Specifications | Apple iPod and iPod Touch Cell Phone User Manual

iPhone and iPod touch
Enterprise Deployment
Guide
K Apple Inc.
© 2008 Apple Inc. All rights reserved.
This manual may not be copied, in whole or in part,
without the written consent of Apple.
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Apple
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www.apple.com
Apple, the Apple logo, iPod, iTunes, Leopard, Mac,
Macintosh, the Mac logo, Mac OS, Safari, Tiger, and
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Simultaneously published in the United States and
Canada.
019-1333/2008-07
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Preface
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Contents
iPhone in the Enterprise
System Requirements
Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync
VPN
Network Security
Certificates
Email accounts
Additional Resources
Chapter 1
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15
15
Deploying iPhone and iPod touch
Activating Devices
Preparing Access to Network Services and Enterprise Data
Determining Device Passcode Policies
Configuring Devices
Other Resources
Chapter 2
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Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
About iPhone Configuration Utility
Creating Configuration Profiles
Editing Configuration Profiles
Preparing Configuration Profiles for Deployment
Installing Configuration Profiles
Removing and Updating Configuration Profiles
Chapter 3
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Manually Configuring Devices
VPN Settings
Wi-Fi Settings
Exchange Settings
Installing Identities and Root Certificates
Additional Mail Accounts
Other Resources
Chapter 4
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Deploying iTunes
Installing iTunes
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4
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Setting iTunes Restrictions
Chapter 5
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Deploying iPhone Applications
Register for Application Development
Signing Applications
Creating the Distribution Provisioning Profile
Installing Provisioning Profiles using iTunes
Installing Provisioning Profiles using iPhone Configuration Utility for Mac OS X
Installing Applications using iTunes
Installing Applications using iPhone Configuration Utility for Mac OS X
Using Enterprise Applications
Other Resources
Appendix A
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Cisco VPN Server Configuration
Authentication Methods
Authentication Groups
Certificates
IPSec Settings
Other Supported Features
Appendix B
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Configuration Profile Format
Root Level
Payload Content
Passcode Policy Payload
Email Payload
APN Payload
Exchange Payload
VPN Payload
Wi-Fi Payload
Proxy settings
Contents
Preface
iPhone in the Enterprise
Learn how to integrate iPhone and iPod touch with your
enterprise systems.
This guide is for system administrators. It provides information about deploying and
supporting iPhone and iPod touch in enterprise environments.
System Requirements
Read this section for an overview of the system requirements and the various
components available for integrating iPhone and iPod touch with your enterprise
systems.
iPhone and iPod touch
iPhone and iPod touch devices you use with your enterprise network must be updated
with iPhone software 2.0 or later.
iTunes
iTunes 7.7 or later is required in order to set up a device. This version is also required in
order to install software updates for iPhone or iPod touch, install applications, as well as
to sync music, video, or other data with a Mac or PC.
To use iTunes, you need a Mac or PC that has a USB 2.0 port and meets the following
specifications.
Mac OS X computers
 Mac OS X v10.4.10 Tiger or later
 1 GHz processor or faster
 256 MB of RAM
 QuickTime 7.1.6 or later
5
Windows computers
 Windows XP Service Pack 2 or Windows Vista
 500 MHz Pentium processor or faster
 256 MB of RAM
 QuickTime 7.1.6 or later
Some features of iTunes, such as use of the iTunes Store, have additional requirements.
See the documentation included with the iTunes installer for more information.
iPhone Configuration Utility
iPhone Configuration Utility lets you create configuration profiles for your devices.
The Mac OS X version of the utility also lets you manage profiles, install applications,
and view console logs from connected devices. This version requires:
 Mac OS X v10.5 Leopard
The web-based version of the utility requires:
 Microsoft Windows Vista (32-bit only), or Microsoft Windows XP with .NET Framework
Version 2.0, or Mac OS X v10.5 Leopard
 Microsoft Internet Explorer 7, or Firefox 2, or Safari 3
Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync
iPhone and iPod touch support the following versions of Microsoft Exchange:
 Exchange ActiveSync for Exchange Server (EAS) 2003 Service Pack 2
 Exchange ActiveSync for Exchange Server (EAS) 2007 Service Pack 1
Supported Exchange ActiveSync Policies
The following Exchange policies are supported:
 Enforce password on device
 Minimum password length
 Require both numbers and letters
 Inactivity time in minutes
For a description of each policy, refer to your Exchange ActiveSync documentation.
6
Preface iPhone in the Enterprise
Remote Wipe
You can remotely wipe the contents of an iPhone or iPod touch. Doing so quickly
removes all data and configuration information from the device, then the device is
securely erased and restored to original, factory settings. It can take approximately one
hour for each 8 GB of device capacity for the process to finish.
With Exchange Server 2007, you can initiate a remote wipe using the Exchange
Management Console, Outlook Web Access, or the Exchange ActiveSync Mobile
Administration Web Tool.
With Exchange Server 2003, you can initiate a remote wipe using the Exchange
ActiveSync Mobile Administration Web Tool.
Users can also wipe a device in their possession by choosing Erase All Content and
Settings from the Settings menu.
Important: Because wiping the device can take a long time, connect the device to its
power supply. If the device turns off due to low power, the wiping process resumes
when the device is connected to power.
Microsoft Direct Push
The Exchange server delivers email, contacts and calendar events to iPhone
automatically if a cellular data connection is available. With iPod touch, or when iPhone
doesn’t have a cellular data signal, information isn’t automatically pushed to the device;
it’s retrieved when you try to view the data or when you choose Settings > Fetch New
Data.
Microsoft Exchange Autodiscovery
The Autodiscovery service of Exchange Server 2007 is supported. When you’re
manually configuring an iPhone and iPod touch, the Autodiscovery service uses your
email address and password to automatically determine the correct Exchange server
information.
Microsoft Exchange Global Address List
iPhone and iPod touch retrieve contact information from your company’s Exchange
server corporate directory. You can access the directory when searching in Contacts,
and it is automatically accessed for completing email addresses as you enter them.
Preface iPhone in the Enterprise
7
Exchange ActiveSync Features Not Supported
Not all Exchange features are supported, including, for example:
 Folder management
 Opening links in email to documents stored on Sharepoint servers
 Task synchronization
 Setting an “out of office” autoreply message
 Creating meeting invitations
 Flagging messages for follow-up
VPN
iPhone and iPod touch work with VPN servers that support the following protocols and
authentication methods:
 L2TP/IPSec with user authentication by MS-CHAPV2 Password, RSA SecurID and
CryptoCard, and machine authentication by shared secret.
 PPTP with user authentication by MS-CHAPV2 Password, RSA SecurID, and
CryptoCard.
 Cisco IPSec with user authentication by Password, RSA SecurID, or CryptoCard, and
machine authentication by shared secret and certificates. See Appendix A for
recommendations for configuring Cisco VPN servers.
Network Security
iPhone and iPod touchiPod touch support the following 802.11i wireless networking
security standards as defined by the Wi-Fi Alliance:
 WEP
 WPA Personal
 WPA Enterprise
 WPA2 Personal
 WPA2 Enterprise
Additionally, iPhone and iPod touch support the following 802.1X authentication
methods for WPA Enterprise and WPA2 Enterprise networks:
 EAP-TLS
 EAP -TTLS
 EAP-FAST
 PEAP v0, PEAP v1
 LEAP
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Preface iPhone in the Enterprise
Certificates
iPhone and iPod touch can use certificates in the following raw formats:
 PKCS1 (.cer, .crt, .der)
 PKSC12 (.p12, .pfx)
Email accounts
iPhone and iPod touch support industry-standard IMAP4- and POP3-enabled mail
solutions on a range of server platforms including Windows, UNIX, Linux, and
Mac OS X.
Additional Resources
In addition to this guide, the following publications and websites provide information
about iPhone and iPod touch:
 iPhone User Guide, available for download at www.apple.com/support/iphone
 iPhone Guided Tour at www.apple.com/iphone/gettingstarted
 iPod touch Guided Tour at www.apple.com/ipodtouch/guidedtour
 iPhone webpage at www.apple.com/iphone
 iPod touch webpage at www.apple.com/ipodtouch
 iPhone in Enterprise webpage at www.apple.com/iphone/enterprise
 iPhone Support webpage at www.apple.com/support/iphone
 iPod touch Support webpage at www.apple.com/support/ipodtouch
 iTunes webpage at www.apple.com/itunes
 Exchange Product Overview at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/
bb124558.aspx
 Exchange 2003 Technical Documentation Library at http://technet.microsoft.com/
en-us/library/bb123872(EXCHG.65).aspx
 Wi-Fi for Enterprise webpage at www.wi-fi.org/enterprise.php
Preface iPhone in the Enterprise
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1
Deploying iPhone and iPod touch
1
This chapter provides an overview of how to deploy iPhone
and iPod touch in your enterprise.
iPhone and iPod touch are designed to easily integrate with your enterprise systems
including Microsoft Exchange 2003 and 2007, 802.1X-based secure wireless networks,
and Cisco IPSec virtual private networks. As with any enterprise solution, good
planning and an understanding of your deployment options make deployment easier
and more efficient for you and your users.
When planning your deployment of iPhone and iPod touch consider the following:
 How will your company’s iPhones be activated for wireless cellular service?
 Which enterprise network services, applications and data will your users need to
access?
 What policies do you want to set on the devices to protect sensitive company data?
 Do you want to manually configure devices individually, or use a streamlined process
for configuring a large fleet?
The specifics of your enterprise environment, IT policies, wireless carrier, and your
computing and communication requirements affect how you tailor your deployment
strategy.
Activating Devices
Each iPhone must be activated with your wireless carrier before it can be used to make
and receive calls, send text messages or connect to the cellular data network. Contact
your carrier for voice and data tariffs and activation instructions for consumer and
business customers.
You or your user will need to install a SIM card in the iPhone. After the SIM card is
installed, iPhone must be connected to a computer with iTunes to complete the
activation process. If the SIM card is already active, iPhone will be unlocked and ready
for immediate use; otherwise, iTunes will walk you through the process of activating a
new line of service.
