User`s guide | Agilent Technologies 75000 SERIES B Switch User Manual

LAN Interface User’s Guide Supplement
Agilent Technologies 8712ET/ES and 8714ET/ES
RF Network Analyzers
Part No. 08714-90013
Printed in USA
Print Date: June 2000
Supersedes October 1999
© Copyright 1998-2000
Agilent Technologies, Inc
Notice
The information contained in this document is subject to change without
notice. Agilent Technologies makes no warranty of any kind with regard
to this material, including but not limited to, the implied warranties of
merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Agilent
Technologies shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for
incidental or consequential damages in connection with the furnishing,
performance, or use of this material.
Key Conventions
This manual uses the following conventions:
FRONT PANEL KEY : This represents a key physically located on the
analyzer (a “hardkey”).
Softkey : This indicates a “softkey”— a key whose label is determined
by the instrument’s firmware, and is displayed on the right side of the
instrument’s screen next to the eight unlabeled keys.
Firmware Revision
This manual documents analyzers with firmware revisions E.06.00 and
later.
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LAN Interface Supplement
Acknowledgments
Excel™ is a product of Microsoft® Corporation.
Lotus® 1-2-3®, and Lotus Amipro are U.S. registered trademarks of Lotus
Development Corporation.
Microsoft Excel® and Microsoft Word are U.S. registered trademarks of
Microsoft Corporation.
QuickBasic™ is a product of Microsoft Corporation.
Windows® is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
Portions of the TCP/IP software are copyright Phil Karn, KA9Q.
GIF output routines are by John Silva (derived from Jef Poskanzer’s
PBMplus package).
Java™ is a U.S. trademark of Sun Microsystems, Incorporated.
Lotus® 1-2-3® are U.S. registered trademarks of Lotus Development
Corporation.
Microsoft® is a U.S. registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
MS® and MS-DOS® are U.S. registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation.
MS Windows®, Windows®, Windows 95®, and Windows NT® are U.S.
registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Netscape® is a U.S. registered trademark of Netscape Communications
Corporation.
Pentium® is a U.S. registered trademark of Intel Corporation.
Postscript™ is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated which may
be registered in certain jurisdictions.
Reflection™ is a U.S. trademark of Walker, Richer & Quinn, Incorporated.
UNIX® is a registered trademark in the United States and other
countries, licensed exclusively through X/Open Company Limited.
Portions of the software include source code from the Info–ZIP group. This code is
freely available on the Internet by anonymous ftp
asftp.uu.net:/pub/archiving/zip/unzip51/.tar.Z, and from CompuServe
asunz51.zip in the IBMPRO forum, library 10 (data compression).
LAN Interface Supplement
iii
Documentation Outline
This User’s Guide Supplement describes how to connect, use and
troubleshoot the LAN interface on your analyzer. This supplement
contains the following chapters:
1.
Connecting and
Configuring the Analyzer
Describes how to connect the analyzer to the LAN,
and how to configure the analyzer for use on the
LAN. Basic user account and file administration is
also described. To effectively use this chapter, you
should be familiar with your network setup and
operation.
2.
Accessing the Analyzer’s
Web Pages
Describes how to use a Web browser to access built-in
Web pages.
3.
Printing
Describes how to configure and print to a network
printer.
4.
Accessing the Analyzer’s
File System
Describes how to access the analyzer’s file system
using file transfer protocol (FTP). The directory
structure of the analyzer is described here.
5.
Accessing the Analyzer’s
Dynamic Data Disk
Describes the analyzer’s ‘data’ directory, the dynamic
data disk. Includes an example program.
6.
Controlling the Analyzer
via the LAN
Shows you methods for programming the analyzer
via the network connection.
7.
Using Network File
System (NFS)
Describes how to configure and use NFS.
8.
General Troubleshooting
Describes what to do if you have a problem using the
analyzer on your network.
9.
Quick Reference
Provides useful information in summary form.
Glossary
Definitions for networking and other terms used in
this book.
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LAN Interface Supplement
Agilent Technologies 8712ET/ES and
8714ET/ES
Network Analyzer
Documentation Map
The CDROM provides the contents of all of the
documents listed below.
The User’s Guide shows how to make measurements,
explains commonly-used features, and tells you how to
get the most performance from the analyzer.
The LAN Interface User’s Guide Supplement shows
how to use a local area network (LAN) for
programming and remote operation of the analyzer.
The Automating Measurements User’s Guide
Supplement provides information on how to configure
and control test systems for automation of test
processes.
The Programmer’s Guide provides programming
information including GPIB and SCPI command
references, as well as short programming examples.
LAN Interface Supplement
v
The Example Programs Guide provides a tutorial
introduction using BASIC programming examples to
demonstrate the remote operation of the analyzer.
The Service Guide provides the information needed to
adjust, troubleshoot, repair, and verify analyzer
conformance to published specifications.
The HP Instrument BASIC User’s Handbook
describes programming and interfacing techniques
using HP Instrument BASIC, and includes a language
reference.
The HP Instrument BASIC User’s Handbook
Supplement shows how to use HP Instrument BASIC
to program the analyzer.
The Option 100 Fault Location and Structural Return
Loss Measurements User’s Guide Supplement
provides theory and measurement examples for
making fault location and SRL measurements.
(Shipped only with Option 100 analyzers.)
The CATV Quick Start Guide provides abbreviated
instructions for testing the quality of coaxial cables.
(Shipped only with Option 100 analyzers.)
The Cellular Antenna Quick Start Guide provides
abbreviated instructions for verifying the performance
of cellular antenna systems. (Shipped only with
Option 100 analyzers.)
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LAN Interface Supplement
Contents
1. Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
About This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Intoducing the LAN Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
LAN Client/Server Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Connecting the Analyzer to the LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Setting Up a Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Point-to-Point Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Configuring the Analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
The Analyzer's IP Address and Hostname . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
The Gateway Address. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
The Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
The Ethernet Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
To Configure the Analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
Testing the LAN Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
Running Ping under Windows 95 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
Running Ping under UNIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12
Managing User Names and Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13
Constructing Valid User Names and Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13
Adding New User Names and Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13
Removing a User from the Access List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-14
Displaying the Access List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-14
Using BOOTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-15
BOOTP Fundamentals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-15
Setting Up the BOOTP Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-15
Setting Up the BOOTP Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-16
Testing BOOTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-18
Setting Up LAN Features with Wizards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-21
IBasic LAN Wizard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-21
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Contents
Windows LAN Wizard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-21
2. Accessing the Analyzer's Web Pages
About This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
Accessing the Analyzer with Your Web Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4
Screen Snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-6
Control the Analyzer with SCPI Commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-8
Analyzer Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-10
Product Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-10
Product Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-11
Other Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-11
3. Printing
About This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-2
Compatible Printers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-2
Configuring the Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-3
Configuring the Analyzer for Printing to a LAN Printer . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4
If You Have Trouble Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-6
4. Accessing the Analyzer's File System Using FTP
About This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-2
Using FTP to Access the Analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-3
Example 1: Copying a File to the Analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-5
Example 2: Retrieving a File from the Analyzer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-6
Commonly Used FTP Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-8
Using GUI FTP Software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-10
Example: Transferring Files between the Analyzer and Your PC . .4-10
viii
Contents
5. Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
The Dynamic Data Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Saving and Recalling Analyzer States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Copying Programs to and from the Analyzer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Copying an IBASIC Program to or from the Analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Copying and Running a Program with One Command . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Copying a Screen Image to a Local File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Copying Instrument Parameters in ASCII Text Format . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13
Retrieving Measurement Data in ASCII Format. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14
Importing Graphics or Data into PC Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
Importing a Screen Snapshot into a Word Processor Program . . . . 5-15
Importing Trace Data into a Spreadsheet Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16
6. Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
About This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Using Socket Programming to Control Your Analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
Setting Up Your Analyzer for Socket Programming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
Controlling the Analyzer via the Dynamic Data Disk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
Entering Commands Directly with Telnet . . . . . . . . . 6-5
Telnet Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
IBASIC Communication across the LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24
Controlling Multiple Analyzers using a Perl Script . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-28
Controlling the Analyzer using HP VEE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-31
Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™ Applet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-33
Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-42
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Contents
Collecting SICL LAN Setup Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-43
Configuring Your Analyzer as a SICL LAN Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-44
Configuring Your PC as a SICL LAN Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-44
Controlling Your Analyzer with SICL LAN and HP VEE . . . . . . . .6-45
Controlling Your Analyzer with SICL LAN and HP BASIC for
Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-49
Controlling Your Analyzer with SICL LAN and HP BASIC for UNIX
(Rocky Mountain BASIC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-50
7. Using the Network File System (NFS)
About This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-2
Introduction to NFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-3
NFS Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-4
Setting Up NFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-5
Configuring the Analyzer as an NFS Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-5
Using a Local HOSTS File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-11
Using NFS Automount—Connecting to Network Resources
Automatically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-13
Using Save/Recall with NFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-15
8. General Troubleshooting
About This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-2
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-3
Assess the Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-3
Ping the Analyzer from Your Computer or Workstation. . . . . . . . . . .8-5
Ping Your Computer or Other Device from Your Analyzer. . . . . . . . .8-7
Capturing Network Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-10
Subnets and Gateways. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-15
Troubleshooting Subnet Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-17
Solutions to Common Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-18
x
Contents
If you cannot connect to the analyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-18
If you cannot access the file system via ftp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-18
If you cannot telnet to the command parser port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
If you get an "operation timed-out" message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
If you cannot access internal web pages or import graphic images when
using a point-to-point connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
If all else fails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
9. Quick Reference
EIA/TIA 568B Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
The TELNET Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
Synopsis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
Options and Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
The FTP Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
Synopsis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
Options and Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
The PING Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Synopsis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Options and Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Dynamic Data Disk Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9
Agilent Technologies Sales and Service Offices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
Glossary
xi
1
Connecting and Configuring the
Analyzer
1-1
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
About This Chapter
About This Chapter
This chapter describes how to
• connect your analyzer to your network
• set up a network
• configure your analyzer
• verify connectivity
• manage user names and passwords
• configure your analyzer automatically using BOOTP
• run programs automatically using BOOTP
In order to complete the steps in this chapter, you'll need
❏ A computer with a LAN interface, running an operating system that
supports TCP/IP, like UNIX® or Microsoft Windows 95®. A typical
computer would be an IBM-compatible Pentium®-based PC with a
10Base-T LAN card, or an HP J210 PA-RISC workstation.
❏ A computer program that communicates over the LAN using TCP/IP.
This might be an FTP or telnet program, or a program that you write.
This will be covered in detail in the following chapters.
❏ LAN cabling, and typically a LAN hub.
If you only wish to print to a LaserJet printer via the LAN, you'll need
❏ an HP LaserJet printer with an HP JetDirect LAN interface card
❏ LAN cabling, and typically, a LAN hub
NOTE
Older versions of Novell Netware used IPX networking protocol
exclusively. IPX protocol is not compatible with TCP/IP protocol.
Newer versions of Novell Netware, such as version 3.1x and 4.xx
accommodate add-on products which provide a gateway to a TCP/IP
network. Consult your Novell network administrator for the latest
information on using Novell Netware with TCP/IP protocol.
1-2
LAN Interface Supplement
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Intoducing the LAN Interface
Intoducing the LAN Interface
With the LAN interface you can
•
transfer IBASIC programs between your computer and your
analyzer
•
transfer files between your computer and your analyzer using file
transfer protocol (FTP)
•
save files from your analyzer to a computer using network file system
(NFS)
•
connect many analyzers to one computer
•
automate the control of your analyzer
•
program the analyzer using SCPI commands
•
print hardcopy directly to an HP LaserJet printer
•
use your analyzer’s Web links to find
✓ general information about the Agilent 87xx family of analyzers
✓ online documentation such as SCPI command references
✓ specific information about your analyzer such as your current
firmware revision, installed options, even the analyzer’s current
screen image
✓ general information about Agilent Technologies, and how to obtain
assistance if you need it
LAN Interface Supplement
1-3
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Intoducing the LAN Interface
LAN Client/Server Functions
Your analyzer acts as either a client or server when you use the
client/server features of the analyzer. For example, if you use Network
File System (NFS), your analyzer acts as an NFS client (see Chapter 7,
“Using the Network File System (NFS),” on page 7-1). The table below
lists the client/server features of the analyzer, and the function
performed by the analyzer when you use each feature:
Client/Server Feature
Analyzer Function
BOOTP
client
FTP
server
NFS
client
SICL LAN
server
1-4
LAN Interface Supplement
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Connecting the Analyzer to the LAN
Connecting the Analyzer to the LAN
Your analyzer has an RJ-45 connector (see Figure 1-1) and connects to
your network using 10Base-T unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cabling,
also called Ethertwist. Ethertwist cables resemble standard modular
phone cables.
NOTE
If your network uses ThinLAN (10Base-2), you will need to purchase an
adapter which converts the ThinLAN BNC connector to 10Base-T
Ethertwist.
To connect the analyzer to your network:
1. Turn off the analyzer.
2. Connect the Ethertwist cable from your network to the LAN
ETHERTWIST port on the rear of your analyzer.
3. Turn on the analyzer.
Figure 1-1
The LAN ETHERTWIST Port
LAN Interface Supplement
1-5
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Setting Up a Network
Setting Up a Network
If you do not already have a network, you will need to create one. A
simple network consists of a central LAN hub with multiple Ethertwist
cables, one connected to the LAN port of each network device. This is
often called a star topology, with the LAN hub at the center.
• Typical 8-port hub
HP J2610B AdvanceStack 10Base-T Hub-8U
• Typical 16-port hub
HP J2611B AdvanceStack 10Base-T Hub-16U
• Typical Ethertwist cables
92268A twisted-pair “straight-through” cable, 4 meters
92268B twisted-pair “straight-through” cable, 8 meters
92268C twisted-pair “straight-through” cable, 16 meters
92268D twisted-pair “straight-through” cable, 32 meters
92268N twisted-pair “straight-through” cable, 300 meters
To order cables, contact the nearest Agilent Technologies sales or service
office. See Table 9-5 on page 9-11 for a list of sales and service offices.
Figure 1-2
Example of LAN Star Topology
1-6
LAN Interface Supplement
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Setting Up a Network
Point-to-Point Connections
It is possible to connect a single computer to a single analyzer, and avoid
using a LAN hub. To do this, you must use a special “cross-over” cable or
adapter, which acts like a LAN hub. See “EIA/TIA 568B Wiring” on page
9-2 for wiring details. If you try to create a point-to-point connection
using a standard “straight-through” cable, it will not work. For most
applications, the use of a LAN hub is simpler, and additional devices can
be added easily.
NOTE
Some commercially-available cross-over cables do not implement the
cross-over wiring required for your analyzer. Please refer to “EIA/TIA
568B Wiring” on page 9-2 and verify all connections before using cables
not made by Agilent Technologies.
NOTE
Point-to-point connections may not work when connecting to older laser
printers. Older printers typically require a boot server for network use.
For a point-to-point connection with a printer, use an HP LaserJet 4 or
newer.
NOTE
Point-to-point connections do not require the use of proxy servers, since
no server is present in a point-to-point network connection. To use a
point-to-point connection, first disable the use of a proxy server in your
LAN software. Refer to your software documentation for instructions
how to do this.
LAN Interface Supplement
1-7
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Configuring the Analyzer
Configuring the Analyzer
Before you configure your analyzer, you will need to contact your
network administrator to obtain the following information:
❏ an IP address for the analyzer
❏ a host name for the analyzer
❏ a gateway IP address
❏ a subnet mask
The Analyzer's IP Address and Hostname
Each device on your network must have a unique address so that all
devices can communicate simultaneously over the same network. These
unique addresses are called IP addresses, and are assigned by your
network administrator. An IP address is a set of four decimal numbers,
separated by periods, like 192.170.128.21. In this document, the term
“LAN address” refers to the IP address.
CAUTION
It is important that no two devices are assigned the same IP address.
Both devices may fail to communicate on the network.
You may also receive (or request) from your network administrator a
hostname for your analyzer, like my8712.
The hostname is not required, but can be used on your computer so that
you don't have to remember the IP address. Typically, the hostname is
found in the /etc/hosts or control panel/network file on your
computer or is returned by a name server.
Your network administrator will apply for a range of IP addresses from
the Internet Network Information Center (InterNIC). InterNIC is
responsible for registering domain names and assigning TCP/IP network
numbers to networks that connect to the Internet. You may contact
InterNIC via e-mail at hostmaster@internic.net, or by accessing
their Web site at http://www.networksolutions.com.
1-8
LAN Interface Supplement
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Configuring the Analyzer
The Gateway Address
If your analyzer will be communicating with devices on different physical
networks, you may need to have your network administrator assign a
gateway IP address for you. The gateway IP address is the address of a
routing device that connects your analyzer's LAN with other LANs. Set
the gateway address to 0.0.0.0 if a gateway is not required. See “To
Configure the Analyzer” on page 1-10 to set this.
See “Subnets and Gateways” on page 8-15 for more information on
gateway addresses.
The Subnet Mask
If your analyzer will be communicating with devices on different physical
networks, you may need to have your network administrator assign a
subnet mask number for you. The subnet mask tells your analyzer
whether a remote device is on the same LAN as your analyzer. If your
analyzer is attempting to communicate with another device, the subnet
mask defines whether your analyzer needs to route communications
through the gateway. Set the subnet mask to 0.0.0.0 if a subnet mask
is not required. See “Configuring the Analyzer” on page 1-8to set this.
See “Subnets and Gateways” on page 8-15 for more information on
subnet masks.
The Ethernet Address
Your analyzer has a unique built-in Ethernet address associated with the
LAN hardware inside it. The Ethernet address is a 48-bit number
assigned at the factory. You don’t have to know the Ethernet address to
configure and use the analyzer, unless you are using the BOOTP feature
(see “Using BOOTP” on page 1-15 for details).
LAN Interface Supplement
1-9
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Configuring the Analyzer
To Configure the Analyzer
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
NOTE
LAN to access the LAN menu.
After each of the following steps, the analyzer will prompt you to cycle
power for the new setting to take effect. It is not necessary to cycle the
power after each step. It only needs to be done once—when you are
finished entering all of the settings.
2. Press LAN Port Setup HP 871xxx IP Address , and enter the
IP address that your network administrator assigned to your
analyzer. You may have also received a hostname (for example:
my8712). You cannot enter the hostname into your analyzer, just the
IP address. The hostname can be used on your computer so that you
don't have to remember the IP address.
3. Press Gateway IP Address , and enter the numbers assigned to
you by your network administrator. If you were not assigned a
gateway IP address, leave the setting at 0.0.0.0 (default value) to
disable gateway routing.
4. Press Subnet Mask , and enter the numbers assigned to you by
your network administrator. If you were not assigned a subnet mask,
leave the setting at 0.0.0.0 (default value) to disable subnet
masking.
5. Once you have entered these settings, cycle the power on your
analyzer to initialize the LAN interface with these new values.
1-10
LAN Interface Supplement
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Testing the LAN Communication
Testing the LAN Communication
You should now test communication between your computer and your
analyzer.
The ping utility is typically used to test LAN communication.
Running Ping under Windows 95
Enter the following at the command prompt of a DOS window on your
computer or workstation:
ping <IP address>
or
ping <hostname>
<IP address> is the number that was assigned by your network
administrator and was entered into your analyzer in “To Configure the
Analyzer” on page 1-10. The <hostname> is the hostname assigned to
your IP address. For example, type:
ping
my8712
where my8712 is the <hostname>.
The ping utility has three common responses. If there is a valid working
connection, you should see a response similar to this:
Pinging my8712 [15.4.43.5] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply
Reply
Reply
Reply
from
from
from
from
15.4.43.5:
15.4.43.5:
15.4.43.5:
15.4.43.5:
bytes=32
bytes=32
bytes=32
bytes=32
time=37ms
time=30ms
time=30ms
time=31ms
TTL=252
TTL=252
TTL=252
TTL=252
If you see a response similar to the following, your connection may have a
problem. Refer to “Troubleshooting the Initial Connection” on page 8-3
for troubleshooting help and information.
Request
Request
Request
Request
timed
timed
timed
timed
out.
out.
out.
out.
LAN Interface Supplement
1-11
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Testing the LAN Communication
The following response is generally caused by an incorrect subnet mask
or IP address. It usually points to a software setting conflict, and does
not signify a hardware problem.
Host
Host
Host
Host
Unreachable.
Unreachable.
Unreachable.
Unreachable.
Running Ping under UNIX
The ping program is typically found in the /etc or/usr/etc directory,
so you must add the appropriate directory to your path, or type the full
path:
/etc/ping <IP address> 64 5
or
/etc/ping <hostname> 64 5
This command tells ping to send 5 packets of 64 bytes each.
The output should look similar to this:
PING hostname: 64 byte packets
64 bytes from 15.4.43.5: icmp_seq=0.
64 bytes from 15.4.43.5: icmp_seq=1.
64 bytes from 15.4.43.5: icmp_seq=2.
64 bytes from 15.4.43.5: icmp_seq=3.
64 bytes from 15.4.43.5: icmp_seq=4.
time=8.
time=4.
time=4.
time=3.
time=3.
ms
ms
ms
ms
ms
hostname PING Statistics
5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 3/4/8
If you do not see any output after about 20 seconds, interrupt the ping
command using ^c (hold down the “Ctrl” key, and press “c”). Once you do
this, the ping program should provide some statistics on how many
packets were sent and received. If the statistics look like
hostname PING Statistics
4 packets transmitted, 0 packets received, 100% packet loss
there is a communications problem. Refer to “Troubleshooting the Initial
Connection” on page 8-3 for troubleshooting help and information.
1-12
LAN Interface Supplement
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Managing User Names and Passwords
Managing User Names and Passwords
Your analyzer implements a limited form of network security using user
name and password pairs. Any remote access of the analyzer, including
Telnet or FTP access, requires a valid user name and associated
password.
A default user name and password pair is set for you prior to shipment:
NOTE
User Name
network
Password
analyzer
You should change this user name and password if you want to use the
security features of the analyzer, since the default user name and
password is the same for all new analyzers, and is therefore public.
Constructing Valid User Names and
Passwords
A valid user name must have 1 to 40 characters. A valid password must
have 8 to 40 characters.
Adding New User Names and Passwords
NOTE
You can add up to seven user name/password pairs to the analyzer’s
access list.
Perform the following steps to add a new user name and password to the
access list:
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
LAN
Login User Setup .
2. Press Add Login User .
3. Type the user name in the displayed dialog box.
4. Press Enter when you are done.
5. Type the password in the displayed dialog box.
6. Press Enter when you are done.
LAN Interface Supplement
1-13
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Managing User Names and Passwords
7. Type the password again (to confirm the password) in the displayed
dialog box.
8. Press Enter when you are done.
If the entries are valid, the new user name and password will be
confirmed with the following message:
User ... has been added to the list
Removing a User from the Access List
Perform the following steps to remove a user from the access list:
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
LAN
Login User Setup .
