Troubleshooting guide | Avaya EC500 Telephone User Manual

EC500
Extension to Cellular
Release 3
Troubleshooting Guide
210-100-102
Issue 3
Comcode 700211238
January 2002
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“Toll fraud” is the unauthorized use of your telecommunications
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a corporate employee, agent, subcontractor, or working on your
company’s behalf). Be aware that there may be a risk of toll fraud
associated with your system and that, if toll fraud occurs, it can
result in substantial additional charges for your telecommunications services.
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If you suspect you are being victimized by toll fraud and you need
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National Customer Care Center telephone number. Users of the
MERLIN®, PARTNER®, and System 25 products should call 1
800 628-2888. Users of the System 75, System 85, DEFINITY®
Generic 1, 2 and 3, and DEFINITY® ECS products should call 1
800 643-2353.
Providing Telecommunications Security
Telecommunications security of voice, data, and/or video communications is the prevention of any type of intrusion to, that is,
either unauthorized or malicious access to or use of, your company’s telecommunications equipment) by some party.
Your company’s “telecommunications equipment” includes both
this Avaya product and any other voice/data/video equipment that
could be accessed via this Avaya product (i.e., “networked equipment”).
An “outside party” is anyone who is not a corporate employee,
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Whereas, a “malicious party” is anyone, including someone who
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Such intrusions may be either to/through synchronous (time-multiplexed and/or circuit-based) or asynchronous (character-, message-, or packet-based) equipment or interfaces for reasons of:
• Utilization of capabilities special to the accessed equipment
• Theft (such as, of intellectual property, financial assets, or
toll-facility access)
• Eavesdropping (privacy invasions to humans)
• Mischief (troubling, but apparently innocuous, tampering)
• Harm (such as harmful tampering, data loss or alteration,
regardless of motive or intent)
Be aware that there may be a risk of unauthorized intrusions associated with your system and/or its networked equipment. Also
realize that, if such an intrusion should occur, it could result in a
variety of losses to your company including, but not limited to,
human/data privacy, intellectual property, material assets, financial resources, labor costs, and/or legal costs.
Your Responsibility for Your Company’s Telecommunications
Security
The final responsibility for securing both this system and its networked equipment rests with you – an Avaya customer’s system
administrator, your telecommunications peers, and your managers.
Base the fulfillment of your responsibility on acquired knowledge
and resources from a variety of sources including, but not limited
to:
• Installation documents
• System administration documents
• Security documents
• Hardware-/software-based security tools
• Shared information between you and your peers
• Telecommunications security experts
To prevent intrusions to your telecommunications equipment, you
and your peers should carefully program and configure your:
• Avaya-provided telecommunications systems and their
interfaces
• Avaya-provided software applications, as well as their
underlying hardware/software platforms and interfaces
• Any other equipment networked to your Avaya products
Avaya does not warrant that this product or any of its networked
equipment is either immune from or will prevent either unauthorized or malicious intrusions. Avaya will not be responsible for
any charges, losses, or damages that result from such intrusions.
Federal Communications Commission Statement
Part 15: Class A Statement. This equipment has been tested and
found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when
the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This
equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy
and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions,
may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case the user will be required to correct
the interference at his own expense.
Part 15: Class B Statement. This equipment has been tested and
found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a
residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio-frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference
to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that
interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and
on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one
or more of the following measures:
• Reorient the receiving television or radio antenna where
this may be done safely.
• To the extent possible, relocate the receiver with respect to
the telephone equipment.
• Where the telephone equipment requires ac power, plug the
telephone into a different ac outlet so that the telephone
equipment and receiver are on different branch circuits.
Document” entitled “Related Resources.”
Part 15: Personal Computer Statement. This equipment
has been certified to comply with the limits for a Class B
computing device, pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC
Rules. Only peripherals (computing input/output devices,
terminals, printers, etc.) certified to comply with the Class B
limits may be attached to this computer. Operation with noncertified peripherals is likely to result in interference to radio
and television reception.
Part 68: Network Registration Number. This equipment is
registered with the FCC in accordance with Part 68 of the
FCC Rules.
Part 68: Answer-Supervision Signaling. Allowing this
equipment to be operated in a manner that does not provide
proper answer-supervision signaling is in violation of Part 68
Rules. This equipment returns answer-supervision signals to
the public switched network when:
• Answered by the called station
• Answered by the attendant
• Routed to a recorded announcement that can be
administered by the CPE user
This equipment returns answer-supervision signals on all
DID calls forwarded back to the public switched telephone
network. Permissible exceptions are:
• A call is unanswered
• A busy tone is received
• A reorder tone is received
Industry Canada (IC) Interference Information
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for
radio noise emissions set out in the radio interference regulations of Industry Canada.
