Black Box 945 Network Card User Manual

How To Use
Data Communications
with the Watlow
Series 945
User's Manual
Watlow Controls, 1241 Bundy Blvd., P.O.Box 5580, Winona, MN 55987-5580, Phone: 507/454-5300, Fax: 507/452-4507
W945-SA50-9210
March, 1992
Supersedes:
W945-SA40-9119
How to Use Data Communications
$5.00
Made in the U.S.A.
Printed on Recycled Paper
WATLOW Series 945
1
Contents
Page
3
3
3
4
5
6
6
7
7
7
8
10
11
11
11
12
12
13
13
14
15
16
16
16
17
17
18
19
20
22
23
23
24
25
26
26
27
2
Item
Data Communications and the Series 945
Hardware Interfaces Protocols
Communications Wiring
RS-422A Interface Pinouts
RS-423A Interface Pinouts
(RS-232C Compatible)
EIA-485 Interface Pinouts
Connecting the Control and Computer
Setting Hardware Protocol Switches
Network Connections
Series 945 Communication Parameters
Communications Setup Parameters
ASCII and Series 945 Information
Series 945 General Message Syntax
Message Syntax
Data Rules
Command List
Example Format
XON/XOFF Protocol for RS-423A
Start and Stop Communicating with the
Series 945 and XON/XOFF
XON/XOFF "=" Command Example
XON/XOFF "?" Command Example
ANSI X3.28 Protocol for RS-422 & EIA-485
Device Address
Starting Communications in ANSI X3.28
Stopping Communications in ANSI X3.28
ANSI X3.28 "=" Command Example
ANSI X3.28 "?" Command Example
"?" Command
"=" Command
Data Logging
Table Printout
Statistical Process Control - SPC
The Difference Between Control and
Specification Limits
Chart and SPC Printout
NAKs and Error Codes
User Responsibility
Index
WATLOW Series 945
Figures
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Tables
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Item
RS-422 Interface Wiring
RS-423 Interface Wiring
EIA-485 Interface Wiring
RS-422/RS-423 Switch Selection
General Message Syntax Example
XON/XOFF "=" Command Example
XON/XOFF "?" Command Example
ANSI X3.28 "=" Command Example
ANSI X3.28 "?" Command Example
Data Logging Interface Wiring
Table Printout Example
Chart & SPC Printout Example
Item
Setup Menu Prompts and Descriptions
ASCII Character Set
ASCII Control Characters (Partial Set)
Address to ASCII Conversion
"?" Command Data and Responses,
Partial Set
"=" Command and "?" Command Data
Printer Troubleshooting
How to Use Data Communications
Data Comm
How to Use Data Communications
with the Watlow Series 945
This manual is a supplement to the Series 945 User's Manual. It is for users with
the data communications option. Use in conjunction with the Series 945 User's
Manual.
This is expert user-level material and requires previous experience with data
communications.
Two Serial Hardware Interfaces and
Two Software Protocols
Depending on your units model number, you may have one of two hardware
interfaces:
1)RS-422A for a "multidrop" or (multiple device) network, up to ten devices total;
with 4000 ft. network length limit, or RS-423A (RS-232C compatible) for one on
one communication with a 50 ft. network length limit with a 945 and a host
computer (945A-XXXX--B000). Selecting RS-422A or RS-423A is user selectable via internal switches. See Page 7.
2)EIA-485 (945A-XXXX-D000) also for a multidrop network, up to 32
addresses total, and with a 4000 ft. network length limit.
There are two protocols available to you. Depending on the type of network you
need, you must use the correct combination of interface and protocol.
We use ANSI X3.28 Protocol, based on ANSI X3.28 - 1976 Subcategories 2.2,
and A3, with the RS-422A and EIA-485 interface to run a multiple device network.
We also use XON/XOFF Protocol, a simpler protocol, to run a two device network
with an RS-423A interface. XON/XOFF will also work with the RS-422A and EIA485 interface, but the network is limited to two devices (one computer or printer
and a Series 945). XON/XOFF Protocol requires no responses to messages like
the ANSI X3.28 Protocol does. Likewise, ANSI X3.28 Protocol, which provides a
response to every message, will work with the RS-423 interface. But again you are
limited to one Series 945 and a host computer or printer.
To select which protocol you are going to use, go into the SETUP menu and use
the MODE key to advance to the Prot parameter. Select either FULL, for ANSI
X3.28 2.2 - A.3, or On for XON - XOFF.
If you are using ANSI X3.28 Protocol, choose an address number for the control
under the Addr parameter following the Prot parameter. This parameter will only
appear if Prot = FULL.
Communications Wiring
To connect your Series 945 to a computer or printer, use the next three pages as a
reference. Your computer or printer hardware manual will provide more detailed
serial port pin information. Also refer to the noise prevention section in Appendix 1
of the Series 945 User's Manual. In the often noisy environments of industrial
locations, it is important not to take noise isolation lightly.
How to Use Data Communications
WATLOW Series 945
3
RS-422A
RS-422A Interface Pinouts
945A-XXXX-B000
The RS-422A communications uses a four wire (full duplex) system. There are
two separate lines for transmitting, and two lines for receiving data between the
computer and the Series 945. With RS-422A you can have from one to ten Series
945 controls connected to a single computer.
This diagram is a typical wiring example. The connections on the host computer
may vary depending on models. Refer to your computer user's manual for more
information.
Figure 1 RS-422A Interface,
Pin Designations.
19
20
21
22
Series 945
#1
23
T+
TR+
RSignal Common
(Optional)
Twisted Pair Wire
Host Computer
(rear view)
Series 945
#10
19
20
21
22
23
Twisted Pair Wire
T+
TR+
RSignal Common
(Optional)
DB-9 female
connector
(viewed from wire side)
1
Com
6
2
7
T-
8
4
T+
9
R-
3
R+
5
NOTE:
The Electronic
Industry Association
(EIA) RS-422A
standard recommends a maximum
4000 ft. total network
distance.
4
WATLOW Series 945
How to Use Data Communications
RS-423A
RS-423A Interface Pinouts (RS-232C Compatible)
945A-XXXX-B000
The RS-423A communications uses a three wire (full duplex) system. There is a
separate line for transmitting, a line for receiving data, and a line for signal common
between the computer and the Series 945. With RS-423A you can have only one
Series 945 control connected to a single computer or printer.