2. Press Delete Login User .
3. Type the user name in the dialog box that is displayed.
4. Press Enter to confirm your entry.
5. Type the user password in the dialog box.
6. Press Enter to confirm your entry.
If the entries are valid you should see a confirmation message displayed
on the screen:
User ... has been deleted from the list
NOTE
If you forget any of the user passwords, you will have to delete all users
LAN Login User Setup
by pressing SYSTEM OPTIONS
Delete All Users
and re-enter all user names and passwords.
Displaying the Access List
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
LAN
Login User Setup .
2. Press Display User List .
A table of the login user names will be displayed on the screen.
1-14
LAN Interface Supplement
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Using BOOTP
Using BOOTP
BOOTP Fundamentals
The Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) is a simple and elegant method of
automatically distributing network information and software via the
LAN. BOOTP is built on the client-server model. The BOOTP client
configures itself using configuration information obtained from a BOOTP
server. Your analyzer has a built-in BOOTP client. The analyzer can use
BOOTP to configure itself automatically, obtaining its network
configuration information (IP address, gateway address, and subnet
mask) from a central BOOTP server over the network. On power up, the
analyzer broadcasts a request to boot from a remote server. If a BOOTP
server is available on the LAN listening for BOOTP client requests, it
transmits configuration parameters to the analyzer over the network.
The analyzer uses those parameters automatically.
BOOTP can also be used to automatically retrieve and execute an IBASIC
program at boot time. The boot file is transferred to the analyzer from
the BOOTP server using FTP or trivial file transfer protocol (TFTP). If the
transfer is successful, the file will be loaded into the analyzer’s memory
and executed. The boot file can be any valid IBASIC program.
Setting Up the BOOTP Server
To use the BOOTP client in your analyzer, you need a BOOTP server
application running on a remote UNIX system or a PC. A BOOTP server,
bootpd (BOOTP daemon), is an integral part of most UNIX operating
systems. You will need to obtain a separate BOOTP server application for
your PC. Consult your network administrator for obtaining a BOOTP
server application for your PC, and for assistance setting up a BOOTP
server.
The following steps are required to use BOOTP:
1. Assure that the analyzer and BOOTP server are not separated by a
gateway. Consult your network administrator if you are not sure.
2. Set up a BOOTP server application on a remote host (UNIX system or
PC). You will need the following information:
LAN Interface Supplement
1-15
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Using BOOTP
❏ The Ethernet address of the analyzer. To find out the Ethernet
address of your analyzer, press
LAN LAN Port Setup
SYSTEM OPTIONS
Ethernet Address .
❏ An IP address for the analyzer. This address is usually assigned
by your network administrator.
❏ An optional BOOTP host name and IP address.
❏ An optional absolute (fully qualified) path to the boot file, which
includes all the directories leading to it. If you want to retrieve an
IBASIC boot program from your BOOTP server at boot time and
execute it, you must know the absolute path to the boot file. The
boot file must be accessible using FTP or TFTP.
❏ The LAN gateway address and the subnet mask.
Setting Up the BOOTP Client
Perform the following steps to set up the BOOTP client in your analyzer:
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
LAN
BOOTP Setup .
2. Toggle [BOOTP] to ON if needed to enable BOOTP. The softkey label
will change to BOOTP ON off .
3. Press FTP or TFTP to select either FTP or TFTP file transfer
method. If your remote system requires a user name and password,
you must use FTP, since TFTP does not implement any user
validation.
If you select FTP
a. Press FTP User Name
remote BOOTP host.
and enter a valid user name for your
b. Press FTP Password and enter a valid password for your
remote BOOTP host.
4. Press Timeout and enter a timeout time, in seconds, for BOOTP
requests. This value is typically between one and five seconds. The
Timeout value is the number of seconds that your analyzer will
spend transmitting BOOTP requests at boot time. If there is no
response to the first BOOTP request, then the analyzer will retransmit
1-16
LAN Interface Supplement
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Using BOOTP
a request. The analyzer will continue to retransmit requests at
exponentially increasing time intervals until it receives a response or
the Timeout value has expired.
5. Press Optional Boot Host and enter a hostname or a host IP
address if you want BOOTP requests sent to a specific remote host
only. Otherwise, the analyzer will broadcast a BOOTP request at boot
time, and will accept a response from any BOOTP server.
If you do not want to use Optional Boot Host , make sure that it
contains a null or empty string by pressing Optional Boot Host
Clear Entry Enter .
Etry
NOTE
If you use Optional Boot Host , you are also required to set up your
analyzer’s IP address. Refer to “To Configure the Analyzer” on page 1-10
for details on how to set up your analyzer’s IP address.
NOTE
A local HOSTS file is required to specify a boot host by name. A local
HOSTS file is not required to specify a boot host by IP address. “Using a
Local HOSTS File” on page 7-11 for details about creating and using a
local HOSTS file.
6. Press Optional File Name and enter an absolute (fully qualified)
path to the file to be loaded and executed when the analyzer boots.
For example, if your file name is test23.bas, and the path to the file
is /server5/users/testeng/prodtests, enter the following for
the absolute (fully-qualified) path name:
/server5/users/testeng/prodtests/test23.bas
NOTE
You must use the UNIX-style forward slash (/) to separate names when
you enter path names in the analyzer (the BOOTP client). You may need to
use some other character to separate names when you enter path names
in your particular BOOTP server.
LAN Interface Supplement
1-17
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Using BOOTP
NOTE
Normally, your analyzer will obtain this file name from the BOOTP
server, but you can override this using Optional File Name . If you
do not want to use Optional File Name , make sure that it contains
a null string. To do that, press Optional File Name
Clear Entry Enter
Etry
You can set up your BOOTP server to select the file to download when the
analyzer boots. Consult your BOOTP server documentation or your
system administrator about setting up a BOOTPTAB file on the BOOTP
server.
Testing BOOTP
After your analyzer has been set up correctly as a BOOTP client, make
sure that the BOOTP server is also set up correctly and is running.
Consult your network administrator if you need help doing this.
Perform the steps below to verify that BOOTP works correctly:
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
Parameters Received .
LAN BOOTP Setup
The following dialog box will appear:
1-18
LAN Interface Supplement
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Using BOOTP
Figure 1-3
BOOTP Setup Dialog Box
The dialog box shown above displays the following information:
Host Addr
the host address of the BOOTP server
IP Addr
the analyzer IP address set by BOOTP process
Gateway
the analyzer gateway IP address set by the BOOTP
process
Subnet Mask
the subnet mask set for the analyzer by the BOOTP
process
File Path
the absolute (fully-qualified) path name received
from the BOOTP server, or the [Optional File Path]
if set
Step one shows the network parameters received from the BOOTP
server. To verify that your IBASIC boot file is working correctly,
perform steps two through four.
LAN Interface Supplement
1-19
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Using BOOTP
2. Clear your current network configuration information.
LAN LAN Port Setup
a. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
871xxx IP Address Clear Entry Enter .
81xxx IP Address
Etry
LAN LAN Port Setup
b. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
Gateway IP Address
Clear Entry Enter .
81xxx IP Address
Etry
LAN LAN Port Setup
c. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
Subnet Mask
Clear Entry Enter .
81xxx IP Addre Etry
3. Create an IBASIC file that, when run, will clearly indicate the
successful retrieval and execution of the file. Store it on the BOOTP
server. Here's an example:
10 ASSIGN @Hp8712 TO 800
20 OUTPUT @Hp8712;"DISP:ANN:TITL ON"
30 OUTPUT @Hp8712;"DISP:ANN:CLOC:MODE OFF"
40 OUTPUT @Hp8712;"DISP:ANN:TITL1:DATA 'BOOTP is here!!!'"
50 END
4. Cycle power to your analyzer. After your analyzer boots, the network
IP address, gateway address and subnet mask should be those values
provided by the BOOTP server.
If you have a boot file set up correctly, your analyzer should also
retrieve and execute your boot file. If you used the example program
above, the screen will display
BOOTP is here!!!
1-20
LAN Interface Supplement
Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer
Setting Up LAN Features with Wizards
Setting Up LAN Features with Wizards
IBasic LAN Wizard
An IBasic LAN wizard program is included with the analyzer to assist
users in setting up the LAN features. It is located on the Example
Program Disk, part number 08714-10003, under the name lan_wiz.
Windows LAN Wizard
A Windows-based LAN wizard program is also included with the
analyzer to assist users in setting up the LAN features. It is located on
the Example Program Disk, part number 08714-10003, under the name
wiz871x.exe.
It is necessary to set up the analyzer’s IP address and SCPI socket port
number before using this program.
NOTE
Example programs for the analyzer can be found in the following two
locations:
• Example Programs Disk, 8712ET/ES and 8714ET/ES (DOS format):
part number 08714-10003
• Web site http://www.agilent.com. Use the search function to find Web
pages related to 8712 and 8714 example programs and wizard
programs.
LAN Interface Supplement
1-21
2
Accessing the Analyzer's Web
Pages
2-1
Accessing the Analyzer's Web Pages
This page left intentionally blank.
2-2
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Web Pages
About This Chapter
About This Chapter
Your analyzer has built-in web pages that are accessible with a web
browser such as Netscape Navigator or Microsoft® Internet Explorer.
These web pages contain links to general product information, selected
on-line documentation, benchmarks, information about your analyzer,
and a list of Agilent Technologies offices. You can also e-mail us with your
comments and feedback on the Agilent Technologies 87xx family of
analyzers.
Before you can access your analyzer with a web browser, you need to
connect and configure your analyzer as described in Chapter 1,
“Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer.”
If your analyzer is directly connected to a PC, without the use of a hub or
a larger network, then you probably need to disable the proxy server in
the browser. This is because most web browsers are configured to use
proxy servers for accessing web pages. If your analyzer is directly
connected to your computer, your computer cannot find the proxy server.
If you are communicating to your analyzer over a LAN, then the proxy
setting can be left as it is.
LAN Interface Supplement
2-3
Accessing the Analyzer's Web Pages
Accessing the Analyzer with Your Web Browser
Accessing the Analyzer with Your Web
Browser
To access your analyzer, start your web browser and connect to
http://<hostname>, where <hostname> is the hostname that has
been assigned to the IP address of your analyzer. If you are making a
connection to the analyzer without using a domain name system (DNS)
server, you can use http://<IP address>, where <IP address> is
the IP address of your analyzer. You can also use the IP address form
when using a DNS server.
When you are connected to your analyzer, a web page will appear with
the following information links:
• Get a current screen snapshot
• Control the Analyzer with SCPI Commands
• Examine your analyzer's configuration
• Browse selected product documentation
• Review the Product Summary
• Other links
Click on the hyperlinks (any underlined words) to browse through the
analyzer's pages. See Figure 2-1.
The rest of this chapter explains some of the areas you can browse in
further detail.
2-4
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Web Pages
Accessing the Analyzer with Your Web Browser
Figure 2-1
Analyzer Web Page
LAN Interface Supplement
2-5
Accessing the Analyzer's Web Pages
Accessing the Analyzer with Your Web Browser
Screen Snapshot
Clicking on Get a current screen snapshot shows an exact copy of your
analyzer's current screen image. Use your web browser's “reload” or
“refresh” function to get the most current screen image.
CAUTION
The screen image takes a few seconds to load. Do not push any buttons
on the analyzer or send any programming commands to it while the
snapshot is loading, or an inaccurate image may result.
NOTE
Before capturing the screen image with your web browser, you may wish
to customize the look of the image using the Color Options menu on
your analyzer. (See your analyzer's User's Guide for more information.)
In particular, you may want to choose Inverse Video to create a white
background, especially if you plan to print the page from your web
browser. See Figure 2-2.
2-6
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Web Pages
Accessing the Analyzer with Your Web Browser
Figure 2-2
Screen Snapshot
LAN Interface Supplement
2-7
Accessing the Analyzer's Web Pages
Accessing the Analyzer with Your Web Browser
Control the Analyzer with SCPI Commands
Clicking on Control the Analyzer with SCPI Commands launches a Java
applet. This applet creates a command-entry dialog box. You can control
your analyzer over the LAN by entering SCPI commands in this dialog
box. See Figure 2-3. Commands or queries are sent to the analyzer by
entering the SCPI mnemonic in the SCPI Command: area, and the
response from the analyzer is displayed in the Response Messages: area.
Example commands are provided on this web page as well as a link to
the SCPI command reference.
It may be helpful to save frequently-sent SCPI command strings in a
separate ASCII file. These commands can then be cut and pasted from
the ASCII file into the command line of the dialog box, and edited, if
necessary, before sending them to the analyzer.
NOTE
Java is a powerful, cross-platform programming language developed by
Sun Microsystems. See http://www.javasoft.com for more details.
2-8
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Web Pages
Accessing the Analyzer with Your Web Browser
Figure 2-3
SCPI Command Screen
LAN Interface Supplement
2-9
Accessing the Analyzer's Web Pages
Accessing the Analyzer with Your Web Browser
Analyzer Configuration
Clicking on Examine your analyzer's configuration brings up a screen of
information that is equivalent to pressing SYSTEM OPTIONS
Service Instrument Info on the analyzer. This screen shows the
model and serial number of your analyzer, the firmware revision,
installed options, and the amount of memory.
Product Documentation
This section provides selected portions of your analyzer's documentation
on-line, as well as benchmark information and information about
product upgrades and options.
The following list shows the links currently available on this page:
• Optimizing your Measurements
• Accessing Built-in Disks
• Controlling I/O Ports
• Accessing the Analyzer's file system via the LAN
• Accessing the Dynamic Data Disk via the LAN
• Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
• Agilent Technologies 871xE SCPI command reference
• IEE 488.2 common commands
• Product Upgrades and Options
• Transfer Speeds using GPIB
• Transfer Speeds using LAN
• Printing Speed
• List of printed manuals
If there are additional portions of the analyzer's documentation that you
think would be helpful to have on-line, please contact us via e-mail. Click
on “Contact Agilent Technologies” and “Send us your feedback!” from
your analyzer's web page.
2-10
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Web Pages
Accessing the Analyzer with Your Web Browser
Product Overview
The links in this area provide generic information about the Agilent
Technologies 871xE family of analyzers. New features, compatibility
issues, and available options are included here.
Other Links
At the bottom of every web page in the analyzer, you'll find the following
links:
• Top
takes you to the top of the current
page.
• Search
takes you to the “Product
Documentation” page.
• Contact Agilent Technologies
takes you to a page that provides
links to Agilent Technologies web
sites, and gives you the opportunity
to provide Agilent with feedback on
your analyzer and its documentation.
•
Upgrade Firmware
takes you to a page that helps you
download firmware from Agilent
Technologies websites.
•
VXI plug&play Driver
takes you to a page that helps you
download free VXI plug&play drivers
from Agilent Technologies websites.
• Copyright
LAN Interface Supplement
takes you to copyright information.
2-11
3
Printing
3-1
Printing
About This Chapter
About This Chapter
Your analyzer can print directly to an HP LaserJet printer on your
network. In order to print to a LAN printer, your analyzer must be
communicating on the network. Refer to Chapter 1, “Connecting and
Configuring the Analyzer,” on page 1-1 if you have not yet connected and
configured your analyzer.
Compatible Printers
The HP LaserJet 4 and HP LaserJet 5 families of printers are compatible
with your analyzer for printing directly via a point-to-point connection or
over your network. These newer printers allow you to enter the printer's
IP address directly from the analyzer front panel and do not require a
boot server computer. Your printer should have a JetDirect LAN card
installed.
NOTE
Some older printers, such as an HP LaserJet III, do not allow you to
enter an IP address from the analyzer front panel. They require a boot
server computer on the network that configures (sets) the printer's IP
address.
3-2
LAN Interface Supplement
Printing
Configuring the Printer
Configuring the Printer
Refer to your printer's documentation for instructions on how to set up
your printer for LAN usage. Typically, you will need to contact your
network administrator to assign a unique IP address for your printer.
Your printer software will configure the printer with the assigned IP
address each time it is turned on.
LAN Interface Supplement
3-3
Printing
Configuring the Analyzer for Printing to a LAN Printer
Configuring the Analyzer for Printing to
a LAN Printer
To set up your analyzer to print to a LAN printer:
1. Press HARDCOPY
Select Copy Port .
2. Use the front panel knob, or the
keys to highlight the
LaserJet LAN printer in the table. See Figure 3-1.
3. Press Select . See Figure 3-1.
Figure 3-1
Selecting and Configuring the LAN Printer
3-4
LAN Interface Supplement
Printing
Configuring the Analyzer for Printing to a LAN Printer
4. Press LAN Printr IP Addr . Enter the IP address of the network
printer you wish to use. Use the Clear Entry key to clear the
current or default setting, and then enter the IP address using the
analyzer's numeric keypad. (You can also use a keyboard connected to
the rear panel DIN KEYBOARD connector to enter the IP address.)
5. Press Prior Menu and use the Define PCL5 key to set up the
printer configuration, and use the Define Hardcopy key to define
the output. See your analyzer's User's Guide for information on
configuring printers and defining output.
NOTE
You can print color screen dumps if you send the output to an HP Color
LaserJet or HP Color LaserJet 5 printer. Press Define PCL5 Color .
6. After you have completed the previous steps, you can send hardcopy
to your LAN printer by simply pressing HARDCOPY Start .
LAN Interface Supplement
3-5
Printing
If You Have Trouble Printing
If You Have Trouble Printing
• Make sure the analyzer's LAN IP address has been set
(see “The Analyzer's IP Address and Hostname” on page 1-8).
• Make sure the printer is configured properly. Refer to your printer's
documentation or your network administrator.
• Verify the LAN connection to the printer using the analyzer's built-in
ping diagnostic utility (see “Troubleshooting the Initial Connection”
on page 8-3).
3-6
LAN Interface Supplement
4
Accessing the Analyzer's File
System Using FTP
4-1
Accessing the Analyzer's File System Using FTP
About This Chapter
About This Chapter
This chapter shows you how to access the analyzer's file system using file
transfer protocol (FTP). This chapter provides two simple examples: one
example copies a file to the analyzer from your computer, and the other
retrieves a file from the analyzer. The last section of this chapter
contains a summary of commonly used ftp commands.
NOTE
It is important to distinguish among the several uses of the letters ftp:
FTP
File Transfer Protocol: a standardized service that
provides methods to remotely transfer files among
different computers and operating systems. The FTP
service is implemented by many different computer
applications, including programs named ftp.
ftp
The name given to many different computer programs,
each implementing File Transfer Protocol (FTP).
Programs with the name ftp are available for
Windows 95, Windows NT, and Unix, for example.
ftp
The letters you type to start a program named ftp.
This chapter assumes that your analyzer is physically connected to your
local area network. If it is not connected, refer to “Connecting the
Analyzer to the LAN” on page 1- 5 for information on how to connect the
system.
When you access the analyzer, you will have read and write access to the
analyzer's file system (except for some files in the dynamic “data” disk,
which are described in “The Dynamic Data Disk” on page 5- 2).
CAUTION
Avoid having more than one FTP session access your analyzer
simultaneously. Files may be corrupted if both sessions attempt to use
the same file at the same time.
This caution also applies to file system access performed via SCPI
commands using LAN, GPIB, or IBASIC.
4-2
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's File System Using FTP
Using FTP to Access the Analyzer
Using FTP to Access the Analyzer
If you are using a UNIX workstation, you have built-in networking
software that includes ftp. The same is true if you are operating under
Windows 95. If you are operating under Windows 3.1, you will need to
have additional networking software that includes ftp.
NOTE
There are versions of FTP programs available with a graphical user
interface (GUI). See “Using GUI FTP Software” on page 4- 10 for
information on using these types of programs.
To access the analyzer's file system using FTP and the ftp utility
1. Enter the following command on your computer or workstation:
ftp <hostname>
or
ftp <IP address>
For example, type
ftp
my8712
or
ftp 223.15.2.44
2. When the connection is made, you will be prompted for a login name
and password. Enter your user name and password. The default login
name is network, and the default password is analyzer. See
“Managing User Names and Passwords” on page 1- 13.
3. You should now have a prompt on your computer display that looks
like this:
ftp>-
4. Type dir at the prompt. Your computer display should return
something that looks like this:
200 Port command okay
150 Opening data connection for LIST /
drwx-----2 root
sys
1024
drwx-----2 root
sys
1024
drwx-----2 root
sys
1024
drwx-----2 root
sys
1024
226 File sent OK
LAN Interface Supplement
Oct
Oct
Oct
Oct
9
9
9
9
int
nvram
ram
data
4-3
Accessing the Analyzer's File System Using FTP
Using FTP to Access the Analyzer
The first character in the first field indicates the entry type. A “d”
indicates that the entry is a directory. A “–” indicates that the entry is
an ordinary file.
The next nine characters in the first field are interpreted as three sets
of three bits each. The first three bits identify access permissions for
the user (rwx). The second three bits are left blank. The final three
bits identify the file type:
• A — archive file
• H — hidden file
• S — system file
You can read and write files to:
• int — a DOS-formatted floppy disk in the analyzer's 3.5” floppy
disk drive
• nvram — the analyzer's internal non-volatile memory
• ram — the analyzer's internal volatile memory
The data directory is a dynamic data disk with files that are linked
directly to analyzer operations. See “The Dynamic Data Disk” on
page 5- 2 for information on accessing and using this directory.
5. Use the examples in this chapter to copy a file to the analyzer and to
retrieve a file from the analyzer. Also see “Commonly Used FTP
Commands” on page 4- 8.
4-4
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's File System Using FTP
Using FTP to Access the Analyzer
Example 1: Copying a File to the Analyzer
You can copy files from your computer to your analyzer. For instance, you
may want to develop an IBASIC program on your computer and then
copy it to the analyzer so that you can run it from the front panel of the
analyzer.
This example copies a file, “ib_prog”, from your computer to the
analyzer's nvram disk:
1. On your computer or workstation change directories to the directory
that contains the file “ib_prog.”
2. On your computer or workstation access the analyzer by typing ftp
<hostname>. Enter your user name and password. For example, type
ftp my8712
user name
password
where my8712 is the <hostname>, user name is your login name,
and password is your user password. The username and password
pair must be one of the entries in the analyzer’s access list. Refer to
“Managing User Names and Passwords” on page 1- 13 for details.
3. Change to the non-volatile RAM disk in the analyzer by typing
cd nvram at the ftp prompt.
4. Specify the type of file you will be transferring by typing either
binary or ascii at the ftp prompt. For this example, use ascii.
CAUTION
Binary files can be corrupted if you attempt to transfer them in “ascii”
mode.
5. Type put ib_prog at the ftp prompt.
6. Type bye at the ftp prompt to exit ftp.
You can now recall and run the program from the front panel of your
analyzer.
1. Press SAVE RECALL
Select Disk
Non-Vol RAM Disk .
2. Press Prior Menu Programs . Use the front panel knob to
highlight the IB_PROG file.
3. Press Recall Program
LAN Interface Supplement
Run .
4-5
Accessing the Analyzer's File System Using FTP
Using FTP to Access the Analyzer
NOTE
You can also download and automatically run IBASIC programs by
accessing the data disk. See “Copying an IBASIC Program to or from the
Analyzer” on page 5- 7.
