Acer 7100 Series Laptop User Manual

TravelMate™ 7100 Series
Notebook Computer
User’s Guide
Copyright
This is a product of Acer Inc. developed to TI specifications.
Acer and the Acer logo are registered trademarks and
TravelMate is a trademark of Acer Inc. Texas Instruments,
TI and the TI logo are registered trademarks of Texas
Instruments Inc. Microsoft, Windows, and the Windows logo
are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Intel
and Pentium are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation.
All other brands/product names are trademarks or
registered trademarks of their respective companies.
No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted,
transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into
any language or computer language, in any form or by any
means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, optical, chemical,
manual or otherwise, without the prior written permission
of this company.
© 1997 by this company. All rights reserved.
Disclaimer of Warranties
This company makes no representations or warranties,
either expressed or implied, with respect to the contents
hereof and specifically disclaims the implied warranties of
merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. Any
software described in this manual is sold or licensed “as is.”
Should the programs prove defective following their
purchase, the buyer (and not this company, its distributor,
or its dealer) assumes the entire cost of all necessary
servicing, repair, and any incidental or consequential
damages resulting from any defect in the software. Further,
this company reserves the right to revise this publication
and to make changes from time to time in the contents
hereof without obligation to notify any person of such
revision or changes.
ii
About This User’s Guide
The following conventions are used in this manual:
Notes related to the current topic
Warnings about actions that can cause
damage.
Cautions that help you avoid problems
Important reminders.
Tips or shortcuts.
iii
iv
Contents
Getting Started ............................................................ 1
Unpacking Your Computer ........................... 1
Taking Care of Your Computer ..................... 2
Cleaning ............................................... 3
AC Adapter ........................................... 3
Battery Pack ......................................... 4
Powering Up Your Computer ........................ 5
Entering User Information..................... 6
Creating Backup and Startup Diskettes .. 6
Using Diskettes ............................................ 7
Travel Tips ................................................... 8
Getting Help............................................... 10
Technical Support............................... 10
World Wide Web.................................. 10
System Tour................................................................ 11
Feature Summary ...................................... 11
Performance ....................................... 11
Multimedia and Communications ....... 12
Ergonomics......................................... 12
Expandability ..................................... 12
Display ...................................................... 14
Opening and Closing the Display ........ 14
FlashStart Automatic Power-On .......... 14
Indicator Lights................................... 15
Keyboard.................................................... 17
Lock Keys ........................................... 18
Embedded Keypad .............................. 20
Windows 95 Keys................................ 22
Hot Keys ............................................. 23
Touchpad............................................ 28
Automatic Tilt ..................................... 31
Palm Rest ........................................... 33
v
Contents
Storage ...................................................... 34
Hard Disk ........................................... 34
Module Bay......................................... 34
Ejecting a CD...................................... 35
Using the Floppy Drive Module
Externally ......................................... 35
Swapping Modules.............................. 38
Audio ......................................................... 40
Audio Control ..................................... 41
Ports .......................................................... 42
Rear Panel Ports ................................. 42
Left Panel Ports................................... 45
Security ..................................................... 48
System Resource Lock ........................ 48
Power ......................................................................... 42
Battery Pack .............................................. 49
Removing and Installing the
Battery Pack .................................... 50
Charging the Battery........................... 51
Checking the Battery Level.................. 53
Optimizing Battery Life ....................... 55
Low-Battery Warning .......................... 56
Advanced Power Management .................... 59
Heuristic Power Management ..................... 60
Suspend to Disk ................................. 61
Suspend to Memory ............................ 62
Peripherals and Options........................................... 56
Printers...................................................... 64
PC Cards.................................................... 65
Audio Devices ............................................ 67
External Monitor ........................................ 68
External Keyboard...................................... 69
External Keypad......................................... 70
External Pointing Device ............................ 71
vi
Contents
Mini Dock .................................................. 73
Floppy Drive Cable ..................................... 75
PS/2 Y-Bridge Cable .................................. 76
File Transfer Cable ..................................... 77
Battery Pack .............................................. 78
AC Adapter ................................................ 78
Memory Upgrades ...................................... 79
Hard Disk Upgrades ................................... 82
System Utilities ........................................................... 76
Sleep Manager ........................................... 85
Accessing Sleep Manager .................... 86
Creating Reserved Space..................... 88
Removing a Reserved Space ................ 90
Minimizing Sleep Manager .................. 91
Exiting Sleep Manager ........................ 92
Sleep Manager Troubleshooting Tips ... 92
Uninstalling Sleep Manager ................ 93
Touchpad Driver ........................................ 95
BIOS Setup Utility...................................... 96
About My Computer............................ 97
System Configuration ......................... 99
Advanced System Configuration........ 102
Power Saving Options ....................... 108
System Security................................ 110
Reset To Default Settings .................. 116
Appendix ................................................................. 104
Troubleshooting ....................................... 117
Startup Error Messages............................ 125
Specifications........................................... 127
System Memory Map ................................ 132
I/O Address Map...................................... 132
Interrupts ................................................ 133
DMA Channels ......................................... 134
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS ....... 135
vii
Contents
Canadian DOC Notice .............................. 137
FCC Class B Radio Frequency
Interference Statement .......................... 138
Index ........................................................................ 123
viii
1
Getting Started
Congratulations on your purchase of the
TravelMate 7100 series notebook computer.
Guaranteed and backed by world-class support,
you can be sure of top-notch performance from
your new computer. This section guides you
through the first few steps in setting up your
computer.
Unpacking Your Computer
Carefully unpack the carton and remove the
contents. You should find your computer and an
accessory box containing the following items:
q
AC adapter
q
Battery pack
q
Floppy drive module
q
External floppy drive cable
q
Software library and recovery CD
q
This user’s guide and other documentation
If any of the items is missing or damaged, contact
your dealer immediately.
Caution: Be sure to read the Important Safety
Instructions in the Appendix at the back of
this manual.
1
Getting Started
Taking Care of Your Computer
Your notebook will serve you well if you observe
the following guidelines:
2
q
Do not expose the notebook to prolonged
direct sunlight, or sources of heat, such as a
radiator.
q
Do not expose the notebook to temperatures
below 32ºF (0ºC) or above 122ºF (50ºC).
q
Do not subject the notebook to magnetic
fields.
q
Do not expose the notebook to rain or
excessive moisture.
q
Do not subject the notebook to heavy shock
or vibration.
q
Do not expose the notebook to dust and dirt.
q
Do not place objects on top of the notebook
when it is closed.
q
Do not use the notebook on uneven surfaces.
Getting Started
Cleaning
Before cleaning the notebook, always disconnect
all power to the computer as follows:
1. Close the display lid to turn the notebook off.
2. Disconnect the AC adapter.
3. Remove the battery pack.
To clean the notebook case, use a soft cloth
moistened with water. Do not use liquid or aerosol
cleaners.
Warning! Contact your dealer or see your
service technician if the notebook is dropped
or damaged in any way, or if liquid is spilled
on the notebook.
AC Adapter
The AC adapter provides power to your notebook
and charges the battery pack. Here are some ways
of taking care of the AC adapter:
q
Do not connect the adapter to any device
except the notebook.
q
Do not step on the power cord or place heavy
objects on top of it. Carefully route the power
cord and any cables away from foot traffic.
q
When unplugging the power cord, pull on the
plug and not on the cord.
3
Getting Started
Battery Pack
The long-lasting Lithium-Ion rechargeable battery
pack provides power to your notebook on the go.
Here are some things to keep in mind regarding
the battery pack:
q
Do not expose the battery pack to
temperatures above 122°F (50°C).
q
Use the battery pack only with the TravelMate
7100 series computer.
q
Replace the battery pack only with the same
type (model BTP-S31).
q
Consult your local regulations or waste
disposal provider for any local restrictions on
the disposal or recycling of batteries.
Warning! Do not open or disassemble the
battery pack. Handle a damaged or leaking
lithium-ion battery with extreme care. If the
battery is damaged, electrolyte can leak from
the cells and can cause injury.
4
Getting Started
Powering Up Your Computer
Powering up the computer is as easy as 1-2-3:
1. Insert the Battery
Pack. Insert the battery
pack into the battery
compartment and slide
the battery
compartment cover
toward the rear of the
notebook until the
compartment cover
snaps closed.
5
compartment cover
Getting Started
Entering User Information
When Windows 95 loads for the first time, enter
your user information. Have your Windows 95
authentication number ready. (You can find this
number in the Windows 95 documentation
package.)
Creating Backup and Startup Diskettes
Windows 95 prompts you to create backup and
startup diskettes.
Note: If your Windows 95 package contains a
Windows 95 CD, you do not need to create
backup diskettes for Windows 95. However, you
should still create a Windows 95 startup disk.
6
Getting Started
Using Diskettes
Follow these guidelines when using diskettes with
your computer:
q
Always make backup copies of diskettes that
contain important data or program files.
q
Keep diskettes away from magnetic fields and
sources of heat.
q
Avoid removing a diskette from the drive
when the floppy drive activity light is on.
q
Write-protect diskettes to prevent accidental
erasure. To do this, slide the write-protect tab
to the write-protect (open) position so that
you can see through the tab opening.
q
When you label a diskette, be sure the label is
firmly attached and completely within the
diskette’s label area (the area with the slight
surface depression). An improperly attached
label can cause the diskette to stick in the
drive.
7
Getting Started
Travel Tips
Here are some tips on preparing your computer for
traveling:
1. Make diskette or tape backup copies of
important files on the hard disk.
2. Close the display, making sure the cover latch
is secure.
3. Disconnect the AC adapter and all peripherals.
4. Place the notebook, AC adapter, extra battery
pack and other accessories you might need
(such as modules and documentation) in a
carrying bag.
5. Hand-carry your notebook. Do not check it in
as luggage!
Caution: The notebook can pass through
airport X-ray equipment, but metal detectors
can damage the notebook’s hard disk.
6. Check with your airline if you plan to use your
computer onboard the aircraft.
7. Check that the voltage and power specifications
of the country you are traveling in are
compatible with the computer’s AC adapter. If
necessary, purchase a power cord that is
compatible with the local AC voltage. Do not
use converter kits sold for appliances to power
the notebook.
8
Getting Started
8. If you are using a modem, check that if the
telecommunications system of the country you
are traveling in is compatible with the modem
and its connector.
9
Getting Started
Getting Help
This user’s guide provides clear and concise
information about your computer, so read it
thoroughly.
Technical Support
Should you ever have a problem with your
TravelMate, or if you think something is not
working properly, call our technical support at
(800) 816-2237. Please have handy your system
serial number and system model number. You can
also contact the local dealer or distributor in the
country you are traveling infor assistance.
World Wide Web
If you have access to the Internet, visit our home
page on the World Wide Web at
http://www.acer.com/. There you’ll find the latest
information about our products, as well as
updates on software drivers and utilities.
10
2
System Tour
The Travelmate 7100 combines high-performance,
versatility, multimedia capabilities, and an
advanced power management system in a unique
ergonomic and stylish case.
