Brocade Communications Systems 3200 Switch User Manual

DRAFT: BROCADE CONFIDENTIAL
53-1001761-01
30 March 2010
Converged Enhanced
Ethernet
Administrator’s Guide
Supporting Fabric OS v6.4.0
®
DRAFT: BROCADE CONFIDENTIAL
Copyright © 2006-2010 Brocade Communications Systems, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Brocade, the B-wing symbol, BigIron, DCX, Fabric OS, FastIron, IronPoint, IronShield, IronView, IronWare, JetCore, NetIron,
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are trademarks of Brocade Communications Systems, Inc., in the United States and/or in other countries. All other brands,
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Corporate and Latin American Headquarters
Brocade Communications Systems, Inc.
1745 Technology Drive
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Tel: 1-408-333-8000
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Document History
Title
Publication number
Summary of changes
Date
Converged Enhanced Ethernet
Administrator’s Guide
53-1001258-01
New document
March 2009
Converged Enhanced Ethernet
Administrator’s Guide
53-1001336-02
Updated for FOS v6.3.0
Added new chapters for:
• Standard
configurations
• Port Authentication
November 2009
Converged Enhanced Ethernet
Administrator’s Guide
53-1001761-01
Updated for FOS v6.4.0.
Added new chapter for
IGMP.
March 2010
DRAFT: BROCADE CONFIDENTIAL
Contents
About This Document
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
How this document is organized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Supported hardware and software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi
What’s new in this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xvii
Document conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xvii
Text formatting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Command syntax conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Notes, cautions, and warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
Key terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
Notice to the reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Additional information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Brocade resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Other industry resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Getting technical help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Document feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xx
Chapter 1
Introducing FCoE
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
FCoE terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
FCoE overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
FCoE hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Layer 2 Ethernet overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Layer 2 forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
VLAN tagging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Loop-free network environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Frame classification (incoming) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Congestion control and queuing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Access control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Trunking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Flow Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
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FCoE Initialization Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
FIP discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
FIP login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
FIP logout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
FCoE login. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
FCoE logout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Logincfg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Name server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
FC zoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Registered State Change Notification (RSCN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
FCoE queuing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Chapter 2
Using the CEE CLI
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Management Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
CEE Command Line Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Saving your configuration changes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
CEE CLI RBAC permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Accessing the CEE CLI through the console or Telnet . . . . . . . 15
Accessing the CEE CLI from the Fabric OS shell . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
CEE CLI command modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
CEE CLI keyboard shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Using the do command as a shortcut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Displaying CEE CLI commands and command syntax . . . . . . . 18
CEE CLI command completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
CEE CLI command output modifiers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Chapter 3
Standard CEE Integrations and Configurations
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Overview of standard CEE integrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
SAN Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Integrating a Brocade 8000 switch on a SAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
CEE and LAN integration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Creating the CEE map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Configuring DCBX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Configuring VLAN Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Configuring the CEE Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Server connections to the Brocade 8000 switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Fibre Channel configuration for the CNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Ethernet configuration for the CNA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Minimum CEE configuration to allow FCoE traffic flow. . . . . . . . . . . 29
Chapter 4
Configuring VLANs Using the CEE CLI
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
VLAN overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
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Ingress VLAN filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
VLAN configuration guidelines and restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Default VLAN configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
VLAN configuration and management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Enabling and disabling an interface port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Configuring the MTU on an interface port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Creating a VLAN interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Enabling STP on a VLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Disabling STP on a VLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Configuring a VLAN interface to forward FCoE traffic . . . . . . . . 36
Configuring an interface port as a Layer 2 switch port . . . . . . . 36
Configuring an interface port as an access interface . . . . . . . . 36
Configuring an interface port as a trunk interface . . . . . . . . . . 37
Disabling a VLAN on a trunk interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Configuring an interface port as a converged interface . . . . . . 38
Disabling a VLAN on a converged interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Configuring protocol-based VLAN classifier rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Configuring a VLAN classifier rule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Configuring MAC address-based VLAN classifier rules . . . . . . . 39
Deleting a VLAN classifier rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Creating a VLAN classifier group and adding rules . . . . . . . . . . 40
Activating a VLAN classifier group with an interface port . . . . . 40
Clearing VLAN counter statistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Displaying VLAN information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Configuring the MAC address table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Specifying or disabling the aging time for MAC addresses . . . . 41
Adding static addresses to the MAC address table . . . . . . . . . . 41
Chapter 5
Configuring STP, RSTP, and MSTP using the CEE CLI
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
STP overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Configuring STP on Brocade FCoE hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
RSTP overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
MSTP overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Configuring MSTP on Brocade FCoE hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration guidelines and restrictions . . . 49
Default STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
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STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration and management . . . . . . . . . . 51
Enabling STP, RSTP, or MSTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Disabling STP, RSTP, or MSTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Shutting down STP, RSTP, or MSTP globally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Specifying the bridge priority. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Specifying the bridge forward delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Specifying the bridge maximum aging time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Enabling the error disable timeout timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Specifying the error disable timeout interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Specifying the port-channel path cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Specifying the bridge hello time (STP and RSTP). . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Specifying the transmit hold count (RSTP and MSTP). . . . . . . . 54
Enabling Cisco interoperability (MSTP). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Disabling Cisco interoperability (MSTP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Mapping a VLAN to an MSTP instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Specifying the maximum number of hops
for a BPDU (MSTP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Specifying a name for an MSTP region. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Specifying a revision number for an MSTP configuration . . . . . 56
Flushing MAC addresses (RSTP and MSTP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Clearing spanning tree counters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Clearing spanning tree-detected protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Displaying STP, RSTP, and MSTP-related information . . . . . . . . 58
Configuring STP, RSTP, or MSTP on CEE interface ports . . . . . . . . . 58
Enabling automatic edge detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Configuring the path cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Enabling a port (interface) as an edge port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Enabling the guard root . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Specifying the MSTP hello time. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Specifying restrictions for an MSTP instance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Specifying a link type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Enabling port fast (STP). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Specifying the port priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Restricting the port from becoming a root port . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Restricting the topology change notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Enabling spanning tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Disabling spanning tree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Chapter 6
Configuring Link Aggregation using the CEE CLI
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Link aggregation overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Link Aggregation Group configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Link Aggregation Control Protocol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Dynamic link aggregation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Static link aggregation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Brocade-proprietary aggregation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
LAG distribution process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
LACP configuration guidelines and restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Default LACP configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
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LACP configuration and management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Enabling LACP on a CEE interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Configuring the LACP system priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Configuring the LACP timeout period on a CEE interface . . . . . 70
Clearing LACP counter statistics on a LAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Clearing LACP counter statistics on all LAG groups . . . . . . . . . . 71
Displaying LACP information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
LACP troubleshooting tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Chapter 7
Configuring LLDP using the CEE CLI
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
LLDP overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Layer 2 topology mapping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
DCBX overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Enhanced Transmission Selection (ETS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Priority Flow Control (PFC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
DCBX interaction with other vendor devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
LLDP configuration guidelines and restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Default LLDP configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
LLDP configuration and management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Enabling LLDP globally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Disabling and resetting LLDP globally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Configuring LLDP global command options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Configuring LLDP interface-level command options . . . . . . . . . 83
Clearing LLDP-related information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Displaying LLDP-related information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Chapter 8
Configuring ACLs using the CEE CLI
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
ACL overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Default ACL configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
ACL configuration guidelines and restrictions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
ACL configuration and management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Creating a standard MAC ACL and adding rules . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Creating an extended MAC ACL and adding rules . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Modifying MAC ACL rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Removing a MAC ACL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Reordering the sequence numbers in a MAC ACL . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Applying a MAC ACL to a CEE interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Applying a MAC ACL to a VLAN interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Chapter 9
Configuring QoS using the CEE CLI
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
QoS overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
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Rewriting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Queueing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
User-priority mapping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Traffic class mapping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Congestion control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Tail drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Ethernet pause. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Ethernet Priority Flow Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Multicast rate limiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Strict priority scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Deficit weighted round robin scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Traffic class scheduling policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Multicast queue scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Converged Enhanced Ethernet map configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Chapter 10
Configuring 802.1x Port Authentication
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
802.1x protocol overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
802.1x configuration guidelines and restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
802.1x authentication configuration tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Configure authentication
between the switch and CNA or NIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Interface-specific administrative tasks for 802.1x . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Configuring 802.1x on specific interface ports . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Configuring 802.1x timeouts
on specific interface ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Configuring 802.1x re-authentication
on specific interface ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Disabling 802.1x on specific interface ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Chapter 11
Configuring IGMP
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
About IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Active IGMP snooping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Multicast routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Configuring IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Configuring IGMP snooping querier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Monitoring IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Chapter 12
Configuring RMON using the CEE CLI
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
RMON overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
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RMON configuration and management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Default RMON configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Configuring RMON settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Configuring RMON events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Configuring RMON Ethernet group statistics collection . . . . .120
Chapter 13
FCoE configuration using the Fabric OS CLI
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
FCoE configuration guidelines and restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
Managing and displaying the FCoE configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . .124
Enabling or disabling an FCoE port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124
Configuring FCMAP values for a VLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124
Configuring FIP multicast advertisement intervals . . . . . . . . .124
Clearing logins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Displaying FCoE configuration-related information . . . . . . . . .125
Managing and displaying the FCoE login configuration . . . . . . . . .125
Enabling or disabling FCoE login
configuration management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Displaying or aborting the current
configuration transaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
Cleaning up login groups and VN_port mappings . . . . . . . . . .126
Displaying the FCoE login configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
Saving the current FCoE configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
Creating and managing the FCoE login group configuration . . . . .127
Creating an FCoE login group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
Modifying the FCoE login group device list. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
Deleting an FCoE login group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
Renaming an FCoE login group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Chapter 14
CEE configuration management
In this chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
CEE configuration management guidelines and restrictions. . . . .131
CEE configuration management tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Display the running configuration file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Saving the running configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Loading the startup configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Erasing the startup configuration file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Archiving the running configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Restore an archived running configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Archiving the startup configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Restore an archived startup configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Archive a startup configuration from Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Restore a startup configuration file from Flash . . . . . . . . . . . .133
CEE configuration management commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134
Flash file management commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134
Debugging and logging commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135
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Index
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Figures
Figure 1
Multiple switch fabric configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Figure 2
CEE CLI command mode hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Figure 3
Adding the Brocade 8000 switch to the data center LAN (SAN not shown) . . . 23
Figure 4
Configuring CEE attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Figure 5
CNA protocol stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Figure 6
Ingress VLAN filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Figure 7
Configuring LAGs for a top-of-the-rack CEE switch—Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Figure 8
Configuring LAGs for a top-of-the-rack CEE switch—Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Figure 9
Queue depth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Figure 10
Strict priority schedule — two queues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Figure 11
WRR schedule — two queues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Figure 12
Strict priority and Weighted Round Robin scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
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Tables
Table 1
FCoE terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Table 2
CEE RBAC permissions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Table 3
CEE CLI command modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Table 4
CEE CLI keyboard shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Table 5
CEE CLI command output modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Table 6
Default VLAN configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Table 7
STP versus RSTP state comparison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Table 8
Default STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Table 9
Default MSTP configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Table 10
Default 10-Gigabit Ethernet CEE interface-specific configuration . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Table 11
Default LACP configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Table 12
ETS priority grouping of IPC, LAN, and SAN traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Table 13
Default LLDP configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Table 14
Default MAC ACL configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Table 15
Default priority value of untrusted interfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Table 16
IEEE 802.1Q default priority mapping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Table 17
Default user priority for unicast traffic class mapping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Table 18
Default user priority for multicast traffic class mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Table 19
Supported scheduling configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Table 20
Multicast traffic class equivalence mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Table 21
Default CEE Priority Group Table configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Table 22
Default CEE priority table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Table 23
CEE configuration management commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Table 24
CEE Flash memory file management commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Table 25
Debugging and logging commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
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About This Document
In this chapter
• How this document is organized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Supported hardware and software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• What’s new in this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Document conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Notice to the reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Additional information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Getting technical help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Document feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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How this document is organized
This document is organized to help you find the information that you want as quickly and easily as
possible.
The document contains the following components:
• Chapter 1, “Introducing FCoE,” provides an overview of Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) on
the Brocade FCoE hardware.
• Chapter 2, “Using the CEE CLI,” describes the Converged Enhanced Ethernet (CEE) CLI.
• Chapter 3, “Standard CEE Integrations and Configurations,” describes some basic switch
configurations for command SAN and LAN environments.
• Chapter 4, “Configuring VLANs Using the CEE CLI,” describes how to configure VLANs.
• Chapter 5, “Configuring STP, RSTP, and MSTP using the CEE CLI,” describes how to configure
the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP), Rapid STP (RSTP), and Multiple STP (MSTP).
• Chapter 6, “Configuring Link Aggregation using the CEE CLI,” describes how to configure Link
Aggregation and Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP).
• Chapter 7, “Configuring LLDP using the CEE CLI,” describes how to configure the Link Layer
Discovery Protocol (LLDP) and the Data Center Bridging (DCB) Capability Exchange Protocol
(DCBX).
• Chapter 8, “Configuring ACLs using the CEE CLI,” describes how to configure Access Control
Lists (ACLs).
• Chapter 9, “Configuring QoS using the CEE CLI,” describes how to configure Quality of Service
(QoS).
• Chapter 10, “Configuring 802.1x Port Authentication,”describes how to configure the 802.1x
Port Authentication protocol.
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• Chapter 11, “Configuring IGMP,” describes how to configure IGMP snooping on the Brocade
FCoE hardware.
• Chapter 12, “Configuring RMON using the CEE CLI,” describes how to configure remote
monitoring (RMON).
• Chapter 13, “FCoE configuration using the Fabric OS CLI,” describes how to configure FCoE
using the FOS CLI.
• Chapter 14, “CEE configuration management,” describes how to perform the administrative
tasks required by the Brocade FCoE hardware.
Supported hardware and software
This document includes updated information specific to Fabric OS 6.4.0. The following hardware
platforms are supported in this release:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Brocade 300
Brocade 4100
Brocade 4900
Brocade 5000
Brocade 5100
Brocade 5300
Brocade 5410
Brocade 5424
Brocade 5450
Brocade 5480
Brocade 7500
Brocade 7500E
Brocade 7600
Brocade 7800
Brocade 8000
Brocade Encryption Switch
Brocade VA-40FC
Brocade 48000
Brocade DCX
Brocade DCX-4S
Within this manual, any appearance of the term “Brocade FCoE hardware” is referring to:
• Brocade 8000
• Brocade FCOE10-24 port blade
Although many different software and hardware configurations are tested and supported by
Brocade Communications Systems, Inc. for Fabric OS 6.4.0, documenting all possible
configurations and scenarios is beyond the scope of this document.
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To obtain information about an OS version other than 6.4.0, refer to the documentation specific to
that OS version.
What’s new in this document
This document has been updated for 6.4.0.
The following information was added:
• New chapter on Internet Group Management Protocol.
• New chapter on administering FCoE using Brocade Web Tools.
For further information about new features and documentation updates for this release, refer to
the release notes.
Document conventions
This section describes text formatting conventions and important notice formats used in this
document.
Text formatting
The narrative-text formatting conventions that are used are as follows:
bold text
Identifies command names
Identifies the names of user-manipulated GUI elements
Identifies keywords and operands
Identifies text to enter at the GUI or CLI
italic text
Provides emphasis
Identifies variables
Identifies paths and Internet addresses
Identifies document titles
code text
Identifies CLI output
Identifies command syntax examples
For readability, command names in the narrative portions of this guide are presented in mixed
lettercase: for example, switchShow. In actual examples, command lettercase is often all
lowercase. Otherwise, this manual specifically notes those cases in which a command is case
sensitive.
Command syntax conventions
Command syntax in this manual follows these conventions:
command
Commands are printed in bold.
--option, option
Command options are printed in bold.
-argument, arg
Arguments.
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[]
Optional element.
variable
Variables are printed in italics. In the help pages, values are underlined or
enclosed in angled brackets < >.
...
Repeat the previous element, for example “member[;member...]”
value
Fixed values following arguments are printed in plain font. For example,
--show WWN
|
Boolean. Elements are exclusive. Example: --show -mode egress | ingress
Notes, cautions, and warnings
The following notices and statements are used in this manual. They are listed below in order of
increasing severity of potential hazards.
NOTE
A note provides a tip, guidance, or advice, emphasizes important information, or provides a
reference to related information.
ATTENTION
An Attention statement indicates potential damage to hardware or data.
CAUTION
A Caution statement alerts you to situations that can be potentially hazardous to you or cause
damage to hardware, firmware, software, or data.
DANGER
A Danger statement indicates conditions or situations that can be potentially lethal or extremely
hazardous to you. Safety labels are also attached directly to products to warn of these conditions
or situations.
Key terms
For definitions specific to Brocade and Fibre Channel, see the technical glossaries on Brocade
Connect. See “Brocade resources” on page xix for instructions on accessing Brocade Connect.
For terminology specific to this document, see “FCoE terminology” on page 1.
For definitions of SAN-specific terms, visit the Storage Networking Industry Association online
dictionary at:
http://www.snia.org/education/dictionary
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Notice to the reader
This document may contain references to the trademarks of the following corporations. These
trademarks are the properties of their respective companies and corporations.
These references are made for informational purposes only.
Corporation
Referenced Trademarks and Products
None
Not applicable
Additional information
This section lists additional Brocade and industry-specific documentation that you might find
helpful.
Brocade resources
To get up-to-the-minute information, go to http://my.brocade.com and register at no cost for a user
ID and password.
White papers, online demonstrations, and data sheets are available through the Brocade website
at:
http://www.brocade.com/products-solutions/products/index.page
For additional Brocade documentation, visit the Brocade website:
http://www.brocade.com
Release notes are available on the MyBrocade website and are also bundled with the Fabric OS
firmware.
