3Com 3C16710 Switch User Manual

16710.bk : FRONT.FRM Page 1 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
OFFICECONNECT® HUB 8/TPM
3C16710
USER GUIDE
Part No.
DUA1671-0AAA03
Published
October 1997
16710.bk : FRONT.FRM Page 2 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
3Com Corporation
■
5400 Bayfront Plaza
■
Santa Clara, California
■
95052-8145
© 3Com Technologies, 1997. All rights reserved. No part of this
documentation may be reproduced in any form or by any means
or used to make any derivative work (such as translation,
transformation, or adaptation) without permission from 3Com
Technologies. 3Com Technologies reserves the right to revise this
documentation and to make changes in content from time to time
without obligation on the part of 3Com Technologies to provide
notification of such revision or change. 3Com Technologies
provides this documentation without warranty of any kind, either
implied or expressed, including, but not limited to, the implied
warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.
3Com may make improvements or changes in the product(s)
and/or the program(s) described in this documentation at any
time.
For civilian agencies: Restricted Rights Legend: Use, reproduction
or disclosure is subject to restrictions set forth in subparagraph (a)
through (d) of the Commercial Computer Software - Restricted
Rights Clause at 48 C.F.R. 52.227-19 and the limitations set forth in
3Com Corporation’s standard commercial agreement for the
software. Unpublished rights reserved under the copyright laws of
the United States.
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT LEGENDS:
If you are a United States government agency, then this
documentation and the software described herein are provided to
you subject to the following restricted rights:
Unless otherwise indicated, 3Com registered trademarks are
registered in the United States and may or may not be registered
in other countries.
For units of the Department of Defense: Restricted Rights
Legend: Use, duplication or disclosure by the Government is
subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c) (1) (ii) for
restricted Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software clause
at 48 C.F.R. 52.227-7013. 3Com Technologies, c/o 3Com Centre,
Boundary Way, Hemel Hempstead, Herts, HP2 7YU, UK.
If there is any software on removable media described in this
documentation, it is furnished under a license agreement included
with the product as a separate document, in the hard copy
documentation, or on the removable media in a directory file
named LICENSE.TXT. If you are unable to locate a copy, please
contact 3Com and a copy will be provided to you.
3Com, OfficeConnect, NetAge, SmartAgent and Transcend are
registered trademarks of 3Com Corporation. 3ComFacts and
Ask3Com are service marks of 3Com Corporation.
CompuServe is a registered trademark of CompuServe, Inc.
Windows
is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. VT100 is a
registered trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation.
Other brand and product names may be registered trademarks or
trademarks of their respective holders.
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CONTENTS
IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
CREATING YOUR NETWORK
YOUR HUB ADDRESSES
LEDs and Ports 2-1
Before You Start 2-4
Positioning the OfficeConnect Hub 2-5
Using the Rubber Feet and Stacking Clips 2-6
Wall Mounting the OfficeConnect Hub 2-7
Connecting Workstations and Other Equipment to Your
Hub 2-7
Connecting OfficeConnect Hubs Together 2-8
Spot Checks 2-11
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
ABOUT NETWORK MANAGEMENT
Introduction 1
How to Use This Guide 1
Conventions 2
3Com Network Management 3-1
Why Manage Your Hub? 3-2
Connecting to the Hub and Managing 3-3
Managing Through the Console Port 3-4
Managing Over the Network 3-6
Remote Management Service 3-7
WICHTIGE SICHERHEITSHINWEISE
L’INFORMATION DE SÉCURITÉ IMPOR TANTE
INTRODUCTION
Networking Terminology 1-2
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MANAGING YOUR HUB
USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
Installing Quick Config Manager 4-1
Installation Requirements 4-1
Installation Procedure 4-2
Running Quick Config Manager 4-2
Configuring Multiple Hubs 4-3
Quick Config Manager Window Map 4-3
Accessing the Hub 4-6
Giving the Hub an IP Address 4-7
Resetting the Hub 4-11
Initializing the Hub 4-11
Viewing the Hub 4-12
Displaying Information About the Hub 4-13
Setting Up the Alert LED 4-15
Monitoring 4-18
Monitoring Activity and Errors Statistics 4-19
Frame Types Statistics 4-21
Network Traffic Statistics 4-22
Network Errors Statistics 4-23
Configuring a Port 4-25
Hub Security 4-28
Configuring Security at Port Level 4-29
Configuring Security at Hub Level 4-31
Resilience 4-33
Setting Up a Resilient Link Pair 4-34
Using the Hub to Monitor Other Devices 4-37
Additional Management 4-39
ADDITIONAL MANAGEMENT USING VT100
VT100 User Interface 5-1
Screens 5-1
Screen Components 5-2
Special Keystrokes 5-3
Repeater, Unit and Port Screens 5-4
Screen Map 5-4
Getting Started 5-6
Main Banner 5-6
Logon 5-7
Main Menu 5-9
Logoff 5-9
Auto Logout 5-9
Configuring and Viewing Setup Information 5-10
Setting Up Traps 5-12
Connecting a Modem to the Console Port 5-13
Configuring Local Security 5-15
Configuring Users 5-17
Creating Users 5-17
Editing Users 5-18
Deleting Users 5-19
Polling a Remote Device 5-19
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Viewing Internal Version Numbers 5-20
Downloading a Software Upgrade 5-21
How IP Addresses Work B-3
Assigning IP Addresses to a Small, Contained
Network B-5
IPX Addresses B-6
PROBLEM SOLVING
Isolating a Problem 6-1
Problems When Using Your Hub 6-2
Problems When Using Quick Config Manager 6-3
Problems When Using VT100 6-3
Problems When Using an IP/IPX-based Management
Application 6-4
DIMENSIONS, STANDARDS AND CABLING
Dimensions and Operating Environment A-1
BABT Approval (for U.K. Users Only) A-1
Standards A-1
Cabling A-2
10BASE-T A-2
Console Port A-3
IP AND IPX ADDRESSES
IP Addresses B-1
Obtaining a Network Number B-2
TECHNICAL SUPPOR T
Online Technical Services C-1
World Wide Web Site C-1
3Com Bulletin Board Service C-1
3ComFacts Automated Fax Service C-2
3ComForum on CompuServe Online Service C-3
Support from Your Network Supplier C-4
Support from 3Com C-4
Returning Products for Repair C-6
INDEX
LIMITED LIFETIME WARRANTY
EMC STATEMENTS
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16710.bk : IMSAFETY.FRM Page 7 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
WARNING: Warnings contain directions that you
must follow for your personal safety. Follow all
instructions carefully.
■
This unit operates under SELV conditions (Safety
Extra Low Voltage) according to IEC 950, the
conditions of which are maintained only if the
equipment to which it is connected is also
operational under SELV.
■
There are no user-replaceable fuses or
user-serviceable parts inside the hub. If you have a
physical problem with the unit that cannot be solved
with problem solving actions in this guide, contact
your supplier.
■
Disconnect the power adapter before moving the
unit.
Please read carefully the following information
before installing the OfficeConnect® hub:
■
Exceptional care must be taken during installation
and removal of the unit.
■
Only stack the OfficeConnect hub with other
OfficeConnect units.
■
Only use the power adapter that is supplied with the
unit to ensure compliance with international safety
standards.
■
It is essential that the power outlet is located near
the unit and is accessible. You can only remove
power to the OfficeConnect hub by disconnecting
the power adapter from the unit or from the socket
outlet.
WARNING: Twisted Pair RJ45 ports. These are
shielded RJ45 data sockets. They cannot be used as
telephone sockets. Only connect RJ45 data
connectors to these sockets.
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WICHTIGE SICHERHEITSHINWEISE
ACHTUNG: Die Warnungen enthalten Anweisungen,
die Sie zur eigenen Sicherheit zu befolgen haben.
■
Dieser Hub arbeitet mit SELV-Spannung (Safety Extra
Low Voltage, Sicherheitskleinspannung) gemäß
IEC950. Diese Bedingungen werden nur eingehalten,
wenn die Geräte mit denen der Hub verbunden ist
ebenfalls mit SELV-Spannung arbeiten.
■
Es sind keine von dem Benutzer zu ersetzende oder
zu wartende Teile in dem Gerät vorhanden. Wenn Sie
ein Problem mit dem Hub haben, das nicht mittels
der Fehleranalyse in dieser Anleitung behoben
werden kann, setzen Sie sich mit Ihrem Lieferanten in
Verbindung.
■
Bevor der Hub ausgebaut wird ist das Netzteil zu
ziehen.
Lesen Sie bitte die folgenden Informationen
sorgfältig durch, bevor Sie den Hub einbauen:
■
Auf besondere Vorsicht muß während des Ein- und
Ausbaus des Hubs geachtet werden.
■
Stapeln Sie den Hub nur mit anderen OfficeConnect
Hubs zusammen.
■
Verwenden Sie nur das mit dem Hub mitgelieferte
Netzteil um die internationalen Sicherheitsstandards
zu erfüllen.
■
Die Netzsteckdose muß sich in unmittelbarer Nähe
des Hubs befinden und frei zugänglich sein. Sie
können den Hub nur spannungsfrei schalten, indem
Sie das Steckernetzteil aus der Netzsteckdose ziehen
oder die Verbindung zum Gerät unterbrechen.
ACHTUNG: gedrehte paarfache RJ45 Anschlüsse.
Es sind abgeschirmte RJ45 Datenanschlußbuchsen.
Sie dürfen nicht als Telefonanschluß verwendet
werden. Verbinden Sie nur RJ45 Datenstecker mit
diesen Anschlüssen.
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L’INFORMATION DE SÉCURITÉ IMPORTANTE
AVERTISSEMENT: Les avertissements contiennent
les instructions que vous devez suivre pour votre
sécurité personnelle. Suivre toutes les instructions
avec soin.
Veuillez lire à fond l’information suivante avant
d’installer le moyeu:
■
Le soin exceptionnel doit être pris pendant
l’installation et l’enlèvement du moyeu.
■
Seulement entasser le moyer avec les autres moyeux
OfficeConnects.
■
Seulement utiliser la pièce de raccordement
d’alimentation qui est fournie avec le moyeu pour
assurer la conformité avec les normes de sécurité
internationales.
■
C’est essentiel que le socle de prise de courant du
réseau soit localisé proche du moyeu et soit
accessible. Vous pouvez seulement enlever
l’alimentation au moyeu en débranchant la pièce de
raccordement d’alimentation de l’unité ou du socle
de prise de courant.
■
Ce moyeu fonctionne sous les conditiones SELV
(Sécurité du Voltage le plus Bas) d’après IEC950, les
conditions desquelles sont maintenues seulement si
le matériel à qui il est branché est aussi en
exploitation sous SELV.
■
Il n’y a pas de parties remplaceables par les
utilisateurs ou entretenues par les utilisateurs à
l’intérieur du moyeu. Si vous avez un problème
physique avec le moyeu qui ne peut pas être résolu
avec les actions de la résolution des problèmes dans
ce guide, contacter votre fournisseur.
■
Débrancher la pièce de raccordement d’alimentation
avant de remuer le moyeu.
AVERTISSEMENT: Les ports RJ45 de paire tordue.
Ceux-ci sont les socles de données RJ45 blindés. Ils ne
peuvent pas être utilisés comme socles de téléphone.
Seulement brancher les connecteurs de données RJ45
à ces socles.
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YOUR HUB ADDRESSES
Using Quick Config Manager, you can configure
address information for your hub, which affects the
way you can manage it. It is important that you note
down this information as you may need to enter it
when managing the hub again. Use this page to
note down your settings.
If you initialize the hub, the address settings are
retained to allow you to continue managing the
hub. If you want to return the hub to its default
address settings, you must enter them manually.
For information on configuring the hub’s address
settings, see “Giving the Hub an IP Address” on
page 4-7.
Parameter
Default
Device
Name
3Com
Emergency
Contact
3Com
Support
Contract
3Com
IP Address
0.0.0.0
Subnet
Mask
0.0.0.0
Serial Line
IP Address
192.168.101.1
Subnet
Mask
255.255.255.0
Router
IP Address
0.0.0.0
Manager
IP Address
0.0.0.0
Your Setting
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ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Introduction
This guide describes how to set up and manage the
OfficeConnect® Hub 8/TPM. The hub is ready for use
in your network. It does not require management to
get it working. Management simply allows you to
perform additional network functions, for example
monitoring your network and adding security.
This guide is written for users who are new to
networking. If you are going to manage your
network for the first time, it is possible you may
make mistakes. We have tried to identify the likely
errors you may make and have provided hints and
tips to help you recover from these situations. If you
are already familiar with network management, you
may be able to skip some of the information in this
guide and use the information given for reference
purposes.
There is a Quick Reference Guide accompanying this
guide. It contains some useful information from this
guide which you may need to refer to regularly.
How to Use This Guide
This table shows where to find specific information:
If you are looking for information on:
Turn to:
The hub and networking terms
Chapter 1
Creating your network
Chapter 2
What you can do with management and the
different ways you can manage your hub
Chapter 3
Managing your hub using 3Com’s Transcend®
Quick Configuration Manager
Chapter 4
Additional management using VT100
Chapter 5
Problem solving
Chapter 6
Dimensions, standards and cabling
Appendix A
Network addressing (IP/IPX)
Appendix B
The OfficeConnect product range, obtaining
technical support, and 3Com repair services
Appendix C
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2
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
The text conventions that are used in this guide are:
Conventions
The icon conventions that are used in this guide are:
Icon
Type
Description
Information Note
Information notes call attention to
important features or instructions.
Caution
Cautions alert you to personal
safety risk, system damage, or loss
of data.
Warning
Warnings alert you to the risk of
severe personal injury.
Convention
Description
“Enter” vs. “Type”
When the word “enter” is used in this
guide, it means type something, then
press the Return or Enter key. Do not press
the Return or Enter key when an
instruction simply says “type.”
Text represented as
This typeface is used to represent
screen display displays that appear on your screen, for
example:
Enter the IP address:
Text represented as
commands
This typeface is used to represent
commands that you enter, for example:
191.0.0.172
Keys
When specific keys are referred to in the
text, they are called out by their labels,
such as “the Return key” or “the Escape
key,” or they may be shown as [Return] or
[Esc].
If two or more keys are to be pressed
simultaneously, the keys are linked with a
plus sign (+), for example:
Press [Ctrl]+[Alt]+[Del].
Italics
Italics are used to denote new terms or
emphasis.
16710.bk : GETSTART.FRM Page 1 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
1
INTRODUCTION
Welcome to the world of networking with 3Com® .
In the modern business environment,
communication and sharing information is crucial.
Computer networks have proved to be one of the
fastest modes of communication but until now only
large businesses could afford the networking
advantage. The OfficeConnect® product range from
3Com changed this, bringing networks to the small
office.
The OfficeConnect Hub 8/TPM is ideal for creating a
small network. It is compact and attractively
designed for desktop use, and is part of the
OfficeConnect range which neatly stack together
with clips, providing a host of facilities, for example
print sharing and a network fax. For information on
these products, see “3Com provides easy access to
technical support information through a variety of
services. This appendix describes these services.” on
page C-1.
A single OfficeConnect hub allows you to create a
small network with up to eight workstations, as
shown in Figure 1-1.
Figure 1-1 Small Network Featuring OfficeConnect Hub And
Optional Print Server
If you need to connect more workstations, simply
connect and clip another OfficeConnect hub to form
16710.bk : GETSTART.FRM Page 2 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
1-2
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
a stack (each hub is a single repeater). The
OfficeConnect Hub 8/TPM has eight 10BASE-T ports
and a ninth 10BASE-2 (Coax) port. This guide helps
you get the most out of your hub.
Networking Terminology
A Network is a collection of workstations (for example,
IBM-compatible personal computers) and other
equipment (for example, printers), connected for the
purpose of exchanging information. Networks vary in
size, some are within a single room, others span
continents.
A Local Area Network (LAN) is a network, usually in an
office, that spans no more than a single site.
Ethernet is a type of LAN, referring to the technology used to
pass information around the network.
10BASE-T is the name given to the Ethernet protocol that
runs over Twisted Pair (TP) cable. The OfficeConnect
hub uses RJ45 type connectors for connecting your
network.
10BASE-2 is the name given to the Ethernet protocol that
runs over Coaxial cable.
A Network Loop occurs when two pieces of network
equipment are connected by more than one path.
Your hub detects this and Partitions (isolates) one
of its ports to break the loop.
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Networking Terminology
A Segment is the length of Ethernet cable connected to a
port, whether this cable is 10BASE-T, 10BASE-2
(Coax), or other type. When you daisy-chain
equipment together with 10BASE-2 (Coax) cable, all
of the cable forms a single segment.
Packets are the units of information your workstations and
other equipment send to each other over the
network. A Frame is the data part of a packet. It is
the information that is seen by the hub.
Collisions are a part of normal Ethernet operation and occur
if two or more devices attempt to transmit at the
same time. A sudden sustained increase in the
number of collisions can indicate a problem with a
device, particularly if it is not accompanied by a
general increase in traffic. On coaxial segments an
increase in collisions can also indicate faulty cabling.
Device is a term that is usually used to refer to a piece of
network equipment. Every device has a unique
address that is used to identify it on the network.
1-3
SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) is a
protocol that controls how a management station
gains information from a device. SNMP provides:
■
■
■
A set of rules that define how a management
station can communicate with a device.
A MIB (Management Information Base) that
defines what information can be obtained from
the device by the management station. Every
SNMP-manageable device has a MIB, which is a
list of information about it.
Unsolicited messages called Traps, which work
differently to the usual request/reply
management communication. You can
configure a device so that it generates a trap if a
certain condition occurs, for example a port
partitioning. The trap is sent to the management
station to inform it of the occurrence.
