User guide | 3Com WL-537 Network Router User Manual

OfficeConnect®
Wireless 54Mbps/108Mbps 11g Cable/DSL
Router User Guide
3CRWER100-75(Model:WL-537)
3CRWER200-75(Model:WL-537S)
http://www.3com.com/
3Com Corporation
350 Campus Drive
Marlborough, MA
USA 01752-3064
Copyright © 2006, 3Com Corporation. All rights reserved. No part of this documentation may be reproduced
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UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT LEGEND
If you are a United States government agency, then this documentation and the software described herein are
provided to you subject to the following:
All technical data and computer software are commercial in nature and developed solely at private expense.
Software is delivered as “Commercial Computer Software” as defined in DFARS 252.227-7014 (June 1995) or
as a “commercial item” as defined in FAR 2.101(a) and as such is provided with only such rights as are
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You agree not to remove or deface any portion of any legend provided on any licensed program or
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be registered in other countries.
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Intel and Pentium are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation. Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, and Windows
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All other company and product names may be trademarks of the respective companies with which they are
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ABOUT THIS GUIDE
This guide describes how to install and configure the OfficeConnect
Wireless 54Mbps/108Mbps 11g cable/DSL Router(3CRWER100-75 and
3CRWER200-75).
This guide is intended for use by those responsible for installing and
setting up network equipment; consequently, it assumes a basic working
knowledge of LANs (Local Area Networks) and Internet Router systems.
If a release note is shipped with the OfficeConnect Wireless
54Mbps/108Mbps 11g cable/DSL Router!and contains information that
differs from the information in this guide, follow the information in the
release note.
Most user guides and release notes are available in Adobe Acrobat
Reader Portable Document Format (PDF) on the 3Com World Wide Web
site:
http://www.3com.com
Naming Convention
Throughout this guide, the OfficeConnect Wireless 54Mbps/108Mbps!
11g Cable/DSL Router is referred to as the “Router”.
Category 3 and Category 5 Twisted Pair Cables are referred to as Twisted
Pair Cables throughout this guide.
8
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
Conventions
Table 1 and Table 2 list conventions that are used throughout this guide.
Table 1 Notice Icons
Icon
Notice Type
Description
Information note
Information that describes important features or
instructions.
Caution
Information that alerts you to potential loss of data or
potential damage to an application, system, or device.
Warning
Information that alerts you to potential personal
injury.
Table 2 Text Conventions
Convention
The words “enter”
and “type”
Keyboard key names
Words in italics
Description
When you see the word “enter” in this guide, you must type
something, and then press Return or Enter. Do not press
Return or Enter when an instruction simply says “type.”
If you must press two or more keys simultaneously, the key
names are linked with a plus sign (+). Example:
Press Ctrl+Alt+Del
Italics are used to:
■
Emphasize a point.
■
Denote a new term at the place where it is defined in the
text.
■
Identify menu names, menu commands, and software
button names. Examples:
From the Help menu, select Contents.
Click OK.
Feedback about this
User Guide
Your suggestions are very important to us. They will help make our
documentation more useful to you. Please e-mail comments about this
document to 3Com at:
pddtechpubs_comments@3com.com
Please include the following information when commenting:
■
Document title
■
Document part number (on the title page)
■
Page number (if appropriate)
Conventions
9
Example:
■
OfficeConnect Wireless 54Mbps/108Mbps 11g cable/DSL Router User
Guide
■
Part Number DUA0554-TAAA02
■
Page 24
Do not use this e-mail address for technical support questions. For
information about contacting Technical Support, please refer to the
Support and Safety Information sheet.
Related
Documentation
In addition to this guide, each Router document set includes one
Installation Guide. This guide contains the instructions you need to install
and configure your Router.
10
ABOUT THIS GUIDE
1
INTRODUCING THE ROUTER
Welcome to the world of networking with 3Com®. In the modern
business environment, communication and sharing information is crucial.
Computer networks have proved to be one of the fastest modes of
communication but, until recently, only large businesses could afford the
networking advantage. The OfficeConnect® product range from 3Com
has changed all this, bringing networks to the small office.
The products that compose the OfficeConnect range give you, the small
office user, the same power, flexibility, and protection that has been
available only to large corporations. Now, you can network the
computers in your office, connect them all to a single Internet outlet, and
harness the combined power of all of your computers.
OfficeConnect
Wireless
54Mbps/108Mbps
11g cable/DSL
Router
The OfficeConnect Wireless 54Mbps/108Mbps 11g cable/DSL Router is
designed to provide a cost-effective means of sharing a single broadband
Internet connection amongst several wired and wireless computers. The
Router also provides protection in the form of an electronic “firewall”,
preventing anyone outside of your network from seeing your files or
damaging your computers. The Router can also prevent your users from
accessing Web sites which you find unsuitable.
Figure 1 shows an example network without a Router. In this network,
only one computer is connected to the Internet. This computer must
always be powered on for the other computers on the network to access
the Internet.
12
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCING THE ROUTER
Figure 1 Example Network Without a Router
When you use the Router in your network (Figure 2), it becomes your
connection to the Internet. Connections can be made directly to the
Router, or to an OfficeConnect Switch or Hub, expanding the number of
computers you can have in your network.
Figure 2 Example Network Using a Wireless 11g Cable/DSL Router
Router Advantages
Router Advantages
Package Contents
13
The advantages of the Router include:
■
Shared Internet connection for both wired and wireless computers
■
High speed 802.11g wireless networking
■
No need for a dedicated, “always on” computer serving as your
Internet connection
■
Cross-platform operation for compatibility with Windows, Unix and
Macintosh computers
■
Easy-to-use, Web-based setup and configuration
■
Provides centralization of all network address settings (DHCP)
■
Acts as a Virtual server to enable remote access to Web, FTP, and other
services on your network
■
Security — Firewall protection against Internet hacker attacks and
encryption to protect wireless network traffic
■
Filtered access of inappropriate Web sites using the built-in URL filter
The Router kit includes the following items:
■
One OfficeConnect Wireless 54Mbps/108Mbps 11g cable/DSL Router
■
One power adapter for use with the Router
■
Four rubber feet
■
One Ethernet cable
■
One CD-ROM containing the Quick Installation Guide!and this User
Guide
■
Installation Guide
■
One Support and Safety Information Sheet
■
One Warranty Flyer
If any of these items are missing or damaged, please contact your retailer.
14
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCING THE ROUTER
Minimum System
and Component
Requirements
Front Panel
Your Router requires that the computer(s) and components in your
network be configured with at least the following:
■
A computer with an operating system that supports TCP/IP
networking protocols (for example Windows 95/98/NT/Me/2000/XP,
Unix, Mac OS 8.5 or higher).
■
An Ethernet 10Mbps or 10/100 Mbps NIC for each computer to be
connected to the four-port switch on your Router.
■
An 802.11b or 802.11g wireless NIC.
■
A cable modem or DSL modem with an Ethernet port (RJ-45
connector).
■
An active Internet access account.
■
A Web browser that supports JavaScript, such as Netscape 4.7 or
higher, Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher, or Mozilla 1.2.1 or higher.
The front panel of the Router contains a series of indicator lights (LEDs)
that help describe the status of various networking and connection
operations.
Figure 3 Router - Front Panel
1 Alert LED
Orange
Indicates a number of different conditions, as described below.
Off - The Router is operating normally.
Flashing quickly - Indicates one of the following conditions:
Front Panel
15
■
The Router has just been started up and is running a self-test routine,
or
■
The administrator has invoked the Reset to Factory Defaults
command, or
■
The system software is in the process of being upgraded
In each of these cases, wait until the Router has completed the current
operation and the alert LED is Off.
Flashing slowly - The Router has completed the Reset to Factory Defaults
process, and is waiting for you to reset the unit. To do this, remove
power, wait 10 seconds and then re-apply power. The Router will then
enter the start-up sequence and resume normal operation.
On for 2 seconds, and then off - The Router has detected and prevented
a hacker from attacking your network from the Internet.
Continuously on - A fault has been detected with your Router during the
start-up process. Refer to Chapter 6 “Troubleshooting”.
2 Power LED
Green
Indicates that the Router is powered on.
3 Wireless LAN (WLAN) Status LED
Yellow
If the LED is on it indicates that wireless networking is enabled. If the LED
is flashing, data is being transmitted or received. If the LED is off, the
Wireless LAN has been disabled in the Router, or there is a problem. Refer
to Chapter 6 “Troubleshooting”.
4 Four LAN Status LEDs
Green (100 Mbps link) / yellow (10 Mbps link)
If the LED is on, the link between the port and the next piece of network
equipment is OK. If the LED is flashing, the link is OK and data is being
transmitted or received. If the LED is off, nothing is connected, the
connected device is switched off, or there is a problem with the
connection (refer to Chapter 6 “Troubleshooting”). The port will
automatically adjust to the correct speed and duplex.
16
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCING THE ROUTER
5 Cable/DSL Status LED
Green (100 Mbps link) / yellow (10 Mbps link)
If the LED is on, the link between the Router and the cable or DSL modem
is OK. If the LED is flashing, the link is OK and data is being transmitted or
received. If the LED is off, nothing is connected, the modem is switched
off or there is a problem (refer to Chapter 6 “Troubleshooting”).
Rear Panel
The rear panel (Figure 4) of the Router contains four LAN ports, one
Ethernet Cable/DSL port, a power adapter OK LED, and a power adapter
socket.
Figure 4 Router - Rear Panel
6 Wireless Antennae
The antennae on the product should be placed in a ‘V’ position when
initially installed.
CAUTION: Do not force the antennae beyond their mechanical stops.
Rotating the antennae further may cause damage.
7 Power Adapter Socket
Only use the power adapter supplied with this Router. Do not use any
other adapter.
8 Power Adapter OK LED
Green
Indicates that the power adapter is supplying power to the Router. If the
LED is off, there may be a problem with the power adapter or adapter
cable.
Rear Panel
17
9 Ethernet Cable/DSL port
Use the supplied patch cable to connect the Router to the Ethernet port
on your cable or DSL modem. The port will automatically adjust to the
correct speed and duplex, and will set itself to MDI or MDIX depending
on the device to which they are connected and the type of cable used.
10 Four 10/100 LAN ports
Using suitable RJ-45 cable, you can connect your Router to a computer,
or to any other piece of equipment that has an Ethernet connection (for
example, a hub or a switch). The LAN ports will automatically set
themselves to MDI or MDIX depending on the device to which they are
connected and the type of cable used.
18
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCING THE ROUTER
2
Introduction
HARDWARE INSTALLATION
This chapter will guide you through a basic installation of the Router,
including:
■
Connecting the Router to the Internet.
■
Connecting the Router to your network.
■
Setting up your computers for networking with the Router.
Safety Information
WARNING: Please read the “Safety Information” section in Appendix D
before you start.
VORSICHT: Bitte lesen Sie den Abschnitt “Wichtige Sicherheitshinweise”
sorgfältig durch, bevor Sie das Gerät einschalten.
AVERTISSEMENT: Veuillez lire attentivement la section “Consignes
importantes de sécurité” avant de mettre en route.
Positioning the
Router
You should place the Router in a location that:
■
is conveniently located for connection to the cable or DSL modem that
will be used to connect to the Internet.
■
is centrally located to the wireless computers that will connect to the
Router. A suitable location might be on top of a high shelf or similar
furniture to optimize wireless connections to computers in both
horizontal and vertical directions, allowing wider coverage.
■
allows convenient connection to the computers that will be connected
to the four LAN ports on the rear panel, if desired.
■
allows easy viewing of the front panel LED indicator lights, and access
to the rear panel connectors, if necessary.
20
CHAPTER 2: HARDWARE INSTALLATION
When positioning your Router, ensure:
Using the Rubber
Feet
Stacking the Router
■
It is out of direct sunlight and away from sources of heat.
■
Cabling is away from power lines, fluorescent lighting fixtures, and
sources of electrical noise such as radios, transmitters and broadband
amplifiers.
■
Water or moisture cannot enter the case of the unit.
■
Air flow around the unit and through the vents in the side of the case
is not restricted. 3Com recommends you provide a minimum of
25 mm (1 in.) clearance.
Use the four self-adhesive rubber feet to prevent your Router from
moving around on your desk or when stacking with other flat top
OfficeConnect units. Only stick the feet to the marked areas at each
corner of the underside of your Router.
If you are stacking your Router with other OfficeConnect units, install the
Router at the top of the stack. Refer to the documentation supplied with
your other OfficeConnect unit for details on using the stacking clip.
A stacking clip is not supplied with the Router. Use the stacking clip
supplied with another stackable OfficeConnect unit.
Wall Mounting
There are two slots on the underside of the Router that can be used for
wall mounting.
When wall mounting the unit, ensure that it is within reach of the power
outlet.
You will need two suitable screws to wall mount the unit. To do this:
1 Ensure that the wall you use is smooth, flat, dry and sturdy and make two
screw holes which are 150 mm (5.9 in.) apart.
2 Fix the screws into the wall, leaving their heads 3 mm (0.12 in.) clear of
the wall surface.
3 Remove any connections to the unit and locate it over the screw heads.
When in line, gently push the unit on to the wall and move it downwards
to secure.
Before you Install your Router
21
When making connections, be careful not to push the unit up and off the
wall.
CAUTION: Only wall mount single units, do not wall mount stacked
units.
Before you Install
your Router
Before you install and configure your Router, you need the following
additional information. If you do not have this information, contact your
Internet Service Provider (ISP). Space is provided below for you to record
this information.
If you have a DSL connection and your ISP allocates IP information
dynamically over PPPoE, you need a User Name and Password:
PPPoE User Name
: ______________________
PPPoE Password
: ______________________
PPPoE Service Name
: ______________________
You only need a PPPoE Service Name if your ISP requires one. Do not
enter anything if your ISP does not require this information.