Other industry resources
For additional resource information, visit the Technical Committee T11 website. This website
provides interface standards for high-performance and mass storage applications for Fibre
Channel, storage management, and other applications:
http://www.t11.org
For information about the Fibre Channel industry, visit the Fibre Channel Industry Association
website:
http://www.fibrechannel.org
Getting technical help
Contact your switch support supplier for hardware, firmware, and software support, including
product repairs and part ordering. To expedite your call, have the following information available:
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1. General Information
•
•
•
•
•
•
Switch model
Switch operating system version
Software name and software version, if applicable
Error numbers and messages received
supportSave command output
Detailed description of the problem, including the switch or fabric behavior immediately
following the problem, and specific questions
• Description of any troubleshooting steps already performed and the results
• Serial console and Telnet session logs
• syslog message logs
2. Switch Serial Number
The switch serial number and corresponding bar code are provided on the serial number label,
as illustrated below:
*FT00X0054E9*
FT00X0054E9
The serial number label is located as follows:
• Brocade 300, 4100, 4900, 5100, 5300, 7500, 7800, 8000, VA-40FC, and Brocade
Encryption Switch—On the switch ID pull-out tab located inside the chassis on the port side
on the left
• Brocade 5000—On the switch ID pull-out tab located on the bottom of the port side of the
switch
•
•
•
•
Brocade 7600—On the bottom of the chassis
Brocade 48000—Inside the chassis next to the power supply bays
Brocade DCX—On the bottom right on the port side of the chassis
Brocade DCX-4S—On the bottom right on the port side of the chassis, directly above the
cable management comb
3. World Wide Name (WWN)
Use the licenseIdShow command to display the WWN of the chassis.
If you cannot use the licenseIdShow command because the switch is inoperable, you can get
the WWN from the same place as the serial number, except for the Brocade DCX. For the
Brocade DCX, access the numbers on the WWN cards by removing the Brocade logo plate at
the top of the nonport side of the chassis.
Document feedback
Quality is our first concern at Brocade and we have made every effort to ensure the accuracy and
completeness of this document. However, if you find an error or an omission, or you think that a
topic needs further development, we want to hear from you. Forward your feedback to:
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documentation@brocade.com
Provide the title and version number of the document and as much detail as possible about your
comment, including the topic heading and page number and your suggestions for improvement.
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Chapter
1
Introducing FCoE
In this chapter
• FCoE terminology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
• FCoE overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
• Layer 2 Ethernet overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
• FCoE Initialization Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
• FCoE queuing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
FCoE terminology
Table 1 lists and describes the FCoE terminology used in this document.
TABLE 1
FCoE terminology
Term
Description
FCoE
Fibre Channel over Ethernet
CEE
Converged Enhanced Ethernet
VN_port
FCoE equivalent of an FC N_port
VF_port
FCoE equivalent of an FC F_port
ENode
An FCoE device that supports FCoE VN_ports
(servers and target devices)
FCoE Forwarder (FCF)
An FCoE link end point that provides FC fabric
services
FCoE overview
Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) enables you to transport FC protocols and frames over
Converged Enhanced Ethernet (CEE) networks. CEE is an enhanced Ethernet that enables the
convergence of various applications in data centers (LAN, SAN, and HPC) onto a single interconnect
technology.
FCoE provides a method of encapsulating the Fibre Channel (FC) traffic over a physical Ethernet
link. FCoE frames use a unique EtherType that enables FCoE traffic and standard Ethernet traffic to
be carried on the same link. FC frames are encapsulated in an Ethernet frame and sent from one
FCoE-aware device across an Ethernet network to a second FCoE-aware device. The FCoE-aware
devices may be FCoE end nodes (ENodes) such as servers, storage arrays, or tape drives on one
end and FCoE Forwarders on the other end. FCoE Forwarders (FCFs) are switches providing FC
fabric services and FCoE-to-FC bridging.
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FCoE overview
The motivation behind using CEE networks as a transport mechanism for FC arises from the desire
to simplify host protocol stacks and consolidate network interfaces in data center environments. FC
standards allow for building highly reliable, high-performance fabrics for shared storage, and these
characteristics are what CEE brings to data centers. Therefore, it is logical to consider transporting
FC protocols over a reliable CEE network in such a way that it is completely transparent to the
applications. The underlying CEE fabric is highly reliable and high performing, the same as the FC
SAN.
In FCoE, ENodes discover FCFs and initialize the FCoE connection through the FCoE Initialization
Protocol (FIP). The FIP has a separate EtherType from FCoE. The FIP includes a discovery phase in
which ENodes solicit FCFs, and FCFs respond to the solicitations with advertisements of their own.
At this point, the ENodes know enough about the FCFs to log into them. The fabric login and fabric
discovery (FLOGI/FDISC) for VN-to-VF port connections is also part of the FIP.
NOTE
With pre-FIP implementations, as an alternative to FIP, directly connected devices can send an
FCoE-encapsulated FLOGI to the connected FCF.
FCoE hardware
At a fundamental level, FCoE is designed to enable the transport of storage and networking traffic
over the same physical link. Utilizing this technology, the Brocade 8000 switch and the Brocade
FCOE10-24 port blade provide a unique platform that connects servers to both LAN and SAN
environments.
Within this manual, any appearance of the term “Brocade FCoE hardware” is referring to the
following hardware:
• Brocade 8000 switch
• Brocade FCOE10-24 port blade
NOTE
The intermediate switching devices in the CEE network do not have to be FCoE-aware. They simply
route the FCoE traffic to the FCoE device based on the Ethernet destination address in the FCoE
frame.
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Layer 2 Ethernet overview
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Layer 2 Ethernet overview
The Brocade FCoE hardware contain CEE ports that support FCoE forwarding. The CEE ports are
also backwards compatible and support classic Layer 2 Ethernet networks (see Figure 1). In Layer
2 Ethernet operation, a host with a Converged Network Adapter (CNA) can be directly attached to a
CEE port on the Brocade FCoE hardware. Another host with a classic 10-Gigabit Ethernet NIC can
be either directly attached to a CEE port, or attached to a classic Layer 2 Ethernet network which is
attached to the Brocade FCoE hardware.
FIGURE 1
Multiple switch fabric configuration
Classic Layer 2
Ethernet switch
Host 3
Classic NIC
Host 1
Host 2
Brocade 8000
switch
CNA or
classic NIC
CNA or
classic NIC
FC switch
FC switch
Storage
Layer 2 forwarding
Layer 2 Ethernet frames are forwarded on the CEE ports. 802.1Q VLAN support is used to tag
incoming frames to specific VLANs, and 802.3ac VLAN tagging support is used to accept VLAN
tagged frames from external devices. The 802.1D Spanning Tree Protocol (STP), Rapid Spanning
Tree Protocol (RSTP), and Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) are used as the bridging
protocols between Layer 2 switches.
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Layer 2 Ethernet overview
The Brocade FCoE hardware handles Ethernet frames as follows:
• When the destination MAC address is not in the lookup table, the frame is flooded on all ports
except the ingress port.
• When the destination MAC address is present in the lookup table, the frame is switched only to
the correct egress port.
• When the destination MAC address is present in the lookup table, and the egress port is the
same as the ingress port, the frame is dropped.
• If the Ethernet Frame Check Sequence (FCS) is incorrect, because the switch is in cut-through
mode, a correctly formatted Ethernet frame is sent out with an incorrect FCS.
• If the Ethernet frame is too short, the frame is discarded and the error counter is incremented.
• If the Ethernet frame is too long, the frame is discarded and the error counter is incremented.
• Frames sent to a broadcast destination MAC address are flooded on all ports except the
ingress port.
• When MAC address entries in the lookup table time out, they are removed. In this event, frame
forwarding changes from unicast to flood.
• An existing MAC address entry in the lookup table is discarded when a device is moved to a
new location. When a device is moved, the ingress frame from the new port causes the old
lookup table entry to be discarded and the new entry inserted into the lookup table. Frame
forwarding remains unicast to the new port.
• When the lookup table is full, new entries replace the oldest MAC addresses after the oldest
MAC addresses age and time out. MAC addresses that still have traffic running are not timed
out.
NOTE
New entries start replacing older entries when the lookup table reaches 90 percent of its 32k
capacity.
VLAN tagging
The Brocade FCoE hardware handles VLAN tagging as follows:
• If the CEE port is configured to tag incoming frames with a single VLAN ID, then incoming
frames that are untagged are tagged with the VLAN ID.
• If the CEE port is configured to tag incoming frames with multiple VLAN IDs, then incoming
frames that are untagged are tagged with the correct VLAN ID based on the port setting.
• If the CEE port is configured to accept externally tagged frames, then incoming frames that are
tagged with a VLAN ID are passed through unchanged.
NOTE
To make a VLAN FCoE-capable, you must enable the forwarding of FCoE traffic on the VLAN interface
by entering the fcf forward CEE CLI command on the VLAN interface.
NOTE
Only a single switch-wide VLAN is capable of forwarding FCoE traffic.
For detailed information on configuring VLANs, see “Configuring VLANs Using the CEE CLI” on
page 31.
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Layer 2 Ethernet overview
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Loop-free network environment
The Brocade FCoE hardware uses the following protocols to maintain a loop-free network
environment:
• 802.1D Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)—STP is required to create a loop-free topology in the LAN.
• Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP)—RSTP evolved from the 802.1D STP standard. RSTP
provides for a faster spanning tree convergence after a topology change.
• Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP)—MSTP defines an extension to RSTP to further
develop the usefulness of VLANs. With per-VLAN MSTP, you can configure a separate spanning
tree for each VLAN group. The protocol automatically blocks the links that are redundant in
each spanning tree.
Using MSTP, you can create multiple loop-free active topologies on a single physical topology.
These loop-free topologies are mapped to a set of configurable VLANs. This enables you to
better utilize the physical resources present in the network and achieve better load balancing
of VLAN traffic.
For detailed information on configuring these protocols, see “Configuring STP, RSTP, and MSTP
using the CEE CLI” on page 43.
Frame classification (incoming)
The Brocade FCoE hardware is capable of classifying incoming Ethernet frames based on the
following criteria:
• Port number
• Protocol
• MAC address
The classified frames can be tagged with a VLAN ID or with 802.1p Ethernet priority. The 802.1p
Ethernet priority tagging is done using the Layer 2 Class of Service (CoS). The 802.1p Ethernet
priority is used to tag frames in a VLAN with a Layer 2 CoS to prioritize traffic in the VLAN. The
Brocade FCoE hardware also accepts frames that have been tagged by an external device.
Frame classification options are as follows:
• VLAN ID and Layer 2 CoS by physical port number—With this option, the port is set to classify
incoming frames to a preset VLAN ID and the Layer 2 CoS by the physical port number on the
Brocade FCoE hardware.
• VLAN ID and Layer 2 CoS by LAG virtual port number—With this option, the port is set to classify
incoming frames to a preset VLAN ID and Layer 2 CoS by the Link Aggregation Group (LAG)
virtual port number.
• Layer 2 CoS mutation—With this option, the port is set to change the Layer 2 CoS setting by
enabling the QoS mutation feature.
• Layer 2 CoS trust—With this option, the port is set to accept the Layer 2 CoS of incoming
frames by enabling the QoS trust feature.
For detailed information on configuring QoS, see “Configuring QoS using the CEE CLI” on page 91.
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Layer 2 Ethernet overview
Congestion control and queuing
The Brocade FCoE hardware supports several congestion control and queuing strategies. As an
output queue approaches congestion, Random Early Detection (RED) is used to selectively and
proactively drop frames to maintain maximum link utilization. Incoming frames are classified into
priority queues based on the Layer 2 CoS setting of the incoming frame, or the possible rewriting of
the Layer 2 CoS field based on the settings of the CEE port or VLAN.
The Brocade FCoE hardware supports a combination of two scheduling strategies to queue frames
to the egress ports; Priority queuing, which is also referred to as strict priority, and Deficit Weighted
Round Robin (DWRR) queuing.
The scheduling algorithms work on the eight traffic classes as specified in 802.1Qaz Enhanced
Transmission Selection (ETS).
Queuing features are described as follows:
• RED—RED increases link utilization. When multiple inbound TCP traffic streams are switched
to the same outbound port, and some traffic streams send small frames while other traffic
streams send large frames, link utilization will not be able to reach 100 percent. When RED is
enabled, link utilization approaches 100 percent.
• Classification—Setting user priority.
- Inbound frames are tagged with the user priority set for the inbound port. The tag is visible
when examining the frames on the outbound port. By default, all frames are tagged to
priority zero.
-
Externally tagged Layer 2 frames—When the port is set to accept externally tagged Layer 2
frames, the user priority is set to the Layer 2 CoS of the inbound frames.
• Queuing
- Input queuing—Input queuing optimizes the traffic flow in the following way. Suppose a
CEE port has inbound traffic that is tagged with several priority values, and traffic from
different priority settings is switched to different outbound ports. Some outbound ports
are already congested with background traffic while others are uncongested. With input
queuing, the traffic rate of the traffic streams switched to uncongested ports should
remain high.
6
-
Output queuing—Output queuing optimizes the traffic flow in the following way. Suppose
that several ports carry inbound traffic with different priority settings. Traffic from all ports
is switched to the same outbound port. If the inbound ports have different traffic rates,
some outbound priority groups will be congested while others can remain uncongested.
With output queuing, the traffic rate of the traffic streams that are uncongested should
remain high.
-
Multicast rate limit—A typical multicast rate limiting example is where several ports carry
multicast inbound traffic that is tagged with several priority values. Traffic with different
priority settings is switched to different outbound ports. The multicast rate limit is set so
that the total multicast traffic rate on output ports is less than the specified set rate limit.
-
Multicast input queuing—A typical multicast input queuing example is where several ports
carry multicast inbound traffic that is tagged with several priority values. Traffic with
different priority settings is switched to different outbound ports. Some outbound ports
are already congested with background traffic while others are uncongested. The traffic
rate of the traffic streams switched to the uncongested ports should remain high. All
outbound ports should carry some multicast frames from all inbound ports. This enables
multicast traffic distribution relative to the set threshold values.
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Layer 2 Ethernet overview
-
Multicast output queuing—A typical multicast output queuing example is where several
ports carry multicast inbound traffic. Each port has a different priority setting. Traffic from
all ports is switched to the same outbound port. If the inbound ports have varying traffic
rates, some outbound priority groups will be congested while others remain uncongested.
The traffic rate of the traffic streams that are uncongested remains high. The outbound
ports should carry some multicast frames from all the inbound ports.
• Scheduling—A typical example of scheduling policy (using SP0 and SP1 modes) is where ports
0 through 7 carry inbound traffic, each port has a unique priority level, port 0 has priority 0,
port 1 has priority 1, and so on. All traffic is switched to the same outbound port. In SP0 mode,
all ports have DWRR scheduling; therefore, the frames-per-second (FPS) on all ports should
correspond to the DWRR settings. In SP1 mode, priority 7 traffic uses SP; therefore, priority 7
can achieve a higher FPS. Frames from input ports with the same priority level should be
scheduled in a round robin manner to the output port.
When setting the scheduling policy, each priority group that is using DWRR scheduling can be
set to use a percentage of the total bandwidth by setting the PG_Percentage parameter.
For detailed information on configuring QoS, see “Configuring QoS using the CEE CLI” on page 91.
Access control
Access Control Lists (ACLs) are used for Layer 2 switching security. Standard ACLs inspect the
source address for the inbound ports. Extended ACLs provide filtering by source and destination
addresses and protocol. ACLs can be applied to the CEE ports or to VLANs.
ACLs function as follows:
• A standard Ethernet ACL configured on a physical port is used to permit or deny frames based
on the source MAC address. The default is to permit all frames.
• An extended Ethernet ACL configured on a physical port is used to permit or deny frames
based on the source MAC address, destination MAC address, and EtherType. The default is to
permit all frames.
• A standard Ethernet ACL configured on a LAG virtual port is used to permit or deny frames
based on the source MAC address. The default is to permit all frames. LAG ACLs apply to all
ports in the LAG.
• An extended Ethernet ACL configured on a LAG virtual port is used to permit or deny frames
based on the source MAC address, destination MAC address, and EtherType. The default is to
permit all frames. LAG ACLs apply to all ports in the LAG.
• A standard Ethernet ACL configured on a VLAN is used to permit or deny frames based on the
source MAC address. The default is to permit all frames. VLAN ACLs apply to the Switch Vertical
Interface (SVI) for the VLAN.
• An extended Ethernet ACL configured on a VLAN is used to permit or deny frames based on the
source MAC address, destination MAC address, and EtherType. The default is to permit all
frames. VLAN ACLs apply to the Switch Vertical Interface (SVI) for the VLAN.
For detailed information on configuring ACLs, see “Configuring ACLs using the CEE CLI” on page 85.
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FCoE Initialization Protocol
Trunking
NOTE
The term “trunking” in an Ethernet network refers to the use of multiple network links (ports) in
parallel to increase the link speed beyond the limits of any one single link or port, and to increase
the redundancy for higher availability.
802.1ab Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) is used to detect links to connected switches or
hosts. Trunks can then be configured between an adjacent switch or host and the Brocade FCoE
hardware using the VLAN classifier commands. See “Configuring an interface port as a trunk
interface” on page 37.
The Data Center Bridging (DCB) Capability Exchange Protocol (DCBX) extension is used to identify a
CEE-capable port on an adjacent switch or host. For detailed information on configuring LLDP and
DCBX, see “Configuring LLDP using the CEE CLI” on page 73.
The 802.3ad Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) is used to combine multiple links to create a
trunk with the combined bandwidth of all the individual links. For detailed information on
configuring LACP, see “Configuring Link Aggregation using the CEE CLI” on page 65.
NOTE
The Brocade software supports a maximum 24 LAG interfaces.
Flow Control
802.3x Ethernet pause and Ethernet Priority-based Flow Control (PFC) are used to prevent dropped
frames by slowing traffic at the source end of a link. When a port on a switch or host is not ready to
receive more traffic from the source, perhaps due to congestion, it sends pause frames to the
source to pause the traffic flow. When the congestion has been cleared, it stops requesting the
source to pause traffic flow, and traffic resumes without any frame drop.
When Ethernet pause is enabled, pause frames are sent to the traffic source. Similarly, when PFC
is enabled, there is no frame drop; pause frames are sent to the source switch.
For detailed information on configuring Ethernet pause and PFC, see “Configuring QoS using the
CEE CLI” on page 91.
