Acer 4000M Laptop User Manual

User’s Reference Guide
TM
TravelMate 4000M
Notebook Computer
P/N 9793374-0001, Rev. A
August 1994
Contents
Contents
Preface
Chapter 1 Using the Setup Programs
Accessing the Setup Programs ................................. 1-2
Date and Time Parameters ....................................... 1-7
Disk Drive Parameters ............................................. 1-8
Input/Output (I/O) Parameters ................................ 1-9
Keyboard Parameters ............................................... 1-12
Memory Parameters ................................................. 1-13
Power Management Parameters ............................... 1-14
Power Savings .......................................................... 1-15
Activity Monitoring ................................................... 1-19
Screen Parameters .................................................. 1-21
System Configuration Parameters ........................... 1-23
Chapter 2 Installing and Using Applications
Guidelines for Installing Applications ....................... 2-2
Setting Up a Password ............................................. 2-11
Setting Up a Non MS-DOS Environment .................. 2-15
Restoring MS-DOS System Files............................... 2-16
Chapter 3 Custom Windows Utilities
Overview of Windows Utilities................................... 3-3
Information Utilities ................................................. 3-4
Productivity Utilities................................................. 3-6
Video Utilities........................................................... 3-9
Drop N’ Go Utility..................................................... 3-10
Change Cursor Utility .............................................. 3-14
Super Shutdown Utility............................................ 3-19
iii
Contents
Chapter 4 Laptop Manager
Laptop Manager Features......................................... 4-2
LM Main Menu......................................................... 4-3
Adding Applications to the Menu.............................. 4-5
Adding Items to the Application Menu ...................... 4-14
Changing LM Menu Colors ....................................... 4-15
LM_Setup................................................................. 4-16
Chapter 5 Power Saving Utilities
Optimizing Battery Operation................................... 5-2
SETPOWER Utility ................................................... 5-10
SMARTDRV.EXE Disk Caching Utility...................... 5-11
SPEED Utility........................................................... 5-12
Chapter 6 Palette Utilities
Color Display Utilities .............................................. 6-2
PAL Utility................................................................ 6-3
PALSET Utility ......................................................... 6-11
Chapter 7 Laptop File Manager
Getting Started with LFM ......................................... 7-3
Using the Main Menu............................................... 7-5
Function Key Commands ......................................... 7-6
Character Key Commands........................................ 7-15
Multiple File Operations ........................................... 7-28
Restoring Laptop File Manager ................................. 7-30
iv
Contents
Chapter 8 VGA External Monitor Utilities
Capabilities .............................................................. 8-2
VGA Utility............................................................... 8-5
Advanced Monitor Operations .................................. 8-13
External Monitor Troubleshooting ............................ 8-17
Chapter 9 Other Utilities
ALARM Utility .......................................................... 9-2
GETSTAT Utility ....................................................... 9-3
RAMDRIVE.SYS Device Driver.................................. 9-6
SETCMOS Utility...................................................... 9-7
SETKEY Utility......................................................... 9-10
Chapter 10 Sound
Features................................................................... 10-2
Pocket Recorder ....................................................... 10-3
Pocket Mixer .......................................................... 10-7
Editing, Playing, and Recording................................ 10-8
Pocket CD ............................................................. 10-9
Chapter 11 TravelMate Options
List of Options.......................................................... 11-2
Battery Options........................................................ 11-4
PCMCIA Options ...................................................... 11-5
RAM Expansion ....................................................... 11-6
Using the AC Adapter............................................... 11-9
External Numeric Keypad......................................... 11-10
Carrying Cases......................................................... 11-11
Microphone/Headphone Kit ..................................... 11-12
Other Options .......................................................... 11-13
External Monitor ...................................................... 11-14
v
Contents
Chapter 12 Portable CD-ROM Docking System
Features................................................................... 12-2
Docking Your Notebook ............................................ 12-6
Undocking the Notebook .......................................... 12-8
Using the Portable CD-ROM Docking System ........... 12-10
Options .................................................................... 12-15
Appendix A Specifications
Appendix B Character Sets
Appendix C Keyboard Layouts
Appendix D Diagnostics
Appendix E Power Consumption Values
Appendix F Configuring Memory
Appendix G Connector Pin Assignments
Appendix H Screen Standards
Appendix I Creating Help Displays
Glossary
Index
vi
Copyright (©) 1994 Texas Instruments Incorporated
All Rights Reserved — Printed in U.S.A.
TravelMate 4000M Notebook
User’s Reference Guide
TI Part No. 9793374-0001, Rev. A
Original Issue: April 1994
Changes may be made periodically to the information in
this publication. Such changes will be incorporated in new
editions of this manual.
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any
means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or
otherwise, without the prior written permission of Texas
Instruments Incorporated.
TravelMate, Travelpoint WinSX, WinDX, WinDX2, and BatteryPro are trademarks of
Texas Instruments Incorporated. The icons in the Windows Notebook and
Startup groups are copyrighted by Texas Instruments Incorporated.
BitCom and BotFax are trademarks of BIT Software, Inc.
Hayes is a registered trademark and SmartModem2400 is a trademark of Hayes
Microcomputer Products Inc.
IBM, OS/2, AT PS/2, and VGA are trademarks of International Business Machines
Corporation.
Intel, 386 and 387 are trademarks of Intel Corporation
Lotus is a trademark of Lotus Development Corporation.
MNP is a registered trademark and Microcom is a trademark of Microcom Inc.
Microsoft, GW-Basic, MS-DOS, BallPoint, QuickPort, and MS are registered
trademarks and Windows, Xenix, and Excel are trademarks of the Microsoft
Corporation.
Ethernet is a registered trademark of Xerox Corporation.
Paintbrush is a registered trademark of ZSoft Corporation
NetWare is a registered trademark of Novell, Inc.
UNIX is a registered trademark of American Telephone and Telegraph.
SimulSCAN is a trademark of Cirrus Logic, Inc.
Preface
Your TravelMate 4000M computer comes with a variety of
standard features and options that maximize system
performance and ease of operation. This manual acts as a
reference for software utilities and hardware included with
your notebook.
Preface
Chapter 1- Shows you the basics of system setup using the
supplied Setup programs.
Chapter 2 - Provides information on system software
configuration and utility installation.
Chapter 3 - Describes custom Windows utilities.
Chapter 4 - Describes the functionality of Laptop Manager
in managing your application programs.
Chapter 5 - Describes Power Saving utilities.
Chapter 6 - Describes utilities designed to enhance and
customize your display.
Chapter 7 - Describes Laptop File Manager, a program that
helps you manipulate files and directories stored on the
hard disk.
Chapter 8 - Describes utilities that allow you to connect an
external VGA to your system.
Chapter 9 - Describes miscellaneous utilities for
configuration and system enhancement.
Chapter 10 - Describes the Sound utilities provided with
your notebook.
Chapter 11 - Describes options you may purchase for your
TM4000M computer.
Chapter 12 - Describes the optional Portable CD-ROM
Docking System.
vii
Preface
Appendix A - Provides system specifications for the
TM4000M.
Appendix B - Displays character sets used by the TM4000M.
Appendix C - Displays domestic and international keyboard
layouts.
Appendix D - Describes diagnostics and error codes for your
TM4000M.
Appendix E - Describes the power consumption values for
your TM4000M.
Appendix F - Describes memory configuration for your
TM4000M.
Appendix G - Describes connector pin assignments for the
TM4000M and Portable CD-ROM Docking System.
Appendix H - Describes screen stardards supported by the
TM4000M internal display adapter.
Appendix I - Describes how to custom design your own Help
displays.
A glossary and index are also provided for your reference.
1
Using the Setup Programs
This chapter explains:
❑
How to access the Setup Programs
❑
How to select and save parameters
Contents
Accessing the Setup Programs .........................................1-2
Initial Startup Procedure .............................................1-2
Startup Menu ..............................................................1-3
Creating Backup System Diskettes ..............................1-4
System Recovery Diskette ............................................1-4
Accessing Disk-Based Setup ........................................1-5
Accessing ROM-Based Setup .......................................1-6
Accessing Windows-Based Setup .................................1-6
Defining Setup Parameters ..........................................1-6
Date and Time Parameters...............................................1-7
Disk Drive Parameters .....................................................1-8
Input/Output (I/O) Parameters .......................................1-9
Keyboard Parameters.....................................................1-12
Memory Parameters .......................................................1-13
Power Management Parameters ....................................1-14
Power Savings................................................................1-15
Activity Monitoring ........................................................1-19
Screen Parameters ........................................................1-21
System Configuration Parameters .................................1-23
Using the Setup Programs 1-1
Accessing the Setup Programs
Your computer has three setup programs to assist you in
selecting required hardware and software parameters:
❑
Disk-based Setup
❑
ROM-based Setup
❑
Windows-based Setup
Accessing t he Setup Programs
Initial Startup Procedure
The first time you boot up your notebook, your system
automatically runs Setup. The following questions are
asked:
1.
You are asked which country your keyboard is designed
to support.
Once this information is provided, the Windows Setup
program automatically runs.
2.
You are prompted for your name and program serial
number.
3.
You are asked which printer you would like as a default
printer.
You exit Windows. System files are automatically
unzipped and the system build begins. When complete,
a video greeting appears. After it runs, the following
options appear:
No Change - keep the video and allow it to run each time
you boot the computer
Remove - removes the video entry from the startup file so
that you keep the video, but it does not run each time
you boot the computer
1-2 Using the Setup Programs
Accessing the Setup Programs
Delete - delete the video (the video takes up 12 MB of
hard disk space)
5.
Make your selection.
The system reboots to the Startup Menu.
Startup Menu
Each time your system boots, the Startup Menu appears.
You have ten seconds to make selections from this menu,
otherwise the boot process continues with previously
configured parameters. The following is a description of the
Startup Menu:
Startup Menu Options
Option
Description
Standard Windows for
Workgroups (default)
Loads PCMCIA drivers
Docking System Windows
for Workgroups
Loads PCMCIA and CD-ROM (SCSI)
drivers
Minimum Windows for
Workgroups
No drivers loaded (leaving more memory)
Minimum Docking System
Windows for Workgroups
Loads SCSI drivers (leaving more memory)
System Maintenance
Deletes demo games and allows you to
create back up system diskettes
Games Demonstration
Allows you to view or play pre-loaded
games on the notebook.
To select an option, use the up and down arrow keys or
press the number key of the option you desire. This
highlights the option. Press Enter to select the desired
configuration.
Using the Setup Programs 1-3
Accessing the Setup Programs
Creating Backup System Diskettes
You should create your back up system diskettes as soon
as possible after purchasing your notebook. To create
backup system diskettes, complete the following steps:
1.
Ensure that you have 17 (for U.S.A.) or 18 (all other
countries) high density, 1.4 MB, 3.5" diskettes.
2.
Boot your system.
System startup begins. A DOS Startup Menu appears.
3.
Select option 5, SYSTEM MAINTENANCE AND
BACKUP.
The system backup menu is displayed. You can select
files from the left column to back up by using the up
and down arrow keys to highlight the files. As
filenames in the left column are highlighted, a
description of them appears in the right column and the
number of diskettes required for these files is displayed.
4.
To begin creating the system backup diskettes, insert
the diskette into the floppy drive and press ENTER to
back up highlighted files. Backing up all files requires
17 to 18 diskettes. Each diskette will automatically be
formatted.
You may access the Setup program at a later time to reset
previously configured parameters.
System Recovery Diskette
You should have received a System Recovery diskette with
your notebook. This is a bootable diskette with backup
software and enables you to restore minimum system files.
After the computer boots for the first time, you are
prompted to insert your System Recovery diskette. Ensure
that you make two additional copies of this diskette.
1-4 Using the Setup Programs
Accessing the Setup Programs
You should keep your System Recovery diskette updated
with your latest Windows configuration. To do this,
complete the following steps:
1.
The first time you complete a new addition or change to
Windows (such as adding a new software icon),
manually copy all *.GRP and *.INI files to the first copy
of the System Recovery diskette. These files are
located in the C:\Windows directory.
2.
The next time you complete a new addition or change to
Windows, you should manually copy over all of the
*.GRP and *.INI files to the second copy of the System
Recovery diskette.
3.
After each subsequent change, you should alternate
making the backup of *.GRP and *.INI files to the first
and second copy of the System Recovery diskette.
Accessing Disk-Based Setup
This Setup program, which resides on the hard disk under
the UTILS directory, defines all default and most
user-selectable parameters. Disk-based Setup contains
four screens, or pages, with onscreen prompts plus a
context-sensitive online help.
From the C:\> prompt, you can access Page 1 of disk-based
Setup in two ways:
❑
Press FN-ESC (SETUP)
❑
Type SET_UP and press ENTER.
After Setup has loaded, you can define parameters based
on the information in the online help or in this chapter.
Using the Setup Programs 1-5
Accessing the Setup Programs
Accessing ROM-Based Setup
ROM-based Setup resides in internal ROM. It is identical to
disk-based Setup except it does not have any online help.
To access Page 1 of ROM-based Setup, save any work in
progress, and press CTRL-ALT-ESC. You can then select
parameters as you do for disk-based Setup. The system
reboots even if changes are not made.
Accessing Windows-Based Setup
To access Windows-based Setup, select the Windows
Control Panel in the Main Windows group. Then
double-click the WSetup icon. You can then define
parameters based on the information in the online help and
in this chapter.
Changes to many of the Setup parameters take effect only
at system startup. If you change one of these parameters,
when you save the new Setup parameters, you are
prompted that you need to exit Windows and restart the
computer. To put these changes into effect, double-click on
the Super Shutdown icon to exit Windows, then press
CTRL-ALT-DEL to restart the computer.
Defining Setup Parameters
The three Setup Programs adequately describe what you
need to do to navigate through the menus, use cursor keys,
save parameters, and exit.
n
Note: The Setup Programs are customized for each model
computer and for any given model may not support all of
the selections described in the following pages.
1-6 Using the Setup Programs
Date and Time Parameters
Date a nd T ime P arameters
Parameter
Definitions and Values
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Time
Pressing the space bar when seconds
are highlighted resets seconds to 00.
Page 1
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
International
⇓
Time Format
Date
The day-of-week value is set
automatically when you set the date.
Page 1
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
International
⇓
Date/Time
Date Display
(Time Display)
Determines whether the time is
displayed in 12-hour or 24-hour format.
Page 1
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
International
⇓
Time Format
Values:
US (12-hour) (default)
European (24-hour)
Using the Setup Programs 1-7
Disk Drive Parameters
Disk Drive P arameters
Parameter
Definitions and Values
Diskettes Drives Do not change from defaults unless
Drive A, Drive B external floppy drive configured as
floppy drive
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Page 1
Cannot change.
Use disk- or
ROM-based Setup
Page 1
Cannot change.
Use disk- or
ROM-based Setup
Values:
3.5", 1.44 MB (default, Drive A)
3.5" 720 KB, 5.25", 360 KB,
5.25", 1.2 MB
Not installed (default, Drive B)
Hard Disk 1 & 2
Do not change.
1-8 Using the Setup Programs
Input/Output (I/O) Parameters
The input/output (I/O) parameters define how the
computer treats the following I/O devices:
❑
SerialPort
❑
Parallel port
❑
SCSI
❑
PCMCIA
❑
Game Port
❑
PS/2 Port
Input /Out put (I/O) P arameters
You can use these parameters to enable and define the
ports.
Parameter
Definitions and Values
Standard
Comm
(Serial Port)g11
Defines whether the port is enabled
Port
Determines whether port is COM1 or
COM2.
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Page 4
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
I/O Ports
⇓
Serial Ports
Page 4
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
I/O Ports
⇓
Serial Ports
Values:
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Values:
COM1 (default)
COM2
Using the Setup Programs 1-9
Input/Output (I/O) Parameters
Parameter
Definitions and Values
Baud Rate
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Page 4
Refer to your
Windows
documentation
Data Bits
Values:
7, 8 (default)
Page 4
Refer to your
Windows
documentation
Stop Bits
Values:
1 (default), 2
Page 4
Refer to your
Windows
documentation
Parity
Values:
Odd, Even, None (default)
Page 4
Refer to your
Windows
documentation
Parallel Port
Defines whether parallel port enabled
Page 4
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
I/O Ports
⇓
Parallel
Page 4
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
I/O Ports
⇓
Parallel Port
⇓
Extended Mode
Values:
LPT 1 (default)
LPT 2
LPT 3
Disabled
EPP Mode
Values:
Disabled
SPP (default)
EPP and SPP
ECP
ECP and EPP
1-10 Using the Setup Programs
Input/Output (I/O) Parameters
Parameter
Definitions and Values
SCSI BIOS
Values:
Disable (default)
Enable
PCMCIA
Selects status for PCMCIA option
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Page 4
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
I/O Ports
⇓
SCSI BIOS
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
I/O Ports
⇓
PCMCIA
Values:
HardwareOFF
ON
BIOSOFF
ON
Game Port
Selects status for MIDI/Joy Port
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
I/O Ports
⇓
Game Port
Values:
OFF
ON
PS/2 Port
Selects device for PS/2 port
Values:
Disabled, Mouse, Keyboard
Auto (default)=detects whether
keyboard or mouse attached
No access.
Use Windowsbased Setup
or the SETKEY
command in
MS-DOS.
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
I/O Ports
⇓
PS/2 Port
Using the Setup Programs 1-11
Keyboard Parameters
Keyboard P arameters
Parameter
Caps Lock
Definitions and Values
Startup status of Caps Lock indicator
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Keyboard
⇓
Lock Key State
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Keyboard
⇓
Lock Key State
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Keyboard
⇓
Lock Key State
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Keyboard
⇓
Repeat Rate
Values:
On
Off (default)
Num Lock
Startup status of Num Lock indicator
Values:
On (default)
Off
Scroll-Lock
Startup status of Scroll Lock indicator
Values:
On
Off (default)
Repeat Rate
Speed at which a character repeats
when key pressed and held
Values:
Slow
Normal (default)
Fast
1-12 Using the Setup Programs
Memory Parameters
M emory P arameters
Parameter
Definitions and Values
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Standard
Do not change
Page 1
Cannot change.
Use disk- or
ROM-based Setup
Shadow ROM
Set to default for maximum
performance of BIOS and Extended
RAM unless your application requires
the 384 KB that Shadow ROM uses.
Page 1
Cannot change.
Use disk- or
ROM-based Setup
Values:
Internal (default)
All, None
Using the Setup Programs 1-13
Power Management Parameters
If you use your computer frequently on battery power, the
amount of productive time you can get out of a single
battery charge is important. Although the default values for
the Setup parameters do an adequate job of conserving
power, you can adjust the values of the parameters to
achieve even greater savings and a resulting longer battery
life.
Pow er M ana gement P arameters
Setup has two groups of power management parameters:
❑
Power-savings parameters that define what the
computer does to save power
❑
Activity-monitoring that determines when the
computer goes into and comes out of some of the
power conservation modes.
1-14 Using the Setup Programs
Power Savings
The power-savings parameters define a variety of ways the
computer can modify its activity to affect the drain on the
battery. There is also a parameter called Power Savings that
determines when, if ever, the computer implements the
defined power savings.
Pow er Sa ving s
Parameter
Power Savings
Definitions and Values
Defines how power-savings
parameters as a group are enabled
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Page 2
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
Page 2
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
⇓
System Timeout
⇓
Interval
Page 2
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
⇓
System Timeout
⇓
Action
Values:
Auto (default)—Enabled battery only
On (or Enable)—Enabled both battery
and ac
Off (or Disable)—Disabled
Timeout Interval Number of minutes of inactivity on
monitored devices before
implementing defined timeout action
Values:
1, 2 (default), 5, 10, 15, Always on
Timeout Action
What happens when defined timeout
interval exceeded on monitored
devices.
Values:
Auto Suspend (Default)—backlight off
and goes into low power mode
Backlight Off—only backlight off
Using the Setup Programs 1-15
Power Savings
Parameter
Wakeup
Interval
Definitions and Values
Number of minutes in auto-suspend
mode before waking up
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Page 2
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
⇓
Auto Wakeup
⇓
Interval
Page 2
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
⇓
Wakeup Action
Page 2
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
⇓
Cover Closed
Action
Values:
5, 10 (default), 15, 20
Wakeup Action What happens when wakeup interval
expires and auto-suspend enabled;
applies to battery operations only
Values:
Backlight On and CPU normal
(default)
Backlight Remains Off and CPU
normal
Cover Closed
Action
What happens when the cover is
closed while the computer is on.
Values:
Suspend (default)= backlight and hard
disk off and CPU suspended
Backlight Off= only backlight off
1-16 Using the Setup Programs
Power Savings
Parameter
HDD Motor
Timeout
Definitions and Values
Number of minutes without reads or
writes before hard disk off
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Page 2
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
⇓
HDD Motor
Timeout
Page 2
Main

Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
⇓
Default CPU
Speed
Page 2
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
⇓
LCD Power
Values:
1, 2, 5 (default), 10, Always on
Hard disk access may be delayed
while the hard disk reaches operating
speed. If an application has frequent
hard disk access, a low setting may
actually use more power because of
the power required to bring the hard
disk up to speed.
Default CPU
Speed
CPU speed at startup
Values:
Low, Medium, High
Auto (default)—high speed for AC and
medium speed for battery
CPU speed can be changed by
pressing CTRL-ALT-↑ or CTRL-ALT-↓
(except on DX4 models). You can also
execute the SPEED utility on all
systems.
LCD Power
Defines brightness of backlighting; the
lower the setting, the dimmer the
backlighting and the lower the power
requirements. This parameter is not
supported on color units.
Values:
Low, Medium, High
Auto (default)—high for AC and
medium for battery
Advanced OS
Power
On (default)
Auto
Off
Page 2
Using the Setup Programs 1-17
Power Savings
Parameter
Power Level
Definitions and Values
Level of savings activated under
BatteryPro utility.
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
No access.
Use
SETPOWER
Values:
Disabled
1–Low
2–Medium (default)
3–High
4–Maximum
1-18 Using the Setup Programs
command in
MS-DOS.
Access Path
(Windows)
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
⇓
Power Level
Activity Monitoring
The computer can monitor activity on up to three groups of
devices depending on the model:
Act ivit y M onitoring
❑
Comm—includes the standard serial port
❑
Disks—includes the hard disk, floppy drive, and
CD-ROM
❑
External PS/2 keyboard, numeric keypad, or mouse
connected to the PS/2 port
If no activity occurs on the monitored devices for the
defined Timeout Interval, the computer implements the
defined Timeout Action. The computer resumes full
operation automatically as soon as activity occurs on any of
the monitored devices.
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Pointing Device Yes (default)
No
Page 2
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
⇓
Activity Monitor
⇓
Pointing Device
Disks
Page 2
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
⇓
Activity Monitor
⇓
Disks
Parameter
Definitions and Values
Monitors hard disk and floppy drive
Values:
Yes (or On)
No (or Off) (default)
Using the Setup Programs 1-19
Activity Monitoring
Parameter
Comm
Definitions and Values
Monitors COM port
Values:
Yes (or On) (defaut)
No (or Off)
1-20 Using the Setup Programs
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Page 2
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Power Savings
⇓
Activity Monitor
⇓
Comm
Screen Parameters
Screen P arameters
Parameter
Reverse
Definitions and Values
Specifies startup status of video
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Screen
⇓
Reverse
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Screen
⇓
Expanded Mode
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Screen
⇓
Block Cursor
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Screen
⇓
Display
Values:
On= White on black for text and
graphics
Off (default)=Black on white for text
and graphics
Text Only= Text only
Graphics Only= Graphics only
Not supported on color models
Expanded
Mode
Specifies whether all video modes can
use the entire video area.
Values:
On (default)
Off
In some video modes, Off restricts the
viewing area at the top and bottom of
the display area.
Block Cursor
Specifies whether the cursor is always
a block cursor, regardless of the
application.
Values:
On (default)
Off
Display
Selects the display device.
Values:
LCD= All display output on the LCD
CRT= All display output on an external
monitor; defaults to LCD if no external
monitor (default)
Both=Simultaneous display on the
LCD and on the external monitor;
defaults to LCD if no external monitor
Using the Setup Programs 1-21
Screen Parameters
Parameter
Monitor Type
Definitions and Values
Selects the monitor device driver
appropriate for your external monitor
and application.
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Screen
⇓
Monitor Type
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
Screen
⇓
Palette
Values:
VGA, 8514 Compatible, Super VGA,
Ext. Super VGA (default),
Multifrequency, Extended
Multifrequency, Super Multifrequency,
Ext. Super Multifrequency
Must match external monitor
LCD Palette
Specifies the startup palette.
Values:
Default Palette
0=Standard Palette 0 (default)
1=Text Palette
2=Standard Palette 1
3=Standard Palette 2
4=User Palette 1
5=User Palette 2 (default on some
color models)
User Palette 1,2
Can be changed with RPAL utility or
PALSET
1-22 Using the Setup Programs
System Configuration Parameters
System Config uration P arameters
Parameter
Battery Alarm
Definitions and Values
Defines whether the alarm sounds for
low-battery condition
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
System
Configuration
⇓
Alarms
⇓
Battery Alarm
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
System
Configuration
⇓
Alarms
⇓
Cover Alarm
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control
Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
System
Configuration
⇓
Speakers
Values:
On (default)
Off
Can be delayed in Windows with
Power utility
Cover Alarm
Defines whether the alarm sounds
when the cover closed
Values:
On (default)
Off
Speaker
(Standard)
Defines whether the speaker is on or
off.
Values:
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Using the Setup Programs 1-23
System Configuration Parameters
Parameter
Definitions and Values
Page No.
(Disk/ROM)
Access Path
(Windows)
Speakers
(Multimedia)
Values:
Enabled (default)
Disabled
Page 4
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
I/O Ports
⇓
System
Configuration
⇓
Speakers
Quick Boot
Defines extent of self-test performed at
startup
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control
Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
System
Configuration
⇓
Quick Boot
Page 3
Main
⇓
Control Panel
⇓
WSETUP
⇓
System
Configuration
⇓
Internal Cache
Values:
On (default)=bypasses some tests,
including memory tests
Off= runs all self tests
Internal Cache
Defines cache memory
Values:
On (Enabled) (default)
Off (Disabled)
1-24 Using the Setup Programs
2
Installing and Using Applications
This chapter explains:
❑
Guidelines for loading IBM AT-compatible application
programs
❑
How to set up a password
❑
How to restore MS-DOS system files
Contents
Guidelines for Installing Applications .............................. 2-2
Installation Considerations ......................................... 2-2
AUTOEXEC.BAT File ................................................... 2-3
Default CONFIG.SYS Files........................................... 2-7
Setting Up a Password .................................................. 2-11
Loading the Password Utility ..................................... 2-11
Installing a Password ................................................ 2-12
Changing a Password ................................................ 2-12
Removing a Password................................................ 2-13
Entering the Password .............................................. 2-14
Setting Up a Non MS-DOS Environment ....................... 2-15
Restoring MS-DOS System Files.................................... 2-16
If COMMAND.COM is Missing ................................... 2-16
If .SYS Files are Missing ............................................ 2-16
Restoring Windows.................................................... 2-18
Restoring BatteryPro Utilities .................................... 2-18
Installing and Using Applications 2-1
Guidelines for Installing Applications
Guid elines for Installing App licat ions
Your TravelMate Computer is fully compatible with IBM AT
computers. All applications written for AT computers will
execute on your computer. However, consider these
guidelines before installing applications.
Installation Considerations
The following configuration items will influence how you
install application programs.
Display
When installing an application, select the highestresolution monitor configuration possible. This depends on
your usage of the internal LCD or external analog monitor,
since an external monitor can support higher resolutions.
Keyboard
The computer keyboard emulates all functions of an IBM
AT-101 enhanced keyboard. When installing an
application, select the IBM 101- or AT-enhanced keyboard
configuration.
The Point
The Point is compatible with the Microsoft PS/2 mouse.
When installing an application, select the Microsoft PS/2
mouse configuration.
2-2 Installing and Using Applications
Guidelines for Installing Applications
Processing Speed
Some applications cannot execute at the high speed
available with your computer. Check the application
documentation for the required processing speed and, if
necessary, change the speed using one of the following
methods:
n
❑
Setup Program (see instructions in this manual)
❑
CTRL-ALT-↑ or CTRL-ALT-↓ (except on DX4 models)
❑
SPEED utility
Note: On DX4 models, memory managers such as
EMM386 cannot be loaded when using the SPEED utility.
❑
n
Laptop Manager Change menu
Note: Some applications may require the internal cache to
be disabled. This is done through the System Setup
program.
You can configure Laptop Manager to load the programs
with necessary speed settings. Then you do not have to
change the Setup Program settings each time you load an
application that requires a different processing speed.
Memory
A standard computer has 4 MB of memory, 640 KB of
system memory, plus extended memory. You may purchase
optional memory to upgrade your system to 8 or 20 MB of
memory.
AUTOEXEC.BAT File
The AUTOEXEC.BAT file configures system software
automatically when you boot the computer. If your
Installing and Using Applications 2-3
Guidelines for Installing Applications
application requires additions or changes to the
AUTOEXEC.BAT file, carefully consider the consequences.
Please read and understand this file before you change it.
(See the MS-DOS User’s Guide and Reference furnished with
your computer for more details on constructing this file and
its significance.)
n
Note: If you need to restore the default AUTOEXEC.BAT file
to your hard disk, it is included on the System Recovery
diskette.
Each line of the default AUTOEXEC.BAT file and its purpose
are defined in the following file listing and table. Since this
file changes, the following example and your file may look
slightly different.
2-4 Installing and Using Applications
Guidelines for Installing Applications
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
@ECHO OFF
REM ================================
PROMPT $P$G
PATH=C:\WINDOWS;C:\DOS;C:\UTILS;C:\JAZZ;C:\PCMPLUS
SET TEMP=C:\WINDOWS\TEMP
SET COMSPEC=C:\DOS\COMMAND.COM
SET MFILE=C:\UTILS
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 H5 T4
SET MOUSE=C:\MOUSE
10. C:\WINDOWS\SMARTDRV.EXE /L
11. C:\MOUSE\MOUSE.EXE /Q
12. GOTO %CONFIG%
13. :G
14. REM =======GAMES/DEMONSTRATIONS============
15. CD DEMOS
16. EXECUTE
17. REBOOT
18. :SM
19. REM =======SYSTEM MAINTENANCE=============
20. CD IMAGES
21. EXECUTE
22. REBOOT
23. :S
24: REM =======SCSI DRIVERS/UTILS===============
25. :SP
26. REM ====SCSI AND PCMCIA DRIVERS/UTILS===========
27. C:\SCSI\MSCDEX.EXE /D:ASPICDO /M12
28. :P
29. REM =======PCMCIA DRIVERS/UTILS=============
30. DOSKEY
31. :N
32. REM =======NO SYSTEM DRIVERS/UTILS===========
33. WIN
Installing and Using Applications 2-5
Guidelines for Installing Applications
TravelMate 4000M Factory Default AUTOEXEC.BAT File
Line
Purpose
1
turns off echoing (displaying) of commands on screen
2
comment block
3
tells MS-DOS to display the current drive and directory
4
defines the directories and order in which to search for
files entered on the command line; you can add
additional directories to this line as required
5
tells MS-DOS where to find the temporary files
6
tells MS-DOS where to find the command processor
7
tells MS-DOS where to find the Laptop Manager data file
8
sets interrupt and DMA parameters for sound compatibility
9
tells MS-DOS where to find the mouse driver
10
installs memory manager device driver
11
loads the mouse driver
12
selects the setting selected in CONFIG.SYS
13
sends the user to the games/demonstrations utility
14
comment block describing games/demonstrations
15
goes to the demos directory
16
displays a games/demonstrations menu
17
reboots the system
18
sends the user to the system maintenance utility
19
comment block describing system maintenance utility
20
goes to the images directory
21
displays a system maintenance menu
2-6 Installing and Using Applications
Guidelines for Installing Applications
22
reboots the system
23
loads system and PCMCIA drivers
24
comment block describing SCSI drivers/utilities
25
loads system, PCMCIA, and SCSI drivers
26
comment block describing SCSI and PCMCIA drivers/
utilities
27
executes the MSCDEX so the CD-ROM is accessed
28
loads system and PCMCIA drivers
29
comment block describing PCMCIA drivers/
utilities
30
edits command lines, recalls MS-DOS command, and
creates macros
31
tells the system the user doesn’t want to load any drivers or
32
comment block that says there are no system drivers or
utilities to be loaded
33
runs Windows
Default CONFIG.SYS Files
If your application requires additions or changes to the
CONFIG.SYS file, carefully consider the consequences. The
factory-installed (default) file is listed and described in this
section. Please read and understand this file before you
change it. (See the MS-DOS User’s Guide and Reference for
more details on constructing this file and its significance.)
Each line of the default CONFIG.SYS file and its purpose are
defined in the table following the file listing. You can add
commands required by your application, but do not delete
the existing default commands.
