Specifications | Allied Air Enterprises 92G1UH Furnace User Manual

INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
A95UH, A93UH, 95G1UH & 92G1UH
Warm Air Gas Furnace
Upflow/Horizontal Left and Right Air Discharge
This manual must be left with the homeowner for future reference.
This is a safety alert symbol and should never be ignored. When you see this symbol on labels or in
manuals, be alert to the potential for personal injury or death.
WARNING
CAUTION
Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service or
maintenance can cause property damage, personal injury
or loss of life. Installation and service must be performed
by a licensed professional installer (or equivalent), service
agency or the gas supplier.
As with any mechanical equipment, personal injury can
result from contact with sharp sheet metal edges. Be
careful when you handle this equipment.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Unit Dimensions ............................................................ 2
A95/A93/95G1/92G1UH Parts Arrangement ................ 3
A95/A93/95G1/92G1UH Gas Furnace ......................... 4
Shipping and Packing List ............................................ 4
Safety Information ......................................................... 4
Use of Furnace as a Construction Heater .................... 5
General ......................................................................... 6
Combustion, Dilution, Ventilation Air ............................. 6
Setting Equipment ........................................................ 9
Filters .......................................................................... 13
Duct System ................................................................ 13
Pipe and Fittings Specifications .................................. 13
Joint Cementing Procedure ........................................ 15
Venting Practices ........................................................ 16
Vent Piping Guidelines ................................................ 17
Gas Piping .................................................................. 31
Electrical ..................................................................... 34
Unit Start Up ................................................................ 37
Gas Pressure Measurement ....................................... 39
High Altitude Information ............................................. 39
Other Unit Adjustments ............................................... 41
Service ........................................................................ 42
Planned Service .......................................................... 44
Failure Codes .............................................................. 44
Repair Parts List ......................................................... 45
Start Up Checklist ....................................................... 46
Manufactured By
Allied Air Enterprises, Inc.
A Lennox International, Inc. Company
215 Metropolitan Drive
West Columbia, SC 29170
*506501-01*
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A95UH, A93UH, 95G1UH & 92G1UH Unit Dimensions - inches (mm)
1 NOTE - 20 C/D (5 Ton) size units installed in upflow
applications that require air volumes of 1800 cfm (850 L/s) or
greater must have one of the following:
1. Single side return air with transition, to accommodate
20 x 25 x 1 in. (508 x 635 x 25 mm) air filter.
2. Single side return air with optional RAB Return Air Base
3. Bottom return air.
4. Return air from both sides.
5. Bottom and one side return air.
2 Optional External Side Return Air Filter kit is not for use with
optional Return Air Base.
* Consider sizing requirements for optional IAQ equipment
before cutting side return opening.
FRONT VIEW
SIDE VIEW
Model
A95UH/A93UH
95G1UH/92G1UH
Page 2 of 48
B
A
in.
mm
D
C
in.
mm
in.
mm
in.
mm
16
406
7-5/8
194
045-08
045-12
070-08
070-12
17-1/2
446
16-3/8
416
090-12
090-16
110-16
110-20
21
533
19-7/8
505
19-1/2
495
9-3/8
238
135-20
24-1/2
622
23-3/8
594
23
584
11-1/8
283
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EXPANDED VIEW
Figure 1
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A95UH, A93UH, 95G1UH &92G1UH Gas Furnace
The A95UH/A93UH/95G1UH & 92G1UH Category IV gas
furnace is shipped ready for installation in the upflow or
horizontal position. The furnace is shipped with the bottom
panel in place. The bottom panel must be removed if the
unit is to be installed in horizontal or upflow applications with
bottom return air.
Safety Information
WARNING
Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service or
maintenance can cause property damage, personal injury
or loss of life. Installation and service must be performed
by a licensed professional installer (or equivalent), service
agency or the gas supplier.
The A95UH/A93UH/95G1UH & 92G1UH can be installed
as either a Direct Vent or a Non-Direct Vent gas central
furnace
CAUTION
The furnace is equipped for installation in natural gas
applications. A conversion kit (ordered separately) is required
for use in propane/LP gas applications.
As with any mechanical equipment, personal injury can
result from contact with sharp sheet metal edges. Be
careful when you handle this equipment.
NOTE: In Direct Vent installations, combustion air is taken
from outdoors and flue gases are discharged outdoors. In
Non-Direct Vent installations, combustion air is taken from
indoors and flue gases are discharged outdoors. See Figure
2 for applications involving roof termination.
DANGER
DANGER OF EXPLOSION!
There are circumstances in which odorant used with LP/
Propane gas can lose its scent. In case of a leak, LP/
Propane gas will settle close to the floor and may be difficult
to smell. An LP/Propane leak detector should be installed
in all LP applications.
Use only the type of gas approved for use with this furnace.
Refer to unit nameplate.
A95UH/A93UH/95G1UH & 92G1UH units are CSA
International certified to ANSI Z21.47 and CSA 2.3 standards.
Building Codes
In the USA, installation of gas furnaces must conform with
local building codes. In the absence of local codes, units
must be installed according to the current National Fuel Gas
Code (ANSI Z223.1/NFPA 54). The National Fuel Gas Code
is available from the American National Standards
Institute, Inc., 11 West 42nd Street, New Your, NY 10036.
Figure 2
Shipping and Packing List
1 - Assembled Gas Furnace
1 - Bag assembly containing the following:
3 - Wire nuts
1 - Snap bushing
1 - Snap Plug
1 - Wire tie
1 - Condensate trap
1 - Condensate trap cap
1 - Condensate trap clamp
1 - 2” diameter debris screen
In Canada, installation must conform with current National
Standard of Canada CSA-B149 Natural Gas and Propane
Installation Codes, local plumbing or waste water codes and
other applicable local codes.
In order to ensure proper unit operation in non-direct vent
applications, combustion and ventilation air supply must be
provided according to the current National Fuel Gas Code
or CSA-B149 standard.
Check equipment for shipping damage. If you find any
damage, immediately contact the last carrier.
Please refer to specification sheets for available accessories.
Page 4 of 48
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Installed Locations
This furnace is CSA International certified for installation
clearances to combustible material as listed on the unit
nameplate and in the table in Figure 10. Accessibility and
service clearances must take precedence over fire protection
clearances.
Heating Unit Installed Parallel to Air Handler Unit
NOTE: For installation on combustible floors, the furnace
shall not be installed directly on carpeting, tile, or other
combustible material other than wood flooring.
For installation in a residential garage, the furnace must be
installed so that the burner(s) and the ignition source are
located no less than 18 inches (457 mm) above the floor.
The furnace must be located or protected to avoid physical
damage by vehicles. When a furnace is installed in a public
garage, hangar, or other building that has a hazardous
atmosphere, the furnace must be installed according to
recommended good practice requirements and current
National Fuel Gas Code or CSA B149 standards.
Heating Unit Installed Upstream of Cooling Unit
Note: Furnace must be adjusted to obtain a temperature
rise within the range specified on the unit nameplate. Failure
to do so may cause erratic limit operation and premature
heat exchanger failure.
This furnace must be installed so that its electrical
components are protected from water.
Installed in Combination with a Cooling Coil
When this furnace is used with cooling units (Figure 3), it
shall be installed in parallel with, or on the upstream side of,
cooling units to avoid condensation in the heating
compartment. With a parallel flow arrangement, a damper
(or other means to control the flow of air) must adequately
prevent chilled air from entering the furnace. If the damper
is manually operated, it must be equipped to prevent
operation of either the heating or the cooling unit, unless it
is in the full HEAT or COOL setting.
When installed, this furnace must be electrically grounded
according to local codes. In addition, in the United States,
installation must conform with the current National Electric
Code, ANSI/NFPA No. 70. The National Electric Code (ANSI/
NFPA No. 70) is available from the following address:
National Fire Protection Association
1 Battery March Park
Quincy, MA 02269
NOTE: This furnace is designed for a minimum continuous
return air temperature of 60°F (16°C) or an intermittent
operation down to 55°F (13°C) dry bulb for cases where a
night setback thermostat is used. Return air temperature
must not exceed 85°F (29°C) dry bulb.
This furnace may be installed in alcoves, closets, attics,
basements, garages, and utility rooms in the upflow or
horizontal position.
This furnace design has not been CSA certified for installation
in mobile homes, recreational vehicles, or outdoors.
Use of Furnace as a Construction Heater
These units are not recommended for construction heater
during any phase of construction. Very low return air
temperature, harmful vapors and operation of the unit with
clogged or misplaced filters will damage the unit.
These units may be used for heating of buildings or structures
under construction, if the following conditions are met:
• The vent system must be permanently installed per these
installation instructions.
•
A room thermostat must control the furnace. The use of
fixed jumpers that will provide continuous heating is not
allowed.
•
The return air duct must be provided and sealed to the
furnace.
•
Return air temperature range between 60°F (16°C) and
80°F (27°C) must be maintained.
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In Canada, all electrical wiring and grounding for the unit
must be installed according to the current regulations of the
Canadian Electrical Code Part I (CSA Standard C22.1) and/
or local codes.
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Figure 3
•
Air filters must be installed in the system and must be
maintained during construction.
•
Air filters must be replaced upon construction completion.
Product Contains Fiberglass Wool.
•
The input rate and temperature rise must be set per the
furnace rating plate.
•
One hundred percent (100%) outdoor air must be provided
for combustion air requirements during construction.
Temporary ducting may supply outdoor air to the furnace.
Do not connect duct directly to the furnace. Size the
temporary duct following the instructions in section for
Combustion, Dilution and Ventilation Air in a confined
space with air from outside.
•
The furnace heat exchanger, components, duct system,
air filters and evaporator coils must be thoroughly
cleaned following final construction cleanup.
Disturbing the insulation in this product during
installation, maintenance, or repair will expose you to
fiberglass wool. Breathing this may cause lung cancer.
(Fiberglass wool is known to the State of California to
cause cancer.)
Fiberglass wool may also cause respiratory, skin, and
eye irritation.
To reduce exposure to this substance or for further
information, consult material safety data sheets available
from address shown below, or contact your supervisor.
Allied Air Enterprises, Inc.
215 Metropolitan Drive
West Columbia, SC 29170
•
All furnace operating conditions (including ignition, input
rate, temperature rise and venting) must be verified
according to these installation instructions.
General
These instructions are intended as a general guide and do
not supersede local codes in any way. Consult authorities
having jurisdiction before installation.
WARNING
Combustion, Dilution & Ventilation Air
If this unit is installed as a Non-Direct Vent Furnace,
follow the guidelines in this section.
NOTE: In Non-Direct Vent Installations, combustion air is
taken from indoors and flue gases are discharged outdoors.
WARNING
In addition to the requirements outlined previously, the
following general recommendations must be considered
when installing one of these furnaces:
•
Place the furnace as close to the center of the air
distribution system as possible. The furnace should also
be located close to the chimney or vent termination point.
•
When the furnace is installed in non-direct vent
applications, do not install the furnace where drafts might
blow directly into it. This could cause improper
combustion and unsafe operation.
