User guide | 3Com 3C990BSVR Network Card User Manual

User Guide
10/100 PCI Network Interface Card
with 3XP Processor
3C990B-TX-M
3C990BSVR
10/100 Mbps PCI Client/Server
Network Interface Cards
http://www.3com.com
htt;://www.3com.com/productreg
09-1742-002
Published July 2001
3Com Corporation
■
5400 Bayfront Plaza
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Santa Clara, California
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95052-8145
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U.S.A.
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Contents
About This Guide
Conventions
1
1
Introduction
Onboard 3XP Processor 3
Data Encryption 3
High Encryption Pack for Windows 2000 4
3C990B Client and Server NIC Features 4
Windows 2000 Offload Features 5
Remote Wake-Up 5
Remote Wake-Up Requirements 6
Remote Wake-Up and Multiple NIC Installations 6
Integrated Boot ROM with Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA)
Desktop Management Interface (DMI) 2.0 6
Remote System Alerts 7
Remote Control 7
Keep-Alive 7
Hot Plug NIC Installation 8
Flow Control Features 8
Pause Frames 8
Link Negotiation 8
Offline Diagnostics 8
3C990BSVR Server NIC Features 9
3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server Features 9
Load Balancing 9
Self-Healing Drivers 9
Failover 10
VLANs 10
Traffic Prioritization 11
Server Features Using Other NICs 11
2
Installing and Connecting the NIC
Installation Overview 13
Safety Precautions 13
Installation Requirements 14
Installing Multiple NICs 14
Upgrading Windows 95 to Windows 98 14
Upgrading Windows 98 to Windows Me 15
Updating the Network Driver and NIC Software
15
6
Contents
Installing From Diskette 15
Making a DOS-Bootable Diskette 15
Creating Installation Diskettes 15
Product Registration 16
Preparing the NIC and the Computer 16
Installing and Connecting the NIC 18
Connecting the Remote Wake-Up Cable 19
Installing Software 20
3
Installing NIC Drivers and Diagnostics For Windows
Software Installation Requirements 21
Getting Help 21
Installing the Network Driver Using the EtherCD 21
Before Installing the Network Driver 21
Windows 2000 22
Installing the Driver 22
Verifying the Driver Installation 23
Windows NT 4.0 23
Installing the Driver 23
Verifying the Driver Installation 24
Windows Me 25
Installing the Driver 25
Verifying the Driver Installation 25
Windows 98 26
Installing the Driver 26
Verifying the Driver Installation 26
Windows 95 27
Installing the Driver 27
Verifying the Driver Installation 29
Installing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program 29
Starting the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program 30
Updating the Network Driver and NIC Software 31
Installing Multiple NICs 31
Windows 2000, Windows Me, Windows 98, and Windows 95
Windows NT 4.0 32
4
Installing and Configuring Data Encryption Offloads
Overview 33
Offloading Encryption Processing 33
Selecting Basic or Strong Encryption Processing 34
Enabling Data Encryption 34
Overview 34
Downloading the 3Com Security Software Utility 34
Installing Data Encryption 36
Disabling Data Encryption 37
Upgrading Data Encryption 37
31
Contents
Configuring IPSec In Windows 2000
Creating a Security Policy 38
Defining the Console 38
Creating the Policy 39
Creating a Filter 39
Binding the Filter 40
Creating the Filter Action 40
Binding the Filter Action 41
Enabling Encryption 41
Disabling Encryption 41
5
38
Installing 3Com Advanced Server Features For Windows
Installing 3Com Advanced Server Software 43
Verifying Successful Installation 44
Configuring Groups and VLANs for a Server NIC 44
Planning the Configuration 45
Working With Server Features 46
Windows 2000 46
Windows NT 47
Creating a Group 47
Adding NICs to a Group 47
Specifying a Dedicated IP Address 48
Changing an IP Address 48
Creating a VLAN 49
Specifying Traffic Priorities 49
Saving the Configuration 49
Disabling Load Balancing for a Group 50
Changing the Primary NIC 50
Removing a NIC from a Group 50
Deleting or Editing a VLAN 50
Displaying NIC Properties 51
Displaying Group Properties 51
Troubleshooting a Load Balancing Configuration 51
Changing Windows 2000 Property Settings 52
Identifying Windows 2000 Miniport and LAN Connections
Using Windows 2000 Offload Features 52
Enabling Offloads 53
Configuring Offloads for a Group of Different NICs 54
6
Installing NetWare Drivers
Installing and Configuring the NetWare Driver 55
Using the Latest Support Packs 55
Obtaining NetWare Loadable Modules 56
Server Software Installation Requirements 56
Netware Packet Receive Buffers 56
Slot Numbers for Multiple NICs 57
Obtaining Slot Numbers 57
52
Contents
Installing the NetWare 3.12 Server Driver 57
Installing the Server Driver for NetWare 4.11 and 5.x Using INETCFG 58
Installing the Server Driver and Advanced Server Features Using AUTOEXEC.NCF
Loading the 3Com EtherCD 59
Copying the Driver 60
Specifying the Slot Number 60
Loading the Driver 60
Setting Up Another NIC 61
Installing Multiple Server NICs 61
Verifying the PCI Slot Number 61
Installing Server Features 62
Configuring Groups 62
Verifying the Installation and Configuration 64
Changing NetWare Driver Configuration Parameters 65
Maintaining Groups 65
Planning the Configuration 66
Adding a Secondary NIC to a Group 66
Adding a Group 67
Server Feature Commands 69
group 69
display status 69
help 70
link timeout 70
probe interval 70
receive timeout 70
retry count 71
send timeout 71
ungroup 71
wait timeout 72
Troubleshooting a Group Configuration 72
7
Configuring the NIC
Default NIC Settings 73
Configuration Methods 75
Changing General NIC Configuration Settings 76
Using the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program 76
Using the 3Com DOS Configuration Program 77
Configuring the Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA) 77
Enabling or Disabling the Boot ROM Setting 77
Booting From the Network 78
BBS BIOS-Compatible PCs 78
Non-BBS BIOS-Compatible PCs 79
Disabling the 3Com Logo 79
59
Contents
8
Troubleshooting the NIC
Interpreting the NIC LEDs 81
Viewing the NIC LEDs in the Diagnostics Program 82
Troubleshooting Problems with the LEDs 82
Accessing 3Com Support Databases 82
Accessing the 3Com Knowledgebase 82
Accessing the 3Com NIC Help System 82
Accessing Release Notes and Frequently Asked Questions 83
Troubleshooting the NIC Installation 83
Problems/Error Messages 83
Cleaning Up a Broken Installation 83
Troubleshooting the Network Connection 84
Troubleshooting Remote Wake-Up 85
Troubleshooting a Network Connection 86
Troubleshooting Hubs 87
Cabling Pinouts 87
Removing the Network Driver 87
Windows 2000 87
Windows NT 4.0 88
Windows 95, 98, and Me 88
Removing 3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server Features 89
Windows NT 4.0 89
Windows 2000 89
NetWare 90
9
Running NIC Diagnostics
Running the 3Com DOS Diagnostics Program 91
Running the NIC Diagnostics Tests 92
Running the Network Test 93
Running the NIC Test 93
Viewing the NIC LEDs in the 3Com Diagnostics Program
Viewing Network Statistics 94
Using the 3Com Icon in the Windows System Tray 94
Enabling the Icon 94
Displaying Network Statistics 95
Removing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program 95
A
Specifications and Cabling Requirements
3C990B NIC Specifications 97
Cabling Requirements 98
RJ-45 Connector Pin Assignments
B
98
Installing the 3Com DMI Agent
About the 3Com DMI Agent 99
System Requirements 99
Client PC Requirements 99
Network Management Requirements
Installing the 3Com DMI Agent 100
100
93
Contents
C
EtherCD Content and Navigation
Root Subdirectories List 104
Enabling Auto Insert 104
Text Files List 105
D
Installing a 3Com NIC While Installing the NOS
Windows Fresh Installation 107
Windows NT 107
Windows 2000 107
NetWare Fresh Installation 107
Requirements 107
Installation Instructions 107
E
Technical Support
Online Technical Services 109
World Wide Web Site 109
3Com Knowledgebase Web Services 109
3Com FTP Site 109
Support from Your Network Supplier 110
Support from 3Com 110
Returning Products for Repair 112
Index
Regulatory Compliance Information
FCC Class B Statement
FCC Declaration of Conformity
Industry Canada Class B Emission Compliance Statement
Avis de Conformité à la Réglementation d’Industrie Canada
VCCI Class B Statement
About This Guide
This guide describes how to install, configure, and troubleshoot the following 3Com®
10/100 PCI network interface cards (NICs):
NIC/Description
Model Number
3Com 10/100 Mbps PCI NIC
with 3XP processor
3C990B-TX-M
Client NIC for 3DES (168-bit) and
DES (56-bit) encryption
3Com 10/100 Mbps PCI Server NIC
with 3XP processor
3C990BSVR
Server NIC for 3DES (168-bit) and
DES (56-bit) encryption
This guide is intended for those who install and configure Ethernet NICs. Some familiarity
with Ethernet networks and NICs is assumed.
NOTE: If release notes are shipped with your product and the information there differs
from the information in this guide, follow the instructions in the release notes.
Most user guides and release notes are available in Adobe Acrobat Reader Portable
Document Format (PDF) on the 3Com World Wide Web site:
http://www.3com.com/
You can download Acrobat Reader from the EtherCD or from the Adobe Systems
Incorporated Web site:
http://www.adobe.com/
Conventions
The following tables list conventions that are used throughout this guide.
Icon
Notice Type
Information That
Information note
Describes important features
or instructions
Caution
Alerts you to potential loss of data or
potential damage to an application,
system, or device
Warning
Alerts you to potential personal injury
1
About This Guide
Convention
Description
Screen displays
This typeface represents information as it appears on the screen.
Commands
The word “command” means that you must enter the command exactly as
shown and then press Return or Enter. Commands appear in bold.
Example:
To launch the DOS diagnostics program, enter the following command:
a: install
The words “enter”
and “type”
When you see the word “enter” in this guide, you must type something,
and then press Return or Enter. Do not press Return or Enter when an
instruction simply says “type.”
Words in italics
Italics are used to:
■
Emphasize a point.
■
Denote a new term at the place where it is defined in the text.
■
Identify menu names, menu commands, and software button names.
Examples:
From the Help menu, select Contents.
Click OK.
2
1
Introduction
This chapter describes the following 3Com® 10/100 Mbps PCI network interface card
(NIC) models from the 3C990B NIC family.
Product Name/Description
Model Number
3Com 10/100 Mbps PCI NIC
with 3XP processor
3C990B-TX-M
Client NIC for 3DES (168-bit) and
DES (56-bit) encryption
3Com 10/100 Mbps PCI Server NIC
with 3XP processor
3C990BSVR
Server NIC for 3DES (168-bit) and
DES (56-bit) encryption
NOTE: Information in this user guide refers to both client and server 3C990B NIC
models unless specifically indicated.
The 3C990B NIC connects your PCI-compliant PC to a 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps Ethernet
network. It provides advanced features for high performance and secure transactions.
High performance is achieved through an onboard RISC processor; secure transactions are
achieved through data encryption.
Onboard 3XP Processor
The 3C990B NIC represents a new generation of secure, intelligent client NICs with an
onboard RISC processor (3XP processor). The 3XP processor is designed to optimize
system and network performance. The NIC off-loads key networking and security tasks
from the host PC CPU (central processing unit) to the 3XP processor, even when running
bandwidth-intensive applications such as voice, video, imaging, and Internet and intranet
applications.
Data Encryption
The 3C990B NIC provides Data Encryption Standard (DES) 56-bit encryption and 3DES
(3DES 168-bit) encryption. Encryption processing is handled entirely by the 3XP processor
on the NIC.
The 3XP processor enables true end-to-end network security (IPSec) at the data capacity of
the connected network cable (wire speed), without sacrificing performance.
The 3C990B NIC is shipped with encryption disabled. Once you have installed the NIC,
you can upgrade it to the appropriate level of encryption acceleration (DES or 3DES)
through the Security Software Utility provided on the 3Com EtherCD. See “Installing and
Configuring Data Encryption Offloads” on page 33 for more information.
3
1
Introduction
High Encryption Pack for Windows 2000
Microsoft Windows 2000 features a built-in VPN client. The Windows 2000 High
Encryption Pack allows you to enhance your system with the highest available encryption
level (168-bit). You can download the High Encryption Pack from the following Microsoft
World Wide Web site:
http://www.microsoft.com/WINDOWS2000/downloads/recommended/
encryption/default.asp
NOTE: The Windows 2000 High Encryption Pack is eligible for export from the
U.S. to all customers worldwide, except to U.S. embargoed destinations. Please
see http://www.microsoft.com/exporting/ for details. Other countries
may exercise separate jurisdiction over the import, export, or use of encryption
products. Users who download this product should observe any local regulations
that may apply to the distribution or use of encryption products.
3C990B Client and Server NIC Features
The 3C990B NIC and accompanying software provide features that relieve network
congestion and ensure high performance and maximum bandwidth availability.
Remote Wake-Up
(RWU) connector
Remote Wake-Up
(RWU) connector
3XP Processor
YE
L
GR /100
N/1
0
AC
T
YE
L
GR /100
N/1
0
AC
T
3C990BSVR
3C990B-TX-M
The 3C990B NIC provides these features for supported IP and IPX environments:
■ Support for Windows 2000 Offload Features — Off loading of key TCP/IP networking
and security tasks from the Windows 2000 operating system.
■ Remote Wake-Up — Lets you power on a computer remotely for after-hours
administration.
■ Integrated Boot ROM with Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA) — Adds management
capabilities by enabling the computer to boot from a network server, rather than from its
local drive. MBA is compliant with the Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) specification.
4
3C990B Client and Server NIC Features
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Desktop Management Interface (DMI) 2.0 — Enables managed computers and net
computers to report details about themselves and their peripheral devices across the
network to a DMI 2.0-compliant management application.
Remote System Alerts (heartbeat packets) — Can signal a possible computer power
loss or theft.
Remote Control — Lets you troubleshoot and resolve system issues across the network.
Keep-Alive — Prevents the computer workstation address from being aged-out of
switch router tables.
Hot Plug NIC Installation — Lets you add a new NIC or remove and replace a NIC
without turning off power to the computer.
Flow Control Features — prevents the loss of packets by keeping the input buffers of a
device from overflowing.
Offline Diagnostics — Provides offline diagnostics programs for configuring, testing,
and troubleshooting NICs.
3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server Features (for 3C990BSVR server NICs only) —
Improved network performance, management, and control.
Windows 2000 Offload Features
The 3C990B NIC supports Windows 2000 offload features in an IP environment. The
Windows 2000 offload features are designed to enhance the Windows 2000 operating
system capabilities by off-loading key TCP/IP networking and security tasks from the
Windows 2000 operating system:
■ IPSec Offload — reduces CPU utilization by allowing the 3XP processor and a crypto
chip on the NIC to perform data encryption operations. (For more information, see
Chapter 4, “Installing and Configuring Data Encryption Offloads.”)
NOTE: The 3C990B NIC is shipped with the IPSec offload capability disabled. To
learn about enabling IPSec offloads, see Chapter 4, “Installing and Configuring
Data Encryption Offloads.”
■
TCP Segmentation Offload — reduces CPU utilization by allowing the 3XP processor
on the NIC to perform segmentation of TCP packets.
NOTE: Windows 2000 does not allow IPSec offloads and TCP Segmentation
offloads for the same session. Though all offload types may be enabled, TCP
Segmentation offloading will not occur during an IPSec session.
■
■
IP and TCP Checksum Offload — reduced CPU utilization by allowing the 3XP processor
on the NIC to perform the checksum calculation of TCP/IP and UDP/IP packets.
802.1P Packet Priority Offload — reduces CPU utilization by allowing the 3XP processor
on the NIC to perform the insertion of the 802.1Q tag header into the packet.
For more information on enabling and disabling offloads for Windows 2000, see “Using
Windows 2000 Offload Features” on page 52.
Remote Wake-Up
Remote Wake-Up provides the ability to remotely power-on a network computer for afterhours administration. When the PC is in sleep mode and receives a wake-up packet
(Magic Packet frame) through the LAN, the NIC turns on the power to the PC. Remote
Wake-Up also requires using a desktop management application that is able to generate a
Magic Packet Remote Wake-Up signal.
5
1
Introduction
If the computer complies with PCI 2.2, Remote Wake-Up is automatically enabled through
the PCI bus. If the computer complies with PCI 2.1, Remote Wake-Up support is enabled
by connecting a Remote Wake-Up cable from the NIC’s Remote Wake-Up (RWU)
connector to a 3-pin Remote Wake-Up connector on the computer motherboard.
NOTE: The NIC provides a network connection with or without the Remote Wake-Up
cable installed.
Remote Wake-Up Requirements
The following conditions are required to use Remote Wake-Up:
■ Management application that supports Remote Wake-Up
■ BIOS that supports Remote Wake-Up
■ PCI 2.2-compliant bus or a 3-pin Remote Wake-Up connector on the computer
motherboard and a 5-volt standby power supply unit rated at a minimum of
375 milliamperes
If you are unsure whether your computer meets the requirements listed above, refer to the
computer documentation or consult the computer manufacturer.
Remote Wake-Up and Multiple NIC Installations
To use multiple NICs as Remote Wake-Up NICs in the same computer, the computer must
have a power supply that can support multiple Remote Wake-Up devices.
Refer to your computer documentation if you are unsure whether your computer power
supply can accommodate more than one Remote Wake-Up device.
Integrated Boot ROM with Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA)
The Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA) software adds management capabilities to the NIC
by enabling the computer to boot from a network server, rather than from the computer’s
local drive. MBA is compliant with the Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) specification.
This preboot support allows you to use management applications to perform various tasks
remotely. For example, you can:
■ Install and configure a new computer that has never been connected to the network.
■ Upgrade software.
■ Configure or reconfigure multiple systems simultaneously.
■ Scan for viruses.
■ Backup hard drives and perform disaster recovery tasks.
For information on configuring the MBA to boot from the network, see “Configuring the
Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA)” on page 77.
For detailed information on the MBA, refer to the Managed PC Boot Agent User Guide,
located with the MBA software on the 3Com EtherCD.
Desktop Management Interface (DMI) 2.0
Desktop Management Interface (DMI) is a network management standard that is widely
accepted for managing Intel-based computers.
DMI 2.0 enables managed computers and net computers to report details about
themselves and their peripheral devices across the network to a DMI 2.0-compliant
management application.
6
3C990B Client and Server NIC Features
The 3Com DMI Agent allows any DMI management application to access information
such as:
■ NIC driver location, version, and size
■ Packets-sent statistics
■ Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) receive errors
A network administrator can then use this type of information to remotely configure and
manage a client or server computer.
The 3Com DMI Agent consists of a DMI browser with the following components:
■ DMI service layer
■ DMI agent
■ GUI installer
■ NDIS drivers
For detailed information about the 3Com DMI Agent, refer to the 3Com DMI Agent User
Guide included with the DMI software on the EtherCD. For information about installing
the 3Com DMI Agent and downloading the 3Com DMI Agent User Guide, see
Appendix B, "Installing the 3Com DMI Agent."
Remote System Alerts
You can configure the 3C990B NIC to transmit a number of different packet alerts to the
management server to notify the network administrator that there is a system issue that
requires attention. These alerts support the Alert Standard Forum (ASF) specification and
provide system monitoring in the OS-absent environment. The alerting capability is
present whether the system is powered off, booting up, in sleep mode, or the OS has
hung. There are many different alert types, including those that relate to:
■ Physical security — chassis intrusion, heartbeat, loss of connection
■ Environmental conditions — fan speed, temperature, voltage deviations
■ BIOS issues — ROM initialization, system memory
Remote Control
The 3C990B NIC can also receive commands via Remote Control and Management Protocol
(RMCP). This feature is also specified in the ASF specification and lets network administrators
troubleshoot and resolve system issues across the network. Commands include:
■ Power on
■ Power off
■ Reboot
■ Reboot from an alternative device (for example: MBA, CD-ROM, and so forth)
Both monitoring alerts and sending commands are available in the system console
through the 3Com Remote System Alert Manager. This management plug-in is available
for HP OpenView Network Node Manager, Microsoft Systems Management Server, and
Intel LANDesk Client Manager.
Keep-Alive
The 3C990B NIC can also transmit a workgroup keep-alive packet periodically while the
computer is in a sleep state. This packet prevents the computer workstation address from
being aged-out of switch router tables.
7
1
Introduction
Hot Plug NIC Installation
If your computer supports PCI hot plug specifications, you can add a new 3Com NIC or
remove and replace a 3Com NIC without turning off power to the computer. Hot plug
NIC installation allows you to expand connections without taking the computer out of
service. It makes troubleshooting faster and easier because you do not need to wait for
the computer to reboot.
For instructions on performing a hot plug NIC installation, refer to your computer
documentation.
Flow Control Features
The 3C990B NICs use flow control technology to throttle the incoming data packet stream
and prevent the loss of packets. IEEE 803.2x flow control prevents the input buffers of a
device from overflowing. By using pause frames to communicate buffer status between
linked transmitting and receiving devices (transmitters and receivers). A receiver sends a
pause frame to tell a transmitter to stop the transmission of data frames for a specified
period, allowing the receiver’s input port buffers to empty before receiving new packets.
Pause Frames
When a transmitter receives pause frames, it suspends transmission for the specified
period. When the receiver’s input buffers can store packets again, it can either send
another pause frame to tell the transmitter to resume transmission, or wait for
transmission to resume at the end of the specified period.
With asymmetric flow control, only one of two linked devices can receive pause frames.
With symmetric flow control, both linked devices can send and receive pause frames.
Link Negotiation
Related to flow control is the auto negotiation capability, in which linked devices advertise
their flow control capabilities and automatically select the best common mode of
communication.
Rare cases (for example, linking to a device that does not support auto-negotiation) may
require that auto-negotiation be disabled on a port, thereby enabling forced link on that
port. When forced link is enabled, linked devices must have matching flow control
capabilities. For example, a port that is set for forced link and reception flow control can
connect successfully only with a port that is set for forced link and transmission flow control.
Offline Diagnostics
The NIC software includes offline diagnostics programs for configuring, testing, and
troubleshooting NICs. The configuration program within the DOS diagnostics program is used
for a PC running DOS or NetWare. The 3Com NIC diagnostics program (3Com NIC Doctor) is a
Windows-based program used for a PC running Windows 2000, Windows NT 4.0, Windows
Millennium Edition (Windows Me), Windows 98, or Windows 95.
8
3C990BSVR Server NIC Features
3C990BSVR Server NIC Features
The 3C990BSVR NIC and accompanying software provide a variety of features that relieve
network congestion and ensure high performance and maximum bandwidth availability.
NOTE: Advanced server features are available for the 3C990BSVR server NIC only.
They are not available for the 3C990B-TX-M client NIC. Only system administrators
should configure these features.
3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server Features
3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server software adds intelligence to the NIC to improve
network performance, management, and control. Advanced server features relieve network
congestion and ensure high performance and maximum bandwidth availability.
■ Load Balancing groups share the network load over resilient server links (RSLs) that
keep traffic flowing even if a NIC in a group is temporarily disconnected.
■ Self-Healing Drivers (SHDs) detect common error conditions and correct them while
maintaining server link performance.
■ Failover fault tolerance provides a backup solution in the event of a NIC failure.
■ VLANs (IEEE 802.1Q multiple virtual LANs) let you divide network segments into
logical partitions that simplify configuration changes, organize work groups
efficiently, help to control traffic, and provide extra security.
■ Traffic Prioritization (IEEE 802.1p/Q) ensures that business-critical and delay-sensitive
traffic (such as multimedia applications) has priority over normal data.
Load Balancing
Load balancing maximizes bandwidth at the server through the use of multiple parallel
resilient server links (RSLs) that share the network load as shown in the next figure.
An RSL consists of two or more NICs that form a virtual NIC. Each virtual NIC has multiple
physical NICs bound to it, forming a group. Each NIC in a group uses the same protocols
and frame types. One NIC is designated the primary NIC and the others secondary NICs.
Bidirectional
Transmit-only
Server
Primary Secondaries
Switch
®
Primary Secondaries
®
Clients
Self-Healing Drivers
Self-healing drivers (SHDs) are automatically installed with the NIC software, and work
together with RSLs to maintain the network connection. An SHD monitors the NIC
continuously for error conditions and makes corrections. These corrections can include
resetting the NIC, rebuilding software data structures, temporarily disabling features, or
transferring all network traffic to secondary NICs (termed a failover event). An SHD can
also continuously monitor the status of the physical NICs in a virtual NIC group before and
after failover. Errors and actions are reported to the system console and to the system log
file. Error threshold values can be configured at any time.
9
1
Introduction
Failover
In addition to load balancing, RSLs provide failover fault tolerance between a server and a
switch—if one NIC in a group fails, the others assume the network load of the failed NIC.
The failover behavior of secondary NICs depends on how you set load balancing:
■ In a transmit load balancing arrangement, the primary NIC is the only one that
receives packets. If the primary NIC fails, a secondary NIC assumes the configuration
profile, network traffic, and active status of the failed primary NIC.
■ In a bidirectional load balancing arrangement, all NICs receive packets. If any NIC fails,
receive load balancing is disabled, and the other NICs continue transmit-only load
balancing activity. Receive load balancing is restored when new connections are
established with clients.
If the primary NIC fails, a secondary NIC takes over packet reception for the group.
Bidirectional load balancing is restored after a failure when applications create new
connections and new clients log in as illustrated in the following figure.
