3Com 3C892 Network Card User Manual

®
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
3C892
User Guide
http://www.3com.com/
Part No. 984/000023-3
Published February1999
3Com Corporation
5400 Bayfront Plaza
Santa Clara, California
95052-8145
Copyright © 3Com Corporation, 1999. All rights reserved. No part of this documentation may be
reproduced in any form or by any means or used to make any derivative work (such as translation,
transformation, or adaptation) without permission from 3Com Corporation.
3Com Corporation reserves the right to revise this documentation and to make changes in content from
time to time without obligation on the part of 3Com Corporation to provide notification of such revision
or change.
3Com Corporation provides this documentation without warranty of any kind, either implied or
expressed, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a
particular purpose. 3Com may make improvements or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s)
described in this documentation at any time.
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT LEGENDS:
If you are a United States government agency, then this documentation and the software described
herein are provided to you subject to the following restricted rights:
For units of the Department of Defense:
Restricted Rights Legend: Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is subject to restrictions as
set forth in subparagraph (c) (1) (ii) for Restricted Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software Clause
at 48 C.F.R. 52.227-7013. 3Com Corporation, 5400 Bayfront Plaza, Santa Clara, California 95052-8145.
For civilian agencies:
Restricted Rights Legend: Use, reproduction, or disclosure is subject to restrictions set forth in
subparagraph (a) through (d) of the Commercial Computer Software - Restricted Rights Clause at 48
C.F.R. 52.227-19 and the limitations set forth in 3Com Corporation’s standard commercial agreement for
the software. Unpublished rights reserved under the copyright laws of the United States.
If there is any software on removable media described in this documentation, it is furnished under a
license agreement included with the product as a separate document, or in the hard copy
documentation. If you are unable to locate a copy, please contact 3Com and a copy will be provided to
you.
Unless otherwise indicated, 3Com registered trademarks are registered in the United States and may or
may not be registered in other countries.
3Com and OfficeConnect are registered trademarks of 3Com Corporation. 3ComFacts is a service mark
of 3Com.
Stac and LZS are registered trademarks and Hi/fn is a trademark of Stac, Inc. Pentium is a registered
trademark of Intel. Windows and Windows NT are registered trademarks of Microsoft. Macintosh is a
registered trademark of Apple Computer Corporation. IBM is a registered trademark of International
Business Machines Corporation.
Other brand and product names may be registered trademarks or trademarks of their respective holders.
.
ii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
How to Use This Guide
Conventions 10
Year 2000 Compliance
1
9
10
INTRODUCTION
Introduction 11
Applications 11
Local Networking with Access to the Internet 11
Local Networking with Access to a Remote Office 12
Local Networking with Access to the Internet and a Remote Office
Features 13
Ease of Installation and Use 13
High Performance 13
Connectivity 13
Routing 13
Bandwidth Management 14
Remote Management 14
Voice Features 14
Protocols 14
ISDN Standards and Interface 15
Security 15
Upgradability 15
Diagnostics 15
Warranty 15
Internet Applications and Games 15
2
12
ISDN LAN MODEM
FUNCTIONALITY DESCRIPTION
Connection Types 17
LAN Side Connection 17
Application Sharing over the LAN 18
WAN Side Connection 18
Two Separate Connections to Different Locations. 18
One High Speed Connection to a Single Location 19
19
19
Call Routing Protocol and IP Address Translation 20
iii
Placing a Call to a Previously Defined Destination 20
Call Routing While No Other Calls Are Connected 20
Call Routing While One Call Is Already Connected 21
Understanding Multilink PPP and BACP/BAP 21
What is Multilink PPP? 21
What is BACP/BAP? 21
Multilink PPP Configuration Options 22
Understanding Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation 22
Understanding VPNs and PPTP 23
23
Setting Up the Server Side of the Tunnel 23
Setting Up the Client Side of the Tunnel 23
For Windows Dial-Up Networking Users 24
Establishing a Tunnel via the ISDN LAN Modem 24
3
HARDWARE DESCRIPTION AND INSTALLATION
Package Contents 25
Before You Install the ISDN LAN Modem 25
Front Panel LED Description 26
Back Panel Connector Description 27
Installing the ISDN LAN Modem 27
Before You Begin 27
Installing the ISDN Cable 28
Connecting to a 10BASE-T Ethernet Port 28
Connecting to Another Ethernet Hub 29
Before You Begin 29
Installing Analog Equipment 30
Installing the Power Cable 31
Wall Mounting the ISDN LAN Modem 31
Using Rubber Feet and Stacking Clips 32
32
4
SETTING UP TCP/IP FOR WINDOWS AND MACINTOSH
TCP/IP Setup Using Windows 98 and Windows 95
TCP/IP Setup Using Windows NT 4.0 36
TCP/IP Setup Using Mac OS 7.6 or later 39
TCP/IP Setup Using Windows 3.11 40
Setting Up TCP/IP Using MS TCP 40
41
5
33
CONFIGURING THE ISDN LAN MODEM
Typical Configuration 43
Before You Begin 43
You Should Have Done This 43
You Should Have This Information 44
Determine Whether You Use Dynamic or Static IP Addresses 44
Setting Up Your Computer If You Have a Static IP Address 45
iv
For Windows 98 and 95 Users 45
For Windows NT 4.0 Users 45
For Macintosh Users 46
For Windows 3.11 Users 46
Configuring the ISDN LAN Modem for the Typical Configuration 47
Configuring a Static IP Address on the ISDN LAN Modem 51
ISDN LAN Modem Main Page 52
Links from the Illustration 52
Links from the Buttons 53
6
ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
Before you Begin 55
Setting Up Additional Service Providers 56
ISP versus Private Network 56
When to Select ISP 56
When to Select Private Network 57
Setting Up a Connection to an ISP 57
Before You Begin 57
Setting Up a Connection to the Internet 57
Setting Up a Connection to a Private Network 60
Before You Begin 60
Setting Up a Connection to a Remote LAN 60
Associating Service Providers with Workstations on the LAN 63
Editing Service Provider Profiles 64
Restricting Workstations from Accessing Service Provider(s) 65
Configuring Your LAN Parameters 65
Understanding LAN Parameters 65
Name 65
IP Address and Subnet Mask 66
Local Domain Name 66
Enable DHCP Server 66
Enable NetBIOS Filtering 66
Configuring the LAN Parameters 67
Changing Data Call Parameters 67
Understanding Data Call Parameters 68
Minimum Call Duration 68
Disconnecting an Automatic Data Call 68
Disconnecting a Manual Data Call 68
Connect/Disconnect Threshold for the Second B Channel 69
69
69
Configuring the Data Call Parameters 69
Changing Voice Call Routing 70
Understanding How Calls Are Routed 70
Changing Voice Call Routing 70
Reserving DHCP Addresses 71
Selective Password Protection 71
Changing Your Password 72
v
Setting Up Your ISDN Line Manually 72
Locking and Unlocking the Configuration 73
73
74
Configuring the ISDN LAN Modem from a Remote Location 74
Configuring the ISDN LAN Modem Remotely via Another LAN Modem
Configuring the ISDN LAN Modem Remotely via an ISDN Modem 74
75
7
SUPPLEMENTARY VOICE CALL SERVICES
Supplementary Voice Services 77
Before You Begin 77
Call Waiting 78
How to Configure Call Waiting 78
How to Use Call Waiting 79
Caller ID 80
Caller ID 80
Caller ID Date and Time 80
Caller ID Blocking 80
Flexible Calling 81
Configuring FCO on the ISDN LAN Modem
Flexible Calling Codes 81
Call Conference (Three-Way Calling) 82
Call Transfer 82
Message Service/Voice Mail 83
Call Forwarding 83
8
81
PLACING, RECEIVING AND DISCONNECTING CALLS
Placing Calls 85
Placing a Call Automatically 85
Telephone Number Selection for Data Calls 85
Call Routing Among Service Providers 85
Placing a Call Manually 86
Placing a Call Manually to an Existing Service Provider 86
Placing a Call Manually to a Temporary Service Provider 86
Participating in a Temporary Call 87
Placing Multilink PPP Calls 87
Receiving Calls 87
Receiving Data Calls 87
Receiving Voice Calls 88
Distinctive Ringing 88
Disconnecting Data Calls 88
Disconnecting Data Calls Manually 88
Disconnecting Calls Automatically Using Timers 89
Minimum Call Duration 89
Idle Timeout 89
Bandwidth on Demand Parameters 89
vi
74
Connect/Disconnect threshold for the second B channel
89
89
9
89
TROUBLESHOOTING AND MAINTENANCE
Checking the Basics 91
Monitoring LEDs 92
Monitoring the ALERT LED 92
Monitoring the ISDN LED 92
Monitoring the
B Channel LEDs 92
Monitoring the LAN Port Status LEDs 92
Troubleshooting Problems Indicated by LEDs 93
Evaluating Symptoms and Solutions 94
Finding More Information 100
Contacting Technical Support 100
Downloading Firmware to Your ISDN LAN Modem 100
Resetting the ISDN LAN Modem 100
Resetting the ISDN Modem Using a Telephone 100
Reviewing Statistics 101
Understanding System Statistics 101
Understanding ISDN Information 102
Understanding Current Call Information 102
Understanding Last Call Information 103
Understanding Service Provider Information 104
A
NETWORKING PRIMER
What is a network? 105
What is a LAN? 105
What is a WAN? 105
How does a LAN connect to a WAN? 106
What is a LAN modem? 106
What is ISDN? 106
How do different devices communicate with each other?
What is TCP/IP? 107
What is an IP Address? 108
What is a Subnet Mask? 108
Dynamic and Static IP Addresses 108
What is DHCP? 109
What is DNS? 109
What is NAT? 109
What are numbered and unnumbered links? 109
How is overall throughput determined? 109
B
107
USING THE CUSTOM WEB BROWSER
Custom Links 111
Using Favorites 112
Installing the Custom Internet Explorer Browser
112
vii
Installing Future Releases of Internet Explorer
C
ISDN LAN MODEM FACTORY DEFAULTS
D
ISDN LAN MODEM SPECIFICATIONS
Year 2000 Compliance
E
112
116
ORDERING ISDN SERVICE
If You Place Your ISDN Order Through 3Com 117
If You Place Your ISDN Order Through the Telephone Company 117
Placing Your Order 118
Supplementary Voice Features Included with U, EZ-ISDN-1, V and EZ-ISDN 1A 119
119
Limitations of ISDN Ordering Codes U, EZ-ISDN 1, V and EZ-ISDN 1A 119
Simultaneous Voice and Data on the Same Telephone Number 119
Supplementary Voice Services on Telephone Number 1 Only 120
If You Must Have Simultaneous Voice and Data Capability on Both Numbers 120
For Lucent Technologies 5ESS® Switches 120
For Siemens EWSD Switches 120
For Nortel DMS-100® Switches 121
What If I Already Have ISDN Service? 121
How S1 Differs from U/EZ-ISDN 1 and V/EZ-ISDN 1A 121
If You Are Currently Using Capability Package S1 and Would Like to Add
Supplementary Voice Services 121
If You Are Unable to Have Supplementary Voice Services Added to S1 121
Table of ISDN Ordering Code Capabilities 122
GLOSSARY
INDEX
3COM CORPORATION LIMITED WARRANTY
viii
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
About This Guide provides an overview of this guide, describes guide conventions,
and tells you where to look for specific information.
This guide describes how to install and configure the OfficeConnect ISDN LAN
Modem and provides descriptions of key applications and networking concepts.
Audience Description
How to Use
This Guide
This guide is intended for end users with no presumed level of expertise.
Table 1 shows where to find specific information in this guide.
Table 1
If you are looking for...
Turn to...
An overview of the ISDN LAN Modem
Chapter 1
An explanation of the ISDN LAN Modem’s key functionality
Chapter 2
A description of the ISDN LAN Modem’s hardware components
Chapter 3
Instructions on setting up TCP/IP
Chapter 4
Instructions for the typical configuring of the ISDN LAN Modem software
Chapter 5
Instructions for advanced configuration of the ISDN LAN Modem software
Chapter 6
Information on supplementary voice services
Chapter 7
Information on placing, receiving and disconnecting calls
Chapter 8
Information on troubleshooting and maintenance
Chapter 9
Background information on networking
Appendix A
Information on using the custom browser
Appendix B
ISDN LAN Modem factory default settings
Appendix C
Technical specifications for the ISDN LAN Modem
Appendix D
Instructions for ordering ISDN service for the ISDN LAN Modem
Appendix E
Definition of terms
Glossary
10
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Conventions
Table 2 and Table 3 list conventions that are used throughout this guide.
Table 2 Notice Icons
Icon
Notice Type
Description
Information note
Information that describes important features or instructions
Caution
Information that alerts you to potential loss of data or potential
damage to an application, system, or device
Warning
Information that alerts you to potential personal injury
Table 3 Text Conventions
Convention
Description
Screen displays This typeface represents information as it appears on the screen.
Commands
The word “command” means that you must enter the command
exactly as shown and then press Return or Enter. Commands appear in
bold. Example:
To remove the IP address, enter the following command:
SETDefault !0 -IP NETaddr = 0.0.0.0
The words “enter”
and “type”
When you see the word “enter” in this guide, you must type
something, and then press Return or Enter. Do not press Return or
Enter when an instruction simply says “type.”
Keyboard key names
If you must press two or more keys simultaneously, the key names are
linked with a plus sign (+). Example:
Press Ctrl+Alt+Del
Words in italics
Italics are used to:
■
Emphasize a point.
■
Denote a new term at the place where it is defined in the text.
■
Identify menu names, menu commands, and software button
names. Examples:
From the Help menu, select Contents.
Click OK.
Year 2000 Compliance
The OfficeConnect ISDN LAN Modem is Year 2000 compliant. Specifically, its
system clock is capable of accepting and storing dates including and beyond the
year 2000.
For information on Year 2000 compliance and 3Com products, visit the 3Com
Year 2000 Web page:
http://www.3com.com/products/yr2000.html
1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter provides an overview of the OfficeConnect® ISDN LAN Modem,
referred to throughout this document as the ISDN LAN Modem.
Introduction
The ISDN LAN Modem is an easy to install, LAN to WAN modem. For the LAN, it
provides four 10BASE-T Ethernet connections— expandable to 25 connections.
Refer to Figure 1 for an example showing 10 connections by adding an 8-port
10BASE-T Ethernet hub. For WAN access, it provides a Basic Rate Interface (BRI)
ISDN port.
With the ISDN LAN Modem, small office and home office users can share remote
access to the Internet or to a remote office while continuing to network locally.
Applications
The primary application for the ISDN LAN Modem is:
■
Local Networking with
Access to the Internet
Local networking with shared access to the Internet and/or a remote office
LAN.
Users can share access to the Internet while continuing to network locally.
OfficeConnect®
Hub 8 TPO
Port Status
PWR PKT COLL
Alert
Network Utilization
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 COAX 1% 2% 3% 6% 12% 25% 50% 80%
green = link OK, off = link fail, yellow = partition
Office
Connect¤
Hub
Internet/Intranet
or
online service
3 Com
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
LAN STATUS
Alert
PWR
ISDN
B1 B2
Tx Coll
1OfficeConnect™
2 3 4
ISDN LAN Modem
3 Com
ISDN BRI line
Figure 1 Local Networking with Access to the Internet
Public telephone
network
12
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Local Networking with
Access to a Remote
Office
Users can share access to a remote office LAN while continuing to network locally.
Remote office
LAN
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
LAN STATUS
Alert
PWR
ISDN
1
Tx Coll
B1 B2
2
3
4
OfficeConnect™
ISDN LAN Modem
3 Com
Public telephone
network
ISDN BRI line
Figure 2 Local Networking with Access to a Remote Office
Local Networking with
Access to the Internet
and a Remote Office
Users can share access to a remote office and the Internet while continuing to
network locally.
Internet/Intranet or
online service
Remote office
LAN
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
LAN STATUS
Alert
PWR
ISDN
B1 B2
Tx Coll
1
2
3
4
OfficeConnect™
ISDN LAN Modem
3 Com
Public telephone
network
ISDN BRI line
Figure 3 Local Networking with Access to a Remote Office and the Internet
Features
Features
13
Ease of Installation and Use
■
SPID Wizard automatic configuration for telephone company switch and
service profile ID (SPID) numbers.
■
Web-based, point-and-click user interface for configuration and online help.
■
Automatic configuration verification with Internet connection through your
Internet Service Provider (ISP).
■
Firmware updates, user guides and technical notes available on the Web.
High Performance
■
Hi/fn™ LZS® compression, which conforms to these IETF RFCs: The PPP
Compression Control Protocol (RFC 1962) and PPP Stacker LZS Compression
Protocol (RFC 1974).
■
Multilink PPP (RFC 1990), which combines two PPP B channel calls to create a
virtual, single 128 Kbps network connection.
■
TollMizer, which places a single B channel or a Multilink PPP data call over a
voice connection, saving you the additional charge for a data call.
Connectivity
■
ISDN Basic Rate U interface.
■
Built in four-port 10BASE-T, 10 Mbps Ethernet hub. Up to 25 users can be
supported by connecting to an external eight port-hub.
■
Two analog voice ports.
■
Preferred Provider support which allows simultaneous connections to two
different ISPs.
Routing
■
IP Routing.
■
Dynamic or static IP addresses supplied by the ISP (WAN side).
■
WAN access for up to 25 local workstations on the LAN (10BASE-T).
■
Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) server functionality on the LAN, which
automatically assigns an IP address to a newly-attached computer on an IP
network.
■
Domain Name Service (DNS) server functionality for the LAN, which translates
the common, alphanumeric name of a device to the numeric IP address of a
device.
■
Network Address Translation (NAT) between LAN and WAN, which allows
multiple users on the LAN to share a WAN connection. Note that individual
email accounts may still be maintained at the ISP.
■
Multiplexing traffic from several computers to the same remote destination.
14
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Bandwidth Management
■
Automatic call connection (also known as dial-on-demand routing).
■
Automatic disconnection of idle calls after a specified length of time.
■
Bandwidth on Demand using Bandwidth Allocation Control Protocol
(BACP)/Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) based on a specified threshold.
■
Dynamic bandwidth allocation (DBA), which allows you to place or receive a
voice or data call while a Multilink PPP call is active.
■
Manual call connection and disconnection.
Remote Management
■
Remote management using the same Web browser interface.
Voice Features
■
Two analog voice ports for using analog telephone equipment such as
touch-tone telephones, fax and answering machines, and analog modems.
■
Flexible call routing to the two analog ports.
■
Caller ID name and telephone display (supports Bellcore GR-30-CORE and
SR-TSV-002476 standards).
■
Caller ID Blocking
■
Call Waiting
■
Call Conference (Three-way calling)
■
Call Transfer
■
Call Forward
■
Distinctive Ringing
■
Voice Mail
Protocols
■
IETF PPP (RFC 1661, 1662, 1663).
■
IETF Multilink PPP (RFC 1990).
■
PPTP (Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol— PPTP draft-ietf-pppext-pptp-02.txt).
■
IETF Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) (RFC 1334) and Challenge
Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP) security (RFC 1994).
■
MS-CHAP support (as defined in Network Working Group Information Memo:
Microsoft PPP CHAP Extensions. S. Cob, Rev. 1.3 March 1997 including only
the functionality that keeps with IETF 1994).
■
IP address negotiation using IPCP (RFC 1332).
■
CCP (RFC 1962, 1974).
■
BACP/BAP (RFC 2125).
■
Network Address Translation between LAN and WAN (RFC 1631).
Features
15
ISDN Standards and Interface
■
Basic Rate ISDN U interface with built-in NT1.
■
Full ISDN signaling support of National ISDN.
■
Compatibility with Lucent, Northern Telecom and Siemens switches.
Security
■
PAP, CHAP and MS-CHAP support on both single-channel and Multilink PPP
calls.
Upgradability
■
Flash memory for field firmware updates.
■
Firmware posted on 3Com’s Web site.
Diagnostics
■
LED status display.
■
Statistics display.
Warranty
■
Lifetime Limited Warranty (refer to the back of this User Guide for details).
Internet Applications and Games
Support for applications that use the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) and the
Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). The UDP protocol is used primarily by Internet
games.
Look for the latest list of Internet applications and games that interoperate with
the ISDN LAN Modem at
http://www.remoteaccess.3com.com/support/docs/lanmodem/welcome.html
16
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
2
ISDN LAN MODEM
FUNCTIONALITY DESCRIPTION
This chapter provides a description of the key functionality of the ISDN LAN
Modem. It includes the following topics:
■
Connection Types
■
Call Routing Protocol and IP Address Translation
■
Understanding Multilink PPP and Bandwidth on Demand
■
Understanding Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation
■
Understanding PPTP
For a basic understanding of ISDN and networking, refer to Appendix A.
Connection Types
LAN Side Connection
The ISDN LAN Modem provides LAN side and WAN side connections.
On the LAN side, up to four users can connect to the LAN Modem’s built in
Ethernet hub, or up to 25 users may connect to the LAN Modem via an external
user-supplied hub, enabling users to share files and printers and to use Internet
email. An example of ten workstation connections is shown in An example of 10
workstation connections is shown in Figure 4.
10 Mbps
Ethernet LAN
OfficeConnect®
Hub 8 TPO
Port Status
PWR PKT COLL
Alert
LAN STATUS
Alert
PWR
ISDN
B1 B2
Tx Coll
1
2
3
4
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
Network Utilization
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 COAX 1% 2% 3% 6% 12% 25% 50% 80%
green = link OK, off = link fail, yellow = partition
Office
Connect¤
Hub
3 Com
3 Com
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
Figure 4 ISDN LAN Modem LAN Connection with 10 Workstations
An example of a single connection is shown in Figure 5.
18
CHAPTER 2: ISDN LAN MODEM FUNCTIONALITY DESCRIPTION
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
LAN STATUS
Alert
PWR
ISDN
B1 B2
Tx Coll
1
2
3 Com
3
4
Figure 5 ISDN LAN Modem Single Workstation Connection Example
Application Sharing over the LAN
Most operating systems such as Windows 98 and 95 and Macintosh provide the
capability for users on the LAN to share applications, files and printers among
computers. For example, if only one computer has a Web browser, the other users
on the LAN can use that Web browser to access the Internet. Note that speed will
likely be reduced when applications are shared. Refer to your operating system
documentation for instructions on setting up sharing between users on a LAN.
WAN Side Connection
The ISDN LAN Modem allows users to connect to a WAN using either of the
following methods at one time.
■
Two separate connections to two different locations (one per B channel)
■
One high-speed Multilink PPP connection to a single location (combines both
B channels)
Once a WAN connection is established, up to 25 users can share that connection
and access the same location simultaneously. If you desire, you can also restrict
access to certain users.
Two Separate
Connections to Different
Locations.
An ISDN BRI line has two B channels for transmitting data or voice. Because each
B channel is independent, you can connect to two different locations. Once the
connection is established, up to 25 users can share either connection. Figure 6
shows one user connecting to a remote office LAN while another connects to the
Internet.
Internet/Intranet or
online service
Greg's PC
Greg
64 Kbps B1
Peter
64 Kbps B2
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
Marcia's PC
LAN STATUS
Alert
PWR
ISDN
B1 B2
Tx Coll
1
2
3
4
OfficeConnect™
ISDN LAN Modem
3 Com
Greg—64 Kbps B1
Peter— 64 Kbps B2
Public telephone
network
ISDN BRI line
Peter's PC
Jan's PC
Figure 6 Two Simultaneous Remote Connections to Different Locations
Remote office
LAN
Connection Types
One High Speed
Connection to a Single
Location
19
Alternatively, the B channels can be combined using Multilink PPP to form one
high-speed connection to a single location. Figure 7 shows a single high-speed
connection to a remote office LAN.
Jerry's PC
Remote office
LAN
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
LAN STATUS
Elaine's PC
Alert
PWR
ISDN
B1 B2
Tx Coll
1
2
3
OfficeConnect™
ISDN LAN Modem
4
64 Kbps B1
64 Kbps B2
3 Com
Public telephone
network
128 Kbps B1 & B2
Combining both
B channels with Multilink
provides a single 128 Kbps*
connection
George's PC
*Without compression.
Cosmo's PC
Figure 7 One High-Speed Connection to a Single Location
Up to 25 users can share a connection to the same location over the single
connection created by Multilink PPP. Figure 8 shows three users on the LAN
accessing the Internet through the same Internet provider and over the single
high-speed connection.
Internet/Intranet or
online service
Mary's PC
ry ray
MaMurLou
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
Ted's PC
LAN STATUS
Alert
PWR
ISDN
B1 B2
Tx Coll
1
2
3
4
OfficeConnect™
ISDN LAN Modem
3 Com
Mary
Murray
Lou
ISDN BRI line
Murray's PC
Lou's PC
Figure 8 Shared Connection to the Same Location
Public telephone
network
20
CHAPTER 2: ISDN LAN MODEM FUNCTIONALITY DESCRIPTION
Call Routing Protocol
and IP Address
Translation
Placing a Call to a
Previously Defined
Destination
This section describes the call routing protocol used by the ISDN LAN Modem and
explains how IP addresses are translated.
To illustrate how the ISDN LAN Modem routes outgoing data calls, let us assume
that you have set up the following types of service providers.
■
A direct connection to an Internet Service Provider
■
A direct connection to a remote office LAN
■
A direct connection to a remote office LAN from which you can also access the
Internet
If all of those connection types are configured on the ISDN LAN Modem and are
associated with your computer, the following algorithm is performed for each of
the following scenarios.
Call Routing While No Other Calls Are Connected
If the ISDN LAN Modem has not established any calls to a remote destination and
you want to access the Internet from your computer, you simply launch your Web
browser (or whichever networking application you like). When the ISDN LAN
Modem receives the information packet requesting access to the WAN, it must
determine which connection type to use. The ISDN LAN Modem looks at the
destination Network ID (which comprises the destination IP address and subnet
mask) associated with the packet. If the Network ID of the packet matches the
Network ID of the remote LAN, with or without Internet access, then the call is
placed to the remote LAN. If it does not match the Network ID of the remote LAN,
with or without Internet access, then the call is routed to the direct ISP connection.