•
When the furnace is installed in non-direct vent
applications, do not block the furnace combustion air
opening with clothing, boxes, doors, etc. Air is needed
for proper combustion and safe unit operation.
•
When the furnace is installed in an attic or other insulated
space, keep insulation away from the furnace.
•
When the furnace is installed in an unconditioned space,
consider provisions required to prevent freezing of
condensate drain system.
CAUTION
These units should not be installed in areas normally
subject to freezing temperatures.
Page 6 of 48
Insufficient combustion air can cause headaches,
nausea, dizziness or asphyxiation. It will also cause
excess water in the heat exchanger resulting in rusting
and premature heat exchanger failure. Excessive
exposure to contaminated combustion air will result in
safety and performance related problems. Avoid
exposure to the following substances in the combustion
air supply:
Permanent wave solutions
Chlorinated waxes and cleaners
Chlorine base swimming pool chemicals
Water softening chemicals
De-icing salts or chemicals
Carbon tetrachloride
Halogen type refrigerants
Cleaning solvents (such as perchloroethylene)
Printing inks, paint removers, varnishes, etc.
Hydrochloric acid
Antistatic fabric softeners for clothes dryers
Masonry acid washing materials
In the past, there was no problem in bringing in sufficient
outdoor air for combustion. Infiltration provided all the air
that was needed. In today’s homes, tight construction
practices make it necessary to bring in air from outside for
combustion. Take into account that exhaust fans, appliance
vents, chimneys, and fireplaces force additional air that could
be used for combustion out of the house. Unless outside
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506501-01
air is brought into the house for combustion, negative
pressure (outside pressure is greater than inside pressure)
will build to the point that a down draft can occur in the furnace
vent pipe or chimney. As a result, combustion gases enter
the living space creating a potentially dangerous situation.
In the absence of local codes concerning air for combustion
and ventilation, use the guidelines and procedures in this
section to install these furnaces to ensure efficient and safe
operation. You must consider combustion air needs and
requirements for exhaust vents and gas piping. A portion of
this information has been reprinted with permission from
the National Fuel Gas Code (ANSI-Z223.1/NFPA 54). This
reprinted material is not the complete and official position of
ANSI on the referenced subject, which is represented only
by the standard in its entirely.
In Canada, refer to the CSA B149 Installation codes.
CAUTION
Do not install the furnace in a corrosive or contaminated
atmosphere. Meet all combustion and ventilation air
requirements, as well as all local codes.
All gas-fired appliances require air for the combustion
process. If sufficient combustion air is not available, the
furnace or other appliance will operate inefficiently and
unsafely. Enough air must be provided to meet the needs
of all fuel-burning appliances and appliances such as exhaust
fans which force air out of the house. When fireplaces,
exhaust fans, or clothes dryers are used at the same time
as the furnace, much more air is required to ensure proper
combustion and to prevent a down draft. Insufficient air
causes incomplete combustion which can result in carbon
monoxide.
infiltration. If the furnace is located in a building of tight
construction with weather stripping and caulking around the
windows and doors, follow the procedures in the “Air from
Outside” section.
Confined Space
A confined space is an area with a volume less than 50
cubic feet (1.42 m³) per 1,000 Btu (.29 kW) per hour of the
combined input rating of all appliances installed in that space.
This definition includes furnace closets or small equipment
rooms.
When the furnace is installed so that supply ducts carry air
circulated by the furnace to areas outside the space
containing the furnace, the return air must be handled by
ducts which are sealed to the furnace casing and which
terminate outside the space containing the furnace. This is
especially important when the furnace is mounted on a
platform in a confined space such as a closet or small
equipment room. Even a small leak around the base of the
unit at the platform or at the return air duct connection can
cause a potentially dangerous negative pressure condition.
Air for combustion and ventilation can be brought into the
confined space either from inside the building or from outside.
Air from Inside
If the confined space that houses the furnace adjoins a space
categorized as unconfined, air can be brought in by providing
two permanent openings between the two spaces. Each
opening must have a minimum free area of 1 square inch
(645 mm²) per 1,000 Btu (.29 kW) per hour of total input
rating of all gas-fired equipment in the confined space. Each
opening must be at least 100 square inches (64516 mm²).
One opening shall be within 12 inches (305 mm) of the top
of the enclosure and one opening within 12 inches (305 mm)
of the bottom. See Figure 4.
Equipment in Confined Space - All Air From Inside
In addition to providing combustion air, fresh outdoor air
dilutes contaminants in the indoor air. These contaminants
may include bleaches, adhesives, detergents, solvents and
other contaminants which can corrode furnace components.
The requirements for providing air for combustion and
ventilation depend largely on whether the furnace is installed
in an unconfined or a confined space.
Unconfined Space
An unconfined space is an area such as a basement or
large equipment room with a volume greater than 50 cubic
feet (1.42 m³) per 1,000 Btu (.29 kW) per hour of the
combined input rating of all appliances installed in that space.
This space also includes adjacent rooms which are not
separated by a door. Though an area may appear to be
unconfined, it might be necessary to bring in outdoor air for
combustion if the structure does not provide enough air by
NOTE: Each opening shall have a free area of at least one square
inch per 1,000 Btu (645 mm² per .29 kW) per hour of the total input
rating of all equipment in the enclosure, but not less than 100 square
inches (64546 mm²).
Figure 4
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Page 7 of 48
Air from Outside
If air from outside is brought in for combustion and ventilation,
the confined space shall be provided with two permanent
openings. One opening shall be within 12” (305 mm) of the
top of the enclosure and one within 12” (305 mm) of the
bottom. These openings must communicate directly or by
ducts with the outdoors or spaces (crawl or attic) that freely
communicate with the outdoors or indirectly through vertical
ducts. Each opening shall have a minimum free area of 1
square inch per 4,000 Btu (645 mm² per .59 kW) per total
input rating of all equipment in the enclosure (See Figure 5).
to 25 percent free area and metal louvers and grilles will
have 60 to 75 percent free area. Louvers and grilles must
be fixed in the open position or interlocked with the equipment
so that they are opened automatically during equipment
operation.
EQUIPMENT IN CONFINED SPACE - ALL AIR FROM OUTSIDE
(Inlet Air through Ventilated Attic)
EQUIPMENT IN CONFINED SPACE - ALL AIR FROM OUTSIDE
(Inlet Air from Crawl Space and Outlet Air to Ventilated Attic)
NOTE: The inlet and outlet air openings shall each have a free area
of at least one square inch per 4,000 Btu (645 mm² per 1.17 kW) per
hour of the total input rating of all equipment in the enclosure.
Figure 6
NOTE: The inlet and outlet air openings shall each have a free area
of at least one square inch per 4,000 Btu (645 mm² per 1.17 kW) per
hour of the total input rating of all equipment in the enclosure.
EQUIPMENT IN CONFINED SPACE - ALL AIR FROM OUTSIDE
Figure 5
If air from outside is brought in for combustion and ventilation,
the confined space must have two permanent openings. One
opening shall be within 12 inches (305 mm) of the top of the
enclosure and one opening within 12 inches (305 mm) of
the bottom. These openings must communicate directly or
by ducts with the outdoors or spaces (crawl or attic) that
freely communicate with the outdoors or indirectly through
vertical ducts. Each opening shall have a minimum free
area of 1 square inch (645 mm²) per 4,000 Btu (1.17 kW)
per hour of total input rating of all equipment in the enclosure.
See Figures 5 and 6. When communicating with the
outdoors through horizontal ducts, each opening shall have
a minimum free area of 1 square inch (645 mm²) per 2,000
Btu (.56 kW) per total input rating of all equipment in the
enclosure. See Figure 7.
When ducts are used, they shall be of the same crosssectional area as the free area of the openings to which
they connect. The minimum dimension of rectangular air
ducts shall be no less than 3 inches (75 mm). In calculating
free area, the blocking effect of louvers, grilles, or screens
must be considered. If the design and free area of protective
covering is not known for calculating the size opening
required, it may be assumed that wood louvers will have 20
Page 8 of 48
Issue 1031
NOTE: Each air duct opening shall have a free area of at least one
square inch per 2,000 Btu (645 mm² per .59 kW) per hour of the
total input rating of all equipment in the enclosure. If the equipment
room is located against an outside wall and the air openings
communicate directly with the outdoors, each opening shall have a
free area of at least 1 square inch per 4,000 Btu (645 mm² per 1.17
kW) per hour of the total input rating of all other equipment in the
enclosure.
Figure 7
506501-01
Shipping Bolt Removal
Units with 1/2 hp blower motor are equipped with three
flexible legs and one rigid leg. The rigid leg is equipped with
a shipping bolt and a flat white plastic washer (rather than
the rubber mounting grommet used with a flexible mounting
leg). See Figure 8. The bolt and washer must be removed
before the furnace is placed into operation. After the
bolt and washer have been removed, the rigid leg will not
touch the blower housing.
INSTALLATION
Setting Equipment
WARNING
Do not connect the return air ducts to the back of the
furnace. Doing so will adversely affect the operation of
the safety control devices, which could result in personal
injury or death.
WARNING
Units with 1/2 HP
Blower Motor
Figure 8
Blower access panel must be securely in place when
blower and burners are operating. Gas fumes, which
could contain carbon monoxide, can be drawn into living
space resulting in personal injury or death.
Upflow Applications
The gas furnaces can be installed as shipped in the upflow
position. Refer to Figure 10 for clearances. Select a location
that allows for the required clearances that are listed on the
unit nameplate. Also consider gas supply connections,
electrical supply, vent connection, condensate trap and drain
connections, and installation and service clearances [24
inches (610 mm) at unit front]. The unit must be level from
side to side. Tilt the unit slightly (maximum 1/2 in. from
level) from back to front to aid in the draining of the heat
exchanger. See Figure 9.
Allow for clearances to combustible materials as indicated
on the unit nameplate.
SETTING EQUIPMENT
Unit must be level side-to-side in all applications.
Tilt the unit slightly (Max. 1/2”) from back to front to aid in the draining of
the heat exchanger.
Figure 9
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WARNING
Improper installation of the furnace can result in personal
injury or death. Combustion and flue products must
never be allowed to enter the return air system or air in
the living space. Use sheet metal screws and joint tape
to seal return air system to furnace.
In platform installations with furnace return, the furnace
should be sealed airtight to the return air plenum. A
door must never be used as a portion of the return air
duct system. The base must provide a stable support
and an airtight seal to the furnace. Allow absolutely no
sagging, cracks, gaps, etc.
For no reason should return and supply air duct systems
ever be connected to or from other heating devices such
as a fireplace or stove, etc. Fire, explosion, carbon
monoxide poisoning, personal injury and/or property
damage could result.
Return Air Guidlines
Return air can be brought in through the bottom or either
side of the furnace installed in an upflow application. If the
furnace is installed on a platform with bottom return, make
an airtight seal between the bottom of the furnace and the
platform to ensure that the furnace operates properly and
safely. The furnace is equipped with a removable bottom
panel to facilitate installation.
Markings are provided on both sides of the furnace cabinet
for installations that require side return air. Cut the furnace
cabinet at the maximum dimensions shown on page 2.