This diagram is a typical wiring example. The connections on the host computer
may vary depending on models. Refer to your computer user's manual for more
information.
Host Computer
(rear view)
Figure 2 RS-423A Interface,
Pin Designations.
8 9 10 11 12 13
#1
7
945
20
21
22
23
DTR (Data Terminal Ready)
14 15 16 17 18 19 2 0 21 22 23 24 25
R, and RLSD together.
S and CTS together.
mputer's user manual.
1 2 33 44 5 6
DB-25 female
connector
(viewed from wire side)
T
R
RTS (Request To Send)
CTS (Clear To Send)
DSR (Data Set Ready)
Com
RLSD (Received Line Signal Detector)
T
Jumper to Signal Common
R
Signal Common
NOTE:
The Electronic
Industry Association
(EIA) RS-423A
standard recommends a maximum
50 foot total pointto-point distance.
How to Use Data Communications
WATLOW Series 945
5
EIA-485
EIA-485 Interface Pinouts
945A-XXXX-D000
The EIA-485 communications uses a two wire (half duplex) system. There are only
two lines, both lines used for transmitting and receiving. Only one device, the
computer or the control, can be speaking at a time. There is a 1 millisecond delay
requried for the Series 945 to go between transmission and receipt of data. With
EIA-485 you can have from one to thirty-two Series 945 controls connected to a
computer.
Figure 3 EIA-485 Interface, Pin
Designations.
Series 945
This diagram is a typical wiring example. The connections on the host computer
may vary depending on models. Refer to your computer user's manual for more
information.
#1
19
20
T+/R+
T-/R-
23
Signal Common
(Optional)
Twisted Pair Wire
Host Computer
(rear view)
19
20
Series 945
#31
#32
23
T+/R+
T-/R-
Twisted Pair Wire
Signal Common
(Optional)
1
6
DB-9 female
connector
(viewed from wire side)
Com
2
T-/RT+/R+
7
3
8
4
9
5
T+/R+
T-/R-
NOTE:
The Electronic
Industry Association
EIA-485 standard
recommends a
maximum 4000 ft.
total network distance.
Connecting the Control and the Computer
Remove power from both the Series 945 and your computer or printer before
connecting them together. This prevents noise or static interference from entering
the data communication lines. Assemble a cable and the appropriate wiring at your
computer or printer. Refer to the wiring on Page 4 through 6. As soon as you
connect the data communications line(s), you're ready to apply power to your
system.
6
WATLOW Series 945
How to Use Data Communications
Configuration
(Up)
(Up) RS-423A
RS-423A
Figure 4 RS-422A/RS-423A
Switch Selection.
(Down) RS-422A
(Down) RS-422A
A007-1830
NOTE:
The Series 945
leaves the factory in
RS-423A operation (C1).
How to Set the Hardware Protocol Switches
for 945A-XXXX-B000 Units Only
The RS-422/RS-423 switches are on the Communication Module Board (A0071830). Figure 4 shows the location of this board. You can select C1 for RS-423 or
C2 for RS-422 operation. Both switches must be set the same for the desired
protocol.
To change the position of a switch, remove the power from the Series 945 and turn
theControl
front panel
locking screw 90° counterclockwise. To remove the control chasChassis - Top View
sis, grip the front panel bezel and pull it straight out from the control case. Set the
switches, C1 (towards you for RS-423) or C2 (away from you for RS-422) then
return the control chassis to the case. Be sure it is oriented correctly. Press firmly,
but gently, to seat the chassis. Secure the front panel locking screw and reapply
power.
Network Connections
You can connect a data communication equipped Series 945 to any computer with
an RS-422A or RS-423A (RS-232C compatible) or EIA-485 serial interface. The
serial interface is the key. The IBM™PC® with an RS-232C serial output card,
for instance, will talk to a single RS-423A equipped Series 945. For a multiple 945
network with the same PC, you'll need an RS-232 to RS-422 converter to act as a
"bus," or multiple connection point.
Watlow recommends the Burr-Brown LDM 422 for that purpose. The address is:
Burr-Brown, Inc., 1141 West Grant Rd,. Suite 131, Tucson, AZ 85705, Phone:
(602) 624-2434, Fax: (602) 623-8965.
For EIA-485, we recommend the Black Box LD485A. Their address is: Black Box
Corporation, Mayview Road at Park Drive, Box 12800, Pittsburgh, PA 152421,
Phone: (412) 746-5530.
Series 945 Comunication Parameters
To communicate with the Series 945, match the serial port settings of your computer with the available settings in the 945:
bAUd Rate
dAtA
Start Bit
Stop Bits
= 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600 (choose one)
= 7o = 7 data bits and odd parity
7E = 7 data bits and even parity (choose one)
8n = 8 data bits and no parity
= 1
= 1
How to Use Data Communications
WATLOW Series 945
7
Parameters
Setup Menu - Communications Parameters
Enter the Setup menu by pressing the UP/DOWN keys simultaneously for 3
seconds. The lower display shows the LOC parameter, and the upper display
shows its current level. All keys are inactive until you release both keys. You can
reach the LOC parameter from anywhere. This is only a listing and brief explanation of the parameters, refer to Pages 22 through 26 for a thorough explanation of
Statistical Process Control (SPC).
bAUd
Baud: Represents the current baud rate for serial communications.
Range: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600
Default: 1200
dAtA
Data: Allows the user to select the data bits and parity for communication.
Range: 7 o = 7 data bits and odd parity
7E = 7 data bits and even parity
8 n = 8 data bits and no parity
Default: 7 o
Prot
Protocol: Selects the communication protocol. Must be On for data logging to
occur. FULL = ANSI X3.28 2.2 - A.3 On = XON - XOFF
Range: FULL or On
Default: FULL
Addr
Address: Selects the address device if Prot = FULL. Range: 0 to 31 Default: 0
Log
Log: Selects the data logging function for a printout of the data. Appears if Prot =
On. For further expon on SPC, the parameters and printouts, see Page 22 - 26.
Range: OFF, tAbL, CHrt, SPCA, SPCd, SPCn Default: OFF
LSL
Lower Specification Limit: This value is the specified deviation below set point,
which statistically the process should not exceed. Appears if Prot = On and Log =
SPCA or SPCd. SPCA Range: rL to Lower USL -2°F/-1°C
Default: rL
SPCd Range: 1 to 99
Default: 10
USL
tbS
Time Base: Selects the time in minutes over which 30 random samples are taken
for computing SPC values. Appears if Prot = On and Log = SPCA or SPCd.
