3Com 5210 Telephone User Manual

CommWorks 5210
IP Telephony Manager
User Guide
Release 2.3
Part Number 10044879
CommWorks 5210
IP Telephony Manager
User Guide
Release 2.3
Part Number 10044879
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CONTENTS
CONTENTS
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Finding Information............................................................................................................xiii
Conventions.......................................................................................................................xiv
Related Documentation......................................................................................................xiv
Contacting CommWorks .................................................................................................... xv
1
INSTALLATION
Overview ............................................................................................................................17
Management Workstation..................................................................................................18
Prerequisites .......................................................................................................................18
Before You Begin................................................................................................................19
Removing Previous Versions................................................................................................20
Option 1 .......................................................................................................................20
Option 2 .......................................................................................................................20
Installing IP Telephony Manager..........................................................................................20
Setting PATH and LD_LIBRARY_PATH .............................................................................21
Starting IP Telephony Manager ...........................................................................................22
Connecting to Entities ........................................................................................................22
Determining Gatekeeper and Media Gateway Connectivity ...........................................23
Integrating with HP OpenView ...........................................................................................24
Fixing Incorrect Maps ....................................................................................................24
Removing HP OpenView Integration..............................................................................25
Erasing IP Telephony Manager .......................................................................................25
Verifying the Installation................................................................................................25
Linking CommWorks Objects..............................................................................................26
2
CONFIGURATION
Management Station Configuration ...................................................................................27
Component Configuration .................................................................................................28
Launching the Configuration Tool .................................................................................28
Synchronizing Network Time ..............................................................................................28
Setting the Time Zone ...................................................................................................28
Recording the NTP IP Addresses.....................................................................................28
Selecting Local NTP Servers ......................................................................................28
Selecting Public NTP Servers .....................................................................................29
Setting the NTP Parameters ...........................................................................................29
Setting the NTP Parameters for the HiPer NMC ........................................................29
Setting the NTP Parameters for the Other Entities.....................................................30
vi
Auto Response .................................................................................................................. 31
AutoResponse Configuration ........................................................................................ 31
Setting Authorized Stations................................................................................................ 32
Defining a Range of IP Addresses for Authorized Access .................................................... 34
Threshold Monitoring Configuration .................................................................................. 34
Adding a Threshold Parameter ........................................................................................... 37
Editing a Threshold Parameter............................................................................................ 40
Threshold Traps............................................................................................................. 42
Saving and Restoring Configurations.................................................................................. 43
Saving a Chassis Configuration to NVRAM.................................................................... 43
Restoring a Chassis Configuration from NVRAM ........................................................... 44
Component Save to NVRAM......................................................................................... 45
NMC Save Chassis to NVRAM....................................................................................... 46
Saving Configurations to the CFM ................................................................................ 46
Restoring a Configuration from CFM ............................................................................ 47
3
NAVIGATING
AND
USING
THE
SYSTEM
Accessing IP Telephony Manager Window.......................................................................... 49
File Menu........................................................................................................................... 52
Open Submenu ............................................................................................................ 52
Chassis Save All Submenu............................................................................................. 52
Save Chassis NVRAM Submenu .................................................................................... 53
Restore Chassis NVRAM Submenu ................................................................................ 53
Save CFM Submenu...................................................................................................... 53
Restore CFM Submenu ................................................................................................. 53
Import SDL Files Submenu ............................................................................................ 53
Exit Submenu ............................................................................................................... 53
View Menu ........................................................................................................................ 54
Other Side Submenu..................................................................................................... 54
LED Poll Info Submenu.................................................................................................. 54
Show Toolbar Submenu ................................................................................................ 54
Configuration Menu .......................................................................................................... 56
Programmed Settings Submenu.................................................................................... 56
Action/Commands Submenu ........................................................................................ 59
Software Download Submenu ...................................................................................... 60
Inventory Submenu....................................................................................................... 60
AutoResponse Submenu............................................................................................... 61
Fault Menu ........................................................................................................................ 63
Trap Settings Submenu ................................................................................................. 63
Trap Destination Submenu ............................................................................................ 64
Performance Menu ............................................................................................................ 64
Performance Monitor Submenu .................................................................................... 64
Security Menu.................................................................................................................... 65
Community Names Submenu ....................................................................................... 66
Authorized Stations Submenu....................................................................................... 66
vii
4
MAINTENANCE
Upgrading Software ...........................................................................................................69
Software Upgrade Methods ..........................................................................................70
Upgrading the Software ................................................................................................71
Command Tool...................................................................................................................73
Launching the Command Tool.......................................................................................73
Card-Level vs. Channel-Level Commands.......................................................................73
Command Window.......................................................................................................73
Restarting Other Entities .....................................................................................................75
Restarting after Parameter Changes ..............................................................................76
Setting Manual Switchovers ...............................................................................................77
Changing the SNMP Community Strings ............................................................................78
Clearing Authorized Access Lists.........................................................................................80
Displaying Inventory Information ........................................................................................81
A
ERROR MESSAGES
Overview ............................................................................................................................83
Invocation Errors ................................................................................................................84
Command Line Target Selection ....................................................................................84
Chassis Restore .............................................................................................................85
Chassis Save..................................................................................................................85
Command Tool .............................................................................................................86
Configuration Tool ........................................................................................................86
Software Download ......................................................................................................87
Test Tool ........................................................................................................................88
IP Telephony Manager Console......................................................................................89
Tone Send/Receive.........................................................................................................89
Trap Destination ............................................................................................................89
Execution Errors .................................................................................................................90
All Applications .............................................................................................................90
Chassis Restore .............................................................................................................92
Chassis Save..................................................................................................................93
Command Tool .............................................................................................................93
Configuration Tool ........................................................................................................94
Test Tool ........................................................................................................................95
IP Telephony Manager Console......................................................................................96
Tone send/receive ..........................................................................................................96
Trap Destination ............................................................................................................97
Software Download ......................................................................................................98
viii
B
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
General Syntax................................................................................................................. 101
IP Telephony Manager Console ........................................................................................ 104
Configuration .................................................................................................................. 105
Actions/Commands.......................................................................................................... 109
Query Current Command Status (-q)........................................................................... 109
Set Trap Destination ......................................................................................................... 110
To Add a Trap Destination Entry (-a) ............................................................................ 110
To Modify a Trap Destination Entry (-m) ...................................................................... 110
To Delete a Trap Destination Entry (-d) ........................................................................ 110
SNMP Commands............................................................................................................ 111
Setting SNMP Community Strings ............................................................................... 111
Monitoring SNMP Parameters ..................................................................................... 111
Tone Test ......................................................................................................................... 114
Send Tone Test (-S)...................................................................................................... 114
Receive Tone Test (-R).................................................................................................. 115
Modem Tests ................................................................................................................... 115
Query Current Test Status ........................................................................................... 115
Test Type (-T)............................................................................................................... 115
Duration (-s) ............................................................................................................... 115
Device Save and Restore .................................................................................................. 116
Save Configuration ..................................................................................................... 116
Restore Configuration................................................................................................. 116
Software Download ......................................................................................................... 117
Upgrade File Identification .......................................................................................... 117
Filename Prefixes ........................................................................................................ 118
Software Download Progress Messages ...................................................................... 118
Feature Enable ................................................................................................................. 119
Inventory ......................................................................................................................... 120
Authorized Station Tool.................................................................................................... 121
CLI Parameters (-q, -a, -m, -d) ..................................................................................... 122
AutoResponse ................................................................................................................. 123
Chassis Level Events and Responses ............................................................................ 123
Slot Level Events and Responses.................................................................................. 124
Modem Channel Level Events and Responses.............................................................. 124
C
GLOSSARY
INDEX
ix
LIST OF TABLES
Table 1
Table 2
Table 3
Table 4
Table 5
Table 6
Table 7
Table 8
Table 9
Table 10
Table 11
Table 12
Table 13
Table 14
Content Description............................................................................................ xiii
Notice Icon Description ....................................................................................... xiv
Text Convention Descriptions.............................................................................. xiv
Management Software ....................................................................................... 18
Hardware Prerequisites ....................................................................................... 18
Software Prerequisites ........................................................................................ 19
Files added to HP OpenView Windows Directories .............................................. 27
Threshold Monitor Configuration Fields .............................................................. 36
Upgrade Option Comparison .............................................................................. 71
Zip File Contents................................................................................................. 71
Sample Breakdown of SDL and NAC Filenames................................................. 117
Filename Prefixes .............................................................................................. 118
Software Download Progress Message Descriptions .......................................... 118
CLI Parameter Descriptions ............................................................................... 122
x
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
Figure 9
Figure 10
Figure 11
Figure 12
Figure 13
Figure 14
Figure 15
Figure 16
Figure 17
Figure 18
Figure 19
Figure 20
Figure 21
Figure 22
Figure 23
Figure 24
Figure 25
Figure 26
Figure 27
Figure 28
Figure 29
Figure 30
Figure 31
Figure 32
Figure 33
Figure 34
Figure 35
Figure 36
Figure 37
Figure 38
Figure 39
Figure 40
Figure 41
Figure 42
Figure 43
Figure 44
Figure 45
Figure 46
Figure 47
Figure 48
Figure 49
Figure 50
Figure 51
Figure 52
Figure 53
Performance Window ........................................................................................23
Media Gateway Network Time Protocol Window ...............................................29
Server Network Time Protocol Window ..............................................................30
AutoResponse Window ......................................................................................31
Authorized Stations Window ..............................................................................32
Authorized Stations Add Window ......................................................................33
Authorized Station Completion Window ............................................................33
Selecting an Entity Window ................................................................................34
Parameter Group Selection Window ...................................................................35
Configuring Thresholds Window ........................................................................35
Selecting an Entity Window ................................................................................38
Parameter Group Selection Window ...................................................................38
Configuring Thresholds Window ........................................................................39
Adding Threshold Parameters Window ...............................................................40
Selecting an Entity Window ................................................................................40
Parameter Group Selection Window ...................................................................41
Configuring Thresholds Window ........................................................................41
Editing Threshold Parameters Window ...............................................................42
Save Chassis NVRAM Dialog Box ........................................................................44
Restore Chassis NVRAM Dialog Box ....................................................................45
Save Chassis CFM Dialog Box .............................................................................47
Restore Chassis CFM Dialog Box .........................................................................48
IP Telephony Manager Console Window ............................................................50
IP Telephony Manager Server Window ...............................................................51
File Menu ...........................................................................................................52
Device List Window ............................................................................................52
Software Download Window .............................................................................53
View Menu ........................................................................................................54
LED Poll Info Window .........................................................................................54
Icon View Window .............................................................................................55
Configuration Menu ..........................................................................................56
EdgeServer Pro Card Parameter Group Window .................................................57
Example of HiPer DSP Modem Identification Configuration Table .......................58
Command Tool Window ....................................................................................59
Inventory Window ..............................................................................................60
Inventory Print Menu ..........................................................................................61
Auto Response Window .....................................................................................62
Fault Menu ........................................................................................................63
Trap Setting Window .........................................................................................63
Trap Destination Window ...................................................................................64
Performance Window ........................................................................................64
Performance Monitor Menu ...............................................................................65
Security Menu ....................................................................................................65
Authorized Stations Window ..............................................................................66
Authorized Stations Add Window ......................................................................67
Software Download Dialog Box ..........................................................................72
Software Download (Select a File) Window ........................................................72
Example HiPer DSP Hardware Commands ..........................................................74
Example HiPer DSP Software Commands ............................................................74
Example Media Gateway Command Status Color Codes ....................................75
Asterisks Parameter Example ..............................................................................76
Community Name Drop-Down ...........................................................................78
Community Name Dialog Window .....................................................................78
xi
Figure 54 Community String Warning Message .................................................................79
Figure 55 Device Details Dialog Box ...................................................................................79
Figure 56 Inventory Window ..............................................................................................81
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
About This Guide contains an overview of the IP Telephony Manager User
Guide, describes where to find specific information, lists conventions and
related documentation, and explains how to contact CommWorks
Corporation.
This guide describes how to install, configure, and operate IP Telephony
Manager, as well as how to use it to troubleshoot and maintain components of
the CommWorks IP Telephony Platform. Its primary audience is operations
personnel.
CommWorks issues release notes with some products—visit our website at
http://totalservice.commworks.com. If the information in the release notes
differs from the information in this guide, use the information in the release
notes.
Finding Information
The following table lists the location of specific information.
Table 1 Content Description
If you are looking for
Go to
System overview
Chapter 1
Hardware and software requirements
Chapter 1
Software installation procedures
Chapter 1
Configuration information using IP Telephony Manager
Chapter 2
Performance monitoring instructions
Chapter 2
Console window menu description
Chapter 3
Firmware upgrade procedures and general maintenance information
Chapter 4
Error messages
Appendix A
IP Telephony Manager commands from the UNIX command line
Appendix B
Glossary
Appendix C
xiv
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Conventions
The following tables list conventions in this guide.
Table 2 Notice Icon Description
Icon
Notice Type
Description
Information Note
Information that contains
important features or
instructions.
Caution
Information to alert you to
potential damage to a
program, system, or device.
Warning
Information to alert you to
potential personal injury or
fatality. May also alert you
to potential electrical
hazard.
ESD
Information to alert you to
take proper grounding
precautions before handling
a product.
Table 3 Text Convention Descriptions
Related
Documentation
Convention
Description
Text represented as a
screen display
This typeface represents displays that appear on your terminal
screen, for example: Netlogin:
Text represented as
menu or sub-menu
names.
This typeface represents all menu and sub-menu names within
procedures, for example:
Text represented by
<filename>
This typeface represents a variable. For example: <filename>.
On the File menu, click New.
The following documents contain information about the components of the
CommWorks IP Telephony Platform:
■
CommWorks IP Telephony System Software Installation Guide
■
CommWorks IP Telephony Overview Guide
■
CommWorks IP Telephony Hardware Installation Guide
■
Total Control 1000 Media Gateway Guide
■
CommWorks 4200 Gatekeeper Guide
■
CommWorks 4220 SIP Proxy Server Guide
■
CommWorks 7220 Accounting Server Guide
■
CommWorks 7230 Billing Support Server Guide
■
CommWorks 7210 Directory Mapping Server and CommWorks 7240
Web Provisioning Server Guide
Contacting CommWorks xv
■
CommWorks IP Telephony Parameter (MIB) Reference Guide
■
CommWorks IP Telephony Trap (Alarm) Reference Guide
■
Contacting
CommWorks
CommWorks 4007 SS7 Signaling Gateway Operation and Maintenance
Guide
For information about Customer Service, including support, training, code
releases and updates, contracts, and documentation, visit our website at
http://totalservice.commworks.com.
Refer to the Documentation CD-ROM for information about product warranty.
Before contacting CommWorks Technical Support, have this information
available:
■
Contract number
■
Problem description
■
■
■
Symptoms
■
Known causes
CommWorks products
■
Software and hardware versions
■
Serial numbers
Trouble clearing attempts
1
INSTALLATION
This chapter contains an overview of IP Telephony Manager and installation
procedures for UNIX.
This chapter contains the following topics:
Overview
■
Overview
■
Management Workstation
■
Prerequisites
■
Before You Begin
■
Removing Previous Versions
■
Installing IP Telephony Manager
■
Starting IP Telephony Manager
■
Connecting to Entities
■
Integrating with HP OpenView
■
Linking CommWorks Objects
IP Telephony Manager, previously known as Total Control Manager is a
software application that runs on a UNIX management station. This application
remotely manages CommWorks Network Application Cards (NACs) and
Network Interface Cards (NICs) through a Network Management Card (NMC)
installed on the CommWorks 5210 IP Telephony Platform.
Two protocols govern these management functions: Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP) between the NMC and the management
station, and a proprietary CommWorks protocol between the NMC and the
managed cards.
IP Telephony Manager communicates with the NMC through SNMP rules.
Because the other NACs in the hub do not use SNMP agent software, the
NMC acts as a proxy agent between these cards and the management station.
Standard SNMP traps can be enabled to send a trap message (or event
notification) to one or more management stations. The management stations
use these traps to create logs, trigger alarms, and initiate actions.
18
CHAPTER 1: INSTALLATION
The management station uses Management Information Bases (MIBs), defined
for each card in the hub, to issue commands to the NMC. The NMC executes
the commands and obtains the results using a proprietary CommWorks
protocol. The NMC uses SNMP to send these results to the management
station.
The NMC communicates with each installed card using a proprietary
Management Bus Protocol (MBP). The NMC provides configuration
management for each NAC in the hub and can set each parameter for a NAC
to a specific value. The NMC also configures parameters to predetermined
values when a NAC is installed in the hub. To help manage the configuration,
the NMC can query the current value of parameters for each NAC and
download software for upgrades.
Management
Workstation
You can use HP OpenView or the CommWorks 5000 Network and Service
Management System to monitor the status of all elements of the CommWorks
platform and to act as an alarm server.
Use IP Telephony Manager to configure and monitor all the components of the
CommWork’s platform, such as configuring operational parameters,
upgrading software, and backing up and restoring configurations.
Table 4 lists the additional management software for your workstation.
Table 4 Management Software
Prerequisites
Software Package
Operating System
Function
Network management
application, such as HP
OpenView
HP-UX
General network monitoring and alarm
services
CommWorks 5000
SUN Solaris
SUN Solaris
Network monitoring and bulk operations
Table 5 lists the hardware requirements needed to achieve the best
performance from IP Telephony Manager.
Table 5 Hardware Prerequisites
Operating System
Hardware
SUN Platform
SPARC 20 Workstation, or more recent offering from SUN
64 MB of RAM (minimum)
1 GB Hard Disk Space (Space must be available on one partition.
Swap space is recommended to be at or above 200 MB.)
CD-ROM Drive
Color Monitor
Ethernet Interface
Before You Begin
19
Table 5 Hardware Prerequisites (continued)
Operating System
HP Platform
Hardware
HP 712/100 or higher Model 712 Workstation
64 MB RAM (minimum)
1 GB Hard Disk Space (Space must be available on one partition.
Swap space is recommended to be at or above 200 MB.)
CD-ROM Drive
Color Monitor
Ethernet Interface
Table 6 lists the software requirements needed to achieve the best
performance from IP Telephony Manager.
Table 6 Software Prerequisites
Operating System
Software
SUN Platform
Solaris 2.6, or 2.7 with X11R6
Java Runtime Environment by Sun (shipped with Solaris 7)
Motif Runtime Kit (SUNWmfrun Package)
HP OpenView Windows (OVW) Network Node Manager 6.1
(optional)
HTML Browser (Netscape etc.)
HP Platform
HP-UX 10.20 or higher
HP OpenView Windows Network Node Manager 6.1
(optional)
HTML Browser (Netscape etc.)
Java Runtime Environment by Sun
If you are installing HP OpenView for the first time, temporarily disable
autodiscovery. Do not allow OpenView to discover the devices on your
network automatically. This eases integration with IP Telephony Manager. You
can enable autodiscovery after you install IP Telephony Manager.
Before You Begin
Before installing IP Telephony Manager on your system:
■
■
■
Read the readme file (located at /cdrom/cdrom0/tcm/tcm_sol). It contains IP
Telephony Manager installation notes.
If you are integrating IP Telephony Manager with HP OpenView Network
Node Manager, install and start HP OpenView.
Remove any previous versions of IP Telephony Manager.
This chapter assumes you are running the Korn shell. For installation
instructions for the C or Bourne shells, refer to the readme file.
20
CHAPTER 1: INSTALLATION
If you are using HP OpenView, you must install it before you install IP
Telephony Manager. If not, HP OpenView does not integrate correctly. Make
sure IP Telephony Manager and HP OpenView are installed on the same
system. Remember to disable HP OpenView autodiscovery before you do a first
time install/integration of IP Telephony Manager with HP OpenView.
Removing Previous
Versions
When you remove IP Telephony Manager, you can either save your existing
configuration, data, and log files (retaining chassis IP addresses and
configuration information) or erase these files when you remove IP Telephony
Manager.
