Specifications | Agilent Technologies 8156A Water Dispenser User Manual

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Notices
Copyright © 1994-2000 Agilent
Technologies Deutschland GmbH.
All rights reserved.
No part of this manual may be
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and international copyright laws.
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limited to, the implied warranties of
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Technologies shall not be liable for
errors contained herein or for
incidental or consequential damages in
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performance, or use of this material.
Edition/Print Date
All Editions and Updates of this
manual and their creation dates are
listed below.
08156-91011: E0500
Second Edition ………… May 2000
First Edition W0194, E0694, E0696,
E1098
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The following general safety precautions must be observed during
all phases of operation of this instrument. Failure to comply with
these precautions or with specific warnings elsewhere in this
manual violates safety standards of design, manufacture, and
intended use of the instrument. Agilent Technologies assumes no
liability for the customer’s failure to comply with these
requirements.
*(1(5$/
This product is a Safety Class 1 instrument (provided with a
protective earth terminal). The protective features of this product
may be impaired if it is used in a manner not specified in the
operation instructions.
All Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) used in this product are Class 1
LEDs as per IEC 60825-1.
(19,5210(17$/&21',7,216
This instrument is intended for indoor use in an installation category
II, pollution degree 2 environment. It is designed to operate at a
maximum relative humidity of 95% and at altitudes of up to 2000
meters. Refer to the specifications tables for the ac mains voltage
requirements and ambient operating temperature range.
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Verify that the product is set to match the available line voltage, the
correct fuse is installed, and all safety precautions are taken. Note
the instrument’s external markings described under Safety Symbols.
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To minimize shock hazard, the instrument chassis and cover must
be connected to an electrical protective earth ground. The
instrument must be connected to the ac power mains through a
grounded power cable, with the ground wire firmly connected to an
electrical ground (safety ground) at the power outlet. Any
interruption of the protective (grounding) conductor or
disconnection of the protective earth terminal will cause a potential
shock hazard that could result in personal injury.
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Only fuses with the required rated current, voltage, and specified
type (normal blow, time delay, etc.) should be used. Do not use
repaired fuses or short-circuited fuse holders. To do so could cause
a shock or fire hazard.
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Do not operate the instrument in the presence of flammable gases or
fumes.
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Operating personnel must not remove instrument covers.
Component replacement and internal adjustments must be made
only by qualified service personnel.
Instruments that appear damaged or defective should be made
inoperative and secured against unintended operation until they can
be repaired by qualified service personnel.
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• Adjustments described in this manual are performed with power
supplied to the instrument while protective covers are removed.
Be aware that energy at many points, if contacted, result in
personal injury.
• Do not install substitute parts or perform any unauthorized
modification to the instrument.
• Be aware that capacitors inside the instrument may still be
charged even if the instrument has been connected from its
source of supply.
: $ 5 1, 1*
To avoid hazardous electrical shock, do not operate the instrument
if there are any signs of damage to any portion of the outer
enclosure (covers, panels, and so on).
: $ 5 1, 1*
To avoid the possibility of injury or death, you must observe the
following precautions before powering on the instrument.
– If this instrument is to be energized via an autotransformer for
voltage reduction, ensure that the Common terminal connects
to the earthed pole of the power source.
– Insert the power cable plug only into a socket outlet provided
with a protective earth contact. Do not negate this protective
action by the using an extension cord without a protective
conductor.
– Before switching on the instrument, the protective earth
terminal of the instrument must be connected to a protective
conductor. You can do this by using the power cord supplied
with the instrument.
– It is prohibited to interrupt the protective earth connection
intentionally.
• The following work should be carried out by a qualified
electrician. All local electrical codes must be strictly observed:
If the plug on the cable does not fit the power outlet, or if the cable
is to be attached to a terminal block, cut the cable at the plug end
and rewire it.
The color coding used in the cable depends on the cable supplied. If
you are connecting a new plug, it should meet the local safety
requirements and include the following features:
• Adequate load-carrying capacity (see table of specifications).
• Ground connection.
• Cable clamp.
: $5 1, 1*
To avoid the possibility of injury or death, please note that the
Agilent 8156A does not have a floating earth.
: $5 1, 1*
The Agilent 8156A is not designed for outdoor use. To prevent
potential fire or shock hazard, do not expose the instrument to rain
or other excessive moisture.
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The WARNING sign denotes a hazard. It calls attention to a
procedure, practice, or the like, which, if not correctly performed or
adhered to, could result in personal injury. Do not proceed beyond a
WARNING sign until the indicated conditions are fully understood
and met.
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The CAUTION sign denotes a hazard. It calls attention to an
operating procedure, or the like, which, if not correctly performed
or adhered to, could result in damage to or destruction of part or all
of the product. Do not proceed beyond a CAUTION sign until the
indicated conditions are fully understood and met.
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This manual is divided into 4 parts:
• Chapter 1 tells you how to set up your Attenuator.
• Chapters 2 to 6 shows you what you can do with your Attenuator.
• Chapters 7 to 9 show you how you can remotely program your
Attenuator, using GPIB commands.
• The appendices contain additional information not required for
routine day-to-day use.
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Any adjustment, maintenance, or repair of this product must be
performed by qualified personnel. Contact your customer engineer
through your local Agilent Technologies Service Center. You can
find a list of local service representatives on the Web at:
http://www.agilent-tech.com/services/English/index.html
If you do not have access to the Internet, one of these centers can
direct you to your nearest representative:
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Table of Contents
1 Getting Started
1.1 Using the Attenuator ..............................................29
Using the Modify Keys ...................................................... 29
1.2 Making an Attenuation Sweep ..............................30
Making an Automatic Sweep ............................................ 30
1.3 The Manual Sweep .................................................31
1.4 Using your Attenuator as a Variable Back Reflector
32
1.5 Using the Through-Power Mode ..........................33
1.6 Selecting the Wavelength Calibration and Its Function
33
2 Using the Attenuator
2.1 Setting Up the Hardware ......................................37
2.2 Setting Up the Attenuation .....................................38
Entering the Attenuation Factor ........................................ 38
Entering a Calibration Factor ............................................ 39
Entering the Wavelength ................................................... 40
2.3 Example, Setting the Calibration ..........................42
3 Making an Attenuation Sweep
3.1 Configuring the Hardware ....................................47
11
Table of Contents
3.2 The Automatic Sweep ............................................48
Setting Up an Automatic Sweep ........................................48
Executing the Automatic Sweep ........................................50
3.3 The Manual Sweep .................................................51
Setting Up a Manual Sweep ...............................................51
Executing the Manual Sweep .............................................53
3.4 Example, an Automatic Attenuation Sweep .........54
4 Using your Attenuator as a Variable Back Reflector
4.1 Configuring the Hardware ....................................59
4.2 Setting Up the Software .........................................60
Editing the Setup .................................................................60
Executing the Back Reflector Application .........................61
4.3 Example, Setting a Return Loss ............................62
5 Setting Up the System
5.1 Setting the GPIB Address .....................................67
Resetting the GPIB Address ...............................................67
5.2 Selecting the Wavelength Calibration and Its Function
67
Setting the Function of the Wavelength Calibration ..........68
Selecting the Wavelength Calibration Data .......................69
12
Table of Contents
5.3 Selecting the Through-Power Mode .....................70
Deselecting the Through-Power Mode ............................... 71
Resetting the Through-Power Mode .................................. 71
5.4 Setting the Display Brightness ..............................71
Resetting the Display Brightness ....................................... 71
5.5 Selecting the Setting used at Power-On ...............72
Resetting the Power-On Setting ........................................ 72
5.6 Locking Out ENB/DIS .............................................72
Resetting the ENB/DIS Lock Out ....................................... 73
5.7 Selecting the Shutter State at Power On ..............73
Resetting the Shutter State at Power On ............................ 73
5.8 Setting the Display Resolution ..............................74
Resetting the Display Resolution ...................................... 74
6 Storing and Recalling Settings
6.1 Storing the Setting .................................................77
6.2 Recalling a Setting ..................................................77
Resetting the Instrument .................................................... 77
Recalling a User Setting .................................................... 77
7 Programming the Attenuator
7.1 GPIB Interface .......................................................81
7.2 Setting the GPIB Address .....................................83
13
Table of Contents
7.3 Returning the Instrument to Local Control ........83
7.4 How the Attenuator Receives and Transmits Messages
83
How the Input Queue Works ..............................................83
The Output Queue ..............................................................84
The Error Queue .................................................................84
7.5 Some Notes about Programming and Syntax Diagram
Conventions ..................................................................85
Short Form and Long Form ................................................85
Command and Query Syntax .............................................86
8 Remote Commands
8.1 Units ........................................................................89
8.2 Command Summary ..............................................89
8.3 The Common Commands .....................................93
Common Status Information ..............................................93
*CLS ...................................................................................95
*ESE ...................................................................................95
*ESR? ..................................................................................96
*IDN? .................................................................................97
*OPC ..................................................................................98
*OPT? ................................................................................98
*RCL ..................................................................................99
*RST ..................................................................................99
*SAV ..................................................................................100
*SRE ..................................................................................101
*STB? .................................................................................102
14
Table of Contents
*TST? ................................................................................ 103
*WAI ................................................................................. 104
8.4 DISPlay Commands ................................................104
:DISPlay:BRIGhtness ........................................................ 104
:DISPlay:ENABle .............................................................. 105
8.5 INPut Commands ...................................................106
:INPut:ATTenuation .......................................................... 106
:INPut:LCMode ................................................................. 107
:INPut:OFFSet ................................................................... 107
:INPut:OFFSet:DISPlay .................................................... 108
:INPut:WAVelength .......................................................... 109
8.6 OUTPut Commands ...............................................110
:OUTPut:APMode ............................................................. 110
:OUTPut:POWer ............................................................... 112
:OUTPut:[:STATe] ............................................................ 113
:OUTPut:[:STATe]:APOWeron ........................................ 114
8.7 STATus Commands ...............................................114
:STATus:OPERation:CONDition? .................................... 116
:STATus:OPERation:ENABle .......................................... 117
:STATus:OPERation[:EVENt]? ........................................ 117
:STATus:OPERation:NTRansition ................................... 118
:STATus:OPERation:PTRansition .................................... 118
:STATus:QUEStionable:CONDition? ............................... 119
:STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle ..................................... 119
:STATus:QUEStionable[:EVENt]? ................................... 120
:STATus:QUEStionable:NTRansition .............................. 120
:STATus:QUEStionable:PTRansition ............................... 121
:STATus:PRESet ............................................................... 122
8.8 SYSTem Commands ...............................................122
15
Table of Contents
:SYSTem:ERRor? ..............................................................122
8.9 User Calibration Commands .................................123
Entering the User Calibration Data ....................................123
9 Programming Examples
9.1 Example 1 - Checking Communication ................131
9.2 Example 2 - Status Registers and Queues ............132
9.3 Example 3 - Measuring and Including the Insertion
Loss .................................................................................135
9.4 Example 4 - Running an Attenuation Sweep ........139
A Installation
A.1 Safety Considerations ...........................................143
A.2 Initial Inspection ...................................................143
A.3 AC Line Power Supply Requirements ................144
Line Power Cable ...............................................................144
Replacing the Battery .........................................................146
Replacing the Fuse .............................................................146
A.4 Operating and Storage Environment ...................148
Temperature ........................................................................148
Humidity ............................................................................148
Instrument Positioning and Cooling ...................................148
A.5 Switching on the Attenuator .................................149
16
Table of Contents
A.6 Monitor Output ......................................................149
A.7 Optical Output ......................................................150
Disabling the Optical Output ............................................. 150
A.8 GPIB Interface ......................................................150
Connector ........................................................................... 151
GPIB Logic Levels ............................................................ 152
A.9 Claims and Repackaging .......................................152
Return Shipments to Agilent Technologies ........................ 152
B Accessories
B.1 Instrument and Options .......................................157
B.2 GPIB Cables and Adapters ..................................157
B.3 Connector Interfaces and Other Accessories ......158
Straight Contact Connector ................................................ 158
Option 201, Angled Contact Connector ............................. 160
C Specifications
C.1 Definition of Terms ...............................................165
C.2 Specifications ..........................................................167
Supplementary Performance Characteristics ...................... 169
C.3 Other Specifications ...............................................171
C.4 Declaration of Conformity ....................................172
17
Table of Contents
D Performance Tests
D.1 Equipment Required .............................................175
D.2 Test Record .............................................................177
D.3 Test Failure .............................................................177
D.4 Instrument Specification .......................................177
D.5 Performance Test ...................................................178
I. Total Insertion Loss Test .................................................179
II. Linearity/Attenuation Accuracy Test .............................182
III. Attenuation Repeatability Test ......................................184
IV. Return Loss Test ...........................................................185
D.6 V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional 191
Polarization Dependant Loss Test (Mueller method) .........192
E Cleaning Information
Cleaning Instructions for this Instrument ............................248
E.1 Safety Precautions ..................................................249
E.2 Why is it important to clean optical devices ? .....249
E.3 What do I need for proper cleaning? ...................250
Standard Cleaning Equipment .............................................250
Additional Cleaning Equipment ..........................................253
E.4 Preserving Connectors ...........................................256
Making Connections ...........................................................256
Dust Caps and Shutter Caps ................................................256
Immersion Oil and Other Index Matching Compounds ......256
18
Table of Contents
E.5 Cleaning Instrument Housings .............................257
E.6 Which Cleaning Procedure should I use ? ...........257
Light dirt ............................................................................. 257
Heavy dirt ........................................................................... 257
E.7 How to clean connectors ........................................258
Preferred Procedure ............................................................ 258
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt ............................................... 258
An Alternative Procedure ................................................... 259
E.8 How to clean connector adapters ..........................259
Preferred Procedure ............................................................ 259
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt ............................................... 260
E.9 How to clean connector interfaces ........................260
Preferred Procedure ............................................................ 260
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt ............................................... 261
E.10 How to clean bare fiber adapters ........................261
Preferred Procedure ............................................................ 261
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt ............................................... 262
E.11 How to clean lenses ...............................................262
Preferred Procedure ............................................................ 262
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt ............................................... 263
E.12 How to clean instruments with a fixed connector interface ..................................................................................263
E.13 How to clean instruments with an optical glass plate
264
E.14 How to clean instruments with a physical contact interface .............................................................................264
Preferred Procedure ............................................................ 265
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt ............................................... 265
19
Table of Contents
E.15 How to clean instruments with a recessed lens interface ..................................................................................265
Preferred Procedure .............................................................266
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt ................................................266
E.16 How to clean optical devices which are sensitive to mechanical stress and pressure .........................................267
Preferred Procedure .............................................................267
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt ................................................267
Alternative Procedure ..........................................................267
E.17 How to clean metal filters or attenuator gratings 268
Preferred Procedure .............................................................268
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt ................................................268
E.18 Additional Cleaning Information .......................268
How to clean bare fiber ends ...............................................269
How to clean large area lenses and mirrors .........................269
Preferred Procedure .............................................................269
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt ................................................270
Alternative Procedure A ......................................................270
Alternative Procedure B ......................................................271
E.19 Other Cleaning Hints ...........................................271
Making the connection ........................................................271
Lens cleaning papers ...........................................................271
Immersion oil and other index matching compounds .........272
Cleaning the housing and the mainframe ............................272
F Error messages
F.1 Display Messages ...................................................275
20
Table of Contents
F.2 GPIB Messages .......................................................276
Command Errors ................................................................. 276
Execution Errors ................................................................. 280
Device-Specific Errors ....................................................... 281
Query Errors ....................................................................... 282
Instrument Specific Errors .................................................. 283
21
Table of Contents
22
List of Figures
Figure 1-1 The Attenuator Keys ................................................................................ 29
Figure 1-2 The Modify Keys ..................................................................................... 30
Figure 1-3 The Parameters for an Automatic Sweep ................................................. 31
Figure 1-4 The Hardware Configuration for the Back Reflector (Options 201 and 203) 32
Figure 2-1 The Hardware Configuration for the Attenuator ...................................... 37
Figure 2-2 The Attenuation Factor on the Display .................................................... 38
Figure 2-3 The Calibration Factor on the Display ..................................................... 39
Figure 2-4 The Wavelength on the Display ............................................................... 41
Figure 2-5 Hardware Configuration for Attenuation Example - A ........................... 42
Figure 2-6 Hardware Configuration for Attenuation Example - B ............................ 43
Figure 3-1 The Hardware Configuration for the Attenuator ...................................... 47
Figure 3-2 The Parameters for an Automatic Sweep ................................................. 49
Figure 3-3 Selecting the Automatic Sweep Application ........................................... 49
Figure 3-4 Running the Automatic Sweep ................................................................ 51
Figure 3-5 Editing the STOP Parameter .................................................................... 52
Figure 3-6 Running the Manual Sweep ..................................................................... 53
Figure 4-1 The Hardware Configuration for the Back Reflector ............................... 59
Figure 4-2 Editing the Value for the Reference Return Loss .................................... 61
Figure 4-3 Executing the Back Reflector Application ............................................... 62
Figure 4-4 Hardware Configuration for Variable Return Loss .................................. 63
Figure 5-1 The LAMBDCAL Indicator on the Display ................................................ 68
Figure 5-2 The USERCAL Indicator on the Display .................................................. 69
Figure 5-3 The Display in Through-Power Mode ..................................................... 70
Figure 6-1 The Display when Recalling the Default Setting ..................................... 77
Figure 8-1 Common Status Registers ........................................................................ 94
Figure 8-2 The Status Registers ................................................................................. 116
Figure 9-1 Hardware Configuration for Attenuation Example - A ........................... 135
Figure 9-2 Hardware Configuration for Attenuation Example - B ............................ 136
Figure A-1 Line Power Cables - Plug Identification ................................................. 144
Figure A-2 Rear Panel Markings ............................................................................... 145
Figure A-3 Releasing the Fuse Holder ...................................................................... 147
Figure A-4 The Fuse Holder ...................................................................................... 147
Figure A-5 Correct Positioning of the Attenuator ..................................................... 149
Figure A-6 GPIB Connector ...................................................................................... 151
Figure B-1 Straight Contact Connector Configuration .............................................. 159
23
List of Figures
Figure B-2 Angled Contact Connector Configuration ..............................................
Figure D-1 Total Insertion Loss Test Setup 1, Options 100, 101, 121 ......................
Figure D-2 Total Insertion Loss Test Setup 1, Options 201, 221 ..............................
Figure D-3 Total Insertion Loss Test Setup 1, Option 350 .......................................
Figure D-4 Total Insertion Loss Test Setup 2, Options 100, 101, 121 ......................
Figure D-5 Total Insertion Loss Test Setup 2, Options 201, 221 ..............................
Figure D-6 Total Insertion Loss Test Setup 2, Option 350 .......................................
Figure D-7 Return Loss Test Setup 1, Options 100, 101, 121 ..................................
Figure D-8 Return Loss Test Setup 2, Options 100, 101 ..........................................
Figure D-9 Return Loss Test Setup 2, Option 121 ....................................................
Figure D-10 Return Loss Test Setup 1, Options 201, 221 ........................................
Figure D-11 Return Loss Test Setup 2, Option 201 ..................................................
Figure D-12 Return Loss Test Setup 2, Option 221 ..................................................
Figure D-13 PDL Test Setup 1: Reference Measurement .........................................
Figure D-14 PDL Test Setup 2: Power after DUT ....................................................
24
160
179
180
180
181
181
182
185
187
187
188
189
190
192
198
List of Tables
Table 7-1 GPIB Capabilities ......................................................................................
Table 8-1 Units and Allowed Mnemonics .................................................................
Table 8-2 Common Command Summary ..................................................................
Table 8-3 Command List ...........................................................................................
Table 8-4 The Event Status Enable Register ..............................................................
Table 8-5 The Standard Event Status Register ...........................................................
Table 8-6 Reset State (Default Setting) .....................................................................
Table 8-7 The Service Request Enable Register ........................................................
Table 8-8 The Status Byte Register ............................................................................
Table 8-9 The Self Test Results..................................................................................
Table A-1 Temperature ..............................................................................................
Table C-1 Specifications - Options 100, 101 and 201 ................................................
Table C-2 Monitor Output Options ...........................................................................
Table C-3 Multimode Options ...................................................................................
Table D-1 Equipment Required for the Agilent 8156A (1310/1550nm) ...................
Table D-2 Equipment for the PDL test 1 ....................................................................
Table D-3 Performance Test Agilent 8156A .............................................................
25
82
89
89
90
96
97
100
101
102
103
148
167
168
169
176
191
200
List of Tables
26
1
1
Getting Started
Getting Started
This chapter introduces the features of the Agilent Technologies
8156A. More detail is given on these features in the following
chapters.
The main features of the Agilent 8156A, other than its use as an
attenuator, are its built-in sweep and back reflector applications, its
through-power mode (which displays the power at the output of the
instrument, rather than the amount of attenuation set) and its
selection of wavelength calibration possibilities.
28
Getting Started
Using the Attenuator
1.1 Using the Attenuator
NO T E
Before using the instrument, you should make sure that it is properly
warmed up. The instrument is properly warmed up when it has been
switched on for a minimum of 45 minutes. Failure to do this can cause
errors of up to 0.04dB in the attenuation.
Set the attenuation of the filter using ATT (attenuation factor), λ
(wavelength), and CAL (calibration factor).
Figure 1-1
The Attenuator Keys
The attenuation factor and the calibration factor set the position of
the filter. The calibration factor allows you to offset the value of the
attenuation factor.
Att(dB) = Cal(dB) + Attenuationfilter(dB)
In addition, you can use DISP→CAL to transfer the current
attenuation factor to the calibration factor.
Using the Modify Keys
There are four modify keys on the front panel of the attenuator.
29
Getting Started
Making an Attenuation Sweep
Figure 1-2
The Modify Keys
Editing a Number
Use ⇐ and ⇒ to move the cursor from digit to digit when editing a
number. Use ⇑ and ⇓ to change the value of a digit when editing a
number.
Editing a Non-Numeric Parameter
Use ⇑ or ⇒ to increment the parameter.
Use ⇓ or ⇐ to decrement the parameter.
1.2 Making an Attenuation Sweep
There are two types of attenuation sweep, automatic and manual.
Making an Automatic Sweep
An automatic sweep is one where stepping from one attenuation
factor to the next is done by the instrument.
To select the automatic sweep press SWP, and make sure that
SWEEP is set to AUTO. By pressing SWP repeatedly you view and
30
Getting Started
The Manual Sweep
can edit the parameters for the sweep. START is the attenuation
factor at which the sweep begins, STOP is the attenuation factor
that ends the sweep, STEP is the size of the attenuation factor
change, and DWELL is the time taken for each attenuation factor.
Figure 1-3
The Parameters for an Automatic Sweep
If you have set up your sweep, then you press EXEC to run it.
1.3 The Manual Sweep
A manual sweep is one where stepping from one attenuation factor
to the next is done by the user.
To select the manual sweep press SWP, and make sure that SWEEP
is set to MANUAL. By pressing SWP repeatedly you can view and
edit the parameters for the sweep. START is the attenuation factor
at which the sweep begins, STOP is the attenuation factor that ends
the sweep, and STEP is the size of the attenuation factor change.
If you have set up your sweep, then you press EXEC to run it. To go
to the next attenuation factor in the sweep, press ⇑ or ⇒. To go to
the previous attenuation factor in the sweep, press ⇓ or ⇐.
31
Getting Started
Using your Attenuator as a Variable Back Reflector
1.4 Using your Attenuator as a Variable Back
Reflector
NO T E
Before using the instrument, you should make sure that it is properly
warmed up. The instrument is properly warmed up when it has been
switched on for a minimum of 45 minutes. Failure to do this can cause
errors of up to 0.04dB in the attenuation.
To use the attenuator as a back reflector, you need to set up the
hardware as shown in the figure below.
Figure 1-4
The Hardware Configuration for the Back Reflector (Options 201 and
203)
Press BACK REFL to start operation as a back reflector. You need to
enter measured values for the insertion loss of the attenuator (INS
LOSS), the return loss of the attenuator (RL INPUT), and the
reference return loss you are using (RL REF). The return loss (RL)
is calculated according to the equation
– RLInput ( dB )
– RLInput ( dB )
– ( 2 ( Att ( dB ) + InsLoss ( dB ) ) + RLRef ( dB ) )
-------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 -------------------------------------- 
10
10
10




+ 1 – 10
RL ( dB ) = – 10 log 10
10








You edit the value for the return loss while the application is
running.
32
Getting Started
Using the Through-Power Mode
1.5 Using the Through-Power Mode
NO T E
Before using the instrument, you should make sure that it is properly
warmed up. The instrument is properly warmed up when it has been
switched on for a minimum of 45 minutes. Failure to do this can cause
errors of up to 0.04dB in the attenuation.
In the through-power mode, the instrument shows the power that
gets through the attenuator on the display (that is the power at the
output) rather than the attenuation.
When you select the through-power mode the attenuation factor (in
dB) becomes the value for the through-power (in dBm). Set the
calibration factor (see “Entering a Calibration Factor” on page 39)
to get the attenuation factor to the value of the through-power.
After measuring and setting this base power value, press SYST
repeatedly until THRUPOWR is shown at the bottom of the display.
Select ON to select the through-power mode.
Edit the through-power factor by pressing ATT, and then the
Modify keys.
1.6 Selecting the Wavelength Calibration and Its
Function
The attenuation at any point on the filter is wavelength dependent.
This dependence is measured and stored in the instrument, and is
used, with the value for the wavelength entered by the user to
compensate for the dependence. This is the wavelength calibration
data.
There are two ways in which this data can be used:
33
Getting Started
Selecting the Wavelength Calibration and Its Function
• to reposition the filter so that the attenuation stays constant, or
• to change the attenuation factor on the display to show the
wavelength dependence. You use this to set the wavelength for
an unknown source (you alter the wavelength until the displayed
attenuation matches the measured attenuation).
To set the function of the calibration data press SYST repeatedly
until LAMBDCAL is shown at the bottom of the display. Set
LAMBDCAL to OFF to use the calibration data to reposition the
filter, and set LAMBDCAL to ON to use the calibration data to
change the attenuation factor.
As well as the wavelength calibration data measured for and stored
in your instrument in the factory, there is space reserved in memory
for a set of your own user calibration data. (You load this data into
the instrument over the GPIB. See “User Calibration Commands”
on page 123)
Press SYST repeatedly until USERCAL is shown at the bottom of the
display. OFF selects the factory-made wavelength calibration data.
ON selects the user wavelength calibration data.
34
2
2
Using the Attenuator
Using the Attenuator
This chapter describes the use of the Agilent Technologies 8156A
as an attenuator. There is an example given at the end of this
chapter.
36
Using the Attenuator
Setting Up the Hardware
2.1 Setting Up the Hardware
To use the attenuator, you need to set up the hardware as shown in
the figure below.
Figure 2-1
The Hardware Configuration for the Attenuator
NO T E
Before using the instrument, you should make sure that it is properly
warmed up. The instrument is properly warmed up when it has been
switched on for a minimum of 45 minutes. Failure to do this can cause
errors of up to 0.04dB in the attenuation.
The connector interface you need depends on the connector type
you are using (see “Connector Interfaces and Other Accessories”
on page 158).
If you have option 121 or option 221, then the Monitor Output
provides a signal for monitoring the power getting through the
attenuator. The signal level is approximately 5% of the output
power level. For the most accurate results, you should measure the
coupling ratio, and its wavelength dependence, for the Monitor
Output yourself.
37
Using the Attenuator
Setting Up the Attenuation
2.2 Setting Up the Attenuation
The attenuation can be set in two different ways. This section
describes how to set the attenuation by specifying the attenuation
factor and an offset (called a calibration factor).
“Selecting the Through-Power Mode” on page 70 describes how to
set the attenuation by specifying the power that gets through.
Entering the Attenuation Factor
The attenuation factor is shown at the top left of the display.
Figure 2-2
The Attenuation Factor on the Display
Edit the attenuation factor using the modify keys.
The filter attenuation is changed while you edit the attenuation
factor according to the equation:
Attfilter(dB) = Att(dB) - Cal(dB)
To edit the attenuation factor,
1. press ATT, and
2. edit the factor using the Modify keys (see “Using the Modify
Keys” on page 29).
38
Using the Attenuator
Setting Up the Attenuation
Resetting the Attenuation Factor
To reset the attenuation factor, press and hold ATT until the value
resets (this takes approximately two seconds). The attenuation
factor resets so that the filter attenuation is zero, that is
Att(dB) = Cal(dB)
Entering a Calibration Factor
The calibration factor is shown at the bottom left of the display
Figure 2-3
The Calibration Factor on the Display
This factor does not affect the filter attenuation. It is used to offset
the values for the attenuation factor.
