Specifications | Black Box ACX080 Computer Hardware User Manual

MARCH 2004
MD403A
Portable USB Modem
Users’ Manual
CUSTOMER
SUPPORT
INFORMATION
Order toll-free in the U.S.: Call 877-877-BBOX (outside U.S. call 724-746-5500)
FREE technical support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week: Call 724-746-5500 or fax 724-746-0746
Mailing address: Black Box Corporation, 1000 Park Drive, Lawrence, PA 15055-1018
Web site: www.blackbox.com • E-mail: info@blackbox.com
FCC AND IC RFI STATEMENTS
FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
AND
INDUSTRY CANADA
RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE STATEMENTS
Class B Digital Device. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with
the limits for a Class B computing device pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules.
These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that
interference will not occur in a particular installation. This equipment generates,
uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy, and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or
telephone reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and
on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one of the following
measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which
the receiver is connected.
• Consult an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Caution
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by the party
responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate
the equipment.
To meet FCC requirements, shielded cables and power cords are required to
connect this device to a personal computer or other Class B certified device.
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class B limits for radio noise emission from digital
apparatus set out in the Radio Interference Regulation of Industry Canada.
Le présent appareil numérique n’émet pas de bruits radioélectriques dépassant les limites
applicables aux appareils numériques de classe B prescrites dans le Règlement sur le brouillage
radioélectrique publié par Industrie Canada.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
EMC, Safety and R&TTE Directive Compliance
The CE mark is affixed to this product to confirm compliance with the following
European Community Directives:
Council Directive 89/336/EEC of 3 May 1989 on the approximation of the laws of
Member States relating to electromagnetic compatibility.
and
Council Directive 73/23/EEC of 19 February 1973 on the harmonization of the
laws of Member States relating to electrical equipment designed for use within
certain voltage limits.
and
Council Directive 1999/5/EEC of 9 March 1999 on radio equipment and
telecommunications terminal equipment and the mutual recognition of their
conformity.
2
FCC REQUIREMENTS FOR TELEPHONE-LINE EQUIPMENT
FCC Requirements for
Telephone-Line Equipment
1. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has established rules which
permit this device to be directly connected to the telephone network with
standardized jacks. This equipment should not be used on party lines or coin
lines.
2. If this device is malfunctioning, it may also be causing harm to the telephone
network; this device should be disconnected until the source of the problem
can be determined and until the repair has been made. If this is not done, the
telephone company may temporarily disconnect service.
3. If you have problems with your telephone equipment after installing this
device, disconnect this device from the line to see if it is causing the problem.
If it is, contact your supplier or an authorized agent.
4. The telephone company may make changes in its technical operations and
procedures. If any such changes affect the compatibility or use of this device,
the telephone company is required to give adequate notice of the changes.
5. If the telephone company requests information on what equipment is
connected to their lines, inform them of:
a. The telephone number that this unit is connected to.
b. The ringer equivalence number.
c. The USOC jack required: RJ-11C.
d. The FCC registration number.
Items (b) and (d) can be found on the unit’s FCC label. The ringer
equivalence number (REN) is used to determine how many devices can be
connected to your telephone line. In most areas, the sum of the RENs of all
devices on any one line should not exceed five (5.0). If too many devices are
attached, they may not ring properly.
6. In the event of an equipment malfunction, all repairs should be performed by
your supplier or an authorized agent. It is the responsibility of users requiring
service to report the need for service to the supplier or to an authorized
agent.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
Certification Notice for
Equipment Used in Canada
The Industry Canada label identifies certified equipment. This certification means
that the equipment meets certain telecommunications-network protective,
operation, and safety requirements. Industry Canada does not guarantee the
equipment will operate to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to be
connected to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. The
equipment must also be installed using an acceptable method of connection. In
some cases, the company’s inside wiring associated with a single-line individual
service may be extended by means of a certified connector assembly (extension
cord). The customer should be aware that compliance with the above conditions
may not prevent degradation of service in some situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized maintenance
facility—in this case, Black Box. Any repairs or alterations made by the user to this
equipment, or equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications
company cause to request the user to disconnect the equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground
connections of the power utility, telephone lines, and internal metallic water pipe
system, if present, are connected together. This precaution may be particularly
important in rural areas.
CAUTION
Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but
should contact the appropriate electric inspection authority, or
electrician, as appropriate.
The LOAD NUMBER (LN) assigned to each terminal device denotes the
percentage of the total load to be connected to a telephone loop which is used by
the device, to prevent overloading. The termination on a loop may consist of any
combination of devices, subject only to the requirement that the total of the load
numbers of all the devices does not exceed 100.
4
NOM STATEMENT
NORMAS OFICIALES MEXICANAS (NOM)
ELECTRICAL SAFETY STATEMENT
INSTRUCCIONES DE SEGURIDAD
1. Todas las instrucciones de seguridad y operación deberán ser leídas antes de
que el aparato eléctrico sea operado.
2. Las instrucciones de seguridad y operación deberán ser guardadas para
referencia futura.
3. Todas las advertencias en el aparato eléctrico y en sus instrucciones de
operación deben ser respetadas.
4. Todas las instrucciones de operación y uso deben ser seguidas.
5. El aparato eléctrico no deberá ser usado cerca del agua—por ejemplo, cerca
de la tina de baño, lavabo, sótano mojado o cerca de una alberca, etc..
6. El aparato eléctrico debe ser usado únicamente con carritos o pedestales que
sean recomendados por el fabricante.
7. El aparato eléctrico debe ser montado a la pared o al techo sólo como sea
recomendado por el fabricante.
8. Servicio—El usuario no debe intentar dar servicio al equipo eléctrico más allá
a lo descrito en las instrucciones de operación. Todo otro servicio deberá ser
referido a personal de servicio calificado.
9. El aparato eléctrico debe ser situado de tal manera que su posición no
interfiera su uso. La colocación del aparato eléctrico sobre una cama, sofá,
alfombra o superficie similar puede bloquea la ventilación, no se debe colocar
en libreros o gabinetes que impidan el flujo de aire por los orificios de
ventilación.
10. El equipo eléctrico deber ser situado fuera del alcance de fuentes de calor
como radiadores, registros de calor, estufas u otros aparatos (incluyendo
amplificadores) que producen calor.
11. El aparato eléctrico deberá ser connectado a una fuente de poder sólo del
tipo descrito en el instructivo de operación, o como se indique en el aparato.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
12. Precaución debe ser tomada de tal manera que la tierra fisica y la polarización
del equipo no sea eliminada.
13. Los cables de la fuente de poder deben ser guiados de tal manera que no
sean pisados ni pellizcados por objetos colocados sobre o contra ellos,
poniendo particular atención a los contactos y receptáculos donde salen del
aparato.
14. El equipo eléctrico debe ser limpiado únicamente de acuerdo a las
recomendaciones del fabricante.
15. En caso de existir, una antena externa deberá ser localizada lejos de las lineas
de energia.
16. El cable de corriente deberá ser desconectado del cuando el equipo no sea
usado por un largo periodo de tiempo.
17. Cuidado debe ser tomado de tal manera que objectos liquidos no sean
derramados sobre la cubierta u orificios de ventilación.
18. Servicio por personal calificado deberá ser provisto cuando:
A: El cable de poder o el contacto ha sido dañado; u
B: Objectos han caído o líquido ha sido derramado dentro del aparato; o
C: El aparato ha sido expuesto a la lluvia; o
D: El aparato parece no operar normalmente o muestra un cambio en su
desempeño; o
E: El aparato ha sido tirado o su cubierta ha sido dañada.
6
TRADEMARKS USED IN THIS MANUAL
TRADEMARKS USED IN THIS MANUAL
America Online is a registered trademark of Quantum Computer Services, Inc.
AT&T is a registered trademark of AT&T.
MNP is a registered trademark of Microcom Systems Incorporated.
UL is a registered trademark of Underwriters’ Laboratories Incorporated.
Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are registered trademarks or trademarks of
Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.
Any other trademarks mentioned in this manual are acknowledged to be the property of the
trademark owners.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
Contents
Chapter
Page
1. Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2. Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.2 What the Package Includes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.3 Universal Serial Bus (USB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.4 What Can You Do with Your Modem? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.5 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.5.1 Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.5.2 Fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.5.3 Required Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.6 Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.6.1 Connecting to the Computer (“USB”). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.6.2 Connecting to the Telephone Line (“LINE”) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.6.3 Surge Protectors and Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.7 Front Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
3. Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3.1 Step 1: Connect the Modem to Your System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3.1.1 USB Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3.1.2 Line Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3.2 Step 2: Installing the Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3.2.1 Installation in Windows 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3.2.2 Installation in Windows Me . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
3.2.3 Installation in Windows 98 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.2.4 Removing Your Old Modem from Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.3 Configuring the Modem for Your Country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
3.3.1 Using the Global Wizard Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
3.3.2 Using AT Commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
3.4 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
4. AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
4.1 AT Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
4.2 S-Registers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
4.3 Result Codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
8
CONTENTS
Chapter
Page
5. Remote Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
5.1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
5.2 Basic Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
5.3 Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
5.3.1 Changing the Setup Password. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
5.3.2 Changing the Remote Escape Character . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
6. Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
6.1 None of the Indicators Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
6.2 The Modem Does Not Respond to Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
6.3 The Modem Dials But Cannot Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
6.4 The Modem Disconnects While Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
6.5 The Modem Cannot Connect When Answering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
6.6 The Modem Doesn’t Work with Caller ID. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
6.7 Fax and Data Software Can’t Run at the Same Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
6.8 Calling Black Box. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
6.9 Shipping and Packaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Appendix A. V.90 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
A.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
A.2 V.90 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Appendix B. Loopback Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
B.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
B.2 Local Analog Loopback Test (V.54 Loop 3). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
B.3 Remote Digital Loopback Test (V.54 Loop 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
B.4 Local Digital Loopback Test (V.54 Loop 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Appendix C. Dial-Up Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
C.1 Windows 98/Me Dial-Up Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
C.2 Windows 2000 Dial-Up Networking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Appendix D. Upgrading the Modem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
D.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
D.2 Upgrade Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
1. Specifications
Client-to-Server Data Rates: V.90 or K56flex speeds when accessing an ISP type
V.90 or K56flex server (actual speed depends on server capabilities/line
conditions)
Client-to-Client Data Rates: 33,600, 31,200, 28,800, 26,400, 24,000, 21,600, 19,200,
16,800, 14,400, 12,000, 9600, 7200, 4800, 2400, 300 bps
Fax Data Rates: 14,400, 12,000, 9600, 7200, 4800, 2400, 300 bps
Data Format: Serial, binary, asynchronous
Modem Compatibility: ITU V.90, K56flex; ITU-T V.34 enhanced, V.34, V.32terbo,
V.32bis, V.32, V.22bis, V.22; Bell 212A and 103/113; ITU-T V.29, V.42, V.42bis;
ITU-T V.21 and V.23 in international versions
Fax Compatibility: ITU-T Group 3, Class 1 and 2, T.4, T.30, V.21, V.27ter, V.29,
V.17, and TIA/EIA TR29.2
Error Correction: ITU-T V.42 (LAP-M or MNP® 3–4)
Data Compression: ITU-T V.42bis (4:1 throughput), MNP 5 (2:1 throughput)
Flow Control: X-ON/X-OFF (software), RTS/CTS (hardware)
Intelligent Features: Plug and play; fully AT command compatible; autodial, redial,
repeat dial; pulse or tone dial; dial pauses; auto answer; caller ID; EIA extended
automode; adaptive line probing; automatic symbol and carrier frequency during
startup, retrain, and rate negotiation; call status display, auto-parity and data rate
selections; keyboard-controlled modem options; non-volatile memory; on-screen
displays for modem option parameters; command lines of up to 40 characters
each; help menus; remote configuration
Command Buffer: 40 characters
Data Modulation: FSK at 300 bps, PSK at 1200 bps, QAM at 2400, 4800, and 9600
bps (non-trellis), QAM with trellis-coded modulation (TCM) at 9600, 12,000,
14,400, 16,800, 19,200, 21,600, 24,000, 26,400, 28,800, 31,200, 33,600, and
56,000 bps
Fax Modulation: V.21 CH2 FSK at 300 bps (half-duplex); V.27ter DPSK at 4800 and
2400 bps; V.29 QAM at 9600 and 7200 bps; V.17TCM at 14,400, 12,000, 9600, and
7200 bps
10
CHAPTER 1: Specifications
Carrier Frequencies ITU-T V.34: 1600, 1646, 1680, 1800, 1829, 1867, 1920, 1959,
2000 Hz
Carrier Frequencies ITU-T V.32bis/V.32: 1800 Hz
Carrier Frequencies V.22bis/V.22 or Bell 212A Standard (2400 and 1200 bps):
Transmit originate: 1200 Hz; Transmit answer: 2400 Hz; Receive originate:
2400 Hz; Receive answer: 1200 Hz
Carrier Frequencies ITU-T V.23 (1200 bps): Transmit originate: 390 Hz mark,
450 Hz space; Receive originate: 1300 Hz mark, 2100 Hz space; Transmit answer:
1300 Hz mark, 2100 Hz space; Receive answer: 390 Hz mark, 450 Hz space
Carrier Frequencies ITU-T V.21 (0 to 300 bps): Transmit originate: 980 Hz mark,
1180 Hz space; Receive originate: 1650 Hz mark, 1850 Hz space; Transmit answer:
1650 Hz mark, 1850 Hz space; Receive answer: 980 Hz mark, 1180 Hz space
Carrier Frequencies Bell 103/113 (0 to 300 bps): Transmit originate: 1270 Hz
mark, 1070 Hz space; Receive originate: 2225 Hz mark, 2025 Hz space; Transmit
answer: 2225 Hz mark, 2025 Hz space; Receive answer: 1270 Hz mark, 1070 Hz
space
Fax Carrier Frequencies: V.21 Ch2 (half-duplex): 1650 Hz mark, 1850 Hz space
for transmit originate; 1650 Hz mark, 1860 Hz space for transmit answer; V.27ter:
1800 Hz originate/answer; V.29 QAM: 1800 Hz originate/answer; V.17 TCM:
1800 Hz originate/answer
Transmit Level: -11 dBm (dial-up)
Frequency Stability: ±0.01%
Receiver Sensitivity: -43 dBm under worst-case conditions
AGC Dynamic Range: 43 dB
Connectors: (1) USB connector; (1) RJ-11 phone jack
Cables: (1) RJ-11 phone cable
NOTE
Any cables connected to the computer should be shielded to reduce
interference.