Feature Summary
The computer is packed with features that make it
as easy to work with as it is to look at. Here are
some of the computer’s features:
Performance
q
Intel Pentium® processor with MMX™
technology
q
64-bit main memory and 512KB external (L2)
cache memory
q
Large display in active-matrix TFT
q
PCI local bus video with 128-bit graphics
accelerator
q
Flexible module bay (3.5-inch floppy drive or
CD-ROM drive or optional second hard disk)
q
High-capacity, Enhanced-IDE hard disk
q
An advanced power management system with
two power-saving modes
q
Lithium-Ion smart battery pack
q
High-speed connectivity
11
System Tour
Multimedia and Communications
q
16-bit stereo audio with built-in FM
synthesizer and 3D sound effect
q
Built-in microphone and dual angled stereo
speakers
q
Support for simultaneous display on the
built-in screen and an external monitor for
presentations
q
Full-screen, 30 frames per second, true-color
MPEG video playback
q
Infrared wireless communication
Ergonomics
12
q
Intuitive FlashStart automatic power-on
q
Sleek, smooth and stylish design
q
Full-sized, full-function keyboard
q
Wide and comfortable palm rest
q
Ergonomically-positioned touchpad pointing
device
System Tour
Expandability
q
CardBus PC Card (PCMCIA) slots (two type
II/I or one type III) with Zoomed Video port
function
q
Mini-dock option with built-in CardBus slots
(two type II/I or one type III)
q
USB port onboard
q
Upgradeable memory and hard disk
13
System Tour
Display
The computer’s large graphical display offers
excellent viewing, with quality and performance
equal to desktop displays.
Note: The computer is available with an active
matrix TFT display.
Opening and Closing the Display
To open the display, slide the display lid latch to
the right and lift up the lid. Then tilt it to a
comfortable viewing position. To close the display,
fold the lid down gently until the display lid latch
clicks into place.
Warning! To avoid damaging the display, do
not slam the lid when closing it. Do not place
anything on top of the computer when the
display is closed.
FlashStart Automatic Power-On
The computer has no on/off switch. Instead it uses
a lid switch, located near the center of the display
hinge, that turns the computer on and off
automatically.
14
System Tour
15
System Tour
Power Indicator
Battery Indicator
Indicator Light
Power
Indicator
Icon
Description
Lights when power is on.
Flashes when the computer
is in suspend-to-memory
mode.
Battery
Indicator
Lights when the battery pack
is charging.
Flashes when battery power
is low.
16
System Tour
Keyboard
The computer’s full-size keyboard includes lock
keys, an embedded keypad with cursor-control
keys, Windows 95 keys, twelve function keys that
act as “hot keys” when used in combination with
the special Fn key.
The keyboard also includes a built-in touchpad
pointing device, an automatic tilt feature, and a
comfortable palm rest to provide optimum
ergonomics.
Lock Keys
The computer keyboard contains three lock keys
that act as toggles: Caps Lock, NumLk, and ScrLk.
NumLk and ScrLk require using the Fn key as part
of a key combination. The first time you press one
of these keys or key combinations, you turn on its
function; the next time, you turn off its function,
and so on.
17
System Tour
Tip: When entering a lot of numeric data, toggle
on NumLk or attach an external keypad as
described on page 70.
18
Key
Description
Caps Lock
When Caps Lock is on, alphabetical
characters appear in uppercase as you
type them.
Fn+NumLk
(Fn+F11)
When Num Lock After Boot is enabled
in the BIOS setup utility (see page 101)
and Num Lock is on, the embedded
keypad is in numeric mode. The keys
function as a numeric keypad, complete
with arithmetic operators +, -, *, and
/—just like the keypad on a standard
keyboard.
Fn+ScrLk
(Fn+F12)
When Scroll Lock is on, the screen
moves up or down one line when you
press the ↑ or ↓ key. (Scroll Lock may
not work in some applications.)
System Tour
Embedded Keypad
The embedded keypad functions like a desktop
numeric keypad. It is marked by small characters
printed in the upper right corner of the keycaps.
(For simplicity, cursor-control symbols are not
printed on the keycaps.)
To Use
With NumLk On
With NumLk Off
Numeric keys
Use the keypad
keys in the usual
way
Press and hold
Fn and Shift
while using the
keypad keys
Cursor-control Press and hold
keys
Shift while using
the keypad keys
Press and hold
Fn while using
the keypad keys
Main
keyboard keys
(letters, etc.)
Use the keypad
keys in the
usual way
Press and hold
Fn while using
the keypad keys
19
System Tour
Windows 95 Keys
The computer keyboard contains two keys that
perform Windows 95-specific functions: ÿ and
Key
Description
ÿ key
The same as clicking the Windows 95 Start
button. Pressing other keys in combination
with the ÿ key performs special functions:
ÿ+Tab
Activate the next taskbar button
+E
Explore My Computer
+F
Find Document
+M
Minimize All
Shift+ÿ+M Undo Minimize All
ÿ+R
Display Run dialog box
Opens an application’s context menu. (The
same as the touchpad’s right button.)
key
20
.
System Tour
Hot Keys
The computer’s special Fn key, used in
combination with other keys, provides “hot-key”
combinations that access system control
functions, such as screen contrast, brightness,
volume output, and the BIOS setup utility.
Note: When using hot-key combinations, press
and hold the Fn key before pressing the other key
in the combination.
Hot Key
Icon
Fn+Esc
Fn+F1
?
Fn+F2
Fn+F3
PnP
Function
Description
Suspend-tomemory
Enters suspend-tomemory mode
Help
Displays the hot-key
list
Setup
Enters the BIOS
setup utility
Plug and Play
Configuration
Performs system
configuration for
Plug and Play
operating systems
like Windows 95
21
System Tour
Hot Key
Icon
Function
Description
Fn+F4
Screen
Blackout
Blanks the screen to
save power; to wake
up the screen, press
any key
Fn+F5
Display
Toggle
Switches display
from the built-in
display, to an
external monitor, to
both built-in and
external if one is
connected
Fn+F6
Fuel Gauge
On/Off
Toggles battery
gauge display on and
off. The gauge shows
the battery charge
percentage.
Shows a plug icon if
a powered AC
adapter is connected
to the computer;
shows a speaker icon
if speaker output is
on (Fn+F7); shows a
T icon if turbo mode
is on (Fn+2)
22
Fn+F7
Speaker
On/Off
Toggles speaker
output on and off
Fn+F8
Lock System
Resources
(Password
Lock)
Locks the computer
and requires a
password to unlock
it
Fn+F9
Eject
Accesses the eject
menu described on
page 27
Fn+Ctrl+↑
Volume Up
Increases speaker
volume
System Tour
Hot Key
Icon
Function
Description
Fn+Ctrl+↓
Volume Down
Decreases speaker
volume
Fn+Ctrl+→
Balance Right
Shifts speaker
balance to the right
Fn+Ctrl+←
Balance Left
Shifts speaker
balance to the left
Fn+ÿ+↑
Brightness
Up
Increases screen
brightness
Fn+ÿ+↓
Brightness
Down
Decreases screen
brightness
Fn+ÿ+→
Contrast Up
Increases screen
contrast
(not available for TFT
displays)
Fn+ÿ+←
Contrast
Down
Decreases screen
contrast
(not available for TFT
displays)
Fn+↑
Fuel Gauge
Up
With the fuel gauge
displayed, moves the
fuel gauge up
Fn+↓
Fuel Gauge
Down
With the fuel gauge
displayed, moves the
fuel gauge down
Fn+→
Fuel Gauge
Right
With the fuel gauge
displayed, moves the
fuel gauge right
Fn+←
Fuel Gauge
Left
With the fuel gauge
displayed, moves the
fuel gauge left
Fn+1
CD Eject
Ejects the CD-ROM
drive
Fn+2
Turbo Mode
On/Off
Toggles turbo mode
on and off
23
System Tour
Eject Menu
The Fn+F9 hot-key combination brings up a
special eject menu that allows you to perform
several system configuration functions.
Eject Options:
Battery (Suspend-to-disk) ................ Change
CD-ROM Disc (Also Fn+1) ................... Eject
Mini Dock (Suspend) ....................... Change
Power Off ................................. Change
↑↓ = Move Highlight Bar, ↵ = Select, ESC = Exit
24
Select…
To…
Battery
(Suspend to Disk)
Store all current data and system
information to the hard disk.
CD-ROM Disc
(Also Fn+1)
Open the CD-ROM drive (eject a
CD).
Mini Dock
(Suspend)
Undock the computer. Press the
dock lock and pull the dock
handle toward you to undock the
computer. (See the mini dock
manual for details.) Once the
computer is successfully
undocked, press any key to
resume.
Power Off
Turn the computer off. If you are
using Windows 95, use the
Shutdown command to turn off
your computer.
System Tour
Touchpad
The ergonomically-positioned touchpad is a
pointing device that senses movement on its
surface. The pointer moves on the screen in
response to the movement of your finger on the
surface of the touchpad.
q
Move your finger across the touchpad to move
the pointer on the screen.
q
Press the left and right buttons located at the
lower edge of the touchpad to “click.” These
buttons correspond to the left and right
buttons on a mouse.
q
Alternatively, simply tap on the touchpad to
“click.”
25
System Tour
Function
Left
Button
Right
Button
Tapping on the
Touchpad
Execution
Doubleclick
Tap twice quickly
Selection
Click
once
Tap once
Drag
Click and
hold to
drag the
pointer
Tap twice quickly,
holding your finger
to the touchpad on
the second tap to
drag the pointer
Access
Context
Menu
Click
once
To change Touchpad or pointer characteristics, see
page 95.
26
System Tour
Notes:
Keep your fingers and the touchpad dry and clean
when using the touchpad.
The touchpad is sensitive to finger movements.
Hence, the lighter the touch, the better the
response. Tapping too hard will not increase the
touchpad’s responsiveness.
The touchpad works with most mouse drivers.
However, the touchpad driver supports special
functions that work uniquely with the touchpad.
We recommend you use the touchpad driver
instead of any other mouse driver.
Automatic Tilt
On models with a 12.1-inch display, the computer
can automatically tilt the keyboard to a six-degree
angle whenever you open the lid to provide a
comfortable typing angle similar to desktop
keyboards.
Tip: The automatic tilt feature and the palm rest
described on the next page help prevent repetitive
strain injury to your wrists and fingers.
27
System Tour
To set the automatic tilt feature, follow these
steps:
1. Close the lid.
2. To enable the
automatic tilt feature,
slide the tilt switch,
located above the port
cover on the rear of
the computer, to the
right.
3. To disable the
automatic tilt feature,
slide the tilt switch to
the left.
28
System Tour
Palm Rest
The curved palm rest located below the keyboard
provides a comfortable place to rest your hands as
you type.
29
System Tour
Storage
The computer provides high-capacity storage on a
2.5-inch Enhanced-IDE hard disk. The computer
also contains a bay that accepts removable
modules—a CD-ROM drive, a floppy drive or a
second hard disk option.
Hard Disk
The hard disk can be upgraded when you need
more storage space. See page 82.
Module Bay
The computer’s module bay accommodates a CDROM drive module or a 3.5-inch floppy drive
module or an optional second hard disk. Other
modules may be available — consult your dealer
for details.
CD-ROM Drive Module
Hard Disk Module
Option
Floppy Drive Module
The CD-ROM drive module gives you portable
multimedia access. The floppy drive module can be
used as an internal or external unit. The optional
second hard disk gives you more storage space.
30
System Tour
Ejecting a CD
To eject a CD, press Fn+1 or press the eject button
on the CD-ROM drive, or use your software
application’s CD eject command. (There may be a
few seconds delay before the CD is ejected.)
