ATO V.9256K Network Card User Manual

V.92 56K
Internal Modem
User’s Guide
C6628-0702M1
TOSHIBA
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
2
FCC Notice “Declaration of Conformity Information”
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a
Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits
are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference
in a residential installation.
This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and,
if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, it may cause
harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no
guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this
equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception,
which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is
encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the
following measures:
❖
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
❖
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
❖
Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from that to
which the receiver is connected.
❖
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
NOTE: Only peripherals complying with the FCC Class B limits may be attached
to this modem. Operation with non-compliant peripherals or peripherals not
recommended by Toshiba is likely to result in interference to radio and TV
reception. Changes or modifications made to this equipment not expressly
approved by Toshiba or parties authorized by Toshiba could void the user’s
authority to operate the equipment.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to
the following two conditions:
❖
This device may not cause harmful interference.
❖
This device must accept any interference received, including
interference that may cause undesired operation.
Contact:
Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc.
9740 Irvine Blvd.
Irvine, CA 92618-1697
(949) 583-3000
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3
Industry Canada Requirement
This Class B digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B est conformé à la norme NMB-003
du Canada.
Pursuant to FCC CFR 47, Part 68:
When you are ready to install or use the modem, call your local telephone
company and give them the following information:
❖
The telephone number of the line to which you will connect the
modem
❖
The registration number that is located on the device
The FCC registration number of the modem will be found on either
the device which is to be installed, or, if already installed, on the
bottom of the computer outside of the main system label.
❖
The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) of the modem can vary.
For the REN of your modem, refer to your computer’s user’s guide.
The modem connects to the telephone line by means of a standard jack
called the USOC RJ11C.
Type of service
Your modem is designed to be used on standard-device telephone lines.
Connection to telephone company-provided coin service (central office
implemented systems) is prohibited. Connection to party lines service is
subject to state tariffs. If you have any questions about your telephone line,
such as how many pieces of equipment you can connect to it, the telephone
company will provide this information upon request.
Telephone company procedures
The goal of the telephone company is to provide you with the best service it
can. In order to do this, it may occasionally be necessary for them to make
changes in their equipment, operations, or procedures. If these changes
might affect your service or the operation of your equipment, the telephone
company will give you notice in writing to allow you to make any changes
necessary to maintain uninterrupted service.
If problems arise
If any of your telephone equipment is not operating properly, you should
immediately remove it from your telephone line, as it may cause harm to
the telephone network. If the telephone company notes a problem, they
may temporarily discontinue service. When practical, they will notify you
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4
in advance of this disconnection. If advance notice is not feasible, you will
be notified as soon as possible. When you are notified, you will be given
the opportunity to correct the problem and informed of your right to file a
complaint with the FCC. In the event repairs are ever needed on your
modem, they should be performed by Toshiba Corporation or an authorized
representative of Toshiba Corporation.
Disconnection
If you should ever decide to permanently disconnect your modem from its
present line, please call the telephone company and let them know of this
change.
Fax branding
The Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 makes it unlawful for any
person to use a computer or other electronic device to send any message via
a telephone fax machine unless such message clearly contains in a margin
at the top or bottom of each transmitted page or on the first page of the
transmission, the date and time it is sent and an identification of the
business, other entity or individual sending the message and the telephone
number of the sending machine or such business, other entity or individual.
In order to program this information into your fax modem, you should
complete the setup of your fax software before sending messages.
Instructions for IC CS-03 certified equipment
1
NOTICE: The Industry Canada label identifies certified equipment.
This certification means that the equipment meets certain
telecommunications network protective, operational and safety
requirements as prescribed in the appropriate Terminal Equipment
Technical Requirements document(s). The Department does not
guarantee the equipment will operate to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is
permissible to be connected to the facilities of the local
telecommunications company. The equipment must also be installed
using an acceptable method of connection. The customer should be
aware that compliance with the above conditions may not prevent
degradation of service in some situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be coordinated by a
representative designated by the supplier. Any repairs or alterations
made by the user to this equipment, or equipment malfunctions, may
give the telecommunications company cause to request the user to
disconnect the equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground
connections of the power utility, telephone lines and internal metallic
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5
water pipe system, if present, are connected together. This precaution
may be particularly important in rural areas.
Caution: Users should not attempt to make such connections
themselves, but should contact the appropriate electric inspection
authority, or electrician, as appropriate.
2
The user’s guide of analog equipment must contain the equipment’s
Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) and an explanation notice similar
to the following:
The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) of this device can vary.
For the REN number of your modem, refer to your computer’s user’s
guide.
NOTICE: The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) assigned to each
terminal device provides an indication of the maximum number of
terminals allowed to be connected to a telephone interface. The
termination on an interface may consist of any combination of devices
subject only to the requirement that the sum of the Ringer Equivalence
Numbers of all the devices does not exceed 5.
3
The standard connecting arrangement (telephone jack type) for this
equipment is jack type(s): USOC RJ11C.
Copyright
This user’s guide is copyrighted by Toshiba Corporation with all rights
reserved. Under the copyright laws, this user’s guide cannot be reproduced
in any form without the prior written permission of Toshiba. No patent
liability is assumed, however, with respect to the use of the information
contained herein.
© 2002 by Toshiba Corporation. All rights reserved.
Export Administration Regulation
This document contains technical data that may be controlled under the
U.S. Export Administration Regulations, and may be subject to the
approval of the U.S. Department of Commerce prior to export. Any export,
directly or indirectly, in contravention of the U.S. Export Administration
Regulations is prohibited.
Disclaimer
This user’s guide has been validated and reviewed for accuracy. The
instructions and descriptions it contains are accurate for the Toshiba
internal modem at the time of this user’s guide’s production. However,
succeeding products and user’s guides are subject to change without notice.
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6
Toshiba assumes no liability for damages incurred directly or indirectly
from errors, omissions or discrepancies between the modem and the user’s
guide.
Trademarks
Microsoft and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation.
Microcom and Microcom Networking Protocol are registered trademarks
of Microcom, Inc.
Hayes is a registered trademark of Hayes Microcomputer Products Inc.
MNP is a trademark of Microcom Systems, Inc.
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Contents
Introduction ..............................................................12
Conventions ........................................................... 12
Features ................................................................. 14
Function charts ...................................................... 17
Chapter 1: Modem On Hold....................................... 19
Using Modem On Hold........................................... 20
Answering an incoming voice call.................... 20
Placing an outgoing voice call.......................... 22
Viewing Call History......................................... 25
Configuring Modem On Hold ................................. 25
Configuring Modem On Hold settings.............. 26
Enabling/Disabling the Modem On Hold
autorun status............................................ 28
Adding and removing the Modem On Hold
icon from the system tray .......................... 28
Locating the Modem On Hold application version.. 29
Chapter 2: Function Check ........................................ 31
Running diagnostics .............................................. 31
Determining current connection protocol .............. 38
7
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Contents
Chapter 3: Using the Internal Modem ....................... 44
Connection procedures .......................................... 44
Analog or digital?............................................. 45
Connecting the internal modem ....................... 45
Disconnecting the internal modem .................. 46
Basic operation ...................................................... 47
Connecting to a telephone line ......................... 47
Direct access line ............................................. 47
Extension line................................................... 48
Receiving a call ................................................ 49
Terminating a call............................................. 49
Setting the data flow control ............................ 49
Facsimiles ........................................................ 50
Chapter 4: AT Commands ......................................... 51
AT command formats ............................................ 51
+++ Escape sequence ...................................... 52
A/ Repeat last command .................................. 52
A Answer command......................................... 52
Bn Communication standard setting ................ 52
Dn Dial ............................................................. 53
En Echo command ........................................... 54
Hn Hook control............................................... 55
In Request ID information................................ 55
Ln Monitor speaker volume ............................. 60
Mn Monitor speaker mode............................... 60
Nn Modulation handshake ............................... 61
On Return online to data mode ........................ 61
P Select pulse dialing....................................... 62
Qn Result code control .................................... 62
T Select tone dialing......................................... 62
Vn DCE response format.................................. 62
Wn Result Code Option.................................... 63
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Contents
9
Xn Result code selection, call progress
monitoring ................................................. 63
Extended result codes...................................... 64
Dial tone detect ................................................ 64
Busy tone detect .............................................. 64
Zn Recall stored profile .................................... 65
&Cn Data Carrier Detect (DCD) control ............ 65
&Dn Data Terminal Ready (DTR) control ......... 66
&F Load factory settings.................................. 66
&Gn V.22bis guard tone control....................... 67
&Kn Local flow control selection ..................... 67
&Pn Select Pulse Dial Make/Break Ratio ......... 68
&Tn Self-test commands ................................. 68
&V View active configuration and stored
profile ........................................................ 69
&W Store current configuration....................... 69
&Y Select stored profile for hardware reset ..... 69
&Zn=x Store telephone number ....................... 70
\Nn Error control mode selection ..................... 70
Qn Local flow control selection........................ 71
\Vn Protocol result code .................................. 71
%Cn Data compression control ....................... 72
-V.90=<n> ........................................................ 72
+DS44 V.44 Data Compression Command....... 73
+MS Command ................................................ 74
+PCW Command ............................................. 77
+PIG Command ............................................... 78
+PMH Command ............................................. 79
+VCID Command ............................................. 79
Chapter 5: S-Registers .............................................. 81
S-Register values................................................... 82
S0 Auto answer ring number ........................... 82
S1 Ring counter ............................................... 82
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Contents
S2 AT escape character (user-defined) ............ 83
S3 Command line termination character
(user-defined) ............................................ 83
S4 Response formatting character
(user-defined) ............................................ 83
S5 Command line editing character
(user defined) ............................................ 84
S6 Wait before dialing...................................... 84
S7 Connection completion time-out................. 85
S8 Comma pause time..................................... 85
S11 DTMF dialing speed .................................. 85
S12 Escape guard time .................................... 86
S37 Dial line rate.............................................. 86
AT command set result codes................................ 87
Chapter 6: Test Function ........................................... 92
Test description...................................................... 92
Testing procedure .................................................. 93
Chapter 7: MNP and V.42.......................................... 95
Error-correction overview ...................................... 95
MNP error correction ....................................... 95
V.42 error correction ........................................ 96
Operation modes ................................................... 96
Normal mode ................................................... 96
Reliable mode .................................................. 96
Commands (\Nn) ............................................. 97
Flow control ........................................................... 97
Serial port flow control .................................... 98
XON/XOFF flow control (software) ................... 98
CTS/RTS two-way flow control (hardware) ...... 99
Commands (\Qn, &Kn) .................................... 99
Modem port flow control ............................... 100
Data compression ................................................ 100
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Contents
11
Commands (%Cn) ......................................... 100
Appendix A: Specifications...................................... 101
Network control unit (NCU) ................................. 101
Communication specifications ............................. 102
Appendix B: Communication Conditions ................. 103
Communication parameters................................. 103
Telephone line types............................................. 103
Connectable lines (2-wire) ............................. 104
Unconnectable lines (4-wire) ......................... 104
Dial modes........................................................... 104
Glossary ..................................................................105
Index .......................................................................117
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Introduction
Congratulations on becoming the owner of a V.92 56K-compliant
internal modem offering advanced functions for fax and data
communication. This user’s guide provides detailed information
on features, operation and technical specifications of your internal
modem.
Conventions
This user’s guide uses the following formats to describe, identify,
and highlight terms and operating procedures.
Abbreviations
On first appearance, and whenever necessary for clarity,
abbreviations are enclosed in parentheses following their
definition; for example: Read Only Memory (ROM). Acronyms
are also defined in the Glossary.
12
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Introduction
Conventions
13
Keys
The keyboard keys are used in the text to describe many computer
operations. A distinctive typeface identifies the key top symbols as
they appear on the keyboard. For example, Enter identifies the
Enter key.
Key operation
Some operations require you to simultaneously use two or more
keys. We identify such operations by the key top symbols
separated by a plus sign (+). For example, Ctrl + C means you must
hold down Ctrl and at the same time press C. If three keys are used,
hold down the first two and at the same time press the third.
ATDT
Text you are to type in is represented in the type
face you see to the left.