10
Although there is no cellular service or SIM card for iPod touch, it must also be
connected to a computer with iTunes for unlocking.
Because iTunes is required to complete the activation process for both iPhone and
iPod touch, you must decide whether you want to install iTunes on each user’s Mac or
PC, or whether you’ll complete activation for each device with your own iTunes
installation.
After activation, iTunes isn’t required to use the device with your enterprise systems,
but it is necessary to synchronize music, video and web browser bookmarks with a
computer. It is also required for downloading and installing software updates for
devices and installing your enterprise applications. For more information, see
Chapter 4.
Preparing Access to Network Services and Enterprise Data
iPhone 2.0 software enables secure push email, push contacts and push calendar with
your existing Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 or 2007 solution, as well as Global
Address Lookup, Remote Wipe and device passcode policy enforcement. It also allows
users to securely connect to company resources via WPA Enterprise and WPA2
Enterprise wireless networks using 802.1X wireless authentication and/or via VPN using
PPTP, LT2P over IPSec, or Cisco IPSec protocols.
If your company doesn’t use Microsoft Exchange, your users can still use iPhone or
iPod touch to wirelessly sync email with most standard POP or IMAP-based servers and
services. And they can use iTunes to sync calendar events and contacts from Mac OS X
iCal and Address Book or Microsoft Outlook on a Windows PC.
As you determine which network services you want users to access, here are some
things you should know:
Microsoft Exchange
iPhone communicates directly with your Microsoft Exchange Server via Microsoft
Exchange ActiveSync (EAS). Exchange ActiveSync maintains a connection between the
Exchange Server and iPhone so that when a new email message or meeting invitation
arrives iPhone is instantly updated. iPod touch doesn’t have a cellular connection, so it
receives push notifications only when it is active and connected to a Wi-Fi network.
If your company currently supports Exchange ActiveSync on Exchange Server 2003 or
Exchange Server 2007, you already have the necessary services in place, no additional
configuration is required.
If you have an Exchange Server but your company is new to Exchange ActiveSync,
review the following:
Chapter 1 Deploying iPhone and iPod touch
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Network Configuration
 Make sure port 443 is open on the firewall. If your company uses Outlook Web
Access, port 443 is most likely already open.
 Verify that a server certificate is installed on the Exchange frontend server and enable
Require Basic SSL for the Exchange ActiveSync virtual directory.
 On the Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server, verify that a server
certificate is installed and update the public DNS to properly resolve incoming
connections.
 Make sure the DNS for your network returns a single, externally-routable address to
the Exchange ActiveSync server for both intranet and Internet clients. This is required
so the device can use the same IP address for communicating with the server when
both types of connections are active.
 On the ISA Server, create a web listener as well as an Exchange web client access
publishing rule. This is a necessary step in enabling Exchange ActiveSync. See
Microsoft’s documentation for details.
 For all firewalls and network appliances, set the idle session timeout to 30 minutes.
Refer to Microsoft Exchange documentation for alternative heartbeat and timeout
intervals.
Exchange Account Setup
 Enable Exchange ActiveSync for specific users or groups using the Active Directory
service. These are enabled by default for all mobile devices at the organizational level
in Exchange Server 2003 and Exchange Server 2007. For Exchange Server 2007, see
Recipient Configuration in the Exchange Management Console.
 Configure mobile features, policies, and device security settings using the Exchange
System Manager. For Exchange Server 2007, this is done in the Exchange
Management Console.
 Download and install the Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync Mobile Administration Web
Tool, which is necessary to initiate a remote wipe. For Exchange Server 2007, remote
wipe can also be initiated using Outlook Web Access.
WPA/WPA2 Enterprise Wi-Fi Networks
Support for WPA Enterprise and WPA2 Enterprise ensures that corporate wireless
networks are securely accessed on iPhone and iPod touch. WPA/WPA2 Enterprise uses
128-bit encryption, a proven block-based encryption method that provides a high level
of assurance that corporate data remains protected.
With support for 802.1X authentication, iPhone and iPod touch can be integrated into a
broad range of RADIUS server environments. 802.1X wireless authentication methods
are supported and include EAP-TLS, EAP-TTLS, EAP-FAST, PEAPv0, PEAPv1 and LEAP.
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Chapter 1 Deploying iPhone and iPod touch
WPA/WPA2 Enterprise Network Configuration
 Verify network appliances for compatibility and select an authentication type (EAP
type) supported by iPhone and iPod touch. Make sure that 802.1X is enabled on the
authentication server, and if necessary, install a server certificate and assign network
access permissions to users and groups.
 Configure wireless access points for 802.1X authentication and enter the
corresponding RADIUS server information.
 Test your 802.1X deployment with a Mac or a PC to make sure RADIUS authentication
is properly configured.
 If you plan to use certificate-based authentication, make sure you have your public
key infrastructure configured to support device and user-based certificates with the
corresponding key distribution process.
 Verify certificate format and authentication server compatibility. iPhone and
iPod touch support PKCS1 (.cer, .crt, .der) and PKCS12 (.p12, .pfx).
Virtual Private Networks
Secure access to private networks is supported on iPhone and iPod touch using Cisco
IPSec, L2TP over IPSec, and PPTP virtual private network protocols. If your organization
supports one of these protocols, no additional network configuration or third-party
applications are required to use your devices with your VPN infrastructure.
Cisco IPSec deployments can take advantage of certificate-based authentication via
industry-standard x.509 digital certificates (PKCS1, PKCS12). For two-factor token-based
authentication, iPhone and iPod touch support RSA SecurID and CryptoCard. Users
enter their PIN and token-generated, one-time password directly on their device when
establishing a VPN connection.
iPhone and iPod touch also support shared secret authentication for Cisco IPSec and
L2TP/IPSec deployments and MS-CHAPv2 for basic username and password
authentication.
VPN Setup Guidelines
 iPhone integrates with most existing VPN networks, so minimal configuration should
be necessary to enable iPhone access to your network. The best way to prepare for
deployment is to check if your company’s existing VPN protocols and authentication
methods are supported by iPhone.
 Ensure compatibility with standards by your VPN concentrators. It’s also a good idea
to review the authentication path to your RADIUS or authentication server to make
sure standards supported by iPhone are enabled within your implementation.
 Check with your solutions providers to confirm that your software and equipment
are up-to-date with the latest security patches and firmware.
Chapter 1 Deploying iPhone and iPod touch
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IMAP Email
If you don’t use Microsoft Exchange, you can still implement a secure, standards-based
email solution using any email server that supports IMAP and is configured to require
user authentication and SSL. These servers can be located within a DMZ subnetwork,
behind a corporate firewall, or both.
With SSL, iPhone and iPod touch support 128-bit encryption and X.509 root certificates
issued by the major certificate authorities. They also support strong authentication
methods including industry-standard MD5 Challenge-Response and NTLMv2.
IMAP Network Setup Guidelines
 For additional security protection, install a digital certificate on the server from a
trusted certificate authority (CA). Installing a certificate from a CA is an important
step in ensuring that your proxy server is a trusted entity within your corporate
infrastructure.
 To allow iPhone and iPod touch devices to retrieve email from your server, open port
993 in the firewall and make sure that the proxy server is set to IMAP over SSL.
 To allow devices to send email, port 587, 465, or 25 must be open. Port 587 is used
first and is the best choice.
Enterprise Applications
If you are planning to deploy enterprise iPhone and iPod touch applications, you install
the applications on your devices using iPhone Configuration Utility for Mac OS X or
iTunes for Mac and Windows. Once you deploy an application to user’s devices,
updating those applications will be easier if each user has iTunes installed on their Mac
or PC.
Determining Device Passcode Policies
Once you decide which network services and data your users will access, you should
determine which device passcode policies you want to implement.
Requiring passcodes to be set on your devices is recommended for companies whose
networks, systems, or applications don’t require a password or an authentication token.
If you’re using certificate-based authentication for an 802.1X network or Cisco IPSec
VPN, or your enterprise application saves your login credentials, you should require
users to set a device passcode with a short timeout period so a lost or stolen device
cannot be used without knowing the device passcode.
Policies can be set on iPhone and iPod touch in one of two ways. If the device is
configured to access a Microsoft Exchange account, the Exchange ActiveSync policies
are wirelessly pushed to the device. This allows you to enforce and update the policies
without any action by the user. For information about EAS policies, see “Supported
Exchange ActiveSync Policies” on page 6.
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Chapter 1 Deploying iPhone and iPod touch
If you don’t use Microsoft Exchange, you can set similar policies on your devices by
creating configuration profiles. You distribute the profiles via email or a web site that is
accessible using the device. If you want to change a policy, you must post or send an
updated profile to users for them to install. For information about the device passcode
policies, see “Passcode Settings” on page 22.
Configuring Devices
Next, you need to decide how you’ll configure each iPhone and iPod touch. In large
part, this is influenced by how many devices you plan on deploying and managing
over time. If the number is relatively small, you may find that it is simpler for you or
your users to manually configure each device. This involves using the device to enter
the settings for each mail account, Wi-Fi settings, and VPN configuration information.
See Chapter 3 for details about manual configuration.
If you plan on deploying a large number of devices, or you have a large collection of
email settings, network settings, and certificates to install, then you may want to
configure the devices by creating and distributing configuration profiles. Configuration
profiles quickly load settings and authorization information onto a device. Additionally,
some VPN and Wi-FI settings can only be set using a configuration profile, and if you’re
not using Microsoft Exchange, you’ll need to use a configuration profile to set device
passcode policies.
