User guide | AC International MTA128ST-USB Network Card User Manual

Model MTA128ST-USB
External ISDN Terminal Adapter
User Guide
User Guide
Model MTA128ST-USB
P/N 88311703 Revision D
Copyright ©1999, by Multi-Tech Systems, Inc.
All rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior expressed written
permission from Multi-Tech Systems, Inc.
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. makes no representations or warranties with respect to the contents hereof and
specifically disclaims any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for any particular purpose. Furthermore,
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. reserves the right to revise this publication and to make changes in the content hereof
without obligation of Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. to notify any person or organization of such revisions or changes.
Record of Revisions
Revision
Date
Description
A
6/21/99
Manual released. All pages at revision A.
B
9/3/99
Deleted the RJ-11 phone cord and added ISDN Configuration Utility diskette
to the shipping list
C
10/5/99
Added !DNn, *!DNn, !ENn, *!ENn At commands and modified S-Register S52
D
5/23/00
Added driver installation procedure for Windows 2000, added procedure for
changing descriptor, deleted references to Multi-Tech’s BBS, updated area
code information, added clarification to V.110 support information and made
minor technical updates.
Trademarks
MultiModemISDN, Multi-Tech, and the Multi-Tech logo are trademarks of Multi-Tech Systems, Inc.
AT&T and 5ESS are registered trademarks of American Telephone and Telegraph.
Microsoft, Windows, Windows 2000, Windows 98, and Windows 95 are registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation.
NETCOM is a registered trademark of NETCOM On-Line Communication Services, Inc.
Netscape and Navigator are trademarks of Netscape Communications Corp.
DMS-100 is a trademark of Northern Telecom.
All other trademarks are owned by their respective companies.
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc.
2205 Woodale Drive
Mounds View, MN 55112 U.S.A
(763) 785-3500 or (800) 328-9717
Fax (763) 785-9874
Technical Support (800) 972-2439
Internet Address http://www.multitech.com
Contents
Chapter 1 - Introduction and Description
Introduction .................................................................................................................................................
Product Description ....................................................................................................................................
Universal Serial Bus (USB) .........................................................................................................................
Manual Organization ...................................................................................................................................
Features .....................................................................................................................................................
Technical Specifications .............................................................................................................................
6
6
6
7
8
9
Chapter 2 - Hardware Installation
Introduction ................................................................................................................................................ 11
Unpacking Your MTA128ST-USB ................................................................................................................ 11
Safety Warning Telecom/ISDN-ST ..............................................................................................................11
Assembling the MTA128ST-USB ................................................................................................................ 12
Connecting the MTA128ST-USB to Your System ....................................................................................... 12
Connecting to Your Computer ..............................................................................................................13
Connecting to Power ............................................................................................................................ 13
Connecting to Your ISDN Network Terminator ......................................................................................13
Connecting to Analog Equipment ........................................................................................................13
LED Indicators ........................................................................................................................................... 14
References ................................................................................................................................................ 15
Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
Introduction ................................................................................................................................................ 17
Installing in Windows 2000 .................................................................................................................. 17
Changing the Modem Descriptor (Windows 2000) ............................................................................... 20
Installing in Windows 98 ...................................................................................................................... 22
Changing the Modem Descriptor (Windows 98) ...................................................................................25
Installing in Windows 95 ...................................................................................................................... 28
Removing Your Old Device from Windows 2000 and Windows 98/95 ................................................... 28
Configuration .............................................................................................................................................. 29
Network Configuration ......................................................................................................................... 29
Call Control Configuration ....................................................................................................................30
ISDN MTA128ST-USB Configuration Utility ................................................................................................ 32
Windows 2000 Dial-Up Networking ............................................................................................................. 33
Windows 98/95 Dial-Up Networking ...........................................................................................................37
AT Commands ........................................................................................................................................... 39
Using AT Commands to Configure the MTA128ST-USB .......................................................................39
Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers
and Result Codes
Introduction ................................................................................................................................................ 41
Entering AT Commands .............................................................................................................................41
AT Commands by Function .................................................................................................................42
Data Call Commands ..........................................................................................................................54
S-Registers ................................................................................................................................................ 56
S-Register Summary ........................................................................................................................... 56
Result Codes ............................................................................................................................................. 71
Using AT Commands to Operate the MTA128ST-USB ............................................................................... 72
Modes of Operation .............................................................................................................................72
Making a Call ............................................................................................................................................. 72
Dialing ................................................................................................................................................. 72
iii
Channel Bundling Flag Dialing ............................................................................................................. 72
Canceling a Call .................................................................................................................................. 73
Storing a Telephone Number ................................................................................................................ 73
Dialing a Stored Telephone Number ..................................................................................................... 73
Displaying a Stored Number ................................................................................................................ 73
Answering a Call ........................................................................................................................................ 73
Answering Manually ............................................................................................................................ 73
Answering Automatically ..................................................................................................................... 73
Hanging Up ................................................................................................................................................ 74
Chapter 5 - Troubleshooting
Introduction ................................................................................................................................................ 76
Chapter 6 - Warranty, Service, and
Technical Support
Introduction ................................................................................................................................................ 82
Limited Warranty .................................................................................................................................. 82
Addendum for North American Products ............................................................................................. 82
Addendum for International Products .................................................................................................. 82
Out of Warranty Repair Costs .............................................................................................................. 83
On-line Warranty Registration .............................................................................................................. 83
Software User License Agreement ............................................................................................................. 83
Technical Support ...................................................................................................................................... 85
Contacting Technical Support .............................................................................................................. 85
Service ................................................................................................................................................ 85
Ordering Accessories ................................................................................................................................ 86
Upgrading the MTA128ST-USB with FlashWizard ...................................................................................... 87
Using FlashWizard to Upgrade Firmware ............................................................................................. 87
Appendixes
Appendix A: Regulatory Compliance .......................................................................................................... 89
Class B Statement .............................................................................................................................. 89
FCC Part 15 ........................................................................................................................................ 89
Industry Canada .................................................................................................................................. 89
EMC, Safety, and Terminal Directive Compliance ................................................................................ 89
Appendix B: Configuration Profiles ............................................................................................................. 90
Quick Setup Factory Profiles ..................................................................................................................... 90
Quick Setup Example ......................................................................................................................... 90
Glossary .................................................................................................................................................... 94
Index ........................................................................................................................................................ 104
iv
Chapter 1 - Introduction and Description
MultiModemISDN User Guide
Introduction
Welcome to the world of data communications. You have acquired one of the finest ISDN terminal
adapters (TA) available today from one of America’s oldest and most respected modem
manufacturers: Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. This user guide will help you install, configure, test and use
your terminal adapter.
Product Description
The MTA128ST-USB is a desktop terminal adapter with an ST port used for connection to an ISDN
network, a USB port for connection to a PC or laptop, and an analog port to connect to a telephone,
modem, or fax machine. It ships with a software configuration utility for Windows® 2000 and Windows
98/95. In addition, the MTA128ST-USB accepts AT commands that enable it to use the same
communications software as an analog modem.
USB
ISDN
Modem
TD
with
Analog
RD
Port
LS
B1
B2
TR
OH
128
P1
P2
Figure 1-1: MTA128ST-USB (Front View)
The MTA128ST-USB is compatible with the popular EuroISDN switch protocol, it communicates using
ISDN BRI (2B+D) service, which provides up to 128 Kbps data and voice communications, and it
automatically detects whether an incoming call is voice or data and handles it appropriately.
Universal Serial Bus (USB)
Universal Serial Bus (USB), defined by a consortium of industry leaders, permits connection of
multiple low-speed and medium speed computer peripheral devices such as telephones, modems,
printers, keyboards, mice, and scanners; all from a single personal computer port. The specification,
based on open architecture has become a standard feature in new desktop and notebook computers.
For more details, refer to the USB Public Web Board on the World Wide Web at:
http://www.usb.org/
6
Chapter 1 - Introduction and Description
Manual Organization
This manual is divided into six chapters and two appendixes:
Chapter 1: Introduction and Description—Summarizes product features, lists technical
specifications, and provides an overview of the manual’s organization.
Chapter 2: Hardware Installation—Describes how to connect the MTA128ST-USB to the computer, to
power, to the ISDN BRI line, and to an optional analog device. It also describes the functions of the
front panel LED indicators.
Chapter 3: Software Installation and Configuration —Describes how to install the driver software
and how to configure and operate the MTA128ST-USB using the Windows 2000/98/95 software
configuration utility.
Chapter 4: AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes—Describes how to use AT commands,
S-registers, and result codes to control the MTA128ST-USB through popular communications
programs.
Chapter 5: Troubleshooting—Provides tips and advice for troubleshooting your MTA128ST-USB if
you think it isn’t working correctly.
Chapter 6: Warranty, Service, and Technical Support—Provides terms of your warranty, describes
how to upgrade your unit using the FlashWizard utility, and describes how to get technical support via
telephone and the Internet.
Appendix A: Regulatory Compliance—EMC, Safety, and Terminal Directive Compliance.
Appendix B: Configuration Profiles—Describes how to use the Quick Setup Factory Profiles stored
in the MTA128ST-USB’s firmware and lists contents of each profile.
7
MultiModemISDN User Guide
Features
The MTA128ST-USB communicates over public ISDN telephone lines. Features include:
•
Compatibility with EuroISDN (ETSI/DSS1/NET3), French VN4, and Japanese INS64 switch
protocols
•
USB interface for easy installation; hot-swappable (Windows 2000 and Windows 98) with other
USB devices without restarting or reconfiguring your PC
•
Compatibility with U.S. NI-1, AT&T 5ESS, and DMS-100 switch protocols
•
Compatibility with V.110*, V.120, ML-PPP, and X.75 protocols
•
ISDN BRI (2B+D) and analog ports
•
USB port (Type B)
•
Support of PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol) for high speed ISDN connections
•
Tone detection to allow use of a standard telephone for ISDN line access (an ISDN telephone
is not required)
•
Automatic detection of incoming calls as voice or data
•
Windows 2000 and Windows 98/95 software utility for easy ISDN line configuration
•
AT commands, S-registers, and result codes
•
Ability to use the same communications software as analog modems
•
Flash memory for easy firmware upgrades
* The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available.
8
Chapter 1 - Introduction and Description
Technical Specifications
Your MTA128ST-USB terminal adapter meets the following specifications:
Trade Name
MultiModemISDN
Model Number
MTA128ST-USB (International)
Network Interface
Four-wire S/T interface
Switch Compatibility
EuroISDN (ETSI/DSS1/NET3), VN4, INS64, U.S. NI-1, AT&T 5ESS,
DMS-100
B-Channel Protocols
V.110*, V.120, X.75, ML-PPP
Voice Coding
PCM: A-Law (Europe); µ-Law (US)
LED Indicators
10 front panel LED indicators: Transmit Data, Receive Data, Call Status,
B1 Active, B2 Active, Terminal Ready, Off Hook (AUX port), 128 Kbps,
P1 Active (data protocol), P2 Active (data protocol)
Data Connections
Two ISDN B-channels
One ISDN D-channel
One analog port for connecting a standard telephone, modem, or fax
machine
Command Interface
AT commands, S-registers, result codes,
Windows 2000/98/95 configuration utility, and
Windows 2000/98/95 Dial-Up Networking (DUN)
Connectors
USB: Type B connector
ISDN: RJ-45 female receptacle, 4-wire S/T (accepts connection cable
to the network provider’s NT1 device)
AUX: RJ-11 female receptacle
Switches
Two-position power switch
Power Requirements
Two-prong outlet-mounted transformer (included), 240 VAC
50/60 Hz
Dimensions
15.0 cm × 10.7 cm × 2.8 cm (L × W × D)
Environmental
Temperature range 0°–50° C;
Humidity range 20–90% (noncondensing)
Power Consumption
4 watts
Weight
224 g (8 oz)
Warranty
5 years
* The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available.
9
Chapter 2 - Hardware Installation
Chapter 2 - Hardware Installation
Introduction
This chapter details the contents of the MTA128ST-USB shipping container, describes each cable
connection, and describes the LED indicators.
Unpacking Your MTA128ST-USB
The shipping box contains the MTA128ST-USB, an external power supply, one RJ-45 line cord, one
USB cable, your Quick Start Guide, and three diskettes (i.e., MTA128ST-USB User Guide,
MTA128ST-USB Driver Software, and ISDN Configuration Utility). Inspect the contents for signs of
any shipping damage. If damage is observed, do not power up the unit; contact Multi-Tech’s
Technical Support for advice (refer to Chapter 6). If no damage is observed, place the MTA128STUSB in its final location and refer to “Assembling the MTA128ST-USB” in the next section.
Four USB V.90 Modems
USB
Quick Start Guide
ISDN
Modem
TD
MADE
IN U.S
.A
with Analog
RD
Port
LS
B1
B2
TR
OH
128
P1
P2
U.S.A
MADE IN
Figure 2-1. Unpacking
Safety Warning Telecom/ISDN-ST
1. Never install telephone wiring during a lighting storm.
2. Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically designed for wet
locations.
3. This product is to be used with CE approved/marked computers.
4. Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been
disconnected at the network interface.
5. Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.
6. Avoid using a telephone (other than a cordless type) during an electrical storm. There may be a
remote risk of electrical shock from lightning.
7. Do not use the telephone to report a gas leak in the vicinity of the leak.
8. To reduce the risk of fire, use only No. 26 AWG or larger telecommunication line cord.
9. If S/T - interface ISDN network connection cable is used, the ISDN phone cord
should be connected between the ISDN network connection cable and a NT1 device.
11
MultiModem ISDN User Guide
Assembling the MTA128ST-USB
The only assembly required is to mount the feet on the bottom of your unit (See Figure 2-2). Peel the
four self-adhesive plastic feet off the backing strip and press them into the recesses on the bottom of
the MTA128ST-USB.
Figure 2-2. Mounting the Feet
Connecting the MTA128ST-USB to Your System
Place the MTA128ST-USB terminal adapter in a convenient location. In a typical configuration, you will
need to connect your MTA128ST-USB to your computer’s USB port, to its own power supply, to the
ISDN network terminator, and to any optional analog equipment you are using (e.g., a telephone). Each
cabling procedure is shown in Figure 2-3.
POWER
USB
PHONE
ISDN
Figure 2-3. MTA128ST-USB Connections
12
Chapter 2 - Hardware Installation
Connecting to Your Computer
1. Plug the 4-pin flat end (Type A) into a USB port connector on your computer or laptop.
Note: Do NOT plug the “D-shaped” end (Type B) of the USB cable into the USB connector on the back
panel of the MTA128ST-USB at this time. You will be directed to make the connection when installing the
software drivers.
Connecting to Power
1. Plug the power supply into the unit’s POWER connector.
2. Plug the power supply into a live AC outlet.
3. Turn on the unit by sliding the power switch to ON.
4. Verify operation by observing the LED indicators on the front panel. The LEDs will initially flash in
a self-test pattern, then the LS LED remains on. (See LED descriptions on the next page.) If the
terminal adapter does not appear to be working, see Chapter 5 for troubleshooting help.
Caution: Only use the power supply shipped with your MTA128ST-USB; any other power supply could
damage the unit and void its warranty.
Connecting to Your ISDN Network Terminator
1. If you need a longer line cord than the RJ-45 line cord provided with your MTA128ST-USB, select a
cord that is wired straight through (pin 1 to pin 1; pin 2 to pin 2, etc.) with at least the middle four
pins connected (pins 2, 3, 4, and 5).
2. Plug one end of the provided RJ-45 S/T line cord into the ISDN jack on the MTA128ST-USB and
the other end into the S/T jack on your network terminator.
Note: The AUX jack and ISDN jack are not interchangeable.
Connecting to Analog Equipment
You can connect an analog device such as an analog telephone, modem, or fax machine to the unit.
Simply plug a modular RJ-11 telephone cord into the RJ-11 AUX connector.
Note: The AUX jack and the ISDN jack on the unit are not interchangeable.
13
MultiModem ISDN User Guide
LED Indicators
The ten LED indicators on the front panel (see Figure 2-4) of the MTA128ST-USB report status and
line activity.
USB ISDN Modem with Analog Port
TD
RD
LS
B1
B2
TR
OH
128
P1
P2
Figure 2-4: Front Panel
TD
Transmit Data
Flashes when data is being transmitted (on for a space, off for a mark).
RD
Receive Data
Flashes when data is being received (on for a space, off for a mark).
LS
Power
Lights when the unit is turned on.
B1
Bearer Channel 1 (B1)
When lit, indicates active data or voice connection on bearer channel 1.
B2
Bearer Channel 2 (B2)
When lit, indicates active data or voice connection on bearer channel 2.
TR
Terminal Ready
Lights to indicate that the computer is communicating with the MTA128STUSB, so the MTA128ST-USB can answer an incoming call.
OH
Off Hook
Lights when analog equipment on AUX port is active or off-hook.
128
128 Kbps
Lights to indicate that the B channels have been multiplexed into a single
128 Kbps communications link.
14
Chapter 2 - Hardware Installation
P1
Data Protocol
Lights in combination with P2 and 128 LEDs to indicate which data protocol
(V.110 [build MTA128ST-USB only] , V.120, X.75, PPP, MLPPP) is in use as shown in the
table below.
P2
Data Protocol
Lights in combination with P1 and 128 LEDs to indicate which data protocol
(V.110*, V.120, X.75, PPP, MLPPP) is in use as shown
below:
Data Protocol
128 LED
P1 LED
P2 LED
V.110
V.120
X.75
PPP (1 channel)
MLPPP (2 channels)
OFF
ON
* The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available.
References
The World Wide Web is an excellent source of information about terminal adapters, terminal adapter
installation, configuration, and troubleshooting. The following Web sites are good places to start:
•
Costmo’s Other Resources Page:
http://modems.rosenet.net/or/
•
Data Communications FAQ:
http://www.best.com/~malch/comfaq.html
•
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc.:
http://www.multitech.com/
15
Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
Introduction
This chapter describes how to install the MTA128ST-USB driver software and discusses how to
configure the unit to match your ISDN service and remote terminal adapter (TA). MTA128ST-USB driver
software is installed in Windows 2000, Windows 98, and Windows 95 operating environments.
Installing in Windows 2000
1. Power up your Windows 2000 system.
2. Turn on your MTA128ST-USB. The LS (Power) LED will light.
3. Plug the “D-shaped” end (Type B) of your USB cable into the USB connector on the back of the
unit (See Figure 2-3).
4. Windows will detect that the new modem is present and launch the Found New Hardware
Wizard.
Place the Installation diskette provided with your modem into your floppy drive and click Next >
to proceed with the installation.
5. The Install Hardware Device Drivers dialog box displays.
Verify that the “Search for a suitable driver for my device (recommended)” option is selected and
click Next >.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
6. The Locate Driver Files dialog box displays.
Verify that the “Floppy disk drives” option is selected and click Next >.
7. If the Digital Signature Not Found dialog box displays,
click Yes to continue.
8. The Found New Hardware Wizard asking you to insert the installation diskette displays.
In the Copy manufacturer’s files from: box, use the browse button to find A:\Win2k, or type
A:\Win2k in the box. Make certain that the installation diskette is in drive A:\ and click OK.
18
Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
9. The Driver Files Search Results dialog box displays.
Windows indicates it has found the device drivers and is ready to copy them to your computer.
Click Next >.
10. Windows copies the files to your computer and then displays the Completing the Found New
Hardware Wizard dialog box.
Click Finish to complete installation and exit the wizard.
Note: Click My Computer | Properties | Device Manager to verify that the driver software has been
installed.
19
MultiModemISDN User Guide
Changing the Modem Descriptor (Windows 2000)
The following procedure describes how you can change the description of the terminal adapter. The
default descriptor is MTA128ST-USB CDC ML-PPP.
Note: If you need assistance, contact Multi-Tech’s Technical Support group.
1. Click Start | Settings | Control Panel | System to display the System Properties dialog box.
2. Click the Hardware tab.
3. Select the Device Manager option to display the Device Manager screen.
4. Expand the modem list and highlight the default descriptor - MTA128ST-USB CDC ML-PPP.
5. With the MTA128ST-USB CDC ML-PPP entry still highlighted, right-click and select the
Properties button.
6. Click the Driver tab.
7. The MTA128ST-USB CDC ML-PPP Properties dialog box displays.
Click the Update Driver button.
8. The Upgrade Device Driver Wizard dialog box displays.
Click Next >.
20
Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
9. The Install Hardware Device Drivers dialog box displays.
Select “Display a list of the known drivers for this device ...” and then click Next >.
10. The Install New Modem dialog box displays.
Select the appropriate descriptor (e.g., MTA128ST-USB
CDC V.120 async) and click Next >.
11. The Start Device Driver Installation dialog box displays.
Click Next > to start the device driver installation.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
12. If the Digital Signature Not Found screen displays, click Yes to continue the installation.
13.The Completing the Upgrade Device Driver Wizard dialog box displays.
Click Finish.
14. The Properties dialog box displays. Click Close and then close all remaining screens.
Installing in Windows 98
1. Power up your Windows 98 system.
2. Turn on your MTA128ST-USB. The LS (Power) LED will light.
3. Plug the “D-shaped” end (Type B) of your USB cable into the USB connector on the back of the
unit (See Figure 2-3).
4. Windows will detect that the new modem is present and launch the Add New Hardware Wizard.
Place the Installation diskette provided with your modem into your floppy drive and click Next > to
proceed with the installation.
22
Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
5. The Add New Hardware Wizard dialog box displays.
Verify that the “Search for the best driver for your device. (Recommended)” option is selected and
click Next >.
6. The Add New Hardware Wizard dialog box displays.
Verify that “Specify a location” is selected. Type A:\Win95_98 in the box and click Next >.
7. The Add New Hardware Wizard dialog box displays.
Windows selects the proper driver from the installation disk and displays the information for
verification. Click Next > to install the selected driver.
23
MultiModemISDN User Guide
8. Windows proceeds to copy the files to the system and then displays the Add New Hardware
Wizard dialog box, indicating that Windows has finished installing the software.
Click Finish to complete the installation and exit the wizard.
Note: Click My Computer | Properties | Device Manager to verify that the driver software has been
installed.
24
Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
Changing the Modem Descriptor (Windows 98)
The following procedure describes how you can change the description of the terminal adapter. The
default descriptor is MTA128ST-USB ML-PPP.
Note: If you need assistance, contact Multi-Tech’s Technical Support group.
1. Click Start | Settings | Control Panel | System to display the System Properties dialog box.
2. Select the Device Manager option to display the Device Manager screen.
3. Expand the modem list and highlight the default descriptor - MTA128ST-USB ML-PPP.
4. With the MTA128ST-USB ML-PPP entry still highlighted, right-click and select the Properties
button.
5. Click the Driver tab.
6. The MTA128ST-USB ML-PPP Properties dialog box displays.
Click the Update Driver button.
7. The Update Device Driver Wizard dialog box displays.
Click Next >.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
8. The Update Device Driver Wizard dialog box displays.
Select “Display a list of all the drivers in a specific location, ...” and then click Next >.
9. The Upgrade Device Driver Wizard dialog box displays.
Select the appropriate descriptor (e.g., MTA128ST-USB
V.120 async) and click Next >.
10. The Update Driver Warning screen displays. Click Yes to continue the installation.
26
Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
11. The Update Device Driver Wizard dialog box displays indicating that it is ready to install the
selected driver.
Click Next > to begin installation.
12. Once installtion is completed, the Update Device Driver Wizard dialog box displays, indicating
Windows has finished installing the drivers.