Range: 1 to 60
Default: 5
LinE
Line: Selects the number of lines per page of data logged output. Match this
parameter to the number of lines per page your printer prints. After you select the
number of lines to print, a form feed character is sent to the printer, resetting the
top of the page. Range: 10 to 127 Default: 65
YEAr
Year: Select the current year for the data logging header. Appears if Prot = On
and Log = tAbL, CHrt or SPCA, SPCd, SPCn. Parameter resets to default after a
power interruption. Default: 92
Mon
Month: Select the current month for the data logging header. Appears if Prot =
On and Log = tAbL, CHrt or SPCA, SPCd, SPCn. Parameter resets to default after
a power interruption. Default: 01
dAY
Day: Select the current day for the data logging header. Appears if Prot = On and
Log = tAbL, CHrt or SPCA, SPCd, SPCn. Parameter resets to default after a
power interruption. Default: 01
HOUr
8
Upper Specification Limit: This value is the specified deviation above set point,
which statistically the process should not exceed. Appears if Prot = On and Log =
SPCA or SPCd. SPCA Range: rH to upper LSL +2°F/1°C Default: rL
SPCd Range: 1 to 99
Default: 10
WATLOW Series 945
Hour: Represents the 24 hour time-of-day clock setting for minutes. Appears if
Prot = On and Log = tAbL, CHrt or SPCA, SPCd, SPCn. Parameter resets to
default after a power interruption. Range: 0 to 23
Default: 0
How to Use Data Communications
Minutes: Represents the 24 hour time-of-day clock setting for minutes. Appears
if Prot = On and Log = tAbL, CHrt or SPCA, SPCd, SPCn. Parameter resets to
default after a power interruption. Range: 0 to 59
Default: 0
Setup
Interval: Selects the time interval for the logging function. The logging interval is in
tenth of a minute increments. Appears if Prot = On and Log = tAbL, CHrt or
SPCA, SPCd, SPCn. Range: 0.0 to 60.0 minutes
Default: 0.0
Tag: Selects what variables are to be transmitted out during the data logging
function. Any combination of process, set point and alarms may be "tagged" for
logging. Appears if Prot = On and Log = tAbL.
P = Process
S = Set Point A = Alarm Set Points
Range: PSA, PS -, P-A, P- -, -SA, -S-, --A, --- Default: ---
Table 1 Setup Menu
Prompts and
Descriptions.
Use this page as a master copy for your Series 945 data communications Setup
parameters. Do not enter any values here; make photocopies instead.
Value
Range
Factory Default
1200
tbS
300, 600, 2100, 2400, 4800, 9600
7 o = 7 data bits and odd parity
7E = 7 data bits and even parity
8 n = 8 data bits and no parity
FULL = ANSI X3.28 2.2 - A.3
On = XON - XOFF
0 to 31
OFF, tAbL, CHrt, SPC
SPCA = rL to Lower USL -2°F/-1°C
SPCd = 1 to 99
SPCA = rH to Upper LSL +2°F/1°C
SPCd = 1 to 99
1 to 60
LinE
10 to 127
65
YEAr
--
92
Mon
--
01
dAY
--
01
HOUr
0 to 23
0
Min
0 to 59
0
Int
0.0 to 60.0 minutes
0.0
tag
PSA, PS-, P-A, P--, -SA, -S-, --A, --P = Process
S = Set Point
A = Alarm Set Points
---
bAUd
dAtA
Prot
Addr
Log
LSL
USL
Int
tag
Setup Menu
Parameter
Min
Appears If:
7o
FULL
0
OFF
rL
10
rL
10
5
Prot = FULL
Prot = On
Prot = On &
Log = SPCA, SPCd
Prot = On &
Log = SPCA, SPCd
Prot = On &
Log = SPCA, d, n
Prot = On & Log = tAbL
CHrt or SPCA, d, n
Prot = On & Log = tAbL
CHrt or SPCA, d, n
Prot = On & Log = tAbL
CHrt or SPCA, d, n
Prot = On & Log = tAbL
CHrt or SPCA, d, n
Prot = On & Log = tAbL
CHrt or SPCA, d, n
Prot = On & Log = tAbL
CHrt or SPCA, d, n
Prot = On & Log = tAbL
CHrt or SPCA, d, n
Prot = On & Log = tAbL
Operation Menu
This parameter follows the Aut parameter in the Operation menu. See Page 25 for
more information.
Control Limit Update: When YES is selected, it calculates and prints out control
limits according to the time base. If no is selected, the current control limit is
printed and no subsequent limits are printed. Range: YES or no Default: YES
How to Use Data Communications
CLUP
WATLOW Series 945
9
ASCII Char.
ASCII Character Set
Table 2 ASCII Character
Set
Dec
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
Hex
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
Char
NUL
SOH
STX
ETX
EOT
ENQ
ACK
BEL
BS
HT
LF
VT
FF
CR
SO
SI
Dec
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Hex
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
Char
DLE
DC1
DC2
DC3
DC4
NAK
SYN
ETB
CAN
EM
SUB
ESC
FS
GS
RS
US
Dec
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
Hex
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
2F
Char
SP
!
"
#
$
%
&
'
(
)
*
+
,
.
/
Dec
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
Hex
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
3B
3C
3D
3E
3F
Char
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
:
;
<
=
>
?
Dec
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
Hex
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
4F
Char
@
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
Dec
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
Hex
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
5B
5C
5D
5E
5F
Char
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
[
\
]
^
_
Dec
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
Hex
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
6A
6B
6C
6D
6E
6F
Char
`
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
l
m
n
o
Dec
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
Hex
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
7A
7B
7C
7D
7E
7F
Char
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z
{
|
}
~
DEL
ASCII Control Characters (Partial Set)
Table 3 ASCII Control
Characters
(Partial Set)
10
WATLOW Series 945
ASCII
Char.
ENQ
ACK
NAK
STX
ETX
EOT
DLE
CR
DC1
DC3
Ctrl Key
Equiv.
Ctrl E
Ctrl F
Ctrl U
Ctrl B
Ctrl C
Ctrl D
Ctrl P
Ctrl M
Ctrl Q
Ctrl S
Definition
Enquiry
Acknowledge
Neg. Acknowledge
Start of Text
End of Text
End of Transmission
Data Link Escape
Carriage Return
XON
XOFF
Dec.