Whether or not you’re configuring devices manually or using configuration profiles,
you also need to decide if you’ll configure the devices or if you will delegate this task to
your users. Which you choose depends on your user’s locations, company policy
regarding users’ ability to manage their own IT equipment, and the complexity of the
device configuration you intend to deploy. Configuration profiles work well for a large
enterprise, for remote employees, or for users that are unable to set up their own
devices.
if you want users to activate device themselves or if they need to install or update
enterprise applications, iTunes must be installed on each user’s Mac or PC. iTunes is also
required for software updates to iPhone and iPod touch, so keep that in mind if you
decide to not distribute iTunes to your users. For information about deploying iTunes,
see Chapter 4.
Other Resources
Additional helpful information and resources about iPhone and iPod touch in the
enterprise is available at www.apple.com/iphone/enterprise.
Chapter 1 Deploying iPhone and iPod touch
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2
Creating and Deploying
Configuration Profiles
2
Configuration profiles define how iPhone and iPod touch
work with your enterprise systems.
Configuration profiles are XML files that, when installed, provide information that
iPhone and iPod touch can use to connect to and communicate with your enterprise
systems. They contain VPN configuration information, device security policies,
Exchange settings, mail settings, and certificates.
You distribute configuration profiles by email or using a webpage. When users open
the email attachment or download the profile using Safari on their device, they are
prompted to begin the installation process.
If you prefer not to create and distribute configuration profiles, you can configure
iPhone or iPod touch devices manually. See Chapter 3 for information about manual
configurations.
About iPhone Configuration Utility
You use iPhone Configuration Utility to create configuration profiles. There are two
versions of iPhone Configuration Utility—one is a Mac OS X application and the other
is a web-based version for Mac OS X or Windows.
iPhone Configuration Utility for Mac OS X
iPhone Configuration Utility for Mac OS X is installed in the /Applications/Utilities/
folder, when you run the iPhone Configuration Utility installer.
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When you open iPhone Configuration Utility, a window similar to the one shown below
appears.
The content of the main section of the window changes as you select items in the
sidebar.
The sidebar displays the Library, which contains the following categories:
 Devices shows a list of iPhone and iPod touch devices that have been connected to
your computer.
 Provisioning Profiles lists profiles that permit the use of the device for iPhone OS
development, as authorized by Apple Developer Connection. For information,
see Chapter 5.
 Configuration Profiles lists the configuration profiles you have previously created, and
lets you edit the information you entered, or create a new configuration that you can
send to a user for installation on a device.
 Applications lists your applications that are available to install on devices attached to
your computer.
The sidebar also displays Connected Devices, which shows information about the iPhone
or iPod touch currently connected to your computer’s USB port. Information about a
connected device is automatically added to the Devices list so you can view it again
without having to reconnect the device.
When a device is connected, you can also view console logs and any available crash
logs. These are the same device logs that are available for viewing within the Xcode
development environment on Mac OS X.
Chapter 2 Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
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iPhone Configuration Utility for the Web
The web-based version of iPhone Configuration Utility lets you create configuration
profiles for your devices. Follow the instructions below for the platform you’re using.
Installing on Mac OS X
To install the utility on Mac OS X v10.5 Leopard, open the iPhone Web Config Installer
and follow the onscreen instructions. When the installer finishes, the utility is ready for
use. See “Accessing iPhone Configuration Utility for Web” on page 18.
Installing on Windows XP and Windows Vista
To install the utility on Windows, do the following:
1 For Windows XP, download and run the Microsoft .NET Framework Version 2.0
Redistributable Package (x86) installer from www.microsoft.com/downloads.
2 Run iPhoneConfigWebUtilSetup.exe.
3 To configure the ability to email profiles to users directly from the utility, edit the file
install drive:Program Files\Apple\iPhone Configuration Web
Utility\config\environments\production.rb so that the parameters in the
ActionMailer::Base.smtp_settings method are appropriate for your network.
To confirm that the utility is running, open the Services control panel and make sure
that the iPhone Configuration Utility Web service is running.
Accessing iPhone Configuration Utility for Web
To access the utility, follow the steps below.
1 Open a web browser and go to: http://localhost:3000
If you installed the utility on another computer, substitute its name or address for
localhost in the address above. For information about supported web browsers,
see “iPhone Configuration Utility” on page 6.
2 Log in with the user name admin and the password admin.
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Chapter 2 Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
A screen similar to the one shown here will appear.
For information about using the utility, see “Creating Configuration Profiles,” below.
Changing the User name and Password for iPhone Configuration Utility Web
To change the user name and password for accessing the utility, edit the following file:
 installpath/Apple/iPhone Configuration Web Utility/config/authentication.rb
The default installation location is:
 Mac OS X: /usr/local/iPhoneConfigService/
 Windows: \Program Files\Apple\iPhone Configuration Web Utility
Changing the Web Server Port Number for iPhone Configuration Utility Web
By default, the utility listens for HTTP connections on port 3000. To change the port
number, find the text :port => 3000 in the file listed below and change 3000 to a port
that isn’t already in use.
 Mac OS X: installpath/vendor/rails/railties/lib/commands/servers/mongrel.rb
 Windows: installpath\vendor\rails\railties\lib\commands\webrick.rb
The default installation location is:
 Mac OS X: /usr/local/iPhoneConfigService/
 Windows: \Program Files\Apple\iPhone Configuration Web Utility
After changing the port number, stop and restart the utility. See the instructions below.
Starting or Restarting iPhone Configuration Utility Web
The utility is automatically started by the installer on Windows, or when it’s needed by
Mac OS X, but if you experience problems or change the mail settings, port number,
or user name and password settings, you should stop and restart the utility. Follow the
steps below:
Chapter 2 Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
19
To restart the utility on Windows
1 Go to Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services.
2 Select Apple iPhone Configuration Web Utility.
3 Select Restart from the Action menu.
To restart the utility on Mac OS X
1 Open Terminal.
2 Enter sudo
-s
and authenticate with an administrator password.
3 Enter launchctl
unload /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.iPhone
ConfigService.plist
4 Enter launchctl
load /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.iPhone
ConfigService.plist
Creating Configuration Profiles
To create a new configuration profile, click the New Profile button in the toolbar of
iPhone Configuration Utility for Mac OS X or iPhone Configuration Utility for the Web.
You edit the profile using the panes in the bottom portion of the main window.
Although you can create a single configuration profile that contains all of the necessary
information, consider creating separate profiles for certificates and settings. so you can
update and distribute each type of information separately. This also allows users to
retain the certificates they’ve already installed when installing a new profile that
contains VPN or account settings.
To add information to a configuration profile, select the appropriate pane, click the
Configure button, and then fill in the information you see onscreen, as described
below. Required fields are marked with a red arrow.
For some settings, such as W-Fi settings, you can click the Add (+) button to add
additional configurations. To remove a configuration, click the Delete (–) button in the
configuration details window.
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Chapter 2 Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
General Settings
This is where you provide the name and identifier of this profile.
A configuration name is required. The name you specify appears in the profiles list and
is displayed on the device after the configuration profile is installed. Although the
name doesn’t have to be unique, you should use a descriptive name that identifies the
profile.
The configuration identifier must uniquely identify this profile and must use the format
com.companyname.identifier, where identifier describes the profile. For example:
com.mycompany.homeoffice.
The identifier is important because, when a profile is installed, the Configuration
Identifier value is compared with profiles that are already on the device. If the
Configuration Identifier value is unique, information in the profile is added to the
device. If the identifier matches a profile already installed, information in the profile
replaces the settings already on the device.
Profiles can be verified by signing them, but signed profiles aren’t required. If you don’t
sign a profile, its status is shown as Unsigned when viewed on the device.
If you choose to sign a profile, and the signature can be verified by a certificate on the
device, its status is Verified. If the certificate necessary to verify the signature isn’t on
the device, or if the chain of trust cannot be linked to a root CA that is on the device,
then the profile’s status is Not Verified. Signed profiles are indicated with a checkmark:
Chapter 2 Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
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To sign a profile, click Apply Signature in the Signature section of the General pane.
In the Configuration Signing window that appears, add the digital certificates necessary
to authenticate your signature. (Certificates in raw formats 1 and 12 are supported.)
Then select your private key file and click Sign. The certificate you select here isn’t
added to the device, and is only used to verify your signature. For information about
how to add certificates to the device, see “Credentials Settings” on page 25.
Once you sign a profile, you cannot modify it until you remove the signature.
Click Remove Signature in the General Pane to do so.
Passcode Settings
Use this pane to set device policies if you aren’t using Exchange passcode policies.
You can specify whether a passcode is required in order to use the device, as well as
specify characteristics of the passcode and how often it must be changed. When the
configuration profile is loaded, the user is immediately required to enter a passcode
that meets the policies you select or the profile will not be installed.
If you’re using both device policies and Exchange passcode policies, the two sets of
policies are merged and the strictest of the settings is enforced. See “Microsoft
Exchange ActiveSync” on page 6 for information about Exchange policies.
The following policies are available:
 Require passcode on device: Requires users to enter a passcode before using the
device. Otherwise, anyone who has the device can access all of its functions and
data.
 Allow simple value: Permits users to use repetitive characters in their passcodes.
For example, this would allow the passcodes to “3333” or “A4A4.”
 Require alphanumeric value: Requires that the passcode consist of both letters and
numbers.
 Minimum passcode length: Specifies the smallest number of characters a passcode
can contain.
 Minimum number of complex characters: The number of non-alphanumeric characters
(such as $, &, and !) that the passcode must contain.
 Maximum number of failed attempts: By default, after six failed passcode attempts,
the device imposes a time delay before a passcode can be entered again. The time
delay increases with each failed attempt. After the eleventh failed attempt, the
device is locked and must be reauthorized using iTunes. The value you select
determines how many failed passcode attempts can be made before the device is
locked and requires reauthorization. The passcode time delays always begin after the
sixth attempt, so if you set this value to 6 or lower, no time delays are imposed and
the device locks when the attempt value is exceeded. You cannot specify a value
greater than 11—the device always locks if the user fails to enter the correct
passcode 11 times in succession.
22
Chapter 2 Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
 Maximum passcode age (in days): Requires users to change their passcode at the
interval you specify.
 Passcode lock (in minutes): If the device isn’t used for this period of time, it
automatically locks. Entering the passcode unlocks it.