Installing and Using Applications 2-7
Guidelines for Installing Applications
1. [MENU]
2. MENUCOLOR=11,0
3. MENUITEM=P,STANDARD WINDOWS FOR WORKGROUPS
4. MENUITEM=SP,DOCKING SYSTEM WINDOWS FOR WORKGROUPS
5. MENUITEM=N,MINIMUM WINDOWS FOR WORKGROUPS
6. MENUITEM=S,MINIMUM DOCKING SYSTEM WINDOWS FOR WORKGROUPS
7. MENUITEM=SM,SYSTEM MAINTENANCE AND BACKUP
8. MENUITEM=G,GAMES DEMONSTRATION
9. MENUDEFAULT=P,10
10. [COMMON]
11. DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\HIMEM.SYS /TESTMEM:OFF
12. DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\EMM386.EXE /NOEMS
13. DOS=HIGH,UMB
14. FILES=40
15. BUFFERS=30
16. STACKS=9,256
17. LASTDRIVE=D
18. SHELL=C:\DOS\COMMAND.COM /P
19. [P]
20. INCLUDE=SYD
21. INCLUDE=PD
22. [S]
23. INCLUDE=SYD
24. INCLUDE=SCD
25. [SP]
26. INCLUDE=SYD
27. INCLUDE=PD
28. INCLUDE=SCD
29. [SYD]
30. REM ========SYSTEM DRIVERS================
31. DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\SMARTDRV.EXE /DOUBLE_BUFFER
32. DEVICE=C:\UTILS\BATTERY.PRO /L2
33. DEVICE=C:\JAZZ\JAZZ.SYS P220 I5 D1 E5 T330 Q2
34. DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\IFSHLP.SYS
35. [PD]
36. REM ========PCMCIA DRIVERS================
37. DEVICE=C:\PCMPLUS\PCMSS.EXE
38. DEVICE=C:\PCMPLUS\PCMCS.EXE
39. DEVICE=C:\PCMPLUS\PCMRMAN.EXE
40. DEVICE=C:\PCMPLUS\PCMSCD.EXE
41. [SCD]
42. REM ========SCSI DRIVERS=================
43. DEVICE=C:\SCSI\ASPI2DOS.SYS /D /Z
44. DEVICE=C:\SCSI\ASPICD.SYS /d:ASPICD0
45. [SM]
46. REM ======SYSTEM MAINTENANCE DRIVERS=========
47. DEVICE=C:\DOS\RAMDRIVE.SYS 2048 /E
48. [N]
49. REM =======NO SYSTEM DRIVERS==============
50. [G]
51. REM =======GAMES/DEMONSTRATIONS==============
52. DEVICE=C:\JAZZ\JAZZ.SYS P220 I5 D1 E5 T330 Q2
2-8 Installing and Using Applications
Guidelines for Installing Applications
Factory Default CONFIG.SYS File
(Modify but do not delete these command lines)
Line
Purpose
1
calls the menu subroutine and displays
2
sets the color of the menu
3-8
displays the menu
9
if no menu item is selected after 10 seconds, the p
subroutine is called
10
calls the common subroutine that is run each time the
system boots
11
loads Windows into high memory
12
doesn’t allocate memory for expanded memory
13
loads MS-DOS into extended memory
14
tells MS-DOS how many files can be open at any one time.
You can adjust the value as required by your application
15
tells MS-DOS how many buffers are used for file input/
output. You can adjust the value as required by your
application to maximize processing speed
16
reserves memory for MS-DOS to process hardware
interrupts
17
displays the last valid drive number
18
calls the command.com file
19 - 21
the p subroutine calls the subroutines for system drivers
and PCMCIA drivers
22-24
the s subroutine calls the subroutines for system drivers
and SCSI drivers
25-28
the sp subroutine calls the subroutines for system, PCMCIA,
and SCSI drivers
Installing and Using Applications 2-9
Guidelines for Installing Applications
29-30
defines the system driver subroutine
31
assigns memory manager to a double buffer space for more
efficient performance
32
runs BatteryPro utility?
33
sets the IRQ and DMA for the sound driver
34
a device driver that loads Network software
35-36
defines the PCMCIA driver subroutine
37-40
runs PCMCIA drivers
41-42
defines the SCSI driver subroutine
43-44
runs SCSI drivers
45-46
defines the System Maintenance driver subroutine
47
installs RAM-resident disk space
48-49
defines the No System Drivers subroutine
50-52
defines the Games/Demonstrations subroutine
2-10 Installing and Using Applications
Setting Up a Password
Set ting Up a Pa ssword
The computer provides the Password utility to limit access
to your computer to only those who know the password.
The password is valid until you remove or change it.
c
Be sure to select a password that you can remember. If
you forget your password, you will not be able to access
files. If this occurs, contact TI Technical Support. You
will be required to send your computer to the TI manufacturing facility for service. This service is not covered by warranty.
Loading the Password Utility
1.
The Password utility is located on the System Recovery
diskette provided with your notebook. To load this
utility, insert the diskette into the floppy drive and go
to the MS-DOS A: prompt. Type
INST_PW
The password is automatically installed in the following
directory:
C:\UTILS\PASSWORD
2.
At the MS-DOS C:\> prompt, type
UTILS\PASSWORD\PW
and press ENTER. The Password Utility menu appears. From this menu you can install, change or remove a password, or you can exit the menu.
3.
To select a Password command, press the initial
character of the prompt, or press ↑ or ↓ to highlight to
the desired command, and then press ENTER.
Installing and Using Applications 2-11
Setting Up a Password
Installing a Password
1.
Highlight Install Password on the Password Utility
menu and press ENTER. You are prompted for a
password.
2.
Type a password of up to eight characters, and press
ENTER.
3.
Press ENTER again to install the new password, or
press ESC to cancel the action and return to the
Password Utility menu.
If you have already installed a password, when you select
Install Password, the computer displays the following
message:
Password already exists
Press any key on the keyboard to return to the Password
Utility menu.
Changing a Password
1.
Highlight the Change Password command on the
Password Utility menu and press ENTER. The Change
Password menu appears.
2.
Type the current password, and press ENTER.
If you type the correct password, the message
Password check OK
displays on the next line, and you are prompted to enter a new password.
If you type the wrong password, the message
Incorrect Password
2-12 Installing and Using Applications
Setting Up a Password
displays on the next line, and you are prompted to
press any key to return to the Password Utility menu.
You can try to change the password again, or you can
exit the Password Utility menu by selecting EXIT.
3.
Type a new password of up to eight characters, and
press ENTER.
4.
Press ENTER again to install the new password, or
press the ESC key to abort the process and return to
the Password Utility menu.
Removing a Password
1.
Highlight the Remove Password command on the
Password Utility menu, and press ENTER. The
Remove Password menu appears.
2.
Type the current password, and press ENTER. If you
type the correct password, the message
Password check OK
displays on the next line. Press ENTER to remove the
current password, or press ESC to abort the process
and return to the Password Utility menu.
If you type the wrong password, the message
Incorrect Password
displays on the next line, and you are prompted to
press any key to return to the Password Utility menu.
You can try to remove the password again, or you can
exit the Password Utility menu by selecting EXIT.
Installing and Using Applications 2-13
Setting Up a Password
Entering the Password
Once you install the password, you will be prompted to
enter a password each time you start the computer. See the
User’s Guide.
c
Caution: Be sure to select a password that you can remember. If you forget your password, you will not be
able to access files. If this occurs, contact TI Technical
Support at 1-800-TI-TEXAS. You will be required to
send your computer to the TI manufacturing facility for
service. This service is not covered by warranty.
2-14 Installing and Using Applications
Setting Up a Non MS-DOS Environment
Set ting Up a Non MS- DOS Env ironment
To install an operating system other than MS-DOS, you
must complete the following steps:
1.
At the MS-DOS prompt, press FN+ESC or type
C:\UTILS\SET_UP.EXE
The Setup Program appears.
2.
Press FN+PGDN to go to the page that displays
Advanced OS Power: ON.
3.
Using the Up and Down arrow keys, select the
Advanced OS Power field.
4.
Using the Left and Right arrow keys, select the word
OFF.
5.
Press ESC.
6.
Press F4 to save the change.
The system reboots.
7.
Continue loading your operating system according to
documentation that came with your software. For any
additional drivers, call 1-800-TI-TEXAS.
Installing and Using Applications 2-15
Restoring MS-DOS System Files
Restoring M S-DOS System Files
You cannot restore system files without having first created
the backup diskettes. If your system is down, you cannot
create these diskettes. It is very important to create
backup system diskettes as soon as possible after the
purchase of your computer. Refer to Chapter 1, Creating
Back Up System Diskettes.
The MS-DOS files COMMAND.COM, IO.SYS, EXTMSDOS.SYS, and
MSDOS.SYS are necessary for the operation of your
computer. If any of these files is accidentally deleted or
modified, your computer will not function as designed. This
section describes the procedure for restoring these files
without affecting the applications and data files that may
be on your hard drive.
If you need more information, see the MS-DOS User’s Guide
and Reference.
n
Note: IO.SYS, EXTMSDOS.SYS, and MSDOS.SYS are hidden
files. You will not see these files if you view a directory of
drive C using the DIR command.
If COMMAND.COM is Missing
If COMMAND.COM is missing from your hard disk, the screen
displays this message during the boot process:
Bad or missing Command Interpreter
The computer then becomes inactive. Complete the steps in
the next section to restore COMMAND.COM to your hard
disk.
If .SYS Files are Missing
If the IO.SYS, EXTMSDOS.SYS, and/or the MSDOS.SYS files
are missing from your hard disk, the screen displays the
following message during the boot process:
2-16 Installing and Using Applications
Restoring MS-DOS System Files
Non-System disk or disk error
Replace and press any key when ready
This message is repeated when any key is pressed.
Complete the following steps to restore the .SYS files to your
hard disk:
1.
Turn off the computer, and insert the 3.5-inch Microsoft
MS-DOS, Disk 1 floppy into the floppy drive.
2.
Turn on the computer and when the computer displays
the "Welcome to Setup" menu, press ENTER, and
follow the directions.
You will be asked to verify date/time, country and
keyboard layout, and the directory to which you will be
installing DOS.
3.
Press ENTER.
DOS begins installing and prompts you for all three
diskettes. A supplemental DOS diskette is provided.
This diskette includes optional utilities such as
AccessDOS, keyboard utilities, and MS-DOS 6.2
utilities.
4.
To install the supplemental DOS diskette, insert it into
do drive A and type
A:SETUP
During installation of the fourth diskette, the system will
prompt you for a directory in which to place system
files.
5.
Type:
C:\DOS
Installing and Using Applications 2-17
Restoring MS-DOS System Files
Restoring Windows
After you restore the MS-DOS files, you will be instructed to
restore the remaining software (Windows, BatteryPro,
mouse, SCSI, PCMCIA, and TM4000M display drivers).
1.
Place the Windows backup diskette you should have
created after you purchased your computer in Drive A
and from the MS-DOS C:\> prompt type
A:SETUP
You are prompted to use either Express Setup
(recommended) or Custom Setup and to indicate the
directory to which files will be copied.
2.
Enter C:\Windows as the default.
You are prompted to load each of the Windows diskettes.
3.
When installation is complete, reboot your computer.
Restoring BatteryPro Utilities
After you restore the MS-DOS and Windows files, install the
BatteryPro utilities from the backup diskette you should
have created after you purchased your computer:
1.
Insert the correct backup diskette into drive A, and at
the MS-DOS A:\> prompt, type
INSTALL
and press ENTER.
You will be asked to verify the default directory of
C:\UTILS and to specify files to be installed.
2.
Follow the instructions on the screen.
2-18 Installing and Using Applications
Restoring MS-DOS System Files
See more information on the BatteryPro utilities elsewhere
in this manual.
Installing and Using Applications 2-19
3
Custom Windows Utilities
This chapter tells you about
❑
Utilities designed for your computer to enhance your
performance while using Windows
Contents
Overview of Windows Utilities.......................................... 3-3
Information Utilities ........................................................ 3-4
Battery Level (Wbattery) .............................................. 3-4
BatteryPro APM........................................................... 3-4
Battery Saving Tips (Battips) ....................................... 3-5
Dosnotes ..................................................................... 3-5
Productivity Utilities........................................................ 3-6
Alarms Off (Walarms) .................................................. 3-6
Drop N’ Go .................................................................. 3-6
Change Cursor Icon .................................................... 3-6
Laptop Manager .......................................................... 3-6
LFM (Laptop File Manager) .......................................... 3-6
Power Icon .................................................................. 3-7
Super Shutdown Icon.................................................. 3-7
PCMCIA Information ................................................... 3-7
Sound Mapper ............................................................ 3-7
MIDI Mapper ............................................................... 3-8
Video Utilities.................................................................. 3-9
Drop N’ Go Utility .......................................................... 3-10
Basic Operations....................................................... 3-10
Adding/Changing Applications.................................. 3-10
Deleting Applications ................................................ 3-12
Copying Applications................................................. 3-12
Enable/Disable Menu ............................................... 3-12
Icon Placement.......................................................... 3-13
Change Cursor Utility ................................................... 3-14
Change Cursor Menu ................................................ 3-14
Creating a New Cursor .............................................. 3-15
Change Cursor Menu Bar ......................................... 3-17
File Menu.................................................................. 3-17
Configure Menu ........................................................ 3-18
Custom Windows Utilities 3-1
Contents
Content s
Super Shutdown Utility................................................. 3-19
Shutdown Options .................................................... 3-20
Icon .......................................................................... 3-21
Passwords................................................................. 3-21
Exit Modes ................................................................ 3-22
3-2 Custom Windows Utilities
Overview of Windows Utilities
Overview of Wind ows Utilit ies
The TravelMate 4000M Series custom Windows utilities are
accessible from Windows by double-clicking individual
icons. Most of these utilities are found in the Notebook
Group, but some are in the Startup Group, and still others
are in the Control Panel of the Main Windows Group.
The Windows utilities can be divided into the following
categories:
❑
Information
❑
Productivity
❑
Video
❑
Cursor
Custom Windows Utilities 3-3
Information Utilities
Informat ion Utilit ies
The information utilities provide you information you need
quickly. Your computer has the following information
utilities:
Battery Level (Wbattery)
Double-click on Wbattery in the Notebook Group to display
the battery level dialog box for your TravelMate computer.
This dialog box displays the approximate charge left in your
computer based on user-specified settings. You may
customize Battery Level settings by selecting SETTINGS
from the Control-Menu box in the upper left-hand corner of
the Battery Level dialog box. This displays the Battery
Level Settings dialog box. At this point, you may modify the
following parameters:
❑
The position of your Battery Level dialog box or
Battery Level icon
❑
The elapsed time (in seconds) before the Battery Level
dialog box reappears automatically on your screen
❑
Use of color or monochrome
❑
Minimizing the application
Selecting OPTIONS from the Battery Level Settings dialog
box allows you to specify when the application should
indicate low battery levels (for instance, when the battery
reaches 50% power).
BatteryPro APM
Double-click on this icon in the Notebook Group to display
information about the battery-savings software in your
computer: Texas Instruments BatteryPro Power
Management software and Microsoft Advanced Power
Management (APM) software.
3-4 Custom Windows Utilities
Information Utilities
Battery Saving Tips (Battips)
Double-click on this icon in the Notebook Group for
information about actions you can take to maximize the life
of a battery charge.
Dosnotes
Double-click the Dosnotes icon in the Notebook Group to
run the NBHELP program that describes many of the the
DOS-level utilities.
Custom Windows Utilities 3-5
Productivity Utilities
Prod uctiv ity Utilit ies
The productivity utilities help you function more efficiently
while in the Windows environment. The computer has the
following productivity utilities.
Alarms Off (Walarms)
Double-click the Walarms icon in the Notebook Group to
disable the cover-closed alarm and the low-battery alarm.
Drop N’ Go
Drop N’ Go takes advantage of the Drag and Drop
capabilities of Windows. To learn more about Drop N’ Go,
refer to the Drop N’ Go Utility section of this chapter.
Change Cursor Icon
Double-click on this icon in the Notebook Group to optimize
the Windows cursors. To learn more about the Change
Cursor Utility, refer to the Change Cursor Utility section of
this chapter.
Laptop Manager
Double-click on the Laptop Manager icon in the Notebook
Group to load the Laptop Manager (LM) utility. LM is a
DOS-level program that manages access to DOS-level
applications. LM is described elsewhere in this manual.
To return to Windows from the LM main menu, press Esc.
LFM (Laptop File Manager)
Double-click the LFM icon to load the Laptop File Manager
utility. LFM is a DOS-level program that helps you manage,
view, and edit directories and files on the hard disk or on
floppies. LFM enables you to copy, delete, edit, print,
rename, and perform other common file management
functions using single-key commands. LFM is described
elsewhere in this manual.
3-6 Custom Windows Utilities
Productivity Utilities
To return to Windows from the LFM main menu, press Q.
You are asked if you are sure you want to Exit. Enter Y.
Power Icon
Double-click the Power icon in the Control Panel of the
Main Windows Group to access the interface to Microsoft’s
Advanced Power Management (APM) and Texas
Instruments BatteryPro Power Management system.
Super Shutdown Icon
Double-click the Super Shutdown icon to exit Windows
faster than the standard Windows exiting procedure. If you
have made any changes to Windows applications, they
display “save” prompts that ask if you want to update your
files before exiting the Windows session. Refer to the Super
Shutdown Utility section of this chapter.
n
Note: Shutdown is unable to close DOS applications. If
any DOS applications are active, the application will be
brought to the foreground and the user will be prompted to
close it.
PCMCIA Information
This icon is located in the Control Panel window and
provides status on the PCMCIA slots in the notebook. For
further information on PCMCIA, refer to your Phoenix
PCMCIA User’s Manual.
Sound Mapper
This icon is located in the Control Panel window.
Double-click on the icon to display the Sound Mapper
Configuration screen. From the Sound Mapper
Configuration screen, you can:
❑
configure, change, disable, and get information about
sound drivers
Custom Windows Utilities 3-7
Productivity Utilities
❑
indicate preferred playback and recording file formats
❑
specify whether to use preferred devices only
For further information, refer to online Help provided with
this application.
MIDI Mapper
This icon is located in the Control Panel window.
Double-click on the icon to display the MIDI Mapper
screen. From the MIDI Mapper screen, you can:
❑
select a MIDI setup for a sound device
❑
create a new setup
❑
edit existing key maps, patch maps, and channel
mappings
For further information, refer to online Help provided with
this application.
3-8 Custom Windows Utilities
Video Utilities
Vid eo Utilit ies
The display utilities allow you to customize your notebook
display for your operating environment. The following
utilities are available from the Notebook group menu:
❑
Panel - sends output to the panel on the notebook
❑
CRT - sends output to an external VGA monitor
❑
SIMUL - Sends output to both panel and CRT
Custom Windows Utilities 3-9
Drop N’ Go Utility
D rop N’ Go Utilit y
Drop N’ Go is an application that allows you to display
frequently run applications as icons on your desktop or as
menu items under the File Manager application. This
bypasses the usual file-finding process and keeps your
most useful applications at your fingertips. Applications
loaded in Drop N’ Go appear as boxed icons to differentiate
them from normal Windows icons.
Basic Operations
The following sections cover adding/changing, deleting,
copying, and other application-specific functions relating to
Drop N’ Go. To start Drop N’ Go, select the Exit button
from the Drop N’ Go Setup menu and follow any
instructions that appear on the screen.
Adding/Changing Applications
To Add or Change applications listed in Drop N’ Go,
complete the following steps:
1.
Double click on the Drop N’ Go icon in the Notebook
group on your desktop.
The Drop N’ Go Setup menu appears.
2.
If you are adding an application, place the cursor under
Icon Applications and single click. If you are changing
an application, single click on the application you
want to change.
3.
Select the ADD or CHANGE button.
The Icon Application dialog box appears.
3-10 Custom Windows Utilities
Drop N’ Go Utility
4.
n
Enter required information on the application you
wish to add. This very similar to the Run... dialog box
used in the Program Manager.
Note: The quickest way to Add or Change applications is
to select the down arrow next to the Title box. Selecting
from the list that appears quickly and automatically places
all information.
5.
Select OK.
6.
To add the application as a menu item in File Manager,
select Enable Menu from the Drop N’ Go Setup menu.
7.
Place the cursor under Menu Title, click, and type the
title of the menu you wish to use in File Manager (for
instance, Drop N’ Go).
8.
If you are adding an application, place the cursor under
Menu Applications and single click. If you are
changing an application, single click on the
application you want to change.
9.
Select the Add or Change button.
10. Enter required information on the application you wish
to add. This very similar to the Run... dialog box used
in the Program Manager
11. Select OK.
12. Close the Icon Application Setup dialog box.
A message appears stating that your menu changes
will not take effect until File Manager is restarted.
13. Close and reopen File Manager.
Custom Windows Utilities 3-11
Drop N’ Go Utility
You should now see the selected applications as icons
on your desktop. When you open File Manager, you
should see the menu created in steps 6 through 9.
Deleting Applications
You can delete applications from Drop N’ Go by completing
the following steps:
1.
From the Drop N’ Go Setup menu, select the application
you want to delete by clicking on the filename under
Icon Applications or Menu Applications
2.
Select the DELETE button.
A message appears asking if you want to delete the
specified file.
3.
Select OK.
The file is deleted from the list.
Copying Applications
Normally you will want to have the same applications listed
under Menu Applications that are listed under Icon
Applications. The simplest way to set this up is to add or
change applications under either Menu Applications or Icon
Applications and select the Copy button. For instance, if
you add Calendar under Icon applications, you can select
the Copy button to automatically copy the application to
the Menu Applications list (or vice versa)
Enable/Disable Menu
This feature of Drop N’ Go allows you to enable/disable the
menu you created for the File Manager (see Adding/
Changing Applications). To enable or disable the menu,
select the Enable or Disable Menu button and restart File
Manager.
3-12 Custom Windows Utilities
Drop N’ Go Utility
Icon Placement
You can control Icon placement on your desktop through
Drop N’ Go as follows:
Single click on the Drop N’ Go icon and select Save All
Positions to save all icon positions as they currently appear
on your desktop.
From the Drop N’ Go Setup menu, select Stay on Top so
that your icon always appears on top of open windows.
Custom Windows Utilities 3-13
Change Cursor Utility
Chang e Cursor Utilit y
The Change Cursor utility in the Notebook Group lets you
design or edit the shape and appearance of the following
seven cursors used by Windows:
❑
The arrow is the primary pointer when using a
pointing device
❑
The hourglass signals that Windows is saving work,
loading a program, or otherwise performing work that
cannot be interrupted
❑
The I-beam, called a selection cursor, indicates where
your typing or drawing will appear. Usually the
I-beam can be moved using your pointing device or
mouse
❑
The four double-arrow cursors are used by Windows to
denote box sizing. The cursors east-west, north-south,
northeast-southwest, and northwest-southeast are
named for the directions to which they point.
Note: Custom cursors designed specifically for the
TravelMate 4000M Series automatically load when
Windows loads. Although these cursors were designed for
visibility on the LCD, you can use the default cursors
furnished by Windows instead.
Change Cursor Menu
On the Notebook Group menu, double-click the Change
Cursor icon, and Windows displays the Change Cursor
menu, described in the following subsections.
Detail Window — The left half of the Change Cursor menu
is a 32-by-32 element grid, called the detail window, on
which you can create your own new cursors or edit cursors
that you then can use instead of the default cursors
Left Button Box — The two stacked boxes to the right of
the detail window, labeled Left Button and Right Button, let
3-14 Custom Windows Utilities
Change Cursor Utility
you assign one of four editing functions to the left and right
buttons on your pointing device. Clicking on the circles
within the boxes causes the following when you
subsequently move the pencil-shaped editing cursor to the
detail window.
n
White
causes the button to change the grid element to white
Black
causes the button to change the grid element to black
Screen
causes the button to change the grid element to the
current screen background color: dark gray on the
LCD or blue on a color display or an external color
monitor. Used to cancel a changed element
Inverse
causes the button to change the grid element to
display the inverse of the current screen background
color: darker gray on the LCD or green on a color
display or monitor
Note: The current setting of the computer’s standard/
reverse video switch may cause the images to appear
reversed.
At the far right of the menu is a stack of eight boxes of
various shades of gray (in color if you are using an external
color monitor or a color notebook), called the preview
window. You can move the cursor you are editing or
designing into the boxes to judge the cursor’s appearance
against different backgrounds.
Creating a New Cursor
Creating a cursor involves three primary processes:
❑
Using the File menu to open a new file or load a
previously designed cursor. You may also recall
default cursors from the Cursor menu.
❑
Drawing new cursor(s) on the detail window or editing
existing cursor(s)
Custom Windows Utilities 3-15
Change Cursor Utility
❑
Using the Configure menu to install (or remove) the new
cursor(s) to load automatically when you load Windows
You can start creating a new cursor as soon as you load the
Change Cursor menu. Move the cursor into the detail
window—it then assumes the shape of a pencil. Now click
the left or right pointing device button on the grid elements
you want to color. After you have completed designing the
cursor to your satisfaction, you can save it by using the File
menu described later in this section.
If you want to restore a grid element to its original shade or
color, click on the Screen option. Move your pencil cursor
to the grid element you want to erase, and click to the left
or right button you just changed to a Screen.
You can also select one of the seven default cursors from
the Change Cursor menu bar (described below) and edit it
to create a new cursor shape.
n
Note: Change Cursor must always run in background so
the custom cursors are available for other Windows
applications. Always exit the Change Cursor menu by
clicking on the Exit command in the File menu. This keeps
Change Cursor running in the background. Do not use the
Close command in the Control menu box unless you want
to stop running Change Cursor and revert to the Windows
default cursors.
After you complete your cursor, you can save it as a new
cursor under a new filename and/or install it as one of the
active cursors as described under "File Menu" and
"Configure Menu" later in this chapter.
n
Note: The Mouse control panel can override the Change
Cursor selection in other pointer options, such as "growing
cursor."
3-16 Custom Windows Utilities
Change Cursor Utility
Change Cursor Menu Bar
Select Cursor at the Change Cursor menu bar to display
the Cursor menu. The following items are available at this
menu.
n
Note: Changes made to the cursors are temporary unless
you save them to a file using the File command on the
menu bar.
Set hotspot
sets the exact spot where the cursor actually points,
defined on the detail window as an x. Select this item
and a block cursor with a +(cross) in its center
appears on the detail window instead of the pencil.
Move the + cursor to the square in the detail window
where you want the hot spot and click once. The x
then appears on that square.
Use this
cursor as ...
saves the cursor displayed in the detail window as the
indicated cursor, no matter what shape you have
made it.
Get
default . . .
displays in the detail window the factory default for
the indicated cursor.
File Menu
The File menu provides several options for manipulating
the cursor files.
New
erases any cursor currently in the detail window and
displays a clean grid.
Open
displays a menu at which you can type a new
filename at the Open File Name box, or double-click
the filename of a previously designed cursor.
Save
saves the cursor shown in the detail window under its
existing filename. If you have not yet named the file,
the program displays the Save As menu described
below.
Custom Windows Utilities 3-17
Change Cursor Utility
Save As
displays a menu where you can type a new filename
for your cursor, or you can double-click an existing
filename listed in the Files: window. If you select an
existing filename, the program displays a menu
asking you to verify that you want to replace
(overwrite) an existing cursor file. Click on the OK
button if you still want to replace an existing file.
Exit
minimizes the Change Cursor program (runs it in
background) and returns control to Windows. If you
have created or edited a cursor without saving it, the
Exit command displays a menu asking if you want to
save current changes. If you click on Yes, the program
displays the Save As menu described above if the
cursor is new or saves the changes if the file already
existed.
Configure Menu
The Configure command enables you to save and install the
cursor using the following options.
Save cursor
settings
displays a dialog box listing the filename and path for
the seven cursors used with Windows. If the listing is
correct, click on the OK button.
Load cursor
settings
restores cursor settings after you save them and
automatically loads them for use in Windows. This
function is automatically done if you use the Install
for automatic setup option described next.
Install for
automatic
setup
modifies Windows so that it always boots (if CHCURSOR
also is loaded) with the cursor(s) you select, either the
default cursors or your own design. Clicking on this
option presents a display asking you to OK or cancel
the action.
Uninstall
Change
Cursor
Scheduling
removes the CHCURSOR utility from Windows, which
then uses the default cursors.
relates to power-savings features. Do not change the
value unless advised by your authorized TI
representative.
3-18 Custom Windows Utilities
Super Shutdown Utility
Sup er Shut dow n Utilit y
Super Shutdown is an automatic shutdown configuration
utility available from the Notebook group. With this utility,
your system exits Windows faster than the standard
Windows exit procedure. You can also select from a variety
of user-specified shutdown features that will customize the
way your computer shuts down and reboots. Examples
include automatically closing all Windows and DOS
applications as well as saving files.
To use Super Shutdown, single-click on the Super
Shutdown icon so that the Shutdown Configuration Menu
appears.
n
Note: If the Super Shutdown icon did not automatically
load when entering Windows, you may need to re-install it
from the BatteryPro backup diskettes you should have
created after you purchased your system.
This menu allows you to set the following as defaults for
system shutdown:
❑
Options that allow customized software configuration
upon system shutdown
❑
The position you want the Shutdown icon to appear on
the LCD
❑
Options that customize the LCD
❑
Use of the Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) to
communicate with Windows applications that support
it
❑
Schedule times for automatic system shutdown
Custom Windows Utilities 3-19
Super Shutdown Utility
❑
Maximum power savings for your computer during
battery operation
Shutdown Options
Shutdown options allow you to:
c
❑
Terminate Windows applications unconditionally
❑
Terminate DOS applications unconditionally
Caution: These two methods may result in files not being closed properly and could cause disk errors.
❑
Allow any applications that support DDE (such as
Microsoft EXCEL) to save and close any open files.
❑
Send keystrokes to DOS and Windows applications to
close and save any open files.
3-20 Custom Windows Utilities
Super Shutdown Utility
Icon
The icon options allow you to select whether or not you
want the Shutdown icon to stay on top of any overlapping
windows or to automatically appear in the position in which
it was located at the time of system shutdown.
Passwords
You may set, enter, or change a password using the Super
Shutdown Utility.
Setting Passwords
You may set or reset a password for Super Shutdown. To
set or reset a password, complete the following steps:
1.
Select PASSWORD PROTECTED on the Shutdown
Configuration menu.
2.
Select the SET PASSWORD button.
The Change Password dialog box appears.
Entering a Password
To enter a new password,
1.
Type the new password at the New Password line.
2.
Retype the new password in the Retype New Password
line.
3.
Press ENTER.
Changing a Password
To change a password,
1.
Type the old password in the Old Password line.
Custom Windows Utilities 3-21
Super Shutdown Utility
2.
Type the new password at the New Password line.
3.
Retype the new password in the Retype New Password
line.
4.
Press ENTER.
Exit Modes
To select an exit mode for Shutdown:
❑
Single-click on the Super Shutdown icon and select
the exit mode from the menu, or
❑
Select the Default Exit Mode from the Shutdown
Configuration menu
The following table explains exit modes available from the
Super Shutdown Utility:
3-22 Custom Windows Utilities
Super Shutdown Utility
Shutdown Method
Shutdown Method
Description
Exit to MS-DOS (default)
Takes you to the MS-DOS
prompt after shutdown
Suspend
Enters the power saving mode
Exit to MS-DOS and Suspend
Takes you to the MS-DOS
prompt and enters the power
saving mode
Exit to MS-DOS and Eject
Takes you to the MS-DOS
prompt and then ejects the
notebook from the Docking
Station.
Restart Windows
Exits and then restarts
Windows (useful when
configuration changes have
been made or application errors
must be cleared.
Reboot System
Exits Windows and reboots the
system
Custom Windows Utilities 3-23
Super Shutdown Utility
Application Setup
The Application Setup button allows you to use the
Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) to communicate with
Windows applications that support it. Such applications
are called DDE Servers. When selected, the Application
DDE Information dialog box appears as shown in the
following figure.
Application DDE Information Dialog Box
From this dialog box, the following information is required:
3-24 Custom Windows Utilities
Super Shutdown Utility
Application Setup
Selection
Description
Window Name
The window title that appears in the title bar.
Clicking on the button next to the text box in
the Application Close Information dialog box
drops down a list of applications that are
currently set up.
Keystrokes String
The DDE command or the string of
keystrokes used to close any open files. For
instance, to close an open Winword file, the
keystrokes are ALT+F4.
DDE Server Name
The name that the application responds to for
DDE communication (such as Winword).
DDE Command
The command sent to the DDE from the
application. The Application Close
Information dialog box checks this line if
Keystrokes String does not function. To
obtain DDE Command information, refer to
the User’s Manual for your specific
application or call the manufacturer.
Custom Windows Utilities 3-25
Super Shutdown Utility
The DDE Server and command string must be specified by
the application software. If this is not documented in the
software applications user manual, contact the software
vendor for this information
Scheduling
The Scheduling feature of Shutdown is used during battery
operation of your computer. If a power savings driver is
active on your computer, Shutdown works with it to reduce
power consumption while running Windows. The lower the
value, the greater the savings. See the following figure for
an example of the Scheduling dialog box.
Scheduling Dialog Box
Suggested Values:
❑
Microsoft Word for Windows v 1.1 or lower or Microsoft
PowerPoint - value = 100
❑
Games - value = 130 to 200
3-26 Custom Windows Utilities
4
Laptop Manager
This chapter tells you about
❑
How to use the Laptop Manager utility to supervise
your application programs
❑
How to configure the Laptop Manager utility to load
your application programs at the touch of a key
Contents
Laptop Manager Features................................................ 4-2
LM Main Menu................................................................ 4-3
Loading LM ................................................................. 4-3
Exiting LM .................................................................. 4-3
Quick Commands Box ................................................ 4-3
Single-Character Quick Commands ............................ 4-4
Adding Applications to the Menu..................................... 4-5
Quick Commands Program Setup Menu...................... 4-5
Exiting the Quick Command
Program Setup Menu ............................................... 4-13
Testing Your Menu ................................................... 4-13
Adding Items to the Application Menu ........................... 4-14
Changing LM Menu Colors ............................................ 4-15
LM_Setup...................................................................... 4-16
Laptop Manager 4-1
Laptop Manager Features
Lap top Ma nag er Fea tures
The Laptop Manager (LM) utility is an application control
program that provides quick access to your applications.
