Instruction manual | Avaya Octel 200 Server User Manual

Installation and Maintenance
Octel 200 and Octel 300
Message Servers
Installation and Maintenance Manual
S.4.1
March 2001
Avaya Inc.
Communication Applications Group
1001 Murphy Ranch Road
Milpitas, CA 95035-7912 USA
IV
Copyright 2001, Avaya Inc.
All Rights Reserved
Printed in U.S.A.
Notice
Every effort was made to ensure that the information in this book was
complete and accurate at the time of printing. However, information is
subject to change.
Disclaimer
Intellectual property related to this product (including trademarks) and
registered to Lucent Technologies Inc. has been transferred or licensed
to Avaya Inc.
Any reference within the text to Lucent Technologies Inc. or Lucent
should be interpreted as references to Avaya Inc. The exception is cross
references to Avaya Inc. or to books published prior to April 1, 2001,
which may retain their original Lucent tittles.
Avaya Inc. formed as a result of Lucent’s planned restructuring, designs, builds, and delivers voice, converged voice and data, customer
relationship management, messaging, multi−service networking and
structured cabling products and services. Avaya Labs is the research
and development arm for the company.
Preventing Toll Fraud
“Toll fraud” is the unauthorized use of your telecommunications system by an unauthorized party (for example, a person who is not a corporate employee, agent, subcontractor, or working on your company’s
behalf). Be aware that there may be a risk of toll fraud associated with
your system and that, if toll fraud occurs, it can result in substantial
additional charges for your telecommunications services.
Avaya Inc. Fraud Intervention:
If you suspect that you are being victimized by toll fraud and you need
technical assistance or support, call the Technical Service Center’s Toll
Fraud Intervention Hotline at 1−800−643−2353.
Providing Telecommunications Security
Telecommunications security (of voice, data, and/or video communications) is the prevention of any type of intrusion to (that is, either unauthorized or malicious access to or use of your company’s telecommunications equipment) by some party.
Your company’s “telecommunications equipment” includes both this
Avaya product and any other voice/data/video equipment that could be
accessed via this Avaya product (that is, “networked equipment”).
An “outside party” is anyone who is not a corporate employee, agent,
subcontractor, or working on your company’s behalf. Whereas, a “malicious party” is anyone (including someone who may be otherwise
authorized) who accesses your telecommunications equipment with
either malicious or mischievous intent.
Such intrusions may be either to/through synchronous (time−multiplexed and/or circuit−based) or asynchronous (character−, message−, or
packet−based) equipment or interfaces for reasons of:
S Utilization (of capabilities special to the accessed equip−
ment)
S Theft (such as, of intellectual property, financial assets, or
toll−facility access)
S Eavesdropping (privacy invasions to humans)
S Mischief (troubling, but apparently innocuous, tampering)
S Harm (such as harmful tampering, data loss or alteration,
regardless of motive or intent)
Be aware that there may be a risk of unauthorized intrusions associated
with your system and/or its networked equipment. Also realize that, if
such an intrusion should occur, it could result in a variety of losses to
your company (including but not limited to, human/data privacy, intellectual property, material assets, financial resources, labor costs, and/or
legal costs).
Your Responsibility for Your Company’s Telecommunications Security
The final responsibility for securing both this system and its net−
worked equipment rests with you − a Avaya customer’s system administrator, your telecommunications peers, and your managers. Base the
fulfillment of your responsibility on acquired knowledge and resources
from a variety of sources including but not limited to:
S Installation documents
S System administration documents
S Security documents
S Hardware−/software−based security tools
S Shared information between you and your peers
S Telecommunications security experts
To prevent intrusions to your telecommunications equipment, you and
your peers should carefully program and configure your:
S Avaya−provided telecommunications systems and their
interfaces
S Avaya−provided software applications, as well as their underlying hardware/software platforms and interfaces
S Any other equipment networked to your Avaya products.
Avaya Inc. does not warrant that this product or any of its networked
equipment is either immune from or will prevent either unauthorized or
malicious intrusions. Avaya Inc. will not be responsible for any charges,
losses, or damages that result from such intrusions.
Federal Communications Commission Statement
Part 15: Class A Statement. This equipment has been tested and found
to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15
of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a
commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate
radio−frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with
the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to
cause harmful interference, in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his/her own expense.
Part 68: Network Registration Number. This equipment is registered
with the FCC in accordance with Part 68 of the FCC Rules. Refer to the
FCC Part 68 Notice to Users Compliance Statements in the Product Description Volume.
Canadian Department of Communications (DOC)
Interference Information
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio noise
emissions set out in the radio interference regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.
Le Présent Appareil Nomérique n’émet pas de bruits radioélec−triques dépassant les limites applicables aux appareils numériques de la class A
préscrites dans le reglement sur le brouillage radioélectrique édicté par le
ministére des Communications du Canada.
Ordering Information
Call: Avaya Publications Center
Voice 1−800−457−1235
International Voice 317−361−5353
Fax 1−800−457−1764 International Fax 317−361−5355
Write: Avaya Publications Center
2855 North Franklin Road
Indianapolis, IN 46219
Order: Document No. PB60019-01
March 2001
For additional documents, refer to the section in “About This Book” entitled “Related Documents.”
You can be placed on a standing order list for this and other documents you
may need. Standing order will enable you to automatically receive updated versions of individual documents or document sets, billed to account information that you provide. For more information on standing orders, or to be put on a list to receive future issues of this document, contact
the Avaya Publications Center.
European Union Declaration of Conformity
The “CE” mark affixed to the DEFINITY ONE equipment described in
this book indicates that the equipment conforms to the following European Union (EU) Directives:
S Electromagnetic Compatibility (89/336/EEC)
S Low Voltage (73/23/EEC)
S Telecommunications Terminal Equipment (TTE) i−CTR3
BRI and i−CTR4 PRI
The “CE” mark affixed to the equipment
means that it conforms to the above
directives.
For more information on standards compliance, contact your local
distributor.
Comments
Please send an email message to infodev@avaya.com with your comments about this document.
COMPLIANCE STATEMENTS
FCC PART 68 NOTICE TO USERS
This equipment complies with Part 68 of the FCC rules. On the back of this equipment is a label that
contains, among other information, the FCC registration number and ringer equivalence number (REN)
for this equipment. If requested, this information must be provided to the telephone company.
The REN is used to determine the quantity of devices that can be connected to the telephone line.
Excessive RENs on the telephone line may result in the device not ringing in response to an incoming
call. In most but not all areas, the sum of the RENs should not exceed five(5.0). To be certain of the
number of devices that may be connected to the line, as determined by the total RENs, contact the
telephone company for the maximum REN in your area.
If this equipment causes harm to the telephone network, the telephone, the telephone company will notify
you in advance that temporary discontinuance of service may be required. If advance notice is not
practical, the telephone company will notify the customer as soon as possible. Also, you will be advised
of your right to file a complaint with the FCC.
The telephone company may make changes in its facilities, equipment, operations, or procedures that
could affect the operation of the equipment. If this happens, the telephone company will provide advance
notice in order for you to make the necessary modifications in order to maintain uninterrupted service.
If trouble is experienced with the equipment, please contact:
-
Technical Assistance Center (TAC): The TAC supports distributors, GBS customers, and direct field
service engineers in the United States of America.
408-922-1822
If the trouble is causing harm to the network, the telephone company may request that you remove the
equipment from the network until the problem is resolved.
Repairs should be performed by Octel Communications Corporation or an authorized representative of
Lucent Technologies Corporation or the warranty or service agreement could be void.
This equipment cannot be used on telephone company-provided coin service.
Connection to Party Line Service is subject to state tariffs.
TELEPHONE CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT OF 1991
The Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 makes it unlawful for any person to use a computer or
other electronic device to send any message via a telephone facsimile machine unless such message
clearly contains, in a margin at the top or bottom of each transmitted page or on the first page of the
transmission, the date and time it is sent and an identification of the business, other entity, or individual
sending the message and the telephone number of the sending machine or such business, other entity, or
individual.
ADJUNCTS — KX and PX DEVICES
If the O200 or O300 is to be used with a leased system, permission of the owner should be requested
before its connection. The O200 / O300 when using either the APIC or NPIC is intended only for
connection to a registered PBX and never directly to the network.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
WARNING — FCC PART 15 COMPLIANCE
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device pursuant
to Part 15 FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference when this equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates,
uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this
equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case the user will be
required to correct the interference at his/her own expense. Any changes or modifications to this
equipment not expressly approved by Octel Communications Corporation may void compliance with
FCC requirements and the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
UNITED KINGDOM REQUIREMENTS
AND
INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE
Introduction
The Octel 300 message server is a 32 to 128 port voice messaging system and the Octel 200 message
server is a 4 to 64 port voice messaging system. When installed at a customer’s site, the message server
attaches to the extension lines of a PABX or directly to the public network via Direct Exchange Lines.
This document section describes certain operation requirements which must be complied with in the
United Kingdom to allow connection of the message server to a PABX or directly to the public network.
" CAUTION A
Failure to comply to the requirements described in this document may invalidate the
compliance of the apparatus, thus prohibiting its connection to the network in the United
Kingdom.
" CAUTION A
The approval of this apparatus will be invalidated if it is used with internal software not formally
accepted by BABT. The internal software is not accessible or alterable by the user.
" NOTICE A
There are no user serviceable parts, or user controls, in the system enclosure.
" NOTICE A
Interconnection directly, or by way of other apparatus, of Octel 200 ports or Octel 300 ports
with ports which do not comply with the requirements of BS6301 may produce hazardous
conditions on the BT network. Advice should be obtained from a competent engineer before
such a connection is made.
" NOTICE A
When network addresses (telephone numbers) are manually entered into the system for
auto-calling, care should be exercised to ensure that the addresses are correct
" NOTICE A
This apparatus is not to be used for making calls to the BT emergency service.
Ringer Equivalence
Under normal operating conditions, this apparatus is not meant to form part of a multiple installation; the
port interfaces are the sole termination of the line. Additional apparatus, BT or otherwise, must not be
connected between this equipment and the PABX line or public network.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Functions
The Octel 200 and the Octel 300 message servers have the following functions.
-
Automatically answers calls redirected on no answer or busy conditions.
-
Offers callers an opportunity to leave a message.
-
Stores the message.
-
Forwards the message as and when appropriate.
-
When connected to a PBX, the ability to answer and transfer a call.
-
The option to place outgoing calls (through a PBX, or directly into the public network) for the
purpose of delivering messages.
The Octel 200 and the Octel 300 message servers have the following outcalling functions.
-
-
-
The system operator can store predetermined numbers to be dialed for outcalls within the message
server. These numbers include pauses to allow for secondary proceed indications.
The message server automatically schedules multiple call repeat attempts as required for
unsuccessful outcalls. The times between calls and the number of repeat attempts conform to the
requirements of the appropriate UK specifications.
The message server is suitable for connection to a PABX that returns secondary proceed indication
through the use of dialing pauses, as described above. For PABXs that do not return secondary
proceed indication, the pauses are not used.
Pay Phones
The Octel 200 and the Octel 300 message servers are not suitable as an extension to a pay phone.
Keys
When the message server is in operation, and is not being serviced by maintenance personnel, the key to
the enclosure shall be removed to prevent user (operator) access.
Outcall Configuration Requirements
The Octel 200 and the Octel 300 message servers have the capability to outcall via the PABX or directly
to the public network via Direct Exchange Lines. The message server uses multi-frequency dialing. Loop
disconnect dialing is not supported.
" CAUTION A
Failure to comply to the requirements described in this document may invalidate the
compliance of the apparatus, thus prohibiting its connection to the network in the United
Kingdom.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
System Parameters
The following System Parameters are particular to the requirements for the UK. The installation engineer
must verify that these parameters have the following assignments:
Number
.
System Parameter Name
Value
68
NET:REMOTE DELIVERY ATTEMPT LIMIT
20
69
NET:REMOTE DELAY BEFORE RETRY (MINUTES)
10
Delays in dialing strings (D character) between the PABX access code and the rest of the digits
must be between 3.5 and 8 seconds. Set D character timing in System Parameter 28 — “D”
CHARACTER DELAY TIME.
INFORMATION Table Indices
The following INFORMATION Table indices are particular to the requirements for the UK. The installation
engineer must verify that these indices have the following assignments:
Number
Information Table Index Name
Value
15
OFFSITE SPEAK
4
16
OFFSITE SPEAK DELAY
5
The values for INFORMATION Table Indices 15 and 16 must be set so that the total offhook time is less
than 60 seconds. The above values meet that specification TIMES.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
CANADIAN USER INFORMATION
Industry Canada Certification No. 883-4105A
NOTICE
The Industry Canada label identifies certified equipment. This certification means that the equipment
meets certain telecommunications network protective, operational, and safety requirements. Industry
Canada does not guarantee the equipment will operate to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to be connected to the facilities
of the local telecommunications company. The equipment must also be installed using an acceptable
method of connection. In some cases, the company’s inside wiring associated with a single line individual
service may be extended by means of a certified connector assembly (telephone extension cord). The
customer should be aware that compliance with the above conditions may not prevent degradation of
service in some situations. Communication cables provided by the user to connect to the
telecommunications network must be not less than 26 AWG copper.
Repairs should be performed by Lucent Technologies Corporation or an authorized representative of
Lucent Technologies Corporation or the warranty or service agreement could be void. In the event that
this equipment malfunctions, the telecommunications company may request that the equipment be
disconnected.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground connections of the power utility,
telephone lines, and internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected together. This
precaution may be particularly important in rural areas.
CAUTION
Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but should contact the appropriate
electric inspection authority, or electrician, as appropriate. The equipment is installed by trained
personnel.
The Load Number (LN) assigned to each terminal device denotes the percentage of the total load to be
connected to a telephone loop which is used by the device, to prevent overloading. The termination on a
loop may consist of any combination of devices subject only to the requirement that the total of the Load
Numbers of all the devices does not exceed 100.
The load number of this product O200 / O300 is 19.
CANADIAN EMC STATEMENT
This Class A digital apparatus meets all the requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing
Equipment Regulations (ICES).
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Industrie Canada:
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A respecte toutes les exigences du Reglement sur le matériel
brouilleur du Canada (ICES).
AVIS: L’étiquette de L’Industrie Canada identifie le matériel homologué. Cette étiquette certifie que le
matériel est conforme à certaines normes de protection, d’exploitation et de sécurité des réseaux de
télécommunications. Industrie Canada n’assure toutefois pas que le matériel fonctionnera à la
satisfaction de l’utilisateur.
Avant d’installer ce matériel, l’utilisateur doit s’assurer qu’il est permis de le raccorder aux installations
de l’entreprise locale de télécommunication. Le matériel doit également être installé en suivant une
méthode acceptée de raccordement. L’abonné ne doit pas oublier qu’il est possible que la conformité aux
conditions énoncées ci−dessous n’empechent pas la dégradation du service dans certaines situations.
Les réparations de matériel homologué doivent être effectuées par un centre d’entretien canadien autorisé
designé par le fournisseur. La compagnie de télécommunications peut demander à l’utilisateur de
débrancher un appareil à la suite de reparations où de modifications effectuées par l’utilisateur ou à cause
de mauvais fonctionnement.
Pour sa propre protection, l’utilisateur doit s’assurer que tous les fils de mise à terre de la source
d’énergie électrique, les lignes téléphoniques et les canalisations d’eau métalliques, s’il y en a, sont
raccordées ensembles. Cette précaution est particulierement importante dans les régions rurales.
AVERTISSEMENT: L’utilisateur ne doit pas tenter de faire ces raccordements de lui−même; il doit
avoir recours à un service d’inspection des installations électriques, ou à un électricien, selon le cas.
La câble de télécommunications qui sont fournis par l’utilisateur ne doivent pas être infériers à 26 AWG
de cuivre.
L’Indice de Charge (IC) assigné à chaque dispositif terminal indique, pour éviter toute surcharge, le
pourcentage de la charge totale qui peut être racordée à un circuit téléphonique bouclé utilisé par ce
dispositif. La terminaison du circuit bouclé peut être constituée de n’importe quelle combinaison de
dispositifs, pourvu que la somme des indices de charge de l’ensemble des dispositifs ne dépasse pas 100.
L’indice de charge de ce produit O200 / O300 est 19.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300 Installation and Maintenance Manual
Installation & Maintenance volume
Table of Contents
Chapter 1 INSTALL
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
Understanding the INSTALL Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Using INSTALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Answering Questions in INSTALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Answering Questions About Other Telephone Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-25
Exiting Before the INSTALL is Complete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-27
Chapter 2 Hardware
2.1
Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Chapter 3 Preparing the Phone System
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
How the Octel 200/300 Works with the Phone System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Determining Necessary Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Changes to Central Office Trunking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Phone System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Implementing the Octel 200/300 on PBXs without DIL Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Chapter 4 Installation
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
PB60019−01
Receiving the Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Terminal Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
Octel 200/300 Hardware Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Octel 200/300 Software Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
Connecting the Phone System to the Octel 200/300
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26
Octel 200/300 Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-30
Tracking the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38
PIN Assignments for Message Server Cards and Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-41
Octel 300 Rack Mount Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-55
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Table of Contents
(continued)
Chapter 5 Reports
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9
5.10
5.11
5.12
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Listing and Clearing Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
System Performance Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Network Traffic Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17
User Message Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-23
User Calling Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-25
Disk Usage Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-27
Port Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-29
Mailbox Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-33
User Status Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-34
Integration Calling Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-35
System Performance by COS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-37
Chapter 6 Maintenance Commands
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
Command Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
Application Delays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-46
Message Block and Message Purge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-59
Chapter 7 LOG Commands
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
Appendix A
LOG Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Call Processing Trace (CPT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
Call Detail Record Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-21
Namesend Activity Trace Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-40
Moves, Adds, and Changes Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-43
Server Activity Trace Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-50
Call-Processing Trace Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7A-1
Chapter 8 System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8.1
8.2
8.3
Boot ROM Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Hardware Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
Traffic Peg Count Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-40
Chapter 9 Hardware Replacement
9.1
9.2
Octel 200/300
Hardware Maintenance and Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Hardware Replacement Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Table of Contents
(continued)
Chapter 10 Digital Trunk Interface Card (DTIC)
10.1
10.2
10.3
Digital Trunk Interface Card (DTIC) Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1
How to Configure the DTIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3
Troubleshooting and Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-9
Chapter 11 LAN Card
11.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1
11.2
LAN Installation and Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2
11.3
Testing the LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-7
11.4
Taking the LAN Out of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-11
Appendix A Internet Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11A-1
Appendix B Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11B-1
Appendix C Octel Private MIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11C-1
Chapter 12 Procedures
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.4
12.5
12.6
12.7
PB60019−01
Electronic Feature Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1
Floppy Disk Backup Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-3
Floppy Disk Restore Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-22
Floppy Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-39
Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-40
Hard Disk Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-41
Adding Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-70
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300 Installation and Maintenance Manual
Installation & Maintenance volume
Table of Contents — Figures
Chapter 1 INSTALL
1-1
Order of Questions and Associated Tables in the INSTALL Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Chapter 2 Hardware
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
Octel 200
Octel 200
Octel 200
Octel 200
Octel 300
Octel 300
Octel 300
Octel 300
Cabinet Shelf Structure, From the Front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Cabinet, Inside Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Cabinet, Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Cabinet, Inside Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Cabinet Shelf Structure, From the Front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Cabinet, Inside Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
Cabinet, Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
Cabinet, Inside Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13
Chapter 3 Preparing the Phone System
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
Octel 200/300 Connection to Phone System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
All Incoming Lines Directed to the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Incoming Calls Split Between Console and the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Sample Agency Letter for PE Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Service Provider Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Directing Incoming Calls to the Octel 200/300 When the PBX Does Not Offer a DIL Feature . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Chapter 4 Installation
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-12
Octel 200 Floor Plan for Installation in the US, Canada and Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Octel 300 Floor Plan for Installation for the US, Canada, and Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Octel 200 Direct-Connect Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12
Octel 300 Direct-Connect Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
Diagram of the Field Wiring for –48-Vdc Powered Octel 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
First and Second RS-232C Serial-Port Cable Pinouts for Connection to Terminal Equipment (DTE) . . . . 4-17
Octel 200/300 to External Modem Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-18
50-Pin Male Telco Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Octel 200/300 Cabinet Installed in 19-Inch Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-40
Typical Octel 200/300 Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-45
Connector Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-47
Example of Server-to-Block Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-48
Chapter 6 Maintenance Commands
6-1
6-2
6-3
PB60019−01
Alarm Test Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-38
Sequence Used by the Octel 200/300 To Screen Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-44
Ring/No Answer Tone-Timing Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-47
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Table of Contents — Figures
(continued)
Chapter 8 System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-1
Traffic Peg Count Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-57
Chapter 9 Hardware Replacement
9-1
9-2
9-3
9-4
9-5
9-6
9-7
9-8
9-9
9-10
9-11
9-12
9-13
9-14
9-15
9-16
9-17
9-18
9-19
9-20
9-21
9-22
9-23
9-24
9-25
9-26
9-27
9-28
9-29
9-30
9-31
Shelf Structure in the Octel 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
Inside Front View of Octel 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
Octel 200 Cabinet Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
Inside Rear View of Octel 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
Shelf Structure of Octel 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Inside Front View of Octel 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9
Rear View of Octel 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
Inside Rear View of Octel 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
Card Cage Showing a Printed Circuit Assembly and an Option Control Chip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-13
LED Placement on the LAN Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-18
DTIC−E1 Kit Installation for the Octel 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-22
DTIC−E1 Kit Installation for the Octel 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-22
Fax Application Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-23
120−ohm DTIC−E1 Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-23
Fax Application Processor Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-24
Octel 200 Hard-Disk-Drive Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-26
Octel 300 Hard-Disk-Drive Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-26
Octel 300 Floppy-Disk-Drive Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-28
Octel 200 Power Supply Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-30
Octel 300 Power Supply Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-31
Motherboard Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-36
A.C. Backplane Power Harness Installation for Octel 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-41
D.C. Backplane Power Harness Installation for Octel 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-42
Power-Filter Assembly for 120-Vac and 240-Vac Domestic Octel 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-43
Power-Filter Assembly for 240-Vac International Octel 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-44
Power-Filter Assembly for 48-Vdc Octel 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-45
Octel 300 Disk-Drive Backplanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-46
Cutaway View of the Load-Resistor Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-48
Field Wiring for −48-Vdc Powered Octel 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-51
Option Control Chip (OCC) Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-54
Location of Option Control Chip (OCC) in the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-54
Chapter 10 Digital Trunk Interface Card (DTIC)
10-1
Octel 200/300
DTIC Component Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300 Installation and Maintenance Manual
Installation & Maintenance volume
Table of Contents — Tables
Chapter 2 Hardware
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
Octel 200/300 Subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Octel 200 Subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Octel 300 Subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply Unit d.c. Voltages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-14
2-17
2-18
2-23
Chapter 3 Preparing the Phone System
3-1
PBX Features to Direct Trunks to the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Chapter 4 Installation
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
Input Circuit Current at Nominal Operating Line Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Input Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Equipment Provided by Distributor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
DCE Pinouts for Cable Connections Between the RS-232C Terminal and the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . 4-17
Pinouts for External Modem Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-18
Power Supply Output Rating and Acceptable Operating Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38
66M4-4W Connector Block Designators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-49
Chapter 6 Maintenance Commands
6-1
6-2
6-3
FINDMBOX Messages and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24
Abbreviations for Channel/Port State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-35
Application Delays for Cadence Recognition, for Determining Tone On/Tone Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-54
Chapter 7 LOG Commands
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-5
7-6
7-7
7-8
Trace Activity Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7
Transaction Type Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-23
Descriptions of the CDR Status That Can Be Logged . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-24
Information Logged by Transaction Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-35
Call Detail Record Size by Transaction Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-36
Namesend Activity Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-40
Event and Aux Activities in Namesend Activity Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-42
SAT Log Activity Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-51
Chapter 8 System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-1
8-2
PB60019−01
Boot ROM Diagnostic Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Hardware Error Types and Remedies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Chapter 11 LAN Card
11-1
11-2
Octel 200/300
LED Activity on the LAN Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-5
CD and CU for LAN — Messages and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-12
S.4.1
PB60019−01
INTRODUCTION
Do I really have to read all this?
or
What’s this manual all about, and how do I use it?
Read on. The answer to the first question is no — not right now. The answer to the second question is in
the pages that follow.
Welcome to the Octel 200/300 Manual
The Octel 200/300 Manual contains information about the Octel 200 and the Octel 300 message servers
(referred to as the Octel 200/300). The Manual is divided into two parts:
-
Octel 200/300 System Administrator’s Manual (SAM)
-
Octel 200/300 Installation and Maintenance Manual (I&M)
Together, the SAM and I&M are the complete reference for the Octel 200/300 message servers.
.
The I&M manual is not designed to be used as a standalone reference manual.
The Octel 200/300 SAM & I&M volumes are written for people performing a variety of job functions at
various stages of learning about and implementing Octel 200/300 message servers. Some volumes
educate while others serve as a reference.
The manual is not designed to be read straight through, or used only in reference to a question about
Octel 200/300 message servers. Instead, it offers a structure from which to approach Octel 200/300
message servers — a sequence which closely parallels the process of discovery, assessment, design, and
strategic implementation. It also suggests guidelines for directing readers to the chapters that will benefit
them the most, based on their interests, job functions, and customer needs.
Description of I&M Manual
Volume 4 is the beginning of the I&M Manual. This introduction describes how the manual is organized.
The Volumes contained in the I&M Manual are:
I&M Volumes
-
Volume 4 — Installation and Maintenance
-
Volume 5 — Integration
-
Volume 6 — Networking
For information about the SAM Manual, refer to the Introduction in Volume 1, Product Description and
Administration.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Conventions Used in the Manual
This section describes conventions used throughout the SAM and I&M Manual.
Text
This typeface represents normal text in this manual.
Common terms
The term Octel 200/300 is used throughout this manual to refer the
Octel 200 and the Octel 300 message server.
The term VMX 5000/1000 is used to refer to the VMX 5000 and the
VMX 1000.
The term PBX is used to refer to Private Branch Exchange, key
telephone systems, and Centrex telephone service.
Refer to the System Administrator’s Manual, Product Description
volume, Glossary, for a complete list of terms and definitions used in
this manual.
Quick Reference
Guide (QRG)
The Quick Reference Guide (QRG) appears at the beginning of certain
chapters and summarizes commands and key points that are discussed
in more detail within the chapter.
Octel 200/300
screen sample
Octel 200/300 screens are represented in the following type face and are
surrounded by a gray box:
-----SYSTEM SOFTWARE RELEASE S.X.X.X
(MM/DD/YY)----DAY MM/DD HH:MM:SS YYYY NAME ID:XXXXXX S/N:XXXXX PBX:XX
User entries
within screens
Commands entered from a terminal are represented in this type:
@INSTAL
PBX screens
This partial screen is a sample of the type face and format used to
represent PBX screens:
Page 3 of 3
STATION
DISPLAY BUTTON ASSIGNMENTS
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Keys on the
telephone key pad
and all terminals
Keys that are entered from a telephone key pad or terminal function
keys are represented within a box.
Executing
commands
Execute commands by pressing either the Return key or the Enter
key, depending on which key is available on the terminal. Enter is
used throughout this manual and is interchangeable with Return .
Octel 200/300
prompts
When text represents a prompt spoken by the Octel 200/300, it is
printed in italics and enclosed in quotes.
An example of a telephone key pad entry is: 9
An example of a key on a terminal is: Escape
“Thank you. Just a moment.”
Notes
This is the format for a note.
. Please refer to the Configuration volume, User Table chapter.
The I&M Manual’s Volumes and Chapters
Volume 4 — Installation
and Maintenance
Volume 5 — Integration
Volume 6 — Networking
INSTALL
Standard DTMF Integration
Networking
Hardware
Adaptive Integration
Analog Networking
Preparing the Phone System
Enhanced DTMF In-band Integration
Protocol 1 and 3 − Voicenet
Installation
Centrex SMDI/SMSI
Protocol 2
Reports
NEC NEAX-2400
Protocol 4 − AMIS
Maintenance Commands
Northern Telecom SL-1
Protocol 5 − OctelNet
LOG Commands
AT&T (ATTIC Integration)
Definity G3
System 75/Definity G1
System 85/Definity G2
Collocated Analog Networking
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
Hardware Replacement
DTIC Card
LAN Card
Procedures
ROLM
CBX
9751 Model 30/80
Digital Networking (Remote and
Domain)
Network Name Confirmation
Route Table
Location Table
Cortelco Millenium
Numbering Plan Table
Mitel
SX-200 Digital
SX-200/SX-100 Analog
SX-2000
Network Schedule Table
Configuration Forms
Meridian 1
AT&T APIC Integration
Definity G3
System 75/Definity G1
System 85/Definity G2
Northern Telecom NPIC
MD110 Adaptive Integration
DPNSS Integration
ISDN Integration
QSIG Integration
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Chapters to Read by Job Function
This manual is not written to be read straight through. It is written to be referred to for specific
information. Read the chapters that fit your needs, your job function, or your level of expertise with
Octel 200/300 message servers. The following chart attempts to help you navigate through the volumes.
Volume 4 — Installation and Maintenance
Chapter
Sales
INSTALL
Hardware
Preparing the Phone System
Installation
Reports
Maintenance Commands
LOG Commands
System Errors and Traffic
Pegs
Hardware Replacement
DTIC Card
LAN Card
Procedures
n
n
Configuration Implementation
Installation
n
n
n
n
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n
n
n
n
n
n
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Service/
Maintenance
Volume 5 — Integration
All Chapters
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
Volume 6 — Networking
All Chapters
Chapter Description
This sections describes Volume 4 — Installation and Maintenance. For descriptions of the chapters in
Volume 5 — Integration, and Volume 6 — Networking, refer to the Introduction of those volumes.
Volume 4 — Installation and Maintenance
Volume 4 — Installation and Maintenance, contains information about preparing for an Octel 200/300
installation, and about monitoring and maintaining the Octel 200/300 after installation. The following is a
brief summary of each chapter within the Installation and Maintenance volume.
Octel 200/300
Chapter 1
INSTALL
Provides instructions about using the INSTALL program to install a
new Octel 200/300 and reinstall an existing system.
Chapter 2
HARDWARE
Discusses the Octel 200/300 architecture. Included are an overview
of the hardware, description of subsystems, and system diagrams.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Chapter 3
PREPARING THE
PHONE SYSTEM
Octel 200/300 installation requires special attention to the telephone
system. This chapter includes topics such as how to identify changes
to the Central Office trunking, and how to make the required
changes to the phone system. Sample letters to the Central Office
and PBX service provider are included to ensure smooth changes
and transition to a new system.
Chapter 4
INSTALLATION
Provides detailed instructions and procedures for installing an
Octel 200/300. The entire process is presented, from receiving and
inspecting to the step-by-step testing of an installed system.
Chapter 5
REPORTS
Explains the Octel 200/300 reports in detail. The reports are
valuable tools that allow service personnel to monitor system
performance in both stand-alone and networked environments. This
section also discusses how to generate the reports and clear the data.
Chapter 6
MAINTENANCE
COMMANDS
Explains and lists the maintenance commands and diagnostics tests.
Chapter 7
LOG COMMANDS
Explains and lists the LOG commands including LOG, Call
Processing Trace and Call Detail Record.
Explains and lists boot ROM, hardware errors, and traffic pegs.
Chapter 8
SYSTEM ERRORS
AND TRAFFIC PEGS
PB60019−01
Chapter 9
HARDWARE
REPLACEMENT
Describes the preventive maintenance requirements, the hardware
replacement procedures, and lists the system components and part
numbers.
Chapter 10
DTIC CARD
Describes the Digital Trunk Interface Card (DTIC) used for DTIC
integration. The DTIC is a 30-port line card designed to interface an
Octel 200/300 to E1 (European) trunks. The chapter explains how to
configure, troubleshoot, and maintain the DTIC. The DTIC is
applicable only to specific Lucent channels in Europe and is
available only through those channels.
Chapter 11
LAN CARD
Describes the LAN card and includes details about hardware,
installation, configuration, maintenance, and troubleshooting. The
LAN card is necessary for Digital Networking, LAN Backup and
Restore, or the Gateway Link feature.
Chapter 12
PROCEDURES
Contains the Octel 200/300 procedures. Included are procedures for
backing up, archiving, restoring, recovering and maintaining the
software and configuration database.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
System Administrator’s Manual
Chapter
Installation
Service/
Maintenance
Sales
Configuration
Implementation
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Product Description
General Description
Implementation
Introducing the
Message Server
Integration
Reports
Troubleshooting Commands
LOG Commands
System Errors and Traffic
Pegs
Floppy Backup and Restore
Feature Description
Customizing
System-Wide
Features
Mailbox Features
Fax Mail Plus
Networking
Single Digit Menus
Incoming Call
n
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Multilingual
n
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LAN Backup and
Restore
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n
Restriction
Call Queuing
OctelForms
Prompts
VMX 5000 User
Interface
Configuration
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
n
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PB60019−01
1
INSTALL
Chapter Contents
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
Understanding the INSTALL Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Using INSTALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Entering the INSTALL Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Exiting the INSTALL Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Modifying Tables While Using INSTALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
+ Auto-Increment, USER Table Input Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Adding Mailboxes in Ranges, USER Table Input Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Answering Questions in INSTALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Answering Questions About Other Telephone Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-25
Exiting Before the INSTALL is Complete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-27
Restarting INSTALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-27
Exiting and Continuing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-28
Reinstalling an Installed Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-28
Figure
1-1
PB60019−01
Order of Questions and Associated Tables in the INSTALL Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
INSTALL Program
Command
Description
Enter INSTALL
@INSTA
Used to install a new Octel 200/300.
Reinstall
@INSTA
Reinstall an existing system. Clears tables and messages.
Choices for preloading tables include: ALL TABLES , USER ,
DISTRIBUTION LIST, and COS Tables.
Enter UPDATE program
while in the INSTALL
program
:.A (table name)
:.D (table name)
:.M (table name)
:.L (table name)
Allows you to enter the UPDATE program to list, add,
modify, or delete information in various tables during an
installation. Useful, for example, when you have forgotten to
add a Company Greeting mailbox to the USER Table and you
are trying to enter that mailbox into the INFORMATION Table.
Exit before complete
:.E
Saves all information up to this point. When INSTALL is
resumed, the program resumes.
The @ prompt is the operating system prompt displayed by the Octel 200/300.
The : prompt is the INSTALL prompt.
The . prompt is the UPDATE prompt.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
INSTALL
1.1
1-1
UNDERSTANDING THE INSTALL PROGRAM
Use the INSTALL program to establish server parameters when you are installing the message
server. The INSTALL program displays messages and questions on the terminal. Respond to the
questions by using the keyboard. Press the Enter key to enter the data after you have completed
each entry (on some terminals, this key is marked Return ).
Some questions, such as “What is the PBX manufacturer?” are followed by a list of choices. Enter
the number corresponding to your choice. If the answer needed is not on the list, choose OTHER or
NONE as appropriate.
Some questions, such as “What is the company’s name?” require an answer to be typed rather than
selected from a list. The program specifies a minimum and maximum number of characters allowed
for the response. For example, the company name can be one to eight characters long.
The INSTALL program requires a response to each question. In some cases, you can press Enter
without entering data, and INSTALL records a default answer. Default answers, often the most
commonly chosen answer to a question, are indicated in the following way:
Do you wish to set the system DATE and TIME? (Y/N, empty line = N)
The default answer for this question is N. If you press
shows an empty line, and INSTALL records an N.
Enter
without pressing a letter, the screen
Figure 1-1 shows the order in which information is requested when using the INSTALL program.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
INSTALL Questions
1. a)
Manufacturer
SP 3a
Model
SP 3b
For each manufacturer and model, specific
System Parameters (noted as SP in chart) are
supplied from the Serenade database. These
vary, depending upon the telephone system and
installation. A few examples follow:
b)
Installation name
SP 1
c)
System ID number
SP 2
e)
Alarm number
SP 31
f)
Forward string
SP 45
FLASH TIME, ms.
TRANSFER INIT
reconnect−RNA
reconnect−BUSY
transfer complete
Cancel forward string
SP 46
g)
Minimum length for
security codes
SP 144
ALTERNATE XFER
reconnect−RNA
reconnect−BUSY
transfer complete
h)
Default mailbox security code
SP 105
PBX INIT CODE
USER
2.
MBX,EXT,COS or
MBX,COS (if mbx = ext)
3.
SLOTS
SP 9
SP 13
SP 16
SP 33
You must include intercept mailboxes needed to
configure port COSs (used in the SLOTS Table) and
user mailboxes needed for testing. You can configure
additional mailboxes during INSTALL, or wait until the
basic installation is tested and then complete the system
database using the UPDATE program. Mailboxes that
need to be configured in INSTALL or UPDATE
include: all company greeting mailboxes, intercept
mailboxes, distribution-list pilot numbers, extended
mailboxes (pilot and members), flexible menu
mailboxes, and system users (mailboxes with extensions
and mailboxes only).
Card, Port, Ext, COS, Mode, Outcall, Test
4.
5.
NETWORK ROUTES
Enter the COS, even if you have not assigned the
correct attributes. Attributes can be added or
deleted in the UPDATE program.
Route, Drop, Access
NETWORK LOCATION
Location Name, Protocol, Digital Networking
NETWORK NUMBERING
6.
Location Name, Access,
Additional Digits
Figure 1-1 Order of Questions and Associated Tables in the INSTALL Program
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1-3
INSTALL Questions (continued)
LIST
7.
Distribution List number and members. Must already be in the USER
Table. Can be configured during INSTALL or in the UPDATE program.
8.
COS (Class of Service) Only changed during UPDATE.
INFORMATION TABLE
Different questions are asked, depending on whether the table applies to a
port or a mailbox.
9.
PORT
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
10
18
26
27
29
34
10.
MAILBOX
Intercept Mailbox
Company Greeting Mailbox
Call Blocking Number
Max Digit for Menu
Prefix Digits for Menu
Prefix Extension Number
Rings Before No Answer
Times to Retry on Busy
Use Alt Transfer Codes
Next Mailbox
Auto-Transfer to Assistance
Message with Auto-Transfer
Language
Logon Failure Transfer Mailbox
1
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
35
36
Intercept Mailbox
Call Blocking Number
Max Digit for Menu
Prefix Digits for Menu
Prefix Extension Number
Rings Before No Answer
Msg Wait Rings
Times to Retry on Busy
Use Alt Transfer Codes
Divert Msgs to Mailbox
Message Waiting Notification
Auto Greeting Activation
Offsite Attempt Times
Offsite Speak Times
Offsite Speak Delay
Offsite Prefix Digits
Next Mailbox
Offsite Dial System Parameter Digits
Offsite End System Parameter Digits
FIFO Queue Message Mailbox
Maximum Message Length
Maximum Number of Messages
Personal Assistance
Quick Greeting Activation
Auto-Transfer to Assistance
Message with Auto-Transfer
Announce Calls to Intercept
Language
Group Fax Number
Offsite Only if Urgent
Max Fax Delivery Attempts
Help Operator Mailbox
Override Trunk Group Number
Default Greeting Mailbox
SCHEDULE TABLE
Time period 1...8 plus Default Days/Start Time/Stop Time
Figure 1-1 Order of Questions and Associated Tables in the INSTALL Program (continued)
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-4
1.2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
USING INSTALL
The customer’s specific configuration needs should be determined and a configuration package
completed before the installation begins. Use the configuration package to answer each question in
the INSTALL program. A blank configuration package can be found at the end of the Understanding
Configuration chapter in the Configuration volume.
Follow the directions in the Installation and Maintenance volume, Installation chapter, Terminal
Communications section, to connect your terminal to the OctelR 200/300.
Entering the INSTALL Program
Enter the maintenance level password to access the database. If this is a new installation and the
password has not been changed, enter the maintenance level password set by the manufacturer.
Caution!
You should change the manufacturer password to
ensure the security of the server. Refer to the
Configuration volume, Understanding Configuration
chapter, Using Security Procedures and Guidelines
section.
At the @ prompt enter:
INSTA or INSTAL
Enter
The terminal displays the following messages:
@INSTA
−−−−−−−− SYSTEM INSTALLATION DIALOG
DAY MM/DD/YYYY HH:MM:SS SYSTEMNAME
−−−−−−−−
ID:XXXXX
S/N:XXXXXX
PBX:00
INSTALL then identifies the type of installation.
-
-
-
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
New installation.
INSTALL question 1 follows.
Installation is in progress.
INSTALL can continue, or it can start over.
Message server has previously been installed.
To reinstall the message server, you must enter the maintenance password to initiate the reinstall.
The reinstallation begins by erasing all stored information and messages. Do not use
reinstall unless you are prepared to lose all messages.
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1-5
Exiting the INSTALL Program
When the program is completed, INSTALL displays the following screen:
WARNING: FOR PROPER OPERATION SYSTEM MUST BE RESTARTED AFTER INSTALL!
INSTALL COMPLETE.
WAIT... DONE.
SAVE configuration to a DISKETTE? ( Y/N , empty line = N ).
:
DAY
MM/DD
−−−−−−−−
HH:MM:SS
YYYY
NAME
ID:
SYSTEM INSTALLATION COMPLETED
S/N:
PBX:
−−−−−−−−
Answer Y to copy all the data onto the configuration diskette as a backup. The Octel 200/300 must
be reloaded after the INSTALL is complete.
To exit before you have completed the INSTALL program, at the colon (:) type:
.:E
Enter
When you type (.E) to exit, the portion of the completed configuration is saved to the hard disk. You
can continue the INSTALL later, from where you left off, or you can start over. Refer to the
Restarting INSTALL section or the Exiting and Continuing section of this chapter.
Modifying Tables While Using INSTALL
While using the INSTALL program, you can access the UPDATE program to list, add, modify, or
delete information in the configuration tables.
The INSTALL program displays a colon (:) when it is waiting for a response. At the colon, type a dot
(.), which is the UPDATE prompt, then an L (list), an A (add), an M (modify), or a D (delete),
followed by the name of the table you want to alter. For example,
:.A USER
The INSTALL program activates the UPDATE program. Alter the tables as necessary. To exit
UPDATE, press Enter at the colon. The INSTALL program resumes.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
+ Auto-Increment, USER Table Input Aid
When entering a sequence of mailboxes into the USER Table, the auto-increment input aid allows
you to enter a + after the COS to automatically increment to the next sequential mailbox/extension
number. If the extension field is N, only the mailbox number is incremented. The COS is not
changed. Auto-increment does not cross over to a new first digit. If it is attempted, the Octel 200/300
prompts:
SORRY, (“+”) AUTO−INCREMENT CAN’T CROSS FIRSTDIGIT BOUNDARY.
For example, to enter a sequence of mailbox numbers one by one, enter the mailbox, extension,
COS, and +. The next line displays the mailbox and COS, copied from the previous range, increasing
the number by one. To continue increasing, type a + after the COS. Press Enter to go to the next
mailbox. To stop incrementing the numbers, do not enter the +, just press Enter . The next line will
have no information in it, and the next mailbox may be entered.
The extension number does not need to match the mailbox number to use auto-increment. If mailbox
and extension numbers do not match, be sure the extension number is supposed to be incremented, as
well as the mailbox number. If not, do not use auto-increment.
This example shows how to enter mailbox information using auto-increment. The bold characters are
what was entered.
:4500,4501,0+
:4501,4502,0+
:4502,4503,0
:4700,N,1
:4800,N,5
Adding Mailboxes in Ranges, USER Table Input Aid
To add mailboxes into the USER Table in ranges, enter the first and last mailbox numbers, the first
extension number, and common COS. The mailbox and extension numbers are incremented by one,
and the COS remains the same for all entries.
This example shows how to enter mailbox information in ranges.
:4500−4599,4600,0
For this example, mailboxes 4500−4599, with corresponding extension numbers 4600−4699, each
with COS 0, are added to the USER Table.
Octel 200/300
.
Mailbox and extension numbers cannot cross a first digit boundary. Auto-increment cannot be
used when adding in ranges.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1.3
1-7
ANSWERING QUESTIONS IN INSTALL
During INSTALL, refer to the customer’s completed configuration package. The configuration
package supplies you with the information you need to answer the questions.
After entering the INSTALL program, if this is a new installation, the message server asks whether
the date and time should be set as shown. The INSTALL questions follow.
@INSTA
−−−−−−−
SYSTEM INSTALLATION DIALOG −−−−−−−
DAY MM/DD/YYYY HH:MM:SS
SYSTEMNAME ID:XXXXX
S/N:XXXXXX
PBX:00
NEW CONFIGURATION INSTALLATION.
Do you wish to set the system DATE and TIME? (Y/N, empty line = N)
:Y
Current DATE and TIME:
DAY MM/DD/YYYY HH:MM
Enter new DATE and TIME as: DAY MM/DD/YY HH:MM
or empty line for no change.
MOD:MM/DD/YYYY HH:MM
DATE and TIME set to:
MON MM/DD/YYYY HH:MM
Is this correct? (Y/N, empty line = N):Y
All Messages older than this Date will be deleted.
Are you sure: (Y/N, empty line = N):
1. SYSTEM PARAMETERS
Question 1 is a series of questions that modify specific system parameters. The information entered
is automatically transferred into the SYSTEM PARAMETER Table.
Question 1. a) displays a list of telephone manufacturers from which to select.
Enter the number corresponding to the manufacturer’s name, and press Enter . After you have
selected the telephone manufacturer’s number, the model numbers for that manufacturer are listed.
Select the appropriate number for that model telephone system.
1.
a)
SYSTEM PARAMETERS.
Select the MANUFACTURER−NUMBER of your telephone system
from the following list.
0 − OTHER
1 − ITT
2 − TIE
.
.
:X [manufacturer number]
Select the MODEL−NUMBER of your telephone system
from the following list.
0
.
.
− OTHER
.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
.
If the telephone manufacturer is not listed, enter O for Other and press Enter . If you select 0
for Other, specific questions about the other telephone system are asked before continuing
with question 1.b). Refer to the Answering Questions About Other Telephone Systems section
in this chapter for an explanation of these questions.
After the telephone system model number has been selected, the next questions ask whether the
DTMFINT and TONEDET Tables should be reset. These questions are displayed even if the PBX
selected does not require the DTMFINT or TONEDET Tables. For both DTMFINT and TONEDET
Tables, the default or empty line is YES. Therefore, if you are installing a server that does not
require the DTMFINT or TONEDET Table, you may enter N.
Do you wish to RESET DTMFINT TABLE to FACTORY−DEFAULTS for
this PBX? (If ”YES” , ALL current values will be LOST!)
( Y/N, empty line = Y ):
LOADING CONFIGURATION DATA...DONE
Do you wish to RESET TONEDET TABLE to FACTORY−DEFAULTS for
this PBX? (If “YES” , ALL current values will be LOST!)
( Y/N, empty line = Y ):
Question 1. b) Company name.
b)
What is the name of the company at which this system
is being installed? (1−8 characters).
:
This name is used for internal reports. Up to eight characters can be entered; use the entire name or
an abbreviation of the name.
Question 1. c) System ID number.
c)
What is the SYSTEM ID number? (1−6 digits).
:
The Octel 200/300 serial number can be used as the system ID number. The serial number is printed
on the UL label located at the lower rear of the cabinet. It is important that a different number be
used for each Octel 200/300. This number is used to distinguish among Octel 200/300 message
servers and to identify the message server when an alarm call is made.
Question 1. d) Telephone number of the person who should receive alarm calls.
e)
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
What extension or phone number should be called when an ALARM
is encountered? (If this is an outside call, precede it with
the EXTERNAL ACCESS CODE and an Expect−Dial−Tone, where necessary.)
( 1−20 chars. May include: 0−9,*,#, D=DELAY, E=EXPECT−DIAL−TONE
empty Line = NONE )
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1-9
If something goes wrong with the message server it can call and report the problem. This can be an
on- or off-premise number. Include access codes, if necessary. Enter a D for a delay after any access
codes you might use. (The length of the delay is determined by System Parameter 28.) Enter an E for
“expect dial tone.” Do not use any spaces.
Question 1. e) String of numbers to dial for the forwarding string and the cancel-forwarding
string when the message server is reloading or finished reloading.
f)
What is the forwarding string, including destination extension,
to be dialed when the system is reloading and cannot accept calls?
(May include: 0−9,*,#, D=DELAY, E=EXPECT DIAL TONE, or F=FLASH,
1−12 chars, empty line = NONE
)
:
What is the cancel−forwarding string, to be dialed when the system
has finished reloading and is ready to accept calls?
(May include: 0−9,*,#, D=DELAY, E=EXPECT DIAL TONE, or F=FLASH,
1−12 chars, empty line = NONE
)
:
While the Octel 200/300 is reloading, such as after a power failure, the ports can be forwarded to an
alternate answering point. Enter the code that causes incoming calls to ring at the alternate answering
location. If NONE is entered, all ports remain off hook (busy) when the message server is loading or
reloading.
The second part of this question asks for the cancel forwarding number, which allows a return to the
Octel 200/300 when the server is again operational.
Question 1. f) Minimum length for all mailbox security codes.
g)
Enter the minimum length for all security codes.
(0−10, empty line = 0 )
:
The answer to this question defines the value for System Parameter 144 — MINIMUM LENGTH
FOR SECURITY CODES. The maximum length for a security code is 10 digits.
.
If this is changed after the initial installation, existing security codes with fewer digits are not
affected until the mailbox holder changes the security code.
Question 1. g) Default security code for mailboxes that logon using a mailbox number.
h)
PB60019−01
For mailboxes which logon via MAILBOX number (NO port/trunk cos attr 106)
enter the DEFAULT SECURITY CODE.
Note: This code will apply to all mailboxes which do not have a security
code defined.
(4 −10 digits, N = NONE, empty line = NONE
)
:
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
If question 1. f) is configured, all new mailboxes must have a security code of the minimum length
or longer. The security code entered is the value defined for System Parameter 105 — DEFAULT
SECURITY CODE FOR MAILBOXES. This security code remains on each mailbox until a user
logs on to the mailbox and changes it.
.
The User ID Logon is not configured in the INSTALL program. Refer to the Feature
Description volume, Customizing System-Wide Features chapter, Mailbox Logon section.
.
XX is the value defined in question 1. f) for System Parameter 144. A default security code
must be set if the minimum length is greater than zero.
The security code assigned through this INSTALL question can be changed or deleted through
System Parameter 105. If the value of this parameter is modified, any existing mailboxes that already
have the default security code are automatically assigned the new default security code.
2. USER
2.
USER.
Enter each user’s MAILBOX, EXTENSION, COS, and if desired NAME. Enter as:
(Mailbox=1−8 digits, Extension=1−8 digits, COS=0−511, Name=1–20 characters)
Enter NONE if desired for EXTENSION.
Enter “+” after COS to automatically increment:
MAILBOX, and EXTENSION.
Also, enter any mailboxes to be used as DISTRIBUTION LISTS.
To add users in a range, enter as:
MAILBOX1–MAILBOX2,EXTENSION,COS.
Enter empty line when done.
:2001−2019,2001,10
NOTE: MAILBOXES with first digit ”2” are 4 digits long.
:
Do you wish to add more users? (Y/N, empty line = Y)
:N
For each user, enter a mailbox number, extension number, and COS, separated only by commas. If
System Parameter 212 — USER I.D. LENGTH, is configured, enter the user ID number after the
mailbox number. Do not enter any spaces. Press Enter after each line. You can correct mistakes
later by using the MODIFY command in the UPDATE program.
Define every mailbox, including individual mailboxes, information-only mailboxes, greeting
mailboxes, and distribution list pilot numbers. Make sure to enter intercept mailboxes (numbers sent
when a caller does nothing or presses 0 for assistance.)
.
In the INSTALL program, you can define users without first creating the COS in UPDATE.
When adding multiple users that have the same COS, you can add them in a range. Refer to the
Adding Mailboxes in Ranges, USER Table Input Aid section in this chapter. You cannot cross
mailbox or extension first-digit boundaries when adding users in a range.
When adding a sequence of mailbox numbers one by one, you can enter a + after the COS to
automatically increment to the next sequential mailbox number. Refer to the + Auto-Increment,
USER Table Input Aid section in this chapter.
After entering each mailbox a colon (:) displays indicating that the next mailbox can be entered.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1-11
Press Enter at the colon when you are finished entering mailboxes. The message server prompts
Do you wish to add more users? Enter N. The INSTALL program goes to the next
question.
If you press Enter before finishing, the Octel 200/300 asks whether you want to add more users to
the USER Table. Simply respond YES to return to the USER Table. Mailboxes may also be added
later using UPDATE.
3. SLOTS
The SLOTS Table contains information about each line card slot, integration card slot, and
applications card slot. The SLOTS Table allows each line card and integration card to be configured
individually. Enter the slot number and the type of card to be installed.
Different cards can be configured within a single Octel 200/300. The EntryWorks ACP card can only
be configured in slot 7 for the Octel 200 and in slot 12 for the Octel 300.
When the configuration information for a port is the same as the previous port, you only need to
enter the port extension number followed by Enter . The information for the remainder of the line is
automatically entered.
The dialog for configuring a Telemarketing Line Card (TLC) is similar to the dialog for configuring
a Line Interface Card (LIC).
.
PB60019−01
When you install a PIC card, you must configure the system clock (master clock) sync source.
Refer to the Configuration volume, Slots Table chapter, for information about the LSPTAB
Table and the master clock configuration.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-12
Installation and Maintenance Volume
3. SLOT
Enter SLOT NUMBER to ADD.
Enter empty line when done.
ADD:2
6 −LIC4
7 −DAC4
10−LIC8
11−TLC8
18−LIC4I
23−DTC17−E1
25−DTC17−ISDN
26−DLC16
33−ILIC12FR
34−ILIC12UK
35−ILIC12JP
37−ILIC12GR
Enter Card Type.
SLOT 2 :23
5 −MITEL
50−PICROLM
51−PICATT
52−PICNT
Enter LSP table to be referenced
0−DEFAULT
6−IL12US_S
1−IL12FR_S
7−DL16FR
2−IL12GE_S
8−T1
3−DL16US
9−MD110−E1
4−DL16AU
10−DL16UK_S
5−DL16GE
11−IL12UK_S
(Empty line = 0)
MOD:9
2 −SLIC
3 −RIC
4 −ATTIC
13−SIC8
for this slot.
12−DL1690
13−DPNSS_CB
14−DL16UK_C
15−DL16NTH
16−DL16TOSH
17−DL16TIE
8 −ACP
16−FAX8
17−FAX4
22−LAN
18−IL12UK_C
19−IL12FR_C
20−IL12GE_C
21−IL12US_C
22−EUROISDN
23−PIC_AT&T
24−PIC_NT
25−PIC_ROLM
26−DL16SNG
27−DL16OS
Should this card be:
(1 − PRIMARY
2 − SECONDARY
3 − TERTIARY
N − no
) sync receiver of the master clock?
(1−3, N. Empty line = N):2
Enter information for each PORT.
Enter as: EXTENSION NUMBER connected to each port (1−8 digits),
CLASS−OF−SERVICE (0−254), ANSWER MODE (AX, CX, MX), USE PORT FOR
MESSAGE WAITING AND NETWORK OUTCALLING (Y/N)
1:
2:
3:
.
.
.
28:
29:
30:
N,254,AX,N
N
N
N
N
N
The following examples show the dialog for configuring the different cards. Refer to the
Configuration volume, Slots Table chapter, Using UPDATE section, for information about
configuring the card types.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1-13
Direct Access Card (DAC)
SLOT 2:7
Enter information for each PORT.
Enter as: EXTENSION NUMBER connected to each port (1−8 digits),
CLASS−OF−SERVICE (0−254), SIGNALLING (DTMF, Rotary),
TRUNK TYPE (Wink, Immed, Delay, Loop, Ground).
1 :333,254,DTMF,DELAY
Integration Card
SLOT 4 :5
Enter information for each PORT.
Enter as: EXTENSION NUMBER connected to each port (1−8 digits),
CLASS−OF−SERVICE (0−254), ANSWER MODE (AX, CX, MX), USE PORT FOR
MESSAGE WAITING AND NETWORK OUTCALLING (Y/N), TEST CHANNEL (Y/N)
1 :334,250,AX,N,N
2 :
Configure Integration (1−4=Msg Waiting Link):1
Enter empty line when done.
INS:
Integration cards must be the same.
For the Octel 200, Integration cards can be installed in Slots A1 through A6.
For the Octel 300, most integration cards can be configured in any slot not used for line cards.
ATTIC integration cards and SIC8 cards cannot go in slot 12.
Except for the AT&T System 75/Definity G1, and the G3 ATTIC integrations, each port can be
allocated to only one integration unit. Refer to the Integration volume for additional details about the
specific integration you are configuring.
The fax application processor card can be installed in any unoccupied slot. The following is an
example of the dialog for configuring a fax application processor.
Fax Application Processor Card
.SLOT 8:17
Enter information for each PORT.
Enter as: CLASS-OF-SERVICE ( 0−254 ), TEST CHANNEL (Y/N).
1:126,N
2:126,N
4. NETWORK ROUTES
5. NETWORK LOCATIONS
6. NET NUMBERING PLAN
Questions 4, 5, and 6 pertain to collocated message servers and multilocation networking.
For information about configuring networking, refer to the Networking volume.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-14
Installation and Maintenance Volume
4.
NETWORK ROUTES.
Enter the name for each NETWORK ROUTE, whether the route can be
dropped upon reconnect to caller, and the ACCESS DIGITS to be dialed.
ENTER AS:
ROUTE NAME (1−6 chars), DROP (Y or N), ACCESSDIG (1−29 digits)
ACCESS DIGITS may include: 0−9,*,# or any of the following:
D − delay.
E − wait for DIAL TONE here.
N − wait for DIAL−UP OCC DIAL TONE here.
P − dial PUBLIC NETWORK NUMBER here.
T − dial TIE NETWORK NUMBER here.
Enter empty line when done.
:33,N,456
:
5.
NETWORK LOCATIONS.
Enter requested information for all NETWORK LOCATIONS.
Enter new LOCATION NAME. (1−6 chars)
Enter empty line when done.
:(location name)
Does (location name) have a SYSTEM? (Y/N, empty line = Y)
:
Press
Enter
after each question to continue.
.
If you are installing a single cabinet message server without remote networking, press
to skip to question 7. DISTRIBUTION LISTS.
Enter
If the (location name) does not have a SYSTEM, the next question is as follows:
Does (location name) have the same PBX type as SELF? (PBX type)
(Y/N, empty line = N) (If ”YES”, will do CALL−PROGRESS−DETECTION.)
:
If the (location name) does have a SYSTEM, enter the protocol to use, as follows:
Enter the PROTOCOL to use with (location name) (1,2,3,4,5,empty line =3)
If the above question is answered with 2, refer to the Networking volume, Remote Analog
Networking chapter and Protocol 2 chapter, and LOCATION Table chapter.
If the above question is answered with 4 for AMIS Analog networking, refer to the Networking
volume, Remote Analog Networking chapter and Protocol 4 chapter, and the LOCATION Table
chapter.
If the above question is answered with 5, refer to the Networking volume, Remote Analog
Networking chapter and Protocol 5 chapter, and LOCATION Table chapter.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1-15
Is (location name) located on the same PBX as this system? (Y/N,empty line = N)
:
Enter ROUTE NAMES for up to three ROUTE CHOICES to (location name)
1:
2:
3:
.
Enter PUBLIC NETWORK NUMBER (PNN) to call (location name)
.
(May include: 0−9,*,#, D=DELAY, E=EXPECT DIAL TONE, or Cn.
1−12 chars, empty line = NONE
)
:
Enter TIE NETWORK NUMBER (TNN) to call (location name)
.
(May include: 0−9,*,#, D=DELAY, E=EXPECT DIAL TONE, or Cn.
1−7 chars, empty line = NONE
)
:
Is (location name)
:
accessible over the DIGITAL NETWORK? (Y/N, empty line = N)
If the above question is answered Y for Digital Networking, refer to the Networking volume, Digital
Networking chapter.
6.
NET NUMBERING PLAN.
Enter NUMBERING PLAN information for each NETWORK LOCATION.
Enter as:
LOCATION NAME, INITIAL DIGITS (1−8 digits), NET MAILBOX LENGTH (1−16),
NUM OF DIGITS TO STRIP(0−15)., NUM OF DIGITS TO STRIP FROM SELF(0−8)
Enter empty line when done.
7. LISTS
Question 7 is used to create System Distribution Lists.
7.
DISTRIBUTION LISTS.
Enter the LIST NUMBER. (1−16 digits).
This Number must already exist as a mailbox in the USER table.
Then enter each mailbox to be added to the list.(1−16 digits).
If the list exists, new mailboxes will be appended to existing ones.
Enter empty line when done.
Enter DISTRIBUTION LIST NUMBER.
ADD:4000
WARNING: MESSAGES IF ANY IN MAILBOX WILL BE LOST!
ARE YOU SURE (Y/N) ? (Y/N, EMPTY LINE = N):Y
NEW DISTRIBUTION LIST.
Enter each MAILBOX or RANGE to be added to this list.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-16
Installation and Maintenance Volume
During INSTALL, you can create system distribution lists and add member addresses. The
distribution list number and member numbers must already exist as a mailbox in the USER Table.
If distribution lists are not being added during INSTALL, press
through the UPDATE program.
Enter
. You can add them later,
8. COS
COS tables are not configured during the INSTALL program. When INSTALL is complete, enter the
UPDATE program and add attributes to the COS numbers that were defined for each port and
mailbox defined. Refer to the Configuration volume, COS chapter.
8.
COS.
UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL is complete.
9. INFORMATION TABLES
Question 9 lists the INFORMATION Table indexes for either port or mailbox configuration.
9.
INFORMATION TABLES.
Enter the INFORMATION TABLE number to be added. (1−512)
Enter empty line when done.
:512
Is TABLE 512 for a PORT/TRUNK? (If NO, it’s for a MAILBOX.)
(Y/N, empty line = N)
:Y
To COPY an existing INFORMATION TABLE, enter the TABLE NUMBER.
(1−512, empty line = NONE)
Define at least one port and one mailbox INFORMATION Table, because a default INFORMATION
Table must be entered for every SCHEDULE Table (Question 10).
The INFORMATION Tables contain information about how each port and mailbox process calls. The
COS for each port and mailbox points to the SCHEDULE Table to determine which INFORMATION
Table to use.
When adding an INFORMATION Table, be sure to answer the first question accurately — IS
TABLE X FOR A PORT/TRUNK? (If NO, it’s for a Mailbox.) This is important
because the subsequent questions are different for ports/trunks and mailboxes. For consistency and
clarity, number port INFORMATION Tables from 512, descending, and mailbox INFORMATION
Tables from 1, ascending.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1-17
Port INFORMATION Table Indexes
The following indexes are applicable to port INFORMATION Tables. Refer to the Configuration
volume, Information Table chapter, for details about each index.
-
Index 1. Each port/trunk INFORMATION Table must have an intercept position. The mailbox
must already exist in the USER Table.
1.
-
Index 2. A company greeting mailbox can be configured. If a mailbox number is not entered,
the manufacturer’s recorded generic greeting is used.
2.
-
-
PB60019−01
COMPANY GREETING MAILBOX
:
(1−8 digits, N = NONE, empty line = NONE
)
Index 3. The following index appears if the Incoming Call Restriction option is installed.
3.
-
INTERCEPT MAILBOX
(1−8 digits )
:
CALL BLOCKING NUMBER
:
(0−255, 0 = NONE, empty line = NONE)
Indexes 4 and 5. The following indexes appear if Single Digit Menus are used. Index 5 is not
listed if index 4 is NONE.
4.
MAX DIGIT FOR MENU
:
(0−8, 0 = NONE, empty line = NONE)
5.
PREFIX DIGIT FOR MENU
(1−7 DIGITS, N = NONE, empty line = NONE)
:XX
WARNING: The following MAILBOXES must exist in the USER TABLE or in a
COLOCATED cabinet:
Indexes 6, 7, 9, 10, and 18. The following five indexes are listed.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-18
Installation and Maintenance Volume
-
6.
PRE EXTENSION DIGITS
(1−12 digits; may include: 0−9, *, #, D=DELAY, E= EXPECT−DIAL−TONE,
N = NONE, empty line = NONE
)
(When caller dials EXTENSION that is not a defined MAILBOX.)
:
7.
RINGS BEFORE NO ANSWER
(3−20, empty line = 4
)
(When caller dials EXTENSION that is not a defined MAILBOX.)
:
9.
TIMES TO RETRY ON BUSY
(0−40, empty line = NONE)
(When caller dials EXTENSION that is not a defined MAILBOX.)
:
10.
USE ALT TRANSFER CODES
(Y/N, empty line = N)
(When caller dials EXTENSION that is not a defined MAILBOX.)
:
18.
NEXT MAILBOX
:
27.
AUTOTRANSFER TO ASSIST
:
MSG WITH AUTO TRANSFER
:
LANGUAGE: 0= NONE
1= ENGL US−−V
2= SPANISH
(0−2, empty line = 0)
S.4.1
(Y/N, empty line = N)
VERSION
VERSION
xx
xx
Index 34. When index 34 is configured, callers are transferred to assistance instead of being
disconnected if their attempts to log on are unsuccessful.
34. LOGON FAILURE XFER MAILBOX
:
Octel 200/300
(Y/N, empty line = N)
Index 29. The following index appears if the Multilingual Prompts option is installed. The
languages shown in index 29 depend on current settings. The following is an example where
English and Spanish are currently installed.
29.
-
)
Indexes 26 and 27. The following indexes are used with Personal Assistance, Adaptive Integration,
and with the DID/E&M Trunk Interface Module. Index 27 is not listed if index 26 is N.
26.
-
(1−8 digits, N = NONE, empty line = NONE
(1−8 digits, N = NONE, empty line = NONE
)
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1-19
After index 34 is answered, the port INFORMATION Table is complete, as shown.
−−− INFORMATION TABLE 512 COMPLETE −−−
Enter the INFORMATION TABLE number to be added. (1−512)
Enter empty line when done.
Mailbox INFORMATION Table Indexes
The following indexes are applicable to the mailbox INFORMATION Table. Refer to the
Configuration volume, Information Table chapter, for details about each index.
-
Index 1. If an intercept mailbox is not defined for a mailbox, the call defaults to the Intercept
Mailbox defined for the port or trunk on which the call came in.
1.
-
Index 3. The following index appears if the Incoming Call Restriction option is installed.
3.
-
PB60019−01
INTERCEPT MAILBOX If none, uses PORT/TRUNK info.
(1−8 digits, N = NONE, empty line = NONE
)
:
CALL BLOCKING NUMBER
:
(0−255, 0 = NONE, empty line = NONE)
Indexes 4 and 5. The following indexes appear if the Single Digit Menus are used. Index 5 is
not listed if index 4 is NONE.
4.
MAX DIGIT FOR MENU
:
(0−8, 0 = NONE, empty line = NONE)
5.
PREFIX DIGIT FOR MENU
(1−7 DIGITS, N = NONE, empty line = NONE)
:XX
WARNING: The following MAILBOXES must exist in the USER Table:
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-20
Installation and Maintenance Volume
-
Indexes 6 through 13. The following indexes are listed.
6.
PRE EXTENSION DIGITS
(1−12 digits; may include: 0−9, *, #, D=DELAY, E= EXPECT−DIAL−TONE,
N = NONE, empty line = NONE
)
:
7.
RINGS BEFORE NO ANSWER
:
8.
MSG WAITING RINGS
:
9.
TIMES TO RETRY ON BUSY
:
(3−20, empty line = 4
(3−20, empty line = 4
)
)
(0−40, empty line = NONE)
10.
USE ALT TRANSFER CODE
:
(Y/N, empty line = N)
11.
DIVERT MSG TO MAILBOX
:
12.
MSG WAITING NOTIF
:
13.
AUTO GREETING ACTIVATION
(1−8 digits, N = NONE, empty line = NONE
)
(Y/N, empty line = Y)
(Y/N, empty line = N)
:
-
Index 14. The following index is only listed if index 12 is Y.
14.
-
OFFSITE ATTEMPT TIMES
:
(0−255, empty line = NONE)
Indexes 15, 16, and 17. The following indexes are not listed if index 14 is 0.
15. OFFSITE SPEAK TIMES
:
(0−8, empty line = 3)
16. OFFSITE SPEAK DELAY
:
(1−32 seconds, empty line = 5)
17. OFFSITE PREFIX DIGITS
(1−12 digits; may include: 0−9,*,#, D=DELAY, E=EXPECT−DIAL−TONE,
N=NONE, empty line=NONE)
:
-
Index 18. The following index is listed.
18.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
NEXT MAILBOX
:
(1−8 digits, N = NONE, empty line = NONE
)
PB60019−01
INSTALL
-
Indexes 19 and 20. If the answer to index 14 is 0, indexes 19 and 20 are not listed. When index
20 is yes, the digit string to be dialed must be configured in System Parameter 259.
19. OFFSITE DIAL SYSP DIGS
:
20. OFFSITE END SYSP DIGS
:
-
-
(Y/N, empty line = N)
(1−8 digits, N = NONE, empty line = NONE)
Indexes 22 and 23. Enter the maximum length messages can be and the maximum number of
messages this mailbox can contain.
22.
MAXIMUM MSG LENGTH
:
(1−180 minutes, empty line = 6 minutes)
23.
MAX NUMBER OF MSGS
:
(1−135, empty line = 32
)
Index 24. Defines whether this mailbox has a Personal Assistant.
24.
-
(Y/N, empty line = N)
Index 21. The following index appears if Call Queuing is installed.
21. FIFO QUEUE MSG MAILBOX
:
-
1-21
PERSONAL ASSISTANCE
:
(Y/N, empty line = N)
Index 25. The following index appears if Adaptive Integration is installed.
25. QUICK GREETING ACTIV (Y/N, empty line = N)
:
-
Indexes 26 and 27. The following indexes are used with Personal Assistance and with the
DID/E&M Trunk interface module. Index 27 is not listed if index 26 is N.
26. AUTOTRANSFER TO ASSIST (Y/N, empty line = N)
:
27. MSG WITH AUTO TRANSFER (Y/N, empty line = N)
:
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-22
Installation and Maintenance Volume
-
Index 28. The following index is listed.
28. ANNOUNCE CALLS TO INT (Y/N, empty line = N)
:
-
Index 29. This index appears if Multilingual Prompts is installed. The languages shown in
Question 29 depend on current settings. The following is an example where English and Spanish
are currently installed.
29.
LANGUAGE: 0= NONE
1= ENGL US−−V
2= SPANISH
(0−2, empty line = 0)
-
VERSION
VERSION
8D
8D
Indexes 30 and 32. These indexes appear if Fax Mail Plus is installed. For index 30, enter the
digits of the telephone number for the designated group fax delivery machine.
30.GROUP FAX NUMBER
(1−32 digits, may include: 0−9, *, #, D=DELAY, E=EXPECT-DIAL-TONE,
empty line = NONE
)
ADD:
32. MAX FAX DELIV ATTEMPTS
(0−255, 0=USE SYSTEM PARAMETER 209, 255=UNLIMITED, empty line=SYSP 209)
ADD:
-
Index 31. Enter YES in the following item to provide for offsite/pager outcalling to be made
only for urgent messages. The default is NO.
31. OFFSITE ONLY IF URGENT (Y/N, empty line N)
ADD:
-
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Indexes 33, 35, and 36. Index 33 is operational only if the 5000 User Interface feature is
installed.
33.
HELP OPERATOR MAILBOX
:
(1−8 digits, N = NONE, empty line = NONE
35.
OVERRIDE TRUNK GROUP NUMBER
:
36.
DEFAULT GREETING MAILBOX
:
)
(1−8 digits, N = NONE, empty line = NONE)
(1−8 digits, N = NONE, empty line = NONE)
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1-23
After index 36 is answered, the mailbox INFORMATION Table is complete, as shown.
−−− INFORMATION TABLE 1 COMPLETE −−−
Enter the INFORMATION TABLE number to be added. (1−512)
Enter empty line when done.
10. SCHEDULE TABLES
Enter a SCHEDULE Table for each COS entered for the user mailboxes defined in Question 2 and
for ports defined in Question 3. Enter a schedule for each COS number. Enter the appropriate times,
days, and INFORMATION Table numbers for each SCHEDULE Table time period displayed. When
finished with the time periods, enter an INFORMATION Table to be used for the default times.
10.
SCHEDULE TABLE.
− − − SCHEDULE FOR COS 10
− − −
TIME PERIOD 1:
Enter INFORMATION TABLE number to use. (1−512)
Enter empty line when done.
:
Enter applicable WEEKDAYS as: SU,MO,TU,WE,TH,FR,SA,HOL
(Empty line = MO,TU,WE,TH,FR)
:
Enter START time as: HOURS (00−23): MINUTES (00−59)
(Empty line = 00:00)
:
Enter STOP time as: HOURS (00−23): MINUTES (00−59)
(Empty line = 23:59)
:
TIME PERIOD 2:
Enter INFORMATION TABLE number to use. (1−512)
Enter empty line when done.
:
When you are finished entering all time periods for the SCHEDULE Table, press Enter at the
colon. The message server prompts for the default INFORMATION Table number.
Enter the DEFAULT INFORMATION TABLE number to use outside the
TIME PERIODS specified for COS 10 . (1−512)
INSTALL COMPLETE.
WAIT... DONE.
SAVE configuration to a DISKETTE? ( Y/N , empty line = N ).
:
WARNING: FOR PROPER OPERATION SYSTEM MUST BE RESTARTED AFTER INSTALL!
DAY MM/DD/YYYY HH:MM:SS
−−−−−−−−
@
PB60019−01
SYSTEMNAME
ID:XXXXXX
SYSTEM INSTALLATION COMPLETED
S/N:XXXXXX
PBX:00
−−−−−−−−
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-24
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Save the configuration on your backup configuration disk. Leave the disk in the floppy disk drive.
The Octel 200/300 must be reloaded to operate correctly. To reload, at the @ prompt, enter
RESTA 2
Enter
After the Octel 200/300 has reloaded, it is recommended that you enter the UPDATE program and
use the LIST command to review the answers you just entered. You might also need to change some
of the system parameter values. Refer to the Configuration volume, System Parameter Table chapter.
Use the UPDATE program to modify system parameters and to set COS Attributes.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1.4
1-25
ANSWERING QUESTIONS ABOUT OTHER TELEPHONE
SYSTEMS
The INSTALL program asks the following questions when your telephone system manufacturer or
PBX model number is not listed in question 1.a).
Please answer the following questions for your telephone system:
How do you TRANSFER a call to another EXTENSION?
(May include: 0−9,*,#, D=DELAY, E=EXPECT DIAL TONE, or F=FLASH,
1−8 chars, empty line = NONE)
:FE
Enter the sequence of events when transferring a call before you enter the destination extension
number. For example, if the sequence is “flash,” wait for dial tone, then enter the extension number,
type FE. (If the telephone hookswitch is pressed momentarily, that is considered a flash.)
Enter the sequence of events for a reconnection to the original caller.
How do you RE−CONNECT to the caller if the EXTENSION doesn’t answer?
(May include: 0−9,*,#, D=DELAY, E=EXPECT DIAL TONE, or F=FLASH,
1−8 chars, empty line = NONE)
:F
This is usually similar to transferring a call. For example, if FE is entered for a transfer, an F (flash)
is probably used for a reconnection.
Type the digits, if any, required to complete a transfer. If there are none, press
Enter
.
What digits, if any, are dialed before HANG−UP to COMPLETE a transfer?
(May include: 0−9,*,#, D=DELAY, E=EXPECT DIAL TONE, or F=FLASH,
1−8 chars, empty line = NONE)
:
A ringback is the sound you hear in the receiver when the telephone you are calling is ringing. The
standard ringback is one ring, alternating with silence. A double-interrupted ringback is two short
rings, and then silence. Enter Y for double ringback.
Does this telephone system give DOUBLE−INTERRUPTED RINGBACK
(Y/N, Empty line =N)
:Y
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-26
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Some PBX systems may require a digit sequence to be dialed so that system
extensions get assigned to the incoming call group.
What digits, if any, should be dialed on all PORTS upon POWER−UP?
(May include: 0−9,*,#, D=DELAY, E=EXPECT DIAL TONE, or F=FLASH,
1−8 chars, Empty line = E)
:
End of telephone system specific questions.
At this point, the INSTALL program continues with question 1.b), Company Name. Refer to the
Answering Questions in INSTALL section.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1.5
1-27
EXITING BEFORE THE INSTALL IS COMPLETE
There are two ways that you can leave and re-access the INSTALL program, shown in the following
examples. The first example shows what to do if you make a mistake during INSTALL and, instead
of correcting it, you choose to exit and start over. The second example shows what to do if you are
interrupted during INSTALL and choose to stop temporarily and continue later.
Restarting INSTALL
If you make a serious mistake and you don’t want to fix it later, you can leave the program and start
over. At the point you wish to exit the program, type .E at the colon (:) prompt. The following
example, starting at question 1.c), shows how.
c)
What is the SYSTEM ID number? (1−6 digits).
:555
d)
How many (Octel 200/300) ports will be used? (1−8, empty line = 4)
:.E
EXITING INSTALL
WAIT...DONE.
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−SYSTEM INSTALLATION SUSPENDED−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
@
When you want to return to the INSTALL program, type INSTA at the @ prompt, as shown below.
@INSTA
−−−−−SYSTEM INSTALLATION DIALOG
DAY
MM/DD
HH:MM:SS
YYYY
SYSTEM NAME
ID:000
You have an installation already in progress.
Do you wish to start over with a NEW INSTALLATION?
(Y/N, empty line = NO, continue installation in progress)
Y:
CLEARING ALL TABLES...DONE.
INITIALIZING ALL USER DIRECTORIES...DONE.
1. SYSTEM PARAMETERS.
a) Select the MANUFACTURER NUMBER ..... etc.
All the information entered earlier has been cleared. Begin again with the first question. Refer to the
Answering Questions in INSTALL section.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-28
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Exiting and Continuing
If you start INSTALL and are interrupted, you can leave the program and continue later at the point
where you left off. The following example, starting at question 1.c), shows how.
c)
What is the SYSTEM ID number? (1−6 digits).
:555
d)
How many (Octel 200/300) ports will be used? (1−8, empty line = 4)
:.E
EXITING INSTALL
WAIT...DONE
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−SYSTEM INSTALLATION SUSPENDED−−−−−−−−−−−−−
@
Later, when you want to continue, type INSTA at the @ prompt, as shown.
@INSTA
−−−−−SYSTEM CONFIGURATION DIALOG−−−−−
DAY
MM/DD
HH:MM:SS
YYYY
SYSTEM NAME
ID:000
You have an installation already in progress.
Do you wish to start over with a NEW INSTALLATION?
(Y/N, Empty line = NO, continue installation in progress)
:
d)How many ports will be used? (1−8, empty line = 4)
:
Begin entering data where you left off.
Reinstalling an Installed Octel 200/300
After the Octel 200/300 is installed, situations could arise that warrant a reinstallation:
-
The PBX has been replaced.
There were errors during INSTALL. (Instituting a reinstallation might be more time-efficient
than correcting major errors.)
During a reinstallation, you can use the following options to:
Octel 200/300
-
Reinstall the Octel 200/300, answering every question in the INSTALL program.
-
Preload all the configuration tables from the backup configuration disk.
-
Preload the specific range of tables.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1-29
Enter INSTA at the @ prompt. If you enter Y to reinstall, you are prompted to enter a password.
Enter the maintenance level password. If you do not enter a password or you enter an incorrect
password, the INSTALL program is aborted.
@INSTA
−−−−−−−
SYSTEM INSTALLATION DIALOG −−−−−−−
DAY MM/DD HH:MM:SS YYYY SYSTEM NAME ID:000
S/N:000000
PBX:00
SYSTEM HAS ALREADY BEEN INSTALLED.
Do you wish to RE−INSTALL? (Y/N, empty line = N)
<<IF YES, ALL TABLES WILL BE CLEARED AND USER MESSAGES WILL BE LOST>>
:Y
PASSWORD:
CLEARING ALL TABLES...DONE.
INITIALIZING ALL USER DIRECTORIES...DONE.
All the information entered earlier during the INSTALL is cleared. The message server prompts you
to preload any CONFIGURATION tables from the backup configuration diskette.
Do you wish to PRE-LOAD any tables from a previous INSTALL
from your DISKETTE? (Y/N, empty line = N)
:
If you answer N, none of the database tables are loaded. The reinstallation begins with the first
INSTALL question. Refer to the Answering Questions in INSTALL section.
If tables should be preloaded, enter Y and insert the configuration backup disk. The message server
asks if all tables should be preloaded.
Insert desired DISKETTE in drive. Press RETURN when ready...
PRE−LOAD ALL configuration tables?
:Y
If you answer Y, the Octel 200/300 preloads all of the system configuration tables. If you answer N,
the Octel 200/300 responds with the following:
PRE−LOAD USERS, DISTRIBUTION LIST, COS, SCHEDULE, INFORMATION,
HOLIDAY, DST, and NAMES tables? (Y/N, empty line = N)
If you answer Y, these tables are preloaded. If you answer N, no tables are preloaded.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-30
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Answering Y To Preload All Tables
When preloading, all configuration tables are loaded. However, if a feature has not been purchased
that table is not used.
@INSTA
SYSTEM HAS ALREADY BEEN INSTALLED.
Do you wish to RE−INSTALL? (Y/N, empty line = N)
<<IF YES, ALL TABLES WILL BE CLEARED AND USER MESSAGES WILL BE LOST>>
:Y
PASSWORD:
CLEARING ALL TABLES...DONE.
INITIALIZING ALL USER DIRECTORIES...DONE.
Do you wish to PRE−LOAD any tables from a previous INSTALL
from your DISKETTE? (Y/N, empty line = N)
:Y
Insert desired DISKETTE in drive. Press RETURN when ready...
PRE−LOAD ALL configuration tables?
:Y
Table PRELOAD COMPLETE.
1.
SYSTEM PARAMETERS.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL is complete.
2.
USER.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL is complete.
3.
SLOTS.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL is complete.
4.
NETWORK ROUTES.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL is complete.
5.
NETWORK LOCATIONS.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL is complete.
6.
NETWORK NUMBERING PLAN.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL is complete.
7.
DISTRIBUTION LISTS.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL is complete.
8.
COS.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL is complete.
9.
INFORMATION Tables.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL is complete.
10. SCHEDULE Table.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL is complete.
WARNING: FOR PROPER OPERATION SYSTEM MUST BE RESTARTED AFTER INSTALL:
INSTALL COMPLETE.
WAIT...DONE.
SAVE configuration to a DISKETTE? (Y/N, empty line = N).
:Y
You must reload the Octel 200/300 for it to operate correctly. At the @ prompt, enter RESTA 2.
Make all UPDATE modifications after the message server has rebooted.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
INSTALL
1-31
Answering N To Preload All Tables
When you answer N, ALL tables are not preloaded. Instead, the server prompts you to preload groups
of tables as follows:
@INSTA
−−−−−SYSTEM INSTALLATION DIALOG
DAY
MM/DD
HH:MM:SS
YYYY
SYSTEM NAME
ID:000
SYSTEM HAS ALREADY BEEN INSTALLED.
Do you wish to RE−INSTALL? (Y/N, empty line = N)
<<IF YES, ALL TABLES WILL BE CLEARED AND USER MESSAGES WILL BE LOST>>
:Y
PASSWORD:
CLEARING ALL TABLES...DONE.
INITIALIZING ALL USER DIRECTORIES...DONE.
Do you wish to PRE−LOAD any tables from a previous INSTALL
from your DISKETTE? (Y/N, empty line =N)
:N
Insert desired DISKETTE in drive. Press RETURN when ready ...)
PRE−LOAD ALL configuration tables? (Y/N, empty line = N)
:N
PRE−LOAD USERS, DISTRIBUTION LIST, COS, SCHEDULE, INFORMATION,
HOLIDAY, DST, and names TABLES? (Y/N, empty line = N)
:Y
PRE−LOAD NETWORKING TABLES (ROUTE, LOCATION and ACCESS)? (Y/N, empty line = N)
:N
Table PRELOAD COMPLETE.
Do you wish to set the system DATE and TIME? (Y/N, empty line = N)
:
1. SYSTEM PARAMETERS
a) Select the MANUFACTURER−NUMBER of your telephone system
from the following list:
The installation continues with the regular installation questions until it reaches 2. USER.
2.
USER
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL is complete.
3.
SLOTS.
4.
PB60019−01
NETWORK ROUTES
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1-32
Installation and Maintenance Volume
The following questions appear the same as in a regular installation.
5.
NETWORK LOCATIONS.
6.
NETWORK NUMBERING PLAN.
7.
DISTRIBUTION LISTS.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL
is complete.
8.
COS.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL
is complete.
9.
INFORMATION TABLES.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL
is complete.
10.
SCHEDULE TABLES.
Table PRE−LOADED from disk. UPDATE if necessary when INSTALL
is complete.
Continue with the questions as shown in INSTALL, until this message appears:
WARNING: FOR PROPER OPERATION SYSTEM MUST BE RESTARTED AFTER INSTALL!
INSTALL COMPLETE.
WAIT...DONE.
SAVE configuration to a DISKETTE? (Y/N, empty line = N).
:Y
DAY MM/DD HH:MM:SS YYYY SYSTEM NAME ID:000000 S/N:000000 PBX:00
− − − − − − − − − − SYSTEM INSTALLATION COMPLETED − − − − − − −
For correct operation, you must reload the Octel 200/300 after INSTALL. At the @ prompt, type:
RESTA 2
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Enter
PB60019−01
2
HARDWARE
Chapter Contents
2.1
Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Octel 200/300 Cabinets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Octel 200/300 Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Octel 200/300 Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Octel 200 Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Octel 300 Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Octel 200/300 Subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Line Interface Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Telemarketing Line Card (TLC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Direct Access Card (DAC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
EntryWorks ACP Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Fax Application Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
LAN Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Integration Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Voice Control Unit (VCU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
Central Processing Unit (CPU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
Power Supply Unit (PSU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
Octel 200/300 Motherboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
Option Control Chip (OCC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Floppy Disk Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
Hard Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16
Works for Serenade Hard Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17
Subsystem Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17
Octel 200 Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-24
Octel 300 Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-29
Figures
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
PB60019−01
Octel 200
Octel 200
Octel 200
Octel 200
Octel 300
Octel 300
Octel 300
Octel 300
Cabinet
Cabinet
Cabinet
Cabinet
Cabinet
Cabinet
Cabinet
Cabinet
Shelf Structure − Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
− Inside Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
− Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
− Inside Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shelf Structure − Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
− Inside Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
− Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
− Inside Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Octel 200/300
2-25
2-26
2-27
2-28
2-30
2-31
2-32
2-33
S.4.1
2
HARDWARE
Tables
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
Octel 200/300
PSU DC Voltages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Motherboard Interconnections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Octel 200/300 Subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Octel 200 Subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Octel 300 Subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S.4.1
2-12
2-15
2-17
2-22
2-23
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Hardware
Octel 200 Message Server Specifications
Mailboxes
Up to 5,000 per cabinet
Messages
Maximum Number
Maximum Length
135 per mailbox, configurable by COS
3.0 hours, configurable by COS
Capacity (per cabinet)
Voice Storage
Up to 540 hours per cabinet
Redundant Voice Storage
Up to 270 hours
Redundant System Storage
Standard with multiple-disk message servers
Ports
Up to 64 ports
Maximum Cabinets per System
10 (with Collocated Analog Networking)
Classes of Service (COS)
512
Cabinet Specifications
Cabinet Dimensions
Height
Width
Depth
24.8 inches (63.0 cm)
13.0 inches (33.0 cm)
19.5 inches (49.5 cm)
Cabinet Weight
100 pounds (45.4 kg) maximum, depending on configuration
Air Intake
150 cfm
Air Filter
Washable, installed in door
Cable Access
Rear
Service Access
Front, locked door
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Hardware
Octel 200 Message Server Specifications
Electrical Requirements
100−240 VAC Auto-ranging
PSU System
Voltage Range
Frequency
Maximum Power
100−240 VAC
50−60 Hz
500 WATT
120 VAC System
Voltage Range
Frequency
Maximum Power
90−132 Vac
47–63 Hz
500 WATT
230 VAC System
Voltage Range
Frequency
Maximum Power
180–260 Vac
47–63 Hz
500 WATT
–48 VDC System
Voltage Range
Maximum Power
42–60 Vdc
500 WATT
Remote Alarm
Alarm Relay
Closures
Rating
Access
2 (Major, Minor)
0.5 A at 48 Vdc
Rear, DB9 connector
Alarm Callout
Automatic Callout to configurable service number
Alarm Types
Major Alarm, Minor Alarm
Temperature Alarm
At Alarm Temperatures <50F or >122F (<10C or >50C)
Environmental Requirements
Temperature
Operating (Sea Level)
Nonoperating
Gradient, Operating
Gradient, Nonoperating
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
50F (10C) to 104F (40C)
–50F (–10C) to 129F (54C)
18F (10C) per hour, maximum
36F (20C) per hour, maximum
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Hardware
Octel 200 Message Server Specifications
Environmental Requirements (continued)
Humidity, Operating
20–80%, noncondensing
Atmosphere, Particulate
Matter
80 micrograms per cubic millimeter (max)
Corrosive Gases
<10 ppm
Altitude
Operating
Nonoperating, transit
Nonoperating, storage
–200 to 10,000 feet (–61 to 3,048 meters)
–200 to 40,000 feet (–61 to 12,192 meters)
–200 to 10,000 feet (–61 to 3,048 meters)
Vibration, operational at
22–500 Hz
0.1 g
Installation Environment
Equipment room or office
Flooring
No special requirements
Cabinet Clearance
Front
Rear
Sides
Top
Heat Dissipation
Interfaces
22 inches (55.9 cm)
6 inches (15.2 cm)
1 inch (2.5 cm)
1 inch (2.5 cm)
Maximum 500 watts (1706 Btu per hour) per cabinet, each cooled with
two internal, 4-inch (10.2-cm) fans
Telephone Ports
2-wire, 2500-type; 2-wire, DID-type, optional
Port Connector
50-pin telco, four ports per connector with 4-port LIC, eight ports per
connector with 8-port LIC, twelve ports per connector with 12-port ILC12,
and sixteen ports per connector with 16-port DLC16, rear access, and
sixteen ports per DAC I/O panel (four-port DAC)
PB60019−01
Serial Port
RS-232C, auto-baud-rate select, DB25, 300–38,400 bps
RS-232C
Integration Port
RS-232C, 1200, 2400, 4800, or 9600 bps; DB25
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Hardware
Octel 200 Message Server Specifications
Interfaces (continued)
Internal Modem
Bell 103/212A and CCITT V.22/CCITT V.22 bis. One per cabinet,
accessible from any telephony port.
Works Serial Ports
Four RS-232C (2 DB9, 2 DB25) ports, rear access
Alarm Relay
DB9, rear access
Routine Maintenance
Air Filter Cleaning
At least yearly
Fan Inspection
At least yearly
System Protection
Overtemperature Shutdown
Disk Drive Spin Down
<41F or >131F (<5C or >55C), automatic recovery
Power Supply Shutdown
158F (70C), manual recovery
Power Supply Unit Protection
Circuit Fuse
100−240 VAC Auto−
ranging PSU systems
6A
120 VAC systems
230 VAC systems
DC systems
10 A
5A
15 A
Overcurrent
Four DC outputs, over current protection, automatic recovery
Overvoltage
Power supply shut off
Overtemperature
Power supply shut off, automatic recovery
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Hardware
Octel 200 Message Server Specifications
System Adjustments
Cabinet Adjustments
Levelers
Internal Adjustments
None
Time-of-Day Clock
Accuracy
1 min/mo, at 77F / 25C
Battery Hold Time
>1 year, at 77F / 25C
Battery Life
10 years, at 77F / 25C
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Hardware
Octel 300 Message Server Specifications
Mailboxes
Up to 10,000 per cabinet
Messages
Maximum Number
Maximum Length
135 per mailbox, configurable by COS
3.0 hours, configurable by COS
Capacity (per cabinet)
Voice Storage
Up to 1085 hours per cabinet
Redundant Voice Storage
Up to 542 hours, optional
Redundant System Storage
Standard with multiple-disk systems
Ports
Up to 128 ports
Maximum Cabinets per System
10 (with Collocated Analog Networking)
Classes of Service (COS)
512
Cabinet Specifications
Cabinet Dimensions
Height
Width
Depth
37.5 inches (95.3 cm)
17.5 inches (44.5 cm)
19.5 inches (49.5 cm)
Cabinet Weight
220 pounds (100 kg) maximum, depending on configuration
Air Intake
300 cfm
Air Filter
Washable, installed in door
Cable Access
Rear
Service Access
Front, locked door
Rack Mount
19-inch (48.3 cm), optional
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Hardware
Octel 300 Message Server Specifications
Electrical Requirements
100−240 VAC Auto-ranging
PSU System
Voltage Range
Frequency
Maximum Power
100−240 VAC
50−60 Hz
500 WATT
120-Vac System
Voltage Range
Frequency
Maximum Power
90–132 Vac
47–63 Hz
1000 watts
230-Vac System
Voltage Range
Frequency
Maximum Power
180–260 Vac
47–63 Hz
1000 watts
–48-Vdc System
Voltage Range
Maximum Power
42–60 Vdc
1000 watts
Remote Alarm
Alarm Relay
Closures
Rating
Access
2 (Major, Minor)
0.5 A at 48 Vdc
Rear, DB9 connector
Alarm Callout
Automatic Callout to configurable service number
Alarm Types
Major Alarm
Minor Alarm
Temperature Alarm
At Alarm Temperatures <50F or >122F (<10C or >50C)
Environmental Requirements
Temperature
Operating (Sea Level)
Nonoperating
Gradient, Operating
Gradient, Nonoperating
PB60019−01
50F (10C) to 104F (40C)
–50F (–10C) to 129F (54C)
18F (10C) per hour, maximum
36F (20C) per hour, maximum
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Hardware
Octel 300 Message Server Specifications
Environmental Requirements (continued)
Humidity, Operating
20–80%, noncondensing
Atmosphere, Particulate
Matter
80 micrograms per cubic millimeter (max)
Corrosive Gases
<10 ppm
Altitude
Operating
Nonoperating, in transit
Nonoperating, in storage
–200 to 10,000 feet (–61 to 3,048 meters)
–200 to 40,000 feet (–61 to 12,192 meters)
–200 to 10,000 feet (–61 to 3,048 meters)
Vibration, operational at
22–500 Hz
0.1 g
Installation Environment
Equipment room or office
Flooring
No special requirements
Cabinet Clearance
Front
Rear
Sides
Top
22 inches (55.9 cm)
6 inches (15.2 cm)
1 inch (2.5 cm)
1 inch (2.5 cm)
Interfaces
Telephone Ports
2-wire, 2500-type; 2-wire, DID-type, optional
Port Connector
50-pin telco, four ports per connector with 4-port LIC, eight ports per
connector with 8-port LIC, twelve ports per connector with 12-port ILC12,
and sixteen ports per connector with 16-port DLC16, rear access; and
sixteen ports per DAC I/O panel (four-port DAC)
Serial Port
RS-232C, auto-baud-rate select, DB25, 300–38,400 bps
RS-232C
Integration Port
RS-232C, 1200, 2400, 4800, or 9600 bps; DB25
Internal Modem
Bell 103/212A and CCITT V.22/CCITT V.22 bis. One per cabinet,
accessible from any telephony port.
Works Serial Ports
Four RS-232C (2 DB9, 2 DB25) ports, rear access
Alarm Relay
DB9, rear access
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Hardware
Octel 300 Message Server Specifications
Heat Dissipation
120, 230 and 240 VAC PSU
Maximum 1,000 watts (3412 Btu per hour) per cabinet, each cooled with
four internal, 4-inch (10.2-cm) fans
100−240 VAC Auto-ranging
PSU
Maximum 600 WATT, (2047 Btu per hour) per cabinet, each cooled with
two internal, 4-inch (10.2 cm) fans
Routine Maintenance
Air Filter Cleaning
At least yearly
Fan Inspection
At least yearly
System Protection
Overtemperature Shutdown
Disk Drive Spin Down
<41F or >131F (<5C or >55C), automatic recovery
Power Supply Shutdown
158F (70C), circuit breaker trip, manual recovery
Power Supply Unit Protection
Circuit Breaker
System overcurrent trip, manual recovery
Overcurrent
120, 230 and 240 VAC PSU
100−240 VAC Auto-ranging
PSU
All six DC outputs, automatic recovery
All five DC outputs, automatic recovery
Overvoltage
120, 230 and 240 VAC PSU
100−240 VAC Auto-ranging
PSU
Overtemperature
PB60019−01
All six DC outputs, circuit breaker trip, manual recovery
All five DC outputs, circuit breaker trip, manual recovery
Circuit breaker trip, manual recovery
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Hardware
Octel 300 Message Server Specifications
System Adjustments
Cabinet Adjustments
Levelers
Internal Adjustments
None
Time of Day Clock
Accuracy
1 min/mo, at 77F / 25C
Battery Hold Time
>1 year, at 77F / 25C
Battery Life
10 years, at 77F / 25C
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware
2.1
2-1
HARDWARE
This chapter contains information about the Octel 200R and Octel 300R message server
architecture. Except where noted, the information is the same for both message servers.
The Octel 200/300 outer metal enclosure contains shelves with slots for various disk drives and
system card configurations.
Illustrations of the Octel 200, and the Octel 300 are located at the end of this chapter.
Octel 200/300 Cabinets
Octel 200/300 cabinets have front access for normal maintenance of all components. All cabling is
connected at the back of the cabinet. Side access is not provided or necessary.
The message server door should be closed and locked when access is not required. The door can be
removed as needed.
Octel 200/300 Controllers
The message servers are controlled by two separate cards:
-
CPU (Central Processing Unit)
-
VCU (Voice Control Unit)
A LAN card (Local Area Network) is required to support the following. (The LAN card is optional.)
-
Digital Networking
-
Connection to the Octel Access server
-
LAN Backup/Restore
-
TELNET access to system administration functions
Octel 200/300 Connectors
The following connection points are located on the back of an Octel 200/300 message server:
-
System Terminal Port
-
System Alarm Port
-
I/O Panel
-
RS-232C Connectors
System Terminal Ports
The system terminal port is an RS-232C port used to communicate with the Octel 200/300 for message
server configuration, error reporting, and other system maintenance. Two parallel connectors to the
system terminal port are located on the cabinet; one in the front (SP1) and one in the rear (J1).
Connection can be made to only one of these connectors at a time. If a terminal is to remain with the
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
2-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
message server permanently, use the rear connector. If a terminal is to be connected temporarily, use the
front connector. The front cabinet door must be open to use the front connection.
The system terminal port supports any ASCII send/receive serial terminal. Refer to the Installation
chapter, Terminal Communications section, in this volume.
System Alarm Port
Major and minor alarm relays provide alarms for hardware errors. A dry-relay contact closure
provides major and minor alarms. Refer to the Installation chapter, Pin Assignments for Message
Server Cards and Ports section of this manual for the pinout configuration for the alarm relays.
Relay controls are connected to the alarm relay port at the back of the cabinet. The alarm relays are
located on the CPU card. Any hardware error closes the minor alarm relay. Any alarm call also
closes the major alarm relay. Refer to the Maintenance Commands chapter, Alarm Test section, in
this volume.
If power fails both relays close the contacts. Both relays remain closed during power restoration until
the software boot process opens the relays. If there was an alarm condition before the power failure
or an alarm condition arises during the boot process, the relays remain closed until the hardware
errors are cleared.
I/O Panel
Telco 50-pin connectors on the I/O panel connect cables from the various LICs, TLCs, DACs, and
integration cards to the PBX.
RS-232C Connectors
The J1 and SP1 RS-232C connectors are for terminal communication. J2 is for RS-232 integration.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware
2-3
Octel 200 Cabinet
Each Octel 200 is shipped fully assembled. The cabinet specifications are as follows:
Height: 24.8 inches (63.0 cm)
Clearances: Front: 22 inches (56 cm
Width: 13.0 inches (33.0 cm)
Rear: 6 inches (15 cm)
Depth: 19.5 inches (49.5 cm)
Side:
1 inch (2.5 cm)
Weight: 100 pounds (45.4 kg) maximum
Top:
1 inch (2.5 cm)
Figure 2-1 through Figure 2-4 at the end of this section show various views and component locations
of the Octel 200.
Octel 200 Shelves
The Octel 200 has two shelves − Shelf A and Shelf B − with slots for various configurations of disk
drives and system cards.
Octel 200 Shelf A
Shelf A contains 10 card slots. Six of the slots can be used for Line Interface Cards (LICs) in any
combination, to a maximum of 64 ports. In addition, a maximum of 24 fax channels can be
supported. The following Table shows which cards can go into each slot.
Refer to the Product Description and Administration volume, General Description chapter, General
Octel 200/300 Sizing and Capacity section, for additional information. Refer to the Configuration
volume, Slots Table chapter, for information about configuring the slots.
Slot Number
A1–A6
A1–A7
A5–A7
A7
A8
A9
A10
Cards
LIC, TLC, DAC, DLC16, ILIC12, DTIC, or integration cards
Fax card
LAN card
EntryWorks ACP card
VCU
CPU
(PSU, includes floppy disk load device)
Octel 200 Shelf B
Shelf B contains a slot for a Works for Serenade disk drive and three slots for system/voice disk
drives. The disk drive usage by slot number is as follows:
Slot Number
B1
B2 and B3*
B4
Type of Disk Drive Installed
Works for Serenade disk drive
System/voice disk drives (data and voice storage)
Voice disk drive
*Load the system/voice and voice disk drives into the slots in the following order: B2, B3, B4.
PB60019−01
-
For a single-drive, load the system/voice drive in slot B2
-
With two drives, load the system/voice drives in slots B2 and B3
-
With three drives, load the system/voice drives in slots B2 and B3 and a voice drive in slot B4.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
2-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Other Octel 200 Components
Fans
Two fans are located at the rear of the cabinet.
Air Filter
The washable air filter is located inside the front door. Air intake is from the front and air exhaust is
from the rear of the cabinet.
Octel 300 Cabinet
Each Octel 300 message server is shipped fully assembled. The cabinet specifications are as follows:
Height: 37.5 inches (95.3 cm)
Clearances: Front: 22 inches (55.9 cm)
Width: 17.5 inches (44.5 cm)
Rear:
6 inches (15.2 cm)
Depth: 19.5 inches (49.5 cm)
Side:
1 inch (2.5 cm)
Weight: 220 pounds (100 kg) maximum
Top:
none
Figure 2-5 through Figure 2-8 at the end of this section show various views and component locations
of the Octel 300.
Power
The power line filter prevents electromagnetic interference (EMI) from entering the primary power
lines. The power line filter is located at the rear of the cabinet. The AC system power cord plugs into
the power line filter. Some chassis disassembly is required to replace the power line filter. The
voltage rating of the power line filter must agree with the input voltage rating of the Power Supply
Unit (PSU).
.
In −48 VDC message servers the power cord is integral with the power line filter.
Octel 300 Shelves
The Octel 300 has three shelves − Shelf A, Shelf B, and Shelf C − with slots for various
configurations of disk drives and system cards.
Octel 300 Shelf A
Shelf A contains 15 card slots. Eleven of the slots can be used for Line Interface Cards (LICs) in any
combination, to a maximum of 128 ports. The following Table shows which cards can go into each
slot.
Octel 200/300
-
If fax channels are installed, each channel counts against the 128-port maximum.
-
For older card-based integrations (ATTIC, SLIC, SIC8, and RIC) maximum voice ports is 96.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware
Slot Number
2-5
Cards
A1–A11
LIC, TLC, DAC, DLC16, ILC12, DTIC or integration cards
A1–A12
Fax card
A10–A12
LAN card
A12
EntryWorks ACP card
A13
VCU
A14
CPU
A15
PSU
Refer to the Product Description and Administration volume, General Description chapter, General
Octel 200/300 Sizing Consideration and Capacity section, for additional information. Refer to the
Configuration volume, Slots Table chapter, for information about configuring the slots.
Octel 300 Shelves B and C
The slots in shelves B and C allow various configurations of Octel 300 hard disk drives and contain
the message server’s floppy disk device. The disk drive usage by slot number is as follows:
Slot Number
Type of Disk Drive Installed
B1
Reserved for future use
B2
Works for Serenade disk drive
B3−B4
B5
C1–C4
System/voice disk drives (data and voice storage)
Floppy disk device
Voice disk drives (voice storage only)
Load the system/voice and voice disk drives into the slots in the following order: B3, B4, C1, C2,
C3, then C4.
-
For a single-drive message server, load the system/voice drive in slot B3
-
For a two-drive message server, load the system/voice drives in slots B3 and B4
-
For a three-drive message server, load the system/voice drives in slots B3 and B4 and a voice
drive in slot C1; and so forth.
Other Octel 300 Components
Fans
The washable air filter is inside the front door of the cabinet. The air intake is from the front, and air
exhaust is from the rear and top.
Fan Tray
Four fans are located on a slide-out fan tray in the center of the cabinet, between shelves A and B.
The fan tray is a plug-in fan assembly used for system cooling. The fan assembly is accessible from
the front of the cabinet.
The four fans draw air through the front door air filter, and they exhaust from the top rear and top
sides of the cabinet. The fans use 12 volts and are powered from the +12 VM output of the PSU. The
fans are not sensitive to the input power to the cabinet.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
2-6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Octel 200/300 Subsystems
The following sections describe all Octel 200/300 subsystems. Tables listing each subsystem name,
abbreviation, part number, and brief a description are located at the end of this section.
Line Interface Cards
LICs (Line Interface Card) provide an interface to the PBX extensions. The different types of line
cards used in the Octel 200/300 are as follows:
LIC
PBX Connection
LIC4
25-pair cable
LIC8
25-pair cable
ILC12*
25-pair cable
DLC16*
25-pair cable
DTIC*
Coax Cable or twisted pair
*DSP (Digital Signal Processing) treats dial tone received from the distant end as a disconnect signal.
Each LIC handles the functions of ring detection, dial tone detection, and signal power measurement,
allowing automatic gain control from 0 dB to 24 dB of gain for recording messages.
The LIC has a yellow LED for each port, which indicates port activity. For the DTIC, a green LED is
lit when any of the 30 channels are in use.
In the Octel 200 LICs can occupy slots A1 through A6.
In the Octel 300 LICs can occupy slots A1 through A11.
Telemarketing Line Card (TLC)
The TLC has eight ports. It differs from the LIC because you can only record on the first port of the
TLC located in slot A1. The seven remaining ports in slot A1 are play-only ports. All other TLC
ports in the message server are play-only ports. When recording is attempted on other ports, the
Octel 200/300 prompts “Messages may not be recorded at this time. No storage is available.”
The first TLC must be installed in slot A1 unless there is at least one standard LIC in other system.
In the Octel 200 TLCs can occupy slots A1 through A6.
In the Octel 300 TLCs can occupy slots A1 through A11.
Direct Access Card (DAC)
The DAC is a 4-port interface card. When used in place of the standard LIC, the DAC allows direct
connection of incoming DID or outgoing PBX trunks. Because trunks connect directly to the DAC
card, transfers cannot be made for callers who reach the message server. The DAC is only used for
service feature applications. The DAC requires an external –48 VDC PSU and a rear-mounted DID
I/O panel.
Octel 200/300
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In the Octel 200 DACs can occupy slots A1 through A6.
In the Octel 300 DACs can occupy slots A1 through A11.
EntryWorks ACP Card
The EntryWorks ACP (application control processor) card directs the Works for Serenade flow
control language. It includes the host interface and the ACP SCSI disk drive control. EntryWorks
requires the following:
-
EntryWorks disk drive
-
EntryWorks serial I/O panel and cable
-
EntryWorks external modem and cable
In the Octel 200 the Works for Serenade must occupy slot A7.
In the Octel 300 the Works for Serenade must occupy slot A12.
Fax Application Processor
The fax application processor transmits and receives fax messages for the Fax Mail Plus feature. The
fax processor contains one or two 4-channel fax daughterboards and supports up to eight
simultaneous fax transactions when both daughterboards are installed. Every fax transmission uses a
voice port in addition to the fax channel. It supports communication with CCITT Group 3 fax
machines. The fax channels operate at transmission rates up to 9600 baud.
In the Octel 200 the fax card can occupy slots A1 through A7. The total number of fax channels
cannot exceed the number of voice ports.
In the Octel 300 the fax card can occupy slots A1 through A12. The total number of fax channels
cannot exceed the number of voice ports.
LAN Card
The LAN card is required for both Remote and Domain Digital Networking, Telnet access for system
administration, the LAN Backup and Restore feature, Telnet access, and when an OA server is linked
with an Octel 200/300 message server. The card interfaces with the Octel 200/300 by means of a 10
Base-T Ethernet interface.
In the Octel 200 the LAN card can occupy slots A5, A6 or A7.
In the Octel 300 the LAN card can occupy slots A10, A11 or A12.
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Installation and Maintenance Volume
Integration Cards
Integration cards are used with certain PBX integrations that utilize proprietary digital links. Four
types of integration cards are available. A description of each follows.