Bidirectional
load balancing
Primary failure
Secondary failure
Server
Primary Secondaries
Switch
Primary Secondaries
®
®
Primary Secondaries
®
Clients
®
VLANs
A virtual LAN (VLAN) is a group of location-independent and topology-independent
devices that communicate as if they were on the same physical LAN. Network devices on
different LAN segments and of different media types can be members of the same VLAN.
Membership in a VLAN is determined by a VLAN tag that is transmitted with the Ethernet
frame for use by a switch.
With VLANs, you can define a network according to:
■ Organizational groups—For example, you can have one VLAN for the Marketing
department and one for the Finance department.
■ Application groups—For example, you can have one VLAN for e-mail users and one
for multimedia users.
Implementing VLANs on a network has these advantages:
■ It eases the change and movement of devices on IP networks.
With traditional IP networks, if users move to a different IP subnet, the IP addresses of
each workstation must be updated manually. With VLANs installed, if an end station
on VLAN 1 is moved to a port elsewhere on the network, you need only to specify
that the new port is on VLAN 1.
10
3C990BSVR Server NIC Features
■
■
It helps to control traffic.
With traditional networks, congestion can be caused by broadcast traffic that is
directed to all network devices whether they require it or not. Each VLAN can be set
up to contain only those devices that need to communicate with each other,
increasing network efficiency.
It provides extra security.
Devices within each VLAN can communicate only with member devices in the same
VLAN. If a device in VLAN 1 needs to communicate with devices in VLAN 2, the traffic
must cross a router.
The 3C990B NIC multiple VLAN capability supports IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tagging and works
with any switch that complies with IEEE 802.1Q specifications. Refer to your Ethernet
switch documentation for more information on IEEE 802.1Q VLANs.
Traffic Prioritization
Traffic prioritization (IEEE 802.1p/Q) ensures that business-critical and delay-sensitive
traffic (such as multimedia applications) has priority over normal data.
Server Features Using Other NICs
Up to two foreign NICs (those that are not 3Com server NICs) are allowed in one group
per server. For guidelines on using foreign NICs, see these topics:
■ Windows NT and Windows 2000 — “Planning the Configuration” on page 45
■ NetWare — “Planning the Configuration” on page 66
11
2
Installing and
Connecting the NIC
This chapter describes how to install the NIC in your PC and connect it to an Ethernet or Fast
Ethernet network.
Before starting the installation procedure, you can gain some familiarity with the directory
structure and various files on the EtherCD supplied with the 3C990B NIC by reading
Appendix C, "EtherCD Content and Navigation."
Installation Overview
Installing the NIC involves your carrying out the following tasks:
■ Registering the product
■ Installing the NIC in the PC
■ Connecting the NIC to the network
■ Installing the network driver
■ Enabling data encryption offloads (the 3C990B NIC is shipped with encryption
offloading disabled)
Safety Precautions
Observe the following safety precautions.
WARNING: Computers operate with voltages that can be lethal. Before
removing the cover, turn off the computer and unplug it. Disconnect all cables
that are connected to the main system unit. Remove jewelry from your hands
and wrists. Use insulated or nonconductive tools.
CAUTION: The NIC is packed in an antistatic container to protect it during
shipment. Do not touch the components or any metal parts on the NIC, except
for the backplate. To avoid damaging the NIC or the computer, reduce static
electricity on your body by wearing an electrostatic discharge wrist strap
attached to the chassis or by touching an unpainted metal part of the chassis
before unplugging the computer and before handling the NIC.
CAUTION: Install the NIC in a PCI slot that conforms to PCI 2.1 or higher
specifications. Do not attempt to install the NIC in an ISA or EISA slot. Doing so
may damage the NIC and the computer.
WARNING: Make sure that the computer power cord is unplugged. Only
properly trained and authorized personnel should perform service. Contact the
computer manufacturer for information about safe service techniques.
13
2
Installing and Connecting the NIC
Installation Requirements
The following items are required for hardware and software installation.
■ Network Interface Card (NIC)—At least one 3Com 10/100 Mbps PCI 3C990B NIC
(included)
■ Processor:
■ Server: Intel-based CPU (Pentium-class processor)
■ Client: 80486 or Pentium-class processor
■ RAM:
■ Server: 128 MB minimum; 256 MB recommended
■ Client: 32 MB RAM recommended for running 3Com Advanced Server Technology
■ PCI slot—For each NIC, one bus master slot that conforms to PCI 32-bit
specifications, revision 2.1 or higher
■ Drive—CD-ROM
■ Cable—Category 5 UTP (included) with RJ-45 connectors for Fast Ethernet
(100 Mbps) connectivity. Category 3, 4, or 5 UTP with RJ-45 connectors for Ethernet
(10 Mbps) connectivity. (See cable specifications in “Preparing the NIC and the
Computer” on page 16.)
■ Software—One 3Com EtherCD with 3Com Advanced Server software and network
drivers (included)
■ Operating system—One of the following:
■ Microsoft Windows 2000
■ Microsoft Windows NT 4.0, Service Pack 6a
■ Microsoft Windows 95, 98, Me
■ Novell NetWare server version 3.12, 4.11, or 5.x with the most recent patches and
updates available from Novell technical support (www.novell.com)
NOTE: You can install the NIC base network driver on any Windows PC without
having to also install a specific Microsoft Service Pack; however, 3Com
recommends that you always try to use the most recent Service Pack available
from Microsoft technical support (www.microsoft.com).
Running 3Com 3Com Advanced Server software on Windows NT 4.0 requires
Service Pack 6 or greater from Microsoft.
■
■
Computer BIOS—Latest version. Contact the computer manufacturer to verify.
Remote Wake-Up—For requirements, see “Remote Wake-Up” on page 5.
Installing Multiple NICs
If you are installing multiple 3Com 10/100 PCI NICs in one computer running Windows,
see the instructions in “Installing Multiple NICs” on page 31. If you are installing multiple
3Com 10/100 PCI NICs in one computer running NetWare, follow the instructions in
“Installing Multiple Server NICs” on page 61.
Upgrading Windows 95 to Windows 98
If you are upgrading a computer from Windows 95 to Windows 98, and the computer
already has a 3Com 10/100 PCI NIC installed, follow the instructions in the WIN98.TXT file
located in the HELP directory on the EtherCD.
14
Installing From Diskette
Upgrading Windows 98 to Windows Me
If you are upgrading a computer from Windows 98 to Windows Me, and the computer
already has a 3Com 10/100 PCI NIC installed, follow the instructions in the WINME.TXT
file located in the HELP directory on the EtherCD.
Updating the Network Driver and NIC Software
If you already have a 3Com 10/100 PCI NIC installed and want to update the network driver,
follow the instructions in “Updating the Network Driver and NIC Software” on page 31.
Installing From Diskette
If your computer does not have a CD-ROM drive, use a PC that has a CD-ROM drive and
create installation diskettes from the EtherCD.
NOTE: The installation diskettes allow you to install the network driver and DOS
Diagnostics software only. If you want to install the Windows NIC Diagnostics
program or desktop management software, you must install them from
the EtherCD.
Making a DOS-Bootable Diskette
For installation and configuration procedures that require you to boot from DOS, you
cannot successfully use the MS-DOS prompt from within Windows. Perform a “clean”
boot from DOS or use a DOS boot diskette.
NOTE: If the PC or server is only running DOS and a CD-ROM drive is not installed,
you must install the NIC software using installation diskettes. For more information
about installation diskettes, see the next section, “Creating Installation Diskettes.”.
To make a DOS-bootable diskette:
1 Insert a blank, formatted diskette in drive A.
2 At the DOS prompt, enter:
sys a:
System files are copied to the diskette.
3 Remove the diskette from drive A and attach a label for future reference.
Creating Installation Diskettes
If you anticipate having to install the driver for the 3C990B NIC without having access to a
CD-ROM drive, you can create a set of installation diskettes beforehand using a computer
that does have a CD-ROM drive. To start, you will need three blank, formatted floppy
diskettes. To create installation diskettes from the EtherCD:
1 Turn on the power to the PC and start Windows.
2 Insert the EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive.
The EtherCD Welcome screen appears.
3 Click NIC Software.
4 Click Installation Utilities.
5 Click Create Installation Diskettes.
The EtherCD Diskette Creation Utility Welcome screen appears.
6 Click Next.
15
2
Installing and Connecting the NIC
7 Insert a blank, formatted diskette labeled Disk 1 in the PC, and then click Next.
Files are copied. Disk 1 contains the installation files and driver files for
Windows 2000, Windows NT, and Windows 95/98.
8 Remove the disk and insert the disk labeled Disk 2 when prompted, and then
click OK.
Files are copied. Disk 2 contains the diagnostic and firmware images.
9 Remove the disk and insert the disk labeled Disk 3 when prompted, and then
click OK.
Files are copied. Disk 3 contains the NetWare drivers.
NOTE: For detailed information about the content of the installation diskettes,
refer to the ROADMAP.TXT file contained on Disk 2.
Product Registration
The United States government places registration requirements on using data encryption
products. To obtain customer support for the 3C990B NIC, you are required to
electronically register your NIC product with 3Com.
In addition to enabling customer support for your NIC, registration also entitles you to
receive upgrade information and advance feature information.
NOTE: To be able to register electronically, a Web browser must be installed on your
system. You must also have an active Internet service provider (ISP) connection.
NOTE: The original version of Windows 95 (Build 950) does not automatically
allow you to change your default browser, even if Microsoft Internet Explorer is
not present. If you are running this version of Windows 95 on your PC, access the
following site to register your 3C990B NIC:
http://www.3com.com/productreg
To register electronically:
1 Insert the EtherCD (that shipped with this product) in the CD-ROM drive.
The EtherCD Welcome screen appears.
If the Welcome screen does not appear, see “EtherCD Content and Navigation” on
page 103.
2 Click Register Product, and then Register Online.
3 Follow the prompts as they appear.
Preparing the NIC and the Computer
Observe the precautions listed in “Safety Precautions” on page 13. Follow these
preparation steps:
1 Decide whether you want to use Remote Wake-Up.
If you want to use the Remote Wake-Up feature on a computer that complies with PCI
2.1, you must obtain a Remote Wake-Up cable for the NIC (for details, see “Remote
Wake-Up” on page 5). If the computer complies with PCI 2.2, Remote Wake-Up is
automatically enabled through the PCI bus and no Remote Wake-Up cable is required.
16
Preparing the NIC and the Computer
2 Make sure that cable requirements are met.
The RJ-45 port provides a 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps connection automatically, depending
on the speed of the connected hub or switch.
The following table shows the cable requirements and maximum network cable
lengths for the RJ-45 port.
Network
Environment
Cable Required
Maximum
Cable Length
10 Mbps
(10BASE-T)
Category 3, 4, or 5
unshielded twisted-pair
100 m (328 ft)
100 Mbps
(100BASE-TX)
Category 5 unshielded
twisted-pair
100 m (328 ft)
3 Unpack and inspect the NIC for damage.
4 Exit all open applications and user processes.
5 Turn off the power to the computer and attached devices.
6 Unplug the power cables from the power source.
7 Remove the computer cover.
8 Locate an empty, nonshared bus-mastering PCI slot and remove its slot cover. Save
the screw, if there is one.
Do not install the NIC in a shared PCI slot. Avoid any PCI slot next to an ISA slot. This
slot is often shared and does not support bus mastering.
If you do not know how to identify a PCI slot, check the computer documentation or
ask the system administrator.
If you are planning to install the Remote Wake-Up cable, choose an empty PCI slot
that is close to the Remote Wake-Up connector on the computer motherboard. The
Remote Wake-Up cable is only required if the computer complies with PCI 2.1 and
you want to use the Remote Wake-Up. The cable is not required if the computer
complies with PCI 2.2.
9 Write down the MAC address of the NIC and note the relative position of the
intended PCI slot.
The MAC address is the 12-digit hexadecimal number printed on the small bar code
label on the component side of the NIC. This information is helpful when you are
installing the network drivers and connecting the cables to the hub or switch.
The next step is to install the NIC in the computer and connect it to the network.
17
2
Installing and Connecting the NIC
Installing and Connecting the NIC
Observe the safety precautions listed in “Safety Precautions” on page 13.
Prepare the NIC and the computer as described in “Preparing the NIC and the Computer”
on page 16.
The following instructions apply to installing the NIC in most computers. If these
instructions are not appropriate for your computer, refer to the documentation that
accompanied the computer.
Remove slot cover
Insert NIC
PCI slots
1 Carefully insert the NIC in the empty PCI slot, as shown in the illustration.
Press firmly to ensure that the NIC is fully seated in the slot. Secure the NIC with the
screw if you removed one earlier.
NOTE: If you want to install the Remote Wake-Up cable, go to the next section,
“Connecting the Remote Wake-Up Cable,” to continue the installation. If you do
not want to connect the cable, continue with step 2.
2 Replace the computer cover and plug in the power cord.
Do not turn on the power to the computer.
18
Connecting the Remote Wake-Up Cable
3 Plug the RJ-45 connector on the twisted-pair network cable into the RJ-45 port on the
NIC backplate as shown in the figure.
S
TU
STA
T
AC
4 Connect the other end of the network cable to an active network port.
The next step is to install the software, as described in “Installing Software” on page 20.
NOTE: If you are installing multiple 3Com 10/100 PCI NICs in one computer
running Windows, see the instructions in “Installing Multiple NICs” on page 31. If
you are installing multiple 3Com 10/100 PCI NICs in one computer running
NetWare, follow the instructions in “Installing Multiple Server NICs” on page 61.
NOTE: If your site network installation procedures require you to verify that
installed hardware is functional before you install software, run the
3C99XCFG.EXE DOS diagnostics program before installing the driver. This
program is located on the 3Com EtherCD. For more information, see “Using the
3Com DOS Configuration Program” on page 77.
Connecting the Remote Wake-Up Cable
This section describes how to connect the Remote Wake-Up cable from the NIC to the PC
motherboard. Connecting the Remote Wake-Up cable is optional. Connect this cable only
if your NIC supports Remote Wake-Up and you want to use this feature.
WARNING: Make sure that the PC power cord is unplugged. Only properly
trained and authorized personnel should perform service. Contact your PC
manufacturer for information about safe service techniques.
NOTE: If your PC is compliant with PCI 2.2, Remote Wake-Up is automatically enabled
through the PCI bus. You do not need to connect the Remote Wake-Up cable.
19
2
Installing and Connecting the NIC
To connect the Remote Wake-Up cable:
1 Make sure that the NIC is properly installed in a PCI slot.
2 Insert the Remote Wake-Up cable into the RWU connector on the NIC as shown in
the next figure.
Twist the cable twice before attaching the cable to the PC.
3 Attach the other end of the cable to the connector on the PC motherboard.
Refer to your PC documentation if you need help locating the connector.
4 Replace the PC cover and plug in the power cord.
Do not turn on the power to the PC. Continue at step 3 in “Installing and Connecting
the NIC” on page 18.
Installing Software
See the following topics for requirements and instructions on installing software for
various operating systems:
■ “Installing NIC Drivers and Diagnostics For Windows” on page 21
■ “Updating the Network Driver and NIC Software” on page 31
■ “Installing NetWare Drivers” on page 55
The next step is to install the network driver.
Go to “Installing NIC Drivers and Diagnostics For Windows” on page 21 or “Installing
NetWare Drivers” on page 55.
For a list of additional network drivers that are not included on the EtherCD (for example,
SCO UnixWare 7, SCO OpenServer 5, Linux 2.2, Solaris) and instructions on how to install
them, go to the 3Com Web site and search for “3C990B” and “drivers.”
20
3
Installing NIC Drivers and
Diagnostics For Windows
This chapter explains the following tasks on a computer running Windows 2000,
Windows NT, Windows Millennium Edition (Windows Me), Windows 98, or Windows 95:
■ Install the network driver and NIC software using EtherCD
■ Update the network driver or NIC diagnostics program
■ Install multiple NICs
To obtain the latest version of a driver, go to:
http://www.3com.com/
Search for “3C990B” and “drivers.” The network driver can be used in both Microsoft
and NetWare network environments.
NOTE: For instructions on using the installation diskettes (which can be created
from the EtherCD) to install the network driver, see “Installing From Diskette” on
page 15. For additional information, refer to the text file for your operating system
in the HELP directory on the EtherCD.
Software Installation Requirements
If your site network installation procedures require you to verify that installed hardware is
functional before you install software, you can verify that the installed NIC is functional or
change its configuration settings by running the DOS diagnostics. Use the 3C99XCFG.EXE
program located on the EtherCD. For more information, see “Using the 3Com DOS
Configuration Program” on page 77.
If you are installing the software during the installation of the network operating system,
see “Installing a 3Com NIC While Installing the NOS” on page 107.
For a list of minimum installation prerequisites, see “Installation Requirements” on page 14.
Getting Help
To display the Help system during the software installation, click Help on any 3Com window.
Installing the Network Driver Using the EtherCD
To install the network driver using the EtherCD, follow the steps in the section that is
specific to your Windows operating system.
Before Installing the Network Driver
Before installing the network driver, make sure that:
■ The NIC is installed in the PC and connected to the network. For instructions, see
“Installing and Connecting the NIC” on page 18.
■ All software installation requirements are met. See “Installation Requirements” on
page 14.
21
3
Installing NIC Drivers and Diagnostics For Windows
■
You have the Windows installation files (for Windows 95, 98, Me only). These files
may be on a CD or diskettes, or they may have been copied to your hard drive when
Windows was installed on your PC.
NOTE: If you encounter problems during the installation, refer to the TROUBLE.TXT
file (located in the HELP directory on the EtherCD) for troubleshooting tips.
Windows 2000
This section describes how to install the network driver and NIC software in a PC client or
server running Windows 2000.
NOTE: The 3C990B NIC supports Windows 2000 offload features in an IP
environment. For more information, see “Windows 2000 Offload Features” on
page 5 and “Using Windows 2000 Offload Features” on page 52.
Use the following procedure to install the driver for the first time in a computer that is
running Windows 2000. (If you are updating a previous installation, see “Updating the
Network Driver and NIC Software” on page 31.)
Installing the Driver
1 Turn on the power to the PC.
2 Start Windows 2000 and log in to the Windows 2000 Administrator account.
The Windows 2000 Found New Hardware Wizard starts. The wizard detects the new
NIC(s) and begins the driver installation. The Welcome to the Found New Hardware
Wizard screen appears.
3 Click Next to continue.
The Install Hardware Device Drivers screen appears.
4 Insert the EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive.
5 Select Search for a suitable driver for my device (recommended), and then click Next.
The Locate Driver Files screen appears.
6 Select the CD-ROM drives option, clear any other checked options, and click Next.
The Driver Files Search Results screen appears.
Windows finds the driver on the EtherCD.
7 Click Next to install the driver.
The Hardware Install screen appears. Files are copied. Then the Completing the Found
New Hardware Wizard screen appears, displaying the message “Windows has
finished installing the software for this device.”
8 Click Finish to close the wizard.
If the System Settings Change dialog box appears, requesting that you restart your
computer, click Yes to restart.
The driver installation is complete for Windows 2000. Next, verify the driver installation to
confirm that the NIC is properly installed.
22
Installing the Network Driver Using the EtherCD
Verifying the Driver Installation
1 Right-click the My Computer icon, and then click Properties.
2 Select the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager in the middle panel.
3 Double click Network Adapters and make sure that the name of the 3Com 10/100
PCI NIC appears.
If a red X or a yellow exclamation point (!) appears by the name of the NIC, the
installation was not successful. See “Troubleshooting the NIC” on page 81
for troubleshooting help.
To change configuration settings, see “Configuring the NIC” on page 73.
Windows NT 4.0
This section describes how to install the network driver and NIC software in a PC client or
server running Windows NT 4.0
CAUTION: Your computer must have the latest version of the Windows NT 4.0
service pack installed before you can install the 3Com network driver. You can
download the latest service pack from the Microsoft Web site.
Installing the Driver
1 Turn on the power to the PC and start Windows NT.
2 Log in to the Windows NT Administrator account.
3 Insert the EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive.
4 Right-click the Network Neighborhood icon.
5 Select Properties on the pop-up menu.
The Network window appears.
6 Click the Adapters tab.
If networking has not been installed on your PC before, Windows NT asks you if you want
to install networking. Click Yes. Refer to the WINNT.TXT file located on the EtherCD or
your Windows NT documentation for instructions.
7 Click Add.
The Select Network Adapter dialog box appears.
8 Click Have Disk.
The Insert Disk dialog box appears.
9 Make sure that the correct path to your CD-ROM drive appears in the entry box,
for example:
d:
10 Click OK.
The Select OEM Option screen appears, displaying two driver options:
3Com 10/100 Mbps PCI NIC with 3XP Processor
3Com Server 10/100 Mbps PCI NIC with 3XP Processor
11 If you have installed a client NIC (3C990B-TX-M), select:
3Com 10/100 Mbps PCI NIC with 3XP Processor
If you have installed a server NIC (3C990BSVR), select:
3Com Server 10/100 Mbps PCI NIC with 3XP Processor
23
3
Installing NIC Drivers and Diagnostics For Windows
12 Click OK.
Files are copied. The Network screen appears with the 3Com NIC name listed in the
Network Adapters list box.
13 Click Close.
If the Microsoft TCP/IP Properties screen appears, enter the requested information for
your network environment. Refer to your system administrator or the Windows NT
documentation for assistance. After entering the appropriate TCP/IP information and
clicking OK, the Network Settings Change window appears.
If the Microsoft TCP/IP Properties screen does not appear, the installation is complete.
The Network Settings Change window appears.
14 Click Yes to restart the PC.
The network driver installation is complete. Next, verify the driver installation to
confirm that the NIC is properly installed.
Verifying the Driver Installation
1 Double-click the My Computer icon.
The My Computer screen appears.
2 Double-click the Control Panel icon.
The Control Panel screen appears.
3 Double-click the Network icon.
The Network screen appears.
4 Select the Adapters tab.
5 Make sure that the name of the NIC appears in the list of network adapters.
If the name of the NIC does not appear in the list of network adapters, the installation
was not successful. See “Troubleshooting the NIC Installation” on page 83 for
troubleshooting help.
6 Click OK to close the Network screen. Close the Control Panel screen and the My
computer screen.
You can also use the following alternative method to verify successful NIC installation:
1 In the Windows task bar, click Start, Programs, Administrative Tools, and then
Windows NT Diagnostics.
The Windows NT Diagnostics screen appears.
2 Select the Resources tab.
■ If ELPPx appears in the displayed list in the Device column, the driver is successfully
installed.
■ If ELPPx does not appear in the displayed list in the Device column, the installation
was not successful. See “Troubleshooting the NIC Installation” on page 83 for
troubleshooting help.
After you have verified that the driver has been installed properly, the next step is to install
the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program for Windows operating systems (see “Installing the
3Com NIC Diagnostics Program” later in this chapter).
24
Installing the Network Driver Using the EtherCD
Windows Me
This section describes how to install the network driver and NIC software in a PC client or
server running Windows Me.
Installing the Driver
1 Turn the PC power on.
Windows detects the NIC. The Add New Hardware Wizard starts and displays the
following message:
Windows has found the following new hardware:
PCI Ethernet Controller
Windows can automatically search for and install software
that supports your hardware. If your hardware came with
installation media, insert it now and click Next.
The Add New Hardware Wizard screen also prompts you to select one of two options.
What would you like to do?
_ Automatic search for a better driver (Recommended)
_ Specify the location of the driver (Advanced)
2 Select the Automatic search for a better driver (Recommended) option.
3 Insert the EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive, and then click Next.
Files are copied. Windows finds the driver file for the NIC and displays the following
message:
3Com 10/100 PCI NIC w/3XP (3C990B)
Windows has finished installing the new hardware device.
4 Click Finish.
The Systems Settings Change screen appears, prompting you to restart your computer.
5 Click Yes to restart your computer.
NOTE: You must restart your computer to complete the installation.
The software installation is complete. Next, verify the driver installation to confirm that the
NIC is properly installed.
Verifying the Driver Installation
1 Right-click the My Computer icon, and then click Properties.
2 Select the Device Manager tab.
3 Double-click Network adapters and make sure that the name of the 3Com 10/100 PCI
NIC appears.
If a red X or a yellow exclamation point (!) appears by the name of the NIC, the
installation was not successful. See “Troubleshooting the NIC Installation” on page 83
for troubleshooting help.
After you have verified that the driver has been installed properly, the next step is to install
the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program for Windows operating systems (see the next section,
“Installing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program”).
25
3
Installing NIC Drivers and Diagnostics For Windows
Windows 98
This section describes how to install the network driver and NIC software in a PC client or
server running Windows 98.
Installing the Driver
1 Turn the PC power on.
Windows detects the NIC. The Add New Hardware Wizard starts.
2 Click Next.
The Add New Hardware Wizard screen prompts you to select an option.
3 Select the Search for the best driver for your device (Recommended) option, and then
click Next.
The Add New Hardware Wizard screen prompts you for the driver location.
4 Select the CD-ROM drive option and clear any other check options that are selected.
5 Insert the EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive, and then click Next.
Windows finds the driver file for the device.
6 Click Next.
Files are copied.
The Insert Disk screen appears, prompting you for the Windows 98 CD.
7 Click OK.
The Copying Files dialog box appears.
8 Remove the EtherCD from the CD-ROM drive, insert the Windows 98 CD, enter the
path to the CD-ROM drive, and click OK.
The Add New Hardware Wizard displays a message informing you that Windows has
finished installing the software.
9 Click Finish.
The Systems Settings Change screen appears, prompting you to restart your computer.
10 Click Yes to restart your computer.
NOTE: You must restart your computer to complete the installation.
The software installation is complete. Next, verify the driver installation to confirm that the
NIC is properly installed.