LM has two submenus on one screen on which you can list
the names of applications installed on the hard disk. You
can then load applications from one of the submenus with
a function key, and from the other submenu using the
arrow keys and Enter.
LM enables you to specify unique operating parameters for
each application under its control:
❑
Fixed and prompted parameters that are passed to the
application as it loads
❑
Working directory
❑
Password protection, to any or all applications
❑
Individual color palettes for each application
❑
Power-savings level for each application
❑
Screen background during execution (not available on
color models)
❑
CPU processing speed for each application
Using these features you can select the parameters and
operating environment that maximize battery-charge life
and performance for each application you load under LM.
n
Note: Do not confuse LM with the Laptop File Manager
(LFM) utility also furnished on your computer and described
elsewhere in this manual.
4-2 Laptop Manager
LM Main Menu
LM Ma in Menu
LM is installed on the hard disk at the factory and is also
stored on the the backup diskettes you should have made
after you purchased the notebook. LM displays its main
menu when you load it from the Windows Notebook group
menu or from the MS-DOS prompt.
Loading LM
You can load LM from the Windows Notebook group menu
by double-clicking the Laptop Manager icon.
You also can load LM at the MS-DOS C:\> prompt by typing
LM
and pressing ENTER. LM loads and displays its main menu.
The main menu enables you to select your application.
Procedures for adding items to the Applications list and
Quick Commands box are described later in this chapter.
Pressing F12 at the LM main menu loads the Change Menu
screen. It enables you to add, delete, or modify items on the
main menu. Procedures for using the Change Menu screen
are provided later in this chapter.
Exiting LM
You can exit LM and return to Windows control by pressing
ESC at the LM main menu. Or if you entered LM from the
MS-DOS prompt, the MS-DOS prompt reappears.
Quick Commands Box
You can select applications added to the Quick Commands
box by pressing the assigned function keys (F5 to F11).
The following utilities are installed on the computer at the
factory:
Laptop Manager 4-3
LM Main Menu
❑
F1 — Help screens
❑
F2 — (Laptop) File Manager
❑
F3 — Save Config(uration) described under the
SETCMOS utility elsewhere in this manual
❑
F4 — Reset Config(uration), which is part of the
SETCMOS utility
Single-Character Quick Commands
At the bottom of the LM menu Quick Commands box are
two commands:
❑
Pressing D (for DOS command) causes LM to display a
prompt at the bottom of the screen where you can enter
MS-DOS commands of up to 67 characters. Pressing
ENTER starts the command. When the command is
executed, pressing any key returns you to the LM main
menu.
❑
Pressing P (for path) causes LM to display a prompt at
the bottom of the screen where you can change drives
or directories. For example, you can change from the
C:\ (root directory) to the C:\UTILS directory by
pressing P, typing C:\UTILS, and pressing ENTER.
You can change from the C:\ drive to the A:\ drive by
pressing P and A, and then pressing ENTER.
4-4 Laptop Manager
Adding Applications to the Menu
Add ing Ap plica tions to t he Menu
You can add your own IBM AT-compatible applications to
the LM main menu for easier access; you can also alter or
move current menu items. After you have installed your
own applications on the hard disk, you are ready to insert
listings into the Laptop Manager menu.
You can put the application name into either the
Applications list or the Quick Commands box. Put the
applications you use most often into the Quick Commands
box. Put less frequently used programs and those requiring
a longer name under the Applications list.
Quick Commands Program Setup Menu
1.
At the LM main menu, press F12. LM displays the
Change Menu screen.
Laptop Manager-Change Menu vn.nn
Applications
List
Tue Oct 15 12:15 pm
Change Menu Commands
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
F10
F11
F12
Texas Instruments Incorporated
TravelMate Series
Microsoft Windows n.n
C:\
-
Help
Insert Appl
Delete Appl
Modify Appl
Cut Appl
Paste Appl
Modify Fkey
Cut Fkey
Paste Fkey
Exit Password
Screen Colors
Save
ESC = Exit
2.
Press F7 to access the Modify Function Key.
Laptop Manager 4-5
Adding Applications to the Menu
3.
In response to the Modify Function Key prompt, press
the function key (F5 through F11) you want to assign
to your application.
LM then displays the Quick Command Program Setup
menu.
Laptop Manager - Change Menu Vn.nn
Tue Oct 15 12:15 pm
Quick Command Program Setup - Fn
Display string:
[
]
Program pathname:
Parameter string:
Working directory:
[
[
[
Password required?
Use color palette?
[N]
[N]
]
]
]
Password:
Filename:
[
[
Power savings level to use?........
Screen background during execution?
CPU speed during program execution?
[Current]
[Current]
[Low
]
Keep Laptop Manager resident?......
Prompt after program execution?....
[Y]
[N]
]
]
F1=Help
C:\
The Quick Command Program Setup menu helps you
configure the Quick Commands box on the LM main menu.
Press ENTER after you answer each prompt.
Display String
Type up to 15 alphanumeric characters (including spaces)
to identify the name you want displayed beside your
selected function key on the main menu. For example, type
Communication
4-6 Laptop Manager
Adding Applications to the Menu
and press ENTER. Thereafter, the word Communication will
be displayed in the main menu Quick Commands box,
opposite the function key number you selected.
You also can type line graphics characters to appear on the
function key display. (Press F1 for a list of graphic
characters you can use.) Press and hold FN-ALT, and then
type the three digits for each graphic character on the
embedded numeric keypad (blue key fronts). Then release
FN-ALT.
Program Pathname
In response to the Program pathname prompt, type up to 67
characters for your application pathname. This is the
command your application tells you to use to load the
program at the MS-DOS C:\> prompt.
For example, if your communication program (named
COMPROG) is installed under the UTILS directory on the hard
disk (drive C), to load the program you would type
UTILS\COMPROG at the C:\> prompt. Therefore, you would
type that same command at the Change Menu Program
pathname prompt:
C:\UTILS\COMPROG
and press ENTER.
The more complete your pathname, the faster LM can find
and load your program.
Refer to the MS-DOS User’s Guide and Reference for
discussions of paths, pathnames, and directories. See your
application documentation for directions on how to install
the program on the hard disk and what command to use to
load the program.
Laptop Manager 4-7
Adding Applications to the Menu
Parameter String
The Parameter string prompt enables you to set up your
menu so it does more than call applications. It enables you
to define parameters passed to the program when it is
loaded.
For example, if your communications program requires a
telephone number as a parameter when the program loads,
you would type the number at the Parameter string prompt.
In addition, you can create a prompt to solicit a typed input
that is passed to the application as a parameter by using
the string flag %S. In the previous example, you would type
the Parameter string as:
%S,"Enter phone number to call:"
When you press the selected function key, the prompt
Enter phone number to call: [
]
displays at the bottom of the LM menu. You would then
type a phone number between the square brackets. When
you press ENTER, LM loads the program into memory and
passes the telephone number to the program.
If you want the data you type in response to the prompt
stored and used as a default value each time you load the
program from LM, you can use the buffer flag %A in the
Parameter string. In the previous example, you would type
the Parameter string as
%S="%A","Enter phone number to call:"
With the buffer string in the Parameter string, the telephone
number you typed is saved in the %A buffer and used as
the default value the next time you load the program from
LM.
4-8 Laptop Manager
Adding Applications to the Menu
You can use up to four optional parameter string buffers
(%A, %B, %C, and %D); however, the %D buffer is assigned
for use by the LM single-character command D (DOS). You
can use all four, but the information in the %D buffer will
change every time you enter a string for either the
application or the D (DOS) command.
Working Directory
A working directory is one that is currently in use. Many
applications require that the program reside in the current
directory if it is not in the path. The Working Directory
prompt enables you to change the working directory to
meet the program’s requirements.
This prompt’s primary purpose is for use with applications
that use data files (for example, Lotus 1-2-3®, Microsoft
Excel®, and most word processing programs) so you can
name the directory that stores the associated data files. For
example, if you are installing a word processing program
named LETTERS and it might store data files under a
directory you call DOC under the LETTERS directory on the
hard disk, your working directory prompt could be
C:\LETTERS\DOC
n
Note: If your application does not need or use a data-file
working directory, leave the Working Directory prompt
absolutely empty; that is, be sure there are no spaces or
characters in the prompt field.
Password Required?
In response to the Password required? prompt, select Yes
or No by pressing Y or N. If you choose not to use a
password, the highlight skips the Password prompt.
Laptop Manager 4-9
Adding Applications to the Menu
Password
If you choose to assign a password, type up to 19
alphanumeric characters (including spaces) for the
password you want to use. To protect the secrecy of the
password you type, the characters are not displayed;
asterisks are displayed. Carefully memorize your password,
and record it in a secure place away from where you store
or use your computer.
If you change your mind and decide to delete the password
(before exiting the Setup menu), press Del until all
asterisks are erased.
c
Caution: Once you assign a password, you have to use it
every time you want to run the application to which
the password is assigned. This caution is particularly
pertinent if you assign a password to the Exit to DOS
function (the Exit Password — F10 — key choice on
the setup menu). If you forget the password for this function, you cannot get to the MS-DOS prompt or the Change
Menu screen.
Case is important in your password; to be accepted, a
password must be typed exactly the way you entered it
during setup. For example, if your password is all
uppercase letters, you must type it that way to gain access
to your program.
Use Color Palette?
If you have used the RPAL utility (see instructions elsewhere
in this manual) to create individual color or gray-shades
settings for each of your applications and stored them in
data files, select Y(es) at the Use color palette? prompt and
press ENTER.
4-10 Laptop Manager
Adding Applications to the Menu
Then, at the Filename prompt, type the pathname of the
palette data file associated with this application, and press
ENTER.
n
Note: Your UTILS directory has several color palette files
configured as examples for use with individual applications.
These files end with the .PAL extension (for example, the
sample palette for Lotus 1-2-3 3.0 is Lotus3.PAL). When you
install your applications, examine the UTILS directory for
available palette files.
Power-Savings Level to Use?
n
Note: This prompt does not function if the BATTERY.PRO
device driver is omitted from the CONFIG.SYS file.
When operating on battery power, some applications work
more efficiently and still conserve battery power at different
power-savings levels. If your applications are running
satisfactorily at their current power-savings level, choose
the Current selection at the Power savings level to use
prompt.
After reviewing instructions about power savings elsewhere
in this manual, if you determine that a particular
power-savings level works best for an application, press the
Space Bar to select the level number (1 – 4). Or you can
select 0 (zero) to disable the power-savings feature.
Screen Background During Execution
If you want the screen image reversed from the normal
black-on-white image, you can select Reverse at this
prompt. Select Normal for the standard black-on-white
image, or select Current for the image in effect when you
enter the program from LM.
Laptop Manager 4-11
Adding Applications to the Menu
CPU Speed During Program Execution?
In response to the CPU speed during program execution?
prompt, select the system speed you want to use during
program execution by pressing the Space Bar to toggle
among High, Low, and Auto. Select Low for optimum
battery-charge conservation. Auto uses high speed if the
computer is on AC power or medium speed if the computer
is on battery power. Your application may specify a
processing speed; check your application documentation. If
you are running this application on a DX4 model, ensure
that EMM386 or other memory managers are not loaded.
Keep Laptop Manager Resident?
If you want to keep LM in memory (resident) while your
application is running, select Y in response to the Keep
Laptop Manager resident? prompt. You may not want to
keep LM resident when executing large programs; it uses
approximately 130 KB memory space.
You may want to select Y if you are running an application
that does not use the entire memory and if you want to
avoid wasting the time needed to reload LM from the disk
after running your application. LM uses only 2.5 KBof
memory if not resident.
Prompt After Program Execution?
In response to the Prompt after program execution? prompt,
select Y if you want LM to display the following prompt
when you exit your application program:
Press any key to return to Laptop Manager
If you select N, the LM main menu automatically returns
with no prompt when you exit your application.
4-12 Laptop Manager
Adding Applications to the Menu
Exiting the Quick Command
Program Setup Menu
When you complete all your Quick Command Program
Setup menu selections, press Esc. LM prompts you at the
bottom of the screen:
Keep changes? [Y]
Press ENTER, ESC, or Y if you want to keep your changes
or additions. Press N if you want to exit the Quick
Commands Program Setup menu without keeping the
changes you just made. In either case the LM Change
Menu returns.
At this point you can either select another Quick Command
to program or press Esc to exit the Change Menu. If you
made changes and previously elected to keep the changes,
LM again prompts you at the bottom of the screen:
Save changes? [Y]
Press ENTER, ESC, or Y if you want to keep your changes
or additions. Press N if you want to exit the Change Menu
without saving the changes you just made. In either case
the LM main menu returns.
Testing Your Menu
At the LM main menu, test your new application setup by
pressing the newly assigned function key. Does it load the
application program for you? If you get an error message,
press F12, F7, and the newly assigned function key again.
Check your entries for correctness. Be sure you specified
the correct pathname and working directory and that the
color palette file exists.
You can add both information display strings and
applications to the LM Applications list in the LM main
menu.
Laptop Manager 4-13
Adding Items to the Application Menu
Add ing It ems to t he App lication Menu
The procedure for adding items to the Application menu is
the same as described previously for the Quick Command
Program Setup menu, except you can use several function
keys to insert, delete, modify, or cut and paste an item. On
the Applications list, you must also designate whether the
item is for display only or is to run an application. Press the
Space Bar at the Application Type prompt on the
Application Setup menu to select Display Only or
Application.
In other respects, the Application Setup menu works the
same as the Quick Command Setup menu. You can enter
up to 40 characters in response to the Display string
prompt. If you need more space to enter a label or title than
is available on one Display string prompt line, you can leave
the Application Type prompt set to Display only, enter the
line of type you want to have displayed, and move down a
line at time, inserting lines by pressing F2 (Insert
Application) for each line you want to insert.
When finished inserting lines, toggle the Application Type
prompt to Application by pressing the Space Bar when you
get to the line on which you want to have LM run the
application.
n
Note: If you press ↓ when the highlighted item is at the
bottom of the Application List, the Change Menu
automatically appears for you to create another entry.
You can continue inserting entries—at the beginning, end,
or between existing lines—in your Applications List up to a
total of 255 lines. After you insert the seventeenth line,
succeeding lines require you to use PGDN or PGUP (or ↑
and ↓) to view all lines on your list.
4-14 Laptop Manager
Changing LM Menu Colors
Chang ing LM M enu Colors
Pressing F11 at the LM Change Menu causes LM to display
the Screen Color Setup menu where you can change the
colors of the LM menus displayed by an external monitor
connected to your computer. This menu also affects the
gray shades or colors displayed by the LCD.
The menu is self-explanatory and also provides a Help
display.
Laptop Manager 4-15
LM_Setup
LM_Set up
This application executes when you press F12 at the
Laptop Manager main menu. It allows you to change the
current applications list, The Quick Key definitions, or the
Screen Colors. Changes made are written to a data file
(default is MFILE.DAT). The following table displays
selections available from the LM_Setup menu:
Key
Name
Description
F2
Insert Appl
Insert a new application at the
current cursor location
F3
Delete Appl
Delete the current application
F4
Modify Appl
Change the currently selected
application
F5
Cut Appl
Remove the current application
from the list, retaining the
information
F6
Paste Appl
Place a previously cut application
in a new location
F7
Modify FKey
Modify the data for a function key
F8
Cut FKey
Remove FKey data and place in
buffer
F9
Paste FKey
Place FKey data in the buffer in
the FKey description
F10
Exit Password
Define or change Exit password
F11
Screen Colors
Modify current screen colors
F12
Save
Save application and FKey
updates
4-16 Laptop Manager
5
Power Saving Utilities
This chapter tells you about
❑
How to get the most work from a battery charge
❑
BatteryPro controls for optimum power savings; and
the SETPOWER utility that enables you to control
BatteryPro power levels
❑
SMARTDRV.EXE, a hard disk drive performance
enhancement utility
❑
SPEED, which lets you change CPU operating speed for
optimum performance and battery power savings
Contents
Optimizing Battery Operation .......................................... 5-2
Suspend/Standby Modes ............................................ 5-3
Auto-Suspend Mode .................................................... 5-4
Real-Time Power Savings ............................................ 5-5
Power-Saving Levels.................................................... 5-5
Configuration Power Savings ....................................... 5-7
SETPOWER Utility ........................................................ 5-10
SMARTDRV.EXE Disk Caching Utility ........................... 5-11
SPEED Utility................................................................ 5-12
Show Speed Switch ................................................... 5-12
Using the SPEED Utility ............................................ 5-12
Power-Saving Utilities 5-1
Optimizing Battery Operation
Opt imizing Bat tery Op eration
Your computer has three ways to save battery power:
❑
Manually turning off the LCD and hard disk by
pressing STANDBY or setting up the computer to
enter auto-suspend mode
❑
Saving power, in real time, while running your
applications, through user-selected power-saving levels
❑
Specifying hardware and software configurations that
best match your applications and battery-savings
performance
The following table summarizes the power saving modes;
the sections following describe the modes in more detail.
Power Saving Modes Summary
Foreground/
Background
Tasks
Service Backlight
Active?
Interrupts
On
Mode
Activate
By
Resume
By
Cover
Closed
Closing
cover
Opening
cover
No
No
Standby
Standby
Standby
No
Yes
Auto
Suspend
pointing
device &
keyboard
inactivity
Activity
Yes, after
wakeup
timeout for
duration of
inactivity
timeout
Yes
HDD/FDD
Accesses
Drives
Power
Used
(watts)
No
No
2.0 - 4.2
No
No
2.0 - 5.0
Suspend
No,
Yes, has
2.5 - 6.0
except independent
after
timer
wakeup
timeout
userspecified
on/off
Typical Operation
Hard disk on
6.0 - 12.0
Hard disk off
5.0 - 11.0
Max. usage, all functions on
5-2 Power-Saving Utilities
20.5
Optimizing Battery Operation
Mode
Activate
By
Resume
By
Foreground/
Background
Tasks
Service Backlight
Active?
Interrupts
On
Battery Capacity
HDD/FDD
Accesses
Drives
Power
Used
(watts)
28.8
watt-hour
Suspend/Standby Modes
The computer has three suspend/standby modes you can
select as needed. The three modes, listed in order of
power-saving capabilities, are the cover-closed suspend
mode, the manual standby mode, and the auto-suspend
mode. All three modes are effective in the two Windows
operating modes, including the 386-enhanced mode.
The modes differ in the manner they are enabled and
disabled:
❑
Task execution
❑
Task interrupt servicing
❑
LCD
❑
Hard disk and floppy drive accessing
Caution: Using the suspend/standby modes for too long
can discharge the battery to the point that it can no
longer power both the LCD and the hard disk. If this occurs, your computer will not come out of standby mode
and you must either recharge your battery or plug in
AC power.
Cover-Closed Suspend Mode
This mode, which you can invoke simply by closing the
cover, saves the most battery power. In this mode (if
enabled in the Setup Program), the computer suspends all
tasks, does not service interrupts, and disables the LCD,
Power-Saving Utilities 5-3
Optimizing Battery Operation
hard disk, and floppy drive. This mode overrides other
standby/suspend modes.
You also can use this mode to transport the computer short
distances without turning it off.
The computer instantly resumes normal operation when
you open the cover. All operations continue where left off
when suspended; however, time-dependent tasks may have
lost time, and tasks dependent on device input/output may
have lost data that overflowed buffers.
You may want to avoid this mode with tasks that depend on
real time, such as scheduling applications with audible or
visual reminders and communication tasks that depend on
input/output.
Manual Standby Mode
Pressing STANDBY puts the computer into standby mode,
which turns off the LCD and both disk drives, suspends all
tasks, and activates the orange light on the PWR indicator.
Use this mode when you want to leave the computer for
some time and do not want to turn off or reboot the
computer.
This mode saves about as much battery power as
cover-closed mode.
To resume normal operation, press STANDBY again. The
computer displays the data in effect when it entered
standby mode and resumes all tasks. This mode also is
useful for transporting the computer for short distances.
Auto-Suspend Mode
In this mode the system suspends all tasks and turns off
the LCD. The disk drives are controlled by the Hard Disk
Timeout parameter in Setup, and the system services task
interrupts as needed. The PWR indicator turns orange in
5-4 Power-Saving Utilities
Optimizing Battery Operation
this mode. The system remains in auto-suspend mode until
activity is detected on a monitored device defined in Setup
or until the Auto Wakeup Interval (selected in Setup) expires.
When the Auto Wakeup Interval expires (5 to 20 minutes),
the system returns to normal operation for the duration of
the selected System Timeout Interval (1 to 15 minutes), at
which time the system again enters the auto-suspend mode.
Real-Time Power Savings
Your computer has a special power-saving feature that can
activate in real time while you are running your
application. This feature is implemented by a special device
driver called BATTERY.PRO in the CONFIG.SYS file:
DEVICE=C:\UTILS\BATTERY.PRO [/Ln] [/Sn] [/MAP]
where:
/Ln specifies the power-savings level (0 through 4)
described elsewhere in this chapter. If the /Ln switch is
omitted, the default value of 2 is used.
/Sn similar to /Ln but tells the system what to use under
Windows when the computer is powered by AC. Mainly for
sound software that doesn’t use Application Program
Manager (APM).
/MAP moves the extended BIOS data area within the base
640 KB system memory. The upper 1 KB of system memory
is mapped to provide a corrective 640 KB of system
memory. This switch should be used with applications such
as QEMM to enable them to manage the high memory area
more efficiently. BATTERY.PRO must be the first device driver
in the CONFIG.SYS file to effectively use this switch.
Power-Saving Utilities 5-5
Optimizing Battery Operation
Power-Saving Levels
The power-saving level you should use to optimize
battery-charge life depends on the operations you are
performing and how the application is written. Use Setup to
define power-savings levels.
BatteryPro does not usually conflict with applications.
However, some applications may fail or suffer performance
degradation. Try your applications at the highest level of
savings, and evaluate their performance. If degradation
occurs, try the next lower level until performance is
satisfactory.
The power-savings levels, 0 through 4, used by the
BatteryPro and SETPOWER utilities are defined as follows:
Level 0
Level 0 (zero) disables the battery power-savings
feature. BatteryPro performs no real-time active power
savings. Some programs that run well at more optimal
power-savings levels require level 0 for installation.
Level 1
Level 1 conserves battery power when the processor is
idle, for example, when waiting for keyboard activity
and device input/output. Level 1 features are also
active in levels 2 through 4. Microsoft Excel and
Windows perform well using level 1. Operating system
enhancement programs such as DESQview also work
well at level 1.
Level 1 is the highest level you can use without
affecting processor performance using Lotus
PrintGraph or serial printer interfaces.
Note: Some application programs such as Lotus
1-2-3 do not use standby mode for keyboard and
other device inactivity. You must use a level higher
than 1 to conserve battery power during keyboard
activity.
Level 2
The factory default, level 2, induces more idle time
between keyboard activations and MS-DOS access.
Performance is degraded slightly, but the difference
5-6 Power-Saving Utilities
Optimizing Battery Operation
should be unnoticeable. This level is the optimum
compromise between program performance and
battery charge life.
Most applications work well at level 2, for example,
Lotus 1-2-3 and Microsoft PaintBrush®, Word, and
Works. Many programs that work well at level 1 also
work well at level 2 (for example, Microsoft Windows).
Level 3
Level 3 induces less idle time in the keyboard and
MS-DOS access areas than level 2 but induces idle time
in hard disk and video input/output. This level saves
more power overall with applications that access the
hard disk often.
Programs with high disk read/write rates increase
battery-power consumption. Level 3 “smooths” disk
read/write power consumption over longer access
periods, thus reducing peak power needs. Using level
3 (and level 4) permits more frequent disk access
while using little more power than standby mode.
Note: Generally, use level 3 only if level 4 is not
acceptable. Try level 4 first. Levels 3 and 4 function
identically, with increased power savings at level 4.
Level 4
Combining all techniques used by the lower levels at a
slightly higher value, level 4 produces the highest
power savings—from 10 to 30 minutes extra battery
life, depending on your application. This level also
affects performance more than the other levels, but
you do not notice this with most applications.
Note: You can use the Dates or SETPOWER/S utility
to display the current power level of BatteryPro.
Configuration Power Savings
Use the Setup Program to configure the system to best meet
your power/performance requirements.
Power-Saving Utilities 5-7
Optimizing Battery Operation
Hard Disk Motor Timeout
The hard disk turns off automatically after no activity for
the time set for the Hard Disk Motor Timeout interval in the
Setup Program. You can change the default 5-minutes
setting using the Setup Program.
Note: When the hard disk is off, remember that a slight
delay occurs for the disk drive to reach operating speed.
Some word processing and file editing programs save your
work to a back-up file automatically, causing frequent
access to your hard disk. This could use more power than
leaving the hard disk always on. With such programs, set
the Hard Disk Motor Timeout to higher values. If you find
that the hard disk stays on too much even when you are
not accessing it, try a lower setting, such as 1 minute.
CPU Speed
You can set the CPU Speed item in Setup to low, medium,
high (which also corresponds to power consumption), or
auto. The auto option sets CPU speed to high when you
operate the computer on AC power or to low on battery
power. Use medium if you are using battery power on DX4
models. Set CPU Speed to the lowest value acceptable to
your application to save battery power.
LCD Power
You can set the LCD Power item to low, medium, high
(which also corresponds to power consumption), or auto.
However, the lower the LCD power, the higher the CPU video
update performance. The auto option sets LCD power to
high when you operate the computer on AC power or to
medium on battery power. Setting the battery power to low,
will give you better battery life and font screen updates.
On most models, set LCD Power to the lowest acceptable
values to save battery power. Some graphics programs do
5-8 Power-Saving Utilities
Optimizing Battery Operation
not display satisfactorily at lower values, so experiment
with your particular application. This has no effect on color
units.
I/O (Input/Output) Ports
You can individually disable the parallel or serial ports, if
not in use, to save battery power.
LCD Brightness Control
The LCD is a major power user in the computer. Reducing
the LCD brightness control level even a small amount
significantly reduces power usage. Always set the
brightness control to the lowest comfortable brightness
level, especially in low light conditions (for example, on an
airliner where longer battery charge life is important).
Power-Saving Utilities 5-9
SETPOWER Utility
SETP OWER Utilit y
Using the SETPOWER utility, you can also set the BatteryPro
power-savings level at any MS-DOS prompt. For example, at
the C:\> prompt you can type
SETPOWER /Ln
where n is the power-saving level (0 through 4) you want to
use. You can also include this command line in any batch
file (AUTOEXEC.BAT) you create to load an application.
Laptop Manager can automatically issue this command if
you configure an application’s loading process using the
Laptop Manager Change Menu.
Note: SETPOWER and all other BatteryPro utilities furnished
with your computer are loaded on the hard disk at the
factory under the UTILS directory with the MS-DOS PATH
command already in the AUTOEXEC.BAT file.
If you want to know the current and maximum power
levels, at the C:\> prompt type
SETPOWER /S
and press Enter. SETPOWER displays the current setting, 0
through 4, and the maximum available setting.
Note: You can also use the Dates utility to display the
current setting of BatteryPro.
5-10 Power-Saving Utilities
SMARTDRV.EXE Disk Caching Utility
SM ARTDRV.EX E Disk C aching Utilit y
SMARTDRV.EXE is a disk-caching utility that reduces the
time and power the computer needs to read data from the
hard disk.
SMARTDRV.EXE works best if you use many applications
and files at one time. It is particularly effective when the
computer runs multiple applications that require swapping,
that is, copying applications to and from the hard disk to
make room for all of the applications in memory.
Note: Do not use SMARTDRV.EXE with any other diskcaching utilities.
See the MS-DOS User’s Guide and Reference for a more
detailed description of this utility.
Power-Saving Utilities 5-11
SPEED Utility
SPEED Utilit y
The SPEED utility enables you to set the current CPU
operating speed to low, medium, or high. However, because
the faster speeds consume more power, you may want to
select the low or medium speed to conserve power when
you are operating the computer on its internal battery.
You can change CPU speed in Setup (as described elsewhere
in this manual) or by pressing CTRL-ALT-↑ or CTRL-ALT-↓
(except on DX4 models).
Show Speed Switch
The SPEED command /S(how) switch displays the current
CPU speed setting if you type at the C:\> prompt
SPEED /S
and press ENTER. The program displays
Current CPU speed is set to [High, Medium, or Low]
Note: For this utility to work correctly on a DX4 model,
EMM386 or other memory managers must not be loaded.
Using the SPEED Utility
You can set the CPU speed to low, medium, or high by
typing at the C:\> prompt
SPEED [/L] [/M] [/H]
and pressing ENTER. The /L switch sets CPU speed to low,
/M to medium, and /H to high. The program responds to
the command by displaying
Current CPU speed is set to [Low, Medium, or High]
5-12 Power-Saving Utilities
6
Palette Utilities
This chapter tells you about
❑
PAL, which controls built-in LCD gray shades and
colors as well as external monitor colors
❑
RPAL, which enables you to make real-time changes to
gray shades or colors on the LCD or color combinations
on an external color monitor
Contents
Color Display Utilities...................................................... 6-2
PAL Utility....................................................................... 6-3
Changing to a Predefined Palette ................................. 6-3
Changing Specific Shades ........................................... 6-3
Other Ways to Select a Predefined Palette .................... 6-4
Viewing the Current Palette......................................... 6-4
Installing RPAL ........................................................... 6-6
RPAL Switches ............................................................ 6-6
Using RPAL ................................................................. 6-8
Saving an RPAL Data File............................................ 6-9
Adding RPAL to Your AUTOEXEC.BAT File ................ 6-10
PALSET Utility .............................................................. 6-11
Modifying Gray Scale Palettes.................................... 6-11
Palette Utilities 6-1
Color Display Utilities
Color Display Utilit ies
For the monochrome models, the LCD simultaneously
displays up to 64 colors as 64 shades of gray (mapped into
the 64 VGA standard colors). You can change the shade of
gray selected to represent each of the 16 colors to maximize
contrast between adjacent gray scale shades when running
programs that use particular color combinations. The
mapping of gray scales to colors is called a palette.
The computer has a default palette (P0) which is suitable
for most applications, two alternative fixed palettes (P2 for
text display and P3 for graphics), and two user-definable
palettes (P4 and P5).
In addition, palette P1 sets the foreground and background
shades for text mode displays to give the best contrast. The
P2 palette uses gray scales that uniquely match the colors
used in a program displaying in text mode. Palette P1 uses
a smaller number of gray scales to ensure that the
displayed text is always readable on a background of any
color combination.
The RPAL utility furnished with the BatteryPro package
enables you to modify the two user palettes, P4 and P5.
However, in 4-color and 2-color graphics modes, the palette
is predefined and cannot be modified.
n
Note: Some applications take control of the display and
provide their own color setup procedures. See your
application documentation for details.
6-2 Palette Utilities
PAL Utility
PAL Utilit y
The PAL utility defines the current palette. The power-on
default is defined in Setup as the LCD Palette. You can use
the PAL utility to:
❑
Change to a predefined palette
❑
Change specific colors and gray shades
Changing to a Predefined Palette
To change to one of the system palettes or a user palette
defined by the RPAL utility, at the C:\> prompt, type PAL Pn
and press ENTER.
In this form of the command, n has the following meaning.
0
1
2
3
4
5
n
—
—
—
—
—
—
Default palette
Standard palette 0 (text)
Standard palette 1 (text)
Standard palette 2 (graphics)
User palette 1
User palette 2
Note: Palettes P0 through P3 are system palettes that cannot
be changed. Palettes P4 and P5 are user palettes that can be
modified using the RPAL utility described later in this chapter.
Changing Specific Shades
To change only a few specific shades, at the C:\> prompt
type PAL Cp:c and press Enter.
In this form of the command, p is the color number (hex 0
through F), and c is the gray scale shade number (hex 0 through
F). Refer to “RPAL Utility” later in this chapter for the meaning of
the color numbers. If c is smaller than p, the shade is lighter. If c
is larger than p, the shade is darker.
Palette Utilities 6-3
PAL Utility
n
Note: Palettes created or modified with the PAL command
are not saved. PAL /S displays the currently selected LCD
pallette.
Other Ways to Select a Predefined Palette
After you define a palette using the RPAL utility, you have
two additional ways to select the defined palette:
❑
Select the palette from the keyboard
❑
Include the command in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file
Selecting the Palette From the Keyboard — To change the
current palette, press FN-ALT-ESC. Each time you press
FN-ALT-ESC, the display changes to the next palette (P0
through P5). Stop pressing FN-ALT-ESC when the palette
you prefer is displayed.
Including the Palette in the AUTOEXEC.BAT file — If you
want the computer to load a particular palette at start up,
include the PAL command in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file. For
example, to start up with user palette 1 loaded, include the
command PAL P4 in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file.
n
Note: You also can press FN-ALT-ESC to toggle through
the six available palettes.
Viewing the Current Palette
To view the palette currently in use, type PAL /S at the
MS-DOS prompt and press ENTER.
The current palette is displayed along with the following
statement:
6-4 Palette Utilities
PAL Utility
Color Palette set to Grayscale Palette n
(n=0 – 5)
RPAL Utility
With the RPAL utility, you can make real-time gray shade
changes to the LCD or color changes to a color LCD or an
attached color monitor. RPAL displays a small gray-shades
or color palette over part of your current screen when you
press a hot key (ALT plus an alphabet key you can assign).
n
Note: The RPAL pop-up menu is intended for use only with
text applications and has no effect on graphics applications
such as Microsoft Windows, Ventura Publisher®, and the
graph display within Lotus 1-2-3.