If you have a DSL connection and your ISP allocates IP information
dynamically over PPTP, you need a User Name, Password and PPTP Server
Address:
PPTP User Name
: ______________________
PPTP Password
: ______________________
PPTP Server Address
: ____.____.____.____
22
CHAPTER 2: HARDWARE INSTALLATION
If your ISP allocates fixed or static IP information, you need the following
information:
IP Address
: ____.____.____.____
Subnet Mask
: ____.____.____.____
Default Router address
: ____.____.____.____
DNS address
: ____.____.____.____
If your ISP allocates IP information dynamically over a protocol other than
PPPoE, you do not need any further information. This configuration is
typical of cable connections.
Powering Up the
Router
To power up the Router:
1 Plug the power adapter into the power adapter socket located on the
back panel of the Router.
2 Plug the power adapter into a standard electrical wall socket.
Connecting the
Router
The first step for installing your Router is to physically connect it to a
cable or DSL modem and then connect it to a computer in order to be
able to access the Internet. See Figure 5:
Connecting the Router
23
Figure 5 Connecting the Router
Power
Supply Unit
11g Cable/DSL
Router
Your existing
Cable/DSL Modem
12VDC
1.25A MAX
POWER OK
Cable/DSL
4
3
2
1
net
Inter
LAN
Wireless
Users
Your PC
To use your Router to connect to the Internet through an external cable
or DSL modem:
1 Insert one end of the supplied Ethernet (RJ-45 Category 5) cable into the
Cable/DSL port on the rear panel of the Router.
2 Insert the other end of the cable into the RJ-45 port on your cable or DSL
modem. Check that the Cable/DSL status LED lights on the Router.
3 Connect the cable or DSL modem to the Internet.
4 Connect your computer to one of the four LAN ports on the Router using
a Category 5 twisted pair cable. Check that the corresponding LAN status
LED on the Router lights.
You have now completed the hardware installation of your Router. Next
you need to set up your computers so that they can make use of the
Router to communicate with the Internet.
3Com recommends that you perform the initial Router configuration
from a computer that is directly connected to one of the LAN ports.
If you configure the Router from a wireless computer, note that you may
lose contact with the Router if you change the wireless configuration.
24
CHAPTER 2: HARDWARE INSTALLATION
To communicate wirelessly with your Router, your wireless NIC should be
set as follows:
■
Encryption — none
■
Service Area Name/SSID — 3Com
■
Channel — 11
3
SETTING UP YOUR COMPUTERS
The Router has the ability to dynamically allocate network addresses to
the computers on your network, using DHCP. However, your computers
need to be configured correctly for this to take place. To change the
configuration of your computers to allow this, follow the instructions in
this chapter. If your computers are configured with fixed or static
addresses and you do not wish to change this, then you should use the
Discovery program on the Router CD-ROM to detect and configure your
Router. Refer to Appendix A for information on using the Discovery
program.
Obtaining an IP
Address
Automatically
Windows 2000
Refer to the section below which relates to your operating system for
details on how to obtain an IP address automatically.
If you are using a Windows 2000-based computer, use the following
procedure to change your TCP/IP settings:
1 From the Windows Start Menu, select Settings > Control Panel.
2 Double click on Network and Dial-Up Connections.
3 Double click on Local Area Connection.
4 Click on Properties.
5 A screen similar to Figure 6 should be displayed. Select Internet Protocol
TCP/IP and click on Properties.
26
CHAPTER 3: SETTING UP YOUR COMPUTERS
Figure 6 Local Area Properties Screen
6 Ensure that the options Obtain an IP Address automatically, and Obtain
DNS server address automatically are both selected as shown in Figure 7.
Click OK.
Figure 7 Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties Screen
7 Restart your computer.
Obtaining an IP Address Automatically
Windows XP
27
If you are using a Windows XP computer, use the following procedure to
change your TCP/IP settings:
1 From the Windows Start menu, select Control Panel.
2 Click on Network and Internet Connections.
3 Click on the Network Connections icon.
4 Double click on LAN or High Speed Connection icon. A screen titled Local
Area Connection Status will appear.
5 Select Internet Protocol TCP/IP and click on Properties.
6 Ensure that the options Obtain an IP Address automatically, and Obtain
DNS servers automatically are both selected. Click OK.
7 Restart your computer.
Windows 95/98/ME
If you are using a Windows 95/98/ME computer, use the following
procedure to change your TCP/IP settings:
1 From the Windows Start Menu, select Settings > Control Panel.
2 Double click on Network. Select the TCP/IP item for your network card
and click on Properties.
3 In the TCP/IP dialog, select the IP Address tab, and ensure that Obtain IP
address automatically is selected. Click OK.
Macintosh
If you are using a Macintosh computer, use the following procedure to
change your TCP/IP settings:
1 From the desktop, select Apple Menu, Control Panels, and TCP/IP.
2 In the TCP/IP control panel, set Connect Via: to “Ethernet”.
3 In the TCP/IP control panel, set Configure: to “Using DHCP Server.”
4 Close the TCP/IP dialog box, and save your changes.
5 Restart your computer.
28
CHAPTER 3: SETTING UP YOUR COMPUTERS
Disabling PPPoE
and PPTP Client
Software
If you have PPPoE or PPTP client software installed on your computer, you
will need to disable it. To do this:
1 From the Windows Start menu, select Settings > Control Panel.
2 Double click on Internet Options.
3 Select the Connections Tab. A screen similar to Figure 8 should be
displayed.
4 Select the Never Dial a Connection option.
Figure 8 Internet Properties Screen
You may wish to remove the PPPoE client software from your computer
to free resources, as it is not required for use with the Router.
Disabling Web
Proxy
Ensure that you do not have a web proxy enabled on your computer.
Go to the Control Panel and click on Internet Options. Select the
Connections tab and click LAN Settings at the bottom. Make sure that
the Use Proxy Server option is unchecked.
4
Accessing the
Wizard
RUNNING THE SETUP WIZARD
The Router setup program is Web-based, which means that it is accessed
through your Web browser (Netscape Navigator 4.7 or higher, Internet
Explorer 5.0 or higher, or Mozilla 1.2.1 or higher).
To use the Setup Wizard:
1 Ensure that you have at least one computer connected to the Router.
Refer to Chapter 2 for details on how to do this.
2 Launch your Web browser on the computer.
3 Enter the following URL in the location or address field of your browser:
http://192.168.1.1 (Figure 9). The Login screen displays.
Figure 9 Web Browser Location Field (Factory Default)
4 To log in as an administrator, enter the password (the default setting is
admin) in the System Password field and click Log in (Figure 10).
30
CHAPTER 4: RUNNING THE SETUP WIZARD
Figure 10 Router Login Screen
5 If the password is correct, the Country Selection screen will appear. Select
the country you wish to configure the Router for, then click Apply.
(Figure 11)
If your purchased your Router in the United States, you do not see this
screen, as it is automatically set.
Figure 11 Country Selection Screen
Accessing the Wizard
31
6 When you have selected a country either:
■
The Welcome screen will appear (Figure 12). Select the Wizard tab
and click Wizard.
or
■
If your Router has not been configured before, the Wizard will launch
automatically (refer to Figure 13).
7 Click Next.
8 You will be guided step by step through a basic setup procedure.
Figure 12 Welcome Screen
32
CHAPTER 4: RUNNING THE SETUP WIZARD
Figure 13 Wizard Screen
Password
Figure 14 Change Administration Password Screen
When the Change Administration Password screen (Figure 14) appears,
type the Old Password, then a new password in both the New Password
and Confirm Password boxes.
3Com recommends entering a new password when setting up the Router
for the first time. The Router is shipped from the factory with a default
password, admin.
1. Password is case sensitive.
Accessing the Wizard
33
2. Write the new password down and keep it in a safe place, so that you
can change your settings in the future.
Click Next to display the Time Zone setup screen (Figure 15).
Time Zone
Figure 15 Time Zone Screen
Select your time zone from the pull-down menu, check the daylight
savings option if required, and then click Next.
The Daylight Savings option advances the system clock by one hour. It
does not cause the system clock to be updated for daylight savings time
automatically.
WAN Settings
Figure 16 Internet Settings Screen
This Internet Addressing Mode window allows you to set up the Router
for the type of Internet connection you have. Before setting up your
34
CHAPTER 4: RUNNING THE SETUP WIZARD
Internet connection mode, have the modem setting information from
your ISP ready.
Select an Internet Addressing mode from the following:
■
PPPoE is required (typically DSL users only)
■
ISP provides configuration dynamically (via DHCP)
■
ISP has provided a static IP address
■
PPTP is required (some DSL users in Europe)
and click Next.
PPPoE Mode
Figure 17 PPPoE Screen
To setup the Router for use with a PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE) connection,
use the following procedure:
1 Enter your PPP over Ethernet user name in the PPPoE User Name text box.
2 Enter your PPP over Ethernet password in the PPPoE Password text box.!
3 Enter your PPP over Ethernet service name in the PPPoE Service Name text
box.
Accessing the Wizard
35
Do not enter anything in this box if your ISP does not require a service
name.
4 Enter the MTU value supplied by your ISP in the MTU text box. If your ISP
has not supplied an MTU value, leave this at the default value. The
default is 1454.
5 Select an idle time from the Maximum Idle Time drop down list. This is
the amount of time without Internet activity that you want to allow
before the Router ends the PPPoE session.
6 Check all of your settings, and then click Next.
Dynamic IP Address Mode
To setup the Router for use with a dynamic IP address connection:
1 Select the ISP provides configuration dynamically (via DHCP) and then
click Next.
Figure 18 Hostname Screen
2 Some ISPs require a host name. If your ISP has this requirement, enter the
host name in the Host Name text box (Figure 18) and click Next. The
Clone MAC Address screen displays.
Figure 19 Clone MAC Address Screen
36
CHAPTER 4: RUNNING THE SETUP WIZARD
3 If your ISP requires an assigned MAC address, select Yes, I would like to
enter a MAC address manually and enter the values for a MAC address if
required (Figure 19). If the computer you are now using is the one that
was previously connected directly to the cable modem, choose Yes,
please clone the MAC address from the PC I’m currently using.
Static IP Mode
To setup the Router for use with a static IP address connection, use the
following procedure:
1 Select ISP has provided a static IP address, (see Figure 16) and then click
Next. Figure 20 displays.
Figure 20 Static IP Mode Screen
2 Enter your IP Address in the IP Address text box.
3 Enter your subnet mask in the Subnet Mask text box.
4 Enter your ISP Router address in the Internet (ISP) Gateway Address text
box.
5 Enter your primary DNS address in the Primary DNS Address text box.
6 Enter your secondary DNS address in the Secondary DNS Address text
box.
This step is optional. Not all ISPs require a secondary DNS address.
7 Check all of your settings, and then click Next.
Accessing the Wizard
37
PPTP Mode
Figure 21 PPTP Mode Screen
To setup the Router for use with a PPTP connection, use the following
procedure:
1 Enter your PPTP server address in the PPTP Server Address text box.
2 Enter your PPTP user name in the PPTP User Name text box.
3 Enter your PPTP password in the PPTP Password text box.
4 Enter your Primary DNS Address and Secondary DNS address.
Your ISP may provide you with primary and secondary DNS addresses. If
they have been provided, enter the addresses in the appropriate text
boxes. If not, leave 0.0.0.0 in the boxes.
5 Enter the value supplied by your ISP in the MTU text box. If your ISP has
not supplied an MTU value, leave this at the default value. The default is
1460.
6 Select an idle time from the Maximum Idle Time drop-down list. This is
the amount of time without Internet activity that you want to allow
before the Router ends the PPTP session.
7 Check all of your settings, and then click Next. Figure 22 displays.
38
CHAPTER 4: RUNNING THE SETUP WIZARD
Figure 22 PPTP IP Settings
8 IP settings must be used when establishing a PPTP connection. Fill in the
Initial IP Address and the Initial Subnet Mask fields if your ISP has
provided you with these settings. Alternatively, if the PPTP server is
located in your DSL modem, click Suggest to select an IP address on the
same subnet as the PPTP server.
Accessing the Wizard
39
Heart Beat Signal Mode(For Australia only)
Figure 23 Heart Beat Signal Mode Screen
To set up the Router for use with an L2TP connection, use the following
procedure:
1 IT is a service used in Australia only. If you are using Heart Beat Signal
connection, check with your ISP for the necessary setup information.
2 Enter the User Name and Password you use when logging nonto your ISP
through a Heart Beat connection.
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CHAPTER 4: RUNNING THE SETUP WIZARD
LAN Settings
Figure 24 LAN IP Address Screen
This screen displays a suggested LAN IP address and subnet mask of the
Router. It also allows you to change the IP address and subnet mask.
DHCP
The Router contains a Dynamic Host Configuration (DHCP) server that
can automatically configure the TCP/IP settings of every computer on
your network.
Figure 25 DHCP Server Setup Screen
To activate the DHCP Server option, select Enable the DHCP server with
the following settings: and specify the IP pool range. The largest available
continuous IP pool will be automatically entered; if this is not appropriate,
make your required changes. To disable DHCP, select Do not enable the
DHCP server. Click Next when you have finished.
Accessing the Wizard
Wireless Settings
41
Figure 26 Wireless Configuration Screen
This screen displays the Channel and Service Area Name. It also allows
you to change these settings. There are a maximum of 14 channels, the
number available to you is dependent on the country you reside in.
Selecting Clear Channel Select from the Channel drop-down list allows
the Router to automatically select an available channel when first
powered on.
The Service Area Name default for 3Com products is “3Com”. Up to 32
(case sensitive) characters can be entered for the Service Area Name.
3Com strongly recommends that you change the SSID to something
other than the default.
Click Next when you have finished.
If you are configuring the Router from a wireless computer any changes
you make to the wireless configuration will result in communication
between the Router and your computer being lost. This is why 3Com
strongly recommends that you configure the Router from a wired
computer.