Display
ABC
Text generated by the computer that appears on
its display screen is presented in the type face
you see to the left (bold).
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14
Introduction
Features
Messages
Messages are used in this user’s guide to bring important
information to your attention. Each type of message is identified
as shown below.
CAUTION: This icon indicates the existence of a hazard that could
result in damage to equipment or property if the safety instruction
is not observed.
NOTE: This icon indicates information that relates to the safe
operation of the equipment or related items.
Features
The V.92 56K internal modem provides capability for facsimile
transmissions and standard computer-to-computer data
communications, at a rate of up to 53,000 bits per second
(downstream). It supports the following V.92 features:
❖
Fast Connect—shortens connection times up to 25 percent, by
storing phone line characteristics.
❖
Modem On Hold (MOH)—enables you to talk on the
telephone while connected to the Internet, using the same
telephone line. This feature requires ISP support and Call
Waiting/Caller ID Service. It also requires the Modem On
Hold application, which comes preinstalled on your
computer.
❖
PCM Upstream—transmits up to 48,000 bits per second
upstream to host modems that support the V.92 protocol.
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Introduction
Features
❖
15
Data Compression—increases transmission speeds using the
new V.44 compression algorithm, which is optimized for
World Wide Web browsing. The modem also supports MNP5
and V.42bis data compression protocols.
The internal modem has a modem port (RJ11) for connecting to an
analog telephone line.
CAUTION: Connect the internal modem ONLY to an analog line,
not to a digital line. For more information, see “Connection
procedures” on page 44.
Due to FCC limitations, speeds of 53 kbps are the maximum
permissible transmission rates during downloads. Actual data
transmission speeds will vary depending on line conditions. Many
users will experience throughput in the range of 32 to 44 kbps
under normal conditions, depending on telephone line quality.
To achieve a V.92 56K connection, both your modem and the host
modem (typically at an ISP) must be V.92 56K modems. As many
ISPs do not yet support the V.92 protocol, most connections will
be V.90 56K connections.
V.92 connections also require a phone line that supports the V.92
protocol. Some phone lines will not support V.92 or V.90 56K
connections at all, either because of quality impairments or
additional analog-to-digital conversions (for example, PBX
systems).
When a PCM upstream connection is not possible, the modem
automatically uses the default V.34 protocol for “upstream” data
transmission, which supports connection rates of up to 33,600 bits/
second.
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16
Introduction
Features
56K data communication
The internal modem uses the V.92 protocol to
connect to host V.92 modems at data rates of
up to 53,000 bits per second (bps). It uses the
V.90 protocol to connect at data rates of up to
53,000 bps when connecting to a V.90 host
modem. For connections that do not support
either the V.90 or V.92 protocol, the internal
modem uses the ITU standard V.34 protocol
to connect at rates of up to 33,600 bits per
second. The internal modem also supports all
of the earlier, lower-speed ITU/CCITT
modem protocols.
Fax capability
You can use the internal modem to transmit
and receive facsimiles at rates of up to 14,400
bps. The internal modem supports Class 1 fax
transmission.
Standard commands
The internal modem is compatible with the
industry standard Hayes® AT commands and
S-Register settings.
Error control
This feature assures accurate data transmission even over telephone lines subject to
noise interference. The internal modem uses
Microcom Networking Protocol® 4 (MNP4)
and V.42 error correction.
Data compression
Compression can greatly increase data
throughput. The internal modem supports the
new V.44 compression protocol, which is
optimized for World Wide Web browsing. It
also supports MNP5 and V.42bis data compression protocols.
Serial port access
The internal modem frees your computer’s
serial port for connection of a serial mouse,
serial printer or other serial device.
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Introduction
Function charts
17
Ring indicator
The computer can be powered on automatically when the modem answers a call. This
feature is available only when the computer is
in Resume/Standby mode. Refer to your computer’s documentation for details on ring
indicator power on.
Standby/Hibernate
When the computer is set to Standby or
Hibernate, the modem settings automatically
resume when you turn on the power. Refer to
your computer’s documentation for details on
Standby/Hibernate modes.
Modem On Hold
Enables you to talk on the telephone while connected to the Internet, using the same telephone
line. This feature requires ISP support and Call
Waiting/Caller ID Service. The phone line must
support Type 2 Caller ID (CID).
Fast Connect
Shortens connection times up to 25 percent, by
storing phone line characteristics.
PCM upstream
Transmits up to a maximum rate of 48,000 bits
per second upstream to host V.92 modems that
support this feature.
Function charts
The modem supports these communication protocols:
Functions available in all operating systems
Function
Remarks
Data
V.92/V.90
From 32 Kbps to 56 Kbps
V.34
From 2400 bps to 33.6 Kbps
V.32bis
4800, 7200, 9600 bps, 12, 14.4 Kbps
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18
Introduction
Function charts
Functions available in all operating systems (Continued)
Function
Fax
Remarks
V.32
4800, 9600 bps
V.22bis
1200, 2400 bps
V.22
1200 bps
V.23
75, 600, 1200 bps
V.21
300 bps
BELL212A
1200 bps
BELL103
300 bps
MNP5
Data compression
MNP4
Error control
V.44
Data compression
V.42bis
Data compression
V.42
Error control
V.17
7200, 9600 bps, 12, 14.4 Kbps
V.29
7200, 9600 bps
V.27ter
2400, 4800 bps
V.21 ch2
300 bps
EIA-578
Class 1 command set for fax
Definition: bps stands for bits per second.
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Chapter 1
Modem On Hold
Your computer comes with the Modem On Hold application
preinstalled. This application enables you to answer
incoming voice calls or make outgoing voice calls while
maintaining your Internet connection, by putting the Internet
connection on hold.
To use the Modem On Hold feature, you must have Call
Waiting service and an ISP that supports the V.92 modem
protocol. You must also have Caller ID service, if you want
the application to display the identity of incoming calls. The
phone line must support Type 2 Caller ID.
For V.90 connections, which do not support the Modem On
Hold feature, the Modem On Hold application displays the
incoming call information so that you can choose to either
ignore it, or disconnect the Internet connection to answer the
call. The application can also be configured to automatically
disconnect your Internet connection so that you can answer
incoming voice calls, in case you do not have Call Waiting
service.
19
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20
Modem On Hold
Using Modem On Hold
The Modem On Hold application comes configured to
automatically launch when you start the computer, displaying
an
icon on the system tray. However, you can change this
configuration. See “Configuring Modem On Hold” on
page 25 for instructions.
Using Modem On Hold
The Modem On Hold application pops up the V.92 Modem
On Hold dialog whenever an incoming voice call is detected,
or you place an outgoing voice call while connected to the
Internet. This dialog displays information about the call in a
Call Status box.
Answering an incoming voice call
When the modem detects an incoming voice call during an
Internet connection, the V.92 Modem on Hold dialog appears.
The Call Status box indicates that a call is waiting. If you
have Caller ID, the dialog also displays the phone number
and identity of the incoming call.
Sample Incoming voice call dialog box
1
To ignore an incoming call, click Ignore, or simply
ignore the call.
If you ignore the call, it will continue to ring until the
timer expires in 15 seconds.
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Modem On Hold
Using Modem On Hold
2
21
To answer an incoming call, click Answer, then pick up
your telephone handset.
The Call Status box indicates that the Internet connection
is on hold while you complete your voice call.
Sample Modem On Hold in progress dialog box
3
To maintain the Internet connection, you must complete
the voice call before the Modem On Hold timer expires.
The application displays the timer in the lower right
corner. The timeout value is determined by your ISP.
4
To end your voice call and resume your Internet
connection, click Resume Data Call.
A dialog displays, indicating that the Modem On Hold
has been cancelled and instructing you to hang up.
Sample Modem On Hold cancelled dialog box
5
Click OK.
The Call Status box indicates that it is resuming the
modem (Internet) connection.
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22
Modem On Hold
Using Modem On Hold
Sample Resuming modem connection dialog box
The modem connection is automatically renegotiated and
your Internet connection resumes.
NOTE: A “Call Canceled” message may display. If this occurs, wait
a few seconds while the modem automatically redials and
reestablishes your Internet connection.
Placing an outgoing voice call
To use this function, your phone line must support three-way
calling service.
1
Right-click the
icon, located on the system tray, to
display the modem popup window.
Sample modem popup window
2
Click Place Voice Call.
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Modem On Hold
Using Modem On Hold
23
The V.92 Modem On Hold dialog appears, instructing
you to click the Call button.
Sample Placing a voice call dialog box
3
Before the 15-second timer runs out, click Call.
Otherwise, click Ignore to cancel the call.
The Call Status box indicates that the Internet connection
is on hold while you complete your voice call.
Sample Modem On Hold in progress dialog box
4
Pick up your telephone handset and place your voice call.
5
To maintain the Internet connection, you must complete
the voice call before the Modem On Hold timer expires.
The application displays the timer in the lower-right
corner. The timeout value is determined by your ISP.
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24
Modem On Hold
Using Modem On Hold
6
To end your voice call and resume your Internet
connection, wait until the incoming caller has hung up,
then click Resume Data Call.
If you hang up before the incoming caller, a “Call
Cancelled” message may display. If this occurs, wait a
few seconds while the modem automatically redials and
reestablishes your Internet connection.
A dialog displays, indicating that the Modem On Hold
has been cancelled and instructing you to hang up.
Sample Modem On Hold cancelled dialog box
7
Click OK.
The Call Status box indicates that it is resuming the
modem connection.
Sample Resuming modem connection dialog box
The modem connection is automatically renegotiated and
your Internet connection resumes.
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Modem On Hold
Configuring Modem On Hold
25
Viewing Call History
The Modem On Hold application provides a log of the last
ten incoming calls. The log includes the date, time, phone
number, and Caller ID (if you have Caller ID service).
1
To view the call history, right-click the
icon, located
on the system tray, to display the modem popup window.
Sample modem popup window
2
Click Call History to display the Call History log.
Sample Call History log
Configuring Modem On Hold
The Modem On Hold application comes preconfigured with
Call Waiting, Caller ID, and the Modem On Hold Feature
enabled. If your configuration does not match this, you can
change the default configuration. You can also configure the
application so that it does not automatically run when you
start your computer.
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26
Modem On Hold
Configuring Modem On Hold
Configuring Modem On Hold settings
You configure Modem On Hold settings from the V.92 MoH
Settings dialog.
1
To open the V.92 MoH Settings dialog, double-click the
icon, located on the system tray in the lower-right
corner of your desktop.
The V.92 MoH Settings dialog appears.
Sample V.92 MoH Settings dialog box
2
If you do not have Call Waiting service, clear the Enable
Call Waiting check box.
All of the other settings in this dialog become
unavailable. If you do not have Call Waiting, the modem
will still display a message when it detects an incoming
call during an Internet connection, however you will not
be able to use the Modem On Hold feature to answer that
call without losing the Internet connection.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Modem On Hold
Configuring Modem On Hold
3
27
If you do not want the Modem On Hold feature enabled,
select Disconnect call. Switch to voice.
When the modem detects an incoming voice call during
an Internet connection, it disconnects the Internet
connection so that you can answer the voice call.
4
If Modem On Hold is enabled, you can select or clear the
Enable Caller ID check box to match your telephone
service.
5
To disable the warning that displays before the Modem
On Hold timer expires (disconnecting an incoming or
outgoing voice call if not completed), clear the Warn
before timeout check box.
6
To change the Modem On Hold warning timer value,
select a value from the Warn before timeout dropdown
box.
You can set the timer from 10 to 60 seconds, in intervals
of 10 seconds.
7
If your phone system requires a number to be dialed to
switch between voice and data calls, enter that number in
the To switch between calls, dial box.
If your phone system requires one number to switch from
voice to data and a different number to switch from data
to voice, enter both numbers in the box, separated by a
comma.
8
Click OK to close the dialog and save your changes.
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28
Modem On Hold
Configuring Modem On Hold
Enabling/Disabling the Modem On Hold autorun status
1
Right-click the
icon, located on the system tray, to
display the modem popup window.
Sample modem popup window
2
If Start Automatically is checked, you can click it to
clear the check mark.
The Modem On Hold application no longer launches
automatically when you start your computer.