CommWorks recommends that you save the existing configuration, data, and
log files - (Option 1).
Option 1
To remove a previous version of IP Telephony Manager without erasing your
existing IP Telephony Manager database files:
1 Type cd $TCMHOME.
2 Type ./Remove.
Option 2
To completely remove a previous version of IP Telephony Manager, including all
IP Telephony Manager database files:
1 Type cd $TCMHOME.
2 Type ./Remove -c.
Installing IP
Telephony Manager
To install IP Telephony Manager:
1 Move to the drive and directory that contains the installation files.
2 Create a directory for the software installation.
3 Set the TCMHOME variable to point to that directory.
4 Log in to the UNIX workstation as root.
5 Insert the CommWorks CD.
6 Mount the cdrom drive if necessary.
7 Type: cd <working directory> (for example, cd /cdrom/cdrom0/tcm/tcm_sol).
Installing IP Telephony Manager
21
8 From the command line prompt, type the following commands and press
Return after each:
TCMHOME=<installation directory> (for example, /opt/tcm)
export TCMHOME
mkdir -p $TCMHOME
cd cdrom/cdrom0/tcm_sol (for HP, tcm_ux)
./install
A message appears:
The script will make adjustments, only as needed, to
system files in /etc/imit.d, the crontab, /etc/services,
and /usr/lib/x11.
If TCM is later removed, these adjustments will be
undone to restore the original state.
Do you wish to continue [y/n]
9 Type y, and then press Return.
The installation proceeds, listing files as they are installed. The following
message appears to indicate the installation has completed successfully:
TCM installation is complete
You can now enable HP Overview autodiscovery on your system.
Setting PATH and
LD_LIBRARY_PATH
Before you can start IP Telephony Manager, you must add $TCMHOME to the
PATH statement and indicate the location of the IP Telephony Manager library
files as follows:
From the command line prompt, type the following commands and press
Return after each:
PATH=$PATH:$TCMHOME/bin
export PATH
LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$LD_LIBRARY_PATH:$TCMHOME/lib
export LD_LIBRARY_PATH
22
CHAPTER 1: INSTALLATION
Starting IP Telephony
Manager
After you complete the installation and modify the path statement, you can
start IP Telephony Manager.
To start the IP Telephony Manager, from the command line prompt, type one
of these commands:
# xtcmvfpd
or
# xtcmvfpd <target chassis IP address>
The first command causes a list of the chassis components to display. You can
then select the component that you want to start. The second command
specifies the IP address of the component that you want started.
The IP Telephony Manager graphical user interface (GUI) opens a virtual display
of the target chassis. If the virtual display does not appear, set and export the
paths according to the instructions in this chapter.
For a complete description of the menus on the GUI, refer to Chapter 3
Navigating and Using the System.
Connecting to
Entities
CommWorks IP Telephony Manager lets you configure and monitor any
CommWorks IP Telephony entity (for example the Media Gateway,
Gatekeeper, Accounting Server, Billing Support Server.) on your system. To
connect to the individual entities:
1 Start IP Telephony Manager.
2 Click File, and click Open, and then click New from the IP Telephony Manger
Console window.
3 Enter the name and IP address of the entity.
4 Verify that the community strings are as follows:
■
Read-only is public (case sensitive)
■
Read/write is private (case sensitive)
To modify these default settings, refer to Chapter 4, topic: Changing the SNMP
Community Strings.
5 Click OK.
Connecting to Entities
23
To view the entity after the it is connected using IP Telephony Manager:
1 Start IP Telephony Manager.
2 Click File and then click Open from the IP Telephony Manger Console
window.
3 Select the entity from the list.
4 Click OK.
The entity appears in graphical form. When selected, the entity is blue; when
deselected, the entity is black.
Determining
Gatekeeper and Media
Gateway Connectivity
To test Gatekeeper to Media Gateway connectivity, use the following
procedure.
1 Using IP Telephony Manager Console window, select the edge server card.
2 On the menu bar, select Performance and then Performance Monitor.
The Select Entity window appears.
3 Select the entity 3Com Gateway and then click OK.
The Performance window appears.
Figure 1 Performance Window
4 Select Gatekeepers from the Functional Group.
5 Select Current Gatekeeper IP address and click Add. Click OK.
A real time table appears and displays the selected Gateway and the
Gatekeeper to which it is registered. The IP address of the Gatekeeper to
which it is registered also appears.
24
CHAPTER 1: INSTALLATION
Integrating with HP
OpenView
The IP Telephony Manager installation script installs OpenView integration files
to the appropriate OpenView Network Node Manager subdirectories.
OpenView integration occurs as part of the IP Telephony Manager installation,
when the OpenView environmental variables are set beforehand. To integrate
IP Telephony Manager with OpenView manually, follow the procedure below.
1 Set the OpenView environmental variables.
# cd /opt/OV/bin
# . ./ov.envvars.sh
2 Test the environmental variables.
# cd $OV_BIN
# pwd
Solaris responds as follows:
/opt/OV/bin
3 Change to the directory that contains the integration files.
# cd $TCMHOME/ovw
4 Install the integration files.
# ./Install
You can run the $TCMHOME/ovw/Install script at any time. You do not need
to run $TCMHOME/ovw/Remove before running $TCMHOME/ovw/Install
again.
HP OpenView integrates the IP Telephony Manager icons; this lets you access IP
Telephony Manager from HP OpenView.
Fixing Incorrect Maps
If you populate CommWorks devices in OpenView before you installed IP
Telephony Manager, IP Telephony Manager integration does not change the
component type from a non-CommWorks type to a CommWorks chassis type.
You cannot do this automatically in HP OpenView. For best results, delete and
rediscover the CommWorks devices.
You can also use the OpenView ovtopofix -r -o <object id> command.
CommWorks object IDs 1.3.6.1.4.1.429.2.1 through 1.3.6.1.4.1.429.2.9 must
each be individually specified.
Integrating with HP OpenView
25
If CommWorks devices were populated in OpenView before IP Telephony
Manager was installed, the network map will not display the CommWorks
bitmaps correctly after IP Telephony Manager integration. This occurs even if
the CommWorks menu options are not enabled and the isUSREntNetHub
capability is not set to True. For best results, delete and rediscover the
CommWorks devices.
Removing HP
OpenView Integration
To remove OpenView integration:
1 Login as root.
2 Type the following:
cd $TCMHOME/ovw
./Remove -r
While all CommWorks files are removed from HP OpenView, no changes are
made to the runtime databases. One of the primary purposes of removal is to
prepare for a new installation.
Erasing IP Telephony
Manager
Verifying the
Installation
To erase IP Telephony Manager from HP OpenView, replace the current maps
with new ones. You can also delete and rediscover all the CommWorks devices
from each map.
Start IP Telephony Manager with the following commands:
> TCMHOME=<installation directory>
> export TCMHOME
> PATH=$PATH:$TCMHOME/bin
> export PATH
> ./xtcmvfpd <TCH IP_Address/HostName>
IP Telephony Manager opens.
For a complete description of the menus on the GUI, refer to Chapter 3
Navigating and Using the System.
26
CHAPTER 1: INSTALLATION
Linking CommWorks
Objects
If you choose to install HP OpenView, you must install it before IP Telephony
Manager. This lets you start IP Telephony Manager directly from HP OpenView.
To link CommWorks objects in HP OpenView to IP Telephony Manager, use the
following procedure.
1 Type:
#cd $OV_BIN
#./ovstart
#./ovw
2 Go to the chassis to be linked, and then click on it.
3 Right click and select Symbol Properties from the pop-up menu.
4 Under Behavior, click Execute.
5 Under Application Action, click USRRobotics: USRVFPD.
6 Click Target Objects, click Add, and then click OK.
7 Click OK on the window that appears.
8 Double-click the object with the chassis IP address.
The chassis graphical user interface appears.
2
CONFIGURATION
This chapter describes how to configure CommWorks IP Telephony Manager.
This chapter contains the following topics:
■
Management Station Configuration
■
Component Configuration
■
Synchronizing Network Time
■
Auto Response
■
Setting Authorized Stations
■
Defining a Range of IP Addresses for Authorized Access
■
Threshold Monitoring Configuration
■
Saving and Restoring Configurations
Refer to Chapter 3 for a complete description of the IP Telephony Manager
menus.
Unless otherwise specified, this document uses the generic term edge server to
refer to either the edge server card or the EdgeServer Pro card.
Management Station
Configuration
You should not need to configure your management station after installing IP
Telephony Manager for UNIX. IP Telephony Manager adds the following files to
locations as set up in $OV_BIN/ov.envvars.sh:
Table 7 Files added to HP OpenView Windows Directories
Category
File location
Field definitions
$OV_FIELDS/C/usr_fields
Application registration
$OV_REGISTRATION/C/USRobotics
CommWorks-specific
symbols
$OV_SYMBOLS/C/Connector/USR* (various)
CommWorks icon bitmaps
$OV_BITMAPS/C/connector/usr.* (various)
CommWorks MIB
$OV_SNMP_MIBS/Vendor/USRobotics/usr-mib
OID-to-symbol mappings
appended to $OV_CONF/C/oid_to_sym
28
CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURATION
Component
Configuration
Launching the
Configuration Tool
The IP Telephony Manager Console window is used to select target
components whenever you are performing configuration, sending commands,
or upgrading components through software download.
There are two ways to launch the Configuration Tool:
■
■
Synchronizing
Network Time
Setting the Time Zone
From the IP Telephony Manager Console, select a target from the IP
Telephony Manager Console window, and then from the Configuration
menu, select Programmed Settings.
From the UNIX command line, type xtcmconf followed by the IP address or
hostname of the target device and the target slots and channels (refer to
Appendix B Command Line Interface for more details).
You must synchronize the system time of each component in the network
accurate tracking of the IP telephony traffic. To achieve system
synchronization, set each Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server, and Back-end Server to
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) and use the Network Time Protocol (NTP) on all
system components.
For each Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server, and Back-end Server in the IP telephony
network, set the time zone to GMT.
1 From the Windows desktop, click Start, then Settings, and then click Control
Panel.
2 Double-click Date/Time.
The Date/Time Properties window appears.
3 Click Time Zone.
4 From the drop-down list, select [GMT] Greenwich Mean Time: Dublin,
Edinburgh, Lisbon, London.
5 Click OK.
Recording the NTP IP
Addresses
NTP uses a primary and a secondary NTP time server for system time. You can
use the IP addresses of NTP time servers that are local to your network, or you
can use public NTP time servers. The IP addresses of public NTP time servers are
available on the internet. Use the following procedure to record a primary and
secondary NTP time server address.
Selecting Local NTP Servers
If your local network includes local NTP time servers, record the IP address of
the primary NTP time server and the secondary NTP time server.
Synchronizing Network Time
29
Selecting Public NTP Servers
1 From any computer with internet access, access the following website:
http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/ntp/clock1.htm
2 From the website, record the IP addresses for two separate active servers. One
is used as the primary NTP server, and the other is used as the secondary NTP
server. We recommend choosing NTP server locations that are as close to the
Media Gateway chassis as possible.
Setting the NTP
Parameters
Use NTP to synchronize the time across the network. The NTP parameters must
be set for the HiPer NMC card in each Media Gateway chassis, the
Gatekeepers, SIP Proxy Servers, and the Back-end Servers.
All Media Gateway chassis components are automatically synchronized
through the controlling HiPer NMC after it is configured for NTP.
Setting the NTP Parameters for the HiPer NMC
For the HiPer NMC card in each Media Gateway chassis, do the following:
1 Using IP Telephony Manager, open the Media Gateway chassis.
2 Select the HiPer NMC card.
3 Click Configuration, then Programmed Settings from the IP Telephony
Manager Console window.
4 Select Network Time Protocol from the Parameter Group drop-down list.
The Network Time Protocol windows appears.
Figure 2 Media Gateway Network Time Protocol Window
30
CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURATION
5 Enter the Primary and Secondary NTP IP Addresses (refer to Recording the NTP
IP Addresses).
6 Set the Operational Mode to Unicast.
7 Click Set.
Setting the NTP Parameters for the Other Entities
For each Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server, and Back-end Server:
1 Using IP Telephony Manager, open the targeted server.
2 Select the server icon.
3 Select Configuration, then Programmed Settings from the IP Telephony
Manager Console window.
4 Select 3Com SNMP Agent from the Select Entity drop-down list.
5 Click OK.
6 Select Network Time Protocol.
A window similar to the following appears:
Figure 3 Server Network Time Protocol Window
7 Enter the Primary and Secondary NT IP addresses (refer to Recording the NTP IP
Addresses).
8 Set the Operational Mode to Unicast.
9 Click Set.
10 Click Exit.
Auto Response
Auto Response
31
AutoResponse lets network managers define a set of actions (auto response
script) to be taken automatically when a specified event occurs in the chassis.
The event may be specific to a particular module (NAC or NMC) in a given slot
of the chassis, or specific to a particular entity (such as a single modem
channel).
IP Telephony Manager provides a convenient graphical user interface (GUI) for
the Network Manager to configure automatic responses to a specified event. It
is available on the AutoResponse drop-down menu from the Configure menu.
IP Telephony Manager does not need to be running when an event occurs for
the NMC to invoke the appropriate response, because these responses are
programmed into the NMC.
When there are thresholds for an event, they must be programmed through
the Configuration Tool. For example, the Connection Time Limit Expired event
requires that you specify the Connection Time Limit threshold.
AutoResponse
Configuration
To define the automatic responses:
1 Click one or a group of slot(s)/channel(s) on the IP Telephony Manager console
window.
2 On the Main Menu bar, click Configuration, and then click AutoResponse.
■
■
■
If you selected the edge server card, click OK on the Select Entity window.
The AutoResponse window appears.
If you selected the HiPer DSP card, select where you want the auto response
to be set, either the card or template level and click OK.
The AutoResponse window appears.
Figure 4 AutoResponse Window
32
CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURATION
3 Select the event from the Event drop-down list.
4 Select what you want the system to do when the selected event occurs from
the Available Responses list and click Add.
The response is added to the Responses Configured list box.
5 Click OK.
The response scripts are loaded.
Responses can only be added one at a time. Some responses may require
additional information (for example, Delay N. Seconds). For responses that
require additional input (a descriptor), the AutoResponse Parameters window
displays.
Setting Authorized
Stations
The chassis Network Management Card (NMC) contains an authorized access
list that lets you limit management capability to specific management stations
on your network. After you have created entries in the authorized access list,
only those management stations can send SNMP requests to that device.
To set up an authorized access list:
1 Open a console window for the device whose authorized access list you want
to change.
2 From the Security menu, select Authorized Stations.
The Authorized Stations window appears.
Figure 5 Authorized Stations Window
3 From the Authorized Stations Add window, click Add.
The Authorized Stations Add dialog box appears.
Setting Authorized Stations
33
Figure 6 Authorized Stations Add Window
4 In the Add dialog box, enter the IP address for the workstation you are
currently working from and click OK.
The Authorized Stations Completion window appears with the newly added IP
addresses listed.
Figure 7 Authorized Station Completion Window
For information about setting the network mask, refer to Defining a Range of
IP Addresses for Authorized Access later in this chapter.
5 Click Add to add additional entries for other workstations you want to grant
management access.
6 Repeat these steps for each device on your network.
7 If you changed the authorized stations on the Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server, or
any of the Back-end Servers, you must restart the SNMP agent. Refer to
Restarting Other Entities in Chapter 4 for more information.
34
CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURATION
Defining a Range of
IP Addresses for
Authorized Access
You can define a range of IP addresses for authorized access by using the
Network Mask field in the authorized access list.
The network mask that you type in this field masks the IP address for that entry
to define a range of authorized IP addresses.
For example, a network mask of 255.255.255.255 prevents access from all IP
addresses except the destination IP address. An entry with a destination IP
address of 139.78.202.192 and a network mask of 255.255.0.0 grants access
to all stations with IP addresses within the range of 139.78.0.0 and
139.78.255.255. An entry with the same IP address and a network mask of
255.0.0.0 grants access to all stations with an IP address beginning with 139.
Threshold
Monitoring
Configuration
Threshold monitoring provides local monitoring of any MIB object’s value and
establishes threshold levels for which events can be generated. You can select
which objects to monitor and designate the threshold levels. Threshold values
can be provisioned independently to issue events if the actual values cross the
thresholds. This is different from trap filtering which describes how to
configure the frequency of the traps. This, instead, places thresholds on
certain performance parameter values and issues a trap when the threshold is
exceeded.
To set threshold monitoring from IP Telephony Manager:
1 Open a console window for the device where the threshold is going to be set.
(For the Media Gateway, you need to select the edge server card.)
2 From the Configuration menu, click Programmed Settings.
3 Select the 3COM SNMP SubAgent from the Select Entity window (For
Back-end Servers and the Gatekeeper, select 3Com SNMP Agent.) and click
OK.
Figure 8 Selecting an Entity Window
4 From the Parameter Group Selection window, select Threshold Monitor
Configuration.
Threshold Monitoring Configuration
Figure 9 Parameter Group Selection Window
The Threshold Monitor Configuration window appears.
Figure 10 Configuring Thresholds Window
35
36
CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURATION
The following table contains the fields and the values of the Configuring
Threshold window.
Table 8 Threshold Monitor Configuration Fields
Field Name
Description
Threshold Object
Object ID which is to be monitored. Example:
This has 4294967294 at the end if
an object with multiple instances is 1.3.6.1.4.1.429.4.75.5.1.8.0
to be monitored.
Possible Selections
Threshold Alias
Alias for the object ID. This is used The alias has to be unique
to differentiate the different objects across all objects to be
being monitored. The alias is sent in monitored.
the threshold trap for identifying
the monitor object that has crossed
the threshold or cleared the
threshold
Threshold Period
Frequency at which this parameter
is monitored.
0 sec
15 sec
30 sec
1 minute
15 minutes
30 Minute
Threshold Type
Type of the collection.
None
Delta: The difference between
the start and the end of the
period is used.
Absolute: The actual value is
used
Threshold Alarm Value
Threshold, which if crossed, results
in a trap
An integer value.
If you set the Threshold Type to
Absolute, a trap is sent when
the current value is greater
than the integer value you
entered.
If you set the Threshold Type to
Delta, a trap is sent when the
delta of the threshold period is
greater than the integer value
you entered.
Threshold Alarm Clear
Value
Threshold, which if crossed in the
reverse direction, results in a
threshold clear trap
An integer value.
If you set the Threshold Type to
Absolute, a clear trap is sent
when the current value is less
than the integer value you
entered.
If you set the Threshold Type to
Delta, a clear trap is sent when
the delta of the threshold
period is less than the integer
value you entered.
Adding a Threshold Parameter
37
Table 8 Threshold Monitor Configuration Fields (continued)
Field Name
Description
Possible Selections
Threshold Event
Severity
The severity configured will be sent
in the trap.
None
Critical
Warning
Informational
Threshold Alarm State
State of the threshold object. If an
object is not active, then it has a
state of none. If an object is above
threshold, then this object will show
that state. If an Object has cleared
the threshold, then it will show that
state. If an object is not a part of
the CommonAgent, the
thresholdState will become invalid.
If an object is not internally
accessible, then it will have a state
of Inaccessible.
None
Invalid
Warning
Critical
Clear
Inaccessible
Information
This is a read-only column.
Threshold Row Status
Status of the threshold object. This
is a user-defined entry that is used
to create rows in the table. The
state rowstate can itself be only
active, notReady, notInService. A
rowState of notReady implies that
one or more parameters of the row
haven’t been set to the correct
value. A row in the underCreation
state can be set to active state.
Active
CreateAndWait
notInService
destroy
notReady
createAndGo
5 After you have set the trap thresholds on the Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server, or
any of the Back-end Servers, you must restart the SNMP agent. Refer to
Restarting Other Entities in Chapter 4 for more information.
Adding a Threshold
Parameter
To add a parameter to monitor:
1 Open a console window for the device where the threshold parameter is going
to be added. (For the Media Gateway, you need to select the edge server card.)