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1-4
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
IP (Internet Protocol) is a data communication protocol
used to connect computers and data equipment into
computer networks. It is used on a large international
network called the Internet, which is composed of
universities, government facilities, research
institutions and private companies. IPX is a Novell
Netware protocol that performs a similar function to
IP.
SLIP (Serial Line Internet Protocol) allows you to run the IP
protocol over a serial line connection.
VT100 is a type of terminal which uses ASCII characters.
VT100 screens have a text-based appearance.
Telnet is a network application which enables a workstation
to connect to a device as if it were a terminal, such as
VT100. It is provided as part of IP and is commonly
available with SNMP network management.
A Modem (Modulator-Demodulator) is a piece of equipment
used for transmitting computer data over telephone
lines.
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2
CREATING YOUR NETWORK
All of the products in the OfficeConnect® range are
designed for ease of use. This chapter describes how
to use your OfficeConnect Hub 8/TPM to create your
network, and has information on:
■
The hub’s LEDs and ports
■
What you need to create your network
■
Where to site the hub
■
Using the rubber feet and stacking clips
■
Wall mounting the hub
■
Connecting your workstations and other equipment
to the hub
■
Connecting your hub to other OfficeConnect hubs
LEDs and Ports
The hub features diagnostic LEDs and easy to use
ports.
The LEDs are shown in Figure 2-1, and are used for:
■
Showing you how the hub and its ports are
operating
■
Showing you how much your network is being used
■
Alerting you to a potential problem with your
network
The ports are shown in Figure 2-2, and are used for:
■
Connecting workstations and other equipment to
your hub
■
Connecting your hub to another OfficeConnect hub
■
Connecting a management station to your hub
Figure 2-1 and Figure 2-2 also appear on the Quick
Reference Guide.
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2-2
CHAPTER 2: CREATING YOUR NETWORK
Figure 2-1 The LEDs And How To Use Them
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LEDs and Ports
Figure 2-2 The Ports And How To Use Them
2-3
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2-4
CHAPTER 2: CREATING YOUR NETWORK
Workstation Connections
Before You Start
To connect workstations and other equipment to
your hub, you need:
Your OfficeConnect hub comes with:
■
One power adapter for use with the Office Connect
hub
■
A Warranty Registration card for you to fill out and
return
■
Four rubber feet
■
Four stacking clips
■
One 3.5” Transcend® Quick Configuration Manager
disk
■
A Quick Reference Guide
■
This guide
1
10BASE-T connections for all your equipment. 3Com
produce a range of easy to install network adapters,
which provide your workstations with 10BASE-T
connections.
2
An operating system with network support
configured, running on your workstations.
3
One ‘Straight-through’ 10BASE-T cable for every
workstation or piece of equipment.
A ‘Straight-through’ cable is one where the pins of
one connector are connected to the same pins of the
other connector. 10BASE-T cables can be shielded or
unshielded. We recommend you use shielded. The
maximum length you can use is 100 meters
(328 feet).
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Positioning the OfficeConnect Hub
In order to comply with the 10BASE-T standard, ports
designed for workstation connections have been
marked with the graphical symbol ‘x’. This denotes a
crossover in the port’s internal wiring, for example 1x,
2x, 3x...
Hub Connections
Positioning the OfficeConnect Hub
When installing your OfficeConnect hub, ensure:
■
It is out of direct sunlight and away from sources of
heat.
■
Cabling is away from power lines and fluorescent
lighting fixtures, and sources of electrical noise such
as radios, transmitters and broadband amplifiers.
■
Water or moisture cannot enter the case of the unit.
■
Air flow around the unit and through the vents in the
side of the case is not restricted. We recommend
you provide a minimum of 25.4 mm (1 in) clearance.
If you have additional hubs you want to connect
using 10BASE-2 (Coax), you need:
■
One 10BASE-2 50 Ohm cable for each additional hub.
The minimum cable length you can use is 0.5 meters
(1.6 feet). The maximum segment length you can
have is 185 meters (607 feet).
■
One 10BASE-2 ‘Y’ piece for each hub. You can use ‘T’
pieces but ‘Y’ pieces provide adequate clearance of
the other ports.
■
Two 10BASE-2 50 Ohm terminators (end pieces).
If you have additional hubs you want to connect
using 10BASE-T, you need:
■
One ‘Straight-through’ 10BASE-T cable for each
additional hub.
2-5
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2-6
CHAPTER 2: CREATING YOUR NETWORK
Using the Rubber Feet and Stacking Clips
The four self-adhesive rubber feet prevent your hub
from sliding around on your desk. Stick the feet to
the marked areas at each corner of the underside of
your hub.
The four stacking clips are used for neatly and
securely stacking your OfficeConnect units together.
You can stack up to a maximum of four units.
Large units must be stacked below small units.
To stack your units, secure the clips on one side and
then on the other. Use the following method to
secure one side:
1
Place your new unit on a flat surface. Your clips fit in
the positions on the side of the unit, as shown in
Figure 2-3 (1).
2
Position a clip over one of these holes and push it in
until it clicks into place, as shown in Figure 2-3 (2).
Repeat this for the other clip position on the same
side.
3
Keeping the front of the units aligned, rest the
bottom of the existing unit on the clips’ spikes, as
shown in Figure 2-3 (3). Push the clips firmly into the
existing unit until they click into place.
Figure 2-3 Clipping Your Units Together
Repeat these steps to secure the other side.
To remove a clip, hold the units firmly with one
hand and hook the first finger of your other hand
around the back of the clip. Use reasonable force to
pull it off.
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Wall Mounting the OfficeConnect Hub
Wall Mounting the OfficeConnect Hub
There are two slots on the underside of the
OfficeConnect hub which are used for wall
mounting. You can mount the hub with the LEDs
facing upwards or downwards, to suit your needs.
When wall mounting your hub, ensure that it is
within reach of the power outlet.
You need two suitable screws. Ensure that the wall
you are going to use is smooth, flat, dry and sturdy.
Make two screw holes which are 142 mm (5.6 in)
apart. Use the arrows at the top of the Quick
Reference Guide to mark the position of the holes.
Fix the screws into the wall, leaving their heads 3 mm
(0.12 in) clear of the wall surface.
Remove any connections to the hub and locate it
over the screw heads. When in line, gently push the
hub on to the wall and move it downwards to
secure. When making connections, be careful not to
push the hub up and off the wall.
CAUTION: Only wall mount single hubs, do not wall
mount stacked hubs.
2-7
Connecting Workstations and Other
Equipment to Your Hub
WARNING: Ensure you have read the Important
Safety Information section carefully before you start.
ACHTUNG: Versichern Sie sich, daß Sie den
Abschnitt mit den wichtigen Sicherheitshinweisen
gelesen haben, bevor Sie das Gerät benutzen.
AVERTISSEMENT: Assurer que vous avez lu
soigneusement la section de L’information de Sécurité
Importante avant que vous commenciez.
CAUTION: Do not power the hub off and on quickly.
Wait about 5 seconds between power cycles.
Connecting workstations and other equipment to
your hub is easy. Connect them using 10BASE-T
cables to any of the hub’s eight 10BASE-T RJ45 ports.
10BASE-T cables are very easy to use. To connect a
10BASE-T cable, simply slot the connector into the
relevant RJ45 port. When the connector is fully in, its
latch locks it in place. To disconnect the cable, push
the connector’s latch in and remove it.
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2-8
CHAPTER 2: CREATING YOUR NETWORK
The hub detects all port connections, so you can
start using your network immediately. When you
need more ports, simply add more OfficeConnect
hubs.
Connecting OfficeConnect Hubs Together
You can increase the number of workstations that
can connect to your network by adding more
OfficeConnect hubs. You can use either 10BASE-T or
10BASE-2 (Coax) to do this:
If you are using port 8 to connect a workstation,
ensure the MDI/MDIX switch is set to MDIX.
If you do not use the 10BASE-2 (Coax) port, you do
not need to terminate it with a terminator (end
piece).
■
With 10BASE-2 (Coax) you can connect up to 30
hubs on a single segment, leaving all of the RJ45
ports free.
■
With 10BASE-T you can connect up to four hubs in
series.
CAUTION: Do not connect the same two hubs
together using both 10BASE-T and 10BASE-2 (Coax).
This causes a network loop.
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Connecting OfficeConnect Hubs Together
Connecting Hubs Using 10BASE-2 (Coax)
When using 10BASE-2 (Coax) cable, it is important
that both ends of the segment are properly
terminated with 50 Ohm terminators (end pieces).
Only use 50 Ohm 10BASE-2 (Coax) cables and use a
‘Y’ piece for each hub. You can use ‘T’ pieces but ‘Y’
pieces provide adequate clearance of the other ports.
Connect a 10BASE-2 ‘Y’ piece to each of your hubs.
Daisy-chain each ‘Y’ piece with 10BASE-2 (Coax)
cable to form a single segment, as shown in
Figure 2-4. Remember to terminate the two free ends
of the segment by fitting terminators (end pieces).
To disconnect a 10BASE-2 (Coax) cable, twist each
connector counter-clockwise to unlock it, and
remove it.
Figure 2-4 Correct Hub Connections Using 10BASE-2 (Coax)
2-9
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CHAPTER 2: CREATING YOUR NETWORK
Connecting Hubs Using 10BASE-T
You can connect hubs together with 10BASE-T in a
number of ways, but for simplicity we recommend
the following method:
1
Starting from the bottom, connect port 8 of the
lower hub to port 7 of the hub immediately above.
Repeat for each hub, as shown in Figure 2-5.
2
Set all MDI/MDIX switches to MDI (in) except for the
top hub (the one with port 8 not connected to
another hub). This unused port can be connected to
a workstation provided that the MDI/MDIX switch is
set to MDIX (out).
Figure 2-5 Correct Hub Connections Using 10BASE-T
16710.bk : CREYRNET.FRM Page 11 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Spot Checks
2-11
Checking Hub Connections
When you have connected your hubs, power them
on. The Port Status LEDs for the ports you have used
should be green for 10BASE-T, or off for 10BASE-2
(Coax). If they are not, check your connections.
If the 10BASE-2 (Coax) port is not used and is not
terminated, the LED should be yellow showing that it
has partitioned. This is correct operation.
Spot Checks
At frequent intervals, visually check that:
■
The Alert LED is not lit — this is the best way to find
out if there are problems with your network
■
Case vents are not obstructed
■
Cabling is secure and not pulled taut
If you suspect there is a problem, refer to Chapter 6.
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2-12
CHAPTER 2: CREATING YOUR NETWORK
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3
ABOUT NETWORK MANAGEMENT
Network management is not required to get your hub
working, it simply allows you to change the way it
works and to monitor what is happening to your
network. Each OfficeConnect® Hub 8/TPM is a separate
manageable entity, that means you manage each
OfficeConnect Hub 8/TPM individually. This chapter lists
the management tasks you can perform, and describes
the ways you can connect your management station to
your hub. This guide uses ‘Management Station’ to
refer to the piece of equipment you are using to
manage the hub.
Transcend Quick Configuration Manager, referred to as
‘Quick Config Manager’ in this guide, is supplied with
your hub and provides an easy-to-use graphical
management system, through the hub’s console port.
Quick Config Manager uses a familiar Windows®
interface with point and click operation. To use it
effectively, you need to be familiar with Microsoft
Windows. For information on Microsoft Windows, refer
to the Microsoft Windows User’s Guide.
You can also manage your hub using a VT100 terminal
or any Telnet facility that emulates a VT100 terminal.
VT100 uses a text-based user interface.
3Com Network Management
Quick Config Manager provides a subset of the
functionality that is present in other 3Com
management applications, for example the
IP/IPX-based Transcend® Enterprise Manager for
Windows (version 4.x and above).
Whether your network is large or small, its ongoing
performance, growth and security are only as good
as its management system.
Using intelligent 3Com software distributed
throughout the network, 3Com’s Transcend
management applications support all of today’s
platforms and manage a wide variety of 3Com
products. This gives you total control over your entire
3Com network from a single management station.
For further information about which Transcend
management application can benefit your growing
network, call your local sales office, see “3Com
provides easy access to technical support
16710.bk : ABOUTMAN.FRM Page 2 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
3-2
CHAPTER 3: ABOUT NETWORK M ANAGEMENT
information through a variety of services. This
appendix describes these services.” on page C-1.
Why Manage Your Hub?
With management, you can change and view the
way your hub and network operates:
■
Configure IP information for the hub so that an
IP-based network management station can
communicate with it.
■
Restart the hub to refresh its statistics and use any
new configurations.
■
Initialize the hub to return it to its factory settings
(IP and console port information is retained).
■
Display a graphical representation of the hub to
quickly view the status of each port.
■
Display general hub information.
■
Configure the Alert LED to light for a number of
conditions, and show what conditions have triggered
the Alert LED to come on.
■
Graphically display network information for each port
and the hub.
■
Enable and disable ports.
16710.bk : ABOUTMAN.FRM Page 3 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Connecting to the Hub and Managing
■
Configure security for the hub, including setting up
new users and specifying what equipment is
allowed to communicate through the hub.
■
Set up resilience; specify a backup connection that
takes over should a main connection fail.
■
Configure the hub to send messages over the
network or a modem link, to an IP/IPX-based
management application (for example, Transcend
Enterprise Manager), reporting the state of the hub
and the network.
■
Use the hub to monitor other devices on your
network and report any deviation from their normal
operation to an IP/IPX-based management
application.
■
Poll a remote device to see if it is operational.
■
View any faults that have occurred with the hub.
■
Download any future software upgrades to the hub.
3-3
Connecting to the Hub and Managing
Managing your hub is easy. There are many ways you
can connect your management station to your hub,
as shown in Figure 3-1.
You can manage the hub:
■
■
Through the console port
■
Using Quick Config Manager
■
Using a VT100 Terminal Emulator
■
Using a VT100 Terminal
Over the network
■
Using an IP/IPX-based Network Manager
■
Using a VT100 Terminal Emulator through Telnet
For information on using modems as part of your
management connection, see “Remote
Management Service” on page 3-7.
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CHAPTER 3: ABOUT NETWORK M ANAGEMENT
Managing Through the Console Port
This section describes how to connect and set up
equipment to communicate with the hub through
the console port (called out-of-band management).
By default, the hub automatically configures its baud
rate. The maximum rate the autoconfiguration
function detects is 19200 baud.
You need to use a null modem cable for connection
to the hub’s console port. This is available from your
supplier. The null modem cable must:
■
Have a 9 pin female ‘D’ connector for connection to
your hub, and the appropriate connector for
connection to your management station.
■
Not exceed 15 meters (50 feet).
There are a variety of null modem cables that you
can use. For an example of one of these, see
“Cabling” on page A-2.
Figure 3-1 Different Management Connections To The Hub
Connection to the console port may be direct or
through modems, giving the option of local or
remote management. For information on managing
through modems, see “Remote Management
Service” on page 3-7.
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Connecting to the Hub and Managing
Using Quick Config Manager
Connect one end of the null modem cable to the
console port on the hub, and the other to the serial
(RS232) port on your management station.
Quick Config Manager uses SLIP to manage your
hub. When you have made your connection and
installed Quick Config Manager, you are ready to
manage your hub.
Refer to Chapter 4 for information on installing and
using Quick Config Manager.
Using a VT100 Terminal Emulator
Connect one end of the null modem cable to the
console port on the hub, and the other to the serial
(RS232) port on your management station. You need
to set the character size (8), stop bit (1) and parity
(none) settings of your management station to work
with the hub.
Press [Return][Return] to start the communication.
The management station you are using needs to run
suitable terminal emulation software. Many VT100
terminal emulation packages are available.
3-5
Microsoft Windows has a terminal emulation
program called ‘HyperTerminal’ (for Windows 95) or
‘Terminal’ (for other Windows versions).
Refer to the documentation that accompanies your
particular terminal emulation package for details, or
consult your supplier if you need further advice.
Refer to Chapter 5 for information on performing
additional management using the VT100
management interface.
Using a VT100 Terminal
Connect one end of the null modem cable to the
console port on the hub, and the other to the serial
(RS232) port on your VT100 terminal. You need to set
the character size (8), stop bit (1) and parity (none)
settings of your VT100 terminal to work with the hub.
Press [Return][Return] to start the communication.
Refer to Chapter 5 for information on performing
additional management using the VT100
management interface.
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CHAPTER 3: ABOUT NETWORK M ANAGEMENT
Managing Over the Network
This section describes how to set up equipment to
allow you to communicate with the hub over the
network (called in-band management).
Before you can manage your hub over the network
using IP, you must connect to its console port locally
and use Quick Config Manager to enter IP
information for the hub:
1
2
Connect one end of a null modem cable to the
console port on the hub, and the other to the serial
(RS232) port on your management station.
Install Quick Config Manager and use it to configure
the necessary IP information for the hub.
Refer to Chapter 4 for information on installing and
using Quick Config Manager.
If using IPX, you do not need to enter IPX information
for the hub.
Using an IP/IPX-based Network
Management Application
3Com’s Transcend network management applications
enable you to get the best out of your hub. Any
IP/IPX-based network management application can
manage the hub.
The use of IP/IPX-based network management
applications is not described in this manual. Refer to
the user documentation that accompanies your
application, for more information.
Using a VT100 Terminal Emulator
(over Telnet)
Any VT100 terminal emulator that uses Telnet should
be able to communicate with the hub over the
network. Up to three active management sessions
can access the hub concurrently. If a connection to a
session is not closed, but is lost inadvertently, the
connection is closed by the hub after between 2
and 3 minutes of inactivity.
Refer to the documentation that accompanies your
particular terminal emulation package for details, or
consult your supplier if you need further advice.
16710.bk : ABOUTMAN.FRM Page 7 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Remote Management Service
Refer to Chapter 5 for information on performing
additional management using the VT100
management interface.
