Allied Air Enterprises 80G1UH2V Furnace User Manual

INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
A80UH2V & 80G1UH2V
Warm Air Gas Furnace
Upflow / Horizontal Left and Right Air Discharge
This manual must be left with the homeowner for future reference.
This is a safety alert symbol and should never be ignored. When you see this symbol on labels or in
manuals, be alert to the potential for personal injury or death.
WARNING
CAUTION
Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service or
maintenance can cause property damage, personal injury
or loss of life. Installation and service must be performed
by a licensed professional installer (or equivalent), service
agency or the gas supplier.
As with any mechanical equipment, personal injury can
result from contact with sharp sheet metal edges. Be
careful when you handle this equipment.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Unit Dimensions ............................................................ 2
A80UH2V & 80G1UH2V Parts Arrangement ................ 3
A80UH2V & 80G1UH2V Gas Furnace ......................... 4
Shipping and Packing List ............................................ 4
Safety Information ......................................................... 4
Use of Furnace as a Construction Heater .................... 5
General ......................................................................... 6
Combustion, Dilution, Ventilation Air ............................. 6
Setting Equipment ........................................................ 9
Filters .......................................................................... 12
Duct System ................................................................ 12
Venting ........................................................................ 13
Gas Piping .................................................................. 23
Electrical ..................................................................... 25
Thermostat .................................................................. 27
Unit Start-Up ............................................................... 30
Heating Sequence of Operation ................................. 31
Gas Pressure Adjustment ........................................... 33
High Altitude ................................................................ 34
Other Unit Adjustments ............................................... 34
Maintenance ............................................................... 33
Repair Parts List ......................................................... 37
Wiring Diagram ........................................................... 38
Manufactured By
Allied Air Enterprises, Inc.
A Lennox International, Inc. Company
215 Metropolitan Drive
West Columbia, SC 29170
*506471-01*
506471-01
Issue 1034
Page 1 of 41
A80UH2V & 80G1UH2V Unit Dimensions - inches (mm)
NOTE - 20C and 20D size units installed in upflow applications
that require air volumes of 1800 cfm (850 L/s or greater must
have one of the following:
1. Return air from single side transition will accommodate
20 x 25 x 1 in. (508 x 635 x 25 mm) cleanable air filter.
(Required to maintain proper air velocity.)
2. Single side return air with optional RAB Return Air Base
3. Return Air from bottom and one side.
4. Return air from both sides.
5. Return air from bottom.
2
Flue outlet may be horizontal but furnace must be vented
vertically.
3
Optional external side return air filter kit cannot be used with
the optional RAB Return Air Base.
1
* Consider sizing requirements for optional IAQ equipment before
cutting side return opening.
SIDE VIEW
FRONT VIEW
in.
070-12
14-1/2
090-12
090-16
090-20
Page 2 of 41
B
A
Model
A801UH2V/80G1UH2V
D
C
in.
mm
in.
368
13-3/8
340
13
330
4-3/4
121
17-1/2
446
16-3/8
416
16
406
6-1/4
159
110-20
21
533
19-7/8
504
19-1/2
495
8
203
135-20
24-1/2
622
546
23
584
9-3/4
248
mm
23-3/8
Issue 1034
mm
in.
mm
506471-01
EXPLODED VIEW
HEAT EXCHANGER
COMBUSTION AIR INDUCER
COMBUSTION AIR INDUCER
PRESSURE SWITCH
ROLLOUT SWITCH
GAS VALVE
BURNER BOX
CABINET
CONTROL BOX
ACCESS PANEL
BLOWER ASSEMBLY
Figure 1
506471-01
Issue 1034
Page 3 of 41
A80UH2V & 80G1UH2V Gas Furnace
The A80UH2V & 80G1UH2V gas furnace is shipped with
ready for installation in the upflow or horizontal position (left
or right). for horizontal left position the combustion air
pressure switch must be moved). The furnace is shipped
with the bottom panel in place. The bottom panel must be
removed if the unit is to be installed in a horizontal application.
The panel may also be removed in upflow applications.
The furnace is equipped for installation in natural gas
applications. A conversion kit (ordered separately) is required
for use in propane/LP gas applications.
Check equipment for shipping damage. If you find any
damage, immediately contact the last carrier.
Please refer to specification sheets for available accessories.
DANGER
As with any mechanical equipment, personal injury can
result from contact with sharp sheet metal edges. Be
careful when you handle this equipment.
Certifications
These units are CSA International certified to ANSI Z21.47.
In the USA, installation of gas furnaces must conform with
local building codes. In the absence of local codes, units
must be installed according to the current National Fuel Gas
Code (ANSI-Z223.1). The National Fuel Gas Code is
available from the following address: American National
Standards Institute, Inc., 11 West 42nd Street, New York,
NY 10036.
Shipping and Packing List
1 - Assembled Gas Furnace
1 - Bag assembly containing the following:
2 - Screws
3 - Wire nuts
1 - Snap bushing
1 - Snap Plug
1 - Wire tie
1 - Vent warning label
1 - Owner’s manual and warranty card
Safety Information
CAUTION
Clearances
Adequate clearance must be made around the air openings
into the vestibule area. In order to ensure proper unit
operation, combustion and ventilation air supply must be
provided according to the current National Fuel Gas Code.
Vent installations must be consistent with the venting tables
(in this instruction) and applicable provisions of local building
codes.
This furnace is CSA International certified for installation
clearances to combustible material as listed on the unit
nameplate and in the tables in Figures 7 and 11. Accessibility
and service clearances must take precedence over fire
protection clearances.
NOTE: For installation on combustible floors, the furnace
shall not be installed directly on carpeting, tile, or other
combustible material other than wood flooring.
DANGER OF EXPLOSION!
There are circumstances in which odorant used with
LP/Propane gas can lose its scent. In case of a leak,
LP/Propane gas will settle close to the floor and may be
difficult to smell. An LP/Propane leak detector should
be installed in all LP applications.
WARNING
Installed Locations
For installation in a residential garage, the furnace must be
installed so that the burner(s) and the ignition source are
located no less than 18 inches (457 mm) above the floor.
The furnace must be located or protected to avoid physical
damage by vehicles. When a furnace is installed in a public
garage, hangar, or other building that has a hazardous
atmosphere, the furnace must be installed according to
recommended good practice requirements and current
National Fuel Gas Code.
Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service or
maintenance can cause property damage, personal
injury or loss of life. Installation and service must be
performed by a licensed professional installer (or
equivalent), service agency or the gas supplier.
Page 4 of 41
Issue 1034
506471-01
Temperature Rise
NOTE: Furnace must be adjusted to obtain a temperature
rise within the range specified on the unit nameplate. Failure
to do so may cause erratic limit operation and may result in
premature heat exchanger failure.
This furnace must be installed so that its electrical
components are protected from water.
Installed in Combination with a Cooling Coil
When this furnace is used with cooling units, it shall be
installed in parallel with, or on the upstream side of, cooling
units to avoid condensation in the heating compartment. See
Figure 2. With a parallel flow arrangement, a damper (or
other means to control the flow of air) must adequately
prevent chilled air from entering the furnace. If the damper
is manually operated, it must be equipped to prevent
operation of either the heating or the cooling unit, unless it
is in the full HEAT or COOL setting. See Figure 2.
This furnace may be installed in alcoves, closets, attics,
basements, garages, and utility rooms in the upflow or
horizontal position.
This furnace design has not been certified for
installation in mobile homes, recreational vehicles, or
outdoors.
Use of Furnace as a Construction Heater
Allied Air does not recommended the use of these units as
a construction heater during any phase of construction. Very
low return air temperature, harmful vapors and operation of
the unit with clogged or misplaced filters will damage the
unit.
Units may be used for heating of buildings or structures
under construction, if the following conditions are met:
• The vent system must be permanently installed per these
installation instructions.
•
A room thermostat must control the furnace. The use of
fixed jumpers that will provide continuous heating is not
allowed.
•
The return air duct must be provided and sealed to the
furnace.
•
Return air temperature range between 60°F (16°C) and
80°F (27°C) must be maintained.
•
Air filters must be installed in the system and must be
maintained during construction.
•
Air filters must be replaced upon construction
completion.
•
The input rate and temperature rise must be set per the
furnace rating plate.
•
One hundred percent (100%) outdoor air must be
provided for combustion air requirements during
construc-tion. Temporary ducting may supply outdoor
air to the furnace. Do not connect duct directly to the
furnace. Size the temporary duct following these
instructions in section for Combustion, Dilution and
Ventilation Air in a confined space with air from outside.
•
The furnace heat exchanger, components, duct system,
air filters and evaporator coils must be thoroughly
cleaned following final construction clean-up.
•
All furnace operating conditions (including ignition, input
rate, temperature rise and venting) must be verified
according to these installation instructions.
Issue 1034
Page 5 of 41
Heating Unit Installed Parallel to Air Handler Unit
Heating Unit Installed Upstream of Cooling Unit
Figure 2
When installed, this furnace must be electrically grounded
according to local codes. In addition, in the United States,
installation must conform with the current National Electric
Code, ANSI/NFPA No. 70. The National Electric Code (ANSI/
NFPA No. 70) is available from the following address:
National Fire Protection Association
1 Battery March Park
Quincy, MA 02269
NOTE: This furnace is designed for a minimum continuous
return air temperature of 60° F (16°C) or an intermittent
operation down to 55° F (13°C) dry bulb for cases where a
night setback thermostat is used. Return air temperature
must not exceed 85° F (29°C) dry bulb.
506471-01
General
These instructions are intended as a general guide and do
not supersede local codes in any way. Consult authorities
having jurisdiction before installation.
In addition to the requirements outlined previously, the
following general recommendations must be considered
when installing one of these furnaces:
•
•
•
•
Place the furnace as close to the center of the air
distribution system as possible. The furnace should also
be located close to the chimney or vent termination point.