FCoE Initialization Protocol
The FCoE Initialization Protocol (FIP) discovers and initializes FCoE capable entities connected to
an Ethernet cloud through a dedicated Ethertype, 0x8914, in the Ethernet frame.
FIP discovery
NOTE
This software version supports the October 8, 2008 (REV 1.03) of the ANSI FC Backbone
Specification with priority-tagged FIP VLAN discovery protocol and FIP version 0. This release does
not support FIP Keep Alive.
The Brocade FCoE hardware FIP discovery phase operates as follows:
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FCoE Initialization Protocol
1
• The Brocade FCoE hardware uses the FCoE Initialization Protocol (FIP). Enodes discover FCFs
and initialize the FCoE connection through the FIP.
• VF_port configuration—An FCoE port accepts Enode requests when it is configured as a
VF_port and enabled. An FCoE port does not accept ENode requests when disabled.
• Solicited advertisements—A typical scenario is where a Brocade FCoE hardware receives a FIP
solicitation from an ENode. Replies to the original FIP solicitation are sent to the MAC address
embedded in the original FIP solicitation. After being accepted, the ENode is added to the
VN_port table.
• Login group—When enabled, replies to solicitations are sent only by Brocade FCoE hardware
that have the ENode in the login group.
• FCF forwarding—The Brocade FCoE hardware forwards FIP frames only when the VLAN is set to
FCF forwarding mode.
• VLAN 1—The Brocade FCoE hardware should not forward FIP frames on VLAN 1 because it is
reserved for management traffic only.
• A fabric-provided MAC address is supported. A server-provided MAC-address is not supported
in the Fabric OS v6.4.0 release.
NOTE
In the fabric-provided MAC address format, VN_port MAC addresses are based on a 24-bit
fabric-supplied value. The first three bytes of this value is referred to as the FCMAP. The next
three bytes are the FC ID, which is assigned by the switch when the ENode logs in to the switch.
FIP login
FIP login operates as follows:
• ENodes can log in to the Brocade FCoE hardware using FIP. Fabric login (FLOGI) and fabric
discovery (FDISC) are accepted. Brocade FCoE hardware in the fabric maintain the MAC
address, World Wide Name (WWN), and PID mappings per login. Each ENode port should have
a unique MAC address and WWN.
• FIP FLOGI—The Brocade FCoE hardware accepts the FIP FLOGI from the ENode. The FIP FLOGI
acceptance (ACC) is sent to the ENode if the ENode MAC address or WWN matches the
VN_port table on the Brocade FCoE hardware. The FIP FLOGI request is rejected if the ENode
MAC address or WWN does not match. The ENode login is added to the VN_port table. Fabric
Provided MAC addressing (FPMA) is supported.
• FIP FDISC—The Brocade FCoE hardware accepts FIP FDISC from the ENode. FIP FDISC
acceptance (ACC) is sent to the ENode if the ENode MAC address or WWN matches the
VN_port table on the Brocade FCoE hardware. The FIP FDISC request is rejected if the ENode
MAC address or WWN does not match. The ENode login is added to the VN_port table. FPMA is
supported.
• Maximum logins per VF_port—The Brocade FCoE hardware supports a maximum of 255 logins
per VF_port. The VF_port rejects further logins after the maximum is reached.
• Maximum logins per switch—The Brocade FCoE hardware accepts a maximum of 1024 logins
per switch. Note that the Brocade FCoE hardware does not reject further logins after the
maximum is reached.
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FIP logout
FIP logout operates as follows:
• ENodes can log out from the Brocade FCoE hardware using FIP. The Brocade FCoE hardware in
the fabric updates the MAC address, WWN, and PID mappings upon logout. The Brocade FCoE
hardware also handles scenarios of implicit logout where the ENode has left the fabric without
explicitly logging out.
• FIP logout (LOGO)—The Brocade FCoE hardware accepts a FIP LOGO from the ENode. The FIP
LOGO ACC should be sent to the ENode if the ENode MAC address matches the VN_port table
on the Brocade FCoE hardware. The LOGO is ignored (not rejected) if the ENode MAC address
does not match. The ENode logout is updated in the VN_port table. FPMA is supported.
• Implicit logout—With the ENode directly connected to a CEE port, if the port that the ENode is
attached to goes offline, the Brocade FCoE hardware implicitly logs out that ENode. ENode
logout is updated in the VN_port table. The Brocade FCoE hardware sends FCoE LOGO on
behalf of the ENode.
FCoE login
The Brocade FCoE hardware FCoE login operates as follows:
• ENodes can log in to the Brocade FCoE hardware using FCoE encapsulated, FC Extended Link
Service (ELS) frames. FLOGI and FDISC are accepted. Brocade FCoE hardware in the fabric
maintains the MAC address to WWN/PID mappings per login. Class 2 FLOGI is not supported.
• FCoE FLOGI—The Brocade FCoE hardware accepts FCoE FLOGI from the ENode. FCoE FLOGI
ACC is sent to the ENode if the FCMAP matches the VN_port table on the Brocade FCoE
hardware. Requests are ignored if the FCMAP does not match. The ENode login is added to the
VN_port table.
• FCoE FDISC—The Brocade FCoE hardware accepts FCoE FDISC from the ENode. FCoE FDISC
ACC is sent to the ENode if the FCMAP matches the VN_port table on the Brocade FCoE
hardware. The FCoE FDISC request is ignored if the FCMAP does not match. The ENode login is
added to the VN_port table.
• FCMAP—The Brocade FCoE hardware accepts FCoE FLOGI from the ENode. The FCMAP
determines which FCoE VLAN is accepted for the FCoE session.
NOTE
Only one FCoE VLAN is supported in the Fabric OS v6.4.0 release.
FCoE logout
The Brocade FCoE hardware FCoE logout operates as follows:
• ENodes can log out from the Brocade FCoE hardware using the FCoE encapsulated, FC ELS
frame. Brocade FCoE hardware in the fabric updates the MAC address to WWN/PID mappings
upon logout. The Brocade FCoE hardware also handles scenarios of implicit logout where the
ENode has left the fabric without explicitly logging out.
• FCoE LOGO—The Brocade FCoE hardware accepts the FCoE LOGO from the ENode. The FCoE
LOGO ACC is sent to the ENode if the ENode MAC address matches the VN_port table on the
Brocade FCoE hardware. The LOGO is ignored (not rejected) if the ENode MAC address does
not match. The ENode logout is updated in the VN_port table.
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Logincfg
The Brocade FCoE hardware logincfg mechanism operates as follows:
• The logincfg is the mechanism for controlling ENode logins per Brocade FCoE hardware. Each
unit of Brocade FCoE hardware maintains its own logincfg.
• Login configuration management is optional—when login management is disabled, the default
behavior is to accept logins from any ENode.
• Logingroup creation and deletion—The Brocade FCoE hardware accepts valid logingroup
names and member WWNs. The Brocade FCoE hardware rejects invalid entries. The Brocade
FCoE hardware allows the deletion of logingroups that are defined and committed. You can
display defined and committed logingroups. The logingroup capability is disabled by default.
• Member add and remove—You can add valid member WWNs. Invalid WWNs are rejected.
Duplicate WWNs are uniquely resolved. You can display the current view of defined logingroups
when changes are made to the configuration.
• Commit and abort—Defined logingroup changes can be aborted with no effect on existing
sessions. The Brocade FCoE hardware does not apply the configurations to new sessions until
the changes are committed. Once defined, logingroups are committed. The Brocade FCoE
hardware immediately uses the new configuration.
• No traffic disruption—Changing the logingroup without committing the changes does not affect
existing sessions. After committing the changes, Enodes that were already logged in continue
to function even when that member is removed from the logingroup. New logins from the
former member are rejected.
Name server
The Brocade FCoE hardware name server function operates as follows:
• ENode login and logout to and from the Brocade FCoE hardware updates the name server in
the FC fabric. The Brocade FCoE hardware maintains the MAC address to WWN/PID mappings.
• ENode login and logout—When an ENode login occurs through any means (FIP FLOGI, FIP
FDISC, FCoE FLOGI, or FCoE FDISC), an entry is added to the name server. When an ENode
logout occurs through any means (FIP LOGO, FCoE LOGO, or implicit logout), the entry is
removed from the name server.
• ENode data—The Brocade FCoE hardware maintains a VN_port table. The table tracks the
ENode MAC address, FIP login parameters for each login from the same ENode, and WWN/PID
mappings on the FC side. You can display the VN_port table with the fcoe -loginshow port
command.
FC zoning
The Brocade FCoE hardware FC zoning operates as follows:
• The virtual devices created by the Brocade FCoE hardware on behalf of the ENodes are subject
to FC zoning. An ENode is only allowed to access devices in the same zones. Administrative
Domains (ADs) are not supported in the Fabric OS v6.4.0 release.
• ENodes can access FC devices in the same zones— FC devices that are not in the same zones
cannot be accessed. Zone members can overlap in multiple zones (that is, overlapping zones).
Zoning changes are immediately enabled by hardware enforced zoning.
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FCoE queuing
• ENodes can access all FC devices with no zoning—ENodes can access all FC devices in the
fabric when cfgdisable is issued and Default Zone is set to All Access Mode.
• Field replacement—When a Brocade FCoE hardware is replaced in the field, you can perform a
configdownload on a previously saved configuration. No zoning change is required.
Registered State Change Notification (RSCN)
The Brocade FCoE hardware RSCN function operates as follows:
• RSCN events generated in the FC fabric are forwarded to the ENodes. RSCN events generated
on the FCoE side are forwarded to the FC devices. CEE is not aware of RSCN events.
• Device RSCN—An RSCN is generated to all registered and affected members when an ENode
either logs in or logs out of an FCF through any means. An RSCN is generated when an FC
N_port device either logs in or logs out of the FC fabric.
NOTE
When transmitting an RSCN, zoning rules still apply for FCoE devices as the devices are treated
as regular FC N_ports.
• VF_port RSCN—An RSCN is generated to all registered members when a VF_port goes online or
offline, causing ENode or FC devices to be added or removed.
• Domain RSCN—An RSCN is generated to all registered and affected members when an FC
switch port goes online or offline, causing ENode or FC devices to be added or removed. An
RSCN is generated when two FC switches merge or segment, causing ENode or FC devices to
be added or removed. When FC switches merge or segment, an RSCN is propagated to
ENodes.
• Zoning RSCN—An RSCN is generated to all registered and affected members when a zoning
exchange occurs in the FC fabric.
FCoE queuing
The QOS configuration controls the FCoE traffic distribution. Note that changing these settings
requires changes on both the Brocade FCoE hardware and the CNA; therefore, the link must be
taken offline and back online after a change is made. Traffic scheduler configuration changes
affect FCoE traffic distribution as follows:
• Changing the priority group for a port causes the FCoE traffic distribution to update. The priority
group and bandwidth are updated.
• Changing the priority table for a port causes the FCoE traffic distribution to be updated. The
COS-to-priority group mapping is updated.
•
•
•
•
Changing the class map for a port causes the FCoE traffic distribution to be updated.
Changing the policy map for a port causes FCoE traffic distribution to be updated.
Changing the CEE map for a port causes the FCoE traffic distribution to be updated.
The FCMAP to VLAN mapping determines the FCoE VLAN allowed for the FCoE session.
Modifying this mapping causes the existing sessions to terminate.
NOTE
Only one FCoE VLAN is supported in the Fabric OS v6.4.0 release.
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Chapter
Using the CEE CLI
2
In this chapter
• Management Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
• CEE Command Line Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Management Tools
The Brocade 8000 runs traditional Fabric OS (FOS) software and can be managed using the same
tools traditionally used for SAN management. Using the FOS Command Line Interface (CLI),
administrators have access to all commands and utilities common to other Brocade switches. In
addition, FOS software on the Brocade 8000 enables Brocade Web Tools to support the following
features for configuring and managing a Converged Ethernet Network:
• CEE interface display and configuration
• FCoE trunk display and configuration
• CEE configuration including link aggregation (LACP), Virtual LANs (VLANs), Quality of Service
(QoS), and LLDP (Link Layer Discovery Protocol)/ DCBX protocol (Data Center Bridging
eXchange)
• FCoE login groups
CEE Command Line Interface
The Brocade 8000 introduces a new CLI designed to support the management of CEE and L2
Ethernet switching functionality. The CEE CLI uses an industry-standard hierarchical shell familiar
to Ethernet/IP networking administrators.
All conventional port-related Fabric OS CLI commands are only applicable to Fibre Channel. These
commands have no knowledge of the Ethernet ports. The CEE features and CEE ports can only be
configured through the CEE CLI interface which is accessed by entering the cmsh command from
the Fabric OS shell.
The system starts up with the default Fabric OS configuration and the CEE startup configuration.
After logging in you are in the Fabric OS shell. For information on accessing the CEE commands
from the Fabric OS shell, see “Accessing the CEE CLI from the Fabric OS shell” on page 15.
Some Fabric OS commands are available in the CEE shell. Enter the fos ? command at the CEE CLI
Privileged EXEC mode command prompt to view the available Fabric OS commands. The traditional
Fabric OS command help found in the Fabric OS shell is not available through the CEE shell.
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NOTE
The CEE configuration is not affected by configUpload and configDownload commands entered in
the Fabric OS shell.
Saving your configuration changes
Any configuration changes made to the switch are written into the running-config file. This is a
dynamic file that is lost when the switch reboots. During the boot sequence, the switch resets all
configuration settings to the values in the startup-config file.
To make your changes permanent, you must use either the write memory command or the copy
command to commit the running-config file to the startup--config file.
Saving configuration changes with the copy command
Perform this task from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Saving configuration changes with the write command
Perform this task from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the write memory command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch# write memory
Overwrite the startup config file (y/n): y
Building configuration...
CEE CLI RBAC permissions
Role-Based Action Control (RBAC) defines the capabilities that a user account has based on the
role the account has been assigned. Table 2 displays the permissions matrix for CEE. Permissions
are specifically defined as follows:
• OM—When you enter the cmsh command, you are put directly into Privileged EXEC mode.
• O—When you enter the cmsh command, you are limited to EXEC mode.
• N—You are not allowed access to the CEE CLI.
TABLE 2
CEE RBAC permissions
Root
Factory
Admin
User
Operator
SwitchAdmin
FabricAdmin
ZoneAdmin
BasicSwitchAdmin
SecurityAdmin
OM
OM
OM
O
N
O
OM
N
N
O
O = observe, OM = observe and modify, N = access not allowed
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CEE Command Line Interface
2
Accessing the CEE CLI through the console or Telnet
NOTE
While this example uses the admin role to log in to the switch, any role listed in the “CEE CLI RBAC
permissions” section can be used.
The procedure to access the CEE CLI is the same through either the console interface or through a
Telnet session; both access methods bring you to the login prompt.
switch login: admin
Password:
switch:admin> cmsh
switch#
To return to the Fabric OS CLI, enter the following command.
switch#exit
switch:admin>
NOTE
Multiple users can Telnet and issue commands using the Exec mode and the Privileged Exec mode.
Accessing the CEE CLI from the Fabric OS shell
To enter the CEE CLI from the Fabric OS shell, enter the following command.
switch:admin> cmsh
switch#
To return to the Fabric OS shell, enter the following command.
switch#exit
switch:admin>
CEE CLI command modes
Figure 2 displays the CEE CLI command mode hierarchy.
FIGURE 2
CEE CLI command mode hierarchy
EXEC
Privileged EXEC
Global configuration
Interface configuration
Protocol configuration
CEE CLI features
Console and VTY (line)
configuration
Port-channel
10-Gigabit Ethernet
VLAN
LLDP
Spanning-tree
CEE map
ACLs
Console
Virtual terminal
Table 3 lists the CEE CLI command modes and describes how to access them.
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NOTE
At system startup, if you try to enter Privileged EXEC mode before the system has fully booted, the
following message is displayed:
%Info: Please wait. System configuration is being loaded.
After the system has fully booted, a RASLOG message indicates that the CEE CLI is ready to accept
configuration commands.
TABLE 3
CEE CLI command modes
Command
mode
Prompt
How to access the command mode
Description
EXEC
switch>
Enter the cmsh command at the
Fabric OS prompt after you have
logged in as an appropriate user.
Display running system information
and set terminal line parameters.
Privileged
EXEC
switch#
From the EXEC mode, enter the
enable command.
Display and change system
parameters. Note that this is the
administrative mode and also
includes EXEC mode commands.
Global
configuration
switch(config)#
From the EXEC mode, enter the
configure terminal EXEC command.
Configure features that affect the
entire switch.
Interface
configuration
Port-channel:
switch(conf-if-po-63)#
From the global configuration mode,
specify an interface by entering one
of the following interface types:
• interface port-channel
• interface tengigabitethernet
• interface vlan
Access and configure individual
interfaces.
From the global configuration mode,
specify a protocol by entering one of
the following protocol types:
• protocol lldp
• protocol spanning-tree mstp
• protocol spanning-tree rstp
• protocol spanning-tree stp
Access and configure protocols.
10-Gigabit Ethernet (CEE port):
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#
VLAN:
switch(conf-if-vl-1)#
Protocol
configuration
LLDP:
switch(conf-lldp)#
Spanning-tree:
switch(conf-mstp)#
switch(conf-rstp)#
switch(conf-stp)#
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CEE Command Line Interface
TABLE 3
2
CEE CLI command modes
Command
mode
Prompt
How to access the command mode
Description
Feature
configuration
CEE map:
switch(config-ceemap)#
From the global configuration mode,
specify a CEE feature by entering
one of the following feature names:
• cee-map
• mac access-list
Access and configure CEE features.
From the global configuration mode,
configure a terminal connected
through the console port by entering
the line console command.
Configure a terminal connected
through a Telnet session by entering
the line vty command.
Configure a terminal connected
through the console port or a
terminal connected through a Telnet
session.
Standard ACL:
switch(conf-macl-std)#
Extended ACL:
switch(conf-macl-ext)#
Console and
VTY (line)
configuration
switch(config-line)#
NOTE
Pressing Ctrl+Z or entering the end command in any mode returns you to Privileged EXEC mode.
Entering exit in any mode returns you to the previous mode.