3
If Start Automatically is not checked, you can click it to
select this option.
A check mark appears next to the option. The Modem On
Hold application now launches automatically when you
start your computer.
Adding and removing the Modem On Hold icon from the
system tray
If you no longer wish to use the Modem On Hold application,
you may want to remove it from your system tray. You can
add the icon to the system tray at a later time.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Modem On Hold
Locating the Modem On Hold application version
29
Removing the icon
1
Right-click the
icon, located on the system tray, to
display the modem popup window.
Sample modem popup window
2
Click Exit MOH.
A confirmation dialog appears.
3
Click OK to remove the icon from the system tray.
Adding the icon
From your desktop, click Start, Programs, Toshiba
Internal Modem, Modem on Hold. The icon is added to the
system tray.
Locating the Modem On Hold application
version
1
Right-click the
icon, located on the system tray, to
display the modem popup window.
Sample modem popup window
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
30
Modem On Hold
Locating the Modem On Hold application version
2
Click About MOH to display the application version.
Sample About MOH
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Chapter 2
Function Check
This chapter describes how to check the internal modem’s
functions. Use this procedure when the modem is not
working properly, to help identify the problem and, in many
cases, the solution.
Running diagnostics
If the modem is not working properly, running some simple
diagnostics can help you determine if the modem drivers are
installed correctly, or if the modem is not working due to a
conflict with another application using the communications
port.
To run modem diagnostics:
1
Double-click Control Panel on your computer’s desktop
to open the Control Panel.
31
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
32
Function Check
Running diagnostics
Sample Control Panel
2
Double-click Phone and Modem Options to open the
Phone and Modem Options window.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Function Check
Running diagnostics
33
Sample Phone and Modem Options window
3
Click the Modems tab to display the installed modems.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
34
Function Check
Running diagnostics
Sample Modems tab dialog box
4
If it is not already selected, click Toshiba Software
Modem, then click Properties to open the Toshiba
Software Modem Properties window.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Function Check
Running diagnostics
Sample Toshiba Software Modem Properties window
5
Click the Diagnostics tab.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
35
36
Function Check
Running diagnostics
Sample Diagnostics tab
6
Click Query Modem.
The system executes an automatic operations test,
displaying the following message while the test is in
progress.
Sample Diagnostics test in progress message
If the diagnostic test runs successfully, a series of
commands and the modem’s response displays in the
Modem Information box. The modem drivers are
installed correctly.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Function Check
Running diagnostics
37
Sample Diagnostics results
If the diagnostics test fails, you may see a “Can’t Open
Port” message. This indicates that another application is
using the COM port, or the modem driver is not properly
installed.
7
If the diagnostic test fails, and this is the first time you’ve
run the test, restart the computer and repeat step 1
through step 6.
8
If the diagnostic test fails a second time, double-click
Control Panel on your computer’s desktop to open the
Control Panel.
9
Double-click Add/Remove Programs to open the Add/
Remove programs window.
10 Select and remove the Toshiba Software Modem.
11 If prompted to do so, restart the computer.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
38
Function Check
Determining current connection protocol
12 Reinstall the Toshiba Software Modem driver.
If you do not have the latest driver, you can download it
from www.toshiba.com.
13 Repeat step 1 through step 6 to run diagnostics again.
The issued AT commands, and the modem’s response,
appear in the Modem Information box. Use the scroll bar,
if necessary, to locate the ATI3 command and its
response.
14 Verify that the driver you installed in step 12 is the
currently installed driver.
Determining current connection protocol
If V.92 features do not appear to be functioning, verify that
the connection is a V.92 connection using the following
procedure.
1
Double-click Control Panel on your computer’s desktop
to open the Control Panel.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Function Check
Determining current connection protocol
39
Sample Control Panel
2
Double-click Phone and Modem Options to open the
Phone and Modem Options window.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
40
Function Check
Determining current connection protocol
Sample Phone and Modem Options window
3
Click the Modems tab to display the installed modems.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Function Check
Determining current connection protocol
Sample Modems tab
4
If it is not already selected, click Toshiba Software
Modem, then click Properties to open the Toshiba
Software Modem Properties window.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
41
42
Function Check
Determining current connection protocol
Sample Toshiba Software Modem Properties window
5
Click the Diagnostics tab.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Function Check
Determining current connection protocol
43
Sample Diagnostics tab
6
Click View log to display connection information about
the last call.
7
Locate the data compression format in the log. If it lists
V.44 data compression, the connection was a V.92
connection.
8
To append connection information for future calls to the
existing call log, on the Diagnostics tab select the
Append to Log check box.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Chapter 3
Using the Internal
Modem
This chapter describes connection procedures and basic
operations.
Connection procedures
This section describes how to connect the internal modem to,
and disconnect it from, a telephone jack.
CAUTION: The modem is designed for use with a standard analog
telephone line. Do not connect the modem to a digital telephone
line. A digital line may damage the modem. If you connect the
modem to a digital telephone line, the modem will not dial, and
will display the message NO DIAL TONE at the AT command line.
44
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Using the Internal Modem
Connection procedures
45
Analog or digital?
❖
If you are not sure which type of line a particular line
jack offers, assume that it is digital and do not connect
the internal modem to it.
❖
If the wall jack is known to be connected to a PBX
(Private Branch Exchange) system, then the line is
digital. Do not connect the modem to it.
❖
If a (working) telephone connected to the wall jack has
an REN (Ringer Equivalency Number) printed on its
label, then it is an analog phone. If the phone is working
correctly, then the wall jack itself is analog.
❖
Telephones in an office environment are commonly
connected to digital phone lines.
❖
Unfortunately, the wall jacks for both analog and digital
phone lines use the familiar RJ11 connector as shown on
page 46. If you are not sure that an RJ11 jack terminates
an analog phone line, do not connect the modem to it.
Connecting the internal modem
CAUTION: In the event of a lightning storm, unplug the modem
cable from the telephone jack.
A standard modular cable is supplied with the internal
modem. Follow the steps below to connect the internal
modem to a telephone jack.
1
Turn the connector so that the small connecting lever
faces down.
2
Squeeze the lever and plug the connector into the
computer’s modem port.
3
Plug the other end of the cable into an RJ11 wall jack.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
46
Using the Internal Modem
Connection procedures
Connecting the internal modem
NOTE: When you connect the RJ11 jack, insert it until you hear a
click.
Disconnecting the internal modem
When you need to disconnect the internal modem’s modular
cable:
1
Pinch the connecting lever on the connector in the
telephone wall jack and pull out the connector.
Squeeze here
Disconnecting the cable from the wall jack
2
Disconnect the modular cable from the computer’s
modem port.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Using the Internal Modem
Basic operation
47
Basic operation
After you connect the modular cable to your internal modem
and a telephone line, you are ready to run your
communication software. Refer to your software
documentation for instructions on operating your internal
modem.
As examples, this section describes how to execute basic
modem operations by typing AT commands directly into the
communication software program. You must be in terminal
mode to enter the AT commands. Refer to your software
documentation or online help.
Connecting to a telephone line
The AT commands for connecting to a telephone line depend
on whether you are using a direct line or an extension line,
such as in an office building.
Direct access line
❖
To place a call using tone dialing, enter:
ATDT*******
and press Enter.
The asterisks * indicate the number you are calling.
❖
To place a call using pulse dialing, enter:
ATDP*******
and press Enter.
The asterisks * indicate the number you are calling.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
48
Using the Internal Modem
Basic operation
Extension line
If you are calling from an extension line, such as in an office
building, and need to dial nine or another number to gain
external access, follow the steps below.
❖
To place a call using tone dialing, enter:
ATDT 9,
******* and press Enter.
The nine or other number is for line access; the comma
(,) is for a pause (about 2 seconds with the default
setting) to give time for a connection. The asterisks *
indicate the number you are calling.
❖
To place a call using pulse dialing, enter:
ATDP 9,
******* and press Enter.
The nine or other number is for line access; the comma is
for a pause (about 2 seconds with the default setting) to
give time for a connection. The asterisks * indicate the
number you are calling.
You can enter as many commas as you need. The
following example will result in a six-second pause:
ATDT 9,,, *******
and press Enter.
NOTE: If you are using a PBX connection that does not wait for a
dial tone, add the X0, X1 or X3 to the AT command line. For
example: ATX3DP 9, ******* and press Enter.
Actual usage will vary according to the host system, so please
check with the system manager.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Using the Internal Modem
Basic operation
49
Receiving a call
To set the number of rings before the internal modem
automatically answers the phone, set the S0 register as
follows:
ATS0=*
and press Enter.
The asterisk * indicates the number of rings.
See “S-Register values” on page 82 for more details.
Terminating a call
The methods for terminating a call depend on the status of the
connection.
❖
If the internal modem is dialing or has not yet gone
online, you can terminate a call by pressing any key.
❖
If the terminal is online, enter the escape code (+++), then
type: ATH and press Enter.
❖
If the remote party disconnects, the call will be
automatically cut off.
❖
If the power to the computer is cut off, the call is
terminated.
Setting the data flow control
Data flow control is used to start and stop data transmission
according to the status of the data buffer (full or empty). The
following describes how to set the data flow control method:
❖
CTS/RTS (hardware control)
❖
XON/XOFF (software)
Also, see “MNP and V.42” on page 95.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
50
Using the Internal Modem
Basic operation
CTS/RTS control
This control method is hardware-dependent. To control data
flow, the modem and computer transmit Clear To Send/
Request To Send signals to each other. To set CTS/RTS
control, enter the following AT command:
AT\Q3
XON/XOFF control
This control method is managed by software. The start/stop
signals, that is transfer on/transfer off, are included in the data
stream. To set XON/XOFF control, enter the following AT
command:
AT\Q1
Please use any settings recommended in your
communications software manual.
Facsimiles
Fax communication uses EIA-578 Class 1 commands and
requires fax software. Communication is controlled by the
fax software.
NOTE: Use only software compatible with EIA-578 Class 1. Do not
use EIA-592 Class 2-compatible software.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Chapter 4
AT Commands
In most cases, you will not need to type AT commands
manually. However, there may be some occasions when you
will need to do so.
This chapter describes AT commands for data mode. Fax
commands are issued by application software.
AT command formats
The format for entering AT commands is:
ATXn
where X is the AT command, and n is the specific value for
some of the commands. After you type in the command,
press Enter.
Any command issued is acknowledged with a response in
either text or numeric values known as result codes.
All commands and command-values accepted by the modem
are described in this section; any entry other than those listed
results in an error.
If no value is entered for n, then the command defaults to a
value of n=0.
51
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
52
AT Commands
AT command formats
+++ Escape sequence
The escape sequence allows the modem to exit data mode
and enter online command mode. While in online command
mode, you can communicate directly with your modem using
AT commands. When you finish, you can return to data mode
using the ATO command.
There must be a pause after you enter an escape sequence
before any additional characters can be sent to the modem.
The length of this pause is set by Escape Guard Time (S12).
The pause prevents the modem from interpreting the escape
sequence as data.
The value of the escape sequence character may be changed
using register S2.
A/ Repeat last command
This command repeats the last command string entered. Do
not precede this command with an AT prefix nor conclude it
by pressing Enter.
A Answer command
This command instructs the modem to go off-hook and
answer an incoming call.
Bn Communication standard setting
This command determines the communication standard—
either CCITT or Bell.
NOTE: This command is only useful for matching the modem to
slower modems. It is rarely used today.
B0
Selects CCITT V.22 mode when the modem is
at 1200 bps.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
53
B1
Selects Bell 212A when the modem is at 1200
bps.
B2
Unselects V.23 reverse channel.
B3
Unselects V.23 reverse channel.
B15
Selects V.21 when the modem is at 300 bps.
B16
Selects Bell 103J when the modem is at 300
bps.
Result Codes:
OK
n = 0,1,2,3,15,16
ERROR
Otherwise
Dn Dial
This command instructs the modem to dial a telephone
number. Enter n (the telephone number and any modifiers)
after the ATD command.
Any digit or symbol (0-9, *, #, A, B, C, D) may be dialed as
touch-tone digits. Characters such as spaces, hyphens, and
parentheses do not count. They are ignored by the modem,
but you may want to include them to make the number and
modifiers easier to read.