Once the connection is established, any authorized user on the LAN can use this
connection. The ISDN LAN Modem will translate each individual user’s IP address
into a single, shared IP address (assigned by the remote location), thereby allowing
up to 25 users to access the same remote location.
The following example shows three users sharing a connection to the Internet and
depicts the IP translation as it occurs in the ISDN LAN Modem.
Understanding Multilink PPP and BACP/BAP
Internet/Intranet or
online service
19
Rob's PC
192.168.1.2
2.
16
Translates PC IP
addresses to IP
address assigned
by ISP
8.
1.
2
IP address
assigned by ISP
198.6.1.1
LAN STATUS
Laura's PC
192.168.1.3
Alert
PWR
ISDN
B1 B2
Tx Coll
1
2
3
4
3 Com
1
.1. 1.1 1
8.6 .6. .1.
19 198 8.6
9
1
ISDN BRI line
Public telephone
network
OfficeConnect® ISDN LAN Modem
192.168.1.1
ISDN BRI line
19
Buddy's PC
192.168.1.4
2.1
68
.1.
5
1
.4
.1
68
.1
2
9
OfficeConnect™
ISDN LAN Modem
21
Sally's PC
192.168.1.5
Figure 9 IP Address Translation
Call Routing While One Call Is Already Connected
If the ISDN LAN Modem has established a call to a remote destination, for
instance, to an ISP, and the ISDN LAN Modem receives more packets, then the
ISDN LAN Modem looks at the Network ID of the packets for proper routing. For
example, if the Network ID of the packets matches that of the remote LAN and
that connection has not yet been established, then the call is placed and the
connection is made. If the Network ID does not match and the call type is an
Internet access call, then the packets are routed to the ISP.
Note that the ISDN LAN Modem always calls the first configured ISP. If you have
configured a second ISP and want to use that one instead, from the ISDN LAN
Modem’s configuration home page go to Workstation Parameters, select your
computer, and then associate only the ISP that you want to use.
Understanding
Multilink PPP and
BACP/BAP
What is Multilink PPP?
Multilink PPP is a protocol which combines multiple point-to-point protocol (PPP)
connections to form a single high-bandwidth channel. With a BRI line, Multilink
PPP combines the two 56 Kbps or 64 Kbps ISDN B channels, creating a virtual,
single connection of up to 112 Kbps or 128 Kbps.
What is BACP/BAP?
BACP/BAP is used in conjunction with the Multilink PPP feature and is transparent
to the user (that is, it will not be visible to you as it occurs in the background). You
need not configure this functionality. When Multilink PPP is negotiated, the
Bandwidth Allocation Control Protocol (BACP) negotiates with the peer
equipment to determine whether the peer supports BAP. If the peer supports BAP
22
CHAPTER 2: ISDN LAN MODEM FUNCTIONALITY DESCRIPTION
and agrees to use BAP, then the Bandwidth Allocation Protocol (BAP) negotiates
the addition and removal of the second B channel with the peer equipment based
on a user-defined threshold. A key advantage of BACP/BAP is that it provides a
higher probability of establishing a Multilink PPP call during high traffic conditions
by providing a specific telephone number for the second B channel to call.
Multilink PPP Configuration Options
When configuring Multilink PPP, you can choose one of the following options
from the ISDN LAN Modem’s Service Provider Parameters window.
■
Use One B Channel
When this option is configured, only one B channel is used to connect to this
service provider. Multilink PPP is thereby disabled and BACP/BAP is therefore
not used.
■
Use Two B Channels
When this option is configured, both B channels are always used to connect to
this service provider, regardless of the amount of traffic over each
B channel. Note that when this option is selected, the DBA feature does not
work because both B channels are being used. To use both DBA and Multilink
PPP, select the option Add Second B Channel as Required.
■
Add Second B Channel As Required
When this option is configured (referred to as bandwidth on demand) only one
B channel is used to connect to this service provider, and the second
B channel is automatically added only when the amount of traffic on the first
B channel reaches a threshold you define.
In order for you to use Multilink PPP, the destination you are calling must also
support Multilink PPP. For example, if you are trying to dial in to the Internet, your
ISP must also support Multilink PPP in order to successfully place a Multilink PPP
call. If you attempt to place a Multilink PPP call and the location you are calling
does not support Multilink PPP, then a single B channel PPP connection is
established.
Understanding
Dynamic Bandwidth
Allocation
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation is used in conjunction with Multilink PPP on
demand (to use DBA, you should choose Add Second B Channel As Required
when you configure Bandwidth Allocation). The Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation
feature allows you to automatically and temporarily remove one of the B channels
and use it either to place or receive a call (voice or data) without disturbing the
original call. The only effect on the original call is that it is reduced from a Multilink
PPP call to the speed of one B channel.
Once the interrupting call ends, that B channel is automatically returned to the
Multilink PPP call. Although throughput is reduced while the interrupting call is
active, the reliability of the Multilink PPP call is maintained.
Understanding VPNs and PPTP
Understanding VPNs
and PPTP
23
Virtual private networks (VPN) are private, secure networks created in public
networks such as the Internet. A VPN is essentially a secure, private tunnel within
the Internet. Since VPN calls are placed through a local ISP, they eliminate long
distance charges that would occur from directly dialing to a remote private
network.
Edge
the
the
of
From
to
Network.
the
Heart
One of the protocols which enables a VPN to be created is PPTP. The PPTP protocol
allows for multiple workstations to establish a secure multi-protocol connection to
a remote, private network via a single, locally-dialed ISP account as shown in
Figure 10. Any networking protocols such as IP, IPX and NetBEUI can be supported
transparently through the tunnel. While the ISDN LAN Modem supports PPTP, it
does not play an active role in creating or terminating a tunnel.
3 Com
LAN STATUS
Alert
POWER
ISDN
OK
B1
B2
TX COLL 1
2
3 Com
3
4
ISDN LAN Modem
3C892
Internet Service
Provider
LAN Modem
Tunnel
terminator
Corporate
network
Figure 10 Connection to an Remote Private Network via an ISP
The main steps for creating a VPN are as follows. Each step is explained in detail in
subsequent sections.
■
Set up the server side of the tunnel connection
■
Set up the client side of the tunnel connection
■
Initiate a tunnel between client and server using your client software
Setting Up the Server
Side of the Tunnel
In order to establish a tunnel, the client side must be able to dial into a PPTP tunnel
server on the remote private network such as 3Com’s NETBuilder, PathBuilder, and
Total Control Hub as well as Microsoft’s Windows NT server version 4.0 or later. If
you use Windows NT 4.0, then Service Pack 3 or greater and RAS must be
installed. Also, the protocols required for the private network must be installed on
the PPTP tunnel server. It is recommended that an experienced network
administrator set up the server side. Note that protocols required for the private
network must be installed on each PPTP tunnel client as well as the PPTP tunnel
server.
Setting Up the Client
Side of the Tunnel
In order to establish a tunnel, the client side must have PPTP tunnel client software
such as Windows Dial-Up Networking version 1.2 or higher which includes the
required software VPN adapter or Windows NT operating system with Service Pack
3, or Network TeleSystem’s TunnelBuilder™ VPN software for Windows 3.11 and
Macintosh operating systems. This software should reside on all workstations that
wish to create a tunnel to the tunnel server. Follow instructions provided for
installation and set up.
24
CHAPTER 2: ISDN LAN MODEM FUNCTIONALITY DESCRIPTION
For Windows Dial-Up Networking Users
If you are using Windows Dial-Up Networking version 1.2 or higher, the basic set
up steps are as follows. (Refer to Windows user documentation for details.)
■
Install the PPTP protocol
■
Create a RAS phone book entry for the VPN
A RAS phone book entry is similar to other phone book entries except there is
an IP address in the Phone number field. Once the Phone book entry is
complete, you can double-click the icon to dial into a server that supports PPTP
via any ISP.
Note that protocols required for the private network must be installed on each
PPTP tunnel client as well as PPTP tunnel server.
Establishing a Tunnel via
the ISDN LAN Modem
As with PPP, no configuration is required on the LAN Modem to use PPTP.
However, you must have an ISP configured on the LAN Modem.
Once the client side and server side are configured, you are ready to create a
tunnel. The steps required for creating a tunnel vary depending on which client
software you are using. Refer to the user documentation provided with your PPTP
software to determine how to establish a tunnel. For instance, if you are using
Windows Dial-Up Networking version 1.2 or higher, double-click the phone book
entry for the VPN.
Once you attempt to create a tunnel, the ISDN LAN Modem detects this attempt
and automatically places a call to your ISP. Once the call is connected, a tunnel is
established between your workstation and the tunnel server.
You are ready to access a remote private network LAN as if you were connected
locally. Each workstation that wishes to have access to the remote private LAN will
need to create its own tunnel.
For more information, refer to:
http://www.remoteaccess.3com.com/support/docs/lanmodem/
welcome.html For specific instructions on how to configure a VPN adapter in
Windows 98, 95 or Windows NT, refer to Microsoft’s Web site at
http://www.microsoft.com. and then enter PPTP in the search field.
3
Package Contents
Before You Install the
ISDN LAN Modem
HARDWARE DESCRIPTION AND
INSTALLATION
The ISDN LAN Modem package includes:
■
OfficeConnect ISDN LAN Modem
■
Power cable with an AC wall transformer
■
RJ -11 ISDN telephone cable
■
10BASE-T Ethernet cable
■
3Com Companion Programs CD-ROM
■
OfficeConnect ISDN LAN Modem Getting Started Guide
■
Rubber feet and stacking clips
To install, configure and use the ISDN LAN Modem successfully, you must have the
following:
■
Correct ISDN service installed at your location with an available ISDN RJ-11 or
RJ-45 outlet. If you have not yet ordered ISDN service, refer to Appendix E.
■
A JavaScript-enabled and frames-capable Web browser. A Web browser is
provided on the 3Com Companion Programs CD-ROM. (For more information
refer to Appendix B.) If you use a different Web browser, make sure that it
supports frames such as Netscape 2.1 and later and Internet Explorer 3.0 and
later.
If you already have a version of the Internet Explorer Web browser installed and
would like to install a later version, you should first uninstall the previous version. If
you are asked to replace the older files, it is recommended that you do so.
■
A personal computer with TCP/IP and Ethernet connectivity that meets UL
standards in the United States or is certified to CSA standards in Canada.
■
■
■
For a PC, a 386 or higher processor is recommended and a 10BASE-T
Ethernet card is required.
For an Apple Macintosh computer, system 7.6 or later operating system and
Open Transport (provided as part of system 7.5). Built-in Ethernet
connectivity is provided through an Apple Ethernet port in all Power
Macintosh computers.
TCP/IP is provided as part of the Windows 98, 95, NT and Macintosh System
7.6 and later operating systems. For Windows 3.11 users, TCP/IP software is
provided on the 3Com Companion Programs CD-ROM.
You do not have to have available storage space on your computer’s hard drive
because nothing is copied as part of the ISDN LAN Modem installation. If you want
to copy any programs or documents from the CD-ROMs, ensure that you have
available hard disk space.
26
CHAPTER 3: HARDWARE DESCRIPTION AND INSTALLATION
Front Panel LED
Description
The front panel provides the following LEDs.
LAN STATUS
Alert
POWER
ISDN
OK
B1
B2
TX COLL 1
2
3 Com
3
4
ISDN LAN Modem
3C892
Figure 11 ISDN LAN Modem Front Panel
The functions of the front panel LEDs are described in Table 4. These front panel
LEDs show whether or not the unit is functioning properly and indicate the status
of the activity over the 10BASE-T and ISDN ports.
Table 4 Front Panel LED Indicator Definitions
LED
Color
Description
Alert
Amber
Operational Status. Lit during power-on self-test diagnostic or
after pressing the reset button.
Off indicates the unit has passed the diagnostic tests and is
working properly.
Flashes (four times per second) if one or more of the diagnostics
have failed or after the unit is placed in firmware download mode
and is waiting for a firmware upgrade.Flashes (once per second) to
indicate there are pending voice mail messages.
POWER
Green
Power Indicator. Remains lit as long as power is supplied to the
unit.
ISDN
OK
Green
D Channel Status. Indicates the status of the ISDN physical
network interface and D channel.
Remains lit once the physical ISDN interface and D channel
signaling are synchronized.
Off indicates the physical ISDN interface is not synchronized or is
disconnected.
Flashes when the physical interface attempts synchronization or
when the ISDN D channel parameters have changed.
B1/B2
Amber or
Green
B1/B2 Channel Activity. Green indicates a data call in progress.
Amber indicates a voice call in progress. If a call is in a dialing state,
the LED flashes. When the call is disconnected, the LED goes off.
Tx
Green
Ethernet Transmit Status. Flashes green when data is being
transmitted to the Ethernet LAN from the ISDN LAN Modem.
Off indicates no data is being transmitted to the Ethernet LAN
from the ISDN LAN Modem.
Coll
Amber
Ethernet Collision Status. Flashes amber when some collisions
are taking place on the Ethernet LAN.
Off indicates no collisions are taking place on the Ethernet LAN.
Ports1—4
Green
Ethernet LAN Port Status. On indicates the unit detects the
Ethernet link integrity signal from an attached computer and
operation is normal.
Flashes when the LAN Modem is receiving data on that port.
Off indicates the unit does not detect the Ethernet link integrity
signal. The Ethernet cable may not be properly connected or the
cable may be the wrong polarity.
Installing the ISDN LAN Modem
Back Panel Connector
Description
27
The back panel provides the following components.
10-18 VDC
0.8 A MAX
Power
Connector
RESET
Reset Button
1 PHONE 2
4
Two Analog
Telephone Ports
3 LAN 2
Four Ethernet
10Base-T Connectors
1
ISDN
ISDN
BRI Interface
Figure 12 ISDN LAN Modem Back Panel
From left to right the back panel consists of the following.
Installing the ISDN
LAN Modem
Before You Begin
■
Power: Connect the power module cable to this port.
■
Reset: Press this button for no more than a couple of seconds if you have to
reset the unit. This causes the software to restart while maintaining your
configuration profile which includes service provider information and ISDN line
telephone numbers.
■
Two Analog Telephone Ports: You can connect analog equipment such as a
fax machine or telephone to these ports.
■
Four 10BASE-T Ethernet Ports: Connect the computers to these ports or
another Ethernet hub to add up to 25 users.
■
ISDN Basic Rate Interface Port: Connect the ISDN cable to this port.
This section describes how to do the following.
■
Install the ISDN cable
■
Connect to a 10BASE-T Ethernet LAN
■
Install analog equipment
■
Install the power cable
Before you begin, you will need the following in addition to the ISDN LAN Modem
which was provided in the package:
■
RJ-45 (8-pin) to RJ-11 (6-pin) cable labeled ISDN which was provided in the
package.
■
10BASE-T Ethernet cable (8-pin to 8-pin connectors) labeled Ethernet which
was provided in the package. It is recommended that you use the cable
provided. If, however, you choose to use another cable it must be a
straight-through 10BASE-T Ethernet cable. It cannot be a crossover cable.
■
Power adapter provided (you must use the power adapter provided in the
package).
28
CHAPTER 3: HARDWARE DESCRIPTION AND INSTALLATION
Installing the ISDN Cable
To install the ISDN cable:
1 Connect the RJ-45 (8-pin) connector end of the ISDN cable to the port labeled
ISDN on the back panel, as shown in Figure 13.
N
ISD
E
ON
T
1
PH
2
SE
RE
DC
8V
10-1 AX
AM
0.8
Figure 13 ISDN Cable Connection
2 Connect the RJ-11 (6-pin) connector end of the RJ-45/RJ-11 ISDN cable to the
RJ-11 or RJ-45 ISDN wall jack.
CAUTION: An NT1 (that is, a network termination device) is built into the ISDN
LAN Modem. Never connect the ISDN LAN Modem ISDN port to a standard analog
telephone jack or to an external NT1 device. Make sure that the ISDN cable is
connected directly to the ISDN jack.
Connecting to a
10BASE-T Ethernet Port
To connect a computer to the ISDN LAN Modem, do the following.
1 Insert one end of the 10BASE-T Ethernet cable into one of the four LAN ports on
the back of the ISDN LAN Modem, as shown in Figure 14.
N
ISD
E
ON
ET
1
PH
2
S
RE
DC
8V
10-1 AX
AM
0.8
Figure 14 10BASE-T Ethernet LAN Connection
2 Insert the opposite end of the cable into your computer’s 10BASE-T Ethernet port.
Installing the ISDN LAN Modem
29
CAUTION: You should only have one computer physically connected to the ISDN
LAN Modem during configuration. Once you complete the configuration process,
connect any other computers you would like to have on the LAN and then power
cycle each computer. If the newly-added computers cannot communicate with the
ISDN LAN Modem, refer to “Evaluating Symptoms and Solutions” in Chapter 9.
Connecting to Another
Ethernet Hub
You can connect to another Ethernet hub to allow up to 25 users to access the
WAN. Instructions for adding another Ethernet hub to allow 10 users, a more
common scenario, is as follows.
Before You Begin
In addition to an external 10BASE-T Ethernet hub, you will need a 10BASE-T
Ethernet cable, which may have been provided with the additional hub. If the hub
to which you are connecting your LAN Modem does not have an MDI/X switch,
you must use a crossover cable.
1 Insert one end of the 10BASE-T Ethernet cable into one of the four LAN ports on
the back of the ISDN LAN Modem, as shown in Figure 15.
ISDN
+
10-18 VDC
X
0.8 A MA
-
+
10-18 VDC
X
0.8 A MA
RESET
E2
1 PHON
MDI/MDIX
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
-
Figure 15 10BASE-T Hub-to-Hub Connection
2 Insert the opposite end of the cable into a 10 BASE-T Ethernet port on the other
Ethernet hub.
If you are connecting to an OfficeConnect Hub 8/TPO, insert the opposite end of
the Ethernet cable into port 8 and then set the MDI/X switch to MDI (that is,
pressed in). Make sure that the LED associated with that Ethernet port is lit. If it is
not, try changing the MDI/X switch setting.
30
CHAPTER 3: HARDWARE DESCRIPTION AND INSTALLATION
Installing Analog
Equipment
You can connect an analog touch-tone telephone, answering machine, fax
machine, or external analog modem to the ISDN LAN Modem. You will need an
RJ-11 to RJ-11 cable that is supplied with the analog device for each analog phone
port connection.
To install an analog device:
1 Insert one end of an RJ-11 cable into one of the two analog ports labeled Phone
on the back of the ISDN LAN Modem, as shown in Figure 16.
N
ISD
E
ON
T
1
PH
2
SE
RE
DC
8V
10-1 AX
AM
0.8
Figure 16 Analog Equipment Connection
2 Insert the other end of the RJ-11 cable into the appropriate RJ-11 port on the
analog device.
3 If you have another analog device to install, repeat steps 1 and 2.
CAUTION: The ISDN LAN Modem is designed to operate with touch-tone
telephones that collectively do not exceed a ringer equivalence number (REN) of
three per analog phone port. The ISDN LAN Modem is designed to provide power
(25 mA loop current per phone port) and ringing for these devices on up to 61
meters (200 feet) of AWG 26 or heavier AWG wiring. Although the ISDN LAN
Modem may function satisfactorily at longer cable distances with more than two
attached telephones, proper operation at longer cable distances is not guaranteed
in all situations.
Specialized telephone equipment such as speaker phones that draw large
amounts of power may not work on the ISDN LAN Modem’s Phone port. Because
these devices do not conform to the power specification of the touch-tone
telephone standard, their operation is not guaranteed.
Wall Mounting the ISDN LAN Modem
Installing the Power
Cable
31
To install the power cable:
1 Connect the ISDN LAN Modem power module cable to the 10-18 VDC power
connector on the back panel of the ISDN LAN Modem, as shown in Figure 17.
N
ISD
E
ON
T
1
PH
2
SE
RE
DC
8V
10-1 AX
AM
0.8
Figure 17 Power Cable Connection
2 Plug the other end of the power module into a surge-protected standard 110 VAC
wall outlet.
The indicator LEDs on the front panel flash momentarily as the unit undergoes a
power-up self-test diagnostic. The Power LED remains lit.
This completes the ISDN LAN Modem installation. In addition to the Power LED,
the ISDN LED remains lit indicating the line is configured and ready for use. The
LAN port LEDs associated with workstations connected to those ports also remain
lit indicating the LAN Modem can communicate with the workstation(s).
If you do not have TCP/IP installed and set up on your computer, refer to
Chapter 4, “Setting Up TCP/IP for Windows and Macintosh.” If you already have
TCP/IP installed and set up on your computer, refer to Chapter 5, “Configuring the
ISDN LAN Modem.”
Wall Mounting the ISDN LAN Modem
There are two slots on the underside of the ISDN LAN Modem which are used for
wall mounting. You will need two suitable screws. Ensure that the wall you are
going to use is smooth, flat, dry and sturdy. Make two screw holes which are
5 7/8 in (150 mm) apart. Insert the screws into the wall, leaving their heads 1/8 in
(3 mm) clear of the wall surface.
Remove any connections to the ISDN LAN Modem and position the unit over the
screw heads. When the unit is in line, gently push it onto the wall and move it
downward to secure. When making connections, be careful not to push the ISDN
LAN Modem up and off the wall.
32
CHAPTER 3: HARDWARE DESCRIPTION AND INSTALLATION
WARNING: Only wall mount single units. Do not wall mount stacked OfficeConnect
units.
Using Rubber Feet and Stacking Clips
Attach the feet to the marked areas at each corner of the underside of your ISDN LAN
Modem to stabilize your ISDN LAN Modem and prevent sliding.
Use the four clips to stack OfficeConnect units together. You can stack up to four
units. Stack small units above large units.
1. Place your existing unit on a flat surface.
Your clips fit in these positions on the side
of the unit.
2. Position a clip over one of these holes
and push it until it clicks into place.
Repeat this for the other clip position on
the same side.
3. Keeping the front of the units aligned,
rest the bottom of the new unit on the
clips’ spikes. Push the clips firmly into
the new unit until they click into place.
Figure 18 Using Stacking Clips
Small unit
Use these
holes
Large unit
Use these
holes
Spike
4
SETTING UP TCP/IP FOR WINDOWS
AND MACINTOSH
This chapter describes how to set up the Windows and Macintosh operating
system (OS) TCP/IP stack. Your computer must have a TCP/IP stack in order to use
the ISDN LAN Modem. If you already have TCP/IP installed and set up on your
computer, then go on to Chapter 5. These instructions vary depending upon
which operating system you are using. Refer to the appropriate section.
TCP/IP Setup Using
Windows 98 and
Windows 95
■
TCP/IP Setup Using Windows 98 and Windows 95
■
TCP/IP Setup Using Windows NT 4.0
■
TCP/IP Setup Using Mac OS 7.6 or later
■
TCP/IP Setup Using Windows 3.11
TCP/IP is provided as part of the standard Windows 98 and Windows 95 operating
systems. To set up TCP/IP for the ISDN LAN Modem, do the following.
You may be prompted for your installation disks or CD-ROM.
1 From the Control Panel, double click Network.
The Network dialog box appears.
Figure 19 Network Dialog Box
2 Click Add.
The Select Network Component Type dialog box appears.
34
CHAPTER 4: SETTING U P TCP/IP FOR WINDOWS AND MACINTOSH
Figure 20 Select Network Component Type Dialog Box
3 Select Protocol and then click Add.
The Select Network Protocol dialog box appears.
Figure 21 Select Network Protocol Dialog Box
4 From the Manufacturers list box, select Microsoft, and then from the Network
Protocols list box, select TCP/IP.
5 Click OK.
6 Select the Configuration tab.
The Network Configuration dialog box appears.
7 Select TCP/IP and then click Properties.
If you have multiple TCP/IP entries, select TCP/IP for the Ethernet card associated
with the ISDN LAN Modem.
TCP/IP Setup Using Windows 98 and Windows 95
35
Figure 22 Network Dialog Box
8 From the TCP/IP Properties dialog box, select the IP Address tab.
Figure 23 TCP/IP Properties Dialog Box
9 Most users need to select Obtain an IP address automatically because most LANs
use dynamic IP addresses. If your LAN uses static IP addresses, enter the IP address
and subnet mask. (You can obtain this information from your system administrator
or ISP.)
10 Select Advanced and then check the box to set TCP/IP as the default protocol.
36
CHAPTER 4: SETTING U P TCP/IP FOR WINDOWS AND MACINTOSH
Figure 24 Advanced Parameters of TCP/IP Properties
11 Click OK to close the TCP/IP Properties dialog box.
12 Click OK to close the Network dialog box.
13 Restart Windows 98 or 95 to let these changes take effect.
TCP/IP Setup Using
Windows NT 4.0
Windows NT 4.0 provides TCP/IP as part of its standard operating system. If you
have not already set up TCP/IP, do the following.
You will need your Windows NT 4.0 installation CD-ROM.
1 From the Control Panel, double-click Network.
The Network dialog box appears.
2 Select the Protocols tab, as shown in Figure 25.
TCP/IP Setup Using Windows NT 4.0
37
Figure 25 Windows NT Protocols Configuration Window
3 Click Add.
The Select Network Protocol dialog box appears as shown in Figure 26.
Figure 26 Select Network Protocol Dialog Box
4 Select TCP/IP Protocol and then click OK.
The following message appears.
Figure 27 DHCP Message Box
5 Select the appropriate response for your network.
6 You are then prompted to insert your installation CD-ROM. Insert the Windows NT
4.0 CD ROM and then click Continue.
For users who have Remote Access Service (RAS) installed on their PC, after the
appropriate files are copied to your PC, a message box asks whether or not you
would like TCP/IP installed for RAS. If you select Yes, you must select the device
you want to access remotely and then click Close.
7 After the appropriate files are copied to your PC, you will see TCP/IP Protocol listed
in the Network Protocols group box, as shown in Figure 28.