It is very important that you set up your wireless clients to use the same
Service Area Name or SSID as the one you use on this screen. If your
clients use a different Service Area Name then they will not be able to
communicate with the Router.
The choice of channel is less important as Clients will generally search all
of the available channels. You should however make a note of the
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CHAPTER 4: RUNNING THE SETUP WIZARD
channel you select as this may be useful if you experience problems with
your clients.
Summary
Figure 27 Configuration Summary Screen
When you complete the Setup Wizard, a configuration summary will
display. 3Com recommends that you verify the configuration information
of the Router and then print this page for your records. Click Finish to
display the Wizard completed screen, shown in Figure 28
Accessing the Wizard
43
Figure 28 Wizard Completed Screen
If you have made changes to the LAN Settings or wireless configuration
options, you may need to reconfigure the computer you are using in
order to make contact with the Router again.
Your Router is now configured and ready for use.
See Chapter 5 for a detailed description of the Router configuration
screens.
44
CHAPTER 4: RUNNING THE SETUP WIZARD
5
ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Navigating
Through the Router
Configuration
Pages
Main Menu
This chapter describes all the screens available through the Router
configuration pages, and is provided as a reference. To get to the
configuration pages, browse to the Router by entering the URL in the
location bar of your browser. The default URL is http://192.168.1.1 but if
you changed the Router LAN IP address during initial configuration, use
the new IP address instead. When you have browsed to the Router, log in
using your system password (default admin).
At the left side of all screens is a main menu, as shown in Figure 29 on
page 46. When you click on a topic from the main menu, that page will
appear in the main part of the screen.
■
Welcome — displays the firmware version of the Router, allows you to
change your password, and launch the Wizard
■
LAN Settings — allows you to configure IP address and subnet mask
information, set up DHCP server parameters, and display the DHCP
client list.
■
Wireless Settings — enables /disables access from wireless computers,
configures WPA or WEP encryption, and provides facilities for
improving the security of the wireless network.
■
Internet Settings — sets up Internet addressing modes such as PPPoE
and PPTP connections, allows you to clone the Router’s MAC address,
and set up dynamic IP address allocation and static IP address settings.
■
Firewall — allows configuration of the Router’s firewall features:
Virtual Servers, Special Applications, PCs Privileges, URL Filtering,
Content Filtering and SPI options
■
System Tools — allows the administrator to perform maintenance
activities on the Router.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Option Tabs
■
Advanced — allows you to monitor and configure the Router’s
advanced features, including RIP, DDNS and Security.
■
Status and Logs — displays the current status and activity logs of the
Router.
■
Support/Feedback — contains a comprehensive online help system
and allows you to provide 3Com with feedback on your Router.
Each corresponding menu page may also provide sub-sections which are
accessed through the use of tabs (see Figure 29 for example). To access a
sub-section, simply click on the required tab.
Getting Help
On every screen, a Help button is available which provides access to the
context-sensitive online help system. Click Help for further assistance and
guidance relating to the current screen.
Welcome Screen
Notice Board
The Welcome section allows you to view the Notice board and to change
your Password. You can also gain access to the Configuration Wizard.
Figure 29 Notice Board Screen
Welcome Screen
47
The Notice Board is used to display configuration warning messages. For
example, you would be warned if you had disabled wireless networking
or wireless encryption.
Password
Figure 30 Password Screen
Changing the Administration Password
You can change the password to prevent unauthorized access to the
Administration System. To do this:
1 Enter the current password in the Old Password field
2 Enter the new password in the New Password field
3 Enter the new password again in the Confirm Password field
4 Click Apply to save the new password
The password is case sensitive.
If you have forgotten your password you need to reset the Router.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Wizard
Figure 31 Wizard Screen
Click WIZARD... to launch the configuration wizard. Refer to Chapter 4
for information on how to run the wizard.
LAN Settings
Unit Configuration
The LAN Settings menu provides the following options:
Figure 32 Unit Configuration Screen
LAN Settings
49
The LAN Settings screen is used to specify the LAN IP address of your
Router, and to configure the DHCP server.
1 Select Unit Configuration and then specify the Router IP Address and
Subnet Mask in the LAN Settings section. The default IP address of the
Router is 192.168.1.1.
2 If you want to use the Router as a DHCP Server, check the Enable check
box.
3 Clicking Auto Range will automatically choose the largest available range
of addresses for your network. Alternatively, you can change the address
range by changing the last digit(s) of the IP Pool Start Address, or the IP
Pool End Address, or both.
4 If you use 3Com NBX telephones, enter the IP address of the NBX call
processor at 3Com NBX Call Processor.
5 Check all of your settings, and then click Apply.
The DHCP server will give out addresses to both wired and wireless
clients.
Static DHCP
Assignment
DHCP Clients List
Figure 33 Static DHCP Assignment Screen
Click on the DHCP Client Tab to display a list of all the DHCP clients in
your network.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Wireless Settings
The Wireless Settings menu provides options described in the following
sections.
To improve the security of your wireless network, 3 Com recommends
that you:
1.Change the SSID from its default value
2.Enable Encryption
3.Enable Connection Control
LAN Settings
Configuration
51
Figure 34 Configuration Screen
Enable Wireless Networking
Use this check box to enable or disable the wireless secion of your LAN.
When disabled, no wireless PCs can gain access to either the internet or
other PCs on your Wired or Wireless LAN through this Router.
Channel Selection
Select a number from the drip-down list to specify which Channel the
Router will transmit and receive on. If another access point or Router
nearby is using the same Channel as you, there will be a reduction in the
performance of your network. If this seems to be the case, you should
select a different channel number. Usually the Wireless computers will
scan to find the correct channel, but if they don't you must configure
them to use the same Channel number as the Router.
Choose the Clear Channel Select option to automatically choose the
clearest channel. The Router will check for the clearest channel whenever
it is rebooted, powered up, and when the Clear Channel Select option is
first applied.
Valid channels are country dependent.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Service Area Name/SSID
This allows you to name your Wireless network. The Service Area
Name/SSID field will accept any alphanumeric string and has a maximum
length of 32 characters. Your Wireless computers must be configured
with exactly the same name or you will not establish a connection. The
Service Area Name may also be referred to as "ESSID" depending on your
networking vendor. By default the Router uses the name "3Com". 3Com
recommends that you change the default name.
In order that your wireless computers can connect to the Router, you
must:
■
Use Infrastructure Mode not Ad hoc Mode
■
Have the same Service Area Name as the Router.
■
Have the same Channel number as the Router.
■
Use the same encryption type and keys as the Router.
■
Ensure that the PC is included in the aouthorized Wireless PCs list if
Connection Control is enabled.
Enable Broadcase SSID
Disable this feature after you have installed your wireless network to
improve the security of your network. When the check box is checked,
the Router will broadcast the Service Area Name/SSID of your wireless
network, whick reduces the security of your Router as it allows any
wireless client to see your wireless LAN.
If you have a wireless client that can detect all the available SSIDs in your
area, your client will not list the Router SSID unless this feature is enabled.
THe clients will still be able to connect, provided that they are supplied
with the SSID.
3Com recommends that you install your wireless network with this
feature enabled and than disable it once you have set up the Router and
wireless clients.
SSID
If required, enter a name that you want to use to uniquely identify the
device at the SSID prompt.
LAN Settings
Encryption
53
When setting up wireless networks, it is important to remember that with
encryption disabled, anyone with a Wireless PC can eavesdrop on your
network. 3Com recommends that you get the network working with
encryption disabled first and then enable it as the last step. This will
simplify setting up your network.
You can configure wireless security such as WEP or WPA encryption on
this screen. Note: it is recommended that you use WPA encryption over
WEP if your wireless clients support WPA All of the wireless clients must
use the same security settings in order to connecdt to the router.
■
WPA — Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) is a 256 bit encryption method
with keys that change over time.
■
WEP — Wireless Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a 64 bit or 128 bit
encryption method with user configurable fixed keys.
WPA provides a higher level of security, provided by its longer key and
dynamic changes made to the key over time. 3Com recommends that
you use WPA with any clients which support it.
If you enable encryption on the Router, you must reconfigure your
wireless PCs to use exactly the same Encryption Type and Keys otherwise
the devices will not understand each other.
The encryption methods used by the Router secure data transmitted
through wireless communications between the Router and its wireless
clients. Enabling encryption has no security effect on data transmitted
through wired (Ethernet) connections or through your connections to the
Internet.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
WEP
To enable WEP, select WEP from the Security Mode.
Encryption: Choose from 64 bits or 128 bits
Passphrase:You can enter a passphrase and click on the Generate
button and the router will automatically generate four WEP keys for you.
WEP Key1-4:Manaually assign a passphrase for each key. If you selected
64 bits encryption, enter 10 HEX characters (0-F) for each key. If you
selected 128 bits encrtpyion,enter 26 HEX characters (0-F) for each key.
TX Key:Select a key to be the active key.
Click Save to save the setting
LAN Settings
WPA
To enable WPA, select WPA-PSK or WPA2-PSK from the Security
Mode.
Encryption Methods: Select either TKIP or AES as the encryption
method.
Passphrase:Enter a passphrase between 8 to 63 characters long.
Key Renewal:Enter the desired key renewal time in seconds.
Click Save to save the setting.
55
56
CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
WPA!with RADIUS
If you are using a RADIUS server in your network for authentication, you
may choose WPA or!WPA2 from the Security Mode.
Encryption Methods: Select either TKIP or AES as the encryption
method.
RADIUS Server:Enter the IP Address of your RADIUS server.
RADIUS Port:;Enter the port number of your RADIUS server.
Shared Key:Enter the shared key.
Key Renewal:Enter the desired key renewal time in seconds.
Click Save to save the setting.
LAN Settings
57
Connection Control
You can restrict certain wireless clients from accessing the router by
specifying their MAC address and enabling access restrictn.
Select Enabled from the drop-down menu and choose whether the
specified wireless clients will be prevented or permitted to access the
wireless network. Enter their MAC address in the fields below and click
Save to save the setting.!
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Client List
Client List Screen
The Wireless Client List provides details on the devices that are connected
to the Wireless LAN. The list is only created when Wireless Networking is
enabled. For each device that is connected to the Wireless Lan, the MAC
address and Connection Speed of that device is displayed. As you
connect more devices to the Wireless LAN, the client list will grow to a
maximum of 32 (the maximum number of wireless devices that the
Router can support).
LAN Settings
Advanced Wireless Settings
59
Advanced Wireless Settings Screen
You can configure various advanced wireless settings on this screen.
Click Save to save the setting.
Internet Settings
Before you can configure the Router, you need to know the IP
information allocation method used by your ISP. There are four different
ways that ISP scan allocate IP information, as described below:
Static IP Address (DSL or Cable)
1
The ISP provides the IP addressing information for you to enter manually.
To configure the Router you will need to know the following:
■
■
■
■
2
IP Address
Subnet Mask
ISP Router
DNS address(es)
Dynamic IP Address (DSL or Cable)
Dynamic IP addressing (or DHCP) automatically assigns the Router IP
information. This method is popular with Cable providers. This method is
also used if your modem has a built in DHCP server.
3
PPPoE (DSL only)
If the installation instructions that accompany your modern ask you to
install a PPPoE client on your PC, then select this option. To configure the
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Router you will need to know the following:
■
■
■
User name
Password
Service Name(ifrequired by your ISP)
When you install the Router, you will not need to use the PPPoE software
on your PC.
LAN Settings
61
PPTP (DSL or Cable)
4
PPTP is only used by some European providers. If the installation
instructions that accompany your modern ask you to setup a dialup
connection using a PPTP VPN tunnel then select this option. To configure
the Router you will need to know the following:
■
■
■
User name
Password
VPN Server address(usually your moderm)
When you install the Router, you will not need to use the dialup VPN on
your PC anymore.
5
Heart Beat Signal(For Australia only)
It is a service used in Australia only. If you are using Heart Beat Signal
connection, check with your ISP for the necessary setup information.
User Name and Password
Enter the User Name and Password you use when logging onto your
ISP through a Heart Beat Signal connection.
Connection to ISP
Before beginning this section, ensure you have the required information
from your ISP.
Select Internet Settings from the main menu to display Connection to ISP.
Choose an IP Allocation Mode from the drop down box.
Select an IP Allocation Mode from the following:
■
Static IP address (to be specified manually)
■
Dynamic IP address (automatically allocated)
■
PPPoE (used by DSL providers only)
■
PPTP (used by some European providers)
■
Heart Beat Signal(supported by some ISPs)
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Static IP Address
Connection Parameters Screen - Static IP
To setup the Router for use with a Static IP address connection:
1 Select Static IP Address (to be specified manually) in the IP Allocation
Mode field.
2 Enter your IP Address in the IP Address text box.
This information, along with the rest of the information in this screen,
should be provided to you by your ISP. If the information is already
entered, your ISP has pre-configured your Router, and you should go to
step 7.
3 Enter your subnet mask in the Subnet Mask text box.
4 Enter your ISP Router address in the ISP Gateway Address text box.
5 Enter your primary DNS address in the Primary DNS Address text box.
6 Enter your secondary DNS address in the Secondary DNS Address text
box.
This step is optional. Not all ISPs require a secondary DNS address.
7 Check all of your settings, and then click Save.
LAN Settings
63
Dynamic IP Address
Figure 35 Connection Parameters Screen - Dynamic IP
If this mode is selected, your IP Address, Subnet Mask, and DNS Address
will be obtained automatically from your ISP. They are not displayed on
this screen, but may be viewed on the Status screen (click on Status and
Logs on the left hand menu bar).
To setup the Router for use with a dynamic IP address connection:
1 Select Dynamic IP Address (automatically allocated) in the IP Allocation
Mode field.
2 Enter the Host Name(optional).
Some ISP srequire a host name. If your ISP has this requirement, enter the
host name in the Host Name text box.
