3Com 3C16405, 3C16406, 3C16450 Switch User Manual

®
®
SuperStack II PS Hub
User Guide
3C16405 — PS Hub 40 12-port
3C16406 — PS Hub 40 24-port
3C16450 — PS Hub 50 24-port
http://www.3com.com/
Part No. DUA1640-5AAA02
Published July 1997
3Com Corporation
5400 Bayfront Plaza
Santa Clara, California
95052-8145
© 3Com Technologies, 1997. All rights reserved. No part of this documentation may be reproduced in any
form or by any means or used to make any derivative work (such as translation, transformation, or
adaptation) without permission from 3Com Technologies.
3Com Technologies reserves the right to revise this documentation and to make changes in content from
time to time without obligation on the part of 3Com Technologies to provide notification of such revision
or change.
3Com Technologies provides this documentation without warranty of any kind, either implied or expressed,
including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.
3Com may make improvements or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this
documentation at any time.
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT LEGENDS:
If you are a United States government agency, then this documentation and the software described herein
are provided to you subject to the following restricted rights:
For units of the Department of Defense:
Restricted Rights Legend: Use, duplication or disclosure by the Government is subject to restrictions as set
forth in subparagraph (c) (1) (ii) for restricted Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software clause at 48
C.F.R. 52.227-7013. 3Com Centre, Boundary Way, Maylands Park South, Hemel Hempstead, Herts,
HP2 7YU, UK.
For civilian agencies:
Restricted Rights Legend: Use, reproduction or disclosure is subject to restrictions set forth in subparagraph
(a) through (d) of the Commercial Computer Software - Restricted Rights Clause at 48 C.F.R. 52.227-19 and
the limitations set forth in 3Com Corporation’s standard commercial agreement for the software.
Unpublished rights reserved under the copyright laws of the United States.
If there is any software on removable media described in this documentation, it is furnished under a license
agreement included with the product as a separate document, in the hard copy documentation, or on the
removable media in a directory file named LICENSE.TXT. If you are unable to locate a copy, please contact
3Com and a copy will be provided to you.
Unless otherwise indicated, 3Com registered trademarks are registered in the United States and may or may
not be registered in other countries.
3Com, LANplex, LinkBuilder, NETBuilder II, SmartAgent, SuperStack and Transcend are registered trademarks
of 3Com Corporation. CoreBuilder and FMS are trademarks of 3Com Corporation. 3ComFacts is a service
mark of 3Com Corporation.
CompuServe is a registered trademark of CompuServe, Inc. Windows and Windows NT are registered
trademarks of Microsoft. IPX is a registered trademark of Ideographix, Inc. Netscape Navigator is a
trademark of Netscape Communications Corporation.
Other brand and product names may be registered trademarks or trademarks of their respective holders.
Environmental Statement
It is 3Com’s policy to be environmentally friendly in all its operations. This manual is printed on paper that
comes from sustainable, managed European forests. The production process for making the pulp has a
reduced AOX level (adsorbable organic halogen) resulting in elemental chlorine free paper.
The paper is fully bio-degradable and recyclable.
ii
CONTENTS
IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
L’INFORMATION DE SÉCURITÉ IMPORTANTE
WICHTIGE SICHERHEITSHINWEISE
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Introduction 1
How to Use This Guide
Conventions 2
1
ABOUT
THE
2
PS HUB
Introduction 1-1
Features 1-2
How You Can Use the PS Hub 1-4
Building Up a Network 1-4
Expanding an Existing Network 1-5
Migrating to Higher Performance 1-6
Workgroups 1-7
What Are Workgroups? 1-7
Segments and Port Switching 1-8
Workgroup Example 1-11
2
HOW
THE
PS HUBS DIFFER
Overview 2-1
PS Hub 40 2-2
PS Hub 50 2-2
Segment Switch 2-2
PS Hub 50 Transceiver Module Slot
2-6
3
USING
THE
PS HUB
LEDs and Ports 3-1
Before You Start 3-4
What Other Equipment Is Needed? 3-4
Positioning the PS Hub 3-6
Using the Rubber Feet 3-6
Using the Labels 3-7
Rack and Wall Mounting 3-8
Rack Mounting 3-8
Wall Mounting 3-9
Connecting Workstations to Your Hub 3-11
Using Transceiver Modules 3-12
Connecting PS Hubs Together (Stacking) 3-12
About Cascade Cables 3-13
Using Cascade Cables 3-14
Using Hot Swap Cascade Units 3-15
Connecting Different Hubs and Stacks to Your Hub
Powering On the Units 3-17
Spot Checks 3-17
4
LOAD BALANCING
Overview 4-1
How Does Load Balancing Work?
Using an External Switch 4-3
Performing Load Balancing 4-3
5
MANAGING
THE
4-2
PS HUB
Introduction 5-1
Why Manage Your Stack? 5-2
How You Can Manage Your Stack 5-3
Command Line Interface 5-3
Web Interface 5-3
SNMP Network Management 5-4
Methods of Management 5-5
Requirements for Managing Over the Network
IP Addresses 5-7
iv
3-16
5-6
Command Line Interface (CLI) 5-8
Through the Console Port 5-8
Over the Network 5-11
Web Interface 5-12
Through the Console Port 5-12
Over the Network 5-12
Which Web Browsers are Supported?
Quick Config Manager 5-13
Through the Console Port 5-13
Over the Network 5-14
6
USING
THE
5-12
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Accessing the CLI 6-2
Initial Access 6-2
Logging On 6-2
Logging Off 6-3
Using the CLI Menus 6-4
CLI Menu Structure 6-4
Navigating the Menus and Entering Commands 6-5
Quick Guide to the Commands 6-6
Commands 6-7
Changing the Password 6-7
Setting the IP Configuration 6-8
Viewing the Configuration 6-9
Resetting the Stack 6-10
Initializing the Stack 6-11
Configuring Another Unit in the Stack 6-11
Enabling and Disabling RMON Filter Capture 6-12
7
MANAGEMENT USING
THE
WEB INTERFACE
Accessing the Web Interface 7-1
About the Web Interface 7-4
General Components 7-4
Page Components 7-6
Web Interface Map 7-6
v
Using the Web Interface 7-7
Unit View and Unit Pages 7-8
User Access Levels 7-9
Exiting the Web Interface 7-9
Online Help System and Documentation 7-9
Unit Pages 7-10
Unit View 7-10
Unit Status 7-11
Management Address 7-12
Port Setup 7-13
Console Port Configuration 7-14
Segment Configuration 7-15
Switch Configuration 7-16
Permanent Address Management 7-16
Management Settings Pages 7-17
Documentation 7-17
Getting Started 7-18
Password Setting 7-19
System Name 7-19
Configuration Pages 7-20
Initialize 7-20
Load Balancing 7-20
Reset 7-20
Resilient Links 7-21
Add Resilient Link 7-23
Software Upgrade 7-24
Health Pages 7-25
Segment Graph 7-25
8
PROBLEM SOLVING
Isolating a Problem 8-1
Solving Problems With the Hub 8-2
Solving Problems With the Command Line Interface 8-3
Solving Problems With the Web Interface 8-4
Solving Problems With an SNMP Network Management Application
vi
8-5
A
DIMENSIONS, STANDARDS
AND
CABLING
Dimensions and Operating Environment A-1
BABT Approval (for U.K. Users Only) A-1
Standards A-2
Cabling A-3
10BASE-T Cable A-3
Console Cable A-4
Modem Cable A-5
Cascade Connections A-6
Management Settings A-6
B
MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
Installing Quick Config Manager and the Load Balancing Tool B-2
Installation Requirements B-2
Installation Procedure B-3
Running Quick Config Manager B-4
Configuring Multiple Stacks B-4
Selecting Your Management Access Method (Windows ‘95 and
Windows NT only) B-5
Quick Config Manager Window Map B-5
Accessing the Stack B-8
Giving the Stack an IP Address B-9
Viewing the Stack B-12
Configuring Segments B-14
Configuring the Segment Switch B-17
Load Balancing B-18
Menus B-19
Changing the Community Name B-19
Viewing Current Utilization B-20
Viewing Utilization History B-21
Fixing and Unfixing Segments and Ports B-23
Performing Load Balancing B-25
Changing the Console Port Settings B-27
Upgrading a Stack B-28
Solving Problems With Quick Config Manager B-29
vii
C
SERIAL WEB UTILITY
Introduction C-1
Installing the Serial Web Utility C-1
Using the Serial Web Utility C-3
Solving Problems With the Serial Web Utility
D
C-4
AGENT UPGRADE UTILITY
Using the Upgrade Utility D-1
Solving Problems With the Agent Upgrade Utility
E
D-3
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Online Technical Services E-1
World Wide Web Site E-1
3Com Bulletin Board Service E-1
3ComFacts Automated Fax Service E-2
3ComForum on CompuServe Online Service
Support from Your Network Supplier E-3
Support from 3Com E-4
Returning Products for Repair E-5
E-3
GLOSSARY
INDEX
3COM CORPORATION LIMITED WARRANTY
EMC STATEMENTS
viii
IMPORTANT SAFETY
INFORMATION
WARNING: Warnings contain directions that you must follow for your
personal safety. Follow all instructions carefully.
Please read the following safety information thoroughly before
installing the PS Hub.
■
Installation and removal of the unit must be carried out by qualified
personnel only.
■
Connect the unit to an earthed power supply to ensure compliance
with European safety standards.
■
The power cord set must be approved for the country where it will
be used.
■
The appliance coupler, that is, the connector to the device itself and
not the wall plug, must have a configuration for mating with an
EN60320/IEC320 appliance inlet.
■
For U.S.A. and Canada:
■
The cord set must be UL-approved and CSA certified.
■
The minimum specification for the flexible cord is:
No. 18 AWG
Type SV or SJ
3-conductor
■
■
■
The cord set must have a rated current capacity of at least 10A.
The attachment plug must be an earth-grounding type with a
NEMA 5-15P (15A, 125V) or NEMA 6-15P (15A, 250V)
configuration.
For Denmark:
■
The supply plug must comply with section 107-2-D1, standard
sheet DK2-1a or DK2-5a.
■
For Switzerland:
■
The supply plug must comply with SEV/ASE 1011.
■
It is essential that the mains socket outlet is installed near to the
unit and is accessible. You can only disconnect the unit by
removing the appliance coupler from the unit.
■
This unit operates under SELV conditions (Safety Extra Low Voltage)
according to IEC 950, the conditions of which are maintained only if
the equipment to which it is connected is also operational under
SELV.
■
France and Peru only:
■
■
This unit cannot be powered from IT (impedance à la terre)
supplies. If your supplies are of the IT type, this unit should be
powered by 230V (2P+T) via an isolation transformer ratio 1:1,
with the secondary connection point labelled Neutral, connected
directly to Earth (Ground).
U.K. only:
■
The PS Hub is covered by Oftel General Approval,
NS/G/12345/J/100003, for indirect connection to a public
telecommunications system. This can only be achieved using the
console port on the unit and an approved modem.
■
Twisted Pair RJ45 ports: These are shielded RJ45 data sockets. They
cannot be used as telephone sockets. Only connect RJ45 data
connectors to these sockets. Either shielded or unshielded data
cables with shielded or unshielded jacks can be connected to these
data sockets.
■
Sockets for Redundant Power System (RPS): Only connect a 3Com
Redundant Power System to this socket. For details, follow the
installation instructions in the manuals accompanying the Redundant
Power System.
L’INFORMATION DE SÉCURITÉ
IMPORTANTE
AVERTISSEMENT: Les avertissements contiennent les directions que
vous devez suivre pour votre sécurité personnelle. Suivez toutes les
directives avec soin.
Veuillez lire à fond l'information de la sécurité suivante avant d'installer
le PS Hub.
■
L'installation et l'enlèvement de l'unité doivent être faits seulement
par le personnel qualifié.
■
Brancher l'unité à une source de courant mise à la terre pour assurer
la conformité aux normes de sécurité européennes.
■
La cordon d'alimentation surmoulé doit être approuvé pour le pays
auquel il sera utilisé.
■
Le socle de connecteur, c'est-à-dire, le connecteur à l'appareil
lui-même et non pas la prise murale, doit avoir une configuration
pour le branchement avec une admission d'appareil
EN60320/IEC320.
■
Pour U.S.A. et le Canada:
■
Le cordon surmoulé doit être UL Certifié et CSA Certifié.
■
Les spécifications minimales pour le cordon souple sont:
■
■
■
No. 18 AWG
Type SV ou SJ
3-conducteur
Le cordon surmoulé doit avoir une capacité de courant calculée
au moins de 10A.
La fiche de fixation doit être un type mis à la terre avec une
configuration NEMA 5-15P (15A, 125V) ou NEMA 6-15P (15A,
250V).
■
C'est essentiel que le socle soit installé près de l'unité et soit
accessible. Vous pouvez seulement débrancher l'unité en enlevant
la fiche d'alimentation de la prise de courant.
■
Cette unité marche sous les conditions SELV (Safety Extra Low
Voltage) conformément à IEC950, ces conditions sont maintenues
seulement si le matériel auquel elle est branchée, est aussi en
exploitation sous SELV.
■
Seulement Pour La France et Le Pérou:
■
Cette unité ne peut pas être mise en marche des sources de
courant IT (Impédance à la terre). Si vos sources de courant sont
de type IT, cette unité doit être alimentée par 230V (2P+T) via un
rapport de transformation d'isolation de 1:1, avec un point de
connexion secondaire étiqueté Neutre, branché directement à la
Terre (à la Masse).
■
Les ports RJ45 de paire tordue: Ceux-ci sont les prises de courant de
données RJ45 protégées. Ils ne peuvent pas être utilisés comme
prises de courant téléphoniques. Brancher seulement les connecteurs
RJ45 de données à ces prises de courant. Les câbles de données
blindés ou non blindés, avec les jacks blindés ou non blindés, l'un
ou l'autre, peuvent être branchés à ces prises de courant de
données.
■
Socle Pour Alimentation Multiple: Brancher seulement une
alimentation multiple de 3Com à cet socle. Suivre pour les détails les
directives de l’installation dans le manual qui accompagne
l’alimentation multiple.
WICHTIGE SICHERHEITSHINWEISE
WARNUNG: Warnungen enthalten Anweisungen, die zur eigenen
Sicherheit unbedingt zu beachten sind. Bitte befolgen Sie alle
Anweisungen sorgfältig und genau.
Bitte unbedingt vor dem Einbauen des PS Hub Einheit die folgenden
Sicherheitsanweisungen durchlesen.
■
Ein- und Ausbau des Gerätes ist nur von Fachpersonal vorzunehmen.
■
Das Gerät an geerdete Stromversorgung anschließen, um eine
Übereinstimmung mit den europäischen Sicherheitsbestimmungen
zu gewährleisten.
■
Der Anschlußkabelsatz muß mit den Bestimmungen des Landes
übereinstimmen, in dem er verwendet werden soll.
■
Die Anordnung der Gerätsteckvorrichtung, d.h. die Steckverbindung
am Gerät selbst im Gegensatz zum Wandstecker, muß in den
EN60320/IEC320 Zuführungsstecker am Gerät passen.
■
Es ist wichtig, daß der Netzstecker sich in unmittelbarer Nähe zum
Gerät befindet und leicht erreichbar ist. Das Gerät kann nur durch
Herausziehen des Verbindungssteckers aus der Steckdose vom
Stromnetz getrennt werden.
■
Das Gerät wird mit Sicherheits-Kleinspannung nach IEC 950 (SELV =
Safety Extra Low Voltage) betrieben. Angeschloßen werden können
nur Geräte, die ebenfalls nach SELV betrieben werden.
■
Gedrehte paarfache RJ45 Anschlüsse: Hierbei handelt es sich um
abgeschirmte RJ45 Datenbuchsen, die nicht als Telefonbuchsen
verwendbar sind. Nur RJ45 Datensteckverbinder an diese Buchsen
anschließen. Diese Datenstecker können entweder mit
abgeschirmten oder unabgeschirmten Datenkabeln mit
abgeschirmten oder unabgeschirmten Klinkensteckern verbunden
werden.
■
Steckdose Für Redundant Power System: Nur ein 3Com Redundant
Power System an diese Steckdose anschließen. Für weitere Angaben
die genauen Einbauanweisungen im Handbuch zum Redundant
Power System befolgen.
Die Einheit ist unter keinen Umständen an einen Wechselstrom
Netzstecker (A.C.) anzuschließen, wenn dieser keine Erdung hat.
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Introduction
Audience
Description
This guide describes how to set up and manage these SuperStack® II
PS Hubs:
■
3C16405 — PS Hub 40 12-port
■
3C16406 — PS Hub 40 24-port
■
3C16450 — PS Hub 50 24-port
This guide is intended for users who have networking experience. If you
have used 3Com’s SuperStack II range of products, you may already be
familiar with using this kind of hub. We recommend that you read
through this guide as the PS Hub has a number of important features
which are described in this guide.
If you are familiar with the PS Hub and know how the PS Hub’s port
switching and segments work, you may only want to know how the
PS Hub 40 and PS Hub 50 are different; refer to Chapter 2.
When referring to both the PS Hub 40 and PS Hub 50 generally, this
guide uses the term ‘PS Hub’.
For information on the Limited Warranty, refer to the “3Com
Corporation Limited Warranty” at the back of this guide.
A Quick Reference Guide accompanies this user guide, and provides a
summary of some of the information in this user guide.
If there are Release Notes shipped with your product and the
information in them differs from the information in this guide, follow
the Release Notes.
2
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
How to Use
This Guide
This table shows where to find specific information in this guide.
If you are looking for...
Turn to...
An introduction to the hub, workgrouping and segments
Chapter 1
Information on how the PS Hub 40 and PS Hub 50 are different Chapter 2
from each other
Information on installing and using the hub
Chapter 3
An introduction to load balancing and how it works
Chapter 4
Ways you can manage the hub and how to start your
management session
Chapter 5
Information on using the Command Line Interface to set up
the hub for management
Chapter 6
Information on using the web interface to manage the hub or
stack of hubs
Chapter 7
Information on solving any problems
Chapter 8
The hub’s dimensions, the standards it conforms to, and the
cabling you can use with it
Appendix A
Information on using Quick Config Manager to manage the hub Appendix B
or stack of hubs
Conventions
Information on installing and using the serial web utility
Appendix C
Information on using the agent upgrade utility
Appendix D
Technical support
Appendix E
Table 1 and Table 2 list conventions that are used throughout this
guide.
Table 1
Icon
Notice Icons
Notice Type
Alerts you to...
Information note
Important features or instructions
Caution
Risk of system damage, loss of data, or to personal
safety.
Warning
Risk of severe personal injury
Conventions
Table 2
3
Text Conventions
Convention
Description
Syntax
The word ‘syntax’ means you must evaluate the syntax
provided and supply the appropriate values. Placeholders
for values you must supply appear in angle brackets.
Example:
Change the password by using the following syntax:
password <string>
In this example, you must supply a password string for
<string>.
Commands
The word ‘command’ means you must enter the
command exactly as shown in text and press the Return or
Enter key. Example:
To exit, enter the following command:
Logout
This guide always gives the full form of a command in
uppercase and lowercase letters. However, you can
abbreviate commands by entering only the uppercase
letters and the appropriate value. Commands are not
case-sensitive.
Screen displays This typeface represents information as it appears on the
screen.
The words ‘enter’
and ‘type’
When you see the word ‘enter’ in this guide, you must
type something, and then press the Return or Enter key.
Do not press the Return or Enter key when an instruction
simply says ‘type’.
[Key] names
Key names appear in text in one of two ways:
■
■
Referred to by their labels, such as “the Return key” or
“the Escape key”
Written with brackets, such as [Return] or [Esc].
If you must press two or more keys simultaneously, the key
names are linked with a plus sign (+). Example:
Press [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[Del].
Menu commands
and buttons
Menu commands or button names appear in italics.
Example:
Words in italicized
type
Italics emphasize a point or denote new terms at the place
where they are defined in the text.
Words in bold type
Bold text denotes key features.
From the Configure menu, select Community/Polling...
4
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
1
ABOUT
THE
PS HUB
This chapter contains the following topics:
Introduction
■
Features and benefits of the PS Hub
■
How the PS Hub can be used
■
Using workgroups
■
Description and example of the PS Hub segmentation
■
How the PS Hub works
The SuperStack® II PS Hub, as shown in Figure 1-1, is a flexible
managed Ethernet repeater which is very easy to set up and manage.
It can be used to build a small network or to expand a larger, more
established network.
Figure 1-1
The PS Hub
The PS Hub is part of 3Com’s SuperStack II PS Hub range, which
incorporates many of the features from the successful SuperStack II
range. SuperStack II products can be combined to create a network
that can change and grow with your networking needs.
1-2
CHAPTER 1: ABOUT THE PS HUB
Features
The PS Hub 40 and PS Hub 50 share many features:
NOTE: These terms and features are described in this chapter and the
following chapters.
■
12 or 24 shielded twisted pair ports for easy connection to
10BASE-T networks. An MDI/MDIX switch allows you to cross-over
one of these ports, for connection to other types of hubs and
network equipment.
■
One or two transceiver module slots, providing a choice of media
options:
■
■
The PS Hub 40 has two 10Mbps transceiver module slots that
can be fitted with 3Com 10Mbps transceiver modules.
The PS Hub 50 has one transceiver module slot that can be fitted
with a 3Com 10Mbps or 100Mbps transceiver module.
■
SuperStack II architecture — You can stack up to 10 hubs
(six if free standing), giving you a possible 260 ports per stack.
■
LEDs for quick viewing of hub and port status.
■
Hot-swappable technology which allows hubs to be added and
removed from a stack without affecting stack performance.
■
Mounting brackets for easy installation into a standard 19 inch rack,
or onto a table or wall.
■
+5 Lifetime Limited Warranty — Please refer to the “3Com
Corporation Limited Warranty” at the back of this guide for more
information.
DUA1640-5AAA02
Introduction
Management
Features
■
Complete SmartAgent™ management which is built into each hub;
no additional management cards are needed. When PS Hubs are
stacked, the management is distributed between all hubs in the
stack.
■
Easy to use built-in management interfaces for configuration of your
hub or stack locally or over the network:
■
■
DUA1640-5AAA02
1-3
A Command Line Interface for quick configuration of IP
information for the hub.
A web interface for comprehensive management of the hub
using any suitable web browser.
■
Additional management software (supplied on the CD-ROM),
including 3Com’s Transcend® Quick Configuration Manager for
Windows®.
■
An implementation of SNMP for management over the network,
using the IP protocol.
■
Support for traps (messages) which can alert an SNMP network
management station of any problems.
■
Built-in security and resilience, which protects your network.
■
Port switching — Allows you to build up workgroups by switching
ports easily between the four internal segments. When stacked, all
four segments are carried between the hubs by cascade cables.
■
Automated load balancing — Configures the segments so that the
traffic is distributed evenly across them, making the segments more
efficient. It also analyses inter-segment traffic and moves frequently
communicating ports to the same segment.
1-4
CHAPTER 1: ABOUT THE PS HUB
How You Can
Use the PS Hub
The flexibility of the PS Hub allows it to be used in a number of ways.
You can build up a network or expand a large, established network.
For information on connecting and using your equipment, refer to
Chapter 3.
The PS Hub can be used on its own or in a stack with other PS Hubs.
All PS Hubs have a useful feature called port switching which allows
you to create workgroups within your stack. For information on this
feature, refer to “Segments and Port Switching” on page 1-8.
Building Up a
Network
The PS Hub is ideal for building up a new network. It has its own
built-in management and comes ready to use. The PS Hub range is
totally scalable, enabling you to start with one hub and add to it as
your network grows. You can connect your workstations and other
network equipment to the PS Hub to build a small network, as shown
in Figure 1-2.
Figure 1-2
Building Up a Network
When your network grows, you can expand it easily by adding more
PS Hubs. The PS Hub also has an MDI/MDIX switch which enables your
network to expand further by connecting to other types of hubs, stacks
and networking equipment, as shown in Figure 1-3.
DUA1640-5AAA02
How You Can Use the PS Hub
Figure 1-3
Expanding an
Existing Network
1-5
Connecting to Other Stacks and Hubs
You can add PS Hubs to your existing network to expand the number
of user connections. Each PS Hub has its own built-in management
which is distributed throughout the PS Hubs in the stack. This provides
fault tolerance because there is no single point of failure; all hubs have
management capability (should they become isolated).