Do not install the furnace where drafts might blow directly
into it. This could cause improper combustion.
Do not block the furnace combustion air openings with
clothing, boxes, doors, etc. Air is needed for proper
combustion and safe unit operation.
When the furnace is installed in an attic or other insulated
space, keep insulation away from the furnace.
NOTE: The Commonwealth of Massachusetts stipulates
these additional requirements:
•
•
•
Gas furnaces shall be installed by a licensed plumber
or fitter only.
The gas cock must be “T handle” type.
When a furnace is installed in an attic, the passageway
to and service area surrounding the equipment shall be
floored.
Combustion, Dilution & Ventilation Air
In the past, there was no problem in bringing in sufficient
outdoor air for combustion. Infiltration provided all the air
that was needed. In today’s homes, tight construction
practices make it necessary to bring in air from outside for
combustion. Take into account that exhaust fans, appliance
vents, chimneys, and fireplaces force additional air that could
be used for combustion out of the house. Unless outside
air is brought into the house for combustion, negative
pressure (outside pressure is greater than inside pressure)
will build to the point that a downdraft can occur in the furnace
vent pipe or chimney. As a result, combustion gases enter
the living space creating a potentially dangerous situation.
In the absence of local codes concerning air for combustion
and ventilation, use the guidelines and procedures in this
section to install these furnaces to ensure efficient and safe
operation. You must consider combustion air needs and
requirements for exhaust vents and gas piping.
A portion of this information has been reprinted with
permission from the National Fuel Gas Code (ANSI-Z223.1).
This reprinted material is not the complete and official
position of the ANSI on the referenced subject, which is
represented only by the standard in its entirety.
Insufficient combustion air can cause headaches,
nausea, dizziness or asphyxiation. It will also cause
excess water in the heat exchanger resulting in rusting
and premature heat exchanger failure. Excessive
exposure to contaminated combustion air will result in
safety and performance related problems. Avoid
exposure to the following substances in the combustion
air supply:
Permanent wave solutions
Chlorinated waxes and cleaners
Chlorine base swimming pool chemicals
Water softening chemicals
De-icing salts or chemicals
Carbon tetrachloride
Halogen type refrigerants
Cleaning solvents (such as perchloroethylene)
Printing inks, paint removers, varnishes, etc.
Hydrochloric acid
Antistatic fabric softeners for clothes dryers
Masonry acid washing materials
WARNING
Product Contains Fiberglass Wool.
Disturbing the insulation in this product during
installation, maintenance, or repair will expose you to
fiberglass wool. Breathing this may cause lung cancer.
(Fiberglass wool is known to the State of California to
cause cancer.)
Fiberglass wool may also cause respiratory, skin, and
eye irritation.
To reduce exposure to this substance or for further
information, consult material safety data sheets available
from address shown below, or contact your supervisor.
Allied Air Enterprises, Inc.
215 Metropolitan Drive
West Columbia, SC 29170
Page 6 of 41
WARNING
Issue 1034
506471-01
All gas fired appliances require air for the combustion
process. If sufficient combustion air is not available, the
furnace or other appliances will operate inefficiently and
unsafely. Enough air must be provided to meet the needs
of all fuel burning appliances and appliances such as exhaust
fans which force air out of the house. When fireplaces,
exhaust fans, or clothes dryers are used at the same time
as the furnace, much more air is necessary to ensure proper
combustion and to prevent a downdraft. Insufficient air
causes incomplete combustion which can result in carbon
monoxide.
Equipment in Confined Space - All Air From Inside
In addition to providing combustion air, fresh outdoor air
dilutes contaminants in the indoor air. These contaminants
may include bleaches, adhesives, detergents, solvents and
other contaminants which can corrode furnace components.
NOTE: Each opening shall have a free area of at least one square
inch per 1,000 Btu (645 mm² per .29 kW) per hour of the total input
rating of all equipment in the enclosure, but not less than 100 square
inches (64546 mm²).
The requirements for providing air for combustion and
ventilation depend largely on whether the furnace is installed
in an unconfined or a confined space.
Unconfined Space
An unconfined space is an area such as a basement or
large equipment room with a volume greater than 50 cubic
feet (1.42 m3) per 1,000 Btu (.29 kW) per hour of the
combined input rating of all appliances installed in that space.
This space also includes adjacent rooms which are not
separated by a door. Though an area may appear to be
unconfined, it might be necessary to bring in outdoor air for
combustion if the structure does not provide enough air by
infiltration. If the furnace is located in a building of tight
construction with weather stripping and caulking around the
windows and doors, follow the procedures in the air from
outside section.
Confined Space
A confined space is an area with a volume less than 50
cubic feet (1.42 m3) per 1,000 Btu (.29 kW) per hour of the
combined input rating of all appliances installed in that space.
This definition includes furnace closets or small equipment
rooms.
When the furnace is installed so that supply ducts carry air
circulated by the furnace to areas outside the space
containing the furnace, the return air must be handled by
ducts which are sealed to the furnace casing and which
terminate outside the space containing the furnace. This is
especially important when the furnace is mounted on a
platform in a confined space such as a closet or small
equipment room. Even a small leak around the base of the
unit at the platform or at the return air duct connection can
cause a potentially dangerous negative pressure condition.
Air for combustion and ventilation can be brought into the
confined space either from inside the building or from outside.
506471-01
Figure 3
Air from Inside
If the confined space that houses the furnace adjoins a
space categorized as unconfined, air can be brought in by
providing two permanent openings between the two spaces.
Each opening must have a minimum free area of 1 square
inch (645 mm2) per 1,000 Btu (.29 kW) per hour of total
input rating of all gas fired equipment in the confined space.
Each opening must be at least 100 square inches (64516
mm2). One opening shall be within 12 inches (305 mm) of
the top of the enclosure and one opening within 12 inches
(305 mm) of the bottom. See Figure 3.
Air from Outside
If air from outside is brought in for combustion and ventilation,
the confined space must have two permanent openings. One
opening shall be within 12 inches (305 mm) of the top of the
enclosure and one opening within 12 inches (305 mm) of
the bottom. These openings must communicate directly or
by ducts with the outdoors or spaces (crawl or attic) that
freely communicate with the outdoors or indirectly through
vertical ducts. Each opening shall have a minimum free
area of 1 square inch (645 mm2) per 4,000 Btu (1.17 kW)
per hour of total input rating of all equipment in the en-closure.
See Figures 4 and 5. When communicating with the
outdoors through horizontal ducts, each opening shall have
a minimum free area of 1 square inch (645 mm2) per 2,000
Btu (.56 kW) per total input rating of all equipment in the
enclosure. See Figure 6.
Issue 1034
Page 7 of 41
When ducts are used, they shall be of the same cross
sectional area as the free area of the openings to which
they connect. The minimum dimension of rectangular air
ducts shall be no less than 3 inches (75 mm). In calculating
free area, the blocking effect of louvers, grilles, or screens
must be considered. If the design and free area of protective
covering is not known for calculating the size opening
required, it may be assumed that wood louvers will have 20
to 25 percent free area and metal louvers and grilles will
have 60 to 75 percent free area. Louvers and grilles must
be fixed in the open position or interlocked with the
equipment so that they are opened automatically during
equipment operation.
EQUIPMENT IN CONFINED SPACE
(ALL AIR FROM OUTSIDE)
EQUIPMENT IN CONFINED SPACE - ALL AIR FROM OUTSIDE
(Inlet Air from Crawlspace &
Outlet Air to Ventilated Attic)
NOTE: Each air duct opening shall have a free area of at least one
square inch per 2,000 Btu (645 mm² per .59 kW) per hour of the
total input rating of all equipment in the enclosure. If the equipment
room is located against an outside wall and the air openings
communicate directly with the outdoors, each opening shall have a
free area of at least 1 square inch per 4,000 Btu (645 mm² per 1.17
kW) per hour of the total input rating of all other equipment in the
enclosure.
Figure 6
NOTE: The inlet and outlet air openings shall each have a free area
of at least one square inch per 4,000 Btu (645 mm² per 1.17 kW) per
hour of the total input rating of all equipment in the enclosure.
Figure 4
EQUIPMENT IN CONFINED SPACE - ALL AIR FROM OUTSIDE
(All Air through Ventilated Attic)
NOTE: The inlet and outlet air openings shall each have a free area
of at least one square inch per 4,000 Btu (645 mm² per 1.17 kW) per
hour of the total input rating of all equipment in the enclosure.
Figure 5
Page 8 of 41
Issue 1034
506471-01
Setting Equipment
Upflow Applications
Allow for clearances to combustible materials as indicated
on the unit nameplate. Minimum clearances for closet or
alcove installations are shown in Figure 8.
WARNING
Do not install the furnace on its front or its back. Do not
connect the return air ducts to the back of the furnace.
Doing so will adversely affect the operation of the safety
control devices, which could result in personal injury or
death.
Upflow Application Installation Clearances
The gas furnace can be installed as shipped in either the
upflow position or the horizontal position.
Select a location that allows for the required clearances that
are listed on the unit nameplate. Also consider gas supply
connections, electrical supply, vent connection, and
installation and service clearances [24 inches (610 mm) at
unit front]. The unit must be level.
NOTE: Units with 1/2 hp blower motors are equipped with
three flexible legs and one rigid leg. See Figure 7. The rigid
leg is equipped with a shipping bolt and a flat white plastic
washer (rather than the rubber mounting grommet used with
a flexible mounting leg). The bolt and washer must be
removed before the furnace is placed into operation. After
the bolt and washer have been removed, the rigid leg will
not touch the blower housing.
Units with 1/2 HP
Blower Motor.
* Front clearance In alcove Installation must be 24 in. (610 mm).
Maintain a minimum of 24 in. (610 mm) for front service access.