Diagnostics: Power-on self-test, local analog loop, local digital loop, remote digital
loop
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
Indicators: LEDs for Data, Carrier Detect, Off-Hook, Terminal Ready
Temperature Tolerance: 32 to 120°F (0 to 50°C)
Humidity: 20 to 90%, noncondensing
Size: 1"H x 1.25"W x 3.1"D (2.5 x 3.2 x 7.9 cm)
Weight: 2.2 oz. (62 g)
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CHAPTER 2: Introduction
2. Introduction
2.1 Overview
The Portable USB Modem incorporates V.90 technology, which enables Internet
connections at data rates up to 56 kbps* over standard telephone lines. V.90
technology sends data downstream from the Internet to your computer at these
speeds because data on the telephone network typically is converted from digital to
analog only once before it reaches your modem. Upstream transmissions, and
transmissions between client modems, are limited to data rates of 33.6 kbps, as are
downstream transmissions that are converted more than once on the telephone
network.
The modem is Plug-and-Play in Windows® 2000, Windows Me, and Windows 98
operating systems with interactive automatic dialing and command mode
configuration. In standard mode, you can store up to two command lines or
telephone numbers of up to 40 characters each in the modem’s nonvolatile
memory. The modem pulse- or tone-dials, and recognizes dial tones and busy
signals for reliable call-progress detection. The modem can detect AT&T® calling
card tones. It also has Caller ID, remote configuration, and incorporates selfresetting lightning protection. The modem is FCC-registered for connection
without notification to the telephone company.
This full-duplex, intelligent modem also has V.42 error correction, V.42bis data
compression, and V.17 (14,400 bps), Class 1 and 2, Group 3 fax capabilities.
The modem operates with the Global Wizard program. Telephone company
technical requirements differ from country to country. In the Global Wizard
program, simply specify the country in which you will operate, selecting from a
pull-down menu. Global Wizard does the rest, automatically setting up the correct
operating parameters for your modem to operate in your country.
The Flash Wizard utility lets you update the modem’s firmware.
* Although K56flex technology is capable of downloads of up to 56 kbps, FCC
regulations currently restrict ISP modems to downloads of 53 kbps.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
2.2 What the Package Includes
Your package should include the following items:
• Portable USB Modem
• (1) CD-ROM
• (1) RJ-11 telephone cable
• (1) Quick Start Guide
If anything is missing or damaged, please call Black Box at 724-746-5500.
You must supply:
• A computer with an unused USB port.
• A nearby telephone line jack.
2.3 Universal Serial Bus (USB)
Universal Serial Bus (USB), defined by a consortium of industry leaders, permits
connection of multiple low-speed and medium-speed computer peripheral
devices—telephones, modems, printers, keyboards, mice, and scanners—all from a
single personal computer port. The specification, based on an open architecture is
quickly becoming a standard feature in new desktop and notebook computers.
2.4 What Can You Do with Your Modem?
You can use it to access commercial on-line information services such as America
Online®, Genie, and Prodigy. These services provide access to databases,
encyclopedias, stock reports, news, weather, and shopping. They provide e-mail
links to subscribers of the same and other services. Public message areas, called
forums, allow subscribers to trade information and opinions on a vast array of
topics, while vendor forums provide hardware and software support from
manufacturers. Online services also allow you to upload and download computer
programs, data files, and updated software such as video and printer drivers.
Your modem can also connect you to the Internet. Like the commercial online
services, the Internet provides e-mail services, public message areas, and access to
information and software, much of it easily accessed through the Web.
14
CHAPTER 2: Introduction
Other uses include direct links to colleagues with modems, to banks, and to service
bureaus. You can also telecommute with your fax modem—work at home while
communicating with the office by modem or fax.
And of course, you can use your modem to exchange faxes with any fax machine in
the world, enabling you to communicate quickly with businesses and organizations
that do not have direct modem communications.
2.5 Features
• Complies with major ITU-T, TIA, and EIA international standards to ensure
compatibility with other modems.
• Caller ID capability can identify a caller’s phone number (available only on
U.S. products).
2.5.1 DATA
• Supports the V.90 standard for data transmission speeds up to 56 kbps while
maintaining compatibility with lower-speed modems.
• Supports the enhanced ITU-T V.34 standard, with data transmission speeds to
33.6 kbps.
• Supports asynchronous data rates at 56, 33.6, 31.2, 28.8, 26.4, 24, 21.6, 19.2,
16.8, 14.4, and 12 kbps as well as 9600, 4800, 2400, 1200, and 300 bps.
• Supports automatic fallback to slower speeds in noisy line conditions, and fallforward to faster speeds as conditions improve.
• ITU-T V.42 LAP-M and MNP Class 3 and 4 error correction.
• ITU-T V.42bis (4-to-1) and MNP 5 (2-to-1) data compression.
• Automatically disables data compression when transferring alreadycompressed files.
• Autodial, redial, pulse (rotary), and touch-tone dial.
• Dial tone and busy signal detection for reliable call-progress reporting.
• Compatible with the standard AT command set used by most communication
programs.
15
PORTABLE USB MODEM
2.5.2 FAX
• Supports V.17, Group 3 fax communication standards, allowing it to
communicate with other fax modems as well as with fax machines.
• Responds to EIA/TIA Class 1 and 2 fax commands.
• Sends and receives faxes from your computer at 14,400 bps, 9600 bps,
7200 bps, 4800 bps, 2400 bps, or 300 bps.
2.5.3 REQUIRED EQUIPMENT
In addition to the contents of your modem package, you need the following
equipment.
• Computer: Your modem can be connected only to a computer with a USB
port.
• Telephone Line: You must have a telephone line with jack (connector) that
accepts the cable that comes with the modem. If you do not have a telephone
jack near your computer, you should install one before proceeding.
Do-it-yourself telephone extension kits and accessories are available wherever
telephones are sold. You may also hire an independent contractor or your
local telephone company to install an extension. If you want a separate line for
your fax modem, you must contact your telephone company.
• Communications Software: To operate your modem, you must have data
communications and fax communications software (included with the
modem). Data communications software simplifies control of the modem by
guiding you through the process of selecting your serial port, your port speed,
and other variables, and then storing your settings, including frequently called
phone numbers, so they can be recalled with the stroke of a key or the click of
a mouse. Data communications software must be set up, or configured, before
you can use it.
16
CHAPTER 2: Introduction
2.6 Connections
To use your modem, you must connect its USB cable connector to your computer
(“USB”) and to a telephone line (“LINE”).
PC
USB Connector
RJ-11 Connector
Figure 2-1. USB and communications connectors.
2.6.1 CONNECTING TO THE COMPUTER (“USB”)
Connect the USB connector on the Modem to a USB connector on the back of
your computer.
2.6.2 CONNECTING TO THE TELEPHONE LINE (“LINE”)
Plug one end of the cable provided with the Modem into the telephone jack in
your home or office. Plug the other end into the LINE jack on the modem.
NOTE
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Industry Canada, and
other regulatory agencies impose certain restrictions on equipment
connected to public telephone systems. See pages 1–3 for more
information.
2.6.3 SURGE PROTECTORS AND LIGHTNING
Your modem has self-resetting lightning protection to protect it from electrical
spikes on the telephone line. During an electrical storm, unplug your computer
equipment from both the power outlet and the telephone line.
17
PORTABLE USB MODEM
2.7 Front Panel
The Portable USB Modem has four LEDs on the front panel indicating status,
configuration, and activity.
Figure 2-2. Front panel.
• Data. The Data LED flashes when the modem is transmitting/receiving data
to/from another modem.
• Carrier Detect. The CD LED lights when the modem detects a valid carrier
signal from another modem. It is on when the modem is communicating with
the other modem and off when the link is broken.
• Off-Hook. The OH LED lights when the modem is off-hook, which occurs
when the modem is dialing, online, or answering a call. The LED flashes when
the modem pulse-dials.
• Terminal Ready. The TR LED lights when Windows detects and initializes the
modem.
18
CHAPTER 3: Installation
3. Installation
WARNING
1. Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.