There are two ways of entering the calibration factor.
• by editing, and
• by transferring
Editing the Calibration Factor
You would use this, for example, to enter an offset to compensate
for the insertion loss (attenuation) of your hardware setup.
The filter attenuation stays constant while you edit the calibration
factor. This means that the attenuation factor, shown on the display,
changes according to the formula below (from equation (1)):
AttNEW(dB) = Attfilter(dB) + CalNEW(dB) = AttOLD(dB) -CalOLD(dB) + CalNEW(dB)
To edit an external calibration factor,
39
Using the Attenuator
Setting Up the Attenuation
1. press CAL, and
2. edit the factor using the Modify keys (see “Using the Modify
Keys” on page 29).
Resetting the Calibration Factor
To reset the calibration factor, press and hold CAL until the value
resets to zero (this takes approximately two seconds). The
calibration factor resets to zero.
Transferring to the Calibration Factor
You can transfer the attenuation factor shown on the display into
the calibration factor, so that the attenuation factor is reset to zero.
You would use this, for example, after you have set the power
through the attenuator at a specific level. When you have reset the
attenuation factor, you can edit it to get a relative attenuation.
The filter attenuation stays constant when you transfer to the
calibration factor. This means that the new calibration factor is
calculated from the attenuation factor and the old calibration factor
according to the formula below (from equation (1)):
CalNEW(dB) = -Attfilter(dB) = CalOLD(dB) - AttOLD(dB)
To transfer to the calibration factor, press DISP→CAL.
Entering the Wavelength
The attenuation at any point on the filter is wavelength dependent.
This dependence is measured and stored in the instrument, and is
used, with the value for the wavelength entered by the user, to
compensate for the dependence. This is the wavelength calibration
data.
NO T E
There are two ways of using the wavelength calibration data,
• to reposition the filter so that the attenuation stays constant, or
• to change the attenuation factor on the display to show the
wavelength dependence. You use this to set the wavelength for an
40
Using the Attenuator
Setting Up the Attenuation
unknown source (you alter the wavelength until the displayed
attenuation matches the measured attenuation).
There are two sets of wavelength calibration data, one made in the
factory, individually, for your instrument. The user defines the other.
For more details on these topics, see “Selecting the Wavelength
Calibration and Its Function” on page 67.
The wavelength is shown at the top right of the display.
Figure 2-4
The Wavelength on the Display
Edit the wavelength using the modify keys.
To edit the wavelength,
1. press λ, and
2. edit the value using the Modify keys (see “Using the Modify
Keys” on page 29).
Resetting the Wavelength
To reset the wavelength, press and hold ATT until the value resets
(this takes approximately two seconds). The wavelength resets to
1310nm.
41
Using the Attenuator
Example, Setting the Calibration
2.3 Example, Setting the Calibration
This example uses the Agilent 8156A Attenuator, with a HP 8153A
multimeter with one source and one sensor. The connectors for this
system are all HMS-10.
We set up the hardware, and measure the insertion loss of the
system and use this value to set a calibration factor.
1. Configure the hardware as shown in the figure below, making
sure that all the connectors are clean:
Figure 2-5
Hardware Configuration for Attenuation Example - A
a. Make sure that the power sensor is installed in the
multimeter mainframe in channel A, and the source is in
channel B.
b. Connect both instruments to the electric supply.
c. Switch on both instruments.
42
Using the Attenuator
Example, Setting the Calibration
NO T E
Under normal circumstances you should leave the instruments to
warmup. (The multimeter needs around 20 minutes to warmup. The
attenuator needs around 45 minutes with the shutter open to warmup.)
Warming up is necessary for accuracy of the sensor, and the output
power of the source.
d. Connect a patchcord from the source to the input of the
sensor.
2. Measure the insertion loss of the Hardware setup:
a. On the multimeter:
i. Set the wavelength for the sensor to that of the source.
ii. Activate the source, by pressing the gray button on its
front panel.
iii. Start the loss application (press MODE and then LOSS,
and EXEC).
b. Reconfigure the hardware to include the attenuator:
i. Disconnect the source from the sensor, and connect it to
the input of the attenuator.
Figure 2-6
Hardware Configuration for Attenuation Example - B
ii. Connect a patchcord from the output of the attenuator to
the sensor.
43
Using the Attenuator
Example, Setting the Calibration
c. Set the wavelength on the attenuator to that of the source:
i. Press λ.
ii. Use the modify keys to edit the value for the
wavelength.
d. Reset the calibration factor, by pressing and holding CAL
for two seconds.
e. Reset the attenuation factor, by pressing and holding ATT
for two seconds.
f. Enable the output of the attenuator (press ENB/DIS so that
the LED lights).
g. Note the value for the loss read by the multimeter.
3. Enter the insertion loss of the hardware setup.
a. Press CAL.
b. Edit the calibration factor so that it has the value shown on
the multimeter display, using the modify keys.
You should notice that the value for the attenuation factor changes,
and always has the same value as that for the calibration factor. This
is because the filter attenuation stays at zero (you should also notice
that the display on the multimeter does not change).
The attenuator now shows its full attenuation (including its own
insertion loss) on the display.
44
3
3
Making an Attenuation
Sweep
Making an Attenuation
Sweep
This chapter describes how to make an attenuation sweep with the
Agilent Technologies 8156A Attenuator. An example is given at the
end of the chapter.
46
Making an Attenuation Sweep
Configuring the Hardware
3.1 Configuring the Hardware
To use the attenuator for a sweep, you need to set up the hardware
as shown in the figure below. (This is the configuration as given for
simple attenuation in chapter 2).
Figure 3-1
The Hardware Configuration for the Attenuator
NO T E
Before using the instrument, you should make sure that it is properly
warmed up. The instrument is properly warmed up when it has been
switched on for a minimum of 45 minutes. Failure to do this can cause
errors of up to 0.04dB in the attenuation.
The connector interface you need depends on the connector type
you are using (see “Connector Interfaces and Other Accessories”
on page 158).
If you have option 121 or option 221 (the monitor output), then the
Monitor Output provides a signal for monitoring the power getting
through the attenuator. The signal level is approximately 5% of the
output power level. For the most accurate results, you should
measure the coupling ratio, and its wavelength dependence, for the
Monitor Output yourself.
47
Making an Attenuation Sweep
The Automatic Sweep
3.2 The Automatic Sweep
An automatic sweep is one where stepping from one attenuation
factor to the next is done by the instrument.
Setting Up an Automatic Sweep
There are four parameters for the automatic sweep
NO T E
•
START is the attenuation factor at which the sweep begins.
•
STOP is the attenuation factor that ends the sweep. If START
and STEP are such that the sweep does not end exactly at
STOP, then the sweep ends at the immediately previous value.
•
STEP is the size of the attenuation factor change. This value is
always positive, even for a sweep of decreasing attenuation
factor. STEP cannot be set to a value greater than the difference
between START and STOP.
•
DWELL is the time taken for each attenuation factor.
The dwell time includes the time it takes for the filter attenuation to
change. The time taken to change depends on the size of the attenuation
factor change, and is in the range 20 to 400ms (typical value is 200ms).
48
Making an Attenuation Sweep
The Automatic Sweep
Figure 3-2
The Parameters for an Automatic Sweep
Starting the Setting Up
To select the automatic sweep
1. Press SWP.
2. If it is not already set, use ⇑ or ⇓ to set SWEEP to AUTO.
Figure 3-3
Selecting the Automatic Sweep Application
Editing the Parameters
To edit the value of the parameters
3. Press SWP again to get START.
4. Edit the value of START with the Modify keys.
5. Press SWP again to get STOP.
49
Making an Attenuation Sweep
The Automatic Sweep
6. Edit the value of STOP with the Modify keys.
7. Press SWP again to get STEP.
8. Edit the value of STEP with the Modify keys.
9. Press SWP again to get DWELL.
10. Edit the value of DWELL with the Modify keys.
See “Using the Modify Keys” on page 29 for information on
editing with the Modify keys.
Resetting the Parameters
To reset any of the sweep parameters, press and hold SWP until the
value resets (this takes approximately two seconds).
START and STOP reset so that the filter attenuation (inside the
instrument) is zero, that is
Start = Cal
or
Stop = Cal
See “Entering a Calibration Factor” on page 39 for information
about setting the calibration factor, Cal.
STEP resets to zero.
DWELL resets to 0.2 seconds.
Executing the Automatic Sweep
If you have just set up your sweep, then you only need to press
EXEC to run the application.
If you have already set up the sweep, and are currently operating
the instrument as an attenuator,
1. Press SWP, and then,
2. Press EXEC.
50
Making an Attenuation Sweep
The Manual Sweep
Figure 3-4
Running the Automatic Sweep
If there is something wrong with a parameter (if STEP is zero, for
example), this parameter is shown on the display for editing. Edit
the parameter, and press EXEC again.
Repeating the Sweep
When the sweep is finished (SWEEP READY is shown at the
bottom of the display), you can press EXEC to start it again.
Restarting the Sweep
To restart the sweep at any time while it is running, press EXEC.
3.3 The Manual Sweep
A manual sweep is one where stepping from one attenuation factor
to the next is done by the user.
Setting Up a Manual Sweep
There are three parameters for a manual sweep
• START is the attenuation factor at which the sweep begins.
• STOP is the attenuation factor that ends the sweep. If START
and STEP are such that the sweep does not end exactly at STOP,
then the sweep ends at the immediately previous value.
51
Making an Attenuation Sweep
The Manual Sweep
• STEP is the size of the attenuation factor change. This value is
always positive, even for a sweep of decreasing attenuation
factor. STEP cannot be set to a value greater than the difference
between START and STOP.
Starting the Setting Up
To select the manual sweep
1. Press SWP.
2. If it is not already set, use the modify keys to set SWEEP to
MANUAL.
Editing the Parameters
To edit the value of the parameters
3. Press SWP again to get START.
4. Edit the value of START with the Modify keys.
5. Press SWP again to get STOP.
6. Edit the value of STOP with the Modify keys.
Figure 3-5
Editing the STOP Parameter
7. Press SWP again to get STEP.
8. Edit the value of STEP with the Modify keys.
See “Using the Modify Keys” on page 29 for information on
editing with the Modify keys.
52
Making an Attenuation Sweep
The Manual Sweep
Resetting the Parameters
To reset any of the sweep parameters, press and hold SWP until the
value resets (this takes approximately two seconds).
START and STOP reset so that the filter attenuation (inside the
instrument) is zero, that is
Start = Cal
or
Stop = Cal
See “Entering a Calibration Factor” on page 39 for information
about setting the calibration factor, Cal.
STEP resets to zero.
Executing the Manual Sweep
If you have just set up your sweep, then you only need to press
EXEC to run the application.
If you have already set up the sweep, and are currently operating
the instrument as an attenuator,
1. Press SWP, and then,
2. Press EXEC.
Figure 3-6
Running the Manual Sweep
If there is something wrong with a parameter (if STEP is zero, for
example), this parameter is shown on the display for editing. Edit
the parameter, and press EXEC again.
53
Making an Attenuation Sweep
Example, an Automatic Attenuation Sweep
Changing the Attenuation in a Manual Sweep
To go to the next attenuation factor in the sweep, press ⇑ or ⇒.
To go to the previous attenuation factor in the sweep, press ⇓ or ⇐.
3.4 Example, an Automatic Attenuation Sweep
This example uses the Agilent 8156A Attenuator on its own.
We set up the instrument to sweep from 5dB to 0dB with an interval
of 0.5dB, dwelling for a second at each attenuation factor.
1. First we want to reset the instrument.
NO T E
If someone else is using this instrument, please check with them before
resetting, or store their setting for later recall.
a. Press RECALL.
b. Press EXEC.
2. Start the automatic sweep application.
a. Press SWP.
b. If the sweep parameter is set to MANUAL, press ⇑, or ⇓ to set
it to AUTO.
3. Set the start attenuation factor.
a. Press SWP.
b. Use the Modify keys to set START to 5.000dB.
4. Set the attenuation factor step size.
a. Press SWP, to get the stop parameter. We do not need to edit
this parameter.
b. Press SWP to get the step parameter.
54
Making an Attenuation Sweep
Example, an Automatic Attenuation Sweep
c. Use the Modify keys to set STEP to 0.500dB.
5. Set the dwell time.
a. Press SWP.
b. Use the Modify keys to set DWELL to 1.00s.
6. Execute the sweep
a. Press SWP.
b. Make sure the output is enabled (press ENB/DIS until the
LED lights).
c. Press EXEC.
55
Making an Attenuation Sweep
Example, an Automatic Attenuation Sweep
56
4
4
Using your Attenuator as a
Variable Back Reflector
Using your Attenuator
as a Variable Back
Reflector
This chapter describes how you can use your attenuator as a
variable back reflector. An example using the back reflector kit
(option 203 with option 201) is given at the end of the chapter.
58
Using your Attenuator as a Variable Back Reflector
Configuring the Hardware
4.1 Configuring the Hardware
To use the attenuator as a back reflector, you need to set up the
hardware as shown in the figure below.
NOTE
If this your first time to use the attenuator as a back reflector, you first
need to make some measurements. These require other setups before
setting up the hardware as shown below (see “Setting Up the Software”
on page 60).
Figure 4-1
The Hardware Configuration for the Back Reflector
NO T E
Before using the instrument, you should make sure that it is properly
warmed up. The instrument is properly warmed up when it has been
switched on for a minimum of 45 minutes. Failure to do this can cause
errors of up to 0.04dB in the attenuation.
If you are not using option 201, the connector interfaces you need
depends on the connector type you are using. Option 121 or option
221 (the monitor output) is of no use when using the attenuator as a
back reflector. The disruption to the back reflection performance by
leaving this output open is negligible, though you may want to
terminate it to eliminate any small effect it might have.
59
Using your Attenuator as a Variable Back Reflector
Setting Up the Software
4.2 Setting Up the Software
There are four factors that influence the back reflection of the
attenuator. These are
1. the insertion loss of the attenuator (INS LOSS),
2. the return loss of the attenuator (RL INPUT),
3. the reference return loss you are using (RL REF), and
4. the filter attenuation.
The return loss (RL) is calculated according to the equation
– RLInput ( dB )
– RLInput ( dB )
– ( 2 ( Att ( dB ) + InsLoss ( dB ) ) + RLRef ( dB ) )
-------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 -------------------------------------- 
10
10
10




+ 1 – 10
RL ( dB ) = – 10 log 10
10








You edit the values for the insertion loss, the reference return loss,
and the return loss of the attenuator while you are setting up the
application.
You edit the value for the return loss while the application is
executing. The instrument calculates and sets the required value for
the filter attenuation.
Editing the Setup
Before you start setting up the back reflector application, you may
need to measure the following values, if you do not already know
them:
• The insertion loss of the instrument (see “Example, Setting the
Calibration” on page 42,
• The return loss of the instrument (with the output properly
terminated), and
• The reference return loss value.
60
Using your Attenuator as a Variable Back Reflector
Setting Up the Software
To start setting up the Back Reflector application
1. Press BACK REFL.
After pressing this the first parameter (INS LOSS) is ready to for
editing.
2. Edit the value insertion loss with the Modify keys.
3. Press BACK REFL.
4. Edit the value reference return loss with the Modify keys.
Figure 4-2
Editing the Value for the Reference Return Loss
5. Press BACK REFL.
6. Edit the value attenuator return loss with the Modify keys.
See “Using the Modify Keys” on page 29 for information on
editing with the Modify keys.
Resetting the Parameters
To reset any of the back reflector parameters, press and hold BACK
REFL until the value resets (this takes approximately two seconds).
INS LOSS resets to 2.000dB.
RL REF resets to 14.700dB (the return loss for the glass/air
interface at an open connector)
RL INPUT resets to 60.000dB.
Executing the Back Reflector Application
If you have just set up the application, then you only need to press
EXEC to run the application.
61
Using your Attenuator as a Variable Back Reflector
Example, Setting a Return Loss
If you have already set up the application, and are currently
operating the instrument as an attenuator,
1. Press BACK REFL, and then,
2. Press EXEC.
Figure 4-3
Executing the Back Reflector Application
The value shown at the top left of the display is the return loss of
the instrument. You can edit the value of the return loss with the
Modify keys.
4.3 Example, Setting a Return Loss
This example uses the Ahilent Technologies 8156A Attenuator with
options 201, and 203.
Assuming an insertion loss of 2.00dB and a return loss of 60.000dB
for the instrument we set up the instrument to have a return loss of
20dB.
62
Using your Attenuator as a Variable Back Reflector
Example, Setting a Return Loss
1. Configure the hardware as shown in the figure below:
Figure 4-4
Hardware Configuration for Variable Return Loss
a. Connect the instrument to the electric supply.
b. Switch on the instrument.
2. Reset the instrument.
NO T E
If someone else is using this instrument, please check with them before
resetting, or store their setting for later recall.
a. Press RECALL.
b. Press EXEC.
3. Set the return loss reference value for the Agilent 81000BR
reference reflector.
a. Press BACK REFL twice to select the RL REF parameter.
b. Edit the value, with the Modify keys to set it to 0.180dB
4. Press EXEC to start the application
5. Edit the return loss value, with the Modify keys, to set it to
20.000dB.
63
Using your Attenuator as a Variable Back Reflector
Example, Setting a Return Loss
64
5
5
Setting Up the System
Setting Up the System
This chapter describes how to set the various system parameters for
your attenuator.
66
Setting Up the System
Setting the GPIB Address
5.1 Setting the GPIB Address
To set the GPIB address of the attenuator
1. Press SYST.
2. Edit the value for ADDRESS using the Modify keys.
Resetting the GPIB Address
To reset ADDRESS, press and hold SYST until the value resets (this
takes approximately two seconds).
ADDRESS resets to 28.
5.2 Selecting the Wavelength Calibration and Its
Function
The attenuation at any point on the filter is wavelength dependent.
This dependence is measured and stored in the instrument, and is
used, with the value for the wavelength entered by the user to
compensate for the dependence. This is the wavelength calibration
data.
As well as the wavelength calibration data measured for and stored
in your instrument in the factory, there is space reserved in memory
for a set of your own user calibration data.
There are two choices concerning the use of wavelength calibration
data.
• Whether or not the data should be used to position the filter to
compensate for wavelength dependence.
• Whether the factory-made wavelength calibration data is used,
or the data entered by the user.
67
Setting Up the System
Selecting the Wavelength Calibration and Its Function
Setting the Function of the Wavelength Calibration
This compensation can be used
• to reposition the filter so that the attenuation stays constant, or
• to change the attenuation factor on the display to show the
wavelength dependence. You use this to set the wavelength for
an unknown source (you alter the wavelength until the displayed
attenuation matches the measured attenuation).
To set the function of the wavelength calibration data
1. Press SYST repeatedly until LAMBDCAL is shown at the bottom
of the display.
2. Select the wavelength calibration data function using the Modify
keys. Set LAMBDCAL to OFF so that the function of the
wavelength calibration data is not visible to the user. This keeps
the attenuation value fixed, and alters the filter position. Set
LAMBDCAL to ON to keep the filter position fixed, and for the
function of the wavelength calibration data to be visible to the
user.
While it is ON, LAMBDCAL is shown at the bottom left of the
display (U/L-CAL is shown if the USERCAL is also on).
Figure 5-1
The LAMBDCAL Indicator on the Display
Resetting the Function of the Wavelength
Calibration Data
To reset LAMBDCAL, press and hold SYST until the value resets
(this takes approximately two seconds).
LAMBDCAL resets to OFF.
68
Setting Up the System
Selecting the Wavelength Calibration and Its Function
Selecting the Wavelength Calibration Data
You enter the user wavelength calibration data over the GPIB (see
“User Calibration Commands” on page 123).
Using your own wavelength calibration data, you can use the
attenuator to compensate for the total wavelength dependence of
your hardware configuration.
NO T E
If you are using the instrument in an environment where the
temperature changes, you should not use the user wavelength
calibration data, as it lacks correction for temperature changes.
To select the wavelength calibration data to use
1. Press SYST repeatedly until USERCAL is shown at the bottom of
the display.
2. Select the wavelength calibration data using the Modify keys.
OFF means that the instrument uses the factory-made
wavelength calibration data
ON means that the user wavelength calibration data is used.
While it is ON, USERCAL is shown at the bottom left of the
display (U/L-CAL is shown if the LAMBDCAL is also on).
Figure 5-2
The USERCAL Indicator on the Display
Resetting the Wavelength Calibration Data Set
To reset USERCAL, press and hold SYST until the value resets (this
takes approximately two seconds).
USERCAL resets to OFF.
69
Setting Up the System
Selecting the Through-Power Mode
5.3 Selecting the Through-Power Mode
In the through-power mode, the instrument shows the power that
gets through the attenuator on the display (that is the power at the
output) rather than the attenuation.
When you select the through-power mode the attenuation factor (in
dB) becomes the value for the through-power (in dBm). That is, if
the attenuation factor is at 32.000dB, and you switch the absolute
power mode on, then the base value for the through-power is
32.000dBm.
Measure the power at the output of the attenuator, and then use the
calibration factor (see “Entering a Calibration Factor” on page 39)
to set the attenuation factor to the required value for use as the base
value for the through-power
CalNew = (ThrouhgPowerBase - Att) + CalCurrent
After setting the calibration factor,
1. Press SYST repeatedly until THRUPOWR is shown at the bottom
of the display.
2. Select ON to switch on the through-power mode.
The through-power factor is shown at the upper left on the display,
and you can edit it by pressing ATT, and using the Modify keys (see
“Using the Modify Keys” on page 29).
Figure 5-3
The Display in Through-Power Mode
70
Setting Up the System
Setting the Display Brightness
Deselecting the Through-Power Mode
When you switch the through-power mode off, the last set
calibration factor becomes active, and the attenuation factor is set
so that the filter attenuation does not change.
1. Press SYST repeatedly until THRUPOWR is shown at the bottom
of the display.
2. Select OFF to switch off the through-power mode.
Resetting the Through-Power Mode
To reset THRUPOWR, press and hold SYST until the value resets
(this takes approximately two seconds).
THRUPOWR resets to OFF.
5.4 Setting the Display Brightness
This parameter sets the brightness of the display. To set the
brightness,
1. Press SYST repeatedly until BRIGHT is shown at the bottom of
the display.
2. Use Modify keys to set the brightness.
Resetting the Display Brightness
To reset BRIGHT, press and hold SYST until the value resets (this
takes approximately two seconds).
BRIGHT resets to full brightness.
71
Setting Up the System
Selecting the Setting used at Power-On
5.5 Selecting the Setting used at Power-On
This parameter selects the instrument setting that is used at poweron.
1. Press SYST repeatedly until P ON SET is shown at the bottom
of the display.
2. Use Modify keys to select the setting.
LAST is the setting that was in use when the instrument was
switched off.
DEFAULT is the default setting.
a number is the number of the setting location where the user has
saved a setting.
Resetting the Power-On Setting
To reset P ON SET press and hold SYST until the value resets (this
takes approximately two seconds).
P ON SET is reset to LAST.
5.6 Locking Out ENB/DIS
This selects how the shutter enabling and disabling key operates
while the instrument is being operated over the GPIB.
1. Press SYST repeatedly until SHUTTER is shown at the bottom of
the display.
2. Use Modify keys to select the setting.
NORMAL means that the shutter can be enabled and disabled as
usual with ENB/DIS.
72
Setting Up the System
Selecting the Shutter State at Power On
LOCKOUT means that the shutter cannot be enabled or disabled
(Local Lock Out) while the instrument is being operated over the
GPIB.
Resetting the ENB/DIS Lock Out
To reset SHUTTER, press and hold SYST until the value resets (this
takes approximately two seconds).
SHUTTER resets to NORMAL.
5.7 Selecting the Shutter State at Power On
This selects whether the shutter is open or closed at power-on.
1. Press SYST repeatedly until SHUTTER@ PON is shown at the
bottom of the display.
2. Use Modify keys to select the setting.
DIS means that the shutter is disabled at power-on.
LAST means that the shutter is the set to the state that was in use
when the instrument was switched off.
Resetting the Shutter State at Power On
To reset SHUTTER@ PON press and hold SYST until the value
resets (this takes approximately two seconds).
SHUTTER@ PON resets to LAST.
73
Setting Up the System
Setting the Display Resolution
5.8 Setting the Display Resolution
This parameter sets the resolution of the attenuation factor and the
calibration factor on the screen.
1. Press SYST repeatedly until RESOLUT is shown at the bottom of
the display.
2. Use Modify keys to select the setting.
1/100 sets a resolution of 0.01.
1/1000 sets a resolution of 0.001.
Resetting the Display Resolution
To reset RESOLUT, press and hold SYST until the value resets (this
takes approximately two seconds).
RESOLUT resets to 1/100.
74
6
6
Storing and Recalling
Settings
Storing and Recalling
Settings
This chapter describes how to store instrument settings to memory,
and how to recall them.
A setting consists of the wavelength, calibration and attenuation
factors, all the application parameters, and the system parameters
with the exceptions of the display resolution, the power on setting,
and the GPIB address and command set.
76
Storing and Recalling Settings
Storing the Setting
6.1 Storing the Setting
To store the current instrument setting
1. Press STORE.
2. Select the location where you want to store the setting, using the
⇑ or the ⇓.
3. Press EXEC.
6.2 Recalling a Setting
Resetting the Instrument
To reset the instrument, you should recall the default setting
1. Press RECALL. The DEFAULT location is shown on the display.
Figure 6-1
The Display when Recalling the Default Setting
2. Press EXEC.
Recalling a User Setting
To recall a setting that is stored
77
Storing and Recalling Settings
Recalling a Setting
1. Press RECALL.
2. Select the location from which you want to recall the setting,
using the ⇑ or the ⇓.
3. Press EXEC.
78
7
7
Programming the
Attenuator
Programming the
Attenuator
This chapter gives general information on how to control the
attenuator remotely. Descriptions for the actual commands for the
attenuator are given in the following chapters. The information in
these chapters is specific to the attenuator, and assumes that you are
already familiar with programming the GPIB.
80
Programming the Attenuator
GPIB Interface
7.1 GPIB Interface
The interface used by the attenuator is the GPIB (General Purpose
Interface Bus).
This is the interface used for communication between a controller
and an external device, such as the attenuator. The GPIB conforms
to IEEE standard 488-1978, ANSII standard MC 1.1 and IEC
recommendation 625-1.
If you are not familiar with the GPIB, then refer to the following
books:
• Hewlett-Packard Company. Tutorial Description of HewlettPackard Interface Bus, 1987.
• The International Institute of Electrical and Electronics
Engineers. IEEE Standard 488.1-1987, IEEE Standard Digital
Interface for Programmable Instrumentation. New York, NY,
1987
• The International Institute of Electrical and Electronics
Engineers. IEEE Standard 488.2-1987, IEEE Standard Codes,
Formats, Protocols and Common Commands For Use with
ANSI/IEEE Std 488.1-1987. New York, NY, 1987
To obtain a copy of either of these last two documents, write to:
The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.
345 East 47th Street
New York, NY 10017
USA.
In addition, the commands not from the IEEE-488.2 standard, are
defined according to the Standard Commands for Programmable
Instruments (SCPI). For an introduction to SCPI, and SCPI
programming techniques, refer to the following documents:
• Hewlett-Packard Press (Addison-Wesley Publishing Company,
Inc). A Beginners Guide to SCPI. Barry Eppler. 1991.
81
Programming the Attenuator
GPIB Interface
• The SCPI Consortium. Standard Commands for Programmable
Instruments. Published periodically by various publishers. To
obtain a copy of this manual, contact your Agilent Technologies
representative.
The attenuator interfaces to the GPIB as defined by the IEEE
Standards 488.1 and 488.2. The table shows the interface functional
subset that the attenuator implements.
Table 7-1
GPIB Capabilities
Mnemonic
Function
SH1
Complete source handshake capability
AH1
Complete acceptor handshake capability
T6
Basic talker; serial poll; unaddressed to talk if
addressed to listen
L4
Basic listener; unaddressed to listen if addressed
to talk; no listen only
SR1
Complete service request capability
RL1
Complete remote/local capability
PP0
No parallel poll capability
DC1
Device clear capability
DT0
No device trigger capability
C0
No controller capability
82
Programming the Attenuator
Setting the GPIB Address
7.2 Setting the GPIB Address
You can only set the GPIB address from the front panel. See
“Setting the GPIB Address” on page 67.
The default GPIB address is 28.
7.3 Returning the Instrument to Local Control
If the instrument has been operated in remote the only keys you can
use are Locala and ENB/DIS. The Local key returns the instrument
to local control. Local does not operate if local lockout has been
enabled. ENB/DIS enables and disables the output from the
attenuator. ENB/DIS does not operate if SHUTTER is set to
LOCKOUT (see “Locking Out Enb/Dis” on page 72).