2 From the Configuration menu, click Programmed Settings.
3 Select the 3COM SNMP SubAgent from the Select Entity window (For
Back-end Servers and the Gatekeeper, select 3Com SNMP Agent.) and click
OK.
38
CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURATION
Figure 11 Selecting an Entity Window
4 From the Parameter Group Selection window, select Threshold Monitor
Configuration.
Figure 12 Parameter Group Selection Window
The Threshold Monitor Configuration window appears.
Adding a Threshold Parameter
39
Figure 13 Configuring Thresholds Window
5 Configure the fields in the Configuring Threshold window as needed. Refer to
Table 8. Click Set.
6 Set Threshold Row Status to createAndGo. As shown in the following
figure.
40
CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURATION
Figure 14 Adding Threshold Parameters Window
7 Click Set.
8 If you changed the threshold parameters on the Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server,
or any of the Back-end Servers, you must restart the SNMP agent. Refer to
Restarting Other Entities in Chapter 4 for more information.
Editing a Threshold
Parameter
To edit a parameter that is being monitored:
1 Open a console window for the device where the threshold is going to be
edited. (For the Media Gateway, you need to select the edge server card.)
2 From the Configuration menu, click Programmed Settings.
3 Select the 3COM SNMP SubAgent from the Select Entity window (For
Back-end Servers and the Gatekeeper, select 3Com SNMP Agent.) and click
OK.
Figure 15 Selecting an Entity Window
Editing a Threshold Parameter
4 From the Parameter Group Selection window, select Threshold Monitor
Configuration.
Figure 16 Parameter Group Selection Window
The Threshold Monitor Configuration window appears.
Figure 17 Configuring Thresholds Window
41
42
CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURATION
5 Set Threshold Row Status to notinsservice.
6 Change the configuration as you need, refer to Table 8, and click Set.
7 Set the Threshold Row Status to active.
The following figure shows the Threshold Parameter drop-down list.
Figure 18 Editing Threshold Parameters Window
8 Click Set.
9 If you changed the threshold parameters on the Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server,
or any of the Back-end Servers, you must restart the SNMP agent. Refer to
Restarting Other Entities in Chapter 4 for more information.
Threshold Traps
IP Telephony Manager issues the following traps depending on the Threshold
event severity configured:
■
Threshold Warning
■
Threshold Critical
■
Threshold Informational
■
Threshold Warning Clear
■
Threshold Critical Clear
■
Threshold Informational Clear
Saving and Restoring Configurations
Saving and Restoring
Configurations
43
The Save configuration utility performs a discovery of the configuration of a
device and saves it to a file. After it is saved to a file, the Restore configuration
utility is used to restore the configuration to that device, or it can be used to
apply the file to other devices with similar components.
You can initiate a device save or restore in any of the following ways:
■
■
■
From the File menu of the IP Telephony Manager Console
From your network management platform (HP OpenView). For information
on how to save and restore a device from your network management
platform, refer to your network management User Guide.
From the UNIX command line. For information on saving and restoring
operations from the command line, refer to Appendix B, Command Line
Interface
There are four ways to save configurations:
■
■
■
■
Saving a Chassis Configuration to NVRAM—The Media Gateway
configuration can be saved to a file on the network.
Component Save to NVRAM—Most components contain their own
nonvolatile read access memory (NVRAM). The Media Gateway’s current
configuration can be saved to its NVRAM and later retrieved through a
direct command or by resetting the component.
NMC Save Chassis to NVRAM—An entire device’s configuration can be
saved to the NMC NVRAM.
Saving Chassis Configurations from CFM—This feature lets you save the
configurations of every component of a device to a file (for example, the
configuration of all the cards and channels in a chassis, and the servers).
There are two ways to restore the configurations:
■
■
Saving a Chassis
Configuration to
NVRAM
Restoring a Chassis Configuration from NVRAM—An entire device's
configuration can be restored from a file on the network.
Restoring Chassis Configurations from CFM—This feature lets you
restore the configurations of every component of a device from a file (for
example, the configuration of all the cards and channels in a chassis and
the servers). The device configuration can be restored to that device, or
applied to other devices with similar components.
Use the following procedure to save a Media Gateway chassis configuration to
NVRAM using the IP Telephony Manager.
1 From the IP Telephony Manager Console window, select File menu, and click
Save Chassis NVRAM.
The Save Chassis NVRAM dialog box appears.
44
CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURATION
Figure 19 Save Chassis NVRAM Dialog Box
2 Enter or select the .nvr file you are saving to and click OK.
The default directory for .nvr files is: $TCMHOME/data/nvram/.
If you are saving or restoring from the command line and you are not using the
x prefix option, progress is reported as status messages on screen. For more
information, refer to Appendix B, Command Line Interface.
The Chassis Save Progress window appears.
3 When the save is completed, click OK.
Restoring a Chassis
Configuration from
NVRAM
To restore a Media Gateway chassis configuration from NVRAM using IP
Telephony Manager:
1 From the IP Telephony Manager Console window, select File menu, and click
Restore Chassis NVRAM.
The Restore Chassis NVRAM dialog box appears.
Saving and Restoring Configurations
45
Figure 20 Restore Chassis NVRAM Dialog Box
2 Enter or select the .whb file you are restoring from and click OK.
The default directory for .nvr files is: $TCMHOME/data/nvram/.
If you are saving or restoring from the command line and you are not using the
x prefix option, progress is reported as status messages on screen. For more
information refer to Appendix B, Command Line Interface.
The Chassis Restore Progress window appears.
3 When the restore is completed click OK.
Component Save to
NVRAM
Some device components, such as modems, store their settings in their own
NVRAM and use them for power-on and reset defaults.
To save a component’s settings to NVRAM:
1 Select the component whose configuration you are saving on the IP Telephony
Manager console display.
2 Select Configuration from the IP Telephony Manager Console window.
3 Select Action/Commands from the drop-down menu.
4 Click the Card Level radio button.
5 Select Software in the Category box.
6 Select Both T1/E1 and Modem to NVRAM in the Command to Execute box.
To load a component’s NVRAM settings, issue the Restore from NVRAM
command from the same command group as the Save to NVRAM command.
46
CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURATION
Not all components support the Save to NVRAM feature. For those that
support this feature, the HIPer DSP and NMC cards, you must select the right
command type and group. For example, the modem software command
group is available only when you select modems at the channel level, as
opposed to selecting the whole card. For T1 cards, you must select the whole
card and choose the software command group. Refer to Appendix C for a list
of available commands for each type of IP Telephony Manager component.
NMC Save Chassis to
NVRAM
Use the Save Chassis to NVRAM command to save the configuration of each
component in a device to the NMC’s NVRAM. You can then restore this
configuration to that device by using the Restore Chassis from NVRAM
command.
To execute the Save Chassis to NVRAM and Restore Chassis from NVRAM
commands, follow this procedure:
1 Select the NMC card (or management module) from the IP Telephony Manager
console window.
2 Select Actions/Commands from the Configuration menu.
The Command window appears.
3 Select Save Chassis from NVRAM or Restore Chassis from NVRAM from
the Command to Execute drop-down box.
4 Click Execute, and wait for the Success result.
Saving Configurations
to the CFM
Use the following procedure to save the configuration of the Media Gateway
chassis, Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server, or Back-end Server to the Configuration
File Manager (CFM) using the IP Telephony Manager.
1 From the IP Telephony Manager Console window, select File menu, and click
Save CFM.
The Save CFM dialog box appears.
2 When the save is completed, click OK.
Saving and Restoring Configurations
47
Figure 21 Save Chassis CFM Dialog Box
3 Enter or select the .cfm file you are saving to and click OK.
The default directory for .nvr files is: $TCMHOME/data/nvram/.
If you are saving or restoring from the command line and you are not using the
x prefix option, progress is reported as status messages on screen. For more
information refer, to Appendix B, Command Line Interface.
The Chassis Save Progress window appears.
4 When the save is completed, click OK.
Restoring a
Configuration from
CFM
Use the following procedure to restore the configuration of the Media
Gateway chassis, Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server, or Back-end Server to the
Configuration File Manager (CFM) using the IP Telephony Manager.
1 From the IP Telephony Manager Console window, select File menu, and click
Restore CFM.
The Restore CFM dialog box appears.
48
CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURATION
Figure 22 Restore Chassis CFM Dialog Box
2 Enter or select the .cfm file you are restoring from and click OK.
The default directory for .cfm files is: opt/tcm/data/cfm/tch.
If you are saving or restoring from the command line and you are not using the
x prefix option, progress is reported as status messages on screen. For more
information, refer to Appendix B, Command Line Interface.
The Chassis Restore Progress window appears.
3 When the save is completed, click OK.
4 Restart the SIP Proxy server to ensure that the Back-end server addresses from
the restore are used. Refer to the CommWorks 4220 SIP Proxy Server Guide for
more information on restarting the SIP Proxy server.
3
NAVIGATING AND USING THE SYSTEM
This chapter describes the menus in the IP Telephony Manager. The function of
the menus can vary depending on the component, if that is the case, then you
are referred to that individual component’s user manual.
This chapter contains the following topics:
■
Accessing IP Telephony Manager Window
■
File Menu
■
View Menu
■
Configuration Menu
■
Fault Menu
■
Performance Menu
■
Security Menu
As an example, the descriptions in this section pertain to the CommWorks IP
Telephony Media Gateway. The server menus are similar to the windows
described here.
Accessing IP
Telephony Manager
Window
There are two main menus in the IP Telephony Manager. One is for the Media
Gateway chassis and the other one is for the Back-end Server(s), Gatekeeper,
or SIP Proxy Server.
To access the either main menu, from the command line prompt, type one of
these commands:
# xtcmvfpd
or
# xtcmvfpd <target chassis IP address>
The first command lists the chassis components. You then select the
component that you want to start. The second command, you specify the IP
address of the component that you want to start.
If the Media Gateway was specified:
The IP Telephony Manager Console window appears.
50
CHAPTER 3: NAVIGATING AND USING THE SYSTEM
Figure 23 IP Telephony Manager Console Window
The IP Telephony Manager Console window contains a graphical
representation of the Total Control chassis. The view can be changed by the
View menu to see the front or back of the chassis. Select the area of the
chassis on the IP Telephony Manager Console window on which you want the
function to be performed, then select the function from the main menu bar.
In general:
■
■
■
■
■
Click on LEDs to select individual channels or entities, or the area just
outside the LEDs to select the whole card. For Network Interface Cards
(NICs), click the connectors.
The card’s identity appears to the left of the IP Telephony Manager Console
window.
To select more than one channel or entity at a time, hold down the Shift
key.
You can select only one type of card at a time (for example, you can select
two HiPer DSP Modem cards, but not a HiPer DSP card and some other type
of modem card).
To select all the same type of channels or components in a card, use the All
Like Devices setting in the Select drop-down box at the upper right corner
of the IP Telephony Manager Console window.
If a Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server, or a Back-end Server was selected:
The IP Telephony Manager Server window appears.
Accessing IP Telephony Manager Window
51
Figure 24 IP Telephony Manager Server Window
To perform a function on the Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server, or Back-end Server,
click on the server icon and simply choose the command from the main menu.
The remainder of this section describes the functions located on the main
menu.
As you can see, the Chassis Console window and the Server windows contain
the same menu items. For ease of reference, the IP Telephony Manager
Console windows are used as examples. It is noted when a drop-down
submenu is for the IP Telephony Manager Chassis Console only.
52
CHAPTER 3: NAVIGATING AND USING THE SYSTEM
File Menu
The file menu is used to open devices on the system, save and restore
configurations, and to import Software download files.
Figure 25 shows an example of the File menu from the Media Gateway.
Figure 25 File Menu
Open Submenu
The Open submenu displays the Device List window. It lets you to access other
devices on your VoIP system.
Figure 26 Device List Window
Chassis Save All
Submenu
The Chassis Save All submenu saves to entire chassis’ configuration to NVRAM
(IP Telephony Manager Chassis Console only).
File Menu
Save Chassis NVRAM
Submenu
53
The Save Chassis NVRAM submenu saves the Media Gateway chassis
configuration to a specific file on NVRAM. Refer to Chapter 2 for more
information on saving the chassis to NVRAM (IP Telephony Manager Chassis
Console only).
Restore Chassis NVRAM
Submenu
The Restore Chassis NVRAM submenu restores the Media Gateway chassis
configuration from a specified file. You can also use this submenu to configure
another chassis by using the configuration saved on this file. Refer to Chapter
2 for more information about restoring the Media Gateway chassis
configuration (IP Telephony Manager Chassis Console only).
Save CFM Submenu
The Save CFM Submenu saves the chassis or server configuration to a specified
Configuration File Management (CFM) file. Refer to Chapter 2 for more
information about saving the Media Gateway chassis or the server from a CFM
file.
Restore CFM Submenu
The Restore CFM submenu restores the chassis or server configuration by using
a specified CFM file. Refer to Chapter 2 for more information on restoring the
Media Gateway chassis or the server from a CFM file.
Import SDL Files
Submenu
The Import SDL Files submenu copies the Software Download (SDL) files to a
specified directory. Refer to Chapter 4 for more information on upgrading your
system using the Software Download menu (IP Telephony Manager Chassis
Console only).
Figure 27 Software Download Window
Exit Submenu
The Exit submenu closes the current IP Telephony Manager session.
54
CHAPTER 3: NAVIGATING AND USING THE SYSTEM
View Menu
The View menu lets you adjust the way IP Telephony Manager displays the
console or server window.
Figure 28 View Menu
Other Side Submenu
LED Poll Info Submenu
The Other Side submenu displays the reverse side of the chassis. This guide
shows the front panel of the chassis. Figure 28 shows the back of the Media
Gateway chassis (IP Telephony Manager Chassis Console only).
The LED Poll Info submenu displays the status of the LED lights.
Figure 29 LED Poll Info Window
Show Toolbar Submenu
The Show Toolbar submenu displays four icons.
View Menu
Figure 30 Icon View Window
The first icon displays the Command Tool dialog box for the chosen entity.
The second icon displays the Configuration menus.
The third icon displays the software download dialog box for the selected
entity.
The forth icon displays diagnostics information for the selected entity.
55
56
CHAPTER 3: NAVIGATING AND USING THE SYSTEM
Configuration Menu
The Configuration menu is used to set the VoIP chassis to your environment
requirements.
Figure 31 Configuration Menu
Programmed Settings
Submenu
The Programmed Settings submenu displays the Configuration Tool window
for the selected entity. Parameters for a given component may be divided into
several groups. When you select the Configuration Tool, the Parameter Group
drop-down box appears, prompting you to select a parameter group. You
must select a group from the Parameter Group drop-down box to continue.
Figure 32 shows an example of the CommWorks EdgeServer Pro card
Parameter Group.
Configuration Menu
57
Figure 32 EdgeServer Pro Card Parameter Group Window
The Configuration Tool menu contains the following fields:
■
Selected targets—The name of the target to be configured from this
menu that was selected from the IP Telephony Manager chassis or server.
Displays the slot and channel numbers of the selected components. For
example, S4C1-30 means that channels 1-30 of the component in slot 4 of
a device has been selected. This field is read only.
■
Card-Level and Channel-Level Parameter Groups—IP Telephony
Manager components have different parameter groups depending on
whether you have selected the whole component or individual channels
within a component.
After selecting a parameter group, the configuration table appears, and lists
the current settings for each selected component.
Refer to the individual components user guides for information on configuring
these parameter groups.
Column headings display slot and channel numbers for each selected
component.
58
CHAPTER 3: NAVIGATING AND USING THE SYSTEM
Figure 33 Example of HiPer DSP Modem Identification Configuration Table
Click on the cell with the setting you want to edit. If a value is read-only, the
cursor changes to the “No” sign when placed over the cell.
If the value can be modified, an arrow appears in the value field. When you
click on the field, a drop-down box appears, listing the possible values for the
configuration. You can also use the Tab key to navigate through the fields.
After a value has changed in the configuration table, it turns blue (default).
The new value is not changed in the component, until you click Set. After a Set
is issued and the value is changed in the component, the color returns to
normal.
Other fields on the Configuration Tool menu are:
■
■
■
■
Window Title Bar—Displays the target device IP address.
Get Button—Triggers the SNMP Get operation for the selected parameter
group. The Get operation updates the display with the last-saved values.
Set Button—Triggers the SNMP Set operation for the selected parameter
group. The Set operation writes the displayed values to the device MIB.
Help—Displays information about configurable parameters. Click on the
Help button. The context-sensitive help icon appears. Simply click the
parameter/object for which you want additional information. The system
launches your HTML browser.
Configuration Menu
■
■
Action/Commands
Submenu
59
Exit—Closes the window and displays the previous window.
Adjusting Column Width—You can adjust the column width using the
mouse. Place the cursor over the column divisor line until it changes to a
bar and arrow, then click and drag the line left or right.
The Action/Commands submenu displays the Command Tool window for the
selected entity.
Figure 34 shows an example of the CommWorks EdgeServer Pro entity.
Figure 34 Command Tool Window
The Command Tool window contains the following fields and control buttons:
■
■
■
■
■
Selected Targets—Displays the card type, the slots, and channels that
receives the command.
Category—Some cards have different command categories. If the selected
targets have only one command category, this box is grayed out.
Command to Execute—Click this box to select the command you want to
execute for the selected targets.
Force Command—The card may be in a state where the selected
command is normally rejected (for example, a modem in dial mode). Check
this box to override this lockout.
Command Specific Parameter—Commands for some device types
require an additional parameter to be specified when the command is
issued. his parameter is not required for the Total Control chassis.
■
Issued—Indicates whether or not the command was successfully initiated.
■
Result—Indicates the results of the last executed command.
■
Comment—Displays details about failed commands.
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CHAPTER 3: NAVIGATING AND USING THE SYSTEM
■
Execute—Executes the selected command for the selected targets.
■
Close—Closes the Command Tool window.
Software Download
Submenu
The Software Download submenu displays the files to be downloaded for the
specified entity. You then select the files you need to be downloaded. Refer to
Chapter 4 for more information.
Inventory Submenu
The Inventory submenu displays the inventory information for each
component on the selected chassis (IP Telephony Manager Chassis Console
only).
Figure 35 Inventory Window
The Inventory window contains the following fields:
■
Slot #—Each entry in the inventory data table is labeled by its slot number
in the chassis.
■
Description—Textual description of the displayed chassis.
■
Serial Number—Serial number of the component.
■
Product Code—Hardware product code of the component.
■
Hardware version—Hardware version of the component.
■
DRAM (KB)—Amount of dynamic RAM installed in the component.
■
Flash RAM—Amount of flash RAM installed in the component.
■
DIP Switches—A bit field value displaying DIP switch settings currently in
effect.
Graphically, the displayed binary corresponds to settings as follows:
DIP Switch Numbers: 16151413121110987654321
Bit Field Placeholders: 0000000000000000
Where a "1" at any of the above positions means that the corresponding
DIP switch is ON.
Configuration Menu
61
For example, 0000000010010000 means that DIP switches 8 and 5 are ON
and all others are off.
■
Software Version—Version of software currently installed in the
component's flash RAM.
You can perform the following tasks from this window:
■
Save—Saves the inventory data table to an ASCII text file.
■
Exit—Closes the inventory utility.
■
Print—Prints displayed data to a printer or file either in postscript or ASCII
format. Figure 36 shows the Inventory Print menu.
Figure 36 Inventory Print Menu
The Inventory Print menu contains the following selections:
■
■
■
AutoResponse
Submenu
Print Target—Selects whether to print to file or print to a printer.
Print Format—Selects whether to print in postscript format or ASCII text
format.
Print Command—Postscript output is piped to this command. The
TCM_PRINT_COMMAND system parameter sets the default.
The AutoResponse submenu lets you define what messages need to appear
when an event occurs. Refer to Chapter 2 for more information on how to set
the auto response messages (IP Telephony Manager Chassis Console only).
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CHAPTER 3: NAVIGATING AND USING THE SYSTEM
Figure 37 Auto Response Window
The AutoResponse dialog box contains the following fields and buttons:
■
■
■
■
Selected Targets—This box shows the slot(s) or channel(s) selected in the
chassis display.