2. Never install a telephone jack in wet locations unless the jack is
specifically designed for wet locations.
3. This product is to be used with UL® and cUL listed computers.
4. Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the
telephone line has been disconnected at the network interface.
5. Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.
6. Avoid using a telephone (other than a cordless type) during an
electrical storm. There may be a remote risk of electrical shock from
lightning.
7. Do not use a telephone in the vicinity of a gas leak.
8. To reduce the risk of fire, use only 26 AWG or larger
telecommunication line cord.
3.1 Step 1: Connect the Modem to Your System
PC
USB Connector
RJ-11 Connector
Figure 3-1. Modem connections.
19
PORTABLE USB MODEM
3.1.1 USB CONNECTION
Plug the USB cable connector on the Portable USB Modem into a USB port
connector on your computer.
3.1.2 LINE CONNECTION
Plug one end of the phone cable into the Portable USB Modem’s LINE jack and
the other end into a phone line wall jack.
NOTE
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and Industry Canada
impose certain restrictions on equipment connected to public telephone
systems. See pages 1–3 for more information.
3.2 Step 2: Installing the Modem
3.2.1 INSTALLATION IN WINDOWS 2000
1. Power up your Windows 2000 system.
2. If you have not already done so, connect a) the modem to your computer’s
USB port and b) the telephone line to your modem and a telephone wall
jack.
20
CHAPTER 3: Installation
3. Windows will detect that the new modem is present and indicate that it’s in
the process of installing. The Welcome screen of the Found New Hardware
Wizard appears.
Figure 3-2. Welcome screen.
Click Next >.
21
PORTABLE USB MODEM
4. The Install Hardware Device Drivers screen appears, indicating that it will
install the hardware device drivers.
Portable USB Modem
Figure 3-3. Install Hardware Device Drivers screen.
Verify that “Search for a suitable driver for my device (recommended)” is
selected, and click Next >.
22
CHAPTER 3: Installation
5. The Locate Driver Files screen appears and asks where you want Windows to
search for the driver files.
Portable USB Modem
Figure 3-4. Locate Driver Files screen.
Verify that the “Specify a location” option is the only box selected, place the
Modem Installation CD into your CD drive, and click Next >.
6. The next screen will say “Insert the manufacturer’s installation disk into the
drive selected and then click OK.”
Click on the Browse button. When prompted to insert a disk into drive A:\,
click Cancel. Navigate to your computer’s CD-ROM drive. Select the folder
DRIVERS\WIN 2000. Select the file mdmbbusb.INF and click Open.
23
PORTABLE USB MODEM
7. The Driver Files Search Results screen appears, indicating that Windows has
found the proper driver from the Modem Installation CD.
Portable USB Modem
Figure 3-5. Driver Files Search Results screen.
Click Next > to install the selected driver.
24
CHAPTER 3: Installation
8. The Digital Signature Not Found screen appears.
Portable USB Modem Software
Figure 3-6. Digital Signature Not Found screen.
Click Yes to continue with the installation.
NOTE
This Microsoft® operating system searches for a digital signature when
you install any new hardware. If a “Digital Signature Not Found” screen
appears, simply click the “Yes” button to continue installation. Not
having a digital signature does not affect product performance in any
way.
25
PORTABLE USB MODEM
9. A Copying Files screen appears briefly, indicating that driver files are being
copied to your computer’s hard drive. Then a completion screen appears and
tells you that Windows has finished installing the driver.
Figure 3-7. Completion screen.
Click Finish to complete the installation and exit the wizard.
26
CHAPTER 3: Installation
3.2.2 INSTALLATION IN WINDOWS ME
The Portable USB Modem driver files for Windows Me are installed in two groups,
as described below. The installation wizard begins by installing certain driver files.
At that point, Windows Me detects the modem as a new device. Then the
installation wizard runs again to install the remaining driver files.
1. Power up your Windows Me computer.
2. Connect the Portable USB Modem to your computer’s USB port. Then
connect one end of the provided telephone line cord to your Portable USB
Modem and the other end to a telephone wall jack.
3. Windows Me will detect that the new modem is present and launch the Add
New Hardware Wizard.
Place the Portable USB Modem Installation CD into the CD drive of your PC.
The first Add New Hardware Wizard screen will appear with the message,
“What would you like to do?”
Choose “Specify the location of the driver (Advanced)” and click Next>.
4. At the Add New Hardware Wizard “Windows will search for new drivers…”
screen, uncheck the “Removable Media” button (if necessary), and check
“Specify a location.”
5. Click the “Browse” button and navigate to the “Windows Me” subfolder of the
“Drivers” folder on the MD403A Installation CD. Then click OK. Click
Cancel if it prompts you for a floppy disk.
6. The Add New Hardware Wizard “Windows driver file search…” screen
appears. Click Next>.
7. Transient progress screens will appear while files are being copied. After the
files have been copied to your PC, an Add New Hardware Wizard screen will
appear, indicating that Windows has finished installing the first of two drivers.
Click Finish to complete the installation of this first driver. The wizard will
close.
8. Windows Me will now detect an “Unknown Device” and begin another Add
New Hardware Wizard, again asking “What would you like to do?”
Choose “Specify the location of the driver (Advanced),” and click Next>.
27
PORTABLE USB MODEM
9. At the next screen (the Add New Hardware Wizard “Windows will search for
new drivers…” screen), uncheck the “Removable Media” button (if
necessary), and check “Specify a location.” Click Next>.
10. Transient screens will appear while files are being copied. The Add New
Hardware Wizard “Windows driver file search…” screen will appear. Click
Next>.
11. After files have been copied, a completion screen will appear.
Click Finish to complete the installation of the second driver. The wizard will
close.
12. Remove the Portable USB Modem Installation CD from the computer’s CD
drive.
28
CHAPTER 3: Installation
3.2.3 INSTALLATION IN WINDOWS 98
1. Power up your Windows 98 system.
2. If you have not already done so, connect a) the modem to your computer’s
USB port and b) the telephone line to your modem and a telephone wall
jack.
3. Windows will detect that the new modem is present and launch the Add New
Hardware Wizard dialog box.
Figure 3-8. Add New Hardware Wizard screen.
4. Place the Modem Installation CD into your CD drive and click Next > to
proceed with the installation.
29
PORTABLE USB MODEM
5. The Add New Hardware Wizard dialog box appears with the message “What
do you want Windows to do?”
Figure 3-9. What do you want Windows to do? screen.
Verify that the “Search for the best driver for your device (Recommended)”
option is selected, and click Next >.
6. The Add New Hardware Wizard dialog box is displayed with the message
“Windows will search for a new driver…”
30
CHAPTER 3: Installation
Figure 3-10. Windows will search for a new driver screen.
Verify that the “CD-ROM drive” option is selected, and click Next >.
7. The Add New Hardware Wizard dialog box indicates that Windows has found
an updated driver for this device, and also some other drivers that should
work with this device.
31
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Portable USB Modem
Figure 3-11. Updated driver found screen.
Verify that the “Updated driver (Recommended)” option is selected, and
click Next >.
32
CHAPTER 3: Installation
8. The Add New Hardware Wizard dialog box indicates that Windows will select
the proper driver from the Modem Installation CD and will display the
information for verification.
Portable USB Modem
Figure 3-12. Verification screen.
Click Next > to install the selected driver.
33
PORTABLE USB MODEM
9. Once the files have been copied to your PC, the Add New Hardware Wizard
dialog box appears. It indicates that Windows has finished installing the
driver.
Portable USB Modem
Windows has finished installing the software for
your hardware device.
Figure 3-13. Finish screen.
Click Finish to complete the installation and exit the wizard. The TR LED on
your modem will light when the installation is complete. Remove the CD from
the computer.
34
CHAPTER 3: Installation
3.2.4 REMOVING YOUR OLD MODEM FROM WINDOWS
When your new modem replaces another modem, the old modem installation
remains in Windows even after you install the new modem. The old modem will be
selected in HyperTerminal and other Windows applications. Although you can
change the application connection descriptions one at a time, it is easier to force
Windows applications to use the new modem by removing the old modem from
Windows.
From Windows 2000
1. Click Start | Settings | Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Phone and Modems icon and click on the Modems tab.
3. In the list box, select the old modem.
4. Click Remove, then click Close.
5. The next time you dial a HyperTerminal connection, it will select your new
modem and ask you to confirm the selection.
From Windows Me
1. Go to Start | Settings | Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Modems icon to open the Modems Properties screen.
3. In the General tab a list of modems appears. In this list, highlight the old
modem.
4. Click Remove, then click Close.
5. The next time you dial a HyperTerminal connection, it will select your new
modem and ask you to confirm the selection.
From Windows 98
1. Click Start | Settings | Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Modems icon to open the Modems Properties screen.
3. In the list box, select the old modem.
4. Click Remove, then click Close.
5. The next time you dial a HyperTerminal connection, it will select your new
modem and ask you to confirm the selection.
35
PORTABLE USB MODEM
3.3 Step 3: Configuring the Modem for Your Country
Different countries have different requirements for how modems must function.
Therefore, before you use the modem, you must configure it to match the defaults
of the country in which you are using it. You can configure the modem either
manually using AT commands or with the Global Wizard. Both methods are
described on the next page.
3.3.1 USING THE GLOBAL WIZARD UTILITY
The Global Wizard configuration utility is recommended for computers running
Windows 98, Me, or 2000. The Global Wizard can configure your modem for a
specific country with just a few mouse clicks.
1. Insert the Modem Installation CD into the CD-ROM drive. The Autorun
dialog box appears.
2. Click Initial Setup and Country Selection. The Global Wizard dialog box
appears. Click Next >.
3. View the Global Wizard as it searches for your modem and identifies it. Click
Next >.
4. Select the country in which the modem will be used, then click Next.
5. Review your choice of country. If it is correct, click Next > to configure the
modem.
6. When Global Wizard announces that the parameters have been set, click
Finish to exit.
3.3.2 USING AT COMMANDS
If you are comfortable using AT commands, you can configure your modem using
AT commands. You must enter these commands in your communication
program’s terminal window.
To configure the modem for a specific country, execute the following AT
commands:
1. Type AT%T19,0,nn (where nn represents the country code). Press Enter.
2. The modem will respond “OK.”
3. Type AT&F&W (this saves changes). Press Enter.
36
CHAPTER 3: Installation
4. The modem will respond “OK.”
5. Type ATI9 (this verifies that country code has been chosen). Press Enter.
6. The modem will display the country code in decimal format followed by an
“OK.”
7. Check to be sure the code for your country is displayed. If not, repeat
procedure to correct.
Here are two examples of country, command, and result codes.
Country
AT Command
(Hexidecimal)
ATI9 Result Code
(Decimal)
Euro/NAM
Japan
AT%T19,0,34 (default)
AT%T19,0,10
52
16
3.4 References
The Internet is an excellent source of information in general and modem
installation, configuration, and troubleshooting in particular. The following Web
site is a good places to start:
• Data Communications FAQ: http://www.best.com/~malch/comfaq.html
37
PORTABLE USB MODEM
4. AT Commands, S-Registers, and
Result Codes
4.1 AT Commands
AT commands are used to control the operation of your modem. They are so
called because each command must be preceded by the characters AT to get the
ATtention of the modem.