The following may be used as phone number modifiers:
P
Pulse dialing.
S=n
Dial using the string saved by &Zn command.
T
Touch-tone dialing (default).
,
Pause during dialing. Pause for time specified
in Register S8 before processing the next
character in the dial string.
W
Wait for dial tone. Modem waits for a second
dial tone before processing the dial string.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
54
AT Commands
AT command formats
@
Wait for quiet answer. Wait for five seconds of
silence after dialing the number. If silence is not
detected, the modem sends a NO ANSWER
result code back to the caller.
!
Hook flash. Causes the modem to go on-hook
for 0.5 seconds and then return to off-hook.
;
Return to command mode. Causes the modem
to return to command mode after dialing a
number, without disconnecting the call.
L
Redials last number. Should be the first
character following ATD; ignored otherwise.
$
Bong tone detection
En Echo command
This command controls whether or not the characters entered
from your computer keyboard are displayed on your monitor
(echoed) while the modem is in command mode.
E0
Disables echo to the computer.
E1
Enables echo to the computer (default).
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR Otherwise
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
55
Hn Hook control
This command instructs the modem to go on-hook to
disconnect a call, or off-hook to make the phone line busy.
H0
Modem goes on-hook (default).
H1
Modem goes off-hook.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR
Otherwise
In Request ID information
This command displays product information about the
modem.
I0 or
I3
Returns the modem identity string and driver
version number.
I1
Returns OK (no function).
I2
Returns OK (no function).
I4
Returns the driver build date.
I5
Returns the driver version, bus type (PCI,
AC97), codec type, and country.
I6
Returns OK (no function).
I7
Returns the hardware version.
I8
Returns the codec type.
I9
Returns the country ID in English.
I10
Returns OK (no function).
I11
Returns connection information.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
56
AT Commands
AT command formats
The following table contains an example of the connection
information returned by the I11 command:
Description
Status
Last Connection
V.92
Initial Transmit Carrier Rate
24000
Initial Receive Carrier Rate
49333
Final Transmit Carrier Rate
24000
Final Receive Carrier rate
49333
Protocol Negotiation Result
LAPM
Data Compression Result
V.44
Estimated Noise Level
199
Receive Signal Power Level (-dBm)
26
Transmit Signal Power Level (-dBm)
13
Round Trip Delay (msec)
0
Near Echo Level (-dBm)
13
Far Echo level (-dBm)
73
Transmit Frame Count
0
Transmit Frame Error Count
0
Receive Frame Count
0
Receive Frame Error Count
0
Retrain by Local Modem
0
Retrain by Remote Modem
0
Rate Renegotiation by Local Modem
0
Rate Renegotiation by Remote Modem 0
Call Termination Cause
1
Robbed-Bit Signaling
0
Digital Loss (dB)
03
Remote Server ID
NA
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
Connection Time (sec)
57
19.968
OK
The ATI11 command may be issued from online command
mode or after the end of a call. After a call, some of the
values are no longer valid. The following table defines each
command result, and indicates if the result is valid only
during the call:
Description
Definition
Last Connection
V.92, V.90, V.34, or V.32,
depending on the type of connection
negotiated.
Initial Transmit
Carrier Rate
Initial upstream rate.
Initial Receive
Carrier Rate
Initial downstream rate.
Final Transmit
Carrier Rate
Current or final upstream rate.
Final Receive
Carrier rate
Current or final downstream rate.
Protocol
Negotiation
Result
LAPM, MNP, or NONE, depending
on V.42 negotiation.
Data Compression V.44, V.42bis, MNP5 or NONE.
Result
Estimated Signal/ Signal-to-noise ratio with implied
Noise Level
negative. Higher values indicate
better conditions.
Receive Signal
Power Level
(-dBm)
The received signal power which,
although labeled in -dBm, is only a
relative measure for comparing
calls to and from different locations.
This value is valid only during a
call.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
58
AT Commands
AT command formats
Transmit Signal
Power Level
(-dBm)
The signal power transmitted
upstream.
Round Trip Delay The round trip delay, in
(msec)
milliseconds.
Near Echo Level
(-dBm)
Near echo levels only.
Far Echo level
(-dBm)
Far echo levels only.
Transmit Frame
Count
The number of LAPM frames sent
upstream during this call. The count
wraps around at 65,535.
Transmit Frame
Error Count
The number of REJ frames received
at the analog client modem.
Receive Frame
Count
The number of LAPM frames
received by the client modem
during this call. The count wraps
around at 65,535.
Receive Frame
Error Count
Number of frames received in error
by the client modem.
Retrain by Local
Modem
Number of retrains requested by the
client modem.
Retrain by
Remote Modem
Number of retrains requested by the
remote modem.
Rate
Renegotiation by
Local Modem
Number of renegotiations requested
by the client modem.
Rate
Renegotiation by
Remote Modem
Number of renegotiations requested
by the remote modem.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
Call Termination
Cause
Robbed-Bit
Signaling
59
The reason the call ended. This
value is valid only after the call
ends.
0
local modem
command; ATH, DTR
drop.
1
remote modem
command: cleardown,
loss of signal.
2
no answer, busy, etc.
3
training failure (V.90 or
V.34).
4
protocol failure, for
example if required
by \N4.
For PCM connection only, a
hexadecimal 6-bit pattern of T1
frames with robbed-bit signaling.
Digital Loss (dB) For PCM connection only, the
downstream digital loss.
Remote Server ID NA
Connection Time
(sec)
The time between the remote
answer and the connect result, in
seconds.
Result Codes:
As
described n=0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,11
ERROR
Otherwise
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
60
AT Commands
AT command formats
Ln Monitor speaker volume
This command sets speaker volume to low, medium, or high.
L0
Low volume
L1
Low volume (Same as L0)
L2
Medium volume (default)
L3
High volume
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,2,3
ERROR
Otherwise
Mn Monitor speaker mode
This command turns the speaker on or off.
M0
The speaker is off.
M1
The speaker is on until the modem detects the
carrier signal (default).
M2
The speaker is always on when modem is offhook.
M3
The speaker is on until the carrier is detected,
except when dialing.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,2,3
ERROR
Otherwise
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
61
Nn Modulation handshake
This command controls whether or not the local modem
performs a negotiated handshake at connection time with the
remote modem when the communication speed of the two
modems is different.
N0
When originating or answering, this is for
handshake only at the communication standard
specified by S37 and the ATB command.
N1
When originating or answering, begin the
handshake at the communication standard
specified by S37 and the ATB command
(default).
During handshake, a lower transmission speed
may be selected.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR
Otherwise
On Return online to data mode
O0
Instructs the modem to exit online command
mode and return to data mode (see AT escape
sequence, +++).
O1
This command issues a retrain before returning
to online data mode.
O3
This command issues a rate renegotiation before
returning to online data mode.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,3
ERROR
Otherwise
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
62
AT Commands
AT command formats
P Select pulse dialing
This command configures the modem for pulse (non-touchtone) dialing. Dialed digits are pulsed until a T command or
dial modifier is received. Tone dial is the default setting.
Qn Result code control
Result codes are informational messages sent from the
modem and displayed on your monitor. Basic result codes are
OK, CONNECT, RING, NO CARRIER, and ERROR. The
ATQ command allows the user to turn result codes on or off.
Q0
Enables modem to send result codes to the
computer (default).
Q1
Disables modem from sending result codes to
the computer.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR
Otherwise
T Select tone dialing
This command instructs the modem to send DTMF tones
while dialing. Dialed digits are tone dialed until a P command
or dial modifier is received. This is the default setting.
Vn DCE response format
This command controls whether result codes (including call
progress and negotiation progress messages) are displayed as
words or their numeric equivalents.
V0
Displays result codes as digits.
V1
Displays result codes as text (default).
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
63
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR
Otherwise
Wn Result Code Option
W0
CONNECT result code reports DTE speed.
Disable protocol result codes.
W1
CONNECT result code reports DTE speed.
Enable protocol result codes.
W2
CONNECT result code reports DCE speed.
Enable protocol result codes (default).
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,2
ERROR
Otherwise
Xn Result code selection, call progress monitoring
This command sets detection options for dial tones and busy
signals, which is its primary function. However, it also
enables or disables extended result codes.
Command
Extended
Result code
Dial tone
Detect
Busy signal
Detect
X0
Disable
Disable
Disable
X1
Enable
Disable
Disable
X2
Enable
Enable
Disable
X3
Enable
Disable
Enable
X4
(default)
Enable
Enable
Enable
X5
Enable
Enable
Enable
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
64
AT Commands
AT command formats
Extended result codes
Disabled:
Displays only the basic result codes: OK,
CONNECT, RING, NO CARRIER, and
ERROR.
Enabled:
Displays basic result codes, along with the
connect message and the modem’s data
rate, and an indication of the modem’s error
correction and data compression operation.
Dial tone detect
Disabled: The modem dials a call regardless of
whether it detects a dial tone.
Enabled:
The modem dials only upon detection of a
dial tone, and disconnects the call if the dial
tone is not detected within the specified
time. The period of time the modem waits
before dialing is specified in register S6.
Busy tone detect
Disabled: The modem ignores any busy tones it
receives.
Enabled:
The modem monitors for busy tones.
Result
Codes:
OK
n=0,1,2,3,4,5
ERROR
Otherwise
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
65
Zn Recall stored profile
The modem performs a soft reset and restores (recalls) a
configuration profile according to the parameter supplied.
You can store two configuration profiles. If no parameter is
specified, zero is assumed.
Z0
Reset and restore stored profile 0.
Z1
Reset and restore stored profile 1.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR
Otherwise
&Cn Data Carrier Detect (DCD) control
Data Carrier Detect is a signal from the modem to the
computer indicating that a carrier signal is being received
from a remote modem. DCD normally turns off when the
modem no longer detects the carrier signal.
&C0
The state of the carrier from the remote modem
is ignored. DCD circuit is always on.
&C1
DCD turns on when the remote modem’s carrier
signal is detected, and off when the carrier
signal is not detected (default).
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR
Otherwise
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
66
AT Commands
AT command formats
&Dn Data Terminal Ready (DTR) control
This command interprets how the modem responds to the
state of the DTR signal and changes to the DTR signal.
&D0
Ignore. The modem ignores the true status of
DTR and treats it as always on. This should
only be used if your communication software
does not provide DTR to the modem.
&D1
If the DTR signal is not detected while in online
data mode, the modem enters command mode,
issues an OK result code, and remains
connected.
&D2
If the DTR signal is not detected while in online
data mode, the modem disconnects (default).
&D3
Reset the modem on the on-to-off DTR
transition.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,2,3
ERROR
Otherwise
&F Load factory settings
This command loads the configuration stored and
programmed at the factory. This operation replaces all of the
command options and the S-Register settings in the active
configuration with factory values.
&F
Recall factory setting as active configuration.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
67
&Gn V.22bis guard tone control
This command determines which guard tone, if any, to
transmit while transmitting in the high band (answer mode).
This command is only used in V.22 and V.22bis mode. This
option is not used from North America and is for
international use only.
&G0
Guard tone disabled (default).
&G1
Sets guard tone to 550 Hz.
&G2
Sets guard tone to 1800 Hz.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,2
ERROR
Otherwise
&Kn Local flow control selection
&K0
Disables flow control.
&K3
Enables RTS/CTS flow control (default).
&K4
Enables XON/XOFF flow control.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,3,4
ERROR
Otherwise
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
68
AT Commands
AT command formats
&Pn Select Pulse Dial Make/Break Ratio
&P0
Selects 39% - 61% make/break ratio at 10
pulses per second.
&P1
Selects 33% - 67% make/break ratio at 10
pulses per second.
&P2
Selects 33% - 67% make/break ratio at 20
pulses per second.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0 to 2
ERROR
Otherwise
&Tn Self-test commands
These tests can help to isolate problems if you experience
periodic data loss or random errors.
&T0
Abort. Stops any test in progress.
&T1
Local analog loopback test, V.56 Loop 3. This
test verifies modem operation, as well as the
connection between the modem and computer.