Remote Management Service
The OfficeConnect hub has a special modem dial-out
feature which can be set up by your supplier to
inform them when your hub or network is operating
incorrectly. This allows your supplier to know
immediately when certain problems occur, so they
can act on it, leaving you to carry on with your work.
Contact your supplier to find out if they are offering a
support service based on this feature.
3-7
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CHAPTER 3: ABOUT NETWORK M ANAGEMENT
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4
MANAGING YOUR HUB
USING QUICK CONFIG MANAGER
This chapter describes how to install and use Quick
Config Manager. For an overview of what you can
do when managing the hub, see Chapter 3.
The sections in this chapter are in the order you
would normally perform them when managing the
hub for the first time. If you are new to network
management, read through this chapter to learn
about the different management you can perform.
Quick Config Manager has a comprehensive help
system that has the same useful information as this
chapter.
Before you can manage with Quick Config Manager,
you must make a connection to the hub’s console
port, see Chapter 3.
In the descriptions of the options given in this
chapter, the default values are underlined.
Installing Quick Config Manager
Installation Requirements
Quick Config Manager requires an IBM compatible
PC with at least a 486/33 processor. Your system
must also include:
■
Microsoft Windows® 3.1
or Windows for Workgroups 3.11
or Windows 95.
■
MS-DOS 5.0 or later (not needed for Windows ‘95).
■
Minimum of 4MB available hard disk space.
■
Minimum of 8MB RAM. All RAM above the first
megabyte must be configured as extended memory.
■
3.5” disk drive.
■
VGA or SVGA color monitor.
■
Mouse.
■
Serial port capable of 9600 baud, no Parity, 8bit
Data, 1 StopBit.
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
Installation Procedure
Quick Config Manager can be installed on its own or
on to a workstation that already has other
Transcend® management applications installed on it.
CAUTION: Do not install Quick Config Manager in
the same directory as any other Transcend
management applications. The default directory into
which Quick Config Manager is installed is
C:\QUICKMGR. This can be changed during the
installation if required.
The installation program is a standard Windows
based installation. To install Quick Config Manager:
1
4
In the Command Line box, type drive:\SETUP
(where drive is the letter of your 3.5” disk drive)
and click on OK.
The installation program starts and checks your
system configuration; enter any information that’s
requested. The installation program reports when it
has completed the installation.
When the Quick Config Manager installation is
complete, it has its own program group called
Transcend. If other Transcend management
applications are present, the existing Transcend
program group now includes Quick Config Manager.
Start Windows.
If you already have an existing Transcend
management application running, ensure that it is
closed down.
2
Insert the Quick Config Manager disk into your disk
drive.
3
In the Program Manager window, select the Run
command from the File menu.
Running Quick Config Manager
Whenever you want to start the Quick Config
Manager application, double-click on the Quick
Configuration Manager icon.
CAUTION: Do not run Quick Config Manager in
parallel with any other Transcend management
application.
Before you can manage your hub, you must make a
connection to the hub, see Chapter 3.
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Configuring Multiple Hubs
If you are going to manage over a serial link from
your management station, Quick Config Manager
uses COM1 as the default serial port. You can
change this by editing the following line under the
[slip] subsection of the QUICKMGR.INI file:
SerialAttrib=COM1:9600,n,8,1
Editing it to SerialAttrib=COM2:9600,n,8,1
changes the default serial port to COM2.
4-3
To do this:
1
Make your serial connection to the new hub.
2
From the File menu, select Reset View.
Quick Config Manager closes any windows that are
open in preparation for the new management
session.
Quick Config Manager Window Map
Configuring Multiple Hubs
There is a special feature which allows you to
connect your management station to a new
OfficeConnect® Hub 8/TPM without needing to
close and reopen Quick Config Manager. This is
particularly useful if you have many OfficeConnect
hubs that need configuring or monitoring.
This feature only works if all the hubs you are going
to connect to have the same baud rate (or are set to
Auto Config) as the management station.
Figure 4-1 (over the page) shows how all of the Quick
Config Manager windows are accessed. This diagram
also appears on the Quick Reference Guide. The
number at the top right-hand side of each window
refers to the page that describes the window.
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
Figure 4-1 Quick Config Manager Window Map
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Quick Config Manager Window Map
4-5
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
Accessing the Hub
The OfficeConnect Hub 8/TPM uses community
strings as a security measure, to check management
access to the hub. The community string you use
must match one of the community strings
configured for the hub. Quick Config Manager
remembers the last community string used.
The default community strings are:
■
security — allows you to view and configure the
hub’s information
■
public — allows you to view the hub’s information
To enter the community string:
1
Double-click on the Quick Config Manager icon to
start the application.
2
From the Configure menu, select Community/Polling.
Figure 4-2 Community/Polling Dialog Box
Quick Config Manager displays the
Community/Polling dialog box, as shown in
Figure 4-2.
3
Enter the community string in the box.
4
Click on OK.
Changes made to this dialog box will only take effect
for new windows. Any graphs or zoom view windows
that are already open will continue to use the old
values. Close these windows and reopen them to use
the new values.
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Giving the Hub an IP Address
4-7
You can also use the Community/Polling screen to:
■
Automatically display a graphical representation of
the hub every time you start Quick Config Manager.
■
Define how regularly the graphical representation of
the hub is updated.
■
Define how regularly any displayed graphs are
updated.
Bitmap Off / 15 / 30 / 45 / 60
The time in minutes between consecutive updates of
the graphical representation of the hub. If Off is
selected, the bitmap is not updated at all (you can
select Update Zoom from the File menu to display
any new states).
Graph(s) 15 / 30 / 45 / 60
The time in seconds between consecutive updates of
any graphs that are displayed.
Invoke zoom view on start-up Check this box if you
want the graphical representation of the hub to be
displayed every time you start Quick Config Manager.
Through VT100 management you can configure new
users for the hub (with different community strings),
see “Configuring Users” on page 5-17.
Giving the Hub an IP Address
You can configure the hub with an IP address and
other useful information, enabling it to
communicate over (become part of) an IP network.
The hub does not need an IP address to make your
Quick Config Manager work with it.
You need to give your hub an IP address if you want
to use an IP-based network manager, for example
Transcend Enterprise Manager, to manage it over the
network.
CAUTION: If you have no previous knowledge of IP,
see “IP Addresses” on page B-1.
The IP Setup dialog box is used to set up IP
information and change the SLIP address for the hub.
The IP Setup dialog box has a useful Easy Setup
option which takes you through the IP configuration
process. The information that you enter during the
Easy Setup process is the same as, and is entered
into, the IP Setup dialog box.
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
4-8
To display the IP Setup dialog box and view or
configure the hub’s address settings:
1
From the Configure menu, select IP Setup...
Quick Config Manager displays either the IP Setup
dialog box or the Easy Setup Option, as shown in
Figure 4-3, depending on what IP information is
currently configured for the hub:
■
■
If an IP address has been configured for the hub,
and it is not 0.0.0.0, the IP Setup dialog box is
displayed. If you have previously configured
address information for the hub but want to go
through the Easy Set-Up option again, you can
start it by clicking on the Easy Set-Up button.
If no previous IP information has been
configured for the hub or the IP address is
configured as 0.0.0.0, and the Enable IP box is
checked, the Easy Setup option is started. If you
want to enter information directly into the IP
Setup screen or abort the Easy Setup process,
select Abort.
The Easy Setup option asks you if you want to
manually configure the hub for IP. If you have a
BOOTP server (that automatically allocates IP
addresses) select No, otherwise select Yes.
Figure 4-3 IP Setup Dialog Box And Easy Setup Option
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Giving the Hub an IP Address
2
Enter the relevant information into the IP Setup
diolog box or Easy Setup screens and click on OK to
exit the screens.
3
Reset the hub for any changes to take effect, see
“Resetting the Hub” on page 4-11.
■
4-9
Support Contract — Provides a box for you to type
the ID number of any technical support contract you
may have.
The default entries for these three fields is ‘3Com’.
These defaults are just place holders and should be
changed for your information as soon as possible.
After resetting the hub, you may need to select
Reset View from the File menu to restart
communication using the new information.
CAUTION: Always make a note of any changes you
make to the settings on this screen. There is an area
at the front of this User Guide for doing this, called
“Your Hub Addresses”.
These three fields use the same information as
sysContact and sysName in the MIB II panel, so if you
change them, the fields in the MIB II panel change as
well. For information on the MIB II panel, see
“Displaying Information About the Hub” on
page 4-13.
Device Configuration Shows the following:
Network Configuration Shows the following:
■
Device Name — Provides a box for you to type a
name for the hub. Use a descriptive name, for
example ‘Finance’.
■
Emergency Contact — Provides a box for you to type
the name and/or telephone number of your
network administrator (possibly yourself) who
should be contacted in an emergency.
■
IP Address — Provides a box for you to type the IP
address of the hub.
CAUTION: To ensure that Quick Config Manager can
always communicate with the hub, the IP subnet
192.168.101.x is permanently assigned to the SLIP
port in addition to the user configurable SLIP
address. Do not use this subnet for your Ethernet
(network).
16710.bk : MANAGING.FRM Page 10 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
■
Subnet Mask — Provides a box for you to type the
subnet mask for the IP address.
■
Enable IP — If disabled, the IP fields for this dialog
box are blanked and grayed-out. If enabled, the IP
fields are enabled, allowing you to enter your IP
information. If you are not going to manage the hub
over the network, disable IP.
Out of Band Configuration Shows the following:
■
Serial Line IP Address — SLIP allows IP to run over the
console port instead of the network. SLIP allows you
to use out-of-band management, either locally or
remotely through a modem. SLIP operates with any
valid IP address. The default is 192.168.101.1 which is
the address Quick Config Manager uses.
■
SubNet Mask — Enter the SLIP subnet mask. For a
class C address, 255.255.255.0 (the default) is suitable.
If you are using SLIP and have changed any of the
console port settings using VT100, ensure that Flow
Control is not set to XON/XOFF, see “Connecting a
Modem to the Console Port” on page 5-13.
If you require more information about SLIP, read the
Internet Activities Board document RFC 155.
Router IP Address Enter the IP address of the router
(if you have one) which is used by the hub to
communicate with other networks.
Manager IP Address Enter the IP address of a
management station that has an IP-based network
management application running on it. You can
configure the hub to send messages, called traps, to
this management station.
Quick Config Manager does not have a facility to
receive traps because it is a configuration tool, not a
management tool.
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Resetting the Hub
Resetting the Hub
Initializing the Hub
Resetting the hub simulates switching the hub off
and on. You may want to reset the hub if you want
to:
■
Apply any changes made to the hub’s IP
configuration.
■
Resets the hub’s statistics counters.
Initializing the hub causes it to return to its factory
default settings. You may want to do this if the hub
has been previously used in a different part of your
network, and its settings are incorrect for its new
environment.
To reset the hub:
CAUTION: Initializing the hub removes all
configuration information such as security, resilient
links and passwords. However, the IP address, subnet
mask, default router, SLIP and console port
information is retained to ensure you can continue
management communication with the hub over the
network.
From the Configure menu, select Reset.
To initialize the hub:
CAUTION: Performing a reset may cause some of
the data being transmitted over the network to be
lost.
1
Quick Config Manager asks you to confirm the reset.
1
2
4-11
In the confirmation dialog box, click on OK.
The hub takes about 20 seconds to reset itself. You
may need to select Reset View from the File menu to
re-establish communication with the hub.
From the Configure menu, select Initialize.
Quick Config Manager asks you to confirm the
initialization.
2
In the confirmation dialog box, click on OK.
The hub takes about 20 seconds to initialize itself.
You may need to select Reset View from the File menu
to re-establish communication with the hub.
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
The port color coding shows these conditions:
Viewing the Hub
Quick Config Manager can display a graphical
representation of the hub you are managing, with:
■
The ports color coded to show their condition
■
The Alert LED reflecting its physical state
■
Green — Port enabled and capable of receiving and
transmitting traffic
■
Red — Port enabled and partitioned, or port
enabled but the connection is lost
■
Blue — Port disabled by management
In the Community/Polling dialog box, you can
specify whether the zoom view is invoked on starting
Quick Config Manager, and how often the zoom view
is polled (updated). If you want to update the zoom
view immediately, without waiting for a poll, select
Update Zoom from the File menu.
To display the hub:
■
From the View menu, select Zoom In.
Quick Config Manager displays a zoom view of the
hub, as shown in Figure 4-4. If the zoom view is
already open, it is selected.
Double-clicking on the Zoom View
You can configure information for the hub by
double-clicking on the zoom view:
Figure 4-4 Zoom View Of The Hub
■
If you double-click on a port, the Port dialog box is
displayed. This is used to configure information for a
port, see “Configuring a Port” on page 4-25.
■
If you double-click on anything other than a port, the
General Info dialog box is displayed. This is used to
configure information for the hub, see “Displaying
Information About the Hub” on page 4-13.
16710.bk : MANAGING.FRM Page 13 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Displaying Information About the Hub
Displaying Information About the Hub
Quick Config Manager enables you to display
detailed information about the hub. This information
is stored within the hub in a list, called a MIB
(Management Information Base). The MIB defines
what information can be obtained from the hub by
an SNMP network management station.
To display this information:
1
Do one of the following:
■
■
2
Double-click on the graphical representation of
the hub (but not on a port).
From the Configure menu, select General Info...
In the General Info dialog box, select the MIB II
category.
Quick Config Manager displays the MIB II panel, as
shown in Figure 4-5.
Figure 4-5 MIB II Panel
4-13
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4-14
CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
sysDescr Shows the system description supplied by
the hub’s Management Agent software.
sysLocation Provides a box for you to type the
location of the hub.
sysObjectId Shows the SNMP object identifier for
the hub’s Management Agent software.
sysServices Shows the services that the hub
supports.
sysUpTime Shows the time that has elapsed since
the last reset.
Refresh Refreshes the information in the panel.
sysContact Provides a box for you to type the name
of the person who can be contacted in the event of a
problem with the hub.
sysName Provides a box for you to type the name
of the hub.
sysContact and sysName use the same information
as the Device Configuration fields in the IP Setup
dialog box, so if you change them, the fields in the
IP Setup dialog box change as well.
For information on the IP Setup dialog box, see
“Giving the Hub an IP Address” on page 4-7.
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Setting Up the Alert LED
■
Poll Failures — If your hub has been configured to
monitor a device, it periodically polls it for
information. If the device fails to respond, the failure
is seen by the hub.
■
Network Errors — If the network has high volumes of
communication, or there is a high amount of errors
with the communication, it could be due to too
many devices on your network or an incorrectly
configure device.
Setting Up the Alert LED
The Alert LED can warn you of potential problems
with your network. Quick Config Manager allows
you to:
■
Test the Alert LED.
■
Configure the conditions that cause the Alert LED to
light.
■
View what conditions have caused the Alert LED to
light.
By default, the Alert LED is configured to light if a
10BASE-T port is partitioned or if there is high
network utilization (over 80%).
To configure the Alert LED:
You can configure the Alert LED to light for:
■
Incorrect configurations — If there is a network loop
due to an incorrect configuration in your network, a
port partitions. The coaxial port automatically
partitions if it is not used.
1
Do one of the following:
■
■
■
Security Violations — If an unsuccessful login attempt
occurs, or a device that is not known to your hub
tries to communicate with it, a violation occurs. This
may be due to someone trying to gain unauthorized
access to your network.
4-15
2
Double-click on the graphical representation of
the hub (but not on a port).
From the Configure menu, select General Info...
In the General Info dialog box, choose the Alerts
category.
Quick Config Manager displays the Alerts panel, as
shown in Figure 4-6.
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4-16
CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
If any Alert conditions are active, the conditions are
displayed in red. The other conditions are displayed
in green. If the active conditions are enabled, the
Alert LED will be lit.
In the Alerts panel:
Alert LED Test Enabled / Disabled
Allows you to test the Alert LED. If you select Enable
and click on OK, the Alert LED lights regardless of the
true alert condition of the hub.
When you have finished your test, remember to
disable to Alert LED Test. To do this, select Disable and
click on OK. The Alert LED now reflects the current
Alert condition of the hub.
Figure 4-6 Alerts Panel
3
Configure the conditions for the Alert LED.
4
Click on OK when the Alert LED setup is complete.
UTP Port Partition Enabled / Disabled
Allows you to specify whether the Alert LED lights if
a UTP port becomes partitioned, which happens if a
network loop occurs.
If this condition is resolved after causing the Alert
LED to light, the LED goes off (it stays lit if other
conditions also caused it to light).
16710.bk : MANAGING.FRM Page 17 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Setting Up the Alert LED
Coax Port Partition Enabled / Disabled
Allows you to specify whether the Alert LED lights if
the coaxial port becomes partitioned.
If this condition is resolved after causing the Alert
LED to light, the LED goes off (it stays lit if other
conditions also caused it to light).
Login Violation Enabled / Disabled
Allows you to specify whether the Alert LED lights if
a login violation occurs, which happens if a user
attempts to log on to your hub using the VT100
screens with an invalid username/password
combination three consecutive times.
If this condition caused the Alert LED to light, the
LED goes off after you have acknowledged the alert
by pressing the associated Ack button (the LED stays
lit if other conditions also caused it to light).
Port Security Violation Enabled / Disabled
Allows you to specify whether the Alert LED lights if
a port security violation occurs, which happens if an
unauthorized device attempts to communicate
through your hub.
4-17
If this condition caused the Alert LED to light, the
LED goes off after you have acknowledged the alert
by pressing the associated Ack button (the LED stays
lit if other conditions also caused it to light).
Authentication Failure Enabled / Disabled
Allows you to specify whether the Alert LED lights if
an authentication failure occurs, which happens if a
user attempts to access information on your hub
using an invalid community string.
If this condition caused the Alert LED to light, the
LED goes off after you have acknowledged the alert
by pressing the associated Ack button (the LED stays
lit if other conditions also caused it to light).
