Timer/Counter/
Analyzers
PM6680B, PM6681, PM6681R, PM6685 & PM6685R
Programming Manual
All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is
prohibited without written consent of the copyright owner.
TimeView is a trademark of Pendulum Instruments AB.
FLUKE is a trademark of Fluke Corporation.
TimeView uses the SPAWNO routines by Ralf Brown to minimize
memory use while shelling to DOS and running other programs.
Pendulum Instruments AB - Sweden - 2000
II
Table of Contents
1 Getting Started
‘C’ for National Instruments PC-IIA
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
Finding Your Way Through This Manual . . 1-2
Manual Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Setting Up the Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Interface Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
1. Limit Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
2. REAL Data Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
3. Frequency Profiling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17
4. Fast Sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19
6. Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
2 Bus Commands for the
Benchtop User
5 Instrument Model
Default settings (after *RST). . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Measurement Function Block . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Other Subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Order of Execution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
MEASurement Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
3 Introduction to SCPI
What is SCPI? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
How does SCPI Work in the Instrument? . 3-4
Program and Response Messages . . . . . . 3-8
Command Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Macros. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15
Status Reporting System. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18
Error Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-19
Initialization and Resetting. . . . . . . . . . . . 3-21
6 Using the Subsystems
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Calculate Subsystem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
Calibration Subsystem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
Configure Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
Format Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
Time Stamp Readout Format . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
Input Subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
Measurement Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
Output Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12
Sense Command Subsystems . . . . . . . . 6-14
Status Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-15
Trigger/Arming Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . 6-30
4 Programming Examples
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
GW-Basic for National Instruments
PC-IIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Setting up the interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
1. Limit Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
3. Frequency Profiling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
4. Fast Sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
5. Status Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
6. Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
7 How to Measure Fast
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
Rough Trigger Subsystem Description . . . 7-4
Some Basic Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
Basic Measurement Method . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7
4822 872 20081
August 2000
III
General Speed Improvements. . . . . . . . . . 7-8
40000 measure- ments/second . . . . . . . . 7-11
Supervising a Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-12
Speed Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-17
Diagnostics Subsystem . . . . . . . . 9-29
:DIAGnostic:CALibration:INPut[1|2]:HYSTeresi
s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-30
Display Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-31
:DISPlay :ENABle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-32
8 Error Messages
Fetch Function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-33
9 Command Reference
:FETCh? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-34
:FETCh :ARRay?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-35
Abort. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
Format Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-37
:ABORt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
:FORMat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-38
:FORMat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-38
:FORMat :FIXed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-39
:FORMat :SREGister . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-39
:FORMat :TINFormation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-40
Arming Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
:ARM :COUNt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
:ARM :DELay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
:ARM :ECOunt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
:ARM :LAYer2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
:ARM :LAYer2 :SOURce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
:ARM :SLOPe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9
:ARM :SOURce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9
:ARM :STOP :DELay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
:ARM :STOP :ECOunt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
:ARM :STOP :SLOPe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
:ARM :STOP :SOURce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
Initiate Subsystem. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-41
:INITiate :CONTinuous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-42
:INITiate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-42
Input Subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-43
:INPut«[1]|2» :COUPling . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-44
:INPut«[1]|2» :ATTenuation . . . . . . . . . . . 9-44
:INPut :HYSTeresis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-45
:INPut :FILTer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-45
:INPut :HYSTeresis :AUTO . . . . . . . . . . . 9-46
:INPut«[1]|2» :IMPedance . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-47
:INPut«[1]|2» :LEVel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-47
:INPut :LEVel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-48
:INPut :LEVel :AUTO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-49
:INPut :LEVel :AUTO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-50
:INPut«[1]|2|4» :SLOPe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-51
:INPut2:COMMon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-51
Calculate Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . 9-13
:CALCulate :AVERage :COUNt. . . . . . . . 9-14
:CALCulate :AVERage :STATe . . . . . . . . 9-14
:CALCulate :AVERage :TYPE . . . . . . . . . 9-15
:CALCulate :DATA?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-15
:CALCulate :IMMediate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
:CALCulate :LIMit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
:CALCulate :LIMit :FAIL?. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17
:CALCulate :LIMit :LOWer . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17
:CALCulate :LIMit :LOWer :STATe . . . . . 9-18
:CALCulate :LIMit :UPPer . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-18
:CALCulate :LIMit :UPPer :STATe. . . . . . 9-19
:CALCulate :MATH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-20
:CALCulate :MATH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-21
:CALCulate :MATH :STATe. . . . . . . . . . . 9-21
:CALCulate :STATe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-22
Measurement Function . . . . . . . . . 9-53
:MEASure :<Measuring Function>? . . . . 9-56
:MEASure :ARRay :<Measuring Function>?
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-57
:MEASure:MEMory<N>? . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-58
:MEASure:MEMory? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-58
:MEASure_«:DCYCle/:PDUTycycle» . . . 9-59
EXPLANATIONS OF THE MEASURING
FUNCTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-59
Calibration Subsystem . . . . . . . . . 9-23
:CALibration :INTerpolator :AUTO. . . . . . 9-24
:MEASure :FREQuency?. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-60
:MEASure :FREQuency :BURSt? . . . . . . 9-61
:MEASure :FREQuency :PRF? . . . . . . . . 9-62
:MEASure :FALL :TIME? . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-63
Configure Function . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-25
:CONFigure :<Measuring Function> . . . . 9-26
:CONFigure :ARRay :<Measuring
Function> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-27
IV
:MEASure :FREQuency :RATio?. . . . . . . 9-63
:MEASure [:VOLT] :MAXimum? . . . . . . . 9-64
:MEASure [:VOLT] :MINimum? . . . . . . . . 9-64
:MEASure :NWIDth? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-65
:MEASure :PWIDth? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-65
:MEASure_«:PDUTycycle/ :DCYCle»? . . 9-66
:MEASure_«:NDUTycycle»? . . . . . . . . . . 9-66
:MEASure :PERiod? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-67
:MEASure :PHASe? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-67
:MEASure [:VOLT] :PTPeak? . . . . . . . . . 9-68
:MEASure :RISE :TIME? . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-68
:MEASure :TINTerval? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-69
:MEASure :TOTalize :ACCumulated? . . . 9-70
:CONFigure :TOTalize :CONTinuous . . . 9-71
:MEASure :TOTalize :GATed? . . . . . . . . 9-72
:MEASure :TOTalize :SSTop?. . . . . . . . . 9-72
:MEASure :TOTalize :TIMed? . . . . . . . . . 9-73
:ROSCillator :SOURce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-96
:SDELay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-96
:TOTalize :GATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-97
:VOLTage:GATed:STATe . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-97
Status Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-99
:STATus :DREGister0? . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-100
:STATus :DREGister0 :ENABle. . . . . . . 9-100
:STATus :OPERation :CONDition? . . . . 9-101
:STATus :OPERation :ENABle . . . . . . . 9-102
:STATus:OPERation? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-103
:STATus :PRESet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-103
:STATus :QUEStionable :CONDition?. . 9-104
:STATus :QUEStionable? . . . . . . . . . . . 9-105
:STATus :QUEStionable :ENABle . . . . . 9-105
System Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . 9-107
:SYSTem :COMMunicate: GPIB: ADDRess
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-108
:SYSTem :ERRor?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-108
:SYSTem :PRESet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-109
:SYSTem :SDETect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-109
:SYSTem :SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-110
:SYSTem :TIME :ELAPsed? . . . . . . . . . 9-110
:SYSTem :TOUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-111
:SYSTem :TOUT :TIME. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-111
:SYSTem :UNPRotect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-112
:SYSTem :VERSion?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-112
Memory Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . 9-75
:MEMory :DELete :MACRo . . . . . . . . . . . 9-76
:MEMory :FREE :SENSe?. . . . . . . . . . . . 9-76
:MEMory :FREE :MACRo? . . . . . . . . . . . 9-77
:MEMory :NSTates? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-77
Output Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-79
:OUTPut. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-80
:OUTPut :SCALe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-80
Read Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-81
Test Subsystem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-113
:READ? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-82
:READ:ARRay? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-83
:TEST:CHECk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-114
:TEST :SELect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-114
Sense Command Subsystem . . . . 9-85
Trigger Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . 9-115
:ACQuisition :APERture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-87
:ACQuisition :APERture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-87
:ACQuisition :HOFF: ECOunt . . . . . . . . . 9-88
:ACQuisition :HOFF. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-88
:ACQuisition :HOFF :TIME . . . . . . . . . . . 9-89
:ACQuisition :HOFF :MODE . . . . . . . . . . 9-89
:ACQuisition :RESolution. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-90
:ACQuisition :RESolution. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-90
:AVERage :MODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-91
:AVERage :COUNt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-91
:FREQuency :RANGe :LOWer . . . . . . . . 9-92
:AVERage :STATe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-92
:FUNCtion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-93
:INTernal :FORMat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-95
:TRIGger:COUNt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-116
Common Commands . . . . . . . . . 9-117
∗CLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-118
∗DMC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-119
∗EMC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-120
∗ESE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-121
∗ESR? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-122
∗GMC? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-122
∗IDN?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-123
∗LMC? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-123
∗OPC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-124
∗LRN? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-124
V
∗OPC? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-125
∗OPT? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-125
∗PSC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-126
∗PMC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-126
∗PUD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-127
∗RCL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-127
∗RMC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-128
∗RST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-128
∗SAV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-129
∗SRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-130
∗STB? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-131
∗TRG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-131
*TST? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-132
∗WAI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-132
10 Index
VI
Chapter 1
Getting Started
Getting Started
Finding Your Way Through This Manual
You should use this Programming The ‘Programmers Reference’ SecManual
together
with
the tion of this manual contains:
PM6680B/1/5 Operators Manual.
That manual contains specifications – Chapter 5, Instrument Model explains how the instrument looks
for the counter and explanations of
from the bus. This instrument is
the possibilities and limitations of the
not quite the same as the one used
different measuring functions.
from the front panel.
Sections
– Chapter 6 Using the Subsystems
explains more about each subsysThe chapters in this manual are ditem.
vided into three sections aimed at different levels of reader knowledge.
– Chapter 7, How to Measure Fast
is a set of measuring situations
The ‘General’ Section, which can be
which the user is often confronted
disregarded by the users who know
with when programming a counter.
the IEEE-488 and SCPI standards:
This chapter also contains infor– Chapter 2 Bus Commands for the
mation about how to use the more
Benchtop User gives bus comcomplex subsystem.
mands for the front panel keys.
– Chapter 8, Error Messages con– Chapter 3 Introduction to SCPI
tains a list of all error messages
explains syntax data formats, stathat can be generated during bus
tus reporting, etc.
control.
The Practical Section of this manual – Chapter 9, Command Reference,
contains:
This chapter gives complete information on all commands. The sub– Chapter 4, Programming Examsystems and commands are sorted
ples, with examples of typical proalphabetically.
grams for a wide variety of applications. These programs are writIndex
ten in GW-basic and C.
You can also use the index to get an
overview of the commands. The index is also useful when looking for
additional information on the command you are currently working with.
1-2
Getting Started
Manual
Conventions
Syntax Specification Form
This manual uses the EBNF (Extended
Backus-Naur Form) notation for describing syntax. This notation uses the following types of symbols:
n Printable Characters:
Printable characters such as Command
headers, etc., are printed just as they are,
e.g. period means that you should type
the word PERIOD.
The following printable characters have a
special meaning and will only be used in
that meaning: # ‘ “ () : ; *
Read Chapter 3’ Introduction to SCPI’
for more information.
n Non-printable Characters:
Two non-printable characters are used:
8
indicates the space character
(ASCII code 32).
n Alternative Expressions Giving
Different Result:
Alternative expressions giving different
results are separated by |. For example,
On|Off means that the function may be
switched on or off.
n Grouping: « »
Example:
FORMat8«ASCII|REAL»
specifies the command header FORMat
followed by a space character and either
ASCII or REAL.
n Optionality: [ ]
An expression placed within [ ] is optional.
Example: [:VOLT]:FREQuency
means that the command FREQuency
may or may not be preceded by :VOLT.
n Repetition: { }
An expression placed within { } can be
repeated zero or more times.
n Equality: =
_ indicates the new line character
Equality is specified with =
Example: <Separator>= ,
n Specified Expressions: < >
Mnemonic Conventions
Symbols and expressions that are further
specified elsewhere in this manual are
placed between the <> signs.
For example <Dec. data.>. The following
explanation is found on the same page:
“Where <Dec. data> is a four-digit number between 0.1 and 8*10-9.
n Truncation Rules
(ASCII code 10).
All commands can be truncated to
shortforms. The truncation rules are as
follows:
– The shortform is the first four characters of
the command.
– If the fourth character in the command is a
vowel, then the shortform is the first three
characters of the command. This rule is not
Manual Conventions 1-3
Getting Started
used if the command is only four characters.
– If the last character in the command is a
digit, then this digit is appended to the
shortform.
Examples:
Longform
Shortform
:MEASURE
:MEAS
:NEGATIVE
:NEG
:DREGISTER0
:DREG0
:EXTERNAL4
:EXT4
The shortform is always printed in CAPITALS in this manual: :MEASure, :NEGative, :DREGister0, :EXTernal4 etc.
Setting Up the
Instrument
Setting the GPIB Address
The address switches on the rear panel of
the counter are set to 10 when it is delivered. The address used is displayed when
the instrument is turned on.
If you want to use another bus address,
you can set these switches to any address
between 0 and 30 as shown in the following table.
Switch
Switch
Address Settings Address Settings
0
00000
16
10000
n Example Language
1
00001
17
10001
Small examples are given at various
places in the text. These examples are not
in BASIC or C, nor are they written for
any specific controller. They only contain
the characters you should send to the
counter and the responses that you should
read with the controller.
2
00010
18
10010
3
00011
19
10011
4
00100
20
10100
5
00101
21
10101
6
00110
22
10110
Example:
7
00111
23
10111
8
01000
24
11000
SEND→ MEAS:FREQ?
This means that you should program the
controller so that it addresses the counter
and outputs this string on the GPIB.
9
01001
25
11001
10
01010
26
11010
READ← 1.234567890E6
11
01011
27
11011
This means that you should program the
controller so that it can receive this data
from the GPIB, then address the counter
and read the data.
12
01100
28
11100
13
01101
29
11101
14
01110
30
11110
15
01111
1-4 Setting Up the Instrument
Getting Started
The address can also be set via a GPIB
command or from the AUX MENU on
the PM6680B/1/5. The set address is
stored in nonvolatile memory and remains until you change it.
Power-on
When turned on, the counter starts with
the setting it had when turned off.
n Summary
Description,
Code
Source handshake,
SH1
Acceptor handshake,
AH1
Control function,
C0
Talker Function,
T6
Listener function,
L4
n Standby
Service request,
SR1
When the counter is in REMOTE mode,
you cannot switch it off. You must first
enable Local control by pressing LOCAL.
Remote/local function,
RL1
Parallel poll,
PP0
Device clear function,
DC1
Testing the Bus
Device trigger function,
DT1
Bus drivers,
E2
To test that the instrument is operational
via the bus, use *IDN? to identify the instrument and *OPT? to identify which
options are installed. (See ‘System Subsystem’ , *IDN? and *OPT?)
n SH1 and AH1
These simply mean that the counter can
exchange data with other instruments or a
controller using the bus handshake lines:
DAV, NRFD, NADC.
Interface Functions
n Control Function, C0
What can I do with the Bus?
The counter does not function as a controller.
All the capabilities of the interface for the
PM6680B-series are explained below.
n Talker Function, T6
The counter can send responses and the
results of its measurements to other devices or to the controller. T6 means that it
has the following functions:
– Basic talker.
– No talker only.
– It can send out a status byte as response to
a serial poll from the controller.
– Automatic un-addressing as a talker when
it is addressed as a listener.
Interface Functions 1-5
Getting Started
n Listener Function, L4
The counter can receive programming instructions from the controller. L4 means
that it has the following functions:
– Basic listener.
– No listen only.
– Automatic un-addressing as listener when
addressed as a talker.
n
Service Request, SR1
The counter can call for attention from
the controller, e.g., when a measurement
is completed and a result is available.
n Remote/Local, RL1
You can control the counter manually (locally) from the front panel or remotely
from the controller. The LLO, lo-
1-6 Interface Functions
cal-lock-out function, can disable the LOCAL button on the front panel.
n Parallel Poll, PP0
The counter does not have any parallel
poll facility.
n Device Clear, DC1
The controller can reset the counter via
interface message DCL (Device clear) or
SDC (Selective Device Clear).
n Device Trigger, DT1
You can start a new measurement from
the controller via interface message GET
(Group Execute Trigger).
n Bus Drivers, E2
The GPIB interface has tri-state bus drivers.
Chapter 2
Bus Commands for
the Benchtop User
Bus Commands for the Benchtop User
:INP:FILT8ON|OFF
:INP:IMP850|1E6
:INP:SLOP8POS|NEG
Switches on or off
the 100kHz LP-filter
Sets the input impedance 50Ω or 1MΩ
Positive or negative trigger slope
:INP:ATT81|10
:INP:COUP8AC|DC
:INP:LEV8<level>
Attenuation 1X
or 10X
Level can be set to between
–5.1 to + 5.1 V when attenuator is set to 1X, and
–51 to + 51 V when attenuator is set to 10X
P M 6 6 8 1 R
F R E Q U E N C Y R E F E R E N C E /C O U N T E R /C A L IB R A T O R
5
SWAP AB
Not used via the bus, you address the input you want to
measure on directly
:INP2:SLOP_POS|NEG
R E F
A D J
L O C A L
P R E S E T
U N L O C K /
S T A N D B Y
E X T
R E F
F IL T E R
O N
1 X / 1 0 X
IN P U T A
5 0
/ 1 M
A C / D C
/
A
S W A P
T R IG G E R
S E T A
A U T O
/
B
L E V E L
S E T B
IN P U T B
5 0
/ 1 M
A C / D C
C O M
C H E C K
A
1 X / 1 0 X
T O T
S T /S T O P
:INP:LEV:AUTO8ON|OFF|ONCE
O N
S E T
:INP2:ATT81|10
:INP2:LEV:AUTO8ON|OFF|ONCE
Note that AUTO is selected individually for A and B inputs
:INP2:COM8MON|OFF
:INP2:COUP8AC|DC
:INP2:IMP850|1E6
:INP2:LEV8<level>
2-2 Error Code
H O L D O F F
Bus Commands for the Benchtop User
:DISPL:ENAB8ON|OFF
:ROSC:SOUR8INT|EXT*
:SYST:PRES or *RST
Presets the counter to default
P M 6 6 8 1 R
R E F
A D J
L O C A L
P R E S E T
U N L O C K /
S T A N D B Y
E X T
R E F
F IL T E R
O N
1 X / 1 0 X
F R E Q U E N C Y R E F E R E N C E /C O U N T E R /C A L IB R A T O R
IN P U T A
5 0
/ 1 M
A C / D C
/
A
S W A P
/
B
T R IG G E R L E V E L
S E T A
A U T O
S E T B
IN P U T B
5 0
/ 1 M
A C / D C
C O M
A
1 X / 1 0 X
C H E C K
T O T
S T /S T O P
5 0
H O L D O F F
O N
S E T
:TEST:CHEC8ON|OFF
:TOT:GAT8ON|OFF*
:ACQ:HOFF8ON|OFF*
:ACQ:HOFF:TIME8<time>
*
These commands are from the
SENSE subsystem
Time can be set between
200E–9 and 1.6 *
Error Code 2-3
Bus Commands for the Benchtop User
:FUNC8"functionc8hannel,channel"
*
:ACQ:APER8<time>
Function and channel is explained on page 2-6
Time can be set to:
0.8E–6, 1.6E–6, 3.2
E–6,
6.4E–6 12.8E–6
and 50E–6 to 400 *
The functions in the auxiliary
menu tree are found in many
different subsystem command
trees, for instance the No. of
samples for statistics is in the
Calculate subsystem
:AVER:STAT8OFF|ON
OFF gives SINGLE
ON
gives
AVER-
R U B ID IU M
5 0 p s /3 0 0 M H z
F U N C T IO N
M E N U
A U X
M E N U
M E A S U R E M E N T
P R O C E S S
T R IG
A
D A T A E N T R Y
8
H O L D
S T A R T A R M
M A T H
7
S IN G L E
R E S T A R T
S T O P A R M
S T A T
4
5
K =
1
2
L =
0
M =
C L E A R
E E
S A V E
R E C A L L
9
6
3
X n
-1
X o
S E L E C T
S E T
T R IG
D C -3 0 0 M H z
B
M A X
1 2 V rm s .5 0
3 5 0 V p . 1 M
*
R E F E R E N C E C L O C K
T IM E
G A T E
O F F
A T O M IC
+ /E N T E R
:READ?
:ARM:SOUR8EXT2|EXT4
:ARM:STOP:SOUR8EXT2|EXT4
Starts
a
measurement and
requests result
Switches on start arming on
input B(2) or E(4).
Switches on stop arming on input
B(2) or E(4).
Switches off start arming
Switches off stop arming
:ARM:SOUR8IMM
:ARM:SLOP8POS|NEG
:ARM:STOP:SOUR8IMM
:ARM:STOP:SLOP8POS|NEG
These commands are from the SENSE subsystem
2-4 Error Code
Bus Commands for the Benchtop User
:CALC:MATH8 (<expression>)
Expression is mathematical expression
containing +, –, *, /, and XOLD
XOLD
in a mathematical expression
gives the same result ar
pressing Xn-1
:CALC:MATH:STAT8ON|OFF
Not used via bus;
enter constants directly in the mathematical expression
:CALC:AVER:TYPE8MAX|MIN|SDEV|MEAN
Selects statistical function
:CALC:AVER:STAT8ON|OFF
R U B ID IU M
5 0 p s /3 0 0 M H z
F U N C T IO N
M E N U
A U X
M E N U
M E A S U R E M E N T
T R IG
A
P R O C E S S
R E F E R E N C E C L O C K
D A T A E N T R Y
8
T IM E
H O L D
S T A R T A R M
M A T H
7
S IN G L E
R E S T A R T
S T O P A R M
S T A T
4
5
K =
1
2
L =
0
M =
C L E A R
E E
S A V E
R E C A L L
G A T E
O F F
A T O M IC
9
6
3
X n
-1
X o
S E L E C T
S E T
T R IG
D C -3 0 0 M H z
B
M A X
1 2 V rm s .5 0
3 5 0 V p . 1 M
*SAV8<memory location>
Memory location can be any No.
between 0 and 19
+ /E N T E R
*RCL8<memory location>
Error Code 2-5
Bus Commands for the Benchtop User
:FUNC8"FREQ:RAT81,2"
:FUNC8"FREQ:RAT83,2"
:FUNC8"PER81"
:FUNC8"PWID81"
:FUNC8"FREQ83"
:FUNC8"TINT81,2"
:FUNC8"FREQ81"
:FUNC8"PHAS81,2"
REMOTE
:FUNC8"RISE|FALL:TIME81"
This segment is
on when the instrument is controlled
from
GPIB. Press LOCAL to interrupt
bus control.
:FUNC8"PDUT81"
:FUNC8"TOT:GAT81,2"
:FUNC8"TOT:SST81,2"
:FUNC8"TOT81,2"
:FUNC8"VOLT:MAX81"
SRQ
:FUNC8"VOLT:MIN81"
This segment is on
when the instrument has
sent a Service Request
via GPIB but the controller has not fetched
the message.
:FUNC8"VOLT:PTP81"
All commands on this page are from the
SENSE subsystem
2-6 Error Code
Bus Commands for the Benchtop User
PM6680B
IN P U T A
9 0 V -2 6 5 V
IN P U T B
P A N E L IN P U T S
A N A L O G
O U T P U T
1 6 8 4 2 1
A D D R E S S
P M 9 6 7 8
P M 9 6 9 0
P M 9 6 9 1
P M 9 6 2 1
P M 9 6 2 4
P M 9 6 2 5
P M 9 6 2 6
P M
P M
_ _
_ _
G A T E
O P E N
R E A R
IN P U T C
O N
O F F
9
9
_ _
_ _
6 2
6 9
_ _
_ _
IE E E 4 8 8 /IE C 6 2 5 IN T E R F A C E
S H 1 , A H 1 , T 5 , L 4 , S R 1 ,
R L 1 , D C 1 , D T 1 , E 2
8 /8 0
7
_
_
1 0 M H z
O U T
R E F E R E N C E
IN
E X T
A R M
O N
B A T T E R Y
O F F
A
H
G
D
P R IM A R Y F U S E
1 .6 A T
IN S ID E
P R O B E
T R IG
C O M P
V IE W G N D L E V E L
O U T
B
A
O U T
M a d e in S w e d e n
B
E
E X T R E F M U L T IP L IE R
N O T IN C L
F A N
N O T IN C L
:OUTP8ON|OFF
OUTP:SCAL8<scaling factor>
:SYST:COMM:GPIB:ADDR8<Address>
<Address> can be between 1 and 30
Input 4
:ROSC:SOUR8INT|EXT *
IN P U T
A
IN P U T
B
IN P U T
C
O P T IO N S
P M 9 6 2 1
P M 9 6 2 4
P M 9 6 2 5
P M 9 6 2 5 B
P R IM A R Y F U S E 1 .6 A T
IN S ID E
N
R U B ID IU M
I
5 M H z
P R O B E
C O M P V IE W
A
B G N D
A
A N A L O G
O U T
B
T R IG
L E V E L
A T O M IC R E F E R E N C E C L O C K O U T P U T S /1 0 M H z 0 .6 V rm s IN 5 0
J
K
L
M
F
G A T E
O P E N
H
E X T
A R M
E
9 0 V -2 6 5 V
IE E E 4 8 8 /IE C 6 2 5 IN T E R F A C E
S H 1 , A H 1 , T 6 , L 4 , S R 1 ,
R L 1 , D C 1 , D T 1 , E 2
L R 3 9 4 8 4
D
R E F E R E N C E
IN
G
PM6681R
*
This command is from the SENSE subsystem
Error Code 2-7
Bus Commands for the Benchtop User
Default settings
(after *RST)
PARAMETER
VALUE/
SETTING
PARAMETER
VALUE/
SETTING
Mathematics
OFF
Sample size in Statistics
100
Sample size in Time Interval Average
100
Input A:
Mathematical constants:
Trigger level
AUTO
Impedance
K= and M=
1
1 MΩ
L=
0
Manual Trigger level
0V
(Controlled by autotrigger)
Manual Attenuator
1X
(Controlled by autotrigger)
Coupling
AC
Trigger slope
Pos
Filter
OFF
Input B:
Miscellaneous:
Function
FREQ A
Timeout
100 ms,
OFF
Measuring time
100 µs
Check
OFF
Single cycle
OFF
Analog output control
OFF
Hold Off
Time, OFF
0V
Memory Protection
(Memory 10 to19)
Not
changed by
reset
1X
Auxiliary functions
All switched
OFF
Coupling
DC
Blank LSD
OFF
Trigger slope
Pos
Common
OFF
Trigger level
AUTO
Impedance
1 MΩ
Manual Trigger level
(Controlled by autotrigger)
Manual Attenuator
(Controlled by autotrigger)
Arming:
Start
OFF
Stop
OFF
Delay
Start, Time,
OFF
Channel
Ext Arm
Input E
Statistics:
Statistics
OFF
2-8 Default settings (after *RST)
Chapter 3
Introduction to SCPI
Introduction to SCPI
What is SCPI?
SCPI
(Standard
Commands
for
Programmable Instruments) is a standardized set of commands used to remotely
control programmable test and measurement instruments. The CNT-8X firmware
contains the SCPI. It defines the syntax
and semantics that the controller must use
to communicate with the instrument.
Compatibility
SCPI provides two types of compatibility: Vertical and horizontal.
:INPut:COUPling AC
AC
This chapter is an overview of SCPI and
shows how SCPI is used in Fluke Frequency Counters and Timer/Counters.
SCPI is based on IEEE-488.2 to which it
owes much of its structure and syntax.
SCPI can, however, be used with any of
the standard interfaces, such as GPIB
(=IEC625/IEEE-488), VXI and RS-232.
Reason for SCPI
For each instrument function, SCPI defines a specific command set. The advantage of SCPI is that programming an
instrument is only function dependent
and no longer instrument dependent. Several different types of instruments, for example an oscilloscope, a counter and a
multimeter, can carry out the same function, such as frequency measurement. If
these instruments are SCPI compatible,
you can use the same commands to measure the frequency on all three instruments, although there may be differences
in accuracy, resolution, speed, etc.
3-2 What is SCPI?
AC
Figure 3-1
Vertical
This means that all instruments of the
same type have i´dentical controls. For
eample, oscilloscopes will have the
same controls for timebase, triggers and
voltage settings
10.1234567890E3
:MEASure:FREQuency?
10E3
10.1E3
Figure 3-2
Hoizontal
This means that instruments of different
types that performs the same functions
have the same commands. For example, a DMM, an oscilloscope, and a
counter can all measure frequency with
the same commands
Introduction to SCPI
Management and
Maintenance of Programs
SCPI simplifies maintenance and management of the programs. Today changes
and additions in a good working program
are hardly possible because of the great
diversity in program messages and instruments. Programs are difficult to understand for anyone other than the original
programmer. After some time even the
programmer may be unable to understand
them.
A programmer with SCPI experience,
however, will understand the meaning
and reasons of a SCPI program, because
of his knowledge of the standard.
Changes, extensions, and additions are
much easier to make in an existing application program. SCPI is a step towards
portability of instrument programming
software and, as a consequence, it allows
the exchange of instruments.
GPIB
Response
Messages
GPIB
Interface
Program
Messages
Input Buffer
Output Queue
Response
Messages
Program
Messages
Parser
Message
Exchange
Control
Response
Formatter
Response Data
Figure 3-3
Parsed
Messages
Execution
Control
Instrument
Functions
Executable
Messages
Overview of the firmware in a SCPI instrument.
What is SCPI? 3-3
Introduction to SCPI
How does SCPI
Work in the
Instrument?
The functions inside an instrument that
control the operation provide SCPI compatibility. Figure 3-3 shows a simplified
logical model of the message flow inside
a SCPI instrument.
When the controller sends a message to a
SCPI instrument, roughly the following
happens:
– The GPIB controller addresses the instrument as listener.
– The GPIB interface function places the
message in the Input Buffer.
Message Exchange Control
protocol
Another important function is the Message Exchange Control, defined by
IEEE 488.2. The Message Exchange
Control protocol specifies the interactions
between the several functional elements
that exist between the GPIB functions
and the device-specific functions, see
Figure 3-3 .
The Message Exchange Control protocol
specifies how the instrument and controller should exchange messages. For example, it specifies exactly how an
instrument shall handle program and response messages that it receives from and
returns to a controller.
Input Buffer, parses (decodes) the message,
and checks for the correct syntax. The instrument reports incorrect syntax by sending command errors via the status system
to the controller. Moreover, the parser will
detect if the controller requires a response.
This is the case when the input message is
a query (command with a “?” appended).
This protocol introduces the idea of commands and queries; queries are program
messages that require the device to send a
response. When the controller does not
read this response, the device will generate a Query Error. On the other hand,
commands will not cause the device to
generate a response. When the controller
tries to read a response anyway, the device then generates a Query Error.
The Parser will transfer the executable
messages to the Execution Control block
in token form (internal codes). The Execution Control block will gather the information required for a device action and
will initiate the requested task at the appropriate time. The instrument reports execution errors via the status system over
the GPIB and places them in the Error
Queue.
The Message Exchange Control protocol
also deals with the order of execution of
program messages. It defines how to respond if Command Errors, Query Errors,
Execution Errors, and Device-Specific errors occur. The protocol demands that the
instrument report any violation of the
IEEE-488.2 rules to the controller, even
when it is the controller that violates
these rules.
– When the controller addresses the instru-
The IEEE 488.2 standard defines a set of
operational states and actions to implement the message exchange protocol.
These are shown in the following table:
– The Parser fetches the message from the
ment as talker, the instrument takes data
from the Output Queue and sends it over
the GPIB to the controller.
3-4 How does SCPI Work in the Instrument?
Introduction to SCPI
State
IDLE
READ
Purpose
Wait for messages
Read and execute messages
QUERY
Store responses to be
sent
SEND
Send responses
REComplete sending reSPONSE
sponses
DONE
Finished sending responses
DEADLOCK The device cannot buffer
more data
Action,
Unterminated,
Reason
The controller attempts to
read the device without
first having sent a complete query message
Interrupted, The device is interrupted
by a new program message before it finishes
sending a response message
message. When the controller violates this
rule, the device will report a query error
(interrupted action).
– The instrument sends only one response
message for each query message. If the
query message resulted in more than one
answer, all answers will be sent in one response message.
n Order of Execution
Deferred Commands
Execution control collects commands until the end of the message, or until it finds
a query or other special command that
forces execution. It then checks that the
setting resulting from the commands is a
valid one: No range limits are exceeded,
no coupled parameters are in conflict, etc.
If this is the case, the commands are executed in the sequence they have been received; otherwise, an execution error is
generated, and the commands are discarded.
This deferred execution guarantees the
following:
– All valid commands received before a
Protocol Requirements
In addition to the above functional elements, which process the data, the message exchange protocol has the following
characteristics:
– The controller must end a program message containing a query with a message
terminator before reading the response
from the device (address the device as
talker). If the controller breaks this rule,
the device will report a query error
(unterminated action).
– The controller must read the response to a
query in a previously (terminated) program
message before sending a new program
query are executed before the query is executed.
– All queries are executed in the order they
are received.
– The order of execution of commands is never
reversed.
n Sequential and Overlapped
Commands
There are two classes of commands: sequential and overlapped commands. All
commands in the CNT-8X counters are
sequential, that is one command finishes
before the next command executes.
How does SCPI Work in the Instrument? 3-5
Introduction to SCPI
Remote Local Protocol
The Counter in Remote Operation
n Definitions
When the Counter is in remote operation,
it disables all its local controls except the
LOCAL key.
Remote Operation
When an instrument operates in remote,
all local controls, except the local key,
are disabled.
Local Operation
An instrument operates in local when it is
not in remote mode as defined above.
Local Lockout
In addition to the remote state, an instrument can be set to remote with ‘local
lockout’. This disables the return-to-local
button. In theory, the state local with local lockout is also possible; then, all local
controls except the return-to-local key
are active.
The Counter in Local Operation
When the Counter is in local operation
the instrument is fully programmable
both from the front panel and from the
bus. If a bus message arrives while a
change is being entered from the front
panel, the front panel entry is interrupted
and the bus message is executed.
We recommend you to use Remote mode
when using counters from the bus. If not,
the counter measures continously and the
initiation command :INIT will have no
effect.
3-6 How does SCPI Work in the Instrument?
Introduction to SCPI
Program and Response Messages
The communication between the system
controller and the SCPI instruments connected to the GPIB takes place through
Program and Response Messages. A Program Message is a sequence of one or
more commands sent from the controller
to an instrument. Conversely, a Response
Message is the data from the instrument
to the controller.
C o n tr o lle r
;
< P ro g ra m
Fig 3-6
M e s s a g e U n it>
Syntax of a terminated
Program Message.
D e v ic e
P ro g ra m
C o m m a n d s
M e s s a g e s
Q u e r ie s
R e s p o n s e M e s s a g e s
Figure 3-4
One or more program message units
(commands) may be sent within a simple
program message, see Fig. 3-6.
Program and response
messages.
The GPIB controller instructs the device
through program messages. The device
will only send responses when explicitly
requested to do so; that is, when the controller sends a query. Queries are recognized by the question mark at the end of
the header, for example: *IDN? (requests
the instrument to send identity data).
The ¿ is the pmt (program message
terminator) and it must be one of the following codes:
¿
NL^END
NL
<dab>^END
Syntax and Style
n Syntax of Program Messages
A command or query is called a program
message unit. A program message unit
consists of a header followed by one or
more parameters, as shown in Figure 3-5 .
+
This is <new line>
code sent concurrently with the
END message on
the GPIB.
This is the <new
line> code.
This is the END
message sent
concurrently with
the last data byte
<dab>.
NL is the same as the ASCII LF
(<line feed> = ASCII 10decimal ).
The END message is sent via the
EOI-line of the GPIB.
The ^ character stands for ‘at the
same time as’.
,
< H e a d e r>
Figure 3-5
< S p a c e >
< P a ra m e te r>
Syntax of a Program
Message Unit.
Program and Response Messages 3-7
Introduction to SCPI
Most controller programming languages
send these terminators automatically, but
allow changing it. So make sure that the
terminator is as above.
Example of a terminated program message:
:INP:IMP
1E6;:ACQ:APER
0.1NL^END
program message unit
terminator
program message unit
This program message consists of two
message units. The unit separator (semicolon) separates message units.
Basically there are two types of commands:
Common Commands
The common command header starts with
the asterisk character (*), for example
*RST.
SCPI Commands
SCPI command headers may consist of
several keywords (mnemonics), separated
by the colon character (:).
R o o t
E n d n o d e
S u b n o d e s
root level keyword, representing the highest hierarchical level in the command
tree.
The keywords following represent
subnodes under the root node. See
‘COMMAND TREE’ on page 3-10 for
more details of this subject.
Forgiving Listening
The syntax specification of a command is
as follows:
ACQuisition:APERture8<numeric value>
Where: ACQ and APER specify the
shortform, and ACQuisition and APERture specify the longform. However,
ACQU or APERT are not allowed and
cause a command error.
In program messages either the long or
the shortform may be used in upper or
lower case letters. You may even mix upper and lower case. There is no semantic
difference between upper and lower case
in program messages. This instrument behavior is called forgiving listening.
For example, an application program may
send the following characters over the
bus:
SEND→ iNp:ImP81E6
The example shows the shortform used in
a mix of upper and lower case
SEND→ Input:Imp81E6
Figure 3-7
The SCPI command tree.
Each keyword in a SCPI command
header represents a node in the SCPI
command tree. The leftmost keyword
(INPut in the previous example) is the
3-8 Program and Response Messages
The example shows the a mix of long and
shortform anda mixe of upper and lower
case.
Introduction to SCPI
Notation Habit in Command Syntax
To clarify the difference between short
and longform, the shortform in a syntax
specification is shown in upper case letters and the remaining part of the
longform in lower case letters.
Notice however, that this does not specify
the use of upper and lower case characters in the message that you actually sent.
Upper and lower case letters, as used in
syntax specifications, are only a notation
convention to ease the distinction between long and shortform.
n Syntax of Response Messages
The response of a SCPI instrument to a
query (response message unit) consists of
one or more parameters (data elements)
as the following syntax diagram shows.
There is no header returned.
,
< P a ra m e te r>
Figure 3-8
Syntax of a Response
Message Unit.
If there are multiple queries in a program
message, the instrument groups the multiple response message units together in
one response message according to the
following syntax:
;
< R e s p o n s M e s s a g e U n it>
Fig 3-9
Syntax of a Terminated
Response Message.
The response message terminator (rmt) is
always NL^END, where:
NL^END is <new line> code (equal to
<line feed> code = ASCII 10 decimal)
sent concurrently with the END message.
The END message is sent by asserting the
EOI line of the GPIB bus.
Responses:
A SCPI instrument always sends its response data in shortform and in capitals.
Example:
You program an instrument with the following command:
SEND→ :ROSCillator:SOURce8EXTernal
Then you send the following query to the
instrument:
SEND→ :ROSCillator:SOURce?
The instrument will return:
READ← EXT
response in shortform and in capitals.
Program and Response Messages 3-9
Introduction to SCPI
Command Tree
Command Trees like the one below are
used to document the SCPI command set
in this manual. The keyword (mnemonic)
on the root level of the command tree is
the name of the subsystem. The following example illustrates the Command
Tree of the INPut1 subsystem.
< H E A D E R >
:IN P u t[1 ]
:IM P e d a n c e
P a ra m e te rs
& < N u m e r ic v a lu e > |M A X |M IN
[:S T A T e ]
+
SEND→ INPut:EVENt:HYSTeresis
Where: INPut is the root node and HYSTeresis is the leaf node.
Each colon in the command header
moves the current path down one level
from the root in the command tree. Once
you reach the leaf node level in the tree,
you can add several leaf nodes without
having to repeat the path from the root
level.
Just follow the rules below:
– Always give the full header path, from the
:F IL T e r
[:L P A S s ]
Figure 3-10
n Example:
& < B o o le a n >
Example of an INPut
subsystem command
tree.
The keywords placed in square
brackets are optional nodes. This
means that you may omit them
from the program message.
Example:
SEND→ INPUT1:FILTER:LPASS
:STATE8ON
is the same as
SEND→ INPUT:FILTER8ON
Moving down the Command
Tree
The command tree shows the paths you
should use for the command syntax. A
single command header begins from the
root level downward to the ‘leaf nodes’
of the command tree. (Leaf nodes are the
last keywords in the command header,
before the parameters.)
3-10 Command Tree
root, for the first command in a new program message.
– For the following commands within the
same program message, omit the header
path and send only the leaf node (without
colon).
You can only do this if the header
path of the new leaf-node is the
same as that of the previous one. If
not, the full header path must be
given starting with a colon.
+
Command header = Header path + leaf
node
– Once you send the pmt (program message
terminator), the first command in a new
program message must start from the root.
n Example:
SEND→ INPut:EVENt:HYSTeresis
MIN;LEVel80.5
Introduction to SCPI
This is the command where:
INPut:EVENt is the header path and
:HYSTeresis is the first leaf-node and
LEVel is the second leaf node because
LEVel is also a leaf-node under the
header path INPut:EVENt.
