Apple 4400 Personal Computer User Manual

1
Connecting Monitors and Other Equipment
You can use a single monitor to switch between the PC environment and the
Mac OS environment. Or you can simultaneously display both environments
on two monitors. Any monitor you use must be connected in a specific way
for you to access your PC Compatibility Card software.
To learn how to connect your monitor or monitors, first read about using the
loopback cable on the next page. Then turn to the section on connecting a
single monitor or the section on connecting two monitors. Follow the
instructions for your model of Power Macintosh computer. If you have an
AudioVision or AppleVision monitor, turn to the section with additional
instructions for these monitors.
After you’ve connected your monitor, read the end of this chapter to find out
how to connect other equipment.
1
Using the loopback cable
Your PC Compatibility Card came with a loopback cable. It has three
connectors: middle, long, and short. No matter how you connect your
monitors, these connectors always attach to the same ports:
m The middle connector attaches to the port on your PC Compatibility Card;
this is the port that lets you see the PC environment.
m The long connector attaches to either your computer’s built-in monitor
port, or to a video card (you may leave this end disconnected if you are
using two monitors).
m The short connector attaches to your monitor cable.
This connector (“short connector”)
attaches to your monitor cable.
This connector
(“middle connector”)
attaches to the
PC Compatibility Card.
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This connector (“long connector”)
attaches to either your computer’s built-in
monitor port or video card. It is usually left
disconnected if you are using two monitors.
Connecting a single monitor
Connecting a monitor to your Power Macintosh 4400
Before you begin, make sure your computer and monitor are unplugged. Then
follow these steps using the loopback cable:
WARNING Do not plug a monitor into the joystick port (marked with the
icon ), and do not plug a joystick into a monitor port (marked with the
icon ™). Serious damage can result to your equipment.
1
Plug the middle connector on the
loopback cable into the left port
on your PC Compatibility Card. This
connector has a triple row of pins and
an Apple (K) icon on either side.
2
Plug the long connector on the loopback
cable into the built-in monitor port
(or video card if one is installed).
3
Plug the short connector on the loopback
cable into your monitor’s cable. This connector
has an Apple (K) icon on one side and
a monitor (™) icon on the other.
Connecting Monitors and Other Equipment
3
Connecting a monitor to your Power Macintosh 7300
Before you begin, make sure your computer and monitor are unplugged. Then
follow these steps using the loopback cable:
WARNING Do not plug a monitor into the joystick port (marked with the
icon ), and do not plug a joystick into a monitor port (marked with the
icon ™). Serious damage can result to your equipment.
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1
Plug the middle connector on the
loopback cable into the bottom port
on your PC Compatibility Card. This
connector has a triple row of pins and
an Apple (K) icon on either side.
2
Plug the long connector on the loopback
cable into the built-in monitor port
(or video card if one is installed).
3
Plug the short connector on the loopback
cable into your monitor’s cable. This connector
has an Apple (K) icon on one side and a
monitor (™) icon on the other.
Connecting two monitors
If you connect two monitors, you see the Mac OS environment on one and
the PC environment on the other. The monitor connected to the PC
Compatibility Card shows the PC environment. You can also switch between
Mac OS and PC environments on this monitor if you have a video card.
You can use any combination of Mac OS–compatible and PC-compatible
monitors (with the proper cable adapters, available from your monitor vendor
or Apple-authorized dealer).
Multiple-scan monitor: If you want to use a multiple-scan monitor from a
manufacturer other than Apple to display the PC environment, you also need
to use a VGA-to-Macintosh adapter (available from your computer vendor).
You connect this adapter between the monitor’s cable and the loopback cable.
WARNING Do not plug a monitor into the joystick port (marked with the
icon ), and do not plug a joystick into a monitor port (marked with the
icon ™). Serious damage can result to your equipment.
Connecting Monitors and Other Equipment
5
Connecting two monitors to your Power Macintosh 4400
Before you begin, make sure your computer and monitor are unplugged. Then
follow these steps using the loopback cable:
1
Plug the monitor you
want to use for the
Mac OS environment
into the built-in monitor
port (™) on the back
of your computer.
2
Plug the middle
connector on the
loopback cable into
the left port on the
PC Compatibility Card.
This connector has a
triple row of pins and
an Apple (K) icon on
either side.
3
Plug the short
connector on the
loopback cable into the
second monitor’s cable.
This connector has an
Apple (K) icon on one
side and a monitor (™)
icon on the other.
Mac OS
PC
Mac OS
PC
Mac OS
PC
Long connector
You can leave the long connector unplugged. Or, if you have a video card and
want one monitor to switch between the Mac OS and PC environments, you
can plug the long connector into the video card port.
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Connecting two monitors to your Power Macintosh 7300
Before you begin, make sure your computer and monitor are unplugged. Then
follow these steps using the loopback cable:
1
Plug the monitor you
want to use for the
Mac OS environment
into the built-in monitor
port (™) on the back
of your computer.
2
Plug the middle
connector on the
loopback cable into
the bottom port on the
PC Compatibility Card.
This connector has a
triple row of pins and
an Apple (K) icon on
either side.
3
Plug the short
connector on the
loopback cable into the
second monitor’s cable.
This connector has an
Apple (K) icon on one
side and a monitor (™)
icon on the other.
Mac OS
PC
Mac OS
PC
Mac OS
PC
Long connector
You can leave the long connector unplugged. Or, if you have a video card and
want one monitor to switch between the Mac OS and PC environments, you
can plug the long connector into the video card port.
Connecting Monitors and Other Equipment
7
Connecting an AudioVision monitor
To connect an AudioVision monitor to your Macintosh computer, first
connect the loopback cable to the appropriate ports on your computer as you
would with any other monitor:
m Plug the middle connector on the loopback cable into the PC Compatibility
Card port with the triple row of pins and Apple (K) icon on either side.
m Plug the long connector on the loopback cable into the computer’s built-in
monitor port or video card.
Then plug the short end of the loopback cable into the AudioVision adapter
cable. Plug the remaining cables into the corresponding ADB, sound input,
and sound output ports on the back of your computer. (For more information,
see the manual that came with your AudioVision monitor.)
Plug the ADB (V),
sound output (-), and
sound input (≈) cables
into the corresponding
ports on the back of
the computer.
Plug the short connector on
the loopback cable into the
AudioVision adapter cable.
AudioVision adapter cable
Connecting an AppleVision monitor
You connect your AppleVision monitor like any other monitor, except you
also have to connect an extra cable—the ADB cable, which is thinner than the
others. Plug this cable into the ADB port (marked with V) on the back of your
computer. (For more information, see the manual that came with your
AppleVision monitor.)
If you are using an AppleVision monitor to display the PC environment
only, you will need to adjust the video manually, by pressing the buttons on
the monitor.
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Connecting a pointing device
If you have a standard ADB (Apple Desktop Bus) one-button mouse or other
pointing device, you can simulate the behavior of a two-button PC mouse
using keys on your keyboard. For more information, see the section “Using a
Pointing Device” in Chapter 4.
You can also use an ADB multibutton mouse or other pointing device and
configure it to work as a PC mouse. To use a multibutton pointing device in
the PC environment, you need to install the appropriate software. See the
manual that came with your computer and pointing device for more
information.
You can connect a pointing device to any available ADB port (marked with V)
on your Macintosh computer.
Pointing devices designed specifically for a PC are not recommended for use
with your Macintosh computer.
Connecting a MIDI device
You can connect a MIDI (musical instrument digital interface) device to the
game controller port that comes on some models of the PC Compatibility
Card. To connect a MIDI device, you need a Sound Blaster–compatible
MIDI-to-joystick adapter (available from your computer dealer). For
instructions on connecting devices to the joystick port, see the next section,
“Connecting a PC Game Controller.”
Connecting Monitors and Other Equipment
9
Connecting a PC game controller
Your PC Compatibility Card comes with a game controller port. To connect a
PC game controller, such as a joystick, remove the plastic cover on the game
controller port. Then plug your game controller into the port.
WARNING Do not plug a monitor into the joystick port (marked with the
icon ), and do not plug a joystick into a monitor port (marked with the
icon ™). Serious damage can result to your equipment.
The joystick port is marked with this icon:
Remove the port cover before plugging a game
controller into the joystick port. Leave the port
cover on when a game controller is not attached.
Power Macintosh 4400
PC Compatible
Power Macintosh 7300
PC Compatible
Plug the game controller
into the joystick port.
Game controller
Plug the game controller
into the joystick port.
Game controller
Connecting a printer
You can print from the PC environment on any printer connected to your
Macintosh computer.
You can also purchase a PC Serial and Parallel Card (available from your
Apple-authorized dealer), which allows you to connect a PC-compatible
printer. A printer connected to this card can print only from the PC
environment. You can also purchase a package such as GDT’s PowerPrint.
For more information, see “Setting Printer Options” in Chapter 3.
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Chapter 1
Connecting to a network
You can connect to shared disks on an AppleTalk or other Mac OS–compatible
network using Macintosh file sharing.
By installing the appropriate networking software, you can also connect your
computer to a PC-compatible network, such as a Novell NetWare network.
For more information, see the section “Setting Up Your PC on a Network” in
Chapter 3 and Appendix D, “Installing Network Client Software.”
Connecting a modem or other serial device
Even in the PC environment, you can use a modem or other serial device
connected to the Macintosh serial port. Macintosh computers do not have the
same serial interface that PCs have, so your modem or communications
software may require adjustment when connected to this port.
You can also connect your modem to a PC Serial and Parallel Card (available
from your Apple-authorized dealer), which has a true RS-232 PC serial
interface. A modem or other serial device connected to this card can only be
accessed from the PC environment.
For more information, see Chapter 3, “Setting Up the PC Environment.”
Connecting a security dongle
If your PC software requires a security dongle, you can connect it
by purchasing a PC Serial and Parallel Card (available from your
Apple-authorized dealer).
Connecting Monitors and Other Equipment
11
2
Installing the PC Compatibility Card Software
This chapter describes how to install software for your PC Compatibility Card.
The CDs that came with your PC Compatibility Card contain the software
you need to use the card in both the Macintosh and PC environments. In
addition, Windows 95 is provided so that you can install a basic operating
system for the PC environment.
IMPORTANT If you received this manual with your new computer, the PC
Compatibility Card software is already installed. In addition, a PC container
with Windows 95 and the necessary PC utilities and support software has also
been installed. Refer to this chapter if you need to reinstall the PC
Compatibility Card software, create a new drive container, reinstall
Windows 95, or reinstall PC utilities.
To install the software, you need the following items that came with your PC
Compatibility Card:
m PC Compatibility Card–Mac OS Software CD
m PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD
m Microsoft Windows 95 CD-ROM Setup Boot Disk
m Microsoft Windows 95 CD
Note: Your PC Compatibility card came with two different Windows 95 CDs.
Make sure to use the CD labeled Microsoft Windows 95 and not the one
labeled Microsoft Windows 95 Starts Here/How & Why.
13
There are several steps to installing your PC Compatibility Card software:
m installing the Mac OS software
m creating a storage area (called a drive container) for your PC software
m installing Windows 95
m installing support software for Windows 95
m installing PC utilities
Installing the Mac OS PC Compatibility software
To install the Mac OS software for operating your PC Compatibility Card,
follow these steps:
1
Insert the PC Compatibility Card–Mac OS Software CD into the CD-ROM drive.
If necessary, double-click the CD icon to open it.
2
Double-click the PC Compatibility Software folder to open it.
3
Double-click the Installer icon in the PC Compatibility Software folder.
If you see a message describing the Installer software, click OK.
The Installer window appears.
4
Make sure the disk named in the box is the one on which you want to install software.
If not, click Switch Disk until the correct disk name appears.
Note: If you want to install only specific components, choose Custom Install
from the Easy Install menu. In the Custom Install window, click to place an X
in the boxes next to the components you want to install.
5
Click Install.
The software is automatically installed on your hard disk.
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6
When the installation is complete, follow the instructions on the screen to quit the
Installer and restart your computer.
The following Mac OS software is now installed for use with your PC
Compatibility Card:
Name
Location
PC Setup
Control Panels folder
Ethernet (built-in)
Extensions folder
PC Compatibility Guide
Extensions folder
PC Clipboard
Extensions folder
PC Net Exchange
Extensions folder
PC Network Extension
Extensions folder
PC Print Spooler
Extensions folder
PC Setup Switch
Control Strip Modules
Creating a drive container
A drive container is a file on your computer’s hard disk that acts as a hard drive
for the PC. You create a drive container using the PC Setup control panel.
1
Choose Control Panels from the Apple (K) menu.
2
Double-click the PC Setup icon.
Installing the PC Compatibility Card Software
15
The PC Setup control panel appears.
C drive pop-up menu
3
If the PC is running click Shut Down PC.
4
Choose New Drive File from the C drive pop-up menu.
A dialog box appears.
5
Choose a location for the drive container.
The drive container can be on any hard disk attached to the computer that has
sufficient free space.
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Chapter 2
6
Type a name for the drive container and then press the Tab key.
You can type up to 31 characters.
7
Type a size (in MB) for the drive container.
You can make the container as small as 2 MB or as large as 1023 MB. The
amount of space you need depends on the software you want to install. If you
are installing Microsoft Windows 95, you’ll need at least 200 MB.
IMPORTANT Once a drive container is created, its size cannot be changed.
Before choosing a size for your drive container, decide which PC operating
system and applications you want to run. Check the documentation that came
with the software to estimate how much space you’ll need; then allow some
extra room for applications. If you still run out of space on the drive
container, you can create another drive container and assign it to drive D.
8
Make sure Initialize Drive File is checked.
The Initialize Drive File option is used to create a drive container with a
single partition. A single-partition drive container is recommended for most
standard installations. However, you can create a drive container with
multiple partitions. See “Creating a Multiple Partition/Bootable Drive
Container” in Chapter 3, “Setting Up the PC Environment,” if you need a
drive container with multiple partitions.
9
Click Create.
The new drive container is created.
10
Click Start PC.
Note: If you want the PC to start automatically when the Mac OS starts up,
click the box labeled “Auto-start PC” to place an X in it.
Installing the PC Compatibility Card Software
17
Installing Windows 95
Once the drive container is created, the next step is to install the Windows 95
operating system in it. You can think of a new drive container as a formatted
hard drive that needs an operating system in order to be a startup disk. You
need to install Windows 95 before you can install any applications. Find the
Microsoft Windows 95 CD-ROM Setup Boot Disk and Microsoft Windows 95 CD
that came with your PC Compatibility Card and follow these steps:
Note: Your PC Compatibility card came with two different Windows 95 CDs.
Make sure to use the CD labeled Microsoft Windows 95 and not the one
labeled Microsoft Windows 95 Starts Here/How & Why.
1
Open the PC Setup control panel and click “Switch to PC.”
The Mac OS desktop disappears. (If you set up a dedicated monitor for the
PC environment, the image on the Mac OS monitor dims.) The PC
environment starts up and you see a message about a Non-System disk or disk
error. This message indicates that the PC has started up and not found any
operating system.
2
Insert the Microsoft Windows 95 CD-ROM Setup Boot Disk into the disk drive.
The Microsoft Windows 95 CD-ROM Setup Boot Disk contains the necessary
CD-ROM drivers so that the PC Compatibility Card can access the Macintosh
CD-ROM drive.
3
Insert the Microsoft Windows 95 CD into the CD-ROM drive.
4
Press the Space bar to continue.
5
Follow the onscreen instructions to install Windows 95.
m You need the Windows 95 Certificate of Authenticity number found on the
cover of the Windows 95 manual that came with your PC Compatibility
Card.
m If you choose to make a startup floppy disk, make sure the disk you are
going to use is already formatted for the PC environment. The PC
environment will not recognize an unformatted or Macintosh-formatted
disk.
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Chapter 2
m Do not install any networking software during the Windows 95 installation
process. To install networking software, see Appendix D, “Installing
Network Client Software,” after you have completed the Windows 95 setup
process.
m At the end of the installation process, make sure to eject the Microsoft
Windows 95 CD-ROM Setup Boot Disk by pressing x-E before the computer
restarts. If the Microsoft Windows 95 CD-ROM Setup Boot Disk is still in the
disk drive, the computer will boot from the floppy disk when it restarts.
When the installation process is complete, the PC environment automatically
restarts and runs Windows 95.
6
Follow the onscreen instructions to complete the Windows 95 setup.
The first time you run Windows 95 after installation, the Windows 95 setup
program automatically starts. Follow the instructions on the screen noting the
following items:
m When you are asked to install printer drivers, click Cancel. To set up
printing, see Chapter 3, “Setting Up the PC Environment,” after you have
completed the Windows 95 setup process.
m Do not print the test page if you are prompted to do so.
Installing the PC Compatibility Card Software
19
Installing support software for Windows 95
The software on the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD that came with
your PC Compatibility Card allows the card to work with the Mac OS and
Mac OS–compatible CD-ROM drives, networks, and other equipment.
To install the software, follow these steps:
1
If necessary, switch to the PC environment.
To switch to the PC environment from the Mac OS, press x-Return, or open
the PC Setup control panel and click “Switch to PC.”
2
Insert the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD.
3
Click the Start button; then choose Run from the menu that appears.
4
In the dialog box that appears, type the following:
E:\APPLE\SETUP <return>
5
Follow the instructions that appear on the screen.
The recommended directory in which to install files is C:\APPLE.
By default, all options will be installed. However, you may choose not to
install specific options. These are the installation options:
m Install Macintosh/Windows Copy and Paste: allows you to transfer Clipboard
information between the Mac OS and PC environments
m Install Macintosh/PC Folder Sharing: allows you to use a Mac OS folder
with the PC as a shared PC drive
m Install CD-ROM Support: allows you to use CD-ROM discs in the PC
environment
m Install PC Compatibility Help: helps you set up your Windows 95
environment to properly work with the PC Compatibility Card
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6
When installation is complete, restart the PC.
Click the Start button and select Shutdown. In the Shutdown dialog box,
choose “Restart the Computer?”
Configuring network support in Windows
To configure network support in Windows, see Appendix D, “Installing
Network Client Software.”
Installing PC utilities
The PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD also contains the following
programs and utilities:
m Keyboard files let you use keyboard layouts for a variety of languages.
m QuickTime for Windows lets you view and manipulate video on the PC.
m Sound Blaster software lets you play music and manipulate sound files.
m Video drivers let you configure and use a variety of monitors.
You should install Sound Blaster and the video drivers. QuickTime and the
keyboard files are optional.
Installing the PC Compatibility Card Software
21
Installing keyboard files in Windows 95
Keyboard files allow you to use keyboard layouts for other languages and
keyboards.
IMPORTANT If you are using an international keyboard, be sure to install and
use the keyboard files on the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD. (The
supported languages vary from country to country.) The keyboard files that
come with Windows 95 may not work with your keyboard.
.
1
Start Windows 95.
2
Insert the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD into the CD-ROM drive.
3
Click the Start button.
4
Choose Settings from the menu that appears; then choose Control Panel.
5
Double-click the Keyboard icon.
6
Click the Language tab.
7
Click Add.
8
From the pop-up list that appears, select the language you want. Then click OK.
9
Select the name of the language whose keyboard layout you want to use and then click
OK.
10
Click “Set as Default” and then click OK.
11
When requested to insert the Windows 95 CD, leave the PC Compatibility Card–PC
Utilities CD in the CD-ROM drive and click OK.
You can only use the keyboard drivers provided on the PC Compatibility
Card–PC Utilities CD.
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12
If an error message appears, click OK.
13
Click Browse.
14
Select the E drive in the Drives window.
15
In the Folders window, click the folder and file you want. Then click OK.
The keyboard files are located in the following directory:
E:\KEYBOARD\WIN95
Installing QuickTime for Windows 95
Follow these steps to install the QuickTime for Windows 95 software:
1
In the PC environment, insert the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD into the
CD-ROM drive.
2
In Windows 95, click the Start button.
3
Choose Run from the menu that appears.
4
In the dialog box that appears, type the following:
E:\QUICKTME\QT32INST <return>
5
Follow the instructions that appear on your screen to complete the installation.
Installing Sound Blaster software for Windows 95
1
In the PC environment, insert the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD into the
CD-ROM drive.
2
In Windows 95, click the Start button.
3
Choose Run from the menu that appears.
4
In the dialog box that appears, type the following:
E:\SOUND\W95SETUP.BAT <return>
If a message asks you to insert a disk, click OK.
Let the setup program modify your .INI file.
5
When the Installer asks if you want to reboot the PC, choose No.
6
When the installation is complete, quit and restart Windows 95.
To use the Sound Blaster programs in Windows 95, click Start, choose
Programs, and select the Sound Blaster 16 directory.
Installing the PC Compatibility Card Software
23
Installing video software for Windows 95
The Windows 95 display driver that comes with the PC Compatibility Card
offers better performance than the standard driver. To install the driver, follow
these steps:
1
Insert the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2
In Windows 95, click the Start button.
3
Choose Run from the menu that appears.
4
In the dialog box that appears, type the following:
E:\VIDEO\ATISETUP <return>
5
Click Display Driver.
6
Follow the onscreen instructions to complete the installation.
IMPORTANT The ATI setup program asks you to type D:\WIN95 to specify
the video driver location. Because you are using the PC Compatibility
Card–PC Utilities CD rather than the Microsoft Windows 95 CD, type
E:\VIDEO\WIN95 instead.
You may need to move windows to see the information presented. To move
a window, drag the window’s top bar. To set up your monitor for use in
Windows 95, see Chapter 3, “Setting Up the PC Environment,” after you have
completed the Windows 95 setup process.
Installing your own PC software
You can now install your own PC programs in the drive container you’ve
created. Follow the instructions that came with the programs.
You may need to eject disks during installation. Press x-E to eject a floppy
disk. Press x-Y to eject a CD. For more information on working with disks,
see “Using Floppy Disk Drives and Floppy Disks” and “Using CD-ROM
Discs and Drives” in Chapter 4, “Working in the PC Environment.”
For further information on installing network client software, see
Appendix D, “Installing Network Client Software.”