‡ For installation on a combustible floor, do not install the furnace
directly on carpeting, tile or other combustible materials other than
wood flooring.
† Left side requires 3 inches if a single wall vent is used on 14-1/2
inch cabinets.
Figure 8
Figure 7
506471-01
Issue 1034
Page 9 of 41
Return Air - Upflow Applications
Return air can be brought in through the bottom or either
side of the furnace installed in an upflow application. If the
furnace is installed on a platform with bottom return, make
an airtight seal between the bottom of the furnace and the
platform to ensure that the furnace operates properly and
safely. The furnace is equipped with a removable bottom
panel to facilitate installation.
Single Side Return Air
(with transition and filter)
Markings are provided on both sides of the furnace cabinet
for installations that require side return air. Cut the furnace
cabinet at the maximum dimensions shown on page 2.
NOTE: 20C and 20D units that require air volumes over
1800 cfm (850 L/s) must have one of the following:
1. Single side return air with transition to
accommodate 20 x 25 x 1 in. (508 x 635 x 25 mm)
cleanable air filter. (Required to maintain proper air
velocity.) See Figure 9.
2. Single side return air with optional return airbase.
See Figure 10.
3. Bottom return air.
4. Return air from both sides.
5. Bottom and one side return air.
Figure 9
Optional Return Air Base
(Upflow Applications Only - For use with A, B, C and D cabinets))
FRONT VIEW
NOTE: Optional Side Return Air Filter Kits are not for use with Return Air Base.
1 Both the unit return air opening and the base return air opening must be covered by a single plenum or IAQ cabinet.
Minimum unit side return air opening dimensions for units requiring 1800 cfm or more of air (W x H): 23 x 11 in. (584 x 279 mm).
The opening can be cut as needed to accommodate plenum or IAQ cabinet while maintaining dimensions shown.
Side return air openings must be cut in the field. There are cutting guides stenciled on the cabinet for the side return air opening.
The size of the opening must not extend beyond the markings on the furnace cabinet.
² To minimize pressure drop, the largest opening height possible (up to 14 inches) is preferred.
Figure 10
Page 10 of 41
Issue 1034
506471-01
Removing the Bottom Panel
Remove the two screws that secure the bottom cap to the
furnace. Pivot the bottom cap down to release the bottom
panel. Once the bottom panel has been removed, reinstall
the bottom cap. See Figure 11.
Removing the Bottom Panel
Horizontal Applications
The furnace can be installed in horizontal applications. Order
horizontal suspension kit (51W10) from Allied Air, or use
equivalent suspension method.
Allow for clearances to combustible materials as indicated
on the unit nameplate. Minimum clearances for closet or
alcove installations are shown in Figure 12.
This furnace may be installed in either an attic or a crawl
space. Either suspend the furnace from roof rafters or floor
joists, as shown in Figure 13, or install the furnace on a
platform, as shown in Figure 14.
Typical Horizontal Application
Unit Suspended in Attic or Crawlspace
Figure 11
Horizontal Application
Installatioin clearances
Figure 13
NOTE: Heavy gauge perforated sheet metal straps may
be used to suspend the unit from roof rafters or ceiling joists.
When straps are used to suspend the unit in this way, support
must be provided for both the ends. The straps must not
interfere with the plenum or exhaust piping installation.
Cooling coils and supply and return air plenums must
be supported separately.
NOTE: When the furnace is installed on a platform in a
crawlspace, it must be elevated enough to avoid water
damage and to allow the evaporator coil to drain.
* Front clearance in alcove installation must be 24 in. (610 mm).
Maintain a minimum of 21 in. (610 mm) for front service access.
‡ For installations on a combustible floor, do not install the furnace
directly on carpeting, tile or other combustible materials other than
wood flooring.
Return Air - Horizontal Applications
Return air must be brought in through the end of a furnace
installed in a horizontal application. The furnace is equipped
with a removable bottom panel to facilitate installation. See
Figure 11.
Figure 12
506471-01
Issue 1034
Page 11 of 41
Horizontal Application
Unit installed on Platform
Table 1
Duct System
Use industry approved standards (such as those published
by Air Conditioning Contractors of America or American
Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning
Engineers) to size and install the supply and return air duct
system. This will result in a quiet and low static system that
has uniform air distribution.
Figure 14
NOTE: Do not operate the furnace in the heating mode
with an external static pressure that exceeds 0.8 inches w.c.
Higher external static pressures may cause erratic limit
operation.
WARNING
Improper installation of the furnace can result in personal
injury or death. Combustion and flue products must
never be allowed to enter the return air system or the
living space. Use screws and joint tape to seal the return
air system to the furnace.
Supply Air Plenum
If the furnace is installed without a cooling coil, a removable
access panel must be installed in the supply air duct. The
access panel should be large enough to permit inspection
(either by smoke or reflected light) of the heat exchanger
for leaks after the furnace is installed. The furnace access
panel must always be in place when the furnace is operating
and it must not allow leaks into the supply air duct system.
In platform installations with bottom return air, the furnace
should be sealed airtight to the return air plenum. A
door must never be used as a portion of the return air
duct system. The base must provide a stable support
and an airtight seal to the furnace. Allow absolutely no
sagging, cracks, gaps, etc..
Return Air Plenum
NOTE: Return air must not be drawn from a room where
this furnace, or any other gas fueled appliance (i.e., water
heater), or carbon monoxide producing device (i.e., wood
fireplace) is installed.
The return and supply air duct systems must never be
connected to or from other heating devices such as a
fireplace or stove, etc.. Fire, explosion, carbon
monoxide poisoning, personal injury and/or property
damage could result.
When return air is drawn from a room, a negative pressure
is created in the room. If a gas appliance is operating in a
room with negative pressure, the flue products can be pulled
back down the vent pipe and into the room. This reverse
flow of the flue gas may result in incomplete combustion
and the formation of carbon monoxide gas. This toxic gas
might then be distributed throughout the house by the furnace
duct system.
WARNING
The inner blower panel must be securely in place when
the blower and burners are operating. Gas fumes,
which could contain carbon monoxide, can be drawn
into living space resulting in personal injury or death.
Filters
This unit is not equipped with a filter or rack. A field provided
high velocity filter is required for the unit to operate properly.
Table 1 lists recommended filter sizes.
A filter must be in place any time the unit is operating.
Page 12 of 41
In upflow applications, the return air can be brought in through
the bottom or either side of the furnace. If a furnace with
bottom return air is installed on a platform, make an airtight
seal between the bottom of the furnace and the platform to
ensure that the unit operates properly and safely. Use
fiberglass sealing strips, caulking, or equivalent sealing
method between the plenum and the furnace cabinet to
ensure a tight seal. If a filter is installed, size the return air
duct to fit the filter frame.
Issue 1034
506471-01
Venting
A 4 inch diameter flue transition is factory installed on the
combustion air inducer outlet of all models. Figure 16 shows
the combustion air inducer as shipped from the factory.
Mounting Screws Location
If necessary reposition the combustion air inducer, pressure
switch and/or make-up box as needed per the following
steps. See Figures 16 through 22.
1. Remove the four mounting screws (Figure 15) which
secure the combustion air inducer / pressure switch
assembly to the orifice plate. Lift the assembly and rotate it
90° clockwise or counter clockwise to either the 3 o’clock
position or 9 o’clock position. Resecure with four secrews.
Gasket should be left in place.
2. Use tin snips to cut preferred opening on the cabinet for
repositioning the flue outlet. Use the cut-out piece as a cover
plate to patch unused opening on cabinet.
UPFLOW POSITION
Left Side Vent Discharge
Figure 15
UPFLOW POSITION
Top Vent Discharge
•
•
Remove make-up box assembly (2 screws) and cut wire tie to free makeup box wires. Reinstall make-up box on other side of cabinet.
Resecure make-up box wires: Either pull excess wires through the blower
companrtment and secure using supplied wire tie, or coil excess wire and
secure to the gas manifold.
Figure 17
UPFLOW POSITION
Right Side Vent Discharge
Figure 16
IMPORTANT
The unit will not vent properly with the flue transition
pointed down in the 6 o’clock position.
The combustion air inducer may be rotated clockwise
or counterclockwise by 90° to allow for top or side vent
discharge in all applications. When the unit is installed,
the flue transition must be in the 9 o’clock, 12 o’clock or
3 o’clock position.
•
Pressure switch tubing may be too long. Cut to fit, then reattach to barbed
fitting on pressure switch. Tubing must not be allowed to sag.
Figure 18
506471-01
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Page 13 of 41
Horizontal Position
HORIZONTAL LEFT POSITION
Top Vent discharge
•
•
HORIZONTAL RIGHT POSITION
Top Vent Discharge
Disconnect pressure switch hose from barbed fitting on the pressure
switch assembly. Remove pressure switch assembly (1 screw) and cut
wire tie to free pressure switch wires. Reinstall pressure switch on the
other side of orifice plate and reconnect pressure switch hose.
Resecure pressure seitch wires: Either pull excess wires through the
blower compartment and secure using supplied wire tie, or coil excess
wire and secure to the gas manifold.
•
•
Remove make-up box assembly (2 screws) and cut wire tie to free makeup box wires. Reinstall make-up box on other side of cabinet.
Resecure make-up box wires: Either pull excess wires through the blower
compartment and secure using supplied wire tie, or coil excess wire and
secure to the gas manifold.
Figure 21
Figure 19
HORIZONTAL LEFT POSITION
Side Vent Discharge
•
•
HORIZONTAL RIGHT POSITION
Side Vent Discharge
Disconnect pressure switch hose from barbed fitting on the pressure
switch assembly. Remove pressure switch assembly (1 screw) and cut
wire tie to free pressure switch wires. Reinstall pressure switch on the
other side of orifice plate and reconnect pressure switch hose.