There is no colon before LEVel!
+
Parameters
Numeric Data
Decimal data are printed as numerical
values throughout this manual. Numeric
values may contain both a decimal point
and an exponent (base 10).
These numerals are often represented as
NRf (NR = NumeRic, f = flexible) format.
n Keywords
In addition to entering decimal data as
numeric values, several keywords can exist as special forms of numeric data, such
as MINimum, MAXimum, DEFault,
STEP, UP, DOWN, NAN (Not A Number), INFinity, NINF (Negative INFinity). The Command Reference chapters
explicitly specify which keywords are allowed by a particular command. Valid
keywords for the CNT-8X counters are
MAXimum and MINimum.
MINimum
This keyword sets a parameter to its minimum value.
MAXimum
This keyword sets a parameter to its maximum value.
The instrument always allows MINimum
and MAXimum as a data element in commands, where the parameter is a numeric
value. MIN and MAX values of a parameter can always be queried.
Example:
SEND→ INP:LEV?8MAX
This query returns the maximum range
value.
n Suffixes
You can use suffixes to express a unit or
multiplier that is associated with the decimal numeric data. Valid suffixes are s
(seconds), ms (milliseconds), mohm
(megaohm), kHz (kilohertz), mV (millivolt).
Example:
SEND→ :SENS:ACQ:APER8100ms
Where: ms is the suffix for the numeric
value 100.
Notice that you may also send ms as MS
or mS. MS does still mean milliseconds,
not Mega Siemens!
Response messages do not have suffixes.
The returned value is always sent using
standard units such as V, S, Hz, unless
you explicitly specify a default unit by a
FORMat command.
Boolean Data
A Boolean parameter specifies a single
binary condition which is either true or
false.
Boolean parameters can be one of the following:
– ON or 1 means condition true.
– OFF or 0 means condition false.
Parameters 3-11
Introduction to SCPI
n Example
Other Data Types
SEND→ :SYST:TOUT8ON or
:SYST:TOUT81
Other data types that can be used for parameters are the following:
This switches timeout monitoring on.
A query, for instance :SYSTem:TOUT?,
will return 1 or 0; never ON or OFF.
– String data: Always enclosed between sin-
Expression Data
– Character data: For this data type, the same
You must enclose expression program
data in parenthesis (). Three possibilities
of expression data are as follows:
– <numeric expression data>
gle or double quotes, for example
“This is a string” or ‘This is a string.’
rules apply as for the command header
mnemonics. For example: POSitive, NEGative, EITHer.
– Non-decimal data: For instance, #H3A for hexa
decimal data.
<parameter list>
– Block data: Used to transfer any 8-bit
– <channel list>
An example of <numeric expression data> is:
(X – 10.7E6) This subtracts a 10.7 MHz
intermediate frequency from the measured result.
coded data. This data starts with a preamble that contains information about the
length of the parameter.
Example:
#218INP:IMP850;SENS810
An example of <parameter list> is: (5,0.02)
This is a list of two parameters; the
first one is 5 and the second one 0.02.
An example of <channel list> is: (@3),(@1)
This specifies channel 3 as the main
channel and channel 1 as the second
channel.
Summary
H e a d e r s
s e p a ra te
d iffe r e n t
c o m p o u n
e p a ra to r
s th e
p a rts o f a
d h e a d e r
S in g le o r d o u b le
q u o te in d ic a te s
s tr in g d a ta
[ : S E N S ] : F U N C
S q u a re b ra c k e ts
in d ic a te s th a t th e
te x t in s id e is
o p tio n a l
S p
s e
h e
fro
3-12 Parameters
" F R E Q : R A T
a c
p a
a d
m
e
ra te s
e rs
d a ta
S e m ic o lo n
s e p a ra te s s e v e ra l
p ro g ra m m e s s a g e s
in a s tr in g
3 , 1 " ; : C A L C : M A T H
C o m m a s e p a ra te s
s e v e r a l d a ta fie ld s
fro m e a c h o th e r
A le a d in g
s h o w s th a
fo llo w in g
c o m m a n d
s ta rts fro m
r o o t le v e l
c o m m a n d
c o lo n
t th e
th e
o f th e
tre e
A q
m a
th a
is r
( X
-
u e s tio n
r k in d ic a te s
t a re s p o n s e
e q u e s te d
2 ) ; : R E A D ?
P a r e n th e s is
in d ic a te s
e x p r e s s io n
d a ta
N e w lin e
e n d s a
m e s s a g e
Introduction to SCPI
Macros
A macro is a single command, that represents one or several other commands, depending on your definition. You can
define 25 macros of 40 characters in the
counter. One macro can address other
macros, but you cannot call a macro from
within itself (recursion). You can use
variable parameters that modify the
macro.
within the language (like BASIC) we recommend that you use block data instead,
and use single quotes as string identifiers
within the macro.
+
When using string data for the
commands in a macro, remember to use a different type of
string data identifiers for strings
within the macro. If the macro
should for instance set the input
slope to positive and select the
period function, you must type:
Use macros to do the following:
“:Inp:slope8pos;:Func8’PER81’”
– Provide a shorthand for complex com-
or
mands.
– Cut down on bus traffic.
Macro Names
You can use both commands and queries
as macro labels. The label cannot be the
same as common commands or queries.
If a macro label is the same as a CNT-8X
command, the counter will execute the
macro when macros are enabled
(*EMC81) and it will execute the
CNT-8X command when macros are disabled (*EMC80).
Data Types within Macros
The commands to be performed by the
macro can be sent both as block and
string data.
String data is the easiest to use since you
don’t have to count the number of characters in the macro. However, there are
some things you must keep in mind:
‘:Inp:slope8pos;:Func8"PER81"’
Define Macro Command
*DMC assigns a sequence of commands
to a macro label. Later when you use the
macro label as a command, the counter
will execute the sequence of commands.
Use the following syntax:
*DMC <macro-label>, <commands>
n Simple Macros
Example:
SEND→ *DMC8‘MyInputSetting’
#255:INP:IMP850;HYST81
;LEV80.55;:INP:HYST:AUTO
80;
This
example
defines
a
macro
MyInputSetting, which sets the impedance
to 50 Ω, sets the sensitivity to 1V, the
trigger level to +0.55V, and switches off
auto sensitivity and auto trigger level.
Both double quote (“) and single quote (‘)
can be used to identify the string data. If
you use a controller language that uses
double quotation marks to define strings
Macros 3-13
Introduction to SCPI
Enabling and Disabling
You can pass arguments (variable param- Macros
n Macros with Arguments
eters) with the macro. Insert a dollar sign
($) followed by a single digit in the range
1 to 9 where you want to insert the parameter. See the example below.
When a macro with defined arguments is
used, the first argument sent will replace
any occurrence of $1 in the definition; the
second argument will replace $2, etc.
Example:
SEND→ *DMC8‘AUTO’,#247
:INP:HYST:AUTO8$1;
:INP:IMP8$2
This example defines a macro AUTO,
which takes two arguments, i.e., auto
«ON|OFF|ONCE» ($1) and impedance
«50|1E6» ($2) .
SEND→ AUTO8OFF,50
Switches off both auto sensitivity and
auto trigger level and sets the input impedance to 50Ω.
Deleting Macros
Use the *PMC (purge macro) command
to delete all macros defined with the
*DMC command. This removes all
macro labels and sequences from the
memory. To delete only one macro in the
memory,
use
the
:MEMory:DELete:MACRo command.
+
You cannot overwrite a macro;
you must delete it before you can
use the same name for a new
macro.
n *EMC Enable Macro Command
When you want to execute a CNT-8X
command or query with the same name
as a defined macro, you need to disable
macro execution. Disabling macros does
not delete stored macros; it just hides
them from execution.
Disabling: *EMC80 disables all macros.
Enabling: *EMC81
n *EMC? Enable Macro Query
Use this query to determine if macros are
enabled.
Response:
1 macros are enabled
0 macros are disabled
How to Execute a Macro
Macros are disabled after *RST, so to be
sure, start by enabling macros with
*EMC 1. Now macros can be executed
by using the macro labels as commands.
n Example:
SEND→ *DMC8‘LIMITMON’,’
:CALC:STAT8ON;
:CALC:LIM:STAT8ON;
:CALC:LIM:LOW:DATA
$1;STAT8ON;
:CALC:LIM:UPP:DATA
$2;STAT8ON’
SEND→ *EMC81
Now sending the command
SEND→ LIMITMON81E6,1.1E6
will switch on the limit monitoring to
alarm between the limits 1 MHz and
1.1 MHz.
3-14 Macros
Introduction to SCPI
Retrieve a Macro
n *LMC? Learn Macro Query
n *GMC? Get Macro Contents
This query gives a response containing
the labels of all the macros stored in the
Timer/Counter.
Query
This query gives a response containing
the definition of the macro you specified
when sending the query.
Example using the above defined
macro:
SEND→ *GMC?8‘LIMITMON’
READ← #292:CALC:STAT
ON;:CALC:LIM:STAT ON;
:CALC:LIM:LOW:DATA
$1;STAT8ON;
:CALC:LIM:UPP:DATA
$2;STAT8ON’
Example:
SEND→ *LMC?
READ←“MYINPSETTING”,"LIMITMON
"
Now there are two macros in memory,
and they have the following labels:
“MYINPSETTING” and “LIMITMON”.
Macros 3-15
Introduction to SCPI
Status Reporting
System
Introduction
You can select some conditions in the
counter that should be reported in the Status Byte Register. You can also select if
some bits in the Status Byte should generate a Service Request (SRQ).
(An SRQ is the instrument’s way to call
the controller for help.)
Status reporting is a method to let the
controller know what the counter is doing. You can ask the counter what status
it is in whenever you want to know.
Read more about the Status Subsystem in
Chapter 6.
Q u e s tio n a b le D a ta R e g is te r
S ta n d a r d E v e n t R e g is te r
C o n d itio n R e g is te r
E v e n t R e g is te r
E n a b le R e g is te r
L o g ic a l O R
D e v ic e R e g is te r 0
O p e r a tio n S ta tu s R e g is te r
C o n d itio n R e g is te r
L o g ic a l O R
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
S e r v ic e R e q u e s t E n a b le
L o g ic a l O R
S R Q
Figure 3-11
m e s s a g e
CNT-8X Status register structure.
3-16 Status Reporting System
0
S ta tu s B y te R e g is te r
Introduction to SCPI
Error Reporting
The counter will place a detected error in
its Error Queue. This queue is a FIFO
(First-In First-Out) buffer. When you
read the queue, the first error will come
out first, the last error last.
If the queue overflows, an overflow message is placed last in the queue, and further errors are thrown away until there is
room in the queue again.
n Detecting Errors in the Queue
Bit 2 in the Status Byte Register shows if
the instrument has detected errors. It is
also possible to enable this bit for Service
Request on the GPIB. This can then interrupt the GPIB controller program when
an error occurs.
0, “No error”
When errors occur and you do not read
these errors, the Error Queue may overflow. Then the instrument will overwrite
the last error in the queue with the following:
–350, “Queue overflow”
If more errors occur, they will be discarded.
n Standardized Error Numbers
The instrument reports four classes of
standardized errors in the Standard Event
Status and in the Error/Event Queue as
shown in the following table:
Range of
Error Numbers
Standard
Event
Register
Command
Error
–100 to
–199
bit 5 - CME
Example:
Execution
Error
bit 4 - EXE
SEND→ :SYSTem:ERRor?
READ← –100,8“Command8Error”
–200 to
–299
Device- specific Error
–300 to
–399
+100 to
+32767
bit 3 - DDE
Query Error
–400 to
–499
bit 2 -QYE
n Read the Error/Event Queue
This is done with the :SYSTem:ERRor?
query.
Error Class
The query returns the error number followed by the error description.
+
Further description of all error
numbers can be found in the Error Messages chapter
If more than one error occurred, the query
will return the error that occurred first.
When you read an error you will also remove it from the queue. You can read the
next error by repeating the query. When
you have read all errors the queue is
empty, and the :SYSTem:ERRor? query
will return:
n Command Error
This error shows that the instrument detected a syntax error.
Error Reporting 3-17
Introduction to SCPI
n Execution Error
This error shows that the instrument has
received a valid program message which
it cannot execute because of some device
specific conditions.
n Device-specific Error
This error shows that the instrument
could not properly complete some device
specific operations.
n Query Error
This error will occur when the Message
Exchange Protocol is violated, for example, when you send a query to the instrument and then send a new command
without first reading the response data
from the previous query. Also, trying to
read data from the instrument without
first sending a query to the instrument
will cause this error.
3-18 Error Reporting
Introduction to SCPI
Initialization and
Resetting
– Change the instrument settings or stored
Reset Strategy
– Interrupt or affect any device operation in
There are three levels of initialization:
– Bus initialization
– Message exchange initialization
– Device initialization
n Bus Initialization
This is the first level of initialization. The
controller program should start with this
which initializes the IEEE-interfaces of
all connected instruments. It puts the
complete system into remote enable
(REN-line active) and the controller
sends the interface clear (IFC) command.
The command or the command sequence
for this initialization is controller and language dependent. Refer to the user manual of the system controller in use.
n Message Exchange Initialization
Device clear is the second level of initialization. It initializes the bus message exchange, but does not affect the device
functions.
Device clear can be signaled either with
DCL to all instruments or SDC (Selective
device-clear) only to the addressed instruments. The instrument action on receiving DCL and SDC is identical, they will
do the following:
–
–
–
–
Clear the input buffer.
Clear the output queue.
The device-clear commands will not do
the following:
data in the instrument.
progress.
– Change the status byte register other than
clearing the MAV bit as a result of clearing
the output queue.
Many older IEEE-instruments,
that are not IEEE-488.2 compatible returned to the power-on default settings when receiving a
device-clear command.
IEEE-488.2 does not allow this.
+
When to use a Device-clear Command
The command is useful to escape from
erroneous conditions without having to
alter the current settings of the instrument. The instrument will then discard
pending commands and will clear responses from the output queue. For example; suppose you are using the Counter
in an automated test equipment system
where the controller program returns to
its main loop on any error condition in
the system or the tested unit. To ensure
that no unread query response remains in
the output queue and that no unparsed
message is in the input buffer, it is wise
to use device-clear. (Such remaining responses and commands could influence
later commands and queries.)
n Device Initialization
The third level of initialization is on the
device level. This means that it concerns
only the addressed instruments.
Reset the parser.
Clear any pending commands.
Initialization and Resetting 3-19
Introduction to SCPI
The *RST Command
Use this command to reset a device. It
initializes the device-specific functions in
the Counter.
The following happens when you use the
*RST command:
– You set the Counter-specific functions to a
known default state. The *RST condition
for each command is given in the command reference chapters.
– You disable macros.
– You set the counter in an idle state (outputs
are disabled), so that it can start new operations.
The *CLS Command
Use this command to clear the status data
structures. See ‘Status Reporting system’
in this chapter.
The following happens when you use the
*CLS command:
– The instrument clears all event registers
summarized in the status byte register.
– It empties all queues, which are summa-
rized in the status byte register, except the
output queue, which is summarized in the
MAV bit.
3-20 Initialization and Resetting
Chapter 4
Programming
Examples
Programming Examples
Introduction
Each program example in this chapter is
written for IBM-PC compatible computers equipped with the National Instruments PC-IIA. In addition to that, many
of the examples are written in both
‘GW-BASIC’ and ‘C’.
Even if you do not have these interface
board or use these computer languages,
look at the examples anyway. They give
you a good insight on how to program the
instrument efficiently.
+
To be able to run these programs
without modification, the address
of your counter must be set to 10.
Example 1. Limit Testing
Example 2. REAL Data Format
Example 3. Frequency Profiling
Example 4. Fast Sampling
Example 5. Status Reporting
Example 6. Statistics, this example is only for
PM6680B and PM6681
4-2 Introduction
Programming Examples
GW-Basic for National
Instruments PC-IIA
Setting up the interface
All these programs start with a declaration containing three lines of setup information
for the interface. This declaration must be merged with the programs prior to running
them. The declaration is printed below, but it is also available as a file on the diskettes
delivered with your interface. The file name is DECL.BAS.
20 CLEAR ,60000! : IBINIT1=60000! : IBINIT2=IBINIT1+3 : BLOAD
“bib.m”,IBINIT1
30 CALL
IBINIT1(IBFIND,IBTRG,IBCLR,IBPCT,IBSIC,IBLOC,IBPPC,IBBNA,
IBONL,IBRSC,IBSRE,IBRSV,IBPAD,IBSAD,IBIST,IBDMA,IBEOS,IBTMO,IBEO
T, IBRDF,IBWRTF,IBTRAP,IBDEV,IBLN)
40 CALL
IBINIT2(IBGTS,IBCAC,IBWAIT,IBPOKE,IBWRT,IBWRTA,IBCMD,IBCMDA,
IBRD,IBRDA,IBSTOP,IBRPP,IBRSP,IBDIAG,IBXTRC,IBRDI,IBWRTI,IBRDIA,
IBWRTIA,IBSTA%,IBERR%,IBCNT%)
GW-Basic for National Instruments PC-IIA, Setting Up the Interface 4-3
Programming Examples
1. Limit Testing
This program uses limit testing to check that the frequency is above a preset value.
50 CNTNAME$ = “DEV10"
60 CALL IBFIND (CNTNAME$, CNT%)
70 ‘
80 ‘
90 ‘ —— Set continuous frequency measurement ——
100 WRT$ = “*RST; *CLS; :FUNC ‘FREQ 1’; :INIT:CONT ON”
110 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
120 ‘
130 ‘ —— Enable limit monitoring, limit 1 MHz ——
140 WRT$ = “:CALC:LIM ON; LIM:UPP 1E6; UPP:STATE ON”
150 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
160 WRT$ = “:STAT:DREG0:ENAB 2; *SRE 1"
170 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
180 ‘
190 ‘ —— Wait until the limit is passed ——
200 PRINT “Waiting for limit to be passed”
210 MASK% = &H800
220 CALL IBWAIT (CNT%, MASK%)
230 ‘
240 ‘ —— Read status and device status register ——
250 CALL IBRSP (CNT%, SPR%)
260 ‘
270 ‘ —— Read frequency ——
280 WRT$ = “READ?”
290 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
300 MSG$ = SPACE$(255)
310 CALL IBRD (CNT%, MSG$)
320 PRINT “Frequency = ”; LEFT$(MSG$, IBCNT%)
330 WRT$ = “:STAT:DREG0:EVEN?”
340 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
350 MSG$ = SPACE$(255)
360 CALL IBRD (CNT%, MSG$)
370 ‘
380 ‘ —— Disable continuous measurement ——
390 WRT$ = “:INIT:CONT OFF”
400 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
410 END
4-4 GW-Basic for National Instruments PC-IIA, Setting Up the Interface
Programming Examples
3. Frequency Profiling
Frequency profiling visualizes frequency variations for a certain time. This program
gives an output file called:
PROFILE.DAT. If this file is imported to a spreadsheet program, for instance Excel,
you can create a graph like the one in the figure below.
Figure 4-1
This figure is the results of frequency profiling on a
sweep generator.
50 ‘
60 OPEN “O”, 1, “PROFILE.DAT”
70 CNTNAME$ = “DEV10"
80 CALL IBFIND (CNTNAME$, CNT%)
90 ‘
100 ‘
110 ‘ —— Enable arming, etc. ——
120 WRT$ = “:TRIG:COUN 1; :ARM:COUN 1; SOUR EXT4"
130 CALL IBWRT(CNT%, WRT$)
140 WRT$ = “:INP:LEV:AUTO ONCE
150 CALL IBWRT(CNT%, WRT$)
160 WRT$ = “:DISP:ENAB OFF; :ACQ:APER 1E-6"
170 CALL IBWRT(CNT%, WRT$)
180 ‘
190 ARMDELAY = .0000002
GW-Basic for National Instruments PC-IIA, Setting Up the Interface 4-5
Programming Examples
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
280
290
300
310
320
330
340
350
360
370
380
390
400
410
420
430
440
450
460
470
‘
‘ ==== CAPTURE PROFILE =====
‘
PRINT “Profiling”
‘
FOR I=0 TO 999
‘ —— Set arming delay time -WRT$ = “:ARM:DEL” + STR$(ARMDELAY)
CALL IBWRT(CNT%, WRT$)
‘
‘ —— Measure and read result -WRT$ = “READ?”
CALL IBWRT(CNT%, WRT$)
MSG$ = SPACE$(255)
CALL IBRD(CNT%, MSG$)
‘
‘ —— Write arming delay time and result to file -PRINT#1, STR$(ARMDELAY), LEFT$(MSG$, INSTR(MSG$,
CHR$(10)))
‘
‘ —— Increase arming delay -ARMDELAY = ARMDELAY + .0000001
NEXT I
‘
WRT$ = “:DISP:ENAB ON”
CALL IBWRT(CNT%, WRT$)
‘
CLOSE 1
END
4-6 GW-Basic for National Instruments PC-IIA, Setting Up the Interface
Programming Examples
4. Fast Sampling
This program makes a quick array measurement and stores the results in the internal
memory of the counter. Then it writes the results to a file called MEAS.DAT. The
measurement results as a function of the samples can be visualized in a spreadsheet
program such as Excel.
50 ‘
60 OPEN “O”, 1, “MEAS.DAT”
70 CNTNAME$ = “DEV10"
80 CALL IBFIND (CNTNAME$, CNT%)
90 ‘
100 ‘
110 ‘ —— Clear status ——
120 WRT$ = “*CLS”
130 CALL IBWRT(CNT%, WRT$)
140 ‘
150 ‘ —— Enable 1000 measurement with maximum speed ——
160 WRT$ = “:TRIG:COUN 1000; :ARM:COUN 1"
170 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
180 WRT$ = “:INP:LEV:AUTO ONCE; :CAL:INT:AUTO OFF”
190 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
200 WRT$ = “:DISP:ENAB OFF; :INT:FORM PACKED”
210 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
220 WRT$ = “:ACQ:APER MIN; :AVER:STAT OFF”
230 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
240 ‘
250 ‘ —— Enable SRQ on operation complete ——
260 WRT$ = “*ESE 1; *SRE 32"
270 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
280 ‘
290 ‘ —— Start measurement ——
300 PRINT “Measuring”
310 WRT$ = “INIT; *OPC”
320 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
330 ‘
340 ‘ —— Wait for operation complete ——
350 MASK = &H800
360 CALL IBWAIT (CNT%, MASK)
370 ‘
380 ‘ —— Read status and event status register ——
390 CALL IBRSP (CNT%, SPR%)
400 WRT$ = “*ESR?”
410 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
420 MSG$ = SPACE$(255)
430 CALL IBRD (CNT%, MSG$)
GW-Basic for National Instruments PC-IIA, Setting Up the Interface 4-7
Programming Examples
440
450
460
470
480
490
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
570
580
590
600
610
620
‘
PRINT “Fetching result”
‘
FOR I=0 TO 999
‘ —— Fetch one result ——
WRT$ = “FETCH?”
CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
MSG$ = SPACE$(255)
CALL IBRD (CNT%, MSG$)
‘
‘ —— Write result to file ——
PRINT#1, I, LEFT$(MSG$, INSTR(MSG$, CHR$(10)))
NEXT I
‘
WRT$ = “:DISP:ENAB ON”
CALL IBWRT(CNT%, WRT$)
‘
CLOSE 1
END
4-8 GW-Basic for National Instruments PC-IIA, Setting Up the Interface
Programming Examples
5. Status Reporting
This program sets up the status reporting for Service Request on ‘Message Available’
and ‘Command’, ‘Execution’, or Query’ errors.
The program reads a command from the controller keyboard and sends it to the counter, then it checks the status byte using Serial Poll. It determines the reason for Service
Request, and reads query responses and error messages.
50 CNTNAME$ = “DEV10"
60 CALL IBFIND (CNTNAME$, CNT%)
70 ‘
80 ‘
90 ‘ —— CLEAR STATUS ——
100 WRT$ = “*cls”
110 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
120 ‘
130 ‘ —— SET EVENT STATUS ENABLE ——
140 ‘ Enable Command Error, Execution Error and Query Error
150 WRT$ = “*ese 52"
160 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
170 ‘
180 ‘ —— SET SERVICE REQUEST ENABLE ——
190 ‘ Enable Service Request on Event Status and Message
Available
200 WRT$ = “*sre 48"
210 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
220 ‘
230 ‘ ======== MAIN LOOP =======================================
240 WHILE 1
250
‘
260
‘ —— ENTER COMMAND STRING AND SEND TO COUNTER ——
270
LINE INPUT “Enter command string (<CR> to end):”, CMD$
280
IF CMD$ = “” GOTO 760
290
CMD$ = CMD$
300
CALL IBWRT (CNT%, CMD$)
310
‘ WAIT for execution
320
FOR I=1 TO 1000
330
CALL IBRSP (CNT%, SPR%)
340
IF SPR% AND 16 THEN GOTO 380
350
NEXT I
360
‘
370
‘ —— READ STATUS BYTE ——
380
IF SPR% <> 0 THEN PRINT “Status byte = ”; SPR%
390
ELSE GOTO 750
400
‘
GW-Basic for National Instruments PC-IIA, Setting Up the Interface 4-9
Programming Examples
410
420
430
440
450
460
470
‘ —— CHECK MESSAGE AVAILABLE BIT ——
WHILE SPR% AND 16
PRINT “ Message available bit set”
MSG$ = SPACE$(255)
CALL IBRD (CNT%, MSG$)
LFPOS = INSTR(MSG$, CHR$(10))
IF LFPOS <> 0 THEN PRINT “Response = ” LEFT$(MSG$,
LFPOS)
IF LFPOS = 0 THEN PRINT “Response = ”; MSG$
CALL IBRSP (CNT%, SPR%)
WEND
‘
‘ —— CHECK EVENT STATUS BIT ——
IF NOT SPR% AND 32 GOTO 750
PRINT “ Event status bit set”
WRT$ = “*esr?”
CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
ESR$ = SPACE$(255)
CALL IBRSP (CNT%, SPR%)
CALL IBRD (CNT%, ESR$)
ESR% = VAL(ESR$)
IF ESR% AND 32 THEN PRINT “
Command error”
IF ESR% AND 16 THEN PRINT “
Execution error”
IF ESR% AND 4 THEN PRINT “
Query error”
‘
‘ —— READ ERROR MESSAGES ——
WRT$ = “syst:err?”
ERRMESS$ = SPACE$(255)
CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
CALL IBRD (CNT%, ERRMESS$)
WHILE NOT INSTR(ERRMESS$, “No error”) <> 0
PRINT LEFT$(ERRMESS$, INSTR(ERRMESS$, CHR$(10)))
CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
CALL IBRD (CNT%, ERRMESS$)
WEND
480
490
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
570
580
590
600
610
620
630
640
650
660
670
680
690
700
710
720
730
740
750 WEND
760 PRINT “PROGRAM TERMINATED”
770 END
4-10 GW-Basic for National Instruments PC-IIA, Setting Up the Interface
Programming Examples
6. Statistics
(Only for PM6680B and PM6681)
In this example, the counter makes 10000 measurements and uses the statistical functions to determine MAX, MIN, MEAN, and Standard Deviation. All four results are
sent to the controller.
50 CNTNAME$ = “DEV10"
60 CALL IBFIND (CNTNAME$, CNT%)
70 ‘
80 ‘
90 WRT$ = “*RST; *CLS; *SRE 16; :FUNC ‘Freq 1’; :ACQ:APER MIN”
100 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
110 WRT$ = “:INP:LEV:AUTO Off”
120 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
130 ‘
140 ‘ —— Enable statistics on 10000 measurements ——
150 WRT$ = “:CALC:AVER:STAT ON; COUN 10000"
160 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
170 ‘
180 ‘ ==== Start measurement ====
190 WRT$ = “:Init; *OPC?”
200 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
210 ‘
220 ‘ —— Wait for operation complete (MAV) ——
230 PRINT “WAITING FOR MEASUREMENT TO GET READY”
240 MASK% = &H800
250 CALL IBWAIT (CNT%, MASK%)
260 ‘
270 ‘ —— Read status and response ——
280 CALL IBRSP (CNT%, SPR%)
290 MSG$ = SPACE$(255)
300 CALL IBRD (CNT%, MSG$)
310 ‘
320 ‘ —— Maximum ——
330 WRT$ = “:CALC:AVER:TYPE MAX; :CALC:IMM?”
340 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
350 MSG$ = SPACE$(255)
360 CALL IBRD (CNT%, MSG$)
370 PRINT “MAXIMUM = ”; LEFT$(MSG$, IBCNT%)
380 ‘
390 ‘ —— Minimum ——
400 WRT$ = “:CALC:AVER:TYPE MIN; :CALC:IMM?”
410 CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
420 MSG$ = SPACE$(255)
GW-Basic for National Instruments PC-IIA, Setting Up the Interface 4-11
Programming Examples
430
440
450
460
470
480
490
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
570
580
590
CALL IBRD (CNT%, MSG$)
PRINT “MINIMUM =”; LEFT$(MSG$, IBCNT%)
‘
‘ —— Mean ——
WRT$ = “:CALC:AVER:TYPE MEAN; :CALC:IMM?”
CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
MSG$ = SPACE$(255)
CALL IBRD (CNT%, MSG$)
PRINT “MEAN =”; LEFT$(MSG$, IBCNT%)
‘
‘ —— Standard deviation ——
WRT$ = “:CALC:AVER:TYPE SDEV; :CALC:IMM?”
CALL IBWRT (CNT%, WRT$)
MSG$ = SPACE$(255)
CALL IBRD (CNT%, MSG$)
PRINT “STANDARD DEVIATION =”; LEFT$(MSG$, IBCNT%)
END
4-12 GW-Basic for National Instruments PC-IIA, Setting Up the Interface
Programming Examples
‘C’ for National Instruments
PC-IIA
‘C’ for National Instruments PC-IIA
Programming Examples
1. Limit Testing
This program uses limit testing to check that the frequency is above a preset value.
#include “decl.h”
#include <stdio.h>
#include <process.h>
main ()
{
int
char
Counter, Status, i;
InString[80];
Counter = ibfind(“DEV10");
/*Set continuous frequency measurement*/
ibwrt(Counter, “*RST; *CLS; :FUNC ‘Freq 1’; :INIT:CONT ON”,
41);
/*Enable limit monitoring, limit 1 MHz*/
ibwrt(Counter, “:CALC:LIM ON; LIM:UPP 1E6; UPP:STAT ON”, 38);
ibwrt(Counter, “:STAT:DREG0:ENAB 2; *SRE 1", 26);
/*Wait until the limit is passed*/
printf(“Waiting for limit to be passed\n”);
ibwait(Counter, RQS);
/**Read status and device status register**/
ibrsp(Counter, &Status);
ibwrt(Counter, “:STAT:DREG0:EVEN?”, 17);
ibrd(Counter, InString, 80);
/*Read frequency**/
ibwrt(Counter, “READ?”, 5);
ibrd(Counter, InString, 80);
InString[ibcnt] = ‘\0’;
printf(“Frequency = %s\n”, InString);
/*Disable continuous measurement*/
ibwrt(Counter, “:INIT:CONT OFF”, 14);
}
exit(0);
4-14 ‘C’ for National Instruments PC-IIA, Limit Testing
Programming Examples
2. REAL Data Format
This program uses the REAL data format to speed up the measurement.
/* IEEE 488.2 binary real format follows the ‘little-endian’ format with the
most-significant byte first and the least-significant byte last. Intel processors use the
‘big-endian’ format, with the least-significant byte first, so we have to reverse the byte
order of the incoming block when running on a PC (Intel processor).
#include “decl.h”
#include <stdio.h>
#include <process.h>
#include <conio.h>
main ()
{
int
char
double
Counter = ibfind(“DEV10");
Counter, i;
InString[80];
DoubleFreq;
/*Make the counter output it’s result in real format*/
ibwrt(Counter, “:FORM REAL”, 10);
/*Make continuous measurements until a key is hit*/
do {
/*Make a measurement and read the result*/
ibwrt(Counter, “READ?”, 5);
ibrd(Counter, InString, 80);
/*Assign the bytes 3...10 of InString to DoubleFreq bytes
7...0.
The format of InString is #18******** , where “********”
represents the value.*/
for (i=0; i<8; i++)
((unsigned char *)&DoubleFreq)[7-i] = InString[3+i];
/*Print the result*/
printf(“%le\n”, DoubleFreq);
} while (!kbhit());
/*Restore ascii output format*/
ibwrt(Counter, “:FORM ASCII”, 11);
}
exit(0);
‘C’ for National Instruments PC-IIA, Real Data Format 4-15
Programming Examples
3. Frequency Profiling
Frequency profiling visualizes frequency variations for a certain time. This program
gives an output file called:
PROFILE.DAT. If this file is imported to a spreadsheet program, such as Excel, you
can create a graph like the one in the figure below.
Figure 4-2
#include
#include
#include
#include
This figure is the results of frequency profiling on a
sweep generator.
“decl.h”
<stdio.h>
<process.h>
<string.h>
main ()
{
int
char
InString[80];
double
FILE
Counter, i;
ArmString[80],
ArmDelay;
*ofp;
if (ofp = fopen(“PROFILE.DAT”, “w”)) {
Counter = ibfind(“DEV10");
/*Enable arming, etc.*/
ibwrt(Counter, “:TRIG:COUN 1; :ARM:COUN 1", 25);
4-16 ‘C’ for National Instruments PC-IIA, Frequency Profiling
Programming Examples
ibwrt(Counter, “:INP:LEV:AUTO ONCE”, 18);
ibwrt(Counter, “:DISP:ENAB OFF; :ACQ:APER 1E-6", 30);
ArmDelay=200e-9;
/*CAPTURE PROFILE*/
Printf(”Profiling”);
for (i=0; i<1000; i++) {
/*Set arming delay time*/
sprintf(ArmString, “:ARM:DEL %le”, ArmDelay);
ibwrt(Counter, ArmString, strlen(ArmString));
/*Measure and read result*/
ibwrt(Counter, “READ?”, 5);
ibrd(Counter, InString, 80);
InString[ibcnt] = ‘\0’;
/*Write arming delay time and result to file*/
fprintf(ofp, “%le, %s”, ArmDelay, InString);
}
/*Increase arming delay*/
ArmDelay += 100e-9;
ibwrt(Counter, “:DISP:ENAB ON”, 13);
/*Close file*/
Fclose(ofp);
} else
printf(“CANT OPEN FILE”);
}
exit(0);
4-17 ‘C’ for National Instruments PC-IIA, Frequency Profiling
Programming Examples
4. Fast Sampling
This program makes a quick array measurement and stores the results in the internal
memory of the counter. Then it writes the results to a file called MEAS.DAT. The
measurement results as a function of the samples can be visualized in a spreadsheet
program, such as Excel.
#include
#include
#include
#include
“decl.h”
<stdio.h>
<process.h>
<string.h>
main ()
{
int
char
FILE
Counter, Status, i;
InString[80];
*ofp;
if (ofp = fopen(“MEAS.DAT”, “w”)) {
Counter = ibfind(“DEV10");
/*Clear status*/
ibwrt(Counter, “*CLS”, 4);
/*Enable 1000 measurement with maximum speed*/
ibwrt(Counter, “:TRIG:COUN 1000; :ARM:COUN 1", 28);
ibwrt(Counter, “:INP:LEV:AUTO ONCE; :CAL:INT:AUTO OFF”, 37);
ibwrt(Counter, “:DISP:ENAB OFF; :INT:FORM PACKED”, 32);
ibwrt(Counter, “:ACQ:APER MIN; :AVER:STAT OFF”, 32);
/**Enable SRQ on operation complete**/
ibwrt(Counter, “*ESE 1; *SRE 32", 15);
/*Start measurement*/
printf(“Measuring\n”);
ibwrt(Counter, “INIT; *OPC”, 10);
/*Wait for operation complete*/
ibwait(Counter, RQS);
/**Read status and event status register**/
ibrsp(Counter, &Status);
ibwrt(Counter, “*ESR?”, 5);
4-18 ‘C’ for National Instruments PC-IIA, Fast Sampling
Programming Examples
ibrd(Counter, InString, 80);
printf(“Fetching result”);
for (i=0; i<1000; i++) {
/*Fetch one result*/
ibwrt(Counter, “FETCH?”, 6);
ibrd(Counter, InString, 80);
InString[ibcnt] = ‘\0’;
}
/*Write result to file*/
fprintf(ofp, “%d, %s”, i, InString);
ibwrt(Counter, “:DISP:ENAB ON”, 13);
/*Close file*/
Fclose(ofp);
} else
printf(“CANT OPEN FILE”);
}
exit(0);
‘C’ for National Instruments PC-IIA, Fast Sampliing 4-19
Programming Examples
6. Statistics
(Only for PM6680B and PM6681)
In this example, the counter makes 10000 measurements and uses the statistical functions to determine MAX, MIN, MEAN, and Standard Deviation. All four results are
sent to the controller.
#include “decl.h”
#include <stdio.h>
#include <process.h>
main ()
{
int
char
Counter, Status, i;
InString[80];
Counter = ibfind(“DEV10");
ibwrt(Counter, “*CLS; *SRE 16", 13);
ibwrt(Counter, “*RST; :FUNC ‘Freq 1’; :ACQ:APER MIN”, 38);
ibwrt(Counter, “:INP:LEV:AUTO OFF”, 17);
/*Enable statistics on 10000 measurements*/
ibwrt(Counter, “:CALC:AVER:STAT ON; COUN 10000", 30);
ibwrt(Counter, “:TRIG:COUN 10000", 16);
/*Start measurement*/
ibwrt(Counter, “:Init; *OPC?”, 12);
/*Wait for operation complete (MAV)*/
printf(“Waiting for measurement to get ready\n”);
ibwait(Counter, RQS);
/**Read status and response**/
ibrsp(Counter, &Status);
ibrd(Counter, InString, 80);
/*Read maximum value**/
ibwrt(Counter, “:CALC:AVER:TYPE MAX; :CALC:IMM?”, 31);
ibrd(Counter, InString, 80);
InString[ibcnt] = ‘\0’;
printf(“Maximum = %s\n”, InString);
4-20 ‘C’ for National Instruments PC-IIA, Statistics
Programming Examples
/*Read minimum value*/
ibwrt(Counter, “:CALC:AVER:TYPE MIN; :CALC:IMM?”, 31);
ibrd(Counter, InString, 80);
InString[ibcnt] = ‘\0’;
printf(“Minimum = %s\n”, InString);
/*Read mean value*/
ibwrt(Counter, “:CALC:AVER:TYPE MEAN; :CALC:IMM?”, 32);
ibrd(Counter, InString, 80);
InString[ibcnt] = ‘\0’;
printf(“Mean = %s\n”, InString);
/*Read standard deviation value*/
ibwrt(Counter, “:CALC:AVER:TYPE SDEV; :CALC:IMM?”, 32);
ibrd(Counter, InString, 80);
InString[ibcnt] = ‘\0’;
printf(“Standard deviation = %s\n”, InString);
exit(0);
}
‘C’ for National Instruments PC-IIA, Statistics 4-21
Programming Examples
This side is intentionally left blank.
4-22 ‘C’ for National Instruments PC-IIA
Chapter 5
Instrument Model
Instrument Model
Introduction
The figure below shows how the instrument functions are categorized. This instrument model is fully compatible with
the SCPI generalized instrument model.
The generalized SCPI instrument model,
contains three major instrument categories as shown in the following table:
Function Instrument Examples
type
Signal ac- Sense in- Voltmeter, Osquisition struments
cilloscope,
Counter
Source in- Pulse generaSignal
struments
tor, Power supgeneraply
tion
Signal
Switch inScaners,(de)-m
routing
struments
ultiplexers
Inputs
An instrument may use a combination of
the above functions. The CNT-8X counters belong to the signal acquisition category, and only that category is described
in this manual.
The instrument model in Figure 5-1 defines where elements of the counter language are assigned in the command
hierarchy. The major signal function areas are shown broken into blocks. Each
of these blocks are major command
sub-trees in the counter command language.
The instrument model also shows how
measurement data and applied signals
flow through the instrument. The model
does not include the administrative data
flow associated with queries, commands,
performing calibrations etc.
Channels
1
A
DISPlay
2
B
3
C
4
E
Measurement Function
FORMat
GPIB
OUTPut
TRIGger
Figure 5-1
MEMory
CNT-8X Instrument model. Note that Input B (channel 2) is not available on PM6685.
5-2 Introduction
Instrument Model
Measurement
Function Block
block. The INPut block includes coupling, impedance, filtering etc.
The measurement function block converts
the input signals into an internal data format that is available for formatting into
GPIB bus data. The measurement function is divided into three different blocks:
INPut, SENSe and CALCulate. See
Figure 5-3.
n SENSe
n INPut
The INPut block performs all the signal
conditioning of the input signal before it
is converted into data by the SENSe
A
INPut1
B
INPut2
n CALCulate
The CALCulate block performs all the
necessary calculations to get the required
data. These calculations include: calibration, statistics, mathematics, etc.
1
DISPlay
2
3
C
E
The SENSe block converts the signals
into internal data that can be processed by
the CALCulate block. The SENSe commands control various characteristics of
the measurement and acquisition process.
These include: gate time, measurement
function, resolution, etc.