Tip: To eject a CD using Windows 95, doubleclick My Computer, right-click the CD-ROM drive
icon, and select the Eject command from the
context menu that appears.
Using the Floppy Drive Module Externally
You can use the floppy drive module externally
when a CD-ROM drive module is installed in the
module bay.
Warning! You cannot use the CD-ROM drive
module externally. Only the floppy drive
module can be used externally.
31
System Tour
To use the floppy drive module externally, follow
these steps:
1. If the floppy drive module is installed in the
module bay, remove it by following the steps
described in the next section.
2. Open the port cover on the rear of the
computer, and connect the 25-pin connector
end of the floppy drive cable to the computer’s
parallel port.
3. Connect the other end of the cable to the floppy
drive module.
32
System Tour
Swapping Modules
Follow these steps to swap modules:
1. Click the Windows 95
Start button and select
Shut Down to shut
down your computer.
2. When Windows finishes
shutting down, close
the display.
3. Turn the computer over
and locate the module
release lock on the
bottom of the
computer. With one
hand, slide and hold
the lock in the
direction of the arrow.
With the other hand,
press the module’s
half-moon-shaped
latch to release it and
pull out the module.
4. Insert the new module
securely into the
module bay until it
snaps into position.
5. Restart your computer.
33
System Tour
Audio
The computer includes 16-bit stereo audio with a
built-in FM synthesizer, dual, angled speakers, a
built-in sensitive microphone, and two audio ports
on the computer’s left panel for external audio
devices. For information on connecting external
audio devices, see page 67.
The dual, angled speakers are located on both
sides of the display hinge and direct sound toward
you, creating a unique audio chamber that
produces excellent sound quality. The built-in
microphone uses both front- and side-pickup that
provides excellent quality audio recording.
Microphone
Left Speaker
Right Speaker
34
System Tour
Audio Control
The computer provides several hot keys that allow
you to control audio output:
Hot Key
Icon
Function
Description
Fn+F7
Speaker
On/Off
Toggles speaker
output on and off
Fn+Ctrl+↑
Volume
Up
Increases speaker
volume
Fn+Ctrl+↓
Volume
Down
Decreases speaker
volume
Fn+Ctrl+→
Balance
Right
Shifts speaker
balance to the right
Fn+Ctrl+←
Balance
Left
Shifts speaker
balance to the left
Caution: Audio settings you make with hot
keys are in effect only for a single session—
that is, until you turn off the computer. To
change settings for all sessions, use the audio
controls in Windows 95.
35
System Tour
Ports
The computer’s ports allow you to connect
peripheral devices to your computer just as you
would to a desktop PC. The main ports are found
on the computer’s rear panel. The computer’s left
panel contains the computer’s multimedia ports
and PC card slots.
Rear Panel Ports
The computer’s rear panel contains the computer’s
main ports and connectors as shown in the
illustration below.
1 2
1
2
3
4
36
DC-in Port
PS/2 Port
Serial Port
Parallel Port
3
4
5
6 7
8
5
6
7
8
Mini Dock Connector
External CRT Port
USB Port
Infrared Port
System Tour
Port
Icon
Connects to...
DC-in port
AC adapter and power outlet
PS/2 port
PS/2-compatible device
(PS/2 keyboard, keypad,
mouse)
Serial port
(UART16650compatible)
Serial device (serial mouse)
Parallel port
(EPP/ECPcompliant)
Parallel device (parallel
printer, external floppy drive)
Mini dock
connector
Mini dock
External CRT
port
37
System Tour
Fast Infrared (FIR) Port
The computer’s FIR (fast infrared) port located on
the rear panel allows you to transfer data to IRaware machines without cables. For example, you
can transfer data between two IR-capable
computers, or send data to an IR-aware printer
without using a cable.
The infrared port is IrDA-compliant, and can
transfer data at speeds of up to 4 megabits per
second (Mbps) at a distance of up to one meter.
To use the infrared port, position two IR-aware
devices such that their IR ports are no more than
one meter apart and offset no more than 15
degrees.
When the two computers are in position, simply
begin the data transfer as you normally would. See
your file transfer software for details.
38
System Tour
Left Panel Ports
The computer’s left side panel contains the
computer’s multimedia ports and PC card slots, as
shown in the illustration on the next page.
1 23
1 PC Card Slots
2 Microphone-in/Line-in Port
3 Speaker-out/Line-out Port
Port
Icon
Connects to...
PC Card slots
Two type I/II PC Cards or
one type III Card
Microphone-in/
Line-in
External microphone or line
input device
Speaker-out/
Line-out
Amplified speakers or
headphones
PC Card Slots
The computer contains two PC card slots on the
left panel that accommodate two type I/II or one
type III PC card(s). Consult your dealer for
available PC card options. For information on how
to use the PC card slots, see page 65.
39
System Tour
Multimedia Ports
The computer provides a Mic-In/Line-in port and a
Speaker-out/Line-out port on the left panel to
accommodate multimedia audio devices, such as a
microphone, speakers, or headphones. For
information on how to connect audio devices, see
page 67.
Notes:
Connecting external audio devices to the
computer’s multimedia ports automatically shuts
off the corresponding internal audio device. For
example, if you connect external speakers, the
internal speakers automatically shut off.
If you connect an audio device to the Mic-in or
Line in port, make sure to adjust the appropriate
input from the mixer. See the multimedia section
of your Windows 95 manual.
40
System Tour
Security
The computer includes both hardware and
software features to secure your computer. A
hardware security notch located on the left panel
of the computer lets you connect a standard keybased computer security lock.
Circle or wrap a computer security lock cable
around an immovable object such as a table or
locked drawer handle. Then insert the lock into the
notch and turn the key to secure the lock.
System Resource Lock
A two-level password scheme protects your
computer from unauthorized access. When set,
just press Fn+F8 to lock all system resources. In
this situation, no one can access the computer
without entering the correct password. For more
information about setting and using passwords, see
page 111.
41
3
Power
The computer operates on AC or battery power.
This section contains the information you need to
know to operate the computer on battery power.
This section also includes information about the
computer’s unique power management system.
Battery Pack
The computer uses a single high-capacity LithiumIon smart battery pack that gives you longer use
between charges. The battery pack includes the
following features:
q
Lithium-Ion Technology. Lithium-ion
technology does not have the memory-effect
problem of nickel–cadmium (NiCd) batteries,
nor the temperature problem of nickel–metal–
hydride (NiMH) batteries. Lithium ion
batteries consistently provide the longest
battery life and the best solution for road
warriors.
q
Battery Gauge. The battery pack contains a
built-in gauge that allows you to check the
battery charge level even when the battery is
not installed inside the computer.
q
Battery-Low Warning. When the battery
charge level becomes low, the battery
indicator flashes at regular intervals, warning
you that the battery pack’s power is low and
needs to be recharged.
42
Power
Tips:
Whenever possible, use the AC adapter. The
battery will come in handy when you travel or
during a power failure. It is advisable to have an
extra fully-charged battery pack available for
backup.
If the computer is to be stored for more than two
weeks, it is best to remove the battery pack.
Battery power from a fully charged battery pack
depletes in roughly a week with the computer in
suspend-to-memory mode.
Warning! Do not expose the battery pack to
temperatures below 32ºF (0ºC) or above 140ºF
(60ºC).
Removing and Installing the Battery Pack
To remove the battery pack, follow these steps:
1. Turn off the computer, or connect the AC
adapter to the computer.
2. Press the battery compartment cover latch and
slide it toward the front of the computer.
3. Pull out the battery pack.
43
Power
To install the battery pack, simply reverse the
procedure as follows:
1. Insert the battery pack into the battery
compartment.
2. Slide the battery compartment cover latch
toward the rear of the computer until it snaps
into position.
Charging the Battery
To charge the battery, place the battery pack
inside the battery compartment and plug the AC
adapter into the computer and an electrical outlet.
Depending on the state of the battery and how the
computer is being used, the computer uses one of
three charging modes: Rapid Charge, Charge-InUse, and Trickle Charge.
44
Power
Rapid Charge
The computer uses rapid charge when the
computer is in suspend mode with a powered AC
adapter connected. Using rapid charge, a depleted
battery charges fully in approximately two hours.
Charge-In-Use
The computer uses charge-in-use when the
computer is in use with a powered AC adapter
connected. Using charge-in-use, a depleted battery
charges fully in approximately four hours.
Trickle Charge
When the battery is fully charged and a powered
AC adapter is connected, the computer uses
trickle charge to maintain the battery charge and
prevent the battery from draining while the
computer is in use.
Tip: We suggest that you charge the battery pack
while you sleep. For example, charging the
battery the night before traveling provides a fully
charged battery for use the next day.
Checking the Battery Level
The computer provides three ways to check the
battery charge level:
q
With the onscreen fuel gauge
q
With the Windows 95 battery indicator
45
Power
q
With the battery-pack gauge
Onscreen Fuel Gauge
The onscreen fuel gauge provides a graphic
representation and shows the percentage of the
present battery level. To view the onscreen fuel
gauge, press Fn+F6. (If a powered AC adapter is
connected, a plug icon shows in the onscreen fuel
gauge.)
Press and hold Fn and the cursor keys to move the
fuel gauge around the screen. Press Fn+F6 again
to hide the fuel gauge.
Note: When the battery is charged to the
maximum, it shows a 99% charge. If you see a
??% charge, it means a battery is not installed.
Windows 95 Battery Indicator
Rest the pointer on the taskbar battery icon to
display the current power level. (If a powered AC
adapter is connected, a plug icon replaces the
battery icon on the taskbar.) Double-click the
taskbar icon to display the Power dialog box. You
can also access this dialog box via the Power icon
from Control Panel.
46
Power
Battery Pack Gauge
The battery pack gauge allows you to check the
battery charge level when it is not installed in the
computer. Simply press the fuel gauge button on
the battery pack.
The lights on the fuel gauge show the charge level
as follows:
Lights (LEDs) Lit
Charge Level
lllll
100%
llll¡
≈80%
lll¡¡
≈60%
ll¡¡¡
≈40%
l¡¡¡¡
≈20%
-¡¡¡¡ (blinking)
<20%
Optimizing Battery Life
The battery pack can be recharged approximately
500 times. Follow these suggestions to optimize
battery life and maximize battery power:
q
Purchase an extra battery pack.
47
Power
q
Set the When Lid is Closed parameter to
Suspend to Disk. See page 108.
q
Use the AC adapter whenever possible,
reserving the battery for on-the-go computing.
q
Keep the battery pack in the computer when
the computer is powered by the AC adapter. A
constant trickle charge maintains the battery
level. The charge-in-use function also charges
the battery pack.
q
Set the Display Always On parameter to
Disabled to save power. See page 109.
q
Eject any PC card from the card slot when not
in use because PC cards draw extra power.
q
Store the battery pack in a cool, dry place.
when not in the computer. The higher the
storage temperature, the faster the battery
pack discharges. The recommended storage
temperature is 40º to 86ºF (10º to 30ºC).
Low-Battery Warning
You don’t have to be concerned about battery
power when you use the computer with the AC
adapter connected. However, when you operate the
computer on battery power, pay attention to the
). When less than 10 percent
battery indicator (
charge is left in the battery, the following signals
warn you of the low-battery condition:
48
Power
q
The battery indicator (
49
Power
soon as possible to prevent data loss.
The following table gives you the recommended
courses of action when you encounter a lowbattery warning.