Wi-Fi Settings
Use this pane to set how the device connects to your wireless network. You can add
multiple network configurations by clicking the Add (+) button.
These settings must be specified, and must match the requirements of your network,
in order for the user to initiate a connection.
 Service Set Identifier: Enter the SSID of the wireless network to connect to.
 Hidden Network: Specifies whether the network is broadcasting its identity.
 Security Type: Select an authentication method for the network. The following
choices are available for both Personal and Enterprise networks.
 None: The network doesn’t use authentication.
 WEP: The network uses WEP authentication only.
 WPA/WPA 2: The network uses WPA authentication only.
 Any: The device uses either WEP or WPA authentication when connecting to the
network, but won’t connect to non-authenticated networks.
Enterprise Settings
In this section of the Wi-Fi pane, you specify settings for connecting to enterprise
networks. This section of the pane appears only if you choose an Enterprise setting in
the Security Type pop-up menu.
In the Protocols tab, you specify which EAP methods to use for authentication and
configure the EAP-FAST Protected Access Credential settings.
In the Authentication tab, you specify sign-in settings such as user name and
authentication protocols. If you’ve installed an identity certificate using the Credentials
tab, you can choose it using the Identity Certificate pop-up menu.
In the Trust tab, you specify which certificates should be regarded as trusted for the
purpose of validating the authentication server for the Wi-Fi connection. The Trusted
Certificates list displays certificates that have been added using the Credentials tab, and
lets you select which certificates should be regarded as trusted. Add the names of the
authentication servers to be trusted to the Trusted Server Certificates Names list. You
can specify a particular server, such as server.mycompany.com or a partial name such as
*.mycompany.com.
The Allow Trust Exceptions options lets users decide to trust a server when the chain of
trust can’t be established. To avoid these prompts, and to permit connections only to
trusted services, turn off this option and embed all necessary certificates in a profile.
Chapter 2 Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
23
VPN Settings
Use this pane to enter the VPN settings for connecting to your network. You can add
multiple sets of VPN connections by clicking the Add (+) button.
For information about supported VPN protocols and authentication methods, see
“VPN” on page 8.
Email Settings
Use this pane to configure POP or IMAP mail accounts for the user. These accounts will
be added to the device, and as with Exchange accounts, users need to manually enter
information you omit from the profile, such as their account password, when the profile
is installed.
Users can modify some of the mail settings you provide in a profile, such as the
account name, password, and alternative SMTP servers. If you omit any of this
information from the profile, the users are asked to enter it when they access the
account.
Important: The mail account and all of its data are deleted when the user deletes the
profile.
You can add multiple mail accounts by clicking the Add (+) button.
Exchange Settings
Use this pane to enter the user’s settings for your Exchange server. You can create a
profile for a specific user by specifying the user name, host name, and email address, or
you can provide just the host name—the users are prompted to fill in the other values
when they install the profile.
If you specify the user name, host name, and SSL setting in the profile, the user can’t
change these settings on the device.
You can configure only one Exchange account per device. When a profile containing an
Exchange configuration is installed, all of the contacts and calendar data on the device
that was previously synced using iTunes is erased and replaced with data from the
Exchange account. Other email accounts, including any Exchange IMAP accounts, aren’t
affected when you add an Exchange account.
By default, Exchange syncs contacts, calendar, and email. The user can change these
settings on the device, including how many days worth of data to sync, in Settings >
Accounts. When a device is configured to sync calendars or contacts with Exchange,
iTunes no longer syncs the data with a desktop computer.
If you select the Use SSL option, be sure to add the certificates necessary to
authenticate the connection using the Credentials pane.
24
Chapter 2 Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
Credentials Settings
Use this pane to add certificates to the device. Certificates in raw formats PKCS1
(.cer, .der, .crt) and PKCS12 (.p12, .pfx) are supported.
When installing an identity certificate on the device, make sure that the file contains a
certificate and not just a private key. If you install only a private key without the
necessary certificate, the identity won’t be valid. If you install an identity certificate
without a private key, the user is asked to enter the private key every time the
certificate is used by the device.
Additionally, make sure that the certificate authority that issued the server’s certificate
is trusted on the device. You don’t need to add root certificates that are included on
the device by Apple. To view a list of the preinstalled system roots, see the Apple
Support article at http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2185.
Instead of installing certificates with a profile, you can let users use Safari to download
the certificates directly to their device from a webpage. Or, you can email certificates to
users. See “Installing Identities and Root Certificates” on page 36 for more information.
To add multiple credentials, click the Add (+) button.
Advanced Settings
The Advanced pane lets you change the device’s Access Point Name (APN) settings.
The APN settings define how the device connects to the carrier’s network. Change
these settings only when specifically directed to do so by a carrier network expert. If
these settings are incorrect, the device can’t access data using the cellular network.
To undo an inadvertent change to these settings, delete the profile from the device.
Apple recommends that you define APN settings in a configuration profile separate
from other enterprise settings.
Editing Configuration Profiles
With iPhone Configuration Utility for Mac OS X, select a profile in the Configurations
list, and then use the settings panes to make changes. You can also import a profile by
choosing File > Add to Library and then selecting a .mobileconfig file. If the settings
panes aren’t visible, click the Show Editor button in the toolbar.
With the web-based version of iPhone Configuration Utility, click Import Profile to load
the profile that you want to edit.
If a profile is signed, you must click Remove Signature in the General pane before you
can edit it.
Chapter 2 Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
25
The Configuration Identifier field in the General pane is used by the device to
determine whether a profile is new, or an update to an existing profile. If you want the
updated profile to replace one that users have already installed, don’t change the
Configuration Identifier.
Preparing Configuration Profiles for Deployment
After you’ve created a profile, decide whether you want to distribute it to users by
email, or by posting it to a website. When users use their device to open an email
message or download the profile from the web, they are prompted to start the
installation process. See “Installing Configuration Profiles” on page 27 for information.
Some of the information contained in a profile is obfuscated to prevent casual
snooping, but the profile isn’t encrypted. Make sure the file is accessible only by
authorized users.
Distributing Configuration Profiles by Email
To send a profile by email, click the email button. If you’re using the Mac OS X version
of iPhone Configuration Utility, a new Mail message opens with the profile added as an
uncompressed attachment. If you’re using the web-based version, the profile is emailed
to the address you specify.
Distributing Configuration Profiles on the Web
To post a profile for downloading using Safari on iPhone or iPod touch, click the Export
button. This creates a .mobileconfig file in the location you specify, ready for posting to
your site.
Don’t compress the .mobileconfig file, or the device won’t recognize the profile.
Additionally, you must configure your web server so that .mobileconfig files are
transmitted as application/x-apple-aspen-config files.
Mac OS X Server
If your web server is Mac OS X Server v10.5.3 Leopard or later, it is already configured
for correctly transmitting .mobileconfig files.
For Mac OS X Server versions prior to v10.5.3, add the following MIME type to the MIME
Types settings using Server Admin:
application/x-apple-aspen-config mobileconfig
This ensures that all .mobileconfig files, regardless of where they are stored on your
web server, are correctly sent to clients.
Alternatively, add the MIME type to httpd.conf or one of its subconfiguration files,
provided that your Apache configuration allows directory overrides:
AddType application/x-apple-aspen-config mobileconfig
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Chapter 2 Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
IIS Web Server
If your web server is IIS, add the MIME type in the Properties page of the server using
IIS Manager. The extension is mobileconfig and the file type is application/x-appleaspen-config.
Alternatively, you can add this information to specific sites using the HTTP Headers
section of a website’s properties panel.
Installing Configuration Profiles
Provide your users with the URL where they can download the profiles onto their
devices, or send the profiles to an email account your users can access using the device
before it is set up with your enterprise-specific information.
In either case, the device recognizes the profile and installation begins when the user
taps Install.
During installation, users are asked to enter any necessary information, such as their
Exchange account password, and other information as required by the settings you
specified.
The device also retrieves the Exchange ActiveSync policies from the server, and
refreshes the policies, if they’ve changed, with every subsequent connection. If the
device or Exchange ActiveSync policies enforce a passcode setting, the user must enter
a passcode that complies with the policy in order to complete the installation.
Additionally, the user is asked to enter any passwords necessary to use certificates
included in the profile.
Chapter 2 Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
27
If the installation isn’t completed successfully, perhaps because the Exchange server
was unreachable or the user cancelled the process, none of the information entered by
the user is retained.
Users may want to change how many days worth of data is synced to the device.
The default is three days. This can be changed by going to Settings > Mail, Contacts,
Calendars > Exchange account name.
Removing and Updating Configuration Profiles
Settings enforced by a configuration profile cannot be changed on the device.
To change a setting, you must install an updated profile.
To remove an Exchange account that was installed by a profile, delete the profile.
Important: Removing a configuration profile removes policies and all of the Exchange
account’s data stored on the device, as well as VPN settings, certificates, and other
information associated with the profile.
Configuration profile updates aren’t pushed to users. To distribute a new configuration
profile, you must email it to your users or have them download the new version from a
website. As long as the configuration identifier in the profile matches, the new profile
replaces the profile on the device and adds, updates, or removes information and
settings as specified by the new profile.
28
Chapter 2 Creating and Deploying Configuration Profiles
3
Manually Configuring Devices
3
This chapter describes how to configure iPhone and
iPod touch manually.
If you don’t provide automatic configuration profiles, users can configure their devices
manually. Some settings, such as passcode policies, can only be set by using a
configuration profile.
VPN Settings
To change VPN settings, go to Settings > General > Network > VPN.
When you configure VPN settings, the device asks you to enter information based on
responses it receives from your VPN server. For example, you’ll be asked for a RSA
SecurID token if the server requires one.
You cannot configure a certificate-based VPN connection unless the appropriate
certificates are installed on the device. See “Installing Identities and Root Certificates”
on page 36 for more information.
