User guide | Adder Technology iPEPS Network Card User Manual

AdderLink iPEPS
User Guide
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
Configuration
Initial configuration...................................................................11
Part 1 – Initial configuration (Dual Access model)...............11
Encryption settings............................................................13
Hot plugging and mouse restoration..............................14
Resetting the configuration (Dual Access models) ......15
Part 1 – Initial configuration (Standard model)...................16
If the iPEPS does not respond on the network...............17
Part 2 – Remote configuration..............................................18
Networking issues......................................................................19
Positioning iPEPS in the network..........................................19
Placing iPEPS behind a router or firewall........................19
Placing iPEPS alongside the firewall................................21

Mounting......................................................................................6
Connections..................................................................................7
Host computer.........................................................................7
Local keyboard, video monitor and mouse............................8
IP network port........................................................................8
Power supply connection........................................................9

Installation
Connecting to the iPEPS.............................................................22
Local connection (dual access models only) ........................22
Remote connections..............................................................23
Remote connection by VNC viewer..................................24
Remote connection by Web browser...............................25
Using the viewer window.....................................................26
The menu bar....................................................................26
When using the viewer window......................................26
Mouse pointers..................................................................27
Re-synchronise mouse
................................................27
Access mode - shared/private ..........................................27
Auto calibrate
.............................................................28
Controls..............................................................................28
Downloading VNC viewer from the iPEPS.......................33
If you need to enter a port number.................................33
Viewer encryption settings...............................................34
Supported web browsers..................................................34


AdderLink iPEPS features.............................................................4
What’s in the box.........................................................................5
What you may additionally need................................................5
Operation

Introduction

Contents
Contents - page 2
Index



Appendix 6 – Addresses, masks and ports................................56
IP addresses............................................................................56
Net masks...............................................................................56
Net masks - the binary explanation.................................57
Calculating the mask for IP access control.......................58
Ports........................................................................................59
Security issues with ports..................................................59
Appendix 7 – Cable and connector specifications....................60
RS232 serial mouse to PS/2 converter cable ........................60
Appendix 8 – Hotkey sequence codes.......................................61
Permissible key presses..........................................................61
Creating macro sequences....................................................61
Appendix 9 – Supported video modes......................................62
Warranty.....................................................................................63
Safety information.....................................................................63
End user licence agreement.......................................................64
Radio Frequency Energy............................................................65


Getting assistance.......................................................................35
Troubleshooting.........................................................................35
Appendix 1 - Local configuration menus..................................36
Unit configuration.................................................................37
Network configuration..........................................................38
Reset configuration...............................................................39
Clear IP access control............................................................40
Appendix 2 - VNC viewer connection options..........................41
Colour/Encoding....................................................................41
Inputs......................................................................................42
Scaling....................................................................................43
Misc.........................................................................................43
Identities.................................................................................44
Load / Save.............................................................................44
Appendix 3 - VNC viewer window options...............................45
Appendix 4 - Browser viewer options.......................................46
Encoding and colour level.....................................................46
Inputs......................................................................................46
Security...................................................................................46
Misc.........................................................................................46
Appendix 5 - Remote configuration menus..............................47
User accounts.........................................................................48
Unit configuration.................................................................49
Advanced unit configuration...........................................50
Time & date configuration....................................................51
Network configuration..........................................................52
Setting IP access control....................................................53
Hotkey sequences..................................................................54
Logging and status................................................................55

Further information
IP network/Internet
The IP port allows direct connection
to an Ethernet-based local network
and from there onto the wider
Internet, as required.
IP network/
Internet
Alternatively, the robust iPEPS
security system will allow direct
connection to the outside world.

Adder Virtual Media feature
Allows an authorised remote user to
transfer files and folders to a host
computer, such that they appear as
though presented locally on removable
media (as would a memory stick, CDROM or floppy). Via the IP network link,
the remote user can then control the
host and make use of the transferred
files and folders. An indispensable
feature when remotely upgrading or
patching distant host systems.

Four simultaneous remote users
iPEPS can support four remote users
at any one time.
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
ADDERLINK
®
ADDER
USB adapters
Every iPEPS module is
supplied with special PS/2
to USB adapters. These not
only convert the connector
types but also permit the
use of the Virtual Media
feature on USB equipped
systems.
PC
Local user
(Dual Access model only)
Additional ports allow
direct control of the system
by a locally connected
keyboard, video monitor
and mouse.

Drawing upon our long and successful
history within the field of remote system
control, we have taken our best KVM via
IP technology and miniaturised it. The
result is the AdderLink iPEPS, a highly
responsive, cost efficient way to control
a single system from any remote position
- worldwide.
iPEPS stands for ‘iP Engine Per Server’
and gives an indication of the clear
design goals that have been applied
to this product since its conception.
In situations where a single system
must be placed in a relatively isolated
location and yet must be controlled from
elsewhere, then iPEPS is the solution. The
host system can run its usual operating
system completely unchanged and needs
only to be connected (via its keyboard,
video and mouse ports) to the compact
iPEPS unit. This ensures that there is no
performance hit associated with other
remote solutions and also provides the
authorised remote user with complete
control. The remote user uses a compact
VNC viewer utility and can link to the
iPEPS via any connected IP network, or
via the Internet.
Where local control is also required,
either temporarily or permanently, the
iPEPS Dual Access variant provides the
necessary local connections for keyboard,
monitor and mouse.

Introduction
AdderLink iPEPS features
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IP network port
This intelligent Ethernet
port can automatically
sense whether it is
attached to a 10Mb or
100Mb network.
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KVM console
(Dual Access model only)
Optionally connect a keyboard,
video monitor and a mouse to
these three connectors to allow
local control of the system.

There are two types of AdderLink iPEPS units: the dual access model which
allows a local keyboard, video monitor and mouse to be situated next to the
computer and a standard model which eschews such connections to achieve a
thinner casing. The dual access model measures 118 x 75 x 42mm, whereas the
standard model measures just 118 x 75 x 26mm.
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Indicators
These six indicators clearly show the key aspects of operation:
• LNK Network link and activity indication.
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• REM Keyboard or mouse data are being received from a remote viewer.
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• VNC Indicates that a remote viewer is connected and active.
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Power input
Connect an optional
power adapter here.
• 100 Indicates the Ethernet network speed (10/100Mbs).
Non Dual Access model
The standard iPEPS module lacks the
connectors to attach a local keyboard,
video monitor and mouse, resulting in
a slimmer casing.
Switches
Used to select
power options
and invoke
configuration
mode

2
Connections to computer
Link these connectors to the
keyboard, video and mouse ports of
the computer system to be remotely
controlled.
• LOC Keyboard or mouse data are being received from the local console (or the USB Configuration Disk feature is in use).
• PWR Power indicator.
What’s in the box
What you may additionally need
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
Squid power cable
Allows up to four iPEPS units to be
powered from a single power adapter
Part number: CAB-XSERIES-4WAY-PWR
Four self-adhesive
rubber feet
USB converter
plugs
Standard version power adapter
capable of supplying a single iPEPS
units directly or up to two iPEPS
using the Squid power cable.
Part number: PSU-IEC-5VDC
Heavy duty version power adapter
capable of supplying up to four iPEPS
units using the Squid power cable
Part number: PSU-IEC-5VDC-4AMP
LNK REM VNC
KVM cable set
100 LOC PWR
Power adapter plus countryspecific power cable
POWER
iPEPS Dual Access rack plate
Part number: MET-IPEPS-DA-FASCIA


CD-ROM
DUAL ACCESS
100 LOC PWR
Rack bracket (supplied
only with the standard
iPEPS model)
ADDERLINK
LNK REM VNC
POWER
CCSUN converter
Required to connect Sun computers
that use a mini-DIN port to connect
their keyboard and mouse
Part number: CCSUN-xM
(where x is the cable length in metres:
2, 5 or 10)

iPEPS dual access model

iPEPS standard model
ADDERLINK
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KVM cables
One set per connected computer
Part number: VKVM-xM
(where x is the cable length in
metres: 1, 2, 5 or 10)
Installation
Mounting
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A rack bracket is supplied with
each iPEPS standard model.
An extra width rack bracket is
available as an optional extra for
the iPEPS Dual Access model.
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DUAL ACCESS
(K/M)
Connections

The iPEPS offers two main mounting methods:
• Supplied four self-adhesive rubber feet
• Rack mount brackets - see below
Host computer (below)
Local keyboard, video and mouse
IP network port
Power supply
Host computer
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or
• Via the supplied converters, to the USB connectors of the computer.
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To attach the KVM cable to the iPEPS
1 Ensure that power is disconnected from the iPEPS and the computer.
(Note: If it is not possible to switch off the
computer prior to connection, then a ‘Hot
plug’ procedure is available – see
the Hot plugging and mouse
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2 Connect the plugs at one end of
the KVM cable set to the three
sockets at one end of the iPEPS.
On the Dual Access model
these are the ones on
the bottom row.
The computer’s
PS/2-style sockets
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The iPEPS is connected to the host computer using the supplied KVM cable. At
the computer end of the cable you have the choice of linking the cable’s PS/2
connectors directly to the computer or additionally attaching the supplied USB
converters. The converters not only allow you to use the computer’s USB sockets
but also enable the Adder Virtual Media feature to be used.
The computer’s
USB sockets
The keyboard and mouse
links are cleverly both
fed via the green USB
connection.
When used in this way, the keyboard and mouse signals are both fed via the
green USB converter (and lead).
Note: If you intend to power the iPEPS from the keyboard/mouse interface
(rather than a power adapter) both the purple and the green connections
must be made to the computer. This is true regardless of whether you use
the PS/2 connections or the USB converters. The iPEPS will prevent power
being taken from just one socket in order to prevent overloading.
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The converters are shaped such
that they can be fitted back-toback directly into neighbouring
USB sockets.

•
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•

To attach the KVM cable to the computer
1 Connect the video connector of the KVM cable to the video output socket
of the computer.
2 The keyboard and mouse connections can be made to the computer in two
main ways:
• Directly to PS/2-style keyboard and mouse sockets of the computer.
Installation of the iPEPS involves a number of basic connections
to some or all of the following items:

Connections
IP network port
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From video monitor
3 Configure the network settings as appropriate to the position of the iPEPS
within the network - see Networking issues for details. 
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To connect the IP network port
1 Depending upon where in the network the iPEPS is being connected, run a
category 5e or 6 cable from the appropriate hub or router to the iPEPS.
2 Connect the plug of the category 5e or 6 cable into the IP port on the end
panel of the iPEPS.

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To connect a local keyboard, video monitor and mouse
1 Position a suitable keyboard, video monitor and mouse in the vicinity of the
iPEPS such that their cables will easily reach.
2 Connect the keyboard, video monitor and mouse plugs to the sockets,
collectively labelled as ‘KVM CONSOLE’, on the end panel of the iPEPS.
The iPEPS provides an autosensing Ethernet IP port that can operate at 10 or
100Mbps, according to the network speed. The iPEPS is designed to reside quite
easily at any part of your network:
• It can be placed within the local network, behind any firewall/router
connections to the Internet, or
• It can be placed externally to the local network, on a separate sub-network
or with an open Internet connection.
Wherever in the network the iPEPS is situated, you will need to determine
certain configuration issues such as address allocation and/or firewall adjustment
to allow correct operation. Please refer to Networking issues within the
Configuration chapter for more details.
IMPORTANT: When the iPEPS is accessible from the public Internet, you must
ensure that sufficient security measures are employed.
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Note: Dual Access model only
Where local control is required (as well as remote control), the iPEPS Dual Access
model provides the necessary keyboard, video and mouse console outputs.
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Local keyboard, video monitor and mouse
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Power supply connection
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2 Connect the IEC connector of the supplied country-specific power lead to
the socket of the power supply.
3 Connect the power lead to a nearby mains supply socket.

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To connect the optional power adapter
1 Connect the low voltage output connector from the power supply unit to
the power socket on the end panel of the iPEPS.
Note: Ensure that switch 1 is set to the appropriate setting for your
installation - see ‘Power supply issues and options’ opposite.
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Power supply issues and options
If you intend to derive power from the keyboard and mouse connections, then
both connections must be made to the host computer. The power requirement
of the iPEPS slightly exceeds the maximum that is permissible via a single
keyboard, mouse or USB port. Therefore, the iPEPS will share its requirements
between two ports and will automatically refuse to operate if only one
connection is made.
The iPEPS draws a maximum current of 1A at 5VDC. If your computer cannot
provide the necessary power
LN requirement (via its keyboard, mouse or USB ports)
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then you will need to use10an
power adapter and also prevent the iPEPS
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from deriving any of its power from
R
use switch 1 to determine how power should be derived:
SW1 OFF Derive iPEPS power from
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either the interface
connections or an
external power supply.
ON Derive iPEPS power only
from the external power
adapter.
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The iPEPS provides flexibility in the way that it is powered in order to suit your
installation requirements. Each iPEPS can be powered:
• Via the keyboard and mouse connections from the host computer,
• From an individual power adapter, or
• From a common power adapter (when used with other iPEPS units).
continued
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


PO
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
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Adder Power Squid Cable

LN
100 K RE
LO M V
C P NC
W
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
m
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To use a common power adapter to supply multiple iPEPS units
Available as an optional item, the Adder Power Squid cable allows you to
distribute power from an adapter to a maximum of four iPEPS units.
Note: Do not attempt to power more than two iPEPS units using the standard
5V 2A power adapter unit. For three or four iPEPS, use only the higher capacity
5V 4A adapter.
1 Connect a power output plug of the squid cable to the input socket of each
iPEPS unit.
Note: Ensure that switch 1 on each iPEPS is set to the appropriate setting for
your installation - see Power supply issues and options on the previous
page.
2 Connect the low voltage output connector from the power supply unit to
the input socket of the power spider cable.
3 Connect the IEC connector of the supplied country-specific power lead to
the socket of the power supply.
4 Connect the power lead to a nearby mains supply socket.
Input from the
power adapter
10
Configuration
The iPEPS initial configuration process occurs as two distinct parts. The
standard iPEPS and the Dual Access models differ in Part 1 of their
configuration, but behave in an identical manner for the Part 2 configuration.
Part 2 – Remote configuration
This part of the configuration takes place using a remote network
connection. It allows fine tuning of the part 1 configuration items
plus the creation of multiple user accounts. Go to Part 2 - Remote
configuration.
Part 1 – Initial configuration
This part of the configuration takes place using either a locally connected
keyboard and video monitor (Dual Access model only) or a computer
connected to the same local network as the iPEPS. It allows you to set up key
basic details, network essentials and security key creation.
 