WorkGroup Monitor Failure Enabled / Disabled
Allows you to specify whether the Alert LED lights if
a workgroup monitor failure occurs, which happens if
a remote device fails to respond to a workgroup
monitor poll from your hub.
If this condition caused the Alert LED to light, the
LED goes off after you have acknowledged the alert
by pressing the associated Ack button (the LED stays
lit if other conditions also caused it to light).
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
4-18
Network Utilization High / Med / Low / Disabled
Allows you to specify whether the Alert LED lights if
a certain level of network utilization is exceeded for
five seconds. The levels are:
■
High — 80% network utilization
■
Med — 50% network utilization
■
Low — 12% network utilization
If this condition is resolved after causing the Alert
LED to light, the LED goes off (it stays lit if other
conditions also caused it to light).
Following a period of excessive network activity, the
Alert LED stays lit for a short period of time.
Network Error Rate High / Med / Low / Disabled
Allows you to specify whether the Alert LED lights if
a certain level of network errors is exceeded for
approximately one minute. The levels are:
■
High — 100 errors per 10000 frames
■
Med — 10 errors per 10000 frames
■
Low — 1 error per 10000 frames
If this condition is resolved after causing the Alert
LED to light, the LED goes off (it stays lit if other
conditions also caused it to light).
Monitoring
You can quickly and easily monitor your network by
viewing various types of network information:
■
Activity and errors
■
Frame types
■
Network traffic
■
Network errors
The information is displayed as a graph or pie chart,
and can be helpful for spotting and isolating any
potential network problems you may have.
To view general information for the hub, see
“Displaying Information About the Hub” on
page 4-13.
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Monitoring
Monitoring Activity and Errors Statistics
Quick Config Manager allows you to display the total
network activity and errors seen by a port or the hub
(all ports) in any one time period.
To display the Activity/Errors graph for a port:
1
Double-click on the port for which you want to
display the Activity/Errors graph.
2
In the Port dialog box, choose the Info category.
3
In the Repeater Port Info panel, select the Activity
check box.
4
Click on OK.
To display the Activity/Errors graph for the hub:
■
From the View menu, select Activity/Errors.
Quick Config Manager displays the Activity/Errors
graph, as shown in Figure 4-7.
Figure 4-7 Activity/Errors Graph
4-19
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4-20
CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
Total Errors Shows the total number of errors that
have occurred per poll, it should be a small
percentage of the readable frames figure.
Runts Shows the number of frames received with
octet counts less than the minimum legal size
(512 bits), which were not involved in a collision on
the segment being monitored. Runt frames are the
result of collisions on other segments and are
propagated around the network; this is a normal part
of Ethernet operation. An excessive number of runts
or collisions is an indication of congestion. You may
need to consider segmenting your network
(separating the busiest parts).
Readable Shows the number of frames received that
are of valid length and have not suffered a collision
or FCS error. Look for unusual increases in traffic rate;
this can indicate a potential problem.
Broadcast Shows the number of frames received
which are addressed to all devices. The number of
broadcast frames is normally a small percentage of
the value seen for unicast (single address) frames.
A high level of broadcast frames can adversely affect
network performance.
Collisions Shows the number of frames for which a
transmission collision was detected. Collisions are a
normal part of Ethernet operation and occur if two or
more devices attempt to transmit at the same time.
A sudden sustained increase in the number of
collisions can indicate a problem with a device,
particularly if it is not accompanied by a general
increase in traffic. On coaxial segments an increase
in collisions can also indicate faulty cabling.
The values shown in the Activity/Errors graph are
per poll period, not per second. To change the poll
period, see “Accessing the Hub” on page 4-6.
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Monitoring
Frame Types Statistics
Quick Config Manager allows you to display the total
network frame types seen by a port or the hub (all
ports) in any one time period. Any frames producing
errors are not included, these are shown in the
Activity/Errors graph, see “Monitoring Activity and
Errors Statistics” on page 4-19.
To display the Frame Types pie chart for a port:
1
Double-click on the port for which you want to
display the Frame Types pie chart.
2
In the Port dialog box, choose the Info category.
3
In the Repeater Port Info panel, select the Frames
check box.
4
Click on OK.
To display the Frame Types pie chart for the hub:
■
From the View menu, select Frame Types.
Quick Config Manager displays the Frame Types pie
chart, as shown in Figure 4-8.
Figure 4-8 Frame Types Pie Chart
4-21
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
Unicast Shows the percentage of readable frames
received that are addressed to single devices.
Multicast Shows the percentage of readable frames
received that are addressed to multiple devices. The
total number of multicast frames is normally a small
percentage of the value seen for unicast (single
address) frames. A high level of multicast frames can
adversely affect network performance.
Broadcast Shows the percentage of frames received
which are addressed to all devices. The total number
of broadcast frames is normally a small percentage of
the value seen for unicast (single address) frames. A
high level of broadcast frames can adversely affect
network performance.
Network Traffic Statistics
Quick Config Manager allows you to display the
network traffic as a percentage of the total possible
traffic for a port or the hub (all ports) in any one time
period.
To display the Network Traffic graph for a port:
1
Double-click on the port for which you want to
display the Network Traffic graph.
2
In the Port dialog box, choose the Info category.
3
In the Repeater Port Info panel, select the Traffic
check box.
4
Click on OK.
The values shown in the Frame Types pie chart are
per poll period, not per second. To change the poll
period, see “Accessing the Hub” on page 4-6.
To display the Network Traffic graph for the hub:
■
From the View menu, select Traffic.
Quick Config Manager displays the Network Traffic
graph, as shown in Figure 4-9. The values shown in
the Network Traffic graph are the average per poll
period. To change the poll period, see “Accessing the
Hub” on page 4-6.
16710.bk : MANAGING.FRM Page 23 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Monitoring
4-23
Network Errors Statistics
Quick Config Manager allows you to display the
numbers of frames with errors seen by a port or the
hub (all ports) in any one time period.
To display the Network Errors graph for a port:
1
Double-click on the port for which you want to
display the Network Errors graph.
2
In the Port dialog box, choose the Info category.
3
In the Repeater Port Info panel, select the Errors
check box.
4
Click on OK.
To display the Network Errors graph for the hub:
■
From the View menu, select Errors.
Quick Config Manager displays the Network Errors
graph, as shown in Figure 4-10.
Figure 4-9 Network Traffic Graph
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4-24
CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
FCS Errors Shows the number of frames received
with checksum errors that do not have alignment
errors. FCS errors are most likely caused by noise on
the cable and should be a very small percentage of
the total traffic. If it is not, change the transceivers or
network adapters of devices connected to the hub to
see if this eliminates the problem. FCS errors can also
be caused by electrical interference from other
cables or machinery.
Alignment Shows the number of frames received
with alignment errors (also known as framing errors).
Alignment errors should be a very small percentage
of the total traffic. They are likely to be caused by a
fault at the transmitting device. Locate the segment
and if there is only one transmitting device (for
example, fiber or 10BASE-T) change the transceiver
or adapter to see if this eliminates the problem.
Too Longs Shows the number of frames received
that are greater than the maximum size permitted on
Ethernet (1518 octets).
Figure 4-10 Network Errors Graph
Short Events Shows the number of short events
received. A short event is a transmission of less than
the minimum size permitted on Ethernet (64 octets).
Short events can indicate externally generated noise
causing problems on the network.
16710.bk : MANAGING.FRM Page 25 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Configuring a Port
Check the cable routing and reroute any cabling
which may be affected by other noise sources.
Configuring a Port
Late Events Shows the number of frames for which
a collision was detected after the valid packet
minimum time. A late event can occur if you have a
Local Area Network that is longer than Ethernet
standards allow (for example, more than four
repeaters in series or excessively long segments).
Very Long Events Shows the number of frames that
caused Jabber Lock Up protection to operate. Jabber
Lock Up is when a transceiver turns itself off, if it
starts uncontrollably transmitting. Isolate the source
and change the transceiver or network adapter in the
device to see if this eliminates the problem.
Rate Mismatch Shows the number of frames whose
timing was outside the permitted range. This may
indicate a non-compliant device on your network.
Isolate the source and change the transceiver or
network adapter in the device to see if this
eliminates the problem.
The values shown in the Network Errors graph are
per poll period, not per second. To change the poll
period, see “Accessing the Hub” on page 4-6.
4-25
Quick Config Manager allows you to configure how
individual ports operate, enabling you to introduce
some simple security to your network. The hub
provides more complete security which you can
configure for the ports, see “Hub Security” on
page 4-28.
For each port you can configure it:
■
To be enabled or disabled.
■
To send traps (messages) to an IP/IPX-based network
management application if the port changes state,
for example, the port partitions or its connection is
lost.
■
To learn the MAC address (hardware address) of the
device connected to it.
Enabling a port allows it to repeat information to and
from the network. Disabling a port prevents it from
repeating information onto the network. We
recommend that you disable any unused ports to
prevent unauthorized use.
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
You can configure a port so that it sends a trap to a
network management application when the status of
the link changes (for example, if a device is
connected to or disconnected from the port), or
when the port partitions. You can also configure a
port to store the source address of frames received
by the port, this enables you to detect which
devices are attached to each port of the hub.
To configure a port:
1
From the View menu, select Zoom In to display the
representation of the hub.
2
Double-click on the port you want to configure.
3
In the Port Configuration dialog box, choose the Info
category.
Quick Config Manager displays the Repeater Port Info
panel, as shown in Figure 4-11.
4
In the Repeater Port Info panel, select either Enable
or Disable for Port State.
If the port is part of a resilient link, you cannot enable
or disable the port. You must first delete the resilient
link, see “Resilience” on page 4-33.
Figure 4-11 Repeater Port Info Panel
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Configuring a Port
5
Select either Enable or Disable for Link Traps,
Partition Traps, and Learn Stations.
6
Click on OK.
In the Repeater Port Info panel:
Media Type Shows the type of media connected to
the port.
Partition State Shows whether the port is on and
repeating traffic, or has been automatically isolated
(partitioned). If the port has partitioned check the
cabling at both the port and any devices connected
to the port, and check for network loops.
Link State Shows the state of the link for a twisted
pair (10BASE-T) port.
Port State Enabled / Disabled
Selects whether the port can repeat information to
and from the network.
Link Traps Enabled / Disabled
Selects whether a trap is sent to an IP/IPX-based
network management application if the link state
changes.
4-27
Partition Traps Enabled / Disabled
Selects whether a trap is sent to an IP/IPX-based
network management application if the partition
state changes.
Learn Stations Enabled / Disabled
Selects whether the source address of received
frames is learned.
Attached Station Shows the MAC address of the
device attached to this port (the last device to
transmit to this port).
The check boxes in the View Port box enable you to
display statistics for the port and are described in
“Monitoring” on page 4-18.
The View Station box is always disabled for Quick
Config Manager.
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
3Com’s security is very advanced but easy to set up.
It works by learning in a number of ways what
devices are communicating through its ports. You
can configure the hub to react in two ways:
Hub Security
The OfficeConnect Hub 8/TPM provides flexible
communication between your workstations and
other network equipment. It is a good idea to
configure security for the hub to protect your
network from unwanted communications.
■
Disconnect Unknown Device (DUD) — If the hub
detects a communication from an unknown device
at a port, it can disable that port to prevent further
communication.
■
Need To Know (NTK) — If a frame is to be forwarded
from a port, the destination address of the frame is
checked and if it does not match the device learnt
for that port, the frame is scrambled to prevent the
communication from being intercepted.
Security can be performed at two levels:
■
Port — Configure security for an individual port.
■
Hub — Configure security for one or more ports at a
time.
The way you set up your security depends on what
you want to do. For example, if you have one device
connected to a specific port, you would manage at
port level to secure that connection. If you have
several devices that you want to connect to any of a
number of ports, you would manage at hub level to
secure that connection.
If you simply want to disable a port, see
“Configuring a Port” on page 4-25.
16710.bk : MANAGING.FRM Page 29 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Hub Security
Configuring Security at Port Level
To configure security for a port:
1
From the View menu, select Zoom In to display the
representation of the hub.
2
Double-click on the port for which you want to
configure security.
Quick Config Manager displays the Port
Configuration dialog box.
3
In the Port Configuration dialog box, select the
Security category.
Quick Config Manager displays the Port Security
Configuration panel, as shown in Figure 4-12.
In the Port Security Configuration panel at port level:
Authorized Addresses Shows the following:
■
No. of Addresses — Displays the number of
addresses that can be authorized for this port.
The list above it shows any addresses already
configured for this port.
Figure 4-12 Port Security Configuration Panel
4-29
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
4-30
■
■
■
MAC Address — Allows you to enter the MAC
address for a device to be authorized to transmit
through this port. When you have typed the
MAC address, click on <Add. Use the format
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx for the MAC address.
The port never automatically switches to full
security (for example Auto Learn), you have to do
this manually. While learning, packets received
on a port are not repeated out of the other ports.
■
<Add — Adds the MAC address to the
Authorized addresses list.
Remove — Removes the selected address or
addresses from the Authorized Address list.
DUD (Disconnect Unknown Device) Allows you to
configure the learning and security mode of the port:
■
■
No Restriction — Disables all security and
learning features.
Continually Learn — The port learns the MAC
addresses of the devices transmitting to this
port and stores them in its address table. The
maximum number of addresses learned by the
ports is determined by the value shown in the
No. of Addresses field. When the table is full, the
port continues to learn new addresses,
overwriting the addresses it learned previously.
■
Auto Learn — The port learns the MAC
addresses of the devices transmitting to this
port and stores them permanently in its address
table. The maximum number of addresses
learned by the ports is determined by the value
shown in the No. of Addresses field. When the
table is full, the port automatically switches to
Full Security mode and no other address are
allowed to connect to this port. While learning,
packets received on a port are not repeated out
of the other ports.
Full Security — Learning is disabled and only the
addresses entered as authorized addresses for
this port are allowed to transmit. If an
unauthorized address is detected, a trap will be
sent (if traps are configured) to an IP/IPX-based
management station, and the port is disabled
(if Disable on Intrusion is selected).
16710.bk : MANAGING.FRM Page 31 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Hub Security
■
Disable on Intrusion — Compares the source
address of all frames received on the port to the
authorized addresses for that port. If the source
address of the incoming frame does not match
the authorized addresses for this port, the port is
disabled to prevent communication. This option
is only valid when Full Security has been selected.
When you click on OK, the operation may fail for one
of the following reasons:
■
■
■
Need To Know Allows you to configure which
frames are forwarded to the selected port. If the
port does not support configurable Need To Know,
these options are grayed out:
■
■
■
The operation has timed out.
An Invalid MAC address (in other words,
Multicast or Broadcast address) has been
entered into the list of authorized addresses.
There is a duplicate address on another port.
If the address is on another port already and DUD is
set to Full Security or Autolearn, you must remove the
address from the other port before it can be assigned
to the current port.
Disabled — All frames are forwarded.
Enabled — The port examines the destination
address of the frame. If it matches an authorized
address for the port it is forwarded. If it does not,
it is scrambled, so it can’t be read.
Configuring Security at Hub Level
To configure security for a hub:
1
Allow Broadcasts — In addition to Enabled,
allows broadcast frames to be transmitted to the
port.
Do one of the following:
■
■
■
4-31
Allow Broadcasts and Multicasts — In addition to
Enabled, allows broadcast and multicast frames
to be transmitted to the port.
2
Double-click on the graphical representation of
the hub (but not on a port).
From the Configure menu, select General Info...
In the General Info dialog box, choose the Security
category.
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
In the Security Configuration panel at hub level:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Figure 4-13 Security Configuration Panel
Quick Config Manager displays the Security
Configuration panel, as shown in Figure 4-13.
3
Configure the security features for each port.
4
Click on OK when the security setup is complete.
Available — This lists the hub’s ports, identifying
them by port number and media type. Click on
a port to select it from the list or perform a
multiple selection.
Selected — Shows the ports selected to be
configured. Click on a port to select it from the
list or perform a multiple selection.
Select> — Adds the selected ports in the
Available list to the Selected list.
<Remove — Removes the selected ports from
the Selected list to the Available list.
All>> — Adds all the available ports to the
Selected list.
<<All — Removes all the selected ports from the
Selected list.
DUD and Need To Know are the same as for port
level, see “Configuring Security at Port Level” on
page 4-29.
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Resilience
Resilience
You can make your network more robust by adding
resilience to it.
When a link fails, as shown in Figure 4-14, all
communication between equipment on each side of
the link is lost. It would be very inconvenient for a
manager to physically reinstate the network
immediately and important communication might
be lost.
If a spare link could automatically pick up when the
broken link failed, the network would appear to
function normally to the user. At worst, a few packets
would be corrupted or lost.
This is the concept of resilience. One link is on
standby (called the standby link) waiting to take over
if another link (called the main link) fails, as shown in
Figure 4-15. This pair is called a resilient link pair.
Figure 4-15 A Resilient Link Pair
Figure 4-14 A Failed Link Between Two Hubs
4-33
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
Resilient Links are available over twisted pair media
(10BASE-T) because it carries a link test pulse which is
used to decide whether the main link has failed and
the standby link should take over. However, there is
no such link signal over coaxial media (10BASE-2), so
you cannot set up resilient links using the hub’s
10BASE-2 (Coax) port.
If you have more than two hubs there are a number
of ways you can use resilience when linking them.
Remember to follow hub connection requirements;
always connect an MDIX port to an MDI port, setting
the MDIX switch as appropriate, see “Connecting
Hubs Using 10BASE-T” on page 2-10.
When your network is in use, the hub that has been
used to set up the resilient link pair, monitors the
state of both the main link and the standby link. If
the main link fails, the standby link becomes active. If
the fault with the main link is solved, the standby link
stays active and the main link acts like a standby link.