Resecure pressure seitch wires: Either pull excess wires through the
blower compartment and secure using supplied wire tie, or coil excess
wire and secure to the gas manifold.
Figure 22
Figure 20
Page 14 of 41
Issue 1034
506471-01
These series units are classified as fan assisted Category I
furnaces when vertically vented according to the latest edition
of National Fuel Gas Code (NFPA 54 / ANSI Z223.1) in the
USA. A fan assisted Category I furnace is an appliance
equipped with an integral mechanical means to either draw
or force combustion products through the combustion
chamber and/or heat exchanger. This unit is not approved
for use with horizontal venting.
NOTE: Use these instructions as a guide. They do not
supersede local codes. This furnace must be vented
according to all local codes these installation instructions,
and the provided venting tables in these instructions.
The venting tables in this manual were extracted from the
National Fuel Gas Code (NFPA 54 / ANSI Z223.1) and are
provided as a guide for proper vent installation. Proper
application, termination, construction and location of vents
must conform to local codes having jurisdiction. In the
absence of local codes, the NFGC serves as the defining
document.
Refer to the tables and the venting information contained in
these instructions to properly size and install the venting
system.
IMPORTANT
Once the venting system is installed, attach the
“Disconnected Vent” warning sticker to a visible area of
the plenum near the vent pipe. See Figure 23. The
warning sticker is provided in the bag assembly. Order
kit 66W04 for additional stickers.
Use self drilling sheet metal screws or a mechanical fastener
to firmly secure the vent pipe to the round collar of the flue
transition. If self drilling screws are used to attach the vent
pipe, it is recommended that three be used. Drive one self
drilling screw through the front and one through each side
of the vent pipe and collar. See Figure 23.
Install the first vent connector elbow at a minimum of six
inches (152 mm) from the furnace vent outlet. See Figure
23.
Venting Using a Masonry Chimney
The following additional requirements apply when a lined
masonry chimney is used to vent this furnace.
Masonry chimneys used to vent Category I central furnaces
must be either tile lined or lined with a listed metal lining
system or dedicated gas vent. Unlined masonry chimneys
are prohibited. See Figures 24 and 25 for common venting.
A chimney with one or more sides exposed to the outside of
the structure is considered to be an exterior chimney.
An exterior masonry chimney that is not tile lined must be
lined with B1 vent or a listed insulated flexible metal vent.
An exterior tile lined chimney that is sealed and capped may
be lined with a listed uninsulated flexible metal vent.
If the existing chimney will not accommodate a listed metal
liner, either the chimney must be rebuilt to accommodate
one of these liners or an alternate approved venting method
must be found.
Insulation for the flexible vent pipe must be an encapsulated
fiberglass sleeve recommended by the flexible vent pipe
manufacturer. See Figure 24.
WARNING
Common Venting Using Metal Lined
Masonry Chimney
Asphyxiation hazard. The exhaust vent for this furnace
must be securely connected to the furnace flue transitiion
at all times.
Vent Connection
NOTE 1: Refer to the provided venting tables for installations.
Refer to the capacity requirements shown in the provided venting
tables.
Figure 24
Figure 23
506471-01
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Page 15 of 41
Common Venting Using Tile Lined Interior Masonry Chimney and Combined Vent Connector
NOTE: Refer to provided venting
tables for installations.
NOTE: The chimney must be properly sized
per provided venting tables or lined with
listed metal lining system.
Figure 25
DO NOT insulate the space between the liner and the
chimney wall with puffed mica or any other loose granular
insulating material.
Never connect a Category I appliance to a chimney that is
servicing a solid fuel appliance. If a fireplace chimney flue
is used to vent this appliance, the fireplace opening must be
permanently sealed.
IMPORTANT
SINGLE appliance venting of a fan assisted furnace into
a tile lined masonry chimney (interior or outside wall) is
prohibited. The chimney must first be lined with either
type B1 vent or an insulated single wall flexible vent
lining system which has been sized according to the
provided venting tables and the vent pipe manufacturer’s
instructions.
A type B or listed chimney lining system that passes through
an unused masonry chimney flue is not considered to be
exposed to the outdoors.
A fan assisted furnace may be commonly vented into an
existing lined masonry chimney if the following conditions
are met:
• The chimney is currently serving at least one drafthood
equipped appliance.
• The vent connectors and chimney are sized according
to the provided venting tables.
If type B1 double wall vent is used inside a chimney, no
other appliance can be vented into the chimney. The outer
wall of type B1 vent pipe must not be exposed to flue
products. A type B1 vent or masonry chimney liner shall
terminate above the roof surface with a listed cap or a’iisted
roof assembly according to the terms of their respective
listings and the vent manufacturer’s instructions.
When inspection reveals that an existing chimney is not safe
for the intended purpose, it shall be rebuilt to conform to
nationally recognized standards, lined or relined with suitable
materials, or replaced with a gas vent or chimney suitable
for venting. The chimney passageway must be checked
periodically to ensure that it is clear and free of obstructions.
Page 16 of 41
Do not install a manual damper, barometric draft regulator,
or flue restrictor between the furnace and the chimney.
General Venting Requirements
Vent these furnaces according to these instructions:
1. Vent diameter recommendations and maximum
allowable piping runs are found in the provided venting
tables.
2. In no case should the vent or vent connector diameter
be less than the diameter specified in the provided
venting tables.
3. The minimum vent capacity determined by the sizing
tables must be less than the low fire input rating and the
maximum vent capacity must be greater than the high
fire input rating.
4 . Single appliance vents - If the vertical vent or tile lined
chimney has a larger diameter or flow area than the
vent connector, use the vertical vent diameter to
determine the minimum vent capacity and the vent
connector diameter to determine the maximum vent
capacity. The flow area of the vertical vent, however,
shall not exceed 7 times the flow area of the listed
appliance categorized vent area, drafthood outlet area
or flue collar area unless designed according to
approved engineering methods.
5. Multiple appliance vents - The flow area of the largest
section of vertical vent or chimney shall not exceed 7
times the smallest listed appliance categorized vent
area, drafthood outlet area or flue collar area unless
designed according to approved engineering methods.
Issue 1034
506471-01
6. The entire length of single wall metal vent connector
shall be readily accessible for inspection, cleaning, and
replacement.
7. Single appliance venting configurations with zero lateral
lengths (Tables 3 and 4) are assumed to have no elbows
in the vent system. For all other vent configurations,
the vent system is assumed to have two 90° elbows.
For each additional 90° elbow or equivalent (for example
two 45° elbows equal one 90° elbow) beyond two, the
maximum capacity listed in the venting table should be
reduced by 10% (0.90 x maximum listed capacity).
8. The common venting Tables (5, 6,7, and 8) were
generated using a maximum horizontal vent connector
length of 1-1/2 feet (.46 m) for each inch (25 mm) of
connector diameter as follows:
Table 2
9. If the common vertical vent is offset, the maximum
common vent capacity listed in the common venting
tables should be reduced by 20%, the equivalent of two
90° elbows (0.80 x maximum common vent capacity).
The horizontal length of the offset shall not exceed
1-1/2 feet (.46 m) for each inch (25 mm) of common
vent diameter.
10. The vent pipe should be as short as possible with the
least number of elbows and angles required to complete
the job. Route the vent connector to the vent using the
shortest possible route.
11. A vent connector shall be supported without any dips or
sags and shall slope a minimum of 1/4 inch (6.4 mm)
per linear foot (305 mm) of connector, back toward the
appliance.
12. Vent connectors shall be firmly attached to the furnace
flue collar by self drilling screws or other approved
means,except vent connectors of listed type B vent
material which shall be assembled according to the
manufacturer’s instructions. Joints between sections
of single wall connector piping shall be fastened by
screws or other approved means.
506471-01
13. When the vent connector used for Category I appliances
must be located in or pass through a crawl space, attic
or other areas which may be cold, that portion of the
vent connector shall be constructed of listed doublewall
type B vent material or material having equivalent
insulation qualities.
14. All venting pipe passing through floors, walls, and
ceilings must be installed with the listed clearance to
combustible materials and be fire stopped according to
local codes. In absence of local codes, refer to NFGC
(2223.1 ).
15. No portion of the venting system can extend into, or
pass through any circulation air duct or plenum.
16. Vent connectors serving Category I appliances shall not
be connected to any portion of mechanical draft systems
operating under positive pressure such as Category III
or IV venting systems.
17. If vent connectors are combined prior to entering the
common vent, the maximum common vent capacity
listed in the common venting tables must be reduced by
10%, the equivalent of one 90° elbow (0.90 x maximum
common vent capacity).
18. The common vent diameter must always be at least as
large as the largest vent connector diameter.
19. In no case, shall the vent connector be sized more than
two consecutive table size diameters over the size of
the draft hood outlet or flue collar outlet.
20. Do not install a manual damper, barometric draft
regulator or flue restrictor between the furnace and the
chimney.
21. When connecting this appliance to an existing dedicated
or common venting system, you must inspect the venting
system’s general condition and look for signs of
corrosion. The existing vent pipe size must conform to
these instructions and the provided venting tables. If
the existing venting system does not meet these
requirements, it must be resized.
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Page 17 of 41
Capacity of Type B Double Wall Vents with Type B Double Wall Connectors
Serving a Single Category I Appliance
NOTE: Single appliance venting configureations with zero lateral lengths are assumed to have no elbows in the vent system. For all other vent
configurations, the vent system is assumed to have two 90 ° elbows. For each additional 90° elbow or equivalent (for example two 45° elbows equal
one 90° elbow) beyond two, the maximum capacity listed in the venting table should be reduced by 10 percent (0.90 x maximum listed capacity).
