following countries, you may use the toll-free numbers:
Austria
Belgium
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Hungary
Ireland
Israel
Italy
0800 297468
0800 71429
800 17309
0800 113153
0800 917959
0800 1821502
00800 12813
1800 553117
1800 9453794
1678 79489
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
U.K.
0800 0227788
800 11376
00800 3111206
0800 831416
0800 995014
900 983125
020 795482
0800 55 3072
0800 966197
Latin America
Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
AT&T +800 666 5065
0800 13 3266
1230 020 0645
98012 2127
Mexico
Peru
Puerto Rico
Venezuela
01 800 CARE (01 800 2273)
AT&T +800 666 5065
800 666 5065
AT&T +800 666 5065
North America
1 800 NET 3Com
(1 800 638 3266)
Enterprise Customers:
1 800 876-3266
Returning Products for Repair
Returning Products
for Repair
771
Before you send a product directly to 3Com for repair, you must first
obtain an authorization number. Products sent to 3Com without
authorization numbers will be returned to the sender unopened, at the
sender’s expense.
To obtain an authorization number, call or fax:
Country
Telephone Number
Fax Number
Asia, Pacific Rim
+ 65 543 6500
+ 65 543 6348
Europe, South Africa, and
Middle East
+ 31 30 6029900
+ 31 30 6029999
Latin America
1 408 326 2927
1 408 326 3355
From the following countries, you may call the toll-free numbers; select option 2 and
then option 2:
Austria
Belgium
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Hungary
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
U.K.
0800 297468
0800 71429
800 17309
0800 113153
0800 917959
0800 1821502
00800 12813
1800553117
1800 9453794
1678 79489
0800 0227788
800 11376
00800 3111206
0800 831416
0800 995014
900 983125
020 795482
0800 55 3072
0800 966197
U.S.A. and Canada
1 800 NET 3Com
(1 800 638 3266)
Enterprise Customers:
1 800 876 3266
1 408 326 7120
(not toll-free)
772
APPENDIX A: TECHNICAL SUPPORT
INDEX
Symbols
? character 473, 478
Numbers
3C number 69, 129
3Com bulletin board service (3Com BBS) 768
3Com Knowledgebase Web Services 767
3Com URL 767
3ComFacts 769
802.3_RAW packets 256
A
AARP (AppleTalk Address Resolution
Protocol) 674 to 676
access levels 37, 38
and passwords 75
addModify (snmp trap) 195
address group
adding port addresses 391
address threshold 252
address/port patterns for QoS classifiers 696, 701,
703
addresses
adding static 294
for SNMP trap reporting 194
addressThresholdEvent 257
Administration Console 29 to 42
password access 75
administration console
of an ATM switch 30
advancedPing 179, 475, 476
advancedTraceRoute 184
packet size 480
ttl option 480
wait option 480
advertise RIP mode 451, 453
AEP (AppleTalk Echo Protocol) 682
aggregate rate limit 710, 712
for flow classifiers 715
aggregated links 299
aging time 258
allClosed mode for VLANs
and Ignore STP mode 365
displaying 338
selecting 364
allOpen mode for VLANs
displaying 338
selecting 364
analyzer port
MAC address 758
anchor ports
rate limits affecting 716
trunking 313
AppleTalk
AARP (AppleTalk Address Resolution
Protocol) 674 to 676
AEP (AppleTalk Echo Protocol) 682
checksums 680
DDP statistics 683
forwarding 679
interfaces 663 to 670
NBP statistics 686
ping 682
removing interfaces 669
routes 672, 673
RTMP statistics 684
source socket verification 681
ZIP statistics 685
zones 677, 678
applying controls to classifiers 713
areas 531 to 537
ARP (Address Resolution Protocol)
cache 171
deleting cache entries 170
deleting dynamic cache entries 172
displaying cache 168
flushing all entries 171
flushing dynamic entries 172
remove 170
static cache entry 169
ARP cache 428 to 433
ASCII-based editor
and scripts 124
ATM switch 30
autonegotiation, Ethernet ports 212
774
INDEX
B
backplane ports, interface module 31
backup
saving NV data 107
bandwidth, QoS
displaying 733
modifying 734
bandwidth, RSVP 725, 728
baseline, setting current 133
baud rate
serial port 94, 97
baud setting 95
best service level 711
blocking, ignoring STP 365
BOOTP (Boot Protocol)
as UDP service 442
hop count 442
relay threshold 446
bridge ports
adding MAC addresses 294
defining VLANs 345, 352