Equiv.
5
6
21
2
3
4
16
13
17
19
Hex.
Equiv.
05
06
15
02
03
04
10
0D
11
13
How to Use Data Communications
Syntax
Series 945 General Message Syntax
As soon as you link the devices, you'll be able to talk to the Series 945 using ASCII
characters.
The Series 945 will respond to any Operating or Setup parameter, plus some
others. The control will respond to either upper or lower case ASCII characters
from your computer.
Both protocol/interface combinations will respond to the general syntax, providing
the commands or queries are correctly transmitted. However, the ANSI X3.28
Protocol requires beginning and ending characters, and the XON/XOFF Protocol
requires ending characters. We'll look at those shortly.
Message Syntax
Messages from your computer to the Series 945 must take this general form. All
commands do not require the full number of data fields.
Command <Space> Data.1 <Space> Data.2 <Space> Data.3... Data.N
"Command" is a character set to which the Series 945 will respond. The brackets
"< >" enclose a non-literal description. "Space" is simply a delimiter, an ASCII
space character (Hex 20). "Data Fields" are parameters and values specific to a
command; the number of possible data fields depends on the particular command
you use. Data 1 is here abbreviated, "Data.1", Data 2 is "Data.2" and so on.
In the syntax explanations ahead, we'll show you the specific arguments for each
command. It will speed the process, if you remember this general syntax.
Data Rules
Data fields are parameters and values specific to particular commands. These rules
govern their use. Specific data for each command is listed later in this chapter.
• Data will be ASCII 0 through 9, unless otherwise noted.
• Data can go up to seven total characters, including a minus sign. A + or - sign, if
used, must be first, and it must have a decimal point if applicable.
• Data can use leading zeros. (Up to 7 digits.)
• Data does use decimal points.
• Data.1 portion of message can be up to four total characters.
Command List
These commands, represented by their respective ASCII characters, will enable
you to program the Series 945 from your computer. More detailed descriptions of
the commands are on the pages noted.
?
=
Finds the value of a specific parameter.
Sets a specific parameter to a specific value.
How to Use Data Communications
p. 19
p. 20
WATLOW Series 945
11
ASCII
Example Format
For your benefit, we're presenting message/response examples with syntax required for Series 945 communication. Information bracketed by < > indicates a
description, rather than literal characters. We show each ASCII character that you
must transmit to the Series 945, including space between the characters. (A
"space" is itself an ASCII character, hex 20). For clarity, we also represent each
ASCII character as a hexadecimal pair. The pairs are spread apart on the page for
easy reading. However, electronic devices "see" the hex pairs all together in
"strings," with no spaces in between.
For instance, from the example just below, you want to set the Alarm 1 Low
(A1LO) parameter to 500°. Notice the syntax just below which uses the "=" com= <Space> A1LO <Space> 500
mand.
=
<Space>
A
Figure 5 Series 945
General Message
Syntax Example.
ASCII
Characters
1
L O
Space
5
0
0 <CR>
HEX
Value
3D 20 41 31 4C 4F 20 35 30 30 0D
To send this message, key the ASCII characters into your computer, or write them
into your program. The computer, in turn, will send a string similar to the one at the
bottom of the example, 3D2041314C4F20353030.
Notice that we haven't mentioned protocol here, or any characters added to this
syntax by a protocol. With XON/XOFF, the message above can be transmitted
with only an additional Carriage Return <CR> (hex 0D) character at the end.
However, the ANSI X3.28 Protocol requires an envelope of Start of Text <STX>
(hex 02) and End of Text <ETX> (hex 03) characters around the information you
see above. You'll learn how to do that in the pages ahead.
XON/XOFF Protocol for RS-423A
XON/XOFF (flow control) Protocol allows a communicating device (either a 945 or
the host) to suspend transmission of all messages from the other device, and then
to continue transmission when it's again ready.
The device that needs to suspend transmission sends the XOFF character
(hex 13) to stop the other device's transmitter, and XON (hex 11) to restart it. Note
that technically any character will restart the transmitter, but only the XON character
is not a part of any regular message that may be transferring.
Messages transmit according to the syntax described in the XON/XOFF formats
which follow for each command.
The XON/XOFF Protocol requires a Carriage Return character
(hex 0D) at the end of every message.
12
WATLOW Series 945
How to Use Data Communications
XON/XOFF "="
How To Start and Stop Communicating
with the Series 945 and XON/XOFF
Starting communications with XON/XOFF Protocol is simple. You just configure
your computer to agree with the Series 945 communication parameters and open its
serial communication port in software. Then begin to "talk" by transmitting a message to the Series 945. You stop communicating with XON/XOFF Protocol simply by
ceasing to send messages.
XON/XOFF "=" Command Example
The general command syntax is the one you've already seen. Each command uses a
slightly different variation of it, depending on the number of arguments required for a
message.
• You want to change the Alarm 1 Low (A1LO) value to 500°. The "=" command will
do the job.
The syntax with XON/XOFF Protocol requires an ending Carriage Return <CR>.
"=" Command Syntax with XON/XOFF Protocol:
= <space> Data.1 <space> Data.2 <CR>
With the "=" Command, Data.1 is the Series 945 parameter, in this case Alarm 1 Low,
A1LO. Data.2 is the value you want to set for that parameter, in this example, 500.
Enter in ASCII:
= <space> A1LO <space> 500 <CR>
The hex string will be:
3D2041314C4F203530300D
=
<Space>
A
ASCII
Characters
1
L O
Space
Figure 6 XON/XOFF "="
Command Example.
5
0
0 <CR>
HEX
Value
3D 20 41 31 4C 4F 20 35 30 30 0D
Response from the Series 945:
It sends an "XOFF" when a carriage return is received and then an "XON" when the unit
is done processing the command.
<XOFF> <XON>
13
11
• The complete list of "=" Command data (parameters and value limits) is in
Table 6, Pages 20 - 21.
How to Use Data Communications
WATLOW Series 945
13
XON/XOFF "?"
XON/XOFF "?" Command Example
You want to know the Alarm 1 Low (A1LO) value. The "?" uses a variation of the
message syntax shown just below. This protocol requires an ending carriage
return character.
"?" Command syntax with XON/XOFF Protocol:
? <space> Data.1 <CR>
Enter in ASCII:
? <space> A1LO <CR>
The hex string will be:
3F2041314C4F0D
?