Click Finish.
14. The Properties dialog box displays. Click Close and then close all remaining screens.
27
MultiModemISDN User Guide
Installing in Windows 95
Only certain versions of Windows 95 (OSR2.1, Revision C) offer support for USB peripherals. If you
are unsure if your Windows 95 system supports USB, a free USB evaluation utility is available from
the Shopping Bag page at http://www.usb.org/shopping_bag.html. Down-load the utility (287K) and run
the .exe application to determine if you have USB support.
If you would like to install your MTA128ST-USB in Windows 95, do the following:
1. Power up your Windows 95 system.
2. Turn on your MTA128ST-USB. The LS (Power) LED will light.
3. Plug the “D-shaped” end (Type B) of your USB cable into the USB connector on the back of the
unit (See Figure 2-3).
4. Windows will detect that the new modem is present and launch the Update Device Driver Wizard.
Click Next > to proceed with the installation.
5. Windows searches for the driver on A:\ and, when identified, will display the driver name for
verification. Click Finish to install the driver.
6. Windows prompts you to insert a diskette. Insert it and click OK to continue. The Copy Files ...
dialog box is displayed. In the Copy files from field, type A:\Win95_98 and click OK.
7. When the driver is installed, a completion message will appear and the wizard will exit. At this
time your installation is complete.
Note: At some point, you may need to change the modem descriptor. Follow the procedure described in
Changing the Modem Descriptor (Windows 98).
Removing Your Old Device from Windows 2000 and Windows 98/
95
When your new MTA128ST-USB replaces another terminal adapter, the old installation remains in
Windows 2000 and Windows 98/95 after you install the new device, and the old device is still
selected in HyperTerminal and other Windows 2000 and Windows 98/95 applications. Although you
can change the application connection descriptions one at a time, it is easier to force Windows
applications to use the new device by removing the old modem from Windows.
1. Click Start | Settings | Control Panel.
2. For Windows 98/95 users, double-click the Modems icon to display the Modems Properties
dialog box.
For Windows 2000 users, click the Phone and Modem icon to display the Phone and Modem
Options dialog box, then click the Modems tab.
3. In the list box, select (highlight) the device to be deleted.
4. Click Remove and then click Close to remove the device from your system.
5. The next time you dial a HyperTerminal connection, it will select your new device and ask you to
confirm the selection.
28
Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
Configuration
Run the ISDN MTA128ST-USB configuration utility for North American customized ISDN settings.
Note: For Europe, run the configuration utility to customize the settings of the terminal adapter such as
configuring Multiple Subscriber Numbers (MSNs).
Configure the unit to match your ISDN service and the remote terminal adapter (TA) with any of three
methods listed below:
•
ISDN MTA128ST-USB Configuration Utility
This configuration utility is recommended for computers running Windows 2000/98/95
operating systems. Because it is a software-based utility, you can use it to create and store
as many configurations as you want.
•
Windows 2000/98/95 Dial-Up Networking
Dial-Up Networking (DUN) allows systems using Windows 2000/98/95 to easily configure a
modem connection to another computer or network system.
•
AT Commands
If you prefer using AT commands or want to fine tune the operation of your unit, configure
your unit by using AT commands and S-registers much as you would configure an analog
modem. Enter these commands in your data communication program’s terminal mode. AT
commands are described in detail in your on-line User Guide.
Whatever method you use to configure your MTA128ST-USB, complete the following Network
Configuration planning sheets before beginning the configuration process. Refer to the planning sheets
during the configuration procedure.
Network Configuration
Network Switch Type _____________________________
Select the network switch type your ISDN service provider uses at its local central office. You can set
the MTA128ST-USB to NET3 (DSS1), VN4, INS64, U.S. NI-1, AT&T 5ESS, or DMS-100. If you don’t
know the switch type, get the information from your ISDN service provider. AT command: !C0=
Data TEI ________________________________________
Data TEI (Terminal Endpoint Identifier) is the TEI assigned to the data channel. You can select Auto
TEI, a fixed TEI, or Disable. A TEI is a number used by the central office switch to uniquely identify
each device connected to the network. When it uses dynamic TEI assignments (Auto TEI), the
central office switch assigns a TEI each time the unit connects to the network. However, the ISDN
service provider may assign a fixed TEI at subscription time, in which case you must configure the
unit with the fixed TEI number. You can also disable the channel, which may be useful when multiple
units are attached to a network terminator bus. AT command: !D3=
Voice TEI ___________________________________
Voice TEI is the TEI assigned to the voice channel. Choices are: Auto TEI, a fixed TEI number, or
Disable. AT command: *!D3=
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
Data MSN ___________________________________
The Data MSN (Multiple Subscriber Number) allows a caller to specify an individual MTA128ST-USB
when more than one unit is connected to your network terminator. If you don’t assign a value to the
MSN, the unit accepts all incoming calls. If you only assign a base address to the MSN, the unit
accepts any incoming call with the same base address, regardless of whether a subaddress is
included. If you assign a base address and a subaddress to the MSN, the unit only accepts calls that
match both the base address and the subaddress. The following examples show the syntax for setting
the MSN with and without a subaddress. AT command: !N1=
MSN with subaddress: AT!N1=5551000:001 (base address is 5551000; subaddress is 001)
MSN without subaddress: AT!N1=5551000 (base address is 5551000)
Voice MSN __________________________________
Selects calls on the voice channel in the same way the Data MSN selects calls on the data channel.
AT command: *!N1=
SPIDs and DNs ______________________________
For use with North American switches, the Service Profile Identifier (SPID) must be configured in the
MTA128ST-USB. The SPID is assigned by the local phone company and is for the specific BRI line
where the unit is attached. The SPID field is empty prior to configuration.
AT commands: AT!C6= and AT*!C6=
Directory Number (DN) is the phone number another user calls to contact this unit once it is attached
to the ISDN.
AT commands: AT!N1= and AT*!N1=
Note: SPIDs and DNs are used only by the U.S. NI-1, AT&T 5ESS, and DMS-100 switch types.
Call Control Configuration
Persistent DTR Dialing _______________________
A high DTR (Data Terminal Ready) signal on the USB port indicates your computer or terminal is ready
to communicate with your MTA128ST-USB. DTR normally goes high when a communication program
starts or is ready to dial. Persistent DTR dialing enables the unit to automatically redial the number
stored in memory location 0 whenever DTR is high and the serial port does not have an active call.
You can enable or disable this feature. AT command: $D
Auto Answer Data Calls __________
Rings to Answer ___________
Select Auto Answer if you want your MTA128ST-USB to automatically answer all incoming data calls
(this option does not affect the analog port). The Rings to Answer number, in the range of 1 to 255,
selects the number of rings the unit waits before answering an incoming call. The default is one ring.
AT command: S0=
Dialing Method _____________________________
Select either the Enbloc or the Overlap dialing method for use when establishing a data call. Your
ISDN provider determines the dialing method. The Enbloc method is used for most ISDN dialing;
however, you can select the overlap method if you are working with a private network. AT command:
%A97=
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Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
Data Protocol ________________________________
The data protocol, also known as the B-channel protocol and the rate adaption protocol, is the
language spoken over each 64 Kbps channel between two ISDN devices. The devices on both ends of
the ISDN link must use identical protocols. AT command: !Z=
•
V.110 Protocol*—Used to connect slower, pre-ISDN communications devices to high-speed
ISDN lines. It handles rates up to only 38400 bps and is used mostly in Europe. The devices
on both ends of the link must be set to identical rates. However, the MTA128ST-USB (by
default) is able to adapt to the network rate of a received V.110 call even though it has S76 or
$MB set to a different network rate.
* The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available.
•
V.120 Protocol—Similar to V.110 protocol, but provides rates up to 64000 bps on each B
channel.
•
X.75 Protocol—Packet-switched network protocol for international use. Layer 2 portion of
this protocol is used commonly as a rate adaption protocol.
•
MLPPP Protocol—MLPPP (Multi-Link PPP) protocol provides rates up to 64 Kbps per
channel. This protocol uses both B channels at once, providing an aggregate data
transmission speed of 128 Kbps.
Dialing Numbers _____________________________
The MTA128ST-USB can dial telephone number n, where n can be up to 20 characters. AT
command: Dn (n = phone number)
Stored Numbers _____________________________
The MTA128ST-USB can store as many as ten phone numbers, up to 20 characters each. AT
command: &Z=
Dialing Stored Numbers _______________________
The MTA128ST-USB can dial a number previously stored in directory number n with the &Zn=x
command. AT command: DSn
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
ISDN MTA128ST-USB Configuration Utility
Use the ISDN MTA128ST-USB Configuration Utility with computers running Windows 2000/98/95
operating systems only. Because it is a software utility, you can use it to create and store as many
different configurations as you wish.
To Install in Windows 2000/98/95
1. When installing from disk, insert the Setup disk (provided in your MTA128ST-USB package) into
drive A or B. If installing from a network location, connect to it. (Note the drive letter. You may
need it if you run Setup again.)
2. Click Start | Settings | Control Panel.
3. Double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon.
4. For Windows 98/95 users, click Install on the Install/Uninstall tab.
For Windows 2000 users, click the Add New Programs icon.
5. Follow the instructions that appear on screen.
To Use the ISDN MTA128ST-USB Configuration Utility
1. To start the utility, click Start | Programs, and then double-click the ISDN MTA128ST-USB
Configuration Utility icon. The ISDN TA Configuration Wizard displays.
Select the type of Setup (e.g., Express (Existing), Configuration (e.g., EuroISDN), and then click
Next >. Follow the instructions provided in each succeeding dialog box.
2. Refer to the “Network Configuration” planning sheets completed in the previous section as you
configure the unit. If you have questions about choices in a dialog box, click Help.
3. When you finish configuring the MTA128ST-USB, exit the configuration utility.
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Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
Windows 2000 Dial-Up Networking
The following instructions describe all Dial-Up Networking connection options under Windows 2000 as
well as guide you through setting up a Dial-up Networking connection to an Internet Service Provider
(ISP).
Note: If you are connecting to the Internet, make sure TCP/IP is installed on your computer and that you’ve set
up an access account with an Internet Service Provider.
1.
To set up a Dial-Up Networking connection within Windows 2000, select
Start | Settings | Network and Dial-up Connections.
2.
In the Network and Dial-up Connections dialog box, double-click the Make New Connection
icon. The Network Connection Wizard dialog box is displayed indicating the Wizard will help in
creating a connection to other computers and networks enabling applications such as e-mail,
web browsing, file sharing and printing.
Click Next>.
3.
The Network Connection Type dialog box is displayed offering several connection options.
Select the option which best describes the type of connection you are creating with this definition.
Click Next>.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
The process for completing your Dial-Up Networking connection will vary based on the connection type
selected in the previous step.
If you select Dial-up to private network and have only one modem installed:
a.
The Phone Number to Dial dialog box is displayed. Enter the phone number of the
computer, network or Internet Service Provider (ISP) to which you are connecting. Click
Next>.
b. The Connection Availability dialog box is displayed. If you are creating this connection for
multiple users, select Create this connection for all users. If this connection will be used
only by you, select Create this connection only for myself. Click Next> to continue.
c.
The Completing the Network Connection Wizard dialog box is displayed. You are
prompted for a name to use for this connection. Enter a meaningful name in the box
provided, then click Finish.
If you select Dial-up to the Internet, the Welcome to the Internet Connection Wizard is displayed
as shown below.
a.
Select the appropriate option for the type of connection you are making to the Internet and
click Next>. In this example, “I want to set up my Internet connection manually, or I want to
connect through a local area network (LAN)” was selected.
b. The Setting up your Internet connection dialog box is displayed. Select I connect
through a phone line and modem. Click Next>.
c.
If you have only one modem installed, proceed to the next step. If you have more than one
modem installed on your computer, select your Multi-Tech System’s modem from the list
and click Next>.
d. The Step 1 of 3: Internet account connection information dialog box is displayed. Enter
the Area code, Telephone number and Country/region name and code for your Internet
Service Provider’s access number.
e. Click the Advanced tab to access options for selecting your connection type and logon
procedures. Your ISP should provide this information for your account. If you are not sure
which connection type to choose, try PPP.
Although many ISPs automatically provide an IP address for your machine and their Domain
Name Server (DNS) each time you connect to them, some ISPs do not. If your ISP provided
IP addresses to you, click the Addresses tab. In the IP Address
section, select Always
use the following:, and enter the IP addresses into the appropriate boxes. Click OK to
return to Step 1 of 3: Internet account connection, and click Next>.
Note: If your machine has a network adapter installed, do not enter this address in the address box.
Enter the IP address provided by your ISP.
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Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
f.
The Step 2 of 3: Internet account logon information dialog box is displayed. Enter the user
name and password you will use for your Internet account. Click Next>.
g.
The Step 3 of 3: Configuring your computer dialog box is displayed. In the box provided,
enter a descriptive name for this connection and click Next >.
h. You are then asked if you would like to set up an Internet mail account. You may select Yes
or No. If you select yes, you will be asked to provide specific information about your mail
service. In this example, No is selected. Click Next>.
i.
The Completing the Internet Connection Wizard is displayed. Click Finish.
If you select Connect to a private network through the Internet:
a. In the box provided, enter the Host name or IP address belonging to the computer to which
you are calling. Contact the network administrator for the device to which you are connecting
to obtain this information. Click Next>.
b. The Connection Availability dialog box is displayed. If you are creating this connection for
multiple users, select Create this connection for all users. If this connection will be used
only by you, select Create this connection only for myself. Click Next> to continue.
c.
The Completing the Network Connection Wizard dialog box is displayed. You are prompted
for a name to use for this connection. Enter a meaningful name in the box provided. Click
Finish.
If you select Accept incoming connections:
This option allows another computer to create a virtual connection to your computer through the
Internet, other public network or a direct cable. Virtual Private connections to your computer through
the Internet are possible only if your computer has a known name or IP address on the Internet.
a. The Devices for Incoming Connections dialog box is displayed. Select your Multi-Tech
System modem and click Next>.
b. At the Incoming Virtual Private Connection dialog box, select either Allow virtual private
connection or Do not allow virtual private connection.
c.
The Allowed Users dialog box is displayed. Next, you can Add or Delete users you will
allow to connect to this device. Click Next>.
d. In the Networking Components dialog box, select the boxes next to the name of each
component you want to enable for incoming connections. Click Next>.
e. The Completing the Network Connection Wizard dialog box is displayed. In the box
provided, enter a meaningful name for this connection and click Finish.
If you select Connect directly to another computer:
This connection option is designed to allow a connection between two computers using a serial,
parallel or infrared port.
a. The Host or Guest dialog box is displayed. Select the role you’d like for this computer.
Select Host if this computer has the information you want to access. Select Guest if this
computer will be used to access information on the Host computer.
b.
If you select Host, you will be presented with the Connection Device dialog box. Select the
device from the list. After installing the device through the Wizard, you may configure the
connection properties by right clicking on the icon for this connection and selecting
Properties. Upon completion, click Next>.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
The Allowed Users dialog box is displayed. Select the check box next to the name of each
user you want to allow to connect to this computer. Click Next>.
c.
If you select Guest, the Select a Device dialog box is displayed. Select the COM port you’d
like to use for this connection from the list. Click Next>.
d. The Connection Availability dialog box is displayed. If you are creating this connection for
multiple users, select Create this connection for all users. If this connection will be used
only by you, select Create this connection only for myself. Click Next> to continue.
e. The Competing the Network Connection Wizard dialog box is displayed. You are
prompted for a name to use for this connection. Enter a meaningful name in the field
provided and click Finish.
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Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
Windows 98/95 Dial-Up Networking
Windows 98/95 includes a remote-node client called Dial-Up Networking (DUN). Before beginning,
make certain Dial-Up Networking and TCP/IP are installed on your computer.
1.
To begin your set up:
a. In Windows 95, Click Start | Programs | Accessories |
Dial-Up Networking.
b. In Windows 98, Click Start | Programs | Accessories |
Communications | Dial-Up Networking.
2. If this is the first time you have set up a connection with Dial-Up Networking, the Welcome to
Dial-Up Networking Wizard dialog box is displayed. If the Wizard does not display, double-click
the Make New Connection icon to display the Make New Connection dialog box.
3.
The Make New Connection dialog box displays. Enter a descriptive name for this connection. In
the Select a device: list box, select your Multi-Tech System modem from the list.
Click Next>.
4.
The Make New Connection dialog box displays. Enter the Area code, Telephone number and
Country code for the computer you will be calling with this connection (your ISP’s access phone
number).
Click Next>.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
5.
The Make New Connection dialog box displays indicating you have created a new Dial-Up
connection.
Click Finish.
6.
From the Dial-Up Networking folder, right click on the Dial-Up Connection just created and select
Properties to open the Modem Properties dialog box.
7.
The Modem Properties dialog box displays. Click the Server Types tab to display the server
property sheet. Select the appropriate Server Type, Log on options, and protocol selections for
the device to which you are connecting (e.g., your ISP).
Click OK.
8.
38
If your ISP requires you to enter IP addresses for their server or DNS (Domain Name Server),
click the TCP/IP Settings button.
Chapter 3 - Software Installation and Configuration
9.
The TCP/IP Settings dialog box displays.
If your ISP provided you with an IP address for your computer, select Specify an IP address and
enter the static address in the box provided. If your ISP requires you to enter an IP address for
their name server (DNS), select Specify name server addresses and enter the IP addresses
given to you by your ISP. Click OK to save the TCP/IP values and return to the Server Types
tab.
When you have completed customizing the modem properties for this connection, click OK.
To use this connection, double-click the Dial-Up Connection icon within the Dial-Up Networking
folder. If prompted, enter your Internet account User Name and Password and click Connect.
AT Commands
You can configure the MTA128ST-USB using AT commands, just as you would configure an analog
modem. Use this method if you prefer to work with AT commands or if you have a special requirement
not addressed by the configuration utilities or Dial-Up Networking.
Using AT Commands to Configure the MTA128ST-USB
1. Connect the MTA128ST-USB to the USB port on your PC.
2. Turn on the MTA128ST-USB. Once the drivers are installed, Windows 98/95 will automatically
detect the presence of the MT128ST-USB and activate the associated COM port.
3. Start a data communication program and select the COM port where the MTA128ST-USB is
connected.
4. Referring to the Configuration section, enter the desired AT commands in the terminal window of
the data communications program.
5. When you finish making changes, use the &W command to save and automatically load the
configuration when the MTA128ST-USB is turned on.
6. Quit the data communications program.
For more information on AT commands, refer Chapter 4.
39
Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers
and Result Codes
Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Introduction
One of the ways you can communicate with and configure your MTA128ST-USB is to use AT
commands. AT commands are so-called because, with only a few exceptions, each command string
begins with the characters AT. Using AT commands, you can read and set parameters, and perform
actions such as dialing.
Note: For purposes of brevity, the MTA128ST-USB is referred to as the TA (terminal adapter) throughout this
chapter.
Entering AT Commands
If your MTA128ST-USB (TA) is connected to a computer terminal, you can send AT commands to it by
entering them on the keyboard. If the TA is connected to a computer, you can send AT commands to it
by typing them in the terminal window of a data communications program such as HyperTerminal. You
can also send some AT commands indirectly by configuring your data communications program.
To enter AT commands, use the following format: AT <command string> <cr>. The characters AT
cause the TA to interpret the following string as a command. The command string consists of one or
more commands. The carriage return character, <cr>, sends the command string to the TA. If you are
entering a command string in your communication program’s terminal window, insert the carriage
return character by pressing the ENTER key on your keyboard. If configuring a communications
program, you typically must insert the carriage return character by adding ^M to the end of the
command string.
The TA has three modes of operation: off-line command mode (the default state), on-line command
mode, and data mode. The TA responds to AT commands only when it is in one of the command
modes. After the TA establishes a connection and goes on-line in data mode, it interprets any further
characters you enter as data rather than as commands and transmits them to the remote device.
When the TA is in data mode, you can switch it to on-line command mode by sending it an escape
sequence. The TA responds to two types of escape sequences:
•
In-band where the escape sequence is part of the data stream.
The in-band escape sequence is +++AT<cr>. To change the in-band escape character (+),
change the value in register S2.
•
Out-of-band where the escape sequence is outside the data stream. The out-of-band escape
sequence is <break >AT<cr>. You can send the break signal in the out-of-band escape
sequence only from software, not by pressing SHIFT+BREAK on your keyboard.
When it detects the escape sequence, the TA enters on-line command mode where it responds to
commands while maintaining the connection with the remote device.
The TA’s command buffer can store 80 characters, including spaces and other characters used in
telephone numbers. If you mistype a command string, before you press ENTER, edit it by using the
backspace or the delete key. As you type a command string, it appears on your monitor screen, letting
you verify your input as you type it.
The AT commands recognized by the TA are listed by function in this chapter first in an abbreviated
list, followed by a more detailed list. For an alphabetical list of AT commands, see AT commands in
the index.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
AT Commands by Function
Command Implementation
AT
Return
+++AT<cr>
<break>AT<cr>
Switch
%A97
!C0
!C6
*!C6
!D3
*!D3
!L
>Dn
!DNn
*!DNn
!ENn
*!ENn
!N1
!N2
*!N1
!RXG
!TXG
!Z=n
Attention code
Command execution
In-band escape code
Out-of-band escape code
Configuration
Dialing method
Switch type
Data SPID
Voice SPID
SAPI-0 data TEI
SAPI-0 voice TEI
List DN, SPID, TEI, Data protocol & switch type
Embedded Protocol Analyzer
Disable Data DN/MSN n
Disable Voice DN/MSN n
Enable Data DN/MSN n
Enable Voice DN/MSN n
Data DN/MSN 1
Data DN/MSN 2
Voice DN/MSN
Receive gain
Transmit gain
Rate adaptation protocol
USB Port Configuration
En
Command mode echo
L
List telephone numbers
L5
List current operating parameters
L6
List S-register values
L8
Display ISDN status
Qn
Status displays
Sr=n
Set S-register
Sr?
Read S-register
Vn
Terse/verbose result codes
Xn
Connect messages
Zn
Restore parameters to current power-up profile
&Cn
DCD (Data Carrier Detect) control
&Dn
DTR (Data Terminal Ready) control
&En
Flow control
#Xn
Send Single Multiple Xoff Characters
&Fn
Load quick setup factory profile
&Mn
Asynchronous/Synchronous mode
&Rn
CTS (Clear To Send) control
&Sn
DSR (Data Set Ready) control
&Wn
Store active profile
&Zn=
Store telephone number
&Jn
Automatic Channel Bundling
$Dn
Persistent DTR dialing
%En
Escape sequence options
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Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Data Call Commands
A
Answer
D
Dial
DSn
Dial Stored telephone number
&Jn
H
In
On
@Config
Channel Bundling
Hang up
Display product information
Return on-line
Start ConfigMenu
Command Implementation
Command: AT
Function: Attention Code
Values:
n/a
Default:
n/a
Description: The attention code precedes all command strings except the A/ command
and escape codes.
Command: RETURN
Function: Command Execution
Default:
n/a
Values:
n/a
Description:Press RETURN (ENTER) to execute a command. In command examples,
RETURN frequently is abbreviated <cr>.
Command: +++AT<cr>
Function: In-Band Escape Code
Values:
ASCII
Default:
+ (43)
Description:Makes TA enter command mode (without disconnecting the call) when it is
on-line with a remote device. Default escape code is three + characters
followed by the letters AT, up to 80 command characters and a RETURN
(press Enter). The TA escapes to command mode, executes any commands
in the string, and then remains in command mode. Use S2= command to
change the escape character.
