American Dryer Corp. MLG31PCA Clothes Dryer User Manual

Portégé® Z830 Series
User’s Guide
If you need assistance:
❖
Toshiba’s Support Web site
support.toshiba.com
❖
Toshiba Customer Support Center
Calling within the United States (800) 457-7777
Calling from outside the United States (949) 859-4273
For more information, see “If Something Goes Wrong” on
page 158 in this guide.
GMAD00290010
09/11
2
Handling the cord on this product will expose you to lead, a
chemical known to the State of California to cause birth defects or
other reproductive harm. Wash hands after handling.
Model: Portégé® Z830 Series
Recordable and/or ReWritable Drive(s) and
Associated Software Warranty
The computer system you purchased may include Recordable and/or
ReWritable optical disc drive(s) and associated software, among the most
advanced data storage technologies available. As with any new technology,
you must read and follow all set-up and usage instructions in the applicable
user guides and/or manuals enclosed or provided electronically. If you fail
to do so, this product may not function properly and you may lose data or
suffer other damage. TOSHIBA AMERICA INFORMATION SYSTEMS,
INC. (“TOSHIBA”), ITS AFFILIATES AND SUPPLIERS DO NOT
WARRANT THAT OPERATION OF THE PRODUCT WILL BE
UNINTERRUPTED OR ERROR FREE. YOU AGREE THAT TOSHIBA,
ITS AFFILIATES AND SUPPLIERS SHALL HAVE NO
RESPONSIBILITY FOR DAMAGE TO OR LOSS OF ANY BUSINESS,
PROFITS, PROGRAMS, DATA, NETWORK SYSTEMS OR
REMOVABLE STORAGE MEDIA ARISING OUT OF OR RESULTING
FROM THE USE OF THE PRODUCT, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE
POSSIBILITY THEREOF.
Protection of Stored Data
For your important data, please make periodic back-up copies of all the data
stored on the hard disk or other storage devices as a precaution against possible
failures, alteration, or loss of the data. IF YOUR DATA IS ALTERED OR
LOST DUE TO ANY TROUBLE, FAILURE OR MALFUNCTION OF
THE HARD DISK DRIVE OR OTHER STORAGE DEVICES AND THE
DATA CANNOT BE RECOVERED, TOSHIBA SHALL NOT BE
LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGE OR LOSS OF DATA, OR ANY OTHER
DAMAGE RESULTING THEREFROM. WHEN COPYING OR
TRANSFERRING YOUR DATA, PLEASE BE SURE TO CONFIRM
WHETHER THE DATA HAS BEEN SUCCESSFULLY COPIED OR
TRANSFERRED. TOSHIBA DISCLAIMS ANY LIABILITY FOR THE
FAILURE TO COPY OR TRANSFER THE DATA CORRECTLY.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
3
Critical Applications
The computer you have purchased is not designed for any “critical applications.”
“Critical applications” means life support systems, medical applications,
connections to implanted medical devices, commercial transportation, nuclear
facilities or systems or any other applications where product failure could lead to
injury to persons or loss of life or catastrophic property damage.
ACCORDINGLY, TOSHIBA, ITS AFFILIATES AND SUPPLIERS
DISCLAIM ANY AND ALL LIABILITY ARISING OUT OF THE USE
OF THE COMPUTER PRODUCTS IN ANY CRITICAL
APPLICATIONS. IF YOU USE THE COMPUTER PRODUCTS IN A
CRITICAL APPLICATION, YOU, AND NOT TOSHIBA, ASSUME
FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR SUCH USE.
FCC Notice “Declaration of Conformity Information”
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential
installation.
This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not
installed and used in accordance with the instructions, it may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that
interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does
cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to
correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
❖
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
❖
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
❖
Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from that to which
the receiver is connected.
❖
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
NOTE
Only Peripherals complying with the FCC Class B limits may be attached to this
equipment. Operation with noncompliant peripherals or peripherals not
recommended by Toshiba is likely to result in interference to radio and TV reception.
Shielded cables must be used between the external devices and the computer's
ports. Changes or modifications made to this equipment not expressly approved by
Toshiba or parties authorized by Toshiba could void the user's authority to operate
the equipment.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
4
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions:
❖
This device may not cause harmful interference.
❖
This device must accept any interference received, including interference
that may cause undesired operation.
Contact either:
❖
Toshiba’s Support Web site at support.toshiba.com.
❖
Or call the Toshiba Customer Support Center:
Within the United States at (800) 457-7777
Outside the United States at (949) 859-4273
Industry Canada Requirement
This Class B digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B est conformé à la norme NMB-003 du
Canada.
FCC requirements
The following information is pursuant to FCC CFR 47, Part 68 and refers to
internal modems and is only applicable if your computer has a modem.
This equipment complies with Part 68 of the FCC rules. On the bottom of this
equipment is a label that contains, among other information, the FCC registration
number and ringer equivalence number (REN) for this equipment. If requested,
the information must be provided to the telephone company.
The modem connects to the telephone line by means of a standard jack called the
USOC RJ11C.
A plug and jack used to connect this equipment to the premises wiring and
telephone network must comply with the applicable FCC part 68 rules and
requirements adopted by the ACTA. It is designed to be connected to a
compatible modular jack that is also compliant.
The REN is used to determine the number of devices that may be connected to a
telephone line. Excessive RENs on a telephone line may result in the devices not
ringing in response to an incoming call. In most but not all areas, the sum of
RENs should not exceed five (5.0). To be certain of the number of devices that
may be connected to a line, as determined by the total RENs, contact the local
telephone company. For products approved after July 23, 2001, the REN for this
product is part of the product identifier that has the format
US:AAAEQ##TXXXX. The digits represented by the ## are the REN without a
decimal point (e.g., 03 is a REN of 0.3). For earlier products, the REN is
separately shown on the label.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
5
Connection to party line service is subject to state tariffs. Contact the state public
utility commission, public service commission or corporation commission for
information.
Telephone Company Procedures
The goal of the telephone company is to provide you with the best service it can.
In order to do this, it may occasionally be necessary for them to make changes in
their equipment, operations or procedures. If these changes might affect your
service or the operation of your equipment, the telephone company will give you
notice, in writing, to allow you to make any changes necessary to maintain
uninterrupted service.
If Problems Arise
If this equipment causes harm to the telephone network, the telephone company
will notify you in advance that temporary discontinuance of service may be
required. But if advanced notice is not practical, the telephone company will
notify the customer as soon as possible. Also, you will be advised of your right to
file a complaint with the FCC if you believe it is necessary.
If trouble is experienced with this equipment, for repair or standard limited
warranty information, please contact Toshiba Corporation, Toshiba America
Information Systems, Inc. or an authorized representative of Toshiba, or the
Toshiba Customer Support Center within the United States at (800) 457-7777 or
Outside the United States at (949) 859-4273. If the equipment is causing harm to
the telephone network, the telephone company may request that you disconnect
the equipment until the problem is resolved.
Disconnection
If you should ever decide to permanently disconnect your modem from its
present line, please call the telephone company and let them know of this change.
Fax Branding
The following information is only applicable if your computer has the capability
to send and receive fax transmissions.
The Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 makes it unlawful for any
person to use a computer or other electronic device, including Fax machines, to
send any message unless such message clearly contains in a margin at the top or
bottom of each transmitted page or on the first page of the transmission, the date
and time it is sent and an identification of the business or other entity, or other
individual sending the message and the telephone number of the sending
machine or such business, other entity, or individual. (The telephone number
provided may not be a 900 number or any other number for which charges
exceed local or long-distance transmission charges.)
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
6
In order to program this information into your fax transmission, refer to the fax
software instructions installed on this computer.
Alarm Equipment
If your home has specially wired alarm equipment connected to the telephone
line, ensure the installation of this equipment does not disable your alarm
equipment. If you have questions about what will disable alarm equipment,
consult your telephone company or a qualified installer.
Instructions for IC CS-03 Certified Equipment
1
NOTICE: The Industry Canada label identifies certified equipment.
This certification means that the equipment meets certain
telecommunications network protective, operational and safety
requirements as prescribed in the appropriate Terminal Equipment
Technical Requirements document(s). The Department does not
guarantee the equipment will operate to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to
be connected to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. The
equipment must also be installed using an acceptable method of connection.
The customer should be aware that compliance with the above conditions
may not prevent degradation of service in some situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be coordinated by a representative
designated by the supplier. Any repairs or alterations made by the user to
this equipment, or equipment malfunctions, may give the
telecommunications company cause to request the user to disconnect the
equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground
connections of the power utility, telephone lines and internal metallic water
pipe system, if present, are connected together. This precaution may be
particularly important in rural areas.
Caution: Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves,
but should contact the appropriate electric inspection authority, or
electrician, as appropriate.
2
The user manual of analog equipment must contain the equipment’s
Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) and an explanation notice similar
to the following:
The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) of this device can be found on the
label affixed to your computer.
NOTICE: The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) assigned to each
terminal device provides an indication of the maximum number of
terminals allowed to be connected to a telephone interface. The termination
on an interface may consist of any combination of devices subject only to
the requirement that the sum of the Ringer Equivalence Numbers of all the
devices does not exceed 5.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
7
3
The standard connecting arrangement (telephone jack type) for this
equipment is jack type(s): USOC RJ11C.
Wireless Interoperability
The TOSHIBA Wireless LAN Mini PCI Card products are designed to be
interoperable with any wireless LAN product that is based on Direct Sequence
Spread Spectrum (DSSS) radio technology, and is compliant to:
❖
The IEEE 802.11 Standard on Wireless LANs (Revision A/B/G), as defined
and approved by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.
❖
The Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi®) certification as defined by the Wi-Fi Alliance.
The “Wi-Fi CERTIFIED” logo is a certification mark of the Wi-Fi Alliance.
Bluetooth® and Wireless LAN devices operate within the same radio
frequency range and may interfere with one another. If you use Bluetooth and
Wireless LAN devices simultaneously, you may occasionally experience a
less than optimal network performance or even lose your network
connection.
If you should experience any such problem, immediately turn off your
Bluetooth or Wireless LAN device.
Please contact Toshiba computer product support on Web site
http://www.toshiba-europe.com/computers/tnt/bluetooth.htm in Europe or
support.toshiba.com in the United States for more information.
Radio Frequency Interference Requirements
This device is restricted to indoor use due to its operation in the 5.15 GHz to
5.25 GHz frequency range. FCC requires this product to be used indoors for
frequency range 5.15 GHz to 5.25 GHz to reduce the potential for harmful
interference to co-channel Mobile Satellite systems.
High power radars are allocated as primary users of the 5.25 GHz to 5.35
GHz and 5.65 GHz to 5.85 GHz bands. These radar stations can cause
interference with and/or damage this device.
NOTE
The above caution applies to products that operate with an 802.11a radio
device.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
8
Wireless LAN and Your Health
Wireless LAN products, like other radio devices, emit radio frequency
electromagnetic energy. The level of energy emitted by Wireless LAN devices
however is far much less than the electromagnetic energy emitted by wireless
devices like for example mobile phones.
Because Wireless LAN products operate within the guidelines found in radio
frequency safety standards and recommendations, TOSHIBA believes Wireless
LAN is safe for use by consumers. These standards and recommendations reflect
the consensus of the scientific community and result from deliberations of panels
and committees of scientists who continually review and interpret the extensive
research literature.
In some situations or environments, the use of Wireless LAN may be restricted
by the proprietor of the building or responsible representatives of the
organization. These situations may for example include:
❖
Using the Wireless LAN equipment on board airplanes, or
❖
In any other environment where the risk of interference to other devices or
services is perceived or identified as harmful.
If you are uncertain of the policy that applies on the use of wireless devices in a
specific organization or environment (e.g. airports), you are encouraged to ask for
authorization to use the Wireless LAN device prior to turning on the equipment.
Exposure to Radio Frequency Radiation
The radiated output power of the TOSHIBA Wireless LAN Mini PCI Card is
far below the FCC radio frequency exposure limits. Nevertheless, the
TOSHIBA Wireless LAN Mini PCI Card shall be used in such a manner that
the potential for human contact during normal operation is minimized. The
antenna(s) used for this transmitter must not be co-located or operating in
conjunction with any other antenna or transmitter.
Regulatory Information
The TOSHIBA Wireless LAN Mini PCI Card must be installed and used in strict
accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions as described in the user
documentation that comes with the product. This device complies with the
following radio frequency and safety standards.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
9
Canada – Industry Canada (IC)
This device complies with RSS 210 of Industry Canada.
The installer of this radio equipment must ensure that the antenna is located
or pointed such that it does not emit RF field in excess of Health Canada
limits for the general population; consult Safety Code 6, obtainable from
Health Canada’s Web site www.hc-sc.gc.ca/rpb. The RF device shall not be
co-located with any other transmitter that has not been tested with this
device.
Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not
cause interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference, including
interference that may cause undesired operation of this device.
L’ utilisation de ce dispositif est soumis aux deux conditions suivantes: (1) il ne
doit pas produire de brouillage et (2) l’utilisateur du dispositif doit être prêt à
accepter tout brouillage radioélectrique reçu, même s’il est susceptible de
compromettre son fonctionnement.
The term “IC” before the equipment certification number only signifies that the
Industry Canada technical specifications were met.
To prevent radio interference to the licensed service, this device is intended to be
operated indoors and away from windows to provide maximum shielding.
Equipment (or its transmit antenna) that is installed outdoors is subject to
licensing.
Pour empecher que cet appareil cause du brouillage au service faisant l’objet
d’une licence, il doit etre utilize a l’interieur et devrait etre place loin des fenetres
afin de Fournier un ecram de blindage maximal. Si le matriel (ou son antenne
d’emission) est installe a l’exterieur, il doit faire l’objet d’une licence.
This device is restricted to indoor use due to its operation in the 5.15 GHz to
5.25 GHz frequency range. Industry Canada requires this product to be used
indoors for frequency range 5.15 GHz to 5.25 GHz to reduce the potential for
harmful interference to co-channel Mobile Satellite systems.
High power radars are allocated as primary users of the 5.25 GHz to 5.35
GHz and 5.65 GHz to 5.85 GHz bands. These radar stations can cause
interference with and/or damage this device.
NOTE
The above caution applies to products that operate with an 802.11a radio
device.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
10
EU Declaration of Conformity
TOSHIBA declares that this product conforms to the following Standards:
Supplementary *The product complies with the
Information:
requirements of the Low Voltage
Directive 73/23/EEC, the EMC Directive
89/336/EEC and/or the R&TTE Directive
1999/5/EC.
This product is carrying the CE-Mark in accordance with the related European
Directives. The party responsible for CE-Marking is TOSHIBA Europe GmbH,
Hammfelddamm 8, 41460 Neuss, Germany.
The European Union WEEE (Waste from Electrical and
Electronic Equipment) Directive Information
The European Union WEEE (Waste from Electrical and Electronic Equipment)
Directive is intended to protect the quality of the environment and human health
through the responsible use of natural resources and the adoption of waste
management strategies that focus on recycling and reuse. This Directive requires
producers of electrical and electronic products put on the market in European
Union (EU) member countries after August 2005 to mark such products with a
crossed-out wheeled bin with a black bar symbol. If the product’s battery or
accumulator contains more than the specified values of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg),
and/or cadmium (Cd) defined in the Battery Directive (2006/66/EC), then the
chemical symbols for lead (Pb), mercury (Hg) and/or cadmium (Cd) will appear
below the crossed out wheeled bin symbol on the battery.
Pb, Hg, Cd
In the European Union, these symbols indicate that when the last end user wishes
to discard this product, it must be sent to appropriate facilities for recovery and
recycling. This Directive applies to EU member countries only and does not
apply to end users in other countries such as the United States.
Although the initial emphasis is in Europe, Toshiba is already working with
design engineers, suppliers, and other partners to determine appropriate
worldwide product life cycle planning and end-of-life strategies for our products.
Please contact your local government for applicable laws and regulations
governing the disposal of this product. For information on how to trade-in or
recycle your product, visit www.reuse.toshiba.com.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
11
VCCI Class B Information
Modem Warning Notice
This information is only applicable if your computer has a modem.
Conformity Statement
The equipment has been approved to [Commission Decision “CTR21”] for panEuropean single terminal connection to the Public Switched Telephone Network
(PSTN).
However, due to differences between the individual PSTNs provided in different
countries/regions the approval does not, of itself, give an unconditional assurance
of successful operation on every PSTN network termination point.
In the event of problems, you should contact your equipment supplier in the first
instance.
Taiwan
Article 14
Article 17
Unless approved, for any model accredited low power radio frequency
electric machinery, any company, trader or user shall not change the
frequency, increase the power or change the features and functions of the
original design.
Any use of low power radio frequency electric machinery shall not affect
aviation safety and interfere with legal communications. In the event
interference is caused, the use of such electric machinery shall be
immediately discontinued. Operation of such products can be resumed
only when they are modified and can no longer cause interference.
The legal communications mentioned in the above item refer to radio
communications operated in accordance with telecommunication laws and
regulations.
Low power radio frequency electric machinery shall resist against interference
from legal communications or from industrial, scientific and medical radio
emission electric machinery.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
12
Using this Equipment in Japan
In Japan, the frequency bandwidth of 2,400 MHz to 2,483.5 MHz for second
generation low-power data communication systems such as this equipment
overlaps that of mobile object identification systems (premises radio station and
specified low-power radio station).
1. Sticker
Please put the following sticker on devices incorporating this product.
The frequency bandwidth of this equipment may operate within the
same range as industrial devices, scientific devices, medical
devices, microwave ovens, licensed radio stations and non-licensed
specified low-power radio stations for mobile object identification
systems (RFID) used in factory product lines (Other Radio Stations).
1. Before using this equipment, ensure that it does not interfere with
any of the equipment listed above.
2. If this equipment causes RF interference to other radio stations,
promptly change the frequency being used, change the location
of use, or turn off the source of emissions.
3. Contact TOSHIBA Direct PC if you have problems with interference
caused by this product to Other Radio Stations.
2. Indication
The indication shown below appears on this equipment.
(2) (3)
(1)
2.4DSOF4
(4)
1
2
2.4: This equipment uses a frequency of 2.4 GHz.
DS: This equipment uses DS-SS modulation.
OF: This equipment uses OFDM modulation.
3
4
The interference range of this equipment is less than 40m.
This equipment uses a frequency bandwidth from
2,400 MHz to 2,483.5 MHz.
It is possible to avoid the band of mobile object identification systems.
The indication shown below appears on this equipment.
(1)
(2) (3)
2.4FH1
(4)
1
2
3
2.4: This equipment uses a frequency of 2.4 GHz.
FH: This equipment uses FH-SS modulation.
The interference range of this equipment is less than 10m.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
13
4
This equipment uses a frequency bandwidth from 2,400 MHz to
2,483.5 MHz.
3. TOSHIBA Direct PC
Monday – Friday: 10:00 – 17:00
Toll Free Tel: 0120-15-1048
Direct Dial: 03-3457-4850
Fax: 03-3457-4868
Device Authorization
This device obtains the Technical Regulation Conformity Certification and
the Technical Conditions Compliance Approval, and it belongs to the
device class of radio equipment of low-power data communication system
radio station stipulated in the Radio Law and the Telecommunications
Business Law of Japan.
The name of the radio equipment: refer to the equipment label provided on
the computer
Approved by both the JAPAN APPROVALS INSTITUTE FOR
TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT and the TELECOM
ENGINEERING CENTER
The following restrictions apply:
❖
❖
❖
Do not disassemble or modify the device.
Do not install the embedded wireless module into other device.
5.17 GHz to 5.23 GHz for indoor use only.
Radio Approvals for Wireless Devices
NOTE
The following information is dependent on what type of wireless device is in
your computer. Not all devices are available on all models.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
14
Approved Countries/Regions for the Intel® Wireless Wi-Fi®
Link 5100/5300 Series
This equipment is approved to the radio standard by the countries/regions in the
following table.
Do not use this equipment except in the countries/regions in the following
table.
Andorra
Argentina CNC:
Austria
Belgium
Brazil
Cambodia
Chile
Costa Rica
533AN_HMW: “CNC C-6367”
533AN_MMW: “CNC C-6366”
512AN_HMW: “CNC C-6373”
512AN_MMW: “CNC C-6374”
Azerbaijan
Bermuda
Bulgaria
Canada
China
Croatia
Cyprus
Dominican Republic
Egypt
Finland
French Polynesia
Gibraltar
Guam
Honduras
Iceland
Ireland
Japan
Kuwait
Liechtenstein
Malawi
Martinique
Monaco
Morocco
New Zealand
Oman
Czech Republic
Ecuador
Estonia
France
Germany
Greece
Guatemala
Hong Kong
India
Israel
Jordan
Latvia
Lithuania
Malaysia
Mayotte
Montenegro
Netherlands
Nicaragua
Pakistan
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Australia
Bahrain
Bosnia
Caicos Islands
Cayman Islands
Colombia
Curacao, Netherlands
Antilles
Denmark
El Salvador
Falkland Islands
French Guinea
Ghana
Guadeloupe
Herzegovina
Hungary
Indonesia
Italy
Kenya
Lebanon
Luxemburg
Malta
Mexico
Montserrat
New Caledonia
Norway
Panama
15
Paraguay
Poland
Qatar
Russia
San Marino
Singapore
South Africa
Sri Lanka
Tahiti
Turk Islands
Peru
Portugal
Réunion
Saint Martin
Saudi Arabia
Slovakia
South Korea
Sweden
Taiwan
Ukraine
United Kingdom
Vatican
Virgin Islands
Uruguay
Venezuela
Zimbabwe
Philippines
Puerto Rico
Romania
Saipan
Serbia
Slovenia
Spain
Switzerland
Turkey
UAE
(United Arab Emirates)
USA
Vietnam
Approved Countries/Regions for the Intel® Wireless Wi-Fi®
Link 622ANHMW and 633ANHMW Series
This equipment is approved to the radio standard by the countries/regions in the
following table.
Do not use this equipment except in the countries/regions in the
following table.
Canada
USA
Approved Countries/Regions for the Realtek® RTL8188CE
This equipment is approved to the radio standard by the countries/regions in the
following table.
Do not use this equipment except in the countries/regions in the following
table.
Albania
Australia
Bahrain
Bolivia
Brazil
Cambodia
Chile
Costa Rica
Argentina
Austria
Bangladesh
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Brunei
Canada
China
Croatia
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Aruba (Netherlands)
Azerbaijan
Belgium
Botswana
Bulgaria
CB report
Colombia
Cyprus
16
Czech Republic
Ecuador
Estonia
Germany
Grenada
Hong Kong
India
Israel
Japan - Jate
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Lesotho
Luxembourg
Malta
Montenegro
Nambia
Netherlands Antilles
Nigeria
Pakistan
Paraguay
Poland
Qatar
Saint Vincent and the
Grenadines
Serbia
Slovenia
Spain
Switzerland
Trinidad and Tobago
Uganda
Uruguay
Vietnam
Denmark
Egypt
Finland
Ghana
Guatemala
Hungary
Indonesia
Italy
Japan - Telec
Kenya
Latvia
Liechtenstein
Macedonia
Mexico
Morocco
Nepal
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Peru
Portugal
Romania
Saudi Arabia
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
France
Greece
Honduras
Iceland
Ireland
Jamaica
Jordan
Kuwait
Lebanon
Lithuania
Malaysia
Monaco
Mozambique
Netherlands
Nicaragua
Oman
Papua New Guinea
Philippines
Puerto Rico
Rwanda
Senegal
Singapore
South Africa
Sri Lanka
Taiwan
Tunisia
UAE (United Arab
Emirates)
USA
Zimbabwe
Slovak Republic
South Korea
Sweden
Thailand
Turkey
United Kingdom
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Venezuela
17
Approved Countries/Regions for the Atheros® Wireless Wi-Fi®
Link AR5B95 Series
This equipment is approved to the radio standard by the countries/regions in the
following table.
Do not use this equipment except in the countries/regions in the following
table.
Albania
Argentina CNC:
Austria
Bangladesh
Bosnia
Bulgaria
Chile
Croatia
Denmark
Egypt
Finland
Ghana
Herzegovina
Hungary
Indonesia
Italy
Jordan
Kuwait
Lebanon
Lithuania
Malaysia
Monaco
Nambia
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Peru
Portugal
Romania
Senegal
Slovak Republic
South Korea
Sweden
Thailand
693 GI/2007
3655 GI/2007
Azerbaijan
Belgium
Brazil
Cambodia
China
Cyprus
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
France
Greece
Honduras
Iceland
Iraq
Jamaica
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Lesotho
Luxembourg
Malta
Montenegro
Nepal
Nicaragua
Oman
Papua New Guinea
Philippines
Puerto Rico
Russia
Serbia
Slovenia
Spain
Switzerland
Turkey
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Australia
Bahrain
Bolivia
Brunei
Canada
Colombia
Czech Republic
Ecuador
Estonia
Germany
Guatemala
Hong Kong
India
Ireland
Japan
Kenya
Latvia
Liechtenstein
Macedonia
Mexico
Mozambique
Netherlands
Nigeria
Pakistan
Paraguay
Poland
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Singapore
South Africa
Sri Lanka
Taiwan
UAE (United Arab
Emirates)
18
Ukraine
USA
Yemen
United Kingdom
Venezuela
Zimbabwe
Uruguay
Vietnam
Europe - Restrictions for use of 2.4 GHz Frequencies in
European Community Countries
België/
Belgique:
Deutschland:
France:
Italia:
Nederland:
For private usage outside buildings across public grounds over less than
300m no special registration with IBPT/BIPT is required. Registration to
IBPT/BIPT is required for private usage outside buildings across public
grounds over more than 300m. For registration and license please
contact IBPT/BIPT.
Voor privé-gebruik buiten gebouw over publieke groud over afstand
kleiner dan 300m geen registratie bij BIPT/IBPT nodig; voor gebruik
over afstand groter dan 300m is wel registratie bij BIPT/IBPT nodig.
Voor registratie of licentie kunt u contact opnemen met BIPT.
Dans le cas d’une utilisation privée, à l’extérieur d’un bâtiment, audessus d’un espace public, aucun enregistrement n’est nécessaire pour
une distance de moins de 300m. Pour une distance supérieure à 300m un
enregistrement auprès de l’IBPT est requise. Pour les enregistrements et
licences, veuillez contacter l’IBPT.
License required for outdoor installations. Check with reseller for
procedure to follow.
Anmeldung im Outdoor-Bereich notwendig, aber nicht
genehmigungspflichtig. Bitte mit Händler die Vorgehensweise
abstimmen.
Restricted frequency band: only channels 1 to 7 (2400 MHz and 2454
MHz respectively) may be used outdoors in France. Please contact
A.R.T. (http://www.art-telecom.fr) for applicable procedures to follow.
Bande de fréquence restreinte: seuls les canaux 1- 7 (2400 et 2454 MHz
respectivement) doivent être utilisés endroits extérieur en France. Vous
pouvez contacter l’Autorité de Régulation des Télécommunications
(http://www.art-telecom.fr) pour la procédure à suivre.
License required for indoor use. Use with outdoor installations not
allowed.
È necessaria la concessione ministeriale anche per l’uso interno.
Verificare con i rivenditori la procedura da seguire.
License required for outdoor installations. Check with reseller for
procedure to follow.
Licentie verplicht voor gebruik met buitenantennes. Neem contact op
met verkoper voor juiste procedure.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
19
Europe - Restrictions for Use of 5 GHz Frequencies in
European Community Countries
5150-5250 MHz 5250-5350 MHz
European Community
Countries
Channels: 36, 40, 44,
48
Austria
Belgium, France,
Switzerland/Liechtenstein
Denmark, Finland,
Germany, Greece,
Ireland, Italy,
Luxembourg,
Netherlands, Norway,
Portugal, Sweden, UK
Iceland, Spain
5470-5725 MHz
Channels: 52, 56, 60, Channels: 100, 104, 108, 112,
64
116, 120, 124, 128, 132, 136, 140
Indoor Only
O
O
Indoor Only
x
O
Indoor/Outdoor
x
x
O
O
O
O
O
O
O: allowed x: forbidden
❖
To remain in conformance with European spectrum usage laws for Wireless
LAN operation, the above 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz channel limitations apply.
The user should use the wireless LAN utility to check the current channel of
operation. If operation is occurring outside of the allowable frequencies as
listed above, the user must cease operating the Wireless LAN at that
location and consult the local technical support staff responsible for the
wireless network.
❖
The 5 GHz Turbo mode feature is not allowed for operation in any
European Community country.
❖
This device must not be operated in ad-hoc mode using channels in the
5 GHz bands in the European Community. Ad-hoc mode provides a direct
communication between two client devices without a Wireless LAN Access
Point.
❖
This device must be used with Access Points that have employed and
activated a radar detection feature required for European Community
operation in the 5 GHz bands. This device will operate under the control of
the Access Point in order to avoid operating on a channel occupied by any
radar system in the area. The presence of nearby radar operation may result
in temporary interruption of operation of this device. The Access Point’s
radar detection feature will automatically restart operation on a channel free
of radar. You may consult with the local technical support staff responsible
for the wireless network to ensure the Access Point device(s) are properly
configured for European Community operation.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
20
Approved Countries/Regions for the Realtek® RTL8192E
This equipment is approved to the radio standard by the countries/regions in the
following table.
Do not use this equipment except in the countries/regions in the following table.