You can create custom palettes for each of your
applications and store the specific settings in a data file. If
you assign the custom palette file to the application using
the Laptop Manager Setup Menu, the computer loads the
custom palette when you select the application.
By adding RPAL to your AUTOEXEC.BAT file, you can also
define the current palette when you turn on your computer.
n
Note: Some applications provide their own color setup
procedures. Some applications also take control of the
keyboard and do not recognize the RPAL hot key.
RPAL does not display the palette when you run graphics
applications. However, you can adjust your colors or gray
shades at an MS-DOS prompt before you load your graphics
application program.
Palette Utilities 6-5
PAL Utility
Installing RPAL
To see the switches for the RPAL utility, at the MS-DOS C:\>
prompt type RPAL /? and press ENTER.
RPAL displays the following menu and then returns to the
MS-DOS prompt:
Resident Palette VN.NN
(c) 1990-92 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Usage: RPAL [ /U /I /Ddatafile /Kc /1user1file /2user2file]
[ ] - denotes optional parameters
Parameters:
/U
attempt to uninstall RPAL
/I
install RPAL as a TSR
/Ddatafile
use palette setting in datafile
/Kchar
use char key with the ALT key as hot key,
where char is a letter between A and Z
/1user1file
set user palette 1 to setting in user1file
/2user2file
set user palette 2 to setting in user2file
RPAL Switches
/I switch — Installing RPAL as TSR Program — You can
install RPAL as a terminate-and-stay-resident (TSR)
program. As a TSR program, RPAL is accessible from MS-DOS
and most applications by pressing a hot key (defined by the
/Kc switch described on the next page). To install RPAL as a
TSR program, at the C:\> prompt type RPAL /I and press
ENTER.
If you do not include the /Kc switch, the computer uses
ALT-P as the default hot key.
/U Switch — Removing RPAL From RAM — If RPAL is
installed as a TSR program and you want to remove RPAL
from RAM, at the C:\> prompt type RPAL /U and press
ENTER.
RPAL is deleted from RAM but not from the hard disk; you
can reinstall RPAL at any time at the MS-DOS prompt.
6-6 Palette Utilities
PAL Utility
n
Note: If other TSR programs are currently installed, you
must uninstall them in reverse order from which they were
installed. Or you can update your work and reboot to
remove all TSRs from RAM.
/Ddatafile Switch — Loading an RPAL Data File — To
load an RPAL data file, at the C:\> prompt type RPAL
/Ddatafile and press ENTER.
In datafile include the full path and filename of the RPAL
data file. See “Saving an RPAL Data File” later in this
chapter.
For example, if you stored your custom color data file
(named COLOR.DAT) in the utilities directory (UTILS), your
command to load the file would be:
RPAL /D\UTILS\COLOR.DAT
/Kc Switch — Defining a Hot Key — If you install RPAL as
a TSR file without defining a hot key, ALT-P is the default.
To define another alpha key (A through Z) as the hot key, at
the C:\> prompt type RPAL /Kc and press ENTER, where c is
the alphabet character key (A through Z) you want to be the
hot key.
/1 and /2 Switches — Defining User Palettes — To
establish an RPAL data file as one of the two user palettes,
at the C:\> prompt type either RPAL /1user1file or RPAL
/2user2file and press ENTER.
In these commands, user1file and user2file must be the full
paths and filenames of the RPAL data file you select as user
palette 1 (p4) or user palette 2 (p5). You can then access
these palettes from the keyboard by pressing FN-ALT-ESC.
Refer to the “Saving an RPAL Data File” later in this chapter.
Palette Utilities 6-7
PAL Utility
Using RPAL
To use RPAL at any MS-DOS prompt or during most
applications, press ALT-P (or ALT plus the hot key you
assigned during installation); RPAL displays the following
menu on the left side of your screen:
Set Palette vn.n
[0] Black
1 Blue
2 Green
3 Cyan
4 Red
5 Magenta
6 Brown
7 White
8 Gray
9 LtBlue
A LtGreen
B LtCyan
C LtRed
D LtMagen
E Yellow
F LtWhite
00
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
3B
3C
3D
3E
3F
H=Help
6-8 Palette Utilities
PAL Utility
You can use the following keys at the RPAL menu.
RPAL Menu Function Keys
Key
Function
ì↓
selects the color to adjust
← →
selects the color hue or gray shade
Ctrl-←
moves the menu to the left or right
Ctrl-→
so you can view the entire screen
R
resets all color hue or gray shades to their
factory default values
S
saves the current palette to an RPAL data file
(see the following section)
L
load an RPAL data file
1
saves the current palette as user palette 1 (p4)
2
saves the current palette as user palette 2 (p5)
H
displays help information
Esc
exits the menu
RPAL changes gray shades or colors in real time, so you
can see the changes as you make them.
Saving an RPAL Data File
To save an RPAL data file, follow these steps.
1.
Press S from the RPAL Set Up Menu. RPAL displays a
filename prompt.
2.
Type the full path and filename of the RPAL data file.
(RPAL limits your pathname/filename to 38 characters.)
3.
Either press ENTER to save the file or ESC to exit
without saving the file.
Palette Utilities 6-9
PAL Utility
n
Note: You can save an unlimited number of palettes by
assigning them unique filenames.
Adding RPAL to Your AUTOEXEC.BAT File
By including an RPAL command in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file,
you can install RPAL each time you turn on the computer.
Add the following line to your AUTOEXEC.BAT file:
RPAL /I /Ddatafile /Kc
where the option datafile is the pathname of your custom
RPAL data file (if you do not want the factory default
palette), and c is the alphabet character (A through Z) you
want to use with ALT as the hot key combination (if you do
not want to use the default ALT-P combination).
n
Note: The UTILS directory has several sample color palette
files for use with individual applications. These files end
with the .PAL extension (for example, the sample palette for
Lotus 1-2-3 3.0 is Lotus 3.PAL). When you install your
applications, examine the UTILS directory for available
palette files and try them.
6-10 Palette Utilities
PALSET Utility
PALSET Utilit y
The PALSET utility allows you to change the gray scale
palette definitions for the User1 and User2 palette values.
To use PALSET, type PALSET at the MS-DOS C:> prompt.
The following keys are available at the PALSET main menu:
Key
Function
Description
F1
Help
Provides additional information
on PALSET functionality
F2
Modify User1
Changes the color settings
defined for the User1 palette
F3
Modify User2
Changes the color settings
defined for the User2 palette
F4
Save
Saves the currently displayed
color settings for User1 and
User2 to CMOS
ESC
Exit
Exits the PALSET program
Modifying Gray Scale Palettes
To modify gray scale palettes, complete the following steps:
1.
From the PALSET main menu, select F2 or F3
(depending on the user palette you wish to update.
The Set Gray Scale User Palettes screen appears. From
this screen, the following keys are used to make
selections:
Palette Utilities 6-11
PALSET Utility
Key
Function
Description
F1
Help
Provides additional
information on User
Palette functionality
F2
Reset
Restores the original
color values for the
selected user palette
↑↓
Select Palette
Selects the next or
previous palette
←→
Change Color
Changes the color
definition for the
selected palette
ESC
Exit
Returns to the
previous menu
2.
Use the UP and DOWN arrow keys to select the color
you wish to edit.
3.
Use the LEFT and RIGHT arow keys to changes values
for the selected color.
4.
Select ESC to accept color changes or RESET to reset
values to the previous settings.
6-12 Palette Utilities
7
Laptop File Manager
This chapter tells you about
❑
Using the Laptop File Manager (LFM) program to
manage and view your files and directories
❑
LFM commands that simplify directory and file
copying, deletion, printing, renaming, and other
common file management functions
Contents
Getting Started with LFM ................................................ 7-3
Loading LFM ............................................................... 7-4
Using the Main Menu ...................................................... 7-5
Function Key Commands ................................................ 7-6
F1 Help Key ................................................................ 7-6
F2 CDir (Change Directory) Key................................... 7-6
F3 ReRd (Reread) Key.................................................. 7-7
F4 STAT (Statistics) or CMDS (Commands) Key ........... 7-7
F5 Split (Split Screen) Key ........................................... 7-8
F6 Creat (Create) Key .................................................. 7-9
F7 Sort Key ................................................................. 7-9
F8 DOS (Disk Operating System) Key ........................ 7-10
F9 Go Key ................................................................. 7-11
F10 Setup Key........................................................... 7-12
Character Key Commands............................................. 7-15
Attr (Attribute) Command.......................................... 7-15
Copy Command ........................................................ 7-16
Delete Command....................................................... 7-18
Edit Command.......................................................... 7-19
Excl (Exclude) Command .......................................... 7-19
Find Command ......................................................... 7-21
Incl (Include) Command ............................................ 7-22
Print Command......................................................... 7-24
Quit Command ......................................................... 7-25
Rename Command.................................................... 7-25
Show Command........................................................ 7-26
Tag Command........................................................... 7-27
Laptop File Manager 7-1
Contents
Content s
Up (ESC Key) Command............................................ 7-27
Update Command ..................................................... 7-27
Multiple File Operations ................................................ 7-28
Tagging Files for Multifile Operation .......................... 7-29
Split Screen .............................................................. 7-29
Copying Multiple Files............................................... 7-29
Restoring Laptop File Manager ...................................... 7-30
7-2 Laptop File Manager
Getting Started with LFM
Get ting Sta rted w ith LFM
The Laptop File Manager (LFM) utility supplied with your
computer helps you manipulate files and directories stored
on the hard disk. Many functions operate on two or more
files, called multiple file operations. LFM can do the following:
n
❑
Assign or change file attributes to one or multiple files
❑
Copy one or multiple files or directories to other
directories or floppies
❑
Delete one or multiple directories and files from hard
disk or floppies
❑
Find files using wildcard characters
❑
Send one or multiple files to a printer or other device
connected to your computer
❑
Rename one or multiple files and directories
❑
Show files for viewing
❑
Change a file’s date and time
❑
Display hard disk and floppy statistics, such as disk
capacity and disk space in use
❑
Create files and directories
❑
Sort the directory and file listings by name, extension,
date, or size
❑
Execute MS-DOS commands or shells
Note: Do not confuse Laptop File Manager (LFM) described
in this chapter with the Laptop Manager (LM) utility also
supplied on your computer.
Laptop File Manager 7-3
Getting Started with LFM
Loading LFM
The Laptop Manager utility enables you to load LFM from
the Laptop Manager main menu by pressing F2.
You also can load LFM at the C:\> prompt by typing LFM
and pressing ENTER.
Either way, LFM displays a listing of the files and directories
in the current directory similar to the following figure. From
this listing you can select drives, directories, and files to
view and manipulate.
Laptop File Manager vn.nn
C:\
Filename Ext
DEMOS
DOS
iMAGES
INTL
JAZZ
MOUSE
PCMPLUS
SCSI
UTILS
WINDOWS
24x18 AVI
AUTOEXEC BAK
DBLSPACE BIN
COMMAND COM
CONFIG
SYS
EXTMSDOS SYS
IO
SYS
MSDOS
SYS
Bytes
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
1108890
693
64246
25308
79
30128
40662
38138
Mon Nov 30 12:00 pm
Attr
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
....
A...
A...
ARSH
A...
A...
ARSH
ARSH
ARSH
Last Update
00/00/90 00:00:59
00/00/90 00:59:59
00/00/90 00:59:59
00/00/90 00:59:59
00/00/90 00:59:59
00/00/90 00:59:59
00/00/90 00:59:59
00/00/90 00:59:59
00/00/90 00:00:59
00/00/90 00:59:59
00/00/90 00:59:59
00/00/90 00:00:59
00/00/90 00:59:59
00/00/90 00:00:59
00/00/90 00:00:59
00/00/90 00:00:59
00/00/90 00:59:59
00/00/90 00:59:59
Commands
Commands
A - Attr
C - Copy
D - Delete
E - Edit
X - Excl
F - Find
I - Incl
P - Print
Q - Quit
R - Rename
S - Show
T - Tag
ESC- Up
U - Update
F1=Help F2=CDir F3=ReRd F4=STAT F5=Split F6=Creat F7=Sort F8=DOS F9=Go F10=Setup
n
Note: Typing LFM [path] at the MS-DOS prompt will
execute LFM using the directory specified in the path.
7-4 Laptop File Manager
Using the Main Menu
Using t he Ma in Menu
Use the following keys and commands to move the
highlight around the LFM main menu to help you work with
your directories and files.
LFM Menu Function Keys
Key
Function
F1
shows Help screen
↑
moves highlight up
↓
moves highlight down
End
highlights last listing
Home
highlights first listing
PgDn
shows next page or Help screen if more than 1 page
PgUp
shows previous page or Help screen
S, Enter
if directory name highlighted, shows selected
subdirectory; if filename highlighted, shows
contents of file
T
tags or untags highlighted directory or file for
multiple command action
Esc
if at subdirectory, returns to higher directory;
if at root directory, no action; if command active,
cancels command
Q
exits LFM or current screen of split screen after
the “Are you sure?” prompt:
• press Y to exit LFM or one screen of split screen
• press N or ENTER to cancel exit command
Laptop File Manager 7-5
Function Key Commands
Funct ion Key C ommand s
The function keys (F1 through F10) listed along the bottom
of the LFM main menu provide the functions described in
this section.
F1 Help Key
Pressing F1 at the LFM main menu—and at some LFM
submenus—displays a Help screen with condensed user
instructions. Some Help screens have more than one page;
look in the upper right corner of the Help screen for the
number of pages available. Press PgUp/PgDn to move
among the pages.
F2 CDir (Change Directory) Key
The change-directory function enables you to view other
directories on the current drive, the floppy drive, and any
optional drives connected to your computer. Press F2 at the
main menu, and LFM prompts you at the bottom of the
screen:
Path: [
]
At this prompt, you can type the pathname of the directory
or drive you want LFM to display. If you want to change
directories, type C:\DIRNAME and press ENTER.
LFM then displays the subdirectory and filenames of the
directory named DIRNAME.
If you want to change drives, type the drive letter followed
by a colon (for example, A:). You also can name a
subdirectory on the new drive for display. For example, type
A:\EDITOR and press ENTER.
LFM displays the EDITOR directory and its files.
7-6 Laptop File Manager
Function Key Commands
F3 ReRd (Reread) Key
Pressing F3 causes LFM to redisplay the listing. This
function is useful if you are examining several floppies on
the floppy drive. Rather than having to press F2 (Change
Directory) and type the pathname, press F3 each time you
insert a new floppy. You can also “untag” all files you may
have previously tagged by pressing F3.
F4 STAT (Statistics) or CMDS (Commands)
Key
F4 is a toggle that causes LFM to display in the upper right
quadrant of the main menu either the current drive
statistics or a list of commands you can use at the main
menu. If the statistics are displayed, the F4 prompt on the
main menu shows F4=CMDS. If the commands list is
displayed, the F4 prompt shows F4=STAT.
The statistics display lists the following information:
n
❑
The current drive letter and volume name (if any)
❑
The number of bytes available on the hard disk or
floppy
❑
The number of bytes in use and available for use (free)
on the hard disk or floppy
❑
The number of files on the current directory and their
size in bytes
Note: Subdirectories are listed as files with no size (0
length).
❑
Number of included (tagged) files, if any, and their size
in bytes
Laptop File Manager 7-7
Function Key Commands
F5 Split (Split Screen) Key
The split screen function enables you to view two directory
listings on the same screen. At the LFM main menu, press
F5 and LFM prompts you at the bottom of the screen:
Path: [
]
Type the pathname of the second directory you want to
view and press Enter. The directory can be on the same
drive or a different drive. You can use all function key
commands and single-letter commands on directories and
files in either listing.
Press F5 to switch the highlight between the upper and
lower directory listing.
Using Split Screen to Copy Files
You can simplify use of the Copy command using the split
screen mode. For example, you first select (highlight) the
destination directory to which you want to copy the file and
press F5, then ENTER. Then highlight the source file or
directory on the other screen and press C. LFM then
displays the destination directory name in the “Path: [ … ]”
prompt described above. The split screen quickly displays
the results of the copy process.
Exiting Split Screen
To return to only one screen, press Q to exit the highlighted
window. LFM prompts you at the bottom of the screen
Are you sure? [ N ].
To exit the split screen and return to one screen, press Y. If
you do not want to abandon the split screen mode, press
ENTER or N.
7-8 Laptop File Manager
Function Key Commands
F6 Creat (Create) Key
Pressing F6 enables you to create a new directory or
filename at the LFM prompt at the bottom of the screen
[F]ile or [D]irectory:
If you want to create a new file, press F. If you want to
create a new directory, press D. LFM then prompts:
Path: [
]
Type the filename or directory name and path and press
ENTER.
If you do not type a drive letter or directory name, LFM
stores the new file or directory under the displayed drive or
directory.
You cannot create a new directory and a new file with one
command. You must first create the new directory before
assigning new or existing files to it.
Example 1: If you want to create a new text file called
MYFILE under the existing NEWDIR directory on the floppy
drive, type A:\NEWDIR\MYFILE.TXT and press ENTER.
Example 2: If you want to create a subdirectory called JULY
under the existing MEMOS directory on the root directory of
hard disk, type C:\MEMOS\JULY and press ENTER.
F7 Sort Key
The sort function enables you to display listed files in an
order determined by one of several file attributes. Pressing
F7 causes LFM to display at the bottom of the screen
Sort file list: [N]ame, [E]xtension, [D]ate/time, [S]ize:
Laptop File Manager 7-9
Function Key Commands
Press the key corresponding to the boxed character in the
prompt to begin the sort function. LFM then sorts and
displays the files in the current directory listing (and all
other directories LFM displays) according to the attribute
you select from one of the following.
Name
Press N and LFM sorts all files in alphabetic
order. If any filenames begin with
nonalphabetic characters, they are displayed
before the alphabetic names.
Extension
Press E and LFM sorts all files by filename
extension in alphabetic order. Filenames with
no extension are listed first.
Date/time
Press D and LFM sorts all files by most recent
time and date.
Size
Press S and LFM sorts all files by number of
bytes used, displayingthe largest first.
F8 DOS (Disk Operating System) Key
Pressing F8 at the LFM main menu causes LFM to prompt at
the bottom of the screen
Execute a DOS (S)hell or (C)ommand:
❑
n
If you want to execute an MS-DOS shell, press S. LFM
displays the C:\> prompt where you can type your
shell pathname and press ENTER to execute.
Note: When you finish using the shell, at the MS-DOS
prompt type EXIT and press ENTER.
7-10 Laptop File Manager
Function Key Commands
❑
If you want to execute an MS-DOS command, pressing
C causes LFM to prompt at the bottom of the screen
DOS Command: [
]
where you can type any MS-DOS command and press
Enter to execute.
F9 Go Key
Pressing F9 at the LFM main menu causes LFM to load and
execute programs based on the file’s extension. For
example, if you want to execute the MS-DOS EDIT utility on a
particular file, move the highlight to the EDIT.COM line
under the DOS directory listing and press F9. Depending on
how you have set up your LFM Execute Commands item in
the F10 LFM Setup Commands menu, LFM may prompt you
at the bottom of the screen
Press ESC to cancel, any other key to execute:
Press any key except ESC. Depending on how you have set
up your F10 LFM Setup Commands menu, LFM then may
prompt:
Parameters: [
]
At this prompt you can type the pathname of the file you
want to edit and press ENTER (or, if you are executing
another type of file that requires no parameters, press
ENTER to start execution). In the example, the MS-DOS EDIT
screen would appear.
When you exit the executable program, LFM reloads and
displays its main menu.
LFM uses extended/expanded memory for itself when you
use the Go function, reserving all but about 8 KB for the
program. If no extended/expanded memory is available,
LFM uses about 130 KB of standard base memory.
Laptop File Manager 7-11
Function Key Commands
n
Note: Do not use the Go function to execute a terminateand-stay-resident (TSR) program. LFM cannot reload itself
when you exit the TSR program, and it displays an error
message. The MS-DOS PRINT program is an example. If you
intend to use PRINT, install it in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file so
the resident portion of PRINT will load when you start the
computer.
F10 Setup Key
Pressing F10 at the LFM main menu causes LFM to display
a Setup Commands menu at which you can select one of
three submenus described in this section to configure LFM
operating features.
Pressing F1 causes LFM to display a Help screen describing
the setup functions.
When you complete your changes to each menu, press ESC
to return to the Setup Commands menu. Then press ESC
again and answer the “Save changes?” prompt to return to
the LFM main menu.
7-12 Laptop File Manager
Function Key Commands
Pathnames/Options Setup Menu
Pressing P at the LFM Setup Commands menu causes LFM
to display the Pathnames Setup and Options Setup menu.
Pathname Setup
Editor Pathname
: [ C:\DOS\EDIT.COM
Change Parameters : [ N ] Parms: [ %F
Showfile Pathname : [
Change Parameters : [ N ]
Options Setup
Information Display
Printer Output
Restore Original Dir
Execute Command
Sort File List Key
Screen Display Rows
INCLUDE Directories
Use DOSPRINT if inst
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
Parms:
[ %F
]
]
]
]
Cmds
LPT1
Yes
Prompt
Extension
Normal
No
No
At this menu you can type the pathnames of your own
editing (or word processing) and show-file programs that
you have installed in your computer.
The MS-DOS Editor word processing program is furnished
on your new computer as the default editor.
If the Editor Pathname field is blank, the LFM main menu
E(dit) command does nothing.
LFM furnishes its own show-file program if you do not type
a pathname to another show program.
The executable pathnames you type at the prompts enable
you to use the E(dit) command and the S(how) command at
the LFM main menu. The Options Setup portion of the
menu enables you to select several LFM operating and
display features options.
Laptop File Manager 7-13
Function Key Commands
LFM Colors Menu
Pressing C at the LFM Setup Commands menu causes LFM
to display the Screen Color Setup menu at which you can
change the colors of the LFM menus displayed by a color
LCD or an external monitor connected to your computer or
change the gray shades of the monochrome LCD.
Execute Commands Menu
Pressing E at the LFM Setup Commands menu causes LFM
to display the Execute Commands Setup menu at which
you can type the filename extension, program pathname,
and prompting parameters for executable programs you
want to respond when you press F9 as described in F9 Go
Key.
7-14 Laptop File Manager
Character Key Commands
Cha racter Key C ommand s
The upper right quadrant of the LFM main menu lists the
commands you can use to manipulate the directories and
files displayed on the main menu. If the Commands box is
not displayed, press F4 and LFM replaces the drive
statistics display with the Commands box.
To execute a command press ↑ or ↓ to highlight the
directory/filename to which you want to apply the
command and then press the first letter of the command
name listed in the box to execute the command.
n
Note: Many of the character key commands are capable of
operating on multiple files and directories. See “Multiple
File Operations” at the end of this chapter for information.
Attr (Attribute) Command
To set or change file attributes, highlight the filename on
the LFM listing and press A at the LFM main menu. LFM
places an “A” to the left of the highlighted file and prompts
you at the bottom of the screen
Attributes: [Y]es, [N]o, [I]gnore: [I] arch [I] rdonly [I] sys [I] hide
Press → or ← to move the cursor to the attribute you want
to change. Then press either Y to set the attribute for the
highlighted file, N to delete a previously set attribute, or I to
leave the attribute unchanged.
When you have changed the attribute(s), press ENTER to
complete the process. LFM then changes the “Attr”
(Attribute) column of the highlighted file to reflect your
selections.
Laptop File Manager 7-15
Character Key Commands
arch
(Archive)
Attribute
Setting a file’s Archive attribute affects how
MS-DOS and some applications create a
back-up file when you make changes to the
file.
rdonly
(Read Only)
Attribute
Setting a file or directory to Read-Only
protects the file from any changes or editing.
The file cannot be written to or deleted from
the storage device (hard disk or floppy).
sys
(System)
Attribute
The System attribute is used for system files
(.SYS) required to start and run your
computer. Usually only a user familiar with
programming should modify this attribute.
System files are hidden in MS-DOS directory
(DIR command) listings, but LFM does display
system files.
hide
(Hide File)
Attribute
The Hide attribute “hides” the file from the
MS-DOS DIR and PRINT commands so that the
file is not displayed, read, or printed. However,
LFM does display, read, and print “hidden”
files.
Copy Command
The Copy command enables you to copy the highlighted
file, tagged files (see “Multiple File Operations” later in this
chapter), or an entire directory to another directory or to
the floppy drive.
To copy a file or directory, highlight the file or directory
name you want to copy, and press C. LFM prompts at the
bottom of the screen
Path: [
]
Type the pathname where you want the directory/file
copied to, and press ENTER.
7-16 Laptop File Manager
Character Key Commands
❑
If you do not type a new drive letter or directory name,
LFM copies the file or directory to the current drive or
directory.
❑
If you do not type a new filename, LFM uses the
existing filename.
You also can copy a file/directory to another name you type
at the Path: prompt.
You can create a new directory while copying. At the Path:
prompt type the new directory name as part of the
pathname, and press ENTER. LFM prompts at the bottom of
the screen
Directory doesn’t exist, CREATE? [ Y ]
Press Y if you want LFM to create the new directory.
If you try to copy a file using the same filename under a
different directory, LFM prompts at the bottom of the screen
Copy file : [R]eplace, [A]ppend, [S]kip
To this prompt do one of the following:
❑
Press R if you want LFM to delete the existing file and
replace it with the highlighted file.
❑
Press A if you want LFM to append (add) the
highlighted file to the end of the existing file. Use this
option if you want to combine multiple files into one
file.
❑
Press S if you want LFM to abort the Copy process.
Laptop File Manager 7-17
Character Key Commands
Delete Command
The Delete command enables you to delete the highlighted
file, tagged files (see “Multiple File Operations” later in this
chapter), or an entire directory and all files stored in the
directory.
To delete a file, highlight the file you want to delete and
press D. LFM prompts at the bottom of the screen
Are you sure? [ N ]
If you are certain you want to delete the file, press Y. LFM
deletes the file and removes the filename from the listing. If
you do not want to delete the file, press N or ENTER, and
LFM aborts the Delete operation.
To delete an entire directory of files, highlight the directory
name you want to delete and press D. LFM prompts you at
the bottom of the screen
Delete Directory and ALL Subfiles?: [ N ]
If you are certain you want to delete the directory and all its
files, press Y. LFM displays a second prompt to be sure you
want to delete a directory and all its files.
Are you sure? [ N ]
If you still are certain you want to delete the directory and
all its files, press Y. LFM deletes the directory and its files
and removes the directory name from the listing. If you do
not want to delete the directory, press N or ENTER, and
LFM aborts the Delete operation.
7-18 Laptop File Manager
Character Key Commands
Edit Command
The Edit command loads the highlighted file and the
MS-DOS Editor. You can install and use almost any other
word processing or editing program by entering its
pathname using the Setup function. You must first install
your word processor or editor on the hard disk according to
the instructions furnished with your word processing
program.
You also can use the Microsoft Windows Write word
processing application available under the Windows
program furnished with your new computer.
Excl (Exclude) Command
The Exclude command works with the Include command.
Both commands are used for multiple file operations where
you want to execute one command (such as Copy or Delete)
on a number of files in one operation. The Exclude
command permits you to exclude selected filenames from
tagged files using the Include or Tag commands.
If you have not tagged any files using the Tag or the Include
commands, the Exclude command takes no action. If you
have tagged files—indicated by the >> symbol appearing in
the left margin by the filename—you can exclude them from
the listing by pressing X at the main menu. LFM then
prompts you at the bottom of the screen
Exclude: [A]ttribute, [E]arlier Date, [L]ater Date, [S]elect all,
[I]gnore:
This prompt permits you to exclude files from the tagged
files according to the parameters in the above prompt.
If you want to exclude (untag) all included names, press
ENTER or S.
Laptop File Manager 7-19
Character Key Commands
Attribute
To exclude (untag) all files with certain
attributes, press the A key at the Exclude
prompt and LFM prompts you at the bottom of
the screen
Attributes: [Y]es, [N]o, [I]gnore: [I] arch [I] rdonly [I] sys [I] hide
This prompt enables you to exclude all files
with the same attributes. For example, if you
want to exclude all read-only files in a
directory, move the cursor to the rdonly option
and press Y to select read-only files. Then
press ENTER twice. If you want to exclude all
archived files, press Y with the cursor in the
arch box. You can select any combination of
attributes.
Earlier Date
The Earlier Date prompt enables you to
exclude all files dated earlier than the date
and time you select. Press E at the Exclude
prompt and LFM prompts
File Date: [12/21/90] Time: [12:34:56]
At this prompt type the date or time which
represents the latest date and/or time you
want; LFM excludes all files dated earlier than
that date. Then press ENTER and LFM
prompts at the bottom of the screen
File pattern: [ *.*
]
At the File pattern prompt type the *.*
wildcard characters if you want to exclude
files only by date, or type filename extensions
(for example,*.TXT) or filename
fragments-plus-wildcards to further delimit
the Exclude function. See “Find Command”
described previously and your MS-DOS User’s
Guide and Reference for wildcard use.
7-20 Laptop File Manager
Character Key Commands
Later Date
Pressing L at the Exclude prompt displays the
same File Date prompt as the Earlier Date
prompt described above, and works the same
except LFM excludes all files after the date you
specify.
Select All
Press S (or the ENTER key) at the Exclude
prompt to exclude (and untag) all files in the
directory. This option is particularly useful if
you first select all files and then use the
Exclude command to remove certain files from
the included list.
Ignore
Press I at the Exclude prompt if you do not
want to use any of its options to select files.
LFM then prompts at the bottom of the screen
File pattern: [ *.*
]
At this prompt you can type file patterns for
LFM to use to exclude certain files. For
example, the filename pattern *.TXT excludes
all files with that extension from the tagged
list.
Find Command
The Find command helps you find files on the current
(displayed) directory, according to their filename/extension
pattern. Pressing F at the main menu causes LFM to
prompt at the bottom of the screen
Find file: find the [F]irst or [N]ext:
If you select the [F]irst option by pressing F, LFM looks for
the first occurrence of the filename pattern starting at the
beginning of the directory.
Laptop File Manager 7-21
Character Key Commands
If you select the [N]ext option by pressing N, LFM looks for
the first occurrence of the filename pattern after the
highlighted filename.
After you press F or N, LFM prompts at the bottom of the
screen
File pattern: [ *.*
]
At this prompt enter the filename pattern for which you are
searching. For example, to find the first or next file with a
.TXT extension, type *.TXT and press ENTER. LFM then
searches for the first or next filename with the .TXT
extension. If you want to find the first or next filename
beginning with the characters MI, type MI*.* and LFM looks
for the first or next filename beginning with those two
characters.
Incl (Include) Command
The Include command enables you to tag (select) a number
of files from the current (displayed) directory listing for later
multiple execution of commands such as Delete and Copy.
You can tag all files in a directory or certain files according
to date, file attribute, or file pattern. You can use the
Exclude command in conjunction with the Include
command for even greater selectivity.
Press I at the main menu and LFM prompts at the bottom of
the screen
Include: [A]ttribute, [E]arlier Date, [L]ater date, [S]elect all, [I]gnore:
Attribute
To include (tag) all files with certain
attributes, press A at the Include prompt, and
LFM prompts at the bottom of the screen
7-22 Laptop File Manager
Character Key Commands
Attributes: [Y]es, [N]o, [I]gnore: [I] arch [I] rdonly [I] sys [I] hide
This prompt enables you to include all files
with the same attributes. For example, if you
want to include all read-only files in a
directory, move the cursor to the rdonly option
and press Y to select read-only files Then
press ENTER twice. If you want to include all
archived files, press Y with the cursor in the
arch box. You can select any combination of
attributes.
Earlier Date
This prompt enables you to include all files
dated earlier than the date and time you
select. Press E at the Include prompt, and LFM
prompts you
File Date: [12/21/90] Time: [12:34:56]
Type the date or time which represents the
latest date or time you want: LFM includes all
files dated earlier than that date. Then press
Enter, and LFM prompts at the bottom of the
screen
File pattern: [ *.*
]
At the File pattern prompt type the *.*
wildcard characters if you want to include files
only by date, or type filename extensions (for
example, * .TXT) or filename
fragments-plus-wildcards to further delimit
the Include function. See “Find Command”
described previously and the MS-DOS User’s
Guide and Reference.
Laptop File Manager 7-23
Character Key Commands
Later Date
Pressing L at the Include prompt displays the
same File Date prompt as the Earlier Date
prompt described previously, and works the
same except LFM includes all files after the
date you specify.
Select All
Press S or ENTER at the Include prompt to
include all files in the directory. This option is
particularly useful if you first select all files
and then use the Exclude command described
previously to remove certain files from the
tagged list.
Ignore
Press I at the Include prompt if you do not
want to use any of its options to select files.
LFM then prompts at the bottom of the screen
File pattern: [ *.*
]
At this prompt you can type file patterns to
use to include files. For example, type the
filename pattern *.TXT to include all files with
that extension in the tagged listing. See the
MS-DOS User’s Guide and Reference.
Print Command
The LFM Print command enables you to send the
highlighted file to your system printer or other device
connected to your computer via the LPT or COM ports. Using
F10 (SETUP), the LFM Setup Commands, and the
Pathnames/Options Setup screen described previously, you
can select the printer port (LPT parallel or COM serial) and
whether or not to use the MS-DOS PRINT command.
The LFM Print command prints your file as recorded, with
no pagination or perforation-skip capabilities. You must
embed the appropriate printer control characters and
escape sequences in your file to control your printer (see
your printer’s user manual). Since most applications
7-24 Laptop File Manager
Character Key Commands
provide their own printing facility, you may find their print
functions more convenient to use.