Situation
Recommended Action
AC adapter and
power outlet are
available
1. Connect the AC adapter to the
computer to begin charging the
battery.
2. Resume work.
If you want the battery to recharge
faster, close the display or press
Fn+Esc ( ) to enter suspend
mode.
An extra fullycharged battery
pack is available
1. Press Fn+F9.
2. Select Battery and press Enter
to enter suspend to disk mode.
3. After the computer has
powered off, open the battery
compartment cover.
4. Remove the used up battery
pack.
5. Install the new battery pack.
6. Press any key or open the
display to resume work.
Remember to recharge the old
battery pack.
AC adapter,
power outlet or
extra battery
pack is not
available
50
Close the display to enter suspend
mode.
Power
Advanced Power
Management
The computer supports the Advanced Power
Management (APM) standard defined by Microsoft
and Intel.
Tip: Advanced Power Management greatly
prolongs battery life. Use APM whenever possible.
To use Advanced Power Management, follow these
steps:
1. Click the Start button and select Settings,
Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Power icon in Control Panel.
3. Set the power management mode to Advanced.
If you do not see the Power icon in Control Panel,
refer to your Windows user’s manual for details.
51
Power
Heuristic Power Management
The computer uses a new power management
technique called Heuristic Power Management
(HPM) to take advantage of APM’s power-saving
features without degrading performance. HPM
allows the computer to provide maximum power
conservation and maximum performance.
Power-management methods used by most
computers are timer-based. You set time-out
values for the display, the hard disk, and other
devices. The system then puts itself to sleep when
it detects inactivity that exceeds the times you set.
The problem with this is that no two users are
alike. Each of us has his or her own habits when
using the computer, which makes timer-based
power management ineffective.
HPM is a “self-learning” method. With HPM, the
system manages its power according to the way
you use the machine. In effect, the computer
delivers maximum power when you need it, and
saves power when you don’t need the maximum—
all without any intervention from you. There are no
timers to set, nothing to enable or disable. The
HPM system figures out everything for you.
52
Power
Using HPM, the computer automatically suspends
its operations—that is, enters suspend mode—in
response to a hot key or in response to various
events and conditions. Depending on the When Lid
Is Closed setting in the BIOS setup utility (see
page 108), the system enters one of two suspend
modes:
q
Suspend to Disk
q
Suspend to Memory
Note: If an external monitor is connected to the
computer, the computer does not enter either
suspend mode when you close the display. To
enter suspend mode, disconnect the external
monitor, and then open and reclose the display.
Suspend to Disk
Upon entering suspend-to-disk mode, the
computer stores all current data and system
information on the hard disk in a file created by
the Sleep Manager utility (see page 85). Upon
return to normal mode, the computer restores the
data from the hard disk and resumes where you
left off.
If the When Lid Is Closed setting in the BIOS setup
utility is set to Suspend To Disk and the suspendto-disk file created by Sleep Manager is present
and valid, the computer automatically enters
suspend-to-disk mode when:
q
You close the display
53
Power
q
Battery power becomes low while the
computer is in suspend-to-memory mode
q
The battery fails without a powered AC
adapter connected
Caution: If the battery runs out of power
while the AC adapter is not connected, the
computer enters suspend-to-disk mode,
regardless of the When Lid Is Closed setting.
The computer exits suspend-to-disk mode and
returns to normal mode when you open the
display. (Make sure a charged battery pack is
installed and/or a powered AC adapter is
connected before you open the display.)
Suspend to Memory
Upon entering suspend-to-memory mode, the
computer stores all current data and system
information in memory. Upon return to normal
mode, the computer restores the data from
memory and resumes where you left off.
If the When Lid Is Closed setting in the BIOS setup
utility is set to Suspend To Memory, the computer
automatically enters suspend-to-memory mode
when:
54
q
You close the display
q
You press the suspend hot key Fn+Esc ( )
q
There is sustained inactivity
Power
q
The battery fails without a powered AC
adapter connected
Note: The computer also enters suspend-tomemory mode whenever an attempt to suspend to
disk fails—for example, if the suspend-to-disk file
is absent or invalid.
When the computer enters suspend-to-memory
mode, the power indicator ( ) flashes.
The computer exits suspend-to-memory mode and
returns to normal mode when:
q
You open the display
q
You press any key
q
Resume On Schedule is enabled in setup, and
the selected date and time occur
For information about Resume On Modem Ring and
Resume On Schedule, see page 110.
55
4
Peripherals and Options
The computer provides excellent connectivity and
expansion capabilities. This section describes how
to connect peripherals and hardware options to
the computer and how to upgrade your computer.
(For a complete list of available options and
upgrades, consult your dealer.)
Printers
The computer supports both parallel and serial
printers. To connect a parallel printer, plug the
printer cable into the parallel port ( ) on the
computer’s rear panel.
Parallel
To connect a serial printer, plug the printer cable
into the serial port (
) on the computer’s rear
panel.
56
Peripherals and Options
PC Cards
Credit-card-sized PC cards (PCMCIA cards)
enhance the usability and expandability of your
computer. The computer provides two type I/II PC
Card slots (or one type III slot) on the computer’s
left side panel. Common type II cards include flash
memory, SRAM, fax/data modems, LAN and SCSI
cards. The type III cards most often used are 1.8inch ATA drives and cellular modems.
The computer supports Zoomed Video port
functionality which allows your computer to
support hardware MPEG in the form of a ZV PC
card.
To install a PC card:
Insert a type I/II PC
card into the desired
slot, or insert a type III
card or ZV card into the
lower or bottom slot.
Refer to the card’s user manual for details on how
to install and use the card, including any cable
connections needed, such as a network cable.
To eject a PC card, first exit the application that is
using the card. Then:
57
Peripherals and Options
Flip out the slot eject
button of the slot where
the card is inserted
and …
58
Peripherals and Options
Audio Devices
You can connect audio devices to the line-in ( )
and line-out ( ) ports on the computer’s left
panel. Use the line-in port to connect a 3.5-mm
mini-jack microphone or other line-in device. Use
the line-out port to connect external amplified
speakers or headphones.
Note: When you connect a device to the line-in
port, make sure to turn off the appropriate input
from the mixer. For more information, see the
multimedia section of your Windows 95 user’s
guide.
59
Peripherals and Options
External Monitor
You can connect an external monitor to the CRT
port ( ) on the computer’s rear panel. See your
monitor manual for any additional instructions.
60
Peripherals and Options
External Keyboard
You can connect any PS/2-compatible keyboard to
the computer. Simply plug the external keyboard
into the PS/2 connector (
) on the computer’s
rear panel.
61
Peripherals and Options
External Keypad
You can connect any PS/2-compatible numeric
keypad to the computer. Simply plug the keypad
into the PS/2 connector (
) on the computer’s
rear panel.
62
Peripherals and Options
External Pointing Device
You can connect a serial or PS/2-compatible
mouse or similar pointing device to the computer.
To connect a serial pointing device, plug the device
into the serial port (
) on the computer’s rear
panel.
Serial mouse
Note: To enable the serial mouse, use the Add
New Hardware tool in the Windows 95 Control
Panel.
To connect a PS/2-compatible pointing device,
plug the device into the PS/2 port (
) on the
computer’s rear panel.
PS/2 mouse
Note: Installing an external PS/2 pointing device
disables the built-in touchpad.
63
Peripherals and Options
USB Devices
You can connect a USB (Universal Serial Bus)
peripheral device to your computer. This
peripheral standard allows you to connect USB
devices to your computer without using up your
system resources.
Most USB devices have a built-in USB port onto
themselves which allows you to daisy-chain other
USB devices.
64
Peripherals and Options
Mini Dock
The mini dock allows you to connect your
computer to various peripherals, and includes two
additional CardBus slots. Consult your dealer for
details. For connection instructions, see the guide
included with the mini dock.
65
Peripherals and Options
Floppy Drive Cable
The floppy drive cable allows you to use your
floppy drive module externally. To connect the
cable, open the computer’s rear port cover and
connect the 25-pin connector end of the floppy
drive cable to the computer’s parallel port ( ).
Then connect the other end to the floppy drive
module.
66
Peripherals and Options
PS/2 Y-Bridge Cable
The PS/2 Y-bridge cable allows you to connect a
PS/2 mouse and a PS/2 keyboard to the
computer’s PS/2 port. Plug the single-connector
end of the Y-bridge cable into the computer’s PS/2
port. Then attach the connector with the mouse
icon to the PS/2 mouse cable, and the connector
with the keyboard icon to the PS/2 keyboard.
67
Peripherals and Options
File Transfer Cable
You can use the file transfer cable to transfer data
between the computer and other computers.
Connect one end of the file transfer cable to the
parallel port ( ) on the computer’s rear panel, and
connect the other end to the other computer’s
parallel port. Then use your file transfer utility to
perform the transfer.
Tip: Use the computer’s serial infrared (SIR) port
to transfer data between the computer and
another serial-aware computer. See page 45.
68
Peripherals and Options
Battery Pack
It is good practice to have a spare battery pack
around, especially when you travel. The Li-Ion
(lithium-ion) smart battery supplies more power
than a conventional NiMH (nickel metal-hydride)
battery. With power management, you get even
more power on-the-go.
AC Adapter
You can purchase an additional AC adapter for
your computer or mini docking station.
69
Peripherals and Options
Memory Upgrades
Memory is upgradeable up to 128 MB, employing
64-bit soDIMMs (small outline Dual Inline Memory
Modules) in 8, 16, 32 and 64 MB configurations.
The following table lists the possible memory
configurations.
Slot 1
16 MB
0 MB
32 MB
8 MB
32 MB
16 MB
32 MB
32 MB
0 MB
64 MB
8 MB
64 MB
16 MB
64 MB
32 MB
64 MB
64 MB
Slot 2
16 MB
32 MB
0 MB
32 MB
8 MB
32 MB
16 MB
32 MB
64 MB
0 MB
64 MB
8 MB
64 MB
16 MB
64 MB
32 MB
64 MB
Total Memory
32 MB
32 MB
32 MB
40 MB
40 MB
48 MB
48 MB
64 MB
64 MB
64 MB
72 MB
72 MB
80 MB
80 MB
96 MB
96 MB
128 MB
Both memory slots are accessible via a memory
expansion door on the base of the computer.
70
Peripherals and Options
Caution: When installing memory, we
recommend you seek the help of a qualified
service technician. Improper installation can
damage the memory module or the computer.
Warning! Electronic components can be
damaged by static electricity. To avoid
damage, always wear a wrist grounding strap
(available at most electronic stores) when
handling electronic components. Do not
remove the component from its anti-static
packaging until you are ready to install it.
Follow these steps to install additional memory:
1. Power down your
computer. If you are
using the AC adapter,
disconnect it from the
power outlet.
2. Close the display lid.
3. Turn the computer
over to access the
base.
71
Peripherals and Options
4. Remove two screws
that secure the
memory door and lift
the door up.
5. Insert the memory
module diagonally
into the slot, and then
gently press down on
the module until it
clicks into place.
6. Replace the memory
door and secure it
with the screw.
7. Open the display to
turn on the computer.
After new memory modules have been installed,
the system automatically detects and reconfigures
the total memory size.
72
Peripherals and Options
Hard Disk Upgrades
Larger capacity hard disks are available as an
upgrade. The computer uses a 2.5-inch EnhancedIDE hard disk. The following table shows the
currently supported hard disks. Consult your
dealer for additional hard disks that may be
available.