Table 3
Page 18 of 41
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506471-01
Capacity of Type B Double Wall Vents with Single Wall Metal Connectors
Serving a Single Category I Appliance
NOTE: Single appliance venting configureations with zero lateral lengths are assumed to have no elbows in the vent system. For all other vent
configurations, the vent system is assumed to have two 90 ° elbows. For each additional 90° elbow or equivalent (for example two 45° elbows equal
one 90° elbow) beyond two, the maximum capacity listed in the venting table should be reduced by 10 percent (0.90 x maximum listed capacity).
Table 4
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Issue 1034
Page 19 of 41
Vent Connector Capacity
Type B Double Wall Vents with Type B Double Wall Connectors
Serving Two or More Category I Appliances
Table 5
Common Vent Capacity
Type B Double Wall Vents with Type B Double Wall Connectors
Serving Two or More Category I Appliances
Table 6
Page 20 of 41
Issue 1034
506471-01
Vent Connector Capacity
Type B Double Wall Vents with Single Wall Metal Connectors
Serving Two or More Category I Appliances
NOTE: Single appliance venting configureations with zero lateral lengths are assumed to have no elbows in the vent system. For all other vent
configurations, the vent system is assumed to have two 90 ° elbows. For each additional 90° elbow or equivalent (for example two 45° elbows equal
one 90° elbow) beyond two, the maximum capacity listed in the venting table should be reduced by 10 percent (0.90 x maximum listed capacity).
Table 7
Common Vent Capacity
Type B Double Wall Vents with Single Wall Metal Connectors
Serving Two or more Category I Appliances
Table 8
506471-01
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Removal of the Furnace from Common Vent
In the event that an existing furnace is removed from a
venting system commonly run with separate gas appliances,
the venting system is likely to be too large to properly vent
the remaining attached appliances.
Conduct the following test while each appliance is operating
and the other appliances (which are not operating) remain
connected to the common venting system. If the venting
system has been installed improperly, you must correct the
system as indicated in the general venting requirements
section.
WARNING
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING HAZARD
Failure to follow the steps outlined below for each
appliance connected to the venting system being placed
into operation could result in carbon monoxide poisoning
or death.
3. Close all building doors and windows and all doors
between the space in which the appliances remaining
connected to the common venting system are located
and other spaces of the building. Turn on clothes dryers
and any appliances not connected to the common
venting system. Turn on any exhaust fans, such as
range hoods and bathroom exhausts, so they will
operate at maximum speed. Do not operate a summer
exhaust fan. Close fireplace dampers.
4. Follow the lighting instructions. Turn on the appliance
that is being inspected. Adjust the thermostat so that
the appliance operates continuously.
5. After the burners have operated for 5 minutes, test for
leaks of flue gases at the draft hood relief opening. Use
the flame of a match or candle.
6. After determining that each appliance connected to the
common venting system is venting properly, (step 3)
return all doors, widows, exhaust fans, fireplace
dampers, and any other gas burning appliances to their
previous mode of operation.
7. If a venting problem is found during any of the preceding
tests, the common venting system must be modified to
correct the problem.
The following steps shall be followed for each appliance
connected to the venting system being placed into operation,
while all other appliances connected to the venting system
are not in operation:
Resize the common venting system to the minimum vent
pipe size determined by using the appropriate tables in
Appendix G. (These are in the current standards of the
National Fuel Gas Code ANSI 2223.1.
1. Seal any unused openings in the common venting
system.
2. Inspect the venting system for proper size and horizontal
pitch. Determine that there is no blockage, restriction,
leakage, corrosion, or other deficiencies which could
cause an unsafe condition.
Page 22 of 41
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506471-01
Gas Piping
CAUTION
If a flexible gas connector is required or allowed by the
authority that has jurisdiction, black iron pipe shall be
installed at the gas valve and extend outside the furnace
cabinet. The flexible connector can then be added
between the black iron pipe and the gas supply line.
Gas Supply
1. This unit is shipped standard for left or right side
installation of gas piping (or top entry in horizontal
applica-tions). Connect the gas supply to the piping
assembly.
2. When connecting the gas supply piping, consider factors
such as length of run, number of fittings, and furnace
rating to avoid excessive pressure drop. Table 9 lists
recommended pipe sizes for typical applications.
3. The gas piping must not run in or through air ducts,
clothes chutes, gas vents or chimneys, dumb waiters,
or elevator shafts.
4. The piping should be sloped 1/4 inch (6.4 mm) per 15
feet (4.57 m) upward toward the meter from the furnace.
The piping must be supported at proper intervals [every
8 to 10 feet (2.44 to 3.01 m)] with suitable hangers or
straps. Install a drip leg in vertical pipe runs to the unit.
5. A 1/8" N.P.T. plugged tap or pressure post is located on
the gas valve to facilitate test gauge connection. See
Figure 38.
6. In some localities, codes may require the installation of
a manual main shut off valve and union (furnished by
the installer) external to the unit. The union must be of
the ground joint type.
IMPORTANT
Compounds used on threaded joints of gas piping must
be resistant to the actions of liquified petroleum gases.
NOTE: If emergency shutoff is necessary, shut off the main
manual gas valve and disconnect main power to the furnace.
The installer should properly label these devices.
Gas Pipe Capacity - ft³/hr (m³/hr)
Note: Capacity given in cubic feet (m³) of gas per hour and based on 06.0 specific gravity gas.
Table 9
506471-01
Issue 1034
Page 23 of 41
NOTE: BLACK IRON PIPE ONLY TO BE ROUTED INSIDE OF CABINET
Figure 26
Horizontal Applications
Possible Gas Piping Configurations
NOTE: BLACK IRON PIPE ONLY TO BE ROUTED INSIDE OF CABINET
Figure 27
Page 24 of 41
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506471-01
Leak Check
After gas piping is completed, carefully check all piping
connections (factory and field installed) for gas leaks. Use
a leak detecting solution or other preferred means.
NOTE: If emergency shutoff is necessary, shut off the main
manual gas valve and disconnect the main power to the
furnace. The installer should properly label these devices.
The unit is equipped with a field make-up box on the left
hand side of the cabinet. The make-up box may be moved
to the right side of the furnace to facilitate installation. If the
make-up box is moved to the right side, clip the wire ties
that bundle the wires together. The excess wire must be
pulled into the blower compartment. Secure the excess wire
to the existing harness to protect it from damage.
INTERIOR MAKE-UP BOX INSTALLATION
CAUTION
Some soaps used for leak detection are corrosive to
certain metals. Carefully rinse piping thoroughly after
leak test has been completed. Do not use matches,
candles, flame or other sources of ignition to check for
gas leaks.
The furnace must be isolated by closing its individual manual
shut-off valve and disconnecting from from the gas supply
system the during any pressure testing of the gas supply
system at pressures less than or equal to 1/2 psig (3.48
kPa, 14 inches w.c.).
Figure 29
IMPORTANT
INTERIOR MAKE-UP BOX INSTALLATION
When testing pressure of gas lines, gas valve must be
disconnected and isolated. See Figure 28. Gas valves
can be damaged if subjected to pressures greater than
1/2 psig (3.48 kPa, 14 inches w.c.).
Figure 28
Figure 30
Electrical
ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE (ESD)
Precautions and Procedures
CAUTION
Electrostatic discharge can affect electronic
components. Take precautions during furnace
installation and service to protect the furnace’s electronic
controls. Precautions will help to avoid control exposure
to electrostatic discharge by putting the furnace, the
control and the technician at the same electrostatic
potential. Neutralize electrostatic charge by touching
hand and all tools on an unpainted unit surface, such
as the gas valve or blower deck, before performing any
service procedure.
506471-01
Refer to Figure 40 for schematic wiring diagram and
troubleshooting and Figure 41 for field wiring.
1. The power supply wiring must meet Class I restrictions.
Protected by either a fuse or circuit breaker, select circuit
protection and wire size according to unit nameplate.
NOTE: Unit nameplate states maximum current draw.
Maximum over current protection allowed is 15 AMP.
2. Holes are on both sides of the furnace cabinet to facilitate
wiring.
3. Install a separate (properly sized) disconnect switch near
the furnace so that power can be turned off for servicing.
Issue 1034
Page 25 of 41
Table 10
4. Before connecting the thermostat, check to make sure
the wires will be long enough for servicing at a later
date. Make sure that thermostat wire is long enough to
facilitate future removal of blower for service.
5. Complete the wiring connections to the equipment. Use
the provided unit wiring diagram and the field wiring
diagram shown in Figure 41. Use 18 gauge wire or
larger that is suitable for Class II rating for thermostat
connections.
6. Electrically ground the unit according to local codes or,
in the absence of local codes, according to the current
National Electric Code (ANSI/NFPA No. 70). A green
ground wire is provided in the field make-up box.
NOTE: This furnace contains electronic components that
are polarity sensitive. Make sure that the furnace is wired
correctly and is properly grounded.
7. One line voltage “EAC” 1/4" spade terminal is provided
on the furnace integrated control. Any electronic air
cleaner or other accessory rated up to one amp can be
connected to this terminal with the neutral leg of the
circuit being connected to one of the provided neutral
terminals. See Figure 41 for control configuration. This
terminal is energized when the indoor blower is
operating.
8. One line voltage “HUM” 1/4" spade terminal is provided
on the furnace integrated control. Any humidifier rated
up to one amp can be connected to this terminal with
the neutral leg of the circuit being connected to one of
the provided neutral terminals. See Figure 41 for control
configuration. This terminal is energized in the heating
mode whenever the combustion air inducer is operating.
9. One 24V “H” terminal is provided on the furnace
inte-grated control terminal block. Any humidifier rated
up to 0.5 amp can be connected to this terminal with
the ground leg of the circuit being connected to either
ground or the “C” terminal. See Figure 41 for control
configuration.
Indoor Blower Speeds
1. When the thermostat is set to “FAN ON,” the indoor
blower will run continuously at approximately 38% of
the second stage cooling speed when there is no cooling
or heating demand.