Albania
Austria
Bangladesh
Bosnia
Cambodia
China
Croatia
Denmark
Egypt
Finland
Ghana
Honduras
Iceland
Ireland
Japan
Kenya
Latvia
Liechtenstein
Macedonia
Mexico
Mozambique
Nicaragua
Pakistan
Paraguay
Poland
Qatar
Serbia
Slovenia
Spain
Switzerland
Trinidad
Argentina
Azerbaijan
Belgium
Brazil
Canada
Colombia
Cyprus
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
France
Greece
Hong Kong
India
Israel
Jordan
Kuwait
Lebanon
Lithuania
Malaysia
Monaco
Netherlands
Norway
Panama
Peru
Portugal
Romania
Singapore
South Africa
Sri Lanka
Taiwan
Turkey
United Kingdom
Venezuela
Uruguay
Vietnam
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Australia
Bahrain
Bolivia
Bulgaria
Chile
Costa Rica
Czech Republic
Ecuador
Estonia
Germany
Herzegovina
Hungary
Indonesia
Italy
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Lesotho
Luxembourg
Malta
Morocco
New Zealand
Oman
Papua New Guinea
Philippines
Puerto Rico
Saudi Arabia
Slovak Republic
South Korea
Sweden
Thailand
UAE (United Arab
Emirates)
USA
Zimbabwe
21
Approved Countries/Regions for the Realtek® RTL8191SE
This equipment is approved to the radio standard by the countries/regions in the
following table.
Do not use this equipment except in the countries/regions in the following table.
Albania
Austria
Bangladesh
Bosnia
Cambodia
China
Croatia
Denmark
Egypt
Finland
Germany
Hong Kong
India
Israel
Japan
Kenya
Latvia
Lithuania
Malaysia
Monaco
Netherlands Antilles
Norway
Panama
Peru
Portugal
Romania
Serbia
Slovenia
Spain
Switzerland
Trinidad
Argentina
Azerbaijan
Belgium
Brazil
Canada
Colombia
Cyprus
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
France
Greece
Hungary
Indonesia
Italy
Jordan
Kuwait
Lebanon
Luxembourg
Malta
Morocco
Netherlands
Oman
Papua New Guinea
Philippines
Puerto Rico
Russia
Singapore
South Africa
Sri Lanka
Taiwan
Tunisia
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Australia
Bahrain
Bolivia
Bulgaria
Chile
Costa Rica
Czech Republic
Ecuador
Estonia
Ghana
Herzegovina
Iceland
Ireland
Jamaica
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Liechtenstein
Macedonia
Mexico
Mozambique
New Zealand
Pakistan
Paraguay
Poland
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Slovak Republic
South Korea
Sweden
Thailand
Turkey
22
UAE (United Arab
Emirates)
Uruguay
Vietnam
Ukraine
United Kingdom
USA
Zimbabwe
Venezuela
Approved Countries/Regions for the Realtek® RTL8187B
This equipment is approved to the radio standard by the countries/regions in the
following table.
Do not use this equipment except in the countries/regions in the following
table.
Albania
Australia
Bahrain
Bolivia
Brunei
Canada
Colombia
Cyprus
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
France
Greece
Honduras
Iceland
Ireland
Japan - Jate
Kazakhstan
Kuwait
Lesotho
Luxembourg
Malta
Morocco
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Peru
Portugal
Romania
Senegal
Slovak Republic
South Korea
Algeria
Austria
Bangladesh
Bosnia
Bulgaria
Chile
Costa Rica
Czech Republic
Ecuador
Estonia
Germany
Guatemala
Hong Kong
India
Israel
Japan - Teleco
Kenya
Latvia
Liechtenstein
Macedonia
Mexico
Mozambique
Nicaragua
Oman
Papua New Guinea
Philippines
Puerto Rico
Russia
Serbia and Montenegro
Slovenia
Spain
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Argentina
Azerbaijan
Belgium
Brazil
Cambodia
China
Croatia
Denmark
Egypt
Finland
Ghana
Herzegovina
Hungary
Indonesia
Italy
Jordan
Kyrgyzstan
Lebanon
Lithuania
Malaysia
Monaco
Netherlands
Nigeria
Pakistan
Paraguay
Poland
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
Singapore
South Africa
Sri Lanka
23
Sweden
Thailand
UAE (United Arab
Emirates)
USA
Yemen
Switzerland
Turkey
United Kingdom
Taiwan
Ukraine
Uruguay
Venezuela
Zimbabwe
Vietnam
Bluetooth® Wireless Technology Interoperability
Bluetooth® Cards from TOSHIBA are designed to be interoperable with any
product with Bluetooth wireless technology that is based on Frequency Hopping
Spread Spectrum (FHSS) radio technology, and is compliant to:
❖
❖
Bluetooth Specification as defined and approved by The Bluetooth Special
Interest Group.
Logo certification with Bluetooth wireless technology as defined by The
Bluetooth Special Interest Group.
Always use Bluetooth cards from TOSHIBA in order to enable
wireless networks over two or more (up to a total of seven)
TOSHIBA portable computers using these cards. Please
contact TOSHIBA computer product support on Web site http:/
/www.toshiba-europe.com/computers/tnt/bluetooth.htm in
Europe or support.toshiba.com in the United States for more
information.
When you use Bluetooth cards from TOSHIBA close to 2.4 GHz Wireless
LAN devices, Bluetooth transmissions might slow down or cause errors. If
you detect certain interference while you use Bluetooth cards from TOSHIBA,
always change the frequency, move your computer to the area outside of the
interference range of 2.4 GHz Wireless LAN devices (40 meters/43.74 yards
or more) or stop transmitting from your computer. Please contact TOSHIBA
computer product support on Web site http://www.toshiba-europe.com/
computers/tnt/bluetooth.htm in Europe or support.toshiba.com in the United
States for more information.
Bluetooth and Wireless LAN devices operate within the same radio frequency
range and may interfere with one another. If you use Bluetooth and Wireless
LAN devices simultaneously, you may occasionally experience a less than
optimal network performance or even lose your network connection. If you
should experience any such problem, immediately turn off either one of your
Bluetooth or Wireless LAN. Please contact Toshiba computer product
support on Web site http://www.toshiba-europe.com/computers/tnt/
bluetooth.htm in Europe or support.toshiba.com in the United States for
more information.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
24
Approved Countries/Regions for use (Bluetooth® wireless
technology)
Bluetooth® Card from Toshiba equipment is approved to the radio standard by the
countries/regions in the following table.
Do not use this equipment except in the countries/regions in the following
table.
Argentina
Belgium
Chile
Czech Republic
Estonia
Germany
Hungary
Italy
Korea
Lebanon
Luxembourg
New Zealand
Peru
Portugal
Slovenia
Switzerland
Uruguay
Australia
Bulgaria
China
Denmark
Finland
Greece
Iceland
Japan
Kuwait
Liechtenstein
Malta
Norway
Philippines
Singapore
Spain
Thailand
USA
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Austria
Canada
Cyprus
Egypt
France
Hong Kong
Ireland
Jordan
Latvia
Lithuania
Netherlands
Oman
Poland
Slovakia
Sweden
UK
Venezuela
25
Bluetooth® Wireless Technology and Your Health
The products with Bluetooth® wireless technology, like other radio devices, emit
radio frequency electromagnetic energy. The level of energy emitted by devices
with Bluetooth wireless technology however is much less than the
electromagnetic energy emitted by wireless devices such as mobile phones.
Because products with Bluetooth wireless technology operate within the
guidelines found in radio frequency safety standards and recommendations,
TOSHIBA believes Bluetooth wireless technology is safe for use by consumers.
These standards and recommendations reflect the consensus of the scientific
community and result from deliberations of panels and committees of scientists
who continually review and interpret the extensive research literature.
In some situations or environments, the use of Bluetooth wireless technology
may be restricted by the proprietor of the building or responsible representatives
of the organization. These situations may for example include:
❖
Using the equipment with Bluetooth wireless technology on board
airplanes, or
❖
In any other environment where the risk of interference to other devices or
services is perceived or identified as harmful.
If you are uncertain of the policy that applies on the use of wireless devices in a
specific organization or environment (e.g. airports), you are encouraged to ask for
authorization to use the device with Bluetooth wireless technology prior to
turning on the equipment.
Exposure to Radio Frequency Radiation
The radiated output power of the Bluetooth Card from TOSHIBA is far below
the FCC radio frequency exposure limits. Nevertheless, the Bluetooth Card
from TOSHIBA shall be used in such a manner that the potential for human
contact during normal operation is minimized.
Regulatory statements
This product complies with any mandatory product specification in any country/
region where the product is sold. In addition, the product complies with the
following:
European Union (EU) and EFTA
This equipment complies with the R&TTE directive 1999/5/EC and has been
provided with the CE mark accordingly.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
26
Canada — Industry Canada (IC)
This device complies with RSS 210 of Industry Canada.
Taiwan
Article 14
Article 17
Unless approved, for any model accredited low power radio frequency
electric machinery, any company, trader or user shall not change the
frequency, increase the power or change the features and functions of the
original design.
Any use of low power radio frequency electric machinery shall not affect
aviation safety and interfere with legal communications. In the event
interference is caused, the use of such electric machinery shall be
immediately discontinued. Operation of such products can be resumed
only when they are modified and can no longer cause interference.
The legal communications mentioned in the above item refer to radio
communications operated in accordance with telecommunication laws and
regulations.
Low power radio frequency electric machinery shall resist against interference
from legal communications or from industrial, scientific and medical radio
emission electric machinery.
Location of the Required Label
(Sample shown below. Location of the label and manufacturing information may
vary.)
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
27
Copyright
This guide is copyrighted by Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc. with all
rights reserved. Under the copyright laws, this guide cannot be reproduced in any
form without the prior written permission of Toshiba. No patent liability is
assumed, however, with respect to the use of the information contained herein.
©2011 by Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Export Administration Regulation
This document contains technical data that may be controlled under the U.S.
Export Administration Regulations, and may be subject to the approval of the
U.S. Department of Commerce prior to export. Any export, directly or indirectly,
in contravention of the U.S. Export Administration Regulations is prohibited.
Notice
The information contained in this manual, including but not limited to any
product specifications, is subject to change without notice.
TOSHIBA CORPORATION AND TOSHIBA AMERICA
INFORMATION SYSTEMS, INC. (TOSHIBA) PROVIDES NO
WARRANTY WITH REGARD TO THIS MANUAL OR ANY
OTHER INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN AND HEREBY
EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR ANY PARTICULAR
PURPOSE WITH REGARD TO ANY OF THE FOREGOING.
TOSHIBA ASSUMES NO LIABILITY FOR ANY DAMAGES
INCURRED DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY FROM ANY
TECHNICAL OR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS OR OMISSIONS
CONTAINED HEREIN OR FOR DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN
THE PRODUCT AND THE MANUAL. IN NO EVENT SHALL
TOSHIBA BE LIABLE FOR ANY INCIDENTAL,
CONSEQUENTIAL, SPECIAL, OR EXEMPLARY DAMAGES,
WHETHER BASED ON TORT, CONTRACT OR OTHERWISE,
ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THIS MANUAL
OR ANY OTHER INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN OR THE
USE THEREOF.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
28
Trademarks
Portégé and eco Utility are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Toshiba
America Information Systems, Inc. and/or Toshiba Corporation.
Adobe and Photoshop are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe
Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries.
Atheros is a registered trademark of Atheros Communications, Inc.
Bluetooth word mark and logos are owned by the Bluetooth SIG, Inc. and any
use of such marks by Toshiba is under license. Other trademarks and trade names
are those of their respective owners.
HDMI, the HDMI Logo and High-Definition Multimedia Interface are
trademarks or registered trademarks of HDMI Licensing, LLC.
Intel, Intel Core, Celeron, Centrino and Pentium are trademarks or registered
trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other
countries.
Microsoft, Outlook, Windows, and Windows Media are either registered
trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or
other countries.
MultiMediaCard and MMC are registered trademarks of MultiMediaCard
Association.
Secure Digital and SD are trademarks of SD Card Association.
Wi-Fi is a registered trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance.
All other brand and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of
their respective companies.
Licenses
This Product is licensed under the AVC, the VC-1 and the MPEG-4 Part 2 Visual
patent portfolio licenses for the personal and non-commercial use of a consumer
to (i) encode video in compliance with the above standards (“Video Standards”)
and/or (ii) decode AVC, VC-1 and MPEG-4 Part 2 Visual that was encoded by a
consumer engaged in personal and non-commercial activity or was obtained
from a video provider licensed to provide such video. None of the licenses extend
to any other product regardless of whether such product is included with this
product in a single article. No license is granted or shall be implied for any other
use. Additional information may be obtained from MPEG LA, LLC.
See www.mpegla.com.
Computer Disposal Information
As part of Toshiba’s commitment to preserving the environment, Toshiba
supports various trade-in and recycling programs. For details, please visit
us.toshiba.com/green.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Contents
Introduction................................................................................ 36
This guide ...............................................................38
Safety icons ............................................................39
Other icons used...............................................39
Your computer’s features and
specifications ..............................................40
Other documentation ..............................................40
Service options .......................................................40
Chapter 1: Getting Started......................................................... 41
Selecting a place to work ........................................41
Setting up a work environment .........................41
Keeping yourself comfortable ...........................42
Precautions.......................................................42
Important information on your computer’s
cooling fan ..................................................44
Setting up your computer .......................................44
Connecting to a power source ................................45
Charging the main battery.......................................47
Using the computer for the first time ......................48
29
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
30
Contents
Opening the display panel .................................48
Turning on the power .......................................49
Setting up your software...................................49
Registering your computer with Toshiba ................50
Adding optional external devices.............................50
Adding memory (optional) ......................................50
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive ....................51
Recovering to out-of-box state
(recommended recovery method)...............52
Recovering of factory default software
with user’s data...........................................54
Recovering without changing the internal
storage drive partitions ...............................57
Recovering to a custom size partition ...............60
Creating recovery media ...................................62
Restoring from recovery media.........................65
Erasing the Internal Storage Drive ..........................67
Checking the internal storage drive operating
status ................................................................69
Installing drivers and applications.....................69
Using the touch pad................................................69
Adjusting touch pad settings ............................73
Disabling or enabling the touch pad..................73
Using external display devices ................................74
Selecting video cables.......................................74
Connecting an HDMI™-compatible
television or display device .........................74
Connecting an external monitor or
projector .....................................................75
Directing the display output when you
turn on the computer ..................................75
Adjusting the quality of the external
display ........................................................76
Using an external keyboard.....................................76
Using a mouse ........................................................76
Connecting a printer ...............................................77
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Contents
31
Setting up a printer ...........................................78
Turning off the computer ........................................79
Options for turning off the computer ................79
Using the Shut down command........................81
Using and configuring Hibernation mode .........83
Using and configuring Sleep mode ...................86
Closing the display panel ..................................89
Customizing your computer’s settings....................89
Caring for your computer........................................89
Cleaning the computer ......................................89
Moving the computer........................................89
Using a computer lock ......................................90
Chapter 2: Learning the Basics................................................. 91
Computing tips .......................................................91
Using the keyboard .................................................92
Character keys .................................................93
Making your keyboard emulate a full-size
keyboard .....................................................93
Ctrl, Fn, and Alt keys .........................................93
Function keys....................................................93
Special Windows® keys ...................................94
Overlay keys .....................................................94
Backlit keyboard................................................95
Starting a program..................................................95
Starting a program from the Start menu...........96
Starting a program from Windows®
Explorer ......................................................96
Starting a program using the Search
programs and files field ..............................97
Saving your work ....................................................98
Printing your work ..................................................99
Backing up your work ...........................................100
Restoring your work .......................................101
Toshiba’s online resources ..................................101
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
32
Contents
Chapter 3: Mobile Computing.................................................102
Toshiba’s energy-saver design..............................102
Running the computer on battery power ..............103
Battery Notice .................................................103
Power management ........................................105
Charging batteries.................................................105
Charging the main battery...............................105
Charging the RTC battery................................106
Monitoring main battery power.............................107
Determining remaining battery power.............109
What to do when the main battery
runs low....................................................109
Setting battery notifications ............................110
Conserving battery power ..............................110
Power Plans....................................................111
Using a hot key to set the Power Plan.............112
Using the TOSHIBA eco power plan......................113
Changing the main battery ....................................114
Taking care of your battery ...................................114
Safety precautions ..........................................114
Maintaining your battery .................................115
Disposing of your computer .................................115
Traveling tips ........................................................116
Chapter 4: Exploring Your Computer’s Features...................117
Exploring the desktop ...........................................117
Finding your way around the desktop .............118
Setting up for communications.............................120
Connecting your computer to a network .........121
Exploring audio features .......................................121
Recording sounds...........................................121
Using external speakers or headphones..........122
Using the Web Camera .........................................123
Using the Memory card reader..............................123
Inserting memory media.................................124
Removing memory media...............................124
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Contents
33
Chapter 5: Utilities....................................................................126
TOSHIBA Assist ....................................................127
Connect...........................................................128
Secure.............................................................129
Protect & Fix ...................................................130
Optimize..........................................................131
TOSHIBA Recovery Media Creator ........................132
TOSHIBA Application Installer...............................132
Setting passwords ................................................133
Using an instant password..............................133
Using a supervisor password..........................134
Using a user password ...................................135
TOSHIBA Face Recognition Utility.........................137
TOSHIBA Security Assist ......................................138
TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool Utility......................140
Mouse Utility ........................................................141
TOSHIBA Hardware Setup.....................................142
TOSHIBA Sleep Utility ...........................................144
Starting the TOSHIBA Sleep Utility..................144
USB Sleep and Charge ....................................144
Enabling/Disabling USB Sleep and
Charge ......................................................146
Power supply mode settings...........................146
TOSHIBA Button Support......................................147
TOSHIBA Accessibility ..........................................148
Trusted Platform Module (TPM) ...........................149
Fingerprint Authentication Utility...........................150
Fingerprint utility limitations ...........................150
Using the Fingerprint Authentication
Utility ........................................................150
Fingerprint Logon ...........................................151
Care and maintenance of your fingerprint
reader .......................................................151
Fingerprint reader limitations ..........................153
TOSHIBA eco Utility™ ...........................................154
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
34
Contents
TOSHIBA wireless LAN indicator ..........................155
TOSHIBA Service Station ......................................156
TOSHIBA PC Health Monitor .................................156
Chapter 6: If Something Goes Wrong....................................158
Problems that are easy to fix ................................158
Problems when you turn on the computer............159
The Windows® operating system is not
working...........................................................161
Using Startup options to fix problems ............161
Internet problems ...........................................162
The Windows® operating system can
help you ....................................................163
Fixing a problem with Device Manager .................163
Checking device properties .............................163
Memory problems ................................................164
Power and the batteries ........................................164
Keyboard problems...............................................166
Display problems ..................................................166
Disk or storage drive problems.............................168
Error-checking ................................................168
Sound system problems .......................................169
Wireless networking problems..............................170
Develop good computing habits ...........................172
Data and system configuration backup
in the Windows® operating system ...........173
If you need further assistance...............................177
Before you contact Toshiba ............................177
Contacting Toshiba .........................................178
Other Toshiba Internet Web sites..........................178
Toshiba’s worldwide offices..................................179
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Contents
35
Appendix A: Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards ................................. 181
Hot Key Cards .......................................................181
Using the Hot Key Cards .................................182
Hot key functions ..................................................183
Volume Mute ..................................................183
Lock (Instant security) ....................................184
Power plan .....................................................185
Sleep mode .....................................................186
Hibernation mode ...........................................187
Output (Display switch) .................................188
Display brightness ..........................................189
Disabling or enabling wireless devices............190
Disabling or enabling the touch pad................191
Zoom (Display resolution) ..............................192
Cursor control overlay ....................................192
Numeric overlay..............................................193
Keyboard hot key functions ...........................194
Appendix B: Power Cord/Cable Connectors.......................... 195
Glossary.................................................................................... 196
Index.......................................................................................... 211
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Introduction
Welcome to the world of powerful, portable, multimedia
computing. With your Toshiba computer, your work and
entertainment can accompany you wherever you go.
Your computer model may be ENERGY STAR® qualified. If the
model you purchased is qualified, it is labeled with the ENERGY
STAR® logo on the computer and the following information
applies.
Toshiba is a partner in the Environmental Protection Agency’s
(EPA) ENERGY STAR® Program and has designed this computer
to meet the latest ENERGY STAR® guidelines for energy
efficiency. Your computer ships with the power management
options preset to a configuration that will provide the most stable
operating environment and optimum system performance for both
AC power and battery modes.
To conserve energy, your computer is set to enter the low-power
Sleep mode which shuts down the system and display within 15
minutes of inactivity in AC power mode. We recommend that you
leave this and other energy saving features active, so that your
computer will operate at its maximum energy efficiency. You can
wake the computer from Sleep mode by pressing the power button.
See the “Mobile Computing” section of the Toshiba User’s Guide
for more information on using power management settings to
conserve computer energy.
36
Introduction
37
According to the EPA, a computer meeting the new ENERGY
STAR® specifications will use between 30% and 60% less energy
depending on how it is used. If all U.S. households and businesses
replaced old computers with new ENERGY STAR® qualified
models, we would save more than $2 billion in energy costs each
year and avoid greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to nearly 3
million cars.
If every computer purchased by businesses this year met the new
ENERGY STAR® requirements, businesses would save more than
$1.6 billion over the lifetime of those models. That is equivalent to
lighting 840 million square feet of U.S. commercial building space
each year.
During 2008, Americans, with the help of ENERGY STAR®, saved
about $19 billion dollars on their utility bills and avoided
greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to those from 29 million
vehicles.
Visit http://www.energystar.gov or
http://www.energystar.gov/powermanagement for more
information regarding the ENERGY STAR® Program.
NOTE
This computer is compatible with European Union Directive
2002/95/EC, Restriction of the use of certain Hazardous Substances
in electrical and electronic equipment (RoHS), which restricts use of
lead, cadmium, mercury, hexavalent chromium, PBB, and PBDE.
Toshiba requires its computer component suppliers to meet RoHS
requirements and verifies its suppliers’ commitment to meeting
RoHS requirements by conducting component sampling inspections
during the product design approval process.
NOTE
Certain Microsoft® software product(s) included with this computer
may use technological measures for copy protection. IN SUCH
EVENT, YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO USE THE PRODUCT IF YOU DO
NOT FULLY COMPLY WITH THE PRODUCT ACTIVATION
PROCEDURES. Product activation procedures and Microsoft’s
privacy policy will be detailed during initial launch of the product, or
upon certain reinstallations of the software product(s) or
reconfigurations of the computer, and may be completed by Internet
or telephone (toll charges may apply).
Some software may differ from its retail version (if available), and
may not include user manuals or all program functionality.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
38
Introduction
This guide
NOTE
The product specifications and configuration information are
designed for a product Series. Your particular model may not have
all the features and specifications listed or illustrated. For more
detailed information about the features and specifications on your
particular model, please visit Toshiba’s Web site at
support.toshiba.com.
While Toshiba has made every effort at the time of publication to
ensure the accuracy of the information provided herein, product
specifications, configurations, prices, system/component/options
availability are all subject to change without notice. For the most
up-to-date product information about your computer, or to stay
current with the various computer software or hardware options, visit
Toshiba’s Web site at support.toshiba.com.
This guide
This guide introduces the computer's features as well as some basic
procedures needed to perform tasks in Windows® 7. You can:
❖
Read the entire guide from beginning to end.
❖
Skim through and stop when a topic interests you.
❖
Use the table of contents and the index to find specific
information.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Introduction
Safety icons
39
Safety icons
This manual contains safety instructions that must be observed to
avoid potential hazards that could result in personal injuries,
damage to your equipment, or loss of data. These safety cautions
have been classified according to the seriousness of the risk, and
icons highlight these instructions as follows:
Indicates an imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided,
will result in death or serious injury.
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided,
could result in death or serious injury.
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may
result in minor or moderate injury.
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may
result in property damage.
NOTE
Provides important information.
Other icons used
Additional icons highlight other helpful or educational information:
TECHNICAL NOTE: This icon indicates technical information about
the computer.
HINT: This icon indicates helpful hints and tips.
DEFINITION: This icon indicates the definition of a term used in the
text.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
40
Introduction
Other documentation
Your computer’s features and specifications
Certain computer chassis are designed to accommodate all possible
configurations for an entire product Series. Your select model may
not have all the features and specifications corresponding to all of
the icons or switches shown on the computer chassis, unless you
have selected all those features.
This information applies to all the features and icons described in
this guide.
Below are examples of some of the many possible icons used on
your computer:
(Sample Illustration) System icons
Other documentation
Your computer comes with the following documentation:
❖
An electronic version of the User’s Guide (this document)
❖
A Quick Start Card
❖
A Resource Guide
❖
It may also contain guides for other programs that may come
with your system.
For accessory information, visit Toshiba’s Web site at
accessories.toshiba.com.
Service options
Toshiba offers a full line of optional service programs to
complement its standard limited warranty. Toshiba’s standard
limited warranty, extended warranty, and service upgrade terms and
conditions are available at warranty.toshiba.com.
To stay current on the most recent software and hardware options
for your computer, and for other product information, be sure to
regularly check the Toshiba Web site at support.toshiba.com.
If you have a problem or need to contact Toshiba, see “If Something
Goes Wrong” on page 158.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Chapter 1
Getting Started
This chapter provides tips for using your computer effectively,
summarizes how to connect components, and explains what to do
the first time you use your computer.
The “Instruction Manual for Safety and Comfort,” that is shipped
with your computer, contains important safety information. Please
read the safety instructions carefully and make sure you fully
understand the instructions before you attempt to use your
computer in order to avoid potential hazards that could cause bodily
injury, property damage, or damage the computer.
Selecting a place to work
Your computer is portable and designed to be used in a variety of
circumstances and locations.
Setting up a work environment
Place the computer on a hard flat surface that is large enough for the
computer and any other items you are using, such as a printer.
Leave enough space around the computer and other equipment to
provide adequate ventilation. Otherwise, they may overheat. Read
the “Provide adequate ventilation” section in the “Instruction
Manual for Safety and Comfort” that is shipped with your
computer.
41
42
Getting Started
Selecting a place to work
To keep your computer in prime operating condition, protect your
work area from:
❖
Dust, moisture, and direct sunlight.
❖
Equipment that generates a strong electromagnetic field, such
as stereo speakers (other than speakers that are connected to
the computer) or speakerphones.
❖
Rapid changes in temperature or humidity and sources of
temperature change such as air conditioner vents or heaters.
❖
Extreme heat, cold, or humidity.
❖
Liquids and corrosive chemicals.
Keeping yourself comfortable
The Toshiba Instruction Manual for Safety and Comfort, included
with your computer, contains helpful information for setting up
your work environment and tips for working comfortably
throughout the day.
Precautions
Your computer is designed to provide optimum safety and ease of
use, and to withstand the rigors of travel. You should observe
certain precautions to further reduce the risk of personal injury or
damage to the computer.
❖
Avoid prolonged physical contact with the underside or surface
of the computer.
Never allow any liquids to spill into any part of your computer, and
never expose the computer to rain, water, seawater or moisture.
Exposure to liquid or moisture can cause electric shock or fire,
resulting in damage or serious injury. If any of these eventualities
should accidentally occur, immediately:
1. Turn off the computer.
2. Disconnect the AC adaptor from the power plug socket and
computer.
Failure to follow these instructions could result in serious injury or
permanent damage to the computer.
Do not turn on the power again until you have taken the computer to
an authorized service center.
Getting Started
Selecting a place to work
❖
❖
43
Avoid prolonged physical contact with the underside or surface
of the computer.
Computer base and palm rest can become hot! Avoid prolonged
contact to prevent heat injury to skin.
Today’s performance computers generate heat under normal
operating conditions, as a function of system activity. Avoid
extended contact between the computer base or palm rest and you
skin. Under certain operating conditions such prolonged contact
between the computer base or palm rest and your skin may result in
skin irritation and/or heat injury.
Consider using a hard computer insulating pad or similarly suitable
hard insulating material when using a computer on your lap.
Never place a heavy object on the computer and be careful not to
drop a heavy object onto the computer. It could damage the
computer or cause system failure.
❖
Never turn off the computer if a drive light indicates a drive is active.
Turning off the computer while it is reading from or writing to
a disk/disc or flash media may damage the disk/disc or flash
media, the drive, or both.
❖
Keep the computer and disks away from objects that generate
strong magnetic fields, such as large stereo speakers.
Information on some disks is stored magnetically. Placing a
magnet too close to a disk can erase important files.
Handle discs carefully. Avoid touching the surface of the disc. Grasp
it by its center hole and edge. If you handle the disc incorrectly, you
could damage the disc and possibly lose data.
❖
Scan all new files for viruses.
This precaution is especially important for files you receive via
email or download from the Internet. Occasionally, even new
programs you buy from a supplier may contain a computer
virus. You need a special program to check for viruses.
44
Getting Started
Setting up your computer
Important information on your computer’s cooling fan
Your computer may have a CPU cooling fan that cools the CPU by
drawing outside air into the computer.
Always make sure your computer and AC adaptor have adequate
ventilation and are protected from overheating when the power is turned
on or when an AC adaptor is connected to a power outlet (even if your
computer is in Sleep mode). In this condition, observe the following:
❖
❖
❖
❖
Never cover your computer or AC adaptor with any object.
Never place your computer or AC adaptor near a heat source,
such as an electric blanket or heater.
Never cover or block the air vents including those located at the
underside of the computer.
Always operate your computer on a hard flat surface. Using your
computer on a carpet or other soft material can block the vents
located at the underside of the computer.
Overheating your computer or AC adaptor could cause system
failure, computer or AC adaptor damage or a fire, possibly resulting
in serious injury.
Read the “Provide adequate ventilation” section in the “Instruction
Manual for Safety and Comfort” that is shipped with your
computer.