Furnace applications which include side return air and a
condensate trap installed on the same side of the cabinet
(trap can be installed remotely within 5 ft.) require either a
return air base or field-fabricated transition to accommodate
an optional IAQ accessory taller than 14.5”. See Figure 11.
Side Return Air
(with transition and filter)
Installation Clearances
1 in. (25 mm)
Top/Plenum
* Front
0
Back
0
Sides
0†
Vent
0
Floor
0‡
Figure 11
* Front clearance in alcove installation must be 24 in. (610 mm).
Maintain a minimum of 24 in. (610 mm) for front service access.
† Allow proper clearances to accommodate condensate trap and vent
pipe installation.
‡ For installations on a combustible floor, do not install the furnace
directly on carpeting, tile or other combustible materials other than
wood flooring.
Figure 10
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506501-01
Optional Return Air Base
(Upflow Applications Only)
FRONT VIEW
SIDE VIEW
NOTE: Optional side return air filter kits are not for use with return air base.
1 Both the unit return air opening and the base return air opening must be covered by a single plenum or IAQ cabinet.
Minimum unit side return air opening dimensions for units requiring 1800 cfm or more of air (W x H): 23 x 11 in. (584 x 279 mm).
The opening can be cut as needed to accommodate plenum or IAQ cabinet while maintaining dimensions shown.
Side return air openings must be cut in the field. There are cutting guides stenciled on the cabinet for the side return air opening.
The size of the opening must not extend beyond the markings on the furnace cabinet.
2 To minimize pressure drop, the largest opening height possible (up to 14 inches) is preferred.
Figure 12
panel. Once the bottom panel has been removed, reinstall
the bottom cap. See Figure 13.
Removing the Bottom Panel
Horizontal Applications
WARNING
Do not install the furnace on its front or its back. See
Figure 14.
Figure 13
Figure 14
Removing the Bottom Panel
Remove the two screws that secure the bottom cap to the
furnace. Pivot the bottom cap down to release the bottom
This furnace can be installed in horizontal applications with
either right or left hand air discharge.
Refer to Figure 15 for clearances in horizontal applications.
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Page 11 of 48
Typical Horizontal Application
Horizontal Application
Installation Clearances
Right-Hand Discharge
Figure 16
0
Top
* Front
0
Back
0
Ends
0
Vent
0
Floor
0‡
NOTE: When the furnace is installed on a platform or with
the horizontal suspension kit in a crawl space, it must be
elevated enough to avoid water damage, accommodate drain
trap and to allow the evaporator coil to drain.
* Front clearance in alcove installation must be 24 in. (610 mm).
Maintain a minimum of 24 in. (610 mm) for front service access.
** An 8” service clearance must be maintained below the unit to provide
for servicing of the condensate trap unless the trap is mounted
remotely.
‡ For installations on a combustible floor, do not install the furnace
directly on carpeting, tile or other combustible materials other than
wood flooring.
Figure 15
Suspended Installation of Horizontal Unit
This furnace may be installed in either an attic or a crawl
space. Either suspend the furnace from roof rafters or floor
joists, as shown in Figure 16, or install the furnace on a
platform, as shown in Figure 17. A horizontal suspension kit
(51W10) may be ordered from your distributor or use
equivalent.
Platform Installation of Horizontal Unit
1. Select location for unit keeping in mind service and other
necessary clearances. See Figure 15.
2. Construct a raised wooden frame and cover frame with
a plywood sheet. If unit is installed above finished space,
fabricate an auxiliary drain pan to be installed under unit.
Set unit in drain pan as shown in Figure 17. Leave 8
inches for service clearance below unit for condensate
trap.
3. Provide a service platform in front of unit. When installing
the unit in a crawl space, a proper support platform may
be created using cement blocks.
4. Route auxiliary drain line so that water draining from
this outlet will be easily noticed by the homeowner.
5. If necessary, run the condensate line into a condensate
pump to meet drain line slope requirements. The pump
must be rated for use with condensing furnaces. Protect
the condensate discharge line from the pump to the
outside to avoid freezing.
6. Continue with exhaust, condensate and intake piping
installation according to instructions.
NOTE: Heavy-gauge sheet metal straps may be used to
suspend the unit from roof rafters or ceiling joists. When
straps are used to suspend the unit in this way, support
must be provided for both the ends. The straps must not
interfere with the plenum or exhaust piping installation.
Cooling coils and supply and return air plenums must
be supported separately.
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506501-01
Duct System
Use industry approved standards to size and install the
supply and return air duct system. This will result in a quiet
and low-static system that has uniform air distribution.
NOTE: This furnace is not certified for operation in heating
mode (indoor blower operating at selected heating speed)
with an external static pressure which exceeds 0.5 inches
w.c. Operation at these conditions may result in improper
limit operation.
Supply Air Plenum
If the furnace is installed without a cooling coil, a removable
access panel should be installed in the supply air duct. The
access panel should be large enough to permit inspection
(by reflected light) of the heat exchanger for leaks after the
furnace is installed. The furnace access panel must always
be in place when the furnace is operating and it must not
allow leaks into the supply air duct system.
Figure 17
Return Air -- Horizontal Applications
Return air may be brought in only through the end of a furnace
installed in the horizontal position. The furnace is equipped
with a removable bottom panel to facilitate installation. See
Figure 13.
Filters
This unit is not equipped with a filter or rack. A field provided
filter is required for the unit to operate properly. Table 1 list
recommended filter sizes.
A filter must be in place whenever the is operating.
Table 1
Return Air Plenum
NOTE: Return air must not be drawn from a room where
this furnace, or any other gas fueled appliance (i.e., water
heater), or carbon monoxide producing device (i.e.,
wood fireplace) is installed.
When return air is drawn from a room, a negative pressure
is created in the room. If a gas appliance is operating in a
room with negative pressure, the flue products can be pulled
back down the vent pipe and into the room. This reverse
flow of the flue gas may result in incomplete combustion
and the formation of carbon monoxide gas. This raw gas or
toxic fumes might then be distributed throughout the house
by the furnace duct system.
Return air can be brought in through the bottom or either
side of the furnace. If a furnace with bottom return air is
installed on a platform, make an airtight seal between the
bottom of the furnace and the platform to ensure that the
unit operates properly and safely. Use fiberglass sealing
strips, caulking, or equivalent sealing method between the
plenum and the furnace cabinet to ensure a tight seal. If a
filter is installed, size the return air duct to fit the filter frame.
Pipe & Fittings Specifications
All pipe, fittings, primer and solvent cement must conform
with American National Standard Institute and the American
Society for Testing and Materials (ANSI/ASTM) standards.
The solvent shall be free flowing and contain no lumps,
undissolved particles or any foreign matter that adversely
affects the joint strength or chemical resistance of the
cement. The cement shall show no gelation, stratification,
or separation that cannot be removed by stirring. Refer to
Table 2 for approved piping and fitting materials.
506501-01
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Page 13 of 48
CAUTION
IMPORTANT
Solvent cements for plastic pipe are flammable liquids
and should be kept away from all sources of ignition. Do
not use excessive amounts of solvent cement when
making joints. Good ventilation should be maintained to
reduce fire hazard and to minimize breathing of solvent
vapors. Avoid contact of cement with skin and eyes.
A95UH1D/A93UH1D/95G1UH & 92G1UH exhaust and
intake connections are made of PVC. Use PVC primer
and solvent cement when using PVC vent pipe. When
using ABS vent pipe, use transitional solvent cement to
make connections to the PVC fitting in the unit.
PIPING AND FITTINGS SPECIFICATIONS
Use PVC primer and solvent cement or ABS solvent cement
meeting ASTM specifications, refer to Table 2. As an
alternate, use all purpose cement, to bond ABS, PVC, or
CPVC pipe when using fittings and pipe made of the same
materials. Use transition solvent cement when bonding ABS
to either PVC or CPVC.
Low temperature solvent cement is recommended during
cooler weather. Metal or plastic strapping may be used for
vent pipe hangers. Uniformly apply a liberal coat of PVC
primer for PVC or use a clean dry cloth for ABS to clean
inside socket surface of fitting and male end of pipe to depth
of fitting socket.
Canadian Applications Only
Pipe, fittings, primer and solvent cement used to vent
(exhaust) this appliance must be certified to ULC S636 and
supplied by a single manufacturer as part of an approved
vent (exhaust) system. When bonding the vent system to
the furnace, use ULC S636 approved One-Step Transition
Cement to bond the pipe to the flue collar, or to bond the 90°
elbow or reducing 90° elbow to the flue collar. In addition,
the first three feet of vent pipe from the furnace flue collar
must be accessible for inspection.
Table 2
Page 14 of 48
Issue 1031
506501-01
OUTDOOR TERMINATION KITS USAGE
Table 3
Joint Cementing Procedure
All cementing of joints should be done according to the
specifications outlined in ASTM D 2855.
DANGER
DANGER OF EXPLOSION!
Fumes from PVC glue may ignite during system check.
Allow fumes to dissipate for at least 5 minutes before
placing unit into operation.
506501-01
1. Measure and cut vent pipe to desired length.
2. Debur and chamfer end of pipe, removing any ridges or
rough edges. If end is not chamfered, edge of pipe
may remove cement from fitting socket and result in a
leaking joint.
3. Clean and dry surfaces to be joined.
4. Test fit joint and mark depth of fitting on outside of pipe.
5. Uniformly apply a liberal coat of PVCD primer for PVC
or use a clean dry cloth for ABS to clean inside socket
surface of fitting and male end of pipe to depth of fitting
socket.
NOTE: Time is critical at this stage. Do not allow primer to
dry before applying cement.
Issue 1031
Page 15 of 48
6. Promptly apply solvent cement to end of pipe and inside
socket surface of fitting. Cement should be applied
lightly but uniformly to inside of socket. Take care to
keep excess cement out of socket. Apply second coat
to end of pipe.
7. Immediately after applying last coat of cement to pipe,
and while both inside socket surface and end of pipe
are wet with cement, forcefully insert end of pipe into
socket until it bottoms out. Turn PVC pipe 1/4 turn during
assembly (but not after pipe is fully inserted) to distribute
cement evenly. Do not turn ABS or cellular core pipe.
NOTE: Assembly should be completed within 20 seconds
after last application of cement. Hammer blows should not
be used when inserting pipe.
8. After assembly, wipe excess cement from pipe at end
of fitting socket. A properly made join will show a bead
around its entire perimeter. Any gaps may indicate an
improper defective assembly due to insufficient solvent.
9. Handle joints carefully until completely set.
If this gas furnace replaces a furnace which was commonly vented
with another gas appliance, the size of the existing vent pipe for that
gas appliance must be checked. Without the heat of the original
furnace flue products, the existing vent pipe is probably oversized for
the single water heater or other appliance. The vent should be checked
for proper draw with the remaining appliance.
Figure 19
Venting Practices
Piping Suspension Guidelines
NOTE: Isolate piping at the point where it exits the outside wall or
roof in order to prevent transmission of vibration to the structure.
Exhaust Piping (Figures 22 and 23)
1. In areas where piping penetrates joist or interior walls,
hole must be large enough to allow clearance on all sides
of pipe through center of hole using a hanger.