CEE CLI keyboard shortcuts
Table 4 lists CEE CLI keyboard shortcuts.
TABLE 4
CEE CLI keyboard shortcuts
Keystroke
Description
Ctrl+B or the left arrow key.
Moves the cursor back one character.
Ctrl+F or the right arrow key.
Moves the cursor forward one character.
Ctrl+A
Moves the cursor to the beginning of the command line.
Ctrl+E
Moves the cursor to the end of the command line.
Esc B
Moves the cursor back one word.
Esc F
Moves the cursor forward one word.
Ctrl+Z
Returns to Privileged EXEC mode.
Ctrl+P or the up arrow key.
Displays commands in the history buffer with the most recent command
displayed first.
Ctrl+N or the down arrow key.
Displays commands in the history buffer with the most recent command
displayed last.
NOTE
In EXEC and Privileged EXEC modes, use the show history command to list the commands most
recently entered. The switch retains the history of the last 1000 commands entered from all
terminals.
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Using the do command as a shortcut
You can use the do command to save time when you are working in any configuration mode and
you want to run a command in the EXEC or Privileged EXEC mode.
For example, if you are configuring an LLDP and you want to execute a Privileged EXEC mode
command, such as the dir command, you would first have to exit the LLDP configuration mode.
However, by using the do command with the dir command you can ignore the need to change
configuration modes, as shown in the example below.
switch(conf-lldp)#do dir
Contents of flash://
-rw-r----1276
-rw-r----1276
-rw-r----1276
-rw-r----1276
switch(conf-lldp)#
Wed
Wed
Wed
Wed
Feb
Feb
Feb
Feb
4
4
4
4
07:08:49
07:10:30
07:12:33
10:48:59
2009
2009
2009
2009
startup_rmon_config
rmon_config
rmon_configuration
starup-config
Displaying CEE CLI commands and command syntax
Enter a question mark (?) in any command mode to display the list of commands available in that
mode.
switch>?
Exec commands:
enable
Turn on privileged mode command
exit
End current mode and down to previous mode
help
Description of the interactive help system
logout
Exit from the EXEC
quit
Exit current mode and down to previous mode
show
Show running system information
terminal Set terminal line parameters
To display a list of commands that start with the same characters, type the characters followed by
the question mark (?).
switch>e?
enable Turn on privileged mode command
exit
End current mode and down to previous mode
To display the keywords and arguments associated with a command, enter the keyword followed by
the question mark (?).
switch#terminal ?
length Set number of lines on a screen
no
Negate a command or set its defaults
If the question mark (?) is typed within an incomplete keyword, and the keyword is the only keyword
starting with those characters, the CLI displays help for that keyword only.
switch#show d?
dot1x IEEE 802.1X Port-Based Access Control
<cr>
If the question mark (?) is typed within an incomplete keyword but the keyword matches several
keywords, the CLI displays help for all the matching keywords.
switch#show i?
interface Interface status and configuration
ip
Internet Protocol (IP)
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CEE Command Line Interface
2
The CEE CLI accepts abbreviations for commands. This example is the abbreviation for the show
qos interface all command.
switch#sh q i a
If the switch does not recognize a command after Enter is pressed, an error message displays.
switch#hookup
^
% Invalid input detected at '^' marker.
If an incomplete command is entered, an error message displays.
switch#show
% Incomplete command.
CEE CLI command completion
To automatically complete the spelling of commands or keywords, begin typing the command or
keyword and then press Tab. For example, at the CLI command prompt type te and press Tab:
switch#te
The CLI displays:
switch#terminal
If there is more than one command or keyword associated with the characters typed, the CEE CLI
displays all choices. For example, at the CLI command prompt type show l and press Tab:
switch#show l
The CLI displays:
switch#show l
lacp line lldp
CEE CLI command output modifiers
You can filter the output of the CEE CLI show commands using the output modifiers described in
Table 5.
TABLE 5
CEE CLI command output modifiers
Output modifier
Description
redirect
Redirects the command output to the specified file.
include
Displays the command output that includes the specified expression.
exclude
Displays the command output that excludes the specified expression.
append
Appends the command output to the specified file.
begin
Displays the command output that begins with the specified expression.
last
Displays only the last few lines of the command output.
tee
Redirects the command output to the specified file. Note that this modifier also
displays the command output.
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Chapter
3
Standard CEE Integrations and Configurations
In this chapter
• Overview of standard CEE integrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• SAN Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• CEE and LAN integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Server connections to the Brocade 8000 switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Minimum CEE configuration to allow FCoE traffic flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
21
22
29
29
Overview of standard CEE integrations
This chapter describes standard configurations that are commonly required for the Brocade FCoE
hardware. Brocade believes these configurations cover approximately 90 percent of customer
needs.
The following scenarios for the newly installed converged network are described:
•
•
•
•
SAN integration with the Brocade 8000 switch
LAN configuration for the Brocade FCoE hardware
Connecting Servers to the Brocade FCoE hardware
Minimum CEE configuration to allow FCoE
All of the CLI commands are entered using the Telnet or console interface on the Brocade FCoE
hardware. See “CEE CLI command modes” on page 15 for complete instructions on logging into the
Brocade FCoE hardware.
SAN Integration
FC SANs are typically deployed in a core-edge topology with servers connecting to edge switches in
the fabric. Since the Brocade 8000 FC switching module operates with the same features and
functionality of a regular FC switch, this topology is preserved when the Brocade 8000 switch is
introduced into the fabric. The Brocade 8000 switch can be treated as just another edge switch
connecting to the core FC infrastructure. The only difference is that servers are directly attached
using a CNA supporting the FCoE protocol instead of an HBA supporting the FC protocol.
Connecting the Brocade 8000 switch to an existing FC SAN follows the same process as adding a
new FC edge switch into a SAN. Most SAN environments include redundant fabrics (A and B). A
typical installation involves connecting a Brocade 8000 switch to Fabric A, verifying stability, and
then installing a second Brocade 8000 switch into Fabric B.
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FCoE devices log in to one of the six FCoE ports on the Brocade 8000 switch. The FCoE ports
provide FC services to FCoE initiators and enable bridging between FCoE initiators and FC targets.
FCoE ports differ from regular FC ports in that they are not directly associated with an external
physical port on the switch. Instead, each FCoE port supports up to four logical traffic paths.
Brocade’s implementation of FCoE on the Brocade 8000 switch provides integral NPIV support so
that multiple FCoE initiators can log in to a single FCoE interface.
When a CNA logs into the fabric, it is assigned a new MAC address using a function called Fabric
Provided MAC Address (FPMA). This address is used for all FCoE communication. The first three
bytes of the MAC address are provided by the FC-MAP and the last three bytes are determined by
the FCID. The VF_Port or FC entity that the CNA logs in to determines the FCID.
NOTE
The Brocade 8000 switch also supports the FIP or Fabric Initialization Protocol standard for CNAs to
discover FCFs and initialize an FCoE connection.
Integrating a Brocade 8000 switch on a SAN
Perform the following process to install a new Brocade 8000 switch.
1. On the Brocade 8000 switch, verify that the Zone database is empty and change the domain
ID to a unique number. If there are any non-default fabric configuration changes in the existing
fabric, ensure that these are also configured on the new switch. For details, see the
“Administering Advanced Zoning” and “Performing Basic Configuration Tasks-Domain IDs”
sections of the Fabric OS Administrator’s Guide.
2. Power off the Brocade 8000 switch and connect the Inter-Switch Link (ISL) cables to the core
FC switch or director. For details, see the Brocade 8000 Hardware Reference Guide.
NOTE
Connecting a new Brocade 8000 switch to the fabric while it is powered off ensures that
reconfiguration will not occur.
3. Power on the Brocade 8000 switch and verify that the ISLs are online and the fabric is merged.
4. Check to make sure the existing Zone database files for the fabric were copied over to the
Brocade 8000 switch. For details, see the same sections of the Fabric OS Administrator’s
Guide.
5. Use the FOS CLI command nsShow to display any FCoE or FC devices connected to the switch.
Any CNAs should be able to log in to the fabric and can be zoned using standard management
tools, including the FOS CLI or Web Tools.
6. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
7.
Repeat this procedure for the second Brocade 8000 switch attached to Fabric B.
CEE and LAN integration
Because Brocade FCoE hardware is IEEE 802.1Q compliant, it easily integrates into the existing
LAN infrastructure in a variety of data center network topologies. In a typical installation, the
Brocade 8000 switch acts as an access layer switch connecting to a distribution or core layer
switch in the LAN.
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Figure 3 illustrates a representative data center LAN with Brocade FCoE hardware. The information
and procedures that follow outline the configuration process for introducing the Brocade FCoE
hardware into the network and for feature sets unique to CEE. Unless otherwise noted, all
commands are entered through the CEE CLI. See the Brocade FCoE Administrator’s Guide for
configuration details and supported L2 functionality.
FIGURE 3
Adding the Brocade 8000 switch to the data center LAN (SAN not shown)
Data center
core layer
CORE
Aggregation layer
VLAN
trunks
Data center
access layer
...connected
to SAN fabric
FCoE
VLAN 100
Brocade
8000
Brocade
8000
Data center
servers
Server Group 1
VLAN 10
Server Group 2
VLAN 20
The following steps are the basic process for integrating the Brocade FCoE hardware on a LAN.
1. Create a CEE map for the Brocade FCoE hardware to define the traffic types on your LAN. For
details, see“Creating the CEE map” on page 24.
2. Define your present DCBX setup for TLV. For details, see“Configuring DCBX” on page 25.
3. Configure the Brocade FCoE hardware for your present type of STP. For details, see
“Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol” on page 26.
4. Assign the Brocade FCoE hardware to the correct VLAN membership and VLAN group. For
details, see “Configuring VLAN Membership” on page 26.
5. Assign the CEE interfaces on the Brocade FCoE hardware to the correct VLAN groups. For
details, see “Configuring the CEE Interfaces” on page 27.
6. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
About CEE map attributes
The following information is needed for CEE configuration:
•
The types of traffic flowing through an interface, FCoE, TCP/IP, and so on.
•
The minimum bandwidth required for each traffic type.
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•
Which traffic type needs lossless behavior.
Brocade uses CEE Maps to simplify the configuration of QoS and flow control. Users assign
different priorities to different traffic types and enable lossless connectivity. A CEE map configures
two features: Enhanced Transmission Selection (ETS) and Priority Flow Control (PFC).
ETS is used to allocate bandwidth based on the different priority settings of the converged traffic.
For example, users may want Inter-Process Communications (IPC) traffic to use as much bandwidth
as needed, while LAN and SAN traffic share a designated percentage of the remaining bandwidth.
ETS is used to manage the traffic priorities between traffic types by regulating flow and by
assigning preset amounts of link bandwidth and relative priority to each application.
802.1q-tagged Ethernet frames contain a Priority Code Point (PCP) field, which describes the
802.1p class of service priority. This field indicates that a priority level that can be applied to
different classes of traffic on a CEE link, using values ranging from 0 to 7. For example, a server
administrator may assign FCoE traffic priority 3. Priorities are then grouped into Priority Group IDs
(PGID), which are used by the switch to schedule frame forwarding.
The Brocade FCoE hardware supports two types of scheduling: Strict Priority (SP) and Deficit
Weighted Round Robin (DWRR). An SP scheduler drains all packets queued in the highest-priority
queue before servicing lower-priority traffic classes. Use PGID 15 for strict priority scheduling. Use
DWRR scheduling to facilitate controlled sharing of the network bandwidth. DWRR assigns each
queue a weight, which is used to determine the frequency of frame forwarded for the queue. The
round robin aspect of the scheduling allows each queue to be serviced in a set ordering, sending a
limited amount of data before moving onto the next queue and cycling back to the highest priority
queue after the lowest priority is serviced. PGIDs 0 to 7 can be used for DWRR scheduling.
PFC is an enhancement to the current link-level flow control mechanism defined in IEEE 802.3X
(PAUSE) so that it can operate individually on each priority. PFC is what enables lossless
connectivity and is required for FCoE traffic.
Creating the CEE map
The first step is to define the types of traffic carried over the CEE network. As an example, servers
in Figure 4 use the CEE network for both FCoE and IP. The administrator associates FCoE traffic
with priorities 2 and 3 and IP traffic with priorities 0, 1, and 4-7. All the priorities used for IP traffic
are grouped into a single Priority Group ID titled “PGID 2”, and the priorities used for FCoE are
grouped into “PGID 1”.
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Bandwidth requirements for each PGID are then chosen. The administrator decides to give IP
traffic 60 percent of the schedule and FCoE traffic 40 percent. Finally, since FCoE traffic requires
lossless communication, PFC is also enabled for PGID 1.
FIGURE 4
Configuring CEE attributes
Priority PGID
Desc
7
2
IP
6
2
IP
Priority
BW%
Desc
PFC
5
2
IP
-
-
-
-
4
2
IP
1
40
FCoE
Yes
3
1
FCoE
2
60
IP
No
2
1
FCoE
-
-
-
-
1
2
IP
0
2
IP
3
2
FCoE _ 40%
7
6
5
4
1
0
WRR
IP
_
60%
For the given example, a CEE Map named “srvgroup” is created using the following syntax.
Perform the following steps in global configuration mode.
1. Define the name of the CEE map
Example of setting the CEE map name as “srvgroup”.
switch(config)#cee-map srvgroup
2. Specify the traffic requirements for each PGID using priority-group-table
Example of setting two traffic requirements.
switch(config)#priority-group-table 1 weight 40 pfc
switch(config)#priority-group-table 2 weight 60
3. The priority-table is then used to specify which priorities are mapped to which PGID. The
priorities are defined from lowest to highest.
Example of setting the priority mappings.
switch(config)#priority-table 2 2 1 1 2 2 2 2
4. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Configuring DCBX
DCBX (Data Center Bridging eXchange Protocol) runs on CEE links and is an extension of the Link
Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP). The primary goal of DCBX is to allow the discovery of CEE-capable
hosts and switches and allow CEE-specific parameters—such as those for ETS and PFC—to be sent
before the link is shared. DCBX parameters use a type-length-value (TLV) format. By default, DCBX
is turned on, but there are two TLVs that must be enabled to support FCoE on a CEE link:
• dcbx-fcoe-app-tlv – IEEE Data Center Bridging eXchange FCoE Application TLV.
• dcbx-fcoe-logical-link-tlv - IEEE Data Center Bridging eXchange FCoE Logical Link TLV. The
presence of this TLV declares that the FCoE part of the converged link is UP.
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To configure the TLVs for DCBX, perform the following steps in global configuration mode.
1. Set the protocol type to LLDP.
switch(config)#protocol lldp
2. Activate the protocol.
switch(conf-lldp)#no disable
3. Activate the TLV formats using the advertise command in Protocol LLDP Configuration Mode.
switch(conf-lldp)#advertise dcbx-fcoe-app-tlv
switch(conf-lldp)#advertise dcbx-fcoe-logical-link-tlv
4. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(conf-lldp)#exit
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol
Spanning Tree Protocol is a mechanism to detect and avoid loops in Ethernet networks by
establishing a fixed path between all the switches in a LAN. The Brocade FCoE hardware supports
three spanning tree variations: Standard Spanning Tree (STP), Rapid Spanning Tree (RSTP), and
Multiple Instance Spanning Tree (MSTP).
It is best practice that an access layer switch, such as the Brocade 8000 switch, does not become
the root switch. Changing the bridge or STP priority helps to ensure that this does not occur. The
example below performed from the CEE CLI configures the Brocade 8000 switch for RSTP and sets
the bridge priority to the highest value ensuring it will not become the root switch in an existing
LAN.
To configure RSTP, perform the following steps in global configuration mode.
1. Configure the Brocade 8000 switch for RSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree rstp
2. Set the bridge priority to the highest value so it does not become the root switch in an existing
LAN.
switch(conf-rstp)#bridge-priority 61440
3. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(conf-rstp)#exit
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Configuring VLAN Membership
IEEE 802.1q Virtual LANs (VLANs) provide the capability to overlay the physical network with
multiple virtual networks. VLANs allow network traffic isolation into separate virtual networks
reducing the size of administrative and broadcast domains.
A VLAN contains end stations that have a common set of requirements which can be in
independent physical locations. You can group end stations in a VLAN even if they are not physically
located in the same LAN segment. VLANs are typically associated with IP subnets and all the end
stations in a particular IP subnet belong to the same VLAN.
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CEE and LAN integration
In the sample network shown in Figure 5, there are three VLANs: VLAN 100, VLAN 10, and VLAN 20.
VLAN 10 and 20 are used to isolate the L2 traffic from the two server groups. These VLANs carry IP
traffic from the servers to the data center LAN. Any routing between these VLANs is performed at
the distribution layer of the network. VLAN 100 is a special VLAN used for FCoE traffic between the
servers and storage connected to the Fibre Channel fabric and must be configured as an FCoE
Forwarder (FCF). Only FCF-capable VLANs can carry FCoE traffic.
In addition to creating a special VLAN for FCoE traffic, VLAN classifiers are applied to incoming
EtherTypes for FCoE Initiation Protocol (FIP) and FCoE. VLAN classifiers are rules used to
dynamically classify Ethernet frames on an untagged interface to VLANs.
To configure VLAN membership, perform the following steps in global configuration mode.
1. Create the VLAN interfaces on the Brocade FCoE hardware using the CEE CLI. For details, see
“Creating a VLAN interface” on page 35.
Example of creating two VLAN interfaces and assigning each one to a server group.
switch(config)#interface vlan 10
switch-cmsh(conf-if-vl-10)#description server group 1
switch(config)#interface vlan 20
switch-cmsh(conf-if-vl-20)#description server group 2
switch(config)#interface vlan 100
switch-cmsh(conf-if-vl-100)#description FCoE VLAN
switch-cmsh(conf-if-vl-100)#fcf forward
2. Create VLAN rules and a VLAN classifier group for these two EtherTypes. For details, see
“Creating a VLAN classifier group and adding rules” on page 40.
Example of creating VLAN rules and classifier groups.
switch(config)#vlan
switch(config)#vlan
switch(config)#vlan
switch(config)#vlan
classifier
classifier
classifier
classifier
rule 1 proto fip encap ethv2
rule 2 proto fcoe encap ethv2
group 1 add rule 1
group 1 add rule 2
3. Apply the VLAN classifier group to any CEE interface. This step is optional. For details, see
“Activating a VLAN classifier group with an interface port” on page 40.
4. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Configuring the CEE Interfaces
Traffic from downstream CEE interfaces can be assigned to a VLAN using several methods:
• The VLAN tag contained in the incoming frame
• The VLAN classifiers
• The Port-VLAN ID (PVID)
Because the Ethernet uplink ports from the Brocade FCoE hardware to the distribution layer
switches will carry traffic for multiple VLANs, they are configured as 802.1q trunk ports.
The downstream CEE ports connected to the server CNAs are configured as access ports with a
PVID of either 10 or 20. The VLAN classifier group created for the FIP and FCoE EtherTypes must be
applied to the interfaces in order to place FCoE traffic on the correct VLAN. The CEE map is also
applied to the interface.
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CEE and LAN integration
To configure the CEE interfaces, perform the following steps in global configuration mode.
1. Assign VLANs to the uplink Ethernet port.
NOTE
You must repeat this step for all uplink interfaces. For details, see “Configuring an interface
port as a trunk interface” on page 37.
Example of assigning VLAN 10 and VLAN 20 to the uplink Ethernet port.
switch(config)#interface TenGigabitEthernet 0/1
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#switchport
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#switchport mode trunk
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#switchport trunk allowed vlan add 10
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#switchport trunk allowed vlan add 20
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#no shutdown
2. Apply the VLAN classifier group to the interfaces. For details, see “Activating a VLAN classifier
group with an interface port” on page 40.
Example of applying a VLAN classifier group 1 to the interfaces.
switch(config)#interface TenGigabitEthernet 0/10
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#switchport
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#switchport mode access
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#switchport access vlan 10
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#vlan classifier activate group 1 vlan 100
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#no shutdown
3. Apply the CEE map to the interfaces. For details, see “Applying a CEE provisioning map to an
interface” on page 110.
Example of setting the map name to srvgroup.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#cee srvgroup
4. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#exit
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
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Server connections to the Brocade 8000 switch
3
Server connections to the Brocade 8000 switch
Converged Network Adapters (CNAs) support FCoE and Ethernet LAN communication over the
same cable from the server to a CEE switch, such as the Brocade 8000 switch as shown in
Figure 5. The CNA is presented to the host operating system as both an Ethernet NIC and a Fibre
Channel HBA so that network configuration and server management practices do not change.
FIGURE 5
CNA protocol stack
SCSI
MPIO
TCP
FC
IP
FCoE
CNA
CEE
Brocade
8000
The CNA supports CEE features required to support lossless connectivity and QoS of different
traffic types. Although modification of parameters is possible with some CNAs, most adapters are
set up in a “Willing” mode, meaning that they automatically accept CEE configurations for QoS and
PFC from the connected switch using the DCBX protocol.
Fibre Channel configuration for the CNA
The CNA discovers storage on the FC SAN and presents LUNs to the operating system in the same
manner as an HBA. The same multipathing software needed for high availability in a traditional
SAN can be used in a converged network.
Ethernet configuration for the CNA
Most CNAs support some type of Network Teaming or Link Aggregation protocol to allow the use of
multiple ports in parallel, to improve performance or create redundancy for higher availability. For
highest availability it is always recommended that you install two CNAs into a server and connect
each to a different Brocade 8000 switch.
Minimum CEE configuration to allow FCoE traffic flow
The following process shows the minimum configuration steps required to run FCoE on the Brocade
8000 switch. Treat the sample code for each step as a single CLI batch file.
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Minimum CEE configuration to allow FCoE traffic flow
To set the minimum CEE configuration, perform the following steps in global configuration mode.
1. Configure the CEE interface as a Layer 2 switch port. For details, see “Configuring an interface
port as a Layer 2 switch port” on page 36.
Example of configuring the switch port as a 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/0
switch(config-if)#switchport
switch(config-if)#no shutdown
switch(config-if)#exit
switch(config)#end
2. Create a CEE Map to carry LAN and SAN traffic and apply it to an interface. For details, see
“Converged Enhanced Ethernet map configuration” on page 106.
Example of creating a CEE map for 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface.
switch(config)#cee-map default
switch(conf-cee-map)#priority-group-table 1 weight 40 pfc
switch(conf-cee-map)#priority-group-table 2 weight 60
switch(conf-cee-map)#priority-table 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2
switch(conf-cee-map)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/2
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#cee default
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#exit
3. Create an FCoE VLAN and add an interface to it. For details, see “Configuring an interface port
as an access interface” on page 36.
Example of creating a FCoE VLAN and adding a single interface.
switch(config)#vlan classifier rule 1 proto fcoe encap ethv2
switch(config)#vlan classifier rule 2 proto fip encap ethv2
switch(config)#vlan classifier group 1 add rule 1
switch(config)#vlan classifier group 1 add rule 2
switch(config)#interface vlan 1002
switch(conf-if-vl-1002 )#fcf forward
switch(conf-if-vl-1002 )#interface tengigabitethernet 0/0
switch(config-if-te-0/0)#switchport
switch(config-if-te-0/0)#switchport mode converged
switch(config-if-te-0/0)#switchport converged allowed vlan add 1002
switch(config-if-te-0/0)#vlan classifier activate group 1 vlan 1002
switch(config-if-te-0/0)#cee default
switch(config-if-te-0/0)#no shutdown
switch(config-if-te-0/0)#exit
4. Configure LLDP for FCoE. For details, see “Configuring LLDP interface-level command options”
on page 83.
Example of configuring LLDP for 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface.
switch(config)#protocol lldp
switch(conf-lldp)#advertise dcbx-fcoe-app-tlv
switch(conf-lldp)#advertise dcbx-fcoe-logical-link-tlv
5. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(conf-lldp)#exit
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
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Chapter
4
Configuring VLANs Using the CEE CLI
In this chapter
• VLAN overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Ingress VLAN filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• VLAN configuration guidelines and restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Default VLAN configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• VLAN configuration and management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Configuring protocol-based VLAN classifier rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Configuring the MAC address table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
31
33
33
34
38
41
VLAN overview
IEEE 802.1Q Virtual LANs (VLANs) provide the capability to overlay the physical network with
multiple virtual networks. VLANs allow you to isolate network traffic between virtual networks and
reduce the size of administrative and broadcast domains.
A VLAN contains end stations that have a common set of requirements that are independent of
physical location. You can group end stations in a VLAN even if they are not physically located in the
same LAN segment. VLANs are typically associated with IP subnetworks and all the end stations in
a particular IP subnet belong to the same VLAN. Traffic between VLANs must be routed. VLAN
membership is configurable on a per interface basis.
The VLAN used for carrying FCoE traffic needs to be explicitly designated as the FCoE VLAN. FCoE
VLANs are configured through the CEE CLI (see “Configuring a VLAN interface to forward FCoE
traffic” on page 36).
NOTE
Currently only one VLAN can be configured as the FCoE VLAN.
Ingress VLAN filtering
A frame arriving at Brocade FCoE hardware is either associated with a specific port or with a VLAN,
based on whether the frame is tagged or untagged:
• Admit tagged frames only—The port the frame came in on is assigned to a single VLAN or to
multiple VLANs depending on the VLAN ID in the frame’s VLAN tag. This is called trunk mode.
• Admit untagged frames only—These frames are assigned the port VLAN ID (PVID) assigned to
the port the frame came in on. This is called access mode.
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Ingress VLAN filtering
• Admit VLAN tagged and untagged frames—All tagged and untagged frames would be
processed as follows:
-
All untagged frames are classified into native VLANs.
-
For ingress and egress, non-native VLAN tagged frames are processed according to the
allowed VLAN user specifications. This is called converged mode.
All frames egressing are untagged for the native VLANs.
Any tagged frames coming with a VLAN tag equal to the configured native VLAN are
processed.
NOTE
Ingress VLAN filtering is enabled by default on all Layer 2 interfaces. This ensures that VLANs are
filtered on the incoming port (depending on the user configuration).
Figure 6 displays the frame processing logic for an incoming frame.
FIGURE 6
Ingress VLAN filtering
Incoming frame
on an interface
Is the port
a trunk?
Yes
Is the VLAN ID
an allowed VLAN?
No
Drop frame
No
No
Is the port an
access interface?
Yes
Assign the frame to the
VLAN present in the VLAN ID
field of the Ethernet header
Drop frame
Yes
Does the frame match any
of the configured VLAN classifiers
(MAC address based and
protocol based)?
No
Yes
Assign the
frame to the
classified VLAN
Assign the
frame to the
configured PVID
There are important facts you should know about Ingress VLAN filtering:
•
•
•
•
•
Ingress VLAN filtering is based on port VLAN membership.
Port VLAN membership is configured through the CEE CLI.
Dynamic VLAN registration is not supported.
The Brocade FCoE hardware does VLAN filtering at both the ingress and egress ports.
The VLAN filtering behavior on logical Layer 2 interfaces such as LAG interfaces is the same as
on port interfaces.
• The VLAN filtering database (FDB) determines the forwarding of an incoming frame.
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VLAN configuration guidelines and restrictions
Additionally, there are important facts you should know about the VLAN FDB:
• The VLAN FDB contains information that helps determine the forwarding of an arriving frame
based on MAC address and VLAN ID data. The FDB contains both statically configured data
and dynamic data that is learned by the switch.
• The dynamic updating of FDB entries using learning is supported (if the port state permits).
• Dynamic FDB entries are not created for multicast group addresses.
• Dynamic FDB entries are aged out based on the aging time configured per Brocade FCoE
hardware. The aging time is between 10 and 1000000 seconds. The default is 300 seconds.
• You can add static MAC address entries specifying a VLAN ID. Static entries are not aged out.
• A static FDB entry overwrites an existing dynamically learned FDB entry and disables learning
of the entry going forward.
NOTE
For more information on frame handling for Brocade FCoE hardware, see “Layer 2 Ethernet
overview” on page 3.
VLAN configuration guidelines and restrictions
Follow these VLAN configuration guidelines and restrictions when configuring VLANs.
• In an active topology, MAC addresses can be learned, per VLAN, using Independent VLAN
Learning (IVL) only.
• A MAC address ACL always overrides a static MAC address entry. In this case, the MAC address
is the forwarding address and the forwarding entry can be overwritten by the ACL.
• The Brocade CEE switch supports Ethernet DIX frames and 802.2 LLC SNAP encapsulated
frames only.
Default VLAN configuration
Table 6 lists the default VLAN configuration.
TABLE 6
Default VLAN configuration
Parameter
Default setting
Default VLAN
VLAN 1
Interface VLAN assignment
All interfaces assigned to VLAN 1
VLAN state
Active
MTU size
2500 bytes
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VLAN configuration and management
VLAN configuration and management
NOTE
To see the minimum configuration required to enable FCoE on Brocade FCoE hardware, refer to
“Minimum CEE configuration to allow FCoE traffic flow” on page 29.
NOTE
You need to enter either the copy running-config startup-config command or the write memory
command to save your configuration changes to Flash so that they are not lost if there is a system
reload or power outage.
Enabling and disabling an interface port
NOTE
CEE interfaces are disabled by default.
NOTE
CEE interfaces do not support auto-negotiation of Ethernet link speeds. The CEE interfaces only
support 10-Gigabit Ethernet.
To enable and disable an interface port, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/1.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the shutdown command to toggle the availability of the interface.
To enable the CEE interface:
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#no shutdown
To disable the CEE interface:
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#shutdown
Configuring the MTU on an interface port
To configure the maximum transmission unit (MTU) on an interface port, perform the following
steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the interface port type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/1.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the interface port.
4. Enter the mtu command to specify the MTU value on the interface port.
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Example of setting the MTU value to 4200.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#mtu 4200
Creating a VLAN interface
On Brocade FCoE hardware, VLANs are treated as interfaces from a configuration point of view.
By default all the CEE ports are assigned to VLAN 1 (VLAN ID equals 1). The vlan_ID value can be 1
through 3583. VLAN IDs 3584 through 4094 are internally-reserved VLAN IDs.
To create a VLAN interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface vlan command to assign the VLAN interface number.
Example of assigning the VLAN interface number to “1002”.
switch(config)#interface vlan 1002
Enabling STP on a VLAN
Once all of the interface ports have been configured for a VLAN, you can enable spanning tree
protocol (STP) for all members of the VLAN with a single command. Whichever protocol is currently
selected is used by the VLAN. Only one type of STP can be active at a time.
A physical interface port can be a member of multiple VLANs. For example, a physical port can be a
member of VLAN 1002 and VLAN 55 simultaneously. In addition, VLAN 1002 can have STP enabled
and VLAN 55 can have STP disabled simultaneously.
To enable STP for a VLAN, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol spanning tree command to select the type of STP for the VLAN.
Example of selecting the MSTP protocol.
switch(config)#protocol spanning tree mstp
3. Enter the interface command to select the VLAN interface number.
Example of selecting the VLAN interface number “1002”.
switch(config)#interface vlan 1002
4. Enter the spanning-tree shutdown command to enable spanning tree on VLAN 1002.
switch(conf-if-vl-1002)#no spanning-tree shutdown
Disabling STP on a VLAN
Once all of the interface ports have been configured for a VLAN, you can disable STP for all
members of the VLAN with a single command.
To disable STP for a VLAN, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to select the VLAN interface number.
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Example of selecting the VLAN interface number “55”.
switch(config)#interface vlan 55
3. Enter the spanning-tree shutdown command to disable spanning tree on VLAN 1002.
switch(conf-if-vl-55)#spanning-tree shutdown
Configuring a VLAN interface to forward FCoE traffic
An FCoE Forwarder (FCF) is an FCoE device that supports FCoE VF_ports. It is the equivalent of an
FC switch. A VLAN can be made FCF-capable. Only FCF-capable VLANs can carry FCoE traffic.
To configure a VLAN interface to forward FCoE traffic, perform the following steps from Privileged
EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to select the VLAN interface number.
Example of selecting the VLAN interface number “1002”.
switch(config)#interface vlan 1002
3. Enter the fcf forward command to enable the forwarding of FCoE traffic on the VLAN interface.
switch(conf-if-vl-1002)#fcf forward
Configuring an interface port as a Layer 2 switch port
To configure the interface as a Layer 2 switch port, perform the following steps from Privileged
EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/1.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the switchport command to configure the interface as a Layer 2 switch port.
5. Enter the do show command to confirm the status of the CEE interface. For example
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#do show interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
6. Enter the do show command to confirm the status of the CEE interface running configuration.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#do show running-config interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
Configuring an interface port as an access interface
Each CEE interface port supports admission policies based on whether the frames are untagged or
tagged. Access mode admits only untagged and priority-tagged frames.
To configure the interface as an access interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
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1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/1.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the switchport command to configure the CEE interface as a Layer 2 switch port.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#switchport access vlan 20
Configuring an interface port as a trunk interface
Each CEE interface port supports admission policies based on whether the frames are untagged or
tagged. Trunk mode admits only VLAN-tagged frames.
To configure the interface as a trunk interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/19.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/19
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the switchport command to place the CEE interface into trunk mode.
switch(conf-if-te-0/19)#switchport mode trunk
5. Specify whether all, one, or none of the VLAN interfaces are allowed to transmit and receive
through the CEE interface. Enter the following command that is appropriate for your needs.
• This example allows the VLAN numbered as 30 to transmit/receive through the CEE
interface:
switch(conf-if-te-0/19)#switchport trunk allowed vlan add 30
• To allow all VLANs to transmit/receive through the CEE interface:
switch(conf-if-te-0/19)#switchport trunk allowed vlan all
• This example allows all except VLAN 11 to transmit/receive through the CEE interface:
switch(conf-if-te-0/19)#switchport trunk allowed vlan except 11
• To allow none of the VLANs to transmit/receive through the CEE interface:
switch(conf-if-te-0/19)#switchport trunk allowed vlan none
Disabling a VLAN on a trunk interface
To disable a VLAN on a trunk interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/10.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/10
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
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Configuring protocol-based VLAN classifier rules
4. Enter the switchport command to place the CEE interface into trunk mode.
switch(conf-if-te-0/10)#switchport mode trunk none
Configuring an interface port as a converged interface
Each CEE interface port supports admission policies based on whether the frames are untagged or
tagged. Converged mode admits both tagged and untagged frames. Any tagged frames coming
with a VLAN tag equal to the configured native VLAN are dropped.
To configure the interface as converged interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/1.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the switchport command to set the tagged VLAN on the interface to 100.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#switchport converged allowed vlan add 100
Disabling a VLAN on a converged interface
To disable a VLAN on a converged interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/10.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/10
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the switchport command to place the CEE interface into converged mode.
switch(conf-if-te-0/10)#switchport mode converged none
Configuring protocol-based VLAN classifier rules
You can configure VLAN classifier rules to define specific rules for classifying frames to selected
VLANs based on protocol and MAC addresses. Sets of rules can be grouped into VLAN classifier
groups (see “Creating a VLAN classifier group and adding rules” on page 40).
VLAN classifier rules (1 through 256) are a set of configurable rules that reside in one of these
categories:
• 802.1Q protocol-based classifier rules
• Source MAC address-based classifier rules
• Encapsulated Ethernet classifier rules
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Configuring protocol-based VLAN classifier rules
NOTE
Multiple VLAN classifier rules can be applied per interface provided the resulting VLAN IDs are
unique for the different rules.
802.1Q protocol-based VLANs apply only to untagged frames, or frames with priority tagging.
With both Ethernet-II and 802.2 SNAP encapsulated frames, the following protocol types are
supported:
•
•
•
•
•
Ethernet hexadecimal (0x0000 through 0xffff)
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE)
FCoE Initialization Protocol (FIP)
IP version 6 (IPv6)
NOTE
For complete information on all available VLAN classifier rule options, see the Converged Enhanced
Ethernet Command Reference.