  
 
 

 


 

    





 
 
Connect the iPEPS to an IP network and use a computer located on the same
network to connect to the iPEPS. See page 16 for details.
 

  
 

 

 


 

 

   

>
   
    
  
   
    
    
 
>
   

Unit config screen
Network config screen
Secure keys screen
Allows you to determine a mixture
of basic and fundamental setup
details such as the keyboard layout,
admin password, time and date.
Requires you to configure the
various key aspects of the IP
network port addressing.
This screen uses your mouse movements
or keyboard inputs to create random
data. This unpredictable information is
then combined with several other factors
to develop the basis of the encryption
keys that are used to establish secure
remote links.
Controlling the local configuration menus
The local menus use only the keyboard. Use the keyboard arrow
keys to move the green highlight indicator to the required position.
Then, either type the required information or use the left and right
arrows to change multiple choice items, as appropriate.
Problems?
The iPEPS asks for an unknown admin password

   
>
OR

When controlled via the locally connected keyboard and video
monitor, as the iPEPS Dual Access model is switched on for the
first time it will take you through a set up sequence consisting of
three main screens:
Part 1 – Initial configuration (Standard or Dual Access models)


Part 1 – Initial configuration (Dual Access model)


Initial configuration
continued
11
Part 1 – Initial configuration (Dual Access model)

Time and Date
Set these correctly as all entries
in the activity log are time
stamped using them.
Encryption
Arrange this setting according
to your security requirements.
See Encryption settings for
a description of the issues and
the settings.

   
    
  
   
    
    
 
   
With every mouse move and keypress, the single dash will move across the
screen (unless the same key is pressed repeatedly). Periodically, a new star
character will be added to the bar as the random data are accepted as part
of the new encryption key. When the bar is full, the final encryption keys for
your iPEPS will be created – this process takes roughly 30 to 40 seconds.
When all items are correct, select the Next option to display the next screen.
Use DHCP/IP address/Net
Mask/Gateway
You need to either set the
DHCP option to ‘Yes’ or
manually enter a valid IP
address, Net mask and
Gateway. See Networking
issues for more details.
 

  
 

 

 


 

 

   

VNC and HTTP ports
These should remain set to
5900 and 80, respectively,
unless they clash with an
existing setup within the
network. See Networking
issues for more details.
When all items are correct, select the Next option to display the next screen.
4 Once the secure keys have been calculated the iPEPS will restart and present
a standard logon screen.
  



At this stage the username will
be ‘admin’ and the password
will be whatever you entered
in the first setup screen.

2 Edit the Network config screen. The key elements here are:

   
Admin password
Enter a password of at least
six characters that has a mix
of letters and numerals. The
background colour provides
an indication of password
suitability and is initially red
to indicate that the password
is not sufficient. When a
password with reasonable
strength has been entered it
changes to blue.

 





  
 
 

 


 

    





 
 
3 Move the mouse and enter changing key sequences within this screen.


To perform the initial local configuration (Dual Access model only)
1 Edit the Unit config screen. The key elements here are:
Once the username and password have been accepted, the screen should
now show the host computer screen (or, if none is connected, a blank image).
continued
12
  
Access mode
Allows you to choose between
Shared mode (where all other
logged on users can see your
operations) and Private mode
(where the screens of all other
users are blanked).
Return to host
Quits the menu and returns to
the host screen.
iPEPS encryption settings
The iPEPS configuration page offers three encryption settings:
• Always on - This setting will force all viewers to use encryption. Note:
This setting will preclude any VNC viewer versions that do not support
encryption.
• Prefer off - This setting does not enforce encryption unless a viewer
specifically requests it. If a viewer has its ‘Let server choose’ setting, then an
un-encrypted link will be set up.
• Prefer on - This setting generally enforces encryption unless an earlier
viewer version is unable to support it, in which case the link will be unencrypted. If a viewer has its ‘Let server choose’ setting, then the link will be
encrypted.
Viewer encryption settings
The web browser viewers and VNC viewers (of level 4.0b5S or higher) offer four
encryption settings:
• Always on - This setting will ensure that the link is encrypted, regardless of
the iPEPS encryption setting.
• Let server choose - This setting will follow the configuration of the iPEPS. If
the iPEPS has ‘Always on’ or ‘Prefer on’ set, then the link will be encrypted.
If the ‘Prefer off’ setting is selected at the iPEPS, then the link will not be
encrypted.
• Prefer off - This setting will configure an un-encrypted link if the iPEPS will
allow it, otherwise it will be encrypted.
• Prefer on - If the iPEPS allows it, this setting will configure an encrypted
link, otherwise it will be un-encrypted.

Configuration
Select to gain access to
the Unit and Network
configuration screens. Within
here you can also reset the
iPEPS to its initial state.



 
Restore mouse functions
Select to revive a mouse
that has ceased to function
correctly. See Hot plugging
and mouse restoration for
details.
The iPEPS offers a great deal of flexibility in its configuration and this extends
equally to its encryption settings. Due to the variety of situations in which it
might be used and the range of viewer applications that need to view it, a
number of settings are available that might not make perfect sense at first
glance. However, these settings should allow you to configure the iPEPS and the
viewers to operate as required.
Factors to consider when setting these options might be:
• Do all of the connections and operations require encryption?
• Will some users be using older VNC viewer versions?


   


  

Logoff
Select to close your current
session and display the
screensaver.
Encryption settings

5 To view the options menu: Press
. More about hotkeys.
(if the standard hotkeys were altered, use the new hotkeys plus C)
13

Which restore setting do I use?
The general rule is that unless both the mouse and the driver are both
IntelliMouse compatible then you need to restore the mouse as ‘PS/2’. An
IntelliMouse can operate in either mode, whereas a PS/2 mouse cannot.
Recognising an IntelliMouse-style mouse
The IntelliMouse format was introduced to support, among other features, the
scroll wheel function. If the mouse has a scroll wheel, then it is likely to support
the IntelliMouse format. If it is a Microsoft-branded mouse, then it will usually
state that it is an IntelliMouse on its underside label.
Recognising an IntelliMouse driver
Before hot plugging to the iPEPS (or afterwards using only keyboard control),
access the Windows Control Panel of the computer and select either the Mouse
option (on Windows NT, 2000 and XP) or the System option (on Windows 95,
98, ME). Look for the name of the driver, which will usually include the words
PS/2 or IntelliMouse.
4 Select one of the following options:
• Restore PS/2 Mouse – if PS/2 mode is required, or
• Restore IntelliMouse – if IntelliMouse mode is required.
5 Select the ‘Return to host’ option.
6 Move the mouse a short distance and check for appropriate on-screen
cursor movement. If the mouse cursor darts erratically around the screen,
then cease moving the mouse. This is an indication that the chosen restore
function is incorrect. Try again using the other restore function.
Note: The restore functions predict the likely mouse resolution settings but
may not restore the exact speed or sensitivity settings that were originally
set.


 

  
 

To restore mouse operation when hot plugging:
1 Carefully make the keyboard, monitor and mouse connections between the
host computer and the iPEPS ports.
2 Using a keyboard and monitor directly connected to the iPEPS, log on and
then press
to view the options menu. More about hotkeys
3 Select the ‘Restore mouse functions’ option to display:


It is strongly recommended that you switch off the host computer before
attempting to connect it to the iPEPS. However, if this is not possible then you
need to ‘hot plug’ the computer while it is still running. There is not normally a
danger of damage to the computer, however, when mouse communications are
interrupted, often they fail to re-initialise when reconnected. The iPEPS provides
a feature to reinstate mouse communications once the necessary connections
have been made.
There are two main types of data formats used by current PC mice, these are
the older ‘PS/2’ format and the more recent ‘IntelliMouse®’ format introduced
by Microsoft. These use slightly different data arrangements and it is important
to know which type was being used before you hot-plugged the computer to
the iPEPS. The previous setting depends both on the type of mouse and the type
of driver, as various combinations of PS/2 and IntelliMouse are possible. Using
the incorrect restore function may produce unpredictable results and require the
computer to be re-booted.

Hot plugging and mouse restoration
14
The iPEPS does not display the configuration sequence
If the iPEPS has been previously configured it may not automatically display the
first of the setup screens. In this case you have two options, either:
• Access the Unit or Network configuration screens separately, or
• Reset the configuration:

To invoke a configuration reset by main menu
1 Using the locally connected keyboard and screen, log on as the admin user.
2 Select the ‘Configuration’ option.

Resetting the configuration (Dual Access models only)


 
 
 
   
   
   
 
.


3 Highlight the ‘Reset configuration’ option and press
.
A warning screen will be displayed, select the RESET option and press


    



     
  
   
4 The iPEPS will reset and then display the first of the four initial
configuration screens.
15
A
D
D
E
R®
Part 1 – Initial configuration (Standard or Dual Access models)
3 In the ‘Server:’ entry, type the address: 192.168.1.42
4 Click the OK button. Depending on the options selected, you may need to
confirm certain items. A connection attempt will be made and if successful,
an authentication dialog will be displayed:
KV
M
CO
NS
OL
E
SS
E
K
5 Enter admin as the Username, leave the password entry blank and click
the OK button. The viewer window should now open:
PO
W
ER

CO
MP
UT
E
(V
M) R
A
C
R
LI
N
w
E
A
C
D
D
D
U
A
L
w
m
r.
co
e
d
w
.a
d
LN
100 K RE
LO M V
C P NC
W
R

(K
/M
)
To perform the initial local configuration
1 Connect the iPEPS to an IP network where a suitable computer is available
on the same subnet (please see the Installation chapter for further details).
ON
1
2
If required, select the
encryption mode - MORE [+]
Options button
Provides a range of viewer and connection settings - MORE [+]
You are now ready to
begin Part 2 of the
configuration.
Use the various options
(particularly the ‘Unit
Configuration’ and ‘Network
Configuration’ options) to
arrange the iPEPS to suit
your requirements.


Enter the iPEPS address here
and click OK
If the iPEPS does not respond, then please see the next page for details
of actions that you can take.
6 Click the Configure button to display the Configuration menu:

2 Use a computer connected to the same subnet of the network.
On that computer, locate and select the VNC viewer icon 
A connection details dialog will be displayed:

Click the Configure button
16
LN
100 K RE
LO M V
C P NC
W
R
Configuration File
=================
#Edit and save this file. Close editor before safely removing USB mass storage device.
#Wait 10 seconds after disconnecting USB lead for configuration to happen.
#Lines beginning with a ‘#’ are comments
#All other lines should be of the form: Parameter=Value
#DO NOT USE SPACE OR TABS
#IP Address for device
IpAddress=192.168.1.42
#IP sub-network mask
IpNetMask=255.255.0.0


#
#

To reset the iPEPS to its default network settings
If the iPEPS network address has been previously changed from its factory
default, then it won’t respond when you try to make initial contact. You can
reset it to its default address (192.168.1.42) and other settings by performing
the following:
1 Remove all power to the device.
2 Set switch 2 on the side of the unit to its ON position.
3 Apply power to the device. After about two
Reset
button
seconds the VNC indicator will light. Before the
hole
indicator extinguishes, insert a thin object (such
PO
W
E
as a straightened paperclip) into the small hole
R
adjacent to the power socket to depress the
concealed reset switch and then remove it.
4 Shortly after, the VNC light should flash five
times. This indicates that the reset operation
has been successful.
5 Remove power and return switch 2 on the
side of the unit to its OFF position.
To alter the iPEPS network settings via USB connection
This method allows you to configure the basic iPEPS network settings before it
has been connected to any network. To achieve this task, you need to connect
the iPEPS to a computer that uses Windows 2000, XP or Vista.
1 Remove all power to the device and set switch 2 on the iPEPS unit to ‘ON’.
2 Connect the iPEPS mouse port to a vacant USB socket on your computer using
the supplied KVM cable and green USB converter plug as shown in the Host
Computer connections section. Note: If you also connect the keyboard cable
and purple converter then the iPEPS can derive power from the computer.
3 Power up the iPEPS unit and the computer (if not already switched on).
4 The Windows computer should report that a ‘New Disk’ has been inserted.
Use Windows Explorer to browse to the new disk and locate the file ‘config.
txt’. Edit this file using an editor such as Notepad or Wordpad:
#Gateway for subnet
IpGateway=
#Whether to use DHCP on device 1=true, 0=false
UseDHCP=0
#Set to ‘1’ to reset password
resetAdminPasswd=0
5 Edit the parameters in this file as required, then save the file.
6 IMPORTANT: In the Windows Explorer ‘File’ menu, choose the ‘Eject’ option
in order to prompt the iPEPS to use the new information. Wait a couple of
seconds to ensure that this action has been completed.
7 Disconnect the USB cable from the computer.
8 Wait for ten seconds and then power down the unit.
9 Return Switch 2 to its ‘OFF’ position.
10The iPEPS unit configuration should have been set with the new
information that you provided in the config.txt file. If necessary, you can
confirm that this has happened by repeating these steps to check the
contents of the “config.txt” file.


If the iPEPS fails to respond when you attempt to access it on a local network
(as discussed on the previous page), the most likely cause (presuming that it is
correctly connected) is that it has been re-assigned to use network settings other
than the default values.
In such cases, you can remedy the situation in either of two ways, either:
• Reset the iPEPS back to its default network settings using the reset
procedure (shown below),
or
• Set the iPEPS to any required network settings using a USB link
(shown right) Ü.

If the iPEPS does not respond on the network
17
To perform the remote configuration
1 Use either the VNC viewer or a standard web browser to make remote
contact with the iPEPS – see Connecting to the iPEPS for more details.
2 If the username entry is not blanked out, enter ‘admin’. Then enter the
password that was set during the local configuration stage (if no password
was set, then just press
). Once logged in, the iPEPS will show the video
output from the host system (if one is connected), or otherwise a ‘No Signal’
message.
3 Click the Configure button in the top right hand corner of the window to
display the configuration menu 

The second part of the configuration requires you to log into the iPEPS from
a system via a network connection using either of the following two access
applications:
• The VNC viewer – a small application supplied on the CD-ROM or
downloadable from the Adder and RealVNC websites or even downloadable
from the iPEPS itself.
or
• A standard browser that supports Java – As soon as a web browser makes
contact, the iPEPS downloads a Java application to it. This allows a viewer
window to be opened and operation to commence just as it would with the
VNC viewer application.

Part 2 – Remote configuration
User accounts
Allows you to create and manage up to sixteen separate user
accounts, each with separate access permissions.

Unit configuration
Allows you to alter both basic and fundamental
settings within the iPEPS.
Time & Date Configuration
Allows you to set the current time and date as well as the
timezone specifier and specify a network timeserver, if necessary


Network configuration
Here you can alter any of the existing network settings plus you
can take advantage of the IP access control feature that lets you
to specifically include or exclude certain addresses or networks.

