Avaya 03-300686 Telephone User Manual

Installing and Connecting the MDF
and Telephones
03-300686
Issue 3
Release 5.0
January 2008
© 2008 Avaya Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Notice
While reasonable efforts were made to ensure that the information in this
document was complete and accurate at the time of printing, Avaya Inc. can
assume no liability for any errors. Changes and corrections to the information
in this document may be incorporated in future releases.
For full support information, please see the complete document,
Avaya Support Notices for Hardware Documentation, document number
03-600759, and the complete document,
Avaya Support Notices for Software Documentation, document number
03-600758.
To locate these document on our Web site, simply go to
http://www.avaya.com/support and search for the document number in
the search box.
Documentation disclaimer
Avaya Inc. is not responsible for any modifications, additions, or deletions to
the original published version of this documentation unless such modifications,
additions, or deletions were performed by Avaya. Customer and/or End User
agree to indemnify and hold harmless Avaya, Avaya's agents, servants and
employees against all claims, lawsuits, demands and judgments arising out of,
or in connection with, subsequent modifications, additions or deletions to this
documentation to the extent made by the Customer or End User.
Link disclaimer
Avaya Inc. is not responsible for the contents or reliability of any linked Web
sites referenced elsewhere within this documentation, and Avaya does not
necessarily endorse the products, services, or information described or offered
within them. We cannot guarantee that these links will work all of the time and
we have no control over the availability of the linked pages.
Warranty
Avaya Inc. provides a limited warranty on this product. Refer to your sales
agreement to establish the terms of the limited warranty. In addition, Avaya’s
standard warranty language, as well as information regarding support for this
product, while under warranty, is available through the following Web site:
http://www.avaya.com/support.
Copyright
Except where expressly stated otherwise, the Product is protected by copyright
and other laws respecting proprietary rights. Unauthorized reproduction,
transfer, and or use can be a criminal, as well as a civil, offense under the
applicable law.
Avaya support
Avaya provides a telephone number for you to use to report problems or to ask
questions about your product. The support telephone number
is 1-800-242-2121 in the United States. For additional support telephone
numbers, see the Avaya Web site: http://www.avaya.com/support.
Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
How to use this documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Downloading this book and updates from the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sending us comments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
10
11
Related resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
Chapter 2: Installing the main distribution frame . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13
Physical requirements and layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation space requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13
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Main distribution frame cross-connect fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
Main distribution frame hardware installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17
Main distribution frame placement
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19
Main distribution frame labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
Mounting 110A- or 110P-type terminal blocks on the wall . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
Mounting 110P-type terminal blocks on a frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Installing Cable Slack Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
Chapter 3: Installing the patch panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
Installing patch panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
Cross-connecting the media gateway to the patch panels . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
Chapter 4: Media gateway connections to the MDF. . . . . . . . . . . .
33
Equipment room cabling labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33
Cable routing guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
Trunk cables among network interface,
sneak fuse panel, and media gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
Installing cables between media gateway and MDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
Installing connector cables between auxiliary cabinet and MDF . . . . . . . . .
39
Chapter 5: MDF connections to stations and the
public switched telephone network. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
Station (telephone) wiring design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
Information outlets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
Station cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
42
Closets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Satellite locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
43
Issue 3 January 2008
3
Contents
Site locations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
Station circuit distribution from equipment room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-pair station circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-pair to 4-pair station circuit distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
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45
Connected cable station adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50
Completing a provisioning plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
52
Installing sneak current and off premise protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing sneak fuse panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
54
57
Installing the coupled bonding conductor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing coupled bonding conductor wires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
58
58
Installing and administering the patch cord/jumper . .
Labeling expansion control carrier cable
(MCC1 Media Gateway only) . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting expansion control carrier outputs
cable (MCC1 Media Gateway only) . . . . . . . . .
Connecting trunk pairs using concentrator cables .
Connecting trunk pairs to media gateway
using jumper wires to establish 3-pair modularity
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62
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65
65
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67
Chapter 6: Installing and wiring telephones and trunks . . . . . . . . .
69
Wiring telephones and trunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
69
Connecting telephones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connectable telephones and consoles . . . . . . . .
Connecting a typical telephone . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting adjunct power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting an analog station or 2-wire digital station
Analog tie trunk example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Digital tie trunk example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DS1 tie trunk example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Collocated DS1 interface trunks . . . . . . . . . . . .
DS1 interface trunks using T1 channel service unit. .
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79
Auxiliary connector outputs (MCC1 and SCC1
Media Gateways only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
81
Three-pair and four-pair modularity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
84
Adjunct power connection locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
85
Attendant console example . . . . . . . . . .
Attendant console cabling distances, local
and phantom power . . . . . . . . . . . .
Auxiliary power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hard-wire bridging . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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86
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86
86
87
4 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
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Contents
Dual wiring of 2-wire and 4-wire endpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the attendant console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the 26B1 Selector Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
87
87
88
Connecting external alarm indicators and auxiliary power . . . . . . . . . . . .
88
Installing off-premises station wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
90
Off-premises or out-of-building stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
91
Off-premises connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Off-premises protection requirements . . . . . .
Telephone restrictions for exposed environments
Digital Out-of-Building Telephone Protection . . .
Installing the ITW Linx Enhanced Protector . .
Installing the 4C3S-75 Enhanced Protector . .
Installing the data link protector . . . . . . . .
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91
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94
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95
Emergency transfer units and associated telephones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
96
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808A Emergency Transfer Panel and
telephone installation examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the 808A Emergency Transfer Panel . . . . . .
Installing telephones used only for
emergency transfer (trunk/auxiliary field) . . . . . . . .
Installing telephones used for emergency
transfer and as normal extension (trunk/auxiliary field)
Installing external ringing
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97
99
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104
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105
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106
Installing the queue warning indicator
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
107
Chapter 7: Installing and wiring telephone power supplies . . . . . . .
109
1145B2 power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Important warning for 1145B2 power supply . .
Mounting the 1145B2/1146B2 power supply . .
Installing the wall-mounting plates . . . . . . .
Mounting the 1146B2 Power Distribution Unit .
Installing the battery mounting/wiring . . . . . .
Installing the expanded power distribution unit
Powering up and testing the power supply . . .
Wiring the 1146B2 Power Distribution Unit . . .
Resetting LEDs on power distribution unit . . .
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109
110
111
114
114
115
115
116
117
118
1152A1 Mid-Span Power Distribution Unit . . . . . .
Important safety instructions . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the 1152A1 Power Distribution Unit . . . .
Connecting the 1152A1 Power Distribution Unit
Connecting the cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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119
119
120
120
121
Issue 3 January 2008
5
Contents
Connecting cables to telephones and other end devices. . . . . . . . . .
122
1152B Mid-Span Power Distribution Units . . . . . . . . . . .
Important 1152B PDU Safety Instructions . . . . . . . . .
Using the 1152B PDUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the 1152B PDU cables . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting cables to telephones and other end devices.
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123
124
125
125
126
C360 converged stackable switches . . . . . .
C360 switch important safety instructions.
Using the C360 switch. . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the C360 stackable switches .
Connecting the cables. . . . . . . . . .
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128
128
129
130
131
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131
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132
132
133
Chapter 8: Testing the complete configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
135
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1151B1 and 1151B2 Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . .
Important safety instructions for 1151B1 and
1151B2 Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using 1151B1 and 1151B2 Power Supplies . . . . .
Connecting the 1151B1 or 1151B2 Power Supplies
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Testing port network equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking port network status for each media gateway . . . . . . . .
Checking circuit pack configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing the TN2312BP Internet Protocol
Server Interface circuit pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing Expansion Interface circuit packs, if used . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing time division multiplexing bus for each port network . . . . .
Testing expansion interface exchange, if used, for each port network
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136
136
137
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138
139
140
141
Testing telephones and other equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making test calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing 302C attendant console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing selector console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing external ringing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing queue warning indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing integrated announcement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Record an announcement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Playback announcement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Delete announcement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing music-on-hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing emergency transfer (Avaya S8700 Multi-Connect only)
Testing terminating trunk transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing connectivity to the LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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142
143
143
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145
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145
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146
147
6 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
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Contents
LED indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Telephone console LEDs . . . . .
Attendant console LEDs . . .
Terminal alarm notification . .
DS1 Converter circuit pack LEDs
SPAN LEDs . . . . . . . . . .
Index
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147
148
148
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148
150
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151
Issue 3 January 2008
7
Contents
8 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Chapter 1: Introduction
This documentation, Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones provides procedures
for installing Main Distribution Frames (MDF) and telephones. The procedures explain how you
connect media gateways to the MDF and how to connect the MDF to the public switched
telephone network (PSTN). This document also explains how to install and wire telephones.
The following information is included in this document:
●
Installing the main distribution frame on page 13
●
Installing the patch panel on page 29
●
Media gateway connections to the MDF on page 33
●
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks on page 69
●
Testing the complete configuration on page 135
Audience
This documentation is for the following audiences:
●
Trained field installation
●
Technical support personnel
●
Authorized Business Partners
How to use this documentation
Use this documentation as a guide to install and connect MDFs and telephones. For information
about a particular task, use the index or table of contents to locate the page number where the
information is described.
Perform tasks related to the Main Distribution Frame in the following sections as appropriate:
●
Installing the main distribution frame on page 13
●
Installing the patch panel on page 29. This chapter is only for customers using a patch
panel rather than a main distribution frame (typically smaller installations).
●
Media gateway connections to the MDF on page 33
●
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network on page 41
Issue 3 January 2008
9
Introduction
Connect the necessary telephone, trunking, and peripheral equipment using the information in
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks on page 69 and Installing and wiring telephone
power supplies on page 109.
Complete the installation using information in the following section:
●
Testing the complete configuration on page 135
Downloading this book and updates from the Web
You can download the latest version of this documentation from the Avaya Support Web site
(http://support.avaya.com). You must have access to the Internet and a copy of Adobe Reader
installed on your personal computer.
Avaya makes every effort to ensure that the information in this book is complete and accurate.
However, information can change after we publish this documentation. Therefore, the Avaya
Support Web site might also contain new product information and updates to the information in
this book. You can also download these updates from the Avaya Support Web site.
To view any book, you must have a copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.
Note:
Note:
If you do not have Acrobat Reader, you can get a free copy at
http://www.adobe.com.
To download an electronic version of this documentation:
1. Access the Avaya Support Web site at http://support.avaya.com.
2. At the top of the page, click in the Search text box.
3. Type the documentation number 03-300686 and click the arrow button.
4. In the resulting list, locate the latest version of the document, and then click the document
title to view the latest version of the book.
10 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Related resources
Sending us comments
Avaya welcomes your comments about this book. To reach us by:
●
Mail, send your comments to:
Avaya Inc.
Product Documentation Group
Room B3-H13
1300 W. 120th Ave.
Westminster, CO 80234 USA
●
E-mail, send your comments to:
document@avaya.com
●
Fax, send your comments to:
1-303-538-1741
When commenting, be sure that you mention the name and number of this book, Installing and
Connecting the MDF and Telephones (03-300686).
Related resources
You may need the information in the following documents to perform a complete installation.
These documents are included on the CD-ROM Documentation for Avaya Communication
Manager, Media Gateways and Servers, (03-300151). You can download the contents of this
CD-ROM from the Avaya Support Web site, http://support.avaya.com.
●
Installing the Avaya G650 Media Gateway, 03-300685. Provides procedures for installing
and cabling a G650 Media Gateway, connecting to the customer’s network, and testing the
complete configuration.
●
Adding New Hardware for Avaya Servers and Gateways (03-300684). Provides
information on installing adjunct and peripheral equipment that an S8400, S8500, or
S8700-series Server supports.
●
Electronic Preinstallation Worksheet (EPW). An Excel spreadsheet that provides the
customer network information that you need to configure the control network components
with the Avaya Installation Wizard. Get the completed EPW from the Avaya project
manager, Avaya software technician, or customer network administrator. A blank EPW is
available at the AIW Web site, http://support.avaya.com/avayaiw.
●
Administrator Guide for Avaya Communication Manager, (03-300509). Provides user
information on how to administer trunks and telephones.
Issue 3 January 2008
11
Introduction
●
Maintenance Commands for Avaya Communication Manager 5.0, Media Gateways and
Servers, (03-300431). Provides information on how to use command interfaces, command
syntax, and output from maintenance-related commands.
●
Maintenance Alarms for Avaya Communication Manager 5.0, Media Gateways and
Servers, (03-300430). Provides information on how to use alarms, error codes, and tests
to diagnose and repair problems.
●
Maintenance Procedures for Avaya Communication Manager 5.0, Media Gateways and
Servers (03-300432). Provides information on how to troubleshoot and replace various
components.
●
The following job aids are also available on the CD-ROM Documentation for Avaya
Communication Manager, Media Gateways and Servers:
- Approved Grounds. Provides a description of all approved grounds.
- Connector and Cable Diagrams (Pinout Charts). Provides pinout information for various
components.
- Option Switch Settings. Provides settings for various components.
For all documents associated with the S8400, S8500, S8700-series Server, see the CD titled
Documentation for Avaya Communication Manager, Media Gateways and Servers (03-300151).
12 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Chapter 2: Installing the main distribution frame
If the equipment room does not have one, you must build a main distribution frame (MDF) that
connects the media gateways to the building phone network and to the public switched
telephone network (PSTN). The tasks include the following:
●
Physical requirements and layout on page 13
●
Main distribution frame hardware installation on page 17
If the installation will use a patch panel rather than a main distribution frame, use the procedures
in Chapter 3: Installing the patch panel on page 29.
Physical requirements and layout
Before installing the MDF and other equipment in the equipment room, ensure that there is
adequate space and there is a plan for placing the equipment.
Installation space requirements
Make sure there is adequate space for the following pieces of equipment:
●
Sneak fuse panels and emergency transfer units on page 13
●
110-type hardware on page 13
●
Cable Slack Manager on page 14
Sneak fuse panels and emergency transfer units
You need about 8 inches (20 centimeters) of horizontal wall space for each column of sneak
fuse panels. Horizontal wall space must also be provided for emergency transfer units.
110-type hardware
The trunk/auxiliary field and the distribution field are mounted on the same wall. Each 110P-type
terminal block is 8.5 inches (21.6 centimeters) wide. Vertical patch cord troughs are 5.31 inches
(13.4 centimeters) wide and horizontal patch cord troughs are 23 inches (58.4 centimeters)
wide.
Each 110A-type terminal block is 10.8 inches (27.4 centimeters) wide; however, no horizontal
patch cord troughs are used and the blocks are shorter than 110P-type terminal blocks. This
allows the 110A-type terminal blocks to be stacked. Therefore, the 110A-type hardware requires
less space than the 110P-type hardware on a per-station basis.
Issue 3 January 2008
13
Installing the main distribution frame
Cable Slack Manager
A Cable Slack Manager is 32 inches (81.3 centimeters) wide. Slack managers are commonly
used in installations consisting of media gateway stacks, such as the SCC1 Media Gateways.
Determine the quantity of slack managers by dividing the total length of the MDF in inches
(centimeters) by 32 (81.3). A partial number of 0.4 or less should be rounded down, and a
partial number of 0.5 or more should be rounded up (for example: 2.4 = two Cable Slack
Managers and 2.5 = three Cable Slack Managers).
Note:
Cable clamps are required in installations with Cable Slack Managers. At the rear
of the media gateways, on each rear ground plate, install two cable clamps using
the screws provided. These clamps hold the 25-pair input/output or MDF cables
in place.
Note:
Installation layout
Make sure you review the following information:
●
Information outlet locations on page 14
●
Site, satellite, and adapter locations on page 14
●
Sizing 4-pair station cables on page 15
●
Sizing 25-pair and multiple 25-pair station cables on page 15
●
3-pair station cable circuits on page 15
●
4-pair station cable circuits on page 15
Information outlet locations
The customer or marketing representative must provide floor plans showing the information
outlet locations and types (flush- or surface-mounted) required. The floor plans must also show
a complete overview of all conduit and cabling facilities in the building.
Site, satellite, and adapter locations
Use the following information when determining site, satellite, or adapter locations.
●
Keep the number of locations to a minimum.
●
To minimize the station wiring distances, centrally locate the sites/satellites, or adapters
among the information outlets.
●
Site/satellite locations must be easily accessible and contain AC-powered receptacles.
One 258A/BR2580A adapter is required for each 25-pair station cable containing 4-pair station
circuits. One 356A adapter is required for each 25-pair station cable containing 3-pair station
circuits. Hardware requirements are the same as for the equipment room.
14 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Physical requirements and layout
Sizing 4-pair station cables
Use the scale of the floor plan to determine the approximate length of the station cables
required per the standard SYSTIMAX wiring concepts.
Sizing 25-pair and multiple 25-pair station cables
Use the scale of the floor plan to determine the approximate length of each 25-pair station
cable. The cables must be selected and properly sized to make maximum use of the hardware
at the equipment room or satellite location.
Use 25-pair B25A cables to connect adapters directly to the MDF or satellite location.
Staggered-finger cables, equipped with factory-installed 25-pair connectors at both ends,
should be used when multiple 25-pair cables are used between the equipment room or satellite
location and the adapters. B25A cables are required at the equipment room or satellite location
to connect the staggered-finger cables to the 110-type terminal blocks.
Use the following information to determine the cable size (cable pairs) required for either 3-pair
or 4-pair circuits. Note the length and size on the floor plan to aid in the ordering and installation
of the station cables.
3-pair station cable circuits
To determine the size of station cables containing 3-pair circuits, multiply the number of 3-pair
circuits required at the satellite location by 3.5. Then, using the minimum size cable
requirement, round up the cable size requirement to the next highest available cable bundle
size. This will provide additional pairs for growth and compensate for every twenty-fifth pair in a
cable that is not used.
4-pair station cable circuits
To determine the size of station cables containing 4-pair circuits, find out how many information
outlets are served by the equipment room MDF or satellite location MDF. Multiply the number of
information outlets by 4. Then, using the minimum size cable requirement, round up the cable
size requirement to the next highest available cable bundle size.
Note:
Note:
This formula may not compensate for the unused 25th pair in all cases. If not, it
must be allowed for.
Issue 3 January 2008
15
Installing the main distribution frame
Main distribution frame cross-connect fields
Each main distribution frame (MDF) contains a trunk/auxiliary field and a distribution field. The
trunk/auxiliary field contains three cross-connect areas:
●
The green field terminates the network interface leads from the central office (CO) and
provides the terminals to cross-connect the leads to the purple or yellow fields as required.
A single row of the 110-type terminal block can terminate 24 1-pair, 8 3-pair, or 12 2-pair
trunks.
●
The purple field terminates the trunk circuits from the media gateway with WP-90929, List
1 or 3 concentrator cables. Also, 25-pair cables can be used to terminate trunk circuits
from the media gateway with each trunk circuit pack connecting to one 25-pair row of the
110-type terminal block. Each terminal block row can terminate 24 1-pair, 8 3-pair, or 12
2-pair trunks.
●
The yellow field provides cross-connect terminals for all miscellaneous leads from the
media gateway, such as alarm monitors, emergency transfer relay power, and attendant
console power. This field is used for emergency transfer wiring, paging equipment, music
sources, and so forth.
The distribution field contains four cross-connect areas:
●
The purple field (port field) terminates 25-pair cables from the media gateway. Each line
circuit pack connects to one 25-pair row of the 110-type terminal block. One 25-pair cable
is required for each line circuit pack.
Note:
The TN2183 16-port Analog Line circuit pack requires an adapter cable to
connect from one connector on the media gateway to two 25-pair connectors on
a terminal block. The yellow field (auxiliary field) terminates all 25-pair cables
from the auxiliary cabinet (if used). The yellow field is located in the lower
right-hand corner of the distribution field.
Note:
●
The white field (station field) terminates the station wiring. The white field indicates 3-pair
station circuits (eight circuits per 25-pair cable) routed through a satellite closet.
●
The blue field (station field) also terminates station wiring. The blue field indicates 3- and/
or 4-pair station circuits (eight or six circuits, respectively, per 25-pair cable). The fourth
pair, of the 4-pair station circuit provides adjunct power from the cross-connect field on an
as-needed basis to telephones and consoles within 250 feet (76 meters) of the MDF.
16 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Main distribution frame hardware installation
Main distribution frame hardware installation
This section provides information on installing a main distribution frame (MDF) in an equipment
room. It must be installed before connecting media gateways to it and before connecting it to
the public switched telephone network (PSTN) outside the building and stations within the
building.
SYSTIMAX 110-type hardware is used for the MDF. 110-type hardware is available in two basic
types: the 110A and 110P. The 110A requires less wall space than the 110P. The 110P includes
horizontal and vertical cable troughs for managing cross-connect cables. The media gateways
are connected to the MDF with the supplied B25A male to female 25-pair cables. The cables
are provided in 10-foot (3 meter) and 15-foot (4.5 meter) lengths.
Figure 1: Example MDF connections (MCC1 Media Gateway) shows the cross-connections for
common circuit packs. See this figure when cross-connecting wire pairs to the MDF.
Figure 1: Example MDF connections (MCC1 Media Gateway)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
4 Port MET Line
4 Port Tie Trunk
4 Port Tie Trunk
w/ E&M Signaling
8 Port Analog
8 Port CO
8 Port Data Line
8 Port DID
8 Port Digital
8 Port Hybrid
12 Port BRI
16 Port Analog
16 Port Digital
24 Port Analog
24 Port Digital
DS1
widfccf2 EWS 102798
Figure 2: Example MDF connections (G650 Media Gateway) on page 18 shows a detailed
example of the G600 Media Gateway cables connecting media gateways and satellite closets to
the MDF. This figure shows the cross-connections for one example station circuit.
Issue 3 January 2008
17
Installing the main distribution frame
Figure 2: Example MDF connections (G650 Media Gateway)
2
3
4
9
13
14
11
12
5
15
7
13
6
13
18
8
17
16
10
1
14
13
12
11
10
09
08
-48 VDC
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
-48 VDC
RETURN
cadlmdfb LAO 091103
Figure notes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Rear of Media Gateway
Main Distribution Frame (MDF)
Port Distribution Field (Purple Field)
Station Distribution Field (White Field)
Trunk/Auxiliary Field
Purple Field
Yellow Field
Green Field
Satellite Closet
18 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
Auxiliary Cabinet (Yellow Field)
White Field
Blue Field
Cross-Connect Jumpers
103A or Modular Wall Jack
4-Pair Line Cord
To Line Circuit Pack
To Trunk Circuit Pack
To Network Interface
Main distribution frame placement
Main distribution frame placement
The preferred location of the MDF is directly behind the media gateways.
Figure 3: Typical 110A-type terminal blocks (G650 Media Gateway) shows a typical installation
using 110A-type terminal blocks.
Figure 3: Typical 110A-type terminal blocks (G650 Media Gateway)
1
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7
8
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AC
4
5
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4
6
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9
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6
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AC
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3
4
5
6
7
8
9
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5
12
13
14
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AC
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AC
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3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
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AC
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2
2
cadlmdfa LAO 091103
Figure notes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
G600 Media Gateways in rack
Z113A Cable Slack Manager
25-Pair Cable to Media Gateway
Station Cables
5. Station Distribution Field
6. Port Distribution Field
7. Trunk/Auxiliary Field
Issue 3 January 2008
19
Installing the main distribution frame
Main distribution frame labels
Figure 4: Label graphic symbols and nomenclature on page 20 shows the graphic symbols
used on labels for the media gateways, cross-connections, information outlets, and cables. The
labels are color-coded to identify media gateway wiring:
●
Green — To central office (CO)
●
Purple — To media gateway ports
●
Yellow — To auxiliary equipment and miscellaneous media gateway leads
●
Blue — To information outlets
●
White — From MDF to satellite locations (3-pair)
Each label identifies two rows on the terminal block. The upper half identifies the row above it
and the lower half identifies the row below it. The labels are inserted into the clear plastic
designation strips furnished with the terminal blocks. The strip is snapped in place between the
terminal block rows. Label code number 1220A (comcode 103970000) contains all of the
required labels.