-
PIC integration cards with COD ports
AT&T (ATTIC), ROLM (RIC), Northern Telecom SL-1 (SLIC). Each of these cards is divided
into two integration units; each integration unit supports two integration links.
-
MIC integration cards
-
SIC8 integration cards
In the Octel 200 integration cards can occupy slots A1−A6.
In the Octel 300 integration cards can occupy slots A1−A11.
.
For detailed information about specific Integration cards, refer to the Integration volume.
AT&T (ATTIC), ROLM (RIC), Northern Telecom SL-1 (SLIC)
AT&T Integration Card (ATTIC)
The AT&T Integration Card (ATTIC) is used with Lucent/AT&T System 75, System 85, and
Definity integrations. Refer to the Integration volume, AT&T Adaptive Integration. with ATTIC
The APIC is the preferred approach, and more recently, a QSIG integration based on an E-1
connection to the Lucent Difinity G3 switch is available.
ROLM Integration Card (RIC)
The ROLM Integration Card (RIC) is used with Siemens/ROLM integrations. Refer to the
Integration volume, Rolm CBX and Rolm 9751, Model 30 and Model 80 Adaptive Integration.
Northern Telecom SL-1 Integration Card (SLIC)
The Northern Telecom SL-1 Integration Card (SLIC) is used with Northern Telecom SL-1 and
Meridian 1 integrations. Refer to the Integration volume, SL-1 Adaptive Integration. The NPIC
is the preferred approach for switches that can support the 2616 telephone.
PIC integration cards with COD ports
PIC Integration Card for Lucent/AT&T (APIC)
The APIC Integration Card is used with Lucent/AT&T System 75, System 85, and Definity PBX
integrations. With APIC, the integration and line card functionality are combined on each port.
The APIC card is a 12-port COD card. The ports can be purchased in increments, with a 4−port
minimum. Refer to the Integration volume, AT&T Adaptive Integration With APIC.
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PIC Integration Card for Northern Telecom (NPIC)
The NPIC Integration Card is used with Northern Telecom Meridian 1 or Meridian SL-1 PBX
integrations. With NPIC, the integration and line card functionality are combined on each port.
The NPIC card is a 16-port COD card. Starting with S4.0, NPIC ports can be configured as
agents in an ACD group. The ports can be purchased in increments of two, with a 4−port
minimum. Refer to the Integration volume, Northern Telecom Adaptive Integration With NPIC.
.
.
PIC cards cannot co−exist with other integration cards in the same system.
APIC and NPIC are DSP-based cards (Digital Signal Processing), which treat dial tone
received from the distant end as a disconnect signal.
Mitel Integration Card (MIC)
The Mitel Integration Card (MIC) is used with Mitel SX-200 Digital, SX-100/SX-200 Analog and
SX-2000 S and SG integrations. Refer to the Integration volume, Mitel Adaptive Integration.
Serial Integration Card for the Meridian 1 (SIC8)
The Serial Integration Card (SIC8) was designed for use with Northern Telecom Meridian 1
PBX integrations. Refer to the Integration volume, Meridian 1 Adaptive Integration. Since its
introduction, the NPIC is the preferred approach.
Voice Control Unit (VCU)
The VCU manages the system/voice and voice disk drives. It manipulates and controls all voice data
files. It also controls the loopstart LICs and preprocesses events from the LICs before passing the
events to the CPU.
In the Octel 200 the VCU is located in slot A8 and manages the system/voice and voice disk drives
in slots B2, B3, and B4.
In the Octel 300 the VCU is located in slot A13 and manages the system/voice and voice disk drives
in slots B3, B4, and C1–C4.
Central Processing Unit (CPU)
The CPU controls the VCU and the integration cards and provides relay closure contacts for major
and minor alarms. This section describes the CPU serial I/O ports and other CPU components.
In the Octel 200 the CPU is located in slot A9.
In the Octel 300 the CPU is located in slot A14.
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CPU Serial I/O Ports
The Octel 200 CPU has three ports.
The Octel 300 CPU has five ports.
-
CPU Port − J1
The first serial port supports an RS−232C, auto-baud rate select, DB25, 300−38,400 bps
connection. Database access task is used for the system terminal port, which is accessed at the
rear connector J1 or the front connector SP1.
-
CPU Port − J2
The second serial port can either communicate with the DID/E&M Trunk Interface via an
RS-232C cable or can be used for RS-232C adaptive integration for message waiting and passing
call information from some PBXs. Refer to the Integration volume, Adaptive Integration.
-
CPU Ports − J3 and J4
The Octel 200 CPU provides relay closure contacts for major and minor alarms on port J3. The
Octel 200 does not have port J4.
The Octel 300 third and fourth ports, J3 and J4, are reserved for future use.
-
CPU Port 5
The Octel 300 CPU provides relay closure contacts for major and minor alarms on port J5.
Other CPU Components
-
Floppy Disk Controller
Controls the floppy disk drive.
On the Octel 200, the floppy disk drive is located on the PSU.
On the Octel 300, the floppy disk drive located in slot B5.
-
-
-
-
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Battery Backup
Backs up the message server time-of-day clock. The battery can keep the clock running for up to
one week if the power fails.
TDM Switch
A TDM crosspoint switch controls the TDM bus.
Analog−to−Digital Converter (A to D)
Monitors the message server’s voltages and temperature.
Internal Modem
The internal modem is compatible with the following standards: Bell 103/212A and CCITT
V.22/CCITT V.22 bis. One per cabinet, accessible from any telephony port.
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Power Supply Unit (PSU)
There are eight different Power Supply Units (PSUs) for the Octel 200/300. The differences between
the PSUs are explained in this section.
.
The information in this section applies to all PSUs unless otherwise noted.
A PSU with the correct input voltage must be
used.
Caution!
Do not install or remove the PSU with the
power switch in the ON position.
Earlier Version PSUs
Current Version PSUs
Octel 200 90–132 VAC
(110/220 VAC nominal)
Octel 200 100−240 VAC
autoranging
Octel 200 180–260 VAC
(220/230 VAC nominal)
Octel 300 90–132 VAC
(220/230 VAC nominal)
Octel 300 100−240 VAC
autoranging
Octel 300 180–260 VAC
(220/240 VAC nominal)
Octel 200 −48 VDC (unchanged)
Octel 200 −48 VDC (unchanged)
Octel 300 −48 VDC (unchanged)
Octel 300 −48 VDC (unchanged)
PSU Identification
You can identify which PSU is in your Octel 200/300 by the label as listed below:
Current AC PSU
The front label:
100−240 VAC PSU
Earlier AC PSU
Front Label Octel 200 120VAC: AC PSU
Front Label Octel 300120VACl: AC PSU
The bar code label:
Part Number*
Front Label Octel 200 230VAC: 230 VAC PSU
Front Label Octel 300 240VACl: 240 VAC PSU
Octel 200 only:
P.S. Warning/Fuse Label:
Size: 5x20mm
Rating: 6.3 Amp, 250V, Slow Blow
Octel 200 only:
P.S. Warning/Fuse Label:
(Three check boxes for three possible fuses 10 A,
5 A, or 15 A).
Replacement fuse: 250V, Fast Blow.
*The actual part number is on the back of the PSU. Refer to Table 2-3 for the actual part numbers.
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Installation and Maintenance Volume
PSU Voltages
The AC and DC wiring is prewired to connectors that are automatically engaged when the power
supply is installed. There are no power-supply adjustments. You can check voltages by using a digital
volt meter.
Using the digital volt meter, you can measure the system DC voltages at the voltage test points on
the front edge of the CPU. Refer to the Installation chapter, Octel 200/300 Hardware Installation
section in this volume.
The PSU provides regulated DC voltages as shown in Table 2-1.
Table 2-1 PSU DC Voltages
Name
+5 V
Nominal DC
Voltage
5 volts
Function
Digital logic power
+5 VC
5 volts
Analog circuit power
+12 VM
12 volts
Fan and disk drive motor power
+12 VC
12 volts
Analog circuit power
–12 VC
–12 volts
Analog circuit power
–5 VC
–5 volts
Analog circuit power
Power Fail
The PSU provides the system power fail signal. This signal activates if the message server input
voltage drops out of operational range. The power fail signal interrupts the CPU as a warning of loss
of primary power, allowing controlled shutdown.
Octel 200 Power Supply
The Octel 200 PSU is located in slot A10.
The PSU provides a protective fuse for primary power production. This fuse is opened when a
primary overcurrent occurs. The Octel 200 cabinet contains a spare fuse.
The +5-volt PSU is sensed at the center of the motherboard. Each regulated voltage includes
overvoltage and overcurrent protection. The PSU also includes overtemperature protection.
The input voltage is displayed near the power cord socket at the rear of the cabinet and on the PSU.
The AC power filter is built into the PSU.
The Octel 200 floppy disk drive is an integral part of the PSU. Therefore, if either the PSU or floppy
disk drive malfunction, they are both replaced. Refer to The Procedures chapter for details.
Octel 200/300
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Differences between earlier and current Octel 200 PSUs
Current AC PSU
Fuse: 6.3 Amp, 250V, slow blow, 5x20mm.
Mounted on front of PSU
Autoranging: accepts AC input voltage
from 100 VAC to 240 VAC.
Supports nominal AC input frequencies
of 50/60 Hz (50/60 cycles per second).
Earlier AC PSU
Domestic Fuse: 10 Amp
International Fuse: 5 Amp
Mounted on front of PSU
No Autoranging.
Different units are used for different input
voltages
Power factor corrected to meet European harmonic distortion requirements.
Approved for worldwide usage.
Octel 300 Power Supply
The Octel 300 PSU is located in slot A15.
The PSU provides the message server reset signal. This signal is activated at power up and resets all
boards in the message server. The PSU provides a protective circuit breaker for primary power. This
circuit breaker also acts as the message server power switch. The circuit breaker is tripped for primary
overcurrent, power supply overtemperature, and secondary overvoltage. When the circuit breaker is
tripped the ON/OFF switch is set to the OFF position.
The +5-volt PSU is sensed at the center of the shelf A motherboard. The +12-volt fan and drive
motor power is sensed at the SCSI motherboard B and SCSI motherboard C. Each regulated voltage
of the PSU includes overvoltage and overcurrent. The PSU also includes overtemperature protection.
In the case of an overtemperature occurrence, the circuit breaker opens.
The message server input voltage is displayed on the power line filter box at the rear of the cabinet.
Differences between earlier and current Octel 300 PSUs
Current AC PSU
Earlier AC PSU
A new 100−240 VAC power filter assembly
is required when the new 100−240 VAC
PSU is used.
The AC power filter assemblies are different depending on AC input voltage. The types are:
120 VAC, 240 VAC, and -48 VDC.
Autoranging; accepts AC input voltage
from 100 VAC to 240 VAC.
No Autoranging.
Supports nominal AC input frequencies
of 50/60 Hz (50/60 cycles per second).
Different units are used for different input
voltages.
Power factor corrected to meet European harmonic distortion requirements.
Approved for worldwide usage.
Refer to the Installation chapter, Installation Requirements section, for instructions on installing a
–48 VDC powered PSU. Refer to the Hardware Replacement chapters, Power Supply Unit section,
for instructions about removing and installing a PSU.
Refer to Chapter 9 for more information about the PSUs.
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Installation and Maintenance Volume
Octel 200/300 Motherboards
The motherboard distributes power to the cards, disks, and fans; provides signaling between slots;
interconnects cards and external connectors; and has a reset signal that activates when the power is
turned on (resetting all boards in the message server.)
Motherboards are installed in the rear of the server cabinet.
-
The Octel 200 has one motherboard located behind shelves A and B.
-
The Octel 300 has three motherboards, one located in each shelf: A, B, and C.
The shelf A motherboard has two flat ribbon cables. One connects to the Works drive in slot B2.
The other flat ribbon cable connects to the drives in slots B3 through B5.
The shelf B motherboard has one flat ribbon cable that connects from slot B3 to slot C4.
External Connections
The motherboard interconnects signals from cards installed in slots to respective external circuit
connectors. For example, an LIC installed in slot A1−A7 connects to tip-and-ring circuits of a
telephone network through rear connector P1−P7 in the Octel 200. For the Octel 300, A1−A11
connects to P1−11.
System/Voice SCSI Bus and Works SCSI Bus
The motherboard has signaling for two separate SCSI buses: the system/voice SCSI bus and the
Works for Serenade SCSI bus.
In the Octel 200, the System/Voice SCSI Bus interconnects drives in slots B2 through B4. The Works
for Serenade SCSI bus connects to the drive in B1.
In the Octel 300, the System/Voice SCSI Bus interconnects drives in slots B3 through C4. The Works
for Serenade SCSI bus connects to the drive in slot B2.
SCSI ID Field
The motherboard includes an ID signal field for each slot. This ID field is used by the plug-in disk
assemblies for SCSI bus ID selection. Each SCSI device requires a unique SCSI ID. This signal is
used by the drive assemblies to select a unique SCSI ID.
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Motherboard Interconnections
The following table shows the motherboard functions and their interconnections.
Table 2-2 Motherboard Interconnections
Function
Octel 200
Motherboard
Octel 300
Shelf A
Motherboard
A1 through A12 to
P1 through P12
Octel 300
Shelf B
Motherboard
None
Octel 300
Shelf C
Motherboard
None
External
Connections
A1 through A7 to
P1 through P7
System/Voice
SCSI Bus
B2
B3
B4
None
B3
B4
B5*
C1
C2
C3
C4
Works SCSI
Bus
B1/0
None
B1
B2
None
TDM Bus
A1 through A7
A1 through A12
None
None
*Even though Slot B5 is connected through the SCSI bus, only the floppy drive is installed in this slot. The
floppy drive only draws power from this connection.
Option Control Chip (OCC)
The OCC is located on the motherboard, directly behind the PSU.
.
The Octel 300 OCC is on the Shelf A motherboard.
The OCC contains information about the message server configuration, the number of voice and fax
mailboxes authorized, and the Octel 200/300 feature options.
The OCC must always remain with the message server it was purchased for. If the motherboard must
be replaced, the OCC must be transferred from the old motherboard to the replacement motherboard.
Refer to the Hardware Replacement, Option Control Chip Replacement section, in this manual.
Floppy Disk Drive
The load/backup device is the floppy disk drive, which permits online backup of critical message
server configuration information as well as names and greetings. It offers a reliable means of copying
new software and prompts to the hard disk. The floppy disk drive is also used to restore a message
server to normal operation when replacing the hard disk.
The Octel 200 floppy disk drive is an integral part of the PSU.
The Octel 300 floppy disk drive is a separate unit connected by a cable to the front of the CPU.
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S.4.1
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Installation and Maintenance Volume
Hard Disk Drives
The hard disk drives are plug-in, random access, read/write magnetic hard-disk assemblies, requiring
no adjustments or jumper configurations.
The Octel 200/300 uses SCSI technology hard disk drives that interface to a single SCSI bus. This
bus is controlled by the VCU. Disk drives are used for two functions:
-
-
.
System/Voice disks store the operating message server programs, voice prompts, configuration
information, and voice messages. A portion of a system/voice disk is reserved for system
software, configuration data, and prompts. The remainder of the drive stores voice messages.
Voice storage disks store only voice messages.
Voice data is stored on voice drives in a way that equalizes the space remaining for storage on
each voice drive. Storage on system/voice drives occurs when there are no voice-only drives
or when those drives have less than 20MB available storage.
Depending on capacity and redundancy requirements, each Octel 200/300 can have one or more hard
disk drives.
The Octel 200 can contain from one to three hard disk drives in slots B2, B3, and B4.
-
The maximum disk storage 513 hours of voice storage.
The Octel 300 can contain from one to six hard disk drives in slots B3, B4, C1, C2, C3, and C4.
-
The maximum disk storage is 1068 hours of voice storage.
The first disk drive is always a system/voice disk. If a second disk is installed it is also a
system/voice disk. If additional disks are installed they are voice disks only.
Disk Redundancy
Hot Standby redundancy of all system software, configuration data, and prompts is automatic when a
second system disk is installed. Hot Standby redundancy is not available when only one system disk
is installed.
Redundancy for names, greetings, and messages for message servers containing two or more disk
drives is also available. When Names and Greetings Redundancy, and Message Redundancy are
installed, names, greetings, and messages are made redundant in the following manner.
-
In message servers containing two disk drives, the redundancy is on the second drive.
In message servers containing more than two disk drives, storage of the redundant copy follows
the same algorithm as storage of the primary voice/fax data.
Refer to the Feature Description volume, Hard Disk Redundancy chapter.
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Works for Serenade Hard Disk
The EntryWorks hard disk is a SCSI-technology hard disk. It stores EntryWorks programs and
databases.
-
In the Octel 200 the EntryWorks hard disk occupies slot B1.
-
In the Octel 300 the EntryWorks hard disk occupies slot B2.
Subsystem Configurations
The following tables list each subsystem name, abbreviation, part number, and a brief description.
-
Table 2-3 lists subsystems that are interchangeable between the Octel 200 and the Octel 300.
-
Table 2-4 lists subsystems for the Octel 200
-
Table 2-5 lists subsystems for the Octel 300.
Table 2-3 Octel 200/300 Subsystems
Subsystem Configurations
Part Number
Description
STORAGE
Part numbers with -003 instead of -002 indicate the international version.
500-MB Storage Drive
Octel 200 – 32/46 hours*
740-6632-002
Octel 300 – 25/46 hours*
International
740-6632-003
1GB Storage Drive
740-6631-002
Octel 200 – 82/96 hours*
Octel 300 – 75/96 hours*
International
740-6631-003
2GB Storage Drive
740-6633002
Capacity on Demand (COD) 0-hour drives. SCSI
hard disk drives store voice messages, prompts,
system configuration data, and software.
NOTES:
* The capacity shown for system/voice drives (the
first number) assumes one language. Subtract 1.75
hours for each additional language. The second
number shows the capacity for voice drives.
Octel 200 – 171/185 hours*
Octel 300 – 164/185 hours*
International
PB60019−01
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Octel 200/300
S.4.1
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Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 2-3 Octel 200/300 Subsystems (continued)
Subsystem Configurations
Part Number
Description
LINE INTERFACE CARDS (LIC)
United States, Canada,
Mexico
United Kingdom
300-6002-001
4-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card (LIC4); 4 ports authorized.
300-6032-001
8-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card (LIC8); 8 ports authorized.
300-6054-001
16-port, loopstart telephone line interface card
(DLC16); 0 ports authorized.
300-6002-002
4-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card; 4 ports authorized.
300-6032-002
8-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card; 8 ports authorized.
300-6056-002
12-port, loopstart telephone line interface card
(ILC12); 0 ports authorized.
300-6054-002* 16-port, telephone line interface card; 0 ports
authorized.
France, Belgium
300-6044-001
4-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card; 4 ports authorized.
300-6054-017* 16-port, loopstart telephone line interface card
(DLC16); 0 ports authorized.
Germany
300-6044-005
4-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card; 4 ports authorized.
300-6054-013* 16-port, loopstart telephone line interface card
(DLC16); 0 ports authorized.
Netherlands
New Zealand, Australia
300-6002-009
4-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card; 4 ports authorized.
300-6032-009
8-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card; 8 ports authorized.
300-6054-009
16-port, loopstart telephone line interface card
(DLC16); 0 ports authorized.
300-6002-011
4-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card; 4 ports authorized.
300-6032-011
8-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card; 8 ports authorized.
*The country-specific DLC16 cards have been replaced with a more universal DLC16 analog card (CTR−21, part
number 300-6054-019). This card is authorized for use in Germany, C.I.S. countries, Italy, Spain, Portugal and
Sweden. Consult with your Account Executive for country-specific information.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
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Table 2-3 Octel 200/300 Subsystems (continued)
PB60019−01
Subsystem Configurations
Part Number
Description
Direct Access Card (DAC)
300-6027-001
4-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card. This card allows direct
connection of incoming DID or outgoing PBX
trunks.
New Zealand, Australia
Direct Access Card (DAC)
300-6027-011
4-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card. This card allows direct
connection of incoming DID or outgoing PBX
trunks.
Digital Trunk Interface
Card-E1 (DTIC-E1)
300-6048-003
A per-port integration card that offers 30 COD
ports (referred to as channels) and works in
conjunction with the DPNSS, Euro-ISDN, and
QSIG integrations.
Fax Application Processor
(Fax card)
300-6037-002
4-channel fax processor supports communication
with CCITT Group 3 fax machines and operates
at transmission rates of up to 9600 baud.
300-6037-003
8-channel fax processor supports communication
with CCITT Group 3 fax machines and operates
at transmission rates of up to 9600 baud.
LAN Card
300-6049-001
Used for Digital Networking, LAN Backup and
Restore, Telnet terminal access and connection
to the OctelAccess server. Interfaces with the
Octel 200/300 via a 10BaseT Ethernet interface.
Works for Serenade
ACP card
300-6019-002
Processor for Works for Serenade flow control
language. Includes host interface and ACP SCSI
disk drive control.
Telemarketing Line Card
(TLC)
300-6032-003
8-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card. Octel 200/300 allows recording
by the first port of a TLC only if the TLC is in
slot 1.
United Kingdom
Telemarketing Line Card
300-6032-004
8-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card. Octel 200/300 allows recording
by the first port of a TLC only if the TLC is in
slot 1.
Netherlands Telemarketing
Line Card
300-6032-010
8-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card. Octel 200/300 allows recording
by the first port of a TLC only if the TLC is in
slot 1.
New Zealand, Australia
Telemarketing Line Card
300-6032-012
8-port, two-wire, loopstart telephone line
interface card. Octel 200/300 allows recording
by the first port of a TLC only if the TLC is in
slot 1.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
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Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 2-3 Octel 200/300 Subsystems (continued)
Octel 200/300
Subsystem Configurations
Part Number
AT&T Integration Card
(ATTIC)
300-6018-001
Digital interface card to the AT&T System 75,
System 85, and Definity PBXs. This connection
provides Adaptive Integration features.
AT&T Integration Card
(ATTIC), A-law revision
300-6018-002
Same as 300-6018-001 but used in countries
where A-law is standard.
ROLM Integration Card (RIC)
300-6025-001
Digital interface card to the ROLM 8000, 9000,
and 9751 PBXs. This connection provides
Adaptive Integration features.
Northern Telecom SL-1
Integration Card (SLIC)
300-6009-001
Digital interface card to the Northern Telecom
SL-1 and Meridian 1 PBXs. This connection
provides Adaptive Integration features.
Mitel Integration Card (MIC)
300-6020-001
Digital interface card to the Mitel SX-200
Digital, SX-100/SX-200 Analog, SX-2000, and
SG PBXs.
Mitel Integration Card (MIC),
International
300-6020-002
Same as 300-6020-001 but used internationally.
Serial Integration Card for the
Meridian (SIC8)
300-6040-001
Digital interface card to the Northern Telecom
Meridian 1 PBX. This connection provides
Adaptive Integration features.
APIC Integration Card for
AT&T Systems
300-6058-003
12-port interface card to the AT&T System 75,
System 85, and Definity PBX; 0 ports
authorized.
NPIC Integration Card for
Northern Telecom Systems
300-6058-004
16-port interface card to the Northern Telecom
Meridian 1 and Meridian SL-1 PBX; 0 ports
authorized.
S.4.1
Description
PB60019−01
Hardware
2-21
Table 2-3 Octel 200/300 Subsystems (continued)
Subsystem Configurations
Part Number
Description
OTHER SUBSYSTEM PARTS
PB60019−01
Voice Control Unit (VCU)
300-6001-004
File system manager, SCSI bus control, and
voice bus control.
Central Processing Unit (CPU)
300-6039-004
Central control processor that runs call
processing software.
Works for Serenade Hard Disk
Drive
740-6248-001
SCSI hard disk drive for storage of Works for
Serenade programs and databases.
Works for Serenade Serial I/O
Cable
520-6007-001
Cable connecting the EntryWorks ACP board to
the Works for Serenade serial I/O panel.
Works for Serenade External
Modem
SA10194-03
Dedicated external modem for remote access to
the Works for Serenade subsystem.
Works for Serenade Modem
Cable
SA10187-01
Cable between the Works for Serenade modem
and the serial I/O panel.
Option Control Chip (OCC)
FK90087
Contains information about the software options
the Octel 200/300 is equipped with.
Option Control Chip (OCC)
Replacement
FK90087
Replacement OCC
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
2-22
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 2-4 Octel 200 Subsystems
Octel 200/300
Subsystem Configurations
Part Number
Motherboard (MB)
740-6503-001
Power Supply Units (PSU)
120−230 VAC autoranging
120 VAC
230 VAC
-48 VDC
740-6640-000
740-6504-001
740-6505-001
740-6506-001
Description
Backplane board for interconnecting system
modules and system power distribution.
Power conversion from system input power to
four regulated, DC voltages. The floppy disk
drive is part of the PSU.
AC-to-DC Power Supply
Conversion Kit
740-6543-001
Converts the AC power supply to a DC power
supply; contains the PSU, the DC inlet box, and
the DC backplane harness.
Works for Serenade Serial I/O
Panel
740-6037-002
Rear-mount RS-232C connector panel.
DC Inlet Box
740-6537-002
Inlet box for DC powered systems.
Fan Power Harness
530−6501−001
Electrical connection from the power supply to
the fans that cool the server.
Fan Panel Assembly
740-6502-002
System cooling fans.
Air Filter
840-6507-001
Washable air filter.
Maintenance Port Cable
520-6502-001
Connects motherboard to RS−232 system
terminal port connector.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware
2-23
Table 2-5 Octel 300 Subsystems
PB60019−01
Subsystem Configurations
Part Number
Floppy Disk Drive
740-6010-001
Motherboards (MB)
Shelf A
Shelf B
Shelf C
740-6003-001
300-6006-001
300-6005-001
Power Supply Unit (PSU)
120-240 VAC autoranging
120 VAC
240 VAC
-48 VDC
740-6641-000
740-6016-001
740-6017-001
740-6027-001
Power Filter Assembly
100-240 VAC
120 VAC
240 VAC, Domestic
240 VAC, European
-48 VDC
740-6038-001
740-6006-001
740-6028-001
740-6031-001
740-6075-001
Description
Removable drive for configuration backup and
software and prompt loading during an upgrade.
Backplane boards for interconnecting system
modules and system power distribution.
Power conversion from system input power to
six regulated DC voltages.
Power entry connection and a power line
EMI-suppression filter.
AC-to-DC Power Supply
Conversion Kit
740-6100-001
Converts the AC power supply to a DC power
supply; contains the PSU, the DC inlet box, and
the DC backplane harness.
DAC Power Supply Assembly
740-6050-001
Provides -48 VDC to DAC I/O panel.
Fan Tray Assembly
740-6002-001
System cooling fans.
Fan Tray Power Harness
530−6001−001
Electrical connection from the power supply to
the fans that cool the server.
120/240 VAC
Filter-to-Backplane Harness
530-6009-001
Electrical connection from the power filter
assembly to the backplane.
−48 VDC Filter-to-Backplane
Harness
530-6021-001
Electrical connection from the DC power filter
assembly to the backplane.
Disk Power Harness
530-6010-001
Electrical connection from the disk drive
motherboards to the backplane.
Load Resistor Assembly
740-6128-001
Maintains proper voltage regulation of the PSU.
Air Filter
840-6013-001
Washable air filter.
Works for Serenade Serial I/O
Panel
740-6043-002
Rear mount RS-232C connector panel.
DAC I/O Panel
740-6051-002
Concentrates lines from up to four DAC boards
into connector.
SCSI Bus Jumper Cable
520-6001-001
Cable, flat SCSI bus.
Maintenance Port Cable
520-6003-001
Connects motherboard to RS−232 system
terminal port connector.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
2-24
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Octel 200 Figures
This section contains the following views of the Octel 200 cabinet.
Octel 200/300
-
Octel 200 Cabinet Shelf Structure Front View
-
Octel 200 Cabinet Inside Front View
-
Octel 200 Cabinet Rear View
-
Octel 200 Cabinet Inside Rear View
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware
2-25
Octel 200
VCU Slot
CPU Slot
Front System
Terminal Port
Power Switch
Card Slots
A1 to A7
A1 − A6:
LIC, TLC, DAC, or
integration card
100-240VAC
PSU
A1−A7:
FAX card
Power Supply
Unit
System Fuse
A5−A7:
LAN card
Reload Button
A7:
EntryWorks ACP
card
Floppy Disk
Drive
Voice Disk Drive
Works for
Serenade Disk
Drive
System/Voice
Disk Drives
Figure 2-1 Octel 200 − Cabinet Shelf Structure, Front View
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
2-26
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Octel 200
Front Door
VCU
(Slot A8)
Card Slot
Card Slot
System Terminal Port
(SP1 Connector)
CPU (Slot A9)
ON/OFF Switch
Power Supply/
Floppy Drive Unit
Reload Button
Fuse
Floppy Disk Drive
Floppy Signal
Cable
Disk Drive
Assembly
Figure 2-2 Octel 200 − Cabinet, Inside Front View
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware
2-27
Octel 200
Visual Mailbox
Connector (J4)
System
Terminal
Port (J1)
RS-232C
Connector
(J2)
Alarm Port (J3)
J1
J4
Power Cord
P7
P6
P5
J2
P4
J3
P3
P2
P1
I/O Panel
f
f
Tapped Mounting Holes
(to secure Works for
Serenade Serial I/O
Panel and DAC Panel)
Earth Ground
Connection Point
Figure 2-3 Octel 200 − Cabinet, Rear View
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
2-28
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Octel 200
System
Terminal Port
Fan Power Harness
Connector
Motherboard
Power Cord
Receptacle
Figure 2-4 Octel 200 − Cabinet, Inside Rear View
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware
2-29
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 300 Figures
This section contains the following views of the Octel 300 cabinet.
PB60019−01
-
Octel 300 Cabinet Shelf Structure Front View
-
Octel 300 Cabinet Inside Front View
-
Octel 300 Cabinet Rear View
-
Octel 300 Cabinet Inside Rear View
2-30
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Octel 300
CPU Slot
Front System
Terminal Port
VCU Slot
Power Switch
Card Slots
A1 to A12
A1 − A11:
LIC, TLC, DAC,
100-240VAC
PSU
or Integration
card
A1−A12
FAX card
Power Supply Unit
Reload Button
A10−A12
LAN card
A12:
EntryWorks ACP,
System/Voice
Disk Drives
Fan Tray
Floppy Disk
Drive
Works for
Serenade Disk
Drive
Four Voice
Disk Drives
Figure 2-5 Octel 300 − Cabinet Shelf Structure, Front View
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware
2-31
Octel 300
Front Door
VCU
(Slot A13)
System Terminal Port
(SP1 Connector)
Card Slot
Card Slot
CPU (Slot A14)
ON/OFF Switch
Power Supply Unit
Reload Button
Floppy Signal Cable
Fan Tray
Floppy Disk Drive
Hard Disk Drive
Assembly
Figure 2-6 Octel 300 − Cabinet, Inside Front View
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
2-32
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Octel 300
RS-232C
Connector
Port B (J2)
Reserved
RS-232C
Connectors
(J3 and J4)
Visual Mailbox
Connector (J6)
System Terminal Port
Rear Connection (J1)
Alarm Port (J5)
Power
Receptacle
J1
J6
P12
P11
P10 P9
P8
P7
J3
P6 P5
J2
J5
J4
P4
P3
P2
P1
50-pin Telco
connectors
(25 pair) Amphenol
connectors
Power
Cord
Cable Tiedown
Points
Tapped Mounting
Holes for securing
Serial I/O panel and
DAC panel
Earth Ground
Connection Point
Figure 2-7 Octel 300 − Cabinet, Rear View
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware
2-33
Octel 300
System Terminal
Port Cable
Main
Motherboard
(shelf A)
Main Power
Harness
Power Line
Filter
SCSI Bus
Jumper Cable
Main Disk Drive
Power Harness
Disk Drive
Motherboard
(shelf B)
Disk Drive
Motherboard
(shelf C)
Fan Tray Power
Harness
Figure 2-8 Octel 300 − Cabinet, Inside Rear View
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
3
PREPARING THE PHONE SYSTEM
Chapter Contents
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
How the Octel 200/300 Works with the Phone System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Interfaced Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Integrated Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Answering Incoming Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Acting as a Message Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Determining Necessary Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Changes to Central Office Trunking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Additional Trunking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Ordering PE Trunking Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Phone System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Port Extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Called Extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Trunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Trunk Redirection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Ordering Phone System Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Implementing the Octel 200/300 on PBXs without DIL Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Upgrade the PBX to a Feature Package Offering the DIL Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
Use DID Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
Place the Console in Night Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
Figures
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
Octel 200/300 Connection to Phone System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Octel 200/300 E-1 Digital Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
All Incoming Lines Directed to the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Incoming Calls Split Between Console and the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Sample Agency Letter for PE Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Service Provider Letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
Directing Incoming Calls to the Octel 200/300 When the PBX Does Not Offer a DIL Feature . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Table
3-1
PB60019−01
PBX Features to Direct Trunks to the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Preparing the Phone System
3.1
3-1
HOW THE OCTEL 200/300 WORKS WITH THE PHONE
SYSTEM
The OctelR 200/300 message servers work with PBXs, Centrex, most hybrids, and some key systems. In
most PBX environments, the Octel 200/300 is configured with its voice ports connected to the phone
system as a series of DTMF touchtone single line analog extensions (touchtone sets). In the PBX, these
extensions are programmed to receive an incoming call, to place outgoing calls (within the PBX for
message waiting and also outside the PBX for offsite paging, alarm calls and networking), to place calls
on hold, transfer calls, and reconnect if the called party does not answer. This configuration is referred to
as “behind the switch” because the ports are on the extension side, not the trunk side. Refer to Figure 3-1.
Extensions
PBX
Octel
Trunks
200/300
Extensions to Ports
Figure 3-1 Octel 200/300 Connection to Phone System
Newer integrations, including DNPSS, Euro−ISDN, and QSIG, are based on the ability to use Common
Channel Signalling (CCS) between the switch and the message server. The DTIC card used to support
these integrations provides a 30-port E−1 connection to the switch via either twisted pair or coax cable. In
addition to the 30 ports that carry voice/fax traffic, there is a signalling channel used to send call record
information and to handle message waiting indication commands. Finally, a second data-only channel is
used to provide synchronization. In CCS integrations, the message server ports are no longer on the
“extension side”’ of the PBX. Instead, the message server itself appears to the switch network as a
“transient” PBX. When a call reaches the message server directly or in a forwarded condition, and the
caller dials another extension, the outgoing segment of the call is initiated on a separate port. When the
call is answered, either by the called party or by the message server on a forwarded condition, the PBX
optimizes the route to drop all message server ports that participated in the call.
In “behind the switch” configurations, the message server appears to the PBX to be a series of telephone
extensions. In some PBX environments, the message server appears to the PBX as another node in a
private network of PBXs. In these environments, the physical connection from the message server to the
PBX is based on an E-1 card at each end. the E-1 card in the message server is referred to as the DTIC
card. The E-1 connection is provided through a 2MB digital link. The bandwidth on that link is divided
into 32 time slots. The first time slot, slot 0, is for synchronization. Time slot 16 is the data channel that
transmits the call information. The other 30 time slots are available for voice and fax transmission.
Message waiting indication is provided through the data channel. Figure 3-2 shows the DTIC connection.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
3-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Extensions
PBX
Octel
200/300
Trunks
E-1 Digital Link
Figure 3-2 Octel 200/300 E-1 Digital Link
For convenience, this manual uses the terms “phone system” and “PBX” to refer to any telephone system
that works with the Octel 200/300.
This chapter discusses Octel 200/300 connection to the phone system, the changes required, and how to
order them. It assumes familiarity with some PBX concepts.
.
When implementing a PBX integration, use the appropriate Configuration Note to supplement the
Installation and Maintenance manual.
Changes need to be made to the phone system for Octel 200/300 message servers. Some are changes to
the PBX; others are done in the Public Exchange (PE). This may require lead time. Work with the client
to determine who will make the changes and how long they will take. Prepare a schedule so that everyone
knows who is doing what and the date each item is required.
Interfaced Installations
Each Octel 200/300 port is connected to a touchtone single-line, touchtone PBX extension. A 25-pair
cable connects the Octel 200/300 line card to the PBX extension. A PBX extension connected to a
Octel 200/300 port is referred to as a port extension.
In order for the Octel 200/300 to extend calls correctly, each port extension must be configured in the
PBX to receive calls, place them on hold, initiate, transfer, and reconnect calls.
An Octel 200/300 port is in use during the entire time it takes to answer a call, dial the extension the
caller entered, and connect the caller to the requested extension. The port is then free to handle another
call. When the called extension is busy or does not answer, the Octel 200/300 port remains occupied
while calling another extension or taking a message. An Octel 200/300 port is in use when employees are
listening to or sending messages.
Port extensions answering with the same company greeting and answering mode are placed in a hunting
arrangement within the PBX. The hunt group may be circular or linear (terminal) according to the
requirements of each particular PBX. This assures that callers are answered by the first available port.
The mode (AX, CX, or MX) of the port determines how calls are answered by the Octel 200/300. Refer
to the Configuration volume, Slots Table chapter.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Preparing the Phone System
3-3
Integrated Installations
Different methods are used to integrate a telephone system with the Octel 200/300. In some cases, a
combination of these methods may be used for full integration.
Integration is the ability of the telephone system to provide the Octel 200/300 with information that
identifies the extension number a call was intended for and, in some cases, the extension number from
where the call originated. Integration also handles message waiting indication.
Although calls can be sent directly to the message server (as they are with an interfaced installation) most
integrated environments involve PBXs equipped with DID trunks and most calls are forwarded to the
message server rather than answered directly.
In-band Integration
In-band integration is the ability of a telephone system to send DTMF tones that identify the extension
number for a forwarded call to the port extension answering the call. In-band signalling may include the
condition (busy, ring-no-answer, or direct) for the call. In certain installations, DTMF tones may be used
to turn ON or OFF message waiting indicators to indicate when a mailbox has new messages.
RS-232C Integrations
RS-232C integrations include Centrex integrations that use the Simplified Message Desk Interface
(SMDI) and integrations with some NEC switches. The SMDI call record provides the message server
with the extension number of the called party when an incoming call is forwarded. If the call originated
in the same PE or PBX, the directory number or extension number of the calling party is also sent to the
message server.
The condition or reason the call was forwarded to the message server, as well as the port or member of
the hunt group the call is being sent to, is included in the call record. Message waiting indication may be
turned ON or OFF over RS-232C connections for most installations.
Octel 200/300 Proprietary Card Integrations
Proprietary line cards that function similarly to digital display telephones have been developed for
several different PBXs. The Octel 200/300 reads the display to collect the card record, which is used to
determine the extension and the condition for the call, and then answers the call with the appropriate
greeting or response.
Once the extension and condition for the forwarded or direct call is known, a port answers the call and
provides all remaining call processing and messaging functions. The cards also turn ON or OFF message
waiting indicators in most of the proprietary integrations.
Answering Incoming Calls
The Octel 200/300 can answer all or a portion of a company’s incoming calls. Through the PBX
programming, trunks can be directed to the Octel 200/300 hunt group instead of the operator through a
PBX feature. This feature, often called DIL (Direct In Lines), allows trunks to be directed to a specific
extension or hunt group instead of the console.
The PBX may be set up to direct all or only some incoming trunks to the Octel 200/300. For example, the
main company number may be answered by the attendant, while a second trunk group, with a different
listed directory number, can be directed to the Octel 200/300.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
3-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Figure 3-3 is a block diagram of the Octel 200/300 connected to the phone system where all incoming
lines are directed to it. Arrows denote hunting.
PBX
Octel
200/300
Figure 3-3 All Incoming Lines Directed to the Octel 200/300
Figure 3-4 is a block diagram of the Octel 200/300 connected to a phone system that has incoming lines
split between the console and the Octel 200/300. Arrows denote hunting.
PBX
Octel
200/300
Figure 3-4 Incoming Calls Split Between Console and the
Octel 200/300
Acting as a Message Center
The Octel 200/300 can answer forwarded calls when the PBX does not provide the information needed to
support integration with the message server. The PBX may send only the digits associated with a
forwarded extension, using DTMF tones. The message server in that environment cannot detect that the
call was forwarded. To prevent the message server from acting on the received digits by trying to call the
extension again, ports are configured in CX mode. The Octel 200/300 does not attempt to call the
extension number but instead immediately goes to that extension’s mailbox, plays the appropriate prompt
or greeting, and if configured to do so, offers to take a message.
The attendant may also extend callers to a port to allow them to leave a voice message. This port is
configured as MX mode. It does not call the extension number entered but goes to that extension’s
mailbox and offers to take a message.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Preparing the Phone System
3.2
3-5
DETERMINING NECESSARY CHANGES
During the initial phase of the implementation process, perform a survey of the existing phone system.
From the descriptions of the application(s), decisions are made about how the Octel 200/300 should be
used. Refer to the Product Description volume, Implementation chapter, for a list of questions to ask
during the survey.
Use the results of the survey and the type of application to determine the necessary changes. Schedule
and track these changes using the checklist found in the Installation chapter, Testing the Installation and
Telephone Changes section.
For convenience, Public Exchange (PE) trunk changes are separate from PBX changes. The following
sections discuss changes that may be required and guidelines for ordering the changes for both PE
trunking and the PBX.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
3-6
3.3
Installation and Maintenance Volume
CHANGES TO CENTRAL OFFICE TRUNKING
Public Exchange (PE) changes may be needed to
-
Add trunking capability
-
Create new trunk groups
-
Add, change, or delete 800 services
-
Add, change, or delete DID or Centrex services
-
Split the hunt group (directory listed number), allowing some trunks to be directed to the console and
some to Octel 200/300
Additional Trunking
The specific number of PBX lines and trunks depends on the number of ports and the desired trunking
arrangement.
Although the Octel 200/300 port drops off after it transfers a call, the PE trunk is still occupied during the
entire call. When you decide how many trunks to direct to the Octel 200/300, remember each trunk is
occupied from the time the call is placed until the caller hangs up. As a result, the Octel 200/300 can
answer incoming calls from more trunks than it has ports.
Determine how many trunks to direct to the Octel 200/300 by using PBX traffic data and the traffic
engineering tables. The tables are designed to help decide how to use the Octel 200/300 most effectively
for a given situation. After collecting the traffic data, it may be necessary to order changes from the
telephone company to add or alter the number of trunks.
Ordering PE Trunking Changes
Contact the customer about making arrangements for changes in trunking. Typically, these changes
require significant lead time. The PE requires an agency letter from the customer authorizing you to act
on their behalf.
Figure 3-5 is a sample agency letter you may want to use.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Preparing the Phone System
3-7
DATE:
TO:
All concerned operating telephone companies and other
common carriers
ATTENTION: Supervisor
On this date we have entered into a contractual agreement with (the
Octel 200/300 supplier) to be our communications representative
relating to all voice grade telecommunication needs. This agreement is
for an indefinite period.
(The Octel 200/300 supplier) may order connection and disconnection
of telephone-company provided services and equipment. We hereby
acknowledge that (the Octel 200/300 supplier) may obligate us for
installation and other charges that may appear on our telephone bill.
This authorization does not preclude our ability to act on our own
behalf as necessary.
Please contact (contact name) of (the Octel 200/300 supplier) at
(address, phone number, and extension) if you have any questions.
(Customer’s Name)
(TITLE)
(COMPANY)
Figure 3-5 Sample Agency Letter for PE Changes
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
3-8
3.4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
PHONE SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Changes may be required to the following:
-
The Octel 200/300 port extensions
-
Called extensions
-
Trunks
-
Redirection
-
Selection
Additional equipment may be required before these changes can be made. Most changes are to the PBX
database.
Port Extensions
Connect and configure the port extensions using the following steps:
1.
Designate one single-line, touchtone extension for each Octel 200/300 port. Additional PBX line
circuits may be required. (APIC, NPIC and MIC cards use special lines. Refer to the Integration
volume as appropriate.)
2.
Terminate each of these extensions to a 66M connector block, or equivalent. Clearly mark each
termination point with the extension number.
3.
Assign a PBX class of service to these extensions permitting them to
4.
-
Initiate calls
-
Receive (incoming) calls
-
Place calls on hold
-
Transfer calls
-
Forward calls
Remove any type of call waiting features from the Octel 200/300 port extensions.
.
If configuring ports for outcalling to network locations, off-site message notification or
off-site alarm calls, make sure the port extensions are not restricted from making calls to the
required locations (e.g., toll restriction).
System speed dial commonly can override toll restriction. For security reasons, it may be
desirable to toll restrict the Octel 200/300 ports to local calls and have the ports use the PBX
system speed dial for long distance outcalls.
5.
Set up a hunt group for each group of port extensions configured to answer in the same way
(company greeting, intercept position, mode). Where possible, make these circular hunt groups. Note
that for PBXs that support adaptive integration, calls to the same hunt group can be answered
differently based on the trunk group number in the call record. Refer to the Integration volume for
additional information.
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
In cases where the PBX queues calls to a busy hunt group and no overflow position can be
defined, you may want to set up a “terminal” hunt group with the attendant, if possible, or
other PBX intercept position as the last member of the hunt. When all the ports are busy, calls
hunt to this last member of the group for answer.
PB60019−01
Preparing the Phone System
6.
3-9
Note the pilot number for each hunt group. Depending on the PBX type, the pilot number may be
either
-
a phantom number with no actual extension appearance
-
the first extension of the hunt group
7.
Make the hunt group number easy to enter and easy to remember, since employees use this number
to access the Octel 200/300. Most phone systems support use of an auto-dial key to reach the
message server.
8.
Determine how to set up a fail-safe answering position based upon features available for the PBX
type. This is generally programmed in the PBX by indicating an overflow extension when ports in
the hunt group are not able to answer. If none of these are permitted, refer to item 5 (above).
Called Extensions
Because the Octel 200/300 provides call coverage for busy extensions, any type of call waiting feature
provided by the PBX is not required. This feature may be removed from the PBX configuration for
extensions called through the Octel 200/300.
.
When a busy extension receives a second call, notification of the second call is given by a tone
that indicates a call is waiting. The busy extension may ignore the tone or place the first call on
hold to answer the second. The notification tone is only heard by the called person and the caller
hears ringing instead of a busy tone.
Remove any system call forwarding for call coverage to a number other than the message server pilot
number.
Trunks
Possible changes to the PBX trunk programming include redirecting trunks to the Octel 200/300 and
assuring any trunking changes do not affect the selection of trunks for outgoing calls. No changes need to
be made to the DID trunking or programming in the PBX.
Trunk Redirection
Trunks are directed to the Octel 200/300 via a PBX feature. Many PBX manufacturers call this feature
DIL, Direct In Lines, or DIT, Direct In Trunks. Table 3-1 lists several PBX manufacturers and the name
of that feature for their phone systems. If the phone system does not provide a DIL-type feature, refer to
the Implementing PBXs Without DIL Feature section in this chapter. If the phone system you are working
with is not mentioned here, and you are trying to determine the appropriate feature, first look for DIL, the
most commonly used name.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
3-10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 3-1 PBX Features to Direct Trunks to the Octel 200/300
PBX Manufacturer and Model
Name of Feature
AT&T/Lucent
All but Horizon and AT&T System 25
DDC (Direct Department Calling)
Horizon and AT&T System 25
DGC (Direct Group Calling)
ROLM/Siemans
DEDICATED
FUJITSU/American Telecom Focus
QUASI-DID
NORTHERN TELECOM SL-1/Nortel
AUTO-TERMINATE
Ordering Phone System Changes
If your company is not the PBX provider, order changes from the PBX vendor on behalf of the customer.
Provide a Service Provider Letter (Figure 3-6) to the PBX vendor indicating the changes needed to the
PBX for the Octel 200/300, and schedule the changes. If possible, try to use that PBX’s terminology
when requesting these changes. You may also want to provide them with information from the
appropriate section of Volume V and the appropriate Configuration Note. Review the previous sections of
this chapter for information to fill in the blanks. Read over the letter and in particular, the footnotes.
Depending upon the application, portions of the letter may need to be expanded upon or deleted.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Preparing the Phone System
3-11
The vendor may require your 200/300 registration information:
FCC Registration
Ringer Equivalence
PBX Interface
Line card
The unit
UL Registration
0.7A
25-pair cable
meets FCC Part 68
meets FCC Part 15, Class A
UL1459
Dear (PBX-Vendor Name):
This letter confirms the service order and tentative installation of the Octel 200/300 for
our mutual customer, (company name).
The following items are pertinent to this order:
1.
Extension changes. These changes need to be completed by (date). The
(manufacturer/model type switch) is to be configured as follows:
a. Terminate (number) single-line extension on (number) in the telephone
equipment room. Be sure the customer has enough spare ports on extension
card(s) to support these. Please label these jacks with the assigned
extension numbers.
Or other location where the unit is
to be placed. Refer also to the environmental requirements in INSTALLATION, Installation Requirements
in this manual.
b. The single-line extensions are to have the following class of service
features:
-
If more than one hunt group is required, specify the number of extensions for each hunt group.
-
For example:
hunt group #1 = 6 extensions
hunt group #2 = 2 extensions.
Hunt group #2
Trunks Group:
7500
1-800-337-1100
1-800-337-1101
No toll restrictions on (all/specified) extensions.
d. In the event all members of the hunt group are busy, subsequent calls
should be forwarded to (PBX console attendant/defined extension).
Define the last hunt number as an overflow extension.
2.
For example:
Hunt group #1
No call waiting features associated with any
extensions.
c. The single-line extensions should be placed in a circular hunt group. Please
make the pilot number easy to enter and remember.
This information may not be available for all PBXs. If you want this
call forwarding, however, be sure to
include the number if it’s available.
Where multiple trunk groups exist,
specify the trunks for each hunt
group:
Extensions must be able to initiate, receive, transfer,
and forward calls.
Trunk redirection. The following (or attached) list of trunks needs to be
directed via the (name of DIL feature) of the (manufacturer name) PBX to
the hunt group pilot number.
Cut-over of these trunks to the Octel 200/300 is scheduled to begin (time am/pm) on
(date). Any programming of the (name of the DIL feautre) must be ready by then.
Thank you for your cooperation. If you have any questions, please feel free to call me
at (phone number and extension).
Sincerely,
(NAME)
(TITLE)
Tailor this section to the customer’s
needs. If trunk cut-over is staggered, include schedule in this letter. If a PBX representative needs to
be on-site for this cut-over, arrange
a mutually convenient time with the
PBX vendor.
Figure 3-6 Service Provider Letter
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
3-12
3.5
Installation and Maintenance Volume
IMPLEMENTING THE OCTEL 200/300 ON PBXS WITHOUT
DIL FEATURE
You may encounter a PBX with an older feature package that does not provide the DIL feature.
If the the phone system does not have a DIL feature, there are several alternatives for directing trunks to
the Octel 200/300 ports for answer:
-
Upgrade the PBX to a feature package offering the DIL feature
-
Use DID numbers
-
Place the console in night mode
Not all these alternatives may be feasible for a given situation. The following discusses each in detail.
Main #
PBX
XXX-XXXX
DID
Trunks
-XXXX
Octel
200/300
DID
Alternative 1 — DID
PBX
Octel
200/300
Alternative 2 — Night Mode
Figure 3-7 Directing Incoming Calls to the Octel 200/300
When the PBX Does Not Offer a DIL Feature
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Preparing the Phone System
3-13
Upgrade the PBX to a Feature Package Offering the DIL Feature
Depending on the customer’s current version, this may not be economically feasible. However, this is the
most straightforward solution.
Use DID Numbers
The vast majority of customers have a block of DID numbers, but they may be limited by not having
sufficient DID numbers and trunks. When possible, give callers a number that is a DID extension
answered by the Octel 200/300. This is especially suitable where a second number (not the main
company number) is to be established for company employees, friends, family, and frequent callers to
call to reach extensions or receive information. Refer to Figure 3-7.
Again, in this way the Octel 200/300 can answer a DID number. However, 800 service or main company
numbers cannot be answered this way. Due to the cost of installing DID, this may only be attractive to
companies that already have DID.
Place the Console in Night Mode
If the PBX does not have the DIL feature, placing the console in night mode usually can be used to direct
all incoming trunks to a certain extension (such as the Octel 200/300 hunt group). Refer to Figure 3-7.
However, once the console has been placed in night mode, it may not be used. Callers who require
assistance can be directed (through the Octel 200/300) to a multibutton key set for answering. This
solution is most practical for
-
smaller companies having a single console and willing to direct all trunks to the Octel 200/300.
-
companies using the Octel 200/300 only to answer after hours and on weekends.
Since the console cannot be used, callers who are toll restricted cannot get an outside line from the
operator.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4
INSTALLATION
Chapter Contents
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
PB60019−01
Receiving the Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Inspecting for Shipping Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Unpacking the Cabinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Reshipping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Moving the Equipment On-Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Installation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Site Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Isolation Transformer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Uninterruptible Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Installing the Octel 200/300 With –48-Vdc Power Supply Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10
Distributor-Supplied Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
Terminal Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
Terminal Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
Cable Connections Between the RS-232C Terminal and the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
Connecting the Local Terminal/Setting the Baud Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16
Connections Between an External Modem and the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16
Connecting to the Internal Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17
Connecting to a Remote Message Server Using Telnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-18
Octel 200/300 Hardware Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Starting Up the Message Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Powering Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Measuring d.c. Voltages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21
Octel 200/300 Software Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
Building the Message Server Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
Using INSTALL — Entering the Configuration Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
Using UPDATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-25
Connecting the Phone System to the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26
Connection Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26
Verifying the Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26
Connector Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27
Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-28
Octel 200/300 Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-30
Tracking the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4
INSTALLATION
Chapter Contents
(continued)
4.9
4.10
Octel 200/300
Pin Assignments for Message Server Cards and Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Four-Port Line-Interface Card, ROLM Integration Card, and Mitel Integration Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eight-Port Line-Interface Card and Telemarketing Line Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16-Port Line-Interface Card (DLC16) and the PBX Integration Cards for Northern Telecom (NPIC) .
12-Port International Line-Interface Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DTIC Pin Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Northern Telecom SL-1 Integration Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AT&T Integration Card (ATTIC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Serial Integration Card for the Meridian 1 (SIC8) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
APIC Integration Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SIC8 I/O Panel Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Direct-Access Card (DAC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Direct-Access Card I/O Panel DP EXT Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Direct-Access Card I/O Panel Power Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
External Alarm Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Octel 300 Rack Mount Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preinstallation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S.4.1
4-41
4-42
4-43
4-44
4-45
4-46
4-47
4-48
4-49
4-50
4-51
4-52
4-53
4-53
4-54
4-55
4-56
4-56
4-57
PB60019−01
4
INSTALLATION
Figures
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-12
Octel 200 Floor Plan for Domestic Installation in the US, Canada and Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Octel 300 Floor Plan for Domestic Installation for the US, Canada, and Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Octel 200 Direct-Connect Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
Octel 300 Direct-Connect Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12
Diagram of the Field Wiring for –48-Vdc Powered Octel 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
First and Second RS-232C Serial-Port Cable Pinouts for Connection to Terminal Equipment (DTE) . . . . 4-15
Octel 200/300 to External Modem Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17
Typical Octel 200/300 Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-26
Connector Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-28
Example of Server-to-Block Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-29
50-Pin Male Telco Connector Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-41
Octel 300 Cabinet Installed in 19-Inch Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-55
Tables
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
PB60019−01
Input Circuit Current at Nominal Operating Line Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Input Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Equipment Provided by Distributor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
DCE Pinouts for Cable Connections Between the RS-232C Terminal and the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . 4-15
Pinouts for External Modem Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16
Power Supply Output Rating and Acceptable Operating Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Installation
4.1
4−1
RECEIVING THE EQUIPMENT
This section provides procedures for unpacking, inspecting, inventorying, and reshipping the OctelR
200/300.
The server is shipped in the customer-ordered configuration. All PCAs, power supplies, and disk drives
are installed in the cabinet. Depending on the options ordered with the server (such as DTIC or DAC),
some additional assembly of the server might be required. Refer to specific sections in this chapter about
any options for assembly instructions. Each server is shipped on a pallet, protected by foam inserts, and
covered by a cardboard box.
Weights at maximum configurations are as follows:
-
120 pounds (54 kg) for the Octel 200
-
200 pounds (90 kg) for the Octel 300
Inspecting for Shipping Damage
Before accepting delivery of an Octel 200/300 from the carrier, inspect the tilt-watch indicators, located
on the left front center and the right side center of the carton. Also inspect the cardboard carton. If the
tilt-watch is tripped or the carton has external damage, notify the carrier immediately, and submit a
damage report to the carrier and to Avaya. In the event of equipment damage, negotiate claims directly
with the carrier.
Unpacking the Cabinet
Do not take the server off the shipping pallet unless the unpacking is being done at the installation site.
Caution!
PB60019−01
Make sure that you have at least two people to
remove the server from the pallet. Because of the
weight of the server, it could be damaged or a person
could be injured.
1.
Remove the plastic clips securing the cardboard carton to the shipping pallet. Squeeze the center of
the clip, lift it, and pull it away from the carton.
2.
Remove the cardboard carton by lifting it straight up.
3.
Remove the foam insert from the top of the server.
4.
Remove the bag from the top of the server. The bag contains the front-door key, power cord, and
message server documents.
5.
Inspect the server visually for physical damage.
6.
Use a 7/16 inch wrench to remove the four brackets that secure the server to the pallet. The brackets
are located at the base of the server.
7.
Unlock and open the front door. It is recommended that the front door be removed before moving the
cabinet from the pallet.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
8.
Lift the cabinet straight up, until the stabilizer legs have cleared the server. Lift the server off the
pallet toward the pallet opening at the front of the server.
9.
Place the server in its permanent location.
10. Replace the front door.
11. When the Octel 200/300 is installed, adjust the levelers until the top of the server is level and does not
wobble. No special tools are required to adjust the leveling, although a bubble level is recommended
for this purpose.
12. Collect and save all packing material, cartons, foam inserts, shipping pallet, etc., as they can be reused
to ship the server back to Avaya if any shipping damage was incurred.
Reshipping
If the Octel 200/300 is to be reshipped from your location, use the original shipping carton, and perform
the following:
1.
Verify that all server assemblies are secure.
a.
All boards must be seated and secured with locking ejectors.
b.
All captive fasteners on the disk drive, power supply, and fan assemblies must be secured to the
cabinet with a flat-blade screwdriver.
2.
Remove cabinet front door by opening the door and pulling it straight up, until it is free of the two
hinges.
3.
Remove the front pallet section and place the server on the shipping pallet. This must be performed
by two people.
4.
Replace and lock the front door.
5.
Resecure the front pallet section against the front door, using two pallet bolts.
6.
Replace the plastic bag over the cabinet.
7.
Use a 7/16 inch wrench to replace the four brackets that secure the server to the pallet. The brackets
are located at the base of the server.
8.
Replace the door key and power supply cord in the documentation bag and tape the bag to the top of
the cabinet.
9.
Replace the foam insert, then the cardboard container.
10. Tape the top of the cardboard carton closed and secure it to the pallet with new strapping material.
Caution!
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Do not transport the Octel 200/300 message server
unless it is secured on the shipping pallet in the
vertical, upright position.
PB60019−01
Installation
4−3
Moving the Equipment On-Site
Before moving the server, verify the status of the new site:
-
Is the input power ready?
-
Is it the same as the input power required for the Octel 200/300?
-
Is the installation location ready?
-
Are the telephone extensions ready to be hooked up?
Move the Octel 200/300 server in the vertical, upright position on the shipping pallet. Be careful and
always remember that the Octel 200/300 is delicate electronic equipment.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−4
4.2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
INSTALLATION REQUIREMENTS
Installing the Octel 200/300 involves the following:
-
Connecting PBX extensions to Octel 200/300 ports
-
Connecting power to the cabinet
-
Installing the configuration database
-
Updating the database for both the Octel 200/300 and the PBX
-
Dedicating trunks in the PBX to the Octel 200/300 hunt or distribution group
-
Testing
.
To be sure nothing is left undone during the installation process, use the installation checklist in
the Tracking The Installation section of this chapter.
Before the message server is connected to the PBX, ensure that the appropriate PBX changes have been
made and tested. Instructions for preparing the PBX for the Octel 200/300 installation are provided in the
Preparing the Phone System chapter of this manual. Refer to that chapter for an overview of:
-
Changing the PBX database
-
Setting up hunt groups
-
Directing trunks to the Octel 200/300
Installation personnel must be familiar with the specific details involved in connecting the message
server and the PBX. This critical information is found in this manual as well as in the Configuration Note
written for the specific PBX involved.
Site Requirements
Install the Octel 200/300 in a dust-free location. Keep the Octel 200/300 separate from other equipment
that might produce heat, generate strong magnetic fields, or produce vibration.
If space and environment permit, install the Octel 200/300 in the telephone equipment room. Place the
cabinet to permit front access and ventilation on all sides. The air filter cleaning and replacement
schedule depends on the local environment.
Figure 4-1 is a floor plan for installing the Octel 200 in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.
Figure 4-2 is a floor plan for installing the Octel 300 in the United States, Canada, and Mexico.
The Octel 300 can be rack-mounted. Refer to Octel 300 Rack Mount section at the end of this chapter.
Power Requirements
The Octel 200/300 should receive power from a dedicated, separate circuit. If this is not possible, make
sure that the circuit is free of large motorized equipment, such as copy machines.
The power circuit must be compatible with the input voltage and frequency rating of the Octel 200/300.
The power circuit must have adequate current rating and be protected by a circuit breaker. Check the
voltage rating marked on the back of the message server where the power cord connects to the
Octel 200/300. The voltage rating indicates the input current rating for the Octel 200/300.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
4−5
Table 4-1 indicates the input circuit current that must be supplied by a dedicated branch circuit.
Table 4-1 Input Circuit Current at Nominal Operating Line Voltage
p Voltage
g
Input
Frequency
q
y
Range
120 VAC
230 VAC (Octel 200)
240 VAC (Octel 300)
100-240 VAC Autoranging
−48 VAC
50–60 Hz
50–60 Hz
50−60 Hz
50−60 Hz
DC
Rated Input Current
Octel 200 Octel 300
6A
3A
—
6A
10 A
10 A
—
6A
6A
15 A
In the United States, the 120-Vac wall sockets are rated at 10 amperes and use a NEMA 5–15P plug rated
for 15 amperes. A standard AC branch circuit rated at 15 amperes that complies with the normal United
States wiring practices is recommended.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−6
Acceptable Environment
− Equipment room
− Office environment
Maximum Heat Dissipation
− 1706 BTU/hr
NOMINAL
VOLTAGE
USA
USA
120 VAC
240 VAC
International Country Specific
− 48 VDC
PLUG TYPE
NEMA 5−15P
NEMA 6−15P
Country specific
Permanently wired
Installation and Maintenance Volume
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Figure 4-1 Octel 200 Floor Plan for Domestic Installation in the US, Canada and Mexico
Octel 200/300
Service Access
− Rear access for system cabling
− Front access for service of field
− Side access not required
AIR EXHAUST
Acceptable Environment
− Equipment room
− Office environment
Maximum Heat Dissipation
− 3412 BTU/hr
AIR
EXHAUST
TOP VIEW
SIDE VIEW
NOMINAL
VOLTAGE
USA
USA
International
120 VAC
240 VAC
Country Specific
− 48 VDC
PLUG TYPE
NEMA 5−15P
NEMA 6−15P
Country specific
Permanently wired
Installation
Octel 200/300
Figure 4-2 Octel 300 Floor Plan for Domestic Installation for the US, Canada, and Mexico
PB60019−01
Service Access
− Rear access for system cabling
− Front access for service of field
− Side access not required
4−7
S.4.1
4−8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS FOR A.C. POWERED SYSTEMS
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
To conform to the safety agency grounding requirements, use the power cord provided. This
power cord complies with the following UL requirement:
“An equipment grounding conductor that is not smaller in size than the ungrounded
branch-circuit supply conductors, is to be installed as part of the circuit that supplies the product
or system. Bare, covered or insulated grounding conductors are acceptable. Individually covered
or insulated equipment grounding conductors shall have a continuous outer finish that is either
green, or green with one or more yellow stripes. The equipment grounding conductor is to be
connected to ground at the service equipment.”
Verify that the wall power outlet conforms to the following UL requirement:
“The attachment-plug receptacles in the vicinity of the product or system are all to be of a
grounding type, and the equipment grounding conductors serving these receptacles are to be
connected to earth ground at the service equipment.”
Refer to Table 4-1 for the input-circuit current capacity needed to supply a dedicated circuit.
Use the following guidelines for calculating the Octel 200/300 input power requirements
If the Octel 200/300 is powered by an AC uninterruptible power supply (UPS) or a –48 Vdc source, the
input power requirement should be calculated to ensure that the correct-capacity power source is chosen.
The power requirements depend on the message server’s configuration, because a fully populated cabinet
requires more power than a minimally configured cabinet. The size of the AC UPS or DC source must be
chosen to match the maximum size configuration expected for each installation.
1.
Calculate the exact message server configuration, including all known growth plans.
2.
Determine the total power consumption (in watts) of the configuration, using the values in Table 4-2.
3.
If the message server is to be powered by an AC UPS, multiply the total power consumption figure
by 1.5 to determine its volt-ampere requirements.
4.
The total power consumption and volt-ampere requirements should be rounded up to the next
multiple of 50, before being used to choose an AC UPS or –48 Vdc source.
Warning!
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
A label on the rear of the Octel 300 has a
label that warns of excessive leakage
current. The message server MUST be
properly grounded to minimize safety
concerns.
PB60019−01
Installation
4−9
Table 4-2 Input Power Requirements
Power Consumption (watts)
Component
Octel 200
Octel 300
125
10
15
15
30
20
25
20
20
150
10
15
15
30
20
25
20
20
Base cabinet
4-port line card
8-port line card
16-port line card
Fax Application Processor
LAN card
Voice/system disk drive
Works for Serenadet disk
EntryWorks ACP card
.
The base cabinet includes a VCU and CPU, a floppy disk drive, fans, and PSU. All voice/system
disk drives require the same amount of power, regardless of their storage capacity.
The following example for an Octel 300 message server shows the calculation of the input power
requirements for an 8-port message server equipped with two 4-port line cards, one integration card, and
two voice/system disk drives:
Base cabinet
Two 4-port line cards
One integration card
Two voice/system disk drives
Total input power
Total volt-ampere rating (1.5 x 230)
150
20
10
50
W
W
W
W
230 W
345 VA
Round the total-input power value and the total volt-ampere rating up to the next multiple of 50,
producing the values to be used to select a suitable power source:
Total continuous input power requirement is 250 watts and 350 VA.
Isolation Transformer
For installation sites that could experience power-line transients from lightning or power switching, the
use of an isolation transformer is recommended. A dedicated isolation transformer must be rated at the
following:
-
750 VA or greater is required for the Octel 200.
-
1000 VA or greater is required for the Octel 300.
Uninterruptible Power Supply
If an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) is used, depending on the configuration of the Octel 200/300, a
UPS must be rated up to the following:
PB60019−01
-
750 VA is required for the Octel 200.
-
1400 VA is required for the Octel 300.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Installing the Octel 200/300 With –48-Vdc Power Supply Unit
The –48-Vdc powered server does not include a power cord. A terminal block is provided on the back of
the cabinet for field wiring to the DC power source. The installation must be performed as described
below, to comply with National Electrical Code (NEC) and UL regulations. In addition, use only those
materials mentioned, because they must also be controlled. Field-wiring material is not included with the
server, but it can be obtained from a local hardware store or qualified electrician.
List of Materials
The following materials are required for the installation:
-
1/2-inch (12.7 mm) diameter conduit.
UL-approved, insulated, stranded wire to run through the conduit. Three separate wires must be
connected – use three different wire colors. The grounding conductor insulation should be green and
yellow.
-
The wire size for the Octel 200 must be 12-gauge (3 mm2).
-
The wire size for the Octel 300 must be 10-gauge (5 mm2).
The DC version of the Octel 200/300 must be field-wired and connected to a branch
circuit equipped with a branch-circuit overcurrent-protection device, set at:
- 20 A maximum, 60 Vdc for the Octel 200.
-
.
25 A maximum, 60 Vdc for the Octel 300.
The conduit and the UL-approved, insulated stranded wire can be obtained preassembled.
-
Six forked, crimp-on terminals with upturned ends for the wire size and a #10 screw.
-
Conduit strain relief to fit a 1.10-inch-diameter hole in the sheet metal.
Installation Procedure
Perform the following steps to install the message server with a –48-Vdc power supply:
Octel 200/300
1.
Place the Octel 200/300 near the –48-Vdc power source.
2.
Turn OFF the power to the DC power-source outlet to which the Octel 200/300 will be connected.
3.
Open the front door and verify that the power switch on the PSU is in the OFF position.
4.
Remove the two screws attaching the cover to the DC filter assembly, as shown in Figure 4-3
(Octel 200) or Figure 4-4 (Octel 300) and remove the cover.
5.
Connect the Octel 200/300 to the power source as shown in Figure 4-3 or Figure 4-4 and Figure 4-5.
Connect the positive pole of the power source to the terminal-block position marked “+” and the
negative pole to the position marked “–”.
6.
Connect the earth-ground conductor from a suitable building ground to the ground stud next to the
terminal block on the cabinet (refer to Figure 4-3 or Figure 4-4 and Figure 4-5).
7.
Secure the cover to the DC filter assembly with the two screws removed in step 4.
8.
Turn ON the power to the DC power-source outlet where the Octel 200/300 has been connected.
9.
Turn ON the power switch located on the power supply unit in the Octel 200/300 cabinet, and verify
proper operation, as discussed in the Octel 200/300 Testing section in this chapter.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
4−11
Terminal Block
Negative Lead
Positive Lead
Cover Plate
Conduit Strain
Relief
1/2-inch
Diameter
Conduit
Ground
Lead
DC Inlet Box
Figure 4-3 Octel 200 Direct-Connect Installation
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−12
Installation and Maintenance Volume
DC Filter Assembly
Terminal Block
Positive Lead
Negative Lead
Cover
Ground Lead
Conduit Strain Relief
1/2-inch Diameter Conduit
Figure 4-4 Octel 300 Direct-Connect Installation
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
Conduit With Three
Wires
4−13
Terminal Block
+
DC
Power
Source –
– +
Rear Panel
Earth Ground
Ground
Stud
Figure 4-5 Diagram of the Field Wiring for –48-Vdc Powered
Octel 200
Distributor-Supplied Equipment
Each Octel 200/300 line card is connected to the PBX with a 25-pair cable. Supply one cable for each
line card. Make sure that the cards have male/female connectors and are long enough to reach between
the Octel 200/300 and the PBX extension jack without undue stretching or tension.
.
Please refer to the Pin Assignment for Message Server Cards and Ports section in this chapter for
specific message server and port pin assignments.
The Octel 200/300 can be connected to punchdown blocks with a 25-pair cable and then be jumpered to
the PBX or Central Office lines. The Octel 200/300 can also use 25-pair cable to connect to a breakout
adapter that provides standard modular connectors.
A terminal, used for software installation and update, must be available at the customer site. During
installation, use an RS-232C cable to connect the terminal to the Octel 200/300. This terminal can be
connected to the SP1 connector located in the front of the cabinet or to J1 in the rear of the cabinet. If the
terminal is to be permanently installed with the message server, connect it to J1. If the terminal is only
used temporarily during installation and maintenance, connect it to SP1. A printer is useful for making a
hard copy of the software configuration. A PC with terminal emulation software may also be used. This
may allow archiving information and sessions to a file for later reference.
Table 4-3 lists the equipment provided by the distributor. Refer to the Octel 200/300 Testing section in
this chapter for additional equipment needed for testing.
Table 4-3 Equipment Provided by Distributor
Item
PB60019−01
Quantity
ASCII terminal (CRT or printer)
1
RS-232C cable for terminal or printer
1
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−14
4.3
Installation and Maintenance Volume
TERMINAL COMMUNICATIONS
You can establish communication with the message server by connecting a local terminal, by calling in
through an internal or external modem, or by using the Telnet feature. The Telnet and internal modem
accesses are mutually exclusive. However, the direct connection can exist in “listen only” mode when
either remote access path is used. The direct terminal must be at the @ prompt to allow any form of
remote access.
The Octel 200/300 works with any ASCII send/receive serial terminal/teleprinter that meets RS-232C
specifications.
Regardless of whether the connection is through the internal modem or through Telnet, the message
server automatically logs off if there is no activity within the time specified in System Parameter 286 —
TERMINAL INACTIVITY LOGOUT TIMER (MINUTES). The default is 15 minutes. Refer to the
Configuration volume, SYSTEM PARAMETER Table chapter.
Inactivity logout does not occur when the system administrator is in the midst of a non-interactive
command, such as running a List Trace or running a report. This could take several minutes to complete.
Terminal Installation
The maximum recommended distance between the terminal and the Octel 200/300 is no more than 50
feet, which is the length of a standard RS-232C cable.
The Octel 200/300 uses even parity, 7 data bits, 1 stop bit, and XON/XOFF protocol.
Connect the terminal to the message server terminal port. Two functionally equivalent connections allow
for convenient access:
-
The front connection (SP1) for temporary access
-
The rear connection (J1) for permanent access
The terminal should have the capability of making a hard copy printout. You can use a PC with terminal
emulation software to achieve information and sessions to a file.
Cable Connections Between the RS-232C Terminal and the
Octel 200/300
The system terminal port (SP1 or J1) uses standard 25-pin (DB25) RS-232C connectors (female), with the
DCE pinouts listed in Table 4-4. Figure 4-6 is a diagram of these pinouts. J2 is used when the server is
integrated to a PBX/Centrex using an RS232 link. On the Octel 300, J3 and J4 are reserved for future
use. All ports are configured to use the same pinouts as listed in Table 4−4 and shown in Figure 4−6.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
4−15
Table 4-4 DCE Pinouts for Cable Connections Between the RS-232C
Terminal and the Octel 200/300
Pin
EIA/CKT
Signal Function
1
AA
Protective ground
2
BA
Transmit data (TX)
3
BB
Receive data (RX)
4
CA
Request to send (RTS)
5
CB
Clear to send (CTS)
7
AB
Signal ground
8
CF
Receive-line signal detector (DCD)
20
CD
Data terminal ready (DTR)
To Terminal (DTE)
Octel 200/300 (DCE)
1
2
3
4
5
7
8
20
1 Protection Ground
2 TX
3 RX
4 RTS
5 CTS
7 Signal Ground
8 DCD
20 DTR
Figure 4-6 First and Second RS-232C Serial-Port Cable Pinouts
for Connection to Terminal Equipment (DTE)
For correct operation:
-
DTR (pin 20) must be asserted TRUE by the terminal.
RTS (pin 4) must be asserted TRUE by the terminal when the terminal is able to accept data, or pin 4
must be left open.
If the terminal/teleprinter equipment has pins 1 and 7 connected together, intermittent problems with
the Octel 200/300 might occur. Terminal/teleprinters requiring Data Set Ready (DSR) could require that
pins 6 and 8 be connected together, or pins 8 and 20 be connected together at the terminal end of the
RS-232C cable. If you have a problem with or question about your terminal/teleprinter, contact technical
support resources.call Ericsson.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−16
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Connecting the Local Terminal/Setting the Baud Rate
The following explains how to connect a local terminal and set the baud rate. The Octel 200/300 default
baud rate for the direct terminal connection is 9600. You can adjust the baud rate by using the BAUD
command.
1. Connect the terminal to the RS-232C connector marked J1 in the rear of the cabinet or to SP1 in the
front.
2. Turn the terminal ON and set the terminal baud rate.
Set the terminal baud rate to any of the valid rates: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200 or
38400.
3. Turn the message server power ON.
Immediately following power up, press Enter repeatedly to establish the baud rate. If you do not
establish the baud rate at this time the header and diagnostic messages print at 9600 baud.
Upon power up, the message server executes a power-on selftest diagnostic, or Boot ROM
diagnostic. Wait for the operating system to load and the diagnostic selftest to finish. If the tests were
completed successfully, the Octel 200/300 displays INITIALIZING PORTS...PORT
INITIALIZATION DONE. Refer to the Octel 200/300 Hardware Installation section in this chapter
for an illustration of the boot up screen.
4. When you see the Port Initialization Done prompt, press
Enter
to display the password prompt.
5. When the password prompt displays, enter the password and press
.
Enter
.
Default passwords for new servers are created by the manufacturer. For the report,
administrative, and maintenance levels, the default passwords are REPORT, ADMIN, and
MAINT, respectively. For security, create new server passwords as soon as possible. Refer to
the Maintenance chapter, Miscellaneous Commands section, for information about setting
passwords.
6. The operating system @ prompt appears.
Connections Between an External Modem and the Octel 200/300
You can use an external modem, which appears to the message server as a directly connected terminal.
The external modem can operate at speeds up to 38,400.
Table 4-5 lists the pinouts for an external modem connection. Figure 4-7 is a diagram of external modem
pinouts.
Table 4-5 Pinouts for External Modem Connections
Octel 200/300
Modem
Pin
Number
Octel 200/300
Pin Number
2
3
Transmit data
Receive data
3
2
Receive data
Transmit data
5
4
CTS
RTS
4
5
RTS
CTS
7
7
Signal ground
Signal ground
8
20
DCD
DTR
20
8
DTR
DCD
S.4.1
Modem Signal
Name/Function
Octel 200/300
Name/Function
PB60019−01
Installation
4−17
RS-232C Male Connectors
To modem
(DCE)
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
7
7
8
8
20
20
To Octel 200/300
(DCE)
Figure 4-7 Octel 200/300 to External Modem Pinouts
The Octel 200/300 requires pin 4 (RTS) to be TRUE or left open and pin 20, Data Terminal Ready
(DTR), to be TRUE. The modem must provide DCD (pin 8) and CTS (pin 5) at the modem connector;
that is, DTR (pin 20) and RTS (pin 4) at the Octel 200/300 connector.
Other considerations are as follows:
-
-
The modem must drop DCD with the loss of carrier. If service is interrupted and the modem does not
drop DCD, subsequent callers can reestablish the connection without requiring a password.
Auto-answer must be enabled to allow connection to the modem without on-site intervention.
Forcing DTR high is recommended. This is required to maintain the connection with the message
server if a restart or reload is required. If DTR is not forced high, the connection is lost when the
message server is restarted.
Cable the modem to either the front or rear system-terminal port. Test that the modem is correctly
configured. If you have a problem or question connecting your modem, call technical support.
Caution!
Incorrect connection of the external modem can
result in unauthorized access. Verify that the cabling
and modem are installed correctly, and that the
modem setup is tested. Refer to the Octel 200/300
Support Note FI80048-01 for additional information.
Once the modem connection is established, press Enter until the password prompt appears, and follow
the procedures in the Communicating with the Message Server section of this chapter.
Connecting to the Internal Modem
The Octel 200/300 has an internal modem. The baud rate is 300 to 2,400 kbps.
Connect to the internal modem either by entering # # # 5 when the Octel 200/300 answers or
through a modem-access mailbox. The Octel 200/300 automatically adjusts to the modem’s baud rate.
Connecting to the Internal Modem Using
# # #
5
Connect the message server to the internal modem as follows:
1.
PB60019−01
Call the Octel 200/300.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−18
Installation and Maintenance Volume
2.
When the Octel 200/300 answers, enter
3.
After you hear the high-pitched tone, enter the code to connect to the modem (ATD). The code can
vary, depending on the interface and modem manufacturer. If you do not hear a high-pitched tone,
repeat steps 1 and 2.
4.
Hang up the receiver if step 3 was successful.
# # #
5
Modem-Access Mailboxes
To provide additional system security, access to the internal modem can be restricted to specific
modem-access mailboxes.
To create a modem-access mailbox, assign COS Attribute 118 — PROVIDE MODEM TONE WHEN
MAILBOX IS CALLED, and Attribute 3 — ASK FOR SECURITY CODE BEFORE CALLING
EXTENSION, to the mailbox COS. The mailbox should have a security code assigned before Attribute 3
is added. Attributes 1 — NO MESSAGES MAY BE RECORDED, and Attribute 26 — MAY NOT USE
INTERNAL MESSAGING FEATURES, should also be assigned.
Once the mailbox is defined, log in to set the security code. That security code will be required for
internal modem access and can only be changed by those who know what it is. For additional security,
Attribute 25 — MAY NOT LOG ON, can be assigned by the system administrator and removed only
when the access security code needs to be changed.
To block # # # 5 access to the modem, set System Parameter 223 — DISABLE ###5 ACCESS TO
THE MODEM, to YES.
After creating the modem-access mailbox, perform the following steps to connect to the internal modem
through the modem-access mailbox:
1.
Call the Octel 200/300.
2.
When the company greeting plays, enter the mailbox number of the modem-access mailbox.
3.
Enter the security code as previously described.
4.
After the high-pitched tone, enter the code to connect to the modem (ATD). The code can vary,
depending on the interface and modem manufacturer. If you do not hear a high-pitched tone, repeat
steps 1 through 3.
5.
Hang up the receiver if step 4 was successful.
Connecting to a Remote Message Server Using Telnet
You can use the Telnet feature to establish a high-speed terminal connection from your PC to message
servers on the same LAN/WAN if the target message server has a LAN card installed and configured. In
addition, from a local Octel 200/300 that has been accessed through the internal modem, you can
establish a Telnet link to another Octel 200/300 to update or review that server’s configuration. The
designated name or the TCP/IP address for the target message server must be known.
.
A computer used to establish a Telnet connection must be configured with appropriate
communication software.
.
When you are in the Update mode while connected via Telnet, you can control the screen scroll by
using CNTL−S to stop scrolling and CNTL−Q to start again. These controls have no effect when
used on output generated by a command at the @prompt.
To support access from the local server to any remote server on the same network, System Parameter 318
− TELNET:ENABLE TELNET CLIENT ACCESS THROUGH MODEM must be set to Yes on the local
server. The default setting is No, and can only be changed by Avaya Support.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
4−19
Configuration
A local message server must be configured as follows to allow Telnet access:
-
System Parameter 297 — TELNET: ENABLE TELNET SERVER must be YES to enable Telnet.
System Parameter 300 — TELNET: TELNET SERVER PORT NUMBER can be set to a value other
than the default of 23. This port number is the TCP/IP socket number assigned by the network
administrator. To change System Parameter 300 the LAN must be in courtesy down state.
If the local server is accessed through Telnet and a subsequent Telnet connection is made to the remote
server, both servers must be configured to allow Telnet Access.
When the message server is configured to be accessed through Telnet, the phrase “Telnet Enabled”
appears in the system header.
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−SYSTEM SOFTWARE RELEASE S.X.X.X (MM/DD/YY)−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
Copyright (c) YYYY
Lucent Technologies All Rights Reserved.
DAY
MM/DD
10:37:03
YYYY
NAME ID: 1212
S/N 123456
PBX:49
(Modem enabled)
(Telnet enabled)
Last Logon : 10/17
18:37
RemoteName@
Password
Log On
To log on from a local message server to a remote message server using Telnet, at the @ prompt enter:
TELNET <HOST NAME/IP ADDRESS> [PORT NUMBER]
where HOST NAME/IP ADDRESS is either the name of the remote host or its IP address; and the
PORT NUMBER is the TCP/IP socket number assigned by the customer’s network administrator. The
port number is optional. If not specified, its value is 23.
When the host name is entered, the LANHOST Table is checked. If the name is not listed, translation
from the host name to the host IP address is done by checking the address defined in the digital network
entry for the remote server.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−20
Installation and Maintenance Volume
You can identify which message server you have accessed during a Telnet session because the message
server name, up to six characters, displays before the @ prompt or . (dot) prompt.
.
When you are connected via Telnet and are in UPDATE mode, you can control the screen scroll by
using CNTL−S to stop scrolling and CNTL−Q to start again. These controls have no effect when
used on output generated by a command at the @ prompt.
To exit a Telnet session, at the @ prompt enter:
QUIT
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
4.4
4−21
OCTEL 200/300 HARDWARE INSTALLATION
The physical installation of the message server begins by connecting the terminal to the Octel 200/300,
applying power, and observing the Octel 200/300 self-test.
Starting Up the Message Server
Connect the terminal to the RS-232C connector marked J1 in the rear of the cabinet or to SP1.
When you load or reload the Octel 200/300, the CPU and other system modules execute a power-on
selftest diagnostic, or Boot ROM diagnostic. This section describes the results of the diagnostic.
When the terminal is directly attached, the CPU diagnostic displays progress messages at the default baud
rate of 9600. You can set an alternative baud rate. Refer to the Terminal Communications section in this
chapter for setting the baud rate.
To set the baud rate:
1. Set the baud rate to any of the valid rates: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200 or 38400.
2. Turn ON the power.
3. The baud rate for the terminal session defaults to 9600. If you want to change it, use the BAUD
command. Refer to the Maintenance chapter, Miscellaneous Commands section, for information
about setting the baud rate.
Wait for the operating system to load and the diagnostic selftest to finish. If the tests were completed
successfully, the Octel 200/300 displays INITIALIZING PORTS...PORT INITIALIZATION
DONE. Proceed to the software installation.
Powering Up
Connect the Octel 200/300 power cord to the dedicated power circuit and turn the power switch to ON.
The LEDs on each circuit board are ON or OFF according to the following sequence after power up or
reset:
1.
Diagnostic Phase (red LED ON, green LED OFF)
After power up or reset, each circuit board executes its diagnostic self-test. While the self-test is
running the red LED is ON and the green LED is OFF. A diagnostic self-test can take up to five
minutes.
2.
Software Download Phase (red LED ON, green LED ON)
If a circuit board’s diagnostic self-test is successful, the green LED is turned ON. If the green LED
does not come on within five minutes after power up or reset, replace the circuit board.
3.
Operational Phase (red LED OFF, green LED ON)
The downloaded operational software turns OFF the red LED, indicating that the circuit board is
operational.
4.
Activity LED (yellow LED ON or OFF)
The yellow LED indicates activity. The meaning of the yellow LED is circuit board dependent.
The following message appears as the message server is powering up.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−22
Installation and Maintenance Volume
CPU
486
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Model 300−6039−001
Step 27
Rev F1
32MB
Processor...PASSED
System Voltage/Temp...PASSED
ROM Checksum...PASSED
PIT...PASSED
DMA...PASSED
UART...PASSED
Modem...PASSED
TDM Crosspoint...PASSED
Floppy...PASSED
RTC...PASSED
BIC...PASSED
OCC...PASSED
WDT...PASSED
Control Bus Interface...PASSED
Testing COMPLETED
Booting from SCSI file XBOOT.IM
Image loaded
Loading Image from Hard Disk
Loading file VMS1_3.IM
Loading file VMS2_3.IM
Loading file VMS3_3.IM
Image loaded
−−−−−− SYSTEM SOFTWARE RELEASE S.X.X.X (xx/xx/xx) −−−−−−
Copyright(c) YYYY Lucent Technologies All Rights Reserved.
DAY 11/08 08:44:58 YYYY
ID: S/N:000000 PBX:00
(Modem enabled) (Telnet disabled) Last Logon : 00/00 00:00
@WAITING FOR VCU READY
LOADING VCU WITH FILE H:VCU.IM
VCU STARTED
RUNNING DISK REBUILD...REBUILD DONE
INITIALIZING PORTS...
PORT INITIALIZATION DONE
@
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
4−23
Measuring DC Voltages
The AC and DC wiring is prewired to connectors that are automatically engaged when the power supply
is installed. There are no power-supply adjustments. You can check voltages by using a digital volt meter.
Using the digital volt meter, you can measure the system DC voltages at the voltage test points on the
front edge of the CPU. Measure between Test Point 1, ground (use a common probe lead), and other test
points to determine whether the voltages are in range. Refer to Table 4-6. If any voltage is out of range,
replace the power supply.
Table 4-6 Power Supply Output Rating and Acceptable Operating Ranges
Test Point
Nominal Voltage
8
Ground
Acceptable Operating Range (Vdc)
...
7
–5 VC
–4.50 to –5.50
6
+5 VC
4.50 to 5.50
5
+12 VM
11.40 to 12.60
4
–12 V
–10.80 to –13.20
3
+12 V
10.80 to 13.20
2
+5 V
4.75 to 5.25
1
Ground
...
Reset after Power Up
When you reset the message server using either the Power Up procedure or the CPU reset switch, the
LEDs on the PCAs should respond as described in the Powering Up section. If the diagnostics are not
successful, the Octel 200/300 restarts the test routine. If a problem is found, the terminal displays a
specific error type. Refer to the System Errors and Traffic Pegs chapter, Hardware Errors section, to
interpret the error code and select the maintenance action required.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−24
4.5
Installation and Maintenance Volume
OCTEL 200/300 SOFTWARE INSTALLATION
The Octel 200/300 indicates it is ready to receive commands or other input by displaying a prompt
character. The actual prompt character displayed indicates whether you are at the operating system level
or within the INSTALL or UPDATE programs. The prompt characters are as follows:
Prompt
System Level
Action
@
Operating system
Ready to accept commands
:
INSTALL program
Waiting for input
.
UPDATE program
Waiting for input
To enter an Octel 200/300 command, enter the command at the prompt, and press
labeled Return on some terminals.
Enter
. This key is
Examples of the commands are provided in the Configuration volume, and in this volume in the
Maintenance Commands chapter.
.
Remote access is not available until after the database has been installed. The terminal can only be
connected directly to the Octel 200/300 via RS-232C cable.
Building the Message Server Database
System parameters and customer-provided information are entered in the message server memory
through a terminal and a two-part configuration program. Use the INSTALL program to enter
information for new installations; use the UPDATE program for verification and to change the
configuration database. This section is an overview of the software installation. Refer to the INSTALL
chapter for detailed directions for all steps.
Using INSTALL — Entering the Configuration Database
After the operating system has been loaded and the self-test completed, the Octel 200/300 is ready for
you to enter the password. After a valid password is entered, begin the INSTALL program. At the @
prompt, enter
INSTA
Enter
When prompted, enter data as described in the INSTALL chapter to define the database.
Answer Y when the Octel 200/300 asks whether you want to save the configuration to diskette. The
configuration backup disk should be inserted into the floppy drive. Refer the Hardware chapter for
information about the floppy drive.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
4−25
Using UPDATE
Use the UPDATE program to verify or modify the configuration database, as described in the following
two sections.
Verifying the Configuration Database
After you finish the message server configuration, the terminal again displays the @ prompt. To get a
printout of the database, enter the UPDATE program. At the @ prompt, enter
UP
Enter
The terminal displays the dot (.) prompt. At the dot, enter
L ALL
Check the printout with the configuration forms and verify that the data is correct. If correct, exit from
the program by typing
E
If any of the data is incorrect, follow the instructions in the Configuration volume to change the database.
When changes are made in the configuration database, always save the information to the backup disk
when you exit the UPDATE program. Answer Y when the Octel 200/300 asks whether you want to save
the configuration to disk.
Modifying the Configuration Database
You can modify, add, or delete message server configuration data. When the terminal or teleprinter
displays the @ prompt, enter:
UP and press
Enter
At the dot (.) prompt, enter an UPDATE command. Refer to the Configuration volume, UPDATE chapter.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−26
4.6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
CONNECTING THE PHONE SYSTEM
TO THE OCTEL 200/300
After you have verified that both the message server and the PBX are configured correctly, you must
connect the Octel 200/300 to the PBX.
Connection Overview
The Octel 200/300 installation involves connecting 25-pair cables from the rear of the Octel 200/300 to a
66M4-4W connector block, which is mounted on a backboard. Each 25-pair cable supports one slot on
the Octel 200/300. The Octel 200/300 is then connected with jumper wire to the PBX.
.
Please refer to the Pin Assignment for Message Server Cards and Ports section in this chapter for
specific message server and port pin assignments.
It is recommended that the PBX extensions to be associated with the Octel 200/300 be terminated on a
66M connector block, or equivalent, for ease of installation and fault isolation, as shown in Figure 4-8.
Cross-connect wire
66M4-4W
––––––
––––––
––––––
––––––
––––––
25-pair cable
66M
PBX extensions
terminate here
––––
––––
––––
––––
––––
Bridge clips
Octel 200/300
PBX
Figure 4-8 Typical Octel 200/300 Connections
Verifying the Equipment
The following equipment is required for installation of the Octel 200/300:
-
-
.
PBX extensions associated with the Octel 200/300, to be terminated on a 66M connector block, or
equivalent
Octel 200/300 installation kit
If you need to install a DAC card, refer to the Direct Access Card Installation and Maintenance
Manual, part number PB10105−02.
Each line card installation kit, Part No. 740-6034-001, installs four line-card slots. To determine the
number of line-card installation kits to order, divide the total number of line-card slots by four. The kit
contains the following:
Octel 200/300
-
One 66M4-4W connector block, Part No. PJ86001-01
-
Four 10-foot cables with male-to-female 25-pair connectors, Part No. SA10079-02
-
Two self-tap 10 x 5/8 PH sheet-metal screws, Part No. HH53024-01
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
4−27
A line card installation kit is required if you are installing either line or integration cards for the
Octel 200/300.
.
For more information about the installation of an integration card, refer to the appropriate chapter
in the Integration volume. For information about installing the EntryWorks ACP card, refer to the
Works for Serenade documentation.
Connector Blocks
Figure 4-9 shows the connector block used to add wiring for the Octel 200/300. The block is supplied in
the installation kit. The connector block has 50 separate punchdown contacts in each column, with each
column wired to an amphenol connector at the side of the block. Column A is wired to jack 1, column B
to jack 2, etc.
Mount the block to the backboard in the location that you have specified. Mounting screws are provided
when the block is ordered. Mount the block with the word “TOP” (embossed in the plastic, located at the
upper left side of the block) facing up (refer to Figure 4-9).
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−28
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Column =
Top
A
B
C
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
Jack 1 (A)
to slot 1
Jack 2 (B)
to slot 2
D
Pair
Number
Jack 3 (C)
to slot 3
Jack 4 (D)
to slot 4
Figure 4-9 Connector Block
Wiring
In most cases, the existing wiring is not consistent in its placement of the connections. To isolate faults
quickly, it is recommended that the slots be connected in numerical order, allowing for known or
anticipated expansion. Also make sure that the slot and port numbers can be translated to extension
numbers that are meaningful to the servicing technician.
Figure 4-10 is an example of a 16-port message server that requires one connector block and four 25-pair
cables. From the rear of the cabinet, connect the first 25-pair cable from P1 to jack position 1 of the
66M4-4W connector block, or column A; connect the second 25-pair cable from P2 to jack position 2, or
column B; etc.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
66M4-4W
P6
4−29
66M4-4W
P1
Octel 200/300
Rear View
Figure 4-10 Example of Server-to-Block Connections
For maximum configuration, three connector blocks and twelve 25-pair cables are required.
The actual wiring (cross-connections from the 66M4-4W connector block to the 66M block, or
equivalent), can be made in any manner consistent with good telephony practices. Follow these two
guidelines when punching down wires to ensure correct installation:
-
-
PB60019−01
Do not touch the pins on the connector block with your fingers or with dirty tools. The pins could
oxidize and open after a few months.
Tip is always above ring on the block when a pair is punched down.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−30
4.7
Installation and Maintenance Volume
OCTEL 200/300 TESTING
The Octel 200/300 should always be checked for proper operation after the configuration database is
installed or changes are made. In addition to the message server test, other tests should be made before
the Octel 200/300 is connected. These tests are described in this section. The tests require the following
equipment:
-
Three touchtone telephones; label the telephones as telephone A, telephone B, and telephone C
-
One terminal, directly connected to the Octel 200/300, SP1 or J1, with an RS-232C cable
-
One hard copy of the configuration database
-
-
.
Two extensions for testing, connected to telephone jacks (in addition to the extension associated with
the Octel 200/300)
One modular adapter, Arminger 8-position modular adapter, Part No. AA-2560A, TRW Cinch Super
Mod 25, or Allen Tel AT125−5M or GB 125−5M, is recommended depending on the cards and lines
being used.
These tests assume that no other calls are being made to the Octel 200/300. If calls are received,
the port status could become confusing and might affect the test results.
Operational Test To Verify Dial Tone on PBX Extensions
Verify that dial tone is present on each PBX extension associated with the Octel 200/300, as follows:
1.
Disconnect the 25-pair cables from the back of the Octel 200/300.
2.
Connect the modular adapter to the 25-pair cable associated with slot one.
3.
Connect a touch-tone single-line telephone to the first jack position of the adapter.
4.
Go off-hook. Is dial tone present?
YES
' Continue for all extensions and cables, for each slot configured in the message
server. Proceed to the test in the next section.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
Extension Number Check
Verify that the PBX extension numbers match the Octel 200/300 SLOTS Table, as follows:
1.
Refer to the configuration database listing, specifically to the SLOTS Table.
2.
Connect the telephone labeled B to the modular-adapter position associated with port 1.
3.
Connect the telephones labeled A and C to the two test telephone jacks.
4.
From telephone A, enter the extension number associated with telephone B.
5.
Does telephone B ring?
YES
' Answer the call, verify the circuit quality, and move telephone B to the next Octel 200/300 jack. Continue the procedure until all extensions are tested, then proceed to
the test in the next section.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
PBX Functional Test
Verify that each Octel 200/300 port extension can initiate a transfer by doing a hookswitch flash or using a
transfer key, before entering an extension number. Also, verify that you can reconnect to the caller when
the extension called is not answered or busy. Perform the following steps.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
4−31
1.
Connect telephone B to the modular-adapter position associated with port 1 of the Octel 200/300.
2.
From telephone A, call the extension number associated with telephone B.
3.
Answer telephone B, and perform a hookswitch flash or press the transfer key if available.
4.
Does the PBX provide a stutter or solid dial tone after the hookswitch flash?
YES
' If either tone is present, continue to step 5
NO
' Stop and correct the problem before continuing.
5.
Enter the transfer initiate code, if any, then enter the extension number associated with telephone C.
6.
After several ringbacks, perform a hookswitch flash or other key press, if required, to reconnect to
telephone A.
7.
Did telephone C stop ringing? Were you reconnected to telephone A, which was on hold?
YES
' Connect telephone B to the next Octel 200/300 port extension and
continue until the extensions for each port are tested.
NO
8.
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
Make telephone C busy by taking it off-hook. Then repeat the test, starting with step 1 and calling a
busy extension instead of the ring-no-answer extension.
.
The extension number connected to telephone C should start with the same first digit as those
configured in the USER Table.
Test for Calls to the Intercept Extension (Attendant)
Verify that each extension can transfer a call to the intercept extension (attendant), as follows:
1.
Connect telephone B to the modular-adapter position associated with port 1 of the Octel 200/300.
2.
From telephone A, call the extension number associated with telephone B.
3.
Answer telephone B, and perform a hookswitch flash or press the transfer key, if available. Press
(or the attendant’s extension number), then hang up telephone B.
4.
Did telephone A connect with the operator?
YES
' Continue test for all extensions, then proceed to the test in the next section.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
.
0
Some PBXs do not allow a blind (unscreened) transfer to an attendant. If this is the case, do
not assign Attribute 15 — TRANSFER TO A RINGING EXTENSION, to the COS for this
mailbox.
When all Octel 200/300 port extensions pass these tests, proceed by connecting the 25-pair cables to
the Octel 200/300 and test the message server for standard operation. The Octel 200/300 must
initialize each of the PBX ports. To verify that all the ports are initialized, at the @ prompt, enter
PS.
All ports should return IDL.
Test for Call to a Ring-No-Answer Extension
.
PB60019−01
The extension to be called must have a valid first digit (a mailbox with this first digit must already
exist in the USER Table) or be entered in the USER Table as a mailbox (mailbox number same as
the extension number and a COS).
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−32
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Verify that the Octel 200/300 correctly handles a ring-no-answer (RNA) call.
1.
From telephone A, call the extension associated with port 1.
2.
Did the Octel 200/300 answer with the correct company greeting (a custom greeting or the generic
greeting)?
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
3.
Enter the extension number for telephone C.
4.
Did the Octel 200/300 respond with the prompt: “Thank you, just a moment . . .” (Primary Answer
Mode example)?
5.
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
After a predetermined interval (defined by the entry in the INFORMATION Table for ringbacks
before no answer), does the message server reconnect and speak the prompt “Extension XXX doesn’t
answer. Please leave a message at the tone, or enter another extension number, or press zero for
assistance”?
.
6.
If the mailbox has not been entered in the USER Table, the Octel 200/300 does not offer to
take a message.
YES
' Press
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
9
9
, then hang up.
Repeat the test for each Octel 200/300 port.
Test for Calls to a Busy Extension
Verify that the Octel 200/300 properly handles a call directed to a busy extension.
1.
From telephone A, call the extension associated with port 1.
2.
Did the Octel 200/300 answer with the correct company greeting?
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
3.
Make sure that telephone C is busy by taking it off-hook. Enter the extension number for telephone C.
4.
Did the Octel 200/300 respond with the prompt “Thank you, just a moment . . .” (primary answer
mode example)?
YES
NO
5.
After a short interval, does the message server reconnect and speak the prompt “Extension XXX is
busy. Please leave a message at the tone, or enter another extension number, or press zero for
assistance”?
YES
NO
6.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
' Continue.
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
' Press 9 9 , then hang up.
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
Repeat the test for each Octel 200/300 port.
PB60019−01
Installation
4−33
Hunt Group Operation Test
Verify the hunting sequence, as follows:
.
The terminal command PS displays the current status of each Octel 200/300 port. A
three-character abbreviation denotes the state of each port. Refer to the Maintenance Commands
chapter for more information about using the PS command and the meaning of the states.
1.
From the system level @ prompt, enter PS.
2.
Does the port status show the IDL state for all positions? If not, determine the cause and correct the
problem before continuing.
a.
Some ports may be in the TST (test) state momentarily, because of online diagnostics. If a port
is in the TST state, enter PS several times, before deciding whether the port is in trouble or
self-test is running. Self-test runs every 5 minutes; if a problem is encountered, it is entered in
the Hardware Error Table.
b.
If other calls are being made into the Octel 200/300, all ports might not be idle. If they are not
all idle, check to see whether anyone else is calling.
If the terminal is connected remotely, one of the ports shows the modem as MOD.
3.
From telephone A, enter the extension number or access code associated with the Octel 200/300 hunt
group.
4.
Does the Octel 200/300 answer correctly? If not, determine the cause and correct the problem before
continuing.
5.
From the terminal, enter PS.
.
6.
The port status should show the port in WFD (wait for digits) state when an incoming call is
answered.
Did the correct port answer, based upon how the PBX is programmed for hunting groups?
YES
NO
' Continue.
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
7.
From telephone A, press
8.
Busy out the PBX extension identified in step 6 above.
.
9.
9
9
and hang up after the message server says “good-bye.”
If System Parameter 45 is set to NONE, then you may use the TE C 1 x command to busy out
the port, substituting the port number for x.
Continue the process from step 3 until all ports have been busied out.
Testing Fail-Safe Operation
The fail-safe port operation test comprises the all-ports-busy condition and the ring-no-answer condition.
All Ports Busy
Perform the following steps for the all-ports-busy test:
1.
PB60019−01
While all ports are busied out, use telephone A to enter the extension number or access code of the
hunt group.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−34
Installation and Maintenance Volume
2.
Does the call overflow to the correct answering extension as determined for fail-safe operation?
YES
NO
.
3.
' Continue.
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
Some PBXs might not support hunt-group overflow and the caller could experience a busy
condition or a ring no-answer condition until a port is available to accept the call.
Remove the busy condition from all Octel 200/300 port PBX extensions.
Port Ring-No-Answer
Perform the following steps for the port ring-no-answer test:
1.
Disconnect the 25-pair cables associated with the Octel 200/300.
2.
From telephone A, enter the hunt-group extension number or access code associated with the
extensions connected to the Octel 200/300.
3.
Is the call diverted to the correct alternate answer point when the Octel 200/300 does not answer?
YES
NO
' Continue.
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
4.
Reconnect the modular line cords.
5.
From the terminal, enter TE C 1. The Octel 200/300 should respond, showing that each port is
forwarded until all ports have been forwarded.
6.
Enter PS to verify that all ports are in the FWD (forwarded) state.
7.
From telephone A, enter the hunt-group extension number or access code.
8.
Is the call forwarded to the correct position as specified in the call forwarding string (System
Parameter 45 — SYSTEM RELOAD FORWARD STRING)?
YES
NO
9.
' Continue.
' Determine the cause and correct before continuing.
From the terminal, enter TE C 2 to cancel call forwarding. The Octel 200/300 should respond with
ALL PORTS INITIALIZED.
10. From telephone A, enter the hunt-group extension number or access code.
11. Does the Octel 200/300 answer correctly?
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct before continuing.
12. Enter PS at the terminal.
13. Verify that all ports are in the IDL state and that the cancel forwarding string (System Parameter 46
— SYSTEM RELOAD CANCEL FORWARD STRING) is correct. If any ports still show FWD, use
TE C 2 x, where x is the port number, to cancel forwarding. If cancel forwarding does not work,
determine the cause and correct it before continuing.
Test to Verify Trunk To Octel 200/300 Operation
Octel 200/300
1.
From the terminal, enter the PS command.
2.
Does the port status show all ports in the IDL state?
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
3.
From telephone A, call outside the PBX and back in on trunks dedicated to the hunt group.
4.
Does the Octel 200/300 answer correctly?
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
5.
From the terminal, enter the PS command.
6.
Does the port that answered show WFD state?
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
4−35
7.
From telephone A, enter the extension number associated with telephone C. The Octel 200/300
responds with “Thank you, just a moment.”
8.
Does telephone C ring?
9.
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
Enter the PS command. Port status should show port 1 in the AIC (assisted incoming call/automated
attendant) state.
10. Answer telephone C. Does the Octel 200/300 say “Tick, tick, tick,....Connecting” and transfer the
incoming trunk to telephone C?
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
11. From the terminal, enter the PS command, and verify that the port state is IDL.
12. Busy-out the port that answered.
13. Repeat the procedure from step 3 for all ports, until all ports are busied out. Verify that calls can be
placed through the Octel 200/300 from each port.
14. From telephone A, call out and back in on a trunk dedicated to the hunt group.
15. Does the call overflow to the correct destination?
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
.
Some PBXs might not support overflow, in which case a busy condition or a ring-no-answer
condition could be encountered.
16. Remove the busy condition from all Octel 200/300 port extensions.
17. Repeat steps 3 through 13 except call an extension that does not answer, and then repeat it by calling
a busy extension.
Test to Verify Trunks
1.
PB60019−01
From telephone A, call outside the PBX and back in on the first trunk dedicated to the
Octel 200/300.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−36
Installation and Maintenance Volume
2.
3.
Does the Octel 200/300 answer correctly?
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
Repeat the procedure from step 1 for each trunk, until all hunts have been tested. Verify that each
trunk is answered by the Octel 200/300 with the correct greeting.
.
Toll-free service lines can be tested individually, even if they are bands from other areas, by
using the “plant test” number. Get these from the PE (Public Exchange) if you do not know
them.
Test for Calls to the Intercept Extension
Verify that the Octel 200/300 can transfer a call to the intercept position (attendant) when the caller does
nothing or presses 0 , as follows:
1.
From telephone A, call the extension associated with port 1.
2.
Does the Octel 200/300 answer correctly?
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
3.
Listen to the complete company greeting. Do nothing, let the Octel 200/300 time out, and transfer
the call to the attendant (do not enter any digits).
4.
Did you reach the attendant?
YES
' Continue for all ports.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
instead of waiting for a timeout.
5.
Repeat the procedure except press
6.
From telephone A, call out and back in on a trunk dedicated to the hunt group. When the
Octel 200/300 answers, let the message server time out.
7.
Does the Octel 200/300 transfer the call to the intercept position?
0
YES
' Continue.
NO
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
Message Waiting Test
1.
From telephone A, call out and back in on a trunk dedicated to a Octel 200/300 port.
2.
Does the Octel 200/300 answer correctly?
YES
NO
Octel 200/300
' Continue.
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
3.
Make sure that telephone C is busy, by taking it off-hook. Enter the extension number associated
with telephone C.
4.
After a predetermined interval, the Octel 200/300 should reconnect, and at telephone A you should
hear, “Extension XXX is busy. Please leave a message at the tone, or enter another extension number,
or press zero for assistance.”
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
5.
Leave a test message for telephone C.
.
6.
A message is not delivered to a mailbox unless it is at least 4.5 seconds long. The mailbox
must be entered in the USER Table for the Octel 200/300 to offer to take a message.
The Octel 200/300 should now initiate a message-waiting-notification call (ASAP message waiting)
to the extension associated with telephone C.
.
7.
4−37
If all ports are allowed to make outcalls, the call is not attempted when three-fourths or more
of the ports are being used. Also, for message waiting, INFORMATION Table Index 12 —
MESSAGE WAITING NOTIFICATION, must be set to Y.
Does the Octel 200/300 call the extension associated with telephone C?
YES
NO
' Continue.
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
8.
Answer telephone C. The Octel 200/300 should respond with “Extension XXX has X messages.
Ready,” or “Extension XXX has X messages. Please enter your security code.”
