Specifications | Aiwa CX-NA222 CD Player User Manual

®
OmniSwitch 7700/7800
Getting Started Guide
060130-10, Rev. G
March 2005
Warning. Only personnel knowledgeable in basic electrical and mechanical procedures should install or maintain this
equipment.
Lithium Batteries Caution. There is a danger of explosion if the Lithium battery in your chassis is incorrectly replaced.
Replace the battery only with the same or equivalent type of battery recommended by the manufacturer. Dispose of used
batteries according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The manufacturer’s instructions are as follows:
Return the module with the Lithium battery to Alcatel. The Lithium battery will
be replaced at Alcatel’s factory.
The features and specifications described in this guide are subject to change without notice.
Copyright © 2005 by Alcatel Internetworking, Inc.. All rights reserved. This document may not be reproduced in whole or in
part without the express written permission of Alcatel Internetworking, Inc.
Alcatel® and the Alcatel logo are registered trademarks of Alcatel. Xylan®, OmniSwitch®, OmniStack®, and Alcatel
OmniVista® are registered trademarks of Alcatel Internetworking, Inc.
OmniAccess™, Omni Switch/Router™, PolicyView™, RouterView™, SwitchManager™, VoiceView™, WebView™,
X-Cell™, X-Vision™, and the Xylan logo are trademarks of Alcatel Internetworking, Inc.
This OmniSwitch product contains components which may be covered by one or more of the following U.S. Patents:
• U.S. Patent No. 6,339,830
• U.S. Patent No. 6,070,243
• U.S. Patent No. 6,061,368
• U.S. Patent No. 5,394,402
• U.S. Patent No. 6,047,024
• U.S. Patent No. 6,314,106
Alcatel Internetworking
• U.S. Patent No. 6,542,507
26801 West Agoura Road
Calabasas, CA 91301
(818) 880-3500 FAX (818) 880-3505
US Customer Support: (800) 995-2696
International Customer Support: (818) 878-4507
Internet: http://eservice.ind.alcatel.com
Table of Contents
OmniSwitch 7700/7800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Availability Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Chassis Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
OmniSwitch 7700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
OmniSwitch 7800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Installing the Hardware
............... 4
Items Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Site Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Environmental Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Electrical Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Weight Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Items Included . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Unpacking and Installing the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Unpacking the Chassis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Lifting the Chassis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Mounting the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Airflow Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Rack-Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Optional Rack-Mounting Hardware . . . . . . 9
Standalone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Installing Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Using the Grounding Wrist Strap and Chassis
March 2005
Grounding Lug . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Installing the Network Interface (NI) and
Chassis Management Modules (CMMs) . . . . . .13
NI Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
CMMs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
Installing GBIC Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Installing MiniGBIC Connectors . . . . . . . .15
Blank Cover Plates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16
Connections and Cabling
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Serial Connection to the Console/Modem
Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
Serial Connection Default Settings . . . . . .17
Ethernet Management Port (EMP)
Cable Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Booting the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Component LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Your First Login Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Logging In to the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Setting IP Address Information for the EMP . . . . . 21
Unlocking Session Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Unlocking All Session Types . . . . . . . . . . .22
Unlocking Specified Session Types . . . . . .22
How many sessions are allowed? . . . . . . . .23
Changing the Login Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Setting the System Time Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
iii
Setting the Date and Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Files and Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Setting Optional System
Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Specifying an Administrative Contact . . . . . . . 25
Specifying a System Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Specifying the Switch’s Location . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Boot and Image Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Viewing Your Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Working and Certified Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Working Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Certified Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
How can I tell which directory the switch is
currently using? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Can I save changes to the Certified
directory? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
What happens when the switch boots? . . . .39
Working and Certified Are Identical . . . . .39
Working and Certified Are Different . . . . .40
My Working and Certified directories are
different. Can I force a reboot from the
Working directory? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Saving Your Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Modifying the Serial Connection Settings . . . . . . . 26
CLI Basics
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
CLI Assistance Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Syntax Checking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Command Line (?) Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Partial Keyword Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Deleting Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Inserting Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Previous Command Recall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Prefix Recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Prefix Prompt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Command History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Command Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Enabling Command Logging . . . . . . . . . . . 33
boot.params File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
boot.cfg File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Image Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Loading Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Non-Redundant Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Redundant Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Common CLI Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Using WebView . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Offline Configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Syntax Checking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Scheduling a Configuration File to be Applied at a
Later Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Browser Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Generating Snapshots of the
Current Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Required Image Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Logging In to WebView . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Navigating WebView . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Additional Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
iv
March 2005
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
The WebView login screen does not
display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
The login screen displays, but my login
attempt fails. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Hardware Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
48
Chassis Slot Numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Chassis Management Module (CMM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
CMM Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
CMM Slot Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
CMM Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Network Interface (NI) Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
ENI Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
GNI Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) . . . . . . . 53
Miniature Gigabit Interface Converters
(MiniGBICs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
OS7-ENI-C24 Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
OS7-ENI-FM12 Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
OS7-ENI-P24 Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
OS7-GNI-U2 Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
OS7-GNI-U12 Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
OS7-GNI-C12 Front Panel
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
User Documentation on CD
. . . . . . . . . . 61
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
March 2005
v
vi
March 2005
OmniSwitch 7700/7800
Refer to “Chassis Types” on page 2 for additional details on
OS7700 and OS7800 switches.
TM
Om
niSw
itch
Both half duplex and full duplex are supported on all 10/100
Ethernet ports; full duplex is supported on Gigabit Ethernet
ports.
78
00
1
9
NI
2
10
OS7-ENI-C24
11
OK1
4
12
OK1
B
5
13
8
16
1x
4x
9x
PW
OK2
4x
1x
3x
6x
14x
16x
13x
18x
12x
15x
11x
OK1
11x
10x
7x
12x
9x
11x
8x
5x
10x
7x
9x
6x
3x
8x
5x
7x
14x
13x
21x
23x
16x
4x
14x
19x
OK1
1x
6x
12x
11x
3x
5x
10x
4x
9x
17x
22x
21x
23x
14x
16x
13x
15x
11x
18x
/3.5
18x
15x
20x
20x
17x
22x
19x
21x
22x
19x
21x
23x
21x
23x
23x
100/11
50/60H
5/250V
z,
8.0/7.0
/3.5
A
OK2
ACT
OK1
LINK
OK2
1
OS7-GNI-U2
OK1
OS7-GNI-U2
OS7-GNI-U2
LINK
OK
OK
OVER
TEMP
OK2
ACT
ACT
11x
18x
15x
22x
16x
19x
ACT
13x
18x
15x
20x
17x
22x
19x
LINK
1
RX
20x
17x
21x
ACT
TX
LINK
1
RX
20x
17x
22x
19x
21x
23x
21x
23x
TX
ACT
22x
LINK
1
RX
19x
21x
23x
22x
19x
21x
23x
RX
17x
19x
9x
14x
16x
13x
18x
15x
20x
17x
21x
1
16x
OS7-GNI-U2
7x
14x
16x
13x
18x
12x
15x
11x
20x
17x
22x
19x
18x
15x
20x
17x
22x
19x
16x
13x
18x
20x
17x
15x
14x
TX
13x
23x
AC
DC
OK1
EMP
LINK
LINK
RX
18x
22x
21x
OK1
ACT
TX
ACT
1
ACT
15x
17x
20x
5x
CONS
/MODOLE
EM
EMP
LINK
RX
LINK
RX
TX
3x
14x
16x
10x
13x
12x
9x
11x
11x
22x
19x
16x
13x
18x
15x
20x
17x
ACT
1
LINK
EMP
1x
14x
A
RX
EMP
8x
10x
7x
12x
9x
11x
/3.5
6x
8x
5x
10x
7x
12x
9x
5/250V
8.0/7.0
CONS
/MODOLE
EM
4x
6x
3x
8x
5x
10x
7x
4x
1x
6x
3x
8x
z,
OK2
OK2
100/11
50/60H
OK2
1
EM
TX
5x
OK
OK
OVER
TEMP
OK1
LINK
19x
4x
DC
OK2
ACT
ACT
FAN
OK2
1x
6x
12x
9x
14x
16x
13x
18x
15x
11x
OK1
LINK
EM
CON
SOLE
/MOD
3x
OK2
ACT
CON
SOLE
/MOD
AC
OS7-GNI-U2
10x
7x
OK1
8
OS7-GNI-U2
8x
14x
13x
12x
9x
11x
16x
5x
14x
10x
7x
12x
9x
11x
OK2
OS7-GNI-U2
6x
3x
8x
5x
10x
7x
12x
9x
OS7-GNI-U2
4x
1x
6x
3x
8x
5x
10x
7x
7
OS7-ENI-C24
4x
4x
1x
6x
3x
8x
5x
OK1
1x
4x
1x
6x
3x
FAN
OK2
OK1
NI
6
TEMP
TEMP
OK1
5
PRI
SEC
FAN
22x
OK1
PS1
PS2
PS3
OK2
SEC
TEMP
17x
20x
OK2
PW
R
OK1
PRI
OK2
100/11
50/60H
5/250V
z,
8.0/7.0
SEC
FAN
OS7-ENI-C24
OK2
OK1
PRI
TEMP
OS7-ENI-C24
OK1
OK2
OK1
OS7-ENI-C24
OK1
OS7-ENI-C24
4x
1x
OK2
OK
A
4
OS7-ENI-C24
OK1
OS7-ENI-C24
OK2
SEC
OK
OVER
TEMP
14x
13x
12x
16x
15x
18x
23x
OK2
9x
OK1
B
OS7700-CMM
OS7700-CMM
OS7-ENI-C24
3
Availability Features
AC
DC
11x
CM
M
PRI
NI
2
R
PS1
PS2
PS3
PS4
OK2
1x
3x
8x
7x
6x
5x
12x
15x
10x
13x
20x
22x
21x
23x
19x
18x
20x
17x
22x
19x
21x
16x
18x
15x
20x
17x
22x
19x
8x
14x
16x
13x
18x
15x
20x
17x
OK1
OS7-ENI-C24
OK2
OS7-ENI-C24
7x
14x
16x
10x
13x
12x
9x
11x
OS7-ENI-C24
5x
14x
8x
10x
7x
12x
9x
11x
OS7-ENI-C24
3x
7
15
OK1
OK2
A
14
OK1
OK2
1
OK1
NI
6
OS7800-CMM
1x
6x
8x
10x
7x
12x
9x
5x
OK2
4x
00
6x
77
3x
8x
5x
10x
7x
itch
4x
niSw
1x
6x
3x
8x
5x
Om
M
OS7800-CMM
4x
1x
6x
3x
OK1
TM
CM
A
OK2
OS7-ENI-C24
4x
1x
OK2
OS7-ENI-C24
OK2
OS7-ENI-C24
OK1
3
LINK
LINK
LINK
2
DC
LINK
z,
100/11
50/60H
5/250V
z,
8.0/7.0
ACT
/3.5
A
100/11
50/60H
LINK
OK
OK
OVER
TEMP
ACT
2
ACT
2
AC
DC
TX
RX
RX
TX
RX
OK
OK
OVER
TEMP
LINK
2
23x
ACT
23x
TX
LINK
2
AC
RX
TX
ACT
21x
23x
21x
23x
TX
ACT
ACT
5/250V
8.0/7.0
RX
TX
LINK
2
RX
/3.5
A
TX
2
TX
2
RX
RX
TX
TX
AC
AC
DC
OK
DC
OK
OK
OVER
TEMP
OK
OVER
TEMP
100/11
50/60H
5/250V
z,
8.0/7.0
100/11
50/60H
z,
5/250V
8.0/7.0
/3.5
/3.5
A
A
Features
Alcatel’s OmniSwitch 7700/7800 switches offer high performance 10/100 Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet capabilities, as
well as embedded server load balancing for enterprise requirements.
The OmniSwitch 7700 (OS7700) has a fabric capacity of
approximately 64 Gigabits per second.
Availability ensures that your switch is consistently operational for your day-to-day networking needs. This added reliability is provided through redundant components for critical
hardware and software subsystems. OmniSwitch 7700/7800
switches provide a broad variety of Availability features,
including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Software Redundancy
Hardware Redundancy
Configuration Redundancy
Link Redundancy
Smart Continuous Switching
NI Module Forwarding During CMM Failover
Image Rollback
Hot Swapping
Hardware Monitoring
Power Checking Sequence
The OmniSwitch 7800 (OS7800) has a fabric capacity of
approximately 128 Gigabits per second.
