Technical data | Addonics Technologies ADMS18SA Computer Drive User Manual

Octel Unified Messenger
Concepts and Planning Guide
101-1620-005
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Please address comments to:
Unified Messenger Documentation Team
Lucent Technologies, Octel Messaging Division
1001 Murphy Ranch Road
Milpitas, CA 95035-7912
USA
+1 408-321-2000
http://www.octel.com/um
E-mail: unified.messenger@octel.com
This software is the property of Lucent Technologies Octel Messaging Division, formerly Octel Communications
Corporation, and may not be used without a valid written license agreement. This software is protected by the
copyright laws of the United States, international copyright treaties, and all other applicable national laws. The
right to copy this document is granted to authorized resellers and customers for their use and the use of their
customers, as specified in their agreements with Octel Communications Corporation, a subsidiary of Lucent
Technologies. Any unauthorized use, reproduction (except for legally permissible archival copies), distribution
or transfer of this software, or preparation of derivative works is strictly prohibited.
Copyright 1996-1999 Octel Communications Corporation, a subsidiary of Lucent Technologies. All rights
reserved.
All trademarks identified by the TM or ® symbol are trademarks or registered trademarks, respectively, of Octel
Communications Corporation, a subsidiary of Lucent Technologies. All other trademarks belong to their
respective owners. Printed in the USA.
U.S. Government Restricted Rights Notice
This software is provided with RESTRICTED RIGHTS. Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is
subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraphs (c)(1) and (2) of the Commercial Computer Software Restricted Rights clause at FAR Section §52.227-19, in the applicable software license agreement pursuant to
DFARS §227.7202-3(a) (1995), or in (c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software clause at
DFARS Section §252.227-7013 (OCT 1988), as applicable. Unpublished rights reserved under the copyright
laws of the United States. Contractor/Manufacturer is Octel Communications Corporation, a subsidiary of
Lucent Technologies, 1001 Murphy Ranch Road, Milpitas, CA 95035-7912, USA.
Preface
Overview
This guide provides:
n
Guidelines for planning and sizing a new installation.
n
A description of the hardware and software components of Octel
Unified Messenger.
n
The concepts underlying Octel Unified Messenger, including
voice mail domains, addressing, client and server operations, and
telephony concepts.
Audience
This guide is intended for use by anyone recommending, purchasing, or
installing Octel Unified Messenger. Readers should be familiar with the
concepts and operation of Windows NT and Microsoft Exchange.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Octel Unified Messenger documentation
See the following documentation for more information about Octel
Unified Messenger:
Installation Guide, 101-1621-005
Provides information on the installation process.
Available on the Octel Unified Messenger CD-ROM.
Administrator’s Guide, 101-1618-005
Provides information on administering the Octel Unified Messenger
system.
Available on the Octel Unified Messenger CD-ROM.
Subscriber’s Reference Guide, 101-1619-005
Provides information on using Octel Unified Messenger client
applications.
Available on the Octel Unified Messenger CD-ROM.
Unified Messenger At-A-Glance, 101-1622-004
Provides at-a-glance information on using Octel Unified Messenger from
the telephone user interface.
Configuration Notes
Provides integration information for types of PBX and fax devices.
Available from your Octel Unified Messenger support representative.
Rhetorex User’s Guide for AccuCall+ for Windows 95 and Windows NT,
Revision 1.0, 201-0048-000
Provides information on configuring the voice board driver software to
communicate with a PBX.
Available on the Octel Unified Messenger CD-ROM.
Rhetorex Hardware and Software Installation Guide for Windows 95 and
Windows NT, 201-0050-000
Provides information on installing a Rhetorex Voice Processing board,
and on installing and configuring Rhetorex driver software and firmware.
Available on the Octel Unified Messenger CD-ROM.
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Preface
Unified Messenger Online Support
For Octel Unified Messenger support, contact your Octel Unified
Messenger support representative.
For important, up-to-date information on Octel Unified Messenger, see
the Readme file available on the Octel Unified Messenger CD-ROM.
Conventions
The following conventions are used in this guide:
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Convention
Description
ALL
CAPITALS
Filenames and extensions, directory names, paths,
and acronyms.
Initial Capitals
Names of applications, programs, menu items, and
dialog boxes.
italic type
Book titles.
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Contents
Chapter 1
Introducing Octel Unified Messenger
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-2
Product features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-3
The unified mailbox. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-4
Telephone user interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-5
PC user interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-5
Networked components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-6
Microsoft Exchange Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-6
Voice server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-7
Tracing server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-7
Fax server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-8
PBX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-9
TUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-9
LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-10
PC user interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-10
Benefits summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-11
Subscriber convenience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-11
Ease of administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-11
Send messages near and far . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-11
Chapter 2
Sizing the system
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-2
Design rules for voice mail domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
Sizing ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4
Calculating the number of voice servers required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-9
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Hardware and software requirements for Octel Unified Messenger servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Evaluating the additional load on Microsoft Exchange servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
Evaluating the additional network traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
Using Octel Unified Messenger via slow network connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16
Using multimedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16
ConfigurationUsing the telephone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17
The effect of slow network connections on Octel Unified Messenger applications . . . . . . 2-19
Octel Unified Messenger interoperability with third-party fax servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
Requirements for third-party fax server interoperability with Octel Unified Messenger . . 2-21
Enabling Octel Unified Messenger subscribers for fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21
Routing inbound fax calls to the third-party fax server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22
Chapter 3
System architecture
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Voice mail domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Addressing messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
System components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Client components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Server components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
PBX integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Audio encoding formats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Chapter 4
Designing addressing schemes
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Local mailbox numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Dial-by-Name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Numeric addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Chapter 5
Providing interoperability with existing Octel servers
Introduction to OctelNet™ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
OctelNet Messaging Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Designing an OctelNet addressing scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Prefix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Additional digits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Mailbox length. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
OctelNet addressing scheme design rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Addressing OctelNet messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Addressing OctelNet messages from Octel Unified Messenger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
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Contents
Addressing OctelNet messages to Octel Unified Messenger recipients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-7
Providing single-site interoperability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-8
Automatic mailbox forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-8
Chapter 6
Connecting with the PBX
and establishing security rules
Connecting with the PBX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-2
Establishing security rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-3
Access to voice mail domain administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-3
Access to subscriber accounts administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-3
Access to subscriber mailboxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-3
Appendix A
Appendix A - Sizing for ports
Calculating the number of supported subscribers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
Appendix B
Appendix B - Grade of service
Calculating busy hour traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GL-1
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IN-1
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PART 1
CONCEPTS
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1
Introducing Octel Unified Messenger
This chapter introduces Octel Unified Messenger and discusses the
following topics:
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n
Octel Unified Messenger product features.
n
The “unified mailbox” concept.
n
Networked components of the Octel Unified Messenger
environment.
n
Benefits of using Octel Unified Messenger.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Introduction
Today e-mail, voice mail, and fax are established as strategic, enabling
technologies at companies large and small. As a result, people are
receiving both a larger volume and more types of messages than ever
before.
However, each kind of message typically requires its own access medium
(telephone, personal computer, or fax device) and support structure
(capital equipment, management tools, and service procedures). The task
of retrieving, prioritizing, and storing messages can be inconvenient,
complex, and time-consuming, even though messaging should enhance
and streamline the communications process.
To make this task easier, Octel Unified Messenger provides the following
features:
n
Messaging convenience
Octel Unified Messenger enables everyone to view, listen to,
send, store, and retrieve all their messages from one mailbox (the
“unified mailbox”) with whatever access tool is the most
convenient at any particular time: telephone, desktop computer,
portable computer, or fax device.
n
Simplified messaging management
With Octel Unified Messenger, organizations can simplify
communications administration, maintain accurate messaging
directories, and reduce communication costs.
n
Interoperability
Utilizing OctelNet, Octel Unified Messenger systems
interoperate with other Lucent Technologies Octel Messaging
Division (OMD) voice messaging systems. This means that
subscribers can exchange voice messages with users on other
Octel messaging servers that support OctelNet.
1-2
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Introducing Octel Unified Messenger
Product features
OMD uses the next-generation client/server messaging system Microsoft
Exchange Server to deliver a truly unified messaging architecture that
meets the mission-critical demands of even the largest organization.
Specific features of Octel Unified Messenger include:
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n
A single unified view of messages using the Exchange Server
mailbox.
n
Telephone access to the Exchange Server mailbox.
n
Fax, voice, and e-mail management using personal folders in
Microsoft Exchange or Microsoft Outlook.
n
A single data store for all messages in the Microsoft Exchange
Server.
n
A common, enterprise-wide directory for all messages.
n
A single point of administration through enhanced Microsoft
Exchange Server administration.
n
Text-to-speech (TTS) delivery of e-mail and fax subject headers
or the entire body of text messages.
n
Fax delivery of e-mail messages (including attachments) using
third-party fax servers.
n
Voice message playback through multimedia equipment or a
telephone.
n
Voice messages addressed using the Microsoft Exchange
directory.
n
Ability to send, forward, or reply by voice across a local area
network (LAN), a wide area network (WAN), or the Internet.
n
Voice object embedding in OLE 2.0 and ActiveX compliant
documents.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
The unified mailbox
For each Octel Unified Messenger subscriber, all voice mail, telephone
answering, e-mail, fax, and data messages (including documents and
forms) are stored in the unified mailbox. Messages can be viewed,
listened to, stored, or retrieved using either telephone, PC, or fax.
Figure 1-1 shows the concept of the unified mailbox.
Figure 1-1. Unified mailbox
1
2
3
1 PC
2 Telephone
3 Fax
1-4
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Introducing Octel Unified Messenger
Telephone user interface
Subscribers can access their unified mailbox from a telephone user
interface to do the following:
n
Send and receive voice messages.
n
Play back voice messages.
n
Listen to e-mail messages, using TTS conversion.
n
Forward fax messages to other recipients or to a fax device for
printing.
n
Store, delete, reply to, or forward e-mail, voice, or fax messages.
n
Print e-mail messages on a fax device.
PC user interface
Subscribers can access their unified mailbox from a PC to do the
following:
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n
Send and receive voice messages.
n
Play back voice messages through the telephone or through PC
multimedia equipment.
n
Send and receive e-mail messages.
n
Send and receive fax messages.
n
Store, delete, reply to, or forward e-mail, voice, or fax messages.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Networked components
Figure 1-2 shows the networked components of the Octel Unified
Messenger environment.
Figure 1-2. Octel Unified Messenger networked components
4
1
8
5
7
2
3
9
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
PBX
Telephone user interface
Fax (optional)
Octel voice server
Fax server (optional)
PC user interface
LAN
Octel tracing server
Microsoft Exchange server
Microsoft Exchange Server
The Microsoft Exchange server is a Windows NT-based system that
contains all user mailboxes and all directory information. It
communicates with other Exchange servers on the LAN, with Exchange
servers on remote sites via WAN or network dial-up, and through
gateways with other e-mail systems across the Internet. The Exchange
server provides a single point of administration for subscriber mailboxes.
1-6
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Introducing Octel Unified Messenger
Voice server
The voice server is a Windows NT-based system that is the integral link
between the LAN and the telephone network. It performs the following
functions:
Multilingual
text-to-speech
n
Answers PBX-forwarded telephone calls.
n
Plays personalized greetings.
n
Records messages.
n
Sends compressed message files to subscriber mailboxes for
storage.
n
Retrieves stored messages for playback through the telephone or
through multimedia.
n
Provides the capability for TTS conversion of e-mail messages.
n
Detects incoming faxes and forwards them to third-party fax
servers.
The voice server includes a speech synthesis device that allows
subscribers to hear their e-mail messages over the telephone. This feature
is also used for name confirmation when a recorded name is not available.
Organizations that receive e-mail in more than one language can enable a
multilingual TTS. This identifies the language of the e-mail message and
reads the message in that language.
The following languages are available:
n
English
n
French
n
German
n
Spanish
n
Dutch
n
Italian
n
Russian
Tracing server
The tracing server is a separate system that records operational
information about activity in the voice mail domain. Events, for example,
port activity, are stored in an operation history database. An administrator
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
can generate reports summarizing voice mail activity using the Octel
Unified Messenger Reporting Tool application.
Fax server
The fax server is a third-party component to which the voice server
delegates all functionality related to sending and receiving faxes. For
more information on third-party fax server compatibility with Octel
Unified Messenger, see “Octel Unified Messenger interoperability with
third-party fax servers” on page 2-20.
Octel Unified Messenger, in conjunction with a compatible fax server,
offers the following fax features:
n
Fax messages can be received and stored in a subscriber’s
mailbox.
n
Subscribers can send fax messages and e-mail messages to fax
devices for printing.
n
A copy of a subscriber’s Inbox listing can be faxed to a fax device
through the telephone user interface.