You can use management to view the status of your
links, and to send traps (messages) to an IP/IPX-based
network management application, if anything
changes.
Setting Up a Resilient Link Pair
To set up a resilient link pair, you need to manage
the hub that both links in the pair are connected to.
You can set up to 4 resilient link pairs for the hub.
When you set up your resilient link pair, you only
need to specify the ports that the main link and
standby link are connected to.
Resilient Link Rules
Always follow these rules when setting up a resilient
link pair:
■
Configure the resilient link pair at only one end of
the link. In other words, only one hub controls each
resilient link pair you set up.
■
Each resilient link pair can only have one main link
and one standby link.
■
Each link must not belong to more than one resilient
link pair.
■
For a port that is part of a resilient link pair:
■
Do not disable the link pulse generation.
■
Do not enable security for the port.
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Resilience
1
2
CAUTION: Remember that you must always follow
the hub connection requirements when linking hubs
together, which involves the use of port 8 and the
MDI/MDIX switch.
4
If port 8 is already in use, you may need to use special
crossover cabling for any further links you wish to
make. Crossover cables allow you to make a
connection between two MDIX ports. Contact your
supplier for information on doing this.
5
In the Create Resilient Pair dialog box, choose the
port for the main link, followed by the port for the
standby link.
6
Click on OK.
To set up a resilient link pair:
7
Reconnect the hub with the standby port on it to the
network.
Disconnect the hub which is to provide the standby
port from the network. We recommend you do this,
even though it is possible to set up links while still
connected, to avoid loops being formed accidently.
Do one of the following:
■
■
3
4-35
Double-click on the graphical representation of
the hub (but not on a port).
From the Configure menu, select General Info...
In the General Info dialog box, choose the Resilience
category.
The Resilience Links panel is displayed.
In the Resilience Links panel, click on Create.
Quick Config Manager displays the Create Resilient
Pair dialog box, as shown in Figure 4-16.
When you have created a resilient link pair, it is
added to the table and is color-coded as follows:
■
■
■
Green — Both Main link and Standby link are OK.
Yellow — One of the links is OK, the other has
failed.
Red — Both Main link and Standby link have
failed.
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4-36
CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
In the Resilience Links panel:
Main Port Shows the port number of the main link.
Standby Port Shows the port number of the
standby link.
Link State Shows whether the resilient link pair is
operational or not. When operational either the
main port or the standby port can repeat traffic.
Main State, Standby State Shows whether the main
or the standby link is the active link in the resilient
link pair.
Refresh Refreshes the information in the panel.
Create Displays a dialog box which you can use to
create new resilient link pairs, by choosing the main
and standby links in the resilient link pair.
Figure 4-16 Create Resilient Pair Dialog Box
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Using the Hub to Monitor Other Devices
Delete Removes the resilient link pair from the table
when an entry in the resilience table is selected. If
you delete an entry in the resilience table, the
current active link remains enabled and the current
standby link is cancelled.
4-37
Using the Hub to Monitor Other Devices
Your hub can be used to monitor other devices on
your network, and to notify an IP/IPX-based network
management application should a problem occur
with a device attached to it. The hub notifies the
IP/IPX-based network management application by
sending SNMP traps (messages) to it.
If the main link fails, the standby link becomes active. If
the fault with the main link is solved, the standby link
stays active and the main link acts like a standby link.
You can swap the links around using management.
If you have a large network with many devices, this
feature allows you to distribute device monitoring
among those managed devices on your network,
easing the load on the IP/IPX-based network
management application.
This facility also allows you to monitor devices that
are otherwise not directly manageable, such as
workstations. Any device with an IP or IPX address
can be monitored.
To add a device for the hub to monitor:
1
Do one of the following:
■
■
Double-click on the graphical representation of
the hub (but not on a port).
From the Configure menu, select General Info...
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4-38
CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
2
In the General Info dialog box, choose the WorkGroup
category.
3
In the WorkGroup Monitor panel, click on Add.
Quick Config Manager displays the Add Remote Poll
dialog box, as shown in Figure 4-17.
4
In the Add/Edit Remote Poll dialog box, enter the IP
or IPX address of the device that you want the hub
to poll.
5
Choose the rate at which the device is to be polled.
If the device is critical to the performance of your
network, select a frequent rate. If the device is not
important or on a remote network you can select a
less frequent rate.
6
Select whether polling of this device is to be enabled
or disabled.
You can have up to 10 polling session entries for the
hub (poll 10 different devices), all of which can be
enabled. If you do not want to poll a device now but
want to keep its information for future use, you can
simply disable it by selecting Disable.
7
Click on OK.
Figure 4-17 Add Remote Poll Dialog Box
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Additional Management
When you have added a device to the WorkGroup
Monitor table, its entry is color-coded:
■
■
■
4-39
Additional Management
Green — Device being polled and
communicating.
If you want to perform any of the following
additional management, use the VT100 screens, refer
to Chapter 5:
Red — Device being polled but is not
communicating.
■
View the MAC address
Blue — Device not being polled by the hub.
■
Specify IPX information
■
Connect a modem to the console port
■
Create new users, with different community strings,
and disable different access methods
■
Poll a remote device to see if it is working
■
View the versions of the hub’s internal software and
hardware
■
Download new software to the hub
In the WorkGroup Monitor panel:
Address Shows the addresses of the polled devices.
Rate Shows the frequency at which the device is
polled.
Round Trip Shows the time taken for the device to
respond to the last poll.
Information Shows the number of routers through
which the hub communicates with the device or any
information gathered during the poll.
You can edit or delete a Remote Poll by selecting it
from the panel and clicking on the appropriate
button.
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CHAPTER 4: MANAGING YOUR HUB USING QUICK CONFIG M ANAGER
16710.bk : MANVT100.FRM Page 1 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
5
ADDITIONAL MANAGEMENT
USING VT100
This chapter describes the additional management
tasks you can perform using VT100®. For an overview
of the management you can perform and the
different ways you can make a management
connection to the hub, see Chapter 3.
Only the additional management screens are
described in this chapter. For information on what
the other screens do, refer to the corresponding
Quick Config Manager screens in Chapter 4. The
VT100 Screen Map on page 5-5 includes these
references.
This chapter starts with an overview of the VT100
user interface. A map of all the screens is given, to
help you to access any chosen screen.
In the descriptions of the options given in this
chapter, the default values are underlined.
VT100 User Interface
We suggest you read through this section before you
use the hub’s VT100 facility for the first time.
Afterwards, you should only need it for reference.
Screens
Screens are divided into three main areas:
■
The header area, at the top of the screen, displays a
title which tells you the subject of the screen.
■
The main part of the screen shows management
information.
■
The message area, at the bottom of the screen, is
used to display information and error messages.
The displayed screens may not be identical to those
illustrated in this chapter. The contents of screens
depend on your access level. Access levels are
described in “Logon” on page 5-7.
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CHAPTER 5: ADDITIONAL M ANAGEMENT USING VT100
5-2
Screen Components
The main part of a typical screen contains several
different types of item. This table gives an example of
each component, and explains its use:
Component
Description
◆Enabled◆
Text enclosed in markers is a list, from which
you can select one option only.
Choice Field
Component
Description
OK
Text for a button is shown in upper-case
letters. A button performs an action. A menu
screen such as the Main Menu consists of a
number of buttons arranged in a column.
Other screens have a row of buttons at the
bottom.
Button
To select a button, move the cursor to the
button and press [Return].
To cycle through the options, press [Space].
[005634]
Entry Field
In some cases there is a default entry. To
replace the default entry, simply type in the
new value over it.
Password entry fields are hidden. Anything
typed is not shown on the screen.
To delete a single character, use [Delete] on a
VT100 terminal or [Backspace] on a PC.
Address:
Read-only
information
The OK and CANCEL buttons appear on many
screens. OK updates the hub according to the
data in the fields of the screen, then returns
you to the previous screen. CANCEL returns
you to the previous screen without applying
any changes
Text enclosed in square brackets on the screen
is an Entry Field. Entry Fields allow you to
enter data from the keyboard, which may be
text, decimal or hexadecimal data.
Text not enclosed in markers or square
brackets is information that you cannot
change.
monitor
manager
security
A list box allows you to select one or more
items from a list. Selected items are indicated
by an asterisk (*) next to the item.
List Box
To select a single item, move the cursor
(using the arrow keys) until the item is
highlighted, then press [Return].
To select more than one item: for each item,
move the cursor until the item is highlighted,
then press [Space] to select the item (pressing
[Space] again deselects the item). When all the
desired items are selected, press [Return].
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VT100 User Interface
Special Keystrokes
As well as the keystrokes previously described, there
are several other keystrokes for controlling the
VT100 interface. These keystrokes allow you to move
the cursor around the screen, enter information and
move from one screen to another:
[Tab]
Moves the cursor from one field to
the next.
[Ctrl]+[B]
Moves the cursor to the next button.
When you have finished entering or changing data,
[Ctrl]+[B] is very useful for skipping over the
remaining fields.
[Ctrl]+[P]
Returns you to the previous screen
without actioning any inputs.
[Ctrl]+[R]
Refreshes the screen.
[Ctrl]+[K]
Displays a list of the possible
keystrokes.
5-3
If you are using Telnet or a terminal emulation
program, you may find that some control keys do
not operate, or that they activate other functions.
The Windows terminal emulator uses [Ctrl]+[H] as
backwards deletion, whereas others use it for
backward cursor movement. Consult the manual
accompanying your Telnet or terminal emulation
software before using the control keys.
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5-4
CHAPTER 5: ADDITIONAL M ANAGEMENT USING VT100
Repeater, Unit and Port Screens
There are three levels at which you can manage the
hub using VT100:
■
Repeater — If you manage at Repeater level, you are
managing or viewing the device as a whole. Any
stackable products, for example 3Com’s SuperStack®
range, can be logically stacked so that all the
products form a single, logical repeater.
■
Unit — If you manage at Unit level, you are
managing or viewing the hub.
■
Port — If you manage at Port level, you set up
parameters and examine statistics for individual
ports. This allows you to manage individual users or
small workgroups.
3Com’s OfficeConnect® range can be physically
stacked but not logically stacked. Each unit remains a
separate repeater regardless of how it is connected
to other OfficeConnect units. Therefore, managing
the hub at Repeater level is the same as managing it
at Unit level.
Screen Map
Figure 5-1 shows how the menus and screens are
related to each other. The numbers denote the pages
in this chapter where the screen’s description can be
found.
16710.bk : MANVT100.FRM Page 5 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Screen Map
Figure 5-1 VT100 Screen Map
5-5
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CHAPTER 5: ADDITIONAL M ANAGEMENT USING VT100
Getting Started
This section explains logging on to the VT100
management facility, displaying the main menu and
logging off.
Main Banner
If you are using a VT100 terminal connected (directly
or through modems) to the console port, you need
to perform the wake-up procedure. To do this, press
[Return][Return] at the terminal.
By default, the hub automatically configures the
baud rate of its console port to operate with the
connected terminal or modem, provided the parity,
stop bits and character size are identical to the
connected terminal or modem.
If you are using Telnet or SLIP, the wake-up
procedure is performed automatically.
When the wake-up procedure is successfully
completed, the main banner is displayed, as shown
in Figure 5-2.
Press [Return] to display the Logon screen.
Figure 5-2 Main Banner Screen
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Getting Started
If you cannot see the main banner or it displays
incorrectly, it may be that:
■
■
Your terminal is not configured as a VT100 terminal.
Check that your terminal is set up to operate with
the same parameters that the hub’s console port
uses. The console port’s autoconfigure option only
operates if your terminal uses correct parameters.
The maximum speed is 19200 baud. For
information on the console port, see “Connecting a
Modem to the Console Port” on page 5-13.
Logon
You must enter your user name and password in the
Logon screen, as shown in Figure 5-3, before you
can use the management facility.
Autoconfigure is disabled.
If you are unable to obtain the banner screen, it is
possible that the autoconfigure option has been
disabled. Check the configuration of the terminal.
If you cannot resolve the problem, refer to “Problems
When Using VT100” on page 6-3 for more problem
solving information.
5-7
Figure 5-3 Logon Screen
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CHAPTER 5: ADDITIONAL M ANAGEMENT USING VT100
5-8
If you are logging on for the first time (after
installation or initialization), use one of the default
user names and passwords shown in the following
table. The user name to use depends on which
access level you require:
User Name
Default
Password
monitor
monitor
manager
security
manager
security
Access Level
Monitor — You can access but
not change the operational
parameters of the hub.
Manager — You can change the
operational parameters of the
hub but cannot add or delete
users, download software or
initialize the hub.
Security — You can access all
the screens and change all
manageable parameters.
At the earliest opportunity, the system manager
should change the passwords for the default users.
The system manager needs to log on as ‘manager’
and ‘monitor’ to change their passwords. For
information on how to change a password, see
“Editing Users” on page 5-18.
Initializing the hub returns the passwords to their
default values.
If you are not logging on as one of the default users,
your system manager has assigned you a user name
and password. The user name determines which of
the three access levels (monitor, manager or security)
you have.
The user name and passwords are case sensitive. To
log on to the facility, enter your user name and
password in the appropriate fields and select OK.
The Main Menu screen is displayed.
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Getting Started
Main Menu
The Main Menu, as shown in Figure 5-4, is used for
accessing the various VT100 screens.
5-9
To carry out a particular management task, scroll to
the relevant option and press [Return]. This chapter
describes the screens which perform management
tasks that Quick Config Manager does not.
Logoff
If you have finished using the facility, select the
Logoff option from the bottom of the Main Menu. If
you accessed the facility using a Telnet session or
modem connection, the connection is closed
automatically.
Auto Logout
Figure 5-4 Main Menu
If you are using the management facility for the first
time, we suggest that you:
■
Set up logons for any other users and assign each
user an appropriate security level. See “Configuring
Local Security” on page 5-15.
■
Assign new passwords for the default users. See
“Editing Users” on page 5-18.
There is a built-in security timeout on the VT100
interface. If you do not press any keys for three
minutes, the management facility warns you that
the inactivity timer is about to expire. If you do not
press a key within 10 seconds, the timer expires and
the screen is locked (any displayed statistics
continue to be updated, however). When you next
press any key, the display changes to the Auto
Logout screen, which requests that you enter your
password again. If entered correctly, you are returned
to the screen that was previously active. If entered
incorrectly, you are returned to the Logon screen.
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5-10
CHAPTER 5: ADDITIONAL M ANAGEMENT USING VT100
Configuring and Viewing Setup
Information
The Management Setup screen, as shown in
Figure 5-5, is used to configure IP, IPX and SLIP
parameters for the hub. This screen also provides
access to other screens for you to set up traps and
console port parameters.
If you have no previous knowledge of IP, refer to
Appendix B for more information.
MAC Address The MAC address of the hub. This
cannot be changed.
Device IP Address If using IP, you need to enter a
unique IP address for the hub, see “IP Addresses” on
page B-1. You may use the BOOTP facility (see the
BOOTP Select field description) if your network has a
BOOTP server, or enter it manually. If you change the
device IP address, you must reset the hub to effect
the change.
CAUTION: To ensure that Quick Config Manager can
always communicate with the hub, the IP subnet
192.168.101.x is permanently assigned to the SLIP
port in addition to the user configurable SLIP
address. Do not use this subnet for your Ethernet
(network).
Device SubNet Mask If using IP, enter a suitable
subnet mask. BOOTP does this automatically. For a
class B IP address, 255.255.0.0 is suitable. If you
change this field, reset the hub to effect the change.
Figure 5-5 Management Setup Screen
Default Router If necessary, enter the IP address of
the default router on your network. BOOTP does this
automatically. If you change this field, reset the hub
to effect the change.
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Configuring and Viewing Setup Information
SLIP Address SLIP (Serial Line Internet Protocol)
allows IP to run over the console port instead of the
network. SLIP allows you to use out-of-band Telnet or
SNMP management, either locally or remotely
through a modem. SLIP operates with any valid IP
address. The default is 192.168.101.1 which is the
address Quick Config Manager uses. If you change
this field, reset the hub to effect the change.
CAUTION: Changing the SLIP address and SLIP
subnet mask can prevent Quick Config Manager from
accessing the hub.
If you require more information about SLIP, read the
Internet Activities Board document RFC 155.
SLIP SubNet Mask Enter a suitable subnet mask. For
a class C address, 255.255.255.0 (the default setting)
is suitable. If you change this field, reset the hub to
effect the change.
If you are using SLIP, ensure that Flow Control is not
set to XON/XOFF. For information on the console port,
see “Connecting a Modem to the Console Port” on
page 5-13.
5-11
BOOTP Select Enabled / Disabled
When enabled, BOOTP allows you to download the IP
address, the SubNet Mask, and the Router IP address
from a BOOTP server on your network. When
operative, BOOTP checks that a valid IP address is not
installed before sending out requests for the data.
It continues sending requests for data until one of
three conditions is satisfied:
■
BOOTP is disabled
■
A valid BOOTP reply is received
■
You enter the address manually
When the IP parameters have been received, the hub
resets automatically.
The following four fields are used for IPX addressing:
IPX Network This field shows the address of the
network for this protocol. This address is learned
automatically from the local IPX router or NetWare
File Server, and you should not need to change it.
Node This field shows the node address of the hub,
which is learned automatically.
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5-12
CHAPTER 5: ADDITIONAL M ANAGEMENT USING VT100
Status Enabled / Disabled
This field shows whether the data link protocol is
enabled. Choose Disabled if you wish to prevent
access for any reason, such as security considerations.
Data Link Protocol This field shows the name of the
IPX data link layer protocol.
Setting Up Traps
The Trap Setup screen, as shown in Figure 5-6, is
used to set up traps. Traps are messages sent across
the network to an IP/IPX-based network
management application which inform the network
manager of the status of your hub.