38
CHAPTER 4: SETTING U P TCP/IP FOR WINDOWS AND MACINTOSH
Figure 28 Network Protocols Group Box
8 Click Close.
The Microsoft TCP/IP Properties window appears, as shown in Figure 29.
Figure 29 Microsoft TCP/IP Properties Window
9 From the Adapter drop down list box, select the Ethernet card that is connected to
the ISDN LAN Modem.
10 If this LAN uses dynamic IP addresses, select Obtain an IP address from a DHCP
server. If this LAN uses static IP addresses, enter the IP address and subnet mask.
11 Click OK.
12 Click Yes to restart your PC and allow the changes to take effect.
TCP/IP Setup Using Mac OS 7.6 or later
TCP/IP Setup Using
Mac OS 7.6 or later
39
If you are using Macintosh operating system version 7.6 or later, Open Transport
(OT) PPP is provided and installed by default. If you did not install OT PPP when
you installed your system software, perform a custom installation of your system
software and install OT PPP version 1.1 or later.
To set up TCP/IP for Mac, do the following.
1 From the Apple menu, select Control Panels and then select TCP/IP.
The TCP/IP dialog box appears.
Figure 30 TCP/IP Dialog Box for Macintosh Computers
2 Select Ethernet or Ethernet built in from the Connect via drop down list box.
3 If this LAN uses dynamic IP addresses, select Using DHCP Server from the
Configure drop-down list box. If this LAN uses static IP addresses, select Manually
from the Configure drop-down list box and then enter the IP address.
40
CHAPTER 4: SETTING U P TCP/IP FOR WINDOWS AND MACINTOSH
TCP/IP Setup Using
Windows 3.11
Setting Up TCP/IP Using
MS TCP
If you are using Windows 3.11, a TCP/IP stack is not provided as part of the
operating system. If you do not have a TCP/IP stack, you can use MS TCP which is
provided on the 3Com Companion Programs CD-ROM.
To set up MS_TCP, do the following.
1 Install MS_TCP, located on the 3Com Companion Programs CD-ROM, onto your
hard drive.
2 From the Program Manager, click Network.
Figure 31 Program Manager Group Box
3 From the Network group box, click Network Setup.
Figure 32 Network Group Box
4 From the Network Setup dialog box, click the Drivers button.
5 From the Network Drivers dialog box, click Add Protocol.
6 Select Unlisted or Update Protocol and then click OK.
7 From the Install Driver dialog box, enter the path to the MS TCP directory.
For example, if you installed MS TCP on your C: drive in a directory called MSTCP,
you would enter C:\MSTCP.
8 Select MS TCP/IP-32.X and then click OK to install.
The protocol is added to the list as shown in Figure 33.
TCP/IP Setup Using Windows 3.11
41
Figure 33 Network Setup Dialog Box
9 After the installation is complete, click Close.
10 Click OK.
11 From the MS TCP/IP Configuration dialog box, check the Enable Automatic DHCP
Configuration check box and then click OK.
12 Restart your PC to allow the changes to take effect.
42
CHAPTER 4: SETTING U P TCP/IP FOR WINDOWS AND MACINTOSH
5
CONFIGURING THE ISDN LAN
MODEM
This chapter describes how to configure the ISDN LAN Modem for the typical
configuration. The typical configuration covers the basic setup and includes what
most users need to get up and running. It provides instructions for setting up your
ISDN line and connecting to the Internet. If you followed the instructions in the
Getting Started Guide, you have already set up the typical configuration. To see if
there are any additional changes you would like to make, you may want to look
over Chapter 6, “Advanced Configuration.”
The configuration windows shown in this chapter may differ slightly from what is
displayed on your computer.
Typical Configuration
The typical configuration covers the following main steps.
Launch
Web Browser
Run
SPID Wizard
Run
ISP Wizard
Verify
Configuration
Figure 34 Main Steps for Typical Configuration
Before You Begin
You Should Have Done
This
Make sure that you have done the following.
Before you configure the ISDN LAN Modem, you should have already done the
following:
■
Installed the hardware as described in Chapter 3, “Hardware Description and
Installation.”
■
Installed and set up TCP/IP on all computers you intend to connect to the ISDN
LAN Modem. If TCP/IP is not installed and set up, refer to Chapter 4.
44
CHAPTER 5: CONFIGURING THE ISDN LAN MODEM
CAUTION: You should only have one computer physically connected to the ISDN
LAN Modem during configuration. Once you complete the configuration process,
connect any other computers you would like to have on the LAN and then power
cycle each computer. If the newly-added computers cannot communicate with the
ISDN LAN Modem, refer to “Evaluating Symptoms and Solutions” in Chapter 9.
You Should Have This
Information
Determine Whether You
Use Dynamic or Static IP
Addresses
■
Telephone number(s) for your ISDN line provided by your telephone company.
■
If you want to set up a connection to an ISP, you will also need the telephone
number to call for access to your ISP, as well as your user name, password and
DNS address (if your service provider requires a DNS address to be configured).
Your setup procedure will vary depending upon whether you are using a dynamic
or a static IP address.
A static IP address is a permanent, manually-assigned address recognized by a
remote server, such as a corporate LAN or an ISP. By default, your ISDN LAN
Modem dynamically assigns an IP address to each computer. If you have been
accessing a remote server via a static IP address prior to installing your ISDN LAN
Modem, you may be required to perform additional configuration steps. The first
step is to determine your static versus dynamic IP addressing scenario.
If you determine that your computer has a static IP address, refer to “Setting Up
Your Computer If You Have a Static IP Address.” If your computer has a dynamic IP
address, you may begin configuring the ISDN LAN Modem directly. Refer to
“Configuring the ISDN LAN Modem for the Typical Configuration.”
Determine your IP address type as follows:
■
■
■
For Windows 98, 95 and NT 4.0 Users: From the Start menu, select
Settings and then Control Panel. Double-click Network. Select TCP/IP for the
Ethernet card you will attach to the ISDN LAN Modem and then click
Properties. Select the IP Address tab. If the radio button labeled Obtain an IP
address automatically (Windows 98 and 95) or labeled Obtain an IP address
from a DHCP server (Windows NT 4.0) is selected, your computer has a
dynamic IP address. If the radio button labeled Specify an IP address is
selected, your computer has a static IP address.
For Mac Users: From the Apple menu, open Control Panels. Double-click
TCP/IP. Choose Ethernet or Ethernet built in from the Connect via
drop-down list box, if it is not already chosen. If the Configure drop down
list box is set to Using DHCP Server, then you are on a dynamic network and
are ready to continue directly with “Installing the ISDN LAN Modem.” If
Configure is not set to Using DHCP Server and you have specific values
listed in any of the following fields: IP Address, Subnet mask, Router
address, or Name server addr., then your computer has a static IP address.
For Windows 3.11 Users: From the Program Manager, double-click the
Network program group icon. Double-click the Network Setup icon. Click
the Drivers button. Highlight the Microsoft TCP/IP - 32.X entry and click
Setup. If Enable DHCP Configuration is checked, then your computer has a
dynamic IP address. If an IP address is entered in the IP Address box, then
your computer has a static IP address.
Before You Begin
Setting Up Your
Computer If You Have a
Static IP Address
45
If your computer has a static IP address, you must verify and possibly change some
settings on your computer before you begin the configuration procedure. The
ISDN LAN Modem must be your gateway and one of your DNS servers. Follow the
procedure in the appropriate section to make sure that this is the case. Note that if
your computer has a dynamic IP address, this configuration would occur
automatically and you can go on to “Configuring the ISDN LAN Modem for the
Typical Configuration.”
These instructions assume that the LAN Modem configuration is set the factory
default. If you are moving the LAN Modem from a different LAN, reset the LAN
Modem before you begin. To do so, connect a telephone to one the LAN Modem
phone ports and then enter **3266# from the keypad.
For Windows 98 and 95 Users
1 From the Start menu, select Settings and then Control Panel.
2 Double-click Network and then select TCP/IP.
If you have multiple TCP/IP entries, select TCP/IP for the Ethernet card associated
with the ISDN LAN Modem.
3 Click Properties and then select the Gateway tab and write down the first IP
address in the Installed Gateways box.
If nothing is entered in the Installed Gateway list, enter an IP address that does not
belong to any workstation on your LAN, but is in the subnet that you have chosen
for your LAN. Write this IP address down for later use.
4 Click the DNS Configuration tab.
5 In the DNS Server Search Order edit box, enter the gateway IP address you wrote
down as part of the previous step and then click Add.
6 Click OK to close the TCP/IP Properties box.
7 Click OK to close the Network control panel.
You are asked to restart your computer.
8 Click OK.
For Windows NT 4.0 Users
1 From the Start menu, select Settings and then Control Panel.
2 Double-click Network and then select the Protocols tab.
3 Highlight TCP/IP and then click Properties.
4 Click the IP Address tab and then select the Ethernet card associated with the ISDN
LAN Modem from the Adapter drop-down list box.
5 Write down the IP address in the Installed Gateways box.
6 Click the DNS tab.
7 Click Add.
8 In the TCP/IP DNS Server box, enter the gateway IP address you wrote down
previously and then click Add.
9 Click OK to close the Microsoft TCP/IP Properties dialog box.
10 Click OK to close the Network Control Panel box.
46
CHAPTER 5: CONFIGURING THE ISDN LAN MODEM
You are asked to restart your computer.
11 Click OK.
For Macintosh Users
1 From the Apple menu, open Control Panels. Double-click TCP/IP.
2 Choose Ethernet from the Connect via drop-down list box, if not already chosen.
The Configure drop down list box should be set to Manually if you are on a static
network.
3 Note the series of numbers entered in the Router address box. Write this number
down.
4 Enter this number into the Name server addr. box. (If you already have existing
address(es) listed, add the new address below the last entry.)
5 Choose File and Close.
6 When asked to save your changes, do so by choosing Save.
You may want to rename this configuration so that your previous configuration is
not overwritten.
For Windows 3.11 Users
1 From the Program manager, click Network.
2 From the Network group box, click Network Setup.
3 From the Network Setup dialog box, click the Drivers button.
4 From the Network Drivers dialog box, double-click Microsoft TCP/IP-32.
5 Uncheck Enable Automatic DHCP Configuration.
6 Write down the number in the Default Gateway field.
7 Click OK.
8 Restart your PC to allow the changes to take effect.
You are now ready to install your ISDN LAN Modem. Refer to “Configuring the
ISDN LAN Modem for the Typical Configuration” to continue.
Configuring the ISDN LAN Modem for the Typical Configuration
Configuring the ISDN
LAN Modem for the
Typical Configuration
47
To configure the ISDN LAN Modem for the typical configuration, do the following.
If you are using static IP addressing, you may need the IP address which you
recorded previously in the “Setting Up Your Computer If You Have a Static IP
Address”section.
1 Launch your Web browser.
The ISDN LAN Modem attempts to use its default IP address to communicate with
the computer. If communication cannot be established, the ISDN LAN Modem will
change its default IP address. If this occurs, the ISDN LAN Modem will reset itself
and then function as described in this section.
Regardless of the start page to which your Web browser is set, your Web browser
will go to the ISDN LAN Modem configuration setup.
A welcome message appears, as shown in Figure 35.
Figure 35 Initial SetUp Welcome Window
2 Click Continue.
A message box appears and indicates that the ISDN LAN Modem clock is being
synchronized to the date and time on your workstation.
The Set Password window appears. This password is used to guard access to the
ISDN LAN Modem’s configuration program. If you would like to restrict access to
the configuration program, select a password and record it in a safe place.
48
CHAPTER 5: CONFIGURING THE ISDN LAN MODEM
Figure 36 Set Password Window
3 Enter a password in the Password field and then enter the same password in the
Password (repeat) field to confirm it. If you do not wish to enter a password, leave
the fields empty.
4 Click Submit.
A message box indicates that your password has been set. The SPID Wizard
window appears.
Figure 37 SPID Wizard Window
Configuring the ISDN LAN Modem for the Typical Configuration
49
If you have not ordered your ISDN line, click Abort and then Click Yes to confirm
that you want to abort the SPID Wizard program. The ISDN LAN Modem
configuration main page appears. After you have an ISDN line installed, refer to
“Setting Up Your ISDN Line Manually” for instructions on configuring your ISDN
connection manually.
5 Enter the first telephone number for your ISDN line.
6 If you have another telephone number associated with your ISDN line, enter it in
the second telephone number field. Otherwise, leave this field blank.
7 Click Continue.
The SPID Wizard configures the switch type and SPIDs of your ISDN line. When the
SPID Wizard is done, the ISP Wizard appears
Figure 38 ISP Wizard Window
If you do not want to use the ISP Wizard, click Abort. The ISDN LAN Modem
configuration main page appears. Refer to “Setting Up Additional Service
Providers”for instructions on configuring your ISP connection manually.
8 In the Name field, enter the name of your ISP.
9 In the Telephone Number field, enter the telephone number of your ISP.
If you want to enter another telephone number to connect to your ISP or change
these settings, refer to “Editing Service Provider Profiles” after you have
completed this typical installation procedure.
10 In the User ID and Password fields, enter your user ID and password for your ISP
account.
11 If your ISP requires a DNS address, enter it in the DNS Address(es) field.
12 Specify how you want the bandwidth allocated for this connection.
50
CHAPTER 5: CONFIGURING THE ISDN LAN MODEM
■
■
■
Use one B channel: When selected, one B channel is used to connect to
this service provider.
Add second B channel as required: When selected, the second B channel
is added when the first B channel reaches a certain threshold. The threshold
default is 60%. To change the threshold default, refer to “Changing Data
Call Parameters” in Chapter 6. The second B channel is temporarily
removed when you place or answer another call.
Use two B channels: When selected, both B channels are used to connect
to this service provider (that is, always use Multilink PPP). Note that this
prevents another call, data or voice to be placed or received as there is no
available bandwidth (that is, the second B channel cannot be temporarily
removed).
13 Specify the B channel rate or select TollMizer.
Leave the B channel rate set to 64 Kbps unless your telephone company and the
locations to which you will be connecting only support 56 Kbps.
TollMizer makes a 56 Kbps data call over a voice circuit allowing you to save the
typical cost difference between a voice and data call. Note that the destination you
are calling must also support this feature (also referred to as Switched 56
Permissive or Data Over Voice). Check with your telephone company and ISP to
make sure that they support TollMizer.
14 Click Continue.
A call is launched to your ISP. A congratulations message appears when you
successfully connect to your ISP. This verifies the correct configuration of your ISDN
line and ISP connection.
This configuration covers the typical parameters needed to connect to your ISP.
There are additional parameters for this ISP connection which have been set to a
typical default. These parameters include Domain Name, Compression, NAT, and
WAN Link IP Address. In addition, you can enter a second telephone for
connection to your ISP. For information on these parameters and instructions for
changing their default values, refer to “Editing Service Provider Profiles.”
15 Click Continue to connect to the ISDN LAN Modem Web site where you should
register the product and view the ReadMe file which contains the latest
information.
For all the latest, up to date information about your ISDN LAN Modem, visit
http://www.remoteaccess.3com.com/support/docs/lanmodem/welcome.html
If you cannot access a Web site and your computer has a static IP address, refer to
“Configuring a Static IP Address on the ISDN LAN Modem.” If you experience any
other problems, refer to Chapter 9, “Troubleshooting and Maintenance.”To return
to the LAN Modem’s main configuration page, click Configure Modem from the
Web page.
Configuring the ISDN LAN Modem for the Typical Configuration
Configuring a Static IP
Address on the ISDN
LAN Modem
51
If you followed the steps in “Configuring the ISDN LAN Modem for the Typical
Configuration” and were not able to connect to a Web site and your computer
has a static IP address, there may be an incompatibility between the IP address on
your computer and the IP address on the ISDN LAN Modem. To correct this, do the
following.
1 Enter the following URL in your Web browser: http://3com.oc.lanmodem/
2 From the ISDN LAN Modem’s main configuration page click on the ISDN LAN
Modem icon in the illustration.
The LAN (Ethernet) Parameters page appears.
3 In the IP Address field, enter the default gateway address you entered as described
in “Setting Up Your Computer If You Have a Static IP Address”.
4 Click Submit.
The ISDN LAN Modem will reset.
5 Click Refresh from your Web browser’s menu bar.
The Enter Password window appears.
6 Enter your password and then click Submit.
The ISDN LAN Modem’s main configuration page appears.
7 Click the ISP Wizard button.
You will see the information you entered previously.
8 Click Continue.
A call is launched to your ISP. A congratulations message appears when you
successfully connect to your ISP. This verifies the correct configuration of your ISDN
line and ISP connection.
This configuration covers the typical parameters needed to connect to your ISP.
There are additional parameters for this ISP connection which have been set to a
typical default. These parameters include Domain Name, Compression, NAT, and
WAN Link IP Address. In addition, you can enter a second telephone for
connection to your ISP. For information on these parameters and instructions for
changing their default values, refer to “Editing Service Provider Profiles” on
page 64.
9 Click Continue to go to the ISDN LAN Modem Web site where you should register
the product and view the ReadMe file which contains the latest information.
For all the latest, up to date information about your ISDN LAN Modem, visit
http://www.remoteaccess.3com.com/support/docs/lanmodem/welcome.html
52
CHAPTER 5: CONFIGURING THE ISDN LAN MODEM
ISDN LAN Modem
Main Page
The ISDN LAN Modem main page is shown in Figure 39. From this page you can
access configuration parameters as well as place and receive calls.
Bookmark this page for easy access. Alternatively, if you are using the ISDN LAN
Modem Web browser, click Configure Modem from the Links menu bar.
Figure 39 ISDN LAN Modem WebWizard Main Page
The ISDN LAN Modem main configuration page, also called the WebWizard,
provides links to configuration, dialing, statistics screens and help. Once you click
to a configuration screen, the bottom frame provides help for that configuration
as well as links to other help topics. There are links from the illustration as well as
links from the buttons listed in the left vertical frame.
Links from the
Illustration
By clicking on the icons in the illustration, you can jump to the following locations.
■
Service Providers: Jumps to the Service Providers page where you can
configure a connection to an ISP or a private network.
■
Workstations: Jumps to the Workstation Selection page where you can view a
workstation’s IP address and can change its associations with service providers.
■
ISDN Parameters: Jumps to the ISDN Parameters page where you can
manually configure ISDN parameters if you prefer not to run the SPID Wizard.
Also, supplementary voice services are configurable from this page.
■
LAN Parameters: Jumps to the LAN Parameters page where you can configure
Ethernet parameters for the ISDN LAN Modem.
■
Data Call Parameters: Jumps to the Data Call Timeout Parameters page.
From here you may set inactivity timers, which allow calls to be disconnected
due to network inactivity, keeping telephone usage and Internet access costs
down.
■
Call Routing: Jumps to the Voice Call Routing page where you can configure
how you would like voice calls routed to the analog equipment such as a
telephone or fax machine attached the ISDN LAN Modem’s Phone ports.
■
Current Call Status: Jumps to the Call Statistics page where the latest call
information is displayed.
ISDN LAN Modem Main Page
Links from the Buttons
53
■
Home: Jumps to the main configuration page of the ISDN LAN Modem.
■
SPID Wizard: Activates the SPID Wizard if you need to run it again.
■
ISP Wizard: Allows you to configure an ISP. If you already configured an ISP
using the ISP Wizard, and then you run ISP Wizard again, the latest ISP will
overwrite the previous one. To add a second ISP, go to the Service Providers
page.
■
Manual Calling: Jumps to the Manual Calling page where you can connect
and disconnect calls.
■
Statistics: Jumps to the Statistics page where you can view statistics regarding
the following: system, ISDN, current call, last call and service provider.
■
Maintenance: Jumps to the Maintenance page where you can reset the ISDN
LAN Modem as well as place the ISDN LAN Modem in firmware download
mode in order to download the latest firmware.
■
Password: Jumps to the Password page restrict access to the LAN Modem
WebWizard by configuring a password.
Context-sensitive help is available in the bottom frame of each configuration
screen. To increase the size of the help frame, drag the pane separator up.
This chapter covers the typical configuration steps required for a basic
understanding of your ISDN LAN Modem functionality. For further configuration
options, refer to Chapter 6, “Advanced Configuration.”
54
CHAPTER 5: CONFIGURING THE ISDN LAN MODEM
6
ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
This chapter describes how to configure advanced settings for the ISDN LAN
Modem. For instance, setting up a connection to a private network such as a
remote office LAN, and changing default settings. You should follow the typical
configuration steps first so that you can have your ISDN line parameters set up
before you configure the advanced parameters.
Specifically, this section provides instructions for doing the following.
■
Setting up additional service providers
■
Editing service provider profiles
■
Associating service providers with workstations
■
Configuring LAN parameters
■
Changing data call parameters
■
Changing voice call routing
■
Reserving DHCP addresses
■
Changing your password
■
Locking the configuration
The configuration windows shown in this chapter may differ slightly from that
displayed on your computer.
Before you Begin
Before you begin advanced configuration, access the ISDN LAN Modem’s
WebWizard. To access the WebWizard (also referred to as the ISDN LAN Modem
main configuration page), do the following.
If you are using the ISDN LAN Modem custom Web browser, click Configure
Modem to configure additional parameters. If you are not using the ISDN LAN
Modem Web browser, enter: http://3com.oc.lanmodem/
56
CHAPTER 6: ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
Setting Up Additional
Service Providers
A service provider is a location outside of your LAN that you would like to access
from your LAN, such as an ISP for access to the Internet or a private network such
as a remote office LAN. You can define up to four service providers (that is, remote
destinations) on the ISDN LAN Modem.
This section describes how to do the following:
■
Differentiate between an ISP and private network
■
Set up a connection to an ISP
■
Set up a connection to a private network
■
Associate computers on the LAN with selected service providers
■
Edit service provider profiles
If you set up a connection to an ISP as part of the typical (that is, initial) setup (via
the ISP Wizard), then you already have one service provider defined. Because this is
considered a typical configuration, some default values have been assumed. For
example, the connection to an ISP is associated with all of the computers
connected to your LAN. In other words, all computers on the LAN can connect to
that ISP and therefore the Internet. You may want to review the profile for this ISP
to see if you want to make any changes. For instructions, refer to “Editing Service
Provider Profiles.”
ISP versus Private
Network
There are two types of service providers you may configure, an ISP and a private
network. A description of each follows.
When to Select ISP
Choose ISP when you want to set up a direct connection to the public Internet (via
an Internet Service Provider) as shown in Figure 40.
Internet or
online service
ISDN
LAN Modem
ISDN outlet
Figure 40 Direct Connection to an ISP
Setting Up Additional Service Providers
57
When to Select Private Network
Select private network when you want to connect directly to a remote, private
LAN such as a corporate network, shown in Figure 41. For instance, if you want to
dial into your main office from home in order to access the servers at your office
for e-mail, printing, and so on, then select private network as the type of service
provider you want to configure. If the private network you are dialing into
provides the option of accessing the Internet and you want to be able to reach the
Internet through your corporate LAN (as opposed to through a direct connection
to an ISP), then choose that option when configuring your private network
parameters.
Direct Connection to Private Network
Direct Connection to Private Network
& ISP via Private Network
Remote office LAN
Remote office LAN
Internet or
online service
ISDN
LAN Modem
ISDN
LAN Modem
ISDN outlet
ISDN outlet
Figure 41 Direct Connection to a Private Network
Setting Up a Connection
to an ISP
This section describes how to set up your ISDN LAN Modem for access to the
Internet.
Before You Begin
Before you begin, you will need the following information from your ISP:
■
Telephone number(s) you must dial to access this ISP
■
User ID and password
■
DNS IP address(es)
This information is required only if your ISP does not provide the IP address
dynamically.
Setting Up a Connection to the Internet
To set up a connection to an ISP, do the following.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem main page, click the Service Providers graphic.
2 Select New (Internet Service Provider) from the drop down list box.
58
CHAPTER 6: ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
Figure 42 ISP Service Provider Selection Window
3 Click Select.
The Internet Service Provider Parameters window appears.
Figure 43 ISP Parameters Window
4 In the Name field, enter a name for this remote destination, such as the name of
the ISP. You may want to add an additional description if you have more than one
account with this particular ISP.
5 In the Telephone Number 1 field, enter the telephone number you must dial in
order to reach your ISP.
Setting Up Additional Service Providers
59
6 In the Alternate Number field, you can either enter an alternative number or, if
required by your ISP, a second telephone number to establish a Multilink PPP call.
To enter a second, alternative telephone number for your ISP that will be
automatically dialed (if, for example the first number is busy) select Alternate and
then enter the telephone number in the Number field.
Some ISPs may require that you dial two telephone numbers to establish a
Multilink PPP call. If so, select Multilink from the drop down list box and then enter
the telephone number in the Number field.
7 Under Security, enter your User ID and Password.
8 Under DNS IP Address(es), if your ISP uses static IP addresses (that is, your ISP does
not supply these addresses when a dial up connection is established), enter the
primary DNS IP address of your ISP in the Primary field. If there is a secondary
address, enter it in the Secondary field.
9 Specify Bandwidth Allocation.
■
■
■
Use one B channel: When selected, one B channel is used to connect to
this service provider.
Add second B channel as required: When selected, the second B channel
is added when the first B channel reaches a certain threshold. The threshold
default is 60%. To change the threshold default, refer to “Changing Data
Call Parameters.” The second B channel is temporarily removed when you
place or answer another call.
Use two B channels: When selected, both B channels are used to connect
to this service provider (that is, always use Multilink PPP). Note that this
prevents another call, data or voice to be placed or received as there is no
available bandwidth (that is, the second B channel cannot be temporarily
removed).
10 Under Miscellaneous, specify the B channel rate or select TollMizer.
Leave the B channel rate set to 64 Kbps unless your telephone company and the
locations to which you will be connecting require 56 Kbps.
TollMizer makes a 56 Kbps data call over a voice circuit, allowing you to save the
typical cost difference between a voice and data call. Note that the destination you
are calling must also support this feature (also referred to as Switched 56
Permissive or Data Over Voice). Check with your telephone company and ISP to
make sure that they support TollMizer.