Vendor
Model
Capacit
y
Cylinders
Heads
Sectors
IBM
DTCA
23240
3.0 GB
6304
16
63
IBM
DTCA
24090
4.0 GB
7944
16
63
Follow these steps to install a replacement hard
disk:
1. Power down your
computer. If you are
using the AC adapter,
disconnect it from the
power outlet.
2. Close the display lid.
3. Turn the computer
over to access the
base.
73
Peripherals and Options
4. Remove two screws
that secure the hard
disk door; then press
the hard disk door
release latch and lift
the door up.
5. Lift up (1) and slide
out (2) the hard disk.
74
Peripherals and Options
Note: An additional hard disk can also come in
the form of a module that swaps with the floppy
drive or CD-ROM drive in the module bay. Refer
to your dealer for details.
75
5
System Utilities
The computer comes pre-loaded with the following
system utilities and drivers:
q
Sleep Manager suspend-to-disk utility
q
Touchpad driver
q
Display driver
q
Audio driver
q
System core logic driver
q
File-transfer utility
q
PC Card slot driver and application
Note: Your computer may also have several
application programs pre-loaded. To access the
application programs, click the Start button and
select the application folder. Then click the
program’s icon. For help with an application
program, consult the application’s user manual or
the program’s online help.
Sleep Manager
Sleep Manager is a utility that reserves a space on
the hard disk for the computer’s suspend-to-disk
feature. It creates a contiguous area on the hard
disk where the system saves your data and system
information when the suspend-to-disk feature is
activated.
76
System Utilities
Note: Sleep Manager starts and adjusts the
space needed for suspend-to-disk mode
automatically every time you start Windows 95.
You do not need to access Sleep Manager for
routine use of your computer.
Accessing Sleep Manager
To access Sleep Manager, click the Windows 95
Start button. Then select Programs, 0V Suspend
Utility, Sleep Manager. The main Sleep Manager
window shown on the next page appears.
The Current Setting area shows the drive location
and size of the current hard disk space reserved
by Sleep Manager. The On Board Information area
shows the system memory resources that will be
stored when the system enters suspend mode. The
total of these resources is the recommended size of
the reserved hard disk space shown below the
current setting area.
77
System Utilities
The Enable Indicator on Taskbar check box allows
you to choose whether or not a Sleep Manager
status icon appears on the Windows 95 taskbar.
Select this check box to enable the icon; clear the
check box if you prefer not to see the Sleep
Manager icon on the taskbar.
Note: The Sleep Manager taskbar icon appears
with an exclamation point if Sleep Manager’s
reserved space has not been created, or if APM is
not enabled. The icon appears with a red crossed
circle if the space has not been created and APM
is also not enabled. For more information about
APM, see page 59.
When the Sleep Manager icon is displayed on the
taskbar, you can display the current status of
Sleep Manager by simply resting the mouse
pointer on the icon. Or you can double-click the
icon to access Sleep Manager,
Creating Reserved Space
The Create button at the top of the Sleep Manager
window tells Sleep Manager to find and reserve a
contiguous area on the hard disk for use in
suspend-to-disk mode.
Note: When suspend-to-disk mode is started, the
system checks to see that space been reserved. If
it has not (or the amount of system memory has
been changed since a space was reserved), Sleep
Manager starts automatically and begins the
78
System Utilities
Sleep Manager checks the system configuration
and displays the recommended size. The drive
where the space will be created is defined by the
system and will be the first available logical drive
which has the requested contiguous free disk
space on it. The recommended size is the
minimum size needed to save the current system
status.
If Sleep Manager cannot find the required space on
the hard disk during the space creation process, it
displays the message “Not Enough Space for
Allocation.”
Not Enough Space for Allocation
When Sleep Manager creates the space on the
hard disk, several situations can cause the
appearance of the message Not Enough Space for
Allocation:
80
q
The amount of free space on the drive is less
than Sleep Manager needs. If the total
amount of free space on the drive is less than
the recommended size shown on the Sleep
Manger window, delete some unnecessary
files from the hard disk to make room. Then
re-run Sleep Manager.
q
The hard disk has enough free space, but the
free space exists as small fragments. The free
disk space that Sleep Manager requires must
be contiguous. To solve this problem, run the
Windows 95 Disk Defragmenter utility. Then
re-run Sleep Manager.
System Utilities
q
You are using disk compression and the
amount of free space on the uncompressed
host drive is less than Sleep Manager needs.
Sleep Manager works with most compression
software. However, Sleep Manager can only
create reserved space on the uncompressed
host drive. If the free space on the host drive
is small (as it usually is), use the appropriate
commands in your compression software to
enlarge the size of the host drive. Then re-run
Sleep Manager.
Removing a Reserved Space
If you want to use or take back Sleep Manager’s
reserved space, click Sleep Manager’s Remove
button.
Caution: Removing Sleep Manager’s reserved
space prevents the system from entering
suspend-to-disk mode, and is not
recommended.
When you click Sleep Manager’s Remove button,
the following dialog box appears:
Click Ok to confirm that you want to delete the
Sleep Manager file.
81
System Utilities
Minimizing Sleep Manager
Click the Minimize button on Sleep Manager’s
window to minimize Sleep Manager and allow it to
run in the background. If the Enable Indicator on
Taskbar check box is selected, the Sleep Manager
icon will appear on the taskbar. You can then
restore the Sleep Manager window when you need
it, by double-clicking the taskbar icon. If the
Enable Indicator on Taskbar is not selected, you
must click the Windows 95 Start menu and select
Programs, 0V Suspend Utility, Sleep Manager to
restore Sleep Manager.
Exiting Sleep Manager
Select the Exit button to shut down Sleep
Manager.
Caution: Using the Exit button to shut down
Sleep Manager disables the automatic
adjustment of reserved disk space for suspendto-disk operations, and is not recommended.
Sleep Manager Troubleshooting Tips
The following table lists some error messages you
might see when using Sleep Manager and what to
do about them.
82
System Utilities
Error Message
Solution
BIOS not compliant
with Sleep Manager.
Sleep Manager can run
only on computers with a
compatible BIOS.
This machine does not
have a power
management unit. You
cannot run Sleep
Manager without PMU.
Sleep Manager can only
work on computers with a
power management unit
(PMU) installed.
The APM driver for
Windows is not
installed. Use Windows
Setup to install the APM
driver before you run
Sleep Manager.
See page 59 for
instructions on how to
enable advanced power
management (APM) on
your computer.
Requested disk space is
not enough /The
created file is not
contiguous.
See page 89 for
information on how to
solve disk space problems.
The [directory name]
directory cannot be
created. Enter another
directory or try another
drive.
The directory name you
specified is not valid. (You
can create only one
subdirectory at a time.)
The software has not
been successfully
installed. You must run
Setup again.
Sleep Manager is not
completely installed. Reinstall Sleep Manager.
83
System Utilities
Uninstalling Sleep Manager
Uninstalling Sleep Manager removes the Sleep
Manager utility from your hard disk.
Caution: Uninstalling Sleep Manager does not
remove the hard disk space reserved for
suspend-to-disk mode. Therefore, you can still
use the suspend-to-disk feature. However,
uninstalling Sleep Manager prevents the
automatic adjustment of reserved disk space,
and is not recommended. (For information on
how to remove the reserved hard disk space,
see page 90.)
To uninstall Sleep Manager, follow these steps:
1. Click the Windows 95 Start button, and select
Programs, Sleep Manager, Sleep Manager.
2. Click Exit on the Sleep Manager main window
to shut down Sleep Manger.
3. Click the Windows Start button, and select
Settings, Control Panel.
4. Double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon in
Control Panel.
5. On the Install/Uninstall tab, select Sleep
Manager for Windows 95 and click
Add/Remove.
6. Follow the screen instructions to complete the
uninstallation.
84
System Utilities
Touchpad Driver
The computer’s built-in touchpad works with most
mouse drivers, but the pre-loaded touchpad driver
provides additional functions that work only with
the touchpad.
To configure these additional functions, follow
these steps:
1. Click the Start button and select Settings,
Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Mouse icon.
3. In the Mouse property sheet, select the
TouchPad tab.
To see descriptions of the configuration options,
move the pointer over the option and press the
right touchpad button (right-click). When the
What’s This button appears, press the left
touchpad button to bring up online help for that
option.
85
System Utilities
BIOS Setup Utility
The computer BIOS setup utility allows you to
configure the computer and its hardware settings.
The computer comes correctly configured, and you
do not need to run the BIOS setup utility to use
the computer. However, you might need to use the
BIOS utility if you want to customize the way your
computer works, or if you receive an error message
after making hardware or software changes.
With the BIOS setup utility, you can:
86
q
Check the system configuration
q
Change the system date, time, or speed
q
Change the system startup sequence
q
Set the power-saving suspend mode
q
Set or change resume options
q
Set, change, or remove a system password
System Utilities
Press Fn+F2 to access the BIOS setup utility. You
will see the BIOS Utility main screen shown below.
BIOS Utility
About My Computer
System Configuration
Power Saving Options
System Security
Reset to Default Settings
↑ ↓ = Move Highlight Bar, ↵ = Select, Esc = Exit
Press ↑ or ↓ to highlight the menu item you want.
Then press Enter to access the highlighted item.
Press Esc to exit.
About My Computer
Selecting About My Computer presents you with
two screens of details about the computer and its
peripherals. These screens are for information
only; you cannot change the settings on these
screens.
87
System Utilities
The following table tells you what each of the items
on the About My Computer screens are.
Item
Description
System
Architecture
System architecture information
System BIOS
BIOS version
System ID
ID information on major components
Processor
Processor type and speed
Coprocessor
Coprocessor type
Internal Cache
(L1)
Internal cache size and whether it is
enabled or not
External Cache
(L2)
External cache size and whether it is
enabled or not
Total Memory
Total memory size
Bank A
Bank A memory module size and
type
Bank B
Bank B memory module size and
type
System Peripherals
88
Graphics
Controller
Graphics controller type and video
memory size
Display Output
Display type
Hard Drive 0
IDE 0 drive type and size (hard disk)
Hard Drive 1
IDE 1 drive type (CD-ROM or other
IDE drives)
Floppy Drive A
Floppy drive A type
Floppy Drive B
Floppy drive B type
System Utilities
Item
Description
Expansion Peripherals
PCMCIA Slot 0
Card presence in slot 0 (detected by
the socket service)
PCMCIA Slot 1
Card presence in slot 1 (detected by
the socket service)
Parallel Port
Parallel port base address and IRQ
Serial Port
Serial port base address and IRQ
IrDA (FIR)
Infrared port base address and IRQ
Onboard USB
USB port if enabled or not
AC Adapter
Connected AC adapter information
Main Battery
Installed battery type information
Onboard Audio
Base Address
Audio base address
MPU Base
Address
Audio MPU-401 base address
IRQ Setting
Audio IRQ settings
DMA Channel
Audio DMA channels
89
System Utilities
System Configuration
Selecting System Configuration presents a Basic
System Configuration screen, where you can
change several items in your computer’s
configuration.
Press ↑ or ↓ to move from one item to another, and
← or → to change settings. Press F1 to get help on
a selected item. Press Esc to exit the Basic System
Configuration screen and return to the main BIOS
Utility screen.