Verifying the Driver Installation
1 Right-click the My Computer icon, and then click Properties.
2 Select the Device Manager tab.
3 Double-click Network adapters and make sure that the name of the 3Com 10/100 PCI
NIC appears.
If a red X or a yellow exclamation point (!) appears by the name of the NIC, the
installation was not successful. See “Troubleshooting the NIC Installation” on page 83
for troubleshooting help.
After you have verified that the driver has been installed properly, the next step is to install
the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program for Windows operating systems (see the next section,
“Installing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program”).
26
Installing the Network Driver Using the EtherCD
Windows 95
This section describes how to install the network driver and NIC software in a PC client or
server running Windows 95.
CAUTION: Do not install a 3C990B NIC while installing Windows 95 OSR2 using
the “Custom” option. Install Windows 95 OSR2 first, then install the 3C990B NIC.
Before installing the NIC software:
■ Make sure that the NIC is installed in the PC and connected to the network.
■ Make sure that you have the Windows 95 installation files. These files may be on a
CD or diskettes, or they may have been copied to your hard disk when Windows 95
was installed on your PC.
NOTE: If you encounter problems during the installation, refer to the W95NDIS.TXT
and TROUBLE.TXT files (located in the HELP directory on the EtherCD) for
troubleshooting tips.
Installing the Driver
To begin the driver installation, turn the PC power on. Windows detects the NIC and
depending on the version of Windows 95 that you have installed, either the New
Hardware Found screen appears, or the Update Device Driver Wizard starts.
New Hardware Found If the New Hardware Found screen appears, follow this
procedure to install the NIC driver:
1 Select the Driver from disk provided by hardware manufacturer option, and then
click OK.
The Install From Disk screen appears.
2 Insert the EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive, enter the path to the CD-ROM drive, and
click OK.
■ If networking has already been installed on your PC, go to step 4.
■ If this is the first time that networking is being installed on your PC, the
Identification tab of the Network screen appears. Go to step 3.
3 In the specified fields of the Identification tab screen, enter the following information,
and then click Close.
■ Computer Name—Identifies the PC on the network for other users. This entry must
be a unique name of 15 characters or fewer, containing no spaces.
■ Workgroup—Identifies the group (for example, your department name) to which
your PC belongs. If your computer is connected to a peer-to-peer network, this
entry must be exactly the same for all the PCs in your network.
■ Computer Description—Displays additional details to other users on the network
about this PC. For example, you could specify that the PC is connected to a printer.
Filling in this field is optional.
4 The Insert Disk screen appears, prompting you for the Windows 95 CD. Click OK.
The Copying Files screen appears.
27
3
Installing NIC Drivers and Diagnostics For Windows
5 Do one of the following:
■ If the Windows 95 files were not copied to your hard drive, remove the EtherCD
from the CD-ROM drive, insert the Windows 95 CD, enter the path to the CD-ROM
drive, and then click OK.
■ If the Windows 95 files were copied to your hard drive, enter the path to the
directory containing these files, and then click OK.
Files are copied. The Systems Settings Change screen appears, prompting you to
restart your computer.
6 Click Yes.
NOTE: You must restart your computer to complete the installation.
The software installation is complete. Next, verify the driver installation to confirm that the
NIC is properly installed, as described following the “Update Device Driver Wizard” section.
NOTE: After Windows restarts, double-click the Network icon in the Control Panel
and make sure that the configuration settings are properly set for your network
environment. Contact your system manager for assistance.
Update Device Driver Wizard If the Update Device Driver Wizard starts, follow this
procedure to install the NIC driver:
1 Insert the EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive, and then click Next.
Windows finds the driver.
2 Click Finish.
■ If networking has already been installed on your PC, go to step 4.
■ If this is the first time that networking is being installed on your PC, the
Identification tab of the Network screen appears. Go to step 3.
3 In the specified fields of the Identification tab screen, enter the following information,
and then click Close.
■ Computer Name—Identifies the PC on the network for other users. This entry
must be a unique name of 15 characters or fewer, containing no spaces.
■ Workgroup—Identifies the group (for example, your department name) to which
your PC belongs. If your computer is connected to a peer-to-peer network, this
entry must be exactly the same for all the PCs in your network.
■ Computer Description—Displays additional details to other users on the network
about this PC. For example, you could specify that the PC is connected to a printer.
Filling in this field is optional.
4 The Insert Disk screen appears, prompting you for the EtherCD. Click OK.
The Copying Files screen appears.
5 Enter the path to the CD-ROM drive, and then click OK.
Files are copied. The Insert Disk screen appears, prompting you for the
Windows 95 CD.
6 Click OK.
The Copying Files screen appears.
28
Installing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program
7 Do one of the following:
■ If the Windows 95 files were not copied to your hard drive, remove the EtherCD
from the CD-ROM drive, insert the Windows 95 CD, enter the path to the CD-ROM
drive, and then click OK.
■ If the Windows 95 files were copied to your hard drive, enter the path to the
directory containing these files, and then click OK.
Files are copied. The Systems Settings Change screen appears, prompting you to
restart your computer.
8 Click Yes.
NOTE: After Windows restarts, double-click the Network icon in the Control Panel
and make sure that the configuration settings are properly set for your network
environment. Contact your system manager for assistance.
The software installation is complete. Next, verify the driver installation to confirm that the
NIC is properly installed.
Verifying the Driver Installation
1 Right-click the My Computer icon, and then click Properties.
2 Select the Device Manager tab.
3 Double-click Network adapters and make sure that the name of the 3Com 10/100 PCI
NIC appears.
If a red X or a yellow exclamation point (!) appears by the name of the NIC, the
installation was not successful. See “Troubleshooting the NIC Installation” on page 83
for troubleshooting help.
After you have verified that the driver has been installed properly, the next step is to install
the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program for Windows operating systems (see the next section,
“Installing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program”).
Installing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program
This section describes how to install the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program after you have
already installed the network driver. This program is for PCs running Windows 2000,
Windows NT 4.0, and Windows 98, 95, or Me.
NOTE: If you manually install the network driver by selecting options on the
EtherCD Welcome Screen, you have the option of installing the network driver
with or without the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program. If you have already installed
the network driver together with the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program for
Windows, you can ignore this section. You are ready to configure the NIC as
described in Chapter 7, “Configuring the NIC.”
The 3Com NIC Diagnostics program allows you to run tests that determine the status of
your network and the NIC. It also allows you to configure the NIC, view network statistics
and LEDs, and access support databases.
NOTE: When you install the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program, the network driver is
automatically updated to the latest version on the EtherCD.
29
3
Installing NIC Drivers and Diagnostics For Windows
To install the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program:
1 Turn on the power to the PC and start Windows.
2 Insert the EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive.
The EtherCD Welcome screen appears.
NOTE: If the EtherCD Welcome screen does not appear, auto insert is probably not
enabled for your CD-ROM drive. See “Enabling Auto Insert” on page 104 for
instructions.
3 Click NIC Software.
4 Click NIC Drivers and Diagnostics.
5 Click Update NIC Driver.
6 Click Update Drivers and Diagnostic Program.
The Update screen appears, displaying a message indicating the 3Com NIC Update Kit
has successfully updated the network software, and informing you that you must
restart your PC.
NOTE: If the Update screen does not appear automatically, click the Update
button displayed at the bottom of the window.
7 Click OK to return to the Update NIC drivers screen.
8 Restart Windows if prompted to do so.
The installation is complete. You are ready to configure the NIC as described in
Chapter 7, “Configuring the NIC.”
Starting the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program
To start the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program:
1 Open the Windows Start menu.
2 Select Programs, and then 3Com NIC Utilities.
3 Click 3Com NIC Doctor.
The 3Com NIC Diagnostic screen appears. For instructions on using the program, see
“Running the NIC Diagnostics Tests” on page 92.
Alternatively, you can also start the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program using the following
procedure if the 3Com NIC Diagnostics icon is displayed on the right side of the Windows
task bar:
1 Double-click the 3Com NIC Diagnostics icon.
The 3Com NIC Diagnostic screen appears. For instructions on using the program, see
“Running the NIC Diagnostics Tests” on page 92.
30
Updating the Network Driver and NIC Software
Updating the Network Driver and NIC Software
The latest 3Com network drivers can be downloaded from:
http://www.3com.com/
Search for “3C990B” and “drivers.”
To update the network driver and NIC diagnostic software:
1 Turn on the power to the PC and start Windows.
2 Insert the EtherCD (or disk 1 downloaded from the Web or created from the EtherCD)
in the appropriate drive in the PC.
The EtherCD Welcome screen appears.
3 Click NIC Software.
4 Click NIC Drivers and Diagnostics.
5 Click Update NIC Driver.
6 To update the network driver and NIC diagnostics software, click Update Drivers and
Diagnostics Program.
To update the network driver and remove the NIC diagnostics software, click Update
Drivers and remove Diagnostics Program.
The Update screen appears, displaying a message indicating the 3Com NIC Update Kit
has successfully updated the network software, and informing you that you must
restart your PC.
7 Click OK to return to the Update NIC drivers screen, and then exit the EtherCD.
8 Restart Windows.
The installation is complete.
Installing Multiple NICs
This section describes how to install multiple 3Com 10/100 PCI NICs in a computer
running Windows 2000, Windows Me, Windows 98, Windows 95, or Windows NT 4.0.
NOTE: You must use these procedures to install multiple NICs. Failure to follow these
procedures may lead to problems requiring you to reinstall your operating system.
Windows 2000, Windows Me, Windows 98, and Windows 95
To install multiple NICs in a PC running Windows 2000, Windows Me, Windows 98, or
Windows 95, install and configure each NIC individually, following these steps:
1 Install the first NIC in your PC and connect it to the network, as described in
“Installing and Connecting the NIC” on page 18.
CAUTION: Do not physically install the second NIC in your PC until you
complete the driver installation for the first NIC, following steps 1-6.
2 Turn on the power to the PC and start Windows.
3 Insert the EtherCD when prompted, and then click OK.
4 Follow the prompts on the screen to install the network driver.
See “Windows 2000” on page 22, “Windows 98” on page 26, or “Windows 95” on
page 27, earlier in this chapter for driver installation instructions.
5 After the network driver is installed, restart the PC.
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3
Installing NIC Drivers and Diagnostics For Windows
6 After the PC restarts, exit Windows and turn the power off. Make sure that the PC
is unplugged.
7 Install the second NIC in your PC and connect it to the network.
8 Plug in the PC power cord, turn on the power, and then start Windows.
Windows detects the second NIC. The second NIC uses the same network driver as
the first NIC. You are not prompted for the EtherCD.
When Windows starts, the second NIC appears under Network adapters in the
Device Manager.
9 Repeat the process from step 6 for each additional NIC to be installed.
Windows NT 4.0
To install multiple NICs in a PC running Windows NT 4.0:
1 Install the first NIC in your PC and connect it to the network as described earlier in
this guide.
2 Turn on the power to the PC and start Windows NT.
3 Double-click the My Computer icon, then the Control Panel icon, and then the
Network icon.
The Network screen appears.
4 Select the Adapters tab.
5 Click Add.
The Select Network Adapter screen appears.
6 Click Have Disk.
7 Insert the EtherCD.
8 Make sure that d:\ appears in the entry box (where d:\ represents the letter name of
the CD-ROM drive), and then click OK.
The Select OEM Option screen appears with the name of one of the NICs selected.
Only one NIC appears on this screen.
9 Click OK.
Files are copied. The Network screen appears with the name of the first installed NIC.
10 Close the Network screen.
If you are prompted for network information, enter the requested information.
11 Turn off the PC and install the next NIC (if any).
12 Restart the PC.
13 When Windows NT starts, repeat step 3 through step 11 for each newly installed NIC.
NOTE: You will not be prompted for the EtherCD when you install the network
driver for the second NIC.
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4
Installing and Configuring
Data Encryption Offloads
The 3C990B NIC performs data encryption processing offloads in a Windows 2000
environment. The 3C990B NIC does not encrypt the data itself: the operating system
performs that function.
Encryption processing is handled entirely by the 3XP processor on the NIC. The 3XP
processor enables true end-to-end network security at the data capacity of the connected
network cable, without sacrificing performance.
The data encryption offload capability of the 3C990B NIC is disabled when you first
unpack it. U.S. law requires that users be certified to use certain data encryption products.
This chapter describes how to obtain the proper certification and enable encryption
offloading on the 3C990B NIC by:
■
■
Downloading the 3Com 3C990 Security Software Utility from the 3Com Corporation
World Wide Web site.
Running the Security Software Utility to install DES/3DES encryption on the
3C990B NIC.
This chapter also provides instructions for:
■ Disabling Data Encryption on the 3C990B NIC.
■ Upgrading Data Encryption on the 3C990B NIC from 56-bit DES to 168-bit 3DES.
■ Configuring IPSec In Windows 2000 environments.
Overview
Internet Protocol Security (IPSec) is a framework of open standards for ensuring secure
private communications over IP networks. IPSec ensures confidentiality, integrity, access
control, and authenticity of data communications across a public IP network.
Offloading Encryption Processing
You can configure any two (or more) computers running Windows 2000 to perform IPSec
encryption by changing the Local Security Setting in the operating system. With most non3C990B NICs, all the IPSec processing is done by the host central processing unit (CPU),
which significantly diminishes CPU performance. The 3C990B NIC can offload all the
encryption processing from the host CPU, thereby freeing the CPU to work on other tasks.
For any two or more computers running non-Windows 2000 operating systems
(Windows 95/98/Me/NT), IPSec encryption is provided by third-party applications. The
3C990B NIC does not provide IPSec encryption offloading for those operating systems.
33
4
Installing and Configuring Data Encryption Offloads
Selecting Basic or Strong Encryption Processing
The 3C990B NIC provides Data Encryption Standard (DES) 56-bit encryption processing
and 3DES (3DES 168-bit) encryption processing. You can configure the 3C990B NIC to
process data packets encrypted with either DES (basic) or 3DES (strong) algorithms.
DES and 3DES are IPSec bulk encryption algorithms for coding data. DES encrypts 64-bit
data blocks using a 56-bit key. DES can be applied in several modes. 3DES (Triple DES)
achieves a higher level of security by encrypting the data three times using DES with three
different, unrelated keys. 3DES is also known as 168-bit data encryption.
Enabling Data Encryption
To enable data encryption for the 3C990B NIC, follow the procedure outlined in the
following Overview.
Overview
The basic tasks involved in enabling data encryption for the 3C990B NIC are as follows:
1 Access the 3Com Corporation World Wide Web site.
2 Select DES or 3DES encryption.
3 Provide data about yourself and your location (as required by law).
4 Download the 3Com Security Software Utility from the 3Com Web site to your computer.
5 Run the 3Com Security Software Utility. The utility detects the 3C990B NIC(s) installed
in your computer.
6 Follow the displayed prompts to enable data encryption, and restart the computer.
Each of the steps listed above is covered in more detail in the sections that follow.
Downloading the 3Com Security Software Utility
Before you can enable data encryption for the 3C990B NIC, you must download the
3Com Security Software Utility from the 3Com Corporation World Wide Web site. Follow
these steps to download the utility:
1 Launch your preferred Internet browser on your computer.
3Com recommends using either Microsoft Internet Explorer version 4.0 (or above), or
Netscape Communicator version 4.0 (or above).
2 Type the following URL in the browser address field:
http://www.3com.com/product/offload_enablement
3 Press Enter.
NOTE: You can also access the 3Com Security Software Utility download site by
using the EtherCD. Do the following:
1 Insert the EtherCD in the computer CD-ROM drive.
2 Click Encryption Enablement.
3 Click Begin Encryption Enablement.
Your default Internet browser is launched with the appropriate URL.
The Language Selection page appears, providing several different language options.
34
Enabling Data Encryption
4 Select your desired language.
All subsequent pages will be displayed in the selected language. An introduction to
the 3C990B NIC appears. Follow the prompts.
5 The 3Com 3C990 Security Software Utility Download screen appears, prompting you to
select the level of data encryption that you want to use on your system:
■ 56-bit DES Encryption Version
■ 168-bit 3DES Encryption Version
6 Select either 56-bit or 168-bit encryption and then click Download.
3Com performs an initial security check based on the geographic location of your
computer:
■ If your computer passes the initial 3Com security check, the browser prompts you
for your name, address, and contact information to satisfy U.S. Department of
Commerce regulations. Go to step 7.
■ If your computer fails the initial security check, 3Com will not allow you to
download the 3Com Security Software Utility. You will be asked to enter your
name, address, and contact information, and then to submit the information to
3Com for manual processing. Follow the steps displayed in your browser window.
7 Enter your personal information, such as name and address, in the appropriate fields:
Entries for all the following fields are required unless indicated otherwise:
■ Full Name of Business
If you will be using data encryption for personal use, type:
Self
■ Company Web site URL (optional)
■ Your Name
■ Address
■ City
■ State
■ Zip
■ Country
Use the pull-down menu to select the appropriate country.
■ Telephone
■ Email
■ Fax (optional)
8 Click Submit.
3Com performs a second security check based on the personal information you
entered at step 7:
■ If your computer passes the second 3Com security check, the system displays a
Certificate of Eligibility Under U.S. Export Control Laws to Receive Software
Controlled for Export. Go to step 9.
■ If your computer fails the second security check, 3Com will not allow you to
download the 3Com Security Software Utility. You will be prompted to submit the
personal information you just entered to 3Com for manual processing. Follow the
steps displayed in your browser window.
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Installing and Configuring Data Encryption Offloads
9 Read the Eligibility Certificate, scroll to the bottom of the screen, and click I Agree
to continue.
You must agree to the certification conditions to download the 3Com Security
Software Utility. The 3Com End User Software License Agreement appears.
10 Read the license agreement, scroll to the bottom of the screen, and click I Agree
to continue.
You must agree to the software license conditions to download the 3Com Security
Software Utility. The File Download dialogue box appears, and prompts you to select
one of the following options:
■ Open this file from its current location
■ Save this file to disk
11 Select the default option Save this file to disk and click OK.
The Save As window appears.
12 Enter the download destination directory and file name you want to use for the
encryption application.
Keep the 3Com Security Software Utility in an accessible location. You can use the utility
not only to install encryption on the 3C990B NIC, but to disable encryption as well.
Use the Save in field to specify a different directory than the default one displayed, if
necessary. Use the File name field to change the encryption application filename, if
desired. (Do not change the filename suffix. Leave the .exe filename suffix as shown.)
13 Click OK.
The 3Com Security Software Utility is downloaded to the hard drive location that you
specified in step 12. For further instructions, see the next section, “Installing Data
Encryption.”
Installing Data Encryption
This section explains how to install and activate data encryption on the 3C990B NIC once
you have downloaded the 3Com Security Software Utility from the 3Com Web site. (If you
have not yet downloaded the 3Com Security Software Utility, see instructions for
“Downloading the 3Com Security Software Utility” on page 34.)
To install data encryption, use Windows Explorer to find the 3Com Security Software
Utility in the location where you downloaded it and follow these steps:
1 Run the 3Com Security Software Utility by double-clicking the utility program icon, or
by using the Windows Start menu.
The 3Com Security Software Utility Welcome screen appears. Follow the instructions
on the screen to close any open applications you may have running. (You can also
press Alt+Tab to suspend the 3Com Security Software Utility and close applications.)
Continue at step 2 when all open applications have been closed.
2 Click Next.
The 3Com Security Software Utility first verifies that you have already installed the
3C990B NIC:
■ If the utility cannot find a 3C990B NIC, it will stop, allowing you to install the NIC. For
NIC installation instructions, see “Installing and Connecting the NIC” on page 13.
■ If the utility finds an installed 3C990B NIC, it prompts you to enable or disable
encryption. Go to step 3.
36
Disabling Data Encryption
3 Select Enable to install data encryption.
The 3Com Security Software Utility will install data encryption on the 3C990B NIC at
the level you specified when you downloaded the 3Com Security Software Utility.
Data encryption will not be enabled on the 3C990B NIC until you restart the
computer.
4 Restart the computer to enable data encryption.
Keep the 3Com Security Software Utility in an accessible location. You may want to
use the utility again to disable or re-enable encryption on the 3C990B NIC.
Disabling Data Encryption
To disable data encryption on the 3C990B NIC, use Windows Explorer to find the 3Com
Security Software Utility in the location where you downloaded it and follow these steps:
1 Run the 3Com Security Software Utility by double-clicking the utility program icon, or
by using the Windows Start menu.
The 3Com Security Software Utility Welcome screen appears. Follow the instructions
on the screen to close any open applications you may have running. (You can also
press Alt+Tab to suspend the 3Com Security Software Utility and close applications.)
Continue at step 2 when all open applications have been closed.
2 Click Next.
The 3Com Security Software Utility first verifies that you have already installed and
registered the 3C990B NIC.
When the Registration Number is validated, the utility will prompt you to choose
whether you want to enable encryption or disable encryption.
3 Select Disable to deactivate data encryption.
The 3Com Security Software Utility will disable data encryption on the 3C990B NIC.
4 Restart the computer to disable data encryption.
Keep the 3Com Security Software Utility in an accessible location. You may want to
use the utility again to enable encryption on the 3C990B NIC.
Upgrading Data Encryption
To upgrade the data encryption level for a 3C990B NIC from DES (56-bit) to 3DES
(168-bit), follow these steps:
1 Download the 3DES Security Software Utility.
See “Downloading the 3Com Security Software Utility” on page 34 for instructions.
At step 5 in those instructions, select 168-bit 3DES Encryption Software.
2 Install Data Encryption using the new 3Com Security Software Utility.
See “Installing Data Encryption” on page 36 for instructions.
37
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Installing and Configuring Data Encryption Offloads
Configuring IPSec In Windows 2000
The 3C990B NIC accelerates IP security (IPSec) data encryption from supported operating
systems that provide this offload capability. This feature is currently available in the
Microsoft Windows 2000 operating system.
IPSec primarily consists of two parts:
■ encryption/decryption
■ authentication
To send or receive encrypted data in a PC running Windows 2000 with a 3C990B NIC
installed, you must first create a security policy, and then enable encryption on the NIC.
The security policy establishes and defines how encrypted network traffic between
your PC and a specified server occurs.
Authentication enables the receiver to verify the sender of a packet by adding key fields to
a packet without altering the packet data content.
The following table shows the available levels of encryption:
Encryption
Type
Encryption
Level
Description
AH
Medium
Authentication only
ESP
High
Authentication and encryption
Custom
Varies
Provides encryption and an extra authentication that includes the
IP header.
Custom allows you to select options for both AH and ESP, such as
MD%/SHA-1 and DES/3DES. And you can select the rate at which
new keys are negotiated.
Microsoft uses IKE key exchange to renew keys every x seconds or y
bytes. However, this practice is computationally very high in
overhead. Some users may set these values low and have frequent
key updates. Users more concerned with performance will set these
values higher.
For more information, refer to the Microsoft documentation about
creating IPSec flows.
Creating a Security Policy
The process you use to create and enable a security policy will depend on your network
environment requirements. The following is an example of one approach to creating a
security policy.
NOTE: You must complete all of the sequences in this section to establish and enable
a security policy for transmitting and receiving encrypted data over the network.
Defining the Console
This sequence establishes the Console and defines its parameters.
To define the Console:
1 In the Windows taskbar, click Start, Programs, Accessories, and then
Command Prompt.
2 At the DOS prompt, enter:
MMC
The Console1 screen appears.
38
Configuring IPSec In Windows 2000
3 In the menu click Console, and then Add/Remove Snap-in.
The Add/Remove Snap-in screen appears.
4 Click Add.
The Add Standalone Snap-in screen appears.
5 Select IP Security Policy Management, and then click Add.
The Select which computer this Snap-in will manage screen appears.
6 Enable the Local computer option.
7 Click Finish, Close, and then OK.
Creating the Policy
This sequence creates and names the new security policy.
The Console1 and Console Root screen appears with IP Security Policies on Local Machine
displayed in the list.
1 In the left pane, click IP Security Policies on Local Machine.
2 Right-click inside the right pane below the list items.
3 From the pop-up menu, select Create IP Security Policy.
The IP Security Policy Wizard Starts.
4 Click Next.
The IP Security Policy Name screen appears.
5 Enter a name for the new security policy that you are creating. You can enter a
description to help you identify this policy.
6 Click Next.
The Requests for Secure Communication screen appears.
7 Clear the Activate the default response rule check box.
8 Click Next and then Finish.
A screen appears with the name of the new security policy in the title bar.
9 Click Add.
The Security Rule Wizard starts.
10 Click Next.
The Tunnel Endpoint screen appears.
11 Enable the default option This rule does not specify a tunnel, and then click Next.
The Network Type screen appears.
12 Enable the default option All network connections, and then click Next.
The Authentication Methods screen appears.
13 Enable the Use this string to protect the key exchange (preshared key): option, type
the appropriate string text in the entry field, and then click Next.
Creating a Filter
This sequence creates a filter for the policy.
The IP Filter List screen appears.
1 Click Add.
A new IP Filter List screen appears.
39
4
Installing and Configuring Data Encryption Offloads
2 Enter a name for the filter, and then click Add.
The IP Filter Wizard starts.
3 Click Next.
The IP Traffic Source screen appears.
4 Click Next.
The IP Traffic Destination screen appears.
5 Select A Specific IP Address in the pull-down list.
The IP Address entry box appears on the IP Traffic Destination screen.
6 Enter destination IP address, and then click Next.
The IP Protocol Type screen appears.
7 Accept the default, and then click Next.
8 Click Finish to close the IP Filter Wizard.
9 Click Close to close the IP Filter List screen.
Binding the Filter
This sequence attaches the new filter to the policy.