NOTE
The cooling fan location will vary depending on the computer.
Setting up your computer
TECHNICAL NOTE: You must complete all setup steps up to and
including “Setting up your software” on page 49 before adding
external or internal components to your computer. These
components include, but are not limited to, a mouse, keyboard,
printer, and memory.
Your computer contains a rechargeable main battery that needs to
be charged before you can use it.
To use external power or to charge the battery you must attach the
AC adaptor. See “Connecting to a power source” on page 45.
Getting Started
Connecting to a power source
NOTE
45
Please handle your computer carefully to avoid scratching or
damaging the surface.
Connecting to a power source
Your computer requires power to operate. Use the power cord/cable
and AC adaptor to connect the computer to a live electrical outlet,
or to charge the computer’s battery.
Never pull on a power cord/cable to remove a plug from a socket.
Always grasp the plug directly. Failure to follow this instruction may
damage the cord/cable, and/or result in a fire or electric shock,
possibly resulting in serious injury.
Always confirm that the power plug (and extension cable plug if
used) has been fully inserted into the socket, to ensure a secure
electrical connection. Failure to do so may result in a fire or electric
shock, possibly resulting in serious injury.
Be careful if you use a multiple connector. An overload on one socket
could cause a fire or electric shock, possibly resulting in serious
injury.
Always use the TOSHIBA AC adaptor that was provided with your
computer, or use AC adaptors specified by TOSHIBA to avoid any
risk of fire or other damage to the computer. Use of an incompatible
AC adaptor could cause fire or damage to the computer possibly
resulting in serious injury. TOSHIBA assumes no liability for any
damage caused by use of an incompatible adaptor.
AC adaptor
Power cord/cable
AC adaptor cord
(Sample Illustration) Power cord/cable and AC adaptor
46
Getting Started
Connecting to a power source
To connect AC power to the computer:
1
Connect the power cord/cable to the AC adaptor.
(Sample Illustration) Connecting the power cord/cable to the AC
adaptor
Handling the cord on this product will expose you to lead, a
chemical known to the State of California to cause birth defects or
other reproductive harm. Wash hands after handling.
_
+
2
Plug the AC adaptor cord into the DC-IN on the back of the
computer.
(Sample Illustration) Connecting the AC adaptor cord to the
computer
3
Connect the power cord/cable to a live electrical outlet.
The AC power light on the indicator panel glows green.
Never attempt to connect or disconnect a power plug with wet hands.
Failure to follow this instruction could result in an electric shock,
possibly resulting in serious injury.
Getting Started
Charging the main battery
47
The computer’s main battery light gives you an indication of
the main battery’s current charge:
NOTE
❖
Glows amber while the main battery is being charged
(AC adaptor connected)
❖
Glows green when the main battery is fully charged
❖
Is unlit when the main battery has discharged, the battery
is not charging, or the AC adaptor is not plugged into the
computer or AC outlet
❖
Flashes amber when the main battery charge is low and it
is time to recharge the main battery or plug in the AC
adaptor
If the AC power light flashes amber during charging, either the main
battery is malfunctioning, or it is not receiving correct input from the
AC power supply.
Disconnect the AC power cord/cable and remove the main battery.
See “For more information on the TOSHIBA eco power plan, see the
Help file in the TOSHIBA eco Utility™ window.” on page 113 for
information on replacing the main battery.
Charging the main battery
NOTE
The computer battery is not accessible by user.
Before using the battery to power the computer, you must charge
the battery.
To charge the battery, leave the computer plugged into an AC power
source with the computer turned off until the battery light glows
green. After that, the battery will be completely charged and ready
to power the computer.
NOTE
Battery life and charge time may vary depending on the applications,
power management settings, and features used.
48
Getting Started
Using the computer for the first time
Using the computer for the first time
The computer is now ready for you to turn it on and begin using it.
Opening the display panel
1
Facing the front of the computer, locate the center of the
display panel.
2
Gently raise the panel.
3
Adjust the display to a comfortable viewing angle.
(Sample Illustration) Opening the display panel
NOTE
When opening or closing the display panel, place one hand on the
palm rest to hold the computer in place and use the other hand to
slowly open or close the display panel.
To avoid damaging the display panel, do not force it beyond the point
where it moves easily and never lift the computer by the display
panel.
Do not press or push on the display panel and be careful to remove
any pens or other objects from the keyboard area before closing the
display panel.
Small bright dots may appear on your screen display when you
turn on your computer. Your display contains an extremely large
number of thin-film transistors (TFT) and is manufactured using
high-precision technology. Any small bright dots that may appear
on your display are an intrinsic characteristic of the TFT
manufacturing technology. Over a period of time, and depending on
the usage of the computer, the brightness of the screen will
deteriorate. This is also an intrinsic characteristic of the screen
technology. When the computer is operated on battery power, the
screen will dim and you may not be able to increase the brightness
of the screen while on battery power.
Getting Started
Using the computer for the first time
49
Turning on the power
To turn on the computer:
1
Make sure any external devices (such as the AC adaptor, if you
plan to use AC power rather than battery power) are properly
connected and ready.
2
Check to ensure that all drives and slots are empty.
3
Press and release the power button. The ON/OFF light glows
green.
(Sample Illustration) Turning on the power
The preinstalled operating system will load automatically.
When you turn on the computer for the first time, do not turn off the
power again until the operating system has loaded completely.
Setting up your software
When you turn on the computer for the first time, do not turn off the
power again until the operating system has loaded completely.
NOTE
The names of windows displayed, and the order in which windows
appear, may vary according to your software setup choices.
The first time you turn on your computer, the Setup Wizard guides
you through steps to set up your software. Follow the on-screen
instructions.
50
Getting Started
Registering your computer with Toshiba
Registering your computer with Toshiba
Product registration is strongly recommended, and allows Toshiba
to send you periodic updates, announcements, and special offers
applicable to your product. Product registration can be completed
by either visiting the Toshiba Web site at register.toshiba.com, or by
clicking Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Support & Recovery,
and then Toshiba Registration. Failure to complete Product
Registration will not diminish Customer rights under the Toshiba
standard limited Warranty.
NOTE
To register online, you must be connected to the Internet.
Adding optional external devices
NOTE
Before adding external devices or memory, Toshiba recommends
setting up your software. See “Setting up your software” on page 49.
After starting your computer for the first time you may want to:
❖
Add more memory (see “Adding memory (optional)” on
page 50)
❖
Connect a mouse (see “Using a mouse” on page 76)
❖
Connect an external keyboard (see “Using an external
keyboard” on page 76)
❖
Connect an external monitor (see “Using external display
devices” on page 74)
❖
Connect a local printer (see “Connecting a printer” on page 77)
Adding memory (optional)
Your computer comes with enough memory to run most of today’s
popular applications. You may want to increase the computer’s
memory if you use complex software or process large amounts of
data. Contact the location you purchased the computer at for more
information on adding memory to your computer. Toshiba will not
be responsible for any product damage, data loss, service or part
replacement made necessary by improper installation of a memory
module.
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
51
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
NOTE
To purchase an optional external writable optical disc drive or a USB
Flash drive, visit the Toshiba Web site at accessories.toshiba.com.
Your computer includes recovery utilities to allow you to recover
your internal storage drive if necessary.
The following internal storage drive recovery options are available:
Recovery option
Description
Recover to out-of-box This option restores the original factory image to your
state
internal storage drive, returning your computer to its
out-of-box state. (Recommended recovery method)
Recovery of factory
default software with
user’s data
See “Recovering to out-of-box state (recommended
recovery method)” on page 52.
This option recovers the factory default software, while
the computer attempts to back up all data from C:\Users.
See “Recovering of factory default software with user’s
data” on page 54.
Recover without
This option recovers just your C: drive, leaving any other
changing the internal partitions you may have created (for example, a D: drive)
storage drive partitions intact.
Recover to a custom
size partition
See “Recovering without changing the internal storage
drive partitions” on page 57.
This option allows you to specify a custom size for
the C: partition and then restores your C: drive to its
out-of-box state. Note: With this option, any changes you
made to the C: drive and any other drive partitions you
may have created are deleted.
See “Recovering to a custom size partition” on page 60.
A recovery image of your computer is stored on the internal storage
drive, and the image can be restored by running the recovery
utilities directly from your internal storage drive as described in the
sections below. However, it is strongly recommended that you
create recovery media. If the recovery files on your internal storage
drive become corrupted or are deleted, you can restore your system
from your recovery media. Also, if your original internal storage
drive fails, you can restore your system to a new internal storage
drive from your recovery media. It is strongly recommended that
you create recovery media before using your system for the first
time. See “Creating recovery media” on page 62 and “Restoring
from recovery media” on page 65.
52
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
NOTE
❖ During the internal storage drive recovery process it is strongly
recommended that your computer be connected to an external
power source via the AC adaptor.
❖ The Toshiba Recovery Wizard also provides the option of erasing
your internal storage drive, without restoring the information on
the drive. See “Erasing the Internal Storage Drive” on page 67 for
more information.
❖ When you restore your system, only the operating system files,
applications, and drivers originally shipped with the computer
are restored. Any files that you created are not restored during
this process. Be sure to separately save the files you have
created to external media using Windows® Backup or another
backup program. For more information, see “Backing up your
work” on page 100.
Recovering to out-of-box state (recommended recovery method)
Recovering an internal storage drive to its out-of-box state deletes all
partitions on the drive and all information stored in those partitions.
Be sure to save your work to external media before executing the
recovery. For more information, see “Backing up your work” on
page 100.
NOTE
During the recovery process it is strongly recommended that your
computer be connected to an external power source via the AC
adaptor.
You can recover the original factory image (returning the computer
to its out-of-box state) using the utilities stored on your computer’s
internal storage drive or using recovery media, if you have created
such media. To recover using the first method, follow the procedure
below. To recover using the second method, see “Restoring from
recovery media” on page 65.
To recover the original factory image using the utilities on your
computer’s internal storage drive:
1
Make sure the computer is turned off.
2
While powering on your computer, press the F12 key when the
initial TOSHIBA screen displays.
The Boot menu appears.
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
53
3
Using the arrow keys to scroll down, select the HDD Recovery
option, and then press the ENTER key.
4
If your system offers a choice of Windows® 7 32-bit or 64-bit
operating system, select one at this time. If not, skip to step 5.
5
A warning screen appears, stating that when the recovery is
executed all data will be deleted and rewritten. Click Yes to
continue.
(Sample Image) Warning screen
6
When the Toshiba Recovery Wizard opens and the Selecting a
process screen displays, select Recovery of Factory Default
Software and then click Next.
(Sample Image) Selecting a Process screen
54
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
7
The Recovery of Factory Default Software screen appears.
Select Recover to out-of-box state.
(Sample Image) Recovery of Factory Default Software screen
8
Click Next.
A confirmation message displays reminding you that all data
will be lost during the recovery process. Be sure to save your
work to external media before proceeding (see “Backing up
your work” on page 100).
9
Click Next to begin the recovery.
When the recovery process is complete, a message displays
indicating that the internal storage drive has been recovered.
10 Click Finish to restart the computer.
Recovering of factory default software with user’s data
Using “Recovery of Factory Default Software with user’s data”
recovers your internal storage drive to factory default state and
attempts to save C:\Users data to C:\Backup. Toshiba does not
guarantee successful data back-up. Please make a complete back up
of your data to external media before executing the recovery. For
more information, see “Backing up your work” on page 100.
NOTE
During the recovery process it is strongly recommended that your
computer be connected to an external power source via the AC
adaptor.
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
55
You can recover the factory default software, while the computer
will attempt to back up all of the data from the C:\Users using the
utilities stored on your computer’s internal storage drive:
TECHNICAL NOTE: The data from C:\Users will be copied into the
C:\backup%current date% folder. The directory structure will be
retained, however all of the data will be moved to this folder during
the recovery process. As a result, any user can access the folders
under C:\backup%current date%. To return the data to your private
account, you will need to recreate a new account, and drag and drop
the data into your personal folders.
1
Make sure the computer is turned off.
2
While powering on your computer, press the F12 key when the
initial TOSHIBA screen displays.
The Boot menu appears.
3
Using the arrow keys to scroll down, select the HDD Recovery
option, and then press the ENTER key.
4
If your system offers a choice of Windows® 7 32-bit or 64-bit
operating system, select one at this time. If not, skip to step 5.
5
A warning screen appears, stating that when the recovery is
executed, all data will be deleted and rewritten unless the
“Recovery of Factory Default Software with user’s data”
option is selected in the next step. Click Yes to continue.
(Sample Image) Warning screen
56
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
6
When the Toshiba Recovery Wizard opens and the “Selecting a
process” screen displays, select Recovery of Factory Default
Software with user’s data, and then click Next.
(Sample Image) Selecting a process screen
7
A warning screen appears, stating the Toshiba Recovery
Wizard will “attempt” to save all data. There is a risk that the
Toshiba Recovery Wizard may not be able to save all data
during the recovery process.
Toshiba does not guarantee successful data back up. Be sure to save
your work to external media before executing the recovery
(see “Backing up your work” on page 100).
8
Click Yes to continue.
(Sample Image) Warning screen
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
9
57
When the recovery process is complete, the “Recovery of
Factory Default Software” screen appears, indicating that the
recovery process is complete. Click Finish to restart the
computer.
(Sample Image) Recovery of Factory Default Software - Recovery complete
Recovering without changing the internal storage drive partitions
Recovering without changing the internal storage drive partitions
deletes all information stored on the C: drive. Be sure to save your
work to external media before executing the recovery (see “Backing
up your work” on page 100). If you have created other partitions
(for example, a D: drive), those partitions will remain intact and any
information on them will not be affected.
NOTE
During the internal storage drive recovery process it is strongly
recommended that your computer be connected to an external power
source via the AC adaptor.
58
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
You can recover the C: drive without affecting other partitions by
either using the utilities stored on your computer’s internal storage
drive or by using recovery media, if you have created such media.
To recover using the first method, follow the procedure below. To
recover using the second method, see “Restoring from recovery
media” on page 65.
To recover using the utilities on your computer’s internal storage
drive:
1
Make sure the computer is turned off.
2
While powering on your computer, press the F12 key when the
initial TOSHIBA screen displays.
The Boot menu appears.
3
Using the arrow keys to scroll down, select the HDD Recovery
option, and then press the ENTER key.
4
If your system offers a choice of Windows® 7 32-bit or 64-bit
operating system, select one at this time. If not, skip to step 5.
5
A warning screen appears stating that when the recovery is
executed all data will be deleted and rewritten. Click Yes to
continue.
(Sample Image) Warning screen
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
6
59
When the Toshiba Recovery Wizard opens and the Selecting a
process screen displays, select Recovery of Factory Default
Software and then click Next.
(Sample Image) Selecting a Process screen
7
The Recovery of Factory Default Software screen appears.
Select Recover without changing the hard drive partitions.
(Sample Image) Recovery of Factory Default Software screen
8
Click Next.
A confirmation message displays reminding you that all data
on the C: drive will be lost during the recovery process. Be sure
to save your work to external media before proceeding (see
“Backing up your work” on page 100).
60
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
9
Click Next to begin the recovery.
When the recovery process is complete, a message displays,
indicating that the C: drive has been recovered.
10 Click Finish to restart the computer.
Recovering to a custom size partition
Recovering to a custom size partition deletes all partitions on the
drive and all information stored in those partitions. Be sure to save
your work to external media before executing the recovery. For more
information, see “Backing up your work” on page 100.
NOTE
During the recovery process it is strongly recommended that your
computer be connected to an external power source via the AC
adaptor.
The “Recover to a custom size partition” option restores your C:
drive to its out-of-box state, and allows you to specify the size for
the C: partition. You can resize and recover the C: drive using the
utilities stored on your computer’s internal storage drive or using
recovery media, if you have created such media. To recover using
the first method, follow the procedure below. To recover using the
second method, see “Restoring from recovery media” on page 65.
To resize and recover the C: drive using the utilities on your
computer’s internal storage drive:
1
Make sure the computer is turned off.
2
While powering on your computer, press the F12 key when the
initial TOSHIBA screen displays.
The Boot menu appears.
3
Using the arrow keys to scroll down, select the HDD Recovery
option, and then press the ENTER key.
4
If your system offers a choice of Windows® 7 32-bit or 64-bit
operating system, select one at this time. If not, skip to step 5.
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
5
61
A warning screen appears, stating that when the recovery is
executed all data will be deleted and rewritten. Click Yes to
continue.
(Sample Image) Warning screen
6
When the Toshiba Recovery Wizard opens and the Selecting a
process screen displays, select Recovery of Factory Default
Software and then click Next.
(Sample Image) Selecting a Process screen
62
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
7
The Recovery of Factory Default Software screen appears.
Select Recover to a custom size partition.
(Sample Image) Recovery of Factory Default Software screen
8
Use the on-screen arrow buttons in The size of drive C: field
to set the partition size.
9
Click Next.
A confirmation message displays reminding you that all data
will be lost during the recovery process. Be sure to save your
work to external media before proceeding (see “Backing up
your work” on page 100).
10 Click Next to begin the recovery.
When the recovery process is complete, a message displays
indicating that the C: drive has been recovered.
11 Click Finish to restart the computer.
Creating recovery media
NOTE
To purchase an optional external writable optical disc drive for
creating recovery DVDs, please visit the Toshiba Web site at
accessories.toshiba.com.
It is strongly recommended that you create recovery media. If the
recovery files on your internal storage drive become corrupted or
are deleted, you can restore your system from your recovery media.
Also, if your original internal storage drive fails, you can restore
your system to a new internal storage drive from your recovery
media.
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
NOTE
63
When you create recovery media, only the operating system files,
applications, and drivers originally shipped with the computer are
backed up to the external media and can be restored from this media.
Any files that you created are not backed up on the recovery media.
You will need to separately back up the files you created; for more
information, see “Backing up your work” on page 100.
When you create recovery media, the system will prompt you to
insert several blank DVDs or connect one or more USB flash drives
of a certain minimum capacity to your computer. The amount of
space required for storing the recovery files varies by computer
model. Follow the procedure below to determine how much space
you will need for storing your system’s recovery files.
To create recovery media, you will need an optional external
writable optical disc drive and blank writable DVDs or USB Flash
drives.
To create recovery media:
1
Click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Support & Recovery,
and then Recovery Media Creator.
The TOSHIBA Recovery Media Creator dialog box displays.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Recovery Media Creator dialog box
2
Select USB Flash or DVD from the drop-down list, depending
on the type of external media you want to use.
64
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
NOTE
If an external optical disc drive is attached, the DVD option becomes
available in the dialog box.
3
Check the Information area of the dialog box to determine the
number of DVDs you will need and/or the minimum amount of
storage space required for copying your system’s recovery files
to USB flash drive(s).
4
Do one of the following:
❖
If you are copying files to DVD, connect an optional
external writable optical disc drive to your computer and
insert a blank DVD into the drive.
❖
If you are copying files to a USB flash drive, connect a
USB flash drive of the required minimum capacity (as
specified in the TOSHIBA Recovery Media Creator
utility) to your computer.
All information stored on your DVDs or USB flash drive(s) will be
erased during the process of creating the recovery media. Be sure to
save the information stored on your external media to another
storage device before executing this procedure, or use blank media.
5
Click the Create button in the TOSHIBA Recovery Media
Creator utility dialog box.
6
Follow the on-screen prompts to complete the copy process.
NOTE
If you are copying the recovery files to DVDs, be sure to label each
DVD in the set sequentially (for example, “1 of 3,” “2 of 3,” etc.), so
that you will know in which order to insert the discs during recovery.
For information on using the Recovery media you have created with
the preceding steps, see “Restoring from recovery media” on
page 65.
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
65
Restoring from recovery media
The recovery process deletes information stored on the internal
storage drive. Be sure to save your work to external media before
executing the recovery (see “Backing up your work” on page 100).
NOTE
During the internal storage drive recovery process it is strongly
recommended that your computer be connected to an external power
source via the AC adaptor.
If you have created recovery media for your system, you can restore
your system from such media, if necessary. For example, if your
original internal storage drive fails, you can restore your system to a
new internal storage drive from your recovery media. For
instructions on creating recovery media, see “Creating recovery
media” on page 62.
With recovery media, you can:
❖
Recover to out-of-box state (recommended recovery method)
❖
Recovery of factory default software with user’s data
❖
Recover without changing the internal storage drive partitions
❖
Recover to a custom size partition
For more information on these options, see “Recovering the
Internal Storage Drive” on page 51.
NOTE
When you restore your system, only the operating system files,
applications, and drivers originally shipped with the computer are
restored. Any files that you created are not restored during this
process. Be sure to separately save the files you have created to
external media using Windows® Backup or another backup program.
For more information, see “Backing up your work” on page 100.
To recover your internal storage drive from recovery media:
1
Make sure your computer is turned off.
2
Do one of the following:
❖
If your recovery files are on DVDs, insert the first recovery
DVD into your optional external writable optical disc
drive. Consult the documentation that came with your
optical disc drive to learn how to load the DVD while the
computer is powered off.
66
Getting Started
Recovering the Internal Storage Drive
❖
3
If your recovery files are on a USB flash drive, connect the
USB flash drive to your computer.
Turn on your computer. When the initial TOSHIBA screen
displays, press the F12 key on your keyboard.
The Boot menu displays.
4
Using the arrow keys, select the DVD option or the USB Flash
option, depending on which type of media you are using, and
then press the Enter key.
5
A warning screen appears, stating that when the recovery is
executed all data on your internal storage drive will be deleted
and rewritten. Click Yes to continue.
6
When the Toshiba Recovery Wizard opens and the Selecting a
Process screen displays, select Recovery of Factory Default
Software and then click Next.
7
Select one of the following options:
8
❖
Recover to out-of-box state (recommended recovery
method)—If you want to recover the original factory
image
❖
Recovery of factory default software with user’s data—If
you want to the recovery the factory default software, while the
computer attempts to back up all data from C:\Users
❖
Recover without changing the hard drive partitions—If
you want to recover the C: partition only, leaving other
partitions you have created intact
❖
Recover to a custom size partition—If you want to
recover the C: drive to its out-of-box state and specify a
custom size for the C: drive. Note: This option deletes all
other partitions from the drive.
Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the recovery
process.
When the process is complete, a message displays indicating
that the drive has been recovered.
9
Click Finish to restart the computer.
Getting Started
Erasing the Internal Storage Drive
67
Erasing the Internal Storage Drive
Erasing the internal storage drive will delete all data on the drive,
including the partitions. Be sure to create recovery media and back
up your data to external media before erasing the internal storage
drive.
NOTE
If you want to restore the internal storage drive, use one of the
recovery options instead of erasing the drive. For more information,
see “Recovering the Internal Storage Drive” on page 51.
To delete all data and partitions from the internal storage drive:
1
2
Access the Toshiba Recovery Wizard on your internal storage
drive or on your recovery media.
❖
To access the Recovery Wizard on your internal
storage drive: While powering on your computer, press
the F12 key when the initial TOSHIBA screen displays.
The Boot menu appears. Using the arrow keys to scroll
down, select the HDD Recovery option, and then press
the ENTER key. Read the Warning screen that displays, and
then click Yes to continue.
❖
To access the Recovery Wizard on your recovery
media: Turn off your computer. Insert the first recovery
DVD into your optional external writable optical disc
drive or connect the USB flash drive containing your
recovery files to your computer, and then power on the
computer. When the initial TOSHIBA screen displays,
press F12. Using the arrow keys, select the DVD or USB
Flash option on the Boot menu, depending on which type
of media you are using, and then press the Enter key. Select
Toshiba Recovery Wizard, and then click Next.
Select Erase the hard disk and then click Next.
68
Getting Started
Erasing the Internal Storage Drive
3
Choose one of the following options on the Erase the hard disk
screen:
❖
Delete all data and partitions from the hard disk—This
option deletes all of the data on the internal storage drive
without overwriting the drive.
❖
Delete all partitions and overwrite all sectors on the
hard disk—This option deletes all data and then
overwrites the entire internal storage drive for security
purposes. This process may take several hours, depending
on the size of your internal storage drive.
(Sample Image) Erase the hard disk screen
4
Click Next.
A confirmation message displays reminding you that all data
on the internal storage drive will be lost. Be sure you have
saved your work to external media (see “Backing up your
work” on page 100) and created recovery media (see “Creating
recovery media” on page 62) before proceeding.
5
Click Next to begin erasing the internal storage drive.
When the process is complete, a message displays, indicating
that the internal storage drive has been erased.
6
Click Finish to restart the computer.
Getting Started
Checking the internal storage drive operating status
69
Checking the internal storage drive operating status
After restoring your internal storage drive, you can check its status
as follows:
1
Click Start.
2
Right-click Computer.
3
Select Manage.
4
Click Disk Management.
5
Highlight the internal storage drive in the Volume list to
display its status in the lower portion of the screen.
Installing drivers and applications
The TOSHIBA Application Installer allows you to reinstall the
drivers and applications that were originally bundled with your
computer.
To reinstall drivers and applications:
1
Click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Support & Recovery,
and then TOSHIBA Application Installer.
2
Click Next.
3
Click the item you want to install.
4
Click Install.
5
Follow the on-screen prompts to complete the installation
process.
Using the touch pad
NOTE
Some of the touch pad operations described in this section are only
supported in certain applications.
You can use the touch pad (the small, touch-sensitive area in front
of the keyboard) and the adjacent control buttons to:
❖
Move the pointer on the screen
❖
Select an item on the screen
❖
Open or activate an item on the screen
❖
Scroll through a document or information
❖
Zoom in for a close-up view
70
Getting Started
Using the touch pad
❖
Zoom out to see more information at once
Touch pad
Primary control button
Secondary control button
(Sample Illustration) The touch pad and associated control buttons
Refer to the table below for specific instructions on performing
each operation.
NOTE
The pointer is the icon (usually an arrow) that moves on the screen
when you slide your finger across the touch pad or move a mouse
connected to your computer.
Some of the following features may need to be enabled before they
can be used.
To enable the following features, click on the Mouse icon in the
Optimize tab of Toshiba Assist. Click the Device Settings tab and
then click Settings.
To:
Do the following:
Example:
Move the on-screen Slide your finger across the touch pad in the
direction you want to move the pointer.
pointer
To move the pointer a longer distance, slide
your finger several times across the touch
pad in the preferred direction.
(Sample Illustration)
Pointer moves to the right
Getting Started
Using the touch pad
To:
Do the following:
Select an item
1
2
71
Example:
Move the pointer to the item you want to
select.
Do one of the following:
❖ Tap the touch pad once
OR
❖ Press and release the primary
(left-hand) control button
Open or activate an 1
item
2
(Sample Illustration)
Tap once to select
Move the pointer to the item you want to
open/activate.
Do one of the following:
❖ Tap the touch pad twice in rapid
succession
OR
(Sample Illustration)
❖ Press and release the primary
Tap twice to open
control button twice in rapid
succession
Right-click an item
1
Scroll vertically
Slide your finger along the right edge of the
touch pad in the direction you want to scroll.
Repeat to scroll a longer distance.
Move the pointer to the item you want to
right-click.
2 Press and release the secondary control
button.
This feature varies by program. Check your
program documentation for specific
instructions on right-clicking.
(Sample Illustration)
Click the secondary
(right-hand) control
button
(Sample Illustration)
Vertical scrolling active
area
Scroll horizontally
Slide your finger along the bottom edge of
the touch pad in the direction you want to
scroll. Repeat to scroll a longer distance.
(Sample Illustration)
Horizontal scrolling
active area
72
To:
Getting Started
Using the touch pad
Do the following:
Scroll continuously 1
(Circular scrolling)
2
3
4
Example:
Begin scrolling vertically or horizontally
by sliding your finger along the right or
bottom edge of the touch pad as
described above.
Without lifting your finger from the
touch pad, start moving your finger in a (Sample Illustration)
circular motion on the touch pad.
Circular scrolling
(vertically)
To scroll in the opposite direction,
reverse the direction of the circular
motion.
To stop scrolling, lift your finger off of
the touch pad.
To enable circular scrolling, click on the
Mouse icon in the Optimize tab of Toshiba
Assist. Click the Device Settings tab and then (Sample Illustration)
click on Settings. Double-click on Scrolling Circular scrolling
(horizontally)
and then double-click on One-Finger
Scrolling. Enable Chiral Motion scrolling
and click OK.
Zoom in/out
To zoom in:
❖ Place two fingers close together on
the touch pad and then slide them
apart.
(Sample Illustration)
Zooming in
To zoom out:
❖ Place two fingers slightly apart on
the touch pad and then slide them
together.
(Sample Illustration)
Zooming out
Getting Started
Using the touch pad
73
Adjusting touch pad settings
While you are typing, the on-screen pointer may seem to move or
jump around “by itself” to random locations on the screen. The
on-screen pointer may also seem to automatically select text, click
buttons, and activate other user interface elements. For help with
these problems, try one or more of the following:
❖
Try adjusting your typing technique to avoid accidental contact
with the touch pad. You may be inadvertently brushing the
touch pad with the heel of your hand as you type. Also,
accidental light touches or taps on the touch pad may select an
item or text on the screen, and potentially the item or text may
be replaced by the next character you type.
❖
Temporarily disable the touch pad, so that it does not respond
to touch or button presses while you type. See “Disabling or
enabling the touch pad” on page 73.
❖
Disable the tapping feature. If you disable tapping only, you
can still use the touch pad’s control buttons and move the
pointer by sliding your finger on the touch pad.
❖
Adjust the sensitivity of the touch pad, so that it is less
responsive to accidental light taps and lighter finger pressure.