Date and Time
The current date is in “Day-of-the-week Month
Day, Year” format—for example, [Mon Aug 11,
1997]. The current time is in
“Hour:Minutes:Seconds” format. The system uses
a 24-hour clock—for example, 6:25:50 PM appears
as 18:25:50.
Floppy Drives
The default setting for Floppy Drive A is 1.44 MB
3.5-inch. Floppy Drive B is set to None, and it is
only enabled if you connect an additional external
floppy drive.
90
System Utilities
Hard Disks
The Hard Disk 0 entry refers to the computer’s
internal hard disk. With this entry set to Auto, the
BIOS automatically detects the hard disk and
displays its capacity, cylinders, heads, and
sectors. Other hard disk settings are configured
automatically for optimum drive performance.
You can change the Hard Disk 0 entry to User if
you want to enter drive settings manually. To
determine your drive settings, check the data
found on your hard disk or supplied in the hard
disk vendor documentation.
Caution: We suggest that you leave this
parameter set to Auto to allow the BIOS to
auto-detect the drive settings at each boot-up.
The Hard Disk 1 entry is used when a CD-ROM
drive module or second IDE drive option is
installed in the module bay.
Num Lock After Boot
When set to Enabled, Num Lock After Boot tells
the computer to turn on Num Lock automatically
on startup, activating the keyboard’s embedded
numeric keypad. The default setting is Disabled.
91
System Utilities
LCD Expansion Mode
When set to Enabled, LCD Expansion Mode allows
full-screen views in DOS mode. The default setting
is Disabled.
Internal Speaker
This parameter lets you enable or disable the
internal speaker. The default setting is Enabled.
Tip: You can also toggle the speaker on and off
by pressing the speaker hot key combination
Fn+F7.
Silent Boot
When set to Enabled, the computer shows the
computer logo onscreen and hides the POST
routine messages. The default setting is Enabled.
Fast Boot
When set to Enabled, the computer bypasses the
memory tests to speed up the boot-up process.
The default setting is Disabled.
92
System Utilities
Advanced System Configuration
For advanced users, the System Configuration
menu item contains two hidden pages that allow
you to view and configure more technical aspects
of the computer.
Caution: The computer is already tuned for
optimum performance and you should not need
to access these advanced screens. If you do not
fully understand the items in these special
screens, do not change their values.
To access the Advanced System Configuration
screens, press F8 at the BIOS Utility main screen
before selecting the System Configuration menu
item. When you now select System Configuration
and the Basic System Configuration screen
appears, you will see “Page 1/3” in its upper right
corner. Press PgDn to access page 2, the first
Advanced System Configuration screen, and PgDn
again to access page 3, the second Advanced
System Configuration screen.
Note: F8 acts as a toggle on the BIOS Utility
main screen. Each time you press F8 at the main
screen, you toggle between accessing the singlescreen Basic System Configuration and the threescreen Advanced System Configuration.
93
System Utilities
Internal Cache
Internal cache refers to cache built into the CPU.
When enabled, this setting boosts system
performance. It is also called CPU cache or L1
(level one) cache. The default setting is Enabled.
External Cache
External cache greatly increases system
performance by lessening the load on main
memory. It is also called L2 (level 2) cache. The
default setting is Enabled.
Enhanced IDE Features
The Enhanced IDE Features section includes four
parameters for optimizing hard disk performance.
These performance features depend on drive
support. Newer drives support most or all of these
features.
q
94
Hard Disk Size > 504MB. If your hard disk
size is greater than 504MB and you use DOS
or Windows, set this parameter to Auto. If you
use NetWare, UNIX, or Windows NT, set this
parameter to Disabled. The default setting is
Auto.
System Utilities
q
Multiple Sectors Read/Write. This
parameter enhances hard disk performance
by reading/writing more data at once. The
available values are: Auto or Disabled. The
default Auto setting allows the system to
adjust itself to the optimum read/write
setting.
q
Advanced PIO Mode. Advanced PIO
(Programmed Input/Output) Mode enhances
drive performance by optimizing the hard disk
timing. The available values are: Auto and
Mode 0. The default setting is Auto.
q
Hard Disk 32 Bit Access. This parameter
allows your hard disk to use 32-bit access.
The available values are: Auto and Disabled.
The default setting is Auto.
Tip: We suggest you set all of these parameters
to Auto whenever that choice is available. This
allows the computer to use the hard drive at the
highest possible performance level.
Onboard Communication Ports
The Onboard Communication Ports section allows
you to set addresses and interrupts for the
computer’s serial and parallel ports.
q
Serial Port. The Serial Port parameter can be
set to Enabled or Disabled. The Base Address
parameter accepts the following values: 3F8h,
2F8h, 3E8h or 2E8h. The IRQ parameter
accepts 4 or 11.
95
System Utilities
The default values are Enabled, 3F8h and 4.
q
IrDA (FIR). The IrDA (FIR) parameter can be
set to Enabled or Disabled. The Base Address
parameter accepts the following values: 3F8h,
2F8h, 3E8h or 2E8h. The IRQ parameter
accepts 3 or 10. The DMA Channel
parameter accepts 3, 0 or 1.
The default values are Enabled, 2F8h, 3 and
3.
q
Parallel Port. The Parallel Port parameter can
be set to Enabled or Disabled. The Base
Address parameter accepts 378h or 278h.
The IRQ parameter accepts 7 or 5. The
Operation Mode parameter accepts the
following values: EPP, ECP, Bi-directional or
Standard. The ECP DMA Channel parameter
lets you set the DMA channel used in ECP
mode. You must choose DMA channel 1 or 3
with this parameter if you select ECP as your
parallel port operation mode.
Note: If ECP is selected, the IR port functions at
SIR (serial infrared) speed which is 115.2 kbps.
The default values are Enabled, 378h, 7 and
EPP.
Caution: In order to prevent resource
conflicts, the BIOS Utility does not allow you
to set the same IRQ and address values for
different devices.
96
System Utilities
Onboard USB
When enabled, you can connect USB devices to
the onboard USB port on the rear of the computer.
The default setting is Enabled.
Reset PnP Resources
The system resources are already properly
configured. If resource conflicts arise, you can set
this parameter to Yes to reset and reallocate PnP
resources, after which the BIOS automatically
resets this parameter to No, which is the default
setting.
Power Saving Options
Selecting Power Saving Options on the BIOS Utility
main screen presents a screen that allows you to
adjust several power-saving settings.
When Lid is Closed
The computer’s lid switch acts as its power switch:
opening the display wakes up the computer,
closing the display puts it to sleep. The When Lid
is Closed setting determines which suspend mode
the computer enters when the display is closed:
Suspend to Disk or Suspend to Memory. The
default is Suspend to Disk.
q
Suspend to Disk. With this setting, the
computer saves all data to the hard disk
when you close the display. The computer
wakes up when you reopen the display.
97
System Utilities
q
Suspend to Memory. With this setting, the
computer saves all data to memory when you
close the display or press the suspend hot key
Fn+Esc ( ). The computer wakes up when
you reopen the display or press any key.
Note: If an external monitor is connected to the
computer, the computer will not enter suspend
mode if you close the display. To enter suspend
mode, disconnect the external monitor, open and
reclose the display.
Important! Sleep Manager automatically creates
a suspend-to-disk file when it is run. If the file
becomes invalid, suspend-to-disk mode becomes
unavailable, and the computer automatically
switches to suspend-to-memory mode.
Suspend to Disk on Critical Battery
With this parameter is set to Enabled, the
computer enters suspend-to-disk mode when the
battery becomes critically low. The default setting
is Enabled.
Display Always On
This parameter lets you specify whether the
display is always on or not. When enabled, the
screen will not blank. To save power, the default
setting is Disabled.
98
System Utilities
Resume On Modem Rings
You can set the computer to resume from
suspend-to-memory mode upon detection of a
specific number of modem rings, ranging from 1 to
7. Enabling this option overrides the suspend-todisk function.
Note: This function is currently unavailable.
Resume On Schedule
When this parameter is set to Enabled, the
computer resumes from suspend-to-memory mode
at the specified date and time. Enabling this
option overrides the suspend-to-disk function.
The Resume Date and Resume Time parameters
let you set the date and time for the resume
operation. The date and time fields take the same
format as the System Date and Time parameters in
the System Configuration screen.
If you set a date and time prior to when the
computer enters suspend mode, this field is
automatically disabled. A successful resume
occurring from a date and time match also
automatically disables this field.
99
System Utilities
System Security
When you select System Security from the BIOS
Utility main screen, a screen appears that allows
you to set security options.
Important! If a password is currently present,
the system prompts you to input the password
before entering the System Security screen.
Supervisor and User Passwords
The supervisor and user passwords both prevent
unauthorized access to the computer. When these
passwords are present, the computer prompts for
the user or supervisor password during system
boot-up and resume from suspend. The supervisor
password also gives full access to the BIOS setup
utility. The user password give limited access.
Important! The supervisor password must be set
prior to setting the user password. If you enter
the setup utility with the user password, you
cannot modify the supervisor password or certain
BIOS settings.
To set a password, follow these steps:
1. Select the desired password (Supervisor or
User) to set or edit, and press → or ←. A special
password prompt resembling a key appears:
100
System Utilities
2. Enter a password of up to eight characters.
(The characters do not appear on the screen as
you type them.) After typing your password,
press Enter. The same password prompt
reappears:
3. Retype your password and press Enter to verify
your first entry.
After you set a password, the computer sets the
Supervisor Password (or User Password)
parameter to Present. The next time you boot up,
resume from suspend mode, run the BIOS setup
utility, or unlock system resources, the password
prompt appears and you must type the supervisor
or user password to continue.
Important! The system continues to ask for your
password until you enter the correct password. If
you forget your password, contact your dealer for
assistance.
To remove a password, select the password you
want to remove and press ← or →.
Diskette Drive Access Control (DOS mode only)
This parameter allows you to control the read and
write functions of the floppy drive. The available
options. are: Normal, Write Protect All Sectors,
Write Protect Boot Sector, and Disabled. The
default is Normal.
101
System Utilities
With this parameter set to Normal, the floppy drive
functions normally. When the parameter is set to
Write Protect All Sectors, all write functions to the
floppy drive are disabled, but you can still read
from a disk in the floppy drive. When the
parameter is set to Write Protect Boot Sector, all
write functions to the boot sector of the disk in the
floppy drive are disabled. When the parameter is
set to Disabled, the floppy drive is disabled.
Hard Disk Drive Access Control (DOS mode only)
This parameter allows you to control the read and
write functions of the hard drive. The available
options. are: Normal, Write Protect All Sectors,
Write Protect Boot Sector and Disabled. The
default is Normal.
With this parameter set to Normal, the hard drive
functions normally. When the parameter is set to
Write Protect All Sectors, all write functions to the
hard drive are disabled. When the parameter is
set to Write Protect Boot Sector, all write functions
to the boot sector of the hard drive are disabled.
When the parameter is set to Disabled, the hard
drive is disabled.
Start Up Sequences
This parameter determines which drive the system
boots from when you turn on the system. The
following table describes the available settings.
102
System Utilities
Setting
Description
A: then C:
(default)
System boots from the diskette in floppy
drive A. If the diskette is missing or a
non-system diskette, the system boots
from hard disk C.
C: then A:
System boots from hard disk C. If the
hard disk is a non-system disk, the
system boots from floppy drive A.