Logging and status
Provides various details about the user activity on the iPEPS.
Several of the options within the configuration menu duplicate those
that are available in the local configuration (Dual Access model only).
However, there are other settings that are only available here.
For more information about each menu option, please see Appendix 5
- Remote configuration menus in the ‘Further information’ chapter.
18
Networking issues
Internet
Firewall/
router
Firewall/
router
ADDERLINK
ADDER®
ADDERLINK
ADDER®
KVM link to
host system
Local
network
connection
iPEPS situated behind the
firewall
Local
network
connection
KVM link to
host system
When a web server is also on the local network
Port 80 is the standard port used by web (HTTP) servers. If the iPEPS is situated within
a local network that also includes a web server or any other device serving port 80
then, if you want to use the web browser interface from outside the local network
environment, the HTTP port number of the iPEPS must be changed.
When you change the HTTP port to anything other than 80, then each remote
browser user will need to specify the port address as well as the IP address. For
instance, if you set the HTTP port to ‘8000’ and the IP address is ‘192.168.47.10’
then browser users will need to enter:
http://192.168.47.10:8000
(Note the single colon that separates the IP address and the port number).
The firewall/router would also need to be informed to transfer all traffic to the
new port number through to the iPEPS.
iPEPS situated alongside
the firewall
IMPORTANT: When the iPEPS is accessible from the public Internet or dial up
connection, you must ensure that sufficient security measures are employed.
If you need to change the VNC port number
If you change the VNC port to anything other than 5900, then each VNC viewer
user will need to specify the port address as well as the IP address. For instance,
if you set the VNC port to ‘11590’ and the IP address is ‘192.168.47.10’ then
VNC viewer users will need to enter:

Internet
Port settings
As standard, the iPEPS uses two ports to support its two types of viewer:
• Port 80 for users making contact with a web browser, and
• Port 5900 for those using the VNC viewer.
When these port numbers are used, VNC viewers and web browsers will locate
the iPEPS correctly using only its network address. The firewall/router must be
informed to transfer traffic, requesting these port numbers, through to the
iPEPS.

Every network setup is different and great care needs to be taken when
introducing a powerful device such as the iPEPS into an existing configuration.
A common cause of potential problems can be in clashes with firewall
configurations. For this reason the iPEPS is designed to be intelligent, flexible
and secure. With the minimum of effort the iPEPS can reside either behind the
firewall or alongside with its own separate Internet connection.


Positioning iPEPS in the network
A possible point of contention between the iPEPS and a firewall can occasionally
arise over the use of IP ports. Every port through the firewall represents a potential
point of attack from outside and so it is advisable to minimise the number of open
ports. The iPEPS usually uses two separate port numbers, however, these are easily
changeable and can even be combined into a single port.
IMPORTANT: The correct configuration of routers and firewalls requires advanced
networking skills and intimate knowledge of the particular network. Adder Technology
cannot provide specific advice on how to configure your network devices and strongly
recommend that such tasks are carried out by a qualified professional.

Thanks to its robust security the iPEPS offers you great flexibility in how it
integrates into an existing network structure. The iPEPS is designed to reside
either on an internal network, behind a firewall/router or alternatively with its
own direct Internet connection.

Placing iPEPS behind a router or firewall
192.168.47.10::11590
(Note the double colons that separate the IP address and port number).
The firewall/router would also need to be informed to transfer all traffic to the
new port number through to the iPEPS.
19
iPEPS has a local address
and net mask, i.e.
IP address: 192.168.0.3
Net mask: 255.255.255.0
ADDERLINK
®
ADDER



Firewall/router address:
129.7.1.10
The firewall routes the
request from the VNC viewer
on port 5900 through to
the iPEPS at local address
192.168.0.3
DNS addressing
As with any other network device, you can arrange for your iPEPS to be
accessible using a name, rather than an IP address. This can be achieved in two
main ways:
• For small networks that do not have a DNS (Domain Name System) server,
edit the ‘hosts’ files on the appropriate remote systems. Using the hosts file,
you can manually link the iPEPS address to the required name.
• For larger networks, declare the IP address and required name to the DNS
server of your local network.
The actual steps required to achieve either of these options are beyond the
scope of this document. 

Internet
Remote user with VNC
viewer accesses IP
address: 129.7.1.10 and
automatically uses port
5900.
To discover a DHCP-allocated IP address
Once a DHCP server has allocated an IP address, you will need to know it in
order to access the iPEPS via a network connection. To discover the allocated IP
address:
1 In either the local or remote Network configuration screens, set the ‘Use
DHCP’ option to ‘Yes’ and select ‘Save’. Once the page is saved, the iPEPS
will contact the DHCP server and obtain a new address.
2 Re-enter the same ‘Network configuration’ screen where the new IP address
and network mask should be displayed.

Addressing
When the iPEPS is situated within the local network, you will need to give it an
appropriate local IP address and IP network mask. This is achieved most easily
using the DHCP server option which will apply these details automatically. If
a DHCP server is not available on the network, then these details need to be
applied manually in accordance with the network administrator.
The firewall/router must then be informed to route incoming requests to port
5900 or port 80 (if available) through to the local address being used by the
iPEPS.
20
Addressing
When the iPEPS is situated alongside the firewall, it will require a public static IP
address (i.e. one provided by your Internet service provider).
More addressing information:
Discover DHCP-allocated addresses
DNS addressing


Ensuring sufficient security
The security capabilities offered by the iPEPS are only truly effective when they
are correctly used. An open or weak password or unencrypted link can cause
security loopholes and opportunities for potential intruders. For network links
in general and direct Internet connections in particular, you should carefully
consider and implement the following:
• Ensure that encryption is enabled.
By local configuration or by remote configuration.
• Ensure that you have selected secure passwords with at least 8 characters
and a mixture of upper and lower case and numeric characters.
By remote configuration.
• Reserve the admin password for administration use only and use a nonadmin user profile for day-to-day access.
• Use the latest Secure VNC viewer (this has more in-built security than is
available with the Java viewer). To download the viewer.
• Use non-standard port numbers.
• Restrict the range of IP addresses that are allowed to access the iPEPS to only
those that you will need to use. To restrict IP access.
• Do NOT Force VNC protocol 3.3. Remote configuration.
• Ensure that the computer accessing the iPEPS is clean of viruses and
spyware and has up-to-date firewall and anti-virus software loaded that is
appropriately configured.
• Avoid accessing the iPEPS from public computers.
Ports
In this configuration there should be no constraints on the port numbers
because the iPEPS will probably be the only device at that IP address. Therefore,
maintain the HTTP port as 80 and the VNC port as 5900.

IMPORTANT: If you make the iPEPS accessible from the public Internet, care
should be taken to ensure that the maximum security available is activated. You
are strongly advised to enable encryption and use a strong password. Security
may be further improved by restricting client IP addresses, using a non-standard
port number for access.
Security can be further improved by using the following suggestions:
• Place the iPEPS behind a firewall and use port the numbers to route the VNC
network traffic to an internal IP address.
• Review the activity log from time to time to check for unauthorized use.
• Lock your server consoles after they have been used.
A security white paper that gives further details is available upon request from
Adder Technology Limited.


iPEPS is built from the ground-up to be secure. It employs a sophisticated 128bit
public/private key system that has been rigorously analysed and found to be
highly secure (a security white paper is available upon request from Adder
Technology Ltd). Therefore, you can position the iPEPS alongside the firewall and
control a computer that is also IP connected within the local network.

Placing iPEPS alongside the firewall
21
Local connection (dual access models only)
The keyboard, video monitor and mouse connected directly to the iPEPS dual
access offer password protected access to the host computer.
To make a local connection:
1 Using the keyboard connected directly to the iPEPS dual access, press any
key to exit the screensaver and display the logon prompt.
   


  

 


The iPEPS offers you two ways to connect:
• Local connection (Dual Access models only),
• Remote connection by network link,
...and two types of viewer:
• VNC viewer,
• Standard web browser.
To view the local control menu
1 Press and hold the hotkeys (usually
and
), then press
and finally
release all three keys.
Note: The
and
keys when pressed in combination are called
‘hotkeys’ and they signal to the iPEPS that you wish to control it, rather than
the host computer. However, if these particular hotkeys clash with another
device or program, then your administrator may change them to a different
combination. If the
combination fails to work, then please
contact the system administrator for details.

Connecting to the iPEPS

Operation
2 Enter your username and password. Providing you have the correct
permissions, the screen will display the currently selected host computer.
The local control menu contains numerous options, the most useful of which
are:
• Access mode - Allows you to select a ‘Private’ mode in order to prevent
other logged on users from viewing your actions on the host computer. Use
and
to change between modes.
Note: For the courtesy of other users, this mode should be used sparingly.
The admin user has the ability to overrule the private setting.
• Return to host - Quits the control menu and displays the host computer
screen.

  





  
22
VNC
viewer
Web
browser
Internet


OR
ADDERLINK
ADDER®

From a remote system,
you connect to the iPEPS
using either of two types
of viewer:


To avoid the ‘hall of mirrors’ effect
IMPORTANT: Never configure a system so that your viewer is viewing itself.
When controlling a host computer using the locally connected keyboard, video
monitor and mouse, it is possible to use the VNC viewer or a browser (if the host
computer is networked) to create a remote link back to itself. This will set up a
‘hall of mirrors’ effect, where the computer is viewing itself into infinity.
While technically possible, the iPEPS unit is not designed to withstand this
treatment and could sustain damage.
Remote connections

Local connection (continued)
23
To connect using the VNC viewer
1 Locate and select the VNC viewer icon 
Options button
Provides a range of viewer and connection settings - MORE [+]
2 In the ‘Server:’ entry, type the address of the iPEPS as follows:
v.w.x.y
where v.w.x.y is the IP network address, for example 192.168.0.3
• If you have been asked to also enter a port number.
3 Click the OK button. Depending on the options selected, you may need to
confirm certain items. A connection attempt will be made and if successful,
an authentication dialog will be displayed:
4 Enter your username and password. The viewer window should now open
and show the current host computer. Note: If the Username entry is blanked
out then only admin user account is currently defined and only a password is
required.

If required, select the
encryption mode - MORE [+]

Enter the iPEPS address here
and click OK

A connection details dialog will be displayed:


The VNC viewer is a compact application that runs on your remote system and
allows you to view and use the iPEPS and its host computer. VNC viewer is
readily available from a number of different sources:
• from the iPEPS installation CD
• from the iPEPS itself
• from the RealVNC website

Remote connection by VNC viewer
24
To connect using your Web browser
1 Launch your standard Web browser as usual.
2 In the Address section, type the address of the iPEPS as follows:
If required, select the
encryption mode - MORE [+]
Options button
Provides a range of viewer and connection settings - MORE [+]
4 Make any necessary option/encryption changes and click the OK button
to proceed. Depending on the options selected, you may need to confirm
certain items.
5 A second connection attempt will be made and if successful, an
authentication dialog will be displayed:
6 Enter your username and password. The viewer window should now open
and show the current host computer. Note: If the Username entry is blanked
out then only admin user account is currently defined and only a password is
required.

The previously entered iPEPS
address will be shown here

where v.w.x.y is the IP network address, for example 192.168.0.3
• If you have been asked to also enter a port number.
3 Press
. A connection attempt will be made. In the browser window,
select the ‘Connect using built-in Java VNC viewer’ option to download
a small application that will temporarily empower your browser (on slow
connections the application download can take several tens of seconds to
complete). Once complete, a connection details dialog will be displayed:

http://v.w.x.y


You can use a standard Web browser (supported versions) to gain access to
the iPEPS and its host computer. As soon as you make contact with the iPEPS it
will begin downloading a small Java application to your browser, which will be
used only for the duration of your connection.

Remote connection by Web browser
25
Using the viewer window
When using the viewer window
Controls
Displays a menu of
options concerning
keyboard, video and
mouse operation.
Dialogue area
This area indicates your
username and can also
display other messages.
How do I escape from full screen mode?
Press the F8 button. This button is changeable but is most often set to F8.
Why is the
button flashing red?
This happens when a new host screen is viewed (that has not been viewed
before). Click the
button to perform an auto calibration for the screen and
the mouse. See Auto calibrate for important information about this feature.
How do I remove traces of moved items from the screen?
When you move an item or window across the screen, sometimes it can leave
unsightly trails. These are called artifacts and can be particularly prevalent when
the connection speed is low. To remove artifacts, click the ‘Controls’ button and
select the ‘Refresh screen’ option. See Controls.
Re-sync mouse
Ensures that the
mouse pointer
which you move
and the mouse
pointer on the
host system
are correctly
synchronised.
Auto calibrate
Determines the
optimum video and/or
mouse settings for
the host computer.
This button will flash
red when the new
host screen is first
encountered. Click this
button when you first
visit the new screen.
Access mode
Allows you
to choose
between
Shared and
Private access
modes.
Configure
This option is only
available to the
admin user and
provides access
to the main
configuration
menus.
How do I make the most of a slow connection?
The VNC viewer is slightly better suited to slower connections than the browser
viewer because it offers more options. Click the Options button of the VNC
viewer when entering the iPEPS address during log on.
Adjust the Threshold setting
Ensure that the video Threshold setting is set higher than the automatic setting
suggests. Tweak this setting manually to ensure the best setting.
Fewer colours
Select the Low (64 colours) mode. The Very low option offers hardly any
improvement and looks a lot worse.
Rate limit mouse events
When selected, this mode greatly reduces the mouse movement data that are
sent to the host computer. When you move the local mouse, the remote cursor
will catch up roughly once per second.

CTRL-ALT-DEL
Click to send the CTRLALT-DEL key sequence
to the connected host
computer.

Viewer options
(VNC viewer only)
Click the VNC
icon to view the
viewer window
options.
How do I navigate around a larger screen?
If the screen that you are viewing has a larger resolution than your viewing
window you will need to scroll around to see all items. The viewer window
allows you to ‘bump scroll’ (only in full screen mode). This means that when
your mouse cursor bumps against the edge of the screen, the screen image will
scroll across automatically.

The viewer window presents a menu bar similar to that shown below. Certain
items within the toolbar are displayed depending upon your access permissions
and/or the iPEPS configuration.


The menu bar
What is the best screen resolution to use?
The best resolution for your computer is one that is larger than the screen of
the host computer that you are viewing. This will allow you to see everything
without scrolling around, as described next.

The viewer window gives you the ability to view and control the iPEPS and its
host computer. Its operation is almost identical regardless of whether you used
the VNC viewer or your Web browser to display it.
26
Remote host cursor
For the VNC viewer, the local
cursor is a dot:
Local dot cursor
Remote host cursor
Additionally, for fast network
connections, the VNC viewer also
provides a single mouse mode.
See Controls - Single Mouse for
details.