3 If you use ‘Cable’, your ISP may use your MAC address to authenticate
you. If this is the case, you will need to ‘Clone’ your MAC address. There
are three options:
■
Use the Router’s original Internet MAC address - This field is selected
by default and is automatically filled in with the MAC address of the
Router.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
■
Use this PC’s MAC address - This field is automatically filled in with the
MAC address of the PC you are using to configure the Router. You
should use this address only if you were previously using this computer
to connect directly to your modem.
■
Enter a new MAC address manually - Use this option if you want to
specify a new MAC address. Enter the new MAC address.
4 Check all settings and click Save.
PPP over Ethernet
PPPoE Setup Screen
To setup the Router for use with a PPP over Ethernet connection, use the
following procedure:
1 Select PPP over Ethernet in the IP Allocation Mode field.
2 Enter the Host Name (optional).
Some ISPs require a host name. If your ISP has this requirement, enter the
host name in the Host Name text box.
LAN Settings
65
3 Enter your PPP over Ethernet user name in the PPPoE User Name text box.
4 Enter a password in the PPPoE Password text box.
5 Enter your PPP over Ethernet service name in the PPPoE Service Name text
box. Not all ISPs require a PPPoE service name. Only enter a service name
if your ISP requires this.
6 Enter the MTU value supplied by your ISP. If you do not know this, leave it
at the default value. The default is 1454.
7 Select an idle time from the Maximum Idle Time drop-down list.
This value will correspond to the amount of idle time (no Internet activity)
that will pass before the Router automatically ends your PPP over
Ethernet session.
Since the Router contains its own PPPoE client, you no longer need to run
PPPoE client software on your computer to access the Internet.
PPTP
PPTP Setup Screen
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
To setup the Router for use with a PPTP connection, use the following
procedure:
1 Select PPTP (used by some European providers) in the IP Allocation Mode
field.
2 Enter your PPTP server address in the PPTP Server Address text box (this is
typically the address of your modem).
3 Enter your PPTP user name in the PPTP User Name text box.
4 Enter your password in the PPTP Password text box.
5 Enter the MTU value supplied by your ISP. If you do not know this, leave it
at the default value. The default is 1460.
6 Select an idle time from the Maximum Idle Time drop-down list.
This value will correspond to the amount of idle time (no Internet activity)
that will pass before the Router automatically ends your PPTP session.
7 IP settings must be used when establishing a PPTP connection. To obtain
an IP address
■
Fill in the Initial IP Address, Initial Subnet Mask fields if your ISP has
provided you with these settings.
Check all of your settings, and then click Save.
LAN Settings
67
Heart Beat Signal
Check with your ISP to make sure they support Heart Beat Signal.
To set up the Router for use with a Heart Beat Signal connection, use the
following procedure:
1 Select Heart Beat Signal (For Australia only) in the IP Allocation Mode
field.
2 Enter the Host Name(optional).
Some ISPs require a host name. If your ISP has this requirement, enter the
host name in the Host Name text box.
3 Enter your Heart Beat Signal user name in the Heart Beat Signal User
Name text box.
4 Enter your Heart Beat Signal password in the Heart Beat Signal Password
text box.
5 Enter the MTU value supplied by your ISP. If you do not know this, leave it
at the default value. The default is 1440.
6 Select an idle time from the Maximum Idle Time drop-down list.
This value will correspond to the amount of idle time(no Internet activity)!
that will pass before the Router automatically ends your PPTP session.
Check all of your settings, and then click Save.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Firewall
Virtual Servers
On the main frame of the Firewall setup screen is a menu with six tabs:
Virtual Servers, Special Applications, PCs Privileges, URL Filter, Content
Filter and SPI.
Selecting the Firewall option on the main menu displays the Virtual
Servers setup screen.
Virtual Servers Screen
Virtual DMZ
DMZ (De-Militarized Zone) Host is a computer without the protection of
the firewall. This feature allows a single computer to be exposed to
unrestricted 2-way communication from outside of your network. This
feature should be used only if the Virtual Server or Special Applications
options do not provide the level of access needed for certain applications.
To configure one of your computers as a DMZ host, enter the last digit(s)
of the IP address of the computer in the IP Address of DMZ Host text box,
and then click Save.
Firewall
69
Virtual Server
Activating and configuring a virtual server allows one or more of the
computers on your network to function as a public server. For example,
one of your computers could be configured as an FTP server, allowing
others outside of your office network to download files of your choosing.
Or, if you have created a Web site, you can configure one of your
computers as a Web server, so that others can view your Web site.
If you want to host ftp server or online gaming, you must open up ports
on the router. This page allows you to setup port forwarding for the
specified applications.
Before using forwarding, you should assian static IP addresses to the
designated PCs.
Click Save to save the settings.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Special Applications
Special Applications Screen
Select Special Apps tab to display Authorized Application setup screen.
Some software applications require special or multiple connections to the
Internet and these would normally be blocked by the firewall. For
example Internet Telephony or Video conferences require multiple
connections.
So that these special applications can work properly and are not blocked,
the firewall needs to be told about them. In each instance there will be a
trigger port and incoming port(s), where traffic on the trigger port tells
the firewall to open the incoming ports.
Each defined Special Application only supports a single computer user,
and up to 10 Special Applications can be defined. Any incoming ports
opened by a Special Application trigger will be closed after five minutes
of inactivity.
Special Application allows the router to keep track of outgoing data for
specific port numbers. The router remembers which computer sends out
what data, so when the requested data returns through the router, the
data is sent back to the proper computer by way of IP address and port
mapping rules.
Click Save to save the setting.
Firewall
71
Only one computer on your network can use the special application at
any one time.
SPI Select Firewall from the main menu, then select the SPI to display the
SPI screen.!SPI Screen
Check the Enable SPI and Anti-Dos Firewall protection check box to
enable SPI.!When this feature is enabled, all incoming packets will be
blocked except for those types that you allow in the Stateful Packet
Inspection section.
Web Filters:You can select to filter Proxy, Java, ActiveX, and/or Cookies.
Click Save to save the setting.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
QOS
QoS(Quality of Service) manages information as it is transmitted and
received. It ensures better service to those application with a higher
priority.
Click Save to save the setting.
Internet Access Policy
You can setup policies that deny or allow specific clients to access the
Internet.
Enter Policy Name;!Enter a name for the ploicy.
Firewall
73
Status:Choose to enable or disable the selected policy.
PCs:Click on the Edit List button to specify the network clients. Policy
only applies to the PCs that are in the list.
You can specify each client by its MAC Addressor IP Address. You can also
specify a group of clients by entering their IP Address Range. Once you
have specified all the clients, click Save.
Access Restrictions: Select to Deny or Allow the specified clients to
access the Internet by Day and Time.
Blocked Application Port
Select which application port to block, if any, when the specified PCs
have Internet access.
For your convenience, 11 preset applications and their ports are listed. If
you have a Custom application, select Custom and manually enter its
port number.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Website Blocking
You can block the specified clients from accessing certain websites by URL
or Keyword.
Enter the URL or the Keyword you wish to block.
Click Save to save the setting.
To view all the policies, click the Summary button.
Firewall
Contnet!Filter
75
You can subscribe to the 3Com Content Filter Service, which enables you
to block or allow the URL of a number of pre-defined categories.
The Router comes with a 14-day free trial of the 3Com Content Filter
Service. To activate the 14-day free trial of the service, you must first
register your Router at www.3com.com. To continue using the service
after the trial period, you must purchase the Full 3Com Content Filter
Service(3CS8CFS).
URL Filtering rules supersede content filtering rules. If the 3Com Content
Filter is blocking certain Web sites that you want to allow, you can add
these sites to URL Filter's allow list.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
To activate Content Filtering:
1 Select Firewall form the main menu, then select the Content Filter tab.
The Content Filter screen displays.
Figure63!Content Filter Screen
2 Make sure the Enable Content Filter check box is checked.
3 Select the Content Filter Server that you require from the drop-down list.
If you select custom entry, enter the server IP address in the text box.
4 Select the Server Timeout value in milliseconds. The default is 3000
milliseconds (3 seconds).
5 Select Allow or Deny for each displayed category, as required.
Click Apply to save the settings.
Click Save to save the settings.
Firewall
77
System Tools
The main frame of the System Tools screen includes four administration
items: Restart, Time Zone, Configuration, and Upgrade.
Restart Restart Screen
If your Router is not operating correctly, you can choose to restart the
Router by selecting Restart the Router, simulating the effect of power
cycling the unit. No configuration information will be lost but the log files
will be erased. this function may be of use if you are experiencing
problems and you wish to re-establish your Internet connection. Any
network users who are currently accessing the Internet will have their
access interrupted whilst the restart!takes place, and they may need to
reboot thier computers when the restart has completed and the Router is
operational again.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Time Zone
Time Zone Screen
Choose the time zone that is closest to your actual location. The time
zone setting is used by the system clock when displaying the correct time
in the log files.
If you use Daylight saving tick the Enable Day Light savings box, and then
click Save.
The Router reads the correct time from NTP servers on the Internet and
sets its system clock accordingly. The Daylight Savings option merely
advances the system clock by one hour. It does not cause the system
clock to be updated for daylight savings time automatically.
Firewall
Configuration
79
Configuration Screen
Select the Configuration tab to display the Configuration screen .
Backup Configuration
Click BACKUP to save the current Router configuration. You will be
prompted to download and save a file to disk.
Restore Configuration Data
If you want to reinstate the configuration settings previously saved to a
file, press Browse to locate the backup file on your computer, and then
click RESTORE to copy the data into the Router's memory.
The password will remain unchanged.
Reset to Factory Default
If you want to reset the settings on your Router to those that were loaded
at the factory, click RESET. You will lose all your configuration changes.
The Router LAN IP address will revert to 192.168.1.1, and the DHCP
server on the LAN will be enabled. You may need to reconfigure and
restart your computer to re-establish communication with the Router.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Upgrade
Upgrade Screen
The Upgrade facility allows you to install on the Router any new releases
of system software that 3Com may make available. To install new
software, you first need to download the software from the 3Com
support web site to a folder on your computer. Once you have done this,
select Browse to tell your web browser where this file is on your
computer, and then click Apply. The file will be copied to the Router, and
once this has completed, the Router will restart. Although the upgrade
process has been designed to preserve your configuration settings, it is
recommended that you make a backup of the configuration beforehand,
in case the upgrade process fails for any reason (for example, the
connection between the computer and the Router is lost while the new
software is being copied to the Router).
Advanced
81
The upgrade procedure can take up to two minutes, and is complete
when the Alert LED has stopped flashing and is permanently off. Make
sure that you do not interrupt power to the Router during the upgrade
procedure; if you do, the software may be corrupted and the Router may
not start up properly afterwards. .
Advanced
Static Route
Selecting Advanced from the main menu displays the following five tabs
in your Web browser window: Static Route, RIP, Security!and!Syslog.
The Router supports static route functionality. Select the Static Route tab
to display the screen/
Static Route screen
The following information is displayed for each static route:
■
Index - the index of the static route
■
Network Address - the network address of the route. If network
address and subnet mask are both set to 0.0.0.0, this is the default
route.
■
Subnet Mask - the subnet mask of the route. If network address and
subnet mask are both set to 0.0.0.0, this is the default route.
■
Gateway - the gateway used to route data to the network specified by
the network address.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
RIP
The Router supports the Routing Information Protocol (RIP). RIP allows
you to set up routing information on one RIP enabled device, and have
that routing information replicated to all RIP enabled devices on the
network. LAN and WAN interfaces can be configured independently of
each other.
Select the RIP tab to display the screen/
RIP screen
Check the Enable RIP Mode check box to configure RIP on the Router.
Advanced
DDNS
83
Dynamic Domain Name Server (DDNS) enables you to map a static
domain name to a dynamic IP address. The Router supports two DDNS
providers, TZO.com and DYNDNS.org. Before you can set up DDNS, you
must obtain an account, password and static domain name from your
DDNS provider. DDNS is disabled by default.
To set up DDNS:
1 Select Advanced from the main menu, then select the DDNS tab. The
DDNS screen displays.
DDNS screen
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
2 Select a DDNS Service provider from the drop-down list. This can be
either TZO.com or DynDNS.org.
TZO.com
If you select TZO.com:
1 In the Domain Name text box, enter the domain name.
2 In the E-mail text box, enter the account name.
3 In the Key text box, enter the account password.
4 Click Save to make this service active.
DynDNS.org
If you select DYNDNS.org:
1 In the Host Name text box, enter the host name.
2 In the Username text box, enter the account name.
3 In the Password text box, enter the account password.
4 Click Save!to make this service active.!
Advanced
Security
85
Select Security to display the Security screen.
Security Screen
The Internet connects millions of computer users throughout the world.
The vast majority of the computer users on the Internet are friendly and
have no intention of breaking into, stealing from, or damaging your
network. However, there are hackers who may try to break into your
network. The options in the Security tab features help you to protect your
network.
Advanced Settings
The Advanced Settings section of the Security screen displays the
following options:
■
Enable universal plug and play - Universal plug and play allows
compatible software to read and change some the Router’s firewall
settings. This reduces the configuration required but lessens your
control of the Router’s firewall.
Check on the check box to enable this feature, and then select Apply.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
3Com recommends that you leave this feature disabled for maximum
security.
■
Allow PING from the Internet - PING is a utility, which is used to
determine whether a device is active at the specified IP address. PING
is normally used to test the physical connection between two devices,
to ensure that everything is working correctly.
By default the Router has PING disabled in order to make the device
more difficult to find on the Internet and less prone to attack.
Check on the check box to enable this feature, and then select Save.
3Com recommends that you leave this feature disabled for maximum
security.