Space
A
Figure 7 XON/XOFF "?"
Command Example.
1
ASCII
Characters
HEX
Value
L
O
3F 20 41 31 4C 4F
CR
0D
The value of A1LO will be between rL (Range Low) and rH (Range High), say, 500.
Response from the Series 945:
<XOFF> <XON> <current value of A1LO> <CR>
The hex response string is:
13113530300D
<XOFF>
<XON>
5
ASCII
Characters
0
0
CR
HEX
Value
14
WATLOW Series 945
13
11
35 30
30 0D
How to Use Data Communications
ANSI X3.28
ANSI X3.28 Protocol for RS-422A and EIA-485
The ANSI X3.28 Protocol provides high quality communications by requiring a
response to every message. With a multiple device or "multidrop" network, this
protocol prevents confusion among the separate devices. Furthermore, if noise
occurs somewhere in the system, no parameter will change because noise can't
comply with the protocol.
By placing messages inside a protocol envelope, the messages are protected. In
the examples to come you'll see how this works.
The ANSI X3.28 Protocol requires STX characters at the beginning of a
message and ETX characters at the end.
Device Address
If you are using the ANSI X3.28 Protocol, you must have a device address (identification) number. A Watlow RS-422A multidrop network can handle up to 10 devices with this protocol. EIA-485 can handle up to 32 devices. Set the address
number with the Series 945 in the Addr parameter under the Setup menu.
Address
0-9
10 - 31
ASCII Equivalent
0-9
A-V
Table 4 Address to ASCII
Conversion.
Starting Communications in ANSI X3.28 Protocol
Here's the syntax for starting communications with ANSI X3.28 Protocol. The
master device, your computer, must initiate the data link. The example below
uses the ASCII number 4 as a Series 945 device address.
Enter in ASCII, using this syntax: <Address # 4><ENQ>
ASCII
Characters
4
HEX Value
34
<ENQ>
05
Response from the 945:
<Address # 4><Acknowledge (ACK)>
ASCII
Characters
HEX Value
4
34
<ACK>
06
How to Use Data Communications
WATLOW Series 945
15
ANSI X3.28 "="
Stopping Communications in ANSI X3.28 Protocol
The master device, your computer, must end communications with Device #4 by
using Data Link Escape (DLE) and End of Transmission (EOT) characters.
Enter in ASCII: <DLE><EOT>
ASCII
Characters
HEX Value
<DLE>
<EOT>
10
04
Response from the 945:
None
ANSI X3.28 "=" Command Example
The "=" Command sets a specific 945 parameter to a specific value. The general
command syntax applies to all commands. The definition and number of arguments depends on the command itself. See Table 6, Pages 20 - 21.
In this example, you want to change the Alarm 1 Low value to 500°. Here, the "="
command will do the job.
'"=" command Syntax with ANSI X3.28 Protocol:
<STX> = <space> Data.1 <space> Data.2 <ETX>
With the "=" command, Data.1 is the Series 945 parameter, in this case Alarm 1
Low , A1LO. Data.2 is the value you want to set for that parameter, in this example, 500.
Enter in ASCII:
<STX> = <space> A1LO <space> 500 <optional carriage return> <ETX>
The hex string is:
023D2041314C4F2035303003
<STX>
=
<Space>
A
Figure 8 ANSI X3.28 "="
Command Example.
ASCII
Character
1
L
O Space
5
0
HEX
Value
02 3D 20 41 31 4C 4F
0 <ETX>
20 35 30 30 03
Optional
Carriage
Return
16
WATLOW Series 945
How to Use Data Communications
ANSI X3.28 "?"
Response from the Series 945:
<ACK>
The hex response string is:
06
• You'll find the the complete list of "=" command arguments (parameters and
value limits) in Table 6, Pages 20 - 21.
ANSI X3.28 "?" Command Example
You need to know the Alarm 1 Low value (A1LO). The "?" uses a variation of the
message syntax shown just below. This syntax requires the protocol start of
text and end of text characters.
"?" command syntax with ANSI X3.28 Protocol:
<STX> ?<space> <Data.1> <ETX>
Enter in ASCII:
<STX> ? <space> <A1LO> <optional carriage return> <ETX>
The hex string will be:
023F2041314C4F03
<STX>
?
Space
A
ASCII
Characters
HEX
Value
Optional
Carriage
Return
1
Figure 9 ANSI X3.28 "?"
Command Example.
L O
<ETX>
02 3F 20 41 31 4C 4F 03
First response from the Series 945:
<ACK>
The <ACK> hex response string is:
06
Your computer's confirming response:
<EOT>
The <EOT> response hex string is:
04
Second response from the Series 945:
<STX> <current A1LO value> <carriage return> <ETX>
The hex string is:
023530302003
ASCII
Characters
<STX>
5
HEX
Value
0
<CR>
0
0
<
20
Your computer's next response:
<ACK> or < NAK> (if the message needs to be repeated).
The hex string is:
06 or 15
Final response from the Series 945:
<EOT>
The hex string is:
04
How to Use Data Communications
WATLOW Series 945
17
Commands
Data.1
Respns
Information
Comments
Actual process value
Between R1L and R1H
C1
ACTUAL
IN
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
J T/C
K T/C
T T/C
N T/C
PT2 T/C
C T/C
Not Used
R T/C
S T/C
B T/C
RTD whole
RTD tenths
0-5V
4-20mA
MODE
1
2
4
8
16
Auto mode
Manual mode
Configuration mode
Calibration mode
Alarm silence active
Multiple modes are possible.
ERR
0
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
No error
Open sensor
Reversed sensor
Ambient sensor
Configuration
EE Checksum
A/D underflow
A/D overflow
Not used
Multiple errors are possible.
ER2
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
No error
Transmit buffer overflow
Receive buffer overflow
Framing error
Overrun error
Parity error
Talking out of turn
Invalid reply error
Noise error
Process input active
Local/remote is local
Local/remote is remote
Remote not enabled
Command not found
Parameter not found
Incomplete command line
Invalid character
Number of chars. overflow
Input out of limit
Read only command
Write allowed only
Cleared when ER2 is read.
Only 1 ER2 response is valid.
BTYP
0
1
2
3
T/C Only
T/C, RTD whole, process
T/C, RTD tenths, process
R, S, B T/C
Remote SP
Displays 945 X
X = software revision
Remote set point setting
Table 5 "?" Commands
and Responses.