7.4 How the Attenuator Receives and Transmits
Messages
The attenuator exchanges messages using an input and an output
queue. Error messages are kept in a separate error queue.
How the Input Queue Works
The input queue is a FIFO queue (first-in first-out). Incoming bytes
are stored in the input queue as follows:
1. Receiving a byte:
a. Clears the output queue.
83
Programming the Attenuator
How the Attenuator Receives and Transmits Messages
b. Clears Bit 7 (MSB).
2. No modification is made inside strings or binary blocks. Outside
strings and binary blocks, the following modifications are made:
a. Lower-case characters are converted to upper-case.
b. The characters 0016 to 0916 and 0B16 to 1F16 are converted
to spaces (2016).
c. Two or more blanks are truncated to one.
3. An EOI (End Or Identify) sent with any character is put into the
input queue as the character followed by a line feed (LF, 0A16).
If EOI is sent with a LF, only one LF is put into the input queue.
4. The parser starts if the LF character is received or if the input
queue is full.
Clearing the Input Queue
Switching the power off, or sending a Device Interface Clear signal,
causes commands that are in the input queue, but have not been
executed to be lost.
The Output Queue
The output queue contains responses to query messages. The
attenuator transmits any data from the output queue when a
controller addresses the instrument as a talker.
Each response message ends with a LF (0A16), with EOI=TRUE. If
no query is received, or if the query has an error, the output queue
remains empty.
The Message Available bit (MAV, bit 4) is set in the Status Byte
register whenever there is data in the output queue.
The Error Queue
The error queue is 30 errors long. It is a FIFO queue (first-in firstout). That is, the first error read is the oldest error to have occurred.
A new error is only put into the queue if it is not already in it.
84
Programming the Attenuator
Some Notes about Programming and Syntax Diagram
Conventions
If more than 29 errors are put into the queue, the message ’-350
<Queue Overflow>’ is placed as the last message in the queue.
7.5 Some Notes about Programming and Syntax
Diagram Conventions
A program message is a message containing commands or queries
that you send to the attenuator. The following are a few points about
program messages:
• You can use either upper-case or lower-case characters.
• You can send several commands in a single message. Each
command must be separated from the next one by a semicolon
(;).
• You end a program message with a line feed (LF) character, or
any character sent with End-Or-Identify (EOI).
• You can use any valid number/unit combination.
Example
1500nm, 1.5µm and 1.5e-6m are all equivalent.
If you do not specify a unit, then the default unit is assumed.
The default unit for the commands are given with command
description in the next chapter.
Short Form and Long Form
The instrument accepts messages in short or long forms. For
example, the message :INPUT:WAVELENGTH 1313 is in long
form, the short form of this message is :INP:WAV 1313.
In this manual the messages are written in a combination of upper
and lower case. Upper case characters are used for the short form of
the message. For example, the above command would be written
:INPut:WAVelength.
85
Programming the Attenuator
Some Notes about Programming and Syntax Diagram
Conventions
The first colon can be left out for the first command or query in
your message. That is, the example given above could also be sent
as INP:WAV 1313.
Command and Query Syntax
All characters not between angled brackets must be sent exactly as
shown.
The characters between angled brackets (<…>) indicate the kind of
data that you send, or that you get in a response. You do not type the
angled brackets in the actual message. Descriptions of these items
follow the syntax description. The most common of these are:
string
is ascii data. A string is contained between a ' at
the start and the end, or a ' at the start and the
end.
value
is numeric data in integer (12), decimal (34.5)
or exponential format (67.8E-9).
wsp
is a white space.
Other kinds of data are described as required.
The characters between square brackets ([…]) show optional
information that you can include with the message.
The bar (|) shows an either-or choice of data, for example, a|b
means either a or b, but not both simultaneously.
Extra spaces are ignored; they can be inserted to improve
readability.
86
8
8
Remote Commands
Remote Commands
This chapter gives a list of the remote commands, for use with the
GPIB.
In the remote command descriptions the parts given in upper-case
characters must be given. The parts in lower-case characters can
also be given, but they are optional.
88
Remote Commands
Units
8.1 Units
The units and all the allowed mnemonics are given in the table
below.
Table 8-1
Units and Allowed Mnemonics
Unit
Default
Allowed Mnemonics
deciBel
DB
DB
deciBel/1mW
DBM
DBM DBMW
meter
M
PM, NM, UM, MM, M
Where units are specified with a command, only the Default is
shown, by the full range of mnemonics can be used.
8.2 Command Summary
Table 8-2
Command
Common Command Summary
Parameter/
Response
Min
Max
*CLS
*ESE
<value>
0
255
*ESE?
*ESR?
<value>
<value>
0
0
255
255
*IDN?
*OPC
<string>
Function
Clear Status Command
Standard Event Status Enable
Command
Standard Event Status Enable Query
Standard Event Status Register
Query
Identification Query
Operation Complete Command
89
Remote Commands
Command Summary
Command
*OPC?
*OPT?
*RCL
*RST
*SAV
*SRE
*SRE?
*STB?
*TST?
*WAI
Parameter/
Response
Min
Max
<value>
<string>
<location>
0
9
<location>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
1
0
0
0
0
9
255
255
255
65535
Table 8-3
Function
Operation Complete Query
Options Query
Recall Instrument Setting
Reset Command
Save Instrument Setting
Service Request Enable Command
Service Request Enable Query
Read Status Byte Query
Self Test Query
Wait Command
Command List
Command
Parameter
Response
:DISPlay
:BRIGhtness
:BRIGhtness?
<value>
<value>
:DISPlay
:ENABle
:ENABle?
OFF|ON|0|1
0|1
:INPut
:ATTenuation
<value>|MIN|DE
F|MAX
:ATTenuation?
<value>
:ATTenuation? MIN <value>
:ATTenuation? DEF <value>
:ATTenuation? MAX <value>
:INPut
90
Unit
DB
DB
DB
DB
DB
Min
Max
0
1
0.000dB†
60.000dB†
Default
0.000dB†
Remote Commands
Command Summary
Command
:LCMode
:LCMode?
:INPut
:OFFSet
:DISPlay
:OFFSet?
:OFFSet? MIN
:OFFSet? DEF
:OFFSet? MAX
Parameter
Response
<value>|MIN|DE DB
F|MAX
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>|MIN|DE
F|MAX
:WAVelength?
<value>
:WAVelength? MIN <value>
:WAVelength? DEF <value>
:WAVelength? MAX <value>
:OUTPut
:POWer
:POWer?
:POWer? MIN
:POWer? DEF
:POWer? MAX
:OUTPut
Min
Max
Default
-99.999dB
99.999dB
0.000dB
1200nm
1650nm
1310nm
0.000dB†
60.000dB†
0.000dB†
OFF|ON|0|1
0|1
:INPut
:WAVelength
:OUTPut
:APMode
:APMode?
Unit
DB
DB
DB
DB
M
M
M
M
M
OFF|ON|0|1
0|1
<value>|MIN|DE
F|MAX
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
DBM
DBM
DBM
DBM
DBM
91
Remote Commands
Command Summary
Command
[:STATe]
[:STATe?]
:APOWeron
:APOWeron?
:STATus
:OPERation
[:EVENt]?
:CONDition?
:ENABle
:ENABle?
:NTRansition
:NTRansition?
:PTRansition
:PTRansition?
:QUEStionable
[:EVENt]?
:CONDition?
:ENABle
:ENABle?
:NTRansition
:NTRansition?
:PTRansition
:PTRansition?
:PRESet
:SYSTem
:ERRor?
:UCALibration
:STARt
Parameter
Response
Unit
Min
Max
-32768
32767
OFF|ON|0|1
0|1
DIS|LAST|0|1
0|1
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<value>
<start_value>,
<step_value>
92
M,M
1200nm,0.0 ‡
1nm
Default
Remote Commands
The Common Commands
Command
:STARt?
:STATe
:STATe?
:STOP
:VALue
:VALue?
Parameter
Response
Unit
Min
Max
Default
<start_value>,<step_value>,
<no_of_steps>
M,M
OFF|ON|0|1
0|1
<value>
<value>
DB
DB
-99.999dB
99.999dB
†
These are specified minimum and maximum values, with the
calibration factor (:INPut:OFFSet) set to zero. Actual values
depend on the instrument, and the calibration factor.
‡ These values are interdependent
start value + ((numberofstep-1) × step value) ≤ 1650nm
8.3 The Common Commands
The IEEE 488.2 standard has a list of reserved commands, called
common commands. These are the commands that start with an
asterisk. Some of these commands must be implemented by any
instrument using the standard, others are optional. This section
describes the implemented commands.
Common Status Information
There are four registers for the common status information. Two of
these are status-registers and two are enable-registers. These
registers conform to the IEEE Standard 488.2-1987. You can find
further descriptions of these registers under “*ESE” on page 95,
“*ESR?” on page 96, “*SRE” on page 101, and “*STB?” on
page 102.
93
Remote Commands
The Common Commands
The following figure shows how the registers are organized.
Figure 8-1
Common Status Registers
*
The questionable and operation status trees are described in
“STATus Commands” on page 114.
NO T E
Unused bits in any of the registers return 0 when you read them.
SRQ, The Service Request
A service request (SRQ) occurs when a bit in the Status Byte
register goes from 0 → 1 AND the corresponding bit in the Service
Request Enable Mask is set.
The Request Service (RQS) bit is set to 1 at the same time that the
SRQ is caused. This bit can only be reset by reading it by a serial
94
Remote Commands
The Common Commands
poll. The RQS bit is not affected by the condition that caused the
SRQ. The serial poll command transfers the value of the Status
Byte register to a variable.
*CLS
Syntax
*CLS
Definition
The *CLS command clears the following:
•
Error queue
•
Standard event status register (ESR)
•
Status byte register (STB)
After the *CLS command the instrument is left
waiting for the next command. The instrument
setting is unaltered by the command, though
*OPC/*OPC? actions are canceled.
If the *CLS command occurs directly after a
program message terminator, the output queue
and MAV, bit 4, in the status byte register are
cleared, and if condition bits 2-0 of the status
byte register are zero, MSS, bit 6 of the status
byte register is also zero.
Example
OUTPUT 728;"*CLS"
*ESE
Syntax
*ESE <wsp><value>
0 ≤ value ≤ 255
Definition
The *ESE command sets bits in the standard
event status enable register (ESE) that enable
the corresponding bits in the standard event
status register (ESR).
The register is cleared:
•
At power-on
95
Remote Commands
The Common Commands
•
By sending a value of zero
The register is not changed by the *RST and
*CLS commands.
Table 8-4
The Event Status Enable Register
BIT
MNEMONIC
BIT VALUE
7
Power On
128
6
User Request
64
5
Command Error
32
4
Execution Error
16
3
Device dependent Error
8
2
Query Error
4
1
Request Control
2
0
Operation Complete
1
*ESE?
The standard event status enable query returns
the contents of the standard event status enable
register.
Example
OUTPUT 728;"*ESE 21"
OUTPUT 728;"*ESE?"
ENTER 728; A$
*ESR?
Syntax
*ESR?
Definition
The standard event status register query returns
the contents of the standard event status
register. The register is cleared after being read.
0 ≤ contents ≤ 255
96
Remote Commands
The Common Commands
Table 8-5
The Standard Event Status Register
BITS
MNEMONICS
BIT VALUE
7
Power On
128
6
User Request
64
5
Command Error
32
4
Execution Error
16
3
Device Dependent Error
8
2
Query Error
4
1
Request Control
2
0
Operation Control
1
Example
OUTPUT 728;"*ESR?"
ENTER 728; A$
*IDN?
Syntax
*IDN?
Definition
The identification query commands the
instrument to identify itself over the interface.
Response: HEWLETT-PACKARD,
HP8156A, mmmmmmmmmm, n.nn
HEWLETT-PACKARD:
HP8156A:
mmmmmmmmmm:
n.nn:
Example
manufacturer
instrument model number
serial number (not supplied)
firmware revision level
DIM A$ [100]
OUTPUT 728;"*IDN?"
ENTER 728; A$
97
Remote Commands
The Common Commands
*OPC
Syntax
*OPC
Definition
The instrument parses and executes all
program message units in the input queue and
sets the operation complete bit in the standard
event status register (ESR). This command can
be used to avoid filling the input queue before
the previous commands have finished
executing.
*OPC?
This query causes all the program messages in
the input queue to be parsed and executed.
Once it has completed it places an ASCII ’1’ in
the output queue. There is a short delay
between interpreting the command and putting
the ’1’ in the queue.
Example
OUTPUT 728;"*CLS;*ESE 1;*SRE
32"
OUTPUT 728;"*OPC"
OUTPUT 728;"*CLS;*ESE 1;*SRE
32"OUTPUT 728;"*OPC?"
ENTER 728;A$
*OPT?
Syntax
*OPT?
Definition
This query returns a string with the options
installed in the attenuator. There are three
fields, separated by commas. If an option is not
present in the instrument, the corresponding
field returns a "0".
The three fields are High Performance,
Monitor Output, High Return
Loss. For example, if you have option 201
98
Remote Commands
The Common Commands
(High performance, high return loss version),
the string returned is High Performance,
0,
High Return Loss.
Example
OUTPUT 728;"*OPT?"
ENTER 728;A$
*RCL
Syntax
*RCL <wsp> <location>
0 ≤ location ≤ 9
Definition
An instrument setting from the internal RAM is
made the actual instrument setting (this does
not include GPIB address or parser, the
attenuation resolution or the power on setting).
You recall user settings from locations 1-9. See
“*SAV” on page 100. Location 0 contains the
default setting, which is the same as that
obtained by *RST.
Example
OUTPUT 728;"*RCL 3"
*RST
Syntax
*RST
Definition
The reset setting (default setting) stored in
ROM is made the actual setting.
Instrument state: the instrument is placed in the
idle state awaiting a command.
The following are not changed:
•
GPIB (interface) state
•
Instrument interface address
•
Output queue
99
Remote Commands
The Common Commands
•
Service request enable register (SRE)
•
Standard event status enable register (ESE)
The commands and parameters of the reset
state are listed in the following table.
Table 8-6
Reset State (Default Setting)
Parameter
Reset Value
Attenuation Factor
Calibration Factor
Wavelength
Sweep
Start
Stop
Step
Dwell
Back Refl.
Ins. Loss
RL Ref
RL-Input
λ Cal
User Cal
Through Power Mode
Display Brightness
Power On Setting
Shutter enable under GPIB
Shutter at Power ON
Resolution
0dB
0dB
1310nm
Manual
0.00dB
0.00dB
0.00dB
0.2s
2.00dB
14.70dB
60.00dB
Off
Off
Off
Full
Last
Normal
Disabled
1/100
Example
OUTPUT 728;"*RST"
*SAV
Syntax
*SAV <wsp> <location>
1 ≤ location ≤ 9
100
Remote Commands
The Common Commands
Definition
The instrument setting is stored in RAM. You
can store settings in locations 1-9. The scope of
the saved setting is identical with the scope of
the standard setting described in “*RST” on
page 99.
Example
OUTPUT 728;"*SAV 3"
*SRE
Syntax
*SRE <wsp> <value>
0 ≤ value ≤ 255
Definition
The service request enable command sets bits
in the service request enable register that
enable the corresponding status byte register
bits.
The register is cleared:
•
At power-on
•
By sending a value of zero.
The register is not changed by the *RST and
*CLS commands.
Table 8-7
The Service Request Enable Register
BITS
MNEMONICS
BIT VALUE
7
Operation Status
128
6
Request Status
64
5
Event Status Byte
32
4
Message Available
16
3
Questionable Status
8
2
Not used
0
1
Not used
0
0
Not used
0
101
Remote Commands
The Common Commands
NO T E
Bit 6 cannot be masked.
*SRE?
The service request enable query returns the
contents of the service request enable register.
Example
OUTPUT 728;"*SRE 48"
OUTPUT 728;"*SRE?"
ENTER 728; A$
*STB?
Syntax
*STB?
Definition
The read status byte query returns the contents
of the status byte register.
0 ≤ contents ≤ 255
Table 8-8
The Status Byte Register
Example
102
BITS
MNEMONICS
BIT VALUE
7
Operation Status
128
6
Request Service
64
5
Event Status Byte
32
4
Message Available
16
3
Questionable Status
8
2
Not used
0
1
Not used
0
0
Not used
0
OUTPUT 728;"*STB?"
ENTER 728; A$
Remote Commands
The Common Commands
*TST?
Syntax
*TST?
Definition
The self-test query commands the instrument
to perform a self-test and place the results of
the test in the output queue.
Returned value: 0 ≤ value ≤ 65535. This value
is the sum of the results for the individual tests
Table 8-9
The Self Test Results
BITS
MNEMONICS
BIT VALUE
8
Counter
256
7
Analog to Digital Converter
128
6
General DSP Hardware
64
5
DSP Timeout
32
4
DSP Communications
16
3
Calibration Data Corrupt
8
2
Keypad
4
1
Battery RAM
2
0
Calibration Data
Not Present/ Checksum Fail
1
So 16 would mean that the DSP (Digital Signal
Processor) Communications had failed, 18
would mean that the DSP Communications had
failed, and so had the Battery RAM. A value of
zero indicates no errors.
No further commands are allowed while the
test is running.
The instrument is returned to the setting that
was active at the time the self-test query was
processed.
103
Remote Commands
DISPlay Commands
The self-test does not require operator
interaction beyond sending the *TST? query.
Example
OUTPUT 728;"*TST?"
ENTER 728; A$
*WAI
Syntax
*WAI
Definition
The wait-to-continue command prevents the
instrument from executing any further
commands, all pending operations are
completed.
Example
OUTPUT 728;"*WAI"
8.4 DISPlay Commands
:DISPlay:BRIGhtness
Syntax
:DISPlay:BRIGhtness <wsp> <value>
Description
This command sets the brightness of the
display. The brightness is a floating point
number in the range 0 (least bright) to 1
(brightest). There are seven possible levels of
intensity. The value input for the brightness is
rounded to the closest of these seven values.
The default brightness is 1.
:DISPlay:BRIGhtness?
Syntax
104
:DISPlay:BRIGhtness?
Remote Commands
DISPlay Commands
Description
The query returns the brightness of the display,
where 0 means least brightness, and 1 means
full brightness.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":DISP:BRIG 0.5"
OUTPUT 728;":DISP:BRIG?"
ENTER 728;A$
:DISPlay:ENABle
Syntax
:DISPlay:ENABle <wsp> OFF|ON|0|1
Description
This command enables or disables the front
panel display.
Set the state to OFF or 0 to switch the display
off, set the state to ON or 1 to switch the
display on. The default is for the display to be
on.
:DISPlay:ENABle?
Syntax
:DISPlay:ENABle?
Description
The query returns the current state of the
display.
A returned value of 0 indicates that the display
is off. A returned value of 1 indicates that the
display is on.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":DISP:ENAB ON"
OUTPUT 728;":DISP:ENAB?"
ENTER 728;A$
105
Remote Commands
INPut Commands
8.5 INPut Commands
:INPut:ATTenuation
Syntax
:INPut:ATTenuation <wsp>
<value>[DB]|MIN|DEF|MAX
Description
This command sets the attenuation factor for
the instrument. The attenuation factor is used,
with the calibration factor (see ) to set the filter
attenuation.
Attenuationfilter(dB) = Att(dB) - Cal(dB)
You set the attenuation factor by sending a
value (default units are dB), or by sending
MIN, DEF or MAX, which specify the
minimum, default and maximum values for the
attenuation factor.
The minimum value and the default value are
those values for which Attenuationfilter = 0dB.
The maximum value is that value for which
Attenuationfilter is at its greatest.
:INPut:ATTenuation?
Syntax
:INPut:ATTenuation? [<wsp>
MIN|DEF|MAX]
Description
The query returns the current attenuation
factor, in dB.
Attenuationfilter(dB) = Att(dB) - Cal(dB)
By sending MIN, DEF, or MAX with the query
the minimum, default or maximum value
possible for the attenuation factor is returned.
Example
106
OUTPUT 728;":INP:ATT 32.15"
Remote Commands
INPut Commands
OUTPUT 728;":INP:ATT?"
ENTER 728;A$
:INPut:LCMode
Syntax
:INPut:LCMode <wsp> OFF|ON|0|1
Description
This command sets the function of the
wavelength calibration. That is, whether the
wavelength calibration data is to be used to
reposition the filter to keep the attenuation
factor constant, or to alter the attenuation factor
with the filter kept in a fixed position.
Switch the mode on (using OFF or 0) to keep
the attenuation value fixed, and alter the filter
position. Switch the mode off (using ON or 1)
to keep the filter position fixed, and alter the
attenuation factor.
:INPut:LCMode?
Syntax
:INPut:LCMode?
Description
The query returns the current function of the
wavelength calibration.
0 indicates that the instrument is keeping the
attenuation value fixed, and altering the filter
position. 1 indicates the instrument is keeping
the filter position fixed, and altering the
attenuation factor.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":INP:LCM ON"
OUTPUT 728;":INP:LCM?"
ENTER 728;A$
:INPut:OFFSet
Syntax
:INPut:OFFSet <wsp>
<value>[DB]|MIN|DEF|MAX
107
Remote Commands
INPut Commands
Description
This command sets the calibration factor for
the instrument. This factor does not affect the
filter attenuation. It is used to offset the values
for the attenuation factor. The calibration factor
is used, with the attenuation factor (see
“:INPut:ATTenuation” on page 106) to set the
attenuation of the filter.
Attenuationfilter(dB) = Att(dB) - Cal(dB)
You set the calibration by sending a value
(default units are dB), or by sending MIN, DEF
or MAX, which specify the minimum, default
and maximum values for the calibration factor.
The minimum value for the calibration factor is
-99.999dB. The default value is 0dB. The
maximum value is 99.999dB.
:INPut:OFFSet?
Syntax
:INPut:OFFSet? [<wsp> MIN|DEF|MAX]
Description
The query returns the current calibration factor,
in dB.
By sending MIN, DEF, or MAX with the query
the minimum, default or maximum value
possible for the calibration factor is returned.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":INP:OFFS 32.15"
OUTPUT 728;":INP:OFFS?"
ENTER 728;A$
:INPut:OFFSet:DISPlay
Syntax
108
:INPut:OFFSet:DISPlay
Remote Commands
INPut Commands
Description
This command sets the calibration factor for
the instrument from the current attenuation
factor. The filter attenuation is not affected.
The offset is set so that the attenuation factor
becomes zero.
CalNEW(dB) = -Attfilter(dB) = CalOLD(dB) - AttOLD(dB)
Example
OUTPUT 728;":INP:OFFS:DISP"
OUTPUT 728;":INP:OFFS?"
ENTER 728;A$
:INPut:WAVelength
NO T E
Syntax
:INPut:WAVelength <wsp>
<value>[DB]|MIN|DEF|MAX
Description
This command sets the wavelength for the
instrument. The value is used to make the
compensation for the wavelength dependence
of the filter, using the wavelength calibration
data.
There are two sets of wavelength calibration data, one is made in the
factory, individually, for your instrument. The other is left for the you
to define. Using your own wavelength calibration data, you can use the
attenuator to compensate for the total wavelength dependence of your
hardware configuration.
For more details on this topic, see “Selecting the Wavelength
Calibration and Its Function” on page 67.
You set the wavelength by sending a value
(default units are meters), or by sending MIN,
DEF or MAX, which specify the minimum,
default and maximum values for the
wavelength.
109
Remote Commands
OUTPut Commands
The minimum value for the wavelength is
1200nm. The default value is 1310nm. The
maximum value is 1650nm.
:INPut:WAVelength?
Syntax
:INPut:WAVelength? [<wsp>
MIN|DEF|MAX]
Description
The query returns the current wavelength, in
meters.
By sending MIN, DEF, or MAX with the query
the minimum, default or maximum value
possible for the wavelength is returned.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":INP:WAV 1550nm"
OUTPUT 728;":INP:WAV?"
ENTER 728;A$
8.6 OUTPut Commands
:OUTPut:APMode
Syntax
:OUTPut:APMode <wsp> OFF|ON|0|1
Description
This command sets the whether you set the
attenuation factor, or the through-power to alter
the attenuation of the filter.
When you are switching the absolute power
mode ON, the attenuation factor (in dB)
becomes the base value for the through-power
(in dBm), at the time at which this command is
processed. That is, if the attenuation factor is
set to 32.000dB, and the absolute power mode
is switched on, then the base value for the
through-power is set to 32.000dBm. Use the
110
Remote Commands
OUTPut Commands
calibration factor (see ) to set the attenuation
factor to the required value for use as the base
value for the through-power
CalNew = (Through - PowerBase - Att) + CalCurrent
When you switch the absolute power mode
OFF, the last set calibration factor becomes
active, and the attenuation factor is set so that
the filter attenuation does not change. That is
Att(dB) = Attenuationfilter(dB) + Cal(dB)
NO T E
Using any of the :INPut:ATTenuation commands or queries, or
any of the :INPut:OFFSet commands or queries, switches the
absolute power mode off automatically.
See “:OUTPut:POWer” on page 112 for
information on setting the through-power.
Switch the mode off (using OFF or 0) to set the
attenuation of the filter by specifying the
attenuation and calibration factors. Switch the
mode on (using ON or 1) to set the attenuation
of the filter by specifying the through-power.
:OUTPut:APMode?
Syntax
:OUTPut:APMode?
Description
The query returns whether the attenuation of
the filter is set by the attenuation and
calibration factors, or by the through-power.
0 indicates the instrument sets the attenuation
of the filter from the attenuation and calibration
factors. 1 indicates that the instrument sets the
attenuation of the filter from the throughpower.
111
Remote Commands
OUTPut Commands
Example
OUTPUT 728;":INP:ATT?"
ENTER 728; Att
OUTPUT 728;":INP:OFFS?"
ENTER 728; Cal
Newcal = Basepow - Att + Cal
OUTPUT 728;":INP:OFFS ";Newcal
OUTPUT 728;":OUTP:APM ON"
OUTPUT 728;":OUTP:APM?"
ENTER 728;A$
:OUTPut:POWer
Syntax
:OUTPut:POWer <wsp>
<value>[DBM]|MIN|DEF|MAX
Description
This command sets the through-power for the
instrument. The through-power is used to set
the attenuation of the filter.
Attfilter(dB) = ThroughPowerBase(dBm) - ThroughPower(dBm) + Attfilter@Base(dB)
You set the through-power by sending a value
(default units are dBm), or by sending MIN,
DEF or MAX, which specify the minimum,
default and maximum values for the throughpower.
The maximum value and the default value are
those values for which Attenuationfilter = 0dB.
The minimum value is that value for which
Attenuationfilter is at its greatest. For example,
if you have set INP:ATT 10 and INP:OFFS
2 and then switched UTP:APM ON, then the
through power is set to 12dBm. The maximum
through power, and the default through power,
in this case is 22dBm. The minimum through
power in this case is -38dBm.
112
Remote Commands
OUTPut Commands
:OUTPut:POWer?
Syntax
:OUTPut:POWer? [<wsp> MIN|DEF|MAX]
Description
The query returns the current through-power,
in dBm.
ThroughPower(dBm) = ThroughPowerBase(dBm) + Attfilter@Base(dB) - Attfilter(dB)
By sending MIN, DEF, or MAX with the query
the minimum, default or maximum value
possible for the through-power is returned.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":OUTP:POW 32.15"
OUTPUT 728;":OUTP:POW?"
ENTER 728;A$
:OUTPut:[:STATe]
Syntax
:OUTPut[:STATe] <wsp> OFF|ON|0|1
Description
This command sets the state of the output
shutter, that is, whether it is open or closed.
OFF or 0 closes the shutter, and no power gets
through. ON or 1 opens the shutter, and power
gets through.
:OUTPut[:STATe]?
Syntax
:OUTPut[:STATe]?
Description
The query returns whether the output shutter is
open or closed.
0 indicates the shutter is closed (no power is
getting through). 1 indicates that the shutter is
open (power is getting through).
Example
OUTPUT 728;":OUTP ON"
OUTPUT 728;":OUTP?"
ENTER 728;A$
113
Remote Commands
STATus Commands
:OUTPut:[:STATe]:APOWeron
Syntax
:OUTPut[:STATe]:APOWeron <wsp>
DIS|LAST|0|1
Description
This command sets the state of the output
shutter at power on, that is, whether it is closed,
or takes the state at power-off.
DIS or 0 closes the shutter at power on, and no
power gets through. LAST or 1 sets the shutter
to the state at power-off.
:OUTPut[:STATe]:APOWeron?
Syntax
:OUTPut[:STATe]:APOWeron?
Description
The query returns whether the output shutter is
closed at power on, or set to the state at poweroff.
