3Com 3C996B-T Network Card User Manual

User Guide
Gigabit Server Network Interface Cards
3C996B-T and 3C996-SX
http://www.3com.com/
http://support.3com.com/registration/frontpg.pl
Published November 2001
User guide version 1.0.2
3Com Corporation
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5400 Bayfront Plaza
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Santa Clara, California
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95052-8145
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U.S.A.
Copyright © 2001 3Com Corporation. All rights reserved. No part of this documentation may be reproduced in any form or by any means or used to
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If you are a United States government agency, then this documentation and the software described herein are provided to you subject to the
following:
All technical data and computer software are commercial in nature and developed solely at private expense. Software is delivered as “Commercial
Computer Software” as defined in DFARS 252.227-7014 (June 1995) or as a “commercial item” as defined in FAR 2.101(a) and as such is provided
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Intel and Pentium are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation. Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are registered trademarks
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All other company and product names may be trademarks of the respective companies with which they are associated.
Contents
1
Introduction
Contents 1
Advanced Server Features Overview 1
Load Balance 2
Advanced Server Features for Windows 2000 2
Advanced Server Features for Windows NT 3
Advanced Server Features for Novell NetWare 3
Advanced Server Features for Linux 4
3Com Management Programs 4
Creating a Driver Disk 5
2
Installing and Connecting the NIC
System Requirements 7
Windows XP (64-bit) 7
Windows XP (32-bit) 7
Windows 2000 7
Windows NT 7
NetWare 8
Linux 8
UNIX 8
Solaris 8
Safety Precautions 9
Pre-Installation Checklist 9
Installing and Connecting the NIC 10
Installing the NIC 10
Connecting the Network Cables 12
Installing and Using the 3Com Connection Assistant
System Requirements 13
Installation 13
3
Windows XP Driver Setup
Installing the Driver Software 15
Windows XP 32-bit 15
Windows XP 64-bit 16
Driver Installation Without Master Navigator
Verifying Successful Installation 17
Modifying Configuration Parameters 17
Removing the Driver Software 19
Installing Advanced Server Features 19
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features 20
Configuring Advanced Server Features 20
Configuring Teaming 20
Configuring VLANs 22
Advanced Server Control Suite 23
16
13
Contents
4
Windows 2000 Driver Setup
Installing the Driver Software 25
Verifying Successful Installation 27
Modifying Configuration Parameters 27
Removing the Driver Software 29
Installing Advanced Server Features 30
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features 30
Configuring Advanced Server Features 30
Configuring Teaming 30
Configuring VLANs 32
Advanced Server Control Suite 34
Updating Mini-port (Core) Drivers 34
5
Windows NT Driver Setup
Installing the Driver Software 37
Modifying Configuration Parameters 38
Updating the Driver Software 40
Removing the Driver Software 40
Installing Advanced Server Features 41
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features 41
Configuring Teaming 42
Configuring VLANs 44
Advanced Server Control Suite 45
Installing the Microsoft Loopback Adapter Driver 46
Performing a Fresh Installation of Windows NT on a
Backup Domain Controller 46
Setting up SERVER 2 47
Stopping the Net Logon Service on SERVER 1 48
Stopping the Net Logon Service on SERVER 2 48
Renaming Domain-2/SERVER-2 to DOMAIN-1/SERVER-2
Updating Mini-port (Core) Drivers 49
6
48
Novell NetWare Driver Setup
Pre-Installation Requirements 51
Installing Novell NetWare Server 4.2 51
Installing Novell NetWare Server 5.1 54
Verifying or Modifying NIC Parameters 54
Removing Drivers from Autoexec.ncf 55
Installing Advanced Server Features 56
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features 56
Load Balance and Trunk Mode Selection 57
Loading Frame Types 57
Hot Standby 57
Configuring VLANs 57
Additional Command Line Keywords 59
Editing the AUTOEXEC.NCF File 59
Installing Advanced Server Features on Novell NetWare Server 4.2 and 5.1
NIC Driver Configuration Parameters for Novell NetWare 64
63
Contents
7
Linux Driver Setup
Installation Overview 65
Installing the Source RPM Package 65
Building the Driver From a TAR File 65
Patching PCI Files (Optional) 66
Unloading and Removing the Driver 66
Optional Parameters 66
Advanced Server Features 67
Installing Advanced Server Features 68
Configuring Teams 69
8
UNIX and
SCO OpenServer Driver Setup
UnixWare 7 Driver 75
Package Creation 75
Driver Installation 75
MAC Address 76
Jumbo MTU Size 76
SCO OpenServer Release 5 Driver 76
Installation Diskette 76
Driver Installation 77
Jumbo Frames and Other Advanced Parameters
9
Solaris Driver Setup
Driver Installation 79
Uninstalling the Driver 79
Customizing the Driver Configuration 80
ForceSpeedDuplex 80
FlowControl 80
MaxJumboFrameSize 81
TxPacketDescCnt 81
RxStdDescCnt 81
RxJumboDescCnt 81
RxCoalescingTicks 81
RxMaxCoalescedFrames 81
TxCoalescingTicks 81
TxMaxCoalescedFrames 82
RxCoalescingTicksDuringInt 82
TxCoalescingTicksDuringInt 82
RxMaxCoalescedFramesDuringInt 82
TxMaxCoalescedFramesDuringInt 82
StatsCoalescingTicks 82
DoubleCopyTxBufferSize 82
ndd Command 83
77
Contents
10
3Com Management Programs
Overview 85
Installing the Management Programs 85
Removing the Management Programs 86
Initializing the Management Programs 86
Vital Sign 86
Diagnostics 87
Cable Analysis 88
Load Balance/Virtual LANs 89
Saving the Configuration 91
Restoring the Configuration 91
Load Balance/Virtual LAN Statistics 91
11
Troubleshooting
Hardware Diagnostics 93
Checking Port LEDs 93
Troubleshooting Checklist 94
Checking if Proper Drivers are Loaded
Windows 94
NetWare 95
Linux 95
Running Cable Analysis 95
Length 96
Cable Diagnostics Display 96
Testing Network Connectivity 96
Windows 96
NetWare 96
Linux 97
DOS Diagnostic Failures 97
Wake-on-Lan 97
Known Problems 97
Windows 2000 97
Linux 98
A
94
Key Protocols and Interfaces
CIM 99
DMI 100
SNMP 100
NIC Teaming 101
Load Balancing 101
Link Aggregation (802.3ad) 101
Generic Link Aggregation (Trunking)
Failover Teaming 102
VLANs Overview 102
VLAN Support 102
101
Contents
B
Installing and Using the Managed PC Boot Agent
Booting From the Network 105
Using the Boot ROM on the NIC to Boot from the Network
Enabling or Disabling the Boot ROM Setting 106
C
Specifications
10/100/1000 BASE-T Cable Specifications
Performance Specifications 107
Physical Characteristics 107
Power Requirements 107
Environmental Specifications 108
D
Technical Support
Online Technical Services 109
World Wide Web Site 109
3Com KnowledgeBase Services 109
3Com FTP Site 109
Support from Your Network Supplier 110
Support from 3Com 110
Returning Products for Repair 111
Regulatory Information
FCC Class A Verification Statement 113
FCC Class B Statement 113
FCC Declaration of Conformity 114
Index
107
105
1
Introduction
This guide describes how to install and configure the 3Com® Gigabit Server NICs in
Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT, Novell NetWare, Linux, UNIX, and, Solaris
operating system environments.
Contents
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3Com Gigabit Server NIC
Keep the NIC in its package until ready for installation.
3Com Installation CD with Gigabit Server driver software and online user guide.
Quick start guide.
Inform your network supplier of any missing or damaged items. If you need to return the
NIC, you must use the original (or equivalent) packaging.
Advanced Server Features Overview
The Advanced Server Features program is an intermediate software driver for Windows
2000 Server operating systems (Server, Advanced Server, and Datacenter Server),
Windows NT Server operating systems (Server and Enterprise Server), NetWare, and Linux.
The Advanced Server Features provide load balancing, failover, and VLAN configuration.
These features are provided by creating teams (virtual NICs) that consist of multiple NICs.
A team can consist of one to eight NICs, and each NIC can be designated primary or
standby. All primary NICs in a team will participate in load balancing operations by
sending and receiving a portion of the total traffic. Standby NICs will take over in the
event that all primary NICs have lost their links. VLANs can be added to a team to allow
multiple VLANs with different VLAN IDs. A virtual NIC is created for each VLAN added.
Load balancing and failover features will work with any third-party NIC. VLANs work with
3Com, Broadcom, Alteon, and Intel NICs.
NOTE: Standby can be used only in load balance mode (see “Load Balance”
below).
1
1
Introduction
Load Balance
Load balance is a protocol-specific scheme. The levels of support for IP, IPX, and other
protocols are listed below.
Protocol
Load Balancing
Failover
IP
Yes
Yes
IPX
Yes*
Yes**
Other protocols
No
Yes**
*Only outbound load-balancing for IPX (on NetWare only).
**For 3Com NICs.
Load balance mode works with all Ethernet switches without configuring the switch ports
to any special trunking mode. Only IP traffic will be load-balanced in both inbound and
outbound directions. IPX traffic will be load-balanced in the outbound direction only.
Other protocol packets will be sent and received through one primary NIC only. Failover
for non-IP traffic is supported using 3Com,Broadcom,Alteon, and Intel NICs. The generic
trunking mode requires the Ethernet switch to support some form of port trunking mode
(for example, Cisco Systems Gigabit EtherChannel or other switch vendors’ link
aggregation mode). This mode is protocol-independent and all traffic should be loadbalanced and fault-tolerant.
Advanced Server Features for Windows 2000
The following options are supported under Windows 2000 Server operating systems
(Server, Advanced Server, Datacenter Server). See “Windows 2000 Driver Setup” on
page 25 for additional information.
Failover and Load Balance
■ Adapter teaming for failover (heterogeneous support for 3Com 10/100 server NICs,
Alteon AceNIC, released Intel 10/100 server NICs, released Intel 1000BaseSX server
NICs, and Intel 82559 LAN on Motherboard [LOM])
■ Load balance
■ Generic Link Aggregation (GEC/FEC, open trunk)
■ Link aggregation (IEEE 802.3ad) static implementation only
Virtual LAN (VLANs)
■ Up to 64 VLANs per team using IEEE 802.1Q-1988 tagging
Offloading
■ IP, TCP/UDP checksum
■ Support for segmentation of large TCP packets
■ Jumbo frames (9K)
Power Management
■ Remote Wake Up (magic packet, specific pattern)
NOTE: Wake-on-LAN (WOL) is not supported with the fiber version of the
Gigabit Server NIC (3C996-SX). WOL must be disabled when using the fiber
Gigabit Server NIC.
PCI Hot-Plug
■ Microsoft
2
Advanced Server Features Overview
Advanced Server Features for Windows NT
The following options are supported under Windows NT Server operating systems
(Server and Enterprise Server). See “Windows NT Driver Setup” on page 37 for additional
information.
Failover and Load Balance
■ Adapter teaming for failover (heterogeneous support for 3Com 10/100 server NICs,
released Alteon AceNIC, Intel 82559 LAN on Motherboard (LOM), released
Intel 10/100 server NICs, and released Intel 1000BaseSX server NICs).
■ Load balance
■ Generic Link Aggregation (GEC/FEC, open trunk)
■ Link aggregation (IEEE 802.3ad) static implementation only
Virtual LAN (VLANs)
■ Up to 64 VLANs per team using IEEE 802.1Q-1988 tagging.
Offloading
■ Jumbo frames (9K)
PCI Hot-Plug
■ Contact your OEM for more information.
Advanced Server Features for Novell NetWare
The following options are supported under Novell NetWare. See “Novell NetWare Driver
Setup” on page 51 for additional information.
Failover and Load Balance
■ Adapter teaming for failover (heterogeneous support for 3Com 10/100 server NICs,
Alteon Tigon2/3, Intel 82559 LAN on Motherboard (LOM), Intel 10/100 server NICs,
and Intel 1000BaseSX server NICs).
■ Load Balance
■ Generic Link Aggregation (GEC/FEC, open trunk)
NESL Compliance
For optimal fault tolerance and recovery operations, BASP.LAN relies on the NIC drivers to
generate NESL (NetWare Event Service Layer) events during link changes and other failure
events. NESL is an optional feature in the ODI driver specification and not all drivers
support it. For NESL events to propagate properly to BASP.LAN, ODINEB.NLM must be
loaded before the NESL compliant ODI drivers.
Do the following to determine if a NIC driver supports NESL events:
■ Load BASP.LAN and create a team by binding the NIC to the virtual slot (see
instructions and examples below). In the Virtual Adapter X Team Members screen
of the BASP.LAN menu interface, the Link status of all bound NICs are shown.
Disconnect or connect the NIC cable. The link status shown on the screen should
change immediately if the NIC driver supports NESL events.
3
1
Introduction
Virtual LAN (VLANs)
■ Up to 64 VLANs per NIC using IEEE 802.1Q-1988 tagging (64 is the maximum
configurable, although 32 is the maximum operable).
Offloading
■ IP, TCP/UDP checksum—NetWare 5.0 or greater only
PCI Hot-Plug
■ Contact your OEM for more information.
Advanced Server Features for Linux
The Gigabit Ethernet NIC supports the Linux driver. See “Linux Driver Setup” on page 65
for additional information.
■ Packaging—The driver has been released in two packaging formats, source RPM and
compressed TAR formats.
■ Module Parameters—Optional parameters for the driver can be supplied as
command-line arguments to the insmod command.
■ Advanced Server Features—A kernel module designed for Linux 2.2 kernel that
provides load balancing, failover, and VLAN features.
3Com Management Programs
The 3Com Management Programs is a graphical user interface that functions with the
Windows 2000 Server operating systems (Server, Advanced Server, and Datacenter
Server). See “3Com Management Programs” on page 85 for additional information.
3Com Management Programs have the following features:
■ Vital Sign—The Vital Sign screen allows you to view vital NIC information, network
status, and network connectivity. Active NICs are listed.
■ Diagnostics—The Diagnostics screen allows you to view information and utilize
functions to test this network interface card or LOM.
■ Cable Analysis—From the Cable Analysis screen the user can monitor conditions of an
Ethernet CAT5 cable connection within a cable plant in an Ethernet network. The
software detects various cable conditions such as cable lengths between two given
nodes, cable pair breakage, cable pair polarity, and data skew between cable pairs.
■ Load Balance/Virtual LANs—The Load Balance/Virtual LANs screen allows you to
configure advanced features. Any available NIC can be configured as part of a team.
■ Statistics—The Statistics screen allows you view traffic statistics for most NICs.
Statistical values and coverage are more comprehensive for some NICs than
for others.
4
Creating a Driver Disk
Creating a Driver Disk
Create driver disks using the MakeDisk utility (setup.exe file). This utility will allow you to
create disks with the following drivers:
■ Windows XP 32-bit Driver
■ Windows XP 64-bit Driver
■ Windows 2000 Driver
■ Windows NT Driver
■ NetWare Driver
■ Advanced Server Features—Windows XP 64-bit Driver
■ Advanced Server Features—Windows 2000 Driver
■ Advanced Server Features—Windows NT Driver
■ Advanced Server Features—NetWare Driver
■ Advanced Server Features—Linux Driver
1 Insert the 3Com Installation CD in the CD-ROM drive. Allow your operating system’s
autorun feature to launch the Master Navigator.
2 Click NIC Software.
3 Click Installation Utilities.
4 Click Create Installation Diskette.
5 In the Welcome window of the Diskette Creation Utility, click Next.
6 Insert a 3.5” disk into floppy drive A (default) or B. Click Next.
7 Follow the remaining Diskette Creation Utility commands and insert diskettes when
prompted. When all driver diskettes have been created, the message “Diskette Copy
Complete” appears on your screen.
8 Click OK to end the Diskette Creation Utility.
9 When all driver diskettes have been created, the information screen will appear,
confirming that the drivers were successfully created. Click OK.
5
2
Installing and Connecting the NIC
System Requirements
Before installing the Gigabit Ethernet NIC, be sure your system meets the requirements
listed for your operating system.
Windows XP (64-bit)
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Itanium-based computer that meets Windows XP software requirements
One open 32-bit or 64-bit PCI slot
PCI v2.2 33/66 MHz or PCI-x v1.0 64 bit 133 MHz
256 MB RAM (minimum)
Microsoft Windows XP (64-bit version)
Gigabit Ethernet NIC driver software for Windows XP
Windows XP (32-bit)
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Pentium-based computer that meets Windows XP software requirements
One open 32-bit or 64-bit PCI slot
PCI v2.2 33/66 MHz or PCI-x v1.0 64 bit 133 MHz
128 MB RAM (minimum)
Microsoft Windows XP (32-bit version)
Gigabit Ethernet NIC driver software for Windows XP
Windows 2000
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Pentium-based computer that meets Windows 2000 software requirements
One open 32-bit or 64-bit PCI slot
PCI v2.2 33/66 MHz or PCI-x v1.0 64 bit 133 MHz
128 MB RAM (minimum)
Microsoft Windows 2000 (Server, Advanced Server, or Datacenter Server)
Gigabit Ethernet NIC driver software for Windows 2000:
Windows NT
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Pentium-based computer that meets Windows NT 4.0 software requirements
One open 32-bit or 64-bit PCI slot
PCI v2.2 33/66 MHz or PCI-x v1.0 64 bit 133 MHz
128 MB RAM (minimum)
Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 (Server or Enterprise Server) with Service Pack 5 or later
Gigabit Ethernet NIC driver software for Windows NT
7
2
Installing and Connecting the NIC
NetWare
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Pentium-based computer that meets Novell NetWare 4.2/5.x/6.x software
requirements
One open 32-bit or 64-bit PCI slot
PCI v2.2 33/66 MHz or PCI-x v1.0 64 bit 133 MHz
128 MB RAM (minimum)
One of the following versions of Novell NetWare:
■ Novell NetWare 5.0 or higher, with Support Pack 3 or the most recent NetWare 5
Support Pack
■ Novell NetWare 4.2 with Support Pack 7 or the most recent Support Pack, including
the optional ODI v3.31 LAN drivers (MISC/ODI331).
You can get the appropriate updates from the Novell support Web site
Gigabit Ethernet NIC driver software for Novell NetWare. (Note that the server ODI
driver can be found at the \netware\driver directory).
Linux
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Pentium-based computer that meets Linux software requirements
One open 32-bit or 64-bit PCI slot
PCI v2.2 33/66 MHz or PCI-x v1.0 64 bit 133 MHz
128 MB RAM (minimum)
NOTE: Although the driver should work with many Linux kernel versions and
distributions, it has only been tested on RedHat 6.2 and 7 Linux distributions for
i386 (kernel version 2.2.14 and 2.2.16), and the 2.4.0 test kernel. Furthermore,
the driver has only been tested as a loadable module.
UNIX
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Pentium-based computer that meets corresponding UNIX software requirements
One open 32-bit or 64-bit PCI slot
PCI v2.2 33/66 MHz or PCI-x v1.0 64 bit 133 MHz
128MB RAM (minimum)
Solaris
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8
Pentium-based computer that meets Solaris 8 software requirements
One open 32-bit or 64-bit PCI slot
PCI v2.2 33/66 MHz or PCI-x v1.0 64 bit 133 MHz
128MB RAM (minimum)
Solaris 8 operating system
Safety Precautions
Safety Precautions
Observe the following safety precautions.
WARNING: The NIC is being installed in a system that operates with voltages that
can be lethal. Before you remove the cover of your system, you must observe the
following precautions to protect yourself and to prevent damage to the system
components.
■ Remove any metallic objects or jewelry from your hands and wrists.
■ Use only insulated or nonconducting tools.
■ Verify that the system is powered OFF and unplugged before removing
the cover.
■ Install or remove NICs only in a static-free environment. The use of a properly
grounded wrist strap (or other personal anti-static device) and an anti-static
mat are strongly recommended.
Pre-Installation Checklist
1 Check that your server meets the hardware and software requirements listed under
“System Requirements” on page 7.
2 Verify that your system is using the latest BIOS.
3 Review the information in the release.txt file on the 3Com Installation CD for
important information not available at the time this manual was created.
NOTE: If you acquired the adapter software on a floppy disk or from a third-party
support Web site, please check the appropriate source for the most recent
information.
4 If your system is active, shut it down.
■ Under Windows 2000
If Windows 2000 is currently running, close all applications and select Start/Shut
Down. When the window appears, select Shut Down from the pull-down options,
and click OK.
■ Under Windows NT
If Windows NT is currently running, close all applications and select Start/Shut
Down. Shut down the computer.
■ Under NetWare
If Novell NetWare is currently running, use the down command (NetWare 5) or the
down and exit commands (NetWare 4) at the server_name prompt to gracefully
shut down the server functions and reach the DOS prompt:
server_name: down
server_name: exit
■ Under Linux
If Redhat Linux is currently running, close all applications and at the command
prompt type init 0 to halt the machine. Once the machine is halted, you may
have to turn off the power switch manually.
5 When system shut down is complete, turn the power off and unplug your system.
6 Holding the NIC card by the edges, remove it from its shipping package and place it
on an anti-static surface.
7 Check the NIC for visible signs of damage, particularly on the edge connector. Never
attempt to install any damaged NIC. If the NIC is damaged, report it to your supplier.
9
2
Installing and Connecting the NIC
Installing and Connecting the NIC
This manual covers two types of Gigabit Server NICs: server Ethernet NIC (3C996B-T):
and server fiber NIC (3C996-SX):
The procedure for installing a NIC in a system is identical for both NICs. Connecting the
network cables is different for Ethernet and fiber NICs (see “Connecting the Network
Cables” on page 12”).
Installing the NIC
1 Review the precautions and pre-installation instructions. Before installing the NIC,
ensure the system power is off, the system is unplugged from the power outlet, and
that proper electrical grounding procedures have been followed. Refer to the
following figure to complete the remaining steps.
2 Remove the system cover, and select any empty PCI slot. If you do not know how to
identify a PCI slot, refer to your system documentation.
10
Installing and Connecting the NIC
NOTE: For optimal performance, select a PCI-X slot. For second best
performance, select a 64-bit PCI slot.
3 Remove the blank cover plate from the slot that you selected (see item 1 in the
figure, below).
4 Holding the PCI card by the edges, align the NIC’s connector edge with the PCI
connector dock.
NOTE: The connector dock in a 32-bit PCI slot is shorter than in a 64-bit PCI slot.
Although the NIC is designed to fit in either slot type, when installed in a 32-bit
PCI slot, part of the NIC’s connector edge will remain undocked. This is perfectly
normal.
5 Applying even pressure at both corners of the card, push the NIC until it is firmly
seated in the PCI slot. When properly seated, the NIC’s port connectors will be aligned
with the slot opening, and its faceplate will be flush against the system chassis.
CAUTION: Do not use excessive force when seating the card, as this may damage
the system or the NIC. If the card resists seating, remove it from the system,
realign it, and try again.
6 Secure the NIC with the screw (see item 2 in the figure, below).
7 Replace the system cover and disconnect any personal anti-static devices.
8 Turn the system power on.
After the system returns to normal operation, the NIC hardware is fully installed. The next
step is to connect the network cables.
1
2
11
2
Installing and Connecting the NIC
Connecting the Network Cables
Choose your type of NIC (Ethernet or fiber) and follow the procedure.
Ethernet NICs
Gigabit Ethernet NICs have one RJ-45 connector for attaching the system to an Ethernet
copper-wire segment. When automatic link negotiation is disabled, the port can be
configured for 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps signaling and either half-duplex or full-duplex
operation. To configure the port for 1000 Mbps, both link partners must be configured for
autonegotiation.
Follow this procedure for connecting a network cable to the Gigabit Ethernet NIC:
1 Prepare an appropriate cable. The following table lists the cable characteristics for
connecting to 10/100/1000BASE-T ports:
Port Type
Connector
Media
Maximum Distance
10BASE-T
RJ-45
CAT 3, 4, or 5 UTP
100 meters (325 feet)
100BASE-T
RJ-45
CAT 5 UTP (two pair)
100 meters (325 feet)
1000BASE-T
RJ-45
CAT5 UTP (four pair)
100 meters (325 feet)
NOTE: 1000BASE-T signaling requires four twisted pairs of Category 5 balanced
cabling, as specified in ISO/IEC 11801:1995 and EIA/TIA-568-A (1995) and tested
using procedures defined in TIA/EIA TSB95.