NOTE
touch pad setting options vary by computer model. The touch pad
settings are accessible through the Mouse Properties option of the
Windows Control Panel. For more information, please visit
support.toshiba.com, and enter the phrase “Mouse pointer jumps
around as you type” into the Search field.
Disabling or enabling the touch pad
The touch pad is enabled by default. To enable/disable the touch
pad, do one of the following:
❖
Press the touch pad ON/OFF (
(Available on certain models.)
❖
Press Fn + F9. For more information, see “Disabling or enabling
the touch pad” on page 191.
) button.
74
Getting Started
Using external display devices
NOTE
Alternately, you can disable only the tapping feature. If you disable
tapping only, you can still use the touch pad’s control buttons and
move the pointer by sliding your finger on the touch pad. To disable
tapping only, use the Mouse Properties option in the Windows®
Control Panel.
Using external display devices
Your computer comes with a built-in display, but you can also
connect the following types of external display devices to the video
ports described below:
❖
An HDMI™-compatible television or external display device
via the HDMI™ Out port*
❖
An external monitor or projector via the RGB (monitor) port
HDMI™ Out port*
RGB (Monitor) port
*Available on certain models
(Sample Illustration) Video ports
Selecting video cables
To connect a device to the HDMI™ Out port, you must purchase an
HDMI™ cable.
Connecting an HDMI™-compatible television or display device
To connect an HDMI™-compatible television or display device to
the computer:
❖
Connect one end of an HDMI™ cable (not included with your
computer) to the HDMI™ Out port on the side of your
computer, and then connect the other end of the cable to your
television or display device. Refer to the manual that came
with the television or display device for more information.
Your computer will automatically detect the external display
device.
Getting Started
Using external display devices
75
Connecting an external monitor or projector
You can easily attach an external monitor or projector to your
computer if you need a larger screen. To do this:
1
Read the directions that came with the monitor to see if you
first need to install new software.
2
Connect the monitor’s video cable to the RGB (monitor) port
on the back of the computer.
3
Connect the device’s power cable to a live electrical outlet.
4
Turn on the external device.
Your computer will automatically detect the external display
device.
NOTE
In the future you can change the display settings by pressing
Fn + F5, or by configuring the display properties settings.
Directing the display output when you turn on the computer
Once you have connected an external display device, you can
choose to use the internal display only, the external device only, or
both simultaneously.
NOTE
Some modes are only available with the appropriate device attached
and turned on.
The quickest way to change the display output settings is to use the
display hot key (Fn + F5):
1
Press Fn and F5 simultaneously.
2
While holding down Fn, press F5 repeatedly until the setting
you want takes effect. Briefly pause each time you press the F5
key to allow time for the display to change.
This hot key cycles through the settings in the following order
(the last two options are available if an external monitor is
connected):
❖
Built-in display only
❖
Built-in display and external monitor simultaneously
❖
External monitor only
❖
Built-in display and external monitor (extended desktop)
76
Getting Started
Using an external keyboard
❖
Swap-Switch primary display between internal display
and external monitor when using extended desktop
(Sample Image) Display options window
3
Release the Fn key.
Adjusting the quality of the external display
To obtain the best picture quality from your television (or other
video display device), you may need to adjust the video settings.
See the video device documentation for additional configuration
steps.
Using an external keyboard
If you prefer to use an external keyboard, you can attach one
to your computer. The computer’s USB ports support most
USB-compatible keyboards.
Using a mouse
You may want to use a mouse instead of the computer’s built-in
touch pad. You can use a USB-compatible mouse.
Getting Started
Connecting a printer
77
Connecting a printer
NOTE
Your printer documentation may require you to install the printer
software before physically connecting the printer to your computer. If
you do not install the software as instructed by the printer
manufacturer, the printer may not function correctly.
Read the documentation that came with your printer. Follow the
manufacturer’s instructions when connecting a printer.
You can connect a USB-compatible printer to your computer
through the USB ports. To determine if the printer is
USB-compatible, check its documentation.
To make the connection, you need a suitable USB cable which may
come with your printer. If a USB cable was not included with your
printer, you can purchase one from a computer or electronics store.
If your printer supports Plug and Play, your computer may
automatically recognize the printer; the printer is then ready for use.
Refer to your printer documentation for further instructions.
TECHNICAL NOTE: To determine if your printer supports Plug and
Play, check its documentation.
If your printer does not support Plug and Play, you can set up the
printer as described in “Setting up a printer” on page 78.
To connect a printer to your computer:
1
Connect the printer cable to the printer and then connect the
other end to one of the computer’s USB ports.
2
Plug the printer’s power cable into a live AC outlet.
78
Getting Started
Connecting a printer
Setting up a printer
NOTE
Some printers require a specific installation process. Refer to your
printer installation guide for instructions before completing the
following procedure.
If your printer does not support Plug and Play, follow these steps to
set it up for the first time. You only need to set up the printer once.
1
Click Start, Control Panel, Hardware and Sound, and then
under Devices and Printers, click Add a printer.
The Add Printer Wizard appears.
(Sample Image) Add Printer Wizard
2
Follow the on-screen instructions to set up your printer.
Getting Started
Turning off the computer
79
Turning off the computer
Pressing the power button before shutting down the Windows®
operating system could cause you to lose your work. Make sure the
system indicator panel’s storage drive light and the drive in-use light
are off. If you turn off the power while a disk/disc is being accessed,
you may lose data or damage the disk/disc and/or drive.
It is a good idea to turn off your computer when you are not using it
for a while.
If you are using the computer for the first time, leave the computer
plugged into a power source (even though the computer is off) to
fully charge the main battery.
Options for turning off the computer
Depending on the operating system installed, you have more than
one option available for turning off the computer: Shut down,
Hibernate, and Sleep. Each option has its advantages.
❖
Use the Shut down or Hibernate command if you will not be
using the computer for several days or if you must turn off your
computer.
You must turn off your computer in order to upgrade your
computer’s internal hardware (such as memory).
TECHNICAL NOTE: Before using the Shut down option to turn off
your computer, save your files and make sure all disk/disc activity
lights are off.
If you change your mind and decide to continue working after all,
wait a few seconds before turning the computer on again.
❖
Use the Sleep command to save your work, system settings,
and current state of the desktop to memory, so that when you
turn on the computer again, you will quickly and automatically
return to where you left off.
Hibernation mode
Hibernation mode shuts the computer down completely, but it first
saves the current state of the computer to the internal storage drive.
Since Hibernation mode does not require power to maintain the
saved information, system settings are retained indefinitely.
80
Getting Started
Turning off the computer
Factors to consider when choosing Hibernation:
❖
While in Hibernation mode, the computer uses no main battery
power.
❖
Because the state of the system is stored to the internal storage
drive, no data is lost if the main battery discharges.
❖
Restarting from Hibernation takes less time and consumes less
main battery power than restarting after turning off the
computer using the Shut down command.
❖
Restarting from Hibernation takes a little more time and
consumes more main battery power than restarting from Sleep.
❖
When starting up again, the computer returns to the state in
which you left it, including all open programs and files you
were using.
For information on how to use and configure Hibernation mode see
“Using and configuring Hibernation mode” on page 83.
Sleep mode
The Sleep command places the computer into a power-saving
mode. Sleep saves the current state of the computer to memory so
that, when you restart the computer, you can continue working from
where you left off.
NOTE
After your computer sleeps for an extended period of time, the
Windows® operating system may save any open documents and
programs to your internal storage drive, and then shuts down the
computer.
Factors to consider when choosing Sleep:
❖
While in Sleep mode, the computer uses some main battery
power.
❖
Because the state of the system is stored in memory, you will
lose data if the main battery discharges completely while the
computer is in Sleep mode.
❖
Restarting from Sleep takes less time and consumes less main
battery power than restarting after turning off the computer
using the Hibernation or Shut down commands.
❖
When starting up again, the computer returns to the mode in
which you left it, including all open programs and files you
were using.
Getting Started
Turning off the computer
❖
81
If the battery charge becomes critically low, the computer will
try to enter Hibernation mode.
If you power down using the Sleep command and the main battery
discharges fully, your unsaved information will be lost. Be sure to
save your work first.
For information on using Sleep, see “Using and configuring Sleep
mode” on page 86.
Using the Shut down command
The Shut down command completely shuts down the computer
without saving your work or the current state of the computer. This
command closes all open programs, shuts down the operating
system, and then turns off your computer.
To turn off your computer using the Shut down command:
1
Click Start.
Start button
Shut down button
(Sample Image) Shut down button
2
Click the Shut down button in the lower-right corner of the
Start menu.
The computer closes all open programs, shuts down the
operating system, and then turns off.
Turning off the computer more quickly
You can also turn off the computer by pressing the power button.
To use this method, you first need to activate it using the Power
Options feature. By default, pressing your computer’s power button
puts the computer into Sleep mode.
1
Click Start, Control Panel, System and Security, and then
Power Options.
The Power Options window appears.
82
Getting Started
Turning off the computer
2
Click Change plan settings under the power plan to be
customized.
The Edit Plan Settings window appears.
(Sample Image) Edit Plan Settings screen
3
Click Change advanced power settings.
The Advanced settings tab of the Power Options window
appears.
4
Double-click Power buttons and lid to display the actions that
you can configure.
(Sample Image) Advanced settings tab of Power Options screen
5
Select the options you want from the drop-down lists.
83
Getting Started
Turning off the computer
NOTE
These options can be set separately for how they operate while the
computer is running on battery power or while connected to AC
power.
❖
Lid close action
Set this option to Shut down if you want the computer to
shut down when you close the display panel.
❖
Power button action
Set this option to Shut down if you want the computer to
shut down when you press the power button.
6
Click Apply.
7
Click OK.
Once the computer is configured, you can turn it off by either
pressing the power button or closing the display panel, depending
on the options set.
Restarting your computer
To start the computer up again, press the power button until the
ON/OFF light glows green.
If you turn off the computer by closing the display panel, you can
start it again by opening the display panel.
Using and configuring Hibernation mode
To turn off the computer using the Hibernation command:
1
Click Start, and then click the arrow next to the Shut down
button in the lower-right corner of the Start menu.
Hibernate
Start button
(Sample Image) Shut down menu
Arrow
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Getting Started
Turning off the computer
2
Click Hibernate in the pop-up menu.
The computer saves the state of all open programs and files,
turns off the display, and then turns off.
Configuring Hibernation mode options
You can place the computer into Hibernation mode by either
pressing the power button or closing the display panel. You can also
specify an amount of time after which the computer automatically
goes into Hibernation mode.
To use any of these methods, you first need to enable them using the
Power Options feature.
1
Click Start, Control Panel, System and Security, and then
Power Options.
The Power Options window appears.
2
Click Change plan settings under the power plan to be
customized.
The Edit Plan Settings window appears.
(Sample Image) Edit Plan Settings screen
3
Click Change advanced power settings.
The Advanced settings tab of the Power Options window
appears.
Getting Started
Turning off the computer
4
85
Double-click Power buttons and lid to display the actions that
you can configure.
(Sample Image) Advanced settings tab of Power Options screen
5
Select Hibernate for the options you want.
NOTE
These options can be set separately for how they operate while the
computer is running on battery power or while connected to AC
power.
❖
Lid close action
Set this option to Hibernate if you want the computer to
go into Hibernation mode when you close the display
panel.
❖
Power button action
Set this option to Hibernate if you want the computer to
go into Hibernation mode when you press the power
button.
6
Click Apply.
7
Click OK.
Once the computer is configured, you can place it into Hibernation
mode by either pressing the power button or closing the display
panel, depending on the Hibernation options set.
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Getting Started
Turning off the computer
Starting again from Hibernation mode
To start up the computer from Hibernation mode, press the power
button until the ON/OFF light glows green. The computer returns to
the screen(s) you were using.
If you put the computer in Hibernation mode by closing the display
panel, you can start it again by opening the display panel.
Using and configuring Sleep mode
To turn off the computer using the Sleep command:
1
Click Start, and then click the arrow next to the Shut down
button in the lower-right corner of the Start menu.
Sleep
Start button
Arrow
(Sample Image) Shut down menu
2
Click Sleep in the pop-up menu.
The computer saves the status of all open programs and files to
the memory, turns off the display, and enters into a low-power
mode. The ON/OFF light blinks amber indicating the computer
is in Sleep mode.
Configuring Sleep mode options
You can place the computer into Sleep mode by either pressing the
power button or closing the display panel. You can also specify an
amount of time after which the computer automatically goes into
Sleep mode.
To use any of these methods, you first need to enable them using the
Power Options feature.
1
Click Start, Control Panel, System and Security, and then
Power Options.
The Power Options window appears.
Getting Started
Turning off the computer
2
87
Click Change plan settings under the power plan to be
customized.
The Edit Plan Settings window appears.
(Sample Image) Edit Plan Settings screen
3
4
To change the amount of time after which the computer enters
Sleep mode:
❖
Under Put the computer to sleep, select the desired
amount of time in both the On battery and Plugged in
categories.
❖
To disable the computer from automatically entering Sleep
mode, select Never.
Click Change advanced power settings.
The Advanced settings tab of the Power Options window
appears.
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Getting Started
Turning off the computer
5
Double-click Power buttons and lid to display the actions that
you can configure.
(Sample Image) Advanced settings tab of Power Options screen
6
Select Sleep for the options you want.
NOTE
These options can be set separately for how they operate while the
computer is running on battery power or while connected to AC
power.
❖
Lid close action
Set this option to Sleep if you want the computer to go
into Sleep mode when you close the display panel.
❖
Power button action
Set this option to Sleep if you want the computer to go
into Sleep mode when you press the power button.
7
Click Apply.
8
Click OK.
Once the computer is configured, you can place it into Sleep mode
by either pressing the power button or closing the display panel,
depending on the Sleep options set.
Starting again from Sleep mode
To start up the computer from Sleep mode, press the power button
until the ON/OFF light glows green. The computer returns to the
screen(s) you were using.
Getting Started
Customizing your computer’s settings
89
If you place the computer in Sleep mode by closing the display
panel, you can start it again by opening the display panel.
Closing the display panel
After you have turned off the computer, close the display panel to
keep dust and dirt out of the computer.
Customizing your computer’s settings
There are several ways in which you can customize your computer
to suit your particular requirements. Refer to your operating system
documentation or Help and Support for details.
You may also wish to customize your power usage settings. For
more information, see “Power Plans” on page 111. There are
additional custom settings you can choose. See “Utilities” on
page 126.
Caring for your computer
This section gives tips on cleaning and moving your computer. For
information about taking care of your computer’s battery, see
“Taking care of your battery” on page 114.
NOTE
Please handle your computer carefully to avoid scratching or
damaging the surface.
Cleaning the computer
Keep liquids, including cleaning fluid, out of the computer’s
keyboard, speaker, and other openings. Never spray cleaner directly
onto the computer and/or display. Never use harsh or caustic
chemical products to clean the computer.
To keep your computer clean, gently wipe the display panel and
exterior case with a lightly dampened cloth.
Moving the computer
Before moving your computer, even across the room, make sure all
drive activity has ended (the internal storage drive and optical disc
drive indicator lights stop glowing) and all external peripheral
cables are disconnected.
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Getting Started
Caring for your computer
Do not pick up the computer by its display panel or by the back
(where the ports are located). Doing so could damage the system.
Using a computer lock
You may want to secure your computer to a heavy object such as
your desk. The easiest way to do this is to purchase an optional
computer lock cable. For more information on purchasing a cable
lock, visit accessories.toshiba.com.
(Sample Illustration) Computer lock cable
To secure the computer:
1
Wrap the cable through or around some part of a heavy object.
Make sure there is no way for a potential thief to slip the cable
off the object.
2
Pass the locking end through the loop.
3
Insert the cable’s locking end into the security lock slot on your
computer, then engage the locking device.
The computer is now securely locked.
(Sample Illustration) Attaching security lock cable
Chapter 2
Learning the Basics
This chapter gives some computing tips and provides important
information about basic features.
Computing tips
❖
Save your work frequently.
Your work stays in the computer’s temporary memory until
you save it to the internal storage drive. If the network you are
using goes down and you must restart your computer to
reconnect, or your battery runs out of charge while you are
working, you will lose all work since you last saved.
See “Saving your work” on page 98 for further information.
HINT: Some programs have an automatic save feature that can be
activated. This feature saves your file to the internal storage drive at
preset intervals. See your software documentation for details.
91
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Learning the Basics
Using the keyboard
❖
Back up your files to external media on a regular basis. Label
the backup copies clearly and store them in a safe place.
It is easy to put off backing up because it takes time. However,
if your internal storage drive suddenly fails, you will lose all
the data on it unless you have a separate backup copy. For more
information, see “Data and system configuration backup in the
Windows® operating system” on page 173.
❖
Use Error-checking and Disk Defragmenter regularly to check
and optimize disk space and improve performance.
❖
Scan all new files for viruses.
This precaution is especially important for files you receive via
external media, email, or download from the Internet.
❖
Take frequent breaks to avoid repetitive-motion injuries and
eyestrain.
❖
Do not turn off the computer if a drive indicator light indicates
a drive is active.
Turning off the computer while it is reading from or writing to
a disk may damage the disk, the drive, or both.
NOTE
The Windows® operating system records information, such as your
desktop setup, during its shutdown procedure. If you do not let the
Windows® operating system shut down normally, details such as
new icon positions may be lost.
Using the keyboard
Your computer’s keyboard contains character keys, control keys,
function keys, and special Windows® keys, providing all the
functionality of a full-size keyboard.
(Sample Illustration) Keyboard
Learning the Basics
Using the keyboard
93
Character keys
Typing with the character keys is very much like typing on a
typewriter, except that:
❖
The space bar creates a space character instead of just passing
over an area of the page.
❖
The lowercase letter l (el) and the number 1 are not
interchangeable.
❖
The uppercase letter O and the number 0 are not
interchangeable.
Making your keyboard emulate a full-size keyboard
Although your computer’s keyboard layout is compatible with a
standard full-size keyboard, it includes fewer keys.
A standard full-size keyboard includes two Enter, Ctrl, and Alt keys;
editing keys; cursor positioning keys; and a numeric keypad.
Your computer’s keyboard includes only one Enter key. Most of the
time, this does not matter. However, some programs assign separate
functions to the regular and numeric pad Enter keys on the full-sized
keyboard. Using the Fn key, you can simulate the separate key, as
follows: Press Fn and Enter simultaneously to simulate the Enter key
on the numeric pad of the enhanced keyboard. Pressing the Fn key
simultaneously in combination with one of the specially marked
keys allows you to emulate a full-size keyboard.
Ctrl, Fn, and Alt keys
(Sample Illustration) Ctrl, Fn, and Alt keys
The Ctrl, Fn, and Alt keys do different things depending on the
program you are using. For more information, see your program
documentation.
Function keys
The function keys (not to be confused with the Fn key) are the 12
keys at the top of the keyboard.
(Sample Illustration) Function keys
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Learning the Basics
Using the keyboard
F1 through F12 are called function keys because they execute
programmed functions when pressed. Used in combination with the
Fn key, function keys marked with icons execute specific functions
on the computer. For example, Fn + F9 turns the touch pad ON/OFF.
For more information, see “Hot key functions” on page 183.
Special Windows® keys
Windows® key
Application key
(Sample Illustration) Special Windows® keys
Your computer’s keyboard has one key and one button that have
special functions in Windows®:
❖
Windows® key—Opens the Start menu
❖
Application key—Has a similar function as the secondary
mouse button
Overlay keys
The keys with gray numbers and symbols on the front of them form
the numeric and cursor overlay. This overlay lets you enter numeric
data or control the cursor as you would using the 10-key keypad on
a desktop computer’s keyboard.
(Sample Illustration) Numeric and cursor control overlay
Learning the Basics
Starting a program
95
Using the overlay to type numeric data
The keys with the numbers on their right front are the numeric
overlay keys.
To turn the numeric overlay on, press Fn and F11 simultaneously.
The numeric overlay light glows when the numeric overlay is on.
To disable the numeric overlay, hold down the Fn key and press F11
again. The numeric overlay light goes out.
Using the overlay for cursor control
The keys with the gray arrows and symbols on their left front are
the cursor control overlay keys.
To turn the cursor control overlay on, press Fn and F10
simultaneously. The cursor control overlay light glows when the
cursor control overlay is on.
To disable the cursor control overlay, hold down the Fn key and
press F10 again. The cursor control overlay light goes out.
Backlit keyboard
(Available on certain models.)
Your keyboard may have a backlight illumination feature. If the
keyboard backlight setting is set to Auto, the backlight turns on
when you type on the keyboard and turns off after a certain interval
when you stop typing. You can modify the time-out interval or
change the keyboard backlight setting to always on or always off
using the FN + Z key. For more information, see “Keyboard hot key
functions” on page 194.
Starting a program
The easiest way to start a program is to double-click the name of
the file that contains the information you want to work on. To find
the file, use the Start menu or Windows® Explorer.
If you prefer to open the program first, you have four options. You can:
❖
Double-click the icon for the program on your desktop
❖
Use the Start menu
❖
Use Windows® Explorer to locate the program file
❖
Use the Search programs and files field in the Start menu
The next three sections explain how to start a program from the
Start menu, Windows® Explorer, and the Search programs and files
field.
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Learning the Basics
Starting a program
Starting a program from the Start menu
When you install a program, the operating system usually puts an
icon in the All Programs menu. To start a program that has an icon
in the All Programs menu, follow these steps, which use the
Windows® WordPad program as an example:
1
Click Start, and then All Programs.
The Windows® operating system displays the All Programs
menu, which lists programs and program groups. If your
program is listed, go to step 3, otherwise, continue with step 2.
NOTE
2
If you pause with your mouse on All Programs, it will open it up. You
may need to scroll up or down to see the complete list.
Click the program group, in this example, Accessories.
The Accessories menu is displayed.
3
Click the program, in this example, WordPad.
WordPad opens.
To close the program, click the Close button in the upper-right
corner of the program’s window.
Starting a program from Windows® Explorer
If a program is not listed in the All Programs menu, you can start it
from Windows® Explorer. Windows® Explorer gives you a view of
your computer’s contents as a hierarchy or “tree.” You can easily
see the contents of each drive and folder on your computer. To use
this method, you should know the file name and location of the
program’s executable file (this file ends with .exe).
This example opens WordPad using Windows® Explorer.
NOTE
If you pause with your mouse on All Programs, it will open it up. You
may need to scroll up or down to see the complete list.
1
Click the Windows Explorer icon on the taskbar.
2
In the left part of the window, double-click Computer to
expand the window.
3
In the left part of the window, click the line that ends in “(C:).”
Learning the Basics
Starting a program
4
97
In the right part of the window, double-click the folder
containing the program, in this case Program Files.
Windows® Explorer shows the contents of the Program Files
folder on the right side of the window.
5
In the right part of the window, double-click Windows NT.
6
In the right part of the window, double-click Accessories.
Windows® Explorer shows the contents of the Accessories
folder on the right side of the window.
7
In the right part of the window, double-click wordpad.
The operating system opens WordPad.
To close the program, click the Close button in the upper-right
corner of the program’s window.
Starting a program using the Search programs and files field
This example uses the Start menu’s Search programs and files field
to start WordPad:
1
Click Start to display the Start menu.
The Search programs and files field appears at the bottom of
the Start menu.
Search programs
and files field
(Sample Image) Search programs and files field in Start menu
2
Start typing the program’s name (wordpad) in the Search
programs and files field.
As you type, all matching files and programs are displayed in a
separate window.
3
In the search results window, click WordPad under Programs.
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Learning the Basics
Saving your work
Saving your work
Before you turn off the computer using the Shut down command,
save your work on the internal storage drive, external media, flash
media, or optical disc. This is one of the most important rules of
computing.
When you turn off the computer using the Sleep or Hibernate
commands, your work should be there when you resume.
Many programs offer a feature that saves documents at regular
intervals. Check your program’s documentation to see if it has an
automatic save feature.
Saving files
1
Click on the arrow in the upper-left corner of your
Windows®-based application to display the drop-down menu,
and then click Save.
If you are working with a document that already has a file
name, this is all you need to do. If you created a new document,
your program displays a Save As dialog box.
Use this dialog box to specify where to store the document and
to give it a file name.
(Sample Image) Save As dialog box
2
Choose the drive and folder where you want your file to be
stored.
3
Type a file name, then click Save.
Learning the Basics
Printing your work
99
File names
The Windows® operating system supports long file names that can
contain up to 260 characters and can include spaces. Some
applications do not support long file names and require file names
limited to no more than eight characters.
You may use all the letters, numbers, and other characters on the
keyboard, except for these characters: \ / ? : * " > < |. File names
are not case-sensitive.
Using a file extension
Most programs assign an extension to the file name that identifies
the file as being created in the program with a particular format. For
example, Microsoft® Word saves files with a .doc/.docx extension.
Any file name with an extension of “.doc/.docx” is assumed to be a
Microsoft® Word file. Creating your own extension is usually
unwise, since the program is unlikely to recognize a strange
extension and may refuse to handle your file correctly.
TECHNICAL NOTE: By default, the Windows® operating system does
not show file extensions. For information on showing or hiding file
extensions, see your Windows® online Help.
Printing your work
Ensure the operating system is set up for your printer as described
in “Setting up a printer” on page 78.
HINT: You only need to set up the printer the first time you connect it.
If you use more than one printer or are changing printers, you will
need to set up the Windows® operating system to run with the
additional printer(s).
To print a file:
1
If your printer is not on, turn it on now.
100
Learning the Basics
Backing up your work
2
Click on the arrow in the upper-left corner of your
Windows®-based application to display the drop-down menu,
and then click Print.
The program displays a Print dialog box.
(Sample Image) Print dialog box
3
Specify the print parameters. For example, the range of pages
and number of copies to print.
4
Click Print.
Backing up your work
Back up all the files you create in case something happens to your
computer. You can back up your files to different types of media
such as CDs, DVDs, external storage media, or to a network, if
available.
To back up several files at one time, use the Microsoft® Windows®
Backup program preinstalled on the computer’s internal storage
drive. Also see “Backing up your data or your entire computer with
the Windows® operating system” on page 174.
HINT: Backing up all the files on your internal storage drive may take
a considerable amount of time and multiple CDs/DVDs. You may
prefer to use a high-capacity backup system, such as an external
hard drive.
Learning the Basics
Toshiba’s online resources
101
Restoring your work
To restore information from your backup media to your internal
storage drive, use the Restore option in the Windows® Backup and
Restore program. Look in the online Help or your operating system
documentation for information on restoring files.
(Sample Image) Backup and Restore screen
TECHNICAL NOTE: When restoring files, the backup program
prompts you if you try to overwrite a file that already exists on the
internal storage drive. Make sure the backup version is the one you
want before overwriting the existing file.
Toshiba’s online resources
Toshiba maintains a number of online sites to which you can
connect. These sites provide information about Toshiba products,
give help with technical questions and keep you up to date with
future upgrades. For more information, see “Contacting Toshiba”
on page 178.
Chapter 3
Mobile Computing
This chapter covers all aspects of using your computer while
traveling.
Toshiba’s energy-saver design
Your computer enters a low-power suspension mode when it is not
being used, thereby conserving energy and saving money in the
process. It has a number of other features that enhance its energy
efficiency.
Many of these energy-saving features have been preset by Toshiba.
We recommend you leave these features active, allowing your
computer to operate at its maximum energy efficiency, so that you
can use it for longer periods while traveling.
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Mobile Computing
Running the computer on battery power
103
Your computer contains Toshiba EasyGuard®. The Toshiba
EasyGuard* technology is made up of four foundational elements
that incorporate hardware and software innovations into various
Toshiba computers that address the most common security,
reliability and connectivity issues faced by computer users:
❖
EasyGuard Protect and Fix—to fortify vital information and
vulnerable components against the stress and hazards mobile
computers face every day.
❖
EasyGuard Secure—to defend your data and your computer
against loss, theft or viral attack.
❖
EasyGuard Connect—to help users establish a reliable wired
or wireless connection effortlessly and quickly.
❖
EasyGuard Optimize—to enable users to customize system
settings to be more productive.
*Toshiba EasyGuard® technology comprises a number of features
some of which may or may not be available on a particular Toshiba
computer depending on the model selected. See
easyguard.toshiba.com for detailed information.
Running the computer on battery power
The computer contains a Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion) battery that provides
power when you are away from an AC outlet. You can recharge it
many times.
Battery Notice
Battery life rating is for comparison purposes only, and does not
indicate the battery life that will be obtained by any individual user.
Actual battery life may vary considerably from specifications
depending on product model, configuration, applications, power
management settings and features utilized, as well as the natural
performance variations produced by the design of individual
components. The battery life rating is only achieved on the select
models and configurations tested by Toshiba under the specific test
settings at the time of publication and is not an estimate of a
system’s battery life under any conditions other than the specific
test settings.
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Mobile Computing
Running the computer on battery power
Recharge time varies depending on usage. Battery may not charge
while the computer is consuming full power. After a period of time,
the battery will lose its ability to perform at maximum capacity and
will need to be replaced. This is normal for all batteries.
To ensure that the battery maintains its maximum capacity,
operate the computer on battery power at least once a month. The
Lithium-Ion battery has no memory effect so it is not necessary to
let the battery fully discharge each time. However, for better
accuracy of the battery meter, it is helpful to fully discharge the
battery periodically. Please see “Maintaining your battery” on
page 115 for procedures. If the computer is continuously operated
on AC power, either through an AC adaptor or a port replicator (if
applicable to your system), for an extended period (more than a
month), the battery may fail to retain a charge. This may shorten the
life of the battery, and may cause the battery meter to be inaccurate.
NOTE
For optimum optical media performance, it is recommended that you
play DVDs while running the computer on AC power. For more
information about Windows® power plans, see “Power Plans” on
page 111.