4
INPut4
SENSe
÷2
10MHz
clock
CALCulate
GPIB
5
6
OUTPut
7
TRIGger
Figure 5-2
FORMat
MEMory
CNT-8X Measurement model. Note that Input B ( channel 2 ) is not
available on PM6685
Measurement Function Block 5-3
Instrument Model
Other Subsystems
In addition to the major functions (subsystems), there are several other subsystems in the instrument model.
The different blocks have the following
functions.
n CALibration
This subsystem controls the calibration of
the interpolators used to increase the resolution of the CNT-8X counters.
n DISPlay
Commands in this subsystem control
what data is to be present on the display
and whether the display is on or off.
n FORMat
The FORMat block converts the internal
data representation to the data transferred
over the external GPIB interface. Commands in this block control the data type
to be sent over the external interface.
n MEMory
The MEMory block holds macro and instrument state data inside the counter.
n OUTPut
This subsystem controls the analog output available in the CNT-8X counters.
n STATus
This subsystem can be used to get information about what is happening in the instrument at the moment.
5-4 Other Subsystems
n Synchronization
This subsystem can be used to synchronize the measurements with the controller.
n SYSTem
This subsystem controls some system parameters like timeout.
n TEST
This subsystem tests the hardware and
software of the counter and reports errors.
n TRIGger
The trigger block provides the counter
with synchronization capability with external events. Commands in this block
control the trigger and arming functions
of the Timer/ Counter.
Order of Execution
– All commands in CNT-8X counters are se-
quential, i.e., they are executed in the same
order as they are received.
– If a new measurement command is re-
ceived when a measurement is already in
progress, the measurement in progress will
be aborted unless XWAI is used before the
command.
Instrument Model
MEASurement
Function
anything about the instrument you are using. See Figure 5-3.
n MEASure?
In addition to the subsystems of the instrument model, which controls the instrument
functions,
SCPI
has
signal-oriented functions to obtain measurement results. This group of MEASure
functions has a different level of compatibility and flexibility. The parameters used
with commands from the MEASure
group describe the signal you are going to
measure. This means that the MEASure
functions give compatibility between instruments, since you don’t need to know
A
INPut1
B
INPut2
n CONFigure; READ?
The CONFigure command makes the
counter choose an optimal setting for the
specified measurement. CONFigure
may cause any device setting to change.
1
DISPlay
2
3
C
E
This is the most simple command to use,
but it does not offer much flexibility. The
MEASure? query lets the counter configure itself for an optimal measurement,
start the data acquisition, and return the
result.
4
INPut4
GPIB
CALCulate
SENSe
÷2
10MHz
clock
FORMat
FETch?
5
6
OUTPut
7
TRIGger
MEMory
READ?
CONFigure
MEASure?
Figure 5-3
CNT-8X Measurement Function
Note that Input B (channel 2) is not available on PM6685.
MEASurement Function 5-5
Instrument Model
READ? starts the acquisition and returns
the result.
This sequence does the same as the MEASure command, but now it is possible to
insert commands between CONFigure
and READ? to adjust the setting of a particular function (called fine tuning). For
instance, you can set an input attenuator
at a required value.
n CONFigure; INITiate;FETCh?
The READ? command can be divided
into the INITiate command, which starts
the measurement, and the FETCh? command, which requests the instrument to
return the measuring results to the controller.
Versatility of Measurement Commands
MEASure?
Simple to use,, few
additional possibilities.
CONFigure
READ?
Somewhat more
difficult,, but some
extra possibilities.
CONFigure
INITiate
FETCh?
Most difficult to
use,, but many extra features.
5-6 MEASurement Function
Chapter 6
Using the
Subsystems
Using the Subsystems
Introduction
Although SCPI is intended to be self explanatory, we feel that some hints and
tips on how to use the different subsystems may be useful. This chapter does
6-2
not explain each and every command,
but only those for which we believe extra
explanations are necessary.
Using the Subsystems
Calculate Subsystem
The calculate subsystem processes the
measuring results. Here you can recalculate the result using mathematics, make
statistics (not PM6685) and set upper and
lower limits for the measuing result that
the counter itself monitors and alerts you
when the limits are exceeded.
n Mathematics
The mathematic functions are the same as
on the front panel.
n Statistics
The PM6680B and PM6681 can calculate
and display the MIN, MAX, MEAN and
standard deviation of a given number of
samples. The statistic functions are the
same as on the front panel.
n Limit Monitoring
Limit monitoring makes it is possible to
get a service request when the measurement value falls below a lower limit or
rises above an upper limit. Two status
bits are defined to support limit monitoring. One is set when the results are
greater than the UPPer limit, the other is
set when the result is less than the
LOWer limit. The bits are enabled using
the standard *SRE command and
:STAT:DREG0:ENAB. Using both these
bits, it is possible to get a service request
when a value passes out of a band (
UPPer is set at the upper band border and
LOWer at the lower border) OR when a
measurement value enters a band
(LOWer set at the upper band border and
UPPer set at the lower border).
Turning the limit monitoring calculations
on/off will not influence the status register mask bits which determine whether or
not a service request will be generated
when a limit is reached. Note that the calculate subsystem is automatically enabled
when limit monitoring is switched on.
This means that other enabled calculate
sub-blocks are indirectly switched on.
Calculate Subsystem 6-3
Using the Subsystems
Calibration Subsystem
The interpolators used to increase the resolution of the measurement result in the
counter must be calibrated to maintain the
highest possible accuracy of the counter.
The calibration method of the PM6681
differs from the method used in
PM6680B and PM6685.
n PM6680B, PM6685
The intepolators are automatically calibrated before each measurement. This
procedure takes only a fraction of a second, but to increase speed, you can turn
off the auto calibration.
6-4 Calibration Subsystem
n PM6681
In PM6681, the interpolators are factory
calibrated. Calibration must be performed
only after repair and can be performed at
your local Service centers.
If the calibration is lost for any reason,
the counter will show ZCAL. LOSTZ .
By pressing PRESET you can bypass this
message and use the counter anyway,
however you must press the front panel
key. No bus command takes you past this
error message.
This is so that you cannot bypass the
message by mistake, and run a test system without a calibrated instrument.
Using the Subsystems
Configure Function
The CONFigure command sets up the
counter to make the same measurements
as the MEASure query, but without initiating the measurement and fetching the
result. Use configure when you want to
change any parameters before making the
measurement.
Read more about Configure under MEASure.
Configure Function 6-5
Using the Subsystems
Format Subsystem
Time Stamp
Readout Format
It is not trivial to decide how time
stamped measurements are to be presented on the bus. If the ‘ADIF’ format
defined by SCPI is adopted, it should be
adopted for all data readout, and switched
on and off by the already standardized
:FORMat:DINTerchange command. This
format covers the appropriate readout format for time stamped measurements well,
so when it is selected as output format,
there is not any problem. But the user
may still decide not to use the ADIF format, so we need a solution to the readout
problem whether or not we decide to implement ADIF. The chosen one is as follows:
For :FETCh:SCALar?, :READ:SCALar?
and :MEASure:SCALar?, the readout
will consist of two values instead of one.
6-6 Format Subsystem
The first will be the measured value, and
the next one will be the timestamp value,
given in seconds in the NR2 format
ddd.ddddddddd (12 digits).
In :FORMat ASCii mode, the result will
be given as a floating-point number (NR3
format) followed by integers (NR1 format). In :FORMat REAL mode, the result
will be given as an eight-byte block containing the floating-point measured value,
followed by a four-byte block containing
the integer timestamp count, where each
count represents 125 nanoseconds.
When doing readouts in array form, with
:FETCh :ARRay?, :READ :ARRay? or
:MEASure :ARRay?, the response will
consist of alternating measurement values
and timestamp values, formatted the same
way as for scalar readout. All values will
be separated by commas.
Using the Subsystems
Input Subsystems
PM6685
INP:SLOP POS
INP:FILT OFF
Comparator
1
A
INP:FILT ON
INP:IMP 1E6
INP:SLOP NEG
INP:IMP 50
INP:HYST <value in Volt>
INP:LEV <value in Volt>
Trigger points
t
0V
Reset points
Figure 6-1
Summary of PM6685 input amplifier settings.
Input Subsystems 6-7
Using the Subsystems
PM6680B/PM6681
INP:COUP AC
INP:COUP DC
INP:FILT OFF
INP:SLOP POS
1
A
INP:FILT ON
INP:IMP 1E6
INP:SLOP NEG
INP:IMP 50
INP:ATT 1
INP:ATT 10
INP2:COUP AC
INP2:COUP DC
INP2:COMM ON
INP2:SLOP POS
2
B
INP2:COMM OFF
INP2:IMP 1E6
INP2:SLOP NEG
INP2:IMP 50
INP2:ATT 1
INP2:ATT 10
INP4:SLOP POS
4
E
INP4:SLOP NEG
Figure 6-2
Summary of PM6680B / PM6681 input amplifier settings.
6-8 Input Subsystems
Using the Subsystems
Measurement Function
The Measure function group has a different level of compatibility and flexibility
than other commands. The parameters
used with commands from the Measure
group describe the signal you are going to
measure. This means that the Measure
functions give compatibility between instruments, since you don’t need to know
anything about the instrument you are using.
MEASure?
This is the most simple query to use, but
it does not offer much flexibility. The
MEASure? query lets the instrument configure itself for an optimal measurement,
starts the data acquisition, and returns the
result.
n Example:
SEND→ MEASure:FREQ?
This will execute a frequency measurement
and the result will be sent to the controller.
The instrument will select a setting for this
purpose by itself, and will carry out the required measurement as “well” as possible;
moreover, it will automatically start the
measurement and send the result to the
controller.
You may add parameters to give more
details about the signal you are going to
measure, for example:
SEND→ MEASure:FREQ?8208MHz,1
Where: 20 MHz is the expected value,
which can, of course, also be sent as
20E6, and 1 is the required resolution.
(1 Hz)
Also the channel numbers can be specified, for example:
SEND→ MEASure:FREQ?8(@3)
SEND→ MEASure:FREQ?820E6,
1,(@1)
CONFigure; READ?
The CONFigure command causes the instrument to choose an optimal setting for
the specified measurement. CONFigure
may cause any device setting to change.
READ? starts the acquisition and returns
the result.
This sequence operates in the same way
as the MEASure command, but now it is
possible to insert commands between
CONFigure and READ? to fine tune the
setting of a particular function. For example, you can change the input impedance
from 1 MΩ to 50 Ω.
Measurement Function 6-9
Using the Subsystems
n Example:
SEND→ CONFigure:FREQ82E6,1
2E6 is the expected value
1 is the required resolution (1Hz)
20E6 is the expected signal value
1 is the required resolution
SEND→ INPut:IMPedance1E86
Sets input impedance to 1 MΩ
SEND→ INPut:IMPedance508OHM
SEND→ INITiate
Sets input impedance to 50 Ω
Starts measurement
SEND→ READ?
SEND→ FETCh?
Starts the measurement and returns the
result.
Fetches the result
CONFigure;INITiate;FETCh?
The READ? command can be divided
into the INITiate command, which starts
the measurement, and the FETCh? command, which requests the instrument to
return the measuring results to the controller.
n Example:
SEND→ CONFigure:FREQ820E6,1
6-10 Measurement Function
Versatility of measurement commands
MEASure?
CONFigure
READ?
CONFigure
INITiate
FETCh?
Simple to use, few additional possibilities.
Somewhat more difficult,
but some extra possibilities.
Most difficult to use, but
many extra features.
Using the Subsystems
Output Subsystem
The analog output is turned off as a default. You turn it on/off and set the scaling factor under ANALOG OUT in the
aux menu.
Scaling Factor
The scaling factor has two functions:
– Its exponent selects which digits to output
on the analog output.
– Its value sets what reading should represent
full scale.
.6 7 8 9 0 o n th e d is p la y
g iv e s 3 .3 8 V w ith
s c a lin g fa c to r 1
S c a lin g fa c to r s e le c ts
fu ll s c a le v a lu e
s c a lin g fa c to r 1
s c a lin g fa c to r 4
# 8
5 V r a n g e
A N A L O G O U T
c o n n e c to r
S c a lin g e x p o n e n t m o v e s
in s e r tio n p o in t
5 0 Ω/ 1 M Ω
5 0 Ω/ 1 M Ω
1 2 V rm s -5 0 Ω
3 5 0 V p -1 M Ω
5 0 Ω
A n a lo g O u t = O N , s e t s c a lin g fa c to r a n d e x p o n e n t
Figure 6-3
The analog output function.
As default, the scaling factor is 1 (1E0).
This means that the full scale value is
0.999 and the analog output converts the
fraction (digits to the right of the decimal
point) to a voltage.
The scaling factor should be:
1
Scaling factor =
full scale value
where full scale value is the value for
which you want the analog output to output its maximum voltage (5 V).
Example:
– Take a measurement result, for instance:
12.34567890 E+6 Hz
– Represent this result without exponent:
12345678.90 Hz
– Multiply this value with the scaling factor,
for instance 0.001.
12345.67890
– Take the fractional part of the result:
.67890
Output Subsystem 6-11
Using the Subsystems
– This is the value that will determine the
output voltage; .00 will give 0 V and .99
will give 5 V. This means that the reading
will give:
.67890*5=3.3945 V.
This is ouput as 3.38 V due to the 0.02 V
resolution of the analog output.
D e fa u lt s c a lin g fa c to r = 1
Same exponent, opposite sign
n Resolution
The analog output range is 0 to 5 V in
250 steps, so one step is 0.02 V. If the
scaling factor is 1, one such step is taken
each time the display changes with
X.004, and if the scaling factor is 4, one
step is taken each time the display
changes with X.001.
The X in the above paragraph can be any
digit and does not influence the output
voltage. If the display changes from
0.996 to 1.000, the voltage drops from
4.98 V to 0V. If the display value increases further, the output voltage starts
Output voltage
S c a lin g fa c to r = 1 E - 6
Scaling factor 1
4.98 V
0.004
20mV
Figure 6-4
To use the shown decimal point as reference,
set the exponent of the
scaling factor to the
same value as the exponent of the measurement
result but with opposite
sign.
0.00V
0.000
1.000
0.996
Output voltage
2.000 Displayed
value
1.996
Scaling factor 4
4.98 V
0.001
20mV
0.00V
0. 0.0
24
00
9
0.
2
5
0.
49 0
9
0.
50
0
Displayed
value
Figure 6-5
Output voltage versus
displayed value for two
different scaling factors.
to increase again; see .
6-12 Output Subsystem
Using the Subsystems
Sense Command
Subsystems
Depending on application, you can select
different input channels and input characteristics.
n Switchbox
In automatic test systems, it is difficult to
swap BNC cables when you need to measure on several measuring points. With
PM6680B/1 you can select from three
different basic inputs (A, B and E), on
which the counter can measure directly
without the need for external switching
devices. With PM6685 you can select
from two different basic inputs (A and E).
n Prescaling
For all measuring functions except frequency, the maximum input A frequency
is 160 MHz.
To extend the range for frequency measurements, PM6680B and PM6685 can
divide (scale) the input A frequency by
two, while PM6681 scales by four.
When using channel 1, the counter automatically selects this scaling factor when
measuring FREQ A, giving 300 MHz
max frequency for PM6681 and PM6685,
and 225 MHz for PM6680B.
For all other measuring functions, and for
frequency if you select negative slope,
the counter does not divide the signal and
the max repetition rate is 160 MHz.
Sense Command Subsystem 6-13
Using the Subsystems
Status Subsystem
Introduction
– The Operation Status Register reports the
Status reporting is a method to let the
controller know what the counter is doing. You can ask the counter what status
it is in whenever you want to know.
– The Questionable Data Register reports
You can select some conditions in the
counter that should be reported in the Status Byte Register. You can also select if
some bits in the Status Byte should generate a Service Request (SRQ).
(An SRQ is the instrument’s way to call
the controller for help.)
Status Reporting Model
n The Status Structure
The status reporting model used by
CNT-8X is standardized in IEEE 488.2
and SCPI, so you will find similar status
reporting in most modern instruments.
Figure 6-6 shows an overview of the
complete CNT-8X status register structure. It has four registers, two queues, and
a status byte:
– The Standard Event Register reports the
standardized IEEE 488.2 errors and conditions.
6-14 Status Subsystem
status of the CNT-8X measurement cycle
(see also ARM-TRIG model, page 6-27).
when the output data from the CNT-8X
may not be trusted.
– The Device Register 0 reports when the
measuring result has exceeded preprogrammed limits.
– The Output Queue status reports if there
is output data to be fetched.
– The Error Queue status reports if there
are error messages available in the error
queue.
– The Status Byte contains eight bits. Each
bit shows if there is information to be
fetched in the above described registers
and queues of the status structure.
Using the Registers
Each status register monitors several conditions at once. If something happens to
any one of the monitored conditions, a
summary bit is set true in the Status Byte
Register.
Enable registers are available so that you
can select what conditions should be re-
Using the Subsystems
tive, the bit in the event register is set
true. When the condition changes from
active to inactive, the event register bits
are not affected at all.
ported in the status byte, and what bits in
the status byte should cause SRQ.
+
A register bit is TRUE, i.e., something has happened, when it is
set to 1. It is FALSE when set to
0.
Note that all event registers and the status
byte records positive events. That is when
a condition changes from inactive to ac-
When you read the contents of a register,
the counter answers with the decimal sum
of the bits in the register.
Q u e s tio n a b le D a ta R e g is te r
S ta n d a r d E v e n t R e g is te r
C o n d itio n R e g is te r
E v e n t R e g is te r
E n a b le R e g is te r
L o g ic a l O R
E rro r Q u e u e
O u tp u t Q u e u e
E v e n t R e g is te r
E n a b le R e g is te r
L o g ic a l O R
O p e r a tio n S ta tu s R e g is te r
D e v ic e R e g is te r 0
C o n d itio n R e g is te r
E v e n t R e g is te r
E v e n t R e g is te r
E n a b le R e g is te r
E n a b le R e g is te r
L o g ic a l O R
L o g ic a l O R
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
S ta tu s B y te R e g is te r
S e r v ic e R e q u e s t E n a b le
L o g ic a l O R
S R Q
Figure 6-6
m e s s a g e
CNT-8X Status register structure.
Status Subsystem 6-15
Using the Subsystems
Example:
The counter answers 40 when you ask for
the contents of the Standard Event Status
Register.
– Convert this to binary form. It will give
you 101000.
– Bit 5 is true showing that a command error
has occurred.
– Bit 3 is also true, showing that a device dependent error has occurred.
Use the same technique when you program the enable registers.
– Select which bits should be true.
– Convert the binary expression to decimal
data.
– Send the decimal data to the instrument.
Clearing/Setting all bits
– You can clear an enable register by pro-
gramming it to zero. You can set all bits
true in a 16-bit event enable register by
programming it to 32767 (bit 16 not used).
– You set all bits true in 8-bit registers by
programming them to 255 (Service Request Enable and Standard Event Enable.)
n Using the Queues
The two queues, where CNT-8X stores
output data and error messages, may contain data or be empty. Both these queues
have their own status bit in the Status
Byte. If this bit is true there is data to be
fetched.
When the controller reads data, it will
also remove the data from the queue. The
queue status bit in the status byte will remain true for as long as the queue holds
6-16 Status Subsystem
one or more data bytes. When the queue
is empty, the queue status bit is set false.
Status of the Output Queue (MAV)
The MAV (message available) queue status message appears in bit 4 of the status
byte register. It indicates if there are bytes
ready to be read over the GPIB in the
GPIB output queue of the instrument.
The output queue is where the formatted
data appears before it is transferred to the
controller.
The controller reads this queue by addressing the instrument as a talker. The
command to do this differs between different programming languages. Examples
are IOENTERS and IBREAD.
Status of the Error Message Queue
(EAV)
The EAV (error message available)
queue status message appears in bit 2 of
the status byte register. Use the
:SYSTem:ERRor? query to read the error messages. Chapter 21 explains all
possible error messages .
n Using the Status Byte
The status byte is an eight bit status message. It is sent to the controller as a response to a serial poll or a *STB? query,
see Figure 6-7. Each bit in the status byte
contains a summary message from the
status structure. You can select what bits
in the status byte should generate a service request to alert the controller.
When a service request occurs, the
SRQ-line of the GPIB will be activated.
Whether or not the controller will react
on the service request depends on the
controller program. The controller may
be interrupted on occurrence of a service
Using the Subsystems
request, it may regularly test the
SRQ-line, it may regularly make serial
poll or *STB?, or the controller may not
react at all. The preferred method is to
use SRQ because it presents a minimum
of disturbance to the measurement process.
Example:
Selecting Summary Message to Generate SRQ
RQS/MSS
*SRE816
This sets bit 4 (16=24) in the service request
enable register (see Figure 6-8). This
makes the instrument signal SRQ
when a message is available in the
output queue.
The original status byte of IEEE 488.1 is
sent as a response to a serial poll, and bit
6 means requested service, RQS.
The counter does not generate any SRQ
by default. You must first select which
summary message(s) from the status byte
register should give SRQ. You do that
with the Service Request Enable command *SRE <bit mask>.
qu
eu
e
Q
M
O
R
P R
=
O
pe
S S S
ra
=
tio
R
=
E S M e
n
q
as ue S t
B
te s t a tu
=
E v r S s
M
s
A V
B
en um S e
r
t S m v i it
=
c
M
a
t
Q
a t ry e
es
U
us
S
E
sa
B i ta t
=
g
t
us
E A
Q
e
ue A
V
st vai
=
io
N
n a la b l
o t E rro
bl e i
us
r A
e
n
ed
D
v
D
ai
at out
R
l
p
a
ab
E G
le
0
in
=
th
D
e
ev
er
ic
ro
e
r
R
eg
is
te
r 0
ut
qu
eu
e
IEEE 488.2 added the *STB? query and
expanded the status byte with a slightly
different bit 6, the MSS. This bit is true
S e r v ic e
R e q u e s t
G e n e r a tio n
S R Q
s ig n a l
R Q S
O P R
1 2 8
M
6S S
E S B
M A V
Q U E
E A V
3 2
1 6
8
4
1
D R E G 0
2
1
S ta tu s B y te
R e g is te r
S e r v ic e R e q u e s t E n a b le
L o g ic a l O R
Figure 6-7
The status byte bits.
Status Subsystem 6-17
Using the Subsystems
as long as there is unfetched data in any
of the status event registers.
– The Requested Service bit, RQS, is set true
when a service request has been signalled.
If you read the status byte via a Serial Poll,
bit 6 represents RQS. Reading the status
byte with a serial poll will set the RQS bit
false, showing that the status byte has been
read.
– The Master Summary Status bit, MSS, is
set true if any of the bits that generates
SRQ is true. If you read the status byte using *STB?, bit 6 represents MSS. MSS remains true until all event registers are
cleared and all queues are empty.
Setting up the Counter to
Report Status
Include the following steps in your program when you want to use the status reporting in CNT-8X:
– *CLS Clears all event registers and the error queue
– *ESE <bit mask> Selects what conditions in the Standard Event Status register
should be reported in bit 5 of the status
byte
– :STATus:OPERation:ENABle <bit
mask> Selects which conditions in the
Operation Status register should be reported in bit 7 of the status byte
– :STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle
<bit mask> Selects which conditions in
the Questionable Status register should be
reported in bit 3 of the status byte
– :STATus:DREGister0:ENABle
<bit mask> Selects which conditions
in Device Register 0 should be reported in
bit 0 of the status byte
– *SRE <bit mask> Selects which bits
in the status byte should cause a Service
Request
A programming example using status reporting is available in the Programming
Examples in chapter 4.
Reading and Clearing Status
n Status Byte
As explained earlier, you can read the status byte register in two ways:
Using the Serial Poll (IEEE-488.1 defined).
– Response:
– Bit 6: RQS message, shows that the
counter has requested service via the
SRQ signal.
– Other bits show their summary mes-
sages
– A serial poll sets the RQS bit
FALSE, but does not change other
bits.
Using the Common Query *STB?
– Response:
– Bit 6: MSS message, shows that
there is a reason for service request.
– Other bits show their summary mes-
sages.
– Reading the response will not alter
the status byte.
n Status Event Registers
You read the Status Event registers with
the following queries:
6-18 Status Subsystem
Using the Subsystems
– *ESR? Reads the Standard Event Status
measurement cycle by reading the Operation Status register.
– :STATus:OPERation?
Reading the Event Register will always
show that a measurement has started, that
waiting for triggering and bus arming has
occurred and that the measurement is
stopped. This information is not very useful.
register
Reads the
Operation Status Event register
– :STATus:QUEStionable? Reads the
Questionable Status Event register
– :STATus:DREGister0? Reads Device
Event register
When you read these registers, you will
clear the register you read and the summary message bit in the status byte.
You can also clear all event registers with
the *CLS (Clear Status) command.
n Status Condition Registers
Two of the status register structures also
have condition registers: The Status Operation and the Status Questionable register.
The condition registers differ from the
event registers in that they are not
latched. That is, if a condition in the
counter goes on and then off, the condition register indicates true while the condition is on and false when the condition
goes off. The Event register that monitors
the same condition continues to indicate
true until you read the register.
– :STATus:OPERation:CONDition?
Reads the Operation Status Condition register
– :STATus:QUEStionable:CONDition? Reads the Questionable Status
Condition register
Reading the condition register will not affect the contents of the register.
Why Two Types of Registers?
Let’s say that the counter measures continuously and you want to monitor the
Reading the Condition Register on the
other hand gives only the status of the
measurement cycle, for instance “Measurement stopped”.
+
Although it is possible to read the
condition registers directly, we
recommend that you use SRQ
when monitoring the measurement cycle. The measurement
cycle is disturbed when you read
condition registers.
n Summary:
The way to work when writing your bus
program is as follows:
Set up
– Set up the enable registers so that the
events you are interested in are summarized in the status byte.
– Set up the enable masks so that the condi-
tions you want to be alerted about generate
SRQ. It is good practice to generate SRQ
on the EAV bit. So, enable the EAV-bit via
*SRE.
Check & Action
– Check if an SRQ has been received.
– Make a serial poll of the instruments
on the bus until you find the instrument that issued the SRQ (the instrument that has RQS bit true in the Status Byte).
Status Subsystem 6-19
Using the Subsystems
– When you find it, check which bits
Standard Status Registers
– Let’s say that bit 7, OPR, is true.
These registers are called the standard
status data structure because they are
mandatory in all instruments that fulfill
the IEEE 488.2 standard.
in the Status Byte Register are true.
Then read the contents of the Operation Status Register. In this register
you can see what caused the SRQ.
– Take appropriate actions depending
on the reason for the SRQ.
S ta n d a rd E v e n t
S ta tu s R e g is te r
* E S R ?
P O N U R Q C M E
7
6
E X E
5
D D E Q Y E R Q C
4
3
2 1
O P C
0
* E S E < N R f > S ta n d a r d E v e n t S ta tu s E n a b le
* E S E ?
O u tp u t
Q u e u e
L o g ic a l O R
O u tp u t Q u e u e n o t e m p ty
S e r v ic e
R e q u e s t
G e n e r a tio n
S R Q
s ig n a l
7
R Q S
M
6S
S
E S B
M A V
3
2 1
0
S e r v ic e R e q u e s t E n a b le
L o g ic a l O R
Figure 6-8
Standard status data structures, overview.
6-20 Status Subsystem
S ta tu s B y te
R e g is te r
< . . . r e a d
* S R E < N R f >
* S R E ?
b y
* S T B ?
Using the Subsystems
n Standard Event Status Register
Bit 7 (weight 128) — Power-on (PON)
Bit 3 (weight 8) — Device-dependent
Error (DDE)
A device-dependent error is any device
operation that did not execute properly
because of some internal condition, for
instance error queue overflow. This bit
shows that the error was not a command,
query or execution error.
Bit 2 (weight 4) — Query Error (QYE)
Figure 6-9
Bits in the standard event
status register
Shows that the counter’s power supply has
been turned off and on (since the last time
the controller read or cleared this register).
Bit 6 (weight 64)—User Request (URQ)
Shows that the user has pressed a key on
the front panel of CNT-8X (except LOCAL/PRESET). The URQ bit will be set
regardless of the remote local state of the
counter. The purpose of this signal is, for
example, to call for the attention of the
controller by generating a service request.
Bit 5 (weight 32) — Command Error
(CME)
The output queue control detects query errors. For example the QYE bit shows the
unterminated, interrupted, and deadlock
conditions. For more details, see ‘Error reporting’ on page 3-17.
Bit 1 (weight 2)—Request Control (RQC)
Shows the controller that the device
wants to become the active controller-in-charge. Not used in the CNT-8X.
Bit 0 (weight 1) — Operation Complete
(OPC)
The counter only sets this bit TRUE in response to the operation complete command (*OPC). It shows that the counter
has completed all previously started actions.
n Summary, Standard Event
Status Reporting
Shows that the instrument has detected a
command error. This means that it has received data that violates the syntax rules
for program messages.
*ESE <bit mask>
Bit 4 (weight 16) — Execution Error
(EXE)
*SRE 32
Shows that the counter detected an error
while trying to execute a command. (See
‘Error reporting’ on page 3-17.) The
command is syntactically correct, but the
counter cannot execute it, for example
because a parameter is out of range.
Enable reporting of Standard Event Status in the status byte.
Enable SRQ when the Standard Event
structure has something to report.
Status Subsystem 6-21
Using the Subsystems
SCPI-defined Status
Reading and clearing the event register of Registers
ESR?
the Standard Event structure.
CNT-8X has two 16-bit SCPI-defined
status structures: The operation status and
the questionable data structure. These
group is 16-bits wide while the status
byte and the standard status groups are
8-bits wide.
Q u e s tio n a b le D a ta R e g is te r
S ta n d a r d E v e n t R e g is te r
C o n d itio n R e g is te r
E v e n t R e g is te r
E n a b le R e g is te r
L o g ic a l O R
E rro r Q u e u e
O u tp u t Q u e u e
E v e n t R e g is te r
E n a b le R e g is te r
O p e r a tio n S ta tu s R e g is te r
L o g ic a l O R
D e v ic e R e g is te r 0
C o n d itio n R e g is te r
E v e n t R e g is te r
E v e n t R e g is te r
E n a b le R e g is te r
E n a b le R e g is te r
L o g ic a l O R
L o g ic a l O R
7
6
5
4
3
2 1
0
S ta tu s B y te R e g is te r
S e r v ic e R e q u e s t E n a b le
L o g ic a l O R
S R Q
Figure 6-10
s ig n a l
Status structure 7, Operation Status Group, and Status structure 3,
Questionable Data Group are SCPI defined.
6-22 Status Subsystem
Using the Subsystems
n Operation Status Group
This group reports the status of the
CNT-8X measurement cycle.
O p e r a tio n S ta tu s G r o u p
S T A T u s : O P E R a t i o n : C O N D i t i o n ?
S T A T u s : O P E R a t i o n : E V E N t ?
W F A W F T M S T
M S P
1 5
6
8
2 5 6
M e a s u
W a itin
W a itin
M e a s u
re m
g fo
g fo
re m
e n t
r a rm
r tr ig
e n t
5
6 4
s to
in
g e
s ta
Figure 6-11
g
4
3 2
0
1 6
p p e d
r in g
rte d
Bits in the Opeation Status Register.
Bit 8 (weight 256) — Measurement
Stopped (MSP)
This bit shows that the counter is not measuring. It is set when the measurement, or
sequence of measurements, stops.
Bit 6 (weight 64) — Wait for Bus Arming (WFA)
This bit shows that the counter is waiting
for bus arming in the arm state of the trigger model.
Bit 5 (weight 32) — Waiting for Trigger
and/or External Arming (WFT)
This bit shows when the counter is ready
to start a new measurement via the trigger
control option (488.2), for the shortest
possible trigger delay. The counter is now
in the wait for the trigger state of the trigger model.
Bit 4 (weight 14) — Measurement
Started (MST)
This bit shows that the counter is measuring. It is set when the measurement or sequence of measurements start.
n Summary, Operation Status
Reporting
:STAT:OPER:ENAB
Enable reporting of Operation Status in
the status byte.
*SRE 128
Enable SRQ when operation status has
someting to report.
:STAT:OPER?
Reading and clearing the event register of
the Operation Status Register structure
:STAT:OPER:COND?
Reading the condition register of the Operation Status Register structure.
Status Subsystem 6-23
Using the Subsystems
Questionable Data/Signal
Status Group
Bit 10 (weight 1024) — Timeout for
Measurement (TIO)
This group reports when the output data
from the CNT-8X may not be trusted.
The counter sets this bit true when it
abandons the measurement because the
internal timeout has elapsed, or no signal
has been detected.
See
also
:SYST:TOUT
and
:SYST:SDET.
Q u e s tio n a b le D a ta /S ig n a l S ta tu s
G ro u p
S T A T : Q U E S t : C O N D ?
Bit 8 (weight 256) Overflow (OFL)
S T A T : Q U E S ?
U E P
T IO
1 5 1 4
1 6 3 8 4
O F L
1 0
8
1 0 2 4
2 5 6
0
O v e r flo w
U n e x p e c te d
p a ra m e te r
T im e o u t fo r m e a s u r e m e n t
Figure 6-12
Bits in Questionable data
register.
The counter sets this bit true when it cannot complete the measurement due to
overflow.
n Summary, Questionable
Data/Signal Status Reporting
:STAT:QUES:ENAB <bit mask>
Enable reporting of Questionable
data/signal status in the status byte.
*SRE 8
Bit 14 (weight 16384) — Unexpected
Parameter (UEP)
Enable SRQ when data/signal is questionable.
This bit shows that CNT-8X has received
a parameter that it cannot execute, although the parameter is valid according
to SCPI. This means that when this bit is
true, the instrument has not performed a
measurement exactly as requested.
Reading and clearing the event register of
the Questionable data/signal Register
structure.
:STAT:QUES?
:STAT:QUES:COND?
Reading the condition register of Questionable data/signal Register structure.
6-24 Status Subsystem
Using the Subsystems
Device-defined Status Structure
CNT-8X has one device-defined status
structure called the Device Register 0. It
summarizes this structure in bit 0 of the
status byte. Its purpose is to report when
the measuring result has exceeded preprogrammed limits.
Questionable Data Register
Standard Event Register
Condition Register
Event Register
Enable Register
Logical OR
Error Queue
Output Queue
Event Register
Enable Register
Logical OR
Device Register 0
Operation Status Register
Condition Register
Event Register
Event Register
Enable Register
Enable Register
Logical OR
Logical OR
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Status Byte Register
Service Request Enable
Logical OR
SRQ signal
Figure 6-13
Device-defined status data structures ( model ).
Status Subsystem 6-25
Using the Subsystems
You set the limits with the following
commands in the calculate subsystem.
:CALCulate:LIMit:UPPer and
:CALCulate:LIMit:LOWer
*SRE 1
An example on how to use limit monitoring is available in Chapter 4, ‘Program
Examples.’
Reading and clearing the event register of
Device Register structure 0.
:STAT:DREG0?
– If bit 1 is true, the high limit has been exceeded.
Bit Definition
Device Status Register0
STAT:DREG0:COND?
STAT:DREG0?
15
Enable SRQ when a limit is exceeded.
2
1
4
ceeded.
Power-on Status Clear
0
2
Monitoring of high limit
Monitoring of low limit
Figure 6-14 Bits in the Device Status
Register number 0.
:STATus:DREGister0?
Reads out the contents
of the Device Status
event Register 0 and
clears the register.
Bit 2 (weight 4) — Monitor of Low Limit
This bit is set when the low limit is
passed from above.
Bit 1 (weight 2) — Monitor of High Limit
This bit is set when the high limit is
passed from below.
n Summary, Device-defined
Status Reporting
:STAT:DREG0:ENAB <bit mask>
Enable reporting of device-defined status
in the status byte.
6-26 Status Subsystem
– If bit 2 is true, the low limit has been ex-
Power-on clears all event enable registers and the service request enable register if the power-on status clear flag is set
TRUE (see the common command
*PSC.)
n Preset the Status Reporting
Structure
You can preset the complete status structure to a known state with a single command, the STATus:PRESet command,
which does the following:
– Disables all bits in the Standard Event
Register, the Operation Status Register, and
the Questionable Data Register
– Enables all bits in Device Register 0
– Leaves the Service Request Enable Register unaffected.
Using the Subsystems
Trigger/Arming Subsystem
The SCPI TRIGger subsystem enables synchronization of instrument actions with
specified internal or external events. The
following list gives some examples.
Instrument Action
Some examples of events to synchronize
with are as follows:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
The ARM-TRIG Trigger
Configuration
Figure 6-15 gives a typical trigger configuration, the ARM-TRIG model. The configuration contains two event-detection
layers: the ‘Wait for ARM’ and ‘Wait for
TRIG’ states.
measurement
bus trigger
external signal level or pulse
10 occurrences of a pulse on the external
trigger input
other instrument ready
signal switching
ABORt
Default state
*RST
after power-on
or reset
pon
No longer
initiated
Trigger system initiated
Initiated
Trigger system
initiated
input signal present
1 second after input signal is present
Idle
Still initiated
Completed No.
of ARM loops
Wait for ARM
Arm Layer
sourcing output signal
ARM conditions
satisfied
switching system ready
Trigger Layer
Completed
No. of TRIGger
loops
Wait for TRIG
TRIGger conditions
satisfied
Instrument
Actions
complete
Instrument
Actions
Figure 6-15
Generalized ARM-TRIG
model.
Trigger/Arming Subsystem 6-27
Using the Subsystems
This trigger configuration is sufficient for
most instruments. More complex instruments, such as the CNT-8X, have more
ARM layers.
ID L E
s ta te
*R S T
A B O R t
p o n
IN IT [:IM M ] o r
IN IT :C O N T O N ?
The ‘Wait for TRIG’ event-detection
layer is always the last to be crossed before instrument actions can take place.
Y e s
N o
Structure of the IDLE and
INITIATED States
When you turn on the power or send
*RST or :ABORT to the instrument, it
sets the trigger system in the IDLE state;
see .
The trigger system will exit from the
IDLE state when the instrument receives
an INITiate:IMMediate. The instrument will pass directly through the
INITIATED state downward to the next
event-detection layers (if the instrument
contains any more layers).
The trigger system will return to the INITIATED state when all events required
by the detection layers have occurred and
the instrument has made the intended
measurement. When you program the
trigger system to INITiate:CONTinuous ON, the instrument will directly
exit the INITIATED state moving downward and will repeat the whole flow described
above.
When
INITiate:CONTinuous is OFF,
the trigger system will return to the IDLE
state.
N o
Y e s
Figure 6-16
IN IT IA T E D
s ta te
IN IT [:IM M ] o r
IN IT :C O N T O N ?
Flow diagram of IDLE
and INITIADED layers.
n Structure of an Event-detection
Layer
The
general
structure
of
all
event-detection layers is identical and is
roughly depicted by the flow diagram in
In each layer there are several programmable conditions, which must be satisfied
to pass by the layer in a downward direction:
n Forward Traversing an
Event-detection Layer
After initiating the loop counters, the instrument waits for the event to be detected. You can select the event to be
detected by using the <layer>:SOURce
command.
For
example:
:ARM:LAYer2:SOURce BUS
You can specify a more precise characteristic of the event to occur. For example:
:ARM:LAYer:DELay 0.1
You may program a certain delay between the occurrence of the event and entering into the next layer (or starting the
device actions when in the TRIGger
6-28 Trigger/Arming Subsystem
Using the Subsystems
layer). This delay can be programmed by
using the <layer>:DELay command.
n Backward Traversing an
Event-detection Layer
The number of times a layer event has to
initiate a device action can be programmed by using the <layer>:COUNt
command.
For
example:
:TRIGger:COUNt 3 causes the instrument to measure three times, each
measurement being triggered by the specified events.
Triggering
n *TRG Trigger Command
The trigger command has the same function as the Group Execute Trigger command GET, defined by IEEE 488.1.
When to use *TRG and GET
The *TRG and the GET commands have
the same effect on the instrument. If the
Counter is in idle, i.e., not parsing or executing any commands, GET will execute
much (≈ 20 µs) faster than *TRG
(≈ 4 ms) since the instrument must always parse *TRG.
Trigger/Arming Subsystem 6-29
Using the Subsystems
S e le c t
S o u rc e
IM M e d ia te
A r m in g S ta r t
L a y e r 2
( b u s tr ig )
E v e n t
d e te c tio n
< la y e r >
:S O U R c e
B U S
< la y e r > :IM M e d ia te
E v e n t d e te c tio n la y e r
< la y e r > :C O U N t
L a y e r lo o p
c o u n te r = 0
Y e s
N o
S e le c t
S o u rc e
E X T e r n a l4
IM M e d ia te
S e le c t
C h a r a c te r is tic s
< la y e r >
:S O U R c e
:S L O P e
E v e n t
d e te c tio n
< la y e r > :D E L a y
W a it :D E L a y
E v e n t d e te c tio n la y e r
< la y e r > :C O U N t
< la y e r >
:S O U R c e
A r m in g S ta r t
L a y e r 1
( E x te r n a l c o n tr o l)
In c re m e n t
la y e r - lo o p
c o u n te r b y 1
L a y e r lo o p
c o u n te r = 0
Y e s
N o
S e le c t
S o u rc e
IM M e d ia te
C o m p le te d
N o . o f la y e r
lo o p c o u n ts ?
E v e n t
d e te c tio n
In c re m e n t
la y e r - lo o p
c o u n te r b y 1
E v e n t d e te c tio n la y e r
6-30 Trigger/Arming Subsystem
C o m p le te d
N o . o f la y e r
lo o p c o u n ts ?