The IP Filter List screen appears.
1 Enable the option for the new filter name and make sure that the new filter name
is selected.
2 Click Next.
Creating the Filter Action
This sequence defines how the filter acts on the policy.
The Filter Action screen appears.
1 Click Add.
The Filter Action Wizard starts.
2 Click Next.
The Filter Action Name screen appears.
3 Enter a name (for example: 3DES to the Server), and then click Next.
The Filter Action General Options screen appears.
4 Accept the default, and then click Next.
The screen, Communicating with computers that do not support IPsec, appears.
5 Accept the default value, and then click Next.
The IP Traffic Security screen appears.
6 Select Custom, and then click Settings.
The Custom Security Method Settings screen appears.
7 Enable the Data integrity and encryption (ESP): check box, and then make the
appropriate selections in the Integrity and algorithms list boxes.
8 Click OK, Next, and then Finish.
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Configuring IPSec In Windows 2000
Binding the Filter Action
This sequence attaches the new filter action to the filter and policy.
The Filter Action screen appears.
1 Enable the filter action option and make sure that the filter name is selected. (In this
example, we used the filter name: 3DES to the Server.)
2 Click Next, Finish, and then Close.
The newly created policy appears in the right pane of the Console Root\IP Security
Policies on Local Machine screen.
3 Exit this screen and, when prompted, save the new policy information. Use a
meaningful name for future reference.
You can modify this security policy by double clicking the icon that is created when you
save the policy in the previous step.
Enabling Encryption
An encryption policy must exist in the Console Root\IP Security Policies on the Local
Machine screen before you can enable encryption on the 3C990B NIC.
To enable encryption:
1 Right-click the desired policy icon in the right pane of the screen.
2 Select Assign.
3 A green plus (+) symbol appears on the policy icon to indicate that encryption is
toggled on.
Disabling Encryption
An encryption policy must exist in the Console Root\IP Security Policies on the Local
Machine screen, and be enabled, before you can disable encryption on the 3C990B NIC.
To disable encryption:
1 Right-click the desired policy icon in the right pane of the screen.
2 Select Un-assign.
The absence of a green plus (+) symbol on the policy icon indicates that encryption is
toggled off.
41
5
Installing 3Com Advanced Server
Features For Windows
This chapter explains the following tasks for a computer running Windows 2000 or Windows NT
with the 3Com 10/100 PCI Server NIC (3C990BSVR) with 3XP processor installed.
■ Installing 3Com Advanced Server software for a server NIC
■ Configuring groups and VLANs for a server NIC
3Com Advanced Server (DynamicAccess) features include:
■ Fault tolerance
■ Bi-directional load balancing
■ Resilient server links (RSL)
■ Self-healing drivers (SHD)
■ Multiple virtual LANs (MVLANs) support
■ PCI hot-plug support
■ Traffic prioritization
For more information about 3Com Advanced Server (DynamicAccess) features, see
“3C990BSVR Server NIC Features” on page 9.
This chapter also describes 3C990B NIC support for Windows 2000 offload features in an
IP environment. The Windows 2000 offload features are designed to enhance the
Windows 2000 operating system capabilities by off loading key TCP/IP networking and
security tasks from the Windows 2000 operating system.
Installing 3Com Advanced Server Software
Follow these steps to install 3Com Advanced Server (DynamicAccess) software for a server
NIC installed in a Windows 2000 or Windows NT 4.0 computer:
1 Make sure that the NIC and the network driver are properly installed in your computer.
See Chapter 3, “Installing NIC Drivers and Diagnostics For Windows,” for information
about confirming that the NIC and driver are properly installed.
2 Start Windows.
3 Insert the EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive.
The EtherCD Welcome screen appears.
4 Click NIC Software.
5 Click DynamicAccess technologies.
6 Click Install DynamicAccess software.
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5
Installing 3Com Advanced Server Features For Windows
7 Select the appropriate menu option for your operating system (Windows NT 4.0 or
Windows 2000). Do one of the following:
■ To select Windows NT 4.0, click Install 3Com DynamicAccess Technology for
Windows NT 4.0 Only.
■ To select Windows 2000, click Install 3Com DynamicAccess Technology for
Windows 2000 Only.
The 3Com DynamicAccess Software Installation screen appears, displaying the
following prompt:
Do you wish to install Dynamic Access Software for Servers?
8 Click Yes.
The 3Com Advanced Server Software Installation program starts.
■ When 3Com Advanced Server features are installed for Windows NT, NICs bind to
the Advanced Server protocol and real protocols bind to the Advanced Server
Miniport. Do not modify these bindings.
■ When 3Com Advanced Server features are installed for Windows 2000, LAN
connections bind to the Advanced Server protocol and real protocols bind to the
Advanced Server miniport. Do not modify these bindings.
9 When the 3Com Advanced Server Technology installation is finished, exit the
EtherCD, and then exit Windows.
10 Restart the PC.
NOTE: You must restart the PC to complete the installation.
Verifying Successful Installation
After the 3Com Advanced Server software is installed on the server PC, the following
changes are visible in the Windows Network control panel:
■ For each physical NIC installed in the client PC, a virtual NIC entry appears in the list of
network adapters.
All protocols are re-bound to the virtual NIC. The bindings to the physical NIC are
still intact.
■ A 3Com DynamicAccess entry appears as a protocol.
■ A 3Com DynamicAccess icon is installed in the Windows Control Panel (for NT 4.0
installations only).
Configuring Groups and VLANs for a Server NIC
3Com Advanced Server technology features allow you to configure load balancing groups
and virtual LANs (VLANs). The features are described in “3Com DynamicAccess Advanced
Server Features” on page 9.
The following 3Com Advanced Server technology features are available for NIC groups
in Windows:
■ Load balancing
■ RSL failover
■ Multiple VLANs
The examples in this section illustrate typical actions you might take in the course of
maintaining a 3Com Advanced Server configuration in Windows.
44
Configuring Groups and VLANs for a Server NIC
Planning the Configuration
Consider these items when planning groups and VLANs:
■ Decide whether you want to use bidirectional load balancing, or transmit load balancing.
To use bidirectional load balancing, you must assign a dedicated IP address for each
load balancing group. This address must be unique (not used elsewhere on the
network). For details, see “Specifying a Dedicated IP Address” on page 48.
■ Decide which NICs are to be part of each group. Each group must include at least two NICs.
■ Decide whether you want to use a foreign (non-3Com) NIC in one of the groups.
Up to two foreign NICs (that is, NICs that are not 3Com server NIC) are allowed in one
group per server.
■ Decide which NIC is to be the primary NIC in each group. If a foreign NIC is used, it
must be designated the primary NIC.
■ Disable load balancing if you have set failover for a group of NICs operating at
different speeds. 3Com Advanced Server supports failover for a group of NICs
operating at different speeds (for example, with one NIC operating at 10 Mbps,
another operating at 100 Mbps, and another at 1,000 Mbps). However, Advanced
Server supports load balancing only for a group of NICs operating at the same speed
(with all NICs operating at 10 Mbps, or all operating at 100 Mbps, or all at
1000 Mbps). For example, if you specify failover from a 3Com Gigabit Server 1000
PCI NIC to a 3Com 10/100 PCI NIC, you must disable load balancing for that group to
achieve the best performance.
■ For the best failover performance, turn the spanning tree feature off at switches that
are connected directly to the server. If the spanning tree feature is turned on,
a failover may be delayed up to 30 seconds while the switch processes the spanning
tree algorithm.
■ Plan the cable changes required to connect each primary NIC and all secondary NICs
to the same network segment.
■ Observe the recommended support limit of four groups per server.
■ The following guidelines apply to groups under Windows 2000:
802.1p Support Property—The value of the Windows 2000 802.1p support
property must be the same for all NICs in a group. For example, if this property is
enabled for the primary NIC, it must also be enabled for all other NICs in the group.
Microsoft Task Offload Support—It is possible to form a group of NICs that have
different levels of support for Microsoft Task Offload features (TCP Checksum, TCP
Segmentation, and IP Sec). In this case, the offload support is limited to the features
supported by all NICs in the group. For example, if two NICs in a group support all
offload features but one NIC supports only TCP Checksum, then offload support for
the group is limited to TCP Checksum.
■ Observe these VLAN configuration guidelines:
■ Assign a VLAN ID number to each VLAN. If you are not using a DHCP server, each
VLAN that is using IP services requires an IP address and subnet mask.
■ 3Com Advanced Server software supports as many as 16 VLANs per server.
■ Each VLAN bound to TCP/IP must exist on a separate IP subnet. DHCP servers used
to allocate IP addresses must be located on the same IP subnets as the VLANs.
■ Each VLAN bound to the IPX/SPX protocol must use a unique network number.
45
5
Installing 3Com Advanced Server Features For Windows
■
■
■
To avoid problems associated with blocked multicast streams, configure end
stations that support the IEEE 802.1p GARP Multicast Registration Protocol
specification (GMRP) on separate switch segments from stations that do not
support it.
Under Windows 2000, when VLANs are enabled, the Windows 2000 802.1p
Support property must be disabled for all the underlying miniports.
The following memory requirements are for multiple VLAN configurations. You can
improve overall system performance with VLANs by increasing the physical RAM,
the virtual memory page size, or both.
Number of VLANs
Minimum RAM Size (MB)
Up to 16
128
CAUTION: Before creating or removing a load balancing group or VLAN, take
note of configuration information such as IP addresses and IPX network numbers.
3Com Advanced Server software does not restore a network configuration to its
pre-Advanced Server state. Always verify that the network configuration conforms
to your expectations after creating or removing a load balancing group or VLAN.
Working With Server Features
The 3Com Advanced Server features window contains tabs for these windows:
■ In the Load Balance/RSL window, you can create and change Load Balancing/RSL
groups. The NICs in a group work together to route traffic efficiently and to recover
from failures.
■ In the VLANs window, you can set up virtual LANs. All groups listed on the
Load Balance/RSL window also appear as groups in the VLAN window. Any
ungrouped NICs in the Load Balance/RSL window are also listed in the VLAN window.
Windows 2000
Access 3Com Advanced Server server features through the Windows 2000 Network and
Dial-up Connections window as follows:
1 Log in to Windows 2000 with administrator privileges.
2 Launch the Windows 2000 Network and Dial-up Connections window.
3 Select a Local Area Connection icon.
4 Click the right mouse button and select Properties.
The Local Area Connections Properties window appears.
5 Click the General tab.
6 In the General window, select DynamicAccess Protocol and click Properties.
The DynamicAccess Protocol Properties window appears. Click the appropriate tab to
configure server features.
46
Configuring Groups and VLANs for a Server NIC
Windows NT
Start 3Com Advanced Server features under Windows NT as follows:
1 Log in to the Windows NT Administrator account.
2 From the Windows Start menu, select Settings/Control Panel.
3 Double-click the DynamicAccess SW Server icon.
The DynamicAccess Resilient Server Link/Load Balance/VLAN Configuration window
appears. Click the appropriate tab to configure server features.
Creating a Group
1 Click the Load Balance/RSL tab.
2 In the Load Balance/RSL window, click Create Group.
3 In the Create Group dialog box, type a group name.
4 Set the load balancing:
To enable transmit load balancing — Clear the Receive Load Balance Enabled
check box and check the Transmit Load Balance Enabled box.
To enable bidirectional load balancing — Check both the Transmit Load Balance
Enabled box and the Receive Load Balance Enabled box. Enter only the Host ID bytes
required for a dedicated IP address. For example:
Class A
Byte 1
Byte 2
Network ID
Host ID
24
Class B
Network ID
Byte 3
Byte 4
1
253
Host ID
2
Class C
Network ID
253
Host ID
253
See “Specifying a Dedicated IP Address” later in this chapter for more information on
the dedicated IP address.
To disable all load balancing — Clear the Receive Load Balance Enabled and the
Transmit Load Balance Enabled check boxes.
5 Click OK.
The name of the new NIC group appears in the Load Balancing/RSL Groups list box.
Adding NICs to a Group
1 Click the Load Balance/RSL tab.
2 In the Load Balance/RSL window:
■ Select a group from the Load Balancing/RSL Groups list.
■ Select a NIC from the Network Interface Cards list.
3 Click Add NIC.
The NIC appears as part of the group in the Load Balancing/RSL list box.
If you click Add NIC repeatedly, NICs are added to the group in the order that they are
listed after the first NIC you selected.
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Installing 3Com Advanced Server Features For Windows
Specifying a Dedicated IP Address
Bidirectional load balancing requires that you specify a dedicated IP address for the load
balancing group. This address specifies a Network ID and a Host ID, and it must be unique
(not used elsewhere on the network). For example:
Class A
Class B
Byte 1
Byte 2
Network ID
Host ID
125
24
Network ID
139
Class C
Byte 3
Byte 4
1
253
Host ID
25
2
Network ID
193
253
Host ID
26
3
253
You can specify the dedicated IP address in the Create Group or Group Properties dialog
boxes. You cannot specify the bytes for the Network ID; they are fixed. Specify the bytes
for the Host ID for various classes of subnets as follows:
Class
Byte 1
Specify only bytes
A
126
2, 3, and 4 (the three rightmost boxes).
B
128 - 191
3 and 4 (the two rightmost boxes).
C
192 - 223
4 (the rightmost box).
Changing an IP Address
If another device is using a bidirectional load balancing group's dedicated IP address, you
must change either the other device’s IP address or that of the load balancing group. Use
the appropriate procedure below:
Changing the Other
Device's IP Address
After you change the other device's address, restart receive load balancing as
follows:
1 In the Load Balancing/RSL window, select the group that had the
duplicate address.
2 Click Properties.
3 In the Properties dialog box, click OK.
4 In the Load Balancing/RSL window, click OK to exit the window and
restart Windows.
Changing the Group's
Dedicated IP Address
1 In the Load Balancing/RSL window, select the group that has the
duplicate address.
2 Click Properties.
3 In the Properties dialog box, enter a new IP address and click OK.
4 In the Load Balancing/RSL window, click OK to exit the window and
restart Windows.
48
Configuring Groups and VLANs for a Server NIC
Creating a VLAN
1 Click the VLANs tab.
2 In the VLANs window, select a NIC or group from the VLANs list and click
Create VLAN.
3 In the VLAN ID dialog box, type a VLAN ID number and click OK.
Valid VLAN ID numbers are from 1 – 511 and from 768 – 4095. Numbers in the range
512 – 767 are reserved.
The new VLAN is added to the VLANs list.
Windows 2000—If you create more than one VLAN, assign a VLAN ID number to
each VLAN as follows:
■ Right-click My Network Places and select Properties from the menu.
■ In the next window, right-click a VLAN and select Properties from the menu.
■ Click Configure.
■ In the NIC Properties window, click TCP/IP.
■ In the next window, configure the IP address and subnet mask.
Windows NT—Restart the computer when the software prompts you to do so.
Specifying Traffic Priorities
You can use the DynamicAccess Software Setup window to specify traffic priorities.
1 Double-click the 3Com DynamicAccess icon in the Windows Control Panel.
The DynamicAccess Software Setup window appears.
2 Click the appropriate tab:
■ Traffic Prioritization—Prioritize applications to ease bottlenecks in the network
and allow critical applications to take network precedence. You can turn traffic
prioritization on or off independently for each:
■ NIC that is not in a group and does not have VLANs
■ Group that does not have VLANs
■ VLAN
■ Virtual NIC (NIC, group, or VLAN) shown in the Traffic Prioritization control panel
■ Administration—Set 3Com Advanced Server control panel access, set VLAN options,
enable efficient multicast control, and enable the prioritizing of multicast traffic.
Saving the Configuration
To save and exit, click OK.
A prompt asks whether you want to configure traffic prioritization. If you click Yes, the
DynamicAccess Software Setup window appears.
To exit without saving the configuration, click Cancel.
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Installing 3Com Advanced Server Features For Windows
Disabling Load Balancing for a Group
Follow these steps to disable load balancing for a group:
1 Click the Load Balance/RSL tab.
2 In the Load Balance/RSL window:
■ Select a group from the Load Balancing/RSL Groups list.
■ Click Properties.
3 In the Group Properties dialog box:
To disable receive load balancing only—Clear the Receive Load Balance Enabled
check box.
To disable all load balancing—Clear the Receive Load Balance Enabled and the
Transmit Load Balance Enabled check boxes.
4 Click OK.
Changing the Primary NIC
The first NIC added to an empty group is automatically designated the primary NIC. NICs
added subsequently are designated as secondary NICs. If a foreign (non-3Com) NIC is
used, it must be designated the primary NIC. Primary status is indicated by a P icon at the
beginning of the NIC name.
When there are more than one NIC in a group, you can change the primary NIC as follows:
1 Click the Load Balance/RSL tab.
2 In the Load Balance/RSL window, select a secondary NIC from the Load Balance/RSL
Groups list.
3 Click Select Primary.
Removing a NIC from a Group
Follow these steps to remove a NIC from a group:
1 Click the Load Balance/RSL tab.
2 In the Load Balance/RSL window, select a NIC from a group in the Load Balancing/RSL
Groups list.
3 Click Remove NIC.
Deleting or Editing a VLAN
When a VLAN is selected, you can delete it or edit its properties.
1 Click the VLANs tab.
2 In the VLANs window, select a VLAN.
To delete the selected VLAN, click Delete VLAN.
To edit the VLAN ID for the selected VLAN, click Edit VLAN.
50
Configuring Groups and VLANs for a Server NIC
Displaying NIC Properties
Follow these steps to display NIC properties:
1 Click the Load Balance/RSL tab.
2 In the Load Balance/RSL window, select a NIC.
3 Click Properties.
The NIC Properties window appears, showing the properties of the selected NIC.
Displaying Group Properties
Follow these steps to display group properties:
1 Click the Load Balance/RSL tab.
2 In the Load Balance/RSL window, select a group in the Load Balancing/RSL Groups
list box.
3 Click Properties.
The Group Properties window appears, showing the properties of the selected group.
Troubleshooting a Load Balancing Configuration
Use the troubleshooting tips in the following table to solve problems that may occur in a
load balancing configuration.
NOTE: To access a database of technical information that can help you diagnose
and solve NIC installation, configuration, and upgrade problems, go to:
http://knowledgebase.3com.com
Symptom
Tip
Receive load balancing fails to begin
functioning.
Check the Group Properties to verify that the dedicated IP
address has been entered. If no address appears in the
Group Properties dialog box, enter one to enable receive
load balancing.
Receive load balancing stops
functioning.
Cables may be disconnected, or there may be other
hardware problems. Reconnect or change the cables.
Correct any other hardware problems. Bidirectional load
balancing is restored after this type of failure when
applications create new connections or new clients log in.
Reconnecting cables does not restore
load balancing.
Check the event log for a duplicate IP address. If another
device is using a load balancing group's dedicated IP
address, change one of the IP addresses. See “Changing an
IP Address” on page 48 for instructions.
Receive load balancing does not
function across a router.
Receive load balancing across a router is not supported.
Clients across the router cannot use receive load balancing,
but clients within the subnet get higher throughput from
receive load balancing.
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Installing 3Com Advanced Server Features For Windows
Changing Windows 2000 Property Settings
If you receive warnings about inconsistent property settings (for example, the 802.1p Support
property) while creating a group, use the following procedure to change a NIC property:
1 Right-click the My Computer icon and select Properties from the menu.
2 Click the Hardware tab, then click Device Manager.
3 Double-click Network Adapters.
4 Right-click on the name of the appropriate NIC and select Properties from the menu.
5 Click the Advanced tab.
6 Select the appropriate property from the list (for example, 802.1p Support).
7 Use the scroll list to change the property value.
8 Exit the Device Manager.
Identifying Windows 2000 Miniport and LAN Connections
3Com Advanced Server miniport connections and NIC Local Area Connections are listed in
the Network and Dial-up Connections window. If a group or VLAN is associated with a
miniport, the group name and VLAN name appear in the miniport icon name. If a miniport is
associated with an ungrouped NIC, you can identify the NIC by its MAC address as follows:
1 In the Network and Dial-up Connections window, right-click the miniport icon and
select Properties from the menu.
2 In the DynamicAccess Properties window, click the General tab.
3 In the General tab, move the cursor over the miniport name. (Do not click the name.)
After a short pause, the MAC address of the associated NIC appears in a pop-up window.
Using Windows 2000 Offload Features
The 3C990B NIC supports Windows 2000 offload features in an IP environment. The
Windows 2000 offload features are designed to enhance the Windows 2000 operating
system capabilities by off-loading key TCP/IP networking and security tasks from the
Windows 2000 operating system:
■ IPSec Offload—reduces CPU utilization by allowing the 3XP processor and a crypto
chip on the NIC to perform data encryption operations.
■ TCP Segmentation Offload—reduces CPU utilization by allowing the 3XP processor
on the NIC to perform segmentation of TCP packets.
NOTE: Windows 2000 does not allow IPSec offloads and TCP Segmentation
offloads for the same session. Though all offload types may be enabled, TCP
Segmentation offloading will not occur during an IPSec session.
■
■
52
IP and TCP Checksum Offload—reduced CPU utilization by allowing the 3XP processor
on the NIC to perform the checksum calculation of TCP/IP and UDP/IP packets.
802.1p Packet Priority Offload—reduces CPU utilization by allowing the 3XP processor
on the NIC to perform the insertion of the 802.1Q tag header into the packet.
Using Windows 2000 Offload Features
Enabling Offloads
Windows 2000 provides the capability to individually enable or disable each of the four
offload features. (The default setting for these features is enabled.)
To enable or disable individual offload settings in Windows 2000:
1 Right-click the My Network Places desktop icon and select Properties.
The Network and Dial-up Connections screen appears.
2 Right-click the Local Area Connection icon and select Properties.
The Local Area Connection Properties screen appears.
3 Click Configure.
The 3Com 10/100 Mbps PCI NIC with 3XP Processor screen appears.
4 Click the Advanced tab.
5 Select Enable Offloads in the Property list box.
6 Select the appropriate value in the Value entry box (shown in the following table) for
the desired offload state.
7 Close all open windows.
The following table describes values for the offload functions:
Value
Offload Function Enabled
All Offloads Disabled
No offloads
cksum
TCP Checksum
cksum-ipsec
TCP Checksum and IPSec
cksum-tcpseg
TCP Checksum and TCP Segmentation
cksum-tcpseg-ipsec
TCP Checksum and TCP Segmentation and IPSec
ipsec
IPSec
tcpseg
TCP Segmentation
tcpseg-ipsec
TCP Segmentation and IPSec
802.1p
Packet Priority
802.1p-cksum
Packet Priority and TCP Checksum
802.1p-cksum-ipsec
Packet Priority and TCP Checksum and IPSec
802.1p-cksum-tcpseg
Packet Priority and TCP Checksum and TCP Segmentation
802.1p-cksum-tcpseg-ipsec
Packet Priority and TCP Checksum and TCP Segmentation and IPSec
802.1p-ipsec
Packet Priority and IPSec
802.1p-tcpseg
Packet Priority and TCP Segmentation
802.1p-tcpseg-ipsec
Packet Priority and TCP Segmentation and IPSec
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Installing 3Com Advanced Server Features For Windows
Configuring Offloads for a Group of Different NICs
Your computer may contain a combination of installed NICs (including one or more 3Com
10/100 PCI NICs with the 3XP processor (3C990Bs)) with varying offload capabilities. If
you have a mix of dissimilar NICs configured in a group, then 3Com DynamicAccess
Advanced Server software will support only those offload functions that are supported by
all the NICs in the group.
For example, if you have created a group consisting of a 3C990B NIC and another NIC
that does not have any offload capabilities, then the group will not support any offloads.
In another example, if you have a group of three NICs with two supporting TCP
Checksum, TCP Segmentation, and IPSec offloads, and one supporting only IPSec, then
the group will support only IPSec offloads.
If you add a NIC to an existing group, and that NIC has offload capabilities that differ from
those of the group, then you must reconfigure the group: that is, you must delete the
group, recreate the group, and restart the computer. (If you do not delete and recreate the
group, the Advanced Server software will not bind to the NIC.)
Similarly, if you replace a NIC that has been configured as part of a group with another
NIC that has different offload capabilities, then you must reconfigure the group.
In addition, if you disable or enable any offloads for a group through the Windows 2000
Advanced tab, then you must reconfigure the group.
54
6
Installing NetWare Drivers
This chapter describes how to install drivers for Novell NetWare versions 3.12, 4.11,
and 5.x.
To obtain the latest shipping version of a driver, go to:
http://www.3com.com/
Search for “3C990B” and “drivers.”
Installing and Configuring the NetWare Driver
This section describes how to install the NetWare driver on a Novell server running
NetWare 3.12, 4.11, or 5.x. The \NWSERVER directory contains the network driver file
(3C99X.LAN) to be used for servers running NetWare 3.12, 4.11, or 5.x. Additional files
(NetWare Loadable Modules [NLMs]) that are required for servers running NetWare are on
the EtherCD in the \NWSERVER directory, or they can be obtained from Novell.
Using the Latest Support Packs
The 3C990B NIC does not support NetWare 3.11 or 4.0x servers. The 3C990B NIC does
not support NetWare 3.12 or 4.11 servers that are not updated to the latest Novell
Support Pack. NetWare 3.12 does not support 3C990B NIC load balancing/failover or TCP/
IP checksum offload/hardware checksumming.
CAUTION: If you plan to form load balancing/failover groups using NetWare 4.11
or 5.x, do not enable TCP/IP checksum offload for the 3C990B NIC driver.
Use the following support packs to achieve best results with the network driver.
NetWare Version
Required Support Pack
3.12
Latest patch files.
4.11
Support Pack 6 or later for all types of operation.