2 Connect one end of the cable to the Gigabit Ethernet NIC.
3 Connect the other end of the cable to an RJ-45 Ethernet network port.
For driver installation and configuration instructions, refer to the software configuration
for that specific driver.
After the NIC hardware and its driver software have been properly installed on your
system, the LEDs indicate the following NIC states:
LED
State
Description
1000
On
Good Gigabit Ethernet link.
Off
No 1000 Mbps link; possible link at different speed, possible bad
cable, bad connector, or configuration mismatch.
On
Good 100 Mbps Fast Ethernet link.
Off
No 100 Mbps link; possible link at different speed, possible bad cable,
bad connector, or configuration mismatch.
On
Good 10 Mbps Fast Ethernet link.
Off
No 10 Mbps link; possible link at different speed, possible bad cable,
bad connector, or configuration mismatch.
Blinking
Brief bursts of data detected on the port.
On
Streams of data detected on the port.
Off
No data detected on the port.
100
10
ACT
12
Installing and Using the 3Com Connection Assistant
Fiber NIC
1 If you have not already done so, remove the optical dust cap from the NIC port.
2 Connect the NIC to the network using 62.5/125 µm or 50/125 µm mulitmode fiberoptic cable with SC duplex connectors.
Installing and Using the 3Com Connection Assistant
The 3Com Connection Assistant is an optional Web-based software component that
allows users access to a variety of interactive technical support services.
These services can help you:
■ Fix NIC installation problems.
■ Fix network connection problems.
■ Download the latest NIC drivers.
■ Access a list of frequently asked questions as well as the 3Com Knowledgebase.
System Requirements
To install and use the 3Com Connection Assistant requires:
■ Windows XP, Windows 2000, or Windows NT 4.0.
■ Internet Explorer version 4.0 or later or Netscape Navigator version 4.06 or later.
■ Microsoft Java Virtual Machine (JVM)
See your PC documentation if you are unsure whether your PC is a Microsoft Java
Virtual Machine (JVM).
Installation
1 Insert the 3Com Installation CD in the CD-ROM drive.
The Welcome screen appears. If not, double-click on My Computer, and then doubleclick on the CD-ROM drive icon to invoke the Welcome screen.
2 Click NIC Software.
3 Click 3Com Connection Assistant.
4 Follow the prompts on the screen.
A 3Com Connection Assistant icon appears on your Windows desktop. Double-click
the icon to start the program.
For help on using the 3Com Connection Assistant, see the online help included with
the software.
13
3
Windows XP Driver Setup
Installing the Driver Software
Before you begin software installation:
■ Make sure that all software installation requirements are met. See “System
Requirements” on page 7.
■ Install the hardware. For instructions, see “Installing and Connecting the NIC” on
page 7.
NOTE: Before beginning this procedure, verify that Windows XP has been
upgraded to the latest version with the latest service pack applied.
NOTE: Make sure the correct BIOS and firmware are installed to ensure the system
works correctly.
Windows XP 32-bit
Use the following procedure to install the driver for the first time in a system running
Windows XP 32-bit version.
1 Start Windows and log in. You must have Network Administrator privileges to install
the driver software
2 Insert the 3Com Installation CD in the CD-ROM drive.
3 The main menu appears. Select NIC Software.
4 From the list on the left, select NIC Drivers.
5 Click Install NIC Drivers.
6 Click Install Win XP 32 NIC Drivers.
7 The Please Wait screen appears. After the installation is complete, and Update dialog
box appears. Click OK.
8 The Choose Operating System screen appears. Click Windows XP.
9 Follow the steps in the Completing NIC Installation with Windows XP screen. After
you are through, click Done. The drivers are installed.
15
3
Windows XP Driver Setup
Windows XP 64-bit
Use the following procedure to install the driver for the first time in a computer running
Windows XP 64-bit version.
1 Start Windows and log in. You must have Network Administrator privileges to install
the driver software
2 Insert the 3Com Installation CD in the CD-ROM drive.
3 The main menu appears. Select NIC Software.
4 From the list on the left, select NIC Drivers.
5 Click Install NIC Drivers.
6 Click Install Win XP 64 NIC Drivers.
7 The Please Wait screen appears. After the installation is complete, and Update dialog
box appears. Click OK.
8 The Choose Operating System screen appears. Click Windows XP.
9 Follow the steps in the Completing NIC Installation with Windows XP screen. After
you are through, click Done. The drivers are installed
Driver Installation Without Master Navigator
If you cannot use the 3Com Master Navigator on your system, use the following
procedure to install the updated drivers.
1 Start Windows XP. The driver will be automatically installed.
2 Insert the 3Com Installation CD in the CD-ROM drive. If the main menu appears,
click Exit.
3 Select Start/Control Panel/Network Connections.
4 In the Network Connections window, right-click on the LAN or High-Speed Internet
Connection icon corresponding to the NIC and select Properties.
5 Click Configure, then select Driver.
6 Click Update Driver.
7 Choose Install from a list or specific location (Advanced) and click Next.
8 Select Don’t search, I will choose the driver and click Next.
9 Click Have Disk.
.
10 Click Browse and select the CD-ROM drive, then select OK.
11 Select the NIC and click Next. The driver will be copied to the hard disk.
12 Click Finish. The driver is installed.
16
Verifying Successful Installation
Verifying Successful Installation
1 Right-click My Network Places and select Properties from the menu.
2 Check connections in the LAN or High-Speed Internet window.
Modifying Configuration Parameters
Although the default values should be appropriate in most cases, you may change any
of the available options to meet the requirements of your specific system. After the NIC
driver software has been installed, use this procedure to verify or change the following
NIC properties:
■ 802.1p QOS
■ Checksum Offload
■ Flow Control
■ Jumbo MTU
■ Speed and Duplex
■ Wake Up Capabilities
1 On the Desktop, right-click the My Computer icon and select Properties from the
pop-up menu. The System Properties window displays.
2 Click the Hardware tab and then click Device Manager. The Device Manager
window displays.
3 Scroll down the list of hardware devices to Network Adapters. Click the plus sign (+)
to the left of the icon to display the list of NICs currently configured.
4 Double-click the Gigabit Ethernet NIC you want to configure. The Gigabit Ethernet
Properties window displays, showing the General tab.
5 Select Advanced. A window showing the list of configurable properties (and default
values) for the NIC displays.
6 Change the operating parameters as desired. To change NIC operating parameters
listed under the Advanced tab, click the options listed under Properties and then use
the pull-down window under Value to change the default or assigned value.
NOTE: When link negotiation is enabled, the user-configured link speed,
flow control, and duplex settings are ignored in favor of automatically
determined settings.
17
3
Windows XP Driver Setup
The following options are available:
■ 802.1p QOS
■
■
■
■
■
18
– Disable (default)
– Enable
Checksum Offload
– None
– Rx TCP/IP Checksum
– Tx TCP/IP Checksum
– Tx/Rx TCP/IP Checksum
Flow Control
– Auto
– Disable (default)
– Rx PAUSE
– Rx/Tx PAUSE
– Tx PAUSE
Jumbo MTU
– 1500 (default)
– 2000
– 2500
– 3000
– 3500
– 4000
– 4500
– 5000
– 5500
– 6000
– 6500
– 7000
– 7500
– 8000
– 8500
– 9000
Speed and Duplex
– 10 Mb Full
– 10 Mb Half
– 100 Mb Full
– 100 Mb Half
– Auto (default)
Wake Up Capabilities
– Both (default)
– Magic Packet
– None
– Wake Up Frame
Removing the Driver Software
7 When all desired configuration is complete, click OK to accept the settings.
8 Reloading your driver is recommended. To do so, right-click My Network Places.
9 Right-click the NIC and select Disable. You have unloaded the driver.
10 Right-click the NIC and select Enable. You have reloaded the driver.
11 Verify that the NIC port LEDs operate as described in the table in “Installing and
Connecting the NIC” on page 7.
Removing the Driver Software
Windows XP automatically detects the installation of new hardware. However, Windows
XP does not automatically detect removal of driver software. You must first uninstall the
NIC driver before removing the NIC.
NOTE: If Advanced Server Features are installed, they must be uninstalled before
removing the driver software. See “Uninstalling Advanced Server Features” on
page 20 for details.
To remove the NIC driver and associated software, use the following procedure:
1 Start Windows XP system and log in. You must have Network Administrator privileges
to uninstall the driver software.
2 Select Start, then Control Panel.
3 The Control Panel window appears. Double-click Administrative Tools.
4 Double-click Computer Management.
5 The Computer Management window appears. In the left-hand pane of the window,
click on the “+” sign next to System Tools, and then click on Device Manager.
6 Click Network adapters, then right-click on the 3Com NIC.
7 Select Uninstall.
8 When the Confirm Device Removal window appears, click OK.
The driver and associated software are removed from your system.
NOTE: You must uninstall the driver before removing the NIC and moving it to a
different slot.
Installing Advanced Server Features
NOTE: Advanced Server Features will only install on systems running Windows XP
I64 Server Edition.
1 Start Windows XP I64 Server Edition and log in. You must have Network
Administrator privileges to uninstall the driver software.
2 Insert the enclosed 3Com Installation CD into the CD-ROM drive.
3 Select Start/My Computer.
4 Right-click CD-ROM drive, and select Explore. Do not select Autoplay.
5 Double-click WinXP64 directory on the 3Com Installation CD.
6 Double-click BcmServ directory.
19
3
Windows XP Driver Setup
7 Double-click baspi64i.exe to install Advanced Server Features.
This will install the Advanced Server Features software and display a window.
From this menu, you can create a team. See “Creating a Team and Assigning NICs”
on page 21, or click OK to complete installation.
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features
1 Start Windows XP I64 Server Edition and log in. You must have Network
Administrator privileges to uninstall the driver software.
2 Select Start/Control Panel/Network Connections.
3 Right-click any NIC and select Properties.
4 Click Broadcom Advanced Server Features program driver, and then click Uninstall.
5 A Warning screen appears. Click Yes to continue.
6 At the prompt, click Yes to restart.
Configuring Advanced Server Features
The Advanced Server Features provides load balancing, failover, and VLAN configuration
by creating teams (virtual NICs) that consist of multiple NICs.
Configuring Teaming
NOTE: All teaming configurations can be optionally performed using the 3Com
Management Programs. Refer to “3Com Management Programs” on page 85 for
additional information.
Any available NIC can be configured as part of a team. Teaming is a method of grouping
multiple NICs to a virtual NIC (bundling multiple NICs to look like a single NIC). The benefit
of this approach is load balancing.
By selecting each of the available NICs, move each of them over to the Load Balance
Members column. This “team” now appears as one NIC. Each member in the Load
Balance Member list shares the traffic burden of all its members.
The Standby Member field is used to permit the selection of one team member to handle
traffic, if all other members in the Load Balance Member list fail (failover). The selected
Standby Member will not handle any traffic unless all Load Balance Members fail. When
one load balance member (or more) is restored (fail-back), traffic will then be resumed by
the restored team member(s).
Teaming configuration is optional. Before configuring Teaming, see the “NIC Teaming” in
Key Protocols and Interfaces.
Configuring Teaming consists of the following tasks:
■ Accessing the Advanced Server Features Driver Properties interface
■ Creating teams
■ Adding NICs to the teams
■ Assigning IP addresses to the teams
Each of these tasks is described below, along with procedures describing how to delete
NICs from a failover team and how to delete a team.
20
Configuring Advanced Server Features
Accessing the Advanced Server Features Driver Interface
Use this procedure to access the NIC properties for teaming configuration:
1 Click the Start menu, and then select Settings/Control Panel.
2 Select Network and Dial-up Connections, right-click 3Com Virtual NIC, and then select
Broadcom Advanced Server Program Driver.
The Advanced Server Features window appears.
Interface components of the Advanced Server Features driver properties window are
described below:
■ Select or enter a team name.
This entry field is used to select or enter a team name.
■ Unassigned NICs
This list displays all of the NICs that are available to be added to a team. Because each
NIC can be added to only one team, the NIC is removed from this list after it has been
assigned to a team.
■ Team Type
Load Balance and Failover: Load balancing
FEC/GEC: Also known as general trunking. No standby NIC is allowed when this
option is selected.
■ Team members
This list displays all NICs that belong to a selected team.
■ Standby NICs
This list displays the standby NIC selected for failover for a selected team.
■ VLAN List
This list displays all the VLANs that have been created for the selected team.
Creating a Team and Assigning NICs
A failover team comprises at least one primary NIC (a standby NIC is optional). Each NIC
can belong to only one team. To configure a new failover team, access the Advanced
Server Features Driver Properties window and perform the following steps:
1 Enter a team name in the “Select or enter a team name” entry field.
2 Click Create Team.
NOTE: All other NICs added to the team are reconfigured automatically to
match the team configuration. When the basic configuration properties of a team
are changed, this changes the configuration of all NICs in the team. However,
when a NIC is removed from any failover teams, it will operate according to
the parameters set for it before becoming a member of a failover team.
3 Add a NIC to the team.
■ In the Unassigned NICs list, select the NIC(s) that you want to add to the team
created in the previous step. Move the selected NICs to the Team Members list box
using the double arrows.
■ When you have finished configuring failover teams, click OK to accept the changes.
NOTE: At least one NIC must be displayed in the Team Members list box.
21
3
Windows XP Driver Setup
4 If a team has no NICs assigned, you will be prompted to add a NIC or delete the team.
Click OK. When team has been correctly configured, one Virtual Team NIC driver will
be created for each configured team and will appear along with the other NICs in the
Local Area Connection Properties window. Click OK.
5 Configure the team IP address if necessary. Configure the IP address and any other
necessary TCP/IP configuration for the team. Click OK when finished. If you are
unsure as to how to configure the TCP/IP properties, consult your Microsoft
documentation.
Removing a NIC from a Team
1 To remove an NIC from its assigned team, select the NIC in the Team Members list and
then click the double left arrow. Click OK.
2 In the Local Area Connection Properties window, click OK.
The NIC will be removed from the team list and will reappear in the Unassigned
NICs list.
Deleting a Team
1 To delete a configured failover team and release its assigned NICs, select any NIC in
the team list, and then click Delete Team. Click OK.
2 In the Local Area Connection Properties window click OK.
The team and all its assigned NICs will be removed from the team list. The released
NICs will reappear in the Unassigned NICs list.
NOTE: NICs that are part of a team inherit all the basic configuration properties
of the team, including VLANs associated with the team. If you delete a team, any
VLANs configured for that team will also be deleted.
Configuring VLANs
VLAN Configuration is optional. Before configuring VLANs, see “VLANs Overview” on
page 102.
NOTE: NICs that are members of a team can also be configured to support
VLANs; however, VLANs cannot be configured with foreign NICs.
When configuring VLANs for team NICs, note that any NIC or LOM that is a
member of a team inherits the configuration of the primary NIC. When a NIC or
LOM is removed from the team, however, its original configuration parameters
are used.
By default, Ethernet NICs are configured with VLAN support disabled. Up to 64 VLANs
can be defined for each team on your server. Configuring VLANs consists of the
following tasks:
■ Accessing the VLAN configuration interface.
■ Adding VLAN(s) to the team(s). This includes assigning a unique identifier and name
to each new VLAN.
Each of these tasks is described below, along with procedures describing how to delete
VLANs or modify the properties of a configured VLAN.
22
Configuring Advanced Server Features
Accessing the Adapter VLAN Configuration Interface
Use this procedure to access the NIC properties for VLAN Configuration:
1 Click the Start menu, and then select Settings, Control Panel.
2 Double-click the Gigabit Ethernet NIC icon.
The Advanced Server Features configuration window is displayed. If you do not see
the Gigabit Ethernet NIC icon, you must install the 3Com Management Programs.
For more information, see “3Com Management Programs” on page 85.
The Advanced Server Features configuration window lists the installed NICs and the
VLANs configured for each team. Each VLAN is identified with a unique identifier number
and name that will appear only in this window. Interface components of the VLAN
Configuration window are described in detail below:
■ VLAN List
This list displays all VLANs that have been configured.
■ Control Buttons
There are two control buttons: Create VLAN and Delete VLAN. These buttons are used
for creating and deleting VLANs.
Adding a VLAN
You can define up to 64 VLANs per team. To configure a new VLAN, follow these steps:
1 From the Advanced Server Features window, select the team to which you want to
add a VLAN.
2 Enter a VLAN Name and VLAN ID, and then click Create VLAN.
3 When you have finished adding VLANs to this team, click OK.
4 In the Local Area Connection Properties window, click OK.
A new virtual NIC is created for each VLAN.
NOTE: To maintain optimal NIC performance, your system should have 64 MB of
system memory for each eight VLANs.
When adding VLANs to a single NIC, a one-NIC team must be created.
Deleting a VLAN
To delete a configured VLAN, follow these steps:
1 From the Advanced Server Features window, select the team from which you want to
delete the VLAN, and then click Delete VLAN. The selected VLAN will be deleted from
the VLAN list window.
2 When you have finished deleting VLANs, click OK to accept the changes.
3 Click OK at the Local Area Connection Properties window.
Advanced Server Control Suite
If you have installed the Broadcom Advanced Server Control Suite, all Load Balancing and
VLAN configuration is done from the Advanced Server Control Suite window. You can
access the Advanced Server Control Suite by installing 3Com Management Programs.
See “3Com Management Programs” on page 85 from more details.
23
4
Windows 2000 Driver Setup
Installing the Driver Software
Before you begin software installation:
■ Make sure that all software installation requirements are met. See “System
Requirements” on page 7.
■ Install the hardware. For instructions, see “Installing and Connecting the NIC” on
page 7.
NOTE: Before beginning this procedure, verify that Windows 2000 has been
upgraded to the latest version with the latest service pack applied.
NOTE: Make sure the correct BIOS and firmware are installed to ensure the system
works correctly.
Use the following procedure to install the driver for the first time in a system running
Windows 2000.
1 Start Windows 2000 and log in. You must have Network Administrator privileges to
install the driver software.
The Windows 2000 Found New Hardware wizard detects the new NICs and begins
the driver installation.
2 Insert the 3Com Installation CD in the CD-ROM drive.
3 From the main menu, select NIC Software.
4 From the list on the left, click NIC Drivers.
5 Click Install NIC Drivers.
6 Click Install Win 2000 NIC Drivers.
7 The Please Wait screen appears. After the installation is completed, an Update dialog
box appears. Click OK.
8 The Choose Operating System screen appears. Click Windows 2000.
25
4
Windows 2000 Driver Setup
9 Follow the steps in the Completing NIC installation with Windows 2000 screen.
Click Done.
.
10 Click Exit.
11 Make sure the 3Com Installation CD is still in the CD-ROM drive.
12 In the Found New Hardware Wizard screen, click Next.
13 The Install Hardware Device Drivers window appears. Click Search for a suitable driver
for my device, and then click Next.
14 The Locate Driver Files screen appears. Select the CD-ROM drives checkbox, and then
click Next.
15 The Driver Files Search Results screen appears. Verify that the correct path to the
driver software is shown (c:\winnt\inf\oem0.inf), and then click Next. If you acquired
the NIC software on a floppy disk or from the 3Com Web site, click where the NIC
driver files reside on your system.
16 The Completing the Found New Hardware Wizard screen appears. Click Finish.
After installation of the driver software is complete, you are ready to configure
NIC properties.
NOTE: After installing the drivers, it is recommended that you install the 3Com
Management Programs to make full use of all management features. For more
information, see “3Com Management Programs” on page 85.
26
Verifying Successful Installation
Verifying Successful Installation
1 Right-click My Network Places and select Properties from the menu.
2 Check connections in the Network and Dial-up Connections window.
Modifying Configuration Parameters
Although the default values should be appropriate in most cases, you may change any
of the available options to meet the requirements of your specific system. After the NIC
driver software has been installed, use this procedure to verify or change the following
NIC properties:
■ 802.1p QOS
■ Checksum Offload
■ Flow Control
■ Jumbo MTU
■ Speed and Duplex
■ Wake Up Capabilities
1 On the Desktop, right-click the My Computer icon and select Properties from the
pop-up menu. The System Properties window displays.
2 Click the Hardware tab and then click Device Manager. The Device Manager
window displays.
3 Scroll down the list of hardware devices to Network Adapters. Click the plus sign (+)
to the left of the icon to display the list of NICs currently configured.
4 Double-click the Gigabit Ethernet NIC you want to configure. The Gigabit Ethernet
Properties window displays, showing the General tab.
5 Click the Advanced tab. A window showing the list of configurable properties (and
default values) for the NIC displays.
6 Change the operating parameters as desired. To change NIC operating parameters
listed under the Advanced tab, click the options listed under Properties and then use
the pull-down window under Value to change the default or assigned value.
NOTE: When link negotiation is enabled, the user-configured link speed,
flow control, and duplex settings are ignored in favor of automatically
determined settings.
27
4
Windows 2000 Driver Setup
The following options are available:
■ 802.1p QOS
■
■
■
■
■
28
– Disable (default)
– Enable
Checksum Offload
– None
– Rx TCP/IP Checksum
– Tx TCP/IP Checksum
– Tx/Rx TCP/IP Checksum
Flow Control
– Auto
– Disable (default)
– Rx PAUSE
– Rx/Tx PAUSE
– Tx PAUSE
Jumbo MTU
– 1500 (default)
– 2000
– 2500
– 3000
– 3500
– 4000
– 4500
– 5000
– 5500
– 6000
– 6500
– 7000
– 7500
– 8000
– 8500
– 9000
Speed and Duplex
– 10 Mb Full
– 10 Mb Half
– 100 Mb Full
– 100 Mb Half
– Auto (default)
Wake Up Capabilities
– Both (default)
– Magic Packet
– None
– Wake Up Frame
Removing the Driver Software
7 When all desired configuration is complete, click OK to accept the settings.
8 Reloading your driver is recommended. To do so, right-click My Network Places.
9 Right-click the NIC and select Disable. You have unloaded the driver.
10 Right-click the NIC and select Enable. You have reloaded the driver.
11 Verify that the NIC port LEDs operate as described in the table in “Installing and
Connecting the NIC” on page 7.
Removing the Driver Software
Windows 2000 automatically detects the installation of new hardware. However,
Windows 2000 does not automatically detect removal of driver software. You must
first uninstall the NIC driver before removing the NIC.
NOTE: If Advanced Server Features are installed, they must be uninstalled before
removing the driver software. See “Uninstalling Advanced Server Features” on
page 30 for details.
To remove the NIC, do the following:
1 Start Windows 2000 system and log in. You must have Network Administrator
privileges to uninstall the driver software.
2 Open the Windows Start menu and select Setting, Control Panel:
3 The Control Panel window appears. Double-click Add/remove Hardware Wizard.
4 The Add/Remove Hardware Wizard window appears. Click Next.
5 The Choose a Hardware Task window appears. Click Uninstall/Unplug a device
(recommended), and then click Next. Choose this option to uninstall a device or
to prepare your computer for unplugging a device.
6 The Choose a Removal Task window appears. Click Uninstall a device (recommended),
and then click Next. Choose this option to permanently uninstall a device and
its driver.
7 The Installed Devices on Your Computer screen appears. Click the network adapter
card you want to uninstall (3Com 3C996 10/100/1000 Server NIC), and then
click Next.
8 In the Uninstalled Devices window, click Yes, I want to uninstall this device, and then
click Next.
9 The Completing the Add/Remove Hardware Wizard window appears. Click Finish.
Now you can shut down your system and you can physically remove the NIC from
the server.
NOTE: You must uninstall the driver before removing the NIC and moving it to a
different slot.
29
4
Windows 2000 Driver Setup
Installing Advanced Server Features
NOTE: Advanced Server Features will only install in a system running a Windows
2000 Server operating system (Server, Advanced Server, or Datacenter Server).
1 Start Windows 2000 Server and log in. You must have Network Administrator
privileges to install the driver software.
2 Insert the 3Com Installation CD into the CD-ROM drive.
3 If the main menu appears, click Exit.
4 Double-click My Computer icon.
5 Right-click CD-ROM drive, and select Explore. Do not select Autoplay.
6 Double-click Windows 2000 directory on the 3Com Installation CD.
7 Double-click BcmServ directory.
8 Double-click Baspinst.exe to install Advanced Server Features.
This will install the Advanced Server Features software and display a window.
From this menu, you can create a team. See “Creating a Team and Assigning NICs”
on page 31, or click OK to complete installation.
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features
1 Start Windows 2000 system and log in. You must have Network Administrator
privileges to uninstall the driver software.