March 2005
OmniSwitch 7700/7800
1
For more information on Availability features, refer to your
Hardware Users Guide, Switch Management Guide, and
Network Configuration Guide.
Chassis Types
OmniSwitch 7700
The OmniSwitch 7700 is a 10-slot edge or small enterprise
core switch. The OmniSwitch 7700 offers up to 192 10/100
Ethernet ports and can also be equipped with up to 96 Gigabit
Ethernet ports.
The OmniSwitch 7700 chassis contains the following major
components:
• Eight Network Interface (NI) module slots
• Two Chassis Management Module (CMM) slots
• Power supply bay holding up to three power supplies
• Fan tray with three fans
2
OmniSwitch 7700/7800
March 2005
OmniSwitch 7800
The OmniSwitch 7800 is an 18-slot switch designed for the
medium enterprise core or large wiring closet. The
OmniSwitch 7800 offers up to 384 10/100 Ethernet ports.
Alternatively, it can be equipped with up to 192 Gigabit Ethernet ports.
The OmniSwitch 7800 chassis contains the following major
components:
• 16 Network Interface (NI) module slots
• Two Chassis Management Module (CMM) slots
• Power supply bay holding up to four power supplies
• Fan tray with three fans
March 2005
OmniSwitch 7700/7800
3
Installing the Hardware
Items Required
• Grounding wrist strap (included)
Electrical Requirements
OmniSwitch 7700/7800 switches have the following general
electrical requirements:
• Phillips screwdriver
• Each switch requires one grounded electrical outlet for
• Flat-blade screwdriver
• Serial cable
Site Preparation
Environmental Requirements
OmniSwitch 7700/7800 switches have the following environmental and airflow requirements:
• The installation site must maintain a temperature
between 0° and 45° Celsius (32° and 122° Fahrenheit) and
not exceed 95 percent maximum humidity (noncondensing) at any time.
each power supply installed in the chassis (up to three for
OS7700 switches; up to four for OS7800 switches).
OmniSwitch 7700/7800 switches offer both AC and DC
power supply support. Refer to the Hardware Users Guide
for more information.
• For switches using AC power connections, each
supplied AC power cord is 2 meters (approximately 6.5
feet) long. Do not use extension cords.
Redundant AC Power. If possible, it is recommended
that each AC outlet resides on a separate circuit. With
redundant AC, if a single circuit fails, the switch’s remaining power supplies (on separate circuits) will likely be
unaffected and can therefore continue operating.
• Be sure to allow adequate room for proper air ventila-
tion at the front, back, and sides of the switch. Refer to
“Mounting the Switch” on page 7 for minimum clearance
requirements. No clearance is necessary at the top or
bottom of the chassis.
4
Installing the Hardware
• For switches using DC power, refer to the Hardware
Users Guide for more information, including installation
guidelines.
March 2005
Weight Considerations
Unpacking and Installing the Switch
When fully-populated (i.e., with all CMM and NI modules and
power supplies installed), the OmniSwitch 7700 weighs
approximately 128 lbs (58 Kgs); the OmniSwitch 7800 weighs
approximately 188 lbs (85 Kgs).
Unpacking the Chassis
Items Included
To protect your switch components from electrostatic
discharge (ESD) and physical damage, read all unpacking
recommendations and instructions carefully before beginning.
Recommendations
Your OmniSwitch 7700/7800 order includes the following
items:
• Unpack your OmniSwitch chassis as close as possible
• OmniSwitch chassis with factory-installed power
• Network Interface (NI) modules are packaged in sepa-
supplies per order
• CMM module(s) per order
• NI modules per order
• GBICs per order, if applicable
to the location where it will be installed.
rate boxes. In order to greatly reduce exposure to electrostatic discharge (ESD) and physical damage, do not
unpack these boxes until the NI modules are ready to
be installed.
Instructions
• MiniGBICs per order, if applicable
1 Begin by carefully cutting the tape along the seam
• Blank cover panels, if applicable
marked “OPEN HERE FIRST.”
• Grounding wrist strap
2 Lift the box’s top flaps. Remove the smaller boxes that
• Hardcopy Getting Started Guide
are enclosed and set them aside. These smaller boxes
contain the Ship Kit and the switch’s Chassis Management Modules (CMMs).
• Documentation CD containing a complete set of users
3 Next, completely remove the white plastic handle
• Power cord(s) per order, if applicable
guides for the switch and switch software. Refer to “User
Documentation on CD” on page 61 for a complete list of
included documentation.
March 2005
inserts from the sides of the box. Removing these handles
allows the overpack to be removed.
Installing the Hardware
5
4 The overpack is the outer shell of the packaging. Lift
the overpack straight up until it slides free from the rest of
the packaging. This allows easy access to the chassis.
TE ER
MP
50100/
/60H11
5/
z, 250V
8.0/
7.0/
3.5
A
3.5
A
5 Carefully remove the protective plastic from the switch
chassis.
6 In order to reduce the weight of the chassis, it is
recommended that you remove all factory-installed power
supplies prior to lifting it from the packaging. Steps 7
through 12 below provide instructions for removing power
supplies.
Note. Steps 7 through 12 apply to power supplies that are
newly-shipped in the switch chassis. They have no power
cords attached and the on/off switches are in the off ( O )
position. For instructions on removing power supplies that
are currently operating in an existing switch, refer to your
Hardware Users Guide.
AC
DC
OK
O
OV K
TE ER
MP
50100/
/60H11
5/
z, 250V
8.0/
7.0/
Note. Alcatel provides factory-installed blank cover plates
for empty module slots. Do not remove these cover plates
as they play an important role in chassis ventilation.
8 With one hand, grasp the handle at the front of the
7 Loosen the two captive screws, located at the top and
bottom of the power supply’s front panel. If necessary, use
a flat-blade screwdriver to loosen the screws. Be sure that
both captive screws are completely disengaged from the
threaded holes in the chassis before continuing.
6
Installing the Hardware
power supply and slowly pull the power supply out of the
power supply bay. Do not pull the power supply
completely out of the bay with one hand.
March 2005
Lifting the Chassis
TE R
MP
50100/
/60H11
5/
z, 250V
8.0/
7.0/
3.5
AC
DC
A
Important. Two people are required when lifting the
chassis. Due to its weight, lifting the chassis unassisted
can cause personal injury.
OK
O
OV K
TE ER
MP
50100/
/60H11
5/
z, 250V
8.0/
7.0/
3.5
Once its weight has been reduced by removing the power
supplies, the chassis can be lifted from the packaging material
and moved to the location where it is to be installed (see
important note below).
A
Once the chassis has been removed from the packaging,
continue to “Mounting the Switch” below.
9 When the power supply is pulled out far enough (about
10”), place your other hand under the power supply casing
to support its weight.
10 Continue pulling the power supply out until it is
removed from the chassis.
11 Set the power supply aside on a clean, static-free
Mounting the Switch
Note. Due to their weight and airflow requirements,
OmniSwitch 7700/7800 switches cannot be wall-mounted.
Airflow Considerations
surface. You will need to re-install it later.
12 Remove all remaining power supplies by repeating
steps 7 through 11.
13 Continue to “Lifting the Chassis” below.
March 2005
Be sure that your switch is placed in a well-ventilated, staticfree environment. Always allow adequate clearance at the
front and sides of the switch, as well as behind the switch’s fan
unit (located at the top-rear of the chassis). The following topview diagram shows recommended minimum clearances for
adequate airflow.
Installing the Hardware
7
Rack-Mounting
}
Rear. 6 inches minimum
at rear of chassis fan
unit.
Refer to the important guidelines below before installing the
OmniSwitch chassis in a rack.
• Rack-mounting the chassis requires three people—two
Sides. 2 inches minimum
at left and right sides.
people to hold the chassis and position it in the rack and a
third person to secure the chassis to the rack using the
attachment screws.
• The chassis has two integral rack-mount flanges that
}
Front. 6 inches minimum
at front of chassis.
support standard 19” rack mount installations. Refer to
page 9 for information on optional rack-mounting hardware.
• Alcatel does not provide rack-mount screws. Use the
screws supplied by the rack vendor.
Chassis Top View
Never obstruct the air intake vents located at the bottom-front
and bottom-sides of the chassis or the fan unit’s air output
vents located at the rear of the chassis.
Note. Clearance is not required at the top and bottom of
the chassis.
• To prevent a rack from becoming top heavy, it is recom-
mended that you install the switch at the bottom of the rack
whenever possible.
• If you are installing the switch in a relay rack, be sure to
install and secure the rack per the rack manufacturer’s
specifications.
• Refer to page 7 for important chassis airflow recom-
mendations before installing.
To rack-mount the switch, follow the steps below.
1 Mark the holes on the rack where the chassis is to be
installed.
8
Installing the Hardware
March 2005
2 Using two people, lift and position the chassis until the
5 Once the screws at the bottom of each flange are
rack-mount flanges are flush with the rack post.
secure, install the remaining screws. Be sure that all
screws are securely tightened.
3 Align the holes in the flanges with the rack holes you
marked in step 1.
4 Once the holes are aligned, use a third person to insert
a screw through the bottom hole on each flange. Tighten
both screws until they are secure.
TM
Om
niS
wit
ch
77
00
A
CM
M
1
B
2
NI
3
4
PW
R
PS1
PS2
PS3
5
6
NI
7
8
Optional Rack-Mounting Hardware
All OmniSwitch 7700/7800 switches are shipped with integral
front rack-mount flanges. These flanges support standard 19”
rack mount installations. If you have non-standard rack-mount
requirements, Alcatel offers optional hardware for the following applications:
Note. Be sure to install the screws in the bottom hole of
each flange, as shown, before proceeding.
• 23” rack installations
• Side-mount hardware for additional support
For information on this optional rack mounting hardware,
contact your Alcatel representative.
March 2005
Installing the Hardware
9
Standalone
Installing Power Supplies
The OmniSwitch 7700/7800 can be installed unmounted as a
standalone unit. Be sure that the installation location is a
stable, flat surface that can accommodate the fully-populated
weight of all switches being installed. One fully-populated
OmniSwitch 7700 weighs approximately 128 lbs (58 Kgs); a
fully-populated OmniSwitch 7800 weighs approximately 188
lbs (85 Kgs).
Next, reinstall the power supplies in the chassis power supply
bays by following the steps below.
Note. OmniSwitch 7700/7800 switches must be installed
“right side up.” Never attempt to operate a switch while it
is lying on its side.
1 First, be sure that you do not install the power supply
upside down. When orienting the power supply, note that
the on/off switch and power cord socket are located at the
bottom of the power supply and the fan is located at the
top of the power supply.
2 With one hand, grasp the handle at the front of the
power supply. Place your other hand under the power
supply casing to support its weight.
3 Carefully insert the rear of the casing into the power
To install the switch as a standalone unit, follow the steps
below:
supply bay and slide the power supply back until its
connector meets the chassis backplane connector.
TE R
MP
1 Use two or more people to move and position the
50100/
/60H11
5/
z, 250V
8.0/
7.0/
3.5
A
unpopulated chassis upright on the floor or bench where it
is to be installed.
2 Be sure that adequate clearance has been provided for
chassis airflow and that you have placed the chassis within
reach of all required electrical outlets. For recommended
airflow allowances, refer to page 7. For environmental and
electrical requirements, refer to page 4.
10
Installing the Hardware
AC
DC
OK
O
OV K
TE ER
MP
50100/
/60H11
5/
z, 250V
8.0/
7.0/
3.5
A
March 2005
4 Continue sliding the power supply back until the front
8 Once the power cord is looped through the retainer,
panel meets the front of the chassis. Do not force the
power supply into the bay. Otherwise you can damage the
connectors.
plug the power cord connector into the power supply’s
socket and then plug the power cord into an easily-accessible, properly grounded outlet. Do not use an extension
cord.
5 Tighten the two captive screws, located at the top and
bottom of the power supply’s front panel. Be sure not to
overtighten the captive screws. If you use a screwdriver,
the torque used to tighten the screws must not exceed 2.3
inch pounds.
TE ER
MP
Note. For OS7700 and OS7800 switches using DC power,
the power cord connector snaps into the connector socket.