Le Présent Appareil Nomérique n’émet pas de bruits
radioélectriques dépassant les limites applicables aux appareils numériques de la class A préscrites dans le reglement sur
le brouillage radioélectrique édicté par le Industrie Canada.
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Warranty
Avaya provides a limited warranty on this product. Refer to
the “Limited Use Software License Agreement” card provided with your package.
European Union Declaration of Conformity
The “CE” mark affixed to the equipment means that it conforms to the above directives. Avaya Inc. declares that equipment specified in this document conforms to the referenced
European Union (EU) Directives and Harmonized Standards
listed below:
EMC Directive
89/336/EEC
Low-Voltage Directive73/23/EEC
Acknowledgment
This document was prepared by Avaya Inc., Denver, CO.
Contents
About This Document
■
■
■
■
■
Chapter 1:
Basic Troubleshooting
■
■
■
Chapter 2:
Purpose vii
Intended Audience vii
Reason for Reissue vii
How to Use This Document vii
Related Documentation viii
Introduction 1-1
Error Conditions in the Operation of EC500 1-2
Terminal Error Codes 1-7
What To Do When Users Cannot Receive EC500 Calls
■
■
Introduction 2-1
Procedures for Users Who Cannot Receive EC500 Calls on Their Cell
Phones 2-1
Issue 3 January 2002 v
Contents
vi Issue 3 January 2002
About This Document
Purpose
This guide describes suggested troubleshooting actions to resolve problems that
may occur during EC500 operation.
Intended Audience
The audience for this guide includes System Administrators, Software Specialists,
and Avaya technical personnel.
Reason for Reissue
This guide has been reissued to provide troubleshooting information for Release 3
of EC500.
How to Use This Document
This document is organized as follows:
Chapter 1, Basic Troubleshooting - Provides a chart that covers the most
common problems users may experience due to interaction between EC500 and
their cellular service provider. The chart also provides suggested
actions/resolutions to correct each problem.
Chapter 2, What To Do When Users Cannot Receive EC500 Calls - Provides
procedures for correcting situations which result in users not being able to receive
EC500 calls on their cell phones.
Issue 3 January 2002
vii
About This Document
Related Documentation
Related documentation:
Avaya EC500 Release 3 Extension to Cellular Installation and Administration
Guide, Issue 3, January 2002 (210-100-500)
Avaya EC500 Release 2 Extension to Cellular Installation and Administration
Guide, Issue 2, July 2001 (210-100-500)
Avaya EC500 Extension to Cellular Installation/Administration Guide, Issue 1,
February 8, 2001 (210-100-500)
Avaya EC500 Extension to Cellular Release 3 User Guide, Issue 3, January, 2002
(210-100-700)
Avaya EC500 Extension to Cellular Release 2 User Guide, Issue 1, July, 2001
(210-100-700)
Online documentation for EC500 is provided at the following URLs:
http://www1.avaya.com/enterprise/who/docs/ec500
http://support.avaya.com/wireless
viii Issue 3 January 2002
Chapter 1: Basic Troubleshooting
1
Introduction
This chapter provides a basic troubleshooting chart that covers possible problems
that might be encountered with EC500 operation. Error conditions displayed on
your administrative terminal are also covered.
If users report that EC500 calls are not being received on their cell phones, first
see Chapter 2: What To Do When Users Cannot Receive EC500 Calls, then refer
to the troubleshooting chart in this chapter.
For test procedures used to verify the connection to the cell phone, see Chapter 4,
“Installation and Administration Test” in the EC500 Release 3 Installation and
Administration Guide.
If performing the procedures described in both this chapter and Chapter 2 do not
resolve the problem, contact your Avaya technician for assistance.
Issue 3 January 2002
1-1
Chapter 1: Basic Troubleshooting
Figure 1-1.
Error Conditions in the Operation of EC500
Suggested Action or
Resolution
Situation
Possible Cause(s)
Users cannot receive
EC500 calls on their cell
phones.
See the procedures in
Chapter 2: What To Do When
Users Cannot Receive
EC500 Calls for detailed
information on possible
sources of the problem.
See the procedures in
Chapter 2: What To Do
When Users Cannot
Receive EC500 Calls for
detailed instructions on
troubleshooting this
problem.
The user reports that all
calls go directly to the
cellular voice mail, but
the cell phone is ON and
working fine.