For more information on how to set up fax servers, see “Octel Unified
Messenger interoperability with third-party fax servers” on page 2-20.
Incoming faxes
Incoming faxes may be received in two ways, depending on whether the
system is set up with Direct Inward Dialing (DID):
n
On systems with DID, callers call into a subscriber’s mailbox and
press Start on their fax device.
n
On systems without DID, callers call the subscriber’s automated
attendant from the fax machine’s telephone, select the
subscriber’s extensions by using either Dial-by-Name or by
entering the subscriber’s extension number, and press Start on
their fax device.
Once fax calls are received, Octel Unified Messenger transfers the call
from the voice server to the fax server. When the fax server answers the
call, the voice server identifies the intended recipient and switches the call
to the fax server to receive the fax. The fax server then delivers the fax
message into the recipient’s mailbox.
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Introducing Octel Unified Messenger
Access to faxes
using the TUI
The telephone user interface recognizes messages of the message type
IPM.NOTE.FAX. If a fax server does not support this message type, Octel
Unified Messenger does not classify messages as faxes but only as e-mail
messages with TIFF attachments.
Subscribers can send fax messages to other recipients or to a fax device
for printing. They can also send e-mail messages to a fax device for
printing.
E-mail messages that have attachments, for example, a document in
Microsoft Word or Microsoft Excel format can be converted to fax format
by the fax server and can be printed to a fax device. Which types of
attachments can be printed to a fax device depends on the capabilities of
the fax server.
PBX
The PBX or switch transfers calls from within the enterprise or from the
outside telephone network to the OMD voice server. This capability can
also be provided by the service provider’s central office equipment,
known as Centrex.
An Octel Unified Messenger voice server includes a “PBX integration”.
This is a specialized connection to the PBX that provides information
about calls as they are routed, such as:
n
Who the call was originally intended for (called party).
n
Who placed the call (calling party).
n
What caused the call to be directed to the voice server (for
example, there was no answer or the telephone was busy).
TUI
Subscribers can use a touchtone telephone to do the following:
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n
Record voice messages.
n
Listen to voice and e-mail messages.
n
Reply to voice, e-mail, or fax messages.
n
Instruct the system to store, forward, or delete messages.
n
Send fax and e-mail messages to a fax device for printing.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
LAN
The LAN provides a high-speed (minimum 10 Megabit per second
switched) connection between servers and client systems. Octel Unified
Messenger supports Ethernet and token ring based LAN topologies. Octel
Unified Messenger takes advantage of the file streaming capabilities of
Windows NT to transfer voice files across the network. This minimizes
network traffic congestion and provides speedy message playback and
navigation.
PC user interface
The PC user interface can be a portable or desktop computer that is either
connected by a LAN or part of a remote network. This computer executes
Octel Unified Messenger client software that manages the display of all
messages contained in the subscriber’s mailbox, facilitates and controls
the recording and playback of voice messages, and interacts with the
Exchange client.
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Introducing Octel Unified Messenger
Benefits summary
Octel Unified Messenger provides the following benefits to your
organization.
Subscriber convenience
With Octel Unified Messenger, subscribers can:
n
Store all messages in one place, regardless of the message type.
n
Access voice, e-mail, and fax messages from either the telephone
or PC user interface.
n
Reply to messages in one medium (for example, voice) with
another medium (for example, e-mail).
n
Send voice messages with the same ease and convenience as
sending e-mail messages.
n
Use TTS conversion to listen to e-mail messages when access to a
PC is not possible.
Ease of administration
Octel Unified Messenger offers administrators the following capabilities:
n
All messaging administration can be handled by a single
administrator.
n
Management tools are combined into one application.
n
A single directory for voice, e-mail and fax messages makes
system management easier.
n
PC user interface tools make it easy to create or update mailbox
information.
Send messages near and far
Octel Unified Messenger systems can utilize OctelNet to connect to
existing Octel voice messaging systems at the same location or at remote
locations. Subscribers can send and receive messages from remote
subscribers as easily as if they were all using the same local system.
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PART 2
PLANNING
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2
Sizing the system
This chapter discusses the main points to consider when sizing the
hardware for Octel Unified Messenger. It contains information about:
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n
Voice mail domain design rules.
n
Establishing the number of voice ports required.
n
Calculating the number of voice servers required.
n
Hardware and software requirements.
n
Evaluating the additional load on the Microsoft Exchange server.
n
Evaluating the additional network traffic.
n
Using Octel Unified Messenger via slow network connections.
n
Enabling fax servers to communicate with Octel Unified
Messenger.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Introduction
Sizing the hardware for Octel Unified Messenger involves the following
steps:
1. Designing the voice mail domain structure for the organization.
2. Calculating the number of voice ports required.
3. Calculating the number of OMD voice servers needed.
4. Designing fax server and voice server communication.
5. Evaluating the additional load on Microsoft Exchange.
6. Evaluating the additional network traffic that must be handled.
2-2
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Sizing the system
Design rules for voice mail domains
Designing voice mail domains (VMDs) is very similar to designing
domains in Microsoft NT.
When designing Octel Unified Messenger voice mail domains, the
following rules must be observed.
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n
Each voice server can belong to one voice mail domain only.
n
Each voice mail subscriber can belong to one voice mail domain
only.
n
Each voice server has a single peer Exchange server.
n
Different voice servers in a voice mail domain can have different
peer Exchange servers, provided that those Exchange servers are
in the same Exchange site.
n
An Exchange server can be a peer server for more than one voice
server.
n
An Exchange server can be a peer server for voice servers from
different voice mail domains. However, the voice mail domains
must be located in the same Exchange site as the Exchange
server.
n
A Microsoft Exchange site can contain more than one voice mail
domain.
n
In a voice mail domain, there can be one tracing server only.
n
Voice mail domains cannot spread across multiple Exchange
sites.
n
There is only one PBX integration link per voice server. This
means that if your PBXs are integrated, you need one voice server
per PBX.
n
There can be several PBX types in one voice mail domain.
However, each PBX must be linked to its own voice server and
the voice mail domain properties must match every PBX type.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Sizing ports
Accurate port sizing is critical to the successful implementation of any
voice processing application. A careful analysis of system traffic patterns
must be made. Specifically, the volume of calls generated by internal
subscribers and external callers to the system during the busiest hour of
the day must be determined.
Busy hour traffic is used in the calculation to determine the number of
ports needed to provide an acceptable level of service to the users. Most
newer PBXs provide traffic statistic reports that can provide an accurate
picture of traffic patterns on the switch. When preparing the
implementation of a messaging system, the planner should study a
minimum of one week’s traffic data to determine daily and hourly call
volumes.
How to determine
the busy hour
Most PBXs can generate traffic reports that provide statistics on a weekly,
daily, or hourly basis. Usually these reports break out the traffic statistics
by type of call, for example, incoming calls, outgoing calls, and calls to
specific hunt groups. These reports can be used to determine specific
traffic patterns and when the busy hour occurs.
Suppose that during the course of a typical business week the traffic
report indicates that Monday is the busiest day for incoming calls. On
Monday a total of 3,500 calls are received, and the hourly statistics show
that the busiest hour of the day occurs between 9 a.m. and 10 a.m., with
350 incoming calls. Therefore 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. is the customer’s busy
hour.
Another way of expressing busy hour traffic is as a percentage of total
daily traffic. In the example above, 350 busy hour calls is 10% of the
3,500 total calls received for the day. If traffic statistics are not available,
then an educated guess at busy hour traffic is required. The tables in
Appendix A, “Sizing for Ports” can be used as guidelines for estimating
how many users can be supported with a given number of ports based on
some assumptions about average daily port usage per subscriber. These
tables also provide for traffic patterns of 10%, 14%, or 18% busy hour
traffic.
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Sizing the system
Units of
measurement for
busy hour traffic
Busy hour traffic is normally expressed in units of measurement such as
minutes, Erlangs, or Centum Call Seconds (CCS).
Note: 1 CCS = 100 call seconds. For example, there are 3,600
seconds in 1 hour. To determine the number of CCS in 1 hour,
divide 3,600 by 100 to get 36 CCS.
Minutes, Erlangs, and CCS are different ways of expressing busy hour
traffic. For example, during busy hour, 120 calls are generated with an
average length of 30 seconds each. This equals 3,600 call seconds (120 x
30) of busy hour traffic. This same number can also be expressed as 60
call minutes, 1 Erlang, or 36 CCS of busy hour traffic. That is:
3,600 call seconds(/60) = 60 call minutes(/60) = 1 call hour or
Erlang = 36 CCS
“Calculating the amount of busy hour traffic”, below, describes how to
calculate busy hour offered traffic in seconds and how to convert to
minutes, Erlangs, or CCS units.
Calculating the
amount of busy
hour traffic
Standard traffic engineering tables are used to determine the proper
number of ports based on busy hour offered traffic. Offered traffic is the
total traffic offered to a group of ports during the busy hour, including
calls that are blocked. It is usually expressed in minutes, Erlangs, or CCS.
Carried traffic is the total busy hour traffic that was offered to the group
of ports minus the blocked calls. To calculate the total minutes of busy
hour offered traffic, two variables must be known or estimated:
n
The average number of calls generated during the busy hour. This
is all calls incoming and outgoing.
n
The average length of a call, also known as average hold time
(AHT), usually expressed in seconds or minutes. The hold time
must include call setup and tear-down time. Setup time starts
from the moment a port is seized, that is, when ringing starts.
Tear-down time is the time it takes for the port to be available to
process another call after a caller hangs up or is disconnected by
the server.
Below is a telephone answering/messaging example with no other
applications in use:
If 1,500 calls (forwarded and direct calls) are generated during the busy
hour, and the AHT of a call is 45 seconds, the total busy hour traffic can
be calculated as follows:
1,500 calls x 45 seconds = 67,500 call seconds of busy hour offered
traffic.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
To convert this total into call minutes, divide by 60:
67,500/60 = 1,125 call minutes.
To convert this total into Erlangs, divide by 3600:
67,500/3600 = 18.75 Erlangs.
To convert this total into CCS, divide by 100:
67,500/100 = 675 CCS.
To predict busy hour traffic accurately, you must collect reliable traffic
data that reflects the calling patterns specific installation or application. If
busy hour calls are underestimated, the number of ports may not be
sufficient to provide users with an acceptable level of service. If busy hour
calls are overestimated, the additional number of ports increases the cost
of providing the service needlessly. To calculate the number of ports
accurately, it is necessary to understand the concept of “grade of service”,
see below.
Grade of service
Grade of service (GOS) is the probability that an incoming call is blocked
and therefore the caller hears a busy signal because all ports are in use.
This is expressed as a percentage of callers who call during the busy hour.
For example, if the number of ports is sized so that no more than 2 out of
100 calls are likely to be blocked during the busy hour, the system is said
to provide a P.02 GOS. If no more than 5 out of 100 calls are likely to be
blocked, the system provides a P.05 GOS. P.01 is a better GOS than P.05
and therefore requires more ports.
Common industry GOS for messaging servers are P.01, P.02, P.03, and
P.05.
There is an obvious trade-off between cost and grade of service. The
choice is a business decision based on a number of factors, including how
critical the application is to the business, and the cost of ports and other
physical resources that are required to provide the desired GOS.
The tables in Appendix B “Grade of Service” show the maximum amount
of busy hour traffic supported by a number of ports for each GOS.
2-6
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Sizing the system
PBX integration
device sizing
Sizing outgoing call
features: Intercom
Paging and OctelNet
As described in “PBX integration” on page 3-10, PBX integrations are
accomplished by different methods depending on the PBX type and the
capabilities of the PBX. Although all PBX Integration Devices (PIDs)
perform the same basic functions, they all accomplish it in a slightly
different manner. Therefore, the number of PIDs required to support a
given number of ports varies based on:
n
The number of integrated ports.
n
The type of PID used.
n
The incoming call volume during the busy hour.
Outgoing call features include intercom paging and OctelNet message
delivery. These features require the user of a port by the voice server to
place an outgoing call.
The traffic generated by these features can significantly affect the GOS if
this traffic is not included in the estimate of busy hour offered traffic. If
outcall delivery traffic is managed so that the majority of it occurs outside
of the busy hour, the impact on busy hour GOS is minimized. For
instance, network delivery schedules can be defined to allow only urgent
messages from priority subscribers to be delivered during the busy period.
If a large amount of outcall traffic is expected during the busy hour, it may
be preferable to size a separate group of outgoing ports and dedicate them
to outcalling applications only.
For a conservative estimate of the number of ports required for outgoing
OctelNet messages, use this calculation:
Number of ports = 1 + (average message length * estimated daily
number of messages) / total daily duration of the window during
which OctelNet is free to outcall.
Note: When using this calculation, the following is assumed:
101-1620-005
n
The ports are not taken up by other outgoing calls.
n
The schedule is the same for all priority messages.