Figure 4: Label graphic symbols and nomenclature
r758422i LJK 050996
Figure notes:
1. Floor or Building Identification (write as
required
2. Media Gateway
3. Carrier (leave blank for G600 Media
Gateway)
4. Slot
20 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Information Outlet
Site/Satellite Closet
Tie Circuit
Floor
Building
Mounting 110A- or 110P-type terminal blocks on the wall
Mounting 110A- or 110P-type terminal blocks on the wall
The 110A-type terminal blocks can be stacked in almost any arrangement at any height or
location on the wall. Figure 5: 110A-type terminal blocks (300-pair) on page 22 shows one
arrangement. The distance between the mounting screw holes on the terminal blocks is 10.8
inches (27.4 centimeters). If a vertical patch cord trough is used, the distance between the
mounting screw holes is 5.31 inches (13.3 centimeters).
With 110P-type terminal blocks, the first block of the trunk/auxiliary field is aligned with the left
side of the media gateway. See Figure 6: 110P-type terminal blocks (900-pair) on page 23.
This arrangement allows for growth on the right side of the MDF.
To mount 110A- or 110P-type terminal blocks:
1. Route the cables from the rear of the media gateway stack to the MDF via the Cable Slack
Manager. See Installing Cable Slack Managers on page 25.
2. If you are installing 300-pair terminal blocks, draw a level horizontal line on the wall 47.5
inches (1.2 meters) above the floor. See Figure 5: 110A-type terminal blocks (300-pair) on
page 22.
If you are installing 900-pair terminal blocks, draw a level horizontal line on the wall 23
inches (58.4 cm) above the floor. See Figure 6: 110P-type terminal blocks (900-pair) on
page 23.
3. To mount the first trunk/auxiliary field terminal block, partially install 2 3/4-inch, #12 wood
screws, 7-11/1- inch (19.5-centimeter) apart on the left side of the horizontal line on the wall.
4. Slide the bottom terminal block ft onto the mounting screws and mark the upper mounting
screw locations.
5. Remove the terminal block and partially install the upper mounting screws.
6. Place the terminal block on the mounting screws and tighten the screws.
7. If installing a vertical patch cord trough, partially install the first screw for the patch cord
trough, on the line, 7/8-inch (2.2-centimeter) to the right of the previous screw. Partially
install the second mounting screw 5.31 inch (13.5 centimeter) to the right of the screw just
installed. Repeat Steps 4, 5, and 6.
8. If another trunk/auxiliary field terminal block is to be installed, partially install the first screw
for the terminal block, on the line, 7/8-inch (2.2-centimeter) to the right of the previous
screw. Partially install the second mounting screw 7-11/1- inch (19.5-centimeter) to the right
of the screw just installed. Repeat Steps 4, 5, and 6.
9. If a horizontal patch cord trough is to be installed, install it, on the line, between the trunk/
auxiliary field and the distribution field.
10. To install the first distribution field terminal block, partially install 2 3/4-inch, #12 wood
screws, 7-11/16 inch (19.5 centimeter) apart on the line, to the right of the vertical patch
cord trough. Repeat Steps 4, 5, and 6.
Issue 3 January 2008
21
Installing the main distribution frame
11. If installing another distribution field terminal block, partially install the first screw for the
terminal block, on the line, 7/8-inch (2.2 centimeter) to the right of the previous screw.
Partially install the second mounting screw 7-11/16 inch (19.5 centimeter) to right of the
screw just installed. Repeat Steps 4, 5, and 6.
12. If installing a vertical patch cord trough in the distribution field, repeat Step 6.
13. Repeat Steps 11 and 12 until all the terminal blocks and vertical patch cord troughs in the
distribution field are installed.
Figure 5: 110A-type terminal blocks (300-pair)
r758420b MMR 031496
Figure notes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
4 feet (1.22 meters)
6.6 feet (2 meters)
7.68 inches (19.5 centimeters)
7/8-inch (2.22 centimeters)
5.31 inches (13.5 centimeters)
6. 47.5 inches (120.6
centimeters)
7. Horizontal Line
8. AC Power Strip
9. Floor Line
22 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Mounting 110A- or 110P-type terminal blocks on the wall
Figure 6: 110P-type terminal blocks (900-pair)
r758421b MMR 031496
Figure notes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
4 feet (1.22 meters)
Horizontal Line
7.68 inches (19.5 centimeters)
47.5 inches (120.6 centimeters)
5.31 inches (13.5 centimeters)
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
7/8-inch (2.22 centimeters)
23 inches (58.4 centimeters)
8 feet (2.43 meters)
AC Power Strip
Floor Line
Issue 3 January 2008
23
Installing the main distribution frame
Mounting 110P-type terminal blocks on a frame
The 900-pair 110P-type terminal blocks and the associated patch cord troughs can also be
mounted on a free-standing, floor-mounted 1110A2 Apparatus Mounting Frame. See
Figure 7: 1110A2 and 1110C1 apparatus mountings on page 24.
Each 1110A2 provides the space to mount five terminal blocks/patch cord troughs on each side
of the frame. A cable support structure, apparatus mounting 1110C1, mounts directly on top of
the 1110A2 and provides support for all cables routed to and from the frame. See
Table 1: Apparatus mounting frame ordering information on page 25.
Figure 7: 1110A2 and 1110C1 apparatus mountings
r781401 LJK 040896
Figure notes:
1. 1110C1 Apparatus Mounting
2. 1110A2 Apparatus Mounting
3. 76 inches (193 centimeters)
4. 88.5 inches (225 centimeters)
5. 43.5 inches (110.5 centimeters)
24 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Installing Cable Slack Managers
Table 1: Apparatus mounting frame ordering information
Code number
Description
Comcode
1110A2
Apparatus Mounting
Frame
104032495
1110C1
Cable Support Assembly
104175120
1110A1
End Dress Panel
104176268
2110A1
Top Dress Panel
104176276
2110B1
Bottom Dress Panel
104176284
Installing Cable Slack Managers
Run excess cables on an upper cable ladder (if the MDF connectors are on top) or route them
through a cable slack manager that is placed next to the MDF.
To install cable slack managers:
1. Place the Z113A Cable Slack Manager against the wall under the MDF. See
Figure 9: Cable routing through Cable Slack Manager—example for SCC1 Media
Gateway on page 27. Align the left side of the cable slack manager with the first terminal
block of the trunk/auxiliary field.
2. Place the next cable slack manager beside the previously installed unit. Align the tabs and
interlocks and snap the units together.
3. Repeat Step 2 until all cable slack managers are installed.
Note:
Note:
Nine 1/4-inch (0.63 centimeter) holes are provided in a cable slack manager base
if earthquake mounting is required. If a base is mounted on an uneven floor,
shims may be required for leveling and to assure proper fit of the covers.
Holes are provided in the sides of the base for bolting cable slack manager
together. Obtain bolts and shims locally.
4. An example of how the media gateway cables route through the cable slack manager is
shown in Figure 8: Cable routing through Cable Slack Manager—example for MCC1 Media
Gateway on page 26.
Issue 3 January 2008
25
Installing the main distribution frame
Cable clamps are required in installations with cable slack managers. At the rear of the media
gateways, install two cable clamps using the screws provided. These clamps hold the 25-pair
input/output or MDF cables in place. Figure 8: Cable routing through Cable Slack
Manager—example for MCC1 Media Gateway on page 26 and Figure 9: Cable routing through
Cable Slack Manager—example for SCC1 Media Gateway on page 27 show cable clamp
placement and cable routing.
Figure 8: Cable routing through Cable Slack Manager—example for MCC1 Media Gateway
cbdfflr CJL 102396
Figure notes:
1. Top of Media Gateway
2. Cable Slack Manager
3. Cable Clamp
4. Spare Center Troughs
5. Media Gateway Trough for
Port Cables
26 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Installing Cable Slack Managers
Figure 9: Cable routing through Cable Slack Manager—example for SCC1 Media Gateway
1
2
3
4
5
r758155 CJL 031496
Figure notes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Top of Media Gateways
Cable Clamps
Cable Ties (Optional)
Power Cord
Cable Slack Manager
6. Cable Slack Manager (Cover
Removed)
7. Main Distribution Frame (MDF)
8. Route Cables Along Path Shown
9. Port Cables
Issue 3 January 2008
27
Installing the main distribution frame
28 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Chapter 3: Installing the patch panel
Installing patch panels
This chapter is for installations using a patch panel rather than a main distribution frame for
connections to the building phone network and the public switched telephone network (PSTN).
Patch panels are arrays of RJ45 jacks and associated B25A cables. The panels accommodate
2-wire, 24-port DCP/analog port boards and 8-port analog trunk boards. The panels are
mounted either below or above the media gateway stack. You cannot mount patch panels in
between media gateways.
Note:
Note:
You do not have to mount the patch panels in the same rack as the media
gateways. You can mount the panels in telephone closets as appropriate.
For more information, see Figure 10: Typical RMC patch panel installation on page 30 while
you perform this procedure.
To install patch panels:
1. Use the supplied mounting screws to mount the patch panels on the rack below media
gateway A or above the topmost media gateway.
2. Attach B25A cables to the patch panels and the circuit pack amphenol connectors.
Note:
Note:
Note:
Connect 24-port DCP or analog circuit packs to the 24-port patch panels.
Note:
Connect 8-port analog trunk, “combo,” or DID trunk circuit packs to either of the
first two banks on the 8-port patch panel. If an TN2185B ISDN-BRI S/T-TE
Interface (4-wire, 8 ports) circuit pack is present, connect that circuit pack to the
third bank on the 8-port patch panel.
Cross-connecting the media gateway to the patch panels
Cross-connect the port circuit packs to the G650 Media Gateway patch panels or other standard
110A cross-connect equipment (Figure 11: Sample cross-connect field patch panel
connections on page 31).
Issue 3 January 2008
29
Installing the patch panel
Figure 10: Typical RMC patch panel installation
1
2
3
3
4
5
cadlpat LJK 022502
Figure notes:
1. Circuit pack amphenol
connectors and B25A cables
2. IP server interface adapter
and green CAT5 cable
3. 24-port patch panels
4. 8-port patch panel
5. To network
30 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
widfccf2 EWS 102798
DS1
24 Port Digital
24 Port Analog
16 Port Digital
16 Port Analog
12 Port BRI
8 Port Hybrid
8 Port Digital
8 Port DID
8 Port Data Line
8 Port CO
8 Port Analog
4 Port Tie Trunk
w/ E&M Signaling
4 Port Tie Trunk
4 Port MET Line
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
Cross-connecting the media gateway to the patch panels
Figure 11: Sample cross-connect field patch panel connections
Issue 3 January 2008
31
Installing the patch panel
32 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Chapter 4: Media gateway connections to the MDF
Once the main distribution frame (MDF) is installed and wired, you must connect the media
gateways to the MDF.
Run excess cables on an upper cable ladder (if the MDF connectors are on top) or route them
through a cable slack manager that is placed next to the MDF. For more information, see
Installing Cable Slack Managers on page 25.
This section has information about
●
Equipment room cabling labels on page 33
●
Cable routing guidelines on page 36
●
Trunk cables among network interface, sneak fuse panel, and media gateway on page 38
And procedures for:
●
Installing cables between media gateway and MDF on page 38
●
Installing connector cables between auxiliary cabinet and MDF on page 39
Equipment room cabling labels
The purple port label shown in Figure 12: Equipment room cabling labels on page 34 is
installed on both ends of the 25-pair cables connecting to the trunk/auxiliary field and/or
distribution field.
Issue 3 January 2008
33
Media gateway connections to the MDF
Figure 12: Equipment room cabling labels
1A2
A
labels LJK 060396
Figure notes:
1. Purple Label (Port Cable)
2. Blue/Yellow Label (Building
and Floor)
3. Yellow Label (Auxiliary)
4. Blue/Yellow Label (Site or
Satellite)
The top blue/yellow building and floor labels are for cables connecting from the equipment room
to a site/satellite location on another floor or in another building. The yellow label is for auxiliary
circuits connecting to the trunk/auxiliary field. The bottom blue/yellow label is for 25-pair cables
connecting to site/satellite closets. See Table 2: Equipment room labels.
Table 2: Equipment room labels
Label name
Range
Port Cable
1A1-1A20, 1B1-1B20,
1C1-1C20, 1D1-1D20,
1E1-1E20
Building
Field Identified
Floor
Field Identified
Auxiliary Cable
Field Identified
Site or Satellite
A-F and/or Field Identified
34 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Equipment room cabling labels
Figure 12: Equipment room cabling labels on page 34 details the label name and range of each
label. Table 3: Cable/connector/building label ordering information provides label ordering
information.
Table 3: Cable/connector/building label ordering information
Description
Quantity
Comcode
201A Labels
34 Sheets
103969994
Figure 13: Self-stick label on 25-pair cable connector shows the proper way to install a label on
a 25-pair cable connector. Install the label near the rear of the connector so it is not obscured by
the media gateway connector retainers. It can also be installed on the skin of the cable near the
connector.
Figure 13: Self-stick label on 25-pair cable connector
Issue 3 January 2008
35
Media gateway connections to the MDF
Cable routing guidelines
Figure 14: Cable routing to top terminal blocks and Figure 15: Cable routing to bottom terminal
blocks on page 37 show typical cable routing from the media gateway to the top and bottom of
the MDF, respectively.
Figure 14: Cable routing to top terminal blocks
r75 8424 b M M R 052 996
Figure notes:
1. Main Distribution Frame
2. AC Power Cord (AC-powered
media gateways only)
3. Cable Slack Manager Number 1
4. Trunk/Auxiliary Field
5. Station Distribution Field
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
36 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Cable Slack Manager Number 2
Cable Slack Manager Number 3
Media Gateway(s)
To Building Cables
10 AWG (#25) (6 square millimeters)
Wire to Coupled Bonding Conductor
Cable routing guidelines
Figure 15: Cable routing to bottom terminal blocks
r758432b MMR 052996
Figure notes:
1. Main Distribution Frame
2. AC Power Cord (AC-powered
media gateways only)
3. Cable Slack Manager Number 1
4. Trunk/Auxiliary Field
5. Station Distribution Field
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Cable Slack Manager Number 2
Cable Slack Manager Number 3
Media Gateway(s)
Building Cables (through cable trough)
10 AWG (#25) (6 square millimeters)
Wire to Coupled Bonding Conductor
Use these guidelines when routing cables from the media gateway to the MDF. Following these
guidelines will maximize use of the cable slack managers and make future cabling additions
and changes easier.
●
Connect each port cable at the media gateway, and then route it along the front trough of
the cable slack manager to the connecting/terminal block, where the cable is terminated.
●
Leave enough slack at the media gateway end of the cable to allow for proper dressing of
the cables.
●
Route the cable from the media gateway to the wall. Place the cable beside one of the
rows of columns in the cable slack manager.
Note:
Retainers mounted on the columns keep the cable from protruding above the top
of the base of the cable slack manager.
Note:
●
Determine the length of the cable required to reach from the cable slack manager to the
assigned connecting/terminal block.
●
Use D rings on the wall to support the cable. (The cable must be supported.)
Issue 3 January 2008
37
Media gateway connections to the MDF
●
Coil the cable around the columns in the cable slack manager to store cable slack. The
first run should always go across the full length of the 5 columns in the cable slack
manager.
●
Connect the cable to the assigned connecting/terminal block.
●
Avoid placing copper cables where they may bend or strain fiber optic cables.
Trunk cables among network interface,
sneak fuse panel, and media gateway
The 1-pair of central office (CO) trunks are installed by the network provider in the green field.
Up to 24 pairs may be terminated on each row of the 110-type terminal block. Tie trunks also
appear in the green field with up to eight 3-pair trunks terminated on each row of the 110-type
terminal block.
WP-90929, List 1 and 3 concentrator cables can be used to connect the media gateway to the
110-type terminal blocks in the purple field. The 1-pair patch cords/jumper wires are then run
from the purple terminal block rows to the green terminal block rows in order to establish the
correct 3-pair modularity.
Installing cables between media gateway and MDF
To install cables between the media gateway and the MDF:
1. Install D rings on the wall between the cable slack manager and the terminal/connecting
blocks mounted on the MDF.
2. Install a self-adhesive port label on the back of each connector on the connector cable.
Position the labels so the media gateway connector retainers do not cover them.
3. At the rear of the media gateway, connect one end of the connector cable to the assigned
connector.
4. Route the cable down the rear of the media gateway, through the cable slack manager, and
to the MDF.
5. At the MDF, connect the other end of the cable to the assigned terminal/ connecting block
connector.
6. Store the cable slack in the cable slack manager.
7. Repeat Steps 2 through 6 until all cables are installed.
38 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Installing connector cables between auxiliary cabinet and MDF
Installing connector cables between auxiliary cabinet and
MDF
Auxiliary equipment that connects to the MDF can be mounted inside the auxiliary cabinet. The
equipment connects to an ED-1E1443-10 (Group 1) intraconnection panel mounted in the
cabinet. This intraconnection panel consists of a 110-type 100-pair wiring block. Auxiliary
equipment is connected to the 110-type wiring block. The wiring block is pre-wired to four
25-pair female connectors mounted on the outside rear of the cabinet.
To install connector cables between the auxiliary cabinet and the main distribution frame:
1. Install “D” rings on the wall between the cable slack manager and the terminal/connecting
blocks mounted on the MDF.
2. Install a self-sticking port label on the rear of each connector on the B25A connector cable.
See Figure 16: Self-stick label on 25-pair cable connector on page 39.
3. Labels should be positioned so the cabinet connector retainers do not obscure them.
4. At the rear of the auxiliary cabinet, connect 1 end of the connector cable to the assigned
connector.
5. Route the cable down the rear of the cabinet and through the cable slack manager to the
MDF.
6. At the MDF, connect the other end of the cable to the assigned terminal/connecting block
connector.
7. Store the excess cable in the cable slack manager.
8. Repeat Steps 2 through 6 until all cables are installed.
Figure 16: Self-stick label on 25-pair cable connector
Issue 3 January 2008
39
Media gateway connections to the MDF
40 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Chapter 5: MDF connections to stations and the
public switched telephone network
Once the main distribution frame (MDF) is completed and the media gateways are connected to
the MDF, you must connect the MDF to stations (telephones) and the public switched telephone
network (PSTN). You must also have a provision plan at this time. For more information, see
Completing a provisioning plan on page 52.
Station (telephone) wiring design
Station wiring from the MDF to information outlets are provided by various means. First, station
cables are used to connect the MDF to satellite closets. Then station cables are used to branch
out to site closet locations that are located physically close to information outlets.
Information outlets may be wired directly to the MDF, a satellite closet, or site closet.
The following hardware and cabling is used:
●
Information outlets on page 41 (modular jacks)
●
Station cables on page 42
●
Closets on page 43
●
Station circuit distribution from equipment room on page 44
●
Connected cable station adapters on page 50
Information outlets
Information outlets are 8-pin modular jacks. Most of the outlets are wired with push-on
connections. Information outlets are also available that connect to a double modular plug-ended
4-pair station cable routed from the MDF, a site/satellite location, or an adapter.
Issue 3 January 2008
41
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
Station cables
For clarity a station cable is either a 25-pair cable, multiple 25-pair cable, or 4-pair D-inside wire
(DIW) run from the equipment room, site/satellite location, or adapter to the information outlets.
The following station cables are available. See Figure 17: Example of extending 4-pair station
cables on page 43.
25-pair station cable — Use between the equipment room and site/ satellite locations or
adapters. Use an A25D cable (male to male) between the equipment room and satellite closet.
Use a B25A cable between the equipment room and site closet or adapter.
Multiple 25-pair station cable — Use between the equipment room and site/satellite locations or
adapters. This cable consists of individually sheathed 25-pair cables with a factory-installed
25-pair connector on each end. Use a male-to-female cable to connect between the equipment
room and site location or adapter. Use a male-to-male cable to connect between the equipment
room and satellite location. Staggered finger cables are recommended for all multiple 25-pair
station cables and are available in both double-ended and single-ended types.
Single modular plug-ended 4-pair station cable — Use this cable between adapters and
information outlets that require push-on connections. It can also be used when 4-pair station
cables are field-terminated on the 110-type terminal blocks in the equipment room or satellite
closet and modularly connected to information outlets. The station cables are available in the
following lengths:
Note:
●
10 feet (3.05 meters)
●
25 feet (7.62 meters)
●
50 feet (15.24 meters)
●
75 feet (22.86 meters)
●
100 feet (30.5 meters)
●
150 feet (45.72 meters)
●
200 feet (61 meters)
Note:
If more than 200 feet (61 meters) of 4-pair station cable is required, a 451A in-line
adapter (double-ended modular female connector) is attached to the cable and a
second 4-pair cable of the required length is plugged into the adapter. See
Figure 17: Example of extending 4-pair station cables on page 43.
Double modular plug-ended 4-pair station cable — Use this cable to provide nonstandard length
runs between adapters and information outlets with push-on connections. It can also be used
between adapters and modularly connected information outlets. It is available in the same
lengths as the single modular plug-ended cable.
Bulk Cable — Same as the 25-pair cable or multiple 25-pair cable; however, the bulk cable is
not equipped with connectors. Use this cable between the equipment room and satellite closets
when both are equipped with punch-down type terminal/connecting blocks.
42 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Closets
4-pair station cable — Use this cable when 4-pair station cables are to be field-terminated on
the 110-type terminal blocks in the equipment room or satellite closet and the information outlets
require push-on connections.
Figure 17: Example of extending 4-pair station cables
2
1
5
4
3
5
crdfad1 CJL 101596
Figure notes:
1. Station Cable
2. Information Outlet
3. 451A In-Line Adapter
4. 258A Adapter
5. 4-Pair Station Cable
Closets
Closets are intermediate points between the Main Distribution Field and the endpoint. They are
used to distribute wiring to multiple destinations via cross-connect equipment.
There are two different types of closet configurations. Satellite closets are usually distribution
points for multiple site closets. However, information outlets may be wired directly to a satellite
closet. Site closets are the last cross-connection point before the end user information outlet.
Satellite and site closets may be used to apply bulk station power to information outlets.
Satellite locations
Satellite locations are closets that provide an administration point (using cross-connect
equipment) for station cables and where adjunct power may be applied. The station cable
circuits from the equipment room MDF are 3-pair. At the satellite location, 4-pair circuits run to
the information outlets. The hardware used is 110-type terminal blocks.
Issue 3 January 2008
43
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
Satellite locations using 110-type hardware
Each terminal block has a 3-pair (white field) and a 4-pair (blue field) located on the same
terminal block.
The 110A-type terminal block that can be used is the 110AE1-75FT. It must be field-terminated
to both the white and blue fields.
The 300-pair 110P-type terminal blocks that can be used are:
●
110PE1-300CT/FT — 25-pair connector on the white field and field-terminated on the blue
field
●
110PE1-300FT — Field-terminated on both the white and blue fields
The 900-pair 110P-type terminal blocks that can be used are:
●
110PE1-900CT/FT — 25-pair connector on the white field and field-terminated on the blue
field
●
110PE1-900FT — Field-terminated on both the white and blue fields
Site locations
Site locations are closets that provide a point in the station wiring for the administration of
remote powering. Adapters are used at site locations to terminate the 25-pair station cables and
provide connection points (modular jacks) for power adapters and 4-pair station cables.
The 258A and BR2580A adapters plug into a 25-pair female cable connector. These adapters
divide the 25-pair cable into six 4-pair (modular jack) circuits. See Figure 23: 258A and
BR2580A Adapters on page 50.
The 356A adapter plugs into a 25-pair female cable connector. See Figure 24: 356A
Adapter on page 51. The 356A adapter divides the 25-pair cable into eight 3-pair circuits.