Event—Click this box to select an event. If you select an event that requires
a descriptor, make sure that you have programmed the descriptor.
Response Script Usage %—This indicator shows the percentage of
available script space you have programmed. Each response may take up a
different amount of script space. Monitor this gauge to avoid programming
too many responses to a single event.
Available Responses/Response Script—The responses available for the
event appear on the left, and the responses configured for the event appear
on the right. Refer to AutoResponse Editing for information about
configuring the list. When you select a response that has descriptors, a
window of descriptor options appears .
■
Add—Assigns the selected response to an event.
■
Delete—Removes the selected response.
■
Delete All—Removes all the selected responses from the Responses
Configured list.
■
Get—Queries the NMC for the response script associated with the event.
■
Set—Assigns the selected response script to the event.
■
Load From—Displays the Load From Device window.
Fault Menu
Fault Menu
63
The Fault menu lets you enable/disable traps and define the trap’s destination.
Figure 38 Fault Menu
Trap Settings Submenu
The Trap Setting submenu defines the traps for the specified entity. Refer to
the individual component user guide for information about setting this for
your VoIP component.
Figure 39 Trap Setting Window
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CHAPTER 3: NAVIGATING AND USING THE SYSTEM
Trap Destination
Submenu
The Trap Destination submenu defines and modifies where the traps are sent.
Refer to the individual component user guide for information about setting
this for your VoIP component.
Figure 40 Trap Destination Window
Performance Menu
The Performance menu lets you define the events on your system that IP
Telephony Manager is to monitor.
Figure 41 Performance Window
Performance Monitor
Submenu
The Performance submenu lets you define the events that you want IP
Telephony Manager to monitor and it then report on those events. You can
also view historical information. Refer to the individual component user guide
for information about setting this for your VoIP component.
Security Menu
65
Figure 42 Performance Monitor Menu
After you click OK, a table, or graph appears showing the events you selected
in real time mode.
Security Menu
The Security menus lets you set the SNMP community strings and maintain the
management capabilities at the selected station.
Figure 43 Security Menu
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CHAPTER 3: NAVIGATING AND USING THE SYSTEM
Community Names
Submenu
The Community Names submenu lets you set the SNMP community strings.
The IP Telephony Manager default value for SNMP community string is public
for read only and private for read-write. To change the default values, you
must first change the community string on the devices and then on IP
Telephony Manager.
For security reasons, you cannot view the community strings through IP
Telephony Manager.
For information about changing the community strings, refer to Changing the
SNMP Community Strings, in Chapter 4.
Authorized Stations
Submenu
The Authorized Stations submenu lets you maintain the management and
security functions for the specified station.
The chassis Network Management Card (NMC) contains an authorized access
list that lets you limit management capability to certain management stations
on your network. After you create entries in the authorized access list, only
those management stations can send SNMP requests to that device.
For information about setting the authorizations for a station, refer to Setting
Authorized Stations, in Chapter 2.
To set up an authorized access list:
1 Open a console window for the device whose authorized access list you want
to change.
2 From the Security menu, select Authorized Stations.
The Authorized Stations window appears.
Figure 44 Authorized Stations Window
The Authorized Station window contains the following buttons:
■
Add—Brings up a dialog box for entry of new authorized stations.
Security Menu
■
■
67
Modify— Brings up a dialog box for changing the network mask or
comment for the selected device. (You must select an entry from the list
before using this button.)
Delete—Deletes the selected entry.
When you click Add, the Authorized Stations Add dialog box appears.
Figure 45 Authorized Stations Add Window
The Authorized Stations Add window contains the following fields:
■
■
■
Destination IP—Displays the IP address of the authorized station.
Network Mask—Displays the network mask for the destination IP address
that defines a range of IP addresses for authorized stations.
Comment—Displays a user-entered description of the station.
4
MAINTENANCE
This chapter describes how to use IP Telephony Manager to upgrade software
and perform general maintenance tasks on CommWorks IP Telephony
Platform cards.
This chapter contains the following topics:
■
Upgrading Software
■
Command Tool
■
Restarting Other Entities
■
Setting Manual Switchovers
■
Changing the SNMP Community Strings
■
Clearing Authorized Access Lists
■
Displaying Inventory Information
Unless otherwise specified, this document uses the generic term edge server to
refer to either the edge server card or the EdgeServer Pro card.
Upgrading Software
You can upgrade the Media Gateway, Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy, and Back-end
Server software using SDL-2. IP Telephony Manager uses SDL-2 functionality to
perform upgrades through SNMP and TFTP using a file structure of .dmf.
You can upgrade the software for the following entities using SDL-2:
Media Gateway:
■
CommWorks SNMP SubAgent
■
OOBMAN
■
HiPer DSP
■
Network Management Card (NMC)
Signalling Servers:
■
CommWorks SNMP SubAgent
■
Gatekeeper
■
SIP Proxy
■
OOBMAN
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CHAPTER 4: MAINTENANCE
Back-end Servers:
■
CommWorks SNMP SubAgent
■
OOBMan
■
Provisioning Server
■
Directory Mapping Server
■
Accounting Server
■
Billing Support Server
Remote upgrades of the above listed firmware cards are also accomplished
through the use of SDL-2. SMS is no longer used for this purpose.
Software Upgrade
Methods
You can transfer and install upgrade files by any of the following methods:
■
■
■
■
CommWorks IP Telephony Manager—IP Telephony Manager is an
SNMP-based management program for the CommWorks platform. IP
Telephony Manager provides tools to transfer files to one or more
components simultaneously over an IP network.
Direct Serial Connection—You can connect a serial cable, with null
modem adapter, between a computer and a serial port on a Total Control
NIC, then transfer a file using any serial communications program that
supports ZMODEM file transfers. Refer to the Total Control 1000 Media
Gateway Guide for more information.
SNMP MIB Browser and TFTP Server—If the other two options are not
available, you can use an SNMP MIB browser and an TFTP Server to upgrade
the firmware over an IP network.
SDL2 Utility—The SDL2 utility runs on Windows NT. You can use it to
upgrade the Media Gateway, SIP Proxy Server, Gatekeeper, and Back-end
Servers as follows:
1 Connect a console, keyboard, and mouse to the server whose software you
want to upgrade.
2 From the console window, open the command line interface.
3 Enter: Sdl2 [-hsv] <DMF filename>
The command line options are:
■
■
■
-h
Help
-v Verbose (Error Messages and installation status appear on the command
line.)
-s Silent Mode (The setup process does not interact with the user. This is
used on headless stations.)
The SDL2 utility:
■
Creates a temporary directory.
Upgrading Software
■
Extracts the CAB file from the DMF file.
■
Extracts the installation files from the CAB file.
■
Runs the setup.
71
Table 9 lists a comparison of the installation methods.
Table 9 Upgrade Option Comparison
Option
Advantages
IP Telephony Manager
■
Includes all necessary tools
■
Can perform remotely
■
Serial Connection
■
Disadvantages
■
Can upgrade more than one
card at a time
Minimal software requirement
(ordinary serial
communications program)
■
■
■
MIB Browser / TFTP Server
■
Can perform remotely
■
■
Upgrading the
Software
Must install IP Telephony
Manager first
Requires a local connection
between NIC and computer
Requires an unusual cable
Can upgrade only one card
at a time
Requires specialized
software
Unfriendly user interface
After you have decided what method you want to install the upgrades, you are
ready to upgrade your system with the current software.
If you need to reload the same version of the software on the Back-end
Servers, you must uninstall the Back-end Server software first.
As an example, the procedures in this section refer to the CommWorks IP
Telephony Media Gateway, specifically the HiPer DSP and HiPer NMC cards.
The software is released as two ZIP files, one for the HiPer DSP and one for the
HiPer NMC.
1 Extract the DMF files using the UNIX unzip command.
The following table lists the contents of the zip file:
Table 10 Zip File Contents
Card
ZIP file
Contents of ZIP file
Contents of EXE file
HiPer DSP
hdm02xxxx.zip
hd02xxxx.dmf
n/a
HiPer NMC
nmcdisk3.zip
hr02xxxx.dmf
hipernmc.exe
hm0704xx.dmf
nmcmibs.exe
several MIB files
2 Copy the DMF files to the /opt/tcm/data/sdl directory.
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CHAPTER 4: MAINTENANCE
If you do not have unzip capabilities on your UNIX system, you can download
the freeware from the internet and install it on your system.
3 Select the component to which you want to download software. The Media
Gateway, Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server or select the Back-end Server.
4 If you selected a server to download to, you are prompted to select an entity.
5 From the Configuration menu, click Software Download.
IP Telephony Manager associates the files with the correct component.
Figure 46 Software Download Dialog Box
6 Click Browse.
A new window appears showing all the software files.
Figure 47 Software Download (Select a File) Window
7 Click the software version you want to send to the selected component and
click OK.
This closes the window and brings you back to the Software Download
window.
8 Click OK to start the software download.
Command Tool
73
When the software download is complete, a green box appears under the
command status.
9 Click OK when finished.
Command Tool
The Command Tool is used to perform hardware and software commands on a
selected component, such as busy-out, disconnect, reset, or save to NVRAM.
As an example, the procedures in this section refer to the CommWorks IP
Telephony Media Gateway.
Launching the
Command Tool
To launch the Command Tool, from the IP Telephony Manager Console
window:
1 Select a card from the IP Telephony Manager Console window.
2 Select Actions/Commands from the Configuration menu on the IP
Telephony Manager Console window.
3 Select the entity the command will be performed for.
You can also launch the Command Tool from:
■
■
Card-Level vs.
Channel-Level
Commands
Command Window
The network management platform network map (either OVW Network
Node Manager or SNM): highlight the icon for a IP Telephony Manager
Console device, then select Actions/Commands from the Configuration
menu.
The UNIX command line: use the xtcmcmd command, specifying the target
device IP address or hostname and the target slots and channels. For
complete syntax for the tcmcmd command, see Appendix B, Command
Line Interface.
For the Media Gateway chassis, there are different command options
depending on whether you select the whole card or individual channels within
a card. See Appendix C for a list of commands for each type of card.
After launching the Command Tool, the Command window appears.
Figure 48 shows the hardware commands that can be executed for the HiPer
DSP card.
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CHAPTER 4: MAINTENANCE
Figure 48 Example HiPer DSP Hardware Commands
Figure 49 shows the software commands that can be executed for the HiPer
DSP card.
Figure 49 Example HiPer DSP Software Commands
1 Select the type of command you want to perform from the Command to
Execute or Category drop-down boxes.
2 Click Execute at the bottom of the window.
3 After executing the command, compare the results with the color-coded key
below the status box.
Restarting Other Entities
75
Figure 50 Example Media Gateway Command Status Color Codes
Restarting Other
Entities
You can restart the Gatekeepers, Back-end Servers, and SIP Proxy Servers
gracefully or by a hard restart. A graceful restart closes all open applications on
the server, closes the operating system, and then restarts the computer, just as
if you restarted the computer from the Windows Start menu. A hard restart
closes the applications, processes, and operating system all at once, just as if
you removed power from the computer. We DO NOT recommend executing a
hard restart.
To restart the Gatekeeper, Back-end Servers, and SIP Proxy Server:
1 Using IP Telephony Manager, open the Media Gateway chassis.
2 Click File, and then click Open.
3 Select the entity you are configuring from the Device List.
4 Click OK.
5 Select the entity icon.
6 From the IP Telephony Manager Console window, select Configuration, then
Actions/Commands.
7 When prompted to select an entity, click Windows NT/OS in the list box, and
then click OK.
8 From the Command to execute menu, select Graceful restart
(recommended) or Hard restart.
9 Click Execute and wait for a successful completion of the command.
10 Click Close.
IP Telephony Manager displays the entity as yellow until the operation
completes. After the restart process is complete, the entity icon appears
normal.
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CHAPTER 4: MAINTENANCE
The entity has been successfully restarted.
Restarting after
Parameter Changes
There are various parameters located under the Configuration menu that can
be set to meet your requirements. The parameters that are prefixed with an
asterisks (*) require that the entity be restarted when changes are made to the
parameter.
The following figure displays some of the parameters with the asterisks (*).
Figure 51 Asterisks Parameter Example
If changes are made to any parameter with an asterisk, the entity selected will
need to be restarted for the new values to be recognized.
If you need to restart the Gateway, you need to restart the edge server Plugin
Manager Service (EPMS). To restart the EPMS, you can either restart the 3Com
Gateway on IP Telephony Manager or stop and start the EPMS service from the
service applet on the Windows NT machine. Refer to the Total Control 1000
Media Gateway Guide for more information.
If you need to restart the Gatekeeper, you can either restart 3Com Gatekeeper
on IP Telephony Manager, or stop and start 3Com VoIP Gatekeeper service
applet on Windows NT machine. Refer to the CommWorks 4200 Gatekeeper
Guide for more information.
Setting Manual Switchovers
77
For the Back-end Servers:
■
■
■
Setting Manual
Switchovers
Accounting Server—restart 3Com Accounting service on IP Telephony
Manager, or stop and start 3Com VoIP Accounting Data service applet on
the Windows NT machine.
Directory Mapping Server—restart 3Com Directory service on IP Telephony
Manager, or stop and start 3Com VoIP Directory Data service applet on the
Windows NT machine.
Provisioning Server—restart MS web server on IP Telephony Manager, or
stop and start World Wide Web Publishing service applet on the Windows
NT machine.
You can force the Gatekeeper to manually switch-over to another Accounting,
Directory Mapping, or Authentication Server.
To set the manual switchover:
1 Using IP Telephony Manager, open the Media Gateway chassis.
2 Click File, and then click Open.
3 Select the Gatekeeper you are configuring from the Device List. If the
Gatekeeper is not listed, see Connecting to Entities in Chapter 1.
4 Click OK.
5 Select the server graphic.
6 Click Actions/Commands from the Configuration menu.
7 When prompted to select an entity, click 3Com Gatekeeper in the list box,
and then click OK.
The Command Tool dialog box appears.
8 Click Switchover Commands in the Category drop-down list.
9 From the Command to Execute drop-down list select Switch Accounting,
Switch Directory, or Switch Authentication.
10 Enter the IP address of the new server in the Command Specific Parameter
field.
11 Click Execute and wait for a successful completion of the command.
The server switch-over has been set.
12 Repeat steps 10 through 12 for each server type to manually switchover.
13 Click Close.
A real time table appears and displays the selected Media Gateway and the
Gatekeeper to which it is registered. The IP address is of the Gatekeeper to
which it is registered is also displayed.
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CHAPTER 4: MAINTENANCE
Changing the SNMP
Community Strings
The IP Telephony Manager default value for SNMP community string is public
for read only and private for read-write. To change the default values you must
first change the community string on the devices and then on IP Telephony
Manager.
For security reasons, you cannot view the community strings through IP
Telephony Manager.
To change the SNMP community strings on the devices, from the IP Telephony
Manager main window:
1 Select Community Name from the Security menu.
Figure 52 Community Name Drop-Down
The Community Name dialog window appears.
Figure 53 Community Name Dialog Window
2 Enter the community string in the Community Name field.
3 Click Set.
Changing the SNMP Community Strings
79
A warning message appears verifying that you are about to change the
community string and that this change will impact any user who tries to
connect to the IP Telephony Manager chassis.
Figure 54 Community String Warning Message
After you make this change, the current active IP Telephony Manager session,
will not be able to modify, or read (depending on how you have reset the
community strings) the current opened chassis until you specify the same
community strings for IP Telephony Manager.
You have changed the SNMP community strings on the devices. The next steps
changes the community string for the IP Telephony Manager. There are two
methods available, either through IP Telephony Manager or through the
Command Line interface.
To change the IP Telephony Manager community string through IP Telephony
Manager:
1 Select File and then Open on the IP Telephony Manager Console window.
2 Select the targeted device from the list.
3 Click Details.
4 The Device Details dialog box appears.
Figure 55 Device Details Dialog Box
5 Enter the new SNMP community string.
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CHAPTER 4: MAINTENANCE
6 Click OK.
7 If you changed the 3Com SNMP Community Strings on the Gatekeeper, SIP
Proxy Server, or any of the Back-end Servers, you must restart the SNMP agent.
Refer to Restarting Other Entities for more information.
To change the IP Telephony Manager community string through the command
line enter:
xtcmvfpd <target chassis IP address> [-c readcomm][-C
writecomm]
where:
■
readcomm—read only community string
■
writecomm—read/write community string
If you changed the 3Com SNMP Community Strings on the Gatekeeper, SIP
Proxy Server, or any of the Back-end Servers, you must restart the SNMP agent.
Refer to Restarting Other Entities for more information.
For more information about this command, refer to Appendix B, Command
Line Interface.
Clearing Authorized
Access Lists
If your management station is listed in the authorized access list:
1 Open a console window for the device whose authorized access list you want
to clear.
2 From that console window, click Security, then Authorized Stations.
3 Click the IP address to be cleared from the authorized access list, and then click
Delete. Repeat this step for each entry until you have deleted all entries.
4 If you changed the authorized access list on the Gatekeeper, SIP Proxy Server,
or any of the Back-end Servers, you must restart the SNMP agent. Refer to
Restarting Other Entities for more information.
If your management station is NOT an authorized station and you need to
clear the access list to gain management capability for a device, you must use
the User Interface on the back of the NMC. Refer to the operator’s guide or
installation manual for that device for instructions on how to use the User
Interface.
Displaying Inventory Information
Displaying Inventory
Information
81
The IP Telephony Manager can display the installed components on your VoIP
system; such as the serial numbers, hardware and software version, DIP switch
settings, and memory for each card.
To display inventory information from the IP Telephony Manager Console
window, click Configuration menu, and then select Inventory.
The Inventory window appears with the information.
Figure 56 Inventory Window
A
Overview
ERROR MESSAGES
Error messages are divided into two types:
■
■
Invocation Errors—result from missing or invalid use of command syntax,
and are reported immediately to stderr. They include:
■
Command Line Target Selection
■
Chassis Restore
■
Chassis Save
■
Command Tool
■
Configuration Tool
■
Software Download
■
Test Tool
■
IP Telephony Manager Console
■
Tone Send/Receive
■
Trap Destination
Execution Errors—result from problems occurring after an application is
successfully launched. They include:
■
All Applications
■
Chassis Restore
■
Chassis Save
■
Command Tool
■
Configuration Tool
■
Test Tool
■
IP Telephony Manager Console
■
Tone send/receive
■
Trap Destination
■
Software Download
84
APPENDIX : ERROR MESSAGES
Invocation Errors
This topic describes the error messages that can occur from a command syntax
error.
The invocation errors categories listed here are:
Command Line Target
Selection
■
Command Line Target Selection
■
Chassis Restore
■
Chassis Save
■
Command Tool
■
Configuration Tool
■
Software Download
■
Test Tool
■
IP Telephony Manager Console
■
Tone Send/Receive
■
Trap Destination
The following are the Command Line Target Selection error messages and a
description of what they indicate.
Range out of order <target specification>
A range is backwards (e.g., S5-3 instead of S3-5).
Slot selection is not allowed <target specification>
The application cannot be invoked at the slot level.
Channel selection is not allowed <target specification>
The application cannot be invoked at channel level (e.g., software download).
Time slot selection is not allowed <target specification>
The application cannot be invoked at time slot level. (True for all except
commands.)
Slot number out of range <target specification>
A slot number refers to a slot out of range for the given type of chassis. (e.g.,
slot 10 in a 7-slot chassis.
Channel number out of range <target specification>
A large channel number (not valid for any IP Telephony Manager card) was
specified.
Channel number out of range at slot <target specification>
A channel number refers to a channel not present on the given type of card in
the selected slot.
Invocation Errors
85
Channel range contains zero: <target specification>
A channel range includes 0 (e.g., S1C0-2).
Time slot range contains zero: <target specification>
A time slot range contains zero.
Expected slot-level target: <target specification>
The target specification began with a slot-level target but also has targets at
some other level.