To re-synchronise the mouse
1 Click the
button and then click OK in the subsequent pop-up message.
Note: If you find that this doesn’t work, you may need to perform a mouse
calibration again.
Access mode - shared/private
Up to five users can be simultaneously logged-on (four remote users plus one
local user) and during normal operation, all are able to see the same view of
the currently selected host. If you need to perform a sensitive task that should
not be viewed by other users, you can change the access mode to Private. This
action blanks the viewer window for all other logged on users.
Note: For the courtesy of other users, this mode should be used sparingly. The
admin user has the ability to overrule the private setting.
To change the access mode
1 Click one of the arrow buttons adjacent to the
Shared/Private indicator. 
Local cursor
If you find that your local mouse pointer and that of the host are not correctly
synchronised, use this feature to re-align their movements. This operation is also
selectable from the Controls menu.

For the browser viewer, the local
cursor is a typical arrow:
Re-synchronise mouse


Both viewers provide a double mouse cursor to help overcome any delays
caused by slow connections. When you move your mouse you will see two
mouse cursors, a local one that responds immediately to your movements and a
second, slower moving, cursor that represents the current mouse position at the
host.

Mouse pointers
Single local cursor
27
Upon completion
an information
dialog will
explain the
results:
Resync Mouse
This option has the same effect as the button on the menu bar and resynchronises the local and remote mouse pointers.
Refresh Screen
This option refreshes the whole screen image to remove any artifacts from
moved screen items. This is useful when using very low refresh rates on slow
speed communication links.


Single Mouse Mode
This mode is for fast network connections
where the cursor response is sufficient
to provide instant visual feedback on the
remote screen. When enabled, the cursor is
‘captured’ within the viewer window until you
use the ‘escape’ hot keys.
To escape from single mouse mode, press F8
and then P. Alternatively, enable and use the mouse button escape sequences
- see Advanced unit configuration for details.
The single mouse mode does not require calibration.

To auto calibrate the screen and/or mouse
1 Click the
button to display the Calibrate options dialog:
2 Click the required action.
A progress indicator will be
displayed while the necessary
calculations are made.
When clicked, this button reveals a menu of
options concerned with keyboard, video and
mouse operation.


When you visit the host computer for the very first time, your viewer needs
to determine the optimum video and mouse settings. The button will remind
you to click it by flashing red when a new computer screen is encountered.
Performing this step is important because it can help to decrease unnecessary
video information being sent across the link, thus improving overall
performance.
Once this has been done, the video settings for the host computer will be
retained and re-used.
Note: When performing an auto calibration, ensure that the screen image is
static (no moving images) and also try to remove any on-screen displays (such
as host names or menus). This is because they can affect the calibration process
and result in a lower overall performance level. For mouse calibration, ensure
that there are no application windows located around the upper left corner of
the screen. This is because as the mouse calibration takes place, the cursor may
change (to match the application as it skims across the window) and this may
confuse the calculation. Also ensure that the host system does not have the
mouse cursor trails option enabled.
Controls

Auto calibrate
28
Click to display the Restore
mouse dialog where you
can reinstate a mouse
that has failed to operate
correctly.
For advice on which mouse
type to choose.
Click to calibrate the
remote mouse
For a USB mouse, allows you
to choose between Relative
(standard) and Absolute
positioning modes.
For the latter, the connected host
computer must support absolute
positioning devices.
Click to take text from
the remote viewer
clipboard and present
it at the host computer
as though it had been
typed there directly
When entering codes:
+ means press down the key that follows
– means release the key that follows
+– means press down and release the key that follows
* means wait 250ms (note: if a number immediately follows the asterisk, then the delay will equal the number, in milliseconds)
It is automatically assumed that all keys specified will be released at the end, so
there is need to specify -Ctrl or -Alt if these keys are to be released together.
See Appendix 8 for a list of key sequence codes that can be used.
Examples:
‘Ctrl + Alt 12’ would be expressed as: +Ctrl+ Alt+1–1+2
+N means press the ‘N’ key
+Scroll means press the Scroll lock key
+Space means press the space key

Click to produce a
continuous mouse click
and hold for the left,
centre or right mouse
buttons

Click to send
the code

Click to move the remote
mouse cursor up, down,
left or right
Enter the
code here


Click to produce a single
mouse click for the left,
centre or right mouse
buttons
Keyboard Control
This option displays a keyboard control dialog and is useful for sending keyboard
combinations (to the host) that are needed regularly or that are trapped by the
iPEPS.

Mouse Control
This option displays a mouse control dialog and is useful when the remote
cursor is failing to respond correctly to your mouse movements, even after using
the Resync mouse option.
The mouse control dialog allows you to control the remote mouse cursor using a
selection of buttons that you click with your local mouse.
29
Vertical position
Determines the
vertical position
of the host screen
image within the
viewer window.
Colour, brightness &
contrast
Provides manual
sliders and also an
automatic setting
button to optimise
these important video
constituents for the
current host and
connection speed.
Calibrate all
Click to
determine the
optimum settings
for all aspects of
video the video
connection from
the host system.
Display activity
Indicates the level
of video activity
currently in
progress.
Setting the Threshold manually
Occasionally it can be useful to manually adjust the Threshold setting, in order to
achieve a setting that best suits your particular requirements.
1 Use the ‘Calibrate All’ function to ensure that all other settings are
optimised.
2 Click the Threshold left arrow button to decrement the setting by one and
observe the ‘Display Activity’ indicator.
3 Repeat step 2 until the Display Activity indicator suddenly rises to a much
higher level (i.e. 50%). This will mean that you have reached the noise
boundary. At this point, increment the Threshold value by 2 or 3 points to
achieve an optimum setting.


Horizontal position
Determines the
horizontal position of
the host screen image
within the viewer
window.

Threshold
The threshold
is effectively a
noise filter that
differentiates
between valid
video signals
and background
noise or
interference.
This has
the effect
of reducing
unnecessary
video signals
between the
iPEPS and the
remote system,
thus improving
performance.


Phase
The phase setting
adjusts the alignment
of the host video
output and the
remote system video
display to achieve the
sharpest image.
Using automatic configurations
• Every setting can be individually subjected to an automatic configuration
(click the appropriate ‘Auto’ button) and most can also be manually
adjusted.
• Use the ‘Calibrate All’ button to automatically determine the optimum
settings for all items.
Note: Before using the ‘Calibrate All’ option, if possible, remove on-screen
display (OSD) elements. These OSD elements use different video rates
to those of the host system and can affect the setting of the automatic
threshold value. iPEPS uses an improved calculation procedure to filter out
the effect of these elements. However, best results are obtained when the
screen contains only host system information.
Note: To maximise performance, the threshold level is automatically
increased by 50% when a slow link is detected.

Video Settings
This dialog provides access to all of the key video settings that determine image
quality and link performance.
30
Overlap Capture
When enabled, the iPEPS will begin capturing the
next frame of video output from the host computer
before it has fully completed processing the current
frame. In most cases this produces better video
performance, however, when moving large objects
around the screen (such as an application window),
the video image seen at the remote system may
exhibit temporary artifacts as the large image
moves.
Tile Width and Height
Determines the size of the sample
areas into which the source video
screen is divided for examination
purposes. Smaller sizes result in
more areas to sample, larger areas
result in more frequent screen area
refreshes. 16 is considered to be the
optimum size for both the width
and height settings.

Motion Detection
This option is not
available for use with
the iPEPS.

Info
When selected, this option displays an information dialog showing the current
logged on users, the current host, its video mode and its mouse motion details.

Pixel Format
Determines the colour
depth and data
required to represent
each video pixel.


Virtual Media
Please see the next page for details.

Advanced Settings
This option contains video signal settings that do not normally need to be
adjusted.
31
Select the required storage device or file/folder, choose an appropriate
‘Drive Type’ (virtual CD, floppy or disk (directory)) and click OK. The
selected device will be tagged for transfer but no other action will take
place at this point.
Click the ‘Create VM Drive’ button to announce file availability to the
host computer, whereupon a popup will confirm that the new virtual
media disk is built.
Note that using either of the two methods outlined above, no files or folders
are transferred at this point, instead the iPEPS will simulate a removable
storage device at host computer. This will appear within Windows Explorer
or Apple Finder exactly as a floppy disk, removable drive or memory stick
would.
3 On the host computer (either directly from iPEPS local console or via the
VNC viewer) locate the new virtual drive and access the files as necessary.
Files will be transferred to the host computer as they are specifically
requested by the actions of the host computer. 
• Using Windows Explorer (or the Apple Finder), locate and copy the
required file, folder or drive to the clipboard.
On the remote system, within the VNC viewer window, click the
Controls button and then select the Virtual Media option. A popup
similar to the following will be displayed:


• Within the VNC viewer window, press F8 and then V. A quick scan will
be made of the available storage devices and a popup similar to the
following will be displayed:

To remotely transfer files to a host computer
1 On the remote system, log into the iPEPS using the VNC viewer in the usual
manner.
2 On the remote system, select the file(s), folder(s) or storage device (i.e.
floppy disk, hard drive, CD-ROM, memory stick) that you wish to transfer to
the host computer (to a maximum of 2GB) in either of the following ways:


Virtual Media
The Adder Virtual Media feature allows you to remotely make files available
to the host computer linked to the iPEPS. Single files or collections of files and
folders up to 2GB in size can be quickly transferred via the VNC link. This can
prove to be an invaluable tool when upgrading the host computer from remote
positions.
In order to use the Adder Virtual Media feature, the VM link must be made
between the iPEPS and a USB port on the host computer. See Host computer
connections for details.
32
To enter a port number in VNC viewer
1 Enter the required IP address in the usual ‘Server’ box,
i.e. http://192.168.0.3
2 At the end of the IP address, add two colons and then enter the port
number (in this example, the required port number is 11590),
i.e. http://192.168.0.3::11590
3 Continue with the standard VNC viewer instructions.

To enter a port number in a Web browser
1 Enter the required IP address in the usual Address box,
i.e. http://192.168.0.3
2 At the end of the IP address, add a single colon and then enter the port
number (in this example, the required port number is 8000),
i.e. http://192.168.0.3:8000
3 Continue with the standard Web browser instructions.

Usually, when you make a network connection to the iPEPS (either using the
VNC viewer or a Web browser) you simply enter the IP address, i.e. 192.168.0.3.
However, if a special configuration is necessary, then you may be asked to
specify a port number as well as the IP address.
What is a port?

To download the VNC viewer
1 Open your Web browser.
2 Enter the network address where the iPEPS is situated (in the form:
http://192.168.0.3) and make the link.
3 In the opening iPEPS screen, click the link that offers to download the secure
VNC viewer ‘from the unit’.
4 Save the download file (vncviewer.exe) to your system.
5 Select and run the downloaded file and then connect to the iPEPS using the
VNC viewer application.
If you need to enter a port number


The iPEPS has the ability to distribute its own VNC viewer application.

Downloading VNC viewer from the iPEPS
33
Supported web browsers

Linux
• Netscape 4.61 and above,
with Java Runtime Environment 1.1 or above.
• Opera,
with Java Runtime Environment 1.1 or above.

Windows
• Internet Explorer 5.50 and above,
with Microsoft [Java] Virtual Machine (release 5.50).
with Java Runtime Environment 1.3 or above.

The following web browsers have been tested and found to work correctly with
iPEPS.


The web browser viewers and VNC viewers (of level 4.0b5S or higher) offer four
encryption options. The resulting actions of certain options depend upon how
the iPEPS to which you are connecting is configured:
• Always on - This setting will ensure that the link is encrypted, regardless of
the iPEPS encryption setting.
• Let server choose - This setting will follow the configuration of the iPEPS.
If the iPEPS has a preference to encrypt the link, then it will be so, otherwise
the link will not be encrypted.
• Prefer off - This setting will configure an un-encrypted link if the iPEPS will
allow it, otherwise it will be encrypted.
• Prefer on - If the iPEPS allows it, this setting will configure an encrypted
link, otherwise it will be un-encrypted.
Whenever encryption does take place, the viewer will first need to create the
necessary secure key before the connection process can continue.

Viewer encryption settings
34
Further information
If you are still experiencing problems after checking the list of solutions in the
Troubleshooting section then we provide a number of other solutions:
• Adder Technology website – www.adder.com
Check the Support section of our website for the latest solutions and driver
files.
• Email – support@adder.com
• Fax
in the UK:
in the US:
01954 780081
+1 888 275 1117
• Phone
in the UK:
in the US:
01954 780044
+1 888 932 3337
When logging on using VNC viewer, I cannot enter a username
• Either, the VNC viewer is an old version (download a new one) or only the
admin user has been configured on the iPEPS.


The remote cursor is not correctly responding to my mouse movements
• Recalibrate the mouse. When doing so, ensure that the host system does
not have mouse cursor trails enabled and that the top left corner of the
screen is clear of application windows.

Remote network users are unable to contact the iPEPS
• Check that the correct address is being used by the remote users.
• Check the network settings. Check that the users network address has not
been excluded in the IP access control section.
• If the iPEPS is situated behind a firewall, check that the relevant ports are
being allowed through the firewall and are being correctly routed.
• Check the end panel indicators, the LNK indicator should be on. If the
network link is a 100Mbps connection, the 100 indicator should also be on.


Getting assistance
Troubleshooting

This chapter contains a variety of information, including the following:
• Getting assistance - see below
• Troubleshooting - see right
• Appendices
• Appendix 1 - Local configuration menus
• Appendix 2 - VNC viewer connection options
• Appendix 3 - VNC viewer window options
• Appendix 4 - Browser viewer options
• Appendix 5 - Remote configuration menus
• Appendix 6 - Addresses, masks and ports
• Appendix 7 - Cable specifications
• Appendix 8 - Hotkey sequence codes
• Appendix 9 - Supported video modes
• Safety information
• Warranty
• End user licence agreement
• Radio frequency energy statements
35
Appendix 1 - Local configuration menus


  
Select the ‘Configuration’ option to display:


 
 
 

Select the required option:
• Unit configuration
• Network configuration
• Reset configuration


 
If you are not logged on as the
‘admin’ user then the Configuration
menu will not be available.

   


  


To access the local configuration menus
• On the locally connected keyboard, simultaneously press
.
Note: If the standard hotkeys (CTRL + ALT) have been changed, then you
need to use those keys together with C to access the menus.