The computer also has an internal real-time-clock (RTC) battery.
The RTC battery powers the RTC memory that stores your system
configuration settings and the current time and date information. It
maintains this information for up to a month while the computer is
turned off.
TECHNICAL NOTE: Depending on your system, the RTC battery may
only charge while the computer is turned on.
Mobile Computing
Charging batteries
105
Power management
Your computer ships with the power management options preset
to a configuration that will provide the most stable operating
environment and optimum system performance for both AC power
and battery modes.
Changes to these settings may result in system performance or
stability issues. Users who are not completely familiar with the power
management component of the system should use the preset
configuration. For assistance with setup changes, contact Toshiba’s
Customer Support Center.
Charging batteries
The battery needs to be charged before you can use it to power the
computer.
Always use the AC adaptor specified by Toshiba. You can
order a Toshiba AC adaptor from Toshiba’s Web site at
accessories.toshiba.com.
NOTE
Battery charge time may vary depending on the applications, power
management settings, and features used.
Charging the main battery
To charge the main battery, plug the computer into a live electrical
outlet. The battery charges whether the computer is on or off.
The battery may not start charging immediately under the following
conditions:
❖
The battery is extremely hot or cold.
To ensure that the battery charges to its full capacity, wait until
it reaches room temperature (50 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit, 10 to
26 degrees Celsius).
❖
The battery is almost completely discharged.
Leave the power connected and the battery should begin
charging after a few minutes.
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Mobile Computing
Charging batteries
HINT: Once the battery is fully charged, we recommend that you
operate your computer on battery power until the battery discharges
completely. Doing this extends battery life and helps ensure accurate
monitoring of battery capacity.
Charging the RTC battery
Your computer has an internal real-time clock (RTC) battery. The
RTC battery powers the System Time Clock and BIOS memory
used to store your computer’s configuration settings. When fully
charged, it maintains this information for up to a month when the
computer is powered off.
The RTC battery may have become completely discharged while
your computer was shipped, resulting in a CMOS error message
during startup. The error message may vary by computer model.
NOTE
Depending on your system, the RTC battery may only charge while
the computer is turned on.
To recharge the RTC battery, plug the computer into a live electrical
outlet and leave the computer powered on for 24 hours.
NOTE
It is seldom necessary to charge the RTC battery because it charges
while the computer is on. If the RTC battery is low, the real-time
clock and calendar may display the incorrect time and date or stop
working.
When Hibernation mode is enabled and the RTC battery is
completely discharged, a warning prompts you to reset the real-time
clock.
The computer can be used while the RTC battery is being charged,
although the charging status of the RTC battery cannot be
monitored.
Mobile Computing
Monitoring main battery power
107
Monitoring main battery power
The computer’s main battery light gives you an indication of the
main battery’s current charge.
❖
Glows amber while the main battery is being charged
(AC adaptor connected)
❖
Glows green when the main battery is fully charged
❖
Is unlit when the battery has discharged, the battery is not
charging, or the AC adaptor is not plugged into the computer or
AC outlet
NOTE
❖
NOTE
Battery life and charge time may vary, depending upon power
management settings, applications and features used.
Flashes amber when the main battery charge is low and it is
time to recharge the main battery or plug in the AC adaptor
If the AC power light flashes amber during charging, either a battery
is malfunctioning, or it is not receiving correct input from the AC
power supply.
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Mobile Computing
Monitoring main battery power
HINT: Be careful not to confuse the battery light ( ), the ON/OFF
light ( ), and the power button light (near the upper-left corner of
the keyboard).
When the ON/OFF light or power button light flashes amber, it
indicates that the system is suspended (using the Windows®
operating system Sleep command).
Power
button
System indicator lights
AC power light
ON/OFF light
Battery light
Internal storage drive light
Wireless indicator light
Wireless WAN indicator light*
eco Utility™ indicator light
*Available on certain models
(Sample Illustration) Power and battery light locations
Mobile Computing
Monitoring main battery power
109
Determining remaining battery power
NOTE
Wait a few moments after turning on the computer before trying to
monitor the remaining battery power. The computer needs this time
to check the battery’s remaining capacity and perform its
calculations.
Move the pointer over the power icon in the notification area, see
“Finding your way around the desktop” on page 118 for more
information on the notification area. A pop-up message displays the
remaining battery power as a percentage.
With repeated discharges and recharges, the battery’s capacity
gradually decreases. A frequently used older battery does not power
the computer for as long as a new battery, even when both are fully
charged.
TECHNICAL NOTE: The computer drains the battery faster at low
temperatures. Check your remaining charge frequently if you are
working in temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit.
The computer calculates the remaining battery charge based on your
current rate of power use and other factors such as the age of the
battery.
What to do when the main battery runs low
When the main battery runs low you can:
❖
Plug the computer into an external power source and recharge
the main battery
❖
Save your work and turn off the computer
If you do not manage to do any of these things before the main
battery completely runs out of power, the computer automatically
enters Hibernation mode and turns itself off. Hibernation mode
keeps track of where you were, so that when you turn on the power
again, you can continue where you left off.
If you have Hibernation mode enabled (the default), the computer
copies the details of your open programs and files to the internal
storage drive before shutting down. For more information on using
Hibernation, see “Hibernation mode” on page 79.
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Mobile Computing
Monitoring main battery power
Setting battery notifications
You can set two notifications. Each notification can be set to alert
you when a specified percentage of remaining battery power has
been reached. You can also set the computer to enter Sleep mode or
Hibernation mode or to completely power down when the
notification goes off.
To change the default notification settings:
1
Click Start, Control Panel, System and Security, and then
Power Options.
The Power Options window appears.
2
Click Change plan settings under the power plan to be
customized.
The Edit Plan Settings window appears.
3
Click Change advanced power settings.
The Advanced settings tab of the Power Options window
appears.
4
Double-click Battery to display the battery options.
(Sample Image) Advanced settings tab of Power Options screen
5
Configure the alarm settings to suit your needs.
Conserving battery power
How long a fully charged battery lasts when you are using the
computer depends on a number of factors, such as:
❖
How the computer is configured
Mobile Computing
Monitoring main battery power
111
❖
How much you use the internal storage drive or other optional
devices
❖
Where you are working, since operating time decreases at low
temperatures
There are various ways in which you can conserve power and
extend the operating time of your battery:
❖
Enable Sleep or Hibernation, which saves power when you turn
off the computer and turn it back on again
❖
Use the Windows® power-saving option plans
These power-saving options control the way in which the computer
is configured. By using them, you can increase the length of time
you can use the computer before you need to recharge the battery.
Microsoft® has combined these options into preset Power Plans.
Using one of these power plans lets you choose between maximum
power savings and peak system performance. You may also set
individual power-saving options to suit your own needs.
The following sections describe how to choose a Power Plan and
discuss each power-saving option.
Power Plans
You can choose a predefined Power Plan or select your own
combination of power options. To do this:
1
Click Start, Control Panel, System and Security, and then
Power Options.
The Windows® Power Options window appears.
(Sample Image) Windows® Power Options window
112
Mobile Computing
Monitoring main battery power
2
Select an appropriate plan for your work environment or create
your own custom plan.
3
Click Create a power plan in the left pane to set up a new
plan.
NOTE
4
To edit a plan or to edit advanced settings, continue to the following
steps.
Click Change plan settings to choose the plan you want to
edit.
This screen allows you to change basic settings.
5
Click Change advanced power settings to access settings for
battery notification levels, internal storage drive power save
time, etc.
You can click on the plus signs to expand each item and to see
what settings are available for each item.
6
Click OK to save the plan changes you have performed.
By default the two power plans eco and Balanced are satisfactory
for most people and do not need to be edited. The eco plan is the
best used for maximum battery time. The Balanced plan is a
compromise between battery time and performance.
Using a hot key to set the Power Plan
You may use a hot key to set the Power Plan.
To set the Power Plan:
1
Press Fn and F2 simultaneously to display the Power Plan hot
key card.
(Sample Image) Power Plan hot key card
Mobile Computing
Using the TOSHIBA eco power plan
2
113
While continuing to press Fn, press F2 until you select the
desired Power Plan.
The Power Plan options are: eco and Balanced.
3
Release the Fn key.
The hot key card disappears. You are now in the selected mode.
Using the TOSHIBA eco power plan
This computer is equipped with the TOSHIBA eco power plan.
Operating the computer with this power plan enabled reduces
electrical power consumption by slightly lowering system
performance. For example, when this power plan is enabled, the
brightness of the display is reduced and the interval before Sleep
mode takes effect is shortened. To enable or disable the TOSHIBA
eco power plan, press the eco Utility™ button.
eco Utility™ button
(Sample Illustration) Locating the eco Utility™ button
The TOSHIBA eco Utility™ monitors your power savings from
using the eco power plan by tracking real-time power consumption
and accumulated savings over time. To learn how to access the
utility, see “TOSHIBA eco Utility™” on page 154.
For more information on the TOSHIBA eco power plan, see the
Help file in the TOSHIBA eco Utility™ window.
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Mobile Computing
Changing the main battery
Changing the main battery
When your main battery has run out of power, plug in the AC
adaptor.
If you find that a new battery is needed, contact the location you
purchased the computer at for more information on replacing the
battery. Toshiba will not be responsible for any product damage,
data loss, service or part replacement made necessary by improper
installation of a new battery.
If the computer is leaking or its case is cracked, put on protective
gloves to handle it.
Taking care of your battery
The following sections offer tips on how to take care of your battery
and prolong its life.
Safety precautions
Computer warning indicators
❖ Always immediately turn the power off and disconnect the power
cable/cord plug from the plug socket and stop using the
computer if you observe any of the following conditions:
❖ Offensive or unusual odor
❖ Excessive heat
❖ Discoloration
❖ Deformation, cracks, or leaks
❖ Smoke
❖ Other unusual event during use, such as abnormal sound
❖ Do not expose the computer to fire. The battery could explode.
Do not turn on the computer's power again until an authorized
Toshiba service provider has checked it for safety. Continued use
could cause a fire or rupture possibly resulting in serious injury or
computer failure including but not limited to the loss of data.
Mobile Computing
Disposing of your computer
115
Maintaining your battery
Fully discharging your battery will allow better accuracy of the
battery meter.
To fully discharge your battery:
❖
❖
Periodically, disconnect the computer from a power source and
operate it on battery power until the battery fully discharges.
Before doing so, follow the steps below:
1
Turn off the computer’s power.
2
Disconnect the AC adaptor and turn on the computer’s
power. If it does not turn on, go to step 4.
3
Operate the computer on battery power for five minutes. If
the battery has at least five minutes of operating time,
continue operating until the battery is fully discharged. If
the battery light flashes or there is some other warning to
indicate a low battery, go to step 4.
4
Connect the AC adaptor to the computer and the
power cord/cable to a power outlet. The DC-IN or AC
power-light should glow green, and the battery light
should glow amber to indicate that the battery is being
charged. If the DC-IN or AC power-light indicator does
not glow, power is not being supplied. Check the
connections for the AC adaptor and power cord/cable.
5
Charge the battery until the battery light glows green.
If you are not going to use the computer for more than eight
hours, disconnect the AC adaptor.
Disposing of your computer
Never attempt to dispose of a computer by burning or by
throwing it into a fire, and never allow exposure to a heating
apparatus (e.g., microwave oven). Heat can cause a computer to
explode and/or release caustic liquid, both which may possibly
cause serious injury.
Discard this computer in accordance with applicable laws and
regulations.
Disposal of this product may be regulated due to environmental
considerations. For disposal, reuse or recycling information, please
contact your local government.
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Mobile Computing
Traveling tips
In addition, Toshiba’s recycling initiatives include recycling
programs, events and consumer promotions. For details, please visit
us.toshiba.com/green.
Notice regarding CR coin cell batteries, applicable to California,
U.S.A. only:
Perchlorate Material - special handling may apply.
See http://www.dtsc.ca.gov/hazardouswaste/perchlorate/
Traveling tips
The environmental precautions listed in “Selecting a place to work”
on page 41, also apply while traveling.
❖
Never leave your computer on a sunny ledge or in a place
where it could get wet or covered in dust.
❖
Always travel with the computer in a carrying case. Toshiba
offers a choice of carrying cases for the computer. They all
provide plenty of extra space for manuals, power cords, and
compact discs. Contact your authorized Toshiba representative
for more information or visit Toshiba’s Web site at
accessories.toshiba.com.
TECHNICAL NOTE: When traveling by air, you may be required to
pass your computer through airport security equipment. The X-ray
equipment will not harm your computer.
NOTE
Before using your computer aboard an aircraft, make sure the
Wireless antenna is OFF if your computer has wireless LAN
capability.
NOTE
To enable or disable wireless communication, use the Hot Key
Fn + F8. For more information see “Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards” on
page 181.
Chapter 4
Exploring Your Computer’s
Features
In this chapter, you will explore some of the special features of your
computer.
Exploring the desktop
The desktop is the launching pad for everything you can do in the
Windows® operating system. You can use its features to start
programs, find documents, set up system components, and perform
most other computing tasks.
HINT: The illustrated examples in this guide may appear slightly
different from the screens displayed by your system. The differences
are not significant and do not indicate any change in the functionality
of your system.
117
118
Exploring Your Computer’s Features
Exploring the desktop
Finding your way around the desktop
Your computer’s desktop includes several standard features: icons,
Start button, taskbar, notification area, and background pattern.
Icons
Start button
Taskbar
Notification area
(Sample Image) Windows® operating system desktop
Icons
An icon represents a folder, file, or program that can be quickly
activated by double-clicking the icon.
You can create a new desktop icon for any folder, file, or program
by dragging the element’s icon from its location in a window to the
desktop area.
You may see various icons displayed on your system desktop, for
example:
Recycle Bin—Holds files you have deleted. You may be able to
retrieve these files until you empty the Recycle Bin.
Exploring Your Computer’s Features
Exploring the desktop
119
❖ TECHNICAL NOTE: If you delete a large number of files or very
large files from the internal storage drive, there may be
insufficient space available in the Recycle Bin to hold these files.
In this case, Windows® will prompt you to either permanently
delete the file(s) or cancel the deletion.
❖ If you delete a file (of any size) from an external media or flash
media, it does not go into the Recycle Bin. The file is
permanently deleted.
❖ Permanently deleted files cannot be recovered from the Recycle
Bin.
For more information on the Recycle Bin, see Windows® online
Help.
NOTE
If you place the pointer over an icon, a popup description of the file
contents appears.
Your desktop may contain other icons depending on your
configuration. See Windows® online Help for more specific
information on each icon and how to use it.
Start button
You use the Start button to:
❖
Start programs
❖
Open documents
❖
Adjust system settings
❖
Find files
❖
Access Windows® Help and Support
❖
Suspend system activity and shut down the computer
NOTE
Whenever a procedure in this User’s Guide instructs you to click
Start, it means that you should click the Start button.
Taskbar
Each time you open a program, a button associated with that
program appears on the taskbar. With some programs, a button
appears on the taskbar for each document or window you open. You
can use these buttons to quickly switch between the programs or
windows.
120
Exploring Your Computer’s Features
Setting up for communications
To make a program or window the currently active one, click the
associated taskbar button.
Notification area
The notification area displays icons of tasks or programs that run
continuously in the background and displays notifications. To learn
more about each task, position the pointer over the icon for a few
moments and a short description of the task appears.
Typical tasks in the notification area are Current time, Power usage
mode, network connectivity status, and speaker volume.
To activate a specific task, click the appropriate notification area
icon.
Setting up for communications
To connect to the Internet, use an online service, or communicate
across the telephone lines with another computer, you need:
❖
A browser or communications program
❖
An Internet Service Provider (ISP) or online service if you plan
to use the Internet
❖
A way to connect to the ISP (for example Wi-Fi®/LAN, etc.)
Using Wireless LAN connectivity
NOTE
Wireless connectivity and some features may require you to
purchase additional software, external hardware or services.
Availability of public wireless LAN access points may be limited.
Your system may come with an optional wireless LAN module.
This is a technology that expands wireless communication beyond
networking equipment, and can connect many different kinds of
electronic devices without the need for cables.
For information on how to set up a wireless connection, refer to
your wireless networking device documentation or your network
administrator.
NOTE
To enable or disable wireless communication, use the Hot Key
Fn + F8. For more information see “Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards” on
page 181.
Exploring Your Computer’s Features
Exploring audio features
NOTE
121
When the Wireless antenna is ON, the wireless indicator light
be lit.
will
For help with common Wi-Fi® networking problems, see “Wireless
networking problems” on page 170.
Connecting your computer to a network
You can connect your computer to a network to increase its
capabilities and functionality using one of its communication ports.
Accessing a network
To access a network, connect an Ethernet cable to the Network port
(RJ45) on your computer. For specific information about
connecting to the network, consult your network administrator.
Many hotels, airports, and offices offer Wi-Fi® access. If your
computer has Wi-Fi®, ask for help when connecting to a Wi-Fi®
network.
Setting up the connection
To set up an office connection, consult your network administrator
for network settings and additional considerations.
Exploring audio features
You can use your computer to record sounds using the computer’s
internal microphone (available on certain models) or an optional
external microphone. You can listen to sound files or audio CDs
using the built-in speakers, headphones, or external speakers.
Recording sounds
You may record sounds using the computer’s internal microphone
(available on certain models) or by connecting an optional external
microphone.
Using a microphone
1
If you want to use an external microphone, connect it to the
computer.
122
Exploring Your Computer’s Features
Exploring audio features
2
Click Start, All Programs, Accessories, and then Sound
Recorder.
Start Recording/Stop Recording button
(Sample Image) Sound Recorder screen
3
Click the Start Recording button.
4
Speak normally into the microphone.
5
When you have finished recording, click the Stop Recording
button.
The Save As dialog box appears.
6
To save the file, type a file name, and then click Save.
Using external speakers or headphones
Your computer is equipped with a full stereo sound system with
internal speakers. Instead of using the internal speakers, you can
connect headphones or a pair of external stereo speakers.
Before putting on headphones to listen, turn the volume down. Do
not set the volume too high when using headphones. Continuous
exposure to loud sound can harm your hearing.
TECHNICAL NOTE: When using amplified speakers, use speakers
that require an external power source. Other types of speakers will be
inadequate to produce sound from the computer.
To play back sound files through external speakers or headphones:
1
Locate the headphone jack on the computer.
2
Using any necessary adapters, plug the cable from the
headphones or external speakers into the headphone jack.
The headphone jack requires a 16-ohm stereo mini connector.
To adjust the volume:
❖
For external speakers, use the volume controls on each speaker.
❖
For headphones, use the computer’s volume control.
Exploring Your Computer’s Features
Using the Web Camera
123
Using the Web Camera
(Available on certain models.)
Your computer may come with a built-in Web Camera. With this
Web Camera you can do the following:
❖
Take pictures and record videos with your computer
❖
Chat with others and have them see you while using instant
messaging (IM) programs
❖
Have video conference calls
NOTE
To email, instant message or video conference, you must be
connected to the Internet.
Depending on your computer model, the process of sending email,
taking pictures or recording video messages may vary.
To access the Web Camera, click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA,
Media & Entertainment, and then select the Web Camera
Application. The Web Camera indicator light glows when the Web
Camera is active.
Using the Memory card reader
(Available on certain models.)
The Memory card reader supports the use of Secure Digital™
(SD™), or MultiMediaCard® (MMC®) media. These media can be
used with a variety of digital products: digital music players,
cellular phones, PDAs, digital cameras, digital video camcorders,
etc.
To use a micro or mini SD™ Card, an SD™ adapter is required.
The Memory card reader may also support other types of media.
NOTE
Do not use the Copy Disk function for this type of media. To copy
data from one media to another, use the drag-and-drop feature of the
Windows® operating system.
124
Exploring Your Computer’s Features
Using the Memory card reader
Inserting memory media
The following instructions apply to all types of supported media
devices.
1
NOTE
2
Turn the media so that the contacts (metal areas) are face down.
You may first need to remove the card slot protector before you can insert a
card.
Push the media into the adapter until it locks in place.
(Sample Illustration) Inserting memory media
When inserting memory media, do not touch the metal contacts. You
could expose the storage area to static electricity, which can destroy
data.
Removing memory media
1
Prepare the card for removal by clicking on the Show hidden
icons button ( ), if necessary, in the notification area and then
selecting the Safely Remove Hardware and Eject Media
icon.
If the system is unable to prepare the media for safe removal, a
message will tell you to try again later. If the media can be
removed now, the system displays Safe to Remove Hardware.
If the computer has a spring-loaded adapter slot, see step 2;
otherwise, skip to step 3.
2
Gently press the card inward to release it.
The card pops out slightly.
Exploring Your Computer’s Features
Using the Memory card reader
3
125
Grasp the card and pull it straight out.
(Sample Illustration) Removing memory media
Do not remove memory media while data is being written or read.
Even when the Windows® message “copying...” disappears, writing
to the media might still be in progress and your data could be
destroyed. Wait for the indicator light to go out.
Chapter 5
Utilities
Your computer includes several utilities designed to help you to
reconfigure your system to best meet your individual needs.
Together, these allow you to ascertain certain system details, set
additional options, or change default options. These utilities are
described in this chapter.
NOTE
126
The utilities described in this chapter, and the icons shown in the
sample images are applicable only if the related utility is available on
your system.
❖
TOSHIBA Assist
❖
TOSHIBA Application Installer
❖
Supervisor password
❖
User password
❖
TOSHIBA Face Recognition Utility
❖
TOSHIBA Security Assist
❖
TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool Utility
❖
Mouse Utility
❖
TOSHIBA Hardware Setup
❖
TOSHIBA Sleep Utility
Utilities
TOSHIBA Assist
❖
TOSHIBA Button Support
❖
TOSHIBA Accessibility
❖
Trusted Platform Module (TPM)
❖
Fingerprint Authentication Utility
❖
TOSHIBA eco Utility™
❖
TOSHIBA wireless LAN indicator
❖
TOSHIBA Service Station
❖
TOSHIBA PC Health Monitor
127
TOSHIBA Assist
The TOSHIBA Assist provides quick access to computer functions
and allows you to customize a range of computer settings.
To access TOSHIBA Assist, click Start, All Programs,
TOSHIBA, Support & Recovery, and then TOSHIBA Assist.
The TOSHIBA Assist window appears.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Assist window
The TOSHIBA Assist offers four categories of options:
❖
Connect
❖
Secure
❖
Protect & Fix
❖
Optimize
128
Utilities
TOSHIBA Assist
Connect
The features available in this category are:
❖
Bluetooth® Settings
❖
Bluetooth® Local COM Settings
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Assist window – Connect tab
Utilities
TOSHIBA Assist
Secure
The features available in this category are:
❖
Supervisor password
❖
User password
❖
TOSHIBA Security Assist
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Assist window – Secure tab
129
130
Utilities
TOSHIBA Assist
Protect & Fix
The feature available in this category is:
❖
TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool Utility
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Assist window – Protect & Fix tab
Utilities
TOSHIBA Assist
Optimize
The features available in this category are:
❖
Mouse Utility
❖
TOSHIBA Hardware Setup (Hardware Settings)
❖
TOSHIBA Button Support
❖
TOSHIBA Accessibility
❖
TOSHIBA Face Recognition Utility
❖
TOSHIBA Sleep Utility
❖
TOSHIBA eco Utility™
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Assist window – Optimize tab
131
132
Utilities
TOSHIBA Recovery Media Creator
TOSHIBA Recovery Media Creator
The TOSHIBA Recovery Media Creator utility enables you to
create recovery media that can be used to return your system to its
out-of-box state, if necessary. For detailed information on using the
utility to create recovery media, see “Creating recovery media” on
page 62.
TOSHIBA Application Installer
The TOSHIBA Application Installer allows you to reinstall the
drivers and applications that were originally bundled with your
computer.
To reinstall drivers and applications:
1
Click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Support & Recovery,
and then TOSHIBA Application Installer.
2
Click Next.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Application Installer screen
3
Click the item you want to install.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Application Installer selection screen
Utilities
Setting passwords
4
133
Click Install, then follow the on-screen prompts to complete
the installation process.
Setting passwords
Setting a password lets you walk away from your computer while
providing additional protection for your files. When you set a
password, you must enter the password before you can work on
your computer again.
TOSHIBA supports several types of passwords on your computer:
❖
NOTE
An instant password—Secures your open programs and files
when leaving the computer temporarily.
You need to have created a password for your Windows® account to
use an instant password.
❖
A power-on password—Prevents unauthorized users from
starting the computer.
❖
A supervisor password—Prohibits unauthorized users from
accessing certain functions such as TOSHIBA Hardware
Setup. This is useful if more than one person uses the
computer.
A single user password supports the instant and power-on password
functions.
When setting up passwords, keep the following in mind:
❖
The user password can be set up under the supervisor
password.
❖
The supervisor password must be set before the user password,
or the user password must be deleted and then re-entered after
the supervisor password is set.
Using an instant password
An instant password secures your system with a single keystroke.
Use this feature when you leave your desk for a few minutes and do
not want to turn off the computer.
To use an instant password, press Fn + F1.
To unlock your system, press any key or touch the pointing device
and the Windows® Logon screen will appear. Select your user name
and enter your password, if any.
134
Utilities
Setting passwords
Using a supervisor password
A supervisor password prevents other users from changing
hardware configuration options.
Setting a supervisor password
If you choose to set a supervisor or user password, TOSHIBA
strongly recommends that you save your password in a location
where you can later access it should you not remember it.
TOSHIBA is not responsible for any losses that may occur to you, your
organization or others as a result of the inability to access the computer.
To set a supervisor password:
1
Click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Tools & Utilities,
Password Utility, and then TOSHIBA Assist.
The TOSHIBA Assist window appears.
2
On the left side, click the Secure tab.
3
Click the Supervisor Password icon.
The Supervisor Password tab of the TOSHIBA Password
Utility window appears.
(Sample Image) Supervisor Password Utility window
4
Click Set.
A pop-up screen appears asking for a password.
5
Enter your password, and then enter it again to verify.
Utilities
Setting passwords
135
6
Click Set.
7
Click OK if you want to save the password to a text file or
external media of your choice, or click Cancel to continue
without saving the password to a text file.
8
Shut down the system to complete the process.
Deleting a supervisor password
To delete a supervisor password:
1
Click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Tools & Utilities,
Password Utility, and then TOSHIBA Assist.
The TOSHIBA Assist window appears.
2
On the left side, click the Secure tab.
3
Click the Supervisor Password icon.
The Supervisor Password tab of the TOSHIBA Password
Utility window appears.
4
Click Delete.
A pop-up screen appears asking for a password.
5
Enter the password, then click OK.
A message displays confirming that the password has been
deleted.
6
Click OK to exit.
Using a user password
A user password provides instant password and power-on password
protection.
Setting a user password
If you choose to set a supervisor or user password, TOSHIBA
strongly recommends that you save your password in a location
where you can later access it should you not remember it.
TOSHIBA is not responsible for any losses that may occur to you, your
organization or others as a result of the inability to access the computer.
To register a password for the power-on password functions:
1
Click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Support & Recovery,
and then TOSHIBA Assist.
The TOSHIBA Assist window appears.
136
Utilities
Setting passwords
2
On the left side, click the Secure tab.
3
Click the User Password icon.
The TOSHIBA Password Utility window appears.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Password Utility window
4
Click Set.
5
Enter your password, and then enter it again to verify.
6
Click Set.
7
Click OK if you want to save the password to a text file or
external media of your choice, or click Cancel to continue
without saving the password to a text file.
8
Click OK to exit.
Deleting a user password
To cancel the power-on password function:
1
Click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Support & Recovery,
and then TOSHIBA Assist.
The TOSHIBA Assist window appears.
2
On the left side, click the Secure tab.
3
Click the User Password icon.
4
Click Delete.
5
Follow the on-screen instructions to remove the user password.
Utilities
TOSHIBA Face Recognition Utility
NOTE
137
This will remove the user password only.
TOSHIBA Face Recognition Utility
Your computer may come with the TOSHIBA Face Recognition
utility. This utility provides another way to log on to your computer.
NOTE
For high security purposes, TOSHIBA Face Recognition is not a
suitable substitute for Windows® passwords. To ensure the security
of your system use your established Windows® passwords to log on.
Please refer to the online help file to learn more about this utility
and what it offers. To locate the help file, go to: Start, All
Programs, TOSHIBA, Tools & Utilities, Face Recognition. The
help file covers the following topics:
❖ Setting up a Face Recognition account
❖
Registering a user image
❖
Updating a user image
❖
Changing a user image
❖
Deleting a user image
❖
Configuring Settings
❖
Authentication Functions
Please note that some changes to the likeness of a registrant, such as
hair style changes or wearing a cap or glasses, may affect the
recognition rates when such changes occur after the registrant’s
image has been registered.
TOSHIBA Face Recognition does not guarantee the correct
identification of a user and may incorrectly recognize faces that are
similar to the registrant’s. In addition, bright background light and
or shadows may prevent a registrant from being recognized
correctly. If recognition fails, log on to your computer using your
Windows® password.
TOSHIBA does not guarantee that the face recognition utility
technology will be completely secure or error-free. TOSHIBA does
not guarantee that the face recognition utility will accurately screen
out unauthorized users at all times. TOSHIBA is not liable for any
failure or damage that might arise out of the use of the face
recognition software or utility.
138
Utilities
TOSHIBA Security Assist
TOSHIBA Security Assist
The TOSHIBA Security Assist Utility acts as a “command center”
where you can set up various passwords or other security features,
and see how these features can be used with each other to increase
security even further, or to simplify the ways that you protect your
system.