29
Cisco IPSec Settings
When you manually configure the device for Cisco IPSec VPN, a screen similar to
following appears:
Use this chart to identify the settings and information you enter:
30
Field
Description
Description
A descriptive title that identifies this group of settings.
Server
The DNS name or IP address of the VPN server to connect to.
Account
The user name of the user’s VPN login account. Don’t enter the
group name in this field.
Password
The passphrase of the user’s VPN login account. Leave blank for
RSA SecurID and CryptoCard authentication, or if you want the user
to enter their password manually with every connection attempt.
Use Certificate
This will be available only if you’ve installed a .p12 or .pfx identity
that contains a certificate provisioned for remote access and the
private key for the certificate. When Use Certificate is on, the Group
Name and Shared Secret fields are replaced with an Identify field
that lets you pick from a list of installed VPN-compatible identities.
Group Name
The name of the group that the user belongs to as defined on the
VPN server.
Secret
The group’s shared secret. This is the same for every member of the
user’s assigned group. It’s not the user’s password and must be
specified to initiate a connection.
Chapter 3 Manually Configuring Devices
PPTP Settings
When you manually configure the device for PPTP VPN, a screen similar to the
following appears:
Use this chart to identify the settings and information you enter:
Field
Description
Description
A descriptive title that identifies this group of settings.
Server
The DNS name or IP address of the VPN server to connect to.
Account
The user name of the user’s VPN login account.
RSA SecurID
If you’re using an RSA SecurID token, turn on this option, so the
Password field is hidden.
Password
The passphrase of the user’s VPN login account.
Encryption Level
Auto is the default, which selects the highest encryption level that
is available, starting with 128-bit, then 40-bit, then None. Maximum
is 128-bit only. None turns off encryption.
Send All Traffic
Defaults to On. Sends all network traffic over the VPN link. Turn off
to enable split-tunneling, which routes only traffic destined for
servers inside the VPN through the server. Other traffic is routed
directly to the Internet.
Chapter 3 Manually Configuring Devices
31
L2TP Settings
When you manually configure the device for L2TP VPN, a screen similar to the following
appears:
Use this chart to identify the settings and information you enter:
32
Field
Description
Description
A descriptive title that identifies this group of settings.
Server
The DNS name or IP address of the VPN server to connect to.
Account
The user name of the user’s VPN login account.
Password
The passphrase of the user’s VPN login account.
Secret
The shared secret (pre-shared key) for the L2TP account. This is the
same for all LT2P users.
Send All Traffic
Defaults to On. Sends all network traffic over the VPN link. Turn off
to enable split-tunneling, which routes only traffic destined for
servers inside the VPN through the server. Other traffic is routed
directly to the Internet.
Chapter 3 Manually Configuring Devices
Wi-Fi Settings
To change Wi-Fi settings, go to Settings > General > Network > Wi-Fi. If the network
you’re adding is within range, select it from the list of available networks. Otherwise,
tap Other.
Make sure that your network infrastructure uses authentication and encryption
supported by iPhone and iPod touch. For specifications, see “Network Security” on
page 8. For information about installing PKCS1 and PKCS12 certificates for
authentication, see “Installing Identities and Root Certificates” on page 36.
Chapter 3 Manually Configuring Devices
33
Exchange Settings
You can configure only one Exchange account per device. To add an Exchange account,
go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, and then tap Add Account. On the Add
Account screen, tap Microsoft Exchange.
When you manually configure the device for Exchange, use this chart to identify the
settings and information you enter:
34
Field
Description
Email
The user’s complete email address.
Username
The user name of the user’s Exchange account. Enter it in the
format domain\username.
Password
The passphrase of the user’s Exchange account.
Description
A descriptive title that identifies this group of settings.
Chapter 3 Manually Configuring Devices
iPhone and iPod touch support Microsoft’s Autodiscovery service, which uses your user
name and password to determine the address of the front-end Exchange server. If the
server’s address can’t be determined, you’ll be asked to enter it.
After the Exchange account is successfully configured, the server’s passcode policies are
enforced. If the user’s current passcode doesn’t comply with the Exchange ActiveSync
policies, the user is prompted to change or set their passcode. The device won’t
communicate with the Exchange server until the user sets a compliant passcode.
Next, the device offers to immediately sync with the Exchange server. If you choose not
to sync at this time, you can turn on calendar and contact syncing later in Settings >
Mail, Contacts, and Calendars. By default, Exchange ActiveSync pushes new data to
your device as it arrives on the server. If you prefer to fetch new data on a schedule or
to only pull new data manually, use Settings > Fetch New Data to change the settings.
Chapter 3 Manually Configuring Devices
35
Important: When you configure a device to sync with Exchange, all existing calendar
and contact information on the device is overwritten. Additionally, iTunes no longer
sync contacts and calendars with your desktop computer. You can still sync your device
wirelessly with MobileMe services.
To change how many day’s worth of data is synced to your device, go to Settings >
Mail, Contacts, and Calendars. The default setting is three days.
Installing Identities and Root Certificates
If you don’t distribute certificates using profiles, your users can install them manually by
using the device to download them from a website, or by opening an attachment in an
email message. The device recognizes certificates with the following MIME types and
file extensions:
 application/x-pkcs12, .p12, .pfx
 application/x-x509-ca-cert, .cer, .crt, .der
Identities consist of a x.509 certificate and a private key that is used to identify the
users to a service. iPhone and iPod touch supports importing P12 files that contain
exactly one identity. When the identify is installed, the user is prompted for the
passphrase that protects it.
Root certificates are self-signed anchors for X.509 certificate chain evaluations.
These are used by all x.509 certificate chain evaluations made by Safari, Mail, VPN,
and other applications.
You don’t need to add root certificates that are included on the device by Apple.
To view a list of the preinstalled system roots, see the Apple Support article at
http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2185.
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Chapter 3 Manually Configuring Devices
When a certificate is downloaded to the device, the Install Profile screen appears.
The description indicates the type of certificate: identity or certificate authority (root).
To install the certificate, tap Install.
To view or remove a certificate that has been installed, go to Settings > General >
Profile. If you remove a certificate that is required for accessing an account or network,
your device cannot connect to those services.
Additional Mail Accounts
Although you can configure only one Exchange account, you can add multiple POP
and IMAP accounts. This can be used, for example, to access mail on a Lotus Notes or
Novell Groupwise mail server. Go to Settings > Accounts > Mail, Contacts, and
Calendars. Then tap Other. For more about adding an IMAP account, see the
iPhone User Guide or iPod touch User Guide.
Other Resources
Apple has several video tutorials, viewable in a standard web browser, that show your
users how to set up and use the features of iPhone and iPod touch:
 iPhone Guided Tour at www.apple.com/iphone/gettingstarted
 iPod touch Guided Tour at www.apple.com/ipodtouch/guidedtour
 iPhone Support webpage at www.apple.com/support/iphone
 iPod touch Support webpage at www.apple.com/support/ipodtouch
There is also a user guide for each device, in PDF, that provides additional tips and
usage details:
 iPhone User Guide: http://manuals.info.apple.com/en/iPhone_User_Guide.pdf
 iPod touch User Guide: http://manuals.info.apple.com/en/iPod_touch_User_Guide.pdf
Chapter 3 Manually Configuring Devices
37
4
Deploying iTunes
4
You use iTunes to sync music and video, install applications,
and more.
This chapter describes how to deploy iTunes and enterprise applications, and defines
the settings and restrictions you can specify.
Installing iTunes
iTunes uses standard Macintosh and Windows installers. The latest version of iTunes is
available for downloading at www.apple.com/itunes. For more about iTunes system
requirements, see “iTunes” on page 5.
Installing iTunes on Windows Computers
When you install iTunes on Windows computers, by default you also install the latest
version of QuickTime, Bonjour, and Apple Software Update. You can omit these
components by passing parameters to the iTunes installer, or by pushing only the
components you want to install to your user’s computers.
Installing on Windows using iTunesSetup.exe
If you to use the regular iTunes installation process but omit some components,
you can pass properties to iTunesSetup.exe using the command line.
38
Property
Meaning
NO_AMDS=1
Don’t install Apple Mobile Device Services. This component is
required for iTunes to sync and manage mobile devices.
NO_ASUW=1
Don’t install Apple Software Update for Windows. This application
alerts users to new versions of Apple software.
NO_BONJOUR=1
Don’t install Bonjour. Bonjour provides zero-configuration network
discovery of printers, shared iTunes libraries, and other services.
NO_QUICKTIME=1
Don’t install QuickTime. This component is required to use iTunes.
Don’t omit QuickTime unless you are sure the client computer
already has the latest version installed.
Silently Installing on Windows
To push iTunes to client computers, extract the individual .msi files from
iTunesSetup.exe.
To Extract .msi files from iTunesSetup.exe:
1 Run iTunesSetup.exe.
2 Open %temp% and find a folder named IXPnnn.TMP, where %temp% is your temporary
directory (typically bootdrive:\documents and Settings\user\Local Settings\temp\) and
nnn is a 3-digit random number.
3 Copy the .msi files from the folder to another location.
4 Quit the installer opened by iTunesSetup.exe.
Then use Group Policy Object Editor, in the Microsoft Management Console, to add the
.msi files to a Computer Configuration policy. Make sure that add the configuration to
the Computer Configuration policy, not the User Configuration policy.
Important: iTunes requires QuickTime, and Apple Mobile Device Services (AMDS) is
necessary to use an iPod touch or iPhone with iTunes.
Installing iTunes on Macintosh Computers
Mac computers come with iTunes installed. The latest version of iTunes, which includes
QuickTime, is available at www.apple.com/itunes. To push iTunes to Mac clients, you
can use Workgroup Manager, an administrative tool included with Mac OS X Server.
Setting iTunes Restrictions
You can restrict your users from using certain iTunes features. This is sometimes
referred to as parental controls. The following features can be restricted:
 Automatic and user-initiated checking for new versions of iTunes and device
software updates.