2. When this unit is running in the heating mode, the indoor
blower will run on the heating speed designated by the
positions of DIP switches 11 and 12.
3. When there is a cooling demand, the indoor blower will
run on the cooling speed designated by the positions of
DIP switches 5 and 6.
Generator Use - Voltage Requirements
The following requirements must be kept in mind when
specifying a generator for use with this equipment:
• The furnace requires 120 volts ± 10% (Range: 108 volts
to 132 volts).
• The furnace operates at 60 Hz ± 5% (Range: 57 Hz to
63 Hz).
• The furnace integrated control requires both polarity and
proper ground. Both polarity and proper grounding
should be checked before attempting to operate the
furnace on either permanent or temporary power.
• Generator should have a wave form distortion of less
than 5% RHO.
Electrical Wiring
WARNING
Risk of electrical shock. Disconnect electrical power at
the circuit breaker or service panel before making
electrical connections. Failure to disconnect power
supplies can result in property damage, personal injury,
or death.
The furnace must be grounded and wired in accordance
with local codes or, in the absence of local codes, with the
National Electrical Code ANSI/NFPA No. 70 (latest edition)
and/or CSA C22.1 Electrical Code (latest edition) if an
external electrical source is utilized.
10. Install the room thermostat according to the instructions
provided with the thermostat. If the furnace is being
matched with a heat pump, refer to the instruction
packaged with the dual fuel thermostat.
Page 26 of 41
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506471-01
In all instances, other than wiring for the thermostat, the
wiring to be done and any replacement of wire shall conform
with the temperature limitation for Type T wire –63°F (35°C)
rise.
Automatic Heat Staging Jumper
Connect a sufficiently sized wire with ground to the furnace’s
line voltage connections and ground lug. Refer to the furnace
rating plate for electrical characteristics to be used in sizing
field supply wiring and overcurrent protection.
The line voltage supply should be routed through a readily
accessible disconnect located within sight of the furnace. A
junction box on the furnace side panel is provided for line
voltage connections. Refer to the furnace wiring diagram
for specific connection information.
Proper polarity of the supply connections (“HOT” and
“NEUTRAL”) must be observed to ensure that safety
controls provide the protection intended.
A connection to the ground lug and actual earth ground
(typically a ground stake or buried steel pipe) must be
maintained for proper operation.
Thermostat
Install a room thermostat according to the instructions
furnished with it. Select a location on an inside wall that is
not subject to drafts, direct sunshine, or other heat sources.
The initial heat anticipator setting should be equal to the
total current draw of the control circuit. Low voltage
thermostat connections are to be made to the integrated
ignition/blower control board as indicated on the wiring
diagram.
Single Stage Thermostat Operation
(A80UH2V and 80G1UH2V Models )
The automatic heat staging option allows a single stage
thermostat to be used with two stage furnace models
(A80UH2V or 80G1UH2V). To activate this option, move
the jumper pin (see Figure 31) to desired setting (5 minutes
or 10 minutes). The furnace will start on 1st stage heat and
stay at 1st stage heat for the duration of the selected time
before switching to 2nd stage heat.
W1 on the control board must be connected to W1 on the
thermostat.
Humidifier
Terminals are provided on the integrated ignition/blower
control board for connection to a 120-volt humidifier. The
“HUM” terminal is energized whenever the thermostat calls
for heat. See the furnace wiring diagram for specific
connection information.
506471-01
Figure 31
Electronic Air Cleaner
Terminals are provided on the integrated ignition/blower
control board for connection of a 120-volt electronic air
cleaner. The “EAC” terminal is energized whenever the
thermostat calls for heat, cooling, or continuous blower. See
furnace wiring diagram for specific connection information.
Variable Speed Features
This furnace is equipped with a variable speed circulation
air blower motor that will deliver a constant airflow within a
wide range of external static pressures. Other features of
this variable speed motor include:
Soft Start
The variable speed motor will slowly ramp up to normal
operating speed. This minimizes noise and increases
comfort by eliminating the initial blasts of air encountered
with standard motors.
Soft Stop
At the end of a cooling or heating cycle, the variable speed
motor will slowly ramp down after a short blower “off” delay.
If continuous blower operation has been selected, the
variable speed motor will slowly ramp down until it reaches
the airflow for that mode.
Passive and Active Dehumidification
Passive Dehumidification
For situations where humidity control is a problem, a
dehumidification feature has been built into the variable
speed motor. At the start of each cooling cycle, the variable
speed motor will run at 82% of the rated airflow for 7.5
minutes. After 7.5 minutes has elapsed, the motor will
increase to 100% of the rated airflow.
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Page 27 of 41
Active Dehumidification
To achieve additional dehumidification, clip the jumper wire
located below the DEHUM terminal on the integrated ignition/
blower control board and connect a humidity control that
opens on humidity rise to the DEHUM and R terminals. The
DEHUM terminal on the control board must be connected
to the normally closed contact of the humidity control so that
the board senses an open circuit on high humidity. In this
setup, the variable speed motor will operate at a 18%
reduction in the normal cooling airflow rate when there is a
call for dehumidification.
Both the passive and active dehumidification methods
described above can be utilized on the same furnace.
Circulating Airflow Adjustments
Cooling Mode
The units are factory set for the highest airflow for each model.
Adjustments can be made to the cooling airflow by
repositioning the jumper plug marked COOL – A, B, C, D
(see Figure 32) based on the information found in the table.
To determine what CFM the motor is delivering at any time,
count the number of times the amber LED on the control board
flashes. Each flash signifies 100 CFM; count the flashes and
multiply by 100 to determine the actual CFM delivered (for
example: 10 flashes x 100 = 1000 CFM).
Heating Mode
The unit as shipped is factory set to run at the middle of the
heating rise range as shown on the unit rating plate. If higher or
lower rise is desired, change the airflow 15% up or down by
moving the ADJUST jumper plug (see Figure 32) from the NORM
position to the (+) or (–) position. This adjustment will also cause
the cooling airflow to be raised or lowered by 15%.
The TEST position on the ADJUST tap is not used.
The jumper plug on the HEAT tap should remain in the position
(A, B, C, or D) listed in the HEAT Setting column in the table
found in Figure 32. Changing the setpoints may not increase or
decrease heating blower speeds. In some cases, running the
blower with the heat settings in the wrong position may cause
the furnace to operate outside the furnace’s intended temperature
rise range.
Continuous Blower Operation
The comfort level of the living space can be enhanced when
using this feature by allowing continuous circulation of air
between calls for cooling or heating. The circulation of air
occurs at half the full cooling airflow rate.
To engage the continuous blower operation, place the fan
switch on the thermostat into the ON position. A call for fan
from the thermostat closes R to G on the ignition control
board. The control waits for a 1 second thermostat debounce
delay before responding to the call for fan by ramping the
circulating blower up to 50% of the cooling speed. When
the call for continuous fan is satisfied, the control immediately
ramps down the circulating blower.
ADJUST, HEAT, and COOL Taps
on Integrated Ignition/Blower
Control Board
Figure 32
Page 28 of 41
Issue 1034
506471-01
ADJUSTING AIRFLOW
Table 11
506471-01
Issue 1034
Page 29 of 41
START-UP
To Start Furnace:
Lighting Instructions
CAUTION
For Your Safety, Read Before Operating
Be sure the manual gas control has been in the “OFF”
position for at least 5 minutes before starting the unit.
Do not attempt to manually light the burners.
WARNING
If you do not follow these instructions exactly, a fire or
explosion may result causing property damage, personal
injury, or loss of life.
1. Set the room thermostat to lowest setting.
2. Remove burner access door.
These furnaces are equipped with an ignition device which
automatically lights the burners. Do not try to light the
burners by hand.
Before operating, smell all around the appliance area for
gas. Be sure to smell next to the floor because some gas is
heavier than air and will settle on the floor.
3. Move the gas control knob to the “ON” position. Use
only your hand to turn the gas control knob. Never use
tools. If the knob will not turn by hand, don’t try to repair
it; call a qualified service technician. Force or
attempted repair may result in a fire or explosion.
4. Replace the burner access door.
What to do if you smell gas:
5. Turn on the electrical power to the furnace.
•
Do not try to light any appliances.
•
Extinguish any open flame.
6. Set room thermostat to a point above room temperature
to light the burners. After the burners have ignited, set
room thermostat to desired temperature.
•
Do not touch any electric switch; do not use any phone
in your building.
To Shut Down Furnace:
•
Immediately call your gas supplier from a neighbor’s
phone. Follow the gas supplier’s instructions.
•
If you cannot reach your gas supplier, call the fire
department.
Do not use this furnace if any part has been under water.
Immediately call a qualified service technician to inspect the
furnace and to replace any part of the control system and
gas control which has been under water.
1. Set the room thermostat to the lowest setting.
2. Turn off all electric power to the furnace.
3. Remove burner access door.
4.
Shut off gas by moving gas control knob to “OFF” position.
5. Replace the burner access door.
IMPORTANT: Refer to the Lighting Instruction label on
the furnace for instructions on operating the specific
controls used on your unit.
WARNING
Should overheating occur or the gas supply fail to shut
off, shut off the manual gas valve to the appliance
before shutting off the electrical supply.
Page 30 of 41
Issue 1034
506471-01
OPERATION
the R to G circuit and the circulating blower motor runs at
50% of the selected cooling CFM until switched off. When
the call for fan is turned off, the control de-energizes the
circulating blower.
Sequence of Operation (see Figures 33 – 37)
Heating
On a call for heat from the room thermostat, the control board
performs a 1 second self check. Upon confirmation that the
pressure switch contacts are in an open position, the control
energizes the combustion blower on high speed. The control
then checks for adequate combustion air by making sure
the low-fire pressure switch contacts are closed.