To open TOSHIBA Security Assist:
❖
Click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Tools & Utilities, and
then Security Assist, or click the Security Assist icon in the
Secure tab of TOSHIBA Assist.
The TOSHIBA Security Assist main window appears.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Security Assist window
From the main window, you can select a category that shows the type
of passwords or other security features that can be used in that scenario.
The available categories are:
❖
Boot Setting—Select this category to set up security features
that will prevent an unauthorized user from even starting up
your machine.
❖
BIOS User Password: Set up a power-on password in the
system BIOS.
❖
HDD User Password: Set up a BIOS password and use
the same password for a hard disk password.
❖
Fingerprint Authentication: Register your fingerprints,
to be used in place of a BIOS and/or HDD password, when
requested.
Utilities
TOSHIBA Security Assist
❖
❖
❖
❖
Log on Settings—Select this category to set up security
options that protect individual user accounts.
❖
Password of current user: Check the status of the
Windows® password for the account to which you are
currently logged on.
❖
Password of all users: Check the status of the Windows®
password for any additional Windows® accounts on this
computer.
❖
Fingerprint Authentication: Register your fingerprints,
to be used in place of your Windows® account password,
to log onto your personal account.
Resume Setting—Select this category to configure which
security options you want to use when your system resumes
from Sleep or Hibernation.
❖
Screen Saver: Set up what you want your system to do
when it comes back from the Windows® screen saver.
❖
Setting for resuming from sleep or hibernation: Set up
what you want your system to do when it resumes from
Sleep or Hibernation
❖
Setting for closing the lid: Set up what you want
your system to do when the display panel is closed or
re-opened.
TPM Settings—Select this category to set up the Trusted
Platform Module (available on certain models).
❖
TPM State: Verify whether the TPM is enabled or disabled.
❖
EFS Setting: Verify the Encrypted File System settings.
❖
PSD Setting: Configure or check a “Personal Secure Drive”.
❖
BitLocker State: Verify whether Windows® BitLocker
drive encryption is enabled or disabled
Others—Select this category to check the status of other
security features.
❖
❖
139
Windows Security Center: Check the status of
Windows® Security Center options
Advanced—Select this category to check advanced security
options (available on certain models).
❖
Wireless Key Logon: Configure your computer to allow a
Bluetooth®-compatible cell phone to send an unlock code.
140
Utilities
TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool Utility
TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool Utility
This utility can help diagnose problems with devices in your
computer. Refer to the online Help documentation within the
application for additional help.
NOTE
The TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool utility may show tests for features
you do not have. This is normal and does not indicate a problem.
To use the TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool utility:
1
Click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Support & Recovery,
and then PC Diagnostic Tool, or click the PC Diagnostic Tool
icon in the Protect & Fix tab of TOSHIBA Assist.
The TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool window appears.
2
Click the Diagnostic Tool tab.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool window
3
NOTE
4
Select the devices that you would like to test by clicking the
check box that appears to the left of the device.
Click the + (plus) and - (minus) symbols to expand and collapse the
categories.
Click Start Diagnostics when you are ready to begin the tests.
Utilities
Mouse Utility
141
Mouse Utility
The Mouse utility allows you to change your pointing device or
mouse settings.
To access the Mouse utility:
1
Click Start, Control Panel, Hardware and Sound, and then
under Devices and Printers, click Mouse, or click the Mouse
icon in the Optimize tab of TOSHIBA Assist.
The Mouse Properties screen appears.
The settings you can change are divided into these categories:
❖
Buttons
❖
Pointers
❖
Pointer Options
❖
Wheel
❖
Hardware
❖
Device Settings
You may see additional categories depending on your
particular pointing device.
2
Adjust the settings as desired, then click OK.
142
Utilities
TOSHIBA Hardware Setup
TOSHIBA Hardware Setup
TOSHIBA Hardware Setup is the TOSHIBA configuration
management tool available through the Windows® operating
system. To access it:
❖
Click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Tools & Utilities, and
then HWSetup, or click the TOSHIBA Hardware Settings
icon in the Optimize tab of TOSHIBA Assist.
The TOSHIBA HWSetup screen appears.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA HWSetup screen – General tab options
The TOSHIBA HWSetup screen may have the following tabs:
❖
Advanced—Allows you to enable/disable the ports and
features on your computer
❖
Boot Setting—Allows you to change the sequence in which
your computer searches the drives for the operating system
You can also manually choose the Boot Setting by pressing the
power button to power on the computer, then quickly pressing
the F12 key.
Select the boot device by pressing the arrow keys, then
pressing the Enter key.
NOTE
Since the system is a quick-booting system, you must press the keys
immediately after pressing the power button.
❖
Panel open/Power on—Allows you to turn on the
computer when opening the display panel while the
computer is turned off.
Utilities
TOSHIBA Hardware Setup
❖
143
CPU—Allows you to enable or disable CPU frequency
switching modes
Dynamically Switchable—This mode is the default setting for
your computer, and automatically changes the processing
frequency and decreases voltage depending on the power
source:
❖
AC Power—If your computer is connected to the AC
adaptor, the CPU frequency mode is set to high for faster
processing
❖
Battery Power—If your computer is running on battery
power, the CPU frequency mode is set to low for slower
processing. Switching the CPU to low allows you to
conserve power and extend the operating time of your
battery
Always High—Sets the CPU speed to high when using either
the battery or the AC adaptor
Always Low—Sets the CPU speed to low when using either
the battery or the AC adaptor
❖
Display—Allows you to change various default settings for the
built-in display
NOTE
When the computer restarts, it remembers the last configuration. If
data does not appear on the display you are using after starting in
Sleep mode, press Fn + F5. For more information, see “Directing the
display output when you turn on the computer” on page 75.
❖
General—Allows you to view the current BIOS version or
change certain settings back to their default values
❖
Keyboard—Allows you to access the wake-on keyboard
function
❖
LAN—Allows you to set networking functions
❖
SATA—Allows you to set conditions for SATA
❖
USB—Allows you to enable or disable USB Legacy Emulation
❖
USB Memory Bios Support Type—Interprets the way the
system sees the USB flash drive.
❖
HDD—Hard Disk Drive
❖
FDD—Floppy Disk Drive
144
Utilities
TOSHIBA Sleep Utility
TOSHIBA Sleep Utility
This utility displays whether the “USB Sleep and Charge function”
is enabled or disabled and shows the position of the USB port that
supports the “USB Sleep and Charge function.” It also displays the
remaining battery capacity.
Starting the TOSHIBA Sleep Utility
To start this utility, click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Tools &
Utilities, and then Sleep Utility.
USB Sleep and Charge
Your computer can supply USB bus power (DC 5V) to the USB
port even when the computer is in Sleep mode, Hibernation mode
or shutdown state (powered off).
This function can only be used for the port that supports the USB
Sleep and Charge function (hereinafter called “compatible port”).
Compatible ports are USB ports that have the ( ) symbol icon.
You can use the "USB Sleep and Charge function" to charge certain
USB compatible external devices such as mobile phones or portable
digital music players. However, the "USB Sleep and Charge
function" may not work with certain external devices even if they
are compliant with the USB specification. In those cases, power on
the computer to charge the device.
Utilities
TOSHIBA Sleep Utility
NOTE
145
❖ When “USB Sleep and Charge function” is set to Enabled, USB
bus power (DC 5V) will be supplied to the compatible port even
when the power of the computer is turned OFF.
USB bus power (DC 5V) is similarly supplied to the external
devices which are connected to the compatible ports. However,
some external devices cannot be charged solely by supplying
USB bus power (DC 5V).
As for the specifications of the external devices, please contact
the device manufacturer or check the specifications of the
external devices thoroughly before use.
❖ If USB Sleep and Charge is enabled, the computer’s battery will
discharge during hibernation or when the computer is turned off.
It is recommended that you connect the AC adaptor to the
computer when enabling the USB Sleep and Charge function.
❖ Using the “USB Sleep and Charge function” to charge external
devices will take longer than charging the devices with their own
chargers.
❖ If an external device is connected to the compatible port when
the AC adaptor is not connected to the computer, the battery of
the computer will be depleted even when the power of the
computer is turned OFF. As such, we recommend that you
connect the AC adaptor to the computer when using the “USB
Sleep and Charge function.”
❖ External devices connected to the USB bus power (DC 5V)
function that interfaces with the power ON/OFF of the computer
may always be in an operational state.
❖ When there is a current overflow of the external device connected
to the compatible port, USB bus power (DC 5V) supply may be
stopped for safety reasons.
❖ When "USB Sleep and Charge function" is set to Enabled, the
"USB Wakeup function" does not work for compatible port.
In that case, if there is a USB port that does not have the USB
Sleep and Charge function-compatible icon ( ), attach the
mouse or keyboard to it.
The "USB Wakeup function" will now work, but the "USB Sleep
and Charge function" will be disabled.
Metal paper clips or hair pins/clips will generate heat if they come
into contact with USB ports. Do not allow USB ports to come into
contact with metal products, for example when carrying the computer
in your bag.
146
Utilities
TOSHIBA Sleep Utility
Enabling/Disabling USB Sleep and Charge
This utility can be used to enable or disable the USB Sleep and
Charge function. To enable this function, select the Enable USB
Sleep and Charge check box in the utility. To disable this function,
de-select the check box.
You can also control whether charging takes place when the
computer is running on battery power. To do so, select or de-select
the Enable under Battery Mode check box in the utility.
If you enable charging when the computer is running on battery
power, you can specify that charging stops when battery power
drops below a certain level. Use the slider at the bottom of the
utility window (beneath the “Lower limit of remaining battery life”
heading) to specify when charging should stop. For example, if you
set the slider to 10%, charging will stop when 10% or less of the
battery power remains.
Power supply mode settings
Your computer may provide two different charging modes, to
support various types of USB devices. If your computer provides
more than one charging mode, the charging mode you should select
depends on the USB device you want to charge. For example, Auto
Mode, which is the default mode, will charge a wide variety of
digital audio players. If your device does not charge in Auto Mode,
try using Alternate Mode. To select a different charging mode, use
the Power supply mode drop-down list in the utility.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Sleep Utility screen
Utilities
TOSHIBA Button Support
NOTE
147
With certain external devices, the USB Sleep and Charge function
may not work no matter which charging mode you select. In those
cases, disable USB Sleep and Charge in the utility and turn the
computer on to charge the device, or use a different charging device.
TOSHIBA Button Support
TOSHIBA Button Support allows you to customize the eco button.
This button is located on the system control panel directly above the
keyboard.
To access TOSHIBA Button Support:
1
Click the TOSHIBA Button Support icon in the Optimize
tab of TOSHIBA Assist.
The TOSHIBA Button Support window appears.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Button Support screen
2
Under Button Name, select the button whose function is to be
customized.
3
Make the desired selections.
4
Click Close.
148
Utilities
TOSHIBA Accessibility
TOSHIBA Accessibility
The TOSHIBA Accessibility utility allows you to use the Fn key to
create a hot key combination with one of the function keys without
pressing the two keys simultaneously as is usually required. Using
Accessibility lets you make the Fn key a sticky key, meaning you can
press it once, release it, and then press a function key to activate the
hot key function.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Accessibility window
To use TOSHIBA Accessibility:
1
Click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Tools & Utilities, and
then Accessibility, or click the Accessibility icon in the
Optimize tab of TOSHIBA Assist.
The TOSHIBA Accessibility window appears.
2
Check the Use Fn-StickyKey box.
3
Put a check mark next to the desired option.
4
Click OK.
Utilities
Trusted Platform Module (TPM)
149
Trusted Platform Module (TPM)
NOTE
This section only applies to systems with TPM.
Your TOSHIBA computer includes the TPM (Trusted Platform
Module), which is a security encryption device for your system’s
internal storage drive. TPM is already included on your system, but
needs to be installed and enabled using the following procedures.
To install TPM:
1
2
Launch the TOSHIBA Application Installer from the desktop
and install the following packages:
❖
Infineon Trusted Platform Module Utility
❖
Infineon TPM (Trusted Platform Module) Installation
Guide
Follow the directions on your screen.
Once the TPM files have been installed, you will need to enable the
TPM feature through your system’s BIOS.
To enable TPM:
1
Power on your system while holding down the Esc key.
2
Press F1 when directed.
3
Press the PgDn key.
4
Press the down arrow key until TPM is highlighted, then press
the space bar to change the TPM status to Enabled.
5
Press Y to save the changes.
6
Press End and then press Y to accept the changes.
Your system will restart.
For further information on how to set up and use this utility, refer to
the Infineon TPM (Trusted Platform Module) Installation Guide.
150
Utilities
Fingerprint Authentication Utility
Fingerprint Authentication Utility
(Available on certain models.)
The fingerprint authentication utility can be used to replace the
keyboard-based user password authentication system when booting
up.
The fingerprint authentication utility can also be used for user
logon. The user’s fingerprint is read; if the system recognizes the
fingerprint, the user is automatically logged on.
Fingerprint utility limitations
TOSHIBA does not guarantee that the fingerprint utility technology
will be completely secure or error-free. TOSHIBA does not
guarantee that the fingerprint utility will accurately screen out
unauthorized users at all times. TOSHIBA is not liable for any
failure or damage that might arise out of the use of the fingerprint
software or utility.
Using the Fingerprint Authentication Utility
To access the Fingerprint Authentication Utility, click Start, All
Programs, TOSHIBA, Tools & Utilities, and then select the
Fingerprint Utility. For information on enrolling fingerprints and
using the utility please refer to your online help file.
NOTE
It is recommended that you complete the Fingerprint practice tutorial
before starting fingerprint enrollment. The Fingerprint practice
tutorial shows how to achieve the highest quality fingerprint
samples.
If you choose to use this utility it is strongly recommended that you
delete your fingerprint template data before transferring ownership or
disposing of your computer. Otherwise, personal information and/or
proprietary information on the internal storage drive may be viewed
by a third party. For details on how to delete the fingerprint data, see
your Online help file.
Utilities
Fingerprint Authentication Utility
151
Fingerprint Logon
The fingerprint utility enables logon to your computer using
fingerprints. During user enrollment, fingerprint samples are saved
and associated with the user’s Windows® user account. When the
user attempts to log on again, the user’s fingerprint is read and
compared with the user’s enrolled fingerprints; if the fingerprint is
recognized, user logon is completed.
The Fast User Switching feature of the Windows® operating system
is also supported. If user A is logged on and the fingerprint utility
verifies the fingerprint of user B (who is already enrolled), the
utility recognizes the fingerprint and switches the users.
If your system supports power-on security, existing fingerprint
samples can be used also for power-on authentication.
Care and maintenance of your fingerprint reader
Failure to follow these guidelines and/or procedures might result in
damage to the reader or cause reader failure, finger recognition
problems, or lower finger recognition success rate.
❖
Do not scratch or poke the reader with your nails or any hard or
sharp objects.
❖
Do not press the reader with too much pressure.
❖
Do not touch the reader with a wet finger or any wet objects.
Keep reader surface dry and free of water vapor.
❖
Do not touch the reader with a soiled finger. Minute foreign
particles on a soiled or dirty finger may scratch the reader.
❖
Do not paste stickers or write on the reader.
❖
Do not touch the reader with a finger or any object with
built-up static electricity.
Observe the following before you swipe your finger on the reader,
whether for fingerprint enrollment/registration or recognition.
❖
Wash and dry your hands thoroughly.
❖
Remove static electricity from your fingers by touching any
metal surface. Static electricity is a common cause of reader
failures, especially during dry seasons such as winter.
❖
Clean the reader with a lint-free cloth. Do not use detergent to
clean the reader.
152
Utilities
Fingerprint Authentication Utility
❖
Avoid the following finger conditions for enrollment or
recognition as they may result in fingerprint enrollment errors
or a drop in the fingerprint recognition success rate.
❖
Soaked or swollen finger (e.g., after taking bath)
❖
Injured finger
❖
Wet finger
❖
Soiled or oily finger
❖
Extremely dry skin condition on finger
Observe the following to improve the fingerprint recognition
success rate.
❖
Enroll two or more fingers.
❖
Enroll additional fingers if recognition failure occurs often
using enrolled fingers.
❖
Check your finger condition. Changed conditions, such as
injured, rough, extremely dry, wet, soiled, dirty, oily, soaked or
swollen fingers, may lower the recognition success rate. Also if
the fingerprint is worn down or the finger becomes thinner or
fatter, the recognition success rate may be lowered.
❖
The fingerprint for each finger is different and unique. Please
ensure that only the registered or enrolled fingerprint or
fingerprints are used for identification.
❖
Check sliding position (see illustration below).
(Sample Illustration) Aligning the finger on the reader
Utilities
Fingerprint Authentication Utility
153
Fingerprint reader limitations
❖
The fingerprint reader compares and analyzes the unique
characteristics in a fingerprint. However, there may be
instances where certain users are unable to register their
fingerprints due to insufficient unique characteristics in their
fingerprints.
❖
A warning message will be displayed when recognition is
abnormal or recognition is not successful within a fixed
duration.
❖
The recognition success rate may differ from user to user.
❖
TOSHIBA does not guarantee that this fingerprint recognition
technology will be error-free.
TOSHIBA does not guarantee that the fingerprint reader will
recognize the enrolled user or accurately screen out unauthorized
users at all times. TOSHIBA is not liable for any failure or damage
that might arise out of the use of this fingerprint recognition
software or utility.
154
Utilities
TOSHIBA eco Utility™
TOSHIBA eco Utility™
The TOSHIBA eco Utility™ monitors your power savings from
using the eco power plan by tracking real-time power consumption
and accumulated savings over time.
To access the TOSHIBA eco Utility™, do one of the following:
❖
Click Start, All Programs, TOSHIBA, Tools & Utilities, and
then TOSHIBA eco Utility.
❖
Double-click the TOSHIBA eco Utility icon in the notification
area.
❖
Right-click the TOSHIBA eco Utility icon in the notification
area and select Launch TOSHIBA eco Utility.
The TOSHIBA eco Utility™ window appears.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA eco Utility™ window
To activate the TOSHIBA eco power plan, select ON in the
upper-left section of the screen.
For more information on the TOSHIBA eco power plan and utility,
click the Help button at the bottom of the window.
Utilities
TOSHIBA wireless LAN indicator
155
TOSHIBA wireless LAN indicator
(Available on certain models.)
The TOSHIBA wireless LAN indicator allows you to view the
networks you are currently connected to.
To access the list of connected networks, before logging in, click on
the TOSHIBA wireless LAN indicator icon located on the upper
right side of the logon screen. A screen with the list of connected
networks appears.
(Sample Image) TOSHIBA Accessibility window
156
Utilities
TOSHIBA Service Station
TOSHIBA Service Station
The TOSHIBA Service Station helps you keep your new computer
running at its best by notifying you when updated software,
firmware, documentation or other information is available for your
computer. The TOSHIBA Service Station will alert you when
updates are available, and you can then choose to install the updates
if you wish.
TOSHIBA PC Health Monitor
The TOSHIBA PC Health Monitor software program monitors
computer system functions such as power consumption, the cooling
system and the 3D Accelerometer (available on certain models). It
alerts users to specific system conditions via pop-up messages. It
also tracks the usage of the computer and related devices and logs
service-relevant information on the computer's internal storage
drive.
The collected information includes device operation time and
number of actuations or status changes (e.g.: number of power
button and Fn key combination uses, and AC adaptor, battery, LCD,
fan, HDD, sound volume, wireless communication switch, docking
and USB information), date of initial system use, and also computer
and device usage (e.g.: power settings, battery temperature and
recharging, CPU, memory, backlight illumination time, and
temperatures for various devices). The collected information is not
limited to the examples specified here. The stored data uses a very
small portion of the total hard disk capacity (approximately 3 MB
or less per year).
This information is used to identify and provide a notification of
system conditions that may affect the performance of your
TOSHIBA computer. It may also be used to help diagnose problems
should the computer require service by TOSHIBA or TOSHIBA's
authorized service providers. Additionally, TOSHIBA may use this
information for quality assurance analysis.
Subject to the use restrictions above, the data logged on the internal
storage drive may be transferred to entities located outside of your
country or region of residence (e.g., European Union). Those
countries may or may not have the same data protection laws or
data protection levels as required by your home country or region.
Utilities
TOSHIBA PC Health Monitor
157
You may disable the TOSHIBA PC Health Monitor at any time by
uninstalling the software via the Windows® Control Panel. Doing so
will automatically delete all collected information from the internal
storage drive.
The TOSHIBA PC Health Monitor software does not extend or
modify TOSHIBA's obligations under its standard limited warranty
in any way. TOSHIBA's standard limited warranty terms and
limitations apply.
Chapter 6
If Something Goes Wrong
Some problems you may encounter when using your computer are
relatively easy to identify and solve. Others may require help from
your network administrator or the manufacturer of the software
program.
This chapter aims to help you solve many problems by yourself. It
covers the problems you are most likely to encounter.
If all else fails, contact Toshiba. You will find information on
Toshiba’s support services at the end of this chapter.
Problems that are easy to fix
Your program stops responding.
If you are working with a program that suddenly freezes all
operations, chances are the program has stopped responding. You
can exit the failed program without shutting down the operating
system or closing other programs.
To close a program that has stopped responding:
1
Press Ctrl, Alt, and Del simultaneously (once), then click Start
Task Manager.
The Windows® Task Manager window appears.
158
If Something Goes Wrong
Problems when you turn on the computer
2
159
Click the Applications tab.
If a program has stopped responding, the words “not
responding” appear beside its name in the list.
3
Select the program you want to close, then click End Task.
Closing the failed program should allow you to continue
working. If it does not, continue with the next step.
4
Close the remaining programs one by one by selecting the
program name, then End Task.
Closing all programs should allow you to continue working. If
it does not, power off your computer and then restart it.
Problems when you turn on the computer
These problems may occur when you turn on the power.
The computer will not start.
Make sure you attached the AC adaptor and power cord/cable
properly.
Press and hold the power button for at least 10 seconds.
If you are using the AC adaptor, check that the wall outlet is
working by plugging in another device, such as a lamp.
Verify that the computer is on by looking at the ON/OFF indicator.
If the indicator is glowing, the computer is on. Also, try turning the
computer off and then on.
If you are using an AC adaptor, verify that the computer is receiving
power from the external power source by looking at the AC power
light. If the indicator is glowing, the computer is connected to a live
external power source.
The computer starts but when you press a key nothing
happens.
Verify that the active program accepts text input. Try clicking your
mouse on an area where you can type text and try typing again.
Your computer may be in Sleep mode and have a software or
resource conflict. When this happens turning the power on returns
you to the problem instead of restarting the system. To clear the
condition, press Ctrl, Alt, and Del simultaneously. Then shut down the
computer via software, or follow the steps if your program stops
responding (see “Problems that are easy to fix” on page 158).
160
If Something Goes Wrong
Problems when you turn on the computer
The computer displays the WARNING RESUME FAILURE/Windows Error
Recovery – Windows did not shut down successfully message.
To continue, select Start Windows normally. This can happen if
the computer was put into Sleep mode and the battery has
discharged. If you performed a shutdown before this message was
displayed, a program or driver may have prevented Windows® from
shutting down.
Data stored in the computer’s memory has been lost. Data stored in
the computer’s internal storage drive may not be affected.
Always save your data even when you are using Sleep mode. If
your battery fully discharges, information that has not been saved
will be lost. Your computer can be configured to warn you when the
battery is running low see “What to do when the main battery runs
low” on page 109.
If you are running on battery power, it is recommended that you do
not leave the computer in Sleep mode for long periods of time.
To charge the battery, leave the computer plugged into a live wall
outlet for several hours. For more information see “Charging
batteries” on page 105.
The AC power light is blinking.
If the AC power light is blinking, try the following steps:
1
Connect the AC adaptor to a different power outlet, preferably
in a different room. If the computer starts normally, there may
be a problem with the AC outlet itself, or the voltage level
available from it.
2
Verify that the AC adaptor is the correct unit for your computer
model. The computer may not be able to start from an AC
adaptor that is rated for less current (amperage) than the
computer requires, even if the rated voltage is correct, and the
plug fits correctly in the DC-IN socket. The labels on the
bottom of the computer and the AC adaptor show the
specifications for voltage ("V") and current ("A") for each
device. The voltage level must match exactly. The amperage
rating of the AC adaptor must be equal to or greater than that
required by the computer.
The battery light is blinking when the computer is on.
If the battery light is blinking when the computer is on, this
indicates a power mismatch. Do the following:
1
Check the OUTPUT specifications on the AC adaptor
(for example, DC 19V – 3.95A)
If Something Goes Wrong
®
The Windows operating system is not working
2
161
Check the INPUT specifications on the bottom of the
computer.
The output specifications of the AC adaptor must match the
input specifications of the computer.
3
If the specifications do not match, locate and use the AC
adaptor that shipped with your computer. If the specifications
do match, contact Toshiba. See “Contacting Toshiba” on
page 178.
The Windows® operating system is not working
Once you are familiar with the desktop and used to the way the
operating system responds to your work routine, you can easily
detect if the operating system is not working correctly. For
example:
❖
The operating system fails to start after the initial startup
appears.
❖
The operating system takes a long time to start.
❖
The operating system responds differently from the normal
routine.
❖
The screen does not look right.
Unless a hardware device has failed, problems usually occur when
you change the system in some way such as installing a new
program or adding a device.
If you experience any of these problems, use the options in the
Startup menu to fix the problem.
Using Startup options to fix problems
If the operating system fails to start properly, you may have to
change your system’s configuration or verify the startup procedure
to fix the problem. To do this, use the options in the Startup menu.
To open the Startup menu:
1
Restart your computer.
2
Press F8 when your computer starts and before Windows® starts
loading.
The Windows® Advanced Boot Options menu displays these
options:
❖
Repair Your Computer
❖
Safe Mode
162
If Something Goes Wrong
The Windows® operating system is not working
❖
Safe Mode with Networking
❖
Safe Mode with Command Prompt
❖
Enable Boot Logging
❖
Enable low-resolution video (640 x 480)
❖
Last Known Good Configuration (advanced)
❖
Directory Services Restore Mode
❖
Debugging Mode
❖
Disable automatic restart on system failure
❖
Disable Driver Signature Enforcement
❖
Start Windows® Normally
When you highlight each option using the arrow keys, Windows®
displays information about each option at the bottom after
Description.
See your Windows® documentation for further explanation.
NOTE
If your computer is connected to a network, the Startup menu may
display different versions of Safe mode.
Internet problems
My Internet connection is very slow.
Many factors contribute to the speed with which you can surf the
Internet. They include: network speed, network conditions, time of
day (when everyone else is surfing, your access can be slow) and
popularity of the sites you are trying to access. If accessing a
particular site is very slow, try later.
My browser cannot find the URL address I typed in.
Make sure you separated the domain names of the address with the
forward slash (/). Check the spelling of each name and the syntax of
the address carefully. A single incorrect letter or missed character
will make it impossible for your browser to locate the site.
My browser cannot find a site I bookmarked.
The World Wide Web is constantly changing. A site you
bookmarked yesterday may not be available today or its server may
be down for temporary repair. Try again later.
If Something Goes Wrong
Fixing a problem with Device Manager
163
The Windows® operating system can help you
If the operating system has started properly but you still have a
problem using your computer, the online Help can assist you in
troubleshooting the problem.
To access the Windows® operating system Help and Support:
1
Click Start, then click Help and Support, or press F1.
The Help and Support window appears.
2
Then do one or both of the following:
❖
In the Search programs and files field, type in the topic for
which you need help and follow the on-screen instructions.
❖
Click one of the options listed in the window and then
follow the on-screen instructions.
You can connect to Support Online by clicking the Ask button and
then clicking Microsoft Customer Support or by going to Toshiba
support at support.toshiba.com.
Fixing a problem with Device Manager
Device Manager provides a way to check and change the
configuration of a device.
Changing the default settings using Device Manager can cause other
conflicts that make one or more devices unusable. Device Manager
is a configuration tool for advanced users who understand
configuration parameters and the ramifications of changing them.
Checking device properties
Device Manager provides a way to view the properties of a device.
Properties include the name of the manufacturer, the type of device,
the drivers installed, and the system resources assigned to the
device.
To check a device’s properties:
1
Click Start, Control Panel, System and Security, and then
under System, click Device Manager.
2
To view the device(s) installed, double-click the device type.
164
If Something Goes Wrong
Memory problems
3
To view the properties, double-click the device.
The operating system displays the device Properties dialog
box, which provides an array of tabs. They may include:
❖
The General tab, which provides basic information about
the device.
❖
The Resources tab, which lists resources assigned to the
device. This tab does not appear if the device is not using
resources.
❖
The Driver tab, which displays the drivers being used by
the device. This tab also provides options for updating the
driver or rolling back the driver in case the new version is
causing a problem.
The tabs that appear in the dialog box vary from one device to
another.
For more information about Device Manager, refer to Windows®
online Help.
Memory problems
Incorrectly connected or faulty memory modules may cause errors that
seem to be hardware or even software related.
Your computer has two memory module slots. Both slots are located
under the keyboard and should only be accessed by a Toshiba authorized
service provider.
TECHNICAL NOTE: You must have at least one memory module
installed for the computer to work.
Power and the batteries
Your computer receives its power through the AC adaptor and
power cord/cable or from the system batteries (battery and
real-time clock (RTC) battery). Power problems are interrelated.
For example, a faulty AC adaptor or power cord/cable will neither
power the computer nor recharge the batteries.
Here are some typical problems and how to solve them:
The AC power light does not come on when you plug in the
AC adaptor and power cord/cable.
Make sure the AC adaptor and power cord/cable are firmly plugged
into both the wall outlet and the computer.