Although the circuits are 3-pair, the adapters modular jacks will accept the 8-wide modular plug
used on the 4-pair station cable.
! CAUTION:
CAUTION:
Adapters wired similarly to the 356A should not be used. Their jacks do not
accept 4-pair plugs.
Station circuit distribution from equipment room
This section explains the station circuit distribution from the equipment room to the information
outlets for new wiring installations. Example connection diagrams are provided to show the
options for running and connecting the station cables.
44 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Station circuit distribution from equipment room
If most of the telephones/voice terminals that require remote powering are within 250 feet (76.2
meters) of the equipment room, 4-pair station circuits are run from the equipment room to the
information outlets. If this is not the case, or if the customer requires 2-point administration,
3-pair station circuits are run from the equipment room to satellite locations. Then, the 4-pair
station circuits are run from the satellite locations to the information outlets.
This section has information about
●
4-pair station circuits on page 45
●
3-pair to 4-pair station circuit distribution on page 45
●
Connected cable station adapters on page 50
Lists of telephones and consoles currently sold are provided in Table 7: Connectable telephone
and consoles on page 70.
4-pair station circuits
Four-pair circuits, via station cables, can be run directly from an equipment room MDF to a
258A or BR2580A adapter as shown in Figure 18: 4-pair circuit distribution and connectivity on
page 46. The 4-pair station cables connect the adapter to the information outlets.
The 4-pair station cables can be run directly from the equipment room to the information outlets
if 4-pair terminal blocks are used in the distribution field. See Figure 19: 4-pair run to equipment
room or satellite location on page 47. The station cables must be field-terminated on the
110-type terminal blocks.
If 110-type terminal blocks are used with a modular plug-ended station cable, an adapter can be
connected directly to the 110-type terminal block connectors. See Figure 20: 4-pair run to
equipment room or satellite location on page 47.
3-pair to 4-pair station circuit distribution
Figure 21: 3-pair to 4-pair satellite location connectivity on page 48 shows the 3-pair circuit
distribution from an equipment room MDF to a satellite location using 110-type hardware.
Four-pair circuits are distributed from the satellite location to the information outlets.
Three-pair circuits can also be run directly from the equipment room MDF to a 356A adapter as
shown in Figure 22: 3-pair to 4-pair circuit distribution and connectivity on page 49. Four-pair
station cables connect the adapter to the information outlets. Four-pair station cables can be run
directly from a satellite location to the information outlets as previously described.
Note:
Note:
Bridged taps are not allowed on any part of the station wiring.
Issue 3 January 2008
45
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
Figure 18: 4-pair circuit distribution and connectivity
1
2
3
7
6
4
8
8
10
11
12
13
9
12
r7 6 4 7 9 7 a C J L 0 3 1 3 9 6
Figure notes:
1. Part of Main Distribution Frame
(MDF)
2. 3-Pair Connecting Blocks
3. 4-Pair Connecting Blocks
4. Purple Field
5. Blue Field
6. Patch Cord or Cross-Connect
Jumpers
7. To Media Gateway (3-Pair Modularity)
8. B25A Cable
9. Connectorized (Staggered Finger)
Multiple 25-Pair Cable
10. 258A or BR2580A Adapter
11. Information Outlet
12. 4-Pair Circuit
13. DIW Station Cable (D-Inside Wire)
46 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Station circuit distribution from equipment room
Figure 19: 4-pair run to equipment room or satellite location
2
1
5
2
4
3
r764798a CJL 030796
Figure notes:
4. DIW Station Cable (D-Inside
Wire)
5. Information Outlet
1. Station Side of MDF or Satellite
Location
2. 4-Pair Circuit
3. Blue Field
Figure 20: 4-pair run to equipment room or satellite location
1
9
3
2
8
11
7
10
5
4
6
r758532a CJL 031196
Figure notes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Part of MDF
3-Pair Connecting Blocks
4-Pair Connecting Blocks
Purple Field
Patch Cord or Cross-Connect
Jumpers
6. Blue Field
7. To Media Gateway (3-pair
modularity)
8. A25D Cable
9. 258A or BR2580A Adapter
10. Information Outlet
11. 4-Pair Circuit (DIW station cable
(D-Inside Wire))
Issue 3 January 2008
47
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
Figure 21: 3-pair to 4-pair satellite location connectivity
1
2
2
5
6
8
3
7
15
4
10
2
12
13
9
16
5
14
4
8
11
r758430b LAO 032103
Figure notes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Part of MDF
3-Pair Connecting Blocks
Purple Field
White Field
Patch Cord or Cross-Connect
Jumpers
6. To Media Gateway (3-Pair
Modularity)
7. A25D Cable (3-Pair Circuits)
8. B25A Cable
9. Connectorized (staggered finger)
Multiple 25-Pair Cable
10. 4-Pair Connecting Blocks
11. Blue Field
12. 258A or BR2580A Adapter
13. Information Outlet
14. 4-Pair Circuit (DIW Station Cable
[D-Inside Wire])
15. Part of Satellite Location
16. 4-Pair Circuits (B25A Cable)
48 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Station circuit distribution from equipment room
Figure 22: 3-pair to 4-pair circuit distribution and connectivity
1
2
9
2
8
10
6
11
7
5
12
3
4
r758533a CJL 031196
Figure notes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Part of Main Distribution Frame (MDF)
3-Pair Connecting Blocks
Purple Field
Blue Field
Patch Cord or Cross-Connect Jumpers
To Media Gateway (3-Pair Modularity)
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
B25A Cable
3-Pair Circuits
356A Adapter
Information Outlet
3-Pair Circuit in 4-Pair Wire
DIW Station Cable (D-Inside Wire)
Issue 3 January 2008
49
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
Connected cable station adapters
Station adapters are used to provide modular connectivity either directly to a telephone or to an
information outlet. See Figure 23: 258A and BR2580A Adapters and Figure 24: 356A
Adapter on page 51.
Figure 23: 258A and BR2580A Adapters
1
2
3
4
4
crdfadp CJL 101596
Figure notes:
1. BR2580A Adapter
2. 258A Adapter
3. 25-Pair Male Ribbon Connector
4. 4-Pair Modular Jacks (8 Pins)
50 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Connected cable station adapters
Figure 24: 356A Adapter
1
2
crdf356 CJL 101296
Figure notes:
1. 356A Adapter
2. 4-Pair Modular Jacks (6 pins each, connected to
25-pair ribbon connector)
Table 4: Adapter ordering information
Description
Comcode
258A Adapter
102605136
BR2580A Adapter
403384720
356A Adapter
104158829
400B Adapter
103848859
400B2 Adapter
104152558
ZD8AJ Adapter
103881421
451 Adapter - Gray
103942272
451 Adapt. - White
103786240
Issue 3 January 2008
51
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
Completing a provisioning plan
A provisioning plan should be completed before an installation. The plan determines an
appropriate available port circuit on the media gateway for each telephone, trunk, and
peripheral connection needed, and any auxiliary power for Basic Rate Interface (BRI) and
certain display sets.
Obtain copies of the Port Assignment Record forms (or equivalent) from the customer or
marketing representative. See Figure 25: Port Assignment Record Form on page 53 for an
example of the form. These forms contain the port assignments and identify the extension
numbers (terminal number) of the telephones. Enter the jack assignments at the equipment
room.
The Port Assignment Record should have the following information:
●
Station or trunk type or feature/service
●
Building location (floor/room/desk/outlet)
●
Extension number or trunk group and member number
●
Port circuit location on the media gateway for each endpoint (media gateway/slot/circuit)
●
Route from equipment room through site/satellite closets to each endpoint
●
Auxiliary power supply, if required (main distribution frame (MDF), site/satellite closet, or
information outlet)
52 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Completing a provisioning plan
Figure 25: Port Assignment Record Form
Issue 3 January 2008
53
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
Installing sneak current and off premise protection
Protection from hazardous voltages and currents is required for all off-premises (out of building)
trunks, lines, and terminal installations. Protection for incoming analog trunks is required
between the incoming RJ21X or RJ2GX network interface and the media gateway for both trunk
and off-premise circuit packs. Both over-voltage protection (lightning, power induction, and so
forth), and sneak current protection are required.
Note:
Sneak current protectors with a rating of 350 mA at 600 volts must be
Underwriter’s Laboratory, Inc. (UL) listed for United States installation and
Canadian Standards Association (CSA) certified for Canadian installation.
Note:
The following devices protect the media gateway from over-voltages:
●
Analog trunks use the 507B sneak protector or equivalent. Over-voltage protection is
normally provided by the local telephone company.
●
DS1/E1/T1 circuits require isolation from exposed facilities. This isolation may be provided
by a CSU (T1), LIU (E1), or other equipment that provides equivalent protection
●
Analog telephones use 146 Series Line Protectors combined over-voltage and sneak
current protection, or equivalent: See PEC 8310-0xx; SAP Code 10512x.
●
DCP and ISDN-BRI terminals, and E&M tie trunks, use a low voltage version of the 146
Series Line Protectors.
The Model 507B sneak current fuse panel, or equivalent, is recommended for sneak current
protection for analog trunks. The panel contains two 25-pair connectors, one fuse removal tool,
and 50, 220029 sneak fuses (and two spares). Each column of sneak fuse panels requires
approximately 8 inches (20 centimeters) of horizontal wall space.
See Figure 26: Model 507B sneak fuse panel on page 55. See Table 5: Sneak fuse panel
ordering information on page 55 for ordering information.
54 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Installing sneak current and off premise protection
Figure 26: Model 507B sneak fuse panel
Sneak
Current
Protector
507B
Figure notes:
1. 507B sneak current protector
2. 25-pair male connector (in)
3. 25-pair female connector (out)
4. 220029 fuses (inside panel). Use a
small screwdriver to pry top cover off
Table 5: Sneak fuse panel ordering information
Description
Comcode
157B Connecting Block
403613003
SCP-110 Protector
406948976
507B Sneak Current Fuse Panel
107435091
220029 Sneak Current Fuse
407216316
25-pair male connector
846300994
25-pair female connector
846300994
Connector cables (B25A male to female) connect the network interface to the sneak fuse panel.
Also, 157B connecting blocks equipped with SCP-110 protectors can be used for sneak current
protection.
Issue 3 January 2008
55
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
The 507B includes 52 sneak fuses and two cables and can be ordered using PEC code 63210.
Use the SCP-110 protectors with 110-type hardware and on the 507B sneak fuse panel. The
SCP-110 Protectors can be ordered separately and installed on the 157B connecting block. Fifty
protectors are required per block.
Install the 507B near the network interface or patch panels with locally obtained #12 x 3/4-inch
screws (or equivalent).
Table 6: Sneak fuse connector pinout on page 56 is a pinout of the cable wiring and associated
fuse numbers.
Table 6: Sneak fuse connector pinout
Connector
pin numbers
Pair/fuse
number
26/1
1
27/2
2
28/3
3
29/4
4
30/5
5
31/6
6
32/7
7
33/8
8
34/9
9
35/10
10
36/11
11
37/12
12
38/13
13
39/14
14
40/15
15
41/16
16
42/17
17
43/18
18
44/19
19
1 of 2
56 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Installing sneak current and off premise protection
Table 6: Sneak fuse connector pinout (continued)
Connector
pin numbers
Pair/fuse
number
45/20
20
46/21
21
47/22
22
48/23
23
49/34
24
50/25
25
2 of 2
Installing sneak fuse panels
For general information, see Installing sneak current and off premise protection on page 54.
Figure 26: Model 507B sneak fuse panel on page 55, or equivalent, is recommended for sneak
current protection. The panel contains two 25-pair connectors, fuse removal tool, and fifty
220029 sneak fuses (and two spares). See Table 6: Sneak fuse connector pinout on page 56
for pinout data.
To install sneak fuse panels:
1. Locate the 507B near the network interface or the main distribution frame (MDF).
2. Hold the panel against the mounting surface and mark the mounting screw locations. Drill
pilot holes at the marked locations and partially install a locally obtained #12 x 3/4-inch
screw into the two bottom mounting slots.
3. Slide the sneak fuse panel onto the mounting screws and tighten the screws securely.
4. Install a locally obtained #12 x 3/4-inch screw into the top two mounting slots and tighten
securely.
5. Repeat the procedure for each sneak fuse panel.
6. Secure the B25A cable to the panel with the captive screw on the connector and a supplied
cable tie.
Issue 3 January 2008
57
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
Installing the coupled bonding conductor
The coupled bonding conductor (CBC) provides a path to ground for transient energy (for
instance, lightning) by virtue of mutual inductance between itself and exposed telcom cables.
The CBC connects on one end to an approved single-point ground, runs adjacent to the telcom
cable, and connects on the other end to the CBC terminal bar at the main distribution frame
(MDF).
The CBC can be:
●
a 10 AWG (#25) (6 mm2) wire tie wrapped to the exposed telecom cables
●
a metal cable shield around the exposed cables, or
●
six spare pairs form the exposed cable
A minimum of 12" spacing should be maintained between the CBC and other power, ground, or
non-exposed communications cables.
Installing coupled bonding conductor wires
To install coupled bonding conductor wires:
1. At the DC power cabinet, connect a 10 AWG (#25) (6 mm2) ground wire to the Ground
Discharge Bar. See Figure 27: Typical power and ground for a DC power cabinet on
page 59.
2. Route the 10 AWG (#25) (6 mm2) ground wire to the CBC ground terminal bar at the MDF.
3. Tie wrap the ground wire to the inside wiring cable.
58 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Installing the coupled bonding conductor
Figure 27: Typical power and ground for a DC power cabinet
5
1
3
2
10 AWG
4
10 AWG
RED
-48 V RTN
MCC
BLACK
50A
-48 V
6
Battery
+
circuit
breaker
50A
-
-48
VDC
BLACK
-48 V
LVD
50A
DC power
from rectifiers
7
-48 V RTN
MCC
12
8
-
Rectifiers
10
AC
phase
AC
phase
10 AWG
RED
+
10 AWG
RED
50A
10 AWG
BLACK
10 AWG
RTN
RED
10 AWG
BLACK
Green/Yellow
Green/Yellow
Green/Yellow
9
6 AWG
-48 V RTN
MCC
-48 V
11
10 AWG
10 AWG
10 AWG
cydfdc3i KLC 050304
Figure notes:
1. Approved Ground
2. 1 AWG Ground Wire
3. CBC Ground Terminal Bar at the
MDF (if used)
4. System Single-point Ground
Discharge Bar
5. DC Power Cabinet J58890R or
new DC system
Note:
Note:
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Ground Wire for Battery (+)
Battery Frame Ground
DC Battery Cabinet
Main AC Supply (AC Mains)
AC to DC power cabinet
To Next DC-powered Media Gateway
DC load circuit breakers
Note:
For a high-rise building, connect the CBC to an approved building ground on
each floor.
Note:
Below is general information for installing the CBC in all installations having
exposed facilities.
Issue 3 January 2008
59
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
To provide the coupled bonding protection:
1. Cut a 10 AWG (#25) (2.5 mm2) wire long enough to reach from the equipment room
single-point ground block (or DC power Ground Discharge Bar) to the MDF CBC block. See
Figure 28: Coupled Bonding Conductor on page 61.
2. Connect one end of the 10 AWG (#25) (2.5 mm2) wire to the single-point ground block (or
Ground Discharge Bar).
3. Route the wire next to the 25-pair cables connecting to the trunk/auxiliary (purple) field.
4. Tie wrap the 10 AWG (#25) (2.5 mm2) wire to the 25-pair cables.
5. Connect the 10 AWG (#25) (2.5 mm2) wire to the MDF CBC ground block.
6. Repeat the above steps for each CBC ground wire installed.
60 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Installing the coupled bonding conductor
Figure 28: Coupled Bonding Conductor
cbc_gnd_1 PDH 062696
Figure notes:
1. 25-Pair Tip & Ring Cables to Media
Gateways
2. Coupled Bonding Conductor (CBC)
Terminal Block
3. Tie Wraps
4. Cable Shield or Six Spare Pairs
5. Ground on Carbon Block Protector or
Equivalent
6. Trunk Cable to Network Interface
7. 10 AWG (#25) (2.5 mm2) Wire
8. To Network Media Gateways
9. Battery Plant Ground Discharge Bar
for Single-Point Ground
10. Cross-Connect Ground Block
11. Main Distribution Frame (MDF)
12. To Other Cross-Connect Ground
Blocks
13. Approved Ground
14. Coupled Bonding Conductor (CBC)
Issue 3 January 2008
61
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
Installing and administering the patch cord/jumper
Before starting the patch cord installation, obtain a copy of the Port Assignment Record forms
from the customer or marketing representative. See Figure 25: Port Assignment Record
Form on page 53.
The white label identifying the terminal block row associated with circuits 17 to 24 connects to
an identically labeled terminal block row at the satellite closet. See Figure 29: Example 3-pair
labeling to information outlet on page 63. This is always the case for either 1-point or 2-point
administration.
The satellite symbol must be installed at all connection points between the blue field and the
information outlet. It must also be installed at the information outlet itself.
Figure 30: Example 4-pair labeling to information outlet on page 64 shows an example labeling
scheme for 4-pair circuits from the equipment room to the information outlets. The labeling
scheme for 3-pair circuits from the MDF to a satellite location.
62 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Installing and administering the patch cord/jumper
Figure 29: Example 3-pair labeling to information outlet
crdf5pr CJL 103096
Figure notes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Equipment Room
Satellite Location
Work Location
White Row on 110 Terminal Block
Purple Row on 110 Terminal Block
Blue Row on 110 Terminal Block
Central Location for Terminals 1
through 6
8. D-Inside Wire Cut Down to
Connecting Block
9. 258A Adapter
10. Information Outlet
11. Telephone
12. To Port Connector on Media
Gateway (Media Gateway 1,
Position B, Slot 03)
Issue 3 January 2008
63
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
Figure 30: Example 4-pair labeling to information outlet
crdf4pr CJL 102996
Figure notes:
1. Equipment Room
2. To Central Location for Terminals 1
through 6
3. Blue Row on 110 Terminal Block
4. Purple Row on 110 Terminal Block
5. To Port Connector on Media Gateway
(Media Gateway 1, Position B, Slot 03)
6. 258A Adapter
7. D-Inside Wire Cut Down to
Connecting Block
8. Information Outlet
9. Telephone
Labeling expansion control carrier cable
(MCC1 Media Gateway only)
To label the expansion control carrier cable:
1. Place the appropriate AUX connector label on the assigned 110-type terminal block row.
2. On the expansion control carrier cable, place a yellow auxiliary label on the connectors at
each end of the cable.
3. Write “AUX” on each label.
64 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Installing and administering the patch cord/jumper
Connecting expansion control carrier outputs
cable (MCC1 Media Gateway only)
To connect the expansion control carrier outputs cable:
1. Plug the connector cable in the AUX connector on the rear of the expansion control carrier.
2. Route the connector cable through the cable slack manager to the assigned 110-type
terminal block in the yellow field of the trunk/auxiliary field.
Connecting trunk pairs using concentrator cables
Figure 31: Connect trunk pairs using concentrator cables on page 66 shows trunk pairs
connected to the media gateway with concentrator cables. To install the cables:
1. Connect B25A cables between the network interface and sneak fuse panels.
2. Connect A25D cables from the sneak fuse panels to the 110-type terminal block connectors
in the green field.
3. Connect patch cords/jumper wires from the terminal block in the green field to the
associated terminal block in the purple field.
4. Connect the single-fingered end of the concentrator cables to the 110-type terminal block
connectors in the purple field in Step 3.
5. Connect the other end (2/3-fingered end) of the concentrator cables to the appropriate
carrier slots. Equipped carrier slots are identified on the CSD. Mark the nomenclature strips
above the carriers to identify the slots.
6. Label connectors on each end of the cables that connect to the media gateway.
7. Route the cables down the sides of the media gateway and store the excess cable slack in
the cable slack manager as previously described.
Issue 3 January 2008
65
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
Figure 31: Connect trunk pairs using concentrator cables
NEW796 THC 031296
Figure notes:
1. Trunk/Auxiliary Field
2. To Expansion Control Carrier AUX
Connector (MCC1 Media Gateway
only)
3. Concentrator Cable (WP90929, List 1)
4. Concentrator Cable (WP90929, List 3)
5. A25D (Male-to-Male) Cable
66 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Alternate Block/Rows
RJ21X/RJ2GX Network Interface
Sneak Fuse Panel
B25A Cable
Central Office Trunks
Media Gateway
Installing and administering the patch cord/jumper
Connecting trunk pairs to media gateway
using jumper wires to establish 3-pair modularity
Figure 32: 3-pair modularity for trunk pairs for 1-pair trunks on page 67 and Figure 33: 3-pair
modularity for trunk pairs for 3-pair Tie trunks on page 68 show trunk pairs connected to the
media gateway with jumper wires to establish 3-pair modularity.
To connect the trunk pairs to the purple field:
1. Connect B25A cables between the network interface and the sneak fuse panels. See
Figure 32: 3-pair modularity for trunk pairs for 1-pair trunks on page 67.
2. Connect A25D/B25A cables from the sneak fuse panels to the 110-type terminal block-type
connecting block connectors in the green field.
3. Connect 1-pair patch cords/jumper wires from each 110-type terminal block row in the green
field to the 110-type terminal block rows in the purple field for 1-pair central office (CO)
trunks or in Figure 33: 3-pair modularity for trunk pairs for 3-pair Tie trunks on page 68 for
3-pair tie trunks.
Figure 32: 3-pair modularity for trunk pairs for 1-pair trunks
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22
1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22
1 4 7 10 13 16 19 22
r758425b MMR 031496
Figure notes:
1. Green Field
2. 1-Pair Jumpers
3. Pairs
4. Purple Field
Issue 3 January 2008
67
MDF connections to stations and the public switched telephone network
Figure 33: 3-pair modularity for trunk pairs for 3-pair Tie trunks
3
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
r758537b MMR 031496
Figure notes:
1. Green Field
2. 1-Pair Jumpers
3. Pairs
4. Purple Field
68 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Chapter 6: Installing and wiring telephones and
trunks
The wiring procedures are the same for most Avaya telephones and other equipment.
This task list provides wiring examples of similar installation procedures. These are examples
only; actual wiring procedures may vary at each site.
After installing the equipment, the data for the telephone features must be administered. These
procedures are provided in the Administrator Guide for the Avaya Communication Manager
(03-300509) or with the specific telephone or console.
Note:
See Adding New Hardware for Avaya Servers and Gateways (03-300684) to
install the necessary peripheral equipment.
Note:
! CAUTION:
Having a phone that is on an IP trunk too close to a fax machine can cause
problems. If the phone is too close, the handset can pick up the tones from the
fax machine and change itself into the fax mode.
CAUTION:
To prevent this, turn down the volume on the fax machine, or move the phone set
further away from the fax machine, or on the IP Codec Set screen (change
ip-codec-set), set the Fax field to off if not sending or receiving faxes on the
IP trunk.
Wiring telephones and trunks
This section includes the following wiring examples and wiring procedures:
●
Connecting telephones on page 70
●
Analog tie trunk example on page 76
●
Digital tie trunk example on page 77
●
DS1 tie trunk example on page 78
●
Auxiliary connector outputs (MCC1 and SCC1 Media Gateways only) on page 81
●
Three-pair and four-pair modularity on page 84
●
Adjunct power connection locations on page 85
●
Attendant console example on page 86
Issue 3 January 2008
69
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
●
Connecting external alarm indicators and auxiliary power on page 88
●
Installing off-premises station wiring on page 90
●
Off-premises or out-of-building stations on page 91
●
Off-premises connections on page 91
●
Emergency transfer units and associated telephones on page 96
●
808A Emergency Transfer Panel and telephone installation examples on page 97
●
Installing external ringing on page 106
●
Installing the queue warning indicator on page 107
See the Job Aid titled Connector and Cable Diagrams (Pinout Charts) (555-245-773) for
information on pinouts.