2. When furnace is installed in a residence where unit is
shut down for an extended period of time, such as a
vacation home, make provisions for draining condensate
collection from trap and lines.
3. Route piping to outside of structure. Continue with
installation following instructions given in piping
termination section.
CAUTION
Wall Thickness Guidelines
Do not discharge exhaust into an existing stack or stack
that also serves another gas appliance. If vertical
discharge through an existing unused stack is required,
insert PVC pipe inside the stack until the end is even
with the top or outlet end of the metal stack.
CAUTION
The exhaust vent pipe operates under positive pressure
and must be completely sealed to prevent leakage of
combustion products into the living space.
Figure 18
Page 16 of 48
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506501-01
Vent Piping Guidelines
This gas furnace can be installed as either a Non-Direct
Vent or a Direct Vent gas central furnace.
Use the following steps to correctly size vent pipe diameter.
NOTE: In non-Direct Vent installations, combustion air is
taken from indoors and flue gases are discharged outdoors.
In Direct Vent installations, combustion air is taken from
outdoors and flue gases are discharged outdoors.
Intake and exhaust pipe sizing - Size pipe according to Tables
4 and 5. Table 4 lists the minimum vent pipe lengths
permitted. Table 5 lists the maximum pipe lengths permitted.
Regardless of the diameter of pipe used, the standard roof
and wall terminations described in section Exhaust Piping
Terminations should be used. Exhaust vent termination pipe
is sized to optimize the velocity of the exhaust gas as it exits
the termination. Refer to Table 6.
In some applications which permit the use of several different
sizes of vent pipe, a combination vent pipe may be used.
Contact Allied Air Technical Service for assistance in sizing
vent pipe in these applications.
NOTE: The exhaust collar on all models is sized to
accommodate 2” Schedule 40 vent pipe. When vent pipe
which is larger than 2” must be used in an upflow application,
a transition must be applied at the exhaust collar in order to
properly step to the larger diameter vent pipe. Contact Allied
Air Technical Service for more information concerning sizing
of vent systems which include multiple pipe sizes.
EXHAUST PIPE
Horizontal Application
NOTE: All horizontal runs of exhaust pipe must slope back toward
unit. A minimum of 1/4” (6 mm) drop for each 12” (305 mm) of
horizontal run is mandatory for drainage.
NOTE: Exhaust pipe MUST be glued to furnace exhaust fittings.
MINIMUM VENT PIPE LENGTHS
NOTE: Exhaust piping should be checked carefully to make sure
there are no sages or low spots.
Figure 20
IMPORTANT
*Any approved termination may be added to the minimum length
listed.
**This gas furnace must have 3" to 2" reducing ell (supplied or field
replacement Canadian kit) installed directly into unit flue collar.
Do not use screens or perforated metal in exhaust or
intake terminations. Doing so will cause freeze-ups and
may block the terminations.
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Table 4
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Page 17 of 48
Maximum Allowable Vent Length
Table 5
Page 18 of 48
Issue 1031
506501-01
TYPICAL EXHAUST PIPE CONNECTIONS AND CONDENSATE TRAP INSTALLATION
IN UPFLOW DIRECT OR NON-DIRECT VENT APPLICATIONS
Figure 22
TYPICAL EXHAUST PIPE CONNECTIONS AND CONDENSATE TRAP INSTALLATION
IN HORIZONTAL DIRECT OR NON-DIRECT VENT APPLICATIONS
(RIGHT HAND DISCHARGE SHOWN)
Figure 23
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TYPICAL AIR INTAKE PIPE CONNECTIONS IN UPFLOW
DIRECT VENT APPLICATIONS
Figure 24
TYPICAL INTAKE PIPE CONNECTIONS IN HORIZONTAL DIRECT VENT APPLICATIONS
(Right Hand Discharge Shown)
Figure 25
Intake Piping (Figures 24 through 27)
This gas furnace may be installed in either direct vent or
non-direct vent applications. In non-direct vent
applications, when intake air will be drawn into the furnace
from the surrounding space, the indoor air quality must be
considered and guidelines listed in Combustion, Dilution
and Ventilation Air section must be followed.
Page 20 of 48
Follow the next two steps when installing the unit in Direct
Vent applications, where combustion air is taken from
outdoors and flue gases are discharged outdoors. The
provided air intake screen must not be used in direct
vent applications (outdoors).
Issue 1031
506501-01
1.
2.
Use transition solvent cement or a sheet metal screw
to secure the intake pipe to the inlet air connector.
Route piping to outside of structure. Continue with
installation following instructions given in general guide
lines for piping terminations and in intake and exhaust
piping terminations for direct vent sections. Refer to
Table 5 for pipe sizes.
TYPICAL AIR INTAKE PIPE CONNECTIONS
HORIZONTAL NON-DIRECT VENT APPLICATIONS
(Horizontal Right-Hand Air Discharge Application Shown)
TYPICAL AIR INTAKE PIPE CONNECTIONS
UPFLOW NON-DIRECT
VENT APPLICATIONS
NOTE: Debris screen may be positioned straight out (preferred) or
with an elbow rotated to face down.
Figure 27
NOTE: Debris screen and elbow may be rotated, so that screen
may be positioned to face forward or to either side.
Figure 26
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Page 21 of 48
Follow the next two steps when installing the unit in Non–
Direct Vent applications where combustion air is taken
from indoors and flue gases are discharged outdoors.
1.
Use field-provided materials and the factory-provided
air intake screen to route the intake piping as shown in
figure 26 or 27. Maintain a minimum clearance of 3"
(76 mm) around the air intake opening. The air intake
opening (with the protective screen) should always be
directed forward or to either side in the upflow position,
and either straight out or downward in the horizontal
position.
The air intake piping must not terminate too close
to the flooring or a platform. Ensure that the intake
air inlet will not be obstructed by loose insulation
or other items that may clog the debris screen.
2.
Use a sheet metal screw to secure the intake pipe to
the connector, if desired.
General Guidelines for Vent Terminations
In Non–Direct Vent applications, combustion air is taken
from indoors and the flue gases are discharged to the
outdoors. The furnace is then classified as a non–direct
vent, Category IV gas furnace.
coatings). It is recommended that the exhaust outlet not
be located within 6 feet (1.8 m) of a condensing unit because
the condensate can damage the painted coating.
NOTE: If winter design temperature is below 32° F (0° C),
it is recommended that the exhaust piping be insulated with
1/2" (13 mm), Armaflex or equivalent when run through an
unconditional area. In extremely cold climate areas with
temperature below 20° F (6.7° C) it is recommended that,
3/4" (19 mm) Armaflex or equivalent be used. Insulation on
outside runs of exhaust pipe may be painted or wrapped to
protect insulation from deterioration in accordance with the
insulation manufacturers recommendation. Exhaust pipe
insulation may not be necessary in some specific
applications.
NOTE: During extremely cold temperatures, below
approximately 20° F (6.7° C), units with long runs of vent
pipe through unconditioned space, even when insulated,
may form ice in the exhaust termination that prevents the
unit from operating properly. Longer run times of at least 5
minutes will alleviate most icing problems. Also, a heating
cable may be installed on exhaust piping and termination
to prevent freeze-ups. Heating cable installation kits are
available see unit specification sheets for part numbers.
In Direct Vent applications, combustion air is taken from
outdoors and the flue gases are discharged to the outdoors.
The furnace is then classified as a direct vent, Category IV
gas furnace.
In both Non–Direct Vent and Direct Vent applications, the
vent termination is limited by local building codes. In the
absence of local codes, refer to the current National Fuel
Gas Code ANSI Z223-1/NFPA 54 in U.S.A., and current
CSA-B149 Natural Gas and Propane Installation Codes in
Canada for details.
Position termination according to location given in Figure
28 or 29. In addition, position termination so it is free from
any obstructions and 12" above the average snow
accumulation.
IMPORTANT
Do not use screens or perforated metal in exhaust
terminations. Doing so will cause freeze-ups and may
block the terminations.
IMPORTANT
For Canadian Installations Only:
In accordance to CSA International B149 installation
codes, the minimum allowed distance between the
combustion air intake inlet and the exhaust outlet of other
appliances shall not be less than 12 inches (305 mm).
At vent termination, care must be taken to maintain
protective coatings over building materials (prolonged
exposure to exhaust condensate can destroy protective
Page 22 of 48
Issue 1031
506501-01
VENT TERMINATION CLEARANCES
FOR NON-DIRECT VENT INSTALLATiONS IN THE USA AND CANADA
Figure 28
506501-01
Issue 1031
Page 23 of 48
VENT TERMINATION CLEARANCES
FOR DIRECT VENT INSTALLATiONS IN THE USA AND CANADA
Figure 29
Page 24 of 48
Issue 1031
506501-01
Details of Intake and Exhaust Piping Terminations for
Direct Vent Installations
FIELD SUPPLIED WALL TERMINATION
NOTE: In Direct Vent installations, combustion air is taken
from outdoors and flue gases are discharged to outdoors.
Intake and exhaust pipes may be routed either horizontally
through and outside wall or vertically through the roof. In
attic or closet installations, vertical termination through the
roof is preferred. Figures 30 through 40 show typical
terminations.
1. Exhaust and intake exits must be in same pressure zone.
Do not exit one through the roof and one on the side.
Also, do not exit the intake on one side and the exhaust
on another side of the house or structure.
2. Intake and exhaust pipes should be placed as close
together as possible at termination end (refer to
illustrations). Maximum separation is 3” (76 mm) on
roof terminations and 6” (152 mm) on sidewall
terminations.
3. On roof terminations, the intake piping should terminate
straight down using two 90° elbows (See Figure 30).
4. Exhaust piping must terminate straight out or up as
shown. A reducer may be required on the exhaust piping
at the point where it exits the structure to improve the
velocity of exhaust away from the intake piping. See
Table 6.
EXHAUST PIPE TERMINATION SIZE REDUCTION
See venting Table 5 for maximum venting lengths with this
arrangement.
* Use wall support every 24” (610 mm). Use two wall supports if
extension is greater than 24” (610 mm) but less than 48” (1219 mm).
Table 6
NOTE: Care must be taken to avoid recirculation of exhaust
back into intake pipe.
NOTE: One wall support must be 6” (152 mm) from top of each pipe
(intake and exhaust).
DIRECT VENT ROOF TERMINATION KIT
(15F75 OR 44J41)
Figure 31
Figure 30
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Page 25 of 48
FIELD SUPPLIED WALL TERMINATION
5. On field supplied terminations for sidewall exit, exhaust
piping may extend a maximum of 12 inches (305 mm)
for 2” PVC and 20 inches (508 mm) for 3” (76 mm) PVC
beyond the outside wall. Intake piping should be as
short as possible. See Figures 31 and 32.
6. On field supplied terminations, a minimum distance
between the end of the exhaust pipe and the end of the
intake pipe without a termination elbow is 8” and a
minimum distance of 6” with a termination elbow. See
Figures 31 and 32.