2 Select Start/Settings/Control Panel/Network and Dial-up Connections.
3 Right-click any NIC and select Properties.
4 Click Broadcom Advanced Server Features program driver, and then click Uninstall.
5 A Warning screen appears. Click Yes to continue.
6 At the prompt, click Yes to restart.
Configuring Advanced Server Features
The Advanced Server Features provides load balancing, failover, and VLAN configuration
by creating teams (virtual NICs) that consist of multiple NICs.
Configuring Teaming
NOTE: All teaming configurations can be optionally performed using the 3Com
Management Programs. Refer to “3Com Management Programs” on page 85 for
additional information.
Any available NIC can be configured as part of a team. Teaming is a method of grouping
multiple NICs to a virtual NIC (bundling multiple NICs to look like a single NIC). The benefit
of this approach is load balancing.
By selecting each of the available NICs, move each of them over to the Load Balance
Members column. This “team” now appears as one NIC. Each member in the Load
Balance Member list shares the traffic burden of all its members.
30
Configuring Advanced Server Features
The Standby Member field is used to permit the selection of one team member to handle
traffic, if all other members in the Load Balance Member list fail (failover). The selected
Standby Member will not handle any traffic unless all Load Balance Members fail. When
one load balance member (or more) is restored (fail-back), traffic will then be resumed by
the restored team member(s).
Teaming configuration is optional. Before configuring Teaming, see the “NIC Teaming” in
Key Protocols and Interfaces.
Configuring Teaming consists of the following tasks:
■ Accessing the Advanced Server Features Driver Properties interface
■ Creating teams
■ Adding NICs to the teams
■ Assigning IP addresses to the teams
Each of these tasks is described below, along with procedures describing how to delete
NICs from a failover team and how to delete a team.
Accessing the Advanced Server Features Driver Interface
Use this procedure to access the NIC properties for teaming configuration:
1 Click the Start menu, and then select Settings/Control Panel.
2 Select Network and Dial-up Connections, right-click 3Com Virtual NIC, and then select
Broadcom Advanced Server Program Driver.
The Advanced Server Features window appears.
Interface components of the Advanced Server Features driver properties window are
described below:
■ Select or enter a team name.
This entry field is used to select or enter a team name.
■ Unassigned NICs
This list displays all of the Ethernet NICs that are available to be added to a team.
Because each NIC can be added to only one team, the NIC is removed from this list
after it has been assigned to a team.
■ Team Type
Load Balance and Failover: Load balancing
FEC/GEC: Also known as general trunking. No standby NIC is allowed when this
option is selected.
■ Team members
This list displays all NICs that belong to a selected team.
■ Standby NICs
This list displays the standby NIC selected for failover for a selected team.
■ VLAN List
This list displays all the VLANs that have been created for the selected team.
Creating a Team and Assigning NICs
A failover team comprises at least one primary NIC (a standby NIC is optional). Each NIC
can belong to only one team. To configure a new failover team, access the Advanced
Server Features Driver Properties window and perform the following steps:
1 Enter a team name in the “Select or enter a team name” entry field.
2 Click Create Team.
31
4
Windows 2000 Driver Setup
NOTE: All other NICs added to the team are reconfigured automatically to match
the team configuration. When the basic configuration properties of a team are
changed, this changes the configuration of all NICs in the team. However, when
a NIC is removed from any failover teams, it will operate according to the
parameters set for it before becoming a member of a failover team.
3 Add a NIC to the team.
■ In the Unassigned NICs list, select the NIC(s) that you want to add to the team
created in the previous step. Move the selected NICs to the Team Members list box
using the double arrows.
■ When you have finished configuring failover teams, click OK to accept the changes.
NOTE: At least one NIC must be displayed in the Team Members list box.
4 If a team has no NICs assigned, you will be prompted to add a NIC or delete the team.
Click OK. When team has been correctly configured, one Virtual Team NIC driver will
be created for each configured team and will appear along with the other NICs in the
Local Area Connection Properties window. Click OK.
5 Configure the team IP address if necessary. Configure the IP address and any other
necessary TCP/IP configuration for the team. Click OK when finished. If you are
unsure as to how to configure the TCP/IP properties, consult your Microsoft
documentation.
Removing a NIC from a Team
1 To remove an NIC from its assigned team, select the NIC in the Team Members list and
then click the double left arrow. Click OK.
2 In the Local Area Connection Properties window, click OK.
The NIC will be removed from the team list and will reappear in the Unassigned
NICs list.
Deleting a Team
1 To delete a configured failover team and release its assigned NICs, select any NIC in
the team list, and then click Delete Team. Click OK.
2 In the Local Area Connection Properties window click OK.
The team and all its assigned NICs will be removed from the team list. The released
NICs will reappear in the Unassigned NICs list.
NOTE: NICs that are part of a team inherit all the basic configuration properties of
the team, including VLANs associated with the team. If you delete a team, any
VLANs configured for that team will also be deleted.
Configuring VLANs
VLAN Configuration is optional. Before configuring VLANs, see “VLANs Overview” on
page 102.
32
Configuring Advanced Server Features
NOTE: NICs that are members of a team can also be configured to support
VLANs; however, VLANs cannot be configured with foreign NICs.
When configuring VLANs for team NICs, note that any NIC or LOM that is a
member of a team inherits the configuration of the primary NIC. When a NIC or
LOM is removed from the team, however, its original configuration parameters
are used.
By default, Ethernet NICs are configured with VLAN support disabled. Up to 64 VLANs
can be defined for each team on your server. Configuring VLANs consists of the
following tasks:
■ Accessing the VLAN configuration interface.
■ Adding VLAN(s) to the team(s). This includes assigning a unique identifier and name
to each new VLAN.
Each of these tasks is described below, along with procedures describing how to delete
VLANs or modify the properties of a configured VLAN.
Accessing the Adapter VLAN Configuration Interface
Use this procedure to access the NIC properties for VLAN Configuration:
1 Click the Start menu, and then select Settings, Control Panel.
2 Double-click the Gigabit Ethernet NIC icon.
The Advanced Server Features configuration window is displayed. If you do not see
the Gigabit Ethernet NIC icon, you must install the 3Com Management Programs.
For more information, see “3Com Management Programs” on page 85.
The Advanced Server Features configuration window lists the installed NICs and the
VLANs configured for each team. Each VLAN is identified with a unique identifier number
and name that will appear only in this window. Interface components of the VLAN
Configuration window are described in detail below:
■ VLAN List
This list displays all VLANs that have been configured.
■ Control Buttons
There are two control buttons: Create VLAN and Delete VLAN. These buttons are used
for creating and deleting VLANs.
Adding a VLAN
You can define up to 64 VLANs per team. To configure a new VLAN, follow these steps:
1 From the Advanced Server Features window, select the team to which you want to
add a VLAN.
2 Enter a VLAN Name and VLAN ID, and then click Create VLAN.
3 When you have finished adding VLANs to this team, click OK.
4 In the Local Area Connection Properties window, click OK.
A new virtual NIC is created for each VLAN.
NOTE: To maintain optimal NIC performance, your system should have 64 MB of
system memory for each eight VLANs.
When adding VLANs to a single NIC, a one-NIC team must be created.
33
4
Windows 2000 Driver Setup
Deleting a VLAN
To delete a configured VLAN, follow these steps:
1 From the Advanced Server Features window, select the team from which you want to
delete the VLAN, and then click Delete VLAN. The selected VLAN will be deleted from
the VLAN list window.
2 When you have finished deleting VLANs, click OK to accept the changes.
3 Click OK at the Local Area Connection Properties window.
Advanced Server Control Suite
If you have installed the Broadcom Advanced Server Control Suite, all Load Balancing and
VLAN configuration is done from the Advanced Server Control Suite window. You can
access the Advanced Server Control Suite by installing 3Com Management Programs.
See “3Com Management Programs” on page 85 from more details.
Updating Mini-port (Core) Drivers
If you plan to update your network drivers and you are using an Advanced Server Feature
team, use the following procedures.
CAUTION: Failure to use the following procedure might result in loss of network
connectivity before and after a system reboot.
1 Right-click My Network Places and choose Properties.
2 Open the properties for the virtual NIC.
3 Open the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) properties.
4 Write down the IP address information, and then click Cancel.
5 Right-click the local area connection you wish to update, and then select Properties.
6 Click Configure.
7 Click the Driver tab, and then click Update Driver. Click Next.
8 Click Display a list of the known drivers for the device so that I can choose a specific
driver. Click Next.
9 Click Have Disk.
10 Type the path to the updated driver, and then click OK.
Example: E:\
11 Select the Gigabit Ethernet NIC, and then click Next.
12 Click Next, and then click OK.
13 Repeat steps 5 through 12 for each NIC you want to update.
14 In the last local area connection, open the Advanced Server Features driver properties.
15 Click Save.
16 Type the filename, and then click OK to save the team information to be used during
a restore.
17 Select the team, and then click Delete Team. Click OK.
18 Click OK to make the changes.
19 Open the properties on a local area connection.
34
Updating Mini-port (Core) Drivers
20 Open the Advanced Server Features driver properties.
21 Click Restore.
22 Type the filename you used during the save. Click OK.
23 Click OK twice to make the changes.
24 The virtual NIC appears in the Network and Dialup Connections window. Open the
properties for the virtual NIC.
25 Reset the IP address for the virtual NIC, and then click OK twice to bring up the team.
35
5
Windows NT Driver Setup
Installing the Driver Software
Before you begin software installation:
■ Make sure that all installation requirements are met. See “System Requirements” on
page 7.
■ Install the hardware. See “Installing and Connecting the NIC” on page 7.
NOTE: Make sure that the correct BIOS and Firmware are installed to ensure the
system works correctly.
NOTE: Verify that your Windows NT system is upgraded with Service Pack 5 (or
the latest service pack). If you attempt to install the driver on a new Windows NT
system without Service Pack 5 (or the latest service pack), the installation may not
be successful. (3Com has tested and supports only Service Pack 6a.)
Before installing a service pack, you must first install the MS Loopback Adapter
driver. For information on how to install Microsoft Loopback driver and how to
install Backup Domain Controller, see the release notes for Windows NT.
Use the following procedure to install the driver for the first time in a computer that is
running Windows NT.
1 Start the Windows NT system and log in. You must have Network Administrator
privileges to install the driver software.
2 Insert the 3Com Installation CD in the CD-ROM drive.
3 From the Welcome screen, click NIC Software.
4 Click NIC Drivers.
5 Click Install NIC Driver.
6 The Gigabit Ethernet Controller screen appears. Click Continue. To change
parameters, see “Modifying Configuration Parameters” on page 38.
7 The TCP/IP Properties window opens. Perform any necessary TCP/IP configuration and
click OK when finished. For help configuring TCP/IP protocol, consult your Microsoft
Windows NT 4.0 documentation
8 An update window appears. Click OK.
9 The Choose Operating System screen appears. Click Windows NT.
10 Read the steps in the Completing NIC installation with Windows NT screen.
Click Done.
37
5
Windows NT Driver Setup
11 Click Exit, and then perform the steps outlined in Completing NIC installation with
Windows NT screen.
12 When prompted to restart your computer, click Yes.
The system restarts, using the new configuration settings.
13 When the system returns to normal operation, verify that the NIC port LEDs operate
as described in “Installing and Connecting the NIC” on page 7.
NOTE: After installing the drivers, it is recommended that you install the 3Com
Management Programs to make full use of all management features. For more
information, see “3Com Management Programs” on page 85.
Modifying Configuration Parameters
After the NIC driver software has been installed, you can change the configuration
options at any time. The following NIC parameters are user-configurable:
■ Basic properties: Flow Control, Speed and Duplex, and Jumbo MTU.
■ Optional properties: Failover Team Configuration and VLAN Configuration.
NICs configured as part of a failover share basic configuration properties. Changing the
configuration of one NIC in a specific team changes the properties of all the NICs in
that team.
To access the NIC properties:
1 Open the Control Panel and double-click the Network icon.
2 When the Network window opens, select the Adapters tab.
The bus and slot number of the highlighted NIC are listed in the lower part of
the window.
38
Modifying Configuration Parameters
3 Select the desired NIC from the Network Adapters window and click Properties.
The Gigabit Ethernet Controller window opens.
The possible NIC parameter types are:
■ Flow Control
■
■
– Disable (default)
– Enable
Speed and Duplex
– Auto (default)
– 10 Mb Half
– 10 Mb Full
– 100 Mb Half
– 1000 Mb Full
Jumbo MTU
– 1500 (default)
– 2000
– 2500
– 3000
– 3500
– 4000
– 4500
– 5000
– 5500
– 6500
– 7000
– 7500
– 8000
– 8500
– 9000
4 When NIC parameter configuration is complete, click OK to accept the settings.
5 When prompted to restart your computer, click Yes.
The system restarts, using the new configuration settings.
6 When the system returns to proper operation, verify that the adapter port LEDs
operate as described in the table in “Installing and Connecting the NIC” on page 7.
NOTE: If no configuration changes have been made, you can click No to close the
configuration session without restarting your system.
39
5
Windows NT Driver Setup
Updating the Driver Software
To replace version 4.0 NIC driver software with newer versions as they become available:
1 Start your Windows NT system and log in. You must have Network Administrator
privileges to install the driver software.
2 Insert the 3Com Installation CD in the CD-ROM drive.
3 From the Welcome screen, select NIC Software.
4 Click Update NIC Driver.
5 And Update screen appears. Click OK.
6 The Update NIC Drivers screen appears. Click Done.
7 Click Exit.
8 When prompted to restart your computer, click Yes. The system restarts using the new
configuration settings.
Removing the Driver Software
You must uninstall the driver before removing a NIC or moving it to another slot in the
server. To uninstall the driver software, do the following:
1 Start your Windows NT system and log in. You must have Network Administrator
privileges to install the driver software.
2 Click the Start menu, and then select Setting, Control Panel.
3 The Control Panel screen opens. Double-click the Network icon
4 The Network window appears. Select the Adapters tab.
5 Click the NIC you want to uninstall, and then click Remove.
6 A “Do you still wish to continue” message appears. Click Yes.
7 In the Network Adapters screen, click OK to finish uninstalling the driver.
8 When prompted to restart your computer, click Yes. Now you can shut down your
system, and then physically remove the network interface card from the PCI slot.
NOTE: You must uninstall the driver before removing a NIC or moving it to
another slot in the server. When the driver software has been successfully
uninstalled, you can shut down the system and remove the NIC from the PCI slot.
40
Installing Advanced Server Features
Installing Advanced Server Features
These features are only available for Windows NT Server and Enterprise Server
operating systems.
NOTE: If you have problems installing the Advanced Server Features, uninstall the
Microsoft Loopback Adapter before installing the Advanced Server Features. If
needed, you can reinstall the Microsoft Loopback Adapter afterwards. For more
information see “Installing the Microsoft Loopback Adapter Driver” on page 46.
1 Start your Windows NT system and log in. You must have Network Administrator
privileges to install the driver software.
2 Insert the enclosed 3Com Installation CD into the CD-ROM drive.
3 From the Welcome screen, click Exit. You must exit the Master Navigator to install
Advanced Server Features.
4 Click the Start menu, and then select Settings, Control Panel.
5 The Control Panel window appears. Double-click the Network icon.
6 In the Network window, click the Protocols tab.
7 Click Add.
8 The Select Network Protocol window appears. Click Have Disk.
9 The Insert Disk window appears. Type e:\WindowsNT\BcmServ\ where “e” is the
CD-ROM drive. Click OK.
10 The Select OEM Option window appears. Click OK.
This will install the Advanced Server Features software and display a window.
From this menu, you can create a team (see “Creating a Team and Assigning NICs” on
page 42), or click OK to complete installation.
11 In the Network window, click Close.
12 When prompted to restart your computer, click Yes. After the system restarts,
Advanced Server Features should be installed.
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features
1 Start your Windows NT system and log in. You must have Network Administrator
privileges to install the driver software.
2 Click Start, and then select Settings, Control Panel.
3 Double-click the Network icon.
4 The Network window appears. Click the Protocols tab.
5 Select Advanced Server Features, and then click Remove.
NOTE: Before deleting Advanced Server Features, all teams and VLANs must
be deleted.
6 A Warning screen appears. Click Yes to continue.
7 In the Network window, click Close.
8 When prompted to restart your computer, click Yes. When the system restarts,
Advanced Server Features will be uninstalled.
41
5
Windows NT Driver Setup
Configuring Teaming
Teaming configuration is optional. Before configuring Failover Teaming, see “NIC
Teaming” on page 101.
Configuring Teaming consists of the following tasks:
■ Accessing the Advanced Server Features Driver Properties
■ Creating teams
■ Adding NICs to the teams
■ Assigning an IP address to the teams
■ Rebooting the system
Each of these tasks is described below, along with how to delete NICs from a failover
team and how to delete a team. For each procedure, you must log in as the Network
Administrator.
Accessing the Advanced Server Features Driver Interface
1 Open the Control Panel and double-click the Network icon.
2 When the Network window opens, select the Protocols tab.
3 Select Advanced Server Features program driver, and then click Properties.
The Advanced Server Features window is displayed.
Interface components of the Advanced Server Features window are described below:
■ Select or enter a team name.
(The entry field is used to select or enter a team name.)
■ Unassigned NICs
■ This list displays all of the Ethernet NICs that are available to be added to a team.
Because each adapter can be added to only one team, the NIC is removed from this
list after it has been assigned to a team.
■ Team Type
Load Balance and Failover: Load balancing
FEC/GEC: Also known as general trunking. No standby NIC is allowed when this
option is selected.
■ Team members
This list displays all NICs that belong to a selected team.
■ Standby NIC
This list displays the standby NIC selected for failover belonging to a selected team.
■ VLAN List
This list displays all the VLANs that have been created for the selected team.
Creating a Team and Assigning NICs
A failover team comprises at least one primary NIC and one standby NIC. Each NIC can
belong to only one team. To configure a new team, access the Advanced Server Program
Driver Properties window and do the following:
1 Enter a team name in the “Select or enter a team name” entry field.
2 Click Create Team.
42
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features
NOTE: All other NICs added to the team are reconfigured automatically to match
the team configuration. When a basic team configuration properties are changed,
this changes the configuration of all NICs in the team. However, after an NIC has
been removed from any team, it will operate according to the parameters set for it
before becoming a member of a team.
3 Add a NIC to the team.
■ In the Unassigned NICs list, select the NIC(s) that you want to add to the team
(created in the previous step). Move the selected NIC(s) to the Team members list
box using the double arrows.
■ When you have finished configuring failover teams, click OK to accept the changes.
■ In the Network window, click Close.
NOTE: At least one NIC must be displayed in the Team Members list box. If a team
has no NICs assigned, you will be prompted to add another NIC or delete
the team.
4 The TCP/IP Properties window appears. Configure the Team IP address. Configure the
IP address and any other necessary TCP/IP configuration for the team and click OK
when finished. If you are unsure as to how to configure the TCP/IP properties, consult
your Microsoft documentation.
5 When prompted to restart the system, click Yes. The system restarts, making
the changes.
Removing NICs from a Team
1 To remove a NIC from its assigned team, select the NIC in the Team Members list and
click the double left arrow. Click OK.
2 In the Network window, click Close.
3 When prompted to restart the system, click Yes.
The NIC will be removed from the team list and will reappear in the Unassigned
NICs list.
Deleting a Team
1 To delete a configured failover team and release its assigned NICs, select the NIC in
the team list, and then click Delete Team. Click OK.
2 In the Network window, click Close.
3 When prompted to restart the system, click Yes.
The team and all its assigned NICs will be removed from the team list. The released
NICs will reappear in the Unassigned NICs list.
NOTE: NICs that are part of a team inherit all the basic configuration properties of
the team, including VLANs associated with the team. If you delete a team, any
VLANs configured for that team will also be deleted.
43
5
Windows NT Driver Setup
Configuring VLANs
VLAN configuration is optional. Before configuring VLANs, see the “VLANs Overview” on
page 102.
NOTE: NICs that are members of a team can also be configured to support
VLANs. VLANs, however, cannot be configured for an Intel stand-alone LAN
on Motherboard (LOM) or a team that includes a LOM.
When configuring VLANs for team NICs, note that any NIC or LAN-onmotherboard (LOM) that is a member of a team inherits the configuration of the
primary NIC. However, when an NIC or LOM is removed from the team, its original
configuration parameters are used.
By default, Gigabit Ethernet NICs are configured with VLAN support disabled. As many
as 64 VLANs can be defined for each Gigabit Ethernet NIC on your server. Configuring
VLANs consists of the following tasks:
■ Accessing the VLAN configuration interface.
■ Adding VLAN(s) to the NIC(s). This includes assigning a unique identifier and
(optional) name to each new VLAN.
■ Rebooting the system.
Each of these tasks is described below, along with how to delete VLANs or modify the
properties of a configured VLAN.
Accessing the NIC VLAN Configuration Interface
1 Open your system Control Panel and double-click the Network icon.
2 When the Network window opens, select the Protocols tab.
3 Select the Advanced Server Features driver and click Properties. The Advanced Server
Features window is displayed, from which you can configure VLANs.
The Advanced Server Features configuration window lists the installed NICs and the
VLANs configured for each team, if any. Each VLAN is identified with a unique identifier
number and name that will appear only in this window. Interface components of the
VLAN Configuration window are described in detail below:
■ VLAN List
This list displays all VLANs that have been configured.
■ Control Buttons
There are two control buttons: Create VLAN, and Delete VLAN. These are used for
creating and deleting VLANs.
Adding a VLAN
You can define as many as 64 VLANs per team. To configure a new VLAN, do the
following:
1 From the Advanced Server Features window, select the team to which you want to
add a VLAN.
2 Enter a VLAN Name and VLAN ID, then click Create VLAN.
3 When you have finished adding VLANs to this team, click OK.
4 In the Network window, click Close.
44
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features
5 The TCP/IP Properties window appears. Select the VLAN and configure TCP/IP
settings. Click Apply. You must configure TCP/IP settings for each VLAN you created.
When finished, click OK.
6 When prompted to restart the system, click Yes.
A new virtual NIC will be created for each VLAN.
NOTE: To maintain optimal NIC performance, your system should have 64 MB of
system memory for each eight VLANs created.
Deleting a VLAN
NOTE: If you delete a team, any VLANs configured for that team will also
be deleted.
NICs that are part of a team inherit all the basic configuration properties of the team,
including VLANs associated with the team. If you delete a team, any VLANs configured for
that team will also be deleted.
To delete a configured VLAN, do the following:
1 From the Advanced Server Features window, select the VLAN you want to delete and
click Delete VLAN. The selected VLAN will be deleted from the VLAN list window.
2 When you have finished deleting VLANs, click OK to accept the changes.
3 In the Network window, click Close.
NOTE: If you delete all VLANs for a team, the TCP/IP Properties window appears.
You must configure TCP/IP settings for the team. When finished, click OK.
4 When prompted to restart the system, click Yes.
NOTE: When VLANs are created and then deleted, the original team name and
NIC assignments [Primary/Standby] are still present, but the IP address for the team
is deleted.
Advanced Server Control Suite
If you have installed the Broadcom Advanced Server Control Suite, all Load Balancing and
VLAN configuration is done from the Advanced Server Control Suite window. You can
access the Advanced Server Control Suite by installing 3Com Management Programs.
See “3Com Management Programs” on page 85 from more details.
45
5
Windows NT Driver Setup
Installing the Microsoft Loopback Adapter Driver
When you do a fresh installation of Windows NT 4.0, Microsoft recommends that you
install the Microsoft Loopback Adapter driver, and then verify that networking is
operating normally before installing any NICs. The Loopback Adapter driver enables
the computer to connect to local network resources that then allow alerter and
messenger services to start on a stand-alone system.
Failure to install the Loopback Adapter driver before installing a service pack can result
in a corrupted operating system. 3Com has tested and supports only Service Pack 6a.
To install the driver, do the following:
1 Start the Windows NT 4.0 fresh installation and proceed as usual.
2 In the Windows NT 4.0 Server Setup window, click Select from List.
3 In the list, locate and select MS Loopback Adapter and click OK.
4 In the Windows NT Server Setup window, click Next.
5 Bind protocols (TCP/IP, NetBEUI, or IPX/SPX) to the Loopback adapter driver, and then
click Next.