Figure 1-4 shows how PS Hubs can be added to an existing network
(the network is a stack of SuperStack® II Hub 10 units in this example).
The hubs create more ports now, and allow for further growth in the
future. The PS Hubs are connected to a switch so that communication
between them is controlled.
Figure 1-4
DUA1640-5AAA02
Expanding an Existing Network
1-6
CHAPTER 1: ABOUT THE PS HUB
Migrating to Higher
Performance
The PS Hub is ideal for migrating your existing network to a higher
performance network. Using its internal segments (each running at
10Mbps), you can build up separate workgroups within a PS Hub stack.
Having a PS Hub 50 in your PS Hub stack can extend the flexibility of
your stack:
■
The PS Hub 50 has an internal switch (called a segment switch)
which can interconnect the segments in the stack so that the
workgroups on the segments can communicate.
■
The PS Hub 50 has a transceiver module slot which can be fitted
with a 10Mbps or 100Mbps 3Com transceiver module, providing
you with the option of having a 100Mbps network connection, for
example 100BASE-TX or 100BASE-FX. This allows you to connect to
100Mbps networks or network equipment, for example a server.
For information on the differences between the PS Hub 40 and the
PS Hub 50, refer to Chapter 2.
Figure 1-5
Migrating to a Higher Performance Network
DUA1640-5AAA02
Workgroups
Workgroups
What Are
Workgroups?
1-7
An important feature of the PS Hub is that you can create workgroups.
A good way to organize your network is to neatly group your users in
a logical way, called workgroups. For example, if your office consists of
four departments, you can mirror this by having four workgroups, as
shown in Figure 1-6.
Figure 1-6
Workgroups
You can keep these workgroups separate from each other so that the
communication is contained within each workgroup, or you can use
the switching functionality of a PS Hub 50 to enable communication
between the workgroups.
The workgroups are similar to the structure of your office, so it is easy
for you to make changes to your network; adding and removing users,
and moving users between workgroups.
The rest of this section describes how you can build up workgroups
using your PS Hub.
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1-8
CHAPTER 1: ABOUT THE PS HUB
Segments and
Port Switching
The PS Hub has four separate internal repeaters (called segments)
which you can use to create your workgroups. You can switch the
hub’s ports to any of these segments (called port switching). With the
segments and port switching, you can easily create your workgroups.
How the PS Hub Segments Work
In a stack of PS Hubs, four segments are carried between the hubs by
the cascade cables. These segments are four separate networks internal
to the stack, as shown in Figure 1-7.
Figure 1-7
Cascaded Segments
Each PS Hub has four internal segments. These segments are separate
internal repeaters, and can connect to or remain isolated from their
associated cascaded segments, as shown in Figure 1-8.
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Workgroups
Figure 1-8
1-9
Internal Segments
You use management software to configure the segments. You can:
■
Connect and isolate the segments from their associated cascaded
segments.
■
Switch the ports between the segments (port switching).
The ability to configure the segments allows you to create flexible
workgroups, as shown in Figure 1-9, which can change and grow with
your needs.
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1-10
CHAPTER 1: ABOUT THE PS HUB
Figure 1-9
Workgroups
Benefits of Segments and Port Switching
The key to port switching is that you are not restricted by physical
connections, and can create location and technology independent
networks. This has many benefits:
■
You can move users between segments easily — You simply switch
the ports between the segments, as necessary, using management.
■
The segments are carried throughout the stack — You can add
hubs, when necessary, to extend the existing cascaded segments.
■
Each segment is more efficient — Local network traffic is contained
within each cascaded segment, so they avoid congestion from the
other segments. You can increase the efficiency by using load
balancing to configure the segments so that traffic is distributed
evenly across them. You can use the web interface or Quick Config
Manager to configure load balancing. For information on how load
balancing works, refer to Chapter 4.
■
Total bandwidth is higher — Each segment runs at 10Mbps, so four
separate segments per hub provides a total of 40Mbps per hub.
■
Configuration of the segments can be performed remotely — As
users are moved between the segments by port switching, no
physical changes have to be made.
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Workgroups
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1-11
■
There is extra security — Hub segments can be isolated from the
cascaded segments, so that only workstations on the same hub
segment can communicate with each other.
■
Port switching enables you to extend any existing workgroups you
may have, across the whole network infrastructure, including
shared Ethernet workgroups.
1-12
CHAPTER 1: ABOUT THE PS HUB
Workgroup Example
This example shows how a stack of three PS Hubs can easily create a
network with the desired workgroups. Table 1-1 shows how the users
are grouped:
Table 1-1
Hub
Groupings
Development
Accounts
Marketing
Test
Top
Isolated
A, B, C
Middle
D, E, F, G
Bottom
M, N, O
H, I
J
P, Q
K, L
R, S, T
Figure 1-10 shows how the required workgroups are created using a
stack of PS Hubs.
Figure 1-10
Workgroup Example (see Table 1-1)
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Workgroups
1-13
Your workgroups are easy to change. Table 1-2 shows several changes
to the example, and the simple actions needed to implement the
changes:
Table 1-2
Changes to the Workgroups
Action to implement
change
Change to workgroups
Hub affected
A, B and C become part of
Development (cascaded segment 1)
Top
Reconnect segment 1
to cascaded segment 1
R, S and T become part of Marketing
(cascaded segment 3)
Bottom
Switch ports for R, S
and T to segment 3
U and V are new users on the bottom
hub and become part of Accounts
Bottom
Switch new ports for
U and V to segment 2
Figure 1-11 shows the workgroups after the changes have been made.
Figure 1-11
Workgroup Example After Changes
Port switching is independent of the physical connections, so it can be
made quickly and easily, through either local or remote management.
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CHAPTER 1: ABOUT THE PS HUB
If one of the PS Hubs in the example is a PS Hub 50, you can enable
communication between the four cascaded segments in the stack, so
that your workstations can communicate across the segments.
For information on the PS Hub 50, refer to “PS Hub 50” on page 2-2.
For information on the segment switch in the PS Hub 50, refer to
“Segment Switch” on page 2-2.
For information on load balancing, refer to Chapter 4.
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2
HOW
THE
PS HUBS DIFFER
This chapter contains the following topics:
Overview
■
An overview of the differences between the PS Hub 40 and
PS Hub 50
■
How the PS Hub 50 segment switch and transceiver module slot
work
This chapter describes how the PS Hub 40 and PS Hub 50 are different.
However, they are both part of the PS Hub family and have many
similar features. For information on these common features, refer to
“Features” on page 1-2.
Table 2-1 shows a summary of the differences between the PS Hubs:
Table 2-1
Differences Between the PS Hubs
Features
PS Hub 40
PS Hub 50
Has the hub got an internal segment switch?
No
Yes
Number and type of transceiver module slots
2 x 10Mbps
1 x 10Mbps or
100Mbps
Apart from the differences shown in Table 2-1, the PS Hubs have the
same features.
2-2
CHAPTER 2: HOW THE PS HUBS DIFFER
PS Hub 40
The PS Hub 40 has two 10Mbps transceiver module slots. When fitted
with transceiver modules, these ports can be port switched to any of
the hub’s four internal segments.
For information on what transceiver modules you can use, refer to
“Using Transceiver Modules” on page 3-12.
PS Hub 50
Segment Switch
The main feature of the PS Hub 50 over the PS Hub 40 is that it has an
internal segment switch.
The segment switch is an additional part of the PS Hub 50 which links
the stack’s four cascaded segments. It provides switching between the
four cascaded segments in the stack, so that the workstations on those
cascaded segments can communicate across the segment switch.
Using management, you can connect or isolate the segment switch
from the cascaded segments, as shown in Figure 2-1.
Figure 2-1
The PS Hub 50 Unit’s Segment Switch
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PS Hub 50
2-3
How Does the Segment Switch Work?
Information is passed around the network in small units, called packets.
These packets contain various Ethernet addresses called MAC addresses,
which are unique addresses that are permanently stored within each
piece of network equipment:
■
Source address — the MAC address of the equipment that sent the
packet.
■
Destination address — the MAC address of the equipment that the
packet is intended for.
The network adapters in your workstations have a MAC address which
is used to identify the workstations on the network. An example of a
MAC address is ‘08004e0849d1’.
Using the source addresses, the PS Hub 50 unit’s segment switch can
learn which workstations are connected to each of the cascaded
segments. This information is stored in a switching database, which is a
list containing each source address together with the associated
cascaded segment. Using this database, the segment switch can then
selectively pass future packets to the relevant cascaded segment.
When the switch database is full, no new addresses are learnt. The
segment switch regularly removes unused learnt addresses from the
switch database (known as ageing), if they have not been used after
30 minutes (the ageing period). Using the web interface, you can make
address entries permanent so that they are not removed by the ageing
process.
The segment switch has the following features:
■
Support for multiple PS Hub 50 units in the same stack.
■
Switch database with a capacity of 500 workstation addresses.
■
Self-selecting switch mode:
■
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If a 100Mbps transceiver module is fitted, the segment switch is
in LOI (Local Office Interconnect) mode — The 100Mbps
transceiver module port behaves like a downlink port. A
downlink port is a port that is typically connected to the rest of
the network. All packets with an unknown destination address
are forwarded to the downlink port only, and addresses are not
learnt on this port.
2-4
CHAPTER 2: HOW THE PS HUBS DIFFER
■
If a 10Mbps transceiver module is fitted or no transceiver module
is fitted, the segment switch is in 802.1d Bridge mode — All
packets with an unknown destination address are forwarded to
all ports.
Default Settings
The PS Hub 50 comes ready to use with all of the cascaded segments
connected to its segment switch (the default configuration). To isolate
and connect segments, and to control the way the hub’s segment
switch works, you must manage the hub. For information on
management, refer to Chapter 5.
Multiple PS Hub 50 Units in a Stack
The PS Hub 50 has been designed so that you can have multiple
PS Hub 50 units in the same stack. You may want to do this so that the
cascaded segments are always switched, when:
■
The stack is split.
■
One of the PS Hub 50 units is removed or fails.
You could have two PS Hub 50 units in a stack of PS Hubs, one at the
top and one at the bottom.
PS Hub 50 units automatically detect each other in the stack and
configure themselves so that one of the hubs becomes the active
switch, and the segment switches in all the other hubs are disabled.
This is to reduce the possibility of loops in the stack. If a PS Hub 50 is
removed from the stack or fails, the other hubs reconfigure themselves.
The process for detecting and reconfiguring is as follows:
1 If one hub has a 100Mbps transceiver module fitted, that hub becomes
the active switch.
2 If more than one hub has a 100Mbps transceiver module fitted but
only one has a link (is receiving information through its transceiver
module port), that hub becomes the active switch.
3 If all PS Hub 50 units appear to be equal, the hub with the lowest unit
number (the one nearest the bottom of the stack if connected
correctly) becomes the active switch.
Only the active switch learns addresses and adds them to its switch
database.
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PS Hub 50
2-5
Fast Ethernet Resilience
The process that chooses the active switch (when there are multiple
PS Hub 50 units in a stack) enables you to have a Fast Ethernet resilient
link in your stack.
Figure 2-2 shows a stack of two PS Hub 50 units, both with 100Mbps
transceiver modules. Both transceiver modules have a connection and
appear to be equal, so the bottom unit’s segment is the active segment
switch (and that transceiver module is used). If the connection to the
bottom unit’s transceiver module fails, the stack reconfigures so that
the top unit’s segment switch becomes the active segment switch.
Figure 2-2
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Fast Ethernet Resilience
2-6
CHAPTER 2: HOW THE PS HUBS DIFFER
PS Hub 50
Transceiver Module
Slot
The PS Hub 50 unit’s transceiver module can be fitted with a 3Com
10Mbps or 100Mbps transceiver module. The operation of the
transceiver module slot differs when using either a 10Mbps or
100Mbps transceiver module:
■
Packets with an unknown destination address are dealt with
differently by the segment switch, refer to “How Does the Segment
Switch Work?” on page 2-3.
■
The configuration of the transceiver module port is different.
For information on what transceiver modules you can use, refer to
“Using Transceiver Modules” on page 3-12.
Using a 10Mbps Transceiver Module
When a 10Mbps transceiver module is used, the PS Hub 50 allows you
to port switch it to any of the hub’s four internal segments (by default
it is switched to segment 1), as shown in Figure 2-3.
Figure 2-3
Using a 10Mbps Transceiver Module
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PS Hub 50
2-7
Using a 100Mbps Transceiver Module
When a 100Mbps transceiver module is used, the PS Hub 50
automatically connects it to the hub’s internal segment switch, as
shown in Figure 2-4.
Figure 2-4
Using a 100Mbps Transceiver Module
Using a 100Mbps transceiver module to provide a 100Mbps network
connection, gives you several options:
■
You can have a fast downlink to a network server or the rest of
your network.
■
You can connect a 100Mbps network to your 10Mbps network,
allowing you to migrate to a faster network in the future.
With multiple PS Hub 50 units, you can have a Fast Ethernet resilient
link in your stack, refer to “Fast Ethernet Resilience” on page 2-5.
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CHAPTER 2: HOW THE PS HUBS DIFFER
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3
USING
THE
PS HUB
This chapter contains the following topics:
LEDs and Ports
■
Description of the hub’s LEDs and ports
■
Positioning the hub
■
Rack and wall mounting the hub
■
Connecting PS Hubs together
■
Connecting workstations and other equipment to the hub
■
Spot Checks
Figure 3-1 (over the page) shows the hub’s diagnostic LEDs and easy to
use ports. This diagram also appears on the Quick Reference Guide.
The LEDs:
■
Show you how the hub and its ports are operating
■
Show you how the hub’s segments are operating
■
Alert you to a potential problem with your network
The different types of ports are used for:
■
Connecting workstations and other equipment to your hub
■
Connecting your hub to other PS Hubs, to form a stack
■
Connecting a management station to your hub for local
management
CAUTION: Only connect a SuperStack® II Redundant Power System to
the Redundant Power System socket.
Do not remove the transceiver module blanking plate with the power
still connected.
3-2
CHAPTER 3: USING THE PS HUB
Figure 3-1
The LEDs and Ports (the PS Hub 40 is shown)
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LEDs and Ports
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3-3
3-4
CHAPTER 3: USING THE PS HUB
Before You Start
What Other
Equipment Is
Needed?
Your PS Hub comes with:
■
One power cord for use with the PS Hub
■
Four standard height and two reduced height self-adhesive rubber
feet
■
Two mounting brackets and four screws
■
Four self-adhesive labels
■
One CD-ROM featuring:
■
The 3Com serial web utility (SLIP driver for Windows ‘95)
■
An agent upgrade utility
■
Transcend® Quick Configuration Manager for Windows
■
Transcend® Load Balancing Tool
■
Online help
■
Online versions of this user guide
■
A Warranty Registration card for you to fill out and return
■
A Quick Reference Guide
You may need to get some cables and other equipment for connecting
your workstations and other hubs to the PS Hub. Your supplier should
stock these cables and equipment. For information on how the cables’
pins are connected, refer to “Cabling” on page A-3.
Connecting Workstations
To connect workstations to your hub, you need:
■
One ‘Straight-through’ 10BASE-T cable for every workstation.
We recommend you use shielded 10BASE-T cables. The maximum
length you can use is 100m (328ft).
In order to comply with the 10BASE-T standard, ports designed for
workstation connections have been marked with the graphical symbol
‘x’. This denotes a crossover in the port’s internal wiring, for example
1x, 2x, 3x...
For information on connecting workstations to your hub, refer to
“Connecting Workstations to Your Hub” on page 3-11.
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Before You Start
3-5
Connecting PS Hubs (Stacking)
To connect another PS Hub 40 or PS Hub 50 to your hub using the
cascade ports, you need:
■
One cascade cable for each additional hub.
Cascade cables have resilience built into them which protects the
internal segments and management communication that is carried
between the hubs in the stack. You can increase this resilience by using
SuperStack II PS Hub Hot Swap Cascade Units with the cascade cables,
refer to “Using Hot Swap Cascade Units” on page 3-15.
Cascade cables are available from your supplier in a variety of lengths,
refer to “Cascade Connections” on page A-6. For information on
connecting another PS Hub to your hub, refer to “Connecting PS Hubs
Together (Stacking)” on page 3-12.
Connecting Different Hubs and Stacks
To connect different hubs or stacks to your hub, you need:
■
One ‘Straight-through’ 10BASE-T cable for each unit or stack —
if using the last port (port 12 or 24) and the MDI/MDIX switch.
■
One ‘Crossover’ 10BASE-T cable for each unit or stack — if using
any 10BASE-T port other than port 24.
For information on connecting a hub or stack to your hub, refer to
“Connecting Different Hubs and Stacks to Your Hub” on page 3-16.
Connecting Management Equipment
For information on what equipment you need to manage the hub,
refer to Chapter 5.
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CHAPTER 3: USING THE PS HUB
Positioning the
PS Hub
Using the Rubber
Feet
When installing your PS Hub, ensure that:
■
It is accessible and cables can be connected easily.
■
It is out of direct sunlight and away from sources of heat.
■
Cabling is away from power lines, fluorescent lighting fixtures, and
sources of electrical noise such as radios, transmitters and
broadband amplifiers.
■
Water or moisture cannot enter the case of the unit.
■
Air flow around the unit and through the vents in the side of the
case is not restricted. We recommend you provide a minimum of
25.4mm (1in.) clearance.
■
Free standing hubs are not stacked more than six high, and that
cables are supported so that they cannot pull the stack over.
■
No objects are placed on top of any hub or stack.
Four standard height and two reduced height self-adhesive rubber feet
are supplied with the hub.
Do not apply the feet if you intend to rack or wall mount the hub.
Usage of the feet depends on where the PS Hub is placed:
■
■
If the hub is going to be placed on top of a flat surface or another
PS Hub, use the four standard height feet.
If the hub is going to be placed on top of a LinkBuilder® FMS™ II
hub or other SuperStack II unit, use two standard height feet
towards the front, and the two reduced height feet towards the
rear.
CAUTION: If the hub is to be part of a free standing stack, apply the
feet to each marked corner area on the underside of the hub. If the
free standing stack contains different size hubs, ensure that the larger
hubs are at the bottom of the stack.
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Using the Labels
Using the Labels
3-7
A sheet of four labels is supplied with the hub. Some labels have
already been attached to the hub.
The labels on the bottom of the hub show:
■
The product number, serial number and MAC (Ethernet) address of
the hub.
■
The safety approvals to which the hub conforms.
The labels on the rear of the hub show:
■
The product number of the hub.
■
The power safety information.
The four labels left on the sheet are for you to use as necessary.
Depending on how you are going to position the hub, you may want
to stick the labels in a more accessible place; on the top or on the front
of the hub, for example. All four labels have the name, product
number, serial number and MAC (Ethernet) address of the hub printed
on them.
CAUTION: Do not stick the labels over any of the vents on the sides of
the hub.
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3-8
CHAPTER 3: USING THE PS HUB
Rack and Wall
Mounting
Two mounting brackets and four screws are supplied with the hub.
These are used for rack mounting and wall mounting the hub.
CAUTION: Disconnect all cables from the hub(s) before continuing.
Remove the self-adhesive rubber feet from the underside of the hub,
if already fitted.
Rack Mounting
The hub is 1U high and fits a standard 19in. rack.
To rack mount the hub:
1 Place the hub the right way up on a hard, flat surface with the front
facing towards you.
2 Locate a mounting bracket over the mounting holes on one side of the
hub, as shown in Figure 3-2.
Figure 3-2
Locating the Brackets for Rack Mounting
3 Insert the two screws and fully tighten with a suitable screwdriver.
4 Repeat the two previous steps for the other side of the hub.
5 Insert the hub into the 19in. rack and secure with suitable screws
(not provided).
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Rack and Wall Mounting
Wall Mounting
3-9
You can wall mount up to two hubs.
To fit the brackets to one hub, for wall mounting:
1 Place the hub the right way up on a hard, flat surface with the front
facing towards you.
2 Locate a mounting bracket over the mounting holes on one side of the
hub, as shown in Figure 3-3.
Figure 3-3
Locating the Brackets for Wall Mounting One Hub
3 Insert the two screws and fully tighten with a suitable screwdriver.
4 Repeat the two previous steps for the other side of the hub.
To fit the brackets to two hubs, for wall mounting:
1 Stack the hubs the right way up on a hard, flat surface with the front
facing towards you.
2 Locate two mounting brackets over the mounting holes on one side of
the hubs, as shown in Figure 3-4.
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3-10
CHAPTER 3: USING THE PS HUB
Figure 3-4
Locating the Brackets for Wall Mounting Two Hubs
3 Insert the three screws and fully tighten with a suitable screwdriver.
4 Repeat the two previous steps for the other side of the hubs.
To wall mount the hub(s):
1 Ensure that the wall you are going to use is smooth, flat, dry and
sturdy. If necessary, attach a piece of plywood securely to your wall.
Ensure that the plywood is large enough to mount the hub(s) on.
2 Position the hub(s) against the wall (or plywood) ensuring that the
ventilation holes face sideways.
Mark on the wall the position of the screw holes for both wall
brackets. Drill the four holes.
3 Using suitable fixings and screws (not provided), attach the hub(s)
securely to the wall (or plywood).
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Connecting Workstations to Your Hub
Connecting
Workstations to
Your Hub
3-11
This section describes how to connect workstations to the hub using
the 10BASE-T RJ45 ports.
WARNING: Ensure you have read the Important Safety Information
section carefully before you start.
ACHTUNG: Versichern Sie sich, daß Sie den Abschnitt mit den
wichtigen Sicherheitshinweisen gelesen haben, bevor Sie das Gerät
benutzen.
AVERTISSEMENT: Assurer que vous avez lu soigneusement la section
de L’information de Sécurité Importante avant que vous commenciez.
CAUTION: Always wait about 5 seconds between powering off and
powering on the hub, to ensure that the hub performs a full reset.
Connecting workstations to your hub is easy. Connect them using
10BASE-T cables to any of the hub’s 10BASE-T RJ45 ports. To connect a
10BASE-T cable, simply slot the connector into the relevant RJ45 port.
When the connector is fully in, its latch locks it in place. To disconnect
the cable, push the connector’s latch in and remove it.
The hub detects all port connections, so you can start using your
network immediately. When you need more ports, simply add more
PS Hubs.
In order to comply with the 10BASE-T standard, ports designed for
workstation connections have been marked with the graphical symbol
‘x’. This denotes a crossover in the port’s internal wiring, for example
1x, 2x, 3x...
If you are using the last port (port 12 or 24) to connect a workstation,
ensure the MDI/MDIX switch is set to MDIX.
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3-12
CHAPTER 3: USING THE PS HUB
Using Transceiver
Modules
Depending on your hub, the PS Hub has one or two transceiver module
slots, providing a choice of media options.
PS Hub 40
The PS Hub 40 has two 10Mbps transceiver module slots that can be
fitted with 3Com 10Mbps transceiver modules.
CAUTION: The only transceiver modules that can be used in the
PS Hub 40 unit’s transceiver module slots are 3Com 10Mbps transceiver
modules.
You cannot use two AUI Transceiver Modules or Bridge MicroModules
at the same time.
PS Hub 50
The PS Hub 50 has one transceiver module slot that can be fitted with
a 3Com 10Mbps or 100Mbps transceiver module.
You cannot use an AUI Transceiver Module or Bridge MicroModule.
The operation of the transceiver module in the PS Hub 50 is
determined by the type of transceiver module you use; refer to “PS Hub
50 Transceiver Module Slot” on page 2-6.
Connecting
PS Hubs Together
(Stacking)
You can increase the number of ports in your network by connecting
additional PS Hub 40 and PS Hub 50 units to your hub, to form a stack
(this process is called stacking). The four cascaded segments are carried
through the stack, enabling you to switch the ports on all of the hubs
between the four segments.
You can stack up to 10 units (if they are rack mounted) or six units
(if they are free standing).
CAUTION: Do not have a free standing stack of more than six hubs.
When you connect workstations and other equipment to the stack,
ensure that all cables are supported and cannot pull the stack over.
If installing the PS Hub in a stack of mixed SuperStack II units, the
PS Hub must be installed above the deeper units.
For conformance with Ethernet rules, you can only have four repeaters
in series. For a stack of more than one PS Hub, any path through the
stack counts as going through two logical repeaters.
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Connecting PS Hubs Together (Stacking)
About Cascade
Cables
3-13
Cascade cables are used to connect the PS Hubs to form a stack. These
cables carry the stack’s cascaded segments and distributed
management information; the stack will not work with any other
cables. Cascade cables are available from your supplier, and come in a
variety of lengths, refer to “Cascade Connections” on page A-6.