NOTE
When copying files from a UNIX environment to the analyzer, files that
do not meet the DOS file-naming criteria (no more than eight (8)
characters in filename, with no more than three (3) characters in
extension) will be truncated to comply. For example, if you copy a file
from UNIX named “ibasic_program.abcd”, it will appear as “ibasic_p.abc”
on the analyzer. There will be no indication from ftp that this has
occurred.
Example 2: Retrieving a File from the
Analyzer
You can copy files from your analyzer to your computer. For instance, you
may want to retrieve saved measurement data from your analyzer (or a
group of analyzers) for statistical analysis on your computer. In another
scenario, you may have automated your measurement system using an
IBASIC program to save data or instrument states to the analyzer's
RAM disk. Your remote computer could asynchronously copy and delete
files from the RAM disk, back up data, and prevent the RAM disk from
filling up.
You may also want to copy instrument states and calibrations to your
computer as a backup, eliminating the need for backups on floppy disks.
Analyzer files can also be saved to a remote computer using NFS (see
Chapter 7, “Using the Network File System (NFS),” on page 7-1).
This example copies a file “STATE2.STA” from your analyzer's nvram
disk to a directory on your computer or workstation.
1. On your computer or workstation access the analyzer by typing ftp
<hostname>. Enter your user name and password. For example, type
ftp my8712
user name
password
where my8712 is the <hostname>, user name is your login name,
and password is your user password.
4-6
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's File System Using FTP
Using FTP to Access the Analyzer
2. Change to the non-volatile RAM disk in the analyzer by typing
cd nvram at the ftp prompt.
3. If necessary, use the lcd command to change the local directory on
your computer where you want to put the file. For example: type
lcd /users/myname/871x_data.
4. Specify the type of file you will be transferring by typing either
binary or ascii at the ftp prompt.
CAUTION
Binary files can be corrupted if you attempt to transfer them in “ascii”
mode. For this example, use binary.
5. Type get state2.sta at the ftp prompt.
6. Type bye at the ftp prompt to exit ftp.
7. Verify the file was copied by listing the contents of the directory it was
copied to.
LAN Interface Supplement
4-7
Accessing the Analyzer's File System Using FTP
Commonly Used FTP Commands
Commonly Used FTP Commands
The exact commands you use within ftp depend on the software. If you
are not familiar with your ftp software, type “?” or “help” at the ftp
prompt to see a list of commands.
The following table provides a list and brief description of some
commonly used ftp commands. See “The FTP Command” on page 9- 6
for a summary of ftp.
4-8
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's File System Using FTP
Commonly Used FTP Commands
ftp Commands
Command
Description
ascii
Sets the file transfer type to ASCII.
binary
Sets the file transfer type to binary.
bye
Closes the connection to the host and exits ftp.
cd remote_directory
Sets the working directory on the host to remote_directory.
delete remote_file
Deletes remote_file or empty remote_directory.
dir
[remote_directory]
Lists the contents of the specified remote_directory. If
remote_directory is unspecified, the contents of the current
remote directory are listed.
get remote_file
[local_file]
Copies remote_file to local_file. If local_file is unspecified,
ftp uses the remote_file name as the local_file name.
help
Provides a list of ftp commands.
help command
Provides a brief description of command.
lcd [local_directory]
Sets the local working directory to local_directory.
ls
[remote_directory]
Lists the contents of the specified remote_directory. If the
remote_directory is unspecified, the contents of the current
remote directory are listed.
mget remote_file
[local_file]
Copies remote_file to the local system. If globbing is
enabled, globbing metacharacters are expanded. If local_file
is unspecified, ftp uses the remote_file name as the local_file
name.
mput local_file
[remote_file]
Copies local_file to remote file. If remote_file is unspecified,
ftp uses the local_file name as the remote_file name. If
globbing is enabled, globbing characters are expanded.
put local_file
[remote_file]
Copies local_file to remote file. If remote_file is unspecified,
ftp uses the local_file name as the remote_file name.
quit
Closes the connection to the host and exits ftp.
LAN Interface Supplement
4-9
Accessing the Analyzer's File System Using FTP
Using GUI FTP Software
Using GUI FTP Software
There are versions of FTP programs available with a graphical user
interface (GUI). These programs can make transferring files between the
analyzer and your PC a simple “drag and drop” operation.
NOTE
The procedures in this section were developed using Reflection™ FTP for
Windows NT. They are intended as examples only. Other GUI FTP
software may not be able to understand the analyzer's directory format,
and will probably have different steps.
Example: Transferring Files between the
Analyzer and Your PC
This example copies a file, “ib_prog”, from your computer to the
analyzer's nvram disk.
1. Start the Reflection™ FTP program and set the program options as
follows:
• Set View to Split Window. (View both the command window and
the normal window.)
• Under the Options menu, set Server Directory Format to
Automatic Server Determination.
2. Type your analyzer's hostname in the Server Name box.
3. Click on Open.
4. Enter your user name.
5. Enter your password.
6. To change to the non-volatile RAM disk in the analyzer, click inside
the command window and then type cd nvram at the ftp> prompt.
You can also double-click on a directory to expand the directory listing
and access the files in that directory.
7. Use the Client side of the window to change directories on your PC to
the directory that contains the file “ib_prog”.
8. Click on the file “ib_prog” and “drag” it over to the Server side of the
window and “drop” it.
4-10
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's File System Using FTP
Using GUI FTP Software
9. The file has been transferred to the non-volatile RAM disk on your
analyzer.
10. To drag and drop multiple files, hold down the Ctrl key on your PC
while selecting files with the mouse. When you drag and drop, your
entire selection will be transferred to the analyzer.
11. You can also transfer files from the analyzer to your computer by
dragging files in the other direction.
CAUTION
Be sure to use the appropriate file transfer method (binary or ASCII) for
the file(s) you are transferring. If you are transferring files to or from the
analyzer's dynamic data disk, check Table 5-1 on page 5-2 for file types.
NOTE
In an ftp session, your analyzer is configured as an ftp server, while your
computer is an ftp client. Your analyzer cannot act as an ftp client. This
means that you cannot type ftp from the analyzer’s prompt. You can
start an ftp session from IBASIC, but that will still configure the
analyzer as the ftp server.
LAN Interface Supplement
4-11
5
Accessing the Analyzer's
Dynamic Data Disk
5-1
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
The Dynamic Data Disk
The Dynamic Data Disk
Your analyzer has an ftp directory called “data,” which is a dynamic data
disk. The files in this directory trigger analyzer operations. For example,
you can put an instrument state into this directory and the analyzer will
automatically recall this state. You can do the same with an IBASIC
program: copy it to the analyzer's data directory and it will automatically
run. You can also transfer a screen-image file from the analyzer in either
GIF, PCX, or HP-GL format.
The following files make up the contents of the dynamic data disk:
Table 5-1
File
Contents of the Dynamic Data Disk
File Type
Description
readme.txt
ASCII
This file contains a brief description of each file in this
directory.
state.sta1
binary
This file contains the analyzer's current instrument
state settings. Instrument state settings consist of all
the stimulus and response parameters that set up the
analyzer to make a specific measurement including
markers, limit lines, and memory traces. Instrument
state information is saved and recalled for both
measurement channels. You can either retrieve this
information from the analyzer, or you can put another
analyzer's instrument state information into this file,
which will cause the analyzer to immediately enter the
new instrument state.
cal.sta1
binary
This file contains the analyzer's current calibration
and instrument state settings. The measurement
calibration information is the measurement correction
data that the analyzer creates when you make a
calibration. Measurement calibration information is
saved and recalled for both measurement channels.
You can either retrieve this information from the
analyzer, or you can put another analyzer's calibration
and instrument state information into this file, which
will cause the analyzer to immediately enter the new
cal and instrument state.
5-2
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
The Dynamic Data Disk
File
File Type
Description
data.sta2
binary
This file contains the measurement data for both
measurement channels. You can either retrieve this
information from the analyzer, or you can put data
trace information from another analyzer into this file.
tset_cal.cal1
binary
For use with multiport test sets only. This file contains
the test set calibration data that currently resides on
the analyzer's non-volatile RAM disk. You can either
retrieve this information from the analyzer, or you can
put test set calibration data into this file.
prog.bas2
ASCII
This file contains the currently loaded IBASIC
program. You can either retrieve the program that is
currently in this file, or copy a new program to this file.
prog_run.bas2
ASCII
This file accepts a copy of an IBASIC program, copies it
to prog.bas, and immediately runs the program.
prog_run.scp2
ASCII
This file accepts a copy of a file containing SCPI
commands and immediately executes the commands.
screen.hgl3
ASCII
This file contains the current screen image in HP-GL
format. It is available for uploading to a file on your
computer.
screen.gif
binary
This file contains the current screen image in GIF
format. It is available for uploading to a file on your
computer.
screen.pcx3
binary
This file contains the current screen image in PCX
format. It is available for uploading to a file on your
computer.
screen_m.hgl3
ASCII
This file contains the current screen image, as well as
the current softkey menu, in HP-GL format. It is
available for uploading to a file on your computer.
screen_m.pcx4
binary
This file contains the current screen image, as well as
the current softkey menu, in PCX format. It is
available for uploading to a file on your computer.
LAN Interface Supplement
5-3
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
The Dynamic Data Disk
File
File Type
Description
screen_m.gif4
binary
This file contains the current screen image, as well as
the current softkey menu, in GIF format. It is available
for uploading to a file on your computer.
parm_all.txt5
ASCII
This file contains a listing of all of the instrument's
operating parameters in ASCII text format.
parm_screen.txt5
ASCII
This file contains the information in the current
operating parameters screen in ASCII text format.
trace1.prn6
ASCII
This file contains the measurement channel 1
measurement data in ASCII spreadsheet format.
trace2.prn6
ASCII
This file contains the measurement channel 2
measurement data in ASCII spreadsheet format.
trace1.s1p6
ASCII
This file contains the measurement channel 1
measurement data in Touchstone format.
trace2.s1p6
ASCII
This file contains the measurement channel 2
measurement data in Touchstone format.
1. See “Saving and Recalling Analyzer States” on page 5-5 for information on how to
use this file.
2. See “Copying Programs to and from the Analyzer” on page 5-7 for information on
how to use this file.
3. See “Copying a Screen Image to a Local File” on page 5-10 for information on how
to use this file.
4. See “Copying a Screen Image to a Local File” on page 5-10 for information on how
to use this file.
5. See “Copying Instrument Parameters in ASCII Text Format” on page 5-13 for
information on how to use this file.
6. See “Retrieving Measurement Data in ASCII Format” on page 5-14 for information
on how to use this file.
5-4
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Saving and Recalling Analyzer States
Saving and Recalling Analyzer States
This section describes how to use the state.sta, cal.sta, and
data.sta files that reside in the data directory of the analyzer. See
Table 5-1 on page 5-2 for a brief description of each of these files.
You may have a particular instrument state set up on an analyzer and
would like to set up that state on one or more additional analyzers. To do
this you should do the following:
1. On your computer or workstation, access the analyzer by typing ftp
<hostname>. Enter your user name and password. For example, type
ftp my8712
user name
password
where my8712 is the <hostname>, user name is your login name,
and password is your user password. See “Managing User Names
and Passwords” on page 1-13 for instructions on how to do this.
2. Type cd data at the ftp prompt.
3. Type dir at the ftp prompt to see the listing of files in this directory,
as well as a short description of each file.
4. Type binary at the ftp prompt to specify a binary file transfer.
5. Type get state.sta at the prompt to copy the current instrument
state file from the analyzer to your computer.
6. Close the connection and exit ftp by typing bye or quit at the
prompt.
7. Now you can put the instrument state into a different analyzer. On
your computer or workstation, access the analyzer by typing ftp
<hostname>. Enter your user name and password. For example, type
ftp my8712
user name
password
where my8712 is the <hostname>, user name is your login name,
and password is your user password.
LAN Interface Supplement
5-5
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Saving and Recalling Analyzer States
8. Type cd data at the ftp prompt.
9. Type put state.sta at the ftp prompt. This copies the contents of
the state.sta file from your computer to the new analyzer you are
connected to. The new analyzer will immediately reinitialize itself
with the new instrument state.
The above procedure can be performed with the cal.sta and data.sta
files as well.
CAUTION
When transferring *.sta files between instruments with different
model numbers and/or option configurations, it is possible that some
instrument state settings will not be compatible. For example, if you try
to put an instrument state with a stop frequency of 3 GHz into an
Agilent Technologies 8712ET/ES, the instrument will limit the frequency
to 1.3 GHz (its high frequency limit). When you transfer this file over ftp,
you will not receive any warning or indicator that this has occurred.
NOTE
It is possible to have saved an instrument state file from the front panel
of the analyzer that contains not only the instrument state settings, but
the current calibration and measurement data as well. Putting this one
file into the state.sta file will cause the analyzer to recall instrument
state, cal state, and measurement data.
NOTE
When copying files from a UNIX environment to the analyzer, files that
do not meet the DOS file-naming criteria (no more than eight [8]
characters in filename, with no more than three [3] characters in
extension) will be truncated, and will not generate an error message. For
example, if you copy a file from UNIX named "ibasic_program.abcd", the
destination file name will be ibasic_p.abc.
5-6
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Copying Programs to and from the Analyzer
Copying Programs to and from the
Analyzer
This section describes how to use the prog.bas, prog_run.bas, and
prog_run.scp files that reside in the data directory of the analyzer. See
Table 5-1 on page 5-2 for a brief description of each of these files.
TIP
Refer to Chapter 6, “Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN” for
information on controlling the analyzer from a computer, and how to
interact with an IBASIC program running in the analyzer.
Copying an IBASIC Program to or from the
Analyzer
You can create IBASIC programs on your computer and copy them to
your analyzer. Conversely, you can retrieve a copy of the currently loaded
IBASIC program from your analyzer to your computer. From there you
might want to copy it into another analyzer, or edit it.
To copy an IBASIC program file named "ib_prog" to the analyzer:
1. On your computer or workstation, access the analyzer by typing ftp
<hostname>. Enter your user name and password. For example, type
ftp my8712
user name
password
where my8712 is the <hostname>, user name is your login name,
and password is your user password. See “Using FTP to Access the
Analyzer” on page 4-3 for instructions on how to do this.
2. Type cd data at the ftp prompt.
3. Type put ib_prog prog.bas at the prompt to put a copy of your
program into the analyzer.
4. Close the connection and exit ftp by typing bye or quit at the
prompt.
LAN Interface Supplement
5-7
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Copying Programs to and from the Analyzer
5. To run your IBASIC program, press SYSTEM OPTIONS
Run on the analyzer.
NOTE
IBASIC
You can eliminate this last step, and have your program run
automatically by using the dynamic data disk file named
prog_run.bas. See “Copying and Running a Program with One
Command” on page 5-9.
To copy the currently loaded IBASIC program from your analyzer to your
computer:
1. On your computer or workstation, access the analyzer by typing ftp
<hostname>. Enter your user name and password. For example, type
ftp my8712
user name
password
where my8712 is the <hostname>, user name is your login name,
and password is your user password. See “Using FTP to Access the
Analyzer” on page 4-3 for instructions on how to do this.
2. Type cd data at the ftp prompt.
3. Type dir at the ftp prompt to see the listing of files in this directory,
as well as a short description of each of them.
4. Type get prog.bas at the prompt to retrieve the current IBASIC
program file from the analyzer. This copies the program file prog.bas
to your computer. You may want to give the file a unique name on
your local computer by typing something like this:
get prog.bas newfile
5. Close the connection and exit ftp by typing bye or quit at the
prompt.
5-8
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Copying Programs to and from the Analyzer
Copying and Running a Program with One
Command
You can create an IBASIC program or a file with a list of SCPI
commands on your computer, and then copy and automatically run it by
using the prog_run.bas and prog_run.scp files.
To copy the IBASIC program ib_prog to the analyzer and immediately
run it, follow the instructions below:
1. On your computer or workstation, access the analyzer by typing ftp
<hostname>. Enter your user name and password. For example, type
ftp my8712
user name
password
where my8712 is the <hostname>, user name is your login name,
and password is your user password. See “Using FTP to Access the
Analyzer” on page 4-3 for instructions on how to do this.
2. Type cd data at the ftp prompt.
3. Type put ib_prog prog_run.bas at the prompt. This copies your
program to the analyzer and immediately runs it.
4. You can also copy a file with a list of SCPI commands to the
prog_run.scp data file and the commands will be executed
immediately. See your analyzer's Programmer's Guide for a list of
SCPI commands.
The file you copy to "prog_run.scp" should simply be a list of SCPI
commands. Following is an example file containing SCPI commands:
SENS1:FUNC 'XFR:POW:RAT 2,0';DET NBAN;*WAI
CALC1:MARK:FUNC MAX
DISP:WIND1:TRAC:Y:AUTO ONCE
These commands set the analyzer to measure transmission, place a
marker on the maximum point, and then set the measurement trace
to autoscale mode.
NOTE
Avoid the use of queries, as there is no way to read back the analyzer's
response.
LAN Interface Supplement
5-9
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Copying a Screen Image to a Local File
Copying a Screen Image to a Local File
This section describes how to copy a screen image from the analyzer to a
file on your computer.
To copy a screen image to your computer
1. On your computer or workstation, access the analyzer by typing ftp
<hostname>. Enter your user name and password. For example, type
ftp my8712
user name
password
where my8712 is the <hostname>, user name is your login name,
and password is your user password. See “Using FTP to Access the
Analyzer” on page 4-3 for instructions on how to do this.
2. Type cd data at the ftp prompt.
3. Type dir at the ftp prompt to see the listing of files in this directory.
4. Type binary or image at the ftp prompt to specify a binary transfer.
5. Decide which screen image file you want to retrieve and then use the
get command to transfer it to your computer. For example, type
get screen.pcx image.pcx to retrieve the current screen image
in PCX format, and place it into a file named image.pcx on your
computer.
NOTE
The appearance of the image you retrieve will depend on the selections in
the Define Hardcopy menu on your analyzer, as well as the file you
choose to retrieve from the data directory. For example, Figure 5-1 was
retrieved with the "screen.hgl" file, using the analyzer's default hardcopy
mode, which includes the measurement graph and the marker table.
Figure 5-2 was retrieved with the analyzer's hardcopy mode defined as
Graph Only, using the "screen_m.hgl" file. Figure 5-2 also includes the
analyzer’s softkeys. See Table 5-1 on page 5-2 for the filenames of screen
images.
5-10
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Copying a Screen Image to a Local File
Figure 5-1
Screen Image with Marker Table Shown
LAN Interface Supplement
5-11
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Copying a Screen Image to a Local File
Figure 5-2
Screen Image without Marker Table
5-12
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Copying Instrument Parameters in ASCII Text Format
Copying Instrument Parameters in
ASCII Text Format
This section describes how to use the parm_all.txt and
parm_screen.txt files that reside in the data directory of the analyzer.
See Table 5-1 on page 5-2 for a brief description of each of these files.
Instrument parameters can be viewed on the analyzer by pressing
SYSTEM OPTIONS Operating Parameters . Several screens of
information are available (the exact number depends upon your model
number and option configuration). These screens describe all the current
settings and configurations of the analyzer. You can copy all of these
screens using "parm_all.txt," or just the current screen with
"parm_screen.txt" to an ASCII file on your computer.
To copy instrument operating parameters
1. On your computer or workstation access the analyzer by typing ftp
<hostname>. Enter your user name and password. For example, type
ftp my8712
user name
password
where my8712 is the <hostname>, user name is your login name,
and password is your user password. See “Using FTP to Access the
Analyzer” on page 4-3 for instructions on how to do this.
2. Type cd data at the ftp prompt.
3. Type get parm_all.txt or get parm_screen.txt at the prompt
to copy the desired parameters to your local computer. You can give
the file a unique name on your local computer by typing:
get parm_all.txt newfile
4. Close the connection and exit ftp by typing bye or quit at the
prompt.
NOTE
If you do not rename the "parm_screen.txt" file when copying it to a DOS
environment (as in step 3 above), it will be truncated to "parm_scr.txt" in
order to comply with DOS file-naming conventions. There will be no
indication from ftp that this has happened.
LAN Interface Supplement
5-13
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Retrieving Measurement Data in ASCII Format
Retrieving Measurement Data in ASCII
Format
This section describes how to use the trace1.prn, trace2.prn,
trace1.s1p and trace2.s1p files that reside in the data directory of
the analyzer. See Table 5-1 on page 5-2 for a brief description of each of
these files.
Measurement data can be saved in ASCII formats that are compatible
with many personal computer software packages. The files with the
".prn" extension in the data directory contain measurement data in a
two-column format that can be directly imported into Lotus® 1-2-3®, as
well as other spreadsheet programs. The files with an ".s1p" extension in
the data directory contain measurement data in a format that can be
directly imported into CAE programs such as EEsof's Microwave Design
System (MDS) and Advanced Design System (ADS).
To retrieve measurement data
1. On your computer or workstation access the analyzer by typing ftp
<hostname>. Enter your user name and password. For example, type
ftp my8712
user name
password
where my8712 is the <hostname>, user name is your login name,
and password is your user password. See “Using FTP to Access the
Analyzer” on page 4-3 for instructions on how to do this.
2. Type cd data at the ftp prompt.
3. Type get trace1.prn at the prompt to copy the measurement
channel 1 data in spreadsheet format. See Table 5-1 on page 5-2 for
descriptions of the other trace data files. You can give the file a unique
name on your local computer by typing:
get trace1.prn newfile
4. Close the connection and exit ftp by typing bye or quit at the
prompt.
5-14
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Importing Graphics or Data into PC Applications
Importing Graphics or Data into PC
Applications
Some PC word processor and spreadsheet programs provide methods to
import graphics and data from a LAN connection using the internet http:
protocol. The following examples show how to import a screen image
from your analyzer into Microsoft® Word 97, and how to import trace
data from your analyzer into Microsoft® Excel 97.
Importing a Screen Snapshot into a Word
Processor Program
This example steps you through importing a picture of the analyzer's
current screen into a word processor. These steps were developed using
Microsoft® Word 97. Other word processing programs may or may not
have the same capability, and will probably have different steps:
1. Place the cursor at the point in your file where you want to place the
imported graphic.
2. Click on Insert, Picture, From File. When the dialog box appears,
type
http://my8712/data/screen.pcx
in the File name box.
3. Click on the Insert button in the dialog box.
NOTE
If you have previously imported a screen snapshot from the screen.pcx
file, your computer may reload the file from its memory cache. To ensure
that the screen snapshot is actually the current screen displayed on your
analyzer, click the Refresh Current Page icon on the Web toolbar of Word.
You can also set the Windows operating system to refresh pages (or files)
every time you access them. From your Windows desktop, select
Start>Settings>Control Panel>Internet. Under Temporary Internet Files, select
Settings. Under Check for Newer Versions of Stored Pages, select Every Visit to the
Page.
LAN Interface Supplement
5-15
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Importing Graphics or Data into PC Applications
Importing Trace Data into a Spreadsheet
Program
This example steps you through importing the analyzer's current trace
data into a spreadsheet program. These steps were developed using
Microsoft® Excel 97. Other spreadsheet programs may or may not have
the same capability, and will probably have different steps:
1. Click on File, Open. When the dialog box appears, type
http://my8712/data/trace1.s1p
in the File name box.