2-7
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Total estimated port
requirements
To summarize, when sizing the number of total ports required for any
given server to provide a desired GOS, the following factors must be
considered.
n
Estimated total busy hour offered traffic generated by both
internal and external callers.
n
Estimated total busy hour offered traffic generated by all
applications, including those that place outgoing calls.
A system planner should allow for a safety or growth factor of 5% to 15%
when sizing the initial implementation.
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Sizing the system
Calculating the number of voice servers required
Having established the total number of voice ports, it is possible to
calculate the minimum number of voice servers needed. The minimum
number of servers is equal to the total number of ports needed, divided by
the number of ports to be installed on each of the servers. An Octel
Unified Messenger voice server can support up to 24 voice ports.
To determine the correct (not the minimum) number of servers needed, it
is necessary to consider the effects of the following factors:
n
The voice mail domain design. For more information, see
“Design rules for voice mail domains” on page 2-3.
n
The PBX configuration and integration.
n
Potential heavy processing demands, such as those imposed by
the tracing system.
Note: The Octel Unified Messenger tracing system should
be installed on a separate machine that does not run
the voice server software. This is particularly
recommended for any implementation of Octel
Unified Messenger that uses eight or more voice
ports.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Hardware and software requirements for Octel
Unified Messenger servers
Octel Unified Messenger servers require the following configuration:
Minimum voice
server requirements
n
For systems using 4 to 12 ports: 200 MHz Intel Pentium.
For systems using 16 to 24 ports: 400 MHz Intel Pentium.
n
128 MB RAM.
n
Access to a CD-ROM drive to install the software.
n
Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 with the latest service pack.
n
Rhetorex VPS4, 8-port PCI cards (Vantage PCI_8L or PCI_8LH),
or VRS24 with ATSI voice card(s) (available in US and Canada
only).
n
Microsoft Exchange Client software.
Note: When using Microsoft Exchange Server version 5.5, it
is recommended that you use Microsoft Outlook 98.
n
Rhetorex Installation Suite.
n
1 GB free disk space.
Note: Ensure there is sufficient disk space on the voice
server. If the voice server runs out of disk space, you
will obtain unpredictable results. Microsoft
recommends that you keep at least 20% of disk space
free to guarantee good performance.
Recommended Processor:
The processor recommended for an OMD voice server depends on two
key factors:
n
The number of voice ports to be supported by the server.
n
The maximum number of simultaneous text-to-speech (TTS)
sessions to be allowed on the server. The number cannot exceed
the number of TTS licenses purchased.
Note: Too many TTS sessions can have a detrimental effect
on the voice server’s performance.
2-10
101-1620-005
Sizing the system
Minimum tracing
server requirements
n
For systems with up to 2 voice servers: 200 MHz Intel Pentium.
For systems with more than 2 voice servers: 400 MHz Intel
Pentium
101-1620-005
n
64 Mbytes RAM.
n
Access to a CD-ROM drive to install the software.
n
Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 with the latest service pack.
n
Microsoft Exchange Client software.
n
2 Gbyte free disk space.
2-11
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Evaluating the additional load on Microsoft
Exchange servers
Implementing Octel Unified Messenger affects the activity of the
Exchange servers and the disk space usage.
Number of
Exchange users
Use the following guidelines to estimate the effect of adding Octel
Unified Messenger to an existing Exchange environment:
n
Adding Octel Unified Messenger capability to a single Exchange
mailbox is equivalent to adding approximately 30% to the system
load that would otherwise be required for that mailbox.
n
Adding one line of voice activity to an Exchange server affects
Exchange response time in the same way as the addition of 10
medium-activity e-mail users.
n
Generally, the load imposed by voice mail usage represents a
quarter of the load imposed by e-mail usage from the same
population. This in turn represents a 25% to 30% increase in the
required capacity of the Microsoft Exchange servers.
Example: calculation of impact on the Exchange servers capacity
2-12
n
With a hunt group of 24 lines, which covers a fully configured
Octel Unified Messenger voice server, the system is capable of
supporting approximately 16.6 Erlangs at the peak hour. This
represents a load on the Exchange system equivalent to
approximately 160 simultaneously active voice mail users.
n
The 24 lines should be able to support a total voice mail
population of approximately 720 subscribers with 30 users per
line.
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Sizing the system
Disk space
requirements
Voice messages require 4 Kbytes per second (240 Kbytes per minute) of
space for storage.
Subscriber mailboxes
A subscriber who receives five voice messages per day, with an average
message length of 60 seconds, requires 1.2 Mbyte of storage space to
keep all messages stored on the Exchange server or on another machine if
the subscriber stores the messages in Personal Folders. However, most
people have no need to store all of the messages they receive. Subscribers
should be encouraged to remove unnecessary copies of messages from
their Exchange folders. For example, they should make sure the Deleted
Items and Sent Items folders are not retaining copies of messages longer
than necessary.
Off-line message taking
When the Exchange server is not running, all voice messages from
outside callers are temporarily stored on the Octel Unified Messenger
voice server. This offline spooling facility requires enough available disk
space on the voice server to hold all voice mail coming in during that
time.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Evaluating the additional network traffic
Implementing Octel Unified Messenger results in the flow of voice data
over the organization’s data network. This section provides the
information required to calculate the additional network traffic generated
by an Octel Unified Messenger system. This calculation is based on
several factors, including:
Worst-case network
load
n
The number of voice servers in the voice mail domain (S).
n
The number of ports on each voice server (P).
n
The usage characteristics.
n
The voice encoding rate (32 kilobits per second).
To calculate the worst-case network load contributed by an Octel Unified
Messenger voice mail domain, substitute the number of voice servers in
the voice mail domain for S and the number of ports on each voice server
P into the following formula:
Worst-case network bandwidth = S x P x 32 kilobits per second.
For example, for a site with a voice mail domain containing five voice
servers, each with 24 ports, the worst-case network bandwidth is
5x24x32=3,840 kilobits per second. In addition, it is necessary to apply a
factor to allow for the overheads applicable to the network protocols and
options that are in operation.
This calculation is based on the worst-case assumption that all ports are
recording or playing voice data at the same time. It provides a calculation
of the total network traffic potentially added, but no indication concerning
the direction or path taken by this data.
Dedicated
connection
2-14
Average values will be much lower than indicated by the worst-case
calculation presented above. However, they can still represent a
significant load on the LAN connections between the voice servers and
the Exchange servers. For that reason, each voice server in a multiserver
environment should be given a dedicated switched Ethernet spur or
switched token ring segment connecting directly into the backbone
network.
101-1620-005
Sizing the system
Types of operations
The Octel Unified Messenger voice servers open data streams between
voice servers and:
n
Exchange servers.
n
Client systems.
The actual Exchange server associated with each data stream depends on
the operation and, in some cases, the associated mailbox:
n
The operation of telephone answering results in the establishment
of a data stream between the voice server and the voice server’s
peer e-mail server.
n
The following operations result in the establishment of a
connection between the voice server and the Exchange server
containing the mailbox of the relevant subscriber:
— Playing back a voice message over the telephone.
— Recording a voice message to be sent to another subscriber.
— A caller listening to one of the subscriber's prerecorded
greeting messages.
It is possible, using the information above, to calculate the worst-case and
normal throughput requirement for each voice server and Exchange server
pairing.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Using Octel Unified Messenger via slow network
connections
Octel Unified Messenger applications move voice messages between
Octel Unified Messenger client systems and:
n
Octel Unified Messenger voice servers.
n
Octel Unified Messenger client systems and Exchange servers.
How the data flows between systems is dependent on whether a
subscriber uses multimedia or the telephone and whether voice messages
are recorded or played back.
This section explains how the data flow is affected by slow network
connections, for example, Remote Access Services (RAS), when playing
back or recording messages using multimedia or the telephone. It also
lists client applications and administration utilities that may be affected.
Note: This section does not address the connectivity between voice
servers and e-mail servers. These require high-bandwidth and
low-latency connectivity and are described in “Evaluating the
additional network traffic” on page 2-14.
Using multimedia
Voice messages can be played back or recorded using multimedia.
Playing back voice
messages
Before playback starts, a voice message is copied to the client PC. A
delay in copying the message from the Exchange server to the PC may be
experienced. This delay depends on the message length and the network
bandwidth between the client PC and the Exchange server. Once the
message is copied, playback is not affected by slow network connections.
Recording voice
messages
When recording a voice message, the message is stored on the client PC
until recording is completed. Only then is the message copied to the
Exchange server mailbox. This means that a slow network connection
does not affect the recording process. However, a delay in copying the
message from the client PC to the Exchange server may be experienced.
This delay depends on the message length and the network bandwidth
between the client system and the Exchange server.
2-16
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Sizing the system
Using the telephone
Voice messages can be played back and recorded using the telephone.
Playing back voice
messages
When playing back a voice message, the message is moved from the
Exchange server to a telephone via the voice server. The playback is not
affected by the speed of the client network connection. However, if
playback controls are used, for example, fast forward or rewind, these are
routed through the network connection. Playback controls occupy little
bandwidth, so they are only slightly affected by a slow network
connection.
Figure 2-1 shows the data flow when playing back messages using the
telephone.
Figure 2-1. Data flow when playing back messages using the telephone
When playing back
Public
telephone
network
Playing
back a
message
4
6
Playback controls
5
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
101-1620-005
2
3
5
7
Exchange server
Voice server
RAS machine
PBX
Modem
Telephone
Client PC
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Recording voice
messages
When recording voice messages, the data must be copied from the voice
server to the client PC via slow network connections. It is stored on the
client PC until the recording is stopped. Once recording is stopped, the
message is copied to the Exchange server mailbox. Therefore it is very
important to have adequate network bandwidth. Although lower speeds
may work, a minimum speed of 56 kilobits per second between the client
PC and the voice server is recommended.
Figure 2-2 shows the data flow when recording voice messages using the
telephone.
Figure 2-2. Data flow when recording voice messages using the telephone
When recording
Public
telephone
network
Recording
a message
4
6
When message
is saved or sent
5
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
2-18
2
5
7
3
Exchange server
Voice server
RAS machine
PBX
Modem
Telephone
Client PC
101-1620-005
Sizing the system
The effect of slow network connections on Octel Unified Messenger
applications
This section lists all Octel Unified Messenger applications and how each
is affected by slow network connections.
Octel Unified Messenger Voice Form
If Octel Unified Messenger Voice Form is used with multimedia, a slow
network connection is sufficient.
If the Octel Unified Messenger Voice Form is used with a telephone to
play back voice messages only, a slow network connection is sufficient.
However, if voice messages are recorded, a high-speed connection is
needed. For more information, see Figure 2-2 on page 2-18.
Using Microsoft Exchange Offline. If Microsoft Exchange is used in offline
mode and messages are synchronized with the Exchange server message
store, it is recommended to use multimedia to listen to and record
messages.
Octel Unified Messenger Voice Recorder
It is recommended that you use Octel Unified Messenger Voice Recorder
with local multimedia when using a slow network connection.
Octel Unified Messenger Options
A slow network connection can be used for all configuration operations,
for example, setting call handling. However, a high-speed connection is
required when recording prompts and greetings over the telephone.
Visual Voice Editor
It is recommended that you use multimedia or a 56 kilobits per second
network connection to work with the Visual Voice Editor prompts.
Voice Mail User Administration Extension
A slow network connection can be used for all configuration operations,
for example, setting call handling. However, a high-speed connection is
required when recording the Spoken Name prompt using the telephone.
Port Monitor, Voice Mail System Configuration, Operation History
Viewer, and Reporting Tool
Since none of these applications transmit voice messages, they all work
over slow connections. Operation History Viewer connects to the Octel
Unified Messenger Tracing Server. If it is to be used in live mode, the
network connection must have enough bandwidth for the amount of data
to be viewed.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Octel Unified Messenger interoperability with
third-party fax servers
This section describes how third-party fax servers interoperate with Octel
Unified Messenger. It is recommended that the third-party fax server
resides on a separate Windows NT server. The fax hardware is connected
to a fax hunt group on the PBX.