Expected time slot-level target: <target specification>
The target specification began with a time slot-level target but also has targets
at some other level.
Slot <number> empty: <target specification>
There is no card in the specified slot, based on information available at the last
discovery or IP Telephony Manager Console poll.
Unknown card in slot <number>
The card in the specified slot is unknown and the application does not allow
operation against unknown cards.
Mismatched targets: slot <number>, slot <number>
The two slots contain cards that are not compatible for the present
application’s purposes.
Time slot selection not applicable: <target specification>
There is no time slot-level support for the particular card for which a time slot
specification was given (e.g., the card is not a T1 or ISDN card).
Chassis Restore
The following are the Chassis Restore error messages and what they indicate.
No target specified
The user did not supply an IP address or host name on the command line.
Too many targets specified
The user specified more than one IP address/host name (there is more than one
white space-separated word in the target list).
Chassis Save
The following are the Chassis Save error messages and what they indicate.
Unknown target name or IP address format
The target does not specify a valid IP address or host name.
86
APPENDIX : ERROR MESSAGES
Error, unexpected command line format
The user did not supply an IP address, or (Non-GUI only) did not provide a
filename.
Command Tool
The following are the Command Tool error messages and what they indicate.
Missing -E option
The user did not choose a command to execute using the -E option. (Non-GUI
only)
Missing -G option
The user did not choose a command group using the -G option. (Non-GUI
only)
Non-graphical time slot selection is not supported: <specification>
The user requested time slot selection in the non-GUI by supplying an empty
time slot range (e.g., S1C1T). (Non-GUI only)
Warning: force not supported for this command
The user provided the -F option for a command that does not allow forcing.
The -F option will be ignored. (Non-GUI, warning only)
Error: invalid poll interval value <value> for -p option
The poll interval value given on the command line is not a positive integer.
Error: cannot use -E and -q at the same time
The user specified both a command and a command query. This is not allowed.
Error: No target specified
The user did not supply at least an IP address or host name on the command
line.
Error: Too many targets specified
The user specified more than one IP address/slot-channel combination. (There
is more than one whitespace-separated word in the target list.)
Invalid target format
The target does not specify a valid IP address or host name.
Configuration Tool
The following are the Configuration Tool error messages and what they
indicate.
Error: No target specified
The user did not supply at least an IP address or host name on the command
line.
Invocation Errors
87
Error: Too many targets specified
The user specified more than one IP address/slot-channel combination. (There
is more than one white space-separated word in the target list.)
Invalid target name
The target does not specify a valid IP address or host name.
Software Download
The following are the Software Download error messages and what they
indicate.
Error: No target specified
The user did not supply at least an IP address or host name on the command
line.
Error: Invalid target format
The target does not specify a valid IP address or host name.
Selected Targets do not match each other
Fatal error. Multiple NACs were selected for software download, but one or
more of the selected NACs is not the same card type. Only the first mismatch is
displayed.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility automatically terminates. For xtcmsdl, clicking on the
OK button of the dialog box terminates the utility.
All selected slots are empty
Fatal error. Selected slots do not contain a card.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility automatically terminates. For xtcmsdl, clicking on the
OK button of the dialog box terminates the utility.
extension is not ’NAC’
Fatal Error (tcmsdl). Nonfatal error (xtcmsdl). This error occurs if the specified
SDL file does not have the correct extension (*.nac).
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility terminates. For xtcmsdl, click OK to bring up the
Select Files dialog box and select the correct file.
88
APPENDIX : ERROR MESSAGES
Extension is not ’sdl
’Fatal Error (tcmsdl). Nonfatal error (xtcmsdl). This error occurs if the specified
SDL file does not have the correct extension (*.sdl).
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility terminates. For xtcmsdl, click OK to bring up the Select
Files dialog box and select a NAC file.
No default NAC file
Fatal Error (tcmsdl). Nonfatal error (xtcmsdl). This error occurs if the SDL file
was selected, but the NAC file was not.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility terminates. For xtcmsdl, click OK to bring up the Select
Files dialog box and select a NAC file.
No default SDL file
Fatal Error (tcmsdl). Nonfatal error (xtcmsdl). This error occurs if the NAC file
was selected, but the SDL file was not.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility terminates. For xtcmsdl, click OK to bring up the
Select Files dialog box and select the correct file
<filename> does not match card type <type>
Fatal Error (tcmsdl). Nonfatal error (xtcmsdl). This error occurs if the SDL file
and the NAC file apply to different card types.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility terminates. For xtcmsdl, click OK to bring up the
Select Files dialog box and select the correct file.
Test Tool
The following are the Test Tool error messages and what they indicate.
Error: invalid Loop Back Duration value <value> for -s option
The loopback duration given on the command line is not a positive integer.
Error: cannot use -T and -q at the same time
The user specified both a test and a test query. This is not allowed.
Error: No target specified
The user did not supply at least an IP address or host name on the command
line.
Invocation Errors
89
Error: Too many targets specified
The user specified more than one IP address/slot-channel combination. (There
is more than one white space-separated word in the target list.)
Invalid target format
The target does not specify a valid IP address or host name.
Missing -T option
The user did not choose a test to execute using the -T option. (Non-GUI only)
<target>: Non-Modem Test operation
Reported in the test tool final summary when a command or other
non-modem test result is in the target’s result table. (Non-GUI, warning only)
Program exit during execution
The command or test program was terminated (e.g., by a signal) while a
command or test was in progress. (Warning only)
IP Telephony Manager
Console
The following are the IP Telephony Manager Console error message and what
it indicates.
Error: Too many targets specified
The user specified more than one IP address/host name. (There is more than
one white space-separated word in the target list.)
Tone Send/Receive
The following are the Tone Send/Receive error messages and what they
indicate.
Error: Invalid amplitude value <value>
The amplitude level given on the command line is out of range.
Error: invalid poll interval value <value>
The poll interval value given on the command line is not a positive integer.
Error: invalid test length value <value>
The test duration value given on the command line is not a positive integer
Error: No target specified
The user did not supply an IP address or host name on the command line.
Invalid target specification: <specification>
The target does not specify a valid IP address or host name.
Trap Destination
The following are the Trap Destination error messages and what they indicate.
90
APPENDIX : ERROR MESSAGES
Error: insufficient arguments
A "-a", "-m", or "-d" directive ended unexpectedly.
Error: no target supplied
The user did not supply an IP address or host name on the command line.
Error: invalid target format
The target is not a valid IP address or host name, or contains slot/channel
specifications.
Warning: at most 256 trap commands accepted.
The user specified more than 256 "-a", "-m", or "-d" directives. The
remaining directives will be ignored.
Unexpected argument: <argument>
A directive other than "-a", "-m", or "-d" was seen on the command line.
Warning: trap directives on GUI command line are ignored.
The user provided "-a", "-m", or "-d" directives to the GUI (xtcmtrap).
Execution Errors
This section describes all error messages that can occur as after an application
is successfully launched.
The execution errors categories listed here are:
All Applications
■
All Applications
■
Chassis Restore
■
Chassis Save
■
Command Tool
■
Configuration Tool
■
Test Tool
■
IP Telephony Manager Console
■
Tone send/receive
■
Trap Destination
■
Software Download
The following are the Execution error messages for all applications and what
they indicate.
Execution Errors
91
Error constructing target specification...hostname no longer valid?
The user was prompted for target slot/channels using the chassis selection
dialog. After targets were selected, the construction of a target failed,
probably because an IP host name could not be found in the hosts database
even though the host name was valid at program initialization. (The host
database has probably been changed or is no longer accessible.)
Target not responding because NMC is in a software download state. Please wait until software
download is completed.
The NMC is being actively downloaded, or a download was initiated and not
finished. It will not respond to SNMP requests until download is completed.
NMC in software download state!
The NMC is being actively downloaded, or a download was initiated and not
finished. It will not respond to SNMP requests until download is completed.
SNMP Get: <error>
An error occurred while IP Telephony Manager was issuing an SNMP operation:
either a timeout or an SNMP protocol error. If it is a protocol error, the SNMP
variable information in the error response can be seen in the IP Telephony
Manager log (e.g., syslog).
SNMP Get-Next: <error>
An error occurred while IP Telephony Manager was issuing an SNMP operation:
either a timeout or an SNMP protocol error. If it is a protocol error, the SNMP
variable information in the error response can be seen in the IP Telephony
Manager log (e.g., syslog).
SNMP Set: <error>
An error occurred while IP Telephony Manager was issuing an SNMP operation:
either a timeout or an SNMP protocol error. If it is a protocol error, the SNMP
variable information in the error response can be seen in the IP Telephony
Manager log (e.g., syslog).
Cannot find device files for NMC version <version>!
IP Telephony Manager is communicating with an NMC version too recent for it.
Contact CommWorks sales personnel for a newer version of IP Telephony
Manager.
This device is not a IP Telephony Chassis. Exiting.
IP Telephony Manager was launched against an SNMP device that was not an
Enterprise Network Hub or Modem Pool.
Missing or invalid card.dat file!
IP Telephony Manager has a corrupt device configuration schema, or other
internal error.
92
APPENDIX : ERROR MESSAGES
Missing or invalid device.dat file!
IP Telephony Manager has a corrupt device configuration schema, or other
internal error.
Missing or invalid software.dat file!
IP Telephony Manager has a corrupt device configuration schema, or other
internal error.
IP Telephony Manager Discovery error: <specific error>
An error occurred in attempting to launch IP Telephony Manager against a
chassis (e.g., the discovery process timed out or had some other error).
Invalid host name: <name>
IP Telephony Manager was launched against a host name not in the hosts
database.
Target Selection Error
The user was prompted for target slot/channels using the chassis selection
dialog. After targets were selected, an internal error occurred.
Chassis Restore
The following are the Chassis Restore error messages and what they indicate.
Configuration parse error: <specific error>
The chassis configuration file being restored is invalid and the restore will not
occur. (Nonfatal configuration parse warnings are also produced.)
File is not a Chassis Configuration File
The user specified a file that does not begin with the CommWorks chassis
configuration file header.
Can’t access <filename>
The user specified a file that does not exist or is not readable.
<filename> is a directory.
The user specified a file that is a directory. Only plain text files may be
restored.
There is no matching configuration to restore
The chassis configuration file being restored contains no parameters to be
restored, or those sections which actually match working target slots (if any)
contain no parameters.
Restore was unsuccessful
At least one of the slots being restored experienced an SNMP error or other
serious failure. ("Bad cards" that are skipped by the restore are not counted in
this evaluation.)
Execution Errors
93
The selected configuration file was saved from a chassis of a different size. Continue?
Select either Yes or No.
.whb file does not match chassis size
Fatal error unless -F (force mismatch) is specified.
The selected configuration file is from a chassis with a different card configuration. Continue?
Select either Yes or No.
Chassis Save
The following are the Chassis Save error messages and what they indicate.
<file> already used by another process
Another program is currently saving to the specified file.
error opening <file>
<file> is on a remote machine.
link to that machine is no longer active
A remote mount of the file is not working.
unable to lock <file>
The lock mechanism that prevents two users from writing the same file is in
deadlock (due to a system error or unusual race condition).
There is no matching configuration to save
No working, known cards in the chassis contain any configurable parameters
to be saved.
Command Tool
The following are the Command Tool error messages and what they indicate.
An unrecoverable error has occurred.
An SNMP error or other problem prevented the cycle of commands from being
issued to all target devices. The user may retry the command if desired (GUI);
fatal in non-GUI. Detailed error information may be available in the IP
Telephony Manager log.
Unrecoverable error
An SNMP error or other problem prevented the cycle of commands from being
issued to all target devices. The user may retry the command if desired (GUI);
fatal in non-GUI. Detailed error information may be available in the IP
Telephony Manager log.
Error in time slot specification
The user was prompted for target time slots; after selection, an internal error
occurred. (GUI only)
94
APPENDIX : ERROR MESSAGES
There are no commands for this type of device.
The device configuration files do not list any commands for the target device.
Invalid group name: <name>
The device configuration files do not list <name> as a valid group.
Invalid command: <name>
The device configuration files do not list <name> as a valid command within
the current group.
Slot <number> T1/PRI query: <specific error>
An error occurred in trying to verify or solicit a time slot range specified against
a T1 or ISDN card.
Invalid time slot range for card: <specification>
The user specified a time slot range which includes time slot numbers not valid
for the given type of card.
Command Specific Parameter exceeds maximum length of <length>
The user entered a command parameter that was too long (GUI only). The
command will not be executed.
Slot <number>: graphical selection of time slots in this card is not supported.
IP Telephony Manager is not able to present a selection dialog for the given
card. (The card type is not supported by this particular version of IP Telephony
Manager.)
<target>: Non-command operation
Reported in the command tool final summary when a modem test or other
non-command result is in the target’s result table. (Non-GUI, warning only.)
Cancel Execution and exit program?
Issued in a "Yes/No" dialog when user quits from window frame while
command/test is in progress. (GUI, warning only)
Program exit during execution
The command or test program was terminated (e.g., by a signal) while a
command or test was in progress. (Non-GUI, warning only)
Configuration Tool
The following are the Configuration Tool error messages and what they
indicate.
This device is not the same type as target(s).
The "load from" source does not match the target devices whose new values
are to be loaded.
Execution Errors
95
Cannot load between channel and card levels
The "load from" source is at channel level while the target devices are at card
level, or vice versa.
Missing device configuration file
There is no configuration schema file for the target devices.
There are no configurable parameters for this type of card
The target slot or channel has no configurable parameters.
Modification(s) in current group will be overwritten. Proceed with update?
Issued in a "Yes/No" dialog when the user selects "get" in a group that has
un-set modifications. (Warning only)
Modification(s) in all groups will be overwritten. Proceed with loading?
Issued in a "Yes/No" dialog when the user selects "load from" and there are
groups that have un-set modifications. (Warning only)
Test Tool
The following are the Test Tool error messages and what they indicate.
No defined tests to execute
The device configuration files do not list any tests for the target device.
Invalid Test: <string>
The specified test is not in the list of valid tests.
Selected device is not a modem
Test Tool may be invoked only against modems.
No "Software Commands" found
The Test Tool could not locate the list of tests within the "Software
Commands" group of the device configuration file. This indicates a probable
internal error or corrupt device configuration schema.
An unrecoverable error has occurred.
An SNMP error or other problem prevented the cycle of tests from being issued
to all target devices. The user may retry the test if desired. Detailed error
information may be available in the IP Telephony Manager log.
Unrecoverable error
An SNMP error or other problem prevented the cycle of tests from being issued
to all target devices. The user may retry the test if desired. Detailed error
information may be available in the IP Telephony Manager log.
<target>: Non-Modem Test operation
Reported in the test tool final summary when a command or other
non-modem test result is in the target’s result table. (Non-GUI, warning only)
96
APPENDIX : ERROR MESSAGES
Cancel Execution and exit program?
Issued in a "Yes/No" dialog when user quits from window frame while
command/test is in progress. (GUI, warning only)
Program exit during execution
The command or test program was terminated (e.g., by a signal) while a
command or test was in progress. (Non-GUI, warning only)
IP Telephony Manager
Console
The following are the IP Telephony Manager Console error messages and what
they indicate.
There are other IP Telephony Manager console(s) viewing this chassis from your system. (This is not a
problem as long as you are coordinating your usage with other users.)
A IP Telephony Manager Console has already been opened on the current
system against the given chassis. That console is performing chassis polling
and providing chassis internal status to all IP Telephony Manager applications
at the time they are launched. The IP Telephony Manager Console reporting
this message will poll chassis status independently of the first console, but will
not provide chassis status information to other IP Telephony Manager
applications. (Warning only)
Could not acquire ownership of chassis status file. Launched processes will perform their own
discovery.
This usually means that the user launching the IP Telephony Manager Console
does not have write ownership of the chassis status information file for this
chassis. This can occur if a user such as root opens a IP Telephony Manager
Console and exits it, and other users then launch IP Telephony Manager
Console. (The file can be manually removed in this case; it resides in
/tmp/vfpd.<ip-hex> where <ip-hex is the hexadecimal representation of the IP
address.) (Warning only)
Internal error acquiring chassis status file. Launched processes may perform their own discovery.
An unknown error occurred in trying to update the chassis status information
file for this chassis. (The IP Telephony Manager log may provide more
information.) (Warning only)
<command>: exec failed: <reason>
IP Telephony Manager Console experienced an error when trying to launch a IP
Telephony Manager application. This is printed on the controlling terminal of
the IP Telephony Manager console (the terminal from which IP Telephony
Manager console or its parent was launched).
Tone send/receive
The following are the Tone send/receive error messages and what they
indicate.
Invalid slot number: <number>
The target slot is not a NAC slot number.
Execution Errors
97
Selected device is not a modem
The target slot is not a modem.
Channel number out of range: <number>
The target channel number is invalid for the particular type of card.
No DS0 assigned to modem. Test aborted.
The modem does not have a time slot assignment and tone test is therefore
impossible.
Extra targets, only the first will be used
The user selected more than one modem when invoking a tone test. The first
specified modem will be used, and the others ignored. (Warning only)
Extra command argument after target: <string>
Unused information was seen at the end of the command line and will be
ignored. (Warning only)
Receive ignores frequency/amplitude command arguments
Receive Tone was invoked with frequency/amplitude arguments, which will be
ignored. (Warning only)
Test in progress. Stop it before exiting?
Issued in a "Yes/No" dialog when user quits from window frame while a tone
test is in progress. (GUI, warning only)
Trap Destination
The following are the Trap Destination error messages and what they indicate.
Invalid IP address: <ip-addr>
The IP address entered is not a valid dot-notation IP address or host name in
the host database.
You must enter an IP Address!
When adding a trap destination, the user entered a blank IP address/host
name. (GUI only)
String ’invalid’ may not be used
The community string ’invalid’ is a reserved value and is not allowed to be
entered as data. (GUI only)
Community string too long. Truncate?
Issued in an "OK/Cancel" dialog when a community string and/or comment is
entered that is too long. (GUI, warning only)
Comment too long. Truncate?
Issued in an "OK/Cancel" dialog when a community string and/or comment is
entered that is too long. (GUI, warning only)
98
APPENDIX : ERROR MESSAGES
Community string and Comment too long. Truncate?
Issued in an "OK/Cancel" dialog when a community string and/or comment is
entered that is too long. (GUI, warning only)
Trap query overrides -a/-m/-d
The user specified both -q (query) and -a/-m/-d (table manipulation)
arguments; only -q will be used. (Non-GUI, warning only)
Nothing to do
No trap destination-modifying arguments were given on the command line.
(Non-GUI, warning only)
Community string longer than <number> chars: <string>
The specified string exceeded the size limit for community strings. (Non-GUI,
warning only)
Comment longer than <number> chars: <string>
The specified string exceeded the size limit for community strings. (Non-GUI,
warning only)
String ’invalid’ may not be used
The community string ’invalid’ is a reserved value and is not allowed to be
entered as data. (Non-GUI, warning only)
Software Download
The following are the Software Download error messages and what they
indicate.
IP Telephony Manager Discovery Error: Device not responding
Fatal error. The Software Download utility was unable to discover some or all
of the cards in the chassis.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility automatically terminates. For xtcmsdl, clicking OK of
the dialog box terminates the utility.
Target is not responding because its NMC is in the software download state\loading NAC file\. Please
load target when NMC download is completed.
Fatal error. The Software Download utility was unable to discover the chassis
objects because the NMC was in a Software Download state-either erasing
Flash ROM or loading the NAC file.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility automatically terminates. For xtcmsdl, clicking OK of
the dialog box terminates the utility.
Execution Errors
99
<filename> does not exist
Fatal Error (tcmsdl). Nonfatal error (xtcmsdl). This error occurs if you selected a
filename that does not exist.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility terminates. For xtcmsdl, click OK to bring up the
Select Files dialog box and select the correct file.
No Default SDL File for Card Type <type>
Fatal Error (tcmsdl). Nonfatal error (xtcmsdl). This error occurs if there are no
SDL/NAC files for the selected card type in the default /$TCMHOME/data/sdl
directory.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility terminates. For xtcmsdl, click OK to bring up the
Select Files dialog box and select the correct file.