2. Click on the Open button in the dialog box.
3. A "Text Import Wizard" will guide you through customizing how you
want the data to appear in the spreadsheet. Figure 5-3 shows trace
data (and a screen snapshot) imported into a spreadsheet program.
NOTE
If you have previously imported trace data from the trace1.s1p file (or
whichever of the four trace data files you are attempting to access), your
computer may reload the file from its memory. To ensure that the screen
snapshot is actually the current trace data displayed on your analyzer,
click the Refresh Current Page icon on the Web toolbar of Excel.
You can also set the Windows operating system to refresh pages (or files)
every time you access them. From your Windows desktop, select
Start>Settings>Control Panel>Internet. Under Temporary Internet Files, select
Settings. Under Check for Newer Versions of Stored Pages, select Every Visit to the
Page.
5-16
LAN Interface Supplement
Accessing the Analyzer's Dynamic Data Disk
Importing Graphics or Data into PC Applications
Figure 5-3
Trace Data and Screen Snapshot Imported into a Spreadsheet
LAN Interface Supplement
5-17
6
Controlling the Analyzer via the
LAN
6-1
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
About This Chapter
About This Chapter
NOTE
The example programs described in this chapter are on the Example
Programs Disk that was shipped with your analyzer.
This chapter contains important information about how to control your
analyzer. It includes a number of example programs, and has the
following sections:
• Using Socket Programming to Control Your Analyzer
• Controlling the Analyzer via the Dynamic Data Disk
• Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
• IBASIC Communication across the LAN
• Controlling Multiple Analyzers using a Perl Script
• Controlling the Analyzer using HP VEE
• Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™ Applet
• Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN
6-2
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Using Socket Programming to Control Your Analyzer
Using Socket Programming to Control
Your Analyzer
Your analyzer implements a sockets applications programming interface
(API) compatible with Berkeley sockets, Winsock, and other standard
sockets APIs. You can write programs using sockets to control your
analyzer by sending SCPI commands to a socket connection you create in
your program. Refer to “Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program” on
page 6-9 and “Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™ Applet” on page
6-33 for example programs using sockets to control the analyzer.
Setting Up Your Analyzer for Socket
Programming
Before you can use socket programming, you must set up your analyzer
by setting a socket port number. Follow the steps below to set up a port
number for socket programming:
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
Socket Port No. .
LAN
SCPI Sock. Setup
2. Enter the port number that you will use for your socket connection to
the analyzer.
Port 5025 is set up for you as a default value.
NOTE
Ports 1000 and below are reserved for common services such as Telnet,
FTP, etc. It is good practice to select a port number greater than 2001 for
the custom socket services you write. Consult your system administrator
to find out what ports are available for your use.
If you would like to select or restore the default value for the
Socket Port No. , press SYSTEM OPTIONS LAN
SCPI Sock. Setup Restore Defaults
NOTE
All of the example programs in this chapter that use socket
programming use port 5025. If you change the port setting in your
analyzer, and you use the example programs, be sure to change the port
number in the programs source listings also.
LAN Interface Supplement
6-3
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer via the Dynamic Data Disk
Controlling the Analyzer via the
Dynamic Data Disk
You can control your analyzer by accessing the data directory over the
LAN. With this method you can do the following:
• load instrument states
• load and run IBASIC programs
• load trace data
• send SCPI command sequences to the analyzer
See “The Dynamic Data Disk” on page 5-2 and see “IBASIC
Communication across the LAN” on page 6-24.
6-4
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Entering Commands Directly with Telnet
Entering Commands Directly with
Telnet
Before connecting to your analyzer using telnet, you must have
connected and configured your analyzer as described in Chapter 1,
“Connecting and Configuring the Analyzer.”
Using telnet to send commands to your analyzer works in a similar way
to communicating over GPIB; you establish a connection with the
analyzer, and then send or receive information using SCPI commands.
NOTE
If you need to control the GPIB using “device clear” or SRQ’s, you can use
SICL LAN. SICL LAN provides control of your analyzer via GPIB over
the LAN. See “Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN” on page 6-42.
The syntax of the telnet command is
telnet <hostname>
or
telnet <IP address>
NOTE
You must have an entry in your HOSTS file for your analyzer in order to
specify your analyzer by name in a telnet command. Alternately, you
can enter the IP address directly in the telnet command, in place of the
analyzer name. See “Using a Local HOSTS File” on page 7-11 for details.
For example, type
telnet 15.4.45.255
A brief message appears confirming the connection, and tells you the
escape sequence for breaking the connection:
Trying...
Connected to 15.4.45.255.
Escape character is '^]'.
login:
LAN Interface Supplement
6-5
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Entering Commands Directly with Telnet
When you connect to the analyzer, the analyzer will prompt you for a
user name and password. Enter a user name and password that appear
in the user access list. Refer to “Managing User Names and Passwords”
on page 1-13 for information about the user access list. After you have
entered a valid user name and password, the analyzer will display a
welcome message and a command prompt:
Welcome to the HP871xE Network Analyzer at <IP address>
SCPI>
The analyzer is now ready to accept your SCPI commands. As you type
analyzer SCPI commands, query results appear on the next line. When
you are done, break the telnet connection using the escape character (in
this case Ctrl and “]”), and type quit. To send a “Device Clear”
command to the analyzer, enter Ctrl c. The analyzer will respond with
the following message:
<Device Clear>
SCPI>
See the detailed example that follows.
6-6
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Entering Commands Directly with Telnet
Telnet Example
To connect to the analyzer named "my8712", enter the following
command:
telnet my8712
The computer responds with the following messages:
Trying...
Connected to my8712
Escape character is '^]'.
login:
Enter a valid user name. The analyzer responds with the following
prompt:
password:
Enter the password for the user name given above. The analyzer
responds with a welcome message and the SCPI prompt:
Welcome to the HP871xE Network Analyzer at 15.4.45.255
SCPI>
You can immediately enter programming (SCPI) commands. Typical
commands might be:
SENS1:FUNC 'XFR:POW:RAT 2,0':DET NBAN;*OPC?
CALC1:MARK:FUNC MAX
CALC1:MARK:POIN?
The above example sets the analyzer to measure transmission, places a
marker on the maximum point, and then queries the analyzer for the
amplitude of the marker.
You need to press Enter after typing in each command. After pressing
Enter on the last line in the example above, the analyzer returns the
amplitude level of the marker to your computer and displays it on the
next line. For example, after typing CALC1:MARK:POIN? and pressing
Enter, the computer would display:
+1.71000000000E+002
When you are done, close the telnet connection. Enter the escape
character to get the telnet prompt. The escape character (Ctrl and "]" in
this example) does not print.
At the telnet prompt, type quit or close.
LAN Interface Supplement
6-7
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Entering Commands Directly with Telnet
The telnet connection closes and you see your regular prompt.
Connection closed.
$
NOTE
You can also control your analyzer from your web browser. See
“Accessing the Analyzer with Your Web Browser” on page 2-4.
NOTE
If your telnet connection is in a mode called "line-by-line," there is no
local echo. This means you will not be able to see the characters you are
typing on your computer's display until after you press the Enter key.
To remedy this, you need to change your telnet connection to
"character-by-character" mode. This can be accomplished in most
systems by escaping out of telnet to the telnet> prompt and then
typing mode char. If this does not work, consult your telnet program's
documentation for how to change to "character-by-character" mode.
6-8
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
Controlling the Analyzer with a C
Program
The following example program demonstrates simple socket
programming. It is written in C, and compiles in the HP-UX UNIX
environment, or the WIN32 environment. It is portable to other UNIX
environments with only minor changes.
In UNIX, LAN communication via sockets is very similar to reading or
writing a file. The only difference is the openSocket() routine, which
uses a few network library routines to create the TCP/IP network
connection. Once this connection is created, the standard fread() and
fwrite() routines are used for network communication.
In Windows, the routines send() and recv() must be used, since fread()
and fwrite() may not work on sockets.
The program reads the analyzer's hostname from the command line,
followed by the SCPI command. It then opens a socket to the analyzer
using port 5025, and sends the command. If the command appears to be
a query, the program queries the analyzer for a response, and prints the
response.
NOTE
Port 5025 is the default port for SCPI socket programming. To use a
different port, refer to “Using Socket Programming to Control Your
Analyzer” on page 6-3.
This example program can also be used as a utility to talk to your
analyzer from the command prompt on your UNIX workstation or
Windows 95 PC, or from within a script.
NOTE
This program is included on the Example Programs Disk shipped with
your analyzer as lanio.c.
LAN Interface Supplement
6-9
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
/*
****************************************************************************
* $Header: lanio.c,v 1.5 96/10/04 20:29:32 roger Exp $
* $Revision: 1.5 $
* $Date: 96/10/04 20:29:32 $
*
* $Contributor:
LSID, MID $
*
* $Description:
Functions to talk to an HP 8711C/12C/13C/14C/30A
*
analyzer via TCP/IP. Uses command-line arguments.
*
*
A TCP/IP connection to port 5025 is established and
*
the resultant file descriptor is used to "talk" to the
*
instrument using regular socket I/O mechanisms. $
*
*
*
* 871xC Examples:
*
*
Query the center frequency:
*
lanio 15.4.43.5 'sens:freq:cent?'
*
*
Select Lin Mag format:
*
lanio my8711.sr.hp.com 'CALC:FORM MLIN'
*
*
Take a sweep, wait for end of sweep, move mkr to peak and query x pos:
*
lanio my8711 ':abort;INIT:CONT OFF;:INIT1;*wai; :calc:mark:max; x?'
*
*
Query X and Y values of marker 1 and marker 2 (assumes they are on):
*
lanio my8711 'calc:mark1:x?;y?; :calc:mark2:x?;y?'
*
*
Check for errors (gets one error):
*
lanio my8711 'syst:err?'
*
*
Send a list of commands from a file, and number them:
*
cat scpi_cmds | lanio -n my8711
*
****************************************************************************
*
* This program compiles and runs under
*
- HP-UX 9.05 (UNIX), using HP cc or gcc:
*
+ cc -Aa
-O -o lanio lanio.c
*
+ gcc -Wall -O -o lanio lanio.c
*
*
- Windows 95, using Microsoft Visual C++ 4.0 Standard Edition
*
- Windows NT 3.51, using Microsoft Visual C++ 4.0
*
+ Be sure to add WSOCK32.LIB to your list of libraries!
*
+ Compile both lanio.c and getopt.c
*
+ Consider re-naming the files to lanio.cpp and getopt.cpp
*
* Considerations:
*
- On UNIX systems, file I/O can be used on network sockets.
*
This makes programming very convenient, since routines like
*
getc(), fgets(), fscanf() and fprintf() can be used. These
*
routines typically use the lower level read() and write() calls.
*
*
- In the Windows environment, file operations such as read(), write(),
*
and close() cannot be assumed to work correctly when applied to
*
sockets. Instead, the functions send() and recv() MUST be used.
*/
6-10
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
/* Support both Win32 and HP-UX UNIX environment */
#ifdef _WIN32
/* Visual C++ 4.0 will define this */
# define WINSOCK
#endif
#ifndef WINSOCK
# ifndef _HPUX_SOURCE
# define _HPUX_SOURCE
# endif
#endif
#include
#include
#include
#include
<stdio.h>
<string.h>
<stdlib.h>
<errno.h>
/*
/*
/*
/*
for
for
for
for
fprintf and NULL */
memcpy and memset */
malloc(), atol() */
strerror
*/
#ifdef WINSOCK
#include <windows.h>
#
#
#
ifndef _WINSOCKAPI_
include <winsock.h>
endif
// BSD-style socket functions
#else /* UNIX with BSD sockets */
#
#
#
include <sys/socket.h>
include <netinet/in.h>
include <netdb.h>
#
#
define SOCKET_ERROR (-1)
define INVALID_SOCKET (-1)
typedef
/* for connect and socket*/
/* for sockaddr_in
*/
/* for gethostbyname
*/
int SOCKET;
#endif /* WINSOCK */
#ifdef WINSOCK
/* Declared in getopt.c. See example programs disk. */
extern char *optarg;
extern int optind;
extern int getopt(int argc, char * const argv[], const char* optstring);
#else
# include <unistd.h>
/* for getopt(3C) */
#endif
#define COMMAND_ERROR (1)
#define NO_CMD_ERROR (0)
#define SCPI_PORT 5025
#define INPUT_BUF_SIZE (64*1024)
/**************************************************************************
* Display usage
**************************************************************************/
static void usage(char *basename)
{
fprintf(stderr,"Usage: %s [-nqu] <hostname> [<command>]\n", basename);
LAN Interface Supplement
6-11
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
fprintf(stderr,"
fprintf(stderr,"
fprintf(stderr,"
fprintf(stderr,"
%s [-nqu] <hostname> < stdin\n", basename);
-n, number output lines\n");
-q, quiet; do NOT echo lines\n");
-e, show messages in error queue when done\n");
}
#ifdef WINSOCK
int init_winsock(void)
{
WORD wVersionRequested;
WSADATA wsaData;
int err;
wVersionRequested = MAKEWORD(1, 1);
wVersionRequested = MAKEWORD(2, 0);
err = WSAStartup(wVersionRequested, &wsaData);
if (err != 0) {
/* Tell the user that we couldn't find a useable */
/* winsock.dll.
*/
fprintf(stderr, "Cannot initialize Winsock 1.1.\n");
return -1;
}
return 0;
}
int close_winsock(void)
{
WSACleanup();
return 0;
}
#endif /* WINSOCK */
/***************************************************************************
*
> $Function: openSocket$
*
* $Description: open a TCP/IP socket connection to the instrument $
*
* $Parameters: $
*
(const char *) hostname . . . . Network name of instrument.
*
This can be in dotted decimal notation.
*
(int) portNumber . . . . . . . The TCP/IP port to talk to.
*
Use 5025 for the SCPI port.
*
* $Return:
(int) . . . . . . . . A file descriptor similar to open(1).$
*
* $Errors:
returns -1 if anything goes wrong $
*
***************************************************************************/
SOCKET openSocket(const char *hostname, int portNumber)
{
struct hostent *hostPtr;
struct sockaddr_in peeraddr_in;
SOCKET s;
6-12
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
memset(&peeraddr_in, 0, sizeof(struct sockaddr_in));
/***********************************************/
/* map the desired host name to internal form. */
/***********************************************/
hostPtr = gethostbyname(hostname);
if (hostPtr == NULL)
{
fprintf(stderr,"unable to resolve hostname '%s'\n", hostname);
return INVALID_SOCKET;
}
/*******************/
/* create a socket */
/*******************/
s = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
if (s == INVALID_SOCKET)
{
fprintf(stderr,"unable to create socket to '%s': %s\n",
hostname, strerror(errno));
return INVALID_SOCKET;
}
memcpy(&peeraddr_in.sin_addr.s_addr, hostPtr->h_addr, hostPtr->h_length);
peeraddr_in.sin_family = AF_INET;
peeraddr_in.sin_port = htons((unsigned short)portNumber);
if (connect(s, (const struct sockaddr*)&peeraddr_in,
sizeof(struct sockaddr_in)) == SOCKET_ERROR)
{
fprintf(stderr,"unable to create socket to '%s': %s\n",
hostname, strerror(errno));
return INVALID_SOCKET;
}
return s;
}
/***************************************************************************
*
> $Function: commandInstrument$
*
* $Description: send a SCPI command to the instrument.$
*
* $Parameters: $
*
(FILE *) . . . . . . . . . file pointer associated with TCP/IP socket.
*
(const char *command) . . SCPI command string.
* $Return: (char *) . . . . . . a pointer to the result string.
*
* $Errors:
returns 0 if send fails $
*
***************************************************************************/
int commandInstrument(SOCKET sock,
const char *command)
{
int count;
LAN Interface Supplement
6-13
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
/* fprintf(stderr, "Sending \"%s\".\n", command); */
if (strchr(command, '\n') == NULL) {
fprintf(stderr, "Warning: missing newline on command %s.\n", command);
}
count = send(sock, command, strlen(command), 0);
if (count == SOCKET_ERROR) {
return COMMAND_ERROR;
}
return NO_CMD_ERROR;
}
/**************************************************************************
* recv_line(): similar to fgets(), but uses recv()
**************************************************************************/
char * recv_line(SOCKET sock, char * result, int maxLength)
{
#ifdef WINSOCK
int cur_length = 0;
int count;
char * ptr = result;
int err = 1;
while (cur_length < maxLength) {
/* Get a byte into ptr */
count = recv(sock, ptr, 1, 0);
/* If no chars to read, stop. */
if (count < 1) {
break;
}
cur_length += count;
/* If we hit a newline, stop. */
if (*ptr == '\n') {
ptr++;
err = 0;
break;
}
ptr++;
}
*ptr = '\0';
if (err) {
return NULL;
} else {
return result;
}
#else
/***********************************************************************
* Simpler UNIX version, using file I/O. recv() version works too.
* This demonstrates how to use file I/O on sockets, in UNIX.
***********************************************************************/
FILE * instFile;
instFile = fdopen(sock, "r+");
if (instFile == NULL)
6-14
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
{
fprintf(stderr, "Unable to create FILE * structure : %s\n",
strerror(errno));
exit(2);
}
return fgets(result, maxLength, instFile);
#endif
}
/***************************************************************************
*
> $Function: queryInstrument$
*
* $Description: send a SCPI command to the instrument, return a response.$
*
* $Parameters: $
*
(FILE *) . . . . . . . . . file pointer associated with TCP/IP socket.
*
(const char *command) . . SCPI command string.
*
(char *result) . . . . . . where to put the result.
*
(size_t) maxLength . . . . maximum size of result array in bytes.
*
* $Return: (long) . . . . . . . The number of bytes in result buffer.
*
* $Errors:
returns 0 if anything goes wrong. $
*
***************************************************************************/
long queryInstrument(SOCKET sock,
const char *command, char *result, size_t maxLength)
{
long ch;
char tmp_buf[8];
long resultBytes = 0;
int command_err;
int count;
/*********************************************************
* Send command to analyzer
*********************************************************/
command_err = commandInstrument(sock, command);
if (command_err) return COMMAND_ERROR;
/*********************************************************
* Read response from analyzer
********************************************************/
count = recv(sock, tmp_buf, 1, 0); /* read 1 char */
ch = tmp_buf[0];
if ((count < 1) || (ch == EOF) || (ch == '\n'))
{
*result = '\0'; /* null terminate result for ascii */
return 0;
}
/* use a do-while so we can break out */
do
{
if (ch == '#')
LAN Interface Supplement
6-15
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
{
/* binary data encountered - figure out what it is */
long numDigits;
long numBytes = 0;
/* char length[10]; */
count = recv(sock, tmp_buf, 1, 0); /* read 1 char */
ch = tmp_buf[0];
if ((count < 1) || (ch == EOF)) break; /* End of file */
if (ch < '0' || ch > '9') break;
numDigits = ch - '0';
/* unexpected char */
if (numDigits)
{
/* read numDigits bytes into result string. */
count = recv(sock, result, (int)numDigits, 0);
result[count] = 0; /* null terminate */
numBytes = atol(result);
}
if (numBytes)
{
resultBytes = 0;
/* Loop until we get all the bytes we requested. */
/* Each call seems to return up to 1457 bytes, on HP-UX 9.05 */
do {
int rcount;
rcount = recv(sock, result, (int)numBytes, 0);
resultBytes += rcount;
result
+= rcount; /* Advance pointer */
} while ( resultBytes < numBytes );
/************************************************************
* For LAN dumps, there is always an extra trailing newline
* Since there is no EOI line. For ASCII dumps this is
* great but for binary dumps, it is not needed.
***********************************************************/
if (resultBytes == numBytes)
{
char junk;
count = recv(sock, &junk, 1, 0);
}
}
else
{
/* indefinite block ... dump til we can an extra line feed */
do
{
if (recv_line(sock, result, maxLength) == NULL) break;
if (strlen(result)==1 && *result == '\n') break;
resultBytes += strlen(result);
result += strlen(result);
} while (1);
}
}
else
{
/* ASCII response (not a binary block) */
*result = (char)ch;
6-16
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
if (recv_line(sock, result+1, maxLength-1) == NULL) return 0;
/* REMOVE trailing newline, if present. And terminate string. */
resultBytes = strlen(result);
if (result[resultBytes-1] == '\n') resultBytes -= 1;
result[resultBytes] = '\0';
}
} while (0);
return resultBytes;
}
/*************************************************************************
*
> $Function: showErrors$
*
* $Description: Query the SCPI error queue, until empty. Print results. $
*
* $Return: (void)
*
*************************************************************************/
void showErrors(SOCKET sock)
{
const char * command = "SYST:ERR?\n";
char result_str[256];
do {
queryInstrument(sock, command, result_str, sizeof(result_str)-1);
/******************************************************************
* Typical result_str:
*
-221,"Settings conflict; Frequency span reduced."
*
+0,"No error"
* Don't bother decoding.
******************************************************************/
if (strncmp(result_str, "+0,", 3) == 0) {
/* Matched +0,"No error" */
break;
}
puts(result_str);
} while (1);
}
/***************************************************************************
*
> $Function: isQuery$
*
* $Description: Test current SCPI command to see if it a query. $
*
* $Return: (unsigned char) . . . non-zero if command is a query. 0 if not.
*
***************************************************************************/
unsigned char isQuery( char* cmd )
{
unsigned char q = 0 ;
LAN Interface Supplement
6-17
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
char *query ;
/*********************************************************/
/* if the command has a '?' in it, use queryInstrument. */
/* otherwise, simply send the command.
*/
/* Actually, we must a little more specific so that
*/
/* marker value queries are treated as commands.
*/
/* Example: SENS:FREQ:CENT (CALC1:MARK1:X?)
*/
/*********************************************************/
if ( (query = strchr(cmd,'?')) != NULL)
{
/* Make sure we don't have a marker value query, or
* any command with a '?' followed by a ')' character.
* This kind of command is not a query from our point of view.
* The analyzer does the query internally, and uses the result.
*/
query++ ;
/* bump past '?' */
while (*query)
{
if (*query == ' ') /* attempt to ignore white spc */
query++ ;
else break ;
}
if ( *query != ')' )
{
q = 1 ;
}
}
return q ;
}
/***************************************************************************
*
> $Function: main$
*
* $Description: Read command line arguments, and talk to analyzer.