A cable retainer is not used. For more information, refer to
the Hardware Users Guide.
50100/1
/60 15
Hz /25
, 8.0 0V
/7.
0/3
.5
A
Important. Do not turn on the power supplies at this time.
AC
DC
OK
O
OV K
TE ER
MP
50100/1
/60 15
Hz /25
, 8.0 0V
/7.
0/3
.5
A
9 Install all remaining power supplies by repeating steps
1 through 8 for each power supply.
6 Verify that the power supply’s on/off switch is in the
off ( O ) position.
7 Loop the AC power cord (provided) once through the
cable retainer located on the power supply’s front panel
and secure the retainer using the butterfly fastener. By
looping the power cord through this retainer, the cord
cannot be accidentally pulled from the socket.
March 2005
Installing the Hardware
11
Using the Grounding Wrist Strap and
Chassis Grounding Lug
Because electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage switch
components such as the Network Interface (NI) and CMMs,
you must ground yourself properly before continuing with the
hardware installation. For this purpose, Alcatel provides a
grounding wrist strap and a grounding lug located near the
bottom-right of the chassis.
To properly ground yourself, follow the steps below.
Note. The grounding lug diagram at left is a general
diagram only. It is intended to show the location of the
grounding lug. No NI modules or CMMs should be
installed in your chassis at this time.
Important. For the grounding wrist strap to be effective
in eliminating ESD, the power supplies must be installed
in the chassis and plugged into grounded electrical outlets
as described on page 11.
1 Fasten the provided grounding strap to your wrist.
2 Insert the wrist strap’s connector pin (located at the end
of the strap’s tether) into the grounding lug near the
bottom-right of the chassis, as shown.
6x
3x
18x
15x
20x
17x
x
TX
LIN
K
1
20x
17x
22x
19x
19x
RX
ACT
TX
LIN
K
1
21x
RX
1
22x
RX
19x
21x
23x
TX
ACT
LIN
K
21x
23x
TX
ACT
AC
DC
LIN
K
2
RX
OK
OK
OV
TE ER
MP
ACT
23x
TX
LIN
K
2
RX
TX
100
50/6
/115
0Hz /250
, 8.0/ V
7.0/
ACT
3.5
A
LIN
K
2
RX
TX
2
RX
TX
AC
DC
OK
OK
OV
TE ER
MP
100
50/6
/115
0Hz /250
, 8.0/ V
7.0/
3.5
A
Chassis
Grounding Lug
12
Installing the Hardware
March 2005
Installing the Network Interface (NI) and
Chassis Management Modules (CMMs)
Once you are properly grounded, you may begin installing the
Network Interface (NI) and CMM(s).
NI Modules
NI modules may be installed in any slot position from
1 through 8 in OS7700 switches and 1 through 16 in OS7800
switches.
CMMs
CMMs may be installed in slots A or B in OS7700 and
OS7800 switches. A minimum of one CMM is required for
switch operations; the second CMM provides redundancy.
In non-redundant configurations, the CMM may be installed in
either slot A or B. In redundant configurations, the CMM
installed in slot A will be designated primary by default. For
more information on redundancy, refer to page 49 or, for
detailed information, refer to your Hardware Users Guide.
To install an NI or CMM module, follow the steps below.
Note. To further reduce exposure to electrostatic discharge
(ESD) and physical damage, do not remove more than one
module at a time from the factory packaging. Unpack one
module, immediately install the module in the chassis,
then repeat the sequence for another module.
Important. Before beginning, note that the CMM
modules and NI modules slide into the chassis card guides
differently. CMMs have a sheet metal tray that slides into
the guides; with NIs, the edges of the module’s printed
circuit slide into the guides.
1 Holding the module in both hands, carefully slide it
into the chassis card guide. The component side of the
board should face right.
TM
Om
niS
witc
h7
70
NI modules cannot be installed in CMM slots A or B; likewise, CMMs cannot be installed in any NI slot position.
0
A
CM
M
1
NI
3
B
OS7700-CMM
OS7700-CMM
2
4
OK1
OS7-ENI-C24
OK1
OK2
PW
OK1
R
PS1
PS2
PS3
OK2
PRI
OK2
SEC
5
PRI
4x
1x
NI
6
SEC
OK1
7
OK2
OK1
8
OK1
11x
LINK
AC
DC
OK
OK
OVE
TEMR
P
OK2
14x
ACT
16x
13x
18x
15x
CON
/MOSOL
E
DEM
OK1
LINK
OS7-GNI-U2
12x
9x
OK2
ACT
CON
/MOSOL
E
DEM
OS7-GNI-U2
10x
7x
TEM
P
FAN
OS7-GNI-U2
8x
5x
FAN
OS7-GNI-U2
6x
3x
100/1
50/60
Hz,15/25
8.0/70V
.0/3.5
A
OK2
1
RX
ACT
TX
LINK
1
RX
ACT
20x
17x
Due to the differences in their physical dimensions, OS7700
and OS7800 CMMs are not interchangeable.
TEM
P
TX
EMP
LINK
1
RX
22x
19x
LINK
ACT
TX
ACT
EMP
1
RX
LINK
21x
LINK
TX
ACT
ACT
23x
LINK
2
AC
RX
TX
ACT
DC
RX
TX
OK
OK
OVE
TEMR
P
LINK
2
ACT
100/1
50/60
Hz,15/25
8.0/70V
.0/3.5
LINK
2
RX
More Information on Slot Numbering. For a diagram
showing the chassis layout and slot positions, refer to
“Chassis Slot Numbering” on page 48.
March 2005
A
TX
2
RX
TX
AC
DC
OK
OK
OVE
TEMR
P
100/1
50/60
Hz,15/25
8.0/70V
.0/3.5
A
Installing the Hardware
13
2 The module should slide in easily. Do not force the
4 Once the module is firmly seated, secure the module to
module into the slot. If any resistance is encountered,
ensure the module is aligned properly in the card guide.
Also, see the important note regarding chassis card guides
on page 13.
the chassis by tightening the two captive screws. Be sure
not to overtighten the captive screws. If you use a screwdriver, the torque used to tighten the screws must not
exceed 2.3 inch pounds.
3 When the module is nearly seated in the slot, be sure
that the two extractor levers—one on top of the module
and one on the bottom—are slightly opened (approximately 30 degrees). This allows the notch on each extractor lever to grasp the rail on the chassis. Once the notches
have grasped the rail, press both extractor levers simultaneously until the module is firmly seated.
1
OK
2
1x
3x
5x
6
3x
OK
2
4x
1x
OS7-ENI-C24
OK
1
8x
Notch in Extractor
Lever
3
6x
NI
OK
1
4x
2
Chassis Attachment
Rail
OS7-ENI-C24
OS7-ENI-C24
OK
1
1
NI
2
5 Install all remaining modules by repeating steps 1
through 4 for each module.
OK
2
4x
14
Installing the Hardware
March 2005
Installing GBIC Connectors
If you are installing an OS7-GNI-U2 module, you must install
Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) as required. OS7-GNIU2 modules provide ports for up to two GBICs. These GBICs
are packaged separately.
Caution. Do not force the GBIC into the slot. If the GBIC
does not slide easily into position, verify that the GBIC
grooves are aligned properly. Forcing the GBIC into the
slot can damage the unit, as well as components on your
GNI module.
Installing MiniGBIC Connectors
To install a GBIC follow the steps below.
1 Be sure you have eliminated ESD by using the
provided grounding wrist strap. Refer to “Using the
Grounding Wrist Strap and Chassis Grounding Lug” on
page 12 for more information.
If you are installing an OS7-GNI-U12 module, you must
install Miniature Gigabit Interface Converters (MiniGBICs) as
required. OS7-GNI-U12 modules provide ports for up to 12
MiniGBICs. These MiniGBICs are packaged separately.
To install a MiniGBIC follow the steps below.
2 Note that there is an alignment groove used to keep the
GBIC from being installed backwards or upside-down.
Orient the GBIC with the slot located on the OS7-GNI-U2
module and carefully slide the GBIC into place until the
tabs lock.
To install the
GBIC, insert the
module firmly
into the slot until
the tabs click.
To remove the GBIC, press
and hold tabs while sliding
the module out of the slot.
Groove
Press tab
provided grounding wrist strap. Refer to “Using the
Grounding Wrist Strap and Chassis Grounding Lug” on
page 12 for more information.
2 When inserting a MiniGBIC, be sure that the hinged
face is closed.
3 Slide the MiniGBIC straight into the slot until the
module clicks firmly into place.
4 Push the MiniGBIC into the slot until it clicks into
place.
GBIC Slot
GNI Module
1 Be sure you have eliminated ESD by using the
GBIC Module
Press tab
March 2005
Installing the Hardware
15
Note. The diagram below is a representation only; the
physical appearance of the actual MiniGBIC may vary.
Blank cover plates are factory-installed in the chassis and are
used to cover empty CMM and NI slots, as well as empty
power supply bays.
6
7
8
These cover plates play an important role in chassis airflow
and temperature management. They also provide protection for
module processor boards and other sensitive internal switch
components by closing off a chassis that is not fully populated.
A
C
T
LINK
A
C
T
LINK
A
C
T
LINK
A
C
T
LINK
GNI Module
MiniGBIC Slot
Blank Cover Plates
Because they regulate airflow and help protect internal chassis
components, blank cover plates should remain installed at
empty module slots and power supply bays at all times.
MiniGBIC Module
Caution. The MiniGBIC should slide in easily. Do not
force it into the slot. If any resistance is encountered,
ensure the MiniGBIC is aligned properly. Forcing the
MiniGBIC into the slot can damage the unit, as well as
components on your GNI module.
Note. To remove a MiniGBIC, you must first open the
MiniGBIC’s hinged face to approximately ninety degrees.
Then, grasp the hinged face and carefully pull the
MiniGBIC straight out of the slot.
16
Installing the Hardware
March 2005
Connections and Cabling
Once your switch is properly installed, you should connect all
network and management cables required for your network
applications. Connections may include:
• Serial cable to the console port
• Ethernet cable to the Ethernet Management Port (EMP)
on the CMM
• Gigabit cables to all required GBICs or MiniGBICs
Serial Connection Default Settings
The factory default settings for the serial connection are as
follows:
baud rate
9600
parity
none
data bits (word size)
8
stop bits
1
• Ethernet cables to all required Ethernet Network
Interface (ENI) ports
Serial Connection to the Console/Modem Port
For information on modifying these settings, refer to
“Modifying the Serial Connection Settings” on page 26.
The console port, located on the CMM module, provides a
serial connection to the switch and is required when logging
into the switch for the first time. By default, this female DB-9
connector provides a DCE console connection. However, by
changing the onboard jumper setting, the port can be changed
to a DTE modem connection.
Modem Connections. If you require a modem connection to the switch, you must convert the console port to
support modem connections by installing a hardware
jumper on the CMM. Refer to your Hardware Users
Guide for details.
March 2005
Connections and Cabling
17
Ethernet Management Port (EMP)
Cable Requirements
Refer to the diagram below for console/modem port and EMP
locations.
There are specific cable type requirements (i.e., straightthrough or crossover) based on the location of the Ethernet
Management Port (EMP) and the type of device to which it is
connecting. Refer to the information below:
TM
Om
niS
wit
ch
77
00
A
CM
M
1
OS7-ENI-C24
4
OK
1
OK
1
OK
2
1x
4x
6x
3x
OK
2
OK
1
PW
R
OK
1
PS
PS1
PS2
3
OK
2
PR
I
SE
C
5
4x
PR
I
OK
2
1x
3x
6x
8x
5x
TE
MP
FA
N
OK
1
8
OK
2
9x
12x
11x
14x
13x
16x
18x
15x
OK
1
LIN
K
OK
2
11x
13x
16x
15x
18x
20x
17x
22x
19x
CO
NS
/MO OL
DE E
M
OK
OK
OV
TE ER
MP
OK
1
LIN
K
1
AC
DC
AC
T
14x
13x
16x
15x
18x
20x
17x
CO
NS
/MO OL
DE E
M
AC
T
OS7-GNI-U2
10x
OK
1
7x
9x
12x
11x
14x
16x
13x
9x
50/100/11
60H 5/2
z, 50V
8.0
/7.0
/3.5
A
OK
2
RX
AC
T
LIN
K
1
RX
15x
20x
17x
22x
19x
21x
18x
17x
23x
20x
22x
19x
21x
AC
T
TX
EM
P
22x
19x
21x
23x
LIN
K
1
RX
LIN
K
AC
T
TX
AC
T
EM
P
1
RX
LIN
K
LIN
K
21x
23x
11x
TX
AC
T
AC
T
LIN
K
2
AC
RX
23x
AC
T
TX
DC
RX
TX
OK
OK
OV
TE ER
MP
LIN
K
2
AC
T
50/100/11
60H 5/2
z, 50V
8.0
/7.0
LIN
K
2
RX
/3.5
A
TX
2
RX
TX
13x
Note. For information on manually configuring Ethernet
ports for cabling requirements, refer to “Configuring
Ethernet Ports” in the Network Configuration Guide.