6 Continue the installation as usual.
7 When prompted, click Yes to restart the computer.
8 Install the service pack.
9 When prompted, click Yes to restart the computer.
10 Install the 3Com Gigabit Ethernet NIC, its driver, and Advanced Server Features.
11 Bind protocols (TCP/IP, NetBEUI, or IPX/SPX) to the 3Com Gigabit Ethernet NIC driver.
12 When prompted, click Yes to restart the computer.
Performing a Fresh Installation of Windows NT on a
Backup Domain Controller
CAUTION: If performed incorrectly, this procedure can destroy the primary
domain controller security database. Before you proceed, back up your system.
A fresh installation of Windows NT on a backup domain controller requires the following:
■
■
Installation of the NIC driver
Network connectivity
Because the NIC driver installation requires that the latest Microsoft service pack first
be installed, and because there is no way to install a service pack during a Windows
NT fresh installation on a backup domain controller, you must first set up two servers
as primary domain controllers, and then demote one of them to a backup domain
controller.
CAUTION: Do not use this procedure if SQL or Microsoft Exchange are on
the primary domain controller that you wish to demote to a backup domain
controller. If these items are on the primary domain controller, you must reinstall
them after you finish this procedure.
46
Performing a Fresh Installation of Windows NT on a Backup Domain Controller
CAUTION: If performed incorrectly, this procedure can destroy the primary
domain controller security database. Use the rdisk /s command to make
emergency repair diskettes to backup the server security databases on the
two servers before attempting this procedure.
1 Install Windows NT 4.0 with service pack 6a on two servers set up as primary domain
controllers. (Follow the procedure in “Installing the MS Loopback Driver in Windows
4.0,” above.)
2 Connect the two servers to the same network.
3 Create two domains in the same network. Set up the server and domain names.
For example:
Server/Domain
Server one
Domain one
Server two
Domain two
Name
SERVER-1
DOMAIN-1
SERVER-2
DOMAIN-2
4 Place SERVER-1 in DOMAIN-1.
5 Place SERVER-2 in DOMAIN-2.
6 Set the same administrator password on both SERVER-1 and SERVER-2.
7 Setting up SERVER 1
8 Start Server Manager on DOMAIN-1\SERVER-1. From the Start menu, select Programs/
Administrative Tools (Common)/Server Manager.
9 From the Computer menu, select Add to Domain.
10 Select Windows NT Backup Domain Controller as the computer type.
11 In the Computer Name field, enter the domain and server name. For example:
DOMAIN-2\SERVER-2
12 Click Add.
13 Click Close.
Setting up SERVER 2
1 Start Server Manager on DOMAIN-2\SERVER-2. From the Start menu, select Programs/
Administrative Tools (Common)/Server Manager.
2 From the Computer menu, select Add to Domain.
3 Select Windows NT Backup Domain Controller as the computer type.
4 In the Computer Name field, enter the domain and server name. For example:
DOMAIN-1\SERVER-1
5 Click Add.
6 Click Close.
47
5
Windows NT Driver Setup
Stopping the Net Logon Service on SERVER 1
1 Double-click the Control Panel.
2 Double-click Services.
3 In the Services dialog box, select Net Logon.
4 Click Stop.
5 Click Yes to stop the net logon service. This unlocks the security database.
6 Close the Services dialog box.
Stopping the Net Logon Service on SERVER 2
7 Double-click the Control Panel.
8 Double-click Services.
9 In the Services dialog box, select Net Logon.
10 Click Stop.
11 Click Yes to stop the net logon service
This unlocks the security database.
12 Close the Services dialog box.
Renaming Domain-2/SERVER-2 to DOMAIN-1/SERVER-2
1 On SERVER-2, double-click the Control Panel.
2 Double-click Network.
3 In the Network dialog box, click the Identification tab.
4 Click Change.
5 In the Domain Name field, replace the name DOMAIN-2 with the name DOMAIN-1
and click OK. This process takes a few moments.
6 Click Yes to the Warning prompt.
7 In the Welcome to DOMAIN-1 domain dialog box, click OK.
8 Close the Network dialog box.
9 Click No at the prompt to restart the computer.
10 Establishing the Backup Domain Controller
11 Restart SERVER-1 and log in.
12 Restart SERVER-2, log in, and then wait for all services to start. Do not be alarmed if
you receive a fail service message.
13 On SERVER-1, start Server Manager.
14 From the View menu, select Refresh. The Server Manager dialog box shows both
SERVER-1 and SERVER-2 as PRIMARY controllers.
15 On SERVER-2, start Server Manager.
16 In the Server Manager dialog box, select SERVER-1.
17 From the Computer menu, select Demote to Backup Domain Controller, and then
click Yes.
48
Updating Mini-port (Core) Drivers
18 On SERVER-1, refresh the Server Manager dialog box. From the View menu, select
Refresh. The Server Manager dialog box now shows SERVER-2 as PRIMARY and
SERVER-1 as BACKUP.
19 Select SERVER-2.
20 From the Computer menu, select Synchronize with Primary Domain Controller.
21 Click Yes to start synchronization.
22 Click OK.
23 Restart SERVER-1.
24 Restart SERVER-2.
25 Verify that services are starting correctly. If the backup domain controller begins to
receive 7023 or 3210 errors after you synchronize the domains, correct the situation
as follows:
a On the primary domain controller, start Server Manager and select the backup
domain controller.
b Synchronize that specific backup domain controller with the primary domain
controller.
c After an event indicates that the synchronization is complete, restart the backup
domain controller.
Updating Mini-port (Core) Drivers
If you plan to update your network drivers and you are using an Advanced Server Feature
team, use the following procedures.
CAUTION: Failure to use the following procedure might result in loss of network
connectivity before and after a system reboot.
1 Right-click Network Neighborhood and choose Properties.
2 Select the Protocols tab.
3 Open the TCP/IP Protocol properties.
4 Write down the IP address information for the virtual NIC, and then click Cancel.
5 Click the Adapters tab.
6 Highlight the network adapter, and then click Update.
7 Type the path to the updated driver, and then click Continue.
Example: E:\
8 Open the Advanced Server Features driver properties.
9 Click Save.
10 Type a filename to save the team information to be used during a restore, and then
click OK.
11 Select a team, and then click Delete Team. Click OK to remove the team.
12 Click Close, and then click Yes to restart the computer.
13 After the machine restarts, right-click Network Neighborhood and choose Properties.
14 Select the Protocols tab.
49
5
Windows NT Driver Setup
15 Open the Advanced Server Features driver properties.
16 Click Restore.
17 Type the filename you used during the save, and then click OK.
18 Click OK again to make the changes.
19 Click Close to reset the IP address on the virtual NIC.
20 When the machine prompts you to restart, click Yes.
50
6
Novell NetWare Driver Setup
Pre-Installation Requirements
■
■
The NIC must be installed in the server.
Install the latest support pack files. The NetWare support pack or patch file(s) needed
for your server operating system are indicated below:
NetWare OS
NetWare 5.1
NetWare 4.2
Support Pack or
Patch
NetWare 5.1 Support
Pack (or latest support
pack)
Files to be Installed
The latest support packs can be found at:
http://support.novell.com/misc/patlst.htm
Support Pack 8.0 or
later
NOTE: NetWare 5.x: If you are installing NetWare 5.x for the first time, you will
need to install the NIC driver during the OS installation procedure. Install the
NetWare 5 support pack after you have successfully installed the operating system
on the server.
To obtain the latest support pack files, go to the Novell support Web site and select the
Minimum Patch List option in the navigation bar. Scroll down the page and, using the
table above as a guide, select and download the latest support pack or patch file(s) for the
operating system running on your server.
NOTE: NetWare 4.2: The latest ODI LAN drivers are not installed automatically
with the NetWare 4.2 Support Pack. Follow the support pack instructions for
including the ODI LAN drivers during installation.
Installing Novell NetWare Server 4.2
1 When you install the operating system, select the custom method.
2 When you’re asked if you would like to add startup commands, select Yes.
3 Enter the maximum and minimum packet receive buffers.
The default maximum number of receive buffers for the system is 500; the default
minimum is 128. Edit the startup.ncf file to have the following entries:
SET MAXIMUM PACKET RECEIVE BUFFERS=10000
SET MINIMUM PACKET RECEIVE BUFFERS=2000
4 When prompted for the network boards, select Insert to choose an unlisted driver.
5 Press Enter if the drivers are contained on a floppy disk, or press F3 and enter a
different path.
6 Press Enter to select the network adapter.
7 Select Modify Driver Properties to configure the NIC’s options, or select Save and
Load Driver.
51
6
Novell NetWare Driver Setup
8 Repeat steps 6 through 8 for additional NICs.
9 After you are finished configuring the NICs, select Continue Installation.
NOTE: You may want to change the autoexec.ncf file to add or delete keywords.
The startup.ncf and autoexec.ncf files can be edited by invoking NWCONFIG from
the NetWare 5.x server console, and by invoking LOAD INSTALL from the NetWare
4.x server console.
Example of a typical autoexec.ncf file:
file server name NOVELLSERVER41
# WARNING!
# If you change the name of this server, you must update
# all the licenses that are assigned to this server. Using
# NWAdmin, double-click a license object and click
# Certificate Assignments. If the old name of
# this server appears, you must delete it and then add the
# new server name. Do this for all license objects.
ServerID 1C8EE2C
LOAD ODINEB.NLM
LOAD TCPIP
LOAD B57 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_802.2 NAME=B57_1_E82
BIND IPX B57_1_E82 NET=FAFD3D25
LOAD B57 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_802.3 NAME=B57_1_E83
BIND IPX B57_1_E83 NET=5A2D8D6D
LOAD B57 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_SNAP NAME=B57_1_ESP
BIND IPX B57_1_ESP NET=477A35BD
LOAD B57 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_II NAME=B57_1_EII
BIND IPX B57_1_EII NET=C3C8F2E4
BIND IP B57_1_EII ADDR=172.16.1.1 MASK=ff.ff.ff.0
mount all
Configure the driver parameters, referring to the parameter descriptions found in the
table below.
Parameter
Options
Description
CheckSum =
Default = ON
Selections are:
ON, OFF, Tx, Rx
Enables or disables the transmit and receive checksum offloading feature. Note that checksum is supported under
NetWare 5.x only.
Frame = type
Valid types are:
Ethernet_802.2
Ethernet_802.3
Ethernet_II
Ethernet_SNAP
Defines the frame type being used by this load instance.
Ethernet_802.2 and Ethernet_II are the default values.
name = text
52
Name assigned to this NIC
PDrivers =
Default = OFF
Selections are:
OFF, ON
Allows driver to operate in persistent driver mode. Persistent
driver mode is supported under NetWare 5.x only. Use only if
adapter is placed in a Hot Plug PCI slot and only if required to
swap with an exact board.
RxBuffers =
Default = 200
Min = 32
Max = 1000
Pre-allocates ECB resources on the adapter for receiving
packets.
Installing Novell NetWare Server 4.2
Parameter
Options
Description
TxDescriptors =
Default = 120
Min = 100
Max = 400
Pre-allocates ECB resources on the adapter for transmitting
packets.
RxFlow =
Default = ON
Selections are:
ON, OFF
Allows enabling/disabling of RxFlow control.
TxFlow =
Default = ON
Selections are:
ON, OFF
Allows enabling/disabling of TxFlow control.
Slot = n
Identifies the slot number for the specific BCM5700 adapter
currently being configured. This parameter is not necessary if
only a single adapter is installed.
Speed = n
Default is Auto.
(Note that 1000
FD is only autodetected at this
time.
AUTO, 10FD,
10HD, 100FD,
100HD
If link negotiation has been disabled, you can select port
speed to be either Auto, 10HD or 10FD, 100HD or 100FD.
Link=
Default is FORCE
because the
speed keyword is
usually used
when a switch
and the adapter
speeds are both
forced to a
specific value.
Selections are:
AUTO, FORCE
Used only to allow the adapter to negotiate a specific or
forced line speed with a switch that is not forced, but instead
setup for auto-negotiation. It is best to allow for autonegotiation of the card and switch by not setting this
keyword or the speed keyword. Only use this keyword if
the speed keyword is set to something other than AUTO.
RxTicks=
Default is 75
Min=0, disabled
Max=5000000, 5
seconds
Units in
microseconds
Enables the use of batching receives within a specific
time period.
TxPacketsPer=
Default is
disabled
Min=0
Max=100
Enables the use of batching transmits to a specific amount
of packets.
Node Address=
To override the default Media Access COntroller (MAC)
address (also known as the Locally Administered Address),
specify a node address in this field. The expected range is
0060CD000000 through 0060CFFFFFFF.
NOTE: If you modify any NIC parameters, you must reboot the system before
changes take effect. If you make changes and do not reboot, you may experience
configuration problems. If the driver was loaded at console, however, no reboot is
necessary.
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6
Novell NetWare Driver Setup
Installing Novell NetWare Server 5.1
Be sure that the server has the latest support pack available installed. The latest support
packs can be found at:
http://support.novell.com/misc/patlst.htm.
You may want to create an archive disk by copying all the files from the
CDROM\NetWare\Driver directory onto a floppy disk. If you choose to use the CD directly,
ensure that the CDROM.NLM is loaded and that you are aware of the NetWare Volume
name for the CD that you just installed.
1 When prompted for the network boards, select the field and then press Enter.
2 Press Insert to specify a NIC.
3 Press Insert to specify an unlisted NIC.
4 Press Enter if the drivers are contained on a floppy disk, or press F3 and enter a
different path.
5 Press Enter to select the NIC.
6 Select Modify Driver Properties to configure the NIC’s options, or choose Return to
Driver Summary.
7 If necessary, select additional NICs and repeat steps 5 through 7.
8 After you are finished configuring the NICs, select Continue Installation.
9 Restart the server for the new configuration to take effect.
NOTE: The server must be restarted for the new configuration.
Verifying or Modifying NIC Parameters
When a NIC configuration is saved, the NetWare install program adds load and bind
statements to the autoexec.ncf file. By accessing this file, you can verify the parameters
configured for each NIC, modify them, or enter additional parameters.
NOTE: The Novell monitor program and the config command are also useful for
verifying driver configuration. For information on how to use these programs, see
the Utilities Reference in your Novell NetWare online documentation.
The parameters that can be defined in the load statements are described in the table in
“Installing Novell NetWare Server 4.2” on page 51. A valid autoexec.ncf file is shown
below. One set of load and bind commands (in bold) is shown for each frame type the NIC
is configured to support.
set
set
set
AM)
set
AM)
set
set
Time Zone = PST8PDT
Daylight Savings Time Offset = 1
Start Of Daylight Savings Time = (APRIL SUNDAY FIRST 2:00:00
End Of Daylight Savings Time = (OCTOBER SUNDAY LAST 2:00:00
Default Time Server Type = SINGLE
Bindery Context = O=LAN
# WARNING!
file server name NOVELLSERVER51
54
Removing Drivers from Autoexec.ncf
# WARNING!
# If you change the name of this server, you must update
# all the licenses that are assigned to this server. Using
# NWAdmin, double-click a license object and click
# Certificate Assignments. If the old name of
# this server appears, you must delete it and then add the
# new server name. Do this for all license objects.
ServerID 1C8EE2C
LOAD ODINEB.NLM
LOAD TCPIP
LOAD B57 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_802.2 NAME=B57_1_E82
BIND IPX B57_1_E82 NET=FAFD3D25
LOAD B57 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_802.3 NAME=B57_1_E83
BIND IPX B57_1_E83 NET=5A2D8D6D
LOAD B57 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_SNAP NAME=B57_1_ESP
BIND IPX B57_1_ESP NET=477A35BD
LOAD B57 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_II NAME=B57_1_EII
BIND IPX B57_1_EII NET=C3C8F2E4
BIND IP B57_1_EII ADDR=172.16.1.1 MASK=ff.ff.ff.0
mount all
SEARCH ADD SYS:\JAVA\BIN
SEARCH ADD SYS:\JAVA\NWGFX
NOTE: If you modify any NIC parameters, you must reboot the system before the
changes will take effect. If you make changes and do not reboot, you may experience
configuration problems. If the driver was loaded at console, however, no reboot
is necessary.
Removing Drivers from Autoexec.ncf
To remove the drivers from the autoexec.ncf file, locate the Load and Bind command lines
associated with the Broadcom driver and remark them out by inserting the # symbol at
the beginning of each command line.
Example:
# LOAD
# BIND
# LOAD
# BIND
# LOAD
# BIND
# LOAD
# BIND
# BIND
B57 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_802.2 NAME=B57_1_E82
IPX B57_1_E82 NET=FAFD3D25
B57 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_802.3 NAME=B57_1_E83
IPX B57_1_E83 NET=5A2D8D6D
B57 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_SNAP NAME=B57_1_ESP
IPX B57_1_ESP NET=477A35BD
B57 SLOT=2 FRAME=Ethernet_II NAME=B57_1_EII
IPX B57_1_EII NET=C3C8F2E4
IP B57_1_EII ADDR=172.16.1.1 MASK=ff.ff.ff.0
55
6
Novell NetWare Driver Setup
Installing Advanced Server Features
1 Load BASP.LAN just like a standard LAN driver with the same frame types loaded for
the NIC in the team. BASP.LAN requires a special VSLOT parameter to specify the
virtual slot. The virtual slot can be viewed as a team number.
Example:
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_EII VSLOT=1
2 After BASP.LAN is successfully loaded, a new screen appears. This screen displays
all virtual NIC settings and statistics. Press Alt + Esc to switch back to the console and
continue with step 3.
3 Load the network drivers for the NIC that will be part of the team. The frame types
loaded should be the same for all NICs in the team. Do not bind protocols directly to
these NICs.
Example:
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII SLOT=1
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_2_EII SLOT=3
4 Bind BASP.LAN to the NIC in the team by using a custom BASP BIND command at
the console.
Example:
BASP BIND BASP_1_EII B57_1_EII
BASP BIND BASP_1_EII B57_2_EII
Note that if there are multiple frame types loaded on the virtual and the physical NICs,
it is necessary to bind only one frame type on the virtual NIC to the same frame type
on the physical NIC. The other frame types will be bound automatically.
5 Bind protocols to BASP.LAN.
Example:
BIND IP BASP_1_EII ADDR=x.x.x.x MASK=x.x.x.x
NOTE: Configuration of BASP.LAN should be performed manually by editing the
AUTOEXEC.NCF file. NWCONFIG.NLM (or INSTALL.NLM) cannot completely
configure BASP.LAN.
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features
To uninstall the Advanced Server Features, uninstall the NIC and the Advanced Server
Features drivers.
To uninstall the NIC driver, type the following command at the Command Line Interface (CLI):
UNLOAD B57
The response will be:
B57 “Driver Name” unload
Module B57.LAN unloaded
To uninstall the Advanced Server Features driver, type the following command at the
Command Line Interface (CLI):
UNLOAD BASP
The response will be:
Module BASP.LAN unloaded
NOTE: The Advanced Server Features program can not be unloaded if the NIC is
bound to the Advanced Server Features program.
56
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features
Load Balance and Trunk Mode Selection
Use “MODE=SLB” for Load Balance mode or “MODE=TRUNK” for Generic Trunking
mode. The default is load balance mode.
Example:
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_EII VSLOT=1 MODE=TRUNK
NOTE: Load Balance occurs only on the Tx send side with IPX protocol. It will not
Load Balance on the receive side when running NetWare Advanced Server Features.
Loading Frame Types
After one or more NIC adapters are bound to a virtual adapter, additional frame types can
only be loaded in the virtual adapter if the corresponding frame types are also loaded in
the bound adapters. For example, ETHERNET_802.2 can be loaded in BASP VSLOT 1
if ETHERNET_802.2 is loaded for the B57 driver in SLOT 1 and 2 in the example below.
Similarly, a virtual NIC can only be bound to a physical NIC if the physical NIC has all
the frame types loaded in the virtual NIC.
Example:
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_802.2 NAME=BASP_E82 VSLOT=1
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_802.2 NAME=B57_1_E82 SLOT=1
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_802.2 NAME=B57_2_E82 SLOT=2
Hot Standby
In Load Balance mode, one or more NIC can be designated as hot standby NICs. Use the
keyword “STANDBY” in the BASP BIND command to indicate binding a NIC as a hot standby.
Example:
BASP BIND BASP_1_EII B57_1_EII
BASP BIND BASP_1_EII B57_2_EII STANDBY
In the above example, B57_1_EII and B57_2_EII are bound as primary and hot standby
NICs respectively. Note that standby is valid only for load balance mode.
Configuring VLANs
NOTE: VLANs are not supported on all NICs. If a non-3Com NIC is a member of a
failover team, VLANs may not be supported for that team.
To add VLANs to a team, do the following:
1 Load BASP.LAN with the same frame types as the NIC and specify one or more VLAN
IDs. You can specify a maximum of 64 VLAN IDs.
Example: (VLAN ID 2)
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_V2_EII VSLOT=1
VLAN=2
Note that when VLAN is set to 0 (which is not a valid number) it will disable the VLAN
feature.
The valid range is 1–4094.
2 Load the network drivers for the NIC in the team with the frame types and VLANs
specified.
Example: (3Com NICs)
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII SLOT=1
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_2_EII SLOT=2
57
6
Novell NetWare Driver Setup
3 Bind BASP.LAN to the NIC in the team for each protocol.
Example:
BASP BIND BASP_1_V2_EII B57_1_EII
BASP BIND BASP_1_V2_EII B57_2_EII
Note that if there are multiple VLANs (each with one or more frame types) loaded on
the virtual NIC, it is necessary to bind only one frame type on one VLAN on the virtual
NIC to the same frame type on the physical NIC. The other VLANs will be bound
automatically.
4 Bind protocols to BASP.LAN.
Example:
BIND IP BASP_1_V2_EII ADDR=x.x.x.x MASK=x.x.x.x
This example creates a team with two NICs using VLAN ID 2. Outbound packets will
be tagged with VLAN ID 2; only similarly tagged packets will be received by the NIC in
the team. Additional VLANs with different VLAN IDs can be created in the same team.
The maximum number of VLANs per virtual slot is 64. The valid range of VLAN IDs is
1–4094. VLAN=0 indicates the VLAN is untagged and is the default. Use decimal
numbers to specify the VLAN ID.
The following are examples of multiple VLAN configurations:
LOAD BASP FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_V100_EII VSLOT=1
VLAN=100
LOAD BASP FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_V200_EII VSLOT=1
VLAN=200
LOAD BASP FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_V300_EII VSLOT=1
VLAN=300
LOAD B57 FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII SLOT=1
LOAD B57 FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_2_EII SLOT=4
BASP BIND BASP_1_V100_EII B57_1_EII
BASP BIND BASP_1_V100_EII B57_2_EII
BIND IP BASP_1_V100_EII ADDR=172.16.210.1 MASK=255.255.0.0
BIND IP BASP_1_V200_EII ADDR=172.17.210.1 MASK=255.255.0.0
BIND IP BASP_1_V300_EII ADDR=172.18.210.1 MASK=255.255.0.0
NOTE: When you execute BASP BIND BASP_1_V100_EII B57_1_EII, the NIC
B57_1_EII is bound to all three VLANs.
NOTE: If you are unable to log in to the server after configuring Advanced Server
Features, add the following command lines.
The following command lines should be in the autoexe.ncf file created to
configure BASP:
UNLOAD SLPTCP
LOAD SLPTCP
58
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features
Additional Command Line Keywords
CHECKSUM=ON
This enables BASP.LAN to offload TCP/UDP and IP checksums to the bound NIC if
supported. This will improve performance if some or all NIC in the team support hardware
checksums.
Example:
A team of two BCM5700 NICs with hardware checksums enabled.
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII CHECKSUM=ON
VSLOT=1
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII CHECKSUM=ON SLOT=1
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_2_EII CHECKSUM=ON SLOT=2
BASP BIND BASP_1_EII B57_1_EII
BASP BIND BASP_1_EII B57_2_EII
NOSCREEN
Disables the menu-driven screen when BASP.LAN is loaded for the first time.
Example:
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_EII VSLOT=1 NOSCREEN
GVRP
This enables GVRP (Garp VLAN Registration Protocol) for the VLAN that is loaded. An
untagged 802.2 frame type must be loaded in the virtual NIC and all bound physical NICs
for GVRP to take effect. This is necessary because GVRP uses untagged 802.2 frames to
advertise VLAN memberships. Use VLAN=0 FRAME=ETHERNET_802.2 in the LOAD
command to specify untagged 802.2 frame type.