Quit Command
The Quit command at the main menu erases LFM from RAM
and returns control to MS-DOS, Laptop Manager, or
Windows depending on how you loaded LFM. If LFM is in
split-screen mode, LFM quits the current screen of the two
screens.
To quit LFM or one of the split screens, press Q at the main
menu. LFM prompts at the bottom of the screen
Are you sure? [ N ]
Press Y if you want to quit LFM. Press ENTER or N if you
want LFM to remain on screen.
Rename Command
The Rename command enables you to rename the
highlighted file or directory. You also can use the Rename
command to move the highlighted file to another directory.
However, you cannot move a directory in this manner; you
can only rename the current directory.
You can use the Rename command instead of the Copy
command when you want to delete the files from their
present area while copying the files to another area.
To rename or move highlighted file or directory, at the main
menu press R and LFM prompts at the bottom of the screen
Path: [ FILENAME.EXT
]
If you only want to change the name of the file or directory
and not move it, type the new name, and press ENTER.
Laptop File Manager 7-25
Character Key Commands
If you want to move the file, type the entire pathname
where you want the file moved, including the new or
existing filename, and press ENTER.
For example, to move MYFILE.TXT to the MEMOS directory on
the root directory and change the name, type
MEMOS\FILE1.TXT.
LFM deletes MYFILE.TXT entry from the current directory
and moves it to the FILE1.TXT file under the MEMOS
directory.
Show Command
The Show command has two primary purposes: to display
the data in a highlighted file for you to view and to display a
subdirectory listing.
Showing a Subdirectory
To view a subdirectory, move the highlight to the directory
name and press S. LFM displays the selected directory listing.
To return to the next higher directory level, press ESC. If the
root directory is currently displayed, LFM takes no action.
Showing a File
To view a file, move the highlight to the desired filename
and press S. You cannot edit or modify the file using the
Show command (unless you specified a word processor or
editor program for the Show command).
You can use PGUP and PGDN to page through the file, ↑
and ↓ to scroll up and down one line at a time, and ← and
→ to scroll left and right four columns at a time.
Press HOME and END to display the beginning and end of
the file, respectively. Press ESC to return to the LFM
directory listing.
7-26 Laptop File Manager
Character Key Commands
Tag Command
The Tag command enables you to tag (include) directories
and files, one at a time, for later multiple file operations. To
tag a directory or file, highlight the name of the file, and
press T. LFM displays the >> symbol in the left margin
opposite the name to denote that the directory or file is
tagged; LFM then moves the highlight down to the next
name.
If you want to “untag” (exclude) a name, highlight the
name, and press T. LFM removes the >> tag symbol. If you
want to untag all tags, use the Exclude command or press
F3 (REREAD).
Up (ESC Key) Command
The Up command displays the parent directory of the
currently displayed directory. Press ESC at any listing, and
LFM displays the next higher directory. If the root directory
is currently displayed, LFM takes no action.
Update Command
The Update command permits you to change the
Last Update date and time listing for individual files or
multiple tagged files (but not subdirectories). At the main
menu, press U and LFM prompts at the bottom of the screen:
File Date: [01/01/90] Time: [00:00:58]‘
Type the new date or time you want, and press ENTER.
LFM changes the date on the Last Update column listing to
your new date.
Laptop File Manager 7-27
Multiple File Operations
M ultip le File Operations
You can perform the same character key command on two
or more directories or files by using the Tag command,
Include command, or Exclude command to choose the
names and then activating the command. The following LFM
commands operate on more than one file:
❑
Attribute command
❑
Copy command—be careful with your pathname; do
not supply a filename when copying multiple files;
make use of MS-DOS wildcard characters * and ? (see
the MS-DOS User’s Guide and Reference). A Select each
option enables you to choose to copy each file or
directory and to Replace or Append the file.
❑
Delete command—be cautious using the Delete
command with multiple files; examine the tagged
names carefully before answering the final “Are you
sure?” prompt
❑
Print command—places selected files in the print
queue in the order displayed at the main menu from
top to bottom
❑
Update command
❑
Rename command—you can use the Rename
command to move more than one selected file to
another directory: in the pathname, type only a
directory name, and use MS-DOS * and ? wildcard
characters
Refer to the individual descriptions of these commands
earlier in this chapter and, where the directions refer to one
file, assume that the directions affect all tagged files and
directories.
7-28 Laptop File Manager
Multiple File Operations
Tagging Files for Multifile Operation
To select files for multifile commands, you can use either
the Tag command to tag each file in the main menu listing
or the Include and Exclude commands to select a large
number of related names or extensions. You also can use
the Include All command to tag all files and then selectively
exclude files by pressing T(AG).
If you want to include or exclude directories, follow these
steps.
1.
Press F10 to get to the Setup Commands menu.
2.
Press P to get to the Options Setup Menu.
3.
Highlight the Include Directories item and press the
right arrow to toggle between Yes or No, and make
your selection.
4.
Press ESC to exit.
Refer to the individual descriptions of these commands
earlier in this chapter for more details.
Split Screen
You can simplify use of the Copy command using the LFM
split screen mode. (Press F5 at the main menu to enter
split screen mode). For example, using a split screen you
can view and tag the source files and directories on one
screen and the destination files and directories on the other
screen.
Copying Multiple Files
When you tag multiple files for copying, LFM assumes you
want to use the existing filenames under the new
destination directory (or drive). Thus you do not have to
type the MS-DOS wildcard characters in the pathname.
Laptop File Manager 7-29
Restoring Laptop File Manager
Restoring Lap top File Ma nag er
If LFM has for some reason been deleted from the hard disk,
you can install the LFM files from the backup diskettes you
made of your system software during SETUP.
After installing the software, you should be able to load LFM
from the hard disk, Windows, or from the Laptop Manager
main menu.
7-30 Laptop File Manager
8
VGA External Monitor Utilities
This chapter tells you about
❑
Capabilities and operation of the VGA software when
using an external monitor
❑
Technical data for users wanting to program the VGA
enhanced modes
Contents
Capabilities .....................................................................8-2
Extended 1024 × 768 Graphics Mode...........................8-2
Extended 16 and 256-Color 800 × 600
Graphics Mode..........................................................8-3
Extended 256-Color 640 × 400, 640 × 480,
and 600 × 800 Graphics Modes .................................8-3
132-Column Text Modes ..............................................8-4
VGA Utility ......................................................................8-5
Configuring Your Application Program .........................8-5
Installation Hints.........................................................8-7
TravelMate 4000M VGA Software.................................8-8
Using VGA.EXE ...........................................................8-9
Advanced Monitor Operations ........................................8-13
VGA and Extended VGA Programming .......................8-13
References ................................................................8-16
External Monitor Troubleshooting .................................8-17
VGA External Monitor Utilities 8-1
Capabilities
Ca pa bilit ies
Your TravelMate 4000M computer supports several
enhanced modes beyond the VGA standard, including the
ability to display 132 columns of text and 256-color
graphics at resolutions of 640 × 480 and 640 × 400 on any
supported monitor. In addition, the TravelMate 4000M
supports 800 × 600 resolution, 16- and 256-color graphics
on a multifrequency monitor and 1024 × 768 resolution,
16-color graphics on an 8514 or compatible monitor. Some
products may also support 1280 x 1024 x 16 and 1024 x
768 x 256 resolution (interlaced).
To take advantage of these enhancements, your computer
includes software support for several popular application
programs. The following sections describe the procedures
necessary to install these programs so they can take full
advantage of your computer’s enhanced capabilities.
To obtain the external monitor display drivers, you must
use the Maintenance and Backup procedures defined in
Chapter 1 to make a VGA diskette. You must then install
the drivers from the diskette into your /UTILS directory.
This is done by typing A:\INSTALL.
The TravelMate 4000M drivers described in this chapter
assume you are using a color VGA configuration. If you are
using a monochrome VGA monitor, use the VGA.EXE utility
to switch from monochrome VGA mapping to color mapping
before using the drivers. The command VGA VGA will set
your computer to color mapping.
Extended 1024 × 768 Graphics Mode
The computer is capable of supporting a 1024 × 768
graphics mode with 16 colors. This high-resolution mode is
interlaced and requires the use of an IBM 8514 or
equivalent interlaced monitor. Some products may also
support 1280 x 1024 x 16 and 1024 x 768 x 256 resolution
(interlaced).
8-2 VGA External Monitor Utilities
Capabilities
Extended 16 and 256-Color 800 × 600
Graphics Mode
Your computer display software can drive a multifrequency
display in an extended graphics mode with 800 dots
horizontally by 600 dots vertically in 16 or 256
simultaneous colors. This increased resolution effectively
provides 56 percent more information than standard VGA
modes with software that supports this mode.
Note: The extended resolution 800 × 600 graphics mode of
your computer requires a multifrequency monitor. The
1024 × 768 graphics mode requires an IBM 8514 or
compatible interlaced monitor.
The computer’s 800 × 600 graphics mode is not supported
on the IBM PS/2 8503, 8512, 8513 or 8514 or equivalent
fixed-frequency displays.
You may need to adjust your multifrequency monitor to
display the 800 × 600 graphics mode properly. Use the
vertical and horizontal size and position controls on your
monitor to display the entire 800 × 600 graphics mode
image without distortion.
Extended 256-Color 640 × 400, 640 × 480,
and 600 × 800 Graphics Modes
Your computer can display up to 256 simultaneous colors
at a resolution of 640 × 480 dots. This mode gives five times
the resolution of standard VGA 256-color graphics.
The computer also can display up to 256 simultaneous
colors at a resolution of 640 × 400 dots. This mode gives
you four times the resolution of standard VGA 256-color
graphics.
VGA External Monitor Utilities 8-3
Capabilities
132-Column Text Modes
Your computer supports two 132-column text modes on
either fixed-frequency or multifrequency monitors. One
mode displays 25 rows of 132-column-wide text. The
second mode displays 60 rows of 132-column-wide text.
These modes display large amounts of information at one
time.
These extended modes require specific software support to
take advantage of their capabilities in software applications.
8-4 VGA External Monitor Utilities
VGA Utility
VGA Utilit y
Most software that is compatible with IBM’s Personal
System/2, VGA, or EGA will run automatically on your
computer. Just turn on your computer and install your
application for IBM PS/2 models 50, 60, 70 or 80 video,
VGA, or EGA as instructed by the program’s
documentation.
Configuring Your Application Program
Many applications include an installation or configuration
program to prepare them for operation on particular
hardware. Most newer programs are able to run in the
default VGA configuration of your computer.
However, some programs are written specifically for certain
non-VGA or non-EGA video hardware so you may have to
configure your computer to behave identically to the video
board needed by the particular software. For this purpose,
your system includes a utility to configure your computer
to behave like each of the IBM standard video devices. This
utility, called VGA.EXE, is described in the following section.
The following table lists the fully compatible video
standards supported by your computer and the video
modes and resolutions available under each video standard.
VGA External Monitor Utilities 8-5
VGA Utility
TravelMate 4000M Video Standards Supported
Simultaneous
Colors (1)
Mapping (2)
VGA, PS/2 Display Adapter including MCGA and EGA modes (default)
Monochrome Text
–
80 columns × 25 rows
Monochrome
Standard Mode
Resolution
80 columns × 25 rows
40 columns × 25 rows
80 columns × 60 rows
100 columns × 50 rows
100 columns × 60 rows
100 columns × 25 rows
16
16
Color
Color
16
16
16
Color
Color
Color
132-Col. Text (4)
132-columns × 25 rows
132-columns × 60 rows
16
16
–
–
Color
Color
Monochrome
Monochrome
Graphics
320h × 200v (3)
640h × 200v (3)
320h × 200v (3)
640h × 200v (3)
640h × 350v
640h × 350v
320h × 200v (3)
640h × 480v
640h × 480v
1024h × 256v
1024h × 768v
800h × 600v
800h × 600v
640h × 400v
640h × 480v
1024 x 768 (5)
1280 x 1024 (5)
4
2
16
16
16
–
256
2
16
256
Color
Color
Color
Color
Color
Monochrome
Color
Color
Color
Color
16
16
256
256
256
256
16
16
Color
Color
Color
Color
Color
Color
Color
Color
Color Text
100-Col. Text (4)
Extended Graphics (4)
Notes to the table:
(1) “Simultaneous colors” - the number of colors or shades that can be displayed at one time.
(2) This column refers to the old style display the mode was originally designed for. The 800h
× 600v graphics modes require a multifrequency monitor, and 1024h × 768v graphics modes
require an 8514 or equivalent compatible monitor.
(3) The 200-line vertical resolution modes are double-scanned to display 400 lines on screen.
(4) These modes require use of application-specific drivers that are found on your VGA
diskette created at the time of system backup (refer to Capabilities earlier in this chapter).
(5) Supported on some notebooks.
8-6 VGA External Monitor Utilities
VGA Utility
Installation Hints
The following software installation tips may help you
achieve the best monitor image.
❑
The best display images usually are achieved by
installing your applications for the highest resolution
mode available.
❑
Some applications automatically detect what type of
video card and monitor combination are installed and
configure themselves to take best advantage of the
available hardware.
❑
Install your software for VGA or IBM PS/2 video if
possible. This permits your software to run on your
computer in start-up configuration.
❑
If your software does not specify a VGA or IBM PS/2
option and you are using a color analog monitor, try
installing the application for “color” if available. This
usually works in the computer’s default color mode on
color monitors and the color LCD.
VGA External Monitor Utilities 8-7
VGA Utility
TravelMate 4000M VGA Software
The /UTILS directory contains several programs designed
to help you operate your external monitor most efficiently.
Various drivers in the /UTILS directory let popular
applications take advantage of your computer’s extended
graphics and 132-column text modes. For driver
installation instructions, run the INSTALL.BAT file by typing
INSTALL at the MS-DOS C:\UTILS> prompt
INSTALL
and pressing ENTER.
You can copy the drivers for programs such as Lotus 1-2-3.
Note: To switch the display from the computer’s built-in
LCD to a connected external monitor, use the CRT command
at the MS-DOS C:\> prompt. If you want to display on the
LCD, execute the LCD command at the MS-DOS C:\> prompt.
8-8 VGA External Monitor Utilities
VGA Utility
Using VGA.EXE
The VGA.EXE utility enables you to customize several
features of your LCD or external monitor.
Note: The VGA utility may not operate correctly under
Windows.
At the MS-DOS C:\> prompt, type
VGA
and press ENTER. VGA displays a simple menu listing some
of the options available. Use the ↑ and ↓ keys to select the
feature you want, and press ENTER.
To quit the VGA program, choose the Exit to Operating
System option and press ENTER or simply press ESC.
You may also load VGA.EXE from the DOS prompt line, thus
bypassing the menu. This is useful if you want to
incorporate VGA.EXE commands into a batch file.
To view a list of available command line options, at the
MS-DOS C:\> prompt, type
VGA ?
Note that some commands are for the LCD only, and others
are for use with an external monitor. To get more detailed
information press F1, or at the MS-DOS C:\> prompt, type
VGAHELP
VGA External Monitor Utilities 8-9
VGA Utility
The following commands enable you to use VGA.EXE at the
MS-DOS C:\> prompt.
VGA Utility Commands
Command
Description
VGA
Displays the VGA.EXE menu
ALT
Switches to or from the external monitor
CRT
Switches to the external monitor
LCD
Switches to the LCD
SIM
Switches to SimulScan mode
REV
Reverses the text foreground or background
(not available on color models)
NOR
Switches to the default text foreground or
background (not available on color models)
GREV
Reverses graphics only (not available on color
models)
BOTH
Reverses both text and graphics (not
available on color models)
EXP
Switches the LCD alignment to expanded
mode
NOEXP
Disables LCD expanded mode
CON0
Disables contrast adjustment
CON1
Enables the black-and-white contrast
adjustment
CON2
Enables the background contrast adjustment
CON3
Enables the foreground contrast adjustment
8-10 VGA External Monitor Utilities
VGA Utility
Command
Description
CON4
Enables the foreground and background
contrast adjustments
MON0
Sets the monitor type to VGA
MON1
Sets monitor type to 8514-Compatible
MON2
Sets monitor type to Super VGA
MON3
Sets monitor type to Extended Super VGA
MON4
Sets monitor type to Multi-Frequency
MON5
Sets monitor type to Extended
Multi-Frequency
MON6
Sets monitor type to Super Multi-Frequency
MON7
Sets monitor type to Extended Super
Multi-Freq.
BLON
Turns backlight on
BLOFF
Turns backlight off
VGA 80 × 25 Switches the computer to 25-line, 80-column
text mode. This is the default configuration. A
warm boot (CTRL-ALT-DEL) restores this
mode. (Not available on color models.)
VGA 80 × 50 Switches the computer to enhanced
80-column text mode. This results in 50 lines
in VGA mode, or 43 lines in EGA mode. (Not
available on color models.)
VGA External Monitor Utilities 8-11
VGA Utility
VGA 132 × 25 Switches the computer to color, 25-line,
132-column text mode. This mode is only for
use with specific applications that have been
designed to take advantage of this mode’s
extended text capabilities. Not available on
color models.
Command
Description
VGA 132 × 43 Switches the computer to color, 43-line,
132-column text mode. This mode is only for
use with specific applications that have been
designed to take advantage of this mode’s
extended text capabilities. Not available on
color models.
8-12 VGA External Monitor Utilities
Advanced Monitor Operations
Advanced M onitor Operations
VGA and Extended VGA Programming
This section describes how to access the enhanced modes
of your computer. The information in this section is
intended for users familiar with assembly language
programming. An understanding of this information is not
necessary for normal operation of your computer.
The VGA standard supports a variety of video modes. These
video modes can be accessed through standard video BIOS
calls from assembly language as well as high-level language
routines.
When you start up in MS-DOS, your computer is usually in
standard 80-column text or “alphanumeric” mode. On a color
system this is mode 3+. VGA 640 × 480 dot 16-color graphics
is mode 12H. The following table lists the standard VGA video
modes available with your computer.
VGA External Monitor Utilities 8-13
Advanced Monitor Operations
TravelMate 4000M Standard VGA Video Modes
Mode
(hex) Type
Colors
(1)
Columns Rows
Buffer
Char.
Size (2)
Res. (3)
1
text
16/256 KB
40
25
B8000
9 × 16
360 × 400
2
text
16/256 KB
80
25
B8000
9 × 16
720 × 400
3
text
16/256 KB
80
25
B8000
9 × 16
720 × 400
4
graph.
4/256 KB
40
25
B8000
8×8
320 × 200
5
graph.
4/256 KB
40
25
B8000
8×8
320 × 200
6
graph.
2/256 KB
80
25
B8000
8×8
640 × 200
7
text
4 Mono
80
25
B0000
9 × 16
720 × 400
D
graph.
16/256 KB
40
25
A0000
8×8
320 × 200
E
graph.
16/256 KB
80
25
A0000
8×8
640 × 200
F
graph.
4 Mono
80
25
A0000
8 × 14
640 × 350
10
graph.
16/256 KB
80
25
A0000
8 × 14
640 × 350
11
graph.
2/256 KB
80
30
A0000
8 × 16
640 × 480
12
graph.
16/256 KB
80
30
A0000
8 × 16
640 × 480
13
graph.
256/256 KB
40
25
A0000
8×8
320 × 200
Notes to the table:
Default modes are 3 for color monitors and 7+ for monochrome monitors.
(1) Colors: Where two numbers are given, the first is the number of colors available at one
time; the second number is the total number of possible colors.
(2) Character Size: The size of the matrix that contains each text character.
(3) Resolution: All 200-line modes are “double-scanned” to display 400 lines on screen.
8-14 VGA External Monitor Utilities
Advanced Monitor Operations
Your computer display software adds 13 additional modes
to the standard VGA modes. These modes are the 1024 × 768
and 800 × 600 extended VGA graphics modes, the 640 × 400,
256-color graphics and the 132-column by 25-row and
43-row text modes. These modes each have been assigned
mode identification numbers, summarized in the following
table.
Note: Some products support 1024 x 768 x 256 and 1280
x 1024 x 16 resolution.
TravelMate 4000M Extended VGA Video Modes
Mode
Number
Resolution
column/row
Colors
Character
Mode Type
Cell Size (1)
Memory
Address
Notes
2D
640 × 400
256
8 × 16
Graphics
A000
2E
640 × 400
256
8 × 16
Graphics
A000
30
800 × 600
256
8 × 16
Graphics
A000
CRT
only
37
1024 × 768
16
8 × 16
Graphics
A000
CRT
only
1024 x 768 (2)
256
1280 x 1024 (2)
16
41
100 × 50
16
8×8
Text
B800
CRT
only
42
100 × 60
16
8×8
Text
B800
CRT
only
44
100 × 25
16
8 × 16
Text
B800
CRT
only
51
132 × 30
16
8 × 13
Text
B800
CRT
only
52
132 × 60
16
8×8
Text
B800
CRT
only
53
80 × 60
16
8×8
Text
B800
54
132 × 25
16
8 × 16
Text
B800
CRT
only
64
800 × 600
16
8 × 16
Graphics
A000
CRT
only
6A
800 × 600
16
8 × 16
Graphics
A000
CRT
only
1024 x 768
256
(1) Character Size: The size of the matrix that contains each text character
(2) Available on some notebook products
VGA External Monitor Utilities 8-15
Advanced Monitor Operations
References
Programming the extended VGA modes is similar to
programming the standard VGA video modes of the IBM PS/2
VGA and PS/2 Display Adapter. You may want to refer to the
following publications for details on programming VGA in
general.
IBM Personal System/2 Display Adapter Technical Reference,
April 1987, IBM part number 68X2251 S68X-2251-0
IBM Personal System/2 and Personal Computer BIOS
Interface Technical Reference, April 1987, IBM part number
68X2260 S68X-2260-00
Programmer’s Guide to PC and PS/2 Video Systems, by
Richard Wilton, Microsoft Press, 1987 (ISBN 1-55615-103-9)
8-16 VGA External Monitor Utilities
External Monitor Troubleshooting
Ext erna l Monit or T roub leshoot ing
The following are typical symptoms of installation problems
and their solutions.
Symptom
Solution
No display
(1) Computer not configured appropriately for VGA; configure the
application as instructed in the
application’s documentation.
(2) Monitor signal and/or power
cable not properly plugged in.
(3) Monitor not turned on.
(4) Brightness and/or contrast
controls on monitor not adjusted
properly.
(5) LCD still active; use the CRT
command to switch to external
monitor.
CRT or setup error on
startup
Setup Program not run. See Chapter 1 of this Manual.
Screen displays
distorted images or
screen goes blank
when software is
executed
Check that your monitor was
turned on before starting your
computer.
VGA External Monitor Utilities 8-17
External Monitor Troubleshooting
Symptom
Solution
Screen displays
distorted image on
IBM PS/2 monitor
Your computer is configured for
an invalid monitor via the Setup
Program; the CRT Type item must
be set to match the PS/2 display
or equivalent fixed frequency
monitor.
Unable to display
800 × 600
You must have a multifrequency extended graphics monitor to use the
extended 800 × 600 graphics mode
of the computer. If you are using a
multifrequency monitor, try adjusting the vertical hold and vertical position adjustments.
Unable to display
1024 × 768 extended
graphics
This high-resolution mode is interlaced and requires the use of an
IBM 8514 or equivalent interlaced
monitor.
Large blank bands at
top and bottom of
some images on
multifrequency
monitor; screen
image does not fill up
entire screen in some
modes.
Some multifrequency monitors do
not automatically adjust vertical
screen size as IBM PS/2 monitors
do. Adjust your display for best results.
8-18 VGA External Monitor Utilities
9
Other Utilities
Other utilities available from Texas Instruments are
automatically installed in the /UTILS directory on the hard
disk. Available utilities are as follows:
❑
ALARM utility that controls the low-battery and
cover-closed alarm beepers
❑
GETSTAT utility that tests for the presence of external
devices and the computer power source
❑
RAMDRIVE.SYS device driver that uses part of
computer memory as a hard disk
❑
SETCMOS utility that restores your Setup Program
settings in case of a power loss
❑
SETKEY utility that sets the PS/2 port settings as well
as the keyboard typematic speed and delay
❑
DATES utility provides important system information
Contents
ALARM Utility ................................................................. 9-2
GETSTAT Utility .............................................................. 9-3
GETSTAT Commands.................................................. 9-3
Sample GETSTAT File ................................................. 9-4
RAMDRIVE.SYS Device Driver......................................... 9-6
SETCMOS Utility............................................................. 9-7
SETCMOS Command .................................................. 9-7
Restoring Factory Default CMOS Data......................... 9-8
Saving Your CMOS Data ............................................. 9-9
SETKEY Utility .............................................................. 9-10
Character Repeat Rate .............................................. 9-10
Character Repeat Delay............................................. 9-10
Dates ........................................................................ 9-11
Other Utilities 9-1
ALARM Utility
ALARM Utilit y
The ALARM utility enables you to turn on or turn off the
low-battery beeper and the cover-closed beeper at the
MS-DOS C:\> prompt. To view the command and its options,
at the MS-DOS C:\> prompt type
ALARM
and press ENTER. The current status of the ALARM utility
is displayed.
The Cover Alarm is turned On.
The Low Battery Alarm is turned On.
To view a brief help display, type
Alarm /?
and press ENTER. The utility displays the following screen
listing the command options and the current alarm status.
Usage:
- Alarm [/switch]
Alarm
- Shows status of Cover and Low Battery Alarms
Alarm /On - Turns the Cover and Low Battery Alarms On.
Alarm /Off - Turns the Cover and Low Battery Alarms Off.
The ALARM utility turns on or turns off the low-battery and
the cover-closed alarm beepers.
You also can add either of the commands to your
AUTOEXEC.BAT file to control the alarms when you boot the
computer. For example, add the line
ALARM ON
to your AUTOEXEC.BAT file to turn on both alarms when you
boot the computer. You can also control one or both alarms
using the computer’s Setup Program. (See Chapter 1 of this
manual.)
9-2 Other Utilities
GETSTAT Utility
GET STAT Utilit y
The GETSTAT program can be used in a batch file to test for
the following:
❑
Connection of an external monitor (/M)
❑
Presence of an optional external expansion unit (/E)
❑
Power source in use, external AC Adapter or internal
battery pack (/B)
❑
Type of monitor in use, external or built-in LCD (/V)
GETSTAT returns an error code to the batch file for it to
test.
GETSTAT Commands
To test for the presence of an optional external expansion
unit, use the command:
GETSTAT /M
If the monitor is connected, GETSTAT exits with an
ERRORLEVEL = 1; if the external monitor is not connected,
GETSTAT exits with an ERRORLEVEL = 0.
To determine the current power source in use, use the
command:
GETSTAT /B
If the computer is currently powered by the Battery Pack,
GETSTAT exits with an ERRORLEVEL = 1; if the computer is
currently powered by the AC Adapter, GETSTAT exits with an
ERRORLEVEL = 0.
To test which video device is in current use, use the
command:
Other Utilities 9-3
GETSTAT Utility
GETSTAT /V
If the computer is displaying data on both the external
monitor and the built-in LCD, GETSTAT exits with an
ERRORLEVEL=2.
If the computer is displaying data on an external monitor,
GETSTAT exits with an ERRORLEVEL = 1; if the computer is
using its built-in LCD, GETSTAT exits with an ERRORLEVEL = 0.
Sample GETSTAT File
The following sample shows a typical GETSTAT file you could
create as a batch file named SAMPLE.BAT. This file is stored
in the /UTILS directory.
9-4 Other Utilities
GETSTAT Utility
@echo off
rem version 1.0
25rem ========================
rem check the battery status
rem ========================
getstat /b
if ERRORLEVEL 1 goto yes_batt
echo The unit is currently powered by external power source
goto chk_video
:yes_batt
echo the unit is currently powered by the battery
:chk_video
rem ==============================
rem check the video display status
rem ==============================
getstat /v
if ERRORLEVEL 2 goto yes_sim
if ERRORLEVEL 1 goto yes_mon
echo the video is currently on the LCD
goto chk crt
:yes_mon
echo the video is currently on the external monitor
goto chk crt
:yes_sim
echo the video is currently on SimulSCAN
:chk_crt
rem =============================
rem check the presence of monitor
rem =============================
getstat /m
if ERRORLEVEL 1 goto yes_crt
echo An external monitor is not conected to the system
goto exit_all
:yes_crt
echo An external monitor is connected to the system
:exit_all
Other Utilities 9-5
RAMDRIVE.SYS Device Driver
RAM DRIVE.SYS Device Driv er
Note: When you turn off or warm start your computer, all
data stored in RAM disks is lost (for DOS versions earlier
than 6.0).
The RAMDRIVE.SYS device driver enables your computer to
use some of its memory as if it were a hard disk drive.
Called a RAM disk (and sometimes a virtual disk), it is much
faster than a hard disk because its data is always loaded
into RAM. RAMDRIVE.SYS puts the RAM disks into the
memory area above 1 MB.
Note: Using the RAMDRIVE.SYS device driver increases the
size of MS-DOS resident in memory.
Install and use this device driver as described in the
Microsoft MS-DOS User’s Guide and Reference.
9-6 Other Utilities
SETCMOS Utility
SET CM OS Utilit y
The SETCMOS utility enables you to save and restore the
computer configuration data saved in a battery-powered
CMOS RAM by the computer’s Setup Program. This utility is
useful for:
❑
Restoring configuration data if the CMOS battery is
ever removed, disconnected, or fails.
Note: The CMOS battery is a small internal battery that
powers the CMOS RAM; it is completely separate from the
internal battery pack.
❑
Creating custom configuration data files for each of
your applications. For example, if one program works
best with extended memory and one works best with
expanded memory, you can use SETCMOS to change
configurations without having to use the Setup
Program each time you load the application.
The SETCMOS utility saves the current configuration data to
a file you name. The factory default file, FACTORY.CMS
stored under the UTILS directory, is the file used when you
press F4 (RESET CONFIG) at the Laptop Manager main
menu.
When you change configuration data (for example, when
you add options or change configuration for an application),
be sure you save the data by pressing F3 (SAVE CONFIG)
on the Laptop Manager main menu, or you can run the
SETCMOS utility as described in this section.
SETCMOS Command
To view the SETCMOS command and options, at the
MS-DOS C:\> prompt type
SETCMOS /?
and press ENTER.
Other Utilities 9-7
SETCMOS Utility
The utility displays the following screen and returns to the
MS-DOS prompt.
Usage: setcmos [ [/r] file /s file /n /d /v /h /? ]
/r file
Restore from file and reboot
/s file
Save to file
/n
No reboot on restore
/d
Don’t detect hard disk type
/v
Display version
/h or /?
This help message
Saves/restores CMOS RAM to/from a file.
Note: The /R switch is the default switch for the SETCMOS
command.
Restoring Factory Default CMOS Data
To restore the factory default CMOS configuration data file,
at the MS-DOS C:\> prompt type
SETCMOS /R C:\UTILS\FACTORY.CMS
and press ENTER.
The factory default configuration values are restored in the
CMOS RAM, and the computer reboots itself. The factory
default file (FACTORY.CMS) is stored on the hard disk under
the /UTILS directory.
Note: You also can restore the factory default CMOS
configuration by press F4 at the Laptop Manager main
menu.
9-8 Other Utilities
SETCMOS Utility
Saving Your CMOS Data
Once you have used the computer’s Setup Program to
configure your new computer for your operating
environment and options, you should save the data stored
in the CMOS RAM to your own custom file.
To save the current CMOS RAM data, at the MS-DOS C:\>
prompt type
SETCMOS /S MYFILE.CMS
and press ENTER.
You can type any filename you want instead of the
MYFILE.CMS filename shown in the example. If you ever
need to restore the computer to your configuration settings,
type your filename to the SETCMOS /R command described
previously.
Other Utilities 9-9
SETKEY Utility
SET KEY Utilit y
The SETKEY utility enables you to set the keyboard
typematic rate and the key repeat delay rate. This utility
also sets or displays the current settings for the PS/2 port
(Windows-based units only).
The utility displays the following screen and returns to the
MS-DOS prompt.
Usage: SETKEY [/rx /dx /nx /px /S]
/rx char repeat rate, x is:
v - 30 cps
f
- 20 cps
n - 10 cps (default)
s - 5 cps
c - 2 cps
/dx char repeat delay, x is:
1 - 1 second
2 - .75s
3 - .5s (default)
4 - .25s
Character Repeat Rate
The character repeat rate, set using the rx code, enables
you to adjust the number of characters per second (cps) the
keyboard generates when you hold down an alphanumeric
key. You can set the rate from 2 cps to 30 cps as shown on
the CURSOR command listing. The default repeat rate is
10 cps.
Character Repeat Delay
The character repeat delay, set using the dx code, lets you
adjust the time you must hold down a key before the
typematic feature starts. You can set the delay from 0.25 to
1 second as shown on the CURSOR command listing. The
default delay value is 0.5 second.
9-10 Other Utilities
SETKEY Utility
Dates
The Dates utility provides the following:
❑
System Information
❑
System BIOS Information
❑
VGA BIOS Information
❑
BatteryPro Power Management Information
To view data provided by the Dates utility, enter
DATES
at the MS-DOS prompt.
Other Utilities 9-11
10
Sound
Sound has been pre-installed on your TravelMate 4000M
system. This section is an overview of the Sound utilities
for Windows.