Send query results to stdout. $
*
* $Return: (int) . . . non-zero if an error occurs
*
***************************************************************************/
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
SOCKET instSock;
char *charBuf = (char *) malloc(INPUT_BUF_SIZE);
char *basename;
int chr;
char command[1024];
char *destination;
unsigned char quiet = 0;
unsigned char show_errs = 0;
int number = 0;
basename = strrchr(argv[0], '/');
if (basename != NULL)
basename++ ;
6-18
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
else
basename = argv[0];
while ( ( chr = getopt(argc,argv,"qune")) != EOF )
switch (chr)
{
case 'q': quiet = 1; break;
case 'n': number = 1; break ;
case 'e': show_errs = 1; break ;
case 'u':
case '?': usage(basename); exit(1) ;
}
/* now look for hostname and optional <command> */
if (optind < argc)
{
destination = argv[optind++] ;
strcpy(command, "");
if (optind < argc)
{
while (optind < argc) {
/* <hostname> <command> provided; only one command string */
strcat(command, argv[optind++]);
if (optind < argc) {
strcat(command, " ");
} else {
strcat(command, "\n");
}
}
}
else
{
/* Only <hostname> provided; input on <stdin> */
strcpy(command, "");
if (optind > argc)
{
usage(basename);
exit(1);
}
}
}
else
{
/* no hostname! */
usage(basename);
exit(1);
}
/**********************************************/
/* open a socket connection to the instrument */
/**********************************************/
#ifdef WINSOCK
if (init_winsock() != 0) {
exit(1);
}
#endif /* WINSOCK */
instSock = openSocket(destination, SCPI_PORT);
if (instSock == INVALID_SOCKET) {
LAN Interface Supplement
6-19
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
fprintf(stderr, "Unable to open socket.\n");
return 1;
}
/* fprintf(stderr, "Socket opened.\n"); */
if (strlen(command) > 0)
{
/********************************************************/
/* if the command has a '?' in it, use queryInstrument. */
/* otherwise, simply send the command.
*/
/********************************************************/
if ( isQuery(command) )
{
long bufBytes;
bufBytes = queryInstrument(instSock, command,
charBuf, INPUT_BUF_SIZE);
if (!quiet)
{
fwrite(charBuf, bufBytes, 1, stdout);
fwrite("\n", 1, 1, stdout) ;
fflush(stdout);
}
}
else
{
commandInstrument(instSock, command);
}
}
else
{
/* read a line from <stdin> */
while ( gets(charBuf) != NULL )
{
if ( !strlen(charBuf) )
continue ;
if ( *charBuf == '#' || *charBuf == '!' )
continue ;
strcat(charBuf, "\n");
if (!quiet)
{
if (number)
{
char num[10];
sprintf(num,"%d: ",number);
fwrite(num, strlen(num), 1, stdout);
}
fwrite(charBuf, strlen(charBuf), 1, stdout) ;
fflush(stdout);
}
if ( isQuery(charBuf) )
{
long bufBytes;
/* Put the query response into the same buffer as the
* command string appended after the null terminator.
*/
6-20
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
bufBytes = queryInstrument(instSock, charBuf,
charBuf + strlen(charBuf) + 1,
INPUT_BUF_SIZE -strlen(charBuf) );
if (!quiet)
{
fwrite(" ", 2, 1, stdout) ;
fwrite(charBuf + strlen(charBuf)+1, bufBytes, 1, stdout);
fwrite("\n", 1, 1, stdout) ;
fflush(stdout);
}
}
else
{
commandInstrument(instSock, charBuf);
}
if (number) number++;
}
}
if (show_errs) {
showErrors(instSock);
}
#ifdef WINSOCK
closesocket(instSock);
close_winsock();
#else
close(instSock);
#endif /* WINSOCK */
return 0;
}
/* End of lanio.c */
LAN Interface Supplement
6-21
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
/***************************************************************************
getopt(3C)
getopt(3C)
NAME
getopt - get option letter from argument vector
SYNOPSIS
int getopt(int argc, char * const argv[], const char *optstring);
extern char *optarg;
extern int optind, opterr, optopt;
DESCRIPTION
getopt returns the next option letter in argv (starting from argv[1])
that matches a letter in optstring. optstring is a string of
recognized option letters; if a letter is followed by a colon, the
option is expected to have an argument that may or may not be
separated from it by white space. optarg is set to point to the start
of the option argument on return from getopt.
getopt places in optind the argv index of the next argument to be
processed. The external variable optind is initialized to 1 before
the first call to the function getopt.
When all options have been processed (i.e., up to the first non-option
argument), getopt returns EOF. The special option -- can be used to
delimit the end of the options; EOF is returned, and -- is skipped.
***************************************************************************/
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
/* For NULL, EOF */
/* For strchr() */
char
int
/* Global argument pointer. */
/* Global argv index. */
*optarg;
optind = 0;
static char
*scan = NULL;
/* Private scan pointer. */
int getopt( int argc, char * const argv[], const char* optstring)
{
char c;
char *posn;
optarg = NULL;
if (scan == NULL || *scan == '\0') {
if (optind == 0)
optind++;
if (optind >= argc || argv[optind][0] != '-' || argv[optind][1] == '\0')
return(EOF);
if (strcmp(argv[optind], "--")==0) {
optind++;
return(EOF);
}
scan = argv[optind]+1;
6-22
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a C Program
optind++;
}
c = *scan++;
posn = strchr(optstring, c);
/* DDP */
if (posn == NULL || c == ':') {
fprintf(stderr, "%s: unknown option -%c\n", argv[0], c);
return('?');
}
posn++;
if (*posn == ':') {
if (*scan != '\0') {
optarg = scan;
scan = NULL;
} else {
optarg = argv[optind];
optind++;
}
}
return(c);
}
LAN Interface Supplement
6-23
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
IBASIC Communication across the LAN
IBASIC Communication across the LAN
You may need a way for an IBASIC program running on the analyzer to
signal a remote computer that it has completed some operation.
IBASIC cannot communicate directly across LAN using the ASSIGN and
OUTPUT or ENTER commands. However, IBASIC can use the following
SCPI command to send a message to a remote computer via LAN:
DIAGnostic:COMMunicate:LAN:SEND <IP_ADDR>,<PORT_NUM>,<STRING>
This command opens a socket to the remote computer, and sends the
specified string. The <IP_ADDR> argument specifies the IP address of the
remote computer. The <PORT_NUM> argument specifies the port number
to use. The <STRING> is the message to be sent.
For example:
DIAGnostic:COMMunicate:LAN:SEND ‘15.4.40.49’,8001,’Ready!’
If the remote computer is not listening for a LAN connection at the
specified port, this command will block, and wait for the remote
computer to accept the connection. After about 75 seconds, it will time
out. This is the standard TCP/IP timeout period.
The following IBASIC example program demonstrates LAN
communication using IBASIC.
The section “Controlling Multiple Analyzers using a Perl Script” on page
6-28 shows an example of a program that monitors the LAN for a
response from an IBASIC program.
NOTE
This program is included on the Example Programs Disk shipped with
your analyzer as LAN_SEND.
6-24
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
IBASIC Communication across the LAN
100
!
110
!
This program demonstrates how IBASIC can communicate
120
!
with a remote computer via LAN.
130
!
SCPI command that sends a LAN message to the computer:
140
!
150
!
160
!
170
DIM Cmd$[256]
180
DIM Msg$[128]
190
DIM Snum$[16]
200
!
210
! Initialize the instrument
220
!
230
ASSIGN @Na TO 800
240
OUTPUT @Na;"SYST:PRES;*WAI"
250
OUTPUT @Na;"SENS1:STAT ON; *WAI"
260
OUTPUT @Na;"POW1:MODE FIXed"
270
OUTPUT @Na;"DISP:ANN:FREQ1:MODE CSPAN"
280
OUTPUT @Na;"SENS1:FREQ:CENT 177e6;SPAN 200e6;*WAI"
290
! Put sweep in hold
300
OUTPUT @Na;"ABOR;:INIT1:CONT OFF;*WAI"
310
! Sync up with analyzer
320
OUTPUT @Na;"*OPC?"
330
ENTER @Na;Opc
340
!
350
!
360
! Get serial number
370
OUTPUT @Na;"DIAG:SNUM?"
380
ENTER @Na;Snum$
390
Snum$=Snum$[2,11]
400
!
410
! Begin infinite loop:
420
!
- Take sweep
430
!
- Compute bandwidth
440
!
- Send signal to computer
This is done using a
DIAG:COMM:LAN:SEND '15.4.40.49',8003,'Ready!'
8003 is an arbitrary unused port number.
! Freq sweep
! remove quotes
LAN Interface Supplement
6-25
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
IBASIC Communication across the LAN
450
!
460 Loop: !
470
DISP "Taking sweep..."
480
Count=Count+1
490
! Take sweep, and wait for it to finish.
500
OUTPUT @Na;"INIT1;*OPC?"
510
ENTER @Na;Opc
520
! Autoscale trace to give feedback.
530
OUTPUT @Na;"DISP:WIND1:TRAC:Y:AUTO ONCE"
540
! Perform a search for the -3 dB bandwidth of the filter
550
! This function uses several markers to find 4 key values.
560
OUTPUT @Na;"CALC1:MARK:BWID -3;FUNC:RES?"
570
! Read the four values:
580
! frequency, Q and the insertion loss.
590
ENTER @Na;Bwid,Center_f,Q,Loss
600
!
610
! Signal computer that we are done,
620
! so that it can come grab the meas results
630
!
640
! Create a string that looks like this:
650
!
660
! Could send any string.
670
! a file, and send filename, and computer could FTP the file.
680
!
690
Msg$="'Ready!,"&Snum$&","
700
Msg$=Msg$&val$(Bwid)&","&val$(Center_f)&","&val$(Loss)
710
Msg$=Msg$&chr$(10)&"'"
720
!
730
! Send the message to the computer, via LAN
740
!
750
Cmd$="DIAG:COMM:LAN:SEND '15.4.40.49',8003,"&Msg$
760
OUTPUT @Na;Cmd$
770
DISP "Done with loop ";Count;"
780
!
790
! Pause, and wait for computer to grab data.
the bandwidth, center
Ready!,"US36100007",6.159E+7,1.7248E+8,-1.6088<LF>
6-26
Could also save meas results to
Continuing..."
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
IBASIC Communication across the LAN
800
! Computer will send 'PROG:STAT CONT' when ready
810
!
820
PAUSE
830
GOTO Loop
840
END
LAN Interface Supplement
6-27
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling Multiple Analyzers using a Perl Script
Controlling Multiple Analyzers using a
Perl Script
The following Perl script demonstrates how you can control a network of
analyzers from your workstation.
The script downloads an IBASIC program to a group of analyzers. The
IBASIC program makes a measurement, and then signals the computer
that it needs service. (See the previous section, “IBASIC Communication
across the LAN” on page 6-24 to see how the IBASIC program
accomplishes this.)
The computer receives this signal, then queries the analyzer for
measurement data, and then tells the IBASIC program to continue.
NOTE
This program is included on the Example Programs Disk shipped with
your analyzer as lan_serv.
#! /usr/bin/perl
#
# Perl script to listen on a port, and print received messages.
#
# This script is based on the "server" example in the
# book "Programming perl" by O'Reilley & Associates, Inc.
#
# require 'sys/socket.ph';
require 'ctime.pl';
# Not needed on HP-UX
# Allow use of ctime() to get date
# Get the port number from the command line (first arg).
# If no argument, default to a high-numbered port.
# Users can use ports above 1024 or so.
($port) = @ARGV;
$port = 8003 unless $port;
$AF_INET = 2;
$SOCK_STREAM = 1;
$PF_INET = $AF_INET;
# from /usr/include/sys/socket.h
# from /usr/include/sys/socket.h
# from /usr/include/sys/socket.h
# Is this line noise? No, it's the pack format:
# S = unsigned short, n = short in network order
# a4 = 4 ascii characters, null padded,
# x8 = 8 null bytes (?)
$sockaddr = 'S n a4 x8';
chop($this_hostname = `hostname`);
6-28
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling Multiple Analyzers using a Perl Script
($name, $alias, $proto) = getprotobyname('tcp');
#
# Create arguments for bind() and connect() calls, below.
#
0000 = Wildcard address
#
$thisport = pack($sockaddr, $AF_INET, $port, "\0\0\0\0");
select(NEW_SOCK);
$| = 1;
select(stdout);
#
# Open a network connection via a socket
#
socket(SOCK, $PF_INET, $SOCK_STREAM, $proto) ||
die "cannot create socket: $!\n";
bind(SOCK, $thisport)
||
die "cannot bind socket: $!\n";
listen(SOCK, SOMAXCONN)
||
die "cannot listen socket: $!\n";
printf "Listening on port %d.\n", $port;
#
#
for ($con = 1;; $con++) {
#
# Wait for incomming connections
#
$client_addr = accept(NEW_SOCK, SOCK) ||
die "cannot accept socket: $!\n";
# We have a connection!
# printf("Accepted connection #$con!\n");
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
Here we used to call fork() to fork a child process.
However, this causes problems if the parent doesn't wait()
for the child -- zombie child processes are left behind!
To fix this, it might be better to exec() the child process
code so that it doesn't wait for the parent.
This way, we can handle multipe overlapping messages.
Even if we don't fork(), listen() will allow multiple
pending connections.
if (($child = fork()) == 0) {
#
# Get info about incoming connection, and print it
#
($af, $port, $ipaddr) = unpack($sockaddr, $client_addr);
@ipaddr = unpack('C4', $ipaddr);
$IP_addr = sprintf("%d.%d.%d.%d",
@ipaddr[0], @ipaddr[1], @ipaddr[2], @ipaddr[3]);
$Date = &ctime(time()); # "Mon Oct 21 21:52:22 PDT 1996\n"
printf "%d: Got message from %s at %s", $con, $IP_addr, $Date;
#
# Read incoming message, and save it to a file
LAN Interface Supplement
6-29
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling Multiple Analyzers using a Perl Script
# Append it to a file named
data.IP_addr giving
# each analyzer its own data file.
#
$file = "./data.$IP_addr";
# print "Routing input to $file.\n";
open(FILE_OUT, ">> $file") || die "Cannot open $file: $!";
print FILE_OUT $Date;
while (<NEW_SOCK>) {
print FILE_OUT "$_";
}
close(NEW_SOCK);
close(FILE_OUT);
# Tell the instrument's IBASIC program to continue
system("lanio $IP_addr 'PROGram:STATe CONT'");
}
exit 0;
6-30
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer using HP VEE
Controlling the Analyzer using HP VEE
To control your analyzer via LAN using HP VEE, click on the VEE menu
titled "I/O." Then select "To/From Socket" and position the I/O object box
on the screen. Fill in the following fields:
Connect Port:
Host Name:
Timeout:
5025
<hostname>
15
For faster troubleshooting, you may want to set the timeout to a smaller
number. If the hostname you enter doesn't work, try using the IP address
of your analyzer (example: 15.4.43.5). Using the IP address rather
than the hostname may also be faster. See Figure 6-1 for an example of
an HP VEE screen.
NOTE
If you need to control the GPIB using “device clear” or SRQs, you can use
SICL LAN. SICL LAN provides control of your analyzer via GPIB. See
“Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN” on page 6-42.
LAN Interface Supplement
6-31
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer using HP VEE
Figure 6-1
Sample HP VEE Screen
6-32
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™ Applet
Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™
Applet
The following example program demonstrates simple socket
programming with Java. It is written in Java programming language,
and will compile with Java compilers versions 1.0 and above.
This program is on the Example Programs Disk that was shipped with
your analyzer. Please read the README file on the Example Programs
Disk before using this program.
import
import
import
import
java.awt.*;
java.io.*;
java.net.*;
java.applet.*;
//
//
//
//
//
This is a SCPI Demo to demonstrate how one can communicate with the
HP87xx network analyzer with a JAVA capable browser. This is the
Main class for the SCPI Demo. This applet will need Socks.class to
support the I/O commands and a ScpiDemo.html for a browser to load
the applet.
//
//
//
//
//
To use this applet, either compile this applet with a Java compiler
or use the existing compiled classes. copy ScpiDemo.class,
Socks.class and ScpiDemo.html to a floppy. Insert the floppy into
your instrument. Load up a browser on your computer and do the
following:
//
1. Load this URL in your browser:
//
http://<Your instrument's IP address or name>/int/ScpiDemo.html
//
//
//
//
//
//
2. There should be two text windows show up in the browser:
The top one is the SCPI response text area for any response
coming back from the instrument. The bottom one is for you
to enter a SCPI command. Type in a SCPI command and hit enter.
If the command expects a response, it will show up in the top
window.
public class ScpiDemo extends java.applet.Applet implements Runnable {
Thread
responseThread;
Socks
sck;
URL
appletBase;
TextField
scpiCommand = new TextField();
TextArea
scpiResponse = new TextArea(10, 60);
LAN Interface Supplement
6-33
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™ Applet
Panel
southPanel = new Panel();
Panel
p;
// Initialize the applets
public void init() {
SetupSockets();
SetupPanels();
// Set up font type for both panels
Font font = new Font("TimesRoman", Font.BOLD,14);
scpiResponse.setFont(font);
scpiCommand.setFont(font);
scpiResponse.appendText("SCPI Demo Program:
Response messages\n");
scpiResponse.appendText("-------------------------------------\n");
}
// This routine is called whenever the applet is actived
public void start() {
// Open the sockets if not already opened
sck.OpenSockets();
// Start a response thread
StartResponseThread(true);
}
// This routine is called whenever the applet is out of scope
// i.e. minimize browser
public void stop() {
// Close all local sockets
sck.CloseSockets();
// Kill the response thread
StartResponseThread(false);
}
// Action for sending out scpi commands
6-34
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™ Applet
// This routine is called whenever a command is received from the
// SCPI command panel.
public boolean action(Event evt, Object what) {
// If this is the correct target
if (evt.target == scpiCommand) {
// Get the scpi command
String str = scpiCommand.getText();
// Send it out to the Scpi socket
sck.ScpiWriteLine(str);
// Query for any error
sck.ScpiWriteLine("syst:err?");
return true;
}
return false;
}
// Start/Stop a Response thread to display the response strings
private void StartResponseThread(boolean start) {
if (start) {
// Start a response thread
responseThread = new Thread(this);
responseThread.start();
}
else {
// Kill the response thread
responseThread = null;
}
}
// Response thread running
public void run() {
String str = "";
// Initialize str to null
LAN Interface Supplement
6-35
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™ Applet
// Clear the error queue before starting the thread
// in case if there's any error messages from the previous actions
while ( str.indexOf("No error") == -1 ) {
sck.ScpiWriteLine("syst:err?");
str = sck.ScpiReadLine();
}
// Start receiving response or error messages
while(true) {
str = sck.ScpiReadLine();
// If response messages is "No error", do no display it
if ( str.indexOf("No error") == -1 ) {
// Display the error message in the Response panel
scpiResponse.appendText(str+"\n");
// Query for any error messages
sck.ScpiWriteLine("syst:err?");
}
}
}
// Set up and open the SCPI sockets
private void SetupSockets() {
// Get server url
appletBase = (URL)getCodeBase();
// Open the sockets
sck = new Socks(appletBase);
}
// Set up the SCPI command and response panels
private void SetupPanels() {
// Set up SCPI command panel
southPanel.setLayout(new GridLayout(1, 1));
6-36
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™ Applet
p = new Panel();
p.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
p.add("West", new Label("SCPI command:"));
p.add("Center", scpiCommand);
southPanel.add(p);
// Set up the Response panel
setLayout(new BorderLayout(2,2));
add("Center", scpiResponse);
add("South", southPanel);
}
}
//
Socks class is responsible for open/close/read/write operations
//
from the predefined socket ports.
//
the only port used is 5025 for the SCPI port.
For this example program,
class Socks extends java.applet.Applet {
// Socket Info
// To add a new socket, add a constant here,
// change MAX_NUM_OF_SOCKETS
// then, edit the constructor for the new socket.
public final int SCPI=0;
private final int MAX_NUM_OF_SOCKETS=1;
// Port number
// 5025 is the dedicated port number for HP8711's SCPI port
private final int SCPI_PORT = 5025;
// Socket info
private URL appletBase;
private Socket[] sock = new Socket[MAX_NUM_OF_SOCKETS];
private DataInputStream[] sockIn=new DataInputStream[MAX_NUM_OF_SOCKETS];
private PrintStream[] sockOut = new PrintStream[MAX_NUM_OF_SOCKETS];
private int[] port = new int[MAX_NUM_OF_SOCKETS];
LAN Interface Supplement
6-37
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™ Applet
private boolean[] sockOpen = new boolean[MAX_NUM_OF_SOCKETS];
// Constructor
Socks(URL appletB)
{
appletBase = appletB;
// Set up for port array.
port[SCPI] = SCPI_PORT;
// Initialize the sock array
for ( int i = 0; i < MAX_NUM_OF_SOCKETS; i++ ) {
sock[i] = null;
sockIn[i] = null;
sockOut[i] = null;
sockOpen[i] = false;
}
}
//***** Sockects open/close routines
// Open the socket(s) if not already opened
public void OpenSockets()
{
try {
// Open each socket if possible
for ( int i = 0; i < MAX_NUM_OF_SOCKETS; i++ ) {
if ( !sockOpen[i] ) {
sock[i] = new Socket(appletBase.getHost(),port[i]);
sockIn[i]=new DataInputStream(sock[i].getInputStream());
sockOut[i]=new PrintStream(sock[i].getOutputStream());
if ( (sock[i] != null) && (sockIn[i] != null) &&
(sockOut[i] != null) ) {
sockOpen[i] = true;
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LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™ Applet
}
}
}
}
catch (IOException e) {
System.out.println("Sock, Open Error "+e.getMessage());
}
}
// Close the socket(s) if opened
public void CloseSocket(int s)
{
try {
if ( sockOpen[s] == true ) {
// write blank line to exit servers elegantly
sockOut[s].println();
sockOut[s].flush();
sockIn[s].close();
sockOut[s].close();
sock[s].close();
sockOpen[s] = false;
}
}
catch (IOException e) {
System.out.println("Sock, Close Error "+e.getMessage());
}
}
// Close all sockets
public void CloseSockets()
{
for ( int i=0; i < MAX_NUM_OF_SOCKETS; i++ ) {
LAN Interface Supplement
6-39
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™ Applet
CloseSocket(i);
}
}
// Return the status of the socket, open or close.
public boolean SockOpen(int s)
{
return sockOpen[s];
}
//************* Socket I/O routines.
//*** I/O routines for SCPI socket
// Write an ASCII string with carriage return to SCPI socket
public void ScpiWriteLine(String command)
{
if ( SockOpen(SCPI) ) {
sockOut[SCPI].println(command);
sockOut[SCPI].flush();
}
}
// Read an ASCII string, terminated with carriage return
// from SCPI socket
public String ScpiReadLine()
{
try {
if ( SockOpen(SCPI) ) {
return sockIn[SCPI].readLine();
}
}
catch (IOException e) {
System.out.println("Scpi Read Line Error "+e.getMessage());
}
6-40
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer with a Java™ Applet
return null;
}
// Read a byte from SCPI socket
public byte ScpiReadByte()
{
try {
if ( SockOpen(SCPI) ) {
return sockIn[SCPI].readByte();
}
}
catch (IOException e) {
System.out.println("Scpi Read Byte Error "+e.getMessage());
}
return 0;
}
}
LAN Interface Supplement
6-41
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN
Controlling the Analyzer using SICL
LAN
SICL LAN is a LAN protocol using the Standard Instrument Control
Library (SICL). It provides control of your analyzer over the LAN, using
a variety of computing platforms, I/O interfaces, and operating systems.
With SICL LAN, you control your remote analyzer over the LAN with the
same methods you use for a local analyzer connected directly to the
controller with the GPIB.