AT commands can be issued only when the modem is in command mode or online
command mode. The modem is in command mode when it is not connected to
another modem. The modem is in data mode when it is connected to another
modem and ready to exchange data. Online command mode is a temporary state in
which you can issue commands to the modem while connected to another modem.
To put the modem into online command mode from data mode, you must issue
an escape sequence (+++) followed immediately by the AT characters and the
command (for example, +++ATH to hang up the modem). To return to data mode
from online command mode, you must issue the command ATO.
To send AT commands to the modem you must use a communications program,
such as the HyperTerminal applet in Windows NT® 4.0, or the communications
program included with your modem. You can issue commands to the modem
either directly (by typing them in the terminal window of the communications
program) or indirectly (by configuring the operating system or communications
program to send the commands automatically). Fortunately, communications
programs make daily operation of modems effortless by hiding the commands
from the user. Most users, therefore, need to use AT commands only when
reconfiguring a modem (for example, to turn autoanswer on or off).
The format for entering an AT command is ATXn, where X is the command and n
is the specific value for the command, sometimes called the command parameter.
The value is always a number. If the value is zero, you can omit it from the
command; thus, AT&W is equivalent to AT&W0. Most commands have a default
value, which is the value that is set at the factory.
You must press ENTER to send the command to the modem. Any time the modem
receives a command, it sends a response known as a result code. The most common
result codes are OK, ERROR, and the CONNECT messages that the modem sends to
the computer when it is connecting to another modem. For a table of valid result
codes, see Section 4.3.
38
CHAPTER 4: AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
You can issue several commands in one line, in what is called a command string.
The command string begins with AT and ends when you press ENTER. Spaces to
separate the commands are optional; they are ignored by the command
interpreter. The most familiar command string is the initialization string, which is
used to configure the modem when it is turned on or reset, or when your
communications software calls another modem.
AT COMMAND SUMMARY
Command:
Values:
Description:
AT
n/a
Command:
Values:
Description:
ENTER Key
n/a
Command:
Values:
Description:
A
n/a
Command:
Values:
Description:
A/
n/a
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Bn
Attention Code
The attention code precedes all command lines
except A/, A:, and escape sequences.
Press the Enter (Return) key to execute most
commands.
Answer
Answer call before final ring.
Repeat Last Command
Repeat the last command string. Do not precede
this command with AT. Do not press Enter to
execute.
B0
B1
B2
B3
B15
B16
Communication Standard Setting
n=0–3, 15, 16
1 and 16
Select ITU-T V.22 mode when modem is at
1200 bps.
Select Bell 212A when modem is at 1200 bps.
Deselect V.23 reverse channel (same as B3).
Deselect V.23 reverse channel (same as B2).
Select V.21 when the modem is at 300 bps.
Select Bell 103J when the modem is at 300 bps.
39
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Cn
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Ds
40
C0
C1
Carrier Control
n=1
1
Transmit carrier always off. (Not supported.)
Normal transmit carrier switching (included for
backward compatibility with some software).
Dial
s=dial string (phone number and dial modifiers)
none
Dial telephone number s, where s may up to
40 characters long and include the 0–9, *, #, A, B, C,
and D characters, and the L, P, T, V, W, S, comma
(,), semicolon (;), !, @, ^, and $ dial string
modifiers.
L Redial last number. (Must be placed
immediately after ATD.)
P Pulse-dial following numbers in command.
T Tone-dial following numbers in command
(default).
V Switch to speakerphone mode and dial the
following number. Use ATH command to hang up.
W Wait for a new dial tone before continuing to
dial. (X2, X4, X5, X6, or X7 must be selected.)
,
Pause during dialing for time set in register S8.
;
Return to command mode after dialing. (Place
at end of dial string.)
!
Hook flash. Causes the modem to go on-hook
for one-half second, then off-hook again.
@ Wait for quiet answer. Causes modem to wait
for a ringback, then 5 seconds of silence, before
processing next part of command. If silence is not
detected, the modem returns a NO ANSWER code.
^ Disable data calling tone transmission.
$ Detect AT&T call card “bong” tone. The
character should follow the phone number and
precede the user’s call card number:
ATDT1028807637853500$123456789
CHAPTER 4: AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
DS=y
Dial Stored Telephone Number
n=0–1
none
Dial a number previously stored in directory
number y by the &Zy=x command.
Example: ATDS=1
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
En
Echo Command Mode Characters
n=0 or 1
1
Do not echo keyboard input to the terminal.
Do echo keyboard input to the terminal.
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Fn
E0
E1
F0
F1
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Hn
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
In
H0
H1
I0
I1
I2
I3
I4
I5
Echo Online Data Characters
n=1
1
Enable online data character echo. (Not
supported.)
Disable online data character echo (included for
backward compatibility with some software).
Hook Control
n=0 or 1
0
Go on-hook (hang up).
Go off-hook (make the phone line busy).
Information Request
n=0–5, 9, 11
None
Display default speed and controller firmware
version.
Calculate and display ROM checksum (for example,
12AB).
Check ROM and verify the checksum, displaying
OK or ERROR.
Display default speed and controller firmware
version.
Display firmware version for data pump
(for example, 94).
Display the board ID: software version, hardware
version, and country ID.
41
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Command:
Values:
Description:
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
I9
I11
Display the country code (for example, NA Ver. 1).
Display diagnostic information for the last modem
connection, such as DSP and firmware version, link
type, line speed, serial speed, type of error
correction/data compression, number of past
retrains, etc.
Mn
Monitor Speaker Mode
n=0, 1, 2, or 3
1
Speaker always off.
Speaker on until carrier signal detected.
Speaker always on when modem is off-hook.
Speaker on until carrier is detected, except while
dialing.
Default:
M0
M1
M2
M3
Nn
N0
N1
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
On
O0
O1
O3
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
42
P
Modulation Handshake
n=0 or 1
1
Modem performs handshake only at
communication standard specified by S37 and the
B command.
Modem begins handshake at communication
standard specified by S37 and the B command.
During handshake, fallback to a lower speed can
occur.
Return Online to Data Mode
n=0, 1, 3
None
Exit online command mode and return to data
mode (see +++AT<CR> escape sequence ).
Issue a retrain and return to online data mode.
Issue a rate renegotiation and return to data mode.
Pulse Dialing
P, T
T
Configures the modem for pulse (non-touchtone)
dialing. Dialed digits are pulsed until a T command
or dial modifier is received.
CHAPTER 4: AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Qn
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Sr=n
Set Register Value
r=S-register number; n varies
None
Set value of register Sr to value of n, where n is
entered in decimal format. For example, S0=1.
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Sr?
Read Register Value
r=S-register number
None
Read value of register Sr and display it in 3-digit
decimal form. For example, S2? gives the response
043.
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
T
Tone Dialing
P, T
T
Configures the modem for DTMF (touchtone)
dialing. Dialed digits are tone dialed until a
P command or dial modifier is received.
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Vn
Result Code Format
n=0 or 1
1
Displays result codes as digits (terse response).
Displays result codes as words (verbose response).
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Wn
Q0
Q1
Q2
V0
V1
W0
W1
W2
Result Codes Enable/Disable
n=0 or 1
0
Enable result codes.
Disable result codes.
Returns an OK for backward compatibility with
some software.
Result Code Options
n=0, 1, or 2
2
CONNECT result code reports serial port speed,
disables protocol result codes.
CONNECT result code reports serial port speed,
enables protocol result codes.
CONNECT result code reports line speed, enables
protocol result codes.
43
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Xn
X0
X1
X2
X3
X4
X5
X6
X7
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Yn
Y0
Y1
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Zn
Z0
Z1
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
44
&Bn
&B0
&B1
Result Code Selection
n=0–7
4
Basic result codes (for example, CONNECT); does
not look for dial tone or busy signal.
Extended result codes (for example, CONNECT
46000 V42bis); does not look for dial tone or busy
signal.
Extended result codes with NO DIALTONE; does not
look for busy signal.
Extended result codes with BUSY; does not look for
dial tone.
Extended result codes with NO DIALTONE and
BUSY.
Extended result codes with NO DIALTONE and
BUSY.
Extended result codes with NO DIALTONE and
BUSY.
Basic result codes with NO DIALTONE and BUSY.
Long Space Disconnect
n=0
0
Disable sending or responding to long space break
signal on disconnect.
Enable sending or responding to long space break
signal on disconnect. (Not supported.)
Modem Reset
n=0 or 1
None
Reset modem to profile saved by the last &W
command.
Same as Z0.
V.32 Auto Retrain
n=1
1
Disable V.32 auto retrain. (Not supported.)
Enable V.32 auto retrain.
CHAPTER 4: AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
&Cn
&C0
&C1
&C2
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
&En
&E12
&E13
Data Carrier Detect (DCD) Control
n=0 or 1
1
Forces the DCD circuit to be always high.
DCD goes high when the remote modem’s carrier
signal is detected, and goes low when the carrier
signal is not detected.
DCD drops briefly following disconnect, then goes
high again. Register S18 defines how long DCD
signal remains low after disconnect.
X-ON/X-OFF Pacing Control
n=12 or 13
12
Disables X-ON/X-OFF pacing.
Enables X-ON/X-OFF pacing. (&K4 must also be
set.)
NOTE
&E13 has no effect if hardware control (&K3) is selected.
CAUTION
Do not enable pacing unless you need it. Some applications may not
work if pacing is enabled.
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
&Fn
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
&Gn
&F0
&G0
&G1
&G2
Load Factory Settings
n=0
None
Load factory settings as active configuration.
V.22bis Guard Tone Control
n=0, 1, or 2
0
Disable guard tone.
Set guard tone to 550 Hz.
Set guard tone to 1800 Hz.
NOTE
The &G command is not used in North America.
45
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Command:
Values:
Defaults:
Description:
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
&Kn
&K0
&K3
&K4
&Qn
&Q0
&Q5
&Q6
&Q8
&Q9
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
&Sn
&S0
&S1
&Tn
&T0
&T1
&T3
&T6
Flow Control Selection
n=0, 3, or 4
3
Disable flow control.
Enable CTS/RTS hardware flow control.
Enable X-ON/X-OFF software flow control.
Asynchronous Communications Mode
n=0, 5, 6, 8, or 9
5
Asynchronous with data buffering. Same as \N0.
Error control with data buffering. Same as \N3.
Asynchronous with data buffering. Same as \N0.
MNP error control mode. If MNP error control is
not established, the modem falls back according to
the setting in S36.
V.42 or MNP error control mode. If neither error
control is established, the modem falls back
according to the setting in S36.
Data Set Ready (DSR) Control
n=0 or 1
0
Force DSR always high (on).
Let DSR go high only during a connection.
V.54 Test Commands
n=0, 1, 3 or 6
None
Abort. Stop any test in progress.
Local analog loopback test.
Local digital loopback test.
Remote digital loopback test.
NOTE
To stop a test, you must use the escape sequence (+++AT) before typing
AT&T0.
46
CHAPTER 4: AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Command:
Values:
Description:
&V
Display Current Settings
n/a
Displays the active modem settings, including the
callback security settings if callback security is
enabled. If the setup password has been entered, it
also displays the callback security passwords.
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
&Wn
Store Current Configuration
n=0
None
Stores current modem settings in nonvolatile
memory and causes them to be loaded at power-on
or following the ATZ command instead of the
factory defaults. See also the &F command.