Configuring a VLAN classifier rule
To configure a protocol-based VLAN classifier rule, perform the following steps from Privileged
EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the vlan classifier rule command to configure a protocol-based VLAN classifier rule.
switch(config)#vlan classifier rule 1 proto fcoe encap ethv2
Configuring MAC address-based VLAN classifier rules
To configure a MAC address-based VLAN classifier rule, perform the following steps from Privileged
EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the vlan classifier rule command to configure a MAC address-based VLAN classifier rule.
switch(config)#vlan classifier rule 5 mac 0008.744c.7fid
Deleting a VLAN classifier rule
VLAN classifier groups (1 through 16) can contain any number of VLAN classifier rules.
To configure a VLAN classifier group and remove a VLAN classifier rule, perform the following steps
from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Specify a VLAN classifier group and delete a rule.
switch(config)#vlan classifier group 1 delete rule 1
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Configuring protocol-based VLAN classifier rules
Creating a VLAN classifier group and adding rules
VLAN classifier groups (1 through 16) can contain any number of VLAN classifier rules.
To configure a VLAN classifier group and add a VLAN classifier rule, perform the following steps
from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Create a VLAN classifier group and add a rule.
switch(config)#vlan classifier group 1 add rule 1
Activating a VLAN classifier group with an interface port
To associate a VLAN classifier group with an interface port, perform the following steps from
Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/10.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/10
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the vlan classifier command to activate and associate it with a VLAN interface (group 1
and VLAN 2 are used in this example).
switch(conf-if-te-0/10)#vlan classifier activate group 1 vlan 2
NOTE
This example assumes that VLAN 2 was already created.
Clearing VLAN counter statistics
To clear VLAN counter statistics, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the clear command to clear the VLAN counter statistics for the specified VLAN. The
vlan_ID value can be 1 through 3583. For example, to clear the counter for VLAN 20:
switch#clear counter interface vlan 20
Displaying VLAN information
To display VLAN information, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the show interface command to display the configuration and status of the specified
interface.
Example
switch#show interface tengigabitethernet 0/10 port-channel 10 switchport
2. Enter the show vlan command to display the specified VLAN information. For example, this
syntax displays the status of VLAN 20 for all interfaces, including static and dynamic:
switch#show vlan 20 brief
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Configuring the MAC address table
4
Configuring the MAC address table
Each CEE port has a MAC address table. The MAC address table stores a number of unicast and
multicast address entries without flooding any frames. Brocade FCoE hardware has a configurable
aging timer. If a MAC address remains inactive for a specified number of seconds, it is removed
from the address table. For detailed information on how the switch handles MAC addresses in a
Layer 2 Ethernet environment, see “Layer 2 Ethernet overview” on page 3.
Specifying or disabling the aging time for MAC addresses
You can set the length of time that a dynamic entry remains in the MAC address table after the
entry is used or updated. Static address entries are never aged or removed from the table. You can
also disable the aging time. The default is 300 seconds.
NOTE
To disable the aging time for MAC addresses, enter an aging time value of 0.
To specify an aging time or disable the aging time for MAC addresses, perform the following steps
from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the appropriate command based on whether you want to specify an aging time or disable
the aging time for MAC addresses:
switch(config)#mac-address-table aging-time 600
Adding static addresses to the MAC address table
To add a static address to the MAC address table, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Add the static address 0011.2222.3333 to the MAC address table with a packet received on
VLAN 100:
switch(config)#mac-address-table static 0011.2222.3333 forward
tengigabitethernet 0/1 vlan 100
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Chapter
5
Configuring STP, RSTP, and MSTP using the CEE CLI
In this chapter
• STP overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• RSTP overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• MSTP overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration guidelines and restrictions . . . . . . . . .
• Default STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration and management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Configuring STP, RSTP, or MSTP on CEE interface ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
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50
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STP overview
The IEEE 802.1D Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) runs on bridges and switches that are
802.1D-compliant. STP prevents loops in the network by providing redundant links. If a primary link
fails, the backup link is activated and network traffic is not affected. Without STP running on the
switch or bridge, a link failure can result in a loop.
When the spanning tree algorithm is run, the network switches transform the real network topology
into a spanning tree topology in which any LAN in the network can be reached from any other LAN
through a unique path. The network switches recalculate a new spanning tree topology whenever
there is a change to the network topology.
For each LAN, the switches that attach to the LAN choose a designated switch that is the closest
switch to the root switch. This designated switch is responsible for forwarding all traffic to and from
the LAN. The port on the designated switch that connects to the LAN is called the designated port.
The switches decide which of their ports will be part of the spanning tree. A port is included in the
spanning tree if it is a root port or a designated port.
With STP, data traffic is allowed only on those ports that are part of the spanning tree topology.
Ports that are not part of the spanning tree topology are automatically changed to a blocking
(inactive) state. They are kept in the blocking state until there is a break in the spanning tree
topology, at which time they are automatically activated to provide a new path.
The STP interface states for every Layer 2 interface running STP are as follows:
• Blocking—The interface does not forward frames.
• Listening—The interface is identified by the spanning tree as one that should participate in
frame forwarding. This is a transitional state after the blocking state.
• Learning—The interface prepares to participate in frame forwarding.
• Forwarding—The interface forwards frames.
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STP overview
• Disabled—The interface is not participating in spanning tree because of a shutdown port, no
link on the port, or no spanning tree instance running on the port.
A port participating in spanning tree moves through these states:
•
•
•
•
•
From initialization to blocking.
From blocking to listening or to disabled.
From listening to learning or to disabled.
From learning to forwarding, blocking, or disabled.
From forwarding to disabled.
The following STP features are considered optional features although you might use them in your
STP configuration:
• Root guard—For detailed information, see “Enabling the guard root” on page 59.
• PortFast BPDU guard and BPDU filter—For detailed information, see “Enabling port fast (STP)”
on page 61.
Configuring STP on Brocade FCoE hardware
The process for configuring STP on your Brocade FCoE hardware is as follows.
1. Enter Global Configuration mode.
2. Enable RSTP using the global protocol spanning-tree command. For details, see “Enabling STP,
RSTP, or MSTP” on page 51.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree rstp
3. Designate the root switch using the bridge-priority command. For details, see “Specifying the
bridge priority” on page 52. The range is 0 through 61440 and the priority values can be set
only in increments of 4096.
switch(conf-stp)#bridge-priority 28582
4. Enable PortFast on switch ports using the spanning-tree portfast command. For details, see
“Enabling port fast (STP)” on page 61. Note that this step is optional.
NOTE
PortFast only needs to be enabled on ports that connect to workstations or PCs. Repeat these
commands for every port connected to workstations or PCs. Do not enable PortFast on ports
that connect to other switches.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/10
switch(conf-if-te-0/10)#spanning-tree portfast
switch(conf-if-te-0/10)#exit
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/11
switch(conf-if-te-0/11)#spanning-tree portfast
switch(conf-if-te-0/11)#exit
Repeat these commands for every port connected to workstations or PCs.
5. Set the following ports to forwarding mode:
• All ports of the root switch
• The root port
• The designated port
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6. Enable the guard root feature with the spanning-tree guard root command. The guard root
feature provides a way to enforce the root bridge placement in the network. For detailed
information, refer to“Enabling the guard root” on page 59. Note that this step is optional.
All other switch ports connect to other switches and bridges are automatically placed in
blocking mode.
This does not apply to ports connected to workstations or PCs; these ports remain in the
forwarding state.
7.
Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
When the spanning tree topology is completed, the network switches send and receive data only on
the ports that are part of the spanning tree. Data received on ports that are not part of the
spanning tree is blocked.
NOTE
Brocade recommends leaving other STP variables at their default values.
For more information on STP, see “STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration and management” on
page 51.
RSTP overview
NOTE
RSTP is designed to be compatible and interoperate with STP. However, the advantages of the RSTP
fast reconvergence are lost when it interoperates with switches running STP.
The IEEE 802.1w Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) standard is an evolution of the 802.1D STP
standard. It provides rapid reconvergence following the failure of a switch, a switch port, or a LAN. It
provides rapid reconvergence of edge ports, new root ports, and ports connected through
point-to-point links.
The RSTP interface states for every Layer 2 interface running RSTP are as follows:
• Learning—The interface prepares to participate in frame forwarding.
• Forwarding—The interface forwards frames.
• Discarding—The interface discards frames. Note that the 802.1D disabled, blocking, and
listening states are merged into the RSTP discarding state. Ports in the discarding state do not
take part in the active topology and do not learn MAC addresses.
Table 7 lists the interface state changes between STP and RSTP.
TABLE 7
STP versus RSTP state comparison
STP interface state
RSTP interface state
Is the interface included in the
active topology?
Is the interface learning MAC
addresses?
Disabled
Discarding
No
No
Blocking
Discarding
No
No
Listening
Discarding
Yes
No
Learning
Learning
Yes
Yes
Forwarding
Forwarding
Yes
Yes
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RSTP overview
With RSTP, the port roles for the new interface states are also different. RSTP differentiates
explicitly between the state of the port and the role it plays in the topology. RSTP uses the root port
and designated port roles defined by STP, but splits the blocked port role into backup port and
alternate port roles:
• Backup port—Provides a backup for the designated port and can only exist where two or more
ports of the switch are connected to the same LAN; the LAN where the bridge serves as a
designated switch.
• Alternate port—Serves as an alternate port for the root port providing a redundant path towards
the root bridge.
Only the root port and the designated ports are part of the active topology; the alternate and
backup ports do not participate in it.
When the network is stable, the root and the designated ports are in the forwarding state, while the
the alternate and backup ports are in the discarding state. When there is a topology change, the
new RSTP port roles allow a faster transition of an alternate port into the forwarding state.
For more information on RSTP, see “STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration and management” on
page 51.
Configuring RSTP on Brocade FCoE hardware
The basic process for configuring RSTP on your Brocade FCoE hardware is as follows.
1. Enter Global Configuration mode.
2. Enable RSTP using the global protocol spanning-tree command. For details, see “Enabling STP,
RSTP, or MSTP” on page 51.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree rstp
3. Designate the root switch using the bridge-priority command. For details, see “Specifying the
bridge priority” on page 52. The range is 0 through 61440 and the priority values can be set
only in increments of 4096.
switch(conf-stp)#bridge-priority 28582
4. Configure the bridge forward delay value. For details, see “Specifying the bridge forward delay”
on page 52.
switch(conf-stp)#forward-delay 20
5. Configure the bridge maximum aging time value. For details, see “Specifying the bridge
maximum aging time” on page 53.
switch(conf-stp)#max-age 25
6. Enable the error disable timeout timer value. For details, see “Enabling the error disable
timeout timer” on page 53.
switch(conf-stp)#error-disable-timeout enable
7.
Configure the error-disable-timeout interval value. For details, see “Specifying the error disable
timeout interval” on page 53.
8. switch(conf-stp)#error-disable-timeout interval 60
9. Configure the port-channel path cost. For details, see “Specifying the port-channel path cost”
on page 54.
switch(conf-stp)#port-channel path-cost custom
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10. Configure the bridge hello time value. For details, see “Specifying the bridge hello time (STP
and RSTP)” on page 54.
switch(conf-stp)#hello-time 5
11. Flush the MAC addresses from the VLAN FDB. For details, see “Flushing MAC addresses (RSTP
and MSTP)” on page 57.
switch(config)#spanning-tree tc-flush-standard
12. Enable PortFast on switch ports using the spanning-tree portfast command. For details, see
“Enabling port fast (STP)” on page 61. Note that this step is optional.
NOTE
PortFast only needs to be enabled on ports that connect to workstations or PCs. Repeat these
commands for every port connected to workstations or PCs. Do not enable PortFast on ports
that connect to other switches.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/10
switch(conf-if-te-0/10)#spanning-tree portfast
switch(conf-if-te-0/10)#exit
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/11
switch(conf-if-te-0/11)#spanning-tree portfast
switch(conf-if-te-0/11)#exit
Repeat these commands for every port connected to workstations or PCs.
13. Set the following ports to forwarding mode:
• All ports of the root switch
• The root port
• The designated port
For details, see “Specifying the port priority” on page 61.
14. Enable the guard root feature with the spanning-tree guard root command. The guard root
feature provides a way to enforce the root bridge placement in the network. For detailed
information, refer to“Enabling the guard root” on page 59. Note that this step is optional.
All other switch ports connect to other switches and bridges are automatically placed in
blocking mode.
This does not apply to ports connected to workstations or PCs; these ports remain in the
forwarding state.
15. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#exit
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
MSTP overview
The IEEE 802.1s Multiple STP (MSTP) helps create multiple loop-free active topologies on a single
physical topology. MSTP enables multiple VLANs to be mapped to the same spanning tree instance
(forwarding path), which reduces the number of spanning tree instances needed to support a large
number of VLANs. Each MSTP instance has a spanning tree topology independent of other
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spanning tree instances. With MSTP you can have multiple forwarding paths for data traffic. A
failure in one instance does not affect other instances. With MSTP, you are able to more effectively
utilize the physical resources present in the network and achieve better load balancing of VLAN
traffic.
NOTE
In MSTP mode, RSTP is automatically enabled to provide rapid convergence.
Multiple switches must be configured consistently with the same MSTP configuration to participate
in multiple spanning tree instances. A group of interconnected switches that have the same MSTP
configuration is called an MSTP region.
NOTE
Brocade supports 16 MSTP instances and one MSTP region.
MSTP introduces a hierarchical way of managing switch domains using regions. Switches that
share common MSTP configuration attributes belong to a region. The MSTP configuration
determines the MSTP region where each switch resides. The common MSTP configuration
attributes are as follows:
• Alphanumeric configuration name (32 bytes)
• Configuration revision number (2 bytes)
• 4096-element table that maps each of the VLANs to an MSTP instance
Region boundaries are determined based on the above attributes. A multiple spanning tree
instance is an RSTP instance that operates inside an MSTP region and determines the active
topology for the set of VLANs mapping to that instance. Every region has a common internal
spanning tree (CIST) that forms a single spanning tree instance that includes all the switches in the
region. The difference between the CIST instance and the MSTP instance is that the CIST instance
operates across the MSTP region and forms a loop-free topology across regions, while the MSTP
instance operates only within a region. The CIST instance can operate using RSTP if all the switches
across the regions support RSTP. However, if any of the switches operate using 802.1D STP, the
CIST instance reverts to 802.1D. Each region is viewed logically as a single STP/RSTP bridge to
other regions.
Configuring MSTP on Brocade FCoE hardware
The basic process for configuring MSTP on your Brocade FCoE hardware is as follows.
1. Enter Global Configuration mode.
2. Enable MSTP using the global protocol spanning-tree command. For more details see
“Enabling STP, RSTP, or MSTP” on page 51.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree mstp
3. Specify the region name using the region region_name command. For more details see
“Specifying a name for an MSTP region” on page 56.
switch(conf-mstp)#region brocade1
4. Specify the revision number using the revision command. For more details see “Specifying a
revision number for an MSTP configuration” on page 56.
switch(conf-mstp)#revision 1
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5. Map a VLAN to an MSTP instance using the instance command. For more details see “Mapping
a VLAN to an MSTP instance” on page 55.
switch(conf-mstp)#instance 1 vlan 2, 3
switch(conf-mstp)#instance 2 vlan 4-6
switch(conf-mstp)#instance 1 priority 4096
6. Specify the maximum hops for a BPDU to prevent the messages from looping indefinitely on
the interface using the max-hops hop_count command. For more details see “Specifying the
maximum number of hops for a BPDU (MSTP)” on page 56.
switch(conf-mstp)#max-hops 25
7.
Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(conf-mstp)#exit
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
For more information on MSTP, see “STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration and management” on
page 51.
STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration guidelines and restrictions
Follow these configuration guidelines and restrictions when configuring STP, RSTP, and MSTP:
• You have to disable one form of xSTP before enabling another.
• Packet drops or packet flooding may occur if you do not enable xSTP on all devices connected
on both sides of parallel links.
•
•
•
•
•
LAGs are treated as normal links and by default are enabled for STP.
You can have 16 MSTP instances and one MSTP region.
Create VLANs before mapping them to MSTP instances.
The MSTP force-version option is not supported.
For load balancing across redundant paths in the network to work, all VLAN-to-instance
mapping assignments must match; otherwise, all traffic flows on a single link.
• When you enable MSTP by using the global protocol spanning-tree mstp command, RSTP is
automatically enabled.
• For two or more switches to be in the same MSTP region, they must have the same
VLAN-to-instance map, the same configuration revision number, and the same name.
• Spanning Tree topologies must not be enabled on any direct server connections to the
front-end Ten Gigabit Ethernet ports that may run FCoE traffic. This may result in lost or
dropped FCoE logins.
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Default STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration
Default STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration
Table 8 lists the default STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration.
TABLE 8
Default STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration
Parameter
Default setting
Spanning-tree mode
By default, STP, RSTP, and MSTP are disabled
Bridge priority
32768
Bridge forward delay
15 seconds
Bridge maximum aging time
20 seconds
Error disable timeout timer
Disabled
Error disable timeout interval
300 seconds
Port-channel path cost
Standard
Bridge hello time
2 seconds
Flush MAC addresses from the VLAN FDB
Enabled
Table 9 lists the switch defaults that apply only to MSTP configurations.
TABLE 9
Default MSTP configuration
Parameter
Default setting
Cisco interoperability
Disabled
Switch priority (when mapping a VLAN to an
MSTP instance)
32768
Maximum hops
20 hops
Revision number
0
Table 10 lists the switch defaults for the 10-Gigabit Ethernet CEE interface-specific configuration.
TABLE 10
50
Default 10-Gigabit Ethernet CEE interface-specific configuration
Parameter
Default setting
Spanning tree
Disabled on the interface
Automatic edge detection
Disabled
Path cost
2000
Edge port
Disabled
Guard root
Disabled
Hello time
2 seconds
Link type
Point-to-point
Port fast
Disabled
Port priority
128
CEE interface root port
Allow the CEE interface to become a root port.
CEE interface BPDU restriction
Restriction is disabled
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STP, RSTP, and MSTP configuration and management
NOTE
To see the minimum configuration required to enable FCoE on the Brocade 8000 switch, refer to
“Minimum CEE configuration to allow FCoE traffic flow” on page 29.
NOTE
You need to enter either the copy running-config startup-config command or the write memory
command to save your configuration changes to Flash so that they are not lost if there is a system
reload or power outage.