A:
System boots from the diskette in floppy
drive A. If the diskette is missing or a
non-system disk,ette an error message
appears.
C:
System boots from hard disk C. If the
hard disk is a non-system disk, an error
message appears.
CD-ROM
then C:
then A:
System boots from a CD if one is
installed in the CD-ROM drive. If no CD
is present, the system boots from the
hard disk C. If the hard disk is a nonsystem disk, then the system boots from
floppy drive A.
Refresh New BIOS
Warning! Contact your dealer to upgrade your
BIOS.
Reset To Default Settings
When you select the Reset To Default Settings
from the BIOS Utility main screen, a dialog box
appears asking you to confirm that you want to
reset all settings to their factory defaults.
103
Appendix
Troubleshooting
This section tells how to deal with common system
problems. Read it before calling a technician if a problem
occurs. Solutions to more serious problems require opening
up the system. Do not attempt to open the system by
yourself. Contact your dealer or an TravelMate authorized
service center for assistance.
Question
Answer
I travel a lot and
occasionally use my
computer in extreme
temperature
conditions. Will the
weather affect my
computer?
The computer’s design uses materials that
dissipate heat quickly, without the need
of a fan that can be noisy at times. The
unique power management system also
ensures that major components do not
run too hot by closely monitoring thermal
conditions within the unit itself.
So, whether you are using the computer
in the desert or in the arctic, you never
need to worry about components breaking
down or reduced performance. If you feel
the unit is a bit warm, use the keyboard’s
automatic tilt feature to let the unit
breathe a little.
104
Appendix
Question
Answer
What do I do if my
computer hangs and
rebooting doesn’t
solve the problem?
Every machine should have a fail-safe
switch as a last resort, even a computer.
Desktops have a reset button and the
computer has one too. It not only resets
the machine, but it also re-synchronizes
the computer and its devices for a
successful restart.
The computer’s reset switch is located
inside a small pinhole on the computer’s
right panel. It can be activated with a pin,
paper clip or the tip of a ballpoint pen.
(Do not use a pencil as the pencil lead can
break off and lodge itself in the pinhole.)
I prefer using an
external keyboard
and mouse, but both
have PS/2
connectors and there
is only one PS/2 port
on the computer.
How do I connect
them to the computer
at the same time?
To connect two PS/2-type devices to the
computer, use a PS/2 Y-bridge cable, as
described on page 76. (Connecting two
PS/2-type devices via the mini dock is not
a problem, because there are separate
PS/2 connectors for an external keyboard
and mouse.)
105
Appendix
Question
Answer
I want to use an
external mouse but I
want to disable the
internal touchpad.
First you need to enable the external
mouse (see page 71). Then do the
following:
1. In the Windows 95 Control Panel, open
the mouse dialog.
2. Click on the General tab and change
the mouse device to fit your external
mouse (e.g., standard serial mouse if
you connect an external serial mouse).
106
Appendix
Question
Answer
I opened the display
Look at the power indicator ( ) on the
but the computer
display panel.
does not start or bootIf the indicator is not lit, no power is
up.
being applied to the computer. Check the
following:
q If you are running on battery power, it
may be low and unable to power the
computer. Connect the AC adapter to
recharge the battery pack.
q Make sure the AC adapter is plugged
in properly to the computer and to the
power outlet.
If the indicator is lit, check the following:
q Is a non-bootable (non-system)
diskette in the floppy drive? Remove it
and press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the
system.
q The operating system files may be
damaged or missing. Insert the
Recovery CD in the CD-ROM drive and
press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the
system. See the Recovery CD Kit for
details.
107
Appendix
Question
Answer
The serial mouse
does not work.
Do the following:
q Make sure the serial mouse drivers are
installed. Use the Add New Hardware
tool for assistance.
q Make sure that the serial cable is
plugged securely into the serial port.
q Press Fn+F3 to reconfigure Plug-andPlay devices.
The printer does not
work.
Do the following:
q Make sure that the printer is turned
on and is connected to a power outlet.
q Make sure the printer cable is
connected securely to the computer’s
parallel port and to the corresponding
port on the printer.
q Press Fn+F3 to reconfigure Plug-andPlay devices.
q Press Fn+F2 to enter the BIOS setup
utility. Select About My Computer,
press Enter, and then press PgDn to
go to page 2. Check if the Parallel Port
is enabled. If it is disabled, go to page
3 of the Advanced System
Configuration (see page 103) and set
the parallel port parameters as
described on page 105.
109
Appendix
Question
Answer
No sound comes out
of the computer
speakers.
Check the following:
q The speakers may be muted. Press
Fn+F6. If the pop-up does not contain
a speaker icon, press Fn+F7 to turn on
the speakers.
q The volume level may be too low. Press
Fn+Ctrl+↑ to increase the volume.
q If headphones or external speakers are
connected to the line-out port on the
computer’s left panel, the internal
speakers are automatically turned off.
q Onboard audio may be disabled. Press
Fn+F2 to enter the BIOS setup utility.
Select About My Computer, press
Enter, and then press PgDn to go to
page 2. If onboard audio is disabled,
go to page 3 of the Advanced System
Configuration (see page 103) and
change the onboard audio setting to
Enabled.
110
Appendix
Startup Error Messages
If you receive an error message during system startup, note
the message and take corrective action. The following table
lists the error messages in alphabetical order together with
the recommended course of action.
Error Message
Corrective Action
Disk Boot Failure
Insert a system disk in drive A,
then press Enter.
Diskette Drive Type
Mismatch
Press Fn+F2 to reconfigure the
computer with the BIOS setup
utility.
Equipment Configuration
Error
Press Fn+F2 to reconfigure the
computer with the BIOS setup
utility.
Insert system diskette and
press <Enter> key to reboot
Insert a system disk in drive A,
then press Enter.
Memory Size Mismatch
Press Fn+F2 and select the
System Configuration menu. Then
press Esc to exit the BIOS setup
utility, saving the current settings.
Missing Operating System
Correct the hard drive type and
reboot. See the specification label
pasted on the back side of the
computer or attached to hard disk
drive. We suggest you set the hard
drive type to Auto.
Non-system disk or disk
error. Replace and strike
any key when ready
Insert a system disk in drive A,
then press Enter.
111
Appendix
Error Message
Corrective Action
Real-Time Clock Error
Press Fn+F2 to reconfigure the
computer with the BIOS setup
utility.
Caution: When you reconfigure the computer
with the BIOS setup utility, you must restart the
system for the changes to take effect. To restart
the system during startup, press Ctrl+Alt+Del
before Windows 95 begins loading. To restart from
Windows 95, click the Start button, and select
Shutdown, Restart the Computer.
If you still encounter problems after going through the
corrective measures, or if other error messages appear
during startup, contact your dealer or an authorized service
center for assistance.
112
Appendix
Specifications
Item
Microprocessor
Memory
System/Main
External cache
Standard
Optional
Pentium®
Intel
processor with
MMX™ technology
32MB
Dual 64-bit memory
banks
Expandable to
128MB using
8/16/32/64MB
soDIMMs
512KB L2 cache
(synchronous SRAM)
Flash BIOS
256KB
Storage system
One 2.5-inch, highcapacity EnhancedIDE hard disk
One high-speed IDE
CD-ROM drive
module
Higher-capacity
E-IDE hard disk
Second 3-inch hard
disk module (swaps
into the module bay)
One 3.5-inch,
1.44MB
floppy drive module
(internal/external
use)
Display
Active-matrix TFT
LCD
12.1-inch, 800x600,
64K colors (SVGA)
13.3-inch, 1024x768,
64K colors (XGA)
Up to 1024x768,
64K-color ultra-VGA
monitor
LCD projection panel
113
Appendix
Item
Standard
Video system
PCI local bus video
with 128-bit graphics
accelerator
Audio system
16-bit stereo audio
with built-in FM
synthesizer
Optional
Built-in microphone
and dual angled
speakers
Communications
system
PC card modem
Operating
system
Windows 95
Keyboard and
pointing device
84-/85-key with
Win95 keys
101-/102-key,
PS/2-compatible
keyboard or 17-key
numeric keypad
Touchpad (centrallylocated on palm rest)
External serial or
PS/2 mouse or
similar pointing
device
114
Appendix
Item
Standard
Optional
I/O ports
One 9-pin RS-232
serial port
(UART16550compatible)
Serial mouse, printer
or other serial
devices
One 25-pin parallel
port (EPP/ECPcompliant)
Parallel printer or
other parallel
devices; floppy drive
module (when used
externally)
115
Appendix
Item
Standard
Optional
I/O ports
(continued)
One 15-pin CRT port
Up to a 1024x768
ultra-VGA monitor
One 6-pin PS/2
connector
17-key numeric
keypad, PS/2
keyboard, mouse or
trackball
One 240-pin mini
dock connector
Mini dock
One type III or two
type II PC Card slot(s)
LAN card or other
PC cards
One fast infrared port
(IrDA-compliant)
External IR adapter
One 3.5mm mini-jack Microphone or linemicrophone-in/line-in in device
port
One 3.5mm mini-jack
speaker-out/line-out
port
Speakers or
headphones
One USB port
USB device
Weight
with FDD
with CD-ROM
(includes battery)
7.4 lbs. (3.4kg)
7.5 lbs. (3.5kg)
Dimensions
Round contour
Main footprint
LxWxH
11.7 x 9.1 x 2 inches
(297 x 230 x 51 mm)
116
Carrying bag
Appendix
Item
Temperature
Operating
Non-operating
Standard
50º to 95ºF
(10º to 35ºC)
14º to 140ºF
(–10º to 60ºC)
Humidity
Operating
Non-operating
(non-condensing)
20% to 80% RH
20% to 80% RH
AC adapter
100 to 240Vac, 50 to
60Hz autosensing AC
adapter
Battery pack
Type
Charge time
Optional
Extra AC adapter
Extra battery pack
57WH Lithium-Ion
battery with
intelligent charging
and built-in battery
gauge
2-hour rapid-charge
4-hour in-use charge
117
Appendix
System Memory Map
Address Range
Definition
Function
000000 09FFFF
640 KB memory
Base memory
0A0000 0BFFFF
128 KB video RAM
Reserved for graphics
display buffer
0C0000 0CBFFF
Video BIOS
Video BIOS
CC000 - CDFFF System CardBus
CE000 - CFFFF MiniDock CardBus
0F0000 0FFFFF
64 KB system
BIOS
System BIOS
10000 - 7FFFF
80000 - 27FFF
Extended memory
Onboard memory
SIMM memory
FE0000 FFFFFF
256 KB system
ROM
Duplicate of code
assignment at 0E00000FFFFF
I/O Address Map
Address Range
Device
000 - 00F
020 - 021
02E - 02F
040 - 043
048 - 04B
060 - 06E
070 - 071
080 - 08F
0A0 - 0A1
0C0 - 0DF
DMA controller-1
Interrupt controller-1
NS87338 peripheral controller
Timer 1
Timer 2
Keyboard controller chip select
Real-time clock and NMI mask
DMA page register
Interrupt controller-2
DMA controller-2
118
Appendix
Address Range
1F0 - 1F7
3F6 - 3F7
170 - 177
376 - 377
220 - 22F
240 - 24F
260 - 26F
280 - 28F
278 - 27F
2E8 - 2EF
2F8 - 2FF
300 - 301
310 - 311
320 - 321
330 - 321
378 - 37F
388 - 38B
3BC - 3BE
3B4, 3B5, 3BA
3C0 - 3C5
3C6 - 3C9
3C0 - 3CF
3D0 - 3DF
3E8 - 3EF
3F0 - 3F7
3F8 - 3FF
CF8 - CFF
Device
Hard disk select
Hard disk select
CD-ROM select
CD-ROM select
Audio
Audio - default
Audio
Audio
Parallel port 3
COM 4
COM 2 - IrDA
MPU-401 port - default
MPU-401 port
MPU-401 port
MPU-401 port
Parallel port 2
FM synthesizer
Parallel port 1
Video subsystem
Video DAC
Enhanced graphics display
Color graphics adapter
COM3
Floppy disk controller
COM 1 - Serial 1
PCI configuration register
119
Appendix
Interrupts
Interrupt
Source Device
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
IRQ
System Timer
Keyboard
Cascade
IrDA / 2F8h
Serial Port 1 / 3F8h
Audio
Floppy Disk Controller (FDC)
Parallel Port
Real Time Clock (RTC)
USB/System CardBus
Reserved for PCMCIA card
Reserved for PCMCIA card/MiniDock CardBus
PS/2 Mouse
Co-processor
Hard disk
CD-ROM
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
DMA Channels
Controller
Channel
Address
1
1
0
1
0087
0083
1
1
2
3
0081
0082
2
2
2
2
4
5
6
7
Cascade
008B
0089
008A
120
Function
Audio(default)/IrDA(option)
Audio(default)/ECP(option)
IrDA(option)
Diskette
Audio(option)/FIR IrDA(default)
/ECP(default)
Cascade
Spare
Appendix
IMPORTANT SAFETY
INSTRUCTIONS
1. Read these instructions carefully. Save these
instructions for future reference.