Clears user default settings from nonvolatile
memory and causes the factory defaults to be
loaded at power-on or following the ATZ command.
&W0
&W1
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
&Yn
&Y0
&Y1
Command:
Values:
&Zy=x
Store Dialing Command
y=0–1
x=Dialing command
None
Stores dialing command x in memory location y.
Dial the stored number using the command
ATDS=y.
\An
Select Maximum MNP Block Size
n=0, 1, 2, or 3
3
64-character maximum.
128-character maximum.
192-character maximum.
256-character maximum.
Default:
Description:
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Select Stored Configuration for Hard Reset
n=0
0
Select stored configuration 0 on power-up.
(For backward compatibility with some software.)
Not supported—responds ERROR.
\A0
\A1
\A2
\A3
47
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
\Bn
Transmit Break
n=0–9 in 100-ms units
3
In non-error-correction mode only, sends a break
signal of the specified length to a remote modem.
Works in conjunction with the \K command.
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
\Gn
Modem Port Flow Control
n=0
0
Returns an OK for backward compatibility with
some software.
Not supported—responds ERROR.
\G0
\G1
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
\Jn
\J0
\J1
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
\Kn
\K0
\K1
\K2
\K3
\K4
\K5
48
Data Buffer Control
n=0
0
Enable data buffer—serial port speed is
independent of connect speed.
Disable data buffer—serial port speed is forced to
the line speed.
Break Control
n=0–5
5
Controls the response of the modem to a
\B command. The response is different for each of
three different states.
Data mode. The modem receives the break from
the computer:
Enter online command mode, no break sent to the
remote modem.
Clear data buffers and send break to the remote
modem.
Same as \K0.
Send break immediately to the remote modem.
Same as \K0.
Send break to the remote modem in sequence with
the transmitted data.
CHAPTER 4: AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
\K0
\K1
\K2
\K3
\K4
\K5
\K0
\K1
\K2
\K3
\K4
\K5
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
\Nn
\N0
\N1
\N2
\N3
\N4
\N5
\N7
Data mode. The modem receives the break from
the remote modem:
Clear data buffers and send break to the computer.
Same as \K0.
Send break immediately to the computer.
Same as \K2.
Send break to the computer in sequence with the
received data.
Same as \K4.
Online command mode. The modem receives a
\Bn command from the computer:
Clear data buffers and send break to the remote
modem.
Same as \K0.
Send break immediately to the remote modem.
Same as \K2.
Send break to the remote modem in sequence with
the transmitted data.
Same as \K4.
Error Correction Mode Selection
n=0–5, or 7
3
Non-error correction mode with data buffering
(buffer mode; same as &Q6).
Direct mode.
MNP reliable mode. If the modem cannot make an
MNP connection, it disconnects.
V.42/MNP auto-reliable mode. The modem
attempts first to connect in V.42 error correction
mode, then in MNP mode, and finally in non-errorcorrection (buffer) mode with continued
operation.
V.42 reliable mode. If the modem cannot make a
V.42 connection, it disconnects.
V.42, MNP, or non-error correction (same as \N3).
V.42, MNP, or non-error correction (same as \N3).
49
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Command:
Values:
Description:
\Qn
\Q0
\Q1
\Q2
\Q3
\Tn
Default:
\Tn
Flow Control Selection
n=0, 1, or 3
3
Disable flow control (same as &K0).
X-ON/X-OFF software flow control (same as &K4).
CTS-only flow control. Not supported.
RTS/CTS hardware flow control (same as &K3).
Inactivity Timer
n=0, 1–255
0
Sets the time (in minutes) after the last character is
sent or received that the modem waits before
disconnecting. A value of zero disables the timer.
Applies only in buffer mode.
NOTE
You can also set the inactivity timer by changing the value of S30.
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
\Vn
\V0
\V1
\V2
Command:
Values:
Defaults:
Description:
\Xn
\X0
\X1
Command:
Values:
Defaults:
Description:
-Cn
-C0
-C1
50
Protocol Result Code
n=0, 1, or 2
1
Disable the appending of the protocol result code
to the DCE speed.
Enable the appending of the protocol result code
to the DCE speed.
Same as \V1.
X-ON/X-OFF Pass-Through
n=0 or 1
0
Modem responds to and discards X-ON/X-OFF
characters.
Modem responds to and passes X-ON/X-OFF
characters.
Data Calling Tone
n=0 or 1
0
Disable v.25 data calling tone to deny remote
data/fax/voice discrimination.
Enable V.25 data calling tone to allow remote
data/fax/voice discrimination.
CHAPTER 4: AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Command:
Values:
Defaults:
Description:
%A
%A0
%A1
Command:
Values:
Description:
%B
n/a
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
%Cn
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
Adaptive Answer Result Code Enable
n=0 or 1
0
The %A command controls whether the DATA and
FAX result codes will be sent by the modem. The
modem must be in fax mode for this command to
work. Also, the modem must be set to +FAA=1
which enables the modem to distinguish between a
fax and a data call. When these commands are
enabled, the modem sends DATA to the computer
when it detects data tones and FAX when it detects
fax tones. These strings are used by some servers to
select the appropriate communication program.
Disables adaptive answer result codes.
Enables adaptive answer result codes.
View Numbers in Blacklist
If blacklisting is in effect, AT%B displays the
numbers for which the last call attempted in the
previous two hours failed. In countries that do not
require blacklisting, the ERROR result code
appears.
%C0
%C1
%En
2
%E0
%E1
%E2
#Sx
Data Compression Control
n=0 or 1
1
Disable V.42bis/MNP 5 data compression.
Enable V.42bis/MNP 5 data compression.
Fallback and Fall Forward Control
n=0, 1, or 2
Disable fallback and fall forward.
Enable fallback, disable fall forward.
Enable fallback and fall forward.
Enter Setup Password
x=password (1–8 characters, case-sensitive)
blackbox
Enters the remote configuration setup password.
51
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Command:
Values:
Default:
Description:
#S=x
Command:
Values:
Description:
+++AT<CR> Escape Sequence
n/a
Puts the modem in command mode (and
optionally issues a command) while remaining
online. Type +++AT and up to ten command
characters, then press ENTER. Used mostly to issue
the hang-up command: +++ATH<CR>.
Command:
Values:
Description:
%%%AT<CR> Remote Configuration Escape Sequence
n/a
Initiates remote configuration mode while online
with remote modem. The remote configuration
escape character (%) is defined in register S13.
52
Store Setup Password
x=password (1–8 characters, case-sensitive)
blackbox
Stores a new remote configuration setup password.
CHAPTER 4: AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
4.2 S-Registers
Certain modem values, or parameters, are stored in memory locations called
S-registers. Use the S command to read or to alter the contents of S-registers (see
previous section).
Register Unit
Range
Default
Description
S0
1 ring
0, 1–255
1
Sets the number of rings until
the modem answers. ATS0=0
disables autoanswer
completely.
S1
1 ring
0–255
0
Counts the rings that have
occurred.
S2
decimal
0–127,
43(+)
Sets ASCII code for the
escape character. Values
greater than 127 disable ESC.
128–255
S3
decimal
0–127
13(^M)
Sets the ASCII code for the
carriage-return character.
S4
decimal
0–127
10(^J)
Sets the ASCII code for the
line-feed character.
S5
decimal
0–32,
33–127
8(^H)
Sets the ASCII code for the
backspace character. Values
greater than 32 disable
backspace.
S6
seconds
2–65*
2*
Sets the time the modem waits
after it goes off-hook before it
begins to dial the telephone
number.
53
PORTABLE USB MODEM
54
Register Unit
Range
Default
Description
S7
seconds
1–255*
50*
Sets the time the modem waits
for a carrier signal before
aborting a call. Also sets the
wait for silence time for the @
dial modifier.
S8
seconds
0–65
2
Sets the length of a pause
caused by a comma character
in a dialing command.
S9
decimal
0, 1–127
37(%)
Sets ASCII code for remote
configuration escape
character. S9=0 disables
remote configuration.
S10
100 ms
1–254
20
Sets how long a carrier signal
must be lost before the modem
disconnects.
S11
1 ms
50–150*
95*
Sets spacing and duration of
dialing tones.
S18
1 ms
0–255
20
Sets duration of time from the
time the carrier signal goes low
and then goes high again as
set up by the &C2 command.
S28
decimal
0, 1–255
1
0 disables, 1–255 enables
V.34 modulation.
S30
1 minute
0, 1–255
0
Sets the length of time that
the modem waits before
disconnecting when no data is
sent or received. A value of
zero disables the time. See
also the \T command.
CHAPTER 4: AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Register Unit
Range
Default
Description
S35
decimal
0–1
0
0 disables, 1 enables the V.25
data calling tone, which allows
remote data/fax/voice
discrimination.
S36
decimal
0–7
7
Specifies the action to take if
negotiation fails when error
control is selected. (See S48.)
S37
decimal
0–19
0
Sets the maximum V.34
upstream speed at which the
modem attempts to connect.
0 = maximum modem speed
1 = reserved
2 = 1200/75 bps
3 = 300 bps
4 = reserved
5 = 1200 bps
6 = 2400 bps
7 = 4800 bps
8 = 7200 bps
9 = 9600 bps
10 = 12,000 bps
11 = 14,400 bps
12 = 16,800 bps
13 = 19,200 bps
14 = 21,600 bps
15 = 24,000 bps
16 = 26,400 bps
17 = 28,800 bps
18 = 31,200 bps
19 = 33,600 bps
55
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Register Unit
Range
Default
Description
S38
0–23
1
Sets downstream data rate
where K56flex provides rates
of 32,000 to 56,000 bps in
2000 bps increments. V.90
provides rates of 28,000 to
56,000 bps in increments of
1333 bps.
decimal
0 = V.90 disabled
1 = V.90 autorate
K56flex rates
2 = 28,000 bps
2 = 32,000 bps
3= 29,333 bps
3 = 34,000 bps
4 = 30,666 bps
4 = 36,000 bps
5 = 32,000 bps
5 = 38,000 bps
6 = 33,333 bps
6 = 40,000 bps
7 = 34,666 bps
7 = 42,000 bps
8 = 36,000 bps
8 = 44,000 bps
9 = 37,333 bps
9 = 46,000 bps
10 = 38,666 bps
10 = 48,000 bps
11 = 40,000 bps
11 = 50,000 bps
12 = 41,333 bps
12 = 52,000 bps
13 = 42,666 bps
13 = 54,000 bps
14 = 44,000 bps
14 = 56,000 bps
15 = 45,333 bps
16 = 46,666 bps
17 = 48,000 bps
18 = 49,333 bps
19 = 50,666 bps
20 = 52,000 bps
21 = 53,333 bps
22 = 54,666 bps
23 = 56,000 bps
Upstream data rates
The upstream V.90 data rates are 4800 to
33,600 bps in 2400-bps increments.
56
CHAPTER 4: AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Register Unit
Range
Default
Description
S42
decimal
0–1
1
Enables/disables the 56 kbps
auto rate. When 56 kbps is
disabled, fallback to V.34 is
also disabled. 0=disable;
1=enable.
S43
decimal
0–1
1
For testing and debugging
only. Enables/disables V.32bis
start-up auto mode operation.
0=disable; 1=enable.