 Displaying the iTunes MiniStore while browsing or playing media
 Automatically sync when devices are connected
 Retrieve album artwork
 Use Visualizer plug-ins
 Enter a URL of streaming media
 Automatically discover Apple TV systems
 Register new devices with Apple
 Subscribe to podcasts
 Play Internet radio
 Access the iTunes Store
 Share music with local network computers
Chapter 4 Deploying iTunes
39
Â
Â
Â
Â
Play iTunes media content that is marked as explicit
Play movies
Play TV shows
Play games
Setting iTunes Restrictions for Mac OS X
On Mac OS X, you control access by using keys in a plist file. On Mac OS X the key
values shown above can be specified for each user by editing ~/Library/Preferences/
com.apple.iTunes.plist using Workgroup Manager, an administrative tool included with
Mac OS X Server.
For instructions, see the Apple Support article at http://docs.info.apple.com/
article.html?artnum=303099.
Setting iTunes Restrictions for Windows
On Windows, you control access by setting registry values inside one of the following
registry keys:
On Windows XP and 32-bit Windows Vista:
 HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Apple Computer, Inc.\iTunes\[SID]\Parental
Controls\
 HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Apple Computer, Inc.\iTunes\Parental Controls
On 64-bit Windows Vista:
 HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Wow6432Node\Apple Computer,
Inc.\iTunes\[SID]\Parental Controls\
 HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Wow6432Node\Apple Computer,
Inc.\iTunes\Parental Controls
For instructions, see the Apple Support article at http://docs.info.apple.com/
article.html?artnum=303026.
40
Chapter 4 Deploying iTunes
Updating iTunes and iPhone Software Manually
If you turn off automated and user-initiated software update checking in iTunes, you’ll
need to distribute software updates to users for manual installation.
To update iTunes, see the installation and deployment steps described earlier in this
document. It’s the same process you followed for distributing iTunes to your users.
To update iPhone software, follow these steps:
1 On a computer that doesn’t have iTunes software updating turned off, use iTunes to
download the iPhone software update. To do so, select an attached device in iTunes,
then click the Summary tab, and then click the Check for Update button.
2 After downloading, copy the updater file (.ipsw) found in the following location:
 On Mac OS X: ~/Library/iTunes/iPod Software Updates/
 On Windows: bootdrive:\Documents and Settings\user\Application Data\
Apple Computer\iTunes\iPod Software Updates\
3 Distribute the .ipsw file to your users, or place it on a network drive where they can
access it.
4 Tell your users to back up their device before applying the update. During manual
updates, iTunes doesn’t automatically back up the device before installation. To create a
new backup, right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac) the device in the iTunes
sidebar. Then choose Back Up from the contextual menu that appears.
5 Your users install the update by connecting their device to iTunes, then selecting the
Summary tab for their device. Next, they hold down the Option (Mac) or Shift
(Windows) key and click the Check for Update button.
6 A file selector dialog appears. Users should select the .ipsw file and then click Open to
begin the update process.
Chapter 4 Deploying iTunes
41
5
Deploying iPhone Applications
5
You can distribute iPhone and iPod touch applications to
your users.
If you want to install iPhone OS applications that you’ve developed, you distribute the
application to your users, who install the applications using iTunes.
Applications from the online App Store work on iPhone and iPod touch without any
additional steps. If you develop an application that you want to distribute yourself,
it must be digitally signed with a certificate issued by Apple. You must also provide
your users with a distribution provisioning profile that allows their device to use the
application.
The process for deploying your own applications is:
 Register for enterprise development with Apple.
 Sign your applications using your certificate.
 Create an enterprise distribution provisioning profile that authorizes devices to use
applications you’ve signed.
 Deploy the application and the enterprise distribution provisioning profile to your
users’ computers.
 Instruct users to install the application and profile using iTunes.
See below for more about each of these steps.
Register for Application Development
To develop and deploy custom applications for iPhone and iPod touch, you need to
register for the iPhone Enterprise Developer Program at www.apple.com/developer.
Once you complete the registration process, you’ll receive instructions for enabling
your applications to work on devices.
42
Signing Applications
Applications you distribute to users must be signed with your distribution certificate.
For instructions about obtaining and using a certificate, see the iPhone Developer
Center at http://developer.apple.com/iphone.
Creating the Distribution Provisioning Profile
Distribution provisioning profiles allow you to create applications that your users can
use on their iPhone or iPod touch. You create an enterprise distribution provisioning
profile for a specific application, or multiple applications, by specifying the AppID that
is authorized by the profile. If a user has an application, but doesn’t have a profile that
authorizes its use, the user isn’t able to use the application.
The designated Team Agent for your enterprise can create distribution provisioning
profiles at the Enterprise Program Portal at http://developer.apple.com/iphone. See the
website for instructions.
Once you create the enterprise distribution provisioning profile, download the
.mobileprovision file, and then securely distribute it and your application.
Installing Provisioning Profiles using iTunes
The user’s installed copy of iTunes automatically installs provisioning profiles that are
located in the following folders:
Mac OS X
 ~/Library/MobileDevice/Provisioning Profiles/
 /Library/MobileDevice/Provisioning Profiles/
 the path specified by the ProvisioningProfilesPath key in ~/Library/Preferences/
com.apple.itunes
Windows XP
 bootdrive:\Documents and Settings\username\Application Data\Apple Computer\
MobileDevice\Provisioning Profiles
 bootdrive:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Apple Computer\
MobileDevice\Provisioning Profiles
 the path specified in the HKCU or HKLM by the ProvisioningProfilesPath registery key
SOFTWARE\Apple Computer, Inc\iTunes
Chapter 5 Deploying iPhone Applications
43
Windows Vista
 bootdrive:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming\Apple Computer\MobileDevice\
Provisioning Profiles
 bootdrive:\ProgramData\Apple Computer\MobileDevice\Provisioning Profiles
 the path specified in the HKCU or HKLM by the ProvisioningProfilesPath registery key
SOFTWARE\Apple Computer, Inc\iTunes
iTunes automatically installs provisioning profiles found in the locations above onto
devices it syncs with. Once installed, the provisioning profiles can be viewed on the
device in Settings > General > Profiles.
You can also distribute the .mobileprovision file to your users and have them drag it to
the iTunes application icon. iTunes will copy the file to the correct location as defined
above.
Installing Provisioning Profiles using iPhone Configuration
Utility for Mac OS X
You can use iPhone Configuration Utility for Mac OS X to install provisioning profiles on
connected devices. Follow these steps:
1 In iPhone Configuration Utility, choose File > Open and then select the provisioning
profile that you want to install.
The profile is added to iPhone Configuration Utility and can be viewed by selecting the
Provisioning Profiles category in the Library.
2 Select a device from the Connected Devices list.
3 Select the Provisions tab.
4 Select the provisioning profile from the list, and then click its Install button.
Installing Applications using iTunes
Your users use iTunes to install applications on their devices. Securely distribute the
application to your users and then have them follow these steps:
1 In iTunes, choose File > Add to Library and select the application (.app) you provided.
2 Connect a device to the computer, and then select it in the Devices list in iTunes.
3 Click the Applications tab, then select the application in the list.
4 Click Apply to install the application and all distribution provisioning profiles that are
located in the designated folders discussed in “Installing Provisioning Profiles using
iTunes” on page 43.
44
Chapter 5 Deploying iPhone Applications
Installing Applications using iPhone Configuration Utility for
Mac OS X
You can use iPhone Configuration Utility for Mac OS X to install applications on
connected devices. Follow these steps:
1 In iPhone Configuration Utility, choose File > Open and then select the application that
you want to install.
The application is added to iPhone Configuration Utility and can be viewed by
selecting the Applications category in the Library.
2 Select a device from the Connected Devices list.
3 Select the Applications tab.
4 Select the application from the list, then click its Install button.
Using Enterprise Applications
When a user runs an application that isn’t signed by Apple, the device looks for a
distribution provisioning profile that authorizes its use. If a profile isn’t found, the
application won’t open.
Other Resources
For more information about creating applications and provisioning profiles, see:
 iPhone Developer Center at http://developer.apple.com/iphone
Chapter 5 Deploying iPhone Applications
45
Cisco VPN Server Configuration
A
Use these guidelines to configure your Cisco VPN server for
use with iPhone and iPod touch.
Authentication Methods
iPhone support the following authentication methods:
 Pre-shared key IPsec authentication with user authentication via xauth.
 Client and server certificates for IPsec authentication with optional user
authentication via xauth.
 Hybrid authentication where the server provides a certificate and the client provides
a pre-shared key for IPsec authentication. User authentication is required via xauth.
 User authentication is provided via xauth and includes the following authentication
methods:
 User name with password
 RSA SecurID
 CryptoCard
Authentication Groups
The Cisco Unity protocol uses authentication groups to group users together based on
a common set of authentication and other parameters. You should create an
authentication group for iPhone and iPod touch users. For pre-shared key and hybrid
authentication, the group name must be configured on the device with the group’s
shared secret (pre-shared key) as the group password.
When using certificate authentication, no shared secret is used and the user’s group is
determined based on fields in the certificate. The Cisco server settings can be used to
map fields in a certificate to user groups.
46
Appendix
A
Certificates
When setting up and installing certificates, make sure of the following:
 The server identity certificate must contain the server’s DNS name and/or IP address
in the subject alternate name (SubjectAltName) field. The device uses this
information to verify that the certificate belongs to the server. You can specify the
SubjectAltName using wildcard characters for per-segment matching, such as
vpn.*.mycompany.com, for more flexibility. The DNS name can be put in the common
name field, if no SubjectAltName is specified.
 The certificate of the CA that signed the server’s certificate should be installed on the
device. If it isn’t a root certificate, install the remainder of the trust chain so that the
certificate is trusted.
 If client certificates are used, make sure that the trusted CA certificate that signed the
client’s certificate is installed on the VPN server.
 The certificates and certificate authorities must be valid (not expired, for example.).
 Sending of certificate chains by the server isn’t supported and should be turned off.
 When using certificate-based authentication, make sure that the server is set up to
identify the user’s group based on fields in the client certificate. See “Authentication
Groups” on page 46.