2. Follow all warnings and instructions marked on the
product.
3. Unplug this product from the wall outlet before cleaning.
Do not use liquid cleaners or aerosol cleaners. Use a
damp cloth for cleaning.
4. Do not use this product near water.
5. Do not place this product on an unstable cart, stand, or
table. The product may fall, causing serious damage to
the product.
6. Slots and openings in the cabinet and the back or
bottom are provided for ventilation; to ensure reliable
operation of the product and to protect it from
overheating, these openings must not be blocked or
covered. The openings should never be blocked by
placing the product on a bed, sofa, rug, or other similar
surface. This product should never be placed near or
over a radiator or heat register, or in a built-in
installation unless proper ventilation is provided.
7. This product should be operated from the type of power
indicated on the marking label. If you are not sure of the
type of power available, consult your dealer or local
power company.
8. Do not allow anything to rest on the power cord. Do not
locate this product where persons will walk on the cord.
9. If an extension cord is used with this product, make
sure that the total ampere rating of the equipment
plugged into the extension cord does not exceed the
extension cord ampere rating. Also, make sure that the
total rating of all products plugged into the wall outlet
does not exceed the fuse rating.
121
Appendix
10. Never push objects of any kind into this product through
cabinet slots as they may touch dangerous voltage
points or short out parts that could result in a fire or
electric shock. Never spill liquid of any kind on the
product.
11. Do not attempt to service this product yourself, as
opening or removing covers may expose you to
dangerous voltage points or other risks. Refer all
servicing to qualified service personnel.
12. Unplug this product from the wall outlet and refer
servicing to qualified service personnel under the
following conditions:
a. When the power cord or plug is damaged or frayed
b. If liquid has been spilled into the product
c. If the product has been exposed to rain or water
d. If the product does not operate normally when the
operating instructions are fol-lowed. Adjust only
those controls that are covered by the operating
instructions since improper adjustment of other
controls may result in damage and will often require
extensive work by a qualified technician to restore
the product to normal condition.
e. If the product has been dropped or the cabinet has
been damaged
f.
If the product exhibits a distinct change in
performance, indicating a need for service
g. Replace battery with the same type as the product's
battery we recommend. Use of another battery may
present a risk of fire or explosion. Refer battery
replacement to a qualified serviceman.
13. Warning! Battery may explode if not handled properly.
Do not recharge, disassemble or dispose of in fire. Keep
away from children and dispose of used battery
promptly.
122
Appendix
14. Use only the proper type of power supply cord set
(provided in your accessories box) for this unit. It should
be a detachable type: UL listed/CSA certified, type SPT2, rated 7A 125V minimum, VDE approved or its
equivalent. Maximum length is 15 feet (4.6 meters).
Canadian DOC Notice
This digital apparatus does not exceed Class B limits for
radio noise emissions from digital apparatus set out in the
Radio Interference Regulations of the Canadian Department
of Communications.
Le présent appareil numérique n'émet pas de bruits
radioélectriques dépassant les limites applicables aux
appareils numériques de la classe B prescrites dans le
réglement sur le brouillage radioélectrique édicté par le
Ministère des Communications du Canada.
123
Appendix
FCC Class B Radio Frequency
Interference Statement
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with
the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of
FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable
protection against harmful interference in a residential
installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used
in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. However, there is no
guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular
installation. If this equipment does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is
encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more
of the following measures:
1. Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
2. Increase the separation between the equipment and
receiver.
3. Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit
different from that to which the receiver is connected.
4. Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television
technician for help.
Notice 1:
The changes or modifications not expressly approved by the
party responsible for compliance could void the user's
authority to operate the equipment.
Notice 2:
Shielded interface cables, if any, must be used in order to
comply with the emission limits.
124
Index
A
about my computer, 87
AC adapter, 3
addresses. See base addresses;
memory addresses
advanced PIO mode, 95
advanced power management, 51
audio, 33–35, 59
hot keys, 35
automatic tilt, 27
B
balance, 23, 35
base addresses
I/O map, 116
memory map, 116
parallel port, 96
serial infrared port, 96
serial port, 95
battery gauge, 22
battery indicator, 15, 45, 48
battery pack, 4, 42–50
charge in use, 45
charging, 44
checking, 45
gauge, 47
installing, 5, 43
low-battery warning, 48
optimizing life, 47
rapid charge, 45
removing, 43
storage, 48
trickle charge, 45
BIOS setup utility, 86
about my computer, 87
enhanced IDE features, 94
external cache, 94
internal cache, 94
onboard communication ports,
95
power saving options, 97
reset to default settings, 103
system configuration, 89–97
system security, 99–103
brightness, 23, 107
C
cable
file transfer, 68
floppy drive, 66
PS/2 Y-bridge, 67
cache, 94
Caps Lock, 17, 18
CD-ROM, 30
eject, 23, 24, 31
swapping, 33
charge in use, 45
cleaning, 3
compression, 81
configuration. See BIOS setup
utility
contrast, 23, 107
CRT. See display; monitor, external
cursor-control keys, 19
D
date, 90
DC-in port, 37
disk boot failure, 110
disk compression, 81
diskette drive
access control, 101
diskette drive type mismatch, 110
diskettes, 7
startup, 6
display, 14, 107
brightness, 23, 107
contrast, 23, 107
opening and closing, 14
power-on, 14
toggle, 22
125
Index
display always on, 98
DMA channel, 118
dock. See mini dock
E
eject
CD, 23, 24, 31
menu, 22, 24
embedded keypad, 19, 91
equipment configuration error, 110
error messages
Sleep Manager, 82
startup, 110
external
floppy drive, 31
keyboard, 61
keypad, 62
monitor, 60
mouse, 63
external cache, 94
F
fast boot, 92
features, 11
file transfer cable, 68
FIR port. See infrared port
FlashStart, 14
floppy drive, 30, 31, 66
cable, 66
external, 31
swapping, 33
Fn, 17, 35
fuel gauge, 22, 23, 45, 47, 49
H
hard disk, 30, 73
32-bit access, 95
access control, 102
installing, 73
126
size > 504MB, 94
headphones, 40, 59, 109
heuristic power management, 52
hot keys, 35
I
I/O address map, 116
indicator lights
battery, 15
power, 15
indicators
battery, 45, 48
power, 106
infrared port, 38. See infrared port
base address, 96
insert system diskette, 110
internal cache, 94
internal speaker, 92
Internet, 10
interrupts, 118
parallel, 96
serial infrared port, 96
serial port, 95
IRQ. See interrupts
K
keyboard, 17
automatic tilt, 27
embedded keypad, 19
external, 61
keypad, 91
lock keys, 17
palm rest, 29
touchpad, 24–27
keypad
embedded, 19, 91
external, 62
keys
Caps Lock, 17, 18
cursor-control, 19
Index
Fn, 17, 35
lock, 17
NumLk, 17, 18
ScrLk, 17, 18
Windows 95, 20
O
onboard communication ports, 95
onboard USB, 97
L
LCD expansion mode, 92
lights. See indicator lights
line-in port, 40, 59
line-out port, 40, 59
lock keys, 17
lock system resources, 22
M
memory, 70
installing, 71
memory map, 116
memory size mismatch, 110
mic-in port, 40
microphone, 34, 40, 59
mini dock, 24, 65
missing operating system, 110
module bay, 30
modules
swapping, 33
monitor, external, 60
mouse, 108
external, 63
multimedia ports, 40
multiple sector read/write, 95
N
non-system disk, 110
not enough space for allocation, 80
Num lock after boot, 91
NumLk, 17, 18
127
Index
P
palm rest, 29
parallel port, 37
base address, 96
passwords, 22, 41, 100
PC cards, 56–58
slots, 39
PCMCIA cards. See PC cards
peripherals, 36
plug and play, 21, 97
pointing device. See mouse
ports, 35–40
POST error messages. See error
messages, startup
power indicator, 15, 106
power management, 50–55
advanced (APM), 51
heuristic (HPM), 52
printers, 56, 108
PS/2 port, 37
PS/2 Y-bridge cable, 67
R
rapid charge, 45
real-time clock error, 111
reset, 105
reset to default settings, 103
resume on modem ring, 99
resume on schedule, 99
S
safety instructions, 119
screen. See display
screen blackout, 22
ScrLk, 17, 18
security, 41, 99–103
serial port, 37
base address, 95
setup. See BIOS setup utility
128
silent boot, 92
Sleep Manager, 53, 76–84
accessing, 77
creating reserved space, 78
exiting, 82
minimizing, 82
not enough space for allocation,
80
removing reserved space, 81
troubleshooting, 82
uninstalling, 84
sound. See audio
speaker-out port, 40
speakers, 22, 34, 40, 59, 109
balance, 23, 35
volume, 22, 35
specifications, 111–15
startup sequences, 102
storage, 29–33
CD-ROM, 30
floppy drive, 30, 31
hard disk, 30
suspend to disk, 24, 53, 76, 97
suspend to disk on critical battery,
98
suspend to memory, 21, 54, 98
system configuration, 89–97
system resource lock, 41
T
technical support, 10
temperature, 2, 43, 48, 104
tilt, 27
time, 90
touchpad, 24–27
configuring, 85
travel, 8
trickle charge, 45
troubleshooting, 104–9
Sleep Manager, 82
turbo mode, 23
Index
U
Universal Serial Bus port, 37
upgrades
hard disk, 73
memory, 70
USB, 64
USB port. See Universal Serial Bus
port
W
weather, 104
web site, 10
when lid is closed, 15, 53, 97
Windows 95 keys, 20
Y
Y-bridge cable, 67
V
volume, 22, 35
Z
zero-volt suspend. See Sleep
Manager; suspend to disk
129