11 Under Miscellaneous, leave the default, NAT enabled, unless you are certain you
want to disable it. With NAT enabled, the ISDN LAN Modem translates IP
addresses between the computers on the LAN and the ISP, allowing all LAN users
access to a single ISP. Only disable NAT when static IP addresses are provided by
your ISP for users on the LAN.
12 Under Miscellaneous, if the ISP to which you want to connect does not assign a
dynamic IP address and wants you to use a static IP address, enter the IP address
and the subnet mask in the WAN link fields. Otherwise, leave these fields empty.
13 Under Miscellaneous, indicate whether or not you would like to use compression
when transferring data by selecting the appropriate radio button.
14 For Allow Automatic Call Initiation, leave the default setting, which is Yes.
If you select No, you will have to manually launch a call to this service provider
every time you want to connect. You may want to set this field to No if your calls
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CHAPTER 6: ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
are being connected unintentionally as a result of packets generated by your
workstations.
15 For Enable Intelligent NAT, leave the default setting, which is Yes, in order for the
LAN Modem to better support Internet applications and games.
The ISDN LAN Modem delivers all unsolicited TCP/UDP packets to the workstation
that is currently communicating with the remote host that has generated these
packets. If you set this field to No, all unsolicited TCP/UDP packets are delivered to
the default workstation.
16 In the Default Workstation for Incoming Packets field, specify the workstation to
which all unsolicited TCP/UDP packets should be delivered.
Note that if the Enable Intelligent NAT field is set to Yes, the ISDN LAN Modem
first attempts to deliver the unsolicited TCP/UDP packets to the workstation that is
currently communicating with the remote host that has generated these packets.
Only if no such workstation is found are the packets delivered to the specified
default workstation.
17 Click Submit.
18 If you would like to configure a connection to another ISP, repeat steps 1—17. You
can configure up to a total of four remote destinations.
If you want to password protect the configuration profile of the ISDN LAN
Modem, refer to “Locking and Unlocking the Configuration”.
Setting Up a Connection
to a Private Network
This section describes how to set up your ISDN LAN Modem for access to a private
network such as a remote office LAN.
Before You Begin
Before you begin, you will need the following information from your MIS
department:
■
Telephone number(s) you must dial to access this private network
■
User ID and password
■
IP address/subnet mask of the remote LAN you want to access
In addition, you may need the following, depending on your particular network
setup. Check with your network administrator.
■
Domain name of the remote LAN you want to access
■
DNS IP address(es)
■
WAN Link IP address
Setting Up a Connection to a Remote LAN
To set up a connection to a remote LAN, do the following.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem main page, click the Service Providers graphic.
The Service Provider Selection window appears.
Setting Up Additional Service Providers
61
Figure 44 Private Network Service Provider Selection Window
2 Select New Private Network from the drop-down list box and then click Select.
The Private Network Parameters window appears.
Figure 45 Private Network Parameters Window
62
CHAPTER 6: ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
3 In the Name field, enter a name for this remote destination, such as the name of
the location of the office. You may want to add an additional description if you
have more than one account with this private network.
4 In the Telephone Number 1 field, enter the telephone number you must dial in
order to reach this remote office.
5 In the Alternate Number field, you can either enter an alternative number or, if
required by this private network, a second telephone number to establish a
Multilink PPP call.
To enter a second, alternative telephone number for this private network that will
be automatically dialed (if, for example the first number is busy) select Alternate
and then enter the telephone number in the Number field.
If your private network requires that you dial two telephone numbers to establish
a Multilink PPP call, select Multilink from the drop-down list box and then enter
the telephone number in the Number field.
6 Under Security, enter your User ID and password.
7 Under DNS IP Address(es), if this private network uses static IP addresses (that is,
these IP addresses are not supplied when a dial-up connection is established) enter
the primary DNS IP address of your private network in the Primary field. If there is
a secondary address, enter it in the Secondary field.
8 Specify Bandwidth Allocation.
■
■
■
Use one B channel: When selected, one B channel is used to connect to
this service provider.
Add second B channel as required: When selected, the second B channel
is added when the first B channel reaches a certain threshold. The threshold
default is 60%. To change the threshold default, refer to “Changing Data
Call Parameters.” The second B channel is temporarily removed when you
place or answer another call.
Use two B channels: When selected, both B channels are used to connect
to this service provider (that is, always use Multilink PPP). Note that this
prevents another call, data or voice to be placed or received as there is no
available bandwidth (that is, the second B channel cannot be temporarily
removed).
9 Under Private Network Parameters, enter the IP address, subnet mask and domain
name of the private network. You must enter an IP address and subnet mask.
10 Under Miscellaneous, if you want to be able to access the Internet from this
private network, select the Yes, I want to access the Internet radio button.
Otherwise, select the No radio button.
11 Under Miscellaneous, specify the B channel rate or select TollMizer.
Leave the B channel rate set to 64 Kbps unless your telephone company and the
locations to which you will be connecting require 56 Kbps.
TollMizer makes a 56 Kbps data call over a voice circuit, allowing you to save the
typical cost difference between a voice and data call. Note that the destination you
are calling must also support this feature (also referred to as Switched 56
Permissive or Data Over Voice). Check with your telephone company and ISP to
make sure that they support TollMizer.
Setting Up Additional Service Providers
63
12 Under Miscellaneous, indicate whether or not you would like to use data
compression when transferring data by selecting the appropriate radio button.
13 Under Miscellaneous, leave the default, NAT enabled, unless you are certain you
want to disable it. With NAT enabled, the ISDN LAN Modem translates IP
addresses between the computers on the LAN and the ISP, allowing all LAN users
access to a single ISP. Only disable NAT when static IP addresses are provided by
your ISP for users on the LAN.
14 Under Miscellaneous, if the private network to which you want to connect does
not assign a dynamic IP address and wants you to use a static IP address, enter the
IP address and the subnet mask in the WAN link fields. Otherwise, leave these
fields empty.
15 For Allow Automatic Call Initiation, leave the default setting which is Yes.
If you select No, you will have to manually launch a call to this service provider
every time you want to connect. You may want to set this field to No if your calls
are being connected unintentionally as a result of packets generated by your
workstations.
16 For Enable Intelligent NAT, leave the default setting, which is Yes, in order for the
LAN Modem to better support Internet applications and games.
The ISDN LAN Modem delivers all unsolicited TCP/UDP packets to the workstation
that is currently communicating with the remote host that has generated these
packets. If you set this field to No, all unsolicited TCP/UDP packets are delivered to
the default workstation.
17 In the Default Workstation for Incoming Packets field, specify the workstation to
which all unsolicited TCP/UDP packets should be delivered.
Note that if the Enable Intelligent NAT field is set to Yes, the ISDN LAN Modem
first attempts to deliver the unsolicited TCP/UDP packets to the workstation that is
currently communicating with the remote host that has generated these packets.
Only if no such workstation is found are the packets delivered to the specified
default workstation.
18 Click Submit.
19 If you would like to configure a connection to another remote office, repeat steps
1 through 18. You can configure up to four remote destinations.
If you want to password protect the configuration profile of the ISDN LAN
Modem, refer to “Locking and Unlocking the Configuration.”
Associating Service
Providers with
Workstations on the
LAN
Once you have configured the service providers to which you would like to
connect, they will be associated with all (up to 25) of the workstations on your
LAN by default. You can change these associations if desired. For example, if only
one workstation on the LAN should have Internet access, you can associate that
ISP connection with one workstation exclusively. This will prevent all other users on
the LAN from accessing the Internet from their computers. You can change these
associations from the Workstation Parameters window which provides the
following information for each workstation:
■
Name: This field contains the name of the workstation you selected. If you
have Macintosh computers on your LAN, the name does not automatically
appear in the Name field. You should enter the name for the Macintosh in the
Name field.
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CHAPTER 6: ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
■
IP Address: This field contains the IP address of the workstation you selected.
You should not have to make any changes to this field unless you are using
static IP addresses (that is, IP addresses which are not dynamically assigned by
the ISDN LAN Modem).
■
Service Provider Usage: Under Enable the use of the following Service
Providers, you can see which service providers can be accessed from this
workstation.
■
IP Address Statically Configured on Workstation: This field allows you to
reserve a workstation’s static IP address in the DHCP server to ensure that it is
not dynamically assigned to another workstation. It is recommended that you
do this if you have workstations on your LAN with static IP addresses and other
workstations on the same LAN with dynamic IP addresses.
If you have more than one ISP configured, all calls will be routed to the first ISP
listed. To connect to another ISP that you have configured, uncheck the box(es) of
the ISP(s) that you do not wish to use at this time.
To change the association between service provider connections and a particular
computer on the LAN, do the following.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem main page, click Workstations.
2 From the Workstations drop down list box, select the Workstation for which you
would like to change the accessible service providers.
3 Check or clear the boxes of the service providers you would like to associate or
disassociate.
4 Click Submit.
If you want to password protect the configuration profile of the ISDN LAN
Modem, refer to “Locking and Unlocking the Configuration.”
Editing Service
Provider Profiles
Edit a service provider profile you have previously configured as follows.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem main page, click the Service Providers graphic.
A drop down list box appears which contains the names of the service providers
you have configured.
2 Select the name of the service provider connection profile you would like to edit.
The connection profile page appears.
3 Edit the fields as desired.
For more information on the fields, refer to the appropriate section, “Setting Up a
Connection to an ISP” or “Setting Up a Connection to a Private Network”, or refer
to the online help located in the frame at the bottom of the web page.
4 When finished, click Submit.
Restricting Workstations from Accessing Service Provider(s)
Restricting
Workstations from
Accessing Service
Provider(s)
65
If you want to restrict a workstation(s) on the LAN from accessing a service
providers(s), do the following.
1 click Workstation Parameters from the ISDN LAN Modem home page.
2 Select the workstation from which you want to limit access.
3 Clear the check boxes located next to the names of the service provider(s) you
want to restrict from accessing that service provider over the LAN.
4 When finished, click Submit.
5 Repeat the previous steps for additional workstation access restrictions.
If you want to password protect the configuration profile of the ISDN LAN
Modem, refer to “Locking and Unlocking the Configuration.”
Configuring Your LAN
Parameters
Understanding LAN
Parameters
This section describes how to configure the parameters of your LAN. (LAN refers to
that section of the network comprising your ISDN LAN Modem and all the
computers or other devices attached to it by means of Ethernet cabling.) This
section describes the LAN parameters and then provides configuration steps.
The LAN Parameters window, shown in Figure 46, contains the following fields.
Figure 46 LAN Parameters Window
Name
Displays the name for the ISDN LAN Modem. This name is used for DNS. For
example, the name LANmodem is translated to its IP address 192.168.1.1.
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CHAPTER 6: ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
IP Address and Subnet Mask
The IP address is a unique address which identifies the ISDN LAN Modem on a
network. The default address (192.168.1.1) is a private IP address which will be
translated automatically by the ISDN LAN Modem for Internet access. You should
leave the default unless you are certain that this value must be changed.
The ISDN LAN Modem attempts to use its default IP address to communicate with
the computer. If communication cannot be established, the ISDN LAN Modem will
change its default IP address. If this occurs, the IP address shown in Figure 46 and
the subnet mask will be different.
The subnet mask identifies the subnetwork to which your computer is connected.
You should leave the default unless you are certain that this value must be
changed.
WARNING: If you change the IP address and/or the subnet mask, the ISDN LAN
Modem will re-initialize itself to make the new settings work. All calls will be
terminated and you may need to reconfigure the IP addresses of the computers
connected to the ISDN LAN Modem. For a LAN using static IP addresses, you must
manually reconfigure the IP addresses of the workstations on the LAN via the
Workstation Parameters window. For a LAN using dynamic IP addresses, if you
have Windows 98 or 95, launch Winipcfg.exe (probably located in your Windows
directory), click Release All and then click Renew All.
Local Domain Name
The local domain name identifies your LAN. LAN refers to the network created by
the ISDN LAN Modem and the devices attached to it.
Enable DHCP Server
The ISDN LAN Modem provides DHCP server functionality for the LAN which
automatically assigns a network or IP address to a newly attached workstation on
an IP network. If another device on your LAN is providing this functionality, or if
you are using static IP addresses, then you should disable the DHCP server.
Enable NetBIOS Filtering
For Windows Users: NetBIOS is primarily used by Windows 98, 95 and NT for local
file and printer sharing, note that NetBIOS may also be used on other operating
systems. This protocol can make spurious DNS requests which can inadvertently
cause the LAN Modem to establish unwanted calls to your Service Provider and
results in subsequent charges to your phone bill. When this box is checked,
NetBIOS packets cannot initiate a call, but they will be passed if the call is already
established. If you have no need to perform file or printer sharing over your ISDN
connection, you should enable NetBIOS filtering (that is, check the box). Note that
enabling the NetBIOS filter will not affect your ability to share files and printers
over your LAN. NetBIOS filtering is disabled by default.
Changing Data Call Parameters
Configuring the LAN
Parameters
67
To configure LAN parameters, do the following.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem main page, click the ISDN LAN Modem graphic.
2 In the IP Address field, review the default and enter a different IP address if
required.
3 In the Subnet Mask field, review the default and enter a different subnet mask if
required.
4 In the Local Domain Name field, if desired, enter a name you would like to use for
your local domain. This field is not required. If you do not know what to enter,
leave it blank.
5 Check the Enable DHCP server box to enable DHCP or clear the box to disable it.
WARNING: If you changed the IP address and/or the subnet mask of your ISDN
LAN Modem, the ISDN LAN Modem will re-initialize itself when you submit the
changes by clicking Submit. When the re-initialization occurs, all calls are
terminated, and you may have to reconfigure the IP addresses on the computers
on the LAN.
6 In the Enable NetBIOS filtering field, if desired, check the box to enable filtering.
7 Click Submit.
If you want to password protect the configuration profile of the ISDN LAN
Modem, refer to “Locking and Unlocking the Configuration”.
Changing Data Call
Parameters
This section describes how to change the default settings for the data call
parameters. The data call parameters consist of time-out values and a threshold
setting for bandwidth on demand.
The timeout values are a useful means of using bandwidth efficiently and keeping
telephone usage and Internet access costs down. If there is no activity on a call for
an amount of time you specify, the call is disconnected.
The threshold parameters also provide a useful means of using bandwidth
efficiently by automatically adding a second B channel only when there is enough
traffic to justify the extra bandwidth, and by automatically removing the second B
channel when one B channel is sufficient.
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CHAPTER 6: ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
Understanding Data Call
Parameters
The Data Call Parameters window, shown in Figure 47, contains the following
fields.
Figure 47 Data Call Parameters Window
Minimum Call Duration
The minimum call duration is the minimum length of a call that is measured and
must be satisfied before a call is disconnected. The default for the minimum call
duration is 2 minutes.
Disconnecting an Automatic Data Call
An automatic data call is a call made automatically by the LAN Modem because of
activity on the LAN to the WAN. An example would be a user launching his or her
Web browser. Because the parameters for the call, such as the telephone number
and user name, have been previously defined, a call (to an ISP, for example) may
be automatically and transparently launched with a click of your Web browser.
You can define the amount of time the LAN Modem should wait before
disconnecting this type of data call because of inactivity. The inactivity timer runs
simultaneously with the minimum call duration. For example, if the minimum call
duration is set to 2 minutes and the inactivity timer is set to 30 seconds, the call
will be connected for at least 2 minutes even if there has been no activity for
30 seconds or more. To prevent a data call from being disconnected because of
inactivity, enter 0 (note that you must then manually disconnect the call via the
Manual Calling screen). The default is 30 seconds.
Disconnecting a Manual Data Call
A manual call is established using the Manual Calling option from the LAN
Modem’s main page. You can define the amount of time the LAN Modem should
wait before disconnecting this type of data call because of inactivity. This inactivity
timer is activated once the minimum call duration is satisfied and no further
activity is detected. For example, if the minimum call duration is set to 2 minutes
and the inactivity timer is set to 15 minutes, the call will be connected for at least
15 minutes. To prevent a manual call from being disconnected because of
inactivity, enter 0. The default is 15 minutes.
Changing Data Call Parameters
69
Connect/Disconnect Threshold for the Second B Channel
If you specified that you want to use the second B channel only when needed,
indicate the percentage of bandwidth utilization on the first B channel which must
be reached before the second B channel is allocated, or below which the first
B channel must fall before the second B channel is removed. By default the
threshold is 60%.
Connect Delay
This field defines the length of time the ISDN LAN Modem should wait before
adding the second B channel. The default is 10 seconds. This default, in
combination with the Connect/Disconnect Threshold default,
means that after a B channel reaches over 60% throughput for ten seconds, a
second B channel is added, if not in use by another call.
Disconnect Delay
This field defines the length of time the ISDN LAN Modem should wait before
removing the second B channel. The default is 20 seconds. This default, in
combination with the Connect/Disconnect Threshold default, means that if
throughput falls below 60% for 20 seconds, a B channel is removed.
Configuring the Data
Call Parameters
To configure data call parameters, do the following.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem main page, click Data Call Parameters.
2 Specify the minimum call duration.
3 Specify the inactivity period for an automatic data call.
4 Specify the inactivity period for a manual data call.
5 If you specified that you want to use the second B channel only when needed,
enter the percentage of bandwidth that must be reached on the first B channel
before the second B channel is added or removed.
6 If you specified that you want to use the second B channel only when needed,
enter the length of time the ISDN LAN Modem should wait before adding the
second B channel after the percentage in the Connect/Disconnect Threshold field
is reached.
7 If you specified that you want to use the second B channel only when needed,
enter the length of time the ISDN LAN Modem should wait before removing the
second B channel after it falls below the threshold defined in the
Connect/Disconnect Threshold field.
8 Click Submit.
If you want to password protect the configuration profile of the ISDN LAN
Modem, refer to “Locking and Unlocking the Configuration.”
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CHAPTER 6: ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
Changing Voice Call
Routing
Understanding How
Calls Are Routed
This section describes how calls are routed to analog equipment attached to the
ISDN LAN Modem’s voice ports and provides instructions for changing the way
voice calls are routed.
By default, incoming voice calls to telephone number 1 are routed to Phone port
1, and incoming voice calls to telephone number 2 are routed to Phone port 2.
This default setting is illustrated in Figure 48. Voice calls to 732 555 1212 will only
be routed to the telephone, while voice calls to 732 555 1211 will only be routed
to the fax machine.
ISDN
T
SE
RE
1
E
ON
PH
2
C
8 VD
10-1 AX
AM
0.8
732 555 1211
732 555 1212
Figure 48 Default Voice Call Routing Configuration
Changing Voice Call
Routing
To change the voice call routing setting, do the following.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem’s home page, select Call Routing.
The Call Routing window appears.
Figure 49 Call Routing Window
Reserving DHCP Addresses
71
2 Specify which Phone port should handle calls associated with Telephone Number 1
by checking the appropriate phone port box.
3 If your ISDN line has two telephone numbers, specify which phone port should
handle calls associated with Telephone Number 2.
4 Click Submit.
If you want to password protect the configuration profile of the ISDN LAN
Modem, refer to “Locking and Unlocking the Configuration.”
Reserving DHCP
Addresses
If you have workstations on your LAN with static IP addresses and other
workstations on the same LAN with dynamic IP addresses, it is recommended that
you reserve the static IP addresses in the DHCP server to ensure that they are not
dynamically assigned to another workstation.
Reserve DHCP addresses as follows.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem main page, click the Workstations graphic.
The Workstation Selection window appears.
2 From the Workstations drop-down list box, select the Workstation for which you
would like to reserve the IP address on the DHCP server.
3 Check the box labeled IP Address Statically Configured on Workstation.
4 Click Submit.
If you want to password protect the configuration profile of the ISDN LAN
Modem, refer to “Locking and Unlocking the Configuration.”
Selective Password
Protection
You can set up partial password protection so that workstations may access only
the manual calling page allowing them to place and receive calls. All other
WebWizard pages remain inaccessible.
Note that enabling selective password protection also allows all users to access the
LAN Modem main page which they can use to navigate to the Manual Calling
page. If users attempt to access any other page except Manual Calling or online
help, the LAN Modem prompts the user to enter a password.
To set up selective password protection, do the following.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem main page, click the Password button.
2 Check the box labeled Disable password protection for Manual Calling screen.
3 Click Submit.
All workstations are now able to access the Manual calling screen by clicking the
Manual Calling button from the main configuration screen. For instructions about
placing manual calls, refer to Chapter 8, “Placing, Receiving and Disconnecting
Calls.”
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CHAPTER 6: ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
Changing Your
Password
To change the password you defined as part of the initial setup to restrict access to
the ISDN LAN Modem, do the following.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem main page, click the Password button.
2 Enter your new password in the Password field.
3 Enter your new password in the Password (repeat) field to verify the new
password.
4 Click Submit.
Once a password is configured, an automatic protection feature is invoked if the
WebWizard configuration program is open and there is inactivity for at least five
minutes. After 5 minutes of inactivity, you are locked out of the Web Wizard
configuration program. The password must be entered to gain access.
If you forget your password, you can reset the ISDN LAN Modem to the factory
default which allows you to enter a new password. Note that when the ISDN LAN
Modem is restored to the factory default settings, you will lose your configuration
which includes all service provider profiles and ISDN parameters. For instructions,
refer to Chapter 9, “Resetting the ISDN LAN Modem.”
Setting Up Your ISDN
Line Manually
This section describes how to set up your ISDN line manually. During initial setup,
the SPID Wizard will already have configured these parameters for you unless you
aborted the SPID Wizard. If you aborted the SPID Wizard, or if you have to change
your ISDN parameter settings, do the following. Before you set up your ISDN line,
you will need the following information about your ISDN line from your telephone
company.
■
ISDN switch type
■
Telephone number(s) for your ISDN line
■
SPID for each telephone number
Indicate this information in the information sheet shown in Figure 50 for easy
reference.
OfficeConnect ISDN LAN Modem
ISDN Information Sheet
ISDN Switch Type
____Lucent 5ESS NI1 ____Lucent 5ESS Custom
____Northern Telecom DMS 100 ____Siemens EWSD
Phone #1_____________________________
SPID# for Phone#1_____________________
Phone #2 ____________________________
SPID# for Phone #2____________________
Figure 50 ISDN Information Sheet
Locking and Unlocking the Configuration
73
To set up your ISDN connection, do the following.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem main page, click ISDN Parameters.
The ISDN Parameters window appears.
Figure 51 ISDN Parameters Screen
2 From the ISDN Switch Type drop-down list box, select the ISDN Switch Type
required by your telephone company.
3 In the Telephone Number 1 field, enter the first telephone number associated with
your ISDN line.
4 In the Service Profile ID (SPID) 1 field, enter the SPID associated with Telephone
Number 1.
5 In the Telephone Number 2 field, enter the second telephone number associated
with your ISDN line. If you do not have a second telephone number associated
with your ISDN line, leave this field empty.
6 In the Service Profile ID (SPID) 2 field, enter the SPID associated with Telephone
Number 2.
7 Click Submit.
Note that supplementary voice services may also be configured from the ISDN
Parameters page. For more information, refer to Chapter 7, “Supplementary Voice
Call Services.”
If you want to password protect the configuration profile of the ISDN LAN
Modem, refer to “Locking and Unlocking the Configuration.”
Locking and Unlocking
the Configuration
Once you have completed configuration of the ISDN LAN Modem, you can
establish password protection over your ISDN LAN Modem’s configuration
parameters.
To lock the configuration, do the following.
1 Click Password from the ISDN LAN Modem’s main page.
2 Under the Lock Configuration section, click the Lock Configuration button.
You may need to scroll down to see the Lock Configuration section. A message
indicates that the configuration is locked.
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CHAPTER 6: ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
To unlock the configuration, do the following.
1 Click Continue.
The Enter Password window appears.
2 Enter your password to access the ISDN LAN Modem configuration program.
3 Click Submit. The ISDN LAN Modem main configuration page appears.
Configuring the ISDN
LAN Modem from a
Remote Location
This section provides instructions for dialing into to your ISDN LAN Modem from a
remote location using either another LAN Modem or an ISDN modem, in order to
make configuration changes. In addition to another LAN Modem or ISDN modem,
you will need a Web browser, and any PPP dialer software, such as Windows
98/95’s Dial-Up Networking, installed on your local computer.
Configuring the ISDN
LAN Modem Remotely
via Another LAN Modem
To dial into a LAN Modem from a remote location using another LAN Modem, do
the following:
1 Ensure that the two LAN Modems are on different networks.
For instance, one LAN Modem can be on the 192.168.1.x network, and the other
one can be on the 192.168.2.x network.
2 Create a Private Network entry for the remote router.
No user name or password is needed. You must use an arbitrary numbered WAN
link that is different from the two networks.
3 Run your web browser, and enter the IP address of the remote LAN Modem as the
URL.
Once an ISDN connection is established, you can remotely manage your LAN
Modem.
Configuring the ISDN
LAN Modem Remotely
via an ISDN Modem
To dial into a LAN Modem from a remote location using an ISDN modem and
Windows 98/95 Dial-Up Networking, do the following:
1 Click Start, Programs, Accessories, (Windows 98 users select Communications)
and select Dial-Up Networking.
2 Double-click Make New Connection.
The Make New Connection window opens.
3 Enter a name to designate this dial-up profile, such as LAN Modem.
4 Select the ISDN modem attached to your local PC from the drop down list box and
click Next.
The Make New Connection phone number window will open.
5 Enter the phone number of the remote ISDN LAN Modem to which you wish to
connect and click Next.
6 Click Finish to complete the Make New Connection setup.
You will now have a new icon for the connection just created.
Configuring the ISDN LAN Modem from a Remote Location
75
7 Right click this new icon with your right mouse button and choose Properties.
8 Click the Server Type tab.
For Windows 95 users: PPP, Windows 95, Windows NT 3.5, Internet should be
chosen in the Type of Dial-Up Server list box.
For Windows 98 users: PPP, Internet, Windows NT Server, Windows 98, should be
chosen in the Type of Dial-Up Server list box.