Figure 2-3. Octel Unified Messenger interoperability with third-party fax
servers
4
7
2
3
1
5
6
1
2
3
4
PBX
Fax cards
Voice cards
Fax server which contains:
n Fax server software
n Fax routing
n Windows NT
5 Unified Messenger server which contains:
n OctelNet
n PBX integration/devices
n TTS
n Telephone user interface
n Windows NT
6 Microsoft Exchange server which contains:
n Message transport
n Message database (mailboxes)
n Directory
n Windows NT
7 Client machines which contain:
n Octel Unified Messenger software
n Fax client software
n Microsoft Exchange or Microsoft Outlook client
n Windows ‘95 or Windows NT
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Requirements for third-party fax server interoperability with Octel
Unified Messenger
The following are the requirements for third-party fax server
interoperability with Octel Unified Messenger:
n
Octel Unified Messenger version 2.0 or higher must be installed.
n
The fax server must be integrated with Microsoft Exchange as an
Exchange Connector or an Exchange gateway for fax.
n
The fax server must use a FAX address type that is specified to
Octel Unified Messenger. This is so that one-off addresses can be
created and messages can be delivered to the fax server for
transmission.
n
The fax server must support DTMF detection and collection.
n
The fax server must match the DTMF fax routing number
supplied by Octel Unified Messenger with a subscriber’s
FAXROUTE address.
n
The fax server must create faxes as e-mail messages with .TIF
attachments and send them to the intended Exchange recipient for
storage within the Exchange message store.
n
The fax messages placed in the subscriber’s Outlook inbox
should be identified by a unique message class (IMP.NOTE.FAX)
so they can be detected as faxes by Octel Unified Messenger.
Enabling Octel Unified Messenger subscribers for fax
Octel Unified Messenger subscribers are fax-enabled when a system
administrator adds a FAXROUTE address as an e-mail address type for
the subscriber.
Octel Unified Messenger subscribers with fax-enabled mailboxes can use
the telephone user interface to access fax messages in their mailbox. From
the telephone user interface, fax-enabled subscribers can route fax or
e-mail messages (with or without attachments) to any fax device for
printing. When a subscriber requests the printing of a fax or e-mail
message, Octel Unified Messenger forwards a copy of the message to a
one-off address of the form [FAX:nnnnnnnn], where FAX is the actual
address type for the fax server and nnnnnnn is the telephone number of
the fax device supplied by the subscriber.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Routing inbound fax calls to the third-party fax server
Like voice calls, fax calls placed to a subscriber’s extension are redirected
to the Octel Unified Messenger voice server when these calls encounter a
ring-no-answer or busy condition. Whenever the voice server receives a
call and detects that it is a fax, it places the call on courtesy hold and
initiates a call to the fax server hunt group. After a fixed time delay
(5-second default) Octel Unified Messenger sends fax routing information
as DTMF codes to the fax server and then cuts through the fax call. The
fax routing information sent by Octel Unified Messenger is determined by
retrieving the Microsoft Exchange FAXROUTE address for the
subscriber, based on the called extension number or entered mailbox
number.
After the fax server receives the fax, it determines the Exchange
subscriber’s address by finding the subscriber with a matching
FAXROUTE address. Then the fax server creates an e-mail message with
a .TIF attachment (TIFF group 3 fax format), sets the message class to
IMP.NOTE.FAX, and sends the message to the subscriber’s mailbox.
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3
System architecture
This chapter introduces the Octel Unified Messenger system architecture
and describes some of its key concepts, such as the voice mail domain
(VMD) and addressing mechanisms. This chapter also contains a list of
the main system components, including client, server, and telephony.
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Introduction
This section introduces the concept of a voice mail domain, as well as the
various methods that subscribers can use to address voice messages.
Voice mail domain
An Octel Unified Messenger voice mail domain is a group of OMD voice
servers that share the same set of properties, for example, PBX settings.
Any changes made to a voice mail domain’s properties are updated and
replicated automatically to all voice servers in the domain. Voice mail
domains provide the ability to store and retrieve properties that belong to
a set of servers working together to give integrated call answering.
A voice server has configurable properties, which are maintained by the
system administrator using administrative utilities. Many of these
properties are configured identically for all the servers. An example is the
dates of public holidays. It would be unacceptable to have one server
announcing that the office is open for business, while another server is
simultaneously claiming that the business is closed in observance of a
holiday. It would also be unacceptable to require administrators to ensure
that these properties are configured identically in several voice servers
because of the workload involved, and the risk of error.
The group of voice servers in a voice mail domain can be seen as a single,
“virtual” server for that domain. This virtual voice server allows any Octel
Unified Messenger subscribers in the domain to call in using the
telephone user interface, access their mailboxes, and retrieve their
messages. Also, the virtual voice server can call the telephone of any
subscriber who runs Octel Unified Messenger PC client applications to
play back voice messages.
An organization can create multiple voice mail domains, for example, one
in each major geographical site. Figure 3-1 shows a typical
implementation. It consists of two voice mail domains, one in San
Francisco with three voice servers and two Exchange servers, and one in
London with one voice server and one Exchange server.
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System architecture
Figure 3-1.
Example of typical implementation of voice mail domains
6
3
LAN
San Francisco
4
6
1
4
2
4
2
WAN
Voice mail domain 1
5
6
LAN
London
1
4
Voice mail domain 2
7
7
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
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PBX
Subscribers VMD1
Octel Tracing Server for VMD1
Octel Voice Server
Octel Tracing Server for VMD2
Microsoft Exchange server
Subscribers VMD2
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Addressing messages
When sending voice messages, subscribers enter recipients’ addresses
differently depending on whether they use the PC user interface or the
telephone user interface.
From the PC user
interface
From the telephone
user interface
A subscriber can retrieve recipients’ addresses from the Exchange
directory, in other words, from their address books. Exchange supports an
enterprise-wide directory, which has the following benefits to Octel
Unified Messenger subscribers:
n
The worldwide corporate directory uses unique identifiers valid
from anywhere in the enterprise.
n
Directory information updated in one location is automatically
available in every location.
The following methods are available for subscribers to designate the
recipients of a message using the telephone user interface:
n
The local mailbox number.
n
The numeric address.
n
Dial-by-Name.
n
The OctelNet address.
For more information about addressing mechanisms, see Chapter 4,
“Designing addressing schemes”.
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System architecture
System components
The system components of Octel Unified Messenger are classified in
three categories:
n
Client components
n
Server components
n
Telephony components
Client components
The client applications enable subscribers and administrators to access
Octel Unified Messenger from the telephone or from their desktop PCs.
Telephone access
Outside callers interact with Octel Unified Messenger through the
telephone to leave voice messages or faxes.
In addition, subscribers can access the following applications through the
telephone user interface.
Octel Unified Messenger Options
This application enables subscribers to configure the main voice mail
properties of their mailbox. Subscribers can also override the default fax
number to print a fax to a different fax machine.
Note: Octel Unified Messenger Options can also be accessed from a
desktop PC.
Voice mail system
The telephone user interface provides voice mail subscribers with a
friendly and easy way to record, send, reply to, or forward voice mail
messages. Voice mail subscribers can also forward fax messages to other
subscribers or to a fax device for printing.
Exchange e-mail system
Subscribers can save, forward, or delete e-mail, voice, and fax messages.
They can also use the text-to-speech conversion feature of Octel Unified
Messenger to listen to e-mail messages over the telephone.
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PC access
From a desktop PC, subscribers and administrators can use the following
Octel Unified Messenger applications.
Octel Unified Messenger Options
The Octel Unified Messenger Options application enables subscribers to
modify their mailbox settings at any time from their PC user interface.
Note: The Octel Unified Messenger Options can also be accessed
from the telephone user interface.
Subscribers can modify all or some of their mailbox settings, depending
on how the mailbox is configured by the administrator.
When a mailbox is initially enabled for voice mail, the administrator sets
subscriber defaults for incoming call and message handling. The
administrator also determines the initial telephone password, sets defaults
for the greeting played to outside callers when the line is busy or
unanswered, determines how voice messages are sorted in the subscriber
mailbox, and specifies the default fax printing telephone number.
For more information on Octel Unified Messenger Options, see the Octel
Unified Messenger Subscriber’s Reference Guide.
Octel Unified Messenger Voice Form
The Octel Unified Messenger Voice Form application provides a quick
and easy way to send voice messages from within Microsoft Exchange. It
makes recording and sending voice messages from the desktop PC as easy
as writing and sending e-mail messages.
Subscribers can reply to and forward voice messages with both voice and
e-mail messages. They can also attach an e-mail or voice message to a fax
message.
For more information on Octel Unified Messenger Voice Form, see the
Octel Unified Messenger Subscriber’s Reference Guide.
Octel Unified Messenger Voice Recorder
With Octel Unified Messenger Voice Recorder, subscribers can record
voice and embed recordings as a voice object into an OLE or ActiveX
application, such as Microsoft Word. Recipients of the document can
listen to and change the recording, using Octel Unified Messenger Voice
Recorder.
Octel Unified Messenger Voice Recorder works independently from
Microsoft Exchange and Octel Unified Messenger’s Voice Form. It can be
used to send voice messages.
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System architecture
Administration
applications
System administrators can use the following applications and tools to
manage Octel Unified Messenger.
Voice Mail System Configuration
This application displays property pages for configuring and maintaining
the voice mail system. Properties that are shared across voices servers in a
voice mail domain can be configured centrally. Any changes made to a
voice mail domain’s properties are then replicated to all voice servers in
the domain.
Voice Mail User Administration Extension
This tool adds voice mail administration for a mailbox to Microsoft
Exchange Administrator. It allows an Octel Unified Messenger
administrator to voice enable a mailbox, and maintain voice mail
information for an Octel Unified Messenger subscriber.
Operation History Viewer
This diagnostic tool lets administrators view events generated by voice
mail system activity that are logged in the Octel Unified Messenger
operation history database. They can view live events as they are added to
the operation history database, or view historical events.
Reporting Tool
This tool enables administrators to generate reports for monitoring voice
mail system usage, for planning capacity, and for tracking security. Once
a report is generated, an administrator can zoom in on a specific area of
interest or print the report for easy reference. Reports can also be exported
to several popular file formats, or attached to a message sent via a
MAPI-enabled e-mail system.
Port Monitor
This application provides a graphical interface for checking and changing
the status of ports on a voice server.
OctelNet Gateway Administration Extension
This tool extends Microsoft Exchange Server Administrator with
administration for an OctelNet gateway.
Visual Voice Editor
This application presents a graphical interface for recording customized
company prompts for use by the automated attendant. For example, the
organization’s Welcome greeting. Customized prompts can be recorded
using multimedia equipment or a telephone. Visual Voice Editor displays
audio data as a waveform to enable precise prompt editing.
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Server components
Octel Unified Messenger adds two types of servers, the voice server and
the tracing server, to the Microsoft Exchange Server environment.
Voice server
3-8
An Octel Unified Messenger voice server provides or supports the
following functions:
n
Call management. This function provides an interface between
the voice cards and the Octel Unified Messenger telephony
applications.
n
Messaging. This function provides communication between
Microsoft Exchange and the Octel Unified Messenger
applications.
n
User Profile. This function provides access to the data associated
with individual subscribers, such as numeric address and spoken
name.
n
Text-to-speech. The voice server includes a speech synthesis
device that allows subscribers to hear their e-mail messages over
the telephone. This feature is also used for name confirmation,
when a recorded name is not available.
n
Administration, configuration, and addressing support.
n
OctelNet gateway support.
n
Significant Event Log. The server software records significant
events or alarms in the Windows NT Event Log.
n
Statistics and performance counters. The voice server software
outputs statistics and performance information using the
Windows NT Performance Monitor.
n
Operation history event generation. Voice server software
components generate operation history events during their
execution. These events are written to the operation history
database.
n
Fax capability. The server software detects faxes and forwards
them to third-party fax servers.
n
Print capability. The server software forwards fax and e-mail
messages to third-party fax servers for printing.
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System architecture
Tracing server
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A tracing server maintains connections with all voice servers in a voice
mail domain, and performs the following tasks:
n
Collects the events that are of interest to an administrator for
diagnostic purposes, for example, a Call Waiting state generated
by the telephone user interface.
n
Writes the events to the operation history database.
n
Periodically creates transactions from the operation history
database, and writes them to the transaction database.
n
Periodically cleans up expired events from the operation history
database and from the transaction database.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
PBX integration
Callers who are forwarded to a voice server can leave a message for the
called party without additional intervention. This is made possible
through the integration of the PBX or Centrex with the Octel Unified
Messenger voice server.
With an integrated voice server, callers are greeted by the personal
greeting of the called party, inviting them to leave a message. Integration
also provides callers with the option to transfer to another extension if
they choose not to leave a message.
In an interfaced environment, in other words, without PBX integration,
calls to a subscriber’s telephone are forwarded, but no information about
the call is passed to the voice message server. The caller is requested to
reenter the mailbox or extension number of the person who is being called
in order to play the personal greeting.
Integration is accomplished when a call is forwarded to the voice server
and the telephone system passes information about the call. This
information includes calling party identification if known, called party
identification, and a forwarding reason code.
There are four ways to integrate a PBX with Octel Unified Messenger:
n
In-band signaling
n
Serial RS-232 data channel
n
Digital Meridian Integration Device (DMID)
n
Voice Bridge II
In-band signaling
In-band signaling involves connecting the voice server to the PBX as if it
were a series of single-line telephones or a series of trunks in a hunt
group. The term “in-band” is used because all of the call identification
information is passed from the PBX to the voice server using DTMF
signals on the same line as the voice connection.