This section covers the control menus that are available when you are using the
locally connected keyboard, video monitor and mouse.
36
Keybd layout
Use the arrow buttons to match the keyboard layout expected by the host
system.
Admin password
Enter the password that will be used to gain administrator access to the iPEPS.
There can only be one admin user and only that user is given access to the
configuration menus. The admin password background will be red until a
reasonably secure password has been entered, although this is only advisory as
any password or no password may be entered.
Unit name
The name entered here will be displayed on the local menus and the remote
VNC/browser windows.
Hot keys
Use the left and right arrow keys to select an appropriate hot key sequence for
the locally connected keyboard. This sequence is used in combination with other
keypresses to access the on-screen menus. The options are: Ctrl+Alt (default),
Ctrl+Shift, Alt+Shift, Alt Gr, Left + Right Alt, Left Ctrl + Alt or Right Ctrl + Alt.
Screensaver
Use the left and right arrow keys to select an appropriate period of inactivity
on the local keyboard or mouse before a screensaver is displayed and the user
is logged out. This setting applies to local users only and once the screensaver
is displayed, for security purposes the user is required to log in again. The
timeout period can be selected between 5 minutes and 1 day (24 hours) or you
can choose the OFF setting to disable the screensaver feature. Note: The Idle
timeout option serves a similar purpose for remote connections.
Time and date
Use the left and right arrow keys to select the correct time and date. The time
entry uses the 24 hour clock notation. The internal real time clock will continue
to run for roughly one week without power to the iPEPS, after that it will be lost
and require resetting. Use the up and down arrow keys to move between each
of the sections within the time and date entries.
Encryption
Three options are available: Always on, prefer off, prefer on. The one to choose
depends on the specific details of your installation - see Encryption settings for
details. The use of encryption imposes a slight performance overhead of roughly 10%
but is highly secure against third party intrusion.




To get here
1 Use the local keyboard and log on as the ‘admin’ user.
(hotkeys may be different).
2 Press
3 Select ‘Configuration’.
4 Select ‘Unit configuration’.


 





  
 
 

 


 

    





 
 

This page provides access
to a selection of both basic
and fundamental settings
for the iPEPS.

Unit configuration
37


MAC address
Media Access Control address – this is the unique and unchangeable code that
was hard coded within your iPEPS unit when it was built. It consists of six 2-digit
hexadecimal (base 16) numbers separated by colons. A section of the MAC
address identifies Adder Technology as the manufacturer, while the remainder is
effectively the unique electronic serial number of your particular unit.
Use DHCP
DHCP is an acronym for ‘Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol’. Its function is
particularly useful when connecting to medium size or larger networks. When
this option is selected, your iPEPS will attempt to locate a DHCP server on the
network. If such a server is located, it will supply three things to the iPEPS: an
IP address, an IP network mask (also known as a Subnet mask) and a Gateway
address. These are not usually granted permanently, but on a ‘lease’ basis for
a fixed amount of time or for as long as the iPEPS remains connected and
switched on. Discover allocations.
IP address
This is the identity of the iPEPS within a network. The IP address can be thought
of as the telephone number of the iPEPS. Unlike the MAC address, the IP
address can be altered to suit the network to which it is connected. It can either
be entered manually or configured automatically using the DHCP option. When
the DHCP option is enabled, this entry is greyed out.
Net mask
Also often called the ‘subnet-mask’, this value is used alongside the IP address
to help define a smaller collection (or subnet) of devices on a network. In this
way a distinction is made between locally connected devices and ones that are
reachable elsewhere, such as on the wider Internet. This process helps to reduce
overall traffic on the network and hence speed up connections in general.
Gateway
This is the address of the device that links the local network (to which the iPEPS
is connected) to another network such as the Internet. Usually this is a network
switch or router and it will be used whenever a device to be contacted lies
outside the local network.
VNC port
This is the logical link through which communications with a remote VNC viewer
will be channelled (see What is a port?). The default setting is 5900 which is
a widely recognised port number for use by VNC software. However, in certain
circumstances it may be advantageous to alter this number - see Security issues
with ports for more details.
Note: The VNC port and HTTP port can be set to the same port number in order
to simplify router and firewall configuration. If this is done then the iPEPS will
“listen” for both types of traffic on the single port.
HTTP port
This is the logical link through which communications with a remote web
browser will be channelled. The default setting of 80 is an established standard
for web (HTTP – HyperText Transfer Protocol) traffic though this can be changed
to suit your local network requirements.
Clear IP access control
This option removes all entries from the IP access control feature within the
iPEPS. The IP access control feature (configurable by a remote admin user)
allows certain network address ranges to be denied access to the iPEPS. If set
incorrectly, it is possible to exclude all network users and so this option provides
an emergency recovery point.

   

To get here
1 Use the local keyboard and log on as the ‘admin’ user.
(hotkeys may be different).
2 Press
3 Select ‘Configuration’.
4 Select ‘Network configuration’.


 

  
 

 

 


 

 


This page allows you to
configure the various
aspects of the IP port and its
relationship with the local
network.

Network configuration
38
    


WARNING: This process will remove all settings and return the unit to use its
original state. A complete reconfiguration will be required before it can be used.
To reset the iPEPS configuration
1 With the RESET option highlighted, press
.
2 The first screen of the initial configuration process will be displayed. See
Initial configuration for details.

     
  
   

   
   
 
To get here
1 Use the local keyboard and log on as the ‘admin’ user.
2 Press
(hotkeys may be different).
3 Select ‘Configuration’.
4 Select ‘Reset configuration’.


   

This option allows you to
completely reset the iPEPS.

Reset configuration
39
Clear IP access control


   





 
 


To clear IP access control
1 Use the local keyboard and log on as the ‘admin’ user.
2 Press
(hotkeys may be set differently).
3 Select ‘Configuration’.
4 Select ‘Network
 

configuration’.
  
5 Highlight the ‘Clear IP
 

access control’ option
 

 

and press
.

What is IP access control?
The IP access control feature (configurable by a remote admin user) allows
certain network address ranges to be denied access to the iPEPS. If set
incorrectly, it is possible to exclude all network users and so this option provides
an emergency recovery point.

This option removes all entries from the IP access control feature within the
iPEPS.
40
Appendix 2 - VNC viewer connection options
Colour/Encoding
Auto select
When ticked, this option will
examine the speed of your
connection to the iPEPS and apply
the most suitable encoding method.
This option is suggested for the
majority of installations.
Preferred encoding
There are three manually selectable
encoding methods which are
accessible when the Auto select
option is unticked.
• ZRLE – This is a highly
compressed method that is
best suited to slow modem
connections.
• Hextile – This method offers better performance than the ZRLE when used
over a high speed network because there is no need for the iPEPS to spend
time highly compressing the data.
• Raw – This is a primitive, uncompressed method that is mainly used for
technical support issues. You are recommended not to use this method.
Colour level
This section allows you to select the most appropriate colour level for the
speed of the connection to the iPEPS. Where the connection speed is slow or
inconsistent there will be a necessary compromise between screen response and
colour depth.
• Full – This mode is suitable only for fast network connections and will pass
on the maximum colour depth being used by the host system.
• Medium (256 colours) – This mode reduces the host system output
to a 256 colour mode and is more suitable for ISDN and fast modem
connections.
• Low (64 colours) – This mode is suitable for slower modem connections
and reduces the host system output to 64 colours.
• Very low (8 colours) – This mode provides very rudimentary picture
quality and hardly any speed advantage over the 64 colour setting. You are
recommended not to use this mode.

There are six tabbed pages of options:


Click here to
access the options


IMPORTANT: If you make any changes to the options given here and wish to
retain them for successive connection sessions, you must save the changes.
To do this, change to the ‘Load / Save’ tab and click the ‘Save’ button.

When you are connecting to the
iPEPS using the VNC viewer, a
number of options are available.
41
Customise
Allows you to select which data can
be transferred between server and
viewer.
Send pointer events to server
When un-ticked, the VNC viewer
will not send mouse movement or click data to the iPEPS or host system.
Pass special keys directly to server
When ticked, ‘special’ keys (the Windows key, the Print Screen key, Alt+Tab,
Alt+Escape and Ctrl+Escape) are passed directly to the iPEPS rather than being
interpreted locally.
Menu key
This feature allows you to select which function key is used to display the VNC
viewer options menu. The menu key is only way to exit from the full screen
viewer mode.
Send keyboard events to server
When un-ticked, the VNC viewer will not send keyboard information to the
iPEPS or host system.
Send clipboard changes to server
This feature is restricted to software server versions of VNC and has no effect on
iPEPS installations.
Accept clipboard changes from server
This feature is restricted to software server versions of VNC and has no effect
on iPEPS installations, except for retrieving the activity log as described in the
logging and status section.
IMPORTANT: If you make any changes to the options given here and wish to
retain them for successive connection sessions, you must save the changes.
To do this, change to the ‘Load / Save’ tab and click the ‘Save’ button.

Enable 3-button mouse emulation
This feature allows you to use a 2-button mouse to emulate the middle button
of a 3-button mouse. When enabled, press the left and right mouse buttons
simultaneously to create a middle button action. You are advised to generally
use a 3-button mouse.

Disable all inputs (view-only
mode)
When selected, prevents control
data being passed between server
and viewer. Viewer can display the
server output, but cannot control it.


Rate-limit mouse move events
When ticked, this feature reduces the mouse movement information that is sent
to the iPEPS and host system. This is useful for slow connections and you will
notice that the remote cursor will catch up with the local cursor roughly once
every second.

Enable all inputs
When selected, allows keyboard,
mouse and clipboard data to be
transferred between server and
viewer systems.

Inputs
42
Preserve Aspect Ratio
When ticked, maintains a consistent
ratio between the horizontal and
vertical dimensions of the screen
image.
Render cursor locally
This option does not currently apply
to iPEPS connections.
Allow dynamic desktop resizing
When ticked, the viewer window
will be automatically resized
whenever the host system’s screen
resolution is altered.
Only use protocol version 3.3
This option does not apply to iPEPS connections.
Beep when requested to by the server
When ticked, your local system will beep in response to any error beeps emitted
by the iPEPS.
Offer to automatically reconnect
When ticked, the viewer will offer to restore a lost connection with the server.
Try Single Sign-On if server allows it
This option does not apply to iPEPS connections.


Custom Size
Adjusts the server screen image
according to the Width and Height
settings in the adjacent fields. A drop
box to the right of the fields allows
you to define the image size by
percentage or by pixels, as required.
Full screen mode
When ticked, the VNC viewer will
launch in full screen mode. Use the
menu key (usually F8) to exit from
full screen mode.

Scale to Window Size
Adjusts the server screen image to
suit the size of the viewer window.
Shared connection (do not disconnect other viewers)
This option does not apply to iPEPS
connections.


No Scaling
No attempt is made to make the
screen image fit the viewer window.
You may need to scroll horizontally
and/or vertically to view all parts of
the screen image.
Misc

Scaling
IMPORTANT: If you make any changes to the options given here and wish to
retain them for successive connection sessions, you must save the changes.
To do this, change to the ‘Load / Save’ tab and click the ‘Save’ button.
43
Load / Save
Defaults - Reload
When clicked, all connection
options are returned to the default
settings that are currently saved.
Defaults - Save
When clicked, saves the current connection options as the default set that will
be used in all subsequent VNC connections.

Configuration File - Save As...
Allows you to save the current
settings under a new name so that
they can be copied from one viewer
to another.

Configuration File - Save
Allows you to save the current
settings so that they can be copied
from one viewer to another.

Configuration File - Reload
Allows you to load a configuration
file saved from this, or another
viewer.


This feature helps your VNC viewer
to confirm that a revisited iPEPS is
genuine and not another device
masquerading as an iPEPS. The list
given will retain the identities of all
visited units (that have full security
enabled).
When you first make a secure
connection to the iPEPS, the security
information for that iPEPS unit is
cached within this Identities tab
(i.e. the “identity” is known). The
next time that you connect to the
iPEPS, its identity is checked against
the stored version. If a mismatch is
found between the current and the
stored identities then a warning will
be issued to you.
If an existing iPEPS is fully
reconfigured then it will need to issued with a new identity. In this case the
previous identity, listed in this tab, should be removed so that a new identity can
be created on the next connection.

Identities
44
Appendix 3 - VNC viewer window options
Refresh Screen
Requests data from the server for a complete redraw of
the screen image, not just the items that change.
New connection...
Displays the connection dialog so that you can log on to a
different iPEPS or VNC server location.
Options...
Displays the full range of connection options - see
Appendix 2 for more details.
Connection info...
Displays various connection and display details.
About...
Displays information about your VNC viewer.

Ctrl, Alt, Send F8, Send Ctrl-Alt-Del
Sends the selected keypress(es) to the iPEPS and host
system. This is necessary because certain keys and key
combinations are trapped by the VNC viewer.

Single mouse mode (P)
Used for fast network connections where a second,
“predictor” cursor is not required.


Full screen
Expands the VNC viewer window to fill the whole screen
with no visible window edges. Press F8 to re-display this
menu.

Standard window control items

Click the VNC icon in the top left corner of the viewer window (or press F8) to
display the window options:
45
Encoding and colour level
Auto select
When ticked, this option will examine the speed
of your connection to the iPEPS and apply the
most suitable encoding method. This option is
suggested for the majority of installations.
Preferred encoding
There are three manually selectable encoding
methods which are accessible when the Auto
select option is unticked.
• ZRLE – This is a highly compressed method
that is best suited to slow modem connections.
• Hextile – This method offers better performance than the ZRLE when used
over a high speed network because there is no need for the iPEPS to spend
time highly compressing the data.
• Raw – This is a primitive, uncompressed method that is mainly used for
technical support issues. You are recommended not to use this method.
Colour level
The colour level is fixed at Medium (256 colours) for almost all browsers.
Security
512 bits (low security)
Selects the lowest level of encoding for
communications between the browser and the
iPEPS.
1024 bits (medium security)
Selects the middle level of encoding for
communications between the browser and the
iPEPS.
2048 bits (high security)
Selects the highest level of encoding for communications between the browser
and the iPEPS.
Misc
Shared (don’t disconnect other viewers)
This feature is restricted to software server
versions of VNC and has no effect on iPEPS
installations.
Render cursor locally
This feature is restricted to software server
versions of VNC and has no effect on iPEPS
installations.
Fast CopyRect
This feature is restricted to software server versions of VNC and has no effect on
iPEPS installations.

Send clipboard to server
This feature is restricted to software server versions of VNC and has no effect on
iPEPS installations.

There are four options pages:
Accept clipboard from server
This feature is restricted to software server
versions of VNC and has no effect on iPEPS
installations.

Click here to
access the options
View only (ignore mouse & keyboard)
When ticked, the viewer will not send keyboard
or mouse information to the iPEPS or host
system.