You can use a maximum of 6m (19.6ft) of cascade cabling between the
top and bottom hubs in the stack.
Stack Resilience and Hot Swap Functionality
Cascade cables have built-in resilience and hot swap functionality:
■
Up to three units within the stack can be powered off without
affecting the operation of the other units in the stack.
■
The units within a stack automatically reconfigure when a unit is
added or removed from the stack.
However, if a cascade cable is disconnected, the stack splits into two
isolated stacks. The units within the stack(s) automatically reconfigure
when a cascade cable is connected or disconnected.
Hot Swap Cascade Units
You can increase the resilience of the stack by using 3Com Hot Swap
Cascade Units (3C16430) with the cascade cables. These units can be
fitted to any PS Hub and provide total hot swap functionality.
The stack is held together even if units fail or are removed, added, or
powered off. For more information on how the Hot Swap Cascade
Units work, refer to the documentation that accompanies them.
Hot Swap Cascade Units are available from your supplier, refer to
“Cascade Connections” on page A-6.
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3-14
CHAPTER 3: USING THE PS HUB
Using Cascade Cables
To connect PS Hubs together, using Cascade cables:
1 Position the units as required; rack mounting or wall mounting them as
necessary.
2 Starting with the bottom unit, using a cascade cable:
■
Connect the cable’s connector marked UP to the UP port on the
unit.
■
Connect the cable’s connector marked DOWN to the DOWN port on
the unit directly above it.
Secure the cable in place by tightening its captive screws as tight as
possible by hand.
3 Continue up the stack, repeating step 2 for each unit, as shown in
Figure 3-5.
DOW
N
UP
DOW
N
UP
Figure 3-5
Connecting PS Hubs Together
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Connecting PS Hubs Together (Stacking)
Using Hot Swap
Cascade Units
3-15
To connect PS Hubs together, using Hot Swap Cascade Units:
1 Position the units as required; rack mounting or wall mounting them as
necessary.
2 Connect the Hot Swap Cascade Units with cascade cables:
■
Connect the cables’ connectors marked UP to the UP ports on the
Hot Swap Cascade Units.
■
Connect the cables’ connectors marked DOWN to the DOWN ports
on the Hot Swap Cascade Units.
Secure the cables by tightening the cables’ captive screws as tight as
possible by hand.
3 Starting at the bottom, connect the bottom Hot Swap Cascade Unit to
the UP and DOWN port of the unit. Secure the Hot Swap Cascade Unit
in place by tightening its long captive screws as tight as possible by
hand.
4 Continue up the stack, repeating step 3 for each unit, as shown in
Figure 3-6.
DOW
UP
N
DOW
N
UP
Figure 3-6
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Connecting PS Hubs Together Using Hot Swap Cascade Units
3-16
CHAPTER 3: USING THE PS HUB
Connecting
Different Hubs
and Stacks to Your
Hub
You can connect the PS Hub to different hubs and stacks (for example
a stack of SuperStack II Hub 10 units), giving you flexibility when
creating a new network, or expanding an existing network.
In order to conform with Ethernet rules, you can only have four
repeaters in series. For a stack of more than one PS Hub, any path
through the stack counts as going through two logical repeaters.
Each of the PS Hub’s 10BASE-T ports are internally crossed (MDIX).
The type of cable and ports used must be correct for the connection to
work:
■
You can use ‘Straight-through’ 10BASE-T cable to connect a
crossover (MDIX) port to an uncrossed (MDI) port.
■
You can use ‘Crossover’ 10BASE-T cable to connect two crossover
(MDIX) ports.
The last port (port 12 or 24) on the PS Hub can be either crossed or
uncrossed. The MDI/MDIX switch affects the port’s state:
■
If the switch is IN, the port is uncrossed (MDI).
■
If the switch is OUT, the port is crossed (MDIX).
Figure 3-7 shows a SuperStack II Hub 10 connected to the PS Hub.
A ‘Straight-through’ cable is used, and one of the SuperStack II Hub 10
unit’s crossed (MDIX) ports is connected to port 24 on the PS Hub
(note that the MDI/MDIX switch is IN, so the port is uncrossed).
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Powering On the Units
Figure 3-7
Switch
Powering On the
Units
3-17
Correct Hub Connections Using the Port 24 and the MDI/MDIX
When you have connected all of your equipment together, you are
ready to use your network.
You can power on the unit or the units in the stack in any order, and
can make your port connections at any time. After powering on the
hub, its Power/Self Test LED flashes for a few seconds while the hub
performs its self test. Afterwards, the LED lights green. If it does not,
refer to “Solving Problems With the Hub” on page 8-2.
Any information that you configure for the unit using management, is
retained when you power off the unit.
Spot Checks
At frequent intervals, visually check that:
■
Case vents are not obstructed
■
Cabling is secure and not pulled taut
If you suspect there is a problem, refer to Chapter 8.
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CHAPTER 3: USING THE PS HUB
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4
LOAD BALANCING
This chapter contains the following topics:
Overview
■
An overview of load balancing
■
How load balancing works
The PS Hub has a very useful feature called load balancing which can
be used to configure segments in a stack of PS Hubs. The aim of load
balancing is to increase total throughput across the segments in a
stack, providing more efficient segments.
As load balancing configures segments in a stack, you cannot perform
workgrouping at the same time. In effect, the segments participating in
load balancing are a single, high-capacity workgroup.
For load balancing to work properly, there must be either:
■
A PS Hub 50 in the stack
■
A switch connected to the hubs in the stack
4-2
CHAPTER 4: LOAD BALANCING
How Does Load
Balancing Work?
The load balancing feature monitors the traffic levels in the stack. At
regular intervals or when it reaches a predefined traffic level (whichever
you have configured), the stack starts load balancing. Here are the
steps it performs:
1 The PS Hubs work out which internal segments and cascaded segments
are connected by a switch (either through the PS Hub 50 unit’s
segment switch or an external switch). It does this because the load
balancing feature will only move ports between segments that they
currently communicate with (so that no workstations become isolated).
Figure 4-1 shows an example of a stack (with a PS Hub 50) that is to
be load balanced. The segments that can be load balanced have been
indicated.
Figure 4-1
Example of Load Balancing
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Performing Load Balancing
4-3
2 The load balancing feature notes:
■
Any ports or segments that have been fixed — Through
management you can fix ports and segments that you do not want
load balancing to move.
■
Any ports that are connected to external switches.
These segments and ports will not be moved by load balancing.
However, traffic generated by these ports and segments will still be
considered by the load balancing feature, when it works out what
other ports it will move.
3 The load balancing feature works out how it can configure the
segments. It attempts to:
■
Have frequently communicating ports on the same segment.
■
Reduce the total traffic utilization across the segments.
4 If some benefit will be gained from the new configuration, the load
balancing feature completes the operation by moving the ports
between the segments as required.
Using an External
Switch
The best way to interconnect the cascaded segments in a stack of
PS Hubs is to use a PS Hub 50. However, if you want to connect two or
more segments using an external switch, you must connect the switch
to the PS Hub’s 10BASE-T or transceiver module ports and then port
switch those ports to the relevant segments.
For information on using your switch, refer to the documentation that
accompanies it.
Performing Load
Balancing
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You can configure the load balancing feature through management
(it is disabled by default). For information on initiating the load
balancing feature using the web interface, refer to “Load Balancing”
on page 7-20. For information on setting it up using the Load
Balancing Tool (which is launched from within Quick Config Manager),
refer to “Load Balancing” on page B-18.
4-4
CHAPTER 4: LOAD BALANCING
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5
MANAGING
THE
PS HUB
This chapter contains the following topics:
Introduction
■
The management tasks you can perform
■
What you can use to manage your stack
■
How you can make a management connection to your stack
Network management is not required to make the PS Hub work, but
allows you to change the way it works and to monitor what is
happening to the segments and the rest of the network. There are
many features that can improve the operation of the hub or stack.
A stack of PS Hubs is treated as a single manageable entity, and the
management is distributed. This guide uses the word ‘stack’ to refer to
a stack of one or more PS Hubs, and ‘management station’ to refer
to the piece of equipment you are using to manage the stack (for
example a computer).
If the stack is connected and configured as recommended, the bottom
hub in the stack is unit number 1, the next hub up is unit number 2,
and so on.
All PS Hubs must be running agent software version 2.00 or later for
them to have the functionality mentioned in this user guide (for
example the web interface, CLI and load balancing). However, PS Hubs
that are running earlier agent software are compatible with newer
PS Hubs but do not have the newer functionality.
You can use Quick Configuration Manager to see what versions of
management software are on the units in the stack, and to upgrade
the stack; refer to “Upgrading a Stack” on page B-28.
5-2
CHAPTER 5: MANAGING THE PS HUB
Why Manage Your
Stack?
With management, you can change and view the way the stack or
network operates in the following way:
■
Display a graphical representation for the stack to quickly view the
status of each hub and its ports.
■
Display general information for the stack or hubs.
■
Graphically display network information for the stack’s cascaded
segments.
■
Enable and disable ports, and switch them between segments.
■
Perform load balancing so that the traffic is distributed evenly across
the segments in the stack, resulting in more efficient segments.
■
Configure security for the ports, including specifying what
equipment is allowed to communicate through the ports on the
hub.
■
Set up resilience; specify a backup connection that takes over should
a main connection fail.
■
View statistics.
■
Configure the console port for connection to a modem.
■
Configure user management access levels.
■
Upgrade the management software in the stack with any future
agent software upgrade.
■
Configure the stack to send messages (called traps) to an SNMP
network management application (for example, Transcend ®
Enterprise Manager) if certain conditions arise — you cannot
configure this using the web interface.
■
Perform remote monitoring using RMON — not manageable using
the web interface or Quick Config Manager.
■
Restart the hub to refresh its statistics and use any new
configurations.
■
Initialize the hub to return it to its factory settings (IP information is
retained).
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How You Can Manage Your Stack
How You Can
Manage Your Stack
5-3
A stack of PS Hubs is treated as a single manageable entity, and the
management is distributed. Any network address information (IP
information) that you configure for a hub, can be used to access the
stack.
The PS Hub has two built-in management interfaces which you can
access locally (through the hub’s console port) or remotely (over the
network):
■
A Command Line Interface (CLI) — can be used to set up the stack
with network address information.
■
A web interface — provides easy management of the stack from
any suitable web browser.
There is also a management application called Transcend Quick
Configuration Manager, referred to as ‘Quick Config Manager’ in this
guide, that is supplied on the CD-ROM. It runs under Microsoft
Windows® and provides an easy-to-use graphical management system.
Command Line
Interface
The PS Hub’s Command Line Interface (CLI) is a simple text-based user
interface which allows you to configure some network information for
your hub. The CLI provides just a subset of the web interface’s
functionality but is intended as a quick setup tool, to get your hub
ready for management over the network. You can use a Terminal or
Terminal emulator to access the CLI.
Web Interface
The PS Hub’s web interface provides easy management of the stack.
It behaves in a similar way to a web site on the World Wide Web in
that you access it using a web browser. You use its different pages to
change the network information in your stack and perform different
management tasks.
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5-4
CHAPTER 5: MANAGING THE PS HUB
SNMP Network
Management
The web interface and CLI built into your PS Hub allow you to manage
the stack. However, as your network grows, you may need a more
powerful SNMP network management application that will control all
of your managed units and stacks. Whether your network is large or
small, its ongoing performance, growth and security are only as good
as its management system.
3Com produces a range of powerful graphical SNMP network
management applications (for example Transcend Enterprise Manager
for Windows) that give you total control over your entire 3Com
network from a single management station.
Using intelligent 3Com software distributed throughout the network,
3Com’s Transcend management applications support all of today’s
platforms and manage a wide variety of 3Com products.
For further information about which Transcend management
application can benefit your growing network, call your local sales
office; refer to Appendix E.
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Methods of Management
Methods of
Management
5-5
There are many ways you can connect your management station to the
stack, as shown in Figure 5-1. You can manage the stack:
■
■
Through the console port (known as out-of-band management):
■
Using a web browser
■
Using a terminal emulator
■
Using a terminal
■
Using Quick Config Manager
Over the network (known as in-band management):
■
Using an SNMP network management application
■
Using a web browser
■
Using a terminal emulator (over Telnet)
■
Using Quick Config Manager (Windows® ‘95 and Windows NT®)
If you are going to manage the stack over the network, the quickest
way to set it up with the necessary network information is to connect
to one of the PS Hubs locally and use the CLI.
Figure 5-1
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Different Management Connections to the Stack
5-6
CHAPTER 5: MANAGING THE PS HUB
Requirements for
Managing Over the
Network
When managing your stack over the network, you must remember that
(regardless of your method of management):
■
The hub or stack must be correctly configured with IP information.
You must make a direct management connection through the
console port to do this (or use a BOOTP server).
IP addresses are unique, no two hubs must have the same IP address.
If you have no previous knowledge of IP, refer to “IP Addresses” on
page 5-7.
If you have a BOOTP server, it can automatically assign your network
equipment, including the PS Hubs, with IP information so that it can be
communicated with and managed over the network. Refer to the
documentation that accompanies your BOOTP server for more
information.
■
Any IP information configured for a hub in a stack can be used to
access the whole stack. If the stack is physically split in two, the IP
information remains with the hub and is used by its half; the other
half has no IP information so it becomes unmanageable over the
network. You can configure more than one hub in a stack with IP
information. We recommend you do this for the top and bottom
hubs to obtain redundant management capabilities (should the stack
split).
■
IP must be correctly set up for your management station.
■
You can manage the hub or stack over the network, through any of
the ports. However, for the communication to work over the
network, the port through which your communication reaches the
stack must be connected to segment 1 (either directly or indirectly)
of the hub with the IP address configured. If you are going to use
load balancing to configure your segments, it is a good idea to fix
this port to segment 1.
■
You can manage a mixed stack of PS Hub 40 and PS Hub 50 units.
If you have multiple PS Hub 50 units, only one of the hubs’ segment
switch will be active, refer to “Multiple PS Hub 50 Units in a Stack”
on page 2-4.
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Methods of Management
IP Addresses
5-7
If you are uncertain about what IP addresses to assign your equipment,
contact your network administrator.
To operate correctly, each device on your network (for example a hub
or management station) must have a unique IP address (if one is
configured). IP addresses have the format n.n.n.n where n is a decimal
number between 0 and 255. An example IP address is ‘191.1.1.8’.
The IP address can be split into two parts:
■
The first part (‘191.1’ in the example) identifies the network on
which the device resides.
■
The second part (‘1.8’ in the example) identifies the device within
the network.
If your network is internal to your organization only, you may use any
arbitrary IP address. We suggest you use addresses in the series
191.1.1.X where X is a number between 1 and 254. Use the default
SLIP address of 192.168.101.1.
If your network has a connection to the external IP network, you must
apply for a registered IP address. This system ensures that every IP
address used is unique; if you do not have a registered IP address, you
may be using an identical address to someone else and your network
will not operate correctly.
Obtaining a Registered IP Address
InterNIC Registration Services is the organization responsible for
supplying registered IP addresses. The following contact information is
correct at time of publication:
Network Solutions
Attn.: InterNIC Registration Service
505 Huntmar Park Drive
Herndon
VA 22070
USA
Telephone: (1) (703) 742 4777
World Wide Web site: http://www.internic.com/
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5-8
CHAPTER 5: MANAGING THE PS HUB
Command Line
Interface (CLI)
The CLI allows you to configure a limited set of parameters for the
hub. You can access the CLI:
■
Through the console port
■
Over the network
This section has information on accessing the CLI. For more information
on using the CLI, refer to Chapter 6.
Through the Console
Port
Table E-1 shows the settings for the hub’s console port.
Table E-1
Console Port Settings
Data bits (character size)
8
Stop bit
1
Parity
None
You can access the console port through a direct local connection, or
you can set up a remote connection using a modem.
The terminal or management station (with the terminal emulator)
connected to the console port must use the same settings. By default,
the hub has auto-configuration enabled which will change the hub’s
console port settings to match those of the connected equipment and
automatically detect the baud rate (line speed). The hub can
auto-detect a maximum baud rate of 19200.
You need to use a null modem cable for connecting your terminal or
management station directly to the console port. This should be
available from your supplier. There are a variety of null modem cables
that you can use. For an example of one of these, refer to “Console
Cable” on page A-4.
If you are using a modem in your setup, you need to use a modem
cable. For an example of one of these, refer to “Modem Cable” on
page A-5. For information on setting up a connecting to the modem,
refer to the documentation that accompanies the modem.
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Command Line Interface (CLI)
5-9
To connect your equipment:
1 Connect the serial port on your terminal or management station to the
console port on the PS Hub, using a null modem cable.
2 Ensure that the terminal or management station’s serial port settings
match those of the console port on the PS Hub.
Using a Terminal Emulator
You can use the terminal emulator that comes with Microsoft Windows
to access the hub’s CLI:
■
Windows ‘95 and Windows NT (version 4 or later) have a program
called ‘HyperTerminal’.
■
Other versions of Windows have a program called ‘Terminal’.
For other types of management stations and operating systems, refer to
the documentation that accompanies your terminal emulator for
information on how to use it.
HyperTerminal
HyperTerminal can usually be found from the Windows Start menu, in
Programs, Accessories. To start a HyperTerminal session (after
connecting to the hub’s console port):
1 Double-click on the ‘Hypertrm.exe’ icon to start the application.
The Connection Description dialog box appears.
2 Enter a dummy name in the Name field and click OK.
The Phone Number dialog box appears.
3 Select the serial port that you are using to connect to the hub, in the
Connect using field.
The COM Properties dialog box appears.
4 Configure the data bits to ‘8’, stop bit to ‘1’, parity to ‘none’, and click
OK.
5 Click in the main HyperTerminal window and press [Return] several
times to start the communication.
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CHAPTER 5: MANAGING THE PS HUB
Terminal
Terminal can usually be found from the Main window, in the
Accessories program group. To start a Terminal session (after connecting
to the hub’s console port):
1 Double-click on the ‘Terminal’ icon to start the application.
2 If the Default Serial Port dialog box appears, select the serial port that
you are using to connect to the hub and click OK.
3 From the Settings menu in the main Terminal window, select Terminal
Emulation.
The Terminal Emulation dialog box appears.
4 Select ‘DEC VT-100 (ANSI)’ and click OK.
5 From the Settings menu, select Communications.
The Communications dialog box appears.
6 Configure the data bits to ‘8’, stop bit to ‘1’, parity to ‘none’, and click
OK.
7 Click in the main Terminal window and press [Return] several times to
start the communication.
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Command Line Interface (CLI)
Over the Network
5-11
You can access the CLI over a TCP/IP network using Telnet. To run
Telnet, you need a suitable terminal or management station running a
terminal emulator.
You can have multiple CLI management sessions at the same time. If a
connection is lost inadvertently, the connection is closed by the hub
after about 30 minutes of inactivity.
You can manage the hub or stack over the network, through any of
the ports. However, for the communication to work over the network,
the port through which your communication reaches the stack must be
connected to segment 1 (either directly or indirectly) of the hub with
the IP address configured.
Using a Telnet Terminal Emulator
You can use the Telnet terminal emulator that comes with Microsoft
Windows ‘95 (called ‘Telnet’) to access the hub’s CLI.
To open the Telnet session, you must specify the IP address of the hub
you want to manage. For other types of management stations and
operating systems, refer to the documentation that accompanies your
Telnet terminal emulator for information on how to do this.
Telnet
The Telnet application (‘Telnet.exe’) can usually be found in the
Windows directory on your PC. To start a Telnet session:
1 Run the ‘Telnet.exe’ application.
The Telnet application’s window appears.
2 From the Connect menu, select Remote System.
The Connect dialog box appears.
3 Type the IP address of the stack in the Host name field, select ‘telnet’
for the Port field, and select ‘vt-100’ for the TermType field.
4 Click Connect.
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5-12
CHAPTER 5: MANAGING THE PS HUB
Web Interface
You can manage the PS Hub using its web interface. You can access
the web interface:
■
Through the console port
■
Over the network
This section has information on accessing the web interface. For more
information on using the web interface, refer to Chapter 7.
Through the Console
Port
You can access the web interface through the hub’s console port, using
a management station running SLIP (Serial Line Interface Protocol).
If your management station is running Windows ‘95, you must use the
3Com serial web utility that is supplied on the CD-ROM. This is a SLIP
driver that sets up SLIP access for web interface management. To install
and use the serial web utility, refer to Appendix C.
You need to use a null modem cable for connecting your management
station directly to the console port. This should be available from your
supplier. There are a variety of null modem cables that you can use. For
an example of one of these, refer to “Console Cable” on page A-4.
Over the Network
Which Web
Browsers are
Supported?
You must have an IP stack on your management station, so that you
can manage over a TCP/IP network. An easy way to check this is that if
you have access to the Internet and can download web pages from it,
your management station has already got an IP stack.
For fully operational management, your web browser must support:
■
Java
■
Frames
■
HTML 3.2
Suitable web browsers are Netscape Navigator™ Version 3.0 or
Microsoft Internet Explorer Version 3.0.
Configuring Your Browser
Before you use your web browser to access the web interface, you
must make one small configuration change to it, so that it always
downloads the latest version of a page.
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Quick Config Manager
5-13
To do this for Netscape Navigator:
1 Start Netscape Navigator.
2 From the Options menu, select Network Preferences.
The preferences dialog box appears.
3 Check the ‘Every Time’ checkbox.
4 Click OK.
To do this for Microsoft Internet Explorer:
1 Start Microsoft Internet Explorer.
2 From the View menu, select Options.
The Options dialog box appears.
3 Select the Advanced tab, and in the Advanced property sheet click
Settings.
4 Check the ‘Every visit to the page’ checkbox.
5 Click OK.
Quick Config
Manager
You can manage the PS Hub using Quick Config Manager. You can
manage the hub:
■
Through the console port
■
Over the network — Windows ‘95 and Windows NT (version 4 or
later) only
You can perform similar management functions using Quick Config
Manager as you can using the web interface.
Through the Console
Port
You need to use a null modem cable for connecting your management
station directly to the console port. This should be available from your
supplier. There are a variety of null modem cables that you can use. For
an example of one of these, refer to “Console Cable” on page A-4.
Connect one end of the null modem cable to the console port on the
hub, and the other to the serial (RS232) port on your management
station with Quick Config Manager installed.
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5-14
CHAPTER 5: MANAGING THE PS HUB
When using Quick Config Manager with Windows ‘95 and managing
through the console port, you must first disable FIFO buffers in the
Advanced Port Settings window in Windows ‘95. To do this:
1 In the Windows ‘95 environment, select My Computer.
2 Select (in turn): Control Panel, System, Device Manager, Ports, COM1
(or whatever COM port you are using instead), Port Settings, and
Advanced.
The Advanced Port Settings window appears.
3 Uncheck the Use FIFO Buffers checkbox.
4 Click OK for the Advanced Port Settings window, and all of the
windows that were opened in order to access the window.
When you have made your connection and installed Quick Config
Manager, you are ready to manage the stack. Quick Config Manager
uses COM 1 as the default serial port on your management station.
If you want to change this, refer to “Running Quick Config Manager”
on page B-4.
Over the Network
You must have an IP stack on your management station, so that you
can manage over a TCP/IP network.
You can manage the hub or stack over the network, through any of
the ports. However, for the communication to work over the network,
the port through which your communication reaches the stack must be
connected to segment 1 (either directly or indirectly) of the hub with
the IP address configured.
For information on installing and using Quick Config Manager, refer to
Appendix B.
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6
USING THE
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
This chapter describes how to use the Command Line Interface (CLI).
The CLI is a quick and simple interface that is built-in to the hub, which
allows you to enter various IP address settings, reset it and initialize it.
The web interface and Quick Config Manager can perform most of
the tasks that the CLI can do.
You would normally use the CLI if you have many hubs that you want
to set up quickly with IP address information, for eventual management
using an SNMP network management application.
Simple help is provided with each command in the Command Line
Interface.
Ensure that your terminal or management station (which has the
terminal emulator) has been appropriately set up for your particular
management method and that any necessary connections have been
made, refer to “Command Line Interface (CLI)” on page 5-8.
If you have any problems using the CLI, refer to “Solving Problems
With the Command Line Interface” on page 8-3.