7
OK
2
OS7-GNI-U2
5x
8x
14x
10x
7x
9x
12x
11x
FA
N
OS7-GNI-U2
3x
6x
5x
8x
7x
10x
12x
9x
TE
MP
TX
CO
N
/M SOL
OD E
EM
NI
6
SE
C
OS7-GNI-U2
1x
4x
6x
3x
5x
8x
10x
7x
Crossover
OS7-ENI-C24
4x
1x
OK
2
OS7-ENI-C24
OK
1
B
OS7700-CMM
3
OK
2
7x
EMP to a Computer or
Workstation
Straightthrough
OS7-ENI-C24
EMP to a Switch
OK
1
OS7700-CMM
NI
2
AC
DC
OK
OK
OV
TE ER
MP
50/100/11
60H 5/2
z, 50V
8.0
/7.0
/3.5
15x
A
EM
P
17x
LIN
K
19x
AC
T
For detailed information on all port types, including console/
modem, EMP, Ethernet, and Gigabit Ethernet, refer to the
module descriptions on pages 51 through 59.
18
Connections and Cabling
March 2005
Booting the Switch
Now that you have installed the switch components and
connected all required cables, you can boot the switch. To boot
the switch, simply turn the on/off switch for all installed power
supplies to the on ( | ) position.
Note. If you have more than one power supply installed,
be sure to turn on each power supply in rapid succession,
(i.e., within a few seconds of each other). This ensures that
there will be adequate power for all NI modules when they
boot.
Component LEDs
The boot process takes a few moments to complete. During
this process, the LEDs on the CMM and NI modules may flash
and change color, indicating different stages of the boot.
Following a successful boot, the LEDs on all switch components, including power supplies, should display as follows:
CMM OK1
Solid Green
CMM OK2
Blinking Green
CMM TEMP
Solid Green
CMM FAN
Solid Green
NI OK1
Solid Green
March 2005
NI OK2
Blinking Green
Power Supply AC OK
Solid Green
Power Supply DC OK
Solid Green
Power Supply OVER TEMP
Off
If the LEDs do not display as indicated, make sure the boot
process is completed. Again, the boot process takes several
moments to complete. If the LEDs do not display as indicated
following a complete boot sequence, contact Alcatel Customer
Support.
For descriptions of CMM and NI LED states, see pages 51
through 59. For information on power supply LED states, refer
to the Hardware Users Guide.
Once the switch has completely booted and you have accessed
your computer’s terminal emulation software via the console
port, you are ready to log in to the switch’s Command Line
Interface (CLI) and configure basic information. Continue to
“Your First Login Session” on page 20.
Booting the Switch
19
Your First Login Session
In order to complete the setup process for the switch, you
should complete the following steps during your first login
session:
• Log in to the switch
Logging In to the Switch
When you first log in to the switch, you will be prompted for a
login (i.e., user) name and password. During this first login
session, only one user name option and one password option is
available:
• Set IP address information for the Ethernet
Management Port (EMP)
• Login (i.e., user name)—admin
• Unlock session types
• Password—switch
• Change the login password
• Set the date and time
• Set optional system information
• Save your changes
Important. You must be connected to the switch via the
console port before initiating your first login session.
To log in to the switch, enter admin at the login prompt:
login: admin
Next, enter the factory default password, switch, at the password prompt:
password: switch
The default welcome banner, which includes information such
as the current software version and system date, displays—
followed by the CLI command prompt:
Welcome to the Alcatel OmniSwitch 7000
Software Version 5.1.5: April 30, 2004.
Copyright(c), 1994-2003 Alcatel Internetworking, Inc.
All Rights reserved.
OmniSwitch(TM) is a trademark of Alcatel Internetworking, Inc. registered in the United States Patent and
Trademark Office.
->
20
Your First Login Session
March 2005
More Information On User Accounts. A user account
includes a login name, password, and user privileges.
Privileges determine whether the user has read or write
access to the switch and which commands the user is
authorized to execute.
1 Enter modify boot parameters at the CLI prompt. The
boot prompt displays:
Boot >
2 At the boot prompt, enter boot empipaddr, followed
For detailed information on setting up and modifying user
accounts and user privileges, refer to the Switch Management Guide.
Setting IP Address Information for
the EMP
The Ethernet Management Port (EMP) is located on the CMM
module. The EMP allows you to bypass the Network Interface
(NI) modules and manage the switch over the network directly
through the CMM.
In order to ping the switch through the EMP Ethernet connection, you must change the port’s default IP and gateway
addresses.
To change the default IP and gateway addresses, refer to the
following steps.
by the new default IP address for the EMP. For example:
Boot > boot empipaddr 168.22.2.120
3 Next, enter boot empgatewayipaddr, followed by the
new default gateway address for the EMP. For example:
Boot > boot empgatewayipaddr 168.22.2.254
4 Verify your current changes by entering show at the
boot prompt:
Boot > show
Edit buffer contents:
EMP IP Address
EMP Gateway IP Address
: 168.22.2.120
: 168.22.2.254
(additional table output not shown)
Subnet Mask. The default subnet mask is Class C
(255.255.255.0). If you must change this default value,
use the boot empnetmask command at the boot prompt.
Note. You must be connected to the switch via the console
port before attempting to change IP address information.
Otherwise, an error message will display.
March 2005
Your First Login Session
21
Access to the EMP. By default, only devices in the same
subnet as the EMP will be able to manage the switch
through that port. For information on allowing devices in
other subnets to manage the switch via the EMP, refer to
the Hardware Users Guide.
5 Save these changes to the switch’s running memory by
entering commit system at the boot prompt:
Unlocking Session Types
Security is a key feature on OmniSwitch 7700/7800 switches.
As a result, when you access the switch for the first time, you
must use a direct console port connection. All other session
types (Telnet, FTP, WebView, SNMP, etc.) are “locked out”
until they are manually unlocked by the user.
The CLI command used to unlock session types is
aaa authentication.
Boot > commit system
This will immediately enable your changes and allow
users to ping the EMP. Note, however, that these changes
have not yet been saved to the switch’s boot.params file
and will be lost if the switch is rebooted.
6 To permanently save these changes to the
boot.params file, enter commit file at the boot prompt:
Note. When you unlock session types, you are granting
switch access to non-local sessions (e.g., Telnet). As a
result, users who know the correct user login and password will have remote access to the switch. For more
information on switch security, refer to the Switch
Management Guide.
Boot > commit file
Changes will be preserved following a switch reboot.
7 Return to the CLI prompt by entering exit at the boot
Unlocking All Session Types
To unlock all session types, enter the following command
syntax at the CLI prompt:
prompt.
-> aaa authentication default local
Important. Although you have configured the EMP with
valid IP address information, you will not be able to
access the switch through this port for Telnet, FTP,
WebView, or SNMP sessions until you have unlocked
these remote session types. See “Unlocking Session
Types” for more information.
Unlocking Specified Session Types
You can also unlock session types on a one-by-one basis. For
example, to unlock Telnet sessions only, enter the following
command:
-> aaa authentication telnet local
22
Your First Login Session
March 2005
To unlock WebView (HTTP) sessions only, enter the following command:
-> aaa authentication http local
You cannot specify more than one session type in a single
command line. However, you can still unlock multiple session
types by using the aaa authentication command in succession. For example:
-> aaa authentication http local
-> aaa authentication telnet local
-> aaa authentication ftp local
How many sessions are allowed?
Once a session type has been unlocked, the following number
of sessions is allowed for each type:
Telnet sessions allowed
4 concurrent sessions
FTP sessions allowed
4 concurrent sessions
HTTP (Web browser) sessions allowed
4 concurrent sessions
Secure Shell and Secure
Shell FTP sessions allowed
8 concurrent sessions
Total sessions (Telnet, FTP,
HTTP, Secure Shell and
Secure Shell FTP, console)
21 concurrent sessions
SNMP sessions allowed
50 concurrent sessions
March 2005
Changing the Login Password
Change the login password for admin user sessions by following the steps below:
1 Be sure that you have logged into the switch as user
type admin (see “Logging In to the Switch” on page 20).
2 Enter the keyword password and press Enter.
3 Enter your new password at the prompt (refer to the
note below).
Note. Typically, the password should be a string of nonrepeating characters. The CLI uses the first occurrence of
the character series to uniquely identify the password. For
example, the password engrengr is the same as engr. A
better password might be engr2735.
4 You will be prompted to re-enter the password. Enter
the password a second time.
Note. Be sure to remember or securely record all new
passwords; overriding configured passwords on OS7700
and OS7800 switches is restricted.
New password settings are automatically saved in real time to
the local user database; the user is not required to enter an
additional command in order to save the password information. Also note that new password information is retained
following a reboot.
Your First Login Session
23
All subsequent login sessions—including those through the
console port—will require the new password in order to access
the switch.
User Accounts. The switch allows a maximum of 50 user
accounts in the local user database. For information on
creating additional user types and assigning individual
passwords, refer to the Switch Management Guide.
Setting the System Time Zone
The switch’s default time zone is UTC (also referred to as
Greenwich Mean Time).
Setting the Date and Time
Set the current time for the switch by entering system time,
followed by the current time in hh:mm:ss. For example:
-> system time 18:35:00
The switch uses a 24-hour clock; the time value shown in the
above example would set the time to 6:35 PM.
To set the current date for the switch, enter system date,
followed by the current date in mm/dd/yyyy. For example:
-> system date 06/27/2004
If you require a time zone that is specific to your region—or if
you need to enable Daylight Savings Time (DST) on the
switch—you can configure these settings via the system timezone and system daylight savings time commands. For example, to set the system clock to run on Pacific standard time,
enter the following command.
-> system timezone pst
To enable Daylight Savings time, enter the following
command.
-> system daylight savings time enable
Many other time zone variables are supported. For detailed
information on configuring a time zone for the switch, refer to
your Switch Management Guide.
24
Your First Login Session
March 2005
Setting Optional System
Information
This section provides information on configuring optional
system parameters, including:
Specifying a System Name
The system name is a simple, user-defined text description for
the switch.
• a system name
To specify a system name, enter system name, followed by a
text description of up to 254 characters. If you include spaces
between words in the text string, be sure to enclose the string
in quotes (“ ”).
• the switch’s physical location
For example:
• the switch’s administrative contact
Specifying an Administrative Contact
An administrative contact is the person or department in
charge of the switch. If a contact is specified, users can easily
find the appropriate network administrator if they have questions or comments about the switch.
To specify an administrative contact, enter system contact,
followed by a text string of up to 254 characters. If you
include spaces between words in the text string, be sure to
enclose the string in quotes (“ ”).
-> system name "Engineering Switch 3"
Specifying the Switch’s Location
It is recommended that you use a physical labeling system for
locating and identifying your switch(es). Examples include
placing a sticker or placard with a unique identifier (e.g., the
switch’s default IP address) on each chassis.
However, if no labeling system has been implemented or if
you need to determine a switch’s location from a remote site,
entering a system location can be very useful.
For example:
-> system contact "JSmith X477 js@company.com"
To specify a system location, enter system location, followed
by a text description of up to 254 characters. If you include
spaces between words in the text string, be sure to enclose the
string in quotes (“ ”).
For example:
-> system location "NMS Lab--NE Corner Rack"
March 2005
Your First Login Session
25
Viewing Your Changes
To view your current changes, enter show system at the CLI
prompt.
Saving Your Changes
Once you have configured this basic switch information, save
your changes by entering write memory at the CLI command
prompt.