9.
Enter the security code, if asked, and press
5
to Listen to the test message.
10. Does the message sound clear?
YES
NO
' Continue.
' Determine the cause and correct the problem before continuing.
11. Press 3 to Erase the message, then press
with “X messages will be erased” ?
YES
' Press
9
9
to exit the mailbox. Does the Octel 200/300 respond
to exit the message server. The Octel 200/300 should respond with “good-
bye.”
NO
PB60019−01
' Determine the cause and correct the problem.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−38
4.8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
TRACKING THE INSTALLATION
Use the following checklist to help track any installation and telephone changes, as follows:
-
-
Use the “See Chapter” column for reference to the appropriate chapter in the Installation and
Maintenance volume for further information.
Enter the name of the person who is responsible for tracking an installation task in the “Person
Responsible” column.
-
Enter the date the installation task is to be completed in the “Scheduled” column.
-
Enter the final completion date in the “Completed” column.
Installation Task
See
Chapter
Receiving the Equipment
Person
Responsible
Scheduled
Completed
Installation
Inspect for damage
Carton
Server
AC/DC cables secure
Printed circuit cards
Reshipping procedures
Pre-installation
Installation
Environment
Dust free (Y/N)
Away from large motors (Y/N)
Server accessible (Y/N)
Power
Dedicated fuse or breaker
Dedicated 115-Vac 60-Hz
receptacle
Other required equipment available
Modular line cord
RJ11 jacks or equivalent
CAT or other ASCII terminal
Phillips screwdriver
RS-232C interface cable
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
Installation Task
PBX Preparation
Survey telephone system (Y/N)
See
Chapter
Person
Responsible
Scheduled
4−39
Completed
Preparing the
Phone System
Additional touch-tone extensions (as
required)
Install and label the Octel 200/300 ports
PBX COS changes for the
Octel 200/300 port extensions
Forwarding
Off-site calls, no call restriction
Remove call waiting features
Permitted to transfer, hold,
reconnect
Overflow for RNA/busy
Hunt Group 1
Hunt Group 2
Hunt Group 3
Hardware Installation
Installation
Communicating with the message server
Octel 200/300 installation
Configuration installation
Connecting the PBX to the
Octel 200/300
Testing
Installation
Tools and equipment
Three touch-tone single line
telephones
CAT or other ASCII terminal or
teleprinter
Database hardcopy
Two test extensions
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−40
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Installation Task
Pass/Fail Tests
Step
See
Chapter
Person
Responsible
Scheduled
Completed
Installation
Description
1.
Dial tone on PBX extensions
2.
Extension number check
3.
PBX function
4.
Call to intercept/attendant PBX
5.
Ring-no-answer extension
6.
Busy extension
7.
Hunt Group operation
8.
Fail-safe busy operation
9.
Fail-safe RNA operation
10.
Trunk to the Octel 200/300
operation
11.
Verifying trunks to Octel 200/300
12.
Octel 200/300 to intercept
extension
13.
Message waiting
Trunks
Quantity to the Octel 200/300
Preparing The
Phone System
Dedicate to hunt group(s)
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
No extension restriction, if applicable
Trunk-to-trunk capability (Y/N)
Trunk queuing (Y/N)
incoming only
two-way
Central Office changes
Hunt Group
contains the Octel 200/300
extension
circular hunting
overflow (Y/N)
trunks dedicated (circle one)
DDC, UCD, DIL, Dedicated
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
4.9
4−41
PIN ASSIGNMENTS FOR MESSAGE SERVER
CARDS AND PORTS
Connectors P1 through P12 use a 50-pin male telco connector with the pin arrangement shown in
Figure 4-11.
1
.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
26
50
25
Figure 4-11 50-Pin Male Telco Connector Pinouts
The following sections contain tables showing the pin assignments for the following:
Line-interface card (LIC4, LIC8, DLC16, and ILC12)
Digital trunk interface card (DTIC)
Telemarketing line card (TLC)
ROLM integration card (RIC)
Northern Telecom SL-1 integration card (SLIC)
-
PB60019−01
AT&T integration card (ATTIC)
Mitel integration card (MIC)
Serial integration card for the Meridian 1 (SIC8)
AT&T PBX integration card (APIC)
Northern Telecom PBX integration card (NPIC)
Direct-access card (DAC)
Direct-access card I/O panel J5 connector
Direct-access card I/O panel power connector (P8)
External-alarm port (J3 for Octel 200 and J5 for Octel 300)
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−42
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Four-Port Line-Interface Card, ROLM Integration Card, and
Mitel Integration Card
The following pin assignments are for the four-port line-interface card (LIC4), the ROLM integration
card (RIC), and the Mitel integration card (MIC), as they appear on the rear 50-pin telco connector. If an
LIC is installed in slot A1, it uses 50-pin telco connector P1; if it is installed in slot A2, it uses connector
P2, etc.
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
1
RING1
26
TIP1
2
27
3
28
4
30
6
31
RING3
32
8
33
9
34
10
S.4.1
29
5
7
Octel 200/300
RING2
RING4
35
11
36
12
37
13
38
14
39
15
40
16
41
17
42
18
43
19
44
20
45
21
46
22
47
23
48
24
49
25
50
TIP2
TIP3
TIP4
PB60019−01
Installation
4−43
Eight-Port Line-Interface Card and Telemarketing Line Card
The following pin assignments are for the eight-port line-interface card (LIC8) and the Telemarketing
Line Card (TLC), as they appear on the rear 50-pin telco connector. If an LIC or TLC is installed in slot
A1, it uses 50-pin telco connector P1; if it is installed in slot A2, it uses connector P2, etc.
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
1
RING1
26
TIP1
2
27
3
28
4
29
5
30
6
31
7
RING3
32
8
33
9
34
10
RING4
35
11
36
12
37
13
RING5
38
14
39
15
40
16
RING6
41
17
42
18
43
19
RING7
44
20
45
21
46
22
PB60019−01
RING2
RING8
47
23
48
24
49
25
50
TIP2
TIP3
TIP4
TIP5
TIP6
TIP7
TIP8
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−44
Installation and Maintenance Volume
16-Port Line-Interface Card (DLC16) and the PBX Integration Cards
for Northern Telecom (NPIC)
The following pin assignments are for the 16-port line-interface card (DLC16) and the Northern Telecom
PBX integration card (NPIC) as they appear on the rear 50-pin telco connector.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
1
RING1
26
TIP1
2
RING2
27
TIP2
3
RING3
28
TIP3
4
RING4
29
TIP4
5
RING5
30
TIP5
6
RING6
31
TIP6
7
RING7
32
TIP7
8
RING8
33
TIP8
9
RING9
34
TIP9
10
RING10
35
TIP10
11
RING11
36
TIP11
12
RING12
37
TIP12
13
RING13
38
TIP13
14
RING14
39
TIP14
15
RING15
40
TIP15
16
RING16
41
TIP16
17
42
18
43
19
44
20
45
21
46
22
47
23
48
24
49
25
50
PB60019−01
Installation
4−45
12-Port International Line-Interface Card
The following pin assignments are for the 12-port international line-interface card (ILC12) as they appear
on the rear 50-pin telco connector.
PB60019−01
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
1
RING1
26
TIP1
2
RING2
27
TIP2
3
RING3
28
TIP3
4
RING4
29
TIP4
5
RING5
30
TIP5
6
RING6
31
TIP6
7
RING7
32
TIP7
8
RING8
33
TIP8
9
RING9
34
TIP9
10
RING10
35
TIP10
11
RING11
36
TIP11
12
RING12
37
TIP12
13
38
14
39
15
40
16
41
17
42
18
43
19
44
20
45
21
46
22
47
23
48
24
49
25
50
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−46
Installation and Maintenance Volume
DTIC Pin Assignment
The following pin assignments are for the Digital Trunk Interface Card (DTIC) as they appear on the rear
50-pin telco connector.
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
1
TXRING
26
TXTIP
2
27
3
28
4
30
6
31
RXRING
32
8
33
9
34
10
S.4.1
29
5
7
Octel 200/300
TXRING
RXRING
35
11
36
12
37
13
38
14
39
15
40
16
41
17
42
18
43
19
44
20
45
21
46
22
47
23
48
24
49
25
50
TXRING
RXTIP
RXRING
PB60019−01
Installation
4−47
Northern Telecom SL-1 Integration Card
The following pin assignments are for the Northern Telecom SL-1 integration card (SLIC) as they appear
on the rear 50-pin telco connector. If a SLIC card is installed in slot A9, it uses 50-pin telco connector P9;
if it is installed in slot A10, it uses connector P10, etc.
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
1
AVDR1
26
AVDT1
2
SIGR1
27
SIGT1
3
28
4
AVDR2
29
AVDT2
5
SIGR2
30
SIGT2
6
31
7
AVDR3
32
AVDT3
8
SIGR3
33
SIGT3
9
PB60019−01
34
10
AVDR4
35
AVDT4
11
SIGR4
36
SIGT4
12
37
13
38
14
39
15
40
16
41
17
42
18
43
19
44
20
45
21
46
22
47
23
48
24
49
25
50
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−48
Installation and Maintenance Volume
AT&T Integration Card (ATTIC)
The following pin assignments are for the AT&T integration card (ATTIC) as they appear on the rear
50-pin telco connector. If an ATTIC card is installed in slot A9, it uses 50-pin telco connector P9; if it is
installed in slot A10, it uses connector P10, etc.
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
1
2
TXR1
27
TXT1
3
PXR1
28
PXT1
29
5
TXR2
30
TXT2
6
PXR2
31
PXT2
7
32
8
TXR3
33
TXT3
9
PXR3
34
PXT3
10
S.4.1
Signal Function
26
4
Octel 200/300
50-Pin Number
35
11
TXR4
36
TXT4
12
PXR4
37
PXT4
13
38
14
39
15
40
16
41
17
42
18
43
19
44
20
45
21
46
22
47
23
48
24
49
25
50
PB60019−01
Installation
4−49
Serial Integration Card for the Meridian 1 (SIC8)
The following pin assignments are for the serial integration card (SIC8) for the Meridian 1 as they appear
on the rear 50-pin telco connector. If an SIC8 card is installed in slot A9, it uses 50-pin telco connector
P9; if it is installed in slot A10, it uses connector P10, etc.
PB60019−01
50-Pin
Number
Signal
Function
Signal
Name
50-Pin
Number
Signal
Function
Signal
Name
1
GND
I/O (35)
26
TXD3
I/O (36)
2
TXD1
I/O (18)
27
RXD3
I/O (19)
3
RXD1
I/O (1)
28
RTS3
I/O (2)
4
RTS1
I/O (37)
29
CTS3
I/O (38)
5
CTS1
I/O (20)
30
DSR3
I/O (21)
6
DSR1
I/O (3)
31
DCD3
I/O (4)
7
DCD1
I/O (39)
32
DTR3
I/O (40)
8
DTR1
I/O (22)
33
GND
I/O (23)
9
GND
I/O (5)
34
TXD4
I/O (6)
10
TXD2
I/O (41)
35
RXD4
I/O (42)
11
RXD2
I/O (24)
36
RTS4
I/O (25)
12
RTS2
I/O (7)
37
CTS4
I/O (8)
13
CTS2
I/O (43)
38
DSR4
I/O (44)
14
DSR2
I/O (26)
39
DCD4
I/O (27)
15
DCD2
I/O (9)
40
DTR4
I/O (10)
16
DTR2
I/O (35)
41
GND
I/O (46)
17
GND
I/O (28)
42
TXD7
I/O (29)
18
TXD5
I/O (11)
43
RXD7
I/O (12)
19
RXD5
I/O (47)
44
DSR7
I/O (48)
20
DSR5
I/O (30)
45
DTR7
I/O (31)
21
DTR5
I/O (13)
46
TXD8
I/O (14)
22
TXD6
I/O (49)
47
RXD8
I/O (50)
23
RXD6
I/O (32)
48
DSR8
I/O (33)
24
DSR6
I/O (15)
49
DTR8
I/O (16)
25
DTR6
I/O (34)
50
GND
I/O (51)
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−50
Installation and Maintenance Volume
APIC Integration Card
The following pin assignments are for the AT&T APIC card as they appear on the rear 50-pin telco
connector. If an APIC card is installed in slot A9, it uses 50-pin telco connector P9; if it is installed in slot
A10, it uses connector P10, etc.
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
“TX” signals are from the APIC to the PBX. “PX” signals are from the PBX to the APIC.
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
1
TX RING 1
26
TX TIP 1
2
PX RING 1
27
PX TIP 1
3
TX RING 2
28
TX TIP 2
4
PX RING 2
29
PX TIP 2
5
TX RING 3
30
TX TIP 3
6
PX RING 3
31
PX TIP 3
7
TX RING 4
32
TX TIP 4
8
PX RING 4
33
PX TIP 4
9
TX RING 5
34
TX TIP 5
10
PX RING 5
35
PX TIP 5
11
TX RING 6
36
TX TIP 6
12
PX RING 6
37
PX TIP 6
13
TX RING 7
38
TX TIP 7
14
PX RING 7
39
PX TIP 7
15
TX RING 8
40
TX TIP 8
16
PX RING 8
41
PX TIP 8
17
TX RING 9
42
TX TIP 9
18
PX RING 9
43
PX TIP 9
19
TX RING 10
44
TX TIP 10
20
PX RING 10
45
PX TIP 10
21
TX RING 11
46
TX TIP 11
22
PX RING 11
47
PX TIP 11
23
TX RING 12
48
TX TIP 12
24
PX RING 12
49
PX TIP 12
25
(no connection)
50
(no connection)
PB60019−01
Installation
4−51
SIC8 I/O Panel Pinouts
The following pin assignments are on the SIC8 I/O panel for port 1 (DB 26 connector).
PB60019−01
50-Pin
Number
Signal
Function
1
GND
2
TXD1
LI/O (18)
3
RXD1
LI/O (1)
4
RTS1
LI/O (37)
5
CTS1
LI/O (20)
6
DSR1
LI/O (3)
7
GND
8
DCD1
9
GND
10
N/C
11
N/C
12
N/C
13
N/C
14
N/C
15
N/C
16
N/C
17
N/C
18
N/C
19
N/C
20
DTR1
21
N/C
22
N/C
23
N/C
24
N/C
25
N/C
I/O Line
LI/O (39)
LI/O (22)
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−52
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Direct-Access Card (DAC)
The following pin assignments are for the direct-access Card (DAC) as they appear on the rear 50-pin
telco connector. If a DAC is installed in slot A1, it uses 50-pin telco connector P1; if it is installed in slot
A2, it uses connector P2, etc.
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
1
RING1
26
TIP1
2
27
3
28
4
RING2
5
30
–48V1
31
GND1
7
RING3
32
TIP3
8
33
9
34
RING4
11
12
35
–48V2
37
38
14
39
15
40
16
41
17
42
–48V3
43
19
44
20
45
21
46
22
47
23
48
24
25
TIP4
36
13
18
S.4.1
TIP2
6
10
Octel 200/300
29
–48V4
49
GND2
GND3
GND4
50
PB60019−01
Installation
4−53
Direct-Access Card I/O Panel DP EXT Connector
The following pin assignments are on the DP EXT connector for the DAC I/O panel. DP EXT is a 50-pin
telco connector.
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
50-Pin Number
Signal Function
1
1RING1
26
1TIP1
2
1RING2
27
1TIP2
3
1RING3
28
1TIP3
4
1RING4
29
1TIP4
5
2RING1
30
2TIP1
6
2RING2
31
2TIP2
7
2RING3
32
2TIP3
8
2RING4
33
2TIP4
9
3RING1
34
3TIP1
10
3RING2
35
3TIP2
11
3RING3
36
3TIP3
12
3RING4
37
3TIP4
13
4RING1
38
4TIP1
14
4RING2
39
4TIP2
15
4RING3
40
4TIP3
16
4RING4
41
4TIP4
17
42
18
43
19
44
20
45
21
46
22
47
23
48
24
49
25
50
Direct-Access Card I/O Panel Power Connector
The following pin assignments are for the DAC I/O panel power connector:
Pin
PB60019−01
Function
1
GND
2
–48 Vdc
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−54
Installation and Maintenance Volume
External Alarm Port
The external alarm port uses a 9-pin DB9 female connector with the following pin arrangement:
5
S S S S S1
9S S
S S6
Front View DB9 Male Connector
-
Use connector J3 for the Octel 200.
-
Use connector J5 for the Octel 300.
The external-alarm connector pin assignments are as follows:
AJ1 and AJ2 Connector Pin Assignments
Pin Number
Signal Function
1
Relay A, Pin 1
2
Relay B, Pin 1
3
LINK
4
GND
5
GND
6
Relay A, Pin 2
7
Relay B, Pin 2
8
LINK
9
GND
Relay A is the major alarm relay. Relay B is the minor alarm relay. A relay is open when there is no
alarm. When a relay is closed, it indicates an alarm condition.
With power removed from the cabinet, both Relay A and Relay B are in the closed position (normally
closed), indicating an alarm condition.
Pins 3 and 8 are linked together to provide a loop. You can use this as a confirmation that an alarm cable
is installed. Pins 4, 5, and 9 are connected to cabinet ground. These pins can be jumpered to a relay
contact, if closure to ground is required.
Both Relay A and Relay B are rated at
-
48 Vdc maximum
-
0.5 A maximum
The link loop is rated at
Octel 200/300
-
12 Vdc maximum
-
200 mA maximum
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
4−55
4.10 OCTEL 300 RACK MOUNT INSTALLATION
The Octel 300 can be installed in a 19-inch rack. Figure 4-12 illustrates a rack-mount installation.
OCTEL 300
10 mounting screws
(supplied in Octel
Rack Mount Kit)
2 rack-mounting brackets,
one each side (supplied in
Octel Rack Mount Kit)
8 mounting screws
(supplied by rack manufacturer)
2 support rails
(supplied by rack manufacturer)
Figure 4-12 Octel 300 Cabinet Installed in 19-Inch Rack
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
4−56
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Preinstallation
Determine whether the rack to be used is of a suitable size and strength to hold the Octel 300. At
maximum configuration, the server can weigh as much as 220 pounds and might be too heavy for some
racks. Make sure that the rack is structurally sound before and after the server is installed. Remove any
rack casters, as they make the rack less stable. To increase stability further, you might need to bolt the
rack to the floor or provide some other means of support.
Obtain support rails from the rack manufacturer. Install the rails in the rack to support the weight of the
server. Unless the rack has threaded holes in vertical mounting rails, the rack manufacturer must also
provide speed nuts and rack-mounting screws for securing the front of the server to the rack.
If the Octel 300 is currently in service, make sure that all cables connected to the back of the server are
long enough to reach the server when it is mounted in the rack.
The front and back of the rack must remain open to ensure proper air flow. Mount the server low enough
in the rack so that any service person can easily service the server while standing on the floor.
The following equipment and tools are required:
Quantity
Description
1
Octel 300 message server
1
Rack mount kit, Part # 740-6036-001. Includes
two mounting brackets and 10 mounting screws
1
19-inch rack
2
Support rails, rated for at least 220 pounds
8
Rack-mounting screws
8
Speed nuts, if required
1
Phillips screwdriver
Installation
Use the following steps to install the Octel 300 in a rack:
Octel 200/300
1.
Open and remove the front door of the server.
2.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3.
Make sure that the power to the Octel 300 is turned OFF.
4.
Remove the power-supply unit, fan tray, and all disk drives to reduce the weight of the cabinet and to
protect the disk drives from damage. Refer to the Hardware Replacement chapter, Hardware
Removal section, for instructions about removing assemblies. Make sure to note the slot position of
all disk drives, because they must be replaced in the same slots. You do not need to remove PCAs in
slots A1 through A14.
5.
If the message server has been in service, disconnect all cables from the rear of the cabinet. Make
sure to note the cable positions, because they must be reconnected exactly as they were.
6.
Install the rack-mounting brackets to the front vertical flanges of the Octel 300 cabinet with the
screws provided, using a Phillips screwdriver. Refer to Figure 4-12.
7.
Determine the location of the Octel 300 in the rack, and install the support rails from the rack
manufacturer appropriately.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Installation
8.
Using a tape measure, determine where the speed nuts provided by the manufacturer should clip on
the rack vertical rails to line up with the holes in the Octel 300 rack-mounting brackets.
.
9.
4−57
This step is not necessary if the rack has threaded holes in the vertical mounting rails.
Two people are needed to insert the cabinet into the rack. Lift the partially empty cabinet onto the
support rails in the rack. You might need to remove the leveling feet on the bottom of the cabinet, so
that the cabinet can sit correctly on the support rails.
10. Secure the cabinet to the rack using the mounting screws provided by the rack manufacturer.
11. Install all assemblies removed in step 4, and secure them to the cabinet. Refer to the Hardware
Replacement chapter for instructions about installing assemblies.
12. If the message server has been in service, install all cables in the back of the cabinet as they were
before beginning this procedure. If not, follow the additional installation procedures in the
Connecting the Phone System to the Octel 300 section of this chapter.
13. Turn on the power to the message server, and test its operation. Refer to the Octel 300 Testing
section in this chapter.
14. Replace and lock the front door of the cabinet.
Removal
To remove the Octel 300 from a vertical rack, perform the following steps:
1.
Open and remove the front door of the cabinet.
2.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3.
Make sure that the Octel 300 is turned OFF.
4.
Remove the power-supply unit, fan tray, and all disk drives to reduce the weight of the cabinet and to
protect the disk drives from damage. Refer to the Hardware Replacement chapter for instructions
about removing assemblies. Make sure to note the slot position of all disk drives, because they must
be replaced in the same slots. You do not need to remove PCAs in slots A1 through A14.
5.
If the message server has been in service, disconnect all cables from the rear of the cabinet. Make
sure to note the cable positions, because they might need to be reconnected exactly as they were.
6.
Two people are needed to remove the cabinet from the rack. Lift the partially empty cabinet out of
the rack, and place it on the floor.
7.
Install all assemblies removed in step 4, and secure them to the cabinet. Refer to the Hardware
Replacement chapter for instructions about installing assemblies.
8.
Remove the rack-mount hardware.
9.
If reshipping the Octel 300, refer to the Reshipping section in this chapter.
10. If the Octel 300 is to be returned to service, install all cables at the back of the cabinet as they were
before beginning this procedure.
11. Turn ON the power to the server and test the message server’s operation. Refer to the Octel 300
Testing section in this chapter.
12. Replace and lock the front door to the cabinet.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5
REPORTS
Chapter Contents
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9
5.10
5.11
5.12
PB60019−01
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Listing and Clearing Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Listing a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Listing User Statistics (Selections 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Clearing a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
System Performance Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Call Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Message Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12
Digital Network Performance Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14
Network Traffic Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17
To Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-18
Message Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-18
Network Scheduled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-19
Names Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-19
Network Access Totals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-20
Feature Use Totals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-20
Digital Network Traffic Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-20
Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-21
Message Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-22
Network Scheduled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-22
Other Digital Network Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-22
User Message Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-23
Messaging Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-24
User Calling Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-25
Call Processing Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-25
Disk Usage Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-27
Total System Message Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-28
Total of Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-28
Storage Capacity Based on Message Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-28
Port Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-29
Individual Port Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-31
Port Group Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-31
All Port Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-32
Mailbox Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-33
User Status Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-34
Integration Calling Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-35
Incoming Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-35
System Performance by COS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-37
Caller’s Initial Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-38
Subsequent Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-39
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Reports
Command
Additional Information
List Report
@L R
Shows reports that can be listed. Individual reports are shown
below. System Parameter 72 determines maximum lines per page
for reports.
Clear Report
@C R
Produces a listing of reports that can be cleared. Options are:
1=System Performance and Port Statistic
2=Network Traffic
3=User Call and Message Statistics.
The following reports are cleared:
User Message, User Calling and Mailbox Usage, User Status
Detail, and Integration Calling Statistics
INDIVIDUAL REPORTS
System Performance
1
When clearing this report, the Traffic Peg Count Table is set to
zero. The Port Statistics are cleared as well. Information pertains
to incoming calls, subsequent actions, progress of calls, and
mailbox information.
1 D
Lists the Digital Network Performance Report.
2
For collocated and networked message servers. Information
pertains to route statistics, message delivery, network access
totals, and feature use.
2 D
Lists the Network Traffic Report for digital information only.
User Message Statistics
3
Includes current messages, messages left after various conditions,
logon, and date cleared. Also show information about SDLs
(System Distribution Lists).
User Calling Statistics
4
Includes incoming calls, subsequent calls, calls abandoned, and
date cleared.
Disk Usage
5
Provides statistics about the amount of voice and fax message
storage currently used on the message server.
Port Statistics
6
Information pertains to individual, group, fax channel information,
and all port statistics. This report is cleared when the System
Performance report is cleared.
Network Traffic
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Reports
Command
Additional Information
Mailbox Usage
7
Shows mailbox usage time. Usage includes logon time and access
time.
User Status Detail
8
Shows status information on mailbox access and time durations
associated with individual mailbox usage.
Integration Calling
Statistics
9
Shows information about the type of non-integrated or integrated
calls a mailbox receives.
System Performance
by COS
10
Provides call and message statistics for ports/trunks by COS.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5.1
5-1
OVERVIEW
Reports provide statistics on the operation and usage of the OctelR 200/300 message server and give
owners the ability to monitor various operational aspects of the Octel 200/300. Reports may be accessed
at any time through the system’s administration terminal.
The Octel 200/300 offers reports that provide both system-wide and mailbox statistics. Information is
collected and stored for ten reports.
1.
System Performance/Digital Network Performance
2.
Network Traffic
3.
User Message Statistics
4.
User Calling Statistics
5.
Disk Usage
6.
Port Statistics
7.
Mailbox Usage
8.
User Status Detail
9.
Integration Calling Statistics
10. System Performance by COS
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-2
5.2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
LISTING AND CLEARING REPORTS
Information is collected and stored in various internal tables. The information accumulates until the
report is cleared. Reports can be listed without affecting the accumulated data. Once the command to
clear a report is entered, the values are reset to zero and resume accumulating.
Most reports show only the date they are run. At the top of reports 1, 2, 6 and 10 are two dates. The
“from” date and time indicate when the table was last cleared. The “to” date and time indicate when the
report was last printed. It is recommended that reports be listed and cleared on a regular basis. The
reports can display individual values up to 65535.
.
Beginning with Serenade Release 3.0, the following reports can display individual values up to
999,999.
System Performance
Digital Network Performance
Network Traffic
Digital Network Activity
Disk Usage
Port Statistics
Integration Calling Statistics
System Performance by COS
For a report showing the attributes associated with the COS Table, CSTAT Table, SCHEDULE Table, and
all INFORMATION Tables defined in the SCHEDULE Table, refer to the Configuration volume, COS
chapter, How to Configure the COS Table section, for the LIST PROFILE command.
.
This chapter describes all reports except the DID/E&M Trunk Interface report, which is detailed in
DID/E&M Trunk Interface Installation and Maintenance Manual. For information about Direct
Access Cards, refer to the Direct Access Card (DAC) Installation and Maintenance Manual.
Listing a Report
Reports are printed by selecting from the LIST REPORT menu. At the @ prompt enter
LIST REPORT or L R
@L R
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE STATISTICS.
USER CALLING STATISTICS.
DISK USAGE.
PORT STATISTICS.
MAILBOX USAGE.
USER STATUS DETAIL.
INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS.
SELECT REPORT TO BE LISTED. (1 − 10, EMPTY LINE = EXIT)
:
Select the number of the report you wish to list.
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Enter L R # (report number), to designate a specific report before the menu is displayed.
PB60019−01
Reports
5-3
The prompts displayed after selecting a specific report (i.e., 1−0) vary slightly as shown in the following
sections. These reports can be printed if you have a teleprinter or printer attached to the terminal or PC.
Before each reported is displayed, the message server prompts “READY PRINTER, THEN PRESS
RETURN.”
.
The System Performance and Disk Usage reports display data as of the date and time the report is
requested. Depending on the software release involved and the number and size of disk drives,
there can be considerable delay before output is available.
Digital Network Reports
The System Performance report, 1, and the Network Traffic report, 2, print information about digital
networking. To print digital information for either report, after entering the report number, enter D. For
example, to list digital network information for the System Performance report, at the @ prompt, enter:
L R 1 D
Enter
If you only enter 1 for the System Performance report, the report does not include any statistics from
digital network traffic. The digital networking System Performance report only prints if you enter 1 D. If
you only enter 2 for the Network Traffic report, the report includes all networking information. Enter 2
D to get information only about digital networking.
Listing User Statistics (Selections 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9)
Once a User Message or Calling Statistics, Mailbox Usage, User Status Detail, or Integration Calling
Statistics report has been selected, the following prompt displays.
OCCMP_@l r 3
ENTER DIGIT PATTERN (”?” FOR HELP):
READY PRINTER, THEN PRESS RETURN...
* MESSAGE PROCESSING STATISTICS *
01/26
10:47A.M. YYYY
<−−CURRENT MESSAGES−−> <−MESSAGES LEFT AFTER−>
MAILBOX TOTAL AVGSC TOTSC OLDST BUSY NOANS GREET OTHER
PAGE 1
<−−LOGIN−−>
DATE
TOTAL
LAST CLEAR
If ? is entered for help, the following prompt displays:
Enter one of the following to select one or more mailboxes:
”ALL”
1−8 DIGITS
EMPTY LINE
PB60019−01
−
−
−
ALL MAILBOXES.
ONLY MAILBOXES BEGINNING WITH THIS DIGIT PATTERN.
ABORT WITHOUT ACTION.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
If 1−8 digits are entered, the list displays the mailboxes beginning with the digit(s) entered. In this
example the first digit is 5 and mailboxes are three digits long:
Entered Digits
Mailboxes Displayed
5
All mailboxes beginning with 5
56
All mailboxes beginning with 56
567
Only mailbox 567
All user reports are sorted by first digit. For example, if mailboxes in the 2000 and 300 series are used,
2000 lists first.
The following screen shows an example of the system response when an invalid digit sequence is entered.
NO MATCH FOUND
OCCMP_@
Clearing a Report
To clear reports, at the @ prompt enter
CLEAR REPORT, or C R
@C R
After this command is entered, following prompt displays:
1.
2.
3.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE (IN TRAFFIC PEGS) AND PORT STATISTICS.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE, USER CALLING AND MAILBOX USAGE.
SELECT REPORT TO BE CLEARED.(1 − 3, EMPTY LINE = EXIT)
:
Select the number of the report type you wish to clear. The prompts displayed after selecting a report are
specific to that report type.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5-5
When option 1 — System Performance and Port Statistics, is chosen, the following reports are cleared:
-
System Performance
-
System Performance by COS report
-
Digital Network Performance Report
-
Port Statistics
When option 3 — User Calling and Message Statistics, is chosen, the following reports are cleared:
-
User Message Statistics
-
User Calling Statistics
-
Mailbox Usage
-
Integration Calling Statistics
The Disk Usage and User Status Detail reports cannot be cleared. They always reflect current
information.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-6
5.3
Installation and Maintenance Volume
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE REPORT
'
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE STATISTICS.
USER CALLING STATISTICS.
DISK USAGE.
PORT STATISTICS.
MAILBOX USAGE.
USER STATUS DETAIL.
INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS.
The System Performance report provides system-wide call and message statistics. It details the number of
calls to busy and not answered extensions, calls to attendant/intercept positions, and messages left under
various conditions.
Individual call and message statistics are displayed in the User reports.
.
The System Performance report is based upon the Traffic Peg Count Table. Refer to the System
Errors and Traffic Peg chapter for traffic peg details.
Clearing the System Performance report clears the traffic peg counts and vice versa. If you want
both the System Performance report and the traffic pegs, list both before clearing.
An example of a System Performance report is shown on the next page.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5-7
−−−− SYSTEM PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR (SYSTEM NAME) −−−
FROM: MM/DD HH:MM A.M.
YYYY
TO: MM/DD HH:MM P.M.
YYYY
PAGE 1 OF 1
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
*
INCOMING CALL SUMMARY
*
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
CALLER’S INITIAL ACTION:
DIALED EXTENSION OR DIGITS
764
DEFAULTED TO ASSISTANCE
136
DIALED ”0” FOR ASSISTANCE
59
LEFT A MESSAGE AT THE TONE
0
PRESSED ”#” TO LOG−ON
955
”*” TO MAKE A QUICK MESSAGE
12
CALLER WAS A NETWORK UNIT
1099
CALLER WAS A DID/E&M UNIT
0
OTHER
7
TOTAL CALLS INTO SYSTEM
3032
SUBSEQUENT ACTIONS:
DIALED EXTENSION OR DIGITS
445
SENT TO ASSISTANCE
3
DIALED ”0” FOR ASSISTANCE
117
LEFT A MESSAGE AT THE TONE
370
PRESSED ”#” TO LOG−ON
243
”*” TO MAKE A QUICK MESSAGE
4
TRANSFERRED CALL TO NETWORK
111
PROGRESS OF CALLS TO EXTENSIONS:
ANSWERED
459
RING−NO−ANSWER
104
BUSY
153
GREETING PLAYED (NO CALL)
784
VACANT NUMBER
24
−−−−−−−
TOTAL TO EXTENSIONS
1524
NUMBER OF TIMES USERS LOGGED−ON:
1249
NUMBER OF USER MAILBOXES:
30
NUMBER OF NON-VOICE MAILBOXES:
10
NUMBER OF PORTS CONFIGURED:
4
ALL PORTS BUSY (SECONDS):
0
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
*
MESSAGE SUMMARY
*
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
MESSAGES CREATED:
AFTER BUSY OR NO−ANSWER
83
AFTER GREETING PLAYED
287
RECEIVED FROM NETWORK
976
BY QUICK−MESSAGE
14
BY LOGGED−ON USERS
632
−−−−−−−−
TOTAL MESSAGES CREATED
1992
MESSAGES CURRENTLY STORED:
GREETING MESSAGES
NAME MESSAGES
USER MESSAGES
14
8
68
−−−−−−−−
90
TOTAL MESSAGES STORED
DISK USAGE:
AVG. USER MESSAGE LENGTH (MINUTES)
STORAGE CURRENTLY USED
APPROXIMATE MINUTES OF AUTHORIZED STORAGE
APPROXIMATE MINUTES OF EQUIPPED STORAGE
PB60019−01
0.7
37%
250
150
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Call Summary
The Call Summary portion of the System Performance report shows the stages of calls and actions of
callers into the Octel 200/300. The calls include the following:
-
Callers attempting to reach extensions.
-
People calling into mailboxes.
-
Other calls answered (such as calls from other network locations and calls from the DID Interface).
Information is reported for:
-
Caller’s initial action.
-
Caller’s subsequent actions.
-
Progress of calls to extensions.
The following sections describe the activities reported in each of these categories. Also included are the
traffic peg(s) used as the source for each field.
Caller’s Initial Action
This section displays callers’ initial action upon reaching the Octel 200/300. If a category relates to a
traffic peg, the peg is indicated in parentheses.
An integrated call that has generated a call record, pegs under Caller’s Initial Action, Dialed Extension or
Digits. The call record is considered the initial action taken.
DIALED EXTENSION OR
DIGITS (Peg 129)
This category can include
-
-
-
-
Number of times callers dialed a defined first digit from 0 to 8 (0
applies for message servers configured with mailboxes that start with
0XX).
Number of times callers were sent directly to Next Mailbox without
dialing.
Number of times callers dialed an account code.
Number of times callers dialed extensions or digits to call out on the
network.
With Integration
-
Direct internal call to the Octel 200/300 with call record
.
DEFAULTED TO
ASSISTANCE (Peg 138)
S.4.1
-
Forwarded call to the Octel 200/300 with call record
-
Direct external call to the Octel 200/300 with call record
Number of times callers did nothing (e.g., rotary dial) and were transferred
to attendant or intercept position.
.
Octel 200/300
For mailboxes configured with auto logon, the direct
internal call pegs under Pressed # to log on.
If the call is integrated with a call record, default to assistance is
pegged under Subsequent Actions.
PB60019−01
Reports
DIALED 0 FOR
ASSISTANCE
(Peg 128)
Number of times callers pressed
intercept position.
.
0
5-9
and were transferred to attendant or
If the call is integrated with a call record, pressing
is pegged under Subsequent Actions.
0
for assistance
LEFT A MESSAGE
AT THE TONE
(Peg 140)
Number of times callers left a message as an initial action. This also
includes instances where Next Mailbox gives the caller a greeting and takes
a message without the caller entering any digits.
PRESSED #
TO LOG ON
(Peg 131)
Number of times callers pressed
and unsuccessful logons).
.
* TO MAKE A
QUICK MESSAGE
(Peg 133)
#
to enter a mailbox (includes successful
If the call is integrated with a call record, logon is pegged under
Subsequent Actions, unless the mailbox is configured for Auto
Logon.
Number of times callers pressed * to make a Quick Message.
CALLER WAS A NETWORK Number of times call was identified as originating from a networked
UNIT
system.
(Peg 135)
CALLER WAS A DID/E&M
UNIT
(PEG 136)
Number of times call was identified as a call diverted from a DID/E&M
module.
OTHER
Miscellaneous category including
-
Caller dialed
-
Caller dialed invalid first digit.
-
Caller disconnected (detected hang-up events or from DID Interface).
-
-
TOTAL CALLS
INTO SYSTEM
(Peg 1)
PB60019−01
9
,
# # #
8
or
# # #
5
.
Caller has not taken initial action at the time the report is being
generated.
With Adaptive Integration
-
.
9
Direct internal call into the Octel 200/300 where caller accessed
Quick Greeting Activation.
Numbers within the Other category may fluctuate as new calls come
in and as current callers make an initial action. If Total Calls into the
message server reaches the maximum value (999,999), this field
contains ***. The Other category is calculated by subtracting all
Initial Calls from Total Calls into System. If the subtraction results
in a negative number, Other is ***.
Total calls answered by the Octel 200/300.
.
If the System Performance report or traffic pegs were last cleared
while calls were in progress, this value may be larger than peg 1.
However, the value printed in the System Performance report always
reflects the correct value.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Subsequent Actions
After completing the initial action, (i.e., caller left a message at the tone), another action is taken.
Subsequent actions are described below.
DIALED EXTENSION OR
DIGITS
(Peg 130)
SENT TO
ASSISTANCE
(Peg 139)
This category can include
-
Number of times callers dialed a defined first digit from 0 to 8 (0
applies for systems configured with mailboxes that start with 0XX).
-
Number of times callers went to Next Mailbox.
-
Number of times callers dialed an extension or digit to stay in queue.
-
Number of times a direct internal caller dialed an extension or digit.
This category can include
-
-
-
-
-
Number of times callers were transferred to attendant or intercept
position after dialing too many invalid extensions.
Number of callers that remain on the line for assistance, whether or
not a message was left, when System Parameter 77 — PBX
PROVIDES MOMENTARY DISCONNECT, is set to YES.
Calls intercepted by DID or E&M Interface Modules that defaulted to
assistance, whether or not a message was left.
Number of live calls across a Protocol 1 or 3 network connection that
were sent to assistance.
Autotransfer to personal assistance.
DIALED 0 FOR
ASSISTANCE
(Peg 128)
Number of times callers pressed 0 and were transferred to
attendant/intercept position or Personal Assistant.
LEFT A MESSAGE
AT THE TONE
(Peg 141)
Number of times callers left message after busy/no answer/greeting.
PRESSED
#
TO LOG ON
(Peg 132)
Number of times callers pressed
and unsuccessful logons).
#
to enter a mailbox (includes successful
With Adaptive Integration, the number of times a direct internal caller
pressed # to logon.
Octel 200/300
PRESSED * TO MAKE A
QUICK MESSAGE
(Peg 134)
Number of times callers pressed * to make a Quick Message.
TRANSFERRED CALL TO
NETWORK
(Peg 137)
Number of times callers transferred out using a Protocol 1 or 3 network
connection that supports network call processing.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5-11
Progress of Calls to Extensions
If the callers initial or subsequent action requires the Octel 200/300 to place a call, responses to that call
are detailed below. Also included is the number of logon requests that were successfully completed.
ANSWERED
(Peg 46)
This category can include
Number of answered calls.
-
RING-NO-ANSWER
(Peg 35)
Number of calls placed that were not answered, including:
Number of normal calls to an extension resulting in ring-no-answer,
including first caller to a FIFO queue extension.
-
-
BUSY
(Peg134)
Number of PBX integration calls forwarded on ring-no-answer. (This
applies to PBXs that provide information on why the call forwarded.)
Number of times the Octel 200/300 attempted to place a call but did
not get dial tone at the port.
Number of calls placed to busy extensions, including
Number of normal calls to a busy extension, including first caller to a
FIFO queue extension.
-
-
-
-
-
Number of DID calls that intercepted on busy.
Number of PBX integration calls that forwarded on busy. (This applies
to PBXs that provide information on why the call forwarded.)
Number of times a personal mailbox greeting was played and no call
was placed (normal greeting operation). Also included in this category
are calls to unavailable extensions, and calls to extensions that forward
back to a CX/MX mode port and integration calls where a call record
indicates an “all forward” condition.
Number of times an Extended Absence Greeting is played to an
external caller.
Number of times OctelFormst scripted prompt greeting mailbox was
called (without COS Attribute 6 — CALL FIRST BEFORE PLAYING
GREETING).
Number of times a valid account code was entered.
Number of times callers with FIFO queue position of two or greater
dialed digits to enter or stay in queue, or when maximum queuing limit
was reached, before going to Next Mailbox.
-
Number of times error greeting (Custom Prompt) played.
-
Number of times DID calls were intercepted immediately.
-
PB60019−01
Number of DID calls that intercepted on ring-no-answer.
-
-
GREETING PLAYED
(NO CALL)
(Pegs 144, 39, 98, and 162)
With COS Attribute 15 — TRANSFER TO A RINGING
EXTENSION, or COS Attribute 34 — TRANSFER CALLS
WITHOUT CHECKING FOR BUSY OR NO ANSWER, pegs as
ANSWERED when the call is transferred.
Number of PBX integration calls that forwarded on the All Forward
condition, or from PBXs which do not provide information on why the
call forwarded.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-12
Installation and Maintenance Volume
VACANT NUMBER
(Peg 38)
Number of calls placed by the Octel 200/300 to vacant number (fast busy).
TOTAL TO EXTENSIONS
(Peg 46, 34, 35, 38, 39, 98,
144, and 162)
Total calls placed to extensions by the Octel 200/300.
NUMBER OF TIMES USERS Number of times a mailbox was successfully logged onto.
LOGGED ON
(Peg 9)
NUMBER OF USER
MAILBOXES
Number of mailboxes in the USER Table.
NUMBER OF PORTS
CONFIGURED
Number of ports configured.
ALL PORTS BUSY
(SECONDS) (Peg 24)
Number of seconds during which all the ports were busy and therefore
unavailable.
Message Summary
The Message Summary section details the number of messages created and on what conditions, number
of messages currently stored, and disk usage.
Totals for stored messages include disk space used for storing a forwarded message and all comments
attached to it.
.
Messages are only stored once and addressed to mailboxes as required. Therefore, User Statistics
for messages do not equal total storage used or remaining for system statistics. Personal greetings
and names are not included for individual mailboxes in the User Messaging report; they are
included in the System Summary report.
A description of the Message Summary fields follows.
Messages Created
Messages may be created by callers responding to prompts or by mailbox owners using messaging
features. The following summarizes both types.
AFTER BUSY OR
NO-ANSWER
(Peg 14)
Number of messages left after call to an extension received busy or no
answer.
AFTER GREETING PLAYED Number of messages left after greeting played.
(Peg 142)
Octel 200/300
RECEIVED FROM
NETWORK (Peg 143)
Number of valid messages received from network.
BY QUICK MESSAGE
(Peg 2)
Number of times a Quick Message was left.
BY LOGGED-ON USERS
Number of messages sent from mailboxes.
TOTAL MESSAGES
CREATED
Total number of voice/fax messages created in categories above.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5-13
Messages Currently Stored
Messages are generally created by callers or by mailbox owners. Recorded names and greetings created
using the Insert/Swap feature are also considered to be messages. System totals for each of these
categories are reflected below.
GREETING MESSAGES
Number of greeting messages currently stored in mailboxes.
NAME MESSAGES
Number of name messages currently stored in mailboxes.
USER MESSAGES
Number of messages currently stored. All messages in mailboxes are
counted, except multiple copies. When a message is delivered to several
mailboxes, it is counted only once.
TOTAL MESSAGES
STORED
Sum of greeting, name, and user messages.
Disk Usage
The following provides information about the total disk storage and the percentage of that storage
currently utilized.
AVG. USER MESSAGE
LENGTH
Average length in minutes of the messages currently stored. (Minutes
divided by number of messages.)
STORAGE
CURRENTLY USED
Percentage of total storage currently used.
APPROXIMATE MINUTES
OF AUTHORIZED
STORAGE
Maximum minutes of message storage that is authorized. This number is
derived from the total of all voice hours on non-COD drives and authorized
hours on COD drives.
APPROXIMATE MINUTES
OF EQUIPPED STORAGE
Maximum minutes of message storage that the message server can record.
This number is derived from the total of all voice hours on non-COD drives
and equipped hours on the COD drives.
.
The approximate minutes equipped will not match the approximate
minutes authorized if the message server has not been restarted
since additional COD hours were purchased, or if more hours are
authorized than the physical capacity of installed drives can
provided.
On non-COD drives, a percentage of the drive’s physical storage
capacity is used for system software when the drive is in one of the
system/voice drive slots. Refer to Feature Description volume,
Hard Disk Redundancy chapter for information about Hot Standby.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-14
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Digital Network Performance Report
The Digital Network Performance Report tracks LAN performance. It provides a measure of the
messaging traffic across the digital network and the allocation of the LAN channel resources for the
messaging traffic across the digital network. It is an extension of the System Performance Report.
To access the Digital Network Performance Report, at the @ prompt, enter
L R 1 D
.
Enter
If only 1 is entered for the System Performance report, the report does not include any statistics
from digital networking traffic. The digital networking System Performance report is printed only
when 1 D is entered.
All information shown on this report is computed from values pegged in the Traffic Peg Count Table. All
peg table values max out at 999,999. When a field has reached its maximum, the entry is displayed as
***, with a note at the end of the report:
NOTE: *** = Arithmetic Overflow
If fields are overflowing, it is an indication that the report should be listed and cleared at more frequent
intervals, based on the traffic on the digital network.
An example of a Digital Network Performance Report is shown below. An explanation of the fields
follows.
−− DIGITAL NETWORK PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR XXXXX −−
FROM:MM/DD 00:19 A.M. YYYY
TO:MM/DD 05:17 P.M. YYYY
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
MESSAGE STATISTICS:
VOICE MESSAGES SENT
11
VOICE MESSAGES RECEIVED
28
FAX MESSAGES SENT
0
FAX MESSAGES RECEIVED
0
NAMES SENT
14
NAMES RECEIVED
101
REAL TIME NAMES PLAYED
0
MESSAGE SEND (hh:mm:ss)
00:13:49
MESSAGE RECEIVE (hh:mm:ss)
00:31:49
DIGITAL NETWORKING CHANNEL USAGE:
NUMBER OF CHANNELS
1/2 OR MORE BUSY (hh:mm:ss)
3/4 OR MORE BUSY (hh:mm:ss)
ALL BUSY (hh:mm:ss)
IN USE SENDING MESSAGES (hh:mm:ss)
IN USE RECEIVING MESSAGE (hh:mm:ss)
128
00:00:00
00:00:00
00:00:00
00:01:50
00:04:06
LAN CONNECTIONS:
OUTGOING ATTEMPTED
OUTGOING REJECTED
OUTGOING GOT ALL BUSY
INCOMING ATTEMPTED
INCOMING REJECTED
INCOMING GOT ALL BUSY
LAN AVAILABILITY:
LAN UP
COURTESY DOWN
18
8
0
44
0
0
100.00%
0
NOTE: *** = Arithmetic Overflow
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5-15
Message Statistics
MESSAGES SENT
Number of messages sent.
MESSAGES RECEIVED
Number of messages received.
NAMES RECEIVED
Number of network names received from the digital network.
REAL TIME NAMES
PLAYED
Number of realtime name plays requested (applies only to Domain).
MESSAGE SEND*
Time (in hours, minutes, and seconds) of the actual lengths of the messages
sent.
MESSAGE RECEIVE*
Time (in hours, minutes, and seconds) of the actual lengths of the messages
received.
* These totals are not the same as the amount of time used for sending or receiving messages reflected in
the Channel Usage section of this report. With digital networking, the time to send a message is
actually less than the time it took to record that message. For example, depending on the speed of the
connection, the digital network may take six seconds to transmit a minute of spoken voice.
Digital Networking Channel Usage
PB60019−01
NUMBER OF CHANNELS
Total number of digital networking channels available on the message server.
(4 for Octel 200 models and 16 for Octel 300 models or Octel 200 models
with Feature Bit SW-40056.)
1/2 OR MORE BUSY
Time (in hours, minutes, and seconds) that one-half or more of the digital
networking channels were busy.
3/4 OR MORE BUSY
Time (in hours, minutes, and seconds) that three-quarters or more of the
digital networking channels were busy.
ALL BUSY
Time (in hours, minutes, and seconds) that all digital networking channels
were busy.
IN USE SENDING
MESSAGES
Time (in hours, minutes, and seconds) that messages were sent over the
LAN. The time would normally be less than the time in the MESSAGE
SEND field.
IN USE RECEIVING
MESSAGES
Time (in hours, minutes, and seconds) that messages were received over the
LAN. This time would normally be less than the time in the MESSAGE
RECEIVE field.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-16
Installation and Maintenance Volume
LAN Connections
OUTGOING
Attempted
Number of attempts to make a connection to another location.
Rejected
Number of times an attempt to connect to another location was rejected.
Got Busy
Number of times an attempt to connect to another location was rejected
because all LAN channels were busy at the other location.
INCOMING
Attempted
Number of attempts by another location to connect to this location.
Rejected
Number of times that attempts by another location to connect to this
location were rejected.
Got Busy
Number of times that attempts by another location to connect to this
location were rejected because all LAN channels were busy at this location.
LAN Availability
Octel 200/300
LAN UP
The percentage of time the LAN was up and running, based on the total
message server up time. This field overflows if the peg for the message
server up time reaches its maximum of 999,999 minutes or 694 days.
COURTESY DOWN
The number of times that the CD x command to remove the LAN from
service was executed successfully. This field corresponds to Traffic Peg 150.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5.4
5-17
NETWORK TRAFFIC REPORT
'
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE STATISTICS.
USER CALLING STATISTICS.
DISK USAGE.
PORT STATISTICS.
MAILBOX USAGE.
USER STATUS DETAIL.
INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS.
The Network Traffic report provides traffic information for each location (multicabinet and remote)
configured in the network. All configured locations are listed in the report. Specific fields listed depend
upon the protocol used to connect to the specified location. Traffic information accumulates until the
report is cleared.
.
If you enter 2 for the Network Traffic report, the report includes networking information for both
analog and digital connections (when both are configured). To only get information for digital
networking, enter 2 D. The Digital Networking example is described after the analog example.
−−−−−−−−−− NETWORK TRAFFIC REPORT FOR XXXXX −−−−−−−−−−
FROM: MM/DD HH:SS A.M.
YYYY
TO: MM/DD HH:MM P.M.
YYYY
************************************************************
TO LOCATION << NAME >>
ROUTE CHOICE−> 1. TODL02
−−−−−−−−−−−−−− −−−−−−−−−
CALLS TRIED :
0
ROUTE BUSY
:
0
ROUTE FAIL
:
0
LINEQUAL FAIL:
0
DATA SUCCESS%:
0
MSG−MIN DAY :
0
MSG−MIN NIGHT:
0
−−−−−−−−−
−−−−−−−−−
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−− MESSAGE DELIVERY −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
CALLS CALLS
MSGS
SENT
SENT
DISK
FAXES
TRIED FAILED RETRY NIGHT
DAY
FULL
RETRY
−−−−−− −−−−−− −−−−−− −−−−−− −−−−−− −−−−−−
−−−−−
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
FAXES
NIGHT
−−−−−
0
FAXES
DAY
−−−−−
0
ALLMSG
RET’D
−−−−−−
0
**** NETWORK SCHEDULED ****
WIN1
WIN2
MSGS SENT
0
0
FAXES SENT
0
0
WIN5
−
−
WIN6
−
−
WIN7
−
−
DEF WIN
0
0
WIN6
−
−
WIN7
−
−
DEF WIN
0
0
WIN3
0
−
WIN4
−
−
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−− NAMES DIRECTORY −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
ASCII
ASCII
ASCII
SPOKEN
SPOKEN
SPOKEN
ASCII
RCV
RCV
RCV
RCV
RCV
RCV
NAMVRFU
FAIL
NIGHT
DAY
FAIL
NIGHT
DAY
FAIL
−−−−−
−−−−−
−−−−−
−−−−−−
−−−−−−
−−−−−−
−−−−−−−
0
−
−
0
−
−
0
**** NETWORK SCHEDULED ****
WIN1
WIN2
ASCII NAMES RCV
3
150
SPOKEN NAMES RCV
0
0
−−−NETWORK ACCESS TOTALS−−−
CALLS CALLS ALLPRT ALLRTE
TRIED FAILED BSY/NA FAILED
−−−−−− −−−−−− −−−−−− −−−−−−
0
0
0
0
PB60019−01
WIN3
0
−
WIN4
−
−
WIN5
−
−
−−−−FEATURE USE TOTALS−−−−−
AUTO
QUICK
USER IMMED
ATTEN
MSG LOGON
CALL
−−−−−
−−−−− −−−−− −−−−−
0
0
0
0
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-18
Installation and Maintenance Volume
To Location
For each location name, information is reported for a maximum of three possible route choices. For each
route choice, the following accumulates:
CALLS TRIED
Number of calls attempted to this location by this route.
ROUTE BUSY
Encountered busy trying to reach this location.
ROUTE FAIL
Failed to access this location. Could be due to no route dial tone.
LINEQUAL FAIL
Line test failed. Could be due to low signal or high noise level.
.
Not all protocols support line quality testing.
DATA SUCCESS %
A slight deviation from 100% is not cause for concern because failures will
result in retries. A large deviation from 100% can be indicative of failures
that will result in messages returned to sender, or uncompleted calls.
MSG-MIN DAY
Minutes of messages sent during the day.
MSG-MIN NIGHT
Minutes of messages sent during the night.
.
Because most PBXs automatically route traffic to an alternate path if the specified route is not
available, it is increasingly unnecessary to configure multiple routes in the message server.
Message Delivery
Octel 200/300
CALLS TRIED
Message delivery calls attempted.
CALLS FAILED
Message delivery calls that failed to transfer at least one message. May be
due to no answer, more than 3/4 of the ports busy, or line quality problems.
A second attempt is made at a later time.
MSGS RETRY
Messages that failed in the process of being sent. May be due to the line
being dropped. The Octel 200/300 automatically retries at a later time. This
is an indication of potential line problems.
SENT NIGHT
Messages sent during the night. The night hours are defined by System
Parameter 62 — NET: NIGHT DELIVERY START TIME and System
Parameter 63 — NET: NIGHT DELIVERY END TIME.
SENT DAY
Messages sent during all hours not defined by System Parameters 62 and
63.
DISK FULL
The disk at this location was full and the message was not delivered. These
messages are sent back to the sender’s mailbox.
FAX RETRY
Faxes that failed in the process of being sent. May be due to the line being
dropped. The Octel 200/300 automatically retries at a later time. The
number of retries is determined by Information Table index 32 or System
Parameter 209.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5-19
FAXES NIGHT
Faxes sent during the night. The night hours are defined by System
Parameter 62 or 63.
FAXES DAY
Faxes sent during all hours not defined by System Parameters 62 and 63.
ALLMSG RET’D
This column indicates the number of times all messages were returned for a
particular location. The number is specific to each particular location,
whether primary or secondary, i.e., if messages in the message queue for
the primary location were successfully delivered, but the messages in the
message queue for the secondary location were returned, only the
secondary location indicates that the message was returned.
NETWORK SCHEDULED
Messages sent during windows of time defined n the Network Schedule
Table associated with this location.
Network Scheduled
Each field in the first Network Scheduled section shows the number of messages or faxes sent within a
specified period of time, referred to as a “window.” Each window represents the start and stop times
within a Network Schedule.
If System Parameter 250 − Retrieve Names Only At Night − is set to YES, each field in the second
Network Scheduled section shows the number of ASCII Names and Spoken Names retrieved within a
window.
Refer to Volume VI, Chapter 13 for information on how to establish a Network Schedule.
Names Directory
The Names Directory section applies to OctelNet and digital networking:
ASCII RCV FAIL
Number of times delivery of the ASCII name from the remote node failed.
ASCII RCV NIGHT
Number of times ASCII name was received from the remote node during
the period defined as night.
ASCII RCV DAY
Number of times ASCII name was received from the remote node during
the period defined as day.
SPOKEN RCV FAIL
Number of times delivery of the spoken name from the remote node failed.
SPOKEN RCV NIGHT
Number of times spoken name was received from the remote node during
the period defined as night.
SPOKEN RCV DAY
Number of times spoken name was received from the remote node during
the period defined as day.
ASCII NAMVRCY FAIL
Number of times message was refused because the ASCII name on the
receiving system did not match the ASCII name on the sending system.
.
PB60019−01
System Parameter 251 − must be set to YES.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-20
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Network Access Totals
Summary of network access for each location:
CALLS TRIED
Number of calls attempted to this location.
CALLS FAILED
Calls tried that were not successful. Could be due to all ports busy, route
busy, route failure, or, for protocols 1 and 3, line quality problems.
ALLPRT BSY/NA
Calls tried but not answered by the Octel 200/300 at this location due to all
ports busy or the message server being unavailable.
ALLRTE FAILED
Calls failed due to route busy, failure, or line quality, with no routes to
advance to.
Feature Use Totals
Caller feature usage totals apply only to protocol 1 and 3 connections:
AUTO ATTEN
Calls transferred through the network to an extension at this location using
the automated attendant.
QUICK MSG
Quick Messages left at this location through the network.
USER LOGON
Mailbox logged onto at this location through the network.
IMMED CALL
Immediate call feature used to call an extension at this location through the
network.
Digital Network Traffic Report
To display digital information only, when selecting the report number, enter 2 DIGITAL or 2 D.
.
If you enter 2 for the Network Traffic report, the report includes networking information for both
analog and digital connections (when both are configured). To only get information for digital
networking, enter 2 D. The Digital Networking example is described after the analog example.
All reports for locations connected via the digital network show a corresponding analog segment,
when 2 is entered, even if there is no analog traffic.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5-21
************************************************************
−−−−−−−−−−− NETWORK TRAFFIC REPORT FOR NAME −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
FROM :MM/DD HH:MM A.M. YYYY
TO :MM/DD HH:MM P.M. YYYY
************************************************************
LOCATION << NAME >>
* * * DIGITAL NETWORK ACTIVITY * * *
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−− CONNECTIONS −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
DAY
NIGHT
TRIED
FAILED
DRP
ALL−BSY
MINUTES
MINUTES
0
0
0
0
0
0
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−− MESSAGE DELIVERY −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
VOICE
VOICE
VOICE
DISK
ALLMSG
TRIED
FAILED
RETRY
FULL
MINUTES
RET’D
0
0
0
0
0
0
FAX
TRIED
0
FAX
FAILED
0
FAX
RETRY
0
**** NETWORK SCHEDULED ****
WIN1
WIN2
MSGS SENT
0
0
FAXES SENT
0
0
WIN3
−
−
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−OTHER −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
NAMES
HI SPD
ANALOG
NAMES NAMESND
PLAYED LNK DRP STANDBY MISMTCH
SENT
0
0
0
0
0
WIN4
−
−
WIN5
−
−
WIN6
−
−
WIN7
−
−
DEF WIN
0
0
NAMESND
FAILED
0
Connections
Digital network connections for each location:
PB60019−01
TRIED
Number of times that a request for an open connection was made to the
remote system.
FAILED
Number of times that the open connection request did not result in a
connection grant.
DRP
Number of times that the connection was dropped after it had been
established. A connection is considered dropped if the originating end lost
the connection, without having done an explicit close connection.
ALL-BSY
Number of times that the reason for a connection reject was that all LAN
channels on the destination were busy.
DAY MINUTES
Number of minutes that connections were established and maintained
during the day.
NIGHT MINUTES
Number of minutes that connections were established and maintained
during the night.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-22
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Message Delivery
Information for each location includes
TRIED
Message send attempts over the LAN.
FAILED
Number of send attempts that failed to deliver messages.
RETRY
Number of times the message server tried to send a message to this location
that had already been tried earlier
DISK FULL
Number of times a message transfer was not completed because of a
destination disk being full.
ALL MSG RET’D
Number of instances when messages queued to a location fail to transmit
and are returned to sender.
MINUTES
Number of minutes of messages sent to this location.
Network Scheduled
Each field in the first Network Scheduled section shows the number of messages or faxes sent within a
specified period of time, referred to as a “window.” Each window represents the start and stop times
within a Network Schedule.
If System Parameter 250 − Retrieve Names Only At Night − is set to YES, each field in the second
Network Scheduled section shows the number of ASCII Names and Spoken Names retrieved within a
window.
Refer to Volume VI, Chapter 13 for information on how to establish a Network Schedule.
Other Digital Network Information
Two other kinds of digital network information are provided:
Octel 200/300
NAMES PLAYED
Number of times that this message server requested this location to play a
name in real time. Applicable only to locations in a domain.
HI-SPD LNK DRP
Number of times the permanent TCP/IP connection to this location was
lost. Applicable only to high-speed links.
ANALOG STANDBY
Number of times the digital connection was lost and the network reverted
to Analog Standby.
NAMES MISMTCH
Number of times a message is not delivered over the digital network
because the ASCII names between sending and receiving servers do not
match.
NAMESND SENT
Number of times a Namesend name was successfully sent.
NAMESND FAILED
Number of times a Namesend name failed.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5.5
5-23
USER MESSAGE STATISTICS
'
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE STATISTICS.
USER CALLING STATISTICS.
DISK USAGE.
PORT STATISTICS.
MAILBOX USAGE.
USER STATUS DETAIL.
INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS.
The User Message Statistics report provides a detailed list of call and messaging activity for individual
mailboxes. Each line within the report displays data for a single mailbox. The report contains the number
of current messages, total messages, logon dates and when the statistics were last cleared for each mailbox.
Additional user statistics are provided in the User Calling Statistics report.
.
The User Message Statistics report uses the same tables as the User Calling Statistics and User
Status Detail reports. When one of these reports is cleared, the tables are cleared for all three
reports.
Example of a User Messaging report:
* MESSAGING STATISTICS *
MM/DD HH:MM P.M.
MAILBOX
300
301
304
305
306
307
310
311
PB60019−01
YYYY
PAGE
<−−−CURRENT MESSAGES−−>
TOTAL AVGSC TOTSC OLDST
2
6
3
0
0
0
1
0
19
71
60
0
0
0
16
0
39
430
180
0
0
0
16
0
9/03
9/17
8/31
−−−
−−−
−−−
9/23
−−−
<−MESSAGES LEFT AFTER−>
BUSY NOANS GREET OTHER
0
12
95
34
28
0
18
2
3
29
64
119
57
0
68
80
64
3
128
5
0
0
16
0
4
85
336
119
43
0
118
62
<−−LOGON−−>
TOTAL LAST
60
183
582
230
339
2
304
133
9/21
9/17
9/23
9/23
9/23
9/23
9/22
9/23
1
DATE
CLEAR
7/27
7/27
7/27
7/27
7/27
1/01
7/27
7/27
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-24
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Messaging Statistics
Provides statistics about messages currently stored in each mailbox. Also shows the date that data for
each mailbox was last cleared (from a terminal) by using the command CLEAR REPORTS and choosing
option 3.
This report also shows whether a SDL (System Distribution List) is being used. If the pilot number of a
distribution list is entered for LIST REPORT, the fields display:
Field
Display
MAILBOX
OTHER
LAST LOGON
CLEAR
The SDL pilot number
Number of times pilot number is used to address a message
The current calendar date for all new mailboxes
The date that the C R (clear report) command was issued.
All other fields show 0 (zero) since pilot numbers do not take messages and can not be logged into.
Current Messages
Numbers are given for:
TOTAL
Total number of messages currently stored.
AVGSC
Average seconds per message, based on the total seconds and total number.
TOTSC
Total seconds of current messages stored.
OLDST
Date of the oldest message stored.
Messages Left After
Total number of messages left after the caller encountered any of these conditions:
BUSY*
Extension called was busy.
NO ANSWER*
Extension called did not answer.
GREETING*
Personal greeting was turned ON and played.
OTHER
Messages left by: New Message, Quick Message, Forward, Reply, Return
Receipt, Broadcast, Distribution List.
* Figures in these fields include forwarded calls. The field in which data is logged depends on how the
integration identifies the forwarding reason.
Logon
Mailbox was entered by dialing # and mailbox number (and security code); for quick logon by dialing
# # (and security code); or for auto-logon by entering the security code. This field provides
Octel 200/300
TOTAL
Number of times mailbox was entered.
LAST
Date when mailbox was last entered.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5.6
5-25
USER CALLING STATISTICS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10
'
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE STATISTICS.
USER CALLING STATISTICS.
DISK USAGE.
PORT STATISTICS.
MAILBOX USAGE.
USER STATUS DETAIL.
INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS.
The User Calling Statistics report provides a detailed list of call and messaging activity for individual
mailboxes. Each line within the report displays data for a single mailbox. The report contains the number
of incoming calls, subsequent calls, abandoned calls, and date statistics were last cleared for each mailbox.
Additional user statistics are provided in the User Message Statistics report.
.
The User Calling Statistics report uses the same tables as the User Message Statistics and User
Status Detail reports. When one of these reports is cleared, the tables are cleared for all three reports.
The User Calling Statistics report should be reviewed in conjunction with the Integration Calling
Statistics report whenever the message server is adaptively integrated with the PBX.
Example of a User Calling Statistics report:
* CALL PROCESSING STATISTICS *
MM/DD HH:MM P.M.
MAILBOX
YYYY
PAGE
<−−−−−−INCOMING CALLS−−−−−−−>
TOTAL ANSWD NOANS BUSY GREET
301
303
304
305
307
308
309
310
27
36
7
38
1
2
1
6
1
20
3
14
0
0
0
1
6
16
0
19
0
2
1
4
7
0
0
5
1
0
0
0
13
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
<−SUBSEQ. CALLS−>
TOTAL ATTEN EXTNS
15
7
2
5
0
1
0
0
2
2
0
5
0
1
0
0
13
5
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
CALLS
ABAND
DATE
CLEAR
11
4
2
5
1
1
1
5
9/01
9/01
9/01
9/01
9/01
9/01
9/01
9/01
Call Processing Statistics
Provides statistics about calls to each mailbox. Also shows the date that data for each mailbox was last
cleared (from a terminal) by using the command CLEAR REPORTS and choosing option 3.
Incoming Calls
Provides the following information for calls directed to the mailbox/extension.
TOTAL
PB60019−01
Total number of calls received for each mailbox by the Octel 200/300.
Both integrated and non-integrated calls are included in this total.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-26
Installation and Maintenance Volume
ANSWD
Number of calls answered This number includes only non-integrated calls
that are transferred through the message server. Calls that are released and
forwarded back are pegged in the Integration Calling Statistics report.
NO ANSWD
Number of calls that are transferred by the message server and reconnected
on a no-answer condition. (Calls that are forwarded on a no-answer
condition are pegged in the Integration Calling Statistics report.)
BUSY
Number of calls for which an attempted transfer results in a busy condition.
Calls that are forwarded on a busy condition are pegged in the Integration
Calling Statistics report.
GREET
Number of calls placed to mailbox when
-
Greeting is ON
-
Extended absence greeting is ON
-
No extension is associated with the mailbox
-
Call to extension encounters a re-order signal
-
Calls to Personal Assistance resulting in RNA or busy
Calls that forward to the message server on a forward-all condition are
pegged under Greeting in the Integration Calling Statistics report.
.
For calls that forward back in an integrated message server, refer to the
Integration Calling Statistics Report section for the call count status.
Subsequent Calls
Shows information about what a caller did after the initial call to a mailbox/extension was not answered.
TOTAL
Total number of subsequent calls.
ATTEN
Number of times the caller entered
mailbox.
EXTNS
Number of times caller entered another mailbox or extension.
CALLS ABAND
Number of calls disconnected after reaching an unavailable extension
without leaving a message, calling another extension or the operator.
Included are calls to scripted prompt mailboxes during which the caller
hangs up before completing responses (in situations where COS Attribute
33 — WILL SEND SCRIPTED MESSAGES WITHOUT
CONFIRMATION, is not assigned to the scripted prompt COS).
0
after entering an extension or
A forwarded call where a call record is generated is considered an initial
action. Therefore, if a caller is forwarded, enters a mailbox number and
then hangs up after hearing a greeting or system prompt, the mailbox entry
pegs under Subsequent Calls and the abandon call column is not pegged.
A call forwarded to the Octel 200/300 is considered an initial action, and
Calls Abandon is pegged if the caller hangs up without leaving a message
or dialing another extension.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5.7
5-27
DISK USAGE REPORT
'
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE STATISTICS.
USER CALLING STATISTICS.
DISK USAGE.
PORT STATISTICS.
MAILBOX USAGE.
USER STATUS DETAIL.
INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS.
The Disk Usage report provides statistics about the amount of voice message storage currently used on
the message server.
* DISK USAGE REPORT FOR ABC Name *
MM/DD
06:01 P.M.
YYYY
−−−−TOTAL SYSTEM MESSAGE STORAGE−−−−−−
PHYSICAL TOTAL
STORAGE
%
CAPACITY USED
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
1
2
3
4
5
6
TOTAL
1985
1985
2777
0
0
0
6747
NAMES
NON
REDN REDN
GREETINGS
NON
REDN
REDN
USER MSGS
NON
REDN
REDN
NET NAMES
NON
REDN REDN
32.7%
32.3%
48.2%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
1.0%
0.9%
1.4%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
1.3%
1.6%
2.1%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
1.7%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
30.0%
29.4%
42.5%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.3%
0.2%
0.4%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
39.0%
0.0% 1.1%
0.0%
1.7%
0.7%
35.0%
0.0%
0.3%
TOTAL EQUIPPED MINUTES
TOTAL PURCHASED MINUTES: 3600
73.1% USED
STORAGE CAPACITY BASED ON MESSAGE TYPE:
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
TOTAL
PB60019−01
1
2
3
4
5
6
VOICE MSGS
NON
REDN
REDN
−−−−−−−−−−−
0.0%
24.1%
0.0%
24.3%
1.0%
34.6%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
FAX MSGS
NON
REDN
−−−−−−−−−−−
0.0%
0.0%
0.7%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
5.9%
5.0%
7.8%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.4%
0.2%
6.4%
28.5%
REDN
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-28
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Total System Message Storage
The Disk Usage report displays the storage capacity, total percentage of storage used, and percentages of
storage for names, greetings, and user messages for the disk.
STORAGE CAPACITY
Number of minutes of storage possible on the drive installed.
TOTAL % USED
Total percentage of the disk storage capacity used.
NAMES
Non-redundant and
Redundant
Percentage of the storage capacity used for non-redundant and redundant
local names storage.
GREETINGS
Non-redundant and
Redundant
Percentage of the storage capacity used for non-redundant and redundant
greetings storage.
USER MESSAGES
Non-redundant and
Redundant
Percentage of the storage capacity used for non-redundant and redundant
user messages storage.
NET NAMES
Non-redundant and
Redundant
Percentage of the storage capacity used for non-redundant and redundant
network names storage.
The last row in the Total System Message Storage section lists the total applicable to the combined group
of message server drives.
Total of Minutes
TOTAL EQUIPPED
MINUTES
Maximum minutes of message storage that would be available if no voice
messages (names, greetings, or messages) are stored. This number is
derived from the total of all voice hours on non-COD drives and equipped
hours on the COD drives.
TOTAL PURCHASED
MINUTES
The number of minutes purchased. This number is not the same as the total
equipped minutes if the message server has not been restarted since new
COD hours were purchased, or more hours have been purchased than the
message server is physically equipped to support.
Storage Capacity Based on Message Type
The Disk Usage report displays the storage capacity based on message type for voice messages and fax
messages for every disk.
Octel 200/300
VOICE MESSAGES
Non-redundant and
Redundant
Percentage of the storage capacity used for non-redundant and redundant
storage of voice messages.
FAX MESSAGES
Non-redundant and
Redundant
Percentage of the storage capacity used for non-redundant and redundant
storage of fax messages.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5.8
5-29
PORT STATISTICS
'
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE STATISTICS.
USER CALLING STATISTICS.
DISK USAGE.
PORT STATISTICS.
MAILBOX USAGE.
USER STATUS DETAIL.
INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS.
This report contains information for each port configured in the SLOTS Table. There are three sections of
this report:
-
Individual Port Statistics
-
Port Group Statistics
-
All Port Statistics
.
Port statistics are included for fax calls.
An example of a Port Statistics report follows. The report refers to the fax channels as FAX ports.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-30
Installation and Maintenance Volume
* PORT USAGE REPORT FOR (SYSTEM NAME) *
FROM:
MM/DD
HH:MM A.M. YYYY
TO:
MM/DD
HH:MM P.M. YYYY
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
*
INDIVIDUAL PORT STATISTICS
*
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
PORT
PORT
INCOMING
OUTGOING
SECONDS
NUMBER TYPE
COS
CALLS/FAX CALLS/FAX
BUSY
−−−−−− −−−−
−−−−
−−−−−−−−
−−−−−−−−
−−−−−−−
1
VOC
254
468
0
1242
2
VOC
254
1082
0
2571
.
16
VOC
254
1473
129
3972
17
FAX
150
0
0
0
SELFTEST
FAILED
−−−−−−−−
0
0
0
0
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
*
PORT GROUP STATISTICS
*
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
COS: 254
VOICE PORTS:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
FAX PORTS:
NUMBER OF INCOMING CALLS:
NUMBER OF OUTGOING CALLS:
0
NUMBER OF INCOMING FAXES:
0
NUMBER OF OUTGOING FAXES:
0
NUMBER OF PORTS SIMULTANEOUSLY BUSY:
1 PORT FOR
10 SECONDS
COS: 150
VOICE PORTS:
FAX PORTS
16 17 18 19
NUMBER OF INCOMING CALLS:
NUMBER OF OUTGOING CALLS:
NUMBER OF INCOMING FAXES:
NUMBER OF OUTGOING FAXES:
0
0
0
0
NUMBER OF PORTS SIMULTANEOUSLY BUSY:
1 PORT FOR
0 SECONDS
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
*
ALL PORT STATISTICS
*
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
TOTAL NUMBER OF INCOMING CALLS:
0
TOTAL NUMBER OF OUTGOING CALLS:
0
TOTAL NUMBER OF INCOMING FAXES:
0
TOTAL NUMBER OF OUTGOING FAXES:
0
SECONDS TOO MANY PORTS BUSY TO MAKE OUTCALLS:
SECONDS TOO MANY PORTS BUSY TO MAKE FAX DELIVERY:
3
0
NUMBER OF VOICE PORTS SIMULTANEOUSLY BUSY:
1 PORT FOR
23221 SECONDS
2 PORTS FOR
12823 SECONDS
NUMBER OF FAX PORTS SIMULTANEOUSLY BUSY:
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5-31
Individual Port Statistics
Information in this section includes the number of incoming and outgoing calls for each voice port and
fax channel, the number of seconds each port was busy, and the number of seconds each port was busy
because it failed selftest.
PORT NUMBER
The number associated with each port in the SLOTS Table.
PORT TYPE
Identifies whether the port is a voice port (VOC) or a fax channel (FAX).
COS
The Class of Service assigned to each port.
INCOMING CALLS/ FAXES
The number of incoming calls to each port for the period of time shown in
the report header. The number of incoming calls on a VOC port includes
both voice and fax calls received.
The number of incoming calls on a FAX port is the number of fax messages
received on that fax channel.
OUTGOING CALLS/ FAXES The number of outgoing calls made on each port. Includes calls initiated by
an OctelAccess application, on-site and off-site message waiting, network
messages sent, alarm calls, test network and fax delivery calls.
The number of outgoing calls on a FAX port is the number of faxes
successfully printed on that fax channel.
NUMBER OF SECONDS
BUSY
Number of seconds the VOC port was not idle. The number of seconds fax
channel corresponding to the FAX port was allocated.
SELFTEST FAILED
The number of seconds the VOC port was out of service because selftest
failed. Selftest fails when an error occurs during diagnostics causing the
port to be taken out of service.
Port Group Statistics
Information in this section is grouped by COS. For each COS used in the SLOTS Table, there is a listing
of each port, by number, included in that COS, as well as a total of the number of incoming and outgoing
calls. Below that, there is an indication of how many ports are simultaneously busy for the listed number
of seconds.
PB60019−01
COS
The Class of Service of the port group.
VOICE PORTS
FAX PORTS
The number associated with each port extension having this COS in the
SLOTS Table.
NUMBER OF INCOMING
CALLS
The total number of calls to all VOC ports using this COS. Includes both
voice and fax calls received.
NUMBER OF OUTGOING
CALLS
The total number of calls from all VOC ports using this COS. Includes
OctelAccess applications, on-site and off-site message waiting, network
messages sent, alarm calls, test network calls, and fax delivery calls.
NUMBER OF INCOMING
FAXES
The total number of fax messages received to all FAX ports using this COS.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-32
Installation and Maintenance Volume
NUMBER OF OUTGOING
FAXES
The total number of faxes successfully printed from all FAX ports using
this COS. Includes fax delivery for fax messages and fax-on-demand
requests.
NUMBER OF PORTS
SIMULTANEOUSLY BUSY
The number of ports using this COS that are busy at the same time and the
total number of seconds during the reporting period for which that number
of ports were busy.
All Port Statistics
Information in this section includes the total number of incoming and outgoing calls for the message
server, the number of seconds “n” ports were simultaneously busy, the number of seconds message
waiting could not call because too many ports were busy, and the number of seconds a fax call could not
be made because too many fax channels were busy.
TOTAL NUMBER OF
INCOMING CALLS
The total number of all incoming calls to the message server for the period
of time shown in the header of the report.
TOTAL NUMBER OF
OUTGOING CALLS
The total number of all outgoing calls from the message server for the
period of time shown in the report header. This includes OctelAccess
applications, on-site and off-site message waiting, network messages sent,
alarm calls, test network calls, and fax delivery calls.
TOTAL NUMBER OF
INCOMING FAXES
The total number of all faxes received for the period of time shown in the
header of the report.
TOTAL NUMBER OF
OUTGOING FAXES
The total number of all faxes printed for fax mail, fax overflow delivery
and fax-on-demand for the period of time shown in the header of the report.
SECONDS TOO MANY
PORTS BUSY TO MAKE
OUTCALLS
The number of seconds that no outcall was placed because there were too
many busy ports in the group of ports defined to allow outcall. Refer to the
Configuration volume, Slots Table chapter, for a definition of “too busy.”
SECONDS TOO MANY
PORTS BUSY TO MAKE
FAX DELIVERY
Total number of seconds a FAX port was not available for fax delivery
outcall.
NUMBER OF VOICE PORTS The number of VOC ports that are busy at the same time and the total
SIMULTANEOUSLY BUSY
number of seconds during the reporting period for which that number of
VOC ports were busy (e.g. one port was busy for “x” seconds, 36 ports
were busy for “y” seconds, etc.).
NUMBER OF FAX PORTS
SIMULTANEOUSLY BUSY
The number of FAX ports that are busy at the same time and the total
number of seconds during the reporting period for which that number of
FAX ports were busy.
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
To retain accuracy of the Port Statistics report, it is recommended
the report be listed and cleared before changing a port’s COS in the
UPDATE program, or changing the number of ports in System
Parameter 4 — PORTS USED. The System Performance and Port
Statistics reports are both cleared with the CLEAR REPORT
command. Therefore, also list and clear the System Performance
report when listing and clearing the Port Statistics report.
PB60019−01
Reports
5.9
5-33
MAILBOX USAGE
'
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE STATISTICS.
USER CALLING STATISTICS.
DISK USAGE.
PORT STATISTICS.
MAILBOX USAGE.
USER STATUS DETAIL.
INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS.
The Mailbox Usage report contains information detailing individual mailbox usage. The report shows the
amount of time a port was used for each mailbox in the USER Table. The extension associated with each
mailbox is also listed. The usage time for each mailbox is measured in two ways: Logon Time and
Access Time.
-
-
Logon Time. Logon time is the amount of time a person is logged onto their mailbox. The
accumulated time is added to that mailbox’s logon time when the person exits their mailbox (by
entering 9 9 or hanging up).
Access Time. Access time is the amount of time a caller listens to a greeting and/or leaves a
message. The accumulated time is added to that mailbox’s access time after the greeting plays or a
message is left.
This is an example of a Mailbox Usage report:
* MAILBOX USAGE SUMMARY *
MM/DD
HH:MM P.M.
YYYY
MAILBOX
EXTENSION
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
468
469
470
471
472
474
475
Page 1
LOGON
TIME (MIN)
ACCESS
TIME (MIN)
22
24
4
14
11
0
10
6
2
6
0
12
9
0
2
3
In some applications, it may be necessary to only collect timing information for certain ports. For
example — the amount of time a person is logged onto a mailbox over a WATS line should be charged
for, but the time logged on locally should not.
To provide this capability, COS Attribute 55 — DO NOT COLLECT MAILBOX TIMING
INFORMATION FOR THIS PORT, can be assigned to specific ports. Timing information is not collected
for calls made to ports with this attribute in their COS. (Attribute 55 has no effect if assigned to a mailbox.)
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-34
Installation and Maintenance Volume
5.10 USER STATUS DETAIL
'
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE STATISTICS.
USER CALLING STATISTICS.
DISK USAGE.
PORT STATISTICS.
MAILBOX USAGE.
USER STATUS DETAIL.
INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS.
This report provides current status information on mailbox access and the time durations associated with
individual mailbox usage.
The following information is provided for each mailbox.
-
Mailbox Number
-
Name Recorded (Y/N)
-
Greeting ON (Y/N or EA for extended absence greeting ON)
-
Greeting Length (mmm:ss)
-
Last Logon (mm/dd)
-
Oldest Message (mm/dd hh:mm)
-
Newest Message (mm/dd hh:mm)
-
Total Current Messages (up to 135)
-
Total Message Duration (mmm:ss)
An example of the User Status Detail report follows.
*USER STATUS DETAIL REPORT*
MM/DD
Octel 200/300
HH:MM P.M.
YYYY
Page 1
NAME <GREETING>
MAILBOX REC? ON? LENGTH
LAST
LOG−ON
549
550
551
552
599
6/26
6/03
6/16
6/12
6/06
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
EA
Y
Y
0:07
1:02
0:33
0:18
0:13
10:03
13:11
19:19
10:59
9:03
<−−−−−−−−−−−MESSAGES−−−−−−−−−−>
OLDEST
NEWEST
TOTAL
6/04 11:18
5/26 13:56
6/09 16:39
6/12 9:19
−−−
6/26 10:03
6/13 12:08
6/16 16:39
6/18 10:49
−−−
8
3
4
3
0
DUR.
1:23
3:05
2:46
5:23
0:00
.
The User Status Detail report uses the same tables as the User Message Statistics and User Calling
Statistics reports. When one of these reports is cleared, the tables are cleared for all three reports.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Reports
5-35
5.11 INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS
'
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE STATISTICS.
USER CALLING STATISTICS.
DISK USAGE.
PORT STATISTICS.
MAILBOX USAGE.
USER STATUS DETAIL.
INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS.
The Integration Calling Statistics Report lists information about the type of non-integrated or integrated
calls a mailbox received, as well as the number of calls to the mailbox that are abandoned.
* INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS *
MM/DD
MAILBOX
HH:MM P.M.
YYYY
Page 1
<−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−INCOMING CALLS−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−>
<−−NON-INTEGRATED−−>
<−−−INTEGRATED−−−> CALLS DATE
TOTAL
ANSWD
NOANS
BUSY
GREET
NOANS
BUSY ALL
ABAND CLEAR
Incoming Calls
The Integration Calling Statistics report provides the following information for calls directed to the listed
mailbox. In the report, the Total and the Answered fields follow the Mailbox field, and the Calls
Abandoned and the Date Cleared fields follow the Non−Integrated and the Integrated fields.
TOTAL
Total number of calls placed by the Octel 200/300 to the mailbox.
ANSWD
Number of calls answered or transferred to ringing.
CALLS ABAND
Number of calls disconnected after reaching an unavailable extension
without leaving a message, calling another extension or calling the
operator.
DATE CLEAR
The date the statistics were last cleared.
Non-Integrated Fields
PB60019−01
NO ANSWD
Number of supervised transfers from the message server that are not
answered.
BUSY
Number of supervised transfers from the message server that encounter a
busy signal.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-36
Installation and Maintenance Volume
GREET
Number of calls placed to the mailbox when
-
Greeting is ON (and the mailbox COS does not have Attribute 6).
-
Extension is unavailable or vacant.
-
Call is placed to an extension which forwards back to a CX/MX mode
port.
-
DID calls which were intercepted immediately.
-
Calls to Personal Assistance resulting in RNA or busy.
Integrated Fields
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
NO ANSWD
Number of calls not answered. Includes PBX integration calls that forward
on the ring-no-answer condition.
BUSY
Number of calls placed to a busy extension. Includes PBX integration calls
that forward on the busy condition.
ALL (FORWARD)
Number of integrated calls forwarded on the All Forward condition. This
also includes forwarded calls with no forward condition.
PB60019−01
Reports
5-37
5.12 SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS
'
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE STATISTICS.
USER CALLING STATISTICS.
DISK USAGE.
PORT STATISTICS.
MAILBOX USAGE.
USER STATUS DETAIL.
INTEGRATION CALLING STATISTICS.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS.
System Performance by COS report provides call and message statistics for ports/trunks by COS.
Example of a System Performance by COS report:
* SYSTEM PERFORMANCE BY COS FOR XXXXX
*
FROM: MM/DD HH:MM A.M.
YYYY
TO: MM/DD HH:MM P.M.
YYYY
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
PORT/TRUNK COS: XXX
CALLER’S INITIAL ACTION
DIALED EXTENSION OR DIGITS
6
INTEGRATION:
RNA FORWARD;
0
BUSY FORWARD;
0
ALL FORWARD:
0
DEFAULTED TO ASSISTANCE:
0
DIALED ”0” FOR ASSISTANCE:
0
PRESSED ”#” TO LOG−ON:
44
”*” TO MAKE A QUICK MESSAGE:
0
CALLER WAS A NETWORK UNIT:
0
CALLER WAS A DID/E&M UNIT:
0
OTHER:
0
TOTAL CALLS INTO SYSTEM:
52
CALLERS SUBSEQUENT ACTIONS
DIALED EXTENSION OR DIGITS:
10
DEFAULTED TO ASSISTANCE:
0
DIALED ”0” FOR ASSISTANCE:
1
LEFT A MESSAGE AT THE TONE:
0
PRESSED ”#” TO LOG−ON:
10
”*” TO MAKE A QUICK MESSAGE:
0
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-38
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Caller’s Initial Action
This section displays callers’ initial actions upon reaching the port/trunk COS specified.
DIALED EXTENSION OR
DIGITS
This can include
-
-
-
INTEGRATION
Octel 200/300
Number of times callers dialed a defined first digit from 1−8.
Number of times callers were sent directly to Next Mailbox without
dialing.
With Adaptive Integration, every time a call is forwarded to the
Octel 200/300.
Number of times callers dialed an account code.
Number of integrated calls that forwarded in.
RNA FORWARD
Number of calls placed that were not answered.
BUSY FORWARD
Number of calls placed to a busy extension.
ALL FORWARD
Number of calls placed to an All Forwarded condition.
DEFAULTED TO
ASSISTANCE
Number of times callers did nothing (e.g., rotary dial) and were transferred
to attendant or intercept position.
DIALED 0 FOR
ASSISTANCE
Number of times callers pressed
intercept position.
LEFT A MESSAGE
AT THE TONE
Number of times callers left a message as an initial action. This also
includes instances where Next Mailbox gives the caller a greeting and takes
a message without the caller entering any digits.
PRESSED #
TO LOG ON
Number of times callers pressed
and unsuccessful logons).
* TO MAKE A
QUICK MESSAGE
Number of times callers pressed * to make a Quick Message.
CALLER WAS A
NETWORK UNIT
Number of times caller identified itself as a Network system. That is, the
call was from another network location.
CALLER WAS A
DID/E&M UNIT
Number of times caller identified itself as a DID/E&M system. That is, the
call was intercepted by the Octel 200/300DID/E&M Interface.
S.4.1
0
#
and were transferred to attendant or
to enter a mailbox (includes successful
PB60019−01
Reports
OTHER
Miscellaneous category including
-
Caller dialed
-
Port called a CX port (extension forwarded to the Octel 200/300).
-
Caller dialed invalid first digit (e.g.,
-
Caller disconnected (detected hang-up events or from DID Interface).
-
Caller has not taken initial action.
-
With Adaptive Integration
-
-
.
TOTAL CALLS
INTO SYSTEM
5-39
9
9
.
9
).
Direct call into the Octel 200/300 where caller hangs up or dials
9 9 .
Direct internal call into the Octel 200/300 where caller accesses
Quick Greeting Activation.
Numbers within the Other category may fluctuate as new calls
come in and as current callers make an initial action.
Total calls answered by the Octel 200/300.
.
If the System Performance report or traffic pegs were last cleared
while calls were in progress, this value may be larger than peg 1.
However, the value printed in the System Performance report always
reflects the correct value.
Subsequent Actions
After completing their initial action (i.e., the caller left a message at the tone), another action is taken.
Subsequent actions are described below.
DIALED EXTENSION OR
DIGITS
This can include
-
Number of times callers dialed a defined first digit from 1−8.
-
Number of times callers went to Next Mailbox.
-
Number of times callers dialed an extension or digit to stay in queue.
-
SENT TO
ASSISTANCE
This can include
-
-
-
PB60019−01
Number of times callers dialed extensions or digits to call out on the
network.
Number of times callers were transferred to attendant or intercept
position after dialing too many invalid extensions.
Number of callers that remain on the line for assistance, whether or not
a message was left, with Adaptive Integration, when System Parameter
77 — PBX PROVIDES MOMENTARY DISCONNECT, is set to YES.
Calls intercepted by DID or E&M Interface Modules which defaulted
to assistance, whether or not a message was left.
-
Number of network calls sent to assistance.
-
Autotransfer to assistance (includes Personal Assistant).
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
5-40
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Octel 200/300
DIALED 0 FOR
ASSISTANCE
Number of times callers pressed 0 and were transferred to the
attendant/intercept position or Personal Assistant.
LEFT A MESSAGE
AT THE TONE
Number of times callers left a message after busy/no answer/greeting.
PRESSED #
TO LOG ON
Number of times callers pressed
and unsuccessful logons).
PRESSED * TO MAKE A
QUICK MESSAGE
Number of times callers pressed * to make a Quick Message.
S.4.1
#
to enter a mailbox (includes successful
PB60019−01
6
MAINTENANCE COMMANDS
Chapter Contents
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
PB60019−01
Command Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
List Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Clear Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
Test Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
System Service Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
Miscellaneous Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10
Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
Mailbox Configuration Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
Message Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-21
Network Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-23
Port Configuration Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-30
Port Mapping Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-30
Floppy Disk Drive Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-31
Hard-Disk-Drive Diagnostics (DEX) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-32
Disk Information Status (L DMAP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-33
Line Interface Card Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-34
Update Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-36
Port Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-37
Alarm Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-39
System Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-42
System Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-42
System Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-43
List Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-43
Application Delays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-46
How Tones Are Recognized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-46
How To Modify Application Delays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-48
Modifiable Application-Delay Indexes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-50
Using UPDATE to Modify Application Delays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-57
Message Block and Message Purge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-59
Marking a Message Unplayable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-59
MPURGE Command Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-61
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6
MAINTENANCE COMMANDS
Figures
6-1
6-2
6-3
Alarm Test Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-41
Sequence Used by the Octel 200/300 To Screen Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-47
Ring/No Answer Tone-Timing Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-50
Tables
6-1
6-2
6-3
Octel 200/300
FINDMBOX Messages and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-27
Abbreviations for Channel/Port State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-37
Application Delays for Cadence Recognition, for Determining Tone On/Tone Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-56
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Maintenance Commands
Command
Type
Subject
Command
Information
List
Commands
Client Controlled
Message pool
L CCM
Displays the current message server utilization for
the Client Controlled Message pool (CCM). Used
for OctelAccess application development.
Client Error Log
L C
Used for OctelAccess troubleshooting. Lists the
errors caused by invalid client requests.
Drive Map
L DMAP
Provides disk information on the physical
characteristic of the disk drive.
Features
L F
Lists the features, the number of ports, mailboxes,
and storage hours the system is equipped with.
List Hardware Error
Table
L H
Lists the Hardware Error Table.
Message Status
L HE x
Lists the status of a message.
x = message number
Integration Board
L INT x y
Lists the current state of the integration board, the
diagnostic status, and the status of the links, and
the pegs. Not used for DPNSS integration.
x = slot number
y = unit number
Mailbox
Configuration
L M x
Lists the current configuration for a mailbox.
x = mailbox number
Mailbox
Configuration
L M x M
Lists information about messages for a specific
mailbox.
x = mailbox number
M = required extension
Network Mailbox
Status
L NET x
Displays message information for a network
location.
x = network location code
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Maintenance Commands
Command
Type
Subject
Command
Information
List
(continued)
Messages Pending
for Domain
Locations
L NET D [x]
Lists messages pending transfer to the domain in
general or specific domain locations. Messages
pending response to LAN queries are also listed.
x = is the domain location (optional)
Failures
L NF
Lists Protocol 2 or Protocol 4 failures.
Refer to the Networking volume — REMOTE
ANALOG NETWORKING chapter for details.
Traffic Peg Count
Table
L P
Lists the pegs.
Personal Distribution
List
L PDL
Lists the number of personal distribution list (PDL)
sectors currently used.
Port Configuration
L PO x
Displays information about a port.
x = port number
Report Types
L R
Prints a menu of the report types.
Report Number
L R x
Lists the report number specified without printing
the menu.
x = report number
L RT 1
List round trip time for message waiting.
Trace
L T
Trace for specific activity, selecting from the menu
shown.
Visual Mailboxt
L VM
Lists the total number of configured Visual
Mailbox users and the total number of purchased
Visual Mailbox licenses.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Maintenance Commands
Command
Type
Subject
Command
Information
Clear
Commands
Clear Hardware
Error Table
C H
Clears the Hardware Error Table.
Integration Board
C I x y
Clears the integration board pegs.
x = slot number
y = unit number
Network
C NF
Clears network failures.
Pegs
C P
Clears the pegs.
Reports
C R
Gives a menu for the type of report to clear.
Message Waiting
C RT 1
Clears the round−trip time for message waiting.
Digital Networking
CMD x PING y
For Digital Networking, performs the lowest-level
“echo” test from the LAN at the local end to the
destination cabinet.
x = slot number in which the LAN card is installed
y = IP address of device to which text Ethernet
packet is sent
LAN Status
T DNET
For Digital Networking, to get a quick indication of
the general “health” of the configuration and
hardware at the local and remote cabinets.
SNMP Manager
System
T SNMP
Tests the mechanism for an Octel 200/300 to
communicate to an SNMP manager system.
Alarm Test
TE A
Attempts to call number defined for alarm call.
System Forwarding
TE C 1 x y
or
CD x y z
Forwards all ports specified. Uses string from
System Parameter 45 — SYSTEM RELOAD
FORWARD STRING .
x = slot number
y = port number or first port in a range of ports
z = port number of the last port in a range of ports
Test
Commands
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Maintenance Commands
Command
Type
Subject
Command
Information
Test
Commands
(continued)
System Initialization
TE C 2 x y
or
CU x y z
Initializes and cancels forwarding for all ports
specified. Sends initialization string from System
Parameter 33 — PBX INITIALIZE CODE , then
cancels forward string from System Parameter 46
— SYSTEM RELOAD CANCEL-FORWARD STRING .
x = slot number
y = port number or first port in a range of ports
z = port number of the last port in a range of ports
Floppy Disk Drive
TE F 1
Isolates faults to floppy, disk drive or disk
controller.
Integration Card
TE INT x y
Tells the integration card to run its link selftest.
Used only for systems with integration cards.
x = slot number
y = unit number
LIC
TE L 1
Checks tone generation and detection circuitry.
TE L 2
Ring-through test. Use only when no traffic.
TE L 4 x
Test if loop current is present on a specific port.
x = port number
TE L 5 x
Tone reflection test on one port.
x = port number
Network Routes
TE NET x y
Tests network routes to a network location.
x = network location code (optional)
y = non-zero show digits entered
System Status
TE S
Checks voltages and temperatures.
Fax Application
Processor
TE X x y z
Fax loopback test. Verifies fax modems on Fax
Application Processor can send and receive fax
data and that the TDM bus connection is correct.
x = slot number
y and z = fax channels
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Maintenance Commands
Command
Type
Subject
Command
Information
System
Service Mode
Commands
System Forwarding
CD
Use the Courtesy Down command with modifiers
to remove the following from service.
CD x y z
or
TE C 1 x y
Port or Ports
Uses string from System Parameter 45 — SYSTEM
RELOAD FORWARD STRING .
x = slot number
y = port number or first port in a range of ports
z = port number of the last port in a range of ports
CD x y
Integration Unit
Takes the integration unit out of service.
x = slot number
y = unit number
CD x
LAN
For Digital Networking, removes the LAN card
from service.
x = LAN card slot number
CDFAX
Removes the fax channel from service.
CDGWL [f]
Removes the OctelAccess server link (gateway)
from service.
f =Forces the OctelAccess Server link to shutdown
immediately without waiting for in-progress
requests or sessions to finish. (optional)
CDINTG
Removes the integration unit from service.
CU x y z
or
TE C 2 x y
Use the Courtesy Down command with modifiers
to remove the following from service.
System Initialization
PB60019−01
Port or Ports
Uses string from System Parameter 45 — SYSTEM
RELOAD FORWARD STRING .
x = slot number
y = port number or first port in a range of ports
z = port number of the last port in a range of ports
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Maintenance Commands
Command
Type
Subject
Command
Information
CU x y
Integration Unit
Brings the integration unit into service.
x = slot number
y = unit number
CU x
LAN
For Digital Networking, returns the LAN card to
service.
x = slot number
CUFAX
Returns the fax channel to service.
CUGWL [f]
Returns the OctelAccess link (gateway) to service
CUINTG
Returns the integration unit from service.
Shutdown
SHUTDOWN
Puts message server in off−line mode, removing
ports, fax cards, and integration units from service,
and disables digital and analog networking. Does
not physically restart or reload the server or disable
the LAN. You must use the STARTUP command to
bring the server back online.
Startup
STARTUP
Brings message server back online, removing port
forwarding, enabling fax cards, integration units,
analog and digital network messaging activity.
APURGE x y z
Starts the message purge function if Automatic
Message Purge is not already in progress. Displays
the thresholds specified and asks for confirmation
before initiating the message purge function.
x = save threshold
y = new threshold
z = Net Name
System
Service Mode
Commands
(continued)
Miscellaneous Automatic Message
Commands
Purge
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Maintenance Commands
Command
Type
Subject
Command
Information
BAUD
Displays the current baud rate setting. The
available baud rates are 300, 600, 1200, 2400,
4800, 9600, 19200 and 38400.
Data Fields
BITTST x
Converts hardware error data fields into bit sets.
x = hexadecimal number.
Connect to card
or software
CONNECT x
Connect to card in specified slot.
CONNECT VCU
Connect to VCU software.
CONNECT LAN
Connect to LAN software.
Message Purge
CPURGE
Cancels message purge if it is in progress,
regardless of whether it was initiated automatically
or by the APURGE command. Asks for
confirmation before cancelling message purge.
Message Block
MBLOCK x y
Blocks a message from being played. It prevents a
mailbox holder from starting to play, or replay, the
message after it is blocked.
x = message header number
y = indicates that the message is to be blocked.
Message Purge
MPURGE x
Deletes the message from every mailbox it was
sent to except if it was forwarded or sent over the
network.
x = message header number
Digital Networking
DCSTAT [x]
For Digital Networking, this command displays the
status of the digital networking channels. You can
specify the status of all digital networking
channels, a specific channel, or a range.
Miscellaneous Baud Rate
Commands
(continued)
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Maintenance Commands
Command
Type
Subject
Command
Information
DEX x y
Reads all disk sectors.
x = disk number
y = region number
Disk Drive
DSKMAP
Displays the last known status of all drives as
recorded by the VCU software. You can run
DSKMAP from the hard or software disk.
Disk Drive
DSKTST
Tests the drive slot specified, updates the last
known status record of the VCU software, and
displays the status.
Names Directory
EXPORTNAMES
Creates and manually initiate the Names Directory
export file that includes all names directory
information. This file is automatically exported to
the OctelAccess server.
Mailbox Location
FINDMBOX
Searches for a mailbox in the local USER Table,
local Network Name Table, and in the Uniform
numbering Plan Domain. The command then prints
a status message of the results of each search.
Back up and Restore
FLOPPY
Backs up and restores greetings, names, scripted
and sequential messages, and personal distribution
list names. Also used to load system prompts.
OctelAccess
GWLSTAT
Review the current status of the OctelAccess server
link, to determine if; it is up or down; last time it
was initialized; number of open sessions; statistics
about the number of sessions, new calls pending
and number of gateways established.
Allowable
Commands
HELP
Displays the allowable commands for the password
level of operation currently logged in to.
System
Configuration
INSTA
Command to enter the system configuration
program INSTALL. This program consists of a
series of questions that define the system database.
Miscellaneous Hard Disk Drive
Commands
(continued)
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Maintenance Commands
Command
Type
Subject
Command
Information
ISTAT x y
Gives the current status of an integration unit.
x = slot number
y = unit number
LAN Status
LANG
Displays the languages installed. This command
lists the settings for a specific language. These
settings can be modified; however, some settings
require a special set of prompts. The settings that
can be modified are listed in this chapter.
Languages
LANSTAT
For Digital Networking, gives basic information
about the current status of the LAN, including
whether the LAN is UP or DOWN and the state of
the high-speed links.
LAN Channel Status
LCSTAT
For Digital Networking, displays the status of LAN
channels. The status of all LAN channels, a
specific LAN channel, or a range can be specified.
Call Detail Record,
Call Processing and
Moves, Adds,
Changes Trace
LOG x y
Collects detailed information about specific events
for these activities: Call Processing Trace, Call
Detail Record log, Moves, Adds and Changes log,
and Server Activity Trace log.
x = specific filter for data collected
y = the log to be traced
Internal Modem
MOD DISABLE
Blocks access to Octel 200/300 via internal
modem.
MOD ENABLE
Restores access to the Octel 200/300 via the
internal modem.
MON2
Used to monitor incoming call records over the
RS-232C link (port 2). To exit the monitor mode,
press Escape .
MON2 H
Show call record data in hexadecimal values as it is
sent by the PBX.
MWL RECALC
Examines each mailbox to determine whether its
message waiting lamp should be ON or OFF.
Miscellaneous Integration Unit
Commands
(continued)
Incoming Call
Records
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Maintenance Commands
Command
Type
Subject
Command
Information
MWL RELITE
Send commands to relight each message waiting
lamp that the Octel 200/300 has marked as ON.
MWOFF x
Turns OFF lamp message waiting.
x = mailbox number. The maximum number of
digits is eight. For ALL, enter A.
Names Directory
NAMESTAT
Prints status of the Dial-by-Name directory (Names
Directory). Also provides overall figures for
Dial-by-Name; that is, the number of local names
stored and the number of network names stored.
Password
PASS x y
Sets the password.
x = password level
y = new password.
Miscellaneous Message Waiting
Lamps
Commands
(continued)
There are three password levels. Each password
may be a maximum of eight alphanumeric
characters, 0−9 and A−Z. All alpha characters must
be in capital letters.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Patch
PAT x
Used to implement fixes to the message server
software using the patch command. Refer to this
chapter for detailed information. x = the following:
Status = status and info for all current patches
Apply x = apply a patch to specified target
Apply All = applies all patches not yet applied
Remove x = removes patch from specified target
Remove All = removes all patches from server
Tone and DTMF
PRT x
Monitors and prints the tone and DTMF events.
This is a real time command.
x = port number to monitor
Port Mapping Status
PRTMAP
Displays information about the allocation of system
port numbers to ports configured in each slot.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Maintenance Commands
Command
Type
Subject
Command
Information
PS x
Displays current state of the ports.
x = non-zero for continuous (optional)
Restart
RESTA
Restarts CPU. All active ports and the modem are
dropped. The maintenance level password must be
entered before restart begins.
Restart
RESTA 2
Restarts CPU. Reloads software from the hard disk.
All active ports and modem are dropped.
Miscellaneous Port Status
Commands
(continued)
Integrations
APIC or NPIC
PB60019−01
Integration trace information is logged to the
message server’s call-processing trace log file.
SDBUG xx 1 FF
yy
xx is the slot number and yy is either 7F to turn on
debug or 00 to turn off.
All other integrations SDBG xx yy zz
xx is the slot number, yy is the unit number, 11 is
the link number, and zz is either 7F to turn on
debug or 00 to turn off.
Network Time
TIME
Displays the current system date and time. Used
only at the @ prompt.
Integration Cards
UPINTG
Restarts integration cards and disrupts call
processing for approximately one to two minutes.
VCU
VCU
Connects to the VCU software and provides
detailed drive status, drive configuration, message
header information on installed hardware. From
this command you can enter the L DMAP
command to get more details.
Write Protect Drive
WPDISK
Write protects a disk drive to prevent any new
messages from being created on that drive.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Maintenance Commands
6.1
6-1
COMMAND SUMMARY
In this chapter, theOctelR 200/300 message server maintenance commands are divided into five
command types as listed below. Maintenance commands are entered from the @ prompt.
-
List commands
-
Clear commands
-
Test commands
-
System service mode commands
-
Miscellaneous commands
The basic command input is listed in BOLD letters, in the left column. The complete command name is in
bold in the right column. In some instances, a modifier and extension might be required to complete the
command string. You must press Enter following all command strings before the message server
executes the command.
The message server is ready to receive information when the @ prompt is displayed. For example, to list
the Hardware Error Table, at the @ prompt, enter
L H
Enter
List Commands
Use a LIST command to display maintenance tables, such as the Hardware Error Table or Traffic Peg
Count Table, features, and mailbox information. A space is always required between the L (for LIST)
and the letter following. At the @ prompt enter
L [name]
Enter
Command
Basic Definition
L CCM
LIST CCM
L C
LIST CLERR
Displays the current message server utilization for the Client Controlled
Message pool (CCM). Used for OctelAccess application development.
Used for OctelAccess troubleshooting. Lists the client error log that shows
errors that are caused by invalid client requests. The error log contains all
relevant information required to isolate the source of the error.
L F
LIST FEATURES
L H
LIST HARDWARE
L HE x
LIST HEADER
L INT x y
LIST INTEGRATION STATUS
Prints the features installed on the Octel 200/300. Lists the maximum
number of ports, drives, SCHEDULE Table entries, and mailboxes.
Lists the Hardware Error Table.
Lists the status of a message, where x is the message number.
Lists current state of the integration board, the diagnostic status, the status of
the links, and the pegs, where x is the slot number, and y is the unit number.
.
PB60019−01
This command is not used for DPNSS integration.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Command
Basic Definition
L M x
LIST MAILBOX
Lists the current configuration of the mailbox specified, where x is the
mailbox number.
L M x M
LIST MAILBOX MESSAGES
L NET x
LIST NETWORK MAILBOX
L NET D [x]
LIST NETWORK DOMAIN [LOCATION]
L NF
LIST NETWORK FAILURES
Lists information about messages for a specific mailbox, where x is the
mailbox number.
Lists messages pending in analog and digital domain network mailboxes
waiting to be sent to the specified network location, where x is the network
location code. Beginning with S3.0, the information listed with this
command includes the current network delivery schedule(s).
Lists messages pending transfer to the domain in general or specific domain
locations, where x is the the domain location (optional). Messages that are
pending response to LAN queries are also listed.
Lists the Network Failure Table, which contains Protocol 2, Protocol 4, and
Protocol 5, and digital-network errors. Table entries identify the date and
time and the system port on which each error occurred. Additional
information about each error type is reported in the DATA1 − DATA4
columns. Refer to the Networking volume, Remote Analog Networking and
Digital Networking chapters.
L P
LIST PEG
L PDL
LIST PERSONAL DISTRIBUTION LISTS
L PO x
LIST PORT
L R
LIST REPORT
Lists the Traffic Peg Count Table.
Lists the number of personal distribution list (PDL) sectors currently used.
Lists the current configuration status for the port number specified, where x
is the port number.