Your analyzer implements a SICL LAN server. To control the analyzer,
you need a SICL LAN client application running on a computer or
workstation that is connected to the analyzer over a LAN. Typical
applications implementing a SICL LAN client include:
• HP VEE
• HP BASIC
• National Instrument’s LabView with HP VISA/SICL client drivers
NOTE
The SICL LAN protocol is Agilent’s implementation of the VXI-11
Instrument Protocol, defined by the VXIbus Consortium working group.
At the time of the publication of this manual, National Instruments’
VISA does not support the VXI-11 Instrument Protocol. However, future
revisions of National Instruments’ VISA will support the VX-11 protocol.
Contact National Instruments for their release date.
SICL LAN can be used with Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT, and
HP-UX.
6-42
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN
Collecting SICL LAN Setup Information
Before you set up your analyzer as a SICL LAN server, you will need to
collect some information about your HP VISA/SICL LAN client
application. Record the following parameters from your HP VISA/SICL
LAN client application after you have set it up:
GPIB name
The GPIB name is the name given to
a device used to communicate with
the analyzer. hpib and gpib are
typical GPIB names. Your analyzer is
shipped with gpib as the GPIB
name. The GPIB name is the same as
the remote SICL address.
GPIB logical unit
The logical unit number is a unique
integer assigned to the device to be
controlled using SICL LAN. Your
analyzer is shipped with the logical
unit number set to 7.
Numbers 0 through 30, excluding 21,
are valid logical unit numbers for
your analyzer. Logical unit number
21 is used for the analyzer’s internal
emulation mode. (If you are using HP
VEE and SICL LAN, the logical unit
number is limited to the range of 0-8.)
GPIB device address
The device address is the GPIB
device address (bus address) assigned
to the device to be controlled using
SICL LAN. Your analyzer is shipped
with the GPIB device address set to
18. You can enter any address from 0
to 1024 as an GPIB address.
The SICL LAN server uses the GPIB name, GPIB logical unit number,
and GPIB address configuration on the SICL LAN client to communicate
with the client. You must match these parameters exactly when you set
up the SICL LAN client and server.
LAN Interface Supplement
6-43
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN
Configuring Your Analyzer as a SICL LAN
Server
After you have collected the required information from the SICL LAN
client, perform the following steps to set up your analyzer as a SICL LAN
server:
1. Enter the GPIB name
Press SYSTEM OPTIONS LAN SICL LAN Setup
GPIB Name , enter the GPIB name from the SICL LAN client, and
press ENTER . Press Clear Entry if you need to replace the
existing entry.
2. Enter the GPIB logical unit number
Press GPIB Log. Unit, enter the GPIB logical unit number from the
SICL LAN client, and press ENTER .
3. Enter the GPIB device address
Press GPIB Dev. Address, enter the GPIB device address from the
SICL LAN client, and press ENTER .
If you want to restore the default settings, press Restore Defaults .
4. Turn the analyzer off, then on.
Configuring Your PC as a SICL LAN Client
The descriptions here are based on HP’s VISA revision G.02.02, model
number HP2094G. A copy of HP’s VISA can be found on the following
website:
http://www.tm.agilent.com/tmo/software/English/HP_IO_Libraries.
html.
These descriptions assume a LAN connection between your computer
and network analyzer. They are not written for the GPIB-to-LAN
gateway.
1. Install HP VISA revision G.02.02 or higher.
2. Run I/O configuration.
3. Select LAN Client from the Available Interface Types.
4. Press Configure.
6-44
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN
5. Enter an interface name, such as lan1.
6. Enter a logical unit number, such as 7.
7. Select OK.
8. Select VISA LAN Client from the Available Interface Types.
9. Press Configure.
10. Enter a VISA Interface name, such as GPIB1.
11. Enter the hostname or IP address of your analyzer in the Hostname
field, such as my8712.hp.com
12. Enter a remote SICL address, such as gpib1.
13. Set the LAN interface to match the defined LAN client (lan1 in this
example).
14. Select OK.
15. Close I/O Configuration by selecting OK.
Controlling Your Analyzer with SICL LAN and
HP VEE
Before you can use SICL LAN with HP VEE, you need to set up HP
VISA/SICL LAN I/O drivers for use with your HP VEE application.
Consult your HP VEE documentation for information how to do this.
NOTE
If you are using HP VEE and SICL LAN, the logical unit number is
limited to the range of 0–8.
The logical unit number is the same as the interface select code (ISC).
HP VEE reserves ISC values 9--18, and does not allow you to use them
for SICL/LAN communications with your analyzer. HP VEE also does
not allow any ISC values higher than 18.
After you have the VISA/SICL LAN I/O drivers installed, perform the
steps below to set up HP VEE to control your analyzer:
1. On your computer or workstation, select
I/O|Instrument Manager.
(See Figure 6-2.)
2. Add a new GPIB device with an address of 7XX, where XX is the
GPIB device address from your analyzer.
LAN Interface Supplement
6-45
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN
Figure 6-2
I/O|Instrument Manager Menu
6-46
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN
Figure 6-3
Adding Your Analyzer as an HP VEE Device
LAN Interface Supplement
6-47
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN
To send SCPI commands to the analyzer, select I/O|Instrument
Manager, and the GPIB device just added. Select Direct I/O. You can now
type SCPI commands in the command window, and they will be sent over
the LAN to your analyzer.
Figure 6-4
Sending SCPI Commands Directly to Your Analyzer
See the HP VEE example program for more details.
6-48
LAN Interface Supplement
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN
Controlling Your Analyzer with SICL LAN and
HP BASIC for Windows
Before you can use HP BASIC for Windows with SICL LAN, you need to
set up HP VISA/SICL LAN I/O drivers for use with your HP BASIC
applications. Consult your HP BASIC documentation for information
how to do this.
To set up SICL LAN for HP BASIC, add the following statement to the
AUTOST program on your PC (all on a single line):
LOAD BIN “HPIBS;DEV lan[analyzer IP address]:HP-IB name
TIME 30 ISC 7”
Replace analyzer IP address with the IP address of your analyzer,
HP-IB name with the GPIB name given to your analyzer, and 7 with the
logical unit number.
For example, the following LOAD statement should be added to your
AUTOST program for the parameters listed below:
analyzer IP
address
12.22.344.225
analyzer GPIB
name
test02
logical unit
number
7
timeout value
(seconds)
30
LOAD statement (all on a single line)
LOAD BIN “HPIBS;DEV lan[12.22.344.225]:test02 TIME 30
ISC 7”
LAN Interface Supplement
6-49
Controlling the Analyzer via the LAN
Controlling the Analyzer using SICL LAN
Consult your HP BASIC documentation to learn how to load the SICL
driver for HP BASIC.
After the SICL driver is loaded, you control your analyzer using
commands such as the following:
OUTPUT 718; “*IDN?”
ENTER 718; S$
where 18 is the device address for the analyzer.
See the HP BASIC example program in this chapter for more
information.
Controlling Your Analyzer with SICL LAN and
HP BASIC for UNIX (Rocky Mountain BASIC)
Before you can use HP Rocky Mountain Basic (HP RMB) with SICL
LAN, you will need to set up the HP SICL LAN I/O drivers for HPRMB.
Consult your system administrator for details.
Create a .rmbrc file in your root directory of your UNIX workstation
with the following entries:
SELECTIVE_OPEN=ON
Interface 8= “lan[analyzer IP address]:HPIB name”;NORMAL
Replace analyzer IP address with the IP address of your analyzer,
and GPIB name with the GPIB name given to your analyzer. Also replace
the “8” of Interface 8 with the logical unit number. Consult your
HPRMB documentation for the exact syntax.
After your SICL driver is configured correctly on your UNIX
workstation, you control your analyzer using commands such as the
following:
OUTPUT 818; “*IDN?”
ENTER 818; S$
where 18 is the device address for the analyzer.
6-50
LAN Interface Supplement
7
Using the Network File System
(NFS)
7-1
Using the Network File System (NFS)
About This Chapter
About This Chapter
This chapter provides a short introduction to the network file system
(NFS), and describes how to configure your analyzer to use NFS. The
following topics are included:
• Introduction to NFS
• Setting Up NFS
• Using NFS Automount—Connecting to Network Resources
Automatically
7-2
LAN Interface Supplement
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Introduction to NFS
Introduction to NFS
Network file system (NFS) is a client/server application that provides
access to remote1 files and directories using the LAN. With NFS, remote
files and directories behave like local2 files and directories. The remote
file system can be used from your analyzer's Save/Recall menu as if it
were a local device. The remote file system can be part of a PC,
workstation, or other computing device.
NFS allows you to save test data from your analyzer directly to a remote
directory; the remote machine does not have to initiate an ftp session to
retrieve the data. This can make saving data in an automated
environment, with many analyzers running independently, very easy. As
a result, NFS simplifies central management of analyzer files and
directories.
NFS requires an NFS server and an NFS client. The server is a computer
that makes its local file system available to NFS clients, using a process
called exporting (or sharing). An NFS client is a computer that uses the
file system made available by the NFS server using a process called
mounting. The file system that is exported by the NFS server is
mounted by the NFS client and behaves like part of the client’s local file
system. When using NFS, your analyzer comprises the NFS client part of
the Network File System. You must provide a workstation, PC or other
computer to serve as the NFS server, and it must include an NFS server
application.
1. Remote files and directories are part of a file system different than
the analyzer file system—they are stored remotely in a computer.
2. Local files and directories are part of the analyzer file system—they are stored locally within the analyzer.
LAN Interface Supplement
7-3
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Introduction to NFS
NFS Protocols
Current implementations of NFS use transmission control protocol
(TCP) as the transport protocol1 over the network. TCP is a reliable
protocol designed to provide guaranteed data delivery. Your analyzer
uses TCP/IP over the LAN.
NFS also uses remote procedure call (RPC) protocol. RPC is a
client/server protocol providing remote services to a local application
(program). The local application can request and execute a procedure on
a remote machine, pass data to the remote procedure, and retrieve data
from the remote procedure. RPC is a key component of the NFS.
1. The transport protocol governs how data is transmitted over a network.
7-4
LAN Interface Supplement
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
Setting Up NFS
Configuring the Analyzer as an NFS Client
NFS Fundamentals
Your analyzer implements the client side of the network file system
(NFS). As an NFS client, your analyzer accesses the remote1 file system
by mounting the remote file system. If the remote file system is mounted
successfully, it can be accessed from your analyzer's Save/Recall menu
as if it were a local2 device.
To configure the NFS client on your analyzer, you will need to set up an
NFS server on the remote system. NFS servers are readily available with
most UNIX operating systems. To use NFS with a PC, you will need
NFS server software for the PC. Consult your network administrator
about obtaining an NFS server for your PC.
NFS uses remote procedure call (RPC) authentication for file access
permissions. To be able to read and write to your remote file system, you
must enter a user ID and a group ID for your analyzer. A default user ID
(2001) and a default group ID (100) are assigned for you before the
analyzer is shipped. If the defaults do not work for you, consult your
network administrator about obtaining a user ID and group ID.
1. Remote files and directories are part of a file system different than
the analyzer file system—they are stored remotely in a computer.
2. Local files and directories are part of the analyzer file system—they are stored locally within the analyzer.
LAN Interface Supplement
7-5
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
Preliminary Requirements
Before setting up the NFS client on your analyzer, do the following:
• Set up an NFS server on the remote system. Consult your system
administrator if you are unsure how to do this.
• Collect the following information required to configure your analyzer
as the NFS client:
✓ The host name and IP address for the remote system (the server).
For example: host1 and 123.046.025.221
✓ The name of your remote file system or subdirectory.
For example: /users/yourname/na_setups
✓ The user ID and the group ID to allow access to the remote host
file system.
For example: user ID = 2001, group ID = 100
✓ A local name to assign to the remote file system. Choose a local
name which is short and easy to remember. Append a colon (:) or
some other special character if you need to distinguish a device
name from a subdirectory name on your Save/Recall menu.
For example: c:\nfs\setups
NOTE
You may find it convenient to use an external keyboard when performing
the following procedure.
7-6
LAN Interface Supplement
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
Mounting a Remote Host File System
The file system that is exported by the NFS server is mounted by the
NFS client, and behaves like part of the local file system. Perform the
following procedure to set up your analyzer to mount to a remote host file
system:
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
LAN NFS Device Setup .
2. Press Mount NFS Device .
3. Type the remote host IP address or remote hostname in the dialog
box displayed on the screen.
4. Press Enter to confirm your entry when you are done.
NOTE
In order to use a remote hostname , you must set up a HOSTS file on your
local non-volatile RAM Disk. A HOSTS file is not required to use a host IP
address. See “Using a Local HOSTS File” on page 7-11 for details.
5. Type the name of the remote host file system or subdirectory in the
dialog box now displayed.
6. Press Enter to confirm your entry when you are done.
NOTE
All NFS directory names and file names are case-sensitive. This is unlike
the local analyzer file system where directory and file names are not
case-sensitive.
7. If required, press Clear Entry and type in a new name for the
default local file system name provided.
8. Press Enter when you are done changing the name, or if the default
name is acceptable.
To retype the file system names, first press [Cancel], then press
[Remote IP Addr/Host] to start from the beginning.
At this point, the analyzer will attempt to mount the remote file
system. If the remote file system is successfully mounted, the
analyzer will display
NFS Mount to <host> successful
where <host> is the remote host name or IP address.
LAN Interface Supplement
7-7
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
NOTE
You can mount up to seven remote NFS file systems as servers. An error
will occur if you try to mount more than seven devices.
NOTE
When you press Enter on the NFS Setup entry line without
inputting a name or address, the analyzer will attempt to mount your
NFS device using the existing entries.
NOTE
If the local file system name is empty because Clear Entry has been
used, or if Enter was pressed without changing the default name, the
remote file system name will be used as the local file system name.
9. If the remote file system is mounted successfully, you can press
[Automount At Powerup] to mount the remote file system
automatically on powerup. You can also set up automount devices in
the [Automount Setup] menu. See “Using NFS
Automount—Connecting to Network Resources Automatically” on
page 7-13 for details.
7-8
LAN Interface Supplement
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
Confirming Remote File System Mounting
To find out if a remote file system has been successfully mounted, press
NFS Device Setup
SYSTEM OPTIONS LAN
Dvice Setup
NFS Device Table
Dvice Setup
The analyzer will display an NFS device table containing three columns
(left to right):
1. Device number, in the order mounted
2. Name of the local file system
3. Remote file system name and IP address
Press Local Path to view an expanded version of your local file
system.
Press Remote Path to view an expanded version of your remote file
system.
Setting up NFS Client Authentication IDs
Perform the following steps to set up authentication IDs for your NFS
client:
NFS Device Setup
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS LAN
Dvice Setup
Authentication .
Dvice Setup
2. Press User ID and type in the user ID for your remote file system.
3. Press Group ID and type in the group ID for your remote file
system.
NOTE
Some systems use only the user ID. If your remote file system does not
use a group ID, use the default Group ID value.
LAN Interface Supplement
7-9
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
Unmounting a Remote File System
Perform the following steps to unmount a remote file system from your
analyzer:
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
NOTE
LAN
Unmount NFS Device .
If the displayed NFS device table is empty, there are no mounted file
systems to unmount.
2. Select the device that you want to unmount and press the softkey
corresponding to that device.
If the device is successfully unmounted, the device will be removed from
the displayed NFS device table. If the NFS device is not present, an error
message will be displayed after the analyzer times out, and the device
will be removed from the NFS device table. The device will also be
removed from the NFS device table if it is unmounted unsuccessfully due
to disconnected links.
NOTE
The NFS device table always compacts itself and refreshes the displayed
information after a successful unmount.
7-10
LAN Interface Supplement
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
Using a Local HOSTS File
You can add one or more host names of other network devices to a local
HOSTS file. This file associates host IP addresses with host names, so
that you can use the host name instead of the host IP address to mount
and automount Network File System (NFS) devices.
On powerup, your analyzer will load the local HOSTS file from
non-volatile RAM. You can then use the host name in
SYSTEM OPTIONS LAN NFS Device Setup and
Setup Setup
NFS Device
SYSTEM OPTIONS LAN Dvice
Automount Dev Setup . Dvice Setup
Dvice Setup
Creating and Saving a Local HOSTS File
You can create a local HOSTS file using an ASCII text editor on your
computer or workstation. Save the file locally, and transfer it to your
analyzer’s non-volatile RAM disk using a 3.5” disk, FTP or NFS. Refer to
“Using FTP to Access the Analyzer” on page 4-3 for information about
disk or FTP file transfers.
HOSTS File Format Rules
The HOSTS file is an ASCII text file formatted according to the following
rules:
1. The file name must be HOSTS, with no file extension.
2. Any combination of upper case and lower case letters can be used in
the file name. The analyzer file system is case-insensitive, and will
accept and use files saved with the name HOSTS, regardless of the
case of the letters originally in the name.
3. Each IP address and host name pair must be on a single line with the
IP address first and the corresponding host name next.
4. The IP address and the corresponding host name must be separated
by at least one space character.
5. Optional comments can be included, and must begin with a “#”
character.
LAN Interface Supplement
7-11
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
The following is an example of a valid HOSTS file:
#
#
# This is a sample hosts file
#
#
#
15.4.45.232
host1
# John Doe's workstation
15.4.45.233
host2
# Jane Doe's PC
If you place the above HOSTS file in non-volatile RAM and power cycle
your analyzer, you can use the name host1 to mount an NFS device by
name instead of the IP address 15.4.45.232.
NOTE
The HOSTS file is loaded only at power-up. If you add new entries to the
file, you will have to cycle power to the instrument in order for the new
entries to take effect.
7-12
LAN Interface Supplement
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
Using NFS Automount—Connecting to
Network Resources Automatically
NFS Automount allows your analyzer to automatically mount one or
more NFS devices on power-up without user intervention.
Adding Devices to the Automount Device Table
NOTE
Adding an NFS device to the automount device table does not guarantee
a successful mount. To ensure a working NFS mount, add NFS devices
to the automount list only after a successful test of the mount process.
See “Configuring the Analyzer as an NFS Client” on page 7-5 for details.
Follow the steps below to add a device to the automount device table:
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS LAN NFS Device Setup
Dvice Setup
Automount Setup .
Dvice Setup
2. Press Remote IP Addr/Host and enter the remote host name or
the IP address in the provided dialog box.
NOTE
Designating an automount NFS host by name requires a local HOSTS file.
See “Using a Local HOSTS File” on page 7-11 for details.
3. Press Enter to confirm your entry.
4. Press Remote Path and enter the remote host file system name in
the provided dialog box.
5. Press Enter to confirm your entry.
6. Press Local Path . The remote file system name is provided as the
default local file system name.
a. Press Enter to use the default local file system name.
b. To use your own local file system name, press Clear Entry and
enter a unique local file system name. Press Enter to confirm
your entry.
NOTE
If the local file system name is NULL or is an empty string (entered by
pressing Clear Entry and Enter without typing anything), the
remote file system name will be used as the local file system name.
7. Press Automount At Powerup to add the NFS file system to the
Dvice
Setup
automount
device
table.
LAN Interface Supplement
7-13
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
NOTE
Pressing Automount At Powerup does not trigger a NFS mount
Dvice
Setup the Analyzer as an NFS Client” on page 7-5 to
process. See
“Configuring
mount NFS devices.
Verifying Automount Entries
Perform the following steps to verify that the NFS device has been
successfully added to the automount device table:
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS LAN NFS Device Setup
Dvice Setup
Automount Setup .
Dvice Setup
2. Press Automount Dev Table to display the automount device
table. Dvice Setup
The automount device table has three columns. The first column lists
the device numbers. The second column lists the given name for your
local file system. The third column lists remote file system names
and the remote host IP addresses. The lines in the automount device
table are listed in the order they were entered.
3. Press Local Path to verify the local file system information.
4. Press Remote Path to verify the remote file system information.
Removing an NFS Device from the Automount Table
Perform the following steps to remove an NFS device from the
automount table:
NFS Device Setup
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS LAN
Dvice Setup
Automount Setup .
Dvice Setup
2. Press Remove Automount . The automount device table will be
Dvice
Setup
displayed
on your
screen.
The numbers on the automount device table match the device
numbers displayed on the softkeys. If the table is empty, you do not
have any NFS devices in the automount device table.
3. Select the device that you want to remove from the table and press
the softkey which corresponds to that device.
NOTE
The automount device table always compacts itself after a successful
removal.
7-14
LAN Interface Supplement
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
Using Save/Recall with NFS
NFS Fundamentals
To access file systems with NFS, you will have to set up at least one NFS
device. See “Configuring the Analyzer as an NFS Client” on page 7-5 in
this chapter for details on how to do this. The following procedures
assume you have already set up at least one NFS device.
Selecting a Remote Device
To save or recall a state, a program, or measurement data to or from an
NFS device, you must first select an NFS device from the [Select Disk]
menu. Since NFS provides transparent access to the remote file system,
the procedure for saving or recalling an instrument state or program
remotely is the same as that used to save or recall an instrument state or
program locally. See Chapter 4, “Accessing the Analyzer's File System
Using FTP,” as well as “Copying Programs to and from the Analyzer” on
page 5-7 and “Saving and Recalling Analyzer States” on page 5-5 for
information on how to save or recall a state or program to a local device.
Also see “Saving and Recalling Measurement Results” in Chapter 4 of
the User’s Guide for your analyzer.
To select an NFS device do the following:
1. Press SAVE RECALL
Select Disk
NFS Device .
The analyzer displays a two-column NFS device table. The first
column contains the device numbers which correspond to the device
numbers on the front panel softkeys. The second column contains the
local path or device names for the NFS devices.
2. Choose an NFS device to use for save/recall and press the
corresponding front panel softkey. If the remote NFS device you
selected is still available, the analyzer will display the directory for
your remote NFS device.
NOTE
The analyzer will report a disk error and switch back to
Non-Vol RAM Disk if there is a network problem, or if the remote
device is not available. You will have to set up the NFS device again
before using it with save/recall.
LAN Interface Supplement
7-15
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
Some of the remote files may show the word unknown in the file
attributes column. This may be due to the lack of appropriate file
access permissions. NFS authentication must be set up correctly for
you to have permission to access certain files on your remote NFS
device. To make sure that all required files are accessible from your
analyzer, confirm that your NFS authentication user ID and group ID
match the corresponding IDs on the remote system. See “Configuring
the Analyzer as an NFS Client” on page 7-5 for details.
Copying Files to a Remote NFS Device
Perform the following steps to copy files from a local device to a remote
NFS device:
1. Press SAVE RECALL
Select Disk .
2. Choose a local device that you want to copy files from and select it by
pressing the corresponding softkey.
3. Press SAVE RECALL
File Utilities to use the file utilities menu.
4. Select the file that you want to copy.
5. Press Copy File to copy the selected file or [Copy All Files] to copy
all the files in the current directory.
6. Press Copy to NFS Device to copy the file or files to an NFS
device. A dialog box with the currently selected NFS device and
selected file name is displayed on top of the screen.
7. Press Enter if the destination device and destination file name is
correct. Otherwise, enter the correct destination file path and press
Enter .