deleting VLANs 363
listing MAC addresses 293
modifying VLANs 355, 360
VLAN summary 339, 342
bridge-wide parameters, allOpen or allClosed VLAN
mode 364
bulletin board service 768
burst size, QoS control 712
burst, advancedPing option 476
C
cast types for QoS classifiers 695, 718
changing VLANs 355, 360
channels
management and data 31
chassis
management architecture 33
power management 33
checksums, AppleTalk 680
Class of Service 267
Class of Service (CoS) 267
classifiers, QoS
applying controls to 713
default 694
defining 694
displaying detail information 692
displaying summary information 691
guidelines for using 689
modifying 701
parameters for defining 695, 718
predefined flow and nonflow 691
removing 706
specifying address/port patterns 696, 701, 703
specifying IP addresses 695, 702
command strings
entering abbreviated 41
entering values 41
quick 34
commands 150
system menu
for baselining statistics 90
for managing NV data 108
community strings 192
configuration tasks 34
conforming packets
service levels 711
console access 73
control packets 733, 734
controls, QoS
associating with classifiers 713
burst size 712
defining 710
displaying detail information 708
displaying summary information 707
modifying 718, 721
names 711
parameters for defining 710
removing 724
service levels 711
specifying IEEE 802.1p tags 712
conventions
notice icons 23
text 24
CoreBuilder 3500 system
and network monitoring 755
CoreBuilder 9000
management features 33
system management overview 30
cost
IP RIP mode 456
Spanning Tree settings 254
D
DAS (dual attach station) pairs
trunks and 307
data channels
management 31
date
displaying 137
DDP (Datagram Delivery Protocol) 683
defaults
control service level (best) 715
INDEX
IP RIP mode (learn) 453
OSPF route metric 538 to 540
QoS classifier 694
route for IP 421
screen height 76
Spanning Tree Protocol 261
ttl value for advancedTraceRoute 480
ttl value for traceRoute 182
UDP port number for advancedTraceRoute 480
UDP port number for traceRoute 182
defining
QoS controls 710, 712, 715
VLANs 310, 331
deleting
links 336
trunks 318
VLANs 363
designated root 253
destination address
for SNMP trap reporting 194
destination IP address for QoS classifiers 702
destination IP address masks 702
detail
trunks 329
detail information
trunks 305
VLANs 341
details, AppleTalk interface 664
Diagnostics status 69
disabled RIP mode 451, 453
disabling
excess packet tagging 737
RSVP 732
displaying
QoS bandwidth 733
QoS classifier detail 692
QoS classifier summary 691
QoS control detail information 708
QoS excess packet tagging 735
QoS summary information 691, 707
RSVP detail information 729
summary RSVP information 728
displaying TCMP state 301, 304, 328
DNS (Domain Name System) servers 436 to 440
documentation
comments 25
drop service level 711
duplex mode, Ethernet ports 212, 213
DVMRP (Distance-Vector Multicast Routing
Protocol) 507
dynamic versus static VLAN origin 345, 352
775
E
edge policing option 725, 728
editor for scripts
EMACS 124
vi 124
EME (Enterprise Management Engine)
console 30
overview 33
enabled RIP mode 451, 453
enabling
excess packet tagging 736
RSVP 730
enabling and disabling Ethernet ports 220
errors
routing interface 406
Ethernet
address
and restoring NV data 110
and roving analysis 757
autonegotiation 212
enabling and disabling ports 220
fragmenting packets 255
menu options 203
PACE Access 217
PACE Interactive Access 218
port duplex mode 212, 213
port flow control 215
port labels 219
port monitoring 221, 222
port numbering 204, 207
port speed 212, 213
port state 220
statistics 204, 208
event log 747, 752
examples
defining QoS classifiers 699
defining QoS controls 717
defining VLANs (Layer 2 devices) 354
defining VLANs (Layer 3 devices) 350, 351, 358,
359
modifying QoS classifiers 705
modifying QoS controls 722
modifying VLANs (Layer 2 devices) 362
modifying VLANs (Layer 3 devices) 359, 362
of a script 125
removing VLANs 363
setting Ignore STP mode 365
trunk changes 316
trunk definitions 311
excess packet tagging, QoS 735, 737
excess packets
treatment with RSVP 728, 730