Connecting telephones
This section includes the various analog, digital, and IP telephones can be connected to the
media gateway including:
●
Connectable telephones and consoles on page 70
●
Connecting a typical telephone on page 73
●
Connecting adjunct power on page 74
●
Connecting an analog station or 2-wire digital station on page 75
Connectable telephones and consoles
Table 7: Connectable telephone and consoles on page 70 lists the telephones and consoles
that can be connected to an Avaya media gateway.
Table 7: Connectable telephone and consoles
Telephone and console models
Type
16xx (Avaya one-X Deskphone Value Edition
Internet Protocol
(IP)
2500/2554
Analog
2402
Digital
1 of 3
70 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Connecting telephones
Table 7: Connectable telephone and consoles (continued)
Telephone and console models
Type
2410
Digital
2420
IP/Digital
2520B Explosive Atmosphere
Analog
3127 Avaya Soundstation/SoundPoint
Speakerphones:
3127-ATR, -STD, -EXP, -APE, -APX, -MIC, -PMI
Analog
3127 Avaya Soundstation/SoundPoint
Speakerphones:
3127-DCP, -DCS, -DCE, -DPE, -DPX, -DDP, -DDX,
-MIC, -PMI
Digital
3410
Wireless
3606, 3616, 3626
Wireless VoIP
3701, 3711
Internet Protocol
(IP) DECT
46xx series:
4601, 4602, 4602SW, 4606, 4610SW, 4612, 4620,
4620SW, 4621SW, 4622SW, 4624, 4625SW, 4630,
4630SW, 4690
Internet Protocol
(IP)
62xx series:
6211, 6219
Analog
64xx series:
6402/D, 6408D+, 6416D/D+M, 6424D+/D+M
Digital
9040 Avaya TransTalk
Wireless
96xx series (Avaya one-X Deskphone Edition IP
telephones)
Internet Protocol
(IP)
Avaya Agent Deskphone 16CC
Enhanced Attendant Consoles:
302D
Digital
603F Avaya Callmaster IV
Digital
607A Avaya Callmaster V ACD Console
Digital
2 of 3
Issue 3 January 2008
71
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Table 7: Connectable telephone and consoles (continued)
Telephone and console models
Type
606A Avaya CallMaster VI ACD Console
Digital
Softphones:
Netmeeting H.323
IP Softphone
CentreVu IP Agent
Softconsole
Internet Protocol
(IP)
3 of 3
72 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Connecting telephones
Connecting a typical telephone
The 302D Enhanced Attendant Console is used to describe a telephone connection typically
used with the 84xx (4-wire) telephones.
The 302D does not require auxiliary power unless it has a 26C1 DXS console or Vacuum
Fluorescent Display. The 302D attendant console always requires auxiliary (adjunct) power (-48
VDC). Power is connected to the console through Pins 7 and 8 of the information outlet. Only
three consoles can be powered by the media gateway. When possible, the primary console
should be powered from the media gateway so it has the same power failure backup as the
media gateway.
The maximum cabling distance for the console powered from the media gateway is 350 feet
(100 meters).
The general steps to connect a telephone are:
1. Choose a device to connect such as a 302D Attendant Console.
2. Choose the port circuit pack and its slot number, such as cabinet 1, slot 02.
3. Choose a port circuit on the port circuit pack, such as Port 05.
4. Install cross-connect jumpers to wire the terminal to the port circuit pack. See
Figure 34: 302D to 4-wire DCP wiring on page 74. This pinout is for the TN754C DCP
Digital Line 4-wire circuit pack.
! CAUTION:
CAUTION:
Do not use the 329A power unit for the attendant console. Use an 1151B1,
1151B2, 1145A, or MSP-1 power unit.
5. For terminals needing adjunct power, wire -48 VDC and ground to appropriate pins on the
terminal. See Figure 34: 302D to 4-wire DCP wiring.
Issue 3 January 2008
73
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Figure 34: 302D to 4-wire DCP wiring
TXT 1
39 TXT5
TXR 2
14 TXR5
PXT 3
40 PXT5
PXR 6
15 PXR5
7
8
302cwire RBP 040596
Figure notes:
1. 302D Attendant Console
2. 4-wire Digital Line Circuit Pack
(Position 1C02)
3. -48 VDC From Adjunct Power
4. Ground From Adjunct Power
Connecting adjunct power
The 400B2 adapter is convenient for connecting local -48 VDC power to a modular plug. See
Figure 35: 400B2 Adapter connecting to a modular plug on page 75.
Each port network can provide power for up to three attendant consoles. This source of power
is preferred for the attendant consoles because it has the same battery backup as the media
gateway. See Auxiliary connector outputs (MCC1 and SCC1 Media Gateways only) on page 81.
Note:
Note:
Adjunct power can be provided locally at the telephone or console by either the
1151B1 or 1151B2 power supply. Adjunct power can be provided from the
equipment room or equipment closet with the 1145B power unit. See Installing
and wiring telephone power supplies on page 109 for power supply information
and installation procedures.
74 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Connecting telephones
Figure 35: 400B2 Adapter connecting to a modular plug
r749428 KLC 060396
Figure notes:
1. Flush-Mounted Information Outlet
2. Surface-Mounted Information
Outlet
3. To Individual Power Unit
4. 400B2 Adapter
5. To Telephone
6. Destination Service Access Point
(DSAP) Power Cord
Connecting an analog station or 2-wire digital station
This example is typical of the 2-wire digital stations (2420, 64xx, 302D), 2-wire analog stations
(2500), analog central office (CO) trunks, direct inward dial (DID) trunks, and external alarms.
See Figure 36: 2500-type analog telephone wiring on page 76.
To connect an analog station or 2-wire digital station:
1. Choose a peripheral to connect (such as a 2-wire digital station).
2. Choose the media module to use and its media gateway and slot number. For example:
MM711 Analog Media Module, Media Gateway 002, Slot V2.
3. Choose a port circuit on the MM711 Media Module, for example port 03.
4. Install cross-connect jumpers to connect the pins from the 2-wire digital station to the
appropriate pins on the MM711 Media Module. Table 8: Station pinout chart on page 76
shows a printout chart for two-wire stations.
5. Administer using Administrator Guide for Avaya Communication Manager (03-300509).
Issue 3 January 2008
75
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Figure 36: 2500-type analog telephone wiring
28 T.3
T 2
R 3
03 R.3
2500wire RBP 071996
Figure notes:
1. 2500-Type Analog Station
2. MM711 Analog Media Module,
Position 1V301
Table 8: Station pinout chart
Jack
Name
1
2
BRI-T
ADJUNCT
+Vadj
DSS
(QUEST)
DTX
T0
3
4
5
6
7
8
+TX
+RX
-RX
-TX
-V
GND
-V
GNDVoice
RRVoice
+V
S0
TTVoice
OKdig
-V
+V
-V
GND
DRX
DSS
(ISDN)
BRI-A
TX
RX
BRI-U
TX
RX
DCP
TIP
RING
ANALOG
TIP
RING
+RX
-RX
HANDSET
GND
-TX
-V
+TX
Analog tie trunk example
This example shows how to connect analog tie trunk wiring from one IP Connect or
Multi-Connect configuration to another one or any other Avaya configuration.
1. Set the option switches on the port circuit pack (such as TN760E Tie Trunk circuit pack).
2. See the job aid titled Option Switch Settings (555-245-774) for detailed information.
3. Install cross-connect jumpers to connect the pins from the tie trunk circuit pack to the
appropriate leads on the external tie trunk.
76 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Connecting telephones
4. Figure 37: Analog Tie Trunk wiring on page 77 shows a media gateway tie trunk connected
to another media gateway tie trunk. Names of the tie trunk leads must be determined from
the manufacturer or supplier of the external trunk circuit.
5. Administer on the Trunk Group screen on Avaya Site Administration (ASA). See the
Administrator Guide for Avaya Communication Manager (03-300509) for more details.
Figure 37: Analog Tie Trunk wiring
T.1 26
29 T.2
R.1 1
4 R.2
T1.1 27
30 T1.2
R1.1 2
5 R1.2
E.1 28
M.1 3
31 E.2
6 M.2
tie_wire RBP 071796
Figure notes:
1. External Trunk or Adapter
2. Tie Trunk Circuit Pack
Digital tie trunk example
This example shows how to connect digital tie trunk wiring from one media gateway to another
one or any other Avaya configuration. Figure 38: Digital Tie Trunk wiring on page 78 shows the
connections.
1. Install cross-connect jumpers to connect the pins from the digital trunk circuit pack to
appropriate pins on the manufacturer’s or supplier’s external digital trunk.
2. Set option switches on the port circuit pack (digital trunk).
3. See the job aid titled Option Switch Settings (555-245-774) for detailed information.
4. Administer on the DS1 and trunk group screens through ASA. See the Administrator Guide
for Avaya Communication Manager (03-300509) for more details.
Issue 3 January 2008
77
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Figure 38: Digital Tie Trunk wiring
Figure notes:
1. External Trunk
2. Digital Trunk Circuit Pack
3. LO
4. LO (Balanced Output Pair)
5. LI
6. LI (Balanced Input Pair)
DS1 tie trunk example
Digital Signal Level 1 (DS1) tie trunks provide a 1.544 Mbps (T1) or 2.048 Mbps (E1) digital data
service between two collocated configurations or between the configuration and a data network.
See these examples:
●
Collocated DS1 interface trunks on page 78
●
DS1 interface trunks using T1 channel service unit on page 79
For cable descriptions, see
●
DS1 cables on page 80
●
Pinout of C6F cable on page 80
Collocated DS1 interface trunks
Two TN464HP DS1 Interface circuit packs can be in collocated configurations. A DS1 Interface
circuit pack in one configuration can be connected to a DS1 in another configuration. A C6D
cable can be used if the distance is less than 50 feet (15.2 meters). If the distance is between
50 feet (15 meters) and 1,310 feet (399 meters), use a C6E cable.
Note:
Note:
The maximum distance between cabinets is 1,310 feet (399 meters).
78 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Connecting telephones
DS1 interface trunks using T1 channel service unit
The T1 channel service unit (CSU) interfaces the DS1 interface trunks with the 1.544 megabits
per second digital facility.
Connect the DS1 interface trunk to a T1 CSU. See Figure 39: Typical connections to channel
service unit on page 79.
Note:
Note:
A 3150 CSU is shown, a 120A Integrated CSU (ICSU) may be used.
Contact your Avaya representative for maximum cabling distances for the 3127 series CSU or
the 120A ICSU.
Figure 39: Typical connections to channel service unit
POWER
AUX PORT COM PORT
MODEM
NETWORK
DTE
0012_1 RBP 062696
Figure notes:
1. Connector to DS1 Interface Circuit Pack
2. C6C Cable (For Distances Over 50 ft (15 m),
Use C6E Cable(s))
3. T1 Channel Service Unit (CSU) 3150 Shown
4. T (Tip)
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
R (Ring)
T1 (Tip 1)
R1 (Ring 1)
1.544 Mbps Digital Service Interface
To T1 Carrier
Issue 3 January 2008
79
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Table 9: DS1 cables
Connector cable
Description and usage
C6C connector cable
50-feet (15 meters) shielded cable equipped with a 50-pin
male connector on one end and a 15-pin male connector
on the other end.
Use this cable to connect a DS1 tie trunk circuit pack to a
CSU.
C6D connector cable
50-feet (15 meters) shielded cable equipped with a 50-pin
male connector on each end.
Use this cable to connect a DS1 tie trunks in collocated
cabinets.
C6E connector cable
100-feet (31 meters) shielded cable equipped with a
50-pin male connector on one end and a 50-pin female
connector on the other end.
Use this cable as an “extension” cable between the DS1
tie trunk circuit pack and other connector cables.
C6F connector cable
50-feet (15 meters) shielded cable equipped with a 50-pin
male connector on one end and a 3 inch (8 centimeter)
stub on the other end.
Use this cable to connect the DS1 tie trunk circuit pack to
channel multiplexers requiring hardwired connections.
Table 10: Pinout of C6F cable
Wire color
Lead
designation
Pin
number
White/Green
LI* (High Side)
47
Green
LI
22
White/Brown
LO
48
Brown
LO* (High Side)
23
White/Slate
LBACK2
49
Slate
LBACK1
24
80 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Auxiliary connector outputs (MCC1 and SCC1 Media Gateways only)
Auxiliary connector outputs (MCC1 and SCC1
Media Gateways only)
Connect a 25-pair cable from the AUX connector on the back of the expansion control carrier to
a connecting block on the trunk/auxiliary field.
Table 11: Auxiliary lead appearances at AUX connector on page 81 shows the:
●
control carrier outputs cable pinouts
●
pinouts for an external alarm
●
port circuit pack and telephone pin designations
The control carrier AUX connector outputs include:
●
Two inputs for external alarm signals
●
Seven -48 VDC power sources for emergency transfer units
●
Three -48 VDC power sources for remotely powering three attendant consoles or
telephone adjuncts
●
A relay contact that actuates a customer-supplied light, bell, or similar device. The relay
can activate when a major, minor, or warning condition occurs. The device connected to
the alarm leads must not exceed a rating of 30Vac RMS or 60Vdc max, at 0.75A max. The
customer provided alarm circuit must also meet the requirements for an SELV (Safety
extra-low voltage) circuit; the alarm circuit power source must be a power supply or
transformer meeting the UL 60950 SELV, Level 3, or Level 5 requirements.
Table 11: Auxiliary lead appearances at AUX connector
Color*
Pinouts
Output
W-BL
BL-W
26
1
Major†
W-O
O-W
27
2
Minor†
W-G
G-W
28
3
GRD
W-BR
BR-W
29
4
GRD
W-S
S-W
30
5
GRD
R-BL
BL-R
31
6
GRD
Power
1 of 3
Issue 3 January 2008
81
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Table 11: Auxiliary lead appearances at AUX connector (continued)
Color*
Pinouts
Output
R-O
O-R
32
7
GRD
R-G
G-R
33
8
Not Connected
R-BR
BR-R
34
9
Not Connected
R-S
S-R
35
10
Not Connected
BK-BL
BL-BK
36
11
-48
GND
BK-O
O-BK
37
12
-48
GND
BK-G
G-BK
38
13
-48
GND
BK-BR
BR-BK
39
14
-48
GND
BK-S
S-BK
40
15
-48
GND
Y-BL
BL-Y
41
16
-48
GND
Y-O
O-Y
42
17
-48
GND
Y-G
G-Y
43
18
Not Connected
Y-BR
BR-Y
44
19
GND
-48
Y-S
S-Y
45
20
GND
-48
V-BL
BL-V
46
21
GND
-48
V-O
O-V
47
22
Not Connected
V-G
G-V
48
23
Ext Alarm A3
Ext Alarm Return
Power
Emergency
Transfer Relay
Power
AUX Power
2 of 3
82 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Auxiliary connector outputs (MCC1 and SCC1 Media Gateways only)
Table 11: Auxiliary lead appearances at AUX connector (continued)
Color*
Pinouts
Output
V-BR
BR-V
49
24
Not Connected
V-S
S-V
50
25
INADS Tip
INADS Ring
Power
3 of 3
*. Color designation is the main wire color and the color of the stripe on the
wire. The following wire colors apply:
W White
BL Blue
O Orange
G Green
BR Brown
S Slate (Grey)
R Red
BK Black
Y Yellow
V Violet
†. External alarm with signal incoming to server.
3External alarm with signal outgoing from server.
Table 12: Station pinout chart provides the station printout chart.
Table 12: Station pinout chart
Jack
Name
1
2
BRI-T
ADJUNCT
+Vadj
DSS
(QUEST)
DTX
T0
3
4
5
6
7
8
+TX
+RX
-RX
-TX
-V
GND
-V
GNDVoice
RRVoice
+V
S0
TTVoice
OKdig
-V
+V
-V
GND
DRX
DSS
(ISDN)
BRI-A
TX
RX
BRI-U
TX
RX
DCP
TIP
RING
ANALOG
TIP
RING
+RX
-RX
HANDSET
GND
-TX
-V
+TX
Issue 3 January 2008
83
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Three-pair and four-pair modularity
Figure 40: 3-pair and 4-pair modularity on page 84 is from the port circuit pack to the voice or
data terminal.
Most terminals connect to an information outlet (modular jack) installed at the work location.
Make the connections from the port circuit pack to the modular jacks, as shown in
Figure 40: 3-pair and 4-pair modularity on page 84. Then plug the terminal into the modular
jack.
Adjunct power connection locations on page 85 shows three methods of connecting adjunct
power.
Figure 40: 3-pair and 4-pair modularity
Figure notes:
1. Port Circuit Pack
2. Media Gateway Connector Pins
(3-Pair Modularity)
3. Main Distribution Frame (MDF) Pins
(3-Pair Modularity)
84 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
4. Input to Information Outlet (4-Pair Modularity)
5. Adjunct Power
6. Output From Information Outlet
(4-Pair Modularity)
7. Voice or Data Terminal Pins
Adjunct power connection locations
Adjunct power connection locations
Figure 41: Example adjunct power connections on page 85 shows typical connection locations
for adjunct power. Adjunct power for station equipment may be supplied from the equipment
room, satellite location, or the work location.
For this figure, the following example is used:
1. If 25 telephones are connected to the media gateway and all 25 telephones need adjunct
power, install a bulk power supply in the equipment room.
2. If only ten of the telephones need adjunct power, install a bulk power supply at the satellite
location.
3. If only one telephone needs adjunct power, install the individual power supply at the work
location.
Figure 41: Example adjunct power connections
12
13
11
5
1
7
9
8
3
10
2
4
6
14
14
cydfadjn KLC 020599
Figure notes:
1. Typical Display Telephone
2. Individual Power Supply (Such as
1151B1 or 1151B2)
3. Information Outlet (Modular Jack)
4. 4-Pair D-Inside Wire (DIW) Cable
5. Satellite Site or Adapter Location
6. 25-Pair D-Inside Wire (DIW) Cable
7. Station Side of Main Distribution
Frame (MDF)
8. 100P6A Patch Cord or Jumpers
9. Media Gateway Side of Main
Distribution Frame (MDF)
10. 25-Pair Cable to Media Gateway
(Analog Line Circuit Pack)
11. Equipment Room
12. Satellite Location
13. Work Location
14. Bulk Power Supply (such as 1145B)
Issue 3 January 2008
85
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Attendant console example
Perform these tasks to install an attendant console
●
Installing the attendant console on page 87
●
Installing the 26B1 Selector Console on page 88
Attendant console cabling distances, local
and phantom power
A console’s maximum distance from the media gateway is limited. The maximum distance for a
302D console is as shown in Table 13: Attendant console cabling distances.
Table 13: Attendant console cabling distances
Enhanced Attendant
Console (302D)
24 AWG wire
(0.5106 mm2)
26 AWG wire
(0.4049 mm2)
Feet
Feet
Meters
Meters
With Selector Console
Phantom powered
800
244
500
152
5,000
1,524
3,400
1,037
Phantom powered
1,400
427
900
274
Locally powered
5,000
1,524
3,400
1,037
Locally powered
Without Selector Console
Auxiliary power
! CAUTION:
CAUTION:
Do not use the 329A power unit for the attendant console.
The nonessential functions of an attendant console and its optional 26A1 or 24A1 selector
console derive their power from an auxiliary power source. Of the maximum of 27 attendant
consoles, 3 of the consoles can derive auxiliary power from the media gateway and through the
auxiliary cable located in the trunk/auxiliary field. Provide auxiliary power for a primary attendant
console through this cable so the console remains fully operational during short power outages.
86 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Attendant console example
An attendant console can also derive auxiliary power from:
●
Individual 1151B1 or 1151B2 power supply
●
258A-type adapters
●
Bulk power supplies such as the 1145B2
A console’s maximum distance from its auxiliary power source is:
●
800 feet (244 meters) for a 302A1
●
350 feet (107 meters) for a 301B1 and 302D
Hard-wire bridging
Analog type hard-wire bridging is not allowed for any DCP endpoints. Hard-wire bridging
provides no way of combining the digital output of two bridged DCP sets. Also, a bridged
endpoint causes degradation of the DCP signal.
! CAUTION:
CAUTION:
Bridging or paralleling these endpoints can cause electrical damage to the
consoles or cause the circuit pack to remove power from the consoles.
Dual wiring of 2-wire and 4-wire endpoints
Do not simultaneously wire a 2-wire and 4-wire endpoint to the same equipment location in an
MDF. The Avaya configurations use separate circuit packs to interface 2- and 4-wire endpoints.
Installing the attendant console
To install the attendant console:
1. Install the attendant console and connect the modular cord to the information outlet.
2. Install labels per the attendant console form and the Display Module form assignments.
3. Install a digital line circuit pack in the assigned slot (if an additional circuit pack is required).
4. Administer the forms listed in “Attendant Console” in Administrator Guide for Avaya
Communication Manager (03-300509).
Issue 3 January 2008
87
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Installing the 26B1 Selector Console
To install the 26B1 Selector Console:
1. Connect the supplied 3-foot (1 meter) D8AC cable to the modular jack on the bottom of the
26B1 Selector Console.
2. Route the cable to the attendant console and connect to the DXS/BLF jack.
3. Attach labels according to the Attendant Console form.
4. Administer the console using Administrator Guide for Avaya Communication Manager
(03-300509).
Connecting external alarm indicators and auxiliary power
Alarms can be generated on adjunct equipment, sent to the server, and recorded and reported
as “external alarms.” A typical major alarm input is from an uninterruptible power supply (UPS).
The media gateway provides a relay contact that can operate a customer-provided alarm, such
as a light or bell. The circuitry and power source are customer-provided. The device connected
to the alarm leads must not exceed a rating of 30Vac RMS or 60Vdc max, at 0.75A max. The
customer provided alarm circuit must also meet the requirements for an SELV (Safety extra-low
voltage) circuit; the alarm circuit power source must be a power supply or transformer meeting
the UL 60950 SELV, Level 3, or Level 5 requirements. See Figure 42: IPSI-2 cabling and
Figure 43: Sample Issue 1 IPSI-2 alarm cable connectivity on page 89.
Figure 42: IPSI-2 cabling
IPSI-2
adapter
700 263 502
IPSI-2
TN2312BP
Carrier
I/O
cable
Carrier
DB9 alarm cable
700 276 389
RJ45 CAT5 cable
IP connection
Amphenol/RJ21
25 pair connector
dli
88 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
1 KLC 111104
Connecting external alarm indicators and auxiliary power
Figure 43: Sample Issue 1 IPSI-2 alarm cable connectivity
Cross Connect
-48V
DB9 Alarm Cable
Contact
Closure on
IPSI-2
48VDC
750mA
Pin #
1
2
GRD
XFER48 BL-W
(-48VDC 120mA max)
GRD W-BL
XTALMA G-W
4
5
XTALMA
XTALMB W-G
XTALMB
6
Major (~AP1) W-O
7
GRD W-BR
3
Minor (~AP2) O-W
8
808A
Emergency
Transfer
Panel
GRD W-O
Alarm Bell,
Light, or
Indicator
UPS Alarms
Major
GRD
Minor
GRD
Isolated
Contacts
60VDC, 5mA
cydlips2 KLC 111104
To connect the external alarm indicators and the auxiliary power:
1. Connect 1 major (Brown-White and White-Brown) and 1 minor (Orange-White and
White-Orange) alarm input pair to the trunk/auxiliary field from the TN2312BP Adapter DB9
alarm connector. See Table 14: Alarm Inputs at TN2312BP Adapter DB9 Alarm
Connector on page 90. Alarms can be generated on adjunct equipment, sent to the Avaya
media gateway, and recorded and reported as “external alarms.” The adjunct equipment
must provide an isolated contact closure across the alarm leads provided by the Avaya
media gateway. The contact must be rated at a minimum of 60 VDC with a current carrying
capacity of 5 mA minimum.
2. Connect an external alarm output (Green-White and White-Green).
3. Note which device connects to which alarm and give this information to your Avaya
representative for troubleshooting purposes.