7. If intake and exhaust piping must be run up a side wall
to position above snow accumulation or other
obstructions, piping must be supported every 24” (610
mm) as shown in Figures 31 and 32. When exhaust
and intake piping must be run up an with pipe sized per
Table 6. The intake piping may be equipped with a 90°
elbow turndown. Using turndown will add 5 feet (1.5 m)
to the equivalent length of the pipe.
8. A multiple furnace installation may use a group of up to
four terminations assembled together horizontally, as
shown in Figure 35.
DIRECT VENT CONCENTRIC ROOFTOP TERMINATION
71M80, 69M29 or 60L46 (US)
41W92 or 41W93 (Canada)
See venting Table 5 for maximum venting lengths with this
arrangement.
* Use wall support every 24” (610 mm). Use two wall supports if
extension is greater than 24” (610 mm) but less than 48” (1219 mm).
NOTE: One wall support must be 6” (152 mm) from top of each pipe
(intake and exhaust).
Figure 33
Figure 32
Page 26 of 48
Issue 1031
506501-01
DIRECT VENT APPLICATION
USING EXISTING CHIMNEY
DIRECT VENT CONCENTRIC WALL TERMINATION
71M80, 69M29 OR 60L46 (US)
41W92 or 41W93 (Canada)
Figure 34
NOTE: Do not discharge exhaust gases directly into any chimney
or vent stack. If vertical discharge through an existing unused
chimney or stack is required, insert piping inside chimney until the
pipe open end is above top of chimney and terminates as illustrated.
In any exterior portion of chimney, the exhaust vent must be insulated.
Figure 36
OPTIONAL VENT TERMINATION FOR MULTIPLE UNIT
INSTALLATION OF DIRECT VENT WALL TERMINATION
Details of Exhaust Piping Terminations for Non-Direct
Vent Applications
Exhaust pipes may be routed either horizontally through an
outside wall or vertically through the roof. In attic or closet
installations, vertical termination through the roof is preferred.
Figures 37 through 40 show typical terminations.
1. Exhaust piping must terminate straight out or up as
shown. The termination pipe must be sized as listed in
Table 6. The specified pipe size ensures proper velocity
required to move the exhaust gases away from the
building.
Figure 35
506501-01
2. On field supplied terminations for side wall exit, exhaust
piping may extend a maximum of 12 inches (305 mm)
for 2” PVC and 20” (508 mm) for 3” (76 mm) PVC beyond
the outside wall. See Figure 38.
Issue 1031
Page 27 of 48
NON-DIRECT VENT FIELD SUPPLIED WALL
TERMINATION EXTENDED OR (15F74)
WALL TERMINATION VENT PIPE EXTENDED
NON-DIRECT VENT ROOF TERMINATION KIT
(15F75 or 44J41)
Figure 37
NON-DIRECT VENT FIELD SUPPLIED WALL
TERMINATION
* Use wall support every 24” (610 mm). Use two supports if extension
is greater than 24” but less than 48”.
Figure 39
NON-DIRECT VENT APPLICATION
USING EXISTING CHIMNEY
Figure 38
3. If exhaust piping must be run up a sidewall to position
above snow accumulation or other obstructions, piping
must be supported every 24” (610 mm) as shown in
Figure 39. When exhaust piping must be run up an
outside wall, any reduction in exhaust pipe size must be
done after the final elbow.
NOTE: Do not discharge exhaust gases directly into any chimney or
vent stack. If vertical discharge through an existing unused chimney
or stack is required. Insert piping inside chimney until the pipe open
end is above top of the chimney and terminates as illustrated. In any
exterior portion of chimney, the exhaust vent must be insulated.
Figure 40
Condensate Piping
This unit is designed for either right or left side exit of
condensate piping in upflow applications. In horizontal
applications, the condensate trap must extend below the
unit. An 8” service clearance is required for the condensate
trap. Refer to Figure 41 for condensate trap locations.
Page 28 of 48
Issue 1031
506501-01
CONDENSATE TRAP AND PLUG LOCATIONS
(Unit shown in upflow position)
NOTE: In upflow applications where side return air filter is installed
on same side as the condensate trap, filter rack MUST be installed
beyond condensate trap or trap must be relocated to avoid
interference.
Figure 41
NOTE: If necessary the condensate trap may be installed
up to 5’ away from the furnace. Use PVC pipe to connect
trap to furnace condensate outlet. Piping from furnace must
slope down a minimum of 1/4” per ft. toward trap.
1. Determine which side condensate piping will exit the
unit, location of trap, field-provided fittings and length of
PVC pipe required to reach available drain.
2. Remove plug (Figure 41) from the cold end header box
at the appropriate location on the side of the unit. Install
field-provided 1/2 NPT male fitting into cold end header
box. Use Teflon tape or appropriate pipe dope.
3. Install the cap over the clean out opening at the base of
the trap. Secure with clamp. See Figure 44.
4. Install drain trap using appropriate PVC fittings, glue all
joints. Glue the provided drain trap as shown in Figure
44. Route the condensate line to an open drain.
Condensate line must maintain a 1/4” downward slope
from the furnace to the drain.
5. Installed field provided vent on trap assembly as shown
in Figures 42 through 45. Trap must extend at least 1”
above the furnace condensate drain connection in upflow
applications and 4-1/2” above the bottom of the cabinet
in horizontal applications.
6. If unit will be started immediately upon completion of
installation, prime trap per procedure outlined in Unit
Start-Up section.
506501-01
Issue 1031
Page 29 of 48
Condensate line must slope downward away from the trap
to drain. If drain level is above condensate trap, condensate
pump must be used. Condensate drain line should be routed
within the conditioned space to avoid freezing of condensate
and blockage of drain line. If this is not possible, a heat
cable kit may be used on the condensate trap and line.
Heating cable kit is available in various lengths; 6 ft. (1.8 m)
- kit no. 26K68; 24 ft. (7.3 m) - kit no. 26K69; and 50 ft. (15.2
m) - kit no. 26K70.
CONDENSATE ASSEMBLY
CONDENSATE TRAP LOCATIONS
(Unit shown in upflow position with remote trap)
Figure 44
UNIT WITH EVAPORATOR COIL
*Piping from furnace must slope down
a minimum of 1/4” per ft. toward trap.
Figure 42
CAUTION
Do not use copper tubing or existing copper condensate
lines for drain line.
Figure 45
CONDENSATE TRAP LOCATIONS
(Unit shown in horizontal right hand discharge position)
*Piping from furnace must slope down a minimum
of 1/4” per ft. toward trap.
Figure 43
Page 30 of 48
Issue 1031
506501-01
6. In some localities, codes may require installation of a
manual main shut-off valve and union (furnished by
installer) external to the unit. Union must be of the
ground joint type.
Gas Piping
CAUTION
If a flexible gas connector is required or allowed by the
authority that has jurisdiction, black iron pipe shall be
installed at the gas valve and extend outside the furnace
cabinet. The flexible connector can then be added
between the black iron pipe and the gas supply line.
IMPORTANT
Compounds used on threaded joints of gas piping must
be resistant to the actions of liquified petroleum gases.
Leak Check
After gas piping is completed, carefully check all piping
connections (factory and field installed) for gas leaks. Use
a leak detecting solution or other preferred means.
WARNING
Do not exceed 600 in.-lbs. (50 ft.-lbs.) torque when
attaching the gas piping to the gas valve.
1. Gas piping may be routed into the unit through either
the left or right hand side. Supply piping enters into the
gas valve from the side of the valve as shown in Figure
47. Move Bellows grommet to side which gas line enters.
Ensure opposite gas line hole is plugged with supplied
plug.
Never use an open flame to test fro gas leaks. Check all
connections using a commercially available soap solution
made specifically for leak detection.
The furnace must be isolated from the gas supply system
by closing its individual manual shut-off valve during any
pressure testing of the gas supply system at pressures more
than or equal to 1/2 psig (3.48 kPa, 14 inches w.c.).
IMPORTANT
The gas valve requires a low inlet pressure switch in
LP/propane applications. A 4” BIP nipple must be
installed in the gas valve inlet when right-side gas entry
is used in LP/propane applications. See Figure 47.
2. When connecting gas supply, factors such as length of
run, number of fittings and furnace rating must be
considered to avoid excessive pressure drop. Table 7
list recommended pipe sizes for typical applications.
NOTE: Use two wrenches when connecting gas piping
to avoid transferring to the manifold.
3. Gas piping must not run in or through air ducts, clothes
chutes, chimneys or gas vents, dumb waiters or elevator
shafts. Center gas line through piping hole. Gas line
should not touch side of unit. See Figures 47 and 48.
4. Piping should be sloped 1/4 “ per 15 feet (6 mm per 5.6
m) upward toward the gas meter from the furnace. The
piping must be supported at proper intervals, every 8 to
10 feet (2.44 to 3.05 m), using suitable hangers or straps.
Install a drip leg in vertical pipe runs to serve as a trap
for sediment or condensate.
5. A 1/8” N.P.T. plugged tap or pressure post is located on
the gas valve to facilitate test gauge connection. See
Figure 55.
506501-01
Issue 1031
Figure 46
IMPORTANT
When testing pressure of gas lines, gas valve must be
disconnected and isolated. See Figure 46. Gas valves
can be damaged if subjected to pressures greater than
1/2 psig (3.48 kPa).
WARNING
FIRE OR EXPLOSION HAZARD
Failure to follow the safety warnings exactly could result
in serious injury, death, or property damage. Never use
an open flame to test for gas leaks. Check all
connections using a commercially available soap
solution made specifically for leak detection. Some
soaps used for leak detection are corrosive to certain
metals. Carefully rinse piping thoroughly after leak test
has been completed.
Page 31 of 48
NOTE: BLACK IRON PIPE ONLY TO BE ROUTED INSIDE OF CABINET
Figure 47
Horizontal Applications
Possible Gas Piping Configurations
Figure 48
Page 32 of 48
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506501-01
GAS PIPE CAPACITY - FT³/HR (kL/HR)
NOTE: Capacity given in cubic feet of gas per hour (kilo liters of gas per hour) and based on 0.60 specific gravity gas.
Table 7
Removal of the Furnace from Common Vent
In the event that an existing furnace is removed from a
venting system commonly run with separate gas appliances,
the venting system is likely to be too large to properly vent
the remaining attached appliances.
Conduct the following test while each appliance is operating
and the other appliances (which are not operating) remain
connected to the common venting system. If the venting
system has been installed improperly, you must correct the
system as indicated in the general venting requirements
section.
WARNING
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING HAZARD
Failure to follow the steps outlined below for each
appliance connected to the venting system being placed
into operation could result in carbon monoxide poisoning
or death.
The following steps shall be followed for each appliance
connected to the venting system being placed into
operation, while all other appliances connected to the
venting system are not in operation.
3. Close all building doors and windows and all doors
between the space in which the appliances remaining
connected to the common venting system are located
and other spaces of the building. Turn ON clothes dryers
and any appliances not connected to the common
venting system. Turn ON any exhaust fans, such as
range hoods and bathroom exhausts, so they will
operate at maximum speed. Do not operate a summer
exhaust fan. Close fireplace dampers.
4. Follow the lighting instructions. Turn ON the appliance
that is being inspected. Adjust the thermostat so that
the appliance operates continuously.