9 Under Advanced Options, uncheck all boxes.
10 Choose the TCP/IP check box for Allowed Network Protocols. Uncheck the boxes
for NetBEUI and IPX/SPX Compatible.
11 Click TCP/IP Settings.
The TCP/IP Settings window opens.
12 Click Specify an IP address and enter an IP address for your computer. Enter
192.168.2.1 if you are not sure.
13 Leave the other options for this window at their default settings, including the
radio button for Server assigned name server addresses.
14 Click OK to close the TCP/IP Settings window.
15 Click OK to close the Server Types window.
16 Click OK to close your connection window.
17 Double-click your new connection icon created via Dial-Up Networking.
The Connect To window will open. You may choose to leave the Username and
Password fields blank at this time.
18 Click Connect.
Your local computer will dial and establish a connection with your remote ISDN
LAN Modem.
19 Once your call has been established, launch a Web browser on your local
computer.
The Web browser attempts to load its default Start Page. Click Stop to cancel this
procedure.
20 Enter the following address in your Web browser’s address bar:
http://192.168.1.1/ to go to the remote ISDN LAN Modem’s main
configuration page.
If you previously set your ISDN LAN Modem’s IP address to something other than
the factory default address, enter this IP address in your Web browser’s address
bar in place of the address shown in the URL above.
21 Enter your password if required and then click Submit.
The ISDN LAN Modem main configuration page appears. You now have full access
and can make any configuration changes as if you were connected via your local
LAN. Note that you are limited to configuration of the LAN Modem when dialing
in from a remote location. For instance, you cannot access the Web when during a
remote dial in session.
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CHAPTER 6: ADVANCED CONFIGURATION
SUPPLEMENTARY VOICE CALL
SERVICES
7
Supplementary Voice
Services
Before You Begin
The ISDN LAN Modem supports the following supplementary voice services.
■
Call Waiting
■
Caller ID
■
Call Conference (Three-Way Calling)
■
Call Transfer
■
Voice Mail (Message Service)
■
Caller ID Name Display
■
Call Forwarding
In order to use these services, they must also be supported on your ISDN line.
Refer to Appendix E for ordering codes which support these features and then call
your telephone company if you want to have these services added.
To use Call Conference, as well as Call Transfer, your ISDN line must support
Flexible Calling. To use ISDN Call Waiting, your ISDN line must support Additional
Call Offering (ACO). Additional line configuration may also be required for Caller
ID Blocking, Call Forwarding and Voice Mail. Check with your telephone company
to determine whether or not these services are supported. Note that there may be
an extra charge to support these features.
Supplementary voice services are configured from the ISDN Parameters page. The
default settings are shown in Figure 52.
Figure 52 Supplementary Voice Services
Descriptions of each supplementary voice service follow.
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CHAPTER 7: SUPPLEMENTARY VOICE CALL S ERVICES
Call Waiting
Call Waiting allows you to place an active call on hold in order to answer another
incoming call on the same telephone number. By default, Call Waiting is enabled
on port 1 and disabled on port 2.
Telephone companies typically provide Call Waiting support on telephone number
1 only. For Call Waiting support on telephone number 2, you will have to have this
capability added to your ISDN line. For more information refer to Appendix E.
How to Configure Call
Waiting
To change the default setting, do the following.
1 Go to the ISDN LAN Modem’s main configuration page
(http://3com.oc.lanmodem/ ).
2 Click ISDN Parameters.
3 Locate Call Waiting Enable, and then clear the check box for the port(s) for which
you want Call Waiting disabled, or check the box for the port(s) for which you
want Call Waiting enabled.
You should disable Call Waiting on a port(s) to which a fax machine is connected
so that any fax calls are not interrupted.
4 Click Submit.
Call Waiting
How to Use Call Waiting
79
To use Call Waiting, do the following.
Table 1
How to Use Call Waiting
How Do I
Do This
Answer a call using Call
Waiting?
When you hear the Call Waiting tone, press and release the
switch hook button to put the first call on hold and connect to
the second call.
If you do not answer the second call, the caller will hear a ring.
Switch back to the first call?
To put the second call on hold and switch back to the first call,
press and release the switch hook button.
Toggle back and forth
between the two calls?
Press and release the switch hook button.
End a call when I hear the
Hang up the phone and wait for it to ring. (The phone rings to
Call Waiting tone (instead of indicate that there is an incoming call and the B-channel LED
putting the call on hold)?
flashes.)
You are connected to the second call when you pick up. Or, if
you already have a call on hold while on an active call and you
want to end the active call before returning to the call on hold,
hang up the phone and wait for it to ring back. Pick up the
phone to reconnect to the call on hold.
Disconnect a call on hold?
To disconnect a call on hold, make the call on hold active by
pressing and releasing the switch hook button. Then, simply
hang up the phone to drop the active call. If the other caller is
still waiting on the line, the phone will ring.
What if the active caller
hangs up from the far end?
If the active caller hangs up from the far end, the call on hold
will remain on hold until you retrieve it by either pressing and
releasing the switch hook button or by hanging up the phone
and then answering it when it rings.
What if the caller on hold
hangs up from the far end?
If the caller on hold on the far end hangs up, you will receive no
notice. When you try to access that caller, either you will remain
on the same call (if you do not have Flexible Calling) or you will
get a dial tone (if you have Flexible Calling and it is enabled).
The ISDN LAN Modem can support a maximum of two simultaneous voice calls
per phone port. If you already have two calls up (one active and one on hold) and
a third call comes in, that caller hears the “user busy” tone unless you have Voice
Mail, in which case the call is sent to your voice mail box.
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Caller ID
The ISDN LAN Modem supports Caller ID and Caller ID Blocking.
Caller ID
Caller ID is supported on the ISDN LAN Modem. If you subscribe to this service, the
telephone number of the calling party is displayed on the caller ID device
connected to the ISDN LAN Modem’s phone port that is called.
The name of the caller may or may not be displayed even if your caller ID device
and service support this feature. Not all telephone companies display the Caller ID
name on a residential ISDN line. Check with your telephone company.
When both B channels are in use, Caller ID is not available. One
B channel must be available to provide the Caller ID information.
Caller ID Date and Time
The date and time displayed by your Caller ID unit is set according to the date and
time on the workstation connected to the ISDN LAN Modem when the ISDN LAN
Modem is powered on. If the date and time is incorrect, connect a workstation to
the ISDN LAN Modem that has the correct date and time and then power cycle the
ISDN LAN Modem. Once it is powered up, launch your Web browser and go to the
ISDN LAN Modem’s main page at http://3com.oc.lanmodem/
Caller ID Blocking
To allow or prevent your telephone number from being displayed on a remote
Caller ID device, do the following. By default your telephone number is displayed.
Not all telephone companies support Caller ID Blocking. Check with your
telephone company. If Caller ID Blocking is not provided on your ISDN line, then
you cannot use this feature.
1 Go to the ISDN LAN Modem’s main page (http://3com.oc.lanmodem/).
2 Click ISDN Parameters.
3 Next to Outgoing Caller ID Block, select the port number box(es) for which you
would like Caller ID Blocking enabled. Clear the port number box(es) for which
you would like Caller ID Blocking disabled.
For instance, if you check the box labeled Port 1, calls made from the telephone
connected to that port will not display the telephone number to the user at the far
end.
4 Click Submit.
Flexible Calling
Flexible Calling
81
Flexible Calling (also known as Flexible Call Offering (FCO)) is an additional service
added to your ISDN line to allow you to use voice features such as Call Conference
(Three Way Calling), Hold, Drop, Transfer and Message Service on telephones
connected to the ISDN LAN Modem’s phone ports. If you are not sure whether
your ISDN line supports Flexible Calling, check with your telephone company.
In some cases your telephone company may enable Flexible Calling on your first
telephone number only. You may need to specifically request that these services
be enabled on your second telephone number as well.
Configuring FCO on the
ISDN LAN Modem
Once Flexible Calling is provided on your ISDN line, you can either enable or
disable Flexible Calling (that is, all of the associated voice features) on the ISDN
LAN Modem on a telephone number basis.
By default, Flexible Calling is enabled on telephone number 1 and disabled on
telephone number 2. If your ISDN line supports Flexible Calling only on the first
telephone number, you should leave this default setting as is. If your ISDN line
supports Flexible Calling on both telephone numbers, you may want to enable
Flexible Calling on telephone number 2 so that you can use Call Conference and
Call Transfer from telephones connected to either ISDN LAN Modem phone port.
To enable or disable Flexible Calling, do the following.
1 Go to the ISDN LAN Modem’s main configuration page
(http://3com.oc.lanmodem/).
2 Click ISDN Parameters.
3 Next to Flexible Calling Enable, select the telephone number check box(es) for
which you would like Flexible Calling enabled. Or, clear the telephone number
check box(es) for which you would like Flexible Calling disabled.
4 Click Submit.
Flexible Calling Codes
Each Flexible Calling feature (that is, Conference, Transfer, Drop and Message
Service) has a code associated with it that allows that particular feature to be
enabled or disabled. By default these features are all enabled. The value displayed
is the code required for this service to work between the ISDN LAN Modem and
your telephone company. It is recommended that you leave the defaults set to the
standard, national values.
To change these values, do the following.
1 Go to the ISDN LAN Modem’s main configuration page
(http://3com.oc.lanmodem/).
2 Click ISDN Parameters.
3 To disable a feature, next to Codes, enter 0 in the box to the right of the feature
you want to disable. To change the values, enter the appropriate value (provided
by your ISDN service provider) in the appropriate box.
4 Click Submit.
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CHAPTER 7: SUPPLEMENTARY VOICE CALL S ERVICES
Call Conference
(Three-Way Calling)
Call Conference (also referred to as Three-Way Calling or TWC) allows you to add
another party to an existing call. This feature can be used whether you have
received or have placed the first call.
You cannot conference two incoming calls. You must initiate the second call in
order to activate Call Conference.
Table 2
How to Use Call Conference
How Do I
Do This
Place a new conference call? While the first call is active, press and release the switch hook
button. The B channel LED light flashes to indicate that the first
call is on hold, and you will hear a dial tone. Then dial a third
party number.
After the third party has answered, press and release the switch
hook button to connect all three parties.
Drop the last party added to To drop the last party added to the conference call, press and
the conference call?
release the switch hook button.
Abort the second call and
switch back to the first call?
If the dialed party is busy, press and release the switch hook
button to cancel the call and reconnect to the first call.
If you dialed a wrong number, or the far end does not answer,
hang up the phone to abort the attempted call. The phone will
then ring, indicating that the first call is on hold. Answer the
phone to reconnect to the first call.
What if I hear a dial tone
A dial tone indicates that one of the parties has dropped their
when I attempt to
call. Press and release the switch hook button to return to the
conference all three parties? previously active call. You can then conference a third party as
described previously.
What if the telephone rings
after I hang up?
Call Transfer
While you try to conference a call, the active call will be put on
hold to allow you to dial a new call. If you hang up the phone
before the call is connected, the telephone will ring to let you
know that you still have a call on hold.
Call Transfer is a voice call feature that allows you to transfer a call to a third party.
This feature can be used whether you have received or have placed the first call.
Table 3
How to Use Call Transfer
How Do I
Do This
Place a new call?
While the first call is active, press and release the switch hook
button, wait for the dial tone, and then dial a third party
number.
After the third party has answered, press and release the switch
hook button to conference all three parties, and then hang up
the telephone to transfer the call.
Cancel the second call and
switch back to the first call?
If the dialed party is busy, press and release the switch hook
button to cancel the attempted call and reconnect to the first
call. If you hang up, the phone will ring back, indicating that
you have a call on hold.
If you dialed a wrong number, or the far end does not answer,
hang up the phone to abort the attempted call. The phone will
then ring, indicating that the first call is on hold. Answer the
phone to reconnect to the first call.
Message Service/Voice Mail
Message Service/Voice
Mail
83
If you subscribe to Voice Mail on your ISDN line, then you have Message Service
which tells you that you have new messages in your voice mail box. By default,
Message Service is disabled. You must enable this feature on the ISDN LAN
Modem to use it.
The Alert LED on the front of the ISDN LAN Modem flashes when there are new
messages in your voice mail box. Note that the Alert LED also flashes during
firmware download. The flash sequence distinguishes the difference— faster
during firmware download and slower for message indication.
You are also notified when you lift the receiver and hear a stutter tone (that is,
multiple short tones in quick succession). Note that this tone may be provided by
either your telephone company or the ISDN LAN Modem.
To change the default setting, do the following.
1 Go to the ISDN LAN Modem’s main configuration page
(http://3com.oc.lanmodem/).
2 Click ISDN Parameters.
3 Locate Message Service Enable, and then select the check box for the telephone
number(s) for which you want Message Service enabled, or clear the boxes for the
telephone number(s) for which you want Message Service disabled.
4 Click Submit.
If you do not subscribe to Voice Mail, make sure that the Message Service Enabled
feature is disabled. If it is enabled and you do not have Voice Mail on your ISDN
line, then callers always hear a ringing signal whenever that number is dialed
whether or not you are on the line.
Call Forwarding
Call Forwarding is a voice service provided by your telephone company that lets
you forward your incoming calls to another telephone number. To use this feature,
enter the appropriate touch-tone key(s) (as described by your telephone company)
from the telephone attached to your ISDN LAN Modem. These tones are passed
through the ISDN LAN Modem.
When a call is placed to a phone connected to the ISDN LAN Modem, the
forwarded call is announced by a short ring on the telephone from which the Call
Forwarding tones were entered. Note that you cannot answer the call. The ring is
a reminder that Call Forwarding is still in effect.
To use Call Forwarding successfully, it is recommended that you configure each
phone port to be associated with only one ISDN telephone number. For instance,
associate telephone number 1 with port 1 exclusively and telephone number 2
with port two exclusively. You can make this change by clicking Call Routing from
the ISDN LAN Modem main page and then checking/clearing the appropriate
boxes. If you have more than one telephone number routed to a single port, this
can cause confusion regarding which telephone number has been forwarded.
Note that this also applies if you have Voice Mail.
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8
PLACING, RECEIVING AND
DISCONNECTING CALLS
This chapter covers the following main topics:
Placing Calls
■
Placing calls automatically and manually
■
Receiving calls
■
Disconnecting data calls
You can place calls from your computer through the ISDN LAN Modem to a
remote location either automatically by using one of the service provider
connections you set up or manually by entering the telephone number of the
destination.
3Com assumes no liability for phone charges or other expenses incurred in
connection with the use of this product.
Placing a Call
Automatically
To place a call using one of the service provider connections you set up, simply
launch the application. For example, if an ISP was configured, simply launch your
Web browser on your computer to connect to the default location configured in
your Web browser.
Telephone Number Selection for Data Calls
When you place a data call, the ISDN LAN Modem tries to use the second
telephone number assigned to your ISDN line in order to leave the first telephone
number free for voice calls. In many instances when voice services are added to an
ISDN line, they are added only to the first telephone number and not the second
telephone number. Because of this, the ISDN LAN Modem tries to use the second
telephone number, when available, for data calls.
Call Routing Among Service Providers
The ISDN LAN Modem automatically calls the first configured service provider. If
you configure a second remote connection, such as an additional ISP, and want to
use that second profile for an automatic data call, do the following.
1 Access the ISDN LAN Modem’s configuration main page.
2 Choose the Workstation graphic.
3 Select your computer.
4 Associate only the Service Provider that you want to use.
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Placing a Call
Manually
Placing a Call Manually
to an Existing Service
Provider
You can also manually place a call to an existing service provider or to a
destination that has not been previously defined as long as the remote location
provides an IP address dynamically during call setup.
To place a call manually to a service provider that is already configured, do the
following.
The existing service provider must be associated with your workstation in order for
you to place a manual call to it. By default all service providers are associated with
all workstations. If you are unsure, click Workstations from the main page and
then select your workstation. Make sure the service provider you want to call is
associated with your workstation.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem home page, click the Manual Calling button.
The Manual Call Control window appears.
2 In the table, locate the name of the service provider to which you want to connect
and then verify that the call is not already connected to that destination by looking
under the Status of Call column.
3 Click Place Call.
A message indicates that the call is being placed. A B channel LED on the ISDN
LAN Modem front panel illuminates green when a connection is established. Once
connected you are ready to run any desired application appropriate for that
location, such as FTP to transfer files, or you may enter a different URL in your Web
browser to access the Internet.
Placing a Call Manually
to a Temporary Service
Provider
To place a call manually to a service provider that has not been previously
configured, do the following. Note that for this type of manual call, the service
provider must supply a dynamic IP address.
This call profile will remain under TempSvcProvider until you change the settings
of these fields.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem’s home page, click Manual Calling.
The Manual Call Control window appears.
2 In the table, locate TempSvcProvider.
3 Click Place Call.
4 Enter the telephone number of the destination in the Telephone Number field.
5 Enter your User ID for the remote destination.
6 Enter your Password for the remote destination.
7 Enter the DNS address if the remote destination does not automatically provide an
IP address. Otherwise, leave this field empty.
8 Specify how you would like the bandwidth allocated for this connection.
You can choose always to use just one B channel for this connection, always to use
two B channels for this connection (that is, always use Multilink PPP), or you can
specify that you only want the second B channel added when the first
B channel reaches the threshold. The threshold default is 60%. To change the
threshold default, refer to “Changing Data Call Parameters” in Chapter 5.
Receiving Calls
87
9 Specify the B channel rate or select TollMizer.
Leave the B channel rate set to 64 Kbps unless your telephone company and the
locations you will be connecting to only support 56 Kbps.
TollMizer sends a data call over a voice circuit allowing you to save the typical cost
difference between a voice and data call. Note that the destination you are calling
must also support this feature (also referred to as Switched 56 Permissive or Data
Over Voice). Check with your telephone company to ensure that they support
Data Over Voice.
10 Click Make Call.
A message indicates that the call is being placed. A B channel LED on the ISDN
LAN Modem front panel illuminates green when a connection is established. Once
connected, you are ready to run any desired application appropriate for that
location, such as ftp to transfer files, or you may enter a different URL in your Web
browser to access the Internet.
Once a temporary call is established, other workstations may also connect to this
service provider by clicking TempSvcProvider. Note that if multiple parties are
connected to TempSvcProvider, the call is disconnected as soon as one party hangs
up.
Participating in a
Temporary Call
Unlike calls to configured service providers, temporary call connections cannot be
shared by other users automatically. For instance, if one workstation is connected
to an ISP that is configured as one of the four service providers and you want to
use the same ISP, you simply launch your Web browser. However, if a temporary
call has been placed, in order for another workstation to use that connection, that
other workstation user must go to the Manual Calling page and then click
Participate in existing call to (telephone number).
Placing Multilink PPP
Calls
Before you place a call, ensure that either the Use Two B Channels or Add Second
B Channel check box on the ISDN LAN Modem’s Service Provider Parameters
window is checked as described in “Setting Up Additional Service Providers” in
Chapter 5. Also, the destination you are calling must also support Multilink PPP.
For example, if you are trying to dial into the Internet, your ISP must also support
Multilink PPP in order to successfully place a Multilink PPP call.
If you place a Multilink PPP call and the remote location you are calling does not
support Multilink PPP, a single B channel call will be established.
Receiving Calls
Receiving Data Calls
This sections describes how the ISDN LAN Modem receives data calls and voice
calls and how distinctive ringing may be used to differentiate voice calls.
The ISDN LAN Modem can receive incoming data calls for the following purposes:
■
Making changes to the previously defined connection types
Refer to Chapter 6, “Configuring the ISDN LAN Modem from a Remote
Location,” for instructions.
■
Downloading the latest firmware
Refer to Chapter 9, “Downloading Firmware to Your ISDN LAN Modem,” for
instructions.
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CHAPTER 8: PLACING, RECEIVING AND DISCONNECTING CALLS
■
Reviewing ISDN LAN Modem statistics
Refer to Chapter 9, “Reviewing Statistics,” for instructions.
Incoming calls for data transfer are not supported. For example, you cannot call
into the ISDN LAN Modem to use a computer as a server that others would dial
into and use for downloading information.
Receiving Voice Calls
Voice calls received by the ISDN LAN Modem will be routed to the analog
equipment connected to the voice ports. By default, incoming voice calls to
telephone number one are routed to Phone port one, and incoming voice calls to
telephone number two are routed to Phone port two.
To change the default routing, refer to “Changing Voice Call Routing” in Chapter
6.
Specialized telephone equipment such as some speakerphones, answering
machines, and fax machines that require more than 42 VAC ringing voltage may
not detect incoming calls.
Distinctive Ringing
You can configure the ISDN LAN Modem to distinguish between telephone rings
for calls to telephones connected to the ISDN LAN Modem’s phone ports. When
this feature is enabled, the ringing pattern for calls to telephone number one
changes to distinguish between calls to telephone number one and calls to
telephone number two.
By default this feature is disabled. To enable, do the following.
1 Go to the ISDN LAN Modem’s main configuration page:
http://3com.oc.lanmodem/
2 Click ISDN Parameters.
3 Locate Distinctive Ringing and then click the box labeled Enable.
4 Click Submit.
Disconnecting Data
Calls
You can disconnect data calls manually or use timers to disconnect calls
automatically.
Disconnecting Data Calls
Manually
To disconnect calls manually, do the following:
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem home page, click Manual Calling. Alternatively, if you
are using the custom browser, click Dial/Hang Up from the Links menu bar.
The Manual Call Control window appears.
2 In the table, locate the name of the service provider from which you wish to
disconnect and then verify that the call is up under the Status of Call column.
3 Click Hangup Call.
A message indicates that the call is being disconnected.
Disconnecting Data Calls
Disconnecting Calls
Automatically Using
Timers
89
There are a number of ways by which you can configure calls to be disconnected
automatically. You can set timers and disconnect thresholds from the Data Call
Parameters window. Specifically, the parameters you can set are as follows.
Minimum Call Duration
Enter the minimum length of a call that is measured before the ISDN LAN Modem
detects inactivity on the connection and then starts an inactivity timer. The default
is 2 minutes.
Idle Timeout
In the field Disconnect a data call after how long of an inactivity period?, enter the
number of seconds after which a call should be disconnected because of inactivity.
Once the minimum call duration is satisfied and then no activity is detected for a
call, this timer is started. To prevent a data call from being disconnected because
of inactivity, enter 0. The default for an automatic call is 30 seconds. The default
for a manual call is 15 minutes.
Bandwidth on Demand
Parameters
You can specify when you want a second B channel to be added automatically
based on the utilization of the first B channel.
Connect/Disconnect threshold for the second B channel
If you specified that you want to use the second B channel only when needed,
indicate the percentage of bandwidth on the first B channel which must be
reached before the second B channel is allocated. By default the threshold is 60%.
Connect Delay
This field defines the length of time the ISDN LAN Modem should wait before
adding the second B channel. By default the length of time is 10 seconds.
Therefore, this default, in combination with the Connect/Disconnect Threshold
default means that after a B channel reaches over 60% throughput for
10 seconds, a second B channel is added, if not already in use.
Disconnect Delay
This field defines the length of time the ISDN LAN Modem should wait before
removing the second B channel. By default the length of time is 20 seconds.
Therefore, this default, in combination with the Connect/Disconnect Threshold
default means that if throughput falls below 60% for 20 seconds, a B channel is
removed.
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9
TROUBLESHOOTING AND
MAINTENANCE
This chapter explains how to isolate and solve problems encountered with the
ISDN LAN Modem. Problems may stem from incorrect option settings or improper
installation.
This chapter covers the following main topics.
■
Checking the basics
■
Monitoring the LEDs
■
Evaluating symptoms and solutions
■
Finding more information
■
Contacting technical support
■
Downloading firmware
■
Resetting the ISDN LAN Modem
■
Reviewing statistics
CAUTION: There are no user-serviceable parts inside your ISDN LAN Modem.
Unauthorized opening of the unit will void the warranty.
Checking the Basics
Before you monitor the LEDs or refer to the section on symptoms and solutions,
check the following:
■
■
■
■
Verify that the cables are not physically damaged. If damage is apparent,
replace the cable.
Verify that you have a proper 10BASE-T Ethernet cable (8-pin to 8-pin)
Verify that the power cord is connected to the ISDN LAN Modem and an
electrical outlet.
Verify that the ISDN cable is properly connected to the ISDN LAN Modem
and the ISDN wall outlet.
The ISDN LAN Modem will not operate if connected to an analog telephone wall
jack. Make sure that the ISDN LAN Modem is connected directly into the ISDN wall
outlet without connection to any intermediate telephone equipment (an NT1
device is not required with the ISDN LAN Modem).
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CHAPTER 9: TROUBLESHOOTING AND M AINTENANCE
Monitoring LEDs
Monitoring the ALERT
LED
If you are experiencing operational inconsistencies, monitor the ALERT, ISDN,
B channel and LAN port status LEDs to isolate problems. Refer to Table 5 for
instructions to resolve the problem.
Press and release the Reset button and observe the ALERT LED. During power-up
self-test, the ALERT LED will remain lit.
■
If the ALERT LED goes out, the test has been successful.
■
If the ALERT LED flashes for more than several seconds, this indicates one of
the following:
■
Voice Mail messages pending (if you subscribe to Voice Mail)
■
ISDN LAN Modem is in firmware download mode
■
The DHCP server is full and cannot assign any more IP addresses
■
There is an internal failure (the ISDN LAN Modem also resets itself)
Voice Mail message indication uses a slower flash than firmware download and
internal failure indication. If the ISDN LAN Modem is neither in firmware
download mode nor do you have voice mail messages, notify your reseller that
the ISDN LAN Modem has failed the self-test and order a replacement.
Monitoring the ISDN
LED
Place a call and then observe the ISDN LED. One of the following three conditions
may occur:
If the ISDN flashes and then remains lit, your ISDN line is functioning properly.
If the ISDN LED never turns on, check the ISDN cable. Ensure that it is connected
securely to the wall outlet and the ISDN LAN Modem’s ISDN port. If the ISDN LED
still is not lit, there may be a problem with your ISDN line.