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3
Setting Up the PC Environment
This chapter contains information on the following aspects of your PC
environment:
m the PC Setup control panel and Control Strip module
m monitors and video software
m RAM
m printer settings
m sound options
m PC drives
m shared volumes
m network settings
m serial port settings
m modem settings
m joystick and MIDI devices
m DOS configuration files
25
About the PC Setup control panel
You can control the following PC options in the PC Setup control panel:
m turning the PC Compatibility Card on and off
m assigning PC drives to drive containers or volumes
m assigning PC COM1 and COM2 ports to Macintosh serial ports or
text files
m setting up shared folders and volumes
m turning PC sound on and off
m changing the command (hot key) that switches between environments
m setting the PC to start automatically when you start up your computer
m switching to the PC automatically when you start up your computer
m setting the fade screen option when switching environments
m switching to, starting, and shutting down the PC
These options are described in this chapter and in Chapter 4, “Working in
the PC Environment.”
To use the PC Setup control panel, follow these steps:
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Chapter 3
1
Choose Control Panels from the Apple (K) menu.
2
Double-click the PC Setup icon to open the PC Setup control panel.
3
When you have specified the settings you want, close the control panel.
Onscreen help: To see brief explanations of items in the control panel, choose
Show Balloons from the Guide (h) menu. For detailed step-by-step help, see
the PC Compatibility Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu.
Setting Up the PC Environment
27
Using the PC Setup Control Strip module
As part of the installation process, a PC Setup module is added to your
Control Strip. From this Control Strip module you can do the following:
m start up the PC or restart the PC
m shut down the PC
m switch to the PC
m open the PC Setup control panel
m set up the PC Print Spooler
For more information on using the Control Strip, see “How do I use the
Control Strip?” in the “Customizing Your Computer” topic area of Mac OS
Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu.
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Chapter 3
Configuring monitors
To connect a monitor, see Chapter 1, “Connecting Monitors and Other
Equipment.”
In most cases, the Mac OS recognizes the monitor you’re using to display the
PC environment. The monitor type appears in the Monitor section of the PC
Setup control panel.
If the monitor you’re using to display the PC environment is not working
correctly, make sure you have connected the monitor according to the
instructions in Chapter 1, “Connecting Monitors and Other Equipment,” and
make sure you have installed and configured the video software as described
in Chapter 2, “Installing the PC Compatibility Card Software.” For additional
information on video settings, see Appendix E, “Configuring Video
Software,” and Chapter 5, “Troubleshooting.”
If a VGA monitor is not working correctly, also check whether your
VGA-to-Macintosh adapter is configurable and verify the correct settings.
Setting Up the PC Environment
29
Selecting and configuring monitors in Windows 95
1
In the Mac OS, open the PC Setup control panel, and make a note of the monitor type
that appears in the Monitor section of the control panel.
You can switch to the Mac OS by typing x-Return.
Type of monitor
recognized by the PC
Setup control panel
2
Switch to the PC environment and make sure Windows 95 is running.
You can switch to the PC environment by clicking “Switch to PC” in the
PC Setup control panel or by pressing x-Return.
3
In Windows 95, click the Start button.
4
Choose Settings from the menu that appears; then choose Control Panel.
5
Double-click the Display icon to open the Display control panel.
6
Click the Settings tab in the Display control panel.
Note: If you have a DDC-compliant monitor (such as an AppleVision display)
connected directly to the video port on the PC Compatibility Card, you do not
need to select a monitor type. Windows 95 will make the appropriate settings
for you. In addition, Windows 95 will configure the Display control panel so
that only the settings that work with your monitor appear. Skip ahead to step 13.
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7
Click Advanced Properties.
8
Click the Monitor tab and then click Change.
9
If your monitor is listed in the dialog box that appears, click its name, click OK, and then
go to step 13. If not, click “Have Disk” and go on to step 10.
10
Insert the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD. Make sure the path in the text box is
E: \ APPLE; then click OK.
11
Click Show All Devices.
12
In the Models box, choose a model corresponding to the monitor type listed in the PC
Setup control panel. Then click OK.
If this type is listed in PC Setup...
...choose this type in the Models box
Apple 14" (this type appears if you’ve
connected a 12-, 13-, or 14-inch
fixed-frequency monitor)
“(all other Apple monitors)”
Apple 16"
“(all other Apple monitors)”
Multiscan (this type appears if you’ve
connected an AppleVision or other
DDC-compliant monitor)
Plug and Play Monitor (VESA DDC) if this type is
automatically selected in the list. Otherwise,
AppleVision 1710AV, AppleVision 1710,
AppleVision 1705, Multiple Scan 1705, or
Multiple Scan 20.
Multiscan 14"
Apple Multiple Scan 14" or Apple Multiple Scan 15"
Multiscan 17"
Apple Multiple Scan 17"
Multiscan 20"
Apple Multiple Scan 20"
19" Color
Your monitor model (if listed), or SuperVGA 1024 x 768
Portrait
“(all other Apple monitors)”
21" Color
“(all other Apple monitors)”
21" Monochrome
“(all other Apple monitors)”
VGA
Standard VGA 640 x 480
To customize a multiple-scan monitor, click the Adjustments tab in the
Display control panel.
Setting Up the PC Environment
31
13
Restart Windows.
A help window appears with information on the video software. When you’re
finished with the help window, click to remove the X from the box at the
bottom of the window, so it won’t appear each time you start up.
RAM information
The RAM portion of the PC Setup control panel shows where RAM is
installed on your PC Compatibility Card. If a DIMM (dual inline memory
module) is installed, the word “DIMM” appears in the box. If no DIMM is
installed, the words “On Board” appear in the box.
PC RAM status
For more information on adding memory to your PC Compatibility Card, see
Appendix C, “Adding Memory to Your PC Compatibility Card.”
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Chapter 3
Setting printer options
From the PC environment, you can print on most printers connected to the
Mac OS–compatible serial port or network connection, using the PC Print
Spooler software.
Note: The PowerPrint package by GDT Softworks lets you use a
PC-compatible parallel-port printer with your computer. For more
information, you can phone GDT at 800-663-6222 or 604-473-3600, or visit
their World Wide Web site at http://www.gdt.com.
Setting up printing in the Mac OS
To print from the PC environment on a printer connected to the computer’s
printer port or other network connection, you need to select a printer in the
Mac OS Chooser and set up the PC Print Spooler software. Follow these steps;
then go to “Setting Up Printing in the PC Environment,” later in this section.
Note: If you are printing from the PC environment using the optional PC
Serial and Parallel Card, see the manual that came with that card for
instructions on how to print from the PC environment.
1
In the Mac OS environment, open the Chooser in the Apple (K) menu and make sure a
printer is selected.
If you are using a PostScript™ printer, be sure to select the LaserWriter 8
driver. For more information on selecting a printer, see the documentation or
onscreen help that came with your computer.
2
Open the Extensions folder inside the System Folder.
Note: You can also open the PC Print Spooler from the PC Setup Control
Strip module, then skip ahead to step 5.
Setting Up the PC Environment
33
34
Chapter 3
3
Open the PC Print Spooler icon.
4
Choose Preferences from the File menu.
5
Select how you want to be notified of printing errors.
6
Choose an option under “Interpret Print Data as.”
Printing data sent from the PC environment has to be interpreted by the Mac
OS before it can be sent to the printer. The PC Print Spooler provides three
ways to interpret printing information from the PC environment.
Note: If you are unsure what printing option to use, select Epson. Epson
emulation is a generic option that works with most printers.
m Select PostScript if your printer supports PostScript. If you plan to print
non-PostScript files on a PostScript printer (for example, if you print files
from the DOS prompt), make sure the checkbox labeled “Allow DOS Text
Printing” has an X in it.
m If you have a PC parallel-port printer and you are using the PowerPrint
package by GDT Softworks, select Printer Specific. You will only be able
to select this option if you have selected a PowerPrint printer in the
Chooser.
m Choose Epson if you are using a non-PostScript printer (such as the Apple
StyleWriter, Apple LaserWriter 300, and certain HP DeskJet models).
For more information about the Epson options, see the next section,
“Epson Emulation and Page Setup Options.”
7
Click OK.
8
Choose Quit from the File menu to exit the Print Spooler application.
Epson emulation and page setup options
If you chose Epson in the Print Spooler Preferences dialog box, you can make
the following settings:
m Select “Gaps between pages” if the application you are printing from does
not allow a 1/2-inch margin at the top and bottom of the page (such as the
DOS prompt or Windows 95 Notepad). Selecting “Gaps between pages”
adds a 1/2-inch margin to the top and bottom of the document. This extra
margin will be in addition to whatever margin is currently set. Choose
“No gaps between pages” if the application you are printing from can
format the page to have at least a 1/2-inch margin at the top and bottom
of the page.
Setting Up the PC Environment
35
m The font in the Default Font box is used when you’re printing ASCII text
from DOS and when the Faster Printing option is selected. For best results,
use a fixed-space font such as Courier or Monaco. Using a proportional
font such as Times® may change your document’s formatting.
m Select Faster Printing when you want to quickly print text from a DOS
application. When this option is selected, printers that use less than 300dpi resolution (such as ImageWriter dot-matrix printers) will print in 72dpi resolution.
m Select Better Quality if you want Epson printer fonts in your document to
be translated to corresponding Macintosh TrueType fonts. Because Epson
printer fonts are fixed-space fonts, the TrueType font will be scaled to
behave like a fixed-space font. Printers that use less than 300-dpi
resolution will print in 144-dpi resolution.
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Chapter 3
For best results, use Epson printer fonts that map to a fixed-space TrueType
font, or use graphical fonts supplied by your DOS application. The following
table lists some Epson printer fonts and the TrueType fonts they are translated
to if Better Quality is selected:
Epson font
TrueType font
Roman
Times (proportional)
SanSerif
Helvetica® (proportional)
Prestige
Palatino® (proportional)
Courier
Courier (fixed)
OCR-A, OCR-B
Monaco (fixed)
Script, Script C,
Monaco (fixed)
Orator, Orator S
Monaco (fixed)
To print legal-size and other size paper from the PC with Epson emulation,
follow these steps:
1
Open the PC Print Spooler.
2
Choose Page Setup from the File menu.
The Page Setup dialog box for the printer currently selected appears.
Setting Up the PC Environment
37
3
Select the desired page size and click OK.
Any attributes you set in the Page Setup dialog box within the PC Print
Spooler will remain in effect until you reset them or select the Default Prefs
button in the Preferences dialog box.
IMPORTANT You must set the page size in the DOS or Windows application
you are printing from to the same size you selected in the Page Setup dialog
box in PC Print Spooler. If you do not do this, your documents may not
print properly.
Note: This feature is only available for Epson emulation printing. For
PostScript and printer-specific printing, set the page attributes within the
DOS or Windows application you are printing from. If “Allow DOS Text
Printing” is selected for PostScript printers, you can adjust the page attributes
for a PostScript printer, but these settings will only take effect when you are
printing from the DOS prompt or a DOS application that does not send
PostScript to the printer.
Resetting the default printing preferences
1
Open the PC Print Spooler.
2
Choose Preferences from the File menu.
3
Click Default Prefs to restore the default settings in the Preferences dialog box.
This sets the printing option to PostScript, sets the default font to Courier,
and resets the page setup attributes to their default state (as defined by the
printer driver selected in the Chooser).
Printing problems
If there is a printing problem, the file you’re trying to print is moved to the
Spooler Rejected folder (in the Preferences folder inside the System Folder).
This might happen if, for example, you try to print a PostScript file with
Epson selected in the PC Print Spooler Preferences.
After setting your preferences correctly, you can print the file automatically by
moving the PC Spooler file from the Spooler Rejected folder to the Spooler
folder. Or you can try switching to the PC environment and printing again.
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Chapter 3
Setting up printing in the PC environment
This section includes basic information you need to set up your printer
drivers in the PC environment. For more detailed information, refer to the
documentation that came with your software and printer.
Note: If you are printing from the PC environment using the optional PC
Serial and Parallel Card, see the manual that came with that card for
instructions on how to print from the PC environment.
IMPORTANT Some printer models support more than one printer language and
may provide separate printer drivers for each language. If you are using the
PostScript printing option, be sure to choose the printer driver that supports
PostScript; otherwise, printing may not work properly.
Setting up printing in Windows 95
Before you print from Windows 95 for the first time (and any time you
change printer drivers), follow these steps:
1
In Windows 95, click the Start button.
2
Choose Settings from the menu that appears, and then choose Printers.
If no printers are installed, see your Windows 95 documentation for
instructions on how to add a printer.
3
Double-click the printer that you are printing on.
4
Choose Properties from the Printer menu.
The properties window for the printer you have selected appears.
5
Click the Details tab.
The Details page appears.
6
Click the Spool Settings button.
The Spool Settings dialog box appears.
Setting Up the PC Environment
39
7
Click the button labeled “Disable bi-directional support for this printer.” Then click OK.
If this button is not available, click OK; then go on to the next step.
8
In the Properties window, click Port Settings.
The Configure LPT Port dialog box appears.
9
Make sure the checkbox labeled “Check port state before printing” is unchecked. Then
click OK.
If you are using a non-Post Script printer, go to step 13. If you are using a
PostScript printer, follow these steps:
10
In the Properties window, click the PostScript tab.
11
Click Advanced.
The Advanced PostScript Options dialog box appears.
12
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Chapter 3
Make sure the checkboxes labeled “Send CTRL+D before Job” and “Send CTRL+D after
Job” are unchecked. Then click OK.
13
Close the Properties window.
IMPORTANT When printing on a PostScript printer from the PC environment,
be sure to print one file at a time. Printing multiple files may cause a
PostScript error. To verify that the file has finished printing, check the
Windows 95 Printer queue.
Printing from Windows 95
To print from Windows 95 using a printer connected to the computer printer
port or network connection, you need to select a printer driver in Windows 95
that corresponds to the option you selected in the PC Print Spooler
Preferences dialog box. If you have not set up the PC Print Spooler, see
“Setting Up Printing in the Mac OS,” earlier in this chapter.
m If you have a PostScript printer (and have selected the PostScript option in
the PC Print Spooler Preferences dialog box), install and select the
PostScript version of the Windows 95 driver that came with your printer. If
you don’t have a Windows driver specifically for your printer, you can
select another PostScript printer driver, such as one of the following:
m LaserWriter Pro 630, if you have a PostScript Level 2 printer (preferred)
m Apple LaserWriter II NTX, if you have a PostScript Level 1 printer
If you are not sure whether you have a PostScript Level 1 or Level 2
printer, choose a PostScript Level 1 printer driver. If you select a driver for
a PostScript Level 1 printer, you can print on any PostScript printer. If you
select a driver for a PostScript Level 2 printer, you can print only on
printers that support PostScript Level 2.
m If you have a PC parallel-port printer and you are using the PowerPrint
package by GDT Softworks (and have selected the Printer Specific option
in the PC Print Spooler Preferences dialog box), select the driver for the
printer connected to the computer using the PowerPrint cable.
Setting Up the PC Environment
41
m If you are using a non-PostScript printer (and have selected the Epson
option in the PC Print Spooler Preferences dialog box), select one of the
following drivers:
m Epson AP-3260 for 360-dpi color printing (preferred driver)
m Epson AP-3250 for 360-dpi black-and-white printing
m Epson Color Stylus for 360-dpi color printing
m Epson LQ-2500 for 180-dpi color printing
If none of the drivers listed above is available, try one of the following:
m Epson LQ-2550/LQ-1050/LQ-1010
m Epson Action Printer 4500/ActionPrinter 4000
Note: The Epson Color Stylus printer is capable of 720 x 360-dpi printing.
However, the PC Compatibility Card software currently supports a maximum
resolution of 360 x 360 dpi. Please verify the maximum resolution in the
application you are printing from, or improper printing may occur.
Saving a printer file
To save a printer file such as a PostScript file in the PC environment, use the
option in your Windows printer driver to print to a file. Do not assign a PC
COM port to a text file in the PC Setup control panel and print to that port in
the PC environment.
Configuring PC sound
You can use three kinds of sound in the PC environment:
m PC beep sounds
m CD sound You can play and control audio CDs in the PC environment.
m Sound Blaster sound You can hear Sound Blaster sound in games and other
programs, and you can use Sound Blaster–compatible utilities to
manipulate sound files. You can also record sound from audio CDs in the
PC environment. For more information about Sound Blaster capabilities,
see the PC Sound manual that came with your PC Compatibility Card.
You can hear sound from the PC environment through the computer speaker,
headphones, or speakers built into your monitor.
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Chapter 3
The Mac OS treats all PC sound as if it were coming from the internal
CD-ROM drive. You can still use the internal CD-ROM drive to play CDs
and CD-ROM discs in the Mac OS.
Note: Microphone and line input are not supported by the PC Compatibility
Card.
Turning PC sound on and off
To hear PC sound, you need to turn on sound for the PC by following
these steps.
Note: Before you begin, make sure that sound is turned on (not muted) in the
Mac OS.
1
Open the PC Setup control panel.
2
Choose an option from the Sound pop-up menu.
Open the pop-up menu to see the
different PC sound options.
You can choose the following options:
m To hear PC sounds in both environments, choose Enabled.
m To hear PC sounds only in the PC environment, choose Auto Enable.
m To shut off PC sounds, choose Disabled.
3
Close the PC Setup control panel.
Setting Up the PC Environment
43
Configuring PC drives
To work in the PC environment, you need to tell the PC Compatibility Card
where PC software and files are stored. You do this by assigning PC drive
letters to storage areas using the PC Setup control panel. You can assign drive
C or D to a PC-formatted SCSI hard drive attached to your Macintosh, or to a
drive container—a file you create on a Macintosh hard disk that acts as a
virtual PC drive. You can also use a drive container created by SoftPC or
SoftWindows™; however, that drive container cannot be bootable.
Note: A hard drive or drive container only boots when assigned to drive C in
the PC Setup control panel.
IMPORTANT If you received this manual with your new computer, a PC drive
container with Windows 95 has already been created on your hard drive and
assigned to Drive C in the PC Setup control panel. Follow the steps in this
section if you need to create additional drive containers. For information on
creating a new drive container with the necessary software, see Chapter 2,
“Installing the PC Compatibility Card Software.”
Creating a single partition/bootable drive container
To create a single partition/bootable drive container for drive C or D, follow
these steps:
1
In the Mac OS, open the PC Setup control panel.
2
If the PC is running, click Shut Down PC.
3
Choose New Drive File from the C: or D: pop-up menu.
4
In the dialog box that appears, choose a location for the drive container.
5
Type a name and a size for the container.
You can make the container as small as 2 MB or as large as 1023 MB. The
amount of space you need depends on the software you want to install. If you
are installing DOS and a few small applications, you’ll need about 100 MB. If
you are installing Microsoft Windows, you’ll need at least 150 MB. If you are
installing Microsoft Windows 95, you’ll need at least 200 MB.
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Chapter 3
IMPORTANT Once a drive container is created, its size cannot be changed.
Before choosing a size for your drive container, decide which PC operating
system and applications you want to run. Check the documentation that came
with the software to estimate how much space you’ll need; then allow some
extra room for applications. If you still run out of space on the drive
container, you can create another drive container and assign it to
another drive.
6
To format the drive container with a single partition, make sure the Initialize Drive File
box is checked.
When this box is checked, PC Setup will initialize the container for you.
7
Click Create.
The time that it takes to create a drive container depends on the size of
the container.
Creating a multiple partition/bootable drive container
IMPORTANT Apple does not recommend the use of multiple partition/nonbootable drive containers with the PC Compatibility Card.
To create a multiple partition/bootable drive container for drive C or D, follow
these steps:
1
In the Mac OS, open the PC Setup control panel.
2
If the PC is running, click Shut Down PC.
Setting Up the PC Environment
45
3
Choose New Drive File from the C: or D: pop-up menu.
4
In the dialog box that appears, choose a location for the drive container.
5
Type a name and a size for the container.
You can make the container as small as 2 MB or as large as 1023 MB. The
amount of space you need depends on the software you want to install. If you
are installing DOS and a few small applications, you’ll need about 100 MB. If
you are installing Microsoft Windows, you’ll need at least 150 MB. If you are
installing Microsoft Windows 95, you’ll need at least 200 MB.
IMPORTANT Once a drive container is created, its size cannot be changed.
Before choosing a size for your drive container, decide which PC operating
system and applications you want to run. Check the documentation that came
with the software to estimate how much space you’ll need; then allow some
extra room for additional applications. If you still run out of space on the drive
container, you can create another drive container and assign it to another drive.
6
To format the drive container with multiple partitions, make sure the Initialize Drive File
box is not checked.
When this box is unchecked, PC Setup does not initialize the container for
you. You have to do it manually in DOS, as described in step 8.
7
Click Create.
The time that it takes to create a drive container depends on the size of the
container.
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Chapter 3
8
To format the container with multiple partitions, switch to DOS and prepare the drive
using the FDISK and FORMAT commands.
To make the container bootable, use the /S parameter of the FORMAT
command. For example, if you want to format the D drive as a bootable
container type, use
FORMAT D: /S <return>
Use the DOS HELP command for more information.
Assigning a drive to a PC-formatted hard disk
To assign a drive to a PC-formatted hard disk connected to your Macintosh
SCSI port or SCSI chain, first assign the drive letter to the hard disk. Then
make sure the hard disk driver is not being loaded by PC Exchange. To do so,
follow the steps below.
IMPORTANT If you use a dedicated PC-formatted partition or SCSI device
instead of a drive container, you may experience some disk read/write errors.
Apple recommends using drive containers on Macintosh-formatted partitions
or SCSI devices as your primary method of data storage.
1
Open the PC Setup control panel.
2
Choose Drive Partition from the C: or D: pop-up menu.
3
In the dialog box that appears, select the hard disk drive you want to assign.
4
Open the PC Exchange control panel.
5
Click the Options button.
6
Make sure the SCSI driver for the PC drive is not checked. Then click OK.
To make the drive bootable, switch to DOS and use the FORMAT command
with the /S parameter. See the DOS HELP command for more information.
IMPORTANT You cannot boot from a locked PC container, a PC container that
is open on your desktop, or a PC container that is on a write-protected file
server. Also, you may not be able to mount a locked PC container if file
sharing is turned on. You can correct the problem by either unlocking the PC
container or turning off file sharing.