extended diagnostics version number 69
776
INDEX
F
H
fax service (3ComFacts) 769
FDDI (Fiber Distributed Data Interface)
fragmenting packets 255
port label 241
FDDI MAC
condition report 237
LLC Service, enabling 239
FDDI station
and SRFs 224, 228
FDDI_Snap packets 256
feedback on documentation 25
File Transfer Protocol (FTP) 87, 89, 107
filter id 371
filters for QoS flow classifiers
defining 696
modifying 701
flow classifiers
cast types 695, 701, 702
defining 694
predefined 691
protocol types 695, 701, 702
removing 706
using aggregate rate limit 715
flow control
defining for Gigabit trunk 310, 315
displaying for trunks 305, 329
flow control, Ethernet ports 215
flush
for management ip routes 164
snmp trap 197
flushing
learned IP routes 424
SNMP trap addresses 197
forwarding
AppleTalk 679
IPX 629
hardware revision numbers 69
high service level 711
hop count 442
G
gateway IP address 421
Gigabit Ethernet
trunks 318
guidelines
for using QoS 689
GVRP (GARP VLAN Registration Protocol)
displaying status 338
using 345, 352
I
ICMP statistics 187, 483
ID, VLAN 341
IEEE 802.1p priority tagging
for excess packets 735, 736
for nonflow classifiers 697, 703, 705
for QoS controls 712
IEEE 802.1Q tagging 349
IGMP (Internet Group Management Protocol)
query mode 524, 525
snooping mode 524, 525
IGMP snooping, Layer 2 devices 270
IGMP snooping, Layer 3 devices 524
Ignore STP mode
selecting 365
ignoring blocking for VLANs 365
in-band-management 149
index 356
VLAN interface 360, 395
interface module
backplane ports 31
interfaces
IP 449
OSPF 541 to 556
interfaces, AppleTalk
define 665
detail display 664
modify 667
interval, QoS statistics 738
IP (Internet Protocol)
address masks for QoS classifiers 695
addresses 395, 421
loading software 89
QoS classifiers 702
addresses and restoring NV data 110
advancedPing 475
advancedTraceRoute 480
ARP cache 428 to 433
defining routes 422
DNS 436
enabling or disabling routing 450
interfaces
displaying 608, 610
removing 613, 649
statistics 418
summary information 398
INDEX
overlapped interfaces 447 to 449
overview 149
ping functions 473, 478
RIP mode 451
routes 450
statistics 482
ICMP 483
UDP 483
traceRoute functions 478
UDP Helper 442, 447
IP multicast
cache 518
DVMRP metric 507, 510
hop count 517
IGMP 524, 525
prune messages 518, 519
routing table 517
TTL threshold 510
tunnels 511, 513, 517, 519, 527
IP multicast filtering
IGMP snooping 524, 525
IP multicast routing
DVMRP 507
IGMP 525
routeDisplay 517
IP protocol types
modifying 704
IP routes
flushing 424
interface status 421
IP routing
enabling or disabling 450
IPX
forwarding
enabling or disabling 629
statistics 653
interfaces
statistics 655
RIP mode
setting 630
statistics 651
triggered updates 631
RIP policy
define 633
summary 632, 637
routes
defining static 618
flushing learned routes 621
removing 620
SAP (Service Advertisement Protocol) mode
statistics 652
triggered updates 639
SAP mode 638
SAP policy
define 642
detail 641
modify 645
remove 648
summary 640
static servers 622, 624
K
KBytes/sec rate limit 712
L
labels, Ethernet ports 219
LANs
virtual 337
Layer 2 devices
defining VLANs 352
modifying VLANs 360
Layer 3 addresses
for VLANs 347
modifying 355
Layer 3 devices
defining VLANs 346
modifying VLANs 355
learn RIP mode 451, 453
learned routes, IP 424
learning state 264
LER (Link Error Rate)
alarm value 242
lerCutoff
and lerAlarm value 243
levels, service 711
limits
for QoS classifiers 694
QoS rate 710, 712, 715
link aggregation 299
link state database, OSPF 557 to 563
links
removing 336
resources 336
listening state 264
LLC (Logical Link Control)
service description 239
LMA (Local Management Application), ATM
Switch 31
log, event 747
logout 126
low service level 711
777
778
INDEX
M
MAC (Media Access Control) addresses
adding 294
displaying 293
MAC type for trunk 310, 315
management
and naming the system 101, 136
configuring system access 190
displaying detailed information 153
displaying summary information 151
SNMP community strings 192
Transcend Network Control Services 30
Web Management applications 30
management data channels 31
management ip