■
Disable NAT - Network Address Translation (NAT) is the method by
which the Router shares the single IP address assigned by your ISP
with the computers on the network. Only disable NAT if your ISP
assigns you multiple IP addresses or you need NAT disabled for an
advanced system configuration. If you have a single IP address and
your turn NAT off, the computers on your network will not be able to
access the Internet. Other problems may also occur.
Check on the check box to disable NAT, and then select Save.
3Com recommends that you leave this feature enabled for maximum
security.
Enabling Remote Administration
It is possible to administer the Router remotely. Select one of the
following options for remote administration:
■
Disable Remote Administration - This option is set as default.
■
Enable administration from a single Internet Host - Only the specified
Host IP Address can manage the Router. Any other users will be
rejected.
■
Enable administration from a whole subnet - This option allows a
number of users within the specified Host Network Address and
Subnet Mask to administer the Router.
■
Enable administration from any Internet Host - This option allows any
host to access the administration pages.
Advanced
87
To remotely administer your Router, enter
http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx:8000 in the location bar of the browser
running on the remote computer, where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the Internet IP
address of the Router. You may then login using the administration
password.
Your Internet IP address can be found at the bottom of the screen. .
Syslog
Select Syslog to display the syslog screen.
Check on the check box to enable this feature, and then click Save.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Status and Logs
Status
Selecting Status and Logs from the main menu displays the Status,!
Logs-and Routing Table in yur Web browser window.
The Status screen displays a tabular representation of your network and
Internet connection.
Status Screen
Status and Logs
Logs
89
Logs will allow you to view both the normal events, and security threats
logged by the Router.
Logs Screen
Select Incoming Log or Outgoing Log from the Type drop-down menu.
The Incoming Log will display a temporary log of the Source IP Addresses
and Destination Port Numbers fo rthe incoming Internet trafic. Click the
Save Log button to save this information to!a file on your PC's hard drive.
Click the Refresh button to update the log. click the Clean button to clear
all the information that is displayed.
The Outgoing Log will display a temporary log of the LAN IP Addresses,
Destination URLs or IP Addresses, Destination URLs or IP Address, and
Service or Port Numbers for the outgoing Internet traffic. Click the Save
Log button to save this information to a file on your PC's hard drive. Click
the Refresh button to update the log. Click the Clearn button to clear all
the information that is displayed.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
Routing Table
Select the Routing table tab to display routing information used by the
Router. The information is displayed in the form at shown as below.
Support/Feedback
Selecting Support/Feedback from the main menu displays the Support
and Feedback screens.
Support
Support Screen
Selecting the Support option on the main menu displays the support links
screen, which contains a list of Internet links that provide information and
support concerning the Router/
Status and Logs
Feedback
91
Feedback Screen
Selecting the Feedback option displays the Feedback screen and allows
you to provide feedback to 3Com on the operation of your Router . This
screen should not be used to obtain technical support.
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CHAPTER 5: ROUTER CONFIGURATION
6
Basic Connection
Checks
Browsing to the
Router
Configuration
Screens
TROUBLESHOOTING
■
Check that the Router is connected to your computers and to the
cable/DSL modem, and that all the equipment is powered on. Check
that the LAN Status and Cable/DSL Status LEDs on the Router are
illuminated, and that any corresponding LEDs on the cable/DSL
modem and the NIC are also illuminated.
■
Ensure that the computers have completed their start-up procedure
and are ready for use. Some network interfaces may not be correctly
initialized until the start-up procedure has completed.
■
If the link status LED does not illuminate for a port that is connected,
check that you do not have a faulty cable. Try a different cable.
If you have connected your Router and computers together but cannot
browse to the Router configuration screens, check the following:
■
Confirm that the physical connection between your computer and the
Router is OK, and that the LAN Status LEDs on the Router and NIC are
illuminated and indicating the same speed (10Mbps or 100Mbps).
Some NICs do not have status LEDs, in which case a diagnostic
program may be available that can give you this information.
■
Ensure that you have configured your computer as described in
Chapter 3, Setting Up Your Computers. Restart your computer while it
is connected to the Router to ensure that your computer receives an IP
address.
■
When entering the address of the Router into your web browser,
ensure that you use the full URL including the http:// prefix (e.g.
http://192.168.1.1).
■
Ensure that you do not have a Web proxy enabled on your computer.
Go to the Control Panel and click on Internet Options. Select the
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CHAPTER 6: TROUBLESHOOTING
Connections tab and click on the LAN Settings button at the bottom.
Make sure that the Proxy Server option is unchecked.
Connecting to the
Internet
■
If you cannot browse to the Router, use the winipcfg utility in
Windows 95/98/ME to verify that your computer has received the
correct address information from the Router. From the Start menu,
choose Run and then enter winipcfg. Check that the computer has
an IP address of the form 192.168.1.xxx (where xxx is in the range
2-254), the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0, and the default Router is
192.168.1.1 (the address of the Router). If these are not correct, use
the Release and Renew functions to obtain a new IP address from the
Router. Under Windows 2000, use the ipconfig command-line utility
to perform the same functions.
■
If you still cannot browse to the Router, then use the Discovery
program on the accompanying CD-ROM as described in Appendix A.
If you can browse to the Router configuration screens but cannot access
sites on the Internet, check the following:
■
Confirm that the physical connection between the Router and the
cable/DSL modem is OK, and that the link status LEDs on both Router
and modem are illuminated.
■
Confirm that the connection between the modem and the cable/DSL
interface is OK.
■
Ensure that you have entered the correct information into the Router
configuration screens as required by your Internet Service Provider. Use
the “Internet Settings” screen to verify this.
■
For DSL users, check that the PPPoE or PPTP user name, password and
service name are correct, if these are required. Only enter a PPPoE
service name if your ISP requires one.
■
For cable users, check whether your ISP requires a fixed MAC
(Ethernet) address. If so, use the Clone MAC Address feature in the
Router to ensure that the correct MAC address is presented.
■
For cable users, check whether your ISP requires a fixed Host Name. If
so, enter the required Host Name in the Internet Settings screen.
■
Ensure that your computers are not configured to use a Web proxy.
On Windows computers, this can be found under Control Panel >
Internet Options > Connections.
Forgotten Password and Reset to Factory Defaults
Forgotten Password
and Reset to
Factory Defaults
105
If you can browse to the Router configuration screen but cannot log on
because you do not know or have forgotten the password, follow the
steps below to reset the Router to it’s factory default configuration.
CAUTION: All your configuration changes will be lost, and you will need
to run the configuration wizard again before you can re-establish your
Router connection to the Internet. Also, other computer users will lose
their network connections whilst this process is taking place, so choose a
time when this would be convenient.
1 Remove power from the Router.
2 Disconnect all your computers and the cable/DSL modem from the
Router.
3 Using a straight through Ethernet cable, connect the Ethernet Cable/DSL
port on the rear of the Router to any one of the LAN ports.
4 Re-apply power to the Router. The Alert LED will flash as the Router starts
up, and after approximately 30 seconds will start to flash more slowly
(typically 2 seconds on, 2 seconds off). Once the Alert LED has started to
flash slowly, remove power from the Router.
5 Remove the cable connecting the Cable/DSL port to the LAN port, and
reconnect one of your computers to one of the Router LAN ports.
6 Re-apply power to the Router, and when the start-up sequence has
completed, browse to:
http://192.168.1.1
and run the configuration wizard. You may need to restart your computer
before you attempt this.
7 When the configuration wizard has completed, you may reconnect your
network as it was before.
Wireless
Networking
■
Ensure that you have an 802.11b or 802.11g wireless adapter for
each wireless computer, and that it is correctly installed and
configured. Verify that each Wireless computer has either Windows
95 or higher or MAC OS 8.5 or higher.
■
Verify that your wireless computers are configured to work in
Infrastructure mode and not Ad Hoc mode. The Router contains an
Access Point that is designed to operate in Infrastructure mode. Ad
Hoc mode is not supported by the Router.
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CHAPTER 6: TROUBLESHOOTING
■
If you have a wired and a wireless NIC in the same computer, ensure
that the wired NIC is disabled.
■
Check the status of the Router Wireless LED, it should be lit if wireless
is enabled and will flash when there is wireless activity. If not lit go to
“Wireless Settings” and enable wireless networking.
■
Ensure that the TCP/IP settings for all devices are correct.
■
Ensure that the Wireless Clients are using the same SSID or Service
Area Name as the Router. The SSID is case-sensitive
■
Ensure that the encryption method and level that you use on your
clients are the same as those configured on the Router. The Router can
simultaneously support WPA and WEP encryption, but can only
support one configuration of each.
■
Ensure that you have the Wireless computer enabled in the list of
allowed MAC addresses if you are using Wireless Connection control
on the Router.
■
If you are having difficulty connecting or are operating at a low speed
try changing the antenna positions on the rear of the Router. For more
effective coverage you can try reorientating your antennae. Place one
antenna vertically and one horizontally to improve coverage.
Additionally consider moving the wireless computer closer to the
Router to confirm that the building structure or fittings are not
adversely affecting the connectivity. If this resolves the problem
consider relocating the Wireless computer or the Router, or trying a
different channel on the Router.
■
Sources of interference: The 2.4Ghz ISM band is used for 802.11b and
802.11g. This is generally a licence free band for low power
applications, and you may have other devices at your location that
operate in this frequency band. You should take care to ensure that
there are no devices like microwave ovens for example close to the
Router or wireless computers as this could affect receiver sensitivity
and reduce the performance of your network. If you are unsure try
relocating both the wireless computers and the Router to establish
whether this problem exists.
■
Most wireless computer Adapters will scan the channels for the
wireless Router. If a wireless computer has not located the Router then
try initiating a search manually if the client software supports this
feature or manually set the channel on your wireless computer to
correspond to the Router channel number. Please refer to your
Wireless computer adapter documentation and vendor to do this.
Power LED or Power Adapter OK LED Not Lit
Power LED or
Power Adapter OK
LED Not Lit
■
Speed of connection: The 802.11b and 802.11g standards will
automatically choose the best speed depending on the quality of your
connection. As the signal quality weakens then the speed falls back to
a lower speed. The speeds supported by 802.11g are 54 Mbps,
48 Mbps, 36 Mbps, 24 Mbps, 18 Mbps, 12 Mbps, and 6 Mbps. The
speeds supported by 802.11b are 11 Mbps, 5.5 Mbps, 2 Mbps and
1 Mbps. In general the closer you are to the Router the better the
speed. If you are not achieving the speed you had anticipated then try
moving the antenna on the Router or moving the Wireless computer
closer to the Router. In an ideal network the Router should be located
in the centre of the network with Wireless computers distributed
around it. Applications are generally available with the computer
wireless card to carry out a site survey. Use this application to find the
optimal siting for your wireless computer. Consult your Computer
Card documentation and vendor for more details.
■
Check that your Router is receiving power by looking at the status of
the Power LED on the front panel and the Power Adapter OK LED on
the rear panel:
■
■
■
■
Replacement Power
Adapters
107
If both LEDs are lit green then the unit is receiving power.
If both LEDs are unlit then no power is being supplied to the unit.
Check that the power adapter is plugged into a working mains
outlet and that the mains outlet is supplying power. If the mains
socket is supplying power then the power adapter or power
adapter connection may be faulty. See “Replacement Power
Adapters” below.
If the Power Adapter OK LED is lit but the Power LED is unlit then
there may be a fault with your unit. Contact 3Com Technical
Support.
Check that you are using the correct power adapter for your Router.
You should only use the power adapter supplied with your Router.
If both the Power Adapter OK LED and Power LED are off, check your
power adapter connection. If the mains outlet is working and is capable
of supplying power to other devices, contact 3Com Technical Support
and ask for a replacement power adapter. Please quote the power
adapter part number shown on the OfficeConnect power adapter you are
using.
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CHAPTER 6: TROUBLESHOOTING
Alternatively, quote the part number for your region:
Power Adapter Part Numbers
Alert LED
Recovering from
Corrupted Software
Part Number
Region
3C16760
US and Canada
3C16761
UK
3C16762
Europe and Middle East
3C16763
Australasia (except Japan and Korea)
3C16764
South Africa
3C16766
Japan
3C16767
Korea
3C16768
Argentina
The Alert LED will flash when the Router unit is first powered up while
the system software checks the hardware for proper operation. Once the
Router has started normal operation, the Alert LED will go out.
■
If the Alert LED does not go out following start up, but illuminates
continuously, this indicates that the software has detected a possible
fault with the hardware. Remove power from the Router, wait 10
seconds and then re-apply power. If the Alert LED comes on
continuously again, then a fault has been detected. Locate the copy of
the Router software on the accompanying CD-ROM or 3Com web site
(http://www.3com.com) and upload it to the Router to see if this
clears the fault (refer to “Recovering from Corrupted Software”
below). If this does not fix the problem, contact your supplier for
further advice.
■
During normal operation, you may notice the Alert LED lighting briefly
from time to time. This indicates that the Router has detected a hacker
attack from the Internet and has prevented it from harming your
network. You need take no specific action on this, unless you decide
that these attacks are happening frequently in which case you may
wish to discuss this with your ISP. The Router logs such attacks, and
this information is available through the Status and Logs screens.
If the Alert LED remains permanently on following power-up, it is possible
that the system software has become corrupted. In this condition, the
Frequently Asked Questions
109
Router will enter a “recovery” state; DHCP is disabled, and the LAN IP
address is set to 192.168.1.1. Follow the instructions below to upload a
new copy of the system software to a Router unit in this state.
Ensure that one of your computers has a copy of the new software image
file stored on its hard disk or available on CD-ROM.
The latest software is available on 3Com’s Web site at:
www.3com.com.
1 Remove power from the Router and disconnect the Cable/DSL modem
and all your computers, except for the one computer with the software
image.
2 You will need to reconfigure this computer with the following static IP
address information:
■
IP address: 192.168.1.2
■
Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
■
Default Router address: 192.168.1.1
3 Restart the computer, and re-apply power to the Router.
4 Using the Web browser on the computer, enter the following URL in the
location bar:
http://192.168.1.1.