Issue 3 January 2008
89
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
4. Connect emergency transfer power (Blue-White and White-Blue)) as shown in
Table 14: Alarm Inputs at TN2312BP Adapter DB9 Alarm Connector.
Table 14: Alarm Inputs at TN2312BP Adapter DB9 Alarm Connector
Color
AUX Connector
Pair Name*
White-Blue
Ground (Pin 2)
XR
Blue-White
XFER48 (Emergency Transfer) (Pin 1)
White-Orange
Ground (Pin 8)
Orange-White
AP2 Minor Alarm Input (Pin 3)
White-Green
EXTALMB (Ground) Alarm Output (Pin 5)
Green-White
EXTALMA Alarm Output (Pin 4)
White-Brown
Ground (Pin 7)
Brown-White
AP1 Major Alarm Input (Pin 6)
1m
AL
1M
*. For additional information on the auxiliary field on the Main Distribution Field, see
Figure 49: Connections for telephone used for emergency transfer on page 103 and
Figure 50: Connections for telephone used for emergency transfer and as normal
extension on page 104.
Installing off-premises station wiring
The local telephone company provides cabling outside the building for off-premises stations.
The off-premises stations can appear on any of the RJ21X network interfaces provided for the
central office (CO) trunks.
! CAUTION:
CAUTION:
Only an FCC-approved (or equivalent) analog type telephone (such as a
2500-type), can be used as an off-premises station. The TN746B and TN2183
Analog Line circuit packs can be connected to off-premises stations.
To install the off-premises station wiring:
1. Install an A25D (male to male) cable between the RJ21X network interface and a sneak
fuse panel.
2. At the main distribution frame (MDF), connect jumper wires between one row/connecting
block in the green field and up to three rows/connecting blocks in the purple field to
concentrate the analog line pairs.
90 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Off-premises or out-of-building stations
3. Connect an A25D cable between the sneak fuse panel and the terminal block connector
associated with the green row in the previous step.
4. Install a green label on the terminal block to identify the remote location.
5. Administer per the Administrator Guide for Avaya Communication Manager (03-300509).
Off-premises or out-of-building stations
Out-of-building campus stations are telephones not physically located in the same building as
the equipment room but located on the same property. Only analog telephones connected to
TN746B, TN791, TN793, TN793B, TN793CP, TN2183, TN2215, TN2793, or TN2793B Analog
Line circuit packs can be installed out-of-building.
Off-premises connections
Figure 44: Connections for 1 to 8 out-of-building analog telephones on page 92 shows the
connections for 1 to 8 off-premises analog telephones.
Figure 45: Connections to 24 out-of-building telephones on page 93 shows the connections for
up to 24 off-premises analog telephones. Concentrations of analog line pairs are used at both
buildings to minimize the off-premises wiring required. At the MDF, jumpers must be connected
between one row/connecting block in the white field and up to three rows/connecting blocks in
the purple field. At the station location, a WP-90929, List 1 Concentrator Cable is used. There
are eight station appearances on each of the three fingers of the concentrator cable.
The maximum distance from the media gateway to the out-of-building telephone is 6,000 feet
(1,829 meters) using 24 AWG (#5) (0.5 square millimeters) wire.
The maximum range of out-of-building analog telephones (500-, 2500-, or 7100-types)
connected to an analog line circuit pack should be such that the maximum loop resistance does
not exceed 1,300 ohms.
Issue 3 January 2008
91
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Figure 44: Connections for 1 to 8 out-of-building analog telephones
1
3
3
2
4
5
4
6
7
6
8
10
9
14
13
11
12
crdfobt CJL 101396
Figure notes:
1. Locally Engineered Cables and
Equipment
2. Out-of-Building Wiring
3. 25-Pair Connector
4. Multi-Pair Protector Units (Primary
Protectors with Heat Coils or Equivalent
with Sneak Current Protection)
5. 356A Adapter
6. B25A Cable (Male to Female)
7. Out-Of-Building Analog Telephones
92 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
8. Part of Main Distribution
Frame (MDF)
9. Station Side
10. Media Gateway Side
11. White Field
12. Purple Field
13. Cross-Connect Jumpers
14. Tip and Ring Wires
15. To Analog Line Circuit Pack
Off-premises connections
Figure 45: Connections to 24 out-of-building telephones
1
2
7
2
4
3
5
3
6
4
8
6
4
9
10
4
11
15
16
14
12
13
crdf24o CJL 101396
Figure notes:
1. Locally Engineered Cables and
Equipment
2. 25-Pair Connector
3. Multi-Pair Protector Units (Primary
Protectors with Heat Coils or
Equivalent with Sneak Current
Protection)
4. B25A Cable (Male to Female)
5. Concentrator Cable (WP90929 List 1)
6. 356A Adapter
7. Out-of-Building Wiring
8. Out-Of-Building Analog
Telephones
9. Part of Main Distribution Frame
(MDF)
10. Station Side
11. Media Gateway Side
12. White Field
13. Purple Field
14. Cross-Connect Jumpers
15. Tip and Ring Wires
Off-premises protection requirements
Both building entrances require carbon block or equivalent protection and sneak current
protection. Protection can be provided by:
●
a 4-type protector, which is equipped with a heat coil
●
a 3-type protector plus a separate sneak current protector
Issue 3 January 2008
93
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
The 4-type protector is the preferred device. For installations not using primary protection,
4-type protectors should always be used. When the 3-type protector is already installed, a
separate sneak current protector is required.
The multi-pair protector units and the off-premises cabling must be locally engineered.
Connected multi-pair protector units (female 25-pair connector) are recommended.
Table 15: Analog line circuit protectors shows the recommended protectors.
Table 15: Analog line circuit protectors
Primary*
Primary
(with heat coil)
Sneak current
protectors*
3B1A (carbon)
4B1C (carbon)
220029 Fuse
3B1E-W
(wide gap gas tube)
4B1E-W
(wide gap gas tube)
SCP-1
3C1S
(solid state)
4C1S
(solid state)
*. The 3-type protectors should be used only if they are already part
of the existing protection system. A sneak current protector is
always required when a 3-type primary protector is used.
For catalogs and ordering information, go to the Avaya Cable Management Systems for Service
Providers Web site (http://connectivity.avaya.com/exchangemax/) and click Products &
Solutions.
Telephone restrictions for exposed environments
Analog telephones connected to TN746B Analog Line circuit packs cannot be installed in an
exposed environment.
Digital Out-of-Building Telephone Protection
Digital out-of-building telephones require protection at both building entrances. The 4C3S-75
Enhanced Protector and the ITW Linx Enhanced Protector can be used to protect digital
telephones and digital line circuit packs. These units provide primary and sneak current
protection. The 4C3S-75 is equipped with a heat coil for sneak current protection, and the ITW
Linx is equipped with replaceable fuses for sneak current protection.
Note:
Note:
The TN2181 16-port, 2-wire digital line circuit pack may not be approved for
some out-of-building uses. Contact your Avaya representative for more
information.
94 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Off-premises connections
The 4C3S-75 may be used only with TN754B Digital Line circuit packs. Table 16: Digital Voice
Circuit Protectors lists the approved protectors.
Table 16: Digital Voice Circuit Protectors
Circuit Pack
Enhanced Primary Protector
(With Sneak Current Protection)
TN754B all vintages
4C3S-75 or ITW Linx
TN2181 all vintages
4C3S-75 or ITW Linx
TN2224CP all
vintages
4C3S-75 or ITW Linx
When possible, all new and reused wiring installations should use blocks that accept the
standard 5-pin plug-in 4C3S-75 protector. However, there are reused wiring installations where
this may not be cost effective. For these installations, the ITW Linx protector may be installed.
An example of this is where screw-type carbon block protectors—or other non–plug-compatible
types—are in place and it is too costly to reterminate the outside plant cable on a 5-pin
mounting block for only a few out-of-building terminals.
Installing the ITW Linx Enhanced Protector
The ITW Linx Enhanced Protector can be installed in series with existing primary protection.
The ITW Linx Enhanced Protector mounts directly on connecting blocks and requires a
separate ground bar.
Installing the 4C3S-75 Enhanced Protector
The 4C3S-75 protector cannot be installed in series with other types of primary protection. It
must be installed as the only protection on the line entering the building. For the 4C3S-75
protector, there are a variety of 25-, 50-, and 100-pair protector panels equipped with 110-type
connecting blocks and/or RJ21X connectors.
Installing the data link protector
The maximum range for out-of-building digital telephones is 3400 feet when using 24 AWG (#5)
(0.5 square millimeters) wire and 2,200 feet (670 meters) when using 26 AWG (#4) (0.4 square
millimeters) wire. The range can be extended to 5,000 feet (1,524 meters) using 24 AWG (#5)
wire or 4,000 feet (1,220 meters) using 26 AWG (#4) wire with the use of a data link protector.
The protector is an isolating transformer used to remove phantom power on the media gateway
side and re-introduce it on the terminal side.
When a protector is used, the telephone must be locally powered by an external power supply
or through the AC power cord provided with some telephones. The protector is installed on the
equipment side of the protection in both buildings.
Issue 3 January 2008
95
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
See Figure 41: Example adjunct power connections on page 85 and Figure 46: Connections
at trunk/auxiliary field on page 96.
Figure 46: Connections at trunk/auxiliary field
25
50
IN
r758482b RBP 062696
Figure notes:
1. To Network Interface Facility
2. To Control Carrier Auxiliary
Connector
3. One Pair of Wires
4. 24th Pair of RJ21X Network
Interface Jack
Emergency transfer units and associated telephones
An 808A Emergency Transfer Panel mounted next to the trunk/auxiliary field provides
emergency transfer capability. You can use 2500-series analog telephones either for
emergency transfer or as normal extensions. For emergency transfer, connect the phones
directly to the 808A; for normal extensions, wire them through the 808A. Analog central office
(CO) and Wide Area Telecommunications Service (WATS) trunks can provide emergency
transfer capability.
The 808A Emergency Transfer Panel provides emergency trunk bypass or power-fail transfer
for up to five incoming CO trunk loops to five selected station sets. The 808A equipment’s
Ringer Equivalency Number (REN) is 1.0A.
At the MDF, the unit is controlled by a connection to a yellow terminal row/connecting block in
the trunk/auxiliary field. The unit is controlled by -48 VDC from the EM TRANS RELAY PWR
terminals. There is one EM TRANS RELAY PWR terminal pair that allows powering one transfer
unit. This wire pair (in the DB9 alarm cable) is connected to the TN2312BP adapter in only the
A-level carrier. Therefore, the G650 Media Gateway only supports one 808A per G650 port
network.
96 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
808A Emergency Transfer Panel and telephone installation examples
Should power be restored to the relays while a call connected through the 808A is in progress,
the 808A maintains the connection until the user goes on-hook. Each 808A can handle up to
five CO trunks.
808A Emergency Transfer Panel and
telephone installation examples
Figure 47: 808A Emergency Transfer Panel on page 98 shows a typical 808A Emergency
Transfer Panel. The 808A connects to the MDF with B25A or A25B cable.
The panel can be installed on any mounting frame in either a vertical or horizontal position. The
housing has ears for screw-mounting and cutouts for snap-mounting the unit in an 89-type
mounting bracket. See Figure 48: 808A Emergency Transfer Panel mounting on page 99.
Task List: Typical Emergency Transfer Panel and Telephone Installation:
●
Installing the 808A Emergency Transfer Panel on page 99
●
Installing telephones used only for emergency transfer (trunk/auxiliary field) on page 104
●
Installing telephones used for emergency transfer and as normal extension (trunk/auxiliary
field) on page 105
Issue 3 January 2008
97
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Figure 47: 808A Emergency Transfer Panel
EMERGENCY
TRANSFER
PANEL
POWER
TRUNK/TEST SWITCHES
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
12
CIRCUIT
1
1
2
2
3
4
TRUNK OPTION
LOOP
GROUND
START
START
BOTH SWITCHES MUST BE
THROWN TO ACTIVATE
TRUNK OPTION
5
TRANSFER TEST SWITCH
NORMAL
OPERATION
ACTIVATED
TRUNK IDENTIFICATION
TRUNK
LINE
EXT
LOC
808A
led808a LJK 040896
Figure notes:
1. 808A Emergency Transfer Panel
2. Circuit Start Selection Switches
3. Trunk Identification Label
4. 25-Pair Male Connector
98 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
808A Emergency Transfer Panel and telephone installation examples
Figure 48: 808A Emergency Transfer Panel mounting
808a_em LJK 042396
Figure notes:
1. 808A Emergency Transfer Panel
2. Ear for Screw Mount
3. Cut-Out for Snap Mount
4. 25-Pair Male Connector
5. Circuit Start Switches
Installing the 808A Emergency Transfer Panel
Note:
Note:
The 808A must be installed in a location that can be accessed only by authorized
personnel. The location must meet standard environmental considerations such
as temperature, humidity, and so forth.
To install the 808A Emergency Transfer Panel:
1. Verify dial tone is present at each trunk circuit.
2. Locate the circuit start selection switches (see Figure 47: 808A Emergency Transfer
Panel on page 98).
These are the first 10 two-position switches on the left side of the Emergency Transfer
Panel. They are used to set each of the five incoming trunk lines to either loop start or
ground start. Two switches are used for each circuit; switches 1 and 2 are used for circuit 1,
switches 3 and 4 are used for circuit 2, and so forth. See Table 17: Trunk/test switches on
page 101.
3. For loop start, set the switches to the left. For ground start, set the switches to the right.
Issue 3 January 2008
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Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
4. Connect a 25-pair cable between the male RJ21 25-pair connector on the Emergency
Transfer Panel and the yellow field of the MDF. Table 18: Pin assignments for 25-pair
connector on page 101 shows the pinouts.
5. Make cross-connections for each emergency trunk/emergency station pair.
The 808A is connected to the MDF by means of a B25A cable. Figure 49: Connections for
telephone used for emergency transfer on page 103 shows the connections at the trunk/
auxiliary field for a telephone used only for emergency transfer.
Figure 50: Connections for telephone used for emergency transfer and as normal
extension on page 104 shows the connections at the trunk/auxiliary field for a telephone
used for emergency transfer as well as a normal extension.
The auxiliary field for a G650 connects via the DB9 alarm cable to the TN2312BP adapter in
the “A” carrier only. See Figure 42: IPSI-2 cabling on page 88 and Figure 43: Sample
Issue 1 IPSI-2 alarm cable connectivity on page 89.
6. On the trunk identification label at the bottom of the panel, record the trunk line, extension,
and location for each circuit.
7. To each telephone designated as an emergency terminal, attach a label identifying it as
such. The labels are provided with the unit.
8. Check for normal operation as follows:
●
Place the test switch (switch 12) in NORMAL OPERATION.
●
Ensure the power supply is providing -48 VDC at 80 mA maximum. The power LED
should be ON.
●
Check wiring connections.
●
Verify there is dial tone on all emergency transfer sets.
If all of the above conditions are not met, remove the panel from service and replace it with
a new panel.
9. Check for transfer operation as follows:
●
Place the test switch (switch 12) in the ACTIVATED position.
●
The power LED should be OFF.
●
Verify there is dial tone on all emergency transfer sets.
If all of the above conditions are not met, remove the panel from service and replace it with
a new panel.
100 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
808A Emergency Transfer Panel and telephone installation examples
.
Table 17: Trunk/test switches
Switch
number
Circuit
number
1
1
2
1
3
2
4
2
5
3
6
3
7
4
8
4
9
5
10
5
11
Not Used
12
Test Switch
Table 18: Pin assignments for 25-pair connector
26
W-BL
TTC1
Tip-PBX Trunk Circuit 1
1
BL-W
RTC1
Ring-PBX Trunk Circuit 1
27
W-O
TTK1
Tip-CO Trunk Circuit 1
2
O-W
RTK1
Ring-CO Trunk Circuit 1
28
W-G
TLC1
Tip-PBX Line Port 1
3
G-W
RLC1
Ring-PBX Line Port 1
29
W-BR
TST1
Tip-Emergency Terminal 1
4
BR-W
RST1
Ring-Emergency Terminal 1
30
W-S
TTC2
Tip-PBX Trunk Circuit 2
5
S-W
RTC2
Ring-PBX Trunk Circuit 2
31
R-BL
TTK2
Tip-CO Trunk Circuit 2
6
BL-R
RTK2
Ring-CO Trunk Circuit 2
1 of 3
Issue 3 January 2008
101
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Table 18: Pin assignments for 25-pair connector (continued)
32
R-O
TLC2
Tip-PBX Line Port 2
7
O-R
RLC2
Ring-PBX Line Port 2
33
R-G
TST2
Tip-Emergency Terminal 2
8
G-R
RST2
Ring-Emergency Terminal 2
34
R-BR
TTC3
Tip-PBX Trunk Circuit 3
9
BR-R
RTC3
Ring-PBX Trunk Circuit 3
35
R-S
TTK3
Tip-CO Trunk Circuit 3
10
S-R
RTK3
Ring-CO Line Port 3
36
BK-BL
TLC3
Tip-PBX Line Port 3
11
BL-BK
RLC3
Ring-PBX Line Port 3
37
BK-O
TST3
Tip-Emergency Terminal 3
12
O-BK
RST3
Ring-Emergency Terminal 3
38
BK-G
TTC4
Tip-PBX Trunk Circuit 4
13
G-BK
RTC4
Ring-PBX Trunk Circuit 4
39
BK-BR
TTK4
Tip-CO Trunk Circuit 4
14
BR-BK
RTK4
Ring-CO Trunk Circuit 4
40
BK-S
TLC4
Tip-PBX Line Port 4
15
S-BK
RLC4
Ring-PBX Line Port 4
41
Y-BL
TST4
Tip-Emergency Terminal 4
16
BL-Y
RST4
Ring-Emergency Terminal 4
42
Y-O
TTC5
Tip-PBX Trunk Circuit 5
17
O-Y
RTC5
Ring-PBX Trunk Circuit 5
43
Y-G
TTK5
Tip-CO Trunk Circuit 5
18
G-Y
RTK5
Ring-CO Trunk Circuit 5
44
Y-BR
TLC5
Tip-PBX Line Port 5
19
BR-Y
RLC5
Ring-PBX Line Port 5
45
Y-S
TST5
Tip-Emergency Terminal 5
20
S-Y
RST5
Ring-Emergency Terminal 5
46
V-BL
COM1
Common 1 Relay Contact
21
BL-V
NO1
Normally Open 1 Contact
2 of 3
102 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
808A Emergency Transfer Panel and telephone installation examples
Table 18: Pin assignments for 25-pair connector (continued)
47
V-O
NC2
Normally Closed 2 Contact
22
O-V
NC1
Normally Closed 1 Contact
48
V-G
COM2
Common 2 Relay Contact
23
G-V
NO2
Normally Open 2 Contact
49
V-BR
24
BR-V
50
V-S
GRD
Ground from Aux Cable
25
S-V
-48PX
-48V from AUX Cable
3 of 3
Figure 49: Connections for telephone used for emergency transfer
25
50
2822
1
2
3
EMXR
2822
TC
TK
LC
ST
TC
TK
LC
XR 1m AL 1M
ALARM MONITORS
3M
3m
3w
ST
TC
TK
LC
ST
TC
TK
LC
ST
TC
1
TK
LC
ST
C
O
M
1
N
O
1
N
C
2
N
C
1
C
O
M
2
N
O
2
C
O
M
3
N
C
3
G
R
D
-48
V
r758580b LAO 111104
Figure notes:
1. To Network Interface Circuitry
2. To TN747B (or Equivalent) Central Office
Trunk Circuit Pack
3. To Blue or White Station Distribution Field
4. To Power Transfer Unit
5. DB9 Alarm Cable to
TN2312BP Adapter
Issue 3 January 2008
103
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Figure 50: Connections for telephone used for emergency transfer and as normal
extension
10
35
ST
2820
ST
EMXR
7
3
TC
TK
LC
4
ST
TC
TK
5
LC
ST
TC
6
TK
LC
ST
7
TC
TK
8
LC
ST
TC
TK
LC
ST
C
O
M
1
N
O
1
N
C
2
N
C
1
C
O
M
2
N
O
2
C
O
M
3
N
C
3
G
R
D
-48
V
XR 1m AL 1M
ALARM MONITORS
r758582b LAO 111104
Figure notes:
1. To Network Interface Facility
2. To Blue or White Station Distribution
Field
3. To TN2183 or Equivalent Analog
Line Circuit Pack
4. To TN747B (or Equivalent)
Central Office Trunk Circuit Pack
5. To Power Transfer Unit
6. DB9 Alarm Cable to TN2312BP
Adapter
Installing telephones used only for
emergency transfer (trunk/auxiliary field)
To install telephones used only for emergency transfer:
1. Connect a pair of wires between the -48V and GRD terminals on the yellow emergency
transfer row/connecting block and the EM TRANS RELAY PWR terminal. See
Figure 49: Connections for telephone used for emergency transfer on page 103.
2. Connect CO trunk leads from the purple field to TC terminals on the yellow emergency
transfer row/connecting block for each trunk.
3. Connect CO trunk leads from the green field to TK terminals on the yellow emergency
transfer row/connecting block for each trunk.
104 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
808A Emergency Transfer Panel and telephone installation examples
4. Connect ST leads on the yellow emergency transfer row/connecting block for each
emergency transfer telephone to the assigned terminal in the blue or white station
distribution field. The ST terminal leads should be terminated on the following pairs: 1, 4, 7,
10, 13, 16, 19, or 22 (the first pair of any 3-pair group).
5. Install the telephone:
●
Connect telephone to the information outlet.
●
Install patch cords/jumper wires between the media gateway side and the station side of
the station distribution field on the MDF.
Installing telephones used for emergency
transfer and as normal extension (trunk/auxiliary field)
To install telephones used for emergency transfer and as a normal extension:
1. Connect a pair of wires between the -48V and GRD terminals on the yellow emergency
transfer row/connecting block to the EM TRANS RELAY PWR terminal. See
Figure 50: Connections for telephone used for emergency transfer and as normal
extension on page 104.
2. Connect CO trunk leads from the purple field to TC terminals on the yellow emergency
transfer row/connecting block for each trunk.
3. Connect CO trunk leads from the green field to TK terminals on the yellow emergency
transfer row/connecting block for each trunk.
4. Connect telephone leads from the purple analog line circuit pack row/ connecting block to
the LC terminals on the yellow emergency transfer row/connecting block for each
telephone.
5. Connect ST leads on the yellow emergency transfer row/connecting block for each
emergency transfer telephone to the assigned terminal in the blue or white station
distribution field.
6. Install the telephone:
●
Connect telephone to the information outlet.
●
Install patch cords/jumper wires between the media gateway side and the station.
Issue 3 January 2008
105
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
Installing external ringing
Connections for external ringing are at an information outlet. The media gateway side of the
MDF is connected to a TN2183 (or equivalent) Analog Line circuit pack. The circuitry and power
source for the device are provided by the customer.
Note:
Note:
A maximum of three devices can connect to one analog line circuit pack port.
To install external ringing:
1. Wire the ringing device to the information outlet as shown in Figure 51: 3-pair and 4-pair
modularity on page 106 and Figure 41: Example adjunct power connections on page 85.
2. Administer per the Administrator Guide for Avaya Communication Manager (03-300509).
Figure 51: 3-pair and 4-pair modularity
Figure notes:
1. Port Circuit Pack
2. Media Gateway Connector Pins
(3-Pair Modularity)
3. Main Distribution Frame (MDF)
Pins (3-Pair Modularity)
4. Input to Information Outlet
(4-Pair Modularity)
5. Adjunct Power
6. Output From Information Outlet
(4-Pair Modularity)
7. Voice or Data Terminal Pins
106 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Installing the queue warning indicator
Installing the queue warning indicator
The connections for the queue warning indicator are the same as external ringing. An AC
indicator (lamp) such as a 21C49 can be used in a uniform call distribution/direct departmental
calling (UCD/DDC) queue.