5. After the main burner has operated for 5 minutes, test
for leaks of flue gases at the draft hood relief opening.
Use the flame of a match or candle.
6. After determining that each appliance connected to the
common venting system is venting properly, (step 3)
return all doors, windows, exhaust fans, fireplace
dampers, and any other gas burning appliances to their
previous mode of operation.
7. If a venting problem is found during any of the preceding
tests, the common venting system must be modified to
correct the problems.
1. Seal any unused openings in the common venting
system.
2. Inspect the venting system for proper size and horizontal
pitch. Determine that there is no blockage, restriction,
leakage, corrosion, or other deficiencies which could
cause an unsafe condition.
506501-01
Issue 1031
Resize the common venting system to the minimum vent
pipe size determined by using the appropriate tables in
Appendix G. (These are in the current standards of the
National Fuel Gas Code ANSI Z223.1.
Page 33 of 48
Electrical
ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE (ESD)
Precautions and Procedures
CAUTION
Electrostatic discharge can affect electronic
components. Take precautions during furnace
installation and service to protect the furnace’s electronic
controls. Precautions will help to avoid control exposure
to electrostatic discharge by putting the furnace, the
control and the technician at the same electrostatic
potential. Neutralize electrostatic charge by touching
hand and all tools on an unpainted unit surface, such as
the gas valve or blower deck, before performing any
service procedure.
INTERIOR MAKE-UP BOX INSTALLATION
The unit is equipped with a field makeup box. The makeup
box may be moved to the right side of the furnace to facilitate
installation. Seal unused openings on left side with plugs
removed from right side. Secure the excess wire to the
existing harness to protect it from damage.
Refer to Figure 52 for field wiring and Figure 53 for schematic
wiring diagram and troubleshooting.
The power supply wiring must meet Class I restrictions.
Protected by either a fuse or circuit breaker, select circuit
protection and wire size according to unit nameplate.
NOTE: Unit nameplate states maximum current draw.
Maximum Over-Current Protection allowed is 15 AMP.
Holes are on both sides of the furnace cabinet to facilitate
wiring.
Install a separate (properly sized) disconnect switch near
the furnace so that power can be turned off for servicing.
Before connecting the thermostat check to make sure the
wires will be long enough for servicing at a later date. Make
sure that thermostat wire is long enough to facilitate future
removal of blower for service.
Complete the wiring connections to the equipment. Use the
provided unit wiring diagram and the field wiring diagram
shown in Figure 52. Use 18 gauge wire or larger that is
suitable for Class II rating for thermostat connections.
Figure 49
INTERIOR MAKE-UP BOX INSTALLATION
Electrically ground the unit according to local codes or, in
the absence of local codes, according to the current National
Electric Code (ANSI/HFPA No. 70) for the USA and current
Canadian Electric Code Part 1 (CSA standard C22.1) for
Canada. A green ground wire is provided in the field makeup
box.
NOTE: The gas furnace contains electronic components
that are polarity sensitive. Make sure that the furnace is
wired correctly and is properly grounded.
Accessory Terminals
One line voltage “EAC” 1/4” spade terminal is provided on
the furnace control board. Any accessory rated up to one
amp can be connected to this terminal with the neutral leg
of the circuit being connected to one of the provided neutral
terminals. If an accessory rated at greater than one amp is
connected to this terminal, it is necessary to use an external
relay. See Figure 54 for control board configuration. This
terminal is energized when the indoor blower is operating.
Figure 50
Page 34 of 48
One line voltage “HUM” 1/4” spade terminal is provided on
the furnace control board. Any humidifier rated up to one
amp can be connected to this terminal with the neutral leg
of the circuit being connected to one of the provided neutral
Issue 1031
506501-01
Indoor Blower Speeds
1. When the thermostat is set to “FAN ON”, the indoor
blower will run continuously on the heating speed when
there is no cooling or heating demand.
2. When the furnace is running in the heating mode, the
indoor blower will run on the heating speed.
3. When there is a cooling demand, the indoor blower will
run on the cooling speed.
FURNACE & CONDENSING UNIT
THERMOSTAT DESIGNATIONS
(Refer to specific thermostat and outdoor unit.)
Figure 51
terminals. If a humidifier rated at greater than one amp is
connected to this terminal, it is necessary to use an external
relay. See Figure 54 for control board configuration. This
terminal is energized in the heating mode when the
combustion air inducer is operating.
Generator Use - Voltage Requirements
• The furnace requires 120 volts ± 10% (Range: 180 volts
to 132 volts)
• The furnace operates at 60 Hz ± 5% (Range: 57 Hz to
63 Hz)
• The furnace integrated control requires both polarity and
proper ground. Both polarity and proper grounding
should be checked before attempting to operate the
furnace on either permanent or temporary power.
• Generator should have a wave form distortion of less
than 5% RHD
Install the room thermostat according to the instructions
provided with the thermostat. See Figure 51 for thermostat
designations. If the furnace is being matched with a help
pump, refer to the FM21 installation instruction or appropriate
dual fuel thermostat instructions.
TYPICAL FIELD WIRING DIAGRAM
WARNING:
ELECTRIC SHOCK HAZARD, CAN CAUSE INJURY
OR DEATH. UNIT MUST BE GROUNDED IN
ACCORDANCE WITH NATIONAL AND LOCAL CODES
NOTE:
IF ANY WIRE IN THIS APPLIANCE IS REPLACED, IT
MUST BE REPLACED WITH WIRE OF LIKE SIZE,
RATING, INSULATION THICKNESS AND
TERMINATION
FIELD SUPPLIED ACC. WIRE
S145 IS USED WITH HONEYWELL GAS VALVE
WHEN APPLIED IN LP GAS UNITS
Figure 52
506501-01
Issue 1031
Page 35 of 48
TYPICAL WIRING DIAGRAM
Figure 53
Page 36 of 48
Issue 1031
506501-01
INTEGRATED CONTROL
(Automatic Hot Surface Ignition System)
Figure 54
Unit Start-Up
FOR YOUR SAFETY READ BEFORE OPERATING
CAUTION
WARNING
Do not use this furnace if any part has been underwater.
A flood-damaged furnace is extremely dangerous.
Attempts to use the furnace can result in fire or
explosion. Immediately call a qualified service technician
to inspect the furnace and to replace all gas controls,
control system parts, and electrical parts that have been
wet or to replace the furnace, if deemed necessary.
WARNING
Danger of explosion. Can cause injury
or product or property damage. Should
the gas supply fail to shut off or if
overheating occurs, shut off the gas
valve to the furnace before shutting off
the electrical blower deck, before
performing any service procedure.
506501-01
Before attempting to perform any service or
maintenance, turn the electrical power to unit OFF at
disconnect switch.
BEFORE LIGHTING the unit, smell all around the furnace
area for gas. Be sure to smell next to the floor because
some gas is heavier than air and will settle on the floor.
The gas valve on the unit is equipped with a gas control
switch (lever). Use only your hand to move switch. Never
use tools. If the switch will not move by hand, do not try to
repair it. Force or attempted repair may result in a fire or
explosion.
Placing the furnace into operation:
This furnace is equipped with an automatic hot surface
ignition system. Do not attempt to manually light burners on
this furnace. Each time the thermostat calls for heat, the
burners will automatically light. The ignitor does not get hot
when there is no call for heat on these units.
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Page 37 of 48
Priming Condensate Trap
The condensate trap should be primed with water prior to
start-up to ensure proper condensate drainage. Either pour
10 fl. oz. (300 ml) of water into the trap, or follow these
steps to prime the trap:
1. Follow the lighting instructions to place the unit into
operation.
2. Set the thermostat to initiate a heating demand.
3. Allow the burners to fire for approximately 3 minutes.
4. Adjust the thermostat to deactivate the heating demand.
5. Wait for the combustion air inducer to stop. Set the
thermostat to initiate a heating demand and again allow
the burners to fire for approximately 3 minutes.
6. Adjust the thermostat to deactivate the heating demand
and wait for the combustion air inducer to stop. At this
point, the trap should be primed with sufficient water to
ensure proper condensate drain operation.
WARNING
If you do not follow these instructions exactly, a fire or
explosion may result causing property damage, personal
injury or death.
Gas Valve Operation (Figure 55)
1. STOP! Read the safety information at the beginning of
this section.
2. Set the thermostat to the lowest setting.
3. Turn OFF all electrical power to the unit.
4. This furnace is equipped with an ignition device which
automatically lights the burners. Do not try to light the
burners by hand.
5. Remove the upper access panel.
6. Move gas valve switch to OFF. See Figure 55.
7. Wait five minutes to clear out any gas. If you then smell
gas, STOP! Immediately call your gas supplier from a
neighbor ’s phone. Follow the gas supplier’s
instructions. If you do not smell gas go to next step.
8. Move gas valve switch to ON. See Figure 55.
GAS VALVE SHOWN IN ON POSITION
Figure 55
Page 38 of 48
9. Replace the upper access panel.
10. Turn on all electrical power to the unit.
11. Set the thermostat to desired setting.
NOTE: When unit is initially started, steps 1 through 11
may need to be repeated to purge air from gas line.
12. If the appliance will not operate, follow the instructions
“Turning Off Gas to Unit” and call your service technician
or gas supplier.
Turning Off Gas to Unit
1. Set the thermostat to the lowest setting.
2. Turn off all electrical power to the unit if service is to be
performed.
3. Remove the upper access panel.
4. Move gas valve switch to OFF.
5. Replace the upper access panel.
Failure To Operate
If the unit fails to operate, check the following:
1. Is the thermostat calling for heat?
2. Are access panels securely in place?
3. Is the main disconnect switch closed?
4. Is there a blown fuse or tripped breaker?
5. Is the filter dirty or plugged? Dirty or plugged filters will
cause the limit control to shut the unit off.
6. Is gas turned on at the meter?
7. Is the manual main shut–off valve open?
8. Is the internal manual shut–off valve open?
9. Is the unit ignition system in lockout? If the unit locks
out again, inspect the unit for blockages.
Heating Sequence Of Operation
1. When thermostat calls for heat, combustion air inducer
starts.
2. Combustion air pressure switch proves blower
operation. Switch is factory set and requires no
adjustment.
3. After a 15 second prepurge, the hot surface ignitor
energizes.
4. After a 20 second ignitor warm-up period, the gas valve
solenoid opens.
5. Gas is ignited, flame sensor proves the flame, and the
combustion process continues.
6. If flame is not detected after first ignition trial, the ignition
control will repeat steps 3 and 4 four more times before
locking out the gas valve. The ignition control will then
automatically repeat steps 1 through 6 after 60 minutes.
To interrupt the 60 minute period, move thermostat from
“Heat” to “OFF” then back to “Heat”. Heating sequence
then restarts at step 1.
Issue 1031
506501-01
Gas Pressure Adjustment
Gas Flow (Approximate)
2. Start unit and allow 5 minutes for unit to reach steady
state.
3. While waiting for the unit to stabilize, observe the flame.
Flame should be stable and should not lift from burner.
Natural gas should burn blue.
4. After allowing unit to stabilize for 5 minutes, record
manifold pressure and compare to value given in Table
9.