Enabling STP, RSTP, or MSTP
You enable STP to detect or avoid loops. STP is not required in a loop-free topology. You must turn
off one form of STP before turning on another form. By default, STP, RSTP, and MSTP are not
enabled.
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable STP, RSTP, or MSTP.
Example
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree rstp
Disabling STP, RSTP, or MSTP
NOTE
Using the no protocol spanning-tree command deletes the context and all the configurations defined
within the context or protocol for the interface.
To disable STP, RSTP, or MSTP, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode. By default,
STP, RSTP, and MSTP are not enabled.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to disable STP, RSTP, or MSTP.
switch(config)#no protocol spanning-tree
Shutting down STP, RSTP, or MSTP globally
To shut down STP, RSTP, or MSTP globally, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the shutdown command to globally shutdown STP, RSTP, or MSTP. The shutdown
command below works in all three modes.
switch(conf-mstp)#shutdown
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Specifying the bridge priority
In any mode (STP, RSTP, or MSTP), use this command to specify the priority of the switch. After you
decide on the root switch, set the appropriate values to designate the switch as the root switch. If a
switch has a bridge priority that is lower than all the other switches, the other switches
automatically select the switch as the root switch.
The root switch should be centrally located and not in a “disruptive” location. Backbone switches
typically serve as the root switch because they often do not connect to end stations. All other
decisions in the network, such as which port to block and which port to put in forwarding mode, are
made from the perspective of the root switch.
Bridge protocol data units (BPDUs) carry the information exchanged between switches. When all
the switches in the network are powered up, they start the process of selecting the root switch.
Each switch transmits a BPDU to directly connected switches on a per-VLAN basis. Each switch
compares the received BPDU to the BPDU that the switch sent. In the root switch selection process,
if switch 1 advertises a root ID that is a lower number than the root ID that switch 2 advertises,
switch 2 stops the advertisement of its root ID, and accepts the root ID of switch 1. The switch with
the lowest bridge priority becomes the root switch.
NOTE
Because each VLAN is in a separate broadcast domain, each VLAN must have its own root switch.
To specify the bridge priority, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable STP, RSTP, or MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree rstp
3. Specify the bridge priority. The range is 0 through 61440 and the priority values can be set only
in increments of 4096. The default priority is 32678.
switch(conf-stp)#bridge-priority 20480
Specifying the bridge forward delay
In any mode (STP, RSTP, or MSTP), use this command to specify how long an interface remains in
the listening and learning states before the interface begins forwarding all spanning tree instances.
The range is 4 through 30 seconds. The default is 15 seconds. The following relationship should be
kept:
2*(forward_delay - 1)>=max_age>=2*(hello_time + 1)
To specify the bridge forward delay, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable STP, RSTP, or MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree stp
3. Specify the bridge forward delay.
switch(conf-stp)#forward-delay 20
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Specifying the bridge maximum aging time
In any mode (STP, RSTP, or MSTP), use this command to control the maximum length of time that
passes before an interface saves its Bridge Protocol Data Unit (BPDU) configuration information.
When configuring the maximum aging time, the max-age setting must be greater than the
hello-time setting. The range is 6 through 40 seconds. The default is 20 seconds. The following
relationship should be kept:
2*(forward_delay - 1)>=max_age>=2*(hello_time + 1)
To specify the bridge maximum aging time, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable STP, RSTP, or MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree stp
3. Specify the bridge maximum aging time.
switch(conf-stp)##max-age 25
Enabling the error disable timeout timer
In any mode (STP, RSTP, or MSTP), use this command to enable the timer to bring a port out of the
disabled state. When the STP BPDU guard disables a port, the port remains in the disabled state
unless the port is enabled manually. This command allows you to enable the port from the disabled
state. For details on configuring the error disable timeout interval, see “Specifying the error disable
timeout interval” on page 53.
To enable the error disable timeout timer, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
By default, the timeout feature is disabled.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable STP, RSTP, or MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree stp
3. Enable the error disable timeout timer.
switch(conf-stp)#error-disable-timeout enable
Specifying the error disable timeout interval
In any mode (STP, RSTP, or MSTP), use this command to specify the time in seconds it takes for an
interface to time out. The range is 10 through 1000000 seconds. The default is 300 seconds. By
default, the timeout feature is disabled.
To specify the time in seconds it takes for an interface to time out, perform the following steps from
Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable STP, RSTP, or MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree stp
3. Specify the time in seconds it takes for an interface to time out.
switch(conf-stp)#error-disable-timeout interval 60
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Specifying the port-channel path cost
In any mode (STP, RSTP, or MSTP), use this command to specify the port-channel path cost. The
default port cost is standard. The path cost options are:
• custom—Specifies that the path cost changes according to the port-channel’s bandwidth.
• standard—Specifies that the path cost does not change according to the port-channel’s
bandwidth.
To specify the port-channel path cost, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable STP, RSTP, or MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree stp
3. Specify the port-channel path cost.
switch(conf-stp)#port-channel path-cost custom
Specifying the bridge hello time (STP and RSTP)
In STP or RSTP mode, use this command to configure the bridge hello time. The hello time
determines how often the switch interface broadcasts hello Bridge Protocol Data Units (BPDUs) to
other devices.The range is 1 through 10 seconds. The default is 2 seconds.
When configuring the hello-time, the max-age setting must be greater than the hello-time setting.
The following relationship should be kept:
2*(forward_delay - 1)>=max_age>=2*(hello_time + 1)
To specify the bridge hello time, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable STP, RSTP, or MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree stp
3. Specify the time range in seconds for the interval between the hello BPDUs sent on an
interface.
switch(conf-stp)#hello-time 5
Specifying the transmit hold count (RSTP and MSTP)
In RSTP and MSTP mode, use this command to configure the BPDU burst size by specifying the
transmit hold count value. The command configures the maximum number of BPDUs transmitted
per second for RSTP and MSTP before pausing for 1 second. The range is 1 through 10. The default
is 6 seconds.
To specify the transmit hold count, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Specify the transmit hold count.
switch(config)#transmit-holdcount 5
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Enabling Cisco interoperability (MSTP)
In MSTP mode, use this command to enable or disable the ability of the Brocade FCoE hardware to
interoperate with certain legacy Cisco switches. If Cisco interoperability is required on any switch in
the network, then all switches in the network must be compatible, and therefore enabled using this
command. The default is Cisco interoperability is disabled.
NOTE
This command is necessary because the “version 3 length” field in the MSTP BPDU on some legacy
Cisco switches does not conform to current standards.
To enable Brocade FCoE hardware to interoperate with certain legacy Cisco switches, perform the
following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree mstp
3. Enable the ability of Brocade FCoE hardware to interoperate with certain legacy Cisco switches.
switch(conf-mstp)#cisco-interoperability enable
Disabling Cisco interoperability (MSTP)
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree mstp
3. Disable the ability of Brocade FCoE hardware to interoperate with certain legacy Cisco
switches.
switch(conf-mstp)#cisco-interoperability disable
Mapping a VLAN to an MSTP instance
In MSTP mode, use this command to map a VLAN to an MTSP instance. You can group a set of
VLANs to an instance. This command can be used only after the VLAN is created. VLAN instance
mapping is removed from the configuration if the underlying VLANs are deleted.
To map a VLAN to an MSTP instance, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree mstp
3. Map a VLAN to an MSTP instance.
switch(conf-mstp)#instance 5 vlan 4096
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Specifying the maximum number of hops
for a BPDU (MSTP)
In MSTP mode, use this command to configure the maximum number of hops for a BPDU in an
MSTP region. Specifying the maximum hops for a BPDU prevents the messages from looping
indefinitely on the interface. When you change the number of hops, it affects all spanning tree
instances. The range is 1 through 40. The default is 20 hops.
To configure the maximum number of hops for a BPDU in an MSTP region, perform the following
steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree mstp
3. Enter the max-hops command to configure the maximum number of hops for a BPDU in an
MSTP region.
switch(conf-mstp)#max-hops hop_count
Specifying a name for an MSTP region
In MSTP mode, use this command to assign a name to an MSTP region. The region name has a
maximum length of 32 characters and is case-sensitive.
To assign a name to an MSTP region, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree mstp
3. Enter the region command to assign a name to an MSTP region.
switch(conf-mstp)#region sydney
Specifying a revision number for an MSTP configuration
In MSTP mode, use this command to specify a revision number for an MSTP configuration. The
range is 0 through 255. The default is 0.
To specify a revision number for an MSTP configuration, perform the following steps from Privileged
EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the protocol command to enable MSTP.
switch(config)#protocol spanning-tree mstp
3. Enter the revision command to specify a revision number for an MSTP configuration.
switch(conf-mstp)#revision 17
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Flushing MAC addresses (RSTP and MSTP)
For RSTP and MSTP, use this command to flush the MAC addresses from the VLAN filtering
database (FDB). The VLAN FDB determines the forwarding of an incoming frame. The VLAN FDB
contains information that helps determine the forwarding of an arriving frame based on MAC
address and VLAN ID data (see “VLAN configuration guidelines and restrictions” on page 33).
There are two ways to flush the MAC addresses:
• Standard method—When one port receives a BPDU frame with a topology change flag, it
flushes the FDB for the other ports in the switch. If a BPDU frame with the topology change flag
is received continuously, the switch continues to flush the FDB. This behavior is the default
behavior.
• Brocade method—With this method, the FDB is only flushed for the first and last BPDU with a
topology change flag.
Both methods flush the FDB when the switch receives BPDUs with a topology change flag, but the
Brocade method causes less flushing.
To flush the MAC addresses from the VLAN FDB, perform the following steps.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the appropriate form of the spanning-tree command based on how you want to flush the
address:
• To flush the MAC address using the standard method:
switch(config)#spanning-tree tc-flush-standard
• To flush the MAC addresses from the VLAN FDB using the Brocade method:
switch(config)#no spanning-tree tc-flush-standard
Clearing spanning tree counters
In Privileged EXEC mode, use this command to clear spanning tree counters on all interfaces or on
the specified interface.
To clear spanning tree counters, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the appropriate form of the clear command based on what you want to clear:
• To clear all spanning tree counters on all interfaces:
switch#clear spanning-tree counter
• To clear the spanning tree counters associated with a specific port-channel or CEE port
interface:
switch#clear spanning-tree counter interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
Clearing spanning tree-detected protocols
In Privileged EXEC mode, restart the protocol migration process (force the renegotiation with
neighboring switches) on all interfaces or on the specified interface.
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To restart the protocol migration process, perform the following tasks from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the appropriate form of the clear command based on what you want to clear:
• To clear all spanning tree counters on all interfaces:
switch#clear spanning-tree detected-protocols
• To clear the spanning tree counters associated with a specific port-channel or CEE port
interface:
switch#clear spanning-tree detected-protocols interface tengigabitethernet
0/1
Displaying STP, RSTP, and MSTP-related information
To display STP, RSTP, and MSTP-related information, perform the following tasks from Privileged
EXEC mode.
1. Enter the show spanning tree command to display all STP, RSTP, and MSTP-related information.
switch#show spanning-tree brief
Configuring STP, RSTP, or MSTP on CEE interface ports
This section details the commands for enabling and configuring STP, RSTP, or MSTP on individual
10-Gigabit Ethernet CEE interface ports on Brocade FCoE hardware.
Enabling automatic edge detection
From the CEE interface, use this command to automatically identify the edge port. The port can
become an edge port if no BPDU is received. By default, automatic edge detection is disabled.
To enable automatic edge detection on the CEE interface, perform the following steps from
Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the spanning-tree command to enable automatic edge detection on the CEE interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#spanning-tree autoedge
Configuring the path cost
From the CEE interface, use this command to configure the path cost for spanning tree
calculations. The lower the path cost means there is a greater chance of the interface becoming
the root. The range is 1 through 200000000. The default path cost is 2000.
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To configure the path cost for spanning tree calculations on the CEE interface, perform the
following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the spanning-tree command to configure the path cost for spanning tree calculations on
the CEE interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#spanning-tree cost cost
Enabling a port (interface) as an edge port
From the CEE interface, use this command to enable the port as an edge port to allow the port to
quickly transition to the forwarding state. To configure a port as an edge port, follow these
guidelines:
• A port can become an edge port if no BPDU is received.
• When an edge port receives a BPDU, it becomes a normal spanning tree port and is no longer
an edge port.
• Because ports that are directly connected to end stations cannot create bridging loops in the
network, edge ports transition directly to the forwarding state and skip the listening and
learning states.
• This command is only for RSTP and MSTP. Use the spanning-tree portfast command for STP
(see “Enabling port fast (STP)” on page 61).
To enable the CEE interface as an edge port, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the spanning-tree command to enable the CEE interface as an edge port.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#spanning-tree edgeport bpdu-filter
Enabling the guard root
From the CEE interface, use this command to enable the guard root on the switch. The guard root
feature provides a way to enforce the root bridge placement in the network. With the guard root
enabled on an interface, the switch is able to restrict which interface is allowed to be the spanning
tree root port or the path to the root for the switch. The root port provides the best path from the
switch to the root switch. By default, guard root is disabled.
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Guard root protects the root bridge from malicious attacks and unintentional misconfigurations
where a bridge device that is not intended to be the root bridge becomes the root bridge. This
causes severe bottlenecks in the data path. Guard root ensures that the port on which it is enabled
is a designated port. If the guard root-enabled port receives a superior BPDU, it goes to a
discarding state.
To enable the guard root on a CEE interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the spanning-tree command to enable the guard root on a CEE interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#spanning-tree guard root
Specifying the MSTP hello time
From the CEE interface, use this command to set the time interval between BPDUs sent by the root
switch. Changing the hello-time affects all spanning tree instances.
The max-age setting must be greater than the hello-time setting (see “Specifying the bridge
maximum aging time” on page 53). The range is 1 through 10 seconds. The default is 2 seconds.
To specify the MSTP hello time on a CEE interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the spanning-tree command to specify the hello time on a CEE interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#spanning-tree hello-time 5
Specifying restrictions for an MSTP instance
From the CEE interface, use this command to specify restrictions on the interface for an MSTP
instance.
To specify restrictions for an MSTP instance on a CEE interface, perform the following steps.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode from Privileged
EXEC mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
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4. Enter the spanning-tree command to specify the restrictions for an MSTP instance on a CEE
interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#spanning-tree instance 5 cost 3550 restricted-tcn
Specifying a link type
From the CEE interface, use this command to specify a link type. Specifying the point-to-point
keyword enables rapid spanning tree transitions to the forwarding state. Specifying the shared
keyword disables spanning tree rapid transitions. The default setting is point-to-point.
To specify a link type on a CEE interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the spanning-tree command to specify the link type on the CEE interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#spanning-tree link-type shared
Enabling port fast (STP)
From the CEE interface, use this command to enable port fast on an interface to allow the interface
to quickly transition to the forwarding state. Port fast immediately puts the interface into the
forwarding state without having to wait for the standard forward time.
NOTE
If you enable the portfast bpdu-guard option on an interface and the interface receives a BPDU, the
software disables the interface and puts the interface in the ERR_DISABLE state.
Use the spanning-tree edgeport command for MSTP and RSTP (see “Enabling a port (interface) as
an edge port” on page 59).
To enable port fast on the CEE interface for STP, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the spanning-tree command to enable port fast on the CEE interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#spanning-tree portfast
Specifying the port priority
From the CEE interface, use this command to specify the port priority. The range is 0 through 240
in increments of 16. The default is 128.
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To specify the port priority on the CEE interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the spanning-tree command to specify the port priority on the CEE interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#spanning-tree priority 32
Restricting the port from becoming a root port
From the CEE interface, use this command to restrict a port from becoming a root port. The default
is to allow the CEE interface to become a root port.
To restrict the CEE interface from becoming a root port, perform the following steps from Privileged
EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the spanning-tree command to restrict the CEE interface from becoming a root port.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#spanning-tree restricted-role
Restricting the topology change notification
From the CEE interface, use this command to restrict the topology change notification BPDUs sent
on the interface. By default, the restriction is disabled.
To restrict the topology change notification BPDUs sent on the CEE interface, perform the following
steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the spanning-tree command to restrict the topology change notification BPDUs sent on
the CEE interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#spanning-tree restricted-tcn
Enabling spanning tree
From the CEE interface, use this command to enable spanning tree on the CEE interface. By
default, spanning tree is disabled.
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To enable spanning tree on the CEE interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the spanning-tree command to enable spanning tree on the CEE interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#no spanning-tree shutdown
Disabling spanning tree
From the CEE interface, use this command to disable spanning tree on the CEE interface. By
default, spanning tree is disabled.
To enable spanning tree on the CEE interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the spanning-tree command to enable spanning tree on the CEE interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#spanning-tree shutdown
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6
Configuring Link Aggregation using the CEE CLI
In this chapter
• Link aggregation overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• LACP configuration guidelines and restrictions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Default LACP configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• LACP configuration and management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• LACP troubleshooting tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Link aggregation overview
Link aggregation allows you to bundle multiple physical Ethernet links to form a single logical trunk
providing enhanced performance and redundancy. The aggregated trunk is referred to as a Link
Aggregation Group (LAG). The LAG is viewed as a single link by connected devices, the spanning
tree protocol, IEEE 802.1Q VLANs, and so on. When one physical link in the LAG fails, the other
links stay up and there is no disruption to traffic.
To configure links to form a LAG, the physical links must be the same speed and all links must go to
the same neighboring device. Link aggregation can be done by manually configuring the LAG or by
dynamically configuring the LAG using the IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP).
NOTE
The LAG or LAG interface is also referred to as a port-channel.
The benefits of link aggregation are summarized as follows:
• Increased bandwidth. The logical bandwidth can be dynamically changed as the demand
changes.
• Increased availability.
• Load sharing.
• Rapid configuration and reconfiguration.
The Brocade FCoE hardware supports the following trunk types:
•
•
•
•
Static, standards-based LAG.
Dynamic, standards-based LAG using LACP.
Static, Brocade-proprietary LAG.
Dynamic, Brocade-proprietary LAG using proprietary enhancements to LACP.