When you are connecting to the
iPEPS using a Web browser, a
number of options are available.
Inputs

Appendix 4 - Browser viewer options
46
Appendix 5 - Remote configuration menus
This section covers the configuration menus that are available to remote admin
users using either the VNC viewer or the browser methods of access.


To access the remote configuration menus
• Click the Configure button in the top right
corner of the window when logged on as
the admin user.


Click the required option
• User Accounts
• Unit Configuration
• Time & Date Configuration
• Network Configuration
• Logging and Status

Logged on users
Indicates the current users
irrespective of whether they
are connected locally or via a
network.

Main configuration menu
47
Local
When ticked, the selected user can gain access using the local KVM console
directly connected to the iPEPS (dual access models only).
Remote
When ticked, the selected user can gain access via an IP network link, such as a
local intranet or the wider Internet (depending on how the iPEPS is connected).
To create a new account
1 Enter the required User Name to activate that position (the Password and
access tick box positions will become editable).
2 Optionally enter a password for the user account.
3 Tick/untick the Local and/or Remote options that are appropriate to the user.
4 Click the Save button to register your changes.

Password
Passwords are case sensitive and can include certain keyboard symbols. The
password can be between 1 and 16 characters in length (or can be left blank
for no password - not recommended). It is important to note, however, that
the password background remains shaded in amber while the iPEPS considers
your entered password to be too easy to guess. A suitable password is best
constructed using a mixture of more than 6 letters, numbers and punctuation
characters.

User Name
All user names must consist of lower case characters or numbers only. No
symbols or upper case characters are permissible. The user name can be
between 1 and 16 characters in length.

To get here
1 Using VNC viewer or a browser, log on as the ‘admin’ user.
2 Click the ‘Configure’ button in the top right corner.
3 Click the ‘User Accounts’ option.


This section allows you to manage up to sixteen separate accounts.
The first of the sixteen accounts is the admin account and is the only account
with access rights to the configuration menus. The user name and access rights
are fixed for the admin account, the only change possible for this account is the
password.
There are fifteen user account positions.

User accounts
48
Screensaver Timeout
Use the arrow keys to select an appropriate period of inactivity before a
screensaver is displayed and the user is logged out. This setting applies to local
users only and once the screensaver is displayed, for security purposes the
user is required to log in again. The timeout period can be selected between 5
minutes and 1 day (24 hours) or you can choose the OFF setting to disable the
screensaver feature.
Encryption
Three options are available: Always on, prefer off, prefer on. The one to choose
depends on the specific details of your installation - see Encryption settings for
details. The use of encryption imposes a slight performance overhead of roughly
10% but is highly secure against third party intrusion.
Hardware Version
Indicates the version of the electronic circuitry within the iPEPS unit.
Firmware Version
Indicates the version of the hardwired software within the iPEPS flash memory.
Host Keyboard Layout
Use the arrow buttons to match the keyboard layout expected by the host
system.
Advanced unit configuration
Click this button to display advanced options that do not normally require
alteration.

Local Hot Key Sequence
Use the arrow buttons to select an appropriate hot key sequence for the locally
connected keyboard. This sequence is used in combination with other keypresses
to access the on-screen menus. The options are: Ctrl+Alt (default), Ctrl+Shift,
Alt+Shift, Alt Gr, Left + Right Alt, Left Ctrl + Alt or Right Ctrl + Alt.

Unit Name
The name entered here will be displayed on the local menus and the remote
VNC viewer/browser windows.

To get here
1 Using VNC viewer or a browser, log on as the ‘admin’ user.
2 Click the ‘Configure’ button in the top right corner.
3 Click the ‘Unit Configuration’ option.


This page provides access to a selection of both basic and fundamental settings
for the iPEPS. Many of the settings displayed here are also accessible through the
on-screen menu on the locally attached keyboard, mouse and monitor.

Unit configuration
Admin Password
Enter the password that will be used to gain administrator access to the iPEPS.
There can only be one admin user and only that user is given access to the
configuration menus.
49
To get here
1 Using VNC viewer or a browser, log on as the ‘admin’ user.
2 Click the ‘Configure’ button in the top right corner.
3 Click the ‘Unit Configuration’ option.
4 Click the ‘Advanced Unit Configuration’ option.
Force VNC Protocol 3.3
IMPORTANT: The use of this option is not recommended. Protocol 3.3 is a legacy
version that does not offer any encryption.
Idle Timeout
Determines the period of inactivity on a remote connection before the user is logged
out. The idle timeout period can be set to any time span, expressed in minutes.
Note: The Screensaver option serves a similar purpose for local connections.
Protocol Timeout
Sets the time period by which responses should have been received to outgoing
data packets. If the stated period is exceeded, then a connection is considered
lost and terminated.
Background Refresh Rate
Use the arrow keys to alter the refresh rate for screen images via remote links. This
allows you to tailor the screen refresh to suit the network speed. The options are:
Slow, Medium, Fast or Disabled. When the disabled option is selected, the remote
users will need to manually refresh the screen.
Note: When a low connection speed is detected, the background refresh is
automatically disabled, regardless of the settings of this option.
Single Mouse Mode Mouse Switch
Allows you to select the mouse button combination that can be used to exit from
single mouse mode (when active). Options are: Disabled, Middle+Right Button,
Middle+Left Button.
Behaviour for admin connections when limit reached
Determines what should occur when four global connections already exist and
a fifth, administrator connection attempt is made. Options are: Replace oldest
connection, Replace newest connection and Don’t replace. Only non-administrator
connections can be terminated in this way.


Mouse Rate
Defines the rate at which mouse movement data are transmitted to the system.
The default option is 20ms, which equates to 50 mouse events per second.
This default rate can prove too fast when passed through certain connected
KVM switches from alternative manufacturers. In such cases, data are discarded
causing the local and remote mouse pointers to drift apart. If this effect is
encountered, increase the mouse rate to around 30ms (data are then sent at a
slower rate of 33 times per second).

Mouse Latency Allowance
This option is used during calibration to account for latency delays (caused
as signals pass through a device) introduced by some KVM switches from
alternative manufacturers.
During calibration, the iPEPS waits for 40ms after each mouse movement before
sampling the next. If a KVM device adds a significant delay to the flow of data,
the calibration process can be lengthened or may fail entirely. The value entered here
is added to (or subtracted from) the default 40ms sampling time.
Note: You can enter negative values (down to -40) in order to speed up the
calibration process when using fast KVM switches. Use this option with caution
as it can adversely affect the calibration process.


Displays advanced options that do not normally require alteration.

Advanced unit configuration
Use VESA GTF
When ticked, the VESA Generalized Timing Formula will be used to help
determine the correct input video resolution and timing details. See Appendix 9
for a list of all supported video modes.
Upgrade firmware
Places the unit into upgrade mode.
50
Time and Date
Use the arrow buttons to set the correct current time.
Use NTP
When this option is selected, the iPEPS will synchronise its internal clocks using
information from the (Network Time Protocol) server listed in the NTP Server IP
address field.
NTP Server IP address
Optionally enter the IP address for a known Network Time Protocol server.
Set Time from NTP Server
Click to immediately use the time and date information from the listed NTP server.
For further details
• For details of timezone specifier formats, please refer to:
http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/TZ-Variable.html
• For details of the Network Time Protocol (main RFC number: 1305; the SNTP
subset used as the basis for the iPEPS: 4330)
http://www.ietf.org/rfc.html
To get here
1 Using VNC viewer or a browser, log on as the ‘admin’ user.
2 Click the ‘Configure’ button in the top right corner.
3 Click the ‘Time & Date Configuration’ option.

CET and -1, or EST and 5, respectively.
The dst string and [offset] specify the name and offset for the
corresponding Daylight Saving Time zone; if the offset is omitted, it defaults
to one hour ahead of standard time.
The remainder of the specification describes when Daylight Saving Time is
in effect. The start field is when Daylight Saving Time goes into effect and
the end field is when the change is made back to standard time. The most
common format used for the daylight saving time is: Mm.w.d
Where: m specifies the month and must be between 1 and 12. The day d
must be between 0 (Sunday) and 6. The week w must be between 1 and
5; week 1 is the first week in which day d occurs, and week 5 specifies the
last d day in the month.
The time fields specify when, in the local time currently in effect, the change
to the other time occurs. If omitted, the default is 02:00:00.
Typical examples are:
UK: GMT0BST,M3.5.0/1,M10.5.0/2
Central Europe: CET-1CEST,M3.5.0/2,M10.5.0/3
US Eastern (2006): EST5EDT,M4.1.0/2,M10.5.0/2
US Pacific (2006): PST8PDT,M4.1.0/2,M10.5.0/2
US Eastern (from 2007): EST5EDT,M3.2.0/2,M11.1.0/2
US Pacific (from 2007): PST5PDT,M3.2.0/2,M11.1.0/2

std offset dst [offset],start[/time],end[/time]
The std and offset specify the standard time zone, such as GMT and 0, or


Timezone specifier
Optionally enter a recognised timezone specifier related to the current position
of the iPEPS. When an NTP server is used, the specifier will be used to provide
the correct real time.
The timezone specifier takes the following form:

This page allows you to configure all aspects relating to time and date within the
iPEPS.

Time & date configuration
51
IP Gateway
This is the address of the device that links the local network (to which the iPEPS
is connected) to another network such as the wider Internet. Usually the actual
gateway is a network switch or router and it will be used whenever a required
address lies outside the current network.
MAC address
Media Access Control address – this is the unique and unchangeable code that
was hard coded within your iPEPS unit when it was built. It consists of six 2-digit
hexadecimal (base 16) numbers separated by colons. A section of the MAC
address identifies Adder Technology as the manufacturer, while the remainder is
effectively the unique electronic serial number of your particular unit.
Use DHCP
DHCP is an acronym for ‘Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol’. Its function is
particularly useful when connecting to medium size or larger networks. When
this option is selected, your iPEPS will attempt to locate a DHCP server on the
network. If such a server is located, it will supply three things to the iPEPS: an
IP address, an IP network mask (also known as a Subnet mask) and a Gateway
address. These are not usually granted permanently, but on a ‘lease’ basis for
a fixed amount of time or for as long as the iPEPS remains connected and
switched on. Discover allocations.
VNC Port
This is the logical link through which communications with a remote VNC viewer
will be channelled (see What is a port?). The default setting is 5900 which is
a widely recognised port number for use by VNC software. However, in certain
circumstances it may be advantageous to alter this number - see ‘Security issues
with ports’ for more details.
HTTP Port
This is the logical link through which communications with a remote web
browser will be channelled (see What is a port?). The default setting of 80 is an
established standard for web (HTTP – HyperText Transfer Protocol) traffic though
this can be changed to suit your local network requirements.
IP Access Control
This section allows you to optionally specify ranges of addresses which will or
won’t be granted access to the iPEPS. If this option is left unchanged, then the
default entry of ‘+0.0.0.0/0.0.0.0’ ensures that access from all IP addresses will
be permitted. See Setting IP access control for details.

IP Network Mask
Also often called the subnet-mask, this value is used alongside the IP address
to help define a smaller collection (or subnet) of devices on a network. In this
way a distinction is made between locally connected devices and ones that are
reachable elsewhere, such as on the wider Internet. This process helps to reduce
overall traffic on the network and hence speed up connections in general.

IP Address
This is the identity of the iPEPS within a network. The IP address can be thought
of as the telephone number of the iPEPS. Unlike the MAC address, the IP
address can be altered to suit the network to which it is connected. It can either
be entered manually or configured automatically using the DHCP option. When
the DHCP option is enabled, this entry is greyed out.

To get here
1 Using VNC viewer or a browser, log on as the ‘admin’ user.
2 Click the ‘Configure’ button in the top right corner.
3 Click the ‘Network Configuration’ option.


This page allows you to configure the various aspects of the IP port and its
relationship with the local network.

Network configuration
52
Access
Use the arrow buttons to
select either ‘Allow’ or
‘Deny’ as appropriate.
2 Enter the base network address, the mask and select the appropriate
access setting.
3 Click the OK button.
To get here
1 Using VNC viewer or a browser, log on as the ‘admin’ user.
2 Click the ‘Configure’ button in the top right corner.
3 Click the ‘Network Configuration’ option.
To reorder access control entries
IMPORTANT: When reordering, ensure that any specific allowed addresses are
listed higher in the list than any denied addresses. Take care not to invoke any
deny access settings that would exclude valid users.
1 In the access control list, click on the entry to be moved.
2 Click the Up or Down buttons as appropriate.
To edit/remove access control entries
1 In the access control list, click on the appropriate entry.
2 Click either the Edit or Remove button as appropriate.

Mask
Enter an IP network mask
that indicates the range of
addresses that are to be
allowed or denied access.
For instance, if only a single
specified IP address were to be
required, the mask entry would
be 255.255.255.255 in order
to specify a single location. See
Calculating the mask for IP
access control for details.

Network/Address
Enter the network address
that is to be allowed or denied
access. If a range of addresses
is being specified then specify
any one of the addresses
within the range and use the
Mask entry to indicate the size
of the range.

In the list, access control addresses prefixed by ‘+’ are allow entries while those
prefixed by ‘– ‘ are deny entries.
To define a new IP access control entry
1 Click the Add button to display a popup dialog:


The golden rule with this feature is ‘Include before you exclude’ or to put it
another way ‘Arrange allowed addresses in the list before the denied addresses’.
This is because the positions of entries in the list are vitally important. Once a
range of addresses is denied access, it is not possible to make exceptions for
particular addresses within that range. For instance, if the range of addresses
from A to F are denied access first, then the address C could not be granted
access lower down the list. Address C needs to be placed in the list before the
denied range.
IMPORTANT: This feature should be configured with extreme caution as it is
possible to deny access to everyone. If such an error occurs, see Clear IP access
control for details about how to regain access.

Setting IP access control
53
Hotkey sequences
iPEPS allows you to enter commands that take the form of hotkey sequences
that emulate standard keypress combinations.


Examples
To send the command Ctrl + Alt 4 you should use the following: +Ctrl+Alt+4.
To send the command Ctrl + Alt 12 you should use the following: +Ctrl+ALT+–
1+2 (the ‘+–1’ entry causes the 1 key to be pressed and released before the 2
key is pressed).
To send the command Scroll lock 1 + Enter (with a 500ms delay) you should use
the following: +–Scr*500+1+Ent


Notes
• The entries are not case sensitive.
• It is not necessary to specify all keys to be released at the end because they
are all released automatically after the last code.

Almost any combination of keypresses can be emulated using the following
notations:
+ means press down the key that follows,
– means release the key that follows,
+–means press and then release the key that follows,
* means add a delay. The standard delay period is 250ms, however, if a
number immediately follows the asterisk, this will define an alternate delay
period (in milliseconds).
A list of permissible keypresses and information about how to abbreviate them
are given in Appendix 8.