Setting Up the PC Environment
47
Changing a drive assignment
To change the container or partition assigned to the C or D drive, follow
these steps:
1
Open the PC Setup control panel.
2
To assign a new drive container, choose Other Drive File from the C: or D: pop-up menu.
To assign a PC-formatted hard disk (or partition), choose Drive Partition.
3
In the dialog box that appears, locate the container or partition you want to assign.
4
Make sure the item is not being used as a disk drive in the Mac OS environment.
If a mounted PC drive container icon appears on the desktop, drag it to the
Trash to unmount it.
Mounted drive container
5
Click Restart PC.
IMPORTANT If you want to make your PC drive available to the Mac OS, do not
use a PC compression program. The Mac OS cannot mount compressed drives.
Using shared volumes
You can set up a Mac OS folder, hard disk, or network volume to act as a
PC drive.
Sharing a folder is a convenient way to transfer files between the Mac OS and
the PC environment. Sharing is also useful for network volumes and other
volumes that otherwise would not be readily available to the PC environment.
Note: Do not set up a floppy disk as a shared folder. This can cause
unpredictable results.
Note: DOS treats all shared volumes as if they were on a network. Some
DOS commands, such as FORMAT, CHKDSK, UNDELETE, and SUBST, do
not work on these shared volumes.
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Chapter 3
Sharing files between the Mac OS and the PC
To set up a shared volume, follow these steps:
1
If the PC is not already running, open the PC Setup control panel and click Start PC.
2
In the PC Setup control panel, open the Sharing pop-up menu and choose an available
drive letter.
If no drive letters appear, switch to the PC, open the CONFIG.SYS file, and
make sure that both a LASTDRIVE statement appears and sufficient available
drive letters are assigned. See “Setting Up Your DOS Configuration Files,”
later in this chapter.
Open this pop-up menu to see the
available drive letters.
Setting Up the PC Environment
49
3
In the dialog box that appears, select a folder or disk you want to share.
You can share a Mac OS folder, hard disk, CD-ROM discs, or shared disk. You
cannot share floppy disks.
Note: When you name a folder in the Mac OS environment that you intend to
share with the PC environment, you may want the name to be compatible
with DOS 8.3 filename guidelines. Otherwise, the sharing software will
truncate and translate the name to fit the guidelines. For more information
about naming files, see your DOS manual.
4
To automatically share this item whenever you start up the PC, click the box labeled
“Share every time PC is started.”
Automatically shared items are underlined in the Sharing pop-up menu.
For more information on transferring files between the PC environment and
the Mac OS, see “Using Floppy Disk Drives and Floppy Disks,” “Copying and
Pasting Information Between the Mac OS and Windows Environments,” and
“Using Shared Folders and Volumes” in Chapter 4. Also see the PC
Compatibility Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu.
Note: When you add or remove a shared folder in Windows 95, the view in
the “My Computer” section does not immediately change. You need to refresh
the view once to update the Shared Folder status.
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Chapter 3
Turning off volume sharing
If you no longer want to share a volume, follow these steps:
1
In the Mac OS environment, open the PC Setup control panel.
2
Open the Sharing pop-up menu and choose the name of the volume you want to
stop sharing.
A warning message appears telling you that the item will no longer be
available. Click OK.
Turning off automatic sharing
1
In the Mac OS environment, open the PC Setup control panel.
2
Open the Sharing pop-up menu and choose the name of the volume you no longer want
to share automatically.
Automatically shared items are underlined in the Sharing pop-up menu.
Setting up your PC on a network
Your PC Compatibility Card supports most networking protocols, operating
systems, and application programs that are compatible with the following
network drivers: Novell’s Open Data-Link Interface specification (ODI) or
Microsoft’s Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS) version 2.0.
WARNING You must run SETNET every time you add or remove a
network protocol, install or upgrade network software, or change
anything in the network control panel. If you do not run SETNET, you
will experience network problems.
To set up networking, you need to acquire and install networking client
software in the PC environment. For more information, see Appendix D,
“Installing Network Client Software.”
Setting Up the PC Environment
51
Configuring the PC serial ports
Your PC Compatibility Card supports two serial ports, COM1 and COM2.
You can assign these ports to Macintosh serial ports (such as the printer or
modem port) or to a text file for later processing. Or you can leave the
ports unassigned.
Note: If you are using the optional PC Serial and Parallel Card to connect a
printer, modem, or other device to the PC environment, you do not need to
configure the Macintosh serial ports. See the manual that came with the PC
Serial and Parallel Port card for additional information.
Unassigned Macintosh serial port
Macintosh modem port assigned
to COM1 in the PC environment
To assign a PC COM port, open the PC Setup control panel and choose a setting in the
COM1 or COM2 pop-up menu.
These are the Macintosh serial ports that can be assigned to
COM1 or COM2 in the PC environment. Serial ports already in
use (either by the Macintosh or the PC) are dimmed.
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Chapter 3
IMPORTANT Mac OS programs cannot access a port that you’ve assigned to the
PC environment. If you’re trying to print, fax, or use your modem in the Mac
OS environment, and you get a warning message that the port requested is
busy or in use, then you need to unassign a PC COM port in the PC Setup
control panel.
Setting up a modem or other serial device
From the PC environment, you can use a modem or other serial device
connected to the Macintosh serial port. For best results, use the Apple DB-25
DIN-8 Mac to High-Speed Modem cable (part number M5537LL/A). If you
are unable to obtain this modem cable, you can use the information in the
next section to build a custom cable.
Because the Macintosh uses the RS-422 protocol, the RS-232 Ring Indicator
(RI), Request to Send (RTS), and Data Set Ready (DSR) signals are not
available through a Macintosh serial port. You can attempt to configure your
application to use the carrier string or ignore carrier detect.
Note: The serial port on the optional PC Serial and Parallel Port card (not
included) supports the RS-232 interface directly without your having to use a
special cable or configure your software.
Note: For more information on setting up a modem in Windows 95 to use
TCP/IP for PPP (point-to-point protocol) connections, see Appendix D,
“Installing Network Client Software.”
Setting Up the PC Environment
53
Building a custom cable
The following chart lists the signals present on the Macintosh Mini DIN-8
serial connector and the pins that carry these signals on PC-style DB-9 and
DB-25 connectors. You can use this information to build a custom cable to
connect your PC-compatible serial device to a Macintosh serial port. Refer
to the manual for the serial device you want to connect for more information.
Macintosh signal
Macintosh Mini DIN-8
DB-9
DB-25
RS-232 name
HSKo
1
4
20
DTR
HSKi
2
8
5
CTS
TXD-
3
3
2
TXD
GND
4
5
7
GND
RXD-
5
2
3
RXD
TXD+
6
N/C
N/C
GPi
7
1
8
DCD
RXD+
8
5
7
GND
Connecting a joystick
You can connect a game controller to the joystick port on your PC
Compatibility Card. For more information, see Chapter 1, “Connecting
Monitors and Other Equipment,” and the documentation that came with
your joystick.
Connecting a MIDI device
With an optional adapter, you can connect a MIDI device to the joystick port
on your PC Compatibility Card. For more information, see Chapter 1,
“Connecting Monitors and Other Equipment,” and see the documentation that
came with your MIDI device and MIDI adapter.
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Chapter 3
Setting up your DOS configuration files
When you install the PC Compatibility Card software, it makes all the
necessary modifications to your DOS CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT
files. However, there may be times when you want to modify these files.
Follow these guidelines:
Editing the CONFIG.SYS file
Your CONFIG.SYS files should include the following statements:
DOS=HIGH,UMB
STACKS=9,256
DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS /TESTMEM:OFF
DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE NOEMS
LASTDRIVE=M
DEVICEHIGH=C:\APPLE\CDROM.SYS /D:CDDRVR
INSTALLHIGH=C:\APPLE\MACSHARE.COM
The first line loads DOS into high memory.
If you’re using the DOS utility EMM386 and you don’t require expanded
memory, use all the statements shown above. If you are using EMM386 and
you do require expanded memory, remove the following line:
DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE NOEMS
and replace it with this line:
DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE
For more information on making the best use of memory, see the
information on memory management in the documentation for DOS or for
your memory manager.
The last two lines load the CD-ROM drive software and file-sharing software
into high memory.
Setting Up the PC Environment
55
Setting the number of drive letters
You can share folders and volumes with the PC by assigning them to PC drive
letters. When you install your PC software, the statement LASTDRIVE=M is
included in the CONFIG.SYS file. This allows you to view up to nine folders
or volumes at once.
To change the number of drive letters, change your CONFIG.SYS file to
include the following statement:
LASTDRIVE=x
where x is a letter between F and Z. (The PC reserves drive letters A
through E.)
Each drive letter uses 100 bytes of PC memory.
Editing the AUTOEXEC.BAT file
Your AUTOEXEC.BAT file should include the following statements:
SET TEMP=C:\TMP
SET TMP=C:\TMP
PATH=C:\DOS
LOADHIGH C:\DOS\MSCDEX.EXE /D:CDDRVR /L:E
LOADHIGH C:\APPLE\APPLEPC
C:\DOS\SMARTDRV.EXE /X
The first two lines determine the location for temporary files used by DOS
applications.
The LOADHIGH lines load Windows support and CD-ROM software into
high memory. The letter “E” at the end of the MSCDEX.EXE line assigns the
letter “E” to the CD-ROM drive. You can change it to any unused letter up to
the limit specified in the LASTDRIVE line in your CONFIG.SYS file.
The SMARTDRV line creates a disk cache to speed up DOS disk operations.
The /X option disables the write cache, which is the slower but safer option.
For best CD-ROM performance, the line containing MSCDEX.EXE must
come before the line containing SMARTDRV.EXE.
56
Chapter 3
4
Working in the PC Environment
This chapter describes the software that you use to work in the PC
environment, to switch between the Mac OS and PC environments, and to
share information between both environments.
This chapter describes the following:
m switching between the Mac OS and PC environments
m turning the PC on and off
m using floppy disk drives and floppy disks
m using CD-ROM discs and drives
m using a pointing device
m using keyboards
m copying and pasting information between Mac OS and Windows
environments
m using onscreen help in the PC environment
m using shared folders and volumes
m using PC files in the Mac OS environment
57
Switching between the Mac OS and PC environments
Even though the Mac OS and PC environments are running simultaneously,
you can only use one environment at a time. There are three methods you can
use to switch between the Mac OS and the PC.
Switching with the PC Setup control panel
1
Choose Control Panels from the Apple (K) menu.
2
Double-click the PC Setup icon to open the control panel.
3
Click “Switch to PC” to switch to the PC environment.
If you are using a single monitor to display both environments, you can set
the screen to fade briefly before switching environments by making sure Fade
Screens is checked.
4
58
Chapter 4
To switch back to the Mac OS, press x-Return.
Switching with the Control Strip
If you have the Control Strip open in the Mac OS, you can use the PC Setup
module to switch to the PC.
With the Control Strip visible, follow these steps:
1
Open the pop-up menu in the PC Setup module of the Control Strip and choose
“Switch to PC.”
2
To switch back to the Mac OS, press x-Return.
Switching with a keyboard command
You can set a keyboard command, or hot key, to switch between the Mac OS
and PC environments. The default hot key is x-Return.
WARNING If you are rebuilding the desktop in the Mac OS environment,
make sure rebuilding is complete before you attempt to switch to the PC
environment. If you switch during the rebuilding of the desktop, your
system could “freeze.”
Note: If you set a new hot key, it will work in both environments, and
x-Return will still work to switch from the PC to the Mac OS. But x-Return
will not work to switch from the Mac OS to the PC.
Working in the PC Environment
59
To set a new hot key, follow these steps:
1
In the Mac OS environment, open the PC Setup control panel.
2
Click the Hot Key text box.
3
Type the command you want to use to switch environments.
The x key is automatically included; you type the additional characters you
want. For example, you might type Option-Tab, setting the switch command
to x-Option-Tab.
Some character combinations cannot be used. The PC Setup control panel
will alert you if you select a reserved key combination.
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Chapter 4
Turning the PC on and off in the Mac OS environment
WARNING Be sure to shut down Windows 95 before shutting down the
PC or Mac OS using either the PC Setup control panel or the Control
Strip. If you shut down the PC without shutting down Windows 95, you
could lose information or damage your drive container.
Turning the PC on and off with the PC Setup control panel
With the PC Setup control panel open, do one of the following:
m To start the PC if it’s shut down, click Start PC in the PC Setup control
panel.
If the PC is already running, the button is labeled Restart PC.
m To restart the PC, click Restart PC in the PC Setup control panel.
m To shut down the PC, make sure you have shut down Windows 95. Then
click Shut Down PC in the PC Setup control panel.
This option turns off the PC until you click Start PC.
Working in the PC Environment
61
m To turn off the PC Compatibility Card entirely, click Off at the top of the
PC Setup control panel; then restart the Mac OS.
If you turn off the PC Compatibility Card, you will not be able to switch to
the PC environment.
m To turn the PC Compatibility Card on, click On in the PC Setup control
panel and restart the Mac OS.
Turning the PC on and off with the Control Strip
With the Control Strip visible, do one of the following:
m To start the PC if it’s shut down, choose Start PC from the pop-up menu in
the PC Setup module of the Control Strip.
If the PC is already running, the menu will display Restart PC.
m To restart the PC, choose Restart PC from the pop-up menu in the PC
Setup module of the Control Strip.
m To shut down the PC, make sure you have shut down Windows 95. Then
choose Shutdown PC from the pop-up menu in the PC Setup module of
the Control Strip.
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Chapter 4
Starting the PC automatically
You can set the PC to start automatically when you start your computer, and
you can set your computer to switch to the PC environment automatically
after startup. To do this, you use the PC Setup control panel.
m To start the PC automatically whenever you start up the Mac OS
environment, click the box next to “Auto-start PC” to place an X in it.
m To automatically switch to the PC environment whenever you start up
the Mac OS environment, click the box next to “Switch at Startup” to
place an X in it.
WARNING If you want to switch to the PC whenever you start up, make
sure that the Shut Down Warning option is turned off in the Mac OS
General Controls panel. If the warning is on, you may not be able to
switch back to the Mac OS environment for a few minutes after
switching to the PC.
Working in the PC Environment
63
Restarting the PC in the PC environment
To restart (“warm boot”) the PC in the PC environment, use one of the following
keyboard combinations:
m Control-Alt-… (using the Del key, not the Delete key)
m Control-Alt-. (using the period key on the numeric keypad)
To reset (“cold boot”) the PC in the PC environment, use one of the following
keyboard combinations:
m x-Control-Alt-… (using the Del key, not the Delete key)
m x-Control-Alt-. (using the period key on the numeric keypad)
print
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Chapter 4
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Using floppy disk drives and floppy disks
Keep the following in mind when you use floppy disks:
m To eject a floppy disk in the PC environment, press x-E.
m In the PC environment, the floppy disk drives are A and B.
m In the PC environment, you cannot use a Mac OS–formatted floppy disk. If
you insert one, it will be ejected.
m You can use a locked PC disk in both the PC and Mac OS environments.
m You can access an unlocked floppy disk in the environment that was active
when you inserted the floppy disk, but not in the other environment.
m In the PC environment, blank disks are formatted for the PC. In the
Mac OS, you can format disks for either environment.
m Some blank disks are preformatted. If you insert a new, blank disk in the
PC environment and it is ejected, it may have been preformatted in Mac OS
format. To use the disk in the PC environment, you can switch to the Mac
OS and format the disk for the PC. For instructions, see the documentation
that came with your computer or Mac OS software upgrade kit.
Note: Removable media drives such as Zip or Syquest drives are not directly
accessible from the PC environment in the same way that your CD-ROM and
floppy disk drives are. However, you can set up a shared folder in the Mac OS
environment and then transfer information to and from the removable media.
For more information see “Using Shared Volumes” in Chapter 3, “Setting Up
the PC Environment.”
Restarting the PC from a floppy disk
To restart (reboot) the PC using a floppy disk, insert a floppy disk containing
operating system software into the disk drive. Press Control-Alt-… to restart
the PC.
Working in the PC Environment
65
Using CD-ROM discs and drives
Keep the following in mind when using CD audio discs and CD-ROM discs
and drives:
m In the PC environment, press x-Y to eject a CD. If the disc cannot be
ejected (because a file is in use or the disc is being shared), you will hear
a beep.
m You can start an audio CD in either environment and continue to listen
when you switch environments. (If you start up and switch to the PC while
listening to an audio CD, the CD sound may pause for several seconds
while the PC starts up.)
m If you have more than one CD-ROM drive, the PC environment can use
only the one with the lowest SCSI ID number.
m You can record sound from an audio CD in the PC environment. For more
information, see the PC Sound manual that came with your PC
Compatibility Card.
Using a pointing device
The standard mouse or other pointing device for Macintosh computers has
one button; most PC devices have two buttons that perform different
functions. If you do not have a two-button pointing device, you can purchase
one from your Apple-authorized dealer. Be sure to ask for an ADB (Apple
Desktop Bus) device—input devices designed for a PC will not work with the
Macintosh ADB port.
If you have a multibutton Mac OS–compatible pointing device, you may be
able to configure it to use the right button in the PC environment. Refer to the
instructions that came with your device.
You can use keyboard commands to simulate the actions of the second button.
If you are using a one-button device, you can control it as follows:
m The button behaves like the left button on a two-button device.
m There are two ways to simulate pressing the right button:
m Select an item and then press the = (equal) key on the numeric keypad.
m Hold down the Command key (x) while you press the button.
m To simulate pressing the left and right buttons at the same time, press the
button and the = (equal) key simultaneously.
66
Chapter 4
Note: If the software for your two-button device does not automatically
configure your device for the PC or does not include a “Windows Right
Mouse Button” option, you may be able to assign the = (equal) key to the
right button.
Using keyboards
You can use all Apple keyboards with your PC Compatibility Card.
The Option key on an Apple keyboard is the same as the Alt key in the
PC environment.
On the Apple Extended Keyboard II, use the following equivalents for keys on
a PC keyboard. (These equivalents also apply to the Apple Adjustable
Keyboard if the function keyboard isn’t plugged in.)
PC key
Macintosh keyboard equivalent
Alt
Option
F1 through F9
x-1 through 9
F10
x-0
F11
x-(minus)
F12
x-(equal)
F13
x-[
F14
x-]
F15
x-\
Home
x-[keypad] 7
PageUp
x-[keypad] 9
End
x-[keypad] 1
PageDown
x-[keypad] 3
Insert
x-[keypad] 0
Del
x-[keypad] (period)
Backspace
Delete
Eject a floppy disk
x-E
Eject a CD
x-Y
Working in the PC Environment
67
Copying and pasting information between the Mac OS and Windows environments
You can exchange certain kinds of information between the Mac OS and
Windows environments using the Copy and Paste commands in the Edit menu
in both environments. To do this, the PC Clipboard extension and Macintosh
Easy Open (Mac OS Easy Open) control panel must be installed in the
Mac OS and the WINCLIP utility must be installed in Windows.
The PC Clipboard translates the following information formats:
m Windows CF_TEXT to/from Mac OS TEXT
m Windows RTF to/from Mac OS RTF
m Windows DIB to/from Mac OS PICT
To determine the format of information in the Mac OS, you can paste the
material into the Scrapbook.
Note: Copying and pasting between DOS and the Mac OS is not supported.
However, you can paste information into the MS-DOS prompt in
Windows 95 by using the paste button. If you want to translate information
between the DOS and Mac OS environments, you can exchange files via a
file translation program.
When transferring information between the Mac OS and Windows 95, keep
the following in mind:
m If you have the PC Clipboard extension installed, the Mac OS and
Windows 95 share a Clipboard. That means if you copy an item to the
Mac OS Clipboard, switch to Windows 95, and then copy an item to the
Windows 95 Clipboard, the original Mac OS Clipboard contents will
be deleted.
To prevent this, you can turn off Automatic Document Translation in the
Macintosh Easy Open (Mac OS Easy Open) control panel, or you can
remove the PC Clipboard extension from the Extensions folder (inside the
System Folder in the Mac OS). Removing the extension turns off Clipboard
translation between Mac OS and Windows 95.
Note: If you remove the PC Clipboard extension, you will see an alert
message every time you switch from the PC to the Mac OS.
68
Chapter 4
m If you want to transfer information from the Mac OS Clipboard to
Windows 95, make sure that Windows 95 is running before you switch
environments.
m Sounds cannot be transferred on the Clipboard between the Mac OS
and Windows 95. You must use a sound translation program to transfer
sound files.
m When you’re in the PC environment, all Mac OS programs are put in the
background and the PC Clipboard runs in the foreground. You can prevent
this by removing the PC Clipboard extension from the Extensions folder
(inside the System Folder in the Mac OS). Removing the extension turns
off Clipboard translation between the Mac OS and Windows 95.
Note: If you remove the extension, you will see an alert message every
time you switch from the PC to the Mac OS.
If you are having trouble pasting information between Windows and the
Mac OS, try the following:
m Assign more memory to the PC Clipboard utility and to the Mac OS
application into which you are pasting information.
m Make sure that Macintosh Easy Open (Mac OS Easy Open) is installed.
m In the Macintosh Easy Open (Mac OS Easy Open) control panel, make
sure the Automatic Document Translation option is turned on.
m Save the document you’re copying from in a different format. Then reopen
the document and copy the material you want to move.
m Use the Paste Special command that is available in some Windows
applications. This command lets you specify the format of material
you’re pasting.
m If you’re pasting an image to the Win95 WordPad, try using the command
“Insert Object as Paintbrush Picture.”
m Images that are compressed in the Mac OS (such as Kodak Photo CD
thumbnails) may display only in gray when you paste them into Windows.
If this happens, try expanding the image before copying it.
Working in the PC Environment
69
Transferring large bitmap images
If you are transferring large bitmap images from the PC to the Mac OS
environment, you may have to increase the memory allocated to the PC
Clipboard application. To increase the memory allocation, follow these steps:
1
Open the System Folder and then open the Extensions folder.
2
Select the PC Clipboard icon.
3
Open the File menu and choose Get Info.