If Something Goes Wrong
Power and the batteries
165
If the AC power light still does not come on, check that the wall
outlet is working properly by plugging in a lamp or other appliance.
The AC adaptor and power cord/cable work correctly, but the
battery will not charge.
The battery does not charge while the computer is consuming full
power. Try turning off the computer.
The system may be too hot or too cold to charge properly. If you
think this is the probable cause, let the system reach room
temperature and try again.
If the battery has completely discharged, it may not begin charging
immediately. Leave the AC adaptor and power cord/cable
connected, wait 20 minutes and see if the battery is charging.
If the battery light is glowing after 20 minutes, let the computer
continue charging the battery for at least another 20 minutes before
you turn on the computer.
If the battery light does not glow after 20 minutes, the battery may
have reached the end of its useful life.
The battery appears not to power the computer for as long as
it usually does.
If you frequently repeat shallow charge and discharge, the battery
meter may become inaccurate. Let the battery discharge
completely, then try charging it again.
Check the power options via your Power Plans (see “Power Plans”
on page 111). Have you added a device, such as a memory module,
that takes its power from the battery? Is your software using the
internal storage drive more? Is the display power set to turn off
automatically? Was the battery fully charged to begin with? All
these conditions affect how long the charge lasts.
After a period of time, the battery will lose its ability to perform at
maximum capacity and will need to be replaced. This is normal for
all batteries.
For more information on maintaining battery power, see “Charging
batteries” on page 105.
166
If Something Goes Wrong
Keyboard problems
Keyboard problems
If, while typing, strange things happen or nothing happens, the
problem may be related to the keyboard itself.
The keyboard produces unexpected characters.
A keypad overlay may be on. If the numlock light or cursor control
overlay light is on, press Fn + F10 to turn off the cursor control
overlay light, or Fn + F11 to turn off the numlock light.
If the problem occurs when both the keypad overlays are off, make
sure the software you are using is not remapping the keyboard.
Refer to the software documentation and check that the program
does not assign different meanings to any of the keys.
You have connected an external keyboard and the operating
system displays one or more keyboard error messages.
You may need to update your keyboard driver. Refer to the
documentation that came with the keyboard or to the keyboard
manufacturer's Web site.
The keyboard you connected may be defective or incompatible with
the computer. Try using a different make of keyboard.
Display problems
Here are some typical display problems and their solutions:
The screen is blank.
Display Auto Off may have gone into effect. Press any key to
activate the screen.
You may have activated the instant password feature by pressing
Fn and F1 simultaneously. If you have registered a password, press
any key, type the password and press Enter. If no password is
registered, press any key. The screen reactivates and allows you to
continue working.
If you are using the built-in screen, make sure the display priority is
not set for an external monitor. To do this, press Fn and F5
simultaneously (once). If this does not correct the problem, press
Fn and F5 simultaneously again to return the display priority to its
previous setting.
HINT: Holding the Fn key and pressing the F5 key several times will
advance you through the display options.
If Something Goes Wrong
Display problems
167
If you are using an external monitor:
❖
Check that the monitor is turned on.
❖
Check that the monitor’s power cord/cable is firmly plugged
into a working power outlet.
❖
Check that the cable connecting the external monitor to the
computer is firmly attached.
❖
Try adjusting the contrast and brightness controls on the
external monitor.
❖
Press Fn and F5 simultaneously to make sure the display
priority is not set for the built-in screen.
The screen does not look correct.
You can change the display settings by clicking a blank area of the
desktop with the secondary control button, then clicking
Personalize. This opens the Personalization window. Choose a
theme for your desktop background, under Colors, Sounds, and
Screen Saver, or change the settings for each of these components
individually. Click Display and then Change display settings to
choose the screen resolution.
For more information, see the Windows® online Help.
A message displays saying that there is a problem with your
display settings and that the adapter type is incorrect or the
current settings do not work with your hardware.
Reduce the size of the color palette to one that is supported by the
computer’s internal display.
To change the display properties:
1
Right-click in a blank area of the Windows® desktop.
2
Click Personalize, and then Display.
3
Adjust the screen resolution and/or color quality.
4
Click OK.
The display mode is set to Simultaneous and the external
display device does not work.
Make sure the external monitor is capable of displaying at
resolutions of 800 x 600 or higher. Devices that do not support this
resolution will only work in Internal/External mode, and not
simultaneous mode.
168
If Something Goes Wrong
Disk or storage drive problems
Small bright dots appear on your TFT display when you turn
on your computer.
Small bright dots may appear on your screen display when you
turn on your computer. Your display contains an extremely large
number of thin-film transistors (TFT) and is manufactured using
high-precision technology. Any small bright dots that may appear
on your display are an intrinsic characteristic of the TFT
manufacturing technology. Over a period of time, and depending on
the usage of the computer, the brightness of the screen will
deteriorate. This is also an intrinsic characteristic of the screen
technology. When the computer is operated on battery power, the
screen will dim and you may not be able to increase the brightness
of the screen while on battery power.
Disk or storage drive problems
Problems with the storage drive or with external media usually
show up as an inability to access the drive or as sector errors.
Sometimes a drive problem may cause one or more files to appear
to have garbage in them. Typical problems are:
You are having trouble accessing a drive, or one or more files
appear to be missing.
Make sure you are identifying the drive by its correct name
(A: or C:).
Error-checking
Run Error-checking, which analyzes the directories and files on the
storage drive and repairs any damage it finds.
To run Error-checking:
1 Click Start, and then Computer.
2 Right-click the drive you want to check.
3 On the pop-up menu, click Properties.
The drive’s Properties box appears.
4 Click the Tools tab.
5 Click the Check now... button.
The Check Disk box appears.
6 You can choose one or both options:
❖ Automatically fix file system errors
❖ Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors
7 Click Start.
Error-checking tests and repairs the storage drive.
If Something Goes Wrong
Sound system problems
169
Your hard disk seems very slow.
If you have been using your computer for a long time, your files
may have become fragmented. Run Disk Defragmenter.
To do this, click Start, All Programs, Accessories, System Tools,
and then Disk Defragmenter. After it opens, click Defragment
disk.
Your data files are damaged or corrupted.
Refer to your software documentation for file recovery procedures.
Many software packages automatically create backup files.
You may also be able to recover lost data using utility software.
Consult your network administrator.
Some programs run correctly but others do not.
This is probably a configuration problem. If a program does not run
properly, refer to its documentation and check that the hardware
configuration meets its needs.
Sound system problems
No sound is coming from the computer’s speakers.
Adjust the volume control.
Try pressing Fn + Esc to see if volume mute is disabled.
Check that the volume control on the computer is turned up.
If you are using external headphones or speakers, check that they
are securely connected to your computer.
The computer emits a loud, high-pitched noise.
This is feedback between the microphone and the speakers. It
occurs in any sound system when input from a microphone is fed to
the speakers and the speaker volume is too loud. Adjust the volume
control.
170
If Something Goes Wrong
Wireless networking problems
Wireless networking problems
NOTE
This section provides general troubleshooting tips for networking
problems, specifically wireless (Wi-Fi®) networking.
The terms and concepts used assume a basic understanding of
networks, and may be for more advanced users. If you need
assistance or if you are not familiar with the terminology, please see
Windows® Help and Support or contact your computer technician.
❖
If your computer is equipped with an internal Wi-Fi® adapter,
verify that the Wireless antenna is ON (the wireless indicator
light
will be lit).
❖
Verify that your computer can detect access points or routers. If
it can detect a Wi-Fi® access point or router then it may be a
configuration issue.
❖
Verify that signal strength is good using the utility provided
with the Wi-Fi® adapter.
❖
If another computer is on the same network, verify that it has
network access, and can connect to the Internet. If, for
example, the other computer cannot browse to a public Web
site, the ISP’s (Internet Service Provider) service may be
disrupted.
❖
Verify that the Service Set Identifier (SSID), or network
name, is correct - i.e., that it matches the SSID assigned to the
access point you are attempting to connect through. SSIDs are
case-sensitive.
❖
Check the Windows® Control Panel's Device Manager to verify
that the Wi-Fi® adapter is recognized by the Windows®
operating system, and that the driver is loaded. To access
the Device Manager, click Start, Control Panel, System
and Security, and then System. Carefully note any error
messages - these will be very helpful if you should confer with
a support technician at a later time.
NOTE
To enable or disable wireless communication, use the Hot Key
Fn + F8. For more information see “Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards” on
page 181.
If Something Goes Wrong
Wireless networking problems
❖
171
Use IPCONFIG to verify that the computer has a useful IP
address - one other than the private address of
169.254.xxx.xxx assigned by Windows®.
1
Click Start to open the Start menu.
2
Type Cmd in the Search programs and files field.
3
Enter IPCONFIG /ALL and press Enter.
The IP address for each active network adapter will be
displayed.
❖
Connect your computer directly to your router or broadband
modem, by plugging a standard CAT5 Ethernet patch cable
(sold separately) into your computer's RJ45 Ethernet port. If
your connection problem disappears, the problem lies in the
Wi-Fi® part of your network.
❖
If you have enabled any security provisions (closed system,
MAC address filtering, Wired Equivalent Privacy [WEP], etc.),
check the access point vendor's Web site for recent firmware
upgrades. Problems with WEP keys, in particular, are
frequently addressed in new firmware releases.
The Windows® operating system wireless management utility
does not work.
If you are using an external Wi-Fi® adapter (a USB adapter or other
variety), check if the adapter comes with its own management
utility. If it does, the utility may be disabling the Windows®
operating system wireless management utility, in which case you
must use the adapter's management utility. If the documentation
that accompanies the adapter does not provide enough information
to determine if this is the case, contact that vendor's support group
for further advice.
172
If Something Goes Wrong
Develop good computing habits
Develop good computing habits
Save your work frequently.
You can never predict when your computer will lock, forcing you to
close a program and lose unsaved changes. Many software
programs build in an automatic backup, but you should not rely
solely on this feature. Save your work! See “Computing tips” on
page 91 for instructions.
On a regular basis, back up the information stored on your
internal storage drive.
Use Windows® to back up files, or the entire computer, to an optical
disc, or external hard disk. Here are some ways you can do this:
❖
Use the Windows® operating system to back up files or your
entire computer to an optical disc, or external hard disk.
❖
Copy files to a rewritable external storage device.
❖
Connect your computer to the office network and copy files to
your network partition.
Some people use a combination of these methods, backing up all
files to tape weekly and copying critical files to external media on a
daily basis.
If you have installed your own programs, you should back up these
programs as well as your data files. If something goes wrong that
requires you to reformat your internal storage drive and start again,
reloading all your programs and data files from a backup source
will save time.
Read the user’s guides.
It is very difficult to provide a fail-safe set of steps you can follow
every time you experience a problem with the computer. Your
ability to solve problems will improve as you learn about how the
computer and its software work together.
Get familiar with all the user’s guides provided with your computer,
as well as the manuals that come with the programs and devices you
purchase.
Your local computer store or book store sells a variety of self-help
books you can use to supplement the information in the manuals.
If Something Goes Wrong
Develop good computing habits
173
Data and system configuration backup in the Windows® operating
system
The Windows® operating system offers some easy-to-use features
for backing up your Windows® settings and your data - documents
and other important files. Take advantage of these features to
protect yourself from much more difficult and time-consuming
restoration procedures, and to safeguard your valuable data from
loss.
Saving system configuration with restore points
The System Restore feature of the Windows® operating system
quickly creates restore points - ‘snapshots’ of your Windows®
operating system configuration - and saves them for later recall. If
you experience problems after installing some new hardware or
software, you can easily select a previously established Control
Point to ‘turn back the clock,’ restoring the Windows® operating
system to the state it was in just prior to the installation. This is
much easier and more effective than uninstalling the hardware or
software, which often leaves behind unwanted files and settings. It
is also easy to undo a restore point selection, if you change your
mind.
Follow these steps to create a restore point using the System
Restore utility:
1
Click Start, Control Panel, System and Security, and then
System.
2
In the left pane, click System protection.
The System Protection tab of the System Properties window
appears.
3
Click Create...
4
In the input field, enter a name that is descriptive enough to be
easily understood in the future, such as “Before installing
Brand X Accounting app.” Then click Create.
The Windows® operating system creates the restore point,
automatically stamps it with the current date and time, and
displays a message that the restore point was successfully
created.
5
Click Close.
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If Something Goes Wrong
Develop good computing habits
Then, at a later time, you can re-establish your Windows®
configuration using the saved restore point. To do this:
1
Click Start, All Programs, Accessories, System Tools, and
then System Restore.
2
Select Recommended restore or Choose a different restore
point, and then click Next.
The timestamp and description of each restore point is
displayed.
NOTE
This list may contain restore points that you did not create. Restore
points labeled System Checkpoint were automatically created by the
Windows® operating system. Other restore points may have been
created automatically by applications when they were installed.
3
If you selected Choose a different restore point in step 2,
select the restore point you want to use, and then click Next.
4
Verify that the restore point you selected is the correct one. If it
is not, click Back to return to the previous step.
5
Close all programs and save all open files.
6
Click Finish, and then Yes to begin the system restore.
Your Windows® operating system configuration will now be
restored to the state it was in when the chosen restore point was
created, and then the computer will be automatically restarted.
Backing up your data or your entire computer with the
Windows® operating system
The most valuable component of your computer system is the data
you create and store on its internal storage drive. Since problems
with either hardware or software can make the data inaccessible or
even destroy it, the next most valuable component of your computer
system may be a recent backup of your data.
Fortunately, the Windows® operating system offers a convenient
way to back up your computer or just your important files to optical
disc drives, or hard drives. An external hard drive is recommended
in case the internal storage drive fails. No additional software is
required.
If Something Goes Wrong
Develop good computing habits
175
Follow these steps to back up your computer or files to optical
discs, or a storage drive:
NOTE
You cannot back up the computer while running on battery power.
Connect the AC adaptor before continuing.
1
Prepare your backup target by connecting it and/or inserting a
blank optical disc in the drive.
2
Click Start.
3
Click Control Panel.
4
Click Back up your computer under the System and
Security heading. Follow the on-screen instructions to back up
your files.
For more help, click Start, Help and Support, and search for
“back up files.”
General tips for installing hardware and software
Here are a few tips to help ensure safe and easy installation of new
hardware (printers, pointing devices, external hard drives, optical
disc drive writers, scanners, etc.) and software (applications like
Microsoft® Office and Adobe® Photoshop®, or utility software such
as special toolbars for your web browser).
❖
Create a restore point (refer to “Saving system configuration
with restore points” on page 173). Before installing anything,
use the System Restore utility to set a restore point (see the
section titled restore points). If anything goes wrong, you will
then be able to easily restore the Windows® operating system to
the state it was in prior to the installation, undoing any changes
that the installation process introduced.
❖
Back up your critical data (see “Backing up your data or your
entire computer with the Windows® operating system” on
page 174).
❖
Have your back up media on hand in case you need any files
from them.
❖
Do not guess - follow directions carefully! It is often necessary
to run an installation utility first - before connecting a new
hardware item to the computer. If the device is connected first,
it may be very difficult to complete the installation
successfully. Always carefully follow the installation
instructions that accompany the hardware or software.
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If Something Goes Wrong
Develop good computing habits
❖
Restart the Windows® operating system. Always restart the
Windows® operating system after each installation, even if the
installation utility does not prompt you to do so. This will
ensure that the installation is completed, and will clean up
anything that the installation utility left behind.
❖
Do one installation at a time. If you have several new items to
add to your computer system, install just one at a time, creating
restore points immediately before each successive installation.
This will make it much easier to determine the origin of any
new problems. For best results, follow this sequence:
1
Back up critical data.
2
Create a restore point.
3
Install one item of hardware or software.
4
Restart the Windows® operating system.
5
Use the new hardware or software for a while, noting any
new problems. Make sure that your critical applications
(email, business applications, etc.) are working correctly,
and verify that important devices are still functioning.
6
For each additional hardware or software item, repeat
these steps, starting at step 1 if any of your critical data has
changed, or starting at step 2 if no critical data has
changed.
USB Sleep and Charge is not working.
❖
Make sure that the device you want to charge is connected to a
port that supports the USB Sleep and Charge function. Ports
that support this feature are identified with the ( ) icon.
❖
USB Sleep and Charge may be disabled. Open the TOSHIBA
Sleep and Charge Utility to check if the feature is disabled and
to enable it if necessary. For more information, see
“Enabling/Disabling USB Sleep and Charge” on page 146.
❖
Try selecting a different charging mode in the TOSHIBA Sleep
and Charge Utility, if your computer provides more than one
charging mode. For more information, see “Power supply
mode settings” on page 146.
❖
If you are attempting to charge a device without an AC adaptor
connected to the computer, the computer's battery power may
be below the limit specified in the TOSHIBA Sleep Utility or
the battery may be depleted. Lower the limit in the TOSHIBA
Sleep Utility to enable charging at the current battery power
level, or, if battery power is running low or is depleted, connect
the AC adaptor to your computer.
If Something Goes Wrong
If you need further assistance
❖
177
The USB Sleep and Charge function may not work with certain
external devices even if they are compliant with the USB
specification. In those cases, power on the computer to charge
the device or use a different charging device.
The “USB Wakeup function” does not work.
❖
When the “USB Sleep and Charge function” is set to Enabled
the “USB Wakeup function” does not work for ports that
support the “USB Sleep and Charge function.” In that case, use
a USB port that does not have the “USB Sleep and Charge
function”-compatible icon ( ), if you have a non-Sleep and
Charge USB port available or disable the “USB Sleep and
Charge function.” For more information, see “TOSHIBA Sleep
Utility” on page 144.
If you need further assistance
If you have followed the recommendations in this chapter and are
still having problems, you may need additional technical assistance.
This section contains the steps to take to ask for help.
Before you contact Toshiba
Since some problems may be related to the operating system or the
program you are using, it is important to investigate other sources
of assistance first.
Try the following before you contact Toshiba:
❖
Review the troubleshooting information in your operating
system documentation.
❖
If the problem occurs while you are running a program, consult
the program’s documentation for troubleshooting suggestions.
Contact the software company’s technical support group for
their assistance.
❖
Consult the dealer from whom you purchased your computer
and/or program. Your dealer is your best source for current
information.
For the detailed specifications for your computer, visit
support.toshiba.com. Click Product Support, search for your
model, and then click Detailed Specs.
178
If Something Goes Wrong
Other Toshiba Internet Web sites
Contacting Toshiba
If you still need help and suspect that the problem is
hardware-related, Toshiba offers a variety of resources to help
you.
Toshiba’s Technical Support Web site
For technical support, or to stay current on the most recent software
and hardware options for your computer, and for other product
information, be sure to regularly check the Toshiba Web site at
support.toshiba.com.
Toshiba voice contact
Before calling Toshiba, make sure you have:
❖
Your computer’s serial number
❖
The computer and any optional devices related to the problem
❖
Backup copies of your Windows® operating system and all
other preloaded software on your choice of media
❖
Name and version of the program involved in the problem
along with its installation media
❖
Information about what you were doing when the problem
occurred
❖
Exact error messages and when they occurred
For technical support, call the Toshiba Customer Support Center:
Within the United States at (800) 457-7777
Outside the United States at (949) 859-4273
Other Toshiba Internet Web sites
toshiba.com
us.toshiba.com
accessories.toshiba.com
www.toshiba.ca
www.toshiba-Europe.com
www.toshiba.co.jp/index.htm
support.toshiba.com
acclaim.toshiba.com
Worldwide Toshiba corporate site
Marketing and product information in
the USA
Accessories information in the USA
Canada
Europe
Japan
Mexico and all of Latin America
Toshiba USA Self-Service support web
site
If Something Goes Wrong
Toshiba’s worldwide offices
179
Toshiba’s worldwide offices
Australia
Toshiba (Australia) Pty. Limited
84-92 Talavera Road
North Ryde NSW 2113
Sydney
Australia
Canada
Toshiba Canada Ltd.
191 McNabb Street
Markham, Ontario
L3R - 8H2
Canada
France
Toshiba Systèmes (France) S.A.
7, Rue Ampère; B. P. 131
92800 Puteaux Cédex
France
Germany
Toshiba Europe GmbH
Leibnizstraße 2
D-93055 Regensburg
Germany
Italy
Centro Direzionale Colleoni
Palazzo Perseo
Via Paracelso 10
20041, Agrate Brianza
Milano, Italy
Japan
Toshiba Corporation, PCO-IO
1-1, Shibaura 1-Chome
Minato-Ku, Tokyo, 105-8001
Japan
Latin America and Caribbean
Toshiba America Information
Systems
9740 Irvine Blvd.
Irvine, California 92618
USA
Mexico
Toshiba de México S.A. de C.V.
Sierra Candela No.111, 6to. Piso
Col. Lomas de Chapultepec.
CP 11000 Mexico, DF.
(800) 457-7777 (within the US)
949-859-4273 (outside of the US this call may incur long-distance
charges)
Spain
Toshiba Information Systems
(España) S.A.
Parque Empresarial San Fernando
Edificio Europa, 1a Planta
Escalera A
28831 (Madrid) San Fernando de
Henares
Spain
United Kingdom
Toshiba Information Systems
(U.K) Ltd.
Toshiba Court
Weybridge Business Park
Addlestone Road
Weybridge, Surrey KT15 2UL
United Kingdom
180
If Something Goes Wrong
Toshiba’s worldwide offices
United States
Toshiba America Information
Systems, Inc.
9740 Irvine Boulevard
Irvine, California 92618
United States
The Rest of Europe
Toshiba Europe (I.E.) GmbH
Hammfelddamm 8
D-4-1460 Neuss
Germany
For more information on additional Toshiba worldwide locations,
please visit: www.toshiba.co.jp/index.htm.
Appendix A
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot keys and TOSHIBA Cards provide a quick way to modify
selected system functions and to launch applications.
There are two types of TOSHIBA Cards: Hot Key Cards and
Application Cards.
Hot Key Cards
The Hot Key Cards are used to set or modify the following system
functions:
❖
Mute
❖
Lock (Instant security)
❖
Power Plan
❖
Sleep
❖
Hibernation
❖
Output (Display switch)
❖
Brightness control
❖
Wireless
❖
Touch pad
❖
Cursor overlay
❖
Numeric overlay
❖
Zoom (Display resolution)
181
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
182
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot Key Cards
Using the Hot Key Cards
The Hot Key Cards are normally hidden from view. The Cards
appear when you press the Fn key.
NOTE
Hot keys are keys that, when pressed in combination with the Fn key,
turn system functions on and off. Hot keys have a legend on the key
indicating the option or feature the key controls.
To use the Hot Key Cards:
1
Press and hold the Fn key.
The TOSHIBA Cards appear along the top of the screen.
(Sample Image) Hot Key Card display
2
Select the desired option.
The selected Card is displayed full-size with its available
options below it. All other Cards are again hidden from view.
To use a Hot Key Card using a hot key:
1
Press and hold the Fn key.
2
Press the hot key associated with the desired function.
The associated hot key Card appears at the top of the screen
with its available options below it.
3
To cycle through the displayed options, hold down Fn and press
the hot key repeatedly. Release the Fn key when the desired
option is selected.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot key functions
183
Hot key functions
Hot key functions are performed using either the Hot Key Cards or
by pressing the associated hot key. This section lists the available
hot key functions.
NOTE
Hot keys are keys that, when pressed in combination with the Fn key,
turn system functions on and off. Hot keys have a legend on the key
indicating the option or feature the key controls.
Volume Mute
or
This TOSHIBA Card or hot key enables/disables volume
mute on your computer.
When volume mute is enabled, no sound will come from
the speakers or headphones.
Selecting this Card or pressing the hot key displays the
following options:
Fn +
(Sample Image) Volume Mute options
❖
To enable mute, select
.
❖
To disable mute, select
.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
184
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot key functions
Lock (Instant security)
This TOSHIBA Card or hot key blanks the display.
Selecting this Card or pressing the hot key displays the
following options:
or
Fn +
(Sample Image) Security options
❖
To enable lock, select
❖
To cancel, select
.
.
The Fn + F1 hot key function activates instant security. The user
logon screen will appear and a user with a valid account will need
to log back on to gain access to the computer.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot key functions
185
Power plan
This TOSHIBA Card or hot key displays the power plans
and cycles through the power plans.
or
Fn +
The properties of each power plan, and the power plans that
are displayed by this function, are set in the Power Options
window.
Selecting this Card or pressing the hot key displays the
currently selectable power plans:
(Sample Image) Power Plan options
Cycle through the power plans, then select the desired
power plan.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
186
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot key functions
Sleep mode
This TOSHIBA Card or hot key places the computer into
Sleep mode.
For more information about Sleep mode, please see “Using
and configuring Sleep mode” on page 86.
or
Fn +
Selecting this Card or pressing the hot key displays the
following options:
(Sample Image) Sleep options
❖
To enable Sleep mode, select
❖
To cancel, select
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
.
.
187
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot key functions
Hibernation mode
This TOSHIBA Card or hot key places the computer into
Hibernation mode.
or
Fn +
If Hibernation mode is disabled, this hot key will not
respond. For more information on Hibernation mode, see
“Using and configuring Hibernation mode” on page 83.
Selecting this Card or pressing the hot key displays the
following options:
(Sample Image) Hibernation options
❖
To enable Hibernation mode, select
❖
To cancel, select
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
.
.
188
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot key functions
Output (Display switch)
This TOSHIBA Card or hot key cycles through the
power-on display options (only the first option is
available when you do not have an external monitor
attached) (the last option is available only if you are in
Extended Display Mode).
or
NOTE
Fn +
Some modes are only available with the
appropriate device attached and turned on.
❖
Built-in display only
❖
Built-in display and external monitor
simultaneously
❖
External monitor only
❖
Built-in display and external monitor (extended
desktop)
❖
Swap-Switch primary display between internal
display and external monitor when using extended
desktop
To use a simultaneous mode, you must set the resolution of
the internal display panel to match the resolution of the
external display device.
Selecting this Card or pressing the hot key displays the
following options:
(Sample Image) Display mode options window
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot key functions
189
Cycle through the display modes, then select the desired
mode.
Not all functions are supported on all models.
NOTE
Some systems also support an additional Swap Image Display
mode. This mode is available only if the current setting is an
extended desktop mode (Built-in Display and External Monitor, or
Built-in Display and TV). In extended desktop mode, the image is
split into two sides, one side per display device. To swap sides,
select Swap Image Display.
Display brightness
This TOSHIBA Card decreases or increases the screen
brightness.
Fn +
This hot key decreases the screen brightness.
Fn +
This hot key increases the screen brightness.
Selecting this Card or pressing either hot key displays the
following options:
(Sample Image) Display brightness
Move the slider or press the appropriate hot key repeatedly
to decrease or increase the display brightness.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
190
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot key functions
Disabling or enabling wireless devices
This TOSHIBA Card or hot key enables/disables the
optional wireless devices installed in your computer.
The wireless modes are:
or
❖
Wi-Fi® enabled—Enables just the Wi-Fi® module.
❖
Bluetooth®* enabled—Enables just the
Bluetooth®* module.
❖
Wireless WAN/3G enabled—Enables just the Wireless
WAN/3G* module.
❖
All disabled—Disables the Bluetooth®*, Wi-Fi®, and
Wireless WAN/3G* modules.
❖
All enabled—Enables the Bluetooth®*, Wi-Fi®, and
Wireless WAN/3G* modules.
Fn +
Selecting this Card or pressing the hot key displays the
following options:
(Sample Image) Wireless communication options
❖
To enable Wi-Fi®, select
.
❖
To enable Bluetooth , select
❖
To enable Wireless WAN/3G*, select
❖
To enable all, select
.
❖
To disable all, select
.
❖
To cancel, select
®
.
*Available on certain models.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
.
.
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot key functions
191
Disabling or enabling the touch pad
This TOSHIBA Card or hot key enables/disables the touch
pad.
For more information on using the touch pad, see “Using
the touch pad” on page 69.
or
Fn +
Selecting this Card or pressing the hot key displays the
following options:
(Sample Image) Disable or Enable touch pad options
❖
To enable the touch pad, select
.
❖
To disable the touch pad, select
.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
192
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot key functions
Zoom (Display resolution)
This TOSHIBA Card or hot key switches screen resolution.
Selecting this Card or pressing the hot key displays the
following options:
or
Fn +
[Space bar]
(Sample Image) Screen resolution options
Cycle through the screen resolutions, then select the desired
resolution.
Cursor control overlay
This TOSHIBA Card or hot key turns the cursor control
overlay on and off.
Selecting this Card or pressing the hot key displays the
following options:
or
Fn +
(Sample Image) Cursor control overlay
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot key functions
193
Numeric overlay
This TOSHIBA Card or hot key turns the numeric overlay
on and off.
Selecting this Card or pressing the hot key displays the
following options:
or
Fn +
(Sample Image) Numeric overlay
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
194
Hot Keys/TOSHIBA Cards
Hot key functions
Keyboard hot key functions
Fn +
This hot key turns the scroll lock feature on and off.
Fn +
This hot key allows you to zoom out.
Fn +
This hot key allows you to zoom in.
Fn +
This hot key decreases the speaker volume.
Fn +
This hot key increases the speaker volume.
Fn +
This hot key turns the backlit keyboard off and on.
(Available on certain models)
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Appendix B
Power Cord/Cable
Connectors
Your computer ships with the correct power supply for the country
of purchase. This appendix shows the shapes of the typical AC
power cord/cable connectors for various parts of the world.
USA
Canada
UL approved
CSA approved
United Kingdom
Europe
VDA approved
NEMKO approved
BS approved
Australia
AS approved
195
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.3
Glossary
TECHNICAL NOTE: Some features defined in this glossary may not
be available on your computer.