0 indicates the shutter is closed (no power is
getting through). 1 indicates that the shutter is
set to the state at power-off.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":OUTP:APOW OFF"
OUTPUT 728;":OUTP:APOW?"
ENTER 728;A$
8.7 STATus Commands
There are two ‘nodes’ in the status circuitry. The OPERation node
indicates things that can happen during normal operation. The
QUEStionable node indicates error conditions.
Each node of the status circuitry has five registers:
114
Remote Commands
STATus Commands
• A condition register (CONDition), which contains the current
status.This register is updated continuously. It is not changed by
having its contents read.
• The event register (EVENt), which contains the output from the
transition registers. The contents of this register are cleared
when it is read.
• A positive transition register (PTRansition), which, when
enabled, puts a 1 into the event register, when the corresponding
bit in the condition register goes from 0 to 1.
The power-on condition for this register is for all the bits to be
disabled.
• A negative transition register (NTRansition), which, when
enabled, puts a 1 into the event register, when the corresponding
bit in the condition register goes from 1 to 0.
The power-on condition for this register is for all the bits to be
disabled.
• The enable register (ENABle), which enables changes in the
event register to affect the Status Byte.
The status registers for the attenuator are organized as shown:
115
Remote Commands
STATus Commands
Figure 8-2
The Status Registers
:STATus:OPERation:CONDition?
Syntax
:STATus:OPERation:CONDition?
Description
This query reads the contents of the
OPERation:CONDition register. Only three
bits of the condition register are used:
116
•
Bit 1, which is 1 when the motor that
positions the attenuator filter is settling.
•
Bit 3, which is 1 while the instrument is
performing an attenuation sweep.
Remote Commands
STATus Commands
•
Example
Bit 7, which is 1 after the instrument has
repositioned the attenuator filter due to a
change in temperature.
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:OPER:COND?"
ENTER 728;A$
:STATus:OPERation:ENABle
Syntax
:STATus:OPERation:ENABle <wsp>
<value>
Description
This command sets the bits in the ENABle
register that enable the contents of the EVENt
register to affect the Status Byte (STB). Setting
a bit in this register to 1 enables the
corresponding bit in the EVENt register to
affect bit 7 of the Status Byte.
:STATus:OPERation:ENABle?
Syntax
:STATus:OPERation:ENABle?
Description
This query returns the current contents of the
OPERation:ENABle register.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:OPER:ENAB
138"
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:OPER:ENAB?"
ENTER 728;A$
:STATus:OPERation[:EVENt]?
Syntax
:STATus:OPERation[:EVENt]?
Description
This query reads the contents of the
OPERation:EVENt register. Only three bits of
the event register are used (whether these bits
contain information depends on the transition
register configuration):
117
Remote Commands
STATus Commands
Example
•
Bit 1, which is 1 when the motor that
positions the attenuator filter is settling.
•
Bit 3, which is 1 while the instrument is
performing an attenuation sweep.
•
Bit 7, which is 1 after the instrument has
repositioned the attenuator filter due to a
change in temperature.
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:OPER?"
ENTER 728;A$
:STATus:OPERation:NTRansition
Syntax
:STATus:OPERation:NTRansition
<wsp> <value>
Description
This command sets the bits in the NTRansition
register. Setting a bit in this register enables a
negative transition (1→0) in the corresponding
bit in the CONDition register to set the bit in
the EVENt register.
:STATus:OPERation:NTRansition?
Syntax
:STATus:OPERation:NTRansition?
Description
This query returns the current contents of the
OPERation:NTRansition register.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:OPER:NTR 138"
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:OPER:NTR?"
ENTER 728;A$
:STATus:OPERation:PTRansition
Syntax
118
:STATus:OPERation:PTRansition
<wsp> <value>
Remote Commands
STATus Commands
Description
This command sets the bits in the PTRansition
register. Setting a bit in this register enables a
positive transition (0→1) in the corresponding
bit in the CONDition register to set the bit in
the EVENt register.
:STATus:OPERation:PTRansition?
Syntax
:STATus:OPERation:PTRansition?
Description
This query returns the current contents of the
OPERation:PTRansition register.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:OPER:PTR 138"
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:OPER:PTR?"
ENTER 728;A$
:STATus:QUEStionable:CONDition?
Syntax
:STATus:QUEStionable:CONDition?
Description
This query reads the contents of the
QUEStionable:CONDition register. Only one
bit of the condition register is used:
•
Example
Bit 8, which is 1 when the wavelength is not
within the range of the user wavelength
calibration data.
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:QUES:COND?"
ENTER 728;A$
:STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle
Syntax
:STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle
<wsp> <value>
Description
This command sets the bits in the ENABle
register that enable the contents of the EVENt
register to affect the Status Byte (STB). Setting
119
Remote Commands
STATus Commands
a bit in this register to 1 enables the
corresponding bit in the EVENt register to
affect bit 3 of the Status Byte.
:STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle?
Syntax
:STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle?
Description
This query returns the current contents of the
QUEStionable:ENABle register.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:QUES:ENAB
256"
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:QUES:ENAB?"
ENTER 728;A$
:STATus:QUEStionable[:EVENt]?
Syntax
:STATus:QUEStionable[:EVENt]?
Description
This query reads the contents of the
QUEStionable:EVENt register. Only one bit of
the event register is used (whether these bits
contain information depends on the transition
register configuration):
•
Example
Bit 8, which is 1 when the wavelength is not
within the range of the user wavelength
calibration data.
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:QUES 256"
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:QUES?"
ENTER 728;A$
:STATus:QUEStionable:NTRansition
Syntax
:STATus:QUEStionable:NTRansitio
n <wsp> <value>
120
Remote Commands
STATus Commands
Description
This command sets the bits in the NTRansition
register. Setting a bit in this register enables a
negative transition (1→0) in the corresponding
bit in the CONDition register to set the bit in
the EVENt register.
:STATus:QUEStionable:NTRansition?
Syntax
:STATus:QUEStionable:NTRansitio
n?
Description
This query returns the current contents of the
QUEStionable:NTRansition register.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:QUES:NTR 256"
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:QUES:NTR?"
ENTER 728;A$
:STATus:QUEStionable:PTRansition
Syntax
:STATus:QUEStionable:PTRansitio
n <wsp> <value>
Description
This command sets the bits in the PTRansition
register. Setting a bit in this register enables a
positive transition (0→1) in the corresponding
bit in the CONDition register to set the bit in
the EVENt register.
:STATus:QUEStionable:PTRansition?
Syntax
:STATus:QUEStionable:PTRansitio
n?
Description
This query returns the current contents of the
QUEStionable:PTRansition register.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:QUES:PTR 256"
121
Remote Commands
SYSTem Commands
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:QUES:PTR?"
ENTER 728;A$
:STATus:PRESet
Syntax
:STATus:PRESet
Description
This command presets all the enable registers
and transition filters for both the OPERation
and QUEStionable nodes.
Example
•
All the bits in the ENABle registers are set to
0
•
All the bits in the PTRansition registers are
set to 1
•
All the bits in the NTRansition registers are
set to 0
OUTPUT 728;":STAT:PRES"
8.8 SYSTem Commands
:SYSTem:ERRor?
Syntax
:SYSTem:ERRor?
Description
This query returns the next error from the error
queue (see “The Error Queue” on page 84).
Each error consists of the error code and a short
description of the error, separated by a comma,
for example 0,"No error". Error codes are
numbers in the range -32768 and +32767.
Negative error numbers are defined by the
SCPI standard. Positive error numbers are
device dependent. The errors are listed in
“Display Messages” on page 275
122
Remote Commands
User Calibration Commands
Example
OUTPUT 728;":SYST:ERR?"
ENTER 728;A$
8.9 User Calibration Commands
Entering user calibration data can only be done over the GPIB. This
is done using the commands described here.
Entering the User Calibration Data
To enter the data for the user calibration data, you will need a power
meter, a tunable laser source and the attenuator. If you are going to
use the attenuator to compensate for some other device, this should
be included in the setup as well.
The steps to enter the user calibration data are
1. Set up the hardware.
The following steps can be programmed to make the procedure
easy, as the calibration values must be entered using the GPIB
anyway.
2. Disable the tunable laser source.
3. Execute a zero on the power meter.
4. Set the attenuation to 0.
5. Set the wavelength on the tunable laser source, the attenuator
and the power meter to the start wavelength.
6. Enable the tunable laser source and the attenuator.
7. Set the power meter to dB, and execute a Display-to-Reference.
8. Set the desired attenuation on the attenuator.
9. Start the user calibration (with the data for the start wavelength
and the wavelength stepsize).
123
Remote Commands
User Calibration Commands
This is done with the :UCALibration:STARt command
10. λ=λStart
11. Repeat the following steps until λ>λStop.
a. Set λ on the tunable laser source, the attenuator and the
power meter.
b. Read the power (Power).
c. Power = -Power.
d. Set the user calibration value to Power.
This is done with the :UCALibration:VALue command
e. λ = λ + λStepsize
12. Stop the user calibration.
This is done with the :UCALibration:STOP command
:UCALibration:STARt
Syntax
:UCALibration:STARt <wsp>
<start_value> , <step_value>
Description
This command starts the entering of the user
calibration data.
You must send two values with this command,
the wavelength of the first calibration point,
and the spacing between the calibration points.
The default units for both values are meters.
The minimum value for the start wavelength is
1200nm, and the minimum value for the step
size is 0.1nm, the maximum value for the step
size is 10nm. Other than this, the start and step
values must satisfy the formula
start value + ((number of step - 1) × step value} ≤ 1650nm
where the number of steps must be in the range
10 to 401.
124
Remote Commands
User Calibration Commands
The error -221 indicates that there is a conflict
inherent in the start parameters for the user
calibration. That is, the start_value and/or
step_value is invalid.
The error 201 indicates that the user calibration
is currently on, and calibration data cannot be
changed. Switch the user calibration state off
(see “:UCALibration:STATe” on page 125) and
try again.
:UCALibration:STARt?
Syntax
:UCALibration:STARt?
Description
The query starts returning the data for the user
wavelength calibration.
Three values are returned in response to this
query.
1. The wavelength value for the first calibration data point (in
meters).
2. The step-size between the data calibration points (in meters).
3. The number of data points that have been stored for the full
calibration.
:UCALibration:STATe
Syntax
:UCALibration:STATe <wsp>
OFF|ON|0|1
Description
This command selects the wavelength
calibration to be used. The choice is the factory
made calibration for the instrument, or the
calibration data entered into the instrument by
the user (see “Selecting the Wavelength
Calibration and Its Function” on page 67).
125
Remote Commands
User Calibration Commands
Switch the state off (using OFF or 0) to use the
factory-made calibration. Switch the state on
(using ON or 1) to use the user calibration data.
NO T E
If you are using the instrument in an environment where the
temperature changes, you should not use the user wavelength
calibration data, as it lacks correction for temperature changes.
:UCALibration:STATe?
Syntax
:UCALibration:STATe?
Description
The query returns the current wavelength
calibration state.
0 indicates the instrument is using the factorymade wavelength calibration data. 1 indicates
that the instrument is using the user calibration
data.
Example
OUTPUT 728;":UCAL:STAT ON"
OUTPUT 728;":UCAL:STAT?"
ENTER 728;A$
:UCALibration:STOP
Syntax
:UCALibration:STOP
Description
This command ends the entering of the user
calibration data.
The error 203 indicates that entering the data
points cannot be stopped, because it has not
been started.
:UCALibration:VALue
Syntax
:UCALibration:VALue <wsp> <value>
Description
This command enters a value for the user
wavelength calibration data.
126
Remote Commands
User Calibration Commands
The value that you send with this command, is
the attenuation for the next calibration point.
The wavelength of the calibration point is
updated automatically. The first piece of data is
for the start wavelength specified by the
:UCAL:START command. The default value
for the value is dB.
The value can be in the range 0.001dB to
99.999dB.
:UCALibration:VALue?
Syntax
:UCALibration:VALue?
Description
The query returns a value from the user
wavelength calibration data.
The value returned is the attenuation for the
next calibration point. The wavelength of the
calibration point is updated automatically. The
first piece of data is for the start wavelength as
returned by the :UCAL:START? query. The
values returned are in dB.
The error 204 indicates that there are no more
data points to be read.
127
Remote Commands
User Calibration Commands
128
9
9
Programming Examples
Programming Examples
This chapter gives some programming examples. The language
used for the programming is BASIC 5.1 Language System used on
HP 9000 Series 200/300 computers.
These programming examples do not cover the full command set
for the instrument. They are intended only as an introduction to the
method of programming the instrument. The programming
examples use the GPIB.
130
Programming Examples
Example 1 - Checking Communication
9.1 Example 1 - Checking Communication
Function
This program sends a queries, and displays the reply.
Listing
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
!-----------------------------------!
! Agilent 8156A Programming Example 1
!
! A Simple Communications Check
!
!-----------------------------------!
! Definitions and initialisations
!
110
Att=728
This statement sets the address of the attenuator. The first 7 is to
access the GPIB card in the controller, the 28 is the GPIB address
of the attenuator
120
DIM String$[50]
130
!
150
PRINT TABXY(5,10);"Programming Example 1, Simple Communica
tions"
160
!
170
! Send an IDN query and get the Identification
180
!
190
OUTPUT Att;"*IDN?"
200
ENTER Att;String$
210
PRINT TABXY(10,12);"Identification : ";String$
220
!
230
END
131
Programming Examples
Example 2 - Status Registers and Queues
9.2 Example 2 - Status Registers and Queues
Function
This program sends a commands and queries typed in by the user.
The contents of the status byte and the standard event status register
are displayed. These registers are updated for each new command,
and each time a Service ReQuest (SRQ) occurs. The number of the
most recent error, and the most recent contents of the output queue
is also displayed.
Listing
10
!-------------------------------------------------20
!
30
! Agilent 8156A Programming Example 2
40
!
50
! Status Structure, and a useful self learning tool
60
!
70
!-------------------------------------------------80
!
90
! Declarations and initializations
100
!
110
INTEGER Value,Bit,Quot,Xpos,Ypos
120
DIM Inp$[100]
130
DIM A$[300]
140
Att=728
150
ON INTR 7 GOSUB Pmm_srq
160
!
170
! Mask the registers
180
!
190
OUTPUT Att;"*SRE 248;*ESE 255"
The *SRE 248 command enables bits 7 (Operation Status Summary), 5 (ESB), 4 (MAV), and 3
(Questionable Status Summary) in the status byte (bit 6 (SRQ) cannot be disabled in this
register). The *ESE 255 command enables all of the bits in the Event Status Register.
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
280
290
300
310
320
330
132
!
! Set
!
CLEAR
PRINT
PRINT
PRINT
PRINT
PRINT
PRINT
PRINT
PRINT
PRINT
PRINT
up the screen
SCREEN
TABXY(40,3);"Status Byte"
TABXY(4,1);" OPS SRQ ESB MAV QUE"
TABXY(4,2);" +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+"
TABXY(4,3);" :
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:"
TABXY(4,4);" +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+"
TABXY(4,5);"
^"
TABXY(4,6);"
:"
TABXY(4,7);" +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+"
TABXY(4,8);" :
OR
:"
TABXY(4,9);" +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+"
Programming Examples
Example 2 - Status Registers and Queues
340
PRINT TABXY(4,10);"
^
^
^
^
^
^
^
^"
350
PRINT TABXY(4,11);" +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+"
360
PRINT TABXY(4,12);" :
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:"
370
PRINT TABXY(4,13);" +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+"
380
PRINT TABXY(4,14);" PON URQ CME EXE DDE QYE RQC OPC"
390
PRINT TABXY(40,12);"Standard Event Status Register"
400
PRINT TABXY(4,16);"Last Command :"
410
PRINT TABXY(4,17);"Last Error
:"
420
PRINT TABXY(4,18);"Output Queue :"
430
!
440
! Start the program loop and enable the interrupt for the
errors
450
!
460
Ende=0
470
GOSUB Pmm_srq
480
ENABLE INTR 7;2
490
!
500
! The Central Loop
510
!
520
REPEAT
530
INPUT "Command ? ",Inp$
540
GOSUB Pmm_srq
550
OUTPUT Att;Inp$
560
PRINT TABXY(21,16);"
"
570
PRINT TABXY(21,16);Inp$
580
WAIT 1.0
590
UNTIL Ende=1
600
GOTO 1380
610
!
620
!---------------------------------------------------630 Pmm_srq: ! Interrupt Handling Subroutine to display the
640
! status and the error and output queues
650
!---------------------------------------------------660
!
670
! Get the value for the Status Byte
680
!
690
Value=SPOLL(Att)
700
!
710
! Initialize and start the display of the registers
720
!
730
PRINT TABXY(21,17);"
"
740
PRINT TABXY(21,18);"
"
750
Ypos=3
760
FOR Z=0 TO 1
770
Bit=128
780
Xpos=7
790
!
800
! Do it for each bit
810
!
820
REPEAT
830
Quot=Value DIV Bit
840
!
850
! If the bit is set then display 1
860
!
870
IF Quot>0 THEN
880
PRINT TABXY(Xpos,Ypos);"1"
133
Programming Examples
Example 2 - Status Registers and Queues
890
Value=Value-Bit
900
!
910
! If MAV is set, then get and display the output que
ue contents
920
!
930
IF Z=0 THEN
940
IF Bit=16 THEN
950
ENTER Att;A$
960
PRINT TABXY(21,18);A$
970
END IF
980
END IF
990
!
1000
! If the bit is not set, then display 0
1010
!
1020
ELSE
1030
PRINT TABXY(Xpos,Ypos);"0"
1040
END IF
1050
!
1060
! Set up for the next iteration
1070
!
1080
Bit=Bit DIV 2
1090
Xpos=Xpos+4
1100
UNTIL Bit=0
1110
!
1120
! Now that the status byte is displayed, get the Standar
d Events
1130
! Status Register
1140
!
1150
OUTPUT Att;"*ESR?"
1160
ENTER Att;Value
1170
!
1180
! Set up to display the ESR
1190
!
1200
Ypos=12
1210 NEXT Z
1220 !
1230 ! Read and display any messages in the error queue
1240 !
1250 REPEAT
1260
OUTPUT Att;"SYSTEM:ERROR?"
1270
ENTER Att;Value,A$
The SYSTEM:ERROR? query gets the number of the last error in the error queue.
1280
IF Value<>0 THEN PRINT TABXY(21,17);Value,A$
1290 UNTIL Value=0
1300 !
1310 ! Clear the Status structure and reenable the interrupt be
fore returning
1320 !
1330 OUTPUT Att;"*CLS"
1340 ENABLE INTR 7
1350 !
1360 RETURN
1370 !
1380 END
134
Programming Examples
Example 3 - Measuring and Including the Insertion Loss
9.3 Example 3 - Measuring and Including the
Insertion Loss
Function
This program performs the same sequence as the sample session
given in chapter 1. That is, to measure the insertion loss of the
attenuator, and put this into the calibration factor to that it is
included in all future loss values.
Requirements
This example uses the Agilent 8156A Attenuator, with a 8153A
multimeter with one source and one sensor. The connectors for this
system are all HMS-10.
Setting Up the Equipment
1. At the beginning, configure the hardware as shown in the figure
below, making sure that all the connectors are clean:
Figure 9-1
Hardware Configuration for Attenuation Example - A
a. Make sure that the power sensor is installed in the
multimeter mainframe in channel A, and the source is in
channel B.
135
Programming Examples
Example 3 - Measuring and Including the Insertion Loss
b. Connect both instruments to the electric supply.
c. Switch on both instruments.
NO T E
Under normal circumstances you should leave the instruments to
warmup. (The multimeter needs around 20 minutes to warmup. The
attenuator needs around 45 minutes with the shutter open to warmup.)
Warming up is necessary for accuracy of the sensor, and the output
power of the source.
d. Connect a patchcord from the source to the input of the
sensor.
2. For the second part of the example reconfigure the hardware to
include the attenuator:
a. Disconnect the source from the sensor, and connect it to the
input of the attenuator.
Figure 9-2
Hardware Configuration for Attenuation Example - B
b. Connect a patchcord from the output of the attenuator to the
sensor.
136
Programming Examples
Example 3 - Measuring and Including the Insertion Loss
Listing
10
!----------------------------------------20
!
30
! Programming Example 3
40
!
50
! Measuring the Insertion Loss and using it as a Cal factor
60
!
70
!----------------------------------------80
!
90
! Definitions and Initializations
100 !
110 Att=728
120 Mm=722
130 !
140 OUTPUT Mm;"*rst;*cls"
150 OUTPUT Att;"*rst;*cls"
160 !
170 ! Setup the instruments, with the output of the source connected
180 ! to the input of the sensor and wait for the ENTER key to
190 ! be pressed before continuing
200 !
210 CLEAR SCREEN
220 PRINT TABXY(4,17);""
230 INPUT "Connect the Source to the Sensor and then press ENTER",Inp$
240 !
250 ! Set the sensor wavelength to that of the source
260 !
270 OUTPUT Mm;"sour2:pow:wave?"
280 ENTER Mm;Wvl
290 OUTPUT Mm;"sens1:pow:wave ";Wvl
300 !
310 ! Activate the source
320 !
330 OUTPUT Mm;"sour2:pow:stat on"
340 !
350 ! Set the instrument to measure in dB, and take the current power
360 ! as the reference.
370 !
380 OUTPUT Mm;"sens1:pow:ref:stat on"
390 WAIT 2
Let everything settle before making a reading
400
410
420
tup
430
440
450
460
R to
470
480
490
500
510
520
OUTPUT Mm;"sens1:pow:ref:disp"
!
! Switch off the source and prompt for the next hardware se
!
OUTPUT Mm;"sour2:pow:stat off"
PRINT TABXY(4,17);""
INPUT "Connect the Attenuator into the setup and press ENTE
continue:,Inp$
!
! Set the wavelength on the attenuator
!
OUTPUT Att;"inp:wave ";Wvl
!
! Switch on the source, enable the attenuator
137
Programming Examples
Example 3 - Measuring and Including the Insertion Loss
530 !
540 OUTPUT Mm;"sour2:pow:stat on"
550 OUTPUT Att;"outp on"
560 !
570 ! Read in the power now (the insertion loss of the attenuat
or)
580 ! and put it into the calibration factor on the attenuator.
590 !
600 OUTPUT Mm;"read1:pow?"
610 ENTER Mm;Insloss
620 OUTPUT Att;"inp:offs "; -Insloss
The ‘-’ sign is here because the value from the attenuator is the insertion gain
630
138
END
Programming Examples
Example 4 - Running an Attenuation Sweep
9.4 Example 4 - Running an Attenuation Sweep
Function
We set up the instrument to sweep from 0dB to 5dB with an interval
of 0.5dB, dwelling for a second at each attenuation factor.
The requirements are an Agilent 8156A Attenuator.
Listing
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
280
290
!------------------------------------------------!
! Agilent 8156A Programming Example 4
!
! Running an Attenuation Sweep
!
!------------------------------------------------!
! Definitions and Initializations
!
Att=728
!
Startatt=0.0
Stopatt=5.0
Stepatt=0.5
Dwell=1
!
! Initialise the instrument
!
OUTPUT Att;"*rst;*cls"
!
! Do the sweep
!
FOR Value=Startatt TO Stopatt STEP Stepatt
OUTPUT Att;"inp:att ";Value
WAIT Dwell
NEXT Value
END
139
Programming Examples
Example 4 - Running an Attenuation Sweep
140
A
A
Installation
Installation
This appendix provides installation instructions for the attenuator. It
also includes information about initial inspection and damage
claims, preparation for use, packaging, storage, and shipment.
142
Installation
Safety Considerations
A.1 Safety Considerations
The attenuator is a Class 1 instrument (that is, an instrument with an
exposed metal chassis directly connected to earth via the power
supply cable). The symbol used to show a protective earth terminal
in the instrument is
Before operation, review the instrument and manual for safety
markings and instructions. You must follow these to ensure safe
operation and to maintain the instrument in safe condition.
A.2 Initial Inspection
Inspect the shipping container for damage. If there is damage to the
container or cushioning, keep them until you have checked the
contents of the shipment for completeness and verified the
instrument both mechanically and electrically.
The Function Test gives a procedure for checking the operation of
the instrument. If the contents are incomplete, mechanical damage
or defect is apparent, or if an instrument does not pass the operator’s
checks, notify the nearest Agilent Technologies office.
WA RN IN G
To avoid hazardous electrical shock, do not perform electrical tests
when there are signs of shipping damage to any portion of the outer
enclosure (covers, panels, etc.).
143
Installation
AC Line Power Supply Requirements
A.3 AC Line Power Supply Requirements
The Agilent Technologies 8156A can operate from any singlephase AC power source that supplies between 100V and 240V at a
frequency in the range from 50 to 60Hz. The maximum power
consumption is 40VA with all options installed.
Line Power Cable
In accordance with international safety standards, this instrument
has a three-wire power cable. When connected to an appropriate
AC power receptacle, this cable earths the instrument cabinet. The
type of power cable shipped with each instrument depends on the
country of destination. Refer to Figure A-1 for the part numbers of
the power cables available.
Figure A-1
Line Power Cables - Plug Identification
WA RN IN G
To avoid the possibility of injury or death, you must observe the
following precautions before switching on the instrument.
• If this instrument is to be energized via an autotransformer for
voltage reduction, ensure that the Common terminal connects to the
earth pole of the power source.
• Insert the power cable plug only into a socket outlet provided with a
protective earth contact. Do not negate this protective action by the
using an extension cord without a protective conductor.
144
Installation
AC Line Power Supply Requirements
• Before switching on the instrument, the protective earth terminal of
the instrument must be connected to a protective conductor. You
can do this by using the power cord supplied with the instrument.
• It is prohibited to interrupt the protective earth connection
intentionally.
The following work should be carried out by a qualified electrician.
All local electrical codes must be strictly observed. If the plug on
the cable does not fit the power outlet, or if the cable is to be
attached to a terminal block, cut the cable at the plug end and rewire
it.
The color coding used in the cable depends on the cable supplied. If
you are connecting a new plug, it should meet the local safety
requirements and include the following features:
• Adequate load-carrying capacity (see table of specifications).
• Ground connection.
• Cable clamp.
The AC power requirements are summarized on the rear panel of
the instrument.
Figure A-2
Rear Panel Markings
145
Installation
AC Line Power Supply Requirements
Replacing the Battery
This instrument contains a lithium battery. Replacing thebattery
should be carried out only by a qualified electrician or by Agilent
Technologies service personnel.
There is a danger of explosion if the battery is incorrectly replaced.
Replace only with the same or an equivalent type (Agilent part
number 1420-0394). Discard used batteries according to local
regulations.
Replacing the Fuse
There is one fuse in this instrument. This is a T1A/250V (time-lag)
(Agilent Part No. 2110-0007). The fuse holder is at the rear of the
instrument, beside the line power connector. To replace the fuse,
1. Release the fuse holder: use the blade of a flat-headed
screwdriver to depress the catch at the side of the holder and then
pull the holder out a little.
146
Installation
AC Line Power Supply Requirements
Figure A-3
Releasing the Fuse Holder
2. Pull the fuse holder out of the instrument.
Figure A-4
The Fuse Holder
3. Check and replace the fuse as necessary making sure that the
fuse is always in the top position of the fuse holder, and the
bridge is in the bottom.
4. Place the fuse holder back in the instrument, and push it until the
catch clicks back into place.
147
Installation
Operating and Storage Environment
A.4 Operating and Storage Environment
The following summarizes the Agilent 8156A operating
environment ranges. In order for the attenuator to meet
specifications, the operating environment must be within these
limits.
WA RN IN G
The Agilent 8156A is not designed for outdoor use. To prevent potential
fire or shock hazard, do not expose the instrument to rain or other
excessive moisture.
Temperature
Protect the instrument from temperature extremes and changes in
temperature that may cause condensation within it.
The storage and operating temperature for the Agilent 8156A is
given in the table below.
Table A-1
Temperature
Specified
Operating Range
Storage Range
0°C to 55°C
-40°C to 70°C
Humidity
The operating humidity for the Agilent 8156A is 15% to 95% from
0°C to 40°C.
Instrument Positioning and Cooling
The attenuator has a cooling fan mounted internally. Mount or
position the instrument upright and horizontally so that air can
circulate through it freely. When operating the attenuator, choose a
location that provides at least 75mm (3inches) of clearance at the
148
Installation
Switching on the Attenuator
rear, and at least 25mm (1inch) of clearance at each side. Failure to
provide adequate air clearance may result in excessive internal
temperature, reducing instrument reliability.
Figure A-5
Correct Positioning of the Attenuator
A.5 Switching on the Attenuator
When you switch on the attenuator it goes through self test. This is
the same as the self test described in “*TST?” on page 103.