4
In the Preferred Size text box, type a larger memory allocation, such as 1000K.
5
Close the PC Clipboard Info window.
Using onscreen help in the PC environment
You can install onscreen help for the PC environment when you install the
support software. If you install help, it will be available in the PC
environment in the HELP directory, in the directory where the Apple
software is installed.
To start help in Windows 95, follow these steps:
70
Chapter 4
1
Open the “My Computer” icon on the Windows 95 desktop.
2
Open the C drive.
3
Open the Apple software folder. (The default folder name is “Apple.”)
4
Open the Help folder.
5
Double-click the SETUPHLP application.
Using shared folders and volumes
You can share Mac OS folders and volumes with the PC by assigning them
drive letters. The MACSHARE utility (installed with the PC support
software) makes this possible.
Note: When you name a folder in the Macintosh environment that you intend
to share with the PC environment, use a name that conforms to DOS 8.3
filename guidelines. Otherwise, the sharing software will truncate and
translate the name to fit the guidelines. For more information about naming
files, see your DOS manual.
Note: PC applications and their files work more quickly in a drive container
or on a hard disk than in a shared folder. The performance of Mac OS
programs is not affected by placing them in shared folders.
IMPORTANT Information in the “resource fork” of a Mac OS file (such as an
original icon) is lost when the file is copied in the PC environment. This may
damage some files. To copy a QuickTime file, for example, you must open it
in the Mac OS using the MoviePlayer program and save it in “non-Apple
computer format” before copying or using it in the PC environment.
Using PC files in the Mac OS environment
There are three ways to access PC files in the Mac OS:
m You can access PC files on a floppy disk. For more information, see
“Using Floppy Disk Drives and Floppy Disks,” earlier in this chapter.
m You can access PC files in a shared folder or volume. For information on
setting up a shared area, see “Using Shared Volumes” in Chapter 3.
m You can access PC files in a PC drive container or a PC-formatted SCSI
hard drive attached to your Macintosh.
Working in the PC Environment
71
With Macintosh PC Exchange, you can see, move, and copy PC documents as
icons in the Mac OS. However, you may not be able to open every kind of PC
file in the Mac OS. If you can’t open a file or if the file is not displayed
properly, try one of the following:
m Try opening the file using a different application program.
m Translate the document into a different file format using a file translation
utility.
m If your PC program has an Export feature, use it to save the document in a
different file format.
m Use a PC–Mac OS translation utility.
To gain access to files in a PC drive container from the Mac OS, follow
these steps:
1
In the Finder, double-click the drive container to open it.
The drive container appears on the Mac OS desktop as one of the following
disk icons:
Drive container file
Mounted drive container
2
Double-click the container’s disk icon.
The icon opens and you have access to the files inside it.
Note: If the PC is running, you can copy files from the drive container to the
Mac OS, but you can’t add anything to the drive container or change any files
in it. If you want to add or change files from the Mac OS environment, you
must shut down the PC.
72
Chapter 4
5
Troubleshooting
Consult this chapter when you have questions about using the PC
environment on your Macintosh.
If you have questions about using Windows 95 or PC application programs,
see the manuals that came with your operating system software or programs.
WARNING If you have a problem with your PC compatibility hardware
or software and nothing presented in this manual solves it, consult the
service and support information that came with your computer for
instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or
Apple for assistance. If you attempt to repair the PC compatibility
hardware yourself, any damage you may cause will not be covered by the
limited warranty. Contact an Apple-authorized dealer or service provider
for additional information about this or any other warranty question.
73
Starting up
The Macintosh “freezes” during startup.
Restart the computer while holding down the Shift key. This turns off
extensions. After the computer starts up, restart the computer again. If the
computer still doesn’t start up, consult the troubleshooting information in the
user’s manual that came with the computer.
The PC Setup icon has a red slash through it at startup.
The PC setup extension did not load.
You may have started up the computer holding down the Shift key, which
turns off extensions. Restart the computer without holding down the Shift key.
A RAM disk or RAM cache in the Mac OS may be using too much memory.
Reduce the size of the RAM disk or RAM cache, and restart the computer.
There may be a problem with the PC Setup Prefs file (in the Preferences
folder within the System Folder). Remove the file and restart the Macintosh.
Then use the PC Setup control panel to recreate your settings. If this doesn’t
work, try reinstalling the PC software (see Chapter 2, “Installing the PC
Compatibility Card Software”).
The Mac OS software for the PC Compatibility Card doesn’t seem to be installed.
See Chapter 2, “Installing the PC Compatibility Card Software,” for a list of
the Mac OS software that is required for the PC Compatibility Card. If any
of these items is missing, and you are having trouble using the PC
Compatibility Card, try reinstalling the software, following the instructions
in Chapter 2.
The PC didn’t start up.
Open the PC Setup control panel. If drive C is not assigned to a drive
container or hard disk drive, you see a question mark icon in the C drive box.
In this case, either assign drive C to an existing drive container or create a
new drive container (see “Creating a Drive Container” in Chapter 2).
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Chapter 5
In the PC Setup control panel, make sure the On button is selected. If it is,
click Start PC at the bottom of the control panel. If the On button is not
selected, click it; then restart your Macintosh. Open the PC Setup control
panel again and click Start PC.
If the On button is selected and you have restarted the Macintosh, but the
“Switch to PC,” Start PC, and Shut Down PC buttons are not available, there
may be a problem with your PC Compatibility Card. Consult your Appleauthorized service provider.
There may be a problem with an additional DIMM installed on your PC
Compatibility Card. Open the PC Setup control panel and check the RAM
portion of the control panel. If no DIMM is indicated and you have installed
an additional DIMM, remove it and restart the computer. If a DIMM is
detected by the PC Setup control panel, you can still remove it and restart the
computer. For more information on adding and removing DIMMs, see
Appendix C, “Adding Memory to Your PC Compatibility Card.”
When I start up the computer it goes directly into the PC environment.
If you don’t want the PC environment to start automatically, return to the
Mac OS environment by pressing x-Return. Open the PC Setup control panel
and make sure the “Switch at Startup” box is not checked.
DOS begins to start up but then the screen freezes. The cursor blinks, but I cannot
type anything.
Press x-Control-Alt-… to restart the PC. (If you do not have the … key on
your keyboard, use the period key on the numeric keypad.) When you see the
message “Starting MS-DOS” or “Starting Windows 95,” follow this step to
bypass your CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files:
DOS or Windows: Press and hold the Shift key.
Windows 95: Press and hold the F5 key.
After the PC has started up, check the CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT
files, change any incorrect lines, and then restart the PC.
Troubleshooting
75
Switching to and from the PC
I can’t remember the command I set to switch back from the PC environment to the
Mac OS.
In the PC environment, you can always use x-Return to switch back to the
Mac OS environment. To change the command, see “Switching Between the
Mac OS and PC Environments” in Chapter 4.
There is a delay when switching between environments.
There is a delay when you switch to the PC immediately after starting it or
when you use the x-Control-Alt-… command to perform a hard restart. The
PC is performing some system configuration tasks.
When switching would interfere with a Mac OS system task, there is a slight
delay until the task is completed.
There also may be a delay while a large amount of Clipboard information
is transferred.
If you are switching to the PC immediately after starting up the computer,
make sure the Shut Down Warning is turned off in the General Controls
panel in the Mac OS. If it is on, you may not be able to switch back to the
Mac OS for several minutes after switching to the PC.
When I switch to the Mac OS from the PC environment, a message appears:
“PC Clipboard requires additional system services in order to function. Please ensure
that the PC Compatibility Card is successfully installed.”
Mac OS Easy Open software may be turned off or may not be installed.
Restart the computer, open the Mac OS Easy Open control panel, and make
sure the software is turned on. If you can’t find the control panel, you need to
reinstall it.
In the PC environment, I see the message “Non-system disk or disk error. Replace and
strike any key when ready.”
The PC Compatibility Card can’t find operating system software such as DOS
or Windows.
A nonbootable floppy disk may be in the floppy disk drive. Press x-E to eject
the disk; then press any key to continue or try restarting the PC again.
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Chapter 5
Also, make sure drive C is assigned to a drive container or hard disk drive that
contains DOS or Windows software.
If you can’t find a drive container, it may have been installed on an external
drive that is not turned on, or on removable media that is not available. Or the
drive may have been thrown away or never created. (See Chapter 2,
“Installing the PC Compatibility Card Software,” for more information on
drive containers.)
My monitor flashes oddly when I switch environments.
When you are using a single monitor for both environments, there is a flash
when you switch from one environment to the other. If you prefer not to see
the flash, select the Fade Screens option in the PC Setup control panel.
Monitor problems
See also the troubleshooting section in Appendix E, “Configuring Video
Software.”
When I try to switch to the PC environment, my screen is blank or garbled.
Open the PC Setup control panel and check the Monitor portion of the
control panel.
If you see the message “Not Supported,” your monitor may not be compatible
with the PC Compatibility Card. Refer to Appendix E, “Configuring Video
Software,” for monitor specifications and video modes, and check with your
monitor vendor to see if your monitor conforms to these specifications.
If you see the message “No Monitor,” your monitor may not be connected
properly. Make sure your monitor is connected according to the instructions
in the chapter for installing the card in your computer model and Chapter 1,
“Connecting Monitors and Other Equipment.”
If you’re using a VGA monitor connected to a VGA-to-Macintosh adapter,
you may be able to reconfigure the adapter to identify itself to the PC
Compatibility Card and Macintosh. Check the documentation that came with
your monitor and adapter.
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77
Make sure that you’ve configured your video software correctly. The PC
Compatibility Card does not support resolutions greater than 1280 x 1024. For
more information, see Chapter 2, “Installing the PC Compatibility Card
Software,” and Appendix E, “Configuring Video Software.”
The PC Setup Prefs file may be damaged. Locate the file (in the Preferences
folder inside the System Folder) and drag it to the Trash; then restart the
Macintosh. When the Mac OS starts up, open the PC Setup control panel
and reconfigure your settings.
I tried configuring my display and now it won’t work properly.
In Windows 95, if you choose a configuration that doesn’t display properly,
follow these steps to correct the problem:
1. Switch to the Mac OS by typing x-Return.
2. In the PC Setup control panel, click Restart PC.
3. Switch to the PC.
4. When you see the message “Starting Windows 95,” press F8 to enter
Safe Mode.
5. When Windows 95 starts up, click Start, choose the Settings menu item,
and click Control Panel.
6. Double-click the Display icon.
7. Click the Settings tab, and select a correct monitor setting in the list that
appears (such as 640 x 480). Then restart Windows 95.
My monitor flashes oddly when I switch environments.
When you are using a single monitor for both environments, there is a flash
when you switch from one environment to the other. If you prefer not to see
the flash, select the Fade Screens option in the PC Setup control panel.
When I start up certain software in the PC environment, my monitor shows a jumbled or
rolling image.
You may have selected the wrong monitor type when configuring your video
software. For more information, see Chapter 2, “Installing the PC
Compatibility Card Software.”
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Chapter 5
Some application programs that write directly to the hardware (especially
games) may not work with some monitors. Contact the software company and
ask if the software has a switch to force it to make BIOS calls.
The PC Setup control panel does not report the correct monitor type.
Hold down the Option key and open the Monitor pop-up menu. Choose
“Sense Display Type.” If that does not solve the problem, hold down the
Option key and open the Monitor pop-up menu. Choose the monitor that
most closely matches your monitor.
You may have a VGA-to-Macintosh adapter that is set incorrectly.
If you are using the AppleVision 1710 or 1710AV display, make sure that the
AppleVision software is installed in the Mac OS environment and that the
monitor’s ADB cable is connected to the Macintosh ADB port. For more
information, see Chapter 1, “Connecting Monitors and Other Equipment.”
If you are using a non-Apple monitor, it may report the incorrect monitor
type. If you are using a multiscan monitor, you may want to turn off
autosensing in the PC Setup control panel. Hold down the Option key, open
the Display pop-up menu, and choose the monitor that most closely matches
your monitor.
PC Setup seems to detect my monitor correctly, but when I switch to the PC environment
the image is jumbled or rolling.
If you are using a VGA-to-Macintosh adapter, check whether you can control
the “sync” pulse on one or more signals going to the display. If so, try
changing the “sync” pulse and see if this solves the problem.
My non-Apple display does not seem to work correctly in the PC environment.
m Use the Windows 95 Display control panel to select your monitor name. If
your monitor name is not available, select the SuperVGA monitor option
that matches the maximum resolution supported by your monitor.
m Use the Windows 95 control panel to set the refresh rate to 60 Hz. For
more information, see Appendix E, “Configuring Video Software.”
m If the monitor still does not display properly, reduce the resolution.
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79
Problems using a modem
My modem is not working correctly in Windows 95.
Try disabling the “Use flow control” or “Use error control” options for the
modem. To do so, follow these steps:
1. In Windows 95, click the Start button, choose the Settings menu item, and
then choose Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Modem icon.
3. Click the Properties button.
4. Click the Connection tab in the dialog box that appears.
5. Click the Advanced button.
6. Deselect the “Use flow control” or “Use error control” options, and
click OK.
If you are having trouble connecting at higher baud rates, try setting the
modem speed to 19,200 baud or less.
When I try to use my Mac OS communications software, I get an error that says the
selected port is in use.
Your Mac OS communications software may be trying to use a port that is
assigned to the PC Compatibility Card. Open the PC Setup control panel and
unassign the selected port by setting it to None.
After I assigned a PC COM port to a Macintosh serial port, my computer did not
start up properly.
This problem can occur if you are using Apple Remote Access (ARA) 2.0
or 2.0.1. To correct the problem, restart while holding down the Shift key to
temporarily turn off all system extensions. Then remove the Serial Port
Arbitrator from the Extensions folder inside your System Folder, and restart
your computer. (Before you use ARA, unassign the PC COM port and restart
the Mac OS environment.) You can also correct this problem by upgrading to
ARA 2.1.
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Problems with files and disks
I can’t eject my floppy disk or CD when I am in the PC environment.
To eject a floppy disk in the PC environment, press x-E. To eject a CD in the
PC environment, press x-Y.
If you are unable to eject the disk using the keyboard combination, the disk
may be in use. Close all open applications in both environments and then try
to eject the disk from the Mac OS environment.
I want to assign a drive container to the C or D drive, but I can’t find the drive container
in the dialog box.
The drive container may be assigned to another drive letter. Check the C:
and D: pop-up menus.
The drive container may be on an external hard drive. Make sure that the
drive is connected correctly and the power is on. If it is not connected, shut
down the computer, reconnect it, and then restart.
I want my drive container to have more than one partition.
Create a new drive container following the instructions in “Creating a
Multiple Partition/Bootable Drive Container” in Chapter 3. Initialize the drive
container in DOS using the FDISK and FORMAT commands.
I can’t share all the folders I want.
Make sure that you have sufficient drive letters assigned in your
CONFIG.SYS file’s LASTDRIVE statement. The PC reserves the letters A–E;
other letters are available to be assigned to shared folders or volumes.
Novell NetWare may reassign drive letters even if you have assigned them to
shared folders. Try reserving additional drive letters and reassigning your
shared folders.
I inserted a floppy disk in the PC environment and it was ejected.
The disk may have been formatted for the Mac OS. Switch to the Mac OS and
try inserting the disk again.
Troubleshooting
81
I want to change the size of my drive container.
Once a drive container is created, its size cannot be changed. If you need to
increase the size of your drive container in order to install more applications
or files, you can create another drive container and assign it to drive D.
I inserted a PC-formatted disk in the Mac OS and an initialization message appeared.
PC Exchange may not be installed in the Control Panels folder. If you don’t
find it, you can reinstall it using your system software CD-ROM disc.
The disk may be damaged. Try inserting another disk. If that works, test the
original disk in the PC environment using a disk repair utility.
I can access a floppy disk from one environment but not the other.
Only a locked floppy disk can be accessed in both environments
simultaneously. Eject, lock, and reinsert the disk, or eject the disk, switch to
the environment you want to use it in, and reinsert the disk. The disk must be
formatted for the PC if you want to use it in the PC environment.
I switched to the Mac OS, and I don’t see the floppy disk I was using.
The floppy disk may not have been locked. To use an unlocked PC-formatted
floppy disk in the Mac OS, you must switch to the Mac OS before inserting
the disk. To use a disk in both environments, lock the disk.
Shared folders don’t get updated in Windows 95.
Sometimes you need to refresh shared folders manually in Windows 95. Click
“My Computer,” click View, then click Refresh.
In some Microsoft applications, a shared drive icon looks like a floppy disk or CD icon.
The shared drive is still usable.
I can’t access my Zip or Syquest drive while in the PC environment.
While in the PC environment, you can’t access removable media directly the
same way you access the floppy disk drive. However, you can set up a shared
folder in the Mac OS environment and then transfer information to and from
the removable media. For more information, see “Using Shared Volumes” in
Chapter 3, “Setting Up the PC Environment.”
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I am unable to use Microsoft Backup.
In Windows 95, you cannot use Microsoft Backup because it needs a PC
floppy drive controller that does not exist in your Macintosh. You can use a
Mac OS backup program to back up your PC container file.
You can use Microsoft Backup in Windows 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups.
To do so, configure the backup manually by following these steps:
1. Add the following line to the [386enh] section of your SYSTEM.INI file:
device=vfintd.386
Your SYSTEM.INI file is in the WINDOWS directory.
2. Start the Microsoft Backup program.
3. Click No in the Auto-configure dialog box.
4. In the Configuration window, select “1.44 Mb 3.5” in the Drive A list box.
You may also click Configure from the standard toolbar at the top. Do not
click the Compatibility Test button because it may cause a system “freeze.”
5. Click Backup on the standard toolbar.
6. If you are backing up to floppy disks, choose MS-DOS Path from the
Backup To list box. Type “A:\” in the second list box that appears.
You can type a different path to back up to a network device.
7. Continue with your backup.
When you use the Compare or Restore options, you must choose MS-DOS
Path in the Compare From and Restore From list boxes.
I can’t start up the PC from a drive container created in Insignia SoftWindows or SoftPC.
You can use drive containers created with SoftWindows or SoftPC, but you
will not be able to start up from them. When you select a container created
with SoftWindows or SoftPC, be sure to choose a drive letter other than C.
If SoftWindows or SoftPC is running, you cannot access the drive containers.
In the PC environment, the CD-ROM drive doesn’t recognize some CDs.
The PC Compatibility Card only recognizes the following types of CDs: PC
format (ISO 9660), dual format (discs formatted for both the Macintosh and
PCs), and audio. Some specialized formats are not supported.
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Problems with information transfer
Copying and pasting between environments isn’t working.
Only certain kinds of information can be copied and pasted. See “Copying
and Pasting Information Between the Mac OS and Windows Environments”
in Chapter 4 for more information.
Copying and pasting between Mac OS and Windows works only if the PC
Clipboard extension is installed in the Extensions folder inside the System
Folder (in the Mac OS) and WINCLIP is installed in the Windows
environment.
Check the Control Panels folder in your System Folder to make sure that the
Macintosh Easy Open (Mac OS Easy Open) control panel is installed. Make
sure the Automatic Document Translation option is turned on.
If Mac OS Easy Open is not available, you can install it from your system
software CD.
Windows must be running before you begin to copy and paste.
You cannot copy and paste between the Mac OS and DOS.
The PC Setup Prefs file may be damaged. Locate the file (in the Preferences
folder inside the System Folder) and throw it away; then restart the
Macintosh. When the computer starts up, open the PC Setup control panel
and reconfigure your settings.
Tips for copying and pasting images
If you are having trouble copying and pasting text or images between the
Mac OS and PC environments, try the following tips:
m Instead of using the Paste command, use the Paste Special command if it
is available in the application you are pasting into.
m If you cannot paste an image into a word-processing program in the PC
environment, try pasting the image into a graphics program, such as
PaintBrush. Then copy the image to the Clipboard from the graphics
program and try pasting it into your word-processing program.
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m Instead of copying and pasting, use a shared folder to transfer an entire
file from one environment to another. Some Macintosh and Windows
programs can open files created on other platforms. For example,
ClarisWorks® for Windows can open ClarisWorks files created in the
Mac OS environment, and vice versa. Even if you are using two different
programs, you may be able to save a file in a file format that both
programs understand, such as RTF for text, and EPS or TIFF for graphics.
(Check the manuals that came with your programs to see if they support
common file formats.)
m If you must use the Clipboard to transfer a lot of data or a large graphic,
try transferring the data in smaller pieces or making more memory
available to the application. For more information on increasing a
program’s memory, see the “Memory” topic area of Mac OS Guide,
available in the Guide (h) menu.
m If you are copying and pasting a Photo CD image, make sure you are
copying an expanded version of the image.
I can’t copy graphics from a Microsoft Word 6.0 document in the Mac OS environment.
Try this method instead:
1. Select the graphic in Word 6.0 and choose Cut from the Edit menu.
2. Open the Edit menu and choose Paste Special.
3. In the Paste Special dialog box, select Picture format and click OK.
4. Select the graphic you just pasted and choose either Cut or Copy from the
Edit menu.
5. Switch to the PC environment and try pasting the graphic.
I can’t copy files from the Mac OS environment to a drive container.
To copy files to a drive container, the drive container file has to be mounted
on the desktop and the PC must be shut down.
I cannot open or save my files in a shared folder.
With some Windows 95 programs, you may not be able to open or save files
in a shared folder. You may have to move a file out of the shared folder before
you can open it, or save a file in a different location and then move it into the
shared folder.
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85
Communication and network problems
I can’t connect to a network in the PC environment.
Make sure that your networking software is properly installed and configured
(see the section on installing network support for Windows or Windows 95 in
Chapter 2, “Installing the PC Compatibility Card Software,” and see
Appendix D, “Installing Network Client Software”).
Make sure the network is up and running (check the Chooser and check with
your network administrator).
My PC communications software doesn’t work.
The Macintosh serial port does not have the same interface as the PC does
and some commands do not work. See “Setting Up a Modem or Other Serial
Device” in Chapter 3.
I get an error message associated with my Windows 95 PROTOCOL.INI file.