The device name and file name are case-sensitive, and you can
append the file name with either a '/' or '\' between the device name
and the file name.
If you encounter a file access error, make sure that your network and
the remote system are working correctly and that the NFS
authentication IDs are set up correctly.
NOTE
The NFS device name for the destination must match the NFS path
name used when the NFS device was mounted.
7-16
LAN Interface Supplement
Using the Network File System (NFS)
Setting Up NFS
Copying Files from a Remote NFS Device
Perform the following steps to copy files from a remote NFS device to a
local device:
NOTE
Your analyzer does not support file copy from a remote NFS device to
another remote NFS device.
1. Press SAVE RECALL
Select Disk
NFS Device .
2. Choose an NFS device that you want to copy files from and select it by
pressing the corresponding softkey.
3. Press SAVE RECALL
File Utilities to use the file utilities menu.
4. Select the file that you want to copy.
5. Press Copy File to copy the selected file or [Copy All Files] to copy
all the files in the current directory.
6. Press Copy to NonVol RAM , Copy to Vol RAM , or
Copy to 3.5” Disk to copy the file or files to the desired local
device. A dialog box with the currently selected local device and
selected file name is displayed on top of the screen.
7. Press Enter if the destination device and destination file name is
correct. Otherwise, enter the correct destination file path and press
Enter .
The device name and file name are case-sensitive, and you can
append the file name with either a '/' or '\' between the device name
and the file name.
If you encounter a file access error, make sure that your network and
the remote system are working correctly and that the NFS
authentication IDs are set up correctly.
LAN Interface Supplement
7-17
8
General Troubleshooting
8-1
General Troubleshooting
About This Chapter
About This Chapter
This chapter provides troubleshooting information for the LAN interface.
It has four sections:
• “Troubleshooting the Initial Connection” on page 8-3
• “Subnets and Gateways” on page 8-15
• “Solutions to Common Problems” on page 8-18
8-2
LAN Interface Supplement
General Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
Getting the analyzer to work with your network often requires detailed
knowledge of your local network software. This section attempts to help
you with some common problems. Contact your network administrator
for additional assistance.
Assess the Problem
The analyzer LAN interface does not need or include any proprietary
driver software. It was designed to operate with common network
utilities and drivers.
Either a hardware problem or a software problem can prevent the
analyzer's remote file server from communicating over the LAN. The
following common problems may be encountered:
Timeout Errors
Timeout errors such as "Device Timeout," "File Timeout," and
"Operation Timeout," are symptoms of one or both of the following
problems:
• The currently configured timeout limits are too short compared to the
time it takes the LAN to complete some operations. This problem may
occur during periods of increased LAN traffic.
• The LAN connection has failed, or fails occasionally.
To increase your timeout period, refer to your computer documentation
for instructions. Contact your LAN administrator if problems continue.
Packets Routinely Lost
If packets are routinely lost, proceed to the troubleshooting section in
this chapter relating to your network.
Problems Transferring or Copying Files
If you have problems copying files out of or into the analyzer, you might
be experiencing timeout problems. See the previous section on "Timeout
Errors."
LAN Interface Supplement
8-3
General Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
Communications Not Established
If you have just installed and configured the LAN interface and you have
never been able to access the analyzer via ftp or telnet, go directly to
“Ping the Analyzer from Your Computer or Workstation” on page 8-5.
If you have previously been able to access the analyzer via ftp or telnet
and now cannot do so, check the following:
• Has any hardware been added or moved on your network? This
includes adding or removing any workstations or peripherals, or
changing any cabling.
• Have software applications been added to the network?
• Have any configuration files been modified?
• Have any of the following files been deleted or overwritten?
✓ UNIX:
❏ /etc/hosts
❏ /etc/inetd.conf
❏ /etc/services
✓ PCs:
❏ dependent network files
If you know or suspect that something has changed on your network,
consult with your network administrator.
8-4
LAN Interface Supplement
General Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
Ping the Analyzer from Your Computer or
Workstation
Verify the communications link between the computer and the analyzer
remote file server using the ping utility.
From a UNIX workstation, type:
ping hostname 64 10
where 64 is the packet size, and 10 is the number of packets transmitted.
From a DOS or Windows environment, type:
ping hostname 10
where 10 is the number of echo requests.
Normal Response for UNIX
A normal response to the ping will be a total of 9, 10, or possibly 11
packets received with a minimal average round-trip time. The minimal
average will be different from network to network. LAN traffic will cause
the round-trip time to vary widely.
Because the number of packets received depends on your network traffic
and integrity, the normal number might be different for your network.
Normal Response for DOS or Windows
A normal response to the ping will be a total of 9, 10, or possibly 11
packets received if 10 echo requests were specified.
Because the number of packets received depends on your network traffic
and integrity, the normal number might be different for your network.
Error Messages
• If error messages appear, then check the command syntax before
continuing with the troubleshooting. If the syntax is correct, then
resolve the error messages using your network documentation, or by
consulting your network administrator.
• If an unknown host error message appears, then check the node
names database to see that the hostname and IP address for your
analyzer are correctly entered.
LAN Interface Supplement
8-5
General Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
No Response
No packets received indicates no response from a ping.
• If there is no response, try typing in the IP address with the ping
command, instead of using the hostname. Check that the typed
address matches the IP address assigned in the LAN Port Setup
menu, then check the other addresses in the menu.
• Check that the hostname and IP address are correctly entered in the
node names database.
• If you are using a UNIX environment, ping each node along the route
between your workstation and the analyzer, starting with the your
workstation. Ping each gateway, then attempt a ping of the remote
file server.
• If the analyzer still does not respond to ping, then you should suspect
a hardware problem with the analyzer. To check the analyzer
performance, refer to the analyzer’s Service Guide.
• Make sure that you have used the appropriate cable to connect your
analyzer to the LAN. A patch cable can be used to connect your
analyzer to a hub, or a cross-over cable can be used for direct
analyzer–PC links.
Intermittent Response
If you received 1 to 8 packets back, there is probably a problem with the
network. Because the number of packets received depends on your
network traffic and integrity, the number might be different for your
network.
Use a LAN analyzer or LAN management software to monitor activity
and determine where bottlenecks or other problems are occurring. The
analyzer will still function, but communications over the LAN will be
slower.
On a single-client/single-server network, the most likely cause of
intermittent response to an echo request is a hardware problem with the
LAN module installed in the PC, the cable, or the analyzer. To check the
analyzer performance, refer to the analyzer’s Service Guide.
8-6
LAN Interface Supplement
General Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
Ping Your Computer or Other Device from
Your Analyzer
The last section helped you verify connectivity from your computer to
your analyzer. This section helps you verify the connectivity path in the
opposite direction — from your analyzer to your computer.
To Use the Built-In Ping Utility
To check for connectivity to your computer or any other device on your
network from your analyzer:
1. Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
Diagnostic Utilities .
LAN
LAN Port Setup
2. Press IP Address to Ping and enter the IP address of the
computer or device you are trying verify connectivity to.
3. Press Perform Ping .
LAN Interface Supplement
8-7
General Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
Normal Response
A normal response after pressing Perform Ping is shown below. The
analyzer successfully attempts four cycles of communications with the
indicated network device, and displays the response time for each cycle.
Figure 8-1
Example of a Successful Ping
8-8
LAN Interface Supplement
General Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
Timeout Response
If communication is not established with the selected device within one
second for each cycle, the display will look like this:
Figure 8-2
Example of a Failed Ping
LAN Interface Supplement
8-9
General Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
Capturing Network Statistics
Your analyzer can capture a wide range of network statistics to help find
network problems if they occur. This collection and recording is called
network statistic capturing. It captures the network statistics at the
moment that this feature is enabled, like a snapshot. If you enable this
feature, the analyzer will capture network statistics in the following
categories:
• TCP statistics
• IP statistics
• UDP statistics
• local routing table statistics
To enable network statistic capturing, press
SYSTEM OPTIONS LAN LAN Port Setup
Diagnostic Utilities Netstat Capture
If you enable network statistic capturing, a file named NETSTAT.CAP
will be maintained on your non-volatile RAM disk. NETSTAT.CAP is an
ASCII text file containing network statistics for your analyzer. This
information could be useful if network problems occur, and you should
have a printed copy of this file available if you call Agilent Technologies
for support with a network problem.
The following is an example of a NETSTAT.CAP file:
Logged Date: 1999/4/9
15:47:51
->hostShow - host names
hostname
inet address
aliases
--------
------------
-------
HP871xE
15.4.45.2xx
localhost
127.0.0.1
nvBootLine
0.0.0.0
->ifShow "lo0" - statistic for interface lo0
lo (unit number 0):
Flags: (0x69) UP LOOPBACK ARP RUNNING
Internet address: 127.0.0.1
Netmask 0xff000000 Subnetmask 0xff000000
Metric is 0
Maximum Transfer Unit size is 4096
8-10
LAN Interface Supplement
General Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
24 packets received; 24 packets sent
0 input errors; 0 output errors
0 collisions
->ifShow "sn0" - statistic for interface sn0
sn (unit number 0):
Flags: (0x63) UP BROADCAST ARP RUNNING
Internet address: 15.4.45.2xx
Broadcast address: 15.4.47.255
Netmask 0xff000000 Subnetmask 0xfffff800
Ethernet address is 00:60:b0:84:xx:xx
Metric is 0
Maximum Transfer Unit size is 1500
1348 packets received; 0 packets sent
0 input errors; 0 output errors
0 collisions
->inetstatShow - activities for internet protocol sockets
Active Internet connections (including servers)
PCB
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address
-------- ----- ------ ------ -----------------c1fe8e8c TCP
0
0 0.0.0.0.1024
c1fe818c TCP
0
0 0.0.0.0.5025
c1fe8a0c TCP
0
0 0.0.0.0.23
c1fe8b0c TCP
0
0 0.0.0.0.80
c1fe840c TCP
0
0 0.0.0.0.998
c1fe8e0c TCP
0
0 0.0.0.0.1000
c1fe870c TCP
0
0 0.0.0.0.111
c1fe8f8c TCP
0
0 0.0.0.0.513
c1fe940c TCP
0
0 0.0.0.0.21
c1fe830c UDP
0
0 0.0.0.0.1003
c1fe868c UDP
0
0 0.0.0.0.111
c1fe860c UDP
0
0 0.0.0.0.1004
c1fe858c UDP
0
0 0.0.0.0.1005
c1fe850c UDP
0
0 0.0.0.0.1006
c1fe848c UDP
0
0 0.0.0.0.1007
c1fe838c UDP
0
0 0.0.0.0.2049
c1fe828c UDP
0
0 0.0.0.0.69
c1fe900c UDP
0
0 127.0.0.1.1024
c1fe908c UDP
0
0 0.0.0.0.17185
->tcpstatShown - TCP statistics
Foreign Address
-----------------0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0.0
127.0.0.1.17185
0.0.0.0.0
(state)
------LISTEN
LISTEN
LISTEN
LISTEN
LISTEN
LISTEN
LISTEN
LISTEN
LISTEN
TCP:
0
0
0
0
0
0
packet sent
data packet (0 byte)
data packet (0 byte) retransmitted
ack-only packet (0 delayed)
URG only packet
window probe packet
LAN Interface Supplement
8-11
General Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
window update packet
control packet
packet received
ack (for 0 byte)
duplicate ack
ack for unsent data
packet (0 byte) received in-sequence
completely duplicate packet (0 byte)
packet with some dup. data (0 byte duped)
out-of-order packet (0 byte)
packet (0 byte) of data after window
window probe
window update packet
packet received after close
discarded for bad checksum
discarded for bad header offset field
discarded because packet too short
connection request
connection accept
connection established (including accepts)
connection closed (including 0 drop)
embryonic connection dropped
segment updated rtt (of 0 attempt)
retransmit timeout
connection dropped by rexmit timeout
persist timeout
keepalive timeout
keepalive probe sent
connection dropped by keepalive
->udpstatShow - UDP statistics
UDP:
368 total packets
346 input packets
22 output packets
0 incomplete header
0 bad data length field
0 bad checksum
321 broadcasts received with no ports
0 full socket
->ipstatShow - IP statistics
total
badsum
tooshort
toosmall
badhlen
badlen
fragments
fragdropped
fragtimeout
forward
cantforward
redirectsent
415
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
67
0
8-12
LAN Interface Supplement
General Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
->icmpstatShow - ICMP statistics
ICMP:
2 calls to icmp_error
0 error not generated because old message was icmp
Output histogram:
destination unreachable: 2
0 message with bad code fields
0 message < minimum length
0 bad checksum
0 message with bad length
Input histogram:
destination unreachable: 2
0 message response generated
->arptabShow - arp entries
->mbufShow - memory buffer statistics
type
number
--------FREE
DATA
HEADER
SOCKET
PCB
RTABLE
HTABLE
ATABLE
SONAME
ZOMBIE
SOOPTS
FTABLE
RIGHTS
IFADDR
TOTAL
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
-----37
0
0
0
28
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
70
number of mbufs: 70
number of clusters: 4
number of interface pages: 0
number of free clusters: 4
number of times failed to find space: 0
number of times waited for space: 0
number of times drained protocols for space: 0
->routeShow - network routes
LAN Interface Supplement
8-13
General Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting the Initial Connection
ROUTE NET TABLE
destination
gateway
flags
Refcnt
Use
Interface
-----------------------------------------------------------------------0.0.0.0
15.4.45.2xx
1
0
0
sn0
15.4.40.0
15.4.45.2xx
1
1
24
sn0
-----------------------------------------------------------------------ROUTE HOST TABLE
destination
gateway
flags
Refcnt
Use
Interface
-----------------------------------------------------------------------127.0.0.1
127.0.0.1
5
1
0
lo0
------------------------------------------------------------------------
8-14
LAN Interface Supplement
General Troubleshooting
Subnets and Gateways
Subnets and Gateways
When you configure your analyzer as described in “Configuring the
Analyzer” on page 1-8, you should enter a value for Gateway IP Address
and Subnet Mask if they are required with your LAN. Your network
administrator can tell you if you need to enter these values, and will
supply you with the values to enter. This section provides some basic
information on subnets and gateways.
In large systems, the LAN is often split into subnets. Each subnet is
isolated from other subnets by a router. Each subnet uses a unique and
contiguous range of IP addresses for its hosts. The router acts as the
"gateway" between the subnets. The router decides whether or not LAN
traffic is allowed from one subnet to another.
See Figure 8-3 on page 8-16. This illustration shows a portion of a LAN
system that includes a router (gateway) and two subnets, each including
two hosts.
Each host is a unique device (such as a computer or an analyzer) with a
unique IP address. The router also has a unique IP address.
LAN Interface Supplement
8-15
General Troubleshooting
Subnets and Gateways
Figure 8-3
Example of a LAN with Two Subnets
In order for a host on Subnet 1 to communicate with a host on Subnet 2,
there are two configuration parameters that must be set up correctly:
• Gateway IP Address — the address of the router
• Subnet Mask — a number that allows the host to determine if direct
communication is allowed or whether it must communicate through a
router
These parameters are used by the analyzer (host) and the router to
define the IP address ranges used by each subnet, and by the router.
Refer again to Figure 8-3 for the following discussion:
You would like Analyzer A to communicate with Computer C. Note that
they exist on different subnets, separated by a router.
8-16
LAN Interface Supplement
General Troubleshooting
Subnets and Gateways
Before Analyzer A tries to access Computer C, the analyzer looks at its
subnet mask setting, and uses this mask to determine if Computer C is
on the same LAN subnet.
If the analyzer determines from the subnet mask setting that Computer
C is on the same subnet, then the analyzer establishes direct
communication with Computer C (it sends LAN packets directly to
Computer C's IP address).
If the analyzer determines that Computer C is on a different subnet from
the analyzer (see Figure 8-3), then the analyzer must send LAN packets
to the router's IP address. The router then forwards the packets to
Computer C.
Troubleshooting Subnet Problems
If your analyzer and computer are on separate LAN segments (subnets),
separated by a gateway router, and you are experiencing difficulties in
communicating, try the following solutions:
• Be sure the analyzer's Gateway IP Address and Subnet Mask
under the LAN Port Setup menu have been configured properly.
See “Configuring the Analyzer” on page 1-8.
Your network administrator should be able to tell you whether or not
you need to enter these parameters, and should provide you with the
correct numbers if you do.
• If you have configured the gateway address, your analyzer's IP
address, and the subnet mask properly, but are still having problems
1. Connect your computer and analyzer directly to each other (with
no gateway routers between them). This can be done by connecting
the computer and analyzer to the same subnet, or by the use of a
"cross-over" cable. See “Point-to-Point Connections” on page 1-7.
2. Configure both your computer and your analyzer so that they are
both using a subnet mask value of 0.0.0.0, thus disabling gateway
routing.
3. Now try the ping test in both directions as described in
“Troubleshooting the Initial Connection” on page 8-3. If it works,
and it didn't before, you've determined that you have a problem
with subnetting. Contact your network administrator for
assistance.
LAN Interface Supplement
8-17
General Troubleshooting
Solutions to Common Problems
Solutions to Common Problems
This section describes common problems you may encounter when using
the analyzer on a LAN. It assumes you have been able to connect to the
analyzer in the past. If this is not so, refer to the previous sections first.
If you cannot connect to the analyzer
If you suspect a bad LAN connection between your computer and
analyzer, you can verify the network connection by using the ping
command described earlier in this chapter or another similar echo
request utility.
If a bad connection is revealed, try the following solutions:
• Make sure the analyzer is turned on.
• Check the physical connection to the LAN.
• Make sure the Internet (IP) Address of the analyzer is set up
correctly in the LAN Port Setup menu. (Press SYSTEM OPTIONS
LAN LAN Port Setup .)
• If the analyzer and the computer are on different networks or
subnets, make sure the gateway address and subnet mask values are
set correctly. See “Troubleshooting Subnet Problems” on page 8-17.
If you cannot access the file system via ftp
If you get a "connection refused" message, try the following solutions:
• If the power to the analyzer was just turned on, make sure that you
wait about 25 seconds before attempting the connection.
If you get a "connection timed out" message
• Verify the LAN connection between your computer and the analyzer.
Refer to “If you cannot connect to the analyzer” earlier in this section.
8-18
LAN Interface Supplement
General Troubleshooting
Solutions to Common Problems
If you cannot telnet to the command parser
port
If you get a "connection refused" message
• Try including the telnet port number (23) in the command.
If you get a "connection timed out" or "no response from host" message
• Verify the LAN connection between your computer and the analyzer.
Refer to "If you cannot connect to the analyzer" earlier in this section.
If you get a "connection refused" or "no response from host" message
• If the analyzer was just turned on, make sure that you wait about 25
seconds before attempting the connection.
If you get an "operation timed-out" message
• Check the LAN connection between the computer and the analyzer.
Refer to "If you cannot connect to the analyzer" in this section.
• Increase the file time-out value on your PC or workstation.
If you cannot access internal web pages or
import graphic images when using a
point-to-point connection
• Disable the use of proxy servers. You may have to specify this in a
number of locations, depending on the operating system and software
you are using.
• Disable the use of cached copies of web pages to ensure that you
always get a new copy of the analyzer’s screen image.
If all else fails
• Contact your network administrator.
• If you still cannot solve the problem, contact an Agilent Technologies
Service Center for repair information (see Table 9-5 on page 9-11).
LAN Interface Supplement
8-19
9
Quick Reference
9-1
Quick Reference
EIA/TIA 568B Wiring
EIA/TIA 568B Wiring
Table 9-1
Straight-Through Cable (Unshielded-twisted-pair (UTP) cable
with RJ-45 connectors)
Standard, Straight-Through Wiring (each end)
Signal
Name
Table 9-2
RJ-45
Pin #
Wire
Color
RX+
1
white/orange
RX-
2
orange
TX+
3
white/green
TX-
6
green
Not
Used
4
blue
5
white/blue
7
white/brown
8
brown
Pair #
2
3
1
4
Cross-Over Cable (Unshielded-twisted-pair (UTP) cable with
RJ-45 connectors)
Cross-Over Wiringa
Connector A
Signal
Name
Connector B
RJ-45
Pin #
RJ-45
Pin #
Signal
Name
RX+
1
3
TX+
RX-
2
6
TX-
TX+
3
1
RX+
TX-
6
2
RX-
9-2
LAN Interface Supplement
Quick Reference
EIA/TIA 568B Wiring
Cross-Over Wiringa
Connector A
Signal
Name
Not
Used
Connector B
RJ-45
Pin #
RJ-45
Pin #
4
4
5
5
7
7
8
8
Signal
Name
Not
Used
a. Either end of this cable can be used at the analyzer or LAN device. The connector names are a
convention useful during cable construction
only.
This cable can be used to cascade hubs or to make point-to-point
connections without a LAN hub.
NOTE
A convenient way to make a cross-over adapter is to use two RJ-45 jacks
wired according to Table 9-2, above. Standard straight-through patch
cables can then be used from the analyzer to the adapter, and from the
adapter to other LAN devices. If you use a special-purpose adapter, you
will avoid having a cross-over cable mistaken for a standard,
straight-through patch cable.
NOTE
Some commercially-available cross-over cables do not implement the
cross-over wiring required for your analyzer. Please refer to Table 9-2,
above, and verify all connections before using cables not made by Agilent
Technologies.
LAN Interface Supplement
9-3
Quick Reference
EIA/TIA 568B Wiring
Figure 9-1
Cross-Over Patch Cable Wiring (cross-over end)
9-4
LAN Interface Supplement
Quick Reference
The TELNET Command
The TELNET Command
Synopsis
telnet [host [port]]
Description
The telnet command is used to communicate with another host using
the TELNET protocol. When telnet is invoked with host or port
arguments, a connection is opened to host, and input is sent from the
user to host.
NOTE
Standard UNIX commands are described here. Please see your telnet
documentation for specific information.
NOTE
Only a portion of the available commands and options are described. See
your telnet documentation for more complete information.
Options and Parameters
telnet operates in line-by-line mode or in character-at-a-time mode. In
line-by-line mode, typed text is first echoed on the screen. When the line
is completed by pressing the Enter key, the text line is then sent to
host. In character-at-a-time mode, text is echoed to the screen and sent
to host as it is typed.
In some cases, if your telnet connection is in “line-by-line” mode, there is
no local echo. This means you will not be able to see the characters you
are typing on your computer's display until after you press the Enter
key. Only a portion of the available commands and options are described.
See your telnet documentation for more complete information.
To remedy this, you need to change your telnet connection to
“character-by-character” mode. This can be accomplished in most
systems by escaping out of telnet to the telnet> prompt and then
typing mode char. Consult your telnet program's documentation for
how to change to “character-by-character” mode.
LAN Interface Supplement
9-5
Quick Reference
The FTP Command
The FTP Command
Synopsis
ftp [-g] [-i] [-n] [-v] [server-host]
[-B DataSocketBufferSize]
Description
The ftp command is used to transfer files using the File Transfer
Protocol. ftp transfers files over a network connection between a local
machine and the remote server-host.
NOTE
Standard UNIX commands are described here. Please see your ftp
documentation for specific information.
NOTE
Only a portion of the available commands and options are described. See
your ftp documentation for more complete information.