This will connect you to the Microcode Recovery utility in the Router.
5 Follow the on-screen instructions. Enter the path and filename of the
software image file.
6 When the upload has completed, the Router will restart, run the self-test
and, if successful, resume normal operation. The Alert LED will go out.
7 Refer to the Installation Guide to reconnect your Router to the Cable/DSL
modem and the computers in your network. Do not forget to reconfigure
the computer you used for the software upload.
If the Router does not resume normal operation following the upload, it
may be faulty. Contact your supplier for advice.
Frequently Asked
Questions
How do I reset the Router to Factory Defaults?
See “Forgotten Password and Reset to Factory Defaults”.
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CHAPTER 6: TROUBLESHOOTING
How many computers on the LAN does the Router support?
A maximum of 253 computers on the LAN are supported.
How many wireless clients does the Cable/DSL Router support?
A maximum of 128 wireless clients are supported.
There are only 4 LAN ports on the Router. How are additional
computers connected?
You can expand the number of connections available on your LAN
by using hubs, switches and wireless access points connected to
the Router. 3Com wireless access points and OfficeConnect hubs
and switches provide a simple, reliable means of expanding your
network; contact your supplier for more information, or visit:
http://www.3com.com/
Does the Router support virtual private networks (VPNs)?
The Router supports VPN passthrough, which allows VPN clients on
the LAN to communicate with VPN hosts on the Internet. It is also
possible to set up VPN hosts on your LAN that clients elsewhere on
the Internet can connect to, but this is not a recommended
configuration.
Where can I download software updates for the Router?
Updates to the Router software are posted on the 3Com support
web site, accessible by visiting:
http://www.3com.com
What other online resources are there?
The 3Com Knowledgebase at:
http://knowledgebase.3com.com
is a database of technical information covering all 3Com products.
It is updated daily with information from 3Com technical support
services, and it is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
A
Running the
Discovery
Application
USING DISCOVERY
3Com provides a user friendly Discovery application for detecting the
Router on the network.
Windows Installation
(95/98/2000/Me/NT)
1 Insert the Router CD-ROM in the CD-ROM drive on your computer. A
menu will appear; select Router Discovery.
Discovery will find the Router even if it is unconfigured or misconfigured.
Discovery Welcome Screen
2 When the Welcome screen is displayed click on Next and wait until the
application discovers the Routers connected to your LAN.
112
APPENDIX A: USING DISCOVERY
Discovered Router Screen
3 Highlight the Cable/DSL Router by clicking on it, and press Next.
Discovered Finish!Screen
4 Click on Finish to launch a web browser and display the login page for
the Router.
B
IP ADDRESSING
The Internet
Protocol Suite
The Internet protocol suite consists of a well-defined set of
communications protocols and several standard application protocols.
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is probably the
most widely known and is a combination of two of the protocols (IP and
TCP) working together. TCP/IP is an internationally adopted and
supported networking standard that provides connectivity between
equipment from many vendors over a wide variety of networking
technologies.
Managing the
Router over the
Network
To manage a device over the network, the Router must be correctly
configured with the following IP information:
IP Addresses and
Subnet Masks
■
An IP address
■
A Subnet Mask
Each device on your network must have a unique IP address to operate
correctly. An IP address identifies the address of the device to which data
is being sent and the address of the destination network. IP addresses
have the format n.n.n.x where n is a decimal number between 0 and 255
and x is a number between 1 and 254 inclusive.
However, an IP Address alone is not enough to make your device operate.
In addition to the IP address, you need to set a subnet mask. All networks
are divided into smaller sub-networks and a subnet mask is a number
that enables a device to identify the sub-network to which it is
connected.
114
APPENDIX B: IP ADDRESSING
For your network to work correctly, all devices on the network must have:
■
The same sub-network address.
■
The same subnet mask.
The only value that will be different is the specific host device number.
This value must always be unique.
An example IP address is ‘192.168.100.8’. However, the size of the
network determines the structure of this IP Address. In using the Router,
you will probably only encounter two types of IP Address and subnet
mask structures.
Type One
In a small network, the IP address of ‘192.168.100.8’ is split into two
parts:
■
Part one (‘192.168.100’) identifies the network on which the device
resides.
■
Part two (‘.8’) identifies the device within the network.
This type of IP Address operates on a subnet mask of ‘255.255.255.0’.
See an example about how a network with three computers and a Router
might be configured.
Table 4 IP Addressing and Subnet Masking
Device
IP Address
Subnet Mask
PC 1
192.168.100.8
255.255.255.0
PC 2
192.168.100.33
255.255.255.0
PC 3
192.168.100.188
255.255.255.0
Router
192.168.100.72
255.255.255.0
Type Two
In larger networks, where there are more devices, the IP address of
‘192.168.100.8’ is, again, split into two parts but is structured differently:
■
Part one (‘192.168’) identifies the network on which the device
resides.
■
Part two (‘.100.8’) identifies the device within the network.
How does a Device Obtain an IP Address and Subnet Mask?
115
This type of IP Address operates on a subnet mask of ‘255.255.0.0’.
See an example about how a network (only four computers represented)
and a Router might be configured.
IP Addressing and Subnet Masking
How does a Device
Obtain an IP
Address and Subnet
Mask?
DHCP Addressing
Device
IP Address
Subnet Mask
PC 1
192.168.100.8
255.255.0.0
PC 2
192.168.201.30
255.255.0.0
PC 3
192.168.113.155
255.255.0.0
PC 4
192.168.002.230
255.255.0.0
Router
192.168.002.72
255.255.0.0
There are three different ways to obtain an IP address and the subnet
mask. These are:
■
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Addressing
■
Static Addressing
■
Automatic Addressing (Auto-IP Addressing)
The Router contains a DHCP server, which allows computers on your
network to obtain an IP address and subnet mask automatically. DHCP
assigns a temporary IP address and subnet mask which gets reallocated
once you disconnect from the network.
DHCP will work on any client Operating System such as Windows® 95,
Windows 98 or Windows NT 4.0. Also, using DHCP means that the same
IP address and subnet mask will never be duplicated for devices on the
network. DHCP is particularly useful for networks with large numbers of
users on them.
Static Addressing
Auto-IP Addressing
You must enter an IP Address and the subnet mask manually on every
device. Using a static IP and subnet mask means the address is
permanently fixed.
Network devices use automatic IP addressing if they are configured to
acquire an address using DHCP but are unable to contact a DHCP server.
116
APPENDIX B: IP ADDRESSING
Automatic IP addressing is a scheme where devices allocate themselves
an IP address at random from the industry standard subnet of
169.254.x.x (with a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0). If two devices allocate
themselves the same address, the conflict is detected and one of the
devices allocates itself a new address.
Automatic IP addressing support was introduced by Microsoft in the
Windows 98 operating system and is also supported in Windows 2000.
C
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
This section lists the technical specifications for the OfficeConnect
Wireless 11g Cable/DSL Router.
Wireless 11g
Cable/DSL Router
Interfaces
Cable/DSL modem connection — 10Mbps/100Mbps dual speed Ethernet
port (10BASE-T/100BASE-TX)
LAN connection — four 10Mbps/100Mbps dual speed Ethernet ports
(10BASE-T/100BASE-TX)
WLAN Interfaces
Standard IEEE 802.11g, Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS)
Transmission rate: 54Mbps, automatic fallback to 48, 36, 24, 18, 12, or
6 Mbps
Maximum channels: 14
Range up to 304.8m (1000ft)
Frequency: (US/Canada/Europe) 2.400-2.4835 GHz
Sensitivity: 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48 Mbps: -85 dBm;
54 Mbps -66 dBm typical
Modulation: CCK, BPSK, QPSK, OFDM
Encryption: 40/64 bit WEP, 128 bit WEP, WPA
Maximum clients: 128
O/P Power: 18dBm
Standard IEEE 802.11b, Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS)
Transmission rate: 11bps, automatic fallback to 5.5, 2, or 1 Mbps
Maximum channels: 14
Range up to 304.8m (1000ft)
Frequency: (US/Canada/Europe) 2.400-2.4835 GHz
Sensitivity: 1, 2, 5.5 Mbps: -85 dBm; 11 Mbps -82 dBm typical
Modulation: CCK, BPSK, QPSK, OFDM
118
APPENDIX C: TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Encryption: 40/64 bit WEP, 128 bit WEP, WPA
Maximum clients: 128
O/P Power 18dBm
Operating Temperature
0 °C to 40 °C (32 °F to 105 °F)
Power
7VA, 23.9 BThU/hr
Humidity
0% to 90% (non-condensing) humidity
Dimensions
■
Width = 220 mm (8.7 in.)
■
Depth = 135 mm (5.3 in.)
■
Height = 24 mm (1 in.)
Weight
Approximately 500 g (1.1 lbs)
Standards
Functional:
ISO 8802/3
IEEE 802.3
IEEE 802.11b, 802.11g, Wi-Fi
Safety:
UL60950
CSA 22.2 #60950
IEC 60950
EN 60950
EMC:
EN 55022 Class B
EN 55024
CISPR 22
FCC Part 15 Class B*
ICES-003 Class B
CNS 13438 Class A
ETSI EN 301 489–17
Radio
CFR 47 FCC Part 15.207, 15.209, 15.247 and 15.249.
ETS 300 328 (2.4 GHz ISM band wide band transmission
119
systems.
RSS-210
Environmental: EN 60068 (IEC 68)
*See “Regulatory Information(Page 139)” on for conditions of operation.
System Requirements
Operating Systems
The Router will support the following Operating Systems:
■
Windows 95/98
■
Windows NT 4.0
■
Windows ME
■
Windows 2000
■
Windows XP
■
Mac OS 8.5 or higher
■
Unix
Ethernet Performance
The Router complies to the IEEE 802.3i, u and x specifications.
Wireless Performance
The Router has been designed to conform to the Wi-Fi interoperability
test standard.
Cable Specifications
The Router supports the following cable types and maximum lengths:
■
Category 3 (Ethernet) or Category 5 (Fast Ethernet or Dual Speed
Ethernet) Twisted Pair — shielded and unshielded cable types.
■
Maximum cable length of 100m (327.86 ft).
120
APPENDIX C: TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
D
SAFETY INFORMATION
Important Safety
Information
WARNING: Warnings contain directions that you must follow for your
personal safety. Follow all directions carefully.
You must read the following safety information carefully before you
install or remove the unit:
WARNING: The Router generates and uses radio frequency (rf) energy. In
some environments, the use of rf energy is not permitted. The user
should seek local advice on whether or not rf energy is permitted within
the area of intended use.
WARNING: Exceptional care must be taken during installation and
removal of the unit.
WARNING: Only stack the Router with other OfficeConnect units.
WARNING: To ensure compliance with international safety standards,
only use the power adapter that is supplied with the unit.
WARNING: The socket outlet must be near to the unit and easily
accessible. You can only remove power from the unit by disconnecting
the power cord from the outlet.
WARNING: This unit operates under SELV (Safety Extra Low Voltage)
conditions according to IEC 60950. The conditions are only maintained
if the equipment to which it is connected also operates under SELV
conditions.
WARNING: There are no user-replaceable fuses or user-serviceable
parts inside the Router. If you have a physical problem with the unit
that cannot be solved with problem solving actions in this guide,
contact your supplier.
122
APPENDIX D: SAFETY INFORMATION
WARNING: Disconnect the power adapter before moving the unit.
WARNING: RJ-45 ports. These are shielded RJ-45 data sockets. They
cannot be used as telephone sockets. Only connect RJ-45 data
connectors to these sockets.
Wichtige
Sicherheitshinweise
VORSICHT: Warnhinweise enthalten Anweisungen, die Sie zu Ihrer
eigenen Sicherheit befolgen müssen. Alle Anweisungen sind sorgfältig
zu befolgen.
Sie müssen die folgenden Sicherheitsinformationen sorgfältig
durchlesen, bevor Sie das Geräts installieren oder ausbauen:
VORSICHT: Der Router erzeugt und verwendet Funkfrequenz (RF). In
manchen Umgebungen ist die Verwendung von Funkfrequenz nicht
gestattet. Erkundigen Sie sich bei den zuständigen Stellen, ob die
Verwendung von Funkfrequenz in dem Bereich, in dem der Bluetooth
Access Point eingesetzt werden soll, erlaubt ist.
VORSICHT: Bei der Installation und beim Ausbau des Geräts ist mit
höchster Vorsicht vorzugehen.
VORTSICHT: Stapeln Sie das Geräts nur mit anderen OfficeConnect
Gerätes zusammen.
VORSICHT: Aufgrund von internationalen Sicherheitsnormen darf das
Gerät nur mit dem mitgelieferten Netzadapter verwendet werden.
VORSICHT: Die Netzsteckdose muß in der Nähe des Geräts und leicht
zugänglich sein. Die Stromversorgung des Geräts kann nur durch
Herausziehen des Gerätenetzkabels aus der Netzsteckdose
unterbrochen werden.
VORSICHT: Der Betrieb dieses Geräts erfolgt unter den
SELV-Bedingungen (Sicherheitskleinstspannung) gemäß IEC 60950.
Diese Bedingungen sind nur gegeben, wenn auch die an das Gerät
angeschlossenen Geräte unter SELV-Bedingungen betrieben werden.
123
VORSICHT: Es sind keine von dem Benutzer zu ersetzende oder zu
wartende Teile in dem Gerät vorhanden. Wenn Sie ein Problem mit
dem Router haben, das nicht mittels der Fehleranalyse in dieser
Anleitung behoben werden kann, setzen Sie sich mit Ihrem Lieferanten
in Verbindung.
VORSICHT: Vor dem Ausbau des Geräts das Netzadapterkabel
herausziehen.