Prints a menu for the type of report to list, as follows:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
L R x
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
System Performance
Network Traffic
User Message Statistics
User Calling Statistics
Disk Usage
Port Statistics
Mailbox Usage
User Status Detail
Integration Calling Statistics
System Performance by COS
LIST REPORT NUMBER
Lists the report number specified without printing the menu, where x is the
report number.
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
Command
Basic Definition
L RT 1
LIST ROUND TRIP TIME
Lists the round trip time for message waiting.
For integration, this command lists the following, by link:
-
L T
PB60019−01
Number of mailbox holders assigned
Longest message waiting round trip time
Total number of ON commands in the trip listed
Total number of OFF commands in the trip listed
Current round-trip start-time
Number of ON commands
Number of OFF commands
LIST TRACE
Prints a menu for type of trace to list, as follows:
1=
2=
3=
4=
5=
6=
7=
L VM
6-3
All Activities
Mailbox Activity
Port Activity
Location Activity
Message Activity
Integration Activity
APlink Activity
LIST VISUAL MAILBOX USERS
Lists the total number of configured Visual Mailboxt users and the total
number of purchased Visual Mailbox licenses.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Clear Commands
Use the CLEAR command to clear maintenance tables and reset all data to zero. A space is always
required between the C (for CLEAR) and the letter following. At the @ prompt, enter
C [name]
Enter
Command
Basic Definition
C H
CLEAR HARDWARE
C I x y
CLEAR INTEGRATION
C P
CLEAR PEG
C NF
CLEAR NETWORK FAILURES
C R
CLEAR REPORT
Clears the Hardware Error Table. Also opens the alarm relay, and turns OFF the
alarm LED.
Clears the integration pegs, where x is the slot number and y is the unit number.
Clears the Traffic Peg Count Table and the System Performance report.
Clears the Network Failure Table, which contains Protocol 2, Protocol 4, Protocol
5, and digital-network errors.
Gives a menu as follows, for the type of report to clear.
1.
2.
3.
SYSTEM PERFORMANCE (IN TRAFFIC PEGS) AND PORT STATISTICS.
NETWORK TRAFFIC.
USER MESSAGE, USER CALLING AND MAILBOX USAGE.
SELECT REPORT TO BE CLEARED. (1 − 3, EMPTY LINE = EXIT).
C RT 1
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
CLEAR ROUND TRIP
Clears the round-trip time for message waiting.
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-5
Test Commands
The following commands test the status of the LAN connection, alarm callout, forwarding string,
initializing string, floppy disk, hard disk, line card, network location, and message server. At the @
prompt, : TEST or TE, followed by the name of the function to be tested. For example, to test the alarm,
at the @ prompt, enter
TE A
Enter
A space is always required between the TE (for TEST) and the following letter.
Command
Basic Definition
CMD x PING y
For Digital Networking, performs the lowest-level “echo” test from the LAN at
the local end to the destination server. This is the best tool to use to identify
whether there is end-to-end connectivity across the digital network between two
Octel message servers. It is especially useful to verify that IP addresses are
correctly configured. In the command, x represents the slot number in which
the LAN card is installed and y represents the IP address of the device where the
test Ethernet packet is sent.
TE A
TEST ALARM
TE C 1 x y
TEST CHANNEL 1
TE C 2 x y
TEST CHANNEL 2
TE F 1
TEST FLOPPY 1
TE L 1
TEST LINE 1
Tests the alarm call out feature. Places a call to the number specified in the
SYSTEM PARAMETER Table — System Parameter 31.
Use either the TE C 1 command or the CD command to forward ports. Refer to
the System Service Mode Commands, Courtesy Up/Courtesy Down, section. In
the command, x is the port number or first port in a range of ports (optional),
and y is the port number of the last port in a range of ports (optional).
Use either the TE C 2 command or the CU command to cancel forwarded
ports. Refer to the System Service Mode Commands, Courtesy Up/Courtesy
Down, section. In the command, x is the port number or first port in a range of
ports (optional), and y is the port number of the last port in a range of ports
(optional).
Reads each sector on the floppy disk and reports any errors detected. This test
does not verify data on the disk for accuracy.
Tests the tone reflection. Ports that fail are left in a test state.
.
TE L 2
PB60019−01
This command is not used for DPNSS integration.
TEST LINE 2
Tests ring-through capability of all the ports.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Command
Basic Definition
TE L 4 x
TEST LINE 4
Tests to see whether loop current is present on a specific port, where x is the
port number. The port number must be entered in decimals.
.
TE L 5 x
TEST LINE 5
TE NET x y
TEST NETWORK
Tests tone reflection on one port, where x is the port number.
Tests network routes to a network location, where x is the network location code
(optional), and y is the non-zero show digits entered. Tests all locations if no
network location is specified.
TE S
TEST STATUS
TE INT x y
TEST INTEGRATION
Tests the temperatures and voltages for the Octel 200/300.
Tells the integration card to run a link self-test, where x is the slot number, and
y is the unit number. Used only for message servers with integration cards.
.
Octel 200/300
This command is not used for DPNSS integration.
This command is not used for DPNSS integration.
T DNET
TEST DNET
TE X x y z
TEST FAX
Use this command for Digital Networking to get a quick indication of the
general “health” of the configuration and hardware at the local and remote
cabinets.
Perform a loopback test on the specified fax channels to verify that the fax
modems can send and receive fax data and to test the TDM bus connection.
Fax-modem data is sent across the Octel 200/300’s TDM bus, using one of the
fax channels as a sender and the other as a receiver. When this transaction is
completed, the fax application processor reverses the direction of the data flow
and repeats the transaction. In this command, x is the slot number, y is the fax
channel, and z is the fax channel. Refer to the Feature Description volume, Fax
Mail Plus chapter.
T SNMP
TEST SNMP
DEX x y
Disk EXerciser
Tests all hard disk sectors for read errors, where x is the disk number, and y is
the region number.
S.4.1
An Octel 200/300 can inform an SNMP manager system when a qualified
hardware error is logged. This command tests the mechanism for an
Octel 200/300 to communicate to an SNMP manager system.
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-7
System Service Mode Commands
Courtesy Down and Courtesy Up
Use the Courtesy Down command, CD, to remove the following from service: ports, fax cards, Gateway,
integration units or the LAN. The CD command disables the functionality of the Gateway Link feature.
Use the Courtesy Up command, CU, to return them to service.
Caution!
When connected to the system through the internal
modem, DO NOT courtesy down and hot plug or reset
any Digital Trunk Interface Card (DTIC) that is
providing the primary clock sync source for the message
server. Doing so will interrupt and likely disconnect the
connection with the internal modem until a clock sync
source is reestablished to the server.
Shutdown and Startup
Use the Shutdown command before LAN Backup and Restore procedures to put the message server in an
off−line mode without physically restarting or reloading the server. Like Courtesy Down, Shutdown
removes ports, fax cards, and integration units from service, and disables digital and analog networking.
However, unlike Courtesy Down, Shutdown does not disable the LAN.
Use the Startup command after a LAN Backup or Restore to bring the message server back online,
removing port forwarding, enabling fax cards, integration units, and analog and digital network
messaging activity.
.
Shutdown is required before restoring prompts and system configuration files. We recommend that
you use Shutdown before all LAN Restore procedures to prevent callers and mailbox holders from
accessing the server during restore sessions. Such server activity could disrupt the restore
procedure. For LAN Backup, if there is any possibility that voice messages being backed up could
change during the procedure, the server should be in Shutdown mode.
Courtesy Down Command
Command
Basic Definition
CD
COURTESY DOWN
Use the Courtesy Down command with modifiers to remove the following from
service:
-
Fax cards
CD x
-
Gateway
CD f
Integration units
LAN cards
CD x y
CD x
-
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Command
Basic Definition
CDFAX x y z — COURTESY DOWN FAX
Removes the fax channel from service.
CDGWL [f] — COURTESY DOWN GATEWAY LINK
Removes the OctelAccess server link (gateway) from service. All new requests
from a remote OctelAccess server are rejected, and all current requests in
progress are finished before communication with the OctelAccess server is
stopped. A progress message is displayed. This command is also used to
re-initialize the OctelAccess link to recover from serious unexpected error
conditions. This courtesy down state is maintained across a reload and restart.
Only the CUGWL command can clear this state.
f = enter f to force the OctelAccess Server link to shutdown immediately
without waiting for in-progress requests or sessions to finish. (optional)
CDINTG x y — COURTESY DOWN INTEGRATION UNIT
Removes the integration unit from service.
CD x or CD LAN — COURTESY DOWN LAN
Removes the LAN from service.
Use the CD x command, where x is the LAN card slot number.
CD x y z — COURTESY DOWN Port or Ports
When you use the CD command to specify ports, the Octel 200/300 forwards the
ports specified. If no port is specified, the Octel 200/300 tries to forward all ports.
If a port is successfully forwarded it is left in a forwarded (FWD) state. If a port
fails to complete the forward string it is left in the no-dial-tone (NDT) state. The
Octel 200/300 continues to try to forward all ports specified until successful or
until you press Escape. .
x = first port number
y = relative port or first port in a range or relative unit number
z = port number of last port in range of ports (optional)
. You can also use the command TE C 1 x y to forward all ports.
Courtesy Up Command
Command
Basic Definition
CU
COURTESY UP
Use the Courtesy Up command with modifiers to return the following to service:
-
Fax cards
Gateway
Integration units
LAN cards
CU x
CU
CU x y
CU x
CUFAX x — COURTESY UP FAX
Returns the fax channel to service.
CUGWL — COURTESY UP GATEWAY LINK
Returns the OctelAccess link (gateway) to service.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
Command
6-9
Basic Definition
CUINTG x y — COURTESY UP INTEGRATION UNIT
Returns the integration unit to service.
CU x or CU LAN — COURTESY UP LAN
Use the CU x command, where x is the LAN card slot number.
CU x y z — COURTESY UP Port or ports
When you use the CU command to specify ports, the Octel 200/300 tries to
initialize and cancels forwarding for the ports specified. If no port is specified,
the message server tries to initialize and cancels forwarding for all ports. If a port
successfully initializes and cancels forwarding, it goes to the idle (IDL) state. If a
port fails to complete either the initialization or cancel forward string, it is left in
the no-dial-tone (NDT) state.
.
You can also use the command TE C 2 x y to cancel forwarding of ports.
Shutdown and Startup Commands
The following system service mode commands are required before restoring prompts and system
configuration files, and are recommended for all LAN Restore procedures. Use these commands for
backup procedures when information being backed up could change as the procedure runs.
Command
Basic Definition
SHUTDOWN
Puts the message server in an off−line mode, removing ports, fax cards, and
integration units from service, and disabling digital and analog networking. Does
not physically restart or reload the system or disable the LAN.
Þ Important:
STARTUP
PB60019−01
Whenever the SHUTDOWN command is used to put the server in an
off−line mode, the STARTUP command must be used to bring the
server back online. Even when the server is rebooted after a
SHUTDOWN command, it is still necessary to issue the STARTUP
command to initialize fax cards and the LAN.
Brings the message server back online, removing port forwarding, enabling fax
cards, integration units, and analog and digital network messaging activity.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Miscellaneous Commands
Use these miscellaneous commands as described.
Octel 200/300
Command
Basic Definition
APURGE x y z
Starts the message purge function, if Automatic Message Purge is not already in
process. This command allows you to specify purge thresholds, with the same
restrictions enforced by UPDATE for the message server and CSTAT parameters.
Before initiating the message-purge function, this command displays the
thresholds specified and asks for confirmation. In this command, x is the save
threshold, y is the new threshold, and z is the Net Name.
BAUD
Displays the current baud rate setting of the Octel 200/300. To change the baud
rate, enter BAUD at the @ prompt, followed by the desired baud rate. Then
change the terminal’s baud rate, and press Enter when prompted. The
available baud rates are 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, and 38400.
BITTST x
Converts hardware errors data fields into bit sets, where x is the hexadecimal
number. Refer to the System Errors and Traffic Pegs chapter, Hardware Errors
section, in this volume.
CONNECT x
Connect to card in specified slot
CONNECT VCU
Connect to VCU software
CONNECT LAN
Connect to LAN software
CPURGE x y
Cancels message purge if it is in process, regardless of whether it was initiated
automatically or by the APURGE command. Asks for confirmation before
canceling message purge. x is the slot number, and y is the unit number.
DCSTAT [x]
For Digital Networking, this command displays the status of the digital
networking channels. You can specify the status of all digital networking
channels, a specific channel, or a range.
DEX x y
Reads all disk sectors. Tests each of the specified regions separately, starting with
the lowest-numbered region. Up to six drives are tested. Refer to the Hard Disk
Drive Diagnostics (DEX) section in this chapter. In this command, x is the disk
to test, and y is the region to test.
DSKMAP
Displays the last known status of all drives as recorded by the VCU. You can run
DSKMAP from the hard disk or from the software disk.
DSKTST
Tests the drive slot specified, updates the last known VCU status record and
displays the status. Run DSKTST from the hard disk or from the software disk.
EXPORTNAMES
Creates and manually initiate the Names Directory export file that includes all
names directory information. This file is automatically exported to the
OctelAccess server.
FLOPPY
Backs up and restores greetings, names, scripted and sequential messages, and
personal distribution list names. Also used to load message server prompts. Refer
to the Procedures chapter, Greeting Backup/Restore section, in this volume.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-11
Command
Basic Definition
FINDMBOX
For Digital Networking, to ensure that a mailbox number is unique in a domain,
searches for a mailbox in the local USER Table, local Network Name Table, and
in the uniform numbering plan domain. The command then prints a status
message of the results of each search.
GWLSTAT
Review the current status of the OctelAccess server link, to determine
-
Whether the OctelAccess server is up or down and if it is down, why is it
down
-
Last time the OctelAccess server was initialized
-
Number of open sessions
-
Statistics about the number of sessions, new calls pending and number of
gateways established.
HELP
Displays the allowable commands for the password level of operation currently
logged in to.
INSTA
INSTALL
Use this command to enter the message server configuration program, INSTALL.
This program consists of a series of questions that define the Octel 200/300
database. Answers to questions can be selected from a list, a default value, or
created by the installer.
After you have completed the initial INSTALL program, you must enter a
maintenance-level password before the INSTALL program begins.
ISTAT x y
Gives the current status of an integration unit, where x is the slot number, and y
is the unit number.
L DMAP
Provides information about each drive in the system, including the logical and
physical state of the disk, the vendor, the physical and logical size of the disk,
and the disk key (for example, non-COD or COD). This command can only be
issued after a connection has been made to the VCU software.
LANG
Displays the languages installed. When a language is selected, this command lists
the settings for the language. These settings can be modified; however, some
settings require a special set of prompts. The settings that can be modified are:
SPECIAL TRANSLATE
When Japanese and Korean language prompts are used, you can modify this
option to specify either Japanese or Korean. This is required, so that various
counting and grammar phrases are spoken correctly.
CLOCK FORMAT
This option is modified to specify whether the message server is configured for
12-hour, or 24-hour clock, or whether the change from a.m. to p.m. occurs at 1:00
for the 12-hour clock mode.
SPEAK DATE BEFORE TIME
Modify this option to YES to cause the server to speak the date before speaking
the time. For example, “April fifth at 5:00 p.m..”
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-12
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Command
Basic Definition
LANG
(continued)
SPEAK DAY BEFORE MONTH
Modify this option to YES to cause the server to speak the day before speaking
the month. For example, “Fifth of April.”
SPEAK NAME BEFORE “ONE MESSAGE WAITING” PHRASE
Modify this option to YES to cause the server to speak the name of the message
recipient before the prompt “there is one new message for . . . ”
SPEAK NAME BEFORE “MULTI MESSAGE WAITING” PHRASE
Modify this option to YES to cause the server to speak the name of the message
recipient before the prompt “there are two new messages for . . . ”
SPEAK NAME BEFORE “CALL FOR” PHRASE
Modify this option to YES to cause the server to speak the name of the message
recipient before an incoming call is announced.
SPEAK YEAR AS A NUMBER
Modify this option to YES to cause the server to speak the year as a number. For
example, 1997 is spoken as “One thousand, nine hundred, ninety seven.”
S3.0, this option has been removed.
SPEAK “THOUSAND” WHEN YEAR IS 1XXX
Modify this option to YES causes the server to speak the year without the
first-digit quantity. For example, 1997 is spoken as “Thousand, nine hundred,
ninety seven.” S3.0, this option has been removed.
SPEAK SPECIAL PHRASE WHEN YEAR IS X100
Modify this option to YES if the last two digits for years ending in even hundreds
should not be spoken. For example, the year 2100 is spoken as “Two thousand,
one hundred.” (S3.0, this option has been removed.)
Octel 200/300
LANSTAT
Gives basic information about the current status of the LAN, including whether
the LAN is UP or DOWN, and the state of the high-speed links.
LOG x y
Collects information about specific events for Call Processing Trace (CPT)
activities, Call Detail Record (CDR) log activities, Moves, Adds and Changes
(MAC) log activities and Server Activity Trace (SAT) log activities. This
command displays the collected data according to specific filters that can limit
the time interval and the type of log defined. In this command, x is the specific
filter for data collected in the logs, and y is the log to be traced. For details, refer
to the Log Commands chapter in this volume.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-13
Command
Basic Definition
MBLOCK
MBLOCK msg number <Y|N>
Mark or unmark an existing message as being unplayable, system-wide. The
message is not deleted from the system or any mailboxes as a result of issuing
this command. If a message is marked as unplayable, when an attempt is made to
play the message, the server responds with the announcement: This message has
been marked unplayable by the System Administrator. Please erase.
“msg number” is the hexidecimal message identifier for the message. The
message identifier can be determined from the Call Processing Trace when the
message is recorded or played or by listing the messages for a mailbox that
contains the message.
Y marks the message as unplayable
N marks an unplayable message as being playable again
MPURG
MPURG msg number <mailbox number>
Removes a message from all mailboxes in the server, or if a mailbox number is
provided in the command, removes the message from that mailbox only.
“msg number” is the hexidecimal message identifier for the message. The
message identifier can be determined from the Call Processing Trace when the
message is recorded or played or by listing the messages for a mailbox that
contains the message.
mailbox number if specified, the digits for the mailbox the message is to be
deleted from.
PB60019−01
MOD EM D
MODEM DISABLE
Use this command to block access to the Octel 200/300 through the internal
modem. When the modem is disabled, if a logon is attempted by pressing
# # # 5 , a caller receives the error message “That command is not
allowed.”
MOD EM E
MODEM ENABLE
Restores access to the Octel 200/300 through the internal modem.
MON2
MONITOR TERMINAL #2
MON2 H
Displays call record data in hexadecimal format as it is sent by the PBX.
MWL RECALC
Use this command in certain integrations where the PBX lights lamps through a
computer (for example, AT&T System 85), when the computer has been out of
service. Examines each mailbox to determine whether its message-waiting lamp
should be turned ON or OFF.
MWOFF x
Turns OFF lamp message waiting that the message server link turned ON. This
does not turn off the HASMSG flag that marks the message as newly received. In
this command, x is the mailbox number (up to eight digits). For All, enter A.
MWL RELITE
This command is used in certain integrations, when the PBX has been restarted.
Use this command to turns ON all message-waiting lamps that were ON before
the PBX was restarted. The server checks the HASMSG flag. If it is still set, the
lamp is relit.
Monitors incoming call records over the RS-232C link (port 2).
. To exit the monitor mode, pressEscape .
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-14
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Command
Basic Definition
NAMESTAT
Prints the status of the Dial-by-Name directory (Names Directory). Also provides
overall figures for Dial-by-Name; that is, the number of local names stored and
the number of network names stored.
PASS x y
PASSWORD
There are three password levels. Each password can be a maximum of eight
alphanumeric characters, 0−9 and A−Z. Refer to the Configuration volume,
Understanding Configuration, Security Protection Procedures and Guidelines.
In this command, x is the password level, and y is the new password.
Default passwords are created by the manufacturer. These passwords should be
changed immediately. The following describes the three password levels:
MAINTENANCE
This level allows full access to message server diagnostics, error information, and
the INSTALL and UPDATE programs. A default password, MAINT, is set by the
manufacturer.
ADMINISTRATIVE
This level allows entrance to the UPDATE program. It also allows you to use the
LIST and CLEAR commands for the Hardware Error Table, Traffic Peg Count
Table, and all reports. A default password, ADMIN, is set by the manufacturer.
REPORT
This level allows you to use the LIST and CLEAR commands for the Hardware
Error Table, Traffic Peg Count Table, and all reports, and the DEV command for
DID/E&M reports. A default password, REPORT, is set by the manufacturer.
Passwords can be set for each level, as follows:
Level
Set or Change Password
Maintenance
Maintenance, Administration, Report
Administrative
Administration, Report
Report
Report
To set or change the password, at the @ prompt, enter one of the following
commands, followed by the password:
PASS A (for administrative)
PASS
M (for maintenance)
PASS
R (for report)
The message server requests a password when a terminal is connected to the
message server, when an already connected terminal is turned ON, or when the
modem is accessed. The password entered at that time determines the level of
access to the message server. When a task is complete, you should disconnect the
terminal from the modem or turn it OFF. This ensures that the appropriate access
level is available for the next session.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
Command
Basic Definition
PAT [X]
PATCH [X]
6-15
You can implement fixes to the message server software using the PATCH
command. System Parameter 298 — ENABLE PATCHING AT MAINTENANCE
LEVEL must be set to YES to use this command.
Encrypted patch files can be transferred from a Web site to the message server
using the Kermit file transfer protocol. Refer to the Using Kermit section below.
There are two naming conventions for patch files:
PATsrrr.nnn
For system software patches
PXcccrrr.nnn
For VCU, LAN, and line card patches
The letters in bold face are substituted as follows:
s
ccc
S for CPU module patches
Identifies the card module for the patch, as follows:
VCU
VCC
LAN
LNC
PCA
DLC
DPN
E1
ISD
FAX
ILC
MIC
PCN
R96
SIC
LC4
LC8
TLC
IL4
DAC
VCU Module
VCU software
LAN Module
LAN software
APIC Line Card
DLC16 Line Card
DTIC DPNSS Line Card
DTIC Ericsson Line Card
DTIC Euro−ISDN Line Card
4- and 8-port FAX Card
ILIC12 12−Port Line Card
Mitel Line/Integration Card
NPIC Line/Integration Card
RIC (9006I) Line Integration Card
SIC8 Integration Card
4-Port Analog Line Card
8-Port Analog Line Card
8-Port Telemarketing Line Card
4-Port International Line Card
4-Port Direct Access Line Card
rrr
Identifies the release code for the particular card or module.
Note: This code varies with each card or module. The relevant
release codes are in the Patch Log for the release.
nnn
Identifies the patch number for the particular card or module.
Examples:
PXDLC412.008
DLC16 patch number 8 for release 4.12 of
DLC16 firmware.
CPU Module patch number 53 for release S.4.1.0.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-16
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Command
Basic Definition
The PATCH [X] command can be used as follows:
-
-
-
-
-
PATCH STATUS. Shows the status of all patches currently applied on the
Octel 200/300, the patch number, the date the patch was applied, and the
targets. If a patch is a special patch, sp* follows the patch number.
This information is retained through all restarts. Following a reboot, patches
that were applied to memory-only are removed from the status database.
After the patch status is displayed, a listing of all patches that are on the
message server hard disk, but not yet applied, are listed.
PATCH APPLY xxx <card>[MEMORY|DISK|ALL]. Applies a patch
to the specified target. If no target is specified, the system requests one.
When ALL is specified, the specified patch is applied to both memory and
disk. If the command string does not contain reference to either MEMORY or
DISK, ALL is the default.
PATCH APPLY ALL. Applies all patches not yet applied. When used, all
unapplied patches for all cards are applied. You are not given the option to
apply to memory or disk, the patch is automatically applied to both.
PATCH REMOVE xxx <card> [MEMORY|DISK|ALL]. Removes a
patch from a specified target. The patch code/data is replaced with the
pre−patch code data specified in the patch file. If no target is specified, the
system requests one. If ALL is specified, the patches are removed from both
memory and disk. If the command PAT REM ALL is used, all patches on the
system are removed from all cards.
PATCH REMOVE ALL. Removes all patches applied to the server. The
patch code/data is replaced with the pre−patch code/data specified in each
patch file. You are not given the option to remove from memory or disk, the
patches are automatically removed from both.
Using Kermit
.
System Parameter 298 must be configured before you can access Kermit.
To use the KERMIT utility to download patches from your default upload
directory, where the patches are saved, to the message server:
1.
At the Octel 200/300 server @ prompt, enter KER.
2.
Enter R to receive the patches.
3.
From your communication tool, find the Send File Using Kermit
folder. Click the folder. Select the patch files to download. Click OK
When the patch download is complete, #N3 is displayed and eventually timeouts
to the Kermit> prompt.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1.
Enter QUIT to return to the @ prompt.
2.
From the @ prompt enter the appropriate PATCH Add command to load the
patches to the message server.
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
Command
Basic Definition
PRT x
PRINT TONE
6-17
Monitors and prints DTMF tones entered by the caller, the DTMF tones sent by
the Octel 200/300 port, and the call-progress tones from the PBX to the terminal.
This is a real-time command, and it can be initiated on only one port at a time.
The information is not stored.
In this command, x is the port to monitor. To exit the monitor mode, press
Escape .
The following are the types of messages that can display with the PRT command:
ANSWER
The Octel 200/300 detected that the called party answered the telephone.
NO ANSWER
The Octel 200/300 determined that the called party did not answer within the
specified time period.
SLOW BUSY
Reorder tone from the PBX or central office was detected.
FAST BUSY
Reorder tone from the PBX or central office was detected.
VACANT EXT.
Solid dial tone from the PBX or central office was detected.
FLASH
The Octel 200/300 performed a hook switch.
NO DIAL TONE
The Octel 200/300 did not receive a PBX or central office dial tone.
EXPECT DIAL TONE
The Octel 200/300 is configured to expect a PBX or central office dial tone.
IN—x
x is the incoming digit entered by the caller.
DIAL—x
x is the digits being sent by the Octel 200/300.
T ON
The Octel 200/300 is reporting that a tone was received from the PBX or central
office. The number displayed is the actual time duration of the tone received.
T OFF
The Octel 200/300 is reporting that no tone (silence) was received from the PBX
or central office. The number displayed is the actual time duration that no tone
was present.
PB60019−01
PRTMAP
LIST PORT MAPPING
PS x
PORT STATUS
Lists allocation of message server port numbers to ports configured in each slot,
and displays the allocation of each port to integration unit.
Prints status of all ports, where x is non-zero for continuous (optional) printing.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-18
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Command
Basic Definition
RESTA
RESTART
Restarts the CPU. All active ports and the modem are dropped. With the RESTA
command, the software is not reloaded from the hard drive.
The maintenance-level password is requested before restart is initiated.
RESTA 2
RESTA 2
SDBG
TRACE INTEGRATION
Restarts the CPU, which reloads software from the hard disk. All active ports and
the modem are dropped.
Logs card integration trace information to the message server’s call-processing
trace log file.
To trace APIC and NPIC integrations, at the @ prompt enter
SDBG xx 1 FF yy
where xx is the slot number and yy is either 7F to turn on debug or 00 to turn off.
To trace other integrations, at the @ prompt enter
SDBG xx yy ll zz
where xx is the slot number, yy is the unit number 11 is the link number, and zz is
either 7F to turn on debug or 00 to turn off.
For example, SDBG 2 1 2 7F turns on debug for slot 2, unit 1, link 2.
TIME
TIME
Displays the current message server date and time.
.
To change the date and time, use UPDATE. At the . (dot) prompt, enter
MODIFY DATE. Refer to the Configuration volume, Update chapter
UPINTG
UPDATE INTEGRATION
VCU
Connects to the VCU software. Provides detailed drive status, drive
configuration, message header information and status on installed hardware. It
also provides error status reported by the VCU such as hard disk drive read-write
errors. In addition, from this command, you can enter the L DMAP command to
get more details about the disk drive.
WPDISK
WRITE PROTECT DISK DRIVE
Restarts the integration cards, which disrupts call processing for 1 or 2 minutes.
Use this command to write protect a disk, which prevents any new messages from
being created on that disk. If a message server with one or more drives in a
write-protected condition, a type 34 hardware error is logged.
Refer to DID/E&M Trunk Interface Installation and Maintenance manual, Diagnostic and
Administrative Commands section, for the commands used to communicate with the DID/E&M
Trunk Interface Modules. Refer to the Direct Access Card (DAC) Installation and Maintenance
Manual for information about direct access cards.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6.2
6-19
DIAGNOSTICS
The Octel 200/300 performs self-testing diagnostic programs that run continuously and do not interfere
with normal message server operation. These tests locate faults in the message server and reduce the need
for additional test equipment, circuit descriptions, and schematic diagrams. When errors are detected,
they are logged into the Hardware Error Table, by error code, with the fault and its location described.
In addition to the background diagnostics, you can run several diagnostic or test programs from a
terminal. These demand diagnostics are described in this section.
Poll the message server on a regular schedule by using a compatible modem, or poll it directly through a
terminal or teleprinter. Print the Hardware Error Table, Traffic Peg Count Table, System Performance
report, and User Statistics report. Study the reports for any abnormal indications, which allows for
scheduled maintenance or corrective action, rather than reactive emergency procedures.
.
The screen examples shown in this section might differ from the screens for your message server.
Fields could be added, deleted, or relocated, depending on the hardware and software release.
Mailbox Configuration Status
The mailbox configuration command LIST MAILBOX displays information about a specific mailbox. At
the @ prompt, enter
L M x
Enter
For this command, x is the mailbox number.
When listing a mailbox configured with multiple INFORMATION Tables, status information is displayed
only for the current time period.
The following example shows all possible mailbox configuration items that can be displayed, including
those items added by configuring optional feature packages.
@L M 1019
INFORMATION TABLE NUMBER: 10
CLASS OF SERVICE: 10
WITH ATTRIBUTES: 0 7 8 10 12 17 19 24 28 41 48 54 61 64 76 77 79 82 93 94
EXTENSION NUMBER:
MESSAGE WAITING: ON
OFFSITE OR PAGER #: NONE
GREETING: EXTENDED ABSENCE ON
THIS MAILBOX HAS A SECURITY CODE
PERSONAL ASSISTANCE MAILBOX: NONE
WILL USE PORT INTERCEPT
NUMBER OF MESSAGES: 1
NUMBER OF FUTURE DELIVERY MESSAGES: 0
AUTOMATIC FAX DELIVERY: OFF
AUTOMATIC FAX DELETION: OFF
PERSONAL FAX #: NONE
NAMESCAN: ON
USER #: 0014
GREETING MSG. 1294
NAME MSG. #: 1274
MBOX MSG. #: 0000
MSG. WAIT DELAY: 00
OFFSITE ATTEMPTS: 0
MAX ATTEMPTS: 0
LOG−ON LANGUAGE : NONE
SINGLE DIGIT MENU MAX DIGIT: 0
PREFIX DIGITS: NONE
FLAGS: IN−RNG
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-20
Installation and Maintenance Volume
.
The SINGLE DIGIT MENU MAX DIGIT: and PREFIX DIGITS: fields are for a Single
Digit Menu that was created through the USER Table. Entries in these fields override any entries
made in INFORMATION Table indexes 4 and 5, associated with the COS for the mailbox.
The FLAGS: field describes the state that the mailbox is currently in. The following definitions are for
the flags that might occur.
Screen Text
LOG-ON
SD-USE
IS-FUL
IN-RNG
HASMSG
MW−CAL
LMP-ON
LP-CAL
FX−DEL
LPRTRY
INTGIP
.
Definition
Mailbox holder currently logged on
Mailbox in use by SEND TASK
Mailbox full
Message waiting in range for this mailbox
Mailbox with a newly received message
Message waiting call in progress (or shortly will be)
Message waiting lamp turned ON
Calling to turn ON/OFF lamp
Fax delivery
Lamp-message-waiting command retry
Integration lamp command in progress
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Distribution lists are not mailboxes and cannot be listed with this command.
Use L M x M as an extension of the mailbox configuration status command to list all the messages and
their status for a specific mailbox. To list message information for the mailbox, you must add the letter M
to the command. At the @ prompt, enter
L M x M
Enter
For this command, x is the mailbox number.
An example of this extended command follows:
@L M 2000 M
STATUS
10 NEW
10 NEW
MSG CRE
50B6 003E
51AC 003E
FAX STATUS
00
08 FAX
STATUS
20 SAV
40 LSN
MSG CRE
501D 003E
13FA 0000
FAX STATUS
08 FAX
28 FAX PERSNL
STATUS
48 LSN
40 LSN
MSG CRE
5008 0002
5007 0000
FAX STATUS
08 FAX
00
STATUS
10 NEW
40 LSN
MSG CRE
5187 003E
3002 0000
FAX STATUS
00
18 FAX GROUP
The STATUS, MSG, and CRE columns display information about voice and fax messages. To determine
whether a message listed in these fields is a fax, refer to the FAX STATUS column of the corresponding
row. If a message is a fax, the fax status is described in the column.
For messages in a mailbox that uses the Serenade TUI, when a message is accessed (even if it is not
heard) the STATUS changes from NEW to LSN. An example is when a mailbox holder has two new
messages and presses 5 followed by 5 immediately, both messages are marked as LSN.
For messages in a mailbox that uses the Aria TUI, the status changes from NEW to LSN only after the
message has been listened to for at least three seconds. You can change the three−second parameter by
changing Application Delay 145.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-21
STATUS
The abbreviation or term listed in this column indicates whether a message is new
(NEW), listened to (LSN), saved (SAV), or tagged for future delivery (FUT).
MSG
The message header number that the Octel 200/300 associates with a specific
message is listed in this column. The message header number is a locator of where
voice or fax data is stored on the hard drive.
CRE
This column contains a hexadecimal user number for the mailbox that created the
message. To find out the mailbox number from the hexadecimal number, enter:
@L M x
where x is the hexadecimal number. The message server displays the mailbox
number.
In this column, in addition to the fax status code, the wording indicates whether a
message is a fax, or a fax marked for delivery to a personal or group fax machine.
If the message is not a fax, the fax status displays 00 only.
FAX STATUS
Message Status
The LIST HEADER command displays information about a message. At the @ prompt, enter:
L HE x
Enter
For this command, x is the message number listed when L M x M is entered.
@L HE 1179
CREATOR MAILBOX NUMBER: 1102
EXTENSION MESSAGE NUMBER: 0000
ACM REFERENCE NUMBER: 0000
TIME MM/DD/YY 07:11
USE COUNT: 00001
ORIGINAL MESSAGE TYPE: 1 (make)
DEPTH OF FORWARDING: 0
MSG TRANSMISSION TYPE: 1
CODE RATE: 24 KBS
PRIMARY
SECONDARY
VOICE BLOCKS:
00003
00000
VOICE BLOCK SIZE: 8KBYTES
8KBYTES
DISK NUMBER:
1
0
FLAGS:
ADDRESSES:
7364
CALLING PARTY DIGITS: 808
The following list contains possible descriptions for the ORIGINAL MESSAGE TYPES: field.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-22
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Number
Description
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
Made by message command
Forwarded message
Reply message
Greeting message
Name message
Broadcast message
Message left after call to busy extension
Message after no answer/vacant/Centrex
Quick message
Message left after greeting played or no extension defined
Message came from network
Return receipt message
Message has been forwarded on the network
Mailbox is full
Mailbox does not exist
Disk full
Routes failed too many times
Message undeliverable
Too many addresses for location
Generic mailbox failure (Octel networking)
Not used
Auto-forward of a broadcast message
Personal Distribution List name message
Send failure caused by mailbox being full
Record AP processor
Sent by AP processor
Network clone message
Broadcast message to collocated cabinet
Standard fax message
Message left after forward from busy extension
Message left after forward from no answer
Message left after all forward
Fax recorded for an application processor
Fax voice annotation
Message recorded by a desktop application
5000 User Interface mailbox message
5000 User Interface forced name record
5000 User Interface recorded announcement
OctelNet − name retrieval kick-off message
Message unreadable / disk error
Message rejected because destination mailbox does not support FAX
Message rejected because destination mailbox had extended absence
greeting ON with message blocking turned ON
Message accepted by the destination mailbox had extended absence
greeting ON with no message blocking
Message rejected because destination mailbox in a PDL/SDL had
extended absence greeting with message blocking turned on.
Message accepted because the destination mailbox in a PDL/SDL
had extended absence greeting with no message blocking
43
44
45
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-23
Network Diagnostics
Use the LIST NETWORK command to allow messages pending for analog locations to be listed. The
diagnostic commands available for networking depend on whether the networking is analog or digital.
Enter LIST NET Enter to allow messages pending for analog and domain locations to be listed.
Whether listing an analog network location or a domain location, the screen displays the information in
the same format.
Beginning with S3.0, Network Schedule Table information is displayed. The screen display changes to
show the appropriate network delivery schedule information.
@L Net ...
LOCATION FRAME NUMBER: 0000
DELIVERY SCHEDULE : NORSCH
START TIME: 07:00 END TIME : 12:00
INTERVAL : 0 Minutes
LAST OUTCALL : MM/DD/YY 08:07
DELAY: 00000 MIN.
ERRORS: 00000
LIMIT: 00000
MESSAGE #
1BB2
CURRENT WINDOW
:DEFAULT,2,3,4,5
LOCATION FRAME
NUMBER
Octel internal use only.
DELIVERY
SCHEDULE
Name of the Network Schedule used.
CURRENT
WINDOW
All message delivery windows that are open/active for that location at the current
time.
START TIME
END TIME
The start and time for the delivery schedules.
INTERVAL
The minimum time a message must wait before an outcall is made.
LAST OUTCALL
The date and time of the last outcall.
DELAY
Shows how many minutes the message server waits before attempting to send
remaining messages after a failure. Its value is set by System Parameter 69 —
NET: REMOTE DELAY BEFORE RETRY (MIN).
For Digital Networking, this field applies only when a particular domain location is
listed.
ERRORS
The number of times a network call or message attempt to this location has failed.
For Digital Networking, this field applies only when a particular domain location is
listed.
LIMIT
Shows how many times the message server retries network calls to this location
before returning the current message to the creator’s mailbox. Its value is set by
System Parameter 68 — NET: REMOTE DELIVERY ATTEMPT LIMIT.
For Digital Networking, this field applies only when a particular domain location is
listed.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-24
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Lists the hexadecimal header number of all messages waiting to be sent. Refer to
the Message Status section in this chapter.
Beginning with S3.0, this can also be the message priority for Network Delivery
Schedules listed.
MESSAGE #
For Digital Networking, if the listing is for all domain locations, the header
numbers of all messages in the domain waiting to be sent are listed. If the listing is
for a particular domain location, the header numbers of messages waiting to be sent
to that particular domain location are listed.
MESSAGE
PENDING QUERY
Domain messages could be delayed in the predelivery processing and might not
show up in the list of messages pending for a specific location. These messages
appear under this heading.
Network Mailbox Status for Analog Networking
Use the LIST NETWORK MAILBOX command to display information contained in the network mailbox
about a specific location, including the message numbers of all the messages in the network mailbox
waiting to be sent to that location. It also shows the current delay (in minutes), the error retry count, and
the retry limit.
L NET x
Enter
Where x is the location of the system the messages will be sent to. The command can also be abbreviated
as L N.
@L Net 6400
LOCATION FRAME NUMBER: 0005
DELAY: 00000 MIN.
ERRORS: 00000
LIMIT: 00010
MESSAGE #
000E
0010
0012
Network Domain Status for Digital Networking
Use the LIST NETWORK DOMAIN command to list the messages pending for all domain locations
within a uniform-numbering-plan domain. The following example shows such a listing:
@L NET D
<ALL DOMAIN MESSAGES>
LOCATION FRAME NUMBER: 0002
MESSAGE #
2001
3002
MESSAGES PENDING QUERY:
4003
5002
6002
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-25
If the LIST NET command is followed by digits from the uniform numbering plan of a domain, the
messages pending for all domain network locations are listed. For example, the command LIST NET 4,
where the digit 4 is the first digit in the uniform numbering plan, gives exactly the same listing as LIST
NET DOMAIN in the preceding example.
You can list information about a specific domain location, rather than all domain locations, by adding the
location name after the D in the LIST NET D command, as follows:
@L NET D DALLAS
LOCATION FRAME NUMBER: 0004
DELAY: 00002 MIN.
ERRORS: 00000
LIMIT: 00001
MESSAGE #
2001
LAN Status
Use the LANSTAT command to provide basic information about the current status of the LAN, digital
networking and the Gateway Link. Information about the status of the LAN for previous periods in the
Network Traffic Report for Digital Networks and the Digital Network Performance Report. For
information about those reports, refer to the Reports chapter, Network Reports section, in this volume.
Use the LANSTAT command for information about the current status, whether the LAN is UP or DOWN
and the state of the high-speed links.
The following example shows that the LAN is up and running:
@LANSTAT
LAN STATUS: UP
LAST INITIALIZED ON MM/DD/YY AT 06:05 PM
DIGITAL NETWORKING STATUS:
UP
−−−−−−−− HIGH−SPEED−LINK STATUS −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
LOCATION
STATUS
LAN−PRTCL OTHER
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
SELF
−
3
CHCGO
UP
2
NEWYRK
DOWN
−
DALLAS
DOWN
1
OEM−FAIL
SFO
UP
3
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
GWL STATUS: DOWN − GATEWAY LINK SYSTEM PARAMETER IS NOT ENABLED
@
The entry in the LAN STATUS field is always UP, INITIALIZING, or DOWN.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-26
Installation and Maintenance Volume
DOWN Entry
The LAN is running normally. If a Courtesy Down is in progress, the message
COURTESY DOWN IN PROGRESS is shown.
When the LAN status is UP, the high-speed link status is given for each high-speed
digital location, as follows.
INITIALIZING
Entry
DOWN Entry
-
LOCATION
The location name.
-
STATUS
The status of the link to this location, which is either UP or
DOWN.
-
LAN-PRTCL
The Digital Networking Protocol level of the other system.
This entry allows compatibility with future releases. It does
not relate to analog protocol numbering.
-
OTHER
The entry in this column can be one of the following:
HNDSHAKE, waiting for start-up handshake reply;
OEM-FAIL, cannot establish connection, OEM mismatch.
The LAN is in the initialization process. The current status of the initialization
process is given, from among the following:
-
WAITING FOR LAN-REBUILD TO COMPLETE
-
WAITING FOR LAN TO START
-
WAITING FOR LAN INFO FROM VCU
-
STARTING HIGH-SPEED CONNECTIONS
Communication to the LAN is not UP, and no LAN activity is possible. The reason,
if known, is given. The following are possible reasons:
-
System does not have the Digital Networking feature.
-
A COURTESY-DOWN is in process.
-
LAN SYSTEM PARAMETER NOT ENABLED.
-
LAN BOARD NOT CONFIGURED IN SLOTS TABLE.
At any time during the listing of the LAN status, you can press
line or two.
Escape
to terminate the listing within a
Status of FINDMBOX
Use the command FINDMBOX to search for a mailbox in the local USER Table, local Network Names
Table, and Uniform Numbering Plan Domain. The command then prints a status message of the results of
each search. Refer to Table 6-1 for a list of the status messages.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-27
Table 6-1 FINDMBOX Messages and Descriptions
Status Messages
Description
FOUND IN LOCAL USER TABLE
The mailbox exists in the local USER Table.
NOT FOUND IN LOCAL USER TABLE
The mailbox does not exist in the local USER Table.
FOUND IN LOCAL NETNAME TABLE,
EXISTS IN XXXXXX
The mailbox is found in the local Network Names Table,
which says that it exists in XXXXXX.
NOT FOUND IN LOCAL NETNAMES
TABLE
The mailbox was not found in the local Network Names
Table.
FOUND IN DOMAIN LOCATION YYYYYY Domain location YYYYYY sent a positive response to the
query; that is, the mailbox exists in YYYYYY.
NOT FOUND IN ANY OTHER DOMAIN
LOCATION
All locations in this domain sent negative responses to the
query.
The FINDMBOX command is useful for the following:
-
Ensuring that a mailbox number is unique in a domain
Detecting stale entries in local Network Names Tables where a mailbox has been moved from one
location to another in the domain
You can use the FINDMBOX command to search for a single mailbox or a range of mailboxes. To use the
command to search for a single mailbox, at the @ prompt, enter:
FINDMBOX x
Enter
For this command, x is the mailbox number to be searched for.
To use the command to search for a range of mailboxes, at the @ prompt, enter:
FINDMBOX x y
Enter
For this command, x is the first mailbox number in a range of mailboxes to be searched for, and y is the
last mailbox number in the range.
.
Press
Escape
to abort this command.
The following is an example of the FINDMBOX command:
@FINDMBOX 4573
@
PB60019−01
FOUND
FOUND
FOUND
FOUND
IN
IN
IN
IN
LOCAL USER TABLE.
LOCAL NETNAMES TABLE, EXISTS IN NYORK1.
DOMAIN LOCATION NYORK1.
DOMAIN LOCATION CHICGO.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-28
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Print LAN Status
Use the DCSTAT command to print the status for all digital networking channels, for only the LAN
channel specified, or for a range of digital networking channels specified. With the C option, you can
continuously print the status for the digital networking channel number specified.
-
-
To print the status for all digital network channels, at the @ prompt, enter:
DCSTAT Enter
To print the status for only the digital network channel specified, at the @ prompt, enter:
DCSTAT x Enter
where x is the channel number.
-
To print the status for a range of digital network channels, at the @ prompt, enter
DCSTAT x y Enter
For this command, x is the first digital network channel number in a range, and y is the last digital
network channel number in the range.
-
The Continuous option repeats the command until you press Escape . To print the status continuously
for the digital network channel specified, at the @ prompt, enter:
DCSTAT x C Enter
For this command, x is the digital network channel number and C specifies continuous print.
.
Press
Escape
to interrupt this command.
The following is an example of the DCSTAT command display:
@DCSTAT
LCH01
IDLE
LCH02
IDLE
LCH03
SND
LCH04
IDLE
LCH05
IDLE
LCH06
IDLE
LCH07
CONN
LCH08
CONN
LCH09
IDLE
LCH10
SND
LCH03
SND
LCH04
IDLE
LCH05
IDLE
LCH06
IDLE
LCH07
CONN
LCH08
IDLE
@
Low-Level Echo Test (CMD PING)
The CMD PING command does the lowest-level “echo” test from the LAN adapter on the local system to
the destination message server or computer. It verifies that all the basic requirements are met, such as:
-
Both LAN adapters are present, up and running, and operating their network protocols.
-
LAN end-to-end data transfer is possible across the digital network.
-
The LAN IP addresses are correctly configured.
This is the best tool to use to identify whether there is end-to-end connectivity across the digital network
between two Octel 200/300 message servers. It is especially useful to verify that IP addresses are
correctly configured.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-29
To use the CMD PING command, at the @ prompt, enter:
CMD x PING y
Enter
where x is: the slot number in which the LAN card is installed
where y is: the IP address of the device to which the test ethernet packet is sent
.
For additional Networking diagnostic information, refer to the Networking volume, Digital
Networking chapter, Network Maintenance and Troubleshooting section.
The CMD PING command sends a low-level ethernet packet to the address specified. The receiver
replies with a ping-response packet. An example of a ping success follows.
@CMD 11 PING 157.156.53.3
LAN (Ethernet) Link: MM/DD/YY 12:48:20 (0179fc76:0179fc76) Rev 1.0.3
Current Time: MM/DD/YY 15:15:25 @ Slot 10
LAN>PING 157.156.53.3: 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 157.156.53.3: icmp_sn=0. time=110 ms
−−−−157.156.53.3 PING Statistics−−−−
1 packets transmitted, 1 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 110/110/110
LAN>
@
This is an example of a ping failure:
@CMD 11 PING 157.156.53.5
LAN (Ethernet) Link: 02/4/1994 12:48:20 (0179fc76:0179fc76) Rev 1.0.3
Current Time: 04/12/1994 15:15:49 @ Slot 10
LAN>PING 157.156.53.5: 56 data bytes
still trying...
still trying...
still trying...
still trying...
still trying...
still trying...
157.156.53.5 not responding
LAN>
@
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-30
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Port Configuration Status
Use the LIST PORT command to list the current configuration status for a port. At the @ prompt, enter:
L PO x
Enter
For this command, x represents the port number.
When a port is configured to use different INFORMATION Tables, only current information is displayed.
The following example shows various items that can be displayed, including those added by optional
feature packages.
@L PORT 1
CLASS OF SERVICE: 241 WITH ATTRIBUTES:
USE FOR OUTCALL: YES ANSWERING MODE: AX
PORT TYPE: LIC4 TEST PORT: YES
INFORMATION TABLE NUMBER: 254
INTERCEPT MAILBOX: 4932 INTERCEPT EXTENSION: 1000
PORT EXTENSION: 300
COMPANY GREETING MAILBOX: 4665
Port Mapping Status
Use the PRTMAP command to display information about the assignment of message server port numbers
to ports configured in each slot. This command also displays the assignment of each port to an integration
unit. At the @ prompt, enter:
PRTMAP
Enter
If the PBX type is ATT75, each port can be assigned to more than one integration unit. If the PBX type is
not ATT75, each port can be assigned to only one integration unit and is assigned a line-appearance
number for that integration unit.
If a port is assigned to an integration unit and that port has the COS attribute for nonintegration, Attribute
58 — DO NOT USE THIS PORT FOR INTEGRATION, this command prints *** after the integration
information for the port. The discrepancy in the configuration must be resolved, either by removing the
COS attribute from the port or removing the port from all integration units.
The following is an example of the PRTMAP command without ATT75 assigned:
@PRTMAP
SYSTEM
PORT
ID= 0
1
2
3
4
ID= 0
5
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
SLOT
PORT
EXTN
INTEGRATION
SLOT/UNIT
LINE
APPEARANCE
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
4
1210
1211
1212
1213
10/1
10/1
10/1
10/1
1
2
3
4
2
1
125
10/1
5
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-31
The following is an example of the PRTMAP command with ATT75 assigned:
@PRTMAP
SYSTEM
PORT
ID= 0
1
2
3
4
ID= 0
5
SLOT
PORT
EXTN
INTEGRATION
SLOT/UNIT
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
4
121
122
123
124
10/1 10/2 11/1 11/2
10/1 10/2 11/1 11/2
10/1
10/2
2
1
125
10/2
Floppy Disk Drive Diagnostics
Use the floppy disk drive (FD) diagnostic command TEST FLOPPY 1 to isolate faults to the disk,
floppy disk drive, or floppy disk controller. To run this test, at the @ prompt, enter:
TE F 1
Enter
This test reads the entire disk; if there are errors, the message server responds with the following:
SOFT ERRORS DETECTED
or
FATAL ERROR DETECTED, SEE HARDWARE ERROR TABLE
When the diagnostic is completed, the message server responds as follows:
TEST 01 COMPLETED
If the message server fails to read from or write information to the disk on the first attempt, but is
successful in a subsequent attempt, the message server records a soft error. Soft errors can be caused by
disk wear, contamination on the recording surface, or aging of the floppy disk drive head.
Refer to the Installation chapter for information about the floppy disk write-protect feature.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-32
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Hard Disk Drive Diagnostics (DEX)
The purpose of the DEX command is to “exercise” the disks; hence its name Disk EXerciser. Because
only a small percentage of disk sectors are accessed in the course of normal operation and disk-error
handling cannot be performed for any sectors that are never accessed, DEX provides an orderly and
efficient means to read all disk sectors.
Each disk is divided into five regions, as follows:
Region 1
Region 2
Region 4
Region 8
Region 10
Critical sectors
File system
Prompts
Message headers
Voice data
DEX tests each of the specified regions separately, starting with the lowest-numbered region through the
highest-numbered region. Up to six drives are tested.
When the DEX command finishes testing a region, it displays a status line, as follows:
REGION WW COMPLETE
DISK #1:
DISK #4:
XXXXX
XXXXX
DISK #2: XXXXX
DISK #5: XXXXX
DISK #3: XXXXX
DISK #6: XXXXX
Where WW is the Region tested, and XXXXX is the Number of sectors on the disk that had read errors.
All drives are listed on the status line, even if not installed. If not installed, zeros are displayed.
To use the command, at the @ prompt, enter:
DEX x y
Enter
Where x and y are one of the following:
x = DISK
This argument specifies which disk to test:
1
= Test disk #1 (if system drive #1 is installed)
2
= Test disk #2 (if system drive #2 is installed)
3
= Test disk #3 (if voice drive #3 is installed)
4
= Test disk #4 (if voice drive #4 is installed)
5
= Test disk #5 (if voice drive #5 is installed)
6
= Test disk #6 (if voice drive #6 is installed)
FF
= Test all disks (or those disks that are actually installed)
Enter =
Abort background DEX
If all disks are specified but not all are installed, DEX tests only those disks that are
actually installed. If an invalid option is specified, DEX responds with the following:
INVALID DISK NUMBER or DISK EXERCISE ABORTED
If none of the specified disks are actually installed, DEX responds with the
following:
DRIVE NOT INSTALLED
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
y = REGION
6-33
This argument specifies which regions to test:
1
= Critical sectors
2
= File system
4
= Prompts
8
= Message headers
10
= Voice data
Enter =
All regions
Voice drives have two types of regions, Critical sectors and Voice data. When
running DEX to test all regions for all system and voice drives (that is, DEX FF),
invalid regions of the voice drives are ignored, but the corresponding regions on the
system drives are exercised.
.
The DEX report for a voice drive region that does not exist displays zero
errors.
The following example shows all regions on disk 1 tested:
@DEX 1
REGION 01 COMPLETE
REGION 02 COMPLETE
REGION 04 COMPLETE
REGION 08 COMPLETE
REGION 10 COMPLETE
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
#1:00000
#4:00000
#1:00004
#4:00000
#1:00003
#4:00000
#1:00000
#4:00000
#1:00012
#4:00000
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
#2:00000
#5:00000
#2:00000
#5:00000
#2:00000
#5:00000
#2:00000
#5:00000
#2:00000
#5:00000
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
DISK
#3:00000
#6:00000
#3:00000
#6:00000
#3:00000
#6:00000
#3:00000
#6:00000
#3:00000
#6:00000
DISK EXERCISE COMPLETE
If any errors are reported, refer to the Hardware Errors section in this chapter.
Disk Information Status (L DMAP)
Beginning with Serenade 3.0, the L DMAP command is used to display characteristics of each drive
installed in the system. You must connect to the VCU software before you can enter this command. You
can determine the drive status, the drive manufacturer, the physical and logical size of each disk, and how
the disk is keyed from the information displayed.
At the @ prompt enter:
VCU
Enter
A> appears. At the A> prompt enter:
L DMAP
Enter
To return to the @ prompt, enter:
E Enter .
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-34
Installation and Maintenance Volume
@VCU
Connecting to VCU
VCU 1.11 cksum=(1e0b843) Link:08/27/97 − MM/DD/YY 20:27
A>L DMAP
dev dsk log phy vendor prod_ID
rev
Mb
phy/ log
0 −−− −
−
1 −−− −
−
2 1/1 ACT ALV SEAGAT ST1480
5736 406
cb40e/ cb40e
3 −−− −
−
4 −−− −
−
5 −−− −
−
6 −−− −
−
A>E
@
Mb
h/k
406
0/1
dev =
dsk =
log =
Logical SCSI disk identification number
Dik number/total number of disks
Logical state of the system
ACT
=
Disk is actively used by the system
ERR
=
Disk has non-recoverable error
VLD
=
Disk part of configuration, but needs rebuild.
UNK =
Disk is valid, but not part of this configuration
INV
=
Disk does not have valid configuration block
WPD =
Disk slot is write protected
phy = physical state of the disk
ALV
=
Disk is alive
ERR
=
Disk has error
ILL
=
Disk is not a valid disk for the model defined
vendor = Disk manufacturer details
prod_ID = Disk manufacturer details
rev = Disk manufacturer detail
Mb = Physical size of the disk in Megabytes
phy = Physical size of the disk in disk blocks
/log = Logical size of the disk in disk blocks
MB = Logical size of disk in Megabytes
h/k = OEM identification/ Key revision (1=Non COD, 3=COD)
h = OEM key: 0/1 = VMX/Octel/Lucent and 2/3/5 = OEM
k = COD/non-COD: 1 = non-COD and 3 = COD
fmt = Soft format of drive (CPU/VCU)
.
A COD drive cannot be copied to a non-COD drive.
Line Interface Card Diagnostics
There are three online diagnostic tests that test the line interface cards (LIC).
-
The first test is performed periodically during normal message server operation. It checks the analog
(voice) path of the LIC.
-
The second test is the ring detection/PBX connection test.
-
The third test is the ring-through test.
These tests are described in the following sections.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-35
Tone/DTMF/Beep Test
Use the TEST LINE 1 command to test line 1. To run the test, turn the terminal or teleprinter ON. At
the @ prompt, enter:
TE L 1
Enter
This test runs in sequence on each of the installed ports.
Use the TEST LINE 5 command to test line 5 for a specific port. At the @ prompt, enter:
TE L 5 x
Enter
For this command, x is the specific port number in HEX.
A hybrid transformer is used on the LIC to check tone generation and detection circuitry. A tone is applied
to the hybrid transformer and, as it is being reflected, the tone detector is turned ON. A comparison is made
to see whether the tones sent match the tones detected. The test sequence continues, through all assigned
ports. If a test tone sent is not received correctly, an error is entered in the Hardware Error Table.
Some PBXs have the capability of running diagnostics on their ports. The diagnostics can cause the
Octel 200/300’s self-test to fail and place the Octel 200/300 port in TST (test) mode, taking the port out of
service. The port remains in TST mode until the self-test runs again and can put the port in service or until
the message server is restarted. In cases of conflict with PBX diagnostics, the self-test can be disabled in
the SLOTS Table. Consult with technical support before you set the self-test to NO in the SLOTS Table.
Ring Detection/PBX Connection Test
Use the TEST LINE 4 command for this test. To run the test, turn on the terminal or teleprinter. At the
@ prompt, enter:
TE L 4 x
Enter
For this command, x is the installed port number (in HEX) to be tested.
This test runs only on the port requested in the command, and the port must have the self-test parameter
in the SLOT Table set to YES.
This port is rapidly seized and released repeatedly. This action causes charging and discharging of the
tip-and-ring circuitry on the LIC, if the port is correctly connected to the PBX. These pulses trigger the
ring-detection circuitry on the port.
The test is completed successfully when the LIC reports the detection of this “ringing.” If ringing is not
detected, the test terminates unsuccessfully after 5 seconds and leaves the tested port in the TST mode,
removing the port from service. An error is also logged in the Hardware Error Table.
.
PB60019−01
Some PBXs are not capable of generating sufficient voltage or loop current quickly enough for the
test to succeed. One example is the Northern Telecom SL1. Consult with Technical Support if you
are uncertain whether a particular PBX supports this test.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-36
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Ring-Through Test
The ring-through test runs only on demand and should be used only when the Octel 200/300 is initially
installed or when it is known that no calls are being processed.
The ring-through test performs the following sequence:
1.
Seizes a port
2.
Waits for dial tone from the PBX
3.
Sends digits to a port using the extension number entered in the SLOTS Table
4.
Waits for the port to answer, and sends a test pattern
For example, a four-port message server makes 12 test calls; each test call takes 20 to 30 seconds to
complete. If the port called is busy or does not answer, an error is logged in the Hardware Error Table.
The command for this test is TEST LINE 2. To initiate the test, at the @ prompt, enter:
TE L 2
Enter
Update Integration
The following changes to integration slots require that the integration cards be restarted before the
changes take effect:
-
Adding or deleting integration slots
-
Modifying line appearances for an integration slot
-
Enabling or disabling message waiting links
When any of these changes are made, the Octel 200/300 presents the following message when exiting
from the UPDATE program.
WARNING:
FOR CHANGES TO TAKE EFFECT INTEGRATION MUST BE RESTARTED
To execute the command UPDATE INTEGRATION, at the @ prompt, enter:
UPINTG
Enter
The Octel 200/300 then prompts the following:
RESTART INTEGRATION . . .
ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO DO THIS?
This command restarts the integration cards and, therefore, disrupts call processing for approximately 1
or 2 minutes.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-37
Port Status
The command PORT STATUS displays the current state of the installed ports. At the @ prompt, enter:
PS
Enter
The message server responds with the current state of each installed port.
CH 1
LSN
CH 2
IDL
CH 3
LSN
CH 4
NEW
CH 5
MOD
CH 6
IDL
CH 7
IDL
CH 8
IDL
CH 9
IDL
CH 10
IDL
CH 11
IDL
CH 12
IDL
CH 13
IDL
CH 14
IDL
CH 15
NMS
CH 16
IDL
CH 17
ERR
CH 18
ERR
CH 19
ERR
CH 20
ERR
CH 21
ERR
CH 22
ERR
CH 23
ERR
CH 24
ERR
CH 25 CH 26 CH 27 CH 28 CH 29 CH 30 CH 31 CH 32
FX.IDL FX.RCV FX.SND FX.IDL FX.IDL FX.IDL FX.IDL FX.CDN
The port states are shown under each port channel (CH 1, etc.) and the ports might be in any of the states
listed in Table 6-2.
Table 6-2 Abbreviations for Channel/Port State
Port State
Description
Abbreviation
PB60019−01
ACM
OCTEL CALLER INTERFACE, MAIN STATE (greeting and messaging instructions, etc.)
ACR
OCTEL CALLER INTERFACE, RECORD STATE (recording a message)
ADR
COLLECT ADDRESS FOR A MESSAGE
AFC
AUTO COPY CONFIGURATION
AFZ
PLAY ALL PHRASES
AIC
(ASSISTED INWARD CALLING) CALLING A USER OR PLAYING A GREETING
ALM
ALARM-CALL-OUT
AMR
AMIS MESSAGE RECEIVE
APP
APPLICATION PROCESSOR LINK
APR
PLAY ALL PROMPTS
AUI
ARIA USER INTERFACE
CHK
CHECK FEATURE
CON
CONFIGURATION, MSG WAITING PARAMETERS OR SECURITY
DID
DID
DIG
IN-BAND DTMF INTEGRATION
DIR
DAC ADDRESS COLLECTION
DP1
DPNSS TRANSFER IN PROGRESS − STATE 1
DP2
DPNSS TRANSFER COMPLETION − STATE 2
DRP
DROPPING CALL
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-38
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 6-2 Abbreviations for Channel/Port State (continued)
Port State
Description
Abbreviation
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
EXT
EXIT
ERR
LINE CARD FOR PORT HAS REPORTED A FATAL ERROR
FAX
FAX BOARD CHANNEL STATE
FGT
FORCED GREETING RECORD
FNM
FORCED NAME RECORD
FXA
PRINT ALL FAX
FXC
FAX CONNECT (RECEIVE/SEND)
FXO
FAX MAILBOX CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
FXP
FAX MAILBOX PRINT OPTIONS
FX.ALC
ALLOCATED FAX CHANNEL
FX.CDN
COURTESY DOWN FOR FAX CHANNEL
FX.IDL
FAX IDLE
FX.INT
FAX CHANNEL INITIALIZATION
FX.RCV
RECEIVING FAX
FX.SND
SENDING FAX
FX.TST
FAX CHANNEL TEST
FUT
FUTURE DELIVERY LISTEN
FWD
FORWARDED TO DIGITS IN SYSTEM PARAMETER TABLE
GRT
GREETING
HLP
ASKING FOR HELP
ID2
BUSY OUT PORT AFTER RING IN
IDL
IDLE
LMP
LAMP MESSAGE WAITING IN PROGRESS
LSN
LISTENING TO A MESSAGE
MSW
MESSAGE WAITING
MOD
THIS PORT IS CONNECTED TO THE MODEM
NAM
NAME SETUP
NDT
NO DIAL TONE WHEN ATTEMPTING TO FORWARD OR INITIALIZE PORTS
NET
NETWORKING
NEW
CREATE NEW, FORWARD, REPLY OR GREETING MESSAGE
NMD
NAMES DIRECTORY STATE
NMR
NET MESSAGE RECEIVE - PROTOCOL 1
NMS
NET MESSAGE SEND - PROTOCOL 1
NNR
NETWORK NAME RECEIVE
NSC
NAMESCAN
NTS
NET TEST STATE
OMC
OFFSITE MESSAGE WAITING CONFIGURATION
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-39
Table 6-2 Abbreviations for Channel/Port State (continued)
Port State
Description
Abbreviation
OMR
OCTELNET MESSAGE RECEIVE
OMS
OCTELNET MESSAGE SEND
QAD
COLLECTING AN ADDRESS FOR A QUICK MESSAGE
QCK
RECORDING A QUICK MESSAGE OR MESSAGE AFTER CALL
PAC
PERSONAL ASSISTANCE CONFIGURATION
PDL
PERSONAL DISTRIBUTION LISTS
QS1
QSIG TRANSFER IN PROGRESS − STATE 1
QS2
QSIG TRANSFER COMPLETION − STATE 2
RDY
WAITING FOR COMMAND AT READY
RNM
USER RECORD OWN NAME
SCR
SCRIPTED GREETING
SLQ
SELECT MESSAGE QUEUE
STA
START COMMAND PROCESSING
STR
START OF INITIAL LOGON BEFORE READY
TST
SELFTEST IN PROGRESS OR PORT HAS FAILED SELFTEST
VMR
NET MESSAGE RECEIVED - PROTOCOL 2
VMS
NET MESSAGE SEND - PROTOCOL 2
WFA
WAITING FOR MAILBOX ADDRESS AFTER RECEIVING #
WFD
WAITING FOR FIRST DIGIT AFTER ANSWERING CALL
XPR
TRANSPARENCY STATE FOR DPNSS/qsig (path replacement is in progress)
5KI
VMX 5000 USER INTERFACE
Alarm Test
The TEST ALARM command tests the alarm callout feature. At the @ prompt, enter:
TE A
Enter
The message server attempts to call the string configured in System Parameter 31 — ALARM
NUMBER. If successful, the person answering the alarm call hears a message similar to the following:
“Beep-Beep-Beep-Beep. This is an alarm call from message server number 123. Error type O has
occurred. Press star to acknowledge alarm notification or press pound to connect to the modem.”
If not acknowledged, the message server disconnects the call after 1 minute and retries it every 10
minutes, until it is acknowledged (the listener presses * ).
To log on for remote access, proceed as follows:
1.
Press # . The line Beeps for up to 3 minutes, which allows time to connect the modem and the
terminal.
2.
Press
.
PB60019−01
#
when ready. This connects the modem, which enables remote access to the Octel 200/300.
If the person answering the alarm call does not enter a second # , the server disconnects the call
and continues to retry every 10 minutes, until the call is acknowledged.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-40
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Use the LIST HARDWARE command to list the Hardware Error Table after testing the alarm or enabling
remote access. At the @ prompt, enter:
L H
Enter
The Octel 200/300 prompts *** ALARM HAS BEEN GIVEN *** to indicate an alarm test was
performed. The command CLEAR HARDWARE clears this test message. At the @ prompt, enter:
C H
Enter
Caution!
.
You must clear the Hardware Error Table to reset the
Octel 200/300 callout feature, or the Octel 200/300
will not attempt to call the alarm number when a true
alarm occurs. If the Table shows other errors, refer to
the System Errors and Traffic Pegs chapter, Hardware
Errors section, in this volume.
The TE A command also closes the Alarm Relay and turns ON the Alarm.
The C H command reopens the Alarm Relay and turns OFF the Alarm.
Figure 6-1 shows an alarm-test flow chart.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-41
@TE A
Message server calls string entered in System Parameter 31
“Beep, beep, beep. This is an alarm from
number 123. Error Type O has occurred.
Press star to confirm or press pound for modem
access.”
Stop call
DISCONNECT
Call disconnects after 1 minute.
Message server retries call every 10
minutes, until acknowledged.
Logon for
remote access
Acknowledged
PRESS
Not
Acknowledged
PRESS
*
#
Line “beeps” for up
to 3 minutes
CONNECT
Goodbye
Modem and Terminal
PRESS
#
@L H
FRI MM/DD HH:MM:SS YYYY SYSTEM NAME ID:XXX S/X:XXX PBX:XXX
CLEARED: MM/DD HH:MM
***ALARM HAS BEEN GIVEN***
TABLE IS EMPTY
@C
Callout feature tested
H
or
List Hardware
Error Table
Clear Hardware Error Table
Alarm Callout enabled
Figure 6-1 Alarm Test Flow
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-42
Installation and Maintenance Volume
System Forwarding
The forwarding string entered in System Parameter 45 — SYSTEM-RELOAD FORWARD STRING, is
automatically sent if the Octel 200/300 reloads for any reason. During this time, calls are not accepted for
several minutes, while an automatic check is performed on the database. If forwarding strings are not set
up, incoming calls receive a ring-no-answer until the message server is ready. When forwarding strings
are set up correctly, the PBX forwards all incoming calls to an operator or attendant for handling until the
message server is ready to receive calls. The following describes the procedure for testing this feature.
Either the COURTESY DOWN (CD x y z) command, or the TEST CHANNEL 1 (TE C 1 X Y)
command to test the forward feature. You can specify a specific port or range of ports. This command
causes each port to attempt the forward.
When successful, the following message is displayed:
Port #1 Forwarded
.
.
.
All Requested Ports Forwarded
If only one port is specified, the Octel 200/300 attempts to forward only that port. If a range is specified,
the message server attempts to forward all ports in the range. If no port is specified, the message server
tries to forward all ports. If a port is successfully forwarded, it is left in the forwarded state. If a port fails
to complete the forwarding, it is left in the NDT state. The Octel 200/300 continues to try to forward all
ports specified, until successful or until you press Escape . To review the port status, use the P S
command. To cancel forwarding, run the System Initialization test, as described in the following section.
For additional information about using the CD x y z command, refer to the System Service Mode
Commands, Courtesy Up/Courtesy Down, section.
System Initialization
When the Octel 200/300 has reloaded and is ready to handle calls, an initialization sequence
automatically takes place. First, the message server attempts PBX initialization (System Parameter 33 —
PBX INITIALIZE CODE), then attempts the cancel forward string (System Parameter 46 —
SYSTEM-RELOAD CANCEL FORWARD-STRING), for each port in turn. When a port fails to
complete the initialization or the cancel forward, the port is left in the NDT state. The message server
attempts to initialize a port every 10 seconds.
Use either the COURTESY UP (CU x y z) command or the TEST CHANNEL 2 (TE C 2 x y)
command to test this feature. You can specify a specific port or range of ports. This command causes the
server to attempt initialization and cancel forward for each port in turn.
When the initialization is successful, the following message is displayed:
Port #1 Initialized
.
.
.
All Requested Ports Initialized
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-43
If only one port is specified, the Octel 200/300 tries to initialize and cancel forwarding for only the port
specified. If a range is specified, the message server tries to initialize and cancel forwarding for all ports
in the range. If no port is specified, the message server tries to initialize and cancel forwarding for all
ports. If a port is successfully initialized and forwarding is canceled, it goes to the IDL state. If a port
fails to complete either the initialization or the forwarding, the status remains NDT.
For additional information about using the CU x y z command, refer to the System Service Mode
Commands, Courtesy Up/Courtesy Down, section.
System Status
Use the TEST STATUS command to check the message server status for DC voltages and the
temperature. At the @ prompt, enter:
TE S
Enter
If DC voltages and the temperature are within acceptable ranges the Octel 200/300 responds with:
SYSTEM STATUS TESTED OK.
If DC voltages and the temperature are out of range, the Octel 200/300 responds with the following:
ERROR DETECTED. SEE HARDWARE ERROR TABLE.
List Features
Use the LIST FEATURES command to list the following:
-
Optional feature packages installed
-
Number of installed, authorized, and used ports, mailboxes, and disk-storage hours
-
Maximum number of drives, ports, and languages allowed in the message server
At the @ prompt, enter:
L F
PB60019−01
Enter
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-44
Installation and Maintenance Volume
@L F
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−− SYSTEM SOFTWARE RELEASE S.x.x.x (MM/DD/YY) −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
DAY MM/DD HH:MM:SS YYYY SYSTEMNAME ID:XXX S/N:XXXXXX PBX:23
MODEL TYPE: OCTEL 300
SERIAL NUMBER: 200003
FEATURE PACKAGES:
SW−30001 SW−30003 SW−30004 SW−30007 SW−30008 SW−30009 SW−30015
SW−30019 SW−30020 SW−30021 SW−30022 SW−30023 SW−30024 SW−30026 SW−30027
SW−30028 SW−30029 SW−30030 SW−30031 SW−30032 SW−30034 SW−30049 SW−30050
SW−30051 SW−30052 SW−30053 SW−30055 SW−30056 SW−30057
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
Authorized
Used
Unused
Installed
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
Ports :
Analog
−−
0
0
0
Fax
−−
8
0
8
DSP
16
8
8
16
PIC
24
20
4
24
MBXs :
Voice
Non−Voice
VMB
Fax
900
9100
250
640
678
0
144
507
222
9100
106
133
10000
10000
900
10000
Storage : Hours
100
58
42
106
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
MAXIMUM NUMBER OF DRIVES: 6
MAXIMUM NUMBER OF PORTS: 64
MAXIMUM NUMBER OF SCHEDULE TABLE ENTRIES: 8
NUMBER OF LANGUAGES: 2
@
The LIST FEATURE screen fields are described as follows:
Model Type
Shows the model number that is configured.
Serial Number
Shows the serial number entered during INSTALL.
Feature
Packages
Lists the feature packages that are installed, including standard and optional
features.
Ports, Mbx, and
Storage
Information
Information for Ports, MBXs and Storage are divided into columns marked
Authorized, Used, Unused, and Installed.
-
-
-
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
The Authorized column shows the total number purchased.
The Used column shows the number configured or used. This number can be
as high as the number authorized.
The Unused column shows the number available to be used. (The total
number authorized minus the total number used.)
The Installed column shows the total capacity of the message server for
specific port or mailbox types and storage hours. With Capacity on Demand
(COD), a feature can be installed, but not authorized. For ports, this number is
the number of ports present on the cards physically installed in the message
server. For mailboxes, this indicates the maximum number of mailboxes that
this message server supports.
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
Ports
This rows lists the types of ports installed.
-
-
The Analog row refers to the 4- and 8-port LIC. If the 4- and 8-port line cards
are not controlled by Capacity on Demand (COD), the Authorized column is
empty.
The Fax row is the number of fax-application-processor channels installed. If
the fax card is not controlled by COD, the Authorized column is empty.
.
-
-
Mailboxes
-
-
-
The DSP row shows the number of DLC16 and ILC12 ports authorized, used,
and installed.
The PIC row shows the number of PBX integration card ports authorized, used,
and installed.
The Voice row is the number of authorized, used, and installed mailboxes
used for messaging.
The Non-Voice row shows the number of mailboxes designated for
applications use. These are mailboxes assigned Attribute 26 — MAY NOT
USE INTERNAL MESSAGING FEATURES. For non-voice mailboxes, the
value in the Authorized field is the installed number of mailboxes less the
number of used voice mailboxes.
The VMB row is the number of authorized, used, and installed Visual Mailbox
licenses. The value in the Installed field is equal to the value for authorized
voice mailboxes.
The Fax row is the number of authorized, used, and installed fax mailbox
licenses. The value in the Installed field is equal to the value for installed voice
mailboxes.
This row lists the number of message storage hours authorized, used and installed.
The value in the Authorized field is the number of hours purchased for COD drives
added to the total hours on non-COD drives, not including the message server
overhead. The Used field indicates the total number of hours actually used to store
messages, names, greetings, redundant copies and network names. The Installed
field is the actual physical capacity of all drives in the message server.
.
PB60019−01
The fax capability for a mailbox is controlled by COD.
This row lists the types of mailboxes installed.
-
Storage
6-45
The hours used for message server overhead are not included in either the
Used or Installed values. If all drives were either non-COD drives or fully
authorized COD drives, Installed and Authorized would be the same.
Maximum
Number of
Drives
Shows the maximum number of disk drive slots possible for the message server.
Maximum
Number of Ports
Shows the maximum number of ports possible for the message server, including
analog, DSP, PIC, and fax.
Maximum
Number of
Schedule Table
Entries
Shows the maximum number of entries allowed in SCHEDULE Table entries. The
maximum number is 8.
Number of
Languages
Lists the number of languages installed.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-46
6.3
Installation and Maintenance Volume
APPLICATION DELAYS
Application delays are timing values set in the Octel 200/300. Some of these delays are used to detect the
tone cadence that the PBX provides to the Octel 200/300. The tone cadence indicates a specific call
condition; for example, a ringback tone indicates that the called extension is ringing, and a busy tone
indicates that the called extension is busy.
When a PBX type is selected for System Parameter 3 — PBX TYPE/PBX MODEL, the default values
are set to match the tone cadence of the selected PBX. If the PBX type is not in the list provided by
System Parameter 3, select the PBX type OTHER. Because the tone-cadence values in that situation are
not known, the Octel 200/300 defaults to generic/industry-standard values; for example, a
1-second-on/3-second-off ring cadence, a 500-ms-on/500-ms-off busy cadence, and a 250-ms-on/off for a
fast-busy cadence. These values could need to be changed to work correctly with your PBX when OTHER
has been selected.
If the Octel 200/300 can already detect ringback, slow-busy, fast-busy, and if configured, double interrupted
ringback, the application delay indexes do not need to be modified. However, if the Octel 200/300 detects
an answer condition while monitoring single or double interrupted-ringback, slow-busy, or fast-busy tones,
you must modify the application-delay indexes. The application-delay indexes that can be modified are
described in the How to Modify Application Delays section in this chapter.
How Tones Are Recognized
When the Octel 200/300 screens a call, it is looking for single- or double-interrupted ringback, slow-busy,
or fast-busy tones. To process the call transfer, the Octel 200/300 refers to application-delay indexes 49
through 52. These indexes show the maximum and minimum ON/OFF periods for any tone.
If the tone cadence detected does not comply with these delays, the Octel 200/300 determines that the
tone is not a single or double interrupted ringback, slow busy, or fast busy and that the call has been
answered. If this occurs, the message server completes the call transfer. In a screen display of the Print
Tone (PRT) and List Trace, an answer condition is indicated.
If the tone cadence is within the values set for delays 49 through 52, the Octel 200/300 then compares the
tone cadence with application-delay indexes 53 through 76 for single interrupted ringback, double
interrupted ringback, slow-busy and fast-busy delays, to determine what the condition is. If it does not
comply with any of these delays, it is assumed that the call has been answered and the Octel 200/300
completes the transfer. Figure 5-2 shows the sequence that the Octel 200/300 follows to screen calls.
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
If the PBX provides double interrupted ringback when an internal extension calls another internal
extension, System Parameter 26 — DOUBLE-INTERRUPTED RINGBACK, is set to YES. The
Octel 200/300 looks for a double interrupted ringback versus a single interrupted ringback when
calling an extension.
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-47
Start of Transfer
Dial extension digits and begin looking for tone patterns
Do the tones
comply with ranges
set by delays
49, 50, 51,
or 52?
NO
The call is
considered
answered
YES
Is System
Parameter 26
set to YES?
Double Interrupted
Ringback
Do the
tones comply
with Indexes 61, 62,
63, 64, 65,
66, 67,or
68?
YES
NO
Ringback
Do the tones
comply with ranges
set by delays
53, 54, 55,
or 56?
NO
YES
YES
The phone rings,
monitor ringback (Information Table Index 7)
The phone rings,
monitor ringback (Information Table Index 7)
NO
Slow Busy
Do the tones
comply with ranges
set by delays 69, 70,
71, or 72?
YES
Pull call back.
Speak “ . . . is
busy...”
YES
Pull call back.
Speak “... is invalid . . . ”
NO
Fast Busy
Do the tones
comply with ranges
set by delays
73, 74, 75,
or 76?
Answer
End
Figure 6-2 Sequence Used by the Octel 200/300 To Screen Calls
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-48
Installation and Maintenance Volume
How To Modify Application Delays
You should only modify those application-delay indexes for PBX tones that fail. Before modifying an
application-delay index, use the PRT (PRINT TONE) command and COS Attribute 70 — MEASURE
PBX TONES, to determine the correct timing value. Use the following steps:
1.
Assign COS Attribute 70 to a test mailbox that has an extension number for a telephone set located
near the terminal.
When a mailbox with COS Attribute 70 is called, the Octel 200/300 dials the extension number, stays
on line for 10 tone changes, and then hangs up. During this call, you can determine the tone cadence
of the PBX.
.
2.
The extension called should not be set to forward on ring-no-answer, busy, or fast busy. Other
features, such as camp-on, must be disabled. This could give a false tone cadence.
Select an Octel 200/300 port and at the @ prompt, enter:
PRT x
Enter
For this command, x is the port number to be used.
3.
Call that port’s extension number.
4.
When the message server answers, dial the test mailbox number.
The PRT command monitors and displays the DTMF tones dialed by the caller, the DTMF tones
dialed by the Octel 200/300, and the call-progress tones from the PBX to the terminal. This
command is a real-time command and can be initiated on only one port at a time. The information is
not stored.
.
If the tones do not show on the screen when the PRT command displays the DTMF events, at
the @ prompt, enter:
C S
5.
Enter
Repeat steps 2 through 4. If executing the C S command does not help, contact your technical
support center.
The PRT command should be initiated for any call condition that fails, such as when the message
server calls an extension that is sending a ringback but the message server detects an answer
condition.
The following example displays tone information when the Octel 200/300 screens a call to a
ring-no-answer extension that fails. Refer to the Miscellaneous Commands section in this chapter for
a list of Print Tone output types.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
@PRT 1
IN−2
IN−2
IN−0
FLASH
EXPECT DIAL TONE
420 MS
T ON
600 MS
DIAL TONE
DIAL−2
DIAL−2
DIAL−0
2620 MS
T ON
1000 MS
T OFF
2880 MS
T ON
980 MS
T OFF
2920 MS
T ON
790 MS
ANSWER
6-49
The caller enters DTMF digits.
The Octel 200/300 monitors tones for dial tone.
Dial tone is detected.
Octel 200/300 dials DTMF digits.
Octel 200/300 ignores the first tone change.
Octel 200/300 monitors call progress tones from
the PBX to determine the status of the called extension.
Failure: Octel 200/300 detects an answer condition because
one of the tones from the PBX does not conform to delays in
the Application Delay Table.
6.
Review the PRT display to determine the tone cadence of the tone being monitored. Refer to the
How to Modify Application Delays section in this chapter to find the application-delay indexes that
refer to the error received.
7.
Enter UPDATE to list the current values in the Application Delay Table; at the dot (.) prompt, enter:
L APP
8.
Enter
Create a tone timing diagram to help determine the tone cadence.
The tone values from the PRT display and the current application-delay values listed in the
Application Delay Table can be included in the diagram to determine how much an individual tone
needs to be modified.
For the preceding PRT example, the application-delay indexes that refer to the error received are
indexes 50 and 54. Figure 6-3 shows what the failure would look like on a tone timing diagram. Note
that the failure occurred when the PBX sent a TONE ON for 790 ms. The Octel 200/300 was set to
expect a TONE ON (ringback) for no less then 800 ms and no greater than 1200 ms. This is referred to
as the “window.” In the diagram, the window for the silence period (TONE OFF) between rings is set
to no less than 2800 ms and no greater than 3400 ms. The TONE OFF values are within that window.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-50
Installation and Maintenance Volume
PBX Tone ON
1
2
1200 ms
800 ms
1200 ms
3
1000 ms
980 ms
4
5
6
1200 ms
800 ms
790 ms
800 ms
2920 ms
2800 ms
3400 ms
2880 ms
2800 ms
3400 ms
PBX Tone OFF
1 Maximum Tone ON (53)
Minimum Tone ON (54)
3 Actual Time Tone ON
2
Answer Condition
4
5
6
Actual Time Tone was OFF
Minimum Tone OFF (56)
Maximum Tone OFF (55)
Figure 6-3 Ring/No Answer Tone-Timing Failure
9.
Modify the required application delays.
In this case, Application Delay index 54 would be changed from 800 ms to 760 ms. Decreasing
Index 54 allows for the 790 ms TONE ON.
.
Index 50 must be equal to or less than Index 54.
10. After modifying the appropriate delays, remove Attribute 70, and retest the calls that failed.
If calls still fail, repeat this procedure from step 1.
Modifiable Application-Delay Indexes
The application-delay indexes that can be modified at the Maintenance level while in UPDATE are listed
below, with descriptions of what the delay does and how to use it.
Application Delays for Addressing
131
WAIT DURING ADDRESSING TO RESOLVE DIGIT ENTERED
During addressing, Application Delay 131 causes a delay between digit entries when 0 is the
first digit of mailboxes and extensions or when local mailbox addresses overlap network
prefixes. The default delay is 2.0 seconds.
Use — When 0 is the initial digit for mailboxes and extensions, after 0, or 00−09 are entered,
the message server waits for more digits. If no more digits are entered, the call is transferred
to the operator (0), to the Dial-by-Name directory (00), or, in the case of a PDL address
(01−09), the address is registered.
When local mailbox addresses overlap network prefixes, the message server waits for more
digits after the local mailbox address is entered. If more digits are entered before the timeout
period expires, the address is considered to be a network address. For details about
overlapping mailbox addresses and network prefixes, refer to the Networking volume, Remote
Analog Networking chapter, Remote Networking Operation, Addressing for Overlapping
Mailbox Addresses, and Network Prefixes sections.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-51
Application Delays for Call Processing
8
WAIT AFTER OFF HOOK BEFORE GIVING PROMPT
Application Delay 8 causes a delay between the time the port goes off hook and the time the
greeting or system prompt is played.
Use — If the PBX is slow in sending the speech paths through, it could cause greetings or
prompts to be clipped (only part of the greeting or prompt heard). Modify Application Delay
8 to delay for a longer time before the message server plays the greeting or prompt.
19
TIMEOUT BEFORE LOOKING FOR RINGBACK OR BUSY
After dialing an extension number, the message server waits the amount of time specified in
Application Delay 19 before looking for a ringback, busy, or fast-busy tone.
Use — Some PBXs send a partial ringback or busy tone before starting the ringback or
busy-tone cycle. That would cause the Octel 200/300 to fail, because the partial tone would
not comply with any of the tone windows established in the Application Delay Table. Modify
Application Delay 19 for a longer time interval.
87
WAIT LONGER BEFORE LOOKING FOR RINGBACK
Application Delay 87 only works in conjunction with COS Attribute 30 — EXTENSION IS ON
ANOTHER PBX, WAIT LONGER BEFORE LOOKING AT TONES . After dialing an extension
number, the message server waits the amount of time specified in Application Delay 87
before looking for a ringback, busy, or fast-busy tone.
Use — In some PBX environments, two or more PBXs might be connected through tie lines,
so users on a local PBX could dial an extension number on a remote PBX and be routed
directly to it, without going over the public network. The ringback tone from the distant PBX
is delayed while the PBXs set up the call. Without Attribute 30 and Application Delay 87, the
Octel 200/300 detects the longer silence as an answer and attempts to transfer the call, which
causes a failure. This COS attribute and application-delay combination allows the
Octel 200/300 to wait before looking for a ringback tone when calling certain extensions.
Application Delays used with Enhanced DTMF In-band Integration
79
DIAL TONE MAXIMUM OFF PERIOD
Used as the first delay when looking for dial tone after flash, or whenever E, expect dial tone,
is in a dialing string.
Use —The message server uses this delay to determine if the PBX has provided dialtone after
flash or whenever E is in a dialing string. If dialtone is not received from the PBX within the
duration of this delay, the message server flashes again for dialtone, or, in the case of dialing
strings, hangs up and tries again.
.
110
This delay may be modified in the CPT environment to account for slow CPT (for
dialtone) from the PBX.
FIRST DIGIT TIMEOUT WHILE WAITING FOR DTMF CALL RECORD
This delay value is the time the message server waits after going off hook for the first DTMF
digit of an enhanced DTMF in-band call record.
Use — Some PBXs might not send DTMF call records (digits) in a timely manner. If this
occurs, the Octel 200/300 plays the default company greeting. This delay forces the message
server to wait longer for the first DTMF digit of the call record.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-52
Installation and Maintenance Volume
111
INTERDIGIT TIMEOUT WHILE WAITING FOR DTMF CALL RECORD
The length of time that the message server waits for subsequent DTMF digits of an enhanced
DTMF in-band call record. After the message server receives a DTMF digit of a call record,
this timer starts. If the time ends before receiving another digit, the message server assumes
that the PBX is finished sending digits. If the digits received match a Call Record Condition
in the DTMFINT Table, the message server takes the appropriate action (plays mailbox
greeting, etc.). If the digits received do not match a Call Record Condition, the message
server plays the default company greeting.
Use — If a PBX is slow in sending DTMF digits, this delay should be increased to
compensate for this.
112
DELAY BEFORE PLAYING PROMPT AFTER RECEIVING CALL RECORD
The time that the message server waits before playing a greeting or prompt after receiving a
complete enhanced DTMF call record.
Use — When the PBX sends a DTMF call record to the Octel 200/300, the speech path is
not sent through to the caller. The caller hears silence or a ringback tone. After the PBX sends
the last DTMF digit of the call record, it connects the caller and the Octel 200/300. If the PBX
is slow to send the speech path through, part of the greeting or prompt could be clipped. By
extending this delay, the message server waits longer before playing a greeting or prompt.
141
DURATION OF ONE RING IN MILLISECOND UNITS
Detects Ring-No-Answer (RNA). The default for this delay is a value of 5000 msec.
Use — When internal calls have a value specified in Information Index Table 7 —
NUMBER OF RINGS BEFORE EXTENSION NO ANSWER, this value multiplied by the
duration of one ring gives the time-out value for RNA. When message waiting outcalls have a
value specified in Information Index Table 8 — NUMBER OF MESSAGE WAITING
RINGS, this value is used to compute the time-out value for RNA.
142
MAXIMUM WAIT TIME FOR CALL TRANSFERRING HANG UP
Detects call transferring hang-up delays. The default for this delay is a value of 30000 msec.
Use — When specifying the maximum time the message server waits for the call
transferring party to hang up, so that the transfer to an extension forwarded to the message
server is completed.
Application Delays for Cadence Recognition
49
MAXIMUM TONE ON PERIOD FOR ANY TONE
This delay must be set to a value equal to the largest value for any of the following delays set
in the Application Delay Table: 53, 61, 63, 69, or 73.
Use — When the message server looks for a ringback, busy, or fast-busy tone, it uses this
delay to determine whether the TONE ON is a valid tone. If the TONE ON is longer than this
delay, the message server assumes an answer condition has occurred.
50
MINIMUM TONE ON PERIOD FOR ANY TONE
This delay must be set to a value less than the value for any of the following delays set in the
Application Delay Table: 54, 62, 64, 70, or 74.
Use — When the message server looks for a ringback, busy, or fast-busy tone, it uses this
delay to determine whether the TONE ON is a valid tone. If the TONE ON is less than this
delay, the message server assumes an answer condition has occurred.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
51
6-53
MAXIMUM TONE OFF PERIOD FOR ANY TONE
This delay must be set to a value equal to the largest value for any of the following delays in
the Application Delay Table: 55, 65, 67, 71, or 75.
Use — When the message server looks for a ringback, busy, or fast-busy tone, it uses this
delay to determine whether the TONE OFF is a valid silence period. If the TONE OFF is
greater than this delay, the message server assumes an answer condition has occurred.
.
52
Application delay 123 must be set to 0 for the server to wait the time specified in
application 51. See application delay 123.
MINIMUM TONE OFF PERIOD FOR ANY TONE
This delay must be set to a value less than the value for any of the following delays in the
Application Delay Table: 56, 66, 68, 72, or 76.
Use — When the message server looks for a ringback, busy, or fast-busy tone, it uses this
delay to determine whether the TONE OFF is a valid silence period. If the TONE OFF is less
than this delay, the message server assumes that an answer condition has occurred.
53
RINGBACK MAXIMUM TONE ON PERIOD
The longest delay that a TONE ON can be to qualify as a ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a ringback. If the TONE ON is longer than this delay, the message server
assumes that it is not a ringback.
54
RINGBACK MINIMUM TONE ON PERIOD
The shortest delay that a TONE ON can be to qualify as a ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a ringback. If the TONE ON is shorter than this delay, the message server
assumes that it is not a ringback.
55
RINGBACK MAXIMUM TONE OFF PERIOD
The longest delay that a TONE OFF can be to qualify as a ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a ringback. If the TONE OFF is longer than this delay, the message server
assumes that it is not a ringback.
56
RINGBACK MINIMUM TONE OFF PERIOD
The shortest delay that a TONE OFF can be to qualify as a ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a ringback. If the TONE OFF is shorter than this delay, the message server
assumes that it is not a ringback.
123
TIME TO WAIT FOR FIRST TONE
This delay should only be modified when using CPT-DTMF integration and must be set to 0
or a value greater than application delay 51.
Use — If set to 0, the server waits for the amount of time specified by application delay 51
for the first TONE ON. If application delay 123 is non-zero, after dialing out digits for an
outcall, the server waits this amount of time for the FIRST TONE ON condition. If no TONE
ON occurs in the specified time, the server assumes the call was answered.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-54
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Application Delay indexes 61 through 68 are used only if System Parameter 26 is set to YES.
61
DOUBLE INTERRUPTED RINGBACK MAXIMUM TONE ON LONG PERIOD
The longest delay that a TONE ON, of the long TONE ON period, can be to qualify as a
double interrupted ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a double interrupted ringback. If the TONE ON is longer than this delay, the
message server assumes that it is not a double interrupted ringback.
62
DOUBLE INTERRUPTED RINGBACK MINIMUM TONE ON LONG PERIOD
The shortest delay that a TONE ON, of the long TONE ON period, can be to qualify as a
double interrupted ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that is
monitoring is a double interrupted ringback. If the TONE ON is shorter than this delay, the
message server assumes that it is not a double interrupted ringback.
63
DOUBLE INTERRUPTED RINGBACK MAXIMUM TONE ON SHORT PERIOD
The longest delay that a TONE ON, of the short TONE ON period, can be to qualify as a
double interrupted ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadence that it is
monitoring is a double interrupted ringback. If the TONE ON is longer than this delay, the
message server assumes that it is not a double interrupted ringback.
64
DOUBLE INTERRUPTED RINGBACK MINIMUM TONE ON SHORT PERIOD
The shortest delay that a TONE ON, of the short TONE ON period, can be to qualify as a
double interrupted ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a double interrupted ringback. If the TONE ON is shorter than this delay, the
message server assumes that it is not a double interrupted ringback.
65
DOUBLE INTERRUPTED RINGBACK MAXIMUM TONE OFF LONG PERIOD
The longest delay that a TONE OFF, of the long TONE OFF period, can be to qualify as a
double interrupted ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine if the tone
cadences it is monitoring is double interrupted ringback. If the TONE
OFF is longer than this delay, the message server assumes it is not
double interrupted ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a double interrupted ringback. If the TONE OFF is longer than this delay, the
message server assumes that it is not a double interrupted ringback.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
66
6-55
DOUBLE INTERRUPTED RINGBACK MINIMUM TONE OFF LONG PERIOD
The shortest delay that a TONE OFF, of the long TONE OFF period, can be to qualify as a
double interrupted ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a double interrupted ringback. If the TONE OFF is shorter than this delay, the
message server assumes that it is not a double interrupted ringback.
67
DOUBLE INTERRUPTED RINGBACK MAXIMUM TONE OFF SHORT PERIOD
The longest delay that a TONE OFF, of the short TONE OFF period, can be to qualify as a
double interrupted ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a double interrupted ringback. If the TONE OFF is longer than this delay, the
message server assumes that it is not a double interrupted ringback.
68
DOUBLE INTERRUPTED RINGBACK MINIMUM TONE OFF SHORT PERIOD
The shortest delay that a TONE OFF, of the short TONE OFF period, can be to qualify as a
double interrupted ringback.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is double interrupted ringback. If the TONE OFF is shorter than this delay, the
message server assumes that it is not a double interrupted ringback.
69
SLOW BUSY MAXIMUM TONE ON PERIOD
The longest delay that a TONE ON can be to qualify as a slow-busy tone.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a slow-busy tone. If the TONE ON is longer than this delay, the message server
assumes that it is not a slow-busy tone.
70
SLOW BUSY MINIMUM TONE ON PERIOD
The shortest delay that a TONE ON can be to qualify as a slow-busy tone.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a slow-busy tone. If the TONE ON is shorter than this delay, the message server
assumes that it is not a slow-busy tone.
71
SLOW BUSY MAXIMUM TONE OFF PERIOD
The longest delay that a TONE OFF can be to qualify as a slow-busy tone.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a slow-busy tone. If the TONE OFF is longer than this delay, the message server
assumes that it is not a slow-busy tone.
72
SLOW BUSY MINIMUM TONE OFF PERIOD
The shortest delay that a TONE OFF can be to qualify as a slow-busy tone.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a slow-busy tone. If the TONE OFF is shorter than this delay, the message
server assumes that it is not a slow-busy tone.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-56
Installation and Maintenance Volume
73
FAST BUSY MAXIMUM TONE ON PERIOD
The longest delay that a TONE ON can be to qualify as a fast-busy tone.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a fast-busy tone. If the TONE ON is longer than this delay, the message server
assumes that it is not a fast-busy tone.
74
FAST BUSY MINIMUM TONE ON PERIOD
The shortest delay that a TONE ON can be to qualify as a fast-busy tone.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a fast-busy tone. If the TONE ON is shorter than this delay, the message server
assumes that it is not a fast-busy tone.
75
FAST BUSY MAXIMUM TONE OFF PERIOD
The longest delay that a TONE OFF can be to qualify as a fast-busy tone.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a fast-busy tone. If the TONE OFF is longer than this delay, the message server
assumes that it is not a fast-busy tone.
76
FAST BUSY MINIMUM TONE OFF PERIOD
The shortest delay that a TONE OFF can be to qualify as a fast-busy tone.
Use — The message server uses this delay to determine whether the tone cadences that it is
monitoring is a fast-busy tone. If the TONE OFF is shorter than this delay, the message server
assumes that it is not a fast-busy tone.
Coordinate the following application-delay indexes for cadence recognition. Refer to Table 6-3.
-
-
-
Set index 49 to a value equal to the largest value for any of the following delay indexes: 53, 61, 63,
69, or 71.
Set index 50 to a value less than the value for any of the following delay indexes: 54, 62, 64, 70, or 74.
Set index 51 to a value equal to the largest value for any of the following delay indexes: 55, 65, 67,
71, or 75.
Set index 52 to a value less than the value for any of the following delay indexes: 56, 66, 68, 72, or 76.
Table 6-3 Application Delays for Cadence Recognition, for Determining Tone On/Tone Off
Maximum
Tone On
Minimum
Tone On
Maximum
Tone Off
Minimum
Tone Off
Single Interrupt Ringback
Index 53
Index 54
Index 55
Index 56
Max/Min Acceptable Tone Ranges
Index 49
Index 50
Index 51
Index 52
Double Interrupt Ringback, long periods
Index 61
Index 62
Index 65
Index 66
Double Interrupt Ringback, short periods
Index 63
Index 64
Index 67
Index 68
Slow Busy
Index 69
Index 70
Index 71
Index 72
Fast Busy
Index 73
Index 74
Index 75
Index 76
TONE EVENT
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-57
Using UPDATE to Modify Application Delays
You can use UPDATE to modify specific application delays. When you modify an application-delay
index, enter the new value in milliseconds, rounded to the nearest 20 ms.
Use the UPDATE program as follows:
-
List the current values in the Application Delay Table
-
Modify the values
List Command
.L APP
Use the LIST command to list the current values in the Application Delay Table. The message server
prompts for an individual delay. Enter the application-delay index to be listed.
To list all application delay indexes, press
Table.
Enter
. The following is an example of the Application Delay
.L APP
LST:
APPLICATION DELAY TABLE
INDEX
DELAY (msec.)
0
0
1
7000
2
5000
3
500
4
3000
5
1200
6
1000
7
30000
8
1600
.
.
.
.
251
0
252
0
253
0
254
0
255
0
Modify Command
.M APP
Use the MODIFY command to change application delays. The message server prompts for the
application-delay index to be modified. Refer to the Modifiable Application−Delay Indexes section in
this chapter; only the delays that are listed can be modified at the Maintenance level. Enter the
application-delay index number. Enter the new value, and press Enter . The message server displays the
new value.
The delay values are entered in milliseconds and rounded to the nearest 20 ms value.
The following is an example of Application Delay Index 8 being modified to 1000 ms (1 second).
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-58
Installation and Maintenance Volume
.M APP
Enter APPLICATION DELAY index.
MOD:8
Enter new value (in MILLISECONDS) for APP DELAY 8.
Note: Will be rounded to the nearest 20 MSEC.
(0−1310700 MSEC, (0 means Infinite, empty line = 800
MOD:1000
DELAY set to 1000 MSEC.
Caution!
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
)
Changing an Application Delay from a nonzero value
to zero should never be done. A zero value sets an
infinite timeout that could result in permanently
locking up a port.
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6.4
6-59
MESSAGE BLOCK AND MESSAGE PURGE
Voice and fax messages can be marked as unplayable with the MBLOCK message block command.
Messages can be deleted on a mailbox-by-mailbox basis or from every mailbox in the message server
with the MPURGE message purge command.
To block or purge a message, the message header number must be identified. To determine the message
header number, use either the L M [mailbox number] M command to list mailbox message
information for a specific mailbox, or the L T (list trace) command if only the approximate time of the
message is known. Refer to the Mailbox Configuration Status section in this chapter, for more
information about listing mailbox messages.
Marking a Message Unplayable
Messages that are recorded and sent can be blocked from being played by the message recipients.
Blocking a message makes the message unplayable.
Making a message unplayable has no immediate effect on that message if it is already being played.
However, it prevents a mailbox holder from starting to play or to replay the message after it is blocked. If
a mailbox holder does attempt to play an unplayable message, the creator’s name is played. The status
prompt plays, followed by “This message has been marked unplayable by the system administrator.
Please erase.”
This same prompt is heard if the message is a fax message that the user is trying to print by entering 1
9 8 . The normal fax-message menu, with options to print the fax, is not played. The auto-print feature
is suppressed for fax messages marked unplayable.
If a message is marked for delivery to a remote mailbox but has not been sent, this same prompt is sent
over the network instead of the message. Messages already sent over the network are not deleted or
blocked by the MPURGE and MBLOCK commands.
The mailbox holder might hear silence rather than the preceding prompt, if the following occurs:
-
-
The MBLOCK command is entered at the same time the message is played for a local user or sent
over the network.
A mailbox holder has forwarded the message using the future-delivery option and then listens to the
message while it is still in the mailbox.
To block a message from being played, at the @ prompt, enter:
MBLOCK x Y
Enter
In this command, x is message header number, and Y indicates that the message is to be blocked.
The message server responds with a request to confirm this command.
MAKE MESSAGE 5001 UNPLAYABLE
ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO DO THIS? Y
MESSAGE 5001 MADE UNPLAYABLE
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-60
Installation and Maintenance Volume
A message that is marked as unplayable can be unmarked. To unblock a message so that it can be played
again, at the @ prompt, enter:
MBLOCK x N
Enter
In this command, x is message header number, and N indicates that the message is to be unblocked. The
message server responds with a request to confirm this command.
MAKE MESSAGE 5001 PLAYABLE
ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO DO THIS? Y
MESSAGE 5001 MADE PLAYABLE
The messages server executes the MBLOCK command without checking whether the message is currently
playable or not.
Blocked messages are not automatically deleted from the message server. The space and message header
will be available for reuse whenever the message server has been restarted. When a message is blocked,
the message is flagged as UNPLAY.
@MBLOCK 6941Y
MAKE MESSAGE 6941 UNPLAYABLE
ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO DO THIS? Y
MESSAGE 6941 MADE UNPLAYABLE
@L HE 6941
CREATOR MAILBOX NUMBER 8048
EXTENSION MESSAGE NUMBER:0000
.
.
.
.
.
.
FLAGS:UNPLAY
ADDRESSES:
The Call Processing Trace shows that the message has been made unplayable for all mailboxes for which
the M PURGE command was used.
@L T
.
.
.
.SELECT TRACE TO BE LISTED. (1−7), EMPTY LINE = EXIT).
:2
Enter mailbox (Empty line = ALL)
:4585
Enter start time : Year Month Day Hour Minute or C
(continuous)
:97 12 10 16 00
TIME MM/DD/YY 16:00
MSG 6941 MADE UNPLAYABLE
.
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-61
MPURGE Command Usage
A message that has been recorded and sent can be deleted from one or all mailboxes in the message
server.
From all mailboxes, the MPURGE command first initiates an MBLOCK command so that, while the
message server is searching each mailbox for an occurrence of the message, mailbox holders cannot play
that message.
The search that occurs after the MBLOCK command is issued can take some time to be executed. For
example, on a message server with 1,200 mailboxes, the search takes approximately 1/2 hour. Also,
seconds or even minutes might elapse between the display of the next “mailbox scheduled for deletion”
prompt. When the search has been completed, because the MBLOCK command is issued by the message
server before beginning the message-purge search, the message continues to use the header assigned to it,
and it remains on the disk until the message server is restarted.
When the MPURGE command is issued to delete a message from an individual mailbox, the MBLOCK
command is not evoked. The message is deleted from the mailbox specified. When issued for a particular
mailbox, the MPURGE command is quick to be executed. If a message was sent, for example, to three
mailboxes and purged one mailbox at a time from each of the three, after the final deletion, the message
is deleted from the disk and the header is made available for reuse.
Whether for a single mailbox or for all mailboxes, when the MPURGE command is issued to request that a
message be deleted, if the mailbox holder is logged on, the request to delete is queued, and the deletion
occurs after the mailbox holder logs off.
If the message server is restarted while deletion requests are queued, those queued requests are lost.
However, the message remains unplayable if it has been blocked (explicitly by MBLOCK or implicitly by
the all-mailbox MPURGE command). To verify that messages have been deleted before restarting the
message server, check the trace log.
MPURGE Command for All Mailboxes
To delete a message from every mailbox in the message server, at the @ prompt, enter:
MPURGE x
Enter
In this command, x is the message-header number.
DELETE MESSAGE 5001 FROM ALL MAILBOXES
ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO DO THIS? Y
MESSAGE 5001 SCHEDULED FOR DELETION FROM MAILBOX 2021
MESSAGE 5001 SCHEDULED FOR DELETION FROM MAILBOX 2022
.
.
@
The message server searches all mailboxes for the message to be deleted before returning to the @ prompt.
As it searches, the following prompt is displayed each time there is an occurrence of the message:
MESSAGE xxx SCHEDULED FOR DELETION FROM MAILBOX yyy.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
6-62
Installation and Maintenance Volume
The command can be canceled by entering
printed:
Escape
. The execution pauses, and the following message is
ABORT MPURGE (AND LEAVE MESSAGE UNPLAYABLE) .
ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO DO THIS? Y
@
Enter Y to abort the message purge. If the message purge is aborted, all messages that have already been
queued for deletion are deleted.
MPURGE Command for Message-by-Message Use
To delete a message from one mailbox, at the @ prompt, enter:
MPURGE x z
Enter
In this command, x is the message header number and z is the mailbox number.
Before checking whether the message is actually present in the mailbox, the Octel 200/300 requests
confirmation before deleting a message from the mailbox. For example, when a message is to be deleted
from one mailbox, the message server responds with the following:
DELETE MESSAGE 5001 FROM MAILBOX 2022
ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO DO THIS? Y
@
.
If an original recipient has forwarded the message, the forwarded instance of the message is not
deleted with the MPURGE x y command. However, if a message is deleted from every mailbox
by the MPURGE x command, the message, but not the forwarding comments, is blocked and
cannot play.
If the message should be restricted from all delivery, two options for removing the message are available:
-
-
Use MPURGE to delete the message from all mailboxes. If the message server is large, this could take
some time. The message could be heard by some users before the command to delete it from their
mailboxes is issued.
Do an MBLOCK and then a single-mailbox MPURGE for each mailbox to which the message was sent.
If the message should go to some of the originally addressed mailboxes, then the options are as follows:
-
-
Use MPURGE to delete the message from all mailboxes, and then create a new message with the
appropriate information. Send the message to the desired mailbox addresses.
Use a single-mailbox MPURGE for each mailbox that should not receive the message. If any of these
mailboxes are configured for Auto-Copy, perform the message purge from the Auto-Copy target.
Forwarded messages and network messages are not deleted.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Maintenance Commands
6-63
MBLOCK and MPURGE Considerations
-
-
-
-
-
PB60019−01
Blocked messages (explicitly by MBLOCK or implicitly by an all-mailbox MPURGE) are not
automatically deleted from the message server. The space used by the message and the associated
header become available for reuse when the message server is restarted.
If a message has been forwarded, the forwarded instance is not automatically deleted by the MPURGE
command. Make the message unplayable using the MBLOCK command. The message recipient hears
the sender’s name if available, but the message is not played. The prompt requesting that the
message be deleted is heard.
Any message can be Auto-Copied. If the single-mailbox MPURGE command is used to delete a
message, that message must be deleted from the Auto-Copy target as well. If the all-mailbox
MPURGE is used, in general, the message is deleted from Auto-Copy targets.