These commands
are READ ONLY.
MDL
RSP1
"?" Command
The "?" Command reads a specific value of the Series 945 parameter (Data.1).
Tables 5 and 6 provide the complete list of parameters you may use, plus responses.
18
WATLOW Series 945
How to Use Data Communications
Commands
"=" Command
"The "=" Command sets a specific Series 945 parameter (Data.1) to a specific
value (Data.2) when the unit is in the HOLD mode. Use Tables 5 and 6 to select
parameters (Data.1) in the lefthand column. In Table 6 the low and high limit or
code values (Data.2) are in the three center columns.
Data.1
AXHI
AXLO
ALM
AL1
Data.2
Low Limit
High Limit
Process RL value
RH value
±555/Deviation ±999
Process RL value
RH value
±555/Deviation ±999
0
No alarms occurring
1
A1H occurring
2
A1L occurring
4
A2H occurring
8
A2L occurring
0
2
AL2
0
2
ATMN
1
1
AUT
0
3
CAL*
-180°F
-100°C
-180 Units
0
180°F
100°C
180 Units
1
DEC
Yes
1
1
0
0
0 Units
0
No
60
31
99°F
55°C
99 Units
2
DEX
DFL
0.00
0
9.99
1
0
1°F
1°C
1 Unit
1
0.0
23
99°F
55°C
99 Units
1
60.0
0.00
9.99
CF
CLUP
CTX
DAY
DB
HOUR
HYSX
INDC
INT
ITX
How to Use Data Communications
Code
Function
Alarm High X value
NOTE:
Alarm Low X value
Writing a 0 will clear all
alarms if the alarm
condition no longer
exists.
0
1
2
0
1
2
1
0
1
2
3
Alarm 1 = deviation
Alarm 1 = process
No Alarm 1
Alarm 2 = deviation
Alarm 2 = process
No Alarm 2
Auto/Manual toggle must
be sent twice within 5 sec.
No auto-tuning
Slow response tuning
Medium response tuning
Fast response tuning
Calibration offset
0
1
Display °C
Display °F
SPC control limits update
Output X cycle time
Day of the month/data log
Dead band
0
1
2
No decimal point
0.0
0.00
Output X derivative
US prompts
SI prompts
Hour for data logging
Output X switching hys.
0
1
1
An X means it
applies to either
Output 1 or
Output 2.
Table 6 "=" and "?" Commands. These are
READ or WRITE
commands. See
Table 4 for more "?"
Commands.
* When the 945 RTD
input is 0.1°, these
parameters will have
a decimal point to
the left of the least
significant digit.
UP/DOWN key action
Time interval in minutes
for logging
0.0 = logging OFF
Output X integral
WATLOW Series 945
19
Commands
Data.1
Data.2
Low Limit
NOTE:
An X means it
applies to either
Output 1 or
Output 2.
LATX
0
1
LINE
LOC
LOG
10
0
0
127
3
3
0
1
L-R
LSL
MAN
MIN
MON
OTX
Table 6 Continued
High Limit
rL USL Lower -2°F/-1°C
-100
100
0
59
1
12
0
1 or 2*
OT4
0
2
PBX
0
0.0
999°F
555°C
999 Units
999.9
RAX
REX
RH
RL
RSP
0.00
0.00
Min. IN range
Min. IN range
0
9.99
9.99
Max. IN range
Max. IN range
2
RTD
0
1
SIL
0
1
SPX
TAG
rL
0
rH
7
PBX%
NOTE:
P = Process
S = Set Point
A = Alarm Set Point
- - - = no logging
tbS
USL
YEAR
20
WATLOW Series 945
1
LSL Upper 2°F/1°C
0
60
rH
99
Code
0
1
0
1
2
3
4
5
0
1
0
1
2*
0
1
2
0
1
2
0
1
0
1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Function
Latched alarms
Non-latched alarms
Lines per page for data logging
Lock front panel
Logging OFF See Page 22.
Table
Chart
SPCA
SPCd
SPCn
Local set point
Remote set point
SPC lower spec limit
Manual % output
Minute for data logging
Month for data logging
Heat
Cool
No action
*only applies to Ot2
Output 4 = Process Retransmit
Output 4 = Set Point Retransmit
No action
Proportional Band
dFL = US
Output X proportional
band DFL = SI
Rate
Reset
Range High
Range Low
OFF
0-5
420
DIN
JIS
Alarm silence OFF
Alarm silence ON
Set point
- - - = no logging
--A
-S- SA
P-P-A
PS PSA
SPC time interval in minutes
SPC upper spec limit
Year for data logging
l
How to Use Data Communications
Data Logging
Data Logging
The data logging feature is a convenient replacement for chart recorders. Information is sent directly from the Series 945 to a serial printer, or to a computer disk file.
No computer is needed, although the 945 can be connected to a computer with a
serial port and terminal emulation software.
Data logging provides a handy reference to review process performance. The time
intervals between each entry and data printed are user selectable, with the time
display resetting every 24 hours. If there is a power interruption, the time is reset to
0.0. There are several options for the printer output. Choose from table, chart or
SPC (Statistical Process Control). See the following pages for more information on
printer outputs.
Printer
Host Computer
(rear view)
Figure 10 Data Logging
Interface Wiring
Example.
2 3
4 15 16 17 18 19 2 0 21 22 23 24 25
T
R
#1
8 9 10 11 12 13
Series 945
20
21
22
23
DTR (Data Terminal Ready)
7
Jumper DTR, DSR, and RLSD together.
Also, jumper RTS and CTS together.
Refer to your printer's user manual.
4 56
DB-25 female connector RTS (Request To Send)
(located on back of printer CTS (Clear To Send)
(Data Set Ready)
viewed from wire side) DSR
Com
RLSD (Received Line Signal Detector)
T
Jumper to Signal Common
R
Signal Common
Connect the 945 to the printer as in Figure 10; this is a typical wiring example. The
connections on the printer may vary depending on the model, refer to the printer's
user manual. Enter the Setup menu by pressing the UP/DOWN keys simultaneously for three seconds. Mode through the parameters until you reach bAUd
and follow the parameter listing on Page 8. Select the appropriate data for each
prompt and enter your values in the table on Page 9. Data logging begins once
you return to the control set point.