The lamp is connected to an information outlet. The media gateway side of the MDF is
connected to an analog line circuit pack located in a port carrier.
●
Wire the queue warning indicator to the information outlet as shown in Figure 51: 3-pair
and 4-pair modularity on page 106 and Figure 41: Example adjunct power connections on
page 85.
Issue 3 January 2008
107
Installing and wiring telephones and trunks
108 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Chapter 7: Installing and wiring telephone power
supplies
This section provides information and wiring examples of installation procedures for various
telephone and console power supplies. These are examples only and actual wiring procedures
may vary at each site.
Note:
See Adding New Hardware for Avaya Servers and Gateways (03-300684) to
install the necessary peripheral equipment.
Note:
The power is provided to telephones or consoles either locally or centrally.
Centrally located power supplies include
●
1145B2 power supply on page 109
●
1152A1 Mid-Span Power Distribution Unit on page 119
●
●
1152B Mid-Span Power Distribution Units on page 123
C360 converged stackable switches on page 128
Local power supplies include
●
1151B1 and 1151B2 Power Supplies on page 131
1145B2 power supply
The 1145B2 closet power arrangement provides an uninterruptible -48 VDC power source with
battery and 1146B2 distribution unit for ISDN/DCP, terminal equipment, adjuncts, and other
customer-supplied equipment. During AC power interruptions, batteries automatically provide
power to the load. Although this power supply is available, we recommend that you use the
1151B1 or 1151B2 power supplies.
Note:
Note:
Before you begin, read this Important warning for 1145B2 power supply on
page 110.
Perform these tasks in order:
1. Mounting the 1145B2/1146B2 power supply on page 111
2. Installing the wall-mounting plates on page 114
3. Mounting the 1146B2 Power Distribution Unit on page 114
Issue 3 January 2008
109
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
4. Installing the battery mounting/wiring on page 115
5. Installing the expanded power distribution unit on page 115
6. Powering up and testing the power supply on page 116
7. Wiring the 1146B2 Power Distribution Unit on page 117
8. Resetting LEDs on power distribution unit on page 118
Important warning for 1145B2 power supply
!
WARNING:
WARNING:
Important Safety Instructions follow.
When operating this equipment, basic safety precautions must be followed to reduce the risk of
fire, electric shock and personal injury, including the following:
●
Read and understand all instructions.
●
Do not attach the power supply cord to building surfaces.
●
For continued back-up protection and battery reliability, replace batteries every four years.
●
Follow all warnings and instructions marked on the products.
●
Clean products only with a dry rag.
●
Do not use this product near water.
●
For mounting security, follow all installation instructions when mounting product.
●
Openings on top and bottom of power unit are provided for ventilation. Do not block or
cover these openings. Do not exceed recommended environmental temperatures.
●
Operate these products only from the type of power source indicated on the product
labels.
●
The power unit is equipped with a 3-wire grounding plug; a plug having a third (grounding)
pin. This plug will only fit into a grounding power outlet. This is a safety feature. If you are
unable to insert the plug into the outlet, contact an electrician to replace the outlet. Do not
defeat the safety purpose of the grounding plug.
●
Do not allow anything to rest on or spill into the products.
●
To reduce risk of fire and electrical shock, do not overload power outlets.
●
Never push objects of any kind through the power supply or distribution unit slots as they
may touch dangerous voltage points or short out parts that could result in a risk of fire or
electrical shock.
●
To reduce risk of electric shock, do not disassemble these products. Return them for repair
when needed. Opening or removing covers may expose you to dangerous voltages or
other risks. Incorrect reassembly can cause electric shock when the products are
subsequently used.
110 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
1145B2 power supply
●
Power down the power unit (see label on power unit on how to do this) and refer servicing
under the following conditions:
●
If liquid has been spilled into any of the products
●
If any of the products have been exposed to water
●
If any of the products do not operate normally
●
If any of the products have been dropped or damaged
●
If any of the products exhibits a change in performance
●
Do not attempt to recharge batteries on your own. The batteries may leak corrosive
electrolyte or explode. The 1145B2 power unit recharges the batteries safely.
●
Remove the batteries if the power unit will not be used for a long period of time (several
months or more) since during this time the battery may leak.
●
Discard discharged batteries as soon as possible. Discharged batteries are more likely to
leak.
●
Do not store batteries in high temperature areas. Batteries stored in a cold environment
should be protected from condensation during storage and warming. Batteries should be
stabilized at room temperature prior to use after cold storage. Do not install batteries if the
manufacturing date on the label indicates that the batteries are more than six months old.
Mounting the 1145B2/1146B2 power supply
Figure 52: 1145B2/1146B2 mounting arrangement on page 112 shows how the standard power
supply and wall-mounting plates fit together. Figure 53: Expanded power distribution unit on
page 113 shows the expanded power supply components (power distribution unit and “T”
cable).
A manual switch on the distribution unit allows the user to redirect reserve power to outputs 1
through 32 so all outputs are provided battery reserve power or to outputs 1 through 8 to
provide high power above 6.25 watts.
Note:
The switch must be set to the 1-32 position.
Note:
The 1145B22/1146B2 is a -48 V power supply with 275 watts total output. Each output circuit is
current limited by a Polymer Positive Temperature Coefficient Resistance Device (PTC) that
limits the maximum output to 12 watts. Each 1146B2 output has an LED to indicate the status of
the PTC. If the LED is on, the PTC has a short on that power pair.
Not all outputs can simultaneously provide 12 watts. The average power per output cannot
exceed 8.6 watts (275/32 = 8.6). The 1145B22 is designed to power one ISDN terminal or DCP
adjunct per output. The maximum number of terminals or adjuncts is 32 at less than or equal to
6.25 watts each. The 1145B22 is required for installations outside the United States.
Auxiliary power (local or bulk) is always required for the following:
●
Attendant Console 302D
●
PassageWay adapter interface
Issue 3 January 2008
111
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
Figure 52: 1145B2/1146B2 mounting arrangement
1149 Battery
1
1145 Power Unit
On Battery Reserve
Charging Battery
Output Power On
-48V
-48V
RTN
RTN
17
2
18
3
19
4
20
5
21
6
22
7
23
8
24
9
25
10
26
11
27
12
28
13
29
14
30
15
31
32
16
Unit No.
Connected To:
1-8
1-32
0003_1 PDH 062596
Figure notes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Wall Mounting Plate
Battery (1149B Shown)
1146B2 Power Distribution Unit
1145B2 Power Unit
5. Power Cable
6. Nonswitched Outlet (120 VAC, 20
amp or 230 VAC, 15 amp)
7. Battery Backup Switch Setting
112 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
1145B2 power supply
Figure 53: Expanded power distribution unit
1
2
4
1146 Power Distribution Unit
1149 Battery
8
1145 Power Unit
On Battery Reserve
Charging Battery
Output Power On
3
1146 Power Distribution Unit
5
8
7
6
1-8
1-32
cadfexpw KLC 091403
Figure notes:
1. Wall Mounting Plate
2. Battery (1149B shown)
3. Second 1146B2 Power Distribution
Unit
4. “T” Cable (H600-347-G7)
5. First 1146B2 Power Distribution Unit
6. 1145B2 Power Unit
7. Nonswitched Outlet (120 VAC, 20
amp or 230 VAC, 15 amp)
8. Battery Backup Switch Setting
Issue 3 January 2008
113
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
Installing the wall-mounting plates
The top plate is used for mounting the back-up battery. The bottom plate is used to mount the
power supply and distribution units. The plates can be rack-mounted using standard
rack-mounting brackets. See Figure 52: 1145B2/1146B2 mounting arrangement on page 112.
To install the wall-mounting plates:
1. Locate one plate directly below the other one such that the AC power cord (6.5 feet
[2 meters]) reaches the electrical outlet from a power supply mounted on the bottom plate.
Both plates should be located so the raised letters are right side up.
Note:
Note:
A maximum of four power supplies can be powered from one dedicated 110 VAC,
20 amperes (or 230 VAC, 15 amperes) feeder. Use only nonswitched outlets
(outlets not connected to a wall switch).
2. Secure the wall mounting plates to a standard 3/4-inch (2 centimeters) thick plywood
mounting board. Each mounting plate comes with four #10 x 1/2-inch wood screws.
3. The 1145B2 Power Supply is snap-fit onto the bottom wall mounting plate without tools.
4. An installer-provided insulated ground wire, 16 AWG (#12) (1.2 square millimeters) or
greater, is required to connect the power supply frame ground lug to an approved ground.
The frame ground screw is located next to the AC outlet, to the left of the unit.
Mounting the 1146B2 Power Distribution Unit
See the 1146B2 Power Distribution Unit in Figure 53: Expanded power distribution unit on
page 113. To mount the 1146B2 Power Distribution Unit:
1. Insert and securely tighten the two supplied #8-32 x 1/2-inch shoulder screws (they have an
unthreaded section at the top) into the top holes designated for 1146B2 Power Distribution
Unit on the bottom plate. Mount the unit on these two shoulder screws, using the key holes
on the back of the unit.
2. Secure the unit by inserting the #8-32 x 1-inch screw through the bottom of the unit (just
above the wire clips) into the plate and tighten.
3. Set the battery back-up switch option to the 1-32 (down) position to provide battery back-up
to all outputs.
4. Connect the power distribution unit to the power supply with the power cable. See the
power supply’s right-hand label to locate the output power connection.
114 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
1145B2 power supply
Installing the battery mounting/wiring
Three types of back-up batteries are used. See Table 19: Back-up battery rating on page 115
for the battery type and rating. To install the battery mounting and wiring:
1. Insert two #10-32 x 1/2-inch shoulder screws into the top designated battery holes on the
wall mounting plate. Lightly screw in but do not tighten.
2. Place the keyhole slots in the battery bracket on these two screws. The battery cord exits
from the right of the bracket. Make sure the label on the battery is visible. Tighten the
screws securely.
3. Plug the battery cord into the power supply’s right rear receptacle. The rear receptacle is
indicated on the right label.
Table 19: Back-up battery rating
Battery
Rating
1148B
2.5 amp-hours
1149B
5 amp-hours
1147B
8 amp-hours
Installing the expanded power distribution unit
A second power distribution unit can be installed to provide power to additional devices.
! CAUTION:
Total power cannot exceed 275 watts. The maximum ISDN terminal mixture is 24,
7500-series and 24, 8500-series terminals.
CAUTION:
The maximum DCP terminal mixture is 24, 7400-series and 24, 8400-series or
64, 8400-series terminals.
The expanded power distribution unit kit contains:
●
One 1146B2 Power Distribution Unit
●
One “T” Cable
●
Two #8-32 x 1/2-in. Shoulder Screws
●
One #8-32 x 1-in. Screw
●
One spacer bracket
Issue 3 January 2008
115
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
See Figure 53: Expanded power distribution unit on page 113 while installing the power
distribution unit. To install the expanded power distribution unit:
1. Set the spacer bracket onto the mounting plate and secure with the #8-32 x 1/2-inch
shoulder screws. The spacer bracket is not shown in the figure but is installed behind the
top power distribution unit.
2. Slide the keyhole slots in the power distribution unit over the shoulder screws.
3. Insert the #8-32 x 1-inch screw through the distribution unit, through the spacer bracket, and
into the plate. The mounting hole is located just above the wire clip. Tighten the screw
securely.
4. Set the battery back-up switch to the 1-32 (down) position.
5. Power-down the 1145B2 unit as described on the label on the side of the unit.
6. Remove the output power cable between the 1145B2 and the 1146B2 units. The cable will
not be reused.
7. Connect the P1 connector end of the “T” cable to the bottom power distribution unit.
Connect the P2 connector to the top distribution unit. Connect the P3 connector to the
1145B2.
8. Power-up the 1145B2 as described on the label on the side of the unit.
Powering up and testing the power supply
Table 20: Power supply LEDs on page 116 describes the meaning of the power supply LEDs
when lit.
Table 20: Power supply LEDs
LED
color
Meaning
Green
Power Supply is providing power
Yellow
Battery is charging
Red
Power Supply is on battery reserve
To power up and test the power supply:
1. Connect the AC power cord to the power supply and route the cord to an appropriate AC
outlet using the clips provided on the unit.
Note:
Note:
A maximum of four power supplies can be powered from one dedicated 100–120
V, 50/60 Hz, 20-amp feeder or 200–240 V, 50/60 Hz, 10-amp feeder. Use only
nonswitched outlets.
116 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
1145B2 power supply
2. Plug the cord into the outlet. This powers up the power supply.
3. Check AC operation of the 1145B2 Power Supply by monitoring the LEDs:
PASS: Green and yellow LEDs at the front of the unit should be lit together. See
Table 20: Power supply LEDs on page 116. After the battery reaches full charge (maximum
of 20 hours), the yellow LED should go out.
FAIL: If either green or yellow LED is not lit after powering up, check the connections. Test
the AC outlet. If power is available and the AC power cord and connections are good,
replace the power unit.
4. Disconnect the AC plug on the power supply; this activates the DC supply.
5. Check DC (battery back-up) operation of the 1145B2 Power Supply by monitoring the LEDs:
PASS: The red and green LEDs should be lit together. See Table 20: Power supply
LEDs on page 116.
FAIL: If either green or red LED is not lit after disconnecting AC power, check the
connections. If the connections are good, replace the power unit or batteries.
6. Reconnect AC power to the power supply.
Wiring the 1146B2 Power Distribution Unit
Wire endpoints to the 1146B2 while power from the 1145B2 is on. A red LED lights if its
associated circuit is connected to shorted wiring or to a shorted telephone. To wire the 1146B2
Power Distribution Unit:
1. Install cross-connect jumpers to wire from the unit (the label shows polarity) to Pins 7 and 8
of the appropriate information outlet. Route the wires through the clip provided on the unit. If
a red LED is on, see Resetting LEDs on power distribution unit on page 118. See
Figure 54: Typical wiring to a telephone on page 118.
2. Mark lead destinations on the label next to each connector. Also mark the Unit Number and
Connectivity information on the label.
Issue 3 January 2008
117
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
Figure 54: Typical wiring to a telephone
1
3
2
11
5
4
14
6
12
14
8
7
13
10
9
9
Figure notes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Power Supply Kit
2.5, 5.0, or 8.0 Amp Hour Battery
1146B2 Distribution Unit
1145B2 Power Supply
Circuits 1-16
Circuits 17-32
Port Circuit
Main Distribution Frame
9. Modular Cord
10. Pins 7 and 8 (Display Terminal
Power)
11. AC Input
12. Installer-Provided Ground Wire
13. ISDN/ Display System Protocol
Terminal
14. Circuits 1-32
Resetting LEDs on power distribution unit
A red LED next to any of the 32 power output connectors indicates a short circuit in the building
wiring or the terminal equipment. To reset the LED:
1. Disconnect the terminal equipment from the wall jack.
2. If the LED goes off, the terminal equipment is faulty and must be replaced. If the LED is still
lit, find and repair the short circuit in the building wiring.
3. Reconnect the terminal equipment to the wall jack and retest terminal equipment operation.
118 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
1152A1 Mid-Span Power Distribution Unit
1152A1 Mid-Span Power Distribution Unit
The 1152A1 Mid-Span Power Distribution Unit (PDU) is an Ethernet power supply that provides
power to up to 24 46xx-series IP telephones or wireless LAN (WLAN) access points. This unit is
used with a 10/100BaseTx standard Ethernet network over a standard TIA/EIA-568 Category 5,
6 or 6e cabling plant. The 1152A1 meets the current requirements of the IEEE802.3af standard
for resistive detection.
The 1152A1 PDU complies with the Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL) standard UL 1950,
second edition.
Complies
UL 1950
Approved
CSA C22.2 No.950 Std.
Approved
CE Regulatory
Compliance
Approved
EN 60950
Approved
TUV EN 60950
For safety instructions, see Important safety instructions on page 119. For installation
instructions, see Connecting the cables on page 121.
Important safety instructions
Please read the following helpful tips. Retain these tips for later use.
When using this switch, the following safety precautions should always be followed to reduce
the risk of fire, electric shock, and injury to persons.
●
Read and understand all instructions.
●
Follow all warnings and instructions marked on this switch.
●
This product can be hazardous if immersed in water. To avoid the possibility of electrical
shock, do not use it near water.
●
The 1152A1 PDU contains components sensitive to electrostatic discharge. Do not touch
the circuit boards unless instructed to do so.
●
This product should be operated only from the type of AC (and optional DC) power source
indicated on the label. If you are not sure of the type of AC power being provided, contact
a qualified service person.
●
Do not allow anything to rest on the power cord. Do not locate this product where the cord
will be abused by persons walking on it.
Issue 3 January 2008
119
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
●
Do not overload wall outlets and extension cords as this can result in the risk of line or
electric shock.
●
Disconnect the cords on this product and refer servicing to qualified service personnel
under the following conditions:
●
If the power supply cord or plug is damaged or frayed.
●
If liquid has been spilled into it.
●
If it has been exposed to rain or water.
●
If it was dropped or the housing has been damaged.
●
If it exhibits a distinct change in performance.
●
If it does not operate normally when following the operating instructions.
Using the 1152A1 Power Distribution Unit
The 1152A1 PDU is used to power the 46xx series of IP telephones in addition to providing 10/
100 megabits per second Ethernet connection.
Generation 1 Avaya IP telephones can receive power from the 1152A1 via an in-line adapter.
This adapter provides the resistive signature so that the 1152A1 allows power to flow to the
telephone. The generation 2 telephones do not need an adapter.
The 1152A1 PDU has 24, 10/100 Base-T ports, each can supply up to 16.8 watts using the
internal power supply and operates on a 100-240 VAC, 60/50 hertz power source.
The 1152A1 PDU is 1U high and fits in most standard 19-inch (48-centimeter) racks. It also can
be mounted on a shelf. See the user’s guide that comes with the unit for complete installation
instructions.
Perform these tasks in order:
●
Connecting the 1152A1 Power Distribution Unit on page 120
●
Connecting the cables on page 121
Connecting the 1152A1 Power Distribution Unit
! CAUTION:
CAUTION:
The 1152A1 PDU has no ON/OFF switch. To connect or disconnect power to the
1152A1 PDU, simply insert or remove the power cable from the AC power
receptacle on the rear of the 1152A1 PDU.
120 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
1152A1 Mid-Span Power Distribution Unit
To connect the 1152A1 Power Distribution Unit:
1. Plug a power cord into the power socket on the rear of the 1152A1 Power Distribution Unit.
2. Plug the other end of the power cord into the power receptacle.
The 1152A1 PDU powers up, and the internal fans begin operating.
The 1152A1 PDU then runs through its Power On Self Test (POST), which takes less than
10 seconds. During the test, all the ports on the unit are disabled and the LEDs light up. For
more information on the test, see the user’s guide that comes with the unit.
Connecting the cables
All of the ports on the front of the 1152A1 PDU are configured as data route-through ports for all
data wires (pins 1, 2, 3 and 6).
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Data &
Power
1152A1 Power
Distribution Unit
AC
Data
Console
48Vdc
Use a standard CAT5, CAT6 or CAT6e straight-through Ethernet cable (not supplied), including
all eight wires (4 pairs) as shown in Figure 55: Connecting telephones and other end devices to
the 1152A1 PDU on page 121.
Figure 55: Connecting telephones and other end devices to the 1152A1 PDU
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
End Device
data
data
data
DC +
DC +
data
DC DC -
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RJ-45
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Data & Power Out
RJ-45
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
data
data
data
spare
spare
data
spare
spare
Data In
1152A1 Power Distribution Unit
RJ-45 IN
RJ-45 OUT
Ethernet
Switch/Hub
For Data-In ports connect the Ethernet cable leading from the Ethernet Switch/Hub to the Data
port. For Data & Power Out ports, connect the Ethernet cable leading to the telephone or other
end device to the corresponding Data & Power port.
Note:
Note:
Be certain to connect correspondingly numbered Data and Data & Power ports.
Issue 3 January 2008
121
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
Connecting cables to telephones and other end devices
The 1152A1 PDU contains line-sensing capabilities that enable it to send power only to end
devices designed to receive power from the LAN. These end devices, termed Power over LAN
Enabled, receive power once they are connected to the 1152A1 PDU.
To safeguard devices that are not enabled, the 1152A1 PDU detects devices that are not
enabled so does not send power. Note that data continues to flow via the Ethernet cable
regardless of the status of the end device.
End devices that are not enabled to receive power directly may receive power and data through
an external splitter. The external splitter separates the power and data prior to connection to the
end device (see Figure 56: Connecting an IP telephone with an external splitter on page 122).
Figure 56: Connecting an IP telephone with an external splitter
RJ-45
Male Connector
RJ-45
Female Socket
Data
IP
Phone
Connection to
Power over LAN Hub
Power
DC Power
Connector
Before connecting telephones or other end devices to the 1152A1 PDU, determine if:
●
It is Power over LAN Enabled or not.
If not, you may safely connect the telephone; however, the port supplies no power and
functions as a normal Ethernet data port.
●
It requires an external splitter or whether it requires only a single RJ45 connection.
If an external splitter is needed, be certain to use a splitter with the correct connector and
polarity.
●
Its power requirements are consistent with the 1152A1 PDU voltage and power ratings.
See Appendix B in the user’s guide that comes with the unit for voltage and power ratings.
122 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
1152B Mid-Span Power Distribution Units
To connect telephones and other end devices to the 1152A1 PDU:
1. Connect an Ethernet cable to the telephone using an external splitter or directly (if the
device is Power over LAN Enabled).
2. Connect the opposite end of the same cable to the RJ45 wall outlet.
3. On the front panel of the 1152A1 PDU, monitor the response of the corresponding port LED.
If it lights up GREEN, the unit has identified your telephone as a Power over LAN
1152B Mid-Span Power Distribution Units
The Avaya 1152B Mid-Span Power Distribution Units are Ethernet power supplies that provide
power to up to 48 46xx-series or 96xx IP telephones or wireless LAN (WLAN) access points.
The 1152B PDUs are designed to deliver power in addition to data communication over an
Ethernet network. The 1152B PDUs eliminate the need to connect each Ethernet Data Terminal,
such as an IP Telephone set, to an AC power outlet in addition to the data port. The system also
removes the need for power cables, local AC wall adapters and the use of a dedicated UPS for
each IP telephone. Some models support SNMP remote management via a separate physical
RJ45 input port.
These units are used with a standard 10/100BaseTx Ethernet network infrastructure using
standard TIA/EIA-568 Category 5, 5e, or 6 100-Ohm Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) cable. The
1152B meets the current requirements of the IEEE802.3af-2003 standard for resistive detection.
The units are as follows:
Table 21: 1152B Midspan Power Distribution Units
Avaya Model
Number
Number of
Ports
SNMP
Summary
1152B48S
48
Yes
48-port, AC Input, 48Vdc Output with SNMP
1152B24S
24
Yes
24-port, AC Input, 48Vdc Output with SNMP
1152B06
6
No
6-port, AC Input, 48Vdc Output
1152B06S
6
No
6-port, AC Input, 48Vdc Output with SNMP
Issue 3 January 2008
123
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
The 1152B PDU complies with the Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL) standard UL 60950-1,
1st Edition.
Table 22: 1152B PDU UL 1950 Compliance
Complies
UL 1950
Approved
CAN/CSA-C22.2 No.
60950-1-03Std.
Approved
CE Regulatory
Compliance
Approved
EN 60950
Approved
TUV EN 60950
Important 1152B PDU Safety Instructions
Please read the following helpful tips. Retain these tips for later use.
When using this switch, the following safety precautions should always be followed to reduce
the risk of fire, electric shock, and injury to persons:
●
Read and understand all instructions.
●
Follow all warnings and instructions marked on this switch.
●
This product can be hazardous if immersed in water. To avoid the possibility of electrical
shock, do not use it near water.
●
The 1152B PDU contains components sensitive to electrostatic discharge. Do not touch
the circuit boards unless instructed to do so.