6-2
CHAPTER 6: USING THE COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Accessing the CLI
By default, the hub automatically configures the baud rate of its
console port to operate with the connected management station or
terminal, provided the parity, stop bits and character size are identical
to the connected management station or terminal. You may need to
perform the wake-up procedure to initiate the communication. To do
this, press [Return] several times at the management station or
terminal.
The login sequence for the CLI begins as soon as the hub detects a
connection to its console port, or as soon as a Telnet session is started.
Initial Access
The login prompt Login: is displayed.
As the initial user, enter the default user name admin and press
[Return] at the Password: prompt. The first time you access the CLI,
the password is null.
We recommend that when you have accessed the stack, you change
the default passwords for the user levels (if you have not already done
so) by logging in as the different user levels.
Logging On
At subsequent logins, enter your user name. If the user name is valid,
the Password: prompt appears. You must enter your password
correctly before you can continue with your management session.
If you have logged on correctly, the initial menu appears. If you have
not logged on correctly, the message Incorrect password appears
and the login sequence starts again.
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Accessing the CLI
6-3
Default User Names and Passwords
Table 6-1 shows the default users that can access the hub and their
level of access. We recommend that setting a password is the first task
you carry out on the hub. Setting a password prevents unauthorized
management access to the hub or stack.
Table 6-1
Default Users
User Name
Default
Password
monitor
monitor
Monitor — this user can view but not change all
manageable parameters
manager
manager
Manager — this user can access and change
the operational parameters but not
special/security features
security
security
Security — this user can access and change all
manageable parameters
admin
Logging Off
Access Level
Admin — this level is the same as Security
At the top level of the CLI, if you enter the command logout, the
management session is terminated.
Automatic Logout
As a security measure, a management session will be terminated if
there is a period of inactivity lasting longer than 30 minutes.
After the session has terminated, the first key that you press returns
you to the login prompt.
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6-4
CHAPTER 6: USING THE COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Using the CLI
Menus
When you log on to the CLI correctly, the top-level menu is displayed,
as shown in Figure 6-1. The unit description, unit name and unit
number are shown (PS Hub 50 and Marketing(1) in this example).
Figure 6-1
Top-level menu
Use the CLI by selecting options from this menu and from the others
below it. Each menu option is accompanied by a brief description of
what that option does.
CLI Menu Structure
Figure 6-2 shows the menu/command structure for the CLI.
Figure 6-2
CLI Menu Structure
From the top-level menu, you can access two sub-menus:
■
IP Menu — From here, you can configure IP parameters.
■
System Menu — From here, you can view system configuration,
configure CLI parameters, change your password, reset and
initialize the hub.
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Using the CLI Menus
Navigating the
Menus and Entering
Commands
6-5
You can navigate the menus using any of the following methods:
■
Following the menu hierarchy — at the Select menu option:
prompt, type your selected menu name and press [Return].
The screen changes to show the next level of menus available or the
list of commands available within your selected menu.
■
Entering multiple menu names on the same line — if you are
familiar with the menu structure you can enter successive menus on
the same line at the Select menu option: prompt. For example,
to display the system configuration, the CLI would read:
Select menu option: system display
■
Abbreviated commands — for speedy navigation of the menus, you
need only enter enough characters to uniquely identify the menu
you want at the prompt. For example, to display system
configuration, the CLI would read:
Select menu option: sy di
As you navigate through the menus, the prompt changes to display
your current position in the hierarchy. For example, if you are in the
interface sub-menu of the system menu, ready to enter your next
option, the prompt reads:
Select menu option (system) :
Entering Commands
When you reach the menu level containing the specific command you
want to enter, you are prompted for a command name. Commands
can also be entered at the end of the menu string. Where applicable,
default values for commands are shown in parentheses after the
prompt. If you press the [Return] key for a command with such a value,
the hub continues to use that value.
Returning to the Previous Menu
You can return to the previous menu, by entering q at the prompt.
Returning to the Top-level Menu
You can return to the top-level menu by pressing the [Esc] key.
Obtaining Help
You can get help at any time by entering ? at the prompt.
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CHAPTER 6: USING THE COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Quick Guide to the
Commands
Table 6-2 lists all of the commands available from the CLI and shows
you briefly what each one does and the pages in this chapter that
describes how to use the commands.
Table 6-2
Commands
Command
What does it do?
Description can
be found on...
define
Sets IP and SLIP parameters
page 6-8
(ip) display
Displays IP and SLIP parameters
page 6-9
capture
Enables/disables RMON Filter capture
page 6-12
(system) display
Displays administration information for
the hub
page 6-9
initialize
Configures the stack back to default
settings
page 6-11
inventory
Lists the units in the stack
page 6-10
password
Changes the password of the current
user
page 6-7
reset
Simulates powering off and powering
on the stack
page 6-10
unit
Accesses another unit in the stack
page 6-11
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Commands
Commands
Changing the
Password
6-7
The remaining sections in this chapter detail the management functions
that can be carried out from the CLI.
We recommend that setting a password is the first task you carry out
on the hub. Setting a password prevents unauthorized management
access to the hub or stack.
If you forget your password while logged out of the hub, refer to
“Solving Problems With the Command Line Interface” on page 8-3.
To set a new password or change an existing password:
1 At the top-level menu, enter:
system password
2 You are prompted for your old password:
Old password:
If this is the first time you are setting a password, press [Return]
without entering any text. If you already have a password set up, then
enter the password.
3 The prompt changes to show:
Enter new password:
Enter your new password. The prompt asks you to confirm your new
password by entering it again.
The CLI displays a message to tell you that your password has
successfully changed.
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CHAPTER 6: USING THE COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Setting the IP
Configuration
Before you can manage the hub over the network, you must assign it
an IP address and subnet mask. You may also need to enter a default
router (sometimes known as the default gateway) address. The default
router is the router (if you have one) which is used by the stack to
communicate with other networks. For serial management, you may
need to configure the SLIP address and SLIP subnet mask.
If you have no previous knowledge of IP, refer to “IP Addresses” on
page 5-7. If you change any of these values, you may need to re-access
the hub using the new values.
To enter new IP settings:
1 At the top-level menu, enter:
ip interface define
2 You are prompted for the hub’s IP address:
Enter IP address [0.0.0.0]:
Enter a valid IP address for the Hub.
3 You are prompted for the hub’s subnet mask:
Enter subnet mask [255.255.255.0]:
Enter a subnet mask.
4 You are prompted for a default router address:
Enter default gateway [0.0.0.0]:
Enter a default gateway address or press [Return] if it’s not needed.
5 You are prompted for a SLIP address:
Enter SLIP address [192.168.101.1]:
Enter a SLIP address or press [Return] if it’s not needed.
6 Finally, you are prompted for a SLIP subnet mask:
Enter SLIP subnet mask [255.255.255.0]:
Enter a SLIP subnet mask or press [Return] if it’s not needed.
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Commands
Viewing the
Configuration
6-9
You can use the display command to show current configuration
information for your hub or stack.
Displaying the Hub Configuration
At the top-level menu, enter:
system display
The CLI displays information similar to this example:
3Com PS Hub 50 (3C16450)
Unit Name: Marketing
Location: Top floor
Contact: James
Time since reset: 2 days, 3 hours, 10 minutes
Operational Version: 1.00
Boot Version: 1.00
Hardware Version: 1.00
Serial Number: 2103332
This information is in the hub’s MIB (Management Information Base)
and is read-only. You can change the Unit name, Location and Contact
using the web interface.
If a problem occurs and you need advice from your support
representative, you may be asked for some of the information shown
on this screen.
Displaying the IP Configuration
At the top-level menu, enter:
ip interface display
The CLI displays the IP address, subnet mask, default router address,
SLIP address and SLIP subnet mask for the hub.
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CHAPTER 6: USING THE COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Displaying the Stack Configuration
The inventory commands allows you to list the units in the stack.
At the top-level menu, enter:
system inventory
The CLI displays information similar to this example:
Position
1
2
3
Description
PS Hub 50
PS Hub 40
PS Hub 40
Name
Marketing
Accounts
Development
State
Unit Operational
Unit Operational
Unit Operational
Where:
■
Position — The position of the unit in the stack; if the stack is
correctly connected and configured as recommended, the bottom
unit in the stack is unit number 1, the next unit is unit number 2,
and so on.
■
Description — The type of unit.
■
Name — The name that you have assigned to the unit.
■
State — The current operating status of the unit:
■
■
Resetting the Stack
Unit Operational — Indicates that the unit is operating normally.
Unit Loading — Indicates that there is a process taking place,
for example a software upgrade.
Resetting the stack simulates powering off and powering on the stack.
You may want to do this if you want to reset the stack’s statistics
counters.
CAUTION: Performing a reset may cause some of the data being
transmitted over the network to be lost. It also clears the
non-permanent addresses in the PS Hub 50 unit’s switch database.
To reset the stack:
1 At the top-level menu, enter:
system reset
2 The CLI asks you to confirm the reset. Enter y if you wish to proceed,
or n if you want to stop the reset.
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Commands
Initializing the Stack
6-11
Initializing the stack causes it to return to its factory default settings.
You may want to do this if the stack has been previously used in a
different part of your network, and its settings are incorrect for its new
environment.
CAUTION: Initializing the stack removes all configuration information
including security, resilient links and passwords. However, IP, SLIP and
default router information is retained to ensure you can continue
management communication with the stack over the network.
To initialize the stack:
1 At the top-level menu, enter:
system initialize
2 The CLI asks you to confirm the initialize. Enter y if you wish to
proceed, or n if you want to stop the initialize.
The stack’s passwords return to the default passwords.
Configuring Another
Unit in the Stack
The unit command allows you log on to another unit in the stack
without disconnecting from the current unit.
To configure another unit:
1 At the top-level menu, enter:
system unit
You are prompted for the unit’s number (note that the command
displays the number of the unit that you are currently configuring):
Select unit (1):
2 Enter the unit’s number.
When you have finished configuring the unit, simply log out to return
to the previous unit.
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CHAPTER 6: USING THE COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Enabling and
Disabling RMON
Filter Capture
You can enable or disable RMON Filter capture. By default this is
enabled. You may wish to disable this if you have no requirement to
perform RMON packet monitoring and wish to increase the security of
your network.
To configure RMON Filter capture:
1 At the top-level menu, enter:
system capture
2 Enable or disable RMON Filter capture as required.
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7
MANAGEMENT USING
WEB INTERFACE
THE
This chapter describes how to use the web interface. If you have any
problems using the web interface, refer to “Solving Problems With the
Web Interface” on page 8-4.
Accessing the
Web Interface
You can access the web interface for the stack either through the
console port or over the network. Ensure that your management
station has been appropriately set up for your particular management
method and that any necessary connections have been made, refer to
“Web Interface” on page 5-12.
If you want to access the web interface through a serial link from a
Windows® ‘95 management station (connected to the console port of
a hub in the stack), you must use the 3Com serial web utility (SLIP
Driver); refer to Appendix C.
Any number of people can access the web interface over the network,
at the same time. There is a password panel to prevent unauthorized
management of the stack.
To access the web interface:
1 Start your web browser.
2 In the browser, select the option for opening a location.
7-2
CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
3 In the browser’s open location window or area, enter the web address
URL (Uniform Resource Locator) for the stack.
The web address URL for a stack is in the format:
http://nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn/
Where nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn is:
■
The SLIP address for the stack, which is ‘192.168.101.1’ by default,
if managing through the console port
■
The IP address for the stack, if managing over the network
For example, to access a stack with an IP address of ‘191.1.1.8’ you
would enter:
http://191.1.1.8/
4 When the browser has located the stack, a password panel is displayed,
as shown in Figure 7-1. Enter your user name and password as
requested.
Figure 7-1
Password Panel
If no passwords have been configured for the stack, the default
password for the security level of user is ‘security’. The user names and
passwords are the same as those that you use to access the CLI. For a
list of the user names and the default passwords, refer to “Default User
Names and Passwords” on page 6-3.
We recommend that when you have accessed the stack, you change
the default passwords for the user levels (if you have not already done
so) by logging in as the different user levels.
If you forget your password while logged out of the stack, refer to
“Solving Problems With the Web Interface” on page 8-4.
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Accessing the Web Interface
7-3
When the correct user name and password have been entered, the
front page of the web interface may be displayed, as shown in
Figure 7-2. If this is the first time that the stack has been accessed
using the web interface, the first page of the Getting Started pages is
displayed. For information on how to use the Getting Started pages,
refer to “Getting Started” on page 7-18.
Figure 7-2
The Web Interface’s Front Page
You are now ready to manage the stack.
If you are unable the access the web interface, refer to “Solving
Problems With the Web Interface” on page 8-4.
While managing the stack, you can use your web browser to look at
other web pages or interfaces, and then simply use the back button to
re-access to the web interface. You do not need to re-enter your user
name and password when doing this.
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CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
About the
Web Interface
The web interface has been designed so that it is easy to use. It is
made up of three areas, as shown in Figure 7-3; the banner, side bar
(always displayed) and page (changes to show the different information
about the stack).
Figure 7-3
General Components
Components of the Web Interface
If you click on the:
■
Management categories (on the side bar) — The page area changes
to show different management information about the stack, for
example network addresses and graphs.
■
External links (on the banner) — The web browser displays general
information which is external to the web interface, for example help
and contact information.
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About the Web Interface
7-5
Management Categories
Table 7-1 shows the management categories that are on the side bar.
Table 7-1
Management Categories
Management Settings — Displays information about the
stack’s management settings.
Configuration — Displays information about the configuration
of some of the stack’s features.
Health — Displays statistics for the stack’s segments
(only available if there is a PS Hub 50 in the stack).
Stack icon — Selecting a unit displays information about the
unit, including the Unit View and unit information, as shown
in Figure 7-3.
External Links
Table 7-2 shows the external links that appear on the banner. You can
also click on the 3Com logo to display the 3Com web site.
Table 7-2
General Icons
Help
Displays the online help system for the web interface.
Documentation
Displays the online version of this user guide.
3Com Library
Displays the 3Com online library from the 3Com web site.
3Com Contracts
Displays the 3Com contact page from the 3Com web site.
3Com Support
Displays the 3Com customer support page from the 3Com
web site.
NOTE: Before you can use the online help system and online version of
this user guide, you may need to copy the files from the CD-ROM onto
your management station, refer to “Online Help System and
Documentation” on page 7-9.
If you do not have a connection to the Internet, your web browser is
unable to display 3Com pages from the external links (3Com Library,
3Com Contacts, 3Com Support).
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CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
Page Components
Web Interface Map
When you click on the management categories or stack icon, the page
area changes to show various kinds of information. A page can consist
of these components:
■
Fields — Display current values and allow you to enter new values if
required.
■
Checkboxes — Show whether options are enabled (checked) or
disabled (unchecked). Click on the checkboxes to change them.
■
Action buttons — Affect the information in the fields and
checkboxes for that page.
■
Page links — Link to other pages of information within the same
management category.
Figure 7-4 shows how the pages in the web interface are linked. The
page number under each box is where the description is in this chapter.
Figure 7-4
Web Interface Map
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Using the Web Interface
Using the Web
Interface
7-7
To display management category pages:
1 Click on the management category (on the side bar) that you require.
The page area changes to show a row of page links and the first page
in that category, as shown in Figure 7-5. You can make changes to the
information on the current page and click Apply when finished.
Figure 7-5
Management Category Page
2 To display another page in that management category, click on the link
in the row of links.
The page area changes to show the new page.
3 Make changes to the information on the page as necessary (click Apply
when finished) and choose another when ready. When you have
finished, simply choose another management category from the side
bar.
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CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
Unit View and
Unit Pages
To display the Unit View and the Unit pages:
1 Click on the unit in the stack icon.
The page area changes to show the Unit View and the Unit Status
page. You can make changes to the information on the current page
and click Apply when finished.
2 To display another page, click on part of the Unit View or the links
underneath it, as shown in Figure 7-6.
Figure 7-6
Areas of the Unit View
If you click on:
■
The unit (but not on a port or button) — The Unit Status page is
redisplayed.
■
A 10BASE-T or transceiver module port — The Port Setup page is
displayed for that port.
■
The console port — The Console Port Configuration page is
displayed.
■
Segment Configuration — The Segment Configuration page is
displayed.
■
The segment switch or Cascade Switch — The Switch
Configuration page is displayed (only available for a PS Hub 50).
If you click on one of the segment buttons, the Unit View highlights
the ports (with a blue surround) that are part of that segment.
3 You can make changes to the information on the page (click Apply
when finished) and choose another when ready. When you have
finished, simply choose another management category from the side
bar.
For more information on the Unit View, refer to “Unit View” on page
7-10.
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Online Help System and Documentation
User Access Levels
Exiting the Web
Interface
Online Help
System and
Documentation
7-9
For information on what the different user levels can manage, refer to
“Default User Names and Passwords” on page 6-3.
You can exit from the web interface at any time by closing your web
browser.
The CD-ROM supplied with the PS Hub has an online help system and
online documentation which can be used with the web interface:
■
The online help system is in web format (HTML) so when it is
launched, it appears in a secondary window in your web browser.
■
The online documentation is an online version of this user guide in
two formats; web format (HTML) and portable document file format
(PDF). The version that gets launched from the web interface is the
web format.
To use the online help system and user guide:
1 Decide how you want the web interface to access the files:
■
Copy the files onto your management station’s local drive or place
the CD-ROM in a your management station’s CD-ROM drive.
■
Copy the files onto a network drive or place the CD-ROM in a
network CD-ROM server.
■
Copy the files onto a web server.
2 Copy all of the files into a chosen directory (if required). On the
CD-ROM, the files are in these directories:
■
Help system — Agent\version\Help
■
Documentation — Agent\version\Docs
3 In the Documentation page (in the Management Settings category),
specify the location of the online files. For information on how to do
this, refer to “Documentation” on page 7-17.
The web interface always tries to point to the address you give it. If you
have the online files on your management station’s local drive, when
other users try to access the files, the web interface will try to point to
your files on their management stations, which may or may not exist.
For this reason, it is a good idea to use a network drive or network
CD-ROM server that is accessible to everyone who is going to use the
web interface, so that the files are always in the same drive and
directory for all users.
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CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
Unit Pages
This section describes the fields that appear on the pages in the Unit
category. The first page displayed is the Unit Status page.
Unit View
The Unit View is a graphical version of the unit, as shown in Figure 7-7.
Figure 7-7
Unit View
To refresh the Unit View (to show any new changes), click REFRESH.
If the Unit View fails to show the latest port changes after a refresh,
you must make a small configuration change to your web browser;
refer to “Configuring Your Browser” on page 5-12.
Port Status
The 10BASE-T and transceiver module ports (if transceiver modules are
fitted) are color coded and show these conditions:
■
Black — The port is enabled.
■
Green — The port is enabled and has a connection.
■
Gray — The port has been disabled by management.
■
Red — The port has partitioned (disabled itself to prevent a network
loop).
Identifying Which Ports Belong to a Segment
To view which ports belong to a segment, click on the segment button
on the Unit View. The graphic changes and ports that are members of
that segment are highlighted with a dark blue surround.
To move a port to a different segment, use the Port Setup page for
that port; refer to “Port Setup” on page 7-13.
The Segment Switch
The Unit View for a PS Hub 50 shows the segment switch. If it is
green, it is the active segment switch. If it is gray, it is disabled.
To configure the segment switch, use the Switch Configuration page;
refer to “Switch Configuration” on page 7-16.
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Unit Pages
Unit Status
7-11
This page provides detailed information about the unit:
Unit Name The name configured for the stack.
Location Where the stack is located.
Contact The person to contact if there is a problem with the stack.
The Unit Name can be configured using the System Name page (in the
Management Settings category), refer to “System Name” on page 7-19.
The Location and Contact can be configured using Quick Config
Manager or an SNMP network management application.
Unit Description The unit’s product name.
Hardware Rev The version of hardware inside the unit.
MAC Address The unit’s MAC (Ethernet) address.
Software Version The version of management software that the unit
is running.
Boot PROM Version The version of software on the Boot PROM inside
the unit.
Unit Uptime The time that has elapsed since the unit was last reset,
initialized or powered on.
Unit Attention Light A checkbox for you to light the Attn LED, to
help identify the unit in the stack.
To display the Management Addresses page, click IP Setup at the
bottom of the Unit Status page.
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CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
Management
Address
This page specifies a unique IP address for the stack, as shown in
Figure 7-8.
If you have no previous knowledge of IP, refer to “IP Addresses” on
page 5-7. If you change any of these values, you may need to re-access
the hub using the new values.
Figure 7-8
Management Address Page
The fields are:
IP Address Provides a box for you to type the IP address of the stack.
Network Mask Provides a box for you to type the subnet mask for the
IP address.
Default Router Provides a box for you to type the IP address of the
default router (if you have one) which is used by the stack to
communicate with other networks.
BOOTP Disabled / Enabled
Specifies whether you want your BOOTP server (if you have one) to
automatically allocate the stack an IP address and subnet mask.
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Unit Pages
Port Setup
7-13
This page specifies the port state (enable or disable), link state, partition
state and the segment to which the port is attached, as shown in
Figure 7-9.
Figure 7-9
Port Setup Page
The fields are:
Connector Type Shows the type of cable connected to the port.
Link State Shows the state of the link for a twisted pair (10BASE-T)
port. If the port is a transceiver module port, this field may be blank.
Port State Enabled / Disabled
Specifies whether the port can repeat information to and from the
network.
If the port is part of a resilient link, you cannot enable or disable the
port. You must first delete the resilient link. For more information on
resilient links, refer to “What are Resilient Links?” on page 7-22.
Partition State Shows whether the port is on and repeating traffic, or
has automatically partitioned (isolated itself). If the port has partitioned
check the cabling at both the port and any devices connected to the
port, and check for network loops.
Attached to Shows the segment of which the port is a member.
To make the port a member of a different segment, simply select the
segment. A port only communicates with its segment if it is enabled.
The Partition State and Attached To fields are not displayed for a
100Mbps transceiver module port (in a PS Hub 50).
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CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
Console Port
Configuration
This page configures the console port.
The PS Hub’s console port is already correctly configured by default,
for direct connection to a management station. Only alter these default
settings if you are connecting a modem to the console port.
CAUTION: Do not change any of these settings unless you fully
understand what you are doing. Incorrect settings may lock you out
from the hub’s console port when you select Apply, and you may have
to contact your supplier for information on recovering management
communication if you cannot access the unit over the network.
If you want to change the settings but are unsure of the correct
settings to use, refer to the user documentation that accompanies
your terminal or modem.
The fields are:
Console connection Terminal / Modem
Specifies what you are connecting directly to the console port. If you
are connecting to a modem, select Modem, otherwise leave as Terminal
(management station).
Port Speed 1200 / 2400 / 4800 / 9600 / 19200 / 38400 / AutoConfig
Specifies the baud rate of your management station or modem. The
stack hub can automatically configure its baud rate to work with your
management station or modem. Leave this field as Autoconfig if you
require auto-configuration.
Flow Control None / Xon/Xoff / Hardware RTS/CTS
Specifies the flow control option that corresponds to your management
station or modem.
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Unit Pages
Segment
Configuration
7-15
This page configures the segments in the hub, as shown in Figure 7-10.
You can:
■
Connect or isolate the segments from their associated cascaded
segments.
■
Name the segments.
Figure 7-10
Segment Configuration
To view which ports belong to a segment, click on the segment button
on the Unit View. The graphic changes and ports that are members of
that segment are highlighted with a dark blue surround.
To move a port to a different segment, use the Port Setup page for
that port; refer to “Port Setup” on page 7-13.
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CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
Switch Configuration
This page is used to select which cascaded segments the active
segment switch is attached to. Click on the checkboxes to connect or
isolate the switch as necessary.
This functionality is only available for the PS Hub 50.
For information on the segment switch, refer to “How Does the
Segment Switch Work?” on page 2-3.
To add or edit the permanent address entries in the active segment
switch’s database, click Permanent Address Management. The
Permanent Address Management page is displayed.
Permanent Address
Management
This page is used to add or edit permanent addresses in the active
segment switch’s database, as shown in Figure 7-11.
Figure 7-11
Permanent Address Management Page
The fields are:
MAC Address The MAC address of the device.
Segment The cascaded segment to which the device is connected.
Adding and Deleting Permanent Addresses
To add a permanent address to the switch database, click Add.
The Add a Permanent Address page is displayed. Enter the MAC
address of the device and the cascaded segment to which the device is
connected, and then click Add Address to Switch Port.
To delete a permanent address from the switch database, click on the
entry in the list and then click Delete. The permanent address is made
non-permanent. Non-permanent addresses are removed from the
segment database (known as ageing) if they are not used.