After each line the 945 emits a carriage return. Your printer can be set up to
handle line feeds. The printer must supply a line feed (LF) following a carriage
return (CR). Refer to your printer user's manual for more information.
A data header is printed once the logging function begins. When you change the
time interval (Int) or any selected data (tag), or power is cycled, the header is
printed again. The header always remains the same, regardless of the control
configuration. The time display wraps around to 0.0 every 24 hours. If there is a
power interruption, the control will restart at 0.0 when power is restored.
How to Use Data Communications
WATLOW Series 945
21
Data Logging
Data fields emitted are determined by the tag parameters and control configuration.
As in the following example, tag is set for PSA (Process, Set Points, and Alarm Set
Points). SET-2 is only transmitted when there is a secondary control output, and is
configured the same as the primary output. In the example below, notice A1LO was
changed to 125 resulting in an alarm condition shown as an * (asterisk) in the
PROCESS and LOW-1 columns. After a latching or non-latching alarm is cleared,
the * is removed. The ATUNE column reports the auto-tune status. START denotes the beginning of the sequence, RSTRT signifies auto-tune has been restarted, and END is displayed when complete.
Table Printout
Example: Log = On, Int = 0.5, tag = PSA
P = Process
S = Set Points
A = Alarm Set Points
Parameters represented:
(C1)
Figure 11 Table Printout
Example.
(SP1)
(SP2) (A1LO)
(A1HI)
(A2LO)
(A2HI)
(AUt)
DATE: 01-01-92
TIME PROCESS SET-1 SET-2 LOW-1 HIGH-1 LOW-2 HIGH-2 ATUNE
10:03:47
144 *
200
150 *
240
190 *
210
10:03:58
157 *
200
150
240
190 *
210 START
10:04:34
185 *
200
150
240
190 *
210
10:05:10
177 *
200
150
240
190 *
210
10:05:46
182 *
200
150
240
190 *
210
10:06:02
179 *
200
150
240
190 *
210
END
10:06:38
196
200
150
240
190
210
10:07:14
198
200
150
240
190
210
10:07:50
199
200
150
240
190
210
10:08:26
199
200
150
240
190
210
10:09:02
200
200
150
240
190
210
SPC - Statistical Process Control
SPC tracks variability to help you distinguish between natural variability (common
causes) from unnatural variability (special causes). Based upon measurements,
SPC gives you a picture of how the process is performing. By showing when
special causes are occurring, the SPC printout gives you written changes in the
process. An SPC printout is a picture of the operation. Typically, past data gives
information about what the average measurements and limits should be. These
are traditionally shown by upper and lower control limits. It also gives us a picture
of what is happening now. By comparing the process we can determine when
special, or assignable causes occur. This is advanced user-level material and
requires previous experience with Statistical Process Control (SPC).
For more information we recommend:
Juran's Quality Control Handbook
by J.M. Juran, Editor in Chief & Frank M. Gryna, Associate Editor
Hardcover, 1988
ISBN: 0-7-033176-6
Available from:
22
WATLOW Series 945
McGraw Hill
1221 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10020
1-800-2-MCGRAW
How to Use Data Communications
SPC
The Difference Between Control & Specification Limits
Control limits are established on the control chart at ± 3 standard deviations (3 sigma).
They are based upon the distribution of sample averages and are calculated from the
actual performance of the process. They are typically narrower than specification limits.
Specifications are limits for individual measurements, not averages. They are based upon
engineering or customer requirements, rather than process capability. Process capability
predicts the process performance to predetermined specification limits.
When the LCL (Lower Control Limit) and UCL (Upper Control Limit) values have been
determined, the values for CPKL, CPKU, and CP are calculated and printed once on the
chart. The smaller of these two numbers will be your actual process capability or CPK.
CPKL =
Mean - LSL
3σ
CPKU =
USL - Mean
3σ
If the system is too stable "variation insignificant" is printed. Your process is so stable that
even a severe shift or variation greater than ±6 sigma will still maintain a larger CPK
value. If both LSL and USL are left at their default value, they are set to the 4σ values
below and above the process mean value. Once the mean value has been calculated,
these values are used to calculate CPKL and CPKU values.
Average: The mean, or the arithmetic average, ( x ).
Control Limits: Limits on a control chart, based on actual process data, which are used
as criteria for signalling the need for action, or for judging whether a set of data does or
does not indicate a "state of statistical control."
Lower Control Limit (LCL): Control limit derived by the average minus 3 standard
deviation ( x - 3σ ).
Mean: The arithmetic average, obtained by adding all the values together and dividing by
the number of values ( x ).
Process Capability (CPKL and CPKU): A comparison of process performance with
product specifications over a period of time and while the process is in statistical control.
CPK < 0
Average value is outside the specification limits
CPK between 0 and 1
Variation is greater than the limits.
CPK = 1
Variation and the specification limits are the same
CPK between 1 and 1.33 Acceptable process control
CPK between 1.33 and 2 Good process control
CPK > 2
Excellent process control
Sigma: The unit of standard deviation. Sigma is the greek letter "s" written σ.
SPCA (Specification limits Absolute): Represents SPC with fixed values that do not
track the set point. When SPCA is chosen, the USL range is the LSL parameter + 2 (LSL
+ 2) to the sensor's range high. Default is the sensor's default range high. The LSL range
is from the sensor's default range low to the sensor's default range high. Default is the
sensor's default range low.
SPCd (Specification limits Deviation): Represents SPC with deviation values that
follow changes to the set point. When SPCd is chosen the range for USL it will be numeric values from 1 to 99. Default is 10. The LSL range is from -1 to -99. Default is -10.
SPCn : There are no user defined values. The USL and LSL parameters are masked.
How to Use Data Communications
WATLOW Series 945
23
Chart & SPC
Chart and SPC Printout
Example: Log = SPCA, Int = 0.1
P = Process
S = Set Points
Set Point
DATE: 01-01-90
PROCESS
75
*
01:00:01
NOTE:
The time is printed
every 5th interval
(Int). The temperature variable (*) is
printed every 10th
interval.
One Int = 6 seconds.