Series RS-232 data
channel
This method of integration involves the connection of an RS-232 data link
from the PBX to the voice server. When an incoming call is sent to the
voice server, it is accompanied by a digital message from the PBX. This
messages contains the call information. Although it is sent over a separate
path from the incoming voice call, the call identification information is
linked to a particular voice port on the messaging server. This port
answers the call and plays the appropriate greeting. Data is sent to the
voice server using a standard protocol called Simplified Message Desk
Interface (SMDI) PBX-proprietary protocol.
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System architecture
Digital Meridian
Integration Device
The Digital Meridian Integration Device (DMID) is a device that provides
integration with Northern Telecom switches, such as the Meridian SL-1.
The DMID is located between the PBX and the voice server and appears
as one or two digital telephones to the PBX, depending on the number of
analog ports required. It is connected to the voice server via an RS-232
link. Analog line circuits for the voice path appear on the digital set of the
DMID. When a call is received on the DMID, it simultaneously rings at
the analog port. The DMID interprets the call display information and
transmits it to the voice server, which answers the caller with the
appropriate personal greeting.
VoiceBridge II
The VoiceBridge II is a device that provides integration with several
switch types, including the AT&T G3 and the Rolm 9751. It is connected
to the PBX through one or more digital telephone lines and to the voice
server via an RS-232 link. When a call is received, the VoiceBridge II
routes it to an available voice port and transmits the call information to the
messaging server in SMDI format. The caller is answered with the
appropriate greeting.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Audio encoding formats
Octel Unified Messenger supports the following audio encoding formats:
n
ADPCM audio encoding format. This is a high quality audio
encoding algorithm with a coding rate of 32 kilobit per second.
n
Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) 6.10 audio
encoding format. This audio encoding format has a coding rate of
approximately 13 kilobit per second.
GSM has the following benefits:
n
Voice messages using GSM only use 40% of the storage
space compared with ADPCM messages. This reduces the
network bandwidth and storage requirements. It has a more
significant impact if a high proportion of subscribers use
Octel Unified Messenger through slow network connections.
n
The GSM audio compression manager codec is available on
all Windows desktops. Voice messages recorded using Octel
Unified Messenger and sent to non-Unified Messenger users
can be played back using Microsoft Sound Recorder on a
multimedia-equipped PC without requiring any additional
software.
System administrators decide whether to use GSM or ADPCM format by
voice mail domain in Voice Mail System Configuration.
Important information for Octel Unified Messenger subscribers
upgrading from earlier releases
The selection of GSM as the preferred audio format for existing
installations should be carefully considered. Octel Unified Messenger
releases earlier than release 3.0 do not support the GSM format.
Consequently, any voice messages encoded using GSM format cannot be
played back by earlier releases of Octel Unified Messenger. System
administrators should ensure their system uses ADPCM only until all
Octel Unified Messenger components throughout their enterprise are
updated to Octel Unified Messenger 3.0.
When changing to GSM, all client systems need to be updated with the
new configuration information. This is achieved by using Octel Unified
Messenger Options to connect to an Octel Unified Messenger voice
server. Until subscribers update their desktops, they will continue to send
voice messages in ADPCM format.
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4
Designing addressing schemes
This chapter introduces different forms of addressing and describes the
following addressing schemes:
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n
Local mailbox number.
n
Dial-by-Name.
n
Numeric addresses.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Introduction
Octel Unified Messenger subscribers can use different forms of
addressing:
From the PC user interface
Subscribers use the Microsoft Exchange directory for addressing
messages. An address is always unique within the Exchange directory. An
address entered at any location is automatically available at all locations
within the organization.
From the telephone user interface
Octel Unified Messenger supports four custom forms of addressing.
These four forms are needed because the telephone user interface (TUI)
does not provide a facility to enter alphabetic characters easily. They also
reduce the number of digits that are needed to address messages from the
telephone user interface. The four special forms of addressing are as
follows:
n
Local mailbox number
n
Dial-by-Name
n
Numeric address
n
OctelNet address
This chapter contains information on the first three addressing schemes.
For information on OctelNet addresses, see Chapter 5, “Providing
Interoperability with Existing Octel Servers”.
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Designing addressing schemes
Local mailbox numbers
Local mailbox numbers are used to address any Octel Unified Messenger
subscriber in a voice mail domain from the telephone user interface.
Traditional voice mail systems typically use this form of addressing.
Within a voice mail domain, all local mailbox numbers must have the
same number of digits. Each local mailbox number must be unique within
the domain. Many organizations use telephone extension numbers as local
mailbox numbers. This means that a separate directory item for mailbox
numbers does not need to be maintained.
In a Centrex environment, many organizations use only the last four or
five digits of the subscriber telephone numbers as local mailbox numbers.
This provides a shorter number that is easy to enter, but still unique. Other
schemes are also possible.
Note: A local mailbox number has no significance outside the voice
mail domain. For example, it cannot be used as an element of
an OctelNet address.
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Dial-by-Name
Dial-by-Name is a method of addressing messages by spelling the
recipient’s name using the keys on the telephone keypad.
To support Dial-by-Name addressing, Octel Unified Messenger maintains
an internal database of all recipients in the Exchange directory. This
database is indexed by the DTMF codes corresponding to their spelled
names in “last name, first name” order. Any user in the Exchange
directory can be selected through Dial-by-Name addressing, making it
basically equivalent to entering a recipient's spelled name on the desktop
PC. This provides a means of addressing messages to both Octel Unified
Messenger subscribers and users on other OMD Octel systems.
Note: With Dial-by-Name, if subscribers do not record their own
names, the telephone user interface voices their Microsoft
Exchange display names. This should be taken into
consideration when setting up a format for display names in
the Microsoft Exchange directory.
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Designing addressing schemes
Numeric addresses
A numeric address enables subscribers to address any Octel Unified
Messenger recipient in an organization.
Every Octel Unified Messenger recipient must be assigned a unique
numeric address. The numeric address allows a subscriber to send a
message to any recipient from the telephone user interface without having
to know the recipient’s location. The Exchange directory ensures that all
numeric addresses are unique, and makes them available to all locations
within the organization.
It is recommended that all numeric addresses have the same number of
digits. However, the length of a numeric address must not be the same as
the length of the local mailbox number in any voice mail domain within
the organization. If the lengths conflict, Octel Unified Messenger cannot
distinguish between a local mailbox number and a numeric address. It
assumes the address is a local mailbox number. To avoid conflicts with
the length of any local mailbox numbers, leading digits may be added to
numeric addresses.
Organizations may choose to use telephone numbers for numeric
addresses because they are unique. Other possible schemes include:
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n
A geographic location code associated with a local mailbox
number.
n
Social security numbers.
n
Employee numbers.
n
Short numeric addresses, such as “55” for a Help Desk, or “1” for
the CEO’s office etc.
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5
Providing interoperability
with existing Octel servers
This chapter describes how existing Octel servers can communicate with
Octel Unified Messenger. It introduces OctelNet, OMD’s solution for
voice networking between Octel servers. It includes information on:
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n
Designing an OctelNet addressing scheme.
n
Addressing OctelNet messages.
n
Providing single-site interoperability.
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Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Introduction to OctelNet™
OctelNet is a networking application that allows users on one OMD
system to exchange messages with users on other OMD systems. For
example, organizations already using OMD’s Octel system can provide
interoperability with Octel Unified Messenger through OctelNet. This
allows them to link all employees in one cost-effective messaging
network that is easy to use and manage.
With OctelNet, OMD servers may be located in the same building, in
different cities, or in different countries around the world. Octel Unified
Messenger supports OctelNet as an Exchange gateway. This allows Octel
Unified Messenger subscribers to exchange voice messages with users on
Octel servers inside of their organization. Subscribers can also exchange
voice mail messages with users outside of their organization, such as
customers or vendors, as long as those users have Octel servers with
OctelNet software.
Figure 5-1. OctelNet provides networking between Octel servers and Octel
Unified Messenger
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Providing interoperability with existing Octel servers
OctelNet Messaging Features
When sending or receiving messages via OctelNet, subscribers can:
NameNet™
n
Mark messages as urgent.
n
Request message confirmation.
n
View envelope information.
n
Reply to messages.
n
Address messages by spelling a recipient’s name, using
NameNet.
n
Receive spoken name confirmation, using NameNet.
NameNet allows users to address messages to recipients in the Exchange
directory by spelling the recipient’s name on the telephone keypad. This
feature is known as Dial-by-Name.
NameNet also provides spoken name confirmation for OctelNet
messages. With spoken name confirmation, the recipient’s name is played
to the sender when the message is addressed. This confirms that the
message is being sent to the right person.
Note: With Dial-by-Name and spoken name confirmation, if
subscribers do not record their own names, the TUI voices
their Microsoft Exchange display names. This should be
taken into consideration when setting up a format for display
names in the Microsoft Exchange directory.
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Designing an OctelNet addressing scheme
For messages to be sent via the OctelNet gateway, the administrator must
set up an OctelNet addressing scheme. If required, multiple addressing
schemes can be set up for a single OctelNet node. This allows OctelNet
messages to be addressed in different ways to the same destination
system.
Setting up an OctelNet addressing scheme
An OctelNet addressing scheme consists of:
n
A prefix.
n
Additional digits.
n
Mailbox length.
Prefix
A prefix is a number used by the sending system as a way of addressing
OctelNet messages to the destination system. For more information on
setting up prefixes, see “OctelNet addressing scheme design rules” on
page 5-5.
Additional digits
Additional digits are the number of digits that the subscriber must enter in
addition to the prefix to form a complete OctelNet address. Since an
OctelNet address consists of the prefix followed by the mailbox number,
additional digits are normally the same as the number of digits in the
mailbox number on the destination system. For example,
1234 (prefix) + 6002 (mailbox number)
= 12346002 (OctelNet address)
In this example, the number of additional digits is 4, because 4 digits
(6002) must be added to the prefix to form a complete OctelNet address.
In some cases, however, the prefix can include only some digits of the
mailbox number. For example:
1234 (prefix) + 4002 (mailbox number)
= 1234002 (OctelNet address)
In this example, the number of additional digits is 3 (for the digits 002),
because the 4 of the prefix overlaps with the 4 of the mailbox number.
Mailbox length
5-4
Mailbox length is the number of digits in the mailbox numbers on the
destination system.
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OctelNet addressing scheme design rules
When designing OctelNet addressing schemes, the following rules must
be observed.
n
The mailbox length must be greater than or equal to 3 digits.
n
The additional digits must be less than or equal to the mailbox
length.
n
The number of digits in the prefix plus the additional digits must
be greater than or equal to the mailbox length.
n
In multiple addressing schemes, no two prefixes can contain the
same first digits, if the sum of the additional digits and the
number of digits in the prefix is the same in each case. For more
information, see “Examples” on page 5-6.
Note: This rule applies to addressing schemes across all
OctelNet nodes in the organization.
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Sample addressing schemes
Table 5-1 shows examples of valid OctelNet address schemes. Table 5-2
shows examples of invalid OctelNet multiple addressing schemes.
Table 5-1. Valid OctelNet multiple addressing schemes
Addressing scheme
Why is this valid
prefix
additional
digits
mailbox
length
1234
4
5
1234
5
5
12345
5
5
prefix
additional
digits
mailbox
length
12345
3
4
4321
4
4
4322
4
4
4323
4
4
Although all the prefixes have the
same first digits, the sum of the
additional digits and the number
of digits in the prefix is different
in each case. (See rule 4.)
Although the sum of the
additional digits and the number
of digits in the prefix is the same
(8), the first digits of the prefix
are different in each case. (See
rule 4.)
Table 5-2. Invalid OctelNet multiple addressing schemes
Addressing scheme
5-6
Why is this invalid
prefix
additional
digits
mailbox
length
1234
4
4
12345
3
4
prefix
additional
digits
mailbox
length
1234
5
4
1234
6
5
1234 has the same first digits as
12345, and in each case the sum
of the number of digits in the
prefix and the additional digits is
the same (8). (See rule 4.)
The number of additional digits is
greater than the mailbox length.
(See rule 2.)
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Addressing OctelNet messages
OctelNet addresses provide a means of sending voice messages to
recipients on a voice messaging server that supports OctelNet networking,
such as any OMD Octel Message Server.
Addressing OctelNet messages from Octel Unified Messenger
Two methods can be used for addressing messages to OctelNet recipients:
Administered
OctelNet addressing
n
Administered OctelNet addressing.
n
Casual OctelNet addressing.
With administered OctelNet addressing, the administrator creates a
“custom recipient”. Each OctelNet custom recipient entry must contain
the recipient’s OctelNet address and name. OctelNet custom recipients are
automatically replicated to all Exchange servers in an organization.
To send a message to an OctelNet recipient from the telephone user
interface, the subscriber enters the OctelNet address and receives a spoken
name confirmation.