OK Press [Return] when the OK button is highlighted
to action your selections for this screen. You are
returned to the Main Menu.
If you have changed the parameters, you need to
reset the hub to effect the changes.
SETUP TRAPS Press [Return] when the SETUP TRAPS
button is highlighted to set up the parameters for
traps.
CONSOLE PORT Press [Return] when the CONSOLE
PORT button is highlighted to set up the console port
parameters.
CANCEL Press [Return] when the CANCEL button is
highlighted to abandon this screen without
actioning any changes, and return to the Main Menu.
Figure 5-6 Trap Setup Screen
Your Transcend IP/IPX-based network manager may
automatically set up the trap destination addresses
for you. Check the accompanying documentation.
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Connecting a Modem to the Console Port
IP or IPX Address Enter the IP or IPX address of the
remote network management station to which SNMP
traps should be sent.
Community String The community string allows a
very simple method of authentication between the
hub and the remote network management station.
You can enter any text string of up to 32 characters
(case sensitive). The remote network management
station must be configured to look for traps sent with
this community string, otherwise it will ignore the
traps. The default community string is public.
Throttle To prevent a remote network management
station receiving too many traps at once, you can
configure the hub to transmit traps with a delay
between each trap. If several traps are generated at
once, they will be transmitted with the specified
delay between them. The unit of throttle is one
thousandth of a second. The default value is 100,
which gives a delay of one tenth of a second
between each transmission. If you set the throttle to
0, traps will be sent as soon as they are generated.
If your trap configuration results in a large number of
traps being generated within a short period of time,
it is possible that some traps will not be sent.
5-13
Connecting a Modem to the Console
Port
The Console Port Setup screen is shown in Figure 5-7.
The console port is already correctly configured by
default. Only alter these default settings if you are
connecting a modem to the console port.
CAUTION: Do not change any of these settings
unless you fully understand what you are doing.
Incorrect settings will lock you out from the hub when
you select OK, and you will have to contact your
supplier for information on recovering management
communication.
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5-14
CHAPTER 5: ADDITIONAL M ANAGEMENT USING VT100
If you are unsure of the correct settings to use, refer to
the manual for your terminal or modem. If you
change the settings by accident, return them to their
default settings (shown on these pages as the
underlined values).
Serial Connection Terminal / Modem
Select Modem if you want to manage the hub
through a modem. Otherwise, leave as Terminal.
The cable you require for connecting a modem is
shown in “Cabling” on page A-2.
Figure 5-7 Console Port Setup Screen
If you alter the console port settings and select OK,
you terminate any existing session using the console
port. To avoid terminating the session completely,
ensure that the settings are correct and that the
connected equipment’s settings match the new
configuration.
If you change the console port parameters with
Auto Config already set to Enabled, or if you change
Auto Config to Enabled, you need to perform the
wake-up procedure before communication is
re-established, see “Main Banner” on page 5-6.
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Configuring Local Security
Flow Control NONE / XON/XOFF /
RTS - CTS Bidirectional / RTS - CTS Unidirectional
Select the flow control option that corresponds with
your terminal or modem.
Speed Auto-Config / 1200 / 2400 / 4800 / 9600 /
19200
Select the baud rate for your terminal or modem. The
hub can automatically configure the terminal speed to
work with your VT100 terminal. Note that the setting
made by automatic configuration is not displayed on
the screen. Leave this field as Auto-Config if you require
automatic configuration. To start automatic
configuration, the wake-up procedure must be
performed at your VT100 terminal.
5-15
Configuring Local Security
The Local Security screen, as shown in Figure 5-8, is
used for preventing various types of management
connection. This option is available only for users
with security access level.
The Local Security screen shows a table displaying
every combination of access method (console port,
Telnet or SNMP) and access level. For example, the top
left field shows whether console port access by users
with monitor access level is enabled or disabled.
Char Size, Parity and Stop Bit are all fixed.
Modem Dial String Configured, Hub Login Over
Modem Link Configured and Hub Logout Over
Modem Link Configured are fields reserved for use
by suppliers setting up the special modem dial-out
feature, see “Remote Management Service” on
page 3-7.
Figure 5-8 Local Security Screen
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5-16
CHAPTER 5: ADDITIONAL M ANAGEMENT USING VT100
The access levels are defined as:
■
Monitor — This allows the user to view the essential
operations of the hub and to establish whether or
not the hub is operating correctly. A user at this level
cannot change the operating parameters of the hub.
■
Secure Monitor — In this implementation, Secure
Monitor has the same rights as Monitor.
■
Manager — This allows the user to monitor and
change the operational parameters of the hub. The
user cannot create or delete other users, re-initialize
the hub or download a software image.
■
Specialist — In this implementation, Specialist has
the same rights as Manager.
■
Security — This allows the user to access all the
management operations. This level of security should
be assigned only to the system administrator or
somebody with the system administrator’s
responsibilities.
To prevent you from locking yourself out from the
hub completely, console port access is always kept
enabled for the security access level.
Console Port Enabled / Disabled
To prevent access to the management facilities
through the console port, disable access to the
facility for each access level. To allow you to
configure the hub locally in the event of problems on
your network, we suggest that you change the
default password for the permanently-enabled
security access level, see “Editing Users” on
page 5-18.
Remote Telnet Enabled / Disabled
Telnet is an insecure protocol. You may wish to
disable all access to the management facilities
through Telnet if there is important or secret data on
your network.
Community SNMP Enabled / Disabled
The hub can be managed through SNMP using a
remote network manager. Community SNMP does
have some simple security features but it is an
insecure protocol. You may wish to disable all access
to the management facilities through Community
SNMP if there is important or secret data on your
network.
16710.bk : MANVT100.FRM Page 17 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Configuring Users
Configuring Users
Creating Users
The Create User screen, as shown in Figure 5-9, is
used to add new users. This option is available only
for users with security access level. There can be up
to 10 users, including the three default users. Up to
three users can concurrently access the management
facility using Telnet. There is no limit to the number
of SNMP remote management sessions.
5-17
User Name Enter the name of the user. The name
can be up to 10 characters. The user name is case
sensitive.
Password Enter a password for this user. The
password can be up to 10 characters. The password
is case sensitive and is not displayed on the screen.
Access Level Monitor / Secure Monitor / Manager /
Specialist / Security
Enter an appropriate access level for the new user by
cycling through the options using the space bar.
Community String By default, the community
string is the same as the User Name. You can change
this string to any text string of up to 32 characters.
The community string is used only for SNMP access.
The remote network manager must be configured to
use the same community string.
Each user’s community string must be unique.
Figure 5-9 Create User Screen
16710.bk : MANVT100.FRM Page 18 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
5-18
CHAPTER 5: ADDITIONAL M ANAGEMENT USING VT100
Editing Users
The Edit User screen, as shown in Figure 5-10, is
used to change your own password or community
string. This option is available only for users with
security access level.
No user can directly change another user’s password
or community string. If you are a system
administrator and wish to change another user’s
password, you need to log on as the other user.
The options are similar to the Create User screen, see
“Creating Users” on page 5-17. The main differences
are the password fields. You must type in your
current password in the Old Password field before
you can change any fields. To set a new password,
enter the password in both the New Password and
Confirm Password fields.
If you enter different values for the New Password and
Confirm Password fields, an error message is displayed
when the OK button is selected. If [Return] is then
pressed, a null password is set for the user. The user
can log in but if an attempt is made to change the
password again, the message ‘Old Password Field
Not Completed’ is displayed.
If you forget your password, refer to the advice in
“Problems When Using Quick Config Manager” on
page 6-3.
Figure 5-10 Edit User Screen
16710.bk : MANVT100.FRM Page 19 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Polling a Remote Device
Deleting Users
The Delete Users screen, as shown in Figure 5-11, is
used to remove users from the User List. The User
List shows all of the users configured for the hub.
This option is available only for users with security
access level.
Polling a Remote Device
The Remote Poll screen, as shown in Figure 5-12, is
used to see if a remote device is responding, by
sending a message forcing a response from the
target device. This determines if there is a path or a
congested path between this device and other
devices on the network. This option is available only
for users with manager access level or higher.
Figure 5-11 Delete Users Screen
Select the users to delete from the List Box using the
spacebar, then move to the DELETE USERS button and
press [Return]. You cannot delete the current user
(the user name you used to log on) or any of the
default users (monitor, manager or security).
5-19
Figure 5-12 Remote Poll Screen
16710.bk : MANVT100.FRM Page 20 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
5-20
CHAPTER 5: ADDITIONAL M ANAGEMENT USING VT100
The OfficeConnect Hub 8/TPM must have an IP or IPX
address configured for it, to enable it to receive
responses from the device it is polling.
Target Address Enter the IP or IPX address of the
device to poll.
If there are multiple instances of the Remote Poll
screen, they share the same Target Address. This may
happen if there are multiple Telnet sessions, or a
console port session and a Telnet session. The last
address entered is the address that is polled.
Viewing Internal Version Numbers
The Status screen, as shown in Figure 5-13, shows
information about the hub.
Make a note of this information as your supplier may
need to know it should you contact them with a
problem.
Round Trip Time This is the interval in milliseconds
between the time the last frame was sent to the
target device and the time a response was received
by the hub. If there is no response within a few
seconds, no reply is shown. Also displayed is the
number of router hops and, if set, the time-to-live
for the frame.
The hub can be configured to automatically poll
several devices at regular intervals, and report back to
an IP/IPX-based network management application if
there is no response.
Figure 5-13 Status Screen
16710.bk : MANVT100.FRM Page 21 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Downloading a Software Upgrade
System Up Time This field indicates how long the
hub has been running since the last reset.
Number of Resets This field shows the total
number of resets since the hub was first installed, or
initialized.
5-21
Downloading a Software Upgrade
The Software Upgrade screen, as shown in
Figure 5-14, is used to download a new version of
the software image to the hub. This option is
available only for users with security access level.
Last Reset Type This field indicates the cause of the
last reset.
Management Module Hardware Revision This is
the hardware version of the management board
inside the hub.
Flash EPROM Software Revision This is the version
number of the software image stored in the
management board’s memory.
PROM Software Revision This is the version number
of software stored in the Boot PROMs on the
management board.
Figure 5-14 Software Upgrade Screen
When 3Com issues a new version of the hub
SmartAgent® software, you can obtain the software
image from 3Com bulletin board services, see
“3Com provides easy access to technical support
16710.bk : MANVT100.FRM Page 22 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
5-22
CHAPTER 5: ADDITIONAL M ANAGEMENT USING VT100
information through a variety of services. This
appendix describes these services.” on page C-1.
The software download can be performed through a
serial connection (over SLIP) but it is much faster over
the network.
File Name Enter the name of the file that contains
the software image to be downloaded to the hub.
You must place the image file where it is accessible
to the TFTP load request. Check with your supplier if
you are unsure where to place the image file.
You may wish to download the file from another
directory. If so, you must give the full path to the file
and the filename, using a maximum of 30 characters.
Server Address Enter the IP or IPX address of the
device where the software file containing the image
of the management facility can be found.
OK Select this button to start the software download.
When the download is complete, the hub is reset.
If the software download fails, any traps that are sent
to an IP/IPX-based network manager, reporting the
failure, may indicate an incorrect status. This is not a
concern for a successful download as it always result
in a correct trap status.
16710.bk : PROBSOLV.FRM Page 1 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
6
PROBLEM SOLVING
The OfficeConnect® Hub 8/TPM has been designed
to aid you when detecting and solving possible
problems with your network. These problems are
rarely serious, the cause is usually a disconnected or
damaged cable, or incorrect configuration. If this
chapter does not solve your problem, contact your
supplier for information on what to do next.
Perform these actions first:
■
Ensure all equipment is powered on.
■
Power each hub off, wait about 5 seconds and then
power them on so they perform a self-test. The
self-test only takes a few seconds, during which all
LEDs light. Port Status LEDs light yellow.
Isolating a Problem
A good way of isolating a problem is to see whether
it occurs on a particular port only. This can be done
by:
■
Using a different port to see if the problem still exists.
■
Using management to view how a port has been set
up. In particular, see if the port is:
■
Partitioned because of a network loop
■
Disabled by management
■
Part of a resilient link pair
■
Performing security
Check the Alert LED and if lit, use the Alerts dialog
box in Quick Config Manager to see what condition
is causing it to light.
16710.bk : PROBSOLV.FRM Page 2 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
6-2
CHAPTER 6: PROBLEM SOLVING
Problems When Using Your Hub
Power LED not lit. Check your power adapter
connection. If there is still no power, you may have a
faulty power adapter which needs replacing with
another OfficeConnect power adapter. Do not use
any other power adapter with the hub.
Alert LED continuously lit. If you haven’t configured
the Alert LED, it lights for two default conditions. It
could be that there is either continual excessive use
of your network (over 80%) or, more likely, a
10BASE-T port has partitioned due to a loop in your
network (in which case a Port Status LED is yellow).
Examine your connections and remove the loop.
Each piece of equipment needs only one connection
to your OfficeConnect hub.
If you have configured the Alert LED, check the Alerts
dialog box in Quick Config Manager to see what
conditions have caused the LED to light, see “Setting
Up the Alert LED” on page 4-15.
Check that the Alert LED Test is disabled, in the Alerts
dialog box. If it is not, select Disable and click on OK.
Port Status LED yellow for a 10BASE-T port.
It is likely that there is a loop in your network which
has caused this port to partition. Examine your
connections and remove the loop. Each piece of
equipment needs only one connection to your
OfficeConnect hub.
Port Status LED not lit for a 10BASE-T port that
has a connection. There is a problem with this
connection. Check you are using a ‘Straight-through’
10BASE-T cable which is properly connected at both
ends, is not damaged, and that the equipment it is
connected to is powered on and operating correctly.
Link between two OfficeConnect hubs not
working. Check your hub connections; follow the
information given in “Connecting OfficeConnect
Hubs Together” on page 2-8. With 10BASE-T it is
likely an MDI/MDIX switch is set incorrectly. With
10BASE-2 (Coax) it is likely a terminator (end piece)
is not fitted properly; this would cause the Coax Port
Status LED to light yellow (partition).
16710.bk : PROBSOLV.FRM Page 3 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Problems When Using Quick Config Manager
Problems When Using Quick Config
Manager
You cannot access the hub. For a successful local
management connection, you need to use a
standard null modem cable, and have the hub’s
console port set to 9600 baud (or autoconfiguration
enabled), the serial connection type set to ‘Terminal’,
and the flow control set to ‘NONE’. These are the
default settings. For information on the console port
settings, see “Connecting a Modem to the Console
Port” on page 5-13.
You forget your community string. Log in to the
hub using VT100, and use the Edit User screen to
view your community string, see “Editing Users” on
page 5-18.
6-3
Problems When Using VT100
The initial VT100 Main Banner screen does not
display. Check that your terminal or terminal
emulator is correctly configured to operate as a
VT100 terminal.
For console port access, check you have performed
the wake-up procedure correctly, by pressing
[Return][Return].
Check the settings on your terminal or emulator. The
parity must be set to ‘none’, the stop bit ‘1’ and the
character size ‘8’. The management facility’s
autoconfiguration works only with speeds from 1200
to 19200 baud.
Check that autoconfiguration is not disabled.
If you still cannot access the hub, reset the hub using
Quick Config Manager, see “Resetting the Hub” on
page 4-11, and retry the wake-up procedure. If this
does not work, initialize the hub.
Screens are incorrectly displayed. Check that your
terminal or terminal emulator is correctly configured
to operate as a VT100 terminal.
16710.bk : PROBSOLV.FRM Page 4 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
6-4
CHAPTER 6: PROBLEM SOLVING
Check the settings on your terminal or emulator. The
parity must be set to ‘none’, the stop bit ‘1’ and the
character size ‘8’. The management facility’s
autoconfiguration works only with speeds from 1200
to 19200 baud.
The Telnet management station cannot access
the device. Check the hub’s IP address, subnet mask
and default router are correctly configured, see
“Giving the Hub an IP Address” on page 4-7, and the
device has been reset. Ensure that you enter the IP
address correctly when invoking the Telnet facility.
Problems When Using an IP/IPX-based
Management Application
The IP/IPX-based management application
cannot access the device. Check that:
■
■
■
You forget your password.
Another user with security access level can log in
using VT100, delete your user name, and create a
new user name, with a new password for you, see
“Configuring Users” on page 5-17.
If you know your community string, you can log in
using Quick Config Manager and initialize the
device, see “Initializing the Hub” on page 4-11. This
returns all configuration information, including
passwords, to the default values.
Alternatively, another user with security access level
can log in and initialize the device.
The hub’s IP address, subnet mask and default
router are correctly configured, see “Giving the
Hub an IP Address” on page 4-7.
The hub has been reset, see “Resetting the Hub”
on page 4-11.
The hub’s IP address is correctly recorded by the
IP/IPX-based management application. For
information on how to do this, refer to the
documentation accompanying the application.
Traps are not received by the IP/IPX-based
management application. Check that the address
of the management station is entered in the hub’s
trap table, see “Setting Up Traps” on page 5-12.
16710.bk : PROBSOLV.FRM Page 5 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Problems When Using an IP/IPX-based Management Application
The IP/IPX-based management application can no
longer access the device. Check that
Community-SNMP access is enabled, see
“Configuring Local Security” on page 5-15.
Check that the port through which you are trying to
access the hub has not been disabled. If it is enabled,
check the connections and network cabling at the
port. Try accessing the hub through a different port.
If you can now access the hub, a problem with the
original port is indicated. Re-examine the
connections and cabling.
Possibly there is a network problem preventing you
from accessing the hub over the network. Try
accessing the hub through the console port, and
reset the hub.