T r ig g e r
L a y e r 1
(N u m b e
m e a s u r
o n e a c h
S ta rt
r o f
e m e n ts
a rm )
Chapter 7
How to Measure Fast
How to Measure Fast
Introduction
The CNT-8X counters can complete a
measurement cycle in many different
ways, each with its own advantage. This
means that your first step is to select a basic “measurement scenario” based on the
requirements of the measurement. This
chapter contains some measurement scenarios that you can choose from.
These counters can measure with impressive speed if you program them correctly.
You will find guidelines for speed improvements in each of the described measurement scenarios.
Controller Synchronization
The start of measurements can either be
individually or block synchronized by the
controller. The instrument-to-controller
synchronization deals with how to start a
measurement or sequence of measurements and to read data in the most efficient way. You can also synchronize the
measurement with the measuring object
more accurately by using external control
(arming), but this is not described here.
Measurement Cycle
Synchronization
Timeout
Turn on timeout and set the time longer
than the expected measurement cycle.
Then wait for the timeout period, and
take actions if you got timeout.
If the measurement time is long, you may
have to wait many seconds or even minutes until timeout, just to learn that the
measurement never started.
Measurement started
Before starting a measurement, set up the
status reporting system so that you get a
Service
Request
on
Measurement-in-progress, bit 4 in the Operation
Status Event Register. Check this with serial poll after a reasonable time when the
measurement ought to be started, lets say
after 100ms (time dependent on input signal frequency). If the bit is true, continue.
If false, abort the measurement and check
the signals, alert the operator etc.
n Stop
You must also know when the measurement is completed in order to read out the
results. Should you read results or send
other commands before the measurement
is completed, the measurement will be interrupted.
n Start
You can of course let the controller wait
until you are absolutely certain that the
result is ready, before you fetch it. But it
is better to use *OPC to get an Operation
Complete status message, or *OPC? to
get an ASCii “1” in the output queue,
when the measurement is ready.
If the input signal fails, or there is no
arming etc., the measurement cycle will
not start.
*OPC and *OPC? are common commands described on page 9-124 and
9-125.
It is a good practice to check that the
measurement proceeds as planned when
the controller has started a measurement,
or block of measurements.
7-2 Introduction
How to Measure Fast
*OPC reports when operation is complete, via the Status Subsystem described
on page 6-14.
Rough Trigger
Subsystem
Description
The trigger subsystem is the functional
part of the CNT-8X that controls the start
and stop of measurements. This is the
function that the controller interacts with
when it controls the measurement sequence.
A simplified model of the CNT-8X’s trigger subsystem is a state-machine with
four different states. These states are as
follows:
IDLE State
– The counter waits for new commands. It is
not measuring
WAIT_FOR_BUS_ARM State
– The counter is ready to receive a bus arming signal, GET or XTRG.
WAIT_ FOR_MEASUREMENT_TO_
START State
– The counter waits for the input signal triggering to start the measurement or block of
measurements. If the counter uses arming,
it is waiting for the specified arming event.
MEASUREMENT State
– The counter measures. It monitors the
hardware and controls the measurement
time. If block measurement mode is used,
(ARM:COUN or TRIG:COUN8³2) the
counter stays in this state until all measurements inside the block has been made.
Different actions cause the trigger subsystem to change between the different
states. The transitions are shown in . The
status is reflected in status byte
:STATus:OPERation:CONDition.
S ta te : ID L E
O p e r a tio n C o n d itio n
r e g is te r s ta tu s : 2 5 6
I N I T : C O N T
I N I T
O N
I N I T : C O N T
O F F
O r a ll m e a s u r e m e n ts
c o m p le te d
o r
S ta
W A IT F O R
O p e r a tio n C o n
s ta tu s
te :
B U S A R M
d itio n r e g is te r
: 3 2 0
B u s tr ig r e c e iv e d o r
O F F ( im m e d ia te )
A ll A R M a n d T R IG
lo o p s c o m p le te d
S ta te :
W A IT F O R E X T A R M a n d /o r
IN P U T T R IG
O p e r a tio n C o n d itio n r e g is te r
s ta tu s : 2 8 8
( A r m in g r e c e iv e d o r
S in g le m e a s u r e m e n t
a r m o ff ( im m e d ia te ) )
re a d y
a n d in p u t tr ig
S
M E A
O p e r a tio
r e g is te r
Figure 7-1
ta te
S U
n C
s ta
:
R E
o n d itio n
tu s : 1 6
Trigger subsystem states.
Rough Trigger Subsystem Description 7-3
How to Measure Fast
Some Basic
Commands
Here follows a description of some basic
CNT-8X commands that control the measurement sequence.
CONFigure
The CONFigure command sets up the
counter to do the measurement specified
by the parameters of the command. The
command gives a limited number of parameter options such as:
– Measurement function
– Measurement channel
– Number of measurements and sometimes
also the following:
– Measuring time
– Trigger level
The counter sets up the rest of its functions in the best way for the requested
measurement. This means that any instrument setting may be changed by this
command.
Examples:
– Set up to measure frequency:
CONF:FREQ
– Set up to do 100 frequency measurements:
CONF:ARRay:FREQ8(100)
– Set up to do 100 frequency measurements
on the A-channel:
CONF:ARRay:FREQ8(100),(@1)
– Set up to do 100 frequency measurements
on the A-channel. Expected frequency 10
MHz that should be measured with a resolution of 1 Hz.
CONF:ARRay:FREQ8
(100),10e6,1,(@1)
7-4 Some Basic Commands
INITiate
The INITiate command will normally
start a measurement or measurement sequence and store the result internally in
the CNT-8X. However the actual action
is to change the state of the trigger subsystem
from
“idle”
to
“wait_for_bus_arming”. The result of
changing the state of the trigger subsystem depends on the programming of this
subsystem. For example it could be programmed to do the following:
– Make 1000 measurements.
– Wait for a GET/*TRG and then start a
measurement.
– Wait for a GET and then make 534 measurements.
– Wait for an arming pulse and make one
measurement.
– Wait for an arming pulse and make 234
measurements.
INITiate :CONTinuous
This command sets the counter in a mode
where it continues with a new measurement immediately after it has finished the
previous one. This is done by not returning the trigger subsystem to the “idle”
state.
ABORt
This command stops the current measurement (if any), and sets the trigger subsystem to the “idle” state. This means that
the counter is only waiting for new commands.
FETCh?
The FETCh query retrieves measurement
data. It could either be a single value
(SCALar) or a series of values (ARRay).
How to Measure Fast
Examples:
– Get one measurement: FETCh?
– Get 100 measurements:
FETCh:ARRay?8100
The number of measurements is
defined by the setting of the ARM
and TRIG counters. The ARM
counter can be set directly by the
:CONF and :MEAS commands.
The :FETCh:ARRay? query parameter only decides how many
measurement results to read out.
+
READ?
This command simply means to start a
measurement or measurement sequence
and read data.
This query is identical to:
ABORt;INITiate;FETCh?
This means that the counter starts a measurement ( single or array) after it has
aborted any previous measurements. It
also returns the result.
Examples:
– Start one measurement and fetch result:
READ?
– Start measurements and fetch 100 results:
READ:ARRay?8100
MEASure?
This query is identical to:
CONFigure;READ?
Examples:
– Make a frequency measurement:
MEAS:FREQ?
– Make 100 frequency measurements:
MEAS:ARRay:FREQ?8(100)
– Make 100 frequency measurements on the
A-channel:
MEAS:ARRay:FREQ? (100),(@1)
– Make 100 frequency measurements on the
A-channel. The expected frequency to be
measured is 10MHz with a resolution of 1
Hz.
MEAS:ARRay:FREQ?
(100),10e6,1,(@1)
MEAS:MEM1?, MEAS:MEM? 10
Memory Recall, Measure and Fetch Result
This command is only for PM6681. Use
it when you want to measure several parameters fast, i.e., switch quickly between measurement functions.
MEAS:MEM1? recalls the contents of
memory 1 and reads out the result,
MEAS:MEM2? recalls the contents of
memory two and reads out the result etc.
The equivalent command sequence is
*RCL1;READ?
The allowed range for <N> is 1 to 9. Use
the somewhat slower MEAS:MEMory?8N command if you must use memories 10 to 19.
This means that the command sets up the
counter and starts a measurement/measurement sequence.
TIMING
Data Format
Command
MEAS:MEM1?
MEAS:MEM?81
*RCL8 1;READ?
ASCII
7.9 ms
9.1 ms
10.1 ms
REAL
6.7 ms
8.0 ms
8.9 ms
Some Basic Commands 7-5
How to Measure Fast
Basic Measurement
Method
A basic measurement method for a system composed of signal sources, measuring object, and measuring devices will be
a simple step-by-step procedure. This
procedure goes as follows:
Step 1: Set up signal sources
Step 2: Set up measurement devices
Step 3: Trigger measurement devices
Step 4: Read data
Step 5: Evaluate data
The above procedure may be repeated as
many times as required.
The methods described here deal with
how you should do steps 3 and 4 in the
best and most efficient way with the
CNT-8X.
Individually Synchronized
Measurements
This is a method that you should use
when you need to start each measurement
externally from the controller. The most
probable reason that you should use individually synchronized measurements is
that you need to evaluate data in real time
and make decisions depending on the acquired data. An example of this could be
to tune an oscillator by measuring the
output frequency and adjust the oscillator
depending on the measured frequency.
Of the many available ways to do this
with the CNT-8X, three should be mentioned: READ?, INIT:CONT and GET
and MEASure?
7-6 Basic Measurement Method
n READ?
The READ? query provides a basic
mechanism for this. It ensures that the
measurement is started after the counter
receives the command. It will also send
back the result. The READ? query should
be preceded by setting up the counter by
using either CONFigure or individual
programming commands. This command
should be used if no special speed requirements exists.
n INIT:CONT and GET
In this method the trigger function is continuously initiated by the command INITiate:CONTinuous81. This gives you
the minimal firmware overhead if you
don’t change settings in the counter. Set
up the counter either by using CONFigure, or by using individual programming
commands before starting the measuring
sequence. Setting up includes switching
on the “wait for bus trigger” function
with the following command:
ARM:START:LAY2:SOURce8BUS.
As default, the counter starts a measurement and sends the result to the controller
when receiving a GET or a *TRG command. This method is the fastest way to
make individually synchronized measurements.
n MEASure?
The MEASure? query sets up the counter, ensures that the measurement is
started after the command is received,
and also sends the result to the controller.
This command has the highest possible
degree of compatibility to other instruments; however the command reprograms
the counter, and often you need to set up
How to Measure Fast
the counter by yourself. This is primarily
why we recommend the READ? query.
Block Synchronized
Measurements
In the block synchronized mode, the controller only starts a sequence of measurements. The counter then measures,
without any controller intervention, at the
highest possible speed. It “dumps” the results into internal memory and reads them
out for evaluation later. This method
gives the highest possible data capture
speed.
n READ:ARRay?
This is the basic method for starting up a
measurement sequence and reading the
data. Set up the counter using CONFigure
or individual programming commands
before sending the READ:ARRay?
query. This method will make the measurements with a high measurement rate.
The speed depends on a number of individual measurement parameters; see also
“General speed improvements” below.
The counter stores the data in its internal
memory and when it has captured all
data, it transfers the resulting array to the
controller.
n INIT + GET + FETCH:ARRay?
The READ:ARRay? method has one
drawback, it includes some unwanted
firmware overhead between when the
counter receives the command and it
starts the first measurement. This can be
solved by setting up the counter to wait
for a GET before it starts the measurement sequence. The default actions for
GET include sending a single result ( the
first value) when the counter has completed the sequence. This makes it possi-
ble to let the controller wait for the Message AVailable status bit to find out when
the data capture is ready. You can read
the complete array by using the
FETCH:ARRay? command. So if, for
example, the array size is 4, GET gives
the first result in the array and
FETC:ARR?83 fetches result two, three,
and four.
n MEAS:ARRay?
The MEASure:ARRay? query ensures
that the measurement sequence is started
after the command is received. It will also
send back the results. It also includes setting up the counter. This is the command
that has the highest possible degree of
compatibility with other instruments;
however, this command reprograms the
counter and often you need to program
the counter yourself. This is why we recommend using the READ:ARRay?
query.
General Speed
Improvements
The CNT-8X has many options to improve measurement speed. Here you will
get a list of actions that you can use to
improve the measurement speed. Most of
these commands decrease the average
dead time. The dead time is the time between measurements, that is, from stop to
the next start. These actions are all general, that is, they affect the rate of measurements for all measurement methods
given above; however, they are especially
valuable for the block synchronized measurements. In this mode, the dead time
can be as low as 120µs ( PM6681 ).
General Speed Improvements 7-7
How to Measure Fast
AUTO
Time Measurement
One of the most timesaving commands Resolution
you can use with the CNT-8X is
:INPut:LEVel:AUTO8OFF. This will
save the time it takes to determine the
trigger levels. (About 50ms/measurement
in PM6680B and PM6685, and 85ms in
PM6681.)
Display Control
The display can be switched off with the
command
DISPlay:ENABle8OFF. When you
switch off the display, the counter loses
the measurement data resolution information. This means that the counter always
sends all digits independently of whether
or not they are significant. This command
reduces the dead time by about 7ms.
GPIB Data Format
You can select the format of the result
sent on the GPIB using the FORMat
command. Two options exist: ASCii and
REAL. The REAL format saves a lot of
time both in the instrument and the controller for converting data. However,
when the counter uses the REAL format,
you lose the measurement data resolution
information. It sends the REAL format as
a block data element. This means that it
sends data as:
#18< 8 bytes real>.
The <8 bytes real> is a double precision
binary floating-point code according to
IEEE 488.2 / IEEE 754.
7-8 General Speed Improvements
The basic time measurement resolution
can be selected by using the command
SENSe:ACQ:RES8«HIGH|LOW».
When you set the resolution to low it will
be 100ns for PM6680B and PM6685, and
80ns for PM6681. Instead of the high resolution, which is 0.25ns for PM6680B
and PM6685, and 0.05ns for PM6681.
If the counter does real-time calculations
and you switch to low resolution, the
measurement dead time decreases about
0.6 to 0.9ms. If the counter does not do
real-time calculations, then it saves only
about 0.05ms per measurement cycle. If
the counter does real time calculations
with the display switched on, then you
can save up to 2ms by selecting the lower
resolution.
Automatic Interpolator
Calibration (PM6680B/85)
The time interpolation technique achieves
the high time resolution. The counter automatically calibrates these interpolators
once per measurement cycle. You can
control this automatic calibration by using the command:
CAL:INT:AUTO8 «ON|OFF|ONCE».
When you switch calibration off, the
measurement cycle time decreases.
Disabling this calibration makes the
counter more sensitive to temperature
changes. The measurement values may
drift away, which results in a larger inaccuracy. However, when the instrument
has been switched on for more than 20
minutes and the ambient temperature is
stable within ± 5°C, this is no problem.
You can also easily recalibrate the
How to Measure Fast
interpolators
by
using
CAL:INT:AUTO ONCE command.
the
Block Measurements
40000 measurements/second
(Only PM6681)
When dumping measurement results into
the internal memory, it is important to
program the arming and triggering counters in the best way. For maximum measurement rate use the block armed mode.
To do this set:
:ARM:STARt:LAYer:COUNt81
and
TRIG:COUNt8 <N>
where <N> is the number of measurements in a block.
PM6681 can make measure every period
of a signal with up to 40 000 Hz. This is
called “Back-to-Back” period measurements and in only available via GPIB.
The high speed is obtained when the
PM6681 measures low-resolution measurements directly to its internal memory.
That memory can store 6143 measurement results. When full, the measurement
must be stopped, and the results fetched
by the controller. )
Real Time Calculation
Note also that some functions are disabled to obtain high measurement speed:
You cannot use external arm/trig or
hold-off. Statistics is also disabled.
Normally the counter calculates the results in “real time.” This means that for
each measurement, the counter immediately calculates the result based on the
raw data information in various counting
registers. It needs to do this in order to
display the result, make mathematical
calculations, limit testing and statistical
calculations. It is possible to defer the
calculations until the controller requests
these values. The counter intermediately
stores the measurement data in a packed
format. This is done with the command:
:SENSe:INTernal:FORMat8 PACKed.
This is the most important command when you want to improve
the measurement rate for block
synchronized measurements.
+
Note: If you want a very high speed
you must set :AVER:STATE8OFF and
:ACQ:APER8 MIN.
Example: 1000 back-to-back periods
:SENS:FUNC8"PER81"
Select period as measurement function
:INP:COUP8DC Select DC coupling
:INP:LEV:AUTO8OFF Turn off Auto Trigger
:INP:LEV81 Set fixed trigger level
:SENS:ACQ:RES8LOW Select low resolution/high speed measurements
:SENS:INT:FORM8PACK Suspends the result calculation until the capture is
ready
:TRIG:COUN81000;:ARM:COUN81 Set up
PM6681 for 1000 measurements
:INIT Start a capture
:FETC:ARR?81000 Fetch the 1000 results
from the internal PM6681 memory
40000 measure- ments/second 7-9
How to Measure Fast
Supervising a
Process
One typical use of a counter in the industry is to measure a parameter and alert the
adjusting machinery when the parameter
gets close to the correct value. The machinery now slows down for an accurate
final adjustment of the parameter, and
stops the adjustment procedure when the
value is correct.
Optimal Method
An experienced CNT-8X programmer
knows that he can increase the process
speed to over 300 measurements/second,
by letting the counter do more and the
controller less of the job:
– Set up the counter to measure continuously
with low resolution, without displaying or
reading out any results.
– Set up limit monitoring so that the counter
issues a service request when the frequency
reaches the limit where the laser should
slow down.
An example of such a procedure is when
a laser adjusts the value of a resistor that
is connected to an oscillator. You measure the frequency of the oscillator and
the laser cuts the resistor until the oscillator oscillates at the correct frequency.
– Proceed with one of the following:
– Alternative 1: The program slows down the
Obvious Method
– Alternative 2: The program slows down the
The most obvious way to do this may be
as follows:
– Let the counter measure the frequency.
– Send the result to the controller.
– Let the controller, that controls both the laser cutter and the counter, decide when to
slow down the cutting procedure, and
eventually switch the laser off when the
correct frequency is obtained.
This method works fine for slow processes but the bus transfer rate of the
counter limits the measuring speed to
around
125
measurements/s
for
PM6680B and PM6685, and 250 measurements/s for PM6681. If all speed increasing actions are taken, and only
around 10 measurements/s if no speed increasing actions taken.
7-10 Supervising a Process
laser and recalls new narrower limits from
the internal counter memory and selects
higher resolution.
laser and reprograms the counter to make
high resolution measurements and reports
each measurement result to the controller.
– The controller stops the process when the
desired result is obtained.
See also the limit monitoring programming example in Chapter 4.
How to Measure Fast
Speed Summary
The following table summarizes the time
that can be gained when fine tuning the
measurement process.
The normal dead time between frequency
measurements is approximately as follows:
48.8 ms for the PM6680B.
85 ms for the PM6681.
75 ms for the PM6685.
If you should read out the measuring result to the controller add read out time to
each result. (Consult your controller manual.)
Individually Synchronized Measurements
100ns resolution
CAL:INT:AUTO OFF
Display OFF
INT:CONT and GET
AUTOtrigger OFF
None, normal READ?
Speed Improvement
Actions
Dead Time Between Measurements Including
Transfer to Controller
ASCII Data Format
Real Data Format
PM6680B PM6681 PM6685 PM6680B PM6681 PM6685
Approx.
50 ms
U
Approx. Approx.
85 ms* 75 ms
Approx.
45 ms
Approx. Approx.
85 ms* 75 ms
U
19 ms
10 ms
23 ms
15 ms
9 ms
20 ms
U U
12 ms
9 ms
20 ms
9 ms
8 ms
17 ms
U U U U
12 ms
5.5 ms
12 ms
9 ms
4.2 ms
9 ms
U U U U U
12 ms
5.5 ms
12 ms
8 ms
4.2 ms
8 ms
+
Turning the real-time calculations on/off will not affect the dead time because the
calculations are still done inside the measurement loop during the output of data.
* It takes longer time for PM6681 to determine trigger levels than for PM6680B,
why? The reason is that PM6681 must find the correct level from 16 times as many
triggerlevel setting steps than thePM6680B/85 (1.25 mV steps versus 20mV steps).
Speed Summary 7-11
How to Measure Fast
S p e e d , In d iv id u a lly s y n c . m e a s u r e m e n ts
P M 6 6 8 0 B
S p e e d , In d iv id u a lly s y n c . m e a s u r e m e n ts
P M 6 6 8 5
1 3 0
1 3 0
1 2 0
1 2 0
1 1 0
1 1 0
1 0 0
A S C II, a ll
7 0
6 0
R e a l d a ta , n o
5 0
R e a l d a ta , a ll
4 0
3 0
1 0
8 0
A S C II, a ll
7 0
6 0
R e a l d a ta , n o
5 0
R e a l d a ta , a ll
4 0
3 0
2 0
0
8 E -0 7
1 E -0 4
0 ,0 1
M e a s u r e m e n t T im e
1 0
1
0
S p e e d , In d iv id u a lly s y n c . m e a s u r e m e n ts
P M 6 6 8 1
2 4 0
2 2 0
2 0 0
1 8 0
M e a s u re m e n ts /s e c o n d
A S C II, n o
9 0
M e a s u re m e n ts /s e c o n d
M e a s u re m e n ts /s e c o n d
8 0
2 0
A S C II, n o
1 6 0
1 4 0
A S C II, a ll
1 2 0
R e a l d a ta , n o
1 0 0
8 0
R e a l d a ta , a ll
6 0
4 0
2 0
0
1 0 0
A S C II, n o
9 0
5 E -0 5
0 ,0 0 5
8 E -0 8
5 E -0 4
6 ,4 E -0 7
M e a s u r e m e n t T im e
0 ,0 5
7-12 Speed Summary
0 ,5
8 ,0 0 E -0 7
1 E -0 4
0 ,0 1
M e a s u r e m e n t T im e
1
How to Measure Fast
Block Synchronized Measurements
(:ARM:STARt:LAYer:COUNt 1 and TRIG:COUNt <N>)
Low resolution
([SENS]:ACQ:RES LOW)
Realtime calculations OFF
([SENS]:INT:FORM PACK)
CAL:INT:AUTO OFF
Display OFF
Speed Improvement Actions
U
U
U
U
U
+
+
U
Dead Time Between Measurements
PM6680B
PM6681
PM6685
9 ms
4.5 ms
9 ms
2 ms
1.3 ms
2.5 ms
0.5 ms
0.12 ms
0.6 ms
0.5 ms
0.025 ms*
0.6 ms
1: The GPIB format command will not affect the dead time for the block synchronized mode because the counter captures all data before transferring it to the controller.
2: Switching the real time calculations on/off In the block synchronized mode will
significantly decrease the dead time; however, the time for calculations ( 2 ms for
PM6680B/85 and 1 ms for PM6681) is added to the transfer time.
* In PM6681, low resolution is used for Back-to-Back period measurements.
The measuring time has no effect in this mode. Only the Timestamps are used.
Speed Summary 7-13
How to Measure Fast
S p e e d , B lo c k s y n c . m e a s u r e m e n ts
P M 6 6 8 5
2 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
1 7 5 0
1 7 5 0
1 5 0 0
1 5 0 0
1 2 5 0
B lo c k d a ta , a ll
1 0 0 0
B lo c k d a ta , n o
7 5 0
5 0 0
2 5 0
1 2 5 0
B lo c k d a ta , a ll
1 0 0 0
B lo c k d a ta , n o
7 5 0
5 0 0
2 5 0
0
8 E -0 7
0
1
0 ,0 1
1 E -0 4
M e a s u r e m e n t T im e
S p e e d , B lo c k s y n c . m e a s u r e m e n ts
P M 6 6 8 1
8
7
6
M e a s u re m e n ts /s e c o n d
(T h o u s a n d s )
M e a s u re m e n ts /s e c o n d
M e a s u re m e n ts /s e c o n d
S p e e d , B lo c k s y n c . m e a s u r e m e n ts
P M 6 6 8 0 B
5
B lo c k d a ta , a ll
4
B lo c k d a ta , n o
3
8 ,0 0 E -0 7
0 ,0 1
1 E -0 4
M e a s u r e m e n t T im e
1
Calculating the Measurement
Speed
When opimizing your program for speed,
add the measuring time you use to the
dead time, and subtract the time gain for
the timesaving commands you intend to
use; all times should be expressed in seconds:
1
2
Meas. time + DeadTime - å TimeGain
1
0
0 ,0 0 5
8 E -0 8
5 E -0 5
0 ,0 5
6 ,4 E -0 7
5 E -0 4
M e a s u r e m e n t T im e
0 ,5
=
= number of measurements / second.
Where:
Meas.time is the measurement time
you use.
Deadtime is the deadtime between
measurements after preset. see page
7-11.
Timegain is the timegain in the table
on page 7-15.
7-14 Speed Summary
How to Measure Fast
Timesaving Commands
Time Gain in ms
PM6680B PM6681 PM6685
Freq
FREQ:RANG:LOW8MAX
Sacrifice
Freq
(23)
Freq
(23)
10kHz lower freq. limit for AUTO. This
Timesaving is only possible when
AUTO is on.
50kHz lower freq. limit for AUTO. This
Timesaving is only possible when
AUTO is on.
(55)
INP:LEV:AUTO8OFF
40
70
52
You have to set trigger levels manually.
DISP:ENAB8OFF
5.4
3.5
7.7
Only the controller can read the result.
CAL:INT:AUTO8OFF
0.22
N.A.
0.22
You must instruct the counter to calibrate the interpolators once in a while
to maintain accuracy.
SENS:ACQ:RES8LOW
0.81
0 / 0.1
0.81
Works up to about 40kHz. The resolution of each measurement drops to
100ns for PM6680B/85 and 80ns for
PM6681
(PM6681 Only: Gives Back-to-back
measurements in period, i.e. every period in a block is measured)
TRIG:COUNT82100
0.69
N.A.
0.69
TRIG:COUNT86143
N.A.
4.2
N.A.
No sacrifice, the program loop in the
counter gets shorter, saving time.
INT:FORM8PACK
1.15
1.2
1.15
You cannot use limit monitoring, mathematics etc. in the CALC subsystem,
nor the Display or the Output subsystems.
TRIG:COUNT81000(o
r more)
STAT:OPER:ENAB80
ARM:STA:LAY2:SOUR
8 IMM
INP:LEV:AUTO8OFF
(All together)
FORM:TINF8OFF
N.A.
0.13
N.A.
These commands (all together) will increase measurement speed the last
step from about 4000 to over 8000
measurements/s
N.A.
0
N.A.
No timestamping possible. This only
influences the read. Time stamps are
always registred internally.
+
All these time gain estimates are approximations valid for frequency A measurements and may be changed without notice. The time gain/loss depends on
measuring function.
Speed Summary 7-15
How to Measure Fast
Single “Speed Switch”
Command for PM6680B/85
Single “Speed Switch”
Command for PM6681
Since many parameters must be set to get
the highest measuring speed, it is simpler
if you use the macro function:
Since many parameters must be set to get
the highest measuring speed, it is simpler
if you use the macro function:
Send the following lines to turn on macros; define one macro called FASTFREQ
and one macro called SLOWFREQ.
Send the following lines to turn on macros; define one macro called FASTFREQ
and one macro called SLOWFREQ.
SEND→ *EMC81
SEND→ *DMC8‘FastFreq’,
“:ACQ:APER8MIN;
:AVER:STAT8OFF;
:INP:LEV:AUTO OFF;
:DISP:ENAB8OFF;
:CAL:INT:AUTO8OFF;
:SENS:ACQ:RES8LOW”
SEND→ *EMC81
SEND→ *DMC8‘SlowFreq’,
“:ACQ:APER82008ms;
:AVER:STAT8ON;
:INP:LEV:AUTO8ON;
:DISP:ENAB8ON;
:CAL:INT:AUTO8ON;
:SENS:ACQ:RES8HIGH”
Now you just have to send FASTFREQ to
the counter to get high measurement
speed for frequency measurements, and
SLOWFREQ to return to normal measuring speed.
+
Note that these macros include
all speed-increasing commands
from the table on the previous
page. Omit the ones you do not
want to use in your application
and the ones that do not apply to
your counter.
SEND→ *DMC8‘FastFreq’,
“:ACQ:APER8MIN;
:AVER:STAT8OFF;
:INP:LEV:AUTO8OFF;
:DISP:ENAB8OFF;
:INT:FORM8PACK;
:SENS:ACQ:RES8LOW;
:FORM:TINF8OFF;
:TRIG:COUNT86143;
:STAT:OPER:ENAB80;
:ARM:STA:LAY2:SOUR8IMM"
SEND→ *DMC8‘SlowFreq’,
“:ACQ:APER8200 ms;
:AVER:STAT8ON;
:INP:LEV:AUTO8ON;
:DISP:ENAB8ON;
:INT:FORM8REAL;
:SENS:ACQ:RES8HIGH;
:FORM:TINF8ON;
:TRIG:COUNT81;
:STAT:OPER:ENAB81;
:ARM:STA:LAY2:SOUR8BUS"
Now you just have to send FASTFREQ to
the counter to get high measurement
speed for frequency measurements, and
SLOWFREQ to return to normal measuring speed.
+
7-16 Speed Summary
Note that these macros include
all speed-increasing commands
from the table on the previous
page. Omit the ones you do not
want to use in your application.
Chapter 8
Error Messages
Error Messages
Read the Error/Event Queue
empty, and the
query will return:
:SYSTem:ERRor?
You read the error queue with the :SYS0, “No error”
Tem:ERRor? query.
Example:
SEND→ :SYSTem:ERRor?
READ← –100, “Command Error”
When errors occur and you do not read
these errors, the Error Queue may overflow. Then the instrument will overwrite
the last error in the queue with:
The query returns the error number fol–350, “Queue overflow”
lowed by the error description.
If more errors occur they will be disIf more than one error occurred, the query
carded.
will return the error that occurred first.
When you read an error, you will also reRead more about how to use error reporting in the Introduction to
move it from the queue. You can read the
SCPI chapter
next error by repeating the query. When
you have read all errors, the queue is
+
Command Errors
Error
Number
0
–100
–101
–102
–103
–104
Error Description
Description/Explanation/Examples
No error
Command error
This is the generic syntax error for devices that cannot detect more specific errors. This code indicates
only that a Command Error defined in IEEE-488.2,
11.5.1.1.4 has occurred.
Invalid character
A syntactic element contains a character which is invalid for that type; for example, a header containing
an ampersand, SETUP&. This error might be used
in place of errors –114, –121, –141, and perhaps
some others.
Syntax error
An unrecognized command or data type was encounSyntax error; unrec- tered; for example, a string was received when the
counter does not accept strings.
ognized data
Invalid separator
The parser was expecting a separator and encountered an illegal character; for example, the semicolon was omitted after a program message unit,
∗EMC1:CH1:VOLTS5.
Data type error
The parser recognized a data element different than
one allowed; for example, numeric or string data
was expected but block data was encountered.
8-2 Error Code 0 to -104
Error Messages
Command Errors
Error
Number
Error Description
Description/Explanation/Examples
–105
GET not allowed
–108
Parameter not allowed
–109
Missing parameter
–110
Command header
error
–111
Header separator
error
–112
Program mnemonic
too long
Undefined header
A Group Execute Trigger was received within a program message (see IEEE-488.2, 7.7).
More parameters were received than expected for
the header; for example, the ∗EMC common command accepts only one parameter, so receiving
∗EMC0,,1 is not allowed.
Fewer parameters were received than required for
the header; for example, the ∗EMC common command requires one parameter, so receiving ∗EMC is
not allowed.
An error was detected in the header. This error
message is used when the counter cannot detect
the more specific errors described for errors –111
though –119.
A character that is not a legal header separator was
encountered while parsing the header; for example,
no space followed the header, thus ∗GMC"MACRO"
is an error.
The header contains more than 12 characters (see
IEEE-488.2, 7.6.1.4.1).
The header is syntactically correct, but it is undefined for this specific counter; for example, ∗XYZ is
not defined for any device.
Indicates that a non-header character has been encountered in what the parser expects is a header element.
This error, as well as errors –121 through –129, are
generated when parsing a data element that appears to be of a numeric type. This particular error
message is used when the counter cannot detect a
more specific error.
–113
–114
Header suffix out of
range
–120
Numeric data error
Numeric data error;
overflow from conversion
Numeric data error;
underflow from conversion
Numeric data error;
not a number from
conversion
Error Code -105 to -120 8-3
Error Messages
Command Errors
Error
Number
Error Description
–121
Invalid character in
number
–123
–124
–128
–130
–131
–134
–138
–140
–141
–144
–148
–150
Description/Explanation/Examples
An invalid character for the data type being parsed
was encountered; for example, an alpha in a decimal numeric or a “0" in octal data.
Exponent too large The magnitude of the exponent was larger than
32000 (see IEEE-488.2, 7.7.2.4.1).
Too many digits
The mantissa of a decimal numeric data element contained more than 255 digits excluding leading zeros
(see IEEE-488.2, 7.7.2.4.1).
Numeric data not al- A legal numeric data element was received, but the
lowed
counter does not accept it in this position for the
header.
Suffix error
This error as well as errors –131 through –139 is
generated when parsing a suffix. This particular error message is used when the counter cannot detect
a more specific error.
Invalid suffix
The suffix does not follow the syntax described in
IEEE-488.2, 7.7.3.2, or the suffix is inappropriate for
this counter.
Suffix too long
The suffix contained more than 12 characters (see
IEEE-488.2, 7.7.3.4).
Suffix not allowed
A suffix was encountered after a numeric element
that does not allow suffixes.
Character data error This error as well as errors 141 through –149 is generated when parsing a character data element. This particular error message is used when the counter cannot
detect a more specific error.
Invalid character
Either the character data element contains an invalid
data
character or the particular element received is not
valid for the header.
Character data too The character data element contains more than 12
long
characters (see IEEE-488.2, 7.7.1.4).
Character data not A legal character data element was encountered
allowed
where prohibited by the counter.
String data error
This error as well as errors –151 through –159 is generated when parsing a string data element. This particular error message is used when the counter cannot
detect a more specific error.
8-4 Error Code -121 to -150
Error Messages
Command Errors
Error
Number
Error Description
Description/Explanation/Examples
–151
Invalid string data
Invalid string data;
unexpected end of
message
String data not allowed
Block data error
A string data element was expected, but was invalid
for some reason (see IEEE-488.2, 7.7.5.2); for example, an END message was received before the
terminal quote character.
–158
–160
–161
–168
–170
A string data element was encountered but was not allowed by PM6685 at this point in parsing.
This error as well as errors –161 through –169 is
generated when parsing a block data element. This
particular error message is used when PM6685 cannot detect a more specific error.
Invalid block data
A block data element was expected, but was invalid
for some reason (see IEEE-488.2, 7.7.6.2); for example, an END message was received before the
length was satisfied.
Block data not alA legal block data element was encountered but
lowed
was not allowed by the counter at this point in parsing.
Expression data er- This error as well as errors –171 through –179 is
ror
generated when parsing an expression data element. This particular error message is used if the
counter cannot detect a more specific error.
Expression data er- The floating-point operations specified in the expression caused a floating-point error.
ror; floating-point
underflow
Expression data error; floating-point
overflow
Expression data error; not a number
Expression data er- Two channel list specifications, giving primary and
ror; different number secondary channels for 2-channel measurements,
of channels given
contained a different number of channels.
Error Code -151 to -170 8-5
Error Messages
Command Errors
Error
Number
Error Description
Description/Explanation/Examples
–171
Invalid expression
data
The expression data element was invalid (see
IEEE-488.2, 7.7.7.2); for example, unmatched parentheses or an illegal character were used.
A mnemonic data element in the expression was not
valid.
The expression contained a hexadecimal element
not permitted in expressions.
End of message occurred before the closing parenthesis.
–178
–180
–181
–183
–184
Invalid expression
data; bad mnemonic
Invalid expression
data; illegal element
Invalid expression
data; unexpected
end of message
Invalid expression
data; unrecognized
expression type
Expression data not
allowed
Macro error
The expression could not be recognized as either a
mathematical expression, a data element list or a
channel list.
A legal expression data was encountered but was
not allowed by the counter at this point in parsing.
This error as well as errors –181 through –189 is
generated when defining a macro or executing a
macro. This particular error message is used when
the counter cannot detect a more specific error.
Invalid outside
Indicates that a macro parameter placeholder
macro definition
($<number) was encountered outside of a macro
definition.
Invalid inside macro Indicates that the program message unit sequence,
definition
sent with a ∗DDT or ∗DMC command, is syntactically invalid (see IEEE-10.7.6.3).
Macro parameter
Indicates that a command inside the macro definierror
tion had the wrong number or type of parameters.
Macro parameter
The parameter numbers given are not continuous;
error; unused paone or more numbers have been skipped.
rameter
Macro parameter er- The’$’ sign was not followed by a single digit between 1 and 9.
ror; badly formed
placeholder
The macro was invoked with a different number of
Macro parameter
parameters than used in the definition.
error; parameter
count mismatch
8-6 Error Code -171 to -184
Error Messages
Execution errors
Error
Number
Error Description
description/explanation/examples
–200
Execution error
This is the generic syntax error for devices that cannot detect more specific errors. This code indicates
only that an Execution Error as defined in
IEEE-488.2, 11.5.1.1.5 has occurred.
–210
Trigger error
–211
Trigger ignored
–212
Arm ignored
–213
Init ignored
–214
Trigger deadlock
–215
Arm deadlock
–220
Parameter error
–221
Settings conflict
Settings conflict;
PUD memory is
protected
Settings conflict; invalid combination of
channel and function
Indicates that a GET, ∗TRG, or triggering signal was
received and recognized by the counter but was ignored because of counter timing considerations; for
example, the counter was not ready to respond.
Indicates that an arming signal was received and
recognized by the counter but was ignored.
Indicates that a request for a measurement initiation
was ignored because another measurement was already in progress.
Indicates that the trigger source for the initiation of a
measurement is set to GET and subsequent measurement query is received. The measurement cannot be started until a GET is received, but the GET
would cause an INTERRUPTED error.
Indicates that the arm source for the initiation of a
measurement is set to GET and subsequent measurement query is received. The measurement cannot be started until a GET is received, but the GET
would cause an INTERRUPTED error.
Indicates that a program-data-element related error
occurred. This error message is used when the
counter cannot detect the more specific errors –221
to –229.
Indicates that a legal program data element was
parsed but could not be executed due to the current
counter state (see IEEE-488.2, 6.4.5.3 and
11.5.1.1.5.)
Error Code -200 to -221 8-7
Error Messages
Execution errors
Error
Number
Error Description
description/explanation/examples
–222
Data out of range
Indicates that a legal program data element was
parsed but could not be executed because the interpreted value was outside the legal range as defined
by the counter (see IEEE-488.2, 11.5.1.1.5.).
The expression was too large for the internal floating-point format.
Data below minimum for this function/parameter.
–223
–224
–230
–231
–240
Data out of range;
exponent too large
Data out of range;
below minimum
Data out of range;
above maximum
Data out of range;
(Save/recall memory number)
Too much data
Too much data;
∗PUD string too
long
Too much
data;String or block
too long
Illegal parameter
value
Data corrupt or
stale
Data questionable
Data questionable;
one or more data elements ignored
Hardware error
8-8 Error Code -222 to -240
Data above maximum for this function/ parameter.
A number outside 0 to 19 was given for the save/recall memory.
Indicates that a legal program data element of block,
expression, or string type received that contained
more data than the counter could handle due to
memory or related counter-specific requirements.
Used where exact value, from a list of possible values, was expected.
Possibly invalid data; new reading started but not
completed since last access.
One or more data elements sent with a MEASure or
CONFigure command was ignored by the counter.
Indicates that a legal program command or query
could not be executed because of a hardware problem in the counter. Definition of what constitutes a
hardware problem is completely device specific. This
error message is used when the counter cannot detect the more specific errors described for errors
–241 through –249.
Error Messages
Execution errors
Error
Number
Error Description
description/explanation/examples
–241
Hardware missing
Hardware missing;
(prescaler)"
–254
Media full
–258
Media protected
–260
Expression error
–261
Math error in expression
–270
Macro error
–271
Macro error; out of
name space
Macro error; out of
definition space
Macro syntax error
Indicates that a legal program command or query
could not be executed because of missing counter
hardware; for example, an option was not installed.
Definition of what constitutes missing hardware is completely device specific.
Indicates that a legal program command or query
could not be executed because the media was full;
for example, there is no room on the disk. The definition of what constitutes a full media is device specific.
Indicates that a legal program command or query
could not be executed because the media was protected; for example, the write-protect tab on a disk
was present. The definition of what constitutes protected media is device specific.
Indicates that an expression-program data-elementrelated error occurred. This error message is used
when the counter cannot detect the more specific
errors described for errors –261 through –269.
Indicates that a syntactically correct expression program data element could not be executed due to a
math error; for example, a divide-by-zero was attempted.
Indicates that a macro-related execution error occurred. This error message is used when the counter
cannot detect the more specific error described for errors –271 through –279.
No room for any more macro names.
–272
No room for this macro definition.