Contents
Features........................................................................ 10-2
Pocket Recorder ............................................................ 10-3
Changing the Effects on the Waveform ...................... 10-3
Editing a Waveform ................................................... 10-4
Zooming into a Larger View ....................................... 10-4
Playing Several Waveform Files ................................. 10-5
Playing a Single Waveform File .................................. 10-5
Recording a Waveform File ........................................ 10-5
Recording/Playback Considerations .......................... 10-6
Compressing Sound Files .......................................... 10-6
Using OLE with Pocket Recorder ............................... 10-6
Pocket Mixer ............................................................... 10-7
Starting Pocket Mixer ................................................ 10-7
Audio Mixer Configuration ........................................ 10-7
Setting an Audio Source to Play or Record................. 10-7
Recording Without a Microphone .............................. 10-7
Editing, Playing, and Recording..................................... 10-8
Using VU Meters ....................................................... 10-8
Pocket CD .................................................................. 10-9
Creating and Saving Playlists .................................... 10-9
Playing a CD ............................................................. 10-9
Assigning a Title to a CD ........................................... 10-9
Entering CD Track Titles......................................... 10-10
Deleting Songs ........................................................ 10-10
Adjusting Volume .................................................... 10-10
Cueing Pocket CD for Recording.............................. 10-10
Quitting Pocket CD ................................................. 10-10
Sound 10-1
Features
Fea tures
The sound card included in your TravelMate 4000M
includes the following features:
10-2 Sound
❑
High quality sound
❑
Full Sound Blaster and Sound Blaster Pro
compatibility
❑
20-voice FM music synthesizer
❑
44.1 kHz digitized audio playback
❑
Built-in 2:1, 3:1, and 4:1 compression/decompression
for 8-bit PCM files in both mono and stereo samples
❑
µ-Law, A-Law, and IMA ADPCM
compression/decompression in real time for 16-bit files
❑
MPU-401 UART mode compatible MIDI
❑
Supports the largest library of third-party software
❑
Joystick/MIDI port
❑
Built-in power amplifier
Pocket Recorder
Pocket Recorder
Pocket Recorder is a Windows application for recording
waveform data in 8 or 16-bit format. Pocket Recorder can
splice and blend files together for interesting audio effects.
With Pocket Recorder’s compression and decompression
feature, you can record and play back 16-bit sound files at
higher audio frequencies using a fraction of the memory
space.
To start Pocket Recorder, double click on the Pocket
Recorder icon in the JAZZ group. To exit from Pocket
Recorder, select Exit from the File menu.
Changing the Effects on the Waveform
In both the Higher and Lower commands, the total duration
of the sound wave is held constant. The pitch alteration is
achieved by removing every other wave sample to raise the
pitch or by doubling each wave sample to lower the pitch.
In both cases, this process changes the waveform’s
duration. The technique used in the Faster and Slower
commands is applied here to restore the waveform to its
original duration with its new modified pitch.
By using the Higher and Lower command in conjunction
with the Faster and Slower command, the pitch and
duration may be changed together. This is a more common
feature found in other waveform applications. To get these
effects with Pocket Recorder, the best results are obtained
by applying the combinations in the following sequences:
❑
For increased rate and pitch, use first Higher followed
by Faster.
❑
For decreased rate and pitch, use first Slower followed
by Lower
Sound 10-3
Pocket Recorder
Editing a Waveform
To edit a waveform, select the portion of the waveform file
you want to cut, copy, or paste. You can either:
❑
Click on the mouse button while the insertion point is
in the waveform view area and drag the mouse until a
portion of the waveform is highlighted.
❑
Hold down the SHIFT key and click the mouse button
at a point in the view area. This method selects a
region between the current insertion point (if no
position has been selected, the selection begins at the
beginning of the view area) and the position where the
mouse is clicked.
Zooming into a Larger View
You can zoom into a portion of the waveform by double
clicking inside the view area. Once you have this zoom
view, it is possible to see a wider range of frequencies. You
can then select the portion of the waveform you want to
edit by clicking and dragging over the waveform section.
Edit by pressing the SHIFT key and clicking the left mouse
button simultaneously. This highlights the region between
the two selection points.
10-4 Sound
Pocket Recorder
n
Note: You can’t scroll the view area while you select a
portion of the waveform. You can’t click and drag outside
of the waveform view area to scroll. You can only select one
zoom mode at a time.
Playing Several Waveform Files
You can select a number of waveform files and drop the
selection into Pocket Recorder to play. To do this, minimize
the Pocket Recorder dialog box, select one or more
waveform files (using a File Management tool), and drop the
selection into Pocket Recorder. Pocket Recorder plays all
selections in order unless you maximize the Pocket
Recorder application.
Playing a Single Waveform File
To play a single waveform file, select OPEN from the File
menu. Select the file you wish to play from the resulting
dialog box and select PLAY.
Recording a Waveform File
To record a waveform file, ensure that your microphone or
audio device is plugged into the microphone or line-in plug
on the TravelMate 4000M. Select NEW from the File menu
and customize your sample rate, channels, and sample
mode. Click on the Record button and begin recording.
To stop recording, select STOP. Save the file.
Sound 10-5
Pocket Recorder
n
Note: Pocket Recorder does not allow you to produce a
recording larger in size than the temporary recording file.
Pocket Recorder uses an Auto-Stop feature when your
temporary recording file becomes to large to be saved.
Recording/Playback Considerations
When recording, it is recommended that all audio sources
not used as input for recording have their volume levels
reduced to zero, even though no audio may be present.
Compressing Sound Files
You can select file compression in a 4:1 or 2:1 ratio or with
no compression. To do this, select Save As... from the File
menu and choose the desired compression rate from the
resulting dialog box. Selecting OK saves the compressed
file.
Using OLE with Pocket Recorder
Object linking and embedding (OLE) is a Windows 3.1
system that allows applications to transfer and share data
by establishing a common link between them. The
application requesting data is called a client while the
application providing data is called the server.
OLE clients include Cardfile and Write. OLE servers
include Pocket Recorder, TM4000M, Excel, and Sound
Recorder.
A useful application for OLE would be sending a personal
message through E-mail and having the recipient click on
the embedded icon to hear your voice message.
10-6 Sound
Pocket Mixer
Pocket Mix er
Pocket Mixer is a Windows 3.1 based application that
allows you to:
❑
control master volume
❑
control volume levels and balance of individual input
sources
❑
select a record source
Starting Pocket Mixer
To start Pocket Mixer, double click on the Pocket Mixer icon
in the JAZZ group.
Audio Mixer Configuration
The driver found in your Control Panel window allows you
to select the way DOS and Windows mixers interact with
each other.
Setting an Audio Source to Play or Record
The Pocket Mixer can be used to mix five audio sources for
playback. For recording, you can select one of the three
audio sources:
❑
CD-Player
❑
Line-in
❑
Microphone
Recording Without a Microphone
When not using the microphone to record or playback
sound tracks, reduce the volume level to zero to reduce
extraneous noise.
Sound 10-7
Editing, Playing, and Recording
Edit ing, P laying, a nd Recording
With Pocket Mixer, you can also:
❑
Edit waveform files
❑
Playback from other sources
❑
Record new tracks
A common use of the Pocket Mixer is in recording voice
annotation and placing them within other documents. You
cannot use the Pocket Mixer to record a voice annotation
over CD audio, for example. The Pocket Mixer allows you to
select the recording source. You can adjust the recording
level by using the slider in the Master volume knob.
Using VU Meters
To monitor recording levels, click on the VU meter button.
For optimum recording of a strong signal, the VU meters
should "Bounce" toward the top of the meter and
periodically enter the red zone. To turn the VU meter
function off, click on the VU meter button once again.
n
10-8 Sound
Note: The VU meter function can only be activated when
the card is in a record mode.
Pocket CD
Pocket C D
Pocket CD lets you play audio compact discs in your
TravelMate 4000M CD-ROM drive. Pocket CD has controls
similar to those used by the CD audio player you may have
in your home entertainment center. Pocket CD can play
back music CDs as either an icon or as a maximized
window.
If you minimize or close Pocket CD, the CD-ROM reader
continues playing until you eject the disk. Pocket CD lets
you select the order of songs you want to play with the
default of sequential play.
Creating and Saving Playlists
Once you insert a CD into your CD drive, Pocket CD scans
your CD for playlist information. If you did not create a
playlist for your CD, Pocket CD displays a listing of the
total number of tracks on that CD. Once you create a
playlist, Pocket CD assigns a specific number to that CD.
You may add, select, and modify playlists from the Edit
menu.
Playing a CD
You can play a CD by inserting the disc into the CD-ROM
drive, double clicking the Pocket CD icon and pressing the
Play button. You can play as follows:
❑
by randomly rearranging the title selections in your
playlist (using the Shuffle button)
❑
by playing specific tracks (by selecting a track title
from the current CD Title box or selecting the Start of
Track/Previous Track and Next Track buttons.
Assigning a Title to a CD
You can assign a title to a CD by selecting Modify from the
Edit menu, typing the title in the title box, and clicking OK.
Sound 10-9
Pocket CD
Entering CD Track Titles
You can title a track for a specific CD by selecting Modify
from the Edit menu, selecting the song you want to name,
and Saving from the File menu. A Playlist dialog box
appears into which you type a Playlist filename. Select OK.
Deleting Songs
Select Delete Songs from the Edit menu. This command
allows you to delete songs from your playlist. You cannot
issue this command while a CD is playing.
Adjusting Volume
If your CD-ROM drive has audio output, you can control
volume with the drive’s volume control or you can click the
Pocket Mixer icon to call up Pocket Mixer. Click and drag
the mouse inside the meter for CD audio (the meter with
the CD disk icon above it) to adjust the volume.
Cueing Pocket CD for Recording
Use the Cue feature to pause Pocket CD. You can use this
feature with Pocket Recorder to record audio from a CD
that Pocket CD is cued to play.
Quitting Pocket CD
To end playing your CD sound track and eject the disk, exit
out of the Pocket CD. Click on the eject button to eject the
CD from the drive and select Close from the File menu.
10-10 Sound
11
TravelMate Options
This chapter explains:
❑
Options available for your computer
❑
How to install and use some of these options
❑
How to use external monitors with the computer
Contents
List of Options............................................................... 11-2
Battery Options............................................................. 11-4
Battery Charger ........................................................ 11-4
Extra Battery Pack .................................................... 11-4
PCMCIA Options ........................................................... 11-5
RAM Expansion ............................................................ 11-6
Installing A RAM Expansion Board ........................... 11-6
Using the AC Adapter .................................................... 11-9
External Numeric Keypad............................................ 11-10
Carrying Cases............................................................ 11-11
Microphone/Headphone Kit ........................................ 11-12
Other Options ............................................................. 11-13
Printers ................................................................... 11-13
Cables..................................................................... 11-13
External Monitor ......................................................... 11-14
Supported Monitors ................................................ 11-14
Installing an External Monitor................................. 11-14
TravelMate Options 11-1
List of Options
List of Opt ions
The following options are available with your TM4000M
computer:
Portable
CD-ROM
Docking
System
Provides portable CD-ROM capabilities to the
TM4000M notebook user. This is a 350 ms
double speed CD-ROM drive with built in
stereo speakers, Microsoft headphone,
microphone, and CD-ROM sampler. The unit
is battery and AC powered. Further
information on the Portable CD-ROM Docking
System is provided in Chapter 12.
External
Battery
Charger
Provides a fast way of charging a battery pack
without inserting it into the computer.
Spare
Extends the time you may operate the
Battery Pack computer before recharging.
PCMCIA
Options
Provides modem and Ethernet connections.
Memory
Upgrade
Memory may be upgraded to 8 MB (using a
4-MB upgrade kit) or to 20 MB (using a 16-MB
upgrade kit).
Spare AC
Adapter
You may purchase a spare AC adapter for
your notebook. The kit includes an extra
power cord.
External
Numeric
Keypad
Allows you to connect an external numeric
keypad to the PS/2 port.
Carrying
Case
Three versions available. Helps protect the
computer and accessories during transport.
Headphone/ Provides external headphone and microphone.
Microphone
Kit
11-2 TravelMate Options
List of Options
Printers
You may connect almost any parallel printer
to the parallel port or a serial printer to the
serial port. Texas Instruments makes a variety
of laser and impact printers you may use with
your computer. (Printer interface cables sold
separately.)
MIDI
Connection
Allows you to connect external game and
audio devices to your computer.
SCSI
Cables
High Density to High Density
(TI Part No. 9794074-0001)
High Density to 50-Pin Centronix
(TI Part No. 9694074-0002)
TravelMate Options 11-3
Battery Options
Batt ery Opt ions
Your computer has the following options to enhance
battery-powered operations:
❑
Battery Charger
❑
Extra Battery Pack
Battery Charger
The Battery Charger (TI Part No. 9793360-0001) enhances
the battery power. The Battery Charger allows you to
charge the battery that came with your Portable CD-ROM
Docking System.
n
Note: It is recommended that you purchase an extra
battery pack so that you always have a fully charged
battery. This extra battery pack may also be charged using
the battery charger.
To maximize battery life, completely charge and discharge a
new battery two to three times.
Refer to the guide that comes with the Battery Charger for
usage instructions.
Extra Battery Pack
Keeping an extra, fully-charged Battery Pack (TI Part No.
9793371-0001) on hand can extend the time you can
operate your computer. Install and remove the extra
Battery Pack as described in the Battery Release section of
this chapter. When not in use, always keep the Battery
Pack in its protective case to prevent accidental shorting or
other damage.
11-4 TravelMate Options
PCMCIA Options
PC MC IA Opt ions
Your PCMCIA options include the following:
❑
14.4 KB data/send/receive fax modem
❑
Ethernet 10BaseT
❑
Ethernet 10Base2
❑
Ethernet 10Base5
Refer to the Phoenix PCMCIA User’s Manual to configure
your system with these options. Refer to installation
instructions that come with these options for proper seating
and cabling (if any) of the adapters.
TravelMate Options 11-5
RAM Expansion
RAM Ex pa nsion
Your computer is equipped with 4 MB of random access
memory (RAM). You can increase memory by installing one
of the RAM options:
❑
4-MB RAM Expansion Board (TI Part No.
9793357-0001). This expands RAM from 4 MB to 8
MB.
❑
16-MB RAM Expansion Board (TI Part No.
9793358-0001). This expands RAM from 4 MB to 20
MB
Installing A RAM Expansion Board
To install the RAM Expansion Board, complete the following
steps.
c
Caution: Prevent component damage caused by electrostatic discharge (ESD). Use a high-impedance, groundedconductive floor mat or wrist strap to prevent ESD.
Before touching the integrated circuit devices, discharge static electricity from your hands, tools, and
containers by touching them to a grounded surface.
1.
Turn the notebook upside down on a padded surface.
2.
Remove the screw from the RAM expansion
compartment.
11-6 TravelMate Options
RAM Expansion
Removing the screw from RAM expansion compartment
2.
Carefully attach the expansion card so that connectors
match.
Connecting RAM expansion card
3.
Replace the plastic cover and tighten the screw.
TravelMate Options 11-7
RAM Expansion
Replacing the plastic cover
After installing memory, check that all system memory is
recognized by turning off QuickBoot in the System Setup.
Memory is automatically checked at powerup.
11-8 TravelMate Options
Using the AC Adapter
Using the AC Ada pt er
The AC Adapter - Charges the internal Battery Pack and
operates the computer on AC power whether or not a
Battery Pack is installed
c
Caution: Use only the AC Adapter supplied with your
computer. Another adapter can damage your computer.
To connect the AC Adapter, complete the following steps:
1.
Set the power switch to the off (s) position, or press
STANDBY to put the computer into standby mode.
2.
Connect the female connector of the AC cord to the
inlet on the AC Adapter.
3.
Hold the round connector from the AC Adapter and press
it into the matching jack on the rear panel of the
computer.
4.
Plug the male end of the AC cord into a grounded wall
receptacle of the correct voltage.
AC Adapter - Notebook
5.
If you plan to use other external devices with your unit,
connect the device to the computer before setting the
computer power switch to the on (|) position.
TravelMate Options 11-9
External Numeric Keypad
Ex ternal Numeric Keypa d
The optional Numeric Keypad (TI Part No. 2581381-0002)
enables you to type numeric data while still permitting data
entry on the keyboard. You also have the convenience of
direct access to some functions (such as the PGUP, PGDN,
and HOME keys) without the need to also press the Fn key.
Installing the Numeric Keypad disables the embedded
numeric keypad.
Extended Numeric Keypad
To attach the numeric keypad:
1.
Turn off the computer.
2.
Attach the keyboard connector to the PS/2 port on the
back of your computer.
3.
Ensure that the keyboard/numeric keypad/mouse
switch is in the UP position.
4.
Turn the computer on.
For usage instructions, refer to the Numeric Keypad
documentation.
11-10 TravelMate Options
Carrying Cases
Carrying C ases
There are three types of carrying cases for the TM4000M
notebook:
❑
Portfolio - a low-cost carrying case for your notebook
computer (holds the notebook only)
❑
Carrying Case - a high-quality case for use with your
notebook computer (holds the notebook with power
supply, cables, etc.)
❑
Brief Case - Enough room to carry the notebook and
portable CD-ROM docking system
TravelMate Options 11-11
Microphone/Headphone Kit
Microphone/Hea dp hone Kit
The TravelMate 4000M has an optional microphone and
headphone kit (TI Part No. 9793399-0001). The kit also
comes with installation instructions. To plug in your
microphone, insert the plug into the Mic connector on the
back of the notebook.
Microphone/headphone connections
11-12 TravelMate Options
Other Options
Other Opt ions
Printers
Texas Instruments makes a variety of laser, ink jet, and
impact printers. Your computer has ports for both parallel
and serial printers.
To use a printer, connect the printer to the appropriate port
on the left panel of the computer. Then run Setup as
described in this manual.
Refer to your printer documentation for more installation
and usage instructions.
Cables
The following cables are available with the TM4000M and
Portable CD-ROM Docking System:
Cables
Type
Used With
Part Number
High Density to High
Density
TM4000M
9794074-0001
High Density to 50-Pin
Centronix
TM4000M and
Portable CD-ROM
Docking System
9794074-0002
TravelMate Options 11-13
External Monitor
Ext erna l Monit or
Supported Monitors
The computer supports the following multifrequency
external and VGA monitors.
❑
31kHz/70 Hz (400/200 line mode)
❑
60 Hz (480 line mode)
❑
IBM PS/2 monitors
❑
Multiscanning monitors covering 15.75 to 31.5 kHz,
50 to 70 Hz
Installing an External Monitor
c
Caution: Always turn off the computer before connecting an external monitor.
1.
Turn off power to both the external monitor and the
computer.
2.
Connect the 15-pin external VGA monitor cable to the
15-pin connector on the back panel of the computer.
3.
Turn on power to the computer first; then turn on the
external monitor.
4.
Switch the display between the LCD and the external
monitor by double clicking the Windows Notebook
Group menu CRT or Panel icon. Alternatively, you
may type:
LCD, PANEL, SIMUL VGA UTILS
at the MS-DOS C:\ prompt and press ENTER.
11-14 TravelMate Options
External Monitor
5.
In modes that support simultaneous display on the
LCD and the CRT, switch to simultaneous display by
double-clicking the SimulScan icon in the Windows
Notebook Group menu or by typing
SIM
at the MS-DOS C:\ prompt and pressing ENTER.
For usage information, refer to the external monitor
documentation.
TravelMate Options 11-15
12
Portable CD-ROM Docking System
This chapter explains:
❑
Features of the Portable CD-ROM Docking System
❑
Options available for the Portable CD-ROM Docking
System
❑
How to dock your notebook
❑
How to use features and options of your Portable
CD-ROM Docking System
Contents
Features........................................................................ 12-2
Docking Your Notebook ................................................. 12-5
Undocking the Notebook ............................................... 12-7
Using the Portable CD-ROM Docking System ................ 12-9
Microphones and Headphones .................................. 12-9
Audio Input............................................................. 12-10
Audio Output .......................................................... 12-11
Controls .................................................................. 12-12
Battery LED ............................................................ 12-13
Battery Release ....................................................... 12-13
Options ....................................................................... 12-15
SCSI Hard Drive Enabler Kit ................................... 12-15
AC Adapter.............................................................. 12-20
Battery Options....................................................... 12-20
Portable CD-ROM Docking System 12-1
Features
Fea tures
The Portable CD-ROM Docking System may be attached to
the TM4000M to provide multi-media capabilities for your
notebook.
Portable CD-ROM Docking System
Features
The Portable CD-ROM Docking System has the following
standard features:
❑
Portable CD-ROM Docking System - supports both
information and music CDs
❑
AC Adapter - provided with power cord
❑
Battery power - NiMH battery provides clean and
efficient battery power. Battery charger is built in
❑
50-Pin Centronix connector - can connect to up to six
external SCSI devices
❑
Microphone/headphone kit - comes complete with
microphone, headset, and instructions
12-2 Portable CD-ROM Docking System
Features
❑
CD Home Sampler - comes complete with samples of
Microsoft games for use in the Portable CD-ROM
Docking System.
❑
Built in speakers - sound wings can be opened to
provide enhanced sound
❑
CD Eject - slides the CD out of the drive
❑
Power - turns power to the Portable CD-ROM Docking
System on and off
❑
Mic, headphone, and speaker ports - allows you to
connect external microphones, headphones, and
speakers
❑
Mix, balance, and volume controls - adjusts bass,
treble, volume level, and sound distribution. These
levels can also be adjusted using the sound software.
For more information, refer to Chapter 10, Sound.
Headphone
(mixed
sound)
Microphone
Power
Headphone
(unmixed)
CD EJECT
switch
Portable CD-ROM Docking System - FRONT VIEW
Portable CD-ROM Docking System 12-3
Features
DC In
Line In
SCSI
Speaker
Portable CD-ROM Docking System - REAR VIEW
12-4 Portable CD-ROM Docking System
Docking Your Notebook
Docking Your Noteb ook
To dock your notebook to the Portable CD-ROM Docking
System, complete the following steps:
1.
Ensure that power is turned off at the notebook and
that the AC adapter has been unplugged.
2.
Remove the back plate from the notebook.
Removing the back plate
n
Note: The Back plate may be stored in the backplate
compartment on top of the Portable CD-ROM Docking
System.
3.
Gently insert the notebook into the three male
connectors (Audio In/Out/MIC) on the Portable
CD-ROM Docking System.
Portable CD-ROM Docking System 12-5
Docking Your Notebook
Inserting the Portable CD-ROM Docking System
4.
When in place, push the clamps on the side of the
Portable CD-ROM Docking System in and then up to
latch over the notebook.
Clamping the notebook
5.
When secure, plug in the DC connector.
6.
Switch on the Portable CD-ROM Docking System.
12-6 Portable CD-ROM Docking System
Undocking the Notebook
Undocking t he Noteb ook
To undock the notebook from the Portable CD-ROM
Docking System, complete the following steps:
1.
Turn off power to both the Portable CD-ROM Docking
System and the notebook.
2.
Remove all batteries and remove the power cord.
3.
Unclamp the notebook. To do this, first push in on the
tab with the thumb and lift the clamp up from the
bottom so that the latch drops. Do this on each side
of the notebook.
Unclamping the notebook
4.
Release the notebook by pressing in on the tabs at the
back of the Portable CD-ROM System.
Portable CD-ROM Docking System 12-7
Undocking the Notebook
Releasing the notebook
12-8 Portable CD-ROM Docking System
Using the Portable
CD-ROM Docking System
This section describes the functionality of your Portable
CD-ROM Docking System. With the Portable CD-ROM
Docking System, you may:
❑
CD Eject
❑
Power
❑
Plug in microphones
❑
Plug in headphones
❑
Plug in external audio sources
❑
Adjust audio
Microphones and Headphones
The TravelMate 4000M Portable CD-ROM Docking System
features a microphone and headphone set. The following
diagrams display where the microphone and headset plug
into the Portable CD-ROM Docking System.
Portable CD-ROM Docking System 12-9
Using the Portable
CD-ROM Docking System
Microphone and headphone connections
Software has been pre-loaded on your hard drive that
configures your notebook for the microphone and
headphone. To plug in your microphone, insert the plug
into the Mic connector on the front of the Portable CD-ROM
Docking System. The headphones may be plugged in either
at the CD-ROM player (un-mixed sound) or at the portable
docking system (mixed sound)s.
Audio Input
You can plug in external audio sources through ports on
the Portable CD-ROM Docking System. External sources
may include:
❑
Musical instruments - Line in port
❑
Tape players - Line in port
❑
Mixers - Line in port
❑
Microphones - Microphone port
12-10 Portable CD-ROM Docking System
Using the Portable
CD-ROM Docking System
Audio input ports
Audio Output
You may output audio through the following ports on the
Portable CD-ROM Docking System:
❑
Headphones - Phones port. There are two ports for
the headphones. The port at the Portable CD-ROM
Docking System allows you to listen to CDs as you
would a normal CD player. The port on the right front
of the Portable CD-ROM Docking System allows you to
listen to music that has been mixed or edited through
your notebook.
❑
Speakers - Speaker Out port
Portable CD-ROM Docking System 12-11
Using the Portable
CD-ROM Docking System
Speaker port
Controls
The following controls are provided with the Portable
CD-ROM Docking System:
❑
CD Eject - when pressed, releases the CD from the
Portable CD-ROM Docking System
❑
Power - Turns power to the Portable CD-ROM Docking
System on and off
❑
Volume - Adjusts the level of volume
❑
Balance - Distributes sound to left and right speakers
❑
Mix - Adjusts bass and treble
12-12 Portable CD-ROM Docking System
Using the Portable
CD-ROM Docking System
Battery LED
The battery LED lights amber when the internal battery of
the Portable CD-ROM Docking System is charging. The
LED turns green when the battery is at least 90% charged.
The Battery LED on the notebook lights red when the
battery is low in the upper or lower compartments.
Battery Release
The Battery Release removes the battery from the notebook
while the notebook is docked to the portable CD-ROM
docking system. To release the battery, pull the battery
release tab out.
Battery release
Portable CD-ROM Docking System 12-13
Using the Portable
CD-ROM Docking System
n
Note: The Portable CD-ROM Docking System cannot run
on battery power if a third-party SCSI hard drive is
installed. You must use AC power.
The battery for the Portable CD-ROM Docking System can
power both the Portable CD-ROM Docking System and the
notebook. If the battery in the CD-ROM Docking System is
too low to power the notebook, the notebook enters into
Standby mode. You can place a charged battery in the
notebook without first having to turn the system off. After
inserting a new battery, press Standby to return to normal
operations.
12-14 Portable CD-ROM Docking System
Options
Opt ions
The following optional features can be purchased for the
CD-ROM portable docking system:
❑
SCSI 2.5" Hard Drive Enabler kit - TI Part No.
9793373-0001
❑
Spare AC Adapter - TI Part No. 9793362-0001
❑
Battery Kit - TI Part No. 9793371-0001
❑
Brief Case - will hold the portable docking system
docked to a TM4000M notebook
❑
Battery Charger - TI Part No. 9793360-0001
❑
50-Pin Centronix to 50-Pin Centronix Cable - TI Part
No. 9694704-0003
SCSI-II to 50-Pin Centronix Cable - TI Part No.
9694704-0002
SCSI Hard Drive Enabler Kit
The Portable CD-ROM Docking System includes an external
SCSI II connector. Using a special adapter with this
connector allows you to connect up to six external SCSI
devices.
The SCSI hard drive enabler kit (TI Part No. 9793373-0001)
can be used to place a SCSI drive in place of the battery on
the underside of the Portable CD-ROM Docking System. To
install the SCSI drive, complete the following steps:
1.
Turn power off to both the notebook and Portable
CD-ROM Docking System and disconnect the power
cord.
2.
Turn the system upside down on a padded surface.
The Portable CD-ROM Docking System may still be
clamped to the TravelMate TM4000M notebook.
Portable CD-ROM Docking System 12-15
Options
3.
Remove the battery by pressing the release button and
sliding the battery out.
Battery release
4.
Remove the four screws beside the recessed area in the
battery compartment of the Portable CD-ROM Docking
System.
Remove screws
5.
Open the SCSI drive kit. This should include a SCSI
connector, metal bracket, plastic cover, screws, and
installation instructions.
12-16 Portable CD-ROM Docking System
Options
n
Note: You must purchase a third party 2.5" SCSI hard
drive from your computer supply store or reseller. Seagate
and Toshiba models are known to be compatible.
SCSI Hard Drive Enabler Kit
6.
n
Attach one end of the SCSI connector to the SCSI drive
and the other to the connector on the bottom of the
Portable CD-ROM Docking System.
Note: There will be left-over pins on the right side of the
connector.
7.
Place the drive in the Portable CD-ROM Docking System.
Portable CD-ROM Docking System 12-17
Options
Attaching SCSI connectors
8.
Place the metal bracket over the drive so that the holes in
the feet on the plate are aligned directly over the holes
left by removing the screws.
9.
Screw the bracket down.
Screw the metal plate over the drive
10. Slide the plastic cover over the drive until the plastic
release tab clicks into place.
12-18 Portable CD-ROM Docking System
Options
Insert plastic cover
11. Turn the unit over, attach notebook, and plug in AC
power.
12. Change the lastdrive in the CONFIG.SYS file from D to
E.
13. Add ASPIDISK.SYS/D to the CONFIG.SYS file.
14. Reboot
To partition and format the SCSI hard drive, perform the
following steps:
1.
Go to the SCSI directory and type AFDISK.
2.
Verify the correct hard disk make and type.
3.
Press ENTER.
4.
Verify logical drive information.
5.
Press INSERT to create the partition.
6.
Follow instructions on the screen.
Portable CD-ROM Docking System 12-19
Options
7.
n
When complete, reboot and type FORMAT D:.
Note: The SCSI hard disk should be set at ID0.
AC Adapter
An AC Adapter is provided with your Portable CD-ROM
Docking System. If you want to order a spare AC Adapter,
refer to TI Part No. 9793362-0001. For further information
refer to Chapter 11, TravelMate Options.
Battery Options
The following battery options may be purchased for your
Portable CD-ROM Docking System:
❑
Battery Charger
❑
Extra Battery Pack
For further information on these options, refer to Chapter
11, TravelMate Options, the TravelMate 4000M User’s Guide
and the instructions that accompany the options.
n
Note: You cannot operate the Portable CD-ROM Docking
System on battery power when a third-party SCSI drive has
been installed using the SCSI Hard Drive Enabler Kit. You
must use AC power.
12-20 Portable CD-ROM Docking System
A
Specifications
Memory
Memory for the TM4000M Series includes 4 MB of standard
RAM with the following upgrades available:
❑
4-MB Upgrade Kit
TI Part No. 9793357-0001
❑
16-MB Upgrade Kit
TI Part No. 9693358-0001
Display
The following display types are available:
DX4/75
8.5 inches - Active Matrix Color
SX2/25
9.5 inches - Monochrome
8.5 inches - Active Matrix Color
Video RAM
1-MB
External Monitors
The TM4000M Series notebooks may use the following
external monitor types:
❑
640 x 480 x 256
❑
800 x 600 x 256
❑
1024 x 768 x 256
❑
1280 x 1024 x 16
Specifications A-1
Appendix A
Ap pend ix A
Floppy Disk Drive
All TM4000M Series notebooks use 1.44-MB, 3.5" floppy
disks.
Hard Disk Drives
The following is a listing of hard drives types for the
TM4000M Series notebooks:
DX4/75
340-MB Hard Drive
SX2/25
120-MB Hard Drive
200-MB Hard Drive
CD-ROM Drive
CD-ROM specifications are as follows:
❑
Single-sided
❑
250 ms access time
❑
300 KB per second sustained transfer rate
❑
Supports SCSI synchronous transfer (up to 4.2 MB
per second)
❑
Supports photo-CD multi sessions disc compatibility
and multi-media PC specification compatibility
❑
Output level - .9V (rms Typ)
❑
Output type - unbalanced
❑
Load impedence - 10 kΩ min
A-2 Specifications
Appendix A
❑
Frequency response - 20 Hz to 20 kHz +/- 3dB
❑
Distortion - 0.02% Max. (at 1 kHz w/20 kHz LPF)
❑
Signal to Noise Ratio - 84 dB Typ (IEC 179 A-weighted)
PCMCIA Slots
The TM4000M Series notebooks come standard with a
PCMCIA slot that accommodates 1 Type III or 2 Type II
PCMCIA option cards.
Printer Ports
The TM4000M Series notebooks come standard with the
following:
❑
16550 UART Serial Port
❑
EPP/ECP Parallel Port
SCSI Connections
The TM4000M Series notebooks can be connected to up to
seven external SCSI devices (six if docked to the Portable
CD-ROM Docking System).
PS/2 Port
The PS/2 port accommodates either an external keyboard,
numeric keypad, or mouse. Since an internal pointing
device already exists on the TM4000M Series notebooks,
you must complete the following steps to use an external
mouse:
1.
Turn off the computer.
Specifications A-3
Appendix A
n
Note: If you connect the PS/2 mouse to the computer while
power is on, press CTRL-ALT-DEL (warm start), or cycle
power so the computer can detect the presence of the mouse.
2.
Attach the six-pin Mini-Din connector to the mouse and
insert the other end of the connector into the external
keyboard port on the TravelMate 4000M.
3.
Set the keyboard switch located between the serial and
parallel port on the rear of the notebook to the down
position. This deactivates the internal pointing device.
4.
Reconnect the AC Adapter, and turn on the computer.
MIDI Connection
You can purchase a MIDI connector cable that will connect
digital musical devices or game devices to the
MIDI/Joystick port on the back of your notebook.
MIDI
Connector
MIDI Connector
A-4 Specifications
Appendix A
Sound
TM4000M Series notebooks come with 16-bit sound and
MIDI connections as standard features.