6-5
16710.bk : PROBSOLV.FRM Page 6 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
6-6
CHAPTER 6: PROBLEM SOLVING
16710.bk : DIMSNSTA.FRM Page 1 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
A
DIMENSIONS, STANDARDS AND CABLING
Dimensions and Operating Environment
Standards
Functional:
ISO 8802/3
IEEE 802.3
Safety:
UL 1950, EN 60950
CSA 22.2 #950
EMC:
Figure A-1 Dimensions And Operating Environment For The Hub
BABT Approval (for U.K. Users Only)
The OfficeConnect® Hub 8/TPM is covered by Oftel
General Approval, NS/G/12345/J/100003, for indirect
connection to a public telecommunications system.
This can be achieved using the console port and an
approved modem.
EN 55022 Class B
EN 50082-1
FCC Part 15 Class B certified*
CSA C108.8 Class B
VCCI Class 2
[screened (shielded) cables must be used to ensure
compliance with these EMC standards]
Environmental:
EN 60068 (IEC 68)
*Refer to “EMC Statements” at the back of this user
guide for conditions of operation.
16710.bk : DIMSNSTA.FRM Page 2 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
A-2
APPENDIX A: DIMENSIONS, STANDARDS AND CABLING
Cabling
10BASE-T
Figure A-2 Pin Numbering For 10BASE-T
Straight-through
Crossover
Figure A-3 Straight-through 10BASE-T Cabling
Figure A-4 Crossover 10BASE-T Cabling
16710.bk : DIMSNSTA.FRM Page 3 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Cabling
A-3
Console Port
Figure A-5 Pin Numbering For Serial Connection
Examples of Null Modem Cables You Can Use
Figure A-6 Example Of Null Modem Cabling For 9 Pin Workstation
Figure A-7 Example Of Null Modem Cabling For 25 Pin Workstation
16710.bk : DIMSNSTA.FRM Page 4 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
A-4
APPENDIX A: DIMENSIONS, STANDARDS AND CABLING
Modem Cable
Management Settings
You need to set your management equipment to:
Figure A-8 Modem Cabling For 25 Pin Modem
■
Character size — 8
■
Stop bit — 1
■
Parity — None
16710.bk : IPADDRES.FRM Page 1 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
B
IP AND IPX ADDRESSES
IP Addresses
A world-wide network such as the Internet needs a
globally-accepted method of identifying individual
devices (workstations and network equipment).
Devices on the Internet are assigned unique
addresses. The Internet then behaves like a virtual
network, using these assigned addresses when
sending or receiving packets.
To ensure the uniqueness of Internet addresses, they
are assigned by three organizations, NIC, RIPE and
APNIC-DOM. These organizations assign a globally
unique network number to each network that wants
to connect to the Internet. They only assign the
network portion of the address; assigning the device
numbers is your responsibility.
■
The first part identifies the network on which the
device resides.
■
The second part identifies the device itself.
If you do not plan to connect to the Internet but
need to use IP addresses on your network, you could
assign network numbers on your own. However, NIC,
RIPE and APNIC-DOM still assign and register unique
network numbers to organizations not planning to
join the Internet. This means that if you change your
mind later, you can simply connect to the Internet
without having to obtain new network numbers and
reconfigure every device on your network with a
new address.
Devices attached to the same network must have the
same number assigned to the network portion of the
address, but have different numbers assigned to the
device portion of the address.
For information on assigning your own IP addresses
for a small, contained network, see “Assigning IP
Addresses to a Small, Contained Network” on
page B-5.
Internet addressing uses a 32-bit (or 4 octet) address
field. The bits that make up an Internet address are
divided into two parts:
16710.bk : IPADDRES.FRM Page 2 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
B-2
APPENDIX B: IP AND IPX ADDRESSES
Obtaining a Network Number
There are three organizations responsible for
allocating network numbers. These details are correct
at the time of printing, but may change.
You can also send e-mail to these addresses:
■
hostmaster@rs.internic.net
(host, domain, network changes and updates)
■
action@rs.internic.net
(computer operations)
■
mailserv@rs.internic.net
(automatic mail service)
■
info@internic.net
(automatic mail service for general enquiries)
■
refdesk@is.internic.net
(enquiries not handled by the services above)
USA - InterNIC, Network Solutions
Attention:
Telephone:
InterNIC Registration Services
505 Huntmar Park Drive
Herndon
VA 22070
1-800-444-4345 (Toll Free)
1-619-455-4600
1-703-742-4777
Europe - RIPE
Attention:
RIPE NCC
Kruislaan 409
NL-1098 SJ Amsterdam
The Netherlands
Telephone:
Fax:
e-mail:
+31 20 592 5065
+31 20 592 5090
ncc@ripe.net
16710.bk : IPADDRES.FRM Page 3 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
IP Addresses
Asia Pacific Network Information Centre
(APNIC-DOM)
Attention:
Asia Pacific Network
Information Centre
(APNIC-DOM)
c/o Computer Centre
University of Tokyo
2-11-16 Yayoi
Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113
Japan
Admin. Contact:
Telephone:
e-mail:
Nakayama, Masaya (MN89)
+81 3 3812 2111 ext2720
nakayama@nic.ad.jp
Technical Contact:
Conrad, David (DC396)
Telephone:
+81 3 3580 3781
or +81 3 3580 3784
Fax:
+81 3 3580 3782
e-mail:
davidc@apnic.net
B-3
How IP Addresses Work
To make internet addressing easier to understand, IP
addresses are written in dotted decimal notation, for
example:
191.0.0.72
(10111111.00000000.00000000.01001000 in binary)
The IP address field is affected by:
■
Classes
■
Subnets
Classes
Depending on the Class (or type) of the IP address,
there are many ways that the address field can be
divided into a network number and a device number.
The number used to convey how an IP address is
divided is determined by the most significant bits in
the 32-bit address field.
There are four classes of IP addresses. Each address
class begins with a unique bit pattern, which is used
by the Internet software residing on your devices to
identify the address class.
16710.bk : IPADDRES.FRM Page 4 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
B-4
APPENDIX B: IP AND IPX ADDRESSES
Class A. The highest order bit is set to 0, giving a
seven-bit network number and a 24-bit device
address. You can have 125 networks with 16,777,214
devices per network, and the addresses are in the
range 001.xxx.xxx.xxx to 126.xxx.xxx.xxx (where xxx
represents the device portion).
Subnets
You can further divide your IP network into sub
networks. Support for sub networks is important
because the number of bits assigned to the device
portion of an IP address limits the number of
devices that may be addressed on any given
network. For example, a Class C address is restricted
to 254 devices.
Class B. The two highest order bits are set to 10,
giving a 14-bit network number and a 16-bit device
address. You can have 16382 networks with 65,534
devices per network, and the addresses are in the
range 128.001.xxx.xxx to 191.254.xxx.xxx (where xxx
represents the device portion).
Class C. The three highest order bits are set to 110,
giving a 21-bit network number and a 8-bit device
address. You can have 2,097,152 networks with 254
devices per network, and the addresses are in the
range 192.000.001.xxx to 223.255.254.xxx (where xxx
represents the device portion).
Class D. This is used as a multicast address. The four
highest order bits are set to 1110. Multicasting is
used to send an IP datagram to all members of a host
group. A host group is composed of a set of devices
identified by a single IP address. The addresses are in
the range 224.000.000.000 to 239.255.255.255.
If you have a small network (less than 254 devices)
then you may decide not to have sub networks.
A subnet mask is used to divide the device portion of
the IP address into two parts:
■
The first part identifies subnet number.
■
The second part identifies the device on that subnet.
16710.bk : IPADDRES.FRM Page 5 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
IP Addresses
The bits of the subnet mask are set to 1 if the device
should treat the corresponding bit in the IP address
as part of the original network number or as part of
the subnet number. These bits in the mask are set to
0 if the device should treat the bit as part of the
device number, as shown in Figure B-1.
B-5
Assigning IP Addresses to a Small, Contained
Network
If you have a small network (less than 255 devices)
that you do not plan to connect to the Internet then
here is a guide as to what you can use for the IP
addresses and subnet mask:
■
Use an IP address that is in the range 192.000.001.xxx
to 223.255.254.xxx (Class C) to define your network,
and allocate device numbers (the xxx part of the IP
address), starting from 1.
■
Use a dummy subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 to
match the network portion of your IP addresses.
Remember that no two devices on a network may
have the same IP address.
Figure B-1 Using A Subnet Mask To Obtain The Subnet Address
CAUTION: To ensure that Quick Config Manager can
always communicate with the hub, the IP subnet
192.168.101.x is permanently assigned to the SLIP
port in addition to the user configurable SLIP
address. Do not use this subnet for your Ethernet
(network).
16710.bk : IPADDRES.FRM Page 6 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
B-6
APPENDIX B: IP AND IPX ADDRESSES
IPX Addresses
If you are using the IPX protocol, the OfficeConnect®
Hub 8/TPM is allocated an IPX address automatically
by the local IPX router or NetWare File Server. This
happens approximately 60 seconds after the hub is
powered up for the first time. You should never
need to change the allocated address.
16710.bk : PRODRANG.FRM Page 1 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
C
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
3Com provides easy access to technical support
information through a variety of services. This
appendix describes these services.
Information contained in this appendix is correct at
time of publication. For the very latest, we
recommend that you access 3Com Corporation’s
World Wide Web site as described below.
Online Technical Services
3Com offers worldwide product support 24 hours a
day, 7 days a week, through the following online
systems:
■
World Wide Web site
■
3Com Bulletin Board Service (3ComBBS)
■
3ComFactsSM automated fax service
■
3ComForum on CompuServe® online service
World Wide Web Site
Access the latest networking information on 3Com
Corporation’s World Wide Web site by entering our
URL into your Internet browser:
http://www.3Com.com/
This service features the latest information about
3Com solutions and technologies, customer service
and support, news about the company, NetAge®
Magazine, and more.
3Com Bulletin Board Service
3ComBBS contains patches, software, and drivers for
all 3Com products, as well as technical articles. This
service is available through analog modem or digital
modem (ISDN) 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
Access by Analog Modem
To reach the service by modem, set your modem to
8 data bits, no parity, and 1 stop bit. Call the
telephone number nearest you:
16710.bk : PRODRANG.FRM Page 2 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
APPENDIX C: TECHNICAL SUPPOR T
C-2
3ComFacts Automated Fax Service
Country
Data Rate
Telephone Number
Australia
up to 14400 bps
61 2 9955 2073
Brazil
up to 14400 bps
55 11 547 9666
France
up to 14400 bps
33 1 6986 6954
Germany
up to 28800 bps
4989 62732 188
Hong Kong
up to 14400 bps
852 2537 5608
Italy (fee required)
up to 14400 bps
39 2 27300680
Japan
up to 14400 bps
81 3 3345 7266
Country
Telephone Number
Mexico
up to 28800 bps
52 5 520 7853
Hong Kong
852 2537 5610
P. R. of China
up to 14400 bps
86 10 684 92351
U.K.
44 1442 438279
U.S.A.
1 408 727 7021
Singapore
up to 14400 bps
65 534 5693
Taiwan
up to 14400 bps
886 2 377 5840
U.K.
up to 28800 bps
44 1442 438278
U.S.A.
up to 28800 bps
1 408 980 8204
(continued)
3Com Corporation’s interactive fax service,
3ComFacts, provides data sheets, technical articles,
diagrams, and troubleshooting instructions on 3Com
products 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
Call 3ComFacts using your Touch-Tone telephone
using one of these international access numbers:
Local access numbers are available within the
following countries:
Country
Telephone Number
Access by Digital Modem
Australia
1800 678 515
ISDN users can dial in to 3ComBBS using a digital
modem for fast access up to 56 Kbps. To access
3ComBBS using ISDN, use the following number:
Belgium
0800 71279
Denmark
800 17319
Finland
98 001 4444
408 654 2703
16710.bk : PRODRANG.FRM Page 3 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Online Technical Services
C-3
3ComForum on CompuServe Online Service
Country
Telephone Number
France
05 90 81 58
Germany
0130 81 80 63
Hong Kong
800 933 486
Italy
1678 99085
3ComForum is a CompuServe-based service containing patches, software, drivers, and technical articles
about all 3Com products, as well as a messaging
section for peer support. To use 3ComForum, you
need a CompuServe account.
Malaysia
1800 801 777
To use 3ComForum:
Netherlands
06 0228049
New Zealand
0800 446 398
Norway
800 11062
Portugal
0505 442 607
Russia (Moscow only)
956 0815
Singapore
800 6161 463
Spain
900 964 445
Sweden
020 792954
U.K.
0800 626403
1
Log on to CompuServe.
2
Type go threecom
3
Press [Return] to see the 3ComForum main menu.
16710.bk : PRODRANG.FRM Page 4 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
C-4
APPENDIX C: TECHNICAL SUPPOR T
Contact your local 3Com sales office to find your
authorized service provider using one of these
numbers:
Support from Your Network Supplier
If additional assistance is required, contact your
network supplier. Many suppliers are authorized
3Com service partners who are qualified to provide
a variety of services, including network planning,
installation, hardware maintenance, application training, and support services.
When you contact your network supplier for
assistance, have the following information ready:
■
Diagnostic error messages
■
A list of system hardware and software, including
revision levels
■
Details about recent configuration changes, if
applicable
If you are unable to contact your network supplier,
see the following section on how to contact 3Com.
Support from 3Com
If you are unable to receive support from your
network supplier, technical support contracts are
available from 3Com.
Regional Sales Office
3Com Corporation
P.O. Box 58145
5400 Bayfront Plaza
Santa Clara, California
95052-8145
U.S.A.
3Com Asia Limited
Australia
China
Hong Kong
India
Indonesia
Japan
Korea
Malaysia
New Zealand
Phillippines
Singapore
Taiwan
Thailand
Telephone Number
800 NET 3Com or 1 408 764 5000
408 764 5001 (fax)
61 2 9937 5000 (Sydney)
61 3 9866 8022 (Melbourne)
8610 68492568 (Beijing)
86 21 63740220 Ext 6115 (Shanghai)
852 2501 1111
91 11 644 3974
6221 572 2088
81 6 536 3303 (Osaka)
81 3 3345 7251 (Tokyo)
822 2 319 4711
60 3 732 7910
64 9 366 9138
632 892 4476
65 538 9368
886 2 377 5850
662 231 8151 4
16710.bk : PRODRANG.FRM Page 5 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
Support from 3Com
Regional Sales Office
Telephone Number
3Com Benelux B.V.
Belgium
Netherlands
32 2 725 0202
31 30 6029700
3Com Canada
Calgary
Montreal
Ottawa
Toronto
Vancouver
403 265 3266
514 683 3266
613 566 7055
416 498 3266
604 434 3266
3Com European HQ
49 89 627320
3Com France
33 1 69 86 68 00
3Com GmbH
Austria
Czech Republic/Slovak
Republic
Germany
(Central European HQ)
Hungary
Poland
Switzerland
3Com Ireland
43 1 513 4323
420 2 21845 800
49 30 34 98790 (Berlin)
49 89 627320 (Munich)
36 1 250 83 41
48 22 6451351
41 31 996 14 14
353 1 820 7077
Regional Sales Office
Telephone Number
3Com Latin America
U.S. Headquarters
Northern Latin America
Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Mexico
Peru
Venezuela
408 326 2093
305 261 3266 (Miami, Florida)
541 312 3266
55 11 546 0869
562 633 9242
571 629 4110
52 5 520 7841/7847
51 1 221 5399
58 2 953 8122
3Com Mediterraneo
Italy
Spain
39 2 253011 (Milan)
39 6 5279941 (Rome)
34 1 383 17 00
3Com Middle East
971 4 349049
3Com Nordic AB
Denmark
Finland
Norway
Sweden
45 39 27 85 00
358 0 435 420 67
47 22 18 40 03
46 8 632 56 00
3Com Russia
007 095 258 09 40
3Com Southern Africa
27 11 807 4397
3Com UK Ltd.
44 131 220 8228 (Edinburgh)
44 161 873 7717 (Manchester)
44 162 889 7000 (Marlow)
C-5
16710.bk : PRODRANG.FRM Page 6 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
APPENDIX C: TECHNICAL SUPPOR T
C-6
Returning Products for Repair
Before you send a product directly to 3Com for
repair, you must first obtain a Return Materials
Authorization (RMA) number. Products sent to 3Com
without RMA numbers will be returned to the sender
unopened, at the sender’s expense.