NOTE: Shut unit off and remove manometer as soon as
an accurate reading has been obtained. Take care to remove
barbed fitting and replace threaded plug.
Table 8
Furnace should operate at least 5 minutes before checking
gas flow. Determine time in seconds for two revolutions of
gas through the meter. (Two revolutions assures a more
accurate time.) Divide by two and compare to time in
Table 8. If manifold pressure matches Table 9 and rate is
incorrect, check gas orifices for proper size and restriction.
Remove temporary gas meter if installed.
NOTE: To obtain accurate reading, shut off all other gas
appliances connected to meter.
Supply Pressure Measurement
A threaded plug on the inlet side of the gas valve provides
access to the supply pressure tap. Remove the threaded
plug, install a field-provided barbed fitting and connect a
manometer to measure supply pressure. Replace the
threaded plug after measurements have been taken.
High Altitude Information
NOTE: In Canada, certification for installations at elevations
over 4500 feet (1372 m) is the jurisdiction of local authorities.
The manifold pressure may require adjustment to ensure
proper operation at higher altitudes. Refer to Table 9 for
proper manifold pressure settings at varying altitudes. Table
10 lists required pressure switch changes and conversion
kits at varying altitudes.
The combustion air pressure switches are factory set and
require no adjustment.
Manifold Pressure (Outlet) Inches w.c.
For proper furnace operation the minimum gas supply
pressure is 5" w.c and the maximum gas supply pressure is
13" w.c for natural gas. The minimum gas supply pressure
is 10" w.c. and the maximum gas supply pressure is 13"
w.c. for LP/propane gas.
Manifold Pressure Measurement
1. Remove the threaded plug from the outlet side of the
gas valve and install a field provided barbed fitting.
Connect to a manometer to measure manifold pressure.
Table 9
NOTE: A natural to L.P./propane gas changeover kit is
necessary to convert this unit. Refer to the literature kit
installation instruction for the conversion procedure.
Conversion Kit and Pressure Switch Requirements at Varying Altitudes
Pressure switch is factory set. No adjustment necessary. All models use the factory installed pressure switch from 0-4500 feet (0-1370 m).
Table 10
506501-01
Issue 1031
Page 39 of 48
Testing for Proper Venting and Sufficient Combustion Air for Non-Direct Vent Applications
WARNING
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING HAZARD
Failure to follow the steps outlined below for each
appliance connected to the venting system being placed
into operation could result in carbon monoxide poisoning
or death.
The following steps shall be followed for each appliance
connected to the venting system being placed into
operation, while all other appliances connected to the
venting system are not in operation.
After the gas furnace has been started, the following test
should be conducted to ensure proper venting and sufficient
combustion air has been provided to the unit as well as to
other gas–fired appliances which are separately vented.
If this furnace replaces a Category I furnace which was
commonly vented with another gas appliance, the size of
the existing vent pipe for that gas appliance must be
checked. Without the heat of the original furnace flue
products, the existing vent pipe is probably oversized for
the single water heater or other appliance. The vent should
be checked for proper draw with the remaining appliance.
6. Follow the lighting instruction to place the appliance
being inspected into operation. Adjust thermostat so
appliance will operate continuously.
7. Use the flame of match or candle to test for spillage of
flue gases at the draft hood relief opening after 5
minutes of main burner operation.
8. If improper venting is observed during any of the above
tests, the venting system must be corrected or sufficient
combustion/makeup air must be provided. The venting
system should be re–sized to approach the minimum
size as determined by using the appropriate tables in
appendix G in the current standards of the National Fuel
Gas Code ANSI-Z223.1/NPFA 54 in the U.S.A., and
the appropriate Natural Gas and Propane appliances
venting sizing tables in the current standard of the CSAB149 Natural Gas and Propane Installation Codes in
Canada.
9. After determining that each appliance remaining
connected to the common venting system properly
vents when tested as indicated in step 3, return doors,
windows, exhaust fans, fireplace dampers and any other
gas burning appliance to their previous condition of use.
The test should be conducted while all appliances (both in
operation and those not in operation) are connected to the
venting system being tested. If the venting system has been
installed improperly, or if provisions have not been made
for sufficient amounts of combustion air, corrections must
be made as outlined in the previous section.
1. Seal any unused openings in the venting system.
2. Visually inspect the venting system for proper size and
horizontal pitch. Determine there is no blockage or
restriction, leakage, corrosion, or other deficiencies
which could cause an unsafe condition.
3. To the extent that it is practical, close all building doors
and windows and all doors between the space in which
the appliances connected to the venting system are
located and other spaces of the building.
4. Close fireplace dampers.
5. Turn on clothes dryers and any appliances not
connected to the venting system. Turn on any exhaust
fans, such as range hoods and bathroom exhausts, so
they will operate at maximum speed. Do not operate a
summer exhaust fan.
Page 40 of 48
Issue 1031
506501-01
Other Unit Adjustments
Primary Limit
The primary limit is located on the heating compartment
vestibule panel. This limit is factory set and requires no
adjustment.
Flame Rollout Switches (Two)
These manually reset switches are located on the front of
the burner box.
Pressure Switch
The pressure switch is located in the heating compartment
on the cold end header box. This switch checks for proper
combustion air inducer operation before allowing ignition
trial. The switch is factory set and must not be adjusted.
Temperature Rise
After the furnace has been started and supply and return
air temperatures have been allowed to stabilize, check the
temperature rise. If necessary, adjust the blower speed to
maintain the temperature rise within the range shown on
the unit nameplate. Increase the blower speed to decrease
the temperature. Decrease the blower speed to increase
the temperature rise. Failure to adjust the temperature rise
may cause erratic limit operation.
Fan Control
The fan ON time of 30 seconds is not adjustable. The fan
OFF delay (amount of time that the blower operates after
the heat demand has been satisfied) may be adjusted by
changing the jumper position across the five pins on the
integrated control. The unit is shipped with a factory heat
fan OFF setting of 120 seconds. The fan OFF delay affects
comfort and is adjustable to satisfy individual applications.
Adjust the fan OFF delay to achieve a supply air temperature
between 90° and 110° F at the moment that the blower is
de-energized. Longer OFF delay settings provide lower
return air temperatures; shorter settings provide higher
return air temperatures. See Figure 56.
HEAT FAN-OFF TIME SECONDS
To adjust fan-off timing, reposition jumper across pins to achieve
desired setting.
Figure 56
506501-01
Thermostat Heat Anticipation
Set the heat anticipator setting (if adjustable) according to
the amp draw listed on the wiring diagram that is attached
to the unit.
Electrical
1. Check all wiring for loose connections.
2. Check for the correct voltage at the furnace (furnace
operating).
3. Check amp–draw on the blower motor.
Motor Nameplate__________Actual__________
Blower Speeds
Follow the steps below to change the blower speeds.
1. Turn off electrical power to furnace.
2. Remove blower access panel.
3. Disconnect existing speed tap at control board speed
terminal.
NOTE: Termination of any unused motor leads must be
insulated.
4. Place unused blower speed tap on integrated control
“PARK” terminal or insulate.
5. Refer to blower speed selection chart on unit wiring
diagram for desired heating or cooling speed. See
Blower performance data beginning on the next page.
6. Connect selected speed tap at control board speed
terminal.
7. Re-secure blower access panel.
8. Turn on electrical power to furnace.
9. Recheck temperature rise.
Electronic Ignition
The integrated control has an added feature of an internal
Watchguard control. The feature serves as an automatic
reset device for integrated control lockout caused by ignition
failure. This type of lockout is usually due to low gas line
pressure. After one hour of continuous thermostat demand
for heat, the Watchguard will break and remake thermostat
demand to the furnace and automatically reset the integrated
control to begin the ignition sequence.
Exhaust and Air Intake Pipe
1. Check exhaust and air intake connections for tightness
and to make sure there is no blockage.
2. Is pressure switch closed? Obstructed exhaust pipe
will cause unit to shut off at pressure switch. Check
termination for blockages.
3. Obstructed pipe or termination may cause rollout
switches to open. Reset manual flame rollout switches
on burner box assembly if necessary.
Issue 1031
Page 41 of 48
Service
Winterizing and Condensate Trap Care
1. Turn off power to the furnace.
2. Have a shallow pan ready to empty condensate water.
3. Remove the clean out cap from the condensate trap
and empty water. Inspect the trap then reinstall the clean
out cap.
WARNING
ELECTRICAL SHOCK, FIRE,
OR EXPLOSION HAZARD.
Failure to follow safety warnings exactly could result in
dangerous operation, serious injury, death or property
damage.
Improper servicing could result in dangerous operation,
serious injury, death, or property damage.
Before servicing, disconnect all electrical power to
furnace.
When servicing controls, label all wires prior to
disconnecting. Take care to reconnect wires correctly.
Verify proper operation after servicing.
At the beginning of each heating season, system should be
checked as follows by a qualified service technician:
Blower
Check the blower wheel for debris and clean if necessary.
The blower motors are prelubricated for extended bearing
life. No further lubrication is needed.
WARNING
The blower access panel must be securely in place when
the blower and burners are operating. Gas fumes, which
could contain carbon monoxide, can be drawn into living
space resulting in personal injury or death.
Filters
All air filters are installed external to the unit. Filters should
be inspected monthly. Clean or replace the filters when
necessary to ensure proper furnace operation. Table 1 lists
recommended filter sizes.
Exhaust and air intake pipes
Check the exhaust and air intake pipes and all connections
for tightness and to make sure there is no blockage.
NOTE: After any heavy snow, ice or frozen fog event the
furnace vent pipes may become restricted. Always check
the vent system and remove any snow or ice that may be
obstructing the plastic intake or exhaust pipes.
Electrical
1. Check all wiring for loose connections.
2. Check for the correct voltage at the furnace (furnace
operating).
3. Check amp-draw on the blower motor.
Motor Nameplate__________Actual__________
Page 42 of 48
Cleaning Heat Exchanger
If cleaning the heat exchanger becomes necessary, follow
the below procedures and refer to Figure 1 when
disassembling unit. Use papers or protective covering in
front of furnace while removing heat exchanger assembly.
1. Turn off electrical and gas supplies to the furnace.
2. Remove the burner access panel.
3. Mark all gas valve wires and disconnect them from
valve.
4. Remove gas supply line connected to gas valve.
5. Remove sensor wire from flame sensor. Disconnect
2–pin plug from the ignitor.
6. Disconnect wires from flame rollout switches.
7. Remove four burner assembly screws at the vestibule
panel and remove gas valve /manifold and burner box
as a single unit.
8. If necessary, clean burners at this time. Follow
procedures outlined in Burner Cleaning section.
9. Remove the clean-out cap on trap and drain. Replace
cap.
10. Disconnect condensate drain line from the condensate
trap. Remove condensate trap (it may be necessary to
cut drain pipe). Remove the 1/2" NPT fitting from the
cold end header box. Disconnect drain tubes from cold
end header collector box.
11. Disconnect condensate drain tubes from flue collar.
Remove screws that secures flue collar in place.
Remove flue collar. It may be necessary to cut the
exiting exhaust pipe for removal of the fitting.