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Management Settings Pages
Management
Settings Pages
Documentation
7-17
This section describes the fields that appear on the pages in the
Management Settings category. The first page displayed is the
Documentation page.
This page specifies the directories or URL’s that are used to access the
online help system and documentation, as shown in Figure 7-12.
For more information on how to set up the online help system and
online documentation, refer to “Online Help System and
Documentation” on page 7-9.
Figure 7-12
Documentation Page
The fields are:
Help Specifies where the online help system can be found. Enter the
appropriate directory or web address. Examples are:
■
file://f:/help/default.htm
■
http://yournetwork.com/help/default.htm
Documentation Specifies where the online documentation can be
found. Enter the appropriate directory or web address. Examples are:
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■
file://f:/documentation/manual.htm
■
http://yournetwork.com/docs/manual.htm
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CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
Getting Started
The Getting Started pages are a series of pages which set up basic
information for the stack. You are asked:
■
For a descriptive name for the stack.
■
If you want to allocate the stack IP information or leave the
allocation to a BOOTP server on your network (if you have one).
A BOOTP server automatically allocates IP addresses to all equipment
on your network.
If you chose to allocate the IP information, you are asked:
■
■
For an IP address and subnet mask for the selected unit.
For an IP address for a default router — You may have a default
router which you want the hub to use to communicate with
other networks.
■
The file path or web address (URL) for the online help system and
documentation files.
■
To enter a new password (you can leave it blank if you don’t want
to change it).
If you have no previous knowledge of IP, refer to “IP Addresses” on
page 5-7.
You do not have to use the Getting Started pages to configure this
information, as it can all be configured using other pages in the web
interface.
If you have already configured some of this information for the stack, it
appears in the appropriate fields on the pages.
When you have entered the information in a page, click Apply to
display the next page. You can use the back button of your web
browser to return to a previous page. When you display the last page,
click Finish to accept the changes you have made and to exit from the
Getting Started pages.
If you have changed any of the IP information, you may need to
re-access the web interface using the new IP address.
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Management Settings Pages
Password Setting
7-19
This page changes the password for the user level that you are using,
as shown in Figure 7-13. The passwords that you type do not appear
on the screen.
Figure 7-13
Password Setting Page
The fields are:
New Password Type the new password you want to use.
Confirm Password Retype the password for confirmation.
System Name
This page allows you to enter a name for the stack. Use a descriptive
name, for example ‘First floor stack’.
The name that you specify for the stack appears on some of the CLI
and web interface pages.
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7-20
CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
Configuration
Pages
This section describes the fields that appear on the pages in the
Configuration category. The first page displayed is the Initialization
page.
Initialize
This page is used to initialize the stack. Initializing the stack causes it to
return to its factory default settings. You may want to do this if the
stack has been previously used in a different part of your network, and
its settings are incorrect for its new environment.
CAUTION: Initializing the stack removes all configuration information
including security, resilient links and passwords. However, IP, SLIP and
default router information is retained to ensure you can continue
management communication with the stack over the network.
The stack’s passwords return to the default passwords.
Load Balancing
This page is used to initiate the load balancing feature in the stack.
For information on load balancing, refer to Chapter 4. You can
configure the stack’s load balancing feature by using the Load
Balancing Tool; refer to “Load Balancing” on page B-18.
The stack may take some time to complete the load balancing
operation.
The load balancing feature will not work if Load Balancing has been
disabled by using the Load Balancing Tool.
Load Balancing works by monitoring traffic levels, so the stack only
starts to benefit from it when it has been powered on for a few hours,
and Load Balancing has been enabled for a few hours.
Reset
This page is used to reset the stack. Resetting the stack simulates
powering on and powering off the stack. You may want to do this if
you want to reset the stack’s statistics counters.
CAUTION: Performing a reset may cause some of the data being
transmitted over the network to be lost. It also clears the
non-permanent addresses in the PS Hub 50 unit’s switch database.
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Configuration Pages
Resilient Links
7-21
This page shows the resilient links that have been set up for the stack,
as shown in Figure 7-14.
This page is only available if there is a PS Hub 50 in the stack.
Only 10BASE-T and fiber optic ports (if there are fiber optic transceiver
modules fitted to hubs in the stack) can be part of a resilient link.
However, you can have Fast Ethernet Resilience in your stack with
multiple PS Hub 50 units. For more information, refer to “Fast Ethernet
Resilience” on page 2-5.
Figure 7-14
Resilient Links Page
The fields are:
Main Link Shows the hub and port number of the main link, and the
state of the link.
Standby Link Shows the hub and port number of the standby link,
and the state of the link.
Pair State Shows whether the resilient link pair is operational or not.
When operational either the main port or the standby port can repeat
traffic.
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7-22
CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
What are Resilient Links?
You can make the network more robust by adding resilience to it.
When a link fails all communication between equipment on each side
of the link is lost. To ensure important communication is not lost, the
network needs to be reinstated immediately which could be very
inconvenient for the network manager. If a spare link was configured
to automatically pick up when the broken link failed, the network
would appear to function normally to the user. At worst, a few packets
would be corrupted or lost.
This is the concept of resilience. One link is on standby (called the
standby link) waiting to take over if another link (called the main link)
fails. This pair is called a resilient link pair. The resilient link ports can be
on different hubs in the stack, and any network devices can be at the
other ends of the links.
When the network is in use, the stack that has been used to set up the
resilient link pair, monitors the state of both the main link and the
standby link. If the main link fails, the standby link becomes active.
You can use the Resilient Links page to view the status of the links.
If you have an SNMP network management application, you can
configure the hub to send traps (messages) to the SNMP network
management application, if the states of the links change.
Resilient Link Pairs
To set up a resilient link pair, you need to manage the stack that both
links in the pair are connected to. The number of resilient link pairs you
can set up is only restricted by the number of ports you have in the
stack.
When you set up the resilient link pair, you need to specify the ports
that the main link and standby link are connected to.
Load Balancing does not move ports that are part of a resilient link pair.
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Configuration Pages
7-23
Resilient Link Rules
Always follow these rules when setting up a resilient link pair:
■
Only 10BASE-T and fiber optic ports (if the hub has a fiber optic
transceiver module fitted) can be part of a resilient link.
■
Configure the resilient link pair at only one end of the link. In other
words, only one stack controls each resilient link pair you set up.
■
Each resilient link pair can only have one main link and one standby
link (the ports used can be on different hubs in the stack).
■
Each link must not belong to more than one resilient link pair.
■
For a port that is part of a resilient link pair:
■
■
Do not disable the link pulse generation (you cannot disable this
using the web interface or Quick Config manager).
Do not enable security for the port.
If you have more than two stacks there are a number of ways you can
use resilience when linking them. Remember to connect the stacks
correctly for both links, refer to “Connecting Different Hubs and Stacks
to Your Hub” on page 3-16.
If the main link fails, the standby link becomes active.
Adding, Deleting and Swapping Links
To add a resilient link pair to the list, click Add. The Add Resilient Link
page is displayed.
To delete a resilient link pair from the list, click on the entry in the list
and then click Delete. The resilient link pair is deleted, and the current
active link remains enabled and the standby link is cancelled.
To swap the main and standby ports for a resilient link pair in the list,
click on the entry in the list and then click Swap.
Add Resilient Link
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This page is used for adding resilient links to the stack. Choose on the
main link and click Next, and then choose the standby link and click
Next. The resilient link pair appear in the list on the Resilient Links
page.
7-24
CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
Software Upgrade
This page is used to upgrade the management software on the hubs in
the stack with a new agent software upgrade, as shown in Figure 7-15.
You must copy the new software upgrade into the appropriate
directory on the TFTP server that the server has been configured to look
in. For information on how to use your TFTP server, refer to the
documentation that accompanies it.
When a hub is upgraded, any configurations that have been made to it
are maintained. Upgrading a stack of hubs may take up to 5 minutes
for each hub.
Figure 7-15
Software Upgrade Page
The fields are:
Filename Type the filename of the upgrade file. Do not enter a path.
The file name format is:
■
PS Hub 40 software upgrade — pshxx_yy.bin
■
PS Hub 50 software upgrade — psfxx_yy.bin
Where xx_yy is the version of agent software. You can specify multiple
file names (separated by spaces), to upgrade PS Hub 40 and
PS Hub 50 units in the stack at the same time, for example:
psh02_00.bin psf02_00.bin
Server Address Enter the address of the TFTP server that has the
software upgrade on it.
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Health Pages
Health Pages
Segment Graph
7-25
This section describes the fields that appear on the Segment Graph
page in the Health category.
This page shows two graphs for a segment in a unit in the stack.
The first graph shows information for the last hour, the second graph
shows information for the last 48 hours, as shown in Figure 7-16.
This page is only available if there is a PS Hub 50 in the stack.
Figure 7-16
Segment Graphs Page
The fields are:
Unit Specifies the unit that has the segment.
Segment Specifies the segment that the graphs are displayed for.
Graph Type Specifies the type of graph that is displayed:
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■
Utilization — Shows the utilization of the segment as a percentage.
■
Total Errors — Shows the amount of packets which have errors.
7-26
CHAPTER 7: MANAGEMENT USING THE WEB INTERFACE
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8
PROBLEM SOLVING
The PS Hub has been designed to aid you when detecting and solving
possible problems with your network. These problems are rarely serious,
the cause is usually a disconnected or damaged cable, or incorrect
configuration. If this chapter does not solve your problem, contact your
supplier for information on what to do next.
Perform these actions first:
■
Ensure all equipment is powered on.
■
Power each hub off, wait about 5 seconds and then power them on
so they perform a self test. The self test only takes a few seconds,
during which the Power/Self Test LED flashes.
If you have a problem using Quick Config Manager, refer to “Solving
Problems With Quick Config Manager” on page B-29.
If you have a problem with the serial web utility, refer to “Solving
Problems With the Serial Web Utility” on page C-4.
If you have a problem using the agent upgrade utility, refer to “Solving
Problems With the Agent Upgrade Utility” on page D-3.
Isolating a Problem
A good way of isolating a problem is to see whether it occurs on a
particular port only. This can be done by:
■
Using a different port to see if the problem still exists.
■
Using management to view how a port has been set up. In
particular, see if the port is:
■
Partitioned because of a network loop
■
Disabled by management
■
Part of a resilient link pair
■
Performing security
8-2
CHAPTER 8: PROBLEM SOLVING
Solving Problems
With the Hub
Power LED not lit. Check your power cord connection. If the
connection is secure and there is still no power, you may have a faulty
power cord which needs replacing with another PS Hub power cord.
If you have another PS Hub, try that hub’s power cord with this hub to
isolate whether the fault is with the power cord or the hub.
Power LED yellow. The hub has failed its self-test due to an internal
problem, you need to contact your supplier.
Port Status LED yellow (PS Hub 40) or flashing green (PS Hub 50)
for a 10Mbps transceiver module port. It is likely that there is a
loop in your network which has caused this port to partition. Examine
your connections and remove the loop. Each piece of equipment
needs only one connection to your stack.
Port Status LED flashing green for a 10BASE-T port. It is likely that
there is a loop in your network which has caused this port to partition.
Examine your connections and remove the loop. Each piece of
equipment needs only one connection to your stack.
Port Status LED not lit for a port that has a connection. There is a
problem with this connection. Check you are using a
‘Straight-through’ 10BASE-T cable which is properly connected at both
ends, is not damaged, and that the equipment it is connected to is
powered on and operating correctly.
Link between two PS Hubs not working. Check your stack
connections; follow the information given in “Connecting PS Hubs
Together (Stacking)” on page 3-12.
Link between two stacks not working. Check your hub
connections; follow the information given in “Connecting Different
Hubs and Stacks to Your Hub” on page 3-16. It is likely an MDI/MDIX
switch is incorrectly set.
Segment LEDs constantly lit. There may be a network loop caused
by connecting the segments with:
■
An external switch in addition to the segment switch in a
PS Hub 50.
■
Multiple external switches.
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Solving Problems With the Command Line Interface
8-3
To remove this loop, either disable some of the ports that connect the
external switch to the segments, or isolate the active segment switch in
the PS Hub 50 from the cascaded segments.
Transceiver module not working. Check the Status LED for the
transceiver module slot. There is a problem if the LED is yellow
(PS Hub 40) or flashing green (PS Hub 50 10Mbps transceiver module).
It may be for these reasons:
Solving Problems
With the
Command Line
Interface
■
It could be that the transceiver module is incorrectly fitted
(highly possible if it is a coaxial transceiver module), refer to the
manual that accompanies your transceiver module.
■
It could be that a port has partitioned due to a loop in your
network. Examine your connections and remove the loop. Each
piece of equipment needs only one connection to your stack.
■
It could be that SQE test is enabled for the transceiver module.
Ensure that it is disabled on the transceiver module.
The initial Login prompt does not display. Check that your terminal
or terminal emulator is correctly configured to operate as a standard
terminal. If this doesn’t work, try configuring it to operate as a VT100
terminal.
For console port access, check you have performed the wake-up
procedure correctly, by pressing [Return] several times.
Check the settings on your terminal or emulator. The parity must be set
to ‘none’, the stop bit ‘1’ and the data bits (character size) ‘8’. The
management facility’s auto-configuration works only with speeds from
1200 to 19200 baud.
If you still cannot access the hub, reset the hub using Quick Config
Manager and retry the wake-up procedure. If this does not work,
initialize the hub.
You forget your password. Contact your supplier.
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8-4
CHAPTER 8: PROBLEM SOLVING
Solving Problems
With the Web
Interface
The web browser cannot access the stack. Check that:
■
The stack’s IP address, subnet mask and default router are correctly
configured, refer to “Giving the Stack an IP Address” on page B-9.
■
The stack has been reset.
■
Web Access has not been disabled for the access level you are using
to manage the stack. Use the Access Information panel of the
General Info dialog box in Quick Config Manager, refer to Appendix
B.
■
For management communication to work over the network, the
port through which your communication reaches the stack must be
connected to segment 1 (either directly or indirectly) of the hub with
the IP address configured. For information, refer to “Requirements
for Managing Over the Network” on page 5-6.
The web browser cannot access the stack over a serial link from
a Windows ‘95 management station. You must use the 3Com serial
web utility (SLIP Driver), refer to Appendix C.
The web browser can no longer access the stack. Check that the
port through which you are trying to access the stack has not been
disabled. If it is enabled, check the connections and network cabling at
the port. Try accessing the stack through a different port. If you can
now access the stack, a problem with the original port is indicated, or
it has been switched from segment 1 to another segment. Re-examine
the connections and cabling.
Possibly there is a network problem preventing you from accessing the
stack over the network. Try accessing the stack through the console
port of one of the hubs, and reset the stack.
Some of the web interface is not displayed in the web browser
after downloading. This is probably due to large amounts of traffic
over the network. Either reload (download) the web interface, or click
in the part of the web interface that has not displayed and select the
reload frame option in your web browser.
The Unit View does not display the latest port states. Every time
you want to change the port states or want to update the Unit View,
simply click REFRESH (underneath the Unit View). If the Unit View fails
to show the latest port changes after a refresh, you must make a small
configuration change to your web browser; refer to “Configuring Your
Browser” on page 5-12.
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Solving Problems With an SNMP Network Management Application
Solving Problems
With an SNMP
Network
Management
Application
8-5
The SNMP network management application cannot access the
stack. Check that:
■
The stack’s IP address, subnet mask and default router are correctly
configured, refer to “Giving the Stack an IP Address” on page B-9.
■
The stack has been reset.
■
The stack’s IP address is correctly recorded by the management
application. For information on how to do this, refer to the
documentation accompanying the application.
■
SNMP Access has not been disabled for the access level you are
using to manage the stack. Use the Access Information panel of
the General Info dialog box in Quick Config Manager, refer to
Appendix B.
■
For management communication to work over the network, the
port through which your communication reaches the stack must be
connected to segment 1 (either directly or indirectly) of the hub with
the IP address configured. For information, refer to “Requirements
for Managing Over the Network” on page 5-6.
Traps are not received by the SNMP network management
application. Check that the address of the management station is
entered in the stack. You can do this using Quick Config Manager;
refer to “Giving the Stack an IP Address” on page B-9.
The SNMP network management application can no longer
access the stack. Check that the port through which you are trying to
access the stack has not been disabled. If it is enabled, check the
connections and network cabling at the port. Try accessing the stack
through a different port. If you can now access the stack, a problem
with the original port is indicated, or it has been switched from
segment 1 to another segment. Re-examine the connections and
cabling.
Possibly there is a network problem preventing you from accessing the
stack over the network. Try accessing the stack through the console
port of one of the hubs, and reset the stack.
If you still cannot access the hub, use the Access Information panel of
the General Info dialog box in Quick Config Manager to check if SNMP
access is enabled, refer to Appendix B.
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8-6
CHAPTER 8: PROBLEM SOLVING
DUA1640-5AAA02
A
Dimensions and
Operating
Environment
DIMENSIONS, STANDARDS
CABLING
Table A-1 and Table A-2 show the specifications for the PS Hub.
Table A-1
Dimensions, Power and Operating Environment For All PS Hubs
Height
43.6mm
1.7in.
Width
440mm
17.4in.
Depth
168.5mm
6.7in.
Operating temperature
0 – 50° C
32 – 122 ° F
Humidity
0 – 90%
(non-condensing)
AC line frequency
50/60 Hz
Input voltage
100 – 240V AC
Current rating
1A (maximum)
Table A-2
BABT Approval
(for U.K. Users
Only)
AND
Weight and Power Consumption
3C16405
3C16406
3C16450
Weight
2Kg / 4.4lb
2.1Kg / 4.6lb
2.2Kg / 4.8lb
Power consumption
26W
29W
35W
Heat dissipation
90 BTU/hr
103 BTU/hr
124 BTU/hr
The PS Hub is covered by Oftel General Approval,
NS/G/12345/J/100003, for indirect connection to a public
telecommunications system. This can be achieved using the console
port and an approved modem.
A-2
APPENDIX A: DIMENSIONS, STANDARDS AND CABLING
Standards
Table A-3 shows the standards the PS Hub conforms to.
Table A-3
Standards
Functional
ISO 8802/3
IEEE 802.3
Safety
EN 60950
UL 1950
CSA 22.2 #950
EMC emissions
EN 55022 Class B*
FCC Part 15 subpart B Class A
ICES-003 Class A
VCCI Class 2*
AS/NZS 3548 Class B*
EMC immunity
EN 50082-1
Environmental
EN 60068 (IEC 68)
Reliability
The product meets a minimum calculated MTBF of
60,000 hours using MIL 217 at 25° C (77° F)
* Category 5 screened cables must be used to ensure compliance with the
Class B/Class 2 requirements of this standard. The use of unscreened cables
(Category 3 or 5) complies with the Class A/Class 1 requirements.
Refer to “EMC Statements” at the back of this User Guide for
conditions of operation.
DUA1640-5AAA02
Cabling
Cabling
This section shows the pin-outs for the various cables that are used
with the PS Hub. These cables are available from your supplier.
10BASE-T Cable
Figure A-1
Pin Numbering for 10BASE-T
Straight-through
Figure A-2
Straight-through 10BASE-T Cabling
Crossover
Figure A-3
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A-3
Crossover 10BASE-T Cabling
A-4
APPENDIX A: DIMENSIONS, STANDARDS AND CABLING
Console Cable
Figure A-4
Pin Numbering for Console
Examples of Null Modem Cables You Can Use
Figure A-5
Example of Null Modem Cabling for 9-pin Management Station
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Cabling
Figure A-6
Example of Null Modem Cabling for 25-pin Management Station
Figure A-7
Example of Modem Cabling for 25-pin Management Station
Modem Cable
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A-5
A-6
APPENDIX A: DIMENSIONS, STANDARDS AND CABLING
Cascade Connections
Cascade cables are available in a range of lengths from your supplier.
Hot Swap Cascade Units are also available. Table A-4 shows the
product numbers and the lengths of these items.
Table A-4
Management
Settings
Cascade Cables and Units
Number
Cable
Length
3C16420
Cascade cable
0.3m
11.8in.
3C16421
Cascade cable
1m
39.5in.
3C16422
Cascade cable
3m
118.6in.
3C16430
Hot Swap Cascade Unit
Table A-5 shows the settings you need to set your management
station’s serial port to, if you are managing the PS Hub directly through
its console port.
Table A-5
Management Station Settings
Data bits (character size)
8
Stop bit
1
Parity
None
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B
MANAGEMENT USING
QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
This appendix describes how to install and use Quick Config Manager.
For an overview of what you can do when managing the stack, refer to
“Why Manage Your Stack?” on page 5-2.
Quick Config Manager has a comprehensive help system that has the
same useful information as this appendix. Many of the features in
Quick Config Manager are also available using the web interface, and
they work in a similar way.
If you want to know how to use a feature that is not documented in
this appendix, refer to the Quick Config Manager help files. To invoke
the help files, simply select Help from the Quick Config Manager menu
bar.
Quick Config Manager uses a familiar Windows interface with point
and click operation. To use Quick Config Manager effectively, you need
to be familiar with Microsoft Windows. Refer to the documentation
that accompanies Microsoft Windows, for more information on how
to use the interface.
Quick Config Manager can only manage one stack at a time.
Quick Config Manager cannot perform remote monitoring using
RMON, and remote polling.
If you have any problems using Quick Config Manager, refer to
“Solving Problems With Quick Config Manager” on page B-29.
B-2
APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
What’s new
There are some new and updated windows and dialog boxes in Quick
Config Manager since the previous version (3.00). This is mainly to
include the new PS Hub 50 functionality:
■
Zoom View (updated)
■
Access Information (updated)
■
Switch Configuration (new)
■
Software Upgrade (updated)
■
Launch Load Balancing Tool (new)
Installing Quick
Config Manager
and the
Load Balancing Tool
This section has information on what you need to install Quick Config
Manager and how to install it. The Load Balancing Tool is installed by
the Quick Config Manager installation program.
Installation
Requirements
Quick Config Manager and the Load Balancing Tool require an IBM
compatible PC with at least a 486/33 processor. Your system must also
include:
■
Microsoft Windows 3.1 or later
or Windows ‘95
or Windows NT.
The Load Balancing Tool only installs and runs on a Windows ‘95 or
Windows NT system.
■
MS-DOS 5.0 or later (not needed for Windows ‘95).
■
Minimum of 13MB available hard disk space.
■
Minimum of:
■
8MB RAM for Windows 3.1 or later.
■
16MB RAM for Windows ‘95 or Windows NT.
All RAM above the first megabyte must be configured as
extended memory.
■
CD-ROM drive.
■
VGA color monitor or higher.
■
Mouse.
■
Console port capable of 9600 baud, no parity, 8 data bits (character
size), 1 stop bit.
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Installing Quick Config Manager and the Load Balancing Tool
Installation
Procedure
B-3
Quick Config Manager can be installed on its own or onto a
workstation that already has other Transcend management applications
installed.
CAUTION: Do not install Quick Config Manager in the same directory
as any previously installed Transcend management applications. Quick
Config Manager and the Load Balancing Tool are installed in
subdirectories (QCM and LOADBAL) under the default directory of
C:\TRANSCND. You can change the default directory during installation
if required.
If you have an earlier version of Quick Config Manager on your system,
you can simply install this version over it.
The installation program is a standard Windows based installation.
To install Quick Config Manager:
1 Start Microsoft Windows.
If you already have an existing Transcend management application
running, ensure that it is closed down.
2 Insert the CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.
3 Depending on your version of Windows:
■
Select Run from the Start menu — Windows ‘95 and Windows NT
(version 4 or later).
■
Select Run from the File menu — other versions of Windows.
4 In the Run dialog box, type drive:\TRANSCND\QCM\SETUP
(where drive is the letter of your CD-ROM drive) and click OK.
The installation program starts and checks your system configuration.
Choose which installation you want and enter any information that’s
requested. The installation program reports when installation is
complete.
When the Quick Config Manager installation is complete, it has its own
program group called Transcend. If other Transcend management
applications are present, the existing Transcend program group now
includes Quick Config Manager.
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B-4
APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
Running Quick
Config Manager
Whenever you want to start the Quick Config Manager application,
double-click on the Quick Configuration Manager icon.
CAUTION: Do not run Quick Config Manager in parallel with any other
Transcend management application.