To obtain an RMA number, call or fax:
Country
Telephone Number
U.S.A. and Canada
1 800 876 3266, option 408 764 7120
2
Latin America
1 408 326 2927
408 764 7120
Europe, South Africa,
and Middle East
44 1442 438125
44 1442 435822
Outside Europe, U.S.A.,
and Canada
1 408 326 2926
1 408 764 7120
04/22/97
Fax Number
16710.bk : 16710.IX Page 119 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
INDEX
Numerics
10BASE-2 1-2, 2-5
connecting hubs 2-9
segment 1-3
10BASE-T 1-2, 2-4, 2-5, A-2
connecting hubs 2-10
3Com Bulletin Board Service (3ComBBS) C-1
3Com sales offices C-4
3Com URL C-1
3ComFacts C-2
3ComForum C-3
A
about network management 3-1
access levels 5-17
manager 5-16
monitor 5-16
secure monitor 5-16
security 5-16
specialist 5-16
access method 5-15
accessing the hub 4-6
Activity and Errors graph
broadcast frames 4-20
collisions 4-20
readable frames 4-20
runts 4-20
total errors 4-20
additional management 4-39
Alert LED 4-15
checking 6-1
testing 4-16
Alerts dialog box 4-15
alignment errors 4-24
assigning IP addresses B-5
attached station 4-27
authentication failure 4-17
authorized addresses 4-29
Auto Logout screen 5-9
autoconfiguration 3-4, 5-6
B
before you start 2-4
bitmap 4-7, 4-12
BOOTP 5-11
select 5-11
broadcast frames 4-20, 4-22
bulletin board service C-1
buttons 5-2
C
cabling A-2
char size (console port setup) 5-15
checking hub connections 2-11
choice fields 5-2
classes B-3
clipping hubs together 2-6
clips 2-6
coaxial 1-2
collision 1-3, 4-20
colors
device monitoring 4-39
port 4-12
resilient link pair 4-35
COM port,changing 4-3
community SNMP access 5-16
community string
changing 5-18
entering 5-17
hub 4-6
network manager 5-13
trap 5-13
Community/Polling dialog box 4-6
CompuServe C-3
Configure menu
Community/Polling 4-6
General Info 4-13, 4-15, 4-32, 4-35, 4-38
IP Configuration 4-8
configuring
Alert LED 4-15
IP 4-7
port 4-25
resilient links 4-33
connecting
16710.bk : 16710.IX Page 120 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
a modem to the console port 5-13
management 3-3
workstations 2-7
connecting hubs together 2-8
using 10BASE-2 (Coax) 2-9
using 10BASE-T 2-10
connections
checking 2-11
hub 2-5
workstation 2-4
console port 3-4, 5-13, A-3
autoconfiguration 5-15
changing the management station’s
port 4-3
enabling/disabling access 5-16
management 3-4
terminal emulator, connecting 3-5
VT100 terminal
connecting 3-5
Console Port Setup screen 5-13
contact 4-9
contract ID 4-9
control keys 5-3
conventions 2
Create User screen 5-17
creating
resilient links 4-35
crossover 4-35, A-2
D
data link protocol 5-12
default
COM port 4-3
passwords 5-8
router 5-10
users 5-8
values, note 4-1, 5-1
Delete Users screen 5-19
device 1-3
general information 4-13
IP address 5-10
name 4-9
subnet mask 5-10
diagnostic LEDs 2-1
dialog box
Alerts 4-15
Community/Polling 4-6
IP Configuration 4-8
MIB II 4-13
Port Configuration 4-26
Port Security 4-29
Resilience 4-35
Security Configuration 4-32
Workgroup 4-38
dimensions A-1
disable port 4-25
Disconnect Unknown Device 4-28
displaying graphs and charts 4-18
DUD 4-28
E
Edit User screen 5-18
emergency contact 4-9
enable port 4-25
entry fields 5-2
environment A-1
equipment, connecting 2-7
error rate 4-18
Ethernet 1-2
expanding your network C-1
F
fax service. See 3ComFacts
FCS errors 4-24
feet 2-6
Flash EPROM software revision 5-21
flow control 5-15
frame 1-3
Frame Types chart
broadcast frames 4-22
multicast frames 4-22
unicast frames 4-22
G
general information
device 4-13
getting started 1-1
glossary 1-2
graphical representation of the hub 4-7,
4-12
H
hardware revision 5-21
how IP addresses work B-3
how to use this guide 1
hub
clipping 2-6
connecting equipment 2-7
16710.bk : 16710.IX Page 121 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
connecting to another hub 2-8
connections 2-5
double-clicking 4-12
general information 4-13
getting started 1-1
graphical representation 4-7, 4-12
initializing 4-11
IP address 4-7
managing 3-2
monitoring other devices 4-37
port configuration 4-25
positioning 2-5
problems 6-2
resetting 4-11
security 4-28
siting 2-5
statistics 4-19
wall mounting 2-7
hub level security 4-31
HyperTerminal 3-5
I
image file name 5-22
implementation overview 2-1
Important Safety Information 7
inactivity timer 5-9
in-band management 3-6
initializing the hub 4-11
installating Quick Config Manager 4-1
Internet protocol 1-4
IP 1-4, 3-1, 4-7
IP address 4-9, B-1
allocation of B-2
network manager 5-13
obtaining an B-2
IP Configuration dialog box 4-8
IP/IPX-based network management
application 3-6
IPX 1-4, 3-1
address B-6
network 5-11
network manager address 5-13
isolate 1-2
isolating a problem 6-1
K
keys (VT100) 5-3
L
L’information de Sécurité Importante 9
LAN 1-2
last restart type 5-21
late events 4-25
learn stations 4-27
LEDs 2-1
links
main and standby 4-33
state 4-27
traps 4-27
list box 5-2
local area network 1-2
Local Security screen 5-15
login violation 4-17
logoff 5-9
logon 5-7
Logon screen 5-7
loop 1-2, 2-8
M
MAC address 4-25, 5-10
Main Banner screen 5-6
main link 4-33
Main Menu screen 5-9
management
connections 3-3
settings A-4
station 3-1
tasks 3-2
management facility (VT100)
logoff 5-9
logon 5-7
starting 5-6
manager IP address 4-10
managing
over the network 3-6
through the console port 3-4
with IP/IPX-based network management
application 3-6
with Quick Config Manager 3-5
with VT100 terminal 3-5
with VT100 terminal emulator 3-5, 3-6
your hub 3-2
map
Quick Config Manager windows 4-3
VT100 screens 5-4
MDI/MDIX switch 2-10, 4-34
media type 4-27
MIB 1-3, 4-13
16710.bk : 16710.IX Page 122 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
MIB II dialog box 4-13
modem 1-4, 5-13, A-4
modem dial-out 3-7
monitor failure 4-17
monitoring 4-18
other devices 4-37
mounting 2-7
multicast frames 4-22
N
Need To Know 4-28
NetWare file server B-6
network 1-2
error rate 4-18
expanding C-1
glossary 1-2
loop 1-2, 2-8
management 3-1, 3-6
manager community string 5-13
operating system 2-4
terminology 1-2
utilization 4-18
Network Errors graph
alignment errors 4-24
FCS errors 4-24
late events 4-25
rate mismatch 4-25
short events 4-24
too long errors 4-24
very long events 4-25
network supplier support C-4
Network Traffic graph 4-22
node (IPX) 5-11
NTK 4-28
null modem cable A-3
O
OfficeConnect hub 1-1
online technical services C-1
operating environment A-1
operating system 2-4
out-of-band management 3-4
P
packet 1-3
parity (console port setup) 5-15
partition 1-2, 4-16
state 4-27
traps 4-27
passwords
changing 5-18
creating 5-17
default 5-8
pinouts A-2
polling 4-6
other devices 4-37
port 2-1
attached station 4-27
colors 4-12
configuration 4-25
configure 4-25
learn stations 4-27
link state 4-27
link traps 4-27
media type 4-27
partition state 4-27
partition traps 4-27
security 4-29
security violation 4-17
selection 4-32
state 4-27
Port Configuration dialog box 4-26
Port Security dialog box 4-29
positioning your equipment 2-5
power A-1
problem solving 6-1
problems
using Quick Config Manager 6-3
using VT100 6-3
using your hub 6-2
product range C-1
PROM software revision 5-21
Q
Quick Config Manager 3-1, 3-3, 3-5, 4-2
installing 4-1
problems 6-3
using 4-1
quick installation
connecting equipment 2-7
management software 4-2
QUICKMGR.INI file 4-3
R
rate 4-39
mismatch 4-25
readable frames 4-20
16710.bk : 16710.IX Page 123 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
remote management service 3-7
Remote Poll screen 5-19
remote telnet access 5-16
reseller support tool 3-7
resetting the hub 4-11
resilience 4-33
Resilience dialog box 4-35
resilient links 4-33, 4-34
restart count 5-21
returning products for repair C-6
RJ45 1-2
round trip 4-39
round trip time 5-20
router IP address 4-10, 5-10
rubber feet 2-6
rules, resilient links 4-34
running Quick Config Manager 4-2
runt frames 4-20
S
Safety Information 7
screen
areas 5-1
components 5-2
map 5-4
screens
Auto Logout 5-9
Console Port Setup 5-13
Create User 5-17
Delete Users 5-19
Edit User 5-18
Local Security 5-15
Logon 5-7
Main Banner 5-6
Main Menu 5-9
Remote Poll 5-19
Setup 5-10
Software Upgrade 5-21
Status 5-20
Trap Setup 5-12
security 4-28
hub level 4-31
port level 4-29
violation 4-17
Security Configuration dialog box 4-32
segment 1-3
self-test 6-1
serial connection 5-14
settings A-4
Setup screen 5-10
short events 4-24
siting your equipment 2-5
SLIP 1-4, 4-10, 5-11
address 4-10, 5-11
parameters 4-10, 5-11
subnet mask 4-10, 5-11
SNMP 1-3, 4-13
community string 5-17
enabling/disabling access 5-16
software
image version number 5-21
upgrade 5-21
Software Upgrade screen 5-21
speed (console port setup) 5-15
spot checks 2-11
stacking 2-8
clips 2-6
standards A-1
standy link 4-33
starting 4-2
Quick Config Manager 4-2
the VT100 management facility 5-6
statistics
activity and errors 4-19
frame types 4-21
network errors 4-23
network traffic 4-22
Status screen 5-20
stop bit (console port setup) 5-15
straight-through 2-4, A-2
subnet mask 4-10, 5-10, B-4
subnets B-4
supplier support tool 3-7
support contract 4-9
system up time 5-21
T
target address 5-20
technical support
3Com URL C-1
bulletin board service C-1
fax service C-2
network suppliers C-4
product repair C-6
using CompuServe C-3
technology overview 1-2
Telnet 1-4, 3-1
accessing facility using 3-6
control keys 5-3
enabling/disabling access 5-16
16710.bk : 16710.IX Page 124 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
temperature A-1
Terminal 3-5
terminal emulator 3-3, 3-5
connecting 3-5
terminal speed 5-15
terminology 1-2
testing the Alert LED 4-16
TFTP server address 5-22
throttle 5-13
too long errors 4-24
total errors 4-20
TP 1-2
Transcend Quick Configuration Manager 3-1
trap 4-26
Trap Setup screen 5-12
traps 1-3, 4-25, 4-34, 4-37
community string 5-13
introduction to 5-12
IP address 5-13
throttle 5-13
trouble shooting 6-1
twisted pair 1-2
U
unicast frames 4-22
upgrading software 5-21
URL C-1
user guide conventions 2
user interface, overview of 5-1
user name 5-17
users
access level 5-17
changing community string 5-18
changing password 5-18
creating 5-17
default 5-8
deleting 5-19
password 5-17
utilization 4-18
V
version number
flash EPROM 5-21
hardware 5-21
PROM software 5-21
very long events 4-25
View menu
Activity/Errors 4-19
Frame Types 4-21
Traffic 4-22
Zoom In 4-12
VT100 1-4, 3-1
keys 5-3
problems 6-3
starting 5-6
VT100 screen
areas 5-1
components 5-2
map 5-4
VT100 terminal 3-3, 3-5
emulator 3-5, 3-6
VT100 terminal, connecting 3-5
W
wake-up procedure 5-6
wall mounting 2-7
Wichtige Sicherheitshinweise 8
window map 4-3
Windows 3-1
Workgroup dialog box 4-38
workgroup monitor failure 4-17
workstation connections 2-4
World Wide Web (WWW) C-1
Z
Zoom view 4-12
16710.bk : WARRANTY.FRM Page 125 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
LIMITED LIFETIME WARRANTY
HARDWARE: 3Com warrants its hardware products to be free
from defects in workmanship and materials, under normal use
and service, for the following lengths of time from the date of
purchase from 3Com or its Authorized Reseller:
Internetworking products
Network adapters
Ethernet stackable hubs and
Unmanaged Ethernet fixed port repeaters
(One year if not registered)
*Power supply and fans in these stackable
hubs and unmanaged repeaters
Other hardware products
Spare parts and spares kits
One year
Lifetime
Lifetime*
One year
One year
90 days
If a product does not operate as warranted above during the
applicable warranty period, 3Com shall, at its option and
expense, repair the defective product or part, deliver to
Customer an equivalent product or part to replace the
defective item, or refund to Customer the purchase price paid
for the defective product. All products that are replaced will
become the property of 3Com. Replacement products may be
new or reconditioned. Any replaced or repaired product or
part has a ninety (90) day warranty or the remainder of the
initial warranty period, whichever is longer.
3Com shall not be responsible for any software, firmware,
information, or memory data of Customer contained in,
stored on, or integrated with any products returned to 3Com
for repair under warranty or not.
SOFTWARE: 3Com warrants that the software licensed
from it will perform in substantial conformance to the
specifications therefor for a period of ninety (90) days from
the date of purchase from 3Com or its Authorized Reseller.
3Com warrants the media containing software against
failure during the warranty period. 3Com’s sole obligation
with respect to this express warranty shall be (at 3Com’s
discretion) to refund the purchase price paid by Customer
for any defective software products, or to replace any
defective media. 3Com makes no warranty or
representation that its software products will work in
combination with any hardware or applications software
products provided by third parties, that the operation of
the software products will be uninterrupted or error free, or
that all defects in the software products will be corrected.
STANDARD WARRANTY SERVICE: Standard warranty
service for hardware products may be obtained by
delivering the defective product, accompanied by a copy
of the dated proof of purchase, to 3Com's Corporate
Service Center or to an Authorized 3Com Service Center
during the applicable warranty period. Standard warranty
service for software products may be obtained by
telephoning 3Com's Corporate Service Center or an
Authorized 3Com Service Center, within the warranty
period. Products returned to 3Com's Corporate Service
Center must be pre-authorized by 3Com with a Return
Material Authorization (RMA) number marked on the
outside of the package, and sent prepaid, insured, and
packaged appropriately for safe shipment. The repaired or
replaced item will be shipped to Customer, at 3Com's
expense, not later than thirty (30) days after receipt of the
defective product by 3Com.
16710.bk : WARRANTY.FRM Page 126 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
WARRANTIES EXCLUSIVE: IF A 3COM PRODUCT DOES
NOT OPERATE AS WARRANTED ABOVE, CUSTOMER’S SOLE
REMEDY FOR BREACH OF THAT WARRANTY SHALL BE
REPAIR, REPLACEMENT, OR REFUND OF THE PURCHASE
PRICE PAID, AT 3COM’S OPTION. TO THE FULL EXTENT
ALLOWED BY LAW, THE FOREGOING WARRANTIES AND
REMEDIES ARE EXCLUSIVE AND ARE IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER
WARRANTIES, TERMS OR CONDITIONS, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, EITHER IN FACT OR BY OPERATION OF LAW,
STATUTORY OR OTHERWISE, INCLUDING WARRANTIES,
TERMS OR CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, AND SATISFACTORY
QUALITY. 3COM NEITHER ASSUMES NOR AUTHORIZES ANY
OTHER PERSON TO ASSUME FOR IT ANY OTHER LIABILITY
IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION,
MAINTENANCE OR USE OF ITS PRODUCTS.
3COM SHALL NOT BE LIABLE UNDER THIS WARRANTY IF ITS
TESTING AND EXAMINATION DISCLOSE THAT THE ALLEGED
DEFECT IN THE PRODUCT DOES NOT EXIST OR WAS
CAUSED BY CUSTOMER'S OR ANY THIRD PERSON'S
MISUSE, NEGLECT, IMPROPER INSTALLATION OR TESTING,
UNAUTHORIZED ATTEMPTS TO REPAIR OR MODIFY, OR
ANY OTHER CAUSE BEYOND THE RANGE OF THE
INTENDED USE, OR BY ACCIDENT, FIRE, LIGHTNING, OR
OTHER HAZARD.
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY: TO THE FULL EXTENT
ALLOWED BY LAW 3COM ALSO EXCLUDES FOR ITSELF AND
ITS SUPPLIERS ANY LIABILITY, WHETHER BASED IN
CONTRACT OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE), FOR
INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR
PUNITIVE DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, OR FOR LOSS OF
REVENUE OR PROFITS, LOSS OF BUSINESS, LOSS OF
INFORMATION OR DATA, OR OTHER FINANCIAL LOSS
ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE,
INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE, USE, PERFORMANCE,
FAILURE, OR INTERRUPTION OF ITS PRODUCTS, EVEN IF
3COM OR ITS AUTHORIZED RESELLER HAS BEEN ADVISED
OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES, AND LIMITS ITS
LIABILITY TO REPAIR, REPLACEMENT, OR REFUND OF THE
PURCHASE PRICE PAID, AT 3COM’S OPTION. THIS
DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY FOR DAMAGES WILL NOT BE
AFFECTED IF ANY REMEDY PROVIDED HEREIN SHALL FAIL
OF ITS ESSENTIAL PURPOSE.
Some countries, states, or provinces do not allow the
exclusion or limitation of implied warranties or the
limitation of incidental or consequential damages for
certain products supplied to consumers, so the above
limitations and exclusions may be limited in their
application to you. This warranty gives you specific legal
rights which may vary depending on local law.
GOVERNING LAW: This Limited Warranty shall be
governed by the laws of the state of California.
3Com Corporation
5400 Bayfront Plaza
Santa Clara, CA 95052-8145
(408) 764-5000
18th March 1996
16710.bk : EMCSTATE.FRM Page 127 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM
EMC STATEMENTS
VCCI STATEMENT:
FCC STATEMENT: This equipment has been tested and
found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential installation. This equipment
generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy
and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. However, there is no guarantee that
interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this
equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or
television reception, which can be determined by turning
the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to
correct the interference by one or more of the following
measures:
■
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
■
Increase the separation between the equipment and the
receiver.
The user may find the following booklet prepared by
the Federal Communications Commission helpful:
■
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit
different from that to which the receiver is connected.
‘ How to Identify and Resolve Radio-TV Interference
Problems’
■
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician
for help.
CSA STATEMENT: This Class B digital apparatus meets all
requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing
Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B respecte toutes les
exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du
Canada.
This booklet is available from the U.S. Government
Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402, Stock No.
004-000-00345-4.
In order to meet FCC emissions limits, this equipment
must be used only with cables which comply with
IEEE 802.3.
16710.bk : EMCSTATE.FRM Page 128 Tuesday, October 7, 1997 11:38 AM