advancedPing 179
advancedTraceRoute 184
displaying statistics 186
ping 177
statistics 176
tracing a route destination 182
management ip arp
defining a static cache entry 169
displaying cache 168
flushing all entries from cache 171
flushing dynamic entries 172
removing cache entries 170
management ip interface
defining the IP address 157
displaying summary information 156
modifying 158
removing 159
management ip rip
displaying RIP information 173
management ip route
default 165
defining a static route 162
deleting default 166
displaying the routing table 160
finding in table 167
flushing learned routes 164
noDefault 166
removing an existing route 163
searching the routing table 167
masks
source and destination IP address 695, 702
subnet 395
maximum per-reservation bandwidth 730
maximum total reservable bandwidth 730
memory partition, OSPF 569, 570
memory size 69
menu structure 150
menus
and command strings 40
entering abbreviated command strings 41
entering values 41
navigating 42
selecting options 40
MIBs 768
MLAN channel 31
mode, operating
defining for Ethernet trunk 310, 315
displaying for trunks 305, 329
modem
external, configuring 99, 100
modes, VLAN
definition 340, 343
displaying 338
selecting allOpen or allClosed 364
selecting Ignore STP 365
modifying
QoS bandwidth 734
QoS classifiers 701
QoS controls 718
VLANs (Layer 2 devices) 360
VLANs (Layer 3 devices) 355, 358
module
diagnostic messages 129
displaying date 137
module status information 69
monitoring
ports, Ethernet 221, 222
MultiPoint Link Aggregation (MPLA) 321
mode 324
Peer Switch Interface State 322
N
name server, DNS 436 to 440
names
for QoS classifiers 695, 718
for QoS controls 710
trunk 316
VLAN 349
navigating menus 42
NBP (Name Binding Protocol) 686
neighbor notification
and LLC Service 239
neighbors, OSPF 564 to 566
network supplier support 769
network troubleshooting 755
none, for rate limit 710, 712, 715
nonflow classifiers
cast types 695, 701, 702
defining 694
INDEX
predefined 691
protocol types 695, 701, 702
removing 706
specifying IEEE 802.1p tags 697, 703, 705
numbering
ports, Ethernet 204, 207
numbers
for QoS classifiers 695, 718
for QoS controls 710
NV data
restoring 110
O
online technical services 767
origin, VLAN 340, 343
OSPF (Open Shortest Path First)
areas 531 to 537
default route metric 538 to 540
interfaces 541 to 556
link state database 557 to 563
memory partition 569, 570
neighbors 564 to 566
router ID 567
routing policies 590 to 602
soft restarts 570
statistics 603
stub default metrics 571 to 573
virtual links 574 to 589
out-of-band
management 149
overlapped IP interfaces 447 to 449
P
PACE Access, Ethernet 217
PACE Interactive Access, Ethernet 218
packet filter
displaying contents 372, 373, 374, 376, 377,
379, 382, 384
filter id 371
processing paths 382
packet size
advancedPing 475
advancedTraceRoute 480
packets
tagging of excess 736, 737
password
access levels 35
configuring 75
IP RIP-2 interface 459
percentage rate limit 712
per-reservation bandwidth 725, 728
779
ping 177
advanced ping example 181
example 178
ping command
possible responses 473
pings, AppleTalk 682
policing options, RSVP 725, 728
policy
IPX RIP
define 633
modify 635
summary 632, 637
IPX SAP
define 642
detail 641
modify 645
remove 648
summary 640
policy-based services 689
port
label 241
port group
adding ports 391
port number
setting the traceRoute 182, 480
port ranges for QoS flow classifiers 696, 701, 703
port speed 95
terminal port, setting the 93, 96
port state, Ethernet 220
ports
autonegotiation, Ethernet 212
defining for VLANs 346
defining in trunks 310, 315
duplex mode, Ethernet 212, 213
enabling and disabling, Ethernet 220
flow control, Ethernet 215
labels, Ethernet 219
maximum number in group 391
monitoring, Ethernet 221, 222
numbering, Ethernet 204, 207
PACE Access, Ethernet 217
PACE Interactive Access, Ethernet 218
receive ports for controls 712, 716
speed, Ethernet 212, 213
speed, setting 95
state, Ethernet 220
statistics, Ethernet 204, 208
tagging 349
predefined QoS classifiers 691
priority tags
excess packets 736