Indicates that a syntactically correct macro program
data sequence, according to IEEE-488.2 10.7.2,
could not be executed due to a syntax error within
the macro definition (see IEEE-488.2, 10.7.6.3)
Macro execution er- Indicates that a syntactically correct macro program
ror
data sequence could not be executed due to some
error in the macro definition (see IEEE-488.2,
10.7.6.3)
Error Code -241 to -272 8-9
Error Messages
Execution errors
Error
Number
Error Description
–273
Illegal macro label
–274
–275
–276
–277
–278
description/explanation/examples
Indicates that the macro label defined in the ∗DMC
command was a legal string syntax, but could not be
accepted by the counter (see IEEE-488.2, 10.7.3 and
10.7.6.2); for example, the label was too long, the same
as a common command header, or contained invalid
header syntax.
Macro parameter
Indicates that the macro definition improperly used a
error
macro parameter place holder (see IEEE-488.2,
10.7.3).
Macro definition too Indicates that a syntactically correct macro program
long
data sequence could not be executed because the
string or block contents were too long for the counter to handle (see IEEE-488.2, 10.7.6.1).
Macro recursion er- Indicates that a syntactically correct macro program
ror
data sequence could not be executed because the
counter found it to be recursive (see IEEE-488.2,
10.7.6.6).
Macro redefinition
Indicates that a syntactically correct macro label in
not allowed
the ∗DMC command could not be executed because
the macro label was already defined (see
IEEE-488.2, 10.7.6.4).
Macro header not
Indicates that a syntactically correct macro label in
found
the ∗GMC? query could not be executed because
the header was not previously defined.
8-10 Error Code -273 to -278
Error Messages
Standardized Device specific errors
Error
Number
Error Description
description/explanation/examples
–330
Device specific error This code indicates only that a Device-Dependent
Error as defined in IEEE-488.2, 11.5.1.1.6 has occurred. Contact your local service center.
Memory error
Indicates that an error was detected in the counter’s
memory. Contact your local service center.
PUD memory lost
Indicates that the protected user data saved by the
∗PUD command has been lost. Contact your local
service center.
Save/recall memory Indicates that the nonvolatile calibration data used
lost
by the ∗SAV? command has been lost. Contact your
local service center.
Self-test failed
Contact your local service center.
–350
Queue overflow
–300
–311
–312
–314
A specific code entered into the queue in lieu of the
code that caused the error. This code indicates that
there is no room in the queue and an error occurred
but was not recorded.
Error Code -300 to -350 8-11
Error Messages
Query errors
Error
Number
Error Description
description/explanation/examples
–400
Query error
–410
Query
INTERRUPTED
This code indicates only that a Query Error as defined in IEEE-488.2, 11.5.1.1.7 and 6.3 has occurred.
Indicates that a condition causing an INTERRUPTED Query error occurred (see IEEE-488.2,
6.3.2.3); for example, a query was followed by DAB
or GET before a response was completely sent.
The additional information indicates the IEEE-488.2
message exchange state where the error occurred.
–420
–430
–440
Query INTERRUPTED; in send
state
Query INTERRUPTED; in query
state
Query INTERRUPTED; in response state
Query
UNTERMINATED
Query
UNTERMINATED;
in idle state
Query
UNTERMINATED;
in read state
Query
UNTERMINATED;
in send state
Query
DEADLOCKED
Query
UNTERMINATED
after indefinite response
8-12 Error Code -400 to -440
Indicates that a condition causing an
UNTERMINATED Query error occurred (see
IEEE-488.2, 6.3.2.2); for example, the counter was
addressed to talk and an incomplete program message was received.
The additional information indicates the IEEE-488.2
message exchange state where the error occurred
Indicates that a condition causing an DEADLOCKED
Query error occurred (see IEEE-488.2, 6.3.1.7); for
example, both input buffer and output buffer are full
and the counter cannot continue.
Indicates that a query was received in the same program message after an query requesting an indefinite response was executed (see IEEE-488.2,
6.5.7.5.7.)
Error Messages
CNT-8X Device specific errors (leading 1 only for PM6681)
Error
Number
(1)100
(1)101
(1)102
(1)110
(1)120
(1)130
(1)131
(1)132
(1)133
(1)134
(1)135
(1)136
(1)137
(1)138
(1)139
Error Description
description/explanation/examples
Device operation
gave floating-point
underflow
Device operation
gave floating-point
overflow
Device operation
gave ‘not a number’
A floating-point error occurred during a counter operation.
Invalid measurement function
Save/recall memory
protected
Unsupported command
Unsupported
boolean command
Unsupported decimal command
Unsupported enumerated command
Unsupported auto
command
Unsupported single
shot command
Command queue
full; last command
discarded
The counter was requested to set a measurement
function it could not make.
An attempt was made to write in a protected memory.
Indicates a mismatch between bus and counter capabilities.
A floating-point error occurred during a counter operation.
A floating-point error occurred during a counter operation.
The counter has an internal command queue with
room for about 100 commands. A large number of
commands arrived fast without any intervening
query.
Inappropriate suffix A suffix unit was not appropriate for the command.
unit
Recognized units are Hz (Hertz), s (seconds), Ohm
(Ω) and V (Volt).
Unexpected comA command reached counter execution which
mand to device exe- should have been handled by the bus.
cution
Unexpected query A query reached counter execution which should
to device execution
have been handled by the bus.
Error Code (1)100 to -(1)139 8-13
Error Messages
CNT-8X Device specific errors (leading 1 only for PM6681)
Error
Number
(1)150
(1)160
(1)170
(1)190
(1)191
(1)200
(1)201
(1)202
(1)203
(1)204
(1)205
(1)210
(1)211
(1)212
(1)213
Error Description
description/explanation/examples
Only a fixed, specific math expression is recognized
by the counter, and this was not it.
A new bus command caused a running measurement to be broken off.
An internal setting inconsistency caused the instrument to go to default setting.
An error has occurred during calibration of the instrument.
The input hysteresis values found by the calibration
routine was out of range. Did you remember to remove the input signal?
Message exchange An error occurred in the message exchange handler
error
(generic error).
Reset during bus in- The instrument was waiting for more bus input, but
put
the waiting was broken by the operator.
Reset during bus
The instrument was waiting for more bus output to be
output
read, but the waiting was broken by the operator.
Bad message exAn internal error in the message exchange handler.
change control state
Unexpected reason A spurious GPIB interrupt occurred, not conforming
for GPIB interrupt
to any valid reason like an incoming byte, address
change, etc.
No listener on bus This error is generated when the counter is an acwhen trying to retive talker, and tries to send a byte on the bus, but
spond
there are no active listeners.
(This may occur if the controller issues the device
talker address before its own listener address, which
some PC controller cards has been known to do)
Mnemonic table er- An abnormal condition occurred in connection with
ror
the mnemonics tables (generic error).
Wrong macro table
The macro definitions have been corrupted (could
checksum found
be loss of memory).
Wrong hash table
The hash table has been corrupted. Could be bad
checksum found
memory chips or address logic. Contact your local
service center.
RAM failure to hold The memory did not retain information written to it.
Could be bad memory chips or address logic. Coninformation (hash
tact your local service center.
table)
Bad math expression format
Measurement broken off
Instrument set to
default
Error during calibration
Hysteresis calibration failed
8-14 Error Code (1)150 to -(1)213
Error Messages
CNT-8X Device specific errors (leading 1 only for PM6681)
Error
Number
Error Description
description/explanation/examples
(1)220
Hash table overflow The hash table was too small to hold all mnemonics. Ordinarily indicates a failure to read (RAM or
ROM) correctly. Contact your local service center.
Parser error
Generic error in the parser.
(1)221
Illegal parser call
(1)222
Unrecognized input A character not in the valid IEEE488.2 character set
character
was part of a command.
Internal parser error The parser reached an unexpected internal state.
(1)214
(1)223
(1)230
(1)231
(1)232
(1)233
(1)234
(1)235
(1)240
Response formatter
error
Bad response formatter call
Bad response formatter call (eom)
Invalid function
code to response
formatter
Invalid header type
to response formatter
Invalid data type to
response formatter
Unrecognized error
number in error
queue
The parser was called when it should not be active.
Generic error in the response formatter.
The response formatter was called when it should
not be active.
The response formatter was called to output an end
of message, when it should not be active.
The response formatter was requested to output
data for an unrecognized function.
The response formatter was called with bad data for
the response header (normally empty)
The response formatter was called with bad data for
the response data.
An error number was found in the error queue for
which no matching error information was found.
See also Error Messages in Appendix 1 of the Operators Manual.
Error Code (1)214 to -(1)240 8-15
Error Messages
This page is intentionally left blank.
8-16 Error Code
Chapter 9
Command Reference
This page is intentionally left blank.
9-2 Command Reference
Abort
:ABORt
Command Reference 9-3
:ABORt
PM6680B/81/85
Abort Measurement
The ABORt command terminates a measurement. The trigger subsystem state is
set to “idle-state”.
Type of command:
Aborts all previous measurements if *WAI is not used.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-4 Command Reference
Arming Subsystem
:ARM
[ :STARt / :SEQuence [ 1 ] ]
:LAYer2
:[ IMMediate ]
:SOURce
[ :LAYer [ 1 ] ]
:COUNt
:DELay
:ECOunt
:SLOPe
:SOURce
:STOP / SEQuence2
[ :LAYer [ 1 ] ]
8
BUS | IMMediate
8
<Numeric value> | MIN | MAX
8 <Numeric value> | MIN | MAX
<Numeric value> | MIN | MAX
POSitive|NEGative
EXTernal2 | External4 | IMMediate
8
8
8
8
:DELay
:ECOunt
:SLOPe
:SOURce
8
8
8
<Numeric value> | MIN | MAX
(Only PM6680B /
PM6681)
<Numeric value> | MIN | MAX
(Only PM6680B / PM6681)
POSitive | NEGative
EXTernal2 | EXTernal4 | IMMediate | TIMerf
Command Reference 9-5
:ARM :COUNt
8«<Numeric value>|MIN|MAX»
PM6680B/81/85
No. of Measurements on each Bus arm
This count variable controls the upward exit of the “wait-for-bus-arm” state
(:ARM:STARt:LAY1). The counter loops the trigger subsystem downwards
COUNt number of times before it exits to the idle state.
This means that a COUNt No. of measurements can be done for each Bus arming
or INITiate.
L
The actual number of measurements made on each INIT is equal to:
(:ARM:START:COUNT)*(:TRIG:START:COUNT)
Parameters:
<Numeric value> is a number between 1 and 65 535. (1 switches the function OFF.)
MIN gives 1
MAX gives 65 535
Returned format:
<Numeric value>¿
Example:
SEND® :ARM:COUN8100¿
*RST condition:
1
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed
9-6 Command Reference
:ARM :DELay
PM6680B/81/85
8 «<Numeric value> | MIN | MAX»
Delay after External Start Arming
This command sets a delay between the pulse on the arm input and the time when
the counter starts measuring. The delay is only active when the following is selected:
:ARM:STARt:SOURce 8 EXT4.
Range: 200 ns to 1.67 s.
+
The optional node [:FIXed] is only accepted by PM6681.
Parameters:
<Numeric value> is a number between 200*10–9 and 1.67s.
MIN gives 0 which switches the delay OFF.
MAX gives 1.67 s
Returned format:
<Numeric value>¿
Example:
SEND® :ARM:DEL 80.1¿
*RST condition:
0
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:ARM :ECOunt
PM6680B PM6681
8 «<Numeric value> | MIN | MAX»
External Events before Start Arming
This command sets the number of negative edges required on the B-input (EXT2)
before the counter starts measuring (Start Arming Delay by events). Start Arming
delay by events cannot be used at the same time as stop Arming delay by events
(:ARM:STOP:ECO).
+
The delay is only active when :ARM:START:SOUR 8EXT2|EXT4 is selected.
Only one of the delays: :ARM:STAR:DEL, :ARM:STOP:DEL,
:ARM:STAR:ECO, and :ARM:STOP:ECO can be used at a time. When you program this delay, the other three delays will be reset to their *RST values.
Parameters:
<Numeric value> is a number between 2 and 16 777 215. 1 switches the delay by events OFF.
SEND® :ARM:ECO 825¿
Returned format:
*RST condition:
<Numeric value>¿
1
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-7
:ARM :LAYer2
PM6680B/81/85
Bus Arming Override
This command overrides the waiting for bus arm, provided the source is set to bus.
When this command is issued, the counter will immediately exit the “wait-for-busarm” state.
The counter generates an error if it receives this command when the trigger subsystem is not in the “wait-for-bus-arm” state.
If the Arming source is set to Immediate, this command is ignored.
Example:
SEND® :ARM:LAY2¿
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:ARM :LAYer2 :SOURce
8 «BUS | IMMediate»
PM6680B/81/85
Bus Arming On/Off
Switches between Bus and Immediate mode for the “wait-for-bus-arm” function,
(layer 2). GET and *TRG triggers the counter if Bus is selected as source.
If the counter receives GET/ *TRG when not in “wait-for-bus-arm” state, it ignores
the trigger and generates an error.
It also generates an error if it receives GET/ *TRG and bus arming is switched off
(set to IMMediate).
Returned format:
BUS|IMM¿
Example:
SEND® :ARM:LAY2:SOUR 8 BUS¿
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-8 Command Reference
:ARM :SLOPe
PM6680B/81/85
8 «POSitive|NEGative»
External Arming Start Slope
Sets the slope for the start arming condition.
Returned format:
POS|NEG¿
Example:
SEND® :ARM:SLOP 8 NEG¿
*RST condition:
POS
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:ARM :SOURce
PM6680B/81/85
8 «EXTernal2 | EXTernal4 | IMMediate»
External Arming Start Source
Selects channel 4 (Input E) as arming input, or switches off the start arming function. When switched off the DELay is inactive.
Parameters:
EXTernal2 is input B
(Only PM6680B/81)
EXTernal4 is input E
IMMediate is Start arming OFF
Returned format:
EXT2 | EXT4 | IMM¿
Example:
SEND® :ARM:SOUR 8 EXT4¿
*RST condition:
IMM
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-9
:ARM :STOP :DELay
8 «<Numeric value> | MIN | MAX»
PM6680B PM6681
Delay after External Stop Arming
This command sets a delay between stop slope of the pulse on the arm input and
the time when the counter stops measuring. The delay is only active when the following is selected:
:ARM:STOP:SOURce 8 EXT2|EXT4.
Range: 200 ns to 1.67 s.
+
The optional node [:FIXed] is only accepted by PM6681.
Parameters:
<Numeric value> is a number between 200*10–9 and 1.67s.
MIN gives 0 which switches the delay OFF.
MAX gives 1.67 s
Returned format:
<Numeric value>¿
Example:
SEND® :ARM:STOP:DEL 8 0.1¿
*RST condition:
0
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:ARM :STOP :ECOunt
8 «<Numeric value> | MIN | MAX»
PM6680B/81/85
External Events before Stop Arming
This command sets the number of stop slopes are required on the external stop
arming source before the counter stop measuring (Stop Arming Delay by events).
Stop Arming delay by events cannot be used at the same time as start Arming delay by events (:ARM:START:ECO).
+
The delay is only active when :ARM:STOP:SOUR EXT2|EXT4 is selected.
Only one of the delays: :ARM:STAR:DEL, :ARM:STOP:DEL,
:ARM:STAR:ECO, and :ARM:STOP:ECO can be used at a time. When you program this delay, the other three delays will be reset to their *RST values.
Parameters:
<Numeric value> is a number between 2 and 16 777 215. 1 switches the delay by events OFF.
SEND® :ARM:STOP:ECO 8 25¿
Returned format:
*RST condition:
<Numeric value>¿
1
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-10 Command Reference
:ARM :STOP :SLOPe
PM6680B/81/85
8 «POSitive | NEGative»
External Stop Arming Slope
Sets the slope for the stop arming condition.
Returned format:
POS|NEG¿
Example:
SEND® :ARM:STOP:SLOP 8 NEG¿
*RST condition:
POS
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:ARM :STOP :SOURce
PM6680B/81/85
8 «EXTernal2 | EXTernal4 | IMMediate»
External Stop Arming Source
Selects between channel 2 (Input B) and channel 4 (Input E) as stop arming input,
or switches off the stop arming function.
Parameters:
EXTernal2 is input B
(Only PM6680B/81)
EXTernal4 is input E
IMMediate is Stop arming OFF
Returned format:
EXT4|IMM¿
Example:
SEND® :ARM:STOP:SOUR 8 EXT4¿
*RST condition:
IMM
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-11
This page is intentionally left blank.
9-12 Command Reference
Calculate Subsystem
:CALCulate
8 ON|OFF
:STATe
:DATA?
:IMMediate
:MATH
8 <Numeric expression>
8 ON|OFF
[:EXPRession]
:STATe
:AVERage
:LIMit
8 ON|OFF
8 MIN|MAX|SDEViation|MEAN
8 <Numeric value>|MIN|MAX
[:STATe]
:TYPE
:COUNt
[:STATe] 8
:UPPer
:LOWer
:FAIL?
ON|OFF
[:DATA]
:STATe
8 <Numeric value>|MIN|MAX
8 ON|OFF
[:DATA]
:STATe
8 <Numeric value>|MIN|MAX
8 ON|OFF
Command Reference 9-13
:CALCulate :AVERage :COUNt
8 < No. of samples>
PM6680B PM6681
Sample Size for Statistics
Sets the number of samples to use in statistics sampling.
Parameters:
<No. of samples> is a number in the range of 1 to 65535.
Returned format:
< No. of samples>¿
*RST condition:
100
:CALCulate :AVERage :STATe
8 < Boolean >
Enable Statistics
PM6680B PM6681
Switches On/Off the statistical function. Note that the CALCulate subsystem is automatically enabled when the statistical functions are switched on. This means that
other enabled calculate sub-blocks are indirectly switched on. The statistics must
be enabled before the measurements are performed. When the statistical function
is enabled, the counter will keep the trigger subsystem initiated until the
:CALC:AVER:COUNT variable is reached. This is done without any change in the
trigger subsystem settings. Consider that the trigger subsystem is programmed to
perform 1000 measurements when initiated. In such a case, the counter must
make 10000 measurements if the statistical function requires 9500 measurements
because the number of measurements must be a multiple of the number of measurements programmed in trigger subsystem (1000 in this example).
Parameters
<Boolean> = ( 1/ON | 0/OFF )
Returned format:
<1|0¿
*RST condition:
OFF
9-14 Command Reference
:CALCulate :AVERage :TYPE
PM6680B PM6681
8 «MAX|MIN|MEAN|SDEViation»
Statistical Type
Selects the statistical function to be performed.
+
You must use :CALC:DATA? to read the result of statistical operations. :READ?,
:FETC? will only send the results that the statistical operation is based on.
Parameters:
MAX returns the maximum value of all samples taken under :CALC:AVER
control.
MIN returns the minimum value of all samples taken under :CALC:AVER control.
1 n
MEAN returns the mean value of the samples taken: x = å X i
n i =1
SDEV Returns the standard deviation: s =
Returned format:
MAX|MIN|MEAN|SDEV¿
*RST condition:
MEAN
1 æ
ç
n - 1è
åX
2
i
-
1
n
ö
( å X ) ÷ø
2
i
:CALCulate :DATA?
PM6680B/81/85
Fetch calculated data
Fetches data calculated in the post processing block. Use this command to fetch
the calculated result without making a new measurement.
Returned Format:
<Decimal data>¿
Example for PM6685:
SEND® :CALC:MATH:STAT 8 ON;:CALC:MATH 8 (X 8 - 8 10.7E6);:INIT;
*OPC
Wait for operation complete
SEND® :CALC:DATA?
READ¬ <Measurement 8 result 8 minus 8 10.7E6>
Example for PM6680B/81
SEND® :CALC:MATH:STAT8ON;:CALC:MATH8(((18*8X)8-810.7E6)8/81)
;:init; *OPC
Wait for operation complete
SEND® :CALC:DATA?
READ¬ <Measurement 8 result 8 minus 8 10.7E6>
*RST condition:
Event, no *RST condition.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, Confirmed
Command Reference 9-15
:CALCulate :IMMediate
PM6680B/81/85
Recalculate Data
This event causes the calculate subsystem to reprocess the statistical function on
the sense data without reacquiring the data. Query returns this reprocessed data.
+
This command is not very useful in PM6685, but is accepted to maintain compatibility with the other counters in the CNT-8X series of counters.
<Decimal data>¿
Where: <Decimal data> is the recalculated data.
Returned format:
Example:
SEND® :CALC:AVER:STAT 8 ON;TYPE 8 SDEV;:INIT;*OPC
Wait for operation complete
SEND®
READ¬
SEND®
SEND®
READ¬
:CALC:DATA?
<Value 8 of 8 standard 8 deviation>
:CALC:AVER:TYPE 8 MEAN
:CALC:IMM?
<Mean 8 value>
*RST condition:
Event, no *RST condition.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, Confirmed.
:CALCulate :LIMit
8 <Boolean>
Enable Monitoring of Parameter Limits
PM6680B/81/85
Turns On/Off the limit-monitoring calculations.
Limit monitoring makes it is possible to get a service request when the measurement value falls below a lower limit, or rises above an upper limit.
Two status bits are defined to support limit-monitoring. One is set when the results
are greater than the UPPer limit, the other is set when the result is less than the
LOWer limit. The bits are enabled using the standard *SRE command and
:STAT:DREG0:ENAB. Using both these bits, it is possible to get a service request
when a value passes out of a band ( UPPer is set at the upper band border and
LOWer at the lower border) OR when a measurement value enters a band (LOWer
set at the upper band border and UPPer set at the lower border).
Turning the limit-monitoring calculations On/Off will not influence the status register mask bits, which determine whether or not a service request will be generated
when a limit is reached. Note that the calculate subsystem is automatically enabled when limit-monitoring is switched on. This means that other enabled calculate sub-blocks are indirectly switched on.
Parameters
<Boolean> = ( 1/ON | 0/OFF )
Returned format:
1|0¿
*RST condition:
OFF
See also:
Example 1 in Chapter 4 deals with limit-monitoring.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-16 Command Reference
:CALCulate :LIMit :FAIL?
PM6680B/81/85
Limit Fail
Returns a 1 if the limit testing has failed (the measurement result has passed the
limit), and a 0 if the limit testing has passed.
The following events reset the fail flag:
– Power-on
– *RST
– A :CALC:LIM:STAT OFF ® :CALC:LIM:STAT 8 ON transition
– Reading a 1 with this command.
1| 0¿
Returned format:
Example:
SEND® SENS:FUNC 8 FREQ;:CALC:LIM:STAT 8 ON;:CALC:LIM 8 :HIGH8
1E3;READ?;*WAI;:CALC:LIM:FAIL?
READ¬ 1
if frequency ia above 1kHz, otherwize 0
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:CALCulate :LIMit :LOWer
PM6680B/81/85
8 «<Decimal data>|MAX|MIN»
Set Low Limit
Sets the value of the ‘Lower Limit’ , i.e., the lowest measurement result allowed before the counter generates a 1 that can be read with :CALCulate:LIMit:FAIL?,
or by reading the corresponding status byte.
Parameters
Parameter range: –9.9*10+37 to +9.9*10+37.
Returned format:
< Decimal data>¿
*RST condition:
0
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-17
:CALCulate :LIMit :LOWer :STATe
Calculate
8 <Boolean>
PM6680B/81/85
Check Against Lower Limit
Selects if the measured value should be checked against the lower limit.
Parameters
<Boolean> = ( 1/ON | 0/OFF )
Returned format:
1| 0 ¿
*RST condition:
0
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0 confirmed.
:CALCulate :LIMit :UPPer
8 «<Decimal data>|MAX|MIN»
Set Upper Limit
PM6680B/81/85
Sets the value of the ‘Upper Limit’, i.e., the highest measurement result allowed
before the counter generates a 1 that can be read with :CALCulate:LIMit:FAIL?, or by reading the corresponding status byte.
Parameters
Range: –9.9*10+37 to +9.9*10+37
Returned format:
<Decimal data>¿
*RST condition:
0
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-18 Command Reference
:CALCulate :LIMit :UPPer :STATe
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Boolean>
Check Against Upper Limit
Selects if the measured value should be checked against the upper limit.
Parameters
<Boolean> = ( 1/ON | 0/OFF )
Returned format:
1| 0 ¿
*RST condition:
0
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-19
:CALCulate :MATH
8 (<expression>)
PM6685
Select Mathematical Expression
Defines the mathematical expression used for mathematical operations. This function equals the nulling function from the front panel.
+
+
The data type <expression data> must be typed within parentheses.
The operand must be surrounded by space characters.
Parameters
<expression> is: (X + K) No deviations are allowed from this form.
K can be any positive or negative numerical constant within the range –9.9E+37 to
+9.9E+37
X is the measurement result.
Returned format:
<expression>¿ Where <expression> is the expression selected.
Example This example subtracts 10700000 from the measurement result.
SEND®:CALC:MATH 8 (X 8 – 8 10.7E6)
This example defines the mathematical expression, enables postprocessing
and mathematics, make a measurement, and fetches the result:
SEND®:CALC:MATH 8 (X 8 - 8 10.7E6);MATH:STATE 8 ON;:READ?
Example 2
*RST condition:
( X - 10000
.
E + 7)
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0 Confirmed.
9-20 Command Reference
:CALCulate :MATH
PM6680B PM6681
8 (<expression>)
Select Mathematical Expression
Defines the mathematical expression used for mathematical operations. This function equals the nulling function from the front panel.
+
The data type <expression data> must be typed within parentheses.
Parameters
<expression> is one of the following two mathematical expressions:
((K8*_X)8+8L)8/8M or ((K8/8X)8+8L)8/8M No deviations are allowed.
K, L and M can be any positive or negative numerical constant, or use XOLD for the
last, previously measured value.
Each operand must be surrounded by space characters.
Example
SEND®:CALC:MATH 8 (((1 8 * 8 X) 8 – 8 0) 8 / 8 XOLD)
This example gives a relative result from the last measuring result.
*RST condition:
((( 1 * X ) + 0 )
Returned format:
1)
(No calculation)
<expression>¿
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0 Confirmed.
:CALCulate :MATH :STATe
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Boolean>
Enable Mathematics
Switches on/off the mathematical function. Note that the CALCulate subsystem is
automatically enabled when MATH operations are switched on. This means that
other enabled calculate sub-blocks are indirectly switched on. Switching off mathematics, however, does not switch off the CALCulate subsystem.
Parameters:
<Boolean> = ( 1/ON | 0/OFF )
Returned syntax:
0|1
Example
SEND®:CALC:MATH:STAT 8 1
This example switches on mathematics.
*RST condition:
OFF
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-21
:CALCulate :STATe
PM6680B/81/85
Calculate
8 <Boolean>
Enable Calculation
Switches on/off the complete post-processing block. If disabled, neither mathematics or limit-monitoring can be done.
Parameter
<Boolean> = ( 1/ON | 0/OFF )
SEND® :CALC:STAT 8 1
Switches on Post Processing.
Returned format:
1|0¿
∗RST condition:
OFF
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, Confirmed
9-22 Command Reference
Calibration Subsystem
:CALibration
:INTerpolator
:AUTO
+
8 <Boolean>|ONCE
(Only PM6680B, PM6685)
PM6681 has factory calibrated interpolators, and calibration cannot be changed
by the operator.
Calibration of the PM6681 input hysteresis is done in the Diagnostis subsystem.
Command Reference 9-23
:CALibration :INTerpolator :AUTO
8 <Boolean>| ONCE
PM6680B/85
Calibration of Interpolator
The PM6680B/85 are reciprocal counters that uses an interpolating technique to
increase the resolution. In time measurements, for example, interpolation increases the resolution from 100 ns to 0.25 ns.
The counter calibrates the interpolators automatically once for every measurement
when this command is ON. When this command is OFF, the counter does no calibrations but uses the values from the last preceding calibration. The intention of
this command is to turn off the auto calibration for applications that dump measurements into the internal memory. This will increase the measurement speed.
Parameters
<Boolean> = ( 1 | ON / 0 | OFF )
Returned format:
*RST condition:
1|0¿
ON
See also:
Chapter 6, ‘How to Measure Fast’.
9-24 Command Reference
Configure Function
Set up Instrument for Measurement
:CONFigure
[:SCALar]<Measuring Function>
:ARRay<Measuring Function>
+
8 <Parameters>,(<Channels>)]
8 (<Array Size>)[,<Parameters>,(<Channels>)]
The array size for :MEASure and :CONFigure, and the channels, are expression
data that must be in parentheses ( ).
Measuring Function, Parameters and Channels are explained on page 9-54.
The counter uses the default Parameters and Channels when you omit them in
the command.
Command Reference 9-25
:CONFigure :<Measuring Function>
[8 <parameters>[,(<channels>)]]
PM6680B/81/85
Configure the counter for a single measurement
Use the configure command instead of the measure query when you want to
change other settings, for instance, the input settings before making the measurement and fetching the result.
The :CONFigure command controls the settings of the Input, Sense and Trigger subsystems in the counter in order to make the best possible measurement. It also
switches off any calculations with :CALC:STATE 8 OFF.
:READ? or :INITiate;:FETCh? will make the measurement and read the resulting
measured value.
Since you may not know exactly what settings the counter has chosen to configure
itself for the measurement, send an *RST before doing other manual set up measurements.
Parameters
<Measuring Function>, <Parameters> and <Channels> are defined on page 9-54.
The optional parameter :SCALar means that one measurement is to be done.
<String>¿
<String> contains the current measuring function and channel. The response is a
<String data element> containing the same answer as for [:SENSe]:FUNCtion?.
Returned format:
Example:
SEND® :CONF:FREQ:RAT8(@3),(@1)
Configures the counter for freq. ratio C/A.
See also:
‘Explanations of the Measuring Functions’ starting on page 9-59.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-26 Command Reference
80B/81/85
:CONFigure :ARRay :<Measuring Function>
8 (<array size>)[,<parameters> [,(<channels>)]]
Configure the counter for an array of measurements
The :CONFigure:ARRay command differs from the :CONFigure command in
that it sets up the counter to perform the number of measurements you choose in
the <array size>.
To perform the selected function, you must trigger the counter with the :READ:ARRay? or :INITiate;:FETCh:ARRay? queries.
Parameters
<array size> sets the number of measurements in the array (1 to 2500).
<Measuring Function>, <Parameters>, and <Channels> are defined on page 9-54.
Example:
SEND® :CONF:ARR:PER 8 (7),5E–3,1E–6,(@4)
This example sets up the counter to make seven period measurements. The expected result is 5 ms, and the required resolution is 1 ms. The EXT ARM input is
the measuring input.
To make the measurements and fetch the seven measurement results:
SEND® :READ:ARR? 8 7
READ¬ 5.23421E-3,5.12311E-3,5.87526E-3, 8
5.50345E-3,5.33901E-3,5.25501E-3, 8 5.03571E-3
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-27
This page is intentionally left blank.
9-28 Command Reference
Diagnostics Subsystem
:DIAGnostic
:CALibration
:INPut[1]
:INPut2
:HYSTeresis 8
OFF | ONCE
:HYSTeresis 8
OFF | ONCE
Command Reference 9-29
:DIAGnostic:CALibration:INPut[1|2]:HYSTeresis
8 «OFF | ONCE»
81
Fetch
Input comparator hysteresis calibration
These two commands measure and save the hysteresis levels of the input comparator. This makes it possible to achieve a trig level accuracy of 2.5 mV, which is
important in measurement functions such as phase, to get the best possible results.
+
Since the calibration compensates for the temperature drift of the input amplifier, it should be made at the same temperature as the accurate measurement
is to be made at.
Before sending these commands, be sure to disconnect any signal leads from the
input connector of the input you want to calibrate.
If error code 1191 is generated, the calibration constants are out of range and you
must calibrate again. Check that no cables are connected to input A or input B before recalibrating.
When the input calibration procedure can be done without error codes, the calibration is correct.
Example:
SEND® :DIAG:CAL:INP:HYST 8 ONCE
This string calibrates both input A and input B.
OFF ¿
When queried, these commands always return OFF .
Returned format:
*RST condition:
*RST does not affect these calibration data.
9-30 Command Reference
Display Subsystem
:DISPlay
:ENABle 8
ON OFF
Command Reference 9-31
:DISPlay :ENABle
8 < Boolean >
PM6680B/81/85
Display State
Turns On/Off the updating of the entire display section. This can be used for security reasons or to improve the GPIB speed, since the display does not need to be
updated. Turning off the display reduces the dead time between measurements
by about 7 ms.
When the display is turned off, the information about the measurement resolution
is lost. That is, the counter will always send a full 12 digit mantissa independent of
the measurement resolution.
Parameters:
Where <Boolean> = (1 / ON | 0 / OFF)
Returned format:
1|0 ¿
*RST condition:
ON
See also:
Chapter 6, ‘How to Measure Fast’.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-32 Command Reference
Fetch Function
:FETCh
[:SCALar]?
:ARRay? 8
<Array Size>|MAX
Command Reference 9-33
:FETCh?
PM6680B/81/85
Fetch One Result
The fetch query retrieves one measuring result from the measurement result buffer
of the counter without making new measurements. Fetch does not work unless a
measurement has been made by the :INITiate, :MEASure?, or :READ? commands.
If the counter has made an array of measurements, :FETCh? fetches the first
measuring results first. The second :FETCh? fetches the second result and so on.
When the last measuring result has been fetched, fetch starts over again with the
first result.
The same measuring result can be fetched again and again, as long as the result
is valid, i.e., until the following occurs:
– *RST is received.
– an :INITiate, 8 :MEASure or :READ command is executed
– any reconfiguration is done.
– an acquisition of a new reading is started.
If the measuring result in the output buffer is invalid but a new measurement has
been started, the fetch query completes when a new measuring result becomes
valid. If no new measurement has been started, an error is returned.
Where the optional :SCALar means that one result is retrieved.
<data>¿
The format of the returned data is determined by the format commands :FORMat
and :FORMat:FIXed.
Returned format:
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-34 Command Reference
:FETCh :ARRay?
PM6680B/81/85
8 «<fetch array size>|MAX»
Fetch an Array of Results
:FETCh:ARRay? query differs from the :FETCh? query by fetching several measuring results at once.
An array of measurements must first be made by the commands. :INITiate,
:MEASure:ARRay? or :CONFigure:ARRay;:READ?
If the array size is set to a positive value, the first measurement made is the first
result to be fetched.
When the counter has made an array of measurements, :FETCh:ARRay? 8 10
fetches the first 10 measuring results from the output queue. The second
:FETCh:ARRay? 8 10 fetches the result 11 to 20, and so on. When the last measuring result has been fetched, fetch:array starts over again with the first result.
In totalizing for instance, you may want to read the last measurement result instead of the first one. This is possible if you set the array size to a negative number. Example: :FETCh:ARRay? 8 –5 fetches the last five results. The output
queue pointer is not altered when the array size is negative. That is, the example
above always gives the last five results every time the command is sent.
:FETCh:ARRay? 8 –1 is useful to fetch intermediate results in free-running or array measurements without interrupting the measurement.
Parameters
:ARRay means that an array of retrievals are done for each :FETCh command.
<fetch array size> is the number of retrievals in the array. This number must not
exceed the number of measuring results in the measurement result buffer. The
<SIZE> parameter maximum limit is depending on the
:SENSe:INTernal:FORMat command as follows:
Array Size
Format
Measuring function
PM6680B/85 PM6681
Real:
All functions
2048
7019
Packed:
Frequency, Period, Ratio Totalize
2166
6143
Pulse Width
764
4466
Time-Interval, Rise/Fall time
4466
Phase, Duty Cycle,Volt
7019
Low resolution Frequency and Period
8191
Low Res. Time-Interval and Pulse Width
4095
MAX means that all the results in the output buffer will be fetched.
Command Reference 9-35
<data>[,<data>]¿
The format of the returned data is determined by the format commands :FORMat
and :FORMat:FIXed.
Returned format:
Example:
If :MEAS:ARR:FREQ? 8 (4) gives the results 1.1000,1.2000,1.3000,1.4000
:FETC:ARR 8 2 fetches the results 1.1000,1.2000
:FETC:ARR 8 2 once more fetches the results 1.3000,1.4000
:FETC:ARR 8 –1 always fetches the last result 1.4000
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-36 Command Reference
Format Subsystem
:FORMat
[:DATA]
:FIXed
:SREGister
:TINFormation[:STATe]
8
8
8
8
ASCii REAL[, <Numeric value> | AUTO]
ON OFF
ASCii | BINary | HEXadecimal | OCTal
<Boolean>
Command Reference 9-37
:FORMat
PM6680B/85
8 «ASCii|REAL»
Response Data Type
Sets the format in which the result will be sent on the bus.
Parameters
ASCii will send the measurement result in ASCii form.<sign><mantissa value>E<sign><exponent value>
<sign> = + or –
<mantissa value> = 1 to 12 digits (depending on
measuring resolution) plus one decimal point.
<exponent value> = 1 to 3 digits
REAL will send the result in binary IEEE Double Precision floating-point format in a
block-data element. #18<8 bytes real>. The <8 bytes real> is a double precision binary
floating-point response according to IEEE488.2/IEEE754. This means that the eight
bytes are sent in the following order:
First byte: <sign><7 MSB of the exponent>
Second byte: <4 LSB of the exponent><4 MSB of the fraction>
Third through eight byte: <48 LSB of the fraction>
Returned format:
ASC|REAL¿
*RST condition:
ASCii
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:FORMat
8 «ASCii|REAL»[, <Numeric value> | AUTO]
PM6681
Response Data Type
Sets the format in which the result will be sent on the bus.
This command is identical to the above described command for the PM6680B/85,
except for the optional length parameter.
Parameters:
ASCii: The length controls the number of digits in the mantissa and may be set to values from
2 to 12 or AUTO.
AUTO: The length will be controlled by the resolution of each measurement result. Auto will be
ignored when :INTernal:FORMat 8 PACKed or
:DISPlay:ENABled 8 OFF is selected.
REAL: The length parameter is ignored, ‘reals’ are always output in 8 byte format.
Returned format:
ASC|REAL, <Numeric value> | AUTO¿
*RST condition:
ASCii, AUTO
See also:
:FORMat :TINFormation command
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-38 Command Reference
:FORMat :FIXed
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Boolean>
Response Data Format
Sets the ASCii format to fixed. This results in the following response format:
<sign><mantissa value>E<sign><exponent value>
Where:
<sign> = +|–
<mantissa value> = 12 digits plus one decimal point.
<exponent value> = 3 digits
Parameters
+
<Boolean> = (1 / ON | 0 / OFF)
The counter will add leading zeroes when the measurement resolution is less
than 12 digits.
Returned format:
1|0 ¿
*RST condition:
OFF
:FORMat :SREGister
PM6681
8 «ASCii | BINary | HEXadecimal | OCTal»
Data Type for Status Messages
This command selects the data type of the response to queries for any CONDition,
EVENt and ENABle register. This includes the IEEE 488.2 status register queries.
Parameters:
ASCii
The data is transferred as ASCii bytes in NR1 format.
HEXadecimal
The data is encoded as non-decimal numeric, base 16, preceded by ‘#H’ as specified in IEEE 488.2
The data is encoded as non-decimal numeric base 8, preceded by ‘#Q’ as specified in IEEE 488.2
The data is encoded as non-decimal numeric, base 2, preceded by ‘#B’ as specified in IEEE 488.2
OCTal
BINary
Returned format:
*RST condition:
ASCii | BINary | HEXadecimal | OCTal ¿
ASCii
Command Reference 9-39
:FORMat :TINFormation
8 Boolean
PM6681
Timestamping On/Off Timestamping;On/Off
This command turns on/off the time stamping of measurements. Time stamping is
always done at the start of a measurement with a resolution of 125 ns, and is
saved in the measurement buffer together with the measurement result.
The setting of this command will affect the output format of the MEASure, READ
and FETCh queries.
For :FETCh:SCALar?, :READ:SCALar? and :MEASure:SCALar? the readout will consist of two values instead of one. The first will be the measured value and the next
one will be the timestamp value.
In :FORMat ASCii mode, the result will be given as a floating-point number (NR3
format) followed by the timestamp in seconds in the NR2 format ddd.ddddddddd
(12 digits). In :FORMat REAL mode, the result will be given as an eight-byte block
containing the floating-point measured value, followed by a four-byte block containing the integer timestamp count, where each count represents 125 nanoseconds.
When doing readouts in array form, with :FETCh :ARRay?, :READ :ARRay?, or
:MEASure :ARRay? , the response will consist of alternating measurement values
and timestamp values, formatted the same way as for scalar readout. All values
will be separated by commas.
Parameters
<Boolean> = (1 / ON | 0 / OFF)
Returned format:
1|0 ¿
*RST condition:
OFF
9-40 Command Reference
Initiate Subsystem
:INITiate
[:IMMediate ]
:CONTinuous 8
ON | OFF
Command Reference 9-41
:INITiate
PM6680B/81/85
Initiate Measurement
The :INITiate command initiates a measurement. Executing an :INITiate command changes the counter’s trigger subsystem state from “idle-state” to
“wait-for-bus-arm-state” (see Figure 6-15). The trigger subsystem will continue to
the other states, depending on programming. With the *RST setting, the trigger
subsystem will bypass all its states and make a measurement, then return to idle
state. See also ‘How to use the Trigger Subsystem’ at the end of this chapter.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:INITiate :CONTinuous
8 <Boolean>
Continuously Initiated
PM6680B/81/85
The trigger system could continuously be initiated with this command. When Continuous is OFF, the trigger system remains in the “idle-state” until Continuous is set
to ON or the :INITiate is received. When Continuous is set to ON, the completion of a measurement cycle immediately starts a new trigger cycle without entering the “idle-state”, i.e., the counter is continuously measuring and storing response data.