●
This product should be operated only from the type of AC (and optional DC) power source
indicated on the label. If you are not sure of the type of AC power being provided, contact
a qualified service person.
●
Do not allow anything to rest on the power cord. Do not locate this product where the cord
will be abused by persons walking on it.
●
Do not overload wall outlets and extension cords as this can result in the risk of line or
electric shock.
●
Disconnect the cords on this product and refer servicing to qualified service personnel
under the following conditions:
- The power supply cord or plug is damaged or frayed
- Liquid has been spilled into it
- Exposed to rain or water
124 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
1152B Mid-Span Power Distribution Units
- Dropped or the housing has been damaged
- Exhibits a distinct change in performance
- Operates abnormally when following the operating instructions
Using the 1152B PDUs
The 1152B PDUs are used to power the 46xx series and 96xx series of IP telephones in
addition to providing 10/100 megabits per second Ethernet connection.
Generation 1 Avaya IP telephones can receive power from the 1152B using an in-line adapter.
This adapter provides the resistive signature so that the 1152B allows power to flow to the
telephone. The generation 2 telephones do not need an adapter.
The 1152B PDU has 10/100 Base-T ports, each of which can supply a minimum of 15.4 watts
using the internal power supply and operates on a 100-240 volts AC, 60/50 hertz power source.
The 1152B PDU is 1U high and fits in most standard 19-inch racks. It can also be mounted on a
shelf. Refer to the user’s guide that comes with the unit for complete installation instructions.
Connecting the 1152B PDU cables
All of the ports on the front of the 1152B PDU are configured as data route-through ports for all
data wires (pins 1, 2, 3 and 6).
1
Data &
Power
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
PWR
communication
1152B1 Power
Distribution Unit
AC
Data
Console
48Vdc
h2cm1152 LAO 122006
Use a standard CAT5, CAT6 or CAT6e straight-through Ethernet cable (not supplied), including
all 8 wires (4 pairs) as shown in Connecting cables to telephones and other end devices on
page 126.
Issue 3 January 2008
125
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
Figure 57: Connecting telephones and other end devices to the 1152B PDU
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
End Device
data
data
data
DC +
DC +
data
DC DC -
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
RJ-45
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Data & Power Out
RJ-45
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
data
data
data
spare
spare
data
spare
spare
Data In
1152A1 Power Distribution Unit
RJ-45 IN
RJ-45 OUT
Ethernet
Switch/Hub
For Data-In ports connect the Ethernet cable leading from the Ethernet Switch/Hub to the Data
port. For Data & Power Out ports connect the Ethernet cable leading to the telephone or other
end device to the corresponding Data & Power port.
Note:
Note:
Be certain to connect correspondingly numbered Data and Data & Power ports.
Connecting cables to telephones and other end devices
An 1152B PDU contains line-sensing capabilities that enables it to send power only to end
devices designed to receive power from the LAN. These end devices, termed Power over LAN
Enabled, receive power once they are connected to the 1152B PDU.
To safeguard devices that are not enabled, the 1152B PDU detects devices that are not enabled
so does not send power. Note that data continues to flow using the Ethernet cable regardless of
the status of the end device.
End devices that are not enabled to receive power directly may receive power and data through
an external splitter. The external splitter separates the power and data prior to connection to the
end device (see Figure 58: Connecting an IP telephone with an external splitter on page 127).
126 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
1152B Mid-Span Power Distribution Units
Figure 58: Connecting an IP telephone with an external splitter
RJ-45
Male Connector
RJ-45
Female Socket
Data
IP
Phone
Connection to
Power over LAN Hub
Power
DC Power
Connector
Before connecting telephones or other end devices to the 1152B PDU, determine if the device:
●
Is Power over LAN Enabled or not.
If not, you may safely connect the telephone; however, the port supplies no power and
functions as a normal Ethernet data port.
●
Requires an external splitter or whether it requires only a single RJ45 connection.
If an external splitter is needed, be certain to use a splitter with the correct connector and
polarity.
●
Power requirements are consistent with the 1152B PDU voltage and power ratings.
Refer to Appendix B in the user’s guide that comes with the unit for voltage and power
ratings.
To connect telephones and other end devices to the 1152B PDU
1. Connect an Ethernet cable to the telephone using an external splitter or directly (if the
device is Power over LAN Enabled).
2. Connect the opposite end of the same cable to the RJ45 wall outlet.
3. On the front panel of the 1152B PDU, monitor the response of the corresponding port LED.
If it lights up GREEN, the unit has identified your telephone as a Power over LAN telephone.
Issue 3 January 2008
127
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
C360 converged stackable switches
The Avaya C360 series of converged stackable switches include four main products:
C363T
24 10/100BASE-T + 2 GBIC SFP ports
C363T-PWR
24 10/100BASE-T PoE + 2 GBIC SFP ports
C364T
48 10/100BASE-T + 2 GBIC SFP ports
C364T-PWR
48 10/100BASE-T PoE + 2 GBIC SFP ports
The C360 converged stackable switches comply with the Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL)
standard UL 60950.
Complies
UL 60950
Approved
CSA C22.2 No. 950 Std.
Approved
CE Regulatory
Compliance
For safety instructions, see C360 switch important safety instructions on page 128. For
installation instructions, see Connecting the C360 stackable switches on page 130.
C360 switch important safety instructions
Please read the following helpful tips. Retain these tips for later use.
When using this switch, the following safety precautions should always be followed to reduce
the risk of fire, electric shock, and injury to persons.
●
Read and understand all instructions.
●
Follow all warnings and instructions marked on this switch.
●
This product can be hazardous if immersed in water. To avoid the possibility of electrical
shock, do not use it near water.
●
The Avaya C360 switches and modules contain components sensitive to electrostatic
discharge. Do not touch the circuit boards unless instructed to do so.
●
This product should be operated only from the type of AC (and optional DC) power source
indicated on the label. If you are not sure of the type of AC power being provided, contact
a qualified service person.
128 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
C360 converged stackable switches
●
Do not allow anything to rest on the power cord. Do not locate this product where the cord
will be abused by persons walking on it.
●
Do not overload wall outlets and extension cords as this can result in the risk of line or
electric shock.
●
Disconnect the cords on this product and refer servicing to qualified service personnel
under the following conditions:
●
If the power supply cord or plug is damaged or frayed.
●
If liquid has been spilled into it.
●
If it has been exposed to rain or water.
●
If it was dropped or the housing has been damaged.
●
If it exhibits a distinct change in performance.
●
If it does not operate normally when following the operating instructions.
Using the C360 switch
The C360 Stackable Switch can be used to power 46xx series IP telephones in addition to
providing a 10/100 megabits per second Ethernet connection. The switch can form part of a
stack with the G700 Media Gateway or members of the P330 stackable switching system.
A C360 stack can contain up to 10 switches and up to three backup power supply units. The
stacked switches connect using the stacking submodules that plug into a slot in the back of the
C360. The X330RC cable connects the top and bottom switches in the stack and provides
redundancy and hot-switchability. This characteristic is similar to how modules can be swapped
in a modular switching chassis.
Avaya C360 switches are multilayer switches and can be upgraded with a license to provide
routing (Layer3) functionality.
The C360 switches can be mounted in a standard 19-inch (48-centimeter) rack or mounted on a
wall.
Issue 3 January 2008
129
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
Connecting the C360 stackable switches
Powering up—AC input
To connect the AC input:
1. Insert the power cord into the power inlet on the rear of the unit.
2. Insert the other end of the power cord into the AC power supply.
The unit powers up and performs a self-test procedure. The LEDs flash at regular intervals
after the self-test procedure is completed successfully.
3. Connect the BUPS DC power supply (if available).
Powering up—DC input (optional)
The C360 switches can operate on the AC input only. However, you may wish to use the
optional DC input for the following:
Note:
●
Backup for the power over Ethernet ports
●
To provide more than 200 watts for the power over Ethernet ports
Note:
Please see the Avaya C360 Manager User Guide and the Quick Start for
Hardware Installation Avaya C360 Converged Stackable Switches (03-300148)
for more information.
To connect the BUPS DC terminal unit:
1. Remove the protective plastic cover over the BUPS DC inputs by unscrewing the two
Phillips screws.
!
WARNING:
WARNING:
The conductors to be used for connecting the BUPS to the C360 must be UL
Recognized and CSA Certified and be a minimum of 16 AWG or have a
cross-sectional area of 1.0 mm2.
2. Connect the power cable to the terminals on the C360 and then external DC power supply.
!
WARNING:
WARNING:
Make sure that you connect the cables between the C360 and the external power
supply correctly.
●
Positive (+) to Positive (+)
●
Negative (-) to Negative (-)
3. Replace the plastic cover by aligning the holes with the screw receptacles and replacing the
two Phillips screws.
130 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
1151B1 and 1151B2 Power Supplies
Connecting the cables
To connect IP telephones, PCs, servers, routers, workstations, and hubs.
1. Connect the Ethernet connection cable (not supplied) to a 10/100 megabits per second port
on the front panel of the Avaya C360 series switch.
Note:
Note:
Use standard RJ45 connections and a CAT5 cable for 100 megabits per second
operation.
2. Connect the other end of the cable to the Ethernet port of the PC, server, router,
workstation, IP telephone, switch, or hub.
3. Check that the appropriate link (LNK) LEDs light up.
1151B1 and 1151B2 Power Supplies
The 1151B1 and 1151B2 power supplies are a local power supply. The telephones or consoles
connect directly to them through an RJ45 connector. The 1151B2 has a battery backup.
These power supplies comply with the Underwriters Laboratories Inc. (UL) Standard UL
60950 third edition.
Complies
UL 60950
Certified
CSA C22.2
Approved
EN
Approved
CE Regulatory Compliance
For safety instructions, see Important safety instructions for 1151B1 and 1151B2 Power
Supplies on page 132. For installation instructions, see Connecting the 1151B1 or 1151B2
Power Supplies on page 133.
Issue 3 January 2008
131
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
Important safety instructions for 1151B1 and
1151B2 Power Supplies
Please read the following helpful tips. Retain these tips for later use.
When using this power supply, the following safety precautions should always be followed to
reduce the risk of fire, electric shock, and injury to persons.
●
Read and understand all instructions.
●
Follow all warnings and instructions marked on this power supply.
●
This product can be hazardous if immersed in water. To avoid the possibility of electrical
shock, do not use it near water.
●
To reduce the risk of electric shock, do not disassemble this product except to replace the
battery.
●
This product should be operated only from the type of AC power source indicated on the
label. If you are not sure of the type of AC power being provided, contact a qualified
service person.
●
Do not allow anything to rest on the power cord. Do not locate this product where the cord
will be abused by persons walking on it.
●
Do not overload wall outlets and extension cords as this can result in the risk of line or
electric shock.
●
Disconnect the cords on this product and refer servicing to qualified service personnel
under the following conditions:
●
When the power supply cord or plug is damaged or frayed.
●
If liquid has been spilled into the product.
●
If the product has been exposed to rain or water.
●
If the product was dropped or the housing has been damaged.
●
If the product exhibits a distinct change in performance.
●
If the product does not operate normally by following the operating instructions.
Using 1151B1 and 1151B2 Power Supplies
The 1151B1 and 1151B2 Power Supplies can be used to supply local power to ISDN-T 85xx
and 84xx series and 46xx series telephones connected to a media gateway and to the 302D
Attendant Console that requires auxiliary power for its display. The unit can supply power to
adjunct equipment such as S201A and CS201A speakerphones or a 500A Headset Adapter
attached to any currently manufactured analog, DCP, or ISDN-T telephone equipped with an
adjunct jack.
132 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
1151B1 and 1151B2 Power Supplies
! CAUTION:
CAUTION:
The power supply can be used only with telecommunications equipment, indoors,
and in a controlled environment.
The power supply has a single output of -48 VDC, 0.4 amperes and can operate from either a
120 VAC 60 hertz power source (105 to 129 VAC) or a 220/230/240 VAC 50 hertz power source
(198 to 264 VAC). Input voltage selection is automatic. The output capacity is 19.2 watts.
The power supply can be placed on a flat surface such as a desk. For wall-mounting, keyhole
slots are provided on the bottom of the chassis.
! CAUTION:
CAUTION:
Do not locate the unit within 6 inches (15 centimeters) of the floor.
Connecting the 1151B1 or 1151B2 Power Supplies
The 1151B1 is a standard (no battery backup) power supply unit. The 1151B2 is a battery
backup version of the 1151B1. Either power supply can support one telephone with or without
an adjunct. The maximum loop range is 250 feet (76 meters). Two modular jacks are used.
Power is provided on the PHONE jack, pins 7 and 8 (- and +, respectively).
The PHONE and LINE jacks are 8-pin female nonkeyed 657-type jacks that can accept D4, D6,
and D8 modular plug cables. See an Figure 59: 1151B2 Power Supply — front on page 133.
Figure 59: 1151B2 Power Supply — front
pwr_sup1 CJL 051496
Issue 3 January 2008
133
Installing and wiring telephone power supplies
134 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Chapter 8: Testing the complete configuration
This section provides tests for the complete configuration, including the control and signaling
networks and the telephones and consoles.
This section provides tests to:
●
review the status of the configuration.
●
test the duplication link to the servers (S8700-series only)
●
test the IP server interfaces, expansion interfaces, and TDM buses in the port networks.
●
test the telephones and other equipment.
See LED indicators on page 147 for information regarding the LED status indicators for the
Avaya Ethernet switch(es), uninterruptible power supplies (UPSs), and different circuit packs.
Note:
Note:
Circuit pack positions are usually given by cabinet, and slot. They may also be
given by port. The term “cabinet” refers to five G650 Media Gateways
TDM-cabled together in a rack, making up one port network. A port network is
defined as a group of media gateways connected together with one TDM bus.
Perform these tasks to test the configuration:
! CAUTION:
CAUTION:
To prevent unnecessary trouble tickets, do not enable the alarms (Alarm
Origination feature) until all installation and administration procedures are
completed.
1. Testing port network equipment on page 136
2. Checking port network status for each media gateway on page 136
3. Checking circuit pack configuration on page 137
4. Testing the TN2312BP Internet Protocol Server Interface circuit pack on page 138
5. Testing Expansion Interface circuit packs, if used on page 139
6. Testing time division multiplexing bus for each port network on page 140
7. Testing expansion interface exchange, if used, for each port network on page 141
8. Testing telephones and other equipment on page 142
Issue 3 January 2008
135
Testing the complete configuration
Testing port network equipment
These tests verify that the time division multiplexing (TDM) cables and terminators work. If a
FAIL Result code is seen, check these cables. If problems persist, see the maintenance book
for your configuration.
Checking port network status for each media gateway
The port network status may suggest problem areas. Tests described later provide more
specific diagnostic information.
To check the port network status for each media gateway:
1. Type status port-network number <1-64> and press Enter.
2. Verify the screen displays a Port Network Status screen similar to Figure 60: Sample port
network status screen for Cabinet 1—Avaya S8500 on page 137.
Verify these service states:
Field
Service State
TDM Bus A
in
TDM Bus B
in
Tone/Clock
in
PKT
in
136 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Testing port network equipment
Figure 60: Sample port network status screen for Cabinet 1—Avaya S8500
status port-network 1
PORT NETWORK STATUS
Major Minor Warning Carrier
PN Control
PN Alarms Alarms Alarms Locs
Active
Standby
FIBERLINK
1
1
1
1
0
TDM Service
Bus State
A
B
195
Control
Channel
in
in
1
up
up
Dedicated
Tones
y
n
PKT
01A
01B
TONE/
CLOCK
n
y
01B
01A
Service
State
Major
Alarms
Minor
Alarms
in
n
n
Endpoints
Mode
B-PNC 01B02-03E04 standby
A-PNC 01A01-01E04 active
Service
State
in
in
System
Clock
System
Tones
standby
active
standby
active
Bus
Open Bus
Faults Leads
0
0
Command:
Checking circuit pack configuration
The list configuration report provides a list of circuit packs connected to the configuration and
recognized by the software. To check circuit pack configuration:
1. Type list configuration all and press Enter.
2. Verify the screen displays list configuration similar to Figure 61: Sample system
configuration screen — Page 4, Avaya S8700 Multi-Connect on page 138. Make sure the
software is communicating with each circuit pack (except power supply circuit packs). Do
not attempt to correct any problems until after the diagnostic tests that you run later in the
configuration tests.
3. Note any boards with a VINTAGE column entry of NO BOARD or CONFLICT.
A u indicates unassigned ports, and a number indicates the port has been translated.
Issue 3 January 2008
137
Testing the complete configuration
Figure 61: Sample system configuration screen — Page 4, Avaya S8700 Multi-Connect
list configuration all
Page
4
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Board
Number
Board Type
Code
01B01
01B02
01B03
IP SERVER INTFC
EXPANSION INTRFC
DS1 INTERFACE
01B05
DS1 INTERFACE
01B06
DS1 INTERFACE
TN2312BP HW33 FW045 01 02
TN570C 000002
TN464HP 000020
01 02
09 10
17 18
25 26
TN464HP 000020
01 02
09 10
17 18
25 26
TN464HP 000006
01 02
09 10
17 18
25 26
press CANCEL to quit --
Vintage
Assigned Ports
u=unassigned t=tti p=psa
03 04 05 06 07 08
03
11
19
27
03
11
19
27
03
11
19
27
04
12
20
28
04
12
20
28
04
12
20
28
05
13
21
29
05
13
21
29
05
13
21
29
06
14
22
30
06
14
22
30
06
14
22
30
07
15
23
31
07
15
23
31
07
15
23
u
08
16
24
u
08
16
24
u
08
16
24
u
press NEXT PAGE to continue
Testing the TN2312BP Internet Protocol
Server Interface circuit pack
To test the TN2312BP Internet Protocol Server Interface circuit pack using Avaya Site
Administration:
1. Type test ipserver-interface UUC and press Enter to test all clock and packet
interface components within the IPSI circuit pack.
2. Verify the screen displays Test Results screen similar to Figure 62: Sample IPSI 01A test
results screen — Page 1, Avaya S8700 Multi-Connect on page 139.
138 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Testing port network equipment
Figure 62: Sample IPSI 01A test results screen — Page 1, Avaya S8700 Multi-Connect
test ipserver-interface 1a
Page
1
TEST RESULTS
Port
Maintenance Name
01A
01A
01A0201
01A0201
01A0202
01A0202
01A0203
01A0203
01A0204
01A0204
01A0205
01A0205
01A0206
01A0206
01A0207
TONE-BD
TONE-BD
ETR-PT
ETR-PT
ETR-PT
ETR-PT
ETR-PT
ETR-PT
ETR-PT
ETR-PT
ETR-PT
ETR-PT
ETR-PT
ETR-PT
ETR-PT
Alt. Name Test No. Result
press CANCEL to quit --
46
52
42
43
42
43
42
43
42
43
42
43
42
43
42
Error Code
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
press NEXT PAGE to continue
Testing Expansion Interface circuit packs, if used
To check each Expansion Interface (EI) circuit pack in the media gateway:
1. Type test board UUCSS where UUCSS is the cabinet, and slot for an EI circuit pack in the
media gateway, and press Enter.
Note:
Note:
Labels on the port network and on the strip under the circuit pack contain this
information.
2. Verify the screen displays test results similar to Figure 63: Sample test results for
Expansion Interface Board 2A01 on page 140. This example is for board 2a01.
3. If any result is FAIL, check the connections for the fiber optic link.
4. Repeat Steps 1 and 2 for each Expansion Interface circuit pack.
Issue 3 January 2008
139
Testing the complete configuration
Figure 63: Sample test results for Expansion Interface Board 2A01
TEST RESULTS
Port
Maintenance Name
02A01
02A01
02A01
02A01
02A01
02A01
EXP-INTF
EXP-INTF
EXP-INTF
EXP-INTF
EXP-INTF
EXP-INTF
Alt. Name Test No. Result
237
238
240
241
244
316
Error Code
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
Testing time division multiplexing bus for each port network
To check each TDM bus for each port network (PN) in the configuration.
1. Type test tdm port-network 1 and press Enter.
2. Verify a Test Results screen similar to Figure 64: Sample test results for TDM bus port
network 1 on page 140 appears.
3. If result is FAIL for any test, check the connectors of the TDM bus cables in PN 2.
4. Repeat these steps for each PN to check the TDM bus cables.
Figure 64: Sample test results for TDM bus port network 1
test tdm port-network 1
TEST RESULTS
Port
Maintenance Name
PN
PN
PN
PN
PN
PN
TDM-BUS
TDM-BUS
TDM-BUS
TDM-BUS
TDM-BUS
TDM-BUS
01A
01A
01A
01B
01B
01B
Alt. Name Test No. Result
294
296
297
294
296
297
140 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
PASS
PASS
ABORT
PASS
ABORT
PASS
Error Code
1005
1005
Testing port network equipment
Testing expansion interface exchange, if used, for each port
network
If the configuration is critical reliability, test the expansion interface exchange for each PN:
1. Type status port-network number <1-64> and press Enter.
This displays the standby expansion link. See Figure 65: Sample of port network status
before expansion link is set on page 141.
2. Type set expansion-link UUCSS, where UUCSS is one of the cabinet, and port
locations of the standby expansion link, and press Enter.
3. Verify the bottom of the screen displays:
Command successfully completed
4. Type status port-network number <1-64> and press Enter.
A screen similar to Figure 66: Sample of port network status after expansion link is set on
page 142 displays.
5. Verify that the MODEs of the expansion links have changed.
6. If any problems are indicated, check the TDM cables and the inter-cabinet cables (ICC) in
the associated port network.
Figure 65: Sample of port network status before expansion link is set
status port-network
PORT NETWORK STATUS
Major
PN Alarms
1 0
Minor Warning
Alarms Alarms
1
19
Carrier
PNC Status
Locs
Active Standby
01A
up
2
01B
1
01C
01D
TDM Service Control Dedicated
Bus State
Channel Tones
A
in
n
n
B
in
y
y
Service
PKT State
1
in
Major
Alarms
n
TONE/
CLOCK
01A
01B
Minor
Alarms
n
ATM
PNC
Conn Endpoints
Mode
A-PNC 01D01-AT02A
active
A-PNC 01C01-AT01A active
Service System
System
State
Clock
Tones
in
standby standby
in
active active
Bus
Faults
0
Open Bus
Leads
0
Issue 3 January 2008
141
Testing the complete configuration
Figure 66: Sample of port network status after expansion link is set
status port-network
PORT NETWORK STATUS
Major Minor Warning Carrier
PN Control
PN Alarms Alarms Alarms Locs
Active
Standby
FIBERLINK
1
1
1
1
0
TDM Service
Bus State
A
B
220
Control
Channel
in
in
1
up
up
Dedicated
Tones
y
n
PKT
01A
01B
TONE/
CLOCK
n
y
Service
State
Major
Alarms
Minor
Alarms
in
n
n
Mode
B-PNC 01B02-03E04 standby
A-PNC 01A01-01E04 active
Service
State
01B
01A
Endpoints
in
in
System
Clock
System
Tones
standby
active
standby
active
Bus
Open Bus
Faults Leads
0
0
Command:
Saving translations, if required
●
Type save translations and press Enter to save the translations to the hard drive.
Testing telephones and other equipment
This section describes how to test the telephones and other equipment. Perform these tests
after the equipment has been wired to the media gateway and after the customer’s data for that
equipment has been administered. The tests are acceptance tests and provide some assurance
that the system will perform properly after installation and administration.
If problems occur or more extensive tests are required, see the maintenance book for your
configuration.
Perform these tasks to complete acceptance tests:
●
Making test calls on page 143
●
Testing 302C attendant console on page 143
●
Testing selector console on page 144
142 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Testing telephones and other equipment
●
Testing external ringing on page 144
●
Testing queue warning indicator on page 144
●
Testing integrated announcement on page 144
●
Testing music-on-hold on page 145
●
Testing emergency transfer (Avaya S8700 Multi-Connect only) on page 145
●
Testing terminating trunk transmission on page 146
●
Testing connectivity to the LAN on page 147
Making test calls
Make two calls from one telephone to another telephone. Make the first call by dialing a
telephone and make the second call by dialing a trunk access code and a listed directory
number (LDN).