VORSICHT: RJ-45-Anschlüsse. Dies sind abgeschirmte
RJ-45-Datenbuchsen. Sie können nicht als Telefonanschlußbuchsen
verwendet werden. An diesen Buchsen dürfen nur RJ-45-Datenstecker
angeschlossen werden.
Consignes
importantes de
sécurité
AVERTISSEMENT: Les avertissements présentent des consignes que
vous devez respecter pour garantir votre sécurité personnelle. Vous
devez respecter attentivement toutes les consignes.
Nous vous demandons de lire attentivement les consignes suivantes de
sécurité avant d’installer ou de retirer l’appareil:
AVERTISSEMENT: La Router fournit et utilise de l'énergie
radioélectrique (radio fréquence -rf). L'utilisation de l'énergie
radioélectrique est interdite dans certains environnements. L'utilisateur
devra se renseigner sur l'autorisation de cette énergie dans la zone
prévue.
AVERTISSEMENT: Faites très attention lors de l'installation et de la
dépose du groupe.
AVERTISSEMENT: Seulement entasser le moyer avec les autres moyeux
OfficeConnects.
AVERTISSEMENT: Pour garantir le respect des normes internationales
de sécurité, utilisez uniquement l'adaptateur électrique remis avec cet
appareil.
AVERTISSEMENT: La prise secteur doit se trouver à proximité de
l’appareil et son accès doit être facile. Vous ne pouvez mettre l’appareil
hors circuit qu'en débranchant son cordon électrique au niveau de
cette prise.
124
APPENDIX D: SAFETY INFORMATION
AVERTISSEMENT: L’appareil fonctionne à une tension extrêmement
basse de sécurité qui est conforme à la norme CEI 60950. Ces
conditions ne sont maintenues que si l'équipement auquel il est
raccordé fonctionne dans les mêmes conditions.
AVERTISSEMENT: Il n’y a pas de parties remplaceables par les
utilisateurs ou entretenues par les utilisateurs à l’intérieur du moyeu. Si
vous avez un problème physique avec le moyeu qui ne peut pas être
résolu avec les actions de la résolution des problèmes dans ce guide,
contacter votre fournisseur.
AVERTISSEMENT: Débranchez l'adaptateur électrique avant de retirer
cet appareil.
AVERTISSEMENT: Ports RJ-45. Il s'agit de prises femelles blindées de
données RJ-45. Vous ne pouvez pas les utiliser comme prise de
téléphone. Branchez uniquement des connecteurs de données RJ-45 sur
ces prises femelles.
E
END USER SOFTWARE LICENSE
AGREEMENT
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126
APPENDIX E: END USER SOFTWARE LICENSE AGREEMENT
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Copyright © 2004 3Com Corporation and its licensors. All rights reserved. 3Com is a registered trademark of 3Com Corporation.
F
Information
Regarding Popular
ISPs
ISP INFORMATION
WAN Types
Characteristics
Popular ISPs
Dynamic IP
Cable modem ISP, non-hostname
based. Need to clone the MAC
address in the Advanced tab of
the Internet Settings page.
MediaOne, RoadRunner,
Optimum Online, Time Warner,
Charter, Adelphia, Metrocast.
(Clone MAC)
Dynamic IP
(Hostname)
PPPoE
(DSL)
PPTP
Cable ISP, Requires Hostname to @Home Network, Cogoco,
authenticate ie. cx213818-B.
ComCast, Cox, Excite, Rogers,
Need to enter the hostname in the Shaw, Insight, Videotron
Internet Settings page.
Usually special software installed
on PC, MacPOET/WinPOET,
EnterNet 300. The Router has this
software built in and you can
remove it from your PC. You will
need to enter the user name and
password that your ISP provided
to you in the PPPoE page of the
Router. Leave the service name
blank unless your ISP requires it.
Bell*, Century Tel, Citizens,
Primus, Prodigy, Snet, Sprint FC,
Verizon, First World, Brightnet,
Earthlink, Ameritech, Covad,
Mindspring, Sympatico DSL,
USwest, Owest, SNet
Cable or DSL, always on. Some
European ISPs require a PPTP
tunnel to authenticate their
network.
KPN (Netherlands), Austria
Telecom
128
APPENDIX F: ISP INFORMATION
Static
(DSL)
Static
(Cable)
DSL Modem, always on. Need to
enter ALL IP information from ISP
in the Static IP address section of
the Internet Settings page.
CableSpeed, Cnet, Direct Link,
Drizzle, DSL Extreme, Earthlink
Wireless, Fast Point, Flashcom,
GTE-WhirlWind, Heavenet, HSA
Corp, I-55, InterAccess, LinkLine,
Mission, Nauticom, NAS, Omitel,
Onterra, Phatpipe, Rhythms,
Speakeasy, Sterling, XO, Zyan
Cable Modem, Always on, ISP
Cox Cable, Sprint, US Cable,
assigns specific IP information
Cable-Cable
which needs to be entered on the
“Fixed IP” page of the Router.
*Bell includes Bell Advantage, Bell Canada, Bell South, PacBell and
Southwestern Bell.
GLOSSARY
802.11b
The IEEE specification for wireless Ethernet which allows speeds of up to
11 Mbps. The standard provides for 1, 2, 5.5 and 11 Mbps data rates.
The rates will switch automatically depending on range and environment.
802.11g
The IEEE specification for wireless Ethernet which allows speeds of up to
54 Mbps. The standard provides for 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 54 Mbps data
rates. The rates will switch automatically depending on range and
environment.
10BASE-T
The IEEE specification for 10 Mbps Ethernet over Category 3, 4 or 5
twisted pair cable.
100BASE-TX
The IEEE specification for 100 Mbps Fast Ethernet over Category 5
twisted-pair cable.
Access Point
An Access Point is a device through which wireless clients connect to
other wireless clients and which acts as a bridge between wireless clients
and a wired network, such as Ethernet. Wireless clients can be moved
anywhere within the coverage area of the access point and still connect
with each other. If connected to an Ethernet network, the access point
monitors Ethernet traffic and forwards appropriate Ethernet messages to
the wireless network, while also monitoring wireless client radio traffic
and forwarding wireless client messages to the Ethernet LAN.
Ad Hoc mode
Ad Hoc mode is a configuration supported by most wireless clients. It is
used to connect a peer to peer network together without the use of an
access point. It offers lower performance than infrastructure mode, which
is the mode the Router uses. (see also Infrastructure mode.)
Auto-negotiation
Some devices in the OfficeConnect range support auto-negotiation.
Auto-negotiation is where two devices sharing a link, automatically
130
GLOSSARY
configure to use the best common speed. The order of preference (best
first) is: 100BASE-TX full duplex, 100BASE-TX half duplex, 10BASE-T full
duplex, and 10BASE-T half duplex. Auto-negotiation is defined in the IEEE
802.3 standard for Ethernet and is an operation that takes place in a few
milliseconds.
Bandwidth
The information capacity, measured in bits per second, that a channel can
transmit. The bandwidth of Ethernet is 10 Mbps, the bandwidth of Fast
Ethernet is 100 Mbps. The bandwidth for 802.11b wireless is 11Mbps.
Category 3 Cables
One of five grades of Twisted Pair (TP) cabling defined by the EIA/TIA-586
standard. Category 3 is voice grade cable and can only be used in
Ethernet networks (10BASE-T) to transmit data at speeds of up to 10
Mbps.
Category 5 Cables
One of five grades of Twisted Pair (TP) cabling defined by the EIA/TIA-586
standard. Category 5 can be used in Ethernet (10BASE-T) and Fast
Ethernet networks (100BASE-TX) and can transmit data up to speeds of
100 Mbps. Category 5 cabling is better to use for network cabling than
Category 3, because it supports both Ethernet (10 Mbps) and Fast
Ethernet (100 Mbps) speeds.
Channel
Similar to any radio device, the OfficeConnect Cable/DSL Router allows
you to choose different radio channels in the wireless spectrum. A
channel is a particular frequency within the 2.4GHz spectrum within
which the Router operates.
Client
The term used to described the desktop PC that is connected to your
network.
DDNS
Dynamic Domain Name Server. A method that enables Internet users to
tie their domain name(s) to computers or servers. DDNS enables a domain
name to follow an IP address automatically when the IP address changes.
DHCP
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. This protocol automatically assigns
an IP address for every computer on your network. Windows 95,
Windows 98 and Windows NT 4.0 contain software that assigns IP
addresses to workstations on a network. These assignments are made by
the DHCP server software that runs on Windows NT Server, and Windows
GLOSSARY
131
95 and Windows 98 will call the server to obtain the address. Windows
98 will allocate itself an address if no DHCP server can be found.
DNS Server Address
DSL modem
DNS stands for Domain Name System, which allows Internet host
computers to have a domain name (such as 3com.com) and one or more
IP addresses (such as 192.34.45.8). A DNS server keeps a database of
host computers and their respective domain names and IP addresses, so
that when a domain name is requested (as in typing “3com.com” into
your Internet browser), the user is sent to the proper IP address. The DNS
server address used by the computers on your home network is the
location of the DNS server your ISP has assigned.
DSL stands for digital subscriber line. A DSL modem uses your existing
phone lines to send and receive data at high speeds.
Encryption
A method for providing a level of security to wireless data transmissions.
The OfficeConnect Cable/DSL Router and Wireless Cable/DSL Router offer
a choice of encryption methods. See “WPA” and “WEP” for details.
ESSID
Extended Service Set Identifier. The ESSID is a unique identifier for your
wireless network. You must have the same ESSID entered into the Router
and each of it's wireless clients.
Ethernet
Ethernet Address
Fast Ethernet
A LAN specification developed jointly by Xerox, Intel and Digital
Equipment Corporation. Ethernet networks use CSMA/CD to transmit
packets at a rate of 10 Mbps over a variety of cables.
See MAC address.
An Ethernet system that is designed to operate at 100 Mbps.
Firewall
Electronic protection that prevents anyone outside of your network from
seeing your files or damaging your computers.
Full Duplex
A system that allows packets to be transmitted and received at the same
time and, in effect, doubles the potential throughput of a link.
132
GLOSSARY
Router
A device that acts as a central hub by connecting to each computer's
network interface card and managing the data traffic between the local
network and the Internet.
Half Duplex
A system that allows packets to transmitted and received, but not at the
same time. Contrast with full duplex.
Hub
A device that regenerates LAN traffic so that the transmission distance of
that signal can be extended. Hubs are similar to repeaters, in that they
connect LANs of the same type; however they connect more LANs than a
repeater and are generally more sophisticated.
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. This American
organization was founded in 1963 and sets standards for computers and
communications.
IETF
Internet Engineering Task Force. An organization responsible for
providing engineering solutions for TCP/IP networks. In the network
management area, this group is responsible for the development of the
SNMP protocol.
Infrastructure mode
Infrastructure mode is the wireless configuration supported by the Router.
You will need to ensure all of your clients are set up to use infrastructure
mode in order for them to communicate with the Access Point built into
your Router. (see also Ad Hoc mode)
IP
Internet Protocol. IP is a layer 3 network protocol that is the standard for
sending data through a network. IP is part of the TCP/IP set of protocols
that describe the routing of packets to addressed devices. An IP address
consists of 32 bits divided into two or three fields: a network number and
a host number or a network number, a subnet number, and a host
number.
IP Address
Internet Protocol Address. A unique identifier for a device attached to a
network using TCP/IP. The address is written as four octets separated with
periods (full-stops), and is made up of a network section, an optional
subnet section and a host section.
GLOSSARY
133
ISP
Internet Service Provider. An ISP is a business that provides connectivity to
the Internet for individuals and other businesses or organizations.
LAN
Local Area Network. A network of end stations (such as PCs, printers,
servers) and network devices (hubs and switches) that cover a relatively
small geographic area (usually not larger than a floor or building). LANs
are characterized by high transmission speeds over short distances (up to
1000 metres).
MAC
Media Access Control. A protocol specified by the IEEE for determining
which devices have access to a network at any one time.
MAC Address
Media Access Control Address. Also called the hardware or physical
address. A layer 2 address associated with a particular network device.
Most devices that connect to a LAN have a MAC address assigned to
them as they are used to identify other devices in a network. MAC
addresses are 6 bytes long.
NAT
Network Address Translation. NAT enables all the computers on your
network to share one IP address. The NAT capability of the Router allows
you to access the Internet from any computer on your home network
without having to purchase more IP addresses from your ISP.
Network
A Network is a collection of computers and other computer equipment
that are connected for the purpose of exchanging information or sharing
resources. Networks vary in size, some are within a single room, others
span continents.
Network Interface
Card (NIC)
Protocol
PPPoE
A circuit board installed into a piece of computing equipment, for
example, a computer, that enables you to connect it to the network. A
NIC is also known as an adapter or adapter card.
A set of rules for communication between devices on a network. The
rules dictate format, timing, sequencing and error control.
Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet. Point-to-Point Protocol is a method
of data transmission originally created for dial-up connections; PPPoE is
for Ethernet connections.
134
GLOSSARY
PPTP
RIP
RJ-45
Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol is a method of secure data transmission
between two remote sites over the internet.
Routing Information Protocol. RIP allows an administrator to set up
routing information on one RIP enabled device, and have that routing
information replicated to all RIP enabled devices on the network.
A standard connector used to connect Ethernet networks. The “RJ”
stands for “registered jack”.
Server
A computer in a network that is shared by multiple end stations. Servers
provide end stations with access to shared network services such as
computer files and printer queues.
SPI
Stateful Packet Inspection. This feature requires the firewall to remember
what outgoing requests have been sent and only allow responses to
those requests back through the firewall. This way, un-requested
attempts to access the network will be denied.
SSID
Service Set Identifier. Some vendors of wireless products use SSID
interchangeably with ESSID.
Subnet Address
An extension of the IP addressing scheme that allows a site to use a single
IP network address for multiple physical networks.