Both XMOBILE extensions
may be bridged to the same
line appearance on the
principal phone.
Make sure that both
XMOBILE extensions are
not bridged to the same line
appearance on the principal
phone.
When running the list
command, XMOBILES
that you know are
administered do not
appear.
The cell phone number has
not been administered on the
Station screen, but in the
ARS tables instead.
Use the list all
command or change the
Station screen
administration to include the
cell phone number.
The number (or number
plus*) used to match the cell
phone number includes the
dial prefix.
Don’t include the dial prefix.
1-2 Issue 3 January 2002
Introduction
Suggested Action or
Resolution
Situation
Possible Cause(s)
The user reports that
voice mail messages are
not going to the mailbox
of choice.
Incoming calls to an office
number are usually routed to
the resident AUDIX voice mail
after a pre-determined
number of rings. For cell
phone calls, the same
functionality exists from the
Service Provider. At this time
there is no way to coordinate
the two different voice mail
systems using EC500.
It is possible to set up the
number of rings before
coverage answers so that
one or the other voice mail
systems always answers
first. (The user can contact
the Cellular Service Provider
to disable the service
provider’s voice mail system
and also increase the
number of rings when the
phone is in a unreachable
state i.e., an out-ofcoverage area or when the
phone is not turned ON.)
However, there are
coverage options in both the
Avaya Communications
Server (busy, active,
send-all-calls) and the
network (cell phone
unavailable, network
congested) that cause a call
to immediately go to the
respective voice mail. Users
should realize that an
unanswered call could result
in a voice mail message in
either mailbox.
The user reports that he
or she is missing calls at
the office number
because the cell phone
voice mail is picking up
the call instead.
The user has turned off the
cell phone or the phone is in
an out-of-coverage state.
When this is the case,
Service Providers usually
have the calls routed to voice
mail automatically. There is
no way to control this with
EC500.
It is recommended that
EC500 be disabled prior to
entering an out-of-coverage
area or turning off the cell
phone. This allows the user
to pick up the call on the
office number or let the
Corporate voice mail answer
the calls. Or, the user can
have the Cellular Service
Provider disable that voice
mail system or increase the
number of rings when the
phone is in an unreachable
state.
Issue 3 January 2002
1-3
Chapter 1: Basic Troubleshooting
Suggested Action or
Resolution
Situation
Possible Cause(s)
The user reports that he
or she is missing calls at
the office number
because the cell phone
voice mail is picking up
the call instead.
(Continued...)
Both XMOBILEs are bridged
to the same line appearance
on the principal phone.
Check that the first
XMOBILE is bridged to the
first line appearance and the
second XMOBILE is bridged
to the second line
appearance.
The user reports that the
cell phone is not
receiving caller
identification numbers for
calls from the Avaya
Communications Server,
while the office number
that the cell phone is
bridged to does.
The Avaya Communications
Server has not been
administered properly for
sending 10-digit caller
identification numbers. Most
Service Providers require a
10-digit number.
Re-check both loopback
trunk screens to make sure
the send calling
number is set to y.
External trunks serving the
cell phone are using a
non-ISDN trunk.
Change the routing
administration to route over
an ISDN trunk.
The Configuration Set screen
has the Calling Number
Style field set to PBX.
Change the Calling
Number Style field on the
Configuration Set screen to
network.
There is an incorrect entry on
the ISDN public-unknown
numbering screen.
Verify that the entries on the
ISDN public-unknown
numbering screen are
correct.
The ISDN Service Provider
(SP) is replacing the caller
identification with a fixed
caller ID.
Escalate the issue to your
Telecom Manager who may
contact your ISDN SP to
request that this be fixed, or
find an alternate ISDN SP
that allows the caller
identification to pass.
The switch is blocking the
outgoing caller identification
and is passing a default caller
ID.
Change your switch
administration to allow caller
identification to go outside
the switch.
The user reports that the
person being called is
receiving the incorrect
caller ID.
The user reports that the
cell phone is receiving a
switch default caller
identification number for
calls from the Avaya
Communications Server.
1-4 Issue 3 January 2002
Introduction
Suggested Action or
Resolution
Situation
Possible Cause(s)
The user hears a beep
while on a call originating
from the Avaya
Communications Server,
but is not able to use the
call waiting feature on the
cell phone to switch to
the other call.
Most likely the user is hearing
the tone provided by the
Avaya Communications
Server when call waiting is
enabled at the switch.