Command: <break>AT<cr>
Function: Out-of-Band Escape Code
Values:
n/a
Default:
n/a
Description:Places TA in command mode while remaining on-line. Enter a break signal,
the letters AT, up to 80 command characters, and a RETURN (press Enter).
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
Switch Configuration Commands
Use the following commands to select your network switch type (e.g., EuroISDN Net3) and to specify
other information required to make an ISDN connection.
Command: %A97=n
Function: Dialing Method
Values:
n = 0 or 1
Default:
%A97=0 (En bloc)
Description: Standardized ISDN signaling protocols such as DSS1, DSS2, and SS7
support sending complete indication, (a signal that no more digits follow).
Adding this signal to a telephone number often is impractical. Therefore,
many private networks send the number of a called party using a procedure
called overlap sending, where no sending complete indication is sent.
Computer users can automatically add the sending complete indication to a
telephone number by choosing the en bloc method of sending, which results
in faster call setup. Use the %A97= command to select between the two
methods.
%A97=0
En bloc sending during call SETUP
%A97=1
Overlap sending during call SETUP
Command: !C0=n
Function: Network Switch Type
Values:
n = 0, 1, 2, 4, 5, or 6
Default:
!C0=2 (Net3)
Description:Use the !C0= command to select one of the six network switch types
supported by the TA. Factory default setting is !C0=2 (NET3).
!C0=0
AT&T 5ESS
!C0=1
Northern Telecom DMS-100
!C0=2
EuroISDN NET3
!C0=4
INS64
!C0=5
US NI-1
!C0=6
VN4
Command: !C6=n
Function: Data SPID
Values:
n = 0–20 character string
Default:
null string
Description: Use !C6= to specify the data service profile identifier (SPID) that the ISDN
service provider assigned at subscription time. The data SPID string can
have up to 20 characters. This command is not used if the switch type is set
to NET3.
Note: For DMS-100 switches, any ASCII character except the underline (_)
character is valid. For NI-1 and AT&T switches, only the digits 0–9 are valid.
Command: *!C6=n
Function: Voice SPID
Values:
n = 0- to 20 character string
Default:
null string
Description:Use *!C6= to specify the voice service profile identifier (SPID) that the ISDN
service provider assigned at subscription time. The voice SPID string can
have up to 20 characters. It is not used if the switch type is set to NET3.
Note: For DMS-100 switches, any ASCII character except the underline (_)
character is valid. For NI-1 and AT&T switches, only the digits 0–9 are valid.
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Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Command: !D3=n
Function: SAPI-0 Data TEI
Values:
n = 0–63, 240 (auto), 241 (disable)
Default:
!D3=240 (Auto TEI)
Description:Use !D3= to set the terminal endpoint identifier (TEI) for the data channel. A
TEI is a number used by the central office switch to identify uniquely each
device connected to the network. When it uses dynamic TEI assignments
(auto TEI), the central office switch assigns a TEI each time the TA connects
to the network. However, the ISDN service provider may assign a fixed TEI
at subscription time, in which case you must configure the TA with the fixed
TEI number. You also can use !D3= to disable the data channel, which may
be useful when multiple TAs are attached to a network terminator bus.
!D3=0–63
Sets TEI to a fixed value from 0–63
!D3=240
Sets data channel for dynamic TEI negotiation
!D3=241
Disables TEI
Command: *!D3=n
Function: SAPI-0 Voice TEI
Values:
n = 0–63, 240 (auto), 241 (disable)
Default:
*!D3=240 (Auto TEI)
Description:Use *!D3= to set the TA’s terminal endpoint identifier (TEI) for the voice
channel. See the !D3= command description.
*!D3=0–63
Sets TEI to a fixed value from 0–63
*!D3=240
Sets voice channel for dynamic TEI negotiation (default)
*!D3=241
Disables TEI
Command: !DN=n
Function: Disable Data DN/MSN
Values:
n = 1 or 2
Default:
All ports are enabled.
Description:!DNn disables a Data DN/MSN which disables the associated TA port from
receiving any data calls. However, the port will still be able to originate data
calls. This is useful for applications where a specific port is for dial-out only.
Since the TA has only one serial port, both Data DN/MSN 1 and 2 would
have to be disabled to not accept a call. Disabling only one of the Data DN/
MSNs will cause the TA to not accept bonded calls (ML-PPP or Softbonding).
!DN=1
Disables Data DN/MSN 1
!DN=2
Disables Data DN/MSN 2
Command: *!DN=n
Function: Disable Voice DN/MSN
Values:
n=1
Default:
All ports are enabled.
Description:*!DNn disables a Voice DN/MSN which disables the associated TA port from
receiving any voice calls. However, the port will still be able to originate voice
calls. This is useful for applications where a specific port is for dial-out only
or one does not want to accept voice calls at that time.
*!DN=1
Disables Voice DN/MSN 1
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
Command: !EN=n
Function: Enable Data DN/MSN
Values:
n = 1 or 2
Default:
All ports are enabled.
Description: !ENn enables a Data DN/MSN which will put it back in service for accepting
and originating data calls.
!EN=1
Enable Data DN/MSN 1
!EN=2
Enable Data DN/MSN 2
Command: *!EN=n
Function: Enable Voice DN/MSN
Values:
n=1
Default:
All ports are enabled.
Description:!ENn enables a Voice DN/MSN which will put it back in service for accepting
and originating data calls.
*!EN=1
Enable Voice DN/MSN 1
Command: !L
Function: Display Network Configuration
Values:
n/a
Default:
n/a
Description:Use !L to display the TA’s current DN, SPID, TEI, Data protocol, switch type.
!L
Displays current network configuration
Command: >Dn
Function: Embedded Protocol Analyzer
Values:
0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 98, or 99
Default:
n/a
Description:The embedded protocol analyzer records and analyzes various protocols on
B-channel, D-channel and DTE-DCE interface. The embedded protocol
analyzer is useful as a diagnostic tool in that essential data messages
display, which offers the ability to observe interactive operations of the TA,
Central Exchange, and remote communications equipment.
>D0
Display B-channel traffic, decoded as V.120
>D1
Display D-channel traffic, decoding layers 2 and 3 (Q.921 and
Q.931)
>D2
Display D-channel traffic, decoding layer 2 only (Q.921)
>D3
Display D-channel traffic, decoding layer 3 only (Q.931)
>D4
Display B-channel traffic, decoded as X.75
>D5
Display RS-232 traffic, decoded as PPP
>D6
Display B-channel traffic, decoded as PPP
>D98
Disable embedded protocol analyzer, buffered data unchanged
>D99
Enable embedded protocol analyzer, clearing buffered data
Command: !N1=n
Function: Data DN/MSN 1
Values:
n = 25 character string
Default:
null string
Description: !N1 sets the Directory Number (DN)/Multiple Subscriber Number (MSN) for
the data channel. The DN/MSN is a telephone number assigned to the TA at
subscription time by the ISDN service provider. The DN/MSN is a string of up
to 25 characters; valid characters are 0–9, the * character, and the #
character.
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Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Command: !N2=n
Function: Data DN/MSN 2
Values:
n=25-character string
Default:
Null string
Description: Data DN/MSN 2 accommodates the functionality for handling acceptance of
incoming data. Data DN/MSN 2 can be set to the same value as the Voice
DN/MSN or Data DN/MSN 1. See the !N1= command description.
Note: If using the TA as a host for MultiLink PPP calls with the MP+ Dynamic
Bandwidth Allocation scheme (S59=1), Data DN/MSN 2 must be entered.
Command: *!N1=n
Function: Voice DN/MSN
Values:
n = 25 character string
Default:
null string
Description:Sets the DN/MSN for the voice channel. See the !N1= command description.
Command: !RXGn
Function: Receive Gain
Values:
n = 0–10
Default:
!RXG6 (medium volume)
Description:Use !RXG to control the speaker level of an analog telephone device
connected to the AUX port. AT!RXG0 selects the lowest level, AT!RXG10
selects the highest level, and intermediate numbers select intermediate
levels.
!RXG0
Lowest speaker volume
through
!RXG10
Highest speaker volume
Command: !TXGn
Function: Transmit Gain
Values:
n = 0–4
Default:
!TXG0 (No amplification)
Description:Use !TXG to amplify the microphone output of an analog telephone device
connected to the AUX port. AT!TXG0 selects no amplification, AT!TXG4
selects the highest amplification, and intermediate numbers select
intermediate amplification.
CAUTION: Do not adjust the gain unless absolutely necessary. It is very
large at nonzero levels. Adjust only for special equipment that provides very
low-level signals to the analog port.
!TXG0
No microphone amplification
through
!TXG4
Highest microphone amplification
Command: !Z=n
Function: Rate Adaption Protocol
Values:
n = 5, 6, 9, or 12
Default:
!Z=9 (ML-PPP)
Description: Selects rate adaption protocol used to communicate with another TA. The
local and remote terminal adapters must be set to the same protocol for
communication to take place.
!Z=5
V.120 protocol
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
!Z=6
!Z=9
!Z=12
V.110 protocol*
ML-PPP protocol
X.75 protocol
* The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available. The MTA128ST-USB-RC will return ERROR in response to the !Z=6 command.
USB Port Configuration Commands
Use the following commands to control the interaction between the MTA128ST-USB and the computer
that is connected to it.
Command: En
Function: Command Mode Echo
Values:
n = 0 or 1
Default:
E1 (Echo on)
Description: When you enter commands on the keyboard, the TA echoes the characters
back to the computer or terminal where they display on the monitor. Use E to
turn this feature on and off.
E0
Echo off
E1
Echo on
Command: L5 and L6
Function: List Active Profile
Values:
n = 5 or 6
Default:
none
Description:Lists current operating parameters of the TA, which is useful when changing
communications software or changing default settings. ATL5 lists AT
command parameters, and ATL6 lists values currently stored in the Sregisters. (See S-Registers in this chapter for more information).
Command: L8
Function: Display ISDN Status
Values:
none
Default:
none
Description:Displays low level ISDN status for determining whether the physical layer is
ready, whether the data link layer is ready, what caused a previous
disconnect (Busy, Congestion, Normal Call Clearing, etc.) , and whether (for
North American switch types) SPID numbers have been set up properly
(SPID INCORRECT or SPID CORRECT).
Command: Qn
Function: Enable/Disable Result Codes
Values:
n = 0, 1, or 2
Default:
Q0 (Enable result codes)
Description: Controls whether the TA sends result codes to the computer. (Use V to
select result code format.)
Q0
Enable result codes.
Q1
Disable result codes (quiet mode) for applications such as computercontrolled auto dialing.
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Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Command: Sr=n
Function: Set Register Value
Values:
r = S-register number; n varies
Default:
None
Description:Use Sr=n to set value of an S-register, where r is the number of the Sregister, and n is the value you want to set. See S-Registers in this chapter
for more information.
Command: Sr?
Function: Read Register Value
Values:
r = S-register number
Default:
None
Description:Use Sr? to read the value of an S-register, where r is the number of the Sregister. See S-Registers in this chapter for further information.
Command: Vn
Function: Terse/Verbose Result Codes
Values:
n = 0 or 1
Default:
V1 (Verbose)
Description: Use V to control whether the TA’s result codes display as digits (terse) or as
words (verbose). (Use Q to enable or disable the display of result codes.)
V0
Enable terse result codes.
V1
Enable verbose result codes.
Command:
Function:
Values:
Default:
Xn
Connect Messages
n = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5
X2 (Enable all messages) and
X4 (Disable printing CLI with CONNECT message)
Description:Use X to select which result code messages the TA sends to the computer.
X0
Enables messages OK, CONNECT, RING, NO CARRIER, and
ERROR (terse result codes 0–4).
X1
Enables all messages except BUSY (terse result codes 0–5, 10–14,
17–19, 28, and 32). If a call is placed to a busy line, the message
NO CARRIER displays.
X2
Enable all messages (terse result codes 0–5, 7, 10–14, 17–19, 28,
and 32).
X3
Enables all messages EXCEPT it does NOT print protocol
messages. For example, for a V.120 connection, X2 prints:
CONNECT 64000/V.120
For a V.120 connection, X3 prints only the connect message (and
speed):
CONNECT 64000
X4
Disables printing Calling Line Identification (CLI) at the end of the
CONNECT message line. Does not affect X0, X1, or X2.
X5
Enables printing Calling Line Identification (CLI) at the end of the
CONNECT message line. Does not affect X0, X1, or X2.
Command: Zn
Function: Reset to Stored Profile
Values:
none
Default:
none
Description: Resets TA to its current power-up profile and clears the command buffer. The
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
result is the same as turning the modem off and on. When you enter ATZ,
the state of the &W command determines where the default values originate.
The &W0 defaults come from the customized configuration in NVRAM, and
&W1 defaults come from the factory default configuration in ROM. Because
Z clears the command buffer, it must be the last command in a command
string; normally it is issued by itself: ATZ.
Note that whereas the &F0 reset command always restores the factory
default profile, the Z reset command restores either the factory default or the
stored profile, depending on how the &W command is set.
Command: &Cn
Function: DCD Control
Values:
n = 0, 1, or 2
Default:
&C1 (DCD normal)
Description:Controls behavior of the DCD (Data Carrier Detect) signal (pin 8 on the
RS232E/V.24 interface). Normally, DCD goes high when the TA establishes a
connection and drops when the connection is lost. However, you also can
force DCD to remain high at all times or to remain high except for a brief
drop following a disconnect.
&C0
DCD is forced high at all times
&C1
DCD goes from low to high when TA establishes a connection (DCD
normal)
&C2
DCD drops briefly following disconnect, then goes high again. Register
S10 defines how long DCD signal remains low after disconnect
Command: &Dn
Function: DTR Control
Values:
n = 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4
Default:
&D1 (exits data mode and re-enters AT command mode)
Description:Controls how TA responds to DTR (Data Terminal Ready) signal on pin 20 of
RS232E/V.24 interface. A high DTR signal tells the TA that the connected
computer is ready to communicate.
&D0
TA ignores the DTR signal
&D1
When DTR goes low, TA exits data mode and re-enters AT command
mode
&D2
If DTR goes low, when TA is on-line, the TA hangs up, returns to
command mode, and disables autoanswer. If TA is offline, it neither
answers nor dials while DTR is low.
&D3
When DTR goes low, TA resets the data port and disables
autoanswer. If DTR goes low when TA is online, TA hangs up, resets
active configuration to the stored configuration, and disables
autoanswer.
Note: If the user wants to accept calls while DTR is low, the TA must
be configured to ignore DTR. To do this, enter AT&D0<cr>. With this
configuration, the TA is able to accept calls while DTR is low. If this
configuration setting is not made, the TA rejects incoming calls until
DTR is high while the calls comes in.
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Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
&D4
Ignores DTR when answering a data call. If DTR is low when an
incoming data call is present, the TA will answer the call. If DTR
goes high during that call, nothing will happen. However, if DTR
goes high and then drops for the minimum time specified by S25,
then the call will be disconnected just as it would with &D1. &D4 is
the same as &D1, except that &D4 can answer a data call without
DTR and DTR can remain low for the duration of the call, but if DTR
goes high, then &D4 will behave like &D1.
Command: &En
Function: Flow Control
Values:
n = 3–7, 12, 13
Default:
&E4, &E6, &E13
Description:Selects method by which the TA controls the flow of data to and from the
computer to prevent either device from accepting data faster than it can
handle. The TA provides flow control in both directions. When the TA halts
data flow, it is called flow control; when the computer halts data flow, it is
called pacing.
&E3
Disable flow control by the TA
&E4
Hardware flow control. &E4 causes the TA to use the CTS signal on
pin 5 of the RS232E/V.24 interface to regulate flow control. When
CTS goes low, data flow from the computer is suspended until CTS
goes high again. This method works with pacing, which uses the
RTS signal on pin 4. Hardware flow control cannot be enabled
unless an error correction protocol is selected.
&E5
XON/XOFF flow control. This is an in-band method, in which the
XON and XOFF characters (^Q and ^S, respectively) are inserted
into the data stream, rather than using separate control lines. When
an XOFF character is detected, the data stream is suspended until
an XON character is detected. The drawback to this method is that
some files may contain these characters, causing the file transfer to
be suspended indefinitely.
&E6
When XON/XOFF pacing is active, TA responds to and discards the
XON/XOFF characters from the computer.
&E7
When XON/XOFF pacing is active, the TA responds to the XON/
XOFF characters and passes them through the communications link
to the remote device, thereby pacing the remote terminal adapter as
well.
&E12 Disables pacing
&E13 Enables pacing
Command: #Xn
Function: Send Single/Multiple Xoff Characters
Values:
n = 0 or 1
Default:
#X0
Description: Allows TA to send either a single or multiple Xoff characters to exert flow
control to the terminal.
The #X0 command (factory default setting) causes one Xoff to be sent until
the MTA128ST-USB's buffer reaches the Xon level. The #X1 command uses
an Xoff to be sent for every character received after TA reaches its buffer full
level.
#X0
One Xoff character sent until buffer reaches the Xon level (default)
#X1
Multiple Xoff characters sent for every character received after buffer
reaches the full level
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
Command: &Fn
Function: Load Quick Setup Profile
Values:
n = 0–4
Default:
&F0
Description: For quick setup, the TA includes six Quick Setup Profiles, each contains
configuration parameters for a specific type of port operation. To load a
Quick Setup Profile into active memory, use &Fn, where n is the profile
number to load. You then can customize the profile and store it using the &W
command, so it loads automatically on power-up or reset. These profiles are
stored in permanent memory and are not user configurable. (Appendix B.)
&F0
Profile 0 — Modem-like operation (default)
&F1
Profile 1 — V.110 async operation*
&F2
Profile 2 — V.120 async operation
&F3
Profile 3 — X.75 async operation
&F4
Profile 4 — MLPPP async operation
* The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available. The MTA128ST-USB-RC will respond to the &F1 command with an ERROR..
Command: &Jn
Function: Automatic Channel Bundling
Values:
n = 0 or 1
Default:
n/a
Description:&J1 causes the TA to dial the number given in the dial string again to set up
a bundled PPP connection (also known as MultiLink PPP). Only works with
the PPP/ML-PPP protocol (!Z=9). &J0 will not dial the given number again
and it will not interfere with the given dial string meaning that if there are two
numbers in the dial string (like ATD5551000&5553000) the TA will dial both
of those numbers. &J0 does not disable the dialing of a second number if a
second number is given in the dial string.
n=0
disables automatic channel bundling
n=1
enables automatic channel bundling
Command: &Rn
Function: CTS Control
Values:
n = 0, 1, or 2
Default:
&R1 (CTS forced high)
Description:Allows you control the state of the CTS (Clear to Send) signal on the
RS232E/V.24 interface. Normally the CTS signal follows the state of the RTS
signal when the MTA128ST-USB is online.
&R0
CTS acts normally; i.e., it follows RTS
&R1
CTS is forced high, but still provides online flow control
&R2
CTS is forced high, but it drops on disconnect for the period of time
set by S10. CTS still provides flow control when the TA is online.
Command:
Function:
Values:
Default:
52
&Sn
DSR Control
n = 0, 1, or 2
&S0 (DSR high)
Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Description: Controls state of DSR (Data Set Ready) signal on RS232E/V.24 nterface. A
high DSR signal indicates to the computer that TA is ready to transmit data.
&S0
DSR is always high.
&S1
DSR acts normally; that is, it follows the state of the CD signal,
which goes high when the MTA128ST-USB detects a carrier signal,
and goes low when the carrier signal is lost.
&S2
DSR is always high, except on disconnect, when it drops for the
period of time set by S10 and then goes high again.
Command: &Wn
Function: Store Active Profile
Values:
n = 0 or 1
Default:
&W1 (Use factory default profile)
Description:Stores your active profile, or configuration, in memory, so you won't lose custom settings
when you turn off the TA or reset it.
&W0 Stores all current AT command and S-register values in nonvolatile random
access memory (NVRAM) and configures the TA so it reads your custom
settings in NVRAM when the TA is turned on or when it is reset with the Z
icommand. (The &F reset command continues to read factory default settings in
ROM.)
&W1 Erases your custom settings in NVRAM the next time the TA is
turned off or reset, causing the TA to read factory default settings in
ROM whenever it is turned on or reset.
Command: &Zn=x
Function: Store Telephone Number
Values:
n = 0–9; x = dial string
Default:
n/a
Description:The &Z= command lets you store a telephone number in a memory register for faster
dialing. To store a number, type &Z, the register number (0–9) where you want to store
store the number, the = character, and the dialing string that you want stored; then press
ENTER. The dialing string can have up to 25 characters. To read a stored number, type
AT&Zn? (e.g., AT&Z4?) where n is the number of the register you want to read. To
display a list of all numbers stored in memory, type ATL and press RETURN:
0
14082345678
1
17635551212
2
14089876543
3
4
6313551
5
6
4258513
7
8
17636313550
9
12138880123
Command: $Dn
Function: Persistent DTR Dialing
Values:
n = 0, or 1
Default:
$D0 (Disabled)
Description: Enables or disables persistent DTR dialing (PDD). PDD causes the terminal
adapter to automatically and continuously redial stored telephone number 0
when the port has no active calls and DTR is high.
$D0
Disables PDD.
$D1
Enables PDD.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
Command: $MBn
Function: V.110 Network Rate*
Values:
n = 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400
Default:
$MB38400
Description: If S77=1, then the network rate of the V.110 connection will match that of $MB (S76).
If a V.110 call is received and S77=1, then the incoming V.110 network rate must match
$MB (S76) or the connection will fail. If S77=2 and a V.110 call is originated, then the
network rate will match that of $MB (S76). If S77=2 and a V.110 call is received, then the
setting of $MB (S76) will have no effect on the network rate of that call (see S77 for a
description for this case). The value of $MB will change if S76 is changed and the value
of S76 will change if $MB is changed.
* The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available.
Command: %En
Function: Escape Sequence Options
Values:
n = 0–5
Default:
%E1 and %E4
Description: By default, the TA responds only to the +++ escape method. However, you
can use the %E command to set the TA to respond only to the <break>
method, to respond to either the +++ or the <break> method, or to ignore
both methods and not escape.
%E0
Modem won’t escape
%E1
+++ escape method
%E2
<break> escape method
%E3
Both +++ and <break> escape methods
%E4
Disable OK response to +++
%E5
Enable OK response to +++
%E1 %E5
Enable +++ method and OK response to +++
%E3 %E5
Enable +++ or <break> method and OK response to +++
Data Call Commands
Use these commands to make or configure data calls.
Command: A
Function: Answer Call
Values:
none
Default:
none
Description:Forces TA to answer an incoming call. To make the TA autoanswer, set
register S0 to a value higher than 0.
Command: D
Function: Dial
Values:
none
Default:
none
Description: The D command causes the TA to dial a number (e.g., ATD785-3500 <cr>).
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Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Command: DSn
Function: Dialing a Stored Telephone Number
Values:
n = 0–9
Default:
n=0
Description: To dial a stored telephone number, type &DSn in terminal mode, where n is
the location of the number you want to dial. For example, type ATDS3 <cr>
dials a telephone stored in memory register 3 location.
Command: Hn
Function: Hang Up
Values:
0
Default:
n=0
Description:Forces TA to go off-hook (to take control of the telephone line) or to go onhook (hang up). Since the TA goes off-hook automatically when it dials, the H
command is normally used only to hang up. To hang up, first escape to
command mode (+++AT <cr>), then type ATH (or ATH0) <cr>. You also can
include the hang-up command in the escape sequence: +++ATH <cr>.