IPSec Settings
Use the following IPSec settings:
 Mode: Tunnel Mode
 IKE Exchange Modes: Aggressive Mode for pre-shared key and hybrid authentication,
Main Mode for certificate authentication.
 Encryption Algorithms: 3DES, AES-128, AES-256
 Authentication Algorithms: HMAC-MD5, HMAC-SHA1
 Diffie Hellman Groups: Group 2 is required for pre-shared key and hybrid.
authentication. For certificate authentication, use Group 2 with 3DES and AES-128.
Use Group 2 or 5 with AES-256.
 PFS (Perfect Forward Secrecy): For IKE phase 2, if PFS is used the Diffie Hellman group
must be the same as was used for IKE phase 1.
 Mode Configuration: Must be enabled.
 Dead Peer Detection: Recommended.
 Standard NAT Transversal: Supported and can be enabled if desired. (IPSec over TCP
isn’t supported).
 Load Balancing: Supported and can be enabled if desired.
 Re-keying of Phase 1: Not currently supported. Recommend that re-keying times on
the server be set to approximately one hour.
Appendix A Cisco VPN Server Configuration
47
Other Supported Features
iPhone and iPod touch support the following:
 Application Version: The client software version is sent to the server, allowing the
server to accept or reject connections based on the device’s software version.
 Banner: The banner, if configured on the server, is displayed on the device and the
user must accept it or disconnect.
 Split Tunnel: Split tunneling is supported.
 Split DNS: Split DNS is supported.
 Default Domain: Default domain is supported.
48
Appendix A Cisco VPN Server Configuration
Configuration Profile Format
B
Appendix
B
This appendix specifies the format of mobileconfig files for
those who want to create their own tools.
This document assumes that you’re familiar with the Apple XML DTD and the general
property list format. A general description of the Apple plist format is available at
www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd.
This document uses the terms payload and profile. A profile is the whole file which
configures certain (single or multiple) settings on iPhone or iPod touch. A payload is an
individual component of the profile file.
Root Level
At the root level, the configuration file is a dictionary with the following key/value
pairs:
Key
Value
PayloadVersion
Number, mandatory. The version of the whole configuration
profile file. This version number designates the format of the
whole profile, not the individual payloads.
PayloadUUID
String, mandatory. This is usually a synthetically generated
unique identifier string. The exact content of this string is
irrelevant; however, it must be globally unique.
PayloadType
String, mandatory. Currently, only “Configuration” is a valid value
for this key.
PayloadOrganization
String, optional. This value describes the issuing organization of
the profile, as displayed to the user.
PayloadIdentifier
String, mandatory. This value is by convention a dot-delimited
string uniquely describing the profile, such as
“com.myCorp.iPhone.mailSettings” or
“edu.myCollege.students.vpn”. This is the string by which profiles
are differentiated—if a profile
is installed which matches the identifier of another profile,
it overrides it (instead of being added).
49
Key
Value
PayloadDisplayName
String, mandatory. This value determines a very short string to
be displayed to the user describing the profile, such as “VPN
Settings”. It does not have to be unique.
PayloadDescription
String, optional. This value determines what descriptive, freeform text will be shown to the user on the Detail screen for the
entire profile. This string should clearly identify the profile so the
user can decide whether to install it.
PayloadContent
Array, optional. This value is the actual content of the profile. If it
is omitted, the whole profile has no functional meaning.
Payload Content
The PayloadContent array is an array of dictionaries, where each dictionary describes an
individual payload of the profile. Each functional profile has at least one or more entries
in this array. Each dictionary in this array has a few common properties, regardless of
the payload type. Others are specialized and unique to each payload type.
50
Key
Value
PayloadVersion
Number, mandatory. The version of the individual payload.
Each profile can consist of payloads with different version numbers.
For instance, the VPN version number can be incremented at a
point in the future while the Mail version number would not.
PayloadUUID
String, mandatory. This is usually a synthetically generated unique
identifier string. The exact content of this string is irrelevant;
however, it must be globally unique.
PayloadType
String, mandatory. This key/value pair determines the type of the
individual payload within the profile,.
PayloadOrganization
String, optional. This value describes the issuing organization of the
profile, as it will be shown to the user. It can be, but doesn’t have to
be, the same as the root level PayloadOrganization.
PayloadIdentifier
String, mandatory. This value is by convention a dot-delimited
string uniquely describing the payload. It is usually the root
PayloadIdentifier with an appended subidentifier, describing the
particular payload.
PayloadDisplayName
String, mandatory. This value is a very short string displayed to the
user which describes the profile, such as “VPN Settings”. It does not
have to be unique.
PayloadDescription
String, optional. This value determines what descriptive, free-form
text is displayed on the Detail screen for this particular payload.
Appendix B Configuration Profile Format
Passcode Policy Payload
The Passcode Policy payload is designated by the
com.apple.mobiledevice.passwordpolicy PayloadType value. The presence of this
payload type prompts iPhone to present the user with an alphanumeric passcode entry
mechanism, which allows the entry of arbitrarily long and complex passcodes.
In addition to the settings common to all payloads, this payload defines the following:
Key
Value
allowSimple
Boolean, optional. Default YES. Determines whether a simple
passcode is allowed. A simple passcode is defined as containing
repeated characters, or increasing/decreasing characters (such
as 123 or CBA). Setting this value to “NO” is synonymous to
setting minComplexChars to “1”.
forcePIN
Boolean, optional. Default NO. Determines whether the user is
forced to set a PIN. Simply setting this value (and not others)
forces the user to enter a passcode, without imposing a length
or quality.
maxFailedAttempts
Number, optional. Default 11. Allowed range [2...11]. Specifies the
number of allowed failed attempts to enter the passcode at the
iPhone lock screen. Once this number is exceeded, the device is
locked and must be connected to its designated iTunes in order
to be unlocked.
maxInactivity
Number, optional. Default Infinity. Specifies the number of days
for which the device can be idle (without being unlocked by the
user) before it is locked by the system. Once this limit is reached,
the device is locked and the passcode must be entered.
maxPINAgeInDays
Number, optional. Default Infinity. Specifies the number of days
for which the passcode can remain unchanged. After this
number of days, the user is forced to change the passcode
before the device is unlocked.
minComplexChars
Number, optional. Default 0. Specifies the minimum number of
complex characters that a passcode must contain. A “complex”
character is a character other than a number or a letter, such as
&%$#.
minLength
Number, optional. Default 0. Specifies the minimum overall
length of the passcode. This parameter is independent of the
also optional minComplexChars argument.
requireAlphanumeric
Boolean, optional. Default NO. Specifies whether the user must
enter alphabetic characters (“abcd”), or if numbers are sufficient.
Appendix B Configuration Profile Format
51
Email Payload
The email payload is designated by the com.apple.mail.managed PayloadType value.
This payload creates an email account on the device. In addition to the settings
common to all payloads, this payload defines the following:
52
Key
Value
EmailAccountDescription
String, optional. A user-visible description of the email account,
shown in the Mail and Settings applications.
EmailAccountName
String, optional. The full user name for the account. This is the
user name in sent messages, etc.
EmailAccountType
String, mandatory. Allowed values are EmailTypePOP and
EmailTypeIMAP. Defines the protocol to be used for that
account.
EmailAddress
String, mandatory. Designates the full email address for the
account. If not present in the payload, the device prompts for
this string during profile installation.
IncomingMailServerAuthentication
String, mandatory. Designates the authentication scheme for
incoming mail. Allowed values are EmailAuthPassword and
EmailAuthNone.
IncomingMailServerHostName
String, mandatory. Designates the incoming mail server host
name (or IP address).
IncomingMailServerPortNumber
Number, optional. Designates the incoming mail server port
number. If no port number is specified, the default port for a
given protocol is used.
IncomingMailServerUseSSL
Boolean, optional. Default Yes. Designates whether the incoming
mail server uses SSL for authentication.
IncomingMailServerUsername
String, mandatory. Designates the user name for the email
account, usually the same as the email address up to the @
character. If not present in the payload, and the account is set
up to require authentication for incoming email, the device will
prompt for this string during profile installation.
OutgoingMailServerAuthentication
String, mandatory. Designates the authentication scheme for
outgoing mail. Allowed values are EmailAuthPassword and
EmailAuthNone.
OutgoingMailServerHostName
String, mandatory. Designates the outgoing mail server host
name (or IP address).
OutgoingMailServerPortNumber
Number, optional. Designates the outgoing mail server port
number. If no port number is specified, ports 25, 587 and 465
are used, in this order.
OutgoingMailServerUseSSL
Boolean, optional. Default Yes. Designates whether the outgoing
mail server uses SSL for authentication.
OutgoingMailServerUsername
String, mandatory. Designates the user name for the email
account, usually the same as the email address up to the @
character. If not present in the payload, and the account is set
up to require authentication for outgoing email, the device
prompts for this string during profile installation.
Appendix B Configuration Profile Format
APN Payload
The APN (Access Point Name) payload is designated by the com.apple.apn.managed
PayloadType value. In addition to the settings common to all payloads, this payload
defines the following:
Key
Value
DefaultsData
Dictionary, mandatory. This dictionary contains two key/value
pairs.
DefaultsDomainName
String, mandatory. The only allowed value is
com.apple.managedCarrier.
apns
Array, mandatory. This array contains an arbitrary number of
dictionaries, each describing an APN configuration, with the
key/value pairs below.
apn
String, mandatory. This string specifies the Access Point Name.
username
String, mandatory. This string specifies the user name for this
APN. If it is missing, the device prompts for it during profile
installation.
password
Data, optional. This data represents the password for the user for
this APN. For obfuscation purposes, it is encoded. If it is missing
from the payload, the device prompts for it during profile
installation.
Exchange Payload
The Exchange payload is designated by the com.apple.eas.account PayloadType value.