If an error message appears stating that there are illegal decimal characters in
the PROTOCOL.INI file, the Windows 95 Network control panel may have
modified some of the lines. To correct this problem, run the SETNET utility.
For more information, see Appendix D, “Installing Network Client Software.”
My system “freezes” when I am using ODI with Windows 95.
You may experience system “freezes” if you are using NetBEUI or TCP/IP
with ODI in Windows 95. To correct this problem, delete the following line
from the STARTNET.BAT file in the NWCLIENT directory:
C:\WINDOWS\ODIHLP.EXE
After deleting the line, add it to the end of your AUTOEXEC.BAT file.
When I start up in the PC environment I get a message that a shared volume no
longer exists.
Reassign the drive letter to a new drive. If you cannot remember the drive
letter, drag the PC Setup Preferences file to the Trash, open the PC Setup
control panel, and reconfigure your settings.
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Configuration problems
I can’t assign a COM port to a Macintosh serial port.
COM ports cannot be assigned to Macintosh serial ports that are in use by an
application or network software.
If you assign a COM port to a Macintosh serial port, the serial port cannot be
used by the Mac OS until you unassign the COM port.
When I try to use my Mac OS communications software, I get an error that says the
selected port is in use.
Your Mac OS communications software may be trying to use a port that is
assigned to the PC Compatibility Card. Open the PC Setup control panel and
unassign the selected port by setting it to None.
Sound problems
I can’t hear PC sounds.
PC sound may be turned off in the PC Setup control panel.
If you can’t hear sound from a CD, make sure that the internal audio cables
are installed according to the instructions in the chapter on installing the PC
Compatibility Card in your computer model.
The PC Compatibility Card can play sound only from the CD-ROM drive
with the lowest SCSI ID number. If you’re using another CD-ROM drive, you
won’t hear sound when you switch to the PC environment.
If you are using DOS or Windows, increase the speaker volume with the
Sound Blaster Mixerset application. To run the Mixerset application from
DOS, change to the VIBRA16 directory, type mixerset, and press Return.
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87
Check that the AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS files contain the
following lines:
AUTOEXEC.BAT (for Windows 95)
SET SOUND=C:\PROGRA~1\CREATIVE\CTSND
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 H5 P330 T6
SET MIDI=SYNTH:1 MAP:E
AUTOEXEC.BAT (for Windows)
SET SOUND=C:\VIBRA16
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 H5 P330 T6
SET MIDI=SYNTH:1 MAP:E
C:\VIBRA16\DIAGNOSE /S
C:\VIBRA16\MIXERSET.EXE /P /Q
CONFIG.SYS (for Windows 95 or Windows)
DEVICE=C:\VIBRA16\DRV\VIBRA16.SYS /UNIT=0 /BLASTER=A:220
I:5 D:1 H:5
DEVICE=C:\VIBRA16\DRV\CTMMSYS.SYS
CD sound went away when I switched environments.
If you are playing an audio CD when you start the PC and switch
environments, there is a delay in the sound while the PC completes some
system configuration tasks.
Check that the CONFIG.SYS file contains this line:
DEVICEHIGH=C:\APPLE\CDROM.SYS/D:CDDRVR
Check that the AUTOEXEC.BAT file contains this line:
For Windows 95:
LOADHIGH C:\WINDOWS\COMMAND\MSCDEX.EXE /D:CDDRVR /L:E
For Windows:
LOADHIGH C:\DOS\MSCDEX.EXE /D:CDDRVR /L:E
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Chapter 5
I’m using Windows or Windows for Workgroups, and I can’t play audio CDs with the
Media Player or CD utilities.
Reinstall the MCI CD Audio driver from your original Windows installation
disks. To install this driver, open the Control Panel icon in the Main
program group. Double-click the Drivers icon, select [MCI] sound driver
and click the Add button in the window that appears. Select [MCI CD
Audio] from the scroll list and click OK. Insert the specific Windows
installation disk if necessary.
Printing problems
Printing doesn’t work.
Make sure that you’ve selected the correct preferences in PC Print Spooler (in
the Extensions folder inside the System Folder). If your printer does not
support PostScript, choose Epson.
Make sure that you have chosen appropriate printer drivers in your DOS
applications and your Windows environment. If you have a PostScript Level 1
printer, you must choose a PostScript Level 1 printer driver in Windows—a
driver for a Level 2 printer will not work.
Make sure a printer is selected in the Macintosh Chooser.
If you’re using Windows, make sure that bidirectional printing and the
“Check port before printing” options are turned off. If you’re printing to a
PostScript printer, make sure that the “Send Ctrl+D” feature is turned off.
For more information, see “Setting Printer Options” in Chapter 3.
When I try to print from the DOS prompt, I get an error message.
If you’re using a PostScript printer driver, open PC Print Spooler in the
Extensions folder (inside the System Folder). Choose Preferences from the
File menu. Make sure the checkbox labeled “Allow DOS Text Printing” has an
X in it. Switch to DOS and try printing again (or move the spool file from the
Spooler Rejected folder to the Spooler folder).
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89
When I print a document in the PC environment, the top and bottom get clipped.
If you’re using Epson emulation, open PC Print Spooler in the Extensions
folder, choose Preferences from the File menu, and select “Gaps between
pages.” In the PC environment, configure your applications to print to a
60-line page.
When I print a document from a DOS application, the fonts don’t look right.
Try choosing different fonts. If you’re using Epson fonts instead of bitmap
fonts, use monospaced fonts for best formatting results.
If you’re using Epson emulation, you may have chosen Faster Printing in the
Preferences dialog box of the PC Print Spooler, which prints the whole
document using a single font. Choose Better Quality and try printing again.
You may have selected a proportional space font as your default font in the
PC Print Spooler. If you select a proportional space font, the formatting of
your files may change. Try selecting a monospaced font such as Courier or
Monaco or using the graphical fonts available in your DOS application.
When I print a document in the PC environment, text doesn’t print or is cut off, or text
that should print at the bottom of one page prints on the next page.
Try selecting “No gaps between pages” in the PC Print Spooler Preferences
dialog box, and try printing again. (When you print after choosing this option,
the PC Print Spooler software will print 66 lines per page instead of 60 lines
per page.) For more information, see “Setting Printer Options” in Chapter 3,
“Setting Up the PC Environment.”
I selected “No gaps between pages” in the PC Print Spooler Preferences dialog box, but
text near the top and bottom of each page still doesn’t print or is cut off.
Most laser and ink jet printers cannot print close to the edges of a page. Find
out the minimum margins for your printer in the specifications section of the
manual that came with your printer. Then reset the top and bottom margins in
the application from which you are printing.
When printing multiple files in Windows 95, I keep getting PostScript errors.
Print one file at a time. Printing multiple files may cause a PostScript error. To
verify that the file has finished printing, check the Windows 95 printer queue.
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I can’t print a test page in Windows 95.
When you use Add Printer Wizard to set up a printer, do not print a test page
until the printer is configured according to the instructions in “Setting Up
Printing in Windows 95” in Chapter 3, “Setting Up the PC Environment.”
Then you can print a test sheet by doing the following:
1. In the Printers window, click the icon of the printer you just added.
2. Choose Properties from the Printer menu.
3. In the dialog box that appears, click Print Test Page.
When I print from Windows 95 to my Hewlett Packard PostScript printer, I get several
pages of strange text.
This occurs with some Hewlett Packard printers that support both PCL and
PostScript, including the following printers:
m LaserJet 6 Series w/ PostScript
m LaserJet 5 Series w/ PostScript
m LaserJet 4 Series w/ PostScript
m DeskJet 1600C/CM
m DeskJet 1200C/PS
The Windows 95 printer drivers for these printers include non-PostScript
information called a PJL (Printer Job Language) header that causes the PC
Compatibility Card to incorrectly print the PostScript code.
If the first line of every print job contains the letters PJL, you are experiencing
this problem. Configure the printer driver not to send a PJL header by setting
the printer driver to “archive format.” To do so, follow these steps:
1. Open the Properties window for the HP printer driver.
2. Select the PostScript tab.
3. Change the “PostScript output format” option to “Archive format.”
4. Click OK.
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91
Other problems
I’m running applications in both environments and they seem sluggish.
Significant drive access in one environment (including file sharing) can cause
a slowdown in the other.
The PC environment is frozen, and pressing Control-Alt-… doesn’t reset the system.
Try restarting by pressing x-Control-Alt-period (the decimal point on the
numeric keypad) or x-Control-Alt-…. If you can, switch to the Mac OS and
click Restart PC in the PC Setup control panel. If these options don’t work,
restart the Macintosh using the Reset key or keyboard command.
I can’t configure my pointing device.
You don’t need to configure some pointing devices.
If you have a two-button ADB pointing device, you may be able to use its
software to map the = (equal) key on the numeric keypad to the right button.
This lets the device behave like a standard PC device.
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Appendix A Removing the PC Compatibility Card
From Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
To completely remove your PC Compatibility Card hardware from your Power
Macintosh 7300 PC-Compatible computer, follow the instructions in this
appendix.
To remove the card to add memory, see Appendix B for instructions on how
to open the computer, and Appendix C for how to add memory.
To learn how to remove the card from your Power Macintosh 4400 PCCompatible computer, see the PC Compatibility Card Update that came with
your computer.
WARNING Do not install the card that came installed in your Power
Macintosh 4400 into any other computer. Using this card in another
computer could damage the system or cause random crashes. Only
a Power Macintosh 4400 model can accommodate the power
consumption of this card. (You can install the card from a Power
Macintosh 7300 computer into other models.)
93
WARNING The removal of the PC Compatibility Card is technically
complex. Unless you are comfortable working with components inside
computers, Apple recommends that you have the PC Compatibility Card
removed by your Apple-authorized dealer (who may charge a fee). If
you attempt to remove the card yourself, any damage you may cause
to your equipment will not be covered by the limited warranty on
your computer.
Do not attempt to remove the card, install memory, install the card, or
connect the cables without first reading this manual.
What you need
You’ll be removing your PC Compatibility Card and audio cables. For your
audio to work correctly, you’ll need to install the audio ribbon cable, shown
below on the left, that came with your computer. You will also need to install
the metal port access cover, shown below on the right, to cover the port access
opening on the back of your computer.
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Appendix A
Removing the PC Compatibility Card hardware
Opening the computer, expansion card cover, and chassis
For detailed instructions on opening your computer, expansion card cover,
and chassis, including important precautions, see Appendix B.
Disconnecting the cables
1
Unplug the audio cables from the PC Compatibility Card, the Macintosh logic board, and
the CD-ROM drive.
Be sure to pull the plugs, not the cables.
Remove the audio cables from the card, the logic board, and the CD-ROM drive.
Removing the PC Compatibility Card From Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
95
To remove a small plug attached to the card, grasp the sides of the plug and
pull firmly. It may help to gently rock the plug from side to side as you pull.
Gently rock
the plug.
Don’t pull on
the cable.
IMPORTANT Do not attempt to use pliers to remove any plugs; you may
damage the plugs, the card, or your computer.
2
Remove any other cables from the PC Compatibility Card.
If you have not already done so, remove the loopback cable and the PC
game controller cable (if one is attached) from the ports on the back of the
PC Compatibility Card.
If you are also removing a PC Serial and Parallel Card, detach the
peripheral flex cable from the PC Compatibility Card.
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Appendix A
Removing the card
3
Grasp the card by its edges (without touching any components on the card) and pull it
straight out of the slot.
IMPORTANT Do not rock the card side to side as you remove it. Doing so may
break the card or damage the slot.
Installing the port access cover
4
Slide the port access cover into the port access opening at the back of the computer, to
cover the opening.
Use the port access cover that came with your computer (shown earlier in this
appendix).
Installing the audio ribbon cable
5
Plug the audio ribbon cable into your CD-ROM drive and into the CD Audio
connector on the Macintosh logic board.
You need the audio ribbon cable that came with your computer (shown earlier
in this appendix). Plug either end of the cable into your CD-ROM drive,
thread it through the slot in the chassis, and plug the other end into the CD
audio connector on the Macintosh logic board (where you unplugged one of
the audio cables in step 1).
Replacing the computer’s cover
Replace the computer’s cover by following the instructions in Appendix B, in
the section “Replacing the Computer’s Cover.”
Removing the PC Compatibility Card From Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
97
Appendix B Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card
in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
If you have removed your PC Compatibility Card from your Power Macintosh
4400 computer and want to reinstall it, see the PC Compatibility Card Update
that came with your computer.
WARNING Do not install the card that came installed in your Power
Macintosh 4400 into any other computer. Using this card in another
computer could damage the system or cause random crashes. Only
a Power Macintosh 4400 model can accommodate the power
consumption of this card. (You can install the card from a Power
Macintosh 7300 computer into other models).
If you have removed your PC Compatibility Card from your Power Macintosh
7300 computer and want to reinstall it, follow the instructions in this
appendix. (To remove the card, first follow the instructions on how to open
the computer, expansion card cover, and chassis in this appendix; then see
Appendix A.)
IMPORTANT If you will be installing a PC Serial and Parallel Card with your PC
Compatibility Card, it’s easiest to install both cards at the same time. The PC
Serial and Parallel Card has standard PC ports that allow you to use several
kinds of PC-compatible peripherals from the Windows or DOS environment
(not from the Mac OS environment). Instructions in this chapter indicate when
to see your PC Serial and Parallel Card manual for installation information.
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WARNING The installation of the PC Compatibility Card is technically
complex. Unless you are comfortable installing components inside
computers, Apple recommends that you have the PC Compatibility
Card installed by your Apple-authorized dealer (who may charge a
fee). If you attempt to install the card yourself, any damage you may
cause to your equipment will not be covered by the limited warranty
on your computer.
Do not attempt to remove the card, add memory, install the card, or
connect the cables without first reading this manual.
What you need
Before beginning the installation process, make sure you have the PC
Compatibility Card and the audio cables.
PC Compatibility Card
Audio cables for
SCSI CD-ROM drives (2)
100
Appendix B
Installing the PC Compatibility Card hardware
There are several steps to installing your PC Compatibility Card hardware:
m opening the computer
m disconnecting the CD-ROM audio cable
m opening the expansion card cover and chassis
m inserting the PC Compatibility Card
m connecting the Sound Out cable
m connecting the CD In cable to the card
m replacing the chassis and expansion card cover
m connecting the CD In cable to the CD-ROM drive
m replacing the computer cover
Opening the computer
1
Shut down the computer and disconnect all cables from the computer, except for the
power cord.
Leave the computer plugged in for now, to ground it and protect its
components from static electricity damage.
2
If the security bar is installed, remove it by removing the screw under the front panel and
pressing the center of the bar.
First, remove the screw.
Then press the security bar near its
center to release it from the computer.
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
101
3
Press the two release buttons under the front panel and slide the cover toward you
approximately two inches.
Release buttons
102
Appendix B
4
Remove the cover from the computer.
After you’ve slid the cover forward about two inches, lift it straight up and off
the computer.
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
103
5
Touch the metal part of the power supply case inside the computer.
Always do this before you touch any parts, or install any components, inside
the computer. Touching the power supply case helps release static electricity
from your body and prevent possible damage to internal components.
IMPORTANT You can collect static electricity just by walking away from and
then back to your computer. If you need to move away from your computer
during installation, remember to touch the metal part of the power supply
case again before you continue installing.
Power supply case
104
Appendix B
6
Disconnect the power cord.
Remove the power cord from the back of your computer.
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
105
Disconnecting the CD-ROM audio cable
7
Disconnect the audio ribbon cable from the CD-ROM drive.
Your Power Macintosh PC-Compatible computer came with an audio ribbon
cable that you connected from your CD-ROM drive to your Macintosh logic
board after you removed the card. You need to disconnect this cable.
Be sure to pull the plug, not the cable.
Just disconnect this end of the cable for right now. Later you will replace this
cable with the other audio cables that came with your PC Compatibility Card.
(top, back of computer)
106
Appendix B
Opening the expansion card cover and chassis
8
Flip open the expansion card cover.
(front of computer)
9
Position the support foot.
The support foot holds the computer’s chassis when you open it.
Support foot
(front of computer)
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
107
10
Unlock the chassis release switches.
Move the release switches toward the inside
of the computer to unlock the top chassis.
11
Lift the chassis and rest it on the support foot. Make sure the support arm is engaged.
You can use this tab to lift the top chassis.
108
Appendix B
Gently swing the top part of the chassis
up so that it rests on the support foot.
Support arm
Be sure that the support arm engages this hole on the floor of
the bottom chassis so that the top chassis is locked in place.
What you do next depends on whether you are installing a PC Serial and
Parallel Card.
m If you want to install a PC Serial and Parallel Card, you need to connect the
peripheral flex cable to your PC Compatibility Card now. See the PC Serial
and Parallel Card manual for instructions. Then return to this manual and
go on to the next section, “Inserting the PC Compatibility Card.”
m If you don’t want to install a PC Serial and Parallel Card, go on to the next
section.
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
109
Inserting the PC Compatibility Card
12
Prepare the first PCI expansion slot.
You need to install your PC Compatibility Card in the first PCI expansion
slot, the slot closest to the center of the computer.
m If there is already a card in the first slot, move it to a different slot. If you
will be installing a PC Serial and Parallel Card, you should also remove
any card in the second slot (next to the first slot).
IMPORTANT Always hold PCI cards by their edges. Don’t touch any of the
components on the cards.
m If there is a port access cover installed, remove it.
(back of computer)
Port access opening to first slot
110
Appendix B
13
Align the card with the first expansion slot.
Align the card’s connector end (gold in color) with the first PCI expansion
slot. The ports on the card should face the port access opening on the
computer’s back panel.
14
Insert the card.
The end of the card should engage the card guide at the front of the computer.
Press down on the card. When the card is fully inserted, you won’t be able to
see the gold-colored connector any more.
m Don’t rock the card from side to side; press it straight into the slot. Rocking
the card can damage the PCI slot.
m Don’t force the card. If you meet a lot of resistance, pull the card out and
try again.
m To see if the card is connected, pull it gently. If it resists, it is connected.
Port access
opening
First PCI slot
As you lower the
card, you may find
it helpful to hold the
card slightly away
from the port access
opening until you actually
fit the card into its slot.
Be sure that the card engages the card guide.
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
111
Connecting the Sound Out cable
15
Disconnect the audio ribbon cable from the Macintosh logic board.
This cable is connected near the DRAM DIMM slots. The connector has four
pins and may be labeled “CD AUDIO” on the board.
This is the same cable you disconnected from the CD-ROM drive in
step 7. You will be replacing it with the cables that came installed with your
PC Compatibility Card.
112
Appendix B
16
Pull the cable through the hole in the chassis and set it aside.
Don’t force the cable. If it resists, jiggle it or feed it back through the hole and
try pulling it loose again.
Keep this cable; you will need to reinstall it if you remove your PC
Compatibility Card again.
Pull the disconnected CD cable through
this hole in the computer chassis.
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
113
17
Plug one of the two identical SCSI audio cables into the connector labeled
“REV_SND_OUT” (Reversed Sound Out) on the PC Compatibility Card.
The audio cables that came installed with your PC Compatibility Card may
have different colors of tubing at the ends to help you tell them apart, but
both cables work the same way.
IMPORTANT Use only the cables that came with this PC Compatibility Card.
Do not use cables from other models of the card.
Insert the cable’s smaller plug into the Reversed Sound Out connector. This
connector is in the upper-left corner of the card, the third connector from
the end.
Connector labeled “REV_SND_OUT”
on the PC Compatibility Card
114
Appendix B
18
Route the cable over the top of the PC Compatibility Card, behind the processor card,
and around the back of the Macintosh logic board. Then plug the cable into the audio
connector on the logic board.
Be sure you route the cable between the processor card and the back panel
(not over the top of the processor card).
Keep the cable away from the heat sink and center support post.
Insert the cable’s larger plug into the CD audio connector on the logic board,
where you unplugged the ribbon cable in step 15.
Route the cable around the back
of the computer’s interior as shown.
Processor card
Support post
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
115
Connecting the CD In cable to the card
19
Plug the other SCSI audio cable into the connector labeled “CD IN” on the far upper-left
corner of the PC Compatibility Card.
Insert the cable’s smaller plug into the connector labeled “CD IN” on the PC
Compatibility Card.
Connector labeled “CD IN” on the PC Compatibility Card
Do not plug any cable into this middle connector.
116
Appendix B
20
Route the second cable over the top of the PC Compatibility Card, behind the processor
card, around the back of the logic board, and through the hole in the computer’s chassis.
Be sure to route the cable between the processor card and the back panel (not
over the top of the processor card).
Keep the cable away from the heat sink and the center support post.
You’ll connect this cable to the CD-ROM drive in step 26.
Route the cable around the back
of the computer’s interior as shown.
Processor card
Feed the other end of the cable a few
inches into this hole in the computer chassis.
Support post
IMPORTANT If you are installing the PC Serial and Parallel Card, you should
insert it now. See the PC Serial and Parallel Card manual for instructions.
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
117
Replacing the chassis and expansion card cover
21
Make sure all cards and cables are firmly connected.
22
Disengage the support arm and swing the chassis down, without pinching any cables.
Make sure the cables you connected are away from the heat sink and center
support post.
Support arm
Disengage the support arm from the hole on the floor
of the bottom chassis by lifting up on the support arm.
Gently swing the top part of the chassis down until it rests securely on the bottom chassis.
Be sure that you don’t pinch any of the cables between the top and bottom parts of the chassis.
118
Appendix B
23
Lock the release switches.
Move the release switches toward the outside
of the computer to lock the top chassis.
24
Replace the support foot.
Release the support foot by unsnapping the
catch with your fingertip, and swing the support
foot back inside the chassis.
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
119
25
Flip the expansion card cover up and snap it back into place. (Be sure to snap the cover
back down on both ends.)
If the cover doesn’t snap into place easily, make sure no cables are in the way.
120
Appendix B
Connecting the CD In cable to the CD-ROM drive
26
Plug the audio cable you threaded through the computer’s chassis (in step 20) into the
back of the CD-ROM drive.
(top, back of computer)
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
121
Replacing the computer’s cover
27
Make sure all connectors are firmly attached.
Make sure
these connectors
were not loosened
during the installation.
If they have come
loose, push them
firmly back into place.