To send an OctelNet message from the desktop PC, the subscriber selects
the custom recipient from the Exchange Address Book.
Casual OctelNet
addressing
To send a message to an OctelNet recipient from the telephone user
interface with casual OctelNet addressing, the subscriber enters an
OctelNet address. This address is made up of a prefix number and a
mailbox number. The OctelNet gateway delivers the message to the
address specified. Spoken name confirmation does not take place with
casual OctelNet addressing.
To send a casual OctelNet message from the desktop PC, the subscriber
enters an address of the type [OCTELNET:ppppmmmm], where pppp is
the prefix and mmmm is the mailbox address.
Addressing OctelNet messages to Octel Unified Messenger
recipients
To send an OctelNet message to an Octel Unified Messenger recipient,
the user enters an address. This address consists of the prefix for the Octel
Unified Messenger OctelNet gateway node, followed by the numeric
address for the Octel Unified Messenger recipient.
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Providing single-site interoperability
Although OctelNet is generally used to link multiple sites, it can also be
used to exchange messages between Octel Unified Messenger subscribers
and Octel message server users at the same site. When an Octel Unified
Messenger system and an Octel server share the same PBX, OctelNet
networking can be configured to operate like a single voice server by
using automatic mailbox forwarding.
Automatic mailbox forwarding
Automatic mailbox forwarding capability is provided by the
Follow-Me-Forward feature on Octel servers with Aria™ software, and
the Auto-Copy/Auto-Delete feature on Octel servers with Serenade™
software. On systems that use automatic mailbox forwarding:
Forwarding OctelNet
messages
5-8
n
Automated Attendant allows outside callers to use Dial-by-Name
to reach any user on the PBX regardless of which server (Octel
Unified Messenger or Octel message server) the user resides on.
n
All messages sent to the mailbox on the Octel message server can
be forwarded automatically to the Octel Unified Messenger
mailbox, if a subscriber has a mailbox on an Octel message server
and an Octel Unified Messenger mailbox.
n
When sending messages, Octel message server users can address
messages to Octel Unified Messenger subscribers in the same
way that they address messages to users on the Octel server, that
is, by entering a mailbox number. Messages for Octel Unified
Messenger subscribers are automatically forwarded to their
mailboxes on the Octel Unified Messenger system.
With automatic mailbox forwarding, users on Octel servers at other sites
can send OctelNet messages to Octel Unified Messenger subscribers
without any changes to the OctelNet addressing scheme. The message is
received in the subscriber's mailbox on the Octel server, where it is
automatically forwarded to the Octel Unified Messenger mailbox.
101-1620-005
6
Connecting with the PBX
and establishing security rules
This chapter introduces the following:
101-1620-005
n
How to connect with the PBX.
n
The Octel Unified Messenger’s security features that prevent
unauthorized access.
6-1
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Connecting with the PBX
Using the Voice Mail System Configuration application, an administrator
can specify the parameters necessary to enable PBX integration to the
voice server.
See the Octel Unified Messenger documentation for the specific
information required for the major PBX types. These notes are available
from the Octel support representative.
6-2
101-1620-005
Connecting with the PBX and establishing security rules
Establishing security rules
Octel Unified Messenger offers several features that reduce the risk of
fraudulent long distance charges, unintended disclosure of confidential
information, and decreased performance of the voice servers.
Access to voice mail domain administration
Administrators create and maintain voice mail domains, and configure the
voice servers in these domains. The Voice Mail System Configuration
application presents a collection of property pages for performing these
tasks.
The OMD voice servers run under the Microsoft Windows NT operating
system. All access to the servers is mediated by the Windows NT domain
security mechanism.
Access to the Voice Mail System Configuration application is strictly
controlled through the voice mail domain security feature. This enables
administrators to maintain lists of users and groups who are authorized to
administer the voice mail domain. For information on configuring
security for a voice mail domain, see the Octel Unified Messenger
Administrator’s Guide.
Access to subscriber accounts administration
Octel Unified Messenger administrators create and configure voice mail
accounts for subscribers. OMD has extended the Microsoft Exchange
Administrator with the Voice Mail property page which can only be used
by Exchange administrators.
Access to subscriber mailboxes
Octel Unified Messenger subscribers gain access to the message server
from a desktop PC or through the telephone user interface. Access to
messages via the desktop PC is controlled by the security scheme
established for Microsoft Exchange users. Access through the telephone
user interface is controlled by a subscriber password. This password is set
through Octel Unified Messenger Options or through the telephone user
interface.
The following Octel Unified Messenger features allow the administrator
to minimize the risk of unauthorized access to the messaging server,
messages and long distance lines.
101-1620-005
6-3
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Subscriber
password for the
telephone user
interface
Octel Unified Messenger subscribers maintain a password for accessing
their voice mail through the telephone user interface. They can do this
either from Octel Unified Messenger Options on their desktop PC or
through the telephone user interface.
The administrator enables a subscriber account for voice messaging and
determines the initial password for telephone access. The initial password
can be a randomly generated number. When subscribers access the voice
mail system through the telephone user interface for the first time, they
are prompted to change their passwords. Administrators can reset a
subscriber password at any time, but they are unable to view the
password.
Subscriber passwords for the telephone user interface can be from 0 to 32
digits in length. The Octel Unified Messenger administrator establishes
the minimum password length as a system-wide parameter. Increasing the
number of digits in a password lowers the probability that an
unauthorized user might guess it. Table 6-1 shows the probability of
guessing a password correctly, as a function of the length of the password.
With a 6-digit password, the probability of guessing a password is 1 in
900,000.
6-4
101-1620-005
Connecting with the PBX and establishing security rules
The administrator can also enable password expiration that forces
subscribers to change passwords at predetermined time intervals.
Changing passwords periodically reduces the chances of an unauthorized
user gaining access to a subscriber’s mailbox.
Table 6-1. Probability of guessing password
101-1620-005
Number of digits in the
password
Odds of correctly guessing the
password
1
1 in 9
2
1 in 90
3
1 in 900
4
1 in 9,000
5
1 in 90,000
6
1 in 900,000
7
1 in 9,000,000
8
1 in 90,000,000
9
1 in 900,000,000
10
1 in 9,000,000,000
11
1 in 90,000,000,000
12
1 in 900,000,000,000
13
1 in 9,000,000,000,000
14
1 in 90,000,000,000,000
15
1 in 900,000,000,000,000
6-5
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Recipient’s name
confirmation
Octel Unified Messenger confirms the name of the recipient before
sending a voice message from one subscriber to another. This feature
makes it possible for sender of voice messages to ensure that their
messages are delivered to the intended destination.
Disconnecting
callers who enter
incorrect passwords
If a caller enters an incorrect password to a subscriber’s account, Octel
Unified Messenger informs the caller of the error, and requests entry of
the correct password. The caller is offered another opportunity for two
reasons:
n
The caller might have pressed keys quickly, inadvertently missing
digits.
n
The caller may have recently changed his or her password and
accidentally entered the old password.
Octel Unified Messenger can be configured to disconnect when a
threshold of between one to three attempts has been met. If a caller does
not enter the correct password in the allowed number of attempts, the
caller is automatically disconnected. This feature prevents unauthorized
users from trying various numbers repeatedly in order to discover a
password.
Handling callers
who make too many
errors
Octel Unified Messenger has the capability to disconnect or transfer
callers who make too many errors while trying to navigate through the
system. The number of errors - from 0 to 9 errors - can be configured on a
system-wide basis.
Monitoring system
usage reports
Octel Unified Messenger provides two standard reports that allow the
administrator to monitor the system for potential misuse. These can be
generated using the Reporting Tool application.
Other security
precautions
n
The Port Statistics report shows the number of calls coming into
the ports. Substantial activity occurring at unusual times of the
day can be an indicator of unauthorized system usage.
n
The Login Failures report records information about unsuccessful
telephone logins due to an incorrect password or mailbox number
being entered. Numerous login failures may indicate
unauthorized users trying to access Octel Unified Messenger.
Additional security measures can be implemented on PBX or Centrex
systems.
Access restrictions can be imposed by limiting access to the lines used by
Octel Unified Messenger for call processing through toll restriction. Long
distance carriers also have security services available to help control
unauthorized users. They can monitor normal usage and provide
immediate notification of unusually high long-distance call activity.
Organizations should contact their long distance carrier for more
information about these services.
6-6
101-1620-005
A
Appendix A - Sizing for ports
This appendix gives guidelines for estimating how many users can be
supported with a given number of voice ports.
101-1620-005
A-1
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Calculating the number of supported subscribers
Table A-1 through Table A-18 can be used as guidelines for estimating
how many users can be supported with a given number of ports, based on
average daily port usage per subscriber. These tables also provide for
traffic patterns of 10%, 14%, or 18% Busy Hour traffic.
Table A-1.
A-2
Number of supported subscribers with four ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
36
10
14
46
10
10
65
8
18
45
8
14
58
8
10
81
6
18
60
6
14
77
6
10
108
4
18
90
4
14
116
4
10
163
2
18
181
2
14
232
101-1620-005
Appendix A - Sizing for ports
Table A-2.
101-1620-005
Number of supported subscribers with eight ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
120
10
14
155
10
10
217
8
18
150
8
14
193
8
10
271
6
18
201
6
14
258
6
10
361
4
18
301
4
14
387
4
10
542
2
18
602
2
14
774
2
10
1083
A-3
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Table A-3.
A-4
Number of supported subscribers with twelve ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
220
10
14
283
10
10
397
8
18
275
8
14
354
8
10
496
6
18
367
6
14
472
6
10
661
4
18
551
4
14
708
4
10
992
2
18
1102
2
14
1417
2
10
1983
101-1620-005
Appendix A - Sizing for ports
Table A-4.
101-1620-005
Number of supported subscribers with sixteen ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
327
10
14
420
10
10
588
8
18
409
8
14
525
8
10
735
6
18
545
6
14
700
6
10
981
4
18
817
4
14
1051
4
10
1471
2
18
1634
2
14
2101
2
10
2942
A-5
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Table A-5.
A-6
Number of supported subscribers with twenty ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
439
10
14
564
10
10
790
8
18
549
8
14
705
8
10
988
6
18
731
6
14
940
6
10
1317
4
18
1097
4
14
1411
4
10
1975
2
18
2194
2
14
2821
2
10
3950
101-1620-005
Appendix A - Sizing for ports
Table A-6.
101-1620-005
Number of supported subscribers with twenty-four ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of subscribers
10
18
554
10
14
712
10
10
997
8
18
692
8
14
890
8
10
1246
6
18
923
6
14
1187
6
10
1661
4
18
1384
4
14
1780
4
10
2492
2
18
2769
2
14
3560
2
10
4983
A-7
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Table A-7.
A-8
Number of supported subscribers with twenty-eight ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
671
10
14
863
10
10
1208
8
18
839
8
14
1079
8
10
1510
6
18
1119
6
14
1438
6
10
2014
4
18
1678
4
14
2158
4
10
3021
2
18
3356
2
14
4315
2
10
6042
101-1620-005
Appendix A - Sizing for ports
Table A-8.
101-1620-005
Number of supported subscribers with thirty-two ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
791
10
14
1017
10
10
1423
8
18
988
8
14
1271
8
10
1779
6
18
1318
6
14
1694
6
10
2372
4
18
1977
4
14
2542
4
10
3558
2
18
3954
2
14
5083
2
10
7117
A-9
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Table A-9.
A-10
Number of supported subscribers with thirty-six ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
911
10
14
1171
10
10
1640
8
18
1139
8
14
1464
8
10
2050
6
18
1519
6
14
1952
6
10
2733
4
18
2278
4
14
2929
4
10
4100
2
18
4556
2
14
5857
2
10
8200
101-1620-005
Appendix A - Sizing for ports
Table A-10.
101-1620-005
Number of supported subscribers with forty ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
1032
10
14
1327
10
10
1858
8
18
1291
8
14
1659
8
10
2323
6
18
1721
6
14
2212
6
10
3097
4
18
2581
4
14
3318
4
10
4646
2
18
5162
2
14
6637
2
10
9292
A-11
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Table A-11.
A-12
Number of supported subscribers with forty-four ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
1156
10
14
1486
10
10
2080
8
18
1444
8
14
1857
8
10
2600
6
18
1926
6
14
2476
6
10
3467
4
18
2889
4
14
3714
4
10
5200
2
18
5778
2
14
7429
2
10
10400
101-1620-005
Appendix A - Sizing for ports
Table A-12.
101-1620-005
Number of supported subscribers with forty-eight ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
1280
10
14
1645
10
10
2303
8
18
1600
8
14
2057
8
10
2879
6
18
2133
6
14
2742
6
10
3839
4
18
3199
4
14
4113
4
10
5758
2
18
6398
2
14
8226
2
10
11517
A-13
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Table A-13.