12. Loosen two clamps from flexible no-hub exhaust collar.
13. Disconnect the 2–pin plug from the combustion air
inducer. Remove screws which secure combustion air
inducer to collector box. Remove combustion air
inducer assembly. Remove ground wire.
14. Mark and disconnect all combustion air pressure tubing
from cold end header collector box.
15. Mark and remove wires from pressure switch. Remove
pressure switch. Keep tubing attached to pressure
switch.
16. Remove electrical junction box from the side of the
furnace.
17. Remove blower access panel.
18. Mark and disconnect any remaining wiring to heating
compartment components. Disengage strain relief
bushing and pull wiring and bushing through the hole in
the blower deck.
19. Remove the primary limit from the vestibule panel.
20. Remove top cap screws to allow top cap to be tilted
upward to allow clearance for removing heat exchanger.
Issue 1031
506501-01
21. Remove two screws from the front cabinet flange at the
blower deck. Spread cabinet sides slightly to allow
clearance for removal of heat exchanger.
22. Remove screws along vestibule sides and bottom which
secure vestibule panel and heat exchanger assembly
to cabinet. Remove two screws from blower rails which
secure bottom heat exchanger flange. Remove heat
exchanger from furnace cabinet.
23. Back wash heat exchanger with soapy water solution or
steam. If steam is used it must be below 275°F (135°C).
24. Thoroughly rinse and drain the heat exchanger. Soap
solutions can be corrosive. Take care to rinse entire
assembly.
25. Reinstall heat exchanger into cabinet making sure that
the rear baffle of the heat exchanger assembly is nested
under the support located at the rear of the cabinet.
Remove the indoor blower to view this area through the
blower opening.
26. Re–secure the supporting screws along the vestibule
sides.
27. Reinstall blower assembly and reinstall two screws
through rails.
28. Reinstall cabinet screws on front flange at blower deck.
29. Reinstall screws securing top cap.
30. Reinstall the primary limit on the vestibule panel.
31. Route heating component wiring through hole in blower
deck and reinsert strain relief bushing.
32. Reinstall pressure switch and reconnect pressure switch
wiring.
33. Carefully connect combustion air pressure switch hosing
from pressure switch to proper stubs on cold end header
collector box.
34. Reinstall 1/2" NPT (if removed) in the cold end header
box. Reconnect drain tubing to collector box.
35. Reinstall condensate trap pipe. Reconnect condensate
drain line to the condensate trap.
36. Reinstall electrical junction box.
37. Reinstall the combustion air inducer and flexible no hub
connector. Reconnect the 2 pin plug to the wire harness.
38. Reconnect drain tubes between flue collar and cold end
header box.
39. Secure burner assembly to vestibule panel using four
existing screws. Burners are self aligning to center of
clam shells.
40. Reconnect gas supply line to gas valve.
41. Reconnect flame rollout switch wires.
42. Reconnect sensor wire and reconnect 2 pin plug from
ignitor.
506501-01
43. Reconnect wires to gas valve.
44. Replace the blower compartment access panel.
45. Refer to instruction on verifying gas and electrical
connections when reestablishing supplies.
46. Follow lighting instructions to light and operate furnace
for 5 minutes to ensure that heat exchanger is clean
and dry and that furnace is operating properly.
47. Replace heating compartment access panel.
Cleaning the Burner Assembly
1. Turn off gas and electrical power to the furnace. Remove
heating compartment access panel.
2. Disconnect the gas supply line from the gas valve.
3. Disconnect and label wires from gas valve.
4. Disconnect ignitor wiring at 2 circuit plug.
5. Disconnect and label wires from rollout switch.
6. Disconnect and label flame sensor wire.
7. Disconnect and label ground wire from burner/manifold
assembly.
8. Remove four screws that secures burner/manifold
assembly to vestibule. Remove the assembly and make
note not to allow ignitor plate to dislodge from the
assembly.
9. Gently clean the face of the burners using the soft brush
attachment on a vacuum cleaner. Visually inspect the
inside of the burners and crossovers for any blockage
caused by foreign matter. Remove any blockage
10. Reinstall the burner/manifold assembly using the existing
four screws. Burners are self aligning to center of
clam shells.
11. Reconnect ground wire.
12. Reconnect flame sensor wire.
13. Reconnect rollout switch wires.
14. Reconnect ignitor wires.
15. Reconnect gas valve wires.
16. Reconnect gas supply line to gas valve.
17. Refer to instructions on verifying gas and electrical
connections when re-establishing supplies.
18. Follow instructions to place furnace in operation. Run
furnace 5 minutes to ensure burners are clean and
operating correctly.
19. Replace heating compartment access panel.
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Page 43 of 48
PLANNED SERVICE
A service technician should check the following items during
an annual inspection. Power to the unit must be shut off for
safety.
FAILURE CODES
Fresh air grilles and louvers (on the unit and in the room
where the furnace is installed) - Must be open and
unobstructed to provide combustion air.
Burners - Must be inspected for rust, dirt, or signs of water.
Vent pipe - Must be inspected for signs of water, cracked,
damaged or sagging pipe, or disconnected joints.
Unit appearance - Must be inspected for rust, dirt, signs of
water, burnt or damaged wires, or components.
Blower access door - Must be properly in place and provide
a seal between the return air and the room where the furnace
is installed.
Return air duct - Must be properly attached and provide an
air seal to the unit.
Operating performance - Unit must be observed during
operation to monitor proper performance of the unit and the
vent system.
Combustion gases - Flue products should be analyzed and
compared to the unit specifications.
Problems detected during the inspection may make it
necessary to temporarily shut down the furnace until the
items can be repaired or replaced.
Instruct the homeowners to pay attention to their
furnace. Situations can arise between annual furnace
inspections that may result in unsafe operation. For instance,
items innocently stored next to the furnace may obstruct the
combustion air supply. This could cause incomplete
combustion and the production of carbon monoxide gas.
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REPAIR PARTS LIST
The following repair parts are available through Allied Air dealers. When ordering parts, include the complete furnace model
number listed on the CSA nameplate. All service must be performed by a licensed professional installer (or equivalent),
service agency, or gas supplier.
Cabinet Parts
Upper Access Panel
Blower Access Panel
Top Cap
Control Panel Parts
Transformer
Integrated Control Board
Door Interlock Switch
Blower Parts
Blower Wheel
Motor
Motor Mounting Frame
Motor Capacitor
Blower Housing Cutoff Plate
506501-01
Heating Parts
Flame Sensor
Heat Exchanger Assembly
Gas Manifold
Combustion Air Inducer
Gas Valve
Main Burner Cluster
Main Burner Orifices
Pressure Switch
Ignitor
Primary Limit Control
Flame Rollout Switches
Issue 1031
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Start-Up & Performance Check List
UNIT SET UP
Page 46 of 48
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506501-01
UNIT OPERATION
Heating Mode
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Cooling Mode
Issue 1031
Page 47 of 48
REQUIREMENTS for COMMONWEALTH of MASSACHUSETTS
Modifications to NFPA-54, Chapter 10
Revise NFPA-54 section 10.8.3 to add the following
requirements:
For all side wall, horizontally vented, gas-fueled equipment
installed in every dwelling, building or structure used in whole
or in part for residential purposes, including those owned
or operated by the Commonwealth and where the side wall
exhaust vent termination is less than seven (7) feet above
the finished grade in the area of the venting, including but
not limited to decks and porches, the following requirements
shall be satisfied:
1. INSTALLATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE
DETECTORS. At the time of installation of the side wall,
horizontally vented, gas-fueled equipment, the installing
plumber or gas fitter shall observe that a hard-wired
carbon monoxide detector with an alarm and battery
backup is installed on the floor level where the gas
equipment is to be installed. In addition, the installing
plumber or gas fitter shall observe that a batteryoperated or hard-wired carbon monoxide detector with
an alarm is installed on each additional level of the
dwelling, building or structure served by the side wall,
horizontally vented, gas-fueled equipment. It shall be
the responsibility of the property owner to secure the
services of qualified licensed professionals for the
installation of hard-wired carbon monoxide detectors.
a. In the event that the side wall, horizontally vented,
gas-fueled equipment is installed in a crawl space
or an attic, the hard-wired carbon monoxide
detector with alarm and battery backup may be
installed on the next adjacent floor level.
b. In the event that the requirements of this subdivision
cannot be met at the time of completion of
installation, the owner shall have a period of thirty
(30) days to comply with the above requirements;
provided, however, that during said thirty (30) day
period, a battery-operated carbon monoxide
detector with an alarm shall be installed.
2. APPROVED CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTORS.
Each carbon monoxide detector as required in
accordance with the above provisions shall comply with
NFPA 720 and be ANSI/UL 2034 listed and IAS certified.
3. SIGNAGE. A metal or plastic identification plate shall
be permanently mounted to the exterior of the building
at a minimum height of eight (8) feet above grade
directly in line with the exhaust vent terminal for the
horizontally vented, gas-fueled heating appliance or
equipment. The sign shall read, in print size no less
than one-half (1/2) inch in size, “GAS VENT DIRECTLY
BELOW. KEEP CLEAR OF ALL OBSTRUCTIONS.”
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4.
INSPECTION. The state or local gas inspector of the
side wall, horizontally vented, gas-fueled equipment
shall not approve the installation unless, upon
inspection, the inspector observes carbon monoxide
detectors and signage installed in accordance with the
provisions of 248 CMR 5.08(2)(a) 1 through 4.
EXEMPTIONS: The following equipment is exempt from
24 CMR 5.08(2)(a) 1 through 4:
1.
The equipment listed in Chapter 10 entitled “Equipment
Not Required to Be Vented” in the most current edition
of NFPA 54 as adopted by the Board; and
2. Product Approved side wall, horizontally vented, gasfueled equipment installed in a room or structure
separate from the dwelling, building or structure used
in whole or in part for residential purposes.
MANUFACTURER REQUIREMENTS GAS EQUIPMENT VENTING SYSTEM PROVIDED.
When the manufacturer of Product Approved side wall,
horizontally vented, gas-fueled equipment provides a venting
system design or venting system components with the
equipment, the instructions provided by the manufacturer
for installation of the equipment and the venting system shall
include:
1. Detailed instructions for the installation of the venting
system design or the venting system components: and
2. A complete parts list for the venting system design or
venting system.
MANUFACTURER REQUIREMENTS GAS EQUIPMENT VENTING SYSTEM NOT PROVIDED.
When the manufacturer of Product Approved sidewall,
horizontally vented, gas-fueled equipment does not provide
the parts for venting the flue gases, but identifies “special
venting systems,” the following requirements shall be
satisfied by the manufacturer:
1. The referenced “special venting system” instructions
shall be included with the appliance or equipment
installation instructions; and
2. The “special venting systems” shall be Product
Approved by the Board, and the instructions for that
system shall include a parts list and detailed installation
instructions.
A copy of all installation instructions for all Product
Approved side wall, horizontally vented, gas-fueled
equipment, all venting instructions, all parts lists for
venting instructions, and/or all venting design
instructions shall remain with the appliance or
equipment at the completion of the installation.
Issue 1031
506501-01
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