A.6 Monitor Output
If you have option 121 or option 221(the monitor output), then the
Monitor Output provides a signal for monitoring the power getting
through the attenuator. The signal level is approximately 5% of the
output power level. For the most accurate results, measure the
149
Installation
Optical Output
coupling ratio, and its wavelength dependence, for the Monitor
Output yourself.
A.7 Optical Output
CA UT I O N
The attenuator is supplied with either a straight contact connector or
an angled contact connector (Option 201). Make sure that you only use
the correct cables with your chosen output. See “Connector Interfaces
and Other Accessories” on page 158 for further details on connector
interfaces and accessories.
Disabling the Optical Output
If the optical output is enabled (that is, the green LED is lit), you
can disable it by pressing ENB/DIS.
NO T E
Depending on the attenuation setting, it can take up to 3 seconds for the
output to be disabled (typically delay, 1 second).
A.8 GPIB Interface
You can connect your GPIB interface into a star network, a linear
network, or a combination star and linear network. The limitations
imposed on this network are as follows:
• The total cable length cannot exceed 20 meters
• The maximum cable length per device is 2 meters
• No more than 15 devices may be interconnected on one bus.
150
Installation
GPIB Interface
Connector
The following figure shows the connector and pin assignments.
Connector Part Number: 1251-0293
Figure A-6
GPIB Connector
CA UT I O N
Agilent Technologies products delivered now are equipped with
connectors having ISO metric- threaded lock screws and stud mounts
(ISO M3.5×0.6) that are black in color. Earlier connectors may have
lock screws and stud mounts with imperial-threaded lock screws and
stud mounts (6-32 UNC) that have a shiny nickel finish.
CA UT I O N
It is recommended that you do not stack more than three connectors,
one on top of the other.
Hand-tighten the connector lock screws. Do not use a screwdriver.
151
Installation
Claims and Repackaging
GPIB Logic Levels
The attenuator GPIB lines use standard TTL logic, as follows:
• True = Low = digital ground or 0Vdc to 0.4Vdc
• False = High = open or 2.5Vdc to 5Vdc
All GPIB lines have LOW assertion states. High states are held at
3.0Vdc by pull-ups within the instrument. When a line functions as
an input, it requires approximately 3.2mA to pull it low through a
closure to digital ground. When a line functions as an output, it can
sink up to 48mA in the low state and approximately 0.6mA in the
high state.
NO T E
The GPIB line screens are not isolated from ground.
A.9 Claims and Repackaging
If physical damage is evident or if the instrument does not meet
specification when received, notify the carrier and the nearest
Agilent Technologies Service Office. The Sales/Service Office will
arrange for repair or replacement of the unit without waiting for
settlement of the claim against the carrier.
Return Shipments to Agilent Technologies
If the instrument is to be shipped to an Agilent Technologies/
Service Office, attach a tag showing owner, return address, model
number and full serial number and the type of service required.
The original shipping carton and packing material may be reusable,
but the Agilent Technologies/Service Office will provide
information and recommendation on materials to be used if the
original packing is no longer available or reusable. General
instructions for repacking are as follows:
152
Installation
Claims and Repackaging
1. Wrap instrument in heavy paper or plastic.
2. Use strong shipping container. A double wall carton made of
350-pound test material is adequate.
3. Use enough shock absorbing material (3 to 4 inch layer) around
all sides of the instrument to provide a firm cushion and prevent
movement inside container. Protect control panel with
cardboard.
4. Seal shipping container securely.
5. Mark shipping container FRAGILE to encourage careful
handling.
6. In any correspondence, refer to instrument by model number and
serial number.
153
Installation
Claims and Repackaging
154
B
B
Accessories
Accessories
156
Accessories
Instrument and Options
B.1 Instrument and Options
Table B-1
Mainframe
Description
Model No.
Optical Attenuator
Agilent 8156A
Standard
Option 100
High Performance Version
Option 101
High Performance, High Return Loss Version
Option 201
Monitor Output
Option 121
Monitor Output
Option 221
Back Reflector Kit for option 201*
Option 203
(Additional) Operating and
Option 0B2
Programming Manual
* Kit consists of 1 ea Agilent 81000SI, Agilent 81000FI,
Agilent 81113PC, Agilent 81000UM, Agilent 81000BR
B.2 GPIB Cables and Adapters
The GPIB connector is compatible with the connectors on the
following cables and adapters.
• GPIB Cable, 10833A, 1 m (3.3 ft.)
• GPIB Cable, 10833B, 2 m (6.6 ft.)
• GPIB Cable, 10833C, 4 m (13.2 ft.)
157
Accessories
Connector Interfaces and Other Accessories
• GPIB Cable, 10833D, 0.5 m (1.6 ft.)
• GPIB Adapter, 10834A, 2.3 cm extender.
B.3 Connector Interfaces and Other Accessories
The attenuator is supplied with one of three connector interface
options.
• All options other than option 201 are supplied with a straight
contact connector
• Option 201 with an angled contact connector
Straight Contact Connector
If you want to use straight connectors (such as FC/PC, Diamond
HMS-10, DIN, Biconic, SC, ST, or D4) to connect to the
instrument, you must
1. attach your connector interface (see the list of connector
interfaces below) to the interface adapter,
2. then connect your cable.
158
Accessories
Connector Interfaces and Other Accessories
Figure B-1
Straight Contact Connector Configuration
Table B-2
Connector Interface
Description
Agilent Model No.
Biconic
81000WI
D4
81000GI
Diamond HMS-10/HP
81000AI
DIN 47256
81000SI
FC/PC
81000FI
SC
81000KI
ST
81000VI
159
Accessories
Connector Interfaces and Other Accessories
Option 201, Angled Contact Connector
If you want to use angled contact connectors (such as FC/APC,
Diamond HRL-10, DIN, or SC/APC) to connect to the instrument,
you must
1. attach your connector interface (see the list of connector
interfaces below) to the interface adapter,
2. then connect your cable.
Figure B-2
Angled Contact Connector Configuration
160
Accessories
Connector Interfaces and Other Accessories
Table B-3
Connector Interface
Description
AgilentModel No.
Diamond HRL-10 (DIN)
81000SI
FC/APC
81000FI
SC/APC
81000KI
161
Accessories
Connector Interfaces and Other Accessories
162
C
C
Specifications
Specifications
164
Specifications
Definition of Terms
C.1 Definition of Terms
Attenuation accuracy
The difference between the displayed loss and →excess loss.
Conditions: Attenuation adjustment prior to measurement. That is,
adjustment of the measured attenuation at the highest setting so that
it equals the attenuation setting, for example by adjusting the
wavelength setting.
Measurement: with laser source or LED and optical power meter.
Attenuation range
The range of displayed attenuations.
Excess loss
The difference between actual loss (at an arbitrary attenuation
setting) and [rightarrow]insertion loss (at 0 dB setting).
Insertion loss
The change of power levels after inserting the attenuator between
two connectorized patchcords, with the attenuation set to 0 dB.
Conditions: Arbitrary wavelength setting, temperature within
operating temperature range, jumper cables with high quality
connectors.
Measurement: with laser source or LED and optical power.
Polarization dependent loss
The dependence of the attenuation on the input polarization state,
expressed as the difference between the highest and the lowest
displayed attenuation, in dB.
Conditions: Fabry-Perot type laser source with variable
polarization state and polarization-independent power, generation
of all polarization states (covering the entire Poincar sphere),
jumper cables with high-quality connectors.
165
Specifications
Definition of Terms
Measurement: either with a fiber-loop type polarization controller
using the polarization scanning method, or with a wavelength type
polarization controller using the Mueller method.
Polarization mode dispersion
The change of transit time caused by changing the input
polarization state, expressed in fs (10-15 seconds).
Conditions: Generation of all polarization states (covering the
entire Poincar sphere.
Measurement: with the Agilent Technologies polarization
analyzer.
Repeatability
The random uncertainty in reproducing the attenuation after
changing and re-setting the attenuation. The repeatability is ± half
the span between the maximum and the minimum attenuations,
expressed in dB.
Conditions: uninterrupted line voltage, constant wavelength
setting, temperature within ±1 K, constant input polarization state.
Measurement: with an optical power meter.
Return loss
The ratio of the incident power to the reflected power, expressed in
dB.
Conditions: jumper cables with high-quality connectors on both
attenuator ports. Arbitrary attenuation setting. Applicable to both
attenuator ports, with the respective second port terminated (zero
reference).
Measurement: with a return loss meter, using a Fabry-Perot type
laser source. The measurement result includes attenuator-internal
reflectances and reflectances from both attenuator ports.
Wavelength range The range of wavelengths to which the
specifications apply.
166
Specifications
Specifications
C.2 Specifications
Specifications describe the instrument’s warranted performance.
Supplementary performance characteristics describe the
instrument’s non-warranted typical performance.
Specifications are measured at 1310nm and 1550nm using a laser
source, single-mode fiber and Agilent 81000AI or Agilent 81000SI
connector interfaces.
Table C-1
Specifications - Options 100, 101 and 201
Option 100
Option 101
Option 201
Standard
High
Performance
High Return
Loss
Wavelength Range
1200 - 1650nm
Attenuation Range
60dB (excluding insertion loss)
9/125µm single-mode
Fiber Type
Connector Type
Return Loss
straight contact
>35dB
[1]
Insertion Loss (typ)[2]
4.5dB
Attenuation Accuracy (linearity)[3]
typical
<±0.2dB[4]
<±0.1dB[4]
angled contact
>45dB
>60dB
2.5dB
<±0.1dB
<±0.05dB
<±0.01dB
Repeatability
typical
<±0.005dB
Polarization Dependent Loss
typical
<0.15dBpp
<0.075dBpp
Polarization Mode Dispersion
Useful Back-Reflection Range
•
[1]
<0.08dBpp
<0.02dBpp
4fs
9.0 to 35dB
5.0 to 45dB
5.0 to 60dB
Typical, depends on performance of external connector
167
Specifications
Specifications
Table C-2
•
[2]
•
[3]
•
[4]
Includes insertion loss of two HMS-10 connectors. Typical
variation over temperature range <0.3dBpp.
Measured at constant temperature.
With narrow linewidth lasers, such as DFB lasers, power
fluctuations up to 0.2dBpp may occur.
Monitor Output Options
Option 121
Wavelength Range
Attenuation Range
Fiber Type
Connector Type
Return Loss[1]
High
High Return
Performance
Loss
1200 - 1650nm
60dB (excluding insertion loss)
9/125µm single-mode
straight contact angled contact
>45dB
>60dB
3.3dB
Insertion Loss (typ)[2]
Attenuation Accuracy (linearity)[3]
typical
Repeatability
typical
Polarization Dependent Loss
typical
Polarization Mode Dispersion
Monitor Output (typ.)
Useful Back-Reflection Range
•
[1]
•
[2]
•
[3]
168
Option 221
<±0.1dB
<±0.05dB
<±0.01dB
<±0.005dB
<0.1dBpp
<0.03dBpp
6fs
13dB tap (1:20)
6.6 to 45dB
6.6 to 60dB
Typical, depends on performance of external connector
Includes insertion loss of two HMS-10 connectors. Typical
variation over temperature range <0.3dBpp.
Measured at constant temperature.
Specifications
Specifications
Table C-3
Multimode Options
Option 350
Wavelength Range
1200 - 1650nm
Attenuation Range
60dB (excluding
insertion loss)
Fiber Type
50/125µm multimode
Connector Type
straight contact
Return Loss[1]
22dB
Insertion Loss (typ)[2]
3dB
Attenuation Accuracy (linearity)[3]
typical
<±0.1dB
<±0.08dB
Repeatability
typical
<±0.01dB
<±0.005dB
•
[1]
•
[2]
•
[3]
Typical, depends on performance of external connector
Includes insertion loss of two HMS-10 connectors. Typical
variation over temperature range <0.3dBpp.
Measured at constant temperature.
Supplementary Performance Characteristics
Minimum Attenuation Step: 0.001dB
Switching Time: 20ms to 400ms (depending on actual setting)
Maximum Input Power: 23dBm (200mW)
Operating Modes
Att: Attenuation is shown on the display and can be varied.
169
Specifications
Specifications
λ: Entering of wavelength for automatic correction of attenuation
using typical correction values.
Cal: Offset factor to adjust the attenuation factor on the display
within ±99.999dB range.
Disp→Cal: Sets attenuation value on the display to 0.000dB.
Swp: Manual or automatic up or down attenuation sweep. Start,
stop, step size and dwell time (not for manual sweep) can be
entered.
Back Refl: Desired return loss (back reflection level) can be
entered. Requires Agilent 81000BR back reflector, or Option 203.
Enb/Dis: Optical signal path interrupted with shutter (>80dB
isolation).
Store/Recall: 9 user-selectable parameter settings may be stored
and recalled. Recall of default setting.
General
Recalibration period: 1 year.
Warm-up time: 45 Minutes. Not required if previously stored
within operating temperature range.
GPIB Capability: All modes and parameters can be
programmed, SCPI command set, 8157A compatibility mode.
GPIB Interface Function Code: SH1, AH1, T6, L4, SR1,
RL1, PP0, DC2, DT0, C0
Environmental
Storage temperature: -40 to +70°C
Operating temperature: 0 to +55°C
Humidity: <95% R.H. (to 40°C)
Altitude: to 10,000 feet
170
Specifications
Other Specifications
Installation Category (IEC 664) II
Pollution Degree (IEC 664) 2
Specifications valid at non-condensing conditions.
Power:
100/110/220/240Vrms, ±10%, 90VA max, 48-400Hz.
Battery Back-Up: (for non-volatile memory) With the
instrument switched off all current modes and data will be
maintained for at least 10 years after delivery when stored at room
temperature.
Dimensions: 89mm H, 21s2.35mm W, 345mm D
(3.5”×8.36”×13.6”)
Weight: net 5.3kg (11.8lbs), shipping 9.6kg (21.2lbs)
C.3 Other Specifications
Acoustic Noise Emission:
For ambient temperature up to 30°C
Lp = 41 dB(A)
Lw = 4.3 Bel
Typical operator position,
normal operation.
Geräuschemissionswerte:
Bei einer Umgebungstemperatur bis 30°C
Lp = 41 dB(A)
Lw = 4.3 Bel
am Arbeitsplatz,
normaler Betrieb.
Data are results from type
tests per ISO 7779(EN 27779).
Die Angabe ist das Ergebnis einer
Typprüfung gemäß ISO 7779(EN 27779).
171
Specifications
Declaration of Conformity
C.4 Declaration of Conformity
Manufacturer:
Agilent Technologies
Deutschland GmbH
Optical Communication Measurement Division
Herrenberger Str. 130
D-71034 Böblingen
We declare the system
Product Name:
Model Numbers:
Product Options:
Optical Attenuator
8156A
All
conforms to the following standards
Safety:
IEC 1010-1+A1:1992 EN 61010:1993
EMC:
EN 55011 1990/CINSPR 11 Group 1, Class B (I)
EN 50082-1 (1992)
IEC 801-2 (1991)
ESD
4 kV cd, 8 kV ad
IEC 801-3: (1991)
Radiated Immunity 3 V/m
IEC 801-4: (1988)
Fast Transients
0.5 kV, 1 kV
Supplementary Information:
The product also conforms to other standards not listed here. If further
information on conformance is needed, please contact your local
Agilent Technologies Representative.
(I)
The product was tested in a typical configuration with Agilent systems
(Type test).
Böblingen, September 1st, 1993
Updated, February 2000
172
Hans Baisch
BID Regulations Consultant
D
D
Performance Tests
Performance Tests
The procedures in this section test the optical performance of the
instrument. The complete specifications to which the Agilent
Technologies 8156A is tested are given in Appendix C. All tests
can be performed without access to the interior of the instrument.
The performance tests referspecifically to tests using the Diamond
HMS-10/Agilent connector.
174
Performance Tests
Equipment Required
D.1 Equipment Required
The equipment required for the performance test is listed in the
table below. Any equipment which satisfies the critical
specifications of the equipment given in the table, may be
substituted for the recommended models.
175
Performance Tests
Equipment Required
Table D-1
Equipment Required for the Agilent 8156A (1310/1550nm)
Instrument/Accessory
Recommended HP/
Agilent Model
Required for Option
100
101
121
201
221
350
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
-
x
-
x
-
x
-
x
-
x
81532A
81534A
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
-
81000BR
81000UM
8156A Option 203
1005-0255
x
x
-
x
x
-
x
x
-
x
x
x
x
-
x
x
x
x
x
x
-
-
-
Power Meter
8153A Mainframe with
CW Laser Sources 1310/1550nm 81552SM and 81553SM
or 81554SM
LED Source 1300nm
81542MM
Opt. Sensor Module
Return Loss Module
Reference Reflector
Universal Through Adapter
Back Reflector Kit
DIN Through Adapter
Optical Isolator
Optical Isolator
Connector Interface (6ea)
Connector Interface (4ea)
Connector Interface (1ea)
Connector Interface (1ea)
Connector Interface (4ea)
Connector Interface (1ea)
81000AI
81000AI
81000AI
81000FI
81000SI
81000SI
x
-
x
-
x
x
-
x
x
x
-
x
x
x
x
x
-
Single Mode Fiber (1ea)
Single Mode Fiber (1ea)
Single Mode Fiber (1ea)
Single Mode Fiber (1ea)
Single Mode Fiber (1ea)
Single Mode Fiber (1ea)
81101AC
81101AC
81102SC
81102SC
81109AC
81113PC
x
x
-
x
x
-
x
x
x
-
x
x
x
x
x
-
Multi Mode Fiber (2ea)
81501AC
-
-
-
-
-
x
176
Performance Tests
Test Record
D.2 Test Record
Results of the performance test may be tabulated on the Test Record
provided at the end of the test procedures. It is recommended that
you fill out the Test Record and refer to it while doing the test.
Since the test limits and setup information are printed on the Test
Record for easy reference, the record can also be used as an
abbreviated test procedure (if you are already familiar with the test
procedures). The Test Record can also be used as a permanent
record and may be reproduced without written permission from
Agilent Technologies.
D.3 Test Failure
If the Agilent 8156A fails any performance test, return the
instrument to the nearest Agilent Technologies Sales/Service Office
for repair.
D.4 Instrument Specification
Specifications are the performance characteristics of the instrument
which are certified. These specifications, listed in “Definition of
Terms” on page 165, are the performance standards or limits
against which the Agilent 8156A can be tested. The specifications
also list some supplemental characteristics of the Agilent 8156A.
Supplemental characteristics should be considered as additional
information.
Any changes in the specifications due to manufacturing changes,
design, or traceability to the National Institute of Standards and
177
Performance Tests
Performance Test
Technology (NIST), will be covered in a manual change
supplement, or revised manual. Such specifications supersede any
that were previously published.
D.5 Performance Test
The performance test given in this section includes the Total
Insertion Loss Test, the Attenuation Accuracy Test, the Attenuation
Repeatability Test, and the Return Loss Test. Perform each step in
the order given, using the corresponding test equipment.
The performance test should be performed once at 1310nm, and
then repeated at 1550nm.
NO T E
If you are testing options 100, 101 or 121, you will need to change the
isolator when changing wavelength.
If you are using two separate sources, you will need to change them
when changing wavelength.
NO T E
Make sure that all optical connections of the test setups given in the
procedure are dry and clean. DO NOT USE INDEX MATCHING OIL.
Make sure that all optical connectors are undamaged. The value for
insertion loss depends on the quality of the connectors.
The optical cables from the laser source to and from the Agilent 8156A
Attenuator to the power meter must be fixed on the table to ensure
minimum cable movement during the tests.
The environmental conditions (temperature and relative humidity)
must remain constant during the tests.
178
Performance Tests
Performance Test
I. Total Insertion Loss Test
Specifications
Agilent 8156A
Insertion loss (including both connectors) Option 100
Option 101
Option 121
Option 201
Option 221
Option 350
Typ.
<5.4dB
<3.0dB
<4.2dB
<3.0dB
<3.3dB
<3.0dB
Carry out the following Insertion Loss Test at 1310nm and 1550nm
with single-mode fibers using the the equipment listed previously.
1. Turn the instruments on and allow the instruments to warm up.
2. Connect the equipment as shown in the appropriate Total
Insertion Loss Test Setup 1.
Figure D-1
Total Insertion Loss Test Setup 1, Options 100, 101, 121
179
Performance Tests
Performance Test
Figure D-2
Total Insertion Loss Test Setup 1, Options 201, 221
Figure D-3
Total Insertion Loss Test Setup 1, Option 350
3. On the DUT, press and hold ATT to reset the attenuation to
minimum (any attenuation shown on the display is due to the
calibration factor).
4. Zero the Power-meter and select Autorange. Display [dB]
5. Enable the laser source and set Display to Reference on the
power meter.
6. Connect the equipment as shown in the appropriate Total
Insertion Loss Test Setup 2.
180
Performance Tests
Performance Test
Figure D-4
Total Insertion Loss Test Setup 2, Options 100, 101, 121
Figure D-5
Total Insertion Loss Test Setup 2, Options 201, 221
181
Performance Tests
Performance Test
Figure D-6
Total Insertion Loss Test Setup 2, Option 350
7. Enable the attenuator output and record the power meter reading
(in dB) in the Test Record and check that it is within
specifications.
II. Linearity/Attenuation Accuracy Test
Specifications
Linearity
Agilent 8156A
Option 100
Option 101
Option 121
Option 201
Option 221
Option 350
<±0.2dB
<±0.1dB
<±0.1dB
<±0.1dB
<±0.1dB
<±0.1dB
Carry out the following Attenuation Accuracy tests at 1310nm and
1550nm with single-mode fibers using the equipment listed
previously.
182
Performance Tests
Performance Test
1. Set the attenuator as follows:
λ
as required
CAL
to 0.00 dB
ATT
to 0.00 dB
2. Connect the equipment as shown in the appropriate Total
Insertion Loss Test Setup 2.
NO T E
Use a tape to fix the fibers on the table. Don’t touch the fibers during
the measurement to prevent changes of state of polarization.
3. Zero the power meter channel and make sure that the parameters
are set as follows:
λ
as required
CAL
to 0.000 dB
T
to 500ms
4. Set the power meter to AUTOrange, then enable the laser source
and the attenuator output.
5. On the power meter select display in dB (dB key)
6. Press DISP→REF for the power meter.
7. Set the DUT attenuation to 60dB
8. If the powermeter does not show 60.00dB, set [lambda] on the
DUT so that the power meter shows 60.00dB. Tuning the DUT
in 0.1nm steps is sufficient to accomplish this. This is necessary
to eliminate the wavelength dependence of the DUT.
9. Press and hold ATT until the attenuation resets to 0.000dB.
10. Press DISP→REF for the power meter.
11. Increase the DUT attenuation in steps as shown below and note
the power meter reading in the Test Record.
183
Performance Tests
Performance Test
0.00dB REFERENCE
1 dB
2 dB
3 dB
5 dB
6 dB
7 dB
9 dB
10 dB
11 dB
13 dB
14 dB
24 dB
44 dB
54 dB
60 dB
4 dB
8 dB
12 dB
34 dB
III. Attenuation Repeatability Test
Specifications
Agilent 8156A
Repeatability after any parameter has been changed and reset <±0.01 dB.
Use the same equipment, test setup and instrument settings as used
for the Attenuation Accuracy test (see the appropriate Total
Insertion Loss Test Setup 2).
1. Set the Agilent 8156A attenuation to 1 dB and press DISP→REF
on the power meter.
2. Set the Agilent 8156A attenuation to any other value (e.g.
0.00 dB), wait until it settles at this value (The time taken to
change depends on the size of the attenuation factor change, and
is in the range 20 to 400ms (typical value is 200ms)). Then
change the attenuation back to the previous value. Note the
deviation (dB) in the Test Record and check that it is within
±0.01 dB.
3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for the following attenuation settings:
5 dB
48 dB
184
12 dB
53 dB
24 dB
60 dB
36 dB
Performance Tests
Performance Test
IV. Return Loss Test
Options 100, 101, and 121
Specifications
Agilent 8156A
Return Loss
Option 100
Option 101
Option 121
>35dB
>45dB
>45dB
1. Make sure that all connectors are carefully cleaned.
2. Connect the source to the HP 81534A Input. Attach the high
return loss connector of the patchcord to the Output (the high
return loss connector on these cables is the connector with the
orange sleeve). Using tape, fix the cables to the table.
Figure D-7
Return Loss Test Setup 1, Options 100, 101, 121
3. Make sure that the instrument has warmed up.
4. Disable the source, cover the end of the patchcord (for instance,
using the blue cap supplied with the fiber) and press ZERO to
remove offsets in the power meter.
5. Press PARAM to select the T parameter. Set the averaging time
to 1s.
185
Performance Tests
Performance Test
6. Press PARAM to select the [lambda] parameter. Edit this
parameter and set it to the current wavelength of the source.
7. Enable the source.
8. Press PARAM to select the CAL REF parameter (the current
value for the known return loss is displayed with R: at the side
of the character field).
9. Attach the Agilent 81000BR Reference Reflector to the
patchcord. (Use the Agilent 81000UM, with a connector
interface to do this)
10. Set the reflection reference (R:) to 0.18dB, the default value of
the return loss of the reference reflector.
11. Press DISP→REF (the value read should now be 0.18dB, the
same as the value entered for R:).
NO T E
If this is the first time that you have transferred this value to the
reference after switch on, it might not be displayed properly. In this
case, repeat the step to correct the display.
12. Press PARAM to select the REF AUX parameter.
13. Terminate the cable by wrapping the fiber five times around the
shaft of a screwdriver.
14. Press DISP→REF (the instrument sets the termination
parameter).
15. Disable the DUT.
NO T E
If you have the monitor option (option 121), make sure that the cable at
the monitor output is terminated.
16. Connect the 81109AC patchcord to the 8156A input, and note
the Return Loss result in the Test Record.
17. Connect the 81109AC patchcord to the 8156A output, and note
the Return Loss result in the Test Record.
186
Performance Tests
Performance Test
Figure D-8
Return Loss Test Setup 2, Options 100, 101
Figure D-9
Return Loss Test Setup 2, Option 121
Options 201 and 221
Specifications
Agilent 8156A
Return Loss
Option 201
Option 221
>60dB
>60dB
187
Performance Tests
Performance Test
1. Make sure that all connectors are carefully cleaned.
2. Connect the source to the HP 81534A Input. Attach the high
return loss connector of the patchcord to the Output (the high
return loss connector on these cables is the connector with the
orange sleeve). Using tape, fix the cables to the table.
Figure D-10
Return Loss Test Setup 1, Options 201, 221
3. Make sure that the instrument has warmed up.
4. Disable the source, cover the end of the patchcord (for instance,
using the blue cap supplied with the fiber) and press ZERO to
remove offsets in the power meter.
5. Press PARAM to select the T parameter. Set the averaging time
to 1s.
6. Press PARAM to select the λ parameter. Edit this parameter and
set it to the current wavelength of the source.
7. Enable the source.
8. Press PARAM to select the CAL REF parameter (the current
value for the known return loss is displayed with R: at the side
of the character field).
9. Attach the option 203 to the patchcord. (Use the DIN Through
Adapter (Agilent P/N 1005-0255) to do this)
10. Set the reflection reference (R:) to 0.98dB, the default value of
the return loss of the reference reflector.
188
Performance Tests
Performance Test
11. Press DISP→REF (the value read should now be 0.98dB, the
same as the value entered for R:).
12. Press PARAM to select the REF AUX parameter.
13. Terminate the cable by wrapping the fiber five times around the
shaft of a screwdriver.
14. Press DISP→REF (the instrument sets the termination
parameter).
15. Disable the DUT.
NO T E
If you have the monitor option (option 221), make sure that the cable at
the monitor output is terminated.
16. Connect the 81102SC patchcord to the 8156A input, and note the
Return Loss result in the Test Record.
17. Connect the 81102SC patchcord to the 8156A output, and note
the Return Loss result in the Test Record.
Figure D-11
Return Loss Test Setup 2, Option 201
189
Performance Tests
Performance Test
Figure D-12
Return Loss Test Setup 2, Option 221
190
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
D.6 V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL):
Optional
Table D-2
Equipment for the PDL test 1
Instrument/Accessory
Recommended HP/
Agilent Model
Required for Option
8169A #021
Lightwave Multimeter Mainframe
8153A
Optical Head Interface
81533B
CW Laser Source 1310nm
81552SM and
1550nm 81533SM
or 1310/1550nm 81544SM
2
81521B
Optical Head
100
1
101
1
102
1
201
1
202
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Depolarizing Filter
Connector Interface
Connector Interface
Connector Interface
Connector Adapter
Connector Adapter
Single Mode Fiber
Single Mode Fiber
Single Mode Fiber
Isolator
1
6
1
3
1
1
6
1
3
1
1
6
1
3
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
Polarization Controller
1
81000DF
81000AI
81000FI
81000SI
81000AA
81000SA
81101AC
81113PC
81113SC
1
The equipment is described for a test setup with a polarization
controller with option 021 (straight connector). If you want to use a
polarization controller with a different connector option you have to
use interfaces, adapters and patchcords depending on this option.