Hotkey sequences
54
Date and
time the
event
occurred
Type of event, user name and access
method or remote IP address
To copy and paste the log
You can copy the information listed within the log and paste it into another
application.
1 While viewing the log screen, press Ctrl and C, to copy the data into the
clipboard.
2 In a text application (i.e. Word, WordPad, Notepad) press Ctrl and V, or right
mouse click and ‘Paste’.
Syslog Server IP Address
Logging information can optionally be sent, as it occurs, to a separate system
using the standard Syslog protocol. Enter the IP address of a suitable system in
the field provided.
Click to clear
all log entries
Click to
refresh
the list
Optionally enter an
IP address to which
the status log should
be sent
Click to
return to
the main
menu

To get here
1 Using VNC viewer or a browser, log on as the ‘admin’ user.
2 Click the ‘Configure’ button in the top right corner.
3 Click the ‘Logging and Status’ option.



For further details
• For details of the Syslog protocol (RFC number: 3164)
http://www.ietf.org/rfc.html

This screen provides various details about the user activity on the iPEPS.
Note: The log has a maximum capacity of 1000 event lines. After 1000 entries,
the oldest entries are overwritten. If log data are important to your installation,
ensure a regular backup procedure or use the Syslog Server IP Address option to
send log information automatically to another system.

Logging and status
55
192.168.142.154
192 is the most global part of the number (akin to the 0044 of the phone
number) and 154 is the most local (similar to the 780044 unique local code of
the phone number).
When two network devices communicate with each other, they always “dial the
whole number” regardless of their respective locations in a network. However,
they still need to know whether the other device is local to them or not, and this
is where the net mask comes into play.
1
Sending
device IP
address
192 168 142 154
Net mask
192 168 142 000
Result
2
Destination
device IP
address
192 168 142 22


As a rough analogy, consider how you use the telephone system. The phone
number for Adder Technology in the UK is 0044 (0)1954 780044. This number
consists of three distinct parts:
• 0044 connects from another country to the UK
• (0)1954 selects the main telephone exchange in the Bar Hill area of
Cambridgeshire, and
• 780044 is the unique code for Adder Technology within Bar Hill.
The important parts of the whole number depend on where you are. If you were
based in the same local area as Adder Technology, there would be no point
in dialling out of the UK, or even out of the area. The only part of the whole
number that you are interested in is the final part: 780044.
In a similar way to the various parts of the telephone number, the four sections
(or Octets) of every IP address have different meanings or “weights”. Consider
the following typical IP address:
3
192 168 142 000
192.168.142.000 = 192.168.142.000 ? Answer:YES
4
Address is local
1 The net mask is used to determine the local and global parts of the sender’s IP
address. Where there is 255 in the mask, the corresponding address slips through,
where there is a 0, it is blocked.
2 Where the net mask was 0, the corresponding part of the result is also zero - this
section is now known to be the local part of the IP address.
3 The same process is carried out for the destination address, again using the sender’s
net mask. Now the local parts of both addresses have been equalised to zero, because
their values are not important in determining whether they are both in the same local
network.
4 The results of the two net mask operations are now compared, if they match, the
destination is local. If not, then the sender will still use the same full destination IP
address but will also flag the message to go via the local network gateway and out
into the wider world.
The reason for doing this? It makes the network, as a whole, much more
efficient. If every message for every recipient was shoved straight out onto the
Internet, the whole thing would grind to a halt within seconds. Net masks keep
local traffic just that - local.
Want to know more?

IP addresses
The net mask (or sub-net mask) informs a device as to its own position within a
network. From this it can determine whether any other device is within the same
local network or is situated further afield.
Taking the telephone number analogy given in the IP address section, in order
to use the telephone system efficiently, it is vital for you to know your location
relative to the person you are calling. In this way you avoid dialling unnecessary
numbers.
When one network device needs to talk to another, the first thing that it will
do is a quick calculation using its own IP address, the other device’s IP address
and its own net mask. Suppose a device with address 192.168.142.154 and
net mask 255.255.255.0 needed to communicate with a device at address
192.168.142.22. The sending device would perform several calculations:


IP address, network masks and ports are all closely linked in the quest for one
device to find another across disparate network links.
Net masks

Appendix 6 – Addresses, masks and ports
56
10011010
192 168 142 144
Inside a bit-wise AND function
When you “open up” the last octet
of the net mask and look at the
binary inside, you can see the last
four zero bits preventing any 1’s in
the address from falling through.
Binary equivalent of 154
1111 0 0 0 0
10010000
144
Binary octet after AND
operation with net mask
Decimal equivalent of 10010000
Thus, when 154 is bit-wise ANDed with 240, the result is 144. Likewise, any
local address from 192.168.142.144 through to 192.168.142.159 would
produce exactly the same result when combined with this net mask, hence they
would all be local addresses. However, any difference in the upper three octets
or the upper four bits of the last octet would slip through the mask and the
address would be flagged as not being local.


154


192 168 142 154
Decimal octet prior to AND
operation with net mask

To really understand the operation of a net mask it is necessary to delve deeper
into the life blood of computers – binary; this is native digital, where everything
is either a 1 (one) or 0 (zero), on or off, yes or no.
The net mask operation described on the previous page is known as a ‘bit-wise
AND function’. The example of 255.255.255.0 is handy because the last octet
is completely zero and is “clean” for illustrative purposes. However, actual net
mask calculations are carried out, not on whole decimal numbers, but bit by bit
on binary numbers, hence the term ‘bit-wise’. In a real local network, a net mask
might be 255.255.255.240. Such an example would no longer be quite so clear,
until you look at the net mask in its binary form:
11111111.11111111.11111111.11110000
In this case, the four zeroes at the end of the net mask indicate that the local
part of the address is formed by only the last four bits. If you use the diagram
from the previous example and insert the new net mask, it will have the
following effect on the final result:

Net masks - the binary explanation
57
Address ranges
Although you can define ranges of addresses, due to the way that the mask
operates, there are certain restrictions on the particular ranges that can be set.
For any given address you can encompass neighbouring addresses in blocks of
either 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, etc. and these must fall on particular boundaries.
For instance, if you wanted to define the local address range:
192.168.142.67 to 192.168.142.93
The closest single block to cover the range would be the 32 addresses from:
192.168.142.64 to 192.168.142.95.
The mask needed to accomplish this would be: 255.255.255.224
When you look at the mask in binary, the picture becomes a little clearer. The
above mask has the form: 11111111.11111111.11111111.11100000
Ignoring the initial three octets, the final six zeroes of the mask would ensure
that the 32 addresses from .64 (01000000) to .95 (01011111) would all be
treated in the same manner. See Net masks - the binary explanation for
details.
When defining a mask, the important rule to remember is:
There must be no ‘ones’ to the right of a ‘zero’.
For instance, (ignoring the first three octets) you could not use a mask that had
11100110 because this would affect intermittent addresses within a range in an
impractical manner. The same rule applies across the octets. For example, if you
have zeroes in the third octet, then all of the fourth octet must be zeroes.
Number of addresses encompassed
1 address
2 addresses
4 addresses
8 addresses
16 addresses
32 addresses
64 addresses
128 addresses
256 addresses
If the access control range that you need to define is not possible using one
address and one mask, then you could break it down into two or more entries.
Each of these entries could then use smaller ranges (of differing sizes) that,
when combined with the other entries, cover the range that you require.
For instance, to accurately encompass the range in the earlier example:
192.168.142.67 to 192.168.142.93
You would need to define the following six address and mask combinations in
the IP access control section:
Network/address entry
192.168.142.67
192.168.142.68
192.168.142.72
192.168.142.80
192.168.142.88
192.168.142.93
Mask entry
255.255.255.255
255.255.255.252
255.255.255.248
255.255.255.248
255.255.255.252
255.255.255.255
defines 1 address (.67)
defines 4 addresses (.68 to .71)
defines 8 addresses (.72 to .79)
defines 8 addresses (.80 to .87)
defines 4 addresses (.88 to .92)
defines 1 address (.93)

Binary
11111111
11111110
11111100
11111000
11110000
11100000
11000000
10000000
00000000

All locations
The other easy setting to make is ALL addresses, using the mask 0.0.0.0 As
standard, the IP access control section includes the entry: +0.0.0.0/0.0.0.0
The purpose of this entry is to include all IP addresses. It is possible to similarly
exclude all addresses, however, take great care not to do this as you instantly
render all network access void. There is a recovery procedure should this occur.
Mask octet
255
254
252
248
240
224
192
128
0

Single locations
Some of the simplest addresses to allow or deny are single locations. In this case
you enter the required IP address into the ‘Network/Address’ field and simply
enter the ‘Mask’ as 255.255.255.255 (255 used throughout the mask means
that every bit of the address will be compared and so there can only be one
unique address to match the one stated in the ‘Network/Address’ field).
The permissible mask values (for all octets) are as follows:


The IP access control function uses a standard IP address and a net mask
notation to specify both single locations and ranges of addresses. In order to
use this function correctly, you need to calculate the mask so that it accurately
encompasses the required address(es).

Calculating the mask for IP access control
58
User accesses the company
website at: 129.7.1.10 (this
automatically uses port 80).
User with VNC viewer accesses
IP address: 129.7.1.10 (this
automatically uses port 5900).
Router/firewall address: 129.7.1.10
Router is programmed to send port 5900
VNC traffic to local address 192.168.0.3
and port 80 web traffic to local address
192.168.0.42
ADDERLINK
ADDER®
iPEPS has the local IP
address: 192.168.0.3
Web server


The settings of port numbers become important when the iPEPS is situated
behind a network firewall. In order for a remote VNC viewer or web browser
to make contact with your iPEPS, it is necessary for the firewall to allow
communication through a particular numbered port to occur.
One specific function of firewalls is to restrict access to ports in order to prevent
malicious attackers using them as a route into your network. Every new port
that is opened offers a new possibility for hackers and so the number of
accessible ports is purposefully kept to a minimum. In such cases, it may be
advantageous to change one or both iPEPS ports to use the same number. The
other alternative is to place the iPEPS unit outside the firewall and take full
advantage of its secure operation features – see Networking issues for details.
IMPORTANT: The correct configuration of routers and firewalls requires
advanced networking skills and intimate knowledge of the particular network.
Adder Technology cannot provide specific advice on how to configure your
network devices and strongly recommend that such tasks are carried out by a
qualified professional.

Internet
Security issues with ports


If you accept the analogy of IP addresses being rather like telephone numbers,
then think of ports as extension numbers. In a company of any size, you
generally wouldn’t expect the accounts department to share the same telephone
with the technical department. Although their calls may all be related to the
same company, they concern very different aspects of that company.
It is the same with IP network connections. Although you have only one network
link into your computer and only one IP address (phone number), you are
probably performing many different tasks through that one link, often at the
same time. Thus, when you browse the web your outgoing requests and the
incoming information are all channelled through port 80. When you send an
email, it travels through port 25 and when you transfer files you are, without
knowing it, using port 20.
At the “border crossing” between the wider Internet and every local network
attached to it, there is a router that is usually combined with a firewall. One of
its main tasks is to direct incoming traffic to the correct place within its local
network. A key piece of information to help it do this is the port number:

Ports
Web server has the local
IP address: 192.168.0.42
59
Appendix 7 – Cable and connector specifications
RS232 serial mouse to PS/2 converter cable
DAT
1
2
RXD
TXD
2
5
GND
GND
3
4
DTR
+5V
4
6
DSR
-12V
6
7
RTS
3
TXD (-12V)
NC
8
CTS
NC
9
RI
Female
5
3
1
6
4
2

DCD

1
NC

5


CLK
9pin D-type
female

6pin mini-DIN
female
60
Appendix 8 – Hotkey sequence codes
Math operand keys (see ‘Using abbreviations’)
Add (Plus) | Subtract (Minus) | Multiply
Central control keys (see ‘Using abbreviations’)
Insert | Delete | Home | End | PageUp | PageDown
Up | Down | Left | Right | Print | Pause
Keypad keys (see ‘Using abbreviations’)
KP_Insert | KP_Delete | KP_Home | KP_End | KP_PageUp
KP_PageDown | KP_Up | KP_Down | KP_Left | KP_Right | KP_Enter
KP_Add | KP_Subtract | KP_Divide | KP_Multiply
KP_0 to KP_9
Function keys
F1 | F2 | F3 | F4 | F5 | F6 | F7 | F8 | F9 | F10 | F11 | F12
ASCII characters
All characters can be entered using their ASCII codes, from 32 to 126 (i.e. A,B,C,
… 1,2,3 etc.) with the exception of the special characters ‘+’, ‘-’, ‘+–’ and ‘*’
which have special meanings, as explained below.
Example:
+-SCROLL+-SCROLL+1+ENTER
Press and release scroll twice, press 1 then enter then release all keys (equivalent
definition is +SCROLL-SCROLL+SCROLL-SCROLL+1+ENTER-1-ENTER)
Using abbreviations
To reduce the length of the key definitions, any unique abbreviation for a
key can be used. For example: “scroll”, “scr” and even “sc” all provide an
identifiable match for “ScrollLock” whereas “en” could not be used because it
might mean “Enter” or “End” (“ent” would be suitable for “Enter”).
Note: Hotkey sequences and abbreviations are not case sensitive.
For information about where to enter these codes, please see the sections Host
configuration or Keyboard control.

Backspace | Tab | Return | Enter | Ctrl | Alt | Win | Shift | LShift | RShift
LCtrl | RCtrl | LAlt | AltGr | RAlt | LWin | RWin | Menu | Escape | Space
CapsLock | NumLock | PrintScreen | Scrolllock
Hot key macro sequences can be up to 256 characters long. All keys are
assumed to be released at the end of a line, however, you can also determine
that a key is pressed and released within a sequence. Any of the following three
examples will send a command that emulates and a press and release of the
Scroll Lock key:
+SCROLL-SCROLL
+-SCROLL
+SCROLL-

Main control keys (see ‘Using abbreviations’)
Creating macro sequences


Permissible key presses

These codes are used when defining hotkey switching sequences (macros) for
the host computer and allow you to include almost any of the special keys on
the keyboard.
+ means press down the key that follows,
– means release the key that follows,
+–means press down and release the key that follows,
* means wait 250ms (note: if a number immediately follows the asterisk, then the delay will equal the number, in milliseconds).
Note: Hotkey sequences are not case sensitive.