Example:
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_V2_EII VSLOT=1 VLAN=2
GVRP
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_802.2 NAME=BASP_1_V2_EII VSLOT=1
VLAN=0
Editing the AUTOEXEC.NCF File
When a NIC configuration is saved, the NetWare install program adds load and bind
statements to the autoexec.ncf file. By accessing this file, you can verify the parameters
configured for each NIC, add or delete parameters, or modify parameters.
Autoexec.ncf File Examples
A valid autoexec.ncf file is shown below. It includes one set of load and bind commands
for each VLAN the NIC is configured to support. One load command (in bold) is entered
for each NIC you want to add to a failover team.
Example 1:
set Time Zone = PST8PDT
set Daylight Savings Time Offset = 1:00:00
set Start Of Daylight Savings Time = (APRIL SUNDAY FIRST 2:00:00
AM)
set End Of Daylight Savings Time = (OCTOBER SUNDAY LAST 2:00:00
AM)
set Default Time Server Type = SINGLE
59
6
Novell NetWare Driver Setup
# Note: The Time zone information mentioned above
# should always precede the SERVER name.
Set Bindery Context = 3Com
file server name GOBRCM
ipx internal net 1234ABCD
load conlog maximum=100
; Network driver LOADs and BINDs are initiated via
; INITSYS.NCF. The actual LOAD and BIND commands
; are contained in INITSYS.NCF and NETINFO.CFG.
; These files are in SYS:ETC.
#sys:etc\initsys.ncf
# Team of 2 NICs with frame type Ethernet_II and one VLAN,
number 2
# Load the network drivers for the NIC adapters in the team with
the frame
# types and VLANs specified.
#Load BASP.LAN with the same frame types and VLAN ID(s)
specified.
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_V2_EII VSLOT=1
VLAN=2
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_V2_EII SLOT=1
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_2_V2_EII SLOT=2
# Bind BASP.LAN to the NIC adapters in the team for each
protocol
BASP BIND BASP_1_V2_EII B57_1_V2_EII
BASP BIND BASP_1_V2_EII B57_2_V2_EII
#Bind protocols to BASP.LAN.
BIND IP BASP_1_V2_EII ADDR=192.168.2.200 MASK=255.255.255.0
Example 2:
# Team of 2 NICs with frame type Ethernet_II and three VLANs,
number 2,3,4
# Load the network drivers for the NIC adapters in the team with
the frame
# types and VLANs specified.
#Load BASP.LAN with the same frame types and VLAN ID(s)
specified.
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_V2_EII VSLOT=1
VLAN=2
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_V3_EII VSLOT=1
60
Uninstalling Advanced Server Features
VLAN=3
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_V4_EII VSLOT=1
VLAN=4
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_V_EII SLOT=1
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_2_V_EII SLOT=2
# Bind BASP.LAN to the NIC adapters in the team for each
protocol
# Note: BASP BIND is only used for the first VLAN all other
VLANs are automatically # bound to the virtual adapter
(VSLOT=1).
BASP BIND BASP_1_V2_EII B57_1_V_EII
BASP BIND BASP_1_V2_EII B57_2_V_EII
#Bind protocols to BASP.LAN.
BIND IP BASP_1_V2_EII ADDR=192.168.2.200 MASK=255.255.255.0
BIND IP BASP_1_V3_EII ADDR=192.168.3.200 MASK=255.255.255.0
BIND IP BASP_1_V4_EII ADDR=192.168.4.200 MASK=255.255.255.0
mount all
NOTE: If you modify any adapter parameters, you must reboot the system before the
changes take effect. If you make changes and do not reboot, you may experience
problems. If the driver was loaded at console, however, no reboot is necessary.
Example of Multiple SLB TEAMs with Multiple Frame Types:
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_EII VSLOT=1
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_2_EII VSLOT=2
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_802.2 NAME=BASP_1_E82 VSLOT=1
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_802.2 NAME=BASP_2_E82 VSLOT=2
LOAD
LOAD
LOAD
LOAD
LOAD
LOAD
LOAD
LOAD
B57.LAN
B57.LAN
B57.LAN
B57.LAN
B57.LAN
B57.LAN
B57.LAN
B57.LAN
BASP
BASP
BASP
BASP
BIND
BIND
BIND
BIND
FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII SLOT=1
FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_2_EII SLOT=2
FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_3_EII SLOT=3
FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_4_EII SLOT=4
FRAME=ETHERNET_802.2 NAME=B57_1_E82 SLOT=1
FRAME=ETHERNET_802.2 NAME=B57_2_E82 SLOT=2
FRAME=ETHERNET_802.2 NAME=B57_3_E82 SLOT=3
FRAME=ETHERNET_802.2 NAME=B57_4_E82 SLOT=4
BASP_1_EII
BASP_1_EII
BASP_2_EII
BASP_2_EII
B57_1_EII
B57_2_EII
B57_3_EII
B57_4_EII
BIND IP BASP_1_EII ADDR=172.16.3.50 MASK=255.255.0.0
BIND IPX BASP_1_E82 NET=ABAB
BIND IP BASP_2_EII ADDR=172.17.5.23
MASK=255.255.0.0 BIND IPX BASP_2_E82 NET=BEEF
61
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Novell NetWare Driver Setup
NOTE: Bind B57_1_EII to BASP_1_E82 is also bound to BASP_1_E82. VLSOT
range is from 1 to 4 (only four TEAMS can be configured.)
Example of VLAN with Advanced Server Features:
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_V100_EII VSLOT=1
VLAN=100
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_V100_EII VSLOT=1
VLAN=200
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_V100_EII VSLOT=1
VLAN=300
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII SLOT=1
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII SLOT=2
BASP BIND BASP_1_V100_EII B57_1_EII
BASP BIND BASP_1_V100_EII B57_1_EII
BIND IP BASP_1_V100_EII ADDR=172.16.210.1 MASK=255.255.0.0
BIND IP BASP_1_V200_EII ADDR=172.17.220.1 MASK=255.255.0.0
BIND IP BASP_1_V200_EII ADDR=172.18.230.1 MASK=255.255.0.0
NOTE: Bind B57_1_V100_EII, B57_1_EII are also bound to the other
VLANs on the same VSLOT. VLAN refer to VLAN ID and valid VLAN ID ranges
from 1 to 4096.
Example of TRUNKING with BASP:
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_EII VSLOT=1
MODE=TRUNK
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII SLOT=1
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII SLOT=2
BASP BIND BASP_1_EII B57_1_EII
BASP BIND BASP_1_EII B57_2_EII
BIND IP BASP_1_EII ADDR=172.16.210.1 MASK=255.255.0.0
NOTE: Switch ports must configure for Trunking (FEC or GEC-Cisco only).
Example of GVRP with BASP:
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_EII VSLOT=1
MODE=GVRP
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII SLOT=1
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII SLOT=2
BASP BIND BASP_1_EII B57_1_EII
BASP BIND BASP_1_EII B57_2_EII
BIND IP BASP_1_EII ADDR=172.16.210.1 MASK=255.255.0.0
NOTE: Switch ports must configure for GVRP.
62
Installing Advanced Server Features on Novell NetWare Server 4.2 and 5.1
Installing Advanced Server Features on Novell NetWare Server 4.2 and 5.1
Use the following procedure to install Advanced Server Features on Novell NetWare
Server 4.2 and 5.1:
1 Load BASP.LAN just like a standard LAN driver with the same frame types loaded for
the NIC in the team. BASP.LAN requires a special VSLOT parameter to specify the
virtual slot. The virtual slot can be viewed as a team number.
Example:
LOAD BASP.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=BASP_1_EII VSLOT=1
After BASP.LAN is successfully loaded, a new screen appears. This screen displays all
virtual NIC settings and statistics. Press Alt + Esc to switch back to the console and
continue with step 2.
2 Load the network drivers for the NIC that will be part of the team. The frame types
loaded should be the same for all NICs in the team. Do not bind protocols directly to
these NICs.
Example:
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_1_EII SLOT=1
LOAD B57.LAN FRAME=ETHERNET_II NAME=B57_2_EII SLOT=3
3 Bind BASP.LAN to the NIC in the team by using a custom BASP BIND command at the
console (or in autoexec.inf).
Example:
BASP BIND BASP_1_EII B57_1_EII
BASP BIND BASP_1_EII B57_2_EII
Note that if there are multiple frame types loaded on the virtual and the physical NICs,
it is necessary to bind only one frame type on the virtual NIC to the same frame type
on the physical NIC. The other frame types will be bound automatically.
4 Bind protocols to BASP.LAN.
Example:
BIND IP BASP_1_EII ADDR=x.x.x.x MASK=x.x.x.x
NOTE: Configuration of BASP.LAN should be performed manually by editing the
AUTOEXEC.NCF file. NWCONFIG.NLM (or INSTALL.NLM) cannot completely
configure BASP.LAN.
63
6
Novell NetWare Driver Setup
NIC Driver Configuration Parameters for Novell NetWare
Parameter
Options
Description
CheckSum =
Default = ON
Selections are:
ON, OFF, Tx, Rx
Enables or disables the transmit and receive
checksum off-loading feature. Note that
checksum is supported under NetWare 5.x only.
Frame = type
Valid types are:
Ethernet_802.2
Ethernet_802.3
Ethernet_II
Ethernet_SNAP
Defines the frame type being used by this load
instance. Ethernet_802.2 and Ethernet_II are
the default values.
name = text
Name assigned to this NIC
PDriver =
Default = OFF
Selections are:
OFF, ON
Allows driver to operate in persistent driver
mode. Persistent driver mode is supported
under NetWare 5.x only. Use only if NIC is
placed in a Hot Plug PCI slot and only if required
to swap with an exact NIC.
RxBuffers =
Default = 200
Min = 32
Max = 1000
Pre-allocates ECB resources on the adapter for
receiving packets.
TxDescriptors =
Default = 120
Min = 100
Max = 400
Pre-allocates ECB resources on the adapter for
transmitting packets.
RxFlow =
Default = ON
Selections are:
ON, OFF
Allows enabling and disabling of RxFlow
control.
TxFlow =
Default = ON
Selections are:
ON, OFF
Allows enabling and disabling of TxFlow
control.
Slot = n
Speed = n
Identifies the slot number for the specific
BCM5700 NIC currently being configured. This
parameter is not necessary if only a single NIC is
installed.
Default is Auto. (Note that
If link negotiation has been disabled, you can
1000 FD is only auto-detected at select port speed to be either Auto, 10HD or
this time.
10FD, 100HD or 100FD.
AUTO, 10FD, 10HD, 100FD,
100HD
Link=
Default is FORCE because the
speed keyword is usually used
when a switch and the adapter
speeds are both forced to a
specific value.
Selections are: AUTO, FORCE
Used only to allow the NIC to negotiate a
specific or forced line speed with a switch that
is not forced, but instead setup for autonegotiation. It is best to allow for autonegotiation of the NIC and switch by not setting
this keyword or the speed keyword. Only use
this keyword if the speed keyword is set to
something other than AUTO.
RxTicks=
Default is 75
Min=0, disabled
Max=5000000, 5 seconds
Units in microseconds
Enables the use of batching receives within a
specific time period.
TxPacketsPer=
Default is disabled
Min=0
Max=100
Enables the use of batching transmits to a
specific amount of packets.
Node=
64
To override the default media access control
(MAC) address (also known as the Locally
Administered Address), specify a node address
in this field. The expected range is
0060CD000000 through 0060CFFFFFFF.
7
Linux Driver Setup
Installation Overview
The driver is distributed in three packaging formats: binary RPM, source RPM, and
compressed tar archive. The binary RPM includes precompiled driver modules for kernels
2.2.14-6.1.1 (Red Hat 6.2) and 2.2.16-22 (Red Hat 7.0), and is the preferred installation
method for systems running these kernel versions. The source RPM is suitable for use on
any system that has the RPM utility installed and a properly configured kernel source tree.
The tar archive is made available for cases where the RPM utility is not installed.
NOTE: The following procedures require that you are logged on as “root”
or equivalent.
Installing the Source RPM Package
1 To install the source RPM package, type:
rpm -i bcm5700-<version>.src.rpm
2 CD to the RPM path and build the binary driver for your kernel:
cd /usr/src/{redhat,OpenLinux,turbo, ..}
rpm -bb SPECS/bcm5700.spec
Note that the RPM path is different for different Linux distributions.
3 To install the newly built package, type:
rpm -i RPMS/i386/bcm5700-<version>.i386.rpm
The driver will be installed as /lib/modules/<kernel_version>/net/bcm5700.o.
4 To load the driver, type:
insmod bcm5700
A newly installed Redhat 7's Enterprise kernel needs to be recompiled to regenerate
versioned symbols before any newly compiled driver can load.
Building the Driver From a TAR File
1 Create a directory and extract the files:
tar xvzf bcm5700-<version>.tar.gz
2 Change directory to src directory.
3 Build the driver bcm5700.o as a loadable module for both uniprocessor and
multiprocessor systems:
make
4 Test the driver by loading it:
insmod bcm5700.o
5 Install the driver in /lib/modules/<kernel_version>/net:
install -m 644 bcm5700.o /lib/modules/<kernel_version>/net
Note that a newly installed Red Hat 7 Enterprise kernel needs to be recompiled to
regenerate versioned symbols before any newly compiled driver can load.
65
7
Linux Driver Setup
Patching PCI Files (Optional)
To use Red Hat’s kudzu hardware detection utility, a number of files containing PCI vendor
and device information need to be patched with information on the BCM5700 chip. A
patch file (pci.patch) is included for Red Hat 7. Apply the patch by typing the following:
patch -N -pl -d /usr < pci.patch
To run kudzu, type:
kudzu
Unloading and Removing the Driver
1 Bring down all BCM5700 interfaces using ifconfig or ifdown:
for example, ifdown eth0
2 Unload the driver:
rmmod bcm5700
3 If the driver was installed using RPM, it can be removed using:
rpm -e bcm5700-<version>
Optional Parameters
Optional parameters for the driver can be supplied as command line arguments to the
insmod command. Commonly, these options are specified in a module configuration file: /
etc/modules.conf or /etc/conf.modules. These parameters take the form:
<parameter>=value[,value,...]
where the multiple values for the same parameter are for multiple NICs installed in the
system. All the parameters are listed below.
■
■
66
line_speed
Selects the line speed of the link. This parameter is used together with full_duplex to
select the speed and duplex setting of the link. The valid values are:
0
Autonegotiate (default)
10
10 Mbps
100
100 Mbps
Note that selecting 1000 Mbps manually is invalid. 1000 Mbps can only be achieved
through autonegotiation.
full_duplex
Selects the duplexity of the link. This parameter is used together with line_speed to
select the speed and duplex setting of the link. Note that this parameter is ignored if
line_speed is 0. The valid values are:
0
half duplex
1
full duplex (default)
Advanced Server Features
■
■
■
■
rx_flow_control
Enables or disables receiving flow control (pause) frames. This parameter is used
together with auto_flow_control. The valid values are:
0
pause receive disabled (default)
1
pause receive enabled if auto_flow_control is set to 0, or pause receive advertised if
auto_flow_control is set to 1
tx_flow_control
Enables or disables transmitting flow control (pause) frames. This parameter is used
together with auto_flow_control. The valid values are:
0
pause transmit disabled (default)
1
pause transmit enabled if auto_flow_control is set to 0, or pause transmit advertised
if auto_flow_control is set to 1
auto_flow_control
Enables or disables auto-negotiation of flow control. This parameter is used together
with rx_flow_control and TX_flow_control to determine the advertised flow control
capability. The valid values are:
0
flow control auto-negotiation disabled (default)
1
flow control auto-negotiation enabled with capability specified in rx_flow_control
and TX_flow_control (only valid if line_speed is set to 0)
mtu
Enables jumbo frames up to the specified MTU size. The valid range is from 1500 to
8184.
Advanced Server Features
The Advanced Server Features program is a kernel module designed for the Linux 2.2
kernel that provides load balancing, failover, and VLAN features. These features are
provided by creating teams that consist of multiple NICs. A team can consist of 1 to 8 NICs
and each NIC can be designated primary or standby. All primary NIC in a team will
participate in load balancing operations by sending and receiving a portion of the total
traffic. Standby NICs will take over in the event that all primary NICs have lost their links.
VLANs can be added to a team to allow multiple VLANs with different VLAN IDs and
a virtual device is created for each VLAN added.
Advanced Server Features program supports load balance and generic trunking. In load
balance mode, all the NIC drivers must support NIC Extension (NICE). In this distribution,
only 3Com NICs are supported. Load balance mode works with all Ethernet switches
without configuring the switch ports to any special trunking mode. Only IP traffic will be
load balanced in both inbound and outbound directions. The generic trunking mode does
not require NICE and can work with any NIC, however, it requires the Ethernet switch to
support link aggregation and be properly configured. This mode is protocol-independent
and all traffic should be load balanced and fault tolerant.
67
7
Linux Driver Setup
Installing Advanced Server Features
The driver is released in two packaging formats, source RPM and compressed tar archive.
The file names for the two packages are bcm5700-<version>.src.rpm and bcm5700<version>.tar.gz respectively. Identical files to build the driver are included in both
packages.
Installing the TAR Archive
NOTE: Before installing the tar archive, copy the tar archive from the CD to a temp
directory on your PC.
1 To uncompress and expand tar archive, run:
tar xvfz basplnx-{version}.tgz
2 CD to the basplnx-{version} subdirectory:
cd basplnx-{version}
To install the archive, perform the following:
1 Configure the major device number for Advanced Server Features configuration. The
default major number is 254 and it can be changed by modifying “Makefile.”
NOTE: Kernel sources must be installed and properly configured to build
the driver.
2 To build kernel module “basp.o”, type:
make
The Make process will automatically build the correct module for different kernel
favors, e.g., symbol versioning and SMP support. There is NO need to define DMODVERSIONS in the Makefile.
3 To create device file and to copy files, type:
make install
4 To update the module reference, type:
depmod -a
5 To load the driver, type:
insmod basp
6 See “Configuring Teams” on page 69 to set up the teams.
Installing the RPM Package
1 To install RPM source package, run:
rpm -i basplnx-{version}.src.rpm
2 CD to the RPM path and build the binary driver for the kernel:
cd /usr/src/{redhat, OpenLinux, turbo, ...}
rpm -bb SPECS/basplnx.spec
The RPM path is different for different Linux distributions.
3 To install the newly built package, type:
rpm -i RPMS/i386/basplnx-{version}.i386.rpm
The driver and other required files will be installed.
4 To load the driver, type:
insmod basp
68
Advanced Server Features
5 See “Configuring Teams” on page 69 to set up the teams.
Makefile
makefile
baspcfg
precompiled configuration utility
bcmtype.h
commonly use type header file
blf.c
Advanced Server Features module entry points
blf.h
ioctl interface
blfcore.h
core interface
blfcore.o
precompiled core object
blfopt.h
automatically generated header file from Make
blfver.h
version header file
nicext.h
NICE header file
pal.c
platform abstraction implementation
pal.h
header for platform abstraction
release.txt
this file
nice-2.2.16
contains NICE enabled driver sources code
scripts
contains sample scripts
scripts/basp
init script, goes to /etc/rc.d/init.d
scripts/baspteam
start/stop script, goes to /etc/basp
scripts/baspif
start/stop network, i/f, goes to /etc/basp
scripts/team-sample
sample script of SLB team with three NICs
scripts/team-gec
sample script of GEC team with three NICs
Configuring Teams
1 Copy a configuration script from “/etc/basp/samples” directory to “/etc/basp”
directory.
The configuration script must be prefixed with “team-”.
2 Modify the configuration script to:
■ change the team type
■ add/delete physical network interfaces
■ add/delete virtual network interfaces
The syntax of the configuration script can be found below.
3 Manually start the team for the first time by typing:
/etc/rc.d/init.d/basp start
4 Run “netcfg” to configure the IP addresses of the virtual network interfaces.
If “netcfg” does not run, enter following command:
% ifconfig sw0 172.16.10.10 up
Consult ifconfig(8) for details in manually configuring a network interface.
NOTE: Starting the team is only required for the first time. Teams will be started
automatically in subsequent reboots.
69
7
Linux Driver Setup
NOTE: Forming multiple teams is possible by copying the sample files into “/etc/
basp/” and modifying this file as described in the sample file. The files must have
unique filenames. Name the files “team-xxx” where “xxx” is a unique identifier
for the team.
NOTE: To create more that one virtual interface (VLAN) for each team, refer to the
respective description section in the sample files.
BASPCFG Command Line Tool
The baspcfg command line tool is used to configure the Advanced Server Features teams,
add and remove NICs, and add and remove virtual devices. The following is an example of
the usage of this tool.
baspcfg v1.1.6 All rights reserved.
usage: baspcfg
commands
addteam <tid> <type> <tname>
create a team
delteam <tid>
delete a team
addva <tid> <vlan_id> <vname>
[macaddr]
add a virtual adapter to a team
delva <tid> <vlan_id>
del a virtual adapter from a team bind
bind <tid> <role> <device>
bind a physical adapter to a team unbind
unbind <tid> <device>
unbind a physical adapter from a team
show <tid>
display team configurations
where
70
tid
A unique ID for each team, starting from 0
type
Team type: 0=SLB, 1=FEC/GEC
tname
ASCII string of the team
vlan_id
VLAN ID: from 1 to 4094, 0=untagged or no VLAN
vname
ASCII string of the virtual device
macaddr
MAC address (optional), e.g. 00:10:18:00:11:44
role
Role of the physical device: 0=primary, 1=hot-standby
device
ASCII string of the physical device, e.g. eth0
Advanced Server Features
Startup Scripts
1 basp
This script is intended to be installed in /etc/rc.d/init.d directory. After copying the
script, run “chkconfig --add basp”. This script will be executed at runlevel 2, 3, 4 and
5. When basp runs, it will search the /etc/basp directory to list all the files with “team” prefix, and then it will invoke the “baspteam” script to add or delete the teams. It is
normal, for each “team-*” file in /etc/basp, to represent 1 team.
2 baspteam
This script is called by basp to add or delete a team. To install, create “/etc/basp”
directory and copy this script over.
To manually add a team, type:
baspteam team-sample add
To delete a team, type:
baspteam team-sample del
Note that “team-sample” is the config script.
3 team-sample
This script contains an SLB team configuration with three NICs: eth0, eth1 and eth2.
The team name is “TeamSample”. All three NICs are primary. One virtual interface is
also created for this team and the name of the virtual interface is “sw0”. “sw0” is the
device that ifconfig should be run against to set up the IP address. No VLAN is
enabled in the script.
This script and “team-gec” are intended to be customized. Refer to the configuration
scripts section for details. This script should be copied to /etc/basp directory and retain
the “team-” prefix.
4 team-gec
This configuration script creates a GEC team with 3 network interfaces: eth0, eth1
and eth2. The team name is “TeamGEC”. All 3 NICs are primary. One virtual interface
is added to the team with the name “sw0” and no VLAN is enabled.
This script and the “team-sample” script are intended to be customized. Refer to the
configuration scripts section for details. This script should be copied to /etc/basp
directory and retain the “team-” prefix.
NOTE: Starting the team is only required for the first time. Teams will be started
automatically in subsequent reboots.
NOTE: Forming multiple teams is possible by copying the sample files into “/etc/
basp/” and modifying this file as described in the sample file. The files must
have unique filenames. Name the files “team-xxx” where “xxx” is a unique
identifier for the team.
NOTE: To create more that one virtual interface (VLAN) for each team, refer to
the respective description section in the sample files.
71
7
Linux Driver Setup
Configuration Scripts
Both team-sample and team-gec are configuration scripts that follow the same syntax,
as follows:
■ TEAM_ID: this number uniquely identifies a team.
■ TEAM_TYPE: 0 = SLB, 1 = Generic Trunking/GEC/FEC
■ TEAM_NAME: ascii name of the team
■ TEAM_PAx_NAME: ASCII name of the physical interface x, where x can be 0 to 7.
■ TEAM_PAx_ROLE: role of the physical interface x 0 = Primary, 1 = Hot-standby. This
field must be 0 for Generic Trunking/GEC/FEC team.
■ TEAM_VAx_NAME: ASCII name of the virtual interface x, where x can be 0 to 63
■ TEAM_VAX_VLAN: 802.1p VLAN ID of the virtual interface x. For untagged virtual
interface, i.e., without VLAN enable, set it to 0. The valid VLAN ID can be 0 to 4094.
NICE Patches
Also included in this distributions are network device drivers patched with NICE support.