Before you can manage the stack, you must make a management
connection to the stack. If you are going to manage over a serial link
from your management station, Quick Config Manager uses COM1 as
the default serial port. You can change this by editing the following line
under the [slip] subsection of the QUICKMGR.INI file:
SerialAttrib=COM1:9600,n,8,1
Editing it to SerialAttrib=COM2:9600,n,8,1 changes the default serial
port to COM2.
Before Managing with Quick Config Manager, you must ensure that
your management equipment and the hub have been set up, refer to
“Quick Config Manager” on page 5-13.
Configuring
Multiple Stacks
There is a special feature which enables you to refresh your
management communication when connecting your management
station to different stacks. This means that you do not need to close
and re-open Quick Config Manager, which is particularly useful if you
have many separate stacks that need configuring or monitoring.
To do this:
1 Make your serial connection to the new stack.
2 From the File menu, select Reset View.
Quick Config Manager closes any windows that are open in
preparation for the new management session.
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Selecting Your Management Access Method (Windows ‘95 and Windows NT only)
Selecting Your
Management
Access Method
(Windows ‘95 and
Windows NT only)
B-5
Windows ‘95 and Windows NT allow you to manage the stack over the
network (in-band) using Quick Config Manager. To manage the stack
over the network, the stack must have an IP address and IP must be
configured on your management station. Refer to the Windows ‘95 or
Windows NT documentation for information on configuring IP for your
management station.
To select the communication method you want Quick Config Manager
to use:
1 From the File menu, select Device Access.
Quick Config Manager displays the Device Access dialog box, as shown
in Figure B-1.
Figure B-1
Device Access Dialog Box
2 Select the access method.
3 Enter the IP Address of the stack, if network access is required.
4 Click OK.
Quick Config Manager performs a Reset View. The access method and
IP address are stored and used the next time Quick Config Manager is
run.
Quick Config
Manager Window
Map
DUA1640-5AAA02
Figure B-2 (over the page) shows how all of the Quick Config Manager
windows are accessed. This diagram also appears on the Quick
Reference Guide. The numbers at the top right-hand side of the
windows refer to the pages in this chapter that describe the windows.
B-6
APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
Figure B-2
Quick Config Manager Window Map
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Quick Config Manager Window Map
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B-7
B-8
APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
Accessing the Stack
The PS Hub uses community strings as a security measure, to check
management access to the stack. The community string you use must
match one of the community strings configured for the stack. Quick
Config Manager remembers the last community string used.
The default community string is security which allows you to view and
configure the stack’s information. We recommend you change the
community string as soon as possible for security reasons (use the Edit
Access Levels dialog box), but ensure you remember the community
string as you cannot manage the hub without it.
To enter the community string:
1 From the Configure menu, select Community/Polling.
Quick Config Manager displays the Community/Polling dialog box, as
shown in Figure B-3.
Figure B-3
Community/Polling Dialog Box
2 Enter the community string in the box.
3 Click OK.
Changes made to this dialog box only take effect for new windows.
Any graphs or zoom view windows that are already open will continue
to use the old values. Close these windows and reopen them to use
the new values.
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Giving the Stack an IP Address
Giving the Stack
an IP Address
B-9
You can configure the stack with an IP address and other address
information, enabling it to communicate over (become part of) an IP
network.
The stack does not need an IP address to make Quick Config Manager
work with it over a serial connection.
You need to give the stack an IP address if you want to manage it over
the network using:
■
An SNMP network manager, for example Transcend Enterprise
Manager.
■
Quick Config Manager (Windows ‘95 and Windows NT only).
■
The web interface.
■
The Command Line Interface (over Telnet).
Any IP information given to a hub in the stack is used by the whole
stack. If the stack is physically split, the IP information remains with the
hub and is used by its half, the other half has no IP information. You
can configure more than one hub in a stack with IP information. Doing
this, provides the stack with backup management, should the stack
split or a hub fail.
If you have no previous knowledge of IP, refer to “IP Addresses” on
page 5-7.
The IP Setup dialog box has a useful Easy Setup option which takes you
through the IP configuration process. The information that you enter
during the Easy Setup process is the same as, and is entered into, the IP
Setup dialog box.
If you are managing a stack of hubs, this dialog box shows and affects
the settings of the hub which is unit number 1 in the stack (the bottom
hub, if the stack is correctly configured). To make a different hub unit
number 1, disconnect the stack in such a way that the required hub
becomes the bottom hub. However, be very careful not to break the
management connection.
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APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
To display the IP Setup dialog box and view or configure the hub’s
address settings:
1 From the Configure menu, select IP Setup.
Quick Config Manager displays either the IP Setup dialog box or the
Easy Setup Option, as shown in Figure B-4, depending on the IP
information currently configured for the hub:
■
If an IP address has been configured for the hub, and it is not
0.0.0.0, the IP Setup dialog box is displayed. If you have previously
configured address information for the hub but want to go through
the Easy Set-Up option again, you can start it by clicking on the
Easy Set-Up button.
■
If no previous IP information has been configured for the hub or the
IP address is configured as 0.0.0.0, and the Enable IP box is
checked, the Easy Setup option is started. If you want to enter
information directly into the IP Setup dialog box or abort the Easy
Setup process, select Abort.
The Easy Setup option asks you if you want to manually configure
the hub for IP. If you have a BOOTP server that automatically
allocates IP addresses, select No, otherwise select Yes.
Figure B-4
IP Setup Dialog Box
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Giving the Stack an IP Address
B-11
2 Enter the relevant information into the IP Setup dialog box or Easy
Setup dialog boxes and click OK to exit the dialog boxes.
3 Reset the hub for any changes to take effect.
After resetting the hub, you may need to select Reset View from the
File menu to restart communication using the new information.
CAUTION: Always make a note of any changes that you make to the
settings on this dialog box.
If you are communicating with the stack over the network (Windows
‘95 and Windows NT only) and you change the IP address of the hub,
you need to change the Device Network IP Address entry in the Device
Access dialog box (refer to “Accessing the Stack” on page B-8) to
continue managing the stack over the network.
If you are using SLIP (Quick Config Manager over the console port),
ensure that Flow Control is not set to XON/XOFF (by default, it is set to
None). Unless you need to connect to the stack through a modem, do
not change the console port or SLIP default settings. For information on
the console port, refer to “Changing the Console Port Settings” on
page B-27. If you require more information on SLIP, read the Internet
Activities Board document RFC 155.
Quick Config Manager does not have a facility to receive traps.
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B-12
APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
Viewing the Stack
Quick Config Manager can display a graphical representation of the
stack you are managing, with:
■
The ports color coded to show their condition.
■
Buttons showing the names of the segments, which can be used to
show which ports are connected to the segments.
■
Buttons showing whether the segments are connected or isolated
from their respective cascade segments.
For information on segments and how they work, refer to “Segments
and Port Switching” on page 1-8.
To display the stack:
■
From the View menu, select Zoom In.
Quick Config Manager displays a zoom view of the stack, as shown
in Figure B-5. If the zoom view is already open, it is selected.
Figure B-5
Zoom View of the Stack
In the Community/Polling dialog box, you can specify whether the
zoom view is invoked on starting Quick Config Manager, and how
often the zoom view is polled (updated). If you want to update the
zoom view immediately, without waiting for a poll, select Update Zoom
from the View menu.
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Viewing the Stack
B-13
Port Colors and Icons
Port colors
Segment Switch
icon
RPS icon
The port color coding shows these conditions:
■
Green — Port enabled and capable of repeating traffic to and from
the network (link present).
■
Red — Port enabled but unable to repeat traffic to and from the
network (link lost or port partitioned).
■
Blue — Port disabled by management.
If you have a PS Hub 50 in the stack, its Segment Switch icon is:
■
Blue and white — Active.
■
Gray — Inactive.
If a hub is connected to a Redundant Power System (RPS), an icon is
shown on the right of the hub’s graphical representation. It shows
these conditions:
■
Green — RPS active and no faults.
■
Red — RPS active but has one or more faults.
Identifying the Ports that are Connected to a Segment
You can find out what ports in the stack are connected to a segment
by clicking on that segment’s name button on any of the hubs:
■
If the hub’s segment is isolated from the cascade segment, only
ports that are connected to the hub’s segment are highlighted.
■
If the hub’s segment is connected to the cascade segment, all other
ports in the stack which are part of segments that are connected to
the same cascade segment, are highlighted.
The ports (and any transceiver module ports) that are part of the
segment, are highlighted with a dark blue surround. Click the name
button again to turn off the highlighting.
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APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
Connecting or Isolating Segments from Their Cascade Segments
Next to each segment name button, is another button that shows if
the segment is connected or isolated from its associated cascade
segment:
■
Green with a solid line through it — the segment is connected.
■
Blue with a broken line — the segment is isolated.
Double-click the button to connect or disconnect the segment from the
cascade segment.
Displaying Information for the Stack
You can display information for the stack by double-clicking on the
zoom view:
Configuring
Segments
■
If you double-click on a port, the Port Configuration dialog box is
displayed. This is used to display and configure information about a
port.
■
If you double-click on anything other than a port or button, the
General Info dialog box is displayed. This is used to display and
configure information about the stack.
You can use Quick Config Manager to set up the segments within the
stack to create workgroups. For information on the segments and how
they work, refer to “Segments and Port Switching” on page 1-8.
If you want to use load balancing to configure your segments, refer to
“Load Balancing” on page B-18.
Quick Config Manager handles segments at two levels: the segments
within each hub, and the cascade segments that run through the stack.
Refer to “Connecting or Isolating Segments from Their Cascade
Segments” on page B-14 for information on connecting and isolating
segments from their associated cascade segments.
By default, all ports are assigned to segment 1.
Using the Segment Configuration panel, you can:
■
Move the ports between the segments
■
Name the segments
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Configuring Segments
B-15
For management communication to work over the network, the port
through which your communication reaches the stack must be
connected to segment 1 of the hub with the IP address configured.
You can configure the segments for any of the hubs in the stack,
regardless of the hub through which your management reaches the
stack.
To configure the segments:
1 Do one of the following:
■
Double-click on the graphical representation of the stack (but not on
a port).
■
From the Configure menu, select General Info.
2 In the General Info dialog box, select the Segment Conf category.
Quick Config Manager displays the Segment Configuration panel, as
shown in Figure B-6.
Figure B-6
Segment Configuration Panel
3 Using the Unit pull down list box, select the hub for which you want to
configure segments.
The Unit pull down list box displays the name of the hub (if configured)
or the number of the hub in the stack. In a correctly connected stack,
the bottom hub is unit 1.
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APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
4 Using the Segment pull down list box, select the segment to which you
want to move ports.
5 Highlight the ports in the Port Segment list and click Add >> to add
them to the Segment Member Ports list.
6 Click Apply to confirm your changes before choosing any other hubs
or segments for which you want to move ports.
7 Click OK.
In the unlikely event that you should lose your management connection
while moving ports, simply close this dialog box, perform a Reset View
and then re-enter this dialog box to continue moving ports.
If you have a Zoom View of the stack open, it is not automatically
updated with the information you configured using this panel. To
update the Zoom View, select Update Zoom from the View menu.
Unit Select the hub in the stack you want to configure segments for.
Segment Specify the segment in the hub that you want to configure.
Port Segment Select the ports you want to add to the segment. The list
shows what segments the ports are currently members of.
Segment Member Ports Shows the ports that are members of the
segment.
Add >> Adds the highlighted ports in the Port LAN list to the Segment
Member Ports list.
<< Undo Moves the highlighted ports in the Segment Member Ports list
from the segment, back to the Port Segment list, if these changes have
not been written to the stack.
Name Segment Opens a dialog box which is used to configure the
name for the segment, specified in the Segment field. The name of the
segment appears on the hub’s segment name button, on the graphical
representation (zoom view) of the stack, and is limited to 8 characters.
Apply Writes changes to the stack without closing the panel. Use Apply
if you want to configure another segment.
OK Writes changes to the stack and closes the panel.
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Configuring the Segment Switch
Configuring the
Segment Switch
B-17
All PS Hub 50 units have a segment switch. If you have multiple
PS Hub 50 units in a stack, only one of the units has its segment switch
enabled, called the active segment switch. You can use Quick Config
Manager to connect or isolate the stack’s active segment switch from
the cascaded segments. For information on the PS Hub 50 unit’s
segment switch, refer to “Segment Switch” on page 2-2.
This functionality in Quick Config Manager is not available if there is
not a PS Hub 50 in the stack.
To configure the segment switch:
1 Do one of the following:
■
Double-click on the graphical representation of the stack (but not on
a port).
■
From the Configure menu, select General Info.
2 In the General Info dialog box, select the Switch Conf category.
Quick Config Manager displays the Switch Configuration panel, as
shown in Figure B-7.
Figure B-7
Switch Configuration Panel
3 Use the checkboxes to connect or isolate the segment switch from the
cascaded segments, as required.
4 Click OK.
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B-18
APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
Load Balancing
The PS Hub has a load balancing feature which you can use to move
the ports between the segments in the stack for you. The aim of load
balancing is to reduce total traffic across the segments. It does this by
distributing the traffic between the segments, and keeping the stations
that frequently communicate with each other on the same cascaded
segment, which provides more efficient segments. If enabled, it works
by continually monitoring the traffic through the stack, and then at
regular intervals it moves the ports between the segments if it detects
that some benefit will be gained.
For information on the benefits of load balancing, refer to Chapter 4.
To configure load balancing, you use the Load Balancing Tool which is
supplied with and is launched from Quick Config Manager. The Load
Balancing Tool is installed on your management station by the Quick
Config Manager installation program (if it is running Windows ‘95 or
Windows NT).
The Load Balancing Tool only works when used over the network
(in-band) from a Windows ‘95 or Windows NT management station.
The load balancing feature automatically detects any ports that are
connected to switches and ensures that they are not moved. You can
prevent other ports from being moved by fixing them. Note that their
traffic levels are still taken into consideration when calculating the
segment traffic, so they will still affect other ports being moved.
To display the load balancing window, select Load Balance from the
Configure menu. Quick Config Manager launches the Load Balancing
Tool, as shown in Figure B-8.
You can use the Load Balancing window to:
■
View the current utilization for each of the segments in the stack.
■
View a utilization history for the segments.
■
Fix and unfix segments and ports.
■
Enable or disable the automatic load balancing feature, change how
often it occurs, and specify a threshold at which it occurs.
■
Change the rate at which the utilization information is updated.
■
Change the community name that is used to access the stack.
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Load Balancing
Figure B-8
B-19
Load Balancing Window
Because load balancing is part of the PS Hub, when you exit from the
Load Balancing Tool, the load balancing feature continues to work as
configured.
Menus
The Load Balancing window has five menu items along the top. There
is also a pull right menu that can be obtained by clicking on the right
mouse button while the mouse pointer is over one of the segments.
These menu options are described in the rest of this section.
Changing the
Community Name
When you launch the Load Balancing Tool, Quick Config Manager
passes it the community string that it is using so that the Load
Balancing Tool can access the stack.
If you ever change the community string in Quick Config Manager
while the Load Balancing Tool is running in the background, you need
to change the community string that the Load Balancing Tool uses.
To do this:
1 From the Configure menu, select Community.
The Load Balancing Tool displays the Configure Community dialog box.
2 Enter the new community name and click OK.
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B-20
APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
Viewing Current
Utilization
When the Load Balancing window is first displayed, the window shows
the Current Utilization page, as shown in Figure B-9.
Figure B-9
Current Utilization Page
This page shows the current utilization both across the stack and on
individual segments. Utilization refers to how much of the bandwidth is
being used. There is one utilization bar for:
■
Each cascaded and isolated segment — For example, if you have a
stack with two isolated segments, as shown in Figure B-10, the
Current Utilization page would have six separate segment bars (four
for the cascaded segments, and two for the isolated segments).
■
The total traffic — Represents the bandwidth being utilized across
all segments in the stack, as a percentage of the total possible
bandwidth for the stack. Note that this is not simply the sum of
each individual segment’s utilization.
Figure B-10
Cascaded and Isolated Segments Example
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Load Balancing
Viewing Utilization
History
B-21
If you click the History tab to the top of the panel, the Utilization
History page is displayed, as shown in Figure B-11.
Figure B-11
Utilization History Page
This page shows a graph of the utilization history for:
■
The total traffic that is being produced across all the segments in
the stack — The utilization is the percentage of the total available
bandwidth used to transmit valid and errored packets. It does not
include bandwidth wasted due to collisions.
■
All the cascaded and isolated segments.
The graph displays the values as percentages.
When the PS Hub is powered on, it starts recording the values for each
segment. When you view the Utilization History page, information that
has already been recorded is displayed. If the PS Hub has only just been
powered on, the graph will not display much information. The graph is
updated on each poll, if new information is available.
The PS Hub uses default RMON sessions to record the utilization history
of the segments. If you delete any of these sessions using an SNMP
Network Management Application, the PS Hub will be unable to record
information for those segments and it will not be displayed by the Load
Balancing Tool’s Utilization History page.
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B-22
APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
How the Utilization History Graph Can Be Used
The Utilization History graph is very useful for showing you the positive
changes in utilization of load balancing. You can view the utilization
before and after load balancing was performed, as shown in
Figure B-12.
The total traffic utilization will go down but segment utilization may
not be distributed evenly. This is because load balancing tries to keep
the stations that frequently communicate with each other on the same
cascaded segment.
Figure B-12
Utilization Before and After Load Balancing
Polling
You can change the rate at which the Load Balancing Tool updates its
utilization information (called polling). To do this:
1 From the Configure menu, select Polling.
The Load Balancing Tool displays the Polling dialog box.
2 Use the Enable Polling check box to enable or disable the polling of
utilization information.
If the check box is unchecked, polling is disabled and the Poll Period
field is disabled.
3 Use the Poll Period field to enter how many seconds you want between
each poll for information. The poll period can be 1 – 9999 seconds.
4 Click OK.
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Load Balancing
Fixing and Unfixing
Segments and Ports
B-23
You can fix segments and ports so that they are not moved by load
balancing:
■
Fixing a segment prevents any ports being moved to or from that
segment.
■
Fixing a port prevents that port from being moved to another
segment.
Fixing ports or segments does not prevent you from moving the ports
between segments yourself, using the web interface or Quick Config
Manager. It just prevents the load balancing feature from doing it
automatically.
You may want to fix segments that contain users that communicate
frequently. You may also want to fix ports that have network
equipment (other than workstations) connected directly to them. It is a
good idea to fix ports that are:
■
Used to connect your management station to the stack (this port
must remain on segment 1).
■
Connected to switches, servers and receivers of network traffic, for
example printers.
Segments
To fix or unifx a segment:
1 Right-click on the segment’s name or utilization bar.
A pull right menu appears next to the mouse pointer, which has Fixed
and Fixed Ports options. If Fixed has a tick next to it, the segment is
currently fixed. If it has not got a tick next to it, the segment is
currently unfixed.
2 Select Fix to make the segment fixed or unfixed.
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B-24
APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
Ports
To fix or unfix a port or multiple ports:
1 Right-click on the segment’s name or utilization bar for the segment
that contains the port(s).
A pull right menu appears next to the mouse pointer.
2 Select Fixed Ports.
Quick Config Manager displays a Port Configuration dialog box for the
segment, as shown in Figure B-13. The dialog box shows a list of all
the ports in the stack that are part of that segment, and whether they
are currently fixed or unfixed.
Figure B-13
Port Configuration Dialog Box For a Segment
3 Click on a port or on multiple ports (while dragging the mouse pointer
over the entries, or using [Ctrl]) in the list to highlight the port(s), and
then click Fix or Unfix to fix or unfix the port(s). Click Apply to send the
changes to the unit in the stack before closing the dialog box.
4 Click Cancel to close the dialog box.
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Load Balancing
Performing Load
Balancing
B-25
You can control many areas of the load balancing feature, including:
■
Invoking the load balancing feature manually.
■
Enabling or disable the automatic load balancing feature.
■
Changing how often the automatic load balancing feature occurs
(if enabled).
■
Changing the reactive threshold for the load balancing process
— if this level is exceeded on any segment, the load balancing
feature is automatically invoked (if enabled).
Load Balancing works by monitoring traffic levels, so the stack only
starts to benefit fully from it when it has been powered on for an hour,
and Load Balancing has been enabled for an hour.
We recommend that you perform load balancing during quiet periods
of network activity (possibly at night). To really benefit from load
balancing it is a good idea not to perform load balancing too often.
A suggested rate is every 24 hours.
CAUTION: The equipment connected to the ports that are moved by
load balancing must have their MAC addresses relearnt by the
PS Hub 50 (or external switch), so a small amount of packet loss may
occur while these addresses are relearnt.
Invoking Load Balancing Manually
To invoke the load balancing feature manually:
1 Select Balance Now from the Configure menu.
The feature immediately starts to load balance the units in the stack.
This feature is not available if load balancing has been disabled.
2 Select Refresh from the View menu to update the information that is
displayed in the Load Balancing Tool.
The stack may take some time to complete the load balancing
operation, so you may not see changes straight away.
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APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
Enabling or Disabling the Automatic Load Balancing Feature
To enable or disable the automatic load balancing feature:
1 From the Configure menu, select Load Balancing.
Quick Config Manager displays the Load Balancing dialog box.
2 Use the Enable Load Balancing check box to enable or disable the
automatic load balancing feature.
If the check box is unchecked, the feature is disabled and the
Frequency and Balance At fields are disabled.
3 Use the Frequency field to enter how many hours you want between
each automatic load balance.
4 Use the Balance At field to enter a the utilization level at which you
want the load balancing feature to automatically start, should any
segment exceed this level.
5 Click Apply to send the changes to the units in the stack before
closing the dialog box.
6 Click Cancel to close the dialog box.
Setting both the Frequency and Balance At fields to ‘0’ disables
automatic load balancing, but the load balancing feature still collects
data so that you can do a manual load balance at any time.
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Changing the Console Port Settings
Changing the
Console Port
Settings
B-27
The PS Hub’s console port is already correctly configured by default,
for direct connection to a management station (terminal). Only alter
these default settings if you are connecting a modem to the console
port.
CAUTION: Do not change any of these settings unless you fully
understand what you are doing. Incorrect settings may lock you out
from the hub’s console port when you select OK, and you will have to
contact your supplier for information on recovering management
communication.
Please note that:
DUA1640-5AAA02
■
If you want to change the settings but are unsure of the correct
settings to use, refer to the user documentation that accompanies
your terminal or modem. If you change the settings by accident,
click Cancel to exit from the panel without changing anything.
■
If you are managing a stack of hubs, this panel shows and affects
the settings of the hub which is unit number 1 in the stack (the
bottom hub, if the stack is correctly configured). To make a different
hub unit number 1, disconnect the stack in such a way that the
required hub becomes the bottom hub. However, be very careful
not to break the management connection.
■
If you are using Quick Config Manager over the console port, it is
best to have the Speed set to Auto Config.
■
While changing the speed, Quick Config Manager’s line speed may
become out-of-sync with that of the hub. To resolve this problem,
change the ‘SerialAttrib’ entry to SerialAttrib=COM1:line
speed,n,8,1 under the [slip] section of the QUICKMGR.INI file.
Restart Quick Config Manager.
B-28
APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
Upgrading a Stack
In the future, an upgrade may be issued which enhances the
functionality of the PS Hub. Any such upgrade will be available on the
3Com Bulletin Board Service, refer to “3Com Bulletin Board Service” on
page E-1. Quick Config Manager allows you to upgrade a whole stack
at a time, with any such upgrade.
When a hub is upgraded, any configurations that have been made to it
are maintained. Upgrading a stack of hubs may take up to 5 minutes
for each hub.
To upgrade the stack:
1 From the Configure menu, select Upgrade.
Quick Config Manager displays the Software Upgrade dialog box, as
shown in Figure B-14. This dialog box shows the units in the stack and
the version of agent software that they are running. At the bottom of
the dialog box, the state of the previous software upgrade is displayed
(the text is grayed out if there is a unit in the stack that is running old
agent software):
■
Loading — One or more of the units in the stack are still upgrading.
■
Success — The upgrade was successful.
■
Failure (with a message) — One or more of the units failed to
upgrade successfully.
■
Status unknown — There has not been a recent upgrade.
Figure B-14
Software Upgrade Dialog Box
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Solving Problems With Quick Config Manager
B-29
2 Specify the IP address of the TFTP server that has the upgrade file on it.
3 Specify the file name.
Do not enter a path. The upgrade file must be in the appropriate
directory on the TFTP server that the server has been configured to look
in.