When the write memory command is entered, changes are
automatically saved to the main configuration file (boot.cfg)
and placed in the /flash/working directory. For more information on the boot.cfg file, refer to page 36.
Modifying the Serial Connection
Settings
The switch’s serial connection defaults are listed on page 17.
If you wish to modify the default serial connection settings
(i.e., baud rate, parity, data bits, and stop bits), refer to the
following steps.
Note. You must be connected to the switch via the console
port before attempting to change serial connection
settings. Otherwise, an error message will display.
1 Enter modify boot parameters at the CLI prompt. The
boot prompt displays:
Note. If the switch reboots following a write memory
command entry, the switch will run from the
/flash/certified directory. As a result, subsequent configuration changes cannot be saved using the write memory
command until the switch is once again running from the
/flash/working directory. See page page 38 for important
information on these directories.
Boot >
2 To change the baud rate, enter boot serialbaudrate,
followed by the desired baud rate value. Options include
1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 (default), 19200, 38400, 57600,
76800, and 115200. For example:
Boot > boot serialbaudrate 19200
Note. Setting the console port to speeds above 9600 baud
can cause problems with Zmodem uploads.
26
Your First Login Session
March 2005
3 To change the parity value, enter boot serialparity,
followed by the desired parity value. Options include none
(default), even, and odd. For example:
7 You can save your changes to the boot.params file by
entering commit file at the boot prompt:
Boot > commit file
Boot > boot serialparity even
4 To change the data bits (i.e., word size) value, enter
boot serialwordsize, followed by the number of data bits.
Options include 7 and 8 (default). For example:
When the commit file command is used, changes will not
be enabled until after the next switch reboot.
8 You can also save your changes in real time to the
switch’s running memory by entering commit system at
the boot prompt:
Boot > boot serialwordsize 7
Boot > commit system
5 To change the stop bits value, enter boot serialstop-
bits, followed by the number of stop bits. Options include
1 (default) and 2. For example:
Boot > boot serialstopbits 2
6 Verify your current changes by entering show at the
boot prompt:
Boot > show
Edit buffer contents:
Serial (console) baud
Serial (console) parity
Serial (console) stopbits
Serial (console) wordsize
Caution. There are two important things to consider when
using the commit system command to save serial connection changes:
• Output to the terminal may become illegible due to
incompatible serial connection settings between the
switch and the terminal emulation software.
:
:
:
:
19200
even
2
7
• If you use the commit system command only, changes
will not be saved to the switch’s boot.params file and
will be lost if the switch is rebooted. To save changes
to the boot.params file, refer to step 7.
(additional table output not shown)
March 2005
Your First Login Session
27
9 Return to the CLI prompt by entering exit at the boot
prompt.
This completes the initial setup process. Your OmniSwitch
7700/7800 switch is now ready for additional configuration
and network operation. Refer to the following sections for
more information on using your switch, as well as additional
built-in features.
28
Your First Login Session
March 2005
CLI Basics
The Command Line Interface (CLI) allows you to configure
and monitor your switch by entering single-line commands.
The CLI can be accessed through terminal or Telnet sessions.
Note. Configuring the switch using the CLI is also
referred to as “online configuration.”
The following section provides basic information on CLI
assistance features. For detailed information on the CLI,
including syntax conventions, usage rules, command documentation, and a quick reference card, refer to the OmniSwitch
CLI Reference Guide and the Switch Management Guide.
Note. The software supports vt100 terminal emulation;
CLI assistance features may be limited if your terminal
emulation software is using a setting other than vt100.
Syntax Checking
If you make a mistake while entering command syntax, the
CLI provides clues about how to correct the error. Whenever a
command error is entered, two indicators are displayed:
• An Error message describing the type of error.
• A carat (^) character indicating where the error
occurred.
CLI Assistance Features
The CLI provides built-in features that assist you while entering commands. These features include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Syntax checking
Command line help
Partial keyword completion
Deleting and inserting characters
Previous command recall
Prefix recognition
Prefix prompt
Command history and command logging
March 2005
For example, the syntax
-> show vlan router port mac status
results in the following error:
-> show vlan router port mac status
^
ERROR: Invalid entry: "port"
Because port is not valid syntax for the command, the error
message shows it as an invalid entry and the carat indicates
where the problem has occurred. For this example, the valid
command syntax is
-> show vlan router mac status
CLI Basics
29
Command Line (?) Help
Partial Keyword Completion
The CLI provides additional help in the form of the question
mark (?) character. The ? character provides information that
helps you build your command syntax. For example, if you
enter
The CLI has a partial keyword recognition feature. Instead of
typing an entire keyword, you can type only the minimum
number of characters needed to uniquely identify the keyword,
then press the Tab key. The CLI will complete the keyword
and place the cursor at the end of the command line.
-> show vlan router
at the command line and are unsure of the next keyword, you
can enter the ? character for additional options (be sure to
include a space between the last keyword and the ? character):
-> show vlan router ?
^
MAC IP
(Vlan Manager Command Set)
The carat character (^) indicates the point where you invoked
the command line help. Possible keyword options, along with
the corresponding command set, are displayed. Here, you can
continue building the command by entering either mac or ip.
Some command completion options may indicate user-defined
information. For example: <string>, <slot/port>,
<hh:mm:ss>, etc. The option <cr> indicates that the
command can be completed by pressing Enter.
If you do not enter enough characters to uniquely identify the
keyword, pressing the Tab key will have no effect.
If you enter characters that do not belong to an applicable
keyword, pressing the Tab key will remove the characters and
place the cursor back to its previous position.
Deleting Characters
You can delete CLI command characters by using the Backspace key or the Delete key. The Backspace key deletes each
character in the line, one at a time, from right to left.
To change incorrect syntax with the Delete key, use the Left
Arrow key to move the cursor to the left of the character to be
deleted, then use the Delete key to remove characters to the
right of the cursor.
Note. The ? character can be entered at any time. In addition, you can type the ? character alone at the CLI prompt
to display root keywords for all command sets.
30
CLI Basics
March 2005
Inserting Characters
Prefix Recognition
To insert a character between characters that are already typed,
use the Left and Right Arrow keys to place the cursor into
position, then type the new character. Once the syntax is
correct, execute the command by pressing Enter. In the
following example, the user enters the wrong syntax to execute
a command. The result is an error message.
Prefix recognition is a CLI feature that reduces redundant
command line entry by storing commonly-used prefix information for certain commands. The CLI assumes this stored
prefix information when the next command is entered. For
example, if you enter
-> vlan 32
-> show micrcode
^
ERROR: Invalid entry: "micrcode"
To correct the syntax without retyping the entire command
line, use the !! command to recall the previous syntax. Then,
use the Left Arrow key to position the cursor between the “r”
and the “c” characters. To insert the missing character for this
example, type “o” as shown:
-> !!
-> show microcode
Previous Command Recall
at the command line, the CLI will store the vlan 32 prefix
information.
The following command families support prefix recognition:
• AAA
• Interface
• Link Aggregation
• Quality of Service (QoS)
• Spanning Tree
To recall the last command executed by the switch, press the
Up Arrow key at the prompt and the previous command will
display on your screen. You can execute the command again
by pressing Enter or you can edit it first by deleting or inserting characters.
March 2005
• VLAN Management
CLI Basics
31
Prefix Prompt
You can set the CLI to display the current command prefix as
the command prompt by entering the following command:
-> prompt prefix
After entering this command, your command prompt will
include current stored prefix information until a new prompt is
specified. For example, the following is a prompt for a user
who has begun configuring VLAN 32:
-> vlan 32
To set the prompt back to the default arrow ( -> ), enter the
following syntax, exactly as shown, at the prefix prompt:
prompt string ->
Command History
You can view a list of up to 30 of the most recently executed
commands via the show history command. For example:
-> show history
1 show cmm
2 show fan
3 show sensor
4 show temperature
5 ip load dvmrp
6 show arp
7 show cmm
8 show fan
9 show sensor
10 show temperature
32
CLI Basics
11 ip load dvmrp
12 show arp
13 show history
Note that the most recent commands are displayed lower in the
list. For this reason, the show history command will always be
listed last.
You can recall commands from the history list by entering an
exclamation point ( ! ). For example:
-> !4
-> show temperature
The CLI prints the fourth command from the history list (in
this case, show temperature) at the CLI prompt.
You can also recall the last command in the history list by
entering two exclamation points ( !! ). For example:
-> !!
-> show history
To specify the number of commands displayed in the history
list (1 - 30), use the history size command. For example:
-> history size 10
To view the current history list settings, use the show history
parameters command. For example:
-> show history parameters
History size: 30
CurrentSize: 10
Index Range: 1-10
March 2005
Command Logging
OmniSwitch 7700/7800 switches provide command logging.
This feature allows users to record up to 100 of the most recent
commands entered via Telnet and console sessions. In addition to a list of commands entered, the results of each
command entry are recorded. Results include information such
as whether a command was executed successfully, or whether
a syntax or configuration error occurred.
Note. The command history feature differs from the
command logging feature in that command history buffers up to 30 of the most recent commands. The command
information is not written to a separate log file. Also, the
command history feature includes only general keyword
syntax (i.e., it does not record full syntax, date and time,
session IP address, and entry results). For more information on command history, refer to page 32.
When command logging is enabled via the command-log
enable syntax, a file called command.log is automatically
created in the switch’s /flash directory. Once enabled, configuration commands entered on the command line will be
recorded to this file until command logging is disabled.
The command.log file has a 66402 byte capacity. This capacity allows up to 100 of the most recent commands to be
recorded. Because all CLI command logging information is
archived to the command.log file, command history information will be lost if the file is deleted.
Note. The command.log file cannot be deleted while the
command logging feature is enabled. Before attempting to
remove the file, be sure to disable command logging.
For detailed information on command logging, refer to “Using
the CLI” in the Switch Management Guide.
Refer to the sections below for more information on configuring and using CLI command logging. For detailed information
related to command logging commands, refer to the
OmniSwitch CLI Reference Guide.
Enabling Command Logging
By default, command logging is disabled. To enable command
logging on the switch, enter the following command:
-> command-log enable
March 2005
CLI Basics
33
Common CLI Commands
The following table lists some basic CLI commands that will
help you get acquainted with the CLI interface. Enter each
command exactly as shown. For complete descriptions of
these commands, refer to your CLI Reference Guide.
write memory
Saves current configuration
changes to the /flash/working
directory’s boot.cfg file. For
more information, refer to
page 26.
show running-directory Displays the current running
directory. For more information, refer to page 39.
34
vlan
Creates a new VLAN.
show vlan
Displays a list of VLANs
configured on the switch.
ip interface
Configures an IP interface to
enable IP routing on a VLAN.
show chassis
Displays basic configuration
and status information for the
switch chassis.
show module
Displays basic information for
switches in a stacked configuration.
show ni
Displays basic hardware and
status information for a standalone switch, or for all
switches installed in a stacked
configuration.
CLI Basics
show cmm
Displays basic hardware and
status information for a standalone switch, or for the primary
or secondary switches installed
in a stacked configuration.
show system
Displays basic information
about the switch.
show microcode
Displays the version of
software currently installed on
the switch.
session timeout
Modifies the amount of time
before Telnet and console
sessions time out.
who
Displays all active login
sessions (e.g., Console, Telnet,
FTP, HTTP, Secure Shell,
Secure Shell FTP)
exit
Ends the current Telnet or
console session.
March 2005
Offline Configuring
Scheduling a Configuration File to be
Applied at a Later Time
You can configure OmniSwitch 7700/7800 switches using an
ASCII-based text file. This is referred to as offline configuring. With offline configuring, CLI commands may be typed
into a text document (referred to as a text-based configuration
file) and then uploaded and applied to the switch.
You can apply a file to the switch immediately, or you can
schedule a file to be applied either at a specific date and time
or after a specific amount of time has passed. Timer sessions
can greatly facilitate maintenance tasks such as synchronized
batch updates.
An ASCII-based configuration file can be viewed or edited at
any time using a standard text editor (e.g., WordPad). The
switch also offers its own text editing buffer, so a file can be
edited in the flash file directory without having to be downloaded to a workstation.
Because they are portable, stand-alone documents, configuration files allow users to easily clone switch configurations.