S48
decimal
7 or 128
7
Enables (7) or disables (128)
LAPM negotiation. The
following table lists the S36
and S48 configuration settings
for certain types of
connections.
S48=7
S48=128
LAPM or hangup do not use
LAPM or async Async
LAPM, MNP, or MNP or
hangup
hangup
LAPM, MNP, or MNP or
async
async
S36=0, 2
S36=1, 3
S36=4, 6
S36=5, 7
S89
seconds
0, 5–255
10
Sets the length of time in the
off-line command mode before
the modem goes into standby
mode. A value of zero prevents
standby mode; a value of 1–4
sets the value to 5.
57
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Register Unit
Range
Default
Description
S109
0–2
1
Sets one of three 56-kbps
operating modes: K56flex
mode, V.90 mode, or Automode. S109=2 forces V.90
connections for testing
purposes, etc. S109 sets the
56-kbps operating mode as
shown below:
0=V.90 disabled
1=K56flex or V.90 (Dual mode
enabled)
2=V.90 only (K56flex disabled).
decimal
4.3 Result Codes
In command mode, your modem can send responses called result codes to your
computer. Result codes are used by communications programs and can also
appear on your monitor.
Terse
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
58
Verbose
OK
CONNECT
RING
NO CARRIER
ERROR
CONNECT 1200
NO DIALTONE
BUSY
NO ANSWER
Description
Command executed
Modem connected to line
Ring signal detected
Carrier signal lost or not detected
Invalid command
Connected at 1200 bps
No dial tone detected
Busy signal detected
No answer at remote end
CHAPTER 4: AT Commands, S-Registers, and Result Codes
Terse
10*
11*
12*
13*
14*
24*
25*
26*
40*
55*
56*
57*
58*
59*
60*
70*
71*
72*
73*
74*
75*
76*
77*
78*
79*
80*
81*
82*
Verbose
Description
CONNECT 2400
CONNECT 4800
CONNECT 9600
CONNECT 14400
CONNECT 19200
CONNECT 7200
CONNECT 12000
CONNECT 16800
CONNECT 300
CONNECT 21600
CONNECT 24000
CONNECT 26400
CONNECT 28800
CONNECT 31200
CONNECT 33600
CONNECT 32000
CONNECT 34000
CONNECT 36000
CONNECT 38000
CONNECT 40000
CONNECT 42000
CONNECT 44000
CONNECT 46000
CONNECT 48000
CONNECT 50000
CONNECT 52000
CONNECT 54000
CONNECT 56000
Connected at 2400 bps
Connected at 4800 bps
Connected at 9600 bps
Connected at 14,400 bps
Connected at 19,200 bps
Connected at 7200 bps
Connected at 12,000 bps
Connected at 16,800 bps
Connected at 300 bps
Connected at 21,600 bps
Connected at 24,000 bps
Connected at 26,400 bps
Connected at 28,800 bps
Connected at 31,200 bps
Connected at 33,600 bps
Connected at 32,000 bps, 56 K rate
Connected at 34,000 bps, 56 K rate
Connected at 36,000 bps, 56 K rate
Connected at 38,000 bps, 56 K rate
Connected at 40,000 bps, 56 K rate
Connected at 42,000 bps, 56 K rate
Connected at 44,000 bps, 56 K rate
Connected at 46,000 bps, 56 K rate
Connected at 48,000 bps, 56 K rate
Connected at 50,000 bps, 56 K rate
Connected at 52,000 bps, 56 K rate
Connected at 54,000 bps, 56 K rate
Connected at 56,000 bps, 56 K rate
*EC is added to these result codes when the extended result codes configuration
option is enabled. EC is replaced by one of the following codes, depending on the
type of error control connection:
V42bis—V.42 error control (LAP-M) and V.42bis data compression.
V42—V.42 error control (LAP-M) only.
MNP5—MNP 4 error control and MNP 5 data compression.
MNP4—MNP 4 error control only.
NoEC—No error control protocol.
59
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Terse
88
89
90
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
60
Verbose
Description
DELAYED
BLACKLISTED
BLACKLIST FULL
CONNECT 28000
CONNECT 29333
CONNECT 30666
CONNECT 33333
CONNECT 34666
CONNECT 37333
CONNECT 38666
CONNECT 41333
CONNECT 42666
CONNECT 45333
CONNECT 46666
CONNECT 49333
CONNECT 50666
CONNECT 53333
CONNECT 54666
Delay is in effect for the dialed number
Dialed number is blacklisted
Blacklist is full
Connected at 28,000 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 29,333 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 30,666 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 33,333 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 34,666 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 37,333 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 38,666 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 41,333 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 42,666 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 45,333 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 46,666 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 49,333 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 50,666 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 53,333 bps, V.90 rate
Connected at 54,666 bps, V.90 rate
CHAPTER 5: Remote Configuration
5. Remote Configuration
5.1 Introduction
Remote configuration is a network management tool that allows you to configure
modems anywhere in your network from one location. With password-protected
remote configuration, you can issue AT commands to a remote Portable USB
Modem for maintenance or troubleshooting as if you were on-site.
5.2 Basic Procedure
The following steps are valid regardless of whether the connection is established by
the local or the remote modem.
1. Establish a data connection with a remote modem.
2. Send three remote configuration escape characters followed by AT and the
setup password, and press ENTER. Example: %%%ATblackbox<CR>. You
have four tries to enter the correct password before being disconnected. If the
password is correct, the remote modem responds with
OK
3. You can now send AT commands to configure the remote modem.
4. When you have finished configuring the remote modem, save the new
configuration by typing AT&W0<CR>, then type ATO<CR> to exit remote
configuration. You can then break the connection in the normal way.
CAUTION
If you hang up while you are in remote configuration mode, it may lock
up the remote modem.
5.3 Setup
The Portable USB Modem is shipped with a default setup password (blackbox).
Because anyone who has an owner’s manual knows the default setup password, for
security you should change the password and possibly also the remote
configuration escape character.
61
PORTABLE USB MODEM
5.3.1 CHANGING THE SETUP PASSWORD
1. Open a data communications program such as HyperTerminal.
2. In the terminal window, type AT#Sblackbox (or AT#Syyyyyy if you have
replaced the blackbox password with yyyyyy) and press ENTER. The modem
responds with OK if the setup password is correct and ERROR if it is wrong.
3. To change the password, type AT#S=yyyyyy, where yyyyyy stands for the
password, and press ENTER. The password can include any keyboard
character, and must be one to eight characters long. The modem responds
with OK.
4. The new password is saved automatically. You can now either enter more AT
commands or exit the data communications program. The next time you
remotely configure the modem you must use the new setup password.
NOTE
You can only change the setup password locally; you cannot do it
remotely. Also, passwords are case-sensitive. The next time you enter
the password, it must be in the same case as you set it up.
5.3.2 CHANGING THE REMOTE ESCAPE CHARACTER
To increase security, you can change a remote modem’s remote configuration
escape character. The remote configuration escape character is stored in register
S9. The factory default is 37, which is the ASCII code for the percent character
(%). Setting S9 to 0 (zero) disables remote configuration entirely—but if you do
this remotely, you won’t be able to change it back remotely!
1. Establish a remote configuration link with the remote modem as described in
“Basic Procedure.”
2. Type ATS9=n, where n is the ASCII code for the new remote configuration
escape character, then press ENTER.
3. Save the new value by typing AT&W and pressing ENTER.
4. Type ATO<CR> to exit remote configuration.
62
CHAPTER 6: Troubleshooting
6. Troubleshooting
Your modem was thoroughly tested at the factory before it was shipped. If you are
unable to make a successful connection, or if you experience data loss or garbled
characters during your connection, the modem might be defective. However, it is
more likely that the source of your problem lies elsewhere. The following
symptoms are typical of problems you might encounter:
• None of the LEDs light when the modem is on.
• The modem does not respond to commands.
• The modem dials but is unable to make a connection.
• The modem disconnects while online.
• The modem cannot connect when answering.
• The modem doesn’t work with Caller ID.
• Fax and data software can’t run at the same time.
If you experience problems, please check the following possibilities before calling
Technical Support.
6.1 None of the Indicators Light
When you plug in the modem, the operating system detects and configures the
modem, and the TR LED should come on.
If the TR LED does not come on, check to see that the software from the Modem
Installation CD has been installed.
6.2 The Modem Does Not Respond to Commands
• Make sure you are issuing the modem commands from the data
communications software, either manually in terminal mode or automatically
by configuring the software. (You cannot send commands to the modem from
the DOS prompt.)
• Make sure you are in terminal mode in your data communications program,
then type AT and press ENTER. If you get an OK response, your connections
are good and the problem likely is in the connection setup in your
communications software.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
• Try resetting your modem by unplugging the USB cable from the modem, and
then plugging it back in.
• Try rebooting the computer.
• The modem might be defective. If you have another Portable USB Modem, try
swapping modems. If the problem goes away, the first modem is possibly
defective. Call Tech Support for assistance.
6.3 The Modem Dials But Cannot Connect
There can be several reasons that the modem fails to make a connection.
Possibilities include:
• lack of a physical connection to the telephone line.
• incompatibility between modems.
• a busy signal.
• a wrong number.
• no modem at the other end.
• a faulty modem, computer, or software at the other end.
You can narrow the list of possibilities by using extended result codes. Extended
result codes are enabled by default. If they have been disabled, enter ATV1X4 and
press ENTER while in terminal mode, or include V1X4 in the modem’s
initialization string. When you dial again, the modem will report the call’s
progress.
• If the modem reports NO DIALTONE, check that the modem’s telephone line
cable is connected to both the modem’s LINE jack (not the PHONE jack) and
the telephone wall jack. If the cable looks secure, try replacing it. If that
doesn’t work, the problem might be in your building’s telephone installation.
To test the building installation, plug a telephone into your modem’s
telephone wall jack and listen for a dial tone. If you hear a dial tone, your
modem might be installed behind a company phone system (PBX) with an
internal dial tone that sounds different from the normal dial tone. In that case,
the modem might not recognize the dial tone and might treat it as an error.
Check your PBX manual to see if you can change the internal dial tone; if you
can’t, change your modem’s initialization string to replace X4 with X3, which
will cause the modem to ignore dial tones (note, however, that X3 is not
allowed in some countries, such as France and Spain).
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CHAPTER 6: Troubleshooting
• If the modem reports BUSY, the other number might be busy, in which case
you should try again later, or it might indicate that you have failed to add a 9,
prefix to the phone number if you must dial 9 for an outside line.
If you must dial 9 to get an outside line, the easiest way to dial it automatically
is to include it in the modem’s dial prefix, for example, ATDT9,. Note the
comma, which inserts a pause before the number is dialed. By inserting 9, into
the dial prefix, you do not have to include it in each directory entry.
To change the dial prefix in Windows 98 HyperTerminal, select Call from the
Call menu, click Dialing Properties, and type 9 in the local and long distance
boxes in How I dial from this location.
• If the modem reports NO ANSWER, the other system has failed to go off-hook,
or you might have dialed a wrong number. Check the number.
• If the modem reports NO CARRIER, the phone was answered at the other end,
but no connection was made. You might have dialed a wrong number, and a
person answered instead of a computer, or you might have dialed the correct
number but the other computer or software was turned off or faulty. Check
the number and try again, or try calling another system to make sure your
modem is working. Also, try calling the number on your telephone. If you hear
harsh sounds, then another modem is answering the call, and the modems
might be having problems negotiating because of modem incompatibilities or
line noise. Try connecting at a lower speed.