Returned format:
<Boolean>¿
*RST condition:
OFF
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-42 Command Reference
Input Subsystems
n INPUT A
:INPut[1]
:ATTenuation
:COUPling
:IMPedance
[:EVENt]
:HYSTeresis
:LEVel
:SLOPe
:FILTer
:AUTO
:AUTO
[:LPASs]
[:STATe]
8 <Numeric value>|MIN|MAX (1|10)
8 AC|DC
8 <Numeric value>|MIN|MAX
(Not PM6685)
(Not PM6685)
«<Decimal data>|MAX |MIN»
ON|OFF|ONCE
<Numeric value>|MIN|MAX
ON|OFF|ONCE
POS|NEG
(Only PM6685)
(Only PM6685)
8
8
8
8
8
8 ON|OFF
n INPUT B (Not PM6685)
:INPut2
8 <Numeric value>|MIN|MAX (1|10)
8 AC|DC
8 <Numeric value>|MIN|MAX
:ATTenuation
:COUPling
:IMPedance
[:EVENt]
:LEVel
:SLOPe
:COMMon
n INPUT E
:AUTO
8
8
8
8
<Numeric value>|MIN|MAX
ON|OFF|ONCE
POS|NEG
ON|OFF
:INPut4
[:EVENt]
:SLOPe
8 POS|NEG
Command Reference 9-43
:INPut«[1]|2» :ATTenuation
8 «<Numeric value>|MAX|MIN»
PM6680B PM6681
Attenuation
Attenuates the input signal with 1 or 10. The attenuation is automatically set if the
input level is set to AUTO.
Parameters:
<Numeric values> â 5, and MIN gives attenuation 1.
<Numeric values> > 5, and MAX gives attenuation 10.
Returned format:
1.00000000000E+000|1.00000000000E+001 ¿
Example for Input A (1)
SEND→ :INP:ATT 8 10
Example for Input B (2)
SEND® :INP2:ATT 8 10
Input A (1) and Input B (2): 1 (but set by autotrigger since AUTO is on after *RST. (:INP:LEV:AUTO 8 ON).
*RST condition
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:INPut«[1]|2» :COUPling
8 «AC|DC»
AC/DC Coupling
PM6680B PM6681
Selects AC coupling (normally used for frequency measurements), or DC coupling (normally used for time measurements).
Returned format:
AC|DC¿
Example for Input A (1)
SEND® :INP:COUP 8 DC
Example for Input B (2)
SEND® :INP2:COUP 8 AC
*RST condition
Input A (1): AC
Input B (2): DC
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-44 Command Reference
:INPut :FILTer
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Boolean>
Low Pass Filter
Switches on or off the low pass filter on input 1 (A). It has a cutoff frequency of 100
kHz.
Parameters:
<Boolean> is (1 / ON | 0 / OFF)
Returned format:
*RST condition
1|0¿
OFF
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:INPut :HYSTeresis
PM6685
8 «<Decimal data>|MAX |MIN»
Sensitivity
The sensitivity setting on the front panel is called HYSTeresis from the bus. The
range is 27.12 mV to 75.4 V. This setting has no effect unless autosensitivity is
turned off, see the following page.
Note that the sensitivity setting is coupled with the hysteresis setting according to
the formula:
Trigger Level + Hysteresis
< 37.7057 K
2
Parameters:
<Decimal data> is a number between 27.12E-3 and 75.4.
MAX gives +75.4 V, MIN gives +2.7 mV
When using MAX as data, the counter always tries to set the hysteresis to +75.4 V.
Unless the Trigger level is set to 0, this setting is impossible, and the counter will
return an error message.
Returned format:
<Decimal data>
Example:
SEND→ :INP:HYST 8 0.5;HYST:AUTO 8 0
This example sets the sensitivity to 0.5 V and switches off autosensitivity.
*RST condition
0.65 V (but controlled by Autotrigger since AUTO is on after *RST)
Command Reference 9-45
:INPut :HYSTeresis :AUTO
8 «<Boolean>|ONCE»
PM6685
Auto Sensitivity
AUTO from the front panel turns on both auto sensitivity (hysteresis) and auto
waveform compensation(trigger level). From the bus there are two commands, one
for auto hysteresis and one for auto trigger level. However, the function of these
commands are identical. Both commands turn on/off the hysteresis and the trigger
level simultaneously.
The auto sensitivity function normally sets the hysteresis to 33% of Vpp. However,
two exceptions exists: Pulse Width and Duty Cycle, where the hysteresis is set to
min.
If you have a stable amplitude, use the :AUTO 8 ONCE, and the autotrigger will determine sensitivity once and then set fixed levels.
Parameters
<Boolean> = ( 1/ON | 0/OFF )
ONCE means that AUTO first switches ON to check the signal. After determining suitable sensitivity and trigger level setting, it programs these values as if they where manually set.
It ends by switching off AUTO. Using ONCE instead of AUTO ON improves measuring
speed.
Returned format:
1|0¿
Example:
SEND® :INP:HYST:AUTO 8 OFF
This example switches off AUTO, enabling manual sensitivity and trigger level setting.
*RST condition
ON
9-46 Command Reference
:INPut«[1]|2» :IMPedance
PM6680B/81/85
8 «<Decimal data>|MAX|MIN»
Input Impedance
The impedance can be set to 50 W or 1 MW.
Parameters
MIN or <Decimal data> that rounds off to 50 or less, sets the input impedance to 50
MAX or <Decimal data> that rounds off to 1001 or more, sets the impedance to 1 MW.
Returned format:
5.00000000000E+001|1.00000000000E+6¿
Example for Input A (1)
SEND® :INP:IMP 8 50
Sets the input A impedance to 50 W.
Example for Input B (2)
(Only for PM6680B/81)
SEND® :INP2:IMP 8 50
Sets the input B impedance to 50 W.
*RST condition
1 MW
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
PM6680B PM6681
:INPut«[1]|2» :LEVel
8 «<Decimal data>|MAX|MIN»
Fixed Trigger Level
Input A and input B can be individually set to autotrigger or to fixed trigger levels of
between –5 V and +5 V in steps of 0.02 V (1.25mV for PM6681). If the attenuator
is set to 10X, the range is –50 V and +50 V in 0.2 V(12.5mV steps).
For autotrigger, see the following page.
<Decimal data> is a number between –5 V and +5 V if att=1X and between
–50 V and +50 V if att=10X.
Parameters:
MAX gives +50 V and MIN gives –50 V
When using MAX and MIN as data, the counter always tries to set the trigger level to
+50 V and –50 V. If the attenuator is set to 1X, it is impossible to set this trigger level,
and the counter will return an error message.
Returned format:
<Decimal data>¿
Example for Input A (1)
SEND® :INP:LEV 8 0.01
Example for Input B (2)
SEND® :INP2:LEV 8 2.0
*RST condition
0 (but controlled by Autotrigger since AUTO is on after *RST)
Command Reference 9-47
:INPut :LEVel
8 «<Decimal data>|MAX|MIN»
PM6685
Waveform compensation
The three-position waveform compensation on the front panel is not available
from the bus. Instead, you can set the trigger level, that is, the level on which the
hysteresis band is centered. How to set the trigger level depends on the duty cycle
and the peak-to-peak voltage of the signal.
Trigger level = Vpp * (0.5 - Duty factor )
This setting has no effect unless autosensitivity is turned off, see the following
page.
Parameters
<Decimal data> is a number between approximately –37.7 V and +37.7 V.
MAX gives +37.7 ... V and MIN gives –37.7... V
Note that the 8 :INP:LEV command is coupled with the :INP:HYST command.
See page 9-45.
Returned format:
<Decimal data>¿
Example:
SEND® :INP:LEV 8 3.75;LEV:AUTO 8 0
This example sets the trigger level to 3.75 V and switches off auto trigger level.
*RST condition
0 (but controlled by Autotrigger since AUTO is on after *RST)
9-48 Command Reference
PM6680B PM6681
:INPut :LEVel :AUTO
8 «<Boolean>|ONCE»
Autotrigger
If set to AUTO, the counter automatically controls both the trigger level and the attenuation1. If you have a stable amplitude, use the :AUTO 8 ONCE, and the
autotrigger will determine the trigger level once and then set a fixed level.
+
From the bus, input A and input B are always set to autotrigger individually.
Parameters:
<Boolean> = ( 1/ON | 0/OFF )
ONCE means that the autotrigger switches on, checks the signal, stores the trigger
levels as manually set levels, and then switches off auto. This improves measuring
speed.
Example for Input A (1)
SEND® :INP:LEV:AUTO 8 OFF
Example for Input B (2)
SEND® :INP2:LEV:AUTO 8 ON
Returned format:
*RST condition
1|0¿
ON
1 The autotrigger function normally sets the trigger levels to 50 % of the signal amplitude. Two exceptions exists however:
Rise/Fall time measurements: Here the input 1 (A) trigger level is set to 10% and
the Input 2 (B) trigger level is set to 90% of the amplitude.
Variable Hysteresis mode (channel 7): The input 1 (A) trigger level is set to 75%
and the Input 2 (B) trigger level is set to 25% of the amplitude
Command Reference 9-49
:INPut :LEVel :AUTO
8 «<Boolean>|ONCE»
PM6685
Autotrigger
:INPut:AUTO?
If auto is on, the counter automatically controls the trigger level1 and the hysteresis. If you have a stable amplitude, use the :AUTO ONCE, and auto will determine
the trigger level once, and then set fixed levels.
Parameters
<Boolean> = ( 1/ON | 0/OFF )
ONCE means that AUTO first switches ON to check the signal. After determining suitable sensitivity and trigger level setting, it programs these values as if they where manually set.
It ends by switching off AUTO.
Using ONCE instead of AUTO ON improves measuring speed.
Returned format:
1|0¿
Example:
SEND® :INP;LEV:AUTO 8 OFF
This example switches off AUTO, enabling the programmed trigger level setting.
*RST condition
ON
1 The autotrigger measure peak to peak level, and sets the lower level of the hysteresis band to 33%, and the upper level to 66% of the value, ( for pulse and duty
factor measurement, both levels are set to 50% ).
9-50 Command Reference
:INPut«[1]|2|4» :SLOPe
PM6680B/81/85
8 «POS|NEG»
Trigger Slope
Selects if the counter should trigger on a positive or a negative transition. Selecting
negative slope is useful when measuring negative pulse width and negative duty
cycle.
When you select negative slope, the counter always uses the non-prescaled
mode, limiting the maximum input frequency to 160 MHz. This can be useful when
you want to make fast frequency measurements: Using positive slope, the counter
needs two input cycles to make a SINGLE frequency measurement, but when set
to negative slope, only one input cycle is required.
Returned format:
POS | NEG ¿
Example for Input A (1)
SEND® :INP:SLOP 8 POS
Example for Input B (2)
(Only for PM6680B/81)
SEND® :INP2:SLOP 8 NEG
Example for Input E (4)
SEND® :INP4:SLOP 8 NEG
*RST condition
POS
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
PM6680B PM6681
:INPut2:COMMon
ON|OFF
When on, the signal on input A is fed both to Channel 1 and Channel 2. The interconnection is made before the filter on input A.
Parameters
<Boolean> = ( 1/ON | 0/OFF )
ON means that the signal on input A is fed both to Channel 1 and Channel 2. The input signal
on input B is not used in the measurement. But the signal on input B is terminated by
the input impedance of the counter (50W or 1MW).
OFF means that inputs A and B works separated from each other.
Returned format:
1|0¿
Example:
SEND® :INP2:COMM ON
This example switches on common, feeding the same signal to both channel 1 and
channel 2.
*RST condition
OFF
Command Reference 9-51
This page is intentionally left blank.
9-52 Command Reference
Measurement Function
Set up the Instrument, Perform Measurement, and Read Data
:MEASure
[:SCALar]<Measuring Function>?
[<Parameters>][,(<Channels>)]
:ARRay<Measuring Function>?
:MEMory?
8 (<Array Size>)[,<Parameters>][,(<Channels>)]
[<N>]
:MEMory<N>?
+
The array size for :MEASure and :CONFigure, and the channels, are expression
data that must be in parentheses ( ).
+
If you want to check what function and channels the counter is currently using,
send :CONF?
This query gives the same answer as :FUNC? in the SENSe subsystem
The default channels, which the counter uses when you omit the channels in
the command, are printed in italics in the channel list on the following pages.
Command Reference 9-53
:MEASure|:CONFigure
[:VOLTage]
[:SCALar]
:FREQuency
[:CW]?
PM6680B PM6681
[ _ [<expected value>[,<resolution>],][(@1|@2|@3|@4|@5|@6|@7)]]
:RATio?
[ _ [<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@3|@4),(@1|@2|@3|@4)]]
:BURSt?
[ _ [<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@3|@4|@5|@6|@7)]]
:PRF?
[ _ [<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@3|@4|@5|@6|@7)]]
:PERiod?
[ _ [<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@3|@4|@5|@6|@7)]]
:TINTerval?
[ _ [<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@4),(@1|@2|@4)]]
:PHASe?
[ _ [<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2),(@1|@2)]]
:NWIDth?
[ _ [<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@4)]]
:PWIDth?
[ _ [<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@4)]]
:DCYCle|PDUTycycle? [ _ [<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@4)]]
:NDUTycycle?
[ _ [<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@4)]]
:RISE:TIME?[ _ [<lower thresh.>[,<upper thresh.>[,<exp. value>[,<resol.>]]],][(@1|@2)]]
:FALL:TIME? [ _ [<lower thresh.>[,<upper thresh.>[,<exp. value>[,<resol.>]]],][(@1|@2)]]
:MAXimum?
[ _ (@1|@2)]
:MINimum?
[ _ (@1|@2)]
:PTPeak?
[ _ (@1|@2)]
:TOTalize
:GATed?[
_ [_(@1|@2|@4),(@1|@2|@4)]
:TIMed?
[ _ [<Time for gate open>,][ (@1|@2|@4),(@1|@2|@4)]]
:ACCumulated?[ _ [<Time for gate open>,][ (@1|@2|@4),(@1|@2|@4)]]
:SSTop?
[ _ (@1|@2|@4),(@1|@2|@4)]
[:CONTinuous*][ _ [(@1|@2|@4),(@1|@2|@4)]
:ARRay
:FREQuency
[:CW]? _ (<Size>)[,[<expected value>[,<resolution>],] [(@1|@2|@3|@4|@5|@6|@7)]]
:RATio? _ (<Size>)[,[<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@3|@4),(@1|@2|@3|@4)]]
:BURSt? _ (<Size>)[,<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@3|@4)]]
:PRF? _ (<Size>)[,<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@3|@4)]]
:PERiod?
_ (<Size>)[,<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@3|@4)]]
:TINTerval? _ (<Size>)[,[<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@4),(@1|@2|@4)]]
:PHASe?
_ (<Size>)[,[<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2),(@1|@2)]]
:NWIDth?
_ (<Size>)[,[<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@4)]]
:PWIDth?
_ (<Size>)[,[<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@4)]]
:DCYCle|PDUTycycle? _ (<Size>)[,[<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@4)]]
:NDUTycycle? _ (<Size>)[,[<exp. value>[,<resol.>],][(@1|@2|@4)]]
:RISE:TIME? _ (<Size>)[,[<lower thr..>[,<upper thr.>[,<exp. value>[,<resol.>]]],][(@1|@2)]]
:FALL:TIME? _ (<Size>)[,[<lower thr.>[,<upper thr.>[,<exp. value>[,<resol.>]]],][(@1|@2)]]
:MAXimum? _ (<Size>)[,[(@1|@2)]
:MINimum? _ (<Size>)[,[(@1|@2)]
_ (<Size>)[,[(@1|@2)]
:PTPeak?
:TOTalize?
:GATed? _ (<Size>)[,[(@1|@2|@4),(@1|@2|@4)]]
:TIMed? _ (<Size>)[,[<Time for gate open>,][(@1|@2|@4),(@1|@2|@4)]]
:ACCumulated? _ (<Size>)[,[<Time for gate open>,][(@1|@2|@4),(@1|@2|@4)]]
:SSTop? _ (<Size>)[,[(@1|@2|@4),(@1|@2|@4)]]
_ (<Size>)[,[(@1|@2|@4),(@1|@2|@4)]]
[:CONTinuous*]
9-54 Command Reference
PM6685
:MEASure|:CONFigure
[:VOLTage]
[:SCALar]
:FREQuency
[<expected value>[,<resolution>]][,(@1|@3|@4|@5|@6)]]
:RATio?
[ 8 [<exp. value>[,<resol.>]][,(@1|@3|@4|@5|@6),
(@1|@3|@4|@5|@6)]]
:BURSt?
[ 8 [<expected value>[,<resolution>]][,(@1|@3|@4)]]
:PRF?
[ 8 [<expected value>[,<resolution>]][,(@1|@3|@4)]]
:PERiod?
[ 8 [<expected value>[,<resolution>]][,(@1|@3|@4)]]
:NWIDth?
[ 8 [<threshold>[,(@1|@4)]]
:PWIDth?
[ 8 [<threshold>[,(@1|@4)]]
:PDUTycycle|DCYCle?[ 8 [<threshold>][,(@1|@4)]]
:NDUTycycle?
[ 8 [<threshold>][,(@1|@4)]]
[:CW]?
:TOTalize*
[:CONTinuous]*[ 8
[8
(@0|@1|@4)[,(@0|@1|@4)]
[:ARRay]
:FREQuency
(<Size>)[,[<expected value>[,<resolution>]][,(@1|@3|@4|@5|@6)]]
(<Size>)[_,[<exp. value>[,<resol.>]][,(@1|@3|@4),(@1|@3|@4)]]
(<Size>)[_,[<expected value>[,<resolution>]][,(@1|@3|@4)]]
8 (<Size>)[,[<expected value>[,<resolution>]] [,(@1|@3|@4)]]
:PERiod?
8 (<Size>)[,[<expected value>[,<resolution>]][,(@1|@3|@4)]]
:NWIDth?
8 (<Size>)[,[<threshold>[,(@1|@4)]]
:PWIDth?
8 (<Size>)[,[<threshold>[,(@1|@4)]]
:PDUTycycle|DCYCle? 8 (<Size>)[,[<threshold>][,(@1|@4)]]
:NDUTycycle?
8 (<Size>)[,[<threshold>][,(@1|@4)]]
:TOTalize*
[:CW]? 8
:RATio? 8
:BURSt? 8
:PRF?
[:CONTinuous*] 8
(<Size>)[,[(@0|@1|@4)[,(@0|@1|@4)]]
* Only for :CONFigure
(@0) means that the input is disabled (Only PM6685)
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B (Not available on PM6685)
(@3) means input C (HF-input option)
(@4) means input E (Rear panel arming input)
(@5) means input A prescaled by 2
(@6) means the internal reference
(@7) means input A with the variable hysteresis mode (Only PM6680B and
PM6681)
Command Reference 9-55
:MEASure :<Measuring Function>?
[8 [<parameters>][ ,(<channels>)]]
PM6680B/81/85
Make one measurement
The measure query makes a complete measurement, including configuration and
readout of data. Use measure when you can accept the generic measurement
without fine tuning.
+
When a CONFigure command or MEASure? query is issued, all counter settings
are set to the *RST settings., except those specified as <parameters> and
<channels> in the CONFigure command or MEASure? query.
You cannot use the :MEASure? query for :TOTalize:CONTinuous, since this
function measures without stopping (continuously forever).
The :MEASure? query is a compound query identical to:
:ABORt;:CONFigure:<Meas_func>;:READ?
Parameters:
<Measuring Function>, <Parameters> and <Channels> are defined on page 9-54.
You may omit <parameters> and <Channels>, which are then set to default.
Returned format:
<data>¿
Where: The format of the returned data is determined by the format commands: :FORMat and
:FORMat:FIXed.
Example:
SEND® :MEAS:FREQ? 8 (@3)
READ¬ 1.78112526833E+009
This example measures the frequency on the C-input and outputs the result to the
controller.
Type of command:
See also:
Aborts all previous measurement commands if *WAI is not used.
‘Explanations of the Measuring Functions’ starting on page 9-59.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-56 Command Reference
80B/81/85
:MEASure :ARRay :<Measuring Function>?
[ 8 (<array size>)[,[<parameters>] [,(<channels>)]]
Make an array of measurements
The :MEASure:ARRay query differs from the :MEASure query in that it performs
the number of measurements you decide in the <array size> and sends all the
measuring results in one string to the controller.
+
The array size for :MEASure and :CONFigure, and the channels, are expression
data that must be in parentheses ( ).
The :MEASure:ARRay query is a compound query identical to:
:ABORt;:CONFigure:ARRay:<Meas-func> 8 (<array-size>); :READ:ARRay? 8
(<array-size>)
Parameters:
<array size> sets the number of measurements in the array.
Returned format:
<Measuring result>{[,<measuring result>]}¿
Example:
SEND® :MEAS:ARR:FREQ? 8 (10)
Ten measuring results will be returned.
Type of command:
Aborts all previous measurement commands if not *WAI is used, see page 9-132.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-57
:MEASure:MEMory<N>?
PM6681
Memory Recall, Measure and Fetch Result
Use this command when you want to measure several parameters fast.
:MEAS:MEM1? recalls the contents of memory 1 and reads out the result,
:MEAS:MEM2? recalls the contents of memory two and reads out the result etc.
The equivalent command sequence is *RCL1;READ?
The allowed range for <N> is 1 to 9. Use the somewhat slower :MEAS:MEMory?
N command described below if you must use memories 10 to 19.
TIMING
Data Format
Command
ASCii
REAL
:MEAS:MEM1?
7.9 ms
6.7 ms
:MEAS:MEM? 1
9.1 ms
8.0 ms
*RCL 1;READ?
10.1 ms
8.9 ms
Returned format:
<measurement result>¿
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed
:MEASure:MEMory?
8 <N>
PM6681
Memory Recall, Measure and Fetch Result
Same as above command but somewhat slower. Allows use of all memories (1 to
19).
:MEAS:MEM 8 13
This example recalls the instrument setting in memory number 13, makes a measurement, and fetches the result.
Example:
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed
9-58 Command Reference
EXPLANATIONS OF THE MEASURING
FUNCTIONS
This sub-chapter explains the various measurements that can be
done with :MEASure and :CONFigure;:READ. Only the queries
for single measurements using the measure command are given
here, but all of the information is also valid for the :CONFigure
command and for both scalar (single) and array measurements.
PM6680B/81/85
:MEASure_«:DCYCle/:PDUTycycle»
[8 [<threshold>] [,(@«1|2|4|6»)]]
Positive Duty Cycle
Traditional duty cycle measurement is performed. That is, the ratio between the
on time and the off time of the input pulse is measured.
Parameters
<threshold> parameter sets the trigger levels in volts. If omitted, the auto trigger level is set to
50 percent of the signal.
(@«1|2|4|6») is the channel to measure on:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B (Only PM6680B and PM6681)
(@4) means input E (Rear panel arming input)
(@6) means the internal reference
If you omit the channel, the instrument measures on input A (@1).
Example:
SEND® :MEAS:PDUT?
READ¬ +5.097555E-001
In this example, the duty cycle is 50.97%
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-59
:MEASure :FREQuency?
[8 [<expected value>[,<resolution>]] [,<(@«1|2|3|4|5|6|7»)>]]
PM6680B/81/85
Frequency
Traditional frequency measurements. The counter uses the <expected value> and
<resolution> to calculate the Measurement Time (:SENSe:ACQuisition:APERture).
Example:
SEND® :MEAS:FREQ? 8 (@3)
READ¬ 1.78112526833E+009
This example measures the frequency at input C.
+
The channel is expression data and it must be in parentheses ( ).
Parameters:
<expected value> is the expected frequency,
<resolution> is the required resolution.
<(@«1|3|4|5|6|7»)> is the channel to measure on:
(@1) means input A1
(@2) means input B (Only PM6680B and PM6681)
(@3) means input C (HF-input option)
(@4) means input E (Rear panel arming input)
(@5) means input A prescaled by 2
(@6) means the internal reference
@7) means input A with the variable hysteresis mode (Only PM6680B and PM6681)
If you omit the channel, the instrument measures on input A (@1).
1 The A input is always prescaled by 2 when measuring Frequency A and
prescaled by 1 for all other functions.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-60 Command Reference
PM6680B/81/85
:MEASure :FREQuency :BURSt?
[8 [<expected value>[,<resolution>]] [,<(@«1|2|3|4|5|6|7»)>]]
Burst Carrier Frequency
Measures the carrier frequency of a burst. The burst duration must be less than
50% of the pulse repetition frequency (PRF).
How to measure bursts is described in detail in the Operators Manual.
The counter uses the <expected value> and <resolution> to select a Measurement
Time ([:SENSe]:ACQuisition:APERture), and then sets the sync delay
([:SENSe]:SDELay) to 1.5 * Measurement Time.
Parameters:
<expected value> is the expected carrier frequency,
<resolution> is the required resolution, e.g., 1 gives 1Hz resolution.
<(@«1|2|3|4|5|6|7»)> is the channel to measure on:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B (Only PM6680B and PM6681)
(@3) means input C (HF-input option)
(@4) means input E (Rear panel arming input)
(@5) means input A prescaled by 2
(@6) means the internal reference
(@7) means input A with the variable hysteresis mode (Only PM6680B/81)
If you omit the channel, the instrument measures on input A (@1).
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1992.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-61
:MEASure :FREQuency :PRF?
[8 [<exp. val.>[,<res.>]][,<(@«1|2|3|4|5|6|7»)>]]
PM6680B/81/85
Pulse Repetition Frequency
Measures the PRF (Pulse Repetition Frequency) of a burst signal.The burst duration must be less than 50% of the pulse repetition frequency (PRF).
+
It is better to set up the measurement with the [:SENS]:FUNC “:FREQ:PRF”
command when measuring pulse repetition frequency. This command will allow
you to set a suitable sync delay with the [:SENSe]:Sync:DELay command.
How to measure bursts is described in detail in the Operators Manual.
Parameters:
<exp. val.> is the expected PRF,
<res.> is the required resolution.
<(@«1|3|4|5|6»)> is the channel to measure on:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B (Only PM6680B and PM6681)
(@3) means input C (HF-input option)
(@4) means input E (Rear panel arming input)
(@5) means input A prescaled by 2
(@6) means the internal reference
(@7) means input A with the variable hysteresis mode (Only PM6680B/81)
If you omit the channel, the instrument measures on input A (@1).
The <expected value> and <resolution> are used to calculate the Measurement
Time ([:SENSe]:ACQuisition:APERture). The Sync. Delay is always 10 ms
(default value)
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1992.0, confirmed.
9-62 Command Reference
PM6680B PM6681
:MEASure :FALL :TIME?
[8 [<lower threshold> [,<upper threshold>[,<expected value>[,<resolution>]]]] [,(@1)]]
Fall-time
The transition time from 90% to 10% of the signal amplitude is measured.
The measurement is always a single measurement and the Auto-trigger is always
on, setting the trigger levels to 90% and 10 % of the amplitude. If you need an average transition time measurement, or other trigger levels, use the :SENSe subsystem and manually set trigger levels instead.
Parameters:
<lower threshold>, <upper threshold>, <expected value> and <resolution are all ignored by
the counter
<(@1)> is the channel to measure on, i.e., input A
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
PM6680B/81/85
:MEASure :FREQuency :RATio?
[8 [<expected value> [,<resolution>]][,<(@«1|2|3|4|5|6»)>,<(@«1|2|3|4|5|6»)>]]
Frequency Ratio
Frequency ratio measurements between two inputs.
Example:
SEND® :MEAS:FREQ:RAT? 8 (@1),(@3)
READ¬ 2.345625764333E+000
This example measures the ratio between input A and input C.
+
The channel is expression data and it must be in parentheses ( ).
Parameters:
<expected value> and <resolution> are ignored
<(@«1|2|3|4|5|6»)>,<(@«1|2|3|4|5|6»)> is the channels to measure on:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B (Only PM6680B and PM6681)
(@3) means input C (HF-input option)
(@4) means input E (Rear panel arming input)
(@5) means input A prescaled by 2
(@6) means the internal reference
If you omit the channel, the instrument measures between input A and input E.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-63
:MEASure [:VOLT] :MAXimum?
[ 8 («@1|@2»)]
PM6680B PM6681
Positive Peak Voltage
This command measures the positive peak voltage with the input DC coupled.
Parameters:
(«@1|@2») is the channel to measure on
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:MEASure [:VOLT] :MINimum?
[ 8 («@1|@2»)]
Negative Peak Voltage
PM6680B PM6681
This command measures the negative peak voltage with the input DC coupled
Parameters:
(«@1|@2») is the channel to measure on
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-64 Command Reference
:MEASure :NWIDth?
PM6680B/81/85
[8 [<threshold>] [,<(@«1|2|4|6»)>]]
Negative Pulse Width
A negative pulse width measurement is performed.
This is always a single measurement. If you need an average pulse width measurement, use the :SENSe subsystem instead.
Parameters
<threshold> parameter sets the trigger levels in volts. If omitted, the auto trigger level is set to
50 percent of the signal.
<(@«1|2|4|6»)> is the channel to measure on:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B (Only PM6680B and PM6681)
(@4) means input E (Rear panel arming input)
(@6) means the internal reference
If you omit the channel, the instrument measures on input A.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:MEASure :PWIDth?
PM6680B/81/85
[8 [<threshold>] [,<(@«1|2|4|6»)>]]
Positive Pulse Width
A positive pulse width measurement is performed.
This is always a single measurement. If you need an average pulse width measurement, use the :SENSe subsystem instead.
Parameters
<threshold> parameter sets the trigger levels in volts. If omitted, the auto trigger level is set to
50 percent of the signal.
<(@«1|2|4|6»)> is the channel to measure on:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B (Only PM6680B and PM6681)
(@4) means input E (Rear panel arming input)
(@6) means the internal reference
If you omit the channel, the instrument measures on input A.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-65
:MEASure_«:PDUTycycle/ :DCYCle»?
[8 [<threshold>] [,(@«1|2|4|6»)]]
PM6680B/81/85
Positive duty cycle: Duty Factor
Traditional duty cycle measurement is performed. That is, the ratio between the on
time and the off time of the input pulse is measured.
Parameters
<threshold> parameter sets the trigger levels in volts. If omitted, the auto trigger level is set to
50 percent of the signal.
(@«1|2|4|6») is the channel to measure on:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B (Only PM6680B and PM6681)
(@4) means input E (Rear panel arming input)
(@6) means the internal reference
If you omit the channel, the instrument measures on input A (@1).
Example:
SEND® MEAS:PDUT?
READ¬ +5.097555E-001
In this example, the duty cycle is 50.97%
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:MEASure_«:NDUTycycle»?
[8 [<threshold>] [,(@«1|2|4|6»)]]
PM6680B/81/85
Negative duty cycle: Duty Factor
Traditional duty cycle measurement is performed. That is, the ratio between the on
time and the off time of the input pulse is measured.
Parameters
<threshold> parameter sets the trigger levels in volts. If omitted, the auto trigger level is set to
50 percent of the signal.
(@«1|2|4|6») is the channel to measure on:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B (Only PM6680B and PM6681)
(@4) means input E (Rear panel arming input)
(@6) means the internal reference
If you omit the channel, the instrument measures on input A (@1).
Example:
SEND® MEAS:PDUT?
READ¬ +5.097555E-001
In this example, the duty cycle is 50.97%
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-66 Command Reference
PM6680B/81/85
:MEASure :PERiod?
[8 [<expected value> [,<resolution>]][,<(@«1|2|3|4|5|6|7»)>]]
Period
A traditional period measurement is performed.
The <expected value> and <resolution> are used to calculate the Measurement
Time ([:SENSe]:ACQuisition:APERture).
Parameters:
<expected value> is the expected Period,
<resolution> is the required resolution,
<(@«1|2|3|4|5|6»)> is the channel to measure on:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B (Only PM6680B and PM6681)
(@3) means input C (HF-input option)
(@4) means input E (Rear panel arming input)
(@5) means input A prescaled by 2
(@6) means the internal reference
(@7) means input A with the variable hysteresis mode (Only PM6680B)PM6681)
If you omit the channel, the instrument measures on input A (@1).
Complies to standards:
PM6680B PM6681
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:MEASure :PHASe?
[8 [<expected value>[,<resolution>]] [,(@«1|2»),(@«1|2»)]]
Phase
A traditional PHASe measurement is performed.
Parameters:
<expected value> and <resolution> are ignored by the counter
The first (@«1|2») is the start channel and the second (@«1|2») is the stop channel
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B
If you omit the channel, the instrument measures between input A and input B.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991-0, approved.
Command Reference 9-67
:MEASure [:VOLT] :PTPeak?
[8 (@«1|2»)].
PM6680B PM6681
Peak-to-Peak Voltage
This command make measures the peak-to-peak voltage with the input DC coupled.
Parameters:
(@«1|2») is the channel to measure on
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:MEASure :RISE :TIME?
PM6680B PM6681
[8 [<lower threshold> [,<upper threshold>[,<expected value>[,<resolution>]]]] [,(@1)]
Rise-time
The transition time from 10% to 90% of the signal amplitude is measured.The
measurement is always a single measurement and the Auto-trigger is always on,
setting the trigger levels to 10% and 90 % of the amplitude. If you need an average transition time measurement or other trigger levels, use the :SENSe subsystem and manually set trigger levels instead.
Parameters:
<lower threshold>, <upper threshold>, <expected value> and <resolution are all ignored by
the counter
<(@1)> is the channel to measure on, i.e., input A
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-68 Command Reference
PM6680B PM6681
:MEASure :TINTerval?
8 (@«1|2|4»),(@«1|2|4»)]
Time-Interval
Traditional time-interval measurements are performed. The trigger levels are set
automatically, and positive slope is used. The first channel in the channel list is the
start channel, and the second is the stop channel.
Parameters:
The first (@«1|2|4») is the start channel and the second (@«1|2|4») is the stop channel
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B
(@4) means input E (Rear panel arming input)
If you omit the channel, input A is the start channel, and input B is the stop channel.
Command Reference 9-69
:MEASure :TOTalize :ACCumulated?
[8 <time for gate open>][,(@«1|2|4|5|6») [,(@«1|2|4|5|6»)]]
PM6680B PM6681
Totalize X gated by Y, accumulated
The counter totalizes the pulses on the primary channel. The totalizing starts when
the gate signal on the secondary channel goes on and stops when the gate signal
goes to off. The polarity of on/off is controlled via the :INPut:SLOPe command of
the gate channel. The result is the sum of counts in all the gate openings that occur during a preset time <time for gate open>.
If you use the :CONFigure command, you can select if the counter should count
positive or negative transitions with the :INPut:SLOPe command of the measuring channel.
<time for gate open> is the time you want the totalizing to proceed. Range
PM6680B: is 0.8E–6, 1.6E–6, 3.2E–6, 6.4E–6, 12.8E–6, and 50E–6 to 400 s
Range PM6681 and 80E–9, 160E–9, 320E–9, 640E–9, 1.28E–6, and 20E–6 to
400 s.
Parameters:
The first <(@«1|2|4|5|6»)> is the channel to measure on.
The second <(@«1|2|4|5|6»)> is the gate channel.
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B
(@4) means input E (rear panel arming input)
(@5) means input A prescaled by 2
(@6) means the internal reference
If you omit the channels, the instrument measures on input A with input B as
the gate channel.
+
*RST condition:
Time for gate open = 10 ms ([:SENSe]ACQuisition:APERture)
9-70 Command Reference
:CONFigure :TOTalize :CONTinuous
PM6680B/81/85
[8 (@«1|2|4|6»)][,(@«1|2|4|6»)]
Totalize Manually
This is a count/totalize function controlled from the GPIB interface using the command SENS:TOT:GATE8ON|OFF.
The counter counts up for each event on the primary input channel. and down on
the secondary channel. The result is the difference between the primary and secondary channel. In addition to selecting totalizing, the :CONF:TOT:CONT command also selects positive trigger slope. If you want to count negative slopes on input A, send :INPut:SLOPe8 NEG after the :CONF:TOT:CONT command.
Parameters
(@«1|2|4|6») is the primary (adding)channel:
,(@«1|2|4|6») is the secondary (subtracting) channel:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B (not PM6685)
(@4) means input E (rear panel arming input)
(@6) means the internal reference
Selecting the same channel as both primary and secondary disables the secondary channel.
+
This measurement cannot be done as a :MEASure, it must be done as a :CONFigure followed by :INIT:CONT8ON, gate control with :SENS:TOT:GATE
«ON|OFF» and completed with a :FETCh:ARR? <array size>.
Example:
SEND® :CONF:TOT;:INP:SLOPe neg
This example sets up the counter to totalize the negative slopes on Input A and
disable the secondary channel. (Same as (@1),(@1).)
*RST condition
(@1),(@2) for PM6680B and PM6681, (@1),(@1) for PM6685
Normal Program Sequence for Totalizing on A
CONF:TOT:CONT8(@1),(@1) Set up the counter for totalize on A
INIT:CONT8ON
Initiate the counter continuously
TOT:GATE8ON
Start totalizing
FETC:ARR?8–1
Read intermediate results without stopping the totalizing
TOT:GATE8OFF
Stop totalizing
FETC:ARR?8–1
Fetch the final result from the totalizing
The :FETCh:ARR? command can take both positive and negative data. Positive
data, for instance 10, outputs the first 10 measurements in the counter output
buffer. Negative data, for instance –10, outputs the last ten results.
When totalizing you often want to read the intermediate result without
stopping the totalizing process. :FETC:ARR?8–1 outputs such a result.
Intermediate results
Command Reference 9-71
:MEASure :TOTalize :GATed?
[8 (@«1|2|4|5|6») [,(@«1|2|4|5|6»)]]
PM6680B PM6681
Totalize X gated by Y
The counter totalizes the pulses on the primary channel. The totalizing starts when
the gate signal on the secondary channel goes on and stops when the gate signal
goes to off. The polarity of on/off is controlled via the :INPut:SLOPe command of
the gate signal.
Select if the counter should count positive or negative transitions with the
:INPut:SLOPe command of the measuring channel.
Parameters
The first <(@«1|2|4|5|6»)> is the channel to measure on, the second one is the gate channel:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B
(@4) means input E (rear panel arming input)
(@5) means input A prescaled by 2
(@6) means the internal reference
If you omit the channels, the instrument measures on input A with input B as the
gate channel.
:MEASure :TOTalize :SSTop?
[8 ,(@«1|2|4|5|6») [,(@«1|2|4|5|6»)]]
PM6680B PM6681
Totalize X start/stop by Y
The counter totalizes the pulses on the primary channel. The totalizing starts when
the gate signal on the secondary channel goes on and stops the next time the gate
signal goes on. The polarity of ON is controlled via the :INPut:SLOPe command
of the Start /stop channel.
Select if the counter should count positive or negative transitions with the :INPut:SLOPe command of the measuring channel.
Parameters:
The first <(@«1|2|4|5|6»)> is the channel to measure on, and the second one is the start/stop
channel:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B
(@4) means input E (rear panel arming input)
(@5) means input A prescaled by 2
(@6) means the internal reference
If you omit the channels, the instrument measures on input A with input B is the
start/stop channel.
9-72 Command Reference
PM6680B PM6681
:MEASure :TOTalize :TIMed?
[8 [<time for gate open> [,(@«1|2|4»)][,(@«1|2|4»)]]]
Totalize X-Y During a Preset Time
This is a count/totalize function during a predefined time. The start/stop signal is
generated by the counter and set by <time for gate open>.
The counter counts up for each event on the X-channel and down for each event
on the Y-channel. The result is the difference between the two channels.
If you only want to Totalize on X, you must disable Y by setting both X and Y to the
same channel or disconnecting the signal from Y.
Totalize –Y MANUAL, negative totalizing, is possible if you physically disconnect
the signal on the X input.
Select if the counter should count positive or negative transitions with the INPut:SLOPe command of the channels.
Parameters:
<time for gate open> is the time you want the totalizing to proceed. The range is the same as
for Measurement Time.
The first <(@«1|2|4»)> is the channel that counts up, and the second one is the channel that
counts down:
(@1) means input A
(@2) means input B
(@4) means input E (rear panel arming input)
If you omit the channels, the instrument counts up on input A and down on input B.
Example:
SEND® :MEAS:TOT:TIM? 8 1,(@1),(@1)
In this example the counter totalises the pulses on Channel 1 for one second. Any
signals on channel 2 and 4 are ignored.
*RST condition:
Time for gate open = 10 ms ([:SENSe]:ACQuisition:APERture)
Command Reference 9-73
This page is intentionally left blank.
9-74 Command Reference
Memory Subsystem
:MEMory
:DELete
:FREE
:MACRo 8
‘<Macro name>’
:SENSe?
:NSTates?
:MACRo?
Related Common Commands:
*DMC
*EMC
*GMC?
*LMC?
*LRN?
*PMC
*RCL
*RMC
*SAV
Command Reference 9-75
:MEMory :DELete :MACRo
8 ‘<Macro name>’
PM6680B/81/85
Delete one Macro
This command removes an individual MACRo1.
Parameters
‘<Macro name>’ is the name of the macro you want to delete.
+
<Macro name> is String data that must be surrounded by quotation marks.
See also:
*PMC, if you want to delete all macros.