These drivers are originally taken from Linux 2.2.16 kernel distribution. To install
patched drivers:
1 Copy the NICE header file, “nicext.h”, to the Linux kernel include directory as follows:
cp /usr/src/basplnx-{version}/nicext.h user/src/linux/include/
linux
where /usr/src is the temp directory you created when you installed the “Advanced
Server Features” on page 67.
2 Rename the original network device driver under the Linux kernel source tree /usr/src/
linux/drivers/net:
mv /usr/src/linux/drivers/net/3c59x.c /usr/src/linux/drivers/
net/3c9x.orig
3 Copy the patched drivers to the Linux kernel network driver source directory /usr/src/
linux/drivers/net:
cp 3c59x.c /usr/src/linux/drivers/net/3c59x.c
4 Follow the kernel rebuild instructions to configure kernel support of these drivers
as follows:
CD /usr/src/linux
make config
5 If the patched drivers are configured into kernel, go to step 7. If the patched drivers
are configured as module, go to step 6.
6 In the case of supporting only a module version of these drivers, it is possible to run
the following steps to compile the patched driver, then install them into the proper
module directory:
make modules
make modules_install
There is no need to compile the complete kernel, go to step (8).
7 Rebuild the kernel to compile these patched drivers, as follows:
make dep
make clean
make bzImage
8 Either reboot the system or unload/load the patched modules. Then run configuration
scripts to test the patch.
72
Advanced Server Features
Removing the Driver and Team Configuration
To remove the RPM package, type:
rpm -e basplnx-{version}.386.rpm
To reboot the system, type:
reboot
73
8
UNIX and
SCO OpenServer Driver Setup
UnixWare 7 Driver
This procedure describes the installation procedure for the UnixWare 7 driver. The driver is
released as a TAR file containing the set of object, configuration, and script files used to
create the driver add-on package.
Package Creation
To create a package:
1 On a UnixWare system, create a directory for the package and copy the files on the
installation CD to it.
2 Untar the TAR file using:
tar xvf bcme-<version>.tar.
3 Create a package on a diskette, where the package can be installed on the same
system or other systems, using:
pkgtrans -s <path> diskette1
where <path> is the directory where the TAR file was untarred in step 2.
4 Directly install the package on the same system, using:
pkgadd -d <path>
where <path> is the directory where the TAR file was untarred in step 2.
Driver Installation
To install the driver:
1 Install the bcme package created in step 3 of “Package Creation” using:
pkgadd -d diskette1.
2 Add the new network adapter using either:
netcfg
or
scoadmin.
3 When prompted, select the Line Speed and then select Advanced Option for Flow
Control, MAC Address, and Jumbo MTU Size settings, if desired. The settings for
these parameters are listed below:
Line Speed
AutoNegotiate (default)
HalfDuplex10
FullDuplex10
HalfDuplex 100
FullDuplex100
* 1000 Mbps (1 Gbps) full duplex fixed speed is only valid for fiber connections. For copper
twisted-pair connections, 1 Gbps can only be set through autonegotiation with a 1 Gbps
partner.
75
8
UNIX and SCO OpenServer Driver Setup
Line Speed
FullDuplex1000*
* 1000 Mbps (1 Gbps) full duplex fixed speed is only valid for fiber connections. For copper
twisted-pair connections, 1 Gbps can only be set through autonegotiation with a 1 Gbps
partner.
Flow Control
Off (default)
AutoNegotiate (Symmetric Pause advertised)*
RxPause
TxPause
RxPause/TxPause
*Autonegotiation of Flow Control is only valid when the Line Speed is set to AutoNegotiate.
MAC Address
No Override (default) - a user-administered MAC address entered with a colon separating
each hexadecimal byte (e.g., 12:34:56:78:9a:bc).
Jumbo MTU Size
1500 - 1900 (default is 1500).
SCO OpenServer Release 5 Driver
This procedure describes the installation of the SCO OpenServer Release 5 driver. This
driver is released as a media image file containing the driver package. The media image
file can be copied directly to the target machine, or from an installation diskette.
Installation Diskette
To create an installation diskette:
1 Copy the file VOL.000.000 to an SCO system.
2 Create a diskette using:
dd if =VOL.000.000 of=/dev/rfd0135ds18.
76
SCO OpenServer Release 5 Driver
Driver Installation
To install the driver:
1 Install the SCO OpenServer driver from the media image or installation diskette using
either:
custom
or
scoadmin.
2 Add the new network adapter using:
netconfig.
3 Modify the hardware configuration in Advanced Options to change the Line Speed
and Flow Control, if desired. The settings for these parameters are listed in step 3 of
“Driver Installation” on page 75.
NOTE: A kernel relink and reboot is required before the new configuration will
take effect.
Jumbo Frames and Other Advanced Parameters
Jumbo MTU sizes and other advanced tunable parameters for the BCM5700 controller are
located in the file space.c in the directory /etc/conf/pack.d/bcme. A description for each
parameter is contained in space.c. Modify the desired parameter in space.c, rebuild the
kernel, and reboot the system. Note that the MTU sizes can be individually set for each
adapter in the system, whereas all other parameters apply globally to all adapters.
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9
Solaris Driver Setup
The Solaris Release 8 driver is released in two formats:
1 BRCMbcme.pkg (datastream format)
2 BRCMbcme.tar.Z (compressed and TAR file system format)
Driver Installation
To install the Solaris driver:
1 Change to the directory in which BRCMbcme.pkg resides.
2 Perform one of the following two substeps:
a pkgadd -d BRCMbcme.pkg
or
b Copy BRCMbcme.tar.Z to /tmp
cd /tmp
uncompress BRCMbcme.tar
pkgadd -d /tmp
3 Execute prtconf to determine the instance number of the NIC.
4 ifconfig bcme[instance_number] plumb
5 ifconfig bcme[instance_number] ip_address netmask…
To make these changes permanent:
1 Using a text editor, create a file named hostname.bcme[instance_number] in the /
etc directory.
2 Add the IP address of the interface of this file, then save and exit.
3 Add a proper subnet mask to the file /etc/netmasks.
Uninstalling the Driver
To uninstall the Solaris driver:
1 ifconfig bcme[instance_number] down
2 ifconfig bcme[instance_number] unplumb
3 pkgrm BRCMbcme
79
9
Solaris Driver Setup
Customizing the Driver Configuration
To customize the driver, edit /kernel/drv/bcme.conf and update the respective parameters
in this file. These parameters are described below.
ForceSpeedDuplex
ForceSpeedDuplex configures the link (or instance) to a certain speed and duplex mode.
By default, all instances are set to AutoNegotiate (0). When set to AutoNegotiate, the
instance settings are:
ForceSpeedDuplex=0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0;
These settings are based on the following values:
Value
Description
0
AutoNegotiate
1
10 Mbps speed and Half Duplex mode
2
10 Mbps speed and Full Duplex mode
3
100 Mbps speed and Half Duplex mode
4
100 Mbps speed and Full Duplex mode
For example, to configure adapters of instance 0 to 100 Mbps Full Duplex and instance 3
to 10 Mbps Half Duplex, set the ForceSpeed Duplex parameter to:
ForceSpeedDuplex=4,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0;
FlowControl
FlowControl configures the flow control parameters of a link. By default, all instances are
set to disable both Tx and Rx flow control (0). As a result, the default instance settings are:
FlowControl=0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0;
These settings are based on the following values:
80
Value
Description
0
Both Tx and Rx flow control are disabled.
1
Tx flow control is enabled. Pause frames will be sent if resource is low, but device will not
process Rx Pause Frame.
2
Rx flow control is enabled. If the device receives a Pause Frame, it will stop sending.
However, the device will not send a Pause Frame if resource is low.
3
Both Rx and TX flow control are enabled. Pause frames will be sent if resource is low. If the
device receives a Pause Frame, it will stop sending.
4
Advertise both Rx and TX Flow Control being enabled and negotiate with the link partner.
If link AutoNegotiate is not enabled, then both Tx and Rx Flow Control are disabled.
Customizing the Driver Configuration
MaxJumboFrameSize
MaxJumboFrameSize configures the Jumbo Frame feature of a link. The valid range of
values for this parameter is 0 to 9000. If the value configured is less than 1500, the Jumbo
Frame feature is disabled. Once this is configured, the ifconfig command is used to
configure the desired MTU size. The default instant setting is 0:
MaxJumboFrameSize=0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0;
For example, to configure instance 2 to support a Jumbo Frame of up to 9000 bytes, set
the MaxJumboFrameSize parameter to:
MaxJumboFrameSize=0,0,9000,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0;
ifconfig bcme2 mtu 9000
TxPacketDescCnt
TxPacketDescCnt configures the number of Tx packet descriptors. The valid range of
values for this parameter is 32 to 512. More system memory resources will be used for
a larger number of Tx Packet Descriptors. The default value is 100:
TxPacketDescCnt=100;
RxStdDescCnt
RxStdDescCnt configures the number of Rx packet descriptors. The valid range of values
for this parameter is 32 to 512. More system memory resources will be used for a larger
number of Rx Packet descriptors. The default value is 500:
RxStdDescCnt=500;
RxJumboDescCnt
RxJumboDescCnt configures the number of Rx Jumbo packet descriptors. The valid range
of values is 32 to 256. More system memory resources will be used for a larger number of
Rx Jumbo packet descriptors. This parameter is only used if the Jumbo Frame feature is
enabled. The default value is 50:
RxJumboDescCnt=50;
RxCoalescingTicks
RxCoalescingTicks configures the number of Rx Host Coalescing Ticks in microseconds.
This determines the upper boundary of the time interval in which the device will generate
an interrupt if one or more frames are received. The default value is 150:
RxCoalescingTicks=150;
RxMaxCoalescedFrames
RxMaxCoalescedFrames configures the number of Rx Maximum Coalesced Frames
parameters. This determines the maximum number of Rx buffer descriptors that the
device processes before it will generate an interrupt. The default value is 10:
RxMaxCoalescedFrames=10;
TxCoalescingTicks
TxCoalescingTicks configures the number of Tx Host Coalescing Ticks in microseconds.
This determines maximum time interval before the device generates an interrupt if one or
more frames are sent. The default value is 150:
TxCoalescingTicks=150;
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TxMaxCoalescedFrames
TxMaxCoalescedFrames configures the number of Tx Maximum Coalesced Frames
parameters. This determines upper boundary of the maximum number of Tx buffer
descriptors that the device processes before it will generate an interrupt. The default value
is 10:
TxMaxCoalescedFrames=10;
RxCoalescingTicksDuringInt
RxCoalescingTicksDuringInt configures the number of Rx Host Coalescing Ticks in
microseconds during an interrupt. This determines the maximum time interval before
the device generates an interrupt if one or more frames are received during interrupt
handling. The default value is 50:
RxCoalescingTicksDuringInt=50;
TxCoalescingTicksDuringInt
TxCoalescingTicksDuringInt configures the number of Tx Host Coalescing Ticks in
microseconds during interrupt. This determines the upper boundary of the time interval
that the device generates and interrupt if one or more frames are received during
interrupt handling. The default value is 50:
TxCoalescingTicksDuringInt=50;
RxMaxCoalescedFramesDuringInt
RxMaxCoalescedFramesDuringInt configures the number of Rx Maximum Coalesced
Frames parameters during interrupt handling. This determines the upper boundary of
the maximum number of Rx buffer descriptors that the device processes before it will
generate an interrupt during interrupt handling. The default value is 4:
RxMaxCoalescedFramesDuringInt=4;
TxMaxCoalescedFramesDuringInt
TxMaxCoalescedFramesDuringInt configures the number of Tx Maximum Coalesced
Frames parameters during interrupt handling. This determines the upper boundary of
the maximum number of Tx buffer descriptors that the device processes before it will
generate an interrupt during interrupt handling. The default value is 4:
TxMaxCoalescedFramesDuringInt=4;
StatsCoalescingTicks
StatsCoalescingTicks configures how often adapter statistics are DMAed to the host
memory in microseconds. The default value is 1000000:
StatsCoalescingTicks=1000000;
DoubleCopyTxBufferSize
DoubleCopyTxBufferSize configures a double copy Tx buffer size. If the packet to be
transmitted is less than this parameter and spans more than one fragment, the fragments
of this packet will be combined into one fragment. The default value is 64:
DoubleCopyTxBufferSize=64;
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Customizing the Driver Configuration
ndd Command
Driver configurations can also be temporarily changed with the ndd command. Any
changes made with this command are temporary and will be lost when you reboot the
system. To make permanent configuration changes, modify bcme.conf instead.
NOTE: Refer to the parameter descriptions as required in “Customizing the
Driver Configuration” on page 80.
To display parameters that are configurable using ndd:
ndd /dev/bcme '?'
The system should return the following:
? (read only)
Instance (read and write)
ForceSpeedDuplex (read and write)
FlowControl (read and write)
TxPacketDescCnt (read and write)
RxStdDescCnt (read and write)
RxCoalescingTicks (read and write)
RxMaxCoalescedFrames (read and write)
TxCoalescingTicks (read and write)
TxMaxCoalescedFrames (read and write)
RxCoalescingTicksDuringInt (read and write)
RxMaxCoalescedFramesDuringInt (read and write)
TxCoalescingTicksDuringInt (read and write)
TxMaxCoalescedFramesDuringInt (read and write)
StatsCoalescingTicks (read and write)
DoubleCopyTxBufferSize (read and write)
Configuring a NIC
To configure a particular NIC, the parameter instance must be properly set. For example,
to force a NIC of instance 1 to 100Mbps Full Duplex:
ndd -set /dev/bcme Instance 1
ndd -set /dev/bcme ForceSpeedDuplex 4
To query the current configuration of Flow Control of instance 3:
ndd -set /dev/bcme Instance 3
ndd -get /dev/bcme FlowControl
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3Com Management Programs
Overview
The 3Com Management Programs are an integrated graphical user interface application
that provides status reports for all LAN NICs/controllers in your system (“Vital Sign”);
a comprehensive diagnostics tool for Gigabit Ethernet controllers (“Diagnostics”); an
in-depth analysis of physical cable transceiver conditions (“Cable Analysis”); an easy way
to configure the load balance and failover by grouping multiple NICs/controllers (“Load
Balance/Virtual LAN”); and detailed performance statistics for each selected NIC/controller
(“Statistics”).
3Com Management Programs suite is designed to run in one of the following 32-bit
Windows operating systems:
■ Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 Server and Enterprise Server
■ Microsoft Windows 2000 Server, Advanced Server, and Datacenter Server
To configure the load balance, failover, and VLAN configuration, use 3Com Management
Programs or the Advanced Server Features. Using Advanced Server Features is the
preferred method during installation; using the 3Com Management Programs is more
suitable for use after installation.
Installing the Management Programs
To install the 3Com Management Programs software, do the following:
1 Insert the 3Com Installation CD into your CD-ROM drive.
2 From the Main menu, click NIC Software.
3 Click Install 3Com Management Programs.
4 Click Install 3Com Management Programs.
5 3Com Management Programs Setup screen appears. Click Next.
6 Click Yes to agree to the License Agreement.
7 Select the components you want to install and clear the ones you do not want to
install. Click Next. The files are installed.
8 Click OK and reboot the computer to complete installation. 3Com Management
Programs are now available under Control Panels.
NOTE: If you select to install the SNMP or DMI service and they are not installed
on your system, you will get an error message during installation. In Windows
2000, however, no DMI will be installed or selected.
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Removing the Management Programs
To remove the 3Com Management Programs software, do the following:
1 Select Start/Control Panel, then double-click Add/Remove Programs.
2 Select Management Programs and click Change/Remove.
3 Select Remove from the Modify, Repair, Remove menu and follow the prompts.
Initializing the Management Programs
To initialize the 3Com Management Programs software, do the following:
1 Click Start, Settings, and then click Control Panel.
2 Double-click the Gigabit Ethernet icon.
Vital Sign
The Vital Sign screen allows you to view vital NIC information, network status, and
network connectivity. Active NICs are listed. Select one of the listed NICs to view its vital
sign information.
NOTE: Information for some NICs is less comprehensive than for others.
Interface components of the Vital Sign window are described below:
■ IP Address: Network address that is associated with the selected NIC. An all-zero
value (000.00.000.00) of this parameter indicates the associated driver has not been
bound with Internet Protocol (IP).
■ Physical Address: Physical MAC (Media Access Control) address that is assigned to
the selected NIC by the NIC's vendor. This parameter will never be all zeros.
■ Driver Status: Indicates the status of the driver that is associated with the selected
NIC. The possible values for this parameter are:
■ Driver Loaded (normal operating mode)—The driver associated with the selected
NIC was loaded by the Windows operating system and is functioning.
■ Driver Not Loaded—The driver associated with the selected NIC has not been
loaded by the Windows operating system.
■ Information Not Available—The value is not obtainable from the driver that is
associated with the selected NIC.
■ Driver Version: Indicates the current version of the software driver that is associated
with the selected NIC.
■ Device Number: Indicates the PCI bus number and the device number for the
selected NIC.
Example: [0] 14 indicates the NIC resides in PCI bus 0, device 14.
■ Operating Mode: Indicates the current operating mode of the NIC. The possible
values are:
10 Mbps Half Duplex
10 Mbps Full Duplex
100 Mbps Half Duplex
100 Mbps Full Duplex
1000 Mbps Full Duplex
■ Interrupt: Indicates the interrupt line number that is associated with the selected
NIC. Valid numbers range from 2 to 25.
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Initializing the Management Programs
■
■
■
Memory Address: Indicates the memory mapped address that is assigned to the
selected NIC. This value can never be zero.
PCI Bus Mode: Indicates the type and mode of PCI bus slot that is occupied by the
selected NIC. The possible values of this parameter are:
PCI 33MHz 32-bit bus
PCI 33MHz 64-bit bus
PCI 66MHz 64-bit bus
PCI-X 100 MHz 64-bit bus
Network Status: Provides overall status of the following:
■ Link Status OK—When GREEN, it indicates there is a link established at 10, 100, or
1000 Mbps. When RED, it indicates that a link is not established.
■ Receive OK—Indicates the selected NIC is able to receive data (gigabit only).
■ Transmit OK—Indicates the selected NIC is able to transmit data (gigabit only).
NOTE: Only NICs with a 1000 Mbps link will light the Local Receiver/Remote
receiver LEDs.
NOTE: Parameters (3 thru 10) are not applicable on other vendors' NICs and
these values are displayed as: Information Not Available.
Diagnostics
The Diagnostics screen allows you to view information for 3Com NICs.
This function is used to test the physical NIC components.
NOTE: Network connection will be lost when running these tests.
Interface components of the Diagnostics window are described below:
■ Control Register Test: Verifies the read and write capabilities of the network
controller registers by writing various values to the registers and verifying the result.
The device driver uses these registers to perform network functions such as sending
and receiving information. If the test fails, the network NIC may not work properly.
■ MII Register Test: Verifies the read and write capabilities of the physical layer chip
registers. The physical layer chip is used to control the electrical signals on the wire
and for configuring network speed, such as 1000 Mbps.
■ EEPROM Test: Verifies the content of the EEPROM by reading a portion of the
EEPROM and computing the checksum. The test fails if the computed checksum
differs from the checksum stored in the EEPROM. An EEPROM image upgrade will
not require a code change for this test.
■ Internal Memory Test: Verifies that the network controller internal memory is
functioning properly. The test writes patterned values to the memory and reads back
the results. The test fails if an erroneous value is read back. The network controller will
not function without its internal memory.
■ On Chip CPU Test: Verifies the operation of the two internal CPUs in the network
controller.
■ Interrupt Test: Verifies that the NDIS driver is able to receive interrupts from the
network controller.
■ MAC and PHY Loopback Test: Verifies that the NDIS driver is able to send packets
and receive packets from the network controller. (See “DOS Diagnostic Failures” on
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■
page 97 for information about using the DOS Diagnostic program B57DIAG.exe to
run the PHY Loopback Test.)
Test LED: Verifies that the NIC LED is working properly.
Cable Analysis
From the Cable Analysis screen, the user can monitor conditions of an Ethernet CAT5
cable connection within a cable plant in an Ethernet network. The software detects
various cable conditions such as the cable length between two given nodes, cable pair
breakage, cable pair polarity, and data skew between cable pairs. Given a graphical
environment, it can also display the frequency response characteristics in each cable pair.
The Cable Analysis screen allows you to display the following features:
■ Status
■ Length
■ Margin
■ Frequency
NOTE: Network connection will be lost when running these tests.
■
Status: This field displays the cable condition status based on the cable computation
algorithms. Any detected cable breakage will be displayed by messages in this status
field as well as the inability to detect cable condition message resulted from the
algorithms.
NOTE: User should pay attention to the status message as other field values
in the Cable Analysis screen are invalid if a cable breakage or unknown cable
condition has been detected by the algorithms.
■
■
■
■
88
Length: Allows you to verify cable length and determine whether your configuration
has the appropriate cable (calculated by cable loss and return loss algorithms).
This utility allows you to determine whether the problem is with the NIC or in
the cable plant.
Interface components of the Cable Analysis/Channel Pairs window are described below:
Cable Length Field: Presents the estimated cable length (in meters) for each
individual channel, using two different algorithms.
Margin: Minimum distance between the measured cable pair and the maximum IEEE
802.3ab limits (in dB).
Frequency Margin: Measures the minimum distance between the measured cable
pair and the maximum IEEE 802.3ab limits (in MHz) in the frequency domain.
Initializing the Management Programs
Load Balance/Virtual LANs
The Load Balance/Virtual LANs screen allows you to configure advanced features. Any
available NIC can be configured as part of a team. Teaming is a method of grouping
multiple NICs to a virtual NIC (bundling multiple NICs to appear as a single NIC). The
benefit of this approach is load balancing.
By selecting each of the available NICs, and moving it to the Load Balance Members
column, this appears as one NIC. Each member in the Load Balance Member list shares
the traffic burden of all three members.
The Standby Member field is used to permit the selection of one of the team members
to handle traffic, should all other members in the Load Balance Member list fail (failover).
The selected Standby Member will not handle any traffic unless all Load Balance Members
fail. When one Load Balance Member (or more) is restored (fail-back), traffic will then be
handled by the restored team member(s).
1 Right-click the node of Load Balance tree to display a drop-down menu that is
associated with the selected node type.
2 For the team node, the menu items are Delete and Properties. You can either select
Delete to remove the highlighted team or select Properties to display the Team
Properties dialog box.
3 From the Team Properties dialog box, you can change the team name and/or change
the team type.
4 For the adapter node, the menu items are Unassign and Properties. You can select
Unassign to remove the selected adapter from the team or select Properties to display
the adapter Properties. All display in adapter Properties are read-only.
5 For the VLAN node, the menu items are Delete and Properties. You can either select
Delete to remove the highlighted VLAN or select Properties to display the VLAN
Properties. The only writable item on this dialog box is the VLAN name.
Creating a New Team
1 From the Load Balance/Virtual LAN window, click Create Team.
This displays the Add New Team window.
2 Enter a team name in the Name field, then select the Team Type and click OK.
3 Add an available NIC to the team:
■ In the Available Adapters list, select the NIC(s) that you want to add to the team
you created in the previous step. Move the selected NIC(s) to the Team Members
list box using the double arrows.
■ When you have finished configuring failover teams, click OK or Apply to accept
the changes.
NOTE: At least one NIC must be displayed in the Team Members list box.
The minimum number of characters that can be used in a team name is one. The
maximum number of characters that can be used in a team name is 39. A team name
cannot begin with spaces. If you attempt to use an identical team name, an error
message displays indicating that the entered name already exists. The maximum
number of members in a team is eight.
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4 Click OK. When a team has been correctly configured, one Virtual Team NIC driver
will be created for each configured team.
When you create a generic trunking team, you cannot select a Standby Member.
Standby Members work only with Load Balance and Failover Teams.
5 Configure the Team IP address if necessary. If other NICs in your system use TCP/IP
bindings, the TCP/IP Properties window will open.
6 To access the Internet Protocol Properties window, right-click the My Network Places
icon and select Properties.
7 When the Network and Dial-up Connections window opens, right-click any network
NIC. This displays the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties window.
8 Configure the IP address and any other necessary TCP/IP configuration for the team
and click OK when finished.
Adding a VLAN
You can add VLANs to a team. The concept behind this is that you are adding multiple
virtual NICs that are on different subnets. The benefit of this is that your server can have one
NIC that can belong to multiple subnets. With a VLAN you can couple the functionality of
load balancing for the Load Balance Members and you can employ a failover NIC.
You can define as many as 64 VLANs per team. VLANs can be created only when all
members are 3Com NICs. If you try to create a VLAN with a non-3Com NIC, an error
message displays.