nonflow classifiers 697, 703, 705
QoS controls 712
780
INDEX
prioritzation 267
probe
RMON 755
procedures
defining controls 715
defining flow classifiers 697
defining nonflow classifiers 700
defining RSVP 731
defining VLANs (Layer 2 devices) 354
defining VLANs (Layer 3 devices) 349
modifying VLANs (Layer 2 devices) 361
modifying VLANs (Layer 3 devices) 358
protocol types
for QoS classifiers 695, 718
modifying for VLANs 355
modifying QoS classifier 704
selecting for VLANs 345, 347, 352
prune messages
IP multicast 519
Q
QoS (Quality of Service) bandwidth
displaying 733
modifying 734
QoS (Quality of Service) classifiers
defining 694
displaying detail information 692
displaying summary information 691
example of defining 699
example of modifying 705
guidelines for using 689
modifying 701
removing 706
QoS (Quality of Service) controls
applying to classifiers 713
defining 710
displaying detail information 708
displaying summary information 707
example of defining 717
example of modifying 722
modifying 718, 721
removing 724
service levels 711
specifying rate limits 710, 712, 715
QoS (Quality of Service) excess packet tagging
disabling 737
displaying 735
enabling 736
QoS (Quality of Service) statistics
interval 738
receive 739
transmit 741
quiet
advancedPing option 475
R
rate limits, QoS control 710, 712, 715
modifying one or more 718
using with trunks 716
reboots
trunks and 307
receive ports
rate limit 712
specifying for trunks 716
receive statistics, QoS 739
receivePort rate limit 710, 712, 715
relay threshold
BOOTP 446
remote access 73
removing
IP interfaces 612, 613, 649
links 336
QoS classifiers 706
QoS controls 724
trunks 318
VLANs 363
reserved packets 733, 734
returning products for repair 771
RIP (Routing Information Protocol)
display 173
management statistics 176
mode example 175
modes 173, 174
RIP mode
IP
interface information 451
IPX
setting 630
statistics 651
triggered updates 631
RIP policy
define
IPX 633
modify 635
summary
IPX 632, 637
RIP-2 password 459
rlogin
and rebooting the system 123
router ID, OSPF 567
routes
adding default 165
AppleTalk 672, 673
defining static IP 422
INDEX
deleting default 166
finding in table 167
flushing from the routing table 164
IPX
displaying in routing table 615
flushing all learned 621
removing 620
SAPadvertising 613
types of 421
routing policies, OSPF 590 to 602
roving analysis
and Spanning Tree 758
RSVP (Resource Reservation Protocol)
definition of 689
disabling 732
displaying detail information 729
displaying summary information 728, 729
enabling 730
policing options 725, 728
procedure for defining 731
session information 729
treatment of excess packets 728, 730
RTMP (Routing Table Maintenance Protocol) 684
S
SAP (Service Advertisement Protocol) mode
statistics 652
triggered updates 639
SAP mode
IPX 638
SAP policy
define
IPX 642
detail
IPX 641
modify
IPX 645
remove
IPX 648
summary
IPX 640
script 124
scripts for the Administration Console
examples 125
script command 124
serial number 69, 129
serial port (modem)
setting baud rate 95
server information 116
servers
defining static IPX 624
displaying static IPX 622
table for 622
781
service levels
conforming packets 711
default 715
RSVP 728, 730
services for event logging 752
Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) 116 to 122
size, burst 712
SMT (Station Management)
lerAlarm value 242
lerCutoff value 243
snapshot feature 86
sniffer 755
SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol)
agent 189
community strings 192
display 189
displaying configurations 191
trap reporting
flushing addresses 197
SNMP trap
addressThresholdEvent 257
soft restarts 570
software
backup NV data 107
build date and time 69, 129
version 69
source address 480
advancedPing option 476
advancedTraceRoute option 480
traceRoute option 182
source IP address for QoS classifiers 695, 702, 710,
718
source IP address mask 695, 702
source socket verification
AppleTalk 681
speed, Ethernet ports 212, 213
split horizon 457
SRF (Status Report Frames)
and FDDI stations 224, 228
and lerAlarm 242
state
STP mode (VLANs) 365
state of IP interface 395