Subnet mask
A subnet mask, which may be a part of the TCP/IP information provided
by your ISP, is a set of four numbers configured like an IP address. It is
used to create IP address numbers used only within a particular network
(as opposed to valid IP address numbers recognized by the Internet,
which must assigned by InterNIC).
Subnets
Switch
A network that is a component of a larger network.
A device that interconnects several LANs to form a single logical LAN that
comprises of several LAN segments. Switches are similar to bridges, in
that they connect LANs of a different type; however they connect more
LANs than a bridge and are generally more sophisticated.
GLOSSARY
TCP/IP
135
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. This is the name for two
of the most well-known protocols developed for the interconnection of
networks. Originally a UNIX standard, TCP/IP is now supported on almost
all platforms, and is the protocol of the Internet.
TCP relates to the content of the data travelling through a network —
ensuring that the information sent arrives in one piece when it reaches its
destination. IP relates to the address of the end station to which data is
being sent, as well as the address of the destination network.
Traffic
The movement of data packets on a network.
universal plug and
play
Universal plug and play is a system which allows compatible applications
to read some of their settings from the Router. This allows them to
automatically configure some, or all, of their settings and need less user
configuration.
URL Filter
A URL Filter is a feature of a firewall that allows it to stop its clients form
browsing inappropriate Web sites.
WAN
Wide Area Network. A network that connects computers located in
geographically separate areas (for example, different buildings, cities, or
countries). The Internet is an example of a wide area network.
WDS
Wireless Distribution System. A system that can be comprised of a
bridging and/or a repeater mode. In wireless bridging, APs communicate
only with each other to bridge together two separate networks. In
wireless repeating, APs rebroadcast received signals to extend reach and
range, at the expense of throughput. The Router uses wireless repeating.
WECA
WEP
Wireless Ethernet Compatibility Alliance. An industry group formed to
certify cross vendor interoperability and compatibility of 802.11b and
802.11g wireless networking products and to promote the standard for
enterprise, small business and home environments. (see also 802.11b,
802.11g, Wi-Fi)
Wired Equivalent Privacy. A shared key encryption mechanism for wireless
networking. Encryption strength is 40/64 bit or 128 bit.
136
GLOSSARY
Wi-Fi
Wireless Client
Wireless LAN Service
Area
Wizard
WLAN
WPA
Wireless Fidelity. This is the certification granted by WECA to products
that meet their interoperability criteria. (see also 802.11b, WECA)
The term used to describe a desktop or mobile PC that is wirelessly
connected to your wireless network
Another term for ESSID (Extended Service Set Identifier)
A Windows application that automates a procedure such as installation
or configuration.
Wireless Local Area Network. A WLAN is a group of computers and
devices connected together by wireless in a relatively small area (such as a
house or office).
Wi-Fi Protected Access. A dynamically changing encryption mechanism
for wireless networking. Encryption strength is 256 bit.
139
REGULATORY
INFORMATION
3Com OfficeConnect Wireless 54Mbps/108Mbps 11g Cable/DSL Router (WL-537, WL-537S)
must be installed and used in strict accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions as described in
the user documentation that comes with the product.
This product contains encryption. It is unlawful to export out of the U.S. without obtaining a U.S.
Export License.
This product does not contain any user serviceable components. Any unauthorized product
changes or modifications will invalidate 3Com’s warranty and all applicable regulatory
certifications and approvals.
This product can only be used with the supplied antenna(s). The use of external amplifiers or
non-3Com antennas may invalidate regulatory certifications and approvals.
CAUTION: EXPOSURE TO
RADIO FREQUENCY
RADIATION.
This device generates and radiates radio-frequency energy. In order to comply with FCC
radio-frequency exposure guidelines for an uncontrolled environment, this equipment must be
installed and operated while maintaining a minimum body to antenna distance of 20 cm
(approximately 8 in.).
The installer of this radio equipment must ensure that the antenna is located or pointed such
that it does not emit RF field in excess of Health Canada limits for the general population;
consult Safety Code 6, obtainable from Health Canada’s website www.hc-sc.gc.ca/rpb..
This product must maintain a minimum body to antenna distance of 20 cm. Under these
conditions this product will meet the Basic Restriction limits of 1999/519/EC [Council
Recommendation of 12 July 1999 on the limitation of exposure of the general public to
electromagnetic fields (0 Hz to 300 GHz)].
US – Radio Frequency
Requirements
This device must not be co-located or operated in conjunction with any other antenna or
transmitter.
140
USA-FEDERAL
COMMUNICATIONS
COMMISSION (FCC)
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two
conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any
interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against
harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate
radio frequency energy. If not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, it may cause
harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference
will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio
or television reception, which can be determined by tuning the equipment off and on, the user is
encouraged to try and correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
■
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna
■
Increase the distance between the equipment and the receiver
■
Connect the equipment to outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is
connect
■
Consultthe dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help
The user may find the following booklet prepared by the Federal Communications Commission
helpful:The Interference Handbook
This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. Stock
No.004-000-0034504.
3Com is not responsible for any radio or television interference caused by unauthorized modification
of the devices included with this 3Com OfficeConnect Wireless 54Mbps/108Mbps 11g
Cable/DSL Router (WL-537, WL-537S), or the substitution or attachment of connecting cables
and equipment other than specified by 3Com.
The correction of interference caused by such unauthorized modification, substitution or
attachment will be the responsibility of the user.
141
MANUFACTURER’S
DECLARATION OF
CONFORMITY
3Com Corporation
350 Campus Drive
Marlborough, MA 01752-3064, USA
(800) 527-8677
Date: 03,20 2006
Declares that the Product:
Brand Name: 3Com Corporation
Model Number: WL-537, WL-537S
Equipment Type: 3Com OfficeConnect Wireless 54Mbps/108Mbps 11g Cable/DSL Router
Complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1)
this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference
received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
3Com OfficeConnect Wireless 54Mbps/108Mbps 11g Cable/DSL Router
Model WL-537, WL-537S
142
CANADA – INDUSTRY
CANADA (IC)
This device complies with RSS 210 of Industry Canada.
Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause interference, and
(2) this device must accept any interference, including interference that may cause undesired
operation of this device.”
L ‘ utilisation de ce dispositif est autorisée seulement aux conditions suivantes: (1) il ne doit pas
produire de brouillage et (2) l’ utilisateur du dispositif doit étre prêt à accepter tout brouillage
radioélectrique reçu, même si ce brouillage est susceptible de compromettre le fonctionnement du
dispositif.
The term "IC" before the equipment certification number only signifies that the Industry Canada
technical specifications were met.
To reduce potential radio interference to other users, the antenna type and its gain should be so
chosen that the equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) is not more than that required for
successful communication. To prevent radio interference to the licensed service, this device is intended
to be operated indoors and away from windows to provide maximum shielding. Equipment (or its
transmit antenna) that is installed outdoors is subject to licensing.
Pour empecher que cet appareil cause du brouillage au service faisant l'objet d'une licence, il doit
etre utilize a l'interieur et devrait etre place loin des fenetres afin de Fournier un ecram de blindage
maximal. Si le matriel (ou son antenne d'emission) est installe a l'exterieur, il doit faire l'objet d'une
licence.
INDUSTRY CANADA (IC)
EMISSIONS COMPLIANCE
STATEMENT
This Class B digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
AVIS DE CONFORMITÉ À LA
RÉGLEMENTATION
D’INDUSTRIE CANADA
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B est conform à la norme NMB-003 du Canada.
SAFETY COMPLIANCE
NOTICE
This device has been tested and certified according to the following safety standards and is intended
for use only in Information Technology Equipment which has been tested to these or other equivalent
standards:
■
UL Standard 60950-1
■
CAN/CSA C22.2 No. 60950-1
■
IEC 60950-1
■
EN 60950-1
143
EUROPE – EU
DECLARATION OF
CONFORMITY
This equipment may be operated in
AT
BE
CY
CZ
DK
EE
FI
DE
GR
HU
IE
IT
LV
LT
FR
LU
MT
NL
PL
PT
SK
SI
ES
SE
GB
IS
LI
NO
CH
BG
RO
TR
Intended use: IEEE 802.11g/b radio LAN device
NOTE: To ensure product operation is in compliance with local regulations, select the country in
which the product is installed. Refer to 3Com OfficeConnect Wireless 54Mbps/108Mbps 11g
Cable/DSL Router User Guide.
EUROPE - DECLARATION
OF CONFORMITY IN
LANGUAGES OF THE
EUROPEAN COMMUNITY
English
Finnish
Dutch
French
Swedish
Danish
German
Hereby, 3Com Corporation, declares that this RLAN device is in
compliance with the essential requirements and other relevant
provisions of Directive 1999/5/EC.
3Com Corporation vakuuttaa täten että RLAN device tyyppinen laite
on direktiivin 1999/5/EY oleellisten vaatimusten ja sitä koskevien
direktiivin muiden ehtojen mukainen.
Hierbij verklaart 3Com Corporation dat het toestel RLAN device in
overeenstemming is met de essentiële eisen en de andere relevante
bepalingen van richtlijn 1999/5/EG
Bij deze verklaart 3Com Corporation dat deze RLAN device voldoet
aan de essentiële eisen en aan de overige relevante bepalingen van
Richtlijn 1999/5/EC.
Par la présente 3Com Corporation déclare que l'appareil RLAN
device est conforme aux exigences essentielles et aux autres
dispositions pertinentes de la directive 1999/5/CE
Par la présente, 3Com Corporation déclare que ce RLAN device est
conforme aux exigences essentielles et aux autres dispositions de la
directive 1999/5/CE qui lui sont applicables
Härmed intygar 3Com Corporation att denna RLAN device står I
överensstämmelse med de väsentliga egenskapskrav och övriga
relevanta bestämmelser som framgår av direktiv 1999/5/EG.
Undertegnede 3Com Corporation erklærer herved, at følgende
udstyr RLAN device overholder de væsentlige krav og øvrige
relevante krav i direktiv 1999/5/EF
Hiermit erklärt 3Com Corporation, dass sich dieser/diese/dieses
RLAN device in Übereinstimmung mit den grundlegenden
Anforderungen und den anderen relevanten Vorschriften der
Richtlinie 1999/5/EG befindet". (BMWi)
Hiermit erklärt 3Com Corporation die Übereinstimmung des Gerätes
RLAN device mit den grundlegenden Anforderungen und den
anderen relevanten Festlegungen der Richtlinie 1999/5/EG. (Wien)
144
Greek
Italian
Spanish
Portuguese
Malti
Estonian
Hungarian
Slovak
Czech
Slovene
Lithuanian
Latvian
3Com Corporation RLAN device
1999/5/
Con la presente 3Com Corporation dichiara che questo RLAN
device è conforme ai requisiti essenziali ed alle altre disposizioni
pertinenti stabilite dalla direttiva 1999/5/CE.
Por medio de la presente 3Com Corporation declara que el RLAN
device cumple con los requisitos esenciales y cualesquiera otras
disposiciones aplicables o exigibles de la Directiva 1999/5/CE
3Com Corporation declara que este RLAN device está conforme
com os requisitos essenciais e outras disposições da Directiva
1999/5/CE.
Hawnhekk, 3Com Corporation, jiddikjara li dan RLAN device
jikkonforma mal-tiijiet essenzjali u ma provvedimenti orajn relevanti li
hemm fid-Dirrettiva 1999/5/EC
Käesolevaga kinnitab 3Com Corporation seadme RLAN device
vastavust direktiivi 1999/5/EÜ põhinõuetele ja nimetatud direktiivist
tulenevatele teistele asjakohastele sätetele.
Alulírott, 3Com Corporation nyilatkozom, hogy a RLAN device
megfelel a vonatkozó alapvetõ követelményeknek és az 1999/5/EC
irányelv egyéb elõírásainak.
3Com Corporation týmto vyhlasuje, že RLAN device spa základné
požiadavky a všetky príslušné ustanovenia Smernice 1999/5/ES.
3Com Corporation tímto prohlašuje, že tento RLAN device je ve
shod se základními požadavky a dalšími píslušnými ustanoveními
smrnice 1999/5/ES.
Šiuo 3Com Corporation deklaruoja, kad šis RLAN device atitinka
esminius reikalavimus ir kitas 1999/5/EB Direktyvos nuostatas.
Šiuo 3Com Corporation deklaruoja, kad šis RLAN device atitinka
esminius reikalavimus ir kitas 1999/5/EB Direktyvos nuostatas.
Ar šo 3Com Corporation deklar, ka RLAN device atbilst Direktvas
1999/5/EK btiskajm prasbm un citiem ar to saisttajiem noteikumiem.
A copy of the signed Declaration of Conformity can be downloaded from the Product Support web page for the
3CRWER100-75(WL-537) at http://www.3com.com.
Also available at http://support.3com.com/doc/WL-537_EU_DOC.pdf
A copy of the signed Declaration of Conformity can be downloaded from the Product Support web page for the
3CRWER200-75(WL-537S) at http://www.3com.com.
Also available at http://support.3com.com/doc/WL-537S_EU_DOC.pdf
EUROPE – RESTRICTIONS FOR USE OF 2.4GHZ FREQUENCIES IN EUROPEAN COMMUNITY COUNTRIES
■This
device may be operated indoors or outdoors in all countries of the European Community
using the 2.4GHz band: Channels 1 – 13, except where noted below.
■In
Italy the end-user must apply for a license from the national spectrum authority to operate
this device outdoors.
■In
Belgium outdoor operation is only permitted using the 2.46 – 2.4835 GHz band: Channel 13.
■In
France outdoor operation is only permitted using the 2.4 – 2.454 GHz band: Channels 1 – 7.
Brazil RF Compliance
Este equipamento opera em caráter secundário, isto é, náo tem direito a proteçáo contra interferencia prejudicial, mesmo de estaçoes
do mesmo tipo, e náo causar interferencia a sistema operando em caráter primário.
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