Support Pack 7 or higher is required for proper operation of
the failover mechanism for the 3C990B server NIC.
5.x
Support Pack 2a or later
NOTE: The required support pack must be loaded before you install the driver for
the 3C990B NIC.
You can obtain the latest support packs from the Novell Web site:
http://www.support.novell.com
55
6
Installing NetWare Drivers
Obtaining NetWare Loadable Modules
You can obtain current NLMs for the NetWare servers listed in the table below from the
\NWSERVER directory on the EtherCD, or from the Novell Web site:
http://www.support.novell.com
NetWare Server
NLM Name
NetWare 3.12
ETHERTSM.NLM
MSM31X.NLM
NBI31X.NLM
NetWare 4.11, 5.x
ETHERTSM.NLM
TCPIP.NLM
NBI.NLM
MSM.NLM
NOTE: To upgrade the NetWare driver for a NetWare server, you must create
installation diskettes from the EtherCD that accompanied this product. Use these
diskettes to install the Netware server driver. See “Creating Installation Diskettes”
on page 15.
Server Software Installation Requirements
Before you install software, you may want to verify that the installed NICs are functional
or change their configuration settings by running DOS diagnostics. Use
the 3C99XCFG.EXE program located on the EtherCD.
The instructions in this section describe how to set up a sample server configuration.
Setting up your own configuration may require a slightly different sequence of tasks and
different numbers of NICs.
If you are installing the software during the installation of the network operating system,
see “Installing a 3Com NIC While Installing the NOS” on page 107.
For a list of installation requirements, see “Installation Requirements” on page 14.
Netware Packet Receive Buffers
Follow these guidelines for NetWare 4.11 and 5.x:
■ The driver requires 200 packet receive buffers for each installed NIC.
■ You must increase the minimum and maximum packet receive buffers values by 200
for each installed NIC.
For example, if you install two NICs, increase the parameters in the STARTUP.NCF file
by 400 as follows:
Before installing NICs
SET MINIMUM PACKET RECEIVE BUFFERS = 1000
SET MAXIMUM PACKET RECEIVE BUFFERS = 2500
After installing two NICs
SET MINIMUM PACKET RECEIVE BUFFERS = 1400
SET MAXIMUM PACKET RECEIVE BUFFERS = 2900
56
Installing and Configuring the NetWare Driver
Slot Numbers for Multiple NICs
If you are installing more than one NIC on a server, you must know which NIC corresponds
to a given PCI slot in order to connect a cable from the NIC to the appropriate port on the
hub or switch. You can correlate slots with physical NICs by the NIC MAC addresses. (The
MAC address is written on a bar code label on the top component side of the NIC.)
Obtaining Slot Numbers
The NetWare driver installation program requires you to enter a PCI slot number for each
NIC. In older versions of NetWare software, the term slot number referred to the physical
slot in which the NIC was installed in the server. Now, the slot number is a combination of
the bus number, bus type, and the physical slot number. The value of a slot number can be
10001 or larger.
Follow this procedure to obtain slot numbers for a multi-NIC installation:
1 Install only one 3C990B NIC, as described in “Installing and Connecting the NIC” on
page 18.
2 Follow the installation instructions in this chapter to load the EtherCD, copy the driver,
and load the driver.
3 In the NetWare Console, issue a CONFIG command.
4 Write down the slot number that is listed for the installed NIC.
5 Install the second 3C990B NIC.
6 Follow the installation instructions in this chapter to install the driver on the second NIC.
Each time you load the driver, the CONFIG command displays the slot numbers for all
the 3C990B NICs in the system.
Installing the NetWare 3.12 Server Driver
To install the driver in a NetWare 3.12 server:
1 Copy the MSM31X.NLM, ETHERTSM.NLM, and NBI31.NLM files from the \NWSERVER
directory on the EtherCD to the directory on your hard drive where other NLM files
are located.
NOTE: Copy the NLM files only if the versions existing on the server are older than
the versions supplied on the EtherCD.
The NLM file location is typically in the sys:system directory. You need a NetWare client
system to copy the NLM files to the server.
2 Copy the LAN driver file (3C99X.LAN) from the EtherCD to the same directory.
3 Add the following two lines to the AUTOEXEC.NCF file:
load sys:\system\3c99x.lan slot=<slot> NAME=<name>
FRAME=<frametype>
bind ipx to <name> net=<number>
NOTE: If you copy the NLM files to a different directory, you must specify the path
in the preceding LOAD statement.
4 Save and exit the file, and then reboot the server.
57
6
Installing NetWare Drivers
Installing the Server Driver for NetWare 4.11 and 5.x Using INETCFG
To install the driver in a NetWare 4.11or 5.x server:
1 Copy the MSM.NLM, ETHERTSM.NLM, and NBI.NLM files from the \NWSERVER
directory on the EtherCD to the directory on your hard drive where other NLM files
are located.
NOTE: Copy the NLM files only if the versions existing on the server are older
than the versions supplied on the EtherCD.
CAUTION: You can configure load balancing only through the command line
interface or by manually updating the AUTOEXEC.NCF file. You cannot have load
balancing automatically configured by INETCFG.SYS.
The NLM file location is typically in the sys:system directory. You need a NetWare client
system to copy the NLM files to the server.
2 Insert installation diskette 2 in drive A.
3 At the server prompt, enter:
load inetcfg
The Internetworking Configuration screen appears.
4 In the displayed menu, select Boards, and then press Enter.
5 Press Insert.
A list of currently installed drivers appears.
6 Press Insert again.
The New Driver dialog box appears.
7 Enter the directory:
a:\nwserver\3c99x.lan
An updated list of installed drivers appears.
8 Select 3C99x, and then press Enter.
You are prompted to name the NIC, for example: 3c99x_1.
9 Type the name of the NIC and press Enter.
You are prompted for the slot number. For information on how to verify the slot
number, see “Verifying the PCI Slot Number” on page 61.
10 Enter the slot number, and then press Enter.
11 Press Esc, Enter (to save), and then Esc.
The Internetworking Configuration screen appears.
12 Select Bindings, and then press Enter.
The configured protocols for installed NICs appears. (This list will be empty if no
protocols are currently bound to the NIC.)
58
Installing and Configuring the NetWare Driver
13 Press Insert.
The Select From the List of Configured Protocols screen appears.
For NetWare 5.x:
■ The default To a Network Interface is selected. Press Enter.
The Select a Configured Network Interface screen appears.
■ Select the board. For example, enter: 3c99x_1, and then press Enter.
14 When prompted, enter the network number, and then press Enter.
15 In the Frame Type field, press Enter to display a list of frames, choose a frame, and
press Enter.
16 Press Esc.
You are prompted to save the changes.
17 Press Enter to save the changes.
The configured Protocol to Network Interface Bindings screen appears.
18 Press Esc to Exit.
The Main menu appears.
■ NetWare 4.11: Restart the server.
■ NetWare 5.x:
■ Select Reinitialize System.
■ Press Enter to reinitialize.
19 Press Esc to exit from the program.
Installing the Server Driver and Advanced Server Features Using
AUTOEXEC.NCF
You can also install the server driver by editing (or adding new) LOAD commands in the
AUTOEXEC.NCF file.
With NetWare installed and the server up and running, complete the following steps to
install and configure the driver and 3Com Advanced Server technology server features on
a NetWare file server.
In NetWare screens, use the arrow keys to select an item, and then press Enter.
Loading the 3Com EtherCD
NetWare 4.11
Insert the CD in the CD-ROM drive and enter these commands:
load cdrom
cd mount ecd200p99x
NetWare 5.x
Insert the CD in the CD-ROM drive and enter this command:
load cdrom
Wait for the message that states the CD is mounted successfully, and then
proceed to copy the driver.
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6
Installing NetWare Drivers
Copying the Driver
1 Enter this command at the prompt:
■ NetWare 4.11: load install
■ NetWare 5.x:
load nwconfig
2 In the Configuration Options screen, select Driver options.
3 In the Driver Options screen, select Configure network drivers.
4 In the Additional Driver Actions screen, select Select a driver.
The Select a Driver screen appears, listing all previously saved drivers in the system.
If this is the first installation of the 3Com server NIC driver, it does not appear in this list.
5 Press Insert.
A system message for selecting a disk drive appears.
6 Press F3.
7 Enter a path to the volume that contains the driver. For example:
3C99XC_TXM:\nwserver
The Select a Driver to Install screen appears with the 3Com Server 10/100 PCI NIC
driver name highlighted.
8 Press Enter to select the driver.
9 Select Yes at the prompt to confirm the name of the driver to copy.
The installation program copies the driver to the appropriate server subdirectory. The
Configuration screen appears.
Specifying the Slot Number
You need not specify the slot number if you are installing only one NIC.
1 In the Configuration screen, select Slot Number.
2 Enter the slot number of the NIC that you want to install. For example:
10001
See “Changing NetWare Driver Configuration Parameters” on page 65 for
instructions on changing other parameters in this screen.
Loading the Driver
1 Select Save parameters and load driver.
The installation program loads the configured driver and then writes the appropriate
LOAD and BIND commands to the AUTOEXEC.NCF file.
The system assigns a network number.
2 Enter a network number, or press Enter to select the system-assigned number.
If no errors are encountered, the installation program asks whether you want to select
an additional network driver.
3 Select Yes to set up another NIC.
60
Installing and Configuring the NetWare Driver
Setting Up Another NIC
1 Follow the prompts for another NIC:
a Select the driver
b Enter the slot number
c Save parameters and load the driver
2 Repeat the process for all NICs to be set up.
3 After all NICs are set up, press Esc several times to return to the Installation Options screen.
Installing Multiple Server NICs
To support more than one NIC in a NetWare server, change the AUTOEXEC.NCF file to the
following format:
load 3C99X.LAN slot=<slot1> NAME=<name1> FRAME=<frametype1>
bind ipx to <name1> net=<net1>
load 3C99X.LAN slot=<slot2> NAME=<name2> FRAME=<frametype2>
bind ipx to <name2> net=<net2>
The values <slot1> and <slot2> are the numbers of the PCI slots in which the NICs are
physically installed. To view the numbers of these PCI slots, use the 3Com Configuration
and Diagnostic program for DOS. See “Verifying the PCI Slot Number” on page 61
for instructions.
The values <name1> and <name2> are unique names assigned to each NIC by your
system administrator. The values <name1> and <name 2> must be different.
The frame parameters <frametype1> and <frametype2> can be one of the following:
■ Ethernet_802.2
■ Ethernet_802.3
■ Ethernet_II
■ Ethernet_SNAP
Make sure that the frametype for the server and the workstation is the same. For example,
if the server uses Ethernet_802.2, the workstation must also use Ethernet_802.2.
The values <net1> and <net2> are unique numbers assigned by the system administrator
to each NIC. Make sure that <net1> and <net2> are different numbers.
See the appropriate Novell NetWare manuals for further information.
Verifying the PCI Slot Number
To verify the PCI slot number in which a NIC is installed:
1 Boot the NetWare server with the -na option.
This prevents the AUTOEXEC.NCF file from loading. For example, enter:
server -na
2 Issue the load command for the NIC LAN driver without a slot parameter.
For example, enter:
load sys:\system\3c99x.lan
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6
Installing NetWare Drivers
3 NetWare lists the valid slot number(s) for the NIC, depending on how many NICs are
installed. The values appearing in the list are the slot values that you should use.
Example:
After you issue the command, a message appears. At the end of the message,
additional text similar to the following appears:
Total of 2 3C99x PCI adapter card(s) found. Supported slot
values are 2,3.
Slot:2
Installing Server Features
Two drivers are associated with 3Com Advanced Server technology features under
NetWare: SE and LBRSL.
1 From the Configuration Options screen select Product options.
2 Select Install a product not listed.
The following message appears:
Product will be installed from A:\. If you are installing
from floppy, insert the first diskette of the product you
want to install into the drive and verify that the path above
is correct.
Press <F3> to specify a different path;
Press <ENTER> to continue.
3 Press F3.
4 Enter this command:
3c99xC_txm:\nwserver
The following message appears:
Product “3Com DynamicAccess Server Features” was found.
Verify that this is the product you want to install before
proceeding.
Press <ENTER> to continue.
Press <ESC> to abort installation.
5 Press Enter.
The system copies the 3Com Advanced Server software to the SYS volume.
Configuring Groups
1 Press Esc to return to the Installation Options screen.
2 From the Configuration Options screen, select NCF files options (create/edit server
startup files)
3 Select Edit AUTOEXEC.NCF file.
4 Make the following changes to the AUTOEXEC.NCF file:
a Add a command to load the SE and LBRSL drivers before any commands to load
LAN drivers. For example:
load se
load lbrsl
62
Installing and Configuring the NetWare Driver
CAUTION: Do not set Novell’s Load Balance Local LAN=ON when using SE and
LIBRSL (the 3Com Load Balancing suite).
b Add or verify the LOAD commands for the LAN drivers for all slot-frame instances.
c For each Load Balancing/RSL group, load the same protocols and frame types on
the primary and all secondary NICs.
d On the primary NIC only, bind a protocol to each slot-frame instance.
e Remove any protocol BIND commands from each secondary NIC.
f For each group, add an LBRSL GROUP command to group the primary and
secondary NICs together. There can be only one LBRSL GROUP command per
group, and it must list the primary and all secondary NICs. Place this command
after the LAN driver LOAD commands or the SYS:ETC\INITSYS.NCF command. To
specify a load balancing group with resilient server links, use the LB option. To
specify a resilient server link group without load balancing, use the RSL option.
CAUTION: If you are connecting the 3C990B NIC to a spanning tree-enabled hub
or switch, it is possible that the link may drop during load/reset. To avoid this
potential problem, avoid creating the load balancing group in the AUTOEXEC.NCF
file and comment out the LBRSL GROUP/BIND LB <slot 1><slot 2> line. Wait a
couple of minutes until one of the clients connected to the server is able to “see”
the server. Then use the command prompt on the server console screen to enter
the command shown above to form the load balancing group.
For the LBRSL GROUP command syntax, see “Server Feature Commands” on
page 69.
For more information on maintaining the group configuration, see “Maintaining
Groups” on page 65.
5 Save the AUTOEXEC.NCF file and return to the server prompt.
The sample AUTOEXEC.NCF file below shows a group of two NICs. The primary NIC in slot
10001 is bound to a secondary NIC in slot 10002.
63
6
Installing NetWare Drivers
load se
load lbrsl
;Define primary NIC slot-frame instances
load 3c99x slot=10001 frame=ethernet_802.2 name=p1_802.2
load 3c99x slot=10001 frame=ethernet_ii name=p1_ii
;Define secondary NIC slot-frame instances
load 3c99x slot=10002 frame=ethernet_802.2 name=p2_802.2
load 3c99x slot=10002 frame=ethernet_ii name=p2_ii
;Bind protocols to primary NIC
bind ipx to p1_802.2 net=FF02
bind ip to p1_ii address=192.1.1.1 mask=ff.ff.ff.00
;Create a group with NIC 10001 primary and NIC 10002
secondary
lbrsl group lb 10001 10002
;To create a resilient server link group without load
balancing (for
;use with NICs from manufacturers other than 3Com) use the
rsl option:
;lbrsl group rsl 10001 10002
Verifying the Installation and Configuration
To verify that the driver has been properly loaded on the NetWare server, perform the
following procedure:
1 At the system prompt, enter:
load monitor
The NetWare Monitor screen appears.
2 From the Available Options menu, select LAN/WAN Drivers.
The Available LAN Driver menu appears. If the driver has been properly loaded, the
driver and frame types associated with the driver appear on this menu.
3 Select a driver to view its associated statistics.
A functioning driver displays packets being sent and received.
To verify that the server is communicating over the network, complete the following
procedure:
1 Set up a NetWare client on a LAN supported by the server to be tested.
2 Log in or map to the server.
If you cannot log in or map to the server, the link is not functional.
If the link is functional, the following message appears:
Link integrity test for primary slot #XXXXX passed.
64
Changing NetWare Driver Configuration Parameters
Changing NetWare Driver Configuration Parameters
You can change server configuration parameters using the NetWare installation program
Configuration screen. The following table lists the parameters shown on the Configuration
screen. Default values are shown in uppercase text.
Parameter
Range of Values
Description
Slot Number
All PCI slot numbers valid to
the system
Represents the PCI slot number of the physical
NIC to be configured.
Node Address
Default is factory-assigned
MAC address.
Leave blank to use factory-assigned default.
ENABLE_CHKSUM
0 (Disable)
NetWare 5.x only. Enter the parameter on the
load line to enable TCP/IP checksum offload. The
default value is 0 (zero), which means Disable.
1 (Enable)
Do not enable TCP/IP checksum offload if you
plan to form load balancing/failover groups.
SHD_LEVEL
0 (None)
1 (Basic)
2 (Enhanced)
3 (Basic + Enhanced)
1 — The default value, indicating Basic.
Monitors levels for the following self-healing
driver conditions: firmware heartbeat,
interrupt availability, recoverable transmit and
receive errors (CRC, transmit underruns,
receive overruns, collisions, jabbers).
2 — Indicates Enhanced. In this state the NIC
monitors DMA stalls and hardware errors.
VERBOSE
MEDIA_SELECT
0 (Disable)
1 — Enables driver warning and error messages.
1 Enable
The default value is 0 (zero), which means
Disable.
0 (Auto negotiate)
Sets the media speed at which the NIC
communicates with other network devices.
1 (10 Mbps HALF duplex)
2 (10 Mbps FULL duplex)
3 (100 Mbps HALF duplex)
4 (100 Mbps FULL duplex)
The default value is 0 (zero), which means
Auto negotiate. In Auto negotiate mode, the
NIC automatically sets itself to the best
possible speed and duplexity of the network.
When set at any other valid value (1-4), the
NIC is forced to connect at the rate indicated
in the Range of Values column.
Note: If you force the speed and duplexity on
the NIC by using this parameter, make sure
that the NIC has the same speed and duplexity
as the network.
Maintaining Groups
3Com Advanced Server technology server features allow you to configure load balancing
groups. The load balancing features are described in “3Com DynamicAccess Advanced
Server Features” on page 9.
The following 3Com Advanced Server technology features are available for NIC groups
in NetWare:
■ load balancing
■ RSL failover
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6
Installing NetWare Drivers
The examples in this section illustrate typical actions you might take in the course of
maintaining a 3Com Advanced Server server configuration under NetWare. They show
how to add NICs and groups to a server where 3Com Advanced Server technology
features are already installed and configured.
Two drivers are associated with 3Com Advanced Server technology features in
NetWare: SE and LBRSL.
Planning the Configuration
In planning the configuration of your load balancing groups, consider the following factors:
■ Plan the cable changes required to connect each primary NIC and all secondary NICs
to the same network segment.
■ For optimum failover performance, turn the spanning tree feature off at switches that
are connected directly to the server. If the spanning tree feature must be turned on, a
failover may be delayed up to 30 seconds while the switch processes the spanning
tree algorithm.
■ Decide which NICs are to be part of each group. Each group must include at least
two NICs.
■ Decide whether you want to use a foreign NIC in one of the groups.
One foreign NIC (one that is not a 3C990B NIC) is allowed in one group per server.
■ Decide which NIC is to be the primary NIC in each group.
■ Decide whether groups are to perform load balancing:
■ Load balancing groups provide failover and share the network load.
■ Resilient server link groups provide failover, but do not share the network load.
■ If you plan to form load balancing/failover groups, do not enable TCP/IP checksum
offload.
■ To use bidirectional load balancing, you must assign a dedicated IP address for each load
balancing group. This address must be unique (not used elsewhere on the network).
■ Obtain the slot numbers of the NICs. You need these numbers if you are installing
more than one NIC. See “Obtaining Slot Numbers” on page 57 for instructions.
Adding a Secondary NIC to a Group
To add a secondary NIC to a load balancing group, follow these steps:
1 Install the new secondary NIC.
Follow the procedures in “Installing and Connecting the NIC” on page 18.
Connect the new secondary NIC to the network that is used by the group.
2 Make the following changes to the AUTOEXEC.NCF file:
■ Add or verify the LOAD commands for the LAN drivers for all slot-frame instances.
■ Load the same protocols and frame types on the new secondary NIC.
■ Add the slot number of the new secondary NIC to the LBRSL GROUP command.
3 Reboot the server.
The sample AUTOEXEC.NCF file in the following figure shows a group of three NICs. The
primary NIC in slot 10001 is bound to two secondary NICs in slot 10002 and slot 10003.
66
Maintaining Groups
load se
load lbrsl
;Define primary NIC slot-frame instances
load 3c99x slot=10001 frame=ethernet_802.2 name=p1_802.2
load 3c99x slot=10001 frame=ethernet_ii name=p1_ii
;Define secondary NIC
load 3c99x slot=10002
load 3c99x slot=10002
load 3c99x slot=10003
load 3c99x slot=10003
slot-frame instances
frame=ethernet_802.2 name=p2_802.2
frame=ethernet_ii name=p2_ii
frame=ethernet_802.2 name=p3_802.2
frame=ethernet_ii name=p3_ii
;Bind protocols to primary NIC
bind ipx to p1_802.2 net=FF02
bind ip to p1_ii address=192.1.1.1 mask=ff.ff.ff.00
;Create a group with NIC 10001 primary and NICs 10002 and
1003 secondary
lbrsl group lb 10001 10002 10003
;To create a resilient server link group without load
balancing (for
;use with NICs from manufacturers other than 3Com) use the
rsl option:
;lbrsl group rsl 10001 10002 10003
Adding a Group
To add a load balancing group, follow these steps:
1 Install the NICs.
Follow the procedures in “Installing and Connecting the NIC” on page 18.
Connect all NICs in the group to the same network.
2 Make the following changes to the AUTOEXEC.NCF file:
■ Add or verify the LOAD commands for the LAN drivers for all slot-frame instances.
■ In each group, load the same protocols and frame types on the primary and all
secondary NICs.
■ On the primary NIC only, bind a protocol to each slot-frame instance.
■ Remove any BIND commands from each secondary NIC.
■ For each group, add an LBRSL GROUP command to bind the primary and secondary
NICs together. There can be only one LBRSL GROUP command per group, and it
must list the primary and all secondary NICs. Place this command after the LAN
driver LOAD commands or the SYS:ETC\INITSYS.NCF command. To specify a load
balancing group with resilient server links, use the LB option. To specify a resilient
server link group without load balancing, use the RSL option.
For the LBRSL GROUP command syntax, see “Server Feature Commands” on
page 69.
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Installing NetWare Drivers
3 Reboot the server.
The sample AUTOEXEC.NCF file in the following figure shows one group of three
NICs and one group of two NICs. The primary NIC in slot 10001 is bound to two
secondary NICs in slot 10002 and slot 10003. The primary NIC in slot 10004 is bound
to the secondary NIC in slot 10005.
load se
load lbrsl
;Define Group 1 primary NIC slot-frame instances
load 3c99x slot=10001 frame=ethernet_802.2 name=p1_802.2
load 3c99x slot=10001 frame=ethernet_ii name=p1_ii
;Define Group 1 secondary NIC slot-frame instances
load 3c99x slot=10002 frame=ethernet_802.2 name=p2_802.2
load 3c99x slot=10002 frame=ethernet_ii name=p2_ii
load 3c99x slot=10003 frame=ethernet_802.2 name=p3_802.2
load 3c99x slot=10003 frame=ethernet_ii name=p3_ii
;Define Group 2 primary NIC slot-frame instances
load 3c99x slot=10004 frame=ethernet_802.2 name=p4_802.2
load 3c99x slot=10004 frame=ethernet_ii name=p4_ii
;Define Group 2 secondary NIC slot-frame instances
load 3c99x slot=10005 frame=ethernet_802.2 name=p5_802.2
load 3c99x slot=10005 frame=ethernet_ii name=p5_ii
;Bind protocols to primary NICs
bind ipx to p1_802.2 net=FF02
bind ip to p1_ii address=192.1.1.1 mask=ff.ff.ff.00
bind ipx to p4_802.2 net=FF04
bind ip to p4_ii address=192.1.2.1 mask=ff.ff.ff.00
;Create Group 1 with NIC 10001 primary
;and NICs 10002 and 10003 secondary
lbrsl group lb 10001 10002 10003
;Create Group 2 with NIC 10004 primary
;and NIC 10005 secondary
lbrsl group lb 10004 10005
;To create resilient server link groups without load balancing
;use the rsl option:
;lbrsl group rsl 10001 10002 10003
;lbrsl group rsl 10004 10005
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Maintaining Groups
Server Feature Commands
3Com Advanced Server feature commands for NetWare can be used to create sophisticated
configurations of groups and for troubleshooting. You can enter them at the NetWare command
line or add them to the appropriate NCF file. The commands are summarized below.
As shown in the examples, all commands are preceded by the keyword lbrsl.
group
This command creates groups from specified slot parameters for primary and secondary NICs.
Syntax
lbrsl group lb addr RxIPAddr pri_slot sec_slot
[sec_slot ...]
lbrsl group rsl pri_slot sec_slot
[sec_slot...]
where:
lb specifies a load balancing group.
rsl specifies a resilient server link group.
RxIPAddr is a dedicated IP address for the load balancing
group
pri_slot is the PCI slot number of the primary NIC.
sec_slot is the PCI slot number of a secondary NIC.
Example
lbrsl group lb addr 192.1.1.100 10001
10002
lbrsl group rsl 10001 10002
Default
None
display status
This command displays information about all groups, or if a primary slot parameter is
specified, only about the specified group. A separate message is displayed for each loaded
frame type. Board numbers are also displayed. Information about the relationship
between the board numbers and the frame types is shown in the NetWare 5 Console
Monitor. On the Available Options screen, select LAN/WAN drivers for this information.