If the ISDN LED flashes but does not remain lit, first make sure that your ISDN
telephone numbers and SPIDs are configured accurately (click ISDN Parameters
from the WebWizard main page). If your telephone numbers are configured
correctly, check with your telephone company. There may be a problem with your
ISDN line.
Monitoring the
B Channel LEDs
Monitoring the LAN Port
Status LEDs
If the ISDN LED is illuminated, attempt to place a call and observe the B channel
LED(s). The B1 and B2 LEDs flash amber for a voice call or green for a data call
during the call establishment phase and then blinks faster during the PPP
establishment phase. They then remain solid amber or green once the connection
is established. If they do not remain solid amber or green, refer to the
“Troubleshooting Problems Indicated by LEDs” section.
Observe the LAN port status LED labeled 1, 2, 3, or 4 depending on the port
number to which your computer is connected. If the LED(s) is lit, the ISDN LAN
Modem detects the Ethernet link signal and operation is normal. When the
computer attached to that port is transmitting data to the LAN, this LED flashes.
If the port status LED is Off, the ISDN LAN Modem does not detect the Ethernet
link integrity signal. Refer to the “Troubleshooting Problems Indicated by LEDs”
section. First ensure that the workstation is powered on. If so, then the Ethernet
cable may not be properly connected, or it may be the wrong polarity.
Monitoring LEDs
Troubleshooting
Problems Indicated by
LEDs
93
Table Table 5 lists the states of ISDN LAN Modem LEDs which indicate errors and
also provides possible causes and solutions.
Table 5 Troubleshooting Problems Indicated by LEDs
LED
LED State
Possible Cause
Solution
ALERT LED
ALERT LED remains
lit.
An internal failure.
Notify your reseller or technical support that the ISDN
LAN Modem has failed the self-test.
ALERT LED continues
to flash.
Self test failure or ISDN LAN
Modem is in firmware download
mode.
Power cycle the ISDN LAN Modem. If the ALERT LED
continues to flash, the ISDN LAN Modem has failed the
self test. Contact your network supplier. If the ALERT
LED is not flashing, then the ISDN LAN Modem is now
operating correctly.
ISDN LAN Modem has received
new voice mail messages.
Lift the telephone handset and listen for the stutter tone
that indicates new messages are waiting for you.
DHCP server is full and cannot
assign any more IP addresses
Release the last IP address assigned by pressing
**3265# from a telephone connected to a LAN Modem
phone port
Upon power up, both A previous firmware download
the ALERT and ISDN was not completed successfully.
LEDs flash.
Download the firmware. Refer to
ALERT, ISDN OK, B1,
and B2 LEDs
alternately flash.
Firmware download process was
aborted.
Do not remove power plug. Wait until the LEDs stop
flashing (about 1 minute) to allow the ISDN LAN modem
to cancel the firmware download. Once the LEDs stop
flashing, you may restart firmware download.
B channel LED(s) do
not remain green or
amber.
Problem with your computer or
application software or
incompatible local or toll
telephone company.
Carefully monitor the B1 and B2 LEDs while attempting
a call. These LEDs flash during call establishment and
then remain green or amber once the connection is
established.
http://www.remoteaccess.3com.com/support/
docs/lanmodem/welcome.html for firmware
download instructions.
B1/B2
If neither LED flashes, make sure that your computer is
turned on and operational.
If you are able to place a voice call but not a data call,
then there may be an incompatible local or toll
telephone company. Contact your local telephone
company and have it verify that you can dial a data call
to the destination telephone number.
ISDN LED
ISDN LED does not
light.
Poor physical connection to the
local telephone equipment.
Check the cables to ensure that they are securely
connected to the appropriate ports.
If the telephone wires at your site appear to be
satisfactory, call your local telephone company for
assistance.
ISDN LED continues
A mismatch between the settings Check the ISDN statistics screen to determine whether
to flash for more than of the ISDN line and the ISDN
the SPIDs are properly configured. If not, go to the ISDN
a few minutes
LAN Modem configuration.
Parameters screen to enter the correct SPIDs.
Call the telephone company and have it verify that your
line is configured for circuit-switched voice and data
service.
LAN STATUS
LAN port status LED is Ethernet cable is not securely
off (that is, not
connected.
illuminated).
Ethernet card is not set up
properly.
Check the Ethernet cable connection and make sure it is
inserted properly in a port labeled 1,2,3,or 4 on the
back of the ISDN LAN Modem and in the Ethernet port
on the back of your computer. Also, your computer
should be turned on and your network software should
be running.
Make sure your Ethernet card is set up properly (proper
drivers are loaded). Refer to the documentation
provided with your Ethernet card for instructions.
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Evaluating Symptoms
and Solutions
Table 6 lists symptoms of common problems, possible causes, and possible
solutions.
Table 6 Symptoms, Causes, and Solutions
Symptom
Possible Cause
Solution
Upon initial setup,
communication between the
ISDN LAN Modem and my
computer cannot be
established.
Incompatible IP address on your
computer.
Reset the IP address on your computer.
For Windows 98 and 95 users, run Winipcfg.exe.
Select the Ethernet adapter connected to the ISDN LAN
Modem. Click Release All and then click Renew All.
For Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 3.11 users, run
ipconfig /release and ipconfig /renew.
For Mac users, from the Apple menu, select Control
Panels and then select TCP/IP. Make sure Ethernet is
selected in the Connect via field. From the Configure
field, select Using BootP Server to clear the fields, then
close and save changes to the Control Panel. Open the
TCP/IP control panel and select Using DHCP Server. The
fields should now read <will be supplied by
server>. Select File and then Close and save changes
when prompted.
Your Web browser needs the IP
Enter the following URL in your Web browser:
address of the ISDN LAN Modem. http://192.168.1.1/mainpage or
http://3com.oc.lanmodem/
There is a configuration problem. Reset the ISDN LAN Modem to the factory default
setting. Disconnect the ISDN cable from the ISDN LAN
Modem and then connect an analog telephone to one
of the phone ports. Lift the handset and press **3266#
and then replace the handset. Reconnect the ISDN
cable, restart your computer and then launch your Web
browser.
The wrong cable may be
Make sure you are using the 8-pin to 8-pin cable
connected to the LAN port on the labeled Ethernet that was provided with your ISDN LAN
ISDN LAN Modem and your PC.
Modem. If you are using another 10BASE-T Ethernet
(Category 5) cable, it must be a straight-through cable.
Web browser may not be set to a Enter a default URL from within your Web browser.
default start page.
If you are using Internet Explorer, launch your Web
browser. From the View menu select Options. From
Page, select Start Page and then enter an address in the
address field such as http://www.3com.com.
If you are using Netscape, launch your Web browser.
From the Options menu, select General Preferences.
From Browser Starts With, select Home Page Location
and then enter a URL such as http://www.3com.com.
Your Web browser may be configured to use a proxy
server, instead of the LAN Modem.
Internet Explorer users: Launch your Web browser.
From the View menu, select Internet Options, and then
the Connection tab. Under the Proxy Server header,
uncheck the box labeled Accessing the Internet using a
proxy server.
Netscape users: Launch your web browser. From the
Edit menu, select Preferences. Double-click Advanced,
and then click Proxies. Check the box labeled Direct
Connection to the Internet.
(continued)
Evaluating Symptoms and Solutions
Table 6 Symptoms, Causes, and Solutions
Symptom
Possible Cause
Solution
ISDN LAN Modem has assigned
all available IP addresses.
From another computer attached to the ISDN LAN
Modem, go to the LAN Modem’s main configuration
page. Click Workstations. Select the name of computer
you removed and then click Select. Click Release
Workstation Entry. Reboot the workstation. The newlyadded workstation can now be assigned an IP address.
If you cannot release a workstation entry, connect a
telephone to one of the ISDN LAN Modem’s phone
ports and press **3265# from the keypad to release
the last IP address assigned by the LAN Modem.
The LAN Modem seems to be
placing calls inadvertently.
NetBIOS is making DNS requests
causing the LAN Modem to
initiate a call.
Enable NetBIOS filtering. From the ISDN LAN Modem’s
home page, click LAN Parameters. Check the box
labeled Enable NetBIOS filtering.
Although multiple service
providers are configured, all
calls are going to the same
service provider which is a
private network.
You may not have configured the
IP address and the subnet mask
in the Private Network
Parameters window.
From the ISDN LAN Modem’s home page, click Service
Providers and then select the private network profile
you already configured. Enter the IP address and the
subnet mask for the private network.
Clicking Submit in the LAN
Modem’s configuration pages
does not take you to the next
screen.
JavaScript may not be enabled in
your Web browser.
Enable JavaScript via your Web browser’s configuration
options.
The Windows 95 “Connect
To” window opens upon
launching a Web browser.
Networking is setup for use with
a serial port modem.
To bypass the “Connect To” window:
1 Double-click the Internet icon in the control panel.
2 Clear the check box labeled “Connect to the
Internet as needed.”
3 Click OK.
This allows all outgoing connections to run directly
through your ISDN LAN Modem.
Calls cannot be placed from
analog equipment
When the handset of a
telephone attached to the
ISDN LAN Modem is lifted, a
dial tone cannot be heard.
(continued)
If you cannot place calls, there
may be a problem with the
configuration of your ISDN line.
Call the telephone company and have them verify your
telephone number(s) and SPID(s) and that your line is
configured for circuit-switched voice and data service.
Calls from the analog port may
be blocked.
From the Call Routing window, check the Phone Port 1
and Phone Port 2 boxes which are used for voice call
routing. Make sure that the correct Phone Port box for
that port is checked.
There may be two active calls to
different locations thus using
both B channels and leaving no
bandwidth for the voice call.
If there are two independent data calls connected, go
to Manual calling to disconnect one of the active calls.
Bandwidth allocation for this
service provider may be set to
Always use 2 B channels and a
call is currently up.
Either go to Manual calling and disconnect the current
call or go to service providers and change bandwidth
allocation to either Add second B channel as required
or Use one B channel.
The ISDN line cable, power cable
and/or phone cable may not be
firmly connected.
Check all cables and connectors to ensure that they are
inserted securely.
If you cannot place calls, there
may be a problem with the
configuration of your ISDN line.
Call the telephone company and have them verify your
telephone number(s) and SPID(s) and that your line is
configured for circuit-switched voice and data service.
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CHAPTER 9: TROUBLESHOOTING AND M AINTENANCE
Table 6 Symptoms, Causes, and Solutions
Symptom
A computer on the LAN was
replaced with another one and
now the newly added
computer cannot
communicate with the ISDN
LAN Modem.
Possible Cause
Solution
Calls from the analog port may
be blocked.
From the Call Routing window, check the Phone Port 1
and Phone Port 2 boxes which are used for voice call
routing. Make sure that the correct Phone Port box for
that port is checked.
The ISDN LAN Modem has not
released the IP address for the
previous computer and therefore
will not assign a new one
because it allows a maximum of
25.
From another computer attached to the ISDN LAN
Modem, go to the LAN Modem’s main configuration
page. Click Workstations. Select the name of computer
you removed and then click Select. Click Release
Workstation Entry. Reboot the workstation. The newlyadded workstation can now be assigned an IP address.
If you cannot release a workstation entry, connect a
telephone to one of the ISDN LAN Modem’s phone
ports and press **3265# from the keypad to release
the last IP address assigned by the LAN Modem.
Some application software
doesn’t work properly.
Application may have an
embedded IP address which
causes a problem when NAT is
enabled on the ISDN LAN
Modem.
If you have a static network, disable NAT and try using
the application again. Do not disable NAT if your
network is dynamic.
The user name and/or password
for this service provider may not
be entered properly.
Make sure that the user name and password for this
service provider are entered accurately.
A connection has been
established (B1 or B2 green
LED remains lit) but data
cannot be sent.
There is an interoperability
mismatch between the local and
remote applications.
Make sure that the local and remote data applications
have communications capability and are properly
configured.
Calls continue to reconnect or
calls do not timeout and
disconnect.
An application or LAN device is
sending IP packets.
Go to Current or Last Call Statistics and check Reason
for call coming up.
Or, set the workgroup on each PC to workgroup.
Check applications to see if any are running in the
background.
Or, turn off Microsoft’s print/file sharing or use NetBEUI
for local service (that is, within the LAN). To turn off
print/file sharing, from Control Panel select Network
and then the Configuration tab. Click the File and Print
Sharing button. Clear both check boxes and then click
OK.
Make sure that the timeout value is not set to zero.
Check the timeouts configured for the ISDN LAN
Modem as explained in “Changing Data Call
Parameters” in Chapter 6.
If the situation persists, disconnect each attached LAN
device to locate the source of the IP packet generation.
Or you can turn off Automatic Call Initiation, located
on each service provider parameter page.
A Multilink PPP call cannot be
placed. Only one B channel
connects.
(continued)
Multilink PPP may not be
configured properly.
Refer to “Editing Service Provider Profiles” in
Chapter 6 for details.
There may not be enough traffic If you configured bandwidth allocation for this service
to reach the threshold for adding provider to add the second B channel as needed, there
the second B channel.
may not be enough traffic to reach the threshold
defined. Refer to “Changing Data Call Parameters” in
Chapter 6 for the threshold value and instructions on
how to change this value, if desired.
Evaluating Symptoms and Solutions
Table 6 Symptoms, Causes, and Solutions
Symptom
Possible Cause
Solution
May be an incompatibility with
Try reconnecting your call during off peak hours. If you
the router into which you are
are still unable to establish a Multilink PPP call, contact
dialing. Some remote routers split your ISP to confirm that they support this feature.
the two B channels of a Multilink
PPP call between different
routing devices, preventing the
channels from being linked.
A Multilink PPP call was
established but did not remain
connected.
Although only one data call is
connected, another voice or
data call cannot be placed.
When the LAN Modem is
configured to Use 2 B channels
and the remote end disconnects
one of the 2 B channels, the LAN
Modem will disconnect the now
single B channel call since it’s
configured to use 2 B channels.
From the ISDN LAN Modem’s home page, click Service
Providers and then select the provider you were
connecting to using Multilink PPP. For Bandwidth
Allocation, select Add second B channel as required.
A voice or data call may already
be connected leaving only one
B channel available.
Place the Multilink PPP call when both B channels are
available.
The connected call may be
Check the bandwidth allocation setting for that service
configured to always use two
provider. Refer to “Editing Service Provider Profiles” in
B channels, leaving no bandwidth Chapter 6 for details.
available for another call.
Caller ID date and time are not
accurate.
Connect a workstation that has the correct time to the
ISDN LAN Modem and then turn the LAN Modem
power off and then on again. Once it is powered up,
launch your web browser and go to the LAN Modem's
main page at http://3Com.oc.lanmodem/
Cannot place a call over the
LAN Modem's phone port
using a Sportster PC Card
modem.
Modem mistakes analog phone
line for digital line.
Add the following command to the Sportster modem
init string: AT ~~L0.
Cannot place or receive two
simultaneous voice calls.
Your ISDN line may not support
simultaneous voice and data on
both B channels.
Check with your ISDN line provider to determine
whether or not your ISDN line supports simultaneous
voice and data on both B channels.
For a Lucent 5ESS switch, your ISDN line must have
Max B Channel Limit=2 for simultaneous voice and
data.
For a Siemens switch, your ISDN line must have
Number of B Channels Per Call Type Per Office
Equipment Directory Number (NBCCTOEDN) =2.
After placing a Multilink PPP
call, you lift the handset of a
telephone to place a call and
do not hear a dial tone.
The handset was lifted to place a Hang up the handset, wait a few seconds, and then try
call while the ISDN LAN Modem again.
was negotiating the Multilink PPP
call. Negotiation must be
complete before a call can be
placed.
Not receiving message
Message Service box is not
indication for Voice Mail or any checked.
voice mail messages.
From the ISDN LAN Modem’s main configuration page,
click ISDN Parameters. Under Supplementary Services,
check the box labeled Message Service.
Cannot hear dial tone when
Bandwidth Allocation may be set Go to the appropriate Service Providers page and
attempting to place a call using to Use two B Channels.
change the Bandwidth Allocations setting to Add
an ISDN LAN Modem phone
second B channel as required.
port.
(continued)
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CHAPTER 9: TROUBLESHOOTING AND M AINTENANCE
Table 6 Symptoms, Causes, and Solutions
Symptom
Possible Cause
Solution
Attempted to place a voice call
over a directory number that is
already in use for a data call. If
this is the case, your ISDN line is
configured to allow only one B
channel per directory number.
Contact you telephone company if you want to have
simultaneous voice and data on both B channels.
For a Lucent 5ESS switch, your ISDN line must have
Max B Channel Limit=2 for simultaneous voice and
data.
For a Siemens switch, your ISDN line must have
Number of B Channels Per Call Type Per Office
Equipment Directory Number (NBCCTOEDN) =2.
Cannot receive an incoming
call.
Bandwidth Allocation may be set
to Use two B Channels.
Two separate data calls are up.
Your ISDN line does not support
simultaneous voice and data on
both B channels.
Contact you telephone company if you want to have
simultaneous voice and data on both B channels.
For a Lucent 5ESS switch, your ISDN line must have
Max B Channel Limit=2 for simultaneous voice and
data.
For a Siemens switch, your ISDN line must have
Number of B Channels Per Call Type Per Office
Equipment Directory Number (NBCCTOEDN) =2.
Your ISDN line does not have
ACO.
Contact you telephone company to have ACO added.
The analog modem connected
to the ISDN LAN Modem is
unable to detect dial tone
when attempting to place an
analog call while a Multilink
PPP call is established.
The standard period of time most
modems are set to wait for a dial
tone before hanging up the call is
2 seconds, which is about the
same amount of time it takes the
ISDN Modem to drop the second
B channel from a Multilink PPP
call and re-establish a dial tone.
Adjust the analog modem setting as follows: Change
S-Register 6 (Wait Time for Blind Dialing) on the analog
modem to a value of 3 or higher (the default is usually
2) to increase the period of time your analog modem is
set to wait before hanging up the call.
Cannot conference, transfer,
or drop voice calls.
Flexible calling is not enabled.
From the ISDN LAN Modem’s main configuration page,
click ISDN Parameters. Under Flexible Calling Enabled,
check the telephone number check box for which you
want Flexible Calling enabled.
If Flexible Calling is enabled on the ISDN LAN Modem,
check with your telephone company to make sure it is
enabled on your ISDN line.
Your telephone company uses
older codes for these services.
Caller always hears a ringing
signal even when line is busy.
(continued)
From the ISDN LAN Modem’s main configuration page,
click ISDN Parameters. Under Supplementary Services,
enter the following in the Codes field: 6 for
Conference, 7 for Transfer, 8 for Drop and 9 for
Message Service.
Message service is enabled on the From the ISDN LAN Modem’s main configuration page,
ISDN LAN modem but you do not click ISDN Parameters. Under Message Service Enable,
subscribe to voice mail from the make sure both boxes are clear.
telephone company.
Evaluating Symptoms and Solutions
Table 6 Symptoms, Causes, and Solutions
Symptom
Possible Cause
Solution
Sending e-mail is occasionally
slow when more than one
workstation is sending e-mail
to the same SMTP server.
A limitation of NAT, the SMTP
server uses a different port
number than the one requested
by the workstations sending
e-mail so the LAN Modem does
not know which of the 2 (or
more) workstations to forward
the response to. Therefore, the
request is discarded.
Co-ordinate the sending of your e-mail with the other
workstations, or have each workstation use a different
SMTP mail server.
After 30 seconds, the SMTP
server responds, this time using
the port number specified by the
workstation allowing the e-mail
to be sent.
Compression does not work
Compression is not configured.
Go to the appropriate Service Provides page and ensure
compression is enabled.
Compression negotiation was not Although compression is enabled on the LAN Modem,
successful.
the device the LAN Modem is dialing into must also
have compression enabled and also support the same
type of compression (hi/fn LZS) otherwise compression
negotiation will not be successful.
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Finding More
Information
For more information about the ISDN LAN Modem, such as frequently asked
questions and specific technical notes go to the following URL:
http://www.remoteaccess.3com.com/support/docs/lanmodem/welcome.html
and then bookmark this site for quick and easy access. If you are using the ISDN
LAN Modem custom browser, click Updates from the menu bar.
Contacting Technical
Support
For technical support, refer to the technical support card that was included with
your ISDN LAN Modem for the telephone number for your location.
Downloading
Firmware to Your
ISDN LAN Modem
Your ISDN LAN Modem has been designed to be user-upgradable. Firmware
upgrades and instructions will be available at
Resetting the ISDN
LAN Modem
There are two types of resets you can perform, a normal reset and a factory reset.
http://www.remoteaccess.3com.com/support/docs/lanmodem/welcome.html
■
A normal reset resets the ISDN LAN Modem without affecting any of the
configuration that has already been done. Any active calls, however, will be
terminated.
A normal reset can also be performed using the reset button located on the back
of the ISDN LAN Modem.
■
A factory reset restores the ISDN LAN Modem configuration to the factory
default settings listed in Appendix C. All previously configured settings are
cleared and current calls are terminated.
To reset the ISDN LAN Modem, do the following.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem’s home page, select Maintenance.
2 Select the type of reset you would like to perform, normal or factory.
Resetting the ISDN
Modem Using a
Telephone
If your computer cannot communicate with the ISDN LAN Modem and therefore
you cannot get to the ISDN LAN Modem’s home page, you can restore the ISDN
LAN Modem to the factory defaults using a telephone connected to one of the
phone ports.
Once you’ve connected an analog telephone to one of the ISDN LAN Modem’s
phone ports, do the following.
1 Disconnect the ISDN cable from the ISDN LAN Modem.
2 Lift the handset of the telephone.
You may hear a fast busy tone.
3 Press the following keys: **3266#
The ISDN LAN Modem reinitializes itself. Wait at least 10 seconds to ensure
initialization is complete and then go on to step 4.
Reviewing Statistics
101
4 Reconnect the ISDN cable.
5 Restart your computer.
6 Launch your Web browser.
The ISDN LAN Modem begins its initial setup sequence.
Reviewing Statistics
Various statistics about LAN and WAN parameters are stored and available for
review.
To view statistics, do the following.
1 From the ISDN LAN Modem’s home page, select Statistics.
2 Select the type of statistics you would like to review.
You can view the following types of statistics.
■
System
■
ISDN
■
Current Call
■
Last Call
■
Service Provider
Refer to the appropriate section for a list and description of the information
provided.
Click the Update button on each of the statistics screens to see the latest
information.
Understanding System
Statistics
The system statistics provided are as follows.
Table 7 Description of System Statistics
System Statistics
Description
Product ID
Displays product identification number such as 3C892.
Serial Number
Displays the serial number of the ISDN LAN Modem.
Ethernet Address
Displays the MAC address of the ISDN LAN Modem.
System software version number
Displays the firmware version of the ISDN LAN Modem.
Boot software version number
For internal use only.
The LAN modem has been up for Displays the length of time the ISDN LAN Modem has been
running. Timer is reset either when the unit is power-cycled
or reset.
Date (Month/Day/Year)
Lists the current date of the ISDN LAN Modem*
Time (Hour:Minute:Second)
Lists the current time of the ISDN LAN Modem*
* This date and time is based on the date of the computer used to initially set up the ISDN LAN Modem.
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CHAPTER 9: TROUBLESHOOTING AND M AINTENANCE
Understanding ISDN
Information
The ISDN statistics provided are as follows.
Layer 1 status: Indicates whether layer 1, the physical connection, of the ISDN
line is up or down. If layer 1 remains down after you attempt to place a call, there
may be a problem with your ISDN line. First, check to ensure that the correct cable
(labeled ISDN) is firmly connected to the ISDN LAN Modem and the wall jack. If the
problem remains, you should contact your telephone company.
Table 9
Understanding Current
Call Information
ISDN Line Information
Description
Layer 1 status
Indicates whether layer 1 of your ISDN line is up or down.
SPID 1 status
Indicates whether SPID 1 is initialized.
SPID 2 status
Indicates whether SPID 2 is initialized.
The current call information provided is as follows.
Table 10 Current Call Information Description
Current Call
Information
For This Call
Type
Call type
Data or voice
Indicates the type of call (data or voice) and the
B channel rate (56 Kbps or 64 Kbps).
Call direction
Data or voice
Indicates whether the current call is incoming or
outgoing.
Service provider name
Outgoing data Indicates the destination to which the current call is
connected.
IP address in use
Data call
Primary DNS address
Outgoing data Indicates the primary DNS address of the service
provider to which the current call is connected.
Description
Indicates the IP address assigned by the service
provider.
Secondary DNS address Outgoing data If a secondary DNS address is needed, indicates the
secondary DNS address of the service provider to
which the current call is connected. This field will be
empty if a secondary DNS address is not needed.
Data call options
Data call
If the current call is a data call, indicates the type of
data call, (Multilink PPP or PPP); number of B channels
in use for the call; whether compression is on or off,
authentication type, and whether BACP was
negotiated (on) or not (off). For example,
Multilink(2B)No-BACP/PAP/Compression-On.
Call start time
Voice or data
Displays the date and time the call began.
The call has been up for Data call
(seconds)
Indicates the length of time the current call has been
connected.
The connection has
been idle for (seconds)
Data call
Indicates the length of time the current call has been
idle.
Number of octets
received
Data call
Indicates the number of octets (bytes) received by the
ISDN LAN Modem.
Number of octets
transmitted
Data call
Indicates the number of octets (bytes) transmitted by
the ISDN LAN Modem.
(continued)
Reviewing Statistics
103
Table 10 Current Call Information Description
Current Call
Information
For This Call
Type
Calling telephone or
port number
Voice or data
For an incoming voice or data call, indicates the
telephone number of the calling party. For an outgoing
voice call, indicates the port from which the call was
placed. (For outgoing data calls, no information is
provided.)
Called telephone
number
Voice or data
For an outgoing data call, indicates the telephone
number dialed to reach the service provider for the
current call. For an incoming voice or data call,
indicates the telephone number dialed from the far
end. (For outgoing voice calls, no information is
provided.)