If the modem is online when this command is
issued, the modem hangs up.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0
CONNECT n=1
ERROR
Otherwise
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
69
&V View active configuration and stored profile
The modem maintains two stored profiles, in addition to the
active profile. This command is used to display all three
modem configurations, and any stored telephone numbers.
&V
View all three configurations and any stored
telephone numbers.
&W Store current configuration
This command saves the current (active) configuration
(profile), including all S-Registers except S3, S4 and S5.
The current configuration comprises a list of storable
parameters, which you can view using the &V command.
These settings are restored to the active configuration upon
receiving a Zn command or at power-up. Refer to “&V View
active configuration and stored profile” on page 69.
&W0
Stores the current configuration as profile 0.
&W1
Stores the current configuration as profile 1.
Result Codes:
OK
n = 0,1.
ERROR
Otherwise
&Y Select stored profile for hardware reset
This command does not change the modem behavior, but is
included for compatibility with applications that issue the
&Y command.
Result Codes:
OK
n = 0,1.
ERROR
Otherwise
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
70
AT Commands
AT command formats
&Zn=x Store telephone number
This command is used to store up to four dialing strings in the
modem’s nonvolatile memory for later dialing. The format
for the command is &Zn=“stored number” where n is the
location 0-3 to which the number should be written. The dial
string may contain up to 34 characters. The ATDS=n
command dials using the string stored in location n.
Result codes:
OK
n = 0,1,2,3
ERROR
Otherwise
\Nn Error control mode selection
This command determines the type of error control used by
the modem when sending or receiving data.
\N0
Buffer mode. No error control. (Also known as
Normal Mode.)
\N1
Direct mode.
\N2
MNP or disconnect mode. The modem attempts
to connect using MNP2-4 error control
procedures. If this fails, the modem disconnects.
This is also known as MNP-reliable mode.
\N3
V.42, MNP, or buffer (default).
The modem attempts to connect in V.42 error
control mode. If this fails, the modem attempts
to connect in MNP mode. If this fails, the
modem connects in buffer mode and continues
operation. This is also known as V.42/MNP
auto-reliable mode.
\N4
V.42 or disconnect. The modem attempts to
connect in V.42 error control mode. If this fails,
the call will be disconnected.
\N5
V.42. MNP or Buffer (same as \N3).
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
\N7
71
V.42. MNP or Buffer (same as \N3).
Result Codes:
OK
n = 0,1,2,3,4,5,7
ERROR
Otherwise
Qn Local flow control selection
\Q0
Disable flow control.
\Q1
XON/XOFF software flow
control.
\Q3
RTS/CTS to DTE (default).
Result Codes:
OK
n = 0,1,3
ERROR
Otherwise
\Vn Protocol result code
\V0
Disable protocol result code appended to DCE
speed.
\V1
Enable protocol result code appended to DCE
speed (default).
Result Codes
OK
n = 0,1
ERROR
Otherwise
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
72
AT Commands
AT command formats
%Cn Data compression control
This command determines the operation of V.42bis and MNP
class 5 data compression. Online changes do not take effect
until a disconnect occurs first.
%C0
V.42bis/MNP 5 disabled. No data compression.
%C1
V.42bis/MNP 5 enabled. Data compression
enabled (default).
Result Codes:
OK
n = 0, 1
ERROR
Otherwise
-V.90=<n>
This command enables/disables V.90 and changes the
downstream rate.
-V90=0
Disables V.90
-V90=1
Enables V.90 Auto rate (default value)
-V90=X
Controls the downstream rate
-V90?
Shows the current value
-V90=?
Shows the range [0-21]
Possible values of n:
“AT-V90=X” Downstream Rate
0
V.90 disabled
1
Auto rate (Default)
2
28000 bps
3
29333 bps
4
30666 bps
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
5
32000 bps
6
33333 bps
7
34666 bps
8
36000 bps
9
37333 bps
10
38666 bps
11
40000 bps
12
41333 bps
13
42666 bps
14
44000 bps
15
45333 bps
16
46666 bps
17
48000 bps
18
49333 bps
19
50666 bps
20
52000 bps
21
53333 bps
73
+DS44 V.44 Data Compression Command
This command configures the V.44 data compression
direction used by the modem. It can also be used to display
the current data compression configuration, and the
supported <direction> parameter values.
+DS44 = <direction>
Valid <direction> values are as follows:
0
Modem does not negotiate V.44 compression.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
74
AT Commands
AT command formats
1
Modem negotiates V.44 compression for
transmit only.
2
Modem negotiates V.44 compression for
receive only.
3
Modem accepts V.44 compression in both or
either direction (default).
Result Codes:
OK
<direction> = 0,1,2,3
ERROR
Otherwise
+DS44?
This command displays the current V.44 compression
configuration.
+DS44=?
This command displays the supported +DS44 <direction>
parameter values.
+MS Command
This command can be used to set protocol and connection
speed parameters for the modem. Instead of having to change
multiple S registers, this single command produces the same
effect. The command can also be used to display the current
modem protocol and maximum connection speed settings. In
addition, it can be used to display all the supported +MS
command parameter values.
+MS= <carrier>, <automode>, <min_rate>, <max_rate>,
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
75
This command is used to set the various parameters described
below:
<carrier>
The modem protocol. Valid values are:
Value
Meaning
V92
V90
V34
V32T
V32B
V32
V22B
V22
Bell212A
V23C
V.92 (default)
V.90
V.34
V.32ter
V.32bis
V.32
V.22bis
V.22
Bell 212A
V.23, constant carrier,
asymmetric FDM
V.21
Bell 103
V21
Bell103
<automode> 0
Disables automatic modulation
negotiation
1
Enables automatic modulation
negotiation (default)
If a <max_rate> value is specified,
<automode> is automatically disabled.
<min_rate>
The minimum receive rate. Valid
<min_rate> values are from 300 to
57333.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
76
AT Commands
AT command formats
<max_rate>
The maximum receive rate. If set to 0,
then the max rate will be determined by
the modulation means selected in the
<carrier> and <automode> settings. Zero
is the default. Valid <max_rate> values
are from 300 to 57333. Maximum receive
rates for each valid <carrier> are as
follows, in bits per second:
V92
V90
V34
V32B
V32
V22bis
V22
Bell212A
V23C
V.21
Bell103
28000—57333 / steps of 1333
28000—57333 / steps of 1333
2400—33600 / steps of 2400
4800—19200 / steps of 2400
4800—14400 / steps of 2400
2400
2200
1200
1200
300
300
Example: +MS=V92,1,0,0
This sets the modulation to be V.92 and the speed
negotiations to use automode. This is the modem default.
Example: +MS=V90,0,0,45333
This will limit the maximum speed to 45,333 bps in V.90
mode.
+MS?
This command displays the current +MS command
configuration.
+MS=?
This command displays all supported values for each +MS
command parameter.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
77
+PCW Command
This command configures how the modem responds to a call
waiting signal. The modem’s response is also determined by
the current configuration of the +VCID caller ID command
(See “+VCID Command” on page 79 for information on this
command). You can also use the +PCW command to display
the current call waiting configuration, and to display the
supported <call waiting> parameter values.
+PCW=<call waiting>
Valid <call waiting> parameter values are as follows:
0
Enables the call waiting detector. When a call
waiting signal is detected, the modem responds
to it according to the +VCID caller ID
command configuration. This is the default.
1
Enables the call waiting detector. When a call
waiting signal is detected, the modem hangs up
the current call and answers the waiting call.
2
Disables the call waiting detector.
Result Codes:
OK
<call_waiting> = 0,1,2
ERROR
Otherwise
+PCW?
This command displays the current call waiting
configuration.
+PCW=?
This command displays the supported <call_waiting>
parameter values.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
78
AT Commands
AT command formats
+PIG Command
This command enables or disables PCM upstream. You can
also use this command to display the current PCM upstream
configuration, and to display the supported +PIG command
parameter values.
+PIG=<value>
Valid <value> parameter values are as follows:
0
Enables PCM upstream.
1
Disables PCM upstream. This is the default.
Result Codes:
OK
<value> = 0,1
ERROR
Otherwise
+PIG?
This command displays the current +PIG command
configuration.
+PIG=?
This command displays the supported +PIG <value>
parameter values.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
AT Commands
AT command formats
79
+PMH Command
This command enables or disables the Modem On Hold
feature. You can also use this command to display the current
Modem on Hold configuration, and to display the supported
+PMH command parameter values.
+PMH=<value>
Valid <value> parameter values are as follows:
0
Enables Modem On Hold. This is the default.
1
Disables Modem on Hold.
Result Codes:
OK
<value> = 0,1
ERROR
Otherwise
+PMH?
This command displays the current +PMH command
configuration.
+PMH=?
This command displays the supported +PMH <value>
parameter values.
+VCID Command
This command enables or disables caller ID. You can also use
this command to display the current caller ID configuration,
and to display the supported +VCID command parameter
values.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
80
AT Commands
AT command formats
+VCID=<value>
Valid <value> parameter values are as follows:
0
Disables caller ID. This is the default.
1
Enables caller ID, with formatted presentation.
2
Enables caller ID, without formatting.
Result Codes:
OK
<value> = 0,1,2
ERROR
Otherwise
+VCID?
This command displays the current caller ID configuration.
+VCID=?
This command displays the supported +VCID <value>
parameter values.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Chapter 5
S-Registers
S-Registers contain the settings that determine how several
functions of the internal modem operate, such as choosing
how many times to let the telephone ring before the modem
answers and how long to wait before it hangs up if a
connection fails. You can also customize certain AT
commands, such as the escape sequence and command line
termination.
The contents of the registers are changed automatically when
you modify corresponding settings in your communication
software. If you choose, however, you can display and edit
the contents of the registers manually when the modem is in
command mode. If the value is outside the acceptable range,
an error is generated.
This chapter describes the settings for each S-Register.
81
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
82
S-Registers
S-Register values
S-Register values
❖
The format for displaying the value of an S-Register is:
ATSn?
where n is the register number. After you type in the
register press Enter.
❖
The format for modifying the value of an S-Register is:
ATSn=r
where n is the register number, and r is the new register
value. After you type in the register number and its new
value press Enter.
S0 Auto answer ring number
This register determines the number of rings the modem will
count before automatically answering a call. Enter 0 (zero) if
you do not want the modem to automatically answer at all.
When disabled, the modem can only answer with an ATA
command.
Range:
0-255
Default:
0
Units:
rings
S1 Ring counter
This register is read-only. The value of S1 is incremented
with each ring. If no ring occurs over a six-second interval,
the register is cleared.
Range:
0-225
Default:
0
Units:
rings
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
S-Registers
S-Register values
83
S2 AT escape character (user-defined)
This register determines the ASCII value used for an escape
sequence. The default is the + character. The escape sequence
allows the modem to exit data mode and enter command
mode when online. Values greater than 127 disable the escape
sequence.
Range:
0-255
Default:
43
Units:
ASCII
S3 Command line termination character (user-defined)
This register determines the ASCII values as the carriage
return character. This character is used to end command lines
and result codes.
Range:
0-127, ASCII decimal
Default:
13 (carriage return)
Units:
ASCII
S4 Response formatting character (user-defined)
This register determines the ASCII value used as the line feed
character. The modem uses a line feed character in command
mode when it responds to the computer.
Range:
0-127, ASCII decimal
Default:
10 (line feed)
Units:
ASCII
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
84
S-Registers
S-Register values
S5 Command line editing character (user defined)
This register sets the character recognized as a backspace and
pertains to asynchronous transmission only. The modem will
not recognize the backspace character if it is set to an ASCII
value greater than 32. This character can be used to edit a
command line. When the echo command is enabled, the
modem echoes back to the local DTE the backspace
character, an ASCII space character, and a second backspace
character. This means a total of three characters are
transmitted each time the modem processes the backspace
character.
Range:
0-127, ASCII decimal
Default:
8 (backspace)
Units:
ASCII
S6 Wait before dialing
This register sets the length of time, in seconds, that the
modem must wait (pause) after going off-hook before dialing
the first digit of the telephone number. The modem always
pauses for a minimum of two seconds, even if the value of S6
is less than two seconds. The wait for dial tone call progress
feature (W dial modifier in the dial string) will override the
value in register S6.