*
*
*
*
*
Temperature Variable
01:00:31
01:01:01
01:01:31
Lower Control Limit
(SPCA & SPCd only)
01:02:01
Figure 12 Chart and SPC
Printout Example
125
100°F
Temperature
CPKL = 1.36
(SPCA & SPCd only)
01:02:31
92
Maximum Excursion
01:03:31
Time
*
*s
99
Set Point Variable
Temperature Variable
Upper Control Limit
(SPCA & SPCd only)
CPKU = 1.32
U
U
s
*
U
s
U
s
*
U
s
*
U
s
s
U
s
U
s
U
s 101
U
s
U
s*
U
* ss
U
s
*
U
* s
s*
U
s
U
*
s
(Any
concerning
changes
(Any messages
messages concerning
tchanges
he system
printed
here)
ininthe
systemare
are
printed
here)
(SPCA & SPCd only)
L
90
01:03:01
L
L
*
s
s
s
s
* ss *
s
* s *
* ss 101
s*
s *
*s
s
* s
s
* s
s*
s *
* ss 100
* ss
s*
s
s *
* s
CP = 1.34
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
110
110
Maximum Excursion
The Chart and SPC (Statistical Process Control) format are very similar. The only
difference is the SPC output displays the lower (L) and upper (U) control limit.
They are calculated based upon the mean value of the process variable, and are
derived from 30 random samples taken over the selected time base (tbS), the
mean value used is from the previous timebase samples (ex. the mean from the
first 30 samples is used to compute the control limits for the second 30 samples
and so on for every sample period. If SPCA (Specification limits Absolute or SPCd
(spec. limits Deviation) is selected then the CPKL, CP, or CPKu values will also be
printed. If the variation in the process value is too small to calculate the control
limits, L and U and the message "Variation Insignificant" are printed. If at any time
the process value exceeds the control limits during a print interval, the maximum
process excursion value will be printed (if both L and U are exceeded, both maximum values will be printed) on the next line printed. At any time the control limits
can be locked in by setting CLUP to "no" . If CLUP = no, new control limits can be
set by CLUP = YEs.
24
WATLOW Series 945
How to Use Data Communications
Error Codes
Problem
Cause
Action
Printing all on
the same line.
The line feed
is missing.
Set the printer for a carriage
return and line feed.
The printing is
garbled.
Data formats are
not compatible.
Match the Series 945 data
format to the printers data
format using the "Data" prompt.
The printer will
not print.
The printer is off line.
Bring the printer on line.
The transmit and
receive lines are
reversed.
Make sure Terminal #20 and
#22 go to the printers appropriate
receive and transmit terminals.
Table 7 Printer
Troubleshooting.
NAKs and Error Codes
When your message is "not acknowledged" (NAK) in RS-422A or EIA-485 with
ANSI X3.28 Protocol, you may clear ER2 code by reading it. That is, use "?"
Then try the message again; you may have made a syntax error. See the error
code listing in Table 5, Page 19.
With XON/XOFF protocol and the RS-423A interface, the 945 sends no
feedback on commands. Therefore, you may want to query the status of ER 2
after each command you send.
All communications-related error codes are ER2 error codes, that is they are
not considered cause for a shutdown of the 945 unit itself. There is always a
communications error code generated when a <NAK> character is sent under
the ANSI X3.28. With XON/XOFF flow control error codes may be generated,
but there will be no standard indication of this fact.
User Responsibility
All of the previous commands are available on all models of the Series 945 that
have communications capability. It is the responsibility of the user to refrain
from altering parameters which may not appear on the unit. (Example: AXLO
should not be set to 1 or 2 if the unit is not equipped with alarm outputs.)
How to Use Data Communications
WATLOW Series 945
25
Index
A
ALM, 20
ANSI X3.28 "=" Command, Fig. 8, 17
ANSI X3.28 "?" Command, Fig. 9, 18
ANSI X3.28 Protocol for RS-422A & EIA-485, 3, 16
ASCII Character Set, Table 1, 10
ASCII Control Characters (Partial Set), Table 2, 10
AXHI, 20
AXLO, 20
ATMN, 20
AUT, 20
B
Baud Rate, 8
BTYP, 19
C
C1, 19
CAL, 20
Carriage Return, 13
CF, 20
Chart Printout, 25
CLUP, 9, 20
Command, "?", 19
Command, "=", 20
Command Data & Responses, Partial Set for "?", 19
Command Data "=" and "?", Table 6, 20
Command List, 12
Communications
Parameters, 8
Switch Selection, 7
Wiring, 3
Connecting the Control and the Computer, 7
CTX, 20
D
Data Parameters, 8
Data Link Escape (DLE), 17
Data Logging, 22
Data Rules, 11
DB, 20
DEC, 20
Device Address, 16
E
EIA-485, 3, 6
End of Text (ETX), 13
End of Transmission (EOT), 17
ERR, 19
ER2, 19
Example Format, 12
F
Flow Control, 13
G
General Message Syntax, 11
H
How to Use Data Comms. with the Series 945, 3
HYSX, 20
26
I
Identification Number, 16
IN, 19
INDC, 20
INT, 20
Interface Wiring,
RS-422A, Fig. 1, 4
RS-423A, Fig. 2, 5
EIA-485, Fig. 3, 6
L
LATX, 21
LOC, 21
LOG, 8, 21, 22
L-R, 21
LSL, 21
M
MAN, 21
MDL, 19
Message Syntax, 11
MODE, 19
Multidrop, 3
N
NAKs and Error Codes, 26
Network connections, 7
O
OTX, 21
P
PBX, 21
Protocol,
XON-XOFF, 13
ANSI X3.28, 16
R
RAX, 21
REX, 21
RS-422A, 3, 4
RS-423A, 3, 5
RSP, 19, 21
RH, 21
RL, 21
S
Setup Menu, 8
SPC, 23
SPX, 21
Space, 12
Starting Communications in ANSI X3.28 Protocol, 16
Start of Text (STX), 13
Stopping Communications in ANSI X3.28 Protocol, 17
T
Table Printout, 23
TAG, 21
tbS, 20
Two Hardware Interfaces & Protocols, 3
U
USL, 21
W
Wiring Data Communications, 4 - 6
X
XON/XOFF
"=" Command Example, Fig. 6, 14
"?" Command Example, Fig. 7, 15
WATLOW Series 945
How to Use Data Communications
Notes
How to Use Data Communications
WATLOW Series 945
27
Series 945 Data Communications User's Manual
Watlow Controls, 1241 Bundy Blvd., Winona, MN 55987, Phone: 507/454-5300, Fax: 507/452-4507
28
WATLOW Series 945
How to Use Data Communications