Reason for call coming
up
Data
Indicates how the call was placed and which
workstation placed the call. Depending on how the call
was placed you should see something similar to the
following:
Description
“Manual dial by Workstation A.”
“DNS query from Workstation A for
http://www.xxx.xxx.” If the call was automatically
launched and the workstation does not know the IP
address.
“Packet from Workstation A to IP address
xxxx.” If the call was automatically launched and the
workstation knows the IP address.
Understanding Last Call
Information
The last call information for both B channels (that is, call 1 and call 2) is as follows.
Table 11 Understanding Last Call Information
Last Call Information
For This Call
Type
Call type
Data or voice
Indicates the type of call (data or voice) and the
B channel rate (56 Kbps or 64 Kbps) or TollMizer.
Call direction
Data or voice
Indicates whether the last call is incoming or outgoing.
Service provider name
Outgoing data Indicates the destination to which the last call is
connected.
Description
(continued)
Data call options
Data call
If the last call was a data call, indicates the type of data
call, (Multilink PPP or PPP); and number of B channels
in use for the call:
Data Multilink(2B)
Call start time
Voice or data
Displays the date and time the call began.
The call was up for
(seconds)
Data call
Indicates the length of time this last call has been
connected.
Number of octets
received
Data call
Indicates the number of octets (bytes) received by the
ISDN LAN Modem.
Number of octets
transmitted
Data call
Indicates the number of octets (bytes) transmitted by
the ISDN LAN Modem.
Calling telephone or
port number
Voice or data
For the last incoming voice or data call, indicates the
telephone number of the calling party. For the last
outgoing voice call, indicates the port from which the
call was placed. (For outgoing data calls, no
information is provided.)
(continued)
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CHAPTER 9: TROUBLESHOOTING AND M AINTENANCE
Last Call Information
For This Call
Type
Description
Called telephone
number
Voice or data
For the last outgoing data call, indicates the telephone
number dialed to reach the service provider for the
current call. For the last incoming voice or data call,
indicates the telephone number dialed from the far
end. (For outgoing voice calls, no information is
provided.)
Reason for call going
down
Voice or data
Indicates why the last call was disconnected. For
example, idle timer expired, or manual disconnect.
Reason for call coming
up
Data
Indicates how the call was placed and which
workstation placed the call. Depending on how the call
was placed you should see something similar to the
following:
“Manual dial by Workstation A.”
“DNS query from Workstation A for
http://www.xxx.xxx.” If the call was automatically
launched and the workstation does not know the IP
address.
“Packet from Workstation A to IP address
xxxx.” If the call was automatically launched and the
workstation knows the IP address.
Understanding Service
Provider Information
The following Service Provider information is provided after a call has ended.
Table 12 Service Provider Information Description
Service Provider Information
Description
Number of successful
connections
Indicates the total number of successful connections to
each service provider.
Number of failed connections
Indicates the total number of unsuccessful connections to
each service provider.
Total number of octets received
Indicates the total number of octets (bytes) received by the
ISDN LAN Modem.
Total number of octets
transmitted
Indicates the total number of octets (bytes) transmitted by
the ISDN LAN Modem.
Total connection time (seconds)
Indicates the collective amount of time connected to each
service provider so far.
A
NETWORKING PRIMER
This chapter provides a description of basic networking concepts and terminology
to help you better understand the key functionality of the ISDN LAN Modem.
What is a network?
What is a LAN?
A network is a set of computers and other devices such as printers, modems, and
scanners that are connected together either directly via physical cables or indirectly
via dial-up telephone services. A network can be in the same room, the same
building covering a local area, or geographically dispersed covering a wide area.
A Local Area Network (LAN) is two or more computers linked together in a
contained location such as an office building. By linking the computer together,
and creating a LAN, users can share files and share access to printers.
To physically create a LAN, each computer must be linked together using some
type of cabling. Typically, Ethernet cabling is used. There are three main types of
Ethernet networks: 10BASE-T, 10BASE-2 and 10BASE-5. The ISDN LAN Modem
supports four 10BASE-T connections.
A 10BASE-T Ethernet network is used in small networks with only a few dozen
devices closely located. The physical connection for a 10BASE-T Ethernet network
is over a twisted pair cable. The connector used for 10BASE-T looks similar to the
connector used for your telephone. A 10BASE-5 Ethernet network is used in large
networks with many devices where transmissions occur over distant geographic
areas. A 10BASE-2 (Thin) Ethernet network is used in smaller networks with all
devices being relatively close together.
10 Mbps Ethernet LAN
ce
tan
Dis
ks
wor
Net
t Go
Tha
the
m
3 Co
Figure 53 Example of a LAN
What is a WAN?
A Wide Area Network is the result of the connection of two or more LANs,
typically using dial up telephone services via a modem and usually over far
geographic distances.
106
APPENDIX A: NETWORKING PRIMER
How does a LAN connect
to a WAN?
You can connect a LAN to a WAN through a number of devices such as a router or
a bridge that can place a call to the remote LAN using a dial-up telephone service
such as ISDN. Routers and bridges are devices that link networks. A bridge sends
every bit of information across the WAN while a router is considered a more
sophisticated device because of its ability to route only the desired bits of
information across the WAN while checking the integrity of the data and
transmission path.
What is a LAN modem?
A LAN modem is a hybrid between a modem that combines the dial-up
capabilities of a modem with an Ethernet hub. This eliminates the computer COM
port speed bottleneck (the LAN runs at 10 Mbps) while providing local networking
between the attached computers on the LAN. Even with this sophisticated
functionality, a LAN modem is easy to install and use, making it ideal for small
networks.
What is ISDN?
The Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) provides a digital telephone service
which allows both data and voice communication over the same telephone line
and at significantly faster speeds than the traditional Plain Old Telephone Service
(POTS) or analog service. There are two types of lines which provide access to
ISDN, Basic Rate Interface (BRI) and Primary Rate Interface (PRI). The ISDN LAN
Modem supports a BRI interface.
OfficeConnect¤
ISDN LAN Modem
LAN STATUS
Alert
PWR
ISDN
B1 B2
Tx Coll
1
2
3
4
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
Public telephone
network
3 Com
ISDN BRI line
Figure 54 ISDN BRI Line
Each BRI telephone line consists of two 64 Kbps bearer or B channels and one
16 Kbps D channel for each ISDN line. The D channel is the signaling channel; it
carries messages between the ISDN LAN Modem and your telephone company’s
ISDN switch. Note that while the ISDN standard is to have 64 Kbps B channels,
some telephone companies or the equipment you are connecting to may use
56 Kbps channels.
OfficeConnect¤
ISDN LAN Modem
LAN STATUS
Alert
PWR
ISDN
B1 B2
Tx Coll
1
2
3
4
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
3 Com
64 Kbps B Channel
64 Kbps B Channel
16 Kbps D Channel
Public telephone
network
ISDN BRI line
Figure 55 ISDN BRI Line in Detail
A single B channel transmits data or voice traffic at a rate of up to 64 Kbps. The
B channels may be used independently to allow two simultaneous connections to
different locations as shown in Figure 56.
What is a network?
107
Internet/Intranet or
online service
B channel 1
OfficeConnect¤
ISDN LAN Modem
LAN STATUS
Alert
PWR
ISDN
B1 B2
Tx Coll
1
2
3
4
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
B channel 2
3 Com
B channel 1
B channel 2
Remote office
LAN
Public telephone
network
ISDN BRI line
Figure 56 Two Simultaneous Connections
The B channels may also be combined using the Multilink PPP feature to allow one
higher speed connection to a single location as shown in Figure 57.
Internet/Intranet or
online service
128 Kbps B1 & B2
Remote office
LAN
OfficeConnect¤
ISDN LAN Modem
LAN STATUS
Alert
PWR
ISDN
B1 B2
Tx Coll
1
2
3
4
OfficeConnect®
ISDN LAN Modem
3 Com
64 Kbps B1
64 Kbps B2
Public telephone
network
Combining both
B channels with Multilink
provides a single 128 Kbps*
connection
*Without compression.
Figure 57 Using Multilink to Combine B Channels for a Single High-Speed Link
How do different
devices communicate
with each other?
What is TCP/IP?
Once the computers are physically connected in a network, they must run some
type of standard communications software that allows different types of
computers to communicate with each other. Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is becoming the most common software used
to accomplish this.
TCP/IP is a standardized communications protocol that works across LANs and
WANs, allowing different devices to communicate with each other. As its name
indicates, TCP/IP has two main components, TCP and IP. TCP manages the transfer
of data and corrects any errors that occur during transmission. It ensures that data
is reliably transferred. IP routes the data in packets from one location to another
across a network using the source and destination information within each data
packet to determine routing and destinations.
Note that TCP/IP encompasses more than the two protocols which define its
name. It comprises a set of software applications that allow various network
services such as remote file transfer protocol (FTP), remote login (Telnet), and
e-mail Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) and Post Office Protocol (POP) 3.
108
APPENDIX A: NETWORKING PRIMER
What is an IP Address?
An IP address is a 32 bit address used by TCP/IP to uniquely identify the location of
a device on a network. Note that the IP address does not refer to the device itself.
If, for example, you relocate a PC to another area of the same network, you may
need a new IP address.
The structure of this 32-bit address varies depending upon the size of the network
on which the device is located. From largest to smallest, network types are
referred to as Class A, Class B, Class C, and Class D. Within each class, a certain
number of bits identifies the class, the network and the local address. For
example, in a Class C network, the first three bits (110) identify the network type
as Class C. The next 21 bits identify the network and the last eight represent the
local or host address limiting the number of devices to 256. In contrast, a Class A
network allocates 24 bits for local addresses, allowing for many more devices.
IP addresses are composed of four sets of eight bits usually separated by a period.
The IP address of the ISDN LAN Modem identifies the ISDN LAN Modem itself and
the network it creates when devices are connected to the Ethernet ports.
What is a Subnet Mask?
Many networks are divided further into smaller sub networks. A subnet mask is a
number that identifies the sub network to which your computer is connected. The
subnet mask differentiates the part of the IP address that represents the network
and the part that represents the host.
The bits of the subnet mask are set to 1 if the host should treat the corresponding
bit in the IP address as part of the original network number. These bits in the mask
are set to 0 if the host should treat the bits as part of the device number as shown
in Figure 58.
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Subnet Address
Network Number
11111111 11111111
Network Number
Device Number
11111111 00000000
Subnet Device
Number
Figure 58 Subnet Mask
Dynamic and Static IP
Addresses
IP addresses for public networks must be unique and provided by the Network
Information Center (NIC). Because of the increasing popularity of the Internet, the
NIC is running out of permanent IP addresses. It is therefore becoming more
common to use dynamic IP addresses which are assigned temporarily and then
reused, instead of static IP addresses which are permanent. For example, when
you access the Internet, your ISP has a pool of IP addresses it uses to provide
temporary connections to multiple users. Once you disconnect from the Internet,
the IP address you were using is placed back in the pool for use by another user.
If your LAN will not connect to the public Internet, you can set up your own
unique (that is, private) IP address numbering. IP addresses for private networks
such as an office LAN must also be unique but only within that LAN.
What is a network?
109
What is DHCP?
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol automatically assigns a unique, temporary IP
address to a newly attached computer on an IP network.
What is DNS?
Domain Name Service translates the common alphabetic name into the numeric IP
address. For example, floyds_PC is translated to 192.168.1.2. If you do not use the
DHCP functionality of the ISDN LAN Modem, you will have to manually configure
the following parameters for each computer on the LAN: IP address, subnet mask,
DNS address and default gateway.
What is NAT?
Network Address Translation, also known as IP address sharing, allows multiple
users to share a single connection such as an Internet connection. For example,
with the ISDN LAN Modem, when users on the LAN launch their Web browser for
Internet access, their computer’s IP address is translated into the IP address
provided by the ISP for access.
You will probably not want to use NAT If your LAN network is static; that is, an IP
address is assigned to your computer by your MIS department or ISP and manually
configured.
What are numbered and
unnumbered links?
Some networks require an IP address to be assigned to a WAN in addition to the
LAN(s). If a WAN has an IP address assigned to it, it is considered to be a numbered
link. If there is not an IP address assigned to a WAN, it is considered to be an
unnumbered link.
How is overall
throughput determined?
The performance of all linked devices must be considered to determine
end-to-end throughput. Connection performance is affected by each device in the
chain. Therefore, the slowest link in the chain determines the maximum
throughput. On the LAN side, computers on a typical network can communicate
with each other at up to 10 Mbps. When dialing up to a long distance location
using ISDN, you can establish a network connection speed of up to 128 Kbps
without compression or up to 384 Kbps with compression. If you are dialing into
the Internet, the speed of the router providing access must also be considered. In
addition, the Internet itself may have speed limitations.
110
APPENDIX A: NETWORKING PRIMER
B
USING THE CUSTOM WEB BROWSER
An Internet Explorer Web browser tailored for use with your ISDN LAN Modem is
provided on the 3Com Companion Programs CD-ROM. You may prefer to use this
browser as it has been customized for your ISDN LAN Modem, as shown in
Figure 59, making it easier to use.
If you use a different Web browser, make sure that it supports frames. (Netscape
3.0 and later and Internet Explorer 3.0 and later both support frames.)
Jumps to
LAN Modem
main page
Jumps to
manual calling
Jumps to
WWW Page
Jumps to
latest docs
Jumps to the registration page
Figure 59 ISDN LAN Modem Custom Internet Explorer Browser
Custom Links
The following custom buttons provide direct links to ISDN LAN Modem
configuration and information Web sites.
■
Configure Modem
Click here to jump to the ISDN LAN Modem configuration main page.
■
Dial/Hang Up
Click here to jump to the ISDN LAN Modem’s Manual Calling page where you
can connect to and disconnect from the service providers you configured.
■
Register Modem
Click here to jump to the ISDN LAN Modem registration page.
■
Updates
Click here to jump to the site where you will find the latest information on the
ISDN LAN Modem such as the latest firmware version and user documentation.
112
APPENDIX B: USING THE C USTOM WEB B ROWSER
■
User Guide
Click here to jump to the Internet location of the OfficeConnect ISDN LAN
Modem User Guide.
Using Favorites
Under the Favorites menu, a subcategory labeled 3Com sites lists several helpful
sites already bookmarked for you. These include:
■
3Com Corporate
This takes you to the 3Com Corporate Web site.
■
3Com Remote Access
This takes you to the 3Com Remote Access Web site.
■
3Com Shopping
This takes you to the 3Com Shopping Network.
■
3Com Small Business
This takes you to the 3Com Small Business Networking Web site.
■
3Com Support
This takes you the 3Com Support Web site.
Installing the Custom
Internet Explorer
Browser
If you already have a version of the Internet Explorer Web browser installed and
you would like to install a later, customized version, you should first uninstall the
previous version. Also, while installing the later version, you may be asked to
replace the older files. It is recommended that you do so.
To install the custom web browser, do the following
1 Insert the 3Com Companion Programs CD-ROM into your computer’s CD-ROM
drive.
2 From the main screen, click Internet Explorer.
3 Follow the instructions on the screen.
Installing Future Releases of Internet Explorer
Once you install the ISDN LAN Modem custom Internet Explorer Web browser, you
can install future release of standard Internet Explorer while maintaining the links
listed under Favorites. However, any customized buttons may be removed from
the newer version.
C
ISDN LAN MODEM FACTORY
DEFAULTS
Table 13
ISDN LAN Modem Factory Defaults
LAN Parameters
LAN Modem IP Address*
192.168.1.1
Subnet Mask
255.255.255.224
DHCP Server
Enabled
NetBIOS filtering
Disabled
Voice Call Routing
Calls to Telephone 1
Routed to Phone Port 1 only
Calls to Telephone 2
Routed to Phone Port 2 only
Use Data Compression
No
Use NAT
Yes
Bandwidth on Demand
Connect/Disconnect Threshold for
2nd B channel
60%
Connect Delay
10 seconds
Disconnect Delay
20 seconds
Supplementary Voice Services
Call Waiting
Enabled on port 1; Disabled on port 2
Caller ID Blocking
Disabled
Flexible Calling which includes:
Enabled on telephone number 1; Disabled on telephone
number 2
Call Conference, Hold, Drop,
Transfer
Codes
Conference = 60; Transfer = 61; Drop = 62; Message
Service = 63.
Message Service for Voice Mail
Disabled on both telephone numbers
Distinctive Ringing
Disabled on both telephone numbers
Data Call Timeout Values
Minimum Call Duration
2 minutes
Automatic Data Call Inactivity
Disconnect
30 seconds
Manual Data Call Inactivity
Disconnect
15 minutes
* The ISDN LAN Modem attempts to use this default IP address to communicate with the computer during
initial configuration. If communication cannot be established initially, the ISDN LAN Modem will change its
default IP address. If this occurs, the IP address will be different from the default shown here.
114
APPENDIX C: ISDN LAN MODEM FACTORY D EFAULTS
D
ISDN LAN MODEM SPECIFICATIONS
Refer to Table 14 for the ISDN LAN Modem specifications.
Table 14
ISDN LAN Modem Specifications
Network Interface
ISDN Basic rate telephone service provided by the
telephone company
Network (ISDN) Connector
RJ49C
Facility Interface Code
02IS5
ISDN Interface Type
U (integrated NT1)
LAN Interface
Ethernet IEEE 802.3 10BASE-T standard
Physical Dimensions
Length
8.66 in (22.0 cm)
Width
5.44 in (13.8 cm)
Height
1.56 in (4.0 cm)
Environmental Operating
Range
Operating temperature
50° to 122°F (10° to 50°C)
Relative humidity
Up to 90% noncondensing
Power
Input
120 VAC *
Output
13 VDC
Ringer Equivalence Number 3 per analog phone port on up to 200 feet of
AWG 26 or heavier AWG wiring
(REN)
Phone Port Loop Current
25 mA per port
Ringing Voltage
42 VAC
EMI Certification
FCC Part 15, Part 68, Class B
116
APPENDIX D: ISDN LAN MODEM SPECIFICATIONS
* You must use the power supply provided with your ISDN LAN Modem.
Year 2000 Compliance
The OfficeConnect ISDN LAN Modem is Year 2000 compliant.
Specifically, its system clock is capable of accepting and storing dates
including and beyond the year 2000.
For information on Year 2000 compliance and 3Com products, visit the
3Com Year 2000 web page:
http://www.3Com.com/products/yr2000.html
E
ORDERING ISDN SERVICE
This appendix describes how to order ISDN service. Refer to the appropriate
section.
■
If you are ordering ISDN for the first time, refer to “If You Place Your ISDN
Order Through 3Com” to have 3Com order ISDN service for you, free of
charge.
■
To call your telephone company and order ISDN yourself, refer to “If You Place
Your ISDN Order Through the Telephone Company.”
■
If you already have ISDN, refer to “What If I Already Have ISDN Service?”.
ISDN line provisioning information is subject to change. Visit
http://www.remoteaccess.3com.com/support/docs/lanmodem/welcome.html
for the latest information.
If You Place Your ISDN
Order Through 3Com
Simply call 1-800-343-3266 to have your ISDN line ordered for you. 3Com’s
SupernetAccess service will provide the appropriate line parameters to your
telephone company and schedule installation of your ISDN line wherever possible.
Be sure to ask for the order code or order confirmation number.
If You Place Your ISDN
Order Through the
Telephone Company
To simplify the many features available for ISDN, Bellcore has created several
packages, called ISDN Ordering Codes (IOC), for choosing an ISDN line
configuration that best fits your needs. Of these packages, 3Com has two
recommendations, each of which allows you to take the fullest advantage of the
supplementary voice features supported by the ISDN LAN Modem. The ISDN LAN
Modem has completed the ISDN Ordering Codes Translations Review and is
registered with EZ-ISDN 1 and EZ-ISDN 1A.
Your choice will depend on whether or not you want Voice Mail capability on your
line:
■
For ISDN without Voice Mail, 3Com recommends Capability Package U or
EZ-ISDN 1.
■
For ISDN with Voice Mail, 3Com recommends Capability Package V or
EZ-ISDN 1A.
For a complete explanation of these Capability Packages, the specific
supplementary services included with each, and certain limitations in their
coverage which relate to the ISDN LAN Modem, refer to the two sections,
“Supplementary Voice Features Included with U, EZ-ISDN-1, V and EZ-ISDN 1A”
and “Limitations of ISDN Ordering Codes U, EZ-ISDN 1, V and EZ-ISDN 1A.”
118
APPENDIX E: ORDERING ISDN S ERVICE
Placing Your Order
To order ISDN service from the telephone company for the ISDN LAN Modem:
1 Call the telephone company and ask for the ISDN representative.
2 Tell the representative that you would like to place an order for ISDN service for an
OfficeConnect ISDN LAN Modem.
■
For ISDN service without Voice Mail, request that your line be provisioned
according to Bellcore Capability Package U or EZ-ISDN 1.
■
For ISDN service with Voice Mail, request that your line be provisioned
according to Bellcore Capability Package V or EZ-ISDN 1A.
If your telephone company does not recognize these Bellcore Capability Packages
or ISDN Codes, call 1-800-343-3266 and have 3Com order your ISDN line for you.
3 Ask to have the following extra services enabled on your second line if you want
support on both telephone numbers for the service indicated (automatic support
for these services is provided on your first telephone number only. For a complete
explanation, refer to “Supplementary Voice Features Included with U, EZ-ISDN-1,
V and EZ-ISDN 1A”).
■
Additional Call Offering (ACO) -- this adds Call Waiting (and Dynamic
Bandwidth Allocation) to your second line.
■
Flexible Call Offering (FCO) -- this adds Call Conference (Three-Way Calling)
and Call Transfer to your second line.
■
Call Forwarding Variable -- this adds Call Forwarding to your second line.
■
Voice Mail (if you are ordering V or EZ-ISDN 1A) -- this adds Voice Mail to your
second line.
4 If you would like outgoing Caller ID Blocking, ask to have Calling Number
Privacy enabled on either line, or both.
5 Ask the representative which ISDN switch type your ISDN line will be using. Place a
check mark on the appropriate line on the ISDN Information Sheet, Figure 50 in
Chapter 6.
The ISDN LAN Modem does not support supplementary voice services for Lucent
Technologies 5ESS® Custom switches. If you would like to use these services, ask
the representative if another switch type is available for your ISDN line.
6 Ask the ISDN representative to provide the information you need to fill out the rest
of the ISDN Information Sheet, Figure 50 in Chapter 6. You will need the phone
numbers provided by your ISDN representative when you configure your ISDN LAN
Modem. (The rest of the information is not necessary for the configuration itself,
but you may find it helpful to have this information on hand.)
This completes the procedure for ordering your ISDN line.
Supplementary Voice Features Included with U, EZ-ISDN-1, V and EZ-ISDN 1A
Supplementary Voice
Features Included with
U, EZ-ISDN-1, V and
EZ-ISDN 1A
119
Package U or EZ-ISDN 1 includes automatic support on telephone number 1 for
the following supplementary voice features, which are also supported by the ISDN
LAN Modem:
■
Call Waiting
■
Call Conference (or Three-Way Calling)
■
Call Transfer
■
Call Forwarding
■
Caller ID
Package V or EZ-ISDN 1A includes automatic support on telephone number 1 for
all of the above features, plus Voice Mail.
For the purposes of ordering your ISDN line, Packages U and EZ-ISDN 1 are
equivalents. Both offer support for the same set of supplementary voice services.
In some regions you will encounter the term IOC U or Package U; in others, you
will encounter the term EZ-ISDN 1.
Packages V and EZ-ISDN 1A are also equivalents. They differ from U and EZ-ISDN 1
only by the addition of Voice Mail to the list of their services.
Limitations of ISDN
Ordering Codes U,
EZ-ISDN 1, V and
EZ-ISDN 1A
Simultaneous Voice and
Data on the Same
Telephone Number
Although IOC U, EZ-ISDN 1, V and EZ-ISDN 1A are the ISDN Ordering Codes which
will best allow you to take advantage of the ISDN LAN Modem’s supplementary
voice features, certain limitations do exist in the way your ISDN line is provisioned
under them, as described here:
■
Under U, EZ-ISDN 1, V and EZ-ISDN 1A, support for simultaneous voice and
data on the same telephone number is not provided. This means that while you
are on a circuit-switched data call, you will not be able to place or receive a
telephone or fax call on telephone number 2. A circuit-switched data call
always uses telephone number 2 for the first B channel; therefore, whenever
you are on a data call, telephone number 2 becomes unavailable for incoming
or outgoing voice calls (telephone or fax). Telephone number 1, however, will
remain available for a voice call while you are on a data call.
When your ISDN LAN Modem is set to its default settings, telephone number 1
is routed to Port 1 as a telephone line, while telephone number 2 is routed to
Port 2 as a fax line. If a data call is launched to the Internet, you will be able to
receive a telephone call but not a fax call while you are connected. Likewise, if
a fax happens to come in while you are dialing in to the Internet, you will be
unable to place the call to the Internet.
If you must have simultaneous data and voice capability on the same telephone
number, refer to the section, “If You Must Have Simultaneous Voice and Data
Capability on Both Numbers.”
For a complete list of the capabilities of ISDN Ordering Codes U, EZ-ISDN 1, V, and
EZ-ISDN 1A, refer to “Table of ISDN Ordering Code Capabilities.”
120
APPENDIX E: ORDERING ISDN S ERVICE
Supplementary Voice
Services on Telephone
Number 1 Only
■
Under IOC U, EZ-ISDN 1, V and EZ-ISDN 1A, automatic support for the
following features applies only to telephone number 1:
■
Call Waiting
■
Call Conference
■
Call Transfer
■
Call Forwarding
■
Voice Mail (for V and EZ-ISDN 1A)
If you want support for these features on your second telephone number in
addition to your first, you must ask your telephone company to enable the
following extra services on your second line:
■
■
Additional Call Offering (ACO) -- for Call Waiting (and Dynamic
Bandwidth Allocation)
Flexible Call Offering (FCO) -- for Call Conference (Three-Way Calling)
and Call Transfer
■
Call Forwarding Variable -- for Call Forwarding
■
Voice Mail (if you are ordering V or EZ-ISDN 1A) for Voice Mail
Also under U, EZ-ISDN 1, V, and EZ-ISDN 1A, there is no automatic support for
Outgoing Caller ID Blocking, a supplementary voice feature which is
supported by the ISDN LAN Modem. You can, however, request to have
Outgoing Caller ID Blocking added to either telephone number, or both, by
asking for Calling Number Privacy.