6.4 The Modem Disconnects While Online
• If you have Call Waiting on the same phone line as your modem, it can
interrupt your connection when someone tries to call you. If you have Call
Waiting, disable it before each call. In most telephone areas in North America,
you can disable Call Waiting by preceding the telephone number with *70
(check with your local telephone company).
You can automatically disable Call Waiting by including the disabling code in
the modem’s dial prefix (for example, ATDT*70,—note the comma, which
inserts a pause before the number is dialed). To change the dial prefix in
Windows 98 HyperTerminal, select Call from the Call menu, click Dialing
Properties, check This location has Call Waiting, and select the correct code
for your phone service.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
• If you have extension phones on the same line as your modem, you or
someone else can interrupt the connection by picking up another phone. If
this is a frequent problem, disconnect the extension phones before using the
modem, or install another phone line especially for the modem.
• Check for loose connections between the modem and the computer and the
telephone jack.
• You might have had a poor connection because of line conditions or the
problem might have originated on the other end of the line. Try again.
• If you were online with an online service, it might have hung up on you
because of lack of activity on your part or because you exceeded your time
limit for the day. Try again.
6.5 The Modem Cannot Connect When Answering
Autoanswer might be disabled. Turn on autoanswer in your data communications
program or send the command ATS0=1 (ATS0=2 if you have Caller ID service) to
make sure your modem is in terminal mode.
6.6 The Modem Doesn’t Work with Caller ID
• Caller ID information is transmitted between the first and second rings, so if
autoanswer is turned off (S0=0) or if the modem is set to answer after only one
ring (S0=1), the modem will not receive Caller ID information. Check your
initialization string, and if necessary change it to set the modem to answer after
the second ring (S0=2).
• Make sure that you have Caller ID service from your telephone company.
6.7 Fax and Data Software Can’t Run at the Same Time
Communications devices can be accessed by only one application at a time. In
Windows 98, you can have data and fax communication applications open at the
same time, but they cannot use the same modem at the same time.
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CHAPTER 6: Troubleshooting
6.8 Calling Black Box
If you determine that your Portable USB Modem is malfunctioning, do not
attempt to alter or repair the unit. It contains no user-serviceable parts. Contact
Black Box at 724-746-5500.
Before you do, make a record of the history of the problem. We will be able to
provide more efficient and accurate assistance if you have a complete description,
including:
• the nature and duration of the problem.
• when the problem occurs.
• the components involved in the problem.
• any particular application that, when used, appears to create the problem or
make it worse.
6.9 Shipping and Packaging
If you need to transport or ship your Portable USB Modem:
• Package it carefully. We recommend that you use the original container.
• If you are shipping the Portable USB Modem for repair, make sure you
include everything that came in the original package. Before you ship, contact
Black Box to get a Return Authorization (RA) number.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
Appendix A. V.90 Support
A.1 Introduction
V.90 is the ITU designation for what had been formerly called V.pcm. The ITU
recommendation V.90 was determined at a meeting in Geneva ending February 6,
1998.
V.90 will replace K56flex and other proprietary solutions for PCM connections.
Dual-mode client modem code will be important until all central-site digital
modems are upgraded to V.90 and all interoperability problems have been
resolved. Until that time, the dual-mode client code will provide reliable
connections in K56flex mode to the central-site modems currently deployed.
Your V.90 dual-mode (V.90/K56flex) modem now includes:
• New AT commands,
• New Result Codes in V.90 mode, and
• A-law/µ-law selection and various changes to the AT command
documentation.
A.2 V.90 Troubleshooting
1. Check that the modem firmware is the latest.
2. Try adding one or more comma (,) characters to the dialed number in the
dialing string.
3. Try limiting the speed with the S37 (sets the maximum upstream speed) and
S38 (sets the maximum downstream speed) commands.
4. Perform another basic modem/line troubleshooting (check the phone line
for noise, try a different line, or try another device on the same line).
68
APPENDIX B: Loopback Tests
Appendix B. Loopback Tests
B.1 Introduction
Each time you turn on your modem, it performs an automatic self-test to ensure
proper operation. Your modem also has three diagnostic tests: local analog
loopback, remote digital loopback, and local digital loopback. These ITU-T V.54
loopback tests isolate telephone circuit and transmission problems.
In a loopback test, data from your computer loops through the circuits of your
modem and/or a remote modem before it appears on your monitor. When the
loop has been completed, the data on your PC’s monitor should match the
original data.
The local analog loopback test allows you to verify that the modem’s transmitter
and receiver circuits are functioning properly.
The local digital loopback allows you to verify that the local computer or terminal,
the two modems, and the transmission line between them are functioning
properly.
The remote digital loopback test allows you to verify that the remote computer or
terminal, the remote modem, the serial ports, the telephone line, and the local
modem are functioning properly.
NOTE
All loopback tests operate at all speeds except 300 bps.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
B.2 Local Analog Loopback Test (V.54 Loop 3)
In this test, data from your computer or terminal is sent to your modem’s
transmitter, converted into analog form, looped back to the modem’s receiver,
converted into digital form, and then sent to your monitor for verification. No
connection to the phone line is required.
AT&T1
CONNECT
UUUUUUUUU
UUU
Digital
Computer or Terminal
Analog
Portable USB Modem
Local MultiModem
Figure B-1. Local analog loopback test.
TEST PROCEDURE
1. Connect the modem to your computer. Using your communication program,
set the desired baud rate and go into terminal mode.
2. Type AT&T1 and press ENTER. This places your modem in analog loopback
mode in the originate mode. A CONNECT message should appear on your
display. The modem is now out of command mode and in a pseudo-online
mode.
3. Note that the CD LED is on. If you are set for 14,400 bps or higher, a speed
LED should be on. If the CD LED is not on, there is a defect in your modem.
4. Enter characters from your keyboard. For this test, typing multiple uppercase
U characters is a good way to send an alternating test pattern of binary ones
and zeros. The characters entered should be displayed on your monitor. The
TD and RD LEDs should flash when a character is entered.
5. To exit the test, type the escape sequence +++AT and press ENTER. This puts
the modem in online command mode. Then type either AT&T or ATH to
return to command mode.
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APPENDIX B: Loopback Tests
6. Your modem passes this test if the data received on your monitor are the same
as the data entered from your keyboard. If different data appear on your
monitor, your modem is probably causing the problem, though it could also
be your computer. If your modem passes this test, but you are receiving errors
while on line, the remote modem or the phone line could be at fault.
B.3 Remote Digital Loopback Test (V.54 Loop 2)
The remote digital loopback test tests the phone lines and the circuits of both your
modem and a remote modem. In this test, your modem must be on line with
another modem that is set up to respond to a request for remote digital loopback.
(Note that some modems might not support remote digital loopback or might
have it disabled.) Data from your computer or terminal is transmitted through
your modem and over the phone line to the remote modem, where it is then
looped back to your modem.
AT&T6
OK
UUUUUUUUU
UUUUU
AT&T6
OK
Digital
Computer or Terminal
Analog
Local
Portable
Local
MultiModem
USB Modem
Analog
Digital
RemoteMultiModem
Portable
Remote
Computer or Terminal
USB Modem
Figure B-2. Remote digital loopback test.
TEST PROCEDURE
1. Arrange to have &T6 set on the remote test modem.
2. Open your communications software and go into terminal mode. Type AT
and press ENTER; you should get an OK message. Type AT\N and press
ENTER to disable error correction.
3. Dial the remote modem and establish your online connection.
4. Type the escape sequence +++AT and press ENTER to bring your modem
into online command mode.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
5. Type AT&T6 and press ENTER. The local modem responds to this command
by transmitting an unscrambled marking signal, which causes the remote
modem to place itself in digital loopback mode. Then the local modem exits
online command mode and enters data mode.
6. Enter data from your keyboard. For this test, typing multiple uppercase U
characters is a good way to send an alternating test pattern of binary ones and
zeroes. Data received by the remote modem enters its analog receiver, is
converted to digital data, is reconverted into analog, and then is transmitted
back to your modem. Your modem passes this test if the data received on your
monitor is the same as the data entered from your keyboard.
7. To exit the test, type the escape sequence +++AT and press ENTER. This puts
the modem in online command mode. The modem should respond with an
OK message. If you wish to stay on line with the remote modem for normal
data transmission, type AT&T and press ENTER to exit the test, then type
ATO and press ENTER to return on line. If you wish to terminate the call,
type ATH and press ENTER to hang up.
B.4 Local Digital Loopback Test (V.54 Loop 2)
The local digital loopback test is identical to the remote digital loopback test with
one exception. Instead of using your modem to signal a remote modem to place
itself in digital loopback mode, your modem is placed in digital loopback mode
while the remote modem is not. Data is entered and transmitted from the remote
modem, sent across the phone line to your modem, and looped back to the
remote modem.
AT&T3
OK
UUUUUUUUU
UUUUU
Digital
Computer or Terminal
Analog
Local Portable
Local
MultiModem
USB
Modem
Analog
Digital
Remote Portable
Remote MultiModem Computer or Terminal
USB Modem
Figure B-3. Local digital loopback test.
72
APPENDIX B: Loopback Tests
TEST PROCEDURE
1. Open your communications software and go into terminal mode. Type AT
and press ENTER; you should get an OK message. Type AT\N and press
ENTER to disable error correction.
2. Dial the remote modem and establish your online connection.
3. Type the escape sequence +++AT and press ENTER to bring your modem
into online command mode.
4. Type AT&T3 and press ENTER. Once you receive an OK message from your
modem (if responses are enabled), your modem is placed in digital loopback
mode.
5. Have someone enter data from the remote keyboard. For this test, typing
multiple uppercase U characters is a good way to send an alternating test
pattern of binary ones and zeros. The data received by your modem enters its
analog receiver, is converted to digital data, is reconverted into analog, and
then is transmitted back to the remote modem. Your modem passes this test if
the data received on the remote monitor is the same as the data entered from
the remote keyboard.
6. To exit the test, type the escape sequence +++AT and press ENTER. This puts
the modem in online command mode. The modem should respond with an
OK message. If you wish to stay on line with the remote modem for normal
data transmission, type AT&T and press ENTER to exit the test, then type
ATO and press ENTER to return on line. If you wish to terminate the call,
type ATH and press ENTER to hang up.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
Appendix C. Dial-Up Networking
Microsoft’s Dial-Up Networking (DUN) is a system component of Windows 98 and
2000 that enables you to connect your computer to a variety of computer systems
and networks, including the Internet.
Dial-Up Networking has been integrated into Windows 2000. If you are using
Windows 98, you may need to install the Dial-Up Networking code from the fullrelease Windows CD, a companion CD from your Original Equipment
Manufacturer (OEM), or from a complete set of installation (*.CAB) files on your
hard drive. If you are connecting to the Internet, the TCP/IP protocol suite must
also be installed on your computer.
If you are making a Dial-Up connection to the Internet, you’ll need to set up an
account with an Internet Service Provider (ISP). Your ISP should give you the
following information:
• Your access account userid and password.
• The access phone number(s) for dialing into your Internet Service Provider.