122
Appendix B
28
Lower the cover onto the case, leaving a two-inch gap, and then push the cover back.
Two-inch gap
(front of computer)
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
123
29
If you removed the security bar earlier, replace it now.
Place the security bar under the front panel and tilt the bar so that the hook
slides into the slot. Then reinsert the screw and tighten it into place.
IMPORTANT Do not overtighten the screw.
Security bar
Install the screw in the hole on the underside of the security bar.
124
Appendix B
30
Reconnect all equipment.
Reinsert the power cable and all other equipment cables.
Plug the power cord into the back of the computer.
You are now finished reinstalling the card. To learn how to reconnect your
monitors and other equipment, see Chapter 1.
Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your Power Macintosh 7300 Computer
125
Appendix C
Adding Memory to Your PC Compatibility Card
Your PC Compatibility Card comes with RAM (random-access memory)
already installed. You can increase the memory available to the card by
installing a DIMM (dual inline memory module) in the DIMM socket.
Memory you add to the card is for the exclusive use of your PC operating
system and may improve the performance of your PC software.
The DIMM socket accepts an 8, 16, 32, or 64 MB 60 ns, 5-volt DIMM. You
may use either EDO or fast-page mode memory.
WARNING The installation of the memory is technically complex.
Unless you are comfortable installing components inside computers,
Apple recommends that you have memory added by your Appleauthorized dealer (who may charge a fee). If you attempt to add
memory yourself, any damage you may cause to your equipment will
not be covered by the limited warranty on your computer.
Do not attempt to remove the card, add memory, install the card, or
connect the cables without first reading this manual.
127
Installing memory on the card involves the following steps:
m removing the card
m installing the new DIMM
m reinstalling the card
WARNING Your PC Compatibility Card contains one socket for
additional video RAM. To avoid damage to your computer, Apple
recommends that you have your Apple-authorized dealer install
additional video RAM (for a fee). If you attempt to install additional
video RAM yourself, any damage you may cause to your equipment will
not be covered by the limited warranty on your computer. See an
Apple-authorized dealer or service provider for additional information
about this or any other warranty question.
Removing the card
1
Open the computer.
IMPORTANT For detailed instructions on opening your Power Macintosh 7300
computer, including important precautions, see Appendix B. To learn how to
open your Power Macintosh 4400 computer, see the PC Compatibility Card
Update that came with your computer.
2
Remove any cables from the PC Compatibility Card ports.
If you have not already done so, remove the loopback cable, and the PC game
controller cable (if one is attached), from the ports on the back of the PC
Compatibility Card.
3
If necessary, disconnect the audio cables from the PC Compatibility Card.
Because the audio cables can be difficult to remove, it’s best to leave them
connected if possible. If you feel you can pull the card out and access the
DIMM slot without disconnecting the audio cables, leave the cables in place.
128
Appendix C
Otherwise, make a note of where the audio cables are connected so you’ll
know where to reconnect them later. Then grasp the side of each plug and
pull firmly. Be sure to pull the plug, not the cable. It may help to gently rock
the plug from side to side as you pull.
IMPORTANT Do not pull on or move the cables themselves. They are routed
under the chassis in a specific way.
Gently rock
the plug.
Don’t pull on
the cable.
Do not attempt to use pliers to remove these plugs; you may damage the plugs
or your card.
4
If you have installed a PC Serial and Parallel Card, unplug the peripheral flex cable (the
cable that connects the two cards) from your PC Compatibility Card.
5
Grasp the PC Compatibility Card by its sides (without touching any components on the
card) and pull it straight out of the slot.
IMPORTANT Do not rock the card side to side as you remove it. Doing so may
break the card or damage the slot.
Adding Memory to Your PC Compatibility Card
129
Installing the new DIMM
1
Remove the DIMM from its static-proof bag.
Handle the DIMM by its edges. Avoid touching the connectors.
2
Make sure the DIMM lever is in the open position.
Move the ejector lever to the open position, as shown.
130
Appendix C
3
Push the DIMM into the DIMM slot until the lever snaps into the closed position.
The DIMM is designed to fit into the socket
only one way. Be sure to align the notches
in the DIMM with the small ribs inside the
socket. With the ejector in the open
position (as shown), push the DIMM
into the socket until it snaps into
place. The ejector will
automatically close.
Ribs (inside socket)
Ejector (The ejector should be pushed outward
to be in the open position, as shown.)
DIMM socket
Notches
DIMM (The number of components and
their arrangement on your DIMM may vary.)
4
Make sure the DIMM is snapped into place on both ends.
Make sure the DIMM is properly seated
by pressing firmly on both ends.
When in the closed position, the ejector
should engage the small semiround
indentation on the side of the DIMM.
Adding Memory to Your PC Compatibility Card
131
Reinstalling the card
For more detailed instructions on reinstalling the card into your Power
Macintosh 7300 computer, see Appendix B. For detailed reinstallation
instructions for your Power Macintosh 4400 computer, see the PC
Compatibility Card Update that came with your computer.
1
Insert the card into the slot you removed it from.
2
Reconnect the cables to the card as they were before you removed them.
3
Make sure the cables are routed correctly (see Appendix B, step 20).
4
Replace the computer cover.
5
Reconnect the equipment cables to the card ports.
IMPORTANT Make sure you connect your monitor and PC game controller to
the correct ports on the PC Compatibility Card. (See Chapter 1 for more
information.)
Your PC Compatibility Card is now fully installed with extra memory and is
ready to use.
132
Appendix C
Appendix D
Installing Network Client Software
The PC Compatibility Card supports network drivers that conform to Novell’s
Open Data-Link Interface (ODI) and Microsoft’s Network Driver Interface
Specification (NDIS) version 2.0. This appendix describes how to install and
configure a variety of network protocol software and client software.
Use this appendix as a supplement to the documentation that came with your
network software. If your configuration still doesn’t work after following the
instructions in this appendix, contact the manufacturer of your network
software.
Throughout the process of installing network software, remember the four
following items:
m You must run SETNET every time you add or remove a network protocol,
install or upgrade network software, or change anything in the network
control panel. If you do not run SETNET, you will experience network
problems.
m When you install a NetWare client, install it under the NWCLIENT
directory. Otherwise, the SETNET program will not work with ODI and
your networking software will not work correctly.
m Use the MACODI.COM and MACNDIS.DOS driver found on the PC
Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD when installing network protocols for
the PC Compatibility Card. Do not use any of the drivers that ship with
Windows 95.
m When using the MACODI.COM driver, use the latest LSL driver (2.21 or
later), available from the Novell Web site at http://www.novell.com.
133
This appendix contains instructions for installing and setting up the
following network software combinations:
ODI driver with the following protocols
m NetBEUI and IPX/SPX in Windows 95
m TCP/IP in Windows 95
NDIS 2.0 driver with the following protocols
m NetBEUI and IPX/SPX in Windows 95
m Microsoft’s TCP/IP and IPX/SPX in Windows 95
Configuring the built-in TCP/IP Stack for PPP (modem) in Windows 95
If you are installing a protocol for use with an ODI driver, see “Installing
Protocols for Use With Open Data-Link Interface (ODI),” next. If you are
installing a protocol for use with an NDIS 2.0 driver, see “Installing
Protocols for Use With Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS) 2.0,”
later in this appendix.
Installing protocols for use with Open Data-Link Interface (ODI)
Before you install a protocol for use with ODI, follow the instructions in this
section to install the appropriate NetWare client software. Then refer to the
instructions later in this section that describe installing and setting up the
network protocol you want to use.
You need to know the Ethernet frame type in use on your network segment.
Your network administrator can give you this information.
Installing NetWare client software version 1.02 for Windows 95
The NetWare client software that’s installed under Windows 95 can use either
the NDIS or ODI driver (unlike Windows for Workgroups and DOS, where
only the ODI driver can be used). The following steps describe how to install a
NetWare client under Windows 95 using the ODI driver.
134
Appendix D
1
Switch to the PC environment and start Windows 95.
2
In Windows 95, click Start and then select Shutdown from the menu that appears.
3
In the window that appears, select “Restart the computer in MS-DOS mode.”
4
Insert the NetWare Client Kit Disk 1 into the disk drive.
5
To switch to the disk, type the following:
A: <return>
6
To start the installation process, type the following:
INSTALL <return>
7
Follow the instructions on screen for steps 1–3. Then select step 4 and press Return.
A list of network interface controller (NIC) drivers appears.
8
Eject the NetWare floppy disk by pressing x-E.
9
Insert the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD and press Return.
The MACODI.COM driver is located in the \Apple directory on the PC
Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD.
10
From the list of choices, select “PC Compatibility Ethernet Adapter” and press Return.
11
When installation is complete, return to Windows 95 by typing the following:
EXIT <return>
12
When Windows 95 restarts, you see an error message. Press Return.
The error message is
C:\windows\system\vmm32\vnetbios.VXD does not exist
13
Click Start, choose Settings from the menu that appears, and then select Control Panel.
14
Double-click the Network icon to open it.
15
Select Add in the Network control panel.
16
Select the Adapter Component in the Network Component list and then click Add.
17
Under Manufacturers, select “(detected net drivers).”
Installing Network Client Software
135
18
Under Network Adapters, select Existing ODI Driver and click OK.
Configuration takes about 30 seconds. When it’s finished, the Network
Configuration lists the following:
Client for Microsoft Networks
Client for Novell Networks
Existing ODI Driver
IPX/SPX-Compatible Protocol
NetBEUI
19
To share your printers or files with other users on the network, select “File and
Print Sharing.”
Click the checkboxes to turn on file or printer sharing. Then click OK.
20
If file or printer sharing has been selected, the following line is added to the Network
Configuration Box:
File and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks
21
Select the Identification tab.
The computer must have a unique identity to access the network.
22
In the window that appears, type the following information and then click OK:
m a unique name for the computer
m a workgroup for the computer (typically WORKGROUPS)
m a description to identify the computer (optional)
136
Appendix D
23
Click the OK button at the bottom of the configuration box when you are finished.
24
When prompted, insert the Windows 95 CD into the CD-ROM drive.
25
You are asked if you want to restart your computer. Select No.
26
Eject the Windows 95 CD and then insert the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD into
the CD-ROM drive.
27
Click Start and choose Run from the menu that appears.
28
In the dialog box that appears, type
E:\APPLE\SETNET <return>
29
Select the following items and then click OK:
m ODI radio button
m IPX/SPX checkbox
m Ethernet_802.2 radio button
m NETBEUI checkbox
30
Close the control panel and remove the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD from the
CD-ROM drive.
31
Click Start and then choose Shutdown from the menu that appears.
32
Restart the PC.
33
You see a message warning of an invalid NetWare command. Select Yes.
34
In the Login dialog box, enter your user ID.
35
Press Tab, enter your password, and click OK.
A dialog box appears asking to save your password. To save the password,
reenter the password and then click OK. If you don’t want to save the
password, select Cancel.
36
To view other servers on the network, double-click the Neighborhood Network icon on
the Windows 95 desktop.
Your computer scans for other machines on the network.
Installing Network Client Software
137
Installing NetBEUI and IPX/SPX in Windows 95
NetBEUI and IPX/SPX are automatically installed as part of the standard
NetWare client software version 1.02 installation. Refer to the section
“Installing NetWare Client Software Version 1.02 for Windows 95,” earlier in
this appendix.
Installing Client 32 for Windows 95
This section describes how to install Client 32 for Windows 95. Client 32 is
installed on top of the existing NetWare version 1.02.
1
Install NetWare Client version 1.02 for Windows 95.
To install NetWare version 1.02 for Windows 95, follow the steps in the
section “Installing NetWare Client Software Version 1.02 for Windows 95,”
earlier in this appendix.
2
Follow the onscreen instructions.
3
When prompted for a driver, select “Existing ODI Driver.”
4
When installation is complete, restart Windows 95.
Installing TCP/IP in Windows 95
This section describes how to install the TCP/IP protocol for use with an ODI
driver in Windows 95. If you are using NDIS 2.0, refer to this topic in
“Installing Protocols for Use With Network Driver Interface Specification
(NDIS) 2.0,” later in this appendix.
1
Install the NetWare client software.
For more information, see the appropriate section on installing NetWare
client software earlier in this appendix.
138
Appendix D
2
In Windows 95, click the Start button, choose Settings, and then choose Control Panel.
3
Double-click the Network icon in the Control Panel.
4
Click Add in the Network Configuration dialog box.
5
Select Adapter Component from the Network Component list and click Add.
6
In the Manufacturers list, select “(detected net drivers).”
7
In the Network Adapters list, select Existing ODI Driver, and then click OK.
The Network Configuration dialog box appears.
8
Click Add.
9
Double-click the Protocol icon.
10
In the Manufacturers area, select Microsoft. In the Network Protocols area, select TCP/IP.
11
To share files or your printer with other users on the network, click the “File and Print
Sharing” button.
12
Select the checkboxes in the dialog box to enable file or printer sharing. Then
click OK.
If file or printer sharing has been selected, “File and printer sharing for
Microsoft Networks” appears in the Network Configuration dialog box.
13
Select the Identification tab at the top of the Network Configuration dialog box.
14
Type a unique name, a workgroup name, and any description you would like for the
computer.
The computer must have a unique name to access the network. The
workgroup name is usually “WORKGROUPS.”
15
Click OK.
16
Insert the Windows 95 CD when prompted to do so.
17
When the System Settings Change dialog box prompts you to restart your computer,
click No.
18
Go to “Running the Network Protocol Setup (SETNET) Utility,” near the end of this
appendix, and follow the instructions there.
WARNING You must run SETNET every time you add or remove a
network protocol, install or upgrade network software, or change
anything in the network control panel. If you do not run SETNET, you
will experience network problems.
Installing Network Client Software
139
Installing protocols for use with Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS) 2.0
Installing NetBEUI and IPX/SPX in Windows 95
This section describes how to set up the NetBEUI and IPX/SPX protocols for
use with an NDIS driver in Windows 95. If you are using ODI, refer to this
topic in “Installing Protocols for Use With Open Data-Link Interface (ODI)”
earlier in this appendix.
1
In Windows 95, click Start, choose Settings, and then choose Control Panel.
2
Double-click the Network icon to open it.
3
Select Add; then select Adapter.
4
Select Have Disk.
5
Insert the floppy disk containing the NDIS 2.0 driver. Verify the drive; then click OK.
6
You see the message “PC Card Network Driver (NDIS2).” Click OK.
The following network items will be automatically installed:
m Client for Microsoft Networks
m Client for NetWare Networks
m PC Card Network Driver (NDIS2)
m IPX/SPX-compatible Protocol
m NetBEUI
7
Choose any custom settings you need (for example, enable file sharing).
8
Select Identification. Fill in the boxes labeled “Computer Name,” “Workgroups,” and
“Computer Description.” Then click OK.
9
Insert the Windows 95 CD when prompted to do so.
Windows 95 will install all the necessary network components.
10
140
Appendix D
Go to “Running the Network Protocol Setup (SETNET) Utility” near the end of this
appendix and follow the instructions there. Then return to this section.
WARNING You must run SETNET every time you add or remove a
network protocol, install or upgrade network software, or change
anything in the network control panel. If you do not run SETNET, you
will experience network problems.
11
After running SETNET, make sure your PROTOCOL.INI file contains the following:
PROTOCOL.INI
[NDISHLP$]
DRIVERNAME=NDISHLP$
BINDINGS=MACNDIS$
[PROTMAN$]
DRIVERNAME=PROTMAN$
PRIORITY=NDISHLP$
[DATA]
VERSION=V4.00.950
NETCARDS=MACNDIS$,MACNDIS
[NETBEUI$]
DRIVERNAME=NETBEUI$
LANABASE=0
SESSIONS=10
NCBS=12
BINDINGS=MACNDIS$
[NWLINK$]
DRIVERNAME=NWLINK$
FRAME_TYPE=4
CACHESIZE=0
BINDINGS=MACNDIS$
[MACNDIS$]
DRIVERNAME=MACNDIS$
PROTOCOLDOT2="F0,E0,FF"
12
Shut down Windows 95.
13
Switch to the Mac OS by pressing x-Return.
14
Click Restart PC in the PC Setup control panel.
Installing Network Client Software
141
Installing Microsoft TCP/IP-32 IP protocol stack in Windows 95
This section describes how to set up the Microsoft TCP/IP-32 IP protocol for
use with an NDIS driver in Windows 95.
This section assumes that you are installing only the Microsoft TCP/IP
protocol. If you want to install additional protocols, you must modify the
PROTOCOL.INI file accordingly. The SETNET utility can add this
information for you.
1
Start Windows 95.
2
In Windows 95, click Start, choose Settings, and then choose Control Panel.
3
Double-click the Network icon to open it.
4
Select Add; then select Adapter.
5
Select Have Disk.
6
Insert the floppy disk containing the NDIS 2.0 driver. Verify the drive; then click OK.
7
You see the message “PC Card Network Driver (NDIS2).” Click OK.
The following network items will be automatically installed:
m Client for Microsoft Networks
m Client for NetWare Networks
m PC Card Network Driver (NDIS 2.0)
m IPX/SPX-compatible Protocol
m NetBEUI
8
Choose any custom settings you need (for example, enable file sharing).
If you want to install only the TCP/IP protocol, remove the other protocols
after you have installed the TCP/IP protocol stack.
142
Appendix D
9
Click Add; then click Protocol; then click Add. Under Manufacturers, select Microsoft.
Under the Network Protocols, double-click TCP/IP.
10
Enter all the necessary information to configure the TCP/IP stack. Double-click the
TCP/IP protocol under the “PC Card Network Driver (NDIS2)” and enter the necessary
information.
11
Refer to “Running the Network Protocol Setup (SETNET) Utility,” next, and follow the
instructions there.
WARNING You must run SETNET every time you add or remove a
network protocol, install or upgrade network software, or change
anything in the network control panel. If you do not run SETNET, you
will experience network problems.
12
After running SETNET, make sure your PROTOCOL.INI file contains the following
(assuming TCP/IP is the only loaded protocol):
PROTOCOL.INI
[ndishlp$]
DriverName=ndishlp$
Bindings=MacNDIS$
[protman$]
DriverName=protman$
priority=ndishlp$
[data]
version=v4.00.950
netcards=MacNDIS$,MacNDIS
[MacNDIS$]
DriverName=MacNDIS$
ProtocolDIX=”800,806,8035”
13
Shut down Windows 95.
14
Switch to the Mac OS by pressing x-Return.
15
Click Restart PC in the PC Setup control panel.
Installing Network Client Software
143
Running the Network Protocol Setup (SETNET) utility
A PC-compatible Macintosh allows you to connect to more than one network
at a time, one in the PC environment and one in the Mac OS environment.
The Network Protocol Setup (SETNET) utility helps configure your PC
networking setup files (such as NET.CFG and PROTOCOL.INI) to
distinguish between information sent to the network selected in the Mac OS
environment and information sent to the network in the PC environment.
Before running SETNET, you must have installed network driver and protocol
software according to the instructions earlier in this appendix.
WARNING You must run SETNET every time you add or remove a
network protocol, install or upgrade network software, or change
anything in the network control panel. If you do not run SETNET, you
will experience network problems.
IMPORTANT If you are using ODI with Windows 95, you may need to
manually add the following two lines to your PROTOCOL.INI file before
running the SETNET utility.
[NET.CFG]
PATH=C:\NWCLIENT\NET.CFG
1
In Windows 95, click Start, and choose Run from the menu that appears.
A dialog box appears.
2
144
Appendix D
Insert the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD into the CD-ROM drive.
3
Type the following:
E:\APPLE\SETNET.EXE <return>
The Network Protocol Setup dialog box appears.
You do not need to select an option in the Network Driver area. The SETNET
utility automatically detects the network driver you installed.
4
Select one or more network protocols that you installed by clicking checkboxes in the
“Select Protocol and Frame Type” area.
You can select more than one protocol if you have installed more than one. If
you are only using one protocol, be sure to select its checkbox and leave the
other checkboxes unselected.
5
If you are using TCP/IP, ARP, RARP (TCP/IP), or IPX/SPX, select the appropriate frame
type for each selected protocol by clicking the buttons in the “Select Protocol and Frame
Type” area.
6
Click OK.
7
Shut down Windows 95.
8
Switch to the Mac OS by pressing x-Return.
Installing Network Client Software
145
9
Shut down the PC by clicking Shut Down PC in the PC Setup control panel.
10
Shut down the Macintosh, wait ten seconds, and start up the Macintosh again.
You need to shut down the Macintosh and start it up again to make sure that
the network software is installed properly.
Configuring the built-in TCP/IP stack for PPP (modem) in Windows 95
The following instructions assume that this is the first time you are installing
the Point-to-Point (PPP) software and no previous networking software has
been installed.
Using a modem connected to the Macintosh serial port
Note: The following example describes connecting a Macintosh modem to
the Macintosh modem port and then configuring it to be COM1 in the PC
environment. A modem can be connected to either the Macintosh modem
port or printer port and can be configured to COM1 or COM2 in the PC
environment.
146
Appendix D
1
With your computer turned off, connect a modem to the modem port on the back of
your computer.
2
Start up the Mac OS.
3
Open the PC Setup control panel.
4
Open the COM1 menu and choose Modem Port.
5
Switch to the PC environment.
Installing a modem in Windows 95
1
In Windows 95, click Start, choose Settings, and then choose Control Panel.
2
Double-click the Modem icon.
3
Click Next to allow Windows 95 to autodetect the modem. If you are not using a PC
modem, click “Don’t detect my modem; I will select it from a list”; then click Next. In the
next window, choose the modem that is similar to your own.
If Windows 95 does not autodetect your PC modem, check with your
modem’s manufacturer for driver information.
4
From the list of available ports, choose Communications Port (COM1); then click Next.
This step is needed only if Windows 95 did not autodetect your modem.
5
Enter the modem information and then click Next.
Windows 95 installs the appropriate modem driver. The Modem Properties
window appears.
6
Click Finish.
Installing Network Client Software
147
7
Click Diagnostics; then select the COM port that the modem is attached to (COM1).
8
Click More Info to show the characteristics of your modem; then click OK.