<filename> is corrupt
<filename> has a corrupt header marker
<filename> has wrong software type
<filename> has a crc error
Fatal Error (tcmsdl). Nonfatal error (xtcmsdl). This error occurs if the internal
header or the SDL or NAC file is incorrect.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility terminates. For xtcmsdl, click OK to bring up the Select
Files dialog box and select an uncorrupted SDL or NAC file. If one is not
available, you will have to acquire an uncorrupted version from the
CommWorks BBS or Internet FTP site.
Devices are not ready yet. This could be due to a previously aborted SDL followed by a premature
new SDL. Please try waiting a few minutes or invoking a hardware reset on the affected cards.
Fatal error. This error occurs if the target card is communicating with the
Software Download utility, but is unable to accept a software download.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility automatically terminates. For xtcmsdl, clicking OK of
the dialog box terminates the utility.
100 APPENDIX : ERROR MESSAGES
SNMP Set Failed
Fatal error. This error occurs if the target card is communicating with the
Software Download utility, but does not respond correctly to a SNMP Set
command. The exact SNMP error is displayed.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility automatically terminates. For xtcmsdl, clicking the OK
button of the dialog box terminates the utility.
SNMP Get Failed
Fatal error. This error occurs if the target card did not respond to an SNMP Get
request. The exact error is also displayed.
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility automatically terminates. For xtcmsdl, clicking the OK
button of the dialog box terminates the utility.
Erase ROM time out
Fatal error. This error occurs if the target card’s Flash ROM is not erased within
the specified timeout (600 seconds).
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility automatically terminates. For xtcmsdl, clicking the OK
button of the dialog box terminates the utility.
TFTP: <error>
Fatal Error: This is a series of errors that can occur when the Software
Download utility is overwriting the target card’s configuration with the new
code. Such errors include:
■
file not found
■
file already exists
■
no such user
■
time out
■
disk full or allocation exceeded
■
■
■
■
access violation; this could indicate a corrupt or incorrectly named file. This
error occurs if a NAC is pulled out of its slot while the download is taking
place.
illegal TFTP transfer ID; this occurs if there is an internal NMC or chassis
error during downloading.
undefined error code
For tcmsdl, an error message is displayed on the screen or output to the log
file, and then the utility automatically terminates. For xtcmsdl, clicking the
OK button of the dialog box terminates the utility.
B
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
The command line interface consists of a number of non-interactive
commands or utilities. These utilities are run at the command line from a shell
prompt or a shell script.
This appendix contains the following catatorgies of commands:
General Syntax
■
General Syntax
■
IP Telephony Manager Console
■
Configuration
■
Actions/Commands
■
Set Trap Destination
■
Monitoring SNMP Parameters
■
Tone Test
■
Modem Tests
■
Device Save and Restore
■
Software Download
■
Feature Enable
■
Inventory
■
Authorized Station Tool
■
AutoResponse
The following command parameters are available for all utilities:
[x]command [-l logfile] [-h] [-c readcomm] [-C
writecomm] target
Brackets indicate that the parameter is optional. Italics indicates the value to be
supplied by you.
Where:
[x]command
102 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
An "x" placed at the beginning of any IP Telephony Manager command omits
command parameters and the target slot and channel designation-only the
target IP address or hostname is required. Graphic user interfaces (GUIs), such
as the IP Telephony Manager device display, appear and assist you in selecting
component parameters and targets.
When using the "x" prefix, for any IP Telephony Manager command, only the
target IP address or hostname is required. All other parameters are optional.
For example, if you want to make a modem go off hook, you could simply
send the following command:
xtcmcmd 192.78.203.68
First, the device display appears, allowing you to select targets for the
command. After you select your targets, the Command window appears,
allowing you to select and execute the Off Hook command.
[-l logfile]
The filename for the log
If omitted from the command line, messages are sent to the screen by default
(handled as stderr).
If using the x prefix, messages are sent to syslog
To send messages to syslog by default, specify "-" (hyphen) in place of logfile
("-l-" can be sent by itself, it doesn’t have to be included in the command
line).
The "-l-" command also changes the GUI default log output to stderr.
(-h)
This switch can be used by itself to display the syntax for a given utility.
General Syntax 103
For instance, to display Help for the Software Download utility, type the
following command:
tcmsdl -h
[-c readcomm][-C writecomm]
readcomm—read only community string
writecomm—read/write community string
Used to specify the SNMP community strings that have been assigned to the
device. Note that these switches are optional, but can be used to override IP
Telephony Manager’s initialization file settings.
Target
For all utilities, you must specify the IP address or hostname for the device on
which the operation is to be performed. Some utilities require a more specific
target designation that includes slot and channel. T1 cards also allow timeslot
designations for some utilities.
The x command prefix requires only the IP address or hostname, even if the
command calls for specific slots and channels.
The following format is for an unlimited number of targets within the same
device:
IPhost:[ [Srange [Crange[Trange] ] ],
[ [Srange [Crange[Trange] ] ], . . .
where:
Iphost
The IP address or hostname of the target device.
Range
A single integer or a range of integers (for example, 1-4).
:
(colon)
Place after the IPhost designation.
,
(comma)
Place between slot groups.
104 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
S
Sets target slots in the specified range
C
Sets target channels in the specified range. If omitted, execution at the card
level is assumed.
T
Sets target timeslots in the specified range. If omitted, execution at the
channel (span line) level is assumed. When used with the Command Tool, this
part of the target can be given as T (without a range) and you will be
prompted for a timeslot (for xtcmcmd only).
Only one type of component can be selected at a time. For example you can
select all HiPer DSP channels, but you CANNOT select a HiPer DSP channel and
a T1 DS0.
Target Examples:
193.77.205.45
193.77.205.45:S3C4,S4C1,S5C2-4
193.77.205.45:S3-12C1-4
scotty:S17
scotty:S1C2T2-12
IP Telephony
Manager Console
To launch the IP Telephony Manager Console, use one of the following
commands:
# xtcmvfpd
or
# xtcmvfpd <target chassis IP address>
The first command causes a list of the chassis components to display and then
you can select the component that you want to start. The second command
specifies the IP address of the component that you want started.
Configuration 105
Configuration
The configuration command line interface (CLI) uses the following syntax:
tcmget command:
tcmget [-h] [-l logfile] [-c readcomm] [-C writecomm]
[-z] [-L] [-a] [-f file] [-F] [-G group
[parameter]...]... target
tcmset command:
tcmset [-c readcomm] [-C writecomm] [-h] [-l logfile]
[-z] [-L] [-f filename] -G group parameter value
[parameter value]...target
The options and parameters for the tcmget and tcmset commands are
described below. Parameters are shown in parenthesis after the flag name as
appropriate.
-c (readcomm)
SNMP read community string.
-C (writecomm)
SNMP write community string.
-h
Displays this help message.
-l (logfile)
Log file for system diagnostic messages. GUI default: log to UNIX syslog; CLI
default: stderr. Specify ’-’ (hyphen) to reverse these two behaviors.
-z
Disable set logging for this application.
-L
List all groups, or if -G is provided, list parameters for each group specified as
part of a -G argument.
106 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
-f (filename)
■
■
tcmget: Place the result output of the get operation in a file given by
<filename> (stdout can be designated using a filename of ’-’).
tcmset: Read the output of the get operation from the file given by
<filename> and use it to set the values. For example:
tcmset -f <filename> 192.77.203.74:s17
-a
This flag is available in the tcmget command only.
Store output in ’argument’ format.
When used with -f, this allows the data in the output file to be supplied to a
later tcmset operation, using commands like:
tcmset -f <filename> target
(This is most appropriate if there is only one current target being retrieved.)
-F
This flag is available in the tcmget command only.
List full name of each parameter in the result output. Otherwise, the
abbreviated parameter names supplied in the -G argument will be used.
-G (group)
Selects a group, followed by a list of parameters within that group which are
to be retrieved (for tcmget) or set (for tcmset). (For example, ’NMC
Identification’.)
Group specifications must appear after all other command arguments, and
before the target.
Group names are matched using substring comparison against the list of
known group names for the target. Substrings that match at the beginning of
a group name have precedence over substrings that match internally.
Configuration 107
(parameter)
Parameter whose value is to be printed (for tcmget) or set (for tcmset). (For
example, ’Serial Number’.)
Each parameter should be separated by a space and requires proper shell
quoting. At least one parameter should be supplied per group, unless -L (list
parameters by group) is specified.
Parameter names are matched using substring comparison against the list of
known parameter names within the currently selected group. Substring
matching has the same ’initial match priority’ and ambiguity rules as for group
name matching.
(value)
This parameter is available in the tcmset command only.
Value of the parameter. Parameters can be one of the following value types:
■
Integer—Decimal numeric value.
■
Display String—Printable characters, suitably quoted.
■
■
■
■
Octet String—Printable characters, or an ASCII hex string beginning with
'0x' (any string starting with '0x' is assumed to be ASCII hex).
IP Address—IP dot notation.
Object Identifier—Must be a valid numeric object identifier (e.g.
1.3.6.1.4.1.429...)
Enumeration—An enumeration, specified using substring match against
the list of known for this variable (as seen in the Programmed Settings GUI).
Rules for substring match similar to those for group and parameter names
(see the "-G" option above).
Parameter types may be determined by using the -L option
(target)
108 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Specifies slots or channels to be issued commands. Target has the following
format:
<IP-host>:S<s-range>[,C<c-range>][,S<s-range>
[,C<c-range>]...]
where IP-host can be IP-dot notation, or a host name that is defined in the
host database or /etc/hosts file.
■
■
:S<s-range>—decimal number or a range s1-s2 (where s1 and s2 are
decimal numbers and - is a literal hyphen) representing the location of
card(s) within the chassis.
:C<c-range>—decimal number or a range c1-c2 (where c1 and c2 are
decimal numbers and - is a literal hyphen) representing the location of
channel(s) on the specified card(s).
tcmget examples:
tcmget -G ’NMC Identification’ ’Serial Number’
192.77.203.74:S17
(or using substring matching rules)
tcmget -G ’nmc id’ ’serial number’ 192.77.203.74:S17
To list parameters in NMC tests and system group:
tcmget -L -G ’nmc tests’ -G ’system group’
192.77.203.74:S17
tcmset examples:
tcmset -G ’DTE Interface Settings’ ’Default DTE Data
Rate’ BPS19K\ mychas:s3c1
(or using substring matching rules)
tcmset -G ’dte int’ ’dte data rate’ bps19k mychas:s3c1
To list parameters in NMC Logging Group and Logging Traps Group:
tcmset -L -G ’logging gr’ -G ’logging tr’
192.77.203.74:S17
Actions/Commands 109
Actions/Commands
The command utility uses the following syntax:
tcmcmd [-q] -E command -G group [-P parameter][-F][-p
seconds]target
Query Current
Command Status (-q)
Where:
[-q]
Displays the result of the last issued command the selected targets
Example:
tcmcmd [-q]target
-E command
command—a substring of valid commands
A substring match to the beginning of a command string has precedence over
internal matches. For example, "res" executes the Restore from NVRAM
command rather than the Software Reset command. Matching is case
insensitive. Spaces in the command name must be quoted properly according
to shell rules.
Command substrings can mean different commands depending on which
group is selected and whether the command is being executed at the slot level
or channel level. For example, for a modem, "reset" will perform a Hardware
Reset at the slot level, but a Software Reset at the channel level. For a T1 card,
"software" will initiate a Software Download if the Hardware group is
selected, but a Software Reset if the Software group is selected.
-G group
The command type, hardware or software.
[-P parameter]
The parameter to be supplied with command. Required for some devices, but
can be omitted where not used.
[-F]
The component may be in a state where the selected command is normally
rejected (for example, a modem in dial mode). Include this switch to force the
command to execute, regardless of the safeguards. Not all commands use this
feature.
110 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
[-p seconds]
Sets amount of time, in seconds, between polls.
Target
Follows general syntax. Note that if you omit a channel range, the command is
assumed to be targeted at the slot level. This applies as well to timeslot
designations for commands sent to T1 cards-if the timeslot is omitted, the
command will issued at the channel (span) level.
Set Trap Destination
The following commands are used to define where the traps are to send there
output.
Except for the general syntax, the following trap destination-specific syntax
must appear after the target designation in the command string.
To List Current Trap Destination Entries (-q)
Use the following command:
tcmtrap target -q
To Add a Trap
Destination Entry (-a)
Use the following command, notice that the target must be supplied.
tcmtrap target [-a ipaddr trapcomm comment]
Where:
ipaddr—IP address of destination device to be added.
trapcomm—Community string to supply with trap.
comment—Insert a descriptive comment—use shell quoting if necessary.
To Modify a Trap
Destination Entry (-m)
Use the following command to change a current entry, where ipaddr is the IP
address of the entry to change, and the other parameters are the information
that will replace the old information.
tcmtrap target [-m ipaddr trapcomm comment]
To Delete a Trap
Destination Entry (-d)
To delete a trap destination entry, use the following command, where ipaddr is
the IP address of the entry to be deleted:
tcmtrap target [-d ipaddr]
SNMP Commands 111
SNMP Commands
This describes how to set SNMP community strings and how to monitor the
SNMP parameters.
For security reasons, you can not view the community strings through IP
Telephony Manager.
Setting SNMP
Community Strings
This section describes how to set the SNMP community strings.
[x]tcmcs [-h] [-c] readCommunity [-C] writeCommunity
[-z] target
Where:
-c readcomm
SNMP read community string.
-C writecomm
SNMP write community string.
-h
Displays this help message.
-l logfile
Log file for system diagnostic messages. GUI default: log to UNIX syslog; CLI
default: stderr. Specify ’-’ (hyphen) to reverse these two behaviors.
-z
Disable set logging for this application.
target
IP-address or hostname (in hosts database e.g. /etc/hosts) of the chassis to be
configured.
Monitoring SNMP
Parameters
This section describes how to monitor any SNMP parameter and export the
results in comma separated version (CSV) format.
tcmperf [-l logfile] [-h] [-c readcomm] [-C writecomm]
[-z] [-L] [-f filename] [-D delimiter]
[-p poll interval] [-s # of samples]
[-G group [parameter]...]... target
112 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Where:
-l (logfile)
Log file for system diagnostic messages. GUI default: log to UNIX syslog; CLI
default: stderr. Specify ’-’ (hyphen) to reverse these two behaviors.
-h
Displays this help message.
-c (readcomm)
SNMP read community string.
-C (writecomm)
SNMP write community string.
-z
Disable set logging for this application.
-L
List all groups, or if -G is provided, list parameters for each group specified as
part of a -G argument.
-f (filename)
Specifies the file to which to save the query result.
-D (delimiter)
Supplies field separators for a saved file.
If this is omitted, fields are padded with spaces to make columns line up.
-p
Specifies time between polls num in seconds. Default = 1.
-s
Specifies duration num in seconds. Default = 10.
SNMP Commands 113
-G (BI)
Selects a group, followed by a list of parameters within that group which are
to be retrieved. (For example, ’NMC Identification’.)
Group specifications must appear after all other command arguments, and
before the target.
Group names are matched using substring comparison against the list of
known group names for the target. Substrings that match at the beginning of
a group name have precedence over substrings that match internally.
(parameter)
Parameter whose value is to be printed. (For example, ’Serial Number’.)
Each parameter should be separated by a space and requires proper shell
quoting. At least one parameter should be supplied per group, unless -L (list
parameters by group) is specified.
Parameter names are matched using substring comparison against the list of
known parameter names within the currently selected group. Substring
matching has the same ’initial match priority’ and ambiguity rules as for group
name matching.
(target)
Specifies slots or channels to be issued commands. Target has the following
format:
<IP-host>:S<slot>E<entity>
where IP-host can be IP-dot notation, or a host name that is defined in the
host database or /etc/hosts file
■
■
slot—a decimal number or a range 1 or 2 (where 1 and 2 are decimal
numbers) representing the location of the host/card within the chassis.
entity—the system software (residing on the host) on which the results
display.
Example:
tcmperf -c public -C private -f jwtest -D , -G ’System
Time’ ’System Time’ 149.112.207.30:S1E’Windows NT/OS’
114 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Tone Test
Send Tone Test (-S)
This section describes how to send and receive a tone test.
The following command causes the modem to send a tone of the specified
frequency, duration, and amplitude.
tcmtone -S[-t][-s num][-p num]
[freq[hz][level[db]]]target
Where:
-S
Initiates send tone test.
-t
Leave in test mode after exiting program.
-s
Specifies duration number in seconds. Default = 10.
-p
Specifies time between polls num in seconds. Default = 1.
Freq
Specifies frequency. Must be one of the following: 404, 1004, 2804. Default =
404. If specified, frequency must appear after all other flags and before level
and target.
Hz
Optional (ignored). "hz" or "Hz" can be included for clarity.
Level
Specifies amplitude (integer) in dBm. Valid range = 0 to -43. Default = 0. If
specified, frequency must immediately precede level.
Db
Optional (ignored). "db" or dBm" can be included for clarity.
Modem Tests 115
Receive Tone Test (-R)
Use the following command to receive a tone test:
tcmtone -R [-t] [-s num] [-p num] target
Modem Tests
tcmtest -T test [-s num] target
Query Current Test
Status
To query a modem to determine whether a test is already in progress, send the
following command:
tcmtest [-q] target
Test Type (-T)
-T test
Where:
test = modem test type substring. Select from the following list of tests:
■
Local Analog Loop Back
■
Local Digital Loop Back
■
Remote Digital Loop Back
■
V54 Local Analog Loop Back
■
V54 Remote Digital Loop Back
■
Self Tests
■
Test RAM
■
Test ROM
■
Test NVRAM
■
Idle Phone Line Test
A substring match to the beginning of a command string has precedence over
internal matches. For example, "local analog" executes the Local Analog Loop
Back test, not the V54 Local Analog Loop Back test. Matching is case
insensitive. Spaces in the command name must be quoted properly according
to shell rules.
Duration (-s)
[-s num]
num = number of seconds to remain in loop back mode. Default = 60
116 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Device Save and
Restore
The following commands are used to save and restore the configuration on the
specified device.
Save Configuration
tcmsave -f filename target
Where:
filename
The .whb output file to which the configuration is stored.
target
The IP address or hostname of the device.
For example:
tcmsave -f chassis1.whb 192.77.203.66
In this example, the utility saves the configuration data from the chassis with
the IP address of 193.72.205.76 to a file called CHASSIS1.WHB.
Restore Configuration
To run tcmrestore, issue the following command:
tcmrestore -f filename [-F] target
Where:
filename
Filename of the .whb file with the configuration to be restored.
-F
Force restore. Restore configuration from .whb file regardless of component
mismatch.
For example:
tcmrestore -f chassis1.whb 192.77.203.98
In this example, tcmrestore is using the file CHASSIS1.WHB to restore the
configuration to the chassis with the IP address of 192.77.203.98.
Software Download 117
Software Download
To run tcmsdl, issue the following command:
tcmsdl [-s sdlfile] [-n nacfile] [-F] [-v] target
Where:
sdlfile
The SDL file name (if omitted, uses latest version available for card type).
nacfile
The NAC file name (if omitted, uses latest version available for card type).
-F
Force download to an NMC that is already in a download state.
Default directory for .nac and .sdl files is $TCMHOME/data/sdl.
For example:
tcmsdl -s qf020202.sdl -n qf030000.nac
192.77.203.127:S11-12
This example uses the Quad Modem SDL file qf020202.sdl and Quad Modem
NAC file qf030000.nac to update the modem code in slots 11 and 12 of the
chassis with IP address 192.77.203.127.
Upgrade File
Identification
SDL and NAC filenames contain identifying information about card type,
version level, and file type. The examples below show how to interpret this
information from the filename:
Table 11 Sample Breakdown of SDL and NAC Filenames
Filename
Card-specific Prefix
Version #
File Type
nm040100.nac
nm
4.1.0
NAC
qf030005.nac
qf
3.0.5
NAC
li010101.sdl
li
1.1.1
SDL
118 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Filename Prefixes
Filename prefixes indicate which component type uses a given SDL or NAC file.