A-14
Number of supported subscribers with fifty-two ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
1404
10
14
1805
10
10
2527
8
18
1755
8
14
2256
8
10
3158
6
18
2340
6
14
3008
6
10
4211
4
18
3509
4
14
4512
4
10
6317
2
18
7019
2
14
9024
2
10
12633
101-1620-005
Appendix A - Sizing for ports
Table A-14.
101-1620-005
Number of supported subscribers with fifty-six ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of
subscribers
10
18
1529
10
14
1965
10
10
2752
8
18
1911
8
14
2457
8
10
3440
6
18
2548
6
14
3276
6
10
4586
4
18
3822
4
14
4914
4
10
6879
2
18
7644
2
14
9827
2
10
13758
A-15
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Table A-15.
A-16
Number of supported subscribers with sixty ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of subscribers
10
18
1655
10
14
2127
10
10
2978
8
18
2068
8
14
2659
8
10
3723
6
18
2758
6
14
3546
6
10
4964
4
18
4137
4
14
5318
4
10
7446
2
18
8273
2
14
10637
2
10
14892
101-1620-005
Appendix A - Sizing for ports
Table A-16.
101-1620-005
Number of supported subscribers with sixty-four ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of subscribers
10
18
1781
10
14
2289
10
10
3205
8
18
2226
8
14
2862
8
10
4006
6
18
2968
6
14
3815
6
10
5342
4
18
4451
4
14
5723
4
10
8013
2
18
8903
2
14
11446
2
10
16025
A-17
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Table A-17.
A-18
Number of supported subscribers with sixty-eight ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of subscribers
10
18
1907
10
14
2452
10
10
3433
8
18
2384
8
14
3065
8
10
4292
6
18
3179
6
14
4087
6
10
5722
4
18
4769
4
14
6131
4
10
8583
2
18
9537
2
14
12262
2
10
17167
101-1620-005
Appendix A - Sizing for ports
Table A-18.
101-1620-005
Number of supported subscribers with seventy-two ports
Average usage per
subscriber per day
(minutes)
Busy hour peak (% of
daily calls)
Number of subscribers
10
18
2034
10
14
2615
10
10
3662
8
18
2543
8
14
3269
8
10
4577
6
18
3390
6
14
4359
6
10
6103
4
18
5086
4
14
6539
4
10
9154
2
18
10171
2
14
13077
2
10
18308
A-19
This page intentionally left blank.
B
Appendix B - Grade of service
This appendix illustrates the maximum amount of busy hour traffic
supported by a given number of ports for each grade of service (GOS).
101-1620-005
B-1
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Calculating busy hour traffic
Table B-1 through Table B-4 show the maximum amount of busy hour
traffic supported by a given number of ports for each grade of service.
Note: Erlangs, CCS, and minutes are three different measures of
traffic. 60 minutes = 1 Erlang = 36 CCS.
Table B-1.
B-2
Maximum busy hour traffic supported for a GOS of P.01
Ports
Erlangs
CCS
Minutes
4
0.86
31
51.7
8
3.11
112
186.7
12
5.86
211
351.7
16
8.86
319
531.7
20
12.03
433
721.7
24
15.28
550
916.7
28
18.64
671
1118.3
32
22.03
793
1321.7
36
25.50
918
1530.0
40
29.00
1044
1740.0
44
32.53
1171
1951.7
48
36.08
1299
2165.0
52
39.69
1429
2381.7
56
43.31
1559
2598.3
60
46.94
1690
2816.7
64
50.58
1821
3035.0
68
54.25
1953
3255.0
72
57.94
2086
3476.7
101-1620-005
Appendix B - Grade of service
Table B-2.
101-1620-005
Maximum busy hour traffic supported for a GOS of P.02
Ports
Erlangs
CCS
Minutes
4
1.08
39
65.00
8
3.61
130
216.67
12
6.61
238
396.67
16
9.81
353
588.33
20
13.17
474
790.00
24
16.61
598
996.67
28
20.14
725
1208.33
32
23.72
854
1423.33
36
27.33
984
1640.00
40
30.97
1115
1858.33
44
34.67
1248
2080.00
48
38.39
1382
2303.33
52
42.11
1516
2526.67
56
45.86
1651
2751.67
60
49.64
1787
2978.33
64
53.42
1923
3205.00
68
57.22
2060
3433.33
72
61.03
2197
3661.67
B-3
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
Table B-3.
B-4
Maximum busy hour traffic supported for a GOS of P.03
Ports
Erlangs
CCS
Minutes
4
1.25
45
75.00
8
3.97
143
238.33
12
7.14
257
428.33
16
10.50
378
630.00
20
13.97
503
838.33
24
17.56
632
1053.33
28
21.19
763
1271.67
32
24.89
896
1493.33
36
28.64
1031
1718.33
40
32.39
1166
1943.33
44
36.19
1303
2171.67
48
40.00
1440
2400.00
52
43.83
1578
2630.00
56
47.69
1717
2861.67
60
51.56
1856
3093.33
64
55.44
1996
3326.67
68
59.33
2136
3560.00
72
63.22
2276
3793.33
101-1620-005
Appendix B - Grade of service
Table B-4.
101-1620-005
Maximum busy hour traffic supported for a GOS of P.05
Ports
Erlangs
CCS
Minutes
4
1.50
54
90.00
8
4.53
163
271.67
12
7.94
286
476.67
16
11.53
415
691.67
20
15.22
548
913.33
24
19.03
685
1141.67
28
22.86
823
1371.67
32
26.72
962
1603.33
36
30.64
1103
1838.33
40
34.58
1245
2075.00
44
38.56
1388
2313.33
48
42.53
1531
2551.67
52
46.53
1675
2791.67
56
50.53
1819
3031.67
60
54.56
1964
3273.33
64
58.58
2109
3515.00
68
62.64
2255
3758.33
72
66.67
2400
4000.00
B-5
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Glossary
access control list
A list of people in a voice mail domain who have access to Octel Unified Messenger applications
and tools.
AccuCall+
A Rhetorex utility for Windows NT and Windows 95 that allows you to build and edit tone tables.
Adaptive Differential Pulse Code Modulation (ADPCM)
A speech encoding method that produces a digital signal with a lower bit rate than standard pulse
code modulation (PCM). ADPCM calculates the difference between two consecutive speech
samples in standard PCM coded telecom voice signals. The ADPCM encoding rate is 32 kilobit per
second.
automated attendant
An automated service that greets callers and instructs them on how to proceed. The automated
attendant also allows other call handling features such as intercom paging and call screening.
busy hour
A method used to calculate the number of ports required when sizing a system. It represents the
busiest hour of the day, when the volume of calls generated by internal subscribers and external
callers reaches its peak.
call management
A component of the voice server that provides an interface between the voice cards and Octel
Unified Messenger telephony applications.
call screening
A call answering option that requires callers to announce themselves before a subscriber answers
the call. If a call is screened and the subscriber is not available to answer it, the caller has the choice
of leaving a message, or being forwarded to a different extension, or to the operator.
carried traffic
The total busy hour traffic that was offered to the group of ports minus the blocked calls
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Centum Call Second (CCS)
A unit of measurement for call time. The formula for a CCS is the number of calls per hour
multiplied by their average duration in seconds, all multiplied by 100. A CCS is 1/36th of an Erlang.
Class of Service (COS)
A category used to determine a subscriber’s access to system options and features. The
administrator assigns a class of service to each subscriber.
DID
See Direct Inward Dialing.
Dial-by-Name
A method of addressing that enables a subscriber to spell the recipient's name on the telephone
keypad when using the telephone user interface.
Digital Meridian Integration Device (DMID)
A device that provides integration with Northern Telecom switches, such as the Meridian M-1. The
DMID physically sits between the PBX and the voice server and appears as one or two digital
telephones to the PBX, depending on the number of analog ports required. Analog line circuits for
the voice path appear on the digital set of the DMID. When a call is received on the DMID, it
simultaneously rings at the analog port. The DMID interprets the call display information and
transmits it to the voice server which answers the caller with the appropriate personal greeting.
Direct Inward Dialing (DID)
Using DID, a caller can dial inside an organization to reach someone’s telephone extension directly
without going through a receptionist.
DMID
See Digital Meridian Integration Device.
Dual Tone Multifrequency (DTMF)
A combination of two tones that uniquely identify each button on a telephone keypad.
Erlang
A unit of measurement for call time. One Erlang is equivalent to 60 call minutes or 36 CCS. See
also Centum call second.
event
A significant occurrence in a voice mail system that is of interest to an administrator for diagnostic
or reporting purposes.
fax routing address
A Microsoft Exchange e-mail address consisting of a string of digits that uniquely identify the
subscriber to the fax server.
Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM)
An audio encoding format with an encoding rate of approximately 13 kilobit per second.
Grade of service (GOS)
The probability, expressed as a percentage of callers who call during the busy hour, that an
incoming call is blocked (the caller hears a busy signal) because all ports are in use.
GSM
See Global System for Mobile Communications.
GL-2
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Glossary
hunt group
A group of telephone lines where the incoming calls are distributed according to a priority scheme.
in-band signaling
A method of connecting the voice server to the PBX as if it were a series of single-line telephones
or a series of trunks in a hunt group. The term “in-band” is used because all of the call identification
information is passed from the PBX to the voice server using DTMF signals on the same line as the
voice connection.
intercom paging
A method of automatically paging subscribers if they are do not answer their telephones. If a
subscriber does not respond to the page, the caller is transferred to the subscriber’s mailbox.
IVM
A format for storing sound in files used for Octel Unified Messenger voice messages.
local mailbox number
A method of addressing voice messages through the telephone user interface to recipients in a voice
mail domain.
mailbox
A delivery location for incoming voice, e-mail, and fax messages.
message confirmation
A notice confirming that a message was delivered to a recipient.
Microsoft Exchange site
A group of Microsoft Exchange servers, where one or more servers on a high-bandwidth,
permanent LAN work together to provide messaging and other services to a set of users. Within an
Exchange site, users can share information and can be managed as a collection. A Microsoft
Exchange site can be mapped to the Windows NT domain topology that has already been
established. It can also span multiple trusted Windows NT domains that may already exist.
multimedia
A PC has multimedia capabilities if it has a sound card, microphone, and speakers or headphones.
name prompt
A personalized prompt that states a subscriber’s name when that subscriber’s extension is busy or
unanswered and he or she has not recorded a personal greeting.
numeric address
A string of digits that uniquely identifies a recipient or a distribution list across the organization. A
numeric address is used by the telephone user interface as a means of addressing a message.
OctelNet
A networking application that allows users on one OMD system to exchange messages with users
on other OMD systems. OctelNet uses the public or private telephone network for message
transport.
OctelNet custom recipient
An OctelNet recipient who has a mailbox on a remote node.
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OctelNet gateway
An OctelNet gateway enables Octel Unified Messenger subscribers to exchange voice messages
with any other OctelNet-enabled voice mail system, either at the same site or at remote sites.
OctelNet Gateway Administration Extension
An administration tool that adds administration capabilities for an OctelNet gateway to Microsoft
Exchange Server Administrator.
Octel Unified Messenger Options
An application that allows subscribers to configure their mailboxes using their PCs. Subscribers
can record all personal greetings and prompts, personalize their call handling options, and select
whether to use multimedia or the telephone for recording and playing back voice messages.
Octel Unified Messenger Voice Form
An application that provides access to voice messages within a Microsoft Exchange environment.
Through voice forms, subscribers can perform standard voice mail functions such as listening to,
replying to, or forwarding voice messages, or composing new voice messages using their desktop
PCs or telephones.
Octel Unified Messenger Voice Recorder
A tool for sending voice mail and voice-annotated items, such as Microsoft Word documents. It
provides a way to send a quick voice message without having to start up an e-mail application.
offered traffic
The total traffic offered to a group of ports during the busy hour, including calls that are blocked
operation history database
A temporay storage area for events generated by Octel Unified Messenger. The Operation History
Viewer is used for viewing events in this database.
Operation History Viewer
A diagnostic tool that displays events generated by Octel Unified Messenger activity and logged in
the Octel Unified Messenger operation history database. By creating a “session”, administrators
can restrict the number of events to only those that meet their criteria. They can view live events as
they are added to the operation history database, or view historical events.
operator
The person to whom callers are transferred when they request to speak with an operator, exceed the
maximum number of errors permitted on the system, or call from a rotary telephone. Individual
mailboxes may have an operator that is different from the designated system operator, for example,
a personal assistant.
optional greeting
A personalized answering system for greeting callers if a subscriber’s extension is busy or
unanswered, or if incoming calls are blocked.
password
Subscribers must enter their passwords to gain access to Octel Unified Messenger through the
telephone user interface. Subscribers can change their passwords using the telephone user interface
or Octel Unified Messenger Options.
PBX
See Private Branch Exchange.