9
Click General and then click Properties to display the properties for your modem.
10
Click Connection; then click Advanced.
11
Make sure that the flow control and hardware handshaking options are checked. Click
OK until you get back to the Modem Properties window.
12
Click Close to complete the setup process.
Dial-up networking installation
1
In Windows 95, click Start, choose Settings, and then choose Control Panel.
2
Double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon.
3
Click the Windows Setup tab.
4
Double-click Communications.
5
In the window that appears, place a check next to Dial-Up Networking and then click OK.
6
Click OK again to start the installation process.
If the Windows 95 disc is not in the CD-ROM drive, you are asked to
insert it.
7
After the installation process is complete, restart Windows 95.
8
In Windows 95, click Start, choose Settings, and then choose Control Panel from the
menu that appears.
9
Double-click the Network icon.
Now the TCP/IP protocol needs to be installed in order to access the Internet
and other TCP/IP networks.
148
Appendix D
10
In the Network window, click Add.
11
From the list of available components, select Protocol; then click Add.
12
In the window that appears, choose Microsoft from the list of manufacturers. Then
choose TCP/IP from the list of network protocols.
13
Click OK to return to the Network window.
14
Double-click TCP/IP in the list of installed network components.
15
In the window that appears, configure the TCP/IP stack by filling in the appropriate
information. When you are finished, click OK.
16
Follow the instructions on the screen to finish the installation, and then restart
Windows 95.
Making a PPP connection
1
In Windows 95, click Start, choose Programs, choose Accessories, and then choose
Dial-Up Networking from the menu that appears.
2
Double-click Make New Connection.
3
Follow the instructions on screen to finish the procedure.
Consult your Windows 95 manual for more information about establishing a
PPP connection.
Installing Network Client Software
149
Appendix E
Configuring Video Software
This appendix describes special configuration options for the ATI video
circuitry and ATI video drivers that came with your PC Compatibility Card.
About video capabilities
The PC Compatibility Card comes with ATI video circuitry and an ATI
mach64 graphics accelerator, providing high-performance 64-bit graphics, and
acceleration up to 16.7 million colors (at a resolution of 800 x 600), or up to
1280 x 1024 resolution (with 256 colors). Availability of colors and resolutions
depends on the monitor connected, the type of chip, and the amount of video
memory installed.
The video circuitry is initially configured to display basic VGA at a resolution
of 640 x 480. If you have a multiple-scan monitor, you can configure the
circuitry to provide the full range of resolutions and refresh rates that your
monitor can support.
Your operating system may also provide utilities for installing and configuring
enhanced drivers. Please refer to the documentation that came with your
operating system for information.
151
Installing and configuring MPEG video support
For instructions on installing basic video software and selecting monitor types
in Windows 95, see Chapter 2, “Installing the PC Compatibility Card
Software,” and Chapter 3, “Setting Up the PC Environment.” This section
provides information about installing MPEG video software in Windows 95.
Note: Not all of the features described in the ATI onscreen instructions are
supported by the PC Compatibility Card.
Your video software includes the ATI Video Player—an MPEG player for
Windows and Windows 95 that provides full-motion, full-screen, color
MPEG video playback. You must install the enhanced video drivers before
installing the ATI Video Player.
Installing MPEG video support in Windows 95
To install the MPEG video support, follow these steps:
1
Insert the PC Compatibility Card–PC Utilities CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2
Click Start, then choose Run from the menu that appears.
3
Type the following:
E: \VIDEO\ATISETUP <return>
The ATI Setup Window appears.
4
Click ATI Video Player.
5
Follow the setup instructions to complete the installation.
Note: The ATI Installer looks for MPEG support software during the
installation process. If the necessary software is not found, the Installer
installs it and then restarts Windows 95. You will then need to repeat
steps 1 through 5 in order to install the MPEG video support.
152
Appendix E
Optimizing MPEG playback in Windows 95
You have three ways to optimize MPEG file playback performance in
Windows 95: you can adjust virtual memory, adjust CD-ROM caching, or
adjust ATI MPEG Player settings. There is no single best way to configure the
system. The instructions here describe where to find the configuration files
you can use to optimize playback for your system.
To adjust virtual memory settings, follow these steps:
1
Click Start, choose Settings, and choose Control Panel.
2
Double-click the System icon to open it.
3
Click the Performance tab and click the Virtual Memory button.
The options in the Virtual Memory window allow you to let Windows 95
automatically manage your virtual memory or set up virtual memory yourself.
4
Click OK when you are finished and close all the open windows.
5
Shut down Windows 95 and restart the PC for your changes to take effect.
To adjust CD-ROM caching settings, follow these steps:
1
Click Start, choose Settings, and choose Control Panel.
2
Double-click the System icon to open it.
3
Click the Performance tab and click the File System button.
4
Click the CD-ROM tab.
5
Decrease or increase the size of the Supplemental Cache to optimize performance.
6
Choose the speed of your CD-ROM drive from the “Optimize access pattern for”
pop-up menu.
7
Click OK.
Configuring Video Software
153
To set ATI MPEG Player properties, follow these steps:
1
Click Start, choose Programs, and then choose ATI Multimedia.
2
Double-click ATI Player.
3
Follow the onscreen instructions.
Video mode tables
This section describes the video mode specifications for ATI video drivers
using DRAM.
When discussing color depth, 8 bits per pixel (8 bpp) is the same as 256
colors. Therefore, the relation between bpp and colors is as follows:
Bits per pixel
Number of colors
8
256
16
65,000
24
16,700,000
32*
16,700,000
*32 is 24-bpp color data processed using a 32-bpp data format.
The ATI video drivers also support 15 bpp (32,000 colors). Any resolution and
refresh settings that support 16 bpp will support 15 bpp.
154
Appendix E
DRAM accelerator mode
The following table lists color depths and other features supported at various
monitor resolutions in graphics mode. The settings listed in this table can be
applied to multiscan monitors only.
Resolution
640 x 480
800 x 600
Refresh
rate (Hz)
Horizontal
Pixel clock
frequency (kHz) (MHz)
Maximum color
depth (bpp)*
60
31.4
25.2
24, 32†
72
37.7
31.2
24, 32
75
37.5
31.5
24, 32
90
47.9
39.9
16, 32
100
52.9
44.9
16, 16
120
63.7
55.0
—, 16
48 interlaced
33.8
36.0
16, 24
56
35.1
36.0
16, 24
60
37.8
40.0
16, 24
70
44.5
44.9
16, 32
72
48.0
50.0
16, 16
75
46.8
49.5
16, 16
90
57.0
56.6
8, 8
100
62.5
67.5
8, 8
120
76
81
—, 8
*In the “Maximum color depth” column, the first number is the bits per pixel supported at 1 MB DRAM; the second
number is the bits per pixel supported at 2 MB DRAM. A dash (—) means the color depth is not supported in that
DRAM configuration.
32 is 24-bpp color data processed using a 32-bpp data format.
†
continued .
Configuring Video Software
155
Resolution
1024 x 768
1152 x 864
1280 x 1024
Refresh
rate (Hz)
Horizontal
Pixel clock
frequency (kHz) (MHz)
Maximum color
depth (bpp)*
43 interlaced
35.5
44.9
8, 16
60
48.3
65.0
8, 16
70
56.4
75.0
8, 16
72
58.2
75.0
8, 16
75
60.0
78.8
8, 16
90
76.2
100
—, 8
100
79.0
110
—, 8
120
96.7
130
—, 8
43 interlaced
45.9
65.0
8, 16
47 interlaced
44.8
65.0
8, 8
60
54.9
80.0
8, 8
70
66.1
100
—, 8
75
75.1
110
—, 8
80
75.1
110
—, 8
85
77.1
121.5
—, 8
43 interlaced
50.0
80.0
4, 8
47 interlaced
50.0
80.0
4, 8
60
63.9
110
—, 8
70
74.6
126
—, 8
74
78.8
135
—, 8
75
79.9
135
—, 8
*In the “Maximum color depth” column, the first number is the bits per pixel supported at 1 MB DRAM; the second
number is the bits per pixel supported at 2 MB DRAM. A dash (—) means the color depth is not supported in that
DRAM configuration.
156
Appendix E
VESA BIOS Extension modes
The VESA BIOS Extension supports the following modes in multiscan
monitors. To determine which modes you can use with your monitor, run the
VESATEST utility.
Resolution
Maximum color
depth (bpp)
Graphics mode Minimum DRAM (MB)
640 x 480
8
110h, 101h
1
15 (5:5:5)
110h
1
16 (5:6:5)
111h
1
24 (8:8:8)
112h
1
4
102h, 6Ah
1
8
103h
1
15 (5:5:5)
113h
1
16 (5:6:5)
114h
1
4
104h
1
8
105h
1
15 (5:5:5)
116h
2
16 (5:6:5)
117h
2
800 x 600
1024 x 768
Configuring Video Software
157
Fixed-frequency monitors
The following tables list the resolutions supported on fixed-frequency
(non-multiscan) monitors. The color depths for 1 MB and 2 MB of DRAM
are also listed. You cannot change refresh rate and other timing items for
fixed-frequency monitors.
Macintosh 21-Inch Color Display
Refresh rate: 68.7 kHz (horizontal), 75.08 Hz (vertical)
Resolution
Color depth (bpp)
1 MB
2 MB
640 x 400
16
16
640 x 480
16
16
800 x 600
8
8
1024 x 768
not supported
8
Macintosh 21-Inch Monochrome Display
Refresh rate: 68.7 kHz (horizontal), 75.08 Hz (vertical)
158
Appendix E
Resolution
Color depth (bpp)
1 MB
2 MB
640 x 400
16
16
640 x 480
16
16
800 x 600
8
8
1024 x 768
not supported
8
Macintosh 19-Inch Color Display
Refresh rate: 60.2 kHz (horizontal), 74.9 Hz (vertical)
Resolution
Color depth (bpp)
1 MB
2 MB
640 x 400
16
16
640 x 480
16
16
800 x 600
8
8
1024 x 768
8
16
Macintosh 16-Inch Color Display
Refresh rate: 49.7 kHz (horizontal), 74.55 Hz (vertical)
Resolution
Color depth (bpp)
1 MB
2 MB
640 x 400
16
16
640 x 480
16
16
800 x 600
8
8
Macintosh Portrait Display (monochrome)
Refresh rate: 68.7 kHz (horizontal), 75.08 Hz (vertical)
Resolution
Color depth (bpp)
1 MB
2 MB
640 x 400
16
16
640 x 480
16
16
continued .
Configuring Video Software
159
Macintosh 12-Inch Monochrome Display, 13-Inch Color Display,
14-Inch Color Display, and AudioVision Display
Refresh rate: 35 kHz (horizontal), 66.67 Hz (vertical)
Resolution
Color depth (bpp)
1 MB
2 MB
640 x 400
16
16
640 x 400
24
32†
640 x 480
24
32†
32 is 24-bpp color data processed using a 32-bpp data format.
†
User-adjustable monitors
The following monitor types accept additional modes and display
customization. You can customize monitors using the Install program, the ATI
DeskTop program, or the Windows 95 Display control panel. You can add
modes either by selecting a predefined monitor type or by manually selecting
a set of modes. Consult the specifications for your monitor to ensure that it
supports the mode you want.
m VGA/SVGA
m Apple Multiple Scan 15 Display
m Apple Multiple Scan 17 Display
m Apple Multiple Scan 1705 Display
m Apple Multiple Scan 20 Display
m AppleVision 1710 Display
m AppleVision 1710AV Display
m DDC 1 /2B monitor
160
Appendix E
Can’t Find It? See also Mac OS Guide’s
onscreen index. Open the Guide (h) menu and
choose Mac OS Guide;
then click the Index button.
Index
A
accessing PC files, in Mac OS
environment 71–72
adapter cables, AudioVision 8
adapters
Sound Blaster-compatible
MIDI-to-joystick 9
VGA-to-Macintosh 5
ADB (Apple Desktop Bus)
cables 8
multibutton mouse 9
Alt key 67
Apple keyboards, using 67
AppleVision monitor, connecting 8
applications, sluggish 92
ATI Video Player
setup program 24
video capabilities 151
video mode tables 154–160
audio cables xii
disconnecting CD-ROM 106
installing 97
removing 95
for SCSI CD-ROM drives 100
audio CDs, problems playing in
Windows 89
audio ribbon cable, installing 97
AudioVision monitor, connecting 8
AUTOEXEC.BAT file
configuring 56
fixing sound problems 88
automatic volume sharing 51
B
backing up files, problems 83
booting
from a locked PC container 47
PC 64
C
cables
ADB 8
audio xii, 95
AudioVision adapter 8
CD In 116–117, 121
custom 54
loopback 2
Sound Out 112–115
card. See PC Compatibility Card
CD In cable
connecting 116–117
connecting to CD-ROM drive 121
161
Can’t Find It?
See also Mac OS
Guide’s onscreen index.
Open the Guide (h)
menu and choose
Mac OS Guide;
then click the
Index button.
162
Index
CD-ROM
audio cable 106
discs and drives 66
CDs
configuring sound 42
PC Compatibility Card-PC Utilities
20–21
problems playing audio in Windows 89
types recognized 83
using 66
Windows 95 software 13, 18
chassis, replacing 118–121
Client 32 protocol for Windows 95,
installing for ODI 138
cold boot 64
color depth/resolution in display
154–160
COM1 and COM2 serial ports, assigning
52–53
commands
Paste Special 84
resetting hot key to switch
environments 60
Switch to PC 58–59
computer cover
opening 101–105
replacing 97, 122–125
CONFIG.SYS file
assigning drive letters in 49
configuring 55–56
fixing sound problems 88
configuring
CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT
files 55–56
DDC-compliant monitors 30
monitors 30–32
mouse for PC 66–67
PC drives 44–48
PC serial ports 52–53
problems 87
TCP/IP stack for PPP (modem)
146–149
video software 151–160
connecting equipment
AppleVision monitor 8
AudioVision monitor 8
game controller 10
joystick 3, 5
loopback cable 2
MIDI (musical instrument digital
interface) device 9
modem or serial device 11
pointing device 9
printer 10
security dongle 11
single monitor
Power Macintosh 4400 computer
Power Macintosh 7300 computer
two monitors
Power Macintosh 4400 computer
Power Macintosh 7300 computer
containers. See drive containers
Control Strip
turning PC on and off 62
using to switch environments 59
copying files
between Mac OS and Windows
68–70
Mac OS files in PC environment 71
problems 84–85
cover. See computer cover
custom cables 54
3
4
6
7
D
DDC-compliant monitors, configuring 30
decimal characters in PROTOCOL.INI
file 86
desktop, rebuilding before switching 59
DIMM (dual inline memory module)
installing 127–132
status 32
directories
NetWare Client 133
video drive 24
Windows 95 20
disk cache, creating 56
disks
ejecting floppy 81
restarting from 65
sharing 11
display
color/resolution specifications
154–160
driver 24
non-Apple 79–80
documents, problems printing 90
DOS
commands in shared volumes 48
configuring CONFIG.SYS and
AUTOEXEC.BAT files 55–56
running Sound Blaster Mixerset from 87
startup problems 75
DRAM accelerator video mode table
155–156
drive containers
bootable 47
creating for hard disk 15–17
creating multiple partition/bootable
45–47
creating single partition/bootable
44–45
problems 81–82
using in PC environment 44
for Windows 95 xiii
drivers
display 24
installing protocols
for NDIS 140–143
for ODI 134–139
network 51
drives. See PC drives
E
ejecting
CDs 66
floppy disks 65
problems 81
Epson emulation print options,
in Mac OS 35–38
equipment. See connecting equipment
error messages. See messages
errors, reporting during printing 34
Ethernet Mac OS software 15
expansion card cover
opening 107–109
replacing 118–121
extensions
Clipboard 84
turning off 74
F
files
backing up 83
CONFIG.SYS 49
drive container 15–17
keyboard 22–23
sharing 47
using PC in Mac OS 71
verifying print status 41
fixed-frequency monitors, video mode
table 158–159
floppy disks
formatting 65
problems ejecting 81
restarting from 65
folders, problems sharing 81
fonts
in DOS application 90
selecting 36–37
formatting disks 65
G
game controller, connecting 9–10
getting started, quick start xi–xiv
graphics
capabilities 151
problems copying 85
Index
163
H
Can’t Find It?
See also Mac OS
Guide’s onscreen index.
Open the Guide (h)
menu and choose
Mac OS Guide;
then click the
Index button.
hard disk
assigning a drive letter 47–48
creating file for a drive container
15–17
partitioning 44–47
residing in SCSI chain 47–48
hardware. See PC Compatibility Card
help
control panel 27
DOS 47
in PC environment 70
hot key
setting 60
switching between environments 59
installing PC Compatibility Card
software
creating a drive container 15–17
Mac OS software 14–15
PC software 24
PC utilities 21–24
preinstalled 13
Windows 95 software 18–19
Windows 95 support 20–21
instructions, quick start xi–xiv
IPX/SPX protocol
installing for NDIS 140–141
installing for ODI 138
J
joystick, setting up 3, 5
I
icons
My Computer 70
PC Clipboard 70
PC Container 72
PC Print Spooler 34
PC Setup 58, 74
images
bitmap 72
jumbled or rolling 79
information
transferring 68–70, 84–85
initialization 82
installing DIMM (dual inline memory
module) 127–132
installing MPEG video support 152–154
installing network protocols
for NDIS 140–143
for ODI 134–139
installing PC Compatibility Card in
Power Macintosh 7300
computer. See Power Macintosh 7300
computer
164
Index
K
keyboard commands
keystroke equivalents 67
for rebooting 64
simulating two-button mouse 67
switching between environments
59–60
keyboard files in Windows 95, installing
22–23
L
lines per page, setting 90
locked disks 65
locked PC container, booting from 47
loopback cable, attaching 2
M
Macintosh. See Power Macintosh
MACODI.COM and MACNDIS.DOS
drivers, installing network
protocols 133
Mac OS Easy Open 76
Mac OS environment
busy port message 53
communications software problems 87
setting up printing 33–38
sharing volumes with PC 49–51
switching between environments
xiv, 30, 58–60
problems 76–77
turning PC on and off 61–63
using PC files 71–72
memory
expanded 55
increasing 127–132
messages
busy port 53
illegal decimal characters in
PROTOCOL.INI file 86
initialization 82
no monitor 77–78
non-system disk or disk error 76–77
printing from DOS prompt 89
selected port is in use 80, 87
shared volume no longer exists 86
switching problems 76
Microsoft Backup program, problems
using 83
Microsoft Open Data-Link Interface
(ODI) 133–134
Microsoft TCP/IP-32IP protocol stack,
installing for NDIS 142–143
Microsoft Windows 95 CDs 13, 18
MIDI (musical instrument digital
interface) device, connecting 9
Mixerset application, running from DOS 87
modems
cables 53–54
configuring PPP software 146–149
connecting 11
problems in Windows 95 80
setting up 53–54
using PC-compatible xii
mode specifications
bits per pixel/number of colors 154
fixed-frequency monitors 158–160
multiscan monitors 155–157
user-adjustable monitors 160
monitors
configuring 29–32
connecting
AppleVision 8
AudioVision 8
single 3–4
two 5–7
problems 77–79
types 31
user-adjustable 160
video mode tables 154–160
mouse
configuring for PC 66–67
connecting 9
MPEG video support in Windows 95
installing 152–153
optimizing playback 153–154
multibutton Mac OS-compatible pointing
device 66–67
multiple-scan monitors
adapters 5
customizing 31
multiscan monitors, video mode tables
155–157
musical instrument digital interface
(MIDI) device, connecting 9
My Computer icon 70
Index
165
N
Can’t Find It?
See also Mac OS
Guide’s onscreen index.
Open the Guide (h)
menu and choose
Mac OS Guide;
then click the
Index button.
NDIS (Network Driver Interface
Specification) 133
installing protocols for 140–143
NetBEUI protocol
installing for NDIS 140–141
installing for ODI 138
NetWare Client software
directory 133
installing using ODI 134–137
network client software
configuring TCP/IP stack for PPP
146–149
installing protocols for NDIS 140–143
installing protocols for ODI 134–139
running SETNET 144–146
tips for installing 133–134
network protocols
compatible with network drivers 51
installing for NDIS 140–143
installing for ODI 134–139
preventing problems 144
Network Protocol Setup (SETNET),
running 133, 144–146
networks
connecting to 11
installing client software 134–144
problems 86, 144
setting up PC environment 51
no monitor message 77–78
non-system disk or disk error, message
76–77
Novell
Open Data-Link Interface (ODI)
133–134
web site 133
O
ODI (Open Data-Link Interface) 133
installing protocols for 134–139
problems using 86
onscreen help
in PC environment 70
PC Setup control panel 27
166
Index
Open Data-Link Interface (ODI).