Even if a message is part of a forwarding chain, only that particular message is blocked or purged.
Block or purge all messages in the chain, if desired. For instance, if a voice-annotated fax message is
to be purged, enter the MPURGE command separately for both the voice annotation and for the fax
message. Similarly, if a message was forwarded with comments, delete both the comments and the
forwarded message with the MPURGE command.
If part of a forwarded message chain is marked unplayable, when the message server is restarted,
messages from the point of those marked unplayable are deleted. For example, if a message is
forwarded with comments and then forwarded a second time with comments, blocking the first
forwarded comments deletes those comments and the message, but the second forwarded comments
can still be played.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7
LOG COMMANDS
Chapter Content
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
LOG Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Log Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Call Processing Trace (CPT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
Using the CPT Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
Printing the CPT Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
Using the List Trace Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8
Using the LOG PR CPT Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-12
Examples Using LOG PR CPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-14
Examples Using LOG PR CPT for Untraced Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-16
Displaying Types of Events and Supplemental (AUX) Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-20
Call Detail Record Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-21
Configuring the CDR Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-26
Displaying Call Detail Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-29
Setting Display Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-30
CDR Size by Transaction Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-36
Examples of Various CDR Log Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-37
Namesend Activity Trace Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-40
Moves, Adds, and Changes Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-43
Types of Configuration Table Entries Logged . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-43
Server Activity Trace Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-50
Appendix A Call-Processing Trace Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7A-1
Tables
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-5
7-6
7-7
7-8
7-9
PB60019−01
Trace Activity Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7
Transaction Type Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22
Descriptions of the CDR Status That Can Be Logged . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-23
Information Logged by Transaction Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-35
Call Detail Record Size by Transaction Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-36
Namesend Activity Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-40
Event and Aux Activities in Namesend Activity Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-42
SAT Log Aactivity Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-51
SAT Log SAT_StatusTypes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-54
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
LOG Commands
Command
Information
LOG x y
Displays log option and log to be traced.
LOG ?
Displays all log options: PR, BE, PF, MF, ST.
LOG PR [log type]
Lists filters for each log type. Enter the log options
and filters to control the output format and record
selection criteria.
LOG BE x
Sets the beginning time for the CDR or MAC log.
Once the begin time is set, records collected before
this date are no longer accessible.
LOG MF CDR
Used with CDR log to enable or disable filters for
logging combinations of transaction and status types.
LOG PF CDR
Used with the CDR log to display the enabled or
disabled filters modified by the LOG MF command.
LOG ST x
Shows the beginning time and the time of the first
record presently in the log.
LOG Commands
Call Processing Trace (CPT) Commands
L T
Display a menu of seven choices for call processing
trace activity. Enter the trace activity number to be
displayed.
L T x
Displays a specific call processing trace activity.
x = trace activity number to be displayed.
L T ?
Displays all LIST TRACE options
Call Detail Record (CDR) Command
PB60019−01
CDR
Displays the CDR log file.
CDR ?
Displays available options and all report filter types
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Log Commands 7-1
7.1
LOG COMMAND
Use the LOG command to trace information about specific events for
-
Call Processing Trace (CPT) activities
-
Call Detail Record (CDR) log activities
-
Moves, Adds, and Changes (MAC) activities
-
Network Namesend activities (NAM)
-
Server Activity Trace Log (SAT)
The Octel 200/300 displays the collected data according to specific filters that can limit the time interval
for which activities are logged.
To execute the LOG command, at the @ prompt, enter:
LOG x y
In this command, x is a specific option type and y is the log to be traced.
Log Options
There are five options for tracing log activities. Details about each option and how they work with each
log type are described in the following sections.
To display the log options, at the @ prompt, enter:
LOG ?
Enter
Five log options are displayed:
@LOG ?
PR
Print log file
BE
Set begin time of log file
PF
Print filters for input to log file
MF
Modify filters for input to log file
ST
Print status of log file
The following table shows which options can be traced for each log type.
PB60019−01
Log
Type
PR
CPT
n
CDR
n
n
MAC
n
n
NAM
n
n
SAT
n
n
BE
PF
MF
ST
n
n
n
n
n
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
PR Option: Print Log Files
Use the PR option to list filters for each log type. These filters designate the records that can be collected
and displayed. To use this option, enter:
LOG PR [log type],
The OctelR 200/300 prompts for print options and filters to control the output format and record
selection criteria. Enter the desired combinations of print options and filters in the command line. The
print options are common for all log types; the filters differ by log type. The PR filters for each log type
are explained in the appropriate section.
@LOG PR <log type>
Specify Print Option(s):
“S”tart <time>, “E”nd <time>, “L”ine <length>, “p”age <length> “\”
“M”ask <mask (including date and time fields)> “C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>
The general rules for using the LOG PR x command to display activities are as follows:
-
Print options and filters for LOG PR x can be entered in any order.
Print options and filters can be omitted and some might be only partially specified so that a range
that matches the entered characters is displayed.
If no print options or filters are entered after the LOG PR x command, all information is printed,
starting at the beginning of the log and ending with the last entry.
.
At any time, press
Escape
to terminate printing and return to the @ prompt.
The print option fields for setting how the trace is displayed are:
-
-
-
-
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Start [time]
Enter the time that the trace log display should begin. Only those activities with a start time greater
than or equal to the specified time are displayed. If no start time is specified, the display begins at
the beginning of the log. You must specify the year, month, and day. The hour, minute, and second
are optional. For example, S 00 01 23 7 specifies 7 a.m. on January 23, 2000, as the starting
time for records to be printed.
End [time]
Enter the time that the trace log display should end. You must specify the year, month, and day. The
hour, minute, and second are optional. For example, E 00 01 23 9 27 specifies 9:27 a.m. on
January 23, 2000, as the end time. Records with an ending time after this time are not printed.
Line [length
Line length can be shortened if the screen is too small and lines wrap. This will truncate columns on
the right. If the display line length should be changed, enter the line length desired. The standard line
length is 80 characters. The default varies by record type.
Page [length]
Enter the number of lines to be displayed between headers. The default displays the header only
once.
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-3
-
-
-
\ (backslash)
Before pressing Enter , you can enter a backslash (\) to designate that additional print options or
filters follow on another line. If the print options and filters designated are longer than one line, the
backslash connects the additional line to the command string. The backslash can also be used at any
time in the line to segment criteria to identify print options or filters requested easily.
Mask
Not used at Maintenance level.
C
Press the letter C to designate that the records should print continuously from the time the log
command is initiated.
BE Option: Set Begin Time of Log Files
Use the BE option to set the beginning time for the CDR or MAC log. Once the begin time is set, records
collected before this date are no longer accessible.
Setting the begin time for a log facilitates the interface to an external data collection package that periodically
collects the current data in the log. You must specify the year, month, and day; the hour and minute are
optional. To set the begin time, at the @ prompt, enter:
LOG BE X
Enter
In this command, x is CDR or MAC.
Enter the year, month, day, hour, and minute of the begin time. Separate the information by a space.
@LOG BE CDR
Specify Beginning Time
>00 1 6
BEGIN TIME SET FOR LOG
MF Option: Modify Filters
Use the MF option with the CDR log to enable or disable the filters for logging combinations of
transaction and status types. Refer to the Call Detail Record Log section for information about MF for
this log. Enter:
LOG MF CDR
PF Option: Display Filters
Use the PF option with the CDR log. Enabled or disabled filters that are modified by the LOG MF command
can also be displayed with the LOG PF command. Refer to the Call Detail Record Log section for
information about PF for this log. Enter:
LOG PF CDR
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
ST Option: Print Status of Log Files
Use the ST option to show the beginning time and the time of the first record presently in the log. For
CPT, the log begins when the Octel 200/300 is first installed and when it is reinstalled because of a
software upgrade. For CDR or MAC, you can use LOG BE option to alter the begin date. You can use the
ST option with all five log types (PR, BE, PF, MF and ST).
When the log file becomes full, new records overwrite the oldest records in the log. Therefore, the
beginning time of the log and the time on the first record actually in the log at a given time are not the
same once the log has been overwritten.
In the following example, the records that were logged between 3:21:45 p.m., December 6, 2000, and
8:35:03 a.m., December 7, 2000, are no longer accessible.
To display the log beginning time, at the @ prompt, enter:
LOG ST x
Enter
@LOG ST CPT
log name: CPT
LOG FILE BEGINNING TIME IS MM/DD/YY 15:21:45
TIME OF FIRST RECORD IN LOG IS 12/07/00 08:35:03
@
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-5
7.2
CALL PROCESSING TRACE (CPT)
The Call Processing Trace (CPT) logs all call processing and messaging activities and events to one file
on the hard disk drive. The CPT logs events for the following activities:
-
Mailboxes
-
Ports
-
Network locations (Analog and Digital networking activities are logged separately.)
-
Message headers
-
Integrations
-
Applications processors (Works for Serenade)
-
Client Server Protocol (Used to trace activity for OctelDesigner Applications)
The CPT logs activity detected by the Octel 200/300. The CPT can be used to determine, for example, why
a caller entering 399 received the response “Extension 39 is invalid.” The CPT can help determine the port
that was used for the call. However, the reason for the failure requires extensive testing to determine why a
digit was not detected. Possible reasons might include the caller’s instrument, transmission quality, or any
other interruption in the transmission path during sending of the DTMF digits.
The CPT is a diagnostic aid that is designed to be used when a detailed customer complaint is received.
When used correctly, the CPT helps to verify or explain problems, such as late delivery or reappearing
messages.
When the CPT function is used as part of the process to determine why something unexpected happened,
several points should be considered:
-
The PBX numbering plan
-
The Octel 200/300 mailbox/extension numbering scheme
-
The extension numbers assigned to the Octel 200/300 ports
-
The PBX function and feature access codes
Using the CPT Log
When an unexpected event is identified in the CPT, the first step is to backtrack and attempt to
understand all activity reported before the event. The CPT stores several hours of activity for a large,
high traffic message server and up to several days of activities for a small, low traffic message server.
To collect and analyze specific call processing and message activities, you can use either:
LIST TRACE
Prints a simple menu whose options provide predefined filtering.
or
LOG PR CPT
Prints files with no default filters. However, because specific filters can be designated, this command
allows greater control and flexibility by using the filters.
Examine the CPT to determine the DTMF digits entered just before the unexpected event. The CPT
usually explains why the Octel 200/300 performed the way it did.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Printing the CPT Log
The CPT log is printed in the same format for both commands (L T or Log PR CPT). The content of
each record varies according to the type of activity traced, but similar data are printed in the same
column.
MM/DD/YY
MM/DD/YY
MM/DD/YY
HH:MM:SS
11:58:34
11:58:34
PRT TYPE
MSG
MSG
EVENT
REMOVED
FREED
AUX
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
6013
68f9
NO_TALK
696d
The following explains each column.
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
MM/DD/YY
Month, day, and year of the transaction.
HH:MM:SS
Hour, minute, and second of the transaction.
PRT
Three-digit designation of the active port, starting with 0. This column is blank if the activity is not
associated with a port. For Client Server Protocol (CSP), the port column lists an OctelAccess
number from G01 to G99.
TYPE
Types of trace activities being logged. Refer to Table 7-1 for activity types listed in this column.
EVENT
Shows what action was taking place at that time. Refer to Appendix A at the end of this chapter for a
list of possible events.
AUX
Shows supplemental event information. The AUX column also displays the digits entered for an
activity or a fax result code. For fax messages, the AUX column is empty if the fax was successful.
For applications routed through Octel Access, the AUX column displays the application session ID.
Server to the Refer to Appendix A in this chapter for a list of possible events and supplemental
actions that are logged, which includes a list of the fax result codes.
MBX/EXTN
Shows only the mailbox and the extension. The network location code is not shown in this column.
Instead, the network location name is shown in the SOURCE column.
For fax messages, this column shows the baud rate.
-
-
-
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
MSG#
Shows the message number.
SL U L
These three columns show the slot number, the integration unit, and the link. For fax messages, the
SL column shows encoding type MH or MR.
SOURCE
Shows the source of the call (integration). This column shows the network location name for a
network message.
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-7
Table 7-1 Trace Activity Types
PB60019−01
Type
Description
PORT
Port activity
FAX_CHN
Fax channel activity
FAX_MSG
Fax message activity
MBX
Mailbox activity
MSG
Message activity
NET_MSG
Network message activity
LAN_IN
Request received by this server from the LAN
LAN_OUT
Request sent from this server to the LAN
LAN_MSG
Message activity initiated by the LAN
LANLOST
LAN has lost communication
LANSYNC
LAN has synchronized communication
LAN_CTY
Courtesy operation (UP or DOWN specified in the EVENT field)
ONT_IN
An OctelNet (Protocol 5) packet received by server
ONT_OUT
An OctelNet (Protocol 5) packet sent out by server
ONT_ERR
An OctelNet (Protocol 5) protocol error occurred
NAM_DIR
Dial-by-Name directory activity
INTG_C
Card-based integration record, including MIC, RIC, ATTIC, SL1, and M1 integrations
INTG_CA
Card-based ANI integration record
INTG_R
RS-232C integration record
INTG_D
DTMF integration record
LINK_AP
Application control processor link activity
AP
Application control processor mailbox activity (for example, message waiting)
CSP_IN
Packet received from the OctelAccess Server (Beginning with S3.0)
CSP_OUT
Packet sent to the OctelAccess Server
GWLINK_UP
Link between OctelAccess Server and the message server is up
GWLING_DOWN
Link between OctelAccess Server and the message server is down
ISDNMSG
Identifies activity associated with calls to a DTIC card.
INTGQRY
PBX query call record types
INTGREP
PBX reply call record types
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Using the List Trace Command
The L T (List Trace) command displays CPT activities. There are seven activities you can trace. Each
activity is logged separately. At the @ prompt, enter:
L T
@L T
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Enter
ALL ACTIVITIES
MAILBOX ACTIVITY
PORT ACTIVITY
LOCATION ACTIVITY
MESSAGE ACTIVITY
INTEGRATION ACTIVITY
AP/VSA ACTIVITY
SELECT TRACE TO BE LISTED. (1 − 7 EMPTY LINE = EXIT).
:1
Enter start time : Year Month Day Hour Minute or C (continuous)
:
Activity Options
There are seven activities, which are described in this section. You can display a specific activity or
display all activities. For a specific activity, at the @ prompt enter:
L T x
Enter
where x is the specific activity number to trace.
If no specific activity is entered, all activities display.
Time
Specifying a start time helps to trace a specific problem. The trace begins from the time specified until
the last log for that activity is found. You can also specify a complete history or a continuous trace from
the time L T is initiated.
-
To select the complete history stored, press
-
To display current events, enter C (for continuous), and press
-
To exit List Trace, press
Escape
Enter
at the : prompt, instead of entering a start time.
Enter
.
.
When you specify a start time the year and month entries are mandatory and must be entered in the order
shown. The day, hour, and minute entries are optional. For example, 00 02 24 lists all information stored
starting with the first event stored for February 24, 2000 and continuing to the current date and time. If
the date and time entered precedes the date and time for the data stored, the message server starts
reporting events for the earliest date within the range specified.
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
To determine the first record in CPT, enter LOG ST CPT at the @ prompt. Refer to the Log
Command section in this chapter.
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-9
Option 1: All Activities
Select 1 to display All mailbox, port, location, message, integration, and Works for Serenade activities.
@L T 1
Enter start time :
:
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
11/05/00 09:43:05
11/05/00 09:43:05
11/05/00 09:43:05
11/05/00 09:43:05
11/05/00 09:43:06
11/05/00 09:43:06
11/05/00 09:43:06
11/05/00 09:43:06
11/05/00 09:43:06
Year Month Day Hour Minute or C (continuous)
PRT
029
029
014
014
TYPE
PORT
PORT
PORT
MBX
NET_MSG
NET_MSG
NET_MSG
MSG
EVENT
DIGIT_OUT
DIGIT_OUT
OFFSHOOT
MSGWAIT
PUT_IN
SENT
REMOVED
FREED
AUX
4
C
MBX/EXTN MSG#
SET
8207
6609
6609
USE_CNTO
030A
030A
030A
030A
SL U L SOURCE
ABC
A remote network location cannot be uniquely identified by only its prefix digits, because the
NUMBERING PLAN Table can have more than one entry for a location name. For that reason, the prefix
digits for event PUT_IN are not printed in the MBX/EXTN column. Instead, the network location name
is entered in the SOURCE column; in the preceding example, the name ABC is in the SOURCE column.
Refer to the Networking volume, Numbering Plan Table chapter, for more information about multiple
entries for the same location name.
Option 2: Mailbox Activity
Select 2 to display Mailbox Activity. To list activities for all mailboxes, leave the Enter Mailbox:
field blank. To list activities for a defined series of mailbox numbers, enter a specific mailbox number or
only partial digits for the mailbox numbers. All activities on the port used by that mailbox or those
mailboxes are listed until that mailbox or mailboxes log off.
Mailbox activities (type) displayed include the following events:
PB60019−01
-
Mailbox logon and logoff
-
Number of messages at logon
-
Hanging up without logging off
-
An invalid security code entered
-
Message waiting call received
-
Message waiting integration used
-
Number of messages in the mailbox
-
Digits entered by the user
-
Name recorded
-
Greeting recorded
-
Messages sent and received
-
Messages erased
-
Call forwarding mailbox assigned
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
@L T 2
Enter mailbox (Empty line = ALL)
:4720
Enter start time : Year Month Day Hour Minute or C
:
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS PRT TYPE
EVENT
AUX
04/05/00 10:05:19
MSG
PUT_IN
FWD_RNA
04/05/00 10:05:19 009 MBX
MSGWAIT
SET
04/05/00 10:34:50 029 MBX
LOGON
04/05/00 10:34:50 029 MBX
HAS_MSGS
016
04/05/00 10:34:50 029 MBX
NEW_MSGS
001
(continuous)
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
4720
0359
4720
4720
4720
4720
Option 3: Port Activity
Select 3 to display port activity. To display activity for all ports, leave the Enter Port: field blank.
To display activity for a specific port, enter the port number. The following port activities are displayed:
-
Caller action
-
Line drops
-
DTMF digits in and out
-
Call status (busy/RNA)
-
Call transfers made
-
Invalid security code entered
-
Number of messages sent on port
@L T 3
Enter port (Empty line = ALL)
:15
Enter start time : Year Month Day Hour Minute or C (continuous)
:
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS PRT TYPE
EVENT
AUX
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
04/05/00 09:47:30 015 PORT
DIGIT_OUT B
04/05/00 09:47:30 015 PORT
DIGIT_OUT 1
04/05/00 09:47:30 015 PORT
DIGIT_OUT 2
04/05/00 09:47:31 015 PORT
DIGIT_OUT 0
04/05/00 09:47:31 015 PORT
DIGIT_OUT 8
04/05/00 09:47:31 015 PORT
DIGIT_IN
B
04/05/00 09:47:32 015 PORT
DIGIT_IN
9
Option 4: Location Activity
Select 4 to display network location activity. To display activity for all network locations, leave the
Enter Location: field blank. To list the activity for a specific network location, enter the location
code or only partial location code digits. The location entered is displayed in the MBX/EXTN column.
The location activities displayed are:
Octel 200/300
-
Network messages added or removed from a network location
-
The success or failure of a network message received or sent
-
Network message recorded
-
Message number
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-11
@L T 4
Enter location (Empty line = ALL)
:6620
Enter start time : Year Month Day Hour Minute or C (continuous)
:
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS PRT TYPE
EVENT
AUX
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
04/05/00 09:43:05
NET_MSG PUT_IN
6620
7A8D
04/05/00 09:44:16
NET_MSG PUT_IN
6620
7A91
04/05/00 09:44:45
NET_MSG SENT
6620
7A8D
Option 5: Message Activity
Select 5 to display message activity. To display all message activity, leave the Enter Message: field
blank. To display a specific message, enter the message number or a series of digits. The message activity
trace displays as follows:
-
Messages sent, received, erased, freed
-
Names and Greeting activity
@L T 5
Enter message (Empty line = ALL)
:
Enter start time : Year Month Day Hour Minute or C (continuous)
:00 05
MM/DD/YY
05/02/00
05/02/00
05/12/00
05/12/00
05/12/00
05/18/00
HH:MM:SS
13:22:09
13:22:13
07:11:34
07:11:51
07:11:51
06:27:22
PRT TYPE
001 MSG
MSG
001 MSG
001 MSG
MSG
001 MSG
EVENT
RECORD
FREED
RECORD
SENT
PUT_IN
PLAY
AUX
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
RNA
1173
TOO_SHRT
1173
MAKE
1179
1179
MAKE
1121
1179
MAKE
117C
Option 6: Integration Activity
Select 6 to display all integration activities. The integration activities displayed are:
PB60019−01
-
Direct internal and external calls with source or trunk group
-
Forwarded internal and external calls with source or trunk group
-
Message waiting notification
-
Set or clear message waiting
-
Undetermined call location
-
Port used for AT&T System 75 integration
-
Forwarding reasons for slot, unit, and link
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-12
Installation and Maintenance Volume
@L T 6
Enter start time :
:
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
04/05/00 09:56:23
04/05/00 09:57:49
04/05/00 9:57:54
04/05/00 09:58:16
Year Month Day Hour Minute or C (continuous)
PRT
040
041
040
043
TYPE
INTG_C
INTG_C
INTG_C
INTG_C
EVENT
FWD_INT
DIR_EXT
ONHOOK
FWD_EXT
AUX
BUSY
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
4373
09 1 4 1705
800
10 1 1
09 1 4
NO_ANSWER 4334
10 1 3 100
Option 7: Aplink Activity
Select 7 to display Works for Serenade system activity. The activities displayed are:
-
LOST. The data link between the Octel 200/300 CPU and the Works for Serenade system is down.
-
SYNC. The data link is restored.
Using the LOG PR CPT Command
The LOG PR CPT command displays the same activities as are filtered with LIST TRACE.
With the LOG PR CPT command, different combinations of print options and filters can be specified to
consolidate information and focus the display on specific types of trace activities. Use LOG PR CPT to
do the following:
-
Set filter for records with FAX_CHN and FAX_MSG.
-
Set start and end times for any trace.
-
Review timing and sequence of all high-level communication to and from the LAN for Digital
Networking.
To use the LOG command for CPT activities, at the @ prompt, enter:
LOG PR CPT
Enter
.
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
“S”tart <time>, “E”nd <time>, “L”ine <length>, “p”age <length> “\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
Refer to the Log Command section for an explanation of LOG print options.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-13
Filters
In addition to the LOG print options that control the output format, specific filters and arguments can
limit the output to only those activities that match the set of search criteria. A filter need not be specified
and, in some cases, the filters can be partially specified. Only values that match specified filters display.
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Port filter, PR [port number]
Displays port activities. You can display all ports or a specific port. To display all ports, enter only
the filter command, PR. To display a specific port, enter the port number as three digits, beginning
with a leading 0. For example, port 6 would be entered as PR 006 and port 34 as PR 034.
Type filter, TY [type]
Displays a specific type of activity. Enter one of the trace activity types listed in Table 7-1. Except
for TY INTG, only one type can be specified at a time. For all integration activity, enter TY INTG.
Event filter, EV [event]
Displays a specific event. The specific events and their correct spelling, are listed in Appendix A,
Call Processing Trace Activities. Only one event can be specified at a time.
AUX filter, AU [aux]
Displays supplemental event activities. The activities and a list of the fax result codes are in
Appendix A at the end of this chapter. You can only specify one supplemental event for each event.
Mailbox filter, MB [number]
Displays records for a specific mailbox or extension number. The filter can designate partial mailbox
digits to display all mailboxes beginning with those specific digits. The mailbox/extension number is
displayed in the MBX/EXTN: column. When MB is the only filter applied to LOG PR CPT, all
events and supplemental activities for the mailboxes are listed. You can use MB with other filters that
apply to mailbox activity for more detailed filtering.
Message Number filter, MS [number]
Display all records where the specified message header number appears in the MSG# column. A
message number can be determined by reviewing the MSG# column in a trace activity log or at the @
prompt. Enter: L M x M Enter where x is the mailbox number.
Slot filter, SL [number]
Displays records for slot numbers. To display a specific slot number, enter the number as two digits.
For example, you would enter slot 1 as SL 01, slot 12 as SL 12, and so forth.
Unit filter, UN [number]
Displays records for the specific unit number on a slot.
Link filter, LI [number]
Displays records for the specified link.
Source filter, SO
Displays source of the call (integration) and shows the network location name for a network message.
D1, D2, D3, D4, D5 filter
Use these filters to show debug information, when applicable.
Two additional qualifiers help to limit the output further:
-
-
PB60019−01
Center a hyphen (−) preceding a filter to specify that the filter should not match a specific value. For
example, MB − 4 specifies that records in the mailbox column beginning with 4 do not display.
Enter a quote (I) to specify blank columns. For example, EV −I specifies that if the EVENT column
is blank the record does not display.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-14
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Examples Using LOG PR CPT
You can use the LOG command to trace specific information. Use print options, such as the start time (S)
or end time (E) along with any combination of filters. At the @ prompt, enter:
LOG PR CPT
Enter
Print options and filters display.
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
“S”tart <time>, “E”nd <time>, “L”ine <length>, “p”age <length> “\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>S 00 7 6 E 00 7 8
Mailbox Activities
To print all mailbox activity currently in the CPT log, enter the filter MB. You can enter specific mailbox
numbers or partial mailbox digits.
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
“S”tart <time>, “E”nd <time>, “L”ine <length>, “p”age <length> “\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>S 00 7 6 MB − ” TY − NET
In this example, this command displays a mailbox without location information. The TY − NET filter is
necessary because the location and mailbox numbers are both printed in the MB column.
Port Activities
To print all port activity currently in the CPT log, enter the filter PR. To specify a particular port, enter
three digits beginning with 0. You can designate start and end times.
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
“S”tart <time>, “E”nd <time>, “L”ine <length>, “p”age <length> “\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>PR 007 S 00 7 6
In this example, this command displays all CPT records for port 7 that occurred on or after July 7, 2000.
Location Activity
To print the network location activity, enter:
TY NET_MSG
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-15
Message Activity
To print message activity currently in the CPT log using the LOG command, at the @ prompt enter:
LOG PR CPT
Enter
To list all messages or specify a specific message number, enter the filter MS. In this example, this
command displays all records for message 3000, from the beginning of the log to the end.
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
“S”tart <time>, “E”nd <time>, “L”ine <length>, “p”age <length> “\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>MS 3000
Integration Activity
To display integration activity using LOG, specify the type of integration to trace. Enter the filter TY x,
where x is the type of integration to trace. Enter TY INTG to show all integration activity.
-
INTG_C. Card-based integration record (MIC, RIC, ATTIC, SL1, M1)
-
INTG_CA. Card-based ANI integration record (MIC, RIC, ATTIC, SL1, M1)
-
INTG_R. RS-232C integration record
-
INTG_D. DTMF integration record
In addition to TY, you can also specify the following filters for integration:
-
SL Slot number for card integration
-
UN Unit number for card integration
-
LI Link number for card integration
-
SO Source of call (integration)
To display APlink activity using LOG, at the @ prompt enter:
LOG PR CPT
Enter
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
“S”tart <time>, “E”nd <time>, “L”ine <length>, “p”age <length> “\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>TY AP S 00 7 9 11 25
In this example, this command displays all Works for Serenade activity in the CPT log that occurred on
or after 11:25 a.m., July 9, 2000.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-16
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Examples Using LOG PR CPT for Untraced Activities
The following examples use the LOG PR CPT command to display activities that cannot be traced using
the L T command.
LOG for Digital Networking (LAN)
You can use the LOG command to review the timing and sequence of all high-level communication to and
from the LAN for digital networking. The following activities can be displayed:
-
-
Communication to the LAN being lost and reestablished
-
This activity could be caused by LAN restarting or
-
The LAN card being removed and reinserted.
Communication to other high-speed locations being lost and reestablished
-
-
This activity could be caused by the other location experiencing a restart or the digital
connection to the other location being interrupted across the network.
Message transfer traffic
-
-
The sending side shows the message number being sent, the creator, and the result of the
transfer.
The receiving side shows the message number being received and the new message in which it is
stored.
-
Activities for a specified source creator mailbox
-
Activities for a specified LAN channel
The LOG command can show information both in real time, as it happens, or for a previous period by
specifying a start date and time. All entries are time stamped as they occur.
Example of All LAN Type Entries
In this example, the start time (S) is specified as 00 4 21, and the type of filter (TY) is specified as
LAN. This example displays all log entries in the TYPE column that start with LAN.
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
”S”tart <time>, ”E”nd <time>, ”L”ine <length>, ”P”age <length> ”\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>s 00 4 21 ty lan
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
04/21/00 07:23:27
04/21/00 07:23:27
.
.
.
04/21/00 07:26:11
04/21/00 07:26:13
04/21/00 07:26:15
.
.
.
04/21/00 15:47:37
04/21/00 15:47:56
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PRT TYPE
EVENT
AUX
LAN_IN OPENCONN
L01 LAN_OUT CONNGRANT
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
1001
L01 LAN_IN DESTMBX
L01 LAN_IN FAXDLV
L01 LAN_MSG CREATE
NAMEFAIL 4411
NO_EXTN
L05 LANLOST
L05 LANSYNC
000
000
R2071
F69
JOE JONES
66303090
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-17
Example of LANLOST Type Entries
In this example, the start time (S) is specified as 00 4 21, and the type of filter (TY) is specified as
LANLOST. This example displays all log entries that have LANLOST in the TYPE column.
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
”S”tart <time>, ”E”nd <time>, ”L”ine <length>, ”P”age <length> ”\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>s 00 4 21 ty lanlost
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS PRT TYPE
EVENT
D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
04/21/00 15:47:37 L05 LANLOST
AUX
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
000
Example of Search for Source Creator Mailbox Type
In this example, the start time (S) is specified as 00 4 21, and the type of filter (SO, for source) is
specified as 66994474. This example displays all log entries that have an entry of 66994474 in the
SOURCE column.
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
”S”tart <time>, ”E”nd <time>, ”L”ine <length>, ”P”age <length> ”\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>s 00 4 21 SO 66994474
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
04/25/00 14:21:01
04/25/00 14:21:01
04/26/00 09:35:42
04/26/00 09:35:42
04/26/00 09:42:15
04/26/00 09:42:15
PRT TYPE
EVENT
L01
L01
L01
L01
L01
L01
NAMDLV
MSGDLV
NAMDLV
MSGDLV
NAMDLV
MSGDLV
LAN_IN
LAN_IN
LAN_IN
LAN_IN
LAN_IN
LAN_IN
AUX
NO_EXTN
NO_EXTN
NO_EXTN
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
D15
D15
11BA
11C1
11D8
11DA
66994474
66994474
66994474
66994474
66994474
66994474
Example of LANSYNC Type Entries
In this example, the start time (S) is specified as 00 4 21, and the type of filter (TY) is specified as
LANSYNC. This example displays all log entries that have a LANSYNC entry in the TYPE column.
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
”S”tart <time>, ”E”nd <time>, ”L”ine <length>, ”P”age <length> ”\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>s 00 4 21 ty lansync
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS PRT TYPE
EVENT
D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
04/21/00 15:47:56 L05 LANSYNC
PB60019−01
AUX
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
000
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-18
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Example of LAN Channel Number
In this example, the start time (S) is specified as 00 4 21, and the type of filter (PR, for port) is
specified as 101. This example displays all log entries for activities on LAN channel 1, and it shows
message number 10B3 sent to number F68.
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
”S”tart <time>, ”E”nd <time>, ”L”ine <length>, ”P”age <length> ”\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>s 00 4 21 pr 101
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
04/21/00 07:23:27
04/21/00 07:23:27
04/21/00 07:23:27
04/21/00 07:23:27
04/21/00 07:23:27
04/21/00 07:23:27
04/21/00 07:23:27
04/21/00 07:23:27
04/21/00 07:23:27
04/21/00 07:23:27
04/21/00 07:23:28
04/21/00 07:23:28
04/21/00 07:23:28
04/21/00 07:23:29
PRT TYPE
EVENT
L01
L01
L01
L01
L01
L01
L01
L01
L01
L01
L01
L01
L01
L01
CONNGRANT
VCUCONN
STATUS
STATUS
STRTSND
DESTMBX
STRTSND
DESTMBX
MSGDLV
CREATE
STATUS
STATUS
RCV
CLOSEDONE
LAN_OUT
LAN_IN
LAN_OUT
LAN_OUT
LAN_IN
LAN_IN
LAN_OUT
LAN_OUT
LAN_IN
LAN_MSG
LAN_OUT
LAN_OUT
LAN_MSG
LAN_IN
AUX
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
1001
VCUREADY
VCUCONN
110
SUCCESS
SUCCESS 110
NO_EXTN
SUCCESS
COMPLETE
SUCCESS
10B3
F68
151
F68
LOG for Protocol 5 (OctelNet)
You can use the LOG command for tracing various events for Protocol 5 (OctelNet) networking. The
applicable events are provided in Appendix A at the end of this chapter.
The following example uses the LOG PR CPT command for OctelNet information. The start time (S) is
specified as 00 02 09, and the type of filter (TY) is specified as ONT. This example displays all log
entries that start with ONT in the TYPE column.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-19
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
”S”tart <time>, ”E”nd <time>, ”L”ine <length>, ”P”age <length> ”\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>s 00 02 09 00 00 ty ont
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
02/09/00 15:51:48
02/09/00 15:51:48
02/09/00 15:51:53
02/09/00 15:51:53
02/09/00 15:52:00
02/09/00 15:52:00
02/09/00 15:52:12
02/09/00 15:52:12
02/09/00 15:52:18
02/09/00 15:52:18
02/09/00 15:52:31
02/09/00 15:52:34
02/09/00 15:52:37
02/09/00 15:52:42
02/09/00 15:52:42
02/09/00 15:52:52
02/09/00 15:52:51
02/09/00 15:53:12
02/09/00 15:53:12
02/09/00 15:53:13
02/09/00 15:53:14
02/09/00 15:53:24
02/09/00 15:53:24
02/09/00 15:53:31
02/09/00 15:53:31
02/09/00 15:53:32
02/09/00 15:53:32
02/09/00 15:53:42
02/09/00 15:53:42
PRT TYPE
EVENT
AUX
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
004
WKUP_REQ
WKUP_RSP
LYSN_REQ
LYSN_RSP
SHDR_REQ
SHDR_RSP
MHDR_REQ
MHDR_RSP
ADMGENREQ
ADMASCRSP
ADMGENRSP
END_MSG
ADMGENRSP
ADMGENREQ
ADMGENRSP
MHDR_REQ
MHDR_RSP
END_MSG
SAVE_RQ
SAVE_GO
MSG_RSP
MHDR_REQ
MHDR_RSP
END_MSG
SAVE_RQ
SAVE_GO
MSG_RSP
MHDR_REQ
MHDR_RSP
KNOWSER
KNOWSER
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
ONT_IN
ONT_OUT
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
ACCEPT
ADMNMSG
SUCCESS
GETNAME
SUCCESS
SUCCESS
ADDED
CHMODE
SUCCESS
NEWVCE
SUCCESS
NEWVCE
SUCCESS
ENDSES
SUCCESS
2
2
EE6B2800
B2D05E004
0000
NYORK1
9068
JOHN SNOW
00
9068
120B
9068
120B
9058
NYORK1
120C
NYORK1
204
NYORK2
120C
NYORK2
0000
NYORK2
Client Server Protocol Trace Examples
Client Server Protocol (CSP) request-reply trace displays activity between the OctelAccess Server and
the message server. This type of trace information can be used to troubleshoot development of
OctelDesigner applications. The example below shows a voice session between the OctelAccess Server
and the message server. The string of digits following the session ID in the AUX field is the raw bytes in
the packet. This information is not translated.
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
”S”tart <time>, ”E”nd <time>, ”L”ine <length>, ”P”age <length> ”\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
MM/DD/YY
04/21/00
04/21/00
04/21/00
04/21/00
04/21/00
04/21/00
PB60019−01
HH:MM:SS
07:23:27
07:23:27
07:23:27
07:23:27
07:23:27
07:23:27
PRT
001
GO3
G03
G03
GO3
G03
TYPE
PORT
CSP_OUT
CSP_IN
ERROR
CSP_OUT
CSP_IN
EVENT
AUX
OFFSHOOT
NEWCALL
1
SPK_PRMPT
1
CL_ERROR
1
END_SPEAK
1
RECRD_MSG
1
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
8A 01 00 0B 00 0A 00 0B 00 01
08 00 00 00 00 0C 00 0B 00 01
86 00 00 0B 00 0A 00 0B 00 01
13 00 00 00 00 0B 00 0B 00 01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-20
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Other LOG Examples
In this example, use the LOG PR CPT command to print all entries in the CPT trace log for messages
being deferred for mailbox 4999 from 11:00 a.m., July 8, 2000, to 3:00 p.m., July 9, 2000.
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
“S”tart <time>, “E”nd <time>, “L”ine <length>, “p”age <length> “\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>EV DEFERRED MB 4999 S 00 7 8 11 E 00 7 9 15
In this example, use the LOG PR CPT command to print all entries in the CPT trace log for integration
slot 9, unit 1, link 2 starting July 10, 2999, at 12:30:45, and continuing:
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
“S”tart <time>, “E”nd <time>, “L”ine <length>, “p”age <length> “\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>TY intg sl 09 un 1 lt 2 \
>S 00 7 10 12 30 45 C
.
The “\” in the example illustrates the use of the continuation character to show that the command
continues onto another line.
Displaying Types of Events and Supplemental (AUX) Activities
Refer to Appendix A at the end of this chapter for a list of the events and AUX activities that can be
displayed in a Call Process Trace log. With the LOG command, any of these events and AUX activities
can be filtered.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-21
7.3
CALL DETAIL RECORD LOG
The Call Detail Record (CDR) Log collects call processing transaction data in a log file on the
Octel 200/300. Each time a transaction is concluded, its outcome status is logged in the CDR log file.
The file containing these transaction records can be used for billing or maintenance purposes. As a
maintenance tool, the CDR log can be used to optimize Octel 200/300 applications or to identify security
violations.
Table 7-2 and Table 7-3 list the abbreviations displayed for the various transaction types and status types
that can be configured, with a description of each type.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-22
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 7-2 Transaction Type Descriptions
Transaction
Type (XACTIN)
ALOUTC
S.4.1
Alarm outcall
APIN
ACP call in (Works for Serenade).
APOUTC
ACP outcall (Works for Serenade).
CALATT
Call to assistance (0) − dialed.
CALATD
Call to assistance (0) − default.
CALDID
DID call to mailbox through DID module.
CALEXT
For the VMX 5000 User Interface, 001 is used to transfer to a local extension. Extension digits are
included, as are auto attendant calls when no mailbox is defined.
CALHLP
VMX 5000 User Interface only. 000 transfers to a help mailbox. The help mailbox is included.
CALIMM
Immediate call to mailbox.
CALINT
Integrated call to mailbox (includes all calls received with call record).
CALMBX
Call to a mailbox.
CALNXT
Call to a Next Mailbox.
CALPA
Call to Personal Assistance − dialed.
CALPAD
Call to Personal Assistance − default.
CALSDM
Call to a Single Digit Menu mailbox.
COSOVR
Port/Trunk COS override. The new trunk COS is shown.
FAXQCK
Quick fax. For each quick fax sent, there is a FAXRCV transaction type.
FAXDLV
Fax delivery attempt. For each fax delivery, there is a FAXSND transaction type.
FAXSND
Fax channel: send.
FAXRCV
Fax channel: receive.
FAXEDT
Fax channel: edit (Works for Serenade).
LOGON
Mailbox logon.
LPOUTC
Lamp message waiting outcall (only if DTMF digits are used to control lamps).
MODEM
Modem connect.
MWOUTC
Message waiting outcall.
OFOUTC
Off-site message waiting outcall.
NTOUTC
Network outcall attempt.
NTMSGD
Network message: sent day.
NTMSGN
Network message: sent night.
NTMSGR
Network message: received.
NTIN
Octel 200/300
Description
Network call in.
NTCHEK
Network check function. Checking if a network message was listened to. This does not stop the
mailbox logon activity. The logon record continues, after the network check is completed.
QCKMSG
Quick message.
QCKINT
Forced forward, record call-in-progress. Applicable only to selected Enhanced In-band Integration,
this functionality is PBX-dependent.
TELNET
Telnet connect.
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-23
Table 7-3 Descriptions of the CDR Status That Can Be Logged
Status
OK
PB60019−01
Description
All’s well condition (for example, call answered, logon successful).
AFWD
All calls forwarded.
APXF
Transfer control to ACP (Works for Serenade).
BADP
Invalid password.
BADU
UID logon failed, because the incorrect user ID entered.
BADM
Invalid mailbox number.
BLOK
Call blocked.
BUSY
Busy.
CNTU
Number of messages erased and sent during logon.
DIR
Direct call to message server.
DIRI
Direct call from extension.
ERR
Error or network failure after connection.
ERRX
Error in PBX transfer or network busy/RNA.
FBSY
Fast busy.
FLLQ
Failed line quality test.
FLBU
All ports busy on receiving message server.
FLRT
Failed route
FLAR
All routes failed.
FLDK
Disk full.
FLNR
No response from network location.
FLPR
VMX 5000 location protocol error.
FLNN
No room for more netnames in NETNAME Table.
FLNC
Destination not taking network calls, messages returned.
FLRF
Destination refused to accept message from this message server.
FLMO
Destination accepting messages only (no reply).
FLUD
Message undeliverable (too long, etc.).
FLND
DTMF D not received in network response (AMIS protocol).
FLAA
All messages failed.
GRET
Greeting played.
MBXF
Mailbox full.
NTXF
Network access attempt.
NOCL
No call placed.
QUE
Call queued.
RNA
No answer.
VAC
Extension vacant (does not exist).
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-24
Installation and Maintenance Volume
You can use two commands to configure CDR:
-
-
LOG
The LOG command defines which transactions are retained in the log. Use the LOG command to set,
clear, and display the transaction types and status types collected in the CDR log file.
CDR
The CDR command indicates the portion of the retained data that is to be displayed. Use the CDR
command to display collected data, according to specific filters that can limit the time interval,
transaction type, status type, or any combination. The CDR command also provides functions to set
the beginning of the log file, identify whether the log file has wrapped around and overwritten itself,
and format the output.
This section explains the following:
-
What the CDR file contains
-
How to enable the CDR log to record the desired transactions
-
How to define selected items within the log for display
The following example shows a CDR log that begins on April 18, 2000. The columns on the screen are
described below.
@CDR
MM/DD/YY
04/18/00
04/18/00
*04/18/00
04/18/00
04/18/00
04/18/00
*04/18/00
04/18/00
04/18/00
-
-
-
-
-
-
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
HH:MM:SS
00:00:24
00:00:25
00:01:06
00:01:12
00:06:13
00:06:15
00:06:56
00:07:14
00:07:14
XACTIN
LPOUTC
OFOUTC
LOGON
LPOUTC
LPOUTC
OFOUTC
LOGON
CALINT
FAXRCV
STAT
ERR
OK
BADP
ERR
ERR
OK
BADP
OK
OK
MS ME PRT
009
020
00 00 020
009
009
020
00 00 020
01
033
01
007
DURATN
0:00.1
0:00.1
0:00.7
0:00.1
0:00.1
0:00.1
0:00.7
0:01.7
0:01.7
MAILBOX
4450
7395
7395
4450
4450
7395
7395
2070
COS CALLER
252
MM/DD/YY
Lists the month, day, and year of each transaction.
HH/MM/SS
Lists the hour, minute, and second of each transaction.
XACTIN
Lists transaction type or indicates the specific type of calling or messaging event. Refer to Table 7-2
for a list of the transaction types.
STAT
Shows the status of each transaction type. The status indicates what happened when that call was
placed. Refer to Table 7-3 for the list of possible status values.
MS
Shows the number of messages sent in that transaction. For example, in a call transaction in which
no message is left, the entry in the MS column would be 00; with one message left the entry would be
01. A LOGON entry equals the number of messages sent by the mailbox holder while logged on. A
FAXRCV entry indicates the number of fax pages received.
ME
Shows the number of messages erased while the mailbox holder was logged on.
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-25
-
-
PRT
Contains a three-digit designation, starting with 0, of the port that each transaction came in on. For
digital networking entries, this entry is always 000.
DURATN
Lists the number of hours/minutes/tenths of minutes for each transaction. The duration of an event,
reflected in a CDR log that is not designated to be logged is included in the first CDR log entry
associated with the call. For example, assume that records of type CALATT (call attendant) are not
logged, but all transactions of type LOGON are enabled. A call comes into the message server and is
routed to the attendant mailbox. The attendant greeting plays and the caller logs on to a mailbox
rather than hangs up. Because a record is not logged for CALATT, the entire duration of that call is
attributed to LOGON.
For digital networking entries, this column contains the actual voice length of the message for
NTMSGD and NTMSGN entries and is always 0:00.0 for an NTOUTC entry.
.
-
-
-
-
-
Consider the following about entries in the DURATN column:
If the message server time is modified in UPDATE (MODIFY DATE), the durations logged for
calls in process at that time will not be correct. When the time is changed because of daylight
savings time, the duration logged for calls in process is correct.
The maximum duration that is logged is 24 hours; a call lasting 25 hours shows 1 hour.
MAILBOX
Lists the number of the mailbox involved for each transaction type (XACTIN). For example, the
mailbox listed for a LOGON transaction type is the mailbox entered. The mailbox listed for a network
transaction type is the creator’s mailbox. The mailbox listed for a CALPA transaction type is the
mailbox originally called.
COS
Shows the number of the incoming port/trunk group, which is logged only for integrated call records.
Refer to the Call Detail Records, Display Filters section, in this chapter.
CALLER
The caller’s mailbox number is logged only for integrated call records. Refer to the Display Filters
section.
The following two columns are displayed by expanding the screen width to 132. When defining the CDR
transactions within the LOG command, define L [LEN] to be 132 (L 132) to display these columns:
-
-
PB60019−01
DESTINATION
Lists the numbers entered for pager outcalls and fax delivery attempts. The entries represent the
location names as defined in the LOCATION Table for network outcalls or the identification string of
the sending fax machine for a FAXRCV transaction type.
RTE
Lists the route numbers for network outcall attempts. The RTE column represents the voice port
allocation for FAXSND, FAXRCV, and FAXEDT (logged by fax channel only) transaction types. For
digital networking entries, the entry in this column is always 1 for a NTOUTC transaction type.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-26
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Configuring the CDR Log
Records are not saved until the CDR log is configured to save the transaction records. Use the LOG
command to save the combinations of transaction types and status values. The transaction type indicates
the specific type of calling event to log (for example, call to a mailbox, call to a personal assistant). The
status indicates what happened when a call was placed or a message delivery was attempted.
Use the LOG command to:
Modify the specific transaction type and status value combinations used to save transactions in the
CDR log.
-
Display specific transaction type and status value combinations established, as well as the entire log.
-
Modifying CDR for Transaction and Status
To begin recording call detail records, the desired combinations of transaction types and status options
must be enabled. All transaction types and status values can be set, or specific types of transactions and
status values can be set.
.
Setting type and status combinations only determines the records that should actually be saved in
the log. Some type and status combinations might not be valid, but setting them has no effect on
the log file because they would not occur.
Configuration
To configure the type/status combinations to be logged, at the @ prompt, enter:
LOG MF CDR
Enter
@LOG MF CDR
Specify Filters to MODIFY:
<”E”nable or ”D”isable> <XA string or ”ALL”> <ST string or ”ALL”>
Empty line when done. ESCape to abort.
>
Specify the filters to be modified. If all transaction types and all status values are to be enabled, at the >
prompt, enter:
E ALL ALL
Enter
You can enter additional modifications to the CDR log. If no other modifications are to be made, press
Enter again. The message server confirms that the CDR log was modified.
>E ALL ALL
>
LOG FILTERS MODIFIED
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Press Escape to cancel LOG MF CDR at any time before the LOG FILTERS MODIFIED
message displays. No changes are made to the CDR log.
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-27
Transaction Types
To set specific transaction types, at the > prompt, enter the type of transaction and the status value. Refer
to Table 7-2 and Table 7-3 for the correct abbreviations, or use the LOG PF CDR command to display
the CDR log status and view the abbreviations. Refer to the Displaying CDR Type and Status
Configuration section.
A transaction type and a status value can be partially specified. When only the first letter (or two) is
entered, all types and values beginning with that letter are enabled. In the following example, only
transaction types beginning with CAL and status values beginning with B are set.
>E CAL B
>
LOG FILTERS MODIFIED
@LOG PF CDR
Specify Filters to PRINT:
<”E”nable or ”D”isable> <XA string or ”ALL”> <ST string or ”ALL”>
Empty line when done. ESCape to abort.
>E C B
CALMBX
CALATT
CALPA
CALFLX
CALNXT
CALDID
CALINT
CALEXT
CALIMM
CALATD
CALPAD
CALHLP
>
BUSY
BUSY
BUSY
BUSY
BUSY
BUSY
BUSY
BUSY
BUSY
BUSY
BUSY
BUSY
BADP
BADP
BADP
BADP
BADP
BADP
BADP
BADP
BADP
BADP
BADP
BADP
BADM
BADM
BADM
BADM
BADM
BADM
BADM
BADM
BADM
BADM
BADM
BADM
BLOK
BLOK
BLOK
BLOK
BLOK
BLOK
BLOK
BLOK
BLOK
BLOK
BLOK
BLOK
BADU
BADU
BADU
BADU
BADU
BADU
BADU
BADU
BADU
BADU
BADU
BADU
To disable transaction and status values from the CDR log, use the same command:
LOG MF CDR
Use the same procedure to disable transactions and status values, but add a D before specifying the filters
to modify.
D ALL ALL
@LOG MF CDR
Specify Filters to MODIFY:
<”E”nable or ”D”isable> <XA string or ”ALL”> <ST string or ”ALL”>
Empty line when done. ESCape to abort.
>D ALL ALL
>
LOG FILTERS MODIFIED
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-28
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Displaying CDR Type and Status Configuration
The transaction types and status values, both those enabled and disabled, modified by the LOG MF CDR
command can be printed.
To print a single transaction type or all transaction types currently being collected in the CDR log
file, at the @ prompt, enter:
-
LOG PF CDR
Enter
@LOG PF CDR
Specify Filters to PRINT:
<”E”nable or ”D”isable> <XA string or ”ALL”> <ST string or ”ALL”>
Empty line when done. ESCape to abort.
>
Enter the filters you want to print.
To print specific information, enter a transaction type and status value at the > prompt.
-
You can partially specify a transaction type and a status value. When only the first letter (or two) is
entered, all types and values beginning with the letter are displayed. For example, if the status Fxxx
should be displayed for all transaction types that begin with CAL, at the > prompt, enter: E CAL F
Those transaction types beginning with CAL, such as CALATD, CALATT, CALDID, that have a status
beginning with the letter F, such as FLLQ, FLUD, FLND, are printed.
To display all transaction types and all status values that are enabled, at the > prompt, enter:
-
E ALL ALL
Enter
>E ALL ALL
CALMBX
CALATT
OK
BADP
ERR
FLBU
FLNN
FLAA
OK
BADP
RNA
BADM
BLOK
FLRT
FLNC
QUE
RNA
BADM
BUSY
MBXF
NTXF
FLAR
FLRF
NOCL
BUSY
MBXF
AFWD
GRET
APXF
FLDK
FLMO
BADU
AFWD
GRET
DIR
VAC
ERRX
FLNR
FLUD
CNTU
DIR
VAC
DIRI
FBSY
FLLQ
FLPR
FLND
DIRI
FBSY
.
.
.
-
To print disabled transaction and status types, use the same command, LOG PF CDR. At the >
prompt, use D to indicate that disabled transaction and status types are to be displayed. For example,
to display all disabled transaction and status types, enter the following at the > prompt:
D ALL ALL
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Enter
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-29
Displaying Call Detail Records
Use the CDR command to display the CDR log file and to specify which parameters to show. The
following are the parameter options:
-
By time: start and/or end time
-
Page length, line length
-
Specific number of records to be listed
-
-
Actions that occur after a transaction event has been selected, even if those actions were not
themselves selected (subsequent actions)
Types of information specified by filters
Beginning of the log file set and whether the log file has wrapped around and overwritten itself
displayed
To display CDR command parameter options and all the report filter types, at the @ prompt, enter:
CDR ?
Enter
@CDR ?
USAGE:
CDR [S <TIME>] [E <TIME>] [B <TIME>] [R <MAX>] [L <LEN>] [P <LEN>] [W] [SU]
FILTERS: XA <XACTIN>, ST <STAT>, PR <PRT>, CO <COS>, MA <MBX>, MS <MS>, ME <ME>
<TIME> : <YEAR> <MONTH> <DAY> <HOUR> <MINUTE>
Refer to the following section, Setting Display Specifications, for an explanation of each field.
The following rules govern use of the CDR command to control what is displayed:
-
-
You can enter display specifications and filter types in any order.
You can omit display specifications and filter types; some can be partially specified so that a range
or record that matches the entered characters is displayed.
If more than one filter (XA, ST, PR, CO, MA, MS, ME) is entered, a match on any one field allows the
record to be displayed.
@CDR S 00 3 26 0 0 E 00 3 26 18 00 R 25 XA LOG ST OK SU
Start
Time
3/26/00
00:00
PB60019−01
End Time
3/26/00
18:00
Maximum
Records = Type
(XA)
25
Log
Status
OK
List
subsequent
actions
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-30
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Setting Display Specifications
The fields for setting the CDR display specifications, including log file management, are described below.
@CDR ?
USAGE:
CDR [S <TIME>] [E <TIME>] [B <TIME>] [R <MAX>] [L <LEN>] [P <LEN>] [W] [SU]
FILTERS: XA <XACTIN>, ST <STAT>, PR <PRT>, CO <COS>, MA <MBX>, MS <MS>, ME <ME>
<TIME> : <YEAR> <MONTH> <DAY> <HOUR> <MINUTE>
Specifying Time
To view all information stored in the CDR log file, the only criterion you need to specify is timing. There
are two kinds of time frames: Logical Begin Time and Start Time.
.
-
If the CDR log buffer becomes full, the records at the beginning of the log are overwritten.
Overwriting begins at the physical beginning of the buffer rather than at the logical beginning time
that has been set.
Logical Begin Time, B [YY MM DD HH MM]
Starts with the logical beginning time or the first record in the log and ends at the end of the file.
Setting the logical beginning time tells the Octel 200/300 where to start the CDR log if no other start
time is specified. Once the logical begin time is set, records collected before this date are no longer
accessible.
.
When using CDR data to develop reports, set the logical begin time. If it is not set, when data
wraps, there is no way to determine how much data was lost.
To set the logical begin time, at the @ prompt, enter:
CDR B [YY MM DD HH MM]
@CDR B 00 02 01 00 01
BEGIN TIME SET FOR LOG
In this example, the logical begin time is 12:01 a.m., February 1, 2000. The message server confirms
that the begin time is set.
.
-
If you specify B, all other filters, except W, are ignored in that command line.
Start Time, S [YY MM DD HH MM]
Use this command to specify a start and end time within the first time frame. This displays the CDR
log from a time after the logical begin time. If no start time is specified, the listing begins with the
first record logged after the logical begin time. At the @ prompt, enter:
CDR S
Enter
To select a particular start time, at the @ prompt, enter:
CDR S [YY MM DD HH MM]
@CDR S 00 02 07 08 00
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-31
-
End Time, E [YY MM DD HH MM]
Displays CDR data ending at a specified time other than the last record currently in the log. To select
a particular end time, at the @ prompt, enter:
CDR E [YY MM DD HH MM]
@CDR E 00 09 07
You can specify an end time with or without a start time. If no start time is specified, the CDR log is
displayed from the logical begin time to the end time specified.
You can add additional filters to the command line to display only specific type and status information.
-
Wrap, [W]
Displays the current wrap status in the log file. When W is specified all other filters are ignored in
that command line. If some data in the CDR file has been overwritten, the display shows:
LOG FILE WRAPPED
LOG FILE BEGINNING TIME IS MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
TIME OF FIRST RECORD IN LOG IS MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
.
If the logical begin time is not set, line two in the preceding screen is not displayed.
If the logical begin time was set before the file was overwritten, the display shows:
TIME OF FIRST RECORD IN LOG IS MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
All records logged between the beginning time and the time of first record are lost.
Managing the Log File
Establishing the correct logical begin time is critical to good log file management. The following is the
recommended procedure for regular CDR data collection:
-
Specify the end time. At the @ prompt, enter
CDR E 00 01 15 06 00
Enter
Records from the current logical begin time to 6:00 a.m., January 15, 2000, are displayed.
-
Set the begin time to that same end time. At the @ prompt, enter:
CDR B 00 01 15 06 00
PB60019−01
Enter
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-32
Installation and Maintenance Volume
To see the current
logical begin time
To print records from
the current logical
begin time to 6:00 a.m.,
January 15, 2000
To reset logical begin
time
@CDR W
LOG FILE WRAPPED
LOG FILE BEGINNING TIME IS 01/01/00 12:01:00
TIME OF FIRST RECORD IN LOG IS 01/01/00 08:25:03
@CDR E 00 01 15 06 00
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS XACTIN STAT MS ME PRT DURATN MAILBOX
01/01/00 10:42:07 TIMEST OK
.
.
.
01/14/00 20:59:51 CALINT DIRI OO
034 0:00:0
@CDR B 00 01 15 06 00
BEGIN TIME SET FOR LOG
COS CALLER
Specifying the Display
These are the settings for how the CDR log is displayed:
-
-
-
-
Line Length, L [LEN]
The default column format is 80 columns, but any line length up to 132 columns can be displayed.
Two columns, DESTINATION and RTE, cannot be seen if the column format is set to 80. To see
those columns, you must specify the line length to be 132.
Page Length, P [LEN]
The default number of lines per page is 66. If you don’t want header information after every 66 lines,
change this parameter. If 0 is entered, the page displays one header at the beginning of the CDR file.
Number of Records, R [MAX]
Use this command to specify the maximum number of records to list during this command
transaction. If no maximum is specified, all records that meet the criteria are displayed.
Subsequent Action, SU
Print the subsequent actions for records that pass the filter criteria. An asterisk (*) prints in the first
column for each transaction that is not the initial transaction of the call. To see subsequent actions
completed for a record, enter SU in the command line.
@CDR XA LOGON ST BADP SU
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS XACTIN STAT MS ME PRT DURATN MAILBOX
*08/09/00 10:19:38 LOGON BADP 00 00 055 0:00.2 4430
*08/09/00 10:19:38 LOGON BADM 00 00 055 0:00.0 6
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-33
Display Filters
You can use seven filters to specifically define the type of information that displays in the CDR log.
Multiple filters can be used in a command line, but each filter can appear only once. However, if only the
first letter or two of the transaction type or status value is entered, all transaction types or status values
beginning with the letter entered are filtered. If no filter is specified, all information is displayed. The
filters are as follows:
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Transaction Type, XA [XACTIN]
Enter the transaction type to be displayed. In the command string, type XA [type]. For example,
type XA NTMSGD for network messages send day, or XA NT for all network transactions.
Status, ST [STAT]
Enter the type of status information to be displayed. In the command string, type ST [status].
For example, enter ST FLLQ for failed line quality test or ST FL for all network failure conditions.
Port, PR [PRT]
To display a specific port, enter that port number in the command string. The designation of a single
port number must consist of three digits (for example, 005 for Port 5). For ports numbered above
nine, precede the two-digit port number by a single 0 (for example, 023). For ports numbered above
nine, a range of ten ports can be specified by entering the 0 plus one significant number for the
beginning of the range. For example, type PR 03 to display ports 30–39.
COS, CO [COS]
To display the COS of the incoming port/trunk group for an integrated call. The designation of a
single COS must consist of three digits. For COS 1 through 9, the COS should be preceded by 00 (for
example, 001). For COS 10 through 99, the COS should be preceded by 0 (for example, 037). For
COS 10 through 99, a range of ten COSs can be specified by entering the 0 plus one significant
number for the beginning of the range. For example, enter CO 09 to display COS 90 through 99. To
display COS 100 through 199, enter 1.
Mailbox, MA [MBX]
To display specific or partially specified mailbox number prefixes. For example, to display all
mailboxes that start with 43, enter MA 43.
Messages Sent, MS [MS]
To define the number of messages sent during a transaction. For example, if abandoned calls for a
specific transaction type should be displayed, specify MS 00. All calls with 0 messages left would
be displayed.
Messages Erased, ME [ME]
Use this filter to define the number of messages erased.
Multiple Display Filters
All records contain information about transaction type, status, port and duration. Additional information
is logged for specific transaction types. The settings included in this information are defined at the
beginning of this section. Table 7-4 is a matrix of which settings apply to which transaction types.
Examples of Using Multiple Display Filters
The following example shows the use of two filters:
PB60019−01
-
XA CAL, all transaction types starting with CAL
-
PR 009, a specific port
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-34
Installation and Maintenance Volume
@CDR XA CAL PR 009
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
11/22/00 12:04:55
*11/22/00 12:05:14
11/22/00 12:12:13
XACTIN
CALMBX
CALFLX
CALMBX
STAT
GRET
QUE
BUSY
MS ME PRT DURATN MAILBOX
00
009 0:00.1 7777
00
009 0:00.3 8103
01
009 0:01.5 4319
COS CALLER
The following example shows the use of three filters:
-
XA CAL, all transaction types starting with CAL
-
PR 009, a specific port
-
MA 777, a specific mailbox
@CDR XA CAL PR 009 MA 7777
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS XACTIN STAT MS ME PRT DURATN MAILBOX
11/22/00 12:04:55 CALMBX GRET 00
11/22/00 12:43:14 CALMBX GRET 00
009 0:00.4 7777
11/22/00 13:13:13 CALMBX GRET 00
009 0:01.0 7777
.
COS CALLER
009 0:00.1 7777
A filter can be entered only one time.
The following example shows an incorrect entry: the ST filter is entered twice.
@CDR XA LOGON ST BADP ST OK
USAGE:
CDR [S <TIME>] [E <TIME>] [B <TIME>] [R <MAX>] [L <LEN>] [P <LEN>] [W] [SU]
FILTERS: XA <XACTIN>, ST <STAT>, PR <PRT>, CO <COS>, MA <MBX>, MS <MS>, ME <ME>
<TIME> : <YEAR> <MONTH> <DAY> <HOUR> <MINUTE>
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-35
Table 7-4 Information Logged by Transaction Type
Transaction
Type
T
pe
Field
MS
ME
COS
MAILBOX
CALLER
DESTINATION
RTE
ALOUTC
APIN
APOUTC
n
CALATD
n
n
CALATT
n
n
CALDID
n
n
CALEXT
n
CALHLP
n
CALIMM
n
CALINT
n
CALMBX
n
n
CALNXT
n
n
CALPA
n
n
CALPAD
n
n
CALSDM
n
n
n
n
COSOVR
n
n
n
FAXDLV
n
n
FAXEDT
n
FAXQCK
n
FAXRCV
n
n
n
FAXSND
LOGON
n
n
n
n
n
LPOUTC
n
MODEM
MWOUTC
n
OFOUTC
n
NTCHEK
n
n
NTMSGD
n
NTMSGN
n
NTMSGR
n
NTIN
NTMWx
n
NTOUTC
PB60019−01
n
QCKMSG
n
QCKINT
n
n
n
n
n
n
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-36
Installation and Maintenance Volume
CDR Size by Transaction Type
The Octel 200/300 allocates 2MB of disk space for CDR events, and records a time stamp (TIMEST)
every 2K. Each call record requires from 10−18 bytes, depending on the number of digits in the mailbox.
Table 7-5 shows the length of call detail records by transaction type.
Table 7-5 Call Detail Record Size by Transaction Type
Transaction Type
(XACTIN)
Record Size (Bytes),
Fixed Portion
ALOUTC
9
0
APIN
9
0
APOUTC
9
1...23 (Mailboxes or dialed numbers)
CALATD
10
1...8 (Mailboxes)
Additional Bytes,
Variable Portion*
CALATT
10
1...8 (Mailboxes)
CALDID
10
1...8 (Mailboxes)
CALEXT
8
1...8 (Extensions)
CALHLP
8
1...8 (Mailboxes)
CALIMM
10
1...8 (Mailboxes)
CALINT
16
1...8 (Mailboxes)
CALMBX
10
1...8 (Mailboxes)
CALNXT
10
1...8 (Mailboxes)
CALPA
10
1...8 (Mailboxes)
CALPAD
10
1...8 (Mailboxes)
CALSMD
10
1...8 (Mailboxes)
COSOVR
10
0
FAXDLV
13
1...16 (Dialed numbers)
FAXEDT
11
1...8 (Mailboxes)
FAXQCK
10
1...8 (Mailboxes)
FAXRCV
11
1...8 (Mailboxes)
FAXSND
11
1...8 (Mailboxes)
LOGON
11
1...8 (Mailboxes)
LPOUTC
13
0
MODEM
9
0
NTMWx
9
1...8 (Mailboxes)
MWOUTC
13
0
NTCHK
9
1...8 (Mailboxes)
NTIN
9
0
NTMSGD
9
1...8 (Mailboxes)
NTMSGN
9
1...8 (Mailboxes)
NTMSGR
9
1...8 (Mailboxes)
NTOUTC
16
0
OFOUTC
13
1...16 (Dialed numbers)
QCKMSG
10
1...8 (Mailboxes)
QCKINT
16
1...8 (Mailboxes)
TIMEST
9
0
*This varies depending on the number of digits in the mailbox or the number of digits in the dialing string.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-37
To estimate how many days the CDR records can be stored before the buffer becomes full and the log file
wraps, perform the following steps for each transaction type enabled:
1.
Multiply the number of mailbox holders by the average number of times per day that the mailbox
registers activity for the transaction types logged.
2.
Using Table 7-5, calculate the number of bytes used per transaction type record logged; include 1
byte for each 2 digits in the mailbox number.
3.
Multiply the number of transactions per day (from step 1) by the number of bytes per transaction for
that transaction type (from step 2). This is the number of bytes used in 1 day.
4.
Sum the result of step 3 for each transaction type to yield an estimate of the number of bytes used per
day.
5.
Divide the disk space allocated for CDR records (2 MB) by the number of bytes used in 1 day to
determine how many days the storage space will last before the information wraps.
This estimate can help establish the schedule for checking the CDR log.
Examples of Various CDR Log Screens
Several examples of various CDR logs follow. CDR logs can be created for billing or maintenance purposes.
Invalid Logons With Subsequent Actions
This example shows a CDR log for entries of invalid security codes and subsequent caller actions. This
type of CDR log could be used to investigate unauthorized access activity. In this example, the entry
BADP in the STAT column indicates that an invalid security code was entered; the BADM entry indicates
that an invalid mailbox number was entered.
@CDR XA LOGON ST BADP SU
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS XACTIN STAT MS ME PRT DURATN MAILBOX
*08/09/00 10:19:38 LOGON BADP 00 00 055 0:00.2 4430
*08/09/00 10:19:38 LOGON BADM 00 00 055 0:00.0 6
Logon Calls to a Specific Mailbox
This shows a CDR log that details four logon calls to mailbox 4585, starting on August 12, 2000.
In the status column, the OK entry indicates that the logon was successful, and the BADP entry indicates
that an invalid security code was entered when attempting to log on to mailbox 4585. The log shows
subsequent actions, since the initial action in each case was a direct call from the extension (not shown).
@CDR XA LOGON MA 4585 S 00 08 12 08 00
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS XACTIN STAT MS ME PRT
*08/12/00 08:22:17 LOGON OK
01 01 055
*08/12/00 08:23:42 LOGON OK
00 01 051
*08/12/00 08:51:03 LOGON OK
01 00 053
*08/12/00 09:46:13 LOGON BADP 00 00 056
PB60019−01
DURATN
0:01.8
0:00.2
0:01.5
0:00.1
MAILBOX
4585
4585
4585
4585
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-38
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Fax Transactions
This example shows a CDR log for all fax transactions. The CDR command shows the column length set
to 132 (L 132), which is required to see the DESTINATION and RTE columns.
@CDR XA FAX L 132 PO O S 08 00
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS XACTIN STAT
08/16/00 08:00:03 FAXRCV
08/16/00 08:00:05 FAXDLV
08/16/00 08:00:05 FAXSND
08/16/00 08:00:03 FAXDLV
08/16/00 08:00:05 FAXSND
08/16/00 08:00:05 FAXQCK
08/16/00 08:01:57 FAXRCV
08 16 08 00
MS ME PRT DURATN MAILBOX
OK 02
007 0:01.4
OK
032 0:02.6
OK
066 0:02.6
OK
030 0:01.6
OK
063 0:01.6
OK 01
032 0:03.9
OK 07
063 0:03.7
DESTINATION
2126911191
2000
2000
RTE
045
2000
032
2000
030
4735
2200
032
In this example, the records in the log show the following:
-
-
-
A two-page fax was successfully received (FAXRCV and OK entries) from a location with an
identification string of 2126911191. The RTE column displays the voice port allocated with a
FAXRCV entry in the XACTIN column.
A fax was successfully delivered (FAXDLV entry) for mailbox 2000 to extension 2000. The FAXSND
entry shows which fax channel was used to deliver the fax.
A seven-page Quick Fax was sent (FAXQCK entry) to mailbox 4735. Every FAXQCK record is
followed by a FAXRCV record.
The PRT column shows the voice ports for FAXQCK and FAXDLV, and the fax channels for FAXRCV and
FAXSND.
The MS column shows the number of pages received for FAXRCV records. For FAXQCK transactions, the
01 is always indicated in conjunction with a quick fax message, with or without voice annotation.
CDR for Network Messages
This example shows a CDR log for network messages. You could use this CDR log for an application
where the customer bills the user for the calls made on the network.
Set the column length in the CDR command to 132 (L 132), which is required to see the DESTINATION
and RTE columns. The DESTINATION column shows the name in the LOCATION Table.
@CDR L 132 XA NT ST OK
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS XACTIN
09/14/00 09:15:31 NTIN
*09/14/00 09:16:17 NTMSGR
09/14/00 09:16:50 NTOUTC
*09/14/00 09:18:42 NTMSGD
STAT MS ME PRT DURATN MAILBOX
OK
029 0:00.5
OK
029 0:00.8 66093164
OK 030 0:00.6
VMX2D
OK 030 0:01.8 4736
DESTINATION
RTE
The MAILBOX column entry for NTMSGR and NTMSGD entries is the mailbox number of the creator of
the message. The transaction type NTMSGR is preceded with an NTIN entry, and NTMSGD is preceded
with an NTOUTC entry. An OK entry in the STAT column shows that the transaction was successful.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-39
MWN Attempts Encountered Fast Busy
This example shows a CDR log for a port that encountered fast-busy while attempting a message waiting
notification outcall.
@CDR XA MWOUTC ST
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
02/10/00 14:12:32
02/10/00 14:13:09
02/10/00 14:19:21
FBSY
XACTIN
MWOUTC
MWOUTC
MWOUTC
STAT MS ME PRT DURATN MAILBOX
FBSY
012 0:00.0 4428
FBSY
012 0:00.0 2065
FBSY
012 0:00.0 4341
COS CALLER
MWI Attempts
This example shows a CDR log of lamp message waiting indication attempts in an in-band and DTMF
message waiting environment.
@CDR XA LPOUTC
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
02/10/00 15:00:24
02/10/00 15:03:09
02/10/00 15:07:39
02/10/00 15:07:41
02/10/00 15:07:43
02/10/00 15:07:45
02/10/00 15:08:10
02/10/00 16:08:23
XACTIN
TIMEST
LPOUTC
LPOUTC
LPOUTC
LPOUTC
LPOUTC
LPOUTC
TIMEST
STAT MS ME PRT DURATN
OK
ERR
012 0:00.0
OK
012 0:00.0
OK
011 0:00.0
OK
010 0:00.0
OK
009 0:00.0
ERR
008 0:00.0
OK
MAILBOX
COS CALLER
7711
4341
4324
8301
4532
7711
DID Call
This example shows a call through the DID module.
@CDR XA CALDID
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
02/11/00 11:02:48
02/11/00 11:02:48
02/11/00 12:59:37
02/11/00 13:00:11
02/11/00 13:00:11
02/11/00 13:00:34
XACTIN
TIMEST
CALDID
CALDID
TIMEST
CALDID
CALDID
STAT
OK
OK
GRET
OK
GRET
GRET
MS ME PRT DURATN MAILBOX
00
0
034 0:00.1 4347
034 0:00.4 4347
01
00
034 0:00.2 4347
034 0:00.0 4347
COS CALLER
Specific Octel 200/300 Ports
This example shows a CDR log for ports 10 through 19. Only records for a range of ports can be
displayed at one time. In this command line, PR 01 means that records for ports 010 through 019 are
displayed.
@CDR PR 01
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS
08/09/00 10:02:48
08/09/00 10:02:48
08/09/00 10:59:37
08/09/00 10:00:11
PB60019−01
XACTIN
LPOUTC
LPOUTC
LPOUTC
CALATT
STAT
OK
OK
OK
OK
MS ME PRT
013
013
013
00
014
DURATN
0:00.1
0:00.1
0:00.4
0:00.1
MAILBOX
4313
4480
4379
4300
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-40
7.4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
NAMESEND ACTIVITY TRACE LOG
The Namesend Activity Trace Log collects Namesend propagation transaction data for Digital
Networking in a log file. This log includes all activity associated with names propagation, including the
following:
Recorded names received from and propagated to a location using Namesend
-
Additions, deletions, and modifications to the queue of names that are pending propagation, the
Netnames Table, and the Dial-by-Name Directory.
-
.
Refer to the Networking Volume, Digital Networking for information about Namesend.
Use the LOG PR NAM command for different combinations of print options and filters to consolidate
information and focus on specific types of Namesend activities to be displayed.
To use the LOG command for Namesend Activity Trace activities, at the @ prompt, enter:
LOG PR NAM
Enter
@LOG PR NAM
Specify Print Option(s):
”S”tart <time>, ”E”nd <time>, ”L”ine <length>, ”P”age <length>, ”\”,
”M”ask <mask (including date and time fields)>, ”C”ontinuous
Filters: TA TY EV AU MB NA LO
Refer to the Log Command section for an explanation of LOG print options.
In addition to the LOG print options that control the output format, you can enter specific filters and
arguments to limit the output to only those activities that match the set of search criteria. Filters need not
be specified; in some cases, filters can be partially specified. Only the values that match the specified
filters are displayed. The following filters are available:
-
-
Task, TA [TASK]
This filter is for technical support use.
Type, TY [TYPE]
This filter displays a specific type of Namesend activity. Enter one of the types listed in Table 7-6 to
specify a specific type to filter.
Table 7-6 Namesend Activity Types
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Type
Description
QUEUED
Names in queue that are pending propagation
DEQUEU
Names deleted from the queue pending propagation
NAM_RCV
Names that were received at this location
NAM_SND
Names that were propagated automatically
RBLD
The queue of names was propagated again because of a restart
or reload.
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-41
-
-
-
-
-
Event, EV [EVENT]
Displays a specific event. The events that can be specified and their correct spelling are listed in
Table 7-7. Only one event can be specified at a time.
Auxiliary, AU [AUXILIARY]
Displays supplemental event activities. The supplemental activities that can be designated and their
correct spelling are listed in Table 7-7. Only one supplemental event can be specified for each event.
Mailbox, MB [MAILBOX]
Displays records for a specific mailbox or extension number. The filter can designate partial mailbox
digits to display all mailboxes beginning with a specific digit.
Name, NA [NAME]
Displays the name that was sent. A specific name can be specified or the filter can designate can
specify an alphabetic pattern match to display names that match the pattern specified.
Location, LOC [LOCATION]
Displays the location from which the name was sent. A specific location can be specified.
Below is an example of a Names trace log without filters specified.
@LOG PR NAM
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS TASK
TYPE
EVENT
AUX
MBX/EXTEN NAME
LOC
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------06/08/00 12:33:44 CHAN_055 QUEUED ADDASC Q_FULL 4343
JONES JOE MILPITAS
06/08/00 12:42:59 TERMI1TAS QUEUED ADMIN
SUCC
4343
JONES JOE MILPITAS
06/08/00 12:34:56 LCH_13
NAMSND DIGNET NDRFUL 4343
JONES JOE MILPITAS
06/08/00 12:35:01 LCH_13
NAMSND DIGNET SUCC
4343
JONES JOE MILPITAS
06/08/00 12:35:59 LCH_13
DEQUEU SENT
SUCC
4343
JONES JOE MILPITAS
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-42
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 7-7 Event and Aux Activities in Namesend Activity Log
TYPE
EVENT
QUEUED
ADMIN
DEQUEU
Octel 200/300
DESCRIPTION
AUX
DESCRIPTION
Addition to the queue of names
pending by administrator.
SUCCESS
Q_FULL
FAIL
Success.
Queue is full.
An error was encountered on the
remote side. Remote side will
have a software error or
hardware error.
ADDASC
An alphabetic name (ASCII) was
added.
SUCCESS
Q_FULL
FAIL
Success.
Queue is full.
An error was encountered on the
remote side. Remote side will
have a software error or
hardware error.
MODASC
An alphabetic name (ASCII) was
modified.
SUCCESS
Q_FULL
FAIL
Success.
Queue is full.
An error was encountered on the
remote side. Remote side will
have a software error or
hardware error.
MODSPK
A spoken name was modified.
SUCCESS
Q_FULL
FAIL
Success.
Queue is full.
An error was encountered on the
remote side. Remote side will
have a software error or
hardware error.
ADMIN
Deletion from the queue of
names pending by administrator.
SUCCESS
FAIL
Success.
An error was encountered on the
remote side. Remote side will
have a software error or
hardware error.
SENT
Name was successfully
propagated and was removed
from the queue.
SUCCESS
FAIL
Success.
An error was encountered on the
remote side. Remote side will
have a software error or
hardware error.
NAM_RCV
DIGNET
Names received at this location
were sent via digital networking.
SUCCESS
NDRFUL
NTNFUL
Q_FULL
FAIL
Success.
NDR Table is full.
NETNAME Table is full.
Queue is full.
An error was encountered on the
remote side. Remote side will
have a software error or
hardware error.
NAM_SND
DIGNET
Names propagated automatically
via digital networking.
SUCCESS
NDRFUL
NTNFUL
Q_FULL
FAIL
Success.
NDR Table is full.
NETNAME Table is full.
Queue is full.
Failed due to lack of resources.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-43
7.5
MOVES, ADDS, AND CHANGES LOG
Many configuration changes made in the INSTALL program, in the UPDATE program, and within the
mailbox are recorded in the Moves, Adds, and Changes log. With the MAC log, you can use the
following commands:
-
-
-
LOG PR MAC
Displays all activities in the MAC log or sets filters for specific records to be displayed.
LOG BE MAC
Sets the beginning date and time for the MAC log. Once the beginning date and time is set, records
collected before this date are no longer accessible.
LOG ST MAC
Displays the beginning date and time, and time of the first record presently in the log.
The following example shows a MAC log. A description of each of the fields follows.
MM/DD/YY
01/03/00
01/03/00
01/03/00
01/03/00
01/03/00
HH:MM:SS
11:07:14
11:19:24
11:29:05
11:54:45
12:21:38
BY
USER
USER
USER
UPDT
****
ACT
MOD
DEL
MOD
MOD
SAV
REC
USER
USER
USER
DIST
ID
7829
7829
7829
7779
ATTR
AUTOC
AUTOC
AUTOC
MBR
VALUE
72007829
72007829
6639223
MM/DD/YY. Month, day, and year of the transaction.
HH:MM:SS. Hour, minute, and second of the transaction.
BY. The type of application used to make a change to the configuration.
ACT. The type of action taken, such as modification, deletion, or addition of a record.
REC. The table, distribution list or system location that was modified.
ID. The record modified. If the values associated with a mailbox are changed, the entry for this field is
the mailbox number.
ATTR. Record that was changed. Not all changes are recorded.
VALUE. The new value for a record that was modified.
Types of Configuration Table Entries Logged
Change are logged to the MAC log when the following configuration tables are modified:
-
SYSTEM PARAMETER Table
-
INFORMATION Table
-
CLASS OF SERVICE Table
-
USER Table
-
SCHEDULE Table
-
CSTAT Table
-
NAMES Table
-
SLOTS Table
-
CUSTOM PROMPT Table
-
NUMBERING PLAN Table
In addition, the System Distribution List (SDL) changes and extended mailbox additions are logged.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-44
Installation and Maintenance Volume
SYSTEM PARAMETER Table
The following system parameters are entered in the MAC log, if they have been modified. The system
parameter index number is displayed in the ATTR field.
-
145 — APPLICATION PROCESSOR ERROR MAILBOX
-
147 — NAMES DIRECTORY MAILBOX
-
156 — APPLICATION PROCESSOR MESSAGE POOL EM LIST
-
199 — NET: CREATOR MAILBOX FOR RETURNED MESSAGES
An example of a system parameter modification entry to the MAC log follows. In this example, System
Parameter 199 was modified to set the creator mailbox to 3433.
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS BY
ACT REC ID ATTR
01/15/00 14:28:25 UPDT MOD SYSP 01 199
VALUE
3433
CLASS OF SERVICE
Class of Service (COS) attributes that you add, modify, or delete are logged to the MAC log. When you
modify a COS, the ATTR field displays ATBU. In the following example, COS 000 was modified to
include Attribute 112.
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS BY ACT
01/15/00 14:28:25 UPDT MOD
REC
COS
ID ATTR
000 ATBU
VALUE
112
SCHEDULE Table
When you add a SCHEDULE Table or modify a time period or INFORMATION Table default for a
SCHEDULE Table, the information is logged in the MAC log. The REC field displays the COS, and the
ID field displays the corresponding COS number. The ATTR and VALUE fields are empty.
When you create a SCHEDULE Table, and you add a number of schedules and the default schedule, the
first entry in the ACT field displays ADD; for second and subsequent entries, the entry in the ACT field
displays MOD. The schedule number is not listed.
MM/DD/YY
01/15/00
01/15/00
01/15/00
HH:MM:SS
14:28:25
14:28:40
14:28:48
BY
UPDT
UPDT
UPDT
ACT REC ID ATTR
ADD COS 000
MOD COS 000
MOD COS 000
VALUE
NAMES Table
When you add names to or delete names from the NAMES Table, an entry is made in the MAC log.
Whether adding or modifying names, the ACT field displays MOD. The REC field displays whether it is a
USER Table or Distribution list change; ID field displays the mailbox, the ATTR field displays the
name, and the VALUE field displays the new name. In the following example, the name for mailbox 300
is changed to Newton; the name for distribution list 302 is changed to James, and the name for mailbox
300 is deleted.
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Delete is automatic, as part of the Modify command.
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-45
MM/DD/YY
01/15/00
01/15/00
01/15/00
HH:MM:SS
14:28:25
14:30:55
14:31:15
BY
UPDT
UPDT
UPDT
ACT REC
MOD USER
MOD DIST
DEL USER
ID
300
302
300
ATTR
NAME
NAME
NAME
VALUE
NEWTON
JAMES
CUSTOM PROMPT Table
When you modify a CUSTOM PROMPT Table, the MAC log enters the changes by language.
-
The entry in the REC field for changes to the CUSTOM PROMPT Table is LANG.
-
The ID field is the number of the language changed.
-
The ATTR field can include the following:
ATTR
Description
ERNX(n)
The mailbox that plays the nonexistent mailbox greeting for first digit “n”
was changed. A greeting from the mailbox listed in the VALUE field plays
when an extension starting with the “n” digit does not exist, but an attempt is
made to contact it.
ERBL(n)
The mailbox that plays the blocked extension greeting for first digit “n” was
changed. The greeting of the mailbox listed in the VALUE field plays when
an extension starting with the “n” digit is blocked, and an attempt is made to
contact it.
MSGWT
The message waiting notification mailbox was changed to the mailbox listed
in the VALUE field.
APNTF
The application control processor notification mailbox was changed to the
mailbox listed in the VALUE field.
TUTOR
The new user tutorial mailbox was changed to the mailbox listed in the
VALUE field.
MM/DD/YY
01/15/00
01/15/00
01/15/00
PB60019−01
HH:MM:SS
14:58:25
15:00:55
15:01:15
BY
UPDT
UPDT
UPDT
ACT REC
MOD LANG
MOD LANG
DEL LANG
ID
001
001
001
ATTR
ERNX1
ERNX3
TUTOR
VALUE
200
200
300
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-46
Installation and Maintenance Volume
INFORMATION Table
When you add, modify, or delete an INFORMATION Table, the changes are logged in the MAC log. The
ATTR field can display
ATTR
Description
TYP
Type of INFORMATION Table added or deleted. M is mailbox; P is port.
INTCP
The Intercept mailbox is changed to the mailbox listed in the VALUE field.
GRT
The Greeting mailbox is changed to the mailbox listed in the VALUE field.
DIVRT
The Divert mailbox is changed to the mailbox listed in the VALUE field.
NEXT
The Next mailbox is changed to the mailbox listed in the VALUE field.
MXMNU
The Maximum Digits for Menu is changed to the number in the VALUE
field.
PREFX
The Prefix digits is changed to the number in the VALUE field.
FIFO
The FIFO Queue message mailbox is changed to the mailbox listed in the
VALUE field.
MM/DD/YY
01/15/00
01/15/00
01/15/00
HH:MM:SS
14:58:25
15:00:55
15:01:15
BY
UPDT
UPDT
UPDT
ACT REC
ADD INFO
MOD INFO
MOD INFO
ID
001
003
003
ATTR
TYPE
INTCP
DIVRT
VALUE
M
300
400
USER Table
When you add, modify, or delete the USER Table, the changes are logged in the MAC log. The ATTR
field can display the following:
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
ATTR
Description
COS
The COS number for the mailbox is displayed in the ID field.
EXTN
An extension number was added to the mailbox displayed in the ID field.
FDIG(x)
The mailbox listed in the next record begins with a new first digit. The “x” is
the first-digit number. The VALUE field lists the first digit.
AUTO
The autocopy mailbox was changed to the number displayed in the VALUE
field.
OFFPA
The offsite pager number was changed to the number displayed in the
VALUE field.
PFAX
The personal fax number was changed to the number displayed in the VALUE
field.
PERSA
The personal assistance number was changed to the number displayed in the
VALUE field.
PDL(x)
A mailbox number is added to the personal distribution list “x”.
MXMNU
The maximum number of digits used for the single-digit menu was changed.
SEC
This entry is displayed when the security code was reset.
UID
This user ID number was set for the mailbox number in the ID field.
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-47
When you add a new mailbox number to the USER Table, the first entry in the MAC log shows the
mailbox and the COS added. Subsequent entries show other USER Table configurations for the mailbox.
.
When you create a mailbox and add an extension number, the ACT field displays MOD and the
ATTR field displays EXTN.
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS BY
ACT REC ID ATTR
01/15/00 14:58:25 UPDT ADD USER 300 COS
01/15/00 15:01:15 UPDT MOD USER 300 EXTN
VALUE
000
3010
When you create a mailbox starting with a new first digit, before the entry indicating mailbox creation,
an entry is made showing the new first digit; ATTR displays the first-digit number, and the VALUE field
displays the length of the mailbox number. When the last number starting with a particular digit is
deleted, an entry is made indicating the deletion of the mailbox number; another entry is made displaying
the first-digit number. The VALUE field is empty.
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS BY
ACT REC ID ATTR
01/15/00 14:58:25 UPDT MOD SYS 01 FDIG3
01/15/00 15:01:15 UPDT ADD USER 300 COS
VALUE
3
000
CSTAT Table
Only changes to CSTAT Table Index 1 − PDL INDEX VALUE are logged. The ATTR field displays
PDLSC.
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS BY
ACT
01/15/00 14:28:25 UPDT MOD
REC ID
COS 000
ATTR
PDLSC
VALUE
001
SLOTS Table
Changes to the SLOTS Table are logged. When you add a slot number, it is displayed in the IO field. The
following screen shows that slot 1 was added.
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS BY
01/15/00 14:28:25 UPDT
ACT
ADD
REC ID ATTR
SLOT 001
VALUE
NUMBERING PLAN Table
Initial digits that are added, modified, or deleted in the NUMBERING PLAN Table are recorded in the
MAC log.
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS BY
ACT
01/15/00 14:28:25 UPDT ADD
PB60019−01
REC ID ATTR
CAB 212
VALUE
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-48
Installation and Maintenance Volume
When you add or modify the SELF network location number it is recorded in the MAC log.
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS BY
ACT
01/15/00 14:28:25 UPDT MOD
REC ID ATTR
SYS 01 SELF
VALUE
88
System Distribution Lists
The MAC log displays changes to system distribution lists, including the creation of an SDL or changes
to the COS of an SDL pilot mailbox. When you add the first member of an SDL, the MAC log displays
the mailbox as a SDL pilot (CUD) and then displays the mailbox number of the first member added.
MM/DD/YY
01/15/00
01/15/00
01/15/00
HH:MM:SS
14:58:25
15:01:15
15:01:25
BY
UPDT
UPDT
UPDT
ACT REC
CUD USER
MOD DIST
MOD DIST
ID ATTR
305
305 MBR
305 COS
VALUE
306
001
Extended Mailbox
Changes to add extended mailboxes are logged, when you add a mailbox to an extended mailbox. The
ATTR field displays EMB.
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS BY
ACT
REC ID ATTR
01/15/00 14:28:25 UPDT ADD USER 301 EMB
VALUE
303
Using the LOG PR MAC command
To use the LOG command for MAC activities, at the @ prompt,enter:
LOG PR MAC
Enter
@LOG PR MAC
Specify Print Option(s):
”S”tart <time>, ”E”nd <time>, ”L”ine <length>, ”P”age <length>, ”\”,
”M”ask <mask (including date and time fields)>, ”C”ontinuous
Filters: BY AC RE ID AT VA
Refer to the Log Command section in this chapter for an explanation of LOG print options.
In addition to the LOG print options that control the output format, you can enter specific filters and
arguments to limit the output to only those activities that match the set of search criteria. Filters need not
be specified; in some cases, filters can be partially specified. Only the values that match the specified
filters are displayed. The following filters are available.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-49
-
-
-
BY
Displays the application used to make a change to the configuration. Enter one of the BY names that
follows to specify a specific application.
BY
Description
UPDT
Configuration change listed was made either in UPDATE or INSTAL.
****
Message server actions can include, for example, saving the configuration file.
USER
A mailbox holder made changes directly in the mailbox
AC
Displays the action taken, such as add, modify, or delete a record. The actions are:
AC
Description
DEL
Record was deleted.
ADD
Record was added.
MOD
Record was modified.
CUD
Mailbox holder’s mailbox was converted to a distribution list.
CDU
Distribution list was converted to a mailbox holder mailbox.
SAV
This entry indicates an exit from update.
INS
Changes were made in the INSTALL program
REN
Renumber
RE
Displays the configuration table, distribution list or message server location that was modified.
Modifications to the following are recorded in the MAC log.
RE
Description
USER
USER Table
DIST
System Distribution list
COS
CLASS OF SERVICE Table or SCHEDULE Table
INFO
INFORMATION Table
SLOT
SLOT Table
LANG
CUSTOM PROMPT Table
CAB
NUMBERING PLAN Table*
SYS
Message server changes, including changes made to the FIRSTDIGIT Table
SYSP
SYSTEM PARAMETER Table
*This also displays selected information from the ROUTE and LOCATION Tables, however, changes to
those tables are not displayed directly.
-
-
-
PB60019−01
ID
Identifies the record that was modified. If the values associated with a mailbox holder mailbox are
changed, the entry for this field is the mailbox number.
AT
Displays the record that was modified.
VA
Displays the new value for a record that was modified.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-50
7.6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
SERVER ACTIVITY TRACE LOG
The server activity trace (SAT) collects all the functional activity of the OctelAccess server on the
message server into a log file. For each activity, the status of the activity and the mailbox or the message
number acted on are collected. The SAT log can be used as a tool to review the OctelAccess server
activity on the message server.
The SAT log options are:
-
-
LOG PR SAT
Displays all activities in the SAT log or to set filters for specific records to be displayed.
LOG ST SAT
Shows the beginning date and time, and time of the first record presently in the log.
The following example shows a SAT log. A description of each of the fields follows.
@LOG PR SAT
Specify Print Option(s):
”S”tart <time>, ”E”nd <time>, ”L”ine <length>, ”P”age <length>, ”\”,
”M”ask <mask (including date and time fields)>, ”C”ontinuous
Filters: CO MB AC D1 D2 ST
>
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS CONNID
04/24/00 07:35:30
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
MBX
ACTIVITY
LINK UP
DAT1
DAT2 STATUS
MM/DD/YY
Month, day, and year activity occurred.
HH:MM:SS
Hour, minute, and second transaction.
CONNID
The combination of the OctelAccess ID and the session ID that is uniquely mapped to one
Octel 200/300 session ID. For example, a CONNID entry of 008/00001 shows the OctelAccess ID as
008 and the session ID as 00001.
MBX
The mailbox to which the session currently has accesss to.
ACTIVITY
Text strings describing the type of activity on the message server. Refer to Table 7-8 for descriptions
of the activities logged.
DATA1, DATA2
Activity-specific data to be interpreted in the context of the action; for example, message number or
DTMF strings. DATA1 contains the mailbox number or client controlled message (CCM) reference
number or the digit string input; DATA2 contains the message number.
STATUS
The status of the concluded action or the reason for failure. For example, SUCC is entered if the
activity succeeded; BAD_MSGNO appears if a bad message number was received. Refer to
Table 7-9 for the list of status types and descriptions.
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-51
Table 7-8 SAT Log Activity Types
Activity
PB60019−01
DATA1
DATA2
ADD ONE PDL MEMBER
Member mailbox number
PDL number
APPEN MBX MSG
CCM reference number
Message number
CALL MBX
Mailbox/extn digits
Null
CHECK FOR PDL OPTION
Owner member mailbox number
Null
CLAIM NEW CALL
Channel task name
Session ID
CLEAR MSG WTG
Mailbox digits
Null
CLIENT ERR LOGGED
Client error number (decimal)
Null
COMPLETE TRANSFER
Mailbox digits to transfer to
Null
CONNECT TDM
Channel task name
Null
COPY CCM TO MBX
Source mailbox digits
Message numbers
COURTESY DOWN STARTED
Null
Null
DEL ALL PDL LISTS
Null
Null
DEL ONE PDL LIST
Null
PDL number
DEL ONE PDL MEMBER
Member mailbox number
PDL number
DELETE CCM MSG
CCM reference number
Message number
DELETE MBX MSG
Mailbox digits
Message number
DELETE MSG ERROR
Null
Null
DIGIT IN
DTMF digit
Null
DISCONNECT TDM
Channel disconnected
Null
DTMF IN
Channel task name
Digit input
DTMF OUT
DTMF string
DTMF string continued
ERR/OUT OF SYN
Internal session ID
Null
ERROR − CHN ABORT
Channel task name
Session ID
EXP FILE DOWNLOAD
Export file type
Null
FAX CHANNEL ALLOC
Allocated fax channel number
Null
FILE XFER CNCL
Null
Null
GATEWAY CONNECT
Null
Null
GATEWAY DISCONNECT
Null
Null
GET ALL PDL
Number of members returned
PDL number
GET FILE
CCM reference number
Message number
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-52
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 7-8 SAT Log Activity Types
Activity
Octel 200/300
DATA1
DATA2
GET MBX INFO
Mailbox digits
Null
GET MISGINFOR BY MSG
CCM Reference Number
Message Number
GET MSG POSITION
Null
Null
GET MSGINFO BY IDX
Mailbox digits
Index
GET ONE PDL
Number of member returned
PDL number
GET TIME AND DATE
Null
Null
GODIAL
Mailbox digits
Null
GOT PBX ONHOOK
Channel name
Null
GREETING CMD
On/off/select
Message number
INITIATE TRANSFER
Mailbox digits to transfer to
Null
LINK DOWN
Null
Null
LINK UP
Null
Null
LOAD LANGUAGES
Null
Null
LOG ON
Mailbox digits
Null
MBX INFO ALERT
Null
Null
MESSAGE DOWNLOAD
CCM reference number
Message number
MESSAGE UPLOAD
CCM reference number
Message number
MSG WAITING CMD
Mailbox digits
On/off
NEW CALL
Channel task name
Session ID
PAUSE SPEAK
Null
Message number
PDL EDIT REQUEST
Null
Null
PORT ALLOC
Allocated port number
Null
PORT ONHOOK
Port number put on-hook
Null
PUT FILE
Null
Message number
REC LMT WARNING
Session states
Null
RECEIVE FAX
Null
Null
RECONNECT
Port number
Null
RECORD MBX MSG
Creator mailbox digits
Message number
RECORDING ERROR
Null
Null
RELEASE CHANNEL
Channel released
Null
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-53
Table 7-8 SAT Log Activity Types
Activity
PB60019−01
DATA1
DATA2
REPLACE PDL MEMBER
New member mailbox number
PDL number
REQUEST REJECTED
CSP request number(decimal)
Null
RESUME SPEAK
Null
Message number
SAVE MBX MSG
Mailbox digits
Message number
SEND FAX
Null
Null
SEND MSG
Null
Message Number
SESSION CLOSE
Session ID
Null
SESSION OPEN
Session ID
Null
SET LANGUAGES
Prompt set
Null
SET MSG POSITION
Position
Null
SET VOLUME
Volume level
Null
SET/VALIDATE PASSWORD
Mailbox digits
Null
SET/VALIDATE PASSWORD
Mailbox digits
Null
SPEAK CCM MSG
CCM reference number
Null
SPEAK DATA TIME
System prompt number
Null
SPEAK MBX GRTG
Mailbox digits
Message number
SPEAK MBX MSG
Null
Message number
SPEAK MBX NAME
Mailbox digits
Null
SPEAK PDL NAME
Mailbox digits
PDL number
SPEAK PROMPTS
System prompt number
Null
STOP SPEAK RECORD
Null
Message number
TDM STATUS
Null
Null
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-54
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 7-9 SAT Log SAT_Status Types
Octel 200/300
STATUS
DESCRIPTION
SUCCESS
Success
FAIL
Fail
BADMSGNO
Bad message number
DTMFIN
DTMF in
LANDOWN
LAN down
OTHER
−−−
CALLP_BSY
Target busy
CALLP_FBSY
Fast busy
CALLP_RNA
Ring-no-answer
CALLP_VACANT
Target
CALLP_CXPORT
Octel 200/300 message server calling itself
CALLP_NODT
Never received tone from message server
INV_DATA
Invalid data
INV_STATE
Invalid state
INTERR
Internal error
BADDTMFDIG
Bad DTMF digit
2MUCHDATA
Too much data in request
PRTAL_NOTAV
Port allocation: no ports available
INSUFF_DATA
Insufficient data
NORSRC
No resources available
INVSSID
Invalid SSID
ALRDY_ONHK
On-hook request, but port already on-hook
BAD_TO,E
Bad clock structure
SPKRESUMED
Speak resumed
BADMSGTYPE
Bad message type
BADMBXNO
Bad mailbox number
BADVOLLVL
Bad volume index
BAD_PRT_TYP
Bad port type requested
NOCOS
Does not have required COS
MBXBSY
Mailbox busy
BADCCMREF
Bad CCM reference number
NODT
No dial tone
INV_ACCESS
Invalid access
DSK_FAIL
Disk fail
MBX_BSY
Mailbox busy
DST−FULL
Destination mailbox full
SYS_PERF
System performance limit
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-55
Table 7-9 SAT Log SAT_Status Types
PB60019−01
STATUS
DESCRIPTION
NO_GREET
Cannot turn on greeting
MSG_FAIL
Cannot save message
DSK_FULL
Disk full
SILENCE
Only silence/exceeds limit
ONLY_DTMF
Only DTMF
MSG_NOT_EXIST
No such message
APPOOL_FULL
AP mailbox pool full
NO_POOL_CF
No mailbox pool configured
NO_FAX_PRT
No FAX port
NONE_AVAIL
None available (for open session)
ALERT_PM
Information alert − new/purge message
LINE_DROP
PBX line drop
SUCC_DTMF
Record succeeds on DTMF in
SUCC_TIME_LMT
Record succeeds on Time limit
BAD_DST_ADDR
Invalid destination address
BAD_ADDR_OPT
Invalid addressing option
UDIR_FAIL
User directory fails
BAD_ORIG_MSGNO
Invalid original message number
CANNOT_FWD
Cannot forward a message
NO_DST_ADDR
No destination address
MSG_DEL
Message deleted already
GDL_NOMBX
No mailbox for go dial
INV_PSWDOP
Invalid password operation
INVPSWD
Invalid password
PSWCHGREQ
Password change required
PSWNEWREQ
New password required
SHORTPSWD
Short password
MAYNOTUSE
May not use this password
ALERT_LOGOFF
Information alert − user logoff
CLERR
Client error
NONE
Status field is blank
PRTAL_USAGE
Port allocation:usage requirement is not met
PRTAL_NOT_CNFG
Port allocation:no port configured
CH_NOTALLOC
Channel not allocated for TDM
TDM_ERROR
TDM error
DSC_TDM
TDM disconnected
INV_CHTYPE
Invalid channel type
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7-56
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 7-9 SAT Log SAT_Status Types
Octel 200/300
STATUS
DESCRIPTION
DST_FAIL
Destination mailbox fails
COS
Mailbox without OctelAccess COS
RECWARN
Record limit warning
ILLGL_MBX
Illegal mailbox − distribution list, network mailbox
GOT_PRT
Already allocated a port
NO_TDM
No TDM connection
CLOSE_SESS
Close session while busy
TDM_ACTIVE
TDM is still connected
CLOSESS_INPROG
Close session in progress
STOPSPK
Stopped speak operation
NO GWAY
No active OctelAccess connection
TMO
Timed out
NOTNEWCALL
Not a new call
FATAL_CH_ERROR
Fatal channel error: invalid state
PAUSESPK
Pause speak operation
ABORTCH
Abort port
CRTSY_DN
Courtesy down
OPERATOR
Operator initiated action
NETERR
Network error
GWDOWN
OctelAccess Server down
PROTERR
Protocol error
NO_MBX_COS
Mailbox without required COS
XFER_INPROG
File transfer already in progress
FILEXFER_SESS_BUSY
All file transfer sessions busy
XFER_CNCL_NO_INPROG
No file transfer in progress to cancel
INV_ENCODING_RATE
Invalid encoding rate; not used
FILEXFER_CNCL
File transfer canceled
FILENAME_TOO_LONG
File name in request is too long
FILEXFER_INV_MBXNUM
Invalid mailobx number for desk tab upload
NOT_IN_MBX
Message to download not in mailbox
NDR_REBUILD
Names directory export file update in progress
INV_FILETYPE
Invalid export file type
NDR_NO FEATURE
No names directory feature
INV_FAXUSAGE
Inv fax usage for port allocation
NO_PDL_OPT
Mailbox without PDL options
INV PDLNUM
Invalid PDL number
INV_PDL MEMMBX
PDL member mailbox non-existing
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Log Commands 7-57
Table 7-9 SAT Log SAT_Status Types
PB60019−01
STATUS
DESCRIPTION
PDL_OWNER_SDL
PDL owner mailbox an SDL
INV_COS_ATTR
Invalid COS attribute
PDLMEM_EXIST
PDL member already in PDL
PDL_FULL
PDL already full
PDLMEM_NINPDL
PDL member not in PDL
NO_PDLS
PDL owner does not have any PDLs
PDLMEM_IS_SELF
PDL member is self
FTP_CONN_CLOSED
FTP connection is closed
FTP_FILEOPEN
FTP file open error
FTP_FILE_RW_ERR
FTP file read/write error
FTP_NETWORK_ERR
FTP network error
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Call Processing Trace Activities
7A-1
APPENDIX A
CALL-PROCESSING TRACE
ACTIVITIES
The types of activities performed during call processing are shown in Table 7A-1, Trace Activity Types.
Events and supplemental activities are show in Table 7A-2, EVENT and AUX Activities in the
Call-Process Trace Log.
Table 7A-1 Trace Activity Types
PB60019−01
Type
Description
PORT
Port activity
FAX_CHN
Fax channel activity
FAX_MSG
Fax message activity
MBX
Mailbox activity
MSG
Message activity
NET_MSG
Network message activity
LAN_IN
Request received by this server from the LAN
LAN_OUT
Request sent from this server to the LAN
LAN_MSG
Message activity initiated by the LAN
LANLOST
LAN lost communication
LANSYNC
LAN synchronized communication
LAN_CTY
Courtesy operation (UP or DOWN specified in the EVENT column)
ONT_IN
OctelNet (Protocol 5) packet received by this server
ONT_OUT
OctelNet (Protocol 5) packet sent by this server
ONT_ERR
OctelNet (Protocol 5) protocol error occurred
NAM_DIR
Dial-by-Name Directory activity
INTG_C
Card-based integration record, including MIC, RIC, ATTIC, SL1, and M1 integrations
INTG_CA
Card-based ANI integration record
INTG_R
RS-232C integration record
INTG_D
DTMF integration record
LINK_AP
Application-control-processor link activity
AP
Application-control-processor mailbox activity (e.g., message waiting)
VSA
Octel Mailbox Managert activity
XFREXTFWD
Log the transfer to forwarded extension
DIRMSGACC
Log direct message access
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7A-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 7A-1 Trace Activity Types
Type
Description
INTGQRY
Log the PBX query call record types
INTGREP
Log the PBX reply call record types
CHKMBXQRY
Log the PBX query to check the existence of a mailbox
CHKMBXYES
Log the reply “YES” to the check mailbox query
CHKMBXNO
Log the reply “NO” to the check mailbox query
LINK_REQ
Log the PBX query to check the link authorization
LINK_REP
Log the reply to the link supervision query
CSP_IN
Packet received from the OctelAccess server
CSP_OUT
Packet sent from the message server to the OctelAccess server
In Table 7A-2, note the following:
-
-
-
An entry in the TYPE column indicates that the EVENT applies only to the TYPE given.
An entry of OctelNet means that the EVENT can apply to all OctelNet TYPES: ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT, ONT_ERR.
An entry of LAN means that the the EVENT can apply to all LAN TYPES: LAN_IN, LAN_OUT,
LAN_MSG, LANLOST, LANSYNC, and LAN_CTY.
For OctelNet events, the following terminology is used:
-
A base is a message server that makes an outcall and/or sends a message (voice or fax).
-
A node is a message server that receives a message.
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log
TYPE
Column
Entry
EVENT
Column
Entry
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
ABORT
Abort recording (DTMF digit *). Entry
might be sent by the base server or the
node while playing or recording a new
message to indicate some problem or error.
OctelNet
ADMASCRSP
ASCII name response packet
(administrative packet). This packet
contains the ASCII name of the mailbox in
the just-preceding administrative request
packet.
DESCRIPTION
.
The SOURCE column contains the
first 10 characters of the ASCII name.
AUX
Column
Entry
SUCCESS
MBXTYPE
MBXNTFND
NOMATCH
NOASCNM
NOSPKNM
NOACCESS
NOFEAT
CORRUPT
ADDED
SYNTAX
MORE_9
NWERROR
STOP
FSFULL
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
DESCRIPTION
Success
Incorrect mailbox type
Mailbox does not exist
ASCII names do not match
No ASCII name for mailbox
No spoken name for mailbox
Cannot access network directory
Feature not supported
Spoken name corrupted
Name successfully added to Names
Directory
Syntax error in name
More than nine identical names in Names
Directory
Error in updating Names Directory
Stop further protocol exchange — abort
System full
PB60019−01
Call Processing Trace Activities
7A-3
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log (continued)
TYPE
Column
Entry
EVENT
Column
Entry
OctelNet
ADMBALRSP
DESCRIPTION
The mailbox/alias response packet
(administrative packet). This packet is the
response containing alias information for
the same mailbox as in the just-preceding
administrative request packet. This packet
is sent by the node and received by the
base server.
AUX
Column
Entry
NWERROR
STOP
FSFULL
Success
Incorrect mailbox type
Mailbox does not exist
ASCII names do not match
No ASCII name for mailbox
No spoken name for mailbox
Cannot access network directory
Feature not supported
Spoken name corrupted
Name successfully added to Names
Directory
Syntax error in name
More than nine identical names in Names
Directory
Error in updating Names Directory
Stop further protocol exchange — abort
System full
GETALL
GETNAME
CHMODE
TXALL
Get all names.
Get name for mailbox
Change to/from voice/admin mode.
Transmit all names.
SUCCESS
MBXTYPE
MBXNTFND
NOMATCH
NOASCNM
NOSPKNM
NOACCESS
NOFEAT
CORRUPT
ADDED
Success
Incorrect mailbox type
Mailbox does not exist
ASCII names do not match
No ASCII name for mailbox
No spoken name for mailbox
Cannot access network directory
Feature not supported
Spoken name corrupted
Name successfully added to Names
Directory
Syntax error in name
More than nine identical names in Names
Directory
Error in updating Names Directory
Stop further protocol exchange — abort
System full
SUCCESS
MBXTYPE
MBXNTFND
NOMATCH
NOASCNM
NOSPKNM
NOACCESS
NOFEAT
CORRUPT
ADDED
SYNTAX
MORE_9
OctelNet
ADMGENREQ
Generic administrative request packet. This
packet is sent by the base server (the server
trying to retrieve spoken and ASCII
names) and received by the node. The
AUX column contains the type of request.