Range:
2-65
Default:
3
Units:
seconds
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
S-Registers
S-Register values
85
S7 Connection completion time-out
This register sets the time, in seconds, that the modem must
wait before hanging up because the carrier is not detected.
The timer is started when the modem finishes dialing
(originate), or goes off-hook (answer). In originate mode, the
timer is reset upon detection of an answer tone if allowed by
county restriction. The timer also specifies the wait for
silence time for the @ dial modifier in seconds. S7 is not
associated with the W dial modifier.
Range:
1-255
Default:
50
Units:
seconds
S8 Comma pause time
This register sets the time, in seconds, that the modem must
pause when it encounters a comma (,) in the dial command
string.
Range:
0-65
Default:
2
Units:
seconds
S11 DTMF dialing speed
This register determines the dialing speed.
Range:
50-150
Default:
95
Units:
.001 seconds
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
86
S-Registers
S-Register values
S12 Escape guard time
This register sets the value (in 20 ms increments) for the
required pause after the escape sequence (default 1 second).
Range:
0-255
Default:
50
Units:
.02 seconds
S37 Dial line rate
S37 = 0 (default)
maximum modem speed
S37 = 1
reserved
S37 = 2
1200/75 bps
S37 = 3
300 bps
S37 = 4
reserved
S37 = 5
1200 bps
S37 = 6
2400 bps
S37 = 7
4800 bps
S37 = 8
7200 bps
S37 = 9
9600 bps
S37 = 10
12000 bps
S37 = 11
14400 bps
S37 = 12
16800 bps
S37 = 13
19200 bps
S37 = 14
21600 bps
S37 = 15
24000 bps
S37 = 16
26400 bps
S37 = 17
28800 bps
S37 = 18
31200 bps
S37 = 19
33600 bps
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
S-Registers
AT command set result codes
87
AT command set result codes
The following table shows the result codes:
Command Set Result Codes Table
Result Code
Numeric
Description
OK
0
Command executed
CONNECT
1
Modem connected to line
RING
2
A ring signal has been
detected
NO CARRIER
3
Modem lost carrier signal, or
does not detect carrier signal,
or does not detect answer
tone
ERROR
4
Invalid command
CONNECT 1200 EC*
5
Connection at 1200 bps
NO DIAL TONE
6
No dial tone detected
BUSY
7
Busy signal detected
*
10
Connection at 2400 bps
CONNECT 4800 EC*
11
Connection at 4800 bps
CONNECT 2400 EC
* EC appears only when the Extended Result Codes
configuration option is enabled. EC is replaced by one of the
following symbols, depending upon the error control method
used:
V.44 - V.44 data compression with V.42 error control
V.42bis - V.42 error control and V.42bis data compression
V.42 - V.42 error control only
MNP 5 - MNP class 4 error control and MNP class 5 data
compression
MNP 4 - MNP class 4 error control only
NoEC - No error control protocol
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
88
S-Registers
AT command set result codes
Command Set Result Codes Table (Continued)
Result Code
Numeric
CONNECT 9600 EC*
Description
12
Connection at 9600 bps
CONNECT 14400 EC
*
13
Connection at 14400 bps
CONNECT 19200 EC
*
14
Connection at 19200 bps
24
Connection at 7200 bps
CONNECT 12000 EC*
25
Connection at 12000 bps
*
86
Connection at 16800 bps
CONNECT 7200 EC
*
CONNECT 16800 EC
CONNECT 300 EC
*
40
Connection at 300 bps
*
55
Connection at 21600 bps
CONNECT 24000 EC*
56
Connection at 24000 bps
CONNECT 26400 EC
*
57
Connection at 26400 bps
CONNECT 28800 EC
*
58
Connection at 28800 bps
CONNECT 31200 EC
*
59
Connection at 31200 bps
CONNECT 33600 EC*
60
Connection at 33600 bps
*
28
Connection at 38400 bps
(DTE rate)
CONNECT 21600 EC
CONNECT 38400 EC
* EC appears only when the Extended Result Codes
configuration option is enabled. EC is replaced by one of the
following symbols, depending upon the error control method
used:
V.44 - V.44 data compression with V.42 error control
V.42bis - V.42 error control and V.42bis data compression
V.42 - V.42 error control only
MNP 5 - MNP class 4 error control and MNP class 5 data
compression
MNP 4 - MNP class 4 error control only
NoEC - No error control protocol
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
S-Registers
AT command set result codes
89
Command Set Result Codes Table (Continued)
Result Code
Numeric
Description
CONNECT 57600 EC*
18
Connection at 57600 bps
(DTE rate)
CONNECT 115200 EC*
87
Connection at 115200 bps
(DTE rate)
CONNECT 32000 EC*
70
Connection at 32000 bps
*
71
Connection at 34000 bps
CONNECT 36000 EC*
72
Connection at 36000 bps
CONNECT 38000 EC
*
73
Connection at 38000 bps
CONNECT 40000 EC
*
74
Connection at 40000 bps
CONNECT 42000 EC
*
75
Connection at 42000 bps
CONNECT 44000 EC*
76
Connection at 44000 bps
CONNECT 46000 EC
*
77
Connection at 46000 bps
CONNECT 48000 EC
*
78
Connection at 48000 bps
CONNECT 50000 EC
*
79
Connection at 50000 bps
CONNECT 52000 EC*
80
Connection at 52000 bps
*
81
Connection at 54000 bps
CONNECT 34000 EC
CONNECT 54000 EC
* EC appears only when the Extended Result Codes
configuration option is enabled. EC is replaced by one of the
following symbols, depending upon the error control method
used:
V.44 - V.44 data compression with V.42 error control
V.42bis - V.42 error control and V.42bis data compression
V.42 - V.42 error control only
MNP 5 - MNP class 4 error control and MNP class 5 data
compression
MNP 4 - MNP class 4 error control only
NoEC - No error control protocol
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
90
S-Registers
AT command set result codes
Command Set Result Codes Table (Continued)
Result Code
Numeric
Description
CONNECT 56000 EC*
82
Connection at 56000 bps
CONNECT 28000 EC*
100
Connection at 28000 bps
CONNECT 29333 EC*
101
Connection at 29333 bps
CONNECT 30666 EC*
102
Connection at 30666 bps
CONNECT 33333 EC*
103
Connection at 33333 bps
CONNECT 34666 EC*
104
Connection at 34666 bps
CONNECT 37333 EC*
105
Connection at 37333 bps
CONNECT 38666 EC*
106
Connection at 38666 bps
CONNECT 41333 EC*
107
Connection at 41333 bps
CONNECT 42666 EC*
108
Connection at 42666 bps
CONNECT 45333 EC*
109
Connection at 45333 bps
CONNECT 46666 EC*
110
Connection at 46666 bps
CONNECT 49333 EC*
111
Connection at 49333 bps
CONNECT 50666 EC*
112
Connection at 50666 bps
CONNECT 53333 EC*
113
Connection at 53333 bps
* EC appears only when the Extended Result Codes
configuration option is enabled. EC is replaced by one of the
following symbols, depending upon the error control method
used:
V.44 - V.44 data compression with V.42 error control
V.42bis - V.42 error control and V.42bis data compression
V.42 - V.42 error control only
MNP 5 - MNP class 4 error control and MNP class 5 data
compression
MNP 4 - MNP class 4 error control only
NoEC - No error control protocol
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
S-Registers
AT command set result codes
91
Command Set Result Codes Table (Continued)
Result Code
Numeric
CONNECT 54666 EC*
114
Description
Connection at 54666 bps
* EC appears only when the Extended Result Codes
configuration option is enabled. EC is replaced by one of the
following symbols, depending upon the error control method
used:
V.44 - V.44 data compression with V.42 error control
V.42bis - V.42 error control and V.42bis data compression
V.42 - V.42 error control only
MNP 5 - MNP class 4 error control and MNP class 5 data
compression
MNP 4 - MNP class 4 error control only
NoEC - No error control protocol
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Chapter 6
Test Function
Normally, data communications are executed by connecting
your computer and modem to those of a remote station with a
communication line. If any errors or malfunctions are
encountered, it is necessary to check whether the cause is in
the local station, the remote station or the communication
line.
Test description
This internal modem has a local/analog/loopback test
function that identifies the cause of a malfunction. You can
use the test to check errors in data communications or to
check operation following modem connection.
When conducting a test, use the &T command to select test
mode and control. For details on the &T command, refer to
“&Tn Self-test commands” on page 68.
In this test, data is transmitted from the computer, is looped
back (analog/loopback) within the modem from the
transmitter to the receiver, then sent back to the computer.
The test enables you to check whether the computer and
modem are working properly.
92
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Test Function
Testing procedure
93
Modem
Computer
Transmission
Reception
Transmitter
Receiver
Local/analog/loopback test
Testing procedure
To conduct the loopback test:
1
Enter the following AT commands to set the modem to
normal mode:
AT&F\N0
Receive OK
2
Enter the following AT commands to select the local/
analog/loopback test:
AT&T1
You are now in the online state.
3
Enter characters from the keyboard as desired.
The characters you enter should be displayed on the
screen.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
94
Test Function
Testing procedure
4
Enter the escape code as follows to return to the
command state from the online state.
+++
Receive OK.
5
Enter the following AT commands to terminate the test:
AT&T0
Receive OK.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Chapter 7
MNP and V.42
2
The internal modem has built-in protocols MNP (Microcom
Networking Protocol) Class 4 and V.42 for error correction
and MNP class 5 and V.42bis for data compression.
Error-correction overview
Telephone line noise, or electrical interference, can cause
errors in data communication. Noise is especially a problem
at high speeds of 14,400 bps or greater.
The MNP and V.42 protocols were developed to ensure
reliable data communications despite the high probability of
error generation from line noise.
MNP error correction
MNP was developed by Microcom. MNP class 4 enables data
correction of full-duplex communications and also provides
asynchronous/synchronous conversion and data packet-size
negotiation to increase throughput.
95
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
96
MNP and V.42
Operation modes
The protocol of both modems must be the same. Therefore, if
the remote modem supports only class 3 or below, the
protocol for the remote modem will be used. If the remote
modem does not use MNP, the communication will be made
at the speed of the remote modem.
V.42 error correction
The V.42 (ITU-T-Rec V.42) protocol is recommended by the
ITU (International Telecommunications Union). V.42
specifies two kinds of protocols, LAP-M (Link Access
Procedure for Modem) and MNP classes 2, 3, and 4. This
protocol first tries to establish a link to the remote modem
with LAP-M. If it is unsuccessful, it tries to connect with
MNP. Although this modem uses class 4 correction, it can
connect in class 5 to remote modems that support class 5.
Operation modes
The operation mode depends on whether an error-correction
protocol is being used.
Normal mode
Errors are not corrected, even if communication speed is
different between a personal computer and modem, or
between modems, the buffers in the modem and the flow
control function permit communication without changing
communication speed.
Reliable mode
This mode is used with MNP or V.42 protocols to ensure
error-free communication.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
MNP and V.42
Flow control
97
Commands (\ Nn)
The following N modulation handshake commands are used
to set the communication mode:
\N0, \N1
Remote modem unable to use MNP or V.42
\N2
Remote modem uses MNP
\N3
Uncertain if remote modem can use MNP or
V.42
\N4
Remote modem uses V.42
\N5, \N7
Same as \N3
For details, refer to “AT Commands” on page 51.
Flow control
In both normal mode and reliable mode, the buffers in the
modem and its flow control function permit communication
even if the speed is different between a personal computer
and modem (serial port) or between modems (modem port).
If there is a speed difference between the serial port and
modem port, the buffers in the modem will become full
periodically. Therefore, the communication activity is
controlled so that data transmission or reception is
temporarily halted before the data exceeds buffer capacity,
and transmission is resumed when the receiving buffers have
room. This is the flow control function.
The modem card has two kinds of flow control:
❖
Serial port flow control
❖
Modem port flow control (only in reliable mode)
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
98
MNP and V.42
Flow control
Computer
Modem
DTE
Transmit
Receive
Buffer
DCE
Phone line
Phone
Circuit
Buffer
Serial port
flow control
Modem port
flow control
Flow control
Serial port flow control
Serial port data flow is controlled by the modem in its
communication with a personal computer.