To configure a new VLAN, follow these steps:
1 From the Load Balance/Virtual LAN window, select the team to which you want to
add a VLAN.
2 Enter a VLAN ID and VLAN Name, then click Add VLAN.
If you enter a VLAN name or ID and the name already exists, an Input Error message is
displayed.
The Untagged VLAN checkbox is exclusively used by the VLAN ID field. To use VLAN ID
zero, simply check this box.
3 When you have finished adding VLANs to this team, click OK. A new virtual NIC is
created for each VLAN.
NOTE: To maintain optimal NIC performance, your system should have 64 MB
of system memory for each eight VLANs created.
Deleting a VLAN
To delete a configured VLAN, follow these steps. If you delete a Team, any VLANs
configured for that team will also be deleted.
1 From the Load Balance/Virtual LAN window, select the VLAN you want to delete, and
click Remove VLAN. The selected VLAN will be deleted from the Load Balance/Virtual
Lan Configuration window.
2 When you have finished deleting VLANs, click OK to accept the changes.
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Initializing the Management Programs
Saving the Configuration
1 With the Team and VLAN configuration loaded, click Save As at the Load Balance/
Virtual Lan tab.
2 At the Save As screen, enter the path and filename of the new configuration file.
A “bcg” extension will be placed on the filename. Click Save.
3 A configuration file will be placed in the directory.
This new configuration file is a text file and can be viewed by any text editor. The file
contains both adapter and team configuration information.
Restoring the Configuration
1 Click Restore at the Load Balance/Virtual Lan tab.
2 If a configuration is already loaded, the Restore Configuration screen will appear.
Click Yes to continue.
Note that all current configuration data currently loaded will be lost. To save the
current configuration, do the Save Configuration procedure above.
3 At the Open screen, select the configuration file to be restored and click Open.
4 If the configuration file to be restored is elsewhere, navigate to that location to select
the file.
5 The new configuration will be loaded. Click Apply to complete the restoration. Until
Apply is clicked, the configuration has not been restored.
Load Balance/Virtual LAN Statistics
The Statistics screen allows you view traffic statistics. Statistical values and coverage is
more comprehensive for some NICs than for others.
General
Interface components of the Statistics/General window are described below:
■ Frames Tx OK—Count of frames that are successfully transmitted. This counter is
incremented when the TransmitStatus is reported as transmitOK.
■ Frame Rx OK—Count of frames that are successfully received (receiveOK). This does
not include frames received with frame-too-long, FCS, length or alignment errors, or
frames lost due to internal MAC sublayer error. This counter is incremented when the
ReceiveStatus is reported as receiveOK.
■ Directed Frames Tx—Count of directed data frames that are successfully transmitted.
■ Multicast Frames Tx—Count of frames that are successfully transmitted, as indicated
by the status value transmitOK, to a group destination address other than broadcast.
■ Broadcast Frames Tx—Count of the frames that were successfully transmitted as
indicated by the TransmitStatus transmitOK, to the broadcast address. Frames
transmitted to multicast addresses are not broadcast frames and are excluded.
■ Directed Frames Rx—Count of directed data frames that are successfully received.
■ Multicast Frames Rx—Count of frames that are successfully received and are directed
to an active nonbroadcast group address. This does not include frames received with
frame-too-long, FCS, length or alignment errors, or frames lost due to internal MAC
sublayer error. This counter is incremented as indicated by the receiveOK status, and
the value in the Destination field.
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■
Broadcast Frames Rx—Count of frames that are successfully received and are directed
to the broadcast group address. This does not include frames received with frametoo-long, FCS, length or alignment errors, or frames lost due to internal MAC
sublayer error. This counter is incremented as indicated by the receiveOK status, and
the value in the Destination field.
IEEE 802.3
Interface components of the Statistics/IEEE 802.3 window are described below:
■ Frames Rx with Alignment Error—Count of frames that are not an integral number of
octets in length and do not pass the FCS check. This counter is incremented when the
ReceiveStatus is reported as alignmentError.
■ Frames Tx with one Collision—Count of frames that are involved in a single collision,
and are subsequently transmitted successfully. This counter is incremented when the
result of a transmission is reported as transmitOK and the attempt value is 2.
■ Frames Tx with more than one Collision—Count of frames that are involved in more
than one collision, and are subsequently transmitted successfully. This counter is
incremented when the TransmitStatus is reported as transmitOK and the value of
the attempts variable is greater than 2 and less than (or equal to) attemptLimit.
■ Frames Tx after Deferral—Count of frames whose transmission was delayed on its
first attempt because the medium was busy. Frames involved in any collision are
not counted.
Custom Tab
Descriptions of interface components of 3Com’s Management Programs/Custom tab
window are described below.
■ Number of Interrupts generated by this adapter—Number of interrupts generated
by NIC.
■ Number of Interrupts avoided by this adapter—Number of interrupts avoided by NIC.
■ Tx. Max Coalesce Frames Threshold hit—Number of times Send Max Coalesce Frames
Threshold hit.
■ Rx. Max Coalesce Frames Threshold hit—Number of times Recv Max Coalesce Frames
Threshold hit.
■ DMA write Queue was full—Number of times DMA write queue was full.
■ DMA write High Priority Queue was full—Number of times DMA write high priority
queue was full.
■ DMA Read Queue was full—Number of times DMA read queue was full.
■ DMA Read High Priority Queue was full—Number of times DMA read high priority
queue was full.
■ Send Data Completion FTQ was full—Number of times send data completion
FTQ(Flow Through Queue) was full.
■ NIC ran out of the Recv. Buffer—Number of times NIC ran out of the Recv Buffer
Descriptors.
■ Frames size less than 64-byte with bad FCS—Frames size less than 64-byte with bad
FCS(Frame Checksum).
■ MAC Rx. w/ Pause Command and Length = 0—MAC control frames with pause
command and length equal to zero.
■ MAC Rx. w/ Pause Command and Length greater than 0—MAC control frames with
pause command and length greater than zero.
■ MAC Rx. w/ no Pause Command—MAC control frames with no pause command.
■ MAC Sent Xon—MAC Transmit with Xon was on.
■ MAC Sent Xoff—MAC Transmit with Xon was off.
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Troubleshooting
Hardware Diagnostics
Loopback diagnostic tests are available for testing the NIC hardware under Windows.
These tests provide access to NIC internal/external diagnostics, where packet information
is transmitted across the physical link. See “Diagnostics” on page 87.
Checking Port LEDs
The NIC has four LEDs, one for each port speed option (10 Mbps, 100 Mbps, and 1 Gbps),
and one for Data Transfer. The three port speed LEDs indicate active links, and the data
LED indicates data transfer status. When the driver has been loaded and the cables are
connected properly, the appropriate speed LED is lit and the data LED is on if data traffic
is present.
Before the port LEDs can provide troubleshooting information, the NIC must be connected
to the network (see “Installing and Connecting the NIC” on page 7) and the network drivers
for your particular operating system must be installed.
1 Verify that the NIC driver software has been installed and that the NIC is connected to
a network.
2 Check to see that the NIC status LEDs operate as described in the following table:
LED
State
Description
1000
On
Good Gigabit Ethernet link.
Off
No 1000 Mbps link; possible link at different speed, possible bad cable, bad
connector, or configuration mismatch.
On
Good 100 Mbps Fast Ethernet link.
Off
No 100 Mbps link; possible link at different speed, possible bad cable, bad
connector, or configuration mismatch.
On
Good 10 Mbps Ethernet link.
Off
No 10 Mbps link; possible link at different speed, possible bad cable, bad
connector, or configuration mismatch.
Blinking
Brief bursts of data detected on the port.
On
Streams of data detected on the port.
Off
No data detected on the port.
100
10
ACT
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Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting Checklist
WARNING: Before removing or inserting the NIC, please review all precautions
outlined under “Safety Precautions” on page 9.
The following checklist provides recommended actions to take to resolve problems
installing the Gigabit Ethernet NIC or running it in your system.
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Inspect all cables and connections. Verify that the cable connections at the Gigabit
Ethernet NIC and the switch are attached properly. Make sure that the cable length
and rating are compliant with the requirements listed in “Connecting the Network
Cables.”
Check the NIC installation by reviewing “Installing the Hardware.” Make sure that the
NIC board is properly seated in a PCI slot. Check for specific hardware problems, such
as obvious damage to board components or the PCI edge connector.
Check the configuration settings and change them if they are in conflict with
another device.
Make sure that your system is using the latest BIOS.
Try inserting the NIC in another slot. If the new position works, the original slot in
your system may be defective.
Replace the failed NIC with one that is known to work properly. If the second NIC
works in the slot where the first one failed, the failed NIC is probably defective.
Install the NIC in another functioning system and run the tests again. If the NIC
passed the tests in the new system, the system may be defective.
Remove all other NICs from the system and run the tests again. If the NIC passes the
tests, other NICs may be causing contention.
Checking if Proper Drivers are Loaded
The following section describes how to check if the proper drivers are loaded for
Windows, NetWare, and Linux.
Windows
The Vital Sign screen of the 3Com Management Programs allows you to view vital NIC
information, network status, and network connectivity. Active NICs are listed.
1 From the Vital Sign screen, select the NIC to be tested.
2 Click Refresh to display the driver status of the selected adapter.
NOTE: Information for non-3Com adapters is less comprehensive than
information listed for 3Com adapters.
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Running Cable Analysis
NetWare
From the command line, type config then press Enter. The following status information
is displayed:
3Com Gigabit Ethernet NIC
Version:
Hardware Setting:
Mode Address:
Frame Type:
Board Name:
Lan Protocol: ARP (see note)
Lan Protocol: IP Addr: (see note)
NOTE: The LAN protocol status appears after assigning an IP address to the
adapter (that is, bind).
Linux
To verify that the bcm5700.o driver is loaded properly, run “lsmod” and a line similar to
the following will appear if the driver is loaded:
Module
Size
Used by
BCM5700
<size>
<n>
where <size> is the size of the driver in bytes and <n> is the number of adapters
configured using 'ifconfig'.
Running Cable Analysis
The following section describes how to run the cable diagnostics from the 3Com
Management Programs. See “3Com Management Programs” on page 85 for setups
and initialization.
NOTE: This test is designed to work for a 1 gigabit copper link (1000BASE-T) only.
From the Cable Analysis screen the user can monitor conditions of an Ethernet CAT5 cable
connection within a cable plant in an Ethernet network.
NOTE: Network connection will be lost when running these tests.
95
11
Troubleshooting
Length
The Length sub tab allows you to verify cable length and determine whether your
configuration has the appropriate cable, which are calculated by cable loss and return loss
algorithms. This utility allows you to determine whether the problem is with the adapter
or in the cable plant.
1 From the Cable Analysis/Length screen, select the NIC to be tested.
2 Click Initialize, and then click Test to display the status of the selected adapter.
Interface components of the BASCS Cable Analysis window are described below:
■ Cable Length Field
This field presents the estimated cable length in meter on each individual channel
using two different algorithms.
■ Margin
Margin yields the minimum distance between the measured cable pair and the
maximum IEEE 802.3ab limits. The unit is in dB.
■ Frequency Margin
This measures the minimum distance between the measured cable pair and the
maximum IEEE 802.3ab limits in the frequency domain. The unit is in MHz.
Cable Diagnostics Display
The combination of the cable length and the cable status reveal the state of the cable
connection between the local adapter and the far end node (hub/switch/routers). The
cable status will display possible problems associated with the cable if the cable is not in
working order. If the cable is not in working order, displayed cable length is meaningless,
since the correct cable length cannot be calculated properly with a broken cable. The
status window displays various error messages that diagnose possible problems associated
with the cable.
Testing Network Connectivity
The following section describes how to test network connectivity for Windows, NetWare,
and Linux.
Windows
Use the ping command to determine if network connectivity is working.
1 Select Start/Run.
2 Type cmd and click OK.
3 Type ipconfig/all to display the command window.
4 Enter ping <IP address> from the command line.
This displays the network connectivity information.
NetWare
Use Ping and IP host on the network to verify connection has been established.
1 From the command line, type load ping <IP address> then press Enter.
2 This will display the packet send/receive status.
96
DOS Diagnostic Failures
Linux
To verify that the Ethernet interface is up and running, run ifconfig to check the status of
the Ethernet interface. To check the statistics on the Ethernet interface, you can also use
netstat -i. Consult manual pages for more information on ifconfig and netstat.
DOS Diagnostic Failures
Running the DOS diagnostic B57DIAG.exe can result in false failures under the following
circumstances:
■ The DOS diagnostic B57DIAG.exe will fail if EMM386.exe is loaded in low memory. Do
not use EMM386.exe when running the DOS diagnostic program.
■ When using the DOS diagnostic B57DIAG.exe for the fiber NIC (3C996-SX), you must
use the -npol option to pass all diagnostic tests. For example:
b57diag -npol
Omiting the -npol option causes the fiber NIC to fail each diagnostic test.
Wake-on-Lan
The fiber version of the Gigabit Server NIC will not operate with Wake-on-LAN (WOL). You
must disable WOL when using this version of the Gigabit Server NIC.
Known Problems
This section provides a list of known software problems and solutions for Windows 2000
and Linux.
Windows 2000
Problem
Solution
Able to create LAC connections
icons having same name under
network properties menu.
Each network adapter installed properly will have an icon in Network Properties window. The
name of the icon is usually in the form of “Local Area Connection ##” and where ## is a number
starting from 1. The names of icon can be changed by right clicking the icon and selecting
rename. The name of the icon is only meaningful to the Network Properties window. Sometimes
the system administrators will rename these icons to easily differentiate the network
connections. When Advanced Server Features is configured, Advanced Server Features will create
additional adapter icons and rename the icons. The naming convention is to allow end users to
quickly identify the adapter with corresponding team and VLAN. The names of the icons created
by Advanced Server Features therefore are not recommended to be changed.
Uninstalling the Advanced Server
Features software and user is
prompted to reboot early.
After configuring Advanced Server Features team, the system may sometimes prompt user to
reboot. This is because Plug and Play may fail to commit any change in the network protocol
binding. Users can choose not to reboot and continue configuring intermediate driver without
having any side effect. When user has finished all the configuration, it is required to reboot.
Cannot enable VLAN after it is
disabled.
Advanced Server Features program creates additional network connections in “Network
Connection and Dial-up” Window. Similar to physical network connections, these virtual
connections can be disabled via the context menu. However, if these virtual connections are reenabled, the system will report error as “connection failed!”. This is known problem with
Windows 2000. When this happens, rebooting the system enables the virtual connection again.
Able to configure Internet
Connection Sharing (ICS) when
there aren't any unassigned
adapters.
Windows 2000 networking is shipped with the Internet Connection Sharing (ICS), which is
designed to allow multiple computers to access the Internet through a Windows 2000 system.
To configure ICS, a user would need to select a network connection as “outside” connection,
and another network connection as “inside” connection. 3Com has observed that ICS allows
any available network connection to be “outside” and “inside,” regardless of the Advanced
Server Features team configuration. 3Com recommends that the user not select any network
connection that is part of the Advanced Server Features team to be “outside” and “inside.”
97
11
Troubleshooting
Problem
Solution
Team configuration is not retained
when user goes back to edit.
In configuring Advanced Server Features teams, the actual changes of the configuration is not
committed until the user click “OK” in “Network Properties” window. If a user chooses not click
OK and instead goes back to the Advanced Server Features team configuration window, all the
previous uncommitted changes will be lost and the user will need to re-enter the configurations.
As a workaround, the user should always click OK in the Network Properties window after
making changes.
IP address is configurable on a
member of the team.
When a team is created, the TCP/IP properties for the adapters are unselected. The user can
manually select and configure TCP/IP properties of the adapters and configure an IP address.
This is a limitation of the Windows 2000 network installation paradigm, where this invalid
configuration is still allowed.
When creating 64 VLANs, all virtual
adapters show disconnected or one
of the 64 VLANs show disabled.
The maximum VLAN configurations are 63 tagged and one untagged VLAN ID 0. If 64 tagged
VLANs are created, they are disconnected. A reboot is required and only 63 tagged VLANs show
links, while a 64th is disabled.
Linux
Problem
Solution
Enabling the Flow-Control on the
network adapter does not function.
The enabling Flow-Control feature does not work as expected. When the flow control is enabled
on the switch and enabled on the network adapter, it seems to function correctly. But when the
Flow-control is enabled on the network adapter and disabled on the switch, it does not function
correctly.
The Linux driver can not be installed
on Red Hat version 7.0.
This problem happens in Red Hat 7, where the kernel symbols driver code does not match the
one in the source. Rebuilding the kernel will resolve this problem.
Compiling the driver fails under
SuSE's 7.1.
Ensure the full 2.2.18 source tree is installed. The source for 2.2.18 may be installed by installing
the lx_sus22.rpm package (provided on CD or from SuSE's FTP site). The 2.4.0 source may be
installed by installing the lx_sus24.rpm package in situations where the installation process did
not automatically provide the source. Note that the user may need to resolve dependency and
package conflict issues in the process of installing these packages. Also note, that the user will
need to have the appropriate C compilers and binaries installed as usual. Once the source is
installed, the user will need to copy over the following configuration files to the appropriate
locations in the source tree:
/boot/vmlinuz.config, /boot/vmlinuz.version.h
/boot/vmlinuz.autoconf.h
cp /boot/vmlinuz.config /usr/src/linux-2.2.18.SuSE/.config
cp /boot/vmlinuz.version.h /usr/src/linux-2.2.18.SuSE/include/linux/version.h
cp /boot/vmlinuz.autoconf.h /usr/src/linux-2.2.18.SuSE/include/linux/autoconf.h
A rebuild of the source tree is recommended.
make oldconfig
make dep
Rebuild BCM5700 driver module.
98
A
Key Protocols and Interfaces
CIM
The Common Information Model (CIM) is an industry standard defined by the Distributed
Management Task Force (DMTF). Microsoft implements CIM on Windows platforms such
as Windows 2000. 3Com will support CIM on the Windows 2000 platform.
The 3Com implementation of CIM will provide various classes to provide information to
users through CIM client applications. Please note that CIM data provider will provide data
only, and users can choose their preferred CIM client software to browse the information
exposed by CIM provider. The current implementation of CIM is based on IBM FTMI beta
SDK, and is subject to change in the future.
3Com CIM provider provides information through BRCM_NetworkAdapter and
BRCM_ExtraCapacityGroup classes. BRCM_NetworkAdapter class provides NICs including
3Com and other vendors' controllers. BRCM_ExtraCapacityGroup class provides team
configuration for the Advanced Server Features. Current implementation will provide
team information and information of physical network adapters in the team.
Advanced Server Features provides events through event logs. Users can use the “Event
Viewer” provided by Windows 2000, or use CIM to inspect or monitor these events.
3Com CIM provider will also provide event information through CIM's generic event
model. These events are __InstanceCreationEvent, __InstanceDeletionEvent and
__InstanceModificationEvent, and are defined by CIM. CIM requires the client application
to register the events from the client application, using queries as examples shown below
in order to receive events properly.
SELECT * FROM __InstanceModificationEvent where TargetInstance ISA
“BRCM_NetworkAdapter”
SELECT * FROM __InstanceModificationEvent where TargetInstance ISA
“BRCM_ExtraCapacityGroup”
SELECT * FROM __InstanceCreationEvent where TargetInstance ISA
“BRCM_NetworkAdapter”
SELECT * FROM __InstanceDeletionEvent where TargetInstance ISA
“BRCM_NetworkAdapter”
SELECT * FROM __InstanceCreationEvent where TargetInstance ISA “BRCM_ActsAsSpare”
SELECT * FROM __InstanceDeletionEvent where TargetInstance ISA “BRCM_ActsAsSpare”
For detailed information about these events, please refer to CIM documentation.
99
A
Key Protocols and Interfaces
DMI
The DMI PCI Hot-Plug service operates in conjunction with the DMI Service Provider
software component. It provides hot-swap/ hot-add functionality for the NIC in Windows
2000 and Windows NT 4.0 hot plug systems. You should consult the system
documentation to determine the supported Hot-Plug capabilities.
The hot-swap feature allows the user to replace a NIC without bringing down the system.
Hot-add functionality allows the user to add a new NIC into the system without bringing
down the system. These capabilities reduce down time, which is critical to many servers
operating in the Windows 2000 and Windows NT 4.0 environment.
To enable this feature, the PC system hardware has to be hot-plug capable and operate on
Windows 2000 and Windows NT 4.0 operating systems. A third party provided DMI 2.0
Service Provider software has to be installed prior to the installation of the 3Com DMI PCI
Hot-Plug service software. This Service Provider software is available from either Intel
Corporation, or Smart Technology Enabler Corporation. The system also requires the Hot
Plug or Hot Swap application software from the system vendor to enable this feature. You
should consult the system documentation to determine the recommended installation
instructions for the DMI software.
The hot-swap and hot-add features are available to the NIC depending on the system
vendor application software. Some vendors may support one or both features depending
on their system hardware and software implementation.
You are limited to add or replace a NIC with a 3Com NIC of identical hardware
configuration.
SNMP
The Advanced Server Features sub-agent, baspmgnt.dll, is designed for the Windows
2000 and Windows NT SNMP Service. It is required to install the SNMP service before
installing Advanced Server Features sub-agent.
The Advanced Server Features sub-agent allows an SNMP manager to actively monitor the
configurations and performance of the Advanced Server features. The sub-agent also
provides an alarm trap to an SNMP manager to inform the manager of any changes to the
conditions of the Advanced Server Features component.
The Advanced Server Features sub-agent allows monitoring of the configurations and
statistics for the Advanced Server Features teams, the physical NICs participating in a
team, and the virtual NIC adapters created as the result of teaming. Non-teamed NIC
adapters are not monitored at this time. The Advanced Server Features configuration data
includes information such as team IDs, physical/virtual/VLAN/team adapter IDs, physical/
virtual/VLAN/team/ adapter descriptions, and MAC addresses of the adapters.
The statistics include detailed information such as data packets transmitted and received
for the physical/virtual/VLAN/team NICs.
The alarm trap forwards information about the changes in configuration of the physical
NICs participating in a team, such as physical NIC link up/down, and NIC installed/
removed events.
To monitor this information, an SNMP manager needs to load the BASP MIB database files
to allow monitoring of the information described above. These files shown below, are
included with the enclosed 3Com Installation CD:
baspconfig.mib
baspstat.mib
basptrap.mib
100
NIC Teaming
NIC Teaming
Teaming provides traffic load balancing and redundant NIC operation in the event that a
network connection fails. When multiple Gigabit Ethernet NICs are installed in the same
server, they can be grouped into teams. Each team, with up to 8 ports or 8 NICs, can be
configured on the server. If traffic is not identified on any of the NIC team member
connections due to failure of the NIC, cable, switch port, or switch (where the teamed
NICs are attached to separate switches), the load distribution is re-evaluated and reassigned among the remaining team members. In the event all the primary NICs are
down, the hot stand-by NIC becomes active. Existing sessions are maintained, causing no
user impact.
The Advanced Server Features program supports three schemes of load balancing: Load
Balancing, Link Aggregation (802.3ad), and Generic Link Aggregation (Trunking).
NOTE: Gigabit Ethernet NICs can be grouped into failover teams with an Intel
82559 LOM.
Load Balancing
Implementation of load balancing is based on IP flow. This feature supports balancing IP
traffic across multiple NICs (that is, team members) in a bi-directional mode. Each NIC in
the team has a separate MAC address. It provides automatic fault detection and dynamic
failover to another team member or to a hot stand-by member; this is done independently
of layer 3 protocol (IP, IPX, NetBEUI). It works with existing layer 2 and 3 switches.
Link Aggregation (802.3ad)
This mode supports Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) and conforms to the IEEE
802.3ad specification. Configuration software allows you to statically configure which
NICs are to participate in a given team. Because this mode supports LACP, a valid link
aggregation group should be negotiated with the link partner. The negotiated group must
satisfy the terms established by the configuration SW (physical NICs are not able to move
dynamically from one team to another team). If the link partner is not correctly configured
for 802.3ad link configuration, errors are detected and noted. With this mode, all NICs in
the team are configured to receive packets for the same MAC address. The outbound
load-balancing scheme is determined by the Advanced Server Features driver. The team’s
link partner determines the load-balancing scheme for inbound packets.