Moreover, the ability to store a broad range of network information in a single text file facilitates troubleshooting, testing,
and overall network readability.
Syntax Checking
Offline configuration includes a syntax check feature. This
function will report syntax errors or typos that might cause a
command to be rejected by the switch when a configuration
file is applied.
March 2005
Generating Snapshots of the
Current Configuration
A generated snapshot captures the switch’s current configuration settings in a single text file. Captured configuration
settings can then be viewed or edited offline at any time. Troubleshooting is greatly facilitated, as aggregate network information can be read at a glance.
Snapshot files can be used as configuration files for a single
switch or for multiple switches. This allows easy cloning of
switch configurations for networks requiring multiple, similarly-configured switches. Simply place the snapshot file in the
appropriate directory of the switch(es) you want to configure
and use the CLI to apply the file.
For detailed information on offline configuring and the
features described above, refer to the Switch Management
Guide.
CLI Basics
35
Files and Directories
Boot and Image Files
boot.cfg File
Although the switch’s flash memory can contain many file
types (e.g., log and snapshot files), there are three specific file
types that provide key switch and network functions. These
files include the boot.cfg file, the boot.params file, and image
(.img) files.
The boot.cfg file stores your network configuration parameters. When you first boot the switch, no boot.cfg file is
present. This file is automatically generated when you first
issue a write memory command to save your configuration
changes. The file is then automatically placed in the
/flash/working directory.
boot.params File
The boot.params file provides IP address, gateway, and mask
information for the switch’s Ethernet Management Port
(EMP). This information is required for direct Ethernet
connections to the switch’s primary CMM.
This file also contains default console port parameters (baud
rate, etc.) and can be modified via the modify boot parameters CLI command.
In order to be read by the switch, the boot.params file must be
placed in the /flash directory. If the file is deleted for any
reason, a new boot.params file will be automatically generated on the next system boot. However, all user-configured
information, such as IP address, gateway, and mask information, will be lost. Therefore, it is recommended that you keep a
backup copy of this file at all times.
36
Files and Directories
Important. Your switch must be running from the
/flash/working directory in order to save changes to the
boot.cfg file. Refer to “Working and Certified Directories” on page 38 for more information.
Once the configuration parameters stored in the boot.cfg file
are considered tested and reliable, the file can be copied to the
certified directory and become part of the “last known good”
software for the switch.
If all copies of this file are deleted and a system boot occurs,
your network configuration will be lost. Therefore, it is recommended that you keep a backup copy of this file at all times.
March 2005
Image Files
Image files (those files with .img extensions) contain executable code that provides support for the system, NI modules,
and network functions. In other words, they serve as essential
drivers for switch and network operations.
Although these files may be backed up to the root flash directory or any user-defined subdirectory, they must be present in
the /flash/working and /flash/certified directories for the
switch to operate and pass traffic.
If you delete all copies of an image file, you will be required to
contact Alcatel Customer Support for replacements. Therefore, it is recommended that you keep backup copies on your
computer’s hard drive or a locally-accessible server.
For a complete list of OmniSwitch 7700/7800 image files,
along with their functions, refer to the table below.
Feni.img
Provides support for 10/100, Fast Ethernet, and Gigabit Ethernet.
Fdiag.img
Provides enhanced hardware diagnostics
for the switch.
Fadvrout.img
Alcatel’s Advanced Routing software
package. Optional.
Fsecu.img
Provides enhanced security features for
the switch (e.g., Authenticated VLANs
(AVLANs).
Fweb.img
Provides support for the WebView software application.
Fwebl2eth.img
Provides WebView configuration of
Layer 2 features.
Fwebrout.img
Provides WebView configuration of
basic routing features.
Fwebqos.img
Provides WebView configuration of
Quality of Service (QoS) features.
Fos.img
Contains the OmniSwitch 7700/7800
operating system software.
Fwebadvrout.img
Enables WebView configuration of Alcatel’s Advanced Routing. Optional.
Fbase.img
Contains base code for the switch.
Fwebsecu.img
Frelease.img
Contains release number information for
the system software package.
Provides WebView configuration of
enhanced security features for the switch.
Fl2eth.img
Provides support for Layer 2 switching
functions.
Frout.img
Provides support for Layer 3 routing
functions.
Fqos.img
Provides Quality of Service (QoS) functionality.
March 2005
Files and Directories
37
Working and Certified
Directories
OmniSwitch 7700/7800 switches are shipped with 32 MB of
flash memory. This memory is used to store files, including
boot and image files, that are used for switch operations.
The /flash directory contains two subdirectories: /working and
/certified. These directories work together to provide the
image rollback resiliency feature. Image rollback allows the
switch to return to a prior “last known good” version of software in the event of a system software problem.
configuring your switch are saved to the boot.cfg file in the
/flash/working directory.
Once the /flash/working directory’s configuration and image
files are road-tested and considered valid and reliable for your
network, they can be copied to the /flash/certified directory.
Certified Directory
Certified Directory
Intended for: Reliable, Tested configuration
and image files. The switch will roll back
to this software in the event of a system
software error.
On reload: By default, the switch will use
the software in this directory if there are
any differences between the Working and
Certified directories.
Working Directory
Working Directory
Intended for: Files that are being configured
and tested. Once these files are considered
valid and reliable, they can be copied to
the Certified directory.
On reload: If the Working and Certified
directories are identical, the switch will
automatically run from software in this
directory. If the two directories are not
identical, you can instruct the switch to run
from the Working directory by issuing the
reload working command.
Saving changes: You can save configuration changes to the Working directory
via the write memory command.
Saving changes: You cannot save configuration changes to the Certified directory.
To save your changes, be sure that your
switch is operating from the Working
directory.
The software in the /flash/certified directory should be treated
as the “gold master” for the switch. When you place configuration and image files in this directory, you are “certifying”
them as tested and reliable. If the switch is running from the
/flash/working directory and experiences a software problem,
it will “roll back” to the last known good software in the
/flash/certified directory on the next reboot.
The /flash/working directory is intended for software that is
still being configured for your network. Changes made while
38
Files and Directories
March 2005
How can I tell which directory the switch is currently
using?
When you first boot the switch, the /flash/working directory is
used; this allows you to save your initial configuration changes
to the boot.cfg file. However, subsequent boots may result in
your switch running from the /flash/certified directory. Therefore, verifying the current running directory is a key step any
time you are configuring or monitoring the switch.
View the current directory by entering the show runningdirectory command. For example:
-> show running-directory
CONFIGURATION STATUS
Running CMM
CMM Mode
Current CMM Slot
Running configuration
Certify/Restore Status
SYNCHRONIZATION STATUS
Flash Between CMMs
Running Configuration
NIs Reload On Takeover
:
:
:
:
:
PRIMARY,
DUAL CMMs,
A,
WORKING,
CERTIFY NEEDED
: NOT SYNCHRONIZED,
: SYNCHRONIZED,
: ALL NIs
In this example, the switch is using the /flash/working directory.
Can I save changes to the Certified directory?
No. The /flash/certified directory is intended to store only
tested, reliable configuration and image files. Configuration
changes must be saved to the boot.cfg file in the
/flash/working directory. Once those changes have been roadMarch 2005
tested, the contents of the /flash/working directory can be
copied to the /flash/certified directory via the copy working
certified command.
What happens when the switch boots?
During the boot process, the switch compares the contents of
the /flash/working and /flash/certified directories. Based on
this comparison, the switch determines which directory to use
as its running software.
Working and Certified Are Identical
If the software in the /flash/working and /flash/certified
directories are completely identical, the switch considers the
software in both directories to be equally reliable. In this case,
the switch will run from the /flash/working directory.
Working
Directory
Working and Certified
contents are identical.
boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Frelease.img
Etc.
Certified
Directory
boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Frelease.img
Etc.
The switch runs
from Working.
Working
Directory
boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Frelease.img
Etc.
Certified
Directory
boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Frelease.img
Etc.
When the switch is running from the /flash/working directory
software, configuration changes can be saved via the
write memory command.
Files and Directories
39
My Working and Certified directories are different. Can
I force a reboot from the Working directory?
Working and Certified Are Different
If the software in the /flash/working directory differs even
slightly from the software in the /flash/certified directory, the
switch will automatically run from the /flash/certified directory
Working
Directory
Working and Certified
contents are different.
Working
Directory
revised_boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Frelease.img
Etc.
Certified
Directory
boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Frelease.img
Etc.
Yes. If its configuration and image files are known to be reliable, you can override the default and initiate a reboot from the
/flash/working directory. This is done via the reload
working command. For more information, refer to your CLI
Reference Guide.
boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Frelease.img
Etc.
The switch runs
from Certified.
Certified
Directory
boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Frelease.img
Etc.
Working
Directory
Working and Certified
contents are different.
revised_boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Frelease.img
Etc.
Certified
Directory
boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Frelease.img
Etc.
The reload working
command overrides
the default; the
switch runs from
Working.
Working
Directory
revised_boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Frelease.img
Etc.
Certified
Directory
boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Frelease.img
Etc.
When the switch runs from the /flash/certified directory,
configuration changes cannot be saved via the write memory
command
Note. For detailed information on using directories, refer
to the Switch Management Guide.
40
Files and Directories
March 2005
Loading Software
The following section describes the procedure for loading new
release software to your switch. Note that the procedure varies
slightly for non-redundant (single CMM) and redundant (dual
CMM) configurations. Follow the steps that apply to your
system.
3 Using your FTP client or the CLI’s rm command,
delete all .img files from the /flash/working directory.
You can use the asterisk (*) wildcard to delete all .img
files at once. For example:
-> rm working/*.img
Note. For detailed information on loading software and
working with directories in both non-redundant and redundant CMM configurations, refer to the Switch Management Guide.
Non-Redundant Configurations
Important. Do not delete the boot.cfg file. Otherwise,
any configuration changes you have saved will be lost.
Also, do not delete files from the /flash/certified directory.
4 Using your FTP client, upload all required .img files
from the new software release to the /flash/working directory.
1 Verify that all required image files from the new software release are located on your computer’s hard drive or
a locally-accessible server.
2 Establish an FTP session to the switch, then access the
/flash/working directory.
Note. Before attempting to establish an FTP session, be
sure that you have first unlocked the FTP session type via
the aaa authentication command. Otherwise, an FTP
login error will occur. See “Unlocking Session Types” on
page 22 for more information.
March 2005
CMM
FTP
Working Directory
boot.cfg
Fbase.img
Fos.img
Frelease.img
Feni.img
Additional
required files
Loading Software
41
5 Use the install command after the software files have
been transferred to the switch via FTP. For example:
Redundant Configurations
1 Verify that the OK1 LED is solid green and the OK2
-> install /flash/working/*.img
Note. For more information on the install command, refer
to the Switch Management Guide or the CLI Reference
Guide.
LED is flashing green on both the primary and secondary
CMM modules.
2 Next, verify that all required image files from the new
software release are located on your computer’s hard drive
or a locally-accessible server.
3 Establish an FTP session to the switch, then access the
6 Reload the switch from the /flash/working directory.
/flash/working directory.
To do this, enter
-> reload working no rollback-timeout
at the CLI prompt.
Note. This reload process will take a few moments to
complete.
Note. Before attempting to establish an FTP session, be
sure that you have first unlocked the FTP session type via
the aaa authentication command. Otherwise, an FTP
login error will occur. See “Unlocking Session Types” on
page 22 for more information.
4 Using your FTP client or the CLI’s rm command,
Following the reload, the switch will come up running
from the /flash/working directory (i.e., the new release
software) until the next system reboot. Meanwhile, the
software in the /flash/certified directory remains
unchanged and available as a last known good version if
an error should occur with the new software.
Once the release software is considered valid and reliable
with your network configuration, the contents of the
/flash/working directory can be copied to the
/flash/certified directory via the copy working certified
command.
42
Loading Software
delete all .img files from the /flash/working directory on
the primary CMM. (To determine whether you are logged
into the primary CMM, use the show running-directory
command.) You can use the asterisk (*) wildcard to delete
all .img files at once. For example:
-> rm working/*.img
Important. Do not delete the boot.cfg file. Otherwise,
any configuration changes you have saved will be lost.
Also, do not delete files from the /flash/certified directory.
March 2005
5 Using your FTP client, upload all required .img files
from the new software release to the primary CMM’s
/flash/working directory.