Cooling
The unit is set up at the factory for single stage cooling. For
two stage cooling operation, clip the jumper wire located
between the Y to Y2 terminals on the integrated ignition/
blower control board.
The igniter energizes and is allowed to warm up for 7
seconds before the gas valve energizes on 1st stage and
burners ignite. 45 seconds after the control confirms ignition
has occurred, the control drops the combustion blower to
low speed.
If the active dehumidification feature is enabled, the
circulating blower runs at 82% of the selected cooling speed
as long as there is a call for dehumidification.
The circulating blower ramps up to 50% of 1st stage heat speed
and operates at that speed for one minute (including ramp up
time), then at 75% of 1st stage heat speed for an additional
minute. After that, the circulating blower operates at full 1st
stage heat speed until either the heat call is satisfied or the
thermostat initiates a call for 2nd stage heat. On a call for 2nd
stage heat, the control energizes the circulating air blower on
full CFM 2nd stage heat.
The system must not be in either the passive or active
dehumidification mode when charging a cooling system.
If the automatic heat staging option is being used (see Single
Stage Thermostat Operation on page 27), the furnace does
not switch to 2nd stage heat in response to a call from the
thermostat but instead operates at 1st stage heat for the
duration of the selected time before automatically switching
to 2nd stage heat.
When the call for heat is satisfied, the gas valve and
combustion air blower shut down. The control board shuts
off the gas valve and runs the combustion blower for an
additional 15 seconds. The circulating air blower continues
to run for 2 minutes at 82% of the selected heating speed
(low fire or high fire) before ramping down.
In the event the unit loses ignition, the control will attempt to
recycle up to five times before it goes into a 1 hour lockout.
Lockout may be manually reset by removing power from
the control for more than 1 second or removing the
thermostat call for heat for more than 3 seconds.
If during a heating cycle the limit control senses an abnormally
high temperature and opens, the control board de-energizes
the gas valve and the combustion blower while the circulating
blower ramps up to 2nd stage heat speed. The circulating blower
remains energized until the limits are closed.
Fan On
When the thermostat is set for continuous fan operation and
there is no demand for heating or cooling, a call for fan closes
506471-01
IMPORTANT
Single Stage Cooling
A call for cooling from the thermostat closes the R to Y circuit
on the integrated ignition/blower control board. The control
waits for a 1-second delay before energizing the circulating
blower to 82% of the selected cooling CFM (passive
dehumidification mode). After 7.5 minutes, the circulating
blower automatically ramps up to 100% of the selected cooling
airflow. When the call for cooling is satisfied, the circulating
blower ramps back down to 82% of the selected cooling
airflow for 1 minute, then shuts off.
Two Stage Cooling
A call for 1st stage cooling from the thermostat closes the R
to Y circuit on the control board. The control waits for a 1second delay before energizing the circulating blower. The
blower motor runs at 57% of the selected air flow for the first
7.5 minutes of the 1st stage cooling demand (passive
dehumidification mode). After 7.5 minutes, the blower motor
runs at 70% of the selected cooling air flow until 1st stage
cooling demand is satisfied.
A call for 2nd stage cooling from the thermostat closes the R to
Y2 circuit on the control board. The blower motor ramps up to
100% of the selected cooling air flow. When the demand for
cooling is met, the blower ramps down to Y1 until satisfied,
then ramps down to 57% for 1 minute, then turns off.
Heat Pump
For heat pump operation, clip the jumper wire located below
the O terminal on the integrated ignition/blower control board.
In heat pump mode, a call for heat will result in the circulating
air blower operating at the selected cooling airflow after a
brief ramp-up period.
Issue 1034
Page 31 of 41
1st Stage - 2nd Stage (W1/W2) Heat Call
W1/W2
w1 w2
W1
1
min
1
min
100%*
75%*
100%**
2 min
2 min
W1 - Heat Demand Present
w1 - Heat Demand Satisfied
82%**
82%*
W2 - High Heat Demand Present
w2 - High Heat Demand Satisfied
w1
50%*
CALL
* Percentage of Low Fire CFM
OFF
** Percentage of High Fire CFM
Figure 33
Single Stage Cooling
High Heat (W2) Call
W2
y
Y
w2
7.5 minutes
2 min
100%
82%
1
min
82%
100*
82%*
Y - Cool Demand Present
y - Cool Demand Satisfied
CALL
W2 - High Heat Demand Present OFF
w2 - High Heat Demand Satisfied
CALL
OFF
Figure 36
* Percentage of High Fire CFM
Two Stage Cooling
Figure 34
Y1 / Y2 Y1 / y2
Y1
Call for Fan
G
7.5
minutes
g
y1
100%
70%
1
min
57%
57%
50%
70%
1
min
57%
y1
G - Fan Switch ON
CALL
g - Fan Switch OFF
OFF
CALL
Y1 - 1st Stage Cool Demand Present
OFF
y1 - 1st Stage Cool Demand Satisfied
nd
Y2 - 2 Stage Cool Demand Present
Figure 35
y2 - 2nd Stage Cool Demand Satisfied
Figure 37
Page 32 of 41
Issue 1034
506471-01
Controls
Following is a description of the operation of some of the
controls used in this furnace. All models use one of each
control, except as noted.
Pressure Switch
The pressure switch is a normally open switch that monitors
combustion air flow. Inadequate air flow resulting from
excessive venting system restriction or a failed combustion
blower will cause the switch to remain open. A80UH2V and
80G2UHV models have two pressure switches.
propane gas, the manifold pressures are 4.9" w.c. (1st stage)
and 10.0" w.c. (2nd stage).
To measure inlet or outlet pressure, remove plug from
desired pressure tap (inlet or outlet) as shown in Figure 38
and connect a water manometer or gauge to the proper
pressure tap.
GAS VALVE SHOWN IN “ON” POSITION
Rollout Switch
The rollout switch is a normally closed switch that opens when
abnormal temperatures exist in the burner area. This can be
caused by a restricted heat exchanger causing burner flame
to “roll out” into the vestibule area or burner box.
This switch must be manually reset by pushing the button
on top to restore furnace operation. A80UH2V and
80G2UHV models have two rollout switches.
Primary Limit Control
This is a normally closed control that opens if abnormally
high circulating air temperatures occur. It is an automatic
reset control.
Auxiliary Limit Control
This is a normally closed control, located on the circulating
air blower housing, that opens under abnormal “reverse air
flow” conditions that could occur in a counterflow or horizontal
installation if the circulating air blower fails. It is an automatic
reset control.
Interlock (Blower Door) Switch
When the blower door is removed, the interlock switch
breaks the power supply to the burner controls and blower
motor. The switch operation must be checked to confirm it
is operating correctly.
Checking and Adjusting Gas Input
The minimum permissible gas supply pressure for the
purpose of input adjustment is 5"w.c. for natural gas or 11"
w..c. for propane gas. This furnace requires conversion for
use with propane (see Accessories section on page 26 for
correct kit). The maximum inlet gas supply pressure is 10.5"
w.c. for natural gas and 13" w.c. for propane. Gas input
must never exceed the value shown on the furnace rating
plate.
Figure 38
These models have separate adjusting screws (3/32" hex) for
1st stage (marked “LO”) and 2nd stage (marked “HI”). The
adjusting screws are positioned on either side of the barbed
fitting (see Figure 38). Turn the adjusting screws clockwise to
increase pressure and input; counterclockwise to decrease
pressure and input. The pressure regulator adjustment is
sensitive; one turn of the adjusting screw will result in a relatively
large change in manifold pressure.
To adjust the regulator:
1. Set high-fire (2nd stage) setting by turning hex adjustment
screw to desired rate.
2. Set low-fire (1st stage) setting by turning hex adjustment
screw to desired rate.
Make sure the final high and low fire manifold pressures
are within the allowable ranges specified above for the
gas being used.
CAUTION
The furnace rate must be within +/- 2% of the appliance
rating input.
Be sure to replace the inlet and outlet pressure tap plugs
after testing and/or adjusting gas input.
These units are equipped for rated input at manifold pressures
of 1.7" w.c. (1st stage) and 3.5" w.c. (2nd stage) for natural gas.
When these furnaces have been converted for use with
506471-01
Issue 1034
Page 33 of 41
For Natural Gas: Check the furnace rate by observing the
gas meter, when available, making sure all other gas
appliances are turned off. The test hand on the meter should
be timed for at least one revolution. Note the number of
seconds for one revolution.
BTU/HR Cubic Feet Per Revolution x 3600 x Heating
=
INPUT
# Seconds Per Revolution
Value
The heating value of the gas can be obtained from the local
utility company.
For Propane Gas: The only check for the furnace rate is to
properly adjust the manifold pressure using a manometer
and the information provided in Table 12. Typical manifold
set point for installations at altitudes from 0 to 4500 feet
above sea level is 10.0" W.C.
Temperature Rise
Check the temperature rise and, if necessary, adjust blower
speed to maintain temperature rise within the range shown
on the unit rating plate.
High Altitude
In both the United States and Canada, this furnace is
approved for operation at altitudes from 0 to 4500 feet above
sea level without any required modifications. From 4500 to
7500 feet, the gas manifold pressure needs to be adjusted
according to the information shown in Table 12. To adjust
the manifold pressure, refer to previous section Checking
and Adjusting Gas Input. For installations above 7500
feet, call Technical Service at 1-800-515-3501 for assistance.
For installations above 4500 feet fill in the appropiate
information on the furnace label that has the words “This
furnace was converted on . . . . . . “.
Emergency Replacement Motor Operation
If the variable speed motor needs to be replaced in an
emergency situation (such as “no heat”) and an exact
replacement motor is not immediately available, a standard
PSC motor of equivalent frame size, voltage, rotation, and
horsepower can be temporarily installed until the correct
replacement motor can be obtained.