Syntax
lbrsl display status [pri_slot]
where:
pri_slot is the PCI slot number of the primary NIC in
the group for which information is to be displayed. If
this parameter is not specified, information for all
groups is displayed. An example of the type of
information displayed follows:
Group NNN (LB group)
Primary board id: Original NNN, Current NNN
Load balancing on incoming IP packets: Enabled; IP Rx
Addr: NN.NN.NN.NN
Primary node address: XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
Timeout values in seconds: send NNN, receive NNN,
wait NNN, link NNN
Probe Interval: NNN seconds
Slot number NNN (Active), Node Address:
XXX:XXX:XXX:XXX:XXX:XXX
Example
lbrsl display status 10001
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Installing NetWare Drivers
help
This command displays the syntax for the 3Com Advanced Server server features
commands.
Syntax
lbrsl help
link timeout
When a group is being created, the software waits the number of seconds specified by
this command for the link/topology check to finish and then displays timeout
information.
Syntax
lbrsl link timeout seconds
where:
seconds is the time in seconds.
Example
lbrsl link timeout 10
Default
5
probe interval
This command sets the probe packet interval. If no argument is specified or the specified
argument is invalid, the current value is displayed. Otherwise, the new value is displayed.
Syntax
lbrsl probe interval seconds
where seconds is the interval in seconds.
Example
lbrsl set probe interval 1
Default
1 second
If the delay is longer than 1 second, NIC or link
failures are not recognized as quickly.
receive timeout
This command sets the receive timeout individually for each group and displays a message
for each loaded frame type.
Syntax
lbrsl receive timeout pri_slot seconds
where:
pri_slot is the PCI slot number of the primary NIC.
seconds is the time in seconds
70
Example
lbrsl receive timeout 10001 1
Default
1 second
Maintaining Groups
retry count
This command sets the number of retries that the software attempts when a probe packet
fails to appear at the receive end. After the retries, the software puts the board in Wait
mode. If no argument is specified or the specified argument is invalid, the current value is
displayed. Otherwise, the new value is displayed.
Syntax
lbrsl retry count number_of_retries
where:
number_of_retries is any positive integer
Example
lbrsl retry count 2
Default
5
send timeout
This command sets the timeout value, in seconds, that the software waits before
retransmitting a probe packet when a send request to the link support layer (LSL) is not
acknowledged. A message is displayed for each loaded frame type.
Syntax
lbrsl send timeout pri_slot seconds
where:
pri_slot is the PCI slot number of the primary NIC.
seconds is the time in seconds.
Example
lbrsl send timeout 1001 10
Default
10
ungroup
This command deletes a group. The LAN driver for the group must not be loaded. The
following message appears for all frame types that the NIC supports:
Cleaning up resources for group associated with Primary Slot
#xxxx.
Syntax
lbrsl ungroup pri_slot
where:
pri_slot is the PCI slot number of the primary NIC.
Example
lbrsl ungroup 10001
Default
None
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Installing NetWare Drivers
wait timeout
This command sets the timeout value, in seconds, that the software waits before marking
a NIC that is in wait mode as failed (see retry count). If no argument is specified or if the
specified argument is invalid, the current value is displayed. Otherwise, the new value is
displayed.
Syntax
lbrsl wait timeout seconds
where:
seconds is any positive integer.
Example
lbrsl wait timeout 2
Default
1
Troubleshooting a Group Configuration
Use the troubleshooting tip in the table below to solve problems that may occur in a
group configuration.
NOTE: To access a database of technical information that can help you diagnose
and solve NIC installation, configuration, and upgrade problems, go to:
http://knowledgebase.3com.com
72
Symptom
Tip
More than one non-3Com server NIC
has been detected in one or more
groups on this server.
You can use only one NIC that is not a 3Com server NIC in
one 3Com load balancing/RSL group per server. Check the
groups and remove all but one of the non-3Com server
NICs from the groups.
7
Configuring the NIC
This chapter describes how to configure the NIC.
NOTE: Before you change the NIC configuration settings, contact your system
administrator.
Default NIC Settings
The table below lists the configuration settings for the NIC. The default setting is shown in
uppercase in the Settings column.
Option
Description
NetBoot ROM
Provides the ability to boot a PC over the network. Enables or
disables the Netboot ROM (if a boot ROM is installed on the NIC).
■
DISABLED
■
Enabled
Determines if the NIC transmits data across the network in both
directions simultaneously (full-duplex) or in one direction at a
time (half-duplex).
■
AUTO
SELECT
■
Full-Duplex
■
Half-Duplex
Duplex
■
Auto Select allows the NIC to automatically connect at the
duplex mode of the connected hub or switch. When you
select this setting, the Media Type is automatically set to
Auto Select.
■
Full-Duplex sets the NIC to operate in full-duplex mode. To
use this setting, the switch that you are connected to must
support full-duplex. You must also manually set the NIC
Media Type setting.
■
Half-Duplex sets the NIC to operate in half-duplex mode. You
must also set the NIC Media Type setting.
Settings
Note: If you are running Windows 2000, changes made to the
Duplex setting though the 3Com NIC Diagnostics are not
reflected in the registry unless you also change the Media Select
property setting in Windows 2000:
1 In the Device Manager window, double-click Network
adapters.
2 Right-click the 3C990B NIC and select Properties.
3 Select the Advanced tab.
4 Select Media Select in the property list, and make the
appropriate setting change in the Value list.
(continued)
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Configuring the NIC
Option
Description
Media Type
Determines the type of media your network is using.
Settings
■
■
Auto Select allows the NIC to automatically select the Media
Type for you.
AUTO
SELECT
■
■
If you set the NIC Duplex setting to Auto Select, the
Media Type is automatically set to Auto Select.
100BASE-TX
(100 Mbs)
■
10BASE-T
(10 Mbs)
■
BASIC
■
Disabled
■
Enhanced
■
HIGH
■
Medium
■
Low
■
Off
■
Information
■
Warning
■
Error
■
ALL
■
DISABLED
■
Enabled
■
If you set the NIC Duplex setting manually, you must set the
Media Type setting manually.
Note: If you are running Windows 2000, changes made to the
Media Type setting though the 3Com NIC Diagnostics are not
reflected in the registry unless you also change the Media Select
property setting in Windows 2000:
1 In the Device Manager window, double-click Network
adapters.
2 Right-click the 3C990B NIC and select Properties.
3 Select the Advanced tab.
4 Select Media Select in the property list, and make the
appropriate setting change in the Value list.
Self Healing
In BASIC mode, monitors firmware heartbeat and interrupt stalls,
and tries to automatically reset the NIC.
Also monitors link status and reports changes.
In ENHANCED mode, checks for transmit/receive errors and tries
to recover.
Error
Tolerance
Alert Type
Specifies threshold levels for transmit/receive errors. An RSL failover
or NIC reset occurs when the threshold is exceeded during the
sampling period.
■
High = 100 of each error category (default setting)
■
Medium = 50 of each error category
■
Low = 5 of each error category
Enabled alert types are reported to the Windows System Events
monitor. The default setting is ALL. alert types:
- Information
- Warning
- Error
Flow Control
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When enabled, the NIC throttles the incoming data packet stream
to prevent the input buffers from overflowing and losing packets.
Configuration Methods
Configuration Methods
The NIC can be configured using any of the methods listed in the table below.
NOTE: This section describes how to configure the NIC using the 3Com NIC
Diagnostics program for Windows. For instructions on using the other two
methods, see the file or section mentioned in the table.
Method
Description
Requirement(s)
3Com NIC
Diagnostics program
for Windows
Configure the NIC locally using the 3Com NIC
Diagnostics program for Windows:
Windows 2000
Windows NT 4.0
Windows Me
Windows 98, or
Windows 95
1 Make sure that the 3Com NIC diagnostics
program is installed. See “Installing the
3Com NIC Diagnostics Program” on page 29
for installation instructions. See “Using the
3Com NIC Diagnostics Program” later in this
chapter for usage instructions.
2 Open the Windows Start menu.
3 Select Programs, and then
3Com NIC Utilities.
4 Click 3Com NIC Doctor.
3Com
Configuration and
Diagnostics program
for DOS
Configure the NIC locally using the 3Com
Configuration and Diagnostics program for DOS:
DOS or NetWare
1 Copy 3c99xcfg.exe from the EtherCD to the
root directory of a DOS-bootable diskette.
2 Reboot the PC using the DOSbootable diskette.
3 Enter at the DOS prompt:
a:\3c99xcfg.exe
See “Using the 3Com DOS Configuration
Program” on page 77 for more information.
Customers running Japanese DOS must switch
to U.S. mode DOS before running this program.
DMI 2.0 or 2.0s
Configure the NIC remotely using the 3Com DMI
Agent software.
See “Installing the 3Com DMI Agent” on
page 99 for more information.
Windows 2000
Advanced Tab
Configure the NIC locally as described in
“Changing Windows 2000 Property Settings”
on page 52.
3Com DMI Agent and a
DMI-compatible browser
or a network
management application
that supports DMI 2.0
or 2.0s
Windows 2000
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7
Configuring the NIC
Changing General NIC Configuration Settings
This section describes two NIC configuration methods. Depending on your PC operating
system, you can use one of the following configuration programs:
■ 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program—for PCs running Windows 2000, Windows NT
4.0, Windows Me, Windows 98, or Windows 95.
■ 3Com Configuration and Diagnostics Program for DOS—for PCs running DOS
and NetWare.
Using the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program
This section describes NIC configuration for PCs running Windows 2000, Windows NT
4.0, Windows Me, Windows 98, or Windows 95.
Before you configure the NIC, make sure that:
■ The NIC is installed in the PC and is connected to the network.
■ The network driver is installed.
■ The 3Com NIC Diagnostics program is installed.
To change the NIC general configuration settings, such as network driver optimization,
duplex mode, and media type:
1 Open the Windows Start menu.
2 Select Programs, and then 3Com NIC Utilities.
3 Click 3Com NIC Doctor.
The 3Com NIC Diagnostics General screen appears.
NOTE: Click Help to obtain general information about the function of a screen. To
obtain specific information about any topic on a screen, click the question mark (?)
in the upper right corner of the screen, move it over a topic, and click once.
4 If your PC has more than one NIC installed, open the Network Interface Card (NIC) list
box and select the NIC to be configured.
5 Click the Configuration tab.
The Configuration screen appears.
6 Under Network Parameter, select the setting to be changed.
For a description of each setting, click the question mark (?) in the upper right corner
of the screen, move it over a setting, and click once.
7 Open the Set Value list box and select a new value from the list of available options.
Repeat the process to change any other configuration setting.
To undo changes and return the settings to their previous values, click Undo Changes.
To return the settings to the factory default settings, click Set Factory Defaults.
8 Click OK to save the changes and exit the program.
NOTE: For complete instructions on using the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program,
see “Running NIC Diagnostics” on page 91.
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Configuring the Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA)
Using the 3Com DOS Configuration Program
This section describes NIC configuration for computers running DOS or NetWare.
To run the DOS diagnostic program:
1 Copy 3c99xcfg.exe from the EtherCD to the root directory of a DOS-bootable diskette.
NOTE: If you do not have a DOS-bootable diskette, see “Making a DOS-Bootable
Diskette” on page 15 for instructions.
2 Boot to DOS using the DOS-bootable diskette.
3 Enter the following at the DOS prompt:
a:\3c99xcfg.exe
where a:\ is the drive containing the DOS-bootable diskette.
If multiple NICs are installed in the PC, select Select NIC on the first screen to display a
list of installed NICs. Use the arrow keys to select the NIC that you want to configure
and press Enter.
4 Use the arrow keys to scroll the list and make a selection. Press Enter.
NOTE: On the Configuration screen, when you choose the Auto Select setting for
Media Type, the setting for Duplex is automatically changed to Auto Select.
Selecting Auto Select for Duplex automatically changes the Media Type setting to
Auto Select.
NOTE: Note that any configuration change you make through the Windows 2000
Advanced tab overrides the same configuration setting made through the 3Com
NIC (Windows) Diagnostic program or the 3Com DOS Diagnostic program.
5 Continue this procedure for other options. For more information on a specific option,
select the option and press F1.
NOTE: Press Esc to return to a previous screen. If a secondary window is open,
press Esc to close the window.
Configuring the Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA)
This section explains how to configure the Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA) boot ROM to
boot from the network.
NOTE: For detailed information on using, configuring, and troubleshooting the
MBA boot ROM, refer to the Managed PC Boot Agent User Guide, located with
the MBA software on the EtherCD.
Enabling or Disabling the Boot ROM Setting
The default NIC boot ROM setting is Disabled. This setting must be enabled to boot from
the network.
To enable or disable the NIC boot ROM setting:
1 Make sure that the NIC is installed and is connected to the network and that the NIC
driver is installed.
2 Open the Windows Start menu.
3 Select Programs, and then 3Com NIC Utilities.
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7
Configuring the NIC
4 Click 3Com NIC Doctor.
The 3Com NIC Diagnostics General screen appears.
5 Select the Configuration tab.
The Configuration screen appears.
6 Under Network Parameter, select NetBoot ROM.
7 Open the Set Value list box and select Enabled to enable the boot ROM or Disabled to
disable the boot ROM.
8 Click OK to save the setting and exit the program.
Booting From the Network
The boot process for the MBA boot ROM varies depending on the type of PC you have
(BBS BIOS-compatible or non-BBS BIOS-compatible).
If your PC was purchased recently, it may be BBS (BIOS Boot Specification) BIOScompatible. The BBS determines how the system BIOS identifies boot devices in a PC (such
as a CD-ROM drive, a hard drive, or a floppy drive), allows the user to select the boot
order of these devices, and then attempts to boot from each device in the specified order.
Refer to your PC documentation if you do not know which type of PC you have.
BBS BIOS-Compatible PCs
To enable a BBS BIOS-compatible PC to boot from the network using the MBA boot ROM:
1 Make sure that the NIC boot ROM setting is Enabled.
See the previous section, “Enabling or Disabling the Boot ROM Setting,” for instructions.
2 Set the MBA manually as the first boot device in the PC BIOS.
Refer to your PC documentation for instructions on accessing and configuring the
PC BIOS.
3 Reboot the PC.
The MBA attempts to boot from the network using the default boot method PXE. To
change the default boot method or any other MBA configurations, press Ctrl+Alt+B
when the following message appears:
Initializing MBA. Press Ctrl+Alt+B to configure...
If the network boot fails, the following message appears:
Network boot aborted, press any key to continue
The BIOS continues to the next device in the boot order (for example, the local hard drive).
NOTE: To cancel the network boot, press Esc anytime during the network boot process.
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Disabling the 3Com Logo
Non-BBS BIOS-Compatible PCs
To enable a non-BBS BIOS-compatible PC to boot from the network using the MBA boot ROM:
1 Make sure that the NIC boot ROM setting is Enabled.
See “Enabling or Disabling the Boot ROM Setting” on page 77 for instructions.
2 Change the MBA default boot setting from Local to Network.
To change the default boot setting or any other MBA configurations, use the
MBACFG utility or press Ctrl+Alt+B when the following message appears:
Initializing MBA. Press Ctrl+Alt+B to configure...
CAUTION: For computers running Windows 98, boot directly to DOS (using a
DOS-bootable diskette) instead of restarting in MS-DOS mode from a Windows 98
session. The MBACFG.EXE program will not work properly if you restart in MSDOS mode with the 3C990B NIC drivers loaded.
NOTE: For more information on using, configuring, and troubleshooting the MBA
boot ROM, refer to the Managed PC Boot Agent User Guide, located with
the MBA software on the EtherCD.
Disabling the 3Com Logo
To disable the 3Com logo that appears during startup:
1 Make sure that the NIC, the network driver, and the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program
are installed.
2 Open the Windows Start menu.
3 Select Programs, and then 3Com NIC Utilities.
4 Click 3Com NIC Doctor.
The 3Com NIC Diagnostics General screen appears.
5 On the General screen, make sure that the check box next to Show 3Com Logo on
Startup is not selected.
6 Exit the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program.
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8
Troubleshooting the NIC
This chapter describes procedures for locating problems you might have with the
3Com 10/100 PCI (3C990B) NIC. It explains how to:
■ Interpret the NIC LEDs.
■ Access 3Com support databases.
■ Troubleshoot NIC installation problems.
■ Troubleshoot NIC and network connection problems.
■ Troubleshoot Remote Wake-Up.
■ Remove the network driver.
NOTE: To access a database of technical information that can help you diagnose
and solve NIC installation, configuration, and upgrade problems, go to:
http://knowledgebase.3com.com
Interpreting the NIC LEDs
The 3C990B NICs have light-emitting diodes (LEDs), as described in the following table,
that can assist with network troubleshooting.
LED
State
Meaning
YEL/100 GRN/10
Green
If drivers are installed, the 10BASE-T connection is active.
If drivers are not installed, the NIC is receiving power.
Off
YEL/100 GRN/10
Something is preventing the connection between the NIC and the
hub or switch.
Blinking
The cable polarity is reversed. Try a different network cable or
contact your system administrator.
Yellow
If drivers are installed, the 100BASE-TX connection is active.
If drivers are not installed, the NIC is receiving power.
ACT (activity)
Off
Something is preventing the connection between the NIC and the
hub or switch.
Blinking
The cable polarity is reversed. Try a different network cable or
contact your system administrator.
Blinking
Network traffic is present.
Steady
Heavy network traffic is present.
Off
No network traffic is present.
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8
Troubleshooting the NIC
Viewing the NIC LEDs in the Diagnostics Program
To view the LEDs in the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program:
1 Make sure that the NIC, the network driver, and the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program
are installed.
NOTE: For instructions on using the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program, see
“Running NIC Diagnostics” on page 91.
2 Open the Windows Start menu.
3 Select Programs, and then 3Com NIC Utilities.
4 Click 3Com NIC Doctor.
The 3Com NIC Diagnostics General screen appears and displays following LEDs:
Link — lights if there is a valid connection between the NIC and the network.
Transmit — lights if the NIC is transmitting information.
Receive — lights if the NIC is receiving information.
Troubleshooting Problems with the LEDs
If a Link LED indicates a problem, check the following ensure that:
1 Your network hub or switch and the cable connecting to your NIC comply with the
specifications appropriate for your network connection.
2 The hub or switch is powered on.
Accessing 3Com Support Databases
In addition to the 3Com support databases listed in this section, check the README.TXT
files in the ENGLISH, INSTALLS, and NWSERVER subdirectories and check the Help text
files located in the HELP directory on the EtherCD.
Accessing the 3Com Knowledgebase
To access a database of technical information that can help you diagnose and solve NIC
installation, configuration, and upgrade problems, go to:
http://knowledgebase.3com.com
Accessing the 3Com NIC Help System
To access the 3Com NIC Help system:
1 Make sure that the NIC, its driver, and the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program are installed.
See “Installing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program” on page 29 for instructions.
2 Open the Windows Start menu.
3 Select Programs, and then 3Com NIC Utilities.
4 Select 3Com NIC Doctor Help.
The main Help screen appears.
5 Click Help Topics to display a list of Help topics or click Find to search for a Help topic.
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Troubleshooting the NIC Installation
Accessing Release Notes and Frequently Asked Questions
To access release notes and frequently asked questions about the NIC:
1 Make sure that the NIC, its driver, and the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program are installed.
See “Installing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program” on page 29 for instructions.
2 Open the Windows Start menu.
3 Select Programs, and then 3Com NIC Utilities.
4 Click 3Com NIC Doctor.
The 3Com NIC Diagnostics General screen appears.
5 Click the Support tab.
The Support screen appears.
6 Click Support Databases to display customer support databases about the NIC in three
categories:
Release notes — Display tips about installing and using the NIC.
Frequently asked questions — Display common questions asked by customers and
answered by 3Com support experts.
Knowledgebase topics — Display NIC compatibility topics.
Troubleshooting the NIC Installation
If you encounter any of the following problems or error messages, follow the steps in
“Cleaning Up a Broken Installation” later in this chapter to resolve the problem.
Problems/Error Messages
■
■
■
■
■
■
A red X or a A yellow exclamation point (!) appears by the name of the NIC in the
Windows Device Manager.
The Network Neighborhood icon does not appear on the Windows desktop.
The NIC does not appear in the Network Configuration or Properties window.
Error: “This device is not present, not working properly, or does not have all of the
driver installed. Code 22.”
Error: “Windows was unable to locate a driver for this device.”
Error: “You have selected a plug and play adapter. Please turn off your machine an
install the adapter. Then turn on your machine and reinstall.”
Cleaning Up a Broken Installation
If the network driver installation failed, or was not completed properly, follow the steps
below to clean up your system and install the NIC correctly.
This procedure:
■ Removes all 3C990B NIC drivers from your system.
■ Removes the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program.
■ Installs the latest network driver.
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8
Troubleshooting the NIC
You can reinstall the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program after completing this procedure. See
“Installing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program” on page 29 for instructions.
1 Insert the EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive.
The EtherCD Welcome screen appears.
2 Click NIC Software.
3 Click Installation Utilities.
4 Click Undo Broken Installation and Uninstall.
You are given the option to Proceed or go Back. Before proceeding, write down your
network settings so that you can refer to your notes when you reinstall the NIC.
5 Click Proceed.
The uninstall process begins. A warning message appears.
6 Click OK.
A message appears stating that all of the 3C990B NICs have been removed from
your system.
7 Click OK.
8 Exit the EtherCD, and then exit Windows.
9 Restart the computer.
10 Install the network driver, as described in “Installing the Network Driver Using the
EtherCD” on page 21.
If you are prompted for 3Com files when Windows restarts, open the drop-down box
and select the following path:
\options\cabs
See Chapter 3, “Installing NIC Drivers and Diagnostics For Windows,” for information
about confirming that the NIC and driver are properly installed.
After the driver has been reinstalled, reinstall the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program. See
“Installing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program” on page 29 for instructions.
Troubleshooting the Network Connection
If you encounter problems with using the NIC or connecting to the network, check the
table below for troubleshooting tips.
CAUTION: Before inserting or removing the NIC from the computer, turn the
computer power off and unplug the power cord.
Tip
Description
Check the NIC
hardware installation
Make sure that the NIC is installed correctly in a PCI slot. Check for specific
hardware problems, such as broken traces or loose or broken solder
connections. See “Installing and Connecting the NIC” on page 18.
Check the NIC
software installation
Make sure that the NIC software is installed correctly in the computer.
(continued)
84
See Chapter 3, “Installing NIC Drivers and Diagnostics For Windows,” for
information about confirming that the NIC and driver are properly installed.
Troubleshooting Remote Wake-Up
Tip
Description (continued)
Check the network
connection
■
Inspect all cables and connections. Make sure that the cable complies with
length and rating specifications described in “Installing and Connecting
the NIC” on page 18.
■
Examine the cable for obvious signs of damage, wear, or crimping.
Substitute a known working cable. Check the length and rating of the
cable. Make sure that the cable complies with 10BASE-T or 100BASE-TX
recommendations.
Check the
computer BIOS
Make sure that you are running the latest BIOS for your computer. If the BIOS
has not been upgraded in the previous 12 months, contact the computer
manufacturer to obtain the current version of the BIOS software.
Run the NIC
diagnostic tests
Run the NIC and Network Tests, as described in “Running NIC Diagnostics” on
page 91.
If the tests fail, replace the NIC with a known working NIC and run the tests
again, using the same configuration settings as those used on the failed NIC. If
the working NIC passes all tests, the original NIC is probably defective. For
information on product repair, see “Technical Support” on page 109.
Check the
3Com support
databases
Review the known problems and solutions found in the following areas:
■
3Com Knowledgebase
■
3Com NIC Help system
■
Release Notes and Frequently Asked Questions
See “Accessing 3Com Support Databases” on page 82 for instructions on
using these databases.
Download the latest
NIC driver
The 3Com Software Library is your World Wide Web connection to software,
drivers, and INF files for all 3Com products. Point your browser to the 3Com
Web page (http://www.3com.com/). Under Service and Support, click
Software, Drivers & INFs.
Run the Clean Up
Failed Installation
program
The Clean Up Failed Installation program is located on the EtherCD. See
“Cleaning Up a Broken Installation” on page 83 for instructions.
Troubleshooting Remote Wake-Up
If your computer does not boot in response to a Remote Wake-Up event, perform these
troubleshooting steps:
1 Make sure that the computer meets the “Remote Wake-Up Requirements” on
page 6.
NOTE: Wake-On-Error is enabled by default.
2 Make sure that you are using the latest driver for the NIC.
This driver is shipped with the NIC on the EtherCD. It can also be downloaded from the
3Com Software Library. Point your Web browser to the 3Com home page:
http://www.3com.com/
Under “Service and Support,” click Software, Drivers, and INFs.
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Troubleshooting the NIC
3 Check the computer BIOS.
■ Boot the computer and enter the BIOS.
■ For instructions on entering the BIOS, refer to the computer documentation or
consult the computer vendor.
■ Locate the Wake-Up on LAN event setting.
■ Verify that the setting is enabled.
4 Check the Remote Wake-Up cable connection.
If the computer complies with PCI 2.2, the Remote Wake-Up cable is not required.
Remote Wake-Up is automatically enabled through the PCI bus.
■ Turn off the power to the computer and remove the computer cover.
■ Make sure that the Remote Wake-Up cable is plugged in to the RWU connector on
the NIC and in to the appropriate connector on the computer motherboard.
Unplug and reinsert the cable if necessary.
■ Replace the Remote Wake-Up cable with a known functioning Remote Wake-Up
cable and perform the Remote Wake-Up Test again.
5 If the previous steps have failed, install a known functioning Remote Wake-Up NIC in
the computer.
If Remote Wake-Up works with the new NIC installed, consult your computer vendor
for a replacement NIC.