You have two possibilities:
1) communicate to the user
that when a call waiting
indication is heard, but the
user can’t switch the call, he
or she needs to hang up on
the first call in order to
receive the call, OR
2) disable call waiting at the
switch level and the regular
call waiting capability
provided by the Cellular
Service Provider then
handles the call waiting
feature.
The EC500 cell phone
call into the office switch
fails to provide the office
caller ID.
The Cell Phone Number
field administered for the
EC500 XMOBILE station
does not have the required
entry.
Enter the full caller ID
number in the Cell Phone
Number field.
External trunks serving the
cell phone are using a
non-ISDN trunk.
Change the routing
administration to route over
an ISDN trunk.
The XMOBILE station is not
bridged to the user’s desk
phone.
Bridge the XMOBILE station
to the user’s desk phone.
The Mapping Mode field
administered for the EC500
XMOBILE station does not
contain origination or
both.
Enter origination or
both in the Mapping Mode
field.
The external inbound call is
not entering into the switch
over an ISDN trunk.
Contact the ISDN Service
Provider to ensure that
inbound calls enter the
switch via an ISDN trunk.
The external inbound call
does not enter the switch on
which the EC500 Cell
Phone’s XMOBILE station is
administered.
Create an XMOBILE station
for the EC500 Cell Phone
with the proper mapping on
the switch that the call
enters.
Issue 3 January 2002
1-5
Chapter 1: Basic Troubleshooting
Suggested Action or
Resolution
Situation
Possible Cause(s)
The EC500 cell phone
call into the office switch
fails to provide the office
caller ID. (Continued...)
The calling number is
manipulated on the inbound
trunk form.
Administer the EC500
XMOBILE station’s Cell
Phone Number field to
match the modified calling
number.
The Cellular Service Provider
does not send the calling
number.
Call the Cellular Service
Provider to allow the caller
ID to be sent.
Someone else happened to
be on a call at the same time
on the user’s desk phone and
on the same line appearance
as the originating EC500 Cell
Phone call.
Move the bridged line
appearance to a button
unlikely to be used by
another phone call.
The Avaya
Communications Server
does not allow a default
entry of extensions, that
is, instead of entering the
extension followed by the
# key, just entering #
alone.
The cell phone number is not
properly mapped.
See “The EC500 cell phone
call into the office switch
fails to provide the office
caller ID” above and on the
previous page.
An intercept tone is
received when
attempting to
Enable/Disable EC500
(that is, enter the Feature
Access Code, #, Station
Security Code, and #).
The user has used the Station
Security Code of the
XMOBILE extension and it is
different from that of the
principal.
The user must enter the
code of the principal
extension.
1-6 Issue 3 January 2002
Terminal Error Codes
Suggested Action or
Resolution
Situation
Possible Cause(s)
When attempting to
Enable/Disable EC500,
an intercept tone is
received.
The XMOBILE Type
administered on the Station
screen for the XMOBILE
station is not EC500.
Change the XMOBILE Type
administered on the Station
screen to EC500.
The XMOBILE station’s
XMOBILE Type field is
EC500 and Configuration
Set is not administered for
dtmf.
Access the associated
Configuration Set screen
and ensure that the entry in
the Post Connect
Dialing Option field is
dtmf.
The XMOBILE station is not
bridged to the principal.
Bridge the XMOBILE station
to the principal extension.
The office caller ID is that
of the origination mapped
EC500 XMOBILE station
and not that of the
principal extension.
Terminal Error Codes
When the service state of an XMOBILE station changes from In-Service to
Out-of-Service, error type 18 is logged in the error log against the XMOBILE
station and a warning alarm is raised and logged in the alarm log.
When the service state of an XMOBILE station changes from Out-of-Service to
In-Service, error type 18 is removed from the error log and the warning alarm is
removed from the alarm log.
See Chapter 5, “Maintenance,” in the EC500 Release 3 Installation and
Administration Guide for more information on busy out and release maintenance
commands.
Issue 3 January 2002
1-7
Chapter 1: Basic Troubleshooting
1-8 Issue 3 January 2002
Chapter 2: What To Do When Users
Cannot Receive EC500 Calls
2
Introduction
Most problems reported by EC500 users are not likely to be problems with EC500
itself. In most cases, reported problems are caused by unexpected interaction
between the Cellular Service Provider and EC500 features.
This chapter provides troubleshooting procedures to follow when users cannot
receive EC500 calls on their cell phones.
A basic EC500 troubleshooting chart covering other possible problems that might
be encountered with EC500 operation can be found in Chapter 1: Basic
Troubleshooting, as can information on error codes you may see on your
administrative terminal.