H
Go on-hook (hang up)
Command: In
Function: Display Product Information
Values:
n = 0, 1, 2, and 4
Default:
none
Description: Displays the following MTA128ST-USB product information.
I0
Product ID (e.g., 247)
I1
Firmware version number (e.g. 6.00)
I2
Model number (e.g., MTA128ST-USB)
I4
Date and time firmware was made
Command: O
Function: Return Online
Values:
none
Default:
none
Description: The O command returns the TA to online mode from online comman mode.
When TA makes a data connection, it enters online data mode. TA remains in
this mode until it receives an escape sequence or until the call ends. When it
detects an escape sequence, the TA enters online command mode, where it
can accept AT commands while retaining the online connection. To return TA
to online mode from online command mode, enter ATO and press ENTER.
Command: @CONFIG
Function: Start ConfigMenu
Values:
none
Default:
none
Description: The @CONFIG command starts the TA’s internal configuration utility, used to
customize the TA’s configuration for your application. You must enter the
command while in your communication program’s terminal mode.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
S-Registers
S-registers are sections of memory in which values are stored that affect how the MTA128ST-USB
operates. S-registers are so-called because each has a name that begins with the character S. Use
the S command to assign a value or to read the current value of an S-register. To assign a value to an
S-register, use the command Sr=n, where r is the register number, and n is the value you want to
assign, e.g., S7=45. To read an S-register value, use the command Sr?, where r is the register
number, e.g., ATS7?.
S-Register Summary
S-Register
S0
S1
S2
S3
S4
S5
S7
S8
S10
S25
S30
S31
S32
S34
S44
S45
S46
S49
S50
S51
S52
S53
S54
S55
S56
S57
S58
S59
S60
S61
S62
S63
S64
S65
S66
S67
S68
S69
S70
S71
S73
56
Function
Rings Until Answer
Ring Count
Escape Character
Carriage Return Character
Line Feed Character
Backspace Character
Wait for Connection (Abort Timer)
Pause Time for Comma
DCD Drop Time
DTR Drop Time
On-line Inactivity Timer
Maximum Redial Timeout Value
Escape Sequence Timeout
Maximum Escape Sequence Length
POTS Port Ring Frequency
Use Dial Tone from Central Office
Pulse-Dial Recognition
POTS Port Dial Tone Gain
Caller Line ID (CLI)
POTS Port Dial Tone Suppression
Auto-Protocol Detection
Maximum Frame Size (X.75)
Force 56 Kbps B-Channel Data Rate
POTS Port Call Control
Calling Party Number IE Settings
Called Party Number IE Settings
Client-Side Authentification Protocol Negotioation
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation (DBA) Scheme
Bandwidth-on-Demand (BOD) High Threshold
Bandwidth-on-Demand High Throughput Threshold
Bandwidth-on-Demand (BOD) Low Threshold Sampling Period
Bandwidth-on-Demand (BOD) Low Throughput Threshold
Call Bumping (CB)
POTS Call Bump Forwarding Delay
Country Selections for POTS Ring Signal
Single or Dual Cadence Ring Signal
First Active Duration
First Idle Duration
Second Active Duration
Second Idle Duration
MultiLink Endpoint Discriminator Type
Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
S75
S76
S77
S80
Maximum V.110 Buffer Size
V.110 Network rate
V.110 Network Rate Control
Persistent DTR Dialing Delay
Note: V.110 is supported in build MTA128ST-USB only.
S-Register: S0
Function: Number of Rings Until Answer
Unit:
1 ring
Range:
0–255
Default:
1
Description:Sets the number of rings the TA waits for before it answers and begins its
connect sequence. S0=0 turns off the ability to automatically answer a call.
S0=1 causes the TA to automatically answer after 1 ring. If the S0 value is
set too high, the calling device may time out before the TA answers the call.
For autoanswer, S0 must have a nonzero value, DTR must be high (&D
command), and the TA must be offline.
S-Register: S1
Function: Ring Count
Unit:
1 ring
Range:
0–255
Default:
0
Description:Counts the number of rings that have occurred, up to a maximum of 255. It is
a read-only register and is seldom used in typical operation. If you set S1 to
a value other than its default value of zero or if the value is increasing with
rings, this new value remains stored in S1 for eight seconds after the last
ring is counted, after which time the value reverts to zero.
S-Register: S2
Function: Escape Character
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
0–127
Default:
43 (+)
Description: Specifies the character used by the TA to escape from data mode and return
to command mode.
S-Register: S3
Function: Carriage Return Character
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
0–127
Default:
13 (^M)
Description:Specifies the character used by the TA to indicate the end of a command
line.
S-Register: S4
Function: Line Feed Character
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
0–127
Default:
10 (^J)
Description: Specifies the character used by the TA to indicate the end of a status
message.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
S-Register: S5
Function: Backspace Character
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
0–32, 127
Default:
8 (^H)
Description: Specifies the character used by the TA to delete the previous character in the
command line.
S-Register: S7
Function: Wait for Connection (Abort Timer)
Unit:
1 second
Range:
0–255
Default:
45
Description: Sets the Abort Timer delay time, which is the length of time the TA waits for a
connection after dialing. If no connection is established during the specified
time, the TA ends the call.
S-Register: S8
Function: Pause Time for Comma
Unit:
1 second
Range:
n=0-255
Default:
2 (2 seconds)
Description: S8 sets the length of the pause caused by a comma inserted in a dialing
command. The default setting is 2 seconds, where each unit is one second.
S8 may be set for up to 255 seconds.
S-Register: S10
Function: DCD Drop Time
Unit:
50 ms
Range:
0–254, 255
Default:
20
Description:Sets the time after a carrier signal is lost before the TA disconnects. (The
&C2 command must be in effect.) Default setting is one second. Maximum
delay is 25.4 seconds (S10=254). Set S10 to 255 to cause the TA not to
disconnect with loss of carrier.
S-Register: S25
Function: DTR Drop Time
Unit:
100 ms
Range:
0, 1–255
Default:
5
Description: Sets the time that DTR must remain low before TA disconnects. The S25 unit
value for 0 is 50 ms. For values from 1 through 255, the unit value is 100 ms.
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Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
S30
On-line Inactivity Timer
1 minute
n=0 Does not disconnect
n=1–255
Default:
0 (does not disconnect)
Description: Makes the TA disconnect a data connection if no data is transmitted or
received for the specified time. It will NOT cause a POTS call (voice/modem/
fax) to disconnect. The timer restarts any time a data character passes
through the serial port (either sent or received). Disable the inactivity timer
by setting S30=0, which is the factory default setting. S30 currently works for
+ all protocols EXCEPT V.110.
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
S31
Maximum Redial Timeout Value
1 minute
n=0 Does not try to redial
n=1–255
Default:
30 (30 minutes)
Description: Sets the maximum redial timeout value for attempts to add a second channel to a
MLPPP data call. Once the maximum timeout is reached, there are no further attempts
to redial. Re-dialing occurs if a call attempt fails due to the host being busy or not
answering. The first redial timeout period is 1 minute. If re-dialing fails after 1 minute,
the next redial timeout is 3 minutes. If re-dialing fails after 3 minutes, the next redial
timeout is 5 minutes. If re-dialing fails after 5 minutes, subsequent redial timeouts occur
every 5 minutes, up to the maximum redial timeout value (S31).
S-Register: S32
Function: Escape Sequence Timeout
Unit:
100 ms
Range:
0–255
Default:
20
Description:Sets the time allowed in an escape sequence from the receipt of the A in AT to the receipt
of the carriage return. If the S32 time interval expires before you press ENTER, the
escape sequence ends. The default time is 2 seconds.
S-Register: S34
Function: Maximum Escape Sequence Length
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
0–10
Default:
2
Description:Sets the maximum character length of the escape sequence, not including +++AT. For
example, a character length of S34=2 allows two characters after +++AT (e.g.,
+++ATH0). Conversely, an invalid escape sequence (too many characters placed in the
command string) passes through as data (e.g., +++atili2). The maximum length of the
escape sequence is 10 characters.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
S-Register: S44
Function: POTS Port Ring Frequency
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
2–4
Default:
2 (25 Hz)
Description: Controls the ring frequency from the POTS port. S44=n where:
n=2
25 Hz ring frequency
n=3
20 Hz ring frequency
n=4
16.67 Hz ring frequency
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
S45
Use Dial Tone from Central Office
Decimal ASCII code
n=0
No dial tone
n=1
Use Central Office dial tone
n=2
TA generates dial tone
Default:
1 (Use Central Office dial tone)
Description:S45 allows the TA either to generate a dial tone on the POTS port, block any dial tone on
the POTS port, or allow the dial tone from the central office to pass through to the POTS
port (default). Some countries have central offices that send a loud dial tone through to
the POTS port. This makes DTMF- dialing difficult since DTMF digits have to overcome
the loudness of the dial tone (see S49 and S51 for more information).
S-Register: S46
Function: Pulse-Dial Recognition
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
0–3
Default:
0
Description:Controls pulse-dial recognition for New Zealand, Sweden, and the de facto standard for
the rest of the world (England, France, India, and USA). S46 selects country where the
TA is being used to recognize pulse-dialing. S46=n
where:
n=0
Disable pulse-dialing (default)
n=1
England, France, India, USA, etc. (# pulses = digit dialed except 0 is 10 pulses)
n=2
New Zealand (# pulses = 10 digits dialed)
n=3
Sweden (# pulses = digit dialed + 1)
S-register: S49
Function: POTS Port Dial Tone Gain
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
n=0 (Low gain—quiet) thru 10 (high gain—loud)
Default:
0 (Low gain—quiet)
Description:Allows POTS port dial tone gain to be adjusted to an appropriate volume.Must be used in
conjunction with S51=1 in order for there to be a noticed change in the dial tone volume.
See S51.
S-Register: S50
Function: Caller Line ID (CLI)
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
0 or 1
Default:
1 (enabled)
Description: Sets whether the mechanism for identifying two endpoints of a connection is enabled or
disabled. Since RING messages only appear for ISDN data calls, the CLI feature does
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Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
not define a means of conveying Calling Party information to the terminal for ISDN voice
calls. CLI information is included only with the first RING message for a given incoming
call and appears as:
RING
FM: 5552000 TO: 5551000
If the Calling Party Number information is not included in the incoming SETUP message,
the RING message appears as follows:
RING
TO: 5551000
If the Called Party Number information is not included in the incoming SETUP message,
the RING message appears as follows:
RING
FM: 5552000
If neither the Called Party Number nor Calling Party Number is included in the incoming
SETUP message, the RING message contains no additional information.
S-Register: S51
Function: POTS Port Dial Tone Suppression
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
n = 0, 1
Default:
0
Description: S51 only affects NET3 switch type and voice/modem/fax calls attempted on
the POTS port. Some NET3 switches have a hot dial tone (dial tone that
sounds very loud). If the dial tone is too loud, the TA cannot recognize any or
most of the DTMF digits. This is a similar to trying to communicate with
another person in a very loud train station—your voice is drowned out by the
noise of other people and the trains. By setting S51=1, the TA keeps the
receive gain of the POTS port low until a DTMF digit is received. After a
DTMF digit is received, the gain is set back to whatever !RXG was set to
before the phone, modem, or fax went off-hook (!RXG6 by default). !RXG
does not need to be adjusted.
S-Register: S52
Function: Auto-Protocol Detection
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
0, 1, or 2
Default:
1 (Detect)
Description: Enables or disables the ability to identify the reception of V.110, V.120, X.75,
or PPP data calls. The TA determines the type of call by checking for
protocol information in the SETUP message or by matching protocol
information received on the B-channel once connected if no protocol
information is available in the SETUP message. Once the protocol is
determined, the TA will switch its data protocol to match. Upon disconnect
the TA will revert its data protocol selection back to the protocol that was
selected before the call was received when S52=1 “Detect”. If S52=2
“Detect and Select”, then the TA will not revert the protocol selection, rather it
will keep the detected data protocol as the new protocol selection. “Detect
and Select” is useful for applications where the TA receives a call and then
the software performs callback. Callback calls should be made with the
same protocol that was used by the client so “Detect and Select” enables
this possibility. However, if an initialization string or &Fn command is given
to the TA that changes the protocol after the disconnection, then “Detect and
Select” will not be effective. Make sure no commands are given to the TA
that will change the data protocol when using “Detect and Select” if callback
is involved to ensure that the callback call uses the correct data protocol.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
n=0
n=1
n=2
Disable
Detect
Detect and Select
Note: V.110 support is available in build MTA128ST-USB only.
S-Register: S53
Function: Maximum X.75 Buffer Size
Unit:
1 byte
Range:
n=64 - 2048
Default:
2048 (bytes)
Description:S53 allows the maximum buffer size of an X.75 frame to be customized.
Typically a smaller frame size is more compatible with software packages on
a PC (such as HyperTerminal). Larger frame sizes introduce larger delay
which some software cannot deal with appropriately.
S-register: S54
Function: Force 56 Kbps B-Channel Data Rate
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
n=56 (Kbps) or 64 (Kbps)
Default:
64 (Kbps)
Description: S54 can be used to force a 56 Kbps B-channel data rate in order to make 56 Kbps data
calls.
S-Register: S55
Function: POTS Port Call Control
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
1, 2, 17, 18
Default:
1
Description:Allows you to set the type of information transfer capability for calls placed from the
POTS port either by a telephone, modem, or fax. Some Central Office (CO) switches
keep track of the type of line each customer has, and if that line is labeled as a data line
(modem or fax), it will not accept a speech call originated on that line. However, 3.1 kHz
audio information transfer capability is allowed on data lines (modem or fax) by most
switches. S55 also lets you define whether a progress indicator information element
(which indicates that the origination address of the POTS call is non-ISDN) is sent with
the SETUP message for the POTS port call. This may help POTS port calls get through
certain CO switches.
S1
Speech, no progress indicator
S2
3.1 kHz Audio, no progress indicator
S17
Speech, origination address is non-ISDN
S18
3.1 kHz Audio, origination address is non-ISDN
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
62
S56 (applies to NET3 [!C0=2] switch type only)
Calling Party Number IE Settings
decimal ASCII code
128
Disable
Type of Number
0
Unknown,
16
International
32
National
48
Network specific
Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
64
Subscriber
96
Abbreviated
Numbering Plan
0
Unknown
1
ISDN/telephony
3
Data
4
Telex
8
National standard
9
Private
Default:
128 (disabled)
Description: Modifies the value of Octet 3 of the Calling Party Number Information Element that is
sent within the SETUP message for data and POTS port (voice/modem/fax) calls. To set
a specific number type and numbering plan, select an option from the Type of Number
section above and add its value to the value of an option in the Numbering Plan section
above. For example, a National/ISDN Calling Party Number IE would be S56=33, where
32 (National) + 1 (ISDN/telephony) = 33 (National/ISDN). If there is no Data Directory
Number (for data calls) nor Voice Directory Number (for voice/modem/fax calls), no
Calling Party Number IE is sent. By default S56=128, which means no Calling Party
Number IE is sent.
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
S57 (applies to NET3 [!C0=2] switch type only)
Called Party Number IE Settings
decimal ASCII code
128
Disable
Type of Number
0
Unknown,
16
International
32
National
48
Network specific
64
Subscriber
96
Abbreviated
Numbering Plan
0
Unknown
1
ISDN/telephony
3
Data
4
Telex
8
National standard
9
Private
Default:
128 (disabled)
Description: Modifies the value of Octet 3 of the Called Party Number Information
Element that is sent within the SETUP message for a data call and within
each INFORMATION message that is sent when dialing from the POTS port.
To set a specific number type and numbering plan, select an option from the
Type of Number section above and add its value to the value of an option in
the Numbering Plan section above. For example, a National/ISDN Called
Party Number IE would be S57=33, where 32 (National) + 1 (ISDN/
telephony) = 33 (National/ISDN). By default S57=128, which means no
Called Party Number IE is sent.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
S58
Client-side Authentication Protocol Negotiation
Decimal ASCII code
n=1
PAP
n=2
PAP between TA and PC; CHAP MD5 between TA and server
n=3
ANY authentication protocol
Default:
1 (PAP)
Description: Sets the client-side authentication protocol to be negotiated during the Link
Control Protocol (LCP) phase of PPP/MLPPP negotiation. Does not
determine which authentication protocol is negotiated if the TA is used on the
server side. S58=1 allows only PAP to be negotiated. S58=2 allows PAP
between the TA and PC and CHAP MD5 between the TA and server. S58=3
allows any authentication protocol. If the server does not allow PAP, set
S58=2 to try CHAP MD5 with the server. If the server doesn’t allow CHAP
MD5 or the PC doesn’t allow PAP, set S58=3 to allow any authentication
protocol that the server requests. MultiLink connections are possible if the
authentication protocol is PAP (S58=1 or S58=3), CHAP MD5 (S58=2 or
S58=3), MS-CHAP (S58=3) and possibly others (S58=3).
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
S59
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation (DBA) Scheme
Decimal ASCII code
n=0
Disable
n=1
MP+
n=2
PPP
Default:
1 (MP+)
Description: Determines whether Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation (DBA) is disabled or
enabled by the use of a specific scheme (MP+ or PPP). Setting S59=0
disables DBA and as a result disables the Bandwidth-on-Demand and Call
Bumping features. Setting S59=1 (MP+) instructs the TA to negotiate the
MP+ option during the PPP LCP phase. If the MP+ DBA scheme is desired,
but the server does not support MP+, the TA falls back to the PPP DBA
scheme. Due to this fall-back ability, DBA on the client side is always
possible. Setting S59=2 to use PPP instructs the TA to use basic PPP
requests to perform DBA (the most widely accepted scheme). Basic PPP
requests include the LCP Terminate Request command to disconnect a data
channel and instruct the TA to add a second channel by dialing the second
number given in the dial string (or dialing same number if &J1).
If the TA is used as a host, MP+ must be supported by the client also. The
host TA must set S59=1 (MP+). If the TA is used as a host, but either MP+ is
not supported by the client or the host did not set S59=1 (MP+), DBA is not
possible. For example, if the host sets S59=1, but the client does not support
MP+, DBA is not possible. If the host sets S59=2, DBA is not possible. MP+
is required to be negotiated by both the client and host if the host is to
perform DBA. The PPP DBA scheme is the most widely accepted DBA
scheme. This is why the TA falls back to the PPP scheme if MP+ is not
supported, thus allowing DBA to be available at all times (for the client TA).
The second data directory number must be set if using the TA as a host with
MP+ enabled as the DBA scheme. The TA uses the second data directory
number to send to the client as the call-back number to have the client dial to
set up the second data channel (call-back number is sent as a part of MP+
protocol). Due to the ability to send the client a call-back number, it is then
possible to allow the host to perform DBA as well. Since the PPP DBA
scheme cannot instruct the client to call back, we cannot allow the PPP DBA
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Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
scheme to drop a channel due to analog calls.
Note: Using the DBA scheme on the host-side requires that you specify a
Data Directory Number or MSN. Refer to your TA Owner’s Manual for
information on how to specify a Data Directory Number or MSN.
S-register: S60
Function: Bandwidth-on-Demand (BOD) High Threshold
Sampling Period
Unit:
Seconds
Range:
n=0
(BOD completely disabled)
n=1
1–255
Default:
10 (10 seconds)
Description:Sets the Bandwidth-on-Demand High Threshold Sampling Period. Refer to
Bandwidth-on-Demand description and how the High Threshold Sampling
Period (S60) and High Throughput Threshold (S61) are used to determine
when a second channel should be added. With Dynamic Bandwidth
Allocation enabled and BOD enabled, the client TA always has the ability to
utilize BOD. The host TA, however, only has the ability to utilize BOD if MP+
(S59=1) was negotiated successfully by both the client and the host.
A short sampling period causes the TA to respond to an increase in
the throughput sooner than a long sampling period. By default, the average
throughput is determined over 10 seconds of time.
S-register: S61
Function: Bandwidth-on-Demand High Throughput Threshold
Unit:
Kbps
Range:
n=0–64 (Kbps)
Default:
52 (52 Kbps)
Description: Sets the Bandwidth-on-Demand High Throughput Threshold, which
determines whether a second channel should be added due to high
throughput. Refer to the Bandwidth-on-Demand description and how High
Throughput Threshold (S61) and High Threshold Sampling Period (S60)
determine when a second channel should be added. By default, the average
throughput during the High Threshold Sampling Period (S60) must exceed
52 Kbps.
S-register: S62
Function: Bandwidth-on-Demand (BOD) Low Threshold
Sampling Period
Unit:
Seconds
Range:
n=0
Second channel will not disconnect
n=1–255
Default:
10 (10 seconds)
Description: Sets the BOD Low Threshold Sampling Period. Refer to BOD description
and how the Low Threshold Sampling Period (S62) and Low Throughput
Threshold (S63) determine when the second channel should be
disconnected. Setting S62=0 causes the TA to not disconnect second
channel when it is added unless Call Bumping is enabled and an analog call
bumps the data call on the second channel. Setting S62 to a value other
than 0 causes the TA to take an average of throughput. A short sampling
period causes the TA to respond to a decrease in the throughput sooner than
a long sampling period. By default, average throughput is determined over
10 seconds of time.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
S-register: S63
Function: Bandwidth-on-Demand Low Throughput Threshold
Unit:
Kbps
Range:
n=0–64 (Kbps)
Default:
26 (26 Kbps)
Description: Sets BOD Low Throughput Threshold, which determines whether second
channel should be disconnected due to low throughput. Refer to the BOD
description and how the Low Throughput Threshold (S63) and Low
Threshold Sampling Period (S62) determine when second channel should be
disconnected. By default, the average throughput during the Low Threshold
Sampling Period (S62) must be equal to or less than 26 Kbps.
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
S64
Call Bumping (CB)
Decimal ASCII code
n=0
Disable
n=1
Enable
Default:
1 (Enable)
Description:Enables the Call Bumping feature of Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation. With
Call Bumping disabled, incoming and outgoing calls are not possible if both
B-channels are already in use. With Call Bumping enabled, incoming and
outgoing analog calls through the POTS port are possible even if both Bchannels are in use. If the TA is acting as a host device, Call Bumping is
available to the host TA only if MP+ (S59=1) was negotiated by both the
client and the host. Also, Call Bumping is not available to the host TA if the
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation scheme is MP+ (S59=1) and MP+ negotiation
fails. If MP+ negotiation was successful (meaning both client and host
support MP+), Call Bumping is available to the host TA. By default, Call
Bumping is enabled.
Note: If using the TA as a host for MultiLink PPP calls with the MP+ Dynamic
Bandwidth Allocation scheme (S59=1), Data DN/MSN 2 must be entered.
S-register: S65
Function: POTS Call Bump Forwarding Delay
Unit:
5 ms
Range:
n=0-255 (0 ms to 1275 ms)
Default:
20 (100 ms delay)
Description: Allows the forwarding delay time to be adjusted. Some central office
switches are not able to accept another call immediately after tearing down a
call (meaning the TA is able to tear down a call and initiate another call much
faster than the central office). If the central office switch is too slow, then a
Call Bump (due to an incoming or outgoing analog call) will not be
recognized and the analog device will not ring (if incoming) or will not give a
dial tone (if outgoing). A delay of 100 ms is the default, which should allow
enough time for the central office switch to prepare for new calls.