If Remote Wake-Up does not work with the new NIC installed, there may be a
problem with the computer motherboard. Consult your computer manufacturer.
Troubleshooting a Network Connection
When working with 10BASE-T or 100BASE-TX cabling, concentrators, and NICs from
different vendors, it is possible to connect everything but still have no network
communication.
NOTE: For additional network troubleshooting information, see “Running NIC
Diagnostics” on page 91.
To narrow the range of possible causes of common network connection problems:
1 Determine whether your equipment complies with the 10BASE-T or 100BASE-TX standard.
This is particularly important for data concentrators (hubs or repeaters).
2 Connect a straight-through cable from the PC to the hub.
The hub performs an internal crossover so that the signal can go from TD+ to RD+
and TD– to RD–. When you look at an RJ-45 connector from the front (that is, the
opposite side from where the wires enter the connector), pin 1 is identified on the
right side when the metal contacts are facing up.
3 Make sure that the TD+ and TD– wires are twisted together, and that the RD+ and
RD– are twisted together.
Using wires from opposing pairs can cause signals to be lost.
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Removing the Network Driver
Troubleshooting Hubs
A crossover cable can be used to identify the type of failure when hub performance or
connectivity is in question.
To use a crossover cable:
1 Connect a file server and a client PC back-to-back with a crossover cable to verify that
the NIC and network operating system are properly configured.
2 To make a crossover cable, connect TD+ to RD+ and TD– to RD–.
The cable performs the crossover that is usually performed by the hub.
Cabling Pinouts
The following illustration compares the cabling pinouts for straight-through and crossover cables.
12345678
Straight-through
10BASE-T cable
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Crossover
10BASE-T cable
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
TD+ 1
TD– 2
RD+ 3
4
5
RD– 6
7
8
1 TD+
2 TD–
3 RD+
4
5
6 RD–
7
8
If the file server and client PC function together as a small network, then either the
existing cabling or the hub is failing.
When a crossover cable is used, the LED on the NIC functions differently than it would
under normal operating conditions. For example, with a correct crossover connection, the
LED lights, whereas with a straight-through connection, the LED does not light. If you
make a crossover cable and the polarity is mismatched (that is, TD+ to RD– instead of TD+
to RD+), the LED blinks.
Removing the Network Driver
To remove the network driver from your computer, follow the steps for your operating system.
Windows 2000
The Windows 2000 system does not allow you to uninstall the network driver from the
Network and Dial-up Connections window. To remove the network driver:
1 Right-click the My Computer icon.
2 Select Properties on the pop-up menu.
The System Properties screen appears.
3 Select the Hardware tab.
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Troubleshooting the NIC
4 Click Device Manager in the middle panel.
The Device Manager screen appears.
5 Double-click Network Adapters.
6 Right-click the name of the NIC.
7 Select Uninstall on the pop-up menu.
A warning message appears.
8 Click OK to confirm the driver removal.
The network driver is removed. The Device Manager screen appears.
NOTE: The Windows 2000 system does not allow you to uninstall the 3Com
Advanced Server technology miniport using the Device Manager. To remove
Advanced Server technology features in Windows 2000, see “Removing 3Com
DynamicAccess Advanced Server Features” on page 89.
9 Exit the Device Manager and shut down Windows.
To reinstall the NIC driver and software, restart the computer.
To physically remove the NIC from the computer, shut down the system, turn the
power off, and remove the NIC from the computer.
Windows NT 4.0
To remove the network driver:
1 Double-click the My Computer icon, then the Control Panel icon, and then the
Network icon.
The Network screen appears.
2 Click the Adapters tab.
3 Select the name of the NIC in the Network Adapters box, and then click Remove.
4 Click Yes to confirm the removal.
5 Click Close to close the Network screen.
You are prompted to restart the computer.
6 Depending on whether you are removing the NIC or reinstalling NIC software, do the
following:
■ If you are physically removing the NIC from the computer, click No. Do not restart
the computer until you shut down the system, turn the power off, and remove the
NIC from the computer.
■ If you are reinstalling the NIC software, click Yes to restart the computer.
Windows 95, 98, and Me
To remove the network driver:
1 Double-click the My Computer icon, then the Control Panel icon, and then the
System icon.
2 Click the Device Manager tab.
3 Double-click Network adapters.
4 Select the name of the NIC.
5 Click Remove.
88
Removing 3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server Features
6 Click OK to confirm the device removal.
NOTE: Note that removing the network driver does not result in the removal of
the diagnostics software. See “Removing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program”
on page 95.
You are prompted to restart the computer.
If you are physically removing the NIC from the computer, click No. Do not restart the
computer until you shut down the system, turn the power off, and remove the NIC from
the computer.
If you are reinstalling the NIC software, click Yes to restart the computer.
Removing 3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server Features
Follow the steps in this section to remove 3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server features
for your operating system.
Windows NT 4.0
To remove 3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server features:
1 From the Start menu, select Settings/Control Panel.
2 Double-click the Network icon.
3 In the Network window, click the Protocols tab.
4 In the Protocols tab, select DA Pass Thru Driver Transport.
5 Click Remove.
6 Follow the prompts to remove the software and reboot the server.
Windows 2000
The Windows 2000 system does not allow you to uninstall the 3Com Advanced Server
technology miniport using the Device Manager. To remove 3Com DynamicAccess
Advanced Server features:
1 Launch the Windows 2000 Network and Dial-up Connections window.
2 Select a Local Area Connection icon.
3 Click the right mouse button and select Properties from the menu. The Local Area
Connections Properties window appears.
4 Click the General tab.
5 In the General window, select DynamicAccess Protocol and click Uninstall.
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Troubleshooting the NIC
NetWare
To remove 3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server features:
1 Enter this command at the prompt:
NetWare 4.11: load install
NetWare 5.x: load nwconfig
2 In the Installation Options screen, select Product options.
3 In the Other Installation Actions screen, select View/Configure/Remove installed products.
The Currently Installed Products screen appears, listing software products that are
installed in the system.
4 From the list of products, select 3Com DynamicAccess Server Features and press Del.
Select Yes to remove the software.
NOTE: For instructions on removing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program from
your computer, see “Removing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program” on page 95.
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Running NIC Diagnostics
The 3Com 10/100 PCI (3C990B) NIC uses two types of NIC diagnostics programs: a
Windows-based diagnostics program and a DOS-based diagnostics program.
NOTE: Before starting any diagnostics program, close all running applications.
Use the Windows-based 3Com NIC Diagnostics program if you are running any of the
following operating systems:
■ Windows 2000
■ Windows NT 4.0
■ Windows Me
■ Windows 98
■ Windows 95
Use the 3Com DOS Diagnostics program if you are running any of the following operating
systems:
■ DOS
■ NetWare
NOTE: The following sections explain how to start both NIC diagnostics programs.
However, specific instructions are provided only for using the Windows-based
3Com NIC Diagnostics program.
This chapter explains how to:
■ Run the NIC diagnostic tests.
■ View the NIC LEDs in the NIC Diagnostics program.
■ View network statistics.
■ Use the 3Com icon in the Windows system tray.
■ Remove the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program.
Running the 3Com DOS Diagnostics Program
To start the 3Com DOS diagnostics program for DOS and NetWare installations:
1 Copy 3c99xcfg.exe from the EtherCD to the root directory of a DOS-bootable diskette.
CAUTION: If you are running Japanese DOS, you must switch to U.S. mode DOS
before running the 3Com DOS diagnostics program.
NOTE: If you do not have a DOS-bootable diskette, see “Making a DOS-Bootable
Diskette” on page 15 for instructions.
91
9
Running NIC Diagnostics
2 Boot to DOS using the DOS-bootable diskette.
3 Enter the following at the DOS prompt:
a:\3c99xcfg.exe
where a:\ is the drive containing the DOS-bootable diskette.
For more information about the 3Com DOS Diagnostics program to configure the NIC,
see “Using the 3Com DOS Configuration Program” on page 77.
Running the NIC Diagnostics Tests
The 3Com NIC Diagnostics program for Windows contains tests that can check the status
of the following items:
■ Network
■ NIC
To run the NIC Test or Network Test:
1 Make sure that the NIC, the network driver, and the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program
are installed.
2 Open the Windows Start menu.
3 Select Programs, and then 3Com NIC Utilities.
4 Click 3Com NIC Doctor.
The 3Com NIC Diagnostics screen appears.
NOTE: Click Help to obtain general information about the function of a screen. To
obtain specific information about any topic on a screen, click the question mark (?)
in the upper right corner of the screen, move it over a topic, and click once.
The following tabs are available for viewing NIC data:
Tab
Description
General
Select the General tab to display the node address, I/O address, and
device ID for the installed NIC.
Configuration
Select the Configuration tab to view and modify configuration
settings for the installed NIC.
Statistics
Select the Statistics tab to view network traffic statistics about the
installed NIC.
Diagnostics
Select the Diagnostics tab to access diagnostics tests that you can
run on the installed NIC.
Support
Select the Support tab to access various 3Com customer support
resources.
Utilities
Select the Utilities tab to:
- Update firmware for the installed NIC.
- Perform an encryption loopback test (to test the encryption chip).
- Test the SMBus on the system.
5 Select the Diagnostics tab.
The Diagnostics screen appears.
92
Viewing the NIC LEDs in the 3Com Diagnostics Program
Running the Network Test
Run the Network Test to check the NIC connectivity to the network.
To successfully pass the Network Connectivity test, at least one of the following conditions
must be met:
■ A Windows client running on the same network. This client must have a successfully
installed Windows diagnostics program that is currently not running.
■ A NetWare server running on the same network.
■ A DHCP server running on the same network.
A DNS server running on the same network with TCP/IP properties configured for the
DNS server.
To run the Network test:
1 On the Diagnostics screen, click Run Network Test.
The Network Connectivity Test screen appears.
2 Click Start.
If the test passes, the NIC connection to the network is functioning correctly.
3 Click Close.
If the test fails, make sure that the:
■ NIC is properly connected to the network cable.
■ Hub or switch to which the NIC is connected is powered on.
■ Cable complies with the proper length and specifications for your network.
Running the NIC Test
Run the NIC Test to check the physical components, connectors, and circuitry on the NIC.
1 On the Diagnostics screen, click Run NIC Test.
The NIC Test screen appears.
2 Click Perform NIC Test.
While the test is running, a progress bar indicates test progress.
If the test passes, the NIC is functioning correctly.
If the test fails, a message indicates the error type. Click Help in the error message
screen to obtain more information.
3 Click Close.
Viewing the NIC LEDs in the 3Com Diagnostics Program
To view the LEDs in the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program:
1 Make sure that the NIC, the network driver, and the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program
are installed.
2 Open the Windows Start menu.
3 Select Programs, and then 3Com NIC Utilities.
93
9
Running NIC Diagnostics
4 Click 3Com NIC Doctor.
The 3Com NIC Diagnostics General screen appears and displays following LEDs:
Link—lights if there is a valid connection between the NIC and the network.
Transmit—lights if the NIC is transmitting information.
Receive—lights if the NIC is receiving information.
NOTE: For instructions on interpreting the NIC LEDs, see “Interpreting the NIC
LEDs” on page 81.
Viewing Network Statistics
To view statistical information about the network:
1 Make sure that the NIC, the network driver, and the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program
are installed.
2 Open the Windows Start menu.
3 Select Programs, and then 3Com NIC Utilities.
4 Click 3Com NIC Doctor.
The 3Com NIC Diagnostics General screen appears.
5 Click the Statistics tab.
The Statistics screen appears, providing numerical data for a variety of network
events, such as: packets transmitted, bytes transmitted, late collisions, and so forth.
The information is updated by the NIC driver every five seconds.
For a description of each statistic, click the question mark (?) in the upper right corner
of the screen, drag it over a statistic and click once. A pop-up box appears, displaying
information about the statistic.
6 Click OK to exit the diagnostics program. To go to another diagnostics screen, click
the appropriate tab.
Using the 3Com Icon in the Windows System Tray
The 3Com icon, which can be enabled to appear in the Windows system tray, allows you
to start the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program. It also allows you to view the NIC’s link speed
and number of frames sent and received.
Enabling the Icon
To display the 3Com icon in the Windows system tray:
1 Make sure that the NIC, the network driver, and the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program
are installed.
2 Open the Windows Start menu.
3 Select Programs, and then 3Com NIC Utilities.
4 Click 3Com NIC Doctor.
The 3Com NIC Diagnostics General screen appears.
5 On the General screen, select the check box next to Show Icon in System Tray.
6 Close the 3Com NIC Diagnostic program.
The NIC icon appears in the Windows system tray.
When you double-click the icon, the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program starts.
94
Removing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program
Displaying Network Statistics
When you drag the mouse pointer over the icon (but do not double-click the icon) a
network statistics box appears, displaying the following information:
Frames Sent and Received—A count of the number of frames (packets) sent and
received through the NIC since the last time statistics were reset.
Link Speed—The speed (10 Mbps or 100 Mbps) at which the NIC is connected to the network.
The information is updated each time you move your mouse pointer over the 3Com icon.
Removing the 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program
The 3Com NIC Diagnostics Program can be removed using the Add/Remove Programs
Wizard in Windows, or by using the EtherCD.
For instructions on using the Add/Remove Programs Wizard in Windows, refer to your
Windows documentation.
To remove the 3Com NIC Diagnostics program using the EtherCD:
1 Start Windows.
2 Insert the EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive.
The EtherCD Welcome screen appears.
3 Click NIC Software.
4 Click NIC Drivers and Diagnostics.
5 Click Installation Utilities.
6 Click Remove Diagnostics.
7 Click Proceed, and then follow the prompts on the screen.
95
A
Specifications and
Cabling Requirements
This appendix lists the specifications, standards conformance, cable requirements, and
connector pin assignments for the 3Com 10/100 PCI NIC.
3C990B NIC Specifications
The following table provides environmental, interface, and standards information for the
3Com 10/100 PCI NIC with 3XP processor (3C990B family).
Hardware
Memory
128 KB external RAM
Bus interface
PCI Local Bus Specification, Revision 2.2
32-bit bus
PCI master
Supports bus master scatter-gather DMAs.
Dimensions
Length: 13.31 cm (5.24 in)
Height: 8.51 cm (3.35 in)
Power requirement
+5 V ±5% operating 1.26A maximum for normal operation (375
mA for low power mode)
Network Interface
10 Mbps Ethernet 10BASET
Ethernet IEEE 802.3 industry standard for a 10 Mbps baseband
CSMA/CD local area network
100 Mbps Ethernet
100BASE-TX
Ethernet IEEE 802.3u industry standard for a 100 Mbps baseband
CSMA/CD local area network
Environment
Operating temperature
32˚ to 158˚ F (0˚ to 70˚ C)
Storage temperature
–22˚ to 194˚ F (–30˚ to 90˚ C)
Operating humidity
10 to 90% noncondensing
Storage humidity
10 to 90% noncondensing
Altitude
–300 to 3,000 m (–984 ft to 9,840 ft)
Standards Conformance
IEEE 802.3 10BASE-T
IEEE 802.3u 100BASE-TX
IEEE 802.3x full-duplex, auto negotiation, and flow control
IEEE 802.1p (General Attribute Registration protocol) for multicast addresses
IEEE 802.1Q VLAN Tagging
(continued)
97
A
Specifications and Cabling Requirements
Standards Conformance
Microsoft PC97
Microsoft PC98
Microsoft PC99
PCI 2.1 and 2.2
DMI 1.0 and 2.0
ACPI 1.0
SMBus 2.2
WBEM, CIM, WMI
Cabling Requirements
The cable, quality, distance, and connectors must comply with the
Electronic Industries Association/Telecommunications Industries Association (EIA/TIA) 568
Commercial Building Wiring Standard and the Technical Services Bulletin TSB38 standards.
Network connection criteria are shown below:
NIC:
3C990B family
Cable:
Category 3, 4, or 5 unshielded twisted pair
Network cable connector:
RJ-45
Transceiver:
On-board
Maximum Network Segment:
100 m (328 ft)
Speed:
10/100 Mbps
Media Type:
10BASE-T
100BASE-TX
RJ-45 Connector Pin Assignments
The following illustration shows the RJ-45 connector pin assignments for the
3C990B NICs.
YE
L
GR /100
N/1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
AC
T
12345678
98
TD+
TD_
RD+
RD_
B
Installing the 3Com DMI Agent
This appendix explains how to install the 3Com Desktop Management Interface (DMI)
Agent on your PC.
The 3Com DMI Agent allows any DMI-compatible browser or network management
application that supports DMI 2.0 to remotely manage and configure advanced features
of a 3C990B NIC.
NOTE: For detailed information about the 3Com DMI Agent, refer to the 3Com
DMI Agent User Guide included with the 3Com DMI Agent software on the
EtherCD.
About the 3Com DMI Agent
The 3Com DMI Agent allows you to obtain basic NIC information, including:
■ Node address
■ MAC address
■ Driver version
Additionally, depending on the features of your NIC, the 3Com DMI Agent allows you to
view and configure advanced NIC features, including:
■
■
■
■
Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA) software
Remote Wake-Up events
Workgroup keep-alive packet
Remote system alerts (including heartbeat)
Each PC that contains a 3C990B NIC and the 3Com DMI Agent generates a Management
Information Format (MIF) file that contains information about the PC and the NIC. DMI
applications use the information from the MIF to manage the PC and the NIC.
The content of the MIF is based on the capabilities of the NIC driver found in the PC. For
example, if a NIC with an MBA boot ROM is found, all groups related to the boot ROM
are included in the MIF for that particular NIC. This ensures that the network management
application does not receive irrelevant information for the NIC.
For a description of each MIF supported by the 3Com DMI Agent, refer to the 3Com DMI
Agent User Guide included with the 3Com DMI Agent software on the EtherCD.
System Requirements
This section lists the client PC and network management requirements for installing and
using the 3Com DMI Agent.
Client PC Requirements
Your PC requires the following items to use the 3Com DMI Agent:
■ DMI Service Provider 2.0 or greater (such as Smart Technologies Service Provider 2.0)
■ NDIS 3, 4, or 5 driver
99
B
Installing the 3Com DMI Agent
■
Windows 2000, Windows NT 4.0, Windows Me, Windows 98, or Windows 95 using
the appropriate Service Pack listed below:
■ Windows NT 4.0 Service Pack 4
■ Windows 98 Retail Release
■ Windows 95 Retail Service Pack 1 or OEM Service Release (OSR2)
Network Management Requirements
The 3Com DMI Agent InstallShield Wizard checks for the presence of a DMI service
provider on the computer you are configuring as a network management station. The
network management station requires a DMI-compatible browser or a network
management application that supports DMI 2.0, such as:
■ Hewlett Packard TopTools
■ Tivoli Management Suite
■ Dell OpenManage
■ Compaq Insight Manager Management Station
■ Intel LANDesk Client Manager
Installing the 3Com DMI Agent
This section describes how to install the 3Com DMI Agent on a PC running
Windows 2000, Windows NT 4.0, Windows Me, Windows 98, or Windows 95.
NOTE: Before installing the DMI Agent, logon to the PC with an account that has
system administration privileges.
To install the 3Com DMI Agent:
1 Make sure that the PC meets the requirements listed in “Client PC Requirements” on
page 99.
2 Make sure that the 3C990B NIC is installed in the PC and is connected to the network.
3 Insert the EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive.
The EtherCD Welcome screen appears.
4 Click NIC Software.
5 Click Install 3Com DMI Agent Now.
The 3Com DMI Agent setup program prepares the InstallShield Wizard, which allows
you to:
■ View the latest README.TXT file
■ Copy the 3Com DMI Agent User Guide to your computer hard drive.
NOTE: The 3Com DMI Agent User Guide is in Microsoft Word format. If you do
not currently have access to Microsoft Word, you can download a free version of
the Microsoft Word reader from the Microsoft Web site.
■
100
Install the 3Com DMI Agent software
Installing the 3Com DMI Agent
6 Follow the prompts on the screen.
To verify successful installation, use a DMI-compatible browser or a network
management application that supports DMI 2.0 or 2.0s to verify that the 3Com NIC
is present.
NOTE: If you have 3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server features and a foreign
(non-3Com) NIC installed, the foreign NIC is displayed as a 3Com NIC in the DMI
browser.
Refer to the 3Com DMI Agent User Guide or contact your system administrator for
instructions.
101
C
EtherCD Content and Navigation
This appendix provides information about EtherCD content and navigation.
If auto insert is enabled for your CD-ROM drive, the 3Com Welcome screen is displayed
when you insert the EtherCD in your CD-ROM drive.
If the Welcome screen is not displayed when you insert the EtherCD in your CD-ROM
drive, you can:
■
Enable the auto insert feature for your CD-ROM drive (see “Enabling Auto Insert” on
page 104)
or
■
Navigate to the root subdirectories (see “Root Subdirectories List” on page 104)
The following table describes the navigation links available on the Welcome screen:
Links
Description
User Guide
■
Prints a PDF version of the user guide.
■
Copies a PDF version of the user guide to your computer hard drive.
■
Installs and configures the NIC in supported Windows operating systems.
■
Installs 3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server features.
■
Creates installation diskettes to install the NIC software in a PC that does not
have a CD-ROM drive installed.
Other Software
■
Installs Adobe Acrobat Reader (version 4.0 for English or version 3.0 for
international).
Register Product
■
Registers your NIC product online.
Release Notes
■
Describes the features of 3C990B NICs, includes frequently asked questions
and known problems.
NIC Software
103
C
EtherCD Content and Navigation
Root Subdirectories List
The following table lists and describes the root subdirectories included on the EtherCD
that shipped with this product.
Subdirectory
Contains
English
In each language subdirectory files specific to that language. This subdirectory
contains copies of Adobe Acrobat Reader (4.0 or 3.0), CMI Client installation files,
the Disk Copy utility, and a PDF version of the user guide.
Help
Installation and configuration files, basic troubleshooting, support information,
and system resource information.
Installs
Images for 3Com DynamicAccess Advanced Server features, MBA, and 3Com
EtherDisk diskettes.
Ndis2
The DOS NDIS 2.x driver.
NWClient
A DOS NetWare client driver file and runtime image file, a sample NET.CFG file,
and an installer for the DOS ODI client driver.
NWServer
A server driver, LDI import file, and appropriate .NLMs for loading into a NetWare
4.11 or 5.x server.
Enabling Auto Insert
If auto insert is not enabled for your CD-ROM drive, the EtherCD Welcome screen is not
displayed when you insert the EtherCD in your CD-ROM drive. To enable auto insert on
your (Windows 9x) CD-ROM drive:
1 Right-click the My Computer icon, and then select Properties.
2 Select the Device Manager tab.
3 Click the + symbol next to CD-ROM in the list.
4 Select the name of your CD-ROM drive.
5 Click Properties, and then select the Settings tab.
6 Select the check box for Auto insert notification.
To view the Welcome screen on the CD navigator with auto insert enabled, reinsert the
CD in the CD-ROM drive.
104
Text Files List
Text Files List
The following table lists the text files that are included in the Help directory on the
3Com EtherCD.
File Name
File Description
client32.txt
Contains NetWare 4.11 on Windows 95/98 client driver installation notes.
license.txt
Includes the 3C990B NIC software license agreement.
netware.txt
Explains how to install the ODI driver for the NetWare 4.1x and 5.x server. You can
also get NetWare installation instructions from README text files located in the
following directories:
\nwserver\readme.txt (client)
\nwserver\readme_se.txt (server)
\english\diskcopy\disk2\nwserver\readme.txt (client)
\english\diskcopy\disk2\nwserver\readme_se.txt (server)
nwdosodi.txt
Explains how to install the driver for a 16-bit NetWare client running DOS.
register.txt
Explains why and how to register your NIC.
support.txt
Contains information about technical assistance services available from 3Com.
trouble.txt
Contains troubleshooting tips.
unt_nt4.txt
Explains how to perform an automated installation of Windows NT 4.0 over the
network (unattended install).
unt_w98.txt
Explains how to perform an automated installation of Windows 98 over the
network (unattended install).
w95ndis.txt
Provides instructions specific to Windows 95 for first-time installations, updating
drivers, removing the NIC driver and EtherCD software, troubleshooting
installation problems, and a peer-to-peer networking overview.
w95netwr.txt
Explains how to install the Windows 95 driver to support the Microsoft client for
NetWare networks.
wakefaq.txt
Contains common questions and answers about Remote Wake-Up.
win2000.txt
Explains how to install the NIC, verify a successful installation, uninstall the NIC
software, and update the driver.
win98.txt
Explains how to install the NIC, verify a successful installation, uninstall the NIC
software, and update the driver.
winnt.txt
Provides installation instructions and troubleshooting tips for installing drivers in
Windows NT 4.0.
In addition to the Help directory, you can find general installation information and the
latest release notes in the \INSTALLS\README.TXT file (or on EtherDisk 1, if you install
from diskettes.)
105
D
Installing a 3Com NIC While
Installing the NOS
Follow these instructions to install 3Com software while you are installing the network
operating system. (This procedure is often called “performing a fresh installation.”)
Windows Fresh Installation
For installation requirements, see “Installation Requirements” on page 14.
To display the Help system during the driver installation, click Help on any 3Com window.
Windows NT
For instructions, see the WINNT.TXT file in the HELP directory on the EtherCD.
Windows 2000
During the Windows 2000 installation, the Hardware Wizard detects installed NICs and
installs drivers it finds for them from the Windows 2000 CD. If you want to install the
latest software from the EtherCD after you finish installing Windows 2000, restart the
server and follow the instructions for Windows in “Updating the Network Driver and NIC
Software” on page 31.
NetWare Fresh Installation
These instructions apply to NetWare versions 4.11 and 5.x.