• The protocol used to connect to your ISP (PPP or SLIP).
• Your ISP may or may not provide a static IP address for your computer. If your
ISP provides an IP address for your computer or for their Domain Name
Server (DNS), you’ll need to enter these addresses when you configure the
Dial-Up connection. Many ISPs use dynamic IP addresses, which means they
issue your computer a new IP address each time you log into their system. If
your ISP uses dynamic IP addresses, you do not need to configure an IP
address when you create your Dial-Up Connection.
The following instructions will guide you through setting up a basic Dial-Up
Networking connection to the Internet. Many features and settings beyond those
shown here are available for use when creating a Dial-Up connection.
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APPENDIX C: Dial-Up Networking
C.1 Windows 98/Me Dial-Up Networking
NOTE
Before beginning, make certain Dial-Up Networking and TCP/IP are
installed on your computer.
1. To begin your set up:
In Windows 98/Me, go to Start | Programs | Accessories |
Communications | Dial-Up Networking.
2. If this is the first time you have set up a connection with Dial-Up Networking,
the Welcome to Dial-Up Networking Wizard dialog box is displayed. If the
Wizard does not display, double-click the Make New Connection icon to
display the Make New Connection dialog box.
3. The Make New Connection dialog box is displayed. Enter a descriptive name
for this connection. In the “Select a device:” list box, select your Portable USB
Modem from the list.
Figure C-1. Make New Connection dialog box, selecting the modem.
Click Next>.
4. The Make New Connection dialog box is displayed. Enter the Area Code,
Telephone number and Country Code for the computer you will be calling
75
PORTABLE USB MODEM
with this connection (your ISP’s access phone number).
Figure C-2. Make New Connection dialog box, entering phone number.
Click Next>.
5. The Make New Connection dialog box is displayed indicating you have
successfully created a new Dial-Up connection.
Figure C-3. Dial-Up connection created.
Click Finish.
6. From the Dial-Up Networking folder, right click on the Dial-Up Connection
just created and select Properties to open the Modem Properties dialog box.
76
APPENDIX C: Dial-Up Networking
7. The Modem Properties dialog box is displayed. For Windows 98, click the
Server Types tab to display the server property screen. Select the appropriate
Server Type, Log on options, and protocol selections for the device to which
you are connecting (for example, your ISP). For Windows Me, go to the
Networking tab to choose these same server-related options.
Figure C-4. Networking tab.
Click OK.
8. If your ISP requires you to enter IP addresses for their server or DNS
(Domain Name Server), click the TCP/IP Settings button. (In Windows 98,
the TCP/IP Settings button is on the Server Types screen; in Windows Me,
the TCP/IP Settings button is on the Networking screen.)
9. The TCP/IP Settings dialog box is displayed.
77
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Figure C-5. TCP/IP Settings dialog box.
If your ISP provided you with an IP address for your computer, select Specify an IP
address and enter the static address in the box provided. If your ISP requires you
to enter an IP address for their name server (DNS), select Specify name server
addresses and enter the IP addresses given to you by your ISP. Click OK to save the
TCP/IP values and return to the Server Types tab.
When you have completed customizing the modem properties for this connection,
click OK.
To use this connection, double-click the Dial-Up Connection icon within the DialUp Networking folder. If prompted, enter your Internet account User Name and
Password and click Connect.
78
APPENDIX C: Dial-Up Networking
C.2 Windows 2000 Dial-Up Networking
The following instructions describe all Dial-Up Networking connection options
under Windows 2000 as well as guide you through setting up a Dial-Up Networking
connection to an Internet Service Provider (ISP).
NOTE
If you are connecting to the Internet, make sure TCP/IP is installed on
your computer and that you’ve set up an access account with an
Internet Service Provider.
1. To set up a Dial-Up Networking connection within Windows 2000, select
Start | Settings | Network and Dial-up Connections.
2. In the Network and Dial-up Connections dialog box, double-click the Make
New Connection icon. The Network Connection Wizard dialog box is
displayed, indicating the Wizard will help in creating a connection to other
computers and networks enabling applications such as e-mail, web browsing,
file sharing, and printing.
Figure C-6. Network Connection Wizard dialog box.
Click Next>.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
3. The Network Connection Type dialog box is displayed offering several
connection options. Select the option which best describes the type of
connection you are creating with this definition.
Figure C-7. Network Connection Type dialog box.
Click Next>.
The process for completing your Dial-Up Networking connection will vary based
on the connection type selected in the previous step.
If you select Dial-up to private network and have only one modem installed:
a. The Phone Number to Dial dialog box is displayed. Enter the phone number
of the computer, network, or Internet Service Provider (ISP) to which you are
connecting. Click Next>.
b. The Connection Availability dialog box is displayed. If you are creating this
connection for multiple users, select Create this connection for all users. If
this connection will be used only by you, select Create this connection only for
myself. Click Next> to continue.
c. The Completing the Network Connection Wizard dialog box is displayed. You
are prompted for a name to use for this connection. Enter a meaningful
name in the box provided, then click Finish.
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APPENDIX C: Dial-Up Networking
If you select Dial-up to the Internet, the Welcome to the Internet Connection Wizard is
displayed as shown below.
Figure C-8. Welcome to the Internet World Connection Wizard.
a. Select the appropriate option for the type of connection you are making to
the Internet and click Next>. In this example, “I want to set up my Internet
connection manually, or I want to connect through a local area network (LAN)” has
been selected.
b. The Setting up your Internet connection dialog box is displayed. Select
I connect through a phone line and modem. Click Next>.
c. If you have only one modem installed, proceed to the next step. If you have
more than one modem installed on your computer, select the Portable USB
Modem from the list and click Next>.
d. The Step 1 of 3: Internet account connection information dialog box is
displayed. Enter the Area code, Telephone number and Country/region
name and code for your Internet Service Provider’s access number.
e. Click the Advanced tab to access options for selecting your connection type
and logon procedures. Your ISP should provide this information for your
account. If you are not sure which connection type to choose, try PPP.
Although many ISPs automatically provide an IP address for your machine
and their Domain Name Server (DNS) each time you connect to them, some
ISPs do not. If your ISP provided IP addresses to you, click the Addresses tab.
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PORTABLE USB MODEM
In the IP Address section, select Always use the following:, and enter the IP
addresses into the appropriate boxes. Click OK to return to Step 1 of 3:
Internet account connection, and click Next>.
NOTE
If your machine has a network adapter installed, do not enter this
address in the address box. Enter the IP address provided by your ISP.
f. The Step 2 of 3: Internet account logon information dialog box is displayed.
Enter the user name and password you will use for your Internet account.
Click Next>.
g. The Step 3 of 3: Configuring your computer dialog box is displayed. In the
box provided, enter a descriptive name for this connection and click Next>.
h. You are then asked if you would like to set up an Internet mail account. You
may select Yes or No. If you select yes, you will be asked to provide specific
information about your mail service. In this example, No is selected. Click
Next>.
i. The Completing the Internet Connection Wizard is displayed. Click Finish.
If you select Connect to a private network through the Internet:
a. In the box provided, enter the Host name or IP address belonging to the
computer to which you are calling. Contact the network administrator for the
device to which you are connecting to obtain this information. Click Next> to
continue.
b. The Connection Availability dialog box is displayed. If you are creating this
connection for multiple users, select Create this connection for all users. If
this connection will be used only by you, select Create this connection only for
myself. Click Next> to continue.
c. The Completing the Network Connection Wizard dialog box is displayed. You
are prompted for a name to use for this connection. Enter a meaningful
name in the box provided. Click Finish.
If you select Accept incoming connections:
This option allows another computer to create a virtual connection to your
computer through the Internet, other public network, or a direct cable. Virtual
Private connections to your computer through the Internet are possible only if
your computer has a known name or IP address on the Internet.
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APPENDIX C: Dial-Up Networking
a. The Devices for Incoming Connections dialog box is displayed. Select the
Portable USB Modem and click Next>.
b. At the Incoming Virtual Private Connection dialog box, select either Allow
virtual private connection or Do not allow virtual private connection.
c. The Allowed Users dialog box is displayed. Next, you can Add or Delete users
you will allow to connect to this device. Click Next>.
d. In the Networking Components dialog box, select the boxes next to the name
of each networking component you want to enable for incoming connections.
Click Next>.
e. The Completing the Network Connection Wizard dialog box is displayed. In
the box provided, enter a meaningful name for this connection and click
Finish.
If you select Connect directly to another computer:
This connection option is designed to allow a connection between two computers
using a serial, parallel, or infrared port.
a. The Host or Guest dialog box is displayed. Select the role you’d like for this
computer. Select Host if this computer has the information you want to
access. Select Guest if this computer will be used to access information on the
Host computer.
b. If you select Host, you will be presented with the Connection Device dialog
box. Select the device from the list. After installing the device through the
Wizard, you may configure the connection properties by right clicking on the
icon for this connection and selecting Properties. Upon completion, click
Next>.
The Allowed Users dialog box is displayed. Select the check box next to the
name of each user you want to allow to connect to this computer. Click
Next>.
c. If you select Guest, the Select a Device dialog box is displayed. Select the
COM port you’d like to use for this connection from the list. Click Next>.
d The Connection Availability dialog box is displayed. If you are creating this
connection for multiple users, select Create this connection for all users. If
this connection will be used only by you, select Create this connection only for
myself. Click Next> to continue.
e. The Competing the Network Connection Wizard dialog box is displayed. You
are prompted for a name to use for this connection. Enter a meaningful
name in the field provided and click Finish.
83
PORTABLE USB MODEM
Appendix D. Upgrading the
Modem
D.1 Introduction
Your modem is controlled by semi-permanent software, called firmware, which is
stored in flash memory. Firmware is nonvolatile; that is, it remains stored in
memory when the modem is turned off. However, it can be changed by either the
manufacturer or the user as bugs are fixed or new features are added.
Since the firmware in your modem is stored in flash memory, you can upgrade it
yourself in a few minutes by using the following procedures and the Flash Wizard
program.
D.2 Upgrade Overview
The upgrade procedure consists of the following steps, which are described in
greater detail in the following sections.
1. Identify the model number and firmware version of your modem.
2. Identify the current version of the firmware. If your modem already has the
current firmware, there is no need to update it.
3. Download the upgrade file for your modem.
4. Extract the firmware .HEX file and the appropriate flash upgrade program
from the file you downloaded.
5. Document and clear your stored parameters.
6. Upgrade the modem’s firmware using the .HEX file and the flash upgrade
program.
7. Restore your parameters.
84
APPENDIX D: Upgrading the Modem
IDENTIFY THE MODEM FIRMWARE
You must know the model number and firmware version of your modem to know
whether or not you should upgrade it.
1. Run your favorite terminal program. You can use HyperTerminal for
Windows 98, Me, 2000 or Windows NT.
2. In the program’s terminal window, type AT&F. Even if you cannot see the
AT&F command on your screen, be sure to type it completely, and then press
Enter. If the modem does not respond with OK, repeat the AT&F command.
3. Now type ATI3 and record your results. The firmware version should appear
first in the response, which should look similar to the following:
V2.300G-V90_2M_DLS
85
© Copyright 2004. Black Box Corporation. All rights reserved.
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•
Lawrence, PA 15055-1018
•
724-746-5500
•
Fax 724-746-0746
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