Generic Link Aggregation (Trunking)
This mode is very similar to 802.3ad in that all NICs in the team must be configured to
receive packets for the same MAC address. However, this mode does not provide LACP or
marker protocol support. This mode supports a variety of environments where a NIC’s link
partners are statically configured to support a proprietary trunking mechanism. For
instance, this mode could be used to support the (Lucent) “OpenTrunk” or the (Cisco
Systems) Fast EtherChannel (FEC). This mode is a “light” version of the 802.3ad link
aggregation. This approach is much simpler, in that there is not a formal link aggregation
control protocol. As with the other modes, the creation of teams, and the allocation of
physical NICs to various teams, is done statically via user configuration software.
101
A
Key Protocols and Interfaces
Failover Teaming
Failover Teaming provides redundant NIC operation in the event that a network
connection fails. When multiple Gigabit Ethernet NICs are installed in the same server,
they can be grouped into teams. Each team must have at least one NIC, but can support
up to eight NICs. The number of teams is limited by the number of NICs that are installed.
If the primary NIC in a team is disconnected because of failure of the NIC, cable, or switch
port, the secondary team member becomes active, redirecting both inbound and
outbound traffic originally assigned to the primary NIC. Sessions will be maintained,
causing no impact to the user.
VLANs Overview
Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) allow you to split your physical LAN into logical
subparts, to create logical segmentation of workgroups and to enforce security policies
among each logical segment. Each defined VLAN behaves as its own separate network,
with its traffic and broadcasts isolated from the others, increasing bandwidth efficiency
within each logical group. As many as 64 VLANs can be defined for each NIC on your
server, depending on the amount of memory available in your system.
Although VLANs are commonly used to create individual broadcast domains and/or
separate IP subnets, it is sometimes useful for a server to have a presence on more than
one VLAN simultaneously. Gigabit Ethernet NICs support multiple VLANs on a per-port or
per-interface basis, allowing flexible network configurations.
NOTE: VLAN tagging is required to be enabled only on switch ports that create
trunk links to other switches, or on ports connected to tag-capable end-stations,
such as servers or workstations with 3Com NICs.
VLAN Support
Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) are commonly used to split up groups of network
users into manageable broadcast domains, to create logical segmentation of workgroups,
and to enforce security policies among logical segments.
Each Team supports up to 64 VLANs. Note that only 3Com NICs and Alteon AceNIC NICs
can be part of a team with VLANs. With multiple VLANs on a NIC, a server with a single
NIC can have a logical presence on multiple IP subnets. With multiple VLANs in a team, a
server can have a logical presence on multiple IP subnets and benefit from load balancing
and failover.
NOTE: NICs that are members of a failover team can also be configured to
support VLANs. Because VLANs are not supported for an Intel LOM if a LOM is a
member of a failover team, VLANs cannot be configured for that team.
Adaptive Interrupt Frequency
The NIC driver intelligently adjusts host interrupt frequency based on traffic conditions,
to increase overall application throughput. When traffic is light, the NIC driver interrupts
the host for each received packet, minimizing latency. When traffic is heavy, the NIC
issues one host interrupt for multiple, back-to-back incoming packets, preserving host
CPU cycles.
Dual DMA Channels
The PCI interface on the Gigabit Ethernet NIC contains two independent DMA channels
for simultaneous read and write operations.
102
VLANs Overview
32-bit or 64-bit PCI Bus Master
The PCI Interface on the Gigabit Ethernet NIC complies with PCI Local Bus Rev 2.2, is
compatible with both 32-bit and 64-bit PCI buses. As a bus master, the NIC requests
access to the PCI bus, instead of waiting to be polled.
ASIC with Embedded RISC Processor
The core control for the Gigabit Ethernet NIC resides in a tightly integrated, highperformance ASIC. The ASIC includes dual RISC processors. This provides the flexibility to
add new features to the card and adapt it to future network requirements via software
download. This also enables the NIC drivers to exploit the built-in host off-load functions
on the NIC as host operating systems are enhanced to take advantage of these functions.
103
B
Installing and Using the Managed
PC Boot Agent
Booting From the Network
This section explains how to use the Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA) to boot from
the network.
NOTE: For detailed information on using, configuring, and troubleshooting the
MBA, see the Managed PC Boot Agent User Guide, located with the MBA
software on the 3Com Installation CD.
MBA allows the PC to boot from the server rather than from its local hard drive. MBA
is compliant with the Wired for Management, Preboot Execution Environment (PXE)
specification.
Using the Boot ROM on the NIC to Boot from the Network
The boot process for the MBA boot ROM varies depending on the type of PC you have
(BBS BIOS-compatible or non-BBS BIOS-compatible).
If your PC was purchased recently, it may be BBS (BIOS Boot Specification) BIOScompatible. The BBS determines how the system BIOS identifies boot devices in a PC (such
as a CD-ROM drive, a hard drive, or a floppy drive), allows the user to select the boot
order of these devices, and then attempts to boot from each device in the specified order.
Refer to your PC documentation if you do not know which type of PC you have.
BBS BIOS-Compatible PCs
To enable a BBS BIOS-compatible PC to boot from the network using the MBA boot ROM:
1 Make sure that the NIC boot ROM setting is Enabled.
See on page 106 for instructions.
2 Set the MBA manually as the first boot device in the PC BIOS.
Refer to your PC documentation for instructions on accessing and configuring the
PC BIOS.
3 Reboot the PC.
The MBA attempts to boot from the network using the default boot method PXE.
To change the default method or any other MBA configurations, press Ctrl + Alt + B
when the following message appears:
Initializing MBA. Press Ctrl+Alt+B to configure...
If the network boot fails, the following message appears:
Network boot aborted, press any key to continue
The BIOS continues to the next device in the boot order (for example, the local
hard drive).
NOTE: To cancel the network boot, press Esc anytime during the network
boot process.
105
B
Installing and Using the Managed PC Boot Agent
Non-BBS BIOS-Compatible PCs
To enable a non-BBS BIOS-compatible PC to boot from the network using the MBA
boot ROM:
1 Make sure that the NIC boot ROM setting is Enabled.
See “” on page 106 for instructions.
2 Change the MBA default boot setting from Local to Network.
To change the default boot setting or any other MBA configurations, use the
MBACFG utility located on the MBA utility diskette or press Ctrl+Alt+B when the
following message appears:
Initializing MBA. Press Ctrl+Alt+B to configure...
NOTE: For more information on using, configuring, and troubleshooting the
MBA boot ROM, see the Managed PC Boot Agent User Guide, located with
the MBA software on the Installation CD.
Enabling or Disabling the Boot ROM Setting
To enable the boot ROM setting on the NIC:
1 Run b57util.exe from the \dos\utility directory in the 3Com Installation CD.
2 Enter:
run b57util pxee <devnum>
where <devnum> represents the NIC device number (entering all affects all
supported NICs on the network).
To view all command options for this utility, enter:
run b57util help.
To disable the boot ROM setting on the NIC:
1 Run b57util.exe from the \dos\utility directory in the 3Com Installation CD.
2 Enter:
run b57util pxed <devnum>
where <devnum> represents the NIC device number (entering all affects all
supported NICs on the network).
106
C
Specifications
10/100/1000 BASE-T Cable Specifications
Port Type
Connector
Media
Maximum Distance
10BASE-T
RJ-45
Cat. 3, 4, or 5 UTP
100 meters (325 ft)
100/1000BASE-T
RJ-45
Cat. 5 UTP
100 meters (325 ft)
NOTE: 1000BASE-T signaling requires four twisted pairs of Category 5 balanced
cabling, as specified in ISO/IEC 11801:1995 and ANSI/EIA/TIA-568-A (1995) and
tested for additional performance using testing procedures defined in TIA/EIA
TSB95.
Performance Specifications
Feature
Specification
PC-X clock
133 MHz max
PCI clock
66 MHz max
PCI Data/Address
32 bit and 64 bit
PCI data burst transfer rate
132 Mbps (32-bit bus)
264 Mbps (64-bit bus)
528 Mbps (64-bit bus at 66 MHz)
PCI modes
Master/slave
10/100/1000BASE-T
10/100/1000 Mbps (full duplex)
Physical Characteristics
Dimension
Measurement
Length
17.3 cm (6.8 in.)
Width
6.4 cm (2.5 in.)
Power Requirements
Specification
Measurement
Operating voltage
+5 V ± 5%
Power consumption
10 Watts
2 A @ +5 VDC
107
C
Specifications
Environmental Specifications
108
Condition
Operating Specification
Storage Specification
Temperature
0°C to 55°C
(+32°F to +131°F)
–40°C to +85°C (–40°F to +185°F)
Relative humidity
5% to 85% (non-condensing)
40°C, 16 hour dwells at extremes
5% to 95% (non-condensing)
10°C/hour
Altitude
Up to 10,000 ft.
Up to 35,000 ft.
Shock
10g, 1/2 sine wave, 11 msec
60g, 1/2 sine wave, 11 msec
Vibration, peak to peak
displacement
0.005 in. max (5 to 32 Hz)
0.1 in. max (5 to 17 Hz)
Vibration, peak
acceleration
0.25g (5 to 500 Hz)
(Sweep Rate =
1 octave/min.)
0.25g (5 to 500 Hz)
(Sweep Rate = 1 octave/min.)
D
Technical Support
3Com provides easy access to technical support information through a variety of services.
This appendix describes these services.
Information contained in this appendix is correct at time of publication. For the very latest,
3Com recommends that you access the 3Com Corporation World Wide Web site.
Online Technical Services
3Com offers worldwide product support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, through the
following online systems:
■ 3Com Web site
■ 3Com KnowledgeBase Services
■ 3Com FTP site
World Wide Web Site
Access the latest networking information on the 3Com Corporation World Web site by
entering the URL into your Internet browser:
http://3com.com/
This service provides access to online support information such as technical documentation
and software library, as well as support options ranging from technical education to
maintenance and professional services.
3Com KnowledgeBase Services
The 3Com KnowledgeBase is a database of technical information designed to help you
diagnose and solve any problems you may be having with the installation, upgrade, and
configuration of 3Com products. The KnowledgeBase is updated daily with technical
information discovered by 3Com technical support engineers. This complementary service
is accessible around-the-clock to 3Com customers and partners, and is located on the
World Wide Web at:
http://knowledgebase.3com.com
3Com FTP Site
Download drivers, patches, software, and MIBs across the Internet from the 3Com public
FTP site. This service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
To connect to the 3Com FTP site, enter the following information into your FTP client:
■ Hostname: ftp.3com.com (or 192.156.136.12)
■ Username: anonymous
■ Password: <your Internet e-mail address>
NOTE: A user name and password are not needed with Web browser software
such as Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer.
109
D
Technical Support
Support from Your Network Supplier
If additional assistance is required, contact your network supplier. Many suppliers are
authorized 3Com service partners who are qualified to provide a variety of services,
including network planning, installation, hardware maintenance, application training, and
support services.
When you contact your network supplier for assistance, have the following
information ready:
■ Product model name, part number, and serial number
■ A list of system hardware and software, including revision levels
■ Diagnostic error messages
■ Details about recent configuration changes, if applicable
If you are unable to contact your network supplier, see the following section on how
to contact 3Com.
Support from 3Com
If you are unable to obtain assistance from the 3Com online technical resources or from
your network supplier, 3Com offers technical telephone support services. To find out more
about your support options, please call the 3Com technical telephone support phone
number at the location nearest you.
When you contact 3Com for assistance, have the following information ready:
■ Product model name, part number, and serial number
■ A list of system hardware and software, including revision levels
■ Diagnostic error messages
■ Details about recent configuration changes, if applicable
Below is a list of worldwide technical telephone support numbers:
Country
Asia Pacific Rim
Australia
Hong Kong
India
Indonesia
Japan
Malaysia
New Zealand
Pakistan
Philippines
P.R. of China
Singapore
S. Korea
From anywhere in S. Korea:
From Seoul:
Taiwan, R.O.C.
Thailand
Europe
From anywhere in Europe, call:
110
Telephone Number
1 800 678 515
800 933 486
+61 2 9937 5085
001 800 61 009
0031 61 6439
1800 801 777
0800 446 398
+61 2 9937 5085
1235 61 266 2602
10800 61 00137 or 021 6350 1590
800 6161 463
00798 611 2230
(0)2 3455 6455
0080 611 261
001 800 611 2000
+31 (0)30 6029900 phone
+31 (0)30 6029999 fax
Returning Products for Repair
Country
Telephone Number
From the following countries, you may use the toll-free numbers:
Austria
Belgium
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Hungary
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Luxembourg
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
U.K.
0800 293025
0800 778353
8088 33 25
0800 1 18387
0800 91 7736
0800 100 0427
06800 14370
1800 509017
1800 9431983
800 780557
800 29727
0800 023 0245
800 1 0767
00 800 4411 349
800 844 029
0800 995014
900 95 8966
020 796980
0800 835283
0800 085 1816
Latin America
Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Mexico
Peru
Puerto Rico
Venezuela
AT&T +800 666 5065
0800 13 3266
1230 020 0645
98012 2127
01 800 CARE (01 800 2273)
AT&T +800 666 5065
800 666 5065
AT&T +800 666 5065
North America
1-800-527-8677
Returning Products for Repair
Before you send a product directly to 3Com for repair, you must first obtain a Return
Materials Authorization (RMA) number. Products sent to 3Com without RMA numbers
will be returned to the sender unopened, at the sender’s expense.
To obtain an RMA number, call or fax:
Country
Telephone Number
Fax Number
Asia, Pacific Rim
+65 543 6500
+65 543 6348
Europe, South Africa, and
Middle East
+31 30 6029900
+31 30 6029999
From the following European countries, you may call the toll-free numbers; select option 2 and then
option 2:
111
D
Technical Support
Country
Austria
Belgium
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Hungary
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
U.K.
112
Telephone Number
0800 297468
0800 71429
800 17309
0800 113153
0800 917959
0800 1821502
00800 12813
1800553117
1800 9453794
1678 79489
0800 0227788
800 11376
00800 3111206
0800 831416
0800 995014
900 983125
020 795482
0800 55 3072
0800 966197
Latin America
1 408 326 2927
U.S.A. and Canada
1-800-527-8677
Fax Number
Regulatory Information
FCC Class A Verification Statement
WARNING: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules, and the Canadian Department of Communications Equipment Standards
entitled, “Digital Apparatus,” ICES-003. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against
harmful interference in a commercial installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio
frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference, in which case, the user will be required to correct the interference at the user’s own expense.
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by 3Com could void the user’s authority to operate this
equipment.
FCC Class B Statement
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
1 This device may not cause harmful interference, and
2 This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
WARNING: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules, and the Canadian Department of Communications Equipment Standards
entitled, “Digital Apparatus,” ICES-003.These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against
harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency
energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to
radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular
installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by
one or more of the following measures:
■
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
■
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
■
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from the one which the receiver is connected to.
■
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
The user may find the following booklet prepared by the Federal Communications Commission helpful:
The Interference Handbook
This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. Stock No. 004000-00345-4.
NOTE: In order to maintain compliance with the limits of a Class B digital device, 3Com requires that you use
quality interface cables when connecting to this device. Changes or modifications not expressly approved by
3Com could void the user’s authority to operate this equipment. Refer to the manual for specifications on
cabling types.
113
Regulatory Information
FCC Declaration of Conformity
We declare under our sole responsibility that the
Model:
Description:
3C996B-T
Gigabit Server NIC (Ethernet)
3C996-SX
Gigabit Server NIC (Fiber)
to which this declaration relates, are in conformity with the following standards or other normative documents:
■
ANSI C63.4-1992 Methods of Measurement
Federal Communications Commission 47 CFR Part 15, subpart B
3Com Corporation, 5400 Bayfront Plaza, P.O. Box 58145, Santa Clara, CA 95052-8145
114
Index
Numerics
10 LED 93
100 LED 93
1000 LED 93
1000BASE-T signaling requirements 12
32-bit PCI bus master 103
3Com 10/100 server NICs 2, 3
3Com Connection Assistant 13
3Com Management Programs 4, 23,
26, 30, 34, 38, 45, 85 to 92
Cable Analysis 88
Diagnostics 87
initialization 86
installation 85
removing 86
Vital Sign 86
64-bit PCI bus master 103
802.1p QOS 17, 18, 27, 28
A
ACT LED 93
adaptive interrupt frequency 102
Advanced Server Features 1, 19, 29,
41, 56, 58, 62, 63, 67
Linux 4
Novell NetWare 3
Windows 2000 2
Windows NT 3
Windows XP (64-bit) 19
Advanced Server Features subagent 100
Alteon
AceNIC 2, 3
Tigon2/3 3
altitude 108
ASIC with embedded RISC
processor 103
auto_flow_control 67
autoexec.ncf file 52, 54, 55, 59
B
B57DIAG.exe 97
backup domain controller 37, 46
BASP MIB database files 100
BASP.LAN 56, 58, 59
baspcfg
command line tool 70
commands 70
binary RPM 65
BIOS 9, 15, 25
boot ROM, MBA
booting from network 105
enabling or disabling 106
Broadcast Frames
Rx 92
Tx 91
Broadcom Advanced Server Control
Suite 23, 34, 45
verifying proper 94
Driver Status 86
Driver Version 86
dual DMA channels 102
duplex settings 17, 27
C
E
cable
analysis 4
characteristics 12
diagnostics 95
diagnostics display 96
length field 96
length, verifying 96
cable specifications 107
checklist, troubleshooting 94
checksum
IP 2, 4
TCP/UDP 2, 4
CHECKSUM=ON 59
CIM (Common Information Model) 99
Common Information Model (CIM) 99
connectivity, testing 96
Control Register Test 87
EEPROM Test 87
EIA/TIA-568-A (1995) 12
embedded RISC processor 103
EMM386.EXE 97
environmental specifications 108
D
Device Number 86
Diagnostic program (DOS) 97
diagnostic tests
DOS 97
hardware 93
dimensions 107
Directed Frames
Rx 91
Tx 91
Distributed Management Task Force
(DMTF) 99
DMA channels, dual 102
DMA Read High Priority Queue was
full 92
DMA Read Queue was full 92
DMA write High Priority Queue was
full 92
DMA write Queue was full 92
DMI Hotplug service 100
DMI service 85
DMI Service Provider 100
DMTF (Distributed Management Task
Force) 99
DOS Diagnostic program,
B57DIAG.exe 97
DoubleCopyTxBufferSize 82
driver
disk 5
F
failover 1, 2, 3, 20, 30, 85
team 21, 42
team configuration 38
teaming 102
fiber-optic cable 13
flow control 17, 18, 27, 28, 38, 39, 76
ForceSpeedDuplex 80
Frame Rx OK 91
Frames Rx with Alignment Error 92
Frames size less than 64-byte with bad
FCS 92
Frames Tx after Deferral 92
Frames Tx OK 91
Frames Tx with more than one
Collision 92
Frames Tx with one Collision 92
frequency margin 96
full_duplex 66
G
Garp VLAN Registration Protocol 59
GEC/FEC 2, 3
generic link aggregation 2, 3, 101
generic trunking 57, 67
GVRP. See Garp VLAN Registration
Protocol
H
hardware diagnostics 93
hot-swap feature 100
humidity 108
I
IEEE 802.1Q-1988 tagging 2, 3, 4
IEEE 802.3ad 2
Intel
10/100 server NICs 2, 3
1000BaseSX server NICs 3
1
Index
82559 LAN on Motherboard
(LOM) 2, 3
stand-alone LAN on Motherboard
(LOM) 44
Internal Memory Test 87
Internet Explorer 13
Interrupt 86
Interrupt Test 87
IP Address 86
IPX protocol 57
ISO/IEC 11801:1995 12
J
jumbo frames 2, 3
jumbo MTU 17, 18, 27, 28, 38, 39, 76,
77
margin 96
Master Navigator 5, 16
MaxJumboFrameSize 81
Memory Address 87
Microsoft Exchange 46
Microsoft Java Virtual Machine 13
Microsoft Loopback Adapter 37, 41, 46
MII Register Test 87
mini-port (core) drivers
Windows 2000 34
Windows NT 49
MTU 67
Multicast Frames
Rx 91
Tx 91
Multiple SLB TEAM 61
N
K
known software problems 97
L
LACP (Link Aggregation Control
Protocol) 101
LEDs, troubleshooting with 93
length 107
line speed 66, 75
link aggregation 101
generic 3
static 2, 3
Link Aggregation Control Protocol
(LACP) 101
link negotiation 17, 27
link speed 17
Linux 1, 8, 9, 65 to 73
2.2 kernel 67
Advanced Server Features 4
known problems with 98
module parameters 4
packaging 4
load 1
load and bind commands 54, 55
load balance 3, 4, 20, 23, 30, 34, 45,
57, 67, 85, 89, 101
loopback diagnostic tests 93
Loopback Test 97
M
MAC and PHY Loopback Test 87
MAC Rx.
w/ no Pause Command 92
w/ Pause Command and Length
greater than 0 92
w/Pause Command and
Length=0 92
MAC Sent
Xoff 92
Xon 92
Make process 68
Managed PC Boot Agent (MBA)
software overview 105
using software on the NIC boot
ROM 105
2
ndd command 83
NESL. See NetWare Event Server Layer
Netscape Navigator 13
NetWare Event Service Layer 3
Network Administrator privileges 15,
16, 25, 29, 30, 37, 40, 41
network booting 105
network connectivity, testing 96
Network Status 87
network supplier support 110
NIC
Ethernet 10, 12
fiber 10, 13
teaming 101
NIC Extension 72
NIC Extension (NICE) 67
NIC ran out of the Recv. Buffer 92
NICE. See NIC Extension
NOSCREEN 59
Novell NetWare 1, 8, 9, 51 to 64
configuration parameters 64
parameter descriptions 52
support pack 51, 54
Number of Interrupts 92
O
ODI LAN drivers 51
offload, checksum 17, 18, 27, 28
offloading 2
On Chip CPU Test 87
online technical services 109
open trunk 2, 3
Operating Mode 86
operating voltage 107
P
PCI bus master 103
PCI Bus Mode 87
PCI slot
32-bit 11
64-bit 11
PCI-X slot 11
performance specifications 107
PHY Loopback Test 97
Physical Address 86
physical characteristics 107
power
consumption 107
requirements 107
R
Red Hat
6.2 65
7.0 65
kudzu 66
relative humidity 108
remote wake up 2
requirements, 3Com Connection
Assistant 13
returning products for repair 111
RISC processor 103
RJ-45 connector 12
rx_flow_control 67
RxCoalescingTicks 81
RxCoalescingTicksDuringInt 82
RxJumboDescCnt 81
RxMaxCoalescedFrames 81
RxMaxCoalescedFramesDuringInt 82
RxStdDescCnt 81
S
safety precautions 9
SC duplex connectors 13
SCO OpenServer 76 to 77
installation diskette 76
Release 5 driver 76
Send Data Completion FTQ was full 92
service packs 37, 46
shock 108
SNMP 85, 100
software
3Com Connection Assitant,
installing 13
problems and solutions 97
Solaris 1, 8, 79 to 83
source RPM 65, 68
specifications
cable 107
environmental 108
performance 107
speed and duplex 17, 18, 27, 28, 38
SQL 46
startup.ncf file 51
StatsCoalescingTicks 82
switch ports
FEC 62
GEC-Cisco 62
T
tar archive 65, 68
team configuration 42
teaming NICs 101
technical support
network suppliers 110
product repair 111
temperature 108
Index
Test LED 88
TIA/EIA TSB95 12
troubleshooting 93
checklist 94
MBA boot ROM 105
trunking 101
Tx. Max Coalesce Frames Threshold
hit 92
tx_flow_control 67
TxCoalescingTicks 81
TxCoalescingTicksDuringInt 82
TxMaxCoalescedFrames 82
TxMaxCoalescedFramesDuringInt 82
TxPacketDescCnt 81
U
UNIX 1, 8, 75 to 76
UnixWare 7 driver 75
V
vibration 108
virtual
LAN 89
NIC 1, 20, 30
VLAN configuration 1, 20, 22, 23, 30,
32, 34, 38, 44, 45, 57, 85
VLANs 102
W
wake up capabilities 17, 18, 27, 28
Wake-on-LAN (WOL)
disabling 97
fiber not supported 2
width 107
Windows
2000 1, 4, 7, 9, 13, 25 to 35, 85,
97
NT 1, 7, 9, 13, 37 to 50, 85
Enterprise Server 41
Server 41
service packs 37
XP 1, 13, 15 to 23
XP (32-bit) 7, 15
XP (64-bit) 7, 16
WOL. See Wake-on LAN
3