.
OctelNet
ADMGENRSP
The MBX/EXTN column contains
the mailbox number for which the
request is being made (00 for
CHMODE AUX type).
Generic administrative response packet.
SYNTAX
MORE_9
NWERROR
STOP
FSFULL
ALLOC_TO
PB60019−01
DESCRIPTION
Fax allocation
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7A-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log (continued)
TYPE
Column
Entry
EVENT
Column
Entry
LAN
ANLOGSTBY
OctelNet
ASCIINAME
DESCRIPTION
AUX
Column
Entry
DESCRIPTION
Indicates the change from LAN delivery to
analog standby delivery (LAN, analog
standby)
.
The MSG# column contains the
number of the first message in the
queue to be sent to the location for
which analog standby was initiated.
.
The SOURCE column contains the
name of the remote location.
OctelNet ASCII name verification packet.
This packet contains the ASCII name of
the destination mailbox in the
just-preceding message header request
packet sent by the base server (or received
by the node) as it appears in the Names
Directory of the base.
.
The SOURCE column contains the
first 10 characters of the ASCII name.
AUTO_LOGON
CALL_MBX
LAN
LAN
LAN
LAN,
OctelNet
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
Octel 200/300
CLOSEDONE
Connection has been closed.
CONECT_TO
Fax channel connect to voice port.
CONNGRANT
Connection has been granted.
COS_OVRID
COS override occurred.
COURTESY
Generic for courtesy up/down.
CREATE
Created msg to receive new message
delivery.
DEBUG
Integration debug records .
DEFERRED
Message deferred for mailbox.
DESTMBX
Destination mailbox for the message .
.
The SOURCE field contains the
ASCII name for each destination
address sent.
DIGIT_IN
Digit received by system.
DIGIT_OUT
Digit received by system.
DIR_INT
Direct internal call.
DIR_EXT
Direct external call.
DISC_FROM
Fax channel disconnect from voice port.
END_MSG
End of message (DTMF digit #). Sent by
the base to the node at the end of new
message play.
S.4.1
UP/DOWN
NAMEFAIL
Failure status when ASCII name match
fails.
PB60019−01
Call Processing Trace Activities
7A-5
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log (continued)
TYPE
Column
Entry
EVENT
Column
Entry
FAX_MSG
END_PLAY
DESCRIPTION
The playing of the message has ended.
AUX
Column
Entry
The CPT shows result codes for fax transactions in the AUX
column. For fax messages, the AUX column is empty if the
fax was successful. The most common result codes listed
are for the END PLAY event.
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
FAX_MSG
END_PLAY
(continued)
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
PB60019−01
DESCRIPTION
Fax protocol error
Default error code
Modem training failure
Remote fax requested a feature not
supported by the Octel 200/300
Not used
Voice bus timeout
Fax protocol error
VCU software not ready
Bad-page-retransmit limit reached
Modem connection failure; no response
from on-board modem
Modem connection failure
Other side disconnected
Operator assistance not supported in fax
Fax system ID match
No fax or busy line
Transmitter failed in HDLC test. Used in
fax loopback test. Hardware error 63 is
logged
Receiver failed in HDLC test. Used in fax
loopback test. Hardware error 63 logged
Both transmitter and receiver failed in
HDLC test. Used in fax loopback test.
Hardware error 63 logged
Timeout occurred in HDLC test. Used in
fax loopback test. Hardware error 63
logged
No identification frame record from
remote fax
Remote fax did not respond to command
Unable to configure remote fax
Remote fax did not confirm
Octel 200/300’s transmission fax
parameters
Hardware training failed. No carrier
No response from RX for multipage
signal
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7A-6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log (continued)
TYPE
Column
Entry
EVENT
Column
Entry
DESCRIPTION
AUX
Column
Entry
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
20
END_RECRD
Stop recording message.
EX_AB_GRT
Extended absence greeting.
FAX_CHAN
FAX_CONCT
Fax connect information.
FAX_CHAN
FAX_INFO
Fax message information.
FAX_CHAN
FAX_DELIV
Fax delivery.
LAN
FAXDLV
Indicates the delivery and receipt of a fax
message at the receive and send sides.
.
LAN
FORCE_FWD
Unexpected frame from remote fax
No response from remote fax to end of
procedure frame
No response from remote fax to end of
message frame
No response from remote fax to
identification frame
Failure in receiving command frame from
remote fax
Remote fax failed in retransmitting bad
page and disconnected
Remote fax disconnected because of
resolution mismatch
The CPT shows result codes for fax transactions in the AUX
column. For fax messages, the AUX column is empty if the
fax was successful. The most common result codes listed are
for the END_PLAY event.
ON
OFF
START
SUCCESS
FAIL
RETRY
Fax delivery failed, but will retry.
HAS_EXTN
NO_EXTN
This is the last message of a chain.
The SOURCE column contains the
creator mailbox.
Forced forward.
FWD_INT
Forward internal call.
NO_ANSWER
BUSY
ALL
FORCED
Ring-no-answer forward
Busy forward
All forward
Forced forward
FWD_EXT
Forward external call.
NO_ANSWER
BUSY
ALL
FORCED
Ring-no-answer forward
Busy forward
All forward
Forced forward
Message freed.
TOO_SHRT
ERAS_REQ
LISN_END
HIT_**
OLD_GRET
OLD_NAME
NO_ADDR
USE_CNTO
Message too short
Erase requested
Listened to end
Entered **
Old greeting
Old name
No addresses
Use count 0
FREED
Octel 200/300
DESCRIPTION
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Call Processing Trace Activities
7A-7
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log (continued)
TYPE
Column
Entry
EVENT
Column
Entry
DESCRIPTION
AUX
Column
Entry
DESCRIPTION
HUNG_UP
BAD_ADDR
REC_ERR
BAD_ADDR
REC_ERR
BAD_ADDR
REC_ERR
NO_TALK
DTMF_REC
EXTN_HDR
NTNM_DEL
NTNM_PRG
NTNM_CLI
FAX_FAIL
FAX_ADEL
FAX_ABRT
MBX_MSG
FREE_FROM
Fax freed from (Reverse of ALLOC_TO).
FUTR_MAKE
Future delivery message made.
FUTR_SENT
Future delivery message sent.
LAN
HNDSHK_RQ
Handshake request.
LAN
HNDSHK_RP
Handshake reply.
HAS_MSGS
Message count when logged on.
DTMF received while recording
Extension header
Netname deleted
Netname deleted by auto-purge
Netname deleted by CLI
Fax failed
Fax auto deletion
Fax abort
Mailbox message (VMX 5000 UI)
SUCCESS
Message count displayed
HUNGUP
INV_SECUR
Invalid password entered.
INV_USER
Invalid UID.
LINE_DROP
System received drop signal.
LOCK_UP
Possible port lockup (SL1 integration).
LAN
LOCN_UP
Link to this location is up.
LAN
LOCN_DOWN
LOGON
LOG_MSGS
LOGOFF
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
LSYN_REQ
Link to this location is down.
Successful user logon to mailbox.
Number of messages delivered while
logged on.
Successful user logoff.
Line synchronization request packet sent
by the base server to the node.
.
PB60019−01
The protocol level proposed by the
base, which is also in the packet, is
printed in the SOURCE column.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7A-8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log (continued)
TYPE
Column
Entry
EVENT
Column
Entry
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
LSYN_RSP
DESCRIPTION
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
Octel 200/300
The final protocol level determined
by the node (the lower level of that
proposed by the base and that of the
node), which is also in the packet, is
printed in the SOURCE column.
Message marked playable/unplayable.
MARK_DEL
Name is marked for deletion.
MHDR_REQ
Message header request packet sent by the
base server to the node. This packet
contains a message header type, which is
printed in the AUX column.
.
The message header request can
contain a destination mailbox. If it
does (depending on the message
header type), it is printed in the
MBX/EXTN column.
.
The message header request may
contain a source mailbox. If it does
(depending on the message header
type), it is printed in the SOURCE
column.
.
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
MHDR_RSP
S.4.1
DESCRIPTION
Line synchronization response packet sent
by the node to the base.
.
MARKED
AUX
Column
Entry
The message number being sent by
the base is shown in the MSG#
column. for the base server only.
Message header response packet sent by
the node to the base server. The message
header response packet contains the
response to the message header request.
.
The message number of the message
just recorded/copied is shown in the
MSG# column for the node only.
.
The location name of the base server
location (concluded by the node,
based on the source mailbox number)
is shown in the SOURCE column for
the node only.
PLAYABLE
UNPLAYBL
Message marked playable.
Message marked unplayable.
ENDSES
NEWVCE
CPYVCE
POSCONF
NEGCONF
REMNOT
TRNARND
ADMNMSG
NEWNAME
End of session
New voice message
Copy previous voice message
Positive confirmation
Negative confirmation
Remote message waiting notification
Turnaround requested
Administrative message
New voice message with name
confirmation
Copy previous message with name
confirmation
Compound fax message
Fax-only message
Copy previous fax message
Fax compound with name confirmation
Copy previous fax with name
confirmation
Fax-only with name confirmation
CPYNAME
CMPFAX
ONLFAX
CPYFAX
CMPFXNM
CPYFXNM
ONLYFXNM
SUCCESS
MBXNTFND
MBXTYPE
MBXFULL
FUTFULL
FSFULL
NODELETE
NODISABL
BADMSG
NODEBUSY
NOANSWER
BADLINE
RE−SYNC
NOMATCH
USRBLCKD
ABSGREET
RCVMBXFX
RCVPRTFX
RCVSYSFX
SNDPRTFX
Success
Destination mailbox not found or deleted
before the message could be delivered
Nondeliverable mailbox type
Destination mailbox full
Mailbox future delivery full
File system full
Node deleted
Node disabled — return messages
Bad message
Node busy
No answer
Bad line
Re-sync request (used after abort)
ASCII name does not match
Network message blocked by user
User had absent greeting
RCV not a fax-capable mailbox
RCV not a fax-capable port
RCV not a fax-capable system
TX not a fax-capable port
PB60019−01
Call Processing Trace Activities
7A-9
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log (continued)
TYPE
Column
Entry
LAN
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
EVENT
Column
Entry
DESCRIPTION
AUX
Column
Entry
MSGWAIT
Request to turn message waiting on or off.
MSGDLV
Delivering one message of the chain.
HAS_EXTN
NO_EXTN
This is the last message of a chain.
MW_RESULT
Result of attempt to set message waiting.
OFF
OFF_BAD
ON
ON_BAD
NOTCFG
UNABLE
Off:success
Off:failure
On:success
ON:failure
Not configured in PBX
Unable to make
MSG_RSP
Message response packet sent by the node
to the base server. The message response
packet is sent by the node to the base
server after recording the new message. It
contains the node’s response to the
message delivery requested by the base
server. The response types are the same as
those for the message header response and
are traced in exactly the same manner.
NET_NAME
Netname activity.
NEW_MSGS
New message count when logged on.
SET
CLEAR
DESCRIPTION
Turn on message waiting
Turn off message waiting
Message count displayed
OFFHOOK
ONHOOK
LAN
OPENCONN
Open a connection.
PBX_RSTRT
PBX restart integration pcket received.
PLAY
Play message.
PURGE
Name was successfully purged.
PUT_IN
Message was put in mailbox or location.
RBLD_END
Event logged at the end of the rebuild
process for the Names Directory.
RBLD_STRT
Event logged at the beginning of the
rebuild process for the Names Directory.
RBLD_P1
Logged an inconsistency during pass 1 of
the rebuild for the Names Directory.
.
RBLD_P2
Logged an inconsistency during pass 2 of
the rebuild for the Names Directory.
.
PB60019−01
The first 8 digits of the mailbox
number are printed in the
MBX/EXTN column.
Type of message entered in AUX
Type of message entered in AUX
BADUSRNM
BADNETNM
USRINCON
NETINCON
BADNAMNM
USRINCON
The first 8 digits of the mailbox
number are printed in the
MBX/EXTN column.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7A-10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log (continued)
TYPE
Column
Entry
EVENT
Column
Entry
RBLD_P
DESCRIPTION
Logged an inconsistency during pass 3 of
the rebuild for the Names Directory.
.
ONT_ERR
LAN
RCV_FAIL
Logged an OctelNet packet receive failure.
An attempt to receive/decode an OctelNet
packet failed. The reason for the failure is
indicated in the AUX column for
decryption failure, unscrambling failure,
checksum failure, timeout, or the remote
side hanging up. For other errors, the AUX
column is blank.
Start record message.
REMOVED
Message removed from mailbox or
location.
RECEIVED
DESCRIPTION
BADNAMNM
USRINCON
The first 8 digits of the mailbox
number are printed in the
MBX/EXTN column.
RECORD
RCV
AUX
Column
Entry
Received message.
DECRPT
UNSCRM
CHKSUM
TIMOUT
HANGUP
Decryption failure
Unscrambling failure
Checksum failure
Timeout
Remote side hanging up
Type of message is entered in AUX
column
SUCCESS
Network message received.
RECRD_CALL Record call in progress.
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
SAVE_GO
Save go (DTMF digit 9). Sent by the base
server to the node after receiving the save
request from the node.
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
SAVE_RQ
Save request (DTMF digit 8). Request by
the node to the base server after receiving
an end of message from the base.
LAN
SEND
Final message status result of STRTSND.
SENT
Message sent.
SUCCESS
CALLFAIL
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
SER_NUM
Serial number packet sent by the node to
the base server. The serial number (in hex)
is traced in the SOURCE column.
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
SHDR_REQ
Session header request packet sent by the
base server to the node. The serial number
of the base is in the SOURCE column.
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
SHDR_RSP
Session header response packet sent by the
node to the base server. The serial number
of the node is in the SOURCE column.
ACCEPT
OctelNet packet send failure. An attempt to
prepare or send an OctelNet packet failed.
The reason for the failure is indicated in
the AUX column for encryption failure,
scrambling failure, checksum failure, or
the remote side hanging up. For other
errors, the AUX column is blank.
ENCRPT
SCRMBL
CHKSUM
HANGUP
ONT_ERR
Octel 200/300
SND_FAIL
S.4.1
REJECT
Network connection was not successful or
was closed. Will retry to make connection.
The node is accepting the proposed
connection.
The node is rejecting the proposed
connection.
Encryption failure
Scrambling failure
Checksum failure
Remote side hanging up
PB60019−01
Call Processing Trace Activities
7A-11
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log (continued)
TYPE
Column
Entry
EVENT
Column
Entry
LAN
SNMP_QRY
SNMP information has been requested.
SNMP_SND
SNMP information has been sent.
LAN
AUX
Column
Entry
001
002
DESCRIPTION
Digital performance report
Network traffic report
STATUS
NO_ANSWR
FAST_BSY
BUSY
EVENT
RINGING
UNAVAIL
TALKOFF
CAMPON
FAILED
CXPORT
STATUS
SUCCESS
COMPLETE
VCUREADY
VCUCONN
STATUS
(continued)
FAIL
DISKFULL
NOTFND
NONETNAM
UNEXPREQ
Generic failure
MBXFULL
NORECORD
NTNAMFUL
FWDDEPTH
ALL_BSY
OEM_FAIL
REV_FAIL
COURUPDN
Mailbox full
Mailbox set to no record COS
NetNam Table full
Max message forwarding depth exceeded
All LCH are busy
Failed because of OEM mismatch
Protocol level not supported
Courtesy up/down in progress
TSTERADR
TSTERCON
TSTERDOM
TSTERRDG
TSTERSDG
TSTERFDG
TSTERCOL
TSTSWRCV
CPUCHKER
NOFAXFTR
NOFAXCOS
TNDMLIM
RLANFAIL
LLANFAIL
IP address did not match
Connection types do not match
In-domain status does not match
Receiver self digits do not match
Sender self digits do not match
First digit mismatch with senders
Collocated status mismatch
SW error on receive side of testlan
Bad data checksum
Receiver does not have FAX feature
Receiver mbx does not have FAX COS
Msg tandem limit reached
Remote LAN failure
Local LAN failure
STRTSND
TEST
TIMESTAMP
PB60019−01
DESCRIPTION
Starting send for a new message chain.
Completed function
VCU software ready to connect
VCU software connected
Mailbox not found
Network name cannot be updated
Unexpected request
No. of msgs in message chain is shown
Background port self-test.
Debug feature for user to force timestamp
in trace.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7A-12
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log (continued)
TYPE
Column
Entry
EVENT
Column
Entry
DESCRIPTION
TRANSFER
AUX
Column
Entry
DESCRIPTION
FLASH
EXP_DT
GOT_DT
NO_DT
DELAY
Expect dial tone
Got dial tone
No dial tone
USE_PORT
ATTIC integration.
UNKNOWN
Call record in unknown format.
VCUCONN
Connect VCU software for message
transfer.
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
WKUP_REQ
Wakeup request sent by the base server to
the node. The location name being called
is printed in the SOURCE column for the
base only.
NEEDSER
KNOWSER
Wakeup request tone of DTMF CD
Wakeup request tone of DTMF BD
ONT_IN,
ONT_OUT
WKUP_RSP
Wakeup response sent by the node to the
base server.
NEEDSER
KNOWSER
Wakeup request tone of DTMF BDD
Wakeup request tone of DTMF CDD
END_FLUSH
INCOMPLET
INV_1ST
NO RECORD
INV_RECRD
These five events are for the DTMF
Integration.
AP
POLL
SEND
RECEIVE
SYNC
LOST_SYNC
These five events are for Works for
Serenade..
VSA
VSAIN
VSAOUT
VSAUP
VSADOWN
These events show activity for Octel
Mailbox Manager.
INTG_C
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Call Processing Trace Activities
7A-13
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log (continued)
TYPE
Column
Entry
EVENT
Column
Entry
CSP_IN
EST_CONN
Establish a connection
CSP_OUT
REQ_PORT
Requewst a Serenade port
HANGUP
INIT_XFR
DESCRIPTION
AUX
Column
Entry
DESCRIPTION
Hangup a Serenade port
Initiate a transfer
COMPLE_XFR Complete the transfer
RECONNECT
Reconnect to caller
CALL_MBX
Call a mailbox/extension
SPK_PRMPT
Speak system prompts
SPK_GRTG
Speak greeting
SPK_NAME
Speak na;me for a specified mailbox
SPK_MSG
Speak message number
DTMF_OUT
Outpulse a DTMF string
STOP_OPER
Stop a speak/record operation
PAUSE_MSG
Pause speaking message
CONT_MSG
continue speaking message
SETMSGPOS
Set message position
COPY_MSG
Copy a ACM message to a mailbox
ERASE_MSG
Erase message number
RECRD_MSG
Record a message
GT_MBXINF
Get mailbox information
GT_MSGIDX
Get mailbox header information from message index
GT_MSGNUM
Get mailbox header informaiton from message number
GODIAL
PB60019−01
Give control of port to Serenade
MOD_MSGWT
Set/clear application message waiting notification
MSG_XOUT
Request a fax/voice message to be transferred to gatewqay
CKSET_PWD
Validate/set a mailbox password
ERR_SYNAC
Error/out of sync on this session
SET_VOL
Set volume level
SAVE_MSG
Save message in mailbox
GETMSGPOS
get position of a message
SET_GRTG
Set mailbox greeting on/off
SEND_MSG
Address/deliver a recorded message
CLROFFMWT
Turn off offsite message waitingn for this mailbox
GT_OMMPKT
Get OMM packet
RLS_FXPRT
Release a fax port
CONN_TDM
Connect the TDM bus for two ports
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
7A-14
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 7A-2 EVENT and AUX Activities in Call Process Trace Log (continued)
TYPE
Column
Entry
EVENT
Column
Entry
CSP_IN
CSP_OUT
BREAK_TDM
AUX
Column
Entry
Received a fax message
FAX_SEND
Send a fax message
FAX_LOAD
Load a fax form into fax card memory
FAX_MAKE
Save fax card memory into fax document
FAX_EDIT
Place characters on a fax form
CH−FORTDM
Mark a channel available for TDM connetion
CH_NOTTDM
Indicate channel no longer used for TDM conn
LOG_OFF
Client logged off by gateway
FAX_CNCL
Cancel fax transfer
MSG_XIN
Request to transfer a fax/voice message to Serenade
LANG_LOAD
Request languages loaded on message server
LANG_SET
Change language
EST_CONN
Established connection
ONHOOK
Serenade port on hook
RP_PORTRQ
Reply to port re4quest
CMD_ACK
S.4.1
DESCRIPTION
Break the TDM connection
FAX_RCV
RP_MSGCMD
Octel 200/300
DESCRIPTION
Command received, being processed
Reply to message command
PB60019−01
8
SYSTEM ERRORS AND
TRAFFIC PEGS
Chapter Contents
8.1
8.2
8.3
Boot ROM Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Boot ROM Diagnostic Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Hardware Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
Alarm Outcall Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
Alarm Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
Hardware Error Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
Traffic Peg Count Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-40
Traffic Pegs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-41
Figure
8-1
Traffic Peg Count Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-61
Tables
8-1
8-2
PB60019−01
Boot ROM Diagnostic Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Hardware Error Types and Remedies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
Command
Information
L P
Lists the traffic pegs
C P
Clears the Traffic Pegs Count Table
BITTST x
Converts hardware error data fields into bit sets.
x = hexadecimal number
L H
Lists the Hardware Error Table.
C H
Clears the Hardware Error Table.
Traffic Pegs
Hardware Errors
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8.1
8-1
BOOT ROM DIAGNOSTICS
When the OctelR 200/300 is loaded or reloaded (loss of power, system error, or a command), the CPU
and other system modules execute a Power−on Selftest diagnostic, or Boot ROM diagnostic. The
following describes how to access and interpret the boot ROM errors.
The CPU diagnostic displays progress messages at the default baud rate of 9600. You can use an
alternative baud rate:
When locally connected, proceed as follows:
1. Set the baud rate to any of the valid rates: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200 or 38400.
2. Turn ON the power.
3. Immediately following power up, press Enter repeatedly to establish the baud rate. If you do not
establish the baud rate at this time the header and diagnostic messages print at 9600 baud.
Wait for the operating system to load and the diagnostic selftest to finish. If the tests were completed
successfully, the Octel 200/300 displays INITIALIZING PORTS...PORT INITIALIZATION
DONE. The word FAILED displays if one of the tests fail. A sample screen is shown below.
4. When the password prompt is displayed, enter the password, and press
Enter
.
5. The operating system @ prompt appears.
When remotely connected, proceed as follows:
Call the Octel 200/300 from a compatible modem-equipped terminal. When you hear the company
greeting, access the modem by entering # # # 5 , or access the modem through a modem-access
mailbox, if it is used. The message server responds with a high-pitched tone. Connect your modem. The
Octel 200/300 header should appear shortly. Proceed as if directly connected.
The complete diagnostic message shown below is printed. The word FAILED displays if one of the tests
fail.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
CPU
486
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Testing
Model 300−6039−001
Step 27
Rev F1
32MB
Processor...PASSED
System Voltage/Temp...PASSED
ROM Checksum...PASSED
PIT...PASSED
DMA...PASSED
UART...PASSED
Modem...PASSED
TDM Crosspoint...PASSED
Floppy...PASSED
RTC...PASSED
BIC...PASSED
OCC...PASSED
WDT...PASSED
Control Bus Interface...PASSED
Testing COMPLETED
Booting from SCSI file XBOOT.IM
Image loaded
Loading Image from Hard Disk
Loading file VMS1_3.IM
Loading file VMS2_3.IM
Image loaded
Loading file VMS3_3.IM
−−−−−− SYSTEM SOFTWARE RELEASE S.X.X.X (xx/xx/xx) −−−−−−
Copyright(c) 2000 Lucent Technologies All Rights Reserved.
TUE MM/DD 08:44:58 YYYY
ID: S/N:000000 PBX:00
(Modem enabled)
Last Logon : 00/00 00:00
@WAITING FOR VCU READY
LOADING VCU WITH FILE H:VCU.IM
VCU STARTED
RUNNING DISK REBUILD...REBUILD DONE
INITIALIZING PORTS...
PORT INITIALIZATION DONE
@
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-3
Boot Rom Diagnostic Errors
An error message prints if errors are encountered. Table 8-1 is a list of possible boot ROM diagnostic
error numbers, a description of each error, and the most likely cause. The error number is displayed in
hexdecimal form. When a failed assembly is returned for repair, the specific error number provides
additional information. When contacting your technical support center, indicate the boot ROM diagnostic
error number. A fatal error means that the message server does not come up.
Table 8-1 Boot ROM Diagnostic Errors
CPU
Error
CPU
Likely
Cause
001
Fatal
Microprocessor Instruction Set Error
n
CPU
002
Fatal
EPROM (Flash) Checksum Error
n
CPU
003
Fatal
DRAM Pattern Test Error
n
CPU
004
Fatal
DRAM Address Test Error
n
CPU
006
Programmable Interval timer error in timing
n
CPU
007
Programmable interval timer interrupt error
n
CPU
008
Analog to digital converter test error
n
CPU
009
+5V VCC out of range (+4.75V to +5.25V)
n
PSU
00A
+5V clean out of range (+4.75V to +5.25V)
n
PSU
00B
+12V clean out of range (+10.8V to +13.2V)
n
PSU
00C
+12V motor supply out of range (+11.4V to +12.6V)
n
PSU
00D
−5V clean out of range (−5.5V to −4.5V)
n
PSU
00E
−12V out of range (−12,6V to −11.4V)
n
PSU
00F
Temperature out of range (<10C or >50C)
n
CPU
010
Analog tone timer error
n
CPU
Unexpected interrupt error
n
CPU
012
DMA page register test error
n
CPU
013
DMA register test error
n
CPU
014
DMA transfer test error
n
CPU
015
Real Time Clock RAM test error
n
CPU
016
Real Time Clock Alarm interrupt error
n
CPU
017
Real Time Clock counting error
n
CPU
018
Floppy disk controller test error
n
CPU
019
Option Control Chip write error
n
OCC
01A
Option Control Chip read error
n
OCC
01B
Option Control Chip checksum error
n
OCC
01C
Watchdog timer test error
n
CPU
01D
UART 1 test error
n
CPU
01E
UART 2 test error
n
CPU
011
PB60019−01
Severity Description
Fatal
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-1 Boot ROM Diagnostic Errors (continued)
CPU
Error
Octel 200/300
Severity Description
CPU
Likely
Cause
01F
UART 3 test error
n
CPU
020
UART 4 test error
n
CPU
021
Modem loopback error
n
CPU
022
TDM Crosspoint pattern test error
n
CPU
023
TDM Crosspoint address test error
n
CPU
024
Control Bus interrupt test error
n
CPU
025
Control Bus register test error
n
CPU
026
Control Bus shared memory pattern test error
n
CPU
027
Control Bus shared memory address test error
n
CPU
028
Control Bus DMA error
n
CPU
029
VCU Ready timeout
n
CPU
02A
VCU Error status failure
n
CPU
02B
VCU Reply timeout
n
CPU
02C
Invalid VCU reply
n
CPU
02D
Bad VCU reply status
n
CPU
02E
VCU Error: SCSI, boot error, or no bootstrap
n
CPU
02F
General VCU Boot failure
n
CPU
030
Board Information Chip write error
n
CPU
031
Board Information Chip read error
n
CPU
032
Board Information Chip checksum error
n
CPU
033
TDM Codec loopback error
n
CPU
S.4.1
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8.2
8-5
HARDWARE ERRORS
The Octel 200/300 logs each hardware error, along with its date, time, and type, in the Hardware Error
Table. This section explains how to read and interpret the information in the Hardware Error Table. It
also suggests some probable causes and remedies.
-
The command LIST HARDWARE is used to list the Hardware Error Table. From the @ prompt, enter
L H
-
The command CLEAR HARDWARE is used to clear the Hardware Error Table. From the @ prompt,
enter
C H
-
Enter
Enter
For some hardware errors it may be necessary to translate the error bits into the error code. To
display which bits are set in a HEXadecimal number (max 16 bits), from the @ prompt, enter
BITTST x
where x is a hexadecimal number.
An example to see which bits are set in the hex number 1234:
@BITTST 1234
BIT 2
BIT 4
BIT 5
BIT 9
BIT 12
@
IS
IS
IS
IS
IS
SET
SET
SET
SET
SET
Hardware Error Table example and field description:
@L H
THU MM/DD 22:29:56 YYYY
CLEARED: 08/26 11:02
E1_ISDN
ID:200444
TYPE SLOT CHNL PRIO DATE TIME #BAD DATA1
01
09
00
1 01/21 04:24
1 00000001
01
09
00
1 01/21 04:25
1 00000001
01
09
00
1 01/21 04:25
1 00000001
@
-
-
-
DATA2
00000000
00000001
00000002
PBX:32
DATA3
00000034
00000034
00000034
DATA4
00000007
00000007
00000007
TYPE. Range 1−nn. Indicates which hardware assembly detected an error or failed to perform a
function. See Table 8-2.
SLOT. Where applicable, shows slot number in which the PCA was installed when the error was
reported.
CHNL. Indicates the number of the failed channel.
.
PB60019−01
S/N:200003
For Error #24 only,
CHNL 1 refers to unit 1
CHNL 2 refers to unit 2
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
-
PRIO. Indicates the priority level of the hardware error being reported. Each type of hardware error
has been assigned an error priority level. Priority levels range from 0 to 3, with 0 being the lowest
level and 3 the highest. Higher priority hardware errors overwrite lower priority errors if the
Hardware Error Table is full. Always correct the highest priority errors first.
Priority
Number of failures required
to generate an alarm call
3
2
1
1
25
50
Priority 0 reports a test of the alarm (TE A).
-
DATE. Shows the month and day the error was first detected.
-
TIME. Shows the hour and minute the error was first detected, using a 24-hour clock.
-
#BAD. Indicates the number of times the error occurred (up to 99 times).
-
DATA1 – DATA4. These fields contain information used when an assembly is returned for repair.
This information is displayed as eight digits. The first six are zeroes.
.
It is important to enter this information on a failure report when returning an assembly.
Alarm Outcall Scheduling
Alarm outcall scheduling allows you to configure the number of times a failure occurs before an alarm
outcall is made for every hardware error type, regardless of the priority level that has been designated for
the hardware error. You create a schedule that designates the time of day and day of week that an alarm
outcall should be made. With this feature, alarm outcalls for non−critical hardware errors can be blocked.
If alarm outcall scheduling is not established, outcalls to report system problems that are logged in the
Hardware Error Table are placed according to the the priority designated for the hardware error, with no
regard for the time of day or day of week.
To designate alarm outcall schedules to override the priority schedule for hardware errors, two tables
must be configured in update.
-
-
The ALARM Table is configured with a failure limit for each hardware error and an alarm schedule
number to determine when an outcall should be made. The ALARM Table can be configured to block
alarm outcalls for non−critical hardware errors.
The ALARM SCHEDULE Table creates alarm schedules with outcall windows based on time of day,
day of week, and holidays. These schedules can be assigned to hardware errors in the ALARM Table.
Twenty−five alarm schedules can be created with eight different windows. Each schedule can be
referenced by multiple hardware error types.
Refer to the Configuration volume, Alarm Outcall Scheduling.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-7
Alarm Relays
The Octel 200/300 provides both major and minor alarm relays, which can be used to light an LED or
sound an alarm. Refer to the Maintenance Commands chapter, Alarm Test section.
In the event of a power failure, both of these relays close the contacts to indicate the power failure. Both
relays remain closed during a subsequent restoration of power until the software boot process opens the
relays. However, if there is an alarm condition prior to the power failure or an alarm condition arises
during the boot process, the relay(s) remain closed until the CLEAR HARDWARE command is given.
During operation, if any hardware error occurs, the minor alarm relay is closed. In turn, the major alarm
relay closes when an alarm call is attempted, subject to the priority of the hardware errors.
Hardware Error Types
The following table outlines the probable cause and suggested remedy for errors. Clear errors with the
highest priority first. Priority 3 is the highest, 1 is the lowest.
DATA-1 − DATA-4 information in the Hardware Error Table is displayed as eight digits. Only the last
two digits are displayed in the following Hardware Error Table.
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies
Error Type:Name
1: Floppy Disk
Source
TEST FLOP 1 or
while trying to read
Remedy
Clear Hardware Error Table. Run TE F 1.
If errors repeat, replace the following
components one at a time. Run TE F 1
each time. Check cables, diskette, CPU,
MFD.
Priority
1
DATA-1 = ERROR CODES
01 = READ
02 = WRITE
2: Tone Reflection
Selftest or TEST
LINE 1, TEST L
5
Clear Hardware Error Table. Run TE L 1.
If one channel fails, disconnect line card
and run TE L 1 again or TE L 5. If errors
repeat, replace the LIC. If all lines fail,
check the configuration or VCU as possible
cause. Make sure the prompts are loaded.
2
3: Prompt
Selftest or TEST
LINE 1
Same as error 2.
2
4: DTMF Reflection
Selftest or TEST
LINE 1
Same as error 2.
2
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
Source
Remedy
Priority
5: Ring Through
TEST LINE 2
PORT
Verify that extension numbers in the table
are correct. Could be a problem in PBX
extensions or LIC.
2
6: Floppy Disk
Controller
During read or write
to floppy
Clear Hardware Error Table, run TEST
FLOP 1. Check cables. If errors repeat,
replace CPU.
1
8: VCU Online
Online diagnostic tests Replace VCU. Reboot message server. If
error repeats, replace CPU. If problem
continues contact technical support center.
3
10:Disk getting full
Disk message capacity For DATA-1=03 and DATA-2=00−06, and
is all used up or
11 errors, erase messages or increase hard
getting there.
disk capacity. For DATA-2=10 errors, call
your technical support center.
3
DATA-1 =
DATA-2 =
01
03
=
00
=
01−06 =
0a
=
0b
=
0c
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
= ALARM THRESHOLD CONFIGURED IN SYSTEM
=
PARAMETER 108 REACHED
DISK FULL OR CANNOT MAKE MESSAGE REDUNDANT
NO VOICE FILE SLOTS LEFT
LOGICAL DRIVE ID THAT IS FULL
PROMPT AREA FULL
NO DISK WITH SUFFICIENT SPACE AVAILABLE
SYSTEM RECORDING LIMIT EXCEEDED (ZERO HOUR DRIVES)
NOT USED
NOT USED
11: Disk Initialization VCU could not
Contact your technical support center.
Failure
successfully initialize
the disk(s). Either no
valid system disk is
present in the system,
or no valid file system
exists on the system
disk.
Octel 200/300
DATA-1 =
REASON:
01 = NO SYSTEM DISK FOUND
02 = NO VALID FILE SYSTEM FOUND
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
S.4.1
3
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-9
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
12:CPU Parity
Source
Parity error occurred
in CPU memory area.
Remedy
If error repeats, replace power supply unit.
DATA-1
FROM I/O ADDRESS 6A (ERR.ADDR2)
BIT 0, 1, 2 = CONTEXT REG IN USE ON ERROR
DATA-2
FROM I/O ADDRESS 69 (ERR.ADDR1)
HIGH ADDRESS ON PARITY ERROR
DATA-3
FROM I/O ADDRESS 68 (ERR.ADDR0)
LOW ADDRESS ON PARITY ERROR
DATA-4
CONTENTS OF CONTEXT REG DESIGNATED BY DATA-1
Priority
3
14:VCU software
initial checksum
error
VCU code checksum
incorrect
Contact your technical support center.
3
15:System Status
Error
Temperature or
voltage out of range
Check DATA-1 for information pertaining
to what is out of range and perform
corrective action.*
3
*
DATA-1 =
To correct cabinet temperature, check the filter, fan, room
temperature, etc. Be sure there are at least six inches between
cabinet and wall. If Type 15 errors (with DATA-1=01) still
appear, replace the CPU. For Type 15 errors (with DATA-1=02,
03, 04, 05, 06, 0A, or 0B), voltage cannot be adjusted;
recommended action is to replace the power supply.
FAILURE CODE :
01 =
INSIDE CABINET TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT IS OUT OF
RANGE.
10 TO 50 C (50 F TO 122 F)
DATA-2 =
02 =
+5 DIGITAL VOLTAGE MEASUREMENT IS OUT OF RANGE
+4.75 TO +5.25
DATA-2 =
PB60019−01
REASON:
01 = TEMPERATURE TOO HIGH
02 = TEMPERATURE TOO LOW
REASON:
00 = VOLTAGE OUT OF RANGE (DIRECTION
UNKNOWN)
01 = VOLTAGE TOO HIGH
02 = VOLTAGE TOO LOW
03 =
+12 ANALOG VOLTAGE MEASUREMENT IS OUT OF RANGE
+10.80 TO +13.20
DATA-2 = SAME AS FOR 02
04 =
−12 ANALOG VOLTAGE MEASUREMENT IS OUT OF RANGE
−13.20 TO −10.80
DATA-2 = SAME AS FOR 02
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
Source
Remedy
05 =
+12 MOTOR VOLTAGE MEASUREMENT IS OUT OF RANGE
+11.40 TO +12.60
DATA-2 = SAME AS FOR 02
06 =
+5 BATTERY VOLTAGE MEASUREMENT IS OUT OF RANGE
+3.60 TO MINIMUM
DATA-2 = SAME AS FOR 02
Priority
0A = −5 ANALOG VOLTAGE MEASUREMENT IS OUT OF RANGE
−5.50 TO −4.50
DATA-2 = SAME AS FOR 02
15:System Status
Error (continued)
Temperature or
voltage out of range
Check DATA-1 for information pertaining
to what is out of range and perform
corrective action.*
0B =
+5 ANALOG VOLTAGE MEASUREMENT IS OUT OF RANGE
+4.40 TO +5.50
DATA-2 = SAME AS FOR 02
0C =
DISK SHUTDOWN CAUSED BY OUT OF RANGE TEMPERATURE
41 F to greater than 131 F (5 TO 55 C.)
3
DATA-2 = REASON
01 = SUCCESSFUL SHUTDOWN
02 = FAILED TO SHUT DOWN
16:Defect in hard
disk prompt area
Defect in prompt area
logged into Defect
List
Copy prompts from diskette to the hard
disk, using the Floppy Backup Restore
procedure. If errors repeat, possible cause
could be HD or the VCU.
3
DATA-1 =
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
00 = BOTH SYS DRIVES
01 = SYS DRIVE 1
02 = SYS DRIVE 2
LEAST SIGNIFICANT BYTE (Prompt number in HEX)
MOST SIGNIFICANT BYTE (Prompt number in HEX)
LANGUAGE SET # (1 TO N=n)
18. Data lost error.
Hard disk
number
DATA-1
DATA-2
DATA-3
DATA-4
=
=
=
=
S.4.1
Replace hard disk with a spare provided by
the manufacturer. If error continues, contact
your technical support center.
3
LOGICAL DRIVE ID THAT FAILED TO REMAP SECTOR
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
20−22: DID System
Error
Octel 200/300
Failure to attempt to
relocate a bad sector
on a disk. Data has
been lost.
DID Diagnostics or
configuration
problems
Refer to the DID/E&M Trunk Interface
manual for details.
2
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-11
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
Source
Remedy
23:PBX Integration
Problem with the
RS-232C link with
PBX
Check the RS-232C connections. If error
repeats, contact your technical support
center.
24:PBX Integration
Problem with the
integration card or
RS-232C integration
This error pertains only to certain
integrated message server. The following
outlines the probable cause and suggested
remedy for that error, depending upon the
DATA fields.
Priority
2
2
The DATA-1 field specifies the type of error. DATA-2 through DATA-4 are data
associated with the error.
DATA-1 =
ERROR CODE:
01 =
ERROR IN OPENING CODE FILE H:LIC:
There is no code in the message server for the integration card.
REMEDY:
02 =
ERROR DOWNLOADING FILE, DISK ERROR WHILE READING
H:LIC:
REMEDY:
03 =
05 =
PB60019−01
Call your technical support center.
LIC WAS BUSY WHEN IT SHOULDN’T HAVE BEEN
The integration card was not able to accept commands to it
because it was busy.
REMEDY:
04 =
Call your technical support center.
Reset the integration card. If the error persists call your
technical support center.
LIC REPORTED BAD DIAGNOSTIC BYTE:
During the code download procedure or normal operation, the
integration card reported an error through its diagnostic byte.
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
DIAGNOSTIC BYTE
NOT USED
STATE OF LIC TASK WHEN ERROR OCCURRED
REMEDY:
Clear the Hardware Error Table. If the error persists, call
your technical support center.
LIC REPORT LINK STATUS ERROR
The digit display telephone line to the integration card is not
working.
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
LINK NUMBER HAVING ERROR
LINK STATUS
STATE OF LIC TASK WHEN ERROR OCCURRED
REMEDY:
Check the PBX status on the line if DATA-3 = 03 or
check the wiring or PBX hardware if DATA-3 = 04.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-12
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
24:PBX Integration
(continued)
06 =
07 =
Source
Remedy
Problem with the
integration card
RS-232C integration
This error pertains only to certain
integrated message servers. The following
outlines the probable cause and suggested
remedy for that error, depending upon the
DATA fields.
Priority
2
LIC RECEIVED BAD REQUEST FROM CPU
This is an error in communication between the system software
and the integration card.
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
REPLY BYTE (34 = LIC BOOTED, 35 = BOOT ROM)
BAD REQUEST BYTE
STATE OF LIC TASK WHEN ERROR OCCURRED
REMEDY:
Call your technical support center
GOT AN ERROR WHILE DOING MESSAGE WAITING
DATA-2 = REASON FOR FAILURE:
00 = TIMED OUT
01 = NOT APPLICABLE
02 = MW NOT CONFIGURED
03 = COULD NOT MAKE MW
05 = EXTENSION IN “DO NOT DISTURB” (MITEL
INTG)
06 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
REMEDY:
MSG WTG LINK NOT IDLE WHEN CPU SOFTWARE
SENT MWI REQUEST
HIGH BYTE OF USER NUMBER THAT MW FAILED ON
LOW BYTE OF USER NUMBER THAT MW FAILED ON
If DATA-2 = 00 or 03, clear the Hardware Error Table. If
error persists, check PBX configuration of the digital
display phone lines that connect to the integration card. If
DATA-2 = 02, the extension number is not configured for
message waiting. The extension number is determined
from the user number, which is in DATA-3 and DATA-4.
For example,
DATA- 3 = 01; DATA- 4 = 33 = USER #0133.
At the @ prompt, enter L MAILBOX to get the mailbox
number. The Octel 200/300 returns the MAILBOX
number causing the error. A zero (0) must be entered
before the mailbox number. For example,
@ L M 0133 U
Mailbox: 341
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-13
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
24:PBX Integration
(continued)
08 =
Source
Problem with the
integration card
Remedy
This error pertains only to certain
integrated message servers. The following
outlines the probable cause and suggested
remedy for that error, depending upon the
DATA fields.
Priority
2
COULDN’T GET CALL INFO, PROBABLY GLARE, WILL TRANSFER TO
ASSIST:
The integration card was not able to determine the call
information on the last call that came in on Port DATA-3.
09 =
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
REPLY TYPE (38 = BAD DISPLAY, 39 = GLARE)
PORT CALL CAME IN ON (1...16)
UNUSED
REMEDY:
Check the digit display telephone line configuration in
the PBX. Pay particular attention to the port appearances
on the keys. If the configuration is correct and the
problem persists, call your technical support center.
GOT CALL, BUT NO CALL RECORD (OR CALL RECORD WAS
TOO LATE):
DATA-2 = PORT # CALL CAME IN ON
DATA-3 = NOT USED
DATA-4 = NOT USED
The call rang in on the port but the port the integration card (e.g.,
SLIC, ATTIC) didn’t send the call information. Therefore, the
Octel 200/300 port answered the call after five rings and played the
generic company greeting.
REMEDY:
0A =
Check the digit display telephone line configuration in
the PBX. Pay particular attention to the port appearances
on the keys. If the configuration is correct and the
problem persists, call your technical support center.
INTEGRATION TYPE CONFIGURED DOES NOT MATCH
INTEGRATION CARD INSTALLED:
REMEDY: Be sure configuration in the SLOTS Table for the
Octel 200/300 matches the integration card type.
0B =
PB60019−01
CAN’T FORWARD A PORT VIA MIC SINCE EXTENSION TO
FORWARD PORT TO IS NOT DEFINED
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-14
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
24:PBX Integration
(continued)
0C =
Source
Problem with the
integration card
DATA-1 =
04 =
05 =
07 =
S.4.1
The remedy for the error depends on the
DATA-1 values. For DATA-1 values not
listed, call your technical support center.
3
Verify that the Works system hardware is correctly
installed. Run Works system hardware diagnostics.
Call your technical support center, if necessary.
SOFTWARE RELEASE MISMATCH BETWEEN THE
Octel 200/300 AND WORKS
Install correct software releases on the Works system
and the Octel 200/300. Call your technical
support center, if necessary.
WRONG CARD INSTALLED IN AP SLOT (BAD CARD ID)
REMEDY:
Octel 200/300
Clear Hardware Error Table. If error continues, call your
technical support center.
UNABLE TO SYNCHRONIZE LINK
REMEDY:
DATA-1 =
Clear Hardware Error Table. If error continues, call your
technical support center.
Problem with the
RS-232C link to the
Works system
REMEDY:
DATA-1 =
2
TIMED OUT WAITING FOR STATUS BITS TO CHANGE (TO RUN
OR FAIL AFTER DOWNLOAD COMPLETE)
REMEDY:
25:Works Link
Failure
This error pertains only to certain
integrated message servers. The following
outlines the probable cause and suggested
remedy for that error, depending upon the
DATA fields.
Priority
UNEXPECTED CARD STATE
DATA-2 = CARD STATE
00 = RESET
01 = FATAL ERROR
02 = DOWNLOAD
03 = CARD UP
DATA-3 = TASK STATE
00 = RESET
01 = DOWNLOAD
02 = WAIT AFTER DOWNLOAD
03 = UP
REMEDY:
0D =
Remedy
Check to make sure that the card installed in the
slot is an AP card.
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-15
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
27:Option Control
Chip Error
DATA-1 =
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
Source
Problem with the
OCC
Remedy
Contact your technical support center.
Priority
3
ERROR CODE:
01 =
OCC READ ERROR (OCC CHIP PROBABLY BAD OR MISSING)
02 =
OCC CHECKSUM ERROR
03 =
SERIAL NUMBERS ON THE OCC AND SECTOR 3 ARE DIFFERENT
04 =
CONTENTS OF THE OCC AND SECTOR 3 ARE DIFFERENT
05 =
OCC SERIAL NUMBER IS ALL ZEROES
06 =
SECTOR 3 READ ERROR
07 =
SECTOR 3 CHECKSUM ERROR
0D =
HW BIT DOESN’T MATCH OCC
0E =
OEM ID ERROR ON DISK DRIVE
DATA-2 = PHYSICAL SLOT #
DATA-3 = LOG UNIT #
DATA-4 = OEM ID OF DRIVE
UNUSED
UNUSED
UNUSED
28:ACP Error
Works requesting an
error be logged in the
Works Hardware Error
Table
Log onto Works and list the Hardware
Error Table. Refer to the Works Installation
and Maintenance Manual, Maintenance
chapter.
3
29:DMA Timeout
Non-maskable
interrupt
Contact your technical support center.
3
30:Arbitration
Timeout
Non-maskable
interrupt
Contact your technical support center.
3
31:Control BUS
Error
Non-maskable
interrupt
Contact your technical support center.
3
Contact your technical support center.
2
32:CPU Coprocessor Error logged by
Error
coprocessor interrupt
routines and by
coprocessor Task
DATA-1 =
TYPE OF ERROR THAT OCCURRED IN THE COPROCESSOR
01 = COPROCESSOR INITIALIZATION ERROR
DATA-2 gives the reason.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-16
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
Source
Remedy
Priority
DATA-2 =
3D =
3E =
3F =
40 =
41 =
42 =
43 =
44 =
DUAL PORT RAM READ/WRITE TEST FAILED
DUAL PORT RAM VERIFY TEST FAILED
STATIC RAM READ/WRITE TEST FAILED
STATIC RAM VERIFY TEST FAILED
UNEXPECTED INTERRUPT RECEIVED BY
COPROCESSOR
UNEXPECTED NMI RECEIVED BY
COPROCESSOR
COPROCESSOR EXECUTED A WILD JUMP
TIMED OUT WAITING FOR COPROCESSOR
READY
02 =
TIMEOUT WAITING FOR COPROCESSOR DMA CHANNEL 1 TO
COMPLETE
03 =
TIMEOUT WAITING FOR COPROCESSOR DMA CHANNEL 2 TO
COMPLETE
04 =
COPROCESSOR-DETECTED ERROR ON DMA CHANNEL 1
05 =
COPROCESSOR-DETECTED ERROR ON DMA CHANNEL 2
33:Line Card
Hardware Error
Error logged by
selftest when start
LSP reply was
received with either
an error status or an
unexpected OK status
(e.g., Slot is empty or
already reported
down)
Contact your technical support center.
3
The DATA-1 field specifies the type of error. DATA-2 and DATA-3 are data associated
with the error.
DATA-1 =
REPORTED STATUS
00 =
START LSP REPLY RECEIVED WITH EITHER AN ERROR
STATUS OR AN UNEXPECTED OK STATUS
(e.g. slot is empty or already reported down.)
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-17
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
Source
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
00 =
LSP SUCCESSFULLY STARTED
01 =
SCSI ERROR WHILE LOADING LSP
DATA-4 = ERROR CODE
02 =
CARD TYPE IN SLOT DOES NOT MATCH
CONFIGURED TYPE
DATA-4 = CARD TYPE ACTUALLY INSTALLED
IN SLOT
03 =
CONTROL BUS ERROR − SLOT EMPTY OR
CARD NON-RESPONSIVE
04 =
FILE SYSTEM READ ERROR ACCESSING LSP
IMAGE
05 =
CARD IN SLOT REPORTS FATAL DIAGNOSTIC
ERROR
DATA-3 = SUPPLEMENTAL CARD STATUS
06 =
89 =
BAD START LSP REQUEST
LIC REPORTED LIC IMAGE CHECKSUM
ERROR
CURRENT SLOT STATE
PB60019−01
EMPTY (UNCONFIGURED)
WAITING FOR INITIAL START LSP REPLY
RUNNING
ERROR
NO PORTS CONFIGURED FOR LINE CARD
02 =
LINE CARD DISALLOWED BY OCC
03 =
TOTAL PORTS > ALLOWED BY OCC
04 =
ERROR WRITING START LSP REQUEST
05 =
DISK ERROR WHEN SEARCHING FOR LSP CODES
For LIC4
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
01 =
34. Power-ON
Diagnostic Error
PORT 1
PORT 2
PORT 3
PORT 4
Priority
REPORTED STATUS
00
01
02
03
DATA-1
DATA-2
DATA-3
DATA-4
Remedy
Selftest for line cards.
Replace LIC as indicated by slot number.
2
For LIC 8, TLC 8
DATA-1
DATA-2
DATA-3
DATA-4
=
=
=
=
PORT 1, PORT 2
PORT 3, PORT 4
PORT 5, PORT 6
PORT 7, PORT 8
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-18
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
Source
Remedy
Priority
Error Codes for all DATA values:
00
01
02
04
08
10
20
40
80
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
FF =
34 Power-ON
Diagnostic Error
NO ERRORS DETECTED
CHANNEL STATUS REGISTER ERROR
CVSD DATA REGISTER BIT/ADDRESS ERROR
A/D CONVERTER OR POWER DETECT ERROR
CVSD ENCODING CIRCUIT ERROR
DTMF SENDER, POWER LIMITER ERROR
CVSD DECODING CIRCUIT OR OUTPUT GAIN CIRCUIT ERROR
CVSD DECODING, ENCODING ERROR
DTMF SENDER, DTMF DECODER ERROR, OR BAND PASS FILTER
CIRCUIT ERROR
FATAL ERROR
Selftest for integration Replace integration card as indicated by
cards.
slot number.
TE INT
LI INT
DATA-1 through
DATA-4 designate
errors found.
2
DATA-1:
Bit 5:
Bit 4:
Bit 3:
Bit 2:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
TIMER
NMI
Incorrect checksum fond in code during normal operation
Normal (error found during normal code operation)
BOOT (error found during boot process)
Incorrect checksum found in code during boot process
DATA-2
Bit 7:
Bit 6:
Bit 5:
Bit 4:
Bit 3:
Bit 2:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Error detected on Link 4
Error detected on Link 3
Error detected on Link 2
Error detected on Link 1
RAM error type 4
RAM error type 3
RAM error type 2
RAM error type 1
UNDEFINED
UNDEFINED
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-19
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
34. Power-ON
Diagnostic Error
Source
Selftest for CPU.
DATA-1 through
DATA-4 designate
errors found.
Remedy
Replace CPU. For OCC error, replace
OCC.
Priority
3
DATA-1
Bit 7:
Bit 6:
Bit 5:
Bit 4:
Bit 3:
Bit 2:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
5 volts clean out of range
VCC out of range
A to D converter error
PIT1 error
Parity error
DRAM data error
Boot ROM checksum failure
Fatal CPU error
DATA-2
Bit 7:
Bit 6:
Bit 5:
Bit 4:
Bit 3:
Bit 2:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
DMA page register error
Unexpected interrupt
PIT2 (8254) timing error
Temperature out of range
-12 volts clean out of range
-5 volts clean out of range
12 volts motor out of range
12 volts clean out of range
DATA-3
Bit 7:
Bit 6:
Bit 5:
Bit 4:
Bit 3:
Bit 2:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
TDM crosspoint error
Modem failure
COM port failure
Watch Dog Timer failure
OCC error
Floppy Disk Controller error
Real Time Clock error
DMAC error
DATA-4
Bit 3:
Bit 2:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
PB60019−01
CODEC failure
BIC error
VCU error
Control Bus error
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-20
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
34:Power-ON
Diagnostic Error
DATA-1
Bit 0:
Bit 1:
Bit 2:
Bit 3:
Bit 4:
Bit 5:
Bit 6:
Bit 7:
DATA-2
Bit 0:
Bit 1:
Bit 2:
Bit 3:
Bit 4:
Bit 5:
Bit 6:
Bit 7:
DATA-3
Bit 0:
Bit 1:
Bit 2:
Bit 3:
Bit 4:
Bit 5:
Bit 6:
Bit 7:
DATA-4
Bit 0:
Bit 1:
Bit 2:
Bit 3:
Bit 4:
Bit 5:
Bit 6:
Bit 7:
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Source
Selftest for VCU.
DATA-1 through
DATA-4 designate
errors found
Remedy
Replace VCU.
Priority
3
Control Memory parity error detected in memory test.
Control Memory parity circuit failed.
Unexpected interrupt was received.
Timer A interrupt not detected or Timer A timing error detected.
Timer B timing error detected.
Timer C timing error detected.
Timer D timing error detected.
Byte Clock A circuit error detected.
Byte Clock B circuit error detected.
Voice memory failed memory test.
Voice Memory refresh circuit error detected.
Voice Memory parity circuit failed.
Write Protect Memory failed memory test.
Write Protect functionality failed.
Control Bus Shared Memory error detected.
Port Controller Memory failed memory test.
Port Controller failed diagnostic selftest.
Port Controller interrupt functionality failed.
Port Controller ALU failed.
Port Controller carry logic failed.
Port Controller failed to return diagnostic acknowledgement.
Port Controller failed PLAY/RECORD loop back test.
Port Controller failed Silence register loop back test.
DMA controller error detected.
Watch Dog Timer circuit failed.
Master interrupt circuit failed.
Control Bus Status Register circuit failed.
SCSI Controller circuit failed.
Undefined
Undefined
Undefined
Undefined
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-21
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
DATA-1
Bit 7:
Bit 6:
Bit 5:
Bit 4:
Bit 2:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
Source
Remedy
Priority
+5 volts clean out of range.
+5 volts VCC out of range.
Analog to Digital Converter error.
Interval timer error.
DRAM address or pattern error.
EPROM/Flash checksum error.
Fatal Processor error.
DATA-2
Bit 7:
Bit 6:
Bit 4:
Bit 3:
Bit 2:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
DMA page register error.
Unexpected interrupt error.
Temperature out of rage.
−12 volts out of range.
−5 volts clean out of range.
+12 volts motor supply out of range.
+12 volts clean out of range.
DATA-3
Bit 7:
Bit 6:
Bit 5:
Bit 4:
Bit 3:
Bit 2:
Bit 1:
Bit 0:
TDM crosspoint pattern or address error.
Modem loopback or download error.
UART channel 1 or 2 error.
Watchdog timer error.
Optional Control chip error.
Floppy disk controller error.
Real Time Clock error.
DMA register or transfer error.
DATA-4
Bit 7:
Bit 6:
Bit 5:
Bit 4:
Bit 3:
Bit 2:
Bit 0:
Internal status register error
Ethernet Controller error.
Voice Bus Controller error.
SCSI Controller error.
TDM Codec loopback error.
Board Information Chip error.
Control Bus Controller / shared memory error.
36. System RAM
Error
Cache module found
an error with system
RAM, CPU and/or
VCU.
Call your technical support center for
remedy.
3
The DATA-1 field specifies the type of error. DATA-2 through DATA-4 are data
associated with the error.
DATA-1 =
ERROR CODE:
01 =
PB60019−01
FIRMWARE REPORT OF RAM SIZE NOT EVEN MEGABYTE
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-22
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
=
=
=
=
Remedy
02 =
CANNOT R/W MEM AS REPORTED BY FIRMWARE, SEE DATA-2
DATA-2: (D) = MEGABYTES WHERE ERR, WHEN DATA=1 OR 2
03 =
RAM SIZE LESS THAN STANDARD SIZE OF 5 MEG FOR THE
OCTEL 300 AND 2 MEG FOR THE OCTEL 200 (slot = CPU)
08 =
VCU VOICE RAM < REQUIRED AMOUNT FOR PORT COUNT (SLOT =
FIRST LINE CARD SLOT THAT GOES BEYOND LIMIT FOR EXISTING
RAM)
DATA-2 = NUMBER MB NEEDED FOR CURRENT PORT
CONFIGURATION
(IF = FF, NUMBER PORTS CONFIGURED > MAX EXPECTED)
DATA-3 = NUMBER MB REPORTED BY VCU
DATA-4 = NUMBER PORTS CONFIGURED
09 =
VCU CONTROL RAM INSUFFICIENT FOR LANGUAGES LOADED
DATA-2 = VCU CONTROL RAM SIZE IN MEGABYTES
DATA-3 = N/A
DATA-4 = N/A
10 =
VCU RAM INSUFFICIENT FOR # FAX PORTS CONFIGURED
DATA-2 = # FAX PORTS SUPPORTED BY VCU RAM
DATA-3 = VCU CONTROL RAM SIZE IN MEGABYTES
DATA-4 = VCU VOICE RAM SIZE IN MEGABYTES
11 =
VCU RAM INSUFFICIENT FOR TOTAL NUMBER PORTS CONFIGURED
DATA-2 = # PORTS SUPPORTED BY VCU RAM
DATA-3 = VCU CONTROL RAM SIZE IN MEGABYTES
DATA-4 = VCU VOICE RAM SIZE IN MEGABYTES
12 =
CPU RAM SIZE INSUFFICIENT FOR OCC USER AND PORT COUNTS
DATA-2 = 1 IF ERROR READING OCC
2 IF OCC SIZES TOO LARGE FOR TABLE ALLOCATION
13 =
CPU RAM SIZE INSUFFICIENT FOR LAN OPERATION
DATA-2 = 1 IF ERROR WHILE SYS_ALLOC OPERATION
2 IF ERROR WHILE VRTX PARTITION CREATION
37. Ring Detection
Failure
DATA-1
DATA-2
DATA-3
DATA-4
Source
TEST Line 4
Ensure that the PBX is properly connected
to the LIC, and verify that the PBX type
provides sufficient loop current for the test.
If the PBX is properly connected and the
PBX provides sufficient loop current but
the test still fails, replace the LIC. If the
PBX type does not provide sufficient loop
current, do not use TEST Line 4.
Priority
2
UNEXPECTED EVENT TYPE
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-23
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
38. Disk Defect Boot
Region
DATA-1
DATA-2
DATA-3
DATA-4
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
PB60019−01
Priority
Attempt to reload the software code from
the floppy diskette to the hard disk. If error
repeats, replace the hard disk indicated in
DATA-1. If error repeats again, call your
technical support center.
3
Defect in file system
region of a system
disk
Attempt to reload the software code from
the floppy diskette to the hard disk. If error
repeats, replace the hard disk indicated in
DATA-1. If error repeats, call your
technical support center.
3
LOGICAL DRIVE ID WITH DEFECTIVE FILE SYSTEM
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
40. Non-Media Disk
Error
DATA-1 =
Defect in secondary
bootstrap (Xboot)
region
Remedy
LOGICAL DRIVE ID WITH DEFECTIVE XBOOT
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
39. Disk Defect File
System Region
DATA-1
DATA-2
DATA-3
DATA-4
Source
Non-media disk error
Call your technical support center to have
information interpreted.
DRIVE ID AND SEVERITY INDICATION
01 = NON-FATAL ERROR, DRIVE 1
02 = NON-FATAL ERROR, DRIVE 2
03 = NON-FATAL ERROR, DRIVE 3
04 = NON-FATAL ERROR, DRIVE 4
05 = NON-FATAL ERROR, DRIVE 5
06 = NON-FATAL ERROR, DRIVE 6
1
81
82
83
84
85
86
3
=
=
=
=
=
=
FATAL ERROR, DRIVE 1
FATAL ERROR, DRIVE 2
FATAL ERROR, DRIVE 3
FATAL ERROR, DRIVE 4
FATAL ERROR, DRIVE 5
FATAL ERROR, DRIVE 6
SCSI SENSE KEY
SCSI SENSE CODE
NOT USED
3
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-24
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
41. Visual Mailbox
Hardware Error
Source
Remedy
Priority
Command link
interface LAN is
malfunctioning or has
detected a network
error
This is a Visual Mailbox error. First check
that Visual Mailbox is functioning properly.
If it is, this is a false alarm or the condition
has corrected itself.
Check to see if the cable from the
Octel 200/300 to the Gateway is properly
connected and secured. Restart the
Gateway. If the problem still exists, replace
the CLI board in the Gateway.
3
DATA-1 = LAN ERROR TYPE AS FOLLOWS:
01 = NO RESPONSE FROM LAN CONTROLLER AFTER CONTROLLER RESET
02 = NO INTERRUPT RECEIVED FROM LAN AFTER CONTROLLER ENABLED
03 = INCORRECT ID STRING STORED BY CONTROLLER AFTER RESET
DATA-2 = FIRST BYTE OF ID STRING (SHOULD BE D1 HEX)
DATA-3 = SECOND BYTE OF ID STRING (SHOULD BE NODE ID)
20 = PACKET TRANSMISSION WAS NOT ACKNOWLEDGED AFTER 5
SECONDS
DATA-2 = DESTINATION NODE ID
21 = NETWORK RECONFIGURATION OCCURRED DUE TO TOKEN RING
INACTIVITY
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
2
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-25
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
42. Configuration
Error
Source
Error detected in the
configuration tables
Remedy
Check the configuration tables.
Priority
1
The DATA-1 field specifies the type of error. DATA-2 through DATA-4 are data
associated with the error.
DATA-1 =
ERROR CODE:
01 = NO DEFAULT LINK ASSIGNED FOR NON-SPECIFIED COS
DATA-2 = COS
DATA-3 = HIGH BYTE OF USER NUMBER
DATA-4 = LOW BYTE OF USER NUMBER
02 = MORE THAN ONE DEFAULT LINK DEFINED
DATA-2 = DEFAULT LINK ASSIGNED (SEE NOTE 1)
DATA-3 = THIS DEFAULT LINK (SEE NOTE 1)
03 = PORT ASSIGNED TO MORE THAN ONE INTEG TASK
DATA-2 = SYSTEM PORT NUMBER
DATA-3 = FIRST IU TASK ASSIGNED (1...)
DATA-4 = THIS IU TASK ASSIGNED (1...)
04 = AP NOT CONFIGURED IN SLOT TABLE BUT SYSP 146 IS SET
05 = LINK ASSIGNED FOR MWI WAS NOT ENABLED
DATA-2 = LINK AND UNIT (SEE NOTE 1)
DATA-3 = HI BYTE OF USER NUMBER
DATA-4 = LO BYTE OF USER NUMBER
06 = GATEWAY ERROR MBOX NOT CONFIGURED (SYSP 199)
07 = CALL TO MBOX WITH COS ATTRIBUTE 84 THAT WAS NOT
CORRECTLY CONFIGURED
DATA-2 = SPECIFIC OUTFAX (Attribute 84) ERROR
= 0 = MBOX HAS ZERO MESSAGES
= 1 = FIRST MSG IN MBOX IS NOT A FAX
= 2 = RUSDIR FAILED (Read User Director Failed)
08 = PRIMARY-SECONDARY CIRCULAR LINK LIST CORRUPTED
DATA-2 = 0 SANITY CHECK FAILED
1 LOOP DETECTED IN THE LIST
09 = BAD SDM MBOX
DATA-2 = 0
DATA-3 = SUBTYPE
DATA-4 = 8 MAILBOX DIGITS*
*Read the last pair of digits first, the next-to-last second, etc. For example, if the mailbox were
12345678, the data 4 field would read 78563412. The Character “A” represents a 0 and the character
“0” represents a null character. For example, mailbox 52025 would appear as 0050A250.
0A = BAD NETWORK LOCATION
0B = BAD PHANTOM MBOX
DATA-3 = USER# HIGH BYTE, DATA-4 = USER# LOW BYTE.
0C = BAD AUTOCOPY TARGET CONFIGURED
DATA-2, DATA-3 = HI/LO USER # WHOSE AUTOCOPY TARGET IS
INVALID
Note 1: HI NIB = LINK (0...); LO NIB = IU (1...)
0D = BAD FAX TARGET CONFIGURED
DATA-2 = HIGH USER NUMBER WHOSE AUTOCOPY TARGET
IS INVALID
DATA-3 = LOW USER NUMBER WHOSE AUTOCOPY TARGET
IS INVALID
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-26
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
42. Configuration
Error (continued)
Source
Error detected in the
configuration tables
Remedy
Check the configuration tables.
0E =
TOTAL NUMBER OF VISUAL MAILBOX USERS EXCEEDS THE
ALLOWED LIMIT
DATA-2 = HIGH BYTE OF THE TOTAL NUMBER OF VISUAL
MAILBOX USERS
DATA-3 = LOW BYTE OF THE TOTAL NUMBER OF VISUAL
MAILBOX USERS
0F =
PBX HAS UNKNOWN LINE APPEARANCE
DATA-2 = INVALID LINE NUMBER IN WHICH TRANSLATION
WAS ATTEMPTED
10 =
PORT COS HAS UID LOGIN, BUT UID IS NOT CONFIGURED WITH
SYSTEM PARAMETER 212
DATA-2 = PORT COS
DATA-3 = CHANNEL NUMBER
11 =
ERROR IN USER TREE BUILD — USRERR
DATA-2 = TYPE OF ERROR
= 1 = UNKNOWN ERROR
= 2 = DUPLICATE
= 3 = BAD TREE FRAME
= 4 = BAD VUSER FRAME
= 5 = BAD BALANCE FACTOR
= 6 = BAD ROTATION
DATA-3 = HIGH NIBBLE OF USER NUMBER
DATA-4 = LOW NIBBLE OF USER NUMBER
12 =
ERROR IN UID TREE BUILD — UIDERR
DATA-2 = TYPE OF ERROR
= 1 = UNKNOWN ERROR
= 2 = DUPLICATE
= 3 = BAD TREE FRAME
= 4 = BAD VUSER FRAME
= 5 = BAD BALANCE. FACTOR
= 6 = BAD ROTATION
DATA-3 = HIGH NIBBLE OF USER NUMBER
DATA-4 = LOW NIBBLE OF USER NUMBER
13 =
ERROR IN EXTENSION TREE BUILD — EXTERR
DATA-2 = TYPE OF ERROR
= 1 = DUPLICATE
= 2 = INVALID CHARACTER
= 3 = INVALID LENGTH
= 4 = NET NUM CONFLICT
DATA-3 = HIGH NIBBLE OF USER NUMBER
DATA-4 = LOW NIBBLE OF USER NUMBER
14 =
RECEIVED INACCESSIBLE CREATOR MAILBOX DIGITS DURING
A DIGITAL NETWORK MESSAGE TRANSFER
Creator must be accessible through the NUMBERING PLAN Table
Priority
1
in order to be able to receive reply messages, return receipt, etc.
DATA-2, DATA-3, and DATA-4 contain the upper or leading six
digits of inaccessible creator mailbox.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-27
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
42. Configuration
Error (continued)
15
17
18
19
=
=
=
=
1A =
1B =
1C =
PB60019−01
Source
Error detected in the
configuration tables
Remedy
Check the configuration tables.
Priority
1
NO SELF IP ADDRESS CONFIGURED
SNMP SYSTEM MANAGER NOT KNOWN, TRAP MUST BE SENT
NO AP ERROR MAILBOX (SYSTEM PARAMETER 145).
SELF MUST BE CONFIGURED
SOURCE:
Unable to build network creator’s address for delivery of
a network message.
REMEDY:
Add a numbering plan entry for SELF in the
NUMBERING PLAN Table.
OCTELNET SYSTEM MAILBOX NOT CONFIGURED
SOURCE:
The OctelNet System mailbox (System Parameter 248)
has not been configured.
REMEDY:
Configure the OctelNet System mailbox. Refer to the
Configuration volume, Remote Analog Networking
chapter, Configuration, System Parameters, and COS
Attributes sections.
OCTELNET SYSTEM MAILBOX DOES NOT HAVE COS ATTRIBUTE 82
SOURCE:
The OctelNet System mailbox does not have Class of
Service Attribute 82.
REMEDY:
Add COS Attribute 82 — THIS USER MAY RECEIVE FAX
MESSAGES , to the COS of the OctelNet System mailbox.
To add COS Attribute 82 requires that a sufficient number
of Fax Mail Plus licenses are authorized.
OCTELNET MAXIMUM FAX TRANSMISSION TIME IS SET TO ZERO
SOURCE:
The OctelNet maximum fax transmission time (System
Parameter 252) is set to zero.
REMEDY:
Set System Parameter 252 — OCTELNET: MAX FAX
TRANSMIT TIME, to at least 1 minute.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-28
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
42. Configuration
Error (continued)
1D =
Check the configuration tables.
DATA-2 =
LOCATION NUMBER OF REMOTE CABINET IN THE
LOCATION TABLE OF THE LOCAL CABINET
SOURCE:
The remote cabinet (not an Octel 200/300) is configured
to support turnaround. The remote cabinet is an Octel
250/350 or Octel PC, and in its node profile, NODE
RESPONSE ALLOWED has been set to YES for this node.
REMEDY:
Modify the node profile in the remote cabinet and set
NODE RESPONSE ALLOWED to NO.
1F =
DOMAIN FEATURE NOT AVAILABLE
DATA-2 = TYPE OF ERROR
= 1 = QUERIES BEING RECEIVED FROM FIELD
This means that some other system has this cabinet
configured in the domain.
DATA-3 = REMOTE HOST HANDLE OF THAT CABINET.
DATA-4 = UNUSED
20
22
23
24
=
=
=
=
25
26
27
28
=
=
=
=
OctelNet serial # not configured.
Sent a prefix the remote side did not recognize during Namesend.
Other side does not have the Namesend feature.
Generic Gateway error mailbox has not been configured but is required.
(System Parameter 285)
Go Dial went to initialization prompt.
Names Directory error during Namesend.
Multiple domain location configured with same IP address.
Self numbering plan entry not configured, but matches Alternate self.
Location for destination network mailbox not found. It is possible that the
network mailbox was in a distribution list and the location was deleted.
DATA-2 = First 8 digits of the network mailbox.
No forwarding string defined (system parameter 45) for NPIC.
gtfram error on sdisfrms table. This error is mostly caused by incorrect
configuration of the AP pool that should be an extended mailbox
DATA-2 = sysdist frame number that caused the problem
DATA-3 = Number of mailboxes in AP pool yet to scan
Other side does not have the netname feature
DATA-2 = Location number
SDL member configured to not receive messages
DATA-3 = User number
Outcall digit string exceeds max (20 digits)
DATA-2 = Length of outcall number
DATA-3 = User number (0 may indicate network outcall)
Invalid digit in outcall digits
DATA-2 = User number
DATA-3 = Position of invalid digit
2c =
2d =
2e =
Priority
1
REMOTE SYSTEM (NOT Octel 200/300) CONFIGURED TO
SUPPORT TURNAROUND
NO QUERY REPLY POSSIBLE. Digital network is not up, do not have
domain feature, or both.
2b =
S.4.1
Error detected in the
configuration tables
Remedy
1E =
29 =
2a =
Octel 200/300
Source
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-29
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
Source
Remedy
43. Hard Disk/
Error detected in the
Errors 1 or 3 — Run FLOPPY Backup/
Language Table
read/write of language Restore.
Read/Write Error table
Errors 2, 5, 6, 7, or 8 — Run Disk
Exerciser command.
DATA-1 =
DATA-2,
DATA-3,
DATA-4 =
3
ERROR CODE, AS FOLLOWS:
01 = NO LANGUAGE LOADED
02 = NO ACTIVE SYSTEM DISKS FOR READ
03 = CK SUM ERROR ON READ
04 = TABLE SIZE ERR
05 = CAN’T READ EITHER SYS-DISK
06 = ERR ON WRITE TO DISK #1
07 = ERR ON WRITE TO DISK #2
08 = ERR ON WRITE TO BOTH DISKS
09 = LANGUAGE QTY LOADED EXCEEDS OCC MAX
44. CPU/VCU
Request/Reply
Checksum Error
DATA-1 =
Priority
A protocol error
occurred between the
CPU and VCU on the
control bus.
Contact your technical support center.
3
NUMBER OF RETRIES ATTEMPTED BEFORE TRANSACTION
SUCCEEDED OR ABANDONED (MAXIMUM OF 3).
FAILURE REASON FOR EACH ATTEMPT:
01 = NO ERROR (RETRY SUCCEEDED)
02 = CONTROL BUS TIMEOUT ATTEMPTING TO READ
CPU CB STATUS REGISTER
03 = CONTROL BUS TIMEOUT ATTEMPTING TO READ
VCU SHARED RAM
04 = CONTROL BUS TIMEOUT ATTEMPTING TO WRITE
VCU SHARED RAM
05 = INCORRECT CHECKSUM ON VCU REPLY BUFFER
06 = VCU DETECTED CHECKSUM ERROR ON CPU
REQUEST BUFFER
45. Language Set
Error
The VCU software has Contact your technical support center.
replied that there is an
error in a language
set.
3
DATA-1
= THIS ERROR NUMBER
DATA-2 — BIT MAP HI BITS = LOAD FAULT
DATA-3 — BIT MAP HI BITS = NOT LOADED
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-30
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
46. Received DTMF
other than D
(AMIS)
DATA-1 =
Source
While trying to
establish a connection
with a Protocol 4
(AMIS) location,
received non D
DTMF tone,
suggesting that a
person’s telephone
number may have
been entered.
Check the route, PNN and TNN. Contact the system
administrator at the remote end.
Contact your technical support center.
61. VCU: Insufficient The VCU does not
Control RAM
have enough control
RAM for model
specified by CPU.
=
=
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
=
=
Contact your technical support center.
3
MEGABYTES OF RAM ACTUALLY HAVE
MAX PORTS GIVEN BY CPU REQUEST
62. VCU: Insufficient The VCU does not
Voice RAM
have enough voice
RAM for model
specified by CPU.
DATA-1
DATA-2
1
ERROR CODE:
02 = ATTEMPTING TO NETWORK WITH AN OEM MODEL THAT HAS
NETWORKING INCOMPATIBILITY
DATA-2 and DATA-3 = ARE THE INDEX INTO THE NETRLT TABLE
THAT LEADS US TO THE PROBLEMATIC LOCATION
REMEDY:
DATA-1
DATA-2
Check the route. Check that the PNN or
TNN is correct. Contact the system
administrator of the remote network.
Priority
ERROR CODE:
01 = WHILE TRYING TO ESTABLISH A CONNECTION WITH A LOCN,
WE GOT BACK DTMF WE WERE NOT EXPECTING, SUGGESTING
WE MAY HAVE, SOMEHOW, DIALED A PERSON’S TELEPHONE
NUMBER.
FOR PROTOCOL 1, 2 AND 3 WE COULD’VE GOT DTMF 0-9, * OR #
FOR PROTOCOL 4 WE COULD’VE GOT ANY DTMF OTHER THAN
D
DATA-2 and DATA-3 = ARE THE INDEX INTO THE NETRLT TABLE
THAT LEADS US TO THE PROBLEMATIC LOCATION
REMEDY:
DATA-2 =
Remedy
Contact your technical support center.
3
MEGABYTES OF RAM ACTUALLY HAVE
MAX PORTS GIVEN BY CPU REQUEST
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-31
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
63. Fax Card
Hardware Error
DATA-1 =
Source
Fax loopback test failed
or fax card didn’t
respond to command:
TEST X x y z.
Remedy
Replace the fax card and do the loopback
test again.
Priority
2
00 = FAX LOOPBACK TEST FAILED
DATA-2 =OTHER CH# (RELATIVE) USED IN TEST
DATA-3 =ERROR CODE RETURNED FROM FAX PROCESSOR
01 = FAX CARD DIDN’T RESPOND TO TEST COMMAND
DATA-2 =1ST CH# (RELATIVE) USED IN TEST
DATA-3 =2ND CH# (RELATIVE) USED IN TEST
64. LAN Hardware
Error
Problem detected by
the LAN card.
Dependent on the Data-1 values described
below.
3
DATA-1 =ERROR CODE:
00 = INVALID LAN CONTROL BUS ID
Problem with LAN card.
REMEDY: Contact your technical support center.
01 = BAD LAN CONTROL BUS CKSUM
Problem with LAN card.
REMEDY: Contact your technical support center.
02 = LOST COMMUNICATION TO LAN BOARD
Communication between the CPU and LAN card across the control
bus was interrupted or failed for some reason.
REMEDY:
Verify that the LAN card is properly inserted in the slot
and has not been removed. Try the LANSTAT command
to verify that the LAN card is up and communicating
with the CPU. If the error continues, contact your
technical support center.
DATA-2 values in case of LAN_LOST_COMM:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
PB60019−01
Unable to read card status.
Card status is nonoperational.
CB timed out at start of read reply.
CB timed out during read reply packet.
CB time out at start of send request.
CB timed out when checked if took request.
CB timed out at end of the read reply.
CB timed out during write request packet.
CB timed out after write request.
Complement of replies not match.
Checksum wrong after control bus copy.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-32
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
64. LAN Hardware
Error (continued)
Source
Problem detected by
the LAN.
Remedy
Priority
Dependent on the DATA-1 values described
below.
3
03 = REACHED THE MAX. RETRY COUNT WHILE SYNCHRONIZING.
FORCED RESET DONE TO SYNCHRONIZE.
The CPU is unable to communicate with the LAN card.
REMEDY:
Same as for DATA-1 = 02.
04 = LAN CONTROL BLOCK REQUEST SIZE MISMATCH
Compatibility problem with the LAN card.
REMEDY:
Contact your technical support center.
05 = LAN CONTROL REPLY BLOCK SIZE MISMATCH
Compatibility problem with the LAN card.
REMEDY:
Contact your technical support center.
06 = LAN CONTROL BUS TIME OUT DURING READING/WRITING
CONTROL BUS
Problem with the LAN card.
REMEDY:
Contact your technical support center.
07 = OEM NCK OF OTHER SYSTEM DOES NOT MATCH OURS
OEM type between systems is incompatible.
REMEDY:
Use the LANSTAT command to determine which location
is in the OEM-FAIL state. Check the OEM type of the
current system. Contact your technical support center.
08 = ERROR DURING COURTESY DOWN
An error occurred while executing the courtesy down command.
DATA-2 =
01
02
ERROR CODES:
= COURTESY DOWN STATE
= COURTESY STATE STATE
DATA-3 =
01
02
03
ERROR CODES
= LAN EVENT TIMEOUT
= VCU EVENT TIMEOUT
= INVALID LAN SLOT
REMEDY:
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
1
Try the courtesy down command again. If the problem
continues, contact your technical support center.
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-33
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
64. LAN Hardware
Error (continued)
Source
Problem detected by
the LAN.
Remedy
Priority
Dependent on the DATA-1 values described
below.
3
09 = ERROR WITH CSX PARAMETERS
The VCU software is unable to provide the necessary client, server,
and transfer-task resources needed to run LAN. This could typically
occur when LAN is added to an existing installed message server.
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
REMEDY:
NUM_CLIENTS (REPORTED BY VCU)
NUM_SERVERS (REPORTED BY VCU)
NUM_XFERS (REPORTED BY VCU)
If necessary, System Parameters 126, 127, and 128 can be
set to reduce the CSX request to the VCU.
Most likely, the VCU is too old to work with LAN or has
insufficient memory. Contact your technical support
center.
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
3
3
NUM_CLIENTS (REPORTED BY VCU)
NUM_SERVERS (REPORTED BY VCU)
NUM_XFERS (REPORTED BY VCU)
A = MULTIPLE YES RESPONSE TO MAILBOX QUERY
Within a LAN uniform numbering plan, any specific mailbox should
have only one occurrence across the domain. The system, however,
sent a mailbox query and had multiple locations respond with a
“found.”
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
MAILBOX NUMBER (DIG 0 AND 1 PACKED)
MAILBOX NUMBER (DIG 2 AND 3 PACKED)
MAILBOX NUMBER (DIG 4 AND 5 PACKED)
REMEDY:
Use the FINDMBX command to locate all occurrences of
the mailbox in question. Delete the unnecessary
occurrence of the mailbox. If this mailbox must appear
multiple times, the numbering plan must be modified to
remove the mailbox initial digits from the uniform
numbering plan domain.
B = CONTROL BLOCK SIZE MISMATCH
Compatibility problem with LAN.
PB60019−01
DATA-2 =
LOW BYTE OF CTL BLOCK SIZE
REMEDY:
Contact your technical support center.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-34
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
Source
64. LAN Hardware
Error (continued)
Problem detected by
the LAN.
Remedy
Priority
Dependent on the DATA-1 values described
below.
3
C = DATA PACKET RECEIVED GOT CHECKSUM ERROR
Data communication is being corrupted between the local system and
the remote system at the location specified.
DATA-2 values as follows:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
On open conn request received
On connless data packet
On data packet received
On connection grant received
On connection reject received
On a query packet received
Remote end had the cksum error
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
LOW BYTE OF LOCATION
UPPER BYTE OF LOCATION
REMEDY:
The LAN guarantees that if a packet gets through, it
should be perfect, regardless of line conditions.
Therefore, this most likely points to a software problem.
Was the software recently changed or upgraded at either
location? If this continues, contact your technical support
center.
To determine the other location: Subtract 2 from the
number in Data-2 and Data-3 to get the location number
starting from 1. In UPDATE, list the LOCATION Table to
determine the name of the corresponding location.
65 DMA Channel
Error
Problem with CPU
card
Replace CPU card
2
66. LAN Reported
Hardware Error
Problem detected by
the LAN.
Dependent on the DATA-1 values as
described below.
3
DATA-1 =
ERROR CODE ON LAN:
01 = ERROR LOGGED PRIOR TO SYNC-UP WITH CPU SOFTWARE
REMEDY:
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Contact your technical support center.
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-35
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
66. LAN Reported
Hardware Error
(continued)
Source
Problem detected by
the LAN.
Remedy
Dependent on the DATA-1 values as
described below.
Priority
3
02 = LINK LOST
REMEDY:
The LAN controller lost its connection to the LAN. This
usually indicates that the connection to the digital
network went down. It is normally not a problem within
the Octel 200/300 cabinet. It is mainly an informational
error. It shows the date and time of the occurrence, which
can be correlated to the Call Processing Trace and any
user complaints at this time.
This error can occur for many reasons, including the
following:
-
LAN cable or wiring to the hub was disconnected.
-
The digital network was taken down for servicing.
-
Equipment failure in the digital network.
The LAN automatically attempts to reestablish all
connections when the digital network comes up again. All
system functions and features should recover and
continue smoothly.
If digital networking is currently up and running, it means
there was a temporary loss of the network, which has
since been corrected. Otherwise, it may be necessary to
check with the network administrator.
If the problem continues, even when the external digital
network is up, it may indicate a problem with the LAN
card.
03 = COULD NOT GET ETHERNET/MAC ID FROM BIC
REMEDY:
Contact your technical support center.
04 =BAD ROUTE — GATEWAY IP ADDRESS BAD
Error occurs if the user set up a gateway IP address that is incorrect;
i.e., the gateway is not in the same LAN as the system.
DATA-2 and DATA-3 together give 16 bits of error information.
DATA-4 = 0
REMEDY:
PB60019−01
Correct the gateway IP address.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-36
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
66. LAN Reported
Hardware Error
(continued)
Source
Problem detected by
the LAN.
Remedy
Dependent on the DATA-1 values as
described below.
Priority
3
05 = SNMP MANAGER HOST NAME CANNOT BE RESOLVED
Possible reasons include:
-
Manager host name may be bad.
-
Name server IP address may be bad.
-
The Octel 200/300 cannot communicate with the name server.
-
Other — error code in DATA-2 and DATA-3 gives more
information.
REMEDY:
Correct the SNMP manager host name.
-
Correct the name server IP address.
-
Configure the SNMP manager IP address.
DATA-2 = 1, 2, or 3. This tells us where the error was logged
from. DATA-3 and DATA-4 together give 16 bits of error
information.
06 = BAD_SUBNET
The subnet mask for self is not configured correctly..
Most common reason is that the subnet mask has never been
configured. The subnet mask is configured for SELF only, and the
value configured is shown went the L Loc command is issued.
REMEDY:
Get the correct IP address from the LAN administrator
and reconfigure the message server
07 = DUP_IPADDR — IP ADDRESS CONFLICT.
There is another system with the same IP address in the subnetwork
that includes the message server.
REMEDY:
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
ERROR DATA
ERROR DATA
ERROR DATA
67 Patching Error
DATA-4 =
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Get the correct IP address from the LAN administrator
and configure it in the definition of SELF.
Dependent on value in Contact your technical support center.
DATA-4.
3
01 PARTIAL PATCH DETECTED
02 PATCH AREA ALLOCATION ERROR
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-37
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
68 BIC Error
Source
Remedy
Priority
Dependent on value in Replace CPU card.
DATA-1.
DATA-1 =
DATA-1 =
01 BIC read error (chip bad or missing).
02 BIC checksum error
2
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
Computed checksum.
Checksum stored in BIC.
1
69 VCU Software
port-controller
error
DATA-1 =
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
Error detected with
controller.
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
3
VCU software logical port with error status.
Currently active port-control-block for port-block 0 or 1.
Port block status.
Bit 0 = Parity error
Bit 1 = Direction error
Bit 2 = Request timing error
Bit 3 = Port operation complete
70 Control Bus error Error in Control Bus
on a DSP-based
I/O between CPU and
card
card.
DATA-1 =
Contact your technical support center.
Replace the DSP-based card. If error
repeats, call your technical support center.
3
03 Timeout on an ISDN request
04 Timeout on a DTIC request
05 Timeout on a DPNSS request
06 Timeout on a QSIG request
Indicates the message type for which the time out occurred.
User Number, if applicable.
71 High Speed Link
Monitor Error
The Digital
Networking
high-speed link is
down more than the
maximum configured
in System Parameters
267–269. An error is
logged per location.
Check remote location to see if digital
networking is up. Follow troubleshooting
guidelines in the Networking volume,
Digital Networking chapter.
3
DATA-1 = Location number for which logged
DATA-2 = Sub-type, the possible values are as follows:
1 = continuous downtime exceeded system parameter 267
2 = cumulative downtime exceeded system parameter 268
3 = Number of times down exceeded system parameter 269
DATA-3 = Unused
DATA-4 = Unused
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-38
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
72 Protocol Revision
Level Error
DATA-1 =
DATA-2 =
DATA-3 =
DATA-4 =
Source
Namesend activity
Remedy
Disable Namesend to the remote location.
Priority
1
Digital Networking
Local Protocol Revision Level
Remote Protocol Revision Level
Location number of Remote Location
73. Control Bus
Error – VCU
shared RAM I/O
Dependent on value in Replace VCU. If error repeats, contact your
DATA-2.
technical support center.
3
DATA-1 = Task Number
DATA-2 = 01
VCU to CPU
02
CPU to VCU
74 Gateway Timeout Message server timed
error
out waiting for the
gateway poll.
The OctelAccess server is not responding.
Check and bring up the OctelAccess server.
3
DATA-1 = OctelAccess ID (the ID configured at the OctelAccess server)
75 Names Directory
Export error
DATA-1 =
S.4.1
Contact your technical support center.
2
ERROR CODE:
01 =
NO DISK SPACE
02 =
READ ONLY VOLUME
03 =
ROOT DIRECTORY FULL
04 =
NO SYSTEM DEVICE
05 =
FILE CONTAINS BAD SECTORS
06 =
NOT A FILE SYSTEM DRIVE
78. Network Message
Delivery Time
Out
Octel 200/300
Message server
detected error when
updating Names
Directory export file
or during export file
transfer.
Message server
determined that a
network message
failed to be sent after
the remote connection
was established
because the protocol
between the two
servers did not
complete correctly.
Monitor network queue. Delivery attempt
will retry; success is likely on the second or
subsequent attempt. Use @LOCNAM
command to identify the network location.
DATA-1=
0
DATA-2=
Network location
DATA-3=
Message header number
1
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-39
Table 8-2 Hardware Error Types and Remedies (continued)
Error Type:Name
Source
79. Network Message
Transmission is
Stuck
Message server
determined a network
message failed to be
sent when either a
remote connection
was established but
the protocol between
the two servers did not
complete correctly, or
an internal problem
results in failure to
service network
queues.
Contact your technical support center.
If a message is in a
network queue longer
than 25 hours, the
message server logs
this error. The error is
logged once when the
25−hour mark is
detected, and again at
each subsequent
midnight until the
problem is cleared.
The hardware table
shows an 8-bit value
for each of four data
fields (Data1 −
Data4). The “hi word”
is the first four bits,
the “low word” is the
last 4 bits.
Contact your technical support center.
88 Hardware error
Special error
internally used by
Avaya.
Contact Technical Support.
2
89 Hardware error
Special error
internally used by
Avaya.
Contact Technical Support.
2
80. Message in
Network Delivery
Queue is Over 25
Hours Old
PB60019−01
Remedy
DATA-1=
0
DATA-2=
Network location
DATA-3=
Message header number
Priority
3
DATA-11= Network transmission stuck
for all locations
DATA-2=
Number of minutes stuck
DATA-1=
Network location
DATA-2=
Message header number
DATA-3=
Age of message (in minutes)
3
DATA-4−= Hi word Number of net
mailbox containing message
DATA-4−= Lo word Number of messages
greater than 25 hours old
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-40
8.3
Installation and Maintenance Volume
TRAFFIC PEG COUNT TABLE
The Traffic Peg Count Table is used to record events monitored by the OctelR 200/300. Proper use of the
table helps to understand how the various features and functions are being used.
Several of the pegs may be used to determine PBX performance in conjunction with the Octel 200/300,
such as 13, 24, 25, 47−49.
Pegs are arranged in a table ten columns wide. The pegs are numbered from the top left corner across the
first row 0, 1, 2. . . The second row begins with 10, 11, 12 . . .
.
Some pegs are not used. Unused pegs do not appear in the peg description.
The header displayed when the table is listed contains the current date, time, message server name, ID
number, serial number, and PBX type. Under the header is the date and time the Traffic Peg Table was
last cleared. The numbers displayed in the Traffic Peg Table are for the time period beginning from when
the Traffic Peg Table was last cleared.
@L P
MON MM/DD 10:43:20
YYYY
V200_4
ID:200444
S/N:200003
PBX:63
05/16 14:11
TRAFFIC PEGS
0
00000
00010
00020
00030
00040
00050
00060
00070
00080
00090
00100
00110
00120
00130
00140
00150
00160
00170
00180
00190
00200
00210
00220
00230
00240
00250
00260
00270
00280
00290
-
S.4.1
3
00020
10063
00009
00006
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
65535
65535
65535
00000
00000
4
00013
00000
65535
00000
00000
00000
00000
00002
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00002
00000
00000
00001
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
5
00000
07976
00000
00002
00010
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00004
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
6
00000
00009
00000
00002
00002
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00001
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00009
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
7
00001
00001
00001
00001
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00001
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
8
00004
00002
00000
00001
00004
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00004
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00016
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
9
00056
00000
00000
00003
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00004
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00015
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
Enter
Use the command CLEAR PEG to set pegs to zero. At the @ prompt, enter
C P
Octel 200/300
2
00000
00005
00002
00023
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00018
00001
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
Use the command LIST PEG to display pegs on a terminal. At the @ prompt, enter
L P
-
00022
00000
00008
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00001
00000
00000
00001
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
1
00078
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00061
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
00000
Enter
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
Caution!
8-41
Many of the traffic pegs are used in the System
Performance report. When the Traffic Peg Count
Table is cleared, the System Performance report is
also cleared. Likewise, if the System Performance
report is cleared, the Traffic Peg Count Table is
cleared.
Traffic Pegs
#
Description
01
INCOMING CALLS
Total number of incoming calls answered by the Octel 200/300. Includes calls,
logons, hangups, etc.
02
QUICK MESSAGES
03
MESSAGES CREATED
04
TIMES LISTEN WAS USED
05
).
Total number of messages created. Includes messages left after extension busy/no
answer, new messages, reply messages, quick messages, etc. (NEW, REPLY,
QUICK).
Number of times listen was used (
5
).
TIMES LAST WAS USED
Number of times last was used ( 1
5
).
06
MESSAGES SENT TO DISTRIBUTION LIST
07
TIMES SAVE WAS USED
08
TIMES ERASE WAS USED
09
TIMES USER LOGGED ON
10
PB60019−01
Number of quick messages left (Messaging feature *
Number of times messages were sent to Distribution Lists.
Number of times save was used ( 7 ).
Number of times erase was used ( 3 ).
Number of times callers successfully logged on (by pressing
mailbox number and security code).
#
followed by
TIMES EXIT WAS USED
Number of times
9
was used to exit from mailbox.
11
MAILBOX IN USE WHEN USER ATTEMPTED TO LOGON
12
USER WAS DROPPED BECAUSE OF TOO MANY ERRORS
Number of times the mailbox was already in use when logon was attempted.
Number of times a person was disconnected because too many errors had been
made.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-42
Installation and Maintenance Volume
#
Description
13
NO DIAL TONE FROM PBX WHEN TRYING TO MAKE A CALL
14
LEFT MESSAGE AFTER CALLING AN EXTENSION
15
NUMBER OF VOICE PROCESSING ERRORS
16
TIMES NEW WAS USED TO CREATE A MESSAGE
17
NUMBER OF FORWARDED MESSAGES
18
19
20
Number of times the Octel 200/300 attempted to call out and did not receive
dial tone from the PBX (when connecting a call).
Number of messages left after calling an extension that was busy or did not
answer.
Number of software errors.
Number of times new was used to create a message ( 6 ).
Number of times forward was used (1
NUMBER OF REPLY MESSAGES
Number of times reply was used (
S.4.1
1
Number of times volume was used ( 1
).
).
7
TIMES VOLUME WAS USED
8
).
RETURNED TO AUTO ATTENDANT FROM LOGON
Number of times
level.
Octel 200/300
3
9
0
was used from mailbox to return to automated attendant
21
TIMES TIME STAMP WAS USED
22
MESSAGES SENT WITH MORE THAN ONE ADDRESS
23
MESSAGES DELETED
Number of times that time was used ( 8 ).
Number of messages that were directed to more than one address.
Number of messages deleted — heard to conclusion and exited with 9 , deleted
because too short, or erased. If a message has been sent to more than one address,
the message is not deleted (and count accumulated) until all addresses have erased
the message.
24
AMOUNT OF SECONDS ALL PORTS BUSY
25
MESSAGE WAITING COLLIDED WITH AN INCOMING CALL
26
CALLS MADE BY MESSAGE WAITING
27
MESSAGE DELETED — TOO SHORT
Total number of seconds calls were blocked because all Octel 200/300 ports
were busy.
Number of times message waiting call collided with incoming call or did not
receive dial tone from PBX.
Number of message waiting calls made.
Number of messages deleted because they were less than four seconds in duration.
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
#
Description
29
IMMEDIATE CALL USED
Number of times immediate call was used (1
30
BACKUP WHILE LISTENING TO A MESSAGE
31
BACKUP WHILE RECORDING A MESSAGE
4
).
Number of times backup was used while listening to message ( 2 ).
Number of times backup was used while listening to message ( 2
PB60019−01
8-43
32
TIMES SYSTEM HAS RELOADED
33
TIMES SYSTEM HAS RESTARTED
34
AUTO ATTENDANT CALLS TO BUSY EXTENSION
35
AUTO ATTENDANT CALLS TO EXTENSION THAT DID NOT ANSWER
36
GREETINGS PLAYED
37
GREETINGS RECORDED
38
CALLS TO VACANT EXTENSION
39
CALLS TO UNAVAILABLE EXTENSION
40
ALARM CALLS CONFIRMED
41
ALARM CALLS ATTEMPTED
42
NO PORT AVAILABLE WHEN ALARM CALL WAS ATTEMPTED
43
MESSAGE WAITING ENCOUNTERED 3/4 OF THE PORTS BUSY
44
MESSAGE WAITING CALLED VACANT EXTENSION
).
Number of times the Octel 200/300 has reloaded.
Number of times the Octel 200/300 has restarted.
Number of calls made to busy extensions.
Number of calls made to extensions that did not answer.
Number of times greetings, included extended absence greetings, were played.
Number of greetings, including extended absence greetings, that were
recorded.
Number of calls made to extensions that do not exist (does not count message
waiting calls).
Number of calls made to unavailable extensions.
Number of alarm calls confirmed by pressing the *
call.
upon receipt of alarm
Number of calls made attempting to deliver alarm calls.
Number of times an alarm call could not be made because a port was not
available.
Number of seconds message waiting could not call, and/or could not deliver a
network message because 3/4 or more of all ports were busy (when all ports
are configured for outcall).
Number of times message waiting called an extension that did not exist.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-44
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
#
Description
45
AUTO ATTENDANT CALLS PLACED
46
AUTO ATTENDANT CALLS ANSWERED BY CALLED PARTY
47
TRANSFER TO INTERCEPT BY DIALING 0
48
TRANSFER TO INTERCEPT BY TIME OUT
49
NO DIAL TONE ON ALTERNATE TRANSFER CODE
50
BROADCAST MESSAGES SENT
51
58
RESET INTEGRATION UNIT
67
MESSAGE SEND FAILED
68
NUMBER OF CALLS PLACED BY WORKS APPLICATION
69
NUMBER OF CALLS TO EITHER AP OR GATEWAY LINK ERROR MAILBOX
70
SUBSEQUENT CALLS
71
MESSAGE WAITING CALLS TO BUSY EXTENSIONS
72
MESSAGE WAITING CALLS TO RING-NO-ANSWER EXTENSIONS
73
MESSAGE WAITING CALLS ANSWERED
74
NAME MESSAGES RECORDED
Number of times the Octel 200/300 dialed an extension number; counts all
extensions called.
Number of calls placed that were answered.
Number of times transfer to intercept because zero was pressed.
(no digits entered)
Number of times actually transferred to intercept when caller defaulted
because no digits were entered. (The difference between peg 48 and peg 138
equals the number of times the Attendant/Intercept Greeting played.)
Number of times no dial tone was received when attempting the alternate
transfer string.
Number of broadcast messages sent.
Applies only to integration units on integration cards. Number of times the
Octel 200/300 reset the integration card. Could be caused by various
conditions. The Octel 200/300 does not restart.
Number of times message failed to be delivered because mailbox full or set
not to accept messages.
The number of times calls were placed by the Works for Serenade system.
Calls to the AP or to the Gateway Link terminated unexpectedly and the
caller was sent to the AP error mailbox or to the Gateway Link error mailbox.
Number of mailboxes called after placing initial call.
Number of calls message waiting placed to busy extensions.
Number of calls message waiting placed to ring-no-answer extensions.
Number of calls message waiting placed that were answered.
Number of name messages recorded.
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
#
Description
75
SEND FAILED TO EXTENDED MAILBOX — MAILBOX FULL/SET TO NOT
ACCEPT MESSAGE
8-45
Number of times a message was not sent to an Extended mailbox because the
mailbox was full or set not to accept messages.
76
SET UP OFFSITE MESSAGE WAITING
77
MESSAGE WAITING CALLED CX/MX PORT
78
NETWORK MESSAGE SEND ATTEMPT
79
NETWORK MESSAGE SEND SUCCESS
Number of times offsite outcalling digit string was set up.
Number of times an extension was called and answered by an Octel 200/300
CX/MX port.
The number of Protocol 1 or 3 network message send attempts. This peg is
incremented each time the local system attempts to transmit a voice message.
The number of Protocol 1 or 3 network messages sent successfully. This peg is
incremented each time the local system successfully transmits a voice message.
Protocols 1 and 3 send all pending messages for a location (except night
messages) when that location is called.
Night messages are included in the pending messages for a location during the
hours defined in System Parameter 62 — NET: NIGHT DELIVERY START
TIME, and System Parameter 63 — NET: NIGHT DELIVERY END TIME.
80
NETWORK SEND COLLISION
81−
88
CODE DOWNLOADED SUCCESSFULLY TO INTEGRATION CARD
97
DIGIT LOST DURING NETWORK COMMUNICATION
Number of network message send attempts that collided with an incoming
call. This peg is incremented during Protocol 5 operation.
Applies only to integration units of integration cards. Number of times
operating code was successfully downloaded to the integration card after
reset.
The number of times a digit was lost or garbled during network
communications.
(Protocols 1, 3, or 5 only) This peg is incremented if the destination system
responds during network communications that the digits received have failed
a data integrity check. Digits can be corrupted by noise or poor transmission
quality on the network connection.
PB60019−01
98
AIC CALLED CX/MX PORT
99
POWER FAILED
(AIC = Assisted Inward Calling) Number of times a CX/MX port answered
when the Octel 200/300 was extending a call.
Number of times the Octel 200/300 detected a power failure.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-46
Installation and Maintenance Volume
#
Description
100
NET MESSAGE SEND — OTHER SYSTEM BUSY
The number of times a network message call was terminated because the
destination system did not have enough idle ports.
(Protocols 1, 3, or 5 only) This peg is incremented if the destination system
responds during network communication that it has too few idle ports to accept a
network call.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
101
DID/E&M INTERFACE INTERCEPTED IMMEDIATE
102
DID/E&M INTERFACE INTERCEPTED RING-NO-ANSWER
103
DID/E&M INTERFACE INTERCEPTED DUE TO BUSY
104
DID/E&M INTERFACE INTERCEPTED SOMETHING WRONG WITH CALL
105
INVALID BUS MESSAGE TYPE
106
DID/E&M INTERFACE REQUESTED CODE
107
DID/E&M INTERFACE REQUESTED TABLES
108
DID/E&M INTERFACE REQUESTED TO INTERCEPT CALL IMMEDIATELY
109
DID/E&M INTERFACE ERRORS DURING SELFTEST
110
DUPLICATE DEVICES DETECTED (MASTER Octel 200/300S)
111
MESSAGES RECEIVED FROM BUS
112
MESSAGES SENT TO BUS
113
NETWORK MESSAGE RECEIVE DISK FULL
Number of times DID/E&M Interface calls were intercepted immediately.
Number of times DID/E&M Interface calls were intercepted due to
ring-no-answer.
Number of times DID/E&M Interface calls were intercepted due to busy.
Number of times DID/E&M Interface calls were intercepted but something
was wrong with the call.
Received selftest results unexpectedly. Check for error in Hardware Error
Table.
Number of times DID/E&M Interface requested code.
Number of times DID/E&M Interface requested tables.
Number of times DID/E&M Interface was instructed to intercept
immediately.
Number of times DID/E&M Interface had errors to report from selftest.
Number of times duplicate devices were found.
Number of times messages were received from the digital bus.
Number of messages sent to the digital bus.
The number of times the local system reported the disk was full when a
network location was attempting to deliver a message.
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
#
Description
114
NETWORK MESSAGE RECEIVED REACHED BLOCK LIMIT
8-47
The number of times the message being received was longer than expected.
The originating system sends the length of the message being transmitted during
network communication. If the end of message marker is not received, typically
the line has dropped.
115
NETWORK MESSAGE RECEIVED EXCEEDED SILENCE LIMIT
116
NETWORK MESSAGE RECEIVE PORTS BUSY
117
OFFSITE MESSAGE WAITING CALLS PLACED
118
OFFSITE MESSAGE WAITING TIMES ANSWERED
119
OFFSITE MESSAGE WAITING ANSWERED BUT NO RESPONSE
120
OFFSITE MESSAGE WAITING PRE-DIGIT FAILED
121
NETWORK LINE QUALITY TEST ATTEMPT
122
NETWORK LINE QUALITY TEST FAILED
123
NETWORK LINE QUALITY SIGNAL TOO LOW
124
NETWORK LINE QUALITY SIGNAL/NOISE RATIO TOO LOW
125
LAMP MESSAGE WAITING CALLS MADE
126
LINE DROP EVENTS
127
INITIAL DIALED 0 FOR ASSISTANCE
The number of times the local system aborted recording a message being
received during to the silence limit being exceeded.
The number of times the local system terminated a Protocol 1, 3, or 5 network
call because there were too few idle ports.
Number of offsite outcalls attempted.
Number of offsite outcalls answered.
Number of times offsite outcalls were answered but the Octel 200/300
detected no response after speaking the prompt the maximum number of
times.
Number of times the predigit string failed.
The number of line quality test attempts performed during Protocol 1 or 3
network calls.
The number of Protocol 1 or 3 network line quality failures.
The number of Protocol 1 or 3 network line quality tests that failed because
the signal level was too low.
The number of Protocol 1 or 3 network line quality tests that failed because
the signal level was too low.
Number of times a message waiting lamp digit string was attempted.
Number of loop current interruption (momentary disconnect).
Number of times a caller pressed
PB60019−01
0
immediately after answer.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-48
Installation and Maintenance Volume
#
Description
128
SUBSEQUENT DIALED 0 FOR ASSISTANCE
Number of times callers pressed
0
after a mailbox.
129
INITIAL DIALED EXTENSION OR DIGIT
130
SUBSEQUENT DIALED EXTENSION OR DIGIT
131
Number of times a caller initially entered the first digit (1−8) for a defined
mailbox or extension in the USER Table.
Number of times a caller subsequently entered a first digit (1−8) mailbox or
extension defined in the USER Table.
INITIAL PRESSED # TO LOGON
Number of times caller initially dialed # as a first digit, indicating a request
to logon to a mailbox.
132
SUBSEQUENT PRESSED # TO LOGON
133
INITIAL PRESSED
Number of times a caller subsequently pressed
another mailbox.
#
after attempting to call
* FOR QUICK MESSAGE
Number of times * was pressed immediately after the system answered.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
134
SUBSEQUENT PRESSED * FOR QUICK MESSAGE
Number of times * was subsequently pressed after other digits were entered.
135
CALLER WAS NETWORK
136
CALLER WAS DID/E&M INTERFACE UNIT.
137
CALLER WAS TRANSFERRED OUT TO NETWORK
138
INITIAL DEFAULT TO INTERCEPT
139
SUBSEQUENT DEFAULT TO INTERCEPT; CALLER MADE TOO MANY ERRORS
140
INITIAL LEFT MESSAGE AT TONE
The number of times the source of an incoming call was identified as a
network location.
Number of times the caller was a DID/E&M Trunk Interface call.
The number of times Protocol 1 or 3 placed an immediate call to accomplish any
network function. Includes calling an extension, checking if a message has been
listened to, logging on, or sending a Quick Message across the network.
Number of times a caller listened to the Company Greeting, did nothing and
defaulted to the intercept extension. The call may not actually be transferred
to the intercept extension. For example, the greeting may have played or the
caller may have abandoned. (The difference between peg 48 and peg 138
equals the number of times the Attendant/Intercept Greeting played.)
Number of times callers were transferred to the intercept extension after
entering too many non-existent extensions. Calls intercepted by DID or E&M
Interface Modules can also default to assistance after leaving a message.
Number of callers that left a message at the tone.