1 The proposed IEEE488.2 command *RMC (Remove Macro command) also works
on PM6685. It preforms exactly the same action as :MEMory:DELete:MACRo.
Note however that this command is not yet (1993) a certified IEEE488.2 command.
:MEMory :FREE :SENSe?
Memory Free for results
PM6681
This command gives information of the free memory available for sense data
(measuring results) in the counter.
Returned format:
<Data positions available>, <Data positions in use>¿
9-76 Command Reference
:MEMory :FREE :MACRo?
PM6680B/81/85
Memory Free for Macros
This command gives information of the free memory available for MACRos in the
counter. If no macros are specified, 1160 bytes are available.
Returned format:
<Bytes available>, <Bytes used>¿
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:MEMory :NSTates?
PM6680B/81/85
Memory States
The Number of States query (only) requests the number of *SAV/ ∗RCL instrument
setting memory states available in the counter. The counter responds with a value
that is one greater than the maximum that can be sent as a parameter to the *SAV
and *RCL commands. (States are numbered from 0 to max–1.)
Returned format:
<the number of states available>¿
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed
Command Reference 9-77
This page is intentionally left blank.
9-78 Command Reference
Output Subsystem
:OUTPut
[:STATe]
:SCALe
8 ON | OFF
8 <Numeric value>
Command Reference 9-79
:OUTPut
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Boolean>
Enable Analog Out
This command switches on/off the analog output. See also :OUTput:SCALe command on the next page.
Parameters
<Boolean> = ( 1/ON | 0/OFF )
Returned format:
<1|0>¿
Example:
Send® :OUTP 8 1
Switches on the analog output.
*RST condition:
OFF
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0 confirmed.
:OUTPut :SCALe
8 < Decimal data >
PM6680B/81/85
Scaling Factor, Analog Output
This command sets the scaling factor for the analog output. The measurement result is scaled after math, if math is used.
If you want a full-scale output for a specific readout, the formula is:
Scaling factor =
1
full scale value
Parameters
<Decimal data> is the scaling factor. The range is –1020 to +1020.
Returned format:
< Decimal data>¿
Example:
If you want full scale output (5 V) for a reading of 0.00359,
0.00359
= 0.000718
5
Scaling factor =
Send® :OUTP:SCAL 8 718E–6
*RST condition:
1
9-80 Command Reference
Read Function
Perform Measurement and Read Data
:READ
[:SCALar]?
:ARRay? 8
<Array Size>|MAX
Command Reference 9-81
:READ?
PM6680B/81/85
Read one Result
The read function performs new measurements and reads out a measuring result
without reprogramming the counter. Using the :READ? query in conjunction with
the :CONFigure command gives you a measure capability where you can fine tune
the measurement.
If the counter is set up to do an array of measurements, :READ? makes all the
measurements in the array, stores the results in the output buffer, and fetches the
first measuring result. Use FETCh? to fetch other measuring results from the output buffer. The :READ? query is identical to :ABORt;:INITiate;:FETCh?
<data>¿
The format of the returned data is determined by the format commands :FORMat
and FORMat:FIXed.
Returned format:
Example:
SEND® :CONF:FREQ;:INP:FILT 8 ON;:READ?
This example configures the counter to make a standard frequency measurement
with the 100 kHz filter on. The counter is triggered, and data from the measurement are read out with the :READ? query.
SEND® :READ?
This makes a new measurement and fetches the result without changing the programming of the counter.
Type of command:
Aborts all previous measurement commands if *WAI is not used.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-82 Command Reference
:READ:ARRay?
PM6680B/81/85
8 «<array size for FETCh>|MAX»
Read an array of results
The :READ:ARRay? query differs from the :READ? query by reading out several
results at once after making the number of measurements previously set up by
:CONFigure:ARRay 8 or 8 :MEASure:ARRAy?.
The :READ:ARRay? query is identical to:
:ABORt;:INITiate;:FETCh:ARRay?_<array size for FETCh>
+
The <array size for FETCh> does not tell :READ to make that many measurements, only to fetch that many results. :CONF:ARR, 8 :MEAS:ARR,
:ARM:LAY1:COUN or :TRIG:LAY1:COUN sets the number of measurements.
Parameters:
<array size for FETCh> sets the number of measuring results in the array. This size must be
equal or less than the number of measurements specified with :CONFigure.
MAX means that all the results in the output buffer will be fetched.
<data>[,<data>]¿
The format of the returned data is determined by the format commands :FORMat
and :FORMat:FIXed.
Returned format:
SEND® :ARM:COUN 8 10;:READ:ARR? 8 5
This example configures the counter to make an array of 10 standard measurements. The counter is triggered and data from the first five measurements are read
out with the :READ? query.
Type of command:
Aborts all previous measurement commands if *WAI is not used.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-83
This page is intentionally left blank.
9-84 Command Reference
Sense Command Subsystem
n Sense Subsystem command tree for PM6680B and PM6681
[:SENSe]
:ACQuisition
:APERture
:HOFF
[:STATe]
:ECOunt
:MODE
:TIME
:RESolution
:AVERage
:COUNt
:STATe
:FREQuency
:RANGe
:FUNCtion
:INTernal
:LOWer
:FORMat
:ROSCillator
:SOURce
:TOTalize
:GATE
:VOLTage
[:STATe]
:GATed
:STATe
8 <meas time> | MIN | MAX
8
8
8
8
8
ON | OFF
<hold off event count value> | MIN | MAX
TIME | EVENt
<hold off time value> | MIN | MAX
HIGH | LOW
8 <Number of samples> | MIN | MAX
8 TIME | COUNts
8 ON|OFF
8 <Minimum frequency for autotrigger> | MIN | MAX
8 ‘Measuring function [ Primary channel [ , Secondary channel ] ] ‘
8 REAL | PACKed
8 INTernal | EXTernal
8 ON | OFF
8 ON | OFF
Command Reference 9-85
n Sense Subsystem command tree for PM6685
[:SENSe]
8 ‘Measuring function [_ Primary channel [ , Secondary channel ] ] ‘
:FUNCtion
:EVENt1
:LEVel
:AUTO
:HYSTeresis
:AUTO
:SLOPe
:ACQuisition
:APERture
:HOFF2
:AVERage
:TIME
:STATe
:ROSCillator
:SOURce
:SDELay
:TOTalize
:GATE
:INTernal
[:STATe]
:FORMat
8
8
8
8
8
<Trigger level in Volts> | MIN | MAX
ON | OFF | ONCE
<Sensitivity band in Volts> | MIN | MAX
ON | OFF | ONCE
POS | NEG
8 <Measurement Time> | MIN | MAX
8 <Hold off time> | MIN | MAX
8 ON | OFF
8 INTernal | EXTernal
8 <Burst sync. delay> | MIN | MAX
8 <ON | OFF
8 REAL | PACKed
1 Alias commands for commands in the Input subsystem.
2 Alias commands fot the: SDELay command for compatibility with the PM6680B.
9-86 Command Reference
:ACQuisition :APERture
PM6680B/85
8 «<Decimal value > |MIN|MAX»
Set the Measurement Time
Sets the gate time for one measurement.
<decimal value> is 0.8E–6, 1.6E–6, 3.2E–6, 6.4E–6, or 12.8E–6 and
50E–6 to 400s.
MIN gives 800 ns and MAX gives 400 s.
Measurement Times of 800 ns to 12.8 ms work in :FREQ:CW, FREQ:BURST,
:FREQ:PRF, 8 :FREQ:RAT and :PERiod. If one of these short times is selected
when the counter makes other measurements, it will use 50 ms.
Parameters:
+
If you want to switch between Average and Single measurements, use the :AVERage:STATe 8 ON|OFF in the Sense Subsystem.
When Single is selected and an array measurement is done, the Measurement
Time, set by :Acquisition:APERture, sets the time between the measurements in the array. This means that if you want a very high speed, you must set
:AVER:STATE 8 OFF and :ACQ:APER 8 MIN.
Returned format:
<Decimal value >¿
*RST condition:
10 ms
SYST:PRESet condition:
200 ms
:ACQuisition :APERture
PM6681
8 «<Decimal value > | MIN | MAX»
Set the Measurement Time
Sets the gate time for one measurement.
Measurement Times of 80 to 1280 ns work in :FREQ:CW, FREQ:BURST,
:FREQ:PRF, 8 :FREQ:RAT and :PERiod. If one of these short times is selected
when the counter makes other measurements, it will use 5 ms.
+
If you want to switch between Average and Single measurements, use the :AVERage:STATe8 ON|OFF in the Sense Subsystem.
When Single is selected and an array measurement is done, the Measurement
Time, set by :Acquisition:APERture, sets the time between the measurements in the array. This means that if you want a very high speed, you must set
:AVER:STATE 8 OFF and :ACQ:APER 8 MIN.
<decimal value> is 80, 160, 320, 640, 1280 ns and 20 ms to 400 s.
MIN gives 80 ns and MAX gives 400 s.
Parameters:
Returned format:
<Decimal value >¿
*RST condition:
10 ms
SYST:PRESet condition:
200 ms
Command Reference 9-87
:ACQuisition :HOFF
8 <boolean>
PM6680B PM6681
Hold Off On/Off
Switches the Hold Off function On/Off.
Parameters:
<Boolean> = 1 / ON | 0 / OFF
Returned format:
1 | 0¿
*RST condition:
OFF
:ACQuisition :HOFF: ECOunt
8 «<Decimal value>|MIN|MAX»
Hold Off, set event counter
PM6680B PM6681
Sets the Hold Off event value. The counter counts negative events on the B input
(channel 2).
Parameters:
<decimal value> is a number in the range 2 to 16 777 215.
Returned format:
<Decimal value>¿
*RST condition:
100
9-88 Command Reference
PM6680B PM6681
:ACQuisition :HOFF :MODE
8 «TIME|EVENt»
Hold Off Mode
Selects if triggering is going to be disabled for a preset time or for a preset number
of events.
When set to event, the counter counts negative edges on the B input (channel 2).
This function is coupled to the :ARM:START:DEL, :ARM:START:ECO,
:ARM:STOP:DEL and :ARM:STOP:ECO. The different delays must all be of the
same type, (Time or Event). This means that setting one of them to Event delay
causes the others to be set to Event delays.
Parameters:
TIME
EVENt
Returned format:
TIME| EVENt¿
*RST condition:
TIME
PM6680B PM6681
:ACQuisition :HOFF :TIME
8 «<Decimal value> |MIN|MAX»
Hold Off Time
Sets the Hold Off time value.
Parameters:
<Decimal data> = a number between 200E–9 and 1.6777215 for PM6680B,
and between 40E–9 and 1.34217727 for PM6681.
Returned format:
<Decimal value>¿
*RST condition:
10 ms for PM6680B and 1 ms for PM6681
Command Reference 9-89
:ACQuisition :RESolution
8 «HIGH|LOW»
PM6680B
Resolution
Selects basic measurement mode for all time-related measurements.
Parameters:
HIGH: The resolution is the full 0.25 ns
LOW: The resolution is limited to a 100-ns clock. You can use this to increase the
bus speed. Saves about 0.6 to 0.9 ms if the counter does real-time calculations,
otherwise, only 0.05 ms.
Returned format:
HIGH|LOW¿
*RST condition:
HIGH
:ACQuisition :RESolution
8 «HIGH|LOW»
PM6681
Resolution
Turns off interpolator usage and also ignores the high resolution part of the count
registers. Low Resolution functions only for Frequency, Period, Time-Interval and
Pulse Width
Parameters:
HIGH: The resolution is the full 50 ps
LOW: The resolution is limited to 125 ns.
At low resolution no special arming and trig options are supported. There is no
handling of Abort messages from the bus after the measurement series has been
started. That means you cannot break off a low-resolution measurement series.
The results are based primarily on the timestamp values with 125-ns resolution.
Single mode is forced on, and every period of a signal is measured. This mode is
limited in frequency to <40 kHz for Frequency and Period, and <20 kHz for TimeInterval and Pulse Width. At 40 kHz the resolution is 1/400, or 2.6 digits.
Returned format:
HIGH|LOW¿
*RST condition:
HIGH
9-90 Command Reference
PM6680B PM6681
:AVERage :COUNt
8 «<Decimal data>|MIN| MAX»
Average Samples
Sets the number of samples to use when doing time-interval averaging measurements in :AVER:MODE 8 COUN. Applies to the functions:
PWIDTH, TIME, RISE and FALL TIME.
Parameters:
<Decimal data> is a number between 1and 65535.
Returned format:
<Decimal data>¿
*RST condition:
100
Command Reference 9-91
:AVERage :STATe
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Boolean>
Average or Single?
Switch on/off the average function.
Parameters:
<Boolean> = 1 | ON / 0 | OFF
ON means multiple period measurements for period related measurements and time-interval average for Time-Interval measurements.
OFF means that the counter measures on a single cycle. This is the same as when pressing the
SINGLE key on the front panel.
When Single is selected and an array measurement is done, the Measurement
Time, set by :Acquisition:APERture, sets the time between the measurements in the array. This means that if you want a very high speed yo must set
:AVER:STATE 8 OFF and :ACQ:APER 8 MIN.
Returned format:
<Boolean>¿
*RST condition:
ON
:FREQuency :RANGe :LOWer
PM6680B/PM6681
8 «<Numeric value>|MIN|MAX»
High Speed Voltage Measurements
Use this command to speed up voltage measurements and Autotrigger functions
when you don’t need to measure on low frequencies.
Time to determine trigger levels
Min frequency limit (Default)
Measuring
function
Max frequency limit
PM6680B
PM6681
PM6680B
PM6681
Freq A
48 ms
85 ms
26 ms
30 ms
Time A-B
82 ms
38 ms
Parameters:
<Numeric value> for PM6680B, 100 gives the lower frequency limit of 100 Hz
and 10000 for a lower frequency limit of 10 kHz.
MIN gives 100 Hz frequency limit for PM6680B and 1Hz for PM6681.
MAX gives 10 kHz frequency limit forPM6680B and 50 kHz for PM6681.
Returned format:
<Numeric value>¿
*RST condition:
100
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-92 Command Reference
PM6680B/81/85
:FUNCtion
8 ‘<Measuring function>[_<Primary channel> [,<Secondary channel>]]’
Select Measuring Function
Selects which measuring function is to be performed and on which channel(s) the
instrument should measure.
Parameters:
<Measuring function> is the function you want to select, according to the SENSe subsystem
command trees on page 9-85 and page 9-86.
<Primary channel> is the channel used in all single-channel measurements and the main channel in dual-channel measurements.
<Secondary channel> is the ‘other’ channel in dual-channel measurements. Only the primary
channel may be programmed for all single channel measurements.
The measuring function and the channels together form one <String> that must
be placed within quotation marks.
+
Returned format:
“<Measuring function>_<Primary channel>[,<Secondary channel>]”¿
Example Select a pulse period measurement on input A (channel 1):
Send ® :FUNC 8 ‘PER 8 1’
*RST condition:
FREQuency_1
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
n Functions and channels in PM6685
:FREQuency [ :CW ]
:FREQuency [ :CW ] :RATio
:FREQuency :BURSt
:FREQuency :PRFrequency
:PERiod
:NWIDth
:PWIDth
:PDUTycycle | DCYCle
:NDUTycycle
:TOTalize [ :CONTinuous ]
[8
[8
[8
[8
[8
[8
[8
[8
[8
[8
‘1|3|4|5|6‘]
‘1|3|4,1|3|4‘]
‘1|3|4‘]
‘1|3|4‘]
‘1|3|4‘]
‘1|4‘]
‘1|4‘]
‘1|4‘]
‘1|4‘]
‘0|1|4,0|1|4‘]
n Input channels PM6685
0
1
3
4
5
6
means that the input is disabled
means input A
means input C (HF-input option)
means input E (Rear panel arming input)
means input A prescaled by 2
means the internal reference
Command Reference 9-93
n Functions and channels in PM6680B and PM6681
:FREQuency
:FREQuency
:FREQuency
:FREQuency
[ :CW ]
[ :CW ] :RATio
:BURSt
:PRF
[8
[8
[8
[8
‘(1|23|4|5|6|7)‘]
‘1|2|3|4,1|2|3|4‘]
‘1|2|3|4|5|6|7‘]
‘1|2|3|4|5|6|7‘]
:PERiod
[8
‘1|2|3|4|5|6|7‘]
:TINTerval
:PHASe
[8
[8
‘1|2|4,1|2|4|6‘]
‘1|2|6,1|2|6‘]
:NWIDth
:PWIDth
[8
[8
‘1|2|4|6‘]
‘1|2|4|6‘]
:DCYCle | PDUTycycle
:NDUTycycl
[8
[8
‘1|2|4|6‘]
‘1|2|4|6‘]
:RISE:TIME
:FALL:TIME
[8
[8
‘1|2‘]
‘1|2‘]
:VOLT:MAXimum
:VOLT:MINimum
:VOLT:PTPeak
[8
[8
[8
‘1|2‘]
‘1|2‘]
‘1|2‘]
:TOTalize:GATed
:TOTalize:TIMed
:TOTalize:ACCumulated
:TOTalize:SSTop
[8
[8
[8
[8
‘ 1 | 2 | 4 | 6, 1 | 2 | 4 | 6 ‘ ]
‘ 1 | 2 | 4 | 6, 1 | 2 | 4 | 6 ‘ ]
‘ 1 | 2 | 4 | 6, 1 | 2 | 4 | 6 ‘ ]
‘1|2|4|6,1|2|4|6‘]
n Input channels PM6680B and PM6681
1
means input A
2
means input B
3
means input C (HF-input option)
4
means input E (Rear panel arming input)
5
means input A prescaled by 2
6
means the internal reference
7
means input A with the variable hysteresis mode
9-94 Command Reference
:INTernal :FORMat
PM6680B/81/85
«REAL|PACKed»
Internal Format
This command selects the internal data format of the measurement result from the
SENSe block. The purpose of the command is to increase the measurement
speed.
Parameters:
REAL means that the result is calculated in real-time after each measurement.
PACKed means that the raw measurement data is stored internally and the result is not calculated in real-time between measurements. The results are calculated later when they are
sent to the controller. Since the result is not calculated, other blocks cannot use this
data. That means that you cannot have the DISPlay, OUTPut, and CALCulate blocks
switched on when using PACKed format.
The following measuring functions in PM6680B/81 cannot be used with PACKed
format: Phase, Duty Cycle and Volt.
PM6685 cannot used PACKed format with Duty Cycle.
The internal format affects the number measuring results that the measurement result buffer can hold.
Number of Results in
Buffer
Format
Measuring Function
PM6680B/85
PM6681
Real:
All functions
2048
7019
Packed:
Frequency, Period, Ratio Totalize
2166
6143
Pulse Width, Time-Interval, Rise/Fall time
764
4466
Phase, Duty Cycle, Volt
N.A.
N.A.
Low resolution Frequency and Period
N.A.
8191
Low Res. Time-Interval and Pulse Width
N.A.
4095
You must consider this when fetching results with the :FETCh:ARRay query.
*RST condition:
REAL
Command Reference 9-95
:ROSCillator :SOURce
8 «INT|EXT»
PM6680B/81/85
Select Reference Oscillator
Selects the signal from the external reference input as timebase instead of the internal timebase oscillator.
Returned format:
<INT|EXT>¿
*RST condition:
INT
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:SDELay
8 «<Numeric value>|MIN|MAX»
BURST/PRF Synchronization Delay
PM6685
Sets the synchronization delay time used in FREQuency:BURSt | PRF measurements.
Parameter range: 200 ns to 1.6777215 s
*RST condition:
10 ms
9-96 Command Reference
:TOTalize :GATE
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Boolean>
Gate On/Off
Open/closes the gate for :TOTalize[:CONTinuous].
+
Before opening the gate with this command, the counter must be in the ‘continuously initiated’ state , (:INIT:CONT 8 ON)or else the totalizing will not start.
Parameters:
<Boolean> = (1 / ON | 0 / OFF)
Returned format:
<Boolean>¿
Example:
Send ® :FUNC 8 ‘TOT 8 1’
Selects totalizing
on input A
Send ® :INIT:CONT 8 ON;TOT:GATE 8 ON
This will initiate totalizing, reset the totalizing value to zero, and start totalizing.
Send ® TOT:GATE 8 OFF
Read ¬ :FETCh:ARRay? 8 -1
*RST condition:
Stop totalizing
Read the final result
OFF
PM6680B PM6681
:VOLTage:GATed:STATe
8 <Boolean>
Gated Voltage Measurement
Selects the gated mode for the :VOLTage:MAX|MIN|PTPeak measuring functions and for the Autotrigger function.
The gated mode is useful for removing overshoot and undershoot. The gate signal
is controlled by the :ARM:STOP:SLOPe and :ARM:STOP:SOURce commands. If
channel 2 (B) is the source for the gating signal, all other characteristics of that
channel can be used. When Gated Voltage is selected, the Stop Arming function is
disabled from its normal stop arming usage. When gated voltage mode is selected,
high enables measurement and low disables measurements. Use the slope if you
want it the other way around.
Parameters:
<Boolean> = 1/ON|0/OFF
Returned format:
1|0 ¿
*RST condition:
OFF
Command Reference 9-97
This page is intentionally left blank.
9-98 Command Reference
Status Subsystem
:STATus
:DREGister0
:ENABle
[:EVENt]?
8 <bit mask>
:OPERation
:CONDition?
:ENABle
[:EVENt]?
8 <bit mask>
:QUEStionable
:CONDition?
:ENABle
[:EVENt]?
8 <bit mask>
:PRESet
n Related Common Commands:
*CLS
*ESE
*ESR?
*PSC
*SRE
*STB?
8 <bit mask>
8 <bit mask>
8 <bit mask>
Command Reference 9-99
:STATus :DREGister0?
80B/81/85
Read Device Status Event Register
This query reads out the contents of the Device Event Register. Reading the Device Event Register clears the register. See Figure 6-14.
Returned format:
<dec.data> = the sum (between 0 and 6) of all bits that are true. See table below:
Bit No.
Weight
Condition
2
4
Last measurement below low limit.
1
2
Last measurement above high limit.
:STATus :DREGister0 :ENABle
80B/81/85
8 <bit mask>
Enable Device Status Reporting
This command sets the enable bit of the Device Register 0.
Parameters:
<dec.data> = the sum (between 0 and 6) of all bits that are true. See table below:
Bit No.
Weight
2
4
Enable monitoring of low limit
1
2
Enable monitoring of high limit
Returned format:
Condition
<bit mask>¿
9-100 Command Reference
:STATus :OPERation :CONDition?
80B/81/85
Read Operation Status Condition Register
Reads out the contents of the operation status condition register. This register reflects the state of the measurement process. See figure below. Note that bits 0 to
3, 7, and 9 to 15 are not used.
Returned Format:
<Decimal data> = the sum (between 0 and 368) of all bits that are true. See table below:
Bit No.
Weight
8
256
Not Measurement
6
64
Waiting for bus arming
5
32
Waiting for triggering and/ or external arming
4
16
Measurement
Complies to standards:
Condition
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed
Command Reference 9-101
:STATus :OPERation :ENABle
80B/81/85
8 <Decimal data>
Enable Operation Status Reporting
Sets the enable bits of the operation status enable register. This enable register
contains a mask value for the bits to be enabled in the operation status event register. A bit that is set true in the enable register enables the corresponding bit in
the status register. See figure on page 9-101.
An enabled bit will set bit #7, OPR (Operation Status Bit), in the Status Byte Register if the enabled event occurs. See also status reporting on page 3-14.
Power-on will clear this register if power-on clearing is enabled via *PSC.
<dec.data> = the sum (between 0 and 368) of all bits that are true. See table below:
Parameters:
Bit No.
Weight
8
256
No measurement
6
64
Waiting for bus arming
5
32
Waiting for triggering and/or external arming
4
16
Measurement
Returned Format:
Condition
<Decimal data>¿
Example:
SEND® :STAT:OPER:ENAB 8 288
In this example, waiting for triggering, bit 5, and Measurement stopped, bit 8, will
set the OPR-bit of the Status Byte. (This method is faster than using *OPC if you
want to know when the measurement is ready.)
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-102 Command Reference
:STATus:OPERation?
80B/81/85
Read Operation Status, Event
Reads out the contents of the operation event status register. Reading the Operation Event Register clears the register. See figure on page 9-101.
Returned Format:
<Decimal data>¿
<dec.data> = the sum (between 0 and 368) of all bits that are true. See table on page 9-102.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:STATus :PRESet
PM6680B/81/85
Enable Device Status Reporting
This command has an SCPI standardized effect on the status data structures. The
purpose is to precondition these toward reporting only device-dependent status
data.
– It only affects enable registers. It does not change event and condition registers.
– The IEEE-488.2 enable registers, which are handled with the common commands *SRE and
*ESE remain unchanged.
– The command sets or clears all other enable registers. Those relevant for this counter are as
follows:
– It sets all bits of the Device status Enable Registers to 1.
– It sets all bits of the Questionable Data Status Enable Registers and the Operation Status Enable Registers to 0.
– The following registers never change in the counter, but they do conform to the standard
:STATus:PRESet values.
– All bits in the positive transition filters of Questionable Data and Operation status registers
are 1.
– All bits in the negative transition filters of Questionable Data and Operation status registers
are 0.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-103
:STATus :QUEStionable :CONDition?
PM6680B/81/85
Read Questionable Data/Signal Condition Register
Reads out the contents of the status questionable condition register.
Returned Format:
<dec.data> = the sum (between 0 and 17920) of all bits that are true. See table below:
Bit No.
Weight
Condition
14
16384
Unexpected parameter
10
1024
Timeout or no signal detected
9
512
Overflow
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-104 Command Reference
:STATus :QUEStionable :ENABle
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Decimal data>
Enable Questionable Data/Signal Status Reporting
Sets the enable bits of the status questionable enable register. This enable register
contains a mask value for the bits to be enabled in the status questionable event
register. A bit that is set true in the enable register enables the corresponding bit in
the status register. See figure on page 9-104.
An enabled bit will set bit #3, QUE (Questionable Status Bit), in the Status Byte
Register if the enabled event occurs. See also status reporting on page 3-14.
Power-on will clear this register if power-on clearing is enabled via *PSC.
Parameters:
<dec.data> = the sum (between 0 and 17920) of all bits that are true. See the table on page
9-104.
Returned Format:
<Decimal data> ¿
Example:
Send ® :STAT:QUES:ENAB 8 16896
In this example, both ‘unexpected parameter’ bit 14, and ‘overflow’ bit 8, will set
the QUE-bit of the Status Byte when a questionable status occurs.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:STATus :QUEStionable?
PM6680B/81/85
Read Questionable Data/Signal Event Register
Reads out the contents of the status questionable event register. Reading the
Status Questionable Event Register clears the register. See figure on page 9-104.
Returned Format:
<dec.data> = the sum (between 0 and 17920) of all bits that are true. See the table on page
9-104.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-105
This page is intentionally left blank.
9-106 Command Reference
System Subsystem
:SYSTem
:COMMunicate
:GPIB
:ERRor?
:ADDRess
:PRESet
:SYSTem:SDETect[:ENABle]
:SET
:TIME
8 <Numeric value> | MIN | MAX
8 ON | OFF
8 <Block data>
(Only PM6685)
:ELAPsed?
:TOUT
[:STATe]
:TIME
:UNPRotect
8 ON | OFF
8 <timeout value>
:VERSion?
n Related common command:
*IDN?
*OPT?
*PUD
*RST
8 <arbitrary block program data>
Command Reference 9-107
:SYSTem :COMMunicate: GPIB: ADDRess
8 «<Numeric value>|MAX|MIN» [,«<Numeric value>|MAX|MIN»]
80B/81/85
Set GPIB Address
This command sets the GPIB address. This selection overrides the switches on
the rear panel of the counter. The set address is valid until a new address is set,
either by bus command, switch setting, or via the front panel AUX-MENU.
Parameters:
<Numeric value> is a number between 0 and 30.
MIN sets address 0.
MAX sets address 30.
[,<Numeric value>|MAX|MIN] sets a secondary address. This is accepted but not
used in PM6681 and PM6685. PM6680B does not accept a secondary address.
[:SELF] 8 This optional parameter is accepted by PM6681 and PM6685.
PM6680B does not accept [:SELF].
Returned format:>
<Numeric value>¿
Example:
SEND® :SYST:COMM:GPIB:ADDR 8 12
This example sets the bus address to 12.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:SYSTem :ERRor?
PM6680B/81/85
Queries for an ASCii text description of an error that occurred. The error messages are placed in an error queue, with a FIFO (First In-First Out) structure. This
queue is summarized in the Error AVailable (EAV) bit in the status byte.
Returned format:
<error number>,"<Error Description String>"¿
Where:
<Error Description String> = an error description as ASCii text.
See also:
Chapter 8, error messages.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-108 Command Reference
:SYSTem :PRESet
PM6680B/81/85
Preset
This command sets the counter to the same default settings as when the front
panel key LOCAL/PRESET is pressed in local mode.
+
See also:
These are not exactly the same settings as after *RST,
SYST:PRES gives 200 ms Measurement Time and signal detection ON, while
*RST gives 10-ms Measurement Time and signal detection OFF.
Default settings on page -.
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:SYSTem :SDETect
PM6685
8 <Boolean>
Signal Detection
This command switches on or off the signal detection, that is, the ability to show
NO SIGNAL, NO TRIG on the display.
When signal detection is enabled, the measurement attempt will be abandoned
when the no signal is detected. A zero result will be sent to the controller instead of
a measurement result, and the timeout bit in the STATus QUEStionable register
will be set.
Returned format:
«0|1»¿
Where:
0 means no signal detection
1 means signal detection ON.
*RST condition:
0
Command Reference 9-109
:SYSTem :SET
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Block data>
Read or Send Settings
Transmits in binary form the complete current state of the instrument. This data
can be sent to the instrument to later restore this setting. This command has the
same function as the *LRN? common command with the exception that it returns
the data only as response to :SYST:SET?. The query form of this command returns a definite block data element.
Parameters:
<Block data> is the instrument setting previously retrieved via the :SYSTem:SET? query.
Returned format:
<Block data>¿
Where:
<Block data> is #292<92 data bytes> for PM6680B
<Block data> is #3104<104 data bytes> for PM6681
<Block data> is #276<76 data bytes> for PM6685
SEND® :SYST:SET?
READ¬ #2764...-8 .8 .Çä......d...8
+.................-.c-..............8 8 ?..............d
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
:SYSTem :TIME :ELAPsed?
PM6680B/81/85
Read On-time
Use this command if you want to know (in seconds) how long the counter has
been on.
Returned format:
<String>=Power-on time.
For PM6680B and PM6685, this is the time elapsed since the last power-on.
For PM6681, this is the total elapsed time since the counter was new.
9-110 Command Reference
:SYSTem :TOUT
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Boolean>
Timeout On/Off
This command switches on or off the timeout. When timeout is enabled, the measurement attempt will be abandoned when the time set with :SYST:TOUT:TIME
has elapsed. A zero result will be sent to the controller instead of a measurement
result and the timeout bit in the STATus QUEStionable register will be set.
0 means no timeout; 1 means that the timeout set by :SYSTem:TOUT:TIME is used.
Returned format:
Example:
SEND® :SYST:TOUT 8 1;TOUT:TIME 8 0.5;:STAT:QUES:ENAB 8
1024;:*SRE 8 8
This example turns on timeout, sets the timeout to 0.5 s, enables status reporting of
questionable data at timeout, and enables service request on questionable data.
SEND® *STB?
If bit 3 in the status byte is set, read the
questionable data status.
SEND® :STAT:QUES:EVEN?
This query reads the questionable data status.
READ¬ «1024|0»
1024 means timeout has occurred, and 0
means no timeout.
*RST condition:
0
:SYSTem :TOUT :TIME
PM6680B/81/85
8 «<Numeric value>|MIN|MAX»
Timeout, Set
This command sets the timeout in seconds.
The timeout starts when a measurement starts and, if no result is obtained when
the set timeout has elapsed the measurement is terminated.
Note that you must enable timeout using :SYST:TOUT_ON for this setting to take
effect.
Parameters:
<Numeric value> is the timeout in seconds. The range is 0.1 to 25.5 s for PM6680B and
PM6685. The range is 64 ms to 400 s for PM6681
MIN gives 0.1 s (64 ms for PM6681)
MAX gives 25.5 s (400 s for PM6681)
Returned format:
*RST condition:
<Numeric value>¿
0.1 (6.4E-2 for PM6681)
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
Command Reference 9-111
:SYSTem :UNPRotect
PM6680B/81/85
Unprotect
This command will unprotect the user data (set/read by *PUD) and front setting
memories 10-19 until the next PMT (Program message terminator) or Device clear
or Reset (*RST). This makes it necessary to send an unprotect command in the
same message as for instance *PUD.
Example
Send ® :SYST:UNPR; *PUD 8 #240Calibrated 8 1992-11-17, 8 inventory No.1234
Where:
# means that <arbitrary block program data> will follow.
2 means that the two following digits will specify the length of the data block
40 is the number of characters in this example
:SYSTem :VERSion?
PM6680B/81/85
System Version
This query returns the SCPI system version that this instrument complies to.
Returned format:
<year>.<revision>¿
Where <year> is the year of publication of the complied standard and <revision> is
the number of the SCPI standard.
Example
Send ® :SYST:VER?
Read¬ 1991.0
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-112 Command Reference
Test Subsystem
:TEST
:CHECk
:SELect
8 ON | OFF
8 RAM | ROM | LOGic | DISPlay | ALL
n Related common command:
*TST
Command Reference 9-113
:TEST:CHECk
8 <Boolean>
PM6680B/81/85
Select Check signal
This command connects the internal reference signal to the measuring logic, instead of an external measuring signal. This makes it possible to test all functions.
The frequency of the reference is 10 MHz for PM6680B and PM6685, and
100 MHz for PM6681.
Parameters:
<Boolean> = 1 / ON | 0 / OFF
1 and ON means test signal connected
0 and OFF means test signal disconnected.
Selecting channel 6 when entering measuring channel for :CONFigure :MEASure, etc., also selects the reference.
+
Returned format:
1|0¿
*RST condition:
0
:TEST :SELect
8 «RAM | ROM | LOGic | DISPlay | ALL»
Select Self-tests
PM6680B/81/85
Selects which internal self-tests shall be used when self-test is requested by the
*TST command.
Returned format:
«RAM | ROM | LOGic | DISPlay | ALL»¿
*RST condition:
ALL
9-114 Command Reference
Trigger Subsystem
:TRIGger
[ STARt / :SEQuence [ 1 ] ]
[ :LAYer [ 1 ] ]
:COUNt 8
<Numeric value> | MIN | MAX
n Related common command:
*TRG
Command Reference 9-115
:TRIGger:COUNt
8 «<Numeric value> | MIN | MAX»
PM6680B/81/85
No. of Triggerings on each Ext Arm start
Sets how many measurements the instrument should make for each ARM:STARt
condition, (block arming).
These measurements are done without any additional arming conditions before
the measurement. This also means that stop arming is disabled for the measurements inside a block.
+
The actual number of measurements made on each INIT equals to:
(:ARM:START:COUN)*(:TRIG:START:COUNT)
Parameters:
<Numeric value> is a number between 1 and 65535.
MAX gives 65535
MIN gives 1
Example:
SEND® :TRIG:COUN 8 50
Returned format:
*RST condition:
<Numeric value>¿
1
Complies to standards:
SCPI 1991.0, confirmed.
9-116 Command Reference
Common Commands
*CLS
*DMC
*EMC
*ESE
*ESR?
*GMC?
*IDN?
8 <Macro label> , <Program messages>
8 <Decimal data>
8 <Decimal data>
8 <Macro label>
*LMC?
*LRN?
*OPC
*OPC?
*OPT?
*PMC
*PSC
*PUD
*RCL
*RMC
*RST
*SAV
*SRE
*STB?
8
8
8
8
<Decimal data>
<Arbitrary block program data>
<Decimal data>
<Macro name>
8 <Decimal data>
8 <Decimal data>
*TRG
*TST?
*WAI
Command Reference 9-117
*CLS
PM6680B/81/85
Clear Status Command
The *CLS common command clears the status data structures by clearing all event
registers and the error queue. It does not clear enable registers and transition filters. It clears any pending *WAI, *OPC, and *OPC?.
Example:
Send
® *CLS
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
9-118 Command Reference
*DMC
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Macro label> , <Program messages>
Define Macro
Allows you to assign a sequence of one or more program message units to a
macro label. The sequence is executed when the macro label is received as a
command or query. Twenty five macros can be defined at the same time, and each
macro can contain an average of 40 characters.
If a macro has the same name as a command, it masks out the real command with
the same name when macros are enabled. If macros are disabled, the original
command will be executed.
If you define macros when macro execution is disabled, the counter executes the
*DMC command fast, but if macros are enabled, the execution time for this command is longer.
Parameters:
<Macro label> = 1 to 12-character macro label. (String data must be surrounded by “ ” or ‘ ‘
as in the example below.)
<Program messages> = the commands to be executed when the macro label is received, both
block data and string data formats can be used.
Example 1:
SEND® *DMC ‘AMPLITUDE?’,":FUNC 8 ‘FREQ 8 1’;:INP:HYST:AUTO ONCE
8 ;:INP:HYST?;:INP:LEV?"
This example defines a macro called amplitude?.
SEND® AMPLITUDE?
The macro makes an AUTO ONCE and reads out the hysteresis and trigger level
that auto selects. (Macros must be enabled; otherwise, the :AMPLITUDE? query
will not execute, see *EMC)).
READ¬ +3.46125461E-001;+3.64852399E-001
Auto selects 33% of Vpp as hysteresis, so multiplying the first part of this reading
by 3 will give you the signal amplitude (0.346*3=1.04 V in this example). You can
Hysteresis * 3
also calculate positive peak voltage:
+ Trigger Level and negative
2
Hysteresis * 3
peak voltage: Vp
- Trigger Level
2
Example 2:
SEND® *DMC 8 ‘AUTOFILT’,":INP:HYST:AUTO 8 $1;:INP:FILT 8 $1
This example defines a macro AUTO which takes one argument, i.e., auto
«ON|OFF|ONCE» ($1) .
SEND® AUTOFILT 8 OFF
Turns off both the auto function and the filter.
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
Command Reference 9-119
*EMC
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Decimal data>
Enable Macros
This command enables and disables expansion and execution of macros. If macros are disabled, the instrument will not recognize a macro although it is defined in
the instrument. (The Enable Macro command takes a long time to execute.)
Parameters:
<Decimal data> = is 0 or 1. A value which rounds to 0 turns off macro execution. Any other
value turns macro execution on.
Note that 1 or 0 is <Decimal data>, not <Boolean>!
ON|OFF is not allowed here!
+
«0|1» ¿
1 indicates that macro expansion is enabled.
0 indicates that macro expansion is disabled.
Returned format:
Example:
SEND®*EMC 8 1
Enables macro expansion and execution.
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
9-120 Command Reference
*ESE
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Decimal data>
Standard Event Status Enable
Sets the enable bits of the standard event enable register. This enable register
contains a mask value for the bits to be enabled in the standard event status register. A bit that is set true in the enable register enables the corresponding bit in the
status register. An enabled bit will set the ESB (Event Status Bit) in the Status Byte
Register if the enabled event occurs. See also status reporting on page 3-14.
Parameters:
<dec.data> = the sum (between 0 and 255) of all bits that are true.
Event Status Enable Register (1 = enable)
Bit
Weight
Enables
7
128
PON, Power-on occurred
6
64
URQ, User Request
5
32
CME, Command Error
4
16
EXE, Execution Error
3
8
DDE, Device Dependent Error
2
4
QYE, Query Error
1
2
RQC, Request Control (not used)
0
1
Operation Complete
Returned Format:
<Decimal data> ¿
Example:
SEND® *ESE 8 36
In this example, command error, bit 5, and query error, bit 2, will set the ESB-bit of
the Status Byte if these errors occur.
Figure 9-3
Complies to standards:
Bits in the standard event status register.
IEEE 488.2 1987.
Command Reference 9-121
∗ESR?
PM6680B/81/85
Event Status Register
Reads out the contents of the standard event status register. Reading the Standard Event Status Register clears the register.
Returned Format:
<dec.data> = the sum (between 0 and 255) of all bits that are true. See table on page 9-121.
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
*GMC?
PM6680B/81/85
8 < macro label>
Get Macro Definition
This command makes the counter respond with the current definition of the given
macro label.
Parameters:
<Macro label> = the label of the macro for which you want to see the definition. (String data
must be surrounded by “ ” or ‘ ‘ as in the example below.)
Returned Format:
<Block data>¿
Example:
SEND® *GMC? 8 ‘AMPLITUDE?’
Gives a block data response, for instance:
READ¬
#255:FUNC ‘FREQ 1’;:INP:HYST:AUTO ONCE;:INP:HYST?;INP:LEV?
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
9-122 Command Reference
*IDN?
PM6680B/81/85
Identification query
Reads out the manufacturer, model, serial number, Firmware level for main and
GPIB program in an ASCii response data element. The query must be the last
query in a program message.
Response is <Manufacturer> , <Model> , <Serial Number>, <Firmware Level>.
<Serial number> is not implemented in PM6680B and PM6685 and will always return a zero. Please look at the type plate at the rear panel of the counter if you are
interested in the serial number. PM6681 returns the correct serial number.
Example
SEND ®*IDN?