Acronyms
The following acronyms may appear in this User’s Guide.
196
AC
Alternating Current
BIOS
Basic Input/Output System
BD-ROM
Blu-ray Disc Read-Only Memory
bps
bits per second
CD
Compact Disc
CD-ROM
Compact Disc Read-Only Memory
CD-RW
Compact Disc Rewrite Memory
CMOS
Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor
COM1
communications port 1 (serial port)
COM2
communications port 2 (serial port)
CPU
Central Processing Unit
DC
Direct Current
DMA
Direct Memory Access
Glossary
DIMM
Dual Inline Memory Module
DOS
Disk Operating System
DPI
Dots Per Inch
DVD
Digital Versatile (or Video) Disc
197
DVD-ROM Digital Versatile (or Video) Disc Read-Only Memory
EPROM
Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory
eSATA
external Serial Advanced Technology Attachment
FAT
File Allocation Table
FCC
Federal Communications Commission
GB
gigabyte
HDD
Hard Disk Drive
HDMI
High-Definition Multimedia Interface
HDMI-CEC High-Definition Multimedia Interface Consumer
Electronics Control
HTML
Hypertext Markup Language
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
I/O
Input/Output
IRQ
interrupt request
ISP
Internet Service Provider
KB
kilobyte
LAN
Local Area Network
LCD
Liquid Crystal Display
LED
Light Emitting Diode
MB
megabyte
MIDI
Musical Instrument Digital Interface
PC
Personal Computer
PCI
Peripheral Component Interconnect
PCMCIA
Personal Computer Memory Card International
Association
RAM
Random Access Memory
RGB
Red, Green Blue light (monitor)
RFI
Radio Frequency Interference
198
Glossary
ROM
Read-Only Memory
RTC
Real-Time Clock
SD
Secure Digital
SDRAM
Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory
SSD
Solid State Drive
TFT
Thin Film Transistor
USB
Universal Serial Bus
URL
Uniform Resource Locator
WAN
Wide Area Network
www
World Wide Web
Terms
The following terms may appear in this User’s Guide.
A
active-matrix display—A liquid crystal display (LCD) made from an
array of liquid crystal cells using active-matrix technology. Also
known as a “TFT display,” in its simplest form there is one thin film
transistor (TFT) for each cell. This type of display works well with
computers because of its shallow depth and high-quality color.
Active-matrix displays are viewable from wider angles than most
passive-matrix displays.
adapter—A device that provides a compatible connection between two
units. For example, the computer’s internal display adapter receives
information from the software and translates it into images on the
screen. An adapter can take a number of forms, from a
microprocessor to a simple connector. An intelligent adapter (one
that is capable of doing some processing) may also be called a
controller.
Alternating Current (AC)—The type of power usually supplied to
residential and commercial wall outlets. AC reverses its direction at
regular intervals. Compare Direct Current (DC).
application—A computer program that you use to perform tasks of a
specific type. Applications include word processors, spreadsheets,
and database management systems. See also program.
Glossary
B
199
backup—A copy of a file, usually on a removable disk, kept in case the
original file is lost or damaged.
Basic Input/Output System (BIOS)—See BIOS.
baud rate—The speed at which a communication device, such as a
printer or modem, transmits information. Baud rate is the number of
signal changes per second (not necessarily the same as bits per
second). See also bits per second.
Blu-ray Disc (BD)—Offering more storage capacity than DVDs, the
format was developed to allow for more data storage and to enable
recording and playback of high-definition video (HD).
BIOS (Basic Input/Output System)—Basic instructions, stored in
read-only memory (ROM), containing the information the computer
needs to check hardware and load the operating system when you
start up the computer.
bits per second (bps)—A way of measuring the speed at which
information is passed between two devices. This is the basic unit of
measure used in modem communications, and is similar, but not
identical, to the baud rate. See also baud rate.
boot—To start the computer. The term “boot” originates from bootstrap
program (as in “pulling itself up by its bootstraps”), a program that
loads and initializes the operating system. See also reboot.
boot disk—See system disk.
boot priority (startup sequence)—The order in which the computer
accesses its internal storage drives to locate the startup files. Under
the default startup sequence, the computer looks for the startup files
in the external media before checking the internal storage drive.
bus—An electrical circuit that connects the central processing unit
(CPU) with other parts of the computer, such as the video adapter,
disk drives, and ports. It is the pathway through which data flows
from one device to another. See also bus speed, frontside bus.
bus speed—The speed at which the central processing unit (CPU)
communicates with the other parts of the computer.
200
C
Glossary
cache—A section of very fast memory in which frequently used
information is duplicated for quick access. Accessing data from
cache is faster than accessing it from the computer’s main memory.
See also CPU cache, L1 cache, L2 cache.
CD—An individual compact disc. See also CD-ROM.
CD-ROM (Compact Disc Read-Only Memory)—A form of highcapacity storage that uses laser optics instead of magnetic means for
reading data. See also CD. Compare DVD-ROM.
Central Processing Unit (CPU)—The chip that functions as the “brain”
of the computer. It takes information from outside sources, such as
memory or keyboard input, processes the information, and sends the
results to another device that uses the information.
character—Any letter, number, or symbol you can use on the computer.
Some characters are non-printing characters, such as a paragraph
break in a word-processing program. A character occupies one byte
of computer storage.
chip—A small piece of silicon containing computer logic and circuits for
processing, memory, input/output, and/or control functions. Chips
are mounted on printed circuit boards.
click—To press and release the pointing device’s primary button without
moving the pointing device. In the Windows® operating system, this
refers to the pointing device’s left button, unless otherwise stated.
See also double-click.
color palette—A set of specified colors that establishes the colors that
can be displayed on the screen at a particular time.
compatibility—The extent to which computers, programs, or devices
can work together harmoniously, using the same commands,
formats, or language as another.
configuration—(1) The collection of components that make up a single
computer system. (2) How parts of the system are set up (that is,
configured).
controller—A device that controls the transfer of data from a computer
to a peripheral device and vice versa. For example, disk drives,
monitors, keyboards, and printers all require controllers.
CPU—See Central Processing Unit (CPU).
Glossary
201
CPU cache—A section of very fast memory residing between the CPU
and the computer’s main memory that temporarily stores data and
instructions the CPU will need to execute commands and programs.
See also cache, L1 cache, L2 cache.
cursor—An on-screen symbol (usually a flashing vertical line) that
indicates the position where characters will appear when you enter
data.
D
default—The setting selected by a program when the user does not
specify an alternative setting.
device—A component attached to the computer. Devices may be
external (outside the computer’s case) or internal (inside the
computer’s case). Printers, disk drives, and modems are examples of
devices.
device driver—A program (called a “driver”) that permits a computer to
communicate with a device.
dialog box—An on-screen window displayed by the operating system or
a program giving a direction or requesting input from the user.
Direct Current (DC)—The type of power usually supplied by batteries.
DC flows in one direction. Compare Alternating Current (AC).
Direct Memory Access (DMA)—A dedicated channel, bypassing the
CPU, that enables direct data transfer between memory and a
device.
directory—See folder.
disable—To turn a computer option off. See also enable.
disc—A round, flat piece of material, designed to be read from and
written to by optical (laser) technology, and used in the production
of optical discs, such as CDs and DVDs. Compare disk.
disk—A round, flat piece of material that can be magnetically influenced
to hold information in digital form, and used in the production of
magnetic disks, such as hard disks. Compare disc. See also hard
disk.
disk drive—The device that reads and writes information and programs
on external media or hard disk. It rotates the disk at high speed past
one or more read/write heads.
202
Glossary
document—Any file created with an application and, if saved to disk,
given a name by which it can be retrieved. See also file.
double-click—To press and release the pointing device’s primary button
rapidly twice without moving the pointing device. In the Windows®
operating system, this refers to the pointing device’s left button,
unless otherwise stated.
download—(1) In communications, to receive a file from another
computer through a modem or network. (2) To send font data from
the computer to a printer. See also upload.
drag—To hold down the mouse button while moving the pointer to drag
a selected object. In the Windows® operating system, this refers to
the left mouse button, unless otherwise stated.
driver—See device driver.
DVD—An individual digital versatile (or video) disc. See also
DVD-ROM.
DVD-ROM (Digital Versatile [or Video] Disc Read-Only
Memory)—A very high-capacity storage medium that uses laser
optics for reading data. Each DVD-ROM can hold as much data as
several CD-ROMs. Compare CD-ROM.
E
emulation—A technique in which a device or program imitates another
device or program.
enable—To turn on a computer option. See also disable.
eSATA—An external device that supports hot swapping and fast data
transfer. Very useful in storing and transferring large files.
executable file—A computer program that is ready to run. Application
programs and batch files are examples of executable files. Names of
executable files usually end with a .bat or .exe extension.
expansion device—A device that connects to a computer to expand its
capabilities. Other names for an expansion device are port expander,
port replicator, docking station, or network adapter.
extension—See file extension.
external device—See device.
Glossary
F
203
file—A collection of related information, saved on disk with a unique
name. A file may be a program, information used by a program, or a
document. See also document.
File Allocation Table (FAT)—The section of a storage drive that keeps
track of the location of stored files.
file name—A set of characters that uniquely identifies a file within a
particular folder. It consists of two parts: the actual name and the file
name extension. See also file extension.
file extension—The three characters following the period (pronounced
“dot”) at the end of a file name. The extension indicates the type of
file. Examples are .exe for program files and .hlp for help files. See
also file name.
folder—Also called directory. A container for organizing files saved to a
disk. A folder is symbolized on screen by a graphical image (icon)
of a file folder. A folder can contain files and other folders.
format—(verb) To prepare a blank disk for use with the computer’s
operating system. Formatting creates a structure on the disk so the
operating system can write information to the disk or read
information from it.
frontside bus—The primary pathway (bus) between the CPU and the
computer’s main memory. Also called “system bus.” See also bus.
function keys—The keys labeled F1 through F12, typically located on
the keyboard. Their function is determined by the operating system
and/or individual programs.
G
ground—A conductor to which all components of an electric circuit are
connected. It has a potential of zero (0) volts, is connected to the
earth, and is the point of reference for voltages in the circuit.
H
hard disk—A storage device composed of a rigid platter or platters that
can be magnetically coded with data. Hard disks hold much more
information than some external media and are used for long-term
storage of programs and data. The primary (or only) hard disk in a
computer is usually fixed, but some computers have secondary hard
disks that are removable.
hardware—The physical components of a computer system. Compare
software.
204
Glossary
HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface)—An interface
used to transmit high quality audio and video signal via a single
cable in digital format, providing better picture quality than analog
signal.
HDMI-CEC (HDMI Consumer Electronics Control)—One A/V
component can control another while using this function, if
connected with HDMI cables. See also HDMI.
Hibernation—A feature of many Toshiba computers that saves to the
internal storage drive the current state of your work, including all
open files and programs, when you turn the computer off. When
you turn on the computer again, your work is returned to the same
state it was when the computer was turned off. See also Sleep,
Suspend.
hot key—(1) A feature in which certain keys in combination with the Fn
key can set system options or control system parameters, such as the
battery save mode. (2) A key or combination of keys that activates a
memory resident program.
hot swapping—The ability to add or remove devices from a computer
while the computer is running and have the operating system
automatically recognize the change.
I
icon—A small image displayed on the screen that represents a function,
file, or program.
interlaced—A method of refreshing a computer screen, in which only
every other line of pixels is refreshed. Interlaced monitors take two
passes to create a complete screen image. Compare non-interlaced.
internal device—See device.
Internet—The decentralized, world-wide network of computers that
provides electronic mail, the World Wide Web, and other services.
See also World Wide Web.
K
keyboard shortcut—A key or combination of keys that you use to
perform a task instead of using a pointing device such as a mouse.
L
L1 (level one) cache—Memory cache built into the processor to help
improve processing speed. See also cache, CPU cache, L2 cache.
L2 (level two) cache—Memory cache installed on the motherboard to
help improve processing speed. It is slower than L1 cache and faster
than main memory. See also cache, CPU cache, L1 cache.
Glossary
205
LAN (Local Area Network)—A group of computers or other devices
dispersed over a relatively limited area and connected by a
communications link that enables any device to interact with any
other on the network.
LED (Light Emitting Diode)—A solid state lamp (SSL) that uses
light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as the source of light, which offers
long life and high efficiency output. Multiple diodes are used
together, since the light created by individual light-emitting diodes is
small compared to incandescent and compact fluorescent lamps.
LCD (Liquid Crystal Display)—A type of display that uses a liquid
substance between two transparent electrode panels. When an
electric current passes through the electrodes, the molecules in the
liquid form a crystalline pattern that polarizes the light passing
through it. A filter over the electrodes permits only non-polarized
light to pass to the surface of the display, creating light and dark
pixels.
load—To move information from a storage device (such as a hard disk)
into memory for processing.
local area network—See LAN.
logical drive—A section of a disk that is recognized by the operating
system as a separate disk drive. A system’s logical drives may differ
from its physical drives. For example, a single hard disk drive may
be partitioned into two or more logical drives.
M
memory—Typically refers to the computer’s main memory, where
programs are run and data is temporarily stored and processed.
Memory can be volatile and hold data temporarily, such as RAM, or
it can be nonvolatile and hold data permanently, such as ROM. A
computer’s main memory is RAM. See also RAM, ROM.
microprocessor—See Central Processing Unit (CPU).
MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface)—A standard for
connecting musical instruments, synthesizers, and computers. The
MIDI standard provides a way of translating music into a form
computers can use, and vice versa.
modem—Short for “modulator/demodulator.” A device that converts
information from digital to analog, and back to digital, enabling
information to pass back and forth between digital computers and
analog telephone lines.
206
Glossary
motherboard—The computer’s main circuit board that contains the
processor, memory, and other primary components.
MS-DOS prompt—See system prompt.
multi-function drive—A DVD drive that can read and write to CD and
DVD media.
multimedia—A combination of two or more media, such as sound,
animation, and video in a computer program or presentation.
Musical Instrument Digital Interface—See MIDI.
N
network—A collection of computers and associated devices that are
connected by communications facilities. A network allows you to
share data and peripheral devices, such as printers, with other users
and to exchange electronic mail.
non-interlaced—A method of refreshing a computer screen, in which
each pixel of every line is refreshed as the electron beam scans
across and down the screen. Compare interlaced.
non-system disk—A disk for storing programs and data that cannot be
used to start the computer. Compare system disk.
O
online—Available through the computer. Online may refer to
information being read from your own computer’s internal storage
drive, such as online documentation or online Help, or to
information coming from another company on a company network
or the Internet.
operating system—A set of programs that controls how the computer
works. Examples of operating systems are the Windows Vista®
Home Basic and Windows® 7 operating systems.
optical disc drive—A drive which reads plastic coated discs on which
information is recorded digitally, and uses a laser to read data,
music, or videos.
P
palette—See color palette.
parallel—Processes that occur simultaneously. In communications, it
means the transmission of more than one bit of information at a
time. On your computer, the parallel port provides a parallel
communications interface between the computer and an appropriate
device. Most modern printers are parallel. Compare serial.
Glossary
207
password—A unique string of characters entered by a user to verify his
or her identity to the computer or the network.
PC Card—A credit-card-sized expansion card designed to increase the
capabilities of computers. PC Cards provide functions such as
modem, fax/modem, hard disk drive, network adapter, sound card,
or SCSI adapter.
peripheral—Any device, such as a printer or joystick, that is attached to
the computer and controlled by the computer’s CPU.
pixel—Short for “picture element.” The smallest dot that can be
produced on a screen or printer.
Plug and Play—Generally, refers to the computer’s ability to
automatically configure itself to work with peripheral devices.
When capitalized, refers to a standard that, when followed by a
device manufacturer, allows a computer to configure itself
automatically to work with the device.
pointer—An icon (usually an arrow) that moves on the screen when you
slide your finger across the touch pad or move a mouse. Used to
point to and select/activate on-screen items, such as icons, menu
items, and buttons. The shape and purpose of the pointer varies
depending on the program you are using and what you are doing.
pointing device—Any device, such as the touch pad or a mouse, that
enables you to move the pointer on the screen.
port—A socket on the computer where you plug in a cable for
connection to a network or a peripheral device.
processor—See Central Processing Unit (CPU).
program—A set of instructions that can be executed by a computer. The
general classes of programs (also called software) are operating
system, application, and utility. See also operating system,
application, utility.
properties—The attributes of an object or device. For example, the
properties of a file include the file’s type, size, and creation date.
R
RAM (Random Access Memory)—Volatile memory that can be
written to as well as read. Volatile here means that information in
RAM is lost when you turn off your computer. This type of memory
is used for your computer’s main memory. See also memory.
Compare ROM.
208
Glossary
Random Access Memory—See RAM.
Read-Only Memory—See ROM.
reboot—See boot, restart.
removable disk—A disk that can be removed from a disk drive. A Flash
drive is one example of a removable disk.
resolution—A measure of the sharpness of the images that can be
produced by a printer or displayed on a screen. For a printer,
resolution is expressed in dots per inch (dpi). For a screen, it is
expressed as the number of pixels available horizontally and
vertically.
restart—Synonymous with reboot. To reset the computer by reloading
the operating system without turning the computer off. See also
boot.
RGB (Red, Green, Blue) monitor—A monitor that reproduces all
colors by mixing red, green, and blue light in various combinations.
RJ11 connector—A modular connector used on most U.S. telephone
systems and direct-connect modems. The RJ11 connector is a
6-wire connector.
RJ45 connector—An eight-wire connector used to connect a computer
to a network.
ROM (Read-Only Memory)—Non-volatile memory that can be read
but not written to. Non-volatile here means that information in ROM
remains whether or not the computer is receiving power. This type
of memory is used to store your computer’s BIOS, which is
essential instructions the computer reads when you start it up. See
also BIOS, memory. Compare RAM.
S
Secure Digital (SD)—A small, portable, non-volatile memory card used
to store and transfer data between digital products, providing
encryption capability for content security.
select—To highlight or otherwise specify text, data, or graphics with the
intent to perform some operation on it.
serial—Processes that occur one at a time. In communications, it means
the transmission of one bit at a time sequentially over a single
channel. On your computer, the serial port provides a serial interface
between the computer and an appropriate device. Compare parallel.
Glossary
209
shortcut—See keyboard shortcut.
Sleep—A feature of some Windows® operating systems that allows you
to turn off the computer without exiting your open applications and
to continue from where you left off when you turn the computer on
again.
software—See program. Compare hardware.
solid state drive —A data storage device that utilizes solid-state memory
as opposed to a hard disk (see also hard disk). Solid state drives hold
a large amount of information and are used for storage of programs
and data.
Suspend—A feature of some Windows® operating systems that allows
you to turn off the computer without exiting your open applications
and to continue from where you left off when you turn the computer
on again.
system prompt—The symbol (in the MS-DOS® operating system,
generally a drive letter followed by a “greater than” sign) indicating
where users are to enter commands.
T
U
TFT display—See active-matrix display.
Universal Serial Bus (USB)—USB is a serial bus that supports data
transfer. USB allows hot swapping of peripherals. See also bus, hot
swapping, serial.
upload—To send a file to another computer through a modem or
network. See also download.
USB—See Universal Serial Bus (USB).
USB Flash drive—A small, portable flash memory card that plugs into a
computer’s USB port and functions as a portable hard drive. They
are smaller and more durable than an external hard drive because
they do not contain any internal moving parts, but have less storage
capacity. See also Universal Serial Bus (USB).
utility—A computer program designed to perform a narrowly focused
operation or solve a specific problem. Utilities are often related to
computer system management.
210
W
Glossary
Web—See World Wide Web.
Wi-Fi®—A registered trademark term of the Wi-Fi Alliance that stands
for Wireless Fidelity, and is another term for the communication
protocol to permit an Ethernet connection using wireless
communication components.
World Wide Web (www)—The worldwide network of Web sites linked
together over the Internet. A user of the Web can jump from site to
site regardless of the location of the computer hosting the site. See
also Internet.
Index
A
AC adaptor 45
AC power 105
AC power light 45
accessing
network 121
adding
memory (optional) 50
optional external devices 50
adequate ventilation
cooling fan 44
adjusting
touch pad settings 73
audio features 121
B
backing up files 92, 100
backlit keyboard 95
battery
battery life 103
care 115
changing 114
charge indicator light 46
charge time 105
charger 105
charging 47, 105
charging the real-time clock
(RTC) 106
conserving power 110
determine remaining power 109
disposal 115
indicator light 108
low charge 109
maintaining 115
maximum capacity 103
monitoring power 46, 107
power management 105
power options 110
power plan 185
real-time clock (RTC) 104
recharge time 103
RTC memory 104
running computer on battery
power 103
setting notifications 110
taking care of 114
battery indicator light 108
BIOS Setup
see TOSHIBA Hardware Setup
211
212
Index
button
eco Utility™ 113
power 49
Shut down 81
start 119
C
caring for your computer 89
changing
battery 114
character keys 93
charging the battery 47
cleaning the computer 89
communications
set up 120
computer
caring for 89
cleaning 89
environmental precautions 41,
116
moving 89
restarting 83
running on battery power 103
setting up 44
turning off 79
turning off more quickly 81
turning off options 79
computer lock 90
computer will not start
troubleshooting 159
computing habits
troubleshooting 172
computing tips 91
configuring
Hibernation mode 83
Hibernation mode options 84
Sleep mode 86
Sleep mode options 86
connecting
AC adaptor 45
AC adaptor cord to (DC-IN) 46
computer to a network 121
HDMI™-compatible TV or
display device 74
monitor 75
power cord/cable 46
power source 46
connection
set up 121
cooling fan
adequate ventilation 44
customize
computer settings 89
D
data/entire system backup
troubleshooting 174
desktop
creating new icon 118
exploring the 117
icons 118
recycle bin 118
standard features 118
Windows® operating system 117
Device Manager
fixing a problem 163
directing
display output 75
disabling
touch pad 73, 191
display
troubleshooting 167
display devices
external 74
display output settings 75
display panel
opening 48
display, external
adjusting 76
disposal information 28
disposing of your computer 115
E
EasyGuard® 103
eco Utility™ button 113
Index
emulate a full-size keyboard 93
enabling
touch pad 73, 191
ENERGY STAR® 36
exploring
desktop 117
external devices
keyboard 76
mouse 76
external display device
HDMI™ Out port 74
RGB (monitor) port 74
external display, adjusting 76
F
file extensions
using 99
files
backing up 92, 100
file names 99
printing 99
restore 101
saving 98
using a file extension 99
fingerprint
authentication 150
Fingerprint Authentication Utility
using 150
function keys 93
H
headphones
using 122
Help and Support
troubleshooting 163
Hibernation mode 79
configuring 83
configuring options 84
hot key 187
powering down 84
Shut down 84
starting again from 86
using 83
213
hot key
backlight 194
disabling or enabling wireless
devices 190
display brightness 189
Hibernation mode 187
keyboard overlays 194
Lock (Instant security) 184
Output (Display switch) 188
power plan 185
Sleep mode 186
using to set a power plan 112
volume mute 183
Zoom (Display resolution) 192
zooming in 194
zooming out 194
Hot Key Cards 181
Hot key functions 183
I
icon
desktop 118
moving to desktop 118
recycle bin 118
safety 39
installing
memory modules 50
mouse 76
Instruction Manual for Safety and
Comfort 41
internal storage drive
recovery 51
K
keyboard
Alt keys 93
backlit 95
character keys 93
Ctrl keys 93
emulate a full-size 93
Fn key 93
function keys 93
hot keys 194
214
Index
overlay keys 94
special Windows® keys 94
standard full-size 93
troubleshooting 166
using 92
keyboard, external 76
keys
backlit 95
Ctrl Fn Alt 93
function keys 93
overlay for cursor control 95
overlay keys 94
overlay to type numeric data 95
L
LEDs
system indicator lights 108
AC adaptor light 107
AC power light 45, 46
battery light 46, 47
ON/OFF light 49, 83, 86,
88
Web Camera light 123
Licenses 28
lock
computer, using 90
M
maintaining your battery 115
memory
adding (optional) 50
Memory card reader
inserting memory media 124
removing memory media 124
using 123
microphone
using 121
monitor
connecting 75
monitor problems
troubleshooting 167
monitoring battery power 107
mouse
installing 76
mouse utility 141
moving the computer 89
N
network
accessing 121
connecting your computer 121
networking
wireless 120
notification area 120
O
ON/OFF indicator light 108
online resources
Toshiba 101
optional external devices
adding 50
other documentation 40
P
password
deleting a supervisor 135
deleting a user 136
instant password 133
instant, using 133
power-on password 133
setting a supervisor 134
setting a user 135
supervisor password 133
user password 133
passwords
setting 133
port
HDMI™ 74
RGB 74
power
connecting cable to AC adaptor
46
cord/cable 46
cord/cable connectors 195
energy-saving features 102
turning on 49
Index
power button 49
power management 105
optimum performance 105
power plans
selecting power plan options 111
using a hot key 112
power saving options 110
powering down
using Hibernate 84
using Sleep 86
precautions
safety 42
printer
connecting 77
setting up 78
USB-compatible 77
printing a file 99
problem solving
contacting Toshiba 178
Startup options 161
program, starting 95
program, starting from Start menu 96
projector
connecting 75
R
real-time clock (RTC)
battery 104
recording sounds 121
recovery
checking internal storage drive
operating status 69
creating recovery DVDs/media
62
erasing internal storage drive 67
installing drivers and applications
69
internal storage drive 51
out-of-box state 52
with user’s data 54
restoring from recovery media 65
to custom size partition 60
215
without changing drive partitions
57
recycle bin icon 118
registering computer 50
restarting
computer 83
restore points
troubleshooting 173
restoring your work 101
running computer on battery power
103
S
safety
computer 116
disposing of your computer 115
icons 39
precautions 42
saving files 98
Search programs and files field
starting a program 97
selecting
a place to work 41
power plan options 111
video cables 74
setting
low battery notifications 110
setting up
AC adaptor 45
adding memory (optional) 50
communications 120
computer 44
software
Setup Wizard 49
work environment 41
setting up a connection 121
settings
customize computer settings 89
display output 75
Shut down
button 81
command 81
216
Index
computer 81
Hibernation mode 84
Sleep mode 86
Sleep mode 80
configuring 86
configuring options 86
hot key 186
powering down 86
Shut down 86
starting again from 88
using 86
software
Setup Wizard 49
software program
starting 95
starting from Start menu 96
sounds
recording 121
speakers
using external 122
start button 119
starting a program 95
Search programs and files field 97
Windows® Explorer 96
Windows® Start menu 96
starting a program from Start 96
starting again from
Hibernation mode 86
Sleep mode 88
Startup menu
problem solving 161
supervisor password, deleting 135
supervisor password, set up 134
system indicator lights
AC power 45
LEDs 46, 47, 49, 83, 86, 88,
107, 108, 123
T
taking care of battery 114
taskbar 119
television
adjusting display 76
tips
for computing 91
Toshiba
online resources 101
registering computer
Toshiba Web site 50
worldwide offices 179
TOSHIBA Accessibility 148
TOSHIBA Application Installer 132
TOSHIBA Assist 127
Connect tab 128
Optimize tab 131
Protect & Fix tab 130
Secure tab 129
TOSHIBA Button Support 147
Toshiba EasyGuard® 103
TOSHIBA eco power plan 113
TOSHIBA eco Utility™ 154
TOSHIBA Face Recognition Utility
137
TOSHIBA Hardware Setup 142
TOSHIBA PC Diagnostic Tool Utility
140
TOSHIBA PC Health Monitor 156
TOSHIBA Recovery Media Creator
132
TOSHIBA Security Assist 138
TOSHIBA Service Station 156
TOSHIBA Sleep Utility 144
TOSHIBA wireless LAN indicator
155
touch pad
using 69
traveling tips 116
troubleshooting 166
AC power light is blinking 160
battery light is blinking 160
bookmarked site not found 162
checking device properties 163
computer will not start 159
contacting Toshiba 177
Index
corrupted/damaged data files 169
data/entire system backup 174
Device Manager 163
Disk Defragmenter 169
display error message 167
display problems
screen is blank 166
error message, warning resume
failure 160
Error-checking 168
external display problems 167
external keyboard 166
external monitor 167
good computing habits 172
hard disk drive is slow 169
Help and Support, Windows®
operating system 163
high-pitched noise 169
installing hardware/software 175
keyboard 166
keyboard will not respond 159
memory problems 164
missing files/trouble accessing a
drive 168
power and batteries 164
restore points 173
screen does not look correct/
flickers 167
slow Internet connection 162
sound system 169
trouble running programs 169
URL address not found 162
USB Sleep and Charge
cannot use 176
USB Wakeup function
does not work 177
Windows® operating system not
working 161
wireless networking 170
Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 149
turning off
computer 79
217
computer more quickly 81
options 79
turning on
power 49
U
USB Sleep and Charge
cannot use 176
USB Wakeup function
does not work 177
USB-compatible
printer 77
user password, deleting 136
user password, setting 135
using
a microphone 121
computer lock 90
Hibernation mode 83
hot key to set a power plan 112
Memory card reader 123
Shut down command 81
Sleep mode 86
TOSHIBA eco power plan 113
touch pad 69
Web Camera 123
using the keyboard 92
using the overlay for cursor control 95
Utilities 126
V
video projector
adjusting display 76
W
warranty
standard limited warranty 40
Web Camera
using 123
Web sites 178
Wi-Fi®
wireless networking 120
Windows® Explorer
starting a program from 96
218
Index
Windows® operating system
desktop 117
troubleshooting 161
Windows® Start menu
starting a program 96
wireless networking 120
troubleshooting 170
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