If the serial port speed is higher than the modem port speed,
this control function sends a transmission halt request to the
personal computer before the buffers in the modem are about
to become full. When the buffers have room to receive data
again, the transmission halt request is canceled and data
transmission from the personal computer is resumed.
The internal modem provides three kinds of serial port flow
control: one determined by software and two determined by
hardware.
XON/XOFF flow control (software)
Flow control is performed by sending XON and XOFF
control codes in the data stream. The XOFF code makes a
transmission halt request. The XON code makes a
transmission restart request.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
MNP and V.42
Flow control
99
Since these two codes, XON and XOFF, are used as flow
control characters, binary data that includes these two codes
cannot be transmitted or received.
CTS/RTS two-way flow control (hardware)
Flow control is performed by turning on and off the control
lines CTS (clear to send) and RTS (request to send) between
the modem and the computer. A transmission halt or restart
request is made from the modem to the computer using the
CTS signal.
A transmission halt or restart request is made from the
personal computer to the modem using the RTS signal.
Commands (\Qn, &Kn)
Select flow control between the modem and computer (serial
port) as follows:
❖
When CTS/RTS flow control is supported by the
communication software
\Q3, &K3 Communication in reliable mode or normal
mode
❖
When XON/OFF flow control is only supported by the
communication software
\Q1, &K4 Communication in reliable mode or normal
mode
For details, refer to “AT Commands” on page 51.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
100
MNP and V.42
Data compression
Modem port flow control
Modem port flow control refers to flow control between the
modems of the local station and remote station.
If data transmission from the modem under serial port flow
control is interrupted because the computer cannot catch up
with it, modem port flow control is applied to the remote
modem so that transmitted data will not exceed buffer
capacity. This flow control functions in normal mode only.
Data compression
Protocols MNP class 5 and V.42bis are included in the
modem to compress data received from the computer. The
receiving modem decompresses the received data and sends it
to its own computer. This data compression function
increases actual transmission speed up to twofold in
communications using MNP5 or up to three or fourfold in
communications using V.42bis. The compression ratio varies
depending on the data. Actual speed will not always be raised
close to the maximum compression ratio.
The V.44 compression standard provides more efficient data
compression than V.42bis, significantly increasing the
received throughput and reducing the download time for Web
pages.
Commands (%Cn)
Select whether or not to compress data in communications by
MNP class 5 or V.42bis as follows:
%C1 Enables data compression
For details, refer to “AT Commands” on page 51.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Appendix A
Specifications
This appendix summarizes the Toshiba internal modem’s
technical specifications.
Network control unit (NCU)
Type of NCU
AA
Type of line
General telephone line
Type of dialing
Pulse
Tone
Control command
AT commands
EIA-578 commands
Monitor function
Computer’s speaker
101
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
102
Specifications
Communication specifications
Communication specifications
Communication
system
Data:
Full duplex
Fax:
Half duplex
Communication
protocol
Data:
ITU-T-Rec
V.21 / V.22 / V.22bis / V.32 /
V.32bis / V.34 / 56K /V.90 /
V.92
Bell
103/212A
Fax:
ITU-T-Rec
V.17 / V.29 / V.27ter
(Former CCITT)
ch2
Communication
speed
/V.21
Data:
300 / 1200 / 2400 / 4800 /
7200 / 9600 / 12000 / 14400
/16800 / 19200 / 21600 /
24000 / 26400 / 28800 /
29333/30666/33333/34666/
37333/38666/41333/42666/
45333/46666/49333/50666/
53333/54666 bps
Fax:
2400 / 4800 / 7200 / 9600 /
12000 / 14400 bps
Transmitting level -10 dBm
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Appendix B
Communication
Conditions
Communication parameters
Select communication parameters from the table below.
Start
(bit)
Data length
(bit)
Parity
(bit)
Stop
(bit)
1
8
None
1 or more
1
7
0
1 or more
1
7
1
1 or more
1
7
Odd
1 or more
1
7
Even
1 or more
1
7
None
2
Telephone line types
This internal modem can be connected to 2-wire analog
subscriber telephone lines (POTS lines) only.
103
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
104
Communication Conditions
Dial modes
Connectable lines (2-wire)
❖
Ordinary analog telephone lines with direct connection
❖
Corporate analog lines connected to a PBX
❖
Analog lines connected to a PBX, which, for example,
provide dial tone when the handset is picked up and
permit outgoing calls by dialing 9.
Unconnectable lines (4-wire)
❖
Business or home telephones that are connected to a key
service unit or a PBX.
WARNING: These are digital lines that can damage the modem.
Lines that require pressing the (Line) button, for example
“0,” before dialing.
Dial modes
There are two types of dial modes, pulse dial and tone dial.
Generally, pulse dial lines are associated with rotary phones,
but there may be cases where a push button phone is
connected to a pulse dial line, so it is not possible to identify
the type of line simply by looking at the phone. If you are not
sure what type of line you are using, check an ordinary direct
line by the following AT command, where n is the outside
number:
ATDTn Enter
If you connect to the dialed number, the line is tone dial type.
If you do not get a connection, it is pulse dial type.
The command ATDP will connect a pulse line.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Glossary
Acronyms
bps or BPS:Bits per Second
COM1: Communications Port 1 (serial port)
COM2: Communications Port 2 (serial port)
CPU: Central Processing Unit
FCC: Federal Communications Commission
FTP: File Transfer Protocol
GND: Ground
HDD: Hard Disk Drive
HTML: HyperText Markup Language
I/O: Input/Output
IRQ: Interrupt Request
ISA: Industry Standard Architecture
KB: Kilobyte
LAN: Local Area Network
LBA: Logical Block Addressing
105
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
106
Glossary
LFB: Linear Frame Buffer
LPT1: Line Printer Port 1 (parallel port)
MB: Megabyte
MIPS: Millions of Instructions per Second
PBX: Private Branch Exchange
PCI: Peripheral Component Interconnect
PIO: Programmed Input/Output
RFI: Radio Frequency Interference
ROM: Read-Only Memory
RTC: Real-Time Clock
SIMM: Single Inline Memory Module
SPB: Synchronous Pipeline Burst (cache)
UART: Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter
URL: Universal Resource Locator
USB: Universal Serial Bus
VCR: Video Cassette Recorder
VESA: Video Electronics Standards Association
WSS: Windows Sound System
WWW: World Wide Web
A
Auto reliable mode: This mode connects to a remote station by
MNP or V.42 if the remote modem accepts either of these
protocols. Otherwise, it connects in normal mode.
address: A number that identifies a location in the computer’s
memory or on disk. It tells the computer where to find
information such as the name of a file or a value for processing.
A device may use a specific memory address to transfer
information to and from the computer. See also hexadecimal.
alphanumeric: Consisting of numbers, symbols and letters you can
type or print.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Glossary
107
American National Standards Institute (ANSI) character set: The
set of characters available in Microsoft® Windows® operating
system (or other operating system). The character set includes
letters, numbers, symbols and foreign language characters.
American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII): A
set of 256 binary codes that represent the most commonly used
letters, numbers and symbols. See also binary.
animation: A technique of imparting motion to items, either
drawings or inert objects.
application: A computer program that you use to perform tasks of a
specific type. Applications include word processors, spreadsheets
and database management systems. See also program.
asynchronous: A type of data transmission in which information is
sent at variable time intervals. To indicate when a transmitted
character begins and ends, it is preceded by a start bit and
followed by an optional parity bit and one or two stop bits. See
also synchronous.
B
baud (baud rate): The speed at which communications devices
such as printers, terminals, and modems transmit information.
Information travels as a series of electronic signals. The baud rate
measures the rate of change in these signals. This is not
necessarily the same as bits per second, although the two are
related. It is named for Emil Baudot, a pioneer in printing
telegraphy. See also bits per second.
Bell Standard: A series of communication procedures for telephone
lines and other analog data transmission lines standardized by
AT&T (American Telephone & Telegraph).
bit: The basic unit of information used by the computer, a bit may
be either 1 or 0. While an individual bit cannot contain a
significant amount of information, by combining bits into larger
units, such as bytes (a group of eight connected bits), your
computer can deal with huge blocks of data. See also byte.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
108
Glossary
bits per second (BPS): A way of measuring the speed at which
information is passed between two devices. This is the basic
measure used in modem communications. This is similar, but not
identical, to the baud rate. See also baud.
buffer: An area of memory where information is held until it can be
processed. Buffers are frequently used to compensate for the fact
that some parts of the system are faster than others. For example,
the computer sends information to a printer much faster than
even the fastest printer can handle it. A print buffer stores printer
information, enabling the computer to continue with other tasks.
As the printer prints a page, it looks in the buffer to see what to
do next.
bus: An electrical circuit that connects the microprocessor with
other parts of the computer, such as the video adapter, disk drives
and ports. It is the highway along which data flows from one
device to another. See also local bus.
busy: A code indicating the number called is busy.
byte: A sequence of eight bits. A byte is the smallest addressable
unit of data. Each byte represents an integer up to 255 in decimal
(11111111 in binary, or FF in hexadecimal), or a character (such
as a letter, numeral, or other symbol). See also binary, bit,
gigabyte, hexadecimal, kilobyte, megabyte.
C
carrier: A modem converts the digital signals of the personal
computer into analog signals to send them through the telephone
line. The analog signals are “carrier,” because they transport the
data. The analog frequency is determined by the individual
communication specifications.
capacity: The amount of information that can be stored in a
computer’s memory or on a storage device such as a hard disk,
diskette, or CD-ROM. Capacity is usually measured in terms of
kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB) or gigabytes (GB). See also
gigabyte, kilobyte, megabyte.
checksum: A method of checking data errors. Data is divided into
blocks, and the total of the data in those blocks is checked to
determine whether the data has been correctly transmitted. The
total value is called checksum.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Glossary
109
character: Any letter, number or symbol you can use on the
computer. Some characters are non-printing characters, such as a
paragraph break in a word-processing program. A character
occupies one byte of computer storage.
Class 1: A standard for fax transmission. The Toshiba internal
modem supports class 1.
choose: To use the mouse or keyboard to select a menu item, a
button or an icon.
click: To press and release a mouse button. In the Windows®
operating system, refers to the left mouse button, unless
otherwise stated.
COM1 and COM2: Names that the operating system gives the
computer’s serial ports to distinguish between them.
commands: Instructions that tell the computer and its devices what
to do. You can enter commands individually using the keyboard
or pointing device or combine them into macros or programs.
Command state: A state in which data from the personal computer
is received as commands to control the internal modem. Data
from the personal computer will not be output to the telephone
line.
Compression: The translation of data (video, audio, digital or a
combination) to a more compact form for storage or
transmission. In computer terms, files are compressed by
removing repetitive and blank characters. Depending on the type
of file, this can result in a size reduction of over 90%. Modems
use compression to reduce the amount of time needed to send or
receive a file.
Configuration: 1) The set of components in a computer system
(such as memory, printers and disk drives). 2) How parts of the
system are set up. For example, the configuration of the serial
port includes the baud rate, parity, data bits and stop bits.
CTS signal: A Clear to Send signal is an RS-232C standard that
indicates the modem is ready for transmission.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
110
D
Glossary
DAA: Data Access Arrangement is a circuit that isolates a device
from phone lines.
data: Information that a computer can process. The word “data” is
actually plural for “datum,” meaning a single piece of
information.
data bits: A data communications parameter controlling the
number of bits used to represent a character. If data bits = 7, the
computer can generate 128 unique characters, if data bits = 8, the
computer can generate 256 unique characters.
DCE (Data Communications Equipment or Data Circuitterminating Equipment): A device that establishes, maintains and
terminates a session on a network. It may also convert signals for
transmission. It is typically the modem.
DCD signal: This signal tells the personal computer whether the
modem is receiving the carrier from the opposite station
DTE (Data Terminating Equipment): A communications device
that is the source or destination of signals on a network. It is
typically a terminal or computer.
dial tone: The tone that is heard from the handset when it is picked
up
dial mode: Dial mode covers pulse dial and tone dial. Pulse dial
means turning the dial or pressing the buttons to send pulse
signals to connect to the called party. Tone dial means pressing
the button to send tone signals to connect the modem to the called
party.
download: 1) To receive a file from another computer through a
modem. 2) To transmit font data from the computer to a printer.