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
66
S66
Country Selections for POTS Ring Signal
Decimal ASCII code
n=0–27
0
Default
1
Custom single
2
Custom dual
Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
3
Austria
4
Belgium
5
Cyprus
6
Denmark
7
Finland
8
France
9
Germany 1
10
Germany 2
11
Greece
12
Iceland
13
Ireland
14
Italy
15
Luxembourg 1
16
Luxembourg 2
17
Malta
18
Netherlands
19
Norway
20
Portugal
21
Spain
22
Sweden
23
Switzerland 1
24
Switzerland 2
25
United Kingdom 1
26
United Kingdom 2
27
United States
Default:
0 (25 Hz, single ring, 2 sec. on, 4 sec. off)
Description: Sets the frequencies and cadences used when ringing the device attached to
the POTS port (phone, modem, fax). Select the appropriate country to use
the frequencies and cadences specified according to ETS 300 001 (Chapter
1:1992, p. 56). The Austria and France settings default the frequency to 25
Hz since the TA doesn’t support a 50 Hz nominal frequency. A number 1 or 2
next to a country name indicates the availability of either alternate nominal
frequencies or alternate cadences. You also can configure frequencies and
cadences by using @CONFIG menu (selection #6—POTS Port
Configuration) and/or with S-registers S44, S67, S68, S69, S70, and S71.
Save configurations with the &W or &W0 command.
S-register: S67
Function: Single or Dual Cadence Ring Signal
Unit:
Decimal ASCII code
Range:
0 (Single), 1 (Dual)
Default:
0 (Single-cadence ring signal)
Description: Sets the POTS port ring signal for single or dual cadence. Examples of a
dual cadence include Ireland (S66=13), United Kingdom 1 (S66=25), and
United Kingdom 2 (S66=26).
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
Default:
S68
First Active Duration
1 ms
5–9995
2000 ms
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
Description: Sets the duration of the first active period of the ring signal. Any value given
to this S-register is rounded down to the nearest 5 ms. For example,
S68=1234 sets S68 to 1230 ms (1.23 seconds).
S-register: S69
Function: First Idle Duration
Unit:
1 ms
Range:
5–9995
Default:
4000 ms
Description:Sets the duration of the first idle period of the ring signal. Any value given to
this S-register is rounded down to the nearest 5 ms. For example, S69=231
sets S69 to 230 ms (0.23 seconds).
S-register: S70
Function: Second Active Duration
Unit:
1 ms
Range:
5–9995
Default:
400 ms
Description:Sets the duration of the second active period of the ring signal. Any value
given to this S-register is rounded down to the nearest 5 ms. For example,
S70=453 sets S70 to 450 ms (0.45 seconds).
S-register: S71
Function: Second Idle Duration
Unit:
1 ms
Range:
5–9995
Default:
2000 ms
Description: Sets the duration of the second idle period of the ring signal (usually the
longest duration of a dual-cadence ring signal). Any value given to this Sregister is rounded down to the nearest 5 ms. For example, S71=3456 sets
S71 to 3455 ms (3.455 seconds).
S-Register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
S73
MultiLink Endpoint Discriminator Type
decimal ASCII code
n=0—Null Class,
n=1—Locally Assigned Address,
n=2—IP Address,
n=3—IEEE 802.1 Globally Assigned MAC Address,
n=4—PPP Magic-Number Block,
n=5—Public Switched Network Directory Number
Default:
4 (PPP Magic-Number Block)
Description: This S-register allows the MultiLink PPP Endpoint Discriminator type to be
set. The Endpoint Discriminator is used to help determine if a channel is to
be bundled with any other channels (forming a MultiLink Group or Bundle) or
if it is a new bundle. Currently, the Null Class (S73=0), PPP Magic-Number
Block (S73=4), and Public Switched Network Directory Number (S73=5) are
complete. The PPP Magic-Number Block contains 5 Magic-Numbers in this
implementation and is the default type. The Public Switched Network
Directory Number option uses Data Directory Number 1 as the Endpoint
Discriminator (if it is blank, then Endpoint Discriminator is blank). The
Locally Assigned Address (S73=1), IP Address (S73=2), and IEEE 802.1
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Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Globally Assigned MAC Address (S73=3) options currently generate a
random value similar to the PPP Magic-Number Block, except that the length
of the Endpoint Discriminator follows according to the specifications for the
respective type. Refer to RFC 1990 for more information about the MultiLink
Endpoint Discriminator option and its types.
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
S75
Maximum V.110 Buffer Size*
1 byte
n=0 (256 bytes),
n=64-255
Default:
0 (256 bytes)
Description: S75 allows the maximum V.110 buffer size to be customized. An adjustable
packet size can provide higher compatibility with devices that cannot handle
a large delay. Reducing the V.110 buffer size reduces delay.
* The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available.
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
S76
V.110 Network Rate*
decimal ASCII code
n=1—-—600 bps,
n=2——1200 bps,
n=3——2400 bps,
n=4——4800 bps,
n=5——9600 bps,
n=6—19200 bps,
n=7—38400 bps,
Default:
7 (38400 bps)
Description: If S77=1, then the network rate of the V.110 connection will match that of
S76 ($MB). If a V.110 call is received and S77=1, then the incoming V.110
network rate must match S76 ($MB) or the connection will fail. If S77=2 and
a V.110 call is originated, then the network rate will match that of S76 ($MB).
If S77=2 and a V.110 call is received, then the setting of S76 ($MB) will have
no effect on the network rate of that call (see S77 for a description for this
case). The value of S76 will change if $MB is changed and the value of $MB
will change if S76 is changed.
* The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available.
S-register:
Function:
Unit:
Range:
S77
V.110 Network Rate Control*
decimal ASCII code
n=1—use $MB (S76),
n=2—use $MB (S76) or Auto Sync on Answer
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
Default:
2 (use $MB(S76) or Auto Sync on Answer)
Description: The Network Rate for V.110 will be determined by S76 ($MB). If S77=1,
then the network rate will be set to that of S76 ($MB) and if the network does
not match that of the peer device, then the connection will fail. Properties of
S77=1 apply to both received and originated calls. If the TA will be
answering a V.110 call, then it can be set to auto-synchronize (S77=2) on the
incoming V.110 network rate.
Auto-synchronizing allows the TA to adapt to the client’s network rate without
any need for the host to have its network rate predetermined. If S77=2
and a V.110 call is originated, then the network rate will be that of S76 ($MB).
* The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available.
S-Register: S80
Function: Persistent DTR Dialing Delay
Unit:
1 second
Range:
n=1-255 (1-255 seconds)
Default:
5 (5 seconds)
Description: Once DTR is detected as present (active high) and other conditions required
for the TA to dial are met, a delay of S80 seconds will occur before stored
number 0 is dialed. Some conditions include the TA not being in the
@CONFIG menu, not having a data call present at the time, and Persistent
DTR Dialing must be enabled. By default the TA will delay for 5 seconds
before dialing when all conditions are satisfied.
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Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Result Codes
When the MTA128ST-USB (TA) receives an AT command from the computer or terminal, it attempts to
execute the command, then sends a status message to the computer or terminal that reports the
result of the command. The TA provides you with several of these response messages, or result
codes, which can be displayed on your monitor or intercepted and used by your communications
software. Using the V command, you can select whether the result codes are terse (numbers) or
verbose (words).
The TA’s result codes are listed below. Note that the speed of an ISDN channel is always either 56
Kbps or 64 Kbps. Connect messages indicate the speed of the connection between the TA and your
computer or terminal.
TERSE
VERBOSE
DEFINITION
0
1
2
3
OK
Connect
Ring
No carrier
4
5
6
7
9
10
11
12
14
28
56
64
P
T
V
X
Error
Connect 1200
No dial tone
Busy
Connect 600
Connect 2400
Connect 4800
Connect 9600
Connect 19200
Connect 38400
Connect 56000
Connect 64000
/PPP
/V.110
/V.120
/X75
TA executed the command without error
TA established an ISDN connection
TA detected a ring caused by incoming call
TA did not detect carrier within time allotted by SRegister S7
Error in the AT command
TA connected at 1200 bps
TA has a poor connection to ISDN network
TA detected a busy signal
TA connected at 600 bps
TA connected at 2400 bps
TA connected at 4800 bps
TA connected at 9600 bps
TA connected at 19200 bps
TA connected at 38400 bps
TA connected at 56000 bps
TA connected at 64000 bps
TA using Point-to-Point protocol
TA using V.110 rate adaption protocol*
TA using V.120 rate adaption protocol
TA using X.75 rate adaption protocol
* The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
Using AT Commands to Operate the MTA128ST-USB
You can configure and operate the MTA128ST-USB entirely with AT commands if you like. But
remember, you can issue AT commands only from a terminal or from a computer running a
communications program in terminal mode. This section describes how to use AT commands for basic
operations, such as calling, answering a call, and hanging up.
Modes of Operation
The MTA128ST-USB has three modes of operation. They are:
• Offline Command Mode—The MTA128ST-USB communicates with the terminal or computer
and responds to AT commands. There is no data communications link with a remote device.
•
Data Mode—The MTA128ST-USB enters data mode when it makes a successful data
communications link with a remote device. In data mode, the TA can send and receive data,
but it does not respond to AT commands. Instead it treats them as data and transmits them to
the remote device.
•
Online Command Mode—The MTA128ST-USB responds to AT commands while maintaining
a data communications link; however, transmission of data is suspended. To enter online
command mode from data mode, type the escape sequence +++AT<cr>. To return to data
mode from online command mode, type ATO<cr>.
Making a Call
Before you can place a data call, configure the MTA128ST-USB for the local switch type, serial port
speed, and the data type of the ISDN device you want to call. See Chapter 3, Software Installation
and Configuration.
Dialing
To dial a number using AT commands, you must first start a data communications program. In the
program’s terminal mode, type ATDxxxxxxx<cr>, where xxxxxxx is the telephone number you want
to dial, and <cr> is the carriage return character that is sent when you press the ENTER key, e.g.,
ATD7853500<cr>. The dial string can contain up to 80 characters.
To place an ML-PPP call, use an ampersand character (&) to join two telephone numbers, e.g.,
ATD7853500&7853502<cr>. The telephone numbers can be the same or different. Using this
method, two B-channels are activated to transmit data at an aggregate speed of 128 Kbps.
To make it easier to read the dial string, you can use hyphens, spaces or parentheses. These
characters are ignored by the MTA128ST-USB. For example, the MTA128ST-USB would read the
following dial strings the same way:
ATD17637853500 <cr>
ATD 1-763-785-3500 <cr>
ATD 1 (763) 785-3500 <cr>
Channel Bundling Flag Dialing
The command AT&Jn is used to indicate whether outgoing calls should be made on two B-channels
by default. The command AT&J1&W0<cr>, configures the TA to place a call, dialing on two B-channels
by default. If no second number is given in the dial string, that single number is dialed twice. This
compensates for the interworking issues with Windows 95. On the other hand, if the user explicitly
indicates two numbers in the dial string, then two numbers are dialed (e.g.,
ATD7853500&7853502<cr>). The command AT&J0&W0<cr>, disables automatic call bundling. Note
other valid characters joining two telephone numbers include a plus sign (+), and an exclamation mark
(!).
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Chapter 4 - AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Note: In Windows 2000 and Windows 98/95, if the Use Country Code and Area Code box is checked in the
Properties window for dial-up connection, the bundling modifier (i.e., &, + or !) is removed from the dialing
string when the user attempts to make a connection. The solution is to not check the Use Country Code and
Area Code box or to simply add the bundling dial modifier to the phone number at the time of connection.
Canceling a Call
To cancel a call before the TA makes a connection, press any key.
Storing a Telephone Number
To store a telephone number, type &Zn=x in terminal mode, where n is the number of the memory
register in which the number is to be stored, and x is the dial command string that you want to store.
For example, type AT&Z9=763-785-3500 <cr> to store the number 763-785-3500 in memory register
9.
Dialing a Stored Telephone Number
To dial a stored telephone number, type DSn in terminal mode, where n is the location of the number
you wish to dial. For example, type ATDS3 <cr> dials a telephone stored in memory register 3
location.
Displaying a Stored Number
To display a stored telephone number, type &Zn? in terminal mode, where n is the memory register in
which the number is stored. For example, type AT&Z5? <cr> to display the telephone number in
memory register 5. To list all ten telephone numbers stored in memory, type ATL <cr>.
Answering a Call
You can answer incoming calls to the TA either manually or automatically. When the TA detects an
incoming call, it sends a RING result code to the computer or terminal after each ring. If autoanswer is
enabled, the TA automatically answers the call. You can manually answer the call with the A command.
Both methods are described below.
Answering Manually
If your communication program is in terminal mode when the RING result code appears on your
monitor, you can manually answer the call by typing ATA <cr>.
Answering Automatically
To cause the TA to automatically answer a call:
1. Enable autoanswer by setting register S0 to the ring on which you want the TA to answer (e.g., in
terminal mode, type S0=4 to make the TA answer on the fourth ring). You also can use either of
the configuration utilities to the turn on autoanswer and set the number of rings.
2. Make sure that the TA is offline.
The TA answers the call after the number of rings specified by S0. To disable autoanswer, use a
configuration utility or the command S0=0.
Note: If the user wants to accept calls while DTR is low, the TA must be configured to ignore DTR. To do this,
enter AT&D0<cr>. With this configuration, the TA can accept calls while DTR is low. If this configuration
setting is not made, the TA rejects incoming calls until DTR is high while calls comes in.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
Hanging Up
To hang up a call, escape to online command mode (+++AT<cr>), then enter the H command
(ATH<cr>). The escape sequence and hang up command can be combined into one command string:
+++ATH<cr>.
74
Chapter 5 - Troubleshooting
MultiModemISDN User Guide
Introduction
This chapter describes basic problems you may run into with your MTA128ST-USB and how to solve
them. Your MTA128ST-USB was thoroughly tested at the factory before it was shipped. If you are
unable to make a successful connection, or if you experience data loss during your connection, check
the following possibilities before calling Technical Support (see Chapter 6).
•
None of the LEDs light when the MTA128ST-USB is on.
•
The MTA128ST-USB does not respond to commands.
•
The MTA128ST-USB dials but cannot make a connection.
•
You can place data calls but not voice calls, or vice versa.
•
You cannot place two simultaneous data calls.
•
The MTA128ST-USB disconnects while online.
•
The MTA128ST-USB cannot connect when answering.
•
File transfer appears slower than it should be.
•
Data is being lost.
•
There are garbage characters on the monitor.
None of the LEDs light when the MTA128ST-USB is on
When you turn on the MTA128ST-USB, the LED indicators on the front panel should flash briefly as
the unit runs a self-test. If the LEDs remain off, the unit probably is not receiving power.
•
Make sure the MTA128ST-USB’s power switch is on, especially if you normally turn on the unit
by turning on a power strip.
•
If the power supply is plugged into a power strip, make sure the power strip is plugged in and
its power switch is on.
•
Make sure the power supply module is firmly connected to the MTA128ST-USB and to the
wall outlet or power strip.
•
If the power strip is on and the MTA128ST-USB is switched on, try moving the unit’s power
supply to another outlet on the power strip.
•
Test that the outlet is live by plugging another electrical device into it.
•
The MTA128ST-USB or power supply may be defective. If you have another Multi-Tech
MTA128ST-USB, try swapping units. If the problem goes away, the first unit or power supply
may be defective. Call Tech Support for assistance.
Caution: Do not under any circumstances replace the power supply module with one designed for
another product, as it may damage the MTA128ST-USB and void your warranty.
The MTA128ST-USB does not respond to commands
76
•
Make sure the MTA128ST-USB is plugged in and turned on. (See None of the LEDs Light
When the MTA128ST-USB Is On.)
•
Try resetting your MTA128ST-USB by turning it off and on.
•
Make sure you are issuing the MTA128ST-USB commands from the data communications
software, either automatically, or manually in terminal mode. (You cannot send commands to
Chapter 5 - Troubleshooting
the MTA128ST-USB from the DOS prompt.)
•
Make sure you are in terminal mode in your data communications program. Then type AT and
press ENTER. If you get an OK response, your connections are good and the problem may be
in your phonebook entry or session settings.
•
If you don’t get an OK, the problem may still be in the communications software. Make sure
you have done whatever is necessary in your software to make a port connection. Not all
communications programs connect automatically to the COM port. Some connect when the
software loads and remain connected until the program ends. Others, like MultiExpress
Terminal, can disconnect without ending the program (make sure the Connect icon is
plugged in). MultiExpress Terminal also allows multiple terminals to be open, but only one
can access the MTA128ST-USB at a time. If MultiExpress Terminal reports that it cannot
make a connection, yet the MTA128ST-USB’s TR indicator is on, click on the Window menu
to see if more than one terminal is open. The MTA128ST-USB’s TR indicator shows that the
software has made a connection with the unit through the COM port.
•
Your communications software settings may not match the physical port the MTA128ST-USB
is connected to. The USB cable may be plugged into the wrong connector—check your
computer documentation to make sure. Or you may have selected a COM port in your
software other than the one the MTA128ST-USB is physically connected to—compare the
settings in your software to the physical connection.
•
If the MTA128ST-USB is on, the cable is plugged into the correct port, the communications
software is configured correctly, and you still don’t get an OK, the fault may be in the USB
cable. Make sure it is firmly connected at both ends.
•
Is this the first time you have used the cable? If so, check the cable description on the
packaging to make sure the cable is correct for your computer.
•
Peripheral expansion cards, such as bus mouse and sound cards, may include a USB port
preconfigured as COM1 or COM2. The extra USB port, or the card itself, may use the same
COM port, memory address, or interrupt request (IRQ) as your communications port. Be sure
to disable any unused ports.
If you use Windows 98/95, right-click on My Computer, select Properties from the menu, click
on the Device Manager tab, double-click on Ports, then double-click on the Communications
Port your MTA128ST-USB is connected to. In the port’s Properties sheet, click on the
Resources tab to see the port’s Input/Output range and Interrupt Request. If another device
is using the same address range or IRQ, it will appear in the Conflicting Device List. Uncheck
Use Automatic Settings to change the port’s settings so they do not conflict with the other
device, or select the port the conflicting device is on and change it instead. If you need to
open your computer to change switches or jumpers on the conflicting device, refer to the
device’s documentation.
•
The USB port may be defective. If you have another USB port, install the MTA128ST-USB on
it, change the COM port setting in your software, and try again.
•
The MTA128ST-USB may be defective. If you have another Multi-Tech MTA128ST-USB, try
swapping units. If the problem goes away, the first MTA128ST-USB is possibly defective. Call
Tech Support for assistance (see Chapter 6).
The MTA128ST-USB dials but cannot make a connection
There may be several reasons the MTA128ST-USB fails to make a connection. Possibilities include
•
Lack of a proper physical connection to the communication line.
•
A busy signal.
•
A wrong number.
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
•
No terminal adapter at the other end.
•
A faulty communications device, computer, or software at the other end.
•
Incompatibility between communications devices.
•
An improperly configured MTA128ST-USB.
Narrow the list of possibilities by using extended result codes. To enable them, enter ATV1X2 and
press ENTER while in terminal mode or include V1X2 in the MTA128ST-USB’s initialization string
(V1X2 is enabled by default). When you dial again, the MTA128ST-USB reports the call’s progress.
•
If the MTA128ST-USB reports NO DIALTONE, check that the ISDN S/T cable is securely
connected to both the unit’s ISDN jack (not the AUX jack) and the ISDN network terminator
or wall jack. If the cable looks secure, try replacing it. If that doesn’t work, the problem may
be in your building’s telephone installation. Make sure ISDN cables on all devices are wired
straight-through (pin 1 to pin 1, pin 2 to pin 2, etc.) and do not have reversed pairs. The cable
must have at least the middle four pins (pins 2, 3, 4, and 5) connected. A reversed pair on the
U (phone company) side is not important, but a reversed pair on the S/T (your) side can
create problems if you have more than one device, since multiple devices attached to the S/T
interface must all have the same polarity.
•
If the MTA128ST-USB reports BUSY, the other number may be busy, in which case you
should try again later.
•
If the MTA128ST-USB reports NO CARRIER, no connection was made. You might have dialed
the correct number but the other computer or software was turned off or faulty. Check the
number and try again, or try calling another system to make sure your unit is working. Also,
check that you accurately configured the TA with the correct switch type, TEIs, data protocols,
and other parameters needed for a successful call (see Chapter 3).
You can place data calls but not voice calls or vice versa
•
You might not have ordered both voice and data service from your ISDN provider. Check your
contract or latest statement of service from your ISDN provider.
•
Your ISDN provider may have programmed the switch incorrectly. Call the provider.
You cannot place two simultaneous data calls
•
You may not have ordered an ISDN line configuration that supports two simultaneous calls.
Check your contract or latest statement of service from your ISDN provider. Also, your ISDN
provider may have programmed the switch incorrectly. Call the provider.
•
You may have misconfigured your MTA128ST-USB to dial two simultaneous data calls. The
command AT&J1&W0<cr> is used to indicate whether outgoing calls should be made on two
B-channels by default.
•
You may be using the wrong bundling dial modifier (e.g., ATD7853500&7853502<cr>). The
ampersand in this command string is correct. Other valid characters joining two telephone
numbers include a plus sign (+) and an exclamation mark (!).
Note: In Windows 2000 and Windows 98/95, if the Use Country Code and Area Code box is checked in
the Properties window for dial-up connection, the bundling modifier (i.e., &, + or !) is removed from
the dialing string when the user attempts to make a connection. The solution is not to check the Use
Country Code and Area Code box or to simply add the bundling dial modifier to the phone number at
the time of connection.
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Chapter 5 - Troubleshooting
The MTA128ST-USB disconnects while online
•
Check for loose connections between the MTA128ST-USB and the computer, the ISDN jack,
and AC power.
•
The problem may have originated at the other end of the line. Try again.
•
If you were online with a BBS or online service, it may have hung up on you because of lack
of activity on your part or because you exceeded your time limit for the day. Try again.
The MTA128ST-USB cannot connect when answering
•
Autoanswer may be disabled. Turn on autoanswer in your data communications program or
send the command ATS0=1 to your MTA128ST-USB in terminal mode.
Note: If the user wishes to accept calls while DTR is low, the MTA128ST-USB must be configured to ignore
DTR. This is accomplished by entering AT&D0<cr>. With this configuration, the MTA128ST-USB is able
to accept calls while DTR is low. If this configuration setting is not made, the TA rejects incoming calls
until DTR is high while the calls comes in.
File transfer appears slower than it should be
•
If you have several active USB devices on the same USB link, try deactivating one device at
a time to see of the transfer rate increases. USB devices on the same USB link share the
same bandwidth of the USB link. There may be several devices using a large amount of
bandwidth (such as a USB removable, media disk drive) leaving a small amount of
bandwidth for the MTA128ST-USB.
Data is being lost
•
USB cable is not plugged in.
•
Make sure the flow control method you selected in software matches the method selected in
the MTA128ST-USB.
Making a V.120 call, caller gets a NO CARRIER message after dialing the number
Some switches don’t support ISDN SETUP messages that contain a LLC (low layer compatibility)
element. When these switches receive an LLC in the SETUP, they immediately reject the call and a
NO CARRIER message displays. Disable LLC for V.120 calls by issuing the command AT!D0=0. To
enable LLC for V.120 calls, issue the command AT!D0=1.
Making a V.110 call, caller gets a NO CARRIER message after dialing the number
Some switches don’t support extended BC (bearer capability) information in the ISDN SETUP
message, such as the one normally sent by V.110 data protocol. When these switches receive a BC
with extended capability information in the SETUP, they immediately reject the call and a NO
CARRIER message displays. Disable sending extended BC information for V.110 calls by issuing the
command AT!D1=0. To enable sending extended BC information for V.110 calls, issue the command
AT!D1=1 (the default setting).