Codes with special meanings
61
sun 1152 x 900 @ 66Hz
vesa 640 x 480 @ 60Hz
sun 1152 x 900 @ 76Hz
vesa 640 x 480 @ 72Hz
sun 1280 x 1024 @ 67Hz
vesa 640 x 480 @ 75Hz
apple 640 x 480 @ 67Hz
vesa 640 x 480 @ 85Hz
apple 832 x 624 @ 75Hz
vesa 800 x 600 @ 56Hz
apple 1152 x 870 @ 75Hz
vesa 800 x 600 @ 60Hz
vesa 800 x 600 @ 72Hz
1900 x 1200 @ 60Hz**
vesa 800 x 600 @ 75Hz
vesa 800 x 600 @ 85Hz
vesa 1024 x 768 @ 60Hz
vesa 1024 x 768 @ 70Hz

vesa 720 x 400 @ 85Hz

The following video modes are supported and can be automatically configured
by the iPEPS. If a recognised video mode cannot be found, the iPEPS will
gradually change some of the key parameters to discover whether a video lock
can be achieved. Support for VESA GTF (Generalized Timing Formula) is available
and can be enabled via the Advanced Unit Configuration screen.
The half width video modes capture every other pixel. These are not generally
recommended for normal use but may be used for emergency access to high
resolution, high frequency system screens. Half width screens can be expanded
to normal width using the scaling features of the viewer.

Appendix 9 – Supported video modes
vesa 1024 x 768 @ 75Hz
vesa 1152 x 864 @ 75Hz
vesa 1280 x 960 @ 60Hz
vesa 1280 x 1024 @ 60Hz
vesa 1280 x 1024 @ 75Hz
vesa 1600 x 1200 @ 60Hz


vesa 1024 x 768 @ 85Hz
vesa 1600 x 1200 @ 65Hz half-width
vesa 1600 x 1200 @ 75Hz half-width
vesa 1600 x 1200 @ 85Hz half-width
vesa 720 x 400 @ 70Hz*

vesa 1600 x 1200 @ 70Hz half-width
* Not actually a VESA mode but a common DOS/BIOS mode
**May also work on some systems when the operating temperature of the iPEPS is
controlled.
62
•
Safety considerations when using power switches with iPEPS
• Follow the manufacturer’s instructions when setting up and using power
switching products.
• Always ensure that the total ampere rating of the devices plugged into the
power switching product does not exceed the power switching product’s
ampere rating. Also, make sure that the total ampere rating of all the
devices plugged into the wall outlet does not exceed the wall outlet’s
ampere rating.

•

•
•
For use in dry, oil free indoor environments only.
Warning - live parts contained within power adapter.
No user serviceable parts within power adapter - do not dismantle.
Plug the power adapter into a socket outlet close to the module that it is
powering.
Replace the power adapter with a manufacturer approved type only.
Do not use the power adapter if the power adapter case becomes damaged,
cracked or broken or if you suspect that it is not operating properly.
If you use a power extension cord with the iPEPS, make sure the total
ampere rating of the devices plugged into the extension cord does not
exceed the cord’s ampere rating. Also, make sure that the total ampere
rating of all the devices plugged into the wall outlet does not exceed the
wall outlet’s ampere rating.
Do not attempt to service the iPEPS yourself.

•
•
•
•


Adder Technology Ltd warrants that this product shall be free from defects in
workmanship and materials for a period of two years from the date of original
purchase. If the product should fail to operate correctly in normal use during the
warranty period, Adder will replace or repair it free of charge. No liability can be
accepted for damage due to misuse or circumstances outside Adder’s control.
Also Adder will not be responsible for any loss, damage or injury arising directly
or indirectly from the use of this product. Adder’s total liability under the terms
of this warranty shall in all circumstances be limited to the replacement value of
this product.
If any difficulty is experienced in the installation or use of this product that you
are unable to resolve, please contact your supplier.
Safety information
General Public License (Linux)
The iPEPS runs an embedded version of the Linux operating system, licensed
under the GNU General Public License. To obtain the source code for the opensource components of the system visit:
http://www.realvnc.com/products/iPEPSIP/gpl.html.

Warranty
63
2. Permitted and Prohibited Uses
2.1 During the term of this Agreement and as long as you comply with the
terms of this agreement, you may use the Software only with the Product
for your personal use or for the internal use of your business. You may
make as many copies of the Software as you require for your own internal
business purposes only and for archival purposes. You are expressly
prohibited from distributing the Software in any format, in whole or in
part, for sale, or for commercial use or for any unlawful purpose.
2.2 You may not rent, lease or otherwise transfer the Software or allow it
to be copied. Unless permitted by law, you may not reverse engineer,
decompile or disassemble the Software.
3. Warranty
REALVNC DOES NOT WARRANT ANY RESULTS OBTAINED USING THE
SOFTWARE. TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW, REALVNC DISCLAIMS
ALL OTHER WARRANTIES ON THE SOFTWARE, EITHER EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY, NON-INFRINGEMENT OF THIRD PARTY RIGHTS AND FITNESS
FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
6. Term and Termination
This licence shall continue in force unless and until it is terminated by RealVNC
by e-mail notice to you, if it reasonably believes that you have breached a
material term of this Agreement
In the case above, you must delete and destroy all copies of the Software in your
possession and control and overwrite any electronic memory or storage locations
containing the Software.
7. General Terms
7.1 The construction, validity and performance of this Agreement shall be
governed in all respects by English law, and the Parties agree to submit to
the exclusive jurisdiction of the English courts.
7.2 If any provision of this agreement is found to be invalid by any court
having competent jurisdiction, the invalidity of such provision shall not
affect the validity of the remaining provisions of this agreement, which
shall remain in full force and effect.
7.3 No waiver of any term of this agreement shall be deemed a further or
continuing waiver of such term or any other term.
7.4 This agreement constitutes the entire agreement between you and
RealVNC.


5. Export Control
The United States and other countries control the export of Software and
information. You are responsible for compliance with the laws of your local
jurisdiction regarding the import, export or re-export of the Software, and agree
to comply with such restrictions and not to export or re-export the Software
where this is prohibited. By downloading the Software, you are agreeing that
you are not a person or entity to which such export is prohibited.

1. Intellectual Property Rights
The Software and its structure and algorithms are protected by copyright and
other intellectual property laws, and all intellectual property rights in them
belong to RealVNC Limited (“RealVNC”), a United Kingdom Limited Company,
or are licensed to it. You may not reproduce, publish, transmit, modify, create
derivative works from, publicly display the Software or part thereof. Copying
or storing or using the Software other than as permitted in Clause 2 is expressly
prohibited unless you obtain prior written permission from RealVNC.


PLEASE READ THIS AGREEMENT CAREFULLY. THIS AGREEMENT CONCERNS
ENHANCED VNC VIEWER SOFTWARE (“the SOFTWARE”) FOR USE WITH
THE iPEPS PRODUCT (“the PRODUCT”). THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED TO
ENABLE YOU TO OPERATE THE PRODUCT. BY USING ALL OR ANY PORTION
OF THE SOFTWARE YOU ACCEPT ALL THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THIS
AGREEMENT. IF YOU DO NOT ACCEPT ALL THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS
OF THIS AGREEMENT THEN DO NOT USE THE SOFTWARE. BY USING ANY
UPDATED VERSION OF THE SOFTWARE WHICH MAY BE MADE AVAILABLE, YOU
ACCEPT THAT THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT APPLY TO SUCH UPDATED
SOFTWARE.
4. Limitation on Liability
UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHALL REALVNC BE LIABLE FOR ANY
CONSEQUENTIAL INDIRECT OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES WHATSOEVER
INCLUDING LOST PROFITS OR SAVINGS ARISING OUT OF THE USE OF THE
SOFTWARE, THE SERVICE OR THE INFORMATION, RELIANCE ON THE DATA
PRODUCED OR INABILITY TO USE THE SOFTWARE, THE SERVICE OR THE
INFORMATION EVEN IF REALVNC HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
SUCH DAMAGES. BECAUSE SOME STATES AND COUNTRIES DO NOT ALLOW
THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF LIABILITY FOR CONSEQUENTIAL OR
INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
NOTHING IN THIS AGREEMENT LIMITS LIABILITY FOR DEATH OR PERSONAL
INJURY ARISING FROM A PARTY’S NEGLIGENCE OR FROM FRAUDULENT
MISREPRESENTATION ON THE PART OF A PARTY

End user licence agreement
64
Canadian Department of Communications RFI statement
This equipment does not exceed the class A limits for radio noise emissions from
digital apparatus set out in the radio interference regulations of the Canadian
Department of Communications.
Le présent appareil numérique n’émet pas de bruits radioélectriques dépassant
les limites applicables aux appareils numériques de la classe A prescrites dans
le règlement sur le brouillage radioélectriques publié par le ministère des
Communications du Canada.

This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy
and if not installed and used properly, that is, in strict accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions, may cause interference to radio communication.
It has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a class A computing
device in accordance with the specifications in Subpart J of part 15 of FCC rules,
which are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference
when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. Operation of this
equipment in a residential area may cause interference, in which case the user at
his own expense will be required to take whatever measures may be necessary
to correct the interference. Changes or modifications not expressly approved by
the manufacturer could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.

This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a class
A computing device in accordance with the specifications in the European
standard EN55022. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate
radio frequency energy and if not installed and used in accordance with the
instructions may cause harmful interference to radio or television reception.
However, there is no guarantee that harmful interference will not occur in a
particular installation. If this equipment does cause interference to radio or
television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment on
and off, the user is encouraged to correct the interference with one or more
of the following measures: (a) Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna. (b)
Increase the separation between the equipment and the receiver. (c) Connect
the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver
is connected. (d) Consult the supplier or an experienced radio/TV technician for
help.
FCC Compliance Statement (United States)


European EMC directive 89/336/EEC

A Category 5 (or better) twisted pair cable must be used to connect the iPEPS
unit in order to maintain compliance with radio frequency energy emission
regulations and ensure a suitably high level of immunity to electromagnetic
disturbances.
All other interface cables used with this equipment must be shielded in order
to maintain compliance with radio frequency energy emission regulations and
ensure a suitably high level of immunity to electromagnetic disturbances.

Radio Frequency Energy
65


Adder Asia Pacific
6 New Industrial Road,
Hoe Huat Industrial Building
#07-01,
Singapore 536199
Tel: +65 6288 5767
Fax: +65 6284 1150

Adder Corporation,
29 Water Street,
Newburyport,
MA 01950,
United States of America
Tel: +1-888-932-3337
Fax: +1-888-275-1117

Adder Technology Limited,
Technology House,
Trafalgar Way, Bar Hill,
Cambridge, CB3 8SQ,
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0)1954 780044
Fax: +44 (0)1954 780081


© 2008 Adder Technology Limited
All trademarks are acknowledged.
Release 1.0f
March 2008
Part No. ADD0072
Documentation by:
www.ctxd.com
66
B
Binary
net masks 57
Browser
connection 25
C
Cables 5
Cable specifications
56,60,61,62
Calibrate
mouse 27
screen 28
D
Date
local setting 37
DHCP
discovering allocations 20
during initial setup 12
local setting 38
remote setting 52
DNS addressing 20
E
Encryption key 12
Encryption settings 13
viewer 34
End user licence 64
M
Firewall 19
Firmware
current version 49
Force encryption 37
Full screen mode
escape from (F8) 26
Identities
VNC Viewer 44
Indicators 4
Initial configuration 11
IntelliMouse 14
IP access control 52,53
calculating mask 58
IP address
explanation 56
local setting 38
remote setting 52
IP gateway 52
IP network mask 52
IP network port 4
connecting 8
MAC address 38,51,52
Mask
explanation 56
for IP access control 58
Menu bar
viewer window 26
Menu key
changing 42
Menus
local 36
remote 47
Modem
connecting 9
Modem configuration 39
Mouse
calibration 28
control 29
pointers 27
restoration 13,14
resync 27,28
G
Gateway
local setting 38
remote setting 52
H
Hextile 41,46
Host computer
connecting 7
Host configuration 54
Hosts
configuration 54
Hotkeys
to access menus 36
Hotkey sequences 54
codes and macros 61
HTTP port
initial setup 12
local setting 38
remote setting 52
when altered 19
K
Keyboard codes
sending 29
Keyboard Layout
remote setting 49
Keyboard layout
local setting 37
KVM console 4
L
Local connection 22
local control menus 36
Local network
connection 19
Logging 55
Log on 16,24
N
Net mask 38
explanation 56
Network configuration 38,52
Networking issues 19
Network port
connecting 8
Network settings
resetting back to default 17

I

F


Access control
configuration 53
mask calculation 58
Access mode
shared & private 27
Account
creation for users 48
Address
explanation 56
Addressing
DNS 20
network issues 20
Admin password
initial setup 12
local setting 37
Advanced unit configuration
50
Artifacts
on screen 26
Assistance
from Adder 35
Auto calibrate 28
Auto select 41,46
Calibrate all
video settings 30
Clear IP access control
local setting 38
Colour level 41
Configuration
initial steps 11
remote 18
Connections
host computer 7
keyboard 8
local 22
modem 9
monitor 8
mouse 8
network port 8
remote 23
Connector specifications 60
Control menus
for local connection 36
for remote connection 26,47
Controls
viewer options 28

A

Index
67
R
Raw 41,46
Refresh screen 28
Remote configuration 18
advanced unit configuration
50
host configuration 54
logging and status 55
main menu 47
network configuration 52
setting IP access control 53
unit configuration 49
user accounts 48
Remote connection 23
Reset configuration 39
Resync mouse 28
Router 19
S
T
Threshold
adjustment 30
Time
local setting 37
remote setting 49
Troubleshooting 35
U
Video modes 62
Video settings 31
Viewer window 26
Virtual Media 3
operation 31,32
VNC port
initial setup 12
local setting 38
remote setting 52
when altered 19
VNC viewer
configuration menus 47
connection 24
connection options 41
download 33
window options 45
W
Warranty 63
Web browser
connection 25
viewer options 46
Z
ZRLE 41,46

V

Password
admin - setting 37
initial setup 12
remote logon 16,24
setting for users 48
Port number
entering 33
Power switching
configuration 22
on & off select 28
Preferred encoding 41
Private
access mode 27

P
Unit configuration 37,49
Unit name
local setting 37
remote setting 49
USB converter 5
Use DHCP
local setting 38
User accounts 48
Username
initial setup 12
remote logon 16,24


Octets
ip address 56
Safety information 63
Scaling
VNC Viewer 43
Screen
best resolution 26
calibration 28
navigation 26
refresh 28
Screensaver
local setting 37
remote setting 49
Security
ensuring 21
Server
configuration 54
Setup procedure
local setup 11,12,16
remote setup 18
Shared
access mode 27
Single mouse mode 27,28
Slow connections
optimising for 26
Supplied items 5
Syslog 55

O
68
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