For test procedures used to verify the connection to the cell phone, see Chapter 4,
“Installation and Administration Test” in the EC500 Release 3 Installation and
Administration Guide.
Procedures for Users Who Cannot
Receive EC500 Calls on Their Cell
Phones
If an EC500 user is not able to receive EC500 calls on the cell phone, follow these
procedures in the suggested order to isolate and fix the problem. After each step,
you may want to verify that the problem has been fixed by making an EC500 call
to the mapped cell phone.
1. Verify that you can call the cell phone from the switch. This also verifies that
the user’s service contract with the Cellular Service Provider (CSP) is
active, and that the user gets good coverage in that area.
Issue 3 January 2002
2-1
Chapter 2: What To Do When Users Cannot Receive
EC500 Calls
Check this by making a direct call to the cell phone’s published number.
When making this test call, wait until the call rings the cell phone (which
verifies that there is coverage), or until the call goes to the CSP’s voice mail
(which verifies that the service is provided but there may not be good
coverage).
2. Use the status station command for the principal number that the
XMOBILE is bridged to and verify that SAC or Call Forwarding has not
been activated on the principal extension.
3. Use the status station <XMOBILE extension> command to check
the following:
■
The service state is “in service/idle.” If not, use the release
<XMOBILE extension> command to put it back in the active state.
■
The EC500 state is enabled on the Status Station screen. If EC500
is disabled, ask the user to enable EC500 for the principal office
number.
4. On the XMOBILE Station screen verify that the entries in the Mobility
Trunk Group, Dial Prefix, and Cell Phone Number fields are
correct as specified in the EC500 Release 3 Installation and Administration
Guide’s Chapter 3, “Administration.”
5. Enter the status trunk <trunk group number> command for both
the inbound and outbound trunks in the loop back arrangement and verify
that the trunk ports are in service, and that there are enough ports for the
projected EC500 traffic needs; that is, not all ports are in an active state.
If all (or most) ports are active you may need to administer more trunk
ports.
If the trunk ports are in an out-of-service state:
■
Verify that the trunk administration is correct, as specified in the
EC500 Release 3 Installation and Administration Guide’s Chapter 3,
“Administration.”
■
Check the yellow LED on the circuit packs used in the loop back
arrangement.
— If the yellow LED is ON but the trunk is down, do a test
board long clear <ppcss> for both the trunks in the
loop back arrangement. If this does not fix the problem,
continue with the procedures in the next step, Perform
Hardware Checks.
— If the yellow LED is OFF, continue with the procedures in the
next step, Perform Hardware Checks.
2-2 Issue 3 January 2002
Procedures for Users Who Cannot Receive EC500
Calls on Their Cell Phones
■
Perform Hardware Checks:
If using DS1 loop back:
■
If amphenol connector is being used:
— Verify that the loop back cable is properly
cross-connected as specified in Chapter 2,
“Installation and Planning” of the EC500 Release 3
Installation and Administration Guide.
— If the connection is correct, the problem could be a
bad cable. Replace the cable.
■
If a D8W connector is being used:
— Verify that it is connected to Slot 8 of the Type 356A
connector.
— If the above check is OK, the cause of the problem
could be a bad cable. Replace the cable.
— The cause of the problem could also be that the 356A
connector is bad. Replace the connector.
If using H.323 IP trunks for the loop back arrangement:
■
Verify that the administration is as specified in the EC500
Release 3 Installation and Administration Guide’s Chapter 3,
“Administration.”
■
Busy out and release the two signalling groups associated
with EC500 loopback.
■
See maintenance documentation that can be obtained from
the web site:
http://prodpubs.avaya.com/final/definity/r9.5/233758_3.pdf
6. Check the COR of the inbound trunk in the loop back arrangement and
verify that the trunk does not have calling restrictions, that it is not outward
restricted, and that its Facility Restriction Level (FRL) is sufficient to access
an external ISDN trunk facility. If any such problems are found, administer
the right COR for that trunk.
7. Check the ARS Analysis table and make sure that there is an entry to route
the cell phone number over an ISDN trunk on the switch.
If the problem cannot be corrected by following the above procedure(s) or those
listed in Chapter 1, escalate the issue to an Avaya technician. In addition to the
checks listed above, verify with the technician that the EC500 XMOBILE station is
not restricted from receiving incoming calls.
Issue 3 January 2002
2-3
Chapter 2: What To Do When Users Cannot Receive
EC500 Calls
2-4 Issue 3 January 2002
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