When using X.75 data protocol to transfer data via the Zmodem, the Zmodem displays Intermittent
bad packet errors and data throughput drops.
This occurs in cases when the X.75 packet size is greater than 1024 bytes and the terminal adapter
sending the file has a fast baud rate (e.g., 115200 bps) or its a USB TA, and the terminal adapter
receiving the file has a slow baud rate (e.g., 19200 bps). To reduce or possibly eliminate this, reduce
the X.75 packet size (S53) to a value less than or equal to 1024 bytes (e.g., ATS53=512). However, if
you set the receiving terminal adapter’s baud rate nearly equal to or greater than the baud rate of the
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MultiModemISDN User Guide
sending terminal adapter, then the packet size can be greater than 1024, and Zmodem transfers the
data without bad packet errors.
Note: The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available.
The MTA128ST-USB won’t accept V.120 calls from a 3Com Impact IQ terminal adapter.
The Impact IQ displays a connected status, but the MTA128ST-USB does not.
The MTA128ST-USB is looking for a SABME command from the Impact IQ to finish establishing the
V.120 connection. However, the Impact IQ won’t send a SABME until it has data to send. Have the
Impact IQ send a character by pressing any key (such as the space bar) on the terminal attached to
the Impact IQ. The MTA128ST-USB responds with a CONNECT message and displays the key you
pressed (e.g., a space).
MTA128ST-USB receives garbage characters when connected to a 3Com Impact IQ
terminal adapter
Most likely, the Impact IQ has compression turned on. The compression used by the Impact IQ is
incompatible with the compression used by the MTA128ST-USB. Disconnect the data connection and
give the Impact IQ the command AT%CO and then establish the data connection again. The garbage
characters should disappear.
MTA128ST-USB receives garbage characters after receiving several good characters
when connected to a 3Com Sonix adapter
Most likely, the Sonix has compression turned on. The compression used by the Sonix is
incompatible with the compression used by the MTA128ST-USB. Disconnect the data connection and
give the Sonix the command AT”HO (that’s a double quote) and then establish the data connection
again. The garbage characters should disappear.
Each time a 3Com Sonix terminal adapter originates a V.120 call, the MTA128ST-USB
answers the call as a V.110 call*
The Sonix sends V.110 information in the SETUP message to the network. Since the MTA128STUSB’s default is with Auto Protocol Detection enabled (ATS52=1), it looks at SETUP information from
the Sonix and determines erroneously that it is a V.110 call. Disable Auto Protocol Detection in the
MTA128ST-USB with the command ATS52=0 and try the connection again.
Note: The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available. If you are using the MTA128ST-USB-RC, the TA will disconnect after several
seconds, rather than answer the call as V.110.
MTA128ST-USB won’t connect to an ELSA terminal adapter with the V.120 data
protocol
Most likely, the ELSA terminal adapter has compression turned on. The compression used by the
ELSA terminal adapter is incompatible with compression used by the MTA128ST-USB. Give the ELSA
the command AT%CO to disable compression and try again.
80
Chapter 6 - Warranty, Service, and
Technical Support
MultiModem ISDN User Guide
Introduction
This chapter begins your MTA128ST-USB’s five-year warranty. If you have questions or problems with
your unit carefully read the next section, Technical Support. It includes the technical support telephone
numbers and information on how to send in your terminal adapter should you require service. The final
sections explain how to get information and technical support and how to upgrade the MTA128ST-USB
via FlashWizard.
Limited Warranty
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc., (hereafter “MTS”) warrants that the MT128ST-USB will be free from defects
in material or workmanship for a period of two years from date of purchase, or if proof of purchase is
not provided, two years from date of shipment.
MTS MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AND ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES
OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE HEREBY
DISCLAIMED.
This warranty does not apply to any products which have been damaged by lightning storms, water, or
power surges or which have been neglected, altered, abused, used for a purpose other than the one
for which they were manufactured, repaired by Customer or any party without MTS’s written
authorization, or used in any manner inconsistent with MTS’s instructions.
MTS’s entire obligation under this warranty shall be limited (at MTS’s option) to repair or replacement
of any products which prove to be defective within the warranty period or, at MTS’s option, issuance of
a refund of the purchase price. Defective products must be returned by Customer to MTS’s factory —
transportation prepaid.
MTS WILL NOT BE LIABLE FOR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, AND UNDER NO
CIRCUMSTANCES WILL ITS LIABILITY EXCEED THE PRICE FOR DEFECTIVE PRODUCTS.
Addendum for North American Products
In the event that service is required, products may be shipped, freight prepaid, to our Mounds View,
Minnesota, factory (Multi-Tech Systems, Inc., 2205 Woodale Drive, Mounds View, MN 55112, Attn:
Repairs, Serial #_____). A Returned Materials Authorization (RMA) is not required. Return shipping
charges (surface) will be paid by MTS. Please include, inside the shipping box, a description of the
problem, a return shipping address (must have street address, not P.O. Box), a telephone number, and
if the product is out of warranty, a check or purchase order for repair charges.
Extended two-year overnight replacement agreements are available for selected products. Please refer
to our Overnight Replacement Agreement on our web site for details on rates and coverages. Please
direct your questions regarding technical matters, product configuration, verification that the product is
defective, etc., to our Technical Support department at 1-800-972-2439.
Please direct your questions regarding repair expediting, receiving, shipping, billing, etc., to our Repair
Accounting department at (800) 328-9717 or (763) 785-3500.
Repairs for damages caused by lightning storms, water, power surges, incorrect installation, physical
abuse, or user-caused damages are billed on a time-plus-materials basis.
Addendum for International Products
Distributors should contact Amex, Inc., for information about the repairs for your Multi-Tech product.
Amex, Inc.
2724 Summer Street NE Minneapolis, MN 55413
U.S.A. Tel: +(612) 331-3251
Fax: +(612) 331-3180
82
Chapter 6 - Warranty, Service and Tech Support
Please direct your questions regarding technical matters, product configuration, verification that the
product is defective, etc., to our Technical Support department nearest you. When calling the U.S.,
please direct your questions regarding repair expediting, receiving, shipping, billing, etc., to our Repair
Accounting department at +(763) 785-3500 in the U.S.A., or a nearby Multi-Tech office which is listed
on the “Multi-Tech Corporate Offices” sheet in this International Distributor Resource Kit.
Repairs for damages caused by lightning storms, water, power surges, incorrect installation, physical
abuse, or user-caused damages are billed on a time-plus-materials basis.
Out of Warranty Repair Costs
Refer to Multi-Tech System's web site at http://www.multitech.com for information about out of
warranty repair costs.
On-line Warranty Registration
To register your Multi-Tech product on-line, click this link:
http://www.multitech.com/register
Software User License Agreement
IMPORTANT - READ BEFORE OPENING THE SOFTWARE PACKAGE
This license agreement is a legal agreement between you (either an individual or a single entity) and
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. for the Multi-Tech software product enclosed, which includes computer
software and may include associated media, printed materials, and “online” or electronic
documentation (“SOFTWARE PRODUCT”). The SOFTWARE PRODUCT also includes any updates
and supplements to the original SOFTWARE PRODUCT provided to you by Microsoft. Any software
provided along with the SOFTWARE PRODUCT that is associated with a separate end-user license
agreement is licensed to you under the terms of that license agreement.
By installing, copying, downloading, accessing, or otherwise using the SOFTWARE PRODUCT, you
agree to be bound by the terms of this End User License Agreement (EULA). If you do not agree to
the terms of this EULA, do not install or use the SOFTWARE PRODUCT; you may, however, return it
to your place of purchase for a full refund.
SINGLE-USER SOFTWARE LICENSE AGREEMENT
This copy of Multi-Tech software is provided only on the condition that you, Customer, agree to the
following license. READ THIS LICENSE CAREFULLY. If you do not agree to the terms contained in
this license, return the packaged program UNOPENED to the place you obtained it. If you agree to the
terms contained in this license, fill out the enclosed Software Registration Card, date, sign and return
the card by mail. Opening the packaged program constitutes agreement to be bound by the terms and
conditions of this Software License Agreement. Your right to use the software terminates automatically
if you violate any part of this software license agreement.
MULTI-TECH SOFTWARE LICENSE AGREEMENT
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. (MTS) agrees to grant and Customer agrees to accept on the following terms
and conditions, a non-transferable and non-exclusive license to use the software program(s) delivered
with this Agreement.
1.
GRANT OF LICENSE. MTS grants Customer the right to use one copy of the software on a
single computer (the Licensed System). You may not network the software or otherwise use it
on more than one computer or computer terminal at the same time.
2.
COPYRIGHT. The software is owned by MTS and is protected by United States copyright
laws and international treaty provisions. Therefore, Customer must treat the software like any
copyrighted material. Customer may install the software to a single hard disk and keep the
83
MultiModem ISDN User Guide
original for backup or archival purposes. Customer shall NOT copy, or translate into any
language, in whole or in part, any documentation which is provided by MTS in printed form
under this Agreement.
3.
OTHER RESTRICTIONS. The software may not be assigned, sublicensed, translated or
otherwise transferred by Customer without prior written consent from MTS. Customer may not
reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble the software. Any updates shall be used only on
the Licensed System, and shall remain subject to all other terms of this Agreement. Customer
agrees not to provide or otherwise make available the software including, but not limited to
documentation, programs listings, object code, or source code, in any form, to any person
other than Customer and his employees and /or agents, without prior written consent from
MTS. Customer acknowledges that the techniques, algorithms, and processes contained in the
software are proprietary to MTS and Customer agrees not to use or disclose such information
except as necessary to use the software.
Customer shall take reasonable steps consistent with steps taken to protect its own proprietary
information to prevent the unauthorized copying or use by third parties of the software or any of
the other materials provided under this Agreement. Any previous version of the software must
be destroyed or returned to Multi-Tech Systems, Inc. within 90 days of receipt of the software
upgrade or update.
4.
WARRANTY. MTS warrants that the software will perform substantially in accordance to the
product specifications in effect at the time of receipt by Customer. If it fails to perform accordingly, MTS will optionally repair any defect, or replace it. This warranty is void if the failure has
resulted from accident, abuse, or misapplication. A signed Software Registration Card must be
on file at MTS for this warranty to be in effect.
THE FOREGOING WARRANTY IS IN LIEU ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT WILL MTS
BE LIABLE FOR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES RESULTING FROM USE OF THE LICENSED PROGRAM, WHETHER AS A RESULT OF MTS NEGLIGENCE OR NOT, EVEN IF
MTS HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
5.
INDEMNIFICATION. MTS will indemnify and defend Customer from any claim that the software
infringes on any copyright, trademark, or patent. Customer will indemnify and defend MTS
against all other proceedings arising out of Customers use of the software.
6.
GENERAL. If any of the provisions, or portions thereof, of this Agreement are invalid under any
applicable statute or rule of law, they are to that extent deemed to be omitted.
This is the complete and exclusive statement of the Agreement between the parties, which
supersedes all proposals, oral, written and all other communications between the parties
relating to the subject matter of this Agreement. This Agreement may only be amended or
modified in writing, signed by authorized representatives of both parties.
This Agreement shall be governed by the laws of the State of Minnesota.
The waiver of one breach or default hereunder shall not constitute the waiver of any subsequent
breach or default.
84
Chapter 6 - Warranty, Service and Tech Support
Technical Support
Multi-Tech provides free technical support for as long as your product remains in service. Before
calling Technical Support, please complete the Recording Modem Information section below. Also
check your cables to ensure they are connected properly. To contact our Technical Support group, use
one of the following contact options, keeping in mind that phone calls are handled with first priority:
Contacting Technical Support
...Using email
...By phone
U.S. & Canada
tsupport@multitech.com
800-972-2439 or 763-785-3500
France
support@multitech.fr
+(33) 1-64 61 09 81
Germany
technical@de.multitech.com
+(49) 89028-0
China
support@multi-tech.com.cn
+(86) 10-68748015
India
support@multitechindia.com
+(91) 124-340778
U.K. & Europe
support@multitech.co.uk
+(44) 118 959 7774
Multi-Tech has an excellent staff of technical support personnel available to help you get the most out
of your Multi-Tech product. If you have any questions about the operation of this unit, call Technical
Support at (763) 717-5863.
Service
If your tech support specialist decides service is required, send the MTA128ST-USB (freight prepaid)
to our factory. Return shipping charges are paid by Multi-Tech Systems (within North America).
Include the following with your MTA128ST-USB:
•
a description of the problem.
•
return billing and return shipping addresses.
•
contact name and phone number.
•
check or purchase order number for payment if the MTA128ST-USB is out of warranty. Check
with your technical support specialist for current repair charges.)
•
if possible, note the name of the technical support specialist with whom you spoke.
If you need to inquire about the status of the returned product, be prepared to provide the serial
number of the product sent.
Send the MTA128ST-USB to:
Multi-Tech Systems, Inc.
2205 Woodale Drive
Mounds View, Minnesota 55112
ATTN: Service or Repairs
85
MultiModem ISDN User Guide
Ordering Accessories
SupplyNet, Inc. supplies replacement transformers, cables and connectors for select Multi-Tech
products. You can place an order with SupplyNet via mail, phone, fax or the Internet at:
86
Mail:
SupplyNet, Inc.
614 Corporate Way
Valley Cottage, NY 10989
Phone:
800 826-0279
Fax:
914 267-2420
Email:
info@thesupplynet.com
Internet:
http://www.thesupplynet.com
Chapter 6 - Warranty, Service and Tech Support
Upgrading the MTA128ST-USB with FlashWizard
The MTA128ST-USB has a flash PROM, which contains firmware code for the hardware. At various
times, Multi-Tech may add enhancements and/or fixes to the firmware. The flash technology used in
the MTA128ST-USB lets you load these upgrades into the PROM through the MTA128ST-USB’s USB
port.
Using FlashWizard to Upgrade Firmware
1. Download the Flash Wizard utility and the new .HEX file from the Multi-Tech FTP site or MultiTech’s web site.
Note: You must place the .HEX file in the same directory where the Flash Wizard executable is located. The
utility automatically senses the devices on the ports of your PC and finds the .Hex file which is compatible
with the MTA128ST-USB . If no .Hex files are found in the directory where Flash Wizard program is
located, the utility exits with an error.
2.
Launch the Flash Wizard utility (e.g. double-click on the FlashWiz.exe file from Explorer, enter the
file name at the DOS prompt, etc.)
3. The Firmware Update Wizard dialog box is displayed indicating that it is identifying devices (this
may take up to 20 seconds).
4. Once devices have been identified the Firmware Update Wizard dialog box indicating that
devices have been identified displays.
Select the device(s) you want to flash and then click Next >.
5. The Firmware Update Wizard dialog box displays asking you to select the ports and hex file to
update. Once you have made the appropriate selections, click Next>.
6. The Firmware Update Wizard dialog box displays indicating that your devices are being
upgraded. Once finished, click Next >.
7. The Firmware Update Wizard dialog box is displayed indicating the results of the update (e.g., 8
of 8 devices were updated successfully). Click Finish.
The Update Hardware Wizard completes the update process and disappears from your screen.
87
Appendixes
Appendixes
Appendix A: Regulatory Compliance
Class B Statement
FCC Part 15
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may
cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that
interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and
on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
·
·
·
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is
connected.
· Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules.
Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
(1) This device may not cause harmful interference.
(2) This device must accept any interference that may cause undesired operation.
Warning: Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the party responsible for
compliance could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
Industry Canada
This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing
Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numerique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Reglement sur le materiel
brouilleur du Canada.
EMC, Safety, and Terminal Directive Compliance
The CE mark is affixed to this product to confirm compliance with the following European Community
Directives:
Council Directive 89/336/EEC of 3 May 1989 on the approximation of the laws of Member States
relating to electromagnetic compatibility;
and
Council Directive 73/23/EEC of 19 February 1973 on the harmonization of the laws of Member States
relating to electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage
limits;
and
Council Directive 98/13/EC of 12 March 1998 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States
concerning telecommunications terminal and satellite earth station equipment.
89
MultiVOIP 200 User Guide
Appendix B: Configuration Profiles
Quick Setup Factory Profiles
For quick setup, the MTA128ST-USB includes six Quick Setup Factory Profiles, each of which is
configured for a specific type of port operation. You can load a Quick Setup Factory Profile into active
memory by using the command &Fn, in which n is the number of the profile you wish to load. If you
wish, you can then customize the profile and store it, using the &W command, so that it loads
automatically when the MTA128ST-USB is turned on or reset. These profiles are stored in permanent
memory and are not user-configurable as such.
&F0
Profile 0—Modem-like operation (default)
&F1
Profile 1—V.110 async operation
&F2
Profile 2—V.120 async operation
&F3
Profile 3—X.75 async operation
&F4
Profile 4—ML-PPP async operation
Note: The &F1 command will return an error when used with build MT128ST-USB-RC.
Quick Setup Example
The following procedure assumes that you want to load, modify, and store Quick Setup Factory Profile
2 as your default configuration.
1. Select the profile closest to the requirements of your application, in this case— Quick Setup
Factory Profile 2.
2. In terminal mode, type AT&F2 and press ENTER. Quick Setup Profile 2 loads into the MTA128STUSB’s active memory.
3. Enter any additional AT commands that you need to customize the selected profile to your
application (see Chapter 4, AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes).
4. Type AT&W0 and press ENTER to save your customized port configuration.
5. Your customized profile now loads automatically whenever the MTA128ST-USB is turned on or
reset.
Profile 0 (&F0) — Modem-Like Asynchronous Operation
90
AT COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
&C1
$D0
&D1
E1
&E4
&E6
&E13
#X0
&J0
%E1
%E4
&R1
DCD functions normally
Disable persistent DTR dialing
Hang up when DTR drops
Enable command mode echo
Enable hardware flow control
Discard XON/XOFF characters
Enable pacing
Disable Sending Multiple Xoff Characters
Disable Automatic Channel Bundling
Enable +++ escape method
No OK response to +++ or <break> escape
CTS always high
Appendixes
S0=1
S2=43
S3=13
S4=10
S5=8
S7=45
S10=20
S25=5
S32=20
S34=2
S50=1
S52=1
S53=2048
&S1
V1
!Z=x
Answer after 1 ring
Set escape character to + (ASCII 43)
Set carriage return character to CR (ASCII 13)
Set line feed character to LF (ASCII 10)
Set backspace character to BS (ASCII 8)
Wait 45 seconds for connection before aborting
Set DCD drop time to 700 ms
Set DTR detect time to 500 ms
Set escape sequence guard time to 2 seconds
Set maximum escape sequence character length
Caller Line ID enabled
Auto-Protocol Detection enabled
Maximum X.75 buffer size is 2048 characters
DSR follows DCD
Select verbose messages
The data protocol is not modified
Profile 1 (&F1) — V.110 Asynchronous Operation*
* The MTA128ST-USB is manufactured in two builds. To determine the build of your terminal adapter
(TA), issue the ATI2 command in a terminal window. If the TA responds to the command with MTA128STUSB, then it supports V.110. If your TA resonds to the ATI2 command with MTA128ST-USB-RC, V.110
support is not available.
AT COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
&C1
$D0
&D1
E1
&E4
&E6
&E13
#X0
&J0
%E1
%E4
&R1
S0=1
S2=43
S3=13
S4=10
S5=8
S7=45
S10=20
S25=5
S32=20
S34=2
S50=1
S52=1
DCD functions normally
Disable persistent DTR dialing
Hang up when DTR drops
Enable command mode echo
Enable hardware flow control
Discard XON/XOFF characters
Enable pacing
Disable Sending Multiple Xoff Characters
Disable Automatic Channel Bundling
Enable +++ escape method
No OK response to +++ or <break> escape
CTS always high
Answer after 1 ring
Set escape character to + (ASCII 43)
Set carriage return character to CR (ASCII 13)
Set line feed character to LF (ASCII 10)
Set backspace character to BS (ASCII 8)
Wait 45 seconds for connection before aborting
Set DCD drop time to 700 ms
Set DTR detect time to 500 ms
Set escape sequence guard time to 2 seconds
Set maximum escape sequence character length
Caller Line ID enabled
Auto-Protocol Detection enabled
91
MultiModemISDN User Guide
S53=2048
&S1
V1
!Z=6
Maximum X.75 buffer size is 2048 characters
DSR follows DCD
Select verbose messages
Enable V.110 data protocol
Profile 2 (&F2) — V.120 Asynchronous Operation
AT COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
&C1
$D0
&D1
E1
&E4
&E6
&E13
#X0
&J0
%E1
%E4
&R1
S0=1
S2=43
S3=13
S4=10
S5=8
S7=45
S10=20
S25=5
S32=20
S34=2
S50=1
S52=1
S53=2048
&S1
V1
!Z=5
DCD functions normally
Disable persistent DTR dialing
Hang up when DTR drops
Enable command mode echo
Enable hardware flow control
Discard XON/XOFF characters
Enable pacing
Disable Sending Multiple Xoff Characters
Disable Automatic Channel Bundling
Enable +++ escape method
No OK response to +++ or <break> escape
CTS always high
Answer after 1 ring
Set escape character to + (ASCII 43)
Set carriage return character to CR (ASCII 13)
Set line feed character to LF (ASCII 10)
Set backspace character to BS (ASCII 8)
Wait 45 seconds for connection before aborting
Set DCD drop time to 700 ms
Set DTR detect time to 500 ms
Set escape sequence guard time to 2 seconds
Set maximum escape sequence character length
Caller Line ID enabled
Auto-Protocol Detection enabled
Maximum X.75 buffer size is 2048 characters
DSR follows DCD
Select verbose messages
Enable V.120 data protocol
Profile 3 (&F3) — X.75 Asynchronous Operation
92
AT COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
&C1
$D0
&D1
E1
&E4
&E6
&E13
#X0
&J0
%E1
%E4
DCD functions normally
Disable persistent DTR dialing
Hang up when DTR drops
Enable command mode echo
Enable hardware flow control
Discard XON/XOFF characters
Enable pacing
Disable Sending Multiple Xoff Characters
Disable Automatic Channel Bundling
Enable +++ escape method
No OK response to +++ or <break> escape
Appendixes
&R1
S0=1
S2=43
S3=13
S4=10
S5=8
S7=45
S10=20
S25=5
S32=20
S34=2
S50=1
S52=1
S53=2048
&S1
V1
!Z=12
CTS always high
Answer after 1 ring
Set escape character to + (ASCII 43)
Set carriage return character to CR (ASCII 13)
Set line feed character to LF (ASCII 10)
Set backspace character to BS (ASCII 8)
Wait 45 seconds for connection before aborting
Set DCD drop time to 700 ms
Set DTR detect time to 500 ms
Set escape sequence guard time to 2 seconds
Set maximum escape sequence character length
Caller Line ID enabled
Auto-Protocol Detection enabled
Maximum X.75 buffer size is 2048 characters
DSR follows DCD
Select verbose messages
Enable X.75 data protocol
Profile 4 (&F4) — ML-PPP Asynchronous Operation
AT COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
&C1
$D0
&D1
E1
&E4
&E6
&E13
#X0
&J0
%E1
%E4
&R1
S0=1
S2=43
S3=13
S4=10
S5=8
S7=45
S10=20
S25=5
S32=20
S34=2
S50=1
S52=1
S53=2048
&S1
V1
!Z=9
DCD functions normally
Disable persistent DTR dialing
Hang up when DTR drops
Enable command mode echo
Enable hardware flow control
Discard XON/XOFF characters
Enable pacing
Disable Sending Multiple Xoff Characters
Disable Automatic Channel Bundling
Enable +++ escape method
No OK response to +++ or <break> escape
CTS always high
Answer after 1 ring
Set escape character to + (ASCII 43)
Set carriage return character to CR (ASCII 13)
Set line feed character to LF (ASCII 10)
Set backspace character to BS (ASCII 8)
Wait 45 seconds for connection before aborting
Set DCD drop time to 700 ms
Set DTR detect time to 500 ms
Set escape sequence guard time to 2 seconds
Set maximum escape sequence character length
Caller Line ID enabled
Auto-Protocol Detection enabled
Maximum X.75 buffer size 2048 is characters
DSR follows DCD
Select verbose messages
Enable MLPPP data protocol
93
Glossary
Glossary
Symbol
2B1Q (2 bits, 1 quarternary)—A line code at layer one for the BRI U interface. Two bits of data (2B) are mapped into one of four line values
(1Q, or 1quarternary). This coding scheme allows a single copper pair to carry 160 Kbps of information bidirectionally and simultaneously
at a distance of up to three miles.