In most cases, the NAC and SDL files for a given component have the same
prefix. There are some exceptions, such as the Single T1 Card, as shown in the
table below:
Table 12 Filename Prefixes
Software Download
Progress Messages
SDL Prefix
Card/Entity
hd
T1 HiPer DSP
he
E1 HiPer DSP
hr
E1/R2 HiPer DSP
hm
HiPer NMC
vs
3Com SNMP SubAgent (Gateway only)
vm
3Com SNMP Agent (VoIP Server only)
vg
Gateway
vk
Gatekeeper
vp
Provisioning Server
va
Accounting Server
vd
Directory Server
vh
Accounting Server
vt
Authentication Server
vn
SIP Proxy Server
The Software Download utility displays the following messages or writes them
to the log file:
Table 13 Software Download Progress Message Descriptions
Message
Description
Additional Information
BEGIN
Software Download utility invoked
Command is issued from the UNIX
shell
BDISC
Begin chassis discovery
IP address
EDISC
End chassis discovery
IP address
BCONN
Begin connection to chassis
IP address
CONN
Chassis connection established
IP address
BSDL
Begin downloading SDL file
SDL file name, IP address, slot(s)
ESDL
End downloading SDL file
SDL file name, IP address, slot(s)
BERASE
Begin erasing target card’s Flash
ROM
IP address, slot(s)
ERASE
End erasing target card’s Flash ROM IP address, slot(s)
BNAC
Begin downloading NAC file to
target card
ENAC
End downloading NAC file to target NAC file name, IP address, slot(s)
card
ERR
Error message
IP address, slots, description of error,
and possible causes
SUM
Summary of Software Download
process
IP address(es), slot(s) and status
NAC file name, IP address, slot(s)
Feature Enable 119
Table 13 Software Download Progress Message Descriptions (continued)
Feature Enable
Message
Description
Additional Information
SIG
Software Download utility received
a UNIX signal
Signal received. IP Telephony
Manager/Solaris catches the following
signals (to avoid termination): PIPE,
TERM, USR1, and USR2.
END
Utility is terminated
The following command line launches the Feature Enable option:
tcminv [-l logfile] [-h] [-c readcomm] [-C writecomm]
[target]
Where:
-l logfile
The log file for system diagnostic messages.
The GUI log file default is the UNIX syslog file. The CLI default is stderr. You can
reverse these defaults by specifying a "-" (hyphen).
-h
Displays the command line parameters and the descriptions of the parameters
and their flags.
-c readcomm
The SNMP read community string.
-C writecomm
The SNMP write community string.
target
An optional parameter that specifies the chassis device to be feature enabled
If no target is specified, the GUI presents the file selection dialog and proceeds
with file-based feature enable. If the target is specified, the GUI invokes
manual feature enable.
The format for target is as follows:
<IP-host>[:S<slot>]
120 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Where:
IP-host
Can be in IP-dot notation, or a host name that is defined in the host database
or \etc\hosts file.
:S<Slot>
The decimal number representing the location of the card in the chassis.
Inventory
Use the following syntax to launch the Inventory utility:
tcminv [-l logfile] [-h] [-c readcomm] [-C writecomm]
[-d delimiter]
[-f filename] target
Where:
-l logfile
The log file for system diagnostic messages.
The GUI log file default is the UNIX syslog file. The CLI default is stderr. You
can reverse these defaults by specifying a "-" (hyphen).
-h
Displays the command line parameters and the descriptions of the parameters
and their flags.
-c readcomm
The SNMP read community string.
-C writecomm
The SNMP write community string.
-d delimiter
Supplies field separators for a saved file.
If this is omitted, fields are padded with spaces to make columns line up.
Authorized Station Tool 121
-f filename
The file to save inventory to (for CLI only).
target
Specifies chassis host(s) to be displayed.
The format for target is as follows:
<IP-host>
Can be in IP-dot notation, or a host name that is defined in the host database
or /etc/hosts file.
Authorized Station
Tool
The Authorized Station Tool can be accessed using the following syntax:
[x]tcmauth [-l logfile] [-h] [-c readcomm]
[-C writecomm] target [-q]
[-a ipaddr mask comment | -m ipaddr mask comment |
-d ipaddr]...
Where:
-l logfile
The log file for system diagnostic messages
The GUI log file default is the UNIX syslog file. The CLI default is stderr. You can
reverse these defaults by specifying a "-" (hyphen).
-h
Displays the command line parameters and the descriptions of the parameters
and their flags.
-c readcomm
The SNMP read community string.
-C writecomm
The SNMP write community string.
122 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
target
An optional parameter that specifies the IP address or hostname of the NMC in
which stations are being configured
If no target is specified, the GUI behaves as if -h was the only parameter
passed.
The format for target is as follows:
<IP-host>
IP-host can be in IP-dot notation, or a host name that is defined in the host
database or /etc/hosts file
CLI Parameters (-q, -a,
-m, -d)
The CLI parameters must be supplied after the target at the end of the
command line. Any, or all of them can be used in any order. They are executed
in the order they appear in the command line.
These CLI parameters are described in the following table:
Table 14 CLI Parameter Descriptions
Parameter
Description
-q
Lists all Authorized Station currently configured in the target NMC and
then exits. This overrides the specification of -a, -m, or -d.
-a
Adds an Authorized Station to the Authorized Station Table.
Ipaddr
IP address of the new station.
Mask
New network mask.
Comment
New descriptive comment; use shell quoting as necessary.
-m
Changes the network mask/comment of an Authorized Station.
Ipaddr
IP address of entry to be modified.
Mask
New network mask.
Comment
New descriptive comment; use shell quoting as necessary.
-d
Deletes an Authorized Station from the Authorized Station Table.
Ipaddr
IP address of the entry to be deleted.
AutoResponse 123
AutoResponse
The AutoResponse can be invoked by the following syntax:
tcmarsp [-E event] [-h] [target]
Where:
-E event
Specifies which event to use as the default.
The specified parameter must be a substring of one of the event descriptive
strings described below. Substrings that match at the beginning of the
descriptive string have precedence over those that match in the middle. When
there are embedded spaces in the substring, the event should be properly
quoted according to shell rules. The match is case insensitive.
If no event is specified, the GUI defaults to the entire list of AutoResponse
events.
Chassis Level Events
and Responses
The following are the events and the responses to the events from the
AutoResponse command
Events
■
PSU Voltage Out of Range
■
PSU Failed
■
Fan Failed
■
HUB Temperature Out of Range
■
Global Timer 1 Expired
■
Global Timer 2 Expired
■
Global Timer 3 Expired
■
Global Timer 4 Expired
Responses (the "(N)" notation indicates that the response requires a
parameter):
■
Generate AutoResponse SNMP Trap ID (N)
■
Delay Script Execution (N) Seconds
■
Terminate Script Execution
■
Continue If Test Passes
■
Configure Module From NMC NVRAM
■
Configure Module From NMC Factory Defaults
■
Test module
■
Reset module
124 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Slot Level Events and
Responses
The following are the events and the responses to the events from the
AutoResponse command
Events:
■
Module Inserted
■
Module Re-initialized
■
Module Removed
■
Module Non-operational
■
Module Watchdog Time-out
Responses (the "(N)" notation indicates that the response requires a
parameter):
■
Generate AutoResponse SNMP TRAP ID (N)
■
Delay Script Execution (N) Seconds
■
Terminate Script Execution
■
Continue if Test Passes
■
Configure Module from NMC NVRAM
■
Configure Module from NMC Factory Defaults
■
Remove Module from Service
■
Restore Module to Service
■
Test Module
■
Reset Module
■
Busy-Out Module’s Analog Phone Lines
■
Restore Module’s Analog Phone Lines
The last two responses pertaining to analog phone lines are not available on
slots that contain an unknown card type.
Modem Channel Level
Events and Responses
The following are the events and the responses to the events from the
AutoResponse command.
Events:
■
Incoming Connection Established
■
Outgoing Connection Established
■
Incoming Connection Terminated
■
Outgoing Connection Terminated
■
Connection Attempt Failed
■
Connection Time Limit Expired
AutoResponse 125
■
Reset By DTE
■
DTE Transmit Idle
■
Block Error Count at Threshold
■
Fallback Count at Threshold
■
Dial Out Login Failure
■
Dial Out Restricted Number
■
Dial In Login Failure
■
Dial Back Restricted Number
■
Dial Back Using Restricted Modem
■
Login Attempt Limit Exceeded
■
User Blacklisted
■
Attempted Login by Blacklisted User
■
Response Attempt Limit Exceeded
■
Modem Watchdog Reset
■
Management Bus Failure
■
DTR True
■
DTR False
■
Modem Ring No Answer
■
DTE Ring No Answer
■
No Dial Tone
■
No Loop Current Detected
■
Global Timer 1 Expired
■
Global Timer 2 Expired
■
Global Timer 3 Expired
■
Global Timer 4 Expired
■
Packet Bus Active
■
Packet Bus Lost
Responses, (the "(N)" notation indicates that the response requires a
parameter):
■
Generate AutoResponse SNMP TRAP ID (N)
■
Delay Script Execution (N) Seconds
■
Terminate Script Execution
■
Continue if Test Passes
■
Reconfigure from NVRAM
■
Reconfigure from Modem Factory Defaults
126 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
■
Test Modem
■
Test Analog NIC
■
Test Analog Phone Line
■
Restore Analog Phone Line
■
Busy out DS0 - T1 Slot (N) Span (N) Channel (N)
■
Restore DS0 - T1 Slot (N) Span (N) Channel (N)
■
Modem Software Reset
■
Terminate Connection
■
Busy Out Analog Phone Line
-h
Displays the command line parameters and the descriptions of the parameters
and their flags.
-c readcomm
The SNMP read community string.
-C writecomm
The SNMP write community string.
target
An optional parameter that specifies the IP address or hostname of the NMC in
which stations are being configured
If no target is specified, the GUI behaves as if -h was the only parameter
passed.
The format for target is as follows:
<IP-host>:S<s-range>[C<c-range>][,S<s-range>
[C<c-range>]...]
Where:
IP-host
Can be in IP-dot notation, or a host name that is defined in the host database
or \etc\hosts file.
AutoResponse 127
:S<s-range>
A decimal number of a range s1-s2 (where s1 and s2 are decimal numbers
separated by a literal hyphen) representing the location of the card(s) in the
chassis.
:C<c-range>
A decimal number or a range c1-c2 (where c1 and c2 are decimal numbers
separated by a literal hyphen) representing the channel number(s) on the
specified cards.
Only the IP address of the of the chassis needs to be specified. If this is the
case, a graphical window will open showing the VFPD allowing the user to
graphically select the desired targets.
128 APPENDIX : COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
GLOSSARY
C
This appendix lists acronyms and terminology used in the CommWorks VoIP
application.
A-Link
Access link. SS7 Signaling link used to connect the Signaling Transfer Point (STP)
and Signaling Switch Point (SSP).
ACF
Admission Confirm—This is a call flow message.
AMI
Alternate Mark Inversion—A line encoding scheme for transmitting data bits over
T1 and E1transmission systems.
ANI
Automatic Number Identification—The billing number of the person making the
phone call. ANI allows the calling party to be billed without having to enter a PIN.
ARJ
Admission Reject—This is a call flow message.
ARQ
Admission Request—This is a call flow message.
AIS
Alarm Indication Signal—Formerly referred to as a ‘blue alarm’ or ‘blue signal’.
This is a signal that is created when a maintenance alarm indication has been
activated. This signal is transmitted downstream informing that an upstream
failure has been detected.
AS
Autonomous System—An independent system.
AUX
Auxiliary—Backup or acting as a redundancy on the system.
B8ZS
Binary Eight Zero Code Suppression—Line-code type, used on T1 and E1 circuits. A
special code replaces any eight consecutive zeros that are sent over the link. This
code is then interpreted at the remote end of the connection. This technique
guarantees ones density independent of the data stream. Sometimes this is
referred to as bipolar 8-zero substitution.
BHCA
CC
CCS
Busy Hour Call Attempts—The number of calls attempted within 60 minutes
during the busiest times during the day.
Country Code—When calling outside of the country, the called number consists of
the country code, identifying the country where the person to be called resides
and a NSN (National Significant Number). The code of the country is the first three
digits dialed.
Common Channel Signal—This is a Bellcore definition: A network architecture
which uses Signalling System 7 (SS7) protocol for the exchange of information
between telecommunications nodes and networks on an out-of-band basis.
130 APPENDIX : GLOSSARY
CD
CDR
CE
CEPT
CHS
CISPR
CLI
CMOS
CNG
CO
CommWorks IP
Telephony System
Collision Detection—A process where a simultaneous transmission has taken
place. Workstations can determine if this has happened if they do not receive an
acknowledgement from the receiving station within a certain amount of time.
When this occurs, the workstation will try again.
Call Detail Record—Information gather during the call used later for billing
purposes.
Connection Endpoint—A terminator at one end of a layer connection within SAP.
Conférence des administrations Européenes des Postes et Télécommunications
(European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations)—A
standards committee in Europe for the telecommunications industry.
Cylinder-head Sector—The method of identifying a given location on a hard drive.
International Special Committee on Radio Interference
Command Line Interface—A software interface allowing the user to interact
with the operating system by entering commands and optional arguments.
The UNIX operating system runs at the command line from a shell prompt or a
shell script.
Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor
Comfort Noise Generation—The process of adding white noise to the voice
channel so the people know the connection is still good when neither party is
talking.
Central Office—The telephone company facility where the request for service
comes through the switching equipment and the requests for service gets routed.
A total system of hardware and software components that route telephone calls
and data over an IP based network (VoIP).
CPE
Customer Presence Equipment—A piece of equipment that is attached to a
telephone network. This equipment would be the terminal equipment,
telephones, key systems, modems, video conferencing devices and so on.
CPU
Central Processing Unit—The part of the computer that executes the commands
and performs the logic.
CRC
Cyclic Redundancy Check—The process to determine if the data was received
properly.
CSA
1. Call Path Services Architecture—An architecture developed by IBM which
defines the protocols that allow communications between the telephones
switches and computers. 2. Carrier Serving Area—A method used to categorize
the local loops by length, gauge, and subscriber distribution for maximum service
and cost efficiency.
Appendix : Glossary 131
CSMA
Carrier Sense Multiple Access—Media-access mechanism wherein devices ready to
transmit data first check the channel for a carrier. If no carrier is sensed for a
specific period of time, a device can transmit. If two devices transmit at once, a
collision occurs and is detected by all colliding devices. This collision subsequently
delays retransmissions from those devices for some random length of time.
CTS
Clear to Send—Hardware signal defined by the RS-232 specification that indicates
that a transmission can proceed.
CLASS
Custom Local Area Signaling Services—CLASS is a service mark of Bellcore. It is the
signaling service available such as caller-id, call waiting, and auto-redial.
DCD
Data Carrier Detected—Hardware signal defined by the RS-232-C specification
that indicates that a device such as a modem is online and ready for transmission.
DCE
Data Communication Equipment—A communications device that can establish,
maintain, and terminate a connection (for example, a modem). A DCE may also
provide signal conversion between the data terminal equipment (DTE) and the
common carrier's channel.
DCF
Disengage Confirm—This is a call flow message.
DHCP
DHTML
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol—A protocol that allows network
administrators to centrally manage and automate the assignment of Internet
Protocol (IP) addresses in their organization's network.
Dynamic Hypertext Markup Languages—A name for a set of programs that
developers can use to create Web pages that update themselves on the fly.
Dynamic HTML makes your Web documents more interactive than HTML.
DIMM
Dual Inline Memory Module—Has a 10% higher capacity bandwidth than Single
In-line memory module (SIMM). The DIMM’s data path is 128 bits wide.
DIN
Deutsche Institute fur Normung (German Institute for Standardization)—DIN
specifications are issued under the control of the German government. The most
common specification is the dimensions of cable connectors referred to as DIN
connectors.
DINS
DIP
Dialed Number Identification Service
Dual Inline Package—These are small on and off switches on the circuit board
used to configure the board in a semipermanent way. The DIP switches are the
first thing to look at when a configuration isn’t what you intended after an
installation.
DMS
Digital Multiplex System—A digital switch that is used in a central office. It contains
multiple devices to handle the many needs of the system. Such as, local/toll
exchange, long distance switch, international gateway, local and long distance
switch, wireless, and advanced signaling solutions.
DNS
Domain Name Server—System used in the internet for translating names of
network nodes into addresses.
132 APPENDIX : GLOSSARY
DRAM
DRJ
DRQ
Dynamic Random Access Memory—The readable/writable memory used to store
data in PCs. DRAM stores each bit of information in a "cell" composed of a
capacitor and a transistor.
Disengage Reject—This is a call flow message.
Disengage Request—This is a call flow message.
DS
Digital Signal—Standard specifying the electrical characteristics for data
transmission over four-wire telco circuits. DS1 is 1.544 Mbps, and DS3 is 44.736
Mbps. Also referred to as T1 and T3.
DS0
1. Digital Signal level zero—It is equivalent to one voice conversation digitized
under PCM. It transmits digital signals over a single channel at 64-kbps on a T1
facility 2. Data Slot 0
DSP
Digital Signaling Processors—A special computer chip designed to process digital
signals that were originally analog signals.
DSR
Data Set Ready—This is a call flow message.
DTE
Data Terminal Equipment—End-user equipment, typically a terminal or computer,
that can function as the source or destination point of communication on the
network.
DTMF
Dual Tone Multi-frequency—The sounds a touch-tone telephone makes when its
keys are pressed.
DTR
Data Terminal Ready—A control signal that is activated to let the DCE know when
the DTE is ready to send and receive data.
DTS
Data Transformation Service—Technology designed for bypassing functions for
short-hop, line-of-sight applications. It never converts to analog. Its main use is in
high volume, data only applications in urban areas where line costs are higher.
ECC
Error Correcting Code—Code that determines whether line noise has caused data
to be garbled or dropped in transit, and then works to correct the problem. The
two most common error-correction protocols and standards used by analog
modems are MNP and V.42.
EdgeServer Pro Card
Edge server card
EDO RAM
This card on the Total Control Chassis runs Windows NT 4.0 Server, provides two
10/100-Mbps ethernet interfaces, and routes call over IP networks.
This card on the Total Control Chassis runs Windows 2000 Server, provides two
10/100-Mbps ethernet interfaces, and routes call over IP networks.
Extended Data Out Random Access Memory—A more efficient method to access
memory. It reduces access memory time by 10% over the standard DRAM chips.
EIA
Electronic Industries Alliance—A trade organization who sets standards for
electronics.
EMC
Electromagnetic Compatibility—The ability of a device or system to function
without error in its intended electromagnetic environment.
EMI
Electromagnetic Interference—The leakage of radiation from equipment.
Appendix : Glossary 133
ESD
Electrostatic Discharge—Discharge of stored static electricity that can damage
electronic equipment and impair electrical circuitry, resulting in complete or
intermittent failures.
ESF
Extended Super Frame—Framing type used on T1 circuits that consists of 24
frames of 192 bits each, with the 193rd bit providing timing and other functions.
ESF is an enhanced version of super frame (SF).
ESIG
Extended Signaling—A system internal to Total Control which ingresses and
distributes SS7 signaling throughout the Chassis via the packet bus.
ETSI
European Telecommunications Standards Institute—Similar to the ANSI in the
United States. It’s purpose is to provide standards for the telecommunications
industry.
FCC
Federal Communications Commission—A United States federal regulatory agency
which oversees all aspects of the communications industry, TV, radio, telephone
etc. in the United States.
FTP
File Transfer Protocol—Application protocol, part of the TCP/IP protocol stack, for
transferring files between network nodes. FTP is defined in RFC 959.
GCF
GK
GRJ
Gatekeeper Confirm—This is a call flow message.