GL-4
101-1620-005
Glossary
PBX integration
A method that establishes communication between the PBX and the voice mail system. The PBX
supplies information such as who is calling on internal calls, and the extension that the caller is
trying to reach.
PC client applications
A group of applications that enable subscribers and administrators to access Octel Unified
Messenger from their desktop PCs. PC client applications include Octel Unified Messenger Voice
Form, Octel Unified Messenger Voice Recorder, and Octel Unified Messenger Options.
PC user interface
An interface through which subscribers can access the Octel Unified Messenger system from their
PC.
peer e-mail server
The Microsoft Exchange server that acts as host e-mail server for an Octel Unified Messenger voice
server.
personal greeting
A personalized prompt that greets callers when they are transferred to a subscriber’s mailbox if the
extension is busy or not answered.
Please Hold prompt
A personalized prompt that informs callers of the extension they selected while they are transferred
to an extension.
port group
A group of ports allocated to a specific application, such as the PC client, the telephone user
interface, or OctelNet. Port groups are configured using the Voice Mail System Configuration
application.
Port Monitor
A diagnostic tool that provides a graphical user interface for checking and changing the status of
ports on a particular voice server.
Private Branch Exchange (PBX)
A telephone exchange local to a particular organization that uses, rather than provides, telephone
services. Also known as a switch.
prompt
A spoken greeting or instruction which directs callers whose calls have come through the
automated attendant.
Reporting Tool
A tool for generating reports for monitoring voice mail system usage, planning capacity and
tracking security. Once a report is generated, it can be viewed onscreen or printed for easy
reference. It can also be exported to many popular file formats or attached to a message sent via a
MAPI-enabled e-mail system.
Simplified Message Desk Interface (SMDI)
A protocol for sending PBX integration data, that does not require a caller to reenter the telephone
number if the extension is busy or not answered.
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subscriber
A Microsoft Exchange user whose profile is enabled for voice messaging. A subscriber can use
both the telephone user interface and the graphical user interface of Octel Unified Messenger.
switch
See PBX.
telephone user interface (TUI)
An interface through which callers and subscribers can access the Octel Unified Messenger system
via the telephone. The telephone user interface is an automated attendant and voice messaging
system that controls call handling. It greets incoming callers and instructs them on how to proceed.
text-to-speech (TTS)
The conversion of text into speech (speech synthesis). Using text-to-speech, Octel Unified
Messenger subscribers can listen to their e-mail messages over the telephone.
tracing server
A separate server that records operational information about activity in the voice mail domain.
tracing system
A system that captures information related to the operation of voice servers, for both diagnostic and
reporting purposes. The tracing system maintains connections with all voice servers in the voice
mail domain and receives notification of events from each of them. These events are written to two
storage areas: the Operation History and the transaction databases. An administrator can generate
reports summarizing voice mail activity using the Reporting Tool.
transaction database
A storage area where voice messaging events happening in the voice mail domain are written. It is
a permanent database containing summary information that is used by the Reporting Tool.
TTS
See text-to-speech.
TUI
See telephone user interface.
unified mailbox
An Octel Unified Messenger subscriber mailbox, where all voice, fax, telephone answering
messages, e-mail, and data messages (including documents and forms) are stored. Messages can be
viewed, listened to, or retrieved using the telephone or PC.
Visual Voice Editor
An administration tool that allows the recording of customized prompts used by Octel Unified
Messenger. The tool allows recording using multimedia or the telephone user interface. When
modifying a prompt, the user is presented with a graphical rendering of the sound, which allows
precise editing of the audio data.
Voice Mail User Administration Extension
An administration tool that adds voice mail administration capabilities to Microsoft Exchange
Server Administrator. An administrator can enable maiboxes for voice mail and maintain voice
mail information for each Octel Unified Messenger subscriber.
GL-6
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Glossary
voice mail domain
A group of Octel Unified Messenger voice servers that share a common set of properties. All
subscribers who are provided with telephone answering by these voice servers are said to “belong”
to the same voice mail domain.
voice mail enabling
When a new user profile is created in Microsoft Exchange, it does not include any voice mail
information. An administrator can “voice-enable” the mailbox, using the Voice Mail User
Administration extension added by Octel Unified Messenger to the standard Microsoft Exchange
Server Administrator application.
Voice Mail System Configuration
An administration tool used to configure the attributes of a voice mail domain or group of voice
servers.
voice player
A component of the Octel Unified Messenger Voice Form used for playing back and recording
voice messages.
voice server
An executable program that runs as a Windows NT Service.
.WAV
A file extension used for Windows multimedia format audio data.
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Index
A
access control list, definition
account security
GL-1
6-3
AccuCall+, definition
automated attendant, definition
GL-1
additional digits, OctelNet
audio encoding formats
ADPCM 3-12
GSM 3-12
5-4
B
addressing
designing
addressing schemes 4-2
OctelNet addressing schemes 5-4
Dial-by-Name 4-4
local mailbox numbers 4-3
messages using
PC user interface 3-4
telephone user interface 3-4
numeric addresses 4-5
OctelNet addresses 5-7
busy hour
calculating traffic 2-5
definition GL-1
determining 2-4
units of measurement 2-5
addressing schemes
call screening, definition
4-2
administration
applications 3-7
voice server component
ADPCM 3-12
definition GL-1
architecture, system
101-1620-005
3-1
C
call management
definition GL-1
voice server component
carried traffic
definition
3-8
GL-1
Centrex
3-8
GL-1
2-5
GL-1
1-9, 3-10
Centum Call Seconds (CCS)
calculating busy hour 2-5
definition GL-2
sizing ports, using 2-4
IN-1
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
class of service, definition
client components
faxes
accessing using the TUI 1-9
enabling subscribers 2-21
receiving 1-8
routing to third-party fax servers
GL-2
3-5
components of Octel Unified Messenger
client
administration applications 3-7
PC access 3-6
telephone access 3-5
server
tracing server 3-9
voice server 3-8
counters, statistics and performance
G
Grade of service (GOS)
definition GL-2
GSM 3-12
definition
D
Dial-by-Name 4-4, 5-3
definition GL-2
GL-2
GL-2
E
Erlang
calculating busy hour 2-5
definition GL-2
sizing ports, using 2-4
Ethernet
1-10, 2-14
events, definition
GL-3
GL-2
H
Digital Meridian Integration Device (DMID)
definition GL-2
PBX integration 3-10
DTMF, definition
2-6
grunt detection, definition
3-8
Direct Inward Dialing (DID), definition
GL-2
hunt group
definition GL-3
pilot number for fax server
in-band signaling
definition GL-3
PBX integration 3-10
intercom paging, definition
GL-3
interoperability
OctelNet 5-2
single-site 5-8
third-party fax servers
IVM file, definition
2-20
GL-3
L
Exchange server. See Microsoft Exchange server
local area network (LAN) 1-10
communicating via 1-6
F
local mailbox numbers
definition GL-3
fax routing address 2-20
definition GL-2
enabling subscribers 2-21
fax servers 1-8
interoperability
requirements 2-21
with Octel Unified Messenger 2-20
relationship with voice mail domains 2-21
routing inbound fax calls to 2-22
2-20
I
Exchange e-mail system, access via telephone
user interface 3-5
IN-2
2-22
4-3
M
mailbox
definition GL-3
forwarding 5-8
security 6-3
unified 1-4
mailbox length, OctelNet
5-5
101-1620-005
Index
message confirmation, definition
messages
addressing 3-4
sending 1-11
messaging, voice server component
3-8
Microsoft Exchange server 1-6
calculating impact on capacity
2-12
Microsoft Exchange site, definition
monitoring, system usage reports
multimedia, definition
GL-3
6-6
NameNet
OctelNet Gateway Administration
Extension 3-7
definition GL-4
2-5, GL-4
2-14
1-6
Operation History Viewer 3-7
definition GL-4
using a slow network connection
operator, definition
optional greeting, definition
O
P
Octel Unified Messenger Options
definition GL-4
PC access 3-6
using a slow network connection
passwords
definition GL-5
disconnecting callers 6-6
for telephone user interface
outgoing call features
2-19
Octel Unified Messenger Voice Form 3-6
definition GL-4
using a slow network connection 2-19
Octel Unified Messenger Voice Recorder 3-6
definition GL-4
using a slow network connection 2-19
Octel Unified Messenger, system
architecture 3-1
OctelNet
addressing from Octel Unified Messenger
administered 5-7
casual 5-7
definition GL-4
designing addressing schemes 5-4
forwarding messages 5-8
introduction 5-2
messaging features 5-3
sending to Octel Unified Messenger 5-7
PBX 1-9
definition
2-19
GL-4
numeric address 4-5
definition GL-3
101-1620-005
GL-4
operation history event generation, voice server
component 3-8
5-3
networked components
5-8
2-7
3-8
operation history database, definition
GL-3
network traffic, sizing the system
OctelNet gateway 5-7
definition GL-4
voice server component
offered traffic
GL-3
N
Name prompt, definition
single-site interoperability 5-8
automatic mailbox forwarding
sizing ports for outgoing messages
GL-3
GL-4
2-7
6-4
GL-5
PBX integration 1-9, 3-10, 6-2
definition GL-5
DMDI 3-11
in-band signaling 3-10
RS-232 data channel 3-10
sizing ports 2-7
VoiceBridge II 3-11
PC client applications, definition
GL-5
PC user interface 1-10
definition GL-5
functions 1-5
PC access 3-6
peer e-mail server, definition
GL-5
personal greeting, definition
GL-5
IN-3
Octel Unified Messenger Concepts & Planning Guide
determining busy hour 2-4
disk space requirements 2-13
grade of service 2-6
number of Exchange users 2-12
outgoing call features 2-7
PBX integration 2-7
ports 2-4
voice mail domain 2-3
voice servers 2-9
worst case network load 2-14
planning. See sizing
please hold prompt, definition
port group, definition
GL-5
GL-5
Port Monitor 3-7
definition GL-5
using a slow network connection
ports
requirements
sizing 2-4
prefix, OctelNet
2-19
2-8
5-4
Private Branch Exchange. See PBX
prompt, definition
GL-5
R
RAS connections. See slow network connections
recipient’s name confirmation
6-6
Reporting Tool 3-7
definition GL-6
monitoring system usage 6-6
using a slow network connection
2-19
requirements
tracing server 2-11
voice servers 2-10
RS-232 data channel, PBX integration
3-10
S
security
monitoring system for misuse 6-6
password expiration 6-5
recipient's name confirmation 6-6
rules for disconnecting callers 6-6
subscriber accounts 6-3
subscriber mailboxes 6-3
voice mail domain 6-3
sending messages
1-11
Significant Event Log
voice server component
3-8
Simplified Message Desk Interface (SMDI),
definition GL-6
sizing
additional network traffic
IN-4
slow network connections 2-16
effect on
Octel Unified Messenger Options
Octel Unified Messenger Voice
Form 2-19
Octel Unified Messenger Voice
Recorder 2-19
Operation History Viewer 2-19
Port Monitor 2-19
Reporting Tool 2-19
Visual Voice Editor 2-19
Voice Mail System Configuration
Voice Mail User Administration
Extension 2-19
using the telephone
recording 2-18
using with multimedia 2-16
playback 2-16
recording 2-16
using with the telephone 2-17
playback 2-17
spoken name
2-19
2-19
5-3
statistics and performance counters, voice server
component 3-8
subscribers
definition GL-6
fax-enabling 2-21
security for mailbox access
PC user interface 6-3
TUI 6-4
switch. See PBX
system components
3-5
T
2-14
telephone user interface
1-9, 3-5
101-1620-005
Index
Voice player, definition
definition GL-6
functions 1-5
security 6-4
voice server 1-7
definition GL-7
functions 3-8
hardware and software requirements
operations 2-15
sizing 2-9
transferring call to fax server 2-20
text-to-speech
choosing a processor 2-10
definition GL-6
language identification 1-7
voice server component 3-8
Token Ring
1-10, 2-14
VoiceBridge II, PBX integration
tracing server 1-8
definition GL-6
functions 3-9
requirements 2-11
2-10
3-11
W
WAV file, definition
GL-7
wide area network (WAN), communicating
via 1-6
Tracing System 2-9
definition GL-6
transaction database, definition
GL-7
worst-case network load, calculating
2-14
GL-6
U
unified mailbox 1-4
definition GL-6
user profile, voice server component
3-8
V
Visual Voice Editor 3-7
definition GL-7
using a slow network connection
voice mail domain 3-2
administering 6-3
definition GL-7
design rules 2-3
relationship with fax servers
security 6-3
voice mail enabling, definition
2-19
2-20
GL-7
Voice Mail System Configuration 3-7
definition GL-7
setting up security 6-3
using a slow network connection 2-19
voice mail system, access via telephone user
interface 3-5
Voice Mail User Administration Extension 3-7
definition GL-7
using a slow network connection 2-19
101-1620-005
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