191
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
2
Instead of a standard HP 81521B+ Depolarizing Filter Agilent
81000DF, an HP 81521B #001 can also be used, as this option is
especially designed for low PDL.
Polarization Dependant Loss Test (Mueller method)
1. Connect the equipment as shown in Figure D-13
a. Make sure that the connectors, lenses and detector windows
are clean. Refer to the cleaning procedure.
b. Ensure that the instruments have warmed up.
Figure D-13
PDL Test Setup 1: Reference Measurement
2. Using the setup of Figure D-13:
Use a tape to fix the patchcords on the table.
192
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
CA UT I O N
The patchcord from the source to the polarization controller - with the
isolator - must not move during and between all measurements.
The patchcords between the polarization controller and the optical
head must not move from the beginning of the reference measurements
until these are finished.
3. Zero the 8153A.
a. Ensure that the laser source is switched off.
b. Press MENU to change the Measure Mode.
c. Press ZERO and wait while zeroing.
4. Set up the laser source.
a. Set the laser source to 1550 nm (nominal), switch the laser
on, and allow 5 minutes for the laser to settle.
b. Note the actual wavelength in the test record.
5. Set up the power meter.
a. Set the power meter to the actual wavelength.
Press PARAM until the wavelength is displayed, then use the
modify cursor keys to set the actual wavelength.
b. Set the averaging time to 100 ms.
Press PARAM until the averaging time is displayed, then use
the modify cursor keys to set the averaging time to 100 ms.
c. Set the display to W.
Press DBM/W.
6. Set the polarization filter of the 8169A to maximize the signal.
a. Reset the position of all plates.
Press HOME on the polarization controller.
b. Select the polarization filter.
You may need to press POS and/or Pol if the filter is not
193
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
already selected.
c. Modify the filter setting to find the maximum signal
transmission through the polarization controller:
•
Select the most significant digit by using the cursor key.
Use the Modify knob to adjust the displayed angle
slowly until the power reading on the multimeter shows
the maximum value.
•
Select the next digit with the cursor key.
Use the Modify knob to adjust the displayed angle
slowly until the power reading on the multimeter shows
the maximum value.
•
Select the least significant digit by using the cursor key.
Use the Modify knob to adjust the displayed angle
slowly until the power reading on the multimeter shows
the maximum value.
•
Press ENTER
•
Note the displayed angle of the polarization filter as
"Polarizer Setting, Linear Horizontal Polarization" in the
Test Record.
For the following steps, the polarizer is kept constant.
Set plates for Linear Horizontal polarization
7. Set the λ/4 Retarder Plate for Linear Horizontal polarization.
a. Select the λ/4 Retarder Plate.
Press λ/4
b. Modify the λ/4 plate setting to the same angle as the
polarization filter found in item 6c.
c. Press ENTER
d. Note the angle as "λ/4 Plate Setting, Linear Horizontal
Polarization" in the Test Record.
8. Set the λ/2 Retarder Plate for Linear Horizontal polarization.
194
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
a. Select the λ/2 Retarder Plate.
Press λ/2
b. Modify the λ/2 plate setting to the same angle as the
polarization filter found in item 6c.
c. Press ENTER
d. Note the angle as "λ/2 Plate Setting, Linear Horizontal
Polarization" in the Test Record.
Determine settings for Linear Vertical, Linear Diagonal, and
Right Hand Circular Polarization
9. In order to get the required polarization, the λ/2 and λ/4 retarder
plates need to be set to the appropriate values. The corrected
positions of the polarizer plates depend on the actual wavelength
and have to be taken from Table D-3.
In the case of Linear Horizontal polarized light no correction is
to be done. The table lists corrections for every 20 nm step. For
wavelengths between listed values, a linear approximation
should be used.
The value taken from the table (possible by approximation) is to
be added to the values of the λ/4 and λ/2 retarder plate setting for
Linear Horizontal polarized light determined in steps 7. and 8.
respectively:
•
Get the values for the wavelength dependent offset
positions for each type of polarization from Table D-3.
•
Add these values to those for Linear Horizontal polarized
light.
•
Note the calculated "corrected wavelength dependent
position" values in the Test Record for the λ/4 Plate
Setting and the λ/2 Plate setting for Linear Vertical,
Linear Diagonal and Right Hand Circular polarization.
Example: actual wavelength 1552 nm. Find the maximum
transmission for the Linear Horizontal polarized light at a
polarization filter setting of 15.4°.
In Table D-3, wavelength dependent positions can be found and
195
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
approximated:
Linear vertical
λ
Linear diagonal
λ/4 Plate
RH circular
λ/4 Plate
λ/2 Plate
λ/2 Plate
λ/4 Plate
λ/2 Plate
1560nm
1.2°
45.6°
0.8°
22.9°
44°
-16.5°
1552nm
0.7°
45.4°
0.5°
22.7°
44.4°
-15.9°
1540nm
0°
45°
0°
22.5°
45°
-15.1°
The associated Test record will look like this by adding the
appropriate values to those of the Linear Horizontal polarized
light.
Polarization
Linear
Linear
Linear
Right Hand
Horizontal
Vertical
Diagonal
Circular
Polarizer Setting
15.4°
n/a
n/a
n/a
λ/4 Plate Setting
15.4°
n/a
n/a
n/a
λ/2 Plate Setting
15.4°
n/a
n/a
n/a
λ/4 Plate Setting
n/a
16.1°
15.9°
59.8°
λ/2 Plate Setting
n/a
60.8°
38.1°
-0.5°
Corrected wavelength
dependent positions:
10. Measure the Reference Power
a. Linear Horizontal polarized light.
Keep the setting from the polarizer and the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder
Plates from steps 6. to 8.
•
196
Read the power that is displayed on the power meter and
note it as P01 in the test record.
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
b. Linear Vertical polarized light.
•
Set the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder Plates to the "corrected
wavelength dependent positions" for Linear Vertical
polarized light.
You need to select the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder plates by
pressing λ/4 and λ/2 respectively.
Type the appropriate value and press ENTER after each
entry.
•
Read the power that is displayed on the power meter and
note it as P02 in the test record.
c. Linear Diagonal polarized light.
•
Set the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder Plates to the "corrected
wavelength dependent positions" for Linear Diagonal
polarized light.
You need to select the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder plates by
pressing λ/4 and λ/2 respectively.
Type the appropriate value and press ENTER after each
entry.
•
Read the power that is displayed on the power meter and
note it as P03 in the test record.
d. Right Hand Circular polarized light.
•
Set the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder Plates to the "corrected
wavelength dependent positions" for Right Hand
Circular polarized light.
You need to select the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder plates by
pressing λ/4 and λ/2 respectively.
Type the appropriate value and press ENTER after each
entry.
•
Read the power that is displayed on the power meter and
note it as P04 in the test record.
11. Connect the equipment as shown in Figure D-14.
197
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
CA UT I O N
The patchcords between the polarization controller and the optical
head must not move until the measurements are finished.
12. Set the 8156A Attenuator (DUT) to 0dB using the modify keys.
Figure D-14
PDL Test Setup 2: Power after DUT
13. Measure the optical power after the DUT
a. Linear Horizontal polarized light.
•
Set the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder Plates for Linear Horizontal
polarization. You need to select the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder
plates by pressing λ/4 and λ/2 respectively.
Type the appropriate value and press ENTER after each
entry.
198
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
•
Read the power that is displayed on the power meter and
note it as PDUT01 in the test record.
b. Linear Vertical polarized light.
•
Set the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder Plates to the "corrected
wavelength dependent positions" for Linear Vertical
polarized light.
You need to select the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder plates by
pressing λ/4 and λ/2 respectively.
Type the appropriate value and press ENTER after each
entry.
•
Read the power that is displayed on the power meter and
note it as PDUT02 in the test record.
c. Linear Diagonal polarized light.
•
Set the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder Plates to the "corrected
wavelength dependent positions" for Linear Diagonal
polarized light.
You need to select the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder plates by
pressing λ/4 and λ/2 respectively.
Type the appropriate value and press ENTER after each
entry.
•
Read the power that is displayed on the power meter and
note it as PDUT03 in the test record.
d. Right Hand Circular polarized light.
•
Set the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder Plates to the "corrected
wavelength dependent positions" for Right Hand
Circular polarized light.
You need to select the λ/4 and λ/2 Retarder plates by
pressing λ/4 and λ/2 respectively.
Type the appropriate value and press ENTER after each
entry.
•
Read the power that is displayed on the power meter and
note it as PDUT04 in the test record.
199
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
14. Calculate
a. the Mueller coefficients
b. the Minimum and Maximum transmission, and finally
c. the Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL)
as described in the test record.
15. Laser set up for the higher wavelength
a. Set the laser source to 1310nm (nominal)
b. Switch the laser on and allow to settle for about 5 minutes
c. Note the actual wavelength in the test record
d. Repeat steps 6. to 14. for this wavelength as well.
Table D-3
Performance Test Agilent 8156A
Linear vertical
λ
λ/4-Plate
λ/2-Plate
46.2°
1580nm
2.5°
1560nm
1.2°
45.6°
1540nm
0°
45.0°
1520nm
-1.4°
44.3°
1500nm
-2.7°
43.6°
1340nm
-14.7°
36.2°
1320nm
-16.3°
35.1°
1300nm
-17.9°
34.0°
1280nm
-19.6°
32.9°
1260nm
-21.2°
31.7°
200
Linear diagonal
λ/4-Plate
λ/2-Plate
1.7°
23.3°
0.8°
22.9°
0°
22.5°
-1°
22.0°
-2°
21.4°
-13.9°
12.8°
-16°
11.0°
-18.5°
8.9°
-21.2°
6.5°
-24.2°
3.9°
RH Circular
λ/4-Plate
λ/2-Plate
42.9°
-17.1°
44.0°
-16.5°
45.0°
-15.1°
46.2°
-13.8°
47.4°
-12.4°
58.1°
-0.7°
59.6°
1°
61.2°
3°
62.9°
5.1°
64.7°
7.4°
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A
Page 1 of 8
Test Facility:
______________________________________ Report No. ____________________________
______________________________________ Date:
____________________________
______________________________________ Customer: ____________________________
______________________________________ Tested By: ____________________________
Model: Agilent 8156A Attenuator
Serial No.
___________________ Ambient temperature
______ °C
Options
___________________ Relative humidity
______ %
Firmware Rev.
___________________ Line frequency
______ Hz
Special Notes:
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
201
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 100
Page 2 of 8
Model __ __________ Module Report No. _______
Test Equipment Used:
Description
1. Power Meter
Date ________
Model No.
8153A
Trace No. Cal. Due Date
________ __ / ___ /___
2a1. CW Laser Sources 1310nm
81552SM
________ __ / ___ /___
2a2. CW Laser Sources 1550nm
81553SM
________ __ / ___ /___
2b. CW Laser Sources 1310/1550nm
or 81554SM ________ __ / ___ /___
3. Opt Sensor Module
81532A
________ __ / ___ /___
4. Return Loss Module
81534A
________ __ / ___ /___
5. Reference Reflector
81000BR
________ __ / ___ /___
6. Universal Through Adapter
81000UM
________ __ / ___ /___
7.1 Optical Isolator 1310nm
________ __ / ___ /___
8. Connector Interface (6ea)
81210LI
Opt011
81310LI
Opt011
81000AI
9.1 Single Mode Fiber (1ea)
81101AC
________ __ / ___ /___
9.2 Single Mode Fiber
10. ___________________________________________
11. ___________________________________________
12. ___________________________________________
13. ___________________________________________
14. ___________________________________________
15. ___________________________________________
16. ___________________________________________
81109AC
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
7.2 Optical Isolator 1550nm
202
________ __ / ___ /___
________ __ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 100
Page 3 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 100
No. _______________ Date_______________
Maximum Measurement
Test Test Description
Minimum
Uncertainty
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result Spec.
I.
Total Insertion Loss Test
dB
±0.60dB
typ. <4.5dB
measured at __________________nm
with singlemode fiber
II.
_________ 5.4 dB
±0.05dB
Linearity/Att. Acc.
Attenuation
Setting:
0dB
REF
1dB
0.8dB
_________ 1.2dB
2dB
1.8dB
_________ 2.2dB
3dB
2.8dB
_________ 3.2dB
4dB
3.8dB
_________ 4.2dB
5dB
4.8dB
_________ 5.2dB
6dB
5.8dB
_________ 6.2dB
7dB
6.8dB
_________ 7.2dB
8dB
7.8dB
_________ 8.2dB
9dB
8.8dB
_________ 9.2dB
10dB
9.8dB
_________ 10.2dB
203
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 100
Page 4 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 100
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
II. Linearity/Att. Acc.
±0.05dB
Attenuation
Setting:
11dB
10.8dB
_________ 11.2dB
12dB
11.8dB
_________ 12.2dB
13dB
12.8dB
_________ 13.2dB
14dB
13.8dB
_________ 14.2dB
24dB
23.8dB
_________ 24.2dB
34dB
33.8dB
_________ 34.2dB
44dB
43.8dB
_________ 44.2dB
54dB
53.8dB
_________ 54.2dB
60dB
59.8dB
_________ 60.2dB
204
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 100
Page 5 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 100
Test Test Description
No. performed at _________________nm
III. Att. Repeatability Test
No. _______________ Date_______________
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.01dB
Attenuation
Setting:
IV.
1dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
5dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
12dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
24dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
36dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
48dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
53dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
60dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
30dB
30dB
_________
_________
Return Loss Test
typ. >35dB
Input
Output
±0.60dB
±0.60dB
205
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 100
Page 6 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 100
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
I.
Total Insertion Loss Test
dB
±0.60dB
typ. <4.5dB
measured at __________________nm
with SM fiber
II.
_________ 5.4 dB
±0.05dB
Linearity/Att. Acc.
Attenuation
Setting:
0dB
REF
1dB
0.8dB
_________ 1.2dB
2dB
1.8dB
_________ 2.2dB
3dB
2.8dB
_________ 3.2dB
4dB
3.8dB
_________ 4.2dB
5dB
4.8dB
_________ 5.2dB
6dB
5.8dB
_________ 6.2dB
7dB
6.8dB
_________ 7.2dB
8dB
7.8dB
_________ 8.2dB
9dB
8.8dB
_________ 9.2dB
10dB
9.8dB
_________ 10.2dB
206
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 100
Page 7 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 100
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
II. Linearity/Att. Acc.
±0.05dB
Attenuation
Setting:
11dB
10.8dB
_________ 11.2dB
12dB
11.8dB
_________ 12.2dB
13dB
12.8dB
_________ 13.2dB
14dB
13.8dB
_________ 14.2dB
24dB
23.8dB
_________ 24.2dB
34dB
33.8dB
_________ 34.2dB
44dB
43.8dB
_________ 44.2dB
54dB
53.8dB
_________ 54.2dB
60dB
59.8dB
_________ 60.2dB
207
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 100
Page 8 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 100
Test Test Description
No. performed at _________________nm
III. Att. Repeatability Test
No. _______________ Date_______________
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.01dB
Attenuation
Setting:
IV.
1dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
5dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
12dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
24dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
36dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
48dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
53dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
60dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
30dB
30dB
_________
_________
Input
Output
Return Loss Test
typ. >35dB
208
±0.60dB
±0.60dB
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 101
Page 2 of 8
Model __ __________ Module Report No. _______
Test Equipment Used:
Description
1. Power Meter
Date ________
Model No.
8153A
Trace No. Cal. Due Date
________ __ / ___ /___
2a1. CW Laser Sources 1310nm
81552SM
________ __ / ___ /___
2a2. CW Laser Sources 1550nm
81553SM
________ __ / ___ /___
2b. CW Laser Sources 1310/1550nm
or 81554SM ________ __ / ___ /___
3. Opt Sensor Module
81532A
________ __ / ___ /___
4. Return Loss Module
81534A
________ __ / ___ /___
5. Reference Reflector
81000BR
________ __ / ___ /___
6. Universal Through Adapter
81000UM
________ __ / ___ /___
7.1 Optical Isolator 1310nm
81210LI
________ __ / ___ /___
7.2 Optical Isolator 1550nm
________ __ / ___ /___
8. Connector Interface (6ea)
or 81310LI
Opt 011
81000AI
9.1 Single Mode Fiber (1ea)
81101AC
________ __ / ___ /___
9.2 Single Mode Fiber
10. ___________________________________________
11. ___________________________________________
12. ___________________________________________
13. ___________________________________________
14. ___________________________________________
15. ___________________________________________
16. ___________________________________________
81109AC
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________ __ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
209
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 101
Page 3 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 101
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
I.
Total Insertion Loss Test
dB
±0.60dB
typ. <2.5dB
measured at __________________nm
with singlemode fiber
II.
_________ 3.0 dB
±0.05dB
Linearity/Att. Acc.
Attenuation
Setting:
0dB
REF
1dB
0.9dB
_________ 1.1dB
2dB
1.9dB
_________ 2.1dB
3dB
2.9dB
_________ 3.1dB
4dB
3.9dB
_________ 4.1dB
5dB
4.9dB
_________ 5.1dB
6dB
5.9dB
_________ 6.1dB
7dB
6.9dB
_________ 7.1dB
8dB
7.9dB
_________ 8.1dB
9dB
8.9dB
_________ 9.1dB
10dB
9.9dB
_________ 10.1dB
210
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 101
Page 4 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 101
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
II. Linearity/Att. Acc. (cont.)
±0.05dB
Attenuation
Setting:
11dB
10.9dB
_________ 11.1dB
12dB
11.9dB
_________ 12.1dB
13dB
12.9dB
_________ 13.1dB
14dB
13.9dB
_________ 14.1dB
24dB
23.9dB
_________ 24.1dB
34dB
33.9dB
_________ 34.1dB
44dB
43.9dB
_________ 44.1dB
54dB
53.9dB
_________ 54.1dB
60dB
59.9dB
_________ 60.1dB
211
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 101
Page 5 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 101
Test Test Description
No. performed at _________________nm
III. Att. Repeatability Test
No. _______________ Date_______________
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.01dB
Attenuation
Setting:
IV.
1dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
5dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
12dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
24dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
36dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
48dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
53dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
60dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
40dB
40dB
_________
_________
Input
Output
Return Loss Test
typ. >45dB
212
±0.60dB
±0.60dB
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 101
Page 6 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 101
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
I.
Total Insertion Loss Test
dB
±0.60dB
typ. <2.5dB
measured at __________________nm
with SM fiber
II.
_________ 3.0 dB
±0.05dB
Linearity/Att. Acc.
Attenuation
Setting:
0dB
REF
1dB
0.9dB
_________ 1.1dB
2dB
1.9dB
_________ 2.1dB
3dB
2.9dB
_________ 3.1dB
4dB
3.9dB
_________ 4.1dB
5dB
4.9dB
_________ 5.1dB
6dB
5.9dB
_________ 6.1dB
7dB
6.9dB
_________ 7.1dB
8dB
7.9dB
_________ 8.1dB
9dB
8.9dB
_________ 9.1dB
10dB
9.9dB
_________ 10.1dB
213
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 101
Page 7 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 101
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.05dB
II. Linearity/Att. Acc. (cont.)
Attenuation
Setting:
11dB
10.9dB
_________ 11.1dB
12dB
11.9dB
_________ 12.1dB
13dB
12.9dB
_________ 13.1dB
14dB
13.9dB
_________ 14.1dB
24dB
23.9dB
_________ 24.1dB
34dB
33.9dB
_________ 34.1dB
44dB
43.9dB
_________ 44.1dB
54dB
53.9dB
_________ 54.1dB
60dB
59.9dB
_________ 60.1dB
214
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 101
Page 8 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 101
Test Test Description
No. performed at _________________nm
III. Att. Repeatability Test
No. _______________ Date_______________
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.01dB
Attenuation
Setting:
IV.
1dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
5dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
12dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
24dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
36dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
48dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
53dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
60dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
40dB
40dB
_________
_________
Return Loss Test
typ. >45dB
Input
Output
±0.60dB
±0.60dB
215
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 121
Page 2 of 8
Model __ __________ Module
Report No. _______
Date ________
Test Equipment Used:
Description
1. Power Meter
Model No.
8153A
Trace No. Cal. Due Date
________ __ / ___ /___
2a1. CW Laser Sources 1310nm
81552SM
________ __ / ___ /___
2a2. CW Laser Sources 1550nm
81553SM
________ __ / ___ /___
2b. CW Laser Sources 1310/1550nm
or 81554SM ________ __ / ___ /___
3. Opt Sensor Module
81532A
________ __ / ___ /___
4. Return Loss Module
81534A
________ __ / ___ /___
5. Reference Reflector
81000BR
________ __ / ___ /___
6. Universal Through Adapter
81000UM
________ __ / ___ /___
7.1 Optical Isolator 1310nm
81210LI
________ __ / ___ /___
7.2 Optical Isolator 1550nm
________ __ / ___ /___
8. Connector Interface (7ea)
81310LI
Opt011
81000AI
9.1 Single Mode Fiber (1ea)
81101AC
________ __ / ___ /___
9.2 Single Mode Fiber
10. ___________________________________________
11. ___________________________________________
12. ___________________________________________
13. ___________________________________________
14. ___________________________________________
15. ___________________________________________
16. ___________________________________________
81109AC
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
216
________ __ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 121
Page 3 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 121
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
I.
Total Insertion Loss Test
dB
±0.60dB
typ. <3.3dB
measured at __________________nm
with singlemode fiber
II.
_________ 4.2 dB
±0.05dB
Linearity/Att. Acc.
Attenuation
Setting:
0dB
REF
1dB
0.9dB
_________ 1.1dB
2dB
1.9dB
_________ 2.1dB
3dB
2.9dB
_________ 3.1dB
4dB
3.9dB
_________ 4.1dB
5dB
4.9dB
_________ 5.1dB
6dB
5.9dB
_________ 6.1dB
7dB
6.9dB
_________ 7.1dB
8dB
7.9dB
_________ 8.1dB
9dB
8.9dB
_________ 9.1dB
10dB
9.9dB
_________ 10.1dB
217
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 121
Page 4 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 121
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
II. Linearity/Att. Acc. (cont.)
±0.05dB
Attenuation
Setting:
11dB
10.9dB
_________ 11.1dB
12dB
11.9dB
_________ 12.1dB
13dB
12.9dB
_________ 13.1dB
14dB
13.9dB
_________ 14.1dB
24dB
23.9dB
_________ 24.1dB
34dB
33.9dB
_________ 34.1dB
44dB
43.9dB
_________ 44.1dB
54dB
53.9dB
_________ 54.1dB
60dB
59.9dB
_________ 60.1dB
218
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 121
Page 5 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 121
Test Test Description
No. performed at _________________nm
III. Att. Repeatability Test
No. _______________ Date_______________
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.01dB
Attenuation
Setting:
IV.
1dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
5dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
12dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
24dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
36dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
48dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
53dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
60dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
40dB
40dB
_________
_________
Return Loss Test
typ. >45dB
Input
Output
±0.60dB
±0.60dB
219
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 121
Page 6 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 121
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
I.
Total Insertion Loss Test
dB
±0.60dB
typ. <3.3dB
measured at __________________nm
with SM fiber
II.
_________ 4.2 dB
±0.05dB
Linearity/Att. Acc.
Attenuation
Setting:
0dB
REF
1dB
0.9dB
_________ 1.1dB
2dB
1.9dB
_________ 2.1dB
3dB
2.9dB
_________ 3.1dB
4dB
3.9dB
_________ 4.1dB
5dB
4.9dB
_________ 5.1dB
6dB
5.9dB
_________ 6.1dB
7dB
6.9dB
_________ 7.1dB
8dB
7.9dB
_________ 8.1dB
9dB
8.9dB
_________ 9.1dB
10dB
9.9dB
_________ 10.1dB
220
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 121
Page 7 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 121
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.05dB
II. Linearity/Att. Acc. (cont.)
Attenuation
Setting:
11dB
10.9dB
_________ 11.1dB
12dB
11.9dB
_________ 12.1dB
13dB
12.9dB
_________ 13.1dB
14dB
13.9dB
_________ 14.1dB
24dB
23.9dB
_________ 24.1dB
34dB
33.9dB
_________ 34.1dB
44dB
43.9dB
_________ 44.1dB
54dB
53.9dB
_________ 54.1dB
60dB
59.9dB
_________ 60.1dB
221
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 121
Page 8 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 121
Test Test Description
No. performed at _________________nm
III. Att. Repeatability Test
No. _______________ Date_______________
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.01dB
Attenuation
Setting:
IV.
1dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
5dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
12dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
24dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
36dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
48dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
53dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
60dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
40dB
40dB
_________
_________
Input
Output
Return Loss Test
typ. >45dB
222
±0.60dB
±0.60dB
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 201
Page 2 of 8
Model __ __________ Module Report No. _______
Test Equipment Used:
Description
1. Power Meter
Date ________
Model No.
8153A
Trace No. Cal. Due Date
________ __ / ___ /___
2a1. CW Laser Sources 1310nm
81552SM
________ __ / ___ /___
2a2. CW Laser Sources 1550nm
81553SM
________ __ / ___ /___
2b. CW Laser Sources 1310/1550nm
81554SM
________ __ / ___ /___
3. Opt Sensor Module
81532A
________ __ / ___ /___
4. Return Loss Module
81534A
________ __ / ___ /___
5. Back Reflector Kit
8156A #203 ________ __ / ___ /___
6. DIN Through Adapter
1005-0255
________ __ / ___ /___
7.1. Connector Interface (4ea)
81000SI
________ __ / ___ /___
7.2. Connector Interface
81000FI
________ __ / ___ /___
7.3. Connector Interface
81000AI
________ __ / ___ /___
8.1 Single Mode Fiber
81113PC
________ __ / ___ /___
8.2 Single Mode Fiber
9. ___________________________________________
10. ___________________________________________
11. ___________________________________________
12. ___________________________________________
13. ___________________________________________
14. ___________________________________________
15. ___________________________________________
16. ___________________________________________
81102SC
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
223
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 201
Page 3 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 201
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
I.
Total Insertion Loss Test
dB
±0.60dB
typ. <2.5dB
measured at __________________nm
with singlemode fiber
II.
_________ 3.0 dB
±0.05dB
Linearity/Att. Acc.
Attenuation
Setting:
0dB
REF
1dB
0.9dB
_________ 1.1dB
2dB
1.9dB
_________ 2.1dB
3dB
2.9dB
_________ 3.1dB
4dB
3.9dB
_________ 4.1dB
5dB
4.9dB
_________ 5.1dB
6dB
5.9dB
_________ 6.1dB
7dB
6.9dB
_________ 7.1dB
8dB
7.9dB
_________ 8.1dB
9dB
8.9dB
_________ 9.1dB
10dB
9.9dB
_________ 10.1dB
224
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 201
Page 4 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 201
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
II. Linearity/Att. Acc. (cont.)
±0.05dB
Attenuation
Setting:
11dB
10.9dB
_________ 11.1dB
12dB
11.9dB
_________ 12.1dB
13dB
12.9dB
_________ 13.1dB
14dB
13.9dB
_________ 14.1dB
24dB
23.9dB
_________ 24.1dB
34dB
33.9dB
_________ 34.1dB
44dB
43.9dB
_________ 44.1dB
54dB
53.9dB
_________ 54.1dB
60dB
59.9dB
_________ 60.1dB
225
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 201
Page 5 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 201
Test Test Description
No. performed at _________________nm
III. Att. Repeatability Test
No. _______________ Date_______________
Minimum
Result
Maximum Measurement
Spec.
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.01dB
Attenuation
Setting:
IV.
1dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
5dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
12dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
24dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
36dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
48dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
53dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
60dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
55dB
55dB
_________
_________
Input
Output
Return Loss Test
typ. >60dB
226
±0.60dB
±0.60dB
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 201
Page 6 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 201
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
I.
Total Insertion Loss Test
dB
±0.60dB
typ. <2.5dB
measured at __________________nm
with SM fiber
II.
_________ 3.0 dB
±0.05dB
Linearity/Att. Acc.