Testing 302C attendant console
To check that all lamps are operational and call another telephone in the configuration:
1. Simultaneously press and hold Ringer Volume up and POS BUSY.
This puts the console in the self-test mode.
Note:
Note:
Releasing the buttons returns the console to normal mode.
2. Verify all lamps on display light and remain lighted.
Each row of lamps on the console lights and goes dark in sequence from top to bottom.
3. Press Start and listen for dial tone.
The green lamp associated with Idle Call Appearance lights up.
The Position Available lamp goes dark.
4. Dial a number associated with a working telephone.
Audible ringing tone is heard in ear piece.
5. Press Release.
Audible ringing tone is silenced. The green lamp associated with idle call appearance
button goes dark. The Position Available lamp lights.
Issue 3 January 2008
143
Testing the complete configuration
Testing selector console
To check that all selector console lamps are operational and make a call to a telephone in the
configuration:
1. Simultaneously press and hold Ringer Volume up and POS BUSY on the attendant
console. This puts the console in the self-test mode.
Each row of lamps on the selector console lights and goes dark in sequence from top to
bottom.
2. Press hundreds group select button.
The hundreds group select lamp lights and any lamps associated with busy telephone light.
3. Press Direct Extension Selection (DXS) for the desired extension.
Audible ringing tone is heard in the ear piece on attendant console.
4. On attendant console, press Release.
Audible ringing tone is silenced.
Testing external ringing
Make a test call to the attendant console to verify ringing device sounds when the Night lamp on
console is lighted. If ringing device has not been installed by customer, connect spare telephone
to information outlet reserved for ringing device and make test call.
Testing queue warning indicator
Make a test call to an extension associated with a uniform call distribution (UCD) or direct
department calling (DDC) group, and verify the queue warning indicator lamp lights. If the queue
warning indicator has not been installed by customer, connect a spare telephone to the
information outlet reserved for queue warning indicator and make a test call.
Testing integrated announcement
The TN2501AP Announcement circuit packs provide the ability to store messages. The
messages can be recorded from telephones on- or off-premises and have flexible message
lengths. The telephone selected as the test telephone must have a class of service (COS) with
console permission enabled.
144 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Testing telephones and other equipment
Record an announcement
To record an announcement:
1. Select a test telephone with console permissions enabled.
2. Dial the access code followed by the integrated announcement extension number.
3. When you hear a dial tone, press 1. When you hear a beep or stutter tone, speak the
announcement into the telephone.
4. When done, press # if a digital phone or hang up if an analog phone to stop the recording.
You then hear a dial tone.
Playback announcement
To play back an announcement:
1. If using a digital phone, press 2 to hear the announcement. When the announcement is
over, you hear a dial tone. If satisfied, hang up.
2. If using an analog phone, dial the integrated announcement extension number to hear the
announcement.
When the announcement is over, you hear a dial tone. If satisfied, hang up.
Delete announcement
To delete an announcement:
1. Dial the access code followed by the integrated announcement extension number.
2. When you hear a dial tone, press 3 to delete the announcement and end the recording
session.
A confirmation tone is heard when the announcement is deleted.
Testing music-on-hold
Verify music is provided to a held party during any hold interval.
Testing emergency transfer (Avaya S8700 Multi-Connect only)
Put configuration in emergency transfer mode and make call using emergency transfer
telephone. There may be up to four Emergency Transfer panels on a wall in the phone closet,
depending on the configuration.
Issue 3 January 2008
145
Testing the complete configuration
Testing terminating trunk transmission
The terminating trunk transmission test provides for extension number access to 3 tone
sequences that can be used for trunk transmission testing from the distant end of the trunks. To
test terminating trunk transmission:
1. Type change system-parameters maintenance and press Enter and go to screen 2.
2. Under TERMINATING TRUNK TRANSMISSION TEST (Extension), type in 3 extension
numbers in the 3 fields provided:
Test Type 100:_______Test Type 102:_______Test Type 105:_______
Test type
Test features
Test type
100
5.5 seconds of 1004 Hz tone at 0 dB
Quiet until disconnect; disconnect is forced after 1 minute
Test Type
102
9 seconds of 1004 Hz tone at 0 dB
1 second of silence
Cycle is repeated until disconnect, which is forced after
24 hours
Test Type
105
9 seconds of 1004 Hz tone at -16 dB
1 second of silence
9 seconds of 404 Hz tone at -16 dB
1 second of silence
9 seconds of 2804 Hz tone at -16 dB
30 seconds of silence
0.5 seconds of test progress tone (2225 Hz)
About 5 seconds of silence
Forced disconnect
146 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
LED indicators
Testing connectivity to the LAN
To test the external IP connections for the C-LAN, IP Media Processor, and VAL circuit packs,
you must ping the circuit pack and ping a known computer connected to your network. If
everything is configured correctly, the Result column on the Ping Results screen reads PASS.
If it reads ABORT, verify the IP-address information and check the connectivity, including the
cabling.
To test connectivity to the LAN:
1. Type ping ip-address IPaddress board UUCSS and press Enter, where the
variable IPaddress is the IP address of the circuit pack and UUCSS is the cabinet, and slot
of the circuit pack.
2. Type ping ip-address IPaddress board UUCSS and press Enter, where the
variable IPaddress is the IP address of another computer beyond the gateway and UUCSS
is the cabinet, and slot of the circuit pack.
LED indicators
See the maintenance book for your system for detailed alarm and LED descriptions. If a
maintenance object begins to fail some periodic tests, the server will generate an alarm. The
server identifies three levels of alarms:
●
Major Alarms — Failures that cause critical degradation of service and require immediate
attention.
●
Minor Alarms — Failures that cause some degradation of service, but do not cause a
critical portion of the configuration to be inoperable. This condition requires action, but its
consequences are not immediate. Problems might be impaired service to a few trunks or
stations or interfering with one feature across the entire configuration.
●
Warning Alarms — Failures that cause no significant degradation of service or failures in
equipment external to the configuration. Warning alarms are not reported to the attendant
console or INADS.
Alarms are communicated to users and technicians by entries in the alarm and sys logs and the
lighting of LEDs located on the attendant console, on all circuit packs, and, optionally, on
customer-designated telephones.
More detailed information is available here for:
●
Telephone console LEDs on page 148
●
DS1 Converter circuit pack LEDs on page 148
●
SPAN LEDs on page 150
Issue 3 January 2008
147
Testing the complete configuration
Telephone console LEDs
Telephones and attendant consoles have some alarm LEDs that must be checked out.
Attendant console LEDs
The console has two red LEDs, labeled “ALM” and “ACK”. The ALM LED lights steadily when
there is a major or minor alarm at the server. The ACK LED lights steadily if the alarm has been
successfully reported to INADS. If the server is unable to report the alarm to INADS, the LED
flashes; this signals the attendant to call INADS and report the alarm.
Terminal alarm notification
Terminal Alarm Notification is an optional feature that displays several types of alarms on
telephones with administered feature buttons or the attendant console. A maximum of 10 digital
and/or hybrid telephones may be used.
When an alarm occurs, the green status LED associated with the assigned button is in a steady
state. The LED may be turned off by pressing the button associated with the LED. If the LED is
off and the alarm has not been resolved by the time maintenance reschedules testing, the green
status LED resumes its steady state.
DS1 Converter circuit pack LEDs
Eleven LEDs provide an indication of the state of the Figure 67: TN1654 DS1 Converter circuit
pack LEDs and the T1/E1 facilities. The top group has the standard red, green and yellow
LEDs. The red LED indicates an alarm condition and the green LED indicates testing in
progress. The four SPAN LEDs indicate the status of the T1/E1 facilities. The four STATUS
LEDs currently are unused and remain off.
148 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
LED indicators
Figure 67: TN1654 DS1 Converter circuit pack LEDs
Figure notes:
1. Alarm LED (Red)
2. Test LED (Green)
3. Busy LED (Yellow)
4. STATUS LEDs
5. SPAN LEDs
The yellow LED indicates the state of the fiber interface, the fiber channel, the control channel,
and the communications link to the SPE in the following manner and order of priority. See
Table 23: DS1 Converter yellow LED flashing states.
.
Table 23: DS1 Converter yellow LED flashing states
LED on
LED off
Condition
0.1
second
0.1 second
Fiber out-of-frame or fiber loss of signal.
0.5
second
0.5 second
In frame, fiber channel down. The fiber channel communicating
between the DS1 Converter and the other fiber endpoint (EI or
SNI) is down.
1 second
1 second
In frame, control channel down. The control channel between the
two DS1 Converters in the DS1 Converter complex is down.
2 seconds
0.2 second
No response from the server. The server is not acknowledging
messages from the DS1 Converter or the communications link to
the server is down.
1 of 2
Issue 3 January 2008
149
Testing the complete configuration
Table 23: DS1 Converter yellow LED flashing states (continued)
LED on
LED off
solid on
Condition
DS1 Converter active. This is the normal state for an active DS1
Converter.
solid off
DS1 Converter standby. This is the normal state for a standby
DS1 Converter in critical reliability configurations (duplicated
PNC).
2 of 2
SPAN LEDs
The four SPAN LEDs indicate the status of the four T1/E1 facilities. A SPAN LED is in one of the
following states:
●
Solid on yellow: Facility is operational and alarm free.
●
Blinking yellow for 2 seconds, off 0.1 seconds: Facility is operational and alarm free AND is
carrying the control channel (facility A or B only).
●
Solid on red: Facility is alarmed.
●
Solid off: Facility is not administered or has been busied out.
150 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Index
Index
Numerical
110A-type terminal blocks (G650) . . . . . . . . . . 19
110P-type terminal blocks, frame-mounting . . . . . 24
110-type hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
110-type hardware, SCP-110 sneak current protection 54
110-type terminal blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
110-type terminal blocks, wall-mounting . . . . . . . 21
1110A2 apparatus mounting frame . . . . . . . . . 24
1110C1 cable support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
1145B power supply . . . . . . . . . . . 109, 110, 114
1145B power supply, mounting . . . . . . . . . . . 111
1146B power distribution unit . . . . . . . . . .114, 117
1146B power supply, mounting . . . . . . . . . . . 111
1151B1 and 1151B2 power supply . . . . . . 132, 133
1151B1 power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
1151B2 power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
1152A1 power distribution unit . . . . . . . . . . . 119
connecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
connecting cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
258A adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
26B1 selector console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87, 88
2-wire and 4-wire endpoints, dual wiring . . . . . . . 87
2-wire digital station wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
302D attendant console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
356A adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
3-pair and 4-pair modularity. . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
3-pair modularity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
3-pair to 4-pair station circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
3-pair trunks, cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
451A extension adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
4C3S-75 enhanced protector . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
4C3S-75 enhanced protector, installing . . . . . . . 95
4-pair station circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
808A emergency transfer panel . . . . . . . . . . 96, 99
808A emergency transfer panel examples . . . . . . 97
A
adapter
258A, 356A, BR2580A, ZD8AJ . .
451A extender . . . . . . . . . .
adjunct power . . . . . . . . . . . .
connecting . . . . . . . . . . . .
connection locations . . . . . . .
administering patch cords and jumpers
alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
connections . . . . . . . . . . .
terminal alarm notification . . . . .
wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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. 43
. 42
. 73
. 74
. 85
. 62
. 147
. 88
. 148
. 75
analog line circuit protectors . .
analog station wiring . . . . .
analog telephones . . . . . .
analog tie trunk wiring. . . . .
announcements
deleting . . . . . . . . . .
playback procedure . . . .
recording . . . . . . . . .
testing . . . . . . . . . .
attendant console. . . . . . .
cabling distances . . . . .
installing . . . . . . . . .
LEDs . . . . . . . . . . .
maximum cabling distance .
testing . . . . . . . . . .
auxiliary cabinet
cabling to MDF . . . . . .
auxiliary connector outputs . .
auxiliary power . . . . . . . .
alarms . . . . . . . . . .
attendant console . . . . .
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145
145
145
144
. 86
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147, 148
. . . 73
. . 143
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93
75
91
76
39
81
86
88
86
B
back-up battery . .
battery
back-up . . . .
mounting . . .
BR2580A adapter
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
C
C360 converged stackable switches . .
C360 switch
connecting . . . . . . . . . . . .
safety instructions . . . . . . . . .
using the C360 switch . . . . . . .
cabinet
cable clamps . . . . . . . . . . .
cabling to MDF . . . . . . . . . .
cable clamps . . . . . . . . . . . . .
cable clamps, for cable slack manager .
cable routing guidelines . . . . . . . .
cable routing, MDF . . . . . . . . . .
cable slack manager . . . . . . . . .
cable slack manager, installing . . . .
cables
25-pair I/O . . . . . . . . . . . .
attendant console cabling distances
installing . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . 128
. . . . . . 130
. . . . . . 128
. . . . . . 129
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13
38
25
13
36
36
13
25
. . . . . 13, 25
. . . . . . . 86
. . . . . . . 33
Issue 3 January 2008
151
Index
installing between cabinet and MDF . . . . . . . 38
outputs for control carrier . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
cables, installing between auxiliary cabinet and MDF . 39
cabling
installing trunk cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
provisioning plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
cabling layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
calling queue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
carbon block protectors
off-premises connections . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
checking
circuit pack configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
system status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
circuit packs
configuration, testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
DS1 converter LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
duplication interface LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
C-LAN connection, testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
closets
site locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
CO trunk wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
collocated DS1 tie trunks, wiring . . . . . . . . . . 78
concentrator cables, connecting trunk pairs . . . . . 65
connect
1151B1 and 1151B2 power supply . . . . . . . . 133
adjunct power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
external alarm indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
connecting
1152A1 power distribution unit . . . . . . . . . . 120
C360 switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
connecting control carrier outputs cable . . . . . . . 65
connection diagrams, station cables . . . . . . . . . 44
console
attendant, testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
selector, testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
control carrier cable labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
control carrier outputs cable . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 81
coupled bonding conductor wires, installing . . . . . 58
critical reliability
testing systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
cross-connect fields, MDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
D
data link protector, installing . . . . . . . . . .
DC power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DID trunk wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
digital line circuit protectors . . . . . . . . . . .
digital tie trunk wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
direct department calling
testing queue warning indicator . . . . . . .
downloading this book and updates from the Web
DS1 converter
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.
95
58
75
94
77
. . 144
. . 10
circuit pack LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
DS1 tie trunks, wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
dual wiring of 2-wire and 4-wire endpoints . . . . . . 87
E
emergency transfer panel, installing . . .
emergency transfer telephones . . . . .
emergency transfer units . . . . . . . .
emergency transfer, testing . . . . . . .
equipment room
cable routing . . . . . . . . . . . .
cabling labels . . . . . . . . . . . .
station circuit distribution from . . . .
expanded power distribution unit . . . .
expansion interface circuit packs, testing .
expansion interface exchange, testing . .
expansion links, service state . . . . . .
external alarm indicators, connecting . .
external alarm wiring . . . . . . . . . .
external ringing
installing . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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. . . 99
104, 105
. . . 96
. . 145
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. 36
. 33
. 44
. 115
139
141
136
. 88
. 75
. . . . . 106
. . . . . 144
F
floor plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
G
G650 Media Gateway
110A-type terminal blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
cross connecting to MDF. . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
H
hardware
MDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
hard-wire bridging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
I
I/O cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
information outlets, wiring design . . . . . .
installing
26B1 Selector Console . . . . . . . . .
4C3S-75 enhanced protector . . . . . . .
808A emergency transfer panel . . . . .
attendant console . . . . . . . . . . . .
cable slack manager . . . . . . . . . . .
cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
cables between auxiliary cabinet and MDF
cables between cabinet and MDF . . . .
coupled bonding conductor wires . . . . .
152 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
. . . . 25
. . . . 41
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88
95
99
87
25
33
39
38
58
Index
coupled bonding conductors . . . . . .
data link protector . . . . . . . . . . .
external ringing . . . . . . . . . . . .
ITW Linx enhanced protector . . . . .
MDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MDFMain Distribution Frame. See MDF
patch cords and jumpers . . . . . . .
patch panels . . . . . . . . . . . . .
sneak fuse panels . . . . . . . . . .
telephone power supplies
procedures . . . . . . . . . . . .
telephones used for emergency transfer
trunk cables . . . . . . . . . . . . .
integrated announcement
testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IP network connection, testing . . . . . .
ITW Linx enhanced protector . . . . . . .
ITW Linx enhanced protector, installing . .
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. 58
. 95
. 106
. 95
. 19
. . . . . 62
. . . . . 29
. . . . 54, 57
. . . . . 109
. . 104, 105
. . . . . 38
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. 144
. 147
. 94
. 95
J
jumper wires, connecting trunk pairs . . . . . . . . 67
jumpers, installing and administering . . . . . . . . 62
L
labels
equipment room cabling . . . . .
MDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
labels, control carrier cable . . . . .
lead designations
port circuit packs and telephones
LEDs
alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . .
attendant consoles . . . . . . .
DS1 converter circuit packs . . .
power distribution unit . . . . . .
T1/E1 status . . . . . . . . . .
light emitting diodes. See LEDs.
locating the MDF . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . 33
. . . . . . . . 20
. . . . . . . . 64
. . . . . . . 76, 83
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. 147
. 148
. 148
. 118
. 150
. . . . . . . . 19
M
MDF
cabling . . . . . . . . . . . . .
cabling to auxiliary cabinet . . .
cabling to cabinet . . . . . . . .
connections . . . . . . . . . .
cross connecting media gateway
cross-connect fields . . . . . . .
emergency transfer connections .
emergency transfer unit . . . . .
hardware . . . . . . . . . . . .
installation . . . . . . . . . . .
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33
39
38
17
29
16
99
96
17
17
labels . . . . . . . . . . .
location . . . . . . . . . .
off-premises connections .
media gateway
cross connecting to MDF. .
media gateway installation
coupled bonding conductors
modularity
3-pair and 4-pair. . . . . .
mounting terminal blocks . . .
music-on-hold, testing . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . 20
. . . . . . . . . . . 19
. . . . . . . . . 90, 91
. . . . . . . . . . . 29
. . . . . . . . . . . 58
. . . . . . . . . . . 84
. . . . . . . . . 21, 24
. . . . . . . . . . 145
N
night ringing, testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
O
off premise protection . . . . .
off-premises
connections . . . . . . . .
digital line circuit protectors
protection . . . . . . . . .
station wiring . . . . . . .
stations . . . . . . . . . .
out-of-building connections . .
out-of-building stations . . . .
outputs cable for control carrier
. . . . . . . . . . . 54
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. . 91
. . 94
93, 94
. . 90
. . 91
. . 91
. . 91
. . 81
P
patch cords, installing and administering .
patch panels
installing . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
pin designations
port circuit packs and telephones . . .
playback announcement, testing . . . . .
Port Assignment Record form . . . . . .
port circuit pack pin designations . . . .
port network
expansion interface exchange, testing
TDM bus, testing . . . . . . . . . .
power distribution unit . . . . . . . . . .
power supplies for telephones
1151B1 -48V . . . . . . . . . . . .
1151B2 -48V . . . . . . . . . . . .
installing and wiring . . . . . . . . .
testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
primary protectors
off-premises
connections . . . . . . . . . . .
off-premises connections . . . . . .
provisioning plan . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . 62
. . . . . . 29
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76, 83
. 145
. . 62
76, 83
. . . . . 141
. . . . . 140
. . . . . . 118
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131
131
109
. 116
. . . . . . 93
. . . . . . 94
. . . . . . 52
Issue 3 January 2008
153
Index
Q
queue warning indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
R
recorded announcement, testing . . . . . . . . . . 145
ringing, testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
routing cables to MDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
S
safety instructions
1145B power supply . . . . . . .
1151B1 and 1151B2 power supply .
selector console . . . . . . . . . . .
selector console, testing . . . . . . .
service states, checking . . . . . . .
site locations, adapters . . . . . . . .
sneak current
fuse panels . . . . . . . . . . . .
fuses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
sneak current protection . . . . . . .
sneak current protection, installing . .
sneak current protectors
off-premises connections . . . . .
sneak fuse panels . . . . . . . . . .
sneak fuse panels, installing . . . . .
sneak fuse, connector pinout . . . . .
space requirements
110-type hardware . . . . . . . .
cable slack manager . . . . . . .
sneak fuse panels . . . . . . . .
SPAN LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . .
station cables
sizing . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
wiring design . . . . . . . . . . .
station circuit distribution . . . . . . .
system status, checking . . . . . . .
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. 132
. 88
. 144
. 136
. 41
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. 13, 54
. . 57
. . 54
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. 13
. 13
. 13
. 150
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. 44
. 136
54
54
54
57
T
T1 CSU, and DS1 tie trunk . . .
T1/E1 status LEDs . . . . . . .
TDM bus
service state . . . . . . . .
testing . . . . . . . . . . .
telephone calls
making test calls . . . . . .
telephone installation examples .
telephone pin designations . . .
telephones
connecting . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . 78
. . . . . . . . . . 150
. . . . . . . . . . 136
. . . . . . . . . . 140
. . . . . . . . . . 143
. . . . . . . . . . 97
. . . . . . . . . 76, 83
. . . . . . . . . . 73
emergency transfer . . . . . . . . .
terminal alarm notification
alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
terminal blocks
frame-mounting . . . . . . . . . . .
wall-mounting . . . . . . . . . . . .
terminals,connecting . . . . . . . . . .
terminating trunk transmission test types .
terminating trunk transmission testing . .
test types, terminating trunk transmission
testing
1145B2 power supply . . . . . . . .
complete configuration . . . . . . . .
emergency transfer . . . . . . . . .
expansion interface circuit packs . . .
expansion interface exchange . . . .
external ringing . . . . . . . . . . .
integrated announcements . . . . . .
IP network connection . . . . . . . .
music on hold . . . . . . . . . . . .
night ringing . . . . . . . . . . . . .
playback announcement . . . . . . .
queue warning indicator . . . . . . .
selector console . . . . . . . . . . .
TDM bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
terminating trunk transmission . . . .
TN2312AP/BP . . . . . . . . . . .
tie trunk
analog wiring . . . . . . . . . . . .
digital wiring. . . . . . . . . . . . .
TN2312AP/BP
testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TN799DP C-LAN circuit pack . . . . . .
tone clocks
service state . . . . . . . . . . . .
trunk cables, installing . . . . . . . . .
trunk pairs
connecting with concentrator cables .
connecting with jumper wires . . . . .
. . . 104, 105
. . . . . 148
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146
146
146
135
145
139
141
144
144
147
145
144
145
144
144
140
146
138
. . . . . . 76
. . . . . . 77
. . . . . 138
. . . . . 147
. . . . . 136
. . . . . . 38
. . . . . . 65
. . . . . . 67
U
uniform call distribution
testing queue warning indicator. . . . . . . . . 144
using this documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
V
voice terminals, exposed environments . . . . . . . 94
W
wall-mounting plates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
wiring
154 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones
Index
1146B power distribution unit
2-wire digital station . . . . .
alarm . . . . . . . . . . .
analog station . . . . . . .
analog tie trunk . . . . . . .
battery . . . . . . . . . . .
CO trunk . . . . . . . . . .
DID trunk . . . . . . . . . .
digital tie trunk . . . . . . .
DS1 tie trunks . . . . . . .
off-premises stations . . . .
procedures . . . . . . . . .
telephone connection . . . .
wiring telephone power supplies
procedures . . . . . . . . .
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117
75
75
75
76
115
75
75
77
78
90
69
73
. . . . . . . . . . 109
Z
ZD8AJ adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Issue 3 January 2008
155
Index
156 Installing and Connecting the MDF and Telephones