Environment
This section provides information on the optimum
operating environment for your TravelMate 4000M
notebook computer:
Temperature
Operating: 50o to 95o F (10o C to 35o C)
Storage:
-4o to 140o F
(-20o C to +60o C)
Relative Humidity (Noncondensing)
Operating: 20% to 80%
Storage:
10% to 90%
Shock
Maximum 60g pulse in X and Y orientation and a 35g pulse
in the Z axis.
Operating:
Maximum 6g pulse in X,
Y, and Z orientations
Storage:
Maximum 60g pulse in X,
Y, and Z orientations
Vibration
Operating:
Sinusoidal 5 to 20 Hz
limited to 0.0244 inch
peak-to-peak maximum
displacement
0.5g, 20 to 400 Hz
Specifications A-5
Appendix A
Storage:
Sinusoidal 5 to 20 Hz
limited to 0.244 inch
peak-to-peak maximum
displacement
5.0g, 20 to 400Hz
Options
Refer to the individual publications furnished with each
option for specifications.
A-6 Specifications
B
Character Sets
The TravelMate Computer character sets are identical to
the IBM Code Pages for MS-DOS. This appendix shows the
character sets for Code Page 437 (United States), 850
(Multilingual), 863 (Canadian-French), and 865 (Nordic),
with the decimal and hexadecimal codes for each character.
The four-character sets contain differences in the
international, symbol, and graphics characters above
decimal code 128 (extended ASCII characters).
n
Note: The extended ASCII characters that are not on the
keyboard (128 to 255 decimal) can be displayed at the
MS-DOS prompt and in many applications. Press ALT, and
type the ASCII decimal code for the character using the keys
with numbers on their front face and also using FN or
NUM LK on. Release the ALT key and the character is
displayed on the screen. Your printer may or may not print
the extended characters. Refer to the character code tables
in your printer documentation.
Character Sets B-1
Character Sets
Character Sets
Code Page 437, United States
B-2 Character Sets
Character Sets
Code Page 850, Multilingual
Character Sets B-3
Character Sets
Code Page 863, Canadian-French
B-4 Character Sets
Character Sets
Code Page 865, Nordic
Character Sets B-5
C
Keyboard Layouts
Esc
Set Up
F1
F2
F4
F3
F5
F6
F7
F8
&
7
%
1
2
A
Caps
Lock
S
Shift
R
X
Ctrl
T
F
D
Z
6
5
E
W
Q
Fn
4
3
8
U
B
9
1
M
N
6
O
2
K
Prt Sc
SysRq
P
Enter
3
L
0
0
Enter
Enter
Home
Alt
Alt
Del
Ins
Pause
Break
0
5
I
NumLk
Scr Lk
)
9
4
J
F12
(
8
H
V
F11
7
Y
G
C
F10
F9
Shift
End
PgUp
PgDn
U.S. English Keyboard
Esc
Config
F1
F2
F4
F3
F5
F6
F7
F8
&
7
%
2
3
4
A
Shift
S
6
R
Alt
T
F
D
X
Z
Ctrl
5
E
W
Q
Fn
F11
NumLk
F12
Sc r Lk
1
Caps
Lock
F10
F9
C
U
H
B
8
N
I
1
M
5
K
0
Pause
Ins
Del
Brea k
)
0
9
4
J
9
(
8
Y
G
V
7
Prt Sc
SysRq
O
2
6
L
P
3
Shift
0
Alt Gr
Enter
Home
End
PgUp
PgDn
U.K. English Keyboard
Keyboard Layouts C-1
Keyboard Layouts
Keyboard Layouts
Esc
Set Up
F1
F2
F4
F3
F5
F6
F7
2
1
3
Q
Shift
S
>
5
E
W
A
Caps
Lock
4
R
X
Z
7
B
M
N
6
O
2
K
Prt Sc
Scr Lk
SysRq
Pause
Break
Del
Ins
0
5
I
NumLk
9
)
1
J
F12
9
4
U
H
V
C
8
8
Y
G
F11
(
7
T
F
D
F10
F9
&
6
%
1/2
F8
3
L
0
P
Å
Æ
Enter
Shift
0
<
Ctrl
Fn
Home
Alt Gr
Alt
End
PgUp
PgDn
Danish Keyboard
Echap
Config
2
F1
F2
1
&
F4
F3
F5
3
2
F6
4
F7
F8
6
5
7
A
Z
Q
E
S
R
D
8
7
F11
8
T
F
U
H
4
J
I
1
à
5
K
Impr.
Syst
Pause
Attn
O
2
)
6
L
P
3
M
Entrée
ù
>
X
W
C
V
B
N
0
0
<
Fn
Ctrl
Alt
French Keyboard
C-2 Keyboard Layouts
Ins
0
9
ç
Y
G
Vr.Num
Ar.Déf
F12
9
è
(
é
F10
F9
Alt Gr
Fin
Suppr
Keyboard Layouts
Esc
Konfig
F1
F2
F4
F3
F5
F6
F7
F8
&
6
%
1
2
3
2
A
S
>
5
E
W
Q
4
3
R
D
X
Y
7
U
H
)
1
M
N
Entf
Einfg
Untbr
β
0
6
O
2
K
Pause
9
5
I
Druck
S-Abf
Num
Roll
F12
9
4
J
B
V
C
8
8
Z
G
F11
(
7
T
F
F10
F9
3
L
0
P
U
O
Enter
A
0
<
Fn
Strg
Alt
Ende
Pos 1
Alt Gr
Bild
Bild
German Keyboard
Esc
Config
F1
F2
F4
F3
F5
F6
F7
3
2
4
E
W
Q
A
5
S
R
D
7
8
U
H
I
1
X
Z
C
V
B
N
M
0
Canc
Ins
ì
O
2
6
L
é
è
P
3
ç
ò
>
Pausa
Interr
0
5
K
Stamp
R Sist
9
9
4
J
B Num
B Scor
F12
)
8
Y
G
F11
(
7
T
F
F10
F9
&
6
%
1
F8
Invio
à
0
ù
<
Fn
Ctrl
Alt
Alt Gr
Fine
Pag
Pag
Italian Keyboard
Keyboard Layouts C-3
Keyboard Layouts
Esc
Set Up
F1
F2
F4
F3
F5
F6
F7
F8
&
6
%
2
1
3
A
Shift
S
>
5
E
W
Q
Caps
Lock
4
R
X
Z
7
U
B
F12
1
M
N
6
O
2
K
Prt Sc
Scr Lk
SysRq
Pause
Break
Del
Ins
0
5
I
NumLk
9
)
9
4
J
H
V
C
8
8
Y
G
F11
(
7
T
F
D
F10
F9
P
3
L
0
Å
Æ
Enter
Shift
0
<
Ctrl
Fn
Home
Alt Gr
Alt
End
PgUp
PgDn
Norwegian Keyboard
Esc
Config
a
o
F1
F2
F4
F3
F5
F6
F7
F8
&
6
%
2
1
3
A
5
E
W
Q
Bloq
4
S
R
7
8
U
4
J
H
F12
I
1
Imp Pt
B Desp
Pet Sis
0
5
K
B Num
Pausa
Inter
Ins
Supr
9
)
9
8
Y
G
F11
(
7
T
F
D
F10
F9
O
2
¡
6
L
P
3
N
Mayús
>
X
Z
C
V
B
N
M
0
c
0
<
Fn
Ctrl
Alt
Alt Gr
Inicio
Fin
RePág
AvPág
Spanish Keyboard
C-4 Keyboard Layouts
Keyboard Layouts
Esc
Set Up
F1
F2
F4
F3
F5
F6
F7
F8
&
6
%
1/2
2
1
3
A
Shift
S
>
5
E
W
Q
Caps
Lock
4
R
D
X
Z
7
U
H
Nu mL k
Scr Lk
F12
1
M
N
6
O
2
K
Pause
Break
SysRq
Del
Ins
0
5
I
Prt Sc
9
)
9
4
J
B
V
C
8
8
Y
G
F11
(
7
T
F
F10
F9
3
L
0
Å
P
Enter
A
O
Shift
0
<
Ctrl
Fn
Alt
Home
Alt Gr
End
PgUp
PgDn
Swedish/Finnish Keyboard
Esc
Set Up
F1
F2
1
2
>
F6
S
ç
%
5
7
8
(
U
H
B
F11
4
J
N
F12
I
1
M
0
Prt Sc
Scr Lk
SysRq
Pause
Break
Del
Ins
0
5
K
NumLk
9
)
9
8
Z
G
V
F10
F9
7
T
F
C
F8
&
6
R
D
X
Y
F7
4
E
W
A
Caps
Lock
F5
3
Q
Shift
F4
F3
O
2
6
L
èü
üè
P
3
éö
öé
àä
äà
Enter
Shift
0
<
Fn
Ctrl
Alt
Alt Gr
Home
End
PgUp
PgDn
Swiss Keyboard
Keyboard Layouts C-5
Keyboard Layouts
Esc
Set Up
2
F1
F2
F4
F3
2
1
&
F5
3
F6
4
F8
F7
5
Z
A
E
S
Q
F11
8
8
T
F
9
4
U
H
1
J
Pause
SysRq
Bre a k
Ins
Del
)
6
O
2
K
Prt Sc
Scr Lk
à
5
I
Nu m L k
0
ç
Y
G
F12
9
è
R
D
7
7
6
(
é
F10
F9
P
3
L
M
Enter
ù
>
X
W
B
V
C
0
N
0
<
Ctrl
Fn
Home
Alt Gr
Alt
End
PgUp
PgDn
Belgium Keyboard
Esc
Set Up
F1
F2
F4
F3
F5
F6
F7
3
Q
>
5
E
W
A
Caps
Lock
4
S
C
7
V
U
H
B
8
4
J
N
F12
)
I
1
M
0
Prt Sc
Scr Lk
SysRq
Pause
Break
Del
Ins
0
5
K
NumLk
9
9
8
Y
G
F11
(
7
T
F
D
X
Z
R
F10
F9
&
6
%
2
1
F8
O
2
6
L
P
3
c
a
o
Enter
0
<
Fn
Ctrl
Alt
Alt Gr
Home
End
PgUp
PgDn
Portuguese Keyboard
C-6 Keyboard Layouts
D
Diagnostics
Your computer provides two diagnostics routines to ensure
that it and its peripherals are functioning properly. One
routine is executed every time you turn on the computer.
The other is accessed from a separate Diagnostics Program.
Power-On Diagnostics
When you turn on the computer, a self-test executes,
checks internal memory, and displays the number of
kilobytes available for use.
Note: If Quick Boot is enabled, the memory is not displayed.
After a few seconds, MS-DOS starts to load. If MS-DOS fails to
load from the hard disk or a floppy, an error message appears.
Turn off the computer, wait 5 seconds, and turn the
computer on again. If the error message displays
repeatedly, call your Texas Instruments dealer, or call
TI Service at 1-800-TI-TEXAS.
Diagnostics Program
Diagnostics loads and displays its main menu. Use the
cursor keys to highlight the test you want, and press
ENTER to start the test.
Note: For diagnostics on SCSI devices, refer to the Adaptec
EZ-SCSI User’s Manual. For diagnostics on PCMCIA, refer
to the Phoenix PCMCIA User’s Manual.
Diagnostics D-1
Diagnostics
Diag nostics
Park Fixed Disks
The Park Fixed Disk function prepares the fixed disks for
relocation. The fixed disk heads are placed over the
diagnostics cylinder so that vibrations do not cause errors
on the usable media. The heads are also automatically
parked for safe travel when you turn off the computer or
the computer enters standby mode.
Diagnostics
If you select the Diagnostics Program, a warning and menu
display. Press N to abort Diagnostics. Press Y to continue,
and the Diagnostics menu displays.
Each test listed indicates the hardware item and its
configuration to be tested. Some items are listed only
present (P) or not present (N), while others specify a
hardware type. For example, KEYBOARD can be an 84-key
keyboard, a 101-key keyboard, or not present (N). The
floppy types are defined as they are in the Setup Program
menu.
The Diagnostics menu reflects the hardware configuration
that the Diagnostics Program detects in your computer. The
selection process overrides this automatic selection process
or excludes specific tests from a complete suite of tests to
be performed.
Press the cursor keys to highlight an item you want to test
or change, and press F5 and F6 to select new items in each
field.
You can test a single item by moving the highlight to a
particular test and pressing F10. You must select
something other than not present (N) or NONE.
D-2 Diagnostics
Diagnostics
Pressing F9 tests all currently selected devices. If you do
not want to perform specific tests, set these test selections
to not present (N); this tells the Diagnostics Program not to
test these items.
When a single test or suite of tests is initiated, the Test
Control Options and Test Results menu displays. On the
left side of this menu is information relating to the test
currently being performed. The right side of the menu
contains the results of previously completed tests.
Test Control Options
The fields at the top of the menu represent options that
control how tests are performed. These options must be set
before a single test or suite of tests is initiated.
Continuous Test — This field causes the tests to be
performed continuously until you specifically stop them by
pressing ESC. When you press ESC, you can continue
again by pressing the Space Bar, or abort the suite of tests
by again pressing ESC. If you select a single test using F10,
the single test is repeated if the continuous test field is set
to YES. If you select a suite of tests using F9, the entire
suite is repeated.
Stop On Error — If an error is detected during a suite of
tests, the Diagnostics Program stops after the error is
reported, depending on the status of this field. If set to YES
(the default), the program reports the error and then stops
testing until you press the Space Bar to continue or ESC to
end testing.
Echo to LPT1 — This field permits you to send the test
results to a parallel printer attached to LPT1. The
information written to the right side of the menu is echoed
to LPT1 if this option is set to YES. This is useful if you set
the Continuous Test field to YES, the Stop on Error field to
NO, and want to run a test or tests unattended.
Diagnostics D-3
Diagnostics
Choosing Specific Suites of Tests
Many of the tests have submenus that permit you to select
which parts of the test you want. When you select any of
these tests, either individually (using F10) or as part of
suite of tests (using F9), the submenus ask for additional
information. If the tests are run multiple times, the
submenus are displayed only before the first pass.
Each of the test submenus displays whether or not the test
is interactive and whether or not it is destructive to data.
Interactive tests require some user intervention to operate.
For example, if you select the interactive keyboard test, you
must press keys on the keyboard to verify that it is
operating properly. In general, if you are performing
continuous tests, you should not select any interactive
tests, permitting the suite of tests to run unattended.
The following component tests and their respective options
can be selected.
Keyboard Test
Keyboard test (interactive)
Controller test (non-interactive)
Floppy Disk Test
Seek tracks
Verify tracks
Disk change (interactive)
Read/Write (destructive)
Format (destructive)
Fixed Disk Drive Test
Controller test
Head select test
Seek test
D-4 Diagnostics
Diagnostics
Monochrome Adapter Test
Attribute test
Character test
Text test
Memory test
Color Graphics Adapter Test
Attribute test
Character test
Text test
Page test
Graphics test
Background test
Memory test
EGA Adapter Test
Attribute test
Character test
Text test
Page test
Graphics test
Background test
Memory test
VGA Adapter Test
Attribute test
Character test
Text test
Page test
Graphics test
Background test
Memory test
Parallel Port Test
Internal loopback
Printed pattern (requires connected printer)
External loopback (requires loopback connector)
Diagnostics D-5
Diagnostics
Additional Diagnostics
The Diagnostics Program hard disk tests are all
nondestructive except on the diagnostics cylinder. The tests
perform seek tests, head tests, and controller tests, but do
not perform read/write tests on the entire media.
Additional tests for the hard disk are contained in the hard
disk format system, which is described later in this
appendix.
Sound Diagnostics
To check Sound, select sound from the Windows Control
Panel. Select Test to see if sound is on.
Diagnostics Error Codes
When an error is detected by the Diagnostics Program, a
two-byte hexadecimal code is displayed. The first byte is the
class of the error and the second byte is the subclass. The
error code class generally corresponds to a specific
hardware system or group of hardware systems. For
example, class one (01) is used for the system planar board.
The last byte of the code (subclass) describes the actual test
that failed on the specified peripheral. For example, error
0108 indicates that the 8253 counter test failed during the
system planar board test.
D-6 Diagnostics
Diagnostics
The following table lists the classes of error codes. The
numbers are in hexadecimal.
Diagnostics Error Code Classes
Code
DESCription
01xx
System planar board tests
07xx
Keyboard tests
10xx
Math coprocessor tests
17xx
Video tests
20xx
Asynchronous ports tests
27xx
LPT ports tests
30xx
Memory tests
37xx
Diskette/FDisk tests
The following table lists the error codes, by class and
subclass, that could be displayed by the Diagnostics
Program.
Diagnostics Program Error Codes
Code
Class
0101
System board
DMA registers
0102
System board
DMA memory move
0103
System board
Interrupt mask
0104
System board
Hot interrupt line
0105
System board
Stuck NMI
0106
System board
Processor registers
0107
System board
System timer
Failure Description
Diagnostics D-7
Diagnostics
Diagnostics Program Error Codes (continued)
Code
Class
0108
System Board
8253 counters
0109
System Board
System timer interrupts (1)
010A
System Board
System timer interrupts (2)
010B
System Board
Processor flags
0110
System Board
CMOS memory
0111
System Board
Real time clock
0120
System Board
BIOS checksum
0701
Keyboard
Controller
0702
Keyboard
Keyboard map
1001
Coprocessor
Registers
1002
Coprocessor
Calculations
1701
Video
Text attributes
1702
Video
Background colors
1703
Video
Character set
1704
Video
Text page registration
1705
Video
Text pages
1706
Video
Graphics display
1707
Video
EGA/VGA palette
1708
Video
Memory
1709
Video
VGA sequencer
170A
Video
VGA controller registers
170B
Video
VGA attribute controller
170C
Video
VGA DAC
D-8 Diagnostics
Failure DESCription
Diagnostics
Diagnostics Program Error Codes (continued)
Code
Class
Failure DESCription
1730
Video
Cannot initialize video
2001
Serial
Baud rate clock
2002
Serial
Internal loopback data
2003
Serial
Internal loopback control
2004
Serial
External loopback data
2701
LPT
Registers read/write
2702
LPT
Control loopback
2703
LPT
Printed pattern
2704
LPT
Printer not ready
2705
LPT
Unknown error
2706
LPT
No paper/paper jam
2707
LPT
Printer timeout
2708
LPT
Printer busy
3001
Memory
Address lines
3002
Memory
Data patterns
3003
Memory
Walking bits
3701
Disk
Invalid parameter
3702
Disk
Address mark not found
3703
Disk
Write protect error
3704
Disk
Sector not found
3705
Disk
Reset failed
3706
Disk
Change line active
3707
Disk
Drive parameter error
Diagnostics D-9
Diagnostics
Diagnostics Program Error Codes (concluded)
Code
Class
3708
Disk
DMA overrun
3709
Disk
Attempt to DMA across 64 KB
370A
Disk
Bad sector flag found
370B
Disk
Bad cylinder detected
370C
Disk
Media type not found
370D
Disk
Invalid format sectors count
370E
Disk
Control data mark detected
3710
Disk
CRC or ECC error detected
3711
Disk
EGC corrected error
3720
Disk
General controller failure
3740
Disk
Seek operation
3750
Disk
Change line test
3780
Disk
Drive not ready
37BB
Disk
Undefined error occurred
37CC
Disk
Write fault on selected drive
37E0
Disk
Status error
37FF
Disk
Sense operation failed
D-10 Diagnostics
Failure DESCription
Diagnostics
Loopback Connections
The serial and parallel communications tests in the
Diagnostics Program offer optional loopback tests that
require placing loopback connectors on the output ports of
the computer. The loopback connector pin assignments are
listed in the following tables.
Loopback Connector Pin Assignments
Serial Loopback Connections
DB9 Pin
Signal
1-7-8
CD-RTS-CTS
2-3
TX-RX
4-6
DTR-DSR
Parallel Loopback Connections
DB25 Pin
Signal
15-2
D0-ERR
13-1
STRB-SLCT
16-10
INIT-ACK
17-11
SLCTIN-BUSY
14-12
AUTOFEED-PE
Diagnostics D-11
Diagnostics
Hard Disk Format
When you select the Hard Disk Format, the program
displays the Format Fixed Disk menu.
Use the cursor keys to highlight the hard disk you want
formatted or analyzed, and press ENTER. After you have
selected a hard disk, the program displays a warning that
the formatting operation will erase any data currently
stored on the hard disk.
If you do not intend to format or analyze your hard disk,
press N; otherwise, press Y to continue, and the program
displays a menu listing the drives, heads, and cylinders
under test.
Bad Track Table
The center portion of the Format Fixed Disk menu displays
the list of currently recorded bad tracks. This list is central
to the processing of most of the format functions.
Bad tracks are areas of the hard disk that cannot store
data properly. A list of the bad tracks detected by the drive
manufacturer is usually provided with the hard disk drive
when it is purchased. Some of these areas may work
intermittently, but are not dependable for storing data. The
program formats these tracks with a special attribute so
that other programs or commands (such as the MS-DOS
FORMAT command) will not attempt to use bad areas on the
disk.
The bad track list is modified automatically by the SCAN
BAD TRACKS command, the ANALYZE SURFACE command,
and the FORMAT PREFORMATTED DRIVE command. Each of
these functions adds to the list bad tracks they detect
during their processing.
D-12 Diagnostics
Diagnostics
To manually add a bad track to the table, press INS. Use
the cursor keys or ENTER to select between cylinder and
head fields. After the cylinder and head are entered, press
F10 or ENTER, and the new entry will be added to the
table. If an invalid head or cylinder value is entered, the
program displays a menu permitting you to delete a bad
track.
To delete a bad track, use the cursor keys to highlight the
bad track, and press Del. You are not prompted to verify
the deletion, so use this function with care.
To clear the bad track table, press F2; the program displays
a warning message to be sure you want to continue. Press
Y to clear all entries from the bad track table, or press N to
abort. To print the bad track table, press F3 (be sure your
printer is connected).
You can search the disk for all existing bad tracks if the
drive has already been formatted by selecting F5 (scan for
bad tracks). This causes the program to quickly test each
track on the hard disk to determine if it has already been
formatted as bad. Each track found to be bad is added to
the list if not already there.
Setting Interleave
Press F4 to set the interleave, which is the value used by
the format operation to interleave the hard disk tracks.
When setting interleave manually, always use a value of 1,
the default. The interleave setting is the value used to
format, not necessarily the current value for your hard disk.
Diagnostics D-13
Diagnostics
Analyzing the Hard Disk Surface
If you do not need to reformat the entire hard disk but want
to perform a thorough test of the media to detect any bad
or marginal areas, select F6 to analyze the surface.
Caution: This performs a destructive analysis of the
hard disk media (all data on the hard disk will be
erased).
Any bad tracks found during the analysis are automatically
added to the bad track table. As bad tracks are found, they
are reformatted as bad so that a subsequent MS-DOS
operation does not attempt to use these areas on the disk.
Formatting a New Hard Disk
After installing a new hard disk, you should enter the bad
track information provided by the manufacturer into the
bad track table (see above). Then press F7. This option,
specifically for formatting a hard disk that was previously
unformatted—performs the following operations:
❑
Each track of the hard disk is reformatted using the
current interleave value.
❑
Each track in the bad track table is reformatted as
bad so that it cannot be used.
When the format operation is complete, run a surface
analysis to verify that no additional bad tracks are found.
Reformatting a Hard Disk
If your hard disk was previously formatted, press F8 to
automatically reformat. This causes the following
operations:
D-14 Diagnostics
Diagnostics
❑
The program scans the drive for tracks that have
already been marked as bad and adds them to the bad
track table.
❑
Each track is reformatted using the current interleave
value.
❑
Each track in the bad track table is reformatted as
bad so that it cannot be used.
❑
The program performs a surface analysis on the
media, reformats any additional bad tracks as bad,
and adds them to the list.
Using this option is equivalent to performing a SCAN FOR
BAD TRACKS command (F5), followed by a FORMAT
UNFORMATTED DRIVE command (F7), followed by an
ANALYZE HARD DISK operation (F6). The only differences are
that all three operations are done automatically, and the
surface analysis performed is not as thorough or as
time-consuming as that performed when you select F6.
If the bad track table from the manufacturer is available
when the reformat of the drive is done, enter that map
before this operation is performed. This ensures that all
tracks in that list are reformatted as bad regardless of
whether or not they are found by the SCAN FOR BAD TRACKS
operation.
After Formatting is Complete
The HARD DISK FORMAT commands perform low-level
formatting operations on hard disks. After these operations
are complete, insert the MS-DOS Disk 1 floppy into the
floppy drive, and reboot the computer. Follow the
instructions displayed to install MS-DOS and utilities. If you
are using another operating system, see its documentation
for formatting and installation instructions.
Diagnostics D-15
E
Power Consumption Values
The following table summarizes approximate power consumption using various computer power-saving features,
manual and automatic.
Power Consumption by Operating Mode
Typical Power Consumption
Operating Mode
Manual Standby* with DOS background tasks
4.0 – 6.0 watts
Manual Standby* with no background tasks
2.0 – 4.0 watts
Auto Suspend† with DOS background tasks
3.5 – 6.0 watts
Auto Suspend† with Windows background tasks
2.5 – 5.0 watts
Auto Suspend† without background tasks
2.0 – 3.5 watts
Cover Closed Suspend mode
2.0 – 3.2 watts
Operation with hard disk access‡
7.5 – 12.5 watts
Operation with no hard disk access‡
7.0 – 9.0 watts
Operation with LCD off
3.5 – 6.5 watts
0.5 watts
Setup Program LCD Power set to Low
LCD brightness, minimum to maximum
1.5 – 3.5 watts
Typical full-charge battery capacity
32.4 watts
Maximum power consumption, all options
20.5 watts
*Press STANDBY to enter Standby mode.
†Select Auto Suspend in the Setup Program’s Power Savings category.
‡Add 3 to 3.5 watts if BatteryPro is not activated (level 0).
Power Consumption Values E-1
F
Configuring Memory
This appendix describes the various areas of RAM and how
you can make it more efficient by configuring it with the
memory management device drivers supplied with your
computer.
Configuring Memory F-1
Memory Areas
Memory Area s
MS-DOS directly accesses up to 640 KB of RAM for the
execution of programs and commands and for storing
temporary data. MS-DOS cannot directly access memory
beyond this 640-KB limit. The amount of standard default
RAM (640 KB) in the computer is displayed on the Setup
Program menu as Standard (Memory), and it can be
changed in 64-KB increments if required by your
application.
The following memory map shows the available memory
and how MS-DOS uses it.
F-2 Configuring Memory
Memory Areas
Extended Memory
Extended memory is internal system RAM above 1024 KB.
MS-DOS or your applications (that support extended
memory) can access Extended memory if your system is
configured with an extended memory driver (XMS).
Extended memory drivers manage the extended memory
ensuring that two programs do not use the same part of
memory. The enhanced mode of MS Windows uses
extended memory to multitask applications.
MS-DOS includes the HIMEM.SYS extended memory driver.
HIMEM.SYS is defined in your CONFIG.SYS file where it is
automatically loaded each time you boot the system.
HIMEM.SYS also enables MS-DOS programs to use an extra
64-KB region located just above the 1-MB mark for storage
of code and data. This area is known as high memory area
(HMA).
n
Note: MS-DOS can also be loaded in HMA to free up
conventional memory. Refer to your MS-DOS User’s Manual
for instructions.
n
Note: Some application programs that run in 386
enhanced mode (such as Windows) require special extended
memory managers. Use the extended memory manager
provided with your application, if available. Otherwise, use
HIMEM.SYS, the MS-DOS version furnished with your
computer.
You can define part of extended memory as one or more
RAM disks using the RAMDRIVE.SYS device driver. Details are
provided in the next section.
Configuring Memory F-3
Memory Areas
Expanded Memory
Expanded memory conforms to the Expanded Memory
Specification (EMS) developed by Lotus/Intel/Microsoft (LIM)
known as LIM-EMS. Your computer supports EMS
version 4.0.
Expanded memory is accessed by allocating an area
(usually 64 KB) of system memory between 640 KB and
1 MB (and between 256 KB and 640 KB when the /O option
is used) as a “window.” Pages or segments of data are
passed to and from Expanded memory through this
window, which is called the page frame. The page frame is
divided into at least four physical pages of 16 KB each.
The total amount of internal memory above 640 KB can be
assigned to either Extended memory (XMS) or Expanded
memory (EMS), depending on your requirements and which
driver is installed.
n
Note: MS Windows can use both XMS and EMS in 386
Enhanced mode when properly configured. Refer to your
Windows User’s Guide for details and instructions.
The Expanded Memory Manager included with MS-DOS
(EMM386.EXE) manages the interface between the program
and Expanded memory, bringing data in and out through
the page frame as required.
Before you can use Expanded memory, you must install the
EMM386.EXE device driver as described in the next section,
“Memory Device Drivers.” You need not install the
Expanded memory driver if your application does not
support Expanded memory.
F-4 Configuring Memory
Memory Device Drivers
Memory Device Drivers
The following device drivers included in the C:\ directory
are provided to manage memory:
❑
HIMEM.SYS — An extended memory manager that
supervises the computer’s Extended memory so that
no two applications use the same memory at the same
time
❑
EMM386.EXE — Supports LIM-EMS Expanded memory
❑
RAMDRIVE.SYS — Supports RAM disks in standard,
Extended, and Expanded memory
❑
SMARTDRV.EXE — For use with a hard disk and
Extended or Expanded memory that supports
disk-caching to speed up reading from the hard disk.
Installing Device Drivers
To install a driver, add a DEVICE command line to your
CONFIG.SYS file similar to the following, using the MS-DOS EDIT
utility or a word processor that saves text files in ASCII format:
DEVICE=C:\DOS\XXXXXXXX.XXX [options]
Where XXXXXXXX.XXX is the name of the device driver, for
example, HIMEM.SYS. You must then restart the computer to
load the new CONFIG.SYS settings and activate the driver(s).
Configuring Memory F-5
Memory Device Drivers
EMM386.EXE
The EMS memory manager provided with your computer,
EMM386.EXE, conforms to version 4.00 of the
Lotus/Intel/Microsoft Expanded Memory Specification
(EMS). EMM386.EXE enables areas of system memory to be
used as Expanded memory.
The EMM386.EXE device driver must be installed before you
can use Expanded memory. To install EMM386.EXE in its
simplest form, include the following command line in your
CONFIG.SYS file before any other DEVICE commands that use
Expanded memory (for example, RAMDRIVE.SYS) but after
the HIMEM.SYS command line. This allows other device
drivers to use the memory manager.
DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE [options]
Parameters (also called switches or options) for the
EMM386.EXE driver are described in the Microsoft Windows
User’s Guide furnished with your new computer. After it
loads, the memory manager determines the amount of
Expanded memory in the system and performs any
required initialization.
n
Note: The 386 enhanced mode of Microsoft Windows allows
you to simulate part of extended memory as expanded
memory using the EMM386.EXE device driver. However, this
is not recommended as it degrades system performance.
MS-DOS also uses EMM386.EXE to enable Upper Memory
Area (UMA). This allows you to load TSR programs and
device drivers in this area to free up conventional memory.
Again, this may degrade performance. Refer to your
Microsoft Windows User’s Guide or your MS-DOS User’s
Guide for details.
F-6 Configuring Memory
Memory Device Drivers
Some applications may require “backfill” memory, which is
the unused area of standard memory that can be used by
EMM386.EXE as Expanded memory. For example, an
application may require only 256 KB or 512 KB of standard
memory, leaving 384 KB and 128 KB of backfill memory
space, respectively, for use as Expanded memory.
The Shadow ROM memory that you define with the Setup
Program enables mapping the internal system BIOS, Video
BIOS, and option BIOS into high-speed memory for faster
operation. When not selected, the shadow memory is
available for use as Extended memory. The shadow memory
area is limited to 384 KB.
Your computer provides 4 MB of RAM (main memory)
standard. The first MB (1024 KB) of the standard 4 MB is
the system base memory (640 KB) and shadow memory
(384 KB) and cannot be increased beyond 1024 KB. You
can optionally add 4 MB or 16 MB of memory to use as
Extended and/or Expanded memory. This added memory
when combined with the remaining standard 3 MB (4 MB 1024 KB) of system memory (not used for base or shadow
memory) provides either 7 MB or 19 MB, respectively, of
Extended or Expanded memory.
See the Microsoft MS-DOS User’s Guide and Reference for
detailed instructions on installing and configuring
expanded memory.
HIMEM.SYS
HIMEM.SYS is an eXtended Memory Manager (XMM)
conforming to eXtended Memory Specifications (XMS), version
3.04. HIMEM.SYS uses 64 KB of the high-memory area (HMA)
at the beginning of Extended memory to store a single TSR
program or device driver, or it uses this area for data storage.
This effectively increases the size of standard memory for use
by your main application.
Configuring Memory F-7
Memory Device Drivers
To install HIMEM.SYS in its simplest form, include the
following command line in your CONFIG.SYS file before any
other device commands that use Extended memory:
DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\HIMEM.SYS
In this form, HIMEM.SYS uses default values. Access to HMA
is on a “first-come-first-served” basis.
RAMDRIVE.SYS
A RAM disk is a portion of your computer’s memory
configured to simulate a disk drive. A RAM disk, also called
a virtual disk, can be accessed much faster than a normal
drive.
You lose the data stored on a RAM disk when you turn the
computer power off. Therefore, to save the contents of a
RAM disk, copy the contents of the RAM disk to a floppy or
to the hard drive before turning off power. You can copy
files using the included Laptop File Manager utility or the
MS-DOS COPY command, or you can set up a batch file to do
it automatically. Unlike a normal disk, a RAM disk does not
require formatting before use.