Connect the desired speed tap to the “EAC” terminal and the
neutral tap to the neutral terminal on the ignition control (refer
to the furnace wiring diagram). T he ignition control will control
the motor’s operation, including a nominal 20 second “on” delay
with a call for heat and a nominal 180 second “off” delay when
the thermostat is satisfied. It will also operate the motor on a
call for cooling, with no “on” or “off” delays.
Verify that the unit is operating at the desired speed and
within the rise range as shown on the unit rating plate.
The correct replacement motor must be installed as
soon as possible to ensure continued satisfactory
operation of the furnace.
MANIFOLD PRESSURE SETTINGS
* Consult local utility for actual heating value.
Furnace input = Input Factor x Nameplate Input
NOTE: A natural to LP/Propane gas changeover kit is necessary to convert this unit. Refer to the changeover kit installation instruction for the
conversion procedure.
Table 12
Page 34 of 41
Issue 1034
506471-01
MAINTENANCE
Typical Flame Appearance
WARNING
Heat
Exchanger
ELECTRICAL SHOCK, FIRE,
OR EXPLOSION HAZARD
Burner
Failure to follow the safety warnings exactly could result
in dangerous operation, serious injury, death, or property
damage.
Gas
Manifold
Improper servicing could result in dangerous operation,
serious injury, death, or property damage.
Burner
Flame
(Blue Only)
• Before servicing, disconnect all electrical power to
furnace.
Figure 39
• When servicing controls, label all wires prior to
disconnecting. Reconnect wires correctly.
• Verify proper operation after servicing.
It is recommended that this furnace be inspected by a
qualified service technician at the beginning of each heating
season.
Filters
Filters should be checked at least every 6 weeks. Disposable
filters should be replaced when dirty, and cleanable filters
should be cleaned regularly. It is important to keep the air filters
clean, as dirty filters can restrict airflow and the blower and
induced draft motors depend upon sufficient air flowing across
and through them to keep from overheating.
Lubrication
The blower motor and induced draft motor are pre-lubricated
by the manufacturer and do not require further lubricating
attention. However, the motors should be cleaned
periodically to prevent the possibility of overheating due to
an accumulation of dust and dirt on the windings or on the
motor exterior.
Burners
Light the burners and allow to operate for a few minutes to
establish normal burning conditions. Observe the burner
flames. Compare this observation to Figure 39 to determine if
proper flame adjustment is present. Flame should be
predominantly blue in color and strong in appearance. Check
that all burners are lit, and that the flame does not impinge on
the sides of the heat exchanger.
Distorted flame or yellow tipping of the natural gas burner
flame, or long yellow tips on propane, may be caused by lint
accumulation or dirt inside the burner or burner ports, at the
air inlet between the burner and manifold pipe, or
obstructions over the burner orifice.
Use a soft brush or vacuum to clean the affected areas.
506471-01
Issue 1034
Page 35 of 41
CONTROL DIAGNOSTICS
Failure Codes - Red LED
Troubleshooting
Make the following visual checks before troubleshooting:
1.
2.
Check to see that the power to the furnace and the
integrated ignition/blower control board is ON.
The manual shutoff valves in the gas line to the furnace
must be open.
3.
Make sure all wiring connections are secure.
4.
Review the Sequence of Operation (see page 31).
Start the system by setting thermostat above room
temperature. Observe system response. Then use the
information provided in this section to check the system
operation.
The furnace has a built-in, self-diagnostic capability. If a
system problem occurs, a fault code is shown by a red LED
on the control board. The control continuously monitors its
own operation and the operation of the system. If a failure
occurs, the LED will indicate the failure code. The flash
codes are presented in Table 13
Fault Code History Button
The control stores the last five fault codes in memory. A
pushbutton switch is located on the control (see Figure 40
on page 38). When the pushbutton switch is pressed and
released, the control flashes the stored fault codes. The
most recent fault code is flashed first; the oldest fault code
is flashed last. To clear the fault code history, press and
hold the pushbutton switch in for more than 5 seconds before
releasing.
High Heat State LED
On A80UH2V and 80G1UH2V models, a green LED is
provided on the control board to indicate high heat state
(see Table 14).
CFM LED
On A80UH2V and 80G1UH2V models equipped with a
variable speed motor, an amber LED is provided on the
control board to display CFM. To determine what CFM the
motor is delivering at any time, count the number of times
the amber LED flashes. Each flash signifies 100 CFM; count
the flashes and multiply by 100 to determine the actual CFM
delivered (for example: 10 flashes x 100 = 1000 CFM).
Page 36 of 41
Issue 1034
LED Status
Fault Description
LED Off
No power to control or control
hardware fault detected
LED On
Normal operation
1 Flash
Flame Present with gas valve off
2 Flashes
Pressure switch closed with
inducer off
3 Flashes
Low-fire pressure, rollout, or aux
limit switch open
4 Flashes
High limit switch open
5 Flashes
Not used
6 Flashes
Pressure switch cycle lockout
7 Flashes
Lockout due to no ignition
8 Flashes
Lockout due to too many flame
dropouts
9 Flashes
Incorrect polarity and phasing
Table 13
High Heat State - Green LED
LED
Status
Description
LED Off
No demand for high heat
LED On
High heat demand, operating
normally
LED Flashing
High heat demand, high pressure
switch not closed
Table 14
506471-01
REPAIR PARTS
The following repair parts are available from the local distributor. When ordering parts, include the complete furnace model
number and serial number which are printed on the rating plate located on the furnace.
Control Group
Transformer
High limit control
Auxiliary limit
Gas valve
Integrated ignition/blower control board
Flame sensor
Pressure switches – 1st stage and 2nd stage
Blower door interlock switch
Combustion blower assembly
Flame rollout protector switch
Hot surface igniter
Input choke
506471-01
Heat Exchanger Group
Heat exchanger
Blower Group
Blower housing assembly
Blower wheel
Blower mount
Blower motor
Blower motor mount
Burner Group
Gas manifold
Burner orifices
Burners
Issue 1034
Page 37 of 41
Wiring Diagram
VLT
WHT
RED
BLK
BRN
BRN
FLAME
SENSOR
ROLLOUT
SWITCH
GAS VALVE
VLT
VLT
IGNITER
M C HI
WHT/BLK
MAIN
LIMIT
1 2 2-PIN
1 2 CONNECTOR
RED
RED/BLK
ORN
BLU
GRY
BRN
S1 3 2 1
P1 3 2 1
VLT
INTERLOCK
SWITCH
WHT
BLK
HOT
NEUTRAL 120/1/60
GROUND
GRN
PRESSURE
PRESSURE PRESSURE SWITCH - ROLLOUT
SWITCH
SWITCH
SWITCH
DRAIN
(HIGH)
(LOW)
(IF USED) (IF USED)
YEL
YEL
BLK
WHT
INDUCED
DRAFT
BLOWER
5-PIN
CONNECTOR
24V
TRANSFORMER
AUX LIMIT
SWITCH
(IF USED)
LO HEAT
GRY
BRN
WHT/BLK
VLT
PARK 1
PARK 2
HI HEAT
XFMR
CONT
EAC
COOL
HUM
LINE
AUX LIMIT
SWITCH
IGNITION CONTROL
VLT
NEUTRAL
HUM XFMR
HOT
AUTOMATIC
HEAT STAGING
JUMPER
AMBER LED
W1W2 C R G Y
11 8 5 2
Y2 O
10 7 4 1
DEHUM
GREEN LED
RED LED
YEL
12 9 6 3
5 AMP
P5
NONE
5
10
1
2
3
4
5
LINE CIRC EAC
WHT
WHT
RED
RED/BLK
ORN
BLU
120V
WHT
RED
BLK
BLK/WHT
CIRCULATION
BLOWER
SW1
5-PIN
CONNECTOR
1 2 3 4 5
GRN
BLK
WHT
FAULT CODE
HISTORY
BUTTON
(SEE NOTE 1)
W1 W2 C Y R G
CONDENSER
THERMOSTAT
INPUT CHOKE
(IF USED)
WHT
YEL
YEL
WHT
BLK
LINE VOLTAGE - FACTORY
NOTES:
BRN
TYP
LINE VOLTAGE - FIELD
LOW VOLTAGE - FACTORY
1. PRESS AND RELEASE FAULT CODE HISTORY BUTTON TO
DISPLAY FAULT CODES. TO ERASE CODES, PRESS AND HOLD
BUTTON IN FOR MORE THAN 5 SECONDS
LOW VOLTAGE - FIELD
2. IF ANY OF THE ORIGINAL WIRE AS SUPPLIED WITH THE FURNACE MUST BE REPLACED, IT MUST BE REPLACED
WITH WIRING MATERIAL HAVING A TEMP. RATING OF AT LEAST 90°C.
3. PROPER POLARITY MUST BE OBSERVED FOR FIELD LINE VOLTAGE SUPPLY; IGNITION CONTROL WILL LOCK
OUT IF POLARITY IS REVERSED.
4. FOR TEMPORARY SERVICE REPLACEMENT OF CIRCULATING BLOWER MOTOR WITH PSC MOTOR, CONNECT
DESIRED SPEED TAP TO “EAC” TERMINAL AND NEUTRAL TAP TO NEUTRAL TERMINAL ON IGNITION CONTROL.
5. DO NOT CONNECT C (COMMON) CONNECTION BETWEEN INDOOR UNIT AND THERMOSTAT EXCEPT WHEN
REQUIRED BY THE INDOOR THERMOSTAT. REFER TO THE THERMOSTAT INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS.
Figure 40
Page 38 of 41
Issue 1034
506471-01
Typical Field Wiring Diagram
Figure 41
506471-01
Issue 1034
Page 39 of 41
START-UP & PERFORMANCE CHECK LIST
UNIT SET UP
Page 40 of 41
Issue 1034
506471-01
UNIT OPERATION
506471-01
Issue 1034
Page 41 of 41