Requirements
See “Installation Requirements” on page 14.
Installation Instructions
These instructions are intended for installing from the 3Com EtherCD. If you download
3Com software from the Web and make installation diskettes to use for the installation,
the steps are slightly different (you do not need to remove and replace the NetWare CD).
1 Install the NIC hardware and connect it to the network.
2 Start the installation and proceed as usual until you reach the Device Types screen.
3 In the Device Types screen:
Locate the Network Boards field, and notice that there are no NICs listed. From the
Options menu, select Modify.
4 In the next screen, select Network Boards and press Enter.
5 Press Insert (Add a Board).
6 Press Insert (Add Unlisted Driver).
7 Remove the NetWare CD from the CD-ROM drive.
8 Insert the 3Com EtherCD in the CD-ROM drive.
9 Press F3.
107
D
Installing a 3Com NIC While Installing the NOS
10 Enter the location of the driver on the 3Com EtherCD. For example:
D:\nwserver
11 In the Driver Summary screen, select 3C99X.LAN and press Enter.
Edit parameters as necessary.
12 From the Additional Driver Options menu, select Return to Driver Summary.
13 Remove the EtherCD from the CD-ROM drive.
14 Insert the NetWare CD in the CD-ROM drive.
15 From the Options menu, select Continue.
The installation continues.
In NetWare 5.x, the Configure Server Properties windows appear. Locate the Network
Boards list in the Protocols window. The installed NICs are listed in this window. Select
each installed NIC and configure its protocols. Proceed with the installation, and
reboot when you are prompted to do so.
16 When the installation is finished, edit the STARTUP.NCF file.
Specify receive buffers for each installed NIC.
108
E
Technical Support
3Com provides easy access to technical support information through a variety of services.
This appendix describes these services.
Information contained in this appendix is correct at time of publication. For the most
recent information, 3Com recommends that you access the 3Com Corporation World
Wide Web site.
Online Technical Services
3Com offers worldwide product support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, through the
following online systems:
■ World Wide Web site
■ 3Com Knowledgebase Web Services
■ 3Com FTP site
World Wide Web Site
To access the latest networking information on the 3Com Corporation World Wide Web
site enter this URL into your Internet browser:
http://www.3com.com/
This service provides access to online support information such as technical
documentation and software library, as well as support options that range from technical
education to maintenance and professional services.
3Com Knowledgebase Web Services
This interactive tool contains technical product information compiled by 3Com expert
technical engineers around the globe. Located on the World Wide Web at http://
knowledgebase.3com.com, this service gives all 3Com customers and partners
complementary, round-the-clock access to technical information on most 3Com products.
3Com FTP Site
Download drivers, patches, software, and MIBs across the Internet from the 3Com public
FTP site. This service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
To connect to the 3Com FTP site, enter the following information into your FTP client:
■ Hostname: ftp.3com.com
■ Username: anonymous
■ Password: <your Internet e-mail address>
NOTE: You do not need a user name and password with Web browser software
such as Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer.
109
E
Technical Support
Support from Your Network Supplier
If you require additional assistance, contact your network supplier. Many suppliers are
authorized 3Com service partners who are qualified to provide a variety of services,
including network planning, installation, hardware maintenance, application training, and
support services.
When you contact your network supplier for assistance, have the following information ready:
■ Product model name, part number, and serial number
■ A list of system hardware and software, including revision levels
■ Diagnostic error messages
■ Details about recent configuration changes, if applicable
If you are unable to contact your network supplier, see the following section on how to
contact 3Com.
Support from 3Com
If you are unable to obtain assistance from the 3Com online technical resources or from
your network supplier, 3Com offers technical telephone support services. To find out more
about your support options, call the 3Com technical telephone support phone number at
the location nearest you.
When you contact 3Com for assistance, have the following information ready:
■ Product model name, part number, and serial number
■ A list of system hardware and software, including revision levels
■ Diagnostic error messages
■ Details about recent configuration changes, if applicable
Here is a list of worldwide technical telephone support numbers. These numbers are
correct at the time of publication. Refer to the 3Com Web site for updated information.
Country
Asia, Pacific Rim
Australia
Hong Kong
India
Indonesia
Japan
Malaysia
New Zealand
Pakistan
Philippines
P.R. of China
Singapore
S. Korea
From anywhere in S. Korea:
From Seoul:
Taiwan, R.O.C.
Thailand
(continued)
110
Telephone Number
1 800 678 515
800 933 486
+61 2 9937 5085 or
000800 6501111
001 800 61 009
03 5783 1270
1800 801 777
0800 446 398
+61 2 9937 5083
1235 61 266 2602
10800 61 00137 or
021 6350 1590 or
00800 0638 3266
800 6161 463
82 2 3455 6455
00798 611 2230
00798 611 2230
0080 611 261
001 800 611 2000
Support from 3Com
Country
Europe, Middle East and Africa
From anywhere in these regions, call:
Or access the following Internet site:
Telephone Number
0870 24713901
http://www.3com.co.uk/support/emea.html
#belgium
Europe and South Africa
From the following countries, you may use the toll-free numbers:
Austria
Belgium
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Hungary
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Luxembourg
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
U.K.
8088 33 25
0800 78354
8088 33 25
0800 1 019387
0800 91 7736
0800 100 0427
06800 14370
1 800 553 117
18009431983
800 780557
800 29727
0800 023 0245
800 1 0767
00800 4411 349
800 844 029
0800 991183
900 95 8966
020 796980
0800 835283
0800 085 1816
Latin America
Brazil
Mexico
Puerto Rico
Central and South America
0800 13 3266
01 800 849CARE
800 666 5065
AT&T +800 998 2112
North America
1 800 527 8677
Enterprise Customers:
1 800 876 3266
111
E
Technical Support
Returning Products for Repair
Before you send a product directly to 3Com for repair, you must first obtain an
authorization number. Products sent to 3Com without authorization numbers will be
returned to the sender unopened, at the sender’s expense.
To obtain an authorization number, call or fax:
Country
Telephone Number
Fax Number
Asia, Pacific Rim
+65 543 6500
+65 543 6348
Europe, South Africa, and
Middle East
+31 30 6029900
+31 30 6029999
Central and South America
525 201 0075
Argentina
Bolivia
Brazil
0810 222 3266
511 241 1691
0800 133266 or
55 11 5643 2700
525 201 0004
562 240 6200
525 201 0004
525 201 0004
525 201 0004
525 201 0004
511 241 1691
525 201 0004
525 201 0004
Caribbean
Chile
Colombia
Ecuador
Mexico
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay
Venezuela
From the following countries, you may call the toll-free numbers; select option 2 and
then option 2:
Austria
Belgium
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Hungary
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
U.K.
0800 297468
0800 71429
800 17309
0800 113153
0800 917959
0800 1821502
00800 12813
1800553117
1800 9453794
1678 79489
0800 0227788
800 11376
00800 3111206
0800 831416
0800 995014
900 983125
020 795482
0800 55 3072
0800 966197
U.S.A. and Canada
1 800 527 8677
Enterprise Customers:
1 800 876 3266
112
1 408 326 7120
(not toll-free)
Index
Numerics
100BASE-TX
cable requirements 17
Link LED 81
10BASE-T
cable requirements 17
Link LED 81
168-bit encryption, see 3DES
3C99X.LAN file 55
3Com Advanced Server features 9, 44
3Com Configuration and Diagnostics
Program for DOS 75
3Com DMI Agent
client PC requirements 99
installing 100
network management
requirements 100
overview 99, 107
3Com icon, in Windows system tray
removing 94
showing 94
3Com Knowledgebase Web
Services 109
3Com logo, disabling 79
3Com NIC Diagnostics program
installing 29
removing 95
starting 75, 94
3Com Remote System Alert Manager 7
3Com Security Software Utility, see
Security Software Utility
3Com support services, accessing 82
3Com URL 109
3CR990 NIC
features 4
specifications 97
3DES, defined 34
56-bit encryption, see DES
802.1p packet priority offload 5, 52
802.1p support property 45
A
accessing Help 82
ACT (activity) LED 81
activity on the network, verifying 94,
95
adding NICs to a group
NetWare 66, 67
Windows 47
administration with
Advanced Server software 49
DynamicAccess software 49
Advanced Server features
overview 9
protocol bindings, modifying 44
verifying installation 44
Windows
adding NICs to a group 47
creating a group 47
creating a VLAN 49
deleting or editing a VLAN 50
removing the NIC from a
group 50
window, defined 46
Windows 2000
accessing the program 46
installing 43
protocol bindings, modifying 44
Windows NT
installing 43
protocol bindings, modifying 44
starting the program 47
Alert Standard Forum (ASF) 7
Alert Type 74
alerts, remote system
overview 7
requirements 7
asymmetric flow control 8
auto negotiation 8
auto play, CD-ROM 104
AUTOEXEC.NCF file
changing to install the NetWare 3.12
driver 57
changing to support multiple
NICs 61
samples 63, 66, 68
B
bidirectional load balancing 10, 45, 66
BIOS 14
BIOS issues 7
boot disk 15
boot ROM, MBA 4
booting from network 78
default setting 73
enabling or disabling 77
overview 6
broken installation, cleaning up 83
C
cabling
requirements 98
specifications, RJ-45 port 17
troubleshooting 85
unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) 17
CD-ROM, auto play 104
changing configuration, DOS 77
chassis intrusion 7
checksum offload (TCP/IP), enabling for
NetWare 65
cleaning up a broken installation 83
commands for Netware server features
display status 69
group 69
help 70
link timeout 70
probe interval 70
receive timeout 70
retry count 71
send timeout 71
ungroup 71
wait tmo 72
computer requirements 14
configuration guidelines for VLANs 45
configuration parameters
NetWare
changing 65
ENABLE_CHKSUM 65
enabling driver warning and error
messages 65
enabling TCP/IP checksum
offload 65
MEDIA_SELECT 65
monitoring levels for self-healing
driver conditions 65
Node Address 65
setting the media speed 65
SHD_LEVEL 65
Slot Number 65
VERBOSE 65
Windows
Alert Type 74
Error Tolerance 74
flow control 74
Configuration tab 92
configuring
Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA) 77
NIC 76
offloads using Windows 2000 52
VLANs 45, 49
connection, losing 7
conventions, text, About This Guide 2
CRC errors, viewing 7
creating
group
NetWare 62, 67
Windows 47
security policy 38
VLAN, Windows 49
crossover cable 87
113
Index
removing a NIC from a group 50
removing the NIC from a
group 50
window, defined 46
D
data encryption, see encryption
dedicated IP address 48
deleting or editing a VLAN,
Windows 50
DES 34
Desktop Management Interface (DMI),
overview 6
diagnostics program for DOS 75
Diagnostics program, starting 30
Diagnostics tab 92
diagnostics tests, running 92
diagnostics, offline 5
disabling encryption 41
disabling load balancing for a group,
Windows 50
diskettes
creating 15
making a DOS boot 15
obtaining 15
display status command 69
displaying
group properties, Windows 51
NIC properties, Windows 51
DMI (Desktop Management Interface),
overview 6
DOS
3Com Configuration and
Diagnostics Program 75
boot disk 15
changing settings 77
configuration program, changing
settings 77
diagnostics program 91
driver installation requirements
NetWare 56, 107
Windows 21, 107
drivers
NetWare, installing 55
Windows 2000
installing 22
removing 87
Windows 95
Build 950, installing 27
installing 27
OSR2, installing 28
Windows 98, installing 26
Windows Me, installing 25
Windows NT 4.0, installing 23
duplex mode
configuring 76
default setting 73
duplex setting 73
DynamicAccess server features
NetWare
commands 69
configuration guidelines 66
Windows
adding NICs to a group 47
changing the primary NIC 50
creating a group 47
creating a VLAN 49
deleting or editing a VLAN 50
114
Windows 2000
accessing the program 46
installing 43
protocol bindings, modifying 44
Windows NT
installing 43
protocol bindings, modifying 44
starting the program 47
DynamicAccess server features
removing 89
verifying installation 44
DynamicAccess Software Setup
window 49
E
editing
NIC properties, Windows 50
VLAN, Windows 50
efficient multicast control,
configuring 49
EIA/TIA 568 standards 98
ENABLE_CHKSUM 65
encryption (3C990B NIC)
disabling 37
enabling 34
installing 36
overview 33
upgrading 37
encryption (Windows 2000)
binding a filter 40
binding a filter action 41
creating a policy 38
defining a Console 38
disabling 41
enabling 41
filter action, creating a 40
filter, creating a 39
environmental conditions 7
error messages, sending to NetWare
console 65
Error Tolerance 74
exclamation point (!) (yellow) in
Windows Device Manager 83
F
failover
about 10
Advanced Server feature 9
fan speed 7
FAQs 83
flow control 8, 74
forced link 8
foreign NIC
defined 11
designating as primary 45
in NetWare groups 66
in Windows groups 45
frames, sent and received, viewing 95
frequently asked questions (FAQs) 83
fresh install
NetWare 107
Windows 2000 107
Windows NT 107
full-duplex
configuring 73
G
GARP Multicast Registration Protocol
specification (GMRP) 46
General tab 92
GMRP 46
GRN/10 LED, troubleshooting with 81
group command 69
groups 9
adding NICs to
NetWare 66
Windows 47
adding, NetWare 67
configuring during NetWare driver
installation 62
displaying properties of,
Windows 51
removing NICs from, Windows 50
Windows
creating 47
disabling load balancing for 50
H
half-duplex, configuring 73
hardware, installation 18
heartbeat 7
heartbeat packets 5
help command, NetWare server
features 70
Help system, accessing 21, 82
Host ID 48
hot plug NIC installation 5, 8
HP OpenView Network Node
Manager 7
hubs, troubleshooting 87
I
icon, 3Com 94
IEEE 802.1p support property 45
installation
3Com DMI Agent 100
Advanced Server software 43
broken 83
cleaning up broken 83
connecting to the network 19
diskettes
creating 15
obtaining 15
DynamicAccess server software 43
failed, cleaning up 83
fresh install
NetWare 107
Windows 2000 107
Windows NT 107
hardware 18
hot plug 5
Index
NetWare NOS 107
NetWare, verifying 64
overview 13
Remote Wake-Up cable 19
requirements, hardware and
software 14, 20
server features, NetWare 62
steps involved 13
Windows 2000 NOS 107
Windows NT NOS 107
installing drivers
NetWare 55
Windows 2000 22
Windows 95 27
Windows 98 26
Windows Me 25
installing multiple NICs 31
integrated boot ROM 4
Intel LANDesk Client Manager 7
IP address
changing 48
dedicated 48
IP and TCP checksum offload 5, 52
IPSec
configuring in Windows 2000 38
defined 33
IPSec offload 5, 52
K
keep-alive packet, workgroup 7
Knowledgebase topics 83
accessing through diagnostics
program 83
accessing through Web site 82
L
LAN connections, relating to miniport
connections 52
LANDesk Client Manager 7
LEDs
description 81
troubleshooting 82
viewing in Diagnostics program 93
viewing in diagnostics program 82
link
negotiation 8
speed, viewing 95
timeout command 70
Link LED, viewing 82, 94
link negotiation 8
Load Balance/RSL window 46
load balancing
bidirectional 10, 45, 66
dedicated IP address 48
failure 10
defined 9
disabling for Windows 50
groups
adding NICs to, Windows 47
adding, NetWare 67
configuring during NetWare driver
installation 62
creating, Windows 47
maintaining, NetWare 66
maintaining, Windows 44
removing NICs from,
Windows 50
resilient server links (RSLs) 9
transmit 10, 45
troubleshooting
NetWare 72
Windows 51
logo, 3Com, disabling 79
loss of connection 7
M
MAC address 17, 57, 65
maintaining server features
NetWare 66
Windows 44
Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA)
configuring 77
network booting 78
overview 6
MBA see Managed PC Boot Agent
media speed, setting for NetWare 65
media type 74
configuring 76
default setting 74
MEDIA_SELECT 65
memory requirements
client and server minimums 14
NetWare 56
messages, sending to NetWare
console 65
MIBs 109
Microsoft Systems Management
Server 7
Microsoft Task Offload support 45
miniport connections, relating to LAN
connections 52
multicast control, configuring 49
multiple NICs
configuring offloads for 54
in NetWare 57
in Windows 31
N
NetBoot ROM
default setting 73
description 73
NetWare
adding a group 67
adding NICs to a group 66
changing settings using DOS
Diagnostics program 77
configuration parameters 65
configuring server features 62
correlating slot numbers and physical
NICs 57
driver 55
driver installation requirements 56,
107
DynamicAccess server feature
commands 69
maintaining server features 66
NLMs 55
packet receive buffer sizes 56
server features installation 62
slots for multiple NICs 57
system requirements 56, 107
verifying driver installation and
configuration 64
Netware Loadable Modules (NLMs) 55
network
activity, verifying 94, 95
booting 78
connecting to 19
connection
testing 93
troubleshooting 86
connection, troubleshooting 84
driver optimization, configuring 76
statistics, viewing 94
supplier support 110
test, running 93
Network ID 48
NIC
configuration parameters, NetWare
installation program 65
diagnostic tests 92
driver installation 55
duplex setting 73
foreign
defined 11
designating as primary 45
in NetWare groups 66
in Windows groups 45
groups 9
primary 9, 45, 50
properties
displaying, Windows 51
editing, Windows 50
secondary 9
software, removing 87
speed setting 74
test, running 93
virtual 9
NIC diagnostic program
Configuration tab 92
Diagnostics tab 92
General tab 92
starting 30
Statistics tab 92
Support tab 92
Utilities tab 92
NIC installation, hot plug 5
Node Address 65
Novell, see NetWare
O
offline diagnostics 5
offload support 45
offloading
802.1P packet priority for Windows
2000 5, 52
disabling 53
enabling 53
115
Index
IP and TCP checksum for Windows
2000 5, 52
IPSec for Windows 2000 5, 52
TCP segmentation for Windows
2000 5, 52
Windows 2000 networking and
security tasks 5, 52
offloads
configuring for a group of different
NICs 54
disabling 53
enabling 53
enabling TCP/IP checksum for
NetWare 65
support 45
online Help 82
online Knowledgebase 82
online technical services 109
OpenView Network Node Manager 7
P
packet priority (802.1p) offload 5, 52
packet receive buffers, NetWare 56
packets, viewing 94, 95
pause frames 8
PC requirements 14
PCI slot, identifying 17
physical security 7
pin assignments 98
pinouts, crossover cable 87
policy (security), creating 38
Preboot Execution Environment (PXE)
specification 4, 6
primary NIC 9, 45, 50
binding protocol, NetWare 63
changing, Windows 50
probe interval command 70
properties
group, displaying, Windows 51
NIC
displaying, Windows 51
editing, Windows 50
property settings, changing in Windows
2000 52
PXE, see Preboot Execution Environment
R
Receive LED, viewing 82, 94
receive timeout command 70
received frames, viewing 95
reception flow control 8
red X in Windows Device Manager 83
release notes, accessing 83
remote control 7
Remote Control and Management
Protocol, see RMCP
Remote System Alert Manager 7
remote system alerts 5
Remote Wake-Up
cable, connecting 19
multiple NIC Installations 6
overview 5
116
requirements 6
troubleshooting 85
removing
NIC from a group, Windows 50
NIC software 87, 88
server features
NetWare 90
Windows 2000 89
Windows NT 89
requirements
3Com DMI Agent 99
cabling 98
computer 14
driver installation
NetWare 56, 107
Windows 21, 107
hardware and software 14, 20
memory 14
PC 14
Remote Wake-Up 6
resilient server links (RSLs) 9
retry count command 71
returning products for repair 112
RJ-45 port, pin assignments 98
RMCP 7
ROM initialization 7
RWU 5
S
safety precautions 13
secondary NICs 9, 50
security
physical 7
security policy, creating 38
Security Software Utility
downloading 34
installing encryption through 36
self-healing drivers (SHDs) 9
configuring for NetWare 65
default setting 74
overview 9
send timeout command 71
sent frames, viewing 95
server features 9
configuring
NetWare 44, 62, 65
Windows NT 44
installing NetWare 62
maintaining
NetWare 66
Windows 44
removing 89, 90
SHD_LEVEL 65
Slot Number 65
slots
multiple NICs, NetWare 57
obtaining numbers, NetWare 57
software
3Com NIC Diagnostics program,
installing 29
NetWare drivers, installing 55
removing 87
updating 31
Windows network drivers,
installing 21
spanning tree 45, 66
specifications
cabling, RJ-45 port 17
NIC 97
speed (media), setting for NetWare 65
speed, link, viewing 95
Statistics tab 92
statistics, network, viewing 94
straight-through cable 87
support databases, accessing 82
Support tab 92
symmetric flow control 8
system memory alerts 7
system requirements
NetWare 56, 107
Windows 21, 107
Systems Management Server 7
T
TCP and IP checksum offload 5, 52
TCP segmentation offload 5, 52
TCP/IP checksum offload, enabling for
NetWare 65
technical support
3Com Knowledgebase Web
Services 109
3Com URL 109
network suppliers 110
product repair 112
temperature alerts 7
test
Network 93
NIC 93
text files, EtherCD 105
timeout 70
traffic prioritization
configuring 49
overview 9, 11
transmission flow control 8
Transmit LED, viewing 82, 94
transmit load balancing 10, 45
troubleshooting
cable 85
cleaning up a broken installation 83
error messages 83
group configuration 72
hubs 87
hubs with crossover cable 87
LEDs 82
load balancing
NetWare 72
Windows 51
MBA boot ROM 77
network connection 84, 86
NIC installation 83
Remote Wake-Up 85
Windows 2000 property
settings 52
Index
U
W
ungroup command 71
uninstalling
DynamicAccess server features
NetWare 90
Windows 2000 89, 90
Windows NT 89
network driver 87
unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cable 17
updating
network driver 31
NIC diagnostic program 31
upgrading Windows 95 to
Windows 98 14
upgrading Windows 98 to Windows
Me 15
URL 109
Utilities tab 92
wait tmo command 72
warning messages, sending to NetWare
console 65
Windows
adding NICs to a group 47
changing the primary NIC 50
creating a group 47
creating a VLAN 49
driver installation requirements 21,
107
maintaining server features 44
system requirements 21, 107
Windows 2000
802.1p support property 45
changing property settings 52
duplex, setting 73
installing
Advanced Server features 43
driver 22
V
VERBOSE 65
virtual NIC 9
VLANs 9
802.1p Support property 46
defined 10
Windows 44
configuration guidelines 45
creating 49
deleting or editing 50
ID numbers, legal ranges 49
number allowed in a server 45
window, defined 46
voltage deviation alerts 7
DynamicAccess 43
multiple NICs 31
media type, setting 74
miniport and LAN connections,
identifying 52
offload features 5, 52
removing NIC software 87
Windows 95
Build 950 27
installing
driver 27
multiple NICs 31
OSR2 28
removing NIC software 88
upgrading to Windows 98 14
Windows 98
installing
driver 26
multiple NICs 31
removing NIC software 88
upgrading from Windows 95 14
upgrading to Windows Me 15
Windows Me
installing the driver 25
removing NIC software 88
upgrading from Windows 98 15
Windows NT 4.0
help, driver installation 21, 107
installing Advanced Server
features 43
installing Advanced Server
software 43
installing DynamicAccess 43
multiple NIC installations 32
removing NIC software 88
Windows system tray, 3Com icon 94
workgroup keep-alive packet 7
World Wide Web (WWW) 109
X
X (red) in Windows Device Manager 83
Y
YEL/100 LED, troubleshooting with 81
yellow exclamation point (!) in Windows
Device Manager 83
117
Regulatory Compliance
Information
FCC Class B Statement
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
1 This device may not cause harmful interference, and
2 This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
WARNING: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules, and the Canadian Department of Communications Equipment Standards
entitled, “Digital Apparatus,” ICES-003.These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against
harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency
energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to
radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular
installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by
one or more of the following measures:
■
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
■
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
■
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from the one which the receiver is connected to.
■
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
The user may find the following booklet prepared by the Federal Communications Commission helpful:
The Interference Handbook
This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. Stock No. 004-000-00345-4.
NOTE: In order to maintain compliance with the limits of a Class B digital device, 3Com requires that you use
quality interface cables when connecting to this device. Changes or modifications not expressly approved by
3Com could void the user’s authority to operate this equipment. Refer to the manual for specifications on
cabling types.
Regulatory Compliance Information
FCC Declaration of Conformity
We declare under our sole responsibility that the
Model:
Description:
3C990B-TX-M
3Com 10/100 PCI Network Interface Card with 3XP Processor
Client NIC for 3DES (168-bit) encryption and DES (56-bit) encryption
3C990BSVR
3Com Server 10/100 PCI Network Interface Card with 3XP Processor
Server NIC for 3DES (168-bit) encryption and DES (56-bit) encryption
to which this declaration relates, is in conformity with the following standards or other normative documents:
■
ANSI C63.4-1992 Methods of Measurement
■
Federal Communications Commission 47 CFR Part 15, subpart B
15.107 (e) Class B Conducted Limits
15.109 (g) Class B Radiated Emissions Limits
3Com Corporation, 5400 Bayfront Plaza, P.O. Box 58145, Santa Clara, CA 95052-8145
(408) 326-5000
Industry Canada Class B Emission Compliance Statement
This Class B digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
Avis de Conformité à la Réglementation d’Industrie Canada
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B est conform à la norme NMB-003 du Canada.
VCCI Class B Statement
This is a Class B product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council for Interference
from Information Technology Equipment (VCCI). If this is used near a radio or television receiver in a domestic
environment, it may cause radio interference. Install and use the equipment according to the instruction manual.
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