static routes
defining for IP 422
defining for IPX 618
static servers
defining IPX 624
statistics
DDP (Datagram Delivery Protocol) 683
displaying IP, UDP, and ICMP 186
Ethernet 204, 208
general IP 482
782
INDEX
ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol) 187,
483
IP interface 418
IPX forwarding 653
IPX interface 655
IPX RIP 651
IPX SAP 652
NBP (Name Binding Protocol) 686
OSPF (Open Shortest Path First) 603
OSPF soft restart 570
QoS (Quality of Service) interval for 738
QoS receive 739
QoS transmit 741
RTMP (Routing Table Maintenance Protocol) 684
trunk 305, 329
UDP (User Datagram Protocol) 187, 483
VLAN (virtual LAN) 341
ZIP (Zone Information Protocol) 685
statistics, AppleTalk protocol 683 to 686
STP (Spanning Tree Protocol)
stpMode 365
stub default metrics, OSPF 571 to 573
subnet masks
defining 404, 406
displaying 399
for VLANs 349
summary information
trunk 301, 304, 328
VLAN 338
system baseline display 90
system baseline set 91
system console access 73
system console webAccess 71
system diagErrLog 115
system ID 69
system information
displaying 69, 129
system name
displaying 69
setting 101, 135, 136
system reboot 123
system serial port 93, 96
system sntp define 117
system sntp display 116
system sntp modify 118
system sntp pollInterval 121
system sntp remove 119
system sntp state 120
system sntp timezone 104, 106, 121
system sntp tolerance 122
system up time 69
T
T_Opr 232
tagging, VLAN
defining 345, 352
displaying 341
modifying 355, 360
specifying 347, 352
tags, priority
for controls 712
for excess packets 736
for nonflow classifiers 697, 703, 705
TCMP (Trunk Control Message Protocol)
displaying state 301, 304, 305, 328, 329
technical support
3Com Knowledgebase Web Services 767
3Com URL 767
bulletin board service 768
fax service 769
network suppliers 769
product repair 771
telnet
rebooting the system 123
terminal port
port speed 93, 96
terminal speed 93
terminalSpeed command (system serialPort) 93, 96
terminate a Telnet session 126
TFTP (Trivial File Transfer Protocol) 87
time
displaying module 137
time in service 69
tolerance threshold 122
total reservable bandwidth 725, 728
traceRoute
port number 182, 480
source address 182
using 478
traceroute, IP multicast 528
transmit statistics, QoS 741
trap reporting
adding 195
flushing addresses 197
modifying 195
T-Req 232
triggered updates
RIP 631
SAP 639
trunk groups
supported 314
trunking
and VLANs 346
definition 299
overview 299
INDEX
trunks
defining 310, 315
definition 299
detail information 305, 329
maximum ports 316
names 316
removing 318
resources 318
sample definition 311
summary information 304, 328
trusted IP clients 77 to 82
ttl (time to live)
advancedTraceRoute 480
example 185
type of module 69
U
UDP (User Datagram Protocol) Helper
overlapped IP interfaces 447 to 449
port and IP forwarding addresses 444
UDP Helper
BOOTP 442
UDP port number
advancedTraceRoute 480
traceRoute 182
UDP statistics 187, 483
unspecified protocol type 348
updates
RIP triggered 631
SAP triggered 639
URL 767
user configuration information 116
V
values 252
default 41
entering in command strings 41
vi editor 124
VID (VLAN ID) 341
range 347, 352
virtual links, OSPF 574 to 589
VLAN interface 356
VLAN interface index 356, 360
specifying for Ignore STP mode 365
used to delete VLANs 363
VLANs
bridge VLAN commands
modify 316
VLANs (virtual LANs) 337
defining for Layer 2 devices 352
defining for Layer 3 devices 345
detail information and statistics 341
displaying summary information 338
errors 406
interface index 401, 607
modifying (Layer 2 devices) 360
modifying (Layer 3 devices) 355, 358
removing 363
setting allOpen or allClosed mode 364
setting Ignore STP mode 365
trunking 346
VRRP (Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol)
defining 492
enabling or disabling 499
introduction 485
modifying 495
removing 495, 498
W
wait
advancedPing option 475
advancedTraceRoute option 480
Web Management
access 71, 72
applications 30
World Wide Web (WWW) 767
Z
ZIP (Zone Information Protocol) 685
zones 677, 678
783
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