6 Use the install command after the software files have
been transferred to the switch via FTP. For example:
-> install /flash/working/*.img
Note. For more information on the install command, refer
to the Switch Management Guide or the CLI Reference
Guide.
7 Reload the switch from the /flash/working directory.
To do this, enter
-> reload working no rollback-timeout
During this reload, the secondary CMM takes over the primary
role and the switch runs from the /flash/working directory
(i.e., the new release software) until the next system reboot.
Meanwhile, the software in the /flash/certified directory
remains unchanged and available as a last known good version
if an error should occur with the new software.
Once the release software is considered valid and reliable with
your network configuration, the contents of the /flash/working directory can be copied to the /flash/certified directory of
each CMM by entering the following command:
-> copy working certified flash-synchro
This command provides two functions. It copies all contents
from /flash/working to the /flash/certified directory on the
primary CMM, and it copies all directory contents from the
primary CMM to the secondary CMM and synchronizes the
two modules. This helps to ensure effective CMM redundancy.
at the CLI prompt.
Note. This reload process will take a few moments to
complete.
March 2005
Note. The process initialized by the copy working
certified flash-synchro command will take a few
moments to complete.
Loading Software
43
Using WebView
The switch can be configured and monitored using WebView,
Alcatel’s Web-based device management tool. WebView software is pre-installed in the switch; you are not required to load
additional software.
Required Image Files
In order to access WebView, the following image files must be
present in the current running directory:
• Fweb.img
Note. Although WebView software is pre-installed, you
must first enable HTTP sessions for your switch before
you can log in. Refer to “Unlocking Session Types” on
page 22 for more information.
• Fwebl2eth.img
• Fwebrout.img
• Fwebqos.img
• Fwebadvrout.img
Browser Compatibility
• Fwebsecu.img
Refer to “Image Files” on page 37 for more information.
WebView has been tested on the following Web browsers:
• Internet Explorer 6.0 for Windows 2000, Windows NT,
Windows XP
• Netscape 4.79 for Solaris 2.8, HP-UX 11.0
• Netscape 7.1 for Windows 2000, Windows NT,
Solaris 2.8
44
Using WebView
March 2005
Logging In to WebView
Note. Before attempting to establish a WebView session,
be sure that you have first unlocked the HTTP session
type via the aaa authentication command. Otherwise, a
login error will occur. See “Unlocking Session Types” on
page 22 for more information.
Remember, if you have already changed the user name and
password for your switch, be sure to use the new information.
If you have not changed your user name or password, the
factory defaults are admin and switch, respectively. Refer to
the Switch Management Guide for information on modifying
the default user name and password.
Navigating WebView
To access WebView and log in to a switch:
1 Open any Alcatel-tested Web browser (see page 44).
After you have successfully logged in, the Chassis Management home page displays:
2 Enter the switch’s IP address in the browser’s
“Address” text field (“Location:” for Netscape users). The
login screen displays:
The Chassis Management home page provides a physical
representation of the switch, as well as basic system information. This is the main launching point for WebView.
3 Enter the user name and password at the login prompt.
March 2005
Using WebView
45
Navigate the application by clicking on the “Configuration
Group” buttons in the left-hand toolbar
Refine your navigation by selecting “Configuration Options”
for each group from the items displayed in the grey, horizontal navigation bar:
“Configuration
Options” Toolbar.
(In this case, the option
“Device” has been selected.)
Main “Configuration
Group” Toolbar.
(In this case, the group
“Health” has been selected.)
46
Using WebView
Site Maps. WebView also provides site maps for each
configuration group. Site maps allow you to view
complete page contents under each feature. By providing
quick, easy access to specific pages, site maps can reduce
time spent searching through the WebView application.
To access site maps, click the “Site Map” link included on
each configuration group Home page, (e.g., Health).
March 2005
Online Help
Troubleshooting
General online help is available through the main Help link
located in the top WebView banner:
The WebView login screen does not display.
This suggests either a physical or network connection issue.
Try the following options:
• Be sure that you have a good physical Ethernet cable
connection to the Ethernet port used for managing the
switch (EMP or NI port).
• Be sure your computer has a valid Ethernet connection
and IP address. See page 21 for information on configuring the IP address for the EMP.
General Help Link
Detailed, context-based help is provided for each status table
and configuration dialog window:
• Verify that all required WebView image files are
installed in the current running directory. See page 44
for more information.
The login screen displays, but my login attempt fails.
This suggests either a user name and password or Authenticated Switch Access error. Try the following options:
• Check that you are using the correct user name and
Context-specific Help
button.
(In this case, for the VLAN
Administration table.)
password. If you have already changed the user name
and password for your switch, be sure to use the new
information. If you have not changed the user name
and password, the factory defaults are admin and
switch, respectively.
• Be sure that you have “unlocked” HTTP sessions on
Additional Information
the switch. To unlock HTTP sessions, enter the following command:
For more information on using WebView, refer to “Using
WebView” in the Switch Management Guide.
-> aaa authentication http local
See page 22 for information on unlocking session types.
March 2005
Using WebView
47
Hardware Basics
Chassis Slot Numbering
The term “slot” refers to the position at which a module is
installed in the chassis. CMM slot positions are designated as
Slots A and B. For the OS7700, NI slot numbers range from 1
to 8. For the OS7800, NI slot numbers range from 1 to 16.
Power supply bays are also given specific slot numbers. For
the OS7700, slot numbers are designated PS-1 through PS-3,
from top to bottom. For the OS7800, slot numbers are designated PS-1 through PS-4, from top to bottom.
TM
CMM
NI
CMM
1
2
3
4
9
10
11
12
A
NI
B
PWR
5
6
7
8
13
14
15
16
PS1
PS2
PS3
PS4
PS-1
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8
NI
2
PS-2
A B
PWR
B
PS1
PS2
PS3
PS-1
NI
3
5
4
6
7
8
A B
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8
PS-2
PS-3
OmniSwitch 7700 Slot Numbering
48
OmniSwitch 7800
OmniSwitch 7700
A
1
TM
Hardware Basics
9 10 1112
1314 15 16
PS-3
PS-4
OmniSwitch 7800 Slot Numbering
March 2005
Chassis Management
Module (CMM)
The Chassis Management Module (CMM) is the management
unit for OmniSwitch 7700/7800 switches. In its role as the
management unit, the CMM provides key system services,
including:
• Console, modem, and Ethernet management port
connections to the switch
• Software and configuration management, including the
Command Line Interface (CLI)
• Web-based management (WebView)
CMM Redundancy
CMM redundancy is an important resiliency feature. For
CMM redundancy, two fully-operational CMM modules must
be installed in the chassis at all times.
When two CMMs are running in the switch, one CMM has the
primary role and one CMM has the secondary role at any
given time. The primary CMM manages the current switch
operations while the secondary CMM provides backup (also
referred to as “failover”).
Note. By default, the CMM in slot A automatically
assumes the primary role. Refer to pages 48 or 50 for
CMM slot A and B positions.
• SNMP management
• Power management
If the primary CMM fails or goes offline for any reason, the
secondary CMM is notified. The secondary CMM then automatically assumes the primary role.
• Temperature management
• Switch diagnostics
For important information on CMM redundancy, refer to your
Hardware Users Guide.
• Important availability features, including redundancy
(when used in conjunction with another CMM) and
image rollback.
March 2005
Hardware Basics
49
CMM Slot Locations
CMM Slot A
CMM Slot B
CMM Slot A
CMM Slot B
OmniSwitch 7700
50
Hardware Basics
OmniSwitch 7800
March 2005
CMM Front Panel
OS7700-CMM
Module Status LEDs
OK1. Hardware Status. Displays solid green when powered on and
the CMM has passed hardware diagnostic tests. Displays solid
amber when powered on and the CMM has failed hardware diagnostic tests.
OK2. Software Status. Blinks green when the CMM is operational.
Displays solid amber when a system software failure occurs. Blinks
amber when the software is in a transitional state (e.g., when software is being downloaded to the switch).
Module
Redundancy LEDs
PRI. Displays solid green when the CMM is the primary (active)
management module.
Status
LEDs
OK1
OK2
PRI
SEC
TEMP
FAN
SEC. Displays solid green when the CMM is the secondary
(backup) management module. For detailed information on CMM
redundancy, refer to your Hardware Users Guide.
Temperature/Fan Status LEDs
TEMP. Displays solid green when the CMM is operating within the
allowed ambient temperature range. Displays solid amber if a temperature error occurs (i.e., the CMM is operating outside the temperature
range). Refer to the Hardware Users Guide for more information.
CONSOLE
/MODEM
Console/Modem Port. The CMM’s front panel provides one RS232 port for console or modem connections. By default, this female DB-9 connector provides
a DCE console connection. However, by changing the
onboard jumper setting, the port can be changed to a
DTE modem connection.
For detailed information on changing the jumper setting, refer to your Hardware Users Guide.
EMP
FAN. Displays solid green when all fans in the fan tray are running at
normal speed. Displays solid amber if a fan error occurs (i.e., one or
more fans are not running at normal speed).
Ethernet Management Port LEDs
LINK. Link Integrity Status. Displays solid green when an Ethernet
cable connection exists at the CMM’s Ethernet Management Port.
ACT. Flashes green as data is transmitted or received on the CMM’s
Ethernet Management Port.
March 2005
LINK
ACT
Ethernet Management Port (EMP). The CMM’s
front panel also provides one Ethernet 10/100BaseT
port (copper RJ-45). This port provides out-of-band
network management and can be used for Telnet sessions, switch diagnostics, and for downloading software to the switch.
This 10/100BaseT port supports both 10BaseT and
100BaseT with auto-negotiation through the RJ-45
connector.
Hardware Basics
51
Network Interface (NI)
Modules
The following section outlines front panel information for
Network Interface (NI) modules, including LED and port
descriptions. For detailed information on all modules, refer to
your Hardware Users Guide.
ENI Modules
Ethernet Network Interface (ENI) modules provide Ethernet
connectivity and are available in the following port configurations:
• OS7-ENI-C24. Provides 24 twisted-pair ports, auto-
negotiating and individually configurable as 10BaseT or
100BaseTX.
GNI Modules
The Gigabit Ethernet Network Interface (GNI) modules
provide up to twelve 1000 Mbps (1 Gbps) connections per
module. GNI modules can be used for backbone connections
in networks where Gigabit Ethernet is used as the backbone
media. GNI modules can also be used in the wiring closet for
connections to workstations and other devices.
• OS7-GNI-U2. Provides two slots for use with hot-
swappable GBICs. Refer to “Gigabit Interface Converters
(GBICs)” on page 53 for information on connections
supported by GBICs.
• OS7-GNI-U12. Provides 12 slots for use with hot-
swappable MiniGBICs. Refer to “Miniature Gigabit Interface Converters (MiniGBICs)” on page 53 for information
on connections supported by MiniGBICs.
• OS7-GNI-C12. Provides 12 auto-sensing copper ports
• OS7-ENI-FM12. Provides 12 100BaseFX (fiber) ports.
(10/100/1000BaseT).
• OS7-ENI-P24. Provides 24 Ethernet ports for use with
Power over (PoE) configurations. These PoE ports are
twisted-pair and are individually configurable as 10BaseT
or 100BaseTX.
52
Hardware Basics
March 2005
Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs)
The OS7-GNI-U2 module provides two Gigabit Interface
Converters (GBIC) slots. A GBIC is a Gigabit Ethernet port
module that is hot-pluggable—i.e., it can be installed or
removed while the GNI is powered on and operating without
the risk of damage to the GBIC module or the host circuitry.
When a GBIC is installed, the switch automatically gathers
basic GBIC information via the connector’s serial E2PROM
interface. This information includes the GBIC’s capabilities,
standard interfaces, manufacturer, and other information.
The following GBIC types are available for OS7-GNI-U2
modules:
• GBIC-SX—1000BaseSX multimode fiber, supports
distances up to 550 meters; uses SC connectors
• GBIC-LX—1000BaseLX single mode fiber, supports
distances up to 10 km; uses SC connectors
• GBIC-LH-70—1000BaseLH long haul single mode
fiber, supports distances up to 70 km; uses SC connectors
• GBIC-C—1000BaseT copper connection, supports
distances up to 100 meters; uses one RJ-45 connector
Customers should use only Alcatel-provided GBIC modules.