See ODI
opening PC Setup control panel 28
operating systems
compatibility with network drivers 51
installing Windows 95 18–19
Option key 67
P
pages, setting lines per page 90
page setup options 35–38
partitions
creating 44–47
problems 81
Paste Special command 84
pasting, between Mac OS and Windows
environments 68–70
PC Clipboard 68–69
icon 70
Mac OS software 15
problems transferring information
84–85
PC Compatibility Card
increasing memory 127–132
network drivers supported 133
reinstalling in Power Macintosh 7300
connecting CD In cable to
CD-ROM drive 121
connecting the CD In cable 116–117
connecting the Sound Out cable
112–115
disconnecting the CD-ROM
cable 106
inserting the card 110–111
opening expansion card cover and
chassis 107–109
opening the computer 101–105
replacing chassis and expansion
card cover 118–120
replacing the computer cover
122–125
what you need 100
removing from Power Macintosh 7300
93–95
turning on and off with PC Setup
control panel 62
using in other computers 93
video capabilities 151
PC Compatibility Card-Mac OS Software
CD 14
PC Compatibility Card-PC Utilities CD 20
PC Compatibility Card Update 93
PC Compatibility Folder xiii
PC Compatibility Guide 27
PC Compatibility Mac OS software 15
PC COM ports 52–53
assignment problems 87
start-up problems 80
PC container
icons 72
locked 47
PC drives
assigning to a PC-formatted
hard disk 47
changing an assignment 48
creating a multiple partition/bootable
drive container 45–47
creating a single partition/bootable
drive container 44–45
floppy disk drive letters 65
setting up drive letters 56
PC environment. See also setting up the
PC environment
beep sounds 42
capabilities xi-xii
CD-ROM discs and drives 66
communication problems 86
controlling from Control Strip
module 28
copying and pasting
between environments 68–70
problems 84–85
files
in Mac OS environment 71–72
problems 81–83
floppy disks and drives 65
frozen 92
keystroke equivalents 67
modems
connected to Macintosh serial port 53
problems 80
monitor problems 77–79
network problems 86
onscreen help 70
PC Setup control panel 26–27
peripheral devices xii
pointing device 66–67, 92
printing problems 89–91
restarting 64
sharing volumes and folders 49–51, 71
sound
problems 87–89
turning on and off 43
types 42
starting up
automatically 17
from floppy disk 18
problems 74–75
switching 58–60
problems 76–77
turning on and off 61–64
PC Net Exchange Mac OS software 15
PC Network Extension Mac OS
software 15
PC Print Spooler
icon 34
Mac OS software 15
managing the PC 28
opening from PC Setup Control Strip
module 33
Preferences dialog box 36
setting up in Mac OS 33–35
PC Serial and Parallel Card xii, 10, 99
PC Setup control panel
accessing 15–16
RAM information 32
starting the PC automatically 63
switching between environments 58
turning the PC on and off 61–62
using 26–27
Index
167
Can’t Find It?
See also Mac OS
Guide’s onscreen index.
Open the Guide (h)
menu and choose
Mac OS Guide;
then click the
Index button.
168
Index
PC Setup Control Strip module, using 28
PC Setup icon 58
problems with 74
PC Setup Mac OS software 15
PC Setup Switch Mac OS software 15
PC utilities
installing
keyboard files 22–23
QuickTime for Windows 95
software 23
Sound Blaster software for
Windows 95 software 23
video software 24
PJL (Printer Job Language), printing
problems 91
pointing device
configuration problems 92
connecting 9
using 66–67
ports
access cover xii, 97
ADB 8
configuring PC serial 52–53
game controller 9
joystick 3, 5, 10
PC Compatibility Card
Power Macintosh 4400 computer 3
Power Macintosh 7300 computer 7
PostScript printers 33
selecting printer drivers 39–41
Power Macintosh 4400 computer
audio cable xii
connecting monitors 3, 6
removing PC Compatibility Card 93
Power Macintosh 7300 computer
audio ribbon cable xii
connecting monitors 4, 7
reinstalling PC Compatibility Card
connecting CD In cable 121
connecting the CD In cable to card
116–117
connecting the Sound Out cable
112–115
disconnecting CD-ROM cable 106
inserting the card 110–111
installing hardware 101
opening card cover and chassis
107–109
opening the computer 101–105
replacing chassis and card cover
118–120
replacing computer cover 122–125
what you need 100
removing PC Compatibility Card
93–97
Power Macintosh computers
keyboard equivalents 67
logic board 112
monitor resolution 158–160
PC features xi–xii
Power Macintosh modems
connecting to serial port 146–147
dial-up networking installation
148–149
installing in Windows 95, 147–148
making a PPP connection 149
PPP (modem), configuring TCP/IP stack
146–149
printer drivers
saving in PC environment 42
setting up 39–41
printers
connecting 10
Epson emulation print options 35–38
non-PostScript drivers 42
PostScript 33, 39–41
setting options in Mac OS 33–38
setting up printer drivers 39–42
using PC-compatible xii, 10, 33
printing
problems 89–91
reporting errors 34
setting preferences in Mac OS 33–38
setting up in PC environment 39–43
Print Spooler. See PC Print Spooler
programs, sluggish 92
PROTOCOL.INI file 144
containing illegal decimal characters 36
protocols. See network protocols
Q
quick start instructions xi–xiv
QuickTime
copying files to PC environment 71
installing for Windows 95 23
R
RAM (random-access memory),
“On Board” 32
reinstalling PC Compatibility Card in
Power Macintosh 7300
computer. See Power Macintosh
7300 computer
removing card from Power Macintosh
7300 computer 93–97
resolution
VGA 151
video mode tables 154–160
restarting the PC
with the Control Strip 62
in the PC environment 64
with the PC Setup control panel 61
problems 75
S
screen, blank 77
SCSI chain, hard disk in 47
security dongle
connecting 11
using PC-compatible xii
selected port is in use, message 80, 87
selecting monitors 30–32
serial devices 53–54
connecting 11
setting up 53–54
serial ports, assigning 52–53
SETNET (Network Protocol Setup),
running 133, 144–146
setting up the PC environment
configuration problems 87
configuring serial ports 52–53
DOS configuration files 55–56
drives 44–48
hard disk for 15–17
MIDI device 9
modem or serial device 53–54
monitors 29–32
on a network 51
print setup
Mac OS 33–38
PC 39–42
RAM information 32
shared volumes 48–51
sound 42–43
using the Control Strip module 28
using the PC Setup control panel 26–27
shared disks, connecting to 11
shared folders and volumes
between Mac OS and PC 49–51
no longer exist 86
in PC environment 71
problems 81, 85, 86
using DOS commands 48
Shut Down Warning option 63
shutting down PC
from the Control Strip 62
from Control Strip module 28
from the PC Setup control panel 61
SoftPC, problems starting from 83
software
assigning drive letters to storage
areas 44
installing
drive containers 15–17
PC Compatibility Card 14–15, 74
PC utilities 21–24
Windows 95 operating system
18–19
Windows 95 support 20–21
Mac OS 15
Index
169
Can’t Find It?
See also Mac OS
Guide’s onscreen index.
Open the Guide (h)
menu and choose
Mac OS Guide;
then click the
Index button.
170
Index
network client
protocols for NDIS 140–143
protocols for ODI 134–139
running SETNET 144–146
tips for installing 133–134
preinstalled 13
SoftWindows, problems starting from 83
sound
problems 87–89
recording 66
Sound Blaster
compatible MIDI-to-joystick adapter 9
installing software for Windows 95 23
in PC environment 42
running Mixerset application from
DOS 87
sound input and output cables,
AudioVision monitor 8
Sound Out cable, connecting 112–115
speakers 42–43
starting the PC
automatically 63
from Control Strip module 28, 62
with PC Setup control panel 61
starting up
problems 74–75
quick instructions xi–xiv
switching between environments
with Control Strip 59
with PC Setup control panel 58
problems 76–77
using keyboard commands 59–60
using PC Setup Control Strip module 28
Switch to PC command 58–59
Syquest drive, unavailable 82
T, U
TCP/IP-32 IP protocol stack, installing
for NDIS 142–143
TCP/IP protocol
configuring for PPP (modem)
146–149
installing for ODI 138–139
television, reception ix
temporary files, setting up 56
transferring bitmap images 70
troubleshooting
communications software 86
configuration problems 87
copying and pasting 84–85
disks and files 81–83
frozen PC 92
modems 80
monitor problems 77–79
network problems 86
pointing device 92
printing problems 89–91
sluggish applications 92
sound problems 87–89
starting up 74–75
switching to and from PC 76–77
warranty information 73
turning PC Compatibility Card on and off
61–62
V
VESA BIOS Extension video mode table
157
VGA resolution 151
VGA-to-Macintosh adapter 5
video cards, connecting 3–4, 6–7
video software
ATI capabilities 151
installing in Windows 95 24, 152–154
mode tables 154–160
volume sharing
between Mac OS and PC environment
49–50
turning off 51
W, X, Y
warm boot 64
warranty 94
WINCLIP utility, installing 68
Windows 95
CDs 13, 18
Certificate of Authenticity number
xiv, 18
configuring monitors 30–32
copying and pasting to Mac OS
68–69
correcting monitor settings 78
creating a drive container 15–17
installing software 18–19
Client 32, 138
display driver 24
NetBEUI and IPX/SPX 138–139
NetWare client software 134–137
QuickTime 23
Sound Blaster 23
support 20–21
TCP/IP 138–139
video 24
WINCLIP 68
modem problems 80
network drivers 133
ODI problems 86
printing problems 90–91
running on Power Macintosh xi
setting up a modem 53
setting up printing 39–42
shared folders problems 82
shutting down 61
windows, moving 24
workgroup names 139
Z
Zip drive, unavailable 82
Index
171
The Apple Publishing System
This Apple manual was written, edited, and produced on a desktop publishing system using
Apple Macintosh computers and QuarkXPress. Technical illustrations were drawn in Adobe™
Illustrator; screen shots were created and modified with system software, ExposurePro, and
Adobe Photoshop. Final pages were output using PostScript™ technology.
Text type is Times®, display type is Helvetica® Narrow, and cover type is Apple Garamond,
Apple’s corporate font. Ornaments are custom symbols designed for Apple Computer. Some
elements, such as computer voice, are set in Courier, a fixed-width font.
PostScript, the LaserWriter page-description language, was developed by Adobe Systems
Incorporated.

Apple Computer, Inc.
1 Infinite Loop
Cupertino, California 95014-2084
408-996-1010
http://www.apple.com
034-0235-A
Printed in U.S.A.

PCCompatibility Card
User’s manual for Power Macintosh 4400 and 7300 series
PC-compatible computers
K Apple Computer, Inc.
© 1997 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved.
Under the copyright laws, this manual may not be copied, in whole or in part, without the
written consent of Apple. Your rights to the software are governed by the accompanying
software license agreement.
The Apple logo is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other
countries. Use of the “keyboard” Apple logo (Option-Shift-K) for commercial purposes without
the prior written consent of Apple may constitute trademark infringement and unfair
competition in violation of federal and state laws.
Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate. Apple is
not responsible for printing or clerical errors.
Apple Computer, Inc.
1 Infinite Loop
Cupertino, CA 95014-2084
408-996-1010
http://www.apple.com
Apple, the Apple logo, AppleTalk, AppleVision, ImageWriter, LaserWriter, Mac, Macintosh,
Monaco, Power Macintosh, QuickTime, StyleWriter, and TrueType are trademarks of Apple
Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.
AudioVision, Finder, and Macintosh PC Exchange are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.
Adobe and PostScript are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated or its subsidiaries and
may be registered in certain jurisdictions.
ClarisWorks is a registered trademark of Claris Corporation.
Helvetica, Palatino, and Times are registered trademarks of Linotype-Hell AG and/or its
subsidiaries.
Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation and SoftWindows is a trademark
used under license by Insignia from Microsoft Corporation.
Other company and product names mentioned herein are trademarks of their respective
companies. Mention of third-party products is for informational purposes only and constitutes
neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to
the performance or use of these products.
Simultaneously published in the United States and Canada.
Contents
Communications regulation information
Preface Quick Start
ix
xi
1 Connecting Monitors and Other Equipment
Using the loopback cable
1
2
Connecting a single monitor
3
Connecting a monitor to your Power Macintosh 4400
3
Connecting a monitor to your Power Macintosh 7300
4
Connecting two monitors
5
Connecting two monitors to your Power Macintosh 4400
6
Connecting two monitors to your Power Macintosh 7300
7
Connecting an AudioVision monitor
8
Connecting an AppleVision monitor
8
Connecting a pointing device
Connecting a MIDI device
9
9
Connecting a PC game controller
Connecting a printer
10
10
Connecting to a network
11
Connecting a modem or other serial device
Connecting a security dongle
11
11
iii
2 Installing the PC Compatibility Card Software
13
Installing the Mac OS PC Compatibility software
Creating a drive container
Installing Windows 95
15
18
Installing support software for Windows 95
20
Configuring network support in Windows
Installing PC utilities
14
21
21
Installing keyboard files in Windows 95
Installing QuickTime for Windows 95
22
23
Installing Sound Blaster software for Windows 95
Installing video software for Windows 95
Installing your own PC software
24
24
3 Setting Up the PC Environment
25
About the PC Setup control panel
26
Using the PC Setup Control Strip module
Configuring monitors
28
29
Selecting and configuring monitors in Windows 95
RAM information
33
Setting up printing in the Mac OS
33
Setting up printing in the PC environment
Saving a printer file
42
Configuring PC sound
42
Turning PC sound on and off
Configuring PC drives
39
43
44
Creating a single partition/bootable drive container
Creating a multiple partition/bootable drive container
Assigning a drive to a PC-formatted hard disk
Changing a drive assignment
Contents
30
32
Setting printer options
iv
23
48
47
44
45
Using shared volumes
48
Sharing files between the Mac OS and the PC
Turning off volume sharing
51
Turning off automatic sharing
51
Setting up your PC on a network
51
Configuring the PC serial ports
52
Setting up a modem or other serial device
Building a custom cable
Connecting a joystick
49
53
54
54
Connecting a MIDI device
54
Setting up your DOS configuration files
Editing the CONFIG.SYS file
55
55
Editing the AUTOEXEC.BAT file
4 Working in the PC Environment
56
57
Switching between the Mac OS and PC environments
Switching with the PC Setup control panel
Switching with the Control Strip
58
58
59
Switching with a keyboard command
59
Turning the PC on and off in the Mac OS environment
61
Turning the PC on and off with the PC Setup control panel
Turning the PC on and off with the Control Strip
Starting the PC automatically
Using floppy disk drives and floppy disks
Restarting the PC from a floppy disk
Using a pointing device
Using keyboards
62
63
Restarting the PC in the PC environment
Using CD-ROM discs and drives
61
64
65
65
66
66
67
Contents
v
Copying and pasting information between the Mac OS and Windows
environments
68
Transferring large bitmap images
70
Using onscreen help in the PC environment
Using shared folders and volumes
71
Using PC files in the Mac OS environment
5 Troubleshooting
Starting up
70
71
73
74
Switching to and from the PC
Monitor problems
76
77
Problems using a modem
80
Problems with files and disks
81
Problems with information transfer
84
Communication and network problems
Configuration problems
Sound problems
87
87
Printing problems
Other problems
86
89
92
Appendix A Removing the PC Compatibility Card From Your
Power Macintosh 7300 Computer* 93
What you need
94
Removing the PC Compatibility Card hardware
95
Opening the computer, expansion card cover, and chassis
Disconnecting the cables
Removing the card
95
95
97
Installing the port access cover
Installing the audio ribbon cable
Replacing the computer’s cover
97
97
97
*To learn how to remove the card from your Power Macintosh 4400, see the PC Compatibility
Card Update that came with your computer.
vi
Contents
Appendix B Reinstalling the PC Compatibility Card in Your
Power Macintosh 7300 Computer* 99
What you need
100
Installing the PC Compatibility Card hardware
Opening the computer
101
101
Disconnecting the CD-ROM audio cable
106
Opening the expansion card cover and chassis
Inserting the PC Compatibility Card
Connecting the Sound Out cable
107
110
112
Connecting the CD In cable to the card
116
Replacing the chassis and expansion card cover
Connecting the CD In cable to the CD-ROM drive
Replacing the computer’s cover
127
128
Installing the new DIMM
Reinstalling the card
121
122
Appendix C Adding Memory to Your PC Compatibility Card
Removing the card
118
130
132
Appendix D Installing Network Client Software
133
Installing protocols for use with Open Data-Link Interface (ODI)
134
Installing NetWare client software version 1.02 for Windows 95
134
Installing NetBEUI and IPX/SPX in Windows 95
Installing Client 32 for Windows 95
Installing TCP/IP in Windows 95
138
138
138
Installing protocols for use with Network Driver Interface Specification
(NDIS) 2.0
140
Installing NetBEUI and IPX/SPX in Windows 95
140
Installing Microsoft TCP/IP-32 IP protocol stack in Windows 95
142
*To learn how to reinstall the card into your Power Macintosh 4400, see the PC Compatibility
Card Update that came with your computer.
Contents
vii
Running the Network Protocol Setup (SETNET) utility
144
Configuring the built-in TCP/IP stack for PPP (modem) in
Windows 95
146
Using a modem connected to the Macintosh serial port
Installing a modem in Windows 95
Dial-up networking installation
Making a PPP connection
148
149
Appendix E Configuring Video Software
About video capabilities
147
151
151
Installing and configuring MPEG video support
Installing MPEG video support in Windows 95
Optimizing MPEG playback in Windows 95
Video mode tables
154
DRAM accelerator mode
155
VESA BIOS Extension modes
Fixed-frequency monitors
User-adjustable monitors
Index
viii
Contents
161
158
160
157
152
152
153
146
Communications regulation information
FCC declaration of conformity
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two
conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept
any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation. See
instructions if interference to radio or television reception is suspected.
Radio and television interference
The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency
energy. If it is not installed and used properly—that is, in strict accordance with Apple’s
instructions—it may cause interference with radio and television reception.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device
in accordance with the specifications in Part 15 of FCC rules. These specifications are designed
to provide reasonable protection against such interference in a residential installation. However,
there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation.
You can determine whether your computer system is causing interference by turning it off. If
the interference stops, it was probably caused by the computer or one of the peripheral devices.
If your computer system does cause interference to radio or television reception, try to correct
the interference by using one or more of the following measures:
m Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops.
m Move the computer to one side or the other of the television or radio.
m Move the computer farther away from the television or radio.
m Plug the computer into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio.
(That is, make certain the computer and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by
different circuit breakers or fuses.)
If necessary, consult an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple. See the service and support
information that came with your Apple product. Or, consult an experienced radio/television
technician for additional suggestions.
IMPORTANT Changes or modifications to this product not authorized by Apple Computer, Inc.,
could void the FCC Certification and negate your authority to operate the product.
This product was tested for FCC compliance under conditions that included the use of Apple
peripheral devices and Apple shielded cables and connectors between system components. It is
important that you use Apple peripheral devices and shielded cables and connectors between
system components to reduce the possibility of causing interference to radios, television sets,
and other electronic devices. You can obtain Apple peripheral devices and the proper shielded
cables and connectors through an Apple-authorized dealer. For non-Apple peripheral devices,
contact the manufacturer or dealer for assistance.
Responsible party: Robert Steinfeld, Apple Computer, Inc., 1 Infinite Loop, Cupertino, CA
95014-2084, 408-974-2618.
Communications Regulation Information
ix
Industry Canada statement
This Class B device meets all requirements of the Canadian interference-causing equipment
regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la Class B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel
brouilleur du Canada.
VCCI Class 2 statement
x
Communications Regulation Information
Quick Start
Your Power Macintosh computer came with a PC Compatibility Card
installed along with all the software you need to use it, including
Windows 95. You can run Windows 95 applications directly on your
Macintosh computer.
With a PC Compatibility Card, you can
m simultaneously run Mac OS and PC applications
m switch between the Mac OS and PC environments at any time without
quitting the applications you’re using
m view both environments simultaneously on two monitors
m use the same hard disk for both Mac OS and PC software and files
m use your Macintosh-compatible keyboard and one-button or multibutton
Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) mouse with PC software
m use your Macintosh-compatible modem, monitor, and printer with PC
software, or connect some kinds of PC-compatible equipment
m use a joystick or other game controller with PC applications
m connect MIDI equipment (with an appropriate adapter)
m add random-access memory (RAM) to the PC Compatibility Card
m add 1 MB video dynamic random-access memory (DRAM)
(on some models)
m use the built-in serial ports with PC software
m play and record from PC-compatible CD-ROM discs
xi
m copy and paste information between Mac OS and PC documents
m play Sound Blaster–compatible sounds and use Sound Blaster sound
processing utilities (Sound Blaster microphone and line input are not
supported)
m communicate with network servers and other computers running
PC software
Also available for use with this card is a PC Serial and Parallel Card, with a
standard PC RS-232 serial interface and PC-enhanced parallel interface, that
allows you to use PC-compatible printers, modems, and security dongles
from the PC environment. (This card is available from your Apple-authorized
dealer.)
IMPORTANT If you have a Power Macintosh 7300 computer and ever need to
remove and reinstall your card, instructions are provided in Appendix A and
Appendix B. If you have a Power Macintosh 4400 computer, please see the
PC Compatibility Card Update that came with your computer.
Note: Your Power Macintosh 4400 or 7300 PC-Compatible computer came
with an audio cable and a port access cover that look like the corresponding
illustrations below. You will need to install the appropriate cable and the port
access cover if you ever decide to remove your PC Compatibility Card.
Audio ribbon cable for
Power Macintosh 7300
xii
Preface
Audio cable for
Power Macintosh 4400
Port access cover
Getting started
This manual describes how to connect monitors and other equipment to your
PC Compatibility Card, how to set up the software that came with your card,
and how to work with the PC and Mac OS environments.
All the necessary PC Compatibility Card software has already been installed
on your new computer. In addition, a drive container with Windows 95 has
also been created and designated to be the startup disk for the PC
environment. A drive container is a file on your computer’s hard disk that acts
as a hard drive for the PC environment. This 500 MB drive container (with
Windows 95) is located in the Drive Containers folder on your hard disk.
To start using the PC environment, follow these steps:
1
Make sure that a monitor is correctly connected to the PC Compatibility Card.
For instructions on how to connect a monitor and other equipment to the
PC Compatibility Card, see Chapter 1, “Connecting Monitors and Other
Equipment.”
2
Start up the Mac OS environment.
Wait until the Mac OS has finished starting up and the computer desktop and
menu bar appear.
3
Switch to the PC environment by pressing x-Return.
The Mac OS desktop disappears. (If you set up a dedicated monitor for the
PC environment, the image on the Mac OS monitor dims.) After a moment
the PC environment boots and then starts Windows 95.
The first time you run Windows 95, the Windows 95 setup program
automatically starts.
Quick Start
xiii
4
Follow the instructions on the screen to set up Windows 95.
You need the Windows 95 Certificate of Authenticity number found on the
cover of the Windows 95 manual that came with your PC Compatibility Card.
When you are asked to install printer drivers, click Cancel. To set up printing,
see Chapter 3, “Setting Up the PC Environment,” after you have set up
Windows 95.
5
To switch back to the Mac OS at any time, press x–Return again.
Read the information in Chapter 3, “Setting up the PC Environment,” and
Chapter 4, “Working in the PC Environment,” to learn more about the
capabilities of your PC Compatibility Card.
xiv
Preface