To set up a RAM disk, include the following line in your
CONFIG.SYS file:
DEVICE=C:\DOS\RAMDRIVE.SYS [size]
Specify the size in kilobytes. The minimum size is 16 KB,
and the default value is 64 KB.
Several other options are available for setting up a RAM
disk. Refer to your BatteryPro & Productivity Software
User’s Manual for details.
The RAM disk is given the drive letter that follows the last
drive letter being used by your system. For example:
F-8 Configuring Memory
Memory Device Drivers
❑
If your hard drive is configured as drive C, the RAM
disk is drive D.
❑
If your hard drive is drive C and your hard drive is
drive D, the RAM disk is drive E.
SMARTDRV
SMARTDRV is a disk-caching program that reduces the time
it takes your computer to read data from the hard disk.
When SMARTDRV is installed, information from the hard
disk is temporarily stored in a cache in Extended or
Expanded memory. When needed, the data can be accessed
by the processor directly from the cache memory. The data
on the hard disk is updated automatically to reflect the
changes in the data stored in the cache.
Installing SMARTDRV .SYS
To install SMARTDRV.SYS in its simplest form, include the
following command line in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file:
C:\WINDOWS\SMARTDRV.EXE
In this form, a 256-KB cache will be set up in Extended
memory.
If you need to specify a particular size for the cache, or if
you want the cache to be in Expanded memory, refer to
your MS-DOS and Windows manuals.
Configuring Memory F-9
G
Connector Pin Assignments
1
RS-232C Connector
5
6
9
Nine-Pin RS-232C Serial Connector (Female IBM-AT)
Pin No.
Signal Name
Abbreviation
Direction
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Carrier detect
Receive data
Transmit data
Data terminal ready
Signal ground
Data set ready
Request to send
Clear to send
Ring indicator
CD
RD
TD
DTR
SG
DSR
RTS
CTS
RI
Input
Input
Output
Output
Input
Output
Input
Input
Parallel Connector
25-Pin Parallel Printer Connector
Pin No.
Signal Name
1
Strobe
2
Data 0
3
Data 1
4
Data 2
5
Data 3
6
Data 4
7
Data 5
8
Data 6
9
Data 7
10
Acknowledge*
11
Busy
12
Paper Out
13
Select
14
Auto Linefeed*
15
Error*
16
Initialize printer*
17
Select input*
18-25
Ground
*Note: Active Low
Abbreviation
Direction
STROBE–
DATA0
DATA1
DATA2
DATA3
DATA4
DATA5
DATA6
DATA7
ACK–
BUSY
PE
SLCT
AUTO FEED–
PERROR–
INIT–
SLCT IN–
GND
Output
Output
Output
Output
Output
Output
Output
Output
Output
Input
Input
Input
Input
Output
Input
Output
Output
Connector Pin Assignments G-1
Connector Pin Assignments
Connector Pin Assig nment s
15-Pin VGA External
Monitor Connector
Pin No.
Signal Name
Direction
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Red video
Green video
Blue video
Not used
Ground
Red return
Green return
Blue return
Not used
Ground
Not used
Not used
Horizontal sync
Vertical sync
Not used
Output
Output
Output
Input
Input
Input
Output
Output
Note: Monochrome monitors use green video for all video input and ignore
red and blue video.
Six-Pin Mini-Din PS/2 Mouse or
PS/2 Keyboard Connector
Pin No.
Signal Name
Abbreviation
1
2
3
4
5
6
Data
Not used
Ground
+5 volts
clock
Not used
DATA
G-2 Connector Pin Assignments
GND
VCC
CLK
Connector Pin Assignments
15-Pin Micro MIDI/Joy
Connector
Pin Number
Signal Name
1, 8, 9, 15
2
3
4, 5, 12
6
7
10
11
13
14
VCC
DC4
TMRD
GND
TMRC
D5
D6
TMRB
TMRA
D7
9-Pin Serial Port
Connector
Pin
Signal Name
Abbreviation
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Carrier Detect
Receive Data
Transmit Data
Data Terminal Ready
Ground
Data Set Ready
Request to Send
Clear to Send
Ring Indicator
DCD
RXD
TXD
DTR
GND
DSR
RTS
CTS
RI
Connector Pin Assignments G-3
H
Screen Standards
This appendix summarizes the screen standards supported
by your computer’s internal display adapter.
VGA (Video Graphics Array)
The VGA standard supports 640-by-480 pixel monochrome
or 16 of 64 color graphics and 320-by-200 pixel 256-color
graphics. The VGA standard uses an 8-by-16 pixel character
box for text display.
Your computer’s LCD supports VGA by displaying text in an
80-column by 25-line text display with 16 shades of gray
(selectable from 64 shades) in an 8-by-16 pixel character
box in a 640-by-400 pixel area centered on the display.
Your computer also supports color graphics by displaying
colors as 64 shades of gray in two modes:
Resolution: 320-by-200 pixels with 256 shades of gray mapped
into 64 shades
One pixel is converted to a 2 × 2 cell
Display area:
640 × 400
Resolution: 640-by-480 with 64 shades of gray
One pixel is displayed as a 1 × 1 cell
Display area:
640 × 480
Screen Standards H-1
Screen Standards
Screen Sta nda rds
External Monitor Support
Your computer supports all IBM standard VGA video in
addition to 640 x 480, 800-by-600, 1024 x 768, and 1280 x
1024 extended graphics modes on an external monitor.
Many extended text modes are also supported.
n
Note: Operating the LCD in high-resolution modes
(800 x 600, 1024 x 768, or 1280 x 1024) or operating the
computer in SimulScan mode requires the computer to use
more power than the Battery Pack can supply; use the AC
Adapter to supply the additional power required.
c
Caution: Do not operate the LCD in SimulScan mode
with a low battery. Damage to the LCD may occur.
H-2 Screen Standards
Screen Standards
Extended Modes Supported
The following table lists the supported extended modes.
Extended Modes
Mode
(hex)
Colors
Graphics
Text
Resolution Resolution
(Char x
Row)
2e
256/256K 640x480
30
256/256K 800x600
37
16/256K 1024x768
52
16/256K
54
16/256K
64,6a 16/256K
800x600
6Ci
16/256K 1280x 1024
132x60
132x25
160x64
DotClk
MHz
Horizontal
Frequency
Vertical
Frequency
Notes
25
40
44.9
40
40
40
65
31.5
37.8
35.5
31.5
31.5
37.8
48
60
60
87
60
60
53
87
1,4,5
2,5
2,3,5,7
1,5
1,5
2,6
Notes:
1. All PS/2 compatible monitors supporting horizontal sync frequency of 31.5 KHz
2. All Multisync type monitors supporting variable horizontal sync frequencies ranging
from 25.9 KHz to 37.8 KHz
3. Interlaced mode
4. This mode is supported on the LCD, showing 64 gray shades. Simultaneous LCD
and CRT display is supported with the LCD showing 16 gray shades.
5. The extended modes require special software drivers to function correctly. Your
computer comes with an extensive selection of software drivers. Execute INSTALL on the
extended VGA drivers diskette to see information on loading these drivers.
Some applications come with extended mode support. If so, select the computer or
Cirrus Logic driver provided by the application.
6. This is Super VGA compatible mode (SVGA). If SVGA is supported by the
application, this is the mode it will use. Super VGA modes, or other modes
identified as needing a multisync type monitor, do not work with fixed-frequency
monitors. Examples of fixed-frequency monitors are IBM PS/2, 8503, 8512, 8613,
and 8514.
7. Supported only with systems containing 1 MB of video memory
Screen Standards H-3
I
Creating Help Displays
You can custom design your own Help displays to show
information for your own programs or off-the-shelf
applications. You also can add subjects and related
descriptions to the HELP.DAT file created at the factory.
Use an ASCII word processor or editor (such as the MS-DOS
Edit utility) to create and edit the HELP.DAT files or an editor
that creates or “exports” files in ASCII format.
Rules for Creating Help Files
Use the following rules to create your own help files.
❏
: : HELP — must always be the first line in the file,
with the first colon in column 0
❏
: T — precedes the main title for the help display
❏
: C X BF — precedes the colors used for the help
menus, where X selects one of the following menus to
assign a color:
1
2
3
4
5
6
=
=
=
=
=
=
main menu
subject name box
subject description box
error message menu
help menu
print menu
Creating Help Displays I-1
Creating Help Displays
Creating Help Displays
and BF selects the menu color, using B for background
color and F for foreground color in hexadecimal. Colors are
defined as follows:
0 = black
1 = blue
2 = green
3 = cyan
4 = red
5 = magenta
6 = brown
7 = light gray (white)
8 = dark gray
9 = light blue
a = light green
b = light cyan
c = light red
d = light magenta
e = yellow
f = bright white
For example, the string : C 1 97 sets the main menu
(1) background to light blue (9h) and the foreground to
light gray (7h). You must start each menu color selection on a new line.
❏
: P — precedes the subject name that appears in the
left subject name box. You can use up to 12 characters. Data you enter on the lines below the : P line
make up the description that appears in the right
subject description box. You can enter any number of
data lines for the description box. The description box
terminates with a : (colon) in column 0 to start another command or an EOF character.
I-2 Creating Help Displays
Creating Help Displays
❏
; — (semicolon) in column 0 precedes a comment line,
which is ignored by the program. You can insert any
number of comment lines for your own information;
comment lines are not displayed in the Help screens.
You also can use the ; (semicolon) character anywhere
on a menu color line after the :C X Y characters when
preceded by a space character; for example,
: C 1 0f ; this is a sample color comment line.
Column length of the subject name box is 13 characters
maximum; the description box is 52 characters maximum.
Sample Help File
The following figure shows a sample help subject entry,
with comment lines explaining the command lines.
Creating Help Displays I-3
Creating Help Displays
::HELP
;—————————————————————————
; the line above must be the first line in the file
;—————————————————————————
; the following line is the Help menu main title
;———————————————————————:T My Help Display, Version 1.0
;————————————————————————; the following three lines set the colors for the main menu
; and the subject and description boxes
;————————————————————————:C 1 0f ; sets main menu to bright white on black
:C 2 f0 ; sets subject box to black on bright white
:C 3 87 ; sets description box to dk gray on lt gray
;—————————————————————————; you can insert a character counter like the following to
; help you keep lines for the description box to the 52; character maximum
——————————————————————————
;
10
20
30
40
50
;1234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012
;——————————————————————————
; the following lines list the subject box entry ; and the
; description box entry; the subject name is limited to 13
; characters and the description box is 52 characters
; maximum
;—————————————————————————:PSubject Name
The words “Subject Name” will appear in the
left-hand subject name box on the displayed Help
menu and this explanation, whose first line is
indented three characters, will appear in the
right-hand subject description box.
If more than one page is required to complete
the description, the program will automatically
adjust for additional pages.
;—————————————————————————; the following lines are additional entries in the Help file
;—————————————————————————:PEntry No. 2
Entry number 2 will display next on the Help
display.
:PEntry No. 3
Entry number 3 will display next on the Help
display.
:PEtc.
Etc.
;—————————————————————————; the end-of-file command depends on your word
; processor or editor; no particular command is
; necessary
;——————————————————————————
I-4 Creating Help Displays
Creating Help Displays
Naming Your Help File
You can give your help display data file any name and extension you want—except HELP.DAT which is already in use
in the UTILS directory. For example, you could name your
Help display data file MYFILE.HLP. Then when you want to
load your Help display, at the MS-DOS C:\> prompt type
HELP MYFILE.HLP
and press ENTER.
If you type only HELP, without specifying a data file, the program searches first for the default data file HELP.DAT in the
current directory; then it searches through all directories
specified in the PATH environment variable defined in your
AUTOEXEC.BAT file. The program uses the same search technique if you type only a filename. If you type a filename preceded by a \ (backslash), which creates a pathname, the
program searches only for the file specified by the pathname.
Adding Subjects to Existing Help Displays
You can add subjects and descriptions to the existing
HELP.DAT file, stored under the UTILS directory on the hard
disk (drive C). Use your word processor or file editor to insert new subjects and descriptions anywhere in the file, following the rules outlined previously in this appendix.
Note: Be sure to save the file back to disk in ASCII format,
not your word processor’s particular format.
Creating Help Displays I-5
Glossary
This glossary explains many of the terms found in this
manual as well as other computer-related terms.
access — The ability to obtain data from or place data into
internal memory, a floppy, or the hard drive.
access shutter — A metal cover on a floppy that slides open
to allow the computer to read or write data.
adapter — A device that connects an option to the
computer.
application program — A program that instructs the
operating system to perform specific tasks by using either
off-the-shelf routines, such as word-processing, or
programming languages such as BASIC that allow you to
design your own programs.
archiving — The process of storing back-up copies of data
files in a specific location.
ASCII — An acronym for the American Standard Code for
Information Interchange; an agreed-upon standard for the
assignment of numeric values to letters, digits, punctuation
marks, and control codes. The computer processes only
numbers even though characters, letters, and graphic
symbols appear on the screen. The ASCII list is a set of
numeric values for the most frequently used characters.
The computer converts these numeric values to their binary
equivalents.
asynchronous communications software — The software
used to communicate with a subscription information
service, send or receive electronic mail, or process data
using a remote computer.
Glossary 1
Glossary
Glossary
backlight — A feature that allows you to control
background brightness for better readability.
backing up — Duplicating a program or file onto a separate
storage medium so that a copy will be preserved against
possible loss or damage to the original.
backup — A duplicate copy of information or programs;
usually stored on a diskette and kept in a separate location
in case the original is lost or damaged.
BASIC — An acronym for Beginner’s All-purpose Symbolic
Instruction Code; a programming language widely used
because many of its commands resemble everyday
language.
battery, battery pack — An electrical power storage device
that can be installed in, or affixed to, your computer to
provide electrical power.
baud — A signal element change per second. If a signal
element change has only one bit, baud equals bits per
second.
binary — A system of numbering that uses patterns of only
zero’s and one’s. Each item of information, whether a letter,
graphic symbol, or an instruction, is converted to a binary
number before it is processed by your computer.
BIOS — An acronym for Basic Input-Output System;
instructions stored in read-only memory (ROM) at the
factory that check hardware components and load the
computer operating system (MS-DOS, for example) into the
computer when you boot it.
bit — A binary digit (0 or 1); the smallest unit of
information used by your computer.
2 Glossary
Glossary
bits per second — The speed at which your computer
receives or sends data to a device such as a modem or
serial printer.
boot — To start your computer; also called start-up and
power-up.
bps — See bits per second.
brightness control — A control that allows you to adjust the
brightness of the display.
buffer — A portion of the computer’s memory that
temporarily holds information used by a program; for
example, the portion of a document you are working on
while using a word processor.
bug — An error in the hardware or software of your
computer that causes an operation to perform incorrectly.
byte — A grouping of eight binary digits (bits) that your
computer treats as one unit; usually represents one character.
cache — A software device that accumulates copies of
recently used disk sectors in RAM. The application program
can then read these copies without accessing the disk,
thereby increasing performance.
central processing unit (CPU) — The electronic circuits in
your computer where most processing of information takes
place.
Glossary 3
Glossary
character — One of a set of symbols, such as letters,
numerals, or punctuation marks, that can express
information when collectively arranged. Although these
symbols are intelligible to humans, they are not understood
by your computer. For this reason, standardized character
codes consisting of groups of binary digits have been
developed to allow characters to be processed by
computers. In most cases, a character is represented by 8
bits or 1 byte.
character set — A system of codes, such as ASCII, that
assigns a special standardized group of binary digits to
each character.
clock — A timing device that coordinates all internal events
in your computer.
CMOS — An acronym for Complementary Metal Oxide
Semiconductor; a large-scale integration technology that
requires low-power consumption and is, therefore, used for
battery-assisted memory systems.
command — The portion of a computer instruction that
specifies what operation is to be performed.
communications — The electronic transfer of information
between computers or between a terminal and a computer.
An example is sending a data file to another computer by
using telephone lines and a modem.
compiler — A program that translates a language, such as
BASIC, into a language your computer can understand. A
compiler translates the entire program just once.
4 Glossary
Glossary
computer — A combination of a central processing unit
(CPU) and memory designed to process information.
Although a combination of the central processing unit and
memory is defined as a computer, an input device (such as
a keyboard) and an output device (such as a display unit)
are required to make the computer useful.
configure — To adapt software so that it sends the correct
control codes to external devices such as printers. Also
called customize and set up.
connector — A coupling device that allows your computer
to communicate with an external hardware device such as
a printer or another computer.
contrast control — A control that allows you to adjust how
data shows up against the background of the display
screen.
control code — A code that initiates some kind of physical
control action that is not printed (such as line feed and
tab), turns off an external device, or, in combination with
other characters, defines unique commands (for example,
pressing the Ctrl and C keys might tell the computer to
abort a program); a numeric value that instructs the
computer or an external device to perform a specific
instruction.
controller — The electronic circuitry that allows
communication between the computer unit and an external
device.
conventional memory — Internal RAM up to 640 KB,
accessed by MS-DOS directly; also called main memory and
RAM.
coprocessor — An auxiliary processing unit designed to
speed up the processing of certain types of information.
Glossary 5
Glossary
CPU — See central processing unit.
CRT — Abbreviation for cathode ray tube, a common term
for a television-like computer monitor.
CRT adapter — A hardware option that allows you to use a
CRT with your computer.
cursor — A special graphic character on the screen (usually
a block or underline shape, sometimes blinking) that
indicates the next position at which a character will be
entered or deleted from the keyboard.
customize — See configure.
data — Information entered into your computer and then
processed by mathematical and logical operations so that,
ultimately, it can be output in a sensible form. It usually
consists of numerals, letters, or symbols that describe an
object, idea, condition, relationship, or other information.
data base — A collection of related information; usually a
large number of data files stored in one or more storage
media.
data file — A grouping of information with common
descriptive attributes. For example, a customer data file
might consist of basic customer information. Each file
might represent one customer.
data processing — The input, storage, manipulation, and
dissemination of information using sequences of
mathematical and logical operations.
default value — A value that your computer assumes as a
response to a prompt, unless instructed otherwise.
6 Glossary
Glossary
device driver — The small programs used to control
external devices or to run other programs. A device driver
directs production, manipulation, and presentation of
appropriate signals by the computer so that the external
device will perform as required.
diagnostics programs — The programs that test the
components of your computer to verify proper operation or
to diagnose problems.
directory — The list of all files, which itself is a file, on your
computer storage medium for easy reference.
disk controller — A device that controls how information is
transferred between the system unit and the hard disk or
floppies.
disk drive — A device that rotates magnetic media and
accesses data by means of a read/write head.
diskette — See floppy.
DOS — The disk operating system, programs that act as
translator between you and your computer; also see
operating system.
expanded memory — The memory that utilizes an area of
the computer memory as a window, through which pages of
data are “passed.”
expansion bus connector — A coupling device that
connects an external device to your computer.
extended memory — The internal RAM above the 1,024 KB
of conventional memory.
Glossary 7
Glossary
external commands — The utility programs of an operating
system (for example, MS-DOS) that enable you to perform
occasional operations such as copying an entire floppy or
partitioning a hard drive.
external devices — The devices, usually for input and
output, connected to your computer to increase its
capability and usefulness. Examples include printers and
modems.
file — A group of organized data assembled for one
particular purpose, considered as one unit, and stored in
permanent offline storage, such as a drive or tape.
filename — A name that distinguishes one file from
another; may consist of alphabetical characters, numeric
characters, or a combination of both.
firmware — The software that is built into the hardware of a
computer and controls the functions of the hardware.
fixed drive — See hard drive.
floppy — A flexible, flat, circular medium that magnetically
records and provides access to stored data. It is divided into
concentric circular tracks and wedge-shaped sectors. The
diskette is sealed in a protective square envelope that is
lined with a soft material that cleans as the diskette
rotates. The cover has several openings and notches to
accommodate the drive.
formatting — The preparation of various types of magnetic
media to accept data. For example, before you can use
floppies, track and sector information must be set for the
controller. After the floppy is formatted, it can be used for
normal input-output and retrieval operations.
8 Glossary
Glossary
function keys — The keys that perform editing functions in
MS-DOS and have application-defined functions at other
times.
graphics — Visual patterns displayed on the screen or
produced on a printer; usually formed by patterns of dots.
hard drive — A combination of a drive mechanism and
permanently sealed storage medium; capable of storing
large amounts of information.
hardware — The physical components of a computer:
central processing unit, internal memory, drives, printer,
display unit, option boards, external devices, etc. Contrast
with software.
hardware options — Any of several devices that can make
your computer more efficient and powerful.
head — A small electromagnetic device that reads, records,
and erases data on a magnetic storage medium, such as a
drive or tape. Also called a read-write head.
hexadecimal — A numbering system that consists of 16
symbols, 0 to 9 and A to F; used by programmers as a
convenient method of expressing binary values.
input — Information that enters the computer.
input/output — An operation that transfers information
from the central processing unit to a device or from a device
to the central processing unit. An example is storing and
retrieving information with a floppy.
integrated circuit — A microscopic grouping of electronic
components and their connections mounted on a small
chip of material, usually silicon.
Glossary 9
Glossary
internal commands — The core program of the operating
system (for example, MS-DOS) that consists of commands
necessary for day-to-day operations, such as copying files.
internal memory — A temporary storage area for
information (programs and data) in binary form.
KB — An abbreviation for 1,024 bytes; used to designate the
memory capacity of a computer or the storage capacity of a
storage device.
keyboard — A device, similar to a typewriter keyboard, that
allows you to communicate with your computer.
kilobyte — 1,024 bytes, abbreviated KB.
LCD — See liquid crystal display.
liquid crystal display (LCD)— A display made of material,
that reflects or transmits changes when an electric field is
applied.
load — To copy information from a storage device, such as
a floppy or a hard drive, into internal memory of the
computer. Also called download.
loop — A series of instructions or one instruction in a
program that is repeated a prescribed number of times,
followed by a branch instruction that exits the program
from the loop.
main directory — The primary directory of a diskette or a
hard drive. Also called a root directory.
MB — An abbreviation for megabyte; used to designate the
memory capacity of a computer or the storage capacity of a
storage device.
megabyte — 1,024 kilobytes.
10 Glossary
Glossary
microprocessor — A central processing unit assembled on a
single silicon integrated-circuit chip.
modem — A device, separate from or installed in your
computer, that allows it to use telephone lines to
communicate with other devices such as computers.
monitor — A view screen to which a computer sends
graphics or text data you can see.
mouse — A device, manipulated by hand, that moves a
cursor or pointer in the same direction as the movement
created when the mouse is moved.
multi media — The combination of sound, graphics,
animation, and/or text.
multitasking — The concurrent execution of two or more
programs.
multiuser system — A system in which the computer and
other external devices are shared in any one of several
arrangements by several people.
operating system — A set of programs that control the
operation of the computer. Typically, the operating system
regulates space allocation, keeps track of files, saves and
retrieves files, and manages other control functions
associated with data storage. Also see DOS.
partitioning — Dividing a hard disk into work areas, usually
approximately 20 MB in size, to accommodate the working
capacity of the operating system.
Glossary 11
Glossary
path, pathname — A sequence of directory names, usually
ending in a filename, all separated by backslashes (\), to
tell your computer where to find particular subdirectories
and files.
port — An input/output connection between external
devices and the computer. The port has both male and
female connectors that contain a specific number of pins.
processing — The calculating, sorting, storing, and
retrieving of information.
program — A list of instructions that tells your computer
how to perform a specific task.
program file — A program stored on a storage medium such
as a floppy or hard disk.
programming language — A set of words, abbreviations, or
symbols that are converted into the binary numbers and
that represent instructions to the computer. Programming
languages enable programmers to write instructions using
words or symbols and avoid the time-consuming task of
entering the long string of 0s and 1s that represent the
numeric language of the computer. A programmer can use
any one of several different programming languages
designed for a particular computer. Some programming
languages have more than one version (for example,
MS-BASIC and GW-BASIC).
RAM — See random access memory.
12 Glossary
Glossary
random-access memory (RAM) — A type of internal memory
used for the temporary storage of information. The contents
of RAM can be altered, allowing information stored there to
be processed. Unlike read-only memory, information in RAM
is usually lost when power is turned off. For this reason,
information in RAM must be saved on a storage device
before the computer is turned off. Also called main memory
and system memory.
read — To access information from a storage device.
read-only memory (ROM) — A type of internal memory that
contains permanent instructions for your computer. The
contents of ROM cannot be altered. For this reason,
essential instructions are permanently stored in ROM.
These instructions, such as those that execute the self-test,
are not lost when the computer is turned off.
resolution — The contrast between the display and the
background on a screen.
ROM — See read-only memory.
self-test — An automatic check the computer performs
every time it is turned on.
set up — See configure.
software — Computer programs, usually supplied on
floppies or on ROM. Contrast with hardware.
system board — An internal circuit board that holds the
integrated circuits for the microprocessor, memory, and
clock in your computer.
working copy — A copy of a floppy that is used in
day-to-day operations while the original is kept in storage.
This term also can mean a floppy that has both an
operating system and an application on it.
Glossary 13
Glossary
working directory — The default directory used by an
application when it first is loaded onto the hard drive.
write — To record information on a storage device.
write-protect tab — A switch on a floppy drive that prevents
recording of data over existing data.
14 Glossary
Index
A
AC adapter, 11-9, 12-18
Alarms
Walarms, 3-6
utility, 9-2
applications, installing, 2-2
audio
input, 12-11
output, 12-12
autoexec.bat file, 2-4
B
backup diskettes, 1-4
balance, 12-13
battery
alarm, 1-23
external charger, 11-2, 11-4,
12-19
LED, 12-14
level, 3-4
pack, 11-2, 11-4, 12-19
release, 12-14
saving techniques 3-5, 5-2
BatteryPro
APM, 3-4
utility, 2-18
baud rate, 1-10
C
CD
assigning a title, 10-9
ejecting, 12-13
entering track titles, 10-10
playing, 10-9
CD-ROM drive specifications, A-2
cache
disk, 5-11
internal, 1-24
caps lock, 1-12
carrying case, 11-2, 11-11
Change Cursor
configure menu, 3-18
menu, 3-14
menu bar, 3-17
file menu, 3-17
selection, 3-14
utility, 3-14
character
repeat rate, 9-10
repeat delay, 9-10
sets, B-1
color
changing, 4-15
palette, 6-2
COMM, 1-20
command.com file, 2-16
config.sys file, 2-7
connector pin assignments, G-1
cover
alarm, 1-23
closed action, 1-16
closed suspend, 5-3
CPU
Index 1
default speed, 1-17
speed, 5-8
speed during execution, 4-12
CRT, 3-9
cursor
block, 1-21
change, 3-6
creating, 3-15
D
data bits, 1-10
date, 1-7, 9-11
date display, 1-7
deleting
songs, 10-10
diagnostics, D-1
directory working, 4-9
diskettes, 1-8, 1-19
diskete drive, A-2
display, 1-21, 2-2, A-1
drivers, 2-18
string, 4-6
Drop N’ Go, 3-6, 3-10
adding/changing applications,
3-10
copying applications, 3-12
deleting applications, 3-12
enable/disable menu, 3-12
icon placement, 3-13
Dynamic Data Exchange, 3-24
E
EPP mode, 1-10
environment, A-5
expanded mode, 1-21
2 Index
G
games, 1-3
game port, 1-11
GETSTAT utility, 9-3
graphic modes extended, 8-2
grayscale, modifying palette, 6-11
H
hard disk, 1-8, 1-19
formatting, D-15
motor timeout, 1-17, 5-7
parking, D-2
specifications, A-2
headphone/microphone, 11-2,
11-12, 12-10
help displays, creating, I-1
I
input/output ports, 5-8
K
keyboard, 2-2, C-1
L
Laptop Manager, 3-6, 4-1
adding applications, 4-5
exiting, 4-3
features, 4-2
keep resident, 4-12
loading, 4-3
prompt after execution, 4-12
Quick Commands, 4-3, 4-5
Laptop File Manager (LFM), 3-6,
7-1
character key commands, 7-15
colors menu, 7-14
execute commands menu, 7-14
function keys, 7-6
getting started, 7-3
loading, 7-4
multiple file operations, 7-28
pathname/options setup
menu, 7-13
restoring, 7-30
LCD
brightness control, 5-9
palette, 1-22
power, 1-17, 5-8
LM_SETUP, 4-16
M
memory, 2-3, A-1
configuring, F-1
drivers, F-5
installing, 11-6
ramdrive.sys, 9-6, F-8
standard, 1-13
upgrade, 2-3, 11-2, 11-6
menu
testing, 4-13
microphone/headphone, 11-2,
11-12, 12-10
MIDI
connection, 11-3, A-4
Mapper, 3-8
mix, 12-13
monitor
advanced operations, 8-12
external, A-1
installing, 11-14
supported, 11-14
troubleshooting, 8-16
type, 1-22
mouse
drivers, 2-18
MS-DOS
closing applications, 3-7
DOSnotes, 3-5
restoring files, 2-16
multiple files
copying, 7-29
operations, 7-29
N
notebook
docking, 12-6
undocking, 12-8
num lock, 1-12
numeric keypad, 11-2, 11-10
O
options, A-5
notebook, 11-1
portable CD-ROM docking
system, 12-15
P
PAL utility, 6-3
PALSET utility, 6-11
palette, 4-2
changing, 6-3
changing shades, 6-3
color, 4-10, 6-2
LCD, 1-22
selecting, 6-4
User, 1-22
utilities, 6-1
viewing, 6-4
Index 3
panel, 3-9
parallel port, 1-10
parity, 1-10
parameter
activity monitoring, 1-19
date and time, 1-7
disk drive, 1-8
input/output, 1-9
keyboard, 1-12
memory, 1-13
power management, 1-14
power savings, 1-15
screen, 1-21
string, 4-8
system configuration, 1-23
password, 2-11, 4-10
changing, 2-12
entering, 2-12
installing, 2-12
protection, 4-2
removing, 2-12
required, 4-9
Password utility, 2-11
loading, 2-11
pathname program, 4-7
PCMCIA, 1-3, 1-11
drivers, 2-18
information, 3-7
options, 11-2, 11-5
slots, A-3
playing CDs, 10-9
play lists, creating and saving,
10-9
4 Index
Pocket CD, 10-9
cueing, 10-10
quitting, 10-10
Pocket Mixer, 10-7
configuration, 10-7
starting, 10-7
Pocket Recorder, 10-3
zoom, 10-4
pointing device, 1-19, 2-2
Port, 1-9
input/output, 5-8
MIDI, A-4
printer, A-3
PS/2, A-3
Portable CD-ROM Docking
System, 11-2, 12-1
controls, 12-13
features, 12-2
options, 12-5
using, 12-10
power
advanced OS, 1-17
consumption values, E-1
icon, 3-7
level, 1-18
management, 1-14
savings, 1-15, 4-11, 5-2
switch, 12-13
power saving
configuration, 5-7
levels, 5-5
real time, 5-5
power saving utilities, 5-1
printers, 11-3, 11-13, A-3
processing speed, 2-3
PS/2 port, 1-11, A-3
Q
Quick Boot, 1-24
Quick Commands, 4-3, 4-4, 4-5
exiting, 4-13
R
RAMDRIVE.sys file, 9-6, F-8
RPAL, 6-5
adding to autoexec.bat, 6-10
installing, 6-6
saving data file, 6-9
switches, 6-6
using, 6-8
recording
without a microphone, 10-7
using VU meters, 10-8
repeat rate, 1-12
reverse, 1-21
S
Scroll Lock, 1-12
SCSI, 1-3
bios, 1-11
cables, 11-3, 11-13
connections, A-3
drivers, 2-18
hard drive enabler kit, 12-15
screen, background, 4-11
SETCMOS, 9-7
command, 9-7
restoring factory default, 9-8
saving, 9-9
SETKEY utility, 9-10
Setpower Utility, 5-10
setting up a non MS-DOS
environment, 2-15
Setup, 2-15
defining parameters, 1-6
disk-based, 1-4
ROM-based, 1-5
Windows-based, 1-6
shadow ROM, 1-13
shock, A-5
SIMUL, 3-9
smartdrv.exe file, 5-11, F-9
sound, 10-1, A-5
compressing files, 10-6
record/playback, 10-6, 10-7
Sound Mapper, 3-7
speaker,
multimedia, 1-24
standard, 1-23
Speed utility, 2-3, 5-12
switch, 5-12
using, 5-12
Standard Comm, 1-9
standby, 5-4
Startup, 1-2
menu, 1-3
procedure, 1-2
stop bits, 1-10
Super Shutdown, 3-7, 3-19
application setup, 3-24, 3-25
exiting, 3-22
Index 5
icon, 3-21
options, 3-20
passwords, 3-21
scheduling, 3-26
suspend/standby modes, 5-3
auto, 5-4
cover closed, 5-3
manual, 5-4
.sys files, 2-16, 2-17
system
backup diskettes, 1-4
maintenance, 1-3, 1-4
T
text
mode, 8-4
time, 1-7
timeout
action, 1-15
interval, 1-15
V
VGA external monitor utilities, 8-1
VGA.exe, 8-9
VU meters, 10-8
Vibration, A-5
Video, 3-9
6 Index
installation, 8-7
modes, 8-14
programming, 8-12
RAM, A-1
software, 8-8
standards, 8-5, 8-6, 8-13, H-1
Volume
adjusting, 10-10
control, 12-13
W
Wbattery, 3-4
Wakeup
action, 1-16
interval, 1-16
Waveform
changing effects, 10-3
editing, 10-4
playing, 10-5
recording, 10-5
using OLE with, 10-6
Windows
restoring, 2-18
utilities, 3-3
Windows for Workgroups, 1-3
Printed in U.S.A.