The file name format is:
■
PS Hub 40 software upgrade — pshxx_yy.bin
■
PS Hub 50 software upgrade — psfxx_yy.bin
Where xx_yy is the version of agent software. You can specify multiple
file names (separated by spaces), to upgrade PS Hub 40 and
PS Hub 50 units in the stack at the same time, for example:
psh02_00.bin psf02_00.bin
4 Click OK.
Solving Problems
With Quick Config
Manager
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You cannot access the hub over a serial connection for the first
time. There may be a number of reasons for this:
■
For a successful local management connection, you need to use a
standard null modem cable, and have the hub’s console port set to
9600 baud or auto-configuration enabled. These are the default
settings. For information on the console port settings, refer to
“Changing the Console Port Settings” on page B-27.
■
It may be that you have made your management connection to a
serial port, on your management station, which is not the port
Quick Config Manager is using. Quick Config Manager uses COM1
as the default serial port. For information on changing this, refer to
“Running Quick Config Manager” on page B-4.
■
When using Quick Config Manager with Windows ‘95 and
managing through the console port, you must first disable FIFO
buffers in the Advanced Port Settings window in Windows ‘95.
For information on doing this, refer to “Through the Console Port”
on page 5-13.
■
There may be another application running on your management
station, that is using the management station’s serial (COM) port,
for example HyperTerminal.
B-30
APPENDIX B: MANAGEMENT USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
You cannot access the hub over the network for the first time.
Check that:
■
Your management station is correctly configured for IP.
■
The port through which your communication reaches the stack must
be connected to segment 1 (either directly or indirectly) of the hub
with the IP address configured. For more information, refer to
“Requirements for Managing Over the Network” on page 5-6.
You lose your management connection while managing the
stack. If you have changed the community string of the access level
that you are using, you must enter the new community string in the
Community/Polling dialog box.
Reset the connection by selecting Reset View from the File menu.
If this does not work, it may be that Quick Config Manager’s line speed
has become unsynchronized with that of the hub. To resolve this
problem, make Quick Config Manager use a different speed by
changing the ‘SerialAttrib’ entry to SerialAttrib=COM1:line
speed,n,8,1 under the [slip] section of the QUICKMGR.INI file, and
restart Quick Config Manager.
You forget your community string. Contact your supplier.
You cannot access the stack using the web interface or CLI after
changing the community string. When you changed the community
string using the Edit Access Levels dialog box, the Device Password
and Password Confirmation fields were probably left blank, which has
blanked the password. Log on to the web interface or CLI using the
same user level but without a password, and change the password.
You cannot access the Load Balancing Tool. The Load Balancing
Tool only installs and runs on a Windows ‘95 or Windows NT system,
and only works when used over the network (in-band).
DUA1640-5AAA02
C
Introduction
SERIAL WEB UTILITY
If you are using a management station running Microsoft
Windows® ‘95 and want to access the web interface through the PS
Hub’s console port, you must use the 3Com serial web utility (SLIP
Driver) supplied on the CD-ROM that accompanies the hub.
Every time you want to access the web interface, use the serial web
utility to set up the connection to the web interface; it launches your
web browser and accesses the web interface using SLIP for you.
If you have any problems accessing the hub’s web interface using the
serial web utility, refer to “Solving Problems With the Serial Web
Utility” on page C-4.
Installing the
Serial Web Utility
The serial web utility can be installed on to a management station that
already has other Transcend management applications installed on it.
The default directory into which the serial web utility is installed is
C:\Program Files\3Com\3Com Serial Web.
This can be changed during the installation if required.
The installation program is a standard Windows based installation.
To install the serial web utility:
1 Start Windows ‘95.
If you already have an existing Transcend® management application
running, ensure that it is closed down.
2 Insert the CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.
3 Select Run from the Start menu.
C-2
APPENDIX C: SERIAL WEB UTILITY
4 In the Run dialog box, type drive:\Win95\Drivers\Slip\SETUP
(where drive is the letter of your CD-ROM drive) and click OK.
The installation program starts and checks your system configuration;
enter any information that’s requested.
If the setup program cannot find specific files on your management
station, it asks you to insert you Windows ‘95 CD-ROM. If it still cannot
find the files, you must obtain them directly from Microsoft. Contact
Microsoft for more information.
5 When the installation program has ensured all the relevant files are
installed, it asks you to select the COM port. This is the serial port on
your management station that you are going to use when connecting
to the hub’s console port.
If you click Advanced, the Advanced Configuration Parameters dialog
box is displayed, showing all of the settings the serial web utility will
use when it is run. These default settings are already correct for
connection to the hub so you should not need to change them.
The fields are:
Connection name Allows you to enter a name for the connection.
Modem name Allows you to enter a name for the modem connection.
PC SLIP Address The SLIP address that is to be allocated to the
management station. The default address is ‘192.168.101.2’.
Device URL The URL that the serial web utility uses to access the hub,
which includes the hub’s SLIP address. For example, the default SLIP
address for the hub is ‘192.168.101.1’ so the URL is:
http://192.168.101.1/
Flow Control None / XON/XOFF / Hardware RTS/CTS
Allows you to specify the flow control that the management station is
to use.
Data bits, Stop bits and Parity are all fixed.
Speed 1200 / 2400 / 4800 / 9600 / 19200
Allows you to specify the baud rate that the management station is to
use.
You also have the option of changing the PC SLIP Address, Device URL,
Flow Control and Speed after the installation is complete.
DUA1640-5AAA02
Using the Serial Web Utility
C-3
6 When you have finished, the final installation dialog box is displayed
informing you that the serial web utility has been installed on your
management station. Click Finish to close the dialog box.
7 You are asked if you want to restart Windows ‘95 so that it can use
the new settings you have configured. You must restart Windows ‘95
before running the serial web utility.
When you return to the Windows ‘95 desktop, the serial web utility
shortcut (‘Serial Web Management’) created by the installation program
is visible. The utility also has its own program group called ‘Serial Web’
under the default program group specified during the install, which
contains:
Using the Serial
Web Utility
■
Serial Web Management — Launches the serial web utility.
■
Serial Web Setup — Displays the Advanced Configuration
Parameters dialog box, which allows you to view and change some
of the settings the serial web utility uses when it is run.
■
License agreement.
Every time you want to access the web interface through a serial link,
make your management connection (refer to “Web Interface” on page
5-12) and use the serial web utility to set up your connection:
1 Either:
■
Double-click on the Serial Web Management shortcut.
■
Select the Serial Web Management program item in the Serial Web
program group.
2 The serial web utility opens and asks you if you want to use the URL
that has been set up. The URL includes the hub’s SLIP address. For
example, if the SLIP address for the hub is ‘192.168.101.1’, the URL is:
http://192.168.101.1/
If you want to change the URL, click URL. If the URL is correct, click
OK.
3 The serial web utility attempts to establish a connection.
If successful, the standard Windows ‘95 Dial-Up Networking dialog
box is displayed, showing the various connection details. Your default
web browser is then launched with the specified URL.
DUA1640-5AAA02
C-4
APPENDIX C: SERIAL WEB UTILITY
4 The connection is successful if the web interface’s password panel is
displayed. You are now ready to manage the hub or stack; refer to
Chapter 7.
Solving Problems
With the Serial
Web Utility
If you are unable to connect to the hub’s web interface, it may be that:
■
The hub is not turned on.
■
You are not using a proper null modem cable, refer to “Examples of
Null Modem Cables You Can Use” on page A-4.
■
The following settings are different on your hub and management
station:
■
Flow control.
■
Speed (baud rate).
■
The hub has automatically configured its communication speed, but
you have subsequently changed the speed configured on your
management station (the device only automatically configures the
speed the first time it connects).
■
You have selected the wrong COM port on your management
station.
To change some of the settings for the management station, use the
Advanced Configuration Parameters dialog box. To display this, select
the Serial Web Setup program item in the Serial Web program group.
DUA1640-5AAA02
D
AGENT UPGRADE UTILITY
The CD-ROM supplied with the hub has an agent upgrade utility on it
that can be used for upgrading the new version of agent software to
the PS Hub.
NOTE: You would only use this utility if a previous software upgrade
has failed and you are unable to communicate with your hubs using
the web interface or Quick Config Manager. At all other times you
should use the web interface or Quick Config Manager to upgrade
your hubs.
If you have any problems using the agent upgrade utility, refer to
“Solving Problems With the Agent Upgrade Utility” on page D-3.
Using the
Upgrade Utility
The upgrade utility works from an MS-DOS prompt. It upgrades one
hub at a time.
Upgrading a hub may take up to 5 minutes.
To upgrade agent software to a hub:
1 Connect your PC’s serial (COM) port to the hub’s console port, using a
null modem cable.
2 If you are using Microsoft Windows, exit out of it so that you are at the
MS-DOS prompt.
This utility must be run from MS-DOS. It cannot be used from an
MS-DOS Window within Microsoft Windows.
3 At the MS-DOS prompt, change your directory to the drive that is your
CD-ROM drive.
D-2
APPENDIX D: AGENT UPGRADE UTILITY
4 Enter the upgrade command:
■
PS Hub 40 software upgrade — update pshxx_yy.bin
■
PS Hub 50 software upgrade — update psfxx_yy.bin
Where xx_yy is the version of agent software. The version of agent
software on the CD-ROM is the current version that was in the hub
originally. View the contents of the CD-ROM to see the filename for
this version of agent software.
You can also use the following parameter with the upgrade command
to specify the serial (COM) port to use for the PC. The default for this
is COM 1:
-c 1 or -c 2
An example of the upgrade command with this parameter is:
update -c 1 pshxx_yy.bin
5 Power off the hub.
6 Press [Return].
7 Power on the hub immediately (within 5 seconds).
The utility transfers the agent software to the hub.
8 Repeat all of the steps for any other hubs that need upgrading.
DUA1640-5AAA02
Solving Problems With the Agent Upgrade Utility
Solving Problems
With the Agent
Upgrade Utility
D-3
If you have any problems using the upgrade utility, use the following
actions to solve your problems.
An error occurred when the utility tried to connect through the
PC’s serial port. The serial port being used is not the same as the
serial port specified in the upgrade command. Retry the command
ensuring that you specify a value of ‘1’ or ‘2’ for the serial port.
An error occurred when the utility tried to communicate with
the hub. There could be a number of reasons for this:
■
The hub was not powered on within 5 seconds of pressing [Return]
(step 7).
■
The null modem cable is not connected to the hub’s COM port.
■
The null modem cable is not connected to the PC’s serial port, or
the serial port being used is not the same as the serial port specified
in the upgrade command.
■
The hub was not powered off and on as directed.
Retry the command ensuring that you follow all the steps.
An error occurred when the utility tried to open the agent
software file for reading. There could be two reasons for this:
■
The file specified in the upgrade command does not exist or is in a
different directory to the one given. Check the filename and its
location.
■
You do not have read access for the file. Check the file’s properties
using Explorer (in Windows 95) or File Manager (in other versions of
Windows).
The error message USAGE: update [-c comport] filename
is returned. You have not specified the correct number of parameters
for the upgrade command. Retry with the correct parameters.
DUA1640-5AAA02
D-4
APPENDIX D: AGENT UPGRADE UTILITY
An error occurred when the utility tried to transfer the file.
There could be a number of reason for this:
■
The null modem cable has become disconnected from the hub or
the PC during the file transfer. Reconnect the cable and start again.
■
Power to the hub has been disrupted during the file transfer. Check
the power connection to the hub and start again.
■
An incorrect file has been specified and transferred to the hub.
Check the filenames and start again.
■
The utility must be run from MS-DOS. It cannot be used from an
MS-DOS Window within Microsoft Window.
DUA1640-5AAA02
E
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
3Com provides easy access to technical support information through a
variety of services. This appendix describes these services.
Information contained in this appendix is correct at time of
publication. For the very latest, we recommend that you access 3Com
Corporation’s World Wide Web site.
Online Technical
Services
World Wide Web Site
3Com offers worldwide product support 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week, through the following online systems:
■
World Wide Web site
■
3Com Bulletin Board Service (3ComBBS)
■
3ComFactsSM automated fax service
■
3ComForum on CompuServe® online service
Access the latest networking information on 3Com Corporation’s World
Wide Web site by entering our URL into your Internet browser:
http://www.3Com.com/
This service features the latest information about 3Com solutions and
technologies, customer service and support, news about the company,
technical publications, NetAge® Magazine, and more.
3Com Bulletin Board
Service
3ComBBS contains patches, software, and drivers for all 3Com
products, as well as technical articles. This service is available through
analog modem or digital modem (ISDN) 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
E-2
APPENDIX E: TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Access by Analog Modem
To reach the service by modem, set your modem to 8 data bits, no
parity, and 1 stop bit. Call the telephone number nearest you:
Country
Data Rate
Telephone Number
Australia
up to 14400 bps
61 2 9955 2073
Brazil
up to 14400 bps
55 11 547 9666
France
up to 14400 bps
33 1 6986 6954
Germany
up to 28800 bps
4989 62732 188
Hong Kong
up to 14400 bps
852 2537 5608
Italy (fee required)
up to 14400 bps
39 2 27300680
Japan
up to 14400 bps
81 3 3345 7266
Mexico
up to 28800 bps
52 5 520 7853
P. R. of China
up to 14400 bps
86 10 684 92351
Singapore
up to 14400 bps
65 534 5693
Taiwan
up to 14400 bps
886 2 377 5840
U.K.
up to 28800 bps
44 1442 438278
U.S.A.
up to 28800 bps
1 408 980 8204
Access by Digital Modem
ISDN users can dial in to 3ComBBS using a digital modem for fast
access up to 56 Kbps. To access 3ComBBS using ISDN, use the
following number:
408 654 2703
3ComFacts
Automated Fax
Service
3Com Corporation’s interactive fax service, 3ComFacts, provides data
sheets, technical articles, diagrams, and troubleshooting instructions on
3Com products 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
Call 3ComFacts using your Touch-Tone telephone using one of these
international access numbers:
Country
Telephone Number
Hong Kong
852 2537 5610
U.K.
44 1442 438279
U.S.A.
1 408 727 7021
DUA1640-5AAA02
Support from Your Network Supplier
E-3
Local access numbers are available within the following countries:
3ComForum on
CompuServe Online
Service
Country
Telephone
Number
Country
Telephone
Number
Australia
1800 678 515
Netherlands
06 0228049
Belgium
0800 71279
New Zealand
0800 446 398
Denmark
800 17319
Norway
800 11062
Finland
98 001 4444
Portugal
0505 442 607
France
05 90 81 58
Russia (Moscow only)
956 0815
Germany
0130 81 80 63
Singapore
800 6161 463
Hong Kong
800 933 486
Spain
900 964 445
Italy
1678 99085
Sweden
020 792954
Malaysia
1800 801 777
U.K.
0800 626403
3ComForum contains patches, software, drivers, and technical articles
about all 3Com products, as well as a messaging section for peer
support. To use 3ComForum, you need a CompuServe account.
To use 3ComForum:
1 Log on to your CompuServe account.
2 Type go threecom
3 Press [Return] to see the 3ComForum main menu.
Support from Your
Network Supplier
If additional assistance is required, contact your network supplier.
Many suppliers are authorized 3Com service partners who are qualified
to provide a variety of services, including network planning, installation,
hardware maintenance, application training, and support services.
When you contact your network supplier for assistance, have the
following information ready:
■
A list of system hardware and software, including revision levels
■
Diagnostic error messages
■
Details about recent configuration changes, if applicable
If you are unable to contact your network supplier, see the following
section on how to contact 3Com.
DUA1640-5AAA02
E-4
APPENDIX E: TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Support from 3Com
If you are unable to receive support from your network supplier,
technical support contracts are available from 3Com.
Contact your local 3Com sales office to find your authorized service
provider using one of these numbers:
Regional Sales Office
3Com Corporation
P.O. Box 58145
5400 Bayfront Plaza
Santa Clara, California
95052-8145
U.S.A.
3Com Asia Limited
Australia
P.R. of China
Hong Kong
India
Indonesia
Japan
Korea
Malaysia
New Zealand
Philippines
Singapore
Taiwan (R.O.C.)
Thailand
Telephone Number
800 NET 3Com or 1 408 764 5000
408 764 5001 (fax)
61 2 9937 5000 (Sydney)
61 3 9866 8022 (Melbourne)
8610 68492568 (Beijing)
86 21 63740220 Ext 6115
(Shanghai)
852 2501 1111
91 11 644 3974
6221 572 2088
81 6 536 3303 (Osaka)
81 3 3345 7251 (Tokyo)
822 2 319 4711
60 3 732 7910
64 9 366 9138
632 892 4476
65 538 9368
886 2 377 5850
662 231 8151 4
3Com Benelux B.V.
Belgium
Netherlands
32 2 725 0202
31 30 6029700
3Com Canada
Calgary
Montreal
Ottawa
Toronto
Vancouver
403
514
613
416
604
265
683
566
498
434
3266
3266
7055
3266
3266
Regional Sales Office
3Com GmbH
Austria
Czech Republic/Slovak
Republic
Germany
(Central European HQ)
Hungary
Poland
Switzerland
Telephone Number
43 1 513 4323
420 2 21845 800
49
49
36
48
41
30 34 98790 (Berlin)
89 627320 (Munich)
1 250 83 41
22 6451351
31 996 14 14
3Com Ireland
353 1 820 7077
3Com Latin America
U.S. Headquarters
Northern Latin America
Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Mexico
Peru
Venezuela
408 326 2093
305 261 3266 (Miami, Florida)
541 312 3266
55 11 546 0869
562 633 9242
571 629 4110
52 5 520 7841/7847
51 1 221 5399
58 2 953 8122
3Com Mediterraneo
Italy
Spain
39 2 253011 (Milan)
39 6 5279941 (Rome)
34 1 383 17 00
3Com Middle East
971 4 349049
3Com Nordic AB
Denmark
Finland
Norway
Sweden
45 39 27 85 00
358 0 435 420 67
47 22 18 40 03
46 8 632 56 00
3Com Russia
007 095 258 09 40
27 11 807 4397
44 131 220 8228 (Edinburgh)
44 161 873 7717 (Manchester)
44 162 889 7000 (Marlow)
3Com European HQ
49 89 627320
3Com Southern Africa
3Com France
33 1 69 86 68 00
3Com U.K. Ltd.
DUA1640-5AAA02
Returning Products for Repair
Returning Products
for Repair
E-5
Before you send a product directly to 3Com for repair, you must first
obtain a Return Materials Authorization (RMA) number. Products sent
to 3Com without RMA numbers will be returned to the sender
unopened, at the sender’s expense.
To obtain an RMA number, call or fax:
04/22/97
DUA1640-5AAA02
Country
Telephone Number
Fax Number
U.S.A. and Canada
1 800 876 3266, option 2
408 764 7120
Latin America
1 408 326 2927
408 764 7120
Europe, South Africa, and
Middle East
44 1442 438125
44 1442 435822
Elsewhere
1 408 326 2926
1 408 764 7120
GLOSSARY
10BASE-T
The IEEE 802.3 specification for Ethernet over Twisted Pair (TP) cabling.
active segment
switch
In a stack with multiple PS Hub 50 units, only one segment switch can
be active (called the active segment switch), the other segment
switches are disabled. See segment switch.
ageing
The process of removing unused learnt (non-permanent) addresses from
the switch database.
bandwidth
Information capacity, measured in bits per second (bps), that a channel
can transmit. The bandwidth of Ethernet is 10Mbps.
baud rate
BOOTP
bridge mode
broadcast
broadcast storm
The switching speed of a line. Also known as line speed.
The BOOTP protocol allows you to automatically map an IP address to a
given MAC address each time a device is started. In addition, the
protocol can assign the subnet mask and default gateway to a device.
One of the segment switch’s operating modes which conforms to the
IEEE 802.1d specification. Refers to the process of forwarding all
packets with unknown addresses to all of the segments (except the
segment that the packet was received from).
A message sent to all destination devices on the network.
Multiple simultaneous broadcasts that typically absorb available
bandwidth and can cause network failure.
cascaded segments
The segments that run up and down the stack by the cascade cables,
to which the PS Hubs’ internal segments connect (or are isolated from).
console port
The port on the PS Hub accepting a terminal or modem connector. It
changes the parallel arrangement of data within computers to the serial
form used on data transmission links. This port is most often used for
dedicated local management.
2
GLOSSARY
Ethernet
HTTP
A LAN specification developed jointly by Xerox, Intel and Digital
Equipment Corporation (DEC). Ethernet networks operate at 10Mbps
using CSMA/CD to run over cabling.
HyperText Transfer Protocol. The client/server protocol used to connect
servers on the World Wide Web.
Internet
The name given to a public network which spans the world and
consists of thousands of pieces of network equipment. If you connect
to the Internet, you can communicate with equipment and users across
the world. The Internet uses a set of protocols called TCP/IP. The World
Wide Web is part of the Internet.
Intranet
The name given to a large private network. Many businesses have
Intranets so their employees can exchange information between offices
in many countries. Employees are often given access to the Internet but
the Intranet is protected from external access by ‘firewalls’ (security
restrictions imposed on incoming traffic).
IP address
Internet protocol address. A unique identifier for a device attached to a
network using TCP/IP. The address is written as four octets separated
with full-stops (periods), and is made up of a network section, an
optional subnet section and a host section.
IPX
Internetwork Packet Exchange. A protocol allowing communication in a
NetWare network.
LAN
Local Area Network. A network of connected computing resources (for
example workstations, printers, servers) covering a relatively small
geographic area (usually not larger than a floor or building).
Characterized by high data rates and low error rates.
learnt address
An address in the switch database that has been learnt (stored) by the
segment switch. Unused learnt addresses are removed from the switch
database by the ageing process.
line speed
load balancing
See baud rate.
The process of configuring the segments in a stack of hubs so that
utilization is balanced across all the segments in the stack. This
produces more efficient segments, by distributing traffic evenly.
3
LOI mode
Local Office Interconnect. One of the segment switch’s operating
modes. Refers to the process of forwarding all packets with unknown
addresses to the 100Mbps port (the 100Mbps transceiver module).
main port
The port in a resilient link that carries data traffic in normal operating
conditions.
MIB
Management Information Base. Stores a device’s management
characteristics and parameters. MIBs are used by Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP) to contain attributes of their managed
systems. The PS Hub contains its own internal MIB.
multicast
permanent address
protocol
resilience
resilient link
RJ45
RMON
RPS
Single packets copied to a specific subset of network addresses. These
addresses are specified in the destination-address field of the packet.
An address in the switch database that has been made permanent.
Permanent addresses are not removed from the switch database by
the ageing process.
A set of rules for communication between devices on a network. The
rules dictate format, timing, sequencing and error control.
Tolerance. For example, the PS Hub’s cascaded cables make a stack of
PS Hubs resilient because you can power off a unit without it affecting
the other units in the stack. You can also build resilience into your
network by having extra equipment and cabling that carries your traffic
if other equipment and cabling fails. See resilient link.
A pair of ports that can be configured so that one will take over data
transmission should the other fail. See also main port and standby port.
Standard 8-wire connector for IEEE 802.3 10BASE-T networks.
Remote Monitoring. Subset of SNMP MIB II which allows monitoring
and management capabilities by addressing up to ten different groups
of information.
Redundant Power System. Part of the SuperStack II product range,
provides a backup source of power when connected to the PS Hub.
4
GLOSSARY
segment switch
The internal switch in a PS Hub 50. It connects the four cascaded
segments so that devices connected to the cascaded segments can
communicate through the segment switch. The segment switch works
by learning addresses and storing them in a switch database, which it
can refer to and selectively forward on information. The PS Hub 50
unit’s segment switch has two operating modes; LOI and bridge.
segments
The separate networks within a PS Hub to which the ports can be
switched. The segments can be connected to or isolate from the
cascade segments (which extend the segments across other PS Hubs).
SLIP
Serial Line Internet Protocol. A protocol which allows IP to run over a
serial line connection.
SmartAgent®
Intelligent management agents in devices and logical connectivity
systems that reduce the computational load on the network
management station and reduce management-oriented traffic on the
network.
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol. A protocol originally designed
to be used in managing TCP/IP internets. SNMP is presently
implemented on a wide range of computers and networking
equipment and may be used to manage many aspects of network and
end-station operation.
stack
A group of hubs which are connected together in such a way that they
function as a single logical repeater.
standby port
The port in a resilient link that takes over data transmission if the main
port in the link fails.
switch
switch database
TCP/IP
See segment switch.
The database that the PS Hub 50 unit’s segment switch uses to store
addresses in so that it can refer to it when forwarding network traffic.