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
PB60019−01
#
Description
141
SUBSEQUENT LEFT MESSAGE AT TONE
142
MESSAGE RECEIVED AFTER GREETING
143
MESSAGE RECEIVED FROM NETWORK
144
NORMAL GREETING PLAYED, NO CALL PLACED
145
MESSAGE CREATED BUT NOT SENT, (ERROR — NO ADDRESS, ETC.)
146
INCOMPLETE EXTENSION NUMBER DIALED
150
CARD COURTESY DOWN
152
COMMAND SENT OVER RS-232C TO PBX TO TURN ON MESSAGE WAITING
153
COMMAND SENT OVER RS-232C TO PBX TO TURN OFF MESSAGE WAITING
154
INFORMATION SENT FROM PBX OVER RS-232C
155
RECEIVED INVALID/UNEXPECTED RESPONSE FROM PBX OVER RS-232C
156
INTEGRATION — BUSY FORWARD
157
INTEGRATION — RING-NO-ANSWER FORWARD
158
INTEGRATION — ALL FORWARD
159
INTEGRATION — DIRECT CALL
8-49
Number of times a message was left after calling a different mailbox.
Number of messages left after greeting played.
The number of messages received from network locations. Includes all
protocols.
Number of times a greeting played and no additional digits were entered.
Number of messages NOT SENT because there was absolute silence, no
address was entered, or the message was deleted before sent. A message is
defined as any message, greeting, or name.
Number of times caller failed to finish entering an extension number.
Number of times the CD X command was executed successfully for LAN cards.
Number of times a command was sent over RS-232C to PBX to turn ON
message waiting light (PBX integration only).
Number of times a command was sent over RS-232C to PBX to turn OFF
message waiting light (PBX integration only).
Received information from PBX over RS-232C (PBX integration only).
Received invalid or unexpected response from PBX over RS-232C (PBX
integration only).
PBX forwarded call when busy was encountered.
PBX forwarded call when ring-no-answer was encountered.
Integration — PBX immediately forwarded all calls, or forwarding status
unknown (e.g., SL-1).
Integration — Direct extension call to logon.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-50
Installation and Maintenance Volume
#
Description
160
INTEGRATION — NO CALL RECORD
161
TRANSFER TO PERSONAL ASSISTANT
162
PERSONAL ASSISTANT UNAVAILABLE
163
NO PORT AVAILABLE FOR ATTIC
ONLY APPLIES TO AT&T SYSTEM 75 INTEGRATION
Integration — Number of times received a call on an integrated system but
received no call record or it was late.
Number of times caller pressed
Personal Assistance position.
0
or was automatically transferred to a
Number of times a personal assistant did not answer due to busy,
ring-no-answer, or telephone forwarded back to the Octel 200/300.
Number of times the Octel 200/300 was too busy to accept a call from the
ATTIC card. Caller hears ringback until an Octel 200/300 port becomes
available.
164
PORT STATUS CONFLICT WITH SLIC
APPLIES ONLY TO A NORTHERN TELECOM SL-1 INTEGRATION
The Octel 200/300 port status conflicts with the SLIC card status.
165
RESET INTEGRATION CARD
APPLIES ONLY TO INTEGRATION CARDS
Number of times the Octel 200/300 reset the integration card. Could be
caused by various conditions. The Octel 200/300 does not restart.
167
MESSAGE SENT TO PDL WITH AN INVALID MAILBOX AS A MEMBER
168
MW COMMAND SENT TO AN INTEGRATION CARD TO TURN ON LAMP
APPLIES ONLY TO INTEGRATION CARDS
Number of times a message was sent to a Personal Distribution List that
contained an invalid mailbox as one of its members.
Number of times a message waiting command was sent to an integration card
to turn ON a message waiting indicator.
169
MW COMMAND SENT TO AN INTEGRATION CARD TO TURN OFF LAMP
APPLIES ONLY TO INTEGRATION CARDS
Number of times a message waiting command was sent to an integration card
to turn OFF a message waiting indicator.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
170
REPLIED TO ADDITIONAL ADDRESSES
171
MARKED A MESSAGE PRIVATE
172
FUTURE DELIVERY MESSAGE
173
NAMES DIRECTORY MAILBOX
Number of times reply to additional addresses was used.
Number of times mark a message Private was used.
Number of times a Future Delivery message was created.
Number of times the Dial-by-Name directory mailbox was accessed.
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
#
Description
174
PERSONAL DISTRIBUTION LIST
175
PROTOCOL 2 MESSAGE ATTEMPT
8-51
Number of times a Personal Distribution List was used.
The number of Protocol 2 network message delivery attempts.
This peg is incremented each time a message is successfully sent to Protocol 2
locations. Protocol 2 sends all pending messages for a particular location (except
night messages) when that location is called.
176
PROTOCOL 2 MESSAGE SENT
184
APLINK: DIAL TO AP LINK CONNECT TMO LOST
185
TIMES PORT WITH COS ATTRIBUTE 66 GOT AN INCOMING CALL
Number of times a port with Attribute 66 — THIS PORT IS FOR OUTCALLS
ONLY, NO DIAL TONE EXPECTED, received an incoming call.
190
INTEGRATION — PBX RESTART
191
INTEGRATION-RECORD CALL-IN-PROGRESS
192
INTEGRATION — FORCED FORWARD
193
INTEGRATION — UNKNOWN FORMAT
194
INTEGRATION — PREMATURE END
195
INTEGRATION — BAD FIRST DIGIT
196
INTEGRATION — DIGITS NOMATCH
197
TODO QUEUE TOO FULL
198
AP DECPOOLCNT MAILBOX FULL OR OUT-OF-SYNC IN GATEWAY LINK
202
PB60019−01
Number of Protocol 2 messages successfully sent.
Number of times the communication link between the ACP and the CPU was
established.
PBX notified the Octel 200/300 of a restart. message waiting lamps are relit.
Record call-in-progress requested by user.
A call was forced to forward to the Octel 200/300.
Unknown format for call record received.
Premature end of call record.
Bad first digit in VAR field.
Digits do not match call format.
Number of times TODO QUEUE too full (3/4) to take message.
Indicates when an Octel 200/300 mailbox in the application processor message
mailbox pool is out-of-sync with the Works for Serenade application ACM
count or out-of-sync in the Gateway Link CCM scheme.
NETWORK PROTOCOL 4 MESSAGE ATTEMPT
The number of Protocol 4 network message delivery attempts. This peg is
incremented each time the local system attempts to transmit a voice message
to a Protocol 4 location.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-52
Installation and Maintenance Volume
#
Description
203
NETWORK PROTOCOL 4 MESSAGE SENT
204
PORT WENT OFF-HOOK AND DIDN’T GET LOOP CURRENT
205
NUMBER OF MESSAGES AFTER CALLING AN EXTENSION UNDER THE ALL
FORWARD CONDITION
The number of successful Protocol 4 network message deliveries.
The number of times the system port went off-hook and loop current was not
detected.
The number of messages left after calling an extension with all forward.
206
NUMBER OF MESSAGES SENT BY LOGGED ON USERS
207
NUMBER OF OTHER MESSAGES — NET ERRORS, RETURN RECEIPT, MAILBOX
FULL, ETC.
The number of times mailbox holders sent a message after pressing# 6
record a message, 1 3 to forward a message, or 1 7
to reply to a
message.
to
The number of times other messages, such as Return Receipt, Forward on
network, network errors, and ACP messages, were sent.
208
NUMBER OF INVALID USER LOGON ATTEMPTS
209
NUMBER OF INVALID TERMINAL LOGON ATTEMPTS
210
NUMBER OF MESSAGES AFTER CALLING AN EXTENSION WHERE THE
CONDITION WAS BUSY
The number of times an invalid mailbox or password was entered when
attempting to log on to a mailbox.
The number of times an invalid password was used when attempting to log on
to the Octel 200/300 terminal.
The number of times a message was left after calling a busy extension
(forwarded or not).
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
211
TOTAL NUMBER OF FAXES RECEIVED
212
NUMBER OF URGENT MSGS SENT
213
FAX SECONDS TOO FEW FAX CHANNELS TO DO DELIVERY
214
TOTAL NUMBER OF FAXES PRINTED
215
NUMBER OF ATTEMPTS TO PRINT A FAX VIA ATTRIBUTE 84
Total number of fax messages received by the Octel 200/300 including faxes
received with errors.
Total number of messages that were marked urgent.
Total number of seconds no fax channels were available to deliver fax
messages. The minimum number of fax channels that must be idle before
another fax delivery outcall is attempted is determined by System Parameter
202 — FAX NUM FREE FAX CHANNELS TO MAKE FAX CALLS.
Total number of fax messages printed, including fax messages immediately
printed, printed to a group fax number or to a personal fax number.
Total number of calls to fax-on-demand mailboxes.
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
#
Description
216
NUMBER OF FAXES THAT FAILED TO PRINT
217
NUMBER OF TIMES QUICK FAX FEATURE USED
Number of times a caller used Quick Fax, * * , to send a fax message to a
8-53
Number of unsuccessful attempts to print a fax message.
mailbox.
218
NUMBER OF TIMES COULDN’T ALLOCATE A FAX CHANNEL BECAUSE ALL FAX
CHANNELS WERE BUSY
Number of times a fax channel was not available to send or receive a fax
because all fax channels were busy.
219
USER HELP
220
USER DIALED EXTENSION
221
LOGON FAILURE TRANSFER
222
USER RECORDED AN ANNOUNCEMENT
223
USER RECEIVED MAILBOX MESSAGE
224
NUMBER OF TIMES A CALL IS MADE TO A MAILBOX WHICH IS CONFIGURED
FOR PORT/TRUNK COS OVERRIDE
For the VMX 5000 User Interface only. The number of times a mailbox
holder pressed 0 0 0 from a 5000 User Interface mailbox to transfer to
the Help desk.
For the VMX 5000 User Interface only. The number of times a mailbox
holder pressed 0 0 1 and an extension number from a 5000 User Interface
mailbox to call a local extension.
The number of times callers were transferred to the Logon Failure mailbox
after three bad logon attempts.
For the VMX 5000 User Interface only. The number of times a mailbox
holder pressed 0 7 2 to record an announcement.
For the VMX 5000 User Interface only. The number of times a mailbox
holder pressed 0 7 7 to record a mailbox message.
The number of times a call is made to a mailbox that is configured for
port/trunk COS override.
225
USER ACTIVATED EXTENDED ABSENCE GREETING
226
CALL ANSWERING MESSAGE BLOCKED DUE TO EXTENDED ABSENCE
GREETING
The number of extended absence greetings recorded. Traffic Peg 37 is also
incremented.
The number of times a call answering message was blocked because the
extended absence greeting was ON. Traffic Peg 36 is also incremented.
PB60019−01
227
DIGITAL NETWORK MESSAGE SEND SUCCESS
The number of digital network messages sent successfully.
228
MESSAGES RECEIVED FROM DIGITAL NETWORK
Number of messages successfully received from the digital network.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-54
Installation and Maintenance Volume
#
Description
229
NUMBER OF NETWORK NAMES RECEIVED FROM DIGITAL NETWORK
230
REAL-TIME NAME PLAY REQUESTED
Number of network names successfully received from the digital network
Number of times this cabinet played a real-time name from other cabinets.
231
VOICE BLOCKS OF MESSAGE SENT
232
VOICE BLOCKS OF MESSAGE RECEIVED
233
SECONDS ONE-HALF OR MORE LAN CHANNELS BUSY
Number of voice blocks of messages sent.
Number of voice blocks of messages received.
Number of seconds during which one-half or more of the LAN channels were
busy.
234
SECONDS THREE-QUARTERS OR MORE LAN CHANNELS BUSY
Number of seconds during which three-quarters or more of the LAN channels
were busy.
235
SECONDS ALL LAN CHANNELS BUSY
Number of seconds during which all LAN channels were busy.
236
SECONDS LAN CHANNELS IN USE SENDING MESSAGES
237
SECONDS LAN CHANNELS IN USE RECEIVING MESSAGES
238
ATTEMPTS TO MAKE AN OUTGOING CONNECTION
239
OUTGOING CONNECTION REJECTS
240
OUTGOING CONNECTION REJECTS BECAUSE NO LAN CHANNEL
AVAILABLE
Total number of seconds during which LAN channels were sending messages,
for all channels combined.
Total number of seconds during which LAN channels were receiving
messages, for all channels combined.
Number of times LAN channels attempted to open an outgoing connection.
Number of times the attempt to open a connection was rejected.
Number of times the reject was due to too many LAN channels already busy at the
receiving end.
241
INCOMING CONNECTION ATTEMPTS
Number of times this cabinet received a request to open a connection.
242
INCOMING CONNECTION REJECTS BY THIS CABINET
243
INCOMING CONNECTION REJECTS BECAUSE NO LAN CHANNEL AVAILABLE
Number of times this cabinet rejected a request to open a connection.
Number of times this cabinet rejected a request to open a connection because too
many LAN channels were already busy.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
#
8-55
Description
244
MAXIMUM SIMULTANEOUS REAL TIME NAME PLAYS
245
REAL-TIME QUERY CACHE HITS
Maximum number of real-time names that were playing at one time.
This peg gives the number of times for real-time queries that the mailbox location
was found in the Network Names Table.
246
BACKGROUND (MESSAGING) QUERY CACHE HITS
This peg gives the number of times for messaging queries that the mailbox
location was found in the Network Names Table.
247
SINGLE LOCATION QUERIES
Number of single location queries. This peg is incremented only for real-time
name play.
248
REAL-TIME MULTIPLE LOCATION (BROADCAST) QUERIES
249
BACKGROUND MULTIPLE LOCATION (BROADCAST) QUERIES
250
GOT DISK FULL WHILE SENDING MESSAGES OVER THE DIGITAL NETWORK
251
GOT DISK FULL WHILE RECEIVING MESSAGES OVER THE DIGITAL NETWORK
252
LAN CHECKSUM ERROR DETECTED DURING DIGITAL NETWORK
COMMUNICATION
Number of real-time (non-background) query requests that have been
broadcast to all other domain cabinets.
Number of background message delivery query requests sent to all other
domain cabinets.
Number of times the destination cabinet rejected a message during delivery
because of the disk being full.
Number of times this cabinet rejected a message during delivery because of
the disk being full.
Number of times a checksum error occurred during digital network
communication.
253
TOTAL TIME (IN MINUTES) THAT THE SYSTEM IS UP
Number of minutes the Octel 200/300 has been up. Increments every minute. This
peg is used in conjunction with peg 254 to calculate the percentage of time that
the LAN is UP to the time that the system is UP for the Digital Network
Performance Report, LAN Availability.
254
TOTAL TIME (IN MINUTES) THAT THE LAN IS UP
Number of minutes that communication to the LAN adapter has been up.
Increments every minute that the LAN is communicating. This peg is used in
conjunction with peg 253 to calculate the percentage of time that the LAN is UP
to the time that the system is UP for the Digital Network Performance Report,
LAN Availability.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-56
Installation and Maintenance Volume
#
255
Description
NUMBER OF TIMES TOTAL REAL TIME NAMES PLAYED REACHED THE
LIMIT OF AVAILABLE CLIENTS
Number of times a name could not be played by this cabinet in real time over the
LAN. This cabinet had already hit the maximum limit for playing the maximum
number of simultaneous real time names (i.e., hit Maximum Name Clients).
256
NUMBER OF TIMES REAL TIME NAME PLAY RESULTED IN ERROR DUE TO
LIMIT AT SERVER
The number of times that a name could not be played by this cabinet in real time
over the LAN. The cabinet on which the name resides had already hit its limit for
the maximum number of simultaneous real time names that it can provide to other
cabinets (i.e., hit Maximum Name Servers).
257
NUMBER OF TIMES REAL TIME QUERY BY EXTENSION
Number of times a real time LAN query was broadcast to all cabinets in the LAN
domain to search by matching extension digits (versus search by mailbox digits).
258
NUMBER OF TIMES LAN REQUEST QUEUE FILLED UP
The number of times that the LAN request queue filled up.
259
NUMBER OF TIMES DETECT DTMF WHILE RECORDING NET NAME OR
MESSAGE
Number of times DTMF was detected while recording network name or message.
260
NUMBER OF TIMES SENDING NET NAME FAILED
The number of times that sending a network name failed.
261
OCTELNET MESSAGE SEND ATTEMPTS
The number of Protocol 5 network message send attempts.
262
OCTELNET MESSAGE SEND SUCCESSES
The number of successful Protocol 5 network message deliveries.
263
OCTELNET MESSAGE RECEIVE ATTEMPTS
The number of Protocol 5 network message receive attempts.
264
OCTELNET MESSAGE RECEIVE SUCCESSES
The number of successful Protocol 5 network message receives.
265
COPIED A RECEIVED OCTELNET MESSAGE — MORE THAN 10 RECIPIENTS
The number of times a received Protocol 5 message was copied because the
message had more than 10 recipients.
266
COPIED A RECEIVED OCTELNET MESSAGE — DIFFERENT DELIVERY
OPTIONS
The number of times a received Protocol 5 message was copied because the
message had different delivery options than the previous recipient.
267
OCTELNET SYSTEM MAILBOX FULL
The number of times the OctelNet system mailbox was full.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
#
268
8-57
Description
OCTELNET SYSTEM MAILBOX LOCK ATTEMPTS
The number of attempts the Octel 200/300 made to lock the OctelNet system
mailbox. The mailbox is locked whenever a task is underway to read or write to
the mailbox, such as receiving future delivery messages or receiving messages that
have more than 10 recipients or recipients with different delivery options. Only
one task can access a mailbox at a time. Locking the mailbox ensures that the
changes being made by one task do not interfere with changes by another task.
269
OCTELNET SYSTEM MAILBOX LOCK SUCCESSES
The number of successful attempts the Octel 200/300 made to lock the OctelNet
system mailbox. Failure to lock the OctelNet system mailbox (that is, after Peg
268 is incremented because of an attempt to lock it but Peg 269 is not
incremented) means that many tasks have tried to access the mailbox but some
tasks have not been able to access it.
270
OCTELNET MESSAGE RECEIVE EXCEEDS EXPECTED LENGTH GIVEN BY
SENDING SYSTEM
The number of times a Protocol 5 message receive exceeds the expected length
given by the sending system.
271
OCTELNET FAX SEND ATTEMPTS
Number of attempts Octel 200/300 made to send a fax message over Protocol 5.
272
OCTELNET FAX SEND SUCCESSES
Number of successful attempts made to send a fax message over Protocol 5.
273
OCTELNET FAX RECEIVE ATTEMPTS
Number of attempts Octel 200/300 made to receive fax message over Protocol 5.
274
OCTELNET FAX RECEIVE SUCCESSES
The number of successful attempts the Octel 200/300 made to receive a fax
message over Protocol 5.
275
OCTELNET SPOKEN NAME SEND ATTEMPTS
Number of attempts Octel 200/300 made to send a spoken name over Protocol 5.
276
OCTELNET SPOKEN NAME SEND SUCCESSES
The number of successful attempts the Octel 200/300 made to send a spoken name
over Protocol 5.
277
OCTELNET SPOKEN NAME RECEIVE ATTEMPTS
Number of attempts Octel 200/300 made to receive spoken name over Protocol 5.
278
OCTELNET SPOKEN NAME RECEIVE SUCCESSES
The number of successful attempts the Octel 200/300 made to receive a spoken
name over Protocol 5.
279
OCTELNET ASCII NAME SEND ATTEMPTS
The number of attempts the Octel 200/300 made to send an alphabetic (ASCII)
name over Protocol 5.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-58
Installation and Maintenance Volume
#
280
Description
OCTELNET ASCII NAME SEND SUCCESSES
The number of successful attempts the Octel 200/300 made to send an alphabetic
(ASCII) name over Protocol 5.
281
OCTELNET ASCII NAME RECEIVE ATTEMPTS
The number of attempts the Octel 200/300 made to receive an alphabetic (ASCII)
name over Protocol 5.
282
OCTELNET ASCII NAME RECEIVE SUCCESSES
The number of successful attempts the Octel 200/300 made to receive an
alphabetic (ASCII) name over Protocol 5.
283
NUMBER OF DIGITAL NETWORK FAX MESSAGES SENT SUCCESSFULLY
The number of digital network fax messages sent successfully. Fax messages
include voice-annotated fax messages.
284
NUMBER OF DIGITAL NETWORK FAX MESSAGES RECEIVED SUCCESSFULLY
The number of digital network fax messages received successfully. Fax messages
include voice-annotated fax messages.
285
OFFSITE/MESSAGE WAITING END DIGITS FAIL
The number of times the offsite outcalling end digits specified through System
Parameter 259 — DIGIT STRING AT END OF OFFSITE/PAGER DIGITS, failed.
290
GATEWAY LINK − NEW CALL FOR LOGON
The number of times a logon control is transferred to the OctelAccess server.
291
GATEWAY LINK − NEW CALL FOR LOGOFF
The number of times a logoff control is transferred to the OctelAccess server.
292
GATEWAY LINK − STANDARD NEW CALL
The number of times a new call is transferred to the OctelAccess server control.
293
GATEWAY LINK − NEW CALLS NOT CLAIMED BY THE GATEWAY
Number of times an attempt to transfer call control to the OctelAccess server
failed because no gateway assumed control of the new call.
294
GATEWAY LINK − NUMBER OF SESSIONS ESTABLISHED BY THE GATEWAY
The number of sessions established by the OctelAccess server. This is the number
of applications that have connected to the message server.
295
GATEWAY LINK − OUTCALLS INITIATED BY CLIENTS
The number of outcalls made using the OctelAccess server. This is a count of the
number of times applications made outcalls through the OctelAccess server.
296
GATEWAY LINK − FAXES DELIVERED FOR CLIENTS
The number of faxes delivered for applications using the OctelAccess server.
297
GATEWAY LINK − FAX MESSAGES TRANSFERRED TO THE GATEWAY
This is a count of the number of times the OctelAccess server used the file transfer
feature to transfer a fax message from Octel 200/300 to the OctelAccess server.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
#
8-59
Description
298
GATEWAY LINK − VOICE MESSAGES TRANSFERRED TO THE GATEWAY
This is a count of the number of times the OctelAccess server used the file transfer
feature to transfer a voice message from Octel 200/300 to the OctelAccess server.
299
GATEWAY LINK − FAX MESSAGES TRANSFERRED TO THE MESSAGE SERVER
This is a count of the number of times the OctelAccess server used the file transfer
feature to transfer a fax message from the OctelAccess server to Octel 200/300.
300
GATEWAY LINK −VOICE MESSAGES TRANSFERRED TO THE MESSAGE
SERVER
This is a count of the number of times the OctelAccess server used the file transfer
feature to transfer a voice message from the OctelAccess server to Octel 200/300.
301
GATEWAY LINK − FTP REQUESTS REJECTED DUE TO REACHING MAXIMUM
CONCURRENT LIMIT OF 3
The message server allows only three simultaneous file transfers. This is a count
of the number of times a request to transfer files was rejected because three
transfers were already in progress.
307
INTEGRATION − ATTEMPT TO TRANSFER TO AN EXTENSION FORWARDED
An attempt, that may or may not have been successful, was made by a user to
transfer a caller to an extension forwarded to the message server. Used with Matra
PBX integration only.
308s
INTEGRATION − CHECK MAILBOX
Received a query from the PBX in response to check if there is a mailbox
associated with an extension. Used with Matra PBX integration only.
309
INTEGRATION − MAILBOX EXISTS REPLY
Replied “YES” to the PBX in response to the query to check the existence of the
mailbox associated with an extension. Used with Matra PBX integration only.
310
INTEGRATION − MAILBOX DOES NOT EXIST REPLY
Replied “NO” to the PBX in response to the query to check the existence of the
mailbox associated with an extension. Used with Matra PBX integration only.
311
INTEGRATION − LINK SUPERVISION REQUEST
Received a query from the PBX to check if the message server is an authorized
one. Used with Matra PBX integration only.
312
INTEGRATION − LINK SUPERVISION REPLY
Replied “YES” to the PBX in response to the query to check if the message server
is an authorized one. Used with Matra PBX integration only.
Figure 8-1 represents the Traffic Peg Count Table. In the representation, names are used. In the actual
table, the number of occurrences appears.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
8-60
Installation and Maintenance Volume
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
00
J
NUM CALLS
QUICK MSG
MSG
CREATE
LISTEN
LAST
DIST MSG
SAVE
ERASE
LOGON
10
EXIT
ALRDY
LOGON
ERROR
DROP
NO DIAL
MSG AFT
CALL
VPERR
NEW
FOWRD
REPLY
VOLUME
20
RETURN
ATO ATN
TIME
MULTI
ADDR
MSG
DELETE
SEC ALL
BSY
MSG WT
COLID
MSG WT
CALL
TOO SHORT
J
IMMED
CALL
30
BACKUP
LISTEN
BACKUP
RECORD
RELOAD
COUNT
RESTART
COUNT
BUSY
CALLS
NO ANS
CALLS
GREET
PLAY
GREET
RECORD
VACANT
CALLS
UNAVAIL
CALLS
40
ALARM
CONFRM
ALARM
ATTMPT
ALARM NO
PORT
MSG WT NO
PORT
MSG WT
VACANT
CALLS
PLACED
CALLS
ANSWRD
ATN XFR
DIAL 0
ATN XFR BY
TMO
ALT NO
DIAL TN
50
BROAD
CAST
RESET
INTEGR
RESET
INTEGR
RESET
INTEGR
RESET
INTEGR
RESET
INTEGR
RESET
INTEGR
RESET
INTEGR
RESET
INTEGR
J
60
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
MSGND
FAILED
CALLS
PLACED BY
WORKS
CALLS TO
AP ERRORS
MBX
70
SUBSEQ
CALLS
MSG WT
BUSY
MSG WT NO
ANS
MSG WT
ANSWER
NAME
RECORD
EXTND
FAILED
OFFSITE
SETUP
MW GOT CX
PORT
NET SND
ATTMPT
NET SND
SUCCESS
80
NET SND
COLLID
DOWNLD
CODE
DOWNLD
CODE
DOWNLD
CODE
DOWNLD
CODE
DOWNLD
CODE
DOWNLD
CODE
DOWNLD
CODE
DOWNLD
CODE
J
90
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
NET DIG
LOST
AIC GOT CX
PORT
POWER
FAILURE
100
NET SND
BUSY
IMMED
INTCP
RNA INTCP
BUSY INTCP
ERROR
INTCP
INVALID
BUS MSG
RQST CODE
RQST
TABLES
RQST
IMMED
DID/E&M
ERROR
110
DUPLI
FOUND
BUS IN
MSGS
BUS OUT
MSGS
NET RCV
DSK FUL
NET REV
LONG
NET RCV
SIL LIM
NET REV
BUSY
OFF MW
CALLS
OFF MW
ANSWER
OFF MW
SPK LIM
120
OFF MW
PRE FAIL
NET QUA
ATTEMPT
NET QUA
FAIL
NET QUA
LOW SIG
NET QUA
LOW S/N
MSG WT
LAMP
LN DROP
EVENT
INITIAL
DIAL 0
SUBSEQ
DIAL 0
INITIAL DIG
DIAL
130
SUBSQ DIG
DIAL
INITIAL
DIAL #
SUBSEQ
DIAL #
INITIAL
DIAL *
SUBSEQ
DIAL *
CALLER
WAS NET
CALLER
WAS
DID/E&M
CALLER
XFR TO NET
INL DFLT
INTCP
SUB DEF
INTCP
140
INL LFT
MESSAGE
SUB LFT
MESSAGE
MSG AFT
GREETING
MSG RCV
FRM NET
NORMAL
GRT PLA
MSG CRE
NOT SENT
PARTL
EXTENS
J
J
J
150
NUM CTY
DOWN
J
RS232 MW
ON
RS232 MW
OFF
RS232 INFO
RS232
UNKNWN
INTG BUSY
FWD
INTG RNA
FWD
INTG ALL
FWD
INTG
DIRECT
160
INTG NO
CALL REC
XFR PA
PA UNAVAIL
NO PRT
AVAIL
PORT
STATUS
CONFLICT
RESET
INTEGR
J
PDL BAD
ADDR
MW ON
MW OFF
170
REPLY
ADDR
MSG
PRIV
FUTURE
DELIV
NAME DIR
USED
PDL
USED
NET P2
ATTEMPT
NET P2
SUCCESS
J
J
J
180
J
J
J
J
AP LINK
LOST
ATTRI 66
INCOMING
CALL
J
J
J
J
190
INTG
PBX RST
INTG
RECCALL
INTG
FWDFRC
INTG
UNK FMT
INTG
PRE END
INTG
BAD FDG
INTG
DIG NOM
TODO-Q
FULL
APLINK
DECFUL
J
Figure 8-1 Traffic Peg Count Table
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
J
= Not Used
PB60019−01
System Errors and Traffic Pegs
8-61
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
200
J
J
NET P4
ATTEMPT
NET P4
SUCCESS
NO
LOOPC
MSGS
ALLFWD
MSG BY
LOGGED
MSGS
OTHER
INVAL
USRLOG
INVAL
TERMLOG
210
MSG
BUSY
MSG
FAX
URGENT
MSGS
TOO FEW
FAX CH
FAXES
PRINTED
FAXES
PRINTED
VIA ATT 84
FAXES
FAILED TO
PRINT
QUICK FAX
USED
FAX
CHANNELS
BUSY
USER HELP
220
USER DIAL
EXT
LOGON FAIL
XFER
USER REC
ANN
USER REC
MBMSG
COS
OVERRIDE
USER ACT
EAG
MSG BLCK
BY EAG
DIGNET SND
SUCESS
DIGNET
RECD
SUCCESS
DIGNET
NETNAM
RECD
230
RTIME NAM
MSG SENT
VBLOCKS
MSG RECD
VBLOCKS
1/2 LAN CH
BUSY
3/4 LAN CH
BUSY
ALL LAN CH
BUSY
LAN CH
SEND MSGS
LAN CH REC
MSGS
LAN CH
OUTCONCT
LAN CH
REJEC OUT
240
LAN CH
NOT AVAIL
LAN CH
INCOM
LAN CH IN
REJECTS
LAN CH
INCOM
REJECTS
MAX RTIME
NME PLAY
RTIME
QUERY
MSG QUERY
SGL LOC
QUERY
RTIME
BRDCAST
QUERY
BAKGRND
BRDCAST
QUERY
250
DNET SND
REJECTED
DSK FULL
DNET RCD
REJECTED
DISKFULL
DNET
CHCKSUM
ERROR
TIME SYS
UP
TIME LAN
UP
RTIM NAM
RCHD LIMIT
RTIM NAM
PLY ERROR
RTIME EXT
QUERY
LAN RQST Q
FULL
NET
REC_DTMF
260
NET NAME
FAIL
ON MSG
SND ATT
ON MSG
SENT
ON MSG
RCV ATT
ON MSG
RCVD
ON > 10
CLONE
ON DIF
CLONE
ON FULL
SYS MBX
ON LOK
MBX ATT
ON LOK
MBX OK
270
ON MSG
LONG
ON FAX SND
ATT
ON FAX
SENT
ON FAX RCV
ATT
ON FAX
RCVD
ON SPOK
SND ATT
ON SPOK
SENT
ON SPOK
RCV ATT
ON SPOK
RCVD
ON ASCI
SND ATT
280
ON ASCI
SENT
ON ASCI
RCV ATT
ON ASCI
RCVD
LAN SND
FAX SUC
LAN RCV
FAX SUC
OFF/MW
END DIG
J
J
J
J
290
GWL −
LOGON
GWL
LOGOFF
GWL ALONE
GWL NOT
CLMD
GWL #
SESSIONS
GWL
OUTCALLS
GWL FAX
DLVD
GWL FAX
MSG FRM
MS TO
GATEWAY
GWL VOICE
MSG FRM
MS TO
GATEWAY
GWL FAX
MSG FRM
GATEWAY
TO MS
300
GWL VOICE
MSG FRM
GATWEAY
TO MS
GWL FTP
REQUEST
REJECTED
J
J
J
J
J
INTEG
TRANSFER−
INTEGR
CHECK MBX
INTEGR
MBX EXISTS
REPLY
310
INT MBX
NOT EXIST
REPLY
INT LINK
SUPERVISE
REQUEST
INT LINK
SUPERVISE
REPLY
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
Figure 8-1 Traffic Peg Count Table
PB60019−01
J
= Not Used
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9
HARDWARE REPLACEMENT
Chapter Contents
9.1
9.2
PB60019−01
Hardware Maintenance and Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Octel 200/300 Preventive Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Octel 200 Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
Octel 300 Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Hardware Replacement Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
Printed Circuit Assembly (PCA) Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
Line Interface Card Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-13
Integration Card Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14
Local Area Network (LAN) Card Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
DTIC Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-18
Fax Application Processor Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-23
Hard-Disk-Drive Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-24
Floppy-Disk-Drive Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-26
Power Supply Unit Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-29
AC-to-DC Power-Supply Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-44
Octel 200 Fan Panel Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-49
Octel 300 Fan Tray Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-49
Octel 200/300 Air Filter Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-50
Motherboard Assembly Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-51
Octel 300 Disk-Drive Backplane Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-57
Octel 300 Load Resistor Assembly Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-59
Option Control Chip Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-61
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9
HARDWARE REPLACEMENT
Figures
9-1
9-2
9-3
9-4
9-5
9-6
9-7
9-8
9-9
9-10
9-11
9-12
9-13
9-14
9-15
9-16
9-17
9-18
9-19
9-20
9-21
9-22
9-23
9-24
9-25
9-26
9-27
9-28
9-29
9-30
9-31
9-32
Octel 200/300
Octel 200 Shelf Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
Octel 200 Inside Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
Octel 200 Cabinet Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
Octel 200 Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
Octel 300 Shelf Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Octel 300 Inside Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Rear View of Octel 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9
Octel 300 Inside Rear View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
Card Cage Showing a Printed Circuit Assembly and an Option Control Chip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12
LED Placement on the LAN Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17
Octel 200 DTIC−E1 Kit Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-19
Octel 300 DTIC−E1 Kit Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-19
75-ohm DTIC-E1 Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-20
120-ohm DTIC-E1 Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-21
Fax Application Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-23
Octel 200/300 Hard-Disk-Drive Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-25
Octel 300 Floppy-Disk-Drive Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-27
100−240 VAC Autoranging PSU Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-29
Octel 200 Power Supply Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-30
Octel 300 Power Supply Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-31
Octel 300 120 Vac and 240-Vac Domestic Power Filter Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-33
Octel 300 240 Vac International Power Filter Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-34
Octel 300−48 Vdc Powered Filter Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-35
Field Wiring for −48-Vdc Powered Octel 300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-36
Octel 300 100−240 VAC Worldwide Power Filter Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-43
A.C. Backplane Power Harness Installation for Octel 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-45
D.C. Backplane Power Harness Installation for Octel 200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-47
Motherboard Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-51
Octel 300 Disk-Drive Backplanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-57
Cutaway View of the Load-Resistor Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-59
Option Control Chip (OCC) Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-61
Location of Option Control Chip (OCC) in the Octel 200/300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-61
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9.1
9-1
HARDWARE MAINTENANCE AND DIAGRAMS
This chapter provides information about replacing hardware and maintaining Octel 200/300 message
servers. To assist with the procedures, diagrams of the Octel 200 and Octel 300 are shown. Refer to
Chapter 2, Hardware, for a list of all Octel 200/300 part numbers.
Most information in this section pertains to both the Octel 200 and Octel 300. When information is
specific to either the Octel 200 or the Octel 300 it is clearly indicated with an icon in the left margin of
the page.
Octel 200/300 Preventive Maintenance
Preventive maintenance consists of cleaning the air filter and inspecting the fan operation periodically.
The Hardware Error Table and the Disk Usage and Port Statistic reports should also be monitored to
ensure sufficient capacity and effective operation. The frequency of this maintenance depends on the
operating environment provided for the Octel 200/300. Based on the environment, the local service
company should determine the maintenance interval required.
Caution!
Use an antistatic wrist grounding strap to prevent
damage to sensitive electronic components. Before
handling any electronic equipment, including the
Power Supply Unit and cables, fasten one end of the
strap around your wrist and the other end to any
unpainted metal surface of the Octel 200/300 inner
cabinet.
Air Filter
Clean the air filter regularly (every 3 to 4 months) to prevent restricted air flow. Server overheating from
reduced air flow is a common source of alarm calls. Refer to the Air Filter Cleaning section in this
chapter for air-filter removal and replacement procedures.
Fans
Follow these steps to inspect the fans at least once a year.
1.
Unlock and open the door of the server.
2.
For the Octel 200, view the two fans at the rear of the message server and observe whether they are
spinning. (A flashlight is helpful.) If one or both fans are not spinning, replace the fan assembly as
instructed in the Octel 200 Fan Panel Assembly section in this chapter.
For the Octel 300, view the four fans through the card cage at shelf A and observe whether they are
spinning. (A flashlight is helpful.) If one or more fans are not spinning, replace the fan tray as
instructed in the Octel 300 Fan Tray Replacement section in this chapter.
3.
PB60019−01
Close and lock the cabinet front door.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Power Supply Output
The AC and DC wiring is prewired to connectors that are automatically engaged when the power supply
is installed. There are no power-supply adjustments. You can check voltages by using a digital volt meter.
Using the digital volt meter, you can measure the system DC voltages at the voltage test points on the
front edge of the CPU. Refer to the Installation chapter, Octel 200/300 Hardware Installation section in
this volume.
Preventive Maintenance Tools and Equipment
The tools and equipment required to perform preventive maintenance on the Octel 200/300 are:
-
Key to front door
-
5/16 hex socket driver
-
Antistatic wrist strap
-
IC puller
-
Digital volt/ohm meter
-
Breakout box
-
Three standard, touch-tone telephones
-
Digit grabber
-
Telephone test set (butt set)
-
Flashlight
-
Large, flat-blade screwdriver
-
-
11/32 nut driver
-
No. 1 Phillips screwdriver
RS-232C-compatible ASCII send/receive
terminal capable of 300, 1200, or 9600 baud.
(Refer to the Installation chapter, Terminal
Communications section, in this manual.)
Octel 200 Diagrams
Use the following Octel 200 diagrams to provide assistance when performing preventive maintenance or
replacing components. Figure 9-1 through Figure 9-4 shows the Octel 200 shelf structure, front, and rear
views.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
VCU Slot
9-3
CPU Slot
Front System
Terminal Port
Power Switch
Seven
Card Slots
A1 − A6:
LIC, TLC, DAC, or
Integration card
Power Supply
Unit
A1−A7:
FAX card
System Fuse
A5−A7:
LAN card
Reload Button
A7:
Entryworks ACP card
Floppy Disk
Drive
Voice Disk Drive
Works Disk
Drive
System/Voice
Disk Drives
Figure 9-1 Octel 200 Shelf Structure
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Front Door
VCU
(Slot A8)
Front System Terminal
Port (SP1 Connector)
Card Slot
CPU (Slot A9)
Power Switch
Card Slot
Power Supply/
Floppy Drive Unit
Reload Button
System Fuse
Floppy Disk Drive
Floppy Signal Cable
Disk Drive
Assembly
Figure 9-2 Octel 200 Inside Front View
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
Visual Mailbox
Connector (J4)
System
Terminal
Port (J1)
9-5
RS-232C
Connector
(J2)
Alarm Port (J3)
J1
J4
P7
Power Cord
P6
P5
J2
P4
J3
P3
P2
P1
I/O Panel
Tapped Mounting Holes
(to secure Works for
Serenade Serial I/O
Panel and DAC Panel)
Cable Ties
f f
Earth Ground
Connection Point
Figure 9-3 Octel 200 Cabinet Rear View
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
System
Terminal Port
Fan Power Harness
Connector
Motherboard
Power Cord
Receptacle
Figure 9-4 Octel 200 Rear View
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-7
Octel 300 Diagrams
Use the following Octel 300 diagrams when performing preventive maintenance or replacing
components. Figure 9-5 through Figure 9-8 illustrate the front, rear, and inside views.
VCU Slot
CPU Slot
Front System
Terminal Port
Power Switch
Twelve
Card Slots
A1 − A11:
LIC, TLC, DAC,
or Integration
card
Power Supply
Unit
A1−A12
FAX card
Reload Button
A10−A12
LAN card
A12:
Entryworks ACP,
LIC, FAX, TLC,
Integration card
System/Voice
Disk Drives
Fan Tray
Floppy Disk
Drive
Works Disk
Drive
Four Voice
Disk Drives
Figure 9-5 Octel 300 Shelf Structure
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Front Door
VCU
(Slot A13)
Front System Terminal
Port (SP1 Connector)
Card Slot
Card Slot
CPU (Slot A14)
Power Switch
Power Supply Unit
Reload Button
Floppy Signal Cable
Fan Tray
Floppy Disk Drive
Hard Disk Drive
Assembly
Figure 9-6 Octel 300 Inside Front View
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
Visual Mailbox
Connector (J6)
RS-232C
Connector
Port B (J2)
Reserved RS-232C
(J3 and J4
Connectors)
Rear System Terminal
Port Connector (J1)
9-9
Alarm Port (J5)
Power
Receptacle
J1
J6
P12
P11
P10 P9
P8
P7
J3
P6 P5
J2
J4
P4
J5
P3
P2
P1
50-pin Telco
connectors
(25-pair Amphenol
connectors)
Power Cord
Cable Tiedown
Points
Tapped Mounting
Holes (for securing
Works for Serenade
Serial I/O panel and
DAC panel)
Earth Ground
Connection Point
Figure 9-7 Octel 300 Rear View
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
System Terminal
Port Cable
Main Power
Harness
Main
Motherboard
(shelf A)
Power Line
Filter
SCSI Bus
Jumper Cable
Main Disk Drive
Power Harness
Disk Drive
Motherboard
(shelf B)
Fan Tray
Power Harness
Disk Drive
Motherboard
(shelf C)
Figure 9-8 Octel 300 Inside Rear View
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9.2
9-11
HARDWARE REPLACEMENT GUIDELINES
You can safely replace subassemblies in Octel 200 or Octel 300 message servers by following the procedures
in this chapter. None of the subassemblies contain replaceable components; replacing, attempting to replace,
or modifying any subassembly components voids all warranties. Octel can replace an assembly with an
equivalent assembly.
Caution!
.
To install or replace floppy disk drives or the Power
Supply Unit (PSU), you must turn OFF the power to
the message server. Refer to the Power Supply Unit
section in this chapter for details about turning OFF
power. Hard disk drives, line interface cards,
integration cards, and fax application processors can
be replaced when the power is ON.
The message server must be restarted if a LIC (Line Interface Card), integration card, or fax
application processor is added or if the replacement card is not the same as the card removed.
Refer to the Hard Disk Drive Replacement section in this chapter for considerations regarding hot
plug replacement of disk drives.
When replacing or installing subassemblies in an Octel 200/300 cabinet, use the following guidelines:
-
-
Close and lock the cabinet door when not working on the cabinet. The door should not be left open
for more than one hour at a time.
Always wear an antistatic wrist strap before handling any parts.
Caution!
Printed Circuit Assemblies, such as the CPU card,
contain static-sensitive components. The human body
can easily store enough static electricity to damage a
PCA. To avoid discharging this energy to electronic
assemblies, always wear an antistatic wrist strap
when handling assemblies.
Put on the strap before removing a component from
its static bag. Wrap one end around your wrist and
attach the other end to an unpainted part of the
cabinet. The Octel 200/300 must be plugged into a
grounded outlet. Wear the strap during the entire
replacement procedure.
Printed Circuit Assembly (PCA) Replacement
Use this procedure to replace the following PCAs:
-
Voice Control Units (VCU)
-
Central Processing Units (CPU)
To replace Line Interface Cards (LIC), refer to the Line Interface Card Replacement section in this
chapter. To replace integration cards, refer to the Integration Card Replacement section in this chapter.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-12
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Caution!
Printed circuit assemblies, as well as other assemblies
in the Octel 200/300, contain static-sensitive
components. The human body can easily store
enough static electricity to damage a PCA. To avoid
discharging this energy to electronic assemblies,
always wear an antistatic wrist strap when handling
assemblies.
Printed Circuit Assembly (PCA)
Motherboard
Option Control
Chip (OCC)
Figure 9-9 Card Cage Showing a Printed Circuit Assembly and an Option Control Chip
Replacing a PCA
Use the following procedure to replace a VCU or CPU:
1.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
2.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3.
Switch OFF the PSU.
4.
Disengage the PCA from the motherboard by pivoting the plastic card ejectors at the top and bottom
of the PCA front edge.
5.
Slide the PCA out of card cage.
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Handle the PCA only by the top and bottom edges. Do not touch the components on the PCA.
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-13
6.
.Store the removed PCA in a static protection bag.
7.
Remove the replacement PCA from its static protection bag.
8.
While holding the top and bottom edges of the replacement PCA, slide it into the card cage. Check
that the card slides in the plastic card guides to ensure correct insertion.
9.
Pivot the card ejectors, as needed, to grip the small flanges on the front edges of the card cage.
10. Firmly seat the PCA connectors into the motherboard by pressing the ejectors against the front edge
of the PCA. The ejectors will clip onto small pins on the PCA when the connectors are seated.
Do not slam the PCA into the cabinet, as this could
damage the board or the motherboard connectors.
Caution!
11. Switch ON the message server.
12. Test the message server for correct operation.
13. Close and lock the door to the cabinet.
Line Interface Card (LIC) Replacement
The Octel 200/300 LICs (4- and 8-port LIC, ILC12, and DLC16) installed in shelf A are “hot pluggable.”
That means you do not have to turn OFF the message server to remove or install the cards.
.
The message server must be restarted if a card is added or if the replacement card is not the same
as the card removed.
No more than one line card at a time can be removed
or installed with the power ON.
Caution!
The ports must be forwarded before removing the
line card.
Removing LICs
Use the following procedure to remove an LIC:
1.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
2.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3.
Forward the Octel 200/300 ports being replaced.
To forward ports, at the @ prompt, enter
CD x
In this command, x is the slot number for the card being replaced.
.
PB60019−01
You can also use the command TE C 1 x y to forward the ports, where x is the first port
and y is the last port being forwarded.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-14
Installation and Maintenance Volume
4.
Disengage the LIC from the motherboard by pivoting the plastic card ejectors at the top and bottom
of the front edge of the LIC.
5.
Slide the LIC out of the card cage.
.
6.
Handle the LIC only by the top and bottom edges. Do not touch any components on the LIC.
Store the removed LIC in a static protection bag.
Installing LICs
Use the following procedure to install an LIC:
1.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
2.
While holding the top and bottom edges of the card, slide it into the card cage.
3.
Pivot the card ejectors, as needed, to grip the small flanges on the front edges of the card cage.
4.
Firmly seat the LIC connectors into the motherboard by pressing the ejectors against the front edge
of the LIC. The ejectors will clip onto small pins on the LIC when the connectors are seated.
Do not slam the LIC into the cabinet, as this could
damage the board or motherboard connectors.
Caution!
Once the LIC is installed the red LED comes ON. When self-test diagnostics are complete the green
LED comes ON. When the LIC is initialized and ready for operation, the red LED goes OFF.
5.
Initialize the ports by entering
CU x y
In this command, x is the slot, and y is the card being installed.
.
You can also use the command TE C 2 x y to initialize the ports, where x is the first port
and y is the last port being forwarded.
6.
Test the message server for correct operation.
7.
Close and lock the door to the cabinet.
Integration Card Replacement
The Octel 200/300 integration cards installed in Shelf A are hot pluggable. That means you do not have
to turn OFF the message server to remove or install the cards.
.
The message server must be restarted if an integration card is added or if the replacement card is
not the same as the card removed.
No more than one integration card at a time can be
removed or installed with the power ON.
Caution!
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-15
Removing Integration Cards
Use this procedure to replace an integration card.
1. Unlock and open the cabinet door
2. Put on an antistatic wrist strap and connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3. Use the Courtesy Down command to take the integration card out of service. If there are two units,
make sure to down both units. At the @ prompt, enter:
CD x y
x is the slot number, and y is the unit number.
4. Disengage the integration card from the motherboard by pivoting the plastic card ejectors at the top
and bottom front edge of the card.
5. Slide the integration card out of the card cage.
.
Handle the card only by the top and bottom edges. Do not touch the components on the card.
6. Store the removed integration card in a static protection bag.
Installing Integration Cards
Use this procedure to install an integration card.
1. Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
2. While holding the top and bottom edges of the card, slide it into the card cage.
3. Pivot the card ejectors as needed to grip the small flanges on the front edges of the card cage.
4. Firmly seat the integration card connectors into the motherboard by pressing the ejectors against the
front edge of the card. The ejectors clip onto small pins on the integration card when the connectors
are seated.
Do not slam the integration card into the cabinet, as
this could damage the board or motherboard
connectors.
Caution!
Once the integration card is installed the red LED comes ON. When self−test diagnostics are
complete the green LED comes ON. When the card is initialized and ready for operation, the red
LED goes OFF (less than five minutes).
5. Use the Courtesy Up command to initialize the integration card. At the @ prompt, enter:
CU x y
In this command, x is the slot number, and y is the unit number. If there are two units, make sure to
initialize both units.
6. Test the message server for correct operation.
7. Close and lock the cabinet door.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-16
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Local Area Network (LAN) Card Replacement
The LAN card installed in shelf A is designed to be hot plugged; that is, the message server does not need
to be turned OFF to remove or install the card.
Only one LAN card can be installed in an Octel 200/300 message server. The LAN card can be installed
in the following locations:
Slots A5 through A7 for the Octel 200
Slots A10 through A12 for the Octel 300
Removing a LAN Card
Use the following procedure to remove a LAN card:
1.
Before servicing a LAN card, use the Courtesy Down command to take the LAN card out of service.
At the @ prompt, enter
CD x
Enter
In this command, x is the slot number.
2.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
3.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
4.
Disengage the LAN card from the motherboard by pivoting the plastic card ejectors on the top and
bottom front edge of the LAN card.
5.
Slide the LAN card out of the card cage.
.
6.
Handle the LAN card only by the top and bottom edges. Do not touch components on the
LAN card.
Store the removed LAN card in a static protection bag.
Installing a LAN Card
Use the following procedure to install a LAN card:
1.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
2.
While holding the top and bottom edges of the LAN card, slide it into the card cage.
3.
Pivot the card ejectors, as needed, to grip the small flanges on the front edges of the card cage.
4.
Firmly seat the LAN card connectors into the motherboard by pressing the ejectors against the front
edge of the LAN card. The ejectors will clip onto small pins on the LAN card when the connectors
are seated.
Do not slam the LAN card into the cabinet, as this
could damage the board or motherboard connectors.
Caution!
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-17
5.
Install the 10BaseT, RJ45 adapter on the back of the cabinet, for the slot in which the LAN card is
being installed.
6.
After servicing the LAN card, use the Courtesy Up command to put the card into service. At the @
prompt, enter
CU x
Enter
In this command, x is the slot number.
7.
Test the message server for correct operation.
8.
Close and lock the door to the cabinet.
Figure 9-10 shows the eight LEDs on the front edge of the LAN card.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Figure 9-10 LED Placement on the LAN Card
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-18
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Once the LAN card is installed, the LEDs on the LAN card are activated, as follows:
LED
Number
LED Description
LED
Color
LED Activity
1
Standard use
Red
Lit when the LAN card is installed. Goes off when the
card has been initialized and is ready for operation.
2
Standard use
Green
Lit when self-test diagnostics are complete.
3
Development
Yellow
Used only for development.
4
Good link indicator
Yellow
Lit when the adapter and wiring to a hub are correct.
5
Rx polarity reversed
Yellow
Lit if the pair being received by the Ethernet
controller needs to be reversed. Check the wiring.
6
Receive activity
Indicator
Yellow
Lit when the Ethernet controller sees activity on the
receive pair.
7
Transmit activity
indicator
Yellow
Lit when the Ethernet controller sees activity on the
transmit pair.
8
Collision Indicator
Yellow
Lit when a collision occurs. Collisions occur normally
in Ethernet/802.3 networks, because it is part of the
low layer protocol.
DTIC Replacement
The Digital Trunk Interface Cards (DTIC) installed in Shelf A are “hot pluggable.” That means the
system does not need to be powered down to remove or install the cards.
No more than one card at a time may be removed or
installed with power ON.
Caution!
Installing a DTIC Card for a New Installation
These procedures are for installing a DTIC card in a new installation. If you are replacing a DTIC card in
an existing installation, use the procedures in the next section, Replacing a DTIC Card in an Existing
Installation.
.
1.
Configure the SLOTS Table for the DTIC card before installing the card.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap and connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
Install the DTIC−E1 kit as follows:
2.
Octel 200/300
On the I/O panel on the back of the server, remove the two jack screws and washers securing the
connector marked as follows:
-
J2 (for the Octel 200). Refer to Figure 9-11.
-
J4 (for the Octel 300). Refer to Figure 9-12.
3.
Using two new jack screws provided with the kit and washers just removed, attach the grounding
strip where shown in Figure 9-11 for the Octel 200 or Figure 9-12 for the Octel 300.
4.
Install the DTIC adapter by following the steps below for either a 75-ohm or 120−ohm DTIC−E1
adapter, then proceed to Step 5.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-19
DTIC−E1 Adapter
2X New Jack Screws
J1
Grounding
Screw
J3
J4
J2
P7
P6
P5
P4
P3
I/O Cabling
installed here.
Refer to the
figure for the
75-ohm or
the 120-ohm
adapter.
P1
Grounding Strip
Velcro Hold-down
I/O Panel
Figure 9-11 Octel 200 DTIC−E1 Kit Installation
2X New Jack Screws
DTIC−E1 Adapter
Grounding Strip
J1
P11
I/O Panel
Grounding
Screw
J5
J6
P12
J2
J3
P10
P9
P8
P7
J4
P6
P5
P4
P3
P1
I/O Cabling
installed here.
Refer to the
figure for the
75-ohm or
the 120-ohm
adapter.
Velcro Hold-down
Figure 9-12 Octel 300 DTIC−E1 Kit Installation
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-20
Installation and Maintenance Volume
For 75-ohm DTIC−E1 installations:
a.
Connect the 75-ohm DTIC−E1 adapter to the amphenol connector on the I/O panel
corresponding to the DTIC card slot in the system card cage. Secure the Velcro strap. Make sure
that the adapter is completely seated.
b.
Secure the grounding screw on the top of the adapter to the grounding strip.
c.
Attach the customer-provided 75-ohm transmit and receive coax cables to the appropriate coax
connectors on the adapter as shown in Figure 9-13.
Continue with Step 5 below.
Grounding
Screw
Transmit
Note: “Transmit” and “Receive”
are referenced from the voice
server (i.e. DTIC−E1) side.
Receive
Figure 9-13 75-ohm DTIC-E1 Adapter
For 120-ohm DTIC-E1 installations:
a.
Prepare the customer-provided I/O cable as follows:
-
-
Cut the cable jacket so that the conductors protrude approximately 1 inch (25mm) from the
end of the jacket.
Strip approximately .25 inch (6mm) of insulation from the end of each conductor.
Cut the shield so that a .5 inch (13mm) length of shield foil or braid can be pulled back over
the cable jacket.
.
5.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
To pass regulatory requirements, shielded cable must be used.
b.
Connect the conductors from the I/O cable to the 120-ohm adapter as shown in Figure 9-14.
c.
Secure the the cable jacket to the adapter using the clamp provided, or remove the clamp and
secure with a tie-wrap through two small rectangular cutouts. Make sure the clamp or tie−wrap
is clamped down around the shield that has been folded back around the cable jacket.
d.
Connect the adapter to the amphenol connector on the I/O panel corresponding to the DTIC−E1
card slot in the card cage. Secure the Velcro strap. Make sure the adapter is completely seated.
e.
Secure the grounding screw on the top of the adapter to the grounding strip.
Restart the message server as follows:
a.
Forward the ports by entering TE C 1
b.
Enter RESTA to restart the server
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
Cable Clamp
9-21
Grounding
Screw
Tx Ring
Tx Tip
Chassis Ground
Rx Ring
Rx Tip
Folded−back
cable shield
foil or braid
I/O Cable
Tx = DTIC Transmit
Rx= DTIC Receive
Note: I/O Cable bare metal
ground “drain wire” should
be connected to pin 3
(chassis ground) on the 5−
position terminal block.
Figure 9-14 120-ohm DTIC-E1 Adapter
Replacing a DTIC Card in an Existing Installation
1.
Unlock and open the cabinet door.
2.
Put on antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
.
3.
The ports cannot be forwarded.
Before removing the old card, issue the command:
CD x
where x is the slot for the card.
4.
Disengage the DTIC from the motherboard by pivoting the plastic card ejectors on the top and
bottom of the line card front edge.
5.
Slide the DTIC out of the card cage.
.
6.
PB60019−01
Handle the DTIC only by the top and bottom edges. Do not touch components on the card.
Store the removed card in a static protection bag.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-22
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Installing a New DTIC Card in an Existing Installation
1.
On the new DTIC card, check that the DTIC’s SW1 and SW2 switches at the bottom right-hand
corner of the card are set to the correct positions based on the type of DTIC−E1 adapter installed on
the back of the system (at the specified I/O slot location): 75-ohm or 120-ohm. These switches and
their settings are marked on the card.
2.
While holding the top and bottom edges of the card, slide the DTIC into the card cage.
3.
Pivot the card ejectors as needed to grip small flanges on the front edges of the card cage.
4.
Firmly seat the DTIC connectors into the motherboard by pressing ejectors against the front edge of
the card. The ejectors clip onto small pins on the DTIC when the connectors have seated.
No more than one DTIC card at a time may be
removed or installed with power ON.
Caution!
5.
The information for the DTIC card is downloaded from the system and the DTIC becomes
operational.
When the DTIC is installed the uppermost red LED comes ON. When self−test diagnostics are
complete the red LED remains ON and the uppermost green LED comes ON. This indicates that the
card is ready for application code download and initialization.
When the card is operational, only the uppermost green LED remains lit. This indicates the DTIC
application code is operating normally. The green LED stays ON even if problems are detected with
the E1 trunk or other aspects of initialization. However if there are problems, the LEDs below the
green power LED indicate the nature of the problem. Otherwise, the other LEDs remain OFF. Refer
to the following table for the LEDs and their meanings.
LED
Red boot (top)
Green Power
AP code is initializing
DTIC has successfully completed self diagnostics
Red 1 (top)
Loss of signal on trunk (LOS)
Red 2
Loss of frame on trunk (LOF)
Yellow 3
Remote alarm indication (RAI)
Yellow 4
“Other” trunk alarm
Yellow 5
Alarm history
Green 6 (bottom)
6.
Meaning
One or more channels off hook
If the DTIC is being hot-plugged, initialize the ports by entering
CU x y z
where x is the slot, y is the first port in the card, and z is the last port in the card. If y and z are not
specified, the server defaults to all ports on the card.
Octel 200/300
7.
Test the system for proper operation.
8.
Close and lock the cabinet door.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-23
Fax Application Processor Replacement
The Octel 200/300 fax application processors (fax cards) installed in shelf A are hot pluggable. That
means you do not have to turn OFF the message server to remove or install the cards. Figure 9-15 is a
diagram of a fax card.
Card Ejector
SIMM Modules
Red
Green
Amber
Backplane Connectors
Card Stiffeners
Orientation Label
DB2
Front
Fax Daughter Card 2 (channels 5−8)
(solder side up)
SIMM
Modules
DB1
Front
Card Ejector
Fax Daughter Card 1 (channels 1−4)
(solder side up)
Figure 9-15 Fax Application Processor
Removing Fax Application Processors
Use the following procedure to remove a fax card:
1.
Before servicing a fax application processor, use the Courtesy Down command to take the fax card
out of service. At the @ prompt, enter
CD x
Enter
In this command, x is the slot number.
2.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
3.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
4.
Remove the fax card from the Octel 200/300 cabinet by pivoting the plastic card ejectors at the top
and bottom front edge of the card and sliding the card out of the card cage.
.
5.
PB60019−01
Handle the fax card only by the top and bottom edges. Do not touch components on the card.
Store the removed fax card in a static protection bag.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-24
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Installing Fax Application Processors
Use the following procedure to install a fax card:
1.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
2.
While holding the top and bottom edges of the fax card, slide it into the card cage, taking care to
align the card on the card guides and not let the daughter cards touch nearby cards.
3.
Pivot the card ejectors, as needed, to grip the small flanges on the front edges of the card cage.
4.
Firmly seat the fax card connectors into the motherboard by pressing the ejectors against the front
edge of the fax card. The ejectors will clip onto the small pins on the fax card when the connectors
are seated.
Do not slam the fax card into the cabinet as this could
damage the card or motherboard connectors.
Caution!
Once the fax card is installed, the red LED comes ON. When the self-test diagnostics are complete,
the green LED comes ON. When the card is initialized and ready for operation, the red LED goes
OFF.
5.
Use the Courtesy Up command to put the card into service. At the @ prompt, enter
CU x
Enter
In this command, x is the slot number of the fax card.
6.
Test the fax card for correct operation. Refer to the Feature Description volume, Fax Mail Plus
chapter, Testing the Fax Application Processor section, for testing procedures.
7.
Close and lock the door to the cabinet.
Hard Disk Drive Replacement
Hard disk drives are installed in the message server cabinet when it is shipped. When a replacement is
required, you must follow specific procedures to restore or maintain normal message server operation.
Hot plug replacement of hard disk drives is supported. Drives inserted hot are not operational until you
run the Disk Options (DISKO) program. DISKO provides commands to add, remove, replace, restore and
copy hard disk drives. DISKO is not available “on line” (i.e. while the message server is running from
hard disk); it may only be executed when the message server is booted from floppy disk.
.
You must preform off-line procedures and restart the message server when you replace the hard
disk drive.
Refer to the Procedures chapter in this volume, Hard Disk Remove, Replace, Restore, or Add sections.
Only hard disk drives supplied by Avaya can be used to replace or to upgrade a message server. The disk
drive assembly includes all necessary cables. Do not remove or alter any cables on the drive
assembly. Figure 9-16 shows the hard disk drive assembly for the Octel 200/300.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-25
Figure 9-16 Octel 200/300 Hard Disk Drive Assembly
Hard disk drive assemblies are sensitive to static
electricity. Do not attempt the following procedures
without wearing an antistatic wrist strap.
Caution!
Removing the Hard Disk Drive
To remove the hard disk drive, use the following procedures:
1.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
2.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3.
Locate the drive assembly to be removed.
4.
Use a flat-blade screwdriver to loosen the two captive screws securing the disk assembly to the
cabinet.
5.
Gripping the front flange, pull the drive assembly out of the cabinet. Use one hand to support the
bottom of the drive when it clears the cabinet.
6.
Carefully place the drive assembly nearby, to be reinstalled or shipped.
.
PB60019−01
The hard disk drive assemblies are sensitive to rough handling. Be careful and handle them as
gently as possible.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-26
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Installing the Hard Disk Drive Assembly
To install the hard disk drive assembly, use the following procedures:
.
The disk drive ID is automatically selected when the drive assembly is installed. Do not change
the jumpers on the disk drive.
1.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
2.
Remove the new disk drive from the shipping container.
3.
Verify that the part number on the label attached to the sheet metal plate of the drive assembly agrees
with what was ordered.
.
For part numbers and storage hours refer to the Hardware chapter, Subsystem Configurations
section in this volume.
4.
Hold the disk drive with one hand while supporting the weight of the assembly with your other hand.
Orient the drive assembly so that the disk drive is to the right of the sheet metal slider plate.
5.
Guide the sheet metal plate into the card guides that are marked with the appropriate slot ID.
6.
Gently, but firmly, slide the drive assembly into the slot until the connector on the back of the
assembly is mated with the connector on the backplane. This is accomplished when the flange on the
front of the drive assembly sheet metal reaches or very nearly reaches the sheet metal of the cabinet.
Do not slam the drive assembly into cabinet. This
could damage the disk drive.
Caution!
7.
Using a flat-blade screwdriver, tighten the two captive screws that are attached to the front flange of
the drive assembly.
8.
Follow the procedure in the Procedures chapter, Hard Disk Restore/Add/Replace section, in this
volume to restore the message server to correct configuration.
9.
Test the message server for correct operation.
Floppy Disk Drive Replacement
In the event of damage or a malfunction, an Octel 300 floppy disk drive might need to be replaced. You
can only use floppy disk drive assemblies supplied by Avaya. The floppy disk drive assembly includes all
necessary cables. Do not remove or alter any cables on the drive assembly. Figure 9-17 shows the
Octel 300 floppy disk drive assembly.
The Octel 200 floppy disk drive subassembly is mounted within the Power Supply Unit (PSU). If the
floppy disk drive malfunctions, thee floppy disk drive and PSU must be replaced as a unit. Refer to the
Power Supply Unit (PSU) Replacement section in this chapter to replace an Octel 200 floppy disk drive.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-27
Figure 9-17 Octel 300 Floppy Disk Drive Assembly
The floppy disk drive assemblies are sensitive to
static electricity. Do not attempt the following
procedures without wearing an antistatic wrist strap.
Caution!
Removing the Octel 300 Floppy Disk Drive
The Octel 300 floppy disk drive assembly is “hot pluggable.” You do not need to turn OFF the PSU to
remove the assembly. To remove the floppy disk drive assembly, use the following procedures:
1.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
2.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3.
Locate the floppy disk drive assembly.
4.
Remove the configuration backup disk from the floppy disk drive.
5.
Disconnect the floppy disk signal cable from the front of the CPU card.
6.
Use a flat−blade screwdriver to loosen two captive screws securing the floppy drive to the cabinet.
7.
Grip the front flange of the drive assembly and pull it firmly to unseat the rear-mounted connector.
Continue to pull the assembly out of the cabinet. Use one hand to support the bottom of the drive
when it clears the cabinet.
8.
Carefully put the floppy drive assembly nearby to be reinstalled or shipped.
.
PB60019−01
Floppy disk drive assemblies are sensitive to rough handling. Be careful and handle them as
gently as possible.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-28
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Installing Octel 300 Floppy Disk Drive
The Octel 300 floppy disk drive assembly is hot pluggable. You do not need to turn OFF the PSU. To
install a replacement floppy disk drive in the Octel 300 use the following procedure:
1.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
2.
Remove the replacement floppy disk drive assembly from the shipping container.
3.
Hold the front flange of the drive assembly with one hand while supporting the weight of the drive
assembly with your other hand. Orient the drive assembly so that the floppy drive is to the right of
the sheet metal slider plate.
4.
Guide the sheet-metal plate into the card guides marked “B5.”
5.
Gently but firmly slide the drive assembly into the slot until the connector on the back of the
assembly has mated with the connector on the backplane. This is accomplished when the flange on
the front of the drive assembly sheet metal reaches or very nearly reaches the sheet metal of the
cabinet.
Do not slam the floppy disk drive assembly into the
cabinet. This could damage the floppy disk drive.
Caution!
Octel 200/300
6.
Use a flat-blade screwdriver to tighten the two captive screws attached to the front flange of the drive
assembly.
7.
Connect the keyed connector on the floppy drive signal cable to the connector on the CPU card.
8.
Insert the configuration backup disk into the floppy disk drive.
9.
Test the message server for correct operation.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-29
Power Supply Unit Replacement
This section contains replacement information for the Octel 200 Power Supply Unit (including floppy
disk assembly), the Octel 300 Power Supply Unit, and the Octel 300 Filter Assembly.
.
In the first quarter of 2000, a new 100−240 VAC auto-ranging power supply began to ship as a
replacement for the older 120, 230 (Octel 200) or 240 (Octel 300) VAC PSU. Figure 9-18 shows
the new PSU label, which is located on the Octel 300 Power Filter Assembly immediately above
the power cord receptacle, or on the Octel 200 near the power cord. Refer to the Power Supply
Unit section in the Hardware chapter for details about the older and current Power Supply Units
(PSU).
110−240 VAC, 50/60HZ
System Grounding required,
see Installation Requirements
Figure 9-18 100−240 VAC Autoranging PSU Label
Caution!
The following replacement procedures cover different PSUs and
are different depending upon which PSU you are replacing. The
replacement procedures also differ depending upon whether the
message server is an Octel 200 or an Octel 300.
-
-
Warning!
PB60019−01
If you are replacing a 120, 230 (Octel 200), or 240 (Octel 300) VAC PSU
with a 120, 230 (Octel 200), or 240 (Octel 300) VAC PSU
or
If you are replacing a 100−240 VAC auto-ranging PSU with a
100−240 VAC auto-ranging PSU
then
Refer to the first procedure in this section.
If you are replacing a 120, 230 (Octel 200) or 240 (Octel 300) VAC PSU
with a 100−240 VAC auto-ranging PSU
then
Refer to the second procedure in this section.
If the PSU malfunctions, it must be replaced with a new one.
No attempt should be made to replace or alter the PSU’s circuit
components or wire harness. No PSU adjustments are possible.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-30
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Octel 200 Power Supply Unit
The Octel 200 power supply and floppy disk drive are one unit. If either the power supply or floppy disk
drive malfunctions, you must replace the entire unit. The instructions to remove and install the PSU
include instructions to replace an Octel 200 floppy disk drive.
.
In the event the PSU malfunctions, first check the fuse before replacing the PSU.
Figure 9-19 shows the Octel 200 PSU. The appearance of the 120 VAC, 230 VAC, and 100−240 VAC
auto-ranging PSUs are the same.
Power Supply
Power Switch
Fuse Holder
Cable to Floppy
Disk Drive
Floppy Disk Drive
Figure 9-19 Octel 200 Power Supply Unit
Octel 200 Power Supply Fuse
.
The Octel 200 can have one of three PSUs. One PSU uses a 10 Amp fuse for domestic, one uses a
5 Amp fuse for international, and the third uses a 6.3 Amp, 250V, Slow Blow, 5x20mm fuse for
worldwide use. When replacing a fuse, check to see which fuse is currently used and replace it
with a fuse of the same type. Refer to the Power Supply Unit section in the Hardware chapter .
The Octel 200 PSU has a fuse located on the front panel. If all of the following conditions are met, the
fuse might have blown.
-
The power switch on the PSU is ON.
-
The power cord is plugged in.
-
None of the LEDs on the front edges of the cards are lit.
-
The disk drive and fans are quiet (not running).
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
The Octel 200 can have one of three PSUs. One PSU uses a 10 Amp fuse for domestic, one uses a
5 Amp fuse for international, and the third uses a 6.3 Amp, 250V, Slow Blow, 5x20mm fuse for
worldwide use. When replacing a fuse, check to see which fuse is currently used and replace it
with a fuse of the same type. Refer to the Power Supply Unit section in the Hardware chapter.
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-31
Replacing the Fuse
1.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
2.
Turn OFF the power switch on the front of the PSU.
3.
Remove the fuse-holder cap, using a flat-blade screwdriver.
4.
Remove the fuse and verify that the fuse is blown. To remove the fuse, pull the end of the fuse out of
the fuse cap.
5.
Replace the fuse with a fuse of the same rating. To replace the fuse, push one end of the fuse into the
fuse-holder cap and insert the cap into the fuse holder.
6.
Tighten the fuse-holder cap with a flat-blade screwdriver.
7.
Turn ON the power switch.
8.
Check the LEDs on the cards to see whether they are lit.
9.
Check that the disk drive and fans are running.
10. Close and lock the door of the cabinet.
Octel 300 Power Supply Unit
The Octel 300 PSU and the floppy disk drive are separate units and can be replaced separately.
Figure 9-20 shows the Octel 300 power supply assembly. The appearance of the 120 VAC 240 VAC and
100−240 VAC auto-ranging PSUs are the same.
Circuit Breaker
Captive ChassisMounting Screws
Figure 9-20 Octel 300 Power Supply Assembly
Octel 300 120 VAC and 240 VAC PSU Power Filter Assembly
The power filter assembly is a unit that includes a power entry connection and a power line
EMI-suppression filter. The power line filter varies with input power type; for domestic use the input
power is 120/240 VAC, and for international use it is 240 VAC or −48 VDC.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-32
Installation and Maintenance Volume
The power filter assembly is replaced as a unit. Do not disassemble it in any way. Refer to Figure 9-21
for the AC domestic, Figure 9-22 for the AC international, or Figure 9-23 for the DC power filter
assembly illustrations.
The power filter assembly is sensitive to static
electricity. Do not attempt the following procedures
without wearing an antistatic wrist strap.
Caution!
Removing the Power Filter Assembly
To remove the power filter assembly, use the following procedures:
1.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
2.
Turn OFF the PSU.
3.
If the message server has an AC power source, disconnect the power cord at the power filter
assembly and set it aside.
If the cabinet is DC-powered, remove the cover from the DC filter assembly and disconnect the wires
from the power source at the terminal block mounted on the DC filter assembly.
4.
At the cabinet rear, remove four screws that secure the top panel to the cabinet. Remove the panel.
5.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
6.
Remove the three screws that secure the power filter assembly to the cabinet.
7.
Disconnect the wires from the power filter assembly that lead to the motherboard assembly and set
the filter assembly aside.
.
The AC power filter assembly does not require tools, whereas the DC filter assembly requires
an open-ended wrench to disconnect the wires.
Installing the Power Filter Assembly
To install the power filter assembly, use the following procedure:
1.
Connect the wires from the motherboard assembly to the power filter according to the voltage
requirement for the message server.
.
When fastening the filter harness to the DC filter assembly, route the connecting wires away
from the sharp edge.
2.
Secure the power filter assembly to the cabinet with three screws.
3.
Fasten the top panel with the four screws.
4.
If the cabinet has an AC power source, plug the power cord into the AC power connector on the
power filter box.
If the cabinet is DC-powered, reconnect the wires from the power source to the terminal block, as
shown in Figure 9-24.
Octel 200/300
5.
Turn ON the power supply.
6.
Close and lock the door of the cabinet.
7.
Test the message server for correct operation.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-33
Front View of
Connector
Connector
Backplane-toFilter Harness
Harness-Grounding
Hardware
Connector
Mounting
Screws
Green/Yellow
Blue
Brown
Power Filter
Assembly
Figure 9-21 Octel 300 120 VAC and 240 VAC Domestic Power Filter Assembly
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-34
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Front View of
Connector
Connector
Backplane-toFilter Harness
Harness-Grounding
Hardware
Connector
Mounting
Screws
Green/Yellow
Brown
Blue
Power Filter
Assembly
Figure 9-22 Octel 300 240 VAC International Power Filter Assembly
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-35
Front View of
Connector
Connector
Backplane-toFilter Harness
Harness-Grounding
Hardware
Connector
Mounting
Screws
Black
Purple
DC Filter
Assembly
Green/Yellow
Bottom View
of Filter
Figure 9-23 Octel 300 −48 VDC Power Filter Assembly
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-36
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Conduit with three
10-gauge wires
Terminal Block
DC +
Power
Source −
− +
Rear Panel
Earth Ground
Ground Stud
Figure 9-24 Field Wiring for −48 VDC Powered Octel 300
Replacing a PSU with the Same Type of PSU
Follow this procedure if you have a
-
120 VAC, 230 VAC (Octel 200), or 240 VAC PSU (Octel 300)
and you are replacing it with a
-
120 VAC, 230 VAC (Octel 200), or 240 VAC PSU (Octel 300)
or if you have a
-
100−240 VAC Auto-ranging PSU
and you are replacing it with a
-
100−240 VAC Auto-ranging PSU
The PSU is not hot pluggable. Do not remove the
PSU when it is ON.
Caution!
.
If you are replacing any type of PSU in the Octel 300 you must also replace the Power Filter
Assembly. Refer to Octel 300 120 VAC and 240 VAC PSU Power Filter Assembly in this section.
Removing the PSU
1.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
2.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3.
Turn OFF the power to the message server at the switch on the front of the PSU. The switch for the
PSU is a circuit-breaker rocker switch.
On the Octel 200, the switch is OFF when the bottom of the rocker, marked 0, is pressed in. The
switch is ON when the top of the rocker, marked 1, is pressed in.
On the Octel 300, the switch is OFF when the side of the rocker, marked 0, is pressed in. The switch
is ON when the side of the rocker, marked 1, is pressed in.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-37
To avoid risk of electric shock, wait two minutes
after turning OFF the message server to remove the
PSU.
Caution!
4.
Remove the floppy disk drive signal cable from the CPU.
5.
Using a flat−blade screwdriver, loosen the two captive screws on the front of the PSU.
6.
Gripping the PSU handle, pull the PSU firmly to unseat the rear−mounted connectors. Continue to
pull out the PSU, ready to support the bottom with one hand when it clears the cabinet.
Installing the PSU
1.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
2.
Verify that the power supply switch is OFF. The PSU switch is a rocker switch.
On the Octel 200, the PSU switch is OFF when the bottom of the rocker, marked 0, is pressed in. The
switch is ON when the top of the rocker, marked 1, is pressed in.
On the Octel 300, the switch is OFF when the side of the rocker, marked 0, is pressed in. The switch
is ON when the side of the rocker, marked 1, is pressed in.
Installing the PSU with the circuit breaker ON and
the power cord attached to the primary power could
damage the PSU or the message server.
Caution!
3.
Pick up the PSU with one hand on the handle and the other hand under the unit to support its weight.
Support the PSU by holding the sheet-metal slider. Do not touch any power supply electrical
components or wiring.
4.
Line up the edges of the PSU sheet metal with the card guides and slide the PSU halfway into the
cabinet. Remove your supporting hand from the bottom of the sheet-metal plate.
The Octel 200 PSU slot is marked A10
The Octel 300 PSU slot is marked A15
5.
Once again, confirm that the switch is OFF.
6.
Gently, but firmly, continue to slide the PSU into the cabinet by pushing on the handle until the
connectors on the back of the unit have mated with the connectors on the motherboard. This is
accomplished when the flange on the front sheet metal of the PSU reaches or very nearly reaches the
sheet metal of the cabinet.
Do not slam the PSU into the cabinet. This could
damage the PSU.
Caution!
7.
PB60019−01
Using a flat-blade screwdriver, tighten the two captive screws that are attached to the front flange of
the PSU.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-38
Installation and Maintenance Volume
8.
Reattach the floppy disk drive signal cable.
9.
When all other message server maintenance has been accomplished, turn ON the message server at
the PSU switch. Measure the voltages on the front of the CPU, as described in the Installation
chapter, Octel 200/300 Hardware Installation section.
10. Close and lock the door of the cabinet.
Replacing a PSU with a Different Type of PSU
Follow this procedure if you have a
-
120 VAC, 230 VAC (Octel 200), or 240 VAC PSU (Octel 300)
and you are replacing it with a
-
100−240 VAC auto-ranging PSU
The PSU is not hot pluggable. Do not remove the
PSU when it is ON.
Caution!
100−240 VAC Auto-ranging PSU Replacement Kits
The lists below show the components included in the 100−240 VAC auto-ranging PSU Replacement Kits.
There are two separate Replacement Kits, one for the Octel 200 and one for the Octel 300.
Octel 200 120/230 VAC PSU Replacement Kit Part Number FK90246
Item Number
740−6640−000
072−1400−000
445−6277−001
FI90146−01
Description
Assembly, Floppy/Power Supply, 100−240 VAC
Fuse, 50X20MM, 6.3A, 250 VAC, Slowblow
Label, 100−240 VAC Input, UL
Procedure to Install 100−240 VAC PSU
Quantity
1
1
1
1
Octel 300 120/240 VAC PSU Replacement Kit Part Number FK90247
Item Number
740−6641−000
740−6038−001
445−6276−001
FI90146−01
Description
Assembly, Power Supply, 100−240 VAC
Assy, Power Filter, 100−240 VAC Worldwide, Harbor Blow
Label, Warning, High Leakage Current
Procedure to Install 100−240 VAC PSU
Quantity
1
1
1
1
The PSU is sensitive to static electricity. Do not
attempt the following procedures without wearing an
antistatic wrist strap.
Caution!
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
If you are replacing any type of PSU in the Octel 300 you must also replace the Power Filter
Assembly. Refer to Octel 300 120−240 VAC Auto-ranging PSU Power Filter Assembly in this
section.
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-39
Tools Required
Make sure the following tools (or their equivalent) are on hand before continuing:
-
-
Large flat-blade screw driver (for loosening and tightening the captive fasteners on the front of the
power supply assembly.
Regular blunt-tip Phillips-head screw driver (required only for the Octel 300 procedure; used to
remove and replace screws that hold the Top Rear Panel Assembly and Power Filter Assembly).
.
The procedures for the Octel 200 and Octel 300 are different. Be sure to use the correct
procedure.
Octel 200 PSU Replacement Procedures
Use this procedure to replace an existing Octel 200 PSU:
-
120 VAC PSU/Floppy Assembly (740−6504−001) or
-
230 VAC PSU/Floppy Assembly (740−6505−001)
with:
-
Octel 200 100−240 VAC Auto-ranging PSU/Floppy Assembly (740−6640−000).
1. Take antistatic precautions (wear an antistatic wrist strap and connect the strap cable to an unpainted
ground point in the cabinet chassis).
2. Power down the Octel 200 (make sure the power switch is positioned so that the bottom of the
rocker, marked with a 0, is pressed in).
3. Disconnect the floppy drive ribbon cable from the CPU Card.
4. Unscrew and remove the original 120 VAC or 230 VAC PSU/Floppy Assembly and store
appropriately. The PSU/Floppy Assembly is heavy. While removing the unit with one hand, use the
other hand to provide support from underneath.
5. Pick up the new 100−240 VAC PSU/Floppy Assembly with one hand on the handle and the other
hand under the unit to support its weight. Support the PSU by holding the sheet metal slider. Do not
touch any power supply electrical components or wiring.
6. Line up the edges of the PSU sheet metal with the card guides marked A10, and slide the PSU
halfway into the cabinet. Remove your supporting hand from the bottom of the sheet metal plate.
7. Confirm that the power switch on the front of the new PSU is in the OFF (0) position.
8. Gently, but firmly, continue to slide the PSU into the cabinet by pushing on the handle until the
connectors on the back of the PSU have mated with the connectors on the motherboard. This is
accomplished when the flange on the front sheet metal of the PSU reaches or very nearly reaches the
sheet metal of the cabinet.
Do NOT slam the PSU into the cabinet. Doing so
could damage the PSU.
Caution!
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-40
Installation and Maintenance Volume
9. Use a flat-blade screwdriver to tighten the two captive screws that are attached to the front flange of
the PSU.
10. Attach the floppy ribbon cable, which comes from the PSU, to the corresponding connector on the
CPU card.
11. Attach the “100−240 VAC 50/60Hz” label (Part Number 445−6277−001) to the back of the
Octel 200. The new label should be affixed over the existing label, near the power cord.
12. Locate the fuse holder clip for the spare fuse, located inside the cabinet on the right side panel
(towards the front of the cabinet) about five inches from the bottom of the cabinet. Remove and
replace the existing fuse with the 6.3 Amp, 240 VAC, Slow Blow, 5 x 20mm fuse provided in the
Octel 200 PSU Replacement Kit.
.
If the replacement fuse is lost or misplaced, information on the correct type of fuse is on the
label attached to the front of the 100−240 VAC Octel 200 PSU.
13. Turn on the Octel 200, allow the system to boot up, and check for proper operation. If you encounter
problems consult the system technical documentation or contact Technical Support for assistance.
Octel 300 PSU Replacement Procedures
Use this procedure to replace an existing Octel 300 PSU:
-
120 VAC PSU (740−6016−001) or
-
240 VAC PSU (740−6017−001)
with:
-
Octel 300 100−240 VAC Auto-ranging PSUs (740−6641−000)
This procedure also covers replacement of any of the following Filter Assemblies:
-
120 VAC Filter Assembly (740−6006−001/−002)
-
240 VAC Domestic Filter Assembly (740−6028−001/−002
-
240 VAC Euro Filter Assembly (740−6030−001/−002)
with:
-
Octel 300 100−240 VAC Worldwide Filter Assembly (740−6038−001)
1. Take anti-static precautions (wear an anti-static wrist−strap and connect the strap cable to an
unpainted ground point in the cabinet chassis).
2. Power down the Octel 300 (make sure the power switch is positioned so that the bottom of the
rocker, marked 0, is pressed in).
3. At the back of the Octel 300, unplug the AC power cord from the power source. Unplug the other
end of the AC power cord from the Power Filter Assembly located on the back of the Octel 300.
Refer to Figure 9-25.
4. At the rear of the Octel 300, remove the top panel by unscrewing the four screws used to secure the
panel to the cabinet. For reinstallation later, observe the length of the screws. The two screws used to
secure the top of the panel are shorter than the two screws used for the bottom.
5. Remove and set aside the three screws holding the Power Filter Assembly to the chassis. Refer to
Figure 9-25 for the location of the screws.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-41
6. Lift the Power Filter Assembly away from the chassis and unplug the three Backplane-to-Filter
harness connectors from the terminal lugs on the filter mounted on the Power Filter Assembly. Refer
to Figure 9-25. The Power Filter Assembly should now be free from the system chassis and may be
set aside.
7. Take the 100−240 VAC Power Filter Assembly and connect the Backplane-to-Filter wiring
connectors onto the terminal lugs of the filter in the new Power Filter Assembly.
Caution!
Each colored wire (Green/Yellow, Brown, and Blue)
must be connected to the appropriate terminal lug.
Refer to Figure 9-25 for proper wire connector
placement.
8. Position the new 100−240 VAC Power Filter Assembly against the system chassis and reinstall it
using the three screws removed earlier. The screw holes may be slightly difficult to line up, so it is
best to partially install the three screws first. Once all screws are started and the Filter Assembly is
aligned with the screw holes, tighten the three screws for a snug fit, but take care not to over-tighten.
9. At the rear of the Octel 300, reinstall the top panel by fastening it with the four screws set aside
during Step 5.
10. Unscrew and remove the original 120 VAC or 240 VAC PSU (as applicable) and store appropriately.
The PSU is heavy. While removing it with one hand, use the other hand to provide support from
underneath.
11. Pick up the new 100−240 VAC PSU with one hand on the handle and the other hand under the unit to
support its weight. Support the PSU by holding the sheetmetal slider. Do not touch any power
supply electrical components or wiring.
12. Line up the edges of the PSU sheet metal with the card guides marked A15, and slide the PSU
halfway into the cabinet. Remove your supporting hand from the bottom of the sheetmetal plate.
13. Confirm that the power switch on the front of the new unit is in the OFF (0) position.
14. Gently but firmly continue to slide the PSU into the cabinet by pushing on the handle until the
connectors on the back of the unit have mated with the connectors on the motherboard. This is
accomplished when the flange on the front sheetmetal of the PSU reaches or very nearly reaches the
sheetmetal of the cabinet.
Do NOT slam the PSU into the cabinet. Doing so
could damage the PSU.
Caution!
15. Using a flat-blade screwdriver, tighten the two captive screws that are attached to the front flange of
the PSU.
16. At the rear of the cabinet, plug the AC power cord into the Power Filter Assembly.
17. Plug the other end of the AC power cord into the power source.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-42
Installation and Maintenance Volume
18. Turn on the Octel 300, allow it to boot up, and then check for proper operation. If problems are
encountered consult the technical documentation or contact Technical Support for assistance.
19. Attach the “High Leakage Current Warning” Label (Part Number 445−6276−001) to the back of the
Octel 300. Place the label immediately above the PSU voltage label on the Power Filter Assembly.
The “High Leakage Current” warning is an alert that the Octel 300 must be properly grounded to
minimize safety concerns. Refer to the Installation chapter for important safety instructions regarding
message server grounding.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-43
Front View of
Connector
Connector
Backplane-toFilter Harness
Harness-Grounding
Hardware
Connector
Mounting
Screws
Green/Yellow
Brown
Blue
Power Filter
Assembly
Figure 9-25 Octel 300 100−240 VAC Worldwide Power Filter Assembly
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-44
Installation and Maintenance Volume
AC-to-DC Power Supply Conversion
Before proceeding, read the instructions in the Installing the Octel 200/300 with a −48 VDC Power
Supply Unit section, in the Installation chapter of this volume. Make sure that the material is available to
connect the cabinet to the −48 VDC power source.
The Octel 200/300 can be powered by either an AC or DC power source.
The Octel 200 contains either an AC or DC version of the PSU to work with the power source selected.
The DC version requires an additional DC inlet box. To convert the Octel 200 from an AC-powered to a
DC-powered message server, use the Octel 200 instructions.
The Octel 300 contains either an AC or DC version of the PSU and power filter assembly to work with
the power source selected. To convert the Octel 300 from an AC-powered to a DC-powered message
server, use the Octel 300 instructions.
Caution!
Damage to the message server might occur if
replacement procedures are not performed in the
order given.
Removing the Octel 200 AC Subassemblies
This conversion requires the Octel 200 AC-to-DC power supply conversion kit, part number
740-6543-001, which contains the following:
-
DC PSU
-
DC inlet box
-
DC backplane harness
To remove the AC subassemblies, use the following procedures:
Octel 200/300
1.
Remove the AC PSU, following the instructions in the Removing the Power Supply section in this
chapter.
2.
Remove the VCU and CPU cards from slots A8 and A9, respectively.
3.
Discard the spare fuse attached to the side of the cabinet, located under the PSU.
4.
Disconnect the power cord at both ends, and set it aside.
5.
Remove the fan-panel assembly as described in the Removing the Fan Panel from the Octel 200
section.
6.
Remove the AC backplane harness by removing the two screws that hold the connector in the
backplane, as shown in Figure 9-26. These screws can be accessed through the front of the cabinet.
Remove the hardware that secures the ground wires and the connector from the I/O panel. Pull the
harness out of the message server.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-45
Connector to Backplane
Mounting Screws
Front View
of Connector
Connector
Backplane Power Harness
Harness-Grounding
Hardware
Figure 9-26 A.C. Backplane Power Harness Installation for Octel 200
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-46
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Installing DC Subassemblies in the Octel 200
To install the DC subassemblies, use the following procedure:
Octel 200/300
1.
Remove the cover on the DC inlet box, as shown in Figure 9-27.
2.
Remove the two black screws that hold the I/O panel to the cabinet, and attach the DC inlet box to
the cabinet using two new screws.
3.
Install the DC backplane harness, as shown in Figure 9-27.
4.
Secure the fan panel to the cabinet, as described in the Installing the Fan Panel in the Octel 200
section.
5.
Reinstall the VCU and CPU cards in slots A8 and A9, respectively.
6.
Install the DC PSU following the instructions in the Installing the Power Supply Unit section.
7.
Secure the new spare fuse to the side of the cabinet.
8.
Locate the message server label on the base of the cabinet, at the rear. Mark the box on the label
indicating DC power. Remove the mark from the box indicating AC power.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-47
Connector to Backplane
Mounting Screws
Front View
of Connector
Connector
Backplane Power Harness
Harness-Grounding
Hardware
Purple
Black
DC Inlet Box
Green/Yellow
Figure 9-27 D.C. Backplane Power Harness Installation for Octel 200
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-48
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Removing the Octel 300 AC Subassemblies
This conversion requires the Octel 300 AC-to-DC power supply conversion kit, part number
740-6100-001, which contains the following:
-
DC PSU
-
DC filter assembly
-
DC backplane harness
To remove the AC subassemblies, use the following procedure:
1.
Remove the AC PSU, following the instructions in the Removing the Power Supply section.
2.
Remove the VCU and CPU cards from slots A13 and A14, respectively.
3.
Remove the AC Power Filter Assembly, following the instructions in the Removing Power Filter
Assembly from the Octel 300 section.
4.
Remove the AC filter-to-backplane harness by removing the two screws that hold the connector in
the backplane, as shown in Figure 9-21 for the 120 and 240 VAC or Figure 9-25 for the
100−240 VAC. These screws can be accessed through the front of the chassis. Remove the nuts and
washers that secure the ground wires. Pull the harness out of the message server.
Installing the Octel 300 DC Subassemblies
To install the DC subassemblies, use the following procedure:
1.
Install the DC filter-to-backplane harness, as shown in Figure 9-23.
2.
Connect the wires from the backplane harness to the DC filter assembly, as shown in Figure 9-23.
3.
Fasten the DC filter assembly to the cabinet, with three screws.
4.
Fasten the top panel to the cabinet, with four screws.
5.
Reinstall the VCU and CPU cards in slots A13 and A14, respectively.
6.
Install the DC PSU, following the instructions in the Installing the Power Supply section.
7.
Locate the message server label on the base of the cabinet at the rear. Mark the box on the label
indicating DC power. Remove the mark from the box indicating AC power.
Field Wiring to DC Power Source
Connect the Octel 200/300 to a DC power source as described in the Installation chapter, Installing the
Octel 200/300 With a −48 VDC Power Supply Unit section.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-49
Octel 200 Fan Panel Assembly
The Octel 200 fan panel is hot pluggable. That means the message server does not need to be turned OFF
to remove and install the fan panel. However, if the message server must be moved to gain access to the
fan panel, it must be turned OFF to prevent possible damage.
Removing the Octel 200 Fan Panel
Use the following procedures to remove the fan panel. Have the replacement unit ready.
1.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
2.
Use a Phillips head screwdriver to remove the four screws securing the fan pane. Remove the panel
from the back of the message server.
3.
Disconnect the fan power harness from the top of the motherboard. Set the fan panel aside.
When the fan panel is removed, do not operate the
message server for more than four minutes.
Caution!
A cabinet over-temperature condition may result
if this rule is not followed.
Installing the Octel 200 Fan Panel
To install the fan panel, use the following procedures:
1.
Connect the fan power harness for the new fan panel to the power connector on the top of the
motherboard.
2.
Rest the fan panel on the two locating standoffs.
3.
Secure the fan panel with the four screws previously removed. Insert the two short screws at the top
edge, and the two long screws at the bottom edge of the fan panel.
4.
Turn ON the message server and make sure that both fans are spinning.
Octel 300 Fan Tray Replacement
The Octel 300 fan tray is hot pluggable. This means you do not have to turn OFF the message server to
remove and install the fan panel. However, if the message server must be moved to access the fan panel,
it must be turned OFF to prevent possible damage.
.
The Octel 300 should not be operated with the door open or the air filter removed for more than
one hour.
Caution!
PB60019−01
When the fan tray is removed, do not operate the
message server more than four minutes. If the fan
tray cannot be replaced within four minutes, turn
OFF the message server.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-50
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Removing the Octel 300 Fan Tray
Use these procedures to remove the fan panel. Have the replacement unit ready before proceeding.
1.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
2.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3.
Use a flat-blade screwdriver to loosen the two captive screws on the front flange of the fan tray.
4.
Move the floppy drive signal cable to the right so it does not interfere with removing the fan tray.
.
5.
Do not disconnect the floppy drive cable. There is enough relief in the cable to allow you to
remove the fan tray without disconnecting the cable.
Grip the front edge of the fan tray and pull it straight out of the cabinet.
When the fan tray is removed, do not operate the
message server for more than four minutes.
Caution!
Installing the Octel 300 Fan Tray
To install the fan tray, use the following procedures:
1.
Place the fan tray edges into the two U-channels on either side of the cabinet under the card cage.
The floppy disk signal cable should be to the right of the fan tray.
2.
Slide the fan tray into the message server so that the connector on the back of the assembly mates
fully with the connector in the cabinet. This is accomplished when the front flange of the fan tray
reaches or very nearly reaches the two small angle brackets on either side of the cabinet.
3.
Use a flat-blade screwdriver to tighten the two captive screws attached to front flange of the fan tray.
4.
If the message server is OFF, turn it ON. Verify that all four fans are spinning.
OCTEL 200/300 Air Filter Cleaning
Air filters can be cleaned and reused indefinitely. The following sections explain how to remove, clean,
and reinstall an air filter.
.
The Octel 200/300 should not be operated with the door open or the air filter removed for more
than one hour.
Removing the Air Filter
To remove the air filter, use the following procedures:
Octel 200/300
1.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
2.
Free the corners on the back of the door. Then free the top and bottom edges of the air filter from the
Velcro hold-downs.
3.
Slide the air filter out of the door.
4.
Once the air filter is removed, rinse it in cold water until the water runs clear.
5.
Shake out the excess water. The air filter should be dry before you reinstall it.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-51
Installing the Air Filter
To reinstall the air filter, use the following procedures:
1.
Slide the air filter into the door in the way that you removed it. Make sure that the wavy side of the
filter material is against the door.
2.
Once the air filter is in position, push the corners and the top and bottom edges of the air filter
against the Velcro hold-downs.
3.
Close and lock the cabinet door.
Motherboard Assembly Replacement
The motherboard provides the communications bus for the VCU, CPU, and LIC printed circuit
assemblies as well as the DC power distribution for the disk drives. Figure 9-28 shows the motherboard
assembly.
Figure 9-28 Motherboard Assembly
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-52
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Caution!
Replacing the motherboard assembly is a
complicated procedure. Replace it only after you
have confirmed that the motherboard is faulty. Do
not disassemble the motherboard.
The motherboard can only be replaced as an assembly. To replace the motherboard assembly, you must
have access to both the front and rear of cabinet.
.
The Octel 200 and the Octel 300 motherboard removal and reinstallation procedures are
different for each model type Be sure to use the correct procedures.
Wear an an antistatic wrist strap before attempting
the following procedures.
Caution!
Handle the motherboard assembly carefully; do not
drop it or bang it into other objects. Never set
anything on top of it.
Octel 200 Motherboard Assembly
The following procedures are for removing and installation an Octel 200 Motherboard Assembly. Refer to
the following illustrations while using these procedures
Figure 9-26 for the AC Backplane Power Harness
Figure 9-27 for the DC Backplane Power Harness
Removing the Octel 200 Motherboard Assembly
To remove the motherboard assembly, use the following procedures:
1.
Unlock and open the cabinet door.
2.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3.
Turn OFF the PSU. Refer to the Power Supply Unit Replacement section in this chapter for details
about turning OFF the power.
4.
Disconnect the floppy disk signal cable.
5.
Disengage the cards in slots A1 through A9 from the motherboard. (The cards stay in the cabinet.)
6.
Use a flat-blade screwdriver to loosen the two captive screws on the front of the PSU and floppy disk
drive assembly. Disengage it from the backplane. (The PSU and the disk drive assemblies stay in the
cabinet.)
7.
Move to the back of the Octel 200 cabinet. Label all cables attached to the motherboard assembly so
that they can be reattached in the same positions on the new motherboard assembly.
8.
Disconnect the cables from the motherboard assembly.
9.
Unplug the AC power cord from the cabinet.
If the cabinet is DC powered, disconnect the wiring from the DC power source at the DC inlet box.
Remove the DC inlet box from the back of the server as shown in Figure 9-27.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-53
10. Remove the fan panel following the instructions in the Octel 200 Fan Panel Assembly section in this
chapter.
11. Disconnect the maintenance port cable from the upper left hand corner of the motherboard.
12. Use a Phillips screwdriver to remove the four screws that secure the bottom rear panel to the cabinet and
slowly remove the panel.
.
Cables that were disconnected from the motherboard in Step 8 are fastened to the bottom panel
with cable ties. These cables can remain fastened.
13. Remove the six screws that secure the motherboard to the cabinet from the sides of the motherboard
I/O panel.
14. Remove the motherboard.
15. Refer to Figure 9-26 for AC or Figure 9-27 for DC and remove the hardware that secures the
backplane power harness to the motherboard. Use an 11/32 nut driver to remove the grounding
hardware. Remove the backplane power harness from the motherboard so that it can be reinstalled on
the new motherboard.
.
The hardware used to secure the backplane power harness to the motherboard is reused when
securing the harness to the new motherboard.
Installing the Octel 200 Motherboard Assembly
To install the motherboard, use the following procedure:
The motherboard must be aligned precisely to ensure
correct card engagement. To accomplish this, make
sure to follow the instructions exactly.
Caution!
PB60019−01
1.
Install the backplane power harness from the old motherboard on the new motherboard. Refer to
Figure 9-26 for AC or Figure 9-27 for DC, for correct installation.
2.
Remove the Option Control Chip (OCC) from the old motherboard and install it in the new
motherboard assembly. Refer to the Option Control Chip Replacement section in this chapter for
removal and installation procedures.
3.
Hold the new motherboard up to the cabinet and loosely install a screw in the top, center screwhole
to hold it in place.
4.
Partially screw in the remaining 17 screws along the top and bottom of the motherboard. Do not
tighten the screws yet.
5.
Install the six screws on the sides of the motherboard I/O panel, but do not tighten them at this time.
6.
Push only PCAs in slots A1 and A9, the power supply assembly, and one disk drive assembly into the
connectors on the motherboard. Do not tighten the power supply assembly.
7.
Tighten the screws at the top and bottom of the motherboard and the six screws on the I/O panel.
8.
Connect the maintenance port cable to the connector on the top left corner of the motherboard.
9.
Fasten the bottom rear panel with four screws (two short ones at the top, two long ones at the
bottom).
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-54
Installation and Maintenance Volume
10. Reconnect the cables as they were connected on the old motherboard.
11. Replace the fan panel, following the instructions in the Octel 200 Fan Panel Assembly section in this
chapter.
If the cabinet is DC powered, install the DC inlet box.
12. Verify that the PSU is OFF. Attach the power cord.
If the cabinet is DC powered, reconnect the wires from the DC power source to the DC inlet box.
Refer to Figure 9-27.
13. Plug the remaining boards into the motherboard.
14. Tighten the two fasteners on the front of the PSU and disk drive assembly.
15. Reconnect the floppy signal cable to the appropriate connector on the front edge of the CPU.
16. Test the message server for correct operation by following the procedures in the Installation chapter
in this volume.
17. Close and lock the door to the cabinet.
Octel 300 Motherboard Assembly
The following procedures are for removing and installing an Octel 300 Motherboard Assembly. Refer to
the following illustrations while using these procedures.
Figure 9-21 for the 120/240 VAC Domestic Power Filter Assembly
Figure 9-22 for the 240 VAC International Power Filter Assembly
Figure 9-23 for −48 VDC Power Filter Assembly
Figure 9-25 for the 100/240 Worldwide Power Filter Assembly
Removing the Octel 300 Motherboard Assembly
1.
Unlock and open the cabinet door.
2.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3.
Turn OFF the PSU. Refer to the Power Supply Unit Replacement section in this chapter for details
about turning OFF the power to the message server.
4.
Use a flat−blade screwdriver to loosen the two captive screws on the front of the Fan Tray assembly.
Disengage from the backplane. (The Fan Tray assembly stays in the cabinet.)
5.
Disconnect the floppy disk signal cable.
6.
Disengage the cards in slots A1 through A14 from the motherboard. (The cards stay in the cabinet.)
7.
Use a flat−blade screwdriver to loosen the two captive screws on the front of the PSU. Disengage the
PSU from the backplane. (The PSU stays in the cabinet.)
8.
Move to the back of the Octel 300 cabinet. Label all cables attached to the motherboard assembly so
they can be reattached in the same positions on the new motherboard assembly.
9.
Disconnect the cables from the motherboard assembly.
10. Unplug the power cord from the cabinet. If the cabinet is DC powered, disconnect the wires from
the DC power source to the power filter assembly.
11. Remove the four screws that secure the top rear panel to the cabinet then remove the panel.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-55
12. Disconnect the maintenance port cable from the upper left−hand corner of the motherboard assembly.
13. Remove the power filter assembly as described in the Octel 300 Power Filter Assembly Replacement
section of this chapter.
14. Use a Phillips screwdriver to remove the four screws that secure the bottom rear panel to the cabinet
then slowly remove the panel.
.
Cables that were disconnected from the motherboard in Step 9 are fastened to the bottom panel
with cable ties. These cables can remain fastened.
15. Disconnect the power harness for the disk drive backplanes (SCSI motherboard) at the motherboard.
Leave the harness ends connected to the disk drive backplanes.
16. Disconnect the two short flat cables from the motherboard. Leave the cables attached to the top disk
drive backplane.
17. Disconnect the fan tray power harness from the top disk drive backplane.
18. Remove the screws that secure the motherboard assembly to the cabinet from the sides of the
motherboard I/O panel.
19. Remove the screws that secure the motherboard to the cabinet.
20. Remove the motherboard.
21. Remove the power filter harness from the motherboard so that it can be installed on the new
motherboard.
.
The hardware used to secure the power filter harness to the motherboard (two screws, two
nuts, and a lock washer) is reused when securing the harness to the new motherboard.
Installing the Octel 300 Motherboard Assembly
To install the motherboard assembly, use the following procedure:
The motherboard must be aligned precisely to ensure
correct card engagement. To accomplish this, make
sure to follow the instructions exactly.
Caution!
PB60019−01
1.
Install the filter power harness from the old motherboard on the new motherboard. Refer to
Figure 9-21 for correct installation.
2.
Remove the Option Control Chip (OCC) from the old motherboard and install it in the new
motherboard. Refer to the Option Control Chip Replacement section in this chapter for removal and
installation procedures.
3.
Hold the new motherboard up to the cabinet, and install a screw in the top, center screwhole to hold
it in place. Pass the power harness to the fan tray through the small, rectangular cutout in the bottom
of the motherboard.
4.
Screw in the remaining 17 screws along the top and bottom of the motherboard, so that it is just able
to move with a minimal amount of distance between the screwheads and the motherboard. Do not
tighten screws yet.
5.
Install the five screws on the sides of the motherboard I/O panel, but do not tighten them at this time.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-56
Installation and Maintenance Volume
6.
Push only PCAs in slots A1 and A14 and the power supply assembly into the connectors on the
motherboard.
7.
Tighten the screws at the top and bottom of the motherboard and the five screws on the motherboard
I/O panel.
8.
Plug the fan tray harness into the top disk drive backplane.
9.
Connect the two flat cables from the top disk drive backplane to the motherboard.
10. Connect the disk drive backplane power harness to the motherboard.
11. Connect the maintenance port cable to the connector at the top left corner of the motherboard.
12. Install the Power Filter Assembly as described in the Octel 300 Power Filter Assembly Replacement
section in this chapter.
13. Fasten the bottom rear panel with four screws, and reconnect the cables as they were connected on
the old motherboard.
14. Fasten the top rear panel with four screws.
15. Verify that the PSU is OFF. Attach the power cord.
If the cabinet is DC powered, reconnect the wires from the DC power source to the Power Filter
Assembly. Refer to Figure 9-23.
16. Plug the remaining boards into the motherboard.
17. Tighten the two captive screws on the front of the PSU.
18. Test the message server for correct operation by following the procedures in the Installation chapter
in this volume.
19. Close and lock the door to the cabinet.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-57
Octel 300 Disk Drive Backplane Replacement
The disk drive backplanes provide communication and DC power buses from the motherboard to the disk
drive assembly. There are two disk drive backplanes, one for shelf B and one for shelf C.
Disk Drive
Backplane,
Shelf B
Disk Drive
Backplane,
Shelf C
Figure 9-29 Octel 300 Disk Drive Backplanes
Disk drive backplane are sensitive to static
electricity. Do not attempt the following procedures
without wearing an antistatic wrist strap.
Caution!
.
PB60019−01
The disk drive backplane is sensitive to rough
handling. Care should be taken to handle it as gently
as possible.
The following replacement procedures provide steps for removing and installing disk drive
backplanes. Before proceeding, make sure to determine which backplane is faulty.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-58
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Removing the Octel 300 Disk Drive Backplane
Use the following procedure to remove a new disk drive backplane:
1.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
2.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3.
Turn OFF the PSU. Refer to the Power Supply Unit Replacement section in this chapter for details
about turning OFF the power to the message server.
4.
Use a flat-blade screwdriver to loosen the two captive screws on the front of each of the disk drive
assemblies on the shelf that has the faulty backplane. Disengage each disk drive assembly from the
backplane; the disk drive assembly should stay in the cabinet.
5.
At the rear of the Octel 300 cabinet, disconnect all cables attached to the motherboard. Mark the
cables so that they can be reattached at the same positions.
6.
Disconnect the power cord from the cabinet.
7.
Remove the four screws that secure the bottom panel to the cabinet and slowly remove the panel.
Cables that were disconnected from the motherboard in step 5 might be fastened to the bottom panel
with cable ties. These cables can remain fastened.
8.
Disconnect all harnesses and cables from the backplane being replaced. Make sure that the ends of
the harnesses and cables not directly attached to the backplane being replaced remain connected.
9.
If the shelf B disk drive backplane is being removed, and the message server is equipped with a load
resistor assembly, remove the four screws and washers that secure the load resistor assembly to the
message server. Refer to Figure 9-30 to verify whether a load resistor assembly is present.
10. Remove the screws along the top and bottom edges of the backplane and remove it.
Installing the Octel 300 Disk Drive Backplane
Use the following procedure to install a new disk drive backplane:
Caution!
Octel 200/300
The backplane must be aligned precisely to ensure
that the disk drive assembly is fully engaged with the
backplane. To accomplish this, follow the
instructions exactly.
1.
Hold the new backplane up to the cabinet and install a screw in the top, center screw hole to hold it
in place.
2.
If the shelf B backplane is being installed in a message server with a load resistor assembly, secure
the load resistor assembly to the cabinet with four screws and washers, as shown in Figure 9-30. Do
not tighten the screws.
3.
Install all of the screws along the top and bottom edges of the backplane so that the backplane is
barely able to move, with only a small gap between the screwheads and the backplane.
4.
At the front of the cabinet, push each disk drive assembly into its mating connector on the backplane.
5.
Tighten all the screws on the top and bottom edges of the backplane.