Gatekeeper—A device that manages an IP network, supporting all gateways, user
profiles, and authentication. A gatekeeper is defined by the H.323 standard.
Gatekeeper Reject—This is a call flow message.
GRQ
Gatekeeper Request—This is a call flow message.
GSM
Global System for Mobile Communications—The European standard for digital
cellular service using slow frequency-hopping and TDMA.
GW
VoIP Media Gateway—A CommWorks VoIP device that can interconnect networks
with different, incompatible communications protocols. The gateway performs a
layer-7 protocol-conversion to translate one set of protocols to another (for
example, from TCP/IP to SNA or from TCP/IP to X.25). A gateway operates at OSI
layers up through the Session Layer.
GUI
Graphical User Interface—A software interface based on pictorial representations
and menus of operations, commands, and files. Opposite of the operating system
command line interface.
HDB3
High Density Bipolar Three Zeros—A bipolar coding method that does not allow
more than three consecutive zeros in the line signaling.
HDM
High Density Modem—The HiPer DSP card in the VoIP system. It implements the
PSTN interface and CODEC functions of the VoIP system. It contains 24 channels
per card (T1-PRI) or 31 (E1-PRI) channels per card.
IC
Industry Canada—A department of the Canadian government. It serves to
promote all aspects of Canada’s economy. It’s charter is to improve conditions for
investment, improve innovation performance, increase Canada's share of global
trade and build a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace.
134 APPENDIX : GLOSSARY
IDE
Integrated Drive Electronics—Standard interface to the hard disk drive on the PC.
IEC
International Electrotechnical Commission—The international standards body for
electrotechnology.
IIS
Internet Information Server—Microsoft Windows NT web based server. It allows
you to create control and manage a web site remotely.
IMT
Inter-Machine Trunks—In the SS7 network, the IMT is the channel that carries the
data to the SSP.
ISUP
Intergrated Services Digital Network User Part —This is the control function of the
SS7 protocol. It determines the call setup, administration, and call take down on
the SS7 network. In the SS7 system with VoIP enabled, the ISUP commands are
converted to SLAP commands.
I/O
Input/Output
IP
Internet Protocol—A set of instructions that controls the node addresses, routes
the messages, and so on of the internet.
IP Telephony Manager
IP Telephony Manager is a software application developed by CommWorks, a
division of 3Com, that runs on a UNIX management station. This application
remotely manages 3Com Network Application Cards (NACs) and Network
Interface Cards (NICs) through a Network Management Card (NMC) installed on
the CommWorks 5210 IP Telephony Platform.
ISA
ISDN
Industry Standard Architecture—The most common bus architecture on the
motherboard of a MS-DOS based computer.
Integrated Service Digital Network—A system that provides simultaneous voice
and high-speed data transmission through a single channel to the user. ISDN is an
international standard for end-to-end digital transmission of voice, data, and
signaling.
ITG
Internet Telephony Gateway— A bridge between traditional circuit-switched
telephony and the internet that extends the advantages of IP telephony to the
standard telephone by digitizing the standard telephone signal (if it isn't already
digital), significantly compressing it, packetizing it for the internet using Internet
Protocol (IP,) and routing it to a destination over the internet.
ITU
International Telecommunications Union—An organization established by the
United Nations, of which almost every nation is a member. Its charter is to define
standards for telegraphic and telephone equipment.
LAN
Local Area Network—A short distance data communications network. Usually
found within a building or a campus environment.
LCF
Location Confirm—This is a call flow message.
LEC
1. Local Exchange Carrier—The telephone company servicing the local area. 2.
Line Echo Canceler—A module placed on the line to keep the noise and vibration
on the line to a minimum.
LED
Light Emitting Diode—Semiconductor device that emits light. Status lights on
hardware devices are typically LEDs.
Appendix : Glossary 135
LRJ
Location Reject—This is a call flow message.
LRQ
Location Request—This is a call flow message.
MBP
Management Bus Protocol—This protocol was developed by 3Com and is used in
the NMC to communicate to the other cards in the Total Control chassis.
MFC
Multifrequency Compelled—An E1 call setup protocol that requires the signals to
be acknowledged.
MIB
Management Information Base—A key element of SNMP management systems. A
collection of objects that can be accessed via a network management protocol;
holds information about all resources managed by a network management
system.
NAC
Network Access Card—the card in front of the Total Control chassis. It connects to
the NIC in back. It allows the Total Control chassis to receive information from the
NMC, then processes it and sends it out the NIC.
NANP
North American Numbering Plan—The scheme used to identify the telephone
trunks. It is composed of a three digit prefix and the four-digit suffix.
NDC
National Destination Code—Used to identify a Public Land Mobile Network
(PLMN) within a country.
NAC
Network Application Card—In the Total Control chassis, this card is located in the
front of the chassis. It allows communication to the VoIP application.
NIC
Network Interface Cards—In the Total Control chassis, this card is located in the
back of the chassis. It allows access to the network.
NMC
Network Management Card—The NMC provides the management of all the cards
in the Total Control chassis.
NLP
Non-Linear Processing—Processing of a request for service that does not take the
normal route as defined by the PSTN.
NMC
Network Management Card—Manages all of the devices in the Total Control
chassis under the direction of a PC running IP Telephony Manager software.
NSM
Non-Standard Message—A type of non-standard message that is allowed by ITU
T.30.
NTFS
NT File System—The file system on Windows NT servers.
NTP
NVRAM
Network Time Protocol—Protocol built on top of TCP that assures accurate local
time-keeping with reference to radio and atomic clocks located on the internet.
This protocol is capable of synchronizing distributed clocks within milliseconds
over long time periods.
Non-volatile Random Access Memory—Ram that retains its contents when a unit
is turned off.
136 APPENDIX : GLOSSARY
OOBMAN
Out-of-band Manager—OOBMan is an application that runs on 3Com
Windows NT components of the CommWorks IP Telephony platform.
It is designed to allow a user to dial into an NT device, using a terminal
emulation program such as Hyperterminal, and view or modify various
configuration information on that machine.
OS
Operating System—A software program that controls and manages the
operations of a computer system.
OOF
Out-of-frame—OOF conditions occurs in a T1 transmission when two or more out
of four consecutive framing bits are in error.
OOS
Out-of-service—The term used when a module or card is not functioning. It could
be because VoIP has taken it OOS due to errors, or because the card or module
has been removed from the chassis.
PCI
Peripheral Component Interconnect—Designed by Intel. It is a 32-bit local bus on
a PC to transfer data between the CPU and the peripherals.
PCM
Pulse Code Modulation—Technique for converting an analog signal to a digital
signal.
POTS
Plain Old Telephone System—Standard telephone service used by most residential
locations. See PSTN.
PRI
Primary Rate Interface—ISDN interface to primary rate access. In the U.S., the
Primary Rate Interface is split into 23 B channels and one 64 Kbps D channel. PRI is
delivered over the same physical link as a T1, or 1.55 Mbps link. In Europe, PRI is
split into 30 B channels and one 64 k bit/second D channel and is delivered over
the same physical link as an E1.
PSI
Power Supply Interface—The card on the chassis that controls the power for the
chassis.
PSTN
Public Switched Telephone Network—The analog dial-tone-type telephone
networks and services in place worldwide, with transmission rates up to 52Kbps.
In contrast, telephone services based on digital communications lines, such as
ISDN, have higher speeds and bandwidths. The POTS networks also called the
public switched telephone network (PSTN).
PSU
Power Supply Unit—This unit is part of the Total Control chassis. It controls the
power to the chassis. The PSU can be either AC or DC power with 35A, 45A, 70A,
or 130A ratings.
QOS
Quality of Service—An indicator of the performance of a transmission system on
the Internet and other networks. QoS is measured in transmission rate, error rates,
latency, and other characteristics, and can to some extent be guaranteed to a
customer in advance.
RAS
Remote Access Service—Remote access is sending and receiving data to and from
a computer or controlling computer with terminals or PCs connected through
phone/communications links. A remoter access service provides this function.
Appendix : Glossary 137
RCF
RISC
RFI
RRAS
RRJ
Registration Confirm—This is a call flow message.
Reduced Instruction Set Computer— Central processing unit architecture that
greatly reduces processing time by having fewer, simpler instructions programmed
into ROM, but allowing for complex processing by combining these simple
instructions; primarily used in workstations.
Radio Frequency Interface—An interface of a programmable switch matrix
between the RF test instruments of a CASS RF or CNI configuration to a series of
front panel bulkhead connectors.
Routing and Remote Access Service—Microsoft Windows NT’s (RRAS) Routing and
Remote Access Service is used for terminating RAS/PPP calls on a Microsoft Windows
NT system.
Registration Reject—A registration request from an H.323 Gateway to an H.323
Gatekeeper was rejected.
RRQ
Registration Request—An H.323 Gateway has requested to register with a remote
H.323 Gatekeeper endpoint.
RTP
Real Time Protocol—The format of the audio/voice data as it travels through VoIP.
RTS
Request to Send—An RS-232 signal provided by a DTE device to a DCE device
saying "I am ready when you are”. The RTS/CTS RS-232 signals are often used for
flow control between a modem and serial port.
SCSI
Small Computer System Interface—The way the peripherals communicate with
the computer’s main processor.
SDL
Signaling Data Link or Software Download
SF
Super Frame—Common framing type used on T1 circuits. SF consists of 12 frames
of 192 bits each, with the 193rd bit providing error checking and other functions.
SF is superseded by ESF, but is still widely used. Also called D4 framing.
SCP
Service Control Points—The SCP stores customer specific information for example,
toll free numbers, and converts the information received from the incoming call
and directs the call to its destination.
SIP
Session Initiation Protocol—Provides advanced telephony services across an IP
network.
SGP
Signaling Gateway Platform—This is the SS7 Signaling Gateway platform. 3Com’s
SS7 signaling Gateway is an intelligent service exchange node that integrates
services between the circuit and packet networks to deliver significant cost savings
with IMTs for voice trunk access instead of ISDN PRIs.
SLAP
Signaling LAN Application Protocol—SLAP is the interface between the Total
Control Chassis and the external SS7 Gateway system. It replaces the D-channel
signaling that normally exists in an ISDN PRI interface. SLAP is 3Com’s proprietary
software.
SSP
Signaling Switch Point—Simply put, this is the telephone switch.
138 APPENDIX : GLOSSARY
SS7
Signaling System 7—A global standard for telecommunications as defined by the
International Telecommunication Union (ITU). The SS7 standard defines the
procedure protocol by which network elements in the PSTN exchange information
over a digital signaling network.
SMS
System Management Services—Allows provisioning and updating of information
on subscribers and services in near-real time for billing and administrative
purposes.
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol—Standardized method of managing and
monitoring network devices on TCP/IP-based internets. A standard way for
computers to share networking information. In SNMP, two types of
communicating devices exist: agents and managers. An agent provides
networking information to a manager application running on another computer.
The agents and managers share a database of information, called the
Management Information Base (MIB). An agent can use a message called a
traps-PDU to send unsolicited information to the manager.
SQL
Structured Query Language—A standard interactive and programming language
for requesting information from and updating databases.
SRAM
Static Random Access Memory—Type of RAM that retains its contents for as long
as power is supplied. SRAM does not require constant refreshing, like DRAM.
SS
Silence Suppression—A way to save on bandwidth by not transmitting the silences
or gaps in conversation. A voice compression process where the time when there
is no voice being transmitted over the line during a conversation, that space is
filled with data, and video transmission on the line.
SST
Silence Suppression Threshold—The limit of silence allowed on the voice
transmission before data, and video packets are sent on the line. This can be
defined by the user.
STP
Signal Transfer Point—SS7 Signal Routing Node. It is a very reliable packet switch
used to forward signaling messages in an SS7 network. The network switches and
the SCPs connect directly to the STPs for message routing.
SVGA
TCM
Super Video Graphics Array—An enhancement of the VGA display standard.
SVGA can display at least 800 pixels horizontally and about 600 lines vertically.
Total Control Manager—See IP Telephony Manager.
TCP
Transmission Control Protocol—Connection-oriented protocol that provides a
reliable byte stream over IP. A reliable connection means that each end of the
session is guaranteed to receive all of the data transmitted by the other end of the
connection, in the same order that it was originally transmitted without receiving
duplicates.
TDM
Time Division Multiplexing—A technique in which information from multiple
channels can be allocated bandwidth on a single wire based on preassigned time
slots. Bandwidth is allocated to each channel regardless of whether the station has
data to transmit.
Appendix : Glossary 139
TDMA
TFTP
Total Control Manager
Time Division Multiplexing Adapter—A device that allows analog voice and data
devices to work through an ISDN connection. The terminal adapter is a protocol
converter that adapts equipment not designed for ISDN, such as phones, faxes,
and modems.
Trivial File Transfer Protocol—simplified version of the File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
that transfers files but does not provide password protection or user directory
capability.
TCM—See IP Telephony Manager.
UCF
Unregistration Confirm
UDP
User Datagram Protocol—Connectionless transport layer protocol in the TCP/IP
protocol stack. UDP is a simple protocol that exchanges datagrams without
acknowledgments or guaranteed delivery, requiring that error processing and
retransmission be handled by other protocols. UDP is defined in RFC 768.
UI
User Interface—In telephony terms, this is the reference point for the BRI
connection between a telephone company local loop and the customer
equipment.
UL
Underwriters Laboratory—A non-profit laboratory that examines and tests items
submitted by their manufactures for safety.
UNC Names
URJ
Universal Naming Convention Names—Naming conventions for file names or
other resources beginning with ‘\\’, indicating that they exist on a remote
computer.
Unregistration Reject—This is a call flow message.
URQ
Unregistration Request—This is a call flow message.
UTP
Unshielded Twisted Pair— Four-pair wire medium used in a variety of networks. It
consists of copper conductors that are electrically balanced.
VDE
Verbund Deutscher Electronicker—Federation of German Electrical Engineers,
similar to the IEEE in the United States.
VFPD
VoIP
VRAM
WAN
Virtual Front Panel Display—Refers to the GUI display of the Total Control 1000
chassis.
Voice Over Internet Protocol—A set of protocols for managing the delivery of
voice and data information using the Internet Protocol (IP). Voice and data
information is sent in digital form in discrete packets over the Internet instead of in
analog form over the public switched telephone network (PSTN). A major
advantage of VoIP is that it avoids the tolls charged by ordinary telephone service.
VIrtual Random Access Memory
Wide Area Network—Public or private computer network serving a wide
geographic area.
140 APPENDIX : GLOSSARY
ZCS
Zero Code Suppression—Used primarily with T1. The insertion of a one bit to
prevent the transmission of eight consecutive zeros on an active line. When eight
or more consecutive zeros are detected on the line, the system considers the line
inactive, and releases the line.
INDEX
Symbols
.cfm files 48
.dmf 69
.nvr files 44, 47
A
accessing
IP Telephony Manager 49
acronyms 129
Action/Commands menu 59
adjusting column width 59
authorized access 66
authorized access list
clearing 80
Authorized Station Tool
command 121
Authorized Stations
configuring 32
Authorized Stations Add
window elements 67
Authorized Stations menu 66
AutoResponse 31
command 123
configuration 31
menu 61
window elements 62
C
Card-Level vs. Channel-Level Commands
73
Card-Level vs. Channel-Level Parameter
Groups 57
CFM
restore 53
save 46, 53
changing
community string 78
components 52
chassis 47
restoring 46, 53
saving CFM 46
saving NMC 46
saving NVRAM 43
Chassis Save All menu 52
clearing authorized access lists 80
command
general syntax 101
save chassis to NVRAM 46
tcmarsp 123
tcmget 105
tcmset 105
tcmtest 115
x 101
xtcmcmd 73
command line
restoring 47
saving 45, 47
command line interface (CLI) 101
Command Tool
window elements 59
Command Tool window 73
commands
SNMP 111
tcmauth 121
tcmcmd 109
tcminv 119, 120
tcmrestore 116
tcmsave 116
tcmsdl 117
tcmtone 114
tcmtrap 110
community name 78
Community Names menu 66
community string 65
changing 78
setting 66
component
changing 52
configuration 28
Configuration 31, 44
menu 56
configuration 31
component 28
configuration command line interface
command
configuration 105
Configuration Tool
window elements 57
Configuration window 58
elements 57
configuring
authorized access 66
Authorized Stations 32
AutoResponse 31
IP Telephony Manager 56
management station 27
parameters 76
restoring 43
save 52
saves 43
traps 63
conventions xiv
D
direct serial connection 70
displaying
IP address 58
settings 56
E
editing
threshold 40
error message
command line target selection 84
execution 90
Exit menu 53
F
Fault menu 63
feature enable
launching 119
File menu 52
firmware, upgrading Gateway 71
G
general syntax 101
glossary 129
graceful restart 75
H
hard restart 75
HP OpenView
integrating 24
linking objects 26
removing integration 25
I
Import SDL Files menu 53
introduction 17
inventory 81
inventory command 120
Inventory menu 60
Inventory Print
menu 61
window elements 61
Inventory window 60
invocation 84, 90
invocation errors 84, 90
IP address
authorized access 34
display 58
IP Telephony Manager
accessing 49
commands 73
configuring 56
console window 50
display 54
elements 57
exit 53
inventory 60, 81
launch 104
monitor 64
restarting 75
reverse display 54
upgrading 69
window elements 58
IP Telephony Manager commands 109
142
L
R
LED Poll Info menu 54
LED status 54
linking objects in HP OpenView 26
reboot 75
restarting 75, 76
Restore CFM menu 53
Restore Chassis NVRAM menu 53
restoring 47
chassis 46
chassis configuration 47
command line 47
configuration 43
configuration NVRAM 44
restoring chassis CFM 53
restoring chassis NVRAM 53
restoring configurations 116
M
making changes 73
management functions 66
management station
clearing 80
configuration 27
manual Gatekeeper switchover 77
menu
Action/Commands 59
Authorized Stations 66
AutoResponse 61
Chassis Save All 52
Community Names 66
Configuration 56
Exit 53
Fault 63
File 52
Import SDL Files 53
Inventory 60
Inventory Print 61
LED Poll Info 54
Open 52
Other Side 54
Performance 64
Programmed Settings 56
restore CFM 53
Restore Chassis NVRAM 53
Save CFM 53
Save chassis NVRAM 53
Security 65, 78
Show Toolbar 54
Software Download 60
Trap Destination 64
Trap Settings 63
View 54
messages
error 83
event 61
software download 118
monitoring 64
N
NMC 108
O
Open menu 52
Other Side menu 54
overview 17
P
parameter settings 56
Performance menu 64
printing (see Inventory) 61
Programmed Settings menu 56
Q
Query Current Command Status (-q) 109
tone test 114
trap commands 110
Trap Destination menu 64
Trap Setting menu 63
traps 63
U
upgrading
firmware 69
Gateway firmware 71
software 70
V
View menu 54
S
Save CFM menu 53
save chassis NMC 46
Save Chassis NVRAM menu 53
saving
chassis CFM 53
command line 45, 47
configuration 43
configuration NVRAM 43, 52
saving configurations 116
SDL 60
SDL file 53
SDL-2 69
SDL2 utility 70
security functions 66
Security menu 65, 78
selected targets 57
setting community string 66
Show Toolbar menu 54
SMS 70
SNMP
community strings 66
MIB browser 70
software dowload 53
software download command 117
Software Download menu 60
software download messages 118
software upgrades 70
switchover, manual Gatekeeper 77
T
TCM_PRINT_COMMAND 61
tcmarsp 123
tcmauth 121
tcmcmd 109
tcmget command 105
tcminv 119, 120
tcmrestore 116
tcmsave 116
tcmsdl 117
tcmset 105
tcmset examples
108
tcmtest 115
terms 129
test monitoring 115
TFTP server 70
threshold
adding 37
editing 40
title bar 58
W
window elements 58, 59, 60
Authorized Station Add 67
CommWorks Corporation
3800 Golf Road
Rolling Meadows, IL 60008
©2001
3Com Corporation
All rights reserved
Printed in the U.S.A.
Part Number 10044879