A
ACK (acknowledgement code)—A communications code sent from a receiving modem to a transmitting modem to indicate that it is ready
to accept data. It is also used to acknowledge the error-free receipt of transmitted data. Contrast with NAK.
address—A numbered location inside a computer. The computer uses addresses to access resources such as video cards, USB ports,
memory, etc.
analog signal—A waveform that has amplitude, frequency, and phase, which takes on a range of values between its maximum and
minimum points.
analog transmission—A type of telecommunications that uses an analog signal as a carrier of voice, data, video, etc. An analog signal
becomes a carrier when it is modulated by altering its phase, amplitude, and/or frequency to correspond with the source signal. Compare
with digital transmission.
API (application program interface)—A software module created to allow dissimilar, or incompatible applications programs to transfer
information over a communications link. APIs may be simple or complex; they are commonly required to link computer applications with
mainframe programs.
ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange)—Pronounced ass-key. A binary code for data that is used in communications
and in many computers and terminals. The code is used to represent numbers, letters, punctuation, and control characters. The basic ASCII
code is a 7-bit character set, which defines 128 possible characters. The extended 8-bit ASCII code defines 255 characters.
ASI (application services interface)—A software module that creates the interface between a LAN-connected PC and the network operating
system. ASIs packetize computer data for transport over the network. NASI, NCSI, MCSI and NETCI are specific examples.
AT commands—A standard set of commands used to control modems. Each AT command string begins with the characters AT, which
get the attention of the modem before the actual command is issued. See also command mode.
B
background—An activity that takes place in the computer while you are running another application. In other words, the active user
interface does not correspond to the background task.
bandwidth—The transmission capacity of a computer channel, communications line or bus. It is expressed in cycles per second (hertz),
the bandwidth being the difference between the lowest and highest frequencies transmitted. The range of usable frequencies that a
transmission medium will pass without unacceptable attenuation or distortion. Bandwidth is a factor in determining the amount of information
and the speed at which a medium can transmit data or other information.
basic access—A term that describes a simple standardized combination of access channels that constitute the access arrangements for
most ISDN users.
B-channel (bearer channel)—A 64 Kbps ISDN channel used for digital high-speed data or voice transmission. Simultaneous voice and
data transmission requires subscription to two B-channels. A voice call can be placed or received while a data call is in process (or vice
versa); however, two simultaneous voice or two simultaneous data calls are not supported.
bearer capability (BC)—The level of functionality provided by the ISDN B-channel (e.g., data, 3.1 KHz audio, etc.).
bearer services—A set of ISDN functions provided by the B-channel, such as digital telephony, toll-free inbound/outbound calls, 64 Kbps
circuit switched data, X.25 packet switched data, and frame relay data.
bit—A bit (binary digit) is a basic unit of information used in computing and other digital electronics. It can take a value of either 1 or 0,
represented in a computer by a high or low electrical charge.
BONDING (Bandwidth on Demand Interoperability Group)—An inverse multiplexing method that combines multiple ISDN channels into a
single channel for enhanced throughput. Trademark of the BONDING Consortium.
BONDING mode 1—An industry-standard ISDN B channel aggregation protocol that was developed by the Bandwidth On Demand
Interoperability Group. This mode supports user data rates that are multiples of the bearer rate. It provides the full available bandwidth, but no
in-band monitoring. Mode 1 is common to all implementations of BONDING; Modes 0, 2, and 3 are optional.
BONDING Consortium—A group that develops specifications for common control and synchronization for management of high-speed
data over the public network.
BONDING Specification 1.0— The Version 1.0 BONDING specification (August 1992) defines four modes of inverse multiplexing
interoperability. It allows devices from various manufacturers to subdivide a wideband signal into 64 Kbps or 56 Kbps channels, and then pass
the individual channels over a switched digital network, recombining them into a single high-speed signal at the receiving device.
95
MultiModemISDN User Guide
BONDING Specification 1.1— The Version 1.1 BONDING specification (September 1993) incorporates changes to the 1.0 specification
resulting from interworking tests among various vendors, and comments from the TIA standardization process. No changes were made to
the BONDING algorithm or procedures.
bps (bits per second)—The unit of speed at which data bits can be transmitted or received. Bps differs from baud when more than one bit
is represented by a single cycle of the carrier.
BRI (basic rate interface)—Also called 2B+D. One of two forms of ISDN service. BRI provides two 64 Kbps B-channels for video, voice or
data, and one 16 Kbps D-channel for control information. The total BRI data rate is 192 Kbps, with 144 Kbps available to the user. See also
ISDN and PRI.
buffer—A temporary storage register or random access memory (RAM), used in all aspects of data communications, that prevents data from
being lost due to differences in transmission speed. Keyboards, USB ports, muxes and printers are a few examples of devices that contain
buffers.
bus—A common channel between hardware devices, either internally between components in a computer, or externally between stations in a
communications network.
byte—A unit of information consisting of eight binary digits (bits). A byte holds the equivalent of a single or character (such as the letter A).
C
call setup time—The time to establish a circuit-switched call between two points. Includes dialing, wait time, and central office–long
distance service movement time.
carrier signal—An analog signal with known frequency, amplitude and phase characteristics used as a transport facility for useful
information. By knowing the original characteristics, a receiver can interpret any changes as modulations, and thereby recover the
information.
Centrex—A multi-line service, offered by telephone companies, that provides functions and features comparable to those of a PBX for large
business users. See also PBX, exchange.
channel—A data communications path between two computer devices. It can refer to a physical medium (e.g., UTP or coax), or to a
specific carrier frequency. In ISDN, two types of channels are specified: transparent (user can define the service), and nontransparent
(service is assigned protocols for specific network functions). ISDN channel names are designated by a single letter, from A through M,
sometimes combined with a number (see B-channel and D-channel).
circuit-switched network—A technology used by the PSTN that allocates a pair of conductors for the exclusive use of one
communication path. Circuit switching allows multiple conversations on one talk path only if end users multiplex signals prior to
transmission.
circuit switching—The temporary connection of two or more communications channels using a fixed, non-shareable path through the
network. Users have full use of the circuit until the connection is terminated.
CO (central office)—The lowest, most basic, level of switching in the PSTN (public switched telephone network). A business PABX or any
residential telephone connects to the PSTN at a central office.
COM port—A serial communications port on a personal computer. Normally, there are two: COM1 and COM2.
CPE (customer premise equipment)—The generic term for data communications and/or terminal equipment that resides at the user site and
is owned by the user (e.g., not telephone company equipment).
D
DCE (data communications equipment)—Any device that serves as the port of entry from the user equipment to a telecommunications
facility. A modem is a DCE for the telephone network (PSTN) that is commonly on site at the user’s premises. Packet Switched Networks
have another level of DCE that is most often located at a central office.
D-channel—A non-ransparent digital ISDN channel that operates at 16 K or 64 Kbps, used for call control signalling, along with one or
more B-channels. The D (demand) channel signal can control call setup, call teardown, and invocation of Supplementary Services. Is also
used for telemetry and for low-speed, low-priority packet-switched data. Contrast with B-channel.
default—A preset value or option in software packages or in hardware configuration that is used unless you specify otherwise.
default address: an address defined by the Universal Serial Bus Specification and used by a Universal Serial Bus device when it is first
powered or reset. The default address is 00h.
default pipe: the message pipe created by Universal Serial Bus system software to pass control and status information between the host and
a Universal Serial Bus device’s Endpoint 0.
device: a logical or physical entity that performs a function. The actual entity described depends on the context of the reference. At the lowest
level, device may refer to a single hardware component, as in a memory device. At a higher level, it may refer to a collection of hardware
components that perform a particular function, such as a Universal Serial Bus interface device. At an even higher level, device may refer to
the function performed by an entity attached to the Universal Serial Bus; for example, a data/FAX modem device. Devices may be physical,
electrical, addressable, and logical. When used as a non-specific reference, a Universal Serial Bus device is either a hub or a function.
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Glossary
device address: the address of a device on the Universal Serial Bus. The Device Address is the Default Address when the Universal
Serial Bus device is first powered or reset. Hubs and functions are assigned a unique Device Address by Universal Serial Bus software.
device driver—Software that controls how a computer communicates with a device, such as a printer or mouse.
digital data—Information represented by descrete values or conditions (contrast analog data).
digital PBX—A private branch exchange that operates internally on digital signals. See also exchange.
digital signal— A discrete or discontinuous signal (e.g., a sequence of voltage pulses). Digital devices, such as as a series of electrical
pulses that have discrete jumps rather than gradual changes.
digital transmission—A method of electronic information transmission common among computers and other digital devices. Because a
digital signal may be only high or low at any given time, noise and distortion can easily be removed from digital transmissions.
digitize—To convert an analog signal to a digital signal.
DIP switch—Pronounced dip switch. A set of tiny toggle switches, built into a DIP (dual in-line package), used for setting configurable
parameters on a printed circuit board.
DN (directory number)—The phone number assigned to an ISDN TA at subscription time. It is a string of up to 24 characters, consisting of
the valid dialing characters (0-9, *, and #).
driver—A software module that interfaces between the operating system and a specific hardware device (e.g., color monitors, printers,
hard disks, etc.). Also known as a device driver.
DTE (data terminating equipment)—A term used to include any device in a network which generates, stores or displays user information.
DTE is a telecommunications term that usually refers to PCs, terminals, printers, etc.
DTMF (dual-tone multifrequency)—A generic push-button concept made popular by AT&T TouchTone.
DTMF detection—A capability in some fax/data modems that can differentiate between DTMF or fax calling tones. A typical application
would be a program that routes calls to specific communications applications, depending either on the type of call or on a DTMF tone added
to a dialing string.
E
EEPROM (electrically eraseable programmable read-only memory)—A permanent memory chip that can be reprogrammed by the customer
after the manufacturer has set initial values. See also ROM.
EISA (Enhanced Industry Standard Architecture)—Pronounced eesa. The purpose of the EISA bus is to provide a 32-bit bus for faster
throughputs while maintaining backward compatibility with the classic ISA bus architecture.
ET (exchange termination)—The carrier’s local exchange switch. Contrast with LT (loop termination).
exchange—A unit (public or private) that can consist of one or more central offices established to serve a specified area. An exchange
typically has a single rate of charges (tariffs) that has previously been approved by a regulatory group.
exchange area—A geographical area with a uniform set of charges (tariffs), approved by a regulatory group for telephone services. Calls
between any two points within an exchange area are local calls. See digital PBX and PBX.
F
fax (facsimile)—Refers to the bit-mapped rendition of a graphics-oriented document (fax) or to the electronic transmission of the image
over telephone lines bit-mapped approximation of a graphical document and, therefore, cannot be accurately interpreted according to any
character code.
firmware—Software that is stored in read-only memory (ROM). Unlike random access memory (RAM), ROM can retain its content without
electrical power. Some ROM, known as EEPROM, can be reprogrammed electrically while it is in a device.
foreground—The application program currently running on and in control of the PC screen and keyboard. The area of the screen that
occupies the active window. Compare with background.
frequency—A characteristic of an electrical or electronic signal which describes the periodic recurrence of cycles. Frequency is inversely
proportional to the wavelength or pulse width of the signal (e.g., long wavelength signals have low frequencies and short wavelength signals
yield high frequencies).
function: A Universal Serial Bus device that provides a capability to the host. For example, an ISDN connection, a digital microphone, or
speakers.
H
handshaking—A process that two modems go through at the time of call setup to establish synchronization over the data communications
link. It is a synchronization and negotiation process accomplished by the exchange of predefined, mutually recognized control codes.
HDLC (High-Level Data Link Control)—An ISO standard, bit-oriented data communications protocol that provides nearly error-free data
transfers.
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hexadecimal—A base 16 numbering system in which one character represents a four-bit binary value. Hexadecimal notation uses the
numbers 0–9 and the letters A–F, usually suffixed by an h (e.g., 4CF h).
Host Controller: The host’s Universal Serial Bus interface. A hardware device that provides the interface to the Host Controller Driver
(HCD) and the USB bus.
Host Controller Driver (HCD): Software that provides an interface to the USB Driver and the Host Controller. (The interface to the Host
Controller is defined by the OHCI specification.
I
IDN (Integrated Digital Network)—The culmination of transmission and switching functions using digital technology in a circuit-switched
telecommunications network.
IEC (Inter-Exchange Carrier)—A telephone company that is allowed to provide long distance telephone service between LATAs, but not within
any one LATA. Also called IXC.
I-mux (inverse multiplexer)—A device that will dial up and combine several lower speed circuits into a virtual broadband circuit. It takes any
multiple up to an aggregate bandwidth, giving users bandwidth on demand for videoconferencing, LAN-to-LAN connections, etc. In ISDN
devices, inverse multiplexing is performed by the BONDING protocol.
in-band signaling—A technique in which connection control information is sent over the same channel as assigned to the subscriber for
end-to-end communication. Two common examples are DTMF line signaling and MF trunk signaling.
Internet—A computer network consisting of many millions of university, government, and private users around the world.
Internet address—A unique 32-bit address for a specific TCP/IP host on a network. Normally printed in dotted decimal format (e.g.,
129.128.44.227).
I/O address—A location within the I/O address space of your computer used by a device, such as an expansion card, a USB port, or an
internal modem. The address is used for communication between software and a device.
IP address—A unique 32-bit address for a specific TCP/IP host on a network. Normally printed in dotted decimal format (e.g.,
129.128.44.227).
IRQ (interrupt request)—The notification a processor receives when another portion of the computer’s hardware requires its attention. IRQs
are numbered so that the device issuing the IRQ can be identified, and so that IRQs can be prioritized.
ISA (Industry Standards Architecture)—Pronounced ice-a. The classic 8- or 16-bit architecture introduced with IBM’s PC-AT computer. Due to
speed constraints, IBM later introduced a restructured Micro Channel Architecture with a 32-bit bus and increased addressing capabilities.
ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network)—International telecommunications standard for transmitting voice, video and data over a digital
communications line.
ITU-T (formerly CCITT)—International Telecommunications Union–Telecommunications Sector; the United Nations organization that prepares
standards for resolving communications issues and problems.
L
LAPB (Link Access Procedure Balanced)—Based on the X.25 Layer 2 specification. A full-duplex, point-to-point, bit-synchronous protocol
commonly used as a data link control protocol to interface X.25 DTEs. LAPB is the link initialization procedure that establishes and
maintains communications between the DTE and the DCE.
LAPD (Link Access Protocol for the
D-Channel)—Based on the ISDN Q.921 specification. A full-duplex point-to-point bit-synchronous link-level protocol for ISDN connections;
different from LAPB in its framing sequence. Transmission is in units called frames, and a frame may contain one or more X.25 packets.
link optimization—An ISDN feature that permits only user data to open the communications link and keeps administrative packets from
opening the link. A cost saving feature that ensures that remote connections are not unnecessarily utilized.
local loop—A transmission path, typically twisted-pair wire, between an individual subscriber and the nearest public telecommunications
network switching center. Also called the subscriber loop.
LT (loop termination)—A device, similar to an NT1, that terminates the local loop at the carrier’s central switching office. The LT provides the
interface to the ISDN U reference point. Contrast ET (exchange termination).
M
ML-PPP (Multilink PPP)—An open standard for inverse multiplexing, allowing two 64 bps ISDN B channels to be multiplexed into one 128
Kbps link.
modem—A communications device that enables a computer to transmit information over a telephone line. It converts the computer’s digital
signals into analog signals to send over a telephone line and converts them back to digital signals at the receiving end. Modems can be
internal and fit into an expansion slot, or external and connect to a USB port.
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Glossary
MSN (Multiple Subscriber Number) - Allows a caller to specify an individual terminal adapter when more than one unit is connected to your
network terminator. An MSN consists of a base address and a subaddress. If you assisgn a base address only, the unit accepts any
incoming call with the same base address, regardless of whether a subaddress is included. If you assign a base address and a
subaddress, the unit only accepts calls that match both the base address and the subaddress.
multilink—In point-to-point protocol, literally many links. A procedure used to route data packets over many links for increased bandwidth
(e.g., two B-channels on a single BRI for 128 Kbps).
mux (multiplexer)—A device that merges several signals into one composite signal for transmission over a single medium or channel. A
demultiplexer, built into most muxes, reverses the process at the receiving end.
N
nailed connection—A permanent or dedicated circuit of a previously switched circuit or circuits.
nailed-up circuit—A semi-permanent circuit established through a circuit-switching facility for point-to-point connectivity.
NAK (negative acknowledgment)—A communications code used to indicate that a message was not properly received, or that a terminal
does not wish to transmit. Contrast with ACK.
network—A group of computers connected by cables or other means and using software that enables them to share equipment, such as
printers and disk drives to exchange information.
NI-1 (National ISDN-1)—A physical standard to make all compliant ISDN lines appear the same. With ISDN-1 installed, additional costs are
not incurred when changing from prestandard ISDN to standard ISDN. Most RBOCs now are moving to ISDN-1.
NI-2 (National ISDN-2)—A physical standard subsequent to NI1. When tested and deployed, NI-2 will provide additional features and
enhanced plug and play capabilities.
node—Any point within a network that has been assigned an address.
NT (network termination)—Devices that form the boundary between customer premise equipment and telephone company equipment. Two
types of NTs are used: NT1 and NT2.
NT1 (Network TerminationType 1)—An interface device used in the BRI portion of ISDN to connect four-wire (S/T) ISDN devices to the twowire (2BIQ U) IDN. It provides basic rate access in a 2B+D format with two 64 bps channels for voice, data, and video communications. It also
provides one 16 Kbps channel for packet-mode signalling, low-speed data and telecommunications services at the OSI Layer 1 level. Similar
in function to a DSU/CSU device.
NT2 (Network TerminationType 2)—A device at the customer premise (user) side responsible for the ISDN network connection and for
functions such as multiplexing and switching (may be an intelligent device).
NTE (network terminating equipment)—A set of ISDN functions residing at the boundary of the IDN and the subscriber.
NUI (network user identification)—A unique alphanumeric number provided to dial-up users to identify them to packet-switched networks
world-wide. The number is used for network access and billing.
O
OHCI (OpenHCI): Open Host Controller Interface Specification for USB. All transfers on the USB are initiated by the host system’s host
controller. The host controller is responsible for controlling traffic on the USB and can be appropriately programmed to transfer data to and
from USB devices. This is typically a PCI device that can be programmed to run a given schedule of transfers on the USB and bus master the
results into memory for processing by the host software. There are currently two standards for host controllers: OpenHCI (OHCI or Open
Host Controller Interface) and UHCI (Universal Host Controller Interface). Both these standards define register level interfaces of the host
controller to PCI bus. Bandwidth allocation over the USB is software managed and is done by the programming of the host controller.
off-hook—The condition of a device that has accessed a phone line (with or without using the line). In modem use, this is equivalent to a
telephone handset being picked up. Dialing and transmission are allowed, but incoming calls are not answered.
on-demand dialing—A cost-saving feature of ISDN that sets up, transfers, and then closes a call only when the ISDN device detects a data
packet addressed to the remote network, but will not perform setup/transfers of just administrative (non-user data) packets.
out-of-band signaling—A system that uses a separate communications channel or frequency outside the voice band for signaling. Modern
systems use a separate channel, either TDM or virtual. SS7 uses messages for signaling that are carried on signaling links distinct from voice
channels. ISDN uses messages for signaling that are carried on the
D-channel distinct from the voice carried on the B-channels. Frame Relay and ATM use messages that are carried on a separate virtual
connection reserved for signaling.
on-hook—The condition of a device which has not accessed a phone line. In modem use, this is equivalent to a telephone handset that has
not been picked up. In other words, it can receive an incoming call.
P
packet data—Packet-mode calls.
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packet mode—The switching of chunks of information for different users using statistical multiplexing to send them over the same
transmission facility. ISDN packet mode capabilities are based on the ITU-TSS Recommendation X.25 procedures.
parity bit—An extra bit attached to each byte of synchronous data used to detect errors in transmission.
PBX (private branch exchange)—A telephone exchange located on the customer’s premises. The PBX provides a circuit switching facility
for tlephone extension lines within the building, and access to the public telephone network. See also exchange.
P-channel (PCHAN)—The ISDN physical channel identification; contrast logical channel or virtual channel.
PDN (public data network)—A packet-switched network that is available to the public for individual (subscriber) use. Typically, controlled
by a government or a national monopoly.
Plug and Play (PnP): A technology for configuring I/O devices to use non-conflicting resources in a host. Resources managed by Plug
and Play include I/O address ranges, memory address ranges, IRQs, and DMA channels.
port—A location for input or output data exchange. Computers, muxes, etc. have ports for various purposes.
PPP (Point to Point Protocol)—A protocol that lets a computer user access a TCP/IP address using an ISDN terminal adapter or a highspeed modem over a standard telephone line.
PRI (Primary Rate Interface)—One
of two forms of ISDN service. PRI provides 23 64 Kbps B-channels for video, voice or data, and one 64 Kbps D-channel for control
information. Usually used to connect high-cpacity CPE, such as PBXs, to the network. Also called 23B+D in the U.S. and 30B+D in Europe.)
See also ISDN and BRI.
primitive—An abstract representation of interaction accross the access points indicating that information is being passed between the
service user and the service provider. The OSI Reference Model defines four types of primitives: Request, Indication, Response and
Confirm.
PSTN (public switched telephone network)—The group of circuit-switching voice carriers, which are commonly used as analog data
communications services. A worldwide public voice telephone network that is used as a telecommunications medium for the transmission of
voice, data and other information.
pulse dialing—One of two methods of dialing a telephone, usually associated with rotary-dial phones. Compare with tone dialing.
PVC (permanent virtual circuit)—A connection between two endpoints dedicated to a single user. In ISDN, PVCs are established by network
administration and are held for as long as the user subscribes to the service.
Q
Q.921—The ITU-T recommendation for user-network interface layer 2 specifications for D-channel signaling. Similar to LAPD. See also ISDN.
Q.931—The ITU-T recommendation for user-network interface layer 3 specifications for D-channel signalling. See also ISDN.
R
R reference point—Establishes the boundary between non-ISDN compatible equipment (TE-2) and the IDN network. TAs are used to
convert the communication protocol used by the non-ISDN termnials to the desired BRI or PRI protocol. Non-ISDN (TE2) terminal
equipment connects to IDN at the R-Reference point with a TA. (This interface may follow the RS232 or V.35 specification.) Also called the
R interface. (Contrast S reference point.)