Attenuation
Setting:
0dB
REF
1dB
0.9dB
_________ 1.1dB
2dB
1.9dB
_________ 2.1dB
3dB
2.9dB
_________ 3.1dB
4dB
3.9dB
_________ 4.1dB
5dB
4.9dB
_________ 5.1dB
6dB
5.9dB
_________ 6.1dB
7dB
6.9dB
_________ 7.1dB
8dB
7.9dB
_________ 8.1dB
9dB
8.9dB
_________ 9.1dB
10dB
9.9dB
_________ 10.1dB
227
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 201
Page 7 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 201
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.05dB
II. Linearity/Att. Acc. (cont.)
Attenuation
Setting:
11dB
10.9dB
_________ 11.1dB
12dB
11.9dB
_________ 12.1dB
13dB
12.9dB
_________ 13.1dB
14dB
13.9dB
_________ 14.1dB
24dB
23.9dB
_________ 24.1dB
34dB
33.9dB
_________ 34.1dB
44dB
43.9dB
_________ 44.1dB
54dB
53.9dB
_________ 54.1dB
60dB
59.9dB
_________ 60.1dB
228
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 201
Page 8 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 201
Test Test Description
No. performed at _________________nm
III. Att. Repeatability Test
No. _______________ Date_______________
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.01dB
Attenuation
Setting:
IV.
1dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
5dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
12dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
24dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
36dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
48dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
53dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
55dB
55dB
_________
_________
Return Loss Test
typ. >60dB
Input
Output
±0.60dB
±0.60dB
229
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 221
Page 2 of 8
Model __ __________ Module Report No. _______
Test Equipment Used:
Description
1. Power Meter
Date ________
Model No.
8153A
Trace No. Cal. Due Date
________ __ / ___ /___
2a1. CW Laser Sources 1310nm
81552SM
________ __ / ___ /___
2a2. CW Laser Sources 1550nm
81553SM
________ __ / ___ /___
2b. CW Laser Sources 1310/1550nm
81554SM
________ __ / ___ /___
3. Opt Sensor Module
81532A
________ __ / ___ /___
4. Return Loss Module
81534A
________ __ / ___ /___
5. Back Reflector Kit
8156A #203 ________ __ / ___ /___
6. DIN Through Adapter
1005-0255
________ __ / ___ /___
7.1. Connector Interface (5ea)
81000SI
________ __ / ___ /___
7.2. Connector Interface
81000FI
________ __ / ___ /___
7.3. Connector Interface
81000AI
________ __ / ___ /___
8.1 Single Mode Fiber
81113PC
________ __ / ___ /___
8.2 Single Mode Fiber (2ea)
9. ___________________________________________
10. ___________________________________________
11. ___________________________________________
12. ___________________________________________
13. ___________________________________________
14. ___________________________________________
15. ___________________________________________
16. ___________________________________________
81102SC
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
________
230
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
__ / ___ /___
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 221
Page 3 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 221
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
I.
Total Insertion Loss Test
dB
±0.60dB
typ. <3.3dB
measured at __________________nm
with singlemode fiber
II.
_________ 4.2 dB
±0.05dB
Linearity/Att. Acc.
Attenuation
Setting:
0dB
REF
1dB
0.9dB
_________ 1.1dB
2dB
1.9dB
_________ 2.1dB
3dB
2.9dB
_________ 3.1dB
4dB
3.9dB
_________ 4.1dB
5dB
4.9dB
_________ 5.1dB
6dB
5.9dB
_________ 6.1dB
7dB
6.9dB
_________ 7.1dB
8dB
7.9dB
_________ 8.1dB
9dB
8.9dB
_________ 9.1dB
10dB
9.9dB
_________ 10.1dB
231
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 221
Page 4 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 221
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
II. Linearity/Att. Acc. (cont.)
±0.05dB
Attenuation
Setting:
11dB
10.9dB
_________ 11.1dB
12dB
11.9dB
_________ 12.1dB
13dB
12.9dB
_________ 13.1dB
14dB
13.9dB
_________ 14.1dB
24dB
23.9dB
_________ 24.1dB
34dB
33.9dB
_________ 34.1dB
44dB
43.9dB
_________ 44.1dB
54dB
53.9dB
_________ 54.1dB
60dB
59.9dB
_________ 60.1dB
232
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 221
Page 5 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 221
Test Test Description
No. performed at _________________nm
III. Att. Repeatability Test
No. _______________ Date_______________
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.01dB
Attenuation
Setting:
IV.
1dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
5dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
12dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
24dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
36dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
48dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
53dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
60dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
55dB
55dB
_________
_________
Return Loss Test
typ. >60dB
Input
Output
±0.60dB
±0.60dB
233
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 221
Page 6 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 221
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
I.
Total Insertion Loss Test
dB
±0.60dB
typ. <3.3dB
measured at __________________nm
with SM fiber
II.
_________ 4.2 dB
±0.05dB
Linearity/Att. Acc.
Attenuation
Setting:
0dB
REF
1dB
0.9dB
_________ 1.1dB
2dB
1.9dB
_________ 2.1dB
3dB
2.9dB
_________ 3.1dB
4dB
3.9dB
_________ 4.1dB
5dB
4.9dB
_________ 5.1dB
6dB
5.9dB
_________ 6.1dB
7dB
6.9dB
_________ 7.1dB
8dB
7.9dB
_________ 8.1dB
9dB
8.9dB
_________ 9.1dB
10dB
9.9dB
_________ 10.1dB
234
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 221
Page 7 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 221
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.05dB
II. Linearity/Att. Acc. (cont.)
Attenuation
Setting:
11dB
10.9dB
_________ 11.1dB
12dB
11.9dB
_________ 12.1dB
13dB
12.9dB
_________ 13.1dB
14dB
13.9dB
_________ 14.1dB
24dB
23.9dB
_________ 24.1dB
34dB
33.9dB
_________ 34.1dB
44dB
43.9dB
_________ 44.1dB
54dB
53.9dB
_________ 54.1dB
60dB
59.9dB
_________ 60.1dB
235
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 221
Page 8 of 8
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 221
Test Test Description
No. performed at _________________nm
III. Att. Repeatability Test
No. _______________ Date_______________
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.01dB
Attenuation
Setting:
IV.
1dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
5dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
12dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
24dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
36dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
48dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
53dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
55dB
55dB
_________
_________
Return Loss Test
Input
Output
typ. >60dB
236
±0.60dB
±0.60dB
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 350
Page 2 of 5
Model __ __________ Module
Report No. _______
Date ________
Test Equipment Used:
Description
Model No.
Trace No. Cal. Due Date
1. Power Meter
8153A
________ __ / ___ /___
2. LED Source 1300nm
81542SM
________ __ / ___ /___
3. Opt Sensor Module
81532A
________ __ / ___ /___
4. Connector Interface (4ea)
81000AI
________ __ / ___ /___
5. Multi Mode Fiber (2ea)
81501AC
________ __ / ___ /___
6. ___________________________________________
__________ ________ __ / ___ /___
7. ___________________________________________
__________ ________ __ / ___ /___
8. ___________________________________________
__________ ________ __ / ___ /___
9. ___________________________________________
__________ ________ __ / ___ /___
10. ___________________________________________ __________ ________ __ / ___ /___
11. ___________________________________________ __________ ________ __ / ___ /___
12. ___________________________________________ __________ ________ __ / ___ /___
237
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 350
Page 3 of 5
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 350
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
I.
Total Insertion Loss Test
dB
±0.60dB
typ. <3.0dB
measured at __________________nm
with multimode fiber
II.
_________ 3.9 dB
±0.05dB
Linearity/Att. Acc.
Attenuation
Setting:
0dB
REF
1dB
0.9dB
_________ 1.1dB
2dB
1.9dB
_________ 2.1dB
3dB
2.9dB
_________ 3.1dB
4dB
3.9dB
_________ 4.1dB
5dB
4.9dB
_________ 5.1dB
6dB
5.9dB
_________ 6.1dB
7dB
6.9dB
_________ 7.1dB
8dB
7.9dB
_________ 8.1dB
9dB
8.9dB
_________ 9.1dB
10dB
9.9dB
_________ 10.1dB
238
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 350
Page 4 of 5
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 350
No. _______________ Date_______________
Test Test Description
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
No. performed at _________________nm Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
II. Linearity/Att. Acc. (cont.)
±0.05dB
Attenuation
Setting:
11dB
10.9dB
_________ 11.1dB
12dB
11.9dB
_________ 12.1dB
13dB
12.9dB
_________ 13.1dB
14dB
13.9dB
_________ 14.1dB
24dB
23.9dB
_________ 24.1dB
34dB
33.9dB
_________ 34.1dB
44dB
43.9dB
_________ 44.1dB
54dB
53.9dB
_________ 54.1dB
60dB
59.9dB
_________ 60.1dB
239
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test for the Agilent 8156A Option 350
Page 5 of 5
Model Agilent 8156A Attenuator Option 350
Test Test Description
No. performed at _________________nm
III. Att. Repeatability Test
No. _______________ Date_______________
Minimum
Maximum Measurement
Spec.
Result
Spec.
Uncertainty
±0.01dB
Attenuation
Setting:
1dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
5dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
12dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
24dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
36dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
48dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
53dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
60dB Disp→ Ref
-0.01dB
_________ + 0.01dB
240
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test Agilent 8156A:
V. Polarization Dependent Loss Test (optional)
Page 1 of 6
Test Facility:
______________________________________ Report No. ____________________________
______________________________________ Date:
____________________________
______________________________________ Customer: ____________________________
______________________________________ Tested By: ____________________________
Model:
___________________
Serial No.
___________________ Ambient temperature
______ °C
Options
___________________ Relative humidity
______ %
Firmware Rev.
___________________ Line frequency
______ Hz
Special Notes:
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
241
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test Agilent 8156A:
V. Polarization Dependent Loss Test
Page 2 of 6
Test Equipment Used:
Description
1.
2.
3.
4a.
4b.
4c.
5.
HP/Agilent
Model No.
Trace No.
Cal. Due Date
Polarization Controller
8169A #021
___________ ___________ ____/____/____
Lightwave Multimeter
Mainframe
___________ ___________ ____/____/____
Optical Head Interface
81533B
___________ ___________ ____/____/____
CW Laser Source
1310nm
___________ ___________ ____/____/____
CW Laser Source
1550nm
___________ ___________ ____/____/____
CW Laser Source
1310/1550nm
___________ ___________ ____/____/____
Optical Head
81521B
___________ ___________ ____/____/____
242
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test Agilent 8156A:
V. Polarization Dependent Loss Test
Page 3 of 6
Model Agilent 8156A Optical Attenuator
Option: _____________________
Date ________
No. _______________________________________
Wavelength 1310nm (nominal)
Actual wavelength: ______________________nm
Polarizer Setting
λ/4 Plate Setting
λ/2 Plate Setting
Corrected wavelength
dependent positions:
λ/4 Plate Setting
λ/2 Plate Setting
Linear
Horizontal
___________deg
___________deg
___________deg
n/a
n/a
Polarization
Linear
Linear
Vertical
Diagonal
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Right Hand
Circular
n/a
n/a
n/a
___________deg ___________deg ___________deg
___________deg ___________deg ___________deg
Measurement Results
of the Reference Power
P01= ______µW P02=______ µW P03= ______µW P04=______ µW
Measurement Results
of the Power
after the DUT
PDUT01=___ µW PDUT02= ___µW PDUT03= ___µW PDUT04= ___µW
Mueller Coefficients:
m11 = (PDUT01 / P01 + PDUT02 / P02) /2 = _____________________
m12 = (PDUT01 / P01 - PDUT02 / P02) /2 = _____________________
m13 = (PDUT03 / P03) - m11 = ______________________________
m14 = (PDUT04 / P04) - m11 = ______________________________
243
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test Agilent 8156A:
V. Polarization Dependent Loss Test
Page 4 of 6
Minimum and maximum transmission:
2 + m 2 + m 2 = ____________________________
T Max = m 11 + m 12
13
14
2 + m 2 + m 2 = ____________________________
T Min = m 11 – m 12
13
14
Polarization Dependent Loss
PDLdB = 10log(TMax/TMin)
____________________dBpp
244
Maximum Specification
#100
#101, #201
#121, #221
0.15dBpp
0.08dBpp
0.10dBpp
Measurement
Uncertainties
0.02dBpp
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test Agilent 8156A:
V. Polarization Dependent Loss Test
Page 5 of 6
Model Agilent 8156A Optical Attenuator
Option: _____________________
Date ________
No. _______________________________________
Wavelength 1550nm (nominal)
Actual wavelength: ______________________nm
Polarizer Setting
λ/4 Plate Setting
λ/2 Plate Setting
Corrected wavelength
dependent positions:
λ/4 Plate Setting
λ/2 Plate Setting
Linear
Horizontal
___________deg
___________deg
___________deg
n/a
n/a
Polarization
Linear
Linear
Vertical
Diagonal
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Right Hand
Circular
n/a
n/a
n/a
___________deg ___________deg ___________deg
___________deg ___________deg ___________deg
Measurement Results
of the Reference Power
P01= ______µW P02=______ µW P03= ______µW P04=______ µW
Measurement Results
of the Power
after the DUT
PDUT01=___ µW PDUT02= ___µW PDUT03= ___µW PDUT04= ___µW
Mueller Coefficients:
m11 = (PDUT01 / P01 + PDUT02 / P02) /2 = _____________________
m12 = (PDUT01 / P01 - PDUT02 / P02) /2 = _____________________
m13 = (PDUT03 / P03) - m11 = ______________________________
m14 = (PDUT04 / P04) - m11 = ______________________________
245
Performance Tests
V. Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL): Optional
Performance Test Agilent 8156A:
V. Polarization Dependent Loss Test
Page 6 of 6
Minimum and maximum transmission
2 + m 2 + m 2 = ____________________________
T Max = m 11 + m 12
13
14
2 + m 2 + m 2 = ____________________________
T Min = m 11 – m 12
13
14
Polarization Dependent Loss
PDLdB = 10log(TMax/TMin)
____________________dBpp
246
Maximum Specification
#100
#101, #201
#121, #221
0.15dBpp
0.08dBpp
0.10dBpp
Measurement
Uncertainties
0.02dBpp
E
E
Cleaning Information
Cleaning Information
The following Cleaning Instructions contain some general safety
precautions, which must be observed during all phases of cleaning.
Consult your specific optical device manuals or guides for full
information on safety matters.
Please try, whenever possible, to use physically contacting
connectors, and dry connections. Clean the connectors, interfaces,
and bushings carefully after use.
Agilent Technologies assume no liability for the customer’s failure
to comply with these requirements.
Cleaning Instructions for this Instrument
The Cleaning Instructions apply to a number of different types of
Optical Equipment. The following section is relevant for this
instrument.
• “How to clean instruments with a physical contact interface” on
page 264
248
Cleaning Information
Safety Precautions
E.1 Safety Precautions
Please follow the following safety rules:
• Do not remove instrument covers when operating.
• Ensure that the instrument is switched off throughout the
cleaning procedures.
• Use of controls or adjustments or performance of procedures
other than those specified may result in hazardous radiation
exposure.
• Make sure that you disable all sources when you are cleaning
any optical interfaces.
• Under no circumstances look into the end of an optical device
attached to optical outputs when the device is operational. The
laser radiation is not visible to the human eye, but it can seriously
damage your eyesight.
• To prevent electrical shock, disconnect the instrument from the
mains before cleaning. Use a dry cloth, or one slightly dampened
with water, to clean the external case parts. Do not attempt to
clean internally.
• Do not install parts or perform any unauthorized modification to
optical devices.
• Refer servicing only to qualified and authorized personnel.
E.2 Why is it important to clean optical devices ?
In transmission links optical fiber cores are about 9 µm (0.00035")
in diameter. Dust and other particles, however, can range from
tenths to hundredths of microns in diameter. Their comparative size
249
Cleaning Information
What do I need for proper cleaning?
means that they can cover a part of the end of a fiber core, and as a
result will reduce the performance of your system.
Furthermore, the power density may burn dust into the fiber and
cause additional damage (for example, 0 dBm optical power in a
single mode fiber causes a power density of approximately 16
million W/m2). If this happens, measurements become inaccurate
and non-repeatable.
Cleaning is, therefore, an essential yet difficult task. Unfortunately,
when comparing most published cleaning recommendations, you
will discover that they contain several inconsistencies. In this
section, we want to suggest ways to help you clean your various
optical devices, and thus significantly improve the accuracy and
repeatability of your lightwave measurements.
E.3 What do I need for proper cleaning?
Some Standard Cleaning Equipment is necessary for cleaning your
instrument. For certain cleaning procedures, you may also require
certain Additional Cleaning Equipment.
Standard Cleaning Equipment
Before you can start your cleaning procedure you need the
following standard equipment:
• Dust and shutter caps
• Isopropyl alcohol
• Cotton swabs
• Soft tissues
• Pipe cleaner
• Compressed air
250
Cleaning Information
What do I need for proper cleaning?
Dust and shutter caps
All of Agilent Technologies’ lightwave instruments are delivered
with either laser shutter caps or dust caps on the lightwave adapter.
Any cables come with covers to protect the cable ends from
damage or contamination.
We suggest these protected coverings should be kept on the
equipment at all times, except when your optical device is in use.
Be careful when replacing dust caps after use. Do not press the
bottom of the cap onto the fiber too hard, as any dust in the cap can
scratch or pollute your fiber surface.
If you need further dust caps, please contact your nearest Agilent
Technologies sales office.
Isopropyl alcohol
This solvent is usually available from any local pharmaceutical
supplier or chemist's shop.
If you use isopropyl alcohol to clean your optical device, do not
immediately dry the surface with compressed air (except when you
are cleaning very sensitive optical devices). This is because the dust
and the dirt is solved and will leave behind filmy deposits after the
alcohol is evaporated. You should therefore first remove the alcohol
and the dust with a soft tissue, and then use compressed air to blow
away any remaining filaments.
If possible avoid using denatured alcohol containing additives.
Instead, apply alcohol used for medical purposes.
Never try to drink this alcohol, as it may seriously damage to your
health.
Do not use any other solvents, as some may damage plastic
materials and claddings. Acetone, for example, will dissolve the
epoxy used with fiber optic connectors. To avoid damage, only use
isopropyl alcohol.
Cotton swabs
We recommend that you use swabs such as Q-tips or other cotton
swabs normally available from local distributors of medical and
251
Cleaning Information
What do I need for proper cleaning?
hygiene products (for example, a supermarket or a chemist’s shop).
You may be able to obtain various sizes of swab. If this is the case,
select the smallest size for your smallest devices.
Ensure that you use natural cotton swabs. Foam swabs will often
leave behind filmy deposits after cleaning.
Use care when cleaning, and avoid pressing too hard onto your
optical device with the swab. Too much pressure may scratch the
surface, and could cause your device to become misaligned. It is
advisable to rub gently over the surface using only a small circular
movement.
Swabs should be used straight out of the packet, and never used
twice. This is because dust and dirt in the atmosphere, or from a
first cleaning, may collect on your swab and scratch the surface of
your optical device.
Soft tissues
These are available from most stores and distributors of medical
and hygiene products such as supermarkets or chemists’ shops.
We recommend that you do not use normal cotton tissues, but
multi-layered soft tissues made from non-recycled cellulose.
Cellulose tissues are very absorbent and softer. Consequently, they
will not scratch the surface of your device over time.
Use care when cleaning, and avoid pressing on your optical device
with the tissue. Pressing too hard may lead to scratches on the
surface or misalignment of your device. Just rub gently over the
surface using a small circular movement.
Use only clean, fresh soft tissues and never apply them twice. Any
dust and dirt from the air which collects on your tissue, or which
has gathered after initial cleaning, may scratch and pollute your
optical device.
Pipe cleaner
Pipe cleaners can be purchased from tobacconists, and come in
various shapes and sizes.The most suitable one to select for
252
Cleaning Information
What do I need for proper cleaning?
cleaning purposes has soft bristles, which will not produces
scratches.
There are many different kinds of pipe cleaner available from
tobacco shops.
The best way to use a pipe cleaner is to push it in and out of the
device opening (for example, when cleaning an interface). While
you are cleaning, you should slowly rotate the pipe cleaner.
Only use pipe cleaners on connector interfaces or on feed through
adapters. Do not use them on optical head adapters, as the center of
a pipe cleaner is hard metal and can damage the bottom of the
adapter.
Your pipe cleaner should be new when you use it. If it has collected
any dust or dirt, this can scratch or contaminate your device.
The tip and center of the pipe cleaner are made of metal. Avoid
accidentally pressing these metal parts against the inside of the
device, as this can cause scratches.
Compressed air
Compressed air can be purchased from any laboratory supplier.
It is essential that your compressed air is free of dust, water and oil.
Only use clean, dry air. If not, this can lead to filmy deposits or
scratches on the surface of your connector. This will reduce the
performance of your transmission system.
When spraying compressed air, hold the can upright. If the can is
held at a slant, propellant could escape and dirty your optical
device. First spray into the air, as the initial stream of compressed
air could contain some condensation or propellant. Such
condensation leaves behind a filmy deposit.
Please be friendly to your environment and use a CFC-free aerosol.
Additional Cleaning Equipment
Some Cleaning Procedures need the following equipment, which is
not required to clean each instrument:
253
Cleaning Information
What do I need for proper cleaning?
• Microscope with a magnification range about 50X up to 300X
• Ultrasonic bath
• Warm water and liquid soap
• Premoistened cleaning wipes
• Polymer film
• Infrared Sensor Card
Microscope with a magnification range about 50X up to 300X
A microscope can be found in most photography stores, or can be
obtained through or specialist mail order companies. Special fiberscopes are available from suppliers of splicing equipment.
Ideally, the light source on your microscope should be very flexible.
This will allow you to examine your device closely and from
different angles.
A microscope helps you to estimate the type and degree of dirt on
your device. You can use a microscope to choose an appropriate
cleaning method, and then to examine the results. You can also use
your microscope to judge whether your optical device (such as a
connector) is severely scratched and is, therefore, causing
inaccurate measurements.
Ultrasonic bath
Ultrasonic baths are also available from photography or laboratory
suppliers or specialist mail order companies.
An ultrasonic bath will gently remove fat and other stubborn dirt
from your optical devices. This helps increase the life span of the
optical devices.
Only use isopropyl alcohol in your ultrasonic bath, as other solvents
may damage.
Warm water and liquid soap
Only use water if you are sure that there is no other way of cleaning
your optical device without corrosion or damage. Do not use hot
254
Cleaning Information
What do I need for proper cleaning?
water, as this may cause mechanical stress, which can damage your
optical device.
Ensure that your liquid soap has no abrasive properties or perfume
in it. You should also avoid normal washing-up liquid, as it can
cover your device in an iridescent film after it has been air-dried.
Some lenses and mirrors also have a special coating, which may be
sensitive to mechanical stress, or to fat and liquids. For this reason
we recommend you do not touch them.
If you are not sure how sensitive your device is to cleaning, please
contact the manufacturer or your sales distributor.
Premoistened cleaning wipes
Use pre-moistened cleaning wipes as described in each individual
cleaning procedure. Cleaning wipes may be used in every instance
where a moistened soft tissue or cotton swab is applied.
Polymer film
Polymer film is available from laboratory suppliers or specialist
mail order companies.
Using polymer film is a gentle method of cleaning extremely
sensitive devices, such as reference reflectors and mirrors.
Infrared Sensor Card
Infrared sensor cards are available from laboratory suppliers or
specialist mail order companies.
With this card you are able to control the shape of laser light
emitted. The invisible laser beam is projected onto the sensor card,
then becomes visible to the normal eye as a round spot.
Take care never to look into the end of a fiber or any other optical
component, when they are in use. This is because the laser can
seriously damage your eyes.
255
Cleaning Information
Preserving Connectors
E.4 Preserving Connectors
Listed below are some hints on how best to keep your connectors in
the best possible condition.
Making Connections
Before you make any connection you must ensure that all cables
and connectors are clean. If they are dirty, use the appropriate
cleaning procedure.
When inserting the ferrule of a patchcord into a connector or an
adapter, make sure that the fiber end does not touch the outside of
the mating connector or adapter. Otherwise you will rub the fiber
end against an unsuitable surface, producing scratches and dirt
deposits on the surface of your fiber.
Dust Caps and Shutter Caps
Be careful when replacing dust caps after use. Do not press the
bottom of the cap onto the fiber as any dust in the cap can scratch or
dirty your fiber surface.
When you have finished cleaning, put the dust cap back on, or close
the shutter cap if the equipment is not going to be used
immediately.
Keep the caps on the equipment always when it is not in use.
All of Agilent Technologies’ lightwave instruments and accessories
are shipped with either laser shutter caps or dust caps. If you need
additional or replacement dust caps, contact your nearest Agilent
Technologies Sales/Service Office.
Immersion Oil and Other Index Matching
Compounds
Where it is possible, do not use immersion oil or other index
matching compounds with your device. They are liable to impair
256
Cleaning Information
Cleaning Instrument Housings
and dirty the surface of the device. In addition, the characteristics of
your device can be changed and your measurement results affected.
E.5 Cleaning Instrument Housings
Use a dry and very soft cotton tissue to clean the instrument
housing and the keypad. Do not open the instruments as there is a
danger of electric shock, or electrostatic discharge. Opening the
instrument can cause damage to sensitive components, and in
addition your warranty will be voided.
E.6 Which Cleaning Procedure should I use ?
Light dirt
If you just want to clean away light dirt, observe the following
procedure for all devices:
• Use compressed air to blow away large particles.
• Clean the device with a dry cotton swab.
• Use compressed air to blow away any remaining filament left by
the swab.
Heavy dirt
If the above procedure is not enough to clean your instrument,
follow one of the procedures below. Please consult XXXX for the
procedure relevant for this instrument.
If you are unsure of how sensitive your device is to cleaning, please
contact the manufacturer or your sales distributor
257
Cleaning Information
How to clean connectors
E.7 How to clean connectors
Cleaning connectors is difficult as the core diameter of a singlemode fiber is only about 9 µm. This generally means you cannot
see streaks or scratches on the surface. To be certain of the
condition of the surface of your connector and to check it after
cleaning, you need a microscope.
In the case of scratches, or of dust that has been burnt onto the
surface of the connector, you may have no option but to polish the
connector. This depends on the degree of dirtiness, or the depth of
the scratches. This is a difficult procedure and should only be
performed by skilled personal, and as a last resort as it wears out
your connector.
WA RN IN G
Never look into the end of an optical cable that is connected to an active
source.
To assess the projection of the emitted light beam you can use an
infrared sensor card. Hold the card approximately 5 cm from the
output of the connector. The invisible emitted light is project onto
the card and becomes visible as a small circular spot.
Preferred Procedure
Use the following procedure on most occasions.
1. Clean the connector by rubbing a new, dry cotton-swab over the
surface using a small circular movement.
2. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt
Use this procedure particularly when there is greasy dirt on the
connector:
258
Cleaning Information
How to clean connector adapters
1. Moisten a new cotton-swab with isopropyl alcohol.
2. Clean the connector by rubbing the cotton-swab over the surface
using a small circular movement.
3. Take a new, dry soft-tissue and remove the alcohol, dissolved
sediment and dust, by rubbing gently over the surface using a
small circular movement.
4. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
An Alternative Procedure
A better, more gentle, but more expensive cleaning procedure is to
use an ultrasonic bath with isopropyl alcohol.
1. Hold the tip of the connector in the bath for at least three
minutes.
2. Take a new, dry soft-tissue and remove the alcohol, dissolved
sediment and dust, by rubbing gently over the surface using a
small circular movement.
3. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
E.8 How to clean connector adapters
CA UT I O N
Some adapters have an anti-reflection coating on the back to reduce
back reflection. This coating is extremely sensitive to solvents and
mechanical abrasion. Extra care is needed when cleaning these
adapters.
Preferred Procedure
Use the following procedure on most occasions.
259
Cleaning Information
How to clean connector interfaces
1. Clean the adapter by rubbing a new, dry cotton-swab over the
surface using a small circular movement.
2. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt
Use this procedure particularly when there is greasy dirt on the
adapter:
1. Moisten a new cotton-swab with isopropyl alcohol.
2. Clean the adapter by rubbing the cotton-swab over the surface
using a small circular movement.
3. Take a new, dry soft-tissue and remove the alcohol, dissolved
sediment and dust, by rubbing gently over the surface using a
small circular movement.
4. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
E.9 How to clean connector interfaces
CA UT I O N
Be careful when using pipe-cleaners, as the core and the bristles of the
pipe-cleaner are hard and can damage the interface.
Do not use pipe-cleaners on optical head adapters, as the hard core of
normal pipe cleaners can damage the bottom of an adapter.
Preferred Procedure
Use the following procedure on most occasions.
1. Clean the interface by pushing and pulling a new, dry pipecleaner into the opening. Rotate the pipe-cleaner slowly as you
do this.
2. Then clean the interface by rubbing a new, dry cotton-swab over
260
Cleaning Information
How to clean bare fiber adapters
the surface using a small circular movement.
3. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt
Use this procedure particularly when there is greasy dirt on the
interface:
1. Moisten a new pipe-cleaner with isopropyl alcohol.
2. Clean the interface by pushing and pulling the pipe-cleaner into
the opening. Rotate the pipe-cleaner slowly as you do this.
3. Moisten a new cotton-swab with isopropyl alcohol.
4. Clean the interface by rubbing the cotton-swab over the surface
using a small circular movement.
5. Using a new, dry pipe-cleaner, and a new, dry cotton-swab
remove the alcohol, any dissolved sediment and dust.
6. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
E.10 How to clean bare fiber adapters
Bare fiber adapters are difficult to clean. Protect from dust unless
they are in use.
CA UT I O N
Never use any kind of solvent when cleaning a bare fiber adapter as
solvents can damage the foam inside some adapters.
They can deposit dissolved dirt in the groove, which can then dirty the
surface of an inserted fiber.
Preferred Procedure
Use the following procedure on most occasions.
261
Cleaning Information
How to clean lenses
1. Blow away any dust or dirt with compressed air.
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt
Use this procedure particularly when there is greasy dirt on the
adapter:
1. Clean the adapter by pushing and pulling a new, dry pipe-cleaner
into the opening. Rotate the pipe-cleaner slowly as you do this.
CA UT I O N
Be careful when using pipe-cleaners, as the core and the bristles of the
pipe-cleaner are hard and can damage the adapter.
2. Clean the adapter by rubbing a new, dry cotton-swab over the
surface using a small circular movement.
3. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
E.11 How to clean lenses
Some lenses have special coatings that are sensitive to solvents,
grease, liquid and mechanical abrasion. Take extra care when
cleaning lenses with these coatings.
Lens assemblies consisting of several lenses are not normally
sealed. Therefore, use as little alcohol as possible, as it can get
between the lenses and in doing so can change the properties of
projection.
Preferred Procedure
Use the following procedure on most occasions.
1. Clean the lens by rubbing a new, dry cotton-swab over the
surface using a small circular movement.
2. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
262
Cleaning Information
How to clean instruments with a fixed connector interface
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt
Use this procedure particularly when there is greasy dirt on the
lens:
1. Moisten a new cotton-swab with isopropyl alcohol.
2. Clean the lens by rubbing the cotton-swab over the surface using
a small circular movement.
3. Using a new, dry cotton-swab remove the alcohol, any dissolved
sediment and dust.
4. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
E.12 How to clean instruments with a fixed
connector interface
You should only clean instruments with a fixed connector interface
when it is absolutely necessary. This is because it is difficult to
remove any used alcohol or filaments from the input of the optical
block.
It is important, therefore, to keep dust caps on the equipment at all
times, except when your optical device is in use.
If you do discover filaments or particles, the only way to clean a
fixed connector interface and the input of the optical block is to use
compressed air.
If there are fluids or fat in the connector, please refer the instrument
to the skilled personnel of Agilent’s service team.
CA UT I O N
Only use clean, dry compressed air. Make sure that the air is free of
dust, water, and oil. If the air that you use is not clean and dry, this can
lead to filmy deposits or scratches on the surface of your connector
interface. This will degrade the performance of your transmission
system.
263
Cleaning Information
How to clean instruments with an optical glass plate
Never try to open the instrument and clean the optical block by
yourself, because it is easy to scratch optical components, and cause
them to be misaligned.
E.13 How to clean instruments with an optical
glass plate
Some instruments, for example, the optical heads from Agilent
Technologies have an optical glass plate to protect the sensor. Clean
this glass plate in the same way as optical lenses (see “How to clean
lenses” on page 262).
E.14 How to clean instruments with a physical
contact interface
Remove any connector interfaces from the optical output of the
instrument before you start the cleaning procedure.
Cleaning interfaces is difficult as the core diameter of a singlemode fiber is only about 9 µm. This generally means you cannot
see streaks or scratches on the surface. To be certain of the degree
of pollution on the surface of your interface and to check whether it
has been removed after cleaning, you need a microscope.
WA RN IN G
Never look into an optical output, because this can seriously damage
your eyesight.
To assess the projection of the emitted light beam you can use an
infrared sensor card. Hold the card approximately 5 cm from the
264
Cleaning Information
How to clean instruments with a recessed lens interface
interface. The invisible emitted light is project onto the card and
becomes visible as a small circular spot.
Preferred Procedure
Use the following procedure on most occasions.
1. Clean the interface by rubbing a new, dry cotton-swab over the
surface using a small circular movement.
2. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt
Use this procedure particularly when there is greasy dirt on the
interface:
1. Moisten a new cotton-swab with isopropyl alcohol.
2. Clean the interface by rubbing the cotton-swab over the surface
using a small circular movement.
3. Take a new, dry soft-tissue and remove the alcohol, dissolved
sediment and dust, by rubbing gently over the surface using a
small circular movement.
4. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
E.15 How to clean instruments with a recessed
lens interface
WA RN IN G
For instruments with a deeply recessed lens interface (for example the
Agilent Technologies 81633A and 81634A Power Sensors) do NOT
follow ths procedure. Alcohol and compressed air could damage your
lens even further.
265
Cleaning Information
How to clean instruments with a recessed lens interface
Keep your dust and shutter caps on, when your instrument is not in use.
This should prevent it from getting too dirty. If you must clean such
instruments, please refer the instrument to the skilled personnel of
Agilent’s service team.
Preferred Procedure
Use the following procedure on most occasions.
1. Blow away any dust or dirt with compressed air. If this is not
sufficient, then
2. Clean the interface by rubbing a new, dry cotton-swab over the
surface using a small circular movement.
3. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt
Use this procedure particularly when there is greasy dirt on the
interface, and using the procedure for light dirt is not sufficient.
Using isopropyl alcohol should be your last choice for recessed lens
interfaces because of the difficulty of cleaning out any dirt that is
washed to the edge of the interface:
1. Moisten a new cotton-swab with isopropyl alcohol.
2. Clean the interface by rubbing the cotton-swab over the surface
using a small circular movement.
3. Take a new, dry soft-tissue and remove the alcohol, dissolved
sediment and dust, by rubbing gently over the surface using a
small circular movement.
4. Blow away any remaining lint with compressed air.
266
Cleaning Information
How to clean optical devices which are sensitive to mechanical
stress and pressure
E.16 How to clean optical devices which are
sensitive to mechanical stress and pressure
Some optical devices, such as the Agilent 81000BR Reference
Reflector, which has a gold plated surface, are very sensitive to
mechanical stress or pressure. Do not use cotton-swabs, soft-tissues
or other mechanical cleaning tools, as these can scratch or destroy
the surface.
Preferred Procedure
Use the following procedure on most occasions.
1. Blow away any dust or dirt with compressed air.
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt
To clean devices that are extremely sensitive to mechanical stress or
pressure you can also use an optical clean polymer film. This
procedure is time-consuming, but you avoid scratching or
destroying the surface.
1. Put the film on the surface and wait at least 30 minutes to make
sure that the film has had enough time to dry.
2. Remove the film and any dirt with special adhesive tapes.
Alternative Procedure
For these types of optical devices you can often use an ultrasonic
bath with isopropyl alcohol. Only use the ultrasonic bath if you are
sure that it won’t cause any damage anything to the device.
1. Put the device into the bath for at least three minutes.
2. Blow away any remaining liquid with compressed air.
If there are any streaks or drying stains on the surface, repeat the
cleaning procedure.
267
Cleaning Information
How to clean metal filters or attenuator gratings
E.17 How to clean metal filters or attenuator
gratings
This kind of device is extremely fragile. A misalignment of the
grating leads to inaccurate measurements. Never touch the surface
of the metal filter or attenuator grating. Be very careful when using
or cleaning these devices. Do not use cotton-swabs or soft-tissues,
as there is the danger that you cannot remove the lint and that the
device will be destroyed by becoming mechanically distorted.
Preferred Procedure
Use the following procedure on most occasions.
1. Use compressed air at a distance and with low pressure to
remove any dust or lint.
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt
Do not use an ultrasonic bath as this can damage your device.
Use this procedure particularly when there is greasy dirt on the
device:
1. Put the optical device into a bath of isopropyl alcohol, and wait
at least 10 minutes.
2. Remove the fluid using compressed air at some distance and
with low pressure. If there are any streaks or drying stains on the
surface, repeat the whole cleaning procedure.
E.18 Additional Cleaning Information
The following cleaning procedures may be used with other optical
equipment:
268
Cleaning Information
Additional Cleaning Information
• How to clean bare fiber ends
• How to clean large area lenses and mirrors
How to clean bare fiber ends
Bare fiber ends are often used for splices or, together with other
optical components, to create a parallel beam. The end of a fiber
can often be scratched. You make a new cleave. To do this:
1. Strip off the cladding.
2. Take a new soft-tissue and moisten it with isopropyl alcohol.
3. Carefully clean the bare fiber with this tissue.
4. Make your cleave and immediately insert the fiber into your bare
fiber adapter in order to protect the surface from dirt.
How to clean large area lenses and mirrors
Some mirrors, as those from a monochromator, are very soft and
sensitive. Therefore, never touch them and do not use cleaning
tools such as compressed air or polymer film.
Some lenses have special coatings that are sensitive to solvents,
grease, liquid and mechanical abrasion. Take extra care when
cleaning lenses with these coatings.
Lens assemblies consisting of several lenses are not normally
sealed. Therefore, use as little liquid as possible, as it can get
between the lenses and in doing so can change the properties of
projection.
Preferred Procedure
Use the following procedure on most occasions.
269
Cleaning Information
Additional Cleaning Information
1. Blow away any dust or dirt with compressed air.
Procedure for Stubborn Dirt
Use this procedure particularly when there is greasy dirt on the
lens:
CA UT I O N
Only use water if you are sure that your device does not corrode.
Do not use hot water as this can lead to mechanical stress, which can
damage your device.
Make sure that your liquid soap has no abrasive properties or perfume
in it, because they can scratch and damage your device.
Do not use normal washing-up liquid as sometimes an iridescent film
remains.
1. Moisten the lens or the mirror with water.
2. Put a little liquid soap on the surface and gently spread the liquid
over the whole area.
3. Wash off the emulsion with water, being careful to remove it all,
as any remaining streaks can impair measurement accuracy.
4. Take a new, dry soft-tissue and remove the water, by rubbing
gently over the surface using a small circular movement.
5. Blow away remaining lint with compressed air.
Alternative Procedure A
To clean lenses that are extremely sensitive to mechanical stress or
pressure you can also use an optical clean polymer film. This
procedure is time-consuming, but you avoid scratching or
destroying the surface.
1. Put the film on the surface and wait at least 30 minutes to make
sure that the film has had enough time to dry.
2. Remove the film and any dirt with special adhesive tapes.
270
Cleaning Information
Other Cleaning Hints
Alternative Procedure B
If your lens is sensitive to water then:
1. Moisten the lens or the mirror with isopropyl alcohol.
2. Take a new, dry soft-tissue and remove the alcohol, dissolved
sediment and dust, by rubbing gently over the surface using a
small circular movement.
3. Blow away remaining lint with compressed air.
E.19 Other Cleaning Hints
Selecting the correct cleaning method is an important element in
maintaining your equipment and saving you time and money. This
Appendix highlights the main cleaning methods, but cannot address
every individual circumstance.
This section contain some additional hints which we hope will help
you further. For further information, please contact your local
Agilent Technologies representative.
Making the connection
Before you make any connection you must ensure that all lightwave
cables and connectors are clean. If not, then use appropriate the
cleaning methods.
When you insert the ferrule of a patchcord into a connector or an
adapter, ensure that the fiber end does not touch the outside of the
mating connector or adapter. Otherwise, the fiber end will rub up
against something which could scratch it and leave deposits.
Lens cleaning papers
Note that some special lens cleaning papers are not suitable for
cleaning optical devices like connectors, interfaces, lenses, mirrors
271
Cleaning Information
Other Cleaning Hints
and so on. To be absolutely certain that a cleaning paper is
applicable, please ask the salesperson or the manufacturer.
Immersion oil and other index matching compounds
Do not use immersion oil or other index matching compounds with
optical sensors equipped with recessed lenses. They are liable to
dirty the detector and impair its performance. They may also alter
the property of depiction of your optical device, thus rendering your
measurements inaccurate.
Cleaning the housing and the mainframe
When cleaning either the mainframe or the housing of your
instrument, only use a dry and very soft cotton tissue on the
surfaces and the numeric pad.
Never open the instruments as they can be damaged. Opening the
instruments puts you in danger of receiving an electrical shock
from your device, and renders your warranty void.
272
F
F
Error messages
Error Messages
274
Error Messages
Display Messages
F.1 Display Messages
FAILnnnn
indicates that the self test has failed. The number nnnn is a four
digit hexadecimal number that indicates which part of the self test
has failed.
Bits
Mnemonics
Hexadecimal
Value
8
Counter
010016
7
Analog to Digital Convertor
008016
6
General DSP Hardware
004016
5
DSP Timeout
002016
4
DSP Communications
001016
3
Calibration Data
000816
2
Keypad
000416
1
Battery RAM
000216
0
Calibration Data Checksum
000116
So FAIL0010 would mean that the DSP (Digital Signal Processor)
Communications had failed, FAIL0012 would mean that the DSP
Communications had failed, and so had the Battery RAM.
275
Error Messages
GPIB Messages
F.2 GPIB Messages
Command Errors
These are error messages in the range -100 to -199. They indicate
that a syntax error has been detected by the parser in a command,
such as incorrect data, incorrect commands, or misspelled or
mistyped commands.
A command error is signaled by the command error bit (bit 5) in the
event status register.
-100 Command error
This indicates that the parser has found a command error but cannot
be more specific.
-101 Invalid character
The command contains an invalid or unrecognized character.
-102 Syntax error
The command or data could not be recognized.
-103 Invalid separator
The parser was expecting a separator (for example, a semicolon (;)
between commands) but did not find one.
-104 Data type error
The parser was expecting one data type, but found another (for
example, was expecting a string, but received numeric data).
-105 GET not allowed
A Group Execute Trigger was received within a program message
(see IEEE 488.2, 7.7)
276
Error Messages
GPIB Messages
-108 Parameter not allowed
More parameters were received for a command than were expected.
-109 Missing parameter
Fewer parameters were received than the command requires.
-110 Command header error
A command header is the mnemonic part of the command (the part
not containing parameter information. This error indicates that the
parser has found an error in the command header but cannot be
more specific.
-111 Header separator error
A character that is not a valid header separator was encountered.
-112 Program mnemonic too long
The program mnemonic must be 12 characters or shorter.
-113 Undefined header
This header is not defined for use with the instrument.
-114 Header suffix out of range
The header contained an invalid character. This message sometimes
occurs because the parser is trying to interpret a non-header as a
header.
-120 Numeric data error
This error indicates that the parser has found an error in numeric
data (including nondecimal numeric data) but cannot be more
specific.
277
Error Messages
GPIB Messages
-121 Invalid character in number
An invalid character was found in numeric data (note, this may
include and alphabetic character in a decimal data, or a "9" in octal
data).
-123 Exponent too large
The exponent must be less than 32000.
-124 Too many digits
The mantissa of a decimal number can have a maximum of 255
digits (leading zeros are not counted).
-128 Numeric data not allowed
Another data type was expected for this command.
-130 Suffix error
The suffix is the unit, and the unit multiplier for the data. This error
indicates that the parser has found an error in suffix but cannot be
more specific.
-131 Invalid suffix
The suffix is incorrect or inappropriate.
-134 Suffix too long
A suffix can have a maximum of 12 characters.
-138 Suffix not allowed
A suffix was found where none is allowed.
-140 Character data error
This error indicates that the parser has found an error in character
data but cannot be more specific.
278
Error Messages
GPIB Messages
-141 Invalid character data
The character data is incorrect or inappropriate.
-144 Character data too long
Character data can have a maximum of 12 characters.
-148 Character data not allowed
Character data was found where none is allowed.
-150 String data error
This error indicates that the parser has found an error in string data
but cannot be more specific.
-151 Invalid string data
The string data is incorrect, (for example, an END message was
received before the terminal quote character).
-158 String data not allowed
String data was found where none is allowed.
-160 Block data error
This error indicates that the parser has found an error in block data
but cannot be more specific.
-161 Invalid block data
The block data is incorrect (for example, an END message was
received before the length was satisfied).
-168 Block data not allowed
Block data was found where none is allowed.
279
Error Messages
GPIB Messages
Execution Errors
These are error messages in the range -200 to -299. They indicate
that an execution error has been detected by the execution control
block.
An execution error is signaled by the execution error bit (bit 4) in
the event status register.
-200 Execution error
This indicates that an execution error has occurred but the control
block cannot be more specific.
-201 Invalid while in local
This command is invalid because it conflicts with the configuration
under local control.
-202 Settings lost due to rtl
A local setting was lost when the instrument was changing from
remote to local control, or from local to remote control.
-220 Parameter error
This indicates that a parameter error has occurred but the control
block cannot be more specific.
-221 Settings conflict
A valid parameter was received, but could not be used during
execution because of a conflict with the current state of the
instrument.
-222 Data out of range
The data, though valid, was outside the range allowed by the
instrument.
280
Error Messages
GPIB Messages
-223 Too much data
The block, expression, or string data was too long for the
instrument to handle.
-224 Illegal parameter value
One value from a list of possible values was expected. The
parameter received was not found in the list.
-240 Hardware error
Indicates that a command could not be executed due to a hardware
error but the control block cannot be more specific.
-241 Hardware missing
Indicates that a command could not be executed because of missing
instrument hardware.
Device-Specific Errors
These are error messages in the range -300 to -399, or between 1
and 32767. They indicate that an error has been detected that is
specific to the operation of the attenuator.
An device-specific error is signaled by the device-specific error bit
(bit 3) in the event status register.
-300 Device-specific error
This indicates that a device-specific error has occurred. No more
specific information is available.
-310 System error
An instrument system error has occurred.
-311 Memory error
A memory error has been detected.
281
Error Messages
GPIB Messages
-314 Save/recall memory lost
The nonvolatile data saved by the *SAV command has been lost.
-315 Configuration memory lost
The nonvolatile configuration data saved by the instrument has
been lost.
-330 Self-test failed
Further information about the self-test failure is available by using
*TST?.
-350 Queue overflow
The error queue has overflown. This error is written to the last
position in the queue, no further errors are recorded.
Query Errors
These are error messages in the range -400 to -499. They indicate
that an error has been detected by the output queue control.
An device-specific error is signaled by the query error bit (bit 2) in
the event status register.
-300 Query error
This indicates that a query error has occurred. No more specific
information is available.
-410 Query INTERRUPTED
A condition occurred which interrupted the transmission of the
response to a query (for example, a query followed by a DAB or a
GET before the response was completely sent).
-420 Query UNTERMINATED
A condition occurred that interrupted the reception of a query (for
example, the instrument was addressed to talk and an incomplete
program message was received).
282
Error Messages
GPIB Messages
-430 Query DEADLOCKED
A condition causing a deadlocked query has occurred (for example,
both the input and the output buffer are full and the device cannot
continue).
-440 Query UNTERMINATED after indefinite
response
Two queries were received in the same message. The error occurs
on the second query if the first requests an indefinite response, and
was already executed.
Instrument Specific Errors
These are errors with positive error numbers, and are specific to this
instrument.
201
The user calibration is currently on, and calibration data cannot be
changed. Switch the user calibration state to off (see ) and try again.
202
There is no user wavelength calibration data, or the data is invalid.
203
Entering the data points cannot be stopped, because it has not been
started.
204
There no more data points to be read.
283
Error Messages
GPIB Messages
284
Index
Symbols
.....................95,
96, ................101
*ESE .....................95
*ESE? ...................96
*ESR? ...................96
*IDN? ...................97
*OPC ....................95, 98
*OPC? ...................95, 98
*OPT? ...................98
*RCL ....................99
*RST .....................96,
99, ................101
*SAV ....................100
*SRE .....................101
*SRE? ...................102
*STB? ...................102
*TST? ...................103
*WAI ....................104
? ...........................113,
117, ..............120
*CLS
Calculation .........29,
Hardware setup ....37,
38
43
Capital letters (when programming) ......85
Case sensitivity .......85
Common commands .93
CONDition register ..115
CONDition? ...........116,
119
..150,
159, ..............160
Cooling ..................148
Connector Interface
D
BACK REFL
Hardware setup
....59
........32, 59
Back Reflector
Back reflector
.........60
Calculation
Replacing
AC power cable .......144
AC power requirements 144
ADDRESS .............67
ANSI MC 1.1 ..........81
APMode ................110
APMode? ...............111
APOWeron .............114
APOWeron? ...........114
ATTenuation ...........106
Attenuation
.............40,
108
Maximum ..........108
Minimum ..........108
Resetting ...........40
Transferring to ....29, 40
Default
B
Battery
A
Attenuation accuracy
....29,
38, ................39,
106
Default .............39,
106
Maximum ..........106
Minimum ..........106
Resetting ...........39
Attenuation range ....165
Attenuation Sweep ...116,
118
Attenuation sweep ....30, 47
ATTenuation? .........106
AUTO ...................49, 54
Autotransformer ......144
Attenuation factor
..........146
BRIGHT ................71
BRIGhtness ............104
BRIGhtness? ...........104
C
Cable
GPIB
................157
Calibration
........33, 67
.....29,
39, ................44,
107, ..............108
Wavelength
Calibration factor
165
285
Declaration of Conformity
171
DEFAULT .............72, 77
DIS .......................73
Disabling the Optical Output
150
.................104,
105, ..............108
DISPlay
DIsplay
Brightness ..........104
Brightness, Default 104
Display
Brightness ..........71
Brightness, Default 71
Brightness, Resetting 71
Resolution .........74
DWELL
..30,
48, .....49, 55
.............50
Automatic sweep
Default
Index
Resetting
...........50
E
Earth .....................144
Editing
Non-numeric .......30
Numeric ............30
.................105,
117, ..............119
ENABle register ......115,
122
ENABle? ................105,
117, ..............120
Error queue .............84,
95, ................122
ERRor? ..................122
Errors ....................122,
275
OPERation .............117
QUEStionable .........120
EVENt register ........115
......33,
34, .....68,
116, ...118
Settling .............116,
118
Firmware revision ....97
Function Test ..........143
Fuse
Replacing
ENABle
Event Status Enable Register
96
Event Status Enable register
94, ................95,
96, ................100
Event Status Register 94,
95, ................96,
98, ................101,
102
Excess loss .............165
F
..........146
G
General Purpose Interface
Bus ................81
GPIB .....................81
Address .............67, 83
Capabilities ........82
Command summary 89
Default address ....67, 83
Interface functional subset
82
..81
.67
GPIB Adapter .........157
GPIB Cable ............157
GPIB Connector ......151
GPIB Interface ........150
GPIB Logic Levels ...152
Reference works
Resetting address
..............81
IEC 625-1
IEEE
Address
.............81
IEEE 488.1-1987 .....81
IEEE 488.2-1987 .....81, 93
IEEE 488-1978 ........81
If ..........................83
Initial Inspection ......143
INPut ....................106,
107, ..............108,
109, ..............110
Input queue .............83, 98
Clearing ............84
INS LOSS ..............60
Default .............61
Resetting ...........61
Insertion loss ...........165
Measuring ..........43
Inspection
Initial
...............143
Institute of Electrical and
Electronics Engineers,
Inc.
Address
.............81
.....158,
Interface Adapter
160
H
HP-IB
Address
.............99
Humidity
Operating
Filter
Fixed
I
Repositioning
................33,
34, .....68
286
..........148
L
..........34,
68, ................107
Default .............68
Resetting ...........68
LAST ....................72, 73
LCMode ................107
LCMode? ...............107
LAMBDCAL
Index
Local .....................83
LOCKOUT .............72
Long form ..............85
NTRansition?
..........118,
P ON SET
O
M
..................107,
108
OFFSet? .................108
OPERation .............116,
117, ..............118,
119
Operation ...............143
Operation Complete .98
Operation status .......101,
102, ..............114,
115, ..............122
Condition register .116
Enable register ....117
Event register ......117
OFFSet
Maintenance ...........143
MANUAL ..............52
Manufacturer ..........97
MAV .....................84,
95, ................101,
102
Message available ....84
Message exchange ...83
Reception ..........83
Message terminator
Input ................84,
Output ..............84
85
Messages
..........85
.........85
Model number .........97
Modify keys ............29
Long form
Short form
Monitor Output
Coupling ratio
P
121
.....37, 47
MSS ......................95
Multiple commands (in one
message) .........85
N
Node (STATus) .......114
NORMAL ..............72
Notices ..................2
NTRansition ...........118,
Negative transition register
118
Positive transition register
118, ...119
Optical Output .........150
Disabling ...........150
Optical Termination .150
Option ...................157
201 ..................59
Query ...............98
OUTPut .................110,
111, ..............112,
113, ..............114
Output queue ..........84,
98, ................99,
103
..............72
Default .............72
Resetting ...........72
Parser
....................98
.............84
Starting
Polarization dependent loss
165
Polarization mode dispersion
166
POWer ..................112
Power cable ............144
Power plug
rewiring
............145
Power requirements ..144
POWer? .................113
Power-on ...............144
Power-on Setting .....72
PRESet ..................122
Press .....................49,
50, ................52,
53, ................54,
63, ................77, 78
Programming
General
.............85
Protective earth symbol 143
PTRansition ............118,
121
PTRansition register
.115,
122
..........119,
PTRansition?
121
Q
120
NTRansition register
.........119,
120, ..............121
115,
QUEStionable
122
287
Index
..101,
102, ..............114,
115, ..............122
Condition register .119
Enable register ....119,
120
Event register ......120
Short form
Questionable status
Negative transition register
120, ...121
Positive transition register
121
R
Repeatability ...........166
Request Service .......94
Resetting the instrument 54,
63, ................77
.............74
Default .............74
Resetting ...........74
Return loss .............166
Calculation .........32
RL INPUT ..............60
Default .............61
Resetting ...........61
RL REF .................60
Default .............61
Resetting ...........61
RQS ......................94,
101, ..............102
RESOLUT
S
.........85
Selftest ..................103
Serial number ..........97
Serial poll ...............94
Service Request .......94
Service Request Enable 94
Service Request Enable register ..................94,
99, ................101,
102
Setting ...................99
Contents ............77,
100
Default .............77, 99
Power-on ...........72
Recalling ...........77, 99
Storing ..............77,
100
Settling time
Filter
................48
Short form ..............85
SHUTTER .............72,
83
Default .............73
Resetting ...........73
...................113
...........73,
114
SHUTTER@ PON ...73
Default .............73
Resetting ...........73
Specifications ..........165
SRQ ......................94
Shutter
Power-on
Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments
81
Safety ....................143
Safety class .............143
SCPI .....................81
START
..30,
48, .....49, 54
Default .............50, 53
Manual sweep .....31,
Automatic sweep
Long form ..........85
Reference works ..81
288
51, .....52
...........50, 53
STARt ...................124
STARt? ..................125
OUTPut .................113,
114
STATe ...................125
STATe? .................126
STATus .................116,
117, ..............118,
119, ..............120,
121, ..............122
Resetting
Status
...........93
.............94,
95, ................101,
102, ..............115,
117
Status byte ..............84
STATus nodes .........114
Common
Status Byte
STEP
..30,
48, .....49, 54
Default .............50, 53
Manual sweep .....31,
51, .....52
Resetting ...........50, 53
STOP ....................126
Automatic sweep ..30,
48, .....49
Default .............50, 53
Manual sweep .....31,
51, .....52
Resetting ...........50, 53
Automatic sweep
SWP
Hardware setup
....47
Syntax ...................86
SYSTem ................122
Index
T
Temperature considerations
User
Temperature
Cooling .............148
Operating ..........148
Storing ..............148
69
.................34,
67, .....69
V
Temperature variation 116,
118
Wavelength calibration data
...........69
The .......................60
the ........................60
Through power ........112,
113
Default .............113
Maximum ..........113
Minimum ..........113
33,
70, ................110,
111
THRUPOWR ..........33,
70, ................71
Default .............71
Resetting ...........71
Setting up ..........33, 70
VALue ..................126
VALue? .................127
W
WAVelength ...........109
Wavelength ............33,
40, ................67,
109, ..............110
Default .............41,
109, ...110
Maximum ..........109,
110
Minimum ..........109,
110
Resetting ...........41
Through power mode
U
U/L-CAL ...............68, 69
UCALibration .........124,
125, ..............126,
127
Wavelength calibration data
33, ................67,
107
Invalid ..............119,
120
User .................123
Wavelength range ....166
WAVelength? .........110
Units
Mnemonics ........89
Programming ......85,
89
.............34, 69
Default .............69
Factory .............34, 67
Resetting ...........69
USERCAL
289
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