See also upload.
DSP: A digital signal processor is a chip designed for real-time
applications. DSP techniques are used in PC processors as well as
media engines. For example, some high-end notebooks use a
DSP chip to provide Sound Blaster emulation for the internal
modem as well.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Glossary
111
DSR signal: This signal tells the personal computer whether the
modem is ready for communication.
DTR signal: This signal tells the modem whether the personal
computer is ready for communication.
duplex: The method used to transmit data in both directions
between two devices. Synonymous with full duplex. See also half
duplex, full duplex.
E
echo: Displays keyboard entry on the computer terminal.
EIA: Electronic Industries Association is a manufacturers group
that sets standards for data communications equipment.
error control: Detection of errors in data communication. Requests
retransmission of data in which errors were found.
Error control: Detection of errors in data communication. Requests
retransmission of data in which errors were found.
escape: 1) To cancel the task currently in progress. 2) A code
(ASCII code 27, generated by the Esc key) telling the computer
that what follows are commands, not data. Used with peripheral
devices such as printers and modems.
Escape control: This code is used to return to the command state
without disconnecting the line when the internal modem is
online.
F
FIFO: First-In/First-Out means the first data that enters a buffer is
the first to be retrieved.
Fallback: Reduction of a modem’s speed. If the remote modem
cannot communicate as fast as the local modem, the local modem
will reduce its speed.
firmware: A set of instructions built into a chip to control its
activities.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
112
Glossary
Flow control: Flow control ensures smooth data communication. If
operating speed differs between the personal computer and
modem or between your modem and a remote modem and if the
remote station runs short of buffer capacity, a transmission halt
request is sent from the receiver to the transmitter. When the
receiver has enough buffer capacity to resume receiving data, a
transmission restart request is sent. There are two ways of flow
control, XON and OFF control codes and CTS and RTS signals.
frequency: The number of times a signal repeats an identical cycle
within a certain time period.
full duplex: A type of data transmission in which data flows
between two devices in both directions simultaneously. See also
half duplex.
G
gigabyte (GB): A unit of data storage equal to 1,073,741,824 bytes
(1024 x 1024 x 1024 bytes). See also byte.
Guard time: An interval before and after an escape sequence that
prevents the modem from interpreting the escape sequence as
data.
H
half duplex: A type of data transmission in which data flows
between two devices in one direction at a time. See also full
duplex.
handshake: After a telephone line is connected from one station to
another, some signals are exchanged according to the ITU-T or
Bell standard to confirm that the standard is the same between the
calling and called stations prior to starting data communication
between them. This exchange of signals is called handshake.
hangup: Hangup means disconnecting a telephone line to terminate
communication
I
input: Information received by a computer from a storage device
such as a disk, or an input device such as the keyboard.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Glossary
113
input/output (I/O): Input and output are two of the three functions
that computers perform (the other is processing). Input/Output
describes the interrelated tasks of providing information to the
computer and providing the results of processing to users. I/O
devices include keyboards (input) and printers (output). A disk
drive is both an input and an output device, since it can both
provide information to the computer and receive information
from the computer.
ITU-T Standard: A series of communication procedures for
telephone lines and analog data transmission standardized by
ITU (International Telecommunications Union, formerly
CCITT).
K
keyboard: The device you use to type information into the
computer. Each key on the keyboard is a switch that is activated
when you press it. The switch sends a specific code, representing
the character printed on the key, to the processor.
kilobyte (KB): A unit of data storage equal to 1024 bytes. Its
abbreviations (K and KB) are taken from the Greek word kilo,
meaning 1000, although the abbreviation refers to 1024, or 2
raised to the 10th power. See also byte.
M
megabyte (MB): A unit of data storage equal to 1024 KB. From the
Greek work mega for million, one megabyte is actually
1,048,576 bytes (1024 x 1024 bytes). See also byte.
MIPS (Millions of Instructions Per Second): A computer
processor’s performance.
modem: A device for transmitting computer information over
telephone lines. A modem converts (modulates) digital
information for transmission and also converts (demodulates)
information it receives back to digital format. Many modems also
interpret and execute commands received from the computer.
modem port: The port to send and receive data to and from the
modem of a remote station.
MNP: A protocol developed by Microcom®, a modem
manufacturer in the United States, which with an error correcting
function built into the modem itself corrects errors in the modem.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
114
Glossary
N
Normal mode: Error correction is not made by MNP or V.42, but
even if serial port speed is different from modem port speed, the
buffers in the modem and its flow control function permit
communication without changing their speeds.
O
on line: A functional state in which a device is ready to receive or
transmit information.
online: Available through the computer. Online may refer to
information on the hard disk, such as online documentation or
online help, or a connection, through a modem, to another
computer or the Internet.
On hook/Off hook: On hook means the “handset is on the
telephone,” and off hook means it is off. The line is disconnected
from the internal modem when the handset is on hook, and
connected to the internal modem when it is off hook.
P
parity: A method in serial communications of making sure that the
information received is the same as the information that was sent.
It consists of adding an error detection bit to a group of data bits,
making the sum of the bits either odd or even. When you’re using
a modem to connect to another computer, you can set parity to
none, odd or even. In general, you should set parity to none,
unless you’re requested to do otherwise.
Private Branch Exchange (PBX): An automatic digital telephone
switching system that enables users within an organization to
place calls to each other without going through the public
telephone network. Users can also place calls to outside numbers.
Do not connect the Toshiba internal modem to a digital PBX
line, or the modem may be damaged.
protocol: A set of rules and conventions that makes it possible to
transfer information between computers. If you’re transmitting a
file, both modems must use the same protocol—just as two
people talking on the telephone must speak the same language to
communicate effectively. Examples of modem protocols are
V.34, V.42, V.90 and V.92.
Public line: A line served by a telephone company to be connected
to an opposite station via the exchange.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Glossary
115
Pulse dialing: A dialing method that uses pulses instead of tones to
generate a telephone number. Generally associated with rotary
dial phones, although some push-button phones can be used on
pulse lines.
R
Reliable mode: Reliable mode is for error-free communication by
MNP or V.42.
Result code: This code returns to the computer the results of
executing a command sent from it to the internal modem in
characters or numeric values.
RJ11: A modular telephone connector used on most telephone
networks and direct-connect modems.
RTS signal: A Request to Send signal is an RS-232C standard that
indicates the modem is ready to receive data.
RS-232-C: The standard defining control, data and status signals for
cables allowing asynchronous communication with computers,
printers, and other peripheral devices.
S
serial: The handling of data bits one after the other.
serial communications: A communications technique that uses as
few as two interconnecting wires to send bits one after another.
serial interface: An interface between systems or system
components in which information is transmitted sequentially, one
bit at a time. The transmitted bits are reassembled at the receiving
component. A modem uses a serial interface.
serial port: A communications port (COM1 or COM2) to which
you can connect a serial device, such as a modem, a mouse or a
serial printer.
stop bit: In asynchronous serial communications, one or more bits
indicating the end of a block of characters.
S-Register: The S-Register stores the parameters for various
commands and modem operations.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
116
Glossary
synchronous: Having a constant time interval between successive
bits, characters or events. Synchronous data transmission
requires both the sending and receiving devices to use special
synchronizing characters to correct variations in timing between
the devices. See also asynchronous.
T
Test function: When normal communication is not possible, this
function checks the modem, personal computer, and telephone
lines to determine if they are normal.
Tone dialing: A dialing method that uses tones instead of pulses to
generate a telephone number. Generally associated with pushbutton phones, although some push-button phones can be
connected to pulse lines.
U
upload: To send a file to another computer through a modem. See
also download.
UART: Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter is the circuit
interface between the modem and computer. It receives serial bit
data from the modem and converts it into bytes for the computer;
and it converts byte data from the computer into bit data for serial
communication.
X
XON/XOFF flow control: A protocol used by devices receiving
data. It uses two signals: transfer ON and transfer OFF. The
signals are controlled by software.
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
Index
Numerics
56K technology 16
A
analog/loopback test 92
answering a call 20
AT command 52
AT command set
result codes 87
AT commands
answer command 52
Call Waiting 77
Caller ID enable/disable 79
communication standard setting
52
data carrier detect 65
data compression control 72
data terminal ready (DTR) 66
dial a telephone number 53
dial tone detect 64
display result codes 62
echo command 54
error control mode selection 70
escape sequence 52
extended result codes 64
format 51
guard tone control 67
hook control 55
load factory settings 66
local flow control selection 67, 71
Modem On Hold 79
monitor speaker mode 60
monitor speaker volume 60
MS command 74
N modulation handshake 61
PCM Upstream 78
protocol result code 71
repeat last command string 52
request ID information 55
result code control 62
result code option 63
result code selection 63
return to online data mode 61
select pulse dial make/break ratio
68
select pulse dialing 62
117
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
118
Index
select stored profile for hardware
reset 69
select tone dialing 62
self-test commands 68
store current configuration 69
store telephone number 70
V.44 data compression 73
V.90 enable/disable 72
view active configuration and
stored profile 69
D
C
data carrier detect 65
data compression 100
data compression control 72
data terminal ready (DTR) 66
default settings 31
diagnostics 31
dial a telephone number 53
dial tone detect 64
disconnecting the internal modem 46
display result codes 62
call
E
receiving 49
terminating 49
call cancelled error message 22
call history 25
Call Waiting
AT command 77
configuring 25
Caller ID
AT command 79
configuring 25
Clear To Send 50
communication standard setting 52
communications
dial mode types 104
facsimiles 50
handshake commands 97
modes 97
parameters 103
protocols supported 17
specifications 101
telephone line types 103
configuring Modem On Hold 25
connecting internal modem 44, 45
connecting to a telephone line 47
connection procedures 44
CTS/RTS 50
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
echo command 54
error control mode selection 70
error messages
call cancelled 22
escape sequence 52
extended result codes 64
F
Fast Connect 14
fax communication 50
flow control 97
computer to modem 97
modem port 97, 100
modem to modem 97
serial port 97
computer to modem 98
software 98
two-way 99
G
guard tone control 67
H
handshake 61
handshake commands 97
hardware setup 31
Index
hook control 55
N
I
N modulation handshake 61
icons
definitions 14
internal modem
communications protocols 17
connecting 45
connection procedures 44
disconnecting 46
O
L
load factory settings 66
local flow control selection 67, 71
loopback test 93
M
MNP protocol 95
modem
connecting internal 44
flow control function 97
modem port 97
serial port 97
maximum connection speed 74
protocol settings 74
protocols 16
Modem On Hold 14
answering a call 20
application 19
AT command 79
autorun 28
configuring 25
icon 28
placing a call 22
timer 21
using 20
version 29
viewing call history 25
MS command 74
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
119
operation modes 96
normal 96
reliable 96
P
PCM Upstream 14, 78
placing a call 22
protocol result code 71
protocols
MNP 95
V.42 96
R
receiving a call 49
repeat last command string 52
request ID information 55
Request To Send 50
result code control 62
result code option 63
result code selection 63
return to online data mode 61
S
select pulse dial make/break ratio 68
select pulse dialing 62
select tone dialing 62
self-test commands 68
serial port
flow control 98
set protocol and connection speed
parameters 74
speaker on/off 60
speaker volume 60
specifications
Toshiba’s internal modem 101
120
Index
S-register values
AT escape character 83
Comma pause time 85
Command line editing character
84
Command line termination
character 83
Connection completion time-out
85
Dial line rate 86
DTMF dialing speed 85
Escape guard time 86
Response formatting character 83
Wait before dialing 84
store current configuration 69
store telephone number 70
T
telephone line
connecting to 47
direct access line 47
extension line 48
terminating a call 49
test
description 92
function 92
methods 92
test function
loopback test 93
transfer on/transfer off 50
V
V.42 protocol 96
V.44 data compression 15, 73
V.90 enable/disable 72
V.92
connection requirements 15
features 14
verifying connection 38
5.375 x 8.375 ver 2.4.0
view active configuration and stored
profile 69
X
XON/XOFF control 50