RAM (random access memory)—A computer’s primary workspace. All data must be stored in RAM (even for a short while), before
software can use the processor to manipulate the data. Before a PC can do anything useful it must move programs from disk to RAM.
When you turn it off, all information in RAM is lost.
reference point—A connection point between ISDN equipment classes (rather than the specific protocol of the interconnection). Can
include R, S, T, and U reference points.
RJ-11—An industry standard interface used for connecting a telephone to a modular wall outlet; comes in 4-and 6-wire packages.
RJ-45—An 8-wire modular connector for voice and data circuits.
RPOA (recognized private operating agency)—A corporation, private or government-controlled, that provides telecommunications
services. RPOAs, such as AT&T, participate as non-voting members in the ITU-T.
S
S reference point—Provides the connection between NT2 equipment and the TA or TE-1. Can provide both primary and basic rate
services. Also called the S-interface. (Contrast R-reference point.)
SAP (service access point)—A point at which the services of an OSI layer are made available to the next higher layer. See also SAPI.
SAPI (service access point identifier)—A logical point at which data link layer services are provided by a data link layer entity to a layer 3
entity. See also SAP.
service—The requirements offered by an RPOA to its customers to satisfy specific telecommunications needs.
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Glossary
signaling—The process of establishing, maintaining, accounting for, and terminating a connection between two endpoints (e.g., the user
premises and the telco CO). Central office signals to the user premises can include ringing, dial tone, speech signals, etc. Signals from the
user’s telephone can include off-hook, dialing, speech to far-end party, and on-hook signals.
In-band signaling techniques include pulse and tone dialing. With common channel signaling, information is carried out-of-band. In ISDN,
signaling includes the call establishment, call progress monitoring, call termination and enhanced telephone features provided typically by the
D-Channel. See also SS7, out-of-band signaling, and in-band signaling.
SPID (service profile identifier)—In North America, the ISDN network parameter for logical terminal identification and tracking, provided by
the ISDN provider. The voice SPID and data SPID identify a particular set of service or feature parameters. They are assigned by the
ISDN service provider in the form of a string of up to 20 characters at subscription time. The SPID actually points to a specific location in
central office memory where the relevant information is stored.
SS7 (Signaling System 7)—An ITU-T and ANSI standard for digital out-of-band signalling between central offices that provides much of the
network switching intelligence to support many ISDN functions
stop bit—One of the variables used for timing in asynch- ronous data transmission. Depending on the devices, each character may be
trailed by 1, 1.5, or 2 stop bits.
subscriber loop—The pair of wires that connect the end user to the telephone network. These wires provide ISDN service, but also
require an NT1 at the enduser location as well as the LT at the network end. See also local loop.
supplementary services (SS)—ISDN functions beyond the basic requirements; includes videoconferencing, fast dialing, call waiting, call
forwarding, calling line ID.
SVC (switched virtual circuit)—A type of data transmission where the connection is maintained only until the call is cleared.
SVD (simultaneous voice and data)—A technology for letting a user send data via a modem, and use a handset to talk to another user at
the same time over the same connection. The alternative, making a second call, can be expensive or even impossible. The uses for SVD
are telecommuting, videoconferencing, distant learning, tech support, etc.
switched 56—A circuit-switched (full duplex digital synchronous data transmission) service that lets you dial a number and transmit data
to it at 56 Kbps. It is a relatively low cost service, widely used in North America for telecommuting, videoconferencing and high speed data
transfers. Many phone companies are phasing out switched 56 in favor of ISDN service.
switched line—In communications, a physical channel established by dynamically connecting one or more discreet segments. This
connection lasts for the duration of the call after which each segment may be used as part of a different channel. Contrast with leased line.
switched network—A network in which a temporary connection is established from one point via one or more segments.
synchronous transmission—The transmission of data which involves sending a group of characters in a packet. This is a common method
of transmission between computers on a network or between modems. One or more synchronous characters are transmitted to confirm
clocking before each packet of data is transmitted. Compare to Asynchronous Transmission.
T
T—Provides the connection between the NT1 and NT2. Can be internal to or external from the PABX. Provides the connection between the
NT1 equipment and the TA or TE-1. Can provide both Primary Rate and Basic Rate services.
TA—See terminal adapter.
TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol)—A multi-layer set of protocols developed by the US Department of Defense to
link dissimilar computers across dissimilar and unreliable LANs.
TEI (terminal endpoint identifier)—A unique number that is assigned to an ISDN terminal adapter at subscription time. The TEI is used by
the central office to identify the various TAs connected to the ISDN network. The TEI number can be fixed (in the range of 0-63),
dynamically, or automatically assigned at the CO each time the TA is connected to the ISDN interface and powered up.
TE1 (Terminal Equipment Type 1)—A terminal device with a standard ISDN interface (an ISDN-compatible terminal).
TE2 (Terminal Equipment Type 2)—A terminal device with a non-ISDN interface, such as RS232, RS449, V.35 or X.21. Can be a
telephone, data terminal, or voice/data worrkstation, etc.
telecommunication service—A function, such as bearer service and teleservice, offered by an RPOA to its customer in order to satisfy a
specific telecommunications requirement. See also ISDN, RPOA, and bearer service.
telematics—User-oriented ISDN information transfer services (e.g., teletex, videotex, facsimile).
Teleservices—A telecommunications service that provides the complete capability for communication between subscribers according to
protocols agreed to by RPOAs. A set of ISDN features using communications links, including E-Mail and fax services.
Teletext—A telecommunications service that provides a one-way information retrieval service that uses unused portions of a TV channel
bandwidth. A fixed number of text pages are repetitively broadcast for decoding by a decoder at the TV set that can select and display
pages. See also ISDN.
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terminal—The screen and keyboard device used in a mainframe environment for interactive data entry. Terminals have no box, which is
to say they have no file storage or processing capabilities.
terminal adapter (TA)—An ISDN DTE device for connecting a non-ISDN terminal device to the ISDN network. Similar to a protocol
converter or an interface converter, a TA connects a non-ISDN device between the R and S interfaces.
tone dialing—One of two methods of dialing a telephone, usually associated with Touch-Tone® (push button) phones. Compare with
pulse dialing.
TSR (terminate and stay resident)—A software program that remains active and in memory after its user interface is closed. Similar to a
daemon in UNIX environments.
twisted pair wiring—A type of cabling with one or more pairs of insulated wires wrapped around each other. An inexpensive wiring
method used for LAN and telephone applications, also called UTP wiring.
Type A: The upstream (USB Type A) connector. A Type A Connector is for those devices on which the external cable is permanently
attached. Connectors for USB come in two designs: the 'A' and 'B' types. Upstream connections (computer, hub input, etc.) are made
using the 'A' type connector, downstream connections (peripherals, hub outputs) are made using the 'B' type connector. The USB spec
defines two types of connectors to protect the bus from illegal topologies (e.g., connecting one downstream port back to another, etc.) and
to prevent end-user confusion. This allows end users to easily attach the correct connectors to peripherals and ports. Type A Plug and
receptacle are to be used for those devices on which the external cable is permanently attached to devices such as Keyboard, mouse and
hubs. Series B Plug and receptacle are to be used for those devices that require an external detachable cable such as printers, scanners
and modems.
Type B: The uplink (USB Type B) connector. A Type B Connector is for detachable external cables. Allows for double ended cable
assemblies. Connectors for USB come in two designs: the 'A' and 'B' types. Upstream connections (computer, hub input, etc.) are made
using the 'A' type connector, downstream connections (peripherals, hub outputs) are made using the 'B' type connector. The USB spec
defines two types of connectors to protect the bus from illegal topologies (e.g., connecting one downstream port back to another, etc.) and
to prevent end-user confusion. This allows end users to easily attach the correct connectors to peripherals and ports. Type A Plug and
receptacle are to be used for those devices on which the external cable is permanently attached to devices such as Keyboard, mouse and
hubs. Series B Plug and receptacle are used for devices that require an external detachable cable such as printers, scanners and
modems.
U
U reference point—A twisted-pair subscriber loop that connects the LT to the NT1. Normally a 2-wire BRI or PRI line is used, but a 4-wire
BRI can also be used. In the US, the U Reference Point marks the separation point between CPE and the network.
UHCI (Universal Host Controller Interface): The USB Universal Host Controller Interface. All transfers on the USB are initiated by the host
system’s host controller. The host controller is responsible for controlling traffic on the USB and can be appropriately programmed to transfer
data to and from USB devices. This is typically a PCI device that can be programmed to run a given schedule of transfers on the USB and
bus master the results into memory for processing by the host software. There are currently two standards for host controllers: OpenHCI
(OHCI or Open Host Controller Interface) and UHCI (Universal Host Controller Interface). Both these standards define register level
interfaces of the host controller to PCI bus. Bandwidth allocation over the USB is software managed and is done by the programming of the
host controller.
Universal Serial Bus: A collection of Universal Serial Bus devices and the software and hardware that allow them to connect the
capabilities provided by functions to the host.
Universal Serial Bus Device: Includes hubs and functions. See device.
Universal Serial Bus Driver: The host resident software entity responsible for providing common services to clients that are manipulating
one or more functions on one or more Host Controllers.
Universal Serial Bus Interface: The hardware interface between the Universal Serial Bus cable and a Universal Serial Bus device. This
includes the protocol engine required for all Universal Serial Bus devices to be able to receive and send packets.
Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP): Telephone-type wiring. Tansmission media for 10Base-T.
Upstream: The direction of data flow towards the host. An upstream port is the port on a device electrically closest to the host that
generates upstream data traffic from the hub. Upstream ports receive downstream data traffic.
USB: See Universal Serial Bus.
USBD: See Universal Serial Bus Driver.
USB Performance categories: Low Speed (Interactive Devices at 10-100 Kb/s); Medium Speed (Phone, Audio, Compressed Video at
500Kb/s - 10Mbp/s); High Speed (Video, Disk at 25-500 Mb/s)
UTP (unshielded twisted pair) —Telephone-type wiring.
V
V.110—One of the terminal rate adaptation protocols for the ISDN B-channel. V.110 is more hardware-intensive than the V.120 B-channel
standard.
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V.120—One of the terminal rate adaptation protocols for the ISDN B-channel. V.120 is more software-intensive than the V.110 B-channel
standard.
Videotex—A two-way information-retrieval service that can be accessed by terminals and by a TV set (with installed decoder). Allows
interactive retrieval of information pages from a central resource. See also ISDN.
virtual circuit—A logical connection. Used in packet switching wherin a logical connection is established between two devices at the start
of transmission. All information packets follow the same route and arrive in sequence (but do not necessarily carry a complete address).
X
X.25—ITU-T’s definition of a three-level packet-switching protocol to be used between packet-mode DTEs and network DCEs. X.25
corresponds with layer 3 of the 7-layer OSI model.
X.75—An ITU-T standard for linking X.25 packet-switched networks. X.75 defines the connection between public networks, i.e., for a
gateway between X.25 networks.
103
Index
Index
Index
A
Abort timer ...................................................... 58
Answering a call .............................................. 54
Automatically ...............................................73
Manually ...................................................... 73
Assembling the modem ...................................12
AT commands
!C0= ...................................................... 29, 44
!C6= ............................................................. 44
!D3= ............................................................. 45
!L .................................................................. 46
!N1= ............................................................. 46
!RXG ............................................................ 47
!TXG ............................................................ 47
!Z= ............................................................... 47
$D ................................................................ 53
%A97= ......................................................... 44
%E ............................................................... 54
&C ......................................................... 50, 58
&D ......................................................... 50, 57
&E ................................................................ 51
&F ........................................... 42, 51, 52, 90
&R ................................................................ 52
&S ................................................................ 52
&W ................................................. 52, 53, 90
&Z ................................................................ 53
&Zn= ............................................................ 73
&Zn? ............................................................ 73
*!C6= ............................................................ 44
*!D3= ..................................................... 45, 46
*!N1= ............................................................ 47
+++AT<cr> ..................................... 43, 54, 72
<break>AT<cr> ..................................... 43, 54
@Config ....................................................... 55
A ........................................................... 54, 73
D ........................................................... 54, 72
E .................................................................. 48
ENTER key ..................................................43
Entering ....................................................... 41
H ........................................................... 55, 74
I ................................................................... 55
Implementing ...............................................43
L ................................................................... 73
L5 .................................................................48
L6 .................................................................48
Lack of response to ..................................... 76
O ........................................................... 55, 72
Q .................................................................. 48
Sr= ............................................................... 49
Sr? ............................................................... 49
V ........................................................... 49, 71
X .................................................................. 49
Z .................................................................. 49
AT commands, configure the TA ............... 29, 39
Auto-protocol detection ............................. 61, 62
Autoanswer ................................. 54, 57, 73, 79
B
B-channel
protocol ......................................................... 9
Backspace character ....................................... 58
BBS (bulletin board system) ............................ 87
Break signal .....................................................43
C
Cables
ISDN ............................................................ 78
USB serial .................................................... 77
Cabling
Overview ...................................................... 12
To analog equipment .................................... 13
To ISDN network terminator ......................... 13
To power ....................................................... 13
To your PC ................................................... 13
Call control configuration ................................. 30
Auto answer data calls ................................. 30
Data protocol ................................................ 31
Dialing method ............................................. 30
Dialing number ............................................. 31
Dialing stored numbers ................................. 31
Persistent DTR dialing .................................. 30
Rings to answer ........................................... 30
Stored numbers ............................................31
Caller Line ID CLI ............................................. 60
Canceling a call ...............................................73
Carriage return character ................................. 57
Changing the modem descriptor
Windows 2000 .............................................. 20
Windows 98 ..................................................25
COM port ......................................................... 77
Command mode .............................................. 72
Echo ............................................................. 48
Commands
Answer ......................................................... 73
Answer call ..................................................54
Data MSN/DN .............................................. 46
Data SPID .................................................... 44
Data TEI ....................................................... 45
Dial ........................................................ 54, 72
Escape Sequence Options ........................... 54
105
MultiModemISDN User Guide
Flow control .................................................. 51
Hang up ................................................. 55, 74
Hook control ................................................. 55
List Active Profile ......................................... 48
List Telephone Numbers ............................... 73
Load Profile .................................... 42, 52, 90
Pacing .......................................................... 51
Persistent DTR Dialing ................................. 53
Read S-Register ........................................... 49
Receive Gain ............................................... 47
Reset ........................................................... 49
Return Online ............................................... 55
Set S-Register .............................................. 49
Start ConfigMenu ......................................... 55
Store Active Profile ............................... 53, 90
Store Telephone Number ........................ 53, 55
switch type ................................................... 29
Transmit Gain ............................................... 47
Communications programs .............................. 77
Compatibility
Switch ........................................................... 9
Configuration
Call control ................................................... 30
Network ........................................................ 29
Overview ...................................................... 29
Configuration command ................................... 55
Configuration profiles
ML-PPP asynch operation (Profile 4) ........... 93
Modem-like asynch operation (Profile 0) ...... 90
V.110 asynch operation (Profile 1) ................ 91
V.120 asynch operation (Profile 2) ................ 92
X.75 asynch operation (Profile 3) ................. 92
Connectors ....................................................... 9
AUX ....................................................... 13, 78
ISDN ............................................................ 78
CTS (Clear to Send)
Signal ........................................................... 52
CTS Control
AT command ................................................ 52
D
Data mode ....................................................... 72
returning to ................................................... 55
Data protocol
MLPPP ......................................................... 31
V.110 ............................................................ 31
V.120 ............................................................ 31
X.75 ............................................................. 31
Data Terminal Ready (DTR) .............................. 30
DCD (Data Carrier Detect) signal ..................... 50
DCD Control command .................................... 50
DCD drop time ................................................. 58
Dial-Up Networking .......................................... 37
Overview ...................................................... 29
Dial-up networking
Installing ...................................................... 32
106
Using ............................................................ 32
Windows 2000 connection options ............... 33
Windows 98/95 connection options .............. 37
Dialing a Stored Telephone Number .......... 55, 73
Dialing Method
AT command ................................................ 44
Dimensions ....................................................... 9
Directory Number (DN) ..................................... 30
Disabling a channel .......................................... 45
Display Network Configuration command ......... 46
Display Product Information command ............ 55
Displaying a stored number ............................. 73
DMS-100 switch type ....................................... 44
DN (directory number) ............................... 30, 46
Driver software installation
Windows 2000 .............................................. 17
Windows 95 .................................................. 28
Windows 98 ........................................... 17, 22
DSR (Data Set Ready) signal .......................... 53
DSR Control
AT command ................................................ 52
DTR (Data Terminal Ready) .............................. 30
Dialing .......................................................... 53
Drop time ..................................................... 58
Signal ........................................................... 50
DTR (Data Terminal Ready) signal ................... 53
DTR Control
AT command ................................................ 50
E
Echo commands .............................................. 48
Embedded Protocol Analyzer .......................... 46
En bloc sending ............................................... 44
Environmental conditions ................................. 9
Error correction ................................................ 51
Escape character ...................................... 43, 57
Escape sequences .......................................... 72
In-band ......................................................... 43
Options ......................................................... 54
Out-of-band .................................................. 43
Timeout ........................................................ 59
F
Factory profiles ................................................ 90
Firmware upgrade ............................................ 87
FlashWizard, using .......................................... 87
Flow control ..................................................... 79
Hardware ...................................................... 51
RTS/CTS ...................................................... 51
Front panel ....................................................... 76
H
Hanging up a call ............................................. 74
Index
I
Initialization strings .......................................... 78
Installation, driver software
Windows 2000 .............................................. 17
Windows 95 ..................................................28
Windows 98 ..................................................22
ISDN configuration utility, using .......................32
ISDN line ......................................................... 77
ISDN MTA128ST-USB Config utility .......... 29, 32
L
LED indicators ............................................ 9, 76
128 Kbps ...................................................... 14
Bearer Channel 1 .......................................... 14
Bearer Channel 2 .......................................... 14
Data Protocol ...............................................15
Off Hook ...................................................... 14
Receive Data ...............................................14
Terminal Ready ............................................14
Transmit Data ...............................................14
Line connection ...............................................13
Line feed character .......................................... 57
M
Making a call
Canceling a call ............................................73
Channel bundling flag dialing ........................ 72
Dialing .......................................................... 72
Dialing a stored number ................................73
Displaying a stored number ..........................73
Storing a telephone number ......................... 73
Manual organization .......................................... 7
Maximum frame size (X.75) ............................ 62
Messages
Response .....................................................71
Microphone amplification ................................. 47
ML-PPP protocol ...................................... 31, 90
dialing ...........................................................72
Modes of operation .......................................... 72
MSN (multiple subscriber number) ............ 30, 46
MTA128ST-USB
Accessories, ordering ...................................86
Assembling ..................................................12
AT Commands .............................................. 39
Call control configuration .............................. 30
Configuration ................................................ 29
Configuration profiles .................................... 90
Connecting to your system ..........................12
Features ........................................................ 8
ISDN configuration utility .............................32
LED indicators .............................................. 14
Modes of operation ....................................... 72
Network configuration ...................................29
Operation using AT commands ....................72
Product description ....................................... 6
Regulatory compliance ................................. 89
Technical specifications ................................ 9
Troubleshooting ............................................76
Typical configuration ..................................... 12
Unpacking .................................................... 11
Windows 2000 dial-up networking .................33
Windows 98/96 dial-up networking ................ 37
MultiExpress terminal ......................................77
Multiple Subscriber Number (MSN) .................. 30
N
Network configuration
Data MSN .................................................... 30
Data TEI ....................................................... 29
DNs ..............................................................30
Network switch ............................................. 29
SPIDs .......................................................... 30
Voice MSN ................................................... 30
Voice TEI .....................................................29
Network switch type
AT command ................................................ 44
Networkconfiguration ....................................... 29
O
Offline command mode .................................... 72
On-line warranty registration ............................ 83
Online command mode .................................... 72
Operating MTA128ST-USB, AT commands
Answering a call ........................................... 73
Hanging up ................................................... 74
Making a call ................................................ 72
Overlap sending ...............................................44
P
Phone connection ............................................13
Power
Consumption ................................................. 9
Requirements ................................................ 9
Strip ............................................................. 76
Supply .......................................................... 76
Q
Quick setup factory profiles .............................52
R
Rate adaption protocol
AT command ................................................ 47
Reference materials .........................................15
Regulatory compliance ..................................... 89
Remote node operation .................................... 37
Removing a modem from Windows .................. 28
Result codes .................................................... 78
Connect messages command ...................... 49
Enable/disable command .............................48
107
MultiModemISDN User Guide
Terse/verbose command .............................. 49
Rings
Count ........................................................... 57
Number before answering ............................. 57
Rings to answer option ..................................... 30
S
S-registers ....................................................... 49
Sending single multiple Xoff characters ........... 51
Service ............................................................ 85
Service profile idenfiier (SPID) ......................... 30
Setup ............................................................... 90
Specifications, technical ................................... 8
SPID (service profile identifier) ................. 30, 44
Stored number
Listing .......................................................... 53
Reading ........................................................ 53
Storing
Profiles ......................................................... 53
Telephone number ................................. 53, 73
Switch type ....................................................... 9
5ESS ........................................................... 44
DMS-100 ...................................................... 44
Euro-ISDN .................................................... 44
INS64 ........................................................... 44
NET3 ............................................................ 44
NI-1 .............................................................. 44
VN4 .............................................................. 44
T
Technical support ............................................. 85
TEI ................................................................... 29
TEI (terminal endpoint identifier) ...................... 45
Telephone, connecting a .................................. 13
Telephone numbers
Stored .......................................................... 53
Terminal Endpoint Identifier (TEI) ..................... 29
Terminal mode ................................................. 76
Testing ............................................................. 76
Troubleshooting the MTA128ST-USB
3Com Sonix adapter originates a V.120 ........ 80
Can place data calls but not voice calls ....... 78
Cannot connect when answering .................. 79
Cannot place two simultaneous data ..... 78, 79
Data is being lost ......................................... 79
Dials but cannot make a connection ............ 77
Disconnects when online .............................. 79
Does not respond to commands .................. 76
File transfer appears slower ......................... 79
None of the LEDs light ................................. 76
Receives garbage characters ....................... 80
Receives garbage characters after good ...... 80
V.110 call, caller gets a NO CARRIER ......... 79
108
V.120 call, caller gets a NO CARRIER ......... 79
V.120 calls not accepted from a 3Com ......... 80
Will not connect to an ELSA adapter ............ 80
Typical configuration ........................................ 12
U
Uninstalling MTA128ST-USB from Windows ..... 28
Unpacking the MTA128ST-USB ....................... 11
Upgrade firmware, FlashWizard ....................... 87
USB evaluation utility ...................................... 28
USB, overview .................................................. 6
Using AT commands ........................................ 39
V
V.110 protocol ........................................... 31, 90
V.120 protocol ........................................... 31, 90
Voice
Coding ........................................................... 9
MSN/DN command ...................................... 47
SPID command ............................................ 44
TEI command .............................................. 45
Volume
Control .......................................................... 47
Speaker ........................................................ 47
W
Wait for connection (Abort Timer) .................... 58
Warranty ..................................................... 9, 82
Weight .............................................................. 9
Windows 2000, uninstalling a TA ...................... 28
Windows 98/95, uninstalling a TA ..................... 28
World Wide Web ............................................... 15
X
X.75 protocol ..................................... 31, 48, 90
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