Third party GBIC modules not provided by Alcatel are not
guaranteed to work properly.
Note. For information in installing GBIC modules, refer to
“Installing GBIC Connectors” on page 15.
March 2005
Miniature Gigabit Interface Converters
(MiniGBICs)
The OS7-GNI-U12 module provides 12 MiniGBIC slots. A
MiniGBIC is a Gigabit Ethernet port module that is hot-pluggable—i.e., it can be installed or removed while the GNI is
powered on and operating without the risk of damage to the
MiniGBIC module or the host circuitry.
When a MiniGBIC is installed, the switch automatically gathers basic MiniGBIC information via the connector’s serial
E2PROM interface. This information includes the MiniGBIC’s capabilities, standard interfaces, manufacturer, and
other information.
The following MiniGBIC types are available for OS7-GNIU12 modules:
• MINIGBIC-SX—1000BaseSX multimode fiber,
supports distances up to 550 meters; uses LC connectors
• MINIGBIC-LX—1000BaseLX single mode fiber,
supports distances up to 10 km; uses LC connectors
• MINIGBIC-LH-70—1000BaseLH long haul single
mode fiber, supports distances up to 70 km; uses LC
connectors
Customers should use only Alcatel-provided MiniGBIC
modules. Third party MiniGBIC modules not provided by
Alcatel are not guaranteed to work properly.
Note. For information in installing MiniGBIC modules,
refer to “Installing MiniGBIC Connectors” on page 15.
Hardware Basics
53
OS7-ENI-C24 Front Panel
1x
3x
5x
7x
9x
11x
13x
16x
15x
18x
17x
20x
19x
22x
21x
Ethernet Ports
The OS7-ENI-C24 module provides 24 Ethernet ports.
These ports are twisted-pair and are individually configurable as 10BaseT or 100BaseTX. The ports use RJ45 connectors.
23x
Hardware Basics
14x
54
12x
Ethernet Port
10x
LED Location
8x
Refer to the illustration below for the LED locations on each
Ethernet port.
OK2
6x
Ethernet Port LEDs
Each Ethernet port has a built-in corresponding LED. This
LED indicates the link and activity status for each Ethernet
port. The LED displays green when a valid Ethernet cable
connection exists. Flashes green as data is transmitted or
received on the port.
OK1
4x
Module
Status
OK2. Software Status. Blinks green when the ENI is opera- LEDs
tional and has successfully loaded software. Displays solid
amber when powered on and the ENI has failed to load software.
OS7-ENI-C24
Module Status LEDs
OK1. Hardware Status. Displays solid green when powered
on and the ENI has passed hardware diagnostic tests. Displays solid amber when powered on and the ENI has failed
hardware diagnostic tests.
March 2005
OS7-ENI-FM12 Front Panel
OK2. Software Status. Blinks green when
the ENI is operational and has successfully
loaded software. Displays solid amber
when powered on and the ENI has failed to
load software.
Ethernet Port LEDs
Each fiber-based Ethernet port has a corresponding LED. This LED indicates the link
and activity status for each Ethernet port.
The LED displays green when a valid
Ethernet cable connection exists. Flashes
green as data is transmitted or received on
the port.
Module
Status
LEDs
OK1
OS7-ENI-FM12
Module Status LEDs
OK1. Hardware Status. Displays solid
green when powered on and the ENI has
passed hardware diagnostic tests. Displays
solid amber when powered on and the ENI
has failed hardware diagnostic tests.
OK2
1
2
3
Ethernet Ports
The OS7-ENI-FM12 module provides 12 100BaseFX
Ethernet ports. The ports use MT-RJ connectors.
4
5
6
7
8
9
Note
Refer to your Hardware Users Guide for information
on proper handling of MT-RJ connectors and fiberoptic cable.
10
11
12
March 2005
Hardware Basics
55
OS7-ENI-P24 Front Panel
OS7-ENI-P24
OK1. Hardware Status. Displays solid
green when powered on and the ENI has
passed hardware diagnostic tests. Displays
solid amber when powered on and the ENI
has failed hardware diagnostic tests.
OK1
OK2
1x
Module
Status
LEDs
2x
3x
5x
OK2. Software Status. Blinks green when
the ENI is operational and has successfully
loaded software. Displays solid amber
when powered on and the ENI has failed to
load software.
7x
Ethernet Port Link Status LEDs
Each Ethernet port has a built-in corresponding status LED located at the top of
the port. This LED indicates the link and
activity status for each Ethernet port. The
LED displays green when a valid Ethernet
cable connection exists. Flashes green as
data is transmitted or received on the port.
9x
11x
13x
15x
17x
The PoE ports are twisted-pair and are individually
configurable as 10BaseT or 100BaseTX. The ports use
RJ-45 connectors.
19x
21x
23x
Link Status LED
24x
Ethernet Port Power LEDs
Each Ethernet port has a built-in corresponding power port LED located at the
bottom of the port. This LED displays solid
green when power is properly supplied to
the port. Flashes green when there is an
overload or short. And this LED is off if
there is a power failure.
Power on LAN Ethernet Ports
The OS7-ENI-P24 module provides 24 Ethernet ports;
these ports can be used in conjunction with Alcatel’s
Power over Ethernet (PoE) feature. PoE provides
inline power to connected devices. Refer to “Managing
Power over Ethernet (PoE)” in the Hardware Users
Guide for detailed information on the feature.
Port Power LED
Ethernet Port
56
Hardware Basics
March 2005
OS7-GNI-U2 Front Panel
OK2. Software Status. Blinks green when
the GNI is operational and has successfully
loaded software. Displays solid amber
when powered on and the GNI has failed to
load software.
OS7-GNI-U2
Module Status LEDs
OK1. Hardware Status. Displays solid
green when powered on and the GNI has
passed hardware diagnostic tests. Displays
solid amber when powered on and the GNI
has failed hardware diagnostic tests.
OK1
OK2
Module
Status
LEDs
ACT
LINK
RX
Gigabit Ethernet Ports
The OS7-GNI-U2 module provides 2 GBIC slots.
These slots support the following GBIC types:
1
Gigabit Ethernet Port LEDs
ACT. Flashes green when data is transmitted or received on the corresponding Gigabit Ethernet port.
TX
• GBIC-SX—1000BaseSX multimode fiber,
supports distances up to 550 meters; uses
SC connectors
• GBIC-LX—1000BaseLX single mode fiber,
supports distances up to 10 km; uses SC connectors
ACT
LINK. Link Integrity Status. Displays solid
green when a fiber cable connection exists
at the corresponding Gigabit Ethernet port.
LINK
• GBIC-LH-70—1000BaseLH long haul fiber,
RX
2
TX
supports distances over 70 km (up to 100 km
using premium single mode fiber or dispersionshifted single mode fiber); uses SC connectors
• GBIC-C—1000BaseT copper connection,
supports distances up to 100 meters; uses one
RJ-45 connector
Note
Refer to your Hardware Users Guide for information on
proper handling of SC connectors and fiber-optic cable.
March 2005
Hardware Basics
57
OS7-GNI-U12 Front Panel
OK2. Software Status. Blinks green when
the GNI is operational and has successfully
loaded software. Displays solid amber
when powered on and the GNI has failed to
load software.
OS7-GNI-U12
Module Status LEDs
OK1. Hardware Status. Displays solid
green when powered on and the GNI has
passed hardware diagnostic tests. Displays
solid amber when powered on and the GNI
has failed hardware diagnostic tests.
OK1 OK2
Module
Status
LEDs
1
2
3
4
Gigabit Ethernet Port LEDs
Each fiber-based Gigabit Ethernet port has
a corresponding LED. This LED indicates
the link and activity status for each Gigabit
Ethernet port. The LED displays green
when a valid Gigabit Ethernet cable connection exists. Flashes green as data is
transmitted or received on the port.
5
Gigabit Ethernet Ports
The OS7-GNI-U12 module provides 12 MiniGBIC
slots. These slots support the following GBIC types:
• MINIGBIC-SX—1000BaseSX multimode fiber,
6
7
8
supports distances up to 550 meters; uses
LC connectors
• MINIGBIC-LX—1000BaseLX single mode
fiber, supports distances up to 10 km; uses LC
connectors
• MINIGBIC-LH-70—1000BaseLH long haul
9
fiber, supports distances up to 70 km; uses LC
connectors
10
11
12
58
Hardware Basics
Note
Refer to your Hardware Users Guide for information on
proper handling of LC connectors and fiber-optic cable.
March 2005
OS7-GNI-C12 Front Panel
OK2. Software Status. Blinks green when
the GNI is operational and has successfully
loaded software. Displays solid amber
when powered on and the GNI has failed to
load software.
Ethernet Port LEDs
Each Gigabit Ethernet port has two built-in
corresponding LEDs. The top LED indicates 10/100 Mbps link and activity status
for the port while the bottom LED indicates
1 Gigabit link and activity status for the
port. The appropriate LED displays green
when a valid Ethernet cable connection
exists. Flashes green as data is transmitted
or received on the port.
Module
Status
LEDs
OK1
OS7-GNI-C12
Module Status LEDs
OK1. Hardware Status. Displays solid
green when powered on and the GNI has
passed hardware diagnostic tests. Displays
solid amber when powered on and the GNI
has failed hardware diagnostic tests.
OK2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Ethernet Ports
The OS7-GNI-C12 module provides 12 10/100/
1000 Ethernet ports. These ports are twisted-pair
and are individually configurable as 10BaseT,
100BaseTX, or 1000BaseT. The ports use RJ-45
connectors.
9
10
11
12
March 2005
Hardware Basics
59
The CD that accompanies this Getting Started Guide contains
comprehensive Alcatel user documentation, including the
following manuals:
• OmniSwitch 7700/7800 Getting Started Guide
Describes the hardware and software procedures for
getting an OmniSwitch 7700/78000 up and running.
Also provides information on fundamental aspects of
OmniSwitch hardware components and software architecture.
• OmniSwitch 7700/7800/8800 Switch Management
Guide
Includes procedures for readying an individual switch
for integration into a network. Topics include the software directory architecture, image rollback protections, authenticated switch access, managing switch
files, system configuration, using SNMP, and using
web management software (WebView).
• OmniSwitch 7700/7800/8800 Network Configuration
Guide
• OmniSwitch 7700/7800 Hardware Users Guide
Complete technical specifications and procedures for
all OmniSwitch 7700/7800 chassis, power supplies,
fans, Chassis Management Modules (CMMs) and
Network Interface (NI) modules.
• OmniSwitch CLI Reference Guide
Includes network configuration procedures and
descriptive information on all the major software
features and protocols included in the base software
package. Chapters cover Layer 2 information (Ethernet and VLAN configuration), Layer 3 information
(routing protocols, such as RIP and IPX), security
options (authenticated VLANs), Quality of Service
(QoS), link aggregation, and server load balancing.
Complete reference to all CLI commands supported on
the OmniSwitch 7700/78000. Includes syntax definitions, default values, examples, usage guidelines, and
CLI-to-MIB variable mappings.
60
Hardware Basics
March 2005
User Documentation on CD
March 2005
User Documentation on CD
61
• OmniSwitch 7700/7800/8800 Advanced Routing
Configuration Guide
Includes network configuration procedures and
descriptive information on all the software features and
protocols included in the advanced routing software
package. Chapters cover multicast routing (DVMRP
and PIM-SM) and OSPF.
General Information
If you cannot locate a button with the document image behind
the binoculars (as shown), then the global search feature is not
available in the version of Acrobat Reader you are currently
using.
Printing PDFs. When printing pages from the documentation PDFs, de-select Fit to Page if it is selected in your
print dialog. Otherwise pages may print with slightly
smaller margins.
To load the CD and access the user documentation, refer to the
instructions printed on the CD packaging.
All documentation is in PDF format and requires the Adobe
Acrobat Reader program for viewing. Acrobat Reader freeware is available at www.adobe.com.
Global Search. In order to take advantage of the documentation CD’s global search feature, it is recommended
that you select the option for searching PDF files when
downloading Acrobat Reader freeware from the Adobe
Website.
To verify that you are using Acrobat Reader with the global
search option, look for the following button in the toolbar:
62
User Documentation on CD
March 2005
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