6.
Reconnect all harnesses and cables to the backplane.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
7.
Fasten the bottom rear panel with four screws, and reconnect the cables as they were.
8.
Verify that the PSU is OFF. Attach the power cord.
9.
Tighten the fasteners on the front of each disk drive assembly.
9-59
10. Set the PSU switch to ON.
11. Test the message server for correct operation by following the procedures in the Installation chapter
in this volume. Verify that the fans are spinning.
Octel 300 Load Resistor Assembly Replacement
If the load resistor assembly malfunctions, it must be replaced with a new one. Do not attempt to replace
or alter the load resistor components or wire harness.
Fan
Assembly
Connector
Shelf B
Backplane
Load
Resistor
Assembly
Figure 9-30 Cutaway View of the Load Resistor Assembly
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-60
Installation and Maintenance Volume
The Octel 300 is sensitive to static electricity. Do not
attempt the following procedures without wearing an
antistatic wrist strap.
Caution!
Removing the Octel 300 Load Resistor Assembly
Use the following procedures to remove the load resistor assembly:
1.
Unlock and open the door of the cabinet.
2.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
3.
Turn OFF the PSU. Refer to the Power Supply Unit Replacement section in this chapter for details
about turning OFF the power to the message server.
4.
Use a flat-blade screwdriver to loosen the two captive screws on the front of the fan assembly.
5.
Pull the fan assembly forward about 25mm (1 inch). The fan assembly does not need to be removed
from the cabinet.
6.
At the rear of the cabinet, remove the four screws that hold the bottom panel to the back of the
cabinet, and set the panel aside.
7.
Locate the load resistor assembly on the shelf B backplane (refer to Figure 9-30). Note that the
harness attached to the load resistor assembly is also attached to the shelf B disk drive backplane and
to the fan assembly.
8.
Remove the three screws that secure the fan-assembly connector to the cabinet.
9.
Disconnect the harness where it plugs into the shelf B backplane.
10. Remove four screws and washers that secure the load resistor assembly sheet metal to the cabinet,
and set the load resistor assembly aside.
Installing the Octel 300 Load Resistor Assembly
Use the following procedures to install a load resistor assembly:
Octel 200/300
1.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
2.
Verify that the power supply switch is OFF.
3.
Secure the load resistor assembly sheet metal to the chassis with the four screws and washers, as
shown in Figure 9-30.
4.
Connect the load resistor assembly/fan-assembly harness to the shelf B backplane.
5.
Secure the fan assembly connector to the cabinet with three screws.
6.
Attach the bottom rear panel to the cabinet with four screws.
7.
Slide the fan assembly back into the cabinet, and secure it with the captive screws on the front of the
assembly.
8.
Turn ON the message server and check for correct message server operation. Make sure that the fans
are spinning.
9.
Close and lock the door of the cabinet.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Hardware Replacement
9-61
Option Control Chip Replacement
The Option Control Chip (OCC) is the component that controls the features that are installed on the
Octel 200/300. The OCC assembly is an 8-pin integrated circuit inserted into a socket that is soldered
onto the motherboard, as shown in Figure 9-31 and Figure 9-32.
Option Control Chip Motherboard
Assembly (including
socket)
Socket fixed to Motherboard
Figure 9-31 Option Control Chip (OCC) Assembly
Motherboard
Option Control Chip (OCC)
Figure 9-32 Location of Option Control Chip (OCC) in the Octel 200/300
Caution!
PB60019−01
The OCC assembly is sensitive to static electricity
and should be handled as little as possible. Do not
attempt the following procedures without wearing an
antistatic wrist strap.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
9-62
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Removing the OCC
The OCC assembly should always be moved as a unit that includes the OCC integrated circuit and the
socket in which it is mounted. The two parts of the assembly should never be separated.
1.
Perform the procedure in the Removing the Power Supply section.
2.
After the power supply is removed, remove the CPU and the VCU cards. Follow the instructions in
the Printed Circuit Assembly Replacement section.
3.
Locate the OCC assembly next to the top power supply connector on the motherboard. Using an IC
puller, carefully pry the entire OCC assembly from the motherboard. If a pin is broken or bent
during removal, a new OCC must be ordered.
4.
Place the OCC assembly on an antistatic foam pad.
Installing the OCC
To install the OCC assembly, use the following procedures:
Octel 200/300
1.
Install the new OCC assembly next to the top power supply connector on the motherboard. Pin 1 on
the OCC assembly must be up.
2.
Replace the CPU and the VCU cards, as described in the Printed Circuit Assembly Replacement
section of this chapter.
3.
Replace the PSU, as described in the Power Supply Unit Replacement section of this chapter.
4.
Turn ON the message server, and test for correct operation.
5.
Close and lock the door of the cabinet.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
10
DIGITAL TRUNK INTERFACE CARD
(DTIC)
Chapter Contents
10.1
10.2
10.3
Digital Trunk Interface Card (DTIC) Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1
DTIC Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1
How to Configure the DTIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3
System Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3
Class of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4
SLOTS Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4
Troubleshooting and Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-9
Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-9
DTIC Not Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-10
Call into System, Phone Rings but Is Never Answered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-18
System Answers but Voice Quality Is Poor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-18
System Answers but Pops or Buzzes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-18
Modem Connection Has Garbage Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-18
Ports on the DTIC Configured for Ringing but Do Not Answer Calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-19
DTIC Still Does Not Operate Correctly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-19
Figure
10-1
PB60019−01
DTIC Component Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
DTIC
10-1
10.1 DIGITAL TRUNK INTERFACE CARD (DTIC) OVERVIEW
This chapter contains information specific to the digital trunk interface card (DTIC). Included are details
about hardware, installation, configuration, and maintenance and troubleshooting. The DTIC is not
documented elsewhere in this manual.
The DTIC is a 30-port line card designed to interface an Octel 200/300 to E1 trunks.
E1 trunks are the European “building block” standard for Wide Area Network (WAN) communication.
E1 is specified by CCITT and also standardized by ETSI. An E1 trunk can carry 30 simultaneous phone
calls plus signaling information. A port carries voice and data for calls. Each port can be viewed as a
“virtual” telephone connection where each end is either on hook or off hook.
For the DTIC to operate correctly, the following must be configured in the Octel 200/300:
-
SYSTEM PARAMETER Table
-
A COS must be configured for each of the 30 DTIC ports
-
SLOTS Table
DTIC Hardware
The DTIC consists of two major processing components:
-
The control processor (CP)
-
Five digital signal processors (DSPs)
Refer to Figure 10-1 showing the layout of the primary components on the card.
To connect the Octel 200/300 to the PBX, use two 75-ohm coax cables. Be sure that the sw1 and sw2
switches on the card are set correctly to 75 ohms for U.S.A. and 120 ohms for Germany. Refer to
Figure 10-1.
Three kits are available.
Kit Name
Kit Part Number Included in Kit
75 ohm DTIC−E1 Kit
740-6254-002
DTIC−E1 card, DTIC-E1 adapter (BNC version),
grounding strip, EMI suppression material, and
fastening hardware (does not include cables)
120 ohm DTIC−E1 Kit
740-6254-003
DTIC−E1 card, grounding strip, EMI suppression
material, and fastening hardware (does not include
cables)
DTIC−E1 Grounding
Strip Materials Kit
740-6255-001
Grounding strip and fastening hardware (does not
include cables)
Refer to the Installation chapter, DTIC Pin Assignment section, for the 50-pin telco connector pin
assignments for the DTIC. Refer to the Hardware Replacement chapter, DTIC Replacement section, for
the procedure for replacing/installing a DTIC.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
10-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Card Ejector
Status
LEDs
WDT
jumper
Power/run
LEDs
Connector
P4
DSP
PGA
DSP
PGA
DSP
PGA
DSP
PGA
DSP
PGA
Reserved
for 6th
DSP
PGA
DSP
memory
DSP
memory
DSP
memory
DSP
memory
DSP
memory
DSP
memory
DSP
DSP
DSP
DSP
DSP
DSP
Card
Ejector
Card Stiffener
CP memory
PGA
Trunk
Framer
Boot
ROM
SM
sw1
75 ohm
120 ohm
sw2
75 ohm
Trunk
Framer
120 ohm
Card Stiffener
Connector P3
Connector P2
Connector P1
Figure 10-1 DTIC Component Layout
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
DTIC
10-3
10.2 HOW TO CONFIGURE THE DTIC
Before configuring the DTIC, the LSP Table must be added and configured at a password level higher
than Maintenance level. The correct LSP Table must be selected when configuring the SLOTS Table.
LSP tables are preconfigured and exist in the system. The LSP Table defines control parameters for
different DSP-based line/trunk interface cards and the DSP-based integration cards. Each LSP Table has
fields that define values for control parameters needed for correct operation of the card. These values are
downloaded to the card when it boots up.
You can list the LSP Tables in UPDATE by entering the command LIST LSP. If problems exist because
of an LSP Table configuration, information about these parameters is useful if it is necessary to call
technical support for help.
For the DTIC to operate, the Octel 200/300 must be configured correctly. The major items for
configuration are:
-
System Parameters
-
COS
-
SLOTS Table
System Parameters
Several system parameters must be properly set to allow the DTIC to work correctly:
-
-
-
-
-
-
PB60019−01
System Parameter 3 — PBX TYPE and PBX MODEL.
Set the PBX type and model to the correct settings.
System Parameter 9 — FLASH TIME (MSEC).
Set the flash time to 130 msec.
System Parameter 13
Set the five parts of this parameter. The settings are PBX dependent.
-
TRANSFER INITIATE CODE
-
RECONNECT CODE AFTER NO-ANSWER
-
RECONNECT CODE AFTER BUSY
-
RECONNECT CODE AFTER FAST BUSY
-
TRANSFER COMPLETE CODE
System Parameter 51 — RS-232 INTEGRATED WITH PBX.
Does not have to be integrated to work. The setting is site dependent.
System Parameter 77 — PBX PROVIDES MOMENTARY DISCONNECT.
Set to YES.
System Parameter 117 — RINGBACKS BEFORE ANSWERING AX PORT.
Set to 3, 4, or 5 for integrated systems or to 0 if not integrated. This setting is site specific and
depends on customer preference.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
10-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
-
-
System Parameter 175 — PORT NUMBER FOR CALL RECORDS TO FIRST PORT.
These settings are site specific and depend on the numbering of PBX extensions. The following is an
example of settings for the four parts of this parameter:
-
Number of digits in the extension number fields to 5
-
Number of digits in the port number field to 3
-
Fill character to 0 (zero)
-
Port number used in call records to 1
System Parameter 198 — PCM ENCODING FOR THE SYSTEM.
Set to 1, for A-law, or 0 for mu-law.
Voice data is encoded, in the E1 environment, into 8 bit numbers (called octets) that are sent 8000
times per second for each port. This process of sampling and encoding analog voice to these octets is
called Pulse Code Modulation (PCM). PCM uses two standard algorithms for conversion: A-law,
which is used primarily in Europe, and mu-law, which is used in North America. If DTIC voice
quality sounds consistently bad but still recognizable, the DTIC could be operating with the wrong
PCM law. To correct this low voice quality, change the PCM law and restart the message server.
Important: If a DTIC card is configured for A-law, 4- or 8-port line cards cannot be used:
-
To receive fax calls
-
For modem connection using the
# # #
5
command
Class of Service
A COS must be configured for each of the 30 DTIC ports. Assign attributes as required. Refer to the
Configuration volume, COS chapter.
SLOTS Table
The slot where a DTIC is to be installed must be added to the SLOTS Table. Adding a slot for a DTIC is
similar to adding a slot for other line cards. However, there are some questions pertaining specifically to
the DTIC.
Slots can be skipped, as for any line cards. However, the grounding strip is for only the first seven slots.
With Capacity on Demand, the number of ports for the DTIC are purchased as required.
After the slot is configured, the system must be restarted for the DTIC to become operational.
Configuring Slots for the DTIC
The DTIC card is physically connected to a PBX extension (a single line) via two 75-ohm coax cables to
support 30 ports. The PBX directs calls to the message server for answering.
The SLOTS Table contains information about each port on the DTIC card.
Each port connected to a PBX extension can be configured to handle calls differently. For non-integrated
systems, the port extensions must be set up in one or more hunt groups in the PBX. Each hunt group can
be configured to handle calls differently.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
DTIC
10-5
The following example shows only eight ports. The DTIC can have up to 30 ports configured.
SLOT
−−−−
4
CARD TYPE
−−−−−−−−−
DTC17−E1
PORT
−−−−
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
EXTENSION #
−−−−−−−−−−−
COS
−−−
254
254
254
254
254
254
254
254
MODE
−−−−
AX
AX
AX
AX
AX
AX
AX
AX
OUTCALL
−−−−−−−
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
TEST
−−−−
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
SYS
−−−
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
LSPTAB table: QSIG
SECONDARY SYNC RECEIVER OF CLOCK
The following describes the valid or invalid entries for the SLOTS Table fields:
SLOT
Enter the slot number to be configured — slots 1−6 for the Octel 200 and
slots 1−7 for the Octel 300.
.
Because the grounding strip used for the DTIC is only for seven
slots, in effect the slots available for the Octel 300 are slots 1−7.
CARD TYPE
Enter the number for a DTIC card — 23−DTC17−E1.
PORT
Configure the ports in consecutive order. Specifies the port (channel)
number on a card. DTIC cards have 30 channels each. If two DTIC cards
are installed in slots 1 and 2, the channel numbers on the card in the
second slot start with port 31.
EXTENSION #
Enter the PBX extension number connected to each message server port. A
mailbox extension number cannot be the same as a port extension number.
COS
Enter the COS for each port on the card. Directs the message server to
other system tables for the days and times to activate features and where to
get further instructions for handling the call.
Assign port/trunk COS in descending order, starting with the
highest-numbered COS.
MODE
PB60019−01
Enter the Answering Mode. Must be either Primary Answer (AX),
Secondary Answer (CX), or Message Center (MX). Determines how the
message server handles the call when that port answers. For further details
on answering modes, refer to the Product Description volume, General
Description chapter, and to the Configuration volume, Slots Table chapter,
Line Cards section.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
10-6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
OUTCALL
Enter YES or NO to enable or disable message waiting, network message,
and alarm calls. Specifies whether the port may place a call. Provide this
information for each port on the card.
.
For message waiting notification or alarm outcalls, multiple calls
can be placed simultaneously.
.
Some PBXs require that the same port/extension activate and
deactivate the message waiting lamp. To do this, define System
Parameter 106 — LAMP MESSAGE WAITING PORT, with the
port number to use.
Nonintegrated Systems. In most cases, allow all ports to make outcalls.
When all ports are defined as YES, the message server only makes
outcalls when no more than 3/4 of the ports are in use. This leaves ports
available for incoming calls. If NO is defined for any ports, all ports
defined as YES are used for outcalls, even when more than 3/4 are in use.
We recommend that NO for OUTCALL be used only for special
applications.
Integrated Systems. If eight or fewer ports are configured, the message
server makes outcalls when at least two ports are idle. If 9−32 ports are
configured, the message server makes outcalls when at least three ports are
idle. If more than 32 ports are configured, the message server makes
outcalls when at least four ports are idle.
SYNC
Enter 1, 2, or 3 to specify that this card is the primary, secondary, or
tertiary system clock sync source or N that the card is not used as a clock
sync source.
If no other cards (PIC or other DTIC) have been selected as the primary
clock sync source, enter 1. If another card has been selected as the primary
clock sync source, enter 2. If other cards have been selected as the primary
and secondary clock sync source, enter 3. Otherwise, enter N.
If the card selected as the primary clock sync source has problems (for
example, the clock is lost), the system switches to the secondary clock
sync source. If the secondary fails, the system switches to the tertiary
clock sync source. If the tertiary fails, the system uses its own internal but
less accurate clock crystal.
SYS
Designates the system port number for each port on a DTIC card. The port
numbers are allocated sequentially by the system.
LSPTAB
Enter the number to specify the LSP Table to be referenced for this slot.
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
The LSP Table for this DPNSS integration first must be added and
configured at a password level higher than Maintenance level.
PB60019−01
DTIC
10-7
Adding or Modifying a DTIC Card
When adding DTIC cards, ports can be added if the number of used ports is less than the number of
authorized ports. The message server checks to see that the number of ports configured does not exceed
the maximum number of DSP ports purchased.
After the card type is entered, the LSP Table must be entered. After the LSPTAB table is chosen, enter
information about each port, including extension number, COS, answer mode (AX, CX, MX), if the port
is used for message waiting and network outcalling (Y/N), and test channel (Y/N).
.
The LSP Table for this DPNSS integration first must be added and configured at a password level
higher than Maintenance level.
.A SLOT
Enter SLOT NUMBER to ADD.
Enter empty line when done.
ADD:2
1 −AB_10200
6 −DAC4
7 −LIC8
10−LIC8
11−TLC8
18−LIC4I
23−DTC17−E1
24−DTI18−T1
25−DTC17−ISDN
26−DLC16
33−ILIC12FR
34−ILIC12UK
35−ILIC12JP
37−ILIC12GR
53−DTC17−DPNSS
54−DTC17−QSIG
Enter Card Type.
SLOT 2 :23
5 −MITEL
50−PICROLM
51−PICATT
52−PICNT
2 −SLIC
3 −RIC
4 −ATTIC
13−SIC8
8 −ACP
16−FAX8
17−FAX4
Enter LSP table to be referenced for this slot.
0−DEFAULT
7−DL16FR
14−DL16UK_C
21−IL12US_C
1−IL12FR_S
8−T1
15−DL16NTH
22−EUROISDN
2−IL12GE_S
9−MD110−E1
16−DL16TOSH
23−PIC_AT&T
3−DL16US
10−DL16UK_S
17−DL16TIE
24−PIC_NT
4−DL16AU
11−IL12UK_S
18−ILI2UK_C
25−PIC_ROLM
5−DL16GE
12−DL1690
19−ILI2FR_C
26−DL16SNG
6−LIL2US_S
13−DPNSS_CB
20−ILI2GE_C
27−DL16OS
(Empty line = 0)
MOD:9
28−DPN_GPTA
29−DPN_GPTB
30−DPM_MITA
31−DPN_MITB
32−QSIB_MST
33−QSIG_SLV
Should this card be:
(1 − PRIMARY
2 − SECONDARY
3 − TERTIARY
N − no
) sync receiver of the master clock?
(1−3, N. Empty line = N):2
Enter information for each PORT.
Enter as: EXTENSION NUMBER connected to each port (1−8 digits),
CLASS−OF−SERVICE (0−254), ANSWER MODE (AX, CX, MX), USE PORT FOR
MESSAGE WAITING AND NETWORK OUTCALLING (Y/N), TEST CHANNEL (Y/N)
1:
PB60019−01
N,254,AX,N
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
10-8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Modifying a DTIC card in the SLOTS Table is similar to adding a DTIC.
.M SLOT
Enter slot number to MODIFY
Enter empty line when done.
MOD:1
Enter LSPTAB table to be referenced for this slot.
0−DEFAULT
7−DLC16_FR
14−DL16UK_C
21−IL12US_C
1−ILC12_FR_S
8−T1
15−DL16NTH
22−EUROISDN
2−ILC12_GE_S
9−MD110−E1
16−DL16TOSH
23−PIC_AT&T
3−DLC16US
10−DLC16UK_S
17−DL16TIE
24−PIC_NT
4−DLC16AU
11−ILI2UK_S
18−IL12UK_C
25−PIC_ROLM
5−DLC16GE
12−DL1690
19−IL12FR_C
26−DL16SNG
6−ILC12US_S
13−DPNSS_CB
20−IL12GE_C
27−DL16OS
(Empty line = 0)
MOD:
Enter PORT NUMBER to ADD or MODIFY.
Add port (9) or
Modify port (1 − 8)
PORT:
28−DPN_GPTA
29−DPN_GPTB
30−DPN_MITA
31−DPN_MITB
32−QSIG_MST
33−QSIG_SLV
Enter SLOT NUMBER to MODIFY.
Enter empty line when done.
MOD:
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
DTIC
10-9
10.3 TROUBLESHOOTING AND MAINTENANCE
After the installation and configuration of the DTIC is complete and the system has been restarted, verify
whether phone calls can be placed by simply calling the system on one of the DTIC voice mail ports. If
the call is successful (you get the voice mail greeting and there is no popping or buzzing indicating clock
sync problems), the DTIC installation is successful.
If phone calls cannot be placed to the message server, several commands help in troubleshooting the
DTIC card. The following subsection lists these commands. Following that are subsections giving a series
of problems with possible solutions to help in troubleshooting the system.
Diagnostics
The CONNECT command logs onto the DTIC card. At the @ prompt, enter
CONN x
Enter
where x is the slot number of the DTIC. The following message appears:
Connecting to E1
in slot
These status commands give information about the status of the trunks, card, and ports:
-
ST TR gives the status of the trunks.
-
ST CARD gives the status of the DTIC card.
-
ST x, where x is a port number (1−30), gives the status of that port.
-
LIST STATS gives a count of errors seen by the trunk.
.
Putting a c after any status command repeats the status indefinitely to the terminal until the ESC
key is pressed. For example, ST 1 C causes the status of port 1 to be updated continually, rather
than giving the status only one time.
To exit from the DTIC, at the dtic> prompt, enter
EXIT
Enter
The following message appears:
Disconnecting from E1.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
10-10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
DTIC Not Up
The supervisor terminal is presented when you use the CONNECT command to connect to the DTIC. The
supervisor terminal may indicate that the DTIC is up or has not stayed up. This problem is likely caused
by the E1 trunk being down.
Once logged onto the DTIC, you can request the status of the trunk, the card in general, and any of the 30
ports (channels). An example of the status for a bad trunk follows. The trunk, card, and port 1 (channel 1)
status are shown in order.
To request the status of the trunk, at the dtic> prompt, enter
dtic>ST TR
Enter
dtic>ST TR
−−−−− DS1A Signal Status −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
RECEIVE
State:
RAI:
AIS:
Line Code:
Loss of Signal
OFF
OFF
????
TRANSMIT
Traffic:
RAI:
AIS:
Mode:
Loopback:
Disabled
OFF
OFF
Non−CRC4
OFF
Excess CRC Failures: NO
Excess FAS Errors:
NO
Excess FEBE:
NO
−−−−− Timeslot 16 Signaling Channel Status −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
RECEIVE
State:
MF RAI:
AIS:
Out of frame
OFF
OFF
TRANSMIT
Mode:
MF RAI:
AIS:
CAS
ON
OFF
−−−−− CM State −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
State: On−line
-
The TRANSMIT Traffic field shows Disabled, which indicates that the card will not transmit.
The RECEIVE State field shows Loss of Signal (LOS), which indicates that the E1 trunk is not being
detected.
Because the main trunk is LOS, timeslot 16 will also have problems − its state is Out of Frame. The card
state or CM state is still on-line because it is operational but cannot complete calls because of trunk
problems. If the state is not On-line, the card also will not correctly complete calls. The following gives
basic information about the fields for the status of the trunk.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
DTIC
10-11
DS1A Signal Status — State of Entire Trunk
Possible values
Description
In frame
Out of frame
Loss of Signal
Normal.
Functioning but has problems.
Not functioning.
RAI (Remote Alarm
Indication)
OFF
Remote end receiving signal and detects no
problems.
Remote end detects problems with signal from
DTIC.
AIS (Alarm Indication
Signal)
OFF
ON
Normal.
Problem with far end sending pattern, cannot
make phone calls.
Line Code:
AMI (Alternate Mark
Inversion)
HDB3 (High Density
Bipolar with 3 bits)
???
Normal.
Excess CRC Failure
(Cyclic Redundancy
Check)
NO
If the mode is not CRC4 (the mode used in
Europe).
The signal for the check is sent 1,000
times/second. When the check fails more than
about 888 times/second, the digit is incremented.
Excess FAS Errors
(Frame Alignment Signal)
NO
YES
In checking for FAS errors, a signal with a
repetitive pattern is sent by the far end at 8,000
times/second. If the DTIC does not receive an
expected item from the pattern several times in a
row, the field changes to YES.
Excess FEBE
(Far End Block Error)
NO
YES
Signal from DTIC is okay.
Signal from DTIC has problems.
This field applies only for CRC mode.
Disabled
DTIC not able to actively place phone calls. The
card is not usable.
The signal that the DTIC is receiving is not
satisfactory.
Field
RECEIVE
State
TRANSMIT
Traffic
ON
Number of excess
failures
Enabled
RAI (Remote Alarm
Indication)
OFF
AIS (Alarm Indication
Signal)
OFF
ON
Normal.
Near end initializing, cannot make phone calls.
Mode
CRC4
The network is using this advanced error
checking.
The network is not using CRC4.
ON
Non-CRC4
Loopback
OFF
ON
PB60019−01
HDB3 mode is enabled. HDB3 pattern being
sent.
Loss of signal. The question marks (???) appear
in the field.
Near end receiving signal and detects no
problems.
Near end detects problems with signal from
PBX.
Special looping diagnostics are being run.
Normal operation − not looping.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
10-12
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Timeslot 16 Signaling Channel Status — State of Only this Channel
Field
RECEIVE
State
Possible values
Description
In frame
Out of frame
Normal operation.
Can send voice data but not information regarding
call progress, etc.
MF RAI (Multi-Frame
Remote Alarm Indication)
OFF
Far end satisfied with signal on this channel.
Far end not satisfied.
AIS (Alarm Indication
Signal)
OFF
ON
Normal.
Problem with far end sending pattern, cannot make
phone calls.
CAS
CAS (Channel Associated Signaling) is the only
mode currently.
MF RAI (Multi-Frame
Remote Alarm Indication)
OFF
DTIC satisfied with signal being received.
DTIC not satisfied with signal being received.
AIS (Alarm Indication
Signal)
OFF
ON
TRANSMIT
Mode
State
ON
ON
On-line
Off-line
Normal.
Problem.
CM State*
Normal.
Not functioning. For example, the card may be
off-line for 20−30 minutes when the system is
being booted. The card doesn’t think the system
knows the card is there.
.
When the card is being brought up, the CM
State normally starts off-line for 10 seconds
to 30 minutes, depending on whether the
system software is already up or not.
* Card Manager (CM) is the basic high-level software for the DTIC card.
Both the card and port status also indicate problems. Following is the status card listing:
dtic>ST CARD
−−−−− Channel Status − ALL −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
CARD STATE:
SEQUENCER PC:
DOWN
C2
CLOCK MASTER:
CLOCK ACTIVE:
Disabled
Disabled
The card status explicitly says that the card is DOWN, although the reason is not given. The reason is
given in the trunk status. Also, the card is not actively configured as a clock master (that is, the status is
“Disabled”) by the system, a consequence of the card being down. The following gives basic information
about the fields for the status of the card.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
DTIC
10-13
Channel Status − ALL — State of the Card
Field
Possible values
Description
CARD STATE
UP
DOWN
Card is ready for traffic.
Card is not ready for traffic.
The CARD STATE should agree with the
Traffic field under the TRANSMIT section
of the trunk status.
SEQUENCER PC*
Value from 00 to ff (hex) Informational only − for use by Avaya
Engineering.
CLOCK MASTER
Enabled
Disabled
DTIC enabled as clock master.
DTIC not enabled as clock master.
CLOCK ACTIVE
Enabled
A good clock is being received from the
network.
A good clock is not being received from the
network.
Disabled
* A Sequencer PC is a virtual software entity (like a little computer) that has its own task to perform on a specific part of the card’s
software. For example, there is a separate Sequencer PC for keeping track of the health of each port.
Following is the port status for port 1:
dtic>ST 1
−−−−− Channel 01 Status −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
RECEIVE
ABCD:
TRANSMIT
ABCD: 1111
0000
OTHER
CHANNEL STATE:
SEQUENCER PC:
ON HOOK
0f
The port status indicates that code 1111 is being sent. This code occurs because the card is down and the
DTIC is not ready to receive a call from the PBX. The SEQUENCER PC status 0f indicates that the port
is waiting to be told to operate. Generally, 0f means down. The following gives basic information about
the fields for the status of a port (channel).
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
10-14
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Field
Possible values
Description
Channel 01 Status
RECEIVE
ABCD
. ABCD represents bit
patterns (range
0000−1111). Given here
are a few common
patterns. Other patterns
would be for unusual
circumstances.
TRANSMIT
ABCD
OTHER
CHANNEL STATE
SEQUENCER PC*
0001
1101
0101
1101®1001®1101
0000
Idle/on-hook.
Off-hook.
Busy/error.
Flash.
No information or an invalid pattern
being received from the other end.
0001
1101
0001®1101®1111
1101®1001®1101
1111
On-hook.
Off-hook.
Wink.
Flash.
Busy/error.
ON HOOK
OFF HOOK
Value from 00 to ff
(hex)
0f
02
fe and ff
00 to fd
Informational only − for use by Avaya
Engineering.
Down. The port is waiting to be told to
operate.
Up, idle, and ready for calls.
The port is down because of an internal
error.
Most of the other possible values are used
when the port is processing calls.
* A Sequencer PC is a virtual software entity (like a little computer) that has its own task to perform on a specific part of the
card’s software. For example, there is a separate Sequencer PC for keeping track of the health of each port.
For comparison, the following examples show connection to a properly operating DTIC.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
DTIC
10-15
The ST TR command shows the status of the trunk. This example shows normal trunk status.
dtic>ST TR
−−−−− DS1A Signal Status −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
RECEIVE
State:
RAI:
AIS:
Line Code:
TRANSMIT
Traffic:
RAI:
AIS:
Mode:
Loopback:
In Frame
OFF
OFF
HDB3
Enabled
OFF
OFF
Non−CRC4
OFF
Excess CRC Failures: NO
Excess FAS Errors:
NO
Excess FEBE:
NO
−−−−− Timeslot 16 Signaling Channel Status −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
RECEIVE
State:
MF RAI:
AIS:
TRANSMIT
Mode:
MF RAI:
AIS:
In CAS Frame
OFF
OFF
CAS
OFF
OFF
−−−−− CM State −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
State: On−line
The ST CARD command shows the status of the card. This example shows normal card status. In this
example, the card is enabled to be the synchronization receiver of the master clock.
dtic>ST CARD
−−−−− Channel Status − ALL −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
CARD STATE:
SEQUENCER PC:
UP
C2
CLOCK MASTER:
CLOCK ACTIVE:
Enabled
Enabled
The ST 1 command shows the port status for port 1 (channel 1). This example shows normal port status
for port 1. The port is idle and is transmitting and receiving the on-hook code.
dtic>ST 1
−−−−− Channel 01 Status −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
RECEIVE
ABCD: 0001
OTHER:
CHANNEL STATE:
SEQUENCER PC:
PB60019−01
TRANSMIT
ABCD: 0001
ON HOOK
02
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
10-16
Installation and Maintenance Volume
The LIST STATS command gives a count of errors seen by the trunk:
dtic>LIST STATS
ts_oof_cnt
ts_oof_crc_cnt
ts_lcv_cnt
ts_bit_slip_cnt
=
=
=
=
ts_crc_fail_cnt
ts_fas_err_cnt
ts_febe_cnt
= 0
= 0
= 0
ts_oof_cas_cnt
= 0
COFA cnt
CAS COMFA cnt
HDB3 Detect cnt
PCM Frm Slip cnt
=
=
=
=
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
The following gives basic information about the fields for these error counts.
Octel 200/300
Field
Count for ... *
Comments
ts_oof_cnt
Out of frame
Increments if there is an oof problem.
ts_oof_crc_cnt
Change of frame alignment
cyclic redundancy check
Applies when using CRC mode. Increments
when the basic frame is okay but
momentarily could not use CRC.
ts_lcv_cnt
Line code violation
If this count increments, it likely means
serious problems, probably with the PBX,
which may require maintenance.
ts_bit_slip_cnt
Bit slip
The clock sync source is out or the
frequency is slightly off.
ts_crc_fail_cnt
Cyclic redundancy check fail
Intermittent instantaneous errors. There
could be hundreds in a day. This count is
not as serious as the ts_oof_cnt.
ts_fas_err_cnt
Frame alignment signal error
A frame alignment signal is sent in a basic
pattern of 8,000/second. A count of 1 or 2 a
day does not indicate a problem. A count of
several in an hour indicates a problem.
ts_febe_cnt
Far end block error
The far end (the PBX) has problems with
the signal it is receiving. There is a high
CRC count being received from the DTIC.
ts_oof_cas_cnt
Out of frame channel associated
signaling
The voice signal is okay but the system
cannot determine call processing status,
such as whether on-hook or off-hook. Each
incident of this increments the count.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
DTIC
10-17
Field
Count for ... *
Comments
COFA cnt
Change of frame alignment
There could be a count that is too low to be
significant. If the count is 7 or more per
day, it is significant. This indicates
momentary losses of frame, perhaps too
quick to trigger an alarm and bring the card
down. An oof condition must persist for 2
seconds before bringing the card down. If
the count is 256 or more per day, it is very
serious and should be fixed immediately.
CAS COMFA cnt
Channel associated signaling
change of multiframe alignment
Same as for COFA cnt except that this if for
channel 16 only.
HDB3 Detect cnt
High density bipolar with 3 bits
detection
Counts when HDB3 mode is enabled.
HDB3 mode is always enabled for the
DTIC. Increments when HDB3 patterns are
detected. A count of 100 per day or less is
normal. Greater than 100 per day could
indicate problems.
PCM Frm Slip cnt
Pulse code modulation frame slip Indicates a clock problem. Increments
when an entire frame (256 bits) slips all at
once. If the count is 17 or more per day, it
is a minor cause for concern. If the count is
512 or more per day, it is a major problem.
* The ts means trunk scanner.
Solutions for Trunk Problems
Perform the following steps to solve trunk problems:
1.
Make sure the transmit and receive portions of the cable are not reversed. If it is possible to swap the
transmit and receive parts of the cable, do so, and check to see if the DTIC comes up.
2.
Make sure the cable is not broken. Find a loopback cable to loop the DTIC to itself. If it comes up,
the cable could be a problem.
3.
Make sure the PBX is sending a correct E1 framing pattern. Try looping the PBX to itself and seeing
if it operates with what it receives.
4.
Check that the PBX and DTIC both are in the same CRC4 mode — either both disabled or both
enabled.
5.
Make sure that the impedance switches (sw1 and sw2) on the DTIC are set correctly according to
cable type. Both switches must be set the same.
6.
Check the alarm queue on the DTIC for clues about why it is down. Log on to the card and enter
LIST ALARM. For example,
@CONN 2
Connecting to E1
in slot 2
dtic>LIST ALARM
03/22/99 08:05:25 Trunk Loss of Signal
03/22/99 08:05:25 Trunk Out of Frame
03/22/99 08:05:25 Trunk Traffic Disabled
03/22/99 08:05:25 Trunk Out of CAS Multiframe
dtic>EXIT
Disconnecting from E1
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
10-18
Installation and Maintenance Volume
7.
Check the LEDs on the front of the card for trunk problems. The LEDs have the same information as
the status screens although without as much detail. However, if you are unable to get terminal access
to the system, the LEDs might be a good alternative. The meanings of the LEDs are as follows. For
further help, contact Technical Support.
.
LED
Meaning
Red boot (top)
Apcode is initializing
Green Power
DTIC has power
Red 1 (top)
Loss of signal on trunk (LOS)
Red 2
Loss of frame on trunk (LOF)
Yellow 3
Remote alarm indication (RAI)
Yellow 4
“Other” trunk alarm
Yellow 5
Alarm history
Green 6 (bottom)
One or more ports off hook
All red LEDs should be OFF when the card is correctly initialized. If LEDs Red 1 and Red 2
are ON, it indicates that there is no incoming clock, possibly due to incorrect cabling.
Call into System, Phone Rings but Is Never Answered
This problem is unlikely, but it could be caused by the DTIC being operational but not being allowed to
report ringing to the main system. A possible source of this problem is that the signaling method for the
DTIC is not set to the correct value. The signaling method is set in LSP Table parameter 24. If the
problem occurs, contact Technical Support.
System Answers but Voice Quality Is Poor
This problem probably means that the PCM encoding law is incorrectly set. Check whether System Parameter
198 — PCM ENCODING FOR THE SYSTEM, is set correctly. If not, change the value as appropriate.
System Answers but Pops or Buzzes
This problem probably means that the setting of the DTIC as a clock sync source is not correct. If only
one DTIC is configured in the system, check that the DTIC is configured as the primary clock sync
source. If the DTIC is not configured as the primary clock sync source and the PBX has another clock,
the clock rates may not be the same.
If more than one DTIC is configured in the system, check that the DTIC is configured as the primary
clock sync source and also check that the PBX is using the same clock rate.
Modem Connection Has Garbage Characters
This problem occurs when log on is via a modem connection and the characters that appear on the screen
are random characters and digits.
The source of the problem and solution are the same as given for the System Answers But Pops or Buzzes.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
DTIC
10-19
Ports on the DTIC Configured for Ringing but Do Not Answer Calls
This problem could be caused by the message server expecting dial tone when initializing the ports. The
message server, as part of initialization, tells each port to go off hook, listen for dial tone, send a DTMF
string, and then go on hook.
At the @ prompt, use the PS command to see whether the port in question has the code NDT for no dial
tone or ERR for error. To determine whether the failing port number is actually on the DTIC or on
another line card instead, use the LIST SLOT x command, where x is the DTIC slot number.
If NDT or ERR is present, check System Parameter 33 — PBX INITIALIZE CODE. The value for this
parameter should be NONE.
Restart the system to reinitialize the DTIC. Then test that the card accepts phone calls.
DTIC Still Does Not Operate Correctly
If you need to call Technical Support, try to provide the symptoms of the problem and the
revision/version of the DTIC software. You can get complete DTIC revision information by connecting to
the DTIC (E1) and using the VERSION command, as in the following example:
@CONN 2
Connecting to E1
in slot 2
dtic>VERSION
**** Version Information ****
Firmware Rev
Date
Time ChkSum Comment
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
BootROM
3.03 MON DD YYYY 16:40:24 5A32 final DTIC−E1/DLC16 version
Xillinx Images
Rev
Date
Time
Filename
Package
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
Voice Bus Intf
4.0 05/13/00 19:18:43 vbintf.lca 3042PQ100
DTIC Pass 1 TDM
1.0 01/21/00 18:25:31 tdmint.lca 3042PC84
DTIC pass 2 TDM
1.0 12/21/00 01:46:26 dtctdm.lca 3064PC84
DLIC16 TDM
5.0 11/09/00 17:22:11 116TDM.LCA 3042PQ100
PIC TDM
4.0 09/08/00 18:11:45 PICTDM.LCA 3042PQ100
CODE
REV
DATE
TIME
COMMENT
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
DSP
1.67 03/10/00
09:32:40 all 1.65f patches, fix PCM cnvrsn bug
CP
0.01 MAR 20, 2000 13:50
New digit sending method
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11
LAN CARD
Chapter Contents
11.1
11.2
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1
LAN Installation and Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2
SLOTS Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
LOCATION Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
System Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
LAN Card Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-5
11.3
Testing the LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-7
Traffic Pegs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-10
11.4
Taking the LAN Card Out of Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-11
When To Use Courtesy Up or Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-11
Effect of Pressing the Escape Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-13
Appendix A Internet Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11A-1
Appendix B Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11B-1
Appendix C Octel Private MIB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11C-1
Tables
11-1
11-2
PB60019−01
LED Activity on the LAN Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-6
CD and CU for LAN — Messages and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-13
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
LAN Card
Command
Description
Taking LAN card out of service and returning it to service
Courtesy Down
CD x
Takes the LAN card out of service without interrupting
activities in progress.
x = slot number of LAN card.
CU x
Brings the LAN card back into service.
x = slot number of LAN card.
TEST LAN
Tests all locations in the digital network.
TEST LAN x
Tests a single location in the digital network;
x = the specific location name to be tested.
TEST SNMP
Tests the mechanism of communication between the
Octel 200/300 message servers and the SNMP manager
system.
Courtesy Up
Digital Network Test
TEST LAN
SNMP Test
TEST SNMP
Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Tools
LAN CARD PING
Echo Test
CMD x PING y
Lowest level “echo” test from the local LAN to the
destination message server to verify that both LAN cards
are UP, data transfer is possible, and IP addresses are
correct.
x = slot number of LAN card in servers with CPU/VCU
y = IP address of the device to which the Ethernet
packet is sent.
LAN STATUS
PB60019−01
LANSTAT
Lists basic information about the current status of the LAN
— UP, DOWN, INITIALIZING.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
LAN Installation and Configuration 11-1
11.1 OVERVIEW
This chapter contains information about the LAN card. Information includes details about hardware,
installation, configuration, maintenance, and troubleshooting.
A LAN card must be installed to use the following features:
-
Digital Networking
-
LAN Backup and Restore
-
Gateway Link
-
Telnet Access
The LAN card supports 10 Mbps operation according to the IEEE 802.3 standard
The LAN card is part of the the LAN Hardware Kit, part number 740−6221−001. The kit contains:
one LAN card and one 25-pair-to-RJ45 adapter. The kit works with both the Octel 200 or Octel 300.
For LAN card installation, the following are required but not included with the LAN card hardware
kit:
PB60019−01
-
10BaseT Ethernet Hub, compliant with IEEE 802.3
-
Four-pair twisted-pair Ethernet (TPE) wiring with RJ45 connector
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
11.2 LAN INSTALLATION AND CONFIGURATION
Only one LAN card can be installed. The LAN card can be installed in slots A5, A6, or A7 for the
Octel 200 and slots A10, A11, or A12 for the Octel 300.
Perform the following steps for LAN installation and configuration:
1. Configure the LAN card number and card type in the SLOTS table. Refer to the Configuration
volume, SLOTS Table chapter.
2. In the LOCATION table, configure the IP address and SUBNET MASK fields for SELF.
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−− SYSTEM CONFIGURATION UPDATE −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
DAY
MM/DD/YYYY 09:20:47
NAME
ID:999999 S/N:200154
PBX: 10
At the dot (.), enter ? for HELP.
.m loc
Enter existing LOCATION NAME.
MOD: self
What is the PUBLIC SYSTEM NUMBER (CC#TC#SN#) for SELF ? (empty line = NONE)
MOD:
What is the PRIVATE SYSTEM NUMBER (0##N#) for SELF ? (empty line = NONE)
MOD:
Enter the OCTELNET SERIAL NUMBER for SELF.
MOD:
Enter the DIGITAL LOCATION NAME for SELF on the DIGITAL NETWORK (empty line =
NONE)
MOD: LUCENT_SVTC
Enter the IP ADDRESS for SELF on the DIGITAL NETWORK (empty line = NONE)
MOD: 148.147.24.235
Enter the SUBNET MASK for this DIGITAL NETWORK (empty line = 255.255.0.0)
MOD:
SELF saved
Enter existing LOCATION NAME
MOD:
.e
EXITING UPDATE.
WAIT...DONE.
SAVE configuration to a DISKETTE? (Y/N empty line = N)
FRI
MM/DD/YYYY
09:21:43
NAME
ID:999999
S/N:200154
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−− CONFIGURATION UPDATE COMPLETED
@
PBX: 10
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
3. Modify system parameters as required for the LAN to communicate with the network.
4. Install the LAN card in its configured slot.
5. Restart the system.
.
You cannot modify the SLOTS Table or the LOCATION Table when the LAN card is UP. Any
attempt to do so will result in the following error message. Refer to the section, Taking the LAN
Card Out of Service.
LAN is currently UP.
Please COURTESY DOWN the LAN board before doing this operation.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
LAN Installation and Configuration 11-3
SLOTS Table
When adding the LAN card to the SLOTS Table, enter 22 for the card type. The commands MODIFY
SLOT and DELETE SLOT allow a slot with card type 22 to be modified or deleted.
You cannot configure more than one LAN card in the SLOTS Table. Any attempt to add a second LAN
card results in the following error message:
LAN CARD ALREADY CONFIGURED IN SLOT n.
You can install the LAN card in slots A5, A6, or A7 in the Octel 200 and in slots A10, A11, or A12 of
Shelf A in the Octel 300.
You cannot modify or delete the LAN card entry in the SLOTS Table when the LAN card is UP.
LOCATION Table
When adding the SELF location, enter the information in the fields for the SUBNET MASK and the IP
address. This information is required to bring up the LAN.
The SUBNET MASK and IP address number are usually given to you by your LAN administrator. If
your network doesn’t use a subnetting scheme, you should still set up the subnet mask to cover your
network portion. The CPU assigns a SUBNET MASK that conforms with the class of the IP address if
none is entered. Refer to the LAN Appendix A, Implementation of Subnet with Masks.
System Parameters
Configure System Parameters 233 and 234 if a gateway and name server exist on the LAN and must be
accessed. Contact the network administrator for information about these system parameters.
System
Parameter
Description and Use
233
LAN: NAME SERVER IP ADDRESS
The name server is used to determine the IP address of a node, given its ASCII
host name. The ASCII host name is used to identify a node with a symbolic name,
so that hard-coded IP addresses are not used. This entry is optional and need not be
configured if all nodes are known by their IP addresses.
The IP address of the name server must be of the form M.N.O.P, where
M = 1−223; N and O = 0−255, and P = 1−254.
.
PB60019−01
This is the name server in the data network (LAN), not the Octel 200/300
Netnames or Dial-by-Name directory.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
System
Parameter
Description and Use
234
LAN: GATEWAY IP ADDRESS
The gateway unit connects two or more LANs and is used only if the message
server needs to communicate with another message server on a different network.
A typical example would be a Wide Area Network (WAN) connection. If a
gateway is used, its IP address must be configured here.
An IP address must be of the form M.N.O.P, where M = 1−223; N and O = 0−255,
and P = 1−254.
.
This is the gateway unit in the data network (LAN), not to be confused with
the other types of the gateways, such as gateway unit used to connect Visual
Mailbox users from the Entryworks ACP board to the LAN or message
servers used as message gateways, or the OctelAccess server link.
System Parameters 235−240 and 242 are optional. These system parameters are only required when
accessing an existing LAN network and are used only if SNMP is to be used. The SNMP is not required
to support a dedicated LAN that connects only Octel 200/300 message servers.
.
235
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is a standard protocol that allows a network
administrator on the LAN data network to request information from servers attached to the LAN
for the purposes of troubleshooting and network management. The SNMP management application
is typically an off-the-shelf software package run by a network administrator or technician on a
workstation or PC-compatible. Contact your network administrator to determine whether SNMP
management tools are available and how they could be useful. Refer to Appendix B, Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP), for additional information.
LAN: SNMP MANAGER IP ADDRESS
The IP address of the SNMP manager’s PC/workstation, which must be of the form
M.N.O.P, where M = 1−223; N and O = 0−255, and P = 1−254.
236
LAN: SNMP MANAGER HOST aSCII NAME
The host name of the SNMP manager’s PC/workstation, which can be up to 31
alphanumeric characters long.
237
LAN: SNMP LOCATION OF VOICE MAIL CABINET
The location is a descriptive field that specifies the location of the Octel 200/300,
which can be up to 31 characters.
238
LAN: SNMP NAME OF SYSTEM CONTACT
The name of the person who needs to be contacted in case of network trouble with
the Octel 200/300 (that is, the Octel 200/300 system administrator). Also, include
the person’s phone number, if known. The name can be up to 31 characters long.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
LAN Installation and Configuration 11-5
239
LAN: SNMP READ COMMUNITY
The read community that can only access SNMP data. This is a password that
provides read-only access to the SNMP manager, which can be up to 19 characters
long.
240
LAN: SNMP READ WRITE COMMUNITY
The read-write community that can access and modify SNMP data. This is a
password that provides read/write access to the SNMP manager, which can be up
to 19 characters long.
242
LAN: SEND TRAP TO SNMP MANAGER ON ALARM
If this parameter is set to Yes and if the SNMP manager IP address (or manager
name if a name server is configured) is configured, the CPU generates an SNMP
trap request to the LAN whenever a hardware error is logged a sufficient number
of times for its priority to cause an alarm call. The default is No.
LAN Card Installation
LAN cards are hot pluggable. The procedure to install the LAN card is as follows:
1.
Put on an antistatic wrist strap. Connect it to an unpainted portion of the cabinet.
2.
While holding the LAN card by its top and bottom edges, slide the card into the card cage.
3.
Pivot the card ejectors as needed to grip the small flanges on the front edges of the card cage.
4.
Firmly seat the LAN card connectors into the motherboard by pressing the card ejectors against the
front edge of the LAN card. The ejectors will clip onto small pins on the LAN card when the
connectors are seated.
Do not slam the LAN card into the cabinet, as this
could damage the card or motherboard connectors.
Caution!
5.
Install the 25-pair-to-RJ45-adapter on the back of the cabinet for the slot in which the LAN card is
being installed.
6.
Connect the ethernet twisted-pair cable from the RJ45 adapter to the ethernet hub.
7.
After installing the LAN card, restart the message server to put the card into service. At the @
prompt, enter
RESTA
Enter
There are eight LEDs on the front edge of the LAN card. Once the LAN card is installed, the LEDs are
activated as shown in Table 11-1.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11-6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Table 11-1 LED Activity on the LAN Card
Octel 200/300
LED
Color
LED Purpose
LED Activity
Red
Standard use
Lights after the LAN card is installed.
Goes off when the card has been initialized and is ready for
operation.
Green
Standard use
Lights when self-test diagnostics are complete.
Yellow
Development
Used only for development.
Yellow
Good Link Indicator
Lights when the adapter and wiring to a hub are okay.
Yellow
Rx Polarity Reversed
Lights if the pair being received by the ethernet controller
need to be reversed. Check the wiring.
Yellow
Receive Activity
Indicator
Lights when the ethernet controller sees activity on the
receive pair.
Yellow
Transmit Activity
Indicator
Lights when the ethernet controller sees activity on the
transmit pair.
Yellow
Collision Indicator
Lights when a collision occurs. Collisions occur normally
in ethernet/802.3 networks, because it is part of the
low-layer protocol.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
LAN Installation and Configuration 11-7
11.3 TESTING THE LAN
LAN Testing
After the Octel 200/300 is restarted the LAN card comes up.
To test whether the LAN is functional and is communicating with other message servers or network
resources, use the following commands:
-
CMD PING
-
LANSTAT
CMD PING
The CMD PING command does the lowest-level “echo” test from the LAN adapter on the local system to
the destination message server or computer. It verifies that all the basic requirements are met, such as:
-
Both LAN adapters are present, up and running, and operating their network protocols.
-
LAN end-to-end data transfer is possible across the digital network.
-
The LAN IP addresses are correctly configured.
This is the best tool to use to identify whether there is end-to-end connectivity across the digital network
between two Octel 200/300 message servers. It is especially useful to verify that IP addresses are
correctly configured.
To use the CMD PING command, at the @ prompt, enter
CMD x PING y
Enter
where x is:
The slot number in which the LAN card is installed
and where y is:
The IP address of the device to which the test ethernet packet is sent
The CMD PING command sends a low-level ethernet packet to the address specified. The receiver
replies with a ping response packet. An example of a ping success follows.
@CMD LAN PING 157.156.53.3
LAN (Ethernet) Link: MM/DD/YYYY 12:48:20 (0179fc76:0179fc76) Rev 1.0.3
Current Time: 04/12/2000 15:15:25 @ Slot 10
LAN>PING 157.156.53.3: 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 157.156.53.3: icmp_sn=0. time=110 ms
−−−−157.156.53.3 PING Statistics−−−−
1 packets transmitted, 1 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 110/110/110
LAN>
@
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11-8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
This is an example of a ping failure:
@CMD LAN PING 157.156.53.5
LAN (Ethernet) Link: MM/DD/YYYY 12:48:20 (0179fc76:0179fc76) Rev 1.0.3
Current Time: 04/12/2000 15:15:49 @ Slot 10
LAN>PING 157.156.53.5: 56 data bytes
still trying...
still trying...
still trying...
still trying...
still trying...
still trying...
157.156.53.5 not responding
LAN>
@
LANSTAT Command
The LANSTAT command provides basic information about the current LAN status. Information about
the LAN status for previous periods is provided in the Network Traffic Report for Digital Networks.
Refer to the Reports chapter in this volume.
The LANSTAT command provides information about the current status: whether the LAN is UP or
DOWN and the state of the high-speed links. Following is an example of the screen for LANSTAT.
@LANSTAT
LAN STATUS: UP
LAST INITIALIZED ON MM/DD/YY AT 06:05 PM
DIGITAL NETWORKING STATUS:
UP
−−−−−−−− HIGH−SPEED−LINK STATUS −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
LOCATION
STATUS
LAN−PRTCL OTHER
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
SELF
−
3
CHCGO
UP
2
NEWYRK
DOWN
−
DALLAS
DOWN
1
OEM−FAIL
SFO
UP
3
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
GWL STATUS: DOWN − GATEWAY LINK SYSTEM PARAMETER IS NOT ENABLED
@
The LAN status is always UP, INITIALIZING, or DOWN, as follow.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
LAN Installation and Configuration 11-9
LAN Status
Description
UP
The LAN is running. If a COURTESY DOWN is in progress, the message
COURTESY DOWN IN PROGRESS displays. When the LAN status is
UP the high−speed link status is given for each high−speed digital
location as follows:
-
-
-
INITIALIZING
DOWN
LOCATION
The location name.
STATUS
The status of the link to this location, which is either
UP or DOWN.
LAN−PPRTCL The Digital Networking Protocol level of the other
system. This entry allows compatibility with future
releases. It does not relate to analog protocol
numbering.
OTHER
Can be one of the following:
HNDSHAKE, waiting for start−up handshake reply;
OEM-FAIL, cannot establish connection, OEM
mismatch
The LAN is in the initialization process. The current status of the initialization process is given from among the following:
-
WAITING FOR LAN REBUILD TO COMPLETE
-
WAITING FOR LAN TO START
-
WAITING FOR LAN INFO FROM VCU
-
STARTING HIGH−SPEED CONNECTIONS
Communication with the LAN adapter has stopped and no LAN activity is
possible. The reason, if known, is given. The following are possible
reasons:
-
System does not have the Digital Networking feature
-
A COURTESY−DOWN is in progress
-
LAN SYSTEM PARAMETER NOT ENABLED
-
LAN BOARD NOT CONFIGURED IN SLOTS TABLE
At any time during the LAN STATUS listing, you can press
or two.
PB60019−01
Escape
to terminate the listing within a line
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11-10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Traffic Pegs
The following pegs in the Traffic Peg Count Table are useful in monitoring and troubleshooting the LAN.
Octel 200/300
Peg Number
Description and Use
150
COURTESY DOWN:
Number of times the CD command for LAN was executed successfully.
254
TOTAL TIME (IN MINUTES) THAT THE LAN IS UP:
Number of minutes that communication to the LAN adapter has been UP.
Increments every minute that the LAN is communicating with the system software.
This peg is used with peg 253 to calculate the percentage of time that the LAN is UP
to the time that the message server is UP for the Digital Network Performance
Report, LAN Availability.
255
NUMBER OF TIMES TOTAL REALTIME NAMES PLAYED REACHED THE
LIMIT OF AVAILABLE CLIENTS:
The number of times that a name could not be played by this message server in real
time over the LAN, because this message server had already reached the maximum
limit for playing the maximum number of simultaneous real-time names (that is,
reached Maximum Name Clients).
S.4.1
PB60019−01
LAN Installation and Configuration 11-11
11.4 TAKING THE LAN OUT OF SERVICE
Use the Courtesy Down command to take the LAN subsystem out of service. The Courtesy Down
command does the following:
-
-
-
Takes the digital networking hardware and software out of service without interrupting any activity
in progress or causing random errors.
Blocks any new digital networking activities.
Waits for all activities in progress to be completed, such as background message transfers and
real-time name plays, before taking the hardware and software out of service.
Displays progress messages while waiting for any background message transfers or real-time names
to complete.
Use the Courtesy Up command to bring the LAN subsystem back into service. The Courtesy Down
condition is maintained across a system reload, restart, or power cycle. Only a Courtesy Up command
can clear the Courtesy Down condition.
.
The Shutdown command can be used to put the message server in an offline mode without
disabling the LAN subsystem. Refer to the Maintenance Command chapter, System Service Mode
Commands section in this volume.
When To Use Courtesy Up or Down
Courtesy Down
Use the Courtesy Down command before you do the following:
-
Service the LAN card hardware (such as for removal)
-
Take the message server down by powering off, reloading, etc.
-
Use the UPDATE program to make any of the following configuration changes:
-
-
-
Use the ADD, MODIFY, or DELETE commands for the LOCATION Table if the location involved
is a high-speed digital location
Turn off the digital networking feature in the SYSTEM PARAMETER Table; that is, set System
Parameter 225 — DIGITAL NETWORKING ENABLED to no.
Change the SLOTS Table for a LAN card
.
PB60019−01
The UPDATE program blocks these changes if the digital networking system is UP.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11-12
Installation and Maintenance Volume
To bring the LAN card down, at the @ prompt, enter
CD x
Enter
where x is the LAN card slot number
@CD x
STARTING LAN COURTESY DOWN...
LCH01 LCH02 LCH03 LCH04 LCH05 LCH06 LCH07 LCH08
IDLE IDLE SEND CONN IDLE IDLE SEND CONN
WAITING
WAITING
WAITING
WAITING
ALL LAN
FOR 4 LAN CHANNEL(S)
FOR 3 LAN CHANNEL(S)
FOR 2 LAN CHANNEL(S)
FOR 1 LAN CHANNEL(S)
CHANNELS ARE IDLE.
TO
TO
TO
TO
GO
GO
GO
GO
IDLE
IDLE
IDLE
IDLE
WAITING FOR 8 REAL-TIME NAMES TO FINISH PLAYING
LAN COURTESY DOWN COMPLETED SUCCESSFULLY.
@
Courtesy Up
To bring the LAN card up, at the @ prompt, enter
CU x
Enter
where x is the LAN card slot number
@CU 7
STARTING LAN COURTESY UP...
WAITING FOR LAN CARD TO START...
LAN CARD IN SLOT 7 STARTED
LAN COURTESY UP COMPLETED SUCCESSFULLY.
@
Courtesy Up or Down Errors
Any errors that occur while processing a Courtesy Up or Courtesy Down command are logged to the
Hardware Error Table. Some examples are as follows:
-
Timed out waiting for the LAN adapter to come UP
-
Timed out waiting for the LAN adapter to respond to a Courtesy Down request
-
Timed out waiting for the VCU to respond to a Courtesy Down request
-
Timed out waiting for the VCU to respond to the Enable-LAN message server request
Table 11-2 shows other informational or error messages displayed for these commands.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
LAN Installation and Configuration 11-13
Table 11-2 CD and CU for LAN — Messages and Descriptions
Status Messages
Description
SYSTEM DOES NOT HAVE
DIGITAL NETWORKING
FEATURE
Digital Networking feature is not available. To check for
SW-X0049 or SW-X0053 in the feature table, at the @ prompt,
enter L F.
LAN IS CURRENTLY DOWN
LAN is already down or in the process of being brought up when
the CD x command is entered.
LAN IS ALREADY UP
LAN is already up when the CU x command is entered.
COURTESY DOWN
ABORTED
Courtesy Down did not complete successfully because of an error
as shown by one of the other error messages.
COURTESY UP ABORTED
Courtesy Up did not complete successfully because of an error as
shown by one of the other error messages.
Effect of Pressing the Escape Key
The effect of pressing
process has gone.
-
-
-
PB60019−01
while a Courtesy Down command is in progress depends on how far the
If you press Escape before the message WAITING FOR N REAL-TIME NAMES TO FINISH
PLAYING is displayed, the message server aborts the CD command and leaves the LAN in service.
If you press Escape after the message WAITING FOR N REAL-TIME NAMES TO FINISH
PLAYING is displayed, the message server continues processing the CD command and gives the
message PLEASE WAIT ... The shutdown continues.
The effect of pressing
process has gone.
-
Escape
Escape
while a Courtesy Up command is in progress depends on how far the
If you press Escape before the message WAITING FOR LAN TO START is displayed, the message
server continues processing the CU x command and gives the message PLEASE WAIT ... The
Courtesy Up process continues.
If you press Escape after the message WAITING FOR LAN TO START is displayed, the message
server returns to the @ prompt. The message server continues processing the CU x command in the
background. It might take 2 to 3 minutes for the LAN to come UP after this message.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Internet Addressing 11A-1
APPENDIX A
INTERNET ADDRESSING
This appendix provides background information about internet addresses and how this information relates
to the OctelR 200/300 Digital Networking and other LAN-based features.
A TCP/IP* internet is a virtual network built by interconnecting physical networks with gateways.
Addressing is an essential ingredient that helps TCP/IP software hide physical network details and makes
the internet appear to be a single, uniform entity. For an Octel 200/300 to be able to talk to any other
system, a globally accepted method of identifying systems is needed. Often, host identifiers are classified
as names, addresses, or routes. A name identifies what an object is, an address identifies where it is, and a
route tells how to get there. Names, addresses, and routes really refer to successively lower levels of host
identifiers. In general, people usually prefer pronounceable names to identify machines, whereas software
works better with more compact binary representation of identifiers that we think of as addresses.
For addresses, the designers of TCP/IP chose a scheme analogous to physical network addressing in which
each host (or network connection) on the internet is assigned a unique 32-bit integer (4 bytes) IP address
that is used in all communication to the host. These integers are chosen so as to make routing efficient.
The bits of IP address for all hosts on a given network share a common prefix. Conceptually, each address
is a pair (netid, hostid), where netid identifies a network and hostid identifies a host on that network. In
practice, each IP address must have one of the first three forms shown in the following figure. For ease of
communication, IP addresses are written in the dotted decimal format with four decimal integers separated
by decimal points, where each integer gives the value of one octet of the IP address. Thus, the 32-bit address
10000000 00001010 00000010 00011110
is written
128.10.2.30
* Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. A set of communications protocols developed for the Defense Advanced Research Projects
Agency to internetwork dissimilar systems. It runs on a large number of computers and is supported by many hardware vendors from personal
computers to mainframes. It is used by many corporations and almost all American universities and federal organizations. The TCP protocol
controls the transfer of the data, and the IP protocol provides the routing mechanism.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11A-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
0 1234
8
Class A
0
Class B
1 0
Class C
1 1
0
Class D
1 1
1
0
Class E
1 1
1
1
16
netid
24
31
hostid
netid
hostid
netid
hostid
multicast address
0
reserved for future use
Note: The three primary forms (Classes A, B, and
C) can be distinguished by the first two bits.
The Five Forms of Internet (IP) Addresses
Given an IP address, its class can be determined from the three high-order bits, with two bits being
sufficient to distinguish among the three primary classes. The IP address has been defined in such a way
that it is possible to extract the hostid or netid portions quickly. Gateways use the netid as the basis for
routing and depend on such efficient extraction. The major advantage of encoding network information in
the IP address is that it makes efficient routing possible. Another advantage is that IP addresses can refer
to networks as well as hosts.
Special (Reserved) IP Addresses
By convention, hostid 0 is never assigned to an individual host. It refers to the given network. Also by
convention, any hostid consisting of all 1s is reserved for broadcast on the given network. This broadcast
address is called a directed broadcast address, which provides a powerful mechanism that allows a remote
system to send a single packet that will be broadcast on the specified network.
Another form of broadcast address consisting of all 32 1s is called the local network broadcast address or
limited broadcast address. This form may be used as part of a startup procedure before it learns its IP
address or the IP address of the local network. The class A address 127.0.0.0 is reserved for loopback and
is designed for testing and interprocess communication on the local machine. A packet sent to this
address will never appear on the network. The following figure lists all the combinations of 0s and 1s
used by IP itself.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Internet Addressing 11A-3
all 0s
class all 0s
ident.
This host*
host
all 1s
net
127
Host on this net*
Limited broadcast (local net)**
all 1s
anything (often 1)
Directed broadcast for net**
Loopback***
*
Allowed only at system startup and is never a valid destination address.
** Never a valid source address.
*** Should never appear on a network.
Note: The length of the net portion depends on its class.
Special Forms of IP Addresses
Subnet Addressing
The netid portion of an IP address is assigned to an organization by a central agency called IANA.[ The
individual organization is free to divide its hostid portion into multiple smaller physical networks called
subnets.
Suppose a site has a class B address. It has 16 bits of the address to use for its local portion. Suppose
there are eight physical networks at the site. For purposes of addressing efficiency, the organization could
take the top 3 bits from its local portion and assign one value to each of its eight physical networks. This
particular combination gives eight physical networks (subnets) with up to 8,192 hosts per subnetwork.
Another site may choose to assign 8 bits to the subnet, giving 256 subnets each with up to 256 hosts.
Refer to the following figure.
To allow maximum autonomy, the TCP/IP subnet standard allows the subnet partition to be selected on a
per-network basis. Once a partition has been selected for a particular network, machines attached to that
network are expected to use it.
The subnet mask is usually given to you by your LAN administrator along with your system’s IP address.
If your network doesn’t use a subnetting scheme, you should still set up the subnet mask to cover your
network portion. Refer to Example 3 in this chapter.
[
For information on how to get your own assigned IP address, contact Joyce K. Reynolds, (213) 882-1511 JKREY @
ISI.EDU Internet Assigned Numbers. Authority, USC-Information Sciences Institute, 4676 Admiralty Way, Marina
del Rey, California 90292-6695.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11A-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Internet part (netid)
Local part (hostid)
Using the original
IP address scheme.
Internet part
Subnet
Using the subnet
scheme.
Hostid
Conceptual Interpretation of a 32-Bit IP Address
Implementation of Subnets with Masks
The standard specifies that a site using subnet addressing must choose a 32-bit subnet mask for each
network. Bits in the subnet mask are set to 1 if the network treats the corresponding bit in the IP address
as part of the network address, and 0 if it treats the bit as part of the host identifier. For example, the
32-bit subnet mask
11111111 11111111 11111111 00000000
specified that the first three octets (bytes) identify the network and the fourth octet identifies a host on
that network. It is assumed that the subnet mask has 1s for all bits that correspond to the net portion of
the address. For example, the subnet mask for a class B network always includes the first two octets plus
zero or more subnet bits.
The standard does not require that the subnet bits be contiguous. However, it is recommended that sites
use contiguous subnet masks and they use the same mask throughout an entire set of physical networks
that share a network address because noncontiguous subnet masks make assigning host addresses and
understanding routing tables more difficult.
Configuration Implications
For a Octel 200/300 LAN network configuration, it is desirable to collect the subnet information from the
user in the same dotted decimal format used for obtaining IP addresses. The default shown in the
UPDATE questions is for only one network that has zero subnets. The default is derived from the netid
portion of the host’s own IP address.
Example 1 — Assume that the IP address assigned to a system is 157.156.26.1. This is represented in its
binary format
100111101 10011100 00011010 00000001
to note that this is a class B address.
Assume that there are ten different physical networks in this organization. Also assume that with future
growth, there will be up to 20 different physical networks in this organization. To represent ten subnets
requires 4 bits and to represent 20 subnets requires 5 bits — 5 bits is sufficient to represent up to 32
subnets, whereas 4 can represent only 16 subnets. Setting the 5 top bits of the hostid to 1 in addition to
the network portion for the class B address gives the following in binary format:
11111111 11111111 11111000 00000000
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Internet Addressing 11A-5
This is equivalent to
255.255.248.0
which is what the user would enter in reply to the UPDATE question:
Enter the subnet mask for this Digital Network (Default
255.255.0.0):255.255.248.0
Example 2 — Assume that the system administrator in this network wants to divide the network into 256
subnetworks having at most 256 hosts in each subnet. To represent 256 subnets requires 8 bits of subnet
mask information that need to be set to 1:
11111111 11111111 11111111 00000000
This is equivalent to
255.255.255.0
which is what the user would enter in reply to the UPDATE question:
Enter the subnet mask for this Digital Network (Default
255.255.0.0):255.255.255.0
Example 3 — Digital networking used for uniform numbering plan domain or multicabinet systems only.
If there is only one physical network, the system administrator may choose not to use subnets.
If there is no connectivity to any other InterNetworking device, any IP address may be used. However,
using a class C address (i.e., some number in the range 192.0.0.0 − 223.255.255.254) is usually suitable.
For example, for three Octel 200/300 cabinets on their own dedicated LAN segment, the IP addresses
might be
Cabinet 1 — 192.0.0.1
Cabinet 2 — 192.0.0.2
Cabinet 3 — 192.0.0.3
-
If you choose a class A address in the absence of subnets, set the subnet mask to 255.0.0.0.
-
If you choose a class B address in the absence of subnets, set the subnet mask to 255.255.0.0.
-
If you choose a class C address in the absence of subnets, set the subnet mask to 255.255.255.0.
For example, if your IP address is 192.1.2.3, your subnet mask would be 255.255.255.0.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
SNMP
11B-1
APPENDIX B
SIMPLE NETWORK MANAGEMENT
PROTOCOL (SNMP)
11B.1 UNDERSTANDING SIMPLE NETWORK MANAGEMENT PROTOCOL
(SNMP)
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is the standard digital network management protocol in
TCP/IP* networks. An SNMP management application is typically an off-the-shelf software package run
on a PC, terminal, or workstation by a network administrator or technician to manage and troubleshoot a
network. Octel 200/300 message servers with LAN, used for digital networking and other LAN based
features, support communication with the SNMP manager application and management information bases
(MIBs) to supply data about the Octel 200/300 message servers.
.
MIB (management information base) is a directory that lists the logical names of all information
resources residing in a network and pertinent to the network’s management.
Three varieties of SNMP data support; the basic MIB, the private MIB, and hardware error traps, are
provided. Data item groups from the MIBs are supplied to the SNMP manager application as replies to
queries. The SNMP manager application may schedule queries or request them on demand. The hardware
error traps are initiated by the managed Octel 200/300 when a hardware error generates an alarm.
Basic MIB
Internet MIB-II Standard
Private MIB
Specific data items that identify an Octel 200/300 and describe its digital
network traffic and hardware errors. Refer to Appendix C for a listing of
the private MIB and instructions on obtaining the private MIB file from
Internet.
Hardware Error Traps
A notification from the Octel 200/300 to the SNMP manager application
that a hardware error has reached an alarm threshold.
* Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. A set of communications protocols developed for the Defense Advanced Research Projects
Agency to internetwork dissimilar systems. It runs on a large number of computers and is supported by many hardware vendors from personal
computers to mainframes. It is used by many corporations and almost all American universities and federal organizations. The TCP protocol controls the transfer of the data, and the IP protocol provides the routing mechanism.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11B-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
11B.2 BASIC MIB — INTERNET MIB-II
Octel has implemented a subset of the Internet MIB-II Standard. This standard provides access to
low-level TCP/IP and network monitoring information such as
-
Number of packets sent and received
-
Number of error packets at Ethernet, TCP, SNMP, and UDP levels
-
Current UDP socket information
-
Current connection information
-
SNMP requests and replies
More specifically, Internet MIB-II presents 175 attribute variables in the following nine groups:
.
AVAYA has implemented a subset of variables defined in the MIB-II Standard. Contact AVAYA
for a complete list of which variables are supported in the AVAYA implementation.
-
System
-
Interfaces
-
Internet Protocol (IP)
-
Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)
-
Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
-
User Datagram Protocol (UDP)
-
Exterior Gateway Protocol (EGP)
-
Media Specific MIBs
-
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
Refer to the Internet MIB-II Standard Specification for additional information that describes each
variable in detail. The documentation manuals for the SNMP manager software that you are using may
also provide useful information.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
SNMP
11B-3
11B.3 PRIVATE MIB
Introduction
The private MIB consists of about 60 variables whose data values are divided into various groups defined
by the MIB file hierarchy. There are 23 variables that are repeated from each location configured. The
actual division of the groups as displayed on the SNMP manager application depends on the MIB
descriptor file being used.
For example, SUNNET SNMP Manager (by Sun Microsystems) displays the private MIB variables in
four groups representing the system configuration (system ID information), the combined data from the
Digital Network Traffic Report and specified LOCATION Table data fields, the Digital Network
Performance Report, and the Hardware Error Table.
.
The examples in this chapter were formatted by the SUNNET SNMP Manager software package.
Your actual SNMP screens may look different, depending on the specific SNMP Manager software
package and MIB descriptor file you are using.
The four parts of the private MIB collect defined fields of data from the Digital Network Performance
Report, the Digital Network Traffic Report, the LOCATION Table, and the Hardware Error Table. The
relevant fields are organized into groups of associated variable that are retrieved from the Octel 200/300
by SNMP protocol queries from the SNMP manager application.
The four reports available in the private MIB are
CONFIG
Configuration information that identifies the current cabinet.
LOCTABLE
Summary of information for a digital network location.
DNETSTAT
The Digital Network Traffic Report
HWERRTABLE
The system Hardware Error Table
These are described in detail in the sections following.
CONFIG
This part of the private MIB contains configuration information that identifies to the current cabinet,
including:
-
System name
-
System serial number
-
System ID
These variables are taken from the Digital Network Performance Report.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11B-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Following is an example of CONFIG system information for the current cabinet, with system name
[ works9 ]:
Mon MM DD 18:32:29 YYYY [ works9 ] : Quick Dump: VMX−DIAL.config
systemName=OCTEL
sysSerialNum=123456
systemID=98765
LOCTABLE
This part of the private MIB contains the Digital Network Traffic Report and data from the LOCATION
Table. It shows traffic information such as connections and messages to each other digital location from
the current cabinet. It also shows some configuration information for each digital location, including
name, IP address, connection type, etc.
Following is an example of LOCTABLE:
Mon MM DD 18:33:42 YYYY [ works9 ] : Quick Dump: VMX−DIAL.locTable
KEY=1
locIndex=1
locName=ATLNT2
locIpAddr=157.156.16.10
locLinkType=lowspeed
locInDomain=no
locColocated=yes
route1=TO2
route2=
route3=
cattempts=16
cfailures=0
cdroppeds=0
cbusys=0
cdayMin=1
cnightMin=0
mdAttempts=16
mdFails=0
mdRetries=0
mdDiskfulls=0
mdMbxfails=0
mdMinute=12
locPlayedNames=0
locLinkdrops=16
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
LOCATION Table
Digital Network Traffic Report
PB60019−01
SNMP
11B-5
DNETSTAT
This part of the private MIB contains the Digital Network Performance Report. It shows a high-level
summary of all digital networking activity, such as messages sent/received, LAN channel usage, and
connections.
Following is an example of DNETSTAT:
Mon MM DD 18:32:47 YYYY [ works9 ] : Quick Dump: VMX−DIAL.dNetstat
sentMsgs=0
recvMsgs=0
recvNames=0
playedRtNames=0
secSent=0
secRecv=0
lchNumber=4
sec50pct=0
sec75pct=0
sec100pct=0
lchInSendSec=0
lchInRecvSec=0
outAttempts=0
outRejects=0
outGotBusys=0
inAttempts=0
inRejects=0
inGotBusys=0
lanAvailPct=100
HWERRTABLE
This part of the private MIB is a listing of the system Hardware Error Table. It shows the error type,
when it occurred, and some additional error-specific data fields. The Hardware Error Table output is not
filtered to exclude errors not relating to Digital Networking. All hardware errors are reported.
Following is an example of HWERRTABLE:
Mon MM DD 18:33:21 YYYY [ works9 ] : Quick Dump: VMX−DIAL.hwerrTable
KEY
heIndex
heErType
heSlot
1
2
3
64
64
24
6
6
4
1
2
3
PB60019−01
heMon
jun
jun
jun
heDay
heHour
heMin
6
6
6
16
16
16
41
42
53
heChnum
00000000
00000000
00000001
hePrio
heCnt
3
3
2
1
1
99
heData1
heData2
heData3
heData4
00000002
00000009
00000005
00000002
00000004
00000001
00000000
00000004
00000004
00000000
00000004
00000003
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11B-6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
SNMP Query Tracing
When an SNMP query is received by an Octel 200/300, the event is logged in the CP trace. Each type of
query has an identifying number that appears in the AUX field of the CP trace.
CPT Trace Logged To
Identifying Number
001
Digital Network Performance Report or System Configuration
002
Digital Network Traffic Report
003
Hardware Error Table
Following is an example of a CP trace:
@LOG PR CPT
Specify Print Option(s):
”S”tart<time>,’E”nd<time>,”L”ine<length>,”P”age<length>”\”
”C”ontinuous
Filters: PR TY EV AU MB MS SL UN LI SO D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
>s94 09 08 14 45 ev snmp
MM/DD/YY
D1 D2 D3
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
09/08/94
HH:MM:SS PRT TYPE
D4 D5
14:45:37
LAN_IN
14:45:37
LAN_OUT
14:45:43
LAN_IN
14:45:43
LAN_OUT
14:45:48
LAN_IN
14:45:48
LAN_OUT
14:46:28
LAN_IN
14:46:28
LAN_OUT
14:47:59
LAN_IN
14:47:59
LAN_OUT
14:48:04
LAN_IN
14:48:04
LAN_OUT
14:48:10
LAN_IN
14:48:10
LAN_OUT
14:48:15
LAN_IN
14:48:15
LAN_OUT
EVENT
AUX
SNMP_QRY
SNMP_SND
SNMP_QRY
SNMP_SND
SNMP_QRY
SNMP_SND
SNMP_QRY
SNMP_SND
SNMP_QRY
SNMP_SND
SNMP_QRY
SNMP_SND
SNMP_QRY
SNMP_SND
SNMP_QRY
SNMP_SND
001
001
002
002
002
002
002
002
003
003
003
003
003
003
003
003
MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L
SOURCE
Type 1 queries produce a single CPT entry. Type 2 queries produce one entry per network location
configured with. Type 3 queries produce one entry more than the number of error entries.
SNMP Private MIB Information Refresh
In the Octel 200/300, the LAN card maintains a local copy of private MIB information. The LAN card
updates this copy with new information from the CPU at intervals of 2 minutes
When the SNMP manager queries the LAN card for private MIB information, the LAN card responds
immediately from its local copy. The MIB information sent may not reflect changes that have occurred in
the last two minutes, until the LAN card refreshes its copy from the CPU.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
SNMP
11B-7
11B.4 USING SNMP TRAPS
SNMP traps are SNMP protocol messages initiated by the managed system to report a predefined error
condition. For the Octel 200/300, these errors are hardware errors as logged in the Hardware Error Table.
In addition to the name and ID of the logging system, all information for the hardware error that caused
the trap is listed.
Hardware errors have four priorities, ranging from priority 0 (lowest) to priority 3 (highest). An alarm
notification trap is made depending on the combination of the error priority and the number of times the
error (the same type with the same data) is logged. An alarm notification trap is made for the following
combinations of priority and number of times the error is logged:
.
Error Priority
Number of Times
Error Logged
3
1
2
25
1
50
No alarm notification is made for priority 0, which reports the test of the alarm (command TE A).
Conditions for SNMP Trap Notification
The CPU generates an SNMP trap request to the LAN card under the following conditions:
-
The SNMP manager system is configured, which means
-
−
System Parameter 235 — LAN: SNMP MANAGER IP ADDRESS, is configured.
or
-
-
-
.
− Both System Parameter 233 — LAN: NAME SERVER IP ADDRESS, and System
Parameter 236 — LAN: SNMP MANAGER HOST ASCII NAME, are configured.
System Parameter 242 — LAN: SEND TRAP TO THE SNMP MANAGER ON ALARM, is set to
YES.
A hardware error is logged a sufficient number of times for its priority to cause a system alarm
notification.
An alarm outcall is repeated until acknowledgment. There is no such acknowledgment from the
SNMP manager system for SNMP traps. SNMP notification is done only once per occurrence.
Configuring SNMP
The following information must be configured through system parameters:
-
The SNMP manager’s IP address. System Parameter 235 — SNMP MANAGER IP ADDRESS
Sometimes SNMP managers may only have an ASCII name configured, and the actual mapping from the
ASCII name to an IP address is performed by a name server. In this case, the following system
parameters must be configured.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11B-8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
-
The IP address of the name server. System Parameter 233 — LAN: NAME SERVER IP ADDRESS
The ASCII name of the SNMP manager. System Parameter 236 — LAN: SNMP MANAGER HOST
ASCII NAME
When the same hardware error is logged a sufficient number of times (the number is predefined), an
alarm outcall is made. To notify the SNMP manager of the first occurrence of this alarm outcall, the
following system parameter must be enabled:
-
System Parameter 242 — LAN: SEND TRAP TO THE SNMP MANAGER ON ALARM
The default setting for System Parameter 242 is NO. If the SNMP manager system is not configured,
System Parameter 242 cannot be set to YES, and the following message is given:
Please configure system parameter 235, or 236 and 233, for the SNMP
manager system first.
For purposes of authentication and providing access privileges, the SNMP manager and agents exchange
SNMP READ COMMUNITY and SNMP READ WRITE COMMUNITY names. As the names suggest,
members of a READ COMMUNITY can only “read” the SNMP variables. Members of a READ WRITE
COMMUNITY can not only “read” the SNMP variables through SNMP queries but also modify those
SNMP variables that are modifiable. The following system parameters are used to specify the READ and
READ WRITE communities:
-
System Parameter 239 — LAN: SNMP READ COMMUNITY
-
System Parameter 240 — LAN: SNMP READ WRITE COMMUNITY
The character strings in System Parameter 239 and System Parameter 240 are transmitted between the
Octel 200/300 and the SNMP manager application to verify each other’s access to the data being
requested in a query. If the character strings do not match, the queries will fail.
In the SYSTEM PARAMETER Table in UPDATE, even if a string is entered in mixed upper- and
lowercase, it is stored in the system as uppercase. However, when the string is transmitted to the LAN
card, it is then converted to all lowercase. It is this lowercase string that must match the community read
and write strings, as configured in the SNMP manager.
The following examples show this conversion process.
.M SYS 239
Enter the SNMP Read Community Name.
(1 − 19 characters, empty line = PA_LAB_READ)
MOD:PA_Lab_Read
Enter system parameter index.
MOD:240
Enter the SNMP Read Write Community Name.
(1 − 19 characters, empty line = PA_LAB_WRITE)
MOD:PA_Lab_Write
Enter system parameter index.
MOD:
.L SYS 239−240
INDEX VALUE
239 PA_LAB_READ
240 PA_LAB_WRITE
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
(LST?MOD)
L/M
L/M
PARAMETER NAME:
LAN: SNMP READ COMMUNITY
LAN: SNMP READ WRITE COMMUNITY
PB60019−01
SNMP
11B-9
@CON 6
Connecting to LAN in slot 6
LAN (Ethernet) Link: MM/DD/YYYY 12:39:04 (018664b6:018665b6) Rev. 1.1.2
Current Time: 09/12/2000 17:20:42 @ Slot 6
LAN<l cfg
Installation Name : V200_1
VMX System ID
: 200111
Host Name
: v200_1
Domain Name
:
Internet Address : 148.147.250.114
Subnet Mask
: 255.255.255.0
Ethernet Address :00−c0−94−00−00−0e
GateWay Address
: 0.0.0.0
Name Server Addr :0.0.0.0
SNMP − Manager
Manager Name
Sys Name
Location
Contact
RdCommunity
RdWRCommunity
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
148.147.250.28
sunnet
v200_1
pa_lab_read
pa_lab_write
Example of an SNMP Trap Report
Following is an example of an SNMP trap report generated on a system error alarm:
Save...
Report: 65
Device:
1
65
Mon MM DD 17:40:33 YYYY [ works9 ] : Trap:
sequence=55
receive−time=Mon Jun 6 17:40:33 2000
version=0
community=public
enterprise=octel.octelOIDs.octelPlatforms.vmx200.8.1.0
source−time=00:00:50.80
trap−type=enterprise specific trap: 1
sysDescr=OCTEL
− VMX200 Voice Mail System, Id: 98765 Rev 8.1.
KEY=65535
heErType=64
heSlot=6
heMon=jun
heDay=6
heHour=16
heMin=42
heChnum=0
hePrio=3
heCnt=1
heData1=00000009
heData2=00000004
heData3=00000004
heData4=00000004
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11B-10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
SNMP Trap CP Trace Example
Following is an example of a CP trace for an SNMP trap:
MM/DD/YY HH:MM:SS PRT TYPE
D1 D2 D3 D4 D5
EVENT
AUX MBX/EXTN MSG# SL U L SOURCE
MM/DD/YY
SNMP_TRAP
001
12:06:08
LAN_OUT
The value 001 (currently the only one defined) in the auxiliary field (AUX) indicates that the SNMP trap
is being sent because of a hardware error.
Hardware Error Table Entries for an SNMP Trap
A hardware error type 42, DATA1 = 17(hex) will be logged if a trap needs to be sent but the SNMP
system manager is not known. For example,
@L H
THU MM/DD 09:13:17 YYYY ABC,INC
ID:123456 S/N:123456 PBX:23
CLEARED: 05/19 09:10
TYPE SLOT CHNL PRIO DATE
TIME
42
09:13
06
00
1
05/19
#BAD DATA1
1
DATA2
DATA3
DATA4
00000017 00000000 00000000 00000000
For the SNMP manager system to be configured, either its IP address (System Parameter 235) or its host
name (System Parameter 236) and the IP address of the domain name server (System Parameter 233)
must be known.
Once an SNMP trap has been generated, the L H command displays this information. For example,
@L H
THU MM/DD 13:22:08 YYYY ASKME
ID:123456 S/N:123456 PBX:23
CLEARED: 05/19 12:51
*** SNMP MANAGER SYSTEM HAS BEEN NOTIFIED ***
TYPE SLOT CHNL PRIO DATE
33
64
01
06
00
00
3
3
TIME
05/19 12:54
05/19 13:01
#BAD DATA1
1
1
DATA2
DATA3
DATA4
00000000 00000003 00000002 00000000
00000002 00000001 00000000 00000000
After successful completion of an SNMP TEST, hardware error type 64, DATA1 = 0E(hex) with a
priority of 0 is logged.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
SNMP
11B-11
Testing SNMP Trap Functionality
An Octel 200/300 can inform an SNMP manager system when a qualified hardware error is logged. The
TEST SNMP command tests the mechanism and gives assurance that the Octel 200/300 can
communicate to the SNMP manager system, is provided.
Before a TEST SNMP command can be used, System Parameter 242 must be set to YES, and the SNMP
manager system must be configured, which means that either System Parameter 235 or System
Parameters 233 and 236 must be configured.
TEST SNMP Operation
At the @ prompt, enter
TEST SNMP
Enter
The Octel 200/300 then generates hardware error type 64, DATA1 = 0E, with a priority of 0. The system
sends a trap on this error to the SNMP manager system. The user will be informed that the alarm has
been sent and the test is completed.
The user may then have the SNMP manager system pull up the private MIBs for hardware errors on the
Octel 200/300. Successful completion of the test, however, does not guarantee that the SNMP manager
system did indeed receive the trap. The SNMP protocol does not provide for an acknowledgment from
the manager system. It is recommended that the SNMP manager system be pinged before doing TEST
SNMP.
When TEST SNMP is complete, the Hardware Error Table should be listed. The listing will include the
type 64 error and the following message:
*** SNMP MANAGER SYSTEM HAS BEEN NOTIFIED ***
The C H command should be used to clear both of these conditions.
TEST SNMP Messages
On successful completion of the TEST SNMP command, the following message is displayed:
ALARM HAS BEEN SENT TO THE SNMP MANAGER SYSTEM.
If for any reason the SNMP trap could not be sent, one of the following messages is displayed, as
appropriate:
PB60019−01
-
PLEASE CONFIGURE SYSTEM PARAMETERS 235 OR 236 AND 233.
-
LAN COMMUNICATION IS NOT UP.
-
SYSTEM DOES NOT HAVE DIGITAL NETWORKING FEATURE.
-
SYSTEM PARAMETER FOR DIGITAL NETWORKING IS NOT ENABLED.
-
SYSTEM PARAMETER FOR SNMP TRAPS IS NOT ENABLED.
-
HARDWARE ERROR TABLE IS FULL. PLEASE CLEAR IT FIRST.
-
USER ABORT ...
-
SYSTEM ERROR. PLEASE CONTACT TECHNICAL SUPPORT.
-
FAILED TO SEND SNMP TRAP.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11B-12
Installation and Maintenance Volume
TEST SNMP Examples
Following is an example of a successful TEST SNMP:
@TEST SNMP
ALARM HAS BEEN SENT TO THE SNMP MANAGER SYSTEM.
Following is an example of an unsuccessful TEST SNMP:
@TEST SNMP
LAN COMMUNICATION IS NOT UP.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel Private MIB 11C-1
APPENDIX C
OCTEL PRIVATE MIB
11C.1 SAMPLE INTERNET SESSION TO OBTAIN THE PRIVATE MIB
This appendix provides a sample Internet session for obtaining the Octel Private MIB from Internet and a
listing of the Octel Private MIB.
To obtain the private MIB file, connect to the Internet and then do FTP ANONYMOUS from ftp.ISI.EDU
(128.9.176.20). Following is a sample session:
prompt>
prompt>ftp.isi.edu
Name (148.147.1.12:username): anonymous
331 Guest login ok, send your complete e−mail address as password.
Password:<type in your e−mail address here>
230 Guest login ok, access restrictions apply.
ftp>cd mib
ftp>get octel−vmxdial.mib
200 PORT command successful.
150 Opening ASCII mode data connection for octel−vmxdial.mib (210278 bytes).
226 Transfer complete.
local:octel−vmxdial.mib remote:octel−mvxdial.mib
216459 bytes received in 54 seconds (3.9 Kbytes/s)
ftp>quit
222 Goodbye.
prompt>
.
PB60019−01
Bold entries are what you type. Entries enclosed in < > indicate that you should substitute with the
right data.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11C-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
11C.2 LISTING OF OCTEL PRIVATE MIB
VMX−DIAL DEFINITIONS ::= BEGIN
−−
−− VMX−DIAL private MIB definitions for the VMX200/300
−− Filename: vmxdial.mib
−− This MIB definition is provided for use with OCtel’s VMX200/300
−− product only.
−−
−− Contact Person:
−−
LAN Engineering Group
−−
Octel Communication Corporation
−−
−− NOTE:
−− 1. This file will be published electronically in
−−
venera.isi.edu and can be obtained using ftp anonymous.
−−
−− 2. Sunnet Manager User:
−−
Sunnet doesn’t support multi−dimensional table. To make this file works
−−
with subnet, the mnemonic for the second level table need to be replaced
−−
by the number it represents. Example:
−−
locEntry is a table entry, and
−−
route1 is defined as locroute.1 where locroute is locEntry.7
−−
the above definition need to be changed as follows:
−−
. remove the definition for locroute
−−
. route1 is defined as locEntry.7.1
−−
This need to be done for all multi−dimensional tables.
−−
IMPORTS
enterprises, NetworkAddress, IpAddress, Counter, Gauge,
TimeTicks
FROM RFC1155−SMI
OBJECT−TYPE
FROM RFC−1212
DisplayString
FROM RFC1213−MIB;
octel
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { enterprises 662 }
octelOIDs
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { octel 1 }
octelPlatforms OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { octelOIDs 1}
vmx200
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { octelPlatforms 3 }
vmx300
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { octelPlatforms 4 }
octelProducts OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { octel 3 }
vmxDial
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { octelProducts 1 }
config
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { vmxDial 1 }
dNetstat
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { vmxDial 2 }
location
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { vmxDial 3 }
hwerr
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { vmxDial 4 }
−− dNetstat subtrees
message
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { dNetstat 1 }
lanCh
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { dNetstat 2 }
lanConn
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { dNetstat 3 }
systemName
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX DisplayString (SIZE (0..255))
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”VMX System Name, from Configuration”
::= { config 1 }
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel Private MIB 11C-3
sysSerialNum
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX DisplayString (SIZE (0..255))
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”VMX System Serial Number.”
::= { config 2 }
systemID
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX DisplayString (SIZE (0..255))
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”VMX System Identification Number.”
::= { config 3 }
sentVoiceMsgs
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Total number of voice messages sent to the networks”
::= { message 1 }
recvVoiceMsgs
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Total number of voice messages received from the networks”
::= { message 2 }
sentFaxMsgs
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Total number of fax messages sent to the networks”
::= { message 3 }
recvFaxMsgs
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Total number of fax messages received from the networks”
::= { message 4 }
recvNames
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Total number of name received from the networks”
::= { message 5 }
playedRtNames
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Total number of Real Time network name played”
::= { message 6 }
secSent OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11C-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Total number of seconds of message sent to the networks”
::= { message 7 }
secRecv OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Total number of seconds of message received from the networks”
::= { message 8 }
lchNumber
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Maximum number of LAN channel available in the system.”
::= { lanCh 1 }
sec50pct
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Total number of second that 50 percent of lan channel is busy”
::= { lanCh 2 }
sec75pct
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Total number of second that 75 percent of lan channel is busy”
::= { lanCh 3 }
sec100pct
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Total number of second that all of lan channel is busy”
::= { lanCh 4 }
lchInSendSec
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of second LCH is in used for sending message”
::= { lanCh 5 }
lchInRecvSec
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of second LCH is in used for receiving message”
::= { lanCh 6 }
outAttempts
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of time an outgoing lan connection is attempted”
::= { lanConn 1 }
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel Private MIB 11C-5
outRejects
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of time an outgoing lan connection is rejected”
::= { lanConn 2 }
outGotBusys
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of time an outgoing lan connection is rejected,
due to all LCH busy”
::= { lanConn 3 }
inAttempts
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of time an incoming lan connection is requested”
::= { lanConn 4 }
inRejects
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of time an incoming lan connection is rejected”
::= { lanConn 5 }
inGotBusys
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of time an incoming lan connection is rejected,
due to all LCH busy”
::= { lanConn 6 }
lanAvailPct
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Percentage of LAN availability.”
::= { dNetstat 4 }
locTable
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX SEQUENCE OF LocEntry
ACCESS not−accessible
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”List of active Digital Network Location.”
::= { location 1 }
locEntry
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX LocEntry
ACCESS not−accessible
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Each entry contains info about the Network Location.”
INDEX
{ locIndex }
::= { locTable 1 }
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11C-6
Installation and Maintenance Volume
LocEntry
::= SEQUENCE {
locIndex
INTEGER,
locName
DisplayString (SIZE
locIpAddr
IpAddress,
locLinkType
DisplayString,
locInDomain
DisplayString,
locColocated
DisplayString,
route1
DisplayString (SIZE
route2
DisplayString (SIZE
route3
DisplayString (SIZE
cattempts
Counter,
cfailures
Counter,
cdroppeds
Counter,
cbusys
Counter,
cdayMin
INTEGER,
cnightMin
INTEGER,
mdvcAttempts
Counter,
mdvcFails
Counter,
mdvcRetries
Counter,
mdfxAttempts
Counter,
mdfxFails
Counter,
mdfxRetries
Counter,
mdDiskfulls
Counter,
mdMbxfails
Counter,
mdMinute
INTEGER,
locPlayedNames
Counter,
locLinkdrops
Counter,
locAnalogstndbys
Counter
}
locIndex
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
(0..255)),
(0..255)),
(0..255)),
(0..255)),
PB60019−01
Octel Private MIB 11C-7
DESCRIPTION
”Index of this Location Entry”
::= { locEntry 1 }
locName
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX DisplayString (SIZE (0..255))
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”System Name of This Location Entry, SELF means this system”
::= { locEntry 2 }
locIpAddr
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX IpAddress
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Internet Address of this Location”
::= { locEntry 3 }
locLinkType
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER {
lowspeed(1),
highspeed(2)
}
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Type of the network interface”
::= { locEntry 4 }
locInDomain
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER {
no(1),
yes(2)
}
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Whether this location is in the same Uniform Numbering Plan
domain. ”
::= { locEntry 5 }
locColocated
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER {
no(1),
yes(2)
}
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Whether this location is in the same location.”
::= { locEntry 6 }
locroute
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { locEntry 7 }
route1
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX DisplayString (SIZE (0..255))
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”First Entry in the Route Table for this location.”
::= { locroute 1 }
route2
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX DisplayString (SIZE (0..255))
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11C-8
Installation and Maintenance Volume
DESCRIPTION
”Second Entry in the Route Table for this location.”
::= { locroute 2 }
route3
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX DisplayString (SIZE (0..255))
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Third Entry in the Route Table for this location.”
::= { locroute 3 }
locConn OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { locEntry 8 }
cattempts
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of times LAN connection attempted.”
::= { locConn 1 }
cfailures
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of times LAN connection to this location failed.”
::= { locConn 2 }
cdroppeds
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of times LAN connection to this location dropped.”
::= { locConn 3 }
cbusys
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of times All LAN Connection is busy.”
::= { locConn 4 }
cdayMin
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of minutes(day time) LAN connection is established.”
::= { locConn 5 }
cnightMin
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of minutes(night time) LAN connection is established.”
::= { locConn 6 }
msgDelivery
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { locEntry 9 }
mdvcAttempts
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of voice message delivery attempts to this location.”
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel Private MIB 11C-9
::= { msgDelivery 1 }
mdvcFails
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of voice message delivery failures to this location.”
::= { msgDelivery 2 }
mdvcRetries
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of voice message delivery retries to this location.”
::= { msgDelivery 3 }
mdfxAttempts
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of fax message delivery attempts to this location.”
::= { msgDelivery 4 }
mdfxFails
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of fax message delivery failures to this location.”
::= { msgDelivery 5 }
mdfxRetries
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of fax message delivery retries to this location.”
::= { msgDelivery 6 }
mdDiskfulls
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of message delivery to this location fails due to
disk full.”
::= { msgDelivery 7 }
mdMbxfails
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of message delivery to this location fails due to
mailbox verification failure.”
::= { msgDelivery 8 }
mdMinute
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Total number of message (in minute) delivered to
this location.”
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11C-10
Installation and Maintenance Volume
::= { msgDelivery 9 }
locPlayedNames OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of Real Time Network Name Played from this location.”
::= { locEntry 10 }
locLinkdrops
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of time LAN connection dropped, High Speed link only.”
::= { locEntry 11 }
locAnalogstndbys OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX Counter
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Number of times Analog Standby used to this location.”
::= { locEntry 12 }
hwerrTable
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX SEQUENCE OF HwerrEntry
ACCESS not−accessible
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Table of Hardware errors.”
::= { hwerr 1 }
hwerrEntry
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX HwerrEntry
ACCESS not−accessible
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Hardware Error table Entry”
INDEX
{ heIdx }
::= { hwerrTable 1 }
HwerrEntry
::= SEQUENCE {
heIdx
INTEGER,
heType
INTEGER,
heSlot
INTEGER,
heMon
INTEGER,
heDay
INTEGER,
heHour
INTEGER,
heMin
INTEGER,
heCh
INTEGER,
hePrio
INTEGER,
heCnt
INTEGER,
heData1
OCTET STRING,
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel Private MIB 11C-11
heData2
OCTET STRING,
heData3
OCTET STRING,
heData4
OCTET STRING
}
heIdx
heType
heSlot
heMon
heDay
heHour
PB60019−01
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Index of this Hardware Entry”
::= { hwerrEntry 1 }
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Error Type of this hardare error.”
::= { hwerrEntry 2 }
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Slot Number of this Hardware Error Entry”
::= { hwerrEntry 3 }
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER {
jan(1),
feb(2),
mar(3),
apr(4),
may(5),
jun(6),
jul(7),
aug(8),
sep(9),
oct(10),
nov(11),
dec(12)
}
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Month in which this Hardware Error Entry occurred”
::= { hwerrEntry 4 }
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Day on which this Hardware Error Entry occurred”
::= { hwerrEntry 5 }
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
11C-12
Installation and Maintenance Volume
”Hour on which this Hardware Error Entry occurred”
::= { hwerrEntry 6 }
heMin
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Minute on which this Hardware Error Entry occurred”
::= { hwerrEntry 7 }
heCh
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX OCTET STRING
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Channel Number of this Hardware Error Entry”
::= { hwerrEntry 8 }
hePrio
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Priority of this Hardware Error Entry”
::= { hwerrEntry 9 }
heCnt
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Frequency of this hardare error.”
::= { hwerrEntry 10 }
heData1
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX OCTET STRING
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Data1 of this hardare error.”
::= { hwerrEntry 11 }
heData2
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX OCTET STRING
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Data2 of this hardare error.”
::= { hwerrEntry 12 }
heData3
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX OCTET STRING
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Data3 of this hardare error.”
::= { hwerrEntry 13 }
heData4
OBJECT−TYPE
SYNTAX OCTET STRING
ACCESS read−only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
”Data4 of this hardare error.”
::= { hwerrEntry 14 }
hwerrTrap
TRAP−TYPE
ENTERPRISE octel
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Octel Private MIB 11C-13
VARIABLES { sysDescr, heType, heSlot, heMon, heDay,
heHour, heMin, heCh, hePrio, heCnt,
heData1, heData2, heData3, heData4 }
DESCRIPTION
”A hwerrTrap signifies that the VMX system has hardware errors
logged. This trap is sent if the user has configured it.”
::= 1
END
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
12
PROCEDURES
Chapter Contents
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.4
12.5
12.6
12.7
PB60019−01
Electronic Feature Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1
Floppy Disk Backup Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-3
Backing Up All Names, Greetings, Scripted Messages, Sequential Messages,
and Personal Distribution List Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-4
Backing Up All Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-6
Backing Up Local Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-8
Backing Up Network Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-10
Backing Up Greetings by COS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-12
Backing Up a Single Greeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-14
Backing Up a Scripted or Sequential Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-16
Backing Up All Personal Distribution List Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-18
Backing Up Language Prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-20
Floppy Disk Restore Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-22
Restoring All Names, Greetings, Scripted Messages, Sequential Messages,
and Personal Distribution List Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-23
Restoring All Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-25
Restoring Local Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-27
Restoring a Name to a Different Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-29
Restoring Network Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-31
Restoring a Single Greeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-33
Restoring a Greeting to a Different Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-34
Restoring a Scripted or Sequential Mailbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-35
Restoring All Personal Distribution List Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-36
Restoring Language Prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-37
Floppy Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-39
Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-40
Hard Disk Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-41
Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-41
Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-41
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-41
Hard Disk Add . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-45
Hard Disk Copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-49
Hard Disk Remove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-52
Hard Disk Replace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-56
Hard Disk Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-60
Adding Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-70
Upgrade Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-70
Adding Language Prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-73
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Octel 200/300
Quick Reference Guide
Procedures
Section
Command
Electronic Feature
Delivery/Removal
Other Necessary Information
Order Administration department adds
optional software.
Greeting
Backup/Restore
FLOPPY
Backs up and restores greetings, names,
scripted and sequential messages to and from
hard disk and floppy disks. Floppy directory
displays type of message backed up and from
which mailbox.
Disk Options
DISKO
Provides options for the addition, removal, or
replacement of a hard disk drive, or for
system restore.
PB60019−01
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
Procedures
12.1
12-1
ELECTRONIC FEATURE DELIVERY
The Option Control Chip (OCC), located on the Motherboard in Shelf A, contains the features the OctelR 200/300
is equipped with. The following features can be added to Octel 200/300.
Option Number
SW-X0008
SW-X0009
SW-X0020
SW-X0021
SW-X0022
SW-X0024
SW-X0026
SW-X0027
SW-X0028
SW-X0029
SW-X0030
SW-X0032
SW-X0033
SW-X0035
SW-X0050
SW-X0055
SW-X0056
SW-X0057
SW−X0060
SW−X0062
Description
Name and Greeting Redundancy
Message Redundancy
Incoming Call Restriction
Call Queuing (formerly FIFO Queuing)
OctelForms (formerly Scripted Prompting)
Works for Serenadet
Works for Serenade with the Octel 200/300
Works for Serenade Application Development Kit
Works for Serenade 3270 Host Interface
Works for Serenade Application Controlled Messaging
Works for Serenade Local Database Access
Works for Serenade Distributor’s Application Development Kit
Works for Serenade Async Host: 1−16 Sessions
Works for Serenade Async Host: 17−32 Sessions
VMX 5000 User Interface
TTD/TTY
Digital Gateway for the Octel 200 only
LAN Backup and Restore
Aria Telephone User Interface (TUI)
Allow Mailbox Password Reset
To see what options are installed on the Octel 200/300, at the @ prompt, enter
L F
Enter
The LIST FEATURE command displays the features installed, the number of ports, mailboxes, storage hours, and
languages purchased as well as the number of Visual Mailboxt and Fax Mail Plus licenses purchased. The
following is an example of what the screen shows. Refer to the Maintenance Commands chapter for an explanation
of the fields in the screen.
.
PB60019−01
For the X in the part numbers, substitute 4 for the Octel 200 and 3 for the Octel 300.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
12-2
Installation and Maintenance Volume
@L F
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−− SYSTEM SOFTWARE RELEASE S.x.x.x (MM/DD/YY) −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
DAY MM/DD HH:MM:SS YYYY SYSTEMNAME ID:XXX S/N:XXXXXX PBX:23
MODEL TYPE: OCTEL 300
SERIAL NUMBER: 200003
FEATURE PACKAGES:
SW−30008 SW−30009 SW−30020 SW−30021 SW−30022 SW−30024 SW−30026
SW−30028 SW−30029 SW−30030 SW−30032 SW−30033 SW−30035 SW−30050
SW−30056 SW−30057 SW−30060 SW−30062
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
Authorized
Used
Unused
Installed
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
Ports :
Analog
−−
0
0
0
Fax
−−
8
0
8
DSP
16
8
8
16
PIC
24
20
4
24
MBXs :
Voice
Non−Voice
VMB
Fax
900
9322
250
640
678
0
144
507
222
9322
106
133
SW−30027
SW−30055
10000
10000
900
10000
Storage : Hours
100
58
42
106
−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−
MAXIMUM NUMBER OF DRIVES: 6
MAXIMUM NUMBER OF PORTS: 64
MAXIMUM NUMBER OF SCHEDULE TABLE ENTRIES: 8
NUMBER OF LANGUAGES: 2
@
Contact your AVAYA representative to add −
-
Additional features
-
DSP or PIC Ports
-
Mailboxes
-
Disk storage hours
-
Languages
-
Visual Mailbox licenses
-
Fax Mail Plus mailbox licenses
.
Octel 200/300
The OCC must always remain with the message server it was purchased for. You cannot enter the UPDATE
program if the OCC is not installed on the Shelf A Motherboard. If the Shelf A Motherboard must be
replaced, the OCC assembly must be removed from the original board and installed on the replacement board.
S.4.1
PB60019−01
Procedures
12-3
12.2 FLOPPY DISK BACKUP PROCEDURES
This section includes procedures for backing up with floppy disks. If you plan to back up over the LAN, refer to the
Feature Description volume, LAN Backup and Restore chapter. Floppy disk backup procedures back up:
-
All names
-
An individual name in a mailbox
-
All greetings
-
All greetings by COS
-
An individual greeting in a mailbox
-
All messages in a Scripted Prompt mailbox, or in a Sequential Greeting mailbox
-
All messages in all Scripted and Sequential Greeting mailboxes
-
Personal Distribution List names for all mailboxes
-
Personal Distribution List names for an individual mailbox
-
Network Names
-
-
All names, greetings, messages in Scripted and Sequential Greeting mailboxes, and Personal Distribution List
names
All prompts or a single prompt
.
Use 3.5 inch high-density floppy disks for Backup
After the BACKUP option has been selected, the Octel 200/300 checks the floppy to make sure it is not the System
Configuration disk or the Software Update disk. If it is, a warning message prints and the backup is aborted.
The disk is checked to determine if it is formatted. If the floppy is formatted, the Octel 200/300 message server
asks if you would like to continue. If the floppy is not formatted, the floppy disk is formatted, and you are
prompted to enter a name for the floppy before backing up the message.
If the floppy contains messages previously backed up, the Octel 200/300 asks if you would like to reformat and
reuse the floppy, or just append the message to the end.
The Backup supports messages that are too large to save on a single floppy; the Octel 200/300 prompts you to insert
another floppy. After the new floppy is inserted, the disk is checked before the floppy is formatted and backup
resumes.
To abort the Backup at any time, press
Escape
PB60019−01
.
Octel 200/300
S.4.1
12-4
Installation and Maintenance Volume
Backing Up All Names, Greetings, Scripted Messages, Sequential Messages, and
Personal Distribution List Names
The following is an example of backing up all names, greetings, scripted messages, sequential messages, and
Personal Distribution List names. New disks are inserted into the floppy drive.
Action
1.
Octel 200/300 Description and Response
@FLOPPY
Enter
The following menu is displayed:
1. BACKUP
2. RESTORE
3. FLOPPY DIRECTORY
SELECT FLOPPY OPTION (1 − 3, EMPTY LINE = EXIT).
:
2.
:1
Enter
The following menu is displayed:
−−−−−−−−
BACKUP
−−−−−−−−
1. NAMES
2. GREETINGS
3. SCRIPT AND SEQUENTIAL MESSAGES
4. PERSONAL−DISTRIBUTION−LIST NAMES
5. PROMPTS
6. ALL NAMES, GREETINGS, SCRIPT AND SEQUENTIAL MESSAGES,
PERSONAL−DISTRIBUTION−LIST NAMES
SELECT BACKUP OPTION (1 − 6, EMPTY LINE = NONE).
:
3.
:6
Enter
The following is displayed:
IN