Only Caller ID is automatically supported on both telephone numbers under
packages U, EZ-ISDN 1, V and EZ-ISDN 1A.
There may be a charge for adding these services to your line. Check with your
telephone company.
If You Must Have
Simultaneous Voice and
Data Capability on Both
Numbers
If you must have the ability to place a circuit-switched data and voice call
simultaneously on the same telephone number, you can do the following,
depending upon the ISDN switch type used by your telephone company:
For Lucent Technologies 5ESS® Switches
When you call your telephone company to order ISDN, ask for Capability Package
U or EZ-ISDN 1 (or V or EZ-ISDN 1A, if you want Voice Mail). In addition to any
extra supplementary voice services you ask to have added to your line(s), ask to
have the parameter called “Maximum B Channel” (MAXBCHL) set to 2 for both
telephone numbers.
For Siemens EWSD Switches
When you call your telephone company to order ISDN, ask for Capability Package
U or EZ-ISDN 1 (or V or EZ-ISDN 1A, if you want Voice Mail). In addition to any
extra supplementary voice services you ask to have added to your line(s), ask to
have the following parameter set to 2 for both telephone numbers: “Number of B
Channels Per Call Type Per Office Equipment Directory Number” (NBCCTOEDN) -also known as “BCHCT.”
What If I Already Have ISDN Service?
121
For Nortel DMS-100® Switches
If your line is provisioned on a Nortel DMS-100® switch, then regardless of the
ISDN Ordering Code you choose, you cannot have simultaneous voice and data on
the same phone number because of a limitation with the central office switches.
What If I Already Have
ISDN Service?
How S1 Differs from
U/EZ-ISDN 1 and
V/EZ-ISDN 1A
If you already have ISDN service installed for your ISDN LAN Modem and you used
an ISDN Ordering Code (IOC) other than U/EZ-ISDN 1 or V/EZ-ISDN 1A (for
example, you may have ordered Capability Package S1, 3Com's prior
recommendation for ISDN LAN Modem firmware version 5.00, which did not
include support for supplementary voice services), you will need to make changes
to your line if you wish to use all the supplementary voice services supported by
ISDN LAN Modem, firmware version 5.1.0 or later.
Capability Package S1 is a special ordering code which provides support for
simultaneous voice and data on the same Directory Number where Packages
U/EZ-ISDN 1 and V/EZ-ISDN 1A do not. S1 also provides Additional Call Offering
(ACO) -- which allows for Call Waiting and Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation -- on
both telephone numbers, whereas U/EZ-ISDN 1 and V/EZ-ISDN 1A provide ACO
automatically on Directory Number 1 only.
S1 does not, however, provide support for the other supplementary voice features
supported by the ISDN LAN Modem (Call Conference, Call Transfer, and Call
Forwarding) which are available under U/EZ-ISDN 1 and V/EZ-ISDN 1A. (Note, also,
that S1 does not support Voice Mail.)
All three ordering codes, S1, U/EZ-ISDN 1, and V/EZ-ISDN 1A, provide automatic
support for Caller ID on both Directory Numbers. None of them provides
automatic support for Caller ID Blocking.
If You Are Currently Using Capability Package S1 and Would Like to Add
Supplementary Voice Services
If you are currently using Capability Package S1 and would like to use all or some
of the supplementary voice services supported by the ISDN LAN Modem, firmware
version 5.1.0 or later, 3Com recommends that you call your telephone company
and ask to have the following extra services added to Directory Number 1,
Directory Number 2, or both, on your existing line (Note that there may be an
additional charge to have these services added.):
■
For Voice Mail, ask for Voice Mail
■
For Call Conference (Three-Way Calling) and Call Transfer, ask for Flexible Call
Offering (FCO)
■
For Call Forwarding, ask for Call Forwarding Variable
■
For outgoing Caller ID Blocking, ask for Calling Number Privacy
Some telephone companies may choose to refer to the Flexible Calling features by
unique terminology.
If You Are Unable to Have Supplementary Voice Services Added to S1
If your telephone company does not allow piecemeal additions to your line
provisioning (for example, ACO and FCO are not available on a Lucent 5ESS
Custom Switch), 3Com recommends that you change your line to Package U or
122
APPENDIX E: ORDERING ISDN S ERVICE
EZ-ISDN 1 (if you do not want Voice Mail) or Package V or EZ-ISDN 1A (if you want
Voice Mail).
If you make this change, however, you should be aware that certain constraints
apply to both U/EZ-ISDN 1 and V/EZ-ISDN 1A -- in particular, that these codes do
not provide support for simultaneous voice and data on the same Directory
Number. For a full explanation of these constraints, refer to the section, “What
Are the Supplementary Voice Services Included in U/EZ-ISDN 1 and V/EZ-ISDN
1A?” If you must have simultaneous voice and data on the same Directory
Number, refer to the section, “What If I Need Simultaneous Voice and Data
Capability on Both Numbers?”
Table of ISDN
Ordering Code
Capabilities
Table 15 lists the exact supplementary voice services included under Capability
Packages U, EZ-ISDN 1, V and EZ-ISDN 1A, 3Com’s recommended ISDN Ordering
Codes for use with the ISDN LAN Modem.
Table 15
Package U or EZ-ISDN 1
Package V or EZ-ISDN 1A
Automatic
Support on
Telephone
Number1?
Automatic
Support on
Telephone
Number2?
Automatic
Support on
Telephone
Number1?
Automatic
Support on
Telephone
Number2?
Call Waiting and Dynamic
Bandwidth Allocation
(Additional Call Offering)
YES
NO
YES
NO
Call Conference and Call
Transfer (Flexible Call
Offering)
YES
NO
YES
NO
Call Forwarding (Call
Forwarding Variable)
YES
NO
YES
NO
Caller ID
YES
YES
YES
YES
Outgoing Caller ID
Blocking (Calling Number
Privacy)
NO
NO
NO
NO
Voice Mail
NO
NO
YES
NO
Supplementary
Voice Service
GLOSSARY
B channel
Bearer channel. In ISDN communications, a B channel transmits data or voice
traffic at a rate of up to 64 Kbps.
BRI
Basic Rate Interface. A BRI line is one of two access methods to the ISDN; PRI is the
other. Each BRI consists of two 64 Kbps B channels and one 16 Kbps
D channel for each ISDN line.
BACP/BAP
Bandwidth Allocation Control Protocol (BACP) and Bandwidth Allocation Protocol
(BAP) are used in conjunction with the Multilink PPP feature. When Multilink PPP is
negotiated, the BACP negotiates with the peer equipment to determine whether
the peer supports BAP. If the peer supports BAP and agrees to use BAP, then the
BAP negotiates the addition and removal of the second B channel with the peer
equipment based on a user-defined threshold. A key advantage of BACP/BAP is
that it provides a higher probability of establishing a Multilink PPP call during high
traffic conditions by providing a specific telephone number for the second
B channel to call.
CHAP
Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol. CHAP is one of two PPP
authentication protocols supported by the ISDN LAN Modem; PAP is the other. An
authentication protocol requests information to verify a valid user. CHAP is a
stronger authentication method because it uses encryption and may repeatedly
request verification of the identity of the user any time after link establishment.
compression
Compression is a method of reducing the size of data packets without losing any
information. The ISDN modem automatically compresses data for PPP calls to
improve data transfer times using a compression method called Hi/fn LZS.
D channel
DBA
DHCP
The signaling channel on an ISDN line used to carry messages between the ISDN
LAN Modem and the public switch.
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation. DBA is a method of reallocating bandwidth (such
as a B channel) automatically. DBA allows you to place or receive a voice call while
a Multilink PPP call is active.
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. DHCP allows a server to automatically
assign an IP address to a newly-attached computer on an IP network.
default
Value set at the factory.
domain
A domain is a unique name which refers to a single entity on the Internet and is
used for organizational purposes.
DNS
Domain Name Server. DNS translates the common alphabetic name into the
numeric IP address. For example, floyds_PC is translated to 192.168.1.2.
124
GLOSSARY
firmware
Firmware is the code which resides in the ISDN Modem and controls its behavior. It
differs from software in the form of programs that run on your computer.
IP address
An IP address is a set of numbers that uniquely identifies each device in a network.
ISDN
ISP
Kbps
Layer 1
MS-CHAP
Integrated Services Digital Network. ISDN provides a digital telephone service
which allows both data and voice communication over the same telephone line
and at significantly faster speeds than the traditional POTs service. There are two
types of lines which provide access to ISDN, BRI and PRI.
Internet Service Provider. A business that supplies access to the Internet such as
your telephone company or AOL.
Kilobits per second. Kbps is the rate at which data is transmitted between
communication equipment such as ISDN modems.
In ISDN communications, the physical layer of communication between the
communications equipment. If layer one is down, there is no ISDN connection
between the devices.
Microsoft’s proprietary version of CHAP. See also CHAP.
Multilink PPP
Multilink Point-to-Point Protocol. Multilink PPP is a protocol which provides a
method for combining multiple PPP connections. With a BRI line, Multilink PPP
aggregates the two 56 Kbps or 64 Kbps ISDN B channels, creating a virtual single
digital connection of 112 Kbps or 128 Kbps.
National ISDN
An ISDN standard that enables consistency in ISDN service features across different
vendors’ equipment and switches for North America.
NetBIOS Filtering
Network terminator
(NT1)
PAP
PC/TCP
POTS
PPP
PPTP
NetBIOS filtering is a LAN Modem feature that helps prevent the LAN Modem
from establishing unwanted calls by filtering the DNS requests made by NetBIOS
that inadvertently cause the LAN Modem to place a call. NetBIOS is a protocol
primarily used by Windows 98, 95 and NT for local file and printer sharing.
A network termination device that terminates the ISDN line.An NT1 is built into
the ISDN LAN Modem with the U interface. An NT1 is built into the ISDN LAN
Modem with the U interface (3C892).
Password Authentication Protocol. PAP is one of two PPP authentication protocols
supported by the ISDN LAN Modem; CHAP is the other. An authentication
protocol requests information to verify a valid user. PAP requests the user’s name
and password for verification.
PC/TCP is a PC version of TCP/IP created by FTP software.
Plain old telephone service.
Point-to-Point Protocol. PPP provides a standard method of transmitting data
through the Internet. PPP is used for communication between a computer and an
Internet service provider.
Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol. A protocol that allows a workstation to
establish a secure multi-protocol connection to a remote, private network via a
locally-dialed ISP account. See also VPN.
GLOSSARY
PRI
router
125
Primary Rate Interface. A PRI line is one of two access methods to the ISDN; BRI is
the other. In North America, each PRI consists of twenty-three 64 Kbps B channels
and one 64 Kbps D channel.
A router is a device that links networks.
SPID
Service Profile Identifier. If required, this number is supplied to you by the
telephone company. Typically, if your ISDN line has only one telephone number, a
SPID is not required.
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. TCP/IP is a standardized
communications protocol which allows different types of devices to communicate
with each other over LANs and WANs.
TollMizer
TollMizer (also referred to as Switched 56 Permissive or Data Over Voice) makes a
56 Kbps data call over a voice circuit, allowing you to save the typical cost
difference between a voice and data call. Note that the destination you are calling
must also support this feature.
UDP
User Datagram Protocol. A connectionless protocol within TCP/IP that converts
application-generated data messages into packets that can be sent via IP. UDP
does not check for transmission errors therefore it does not perform
retransmission. Reliability is dependent upon the application. Note that because it
does not perform checking, UDP is more efficient than TCP. UDP is commonly used
for Internet games.
VPN
A virtual private network is a secure, private data network that is established over
the Internet resulting in significant cost savings from using local, toll free access
numbers. Also, because the existing Internet backbone is used, there is less
investment needed in private network infrastructure. See also PPTP.
126
GLOSSARY
127
INDEX
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation 22
dynamic IP address
determining if your computer has a
dynamic IP address 44
F
A
analog equipment installation 30
B
B channel LEDs 92, 93
BACP 21, 123
bandwidth on demand parameters 89
BAP 21, 123
C
call conference 82
call forwarding 83
call routing
analog ports 71
call transfer 82
call waiting 78
configuring 78
using 79
caller ID 80
blocking 80
Challenge Handshake Authentication
Protocol (CHAP) 14, 123
changing
data call parameters 67
supplementary voice services 77
voice call routing 70
your password 71
configuration
advanced 55
data call parameters 69
from a remote location 74
ISDN parameters 48, 72
LAN parameters 65
typical 43, 47
connecting
10BASE-T Ethernet port 28
analog devices 30
another Ethernet hub 29
power cable 31
conventions
notice icons, About This Guide 10
text, About This Guide 10
D
D channel LED 93
data call parameters
changing 67
understanding 68
date and time setting 47
disconnecting calls
automatically using timers 89
manually 88
distinctive ringing 88
factory defaults 113
flexible calling 81
codes 81
configuring 81
Password Authentication Protocol
(PAP) 14
PC requirements 25
Phone port 30
placing calls
automatically 85
manually 86
Multilink PPP 87
power cable connection 31
power requirements 113, 115
PPTP 23
private network
setting up a connection to 60
I
installation
analog equipment 30
ISDN cable 28
power cable 31
Internet Service Provider
setting up a connection to 57
IP address
determining if static or dynamic 44
resetting workstation
Macintosh 94
Windows 95 94
Windows NT 4.0 94
ISDN
cable installation 28
manual configuration 72
L
LAN parameters
configuring 65
understanding 65
LEDs
description 26
monitoring 92
locking the configuration 73
M
R
receiving calls
data 87
voice 88
S
service providers
associating with computers on the
LAN 63
editing profiles 64
setting up a connection to a private
network 60
setting up a connection to an ISP 57
setting up additional 56
setting
date and time
caller ID 80
ISDN LAN Modem 47
specifications 115
SPID Wizard 48
static IP address
configuring on the ISDN LAN
modem 51
determining if your computer has a
static IP address 44
supplementary voice services 77 to 83
manually 72
message service
See also voice mail. 83
Multilink PPP 21
placing calls 87
call conference 82
caller ID blocking 80
call forward 83
call transfer 82
call waiting 78
caller ID 80
flexible calling 81
message service 83
N
NAT configuration
for a private network 63
for an ISP 59
NetBIOS filtering 66
network interface 112, 113, 115
NT1 28
O
online help 100
P
password
changing 72
T
TCP/IP
setup using Mac OS 7.6 39
setup using Windows 3.11 40
setup using Windows 95 33
setup using Windows NT 4.0 36
Test LED 92, 93
three-way calling. See call conference.
troubleshooting
checking the basics 91
evaluating symptoms and
solutions 94
monitoring LEDs 92
128
INDEX
U
UDP
support for Internet games 15
unlocking the configuration 73
V
voice call routing
changing 70
understanding 70
voice features
. See supplementary voice services.
voice mail 83
See also message service. 83
W
warranty 15
Y
year 2000 compliance 116
3Com Corporation LIMITED WARRANTY
OfficeConnect ISDN LAN Modem
HARDWARE
3Com warrants this hardware product to be free from defects in workmanship and materials, under normal use and service, for
the following length of time from the date of purchase from 3Com or its authorized reseller:
Lifetime, except that the fan and power supply hardware (if any) are warranted for one (1) year.
3Com’s sole obligation under this express warranty shall be, at 3Com’s option and expense, to repair the defective product or
part, deliver to Customer an equivalent product or part to replace the defective item, or if neither of the two foregoing options
is reasonably available, 3Com may, in its sole discretion, refund to Customer the purchase price paid for the defective product.
All products that are replaced will become the property of 3Com. Replacement products may be new or reconditioned. 3Com
warrants any replaced or repaired product or part for ninety (90) days from shipment, or the remainder of the initial warranty
period, whichever is longer.
SOFTWARE
3Com warrants that each software program licensed from it will perform in substantial conformance to its program
specifications, for a period of ninety (90) days from the date of purchase from 3Com or its authorized reseller. 3Com warrants
the media containing software against failure during the warranty period. No updates are provided. 3Com's sole obligation
under this express warranty shall be, at 3Com's option and expense, to refund the purchase price paid by Customer for any
defective software product, or to replace any defective media with software which substantially conforms to applicable 3Com
published specifications. Customer assumes responsibility for the selection of the appropriate applications program and
associated reference materials. 3Com makes no warranty or representation that its software products will meet Customer’s
requirements or work in combination with any hardware or applications software products provided by third parties, that the
operation of the software products will be uninterrupted or error free, or that all defects in the software products will be
corrected. For any third party products listed in the 3Com software product documentation or specifications as being
compatible, 3Com will make reasonable efforts to provide compatibility, except where the non-compatibility is caused by a
"bug" or defect in the third party's product or from use of the software product not in accordance with 3Com’s published
specifications or user manual.
YEAR 2000 WARRANTY
In addition to the Hardware Warranty and Software Warranty stated above, 3Com warrants that each product sold or licensed
to Customer on and after January 1, 1998 that is date sensitive will continue performing properly with regard to such date data
on and after January 1, 2000, provided that all other products used by Customer in connection or combination with the 3Com
product, including hardware, software, and firmware, accurately exchange date data with the 3Com product, with the
exception of those products identified at 3Com’s Web site, http://www.3com.com/products/yr2000.html, as not meeting this
standard. If it appears that any product that is stated to meet this standard does not perform properly with regard to such date
data on and after January 1, 2000, and Customer notifies 3Com before the later of April 1, 2000, or ninety (90) days after
purchase of the product from 3Com or its authorized reseller, 3Com shall, at its option and expense, provide a software update
which would effect the proper performance of such product, repair such product, deliver to Customer an equivalent product to
replace such product, or if none of the foregoing is feasible, refund to Customer the purchase price paid for such product.
Any software update or replaced or repaired product will carry a Year 2000 Warranty for ninety (90) days after purchase or
until April 1, 2000, whichever is later.
O BTAINING WARRANTY
SERVICE
Customer must contact a 3Com Corporate Service Center or an Authorized 3Com Service Center within the applicable
warranty period to obtain warranty service authorization. Dated proof of purchase from 3Com or its authorized reseller may
be required. Products returned to 3Com's Corporate Service Center must be pre-authorized by 3Com with a Return Material
Authorization (RMA) number marked on the outside of the package, and sent prepaid and packaged appropriately for safe
shipment, and it is recommended that they be insured or sent by a method that provides for tracking of the package. The
repaired or replaced item will be shipped to Customer, at 3Com's expense, not later than thirty (30) days after 3Com receives
the defective product.
Dead- or Defective-on-Arrival. In the event a product completely fails to function or exhibits a defect in materials or
workmanship within the first forty-eight (48) hours of installation but no later than thirty (30) days after the date of purchase,
and this is verified by 3Com, it will be considered dead- or defective-on-arrival (DOA) and a replacement shall be provided by
advance replacement. The replacement product will normally be shipped not later than three (3) business days after 3Com’s
verification of the DOA product, but may be delayed due to export or import procedures. When an advance replacement is
provided and Customer fails to return the original product to 3Com within fifteen (15) days after shipment of the replacement,
3Com will charge Customer for the replacement product, at list price.
3Com shall not be responsible for any software, firmware, information, or memory data of Customer contained in, stored on,
or integrated with any products returned to 3Com for repair, whether under warranty or not.
WARRANTIES EXCLUSIVE
IF A 3COM PRODUCT DOES NOT OPERATE AS WARRANTED ABOVE, CUSTOMER'S SOLE REMEDY FOR BREACH OF THAT
WARRANTY SHALL BE REPAIR, REPLACEMENT, OR REFUND OF THE PURCHASE PRICE PAID, AT 3COM'S OPTION. TO THE FULL
EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW, THE FOREGOING WARRANTIES AND REMEDIES ARE EXCLUSIVE AND ARE IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER
WARRANTIES, TERMS, OR CONDITIONS, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, EITHER IN FACT OR BY OPERATION OF LAW, STATUTORY OR
OTHERWISE, INCLUDING WARRANTIES, TERMS, OR CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE, SATISFACTORY QUALITY, CORRESPONDENCE WITH DESCRIPTION, AND NON-INFRINGEMENT, ALL OF WHICH ARE
EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMED. 3COM NEITHER ASSUMES NOR AUTHORIZES ANY OTHER PERSON TO ASSUME FOR IT ANY OTHER
LIABILITY IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE OR USE OF ITS PRODUCTS.
3COM SHALL NOT BE LIABLE UNDER THIS WARRANTY IF ITS TESTING AND EXAMINATION DISCLOSE THAT THE ALLEGED
DEFECT OR MALFUNCTION IN THE PRODUCT DOES NOT EXIST OR WAS CAUSED BY CUSTOMER'S OR ANY THIRD PERSON'S
MISUSE, NEGLECT, IMPROPER INSTALLATION OR TESTING, UNAUTHORIZED ATTEMPTS TO OPEN, REPAIR OR MODIFY THE
PRODUCT, OR ANY OTHER CAUSE BEYOND THE RANGE OF THE INTENDED USE, OR BY ACCIDENT, FIRE, LIGHTNING, OTHER
HAZARDS, OR ACTS OF GOD.
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY
TO THE FULL EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW, 3COM ALSO EXCLUDES FOR ITSELF AND ITS SUPPLIERS ANY LIABILITY, WHETHER
BASED IN CONTRACT OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE), FOR INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR
PUNITIVE DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, OR FOR LOSS OF REVENUE OR PROFITS, LOSS OF BUSINESS, LOSS OF INFORMATION OR
DATA, OR OTHER FINANCIAL LOSS ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE,
USE, PERFORMANCE, FAILURE, OR INTERRUPTION OF ITS PRODUCTS, EVEN IF 3COM OR ITS AUTHORIZED RESELLER HAS BEEN
ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES, AND LIMITS ITS LIABILITY TO REPAIR, REPLACEMENT, OR REFUND OF THE
PURCHASE PRICE PAID, AT 3COM'S OPTION. THIS DISCLAIMER OF LIABILITY FOR DAMAGES WILL NOT BE AFFECTED IF ANY
REMEDY PROVIDED HEREIN SHALL FAIL OF ITS ESSENTIAL PURPOSE.
DISCLAIMER
Some countries, states, or provinces do not allow the exclusion or limitation of implied warranties or the limitation of incidental
or consequential damages for certain products supplied to consumers, or the limitation of liability for personal injury, so the
above limitations and exclusions may be limited in their application to you. When the implied warranties are not allowed to be
excluded in their entirety, they will be limited to the duration of the applicable written warranty. This warranty gives you
specific legal rights which may vary depending on local law.
GOVERNING LAW
This Limited Warranty shall be governed by the laws of the State of California, U.S.A. excluding its conflicts of laws principles
and excluding the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods.
3Com Corporation
5400 Bayfront Plaza
Santa Clara, CA 95054
(408) 326-5000
DECLARATION OF
CONFORMITY
3Com Corporation
5400 Bayfront Plaza
Santa Clara, CA USA 95052-8145
3Com Corporation declares that the product OfficeConnect ISDN LAN modem conforms to the FCC’s specifications:
Part 15
Operation is subject to the following conditions:
1this device may not cause harmful interference, and
2this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
FCC PART 68 STATEMENT
3Com Corporation
Model No: 3C891
Made in U.S.A.
This device complies with Part 68 of the FCC Rules. On the back of this equipment is a label that contains, among their
information, the FCC registration number for this equipment. If requested, this information must be provided to the telephone
company.
An FCC compliant telephone cord with a modlular plug is provided with this equipment. This device connects to the telephone
network via an RJ45 plug and jack. The plug and jack also comply with FCC part 68 rules.
If this device causes harm to the telephone network, the telephone company will notify you in advance that temporary
discontinuance of service may be required. But, if advance notice is not practical, the telephone company will notify the
customer as soon as possible. Also, you will be advised of your right to file a complaint with the FCC if you believe it is
necessary.
The telephone company may make changes in its facilities, equipment, operations, or procedures that could effect the
operation of the equipment. If this happens, the telephone company will provide advance notice in order for you to make
necessary modifications to maintain uninterrupted service.
If trouble is experienced with this device, for repair and warranty information, please refer to the Technical Support insert.
In the event of device malfunction, all repairs should be performed by 3Com or an authorized agent. It is the responsibility of
users requiring service to report the need for service to our company or to one of our authorized agents. In the event service is
required, refer to the Technical Support insert for information.
If the device is causing harm to the telephone network, the telephone company may request that you disconnect the
equipment until the problem is resolved.
This registered device is capable of providing users access to interstate providers of operator services through those of equal
access codes.
This registered device provides proper answer supervision to the PSTN when DID calls are answered by the called station,
answered by the attendant, routed to a recorded announcement that can be administered by the CPE user, or routed to a dial
prompt and this is device returns answer supervision on all DID calls forwarded to the PSTN. Permissible exceptions are as
follows: a call is unanswered, a busy tone is received, a recorded tone is received.
CANADIAN N OTICE
The Industry Canada label identifies certified equipment. This certification means that the equipment meets certain
telecommunications network protective, operation, and safety requirements. The Department does not guarantee the
equipment will operate to the users’ satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that is permissible to be connected to the facilities of the local
telecommunications company. The equipment must also be installed using an acceptable method of connection. In some cases,
the inside wiring associated with a single-line individual service may be extended by means of a certified connector assembly.
The customer should be aware that compliance with the above conditions may not prevent degradation of service in some
situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized Canadian maintenance facility designated by the supplier. Any
repairs or alterations made by the user to this equipment, or equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications
company cause to request the user to disconnect the equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground connections of the power utility, telephone lines, and
internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected together. This precaution may be particularly important in rural
areas.
CAUTION: Users should not attempt to make electrical ground connections by themselves, but should contact
the appropriate inspection authority or an electrician, as appropriate.