Options and Parameters
When ftp is invoked with a server-host specified, a connection is opened
immediately. Otherwise, ftp waits for user commands.
The following options are supported:
-g
disables expansion of shell metacharacters in file and
directory names
-i
disables prompts during multiple-file operations
-n
disables automatic log-in
-v
enables verbose output
-B
specifies a new DataSocketBufferSize
server-host
the name or address of the remote host.
Table 9-3 lists the available user commands.
9-6
LAN Interface Supplement
Quick Reference
The FTP Command
Table 9-3
ftp Commands
Command
Description
ascii
Sets the file transfer type to ASCII.
binary
Sets the file transfer type to binary.
bye
Closes the connection to the host and exits ftp.
cd remote_directory
Sets the working directory on the host to remote_directory.
delete remote_file
Deletes remote_file or empty remote_directory.
dir
[remote_directory]
Lists the contents of the specified remote_directory. If
remote_directory is unspecified, the contents of the current
remote directory are listed.
get remote_file
[local_file]
Copies remote_file to local_file. If local_file is unspecified,
ftp uses the remote_file name as the local_file name.
help
Provides a list of ftp commands.
help command
Provides a brief description of command.
lcd [local_directory]
Sets the local working directory to local_directory.
ls
[remote_directory]
Lists the contents of the specified remote_directory. If the
remote_directory is unspecified, the contents of the current
remote directory are listed.
mget remote_file
[local_file]
Copy remote_file to the local system. If local_file is
unspecified, ftp uses the remote_file name as the local_file
name.
mput local_file
[remote_file]
Copies local_file to remote file. If remote_file is unspecified,
ftp uses the local_file name as the remote_file name.
put local_file
[remote_file]
Copies local_file to remote file. If remote_file is unspecified,
ftp uses the local_file name as the remote_file name.
quit
Closes the connection to the host and exits ftp.
LAN Interface Supplement
9-7
Quick Reference
The PING Command
The PING Command
Synopsis
ping [-r] [-v] [-o] host [packetsize] [count]
Description
The ping command sends an echo request packet to the host once per
second. Each echo response packet that is returned is listed on the
screen, along with the round-trip time of the echo request and echo
response.
NOTE
Standard UNIX commands are described here. Please see your ping
documentation for specific information.
Options and Parameters
-r
Bypasses the routing tables, and sends the request
directly to the host.
-v
Reports all packets that are received, including the
response packets.
-o
Requests information about the network paths taken
by the requests and responses.
host
The host name or IP address.
packetsize
The size of each packet (8 bytes - 4096 bytes).
count
The number of packets to send before ending ping
(1-(231-1)). If count is not specified, ping sends
packets until interrupted.
9-8
LAN Interface Supplement
Quick Reference
Dynamic Data Disk Contents
Dynamic Data Disk Contents
Table 9-4
File
Contents of the Dynamic Data Disk
File Type
Description
readme.txt
ASCII
This file contains a brief description of each file in this
directory.
state.sta
binary
This file contains the analyzer's current instrument state
settings.
cal.sta
binary
This file contains the analyzer's current calibration and
instrument state settings.
data.sta
binary
This file contains the measurement data for both
measurement channels.
tset_cal.cal
binary
For use with multiport test sets only. This file contains the
test set calibration data that currently resides on the
analyzer's non-volatile RAM disk.
prog.bas
ASCII
This file contains the currently loaded IBASIC program.
prog_run.bas
ASCII
This file accepts a copy of an IBASIC program, copies it to
prog.bas, and immediately runs the program.
prog_run.scp
ASCII
This file accepts a copy of a file containing SCPI commands
and immediately executes the commands.
screen.hgl
ASCII
This file contains the current screen image in HP-GL format.
It is available for uploading to a file on your computer.
screen.gif
binary
This file contains the current screen image in GIF format.
It is available for uploading to a file on your computer
screen.pcx
binary
This file contains the current screen image in PCX format. It
is available for uploading to a file on your computer.
screen_m.hgl
ASCII
This file contains the current screen image, as well as the
current softkey menu, in HP-GL format.
screen_m.pcx
binary
This file contains the current screen image, as well as the
current softkey menu, in PCX format.
LAN Interface Supplement
9-9
Quick Reference
Dynamic Data Disk Contents
File
File Type
Description
screen_m.gif
binary
This file contains the current screen image, as well as the
current softkey menu, in GIF format.
parm_all.txt
ASCII
This file contains a listing of all of the instrument's
operating parameters in ASCII text format.
parm_screen.
txt
ASCII
This file contains the information in the current operating
parameters screen in ASCII text format.
trace1.prn
ASCII
This file contains the measurement channel 1 measurement
data in ASCII spreadsheet format.
trace2.prn
ASCII
This file contains the measurement channel 2 measurement
data in ASCII spreadsheet format.
trace1.s1p
ASCII
This file contains the measurement channel 1 measurement
data in Touchstone format.
trace2.s1p
ASCII
This file contains the measurement channel 2 measurement
data in Touchstone format.
9-10
LAN Interface Supplement
Quick Reference
Agilent Technologies Sales and Service Offices
Agilent Technologies Sales and Service
Offices
Table 9-5
Sales and Service Offices
UNITED STATES
Instrument Support Center
Agilent Technologies, Inc.
(800) 403-0801
EUROPEAN FIELD OPERATIONS
Headquarters
France
Agilent Technologies France
Agilent Technologies S.A.
1 Avenue Du Canada
150, Route du Nant-d’Avril
Zone D’Activite De
1217 Meyrin 2/ Geneva
Courtaboeuf
Switzerland
F-91947 Les Ulis Cedex
(41 22) 780.8111
France
(33 1) 69 82 60 60
Germany
Agilent Technologies
GmbH
Agilent Technologies
Strasse
61352 Bad Homburg
v.d.H
Germany
(49 6172) 16-0
Great Britain
Agilent Technologies
Eskdale Road, Winnersh
Triangle Wokingham,
Berkshire RG41 5DZ
England
(44 118) 9696622
Continued on next page.
LAN Interface Supplement
9-11
Quick Reference
Agilent Technologies Sales and Service Offices
INTERCON FIELD OPERATIONS
Headquarters
Australia
Agilent Technologies
Agilent Technologies Australia
3495 Deer Creek Rd.
Ltd.
Palo Alto, CA 94304-1316
31-41 Joseph Street
USA
Blackburn, Victoria 3130
(650) 857-5027
(61 3) 895-2895
Japan
Agilent Technologies Japan,
Ltd. Measurement
Assistance Center
9-1, Takakura-Cho,
Hachioji-Shi
Tokyo 192-8510, Japan
TEL (81) -426-56-7832
FAX (81) -426-56-7840
Singapore
Agilent Technologies
Singapore (Pte.) Ltd.
150 Beach Road
#29-00 Gateway West
Singapore 0718
(65) 291-9088
Canada
Agilent Technologies
(Canada) Ltd.
17500 South Service Road
Trans-Canada Highway
Kirkland, Quebec H9J
2X8
Canada
(514) 697-4232
Taiwan
Agilent Technologies
Taiwan
8th Floor, H-P Building
337 Fu Hsing North Road
Taipei, Taiwan
(886 2) 712-0404
China
China Agilent Technologies
38 Bei San Huan X1 Road
Shuang Yu Shu
Hai Dian District
Beijing, China
(86 1) 256-6888
9-12
LAN Interface Supplement
Glossary
Glossary-1
Glossary
Glossary
10Base-T A physical network
connection that uses twisted-pair
cables with RJ-45 connectors.
absolute pathname (The
specification of a node (file or
directory) in a hierchical file
system relative to the root
directory (the topmost node)—It is
the full path name of a file or
directory, including all the
directories leading to it, starting
with the root (/) and ending with
the file or directory name itself.
bridge A device that moves traffic
from one network to another.You
use a bridge to connect networks of
the same type together.
datagram An independent piece
of data comprising sufficient
information to be routed to the
destination, without reliance on
previous messages.
client A computer system or
process that requests services from
a server.
Depending on the protocol, your
analyzer is either a client or a
server:
authentication The verification
of an entity (person or process) for
the purpose of granting access to
files or directories, or to verify the
source of a message.
Protocol
Function
BOOTP
client
FTP
server
Automount The automatic
mounting of a remote file system.
NFS
client
SICL LAN
server
BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) A
protocol for passing configuration
information on a TCP/IP network.
Specified by RFC-951.
Glossary-2
client/server A distributed
computing system, with tasks split
between a client and a server.
Clients send requests to servers,
asking for information or actions.
LAN Interface Supplement
Glossary
The client and server must share a
common protocol for client-server
communication to occur.
Ethernet A network that adheres
to the IEEE 802.3 Local Area
Network standard.
Ethernet address A
hexadecimal number which is used
to identify a machine on a network.
Each analyzer is assigned a unique
Ethernet address at the factory
and it is stored in the analyzer's
ROM.
host A computer or device on a
network.
host name A unique name that is
used to identify each host machine
on a network. The host name is
created by the user or the system
administrator. The hostname is
directly linked to a specific IP
address, and can usually be used
in place of the harder-to-remember
IP address.
http (HyperText Transfer
Protocol) A protocol used to carry
World Wide Web (WWW) traffic.
Ethertwist See 10Base-T.
FTP (File Transfer Protocol) A
service that allows you to remotely
transfer files among different
operating systems.
ftp (File Transfer Program) A file
transfer program that uses file
transfer protocol.
gateway A generic term usually
referring to a router.
group ID In UNIX, a unique
number between 0 and 32767 that
identifies a set of users. Each file
has a group ID associated with it,
to indicate the group to which its
group permissions apply. Group
IDs are stored in /etc/passwd
and /etc/group databases.
LAN Interface Supplement
internet The connection of two or
more distinct networks. Often a
gateway or router is used to make
the connection.
Internet The largest internet
(see above) in the world,
connecting millions of networks.
The Internet uses the TCP/IP
protocol.
IP address (Internet Protocol
Address) A unique number that is
assigned to each device which is to
be connected to a TCP/IP network.
Before using your analyzer on a
network, your network
administrator will need to assign
an IP address.
Glossary-3
Glossary
An IP address consists of a 32-bit
value presented in decimal dot
notation: 4 octets (bytes) separated
by a dot.
For example, the binary address
10000000 00000111 00001111
00000001 has the decimal dot
notation of 128.7.15.1
network administrator
Similar to “system administrator”.
network logging The collection
and recording of network
performance measures and other
parameters and statistics.
NFS (Network File System) A
standard network protocol for file
sharing among different operating
systems.
ping A utility that allows you to
determine the status of the
connections between devices and a
network. The ping utility is
usually included with software
packages that provide networking
services. Your analyzer has a ping
utility included in its firmware.
Glossary-4
protocol A set of conventions
that specify how information will
be formatted and transmitted on a
network, and how machines on a
network will communicate.
relative pathname The
specification of a node (file or
directory) in a hierarchical file
system relative to the current
(context-dependent) directory.
RPC (Remote Procedure Call) A
client/server protocol used to
obtain a service from a remote
process, over a network. RPC is a
fundamental part of NFS.
router A device that moves traffic
from one network to another.
Routers are used to connect
different types of networks
together.
server A device that is configured
to provide a service to other
devices on a network, such as
shared access to a file system or a
printer. See client.
Depending on the protocol, your
analyzer is either a client or a
server:
LAN Interface Supplement
Glossary
Protocol
Function
BOOTP
client
FTP
server
NFS
client
SICL LAN
server
SICL LAN A LAN protocol using
the Standard Instrument Control
Library (SICL). It provides control
of instruments over the LAN,
using a variety of computing
platforms, I/O interfaces and
operating systems.
socket An endpoint for
communication over a network. A
socket, consisting of a port number
and a network address, is part of a
mechanism for creating a virtual
connection between two processes.
subnet mask (Also called an
address mask) A bit mask that
identifies the bits corresponding to
the network address and subnet
address portions of the IP address.
The mask has ones in positions of
the IP address corresponding to
the network and subnet
addresses, and zeros in the host
address positions.
LAN Interface Supplement
system administrator A person
who manages systems and
machines on a network. The
system administrator is
responsible for installing software
and hardware on the network and
assigning addresses and names to
machines.
TCP/IP (Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol) A set of
standards for communications
between computers and between
networks.
TFTP (Trivial File Transfer
Protocol Protocol) A very simple
protocol for file transfer over a
network. TFTP uses an unreliable
data protocol without user
identification or directory visibility.
TFTP is specified by RFC 1350.
telnet A protocol that allows
users to create a session to run
programs on or transfer
information to and from a remote
computer.
ThinLAN A physical network
connection that uses coax cables
with BNC connectors.
Glossary-5
Glossary
time out A period of system
inactivity during which the system
awaits user or network response. If
there is no response by the end of
the period, the system takes an
action.
UDP (User Datagram Protocol) A
protocol for passing data on an IP
network. UDP does not guarantee
delivery, and does not require a
connection. It is a lightweight and
efficient protocol, but all error
processing and retransmission of
data must be done by the
application program. Specified by
RFC-768.
VISA (Virtual Instrument
Software Architecture) VISA is an
I/O library used to develop I/O
applications and instrument
drivers that comply with
plug&play standards.
Applications and instrument
drivers developed with VISA work
on any system that has the VISA
I/O layer. This allows software
from many sources to work
together.
Glossary-6
LAN Interface Supplement
Index
data.sta, 5-2, 5-5, 9-9
delete, 4-9
device table
NFS automount, 7-13
DHCP, Glossary-2, Glossary-3,
Glossary-6
Diagnostic Utilities key, 8-7
dir, 4-9
directories in the analyzer, 4-3
directory
int, 4-4
nvram, 4-4
ram, 4-4
directory, data, 5-2
documentation feedback, 2-11
documentation via the Web, 2-10
DOS/UNIX filename
compatibility, 4-6
dynamic data disk, 5-2, 9-9
dynamic host configuration
protocol, Glossary-2,
Glossary-3, Glossary-6
B
binary, 4-9
BOOTP, 1-15–1-20, Glossary-2
bootstrap protocol, Glossary-2
bye, 4-9
cables, LAN, 1-6
CAE programs, data, 5-14
cal.sta, 5-2, 5-5
calibration state, 5-2
calibration states, save and
recall, 5-5
capturing network statistics, 810
cd, 4-9
character-by-character mode, 68
client
BOOTP, 1-16
NFS, 7-3, 7-5–7-10
SICL LAN, 6-42, 6-44
color printing, 3-5
commands, ftp, 4-8, 4-9
common problems, 8-2
connect via ftp, 4-3
connection refused, 8-18, 8-19
connection timed out, 8-18, 8-19
connectivity, to verify, 1-11
connector, LAN, 1-5
controlling via LAN, 6-3
controlling with IBASIC, 6-24–
6-27
controlling with Perl, 6-28–6-30
controlling with SCPI, 2-8
copying
IBASIC program, 5-7
instrument parameters, 5-13
programs, 5-9
screen image, 5-10
copying a file, 4-5, 4-6
NFS, 7-16
copying programs, 5-7
cross-over cable, 1-7
C
C program example, 6-9–6-23
cable model numbers, 1-6
cables, 1-6
D
data directory, 5-2
data state, 5-2, 9-9
data, measurement, 5-14
F
file
local HOSTS, 7-11
file names, 4-6
Numerics
10Base-2, 1-5
10Base-T, Glossary-2
87xxx IP Address key, 1-10
A
absolute pathname, Glossary-2
access list, displaying, 1-14
Accessing the Analyzer’s Web
Page, 2-3, 2-4
address
Ethernet, 1-9
gateway, 1-9
IP, 1-8
printer, 3-4
addresses, how to set, 1-8
analyzer configuration for
printing, 3-4
analyzer file system, 4-4
analyzer info via Web, 2-10
analyzer states, save and recall,
5-5
applet, example, 6-33–6-41
ascii, 4-9
automount
verifying, 7-14
automount device table, 7-13
automount table
removing NFS device, 7-14
automount, NFS, 7-13
Index
E
echo, lack of, 6-8
EIA/TIA 568B wiring, 9-2–9-4
E-mail for feedback, 2-11
error messages, 8-5
errors, timeout, 8-3
Ethernet, Glossary-3
Ethernet address, 1-9, Glossary3
Ethertwist, Glossary-3
Ethertwist cable model
numbers, 1-6
example program, 6-9–6-23
exporting files, 7-3
1
Index
file system, analyzer, 4-2–4-9
file transfer program, 4-2
file transfer protocol, 4-2
file, copying, 4-5, 4-6
filename compatibility, UNIX to
DOS, 4-6
FTP, 4-2, 9-6, Glossary-3
ftp, 4-1, 4-2, Glossary-3
ftp commands, 4-8
ftp, UNIX, 4-3
G
gateway, 8-15, Glossary-3
gateway address, 1-9
Gateway IP Address key, 1-10,
8-15
get, 4-9
get command, 4-6
GPIB
device address, 6-43
logical unit number, 6-43
name, 6-43
group ID, 7-5
setting up, 7-9
GUI FTP software, 4-10
H
hardcopy, 3-2
hardcopy address, 3-5
hardcopy configuration, 3-4
hardcopy via ftp, 5-10
hardcopy, color, 3-5
help, 4-9
host, Glossary-3
host name, Glossary-3
hostname, 1-8
HOSTS file, 7-11
HP BASIC, 6-42
HP VEE, 6-31, 6-42, 6-43, 6-45
HP VISA/SICL LAN, 6-42, 6-43,
6-45
http, Glossary-3
2
hubs, 1-6
I
IBASIC, 5-7
IBASIC programming, 6-24–627
IBASIC programs, copying, 5-7
ID
group, 7-5, 7-9
user, 7-5, 7-9
IDs
setting up, 7-9
image, 4-9
importing graphics or data, 5-15
instrument info via Web, 2-10
instrument state, 5-2
instrument states, save and
recall, 5-5
int, 4-3
intermittent response, 8-6
Internet, Glossary-3
internet, Glossary-3
IP address, 1-8, Glossary-3
IP Address to Ping key, 8-7
J
java program example, 6-33–641
L
LAN
client/server functions, 1-4
star topology, 1-6
LAN cables, 1-6
LAN connector, 1-5
LAN ETHERTWIST connector,
1-5
LAN ETHERTWIST rear panel
port, 1-5
LAN hubs, 1-6
LAN Port Setup, 1-10
LAN Printr IP Addr key, 3-4
lcd, 4-9
line-by-line mode, 6-8
local echo, lack of, 6-8
local HOSTS file, 7-11
logging on to the analyzer, 4-3
ls, 4-9
M
measurement data, 5-14
mounting, 7-3
confirming, 7-9
remote host, 7-7
N
NETSTAT.CAP, 8-10
network administrator,
Glossary-4
Network File System, 7-2–7-17
network statistics, capturing, 810
networks, 1-6
NFS, 7-2–7-17
automount, 7-13
copying files, 7-16
using Save/Recall, 7-15–7-17
NFS protocols, 7-4
no response from host, 8-19
Novell Netware, 1-2
nvram, 4-3
O
openSocket, 6-9
P
parm_all.txt, 5-2, 9-9
parm_screen.txt, 5-2, 9-9
password
ftp, 4-2
passwords
adding, 1-13
default, 1-13
Index
Index
removing, 1-14
pathname
absolute, Glossary-2
relative, Glossary-4
Perl script, example, 6-28–6-30
ping, 1-11, 1-12, 8-5–8-9, 9-8,
Glossary-4
point-to-point connection, 1-7
printer configuration, 3-3
printer connections, 1-7
printers, compatible, 3-2
printing, 3-2
printing configuration, 3-4
printing, color, 3-5
problems and solutions, 8-2
product documentation, 2-10
product feedback, 2-11
product support, 2-11
prog.bas, 5-2, 5-7, 9-9
prog_run.bas, 5-2, 5-7, 5-9, 9-9
prog_run.scp, 5-2, 5-7, 5-9, 9-9
program example, 6-9–6-23
programming
with C, 6-9–6-23
with IBASIC, 6-24–6-27
with Perl, 6-28–6-30
programming via LAN, 6-3
programming, socket, 6-3
programs, copying, 5-7
programs, running, 5-7
programs, to run, 5-9
protocol, Glossary-4
TCP, 7-4
protocols
NFS, 7-4
RPC, 7-4
TCP/IP, 7-4
put, 4-9
put command, 4-5
Q
queries, 5-9
Index
quit, 4-9
R
ram, 4-3
recalling instrument states, 5-5
relative pathname, Glossary-4
remote host file system, 7-7
remote procedure call, Glossary4
retrieving a file, 4-6
retrieving measurement data, 514
RFC 1350, Glossary-5
RJ-45 connector, 1-5
router, 8-15, Glossary-4
RPC, 7-4, Glossary-4
running programs, 5-9
S
sales and service, 9-11
sales and service offices, 9-11
Save/Recall, NFS, 7-15–7-17
saving instrument states, 5-5
SCPI commands, 2-8
screen snapshot, 2-6, 2-7
screen.hgl, 5-2, 5-10, 9-9
screen.pcx, 5-2, 5-10, 9-9
screen_m.gif, 5-2, 5-10, 9-9
screen_m.hgl, 5-2, 5-10, 9-9
screen_m.pcx, 5-2, 5-10, 9-9
screendump, 3-2
screendump configuration, 3-4
screendump via ftp, 5-10
screendump via Web, 2-6, 2-7
screendump, color, 3-5
server, Glossary-4
BOOTP, 1-15
NFS, 7-3
SICL LAN, 6-42, 6-44
SICL LAN, 6-42–6-50, Glossary5
SICL/LAN, 6-5
snapshot, screen, 2-6, 2-7
socket, Glossary-5
socket programming, 6-3
spreadsheet, data, 5-14
star topology, 1-6
state.sta, 5-2, 5-5
subnet, 8-15
subnet mask, 1-9
Subnet Mask key, 1-10, 8-15
subnet, troubleshooting, 8-17
support via the Web, 2-11
system administrator, Glossary5
T
TCP/IP, Glossary-4, Glossary-5
technical support, 2-11
telnet, 6-5–6-8, 9-5, Glossary-5
test set cal, 5-2, 9-9
testing BOOTP, 1-18
testing LAN communication, 111
TFTP, Glossary-5
ThinLAN, 1-5, Glossary-5
time out, Glossary-6
timeout errors, 8-3
timeout period, 6-24
Touchstone format, 5-14
trace data, 5-14
trace1.prn, 5-2, 5-14, 9-9
trace1.s1p, 5-2, 5-14, 9-9
trace2.prn, 5-2, 5-14, 9-9
trace2.s1p, 5-2, 5-14, 9-9
trivial file transfer protocol,
Glossary-5
troubleshooting, 8-2
tset_cal.cal, 5-2, 9-9
twisted-pair cables, 1-6
U
UNIX/DOS filename
compatibility, 4-6
3
Index
unmounting a remote file
system, 7-10
user ID, 7-5
setting up, 7-9
user names
adding, 1-13
default, 1-13
removing, 1-14
W
wiring, EIA/TIA 568B, 9-2–9-4
wizards, 1-21
4
Index
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