READ¬ Fluke, 8 8 8 8 PM6685, 8 0, 8 MAIN 8 V1.01 8 19 Nov 8
1992 8 / 8 GPIB 8 V1.12 8 8 28 8 Oct 8 1992
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
*LMC?
PM6680B/81/85
Learn Macro
Makes the instrument send a list of string data elements, containing all macro labels defined in the instrument.
Returned Format:
<String> { ,<String> }¿
<String> = a Macro label. (String data will be surrounded by “ ” as in the example below.)
Example:
SEND® *LMC?
May give the following response:
READ¬“AUTOFILT”,"AMPLITUDE?"
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
Command Reference 9-123
*LRN?
PM6680B/81/85
Learn Device Setup
Learn Device Setup Query. Causes a response message that can be sent to the
instrument to return it to the state it was in when the *LRN? query was made.
Returned Format:
:SYST:SET_<Block data>¿
Where:
<Block data> is #292<92 data bytes> for PM6680B
<Block data> is #3104<104 data bytes> for PM6681
<Block data> is #276<76 data bytes> for PM6685
Example
SEND® *LRN?
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
*OPC
PM6680B/81/85
Operation Complete
The Operation Complete command causes the device to set the operation complete bit in the Standard Event Status Register when all pending selected device
operations have been finished. See also Example 4 in Chapter 4.
Example:
Enable OPC-bit
SEND® *ESE 8 1
Start measurement (INIT). *OPC will set the operation complete bit in the status register when the
measurement is done.
SEND® :INIT;*OPC
Wait 1s for the measurement to stop. Read serial poll register, will reset service request
SPOLL
Check the Operation complete bit (0) in the serial poll byte. If it is true the measurement is
completed and you can fetch the result.
SEND® FETCh?
Then read the event status register to reset it:
SEND® *ESR?
If bit 0 is false, abort the measurement.
SEND® :ABORt
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
9-124 Command Reference
*OPC?
PM6680B/81/85
Operation Complete Query
Operation Complete query. The Operation Complete query places an ASCii character 1 into the device’s Output Queue when all pending selected device operations have been finished.
Returned Format:
1¿
See also:
Example 6 is Chapter 4.
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
*OPT?
PM6680B/81/85
Option Identification
Response is a list of all detectable options present in the instrument, with absent
options represented with an ASCii ‘0’.
Returned format:
<Bus option>,<Prescaler option>¿
Where:
<Bus option> = GPIB
<Prescaler option> = 0|10|20
0 for prescaler option means that no prescaler is installed.
+
Oscillator type are not detectable and can therefore, not be reported.
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
Command Reference 9-125
*PMC
PM6680B/81/85
Purge Macros
Removes all macro definitions.
Example:
*PMC
See also:
:MEMory:DELete:MACRo 8 ‘<Macro-name>’ if you want to remove a single
macro.
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
*PSC
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Decimal data>
Power-on Status Clear
Enables/disables automatic power-on clearing. The status registers listed below
are cleared when the power-on status clear flag is 1. Power-on does not affect the
registers when the flag is 0.
– Service request enable register (*SRE)
–
–
–
–
–
Event status enable register (*ESE)
Operation status enable register (:STAT:OPER:ENAB)
Questionable data/signal enable register (:STAT:QUES:ENAB)
Device enable registers (:STAT:DREG0:ENAB)
*RST does not affect this power-on status clear flag.
<Decimal data> = a number that rounds to 0 turns off automatic power-on
clearing. Any other value turns it on.
Parameters:
Returned Format:
«1 | 0» ¿
1 is enabled and 0 is disabled.
*PSC 8 1
This example enables automatic power-on clearing.
Example:
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
9-126 Command Reference
*PUD
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Arbitrary block program data>
Protected User Data
Protected user data. This is a data area in which the user may write any data up to
64 characters. The data can always be read, but you can only write data after unprotecting the data area. A typical use would be to hold calibration information, usage time, inventory control numbers, etc.
The content at delivery is: #234 FACTORY CALIBRATED ON: 19YY-MM-DD
– YY = year, MM = month, DD = day
Returned format:
– Where:
<Arbitrary block response data>¿
<arbitrary block program data> is the data last programmed with *PUD.
Example
Send ® :SYST:UNPR; *PUD 8 #240Calibrated 8 1993-07-16,
tory 8 No.1234
8 inven-
# means that <arbitrary block program data> will follow.
2 means that the two following digits will specify the length of the data block.
40 is the number of characters in this example.
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
*RCL
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Decimal data>
Recall
Recalls one of the up to 20 previously stored complete instrument settings from the
internal nonvolatile memory of the instrument.
Memory number 0 contains the power-off settings for PM6685. For PM6681 memory number 0 contains the power-off settings until PRESET is pressed. After preset, memory 0 contains the pre-preset settings.
Parameters:
<Decimal data> = a number between 0 and 19.
Example:
SEND® *RCL 8 10¿
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
Command Reference 9-127
∗RMC
PM6680B/81/85
8 ‘<Macro name>’
Delete one Macro
This command removes an individual MACRo.
Parameters:
‘<Macro name>’ is the name of the macro you want to delete.
+
<Macro name> is String data that must be surrounded by quotation marks.
See also:
*PMC, if you want to delete all macros.
*RST
PM6680B/81/85
Reset
The Reset command resets the counter. It is the third level of reset in a 3-level reset strategy, and it primarily affects the counter functions, not the IEEE 488 bus.
The counter settings will be set to the default settings listed on page -. All previous
commands are discarded, macros are disabled, and the counter is prepared to
start new operations.
Example:
*RST
See also:
Default settings on page -.
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
9-128 Command Reference
*SAV
PM6680B/81/85
_ <Decimal data>
Save
Saves the current settings of the instrument in an internal nonvolatile memory.
Nineteen memory locations are available. Switching the power off and on does not
change the settings stored in the registers.
Note that memory positions 10 to 19 can be protected from the front panel auxiliary
menu. If this has been done, use the :SYSTem:UNPRotect command, then you
can alter these memory positions.
Parameters
<Decimal data> = a number between 1 and 19.
Example:
SEND® *SAV 8 10¿
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987
Command Reference 9-129
*SRE
PM6680B/81/85
8 <Decimal data>
Service Request Enable
The Service Request Enable command sets the service request enable register
bits. This enable register contains a mask value for the bits to be enabled in the
status byte register. A bit that is set true in the enable register enables the corresponding bit in the status byte register to generate a Service Request.
<dec.data> = the sum (between 0 and 255) of all bits that are true.
See table below:
Parameters:
Service Request Enable Register (1 = enable)
Bit
Weight
Enables
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
128
64
32
16
8
4
2
1
OPR, Operation Status
RQS, Request Service
ESB, Event Status Bit
MAV, Message Available
QUE, Questionable Data/Signal Status
EAV, Error Available
Not used
Device Status
Returned Format:
<Integer>¿
Where:
<Integer> = the sum of all bits that are set.
*SRE 8 16
In this example, the counter generates a service request when a message is available in the output queue.
Example:
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
9-130 Command Reference
*STB?
PM6680B/81/85
Status Byte Query
Reads out the value of the Status Byte. Bit 6 reports the Master Summary Status
bit (MSS), not the Request Service (RQS). The MSS is set if the instrument has
one or more reasons for requesting service.
Returned Format:
<Integer> = the sum (between 0 and 255) of all bits that are true. See table below:
Status Byte Register (1 = true)
Bit
Weight
Name
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
128
64
32
16
8
4
2
1
OPR
MSS
ESB
MAV
QUE
EAV
See also:
Condition
Enabled operation status has occurred.
Reason for requesting service
Enabled status event condition has occurred
An output message is ready
The quality of the output signal is questionable
Error available
Not used
DREG0
Enabled status device event conditions have
occurred
If you want to read the status byte with the RQS bit, use serial poll.
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
*TRG
PM6680B/81/85
Trigger
The trigger command *TRG starts the measurement and places the result in the
output queue.
It is the same as:
:ARM:STARt:LAYer2:IMM; *WAI;:FETCh?
The Trigger command is the device-specific equivalent of the IEEE 488.1 defined
Group Execute Trigger, GET. It has exactly the same effect as a GET after it has
been received, and parsed by the counter.
However, GET is much faster than *TRG, since GET is a hardware signal that does
not have to be parsed by the counter.
Example:
SEND®
SEND®
SEND®
READ¬
:ARM:START:LAY2:SOURCE 8 BUS
:INIT:CONT 8 ON
*TRG
+3.2770536E+004
Type of Command:
Aborts all previous measurement commands if not *WAI is used.
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
Command Reference 9-131
*TST?
PM6680B/81/85
Self Test
The self-test query causes an internal self-test and generates a response indicating whether or not the device completed the self-test without any detected errors.
Returned Format:
<Integer>¿
Where:
<Integer> = a number indicating errors according to the table below.
<Integer> =
0
1
2
4
8
16
32
Complies to standards:
PM6680B Error
No error
RAM Failure
ROM 1 Failure
Logic Failure
Display Failure
Not used
Not used
PM6681, PM6685 Error
Display Failure
Logic Failure
RAM Failure
Bus ROM Failure
ROM Bank 1 Failure
ROM Bank 2 Failure
IEEE 488.2 1987
*WAI
PM6680B/81/85
Wait-to-continue
The Wait-to-Continue command prevents the device from executing any further
commands or queries until execution of all previous commands or queries has
been completed.
Example:
SEND®:MEAS:FREQ?; *WAI;:MEAS:PDUT?
In this example, *WAI makes the instrument perform both the frequency and the
Duty Cycle measurement. Without *WAI, only the Duty Cycle measurement would
be performed.
READ¬ +5.1204004E+002;+1.250030E-001
Complies to standards:
IEEE 488.2 1987.
9-132 Command Reference
Chapter 10
Index
Index
!
Array· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-4 - 7-5,7-7
Fetch · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-35
ASCII
Data format · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-8,9-38
Fixed format · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-39
Attenuation · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2,9-44
Auto
Attenuation · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-44
Gated voltage mode · · · · · · · · · · 9-97
Levels selected by· · · · · · · · · · · · 9-49
Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-45,9-48
Once · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-46,9-49 - 9-50
Power on clearing · · · · · · · · · · · 9-126
Sensitivity · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-46
Speed · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-92
Trigger · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-50,9-97
Trigger level· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-49
Trigger On/Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-49
Triggering· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2
Auto calibration on/off· · · · · · · · · · · 9-24
Average
For a preset time · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-91
Measurements· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-92
Mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-91
On/Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-4,9-92
Sample size · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-91
Samples· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-91
Samples in averaging · · · · · · · · · 9-91
State· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-92
Average or Single? · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-92
1 Mohm · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-47
50 ohms · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-47
A
Abort · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-4
Measurement· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-4
AC|DC· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2,9-44
Accumulated, totalize X gated by Y 9-70
Address
GPIB · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-108
Switches · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-4
Analog
Filter· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-45
Analog Out
Enable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-80
Scaling factor· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-80
Aperture · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-87
Arbitrary block data · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-112
Arming· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-8
Bus arm mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-8
Delay by events · · · · · · · · · · 9-7,9-10
Event count range· · · · · · · · · 9-7,9-10
External Events before Start · 9-7,9-10
Start delay · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-7
Start slope · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-9
Start source · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-9
Stop slope · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-11
Stop source · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-11
Subsystem· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-5
Wait for bus · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-23
II
Check Against Upper Limit · · · · · · · 9-19
Check signal · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-114
Clear Status· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-118
Clearing
status registers · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-126
CME-bit· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-21,9-121
Colon · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8,3-10
Command
Error · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-4,3-17,9-121
Error (CME) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-21
Header · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-10
Tree · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-10
Command Error (CME)
Code list· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 8-2
Command tree · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
Commands · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-20
*CLS · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-20,9-118
*DMC · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-13,9-117,9-119
*EMC · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-14,9-120
*ESE · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-117,9-121
*ESR? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-122
*GMC?· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-15,9-122
*IDN? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-123
*LMC · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-117,9-123
*LMC? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-15
*LRN? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-124
*OPT? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-125
*PMC· · · · · · · · · · · · 3-14,9-117,9-126
*PSC · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-117,9-126
*RCL · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-127
*RST · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-117
*SRE · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-17,9-130
*STB? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-117,9-131
*TRG · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-29,9-8,9-131
*TST? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-117,9-132
*WAI· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-132
:ABORt· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-4
:ACQuisition:APERture · · · · · · · · 9-87
:Acquisition:HOFF · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-88
:Acquisition:HOFF:ECOunt · · · · · 9-88
:Acquisition:HOFF:MODE · · · · · · 9-89
B
Back-to-back · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-15
Period · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-9,7-13
Block arming · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-116
Block data · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-12,7-8,9-38
Block measurements · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-8
Boolean · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-11
Burst
Carrier Frequency · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-61
Repetition Frequency · · · · · · · · · 9-62
Synchronization (PM6685) · · · · · 9-96
Bus
Drivers · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-6
Bus Arm · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-6
Exit· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-8
Mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-8
On/Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-8
Override · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-8
Bus initialization · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-19
C
Calculate
Block · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 5-3
Enable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-22
Mathematics · · · · · · · · · · · 9-20 - 9-21
Reading data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-15
Real time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-9
Subsystem· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-13
Calibration · · · · · · · · · · 7-8,9-112,9-127
Of Comparators · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-30
Of Interpolators · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-24
Subsystem· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-23
Change function fast
MEAS:MEM1? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-5
Channel
List · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-12
Selecting · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-13,9-93
Character data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-12
Check · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-3
Check Against Lower Limit · · · · · · · 9-18
III
:Acquisition:HOFF:TIMe · · · · · · · 9-89
:Acquisition:RESolution· · · · · · · · 9-90
:ARM · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-8
:ARM:LAYer2:SOURce · · · · · · · · · 9-8
:ARM:SEQuence:LAYer1:COUNt · 9-6
:ARM:SEQuence:LAYer1:DELay
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-7,9-10
:ARM:SEQuence:LAYer1:SOURce 9-9
:ARM:SEQuence1:LAYer1:ECOunt
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-7,9-10
:ARM:SEQuence1:LAYer1:SLOPe 9-9
:ARM:SEQuence2:SLOPe · · · · · 9-11
:ARM:SEQuence2:SOURce · · · · 9-11
:ARM:STARt · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-8
:ARM:STARt:LAYer1:COUNt· · · · · 9-6
:ARM:STARt:LAYer1:DELay · 9-7,9-10
:ARM:STARt:LAYer1:ECOunt 9-7,9-10
:ARM:STARt:LAYer1:SLOPe· · · · · 9-9
:ARM:STARt:LAYer1:SOURce · · · 9-9
:ARM:STOP:SLOPe · · · · · · · · · · 9-11
:ARM:STOP:SOURce · · · · · · · · · 9-11
:AVERage:COUNts · · · · · · · · · · · 9-91
:AVERage:MODE · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-91
:AVERage:STATe· · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-92
:CALCulate :AVERage :COUNt · 9-14
:CALCulate:AVERage:STATe · · · 9-15
:CALCulate:AVERage:TYPE· · · · 9-15
:CALCulate:DATA · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-15
:CALCulate:IMMediate · · · · · · · · 9-16
:CALCulate:LIMit[:STATe] · · · 6-3,9-16
:CALCulate:LIMit:FAIL· · · · · · · · · 9-17
:CALCulate:LIMit:LOWer:STATe · 9-18
:CALCulate:MATH:STATe · · · · · · 9-21
:CALCulate:STATe· · · · · · · · · · · · 9-22
:CALibration:INTerpolator:AUTO· 9-24
:COMMunicate:GPIB:ADDRess 9-108
:CONFigure · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-26
:CONFigure:ARRay· · · · · · · · · · · 9-27
:CONFigure:DCYCle· · · · · · 9-59,9-66
:CONFigure:FREQuency · · · · · · 9-60
:CONFigure:FREQuency: BURSt :PRF
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-62
:CONFigure:FREQuency:BURSt
:CARRier · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-61
:CONFigure:FREQuency:RATio · 9-63
:CONFigure:FTIMe · · · · · · · · · · · 9-63
:CONFigure:MAXimum · · · · · · · · 9-64
:CONFigure:MINimum· · · · · · · · · 9-64
:CONFigure:NDUTycycle · · · · · · 9-66
:CONFigure:NWIDth · · · · · · · · · · 9-65
:CONFigure:PDUTycycle · · · · · · 9-66
:CONFigure:PERiod · · · · · · · · · · 9-67
:CONFigure:PHASe · · · · · · · · · · 9-67
:CONFigure:PTPeak · · · · · · · · · · 9-68
:CONFigure:PWIDth · · · · · · · · · · 9-65
:CONFigure:RTIMe · · · · · · · 9-63,9-68
:CONFigure:TINTerval· · · · · · · · · 9-69
:CONFigure:TOTalize:ACCumulated
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-70
:CONFigure:TOTalize:CONTinuous
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-71
:CONFigure:TOTalize:GATed · · · 9-72
:CONFigure:TOTalize:GATed? · · 9-72
:CONFigure:TOTalize:SSTop · · · 9-72
:CONFigure:TOTalize:TIMed· · · · 9-73
:DISPlay:ENABle· · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-32
:FETCh:ARRay? · · · · · · · · 9-34 - 9-35
:FETCh? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-34
:FORMat:FIXed · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-39
:FREQuency:RANGe:LOWer · · · 9-92
:FUNCtion · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-93
:INITiate · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-42
:INITiate:CONTinuous · · · · · · · · · 9-42
:INPut:ATTenuation · · · · · · · · · · · 9-44
:INPut:COUPling · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-44
:INPut:FILTer · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-45
:INPut:IMPedance · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-47
:INPut:LEVel · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-47
:INPut:LEVel:AUTO · · · · · · · · · · · 9-49
:INPut:SLOPe · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-51
:MEASure:ARRay? · · · · · · · · · · · 9-57
:MEASure:DCYCle? · · · · · · 9-59,9-66
IV
:MEASure:FREQuency: BURSt :PRF?
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-62
:MEASure:FREQuency:BURSt
:CARRier? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-61
:MEASure:FREQuency:RATio? · 9-63
:MEASure:FREQuency? · · · · · · · 9-60
:MEASure:FTIMe?· · · · · · · · · · · · 9-63
:MEASure:MAXimum? · · · · · · · · 9-64
:MEASure:MEMory? · · · · · · · · · · 9-58
:MEASure:MEMory<N>?· · · · · · · 9-58
:MEASure:MINimum? · · · · · · · · · 9-64
:MEASure:NDUTycycle? · · · · · · · 9-66
:MEASure:NWIDth? · · · · · · · · · · 9-65
:MEASure:PDUTycycle? · · · · · · · 9-66
:MEASure:PERiod?· · · · · · · · · · · 9-67
:MEASure:PHASe? · · · · · · · · · · · 9-67
:MEASure:PTPeak? · · · · · · · · · · 9-68
:MEASure:PWIDth?· · · · · · · · · · · 9-65
:MEASure:RTIMe? · · · · · · · 9-63,9-68
:MEASure:TINTerval? · · · · · · · · · 9-69
:MEASure:TOTalize:ACCumulated?
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-70
:MEASure:TOTalize:CONTinuous?
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-71
:MEASure:TOTalize:GATed?
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-70,9-72
:MEASure:TOTalize:SSTop? · · · · 9-72
:MEASure:TOTalize:TIMed? · · · · 9-73
:MEASure? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-56
:MEMory:DELete:MACRo· 9-76,9-128
:MEMory:FREE:MACRo? · · · · · · 9-77
:MEMory:FREE:SENSe? · · · · · · 9-76
:MEMory:NSTates? · · · · · · · · · · · 9-77
:READ:ARRay? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-83
:READ? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-82
:ROSCillator:SOURce · · · · · · · · · 9-96
:SDELay · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-96
:SENSe:Acquisition:APERture · · 9-87
:SENSe:Acquisition:HOFF · · · · · 9-88
:SENSe:Acquisition:HOFF:ECOunt
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-88
:SENSe:Acquisition:HOFF:MODE
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-89
:SENSe:Acquisition:HOFF:TIMe· 9-89
:SENSe:Acquisition:RESolution · 9-90
:SENSe:AVERage:COUNts · · · · 9-91
:SENSe:AVERage:MODE · · · · · · 9-91
:SENSe:AVERage:STATe · · · · · · 9-92
:SENSe:FREQuency:RANGe:LOWer
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-92
:SENSe:FUNCtion· · · · · · · · · · · · 9-93
:SENSe:ROSCillator:SOURce · · 9-96
:SENSe:SDELay · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-96
:SENSe:TOTalize:GATE · · · · · · · 9-97
:SENSe:VOLTage:GATed:STATe 9-97
:STATus:DREGister0?· · · · · · · · 9-100
:STATus:OPERation:CONDition?
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-101
:STATus:OPERation:ENABle · · 9-102
:STATus:QUEStionable:CONDition?
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-104
:STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle 9-105
:STATus:QUEStionable? · · · · · · 9-105
:SYSTem:ERRor? · · · · · · · · · · · 9-108
:SYSTem:PRESet · · · · · · · · · · · 9-109
:SYSTem:SET · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-110
:SYSTem:TIME:ELAPsed · · · · · 9-110
:SYSTem:TOUT · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-111
:SYSTem:UNPRotect · · 9-111 - 9-112
:TEST:SELect · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-114
:TOTalize:GATE· · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-97
:TRIGger [:SEQuence1]:COUNt 9-116
:TRIGger[:STARt]:COUNt · · · · · 9-116
:VOLTage:GATed:STATe · · · · · · · 9-97
RCL · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-117
SOC? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-101
SOEn · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-102
SOEv? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-103
Common Commands · · · · · · · 3-8,9-117
Common via A · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2
Comparator Calibration · · · · · · · · · 9-30
Configure · · · · · · · · · · 5-5 - 5-6,7-4,9-26
Array · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-27
V
Description· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-9
Function · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-25,9-53
Scalar · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-26
Continuous
Period measurements· · · · · · 7-9,7-15
Continuously Initiated · · · · · · · · · · · 9-42
Control function· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-5
Controller synchronization · · · · · · · · 7-2
Conventions · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-3
Coupling
See AC/DC
Cutoff frequency · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-45
CW · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-61
Device Setup · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-124
Device specific errors · · · 3-4,3-18,8-13
Standardized · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 8-11
Device Status · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-130
Device Status Register
Enable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-100
Event · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-100
No. 0 · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-100
Device Trigger, · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-6
Diagnostics Subsystem · · · · · · · · · 9-29
Display
Enable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-3,9-32
Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-32
On · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-32
State· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-32
Subsystem· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-31
Double Precision floating point format
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-38
Double quotes· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-12
DREG0 · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-131
Dumping measurement results · · · · 7-9
Duration
See Pulse width
Duty cycle measurements · · · · · · · 9-59
Duty factor· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-95
D
Data
Recalculate · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-16
Data format · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-8
Internal· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-95
Data Format · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-39
Data Type · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-38 - 9-39
DC coupling
See AC/DC
DCL · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-19
DDE-bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-21,9-121
Deadlock · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-5
Decimal data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-11
Declaration
For GPIB interface· · · · · · · · · · · · · 4-3
Default · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-3,9-128
Presetting the counter · · · · · · · · 9-109
Deferred commands · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-5
Define Macro· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-119
Delay
After external start arming · · 9-7,9-10
After External Stop Arming · · · · · 9-11
Delete one Macro· · · · · 3-15,9-76,9-128
Device clear · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-6,3-19
Device dependent Error (DDE)
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-21,9-121
Device initialization · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-19
E
EAV · · · · · · · · 6-16,9-108,9-130 - 9-131
Enable
Analog Out· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-80
Calculation· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-22
Display · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-32
Macros · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-120
Mathematics · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-21
Monitoring of Parameter Limits · · 9-16
Service Request · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-130
Standard Event Status· · · · · · · · 9-121
Statistics · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-14
Error
ASCII description · · · · · · · · · · · 9-108
Available · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-130
VI
Clearing queue · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-118
Command · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 8-2
Device specific, code list· · · · · · · 8-13
Escape from condition· · · · · · · · · 3-19
Execution· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 8-7
In self test · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-132
Message available· · · · · · · · · · · · 6-16
Query, code list · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 8-12
Queue · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-17,6-16,8-2
Reporting · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-17
Standardized device specific list · 8-11
Standardized numbers · · · · · · · · 3-17
ESB · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-121,9-130 - 9-131
Escape from erroneous conditions· 3-19
Event
Clearing registers · · · · · · · · · · · 9-118
Detection · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-28
Read Device Status Event Register
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-100
Status bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-121,9-130
Status Register · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-122
Events
Before Start Arming, External 9-7,9-10
Hold Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-88
Example language · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-4
EXE-bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-21,9-121
Execution
Control · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-4
Error · · · · · · · · · · 3-4,3-18,6-21,9-121
Error code list · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 8-7
Expression · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-20 - 9-21
data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-12
Ext. ref. · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-96
External Events before Start Arming
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-7,9-10
External reference · · · · · · · · · · 2-3,9-96
on/off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-3
F
Fail
Limit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-17
Fall time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-91
Measurements· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-63
Fast
Autotrigger · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-92
Period measurements · · · · · · · · · · 7-9
Recall and measure · · · · · · · · · · · 7-5
Fetch· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 5-6,7-4
An Array of Results · · · · · · · · · · · 9-35
Array · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-35
Calcutated Data· · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-15
Description· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-10
Function· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-33
One Result· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-34
Several measurement results · · · 9-35
Filter · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-45
On/off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2
Fixed data format · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-39
Fixed Trigger Level · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-47
Format
Internal data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-95
Response Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-39
Subsystem· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-37
Formula
Mathematics · · · · · · · · · · · 9-20 - 9-21
Macro · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-76 - 9-77
Freerun · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-42
Frequency
Low limit for volt/autotrig · · · · · · · 9-92
Measurement· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-60
Ratio measurements · · · · · · · · · · 9-63
Front panel memories· · · · · · · · · · 9-129
Function · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-4
Change fast · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-5
G
Gate
On/Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-97
Time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-87
Gate time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-87
Gated by Y
Accumulated, Totalize X · · · · · · · 9-70
VII
Totalize X · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-72
Gated Voltage Measurement · · · · · 9-97
GET · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-29,7-6,9-8,9-131
Get Macro · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-122
GPIB Address· · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-4,9-108
Group Execute Trigger · · · · · · · · · 9-131
H
Header path · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-10
Header separator · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
High Speed Period Measurements · 7-9
High Speed Voltage Measurements 9-92
Hold Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-3
Event count · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-88 - 9-89
Event range · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-88
Events · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-88
Mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-89
On/Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-88
Setting time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-89
Time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-89
Time mode· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-89
Time range · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-89
Hysteresis · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-45
I
Identification query · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-123
Idle state · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-28
IFC · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-19
Immediate mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-8
Impedance · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2,9-47
Initiate · · · · · · · · · · · 3-19 - 3-20,5-6,7-4
Continuous · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-28,7-4
Continuously · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-6,9-42
Description· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-10
Immediate · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-28
Measurement· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-42
Subsystem· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-41
Initiated state · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-28
Input
AC/DC · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-44
Attenuation · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2,9-44
Auto trigger · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2
Common · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2
Coupling · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2,9-44
Filter· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2
Impedance · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2,9-47
Selecting · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-13
Selecting channel · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-93
Slope · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2
Subsystems · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-43
Swap · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2
Trigger level · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2
INPut block · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 5-3
Instrument model · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 5-2
Interface clear · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-19
Internal format· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-95
Internal reference · · · · · · · · · · · 2-3,9-96
Interpolators
Calibration of · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-24
Interrupted· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-5
Interval, Time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-69
K
K, L and M · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-20 - 9-21
Keywords · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-11
L
Leading zeroes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-39
Leaf node · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-10
Learn Device Setup · · · · · · · · · · · 9-124
Learn Macro · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-123
Level
Fixed trigger · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-47
Set Trigger · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-48
Limit
Check lower· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-18
Check Upper · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-19
Enable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-16
Enable monitoring · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-22
Example · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4-4,4-14
Fail · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-17
Monitoring · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-26
VIII
Passed· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-100
Set lower · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-17
Set upper · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-18
Listener function · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-6
Local · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-5
Control · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-5
Lockout · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-6
Operation· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-6
Long form · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
Low Pass Filter · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-45
Lower case · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
Lower Limit
Check· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-18
Fail · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-17
Set · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-17
Scalar · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-56
Volt neg. peak · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-64
Volt peak · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-64
Measurement
Abort · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-4
Basic method· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-6
Continuously initiated · · · · · · · · · 9-42
Fetch Results · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-35
Function · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 5-5
Gated Voltage · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-97
High Speed Voltage· · · · · · · · · · · 9-92
Initiate · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-42
No. of, on ext arm start · · · · · · · 9-116
No. on each bus arm · · · · · · · · · · · 9-6
Start sync. · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-2
Started · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-2
Started (MST) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-23
Status · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-101 - 9-102
Stop sync. · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-2
Stopped (MSP) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-23
Terminate · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-4
Time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-87
Time, range · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-87
Time, setting · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-87
Trigger · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-131
Measurement Function· · · · · · · · · · 9-53
Measurement Time · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-87
Setting · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-87
Measuring
Burst CW · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-61
Duty Cycle· · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-59,9-66
Fall Time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-63
Frequency · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-60
Frequency ratio · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-63
Input selection · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-13
Period · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-67
Phase· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-67
PRF · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-62
Pulse width · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-65
Rise Time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-63,9-68
Select function· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-26
M
Macro · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-13 - 3-15
Data types · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-13
Define· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-119
Delete · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-15,9-76,9-128
Delete all · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-126
Description· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-13
Enable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-120
Get · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-122
How to execute · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-14
Learn · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-123
Memory states · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-77
Names · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-13
Purge · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-126
Mathematics · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-5
Enable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-21 - 9-22
Select expression · · · · · · · 9-20 - 9-21
MAV · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-19,9-130 - 9-131
MAX · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-11,9-15
MEAN · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-15
Measure · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 5-5,7-5 - 7-6
Array · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-57
Description· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-9
Functions · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-59
Once · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-56
IX
Selecting function · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-93
Terminate · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-4
Time-Interval · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-69
Totalize X gated by Y · · · · · · · · · 9-72
Transition time· · · · · · · · · · · 9-63,9-68
Measuring time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-4
Range · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-87
Memory · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-5
Fast · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-58
Free for Macros · · · · · · · · 9-76 - 9-77
Recall and measure fast · · · · 7-5,9-58
Subsystem· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-75
Message
Available · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-130
Exchange Control · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-4
exchange initialization · · · · · · · · · 3-19
terminator · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-5
MIN · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-15
Mnemonic conventions · · · · · · · · · · · 1-3
Mnemonics · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
Mode, Hold Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-89
Monitor
Limits · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-3,9-16
Monitor of low limit · · · · · · · · · · · 6-26
of high limit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-26
MSP-bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-23
MSS · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-131
MST-bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-23
Multiple measurements
See Array
Multiple queries· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-9
O
OFL-bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-24
On/Off, Hold Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-88
On-time Read · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-110
OPC-bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-21
Operation
Complete · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-124
Complete (OPC) · · · · · · · · 6-21,9-121
Complete Query · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-125
Operation Status
Bit· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-130
Bits in register · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-23
Condition · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-101
Enable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-102
Event · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-103
Group Overview · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-22
OPR · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-130 - 9-131
Optional nodes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-10
Options
Identification · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-125
Output queue · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-16
Output Subsystem · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-79
Overflow · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-24
Message · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-17
Status· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-104
Override
Bus Arm · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-8
P
Packed
Data format · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-95
Parallel poll, · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-6
Parameter list · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-12
Parenthesis · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-12
Parser · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-4
Peak-to-Peak
Voltage· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-68
Period measurements · · · · · · · · · · 9-67
Back-to-back · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-9
Phase · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-67
N
Negative slope · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-51
Non-decimal data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-12
Notation habit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-9
NRf · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-11
Nulling · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-20 - 9-21
Numeric data· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-11
Numeric expression data · · · · · · · · 3-12
X
Data format · · · · · · · · · · 7-8,9-38,9-95
Recalculate Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-16
Recall · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-5,7-5,9-58,9-127
Reference
Selection · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-96
REMOTE· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-5
Remote operation · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-6
Remote/local · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-6
Remove
All macros · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-126
One macro · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-76,9-128
Repetition · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-3
Request Control (RQC) · · · · 6-21,9-121
Request Service · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-130
Reset · · · · · · · · · · 2-3,3-19,9-109,9-128
Resolution· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-8,9-90
Response
Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-9
Data Format · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-39,9-43
Data Type · · · · · · · · · · · 6-7 - 6-8,9-38
Message · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-5
Message terminator· · · · · · · · · · · · 3-9
Messages · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-7
Result
Fetch one· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-34
Reading · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-82
Retrieve
Front panel setting · · · · · · · · · · 9-127
Measurement data · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-4
Measurement result · · · · · · · · · · 9-34
Rise Time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-91
Measurements· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-68
Trigger levels · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-49
Rmt · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-9
Root level · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
Root node · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
RQC-bit· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-21,9-121
RQS · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-130
RST · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-20
Pmt · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-7,3-10
PON-bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-21,9-121
Positive slope · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-51
Power On · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-21,9-121
Status Clear · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-126
Preset · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-3,9-109
Status at power on · · · · · · · · · · 9-126
Status registers · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-103
Preset Time, totalize X-Y During a · 9-73
PRF · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-62
Synchronization (PM6685) · · · · · 9-96
Program message terminator · 3-7,3-10
Program messages· · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-7
Protected User Data · · · · · · · · · · · 9-127
Pulse
Repetition Frequency · · · · · · · · · 9-62
Width · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-65,9-91
Purge Macro · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-126
Q
QUE · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-130 - 9-131
Query
Error· · 3-4 - 3-5,3-18,6-21,8-12,9-121
Multiple · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-9
Questionable Data/signal · · · · · · · 9-130
Condition · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-104
Enable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-105
Event · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-105
Status group · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-24
Quotes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-12
QYE-bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-21,9-121
R
Ratio · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-63
Read· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 5-6,7-5 - 7-6
Array · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-83
Function· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-81
One Result· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-82
Scalar · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-82
Read or Send Settings · · · · · · · · · 9-110
Real
XI
S
Sample Size for Average · · · · · · · · 9-91
Sample Size for Statistics· · · · · · · · 9-14
Save · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-5,9-129
Scaling Factor
Analog Output · · · · · · · · · · · 6-11,9-80
SCPI · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-2
Compliance of instrument · · · · · 9-112
SDC· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-19
SDEV · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-15
Select Mathematical Expression · · · · · ·
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-20 - 9-21
Selective device clear· · · · · · · · · · · 3-19
Self Test
Activate · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-132
Select · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-114
Semicolon · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
SEND · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-4
SENSe block· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 5-3
Sense Command Subsystem · · · · · 9-85
Sensitivity · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-45
Trigger level· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-45
Sequential commands · · · · · · · · · · · 3-5
Service Request · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-17
Capability · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-6
Enable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-130
Set
Lower Limit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-17
Upper Limit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-18
Settings
Reading · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-110
Short form · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
Signal Detection · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-109
Single · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-4
Measurements· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-90
On/Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-92
Or Average? · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-92
Single quotes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-12
Slope· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2,9-51
Arming start · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-9
Stop arming · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-11
Source
Start arming · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-9
Stop arming · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-11
Speed
Autotrigger · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-92
Individually sync. meas. · · · · · · · · 7-6
Resolution · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-90
Summary · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-11
Voltage measurements, high · · · 9-92
Standard deviation · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-15
Standard Event Status
Enable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-121
Standard event status register · · · · 6-21
Standardized Device specific errors 8-11
Standardized Error numbers · · 3-17,8-2
Start arming
Delay · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-7,9-10
Delay by events · · · · · · · · · · 9-7,9-10
External Events before · · · · · 9-7,9-10
Slope · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-9
Start measurement · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-42
Sync. · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-2
Start source
Arming · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-9
Start/stop
Totalize · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-97
Start/stop by Y, totalize X · · · · · · · · 9-72
Statistics · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-5
Enable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-14
Recalculating data· · · · · · · · · · · · 9-16
Sample size · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-14
Type · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-15
Status
Clear · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-118
Clear data structures· · · · · · · · · · 3-20
Enable reporting · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-103
Enabling Standard Event Status 9-121
Event Status Register · · · · · · · · 9-122
Limit monitor · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-100
Measurement started · · · · · · · · 9-102
XII
Measurement stopped · · · · · · · 9-102
Operation event· · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-103
Overflow · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-104
Preset · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-103
Questionable Data/signal · · · · · 9-104
Questionable Data/signal, Event
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-105
Register structure · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-16
Subsystem· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-99
Timeout · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-104
Unexpected parameter · · · · · · · 9-104
Using the reporting · · · · · · · 3-16,6-14
Waiting for bus arming · · · · · · · 9-102
Waiting for triggering · · · · · · · · · 9-102
Status byte · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-16,6-14
Bit 0 · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-100
Bit 2 · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-16
Bit 3· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-104 - 9-105
Bit 5· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-121 - 9-122
Bit 6 · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-131
Bit 7· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-101 - 9-103
Query · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-131
Reading · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-16,9-131
Status reporting · · · · · · · · · · · 3-16,6-14
Stop Arming
Slope · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-11
Source · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-11
Stop Measurement · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-4
Sync. · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-2
Store
Front panel settings· · · · · · · · · · 9-129
String data· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-12
Subnodes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
Suffixes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-11
Summary
Instrument states· · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-3
Measurement commands · · · · · · 6-10
Of command syntax · · · · · · · · · · 3-14
Of input amplifier settings· · · 6-7 - 6-8
Speed · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-11 - 7-16
Swap A-B · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2
Synchronization · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-2,7-6
Syntax
and Style · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-7
Summary · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-14
System Subsystem · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-107
System Version · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-112
T
Talker function· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-5
tatus
See Message Data Type
Terminate
Measurement · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-4,9-4
Terminator · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
50ohms/1Mohm· · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-47
Test
Activating · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-132
Selecting internal self-test · · · · · 9-114
signal · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-114
Subsystem · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-113
Time
Hold Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-89
Interval · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-69,9-91
Measure Rise · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-68
Read Elapsed · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-110
Rise/fall · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-91
Selecting Measurement Time · · · 9-87
Totalize X-Y During a Preset · · · · 9-73
Time out
For measurement (TIO) · · · · · · · 6-24
Timebase
External/internal · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-96
Timeout · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-2
On/Off· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-111
Range· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-111
Set · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-111
Status· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-104
TIO-bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-24
Totalize
X-Y Manually · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-71
Gate On/Off · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-97
XIII
Start/stop · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-3
X gated by Y · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-72
X gated by Y, accumulated · · · · · 9-70
X start/stop by Y · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-72
Transition time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-91
Trigger· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-29
See Also Command: *TRG
No. of, on ext arm start · · · · · · · 9-116
Slope · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-51
Subsystem· · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-14,9-115
Trigger level · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-2
Auto · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-49
Fixed · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-45,9-47 - 9-48
Set · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-45,9-48
Truncation rules · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1-3
Type, Statistical· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-15
U
UEP-bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-24,9-104
Unexpected parameter (UEP) · · · · 6-24
Status· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-104
Unit separator · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
Unprotect· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-112
Unterminated · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-5
Upper case · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
Upper Limit
Check· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-19
Fail · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-17
Set · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-18
URQ-bit· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-21,9-121
User data· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-112
User request (URQ) · · · · · · · 6-21,9-121
V
Variable hysteresis
Auto levels · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-49
Volt
Gated Measurements · · · · · · · · · 9-97
High Speed Measurements· · · · · 9-92
Negative Peak · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-64
Peak· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-64
Peak-to-Peak· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-68
W
WAI · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 5-4
Wait for bus arming (WFA) · · · · · · · 6-23
Waiting for bus arming
Status· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-102
Waiting for trigger and/or ext. arming
(WFT) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-23
Waiting for triggering
Status· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-102
Wait-to-continue · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-132
Waveform compensation · · · · · · · · 9-48
WFA-bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-23
WFT-bit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-23
X
X · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-8
X gated by Y, accumulated, totalize 9-70
X gated by Y, totalize · · · · · · · · · · · 9-72
X start/stop by Y, totalize · · · · · · · · 9-72
X1/X10 attenuation · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-44
Xn-1· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-5
XOLD · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-21
X-Y During a Preset Time, totalize · 9-73
Y
Y, accumulated, totalize X gated by 9-70
Y, totalize X gated by · · · · · · · · · · · 9-72
Y, totalize X start/stop by · · · · · · · · 9-72
XIV