This payload creates a Microsoft Exchange account on the device. In addition to the
settings common to all payloads, this payload defines the following:
Key
Value
EmailAddress
String, mandatory. If not present in the payload, the device
prompts for this string during profile installation. Specifies the
full email address for the account.
Host
String, mandatory. Specifies the Exchange server host name
(or IP address).
SSL
Boolean, optional. Default YES. Specifies whether the Exchange
server uses SSL for authentication.
UserName
String, mandatory. This string specifies the user name for this
Exchange account. If missing, the devices prompts for it during
profile installation.
Appendix B Configuration Profile Format
53
VPN Payload
The VPN payload is designated by the com.apple.vpn.managed PayloadType value.
In addition to the settings common to all payload types, the VPN payload defines the
following keys.
Key
Value
UserDefinedName
String. Description of the VPN connection displayed on the
device.
OverridePrimary
Boolean. Specifies whether to send all traffic through the VPN
interface. If true, all network traffic is sent over VPN.
VPNType
String. Determines the settings available in the payload for this
type of VPN connection. It can have three possible
values: “L2TP”, “PPTP”, or “IPSec”, representing L2TP, PPTP and
Cisco IPSec respectively.
There are two possible dictionaries present at the top level, under the keys “PPP” and
“IPSec”. The keys inside these two dictionaries are described below, along with the
VPNType value under which the keys are used.
PPP Dictionary Keys
The following elements are for VPN payloads of type PPP.
54
Key
Value
AuthName
String. The VPN account user name. Used for L2TP and PPTP.
AuthPassword
String, optional. Only visible if TokenCard is false. Used for L2TP
and PPTP.
TokenCard
Boolean. Whether to use a token card such as an RSA SecurID
card for connecting. Used for L2TP.
CommRemoteAddress
String. IP address or host name of VPN server. Used for L2TP and
PPTP.
AuthEAPPlugins
Array. Only present if RSA SecurID is being used, in which case
it has one entry, a string with value “EAP-RSA”. Used for L2TP
and PPTP.
AuthProtocol
Array. Only present if RSA SecurID is being used, in which case it
has one entry, a string with value “EAP”. Used for L2TP and PPTP.
CCPMPPE40Enabled
Boolean. See discussion under CCPEnabled. Used for PPTP.
CCPMPPE128Enabled
Boolean. See discussion under CCPEnabled. Used for PPTP.
CCPEnabled
Boolean. Enables encryption on the connection. If this key and
CCPMPPE40Enabled are true, represents automatic encryption
level; if this key and CCPMPPE128Enabled are true, represents
maximum encryption level. If no encryption is used, then none
of the CCP keys are true. Used for PPTP.
Appendix B Configuration Profile Format
IPSec Dictionary Keys
The following elements are for VPN payloads of type IPSec
Key
Value
RemoteAddress
String. IP address or host name of the VPN server. Used for Cisco
IPSec.
AuthenticationMethod
String. Either “SharedSecret” or “Certificate”. Used for L2TP and
Cisco IPSec.
XAuthName
String. User name for VPN account. Used for Cisco IPSec.
XAuthEnabled
Integer. 1 if XAUTH is ON, 0 if it is OFF. Used for Cisco IPSec.
LocalIdentifier
String. Present only if AuthenticationMethod = SharedSecret.
The name of the group to use. If Hybrid Authentication is used,
the string must end with “[hybrid]”. Used for Cisco IPSec.
LocalIdentifierType
String. Present only if AuthenticationMethod = SharedSecret.
The value is “KeyID”. Used for L2TP and Cisco IPSec.
SharedSecret
Data. The shared secret for this VPN account. Only present if
AuthenticationMethod = SharedSecret. Used for L2TP and Cisco
IPSec.
PayloadCertificateUUID
String. The UUID of the certificate to use for the account
credentials. Only present if AuthenticationMethod = Certificate.
Used for Cisco IPSec.
PromptForVPNPIN
Boolean. Whether to prompt for a PIN when connecting. Used
for Cisco IPSec.
Wi-Fi Payload
The Wi-Fi payload is designated by the com.apple.wifi.managed PayloadType value.
This describes version 0 of the PayloadVersion value. In addition to the settings
common to all payload types, the payload defines the following keys.
Key
Value
SSID_STR
String. SSID of the Wi-Fi network to be used. This key name is
declared as APPLE80211KEY_SSID_STR in <Apple80211/
Apple80211API.h>.
HIDDEN_NETWORK
Boolean. Besides SSID, the device uses information such as
broadcast type and encryption type to differentiate a network.
By default, it is assumed that all configured networks are open
or broadcast. To specify a hidden network, you need to include a
boolean for the key “HIDDEN_NETWORK” or
APPLE80211KEY_HIDDEN_NETWORK.
Appendix B Configuration Profile Format
55
Key
Value
EncryptionType
String. The possible values for “EncryptionType” are “WEP”, “WPA”,
or “Any”. “WPA” corresponds to WPA and WPA2 and applies to
both encryption types. Make sure that these values exactly
match the capabilities of the network access point. If you’re
unsure about the encryption type, or would prefer that it applies
to all encryption types, use the value “Any”.
Password
String, optional. The absence of a password doesn’t prevent the
network from being added to the list of known networks. The
user is eventually prompted to provide the password when
connecting to that network.
For 802.1X enterprise networks, the EAP Client Configuration Dictionary must be
provided.
EAPClientConfiguration Dictionary
In addition to the standard encryption types, it is also possible to specify an enterprise
profile for a given network via the “EAPClientConfiguration” key. This key is declared as
kEAPOLControlEAPClientConfiguration in <EAP8021X/EAPOLControlTypes.h>.
If present, its value is a dictionary with the following keys.
56
Key
Value
UserName
String, optional. Unless you know the exact user name, this
property won’t appear in an imported configuration. Users can
enter this information when they authenticate.
AcceptEAPTypes
Array of integer values. These EAP types are accepted.:
13 = TLS
17 = LEAP
21 = TTLS
25 = PEAP
43 = EAP-FAST
TLSTrustedCertificates
Array of data values, optional. This is the list of certificates to be
trusted for this authentication. Each data element contains the
.cer form of the corresponding certificate.
This key lets you craft the list of certificates that are expected for
the given network, and avoids asking the user to dynamically
set trust on a certificate.
Dynamic trust (the certificate dialogue) is disabled if this
property is specified, unless TLSAllowTrustExceptions is also
specified with the value true (see below).
Appendix B Configuration Profile Format
Key
Value
TLSTrustedServerCommonNames
Array of string values, optional. This is the list of server certificate
common names that will be accepted. If a server presents a
certificate that is not in this list, it will not be trusted.
Used alone or in combination with TLSTrustedCertificates, the
property allows someone to carefully craft which certificates to
trust for the given network, and avoid dynamically trusted
certificates
Dynamic trust (the certificate dialogue) is disabled if this
property is specified, unless TLSAllowTrustExceptions is also
specified with the value true (see below).
TLSAllowTrustExceptions
Boolean, optional. Allows/disallows a dynamic trust decision by
the user. The dynamic trust is the certificate dialogue that
appears when a certificate isn’t trusted. If this is false, the
authentication fails if the certificate isn’t already trusted. See
TLSTrustedCertificates and TLSTrustedServerCommonNames
above.
The default value of this property is true unless either
TLSTrustedCertificates or TLSTrustedServerCommonNames is
supplied, in which case the default value is false.
TTLSInnerAuthentication
String, optional. This is the inner authentication used by the
TTLS module. The default value is “MSCHAPv2”.
Possible values are “PAP”, “CHAP”, “MSCHAP”, and “MSCHAPv2”.
OuterIdentity
String, optional. This key is only relevant to TTLS, PEAP, and EAPFAST.
This allows the user to hide his/her identity. The user’s actual
name appears only inside the encrypted tunnel. For example, it
could be set to “anonymous” or “anon”, or
“anon@mycompany.net”.
It can increase security because an attacker can’t see the
authenticating user’s name in the clear.
EAP-Fast Support
The EAP-FAST module uses the following properties in the EAPClientConfiguration
dictionary.
Key
Value
EAPFASTUsePAC
Boolean, optional.
EAPFASTProvisionPAC
Boolean, optional.
EAPFASTProvisionPACAnonymously Boolean, optional.
Thes keys are hierarchical in nature: if EAPFASTUsePAC is false, the other two properties
aren’t consulted. Similarly, if EAPFASTProvisionPAC is false,
EAPFASTProvisionPACAnonymously isn’t consulted.
If EAPFASTUsePAC is false, authentication proceeds much like PEAP or TTLS: the server
proves its identity using a certificate each time.
Appendix B Configuration Profile Format
57
If EAPFASTUsePAC is true, then an existing PAC is used, if it is present. The only way to
get a PAC on the device currently is to allow PAC provisioning. So, you need to enable
EAPFASTProvisionPAC, and if desired, also EAPFASTProvisionPACAnonymously.
EAPFASTProvisionPACAnonymously has a security weakness: it doesn’t authenticate
the server using a certificate; it relies on the shared secret of the user’s password.
Certificates
As with VPN configurations, it’s possible to associate a certificate identity configuration
with a Wi-Fi configuration. This is useful when defining credentials for a secure
enterprise network. To associate an identity, specify its payload UUID via the
“PayloadCertificateUUID” key.
Key
Value
PayloadCertificateUUID
String. UUID of the certificate payload to use for the identity
credential.
Proxy settings
Proxy settings are in a separate dictionary at the top level.
58
Key
Value
PropNetProxiesHTTPEnable
Integer. 1 = Proxy enabled.
PropNetProxiesHTTPProxy
String. Proxy server address.
PropNetProxiesHTTPPort
Integer. Proxy port number.
HTTPProxyUsername
String, optional. User name.
HTTPProxyPassword
String, optional. User’s password.
PropNetProxiesProxyAutoConfigEn
able
Integer. 1 = Auto proxy enabled.
PropNetProxiesProxyAutoConfigUR
LString
String. URL that points to a PAC file where the configuration
information is stored.
Appendix B Configuration Profile Format
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