The switch database can contain learnt addresses and permanent
addresses.
A layered set of communications protocols providing Telnet terminal
emulation, FTP file transfer, and other services for communication
among a wide range of computer equipment.
5
Telnet
TFTP
Transcend®
A TCP/IP application protocol that provides a virtual terminal service,
letting the user log in to another computer system and access a host as
if the user were connected directly to the host.
Trivial File Transfer Protocol. Allows you to transfer files (for example
software upgrades) from a remote device.
3Com’s management system used to manage all of 3Com’s
networking solutions.
UDP
User Datagram Protocol. An internet standard protocol that allows an
application program on one device to send a datagram to an
application program on another device.
URL
Uniform Resource Locator. A URL is a unique address of a Web page.
Using just the URL, your Web browser can find Web pages on the
World Wide Web.
VT100
A type of terminal which uses ASCII characters. VT100 screens have a
text-based appearance.
web
World Wide Web
See World Wide Web.
The World Wide Web (often known as the ‘Web’) is a global network
which is part of the Internet. It is made up of thousands of different
‘Web pages’ and ‘Web sites’ (collections of Web pages) which are
inter-linked. These Web pages are electronic pages of text and
graphics which can be viewed using a Web browser. Many businesses,
non-profit organizations and individuals have created Web pages and
sites which cover a wide range of information. All Web pages and sites
have a unique URL so that they can be located.
6
GLOSSARY
INDEX
Numerics
B
100Mbps transceiver module 2-6
10BASE-T
cable 3-4, 3-5, A-3
ports 3-2
using cables 3-11
3Com Bulletin Board Service (3ComBBS) E-1
3Com sales offices E-4
3Com URL E-1
3ComFacts E-2
3ComForum E-3
802.1 bridge mode 2-4
BABT approvals A-1
balancing the segments 4-1
baud rate 5-8, 7-14
before you start 3-4
benefits of switching 1-10
bitmap B-12
blanking plate 3-1
BOOTP 7-12
server B-10
box contents 3-4
brackets 3-9
bridge mode 2-4
browser 5-12
building up
network 1-4
workgroups 1-8
built-in
management 1-4
resilience 3-13
Bulletin Board Service E-1
A
about the hub 1-1
access
levels, default 6-3
method B-5
accessing
CLI 6-2
hub or stack B-8
web interface 7-1
active segment switch 2-4
Add Resilient Link page 7-23
adding hubs to the stack 1-10, 3-13
address, IP 5-7
adhesive labels 3-7
ageing 2-3
agent software
upgrading 7-24
version 7-11
agent upgrade utility D-1
approvals A-2
associated cascade segments 1-8
Attn LED 7-11
auto-configuration 5-8
automatic load balancing B-26
avoiding congestion 1-10
C
cables 3-4, 3-17
10BASE-T A-3
resilience 3-5
specifications A-3
capacity of the switch database 2-3
cascade
cables 1-8, 3-5, 3-13, A-6
ports 3-2
segments 1-8, B-14
units 3-13
cascaded segment switch 2-2
case vents 3-17
CD-ROM B-3
changing
COM port of the management station B-4
console port B-27
password 6-7, 7-19
speed B-27
character size 5-8
checking 3-17
2
INDEX
CLI 5-3, 5-8, 6-1
commands 6-7
colors, ports 7-10, B-13
COM port of the management station B-4
Command Line Interface 5-3, 5-8, 6-1
problems 8-3
commands, entering 6-5
community string B-8
Community/Polling dialog box B-8
components of the web interface 7-4
CompuServe E-3
Configuration pages 7-20
configuration, displaying 6-9
Configure menu
Community/Polling B-8
General Info B-15, B-17
IP Setup B-10
Load Balance B-18
Upgrade B-28
configuring
console port 7-14, B-27
IP 6-8, 7-12, B-9
load balancing B-18
multiple stacks B-4
resilient links 7-21, 7-22
segment switch 7-16, B-17
segments 1-8, 7-15, B-14
conformance standards A-2
congestion, avoiding 1-10
connecting
10BASE-T cable 3-11
different hubs 3-16
different hubs, switches and stacks 3-5
hubs together 3-12
management station 5-5
segment switch 7-16
segments 7-15, B-14
stacks 3-16
workstations 3-11
connection lost 5-11
connections 3-4
console port 3-2, 5-8, 5-13, A-6
cables A-4
configuring B-27
Console Port Configuration page 7-14
contents of the box 3-4
controlling the CLI 6-5
conventions
notice icons, About This Guide 2
text, About This Guide 3
correcting faults 8-1
creating flexible workgroups 1-9
crossover 10BASE-T cable 3-5, A-3
current utilization B-20
D
data bits 5-8
default
setting for segment switch 2-4
SLIP address 5-7
user names and passwords 6-3
default router 6-8, 7-12
defaults, returning to 6-11, 7-20
Device Access dialog box B-5
diagnostic LEDs 3-1
dialog box
Community/Polling B-8
device access B-5
IP Setup B-10
map B-5
Software Upgrade B-28
differences between the PS Hubs 2-1
different
hub, connecting 3-5, 3-16
stacks, configuring B-4
switch, connecting 3-5
dimensions A-1
disconnecting 10BASE-T cable 3-11
displaying information 6-9
distributed management 1-5
Documentation page 7-17
double-clicking B-14
downlink 2-7
port 2-3
download utility D-1
downloading new software to the stack B-28
E
easy setup option B-10
EMC A-2
emulator 5-9
entering commands 6-5
environment for operation A-1
equipment
connecting 3-11
that comes with the hub 3-4
Ethernet
address of the hub 3-7
repeater 1-1
rules 3-16
shared workgroups 1-10
example of workgrouping 1-11
expanding a network 1-6
external
links 7-5
switch,using 4-3
extra bits 3-4
INDEX
hub
F
factory defaults, returning to 6-11, 7-20
fast configuration of the stack 7-18
Fast Ethernet resilience 2-5
fault tolerance 1-5
fax service. See 3ComFacts
features 1-2, 1-8
feet 3-6
FIFO buffers 5-14
File menu
device access B-5
reset view B-4
Filter capture for RMON 6-12
finding cause of a problem 8-1
fixed ports and segments 4-3, B-23
flexible growth 1-5
flow control 7-14
frequent spot checks 3-17
functional standards A-2
future expansion 1-5
G
gateway, default 6-8
general information about the hub 1-1
Getting Started pages 7-18
graphical representation B-12
graphs 7-25, B-21
grouping users 1-8
growth, flexible 1-5
H
Health pages 7-25
help
CLI 6-5
Quick Config Manager B-1
web interface 7-17
holes, ventilation 3-10, 3-17
Hot Swap Cascade Units 3-13
hot swap functionality 3-13
how
hub segments work 1-8
load balancing works 4-2
PS Hub 50 transceiver module ports work 2-6
PS Hubs differ 2-1
how the segment switch works 2-3
how to use
hub 1-4
LEDs and ports 3-2
accessing B-8
connecting another PS Hub 3-12
connecting equipment 3-11
connections 3-5
double-clicking B-14
features 1-2
general information 1-1
graphical representation B-12
how you can use it 1-4
installing 3-6
IP address B-9
LEDs 3-1
load balancing 4-1
MAC address 3-7
management methods 5-5
managing 5-2
numbers 3-7
ports 3-1
positioning 3-6
powering on 3-17
problems 8-2
siting 3-6
upgrading B-28
using 3-1
wall mounting 3-8
what items the hub comes with 3-4
HyperTerminal application 5-9, 5-11
I
identifying
switched ports B-13
which ports are on a segment 7-10
inactivity 5-11
in-band management 5-5
increasing the number of user connections 1-5
information recycled ii
infrastructure 1-10
initial access 6-2
initialize 6-11
Initialize page 7-20
installing
hub 3-6
Load Balancing Tool B-2
Quick Config Manager B-2
using serial web utility C-1
internal
segment switch 2-2
segments 1-8
InterNIC 5-7
IP B-9
IP address 5-7, 7-12
obtaining 5-7
3
4
INDEX
IP information 7-12
configuring 6-8
displaying 6-9
IP Setup dialog box B-10
IP/IPX-based network management 5-5
application problems 8-5
isolating
problems 8-1
segment switch 7-16
segments 7-15, B-14
items that come with the hub 3-4
L
labels 3-7
learnt addresses 2-3
LEDs 3-1
lights 3-1
line speed 5-8, 7-14
link
external 7-5
main and standby 7-22
state 7-13
load balancing 1-10, 4-1, 7-20
how it works 4-2
Load Balancing Tool B-18
installing B-2
Local Office Interconnect mode 2-3
logging off from the CLI 6-3
logging on to the CLI 6-2
logical repeaters 3-16
login prompt 6-2
LOI mode 2-3
lost connection 5-11
M
MAC addresses 2-3, 3-7, 7-11, 7-16
main link 7-21, 7-22
management 5-1
access method B-5
built-in 1-4
categories 7-5
connections 5-5
distributed 1-5
features 1-3
methods 5-5
settings A-6
software 1-8
software, upgrading 7-24
tasks 5-2
Management Address page 7-12
Management Settings pages 7-17
management station 5-1
COM port B-4
managing
requirements 5-6
the hub 5-2
web interface 7-1
with Quick Config Manager B-1
map
Quick Config Manager B-5
web interface 7-6
MDI/MDIX switch 1-4, 1-6, 3-2, 3-5, 3-11, 3-16, 7-23
menu structure for CLI 6-4
messages 7-22
methods of management 5-5
migrating to higher performance 1-6, 2-7
modem 7-14
cables A-5
mounting 3-8
brackets 3-9
moving users 1-10
multiple
PS Hub 50 units 2-4
segment switches 2-4
stacks, configuring B-4
N
naming
segments 7-15, B-14
stack 7-19
network 1-8
address 5-7
building 1-4
expanding 1-6
growth 1-4
infrastructure 1-10
management 5-1
mask 7-12
supplier support E-3
network management station
connecting 5-5
settings A-6
new features 1-2
null modem cable A-4
number 3-7
unit 5-1
user connections, increasing 1-5
INDEX
O
obtaining an IP address 5-7
online
help B-1
help system and documentation 7-9, 7-17
technical services E-1
operating environment A-1
order numbers, cables A-6
other hubs, connecting 3-16
other stacks and hubs 1-6
out-of-band management 5-5
overview 1-1
P
page components 7-6
panel
Segment Configuration B-15
Switch Configuration B-17
parity 5-8
part number of the hub 3-7
partition state 7-13
parts of the web interface 7-4
password 6-2, 7-2
changing 6-7
default 6-3
Password Setting page 7-19
performing load balancing B-25
Permanent Address Management page 7-16
permanent addresses 2-3
pin numbering A-3
polling B-22
port 3-1
colors 7-10, B-13
connections 3-11
console A-6, B-27
fixing and unfixing B-24
state 3-16, 7-13
status 7-10
transceiver module 3-12
Port Setup page 7-13
port switching 1-4, 1-8
example 1-11
positioning your hub 3-6
power socket 3-2
Power System socket 3-1, 3-2
Power/Self Test LED 3-2, 8-1
powering on your equipment 3-17
problem solving 8-1
5
problems
using Command Line Interface 8-3
using IP/IPX-based network management
application 8-5
using Quick Config Manager B-29
using serial web utility C-4
using SNMP network management application 8-5
using the hub 8-2
using the web interface 8-4
product number
cables A-6
hub 3-7
PS Hub 40 transceiver module ports 2-2
PS Hub 50 1-6
PS Hub 50 segment switch 2-2
PS Hub 50 transceiver module port 2-6
Q
Quick Config Manager 5-3, 5-5, 5-13
installing B-2
map B-5
problems B-29
running B-4
starting B-4
using B-1
quick configuration of the stack 7-18
quick installation
connecting equipment 3-11
management software B-3
R
reasons to manage the hub 5-2
recycled information ii
Redundant Power System socket 3-1, 3-2
refreshing the Unit View 7-10
registered IP addresses 5-7
related standards A-2
reliability A-2
removing a hub from the stack 3-13
requirements
managing over the network 5-6
reset 6-10
Reset page 7-20
reset view B-4
resilience 3-13
cascade cables 3-5
Fast Ethernet 2-5
resilient links 7-22
Resilient Links page 7-21
returning
products for repair E-5
stack to factory defaults 6-11
RJ45 ports 3-2
6
INDEX
RMON B-21
Filter capture 6-12
router, default 6-8, 7-12
RPS
icon B-13
socket 3-1, 3-2
rubber feet 3-6
rules
Ethernet 3-16
resilient links 7-23
rules for managing over the network 5-6
running
Quick Config Manager B-4
S
scalable 1-4
screen map B-5
seeing how the hub is operating 3-1
Segment Configuration page 7-15
Segment Configuration panel B-15
Segment Graph page 7-25
segment switch 2-2
active 2-4
colors 7-10
configuration 7-16
configuring B-17
icon B-13
segmentation
benefits 1-10
how it works 1-8
segments 1-8
configuring B-14
connecting B-14
fixing and unfixing B-23
graphs 7-25
identifying ports B-13
identifying which ports are part of it 7-10
isolating B-14
LEDs 3-2
load balancing 4-1
naming B-14
selecting management access method B-5
self test 3-17, 8-1
self-adhesive rubber feet 3-6
self-selecting switch mode 2-3
separate networks 1-8
serial access C-1
serial number of the hub 3-7
serial web utility C-1
server B-29
setting up
IP information 6-8
online help system and documentation 7-9
settings
console port 5-8
displaying 6-9
management station A-6
shared Ethernet workgroups 1-10
sheet of labels 3-7
siting your hub 3-6
SLIP
address 5-7, 6-8
driver C-1
subnet mask 6-8
small network
building 1-4
SNMP 5-5
network management application
problems 8-5
socket
power 3-2
Redundant Power System 3-1, 3-2
software 1-8
upgrade for stack B-28
upgrading 7-24
Software Upgrade dialog box B-28
Software Upgrade page 7-24
software version 7-11
solving problems 8-1
specifications A-1
speed, console port 7-14
spot checks 3-17
stack 5-1
accessing B-8
connecting 3-5, 3-16
information, displaying 6-10
management 5-1
name 7-19
resilience 3-13
upgrading B-28
Stack/Attn LED 3-2
standards A-2
standby link 7-21, 7-22
starting Quick Config Manager B-4
status LEDs 3-2
sticky labels 3-7
stop bit 5-8
straight-through 10BASE-T cable 3-4, 3-5, A-3
subnet mask 5-7, 6-8
summary of differences between the PS Hubs 2-1
SuperStack hubs 3-16
switch
configuring B-17
connections 3-5
database 2-3
icon B-13
Switch Configuration page 7-16
Switch Configuration panel B-17
INDEX
switching 1-8, 2-2
benefits 1-10
features 2-3
how it works 1-8
identifying ports B-13
System Name page 7-19
T
tasks, management 5-2
technical support
3Com URL E-1
Bulletin Board Service E-1
fax service E-2
network suppliers E-3
product repair E-5
using CompuServe E-3
Telnet 5-5, 5-11
terminal 5-5
Terminal application 5-10
terminal emulator 5-5, 5-9
TFTP server 7-24, B-29
tolerance to faults 1-5
transceiver module 1-6, 3-12
blanking plate 3-1
slots 3-2
transceiver module ports 3-12
PS Hub 40 2-2
PS Hub 50 2-6
Transcend Quick Configuration Manager 5-3
traps 7-22
trouble shooting 8-1
using
10BASE-T cable 3-11
agent upgrade utility D-1
cascade cables 3-14
CLI 6-4
Command Line Interface 6-1
external switch 4-3
Hot Swap Cascade Units 3-15
hub 3-1
labels 3-7
LEDs 3-2
network management 5-1
ports 3-2
Quick Config Manager B-1
rubber feet 3-6
serial web utility C-1
Telnet terminal emulator 5-11
terminal emulator 5-9
transceiver modules 3-12
web interface 7-1
utilization history B-21
V
ventilation holes 3-10, 3-17
version of agent software 7-11
View menu
Update Zoom B-12
Zoom In B-12
viewing
current utilization B-20
operation of the hub 3-1
utilization history B-21
visual checks 3-17
U
unfixing ports and segments B-23
unit number 5-1
Unit pages 7-10
Unit Status page 7-11
Unit View 7-10
upgrade utility D-1
upgrading
stack B-28
upgrading the stack’s management software 7-24
URL 7-2, E-1
user name 7-2
default 6-3
users
grouping 1-8
increasing the number of connections 1-5
W
wake-up procedure 6-2
wall mounting 3-8
ways you can manage 5-5
web
address 7-2
browser 5-5, 5-12
help system 7-9, 7-17
web interface 5-3, 5-12
map 7-6
problems 8-4
using 7-1
what the hub comes with 3-4
why manage the hub 5-2
window
Load Balancing Tool B-18
map B-5
Windows 5-1, 5-14
7
8
INDEX
workgroups 1-4, 1-7
building up 1-8
example 1-11
workstation connections 3-4
World Wide Web (WWW) E-1
Z
Zoom View B-8, B-12, B-16
3Com Corporation
For first five years
LIMITED WARRANTY
+5 Lifetime Limited Warranty
The SuperStack II PS Hub 40 (3C16405 and 3C16450) and PS Hub 50 (3C16450) benefit from 3Com’s
enhanced +5 Lifetime Limited Warranty. This provides a full 5 years of advanced hardware exchange from
your date of purchase in accordance with 3Com’s standard terms and conditions. To qualify, you must
submit your warranty registration card to 3Com. After the initial 5 year period, the warranty reverts to
3Com’s standard lifetime limited warranty. The +5 Lifetime Limited Warranty is not offered or is void
where restricted or prohibited by law.
After first five years
Limited Lifetime Warranty
The duration of the 3Com standard lifetime limited warranty is lifetime, excluding the power supply and
fans. See below for terms and conditions of this warranty.
HARDWARE
3Com warrants its hardware products to be free from defects in workmanship and materials, under
normal use and service, for the following lengths of time from the date of purchase from 3Com or its
Authorized Reseller:
Network adapters
Lifetime
Other Hardware products
One year (unless otherwise specified above)
Spare parts and spare kits
90 days
If a product does not operate as warranted above during the applicable warranty period, 3Com shall, at
its option and expense, repair the defective product or part, deliver to Customer an equivalent product or
part to replace the defective item, or refund to Customer the purchase price paid for the defective
product. All products that are replaced will become the property of 3Com. Replacement products may be
new or reconditioned. Any replaced or repaired product or part has a ninety (90) day warranty or the
remainder of the initial warranty period, whichever is longer.
3Com shall not be responsible for any software, firmware, information, or memory data of Customer
contained in, stored on, or integrated with any products returned to 3Com for repair, whether under
warranty or not.
SOFTWARE
3Com warrants that the software programs licensed from it will perform in substantial conformance to the
program specifications therefor for a period of ninety (90) days from the date of purchase from 3Com or
its Authorized Reseller. 3Com warrants the media containing software against failure during the warranty
period. No updates are provided. 3Com's sole obligation with respect to this express warranty shall be (at
3Com's discretion) to refund the purchase price paid by Customer for any defective software products, or
to replace any defective media with software which substantially conforms to 3Com's applicable published
specifications. Customer assumes responsibility for the selection of the appropriate applications program
and associated reference materials. 3Com makes no warranty or representation that its software products
will work in combination with any hardware or applications software products provided by third parties,
that the operation of the software products will be uninterrupted or error free, or that all defects in the
software products will be corrected. For any third party products listed in the 3Com software product
documentation or specifications as being compatible, 3Com will make reasonable efforts to provide
compatibility, except where the non-compatibility is caused by a “bug” or defect in the third party's
product.
STANDARD WARRANTY
SERVICE
Standard warranty service for hardware products may be obtained by delivering the defective product,
accompanied by a copy of the dated proof of purchase, to 3Com's Corporate Service Center or to an
Authorized 3Com Service Center during the applicable warranty period. Standard warranty service for
software products may be obtained by telephoning 3Com's Corporate Service Center or an Authorized
3Com Service Center, within the warranty period. Products returned to 3Com's Corporate Service Center
must be pre-authorized by 3Com with a Return Material Authorization (RMA) number marked on the
outside of the package, and sent prepaid, insured, and packaged appropriately for safe shipment. The
repaired or replaced item will be shipped to Customer, at 3Com's expense, not later than thirty (30) days
after receipt of the defective product by 3Com.
WARRANTIES EXCLUSIVE
IF A 3COM PRODUCT DOES NOT OPERATE AS WARRANTED ABOVE, CUSTOMER'S SOLE REMEDY FOR
BREACH OF THAT WARRANTY SHALL BE REPAIR, REPLACEMENT, OR REFUND OF THE PURCHASE PRICE
PAID, AT 3COM'S OPTION. TO THE FULL EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW, THE FOREGOING WARRANTIES AND
REMEDIES ARE EXCLUSIVE AND ARE IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, TERMS, OR CONDITIONS,
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, EITHER IN FACT OR BY OPERATION OF LAW, STATUTORY OR OTHERWISE,
INCLUDING WARRANTIES, TERMS, OR CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE, AND SATISFACTORY QUALITY. 3COM NEITHER ASSUMES NOR AUTHORIZES ANY OTHER
PERSON TO ASSUME FOR IT ANY OTHER LIABILITY IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION,
MAINTENANCE OR USE OF ITS PRODUCTS.
3COM SHALL NOT BE LIABLE UNDER THIS WARRANTY IF ITS TESTING AND EXAMINATION DISCLOSE
THAT THE ALLEGED DEFECT IN THE PRODUCT DOES NOT EXIST OR WAS CAUSED BY CUSTOMER'S OR
ANY THIRD PERSON'S MISUSE, NEGLECT, IMPROPER INSTALLATION OR TESTING, UNAUTHORIZED
ATTEMPTS TO REPAIR OR MODIFY, OR ANY OTHER CAUSE BEYOND THE RANGE OF THE INTENDED USE,
OR BY ACCIDENT, FIRE, LIGHTNING, OR OTHER HAZARD.
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY
TO THE FULL EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW 3COM ALSO EXCLUDES FOR ITSELF AND ITS SUPPLIERS ANY
LIABILITY, WHETHER BASED IN CONTRACT OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE), FOR INCIDENTAL,
CONSEQUENTIAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR PUNITIVE DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, OR FOR LOSS OF REVENUE
OR PROFITS, LOSS OF BUSINESS, LOSS OF INFORMATION OR DATA, OR OTHER FINANCIAL LOSS ARISING
OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE, USE, PERFORMANCE,
FAILURE, OR INTERRUPTION OF ITS PRODUCTS, EVEN IF 3COM OR ITS AUTHORIZED RESELLER HAS BEEN
ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES, AND LIMITS ITS LIABILITY TO REPAIR, REPLACEMENT,
OR REFUND OF THE PURCHASE PRICE PAID, AT 3COM'S OPTION. THIS DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY FOR
DAMAGES WILL NOT BE AFFECTED IF ANY REMEDY PROVIDED HEREIN SHALL FAIL OF ITS ESSENTIAL
PURPOSE.
Some countries, states, or provinces do not allow the exclusion or limitation of implied warranties or the
limitation of incidental or consequential damages for certain products supplied to consumers or the
limitation of liability for personal injury, so the above limitations and exclusions may be limited in their
application to you. This warranty gives you specific legal rights which may vary depending on local law.
GOVERNING LAW
This Limited Warranty shall be governed by the laws of the state of California.
3Com Corporation, 5400 Bayfront Plaza, Santa Clara, CA, 95052-8145, U.S.A. Tel: (408) 764-5000
9/1/96
EMC STATEMENTS
FCC STATEMENT
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant
to part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates,
uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a
residential area is likely to cause harmful interference to radio communications, in which case the user will
be required to correct the interference at their own expense.
CSA STATEMENT
This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment
Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur
du Canada.
VCCI STATEMENT
INFORMATION TO THE USER
If this equipment does cause interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by
turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or
more of the following measures:
— Reorient the receiving antenna.
— Relocate the equipment with respect to the receiver.
— Move the equipment away from the receiver.
— Plug the equipment into a different outlet so that equipment and receiver are on different branch
circuits.
If necessary, the user should consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for additional
suggestions. The user may find the following booklet prepared by the Federal Communications
Commission helpful:
How to Identify and Resolve Radio-TV Interference Problems
This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, Stock No.
004-000-00345-4.
In order to meet FCC emissions limits, this equipment must be used only with cables which comply with
IEEE 802.3.