Link Aggregation Group configuration
You can configure a maximum of 24 Link Aggregation Groups (LAG) with up to 16 links per standard
LAG and four links per Brocade-proprietary LAG. Each LAG is associated with an aggregator. The
aggregator manages the Ethernet frame collection and distribution functions.
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On each port, link aggregation control:
•
•
•
•
Maintains configuration information to control port aggregation.
Exchanges configuration information with other devices to form LAGs.
Attaches ports to and detaches ports from the aggregator when they join or leave a LAG.
Enables or disables an aggregator’s frame collection and distribution functions.
Each link in the Brocade FCoE hardware can be associated with a LAG; a link cannot be associated
with more than one LAG. The process of adding and removing links to and from a LAG is controlled
either statically, dynamically, or through LACP.
Each LAG consists of the following components:
• A MAC address that is different from the MAC addresses of the LAG’s individual member links.
• An interface index for each link to identify the link to neighboring devices.
• An administrative key for each link. Only links having the same administrative key value can be
aggregated into a LAG. On each link configured to use LACP, LACP automatically configures an
administrative key value equal to the port-channel identification number.
Figure 7 and Figure 8 show typical IP SAN configurations using LAGs. In a data center the Brocade
8000 switch fits into the top-of-the-rack use case where all the servers in a rack are connected to
the Brocade 8000 switch through Twinax copper or optical fiber cable. The database server layer
connects to the top-of-the-rack Brocade 8000 switch which is located in the network access layer.
The Brocade 8000 switch connects to Layer 2/Layer 3 aggregation routers which provide access
into the existing LAN. This connectivity is formed in a standard V-design or square-design. Both
designs use the LAG as the uplink to provide redundancy and improved bandwidth.
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6
The Brocade 8000 switch interoperates with all of the major Layer 2/Layer 3 aggregation routers
including Foundry Networks, Cisco Systems, and Force10 Networks.
FIGURE 7
Configuring LAGs for a top-of-the-rack CEE switch—Example 1
Data Center Core
Data Center Network
Core Layer
Data Center Network
Aggregation Layer
Data Center Network
Access Layer
(Brocade 8000s)
Router
Router
Brocade 8000
Switch
Brocade 8000
Switch
Data Center Database
Server Layer
Servers
FIGURE 8
Servers
Configuring LAGs for a top-of-the-rack CEE switch—Example 2
Data Center Core
Data Center Network
Core Layer
Data Center Network
Aggregation Layer
Router
Brocade 8000
Switch
Data Center Network
Access Layer
(Brocade 8000s)
Router
Brocade 8000
Switch
Data Center Database
Server Layer
Servers
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Link aggregation overview
Link Aggregation Control Protocol
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) is an IEEE 802.3ad standards-based protocol that allows
two partner systems to dynamically negotiate attributes of physical links between them to form
logical trunks. LACP determines whether a link can be aggregated into a LAG. If a link can be
aggregated into a LAG, LACP puts the link into the LAG. All links in a LAG inherit the same
administrative characteristics. LACP operates in two modes:
• Passive mode—LACP responds to Link Aggregation Control Protocol Data Units (LACPDUs)
initiated by its partner system but does not initiate the LACPDU exchange.
• Active mode—LACP initiates the LACPDU exchange regardless of whether the partner system
sends LACPDUs.
Dynamic link aggregation
Dynamic link aggregation uses LACP to negotiate which links can be added and removed from a
LAG. Typically, two partner systems sharing multiple physical Ethernet links can aggregate a
number of those physical links using LACP. LACP creates a LAG on both partner systems and
identifies the LAG by the LAG ID. All links with the same administrative key and all links that are
connected to the same partner switch become members of the LAG. LACP continuously exchanges
LACPDUs to monitor the health of each member link.
Static link aggregation
In static link aggregation, links are added into a LAG without exchanging LACPDUs between the
partner systems. The distribution and collection of frames on static links is determined by the
operational status and administrative state of the link.
Brocade-proprietary aggregation
Brocade-proprietary aggregation is similar to standards-based link aggregation but differs in how
the traffic is distributed. It also has additional rules that member links must meet before they are
aggregated:
• The most important rule requires that there is not a significant difference in the length of the
fiber between the member links, and that all member links are part of the same port-group.
The ports that belong to port-group 1, port-group 2, and port-group 3 are te0/0 to te0/7, te0/8
to te0/15, and te0/16 to te0/23, respectively.
• A maximum of four Brocade LAGs can be created per port-group.
LAG distribution process
The LAG aggregator is associated with the collection and distribution of Ethernet frames. The
collection and distribution process is required to guarantee the following:
•
•
•
•
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Inserting and capturing control PDUs.
Restricting the traffic of a given conversation to a specific link.
Load balancing between individual links.
Handling dynamic changes in LAG membership.
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LACP configuration guidelines and restrictions
6
LACP configuration guidelines and restrictions
This section applies to standards-based and Brocade-proprietary LAG configurations except where
specifically noted otherwise.
Follow these LACP configuration guidelines and restrictions when configuring LACP:
• All ports on the Brocade FCoE hardware can operate only in full-duplex mode.
• QoS—In the Fabric OS version 6.4.0 release, QoS commands for a LAG need to be specified on
each LAG member link, instead of on the logical LAG interface (port-group). Additionally, the
QoS commands specified on each LAG member link need to be the same on each link.
• Brocade-proprietary LAGs only—All LAG member links need to be part of the same port-group.
• Switchport interfaces—Interfaces configured as “switchport” interfaces cannot be aggregated
into a LAG. However, a LAG can be configured as a switchport.
Default LACP configuration
Table 11 lists the default LACP configuration.
TABLE 11
Default LACP configuration
Parameter
Default setting
System priority
32768
Port priority
32768
Timeout
Long (standard LAG) and short (Brocade LAG)
LACP configuration and management
You need to enter either the copy running-config startup-config command or the write memory
command to save your configuration changes to Flash memory so that they are not lost if there is a
system reload or power outage.
NOTE
To see the minimum configuration required to enable FCoE on the Brocade 8000 switch, refer to
“Minimum CEE configuration to allow FCoE traffic flow” on page 29.
Enabling LACP on a CEE interface
To add additional interfaces to an existing LAG, repeat this procedure using the same LAG group
number for the new interfaces.
To enable LACP on a CEE interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
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LACP configuration and management
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Enter the channel-group command to configure the LACP for the CEE interface.
Example
switch(conf-if)#channel-group 4 mode active type brocade
Configuring the LACP system priority
You configure an LACP system priority on each switch running LACP. LACP uses the system priority
with the switch MAC address to form the system ID and also during negotiation with other switches.
The system priority value must be a number in the range of 1 through 65535. The higher the
number, the lower the priority. The default priority is 32768.
To configure the global LACP system priority, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Specify the LACP system priority.
Example
switch(config)#lacp system-priority 25000
Configuring the LACP timeout period on a CEE interface
The LACP timeout period indicates how long LACP waits before timing out the neighboring device.
The short timeout period is 3 seconds and the long timeout period is 90 seconds. The default is
long.
To configure the LACP timeout period on a CEE interface, perform the following steps from
Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/1.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the no shutdown command to enable the CEE interface.
4. Specify the LACP timeout period for the CEE interface.
Example
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#lacp timeout short
Clearing LACP counter statistics on a LAG
To clear LACP counter statistics, perform the following task from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the clear command to clear the LACP counter statistics for the specified LAG group
number.
Example of clearing counter statistics on LAG group 42
switch#clear lacp 42 counters
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LACP troubleshooting tips
Clearing LACP counter statistics on all LAG groups
To clear LACP counter statistics, perform the following task from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the clear command to clear the LACP counter statistics for all LAG groups.
switch#clear lacp counters
Displaying LACP information
Use the show command to display LACP statistics and configuration information. See the
Converged Enhanced Ethernet Command Reference for information.
LACP troubleshooting tips
To troubleshoot problems with your LACP configuration, use the following troubleshooting tips.
If a standard IEEE 802.3ad-based dynamic trunk is configured on a link and the link is not able to
join the LAG:
• Make sure that both ends of the link are configured as standard for the trunk type.
• Make sure that both ends of the link are not configured for passive mode. They must be
configured as either active/active, active/passive, or passive/active.
• Make sure that the port-channel interface is in the administrative “up” state by ensuring that
the no shutdown command was entered on the interface on both ends of the link.
• Make sure that the links that are part of the LAG are connected to the same neighboring
switch.
• Make sure that the system ID of the switches connected by the link is unique. This can be
verified by entering the show lacp sys-id command on both switches.
• Make sure that LACPDUs are being received and transmitted on both ends of the link and that
there are no error PDUs. This can be verified by entering the show lacp counters
port-channel-num command and looking at the receive mode (rx) and transmit mode (tx)
statistics. The statistics should be incrementing and should not be at zero or a fixed value. If
the PDU rx count is not incrementing, check the interface for possible CRC errors by entering
the show interface link-name command on the neighboring switch. If the PDU tx count is not
incrementing, check the operational status of the link by entering the show interface link-name
command and verifying that the interface status is “up.”
If a Brocade-based dynamic trunk is configured on a link and the link is not able to join the LAG:
• Make sure that both ends of the link are configured as Brocade for trunk type.
• Make sure that both ends of the link are not configured for passive mode. They must be
configured as either active/active, active/passive, or passive/active.
• Make sure that the port-channel interface is in the administrative “up” state by ensuring that
the no shutdown command was entered on the interface on both ends of the link.
• Make sure that the links that are part of the LAG are connected to the same neighboring
switch.
• Make sure that the system ID of the switches connected by the link is unique. This can be
verified by entering the show lacp sys-id command on both switches.
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• Make sure that LACPDUs are being received and transmitted on both ends of the link and
there are no error PDUs. This can be verified by entering the show lacp port-channel-num
counters command and looking at the rx and tx statistics. The statistics should be
incrementing and should not be at zero or a fixed value. If the PDU rx count is not
incrementing, check the interface for possible CRC errors by entering the show interface
link-name command on the neighboring switch.
• Make sure that the fiber length of the link has a deskew value of 7 microseconds. If it does not,
the link will not be able to join the LAG and the following RASLOG message is generated:
Deskew calculation failed for link <link-name>.
When a link has this problem, the show port-channel command displays the following:
Mux machine state : Deskew not OK.
If a Brocade-based static trunk is configured on a link and the link is not able to join the LAG:
• Make sure that both ends of the link are configured as Brocade for trunk type and verify that
the mode is “on.”
• Make sure that the port-channel interface is in the administrative “up” state by ensuring that
the no shutdown command was entered on the interface on both ends of the link.
If a standards-based static trunk is configured on a link and the link is not able to join the LAG:
• Make sure that both ends of the link are configured as standard for trunk type and verify that
the mode is “on.”
• Make sure that the port-channel interface is in the administrative “up” state by ensuring that
the no shutdown command was entered on the interface on both ends of the link.
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7
Configuring LLDP using the CEE CLI
In this chapter
• LLDP overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Layer 2 topology mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• DCBX overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• DCBX interaction with other vendor devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• LLDP configuration guidelines and restrictions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Default LLDP configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• LLDP configuration and management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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LLDP overview
The IEEE 802.1AB Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) enhances the ability of network
management tools to discover and maintain accurate network topologies and simplify LAN
troubleshooting in multi-vendor environments. To efficiently and effectively operate the various
devices in a LAN you must ensure the correct and valid configuration of the protocols and
applications that are enabled on these devices. With Layer 2 networks expanding dramatically, it is
difficult for a network administrator to statically monitor and configure each device in the network.
Using LLDP, network devices such as routers and switches advertise information about themselves
to other network devices and store the information they discover. Details such as device
configuration, device capabilities, and device identification are advertised. LLDP defines the
following:
• A common set of advertisement messages.
• A protocol for transmitting the advertisements.
• A method for storing the information contained in received advertisements.
NOTE
LLDP runs over the data-link layer which allows two devices running different network layer protocols
to learn about each other.
LLDP information is transmitted periodically and stored for a finite period. Every time a device
receives an LLDP advertisement frame, it stores the information and initializes a timer. If the timer
reaches the time to live (TTL) value, the LLDP device deletes the stored information ensuring that
only valid and current LLDP information is stored in network devices and is available to network
management systems.
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Layer 2 topology mapping
Layer 2 topology mapping
The LLDP protocol lets network management systems accurately discover and model Layer 2
network topologies. As LLDP devices transmit and receive advertisements, the devices store
information they discover about their neighbors. Advertisement data such as a neighbor's
management address, device type, and port identification is useful in determining what
neighboring devices are in the network.
NOTE
Brocade’s LLDP implementation supports a one-to-one connection. Each interface has one and only
one neighbor.
The higher level management tools, such as Brocade’s DCFM, can query the LLDP information to
draw Layer 2 physical topologies. The management tools can continue to query a neighboring
device through the device’s management address provided in the LLDP information exchange. As
this process is repeated, the complete Layer 2 topology is mapped.
In LLDP the link discovery is achieved through the exchange of link-level information between two
link partners. The link-level information is refreshed periodically to reflect any dynamic changes in
link-level parameters. The basic format for exchanging information in LLDP is in the form of a type,
length, value (TLV) field.
LLDP keeps a database for both local and remote configurations. The LLDP standard currently
supports three categories of TLVs. Brocade’s LLDP implementation adds a proprietary Brocade
extension TLV set. The four TLV sets are described as follows:
• Basic management TLV set. This set provides information to map the Layer 2 topology and
includes the following TLVs:
-
Chassis ID TLV—Provides the ID for the switch or router where the port resides. This is a
mandatory TLV.
-
Port description TLV—Provides a description of the port in an alphanumeric format. If the
LAN device supports RFC-2863, the port description TLV value equals the “ifDescr” object.
This is a mandatory TLV.
-
System name TLV—Provides the system-assigned name in an alphanumeric format. If the
LAN device supports RFC-3418, the system name TLV value equals the “sysName” object.
This is an optional TLV.
-
System description TLV—Provides a description of the network entity in an alphanumeric
format. This includes system name, hardware version, operating system, and supported
networking software. If the LAN device supports RFC-3418, the value equals the
“sysDescr” object. This is an optional TLV.
-
System capabilities TLV—Indicates the primary functions of the device and whether these
functions are enabled in the device. The capabilities are indicated by two octets. The first
octet indicates Other, Repeater, Bridge, WLAN AP, Router, Telephone, DOCSIS cable device,
and Station, respectively. The second octet is reserved. This is an optional TLV.
-
Management address TLV—Indicates the addresses of the local switch. Remote switches
can use this address to obtain information related to the local switch. This is an optional
TLV.
• IEEE 802.1 organizational TLV set. This set provides information to detect mismatched settings
between local and remote devices. A trap or event can be reported once a mismatch is
detected. This is an optional TLV. This set includes the following TLVs:
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-
Port VLANID TLV—Indicates the port VLAN ID (PVID) that is associated with an untagged or
priority tagged data frame received on the VLAN port.
-
PPVLAN ID TLV—Indicates the port- and protocol--based VLAN ID (PPVID) that is associated
with an untagged or priority tagged data frame received on the VLAN port. The TLV
supports a “flags” field that indicates whether the port is capable of supporting port- and
protocol-based VLANs (PPVLANs) and whether one or more PPVLANs are enabled. The
number of PPVLAN ID TLVs in a Link Layer Discovery Protocol Data Unit (LLDPDU)
corresponds to the number of the PPVLANs enabled on the port.
-
VLAN name TLV—Indicates the assigned name of any VLAN on the device. If the LAN device
supports RFC-2674, the value equals the “dot1QVLANStaticName” object. The number of
VLAN name TLVs in an LLDPDU corresponds to the number of VLANs enabled on the port.
-
Protocol identity TLV—Indicates the set of protocols that are accessible at the device's port.
The protocol identity field in the TLV contains a number of octets after the Layer 2 address
that can enable the receiving device to recognize the protocol. For example, a device that
wishes to advertise the spanning tree protocol includes at least eight octets: 802.3 length
(two octets), LLC addresses (two octets), 802.3 control (one octet), protocol ID (two octets),
and the protocol version (one octet).
• IEEE 802.3 organizational TLV set. This is an optional TLV set. This set includes the following
TLVs:
-
MAC/PHY configuration/status TLV—Indicates duplex and bit rate capabilities and the
current duplex and bit rate settings of the local interface. It also indicates whether the
current settings were configured through auto-negotiation or through manual
configuration.
-
Power through media dependent interface (MDI) TLV—Indicates the power capabilities of
the LAN device.
-
Link aggregation TLV—Indicates whether the link (associated with the port on which the
LLDPDU is transmitted) can be aggregated. It also indicates whether the link is currently
aggregated and provides the aggregated port identifier if the link is aggregated.
-
Maximum Ethernet frame size TLV—Indicates the maximum frame size capability of the
device’s MAC and PHY implementation.
• Brocade extension TLV set. This set is used to identify vendor-specific information. This set
includes the following TLVs:
-
Link Vendor/Version TLV—Indicates the vendor for the switch, host, or router where the
port resides.
-
Primitive supported/version TLV—Indicates where the link-level primitives are supported (if
supported) and the link-level primitive version.
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DCBX overview
DCBX overview
Storage traffic requires a lossless communication which is provided by CEE. The Data Center
Bridging (DCB) Capability Exchange Protocol (DCBX) is used to exchange CEE-related parameters
with neighbors to achieve more efficient scheduling and a priority-based flow control for link traffic.
DCBX uses LLDP to exchange parameters between two link peers; DCBX is built on the LLDP
infrastructure for the exchange of information. DCBX-exchanged parameters are packaged into
organizationally specific TLVs. The DCBX protocol requires an acknowledgement from the other
side of the link, therefore LLDP is turned on in both transmit and receive directions. DCBX requires
version number checking for both control TLVs and feature TLVs.
DCBX interacts with other protocols and features as follows:
• LLDP—LLDP is run in parallel with other Layer 2 protocols such as RSTP and LACP. DCBX is built
on the LLDP infrastructure to communicate capabilities supported between link partners. The
DCBX protocol and feature TLVs are treated as a superset of the LLDP standard.
• QoS management—DCBX capabilities exchanged with a link partner are passed down to the
QoS management entity to set up the Brocade FCoE hardware to control the scheduling and
priority-based flow control in the hardware.
The DCBX standard is subdivided into two features sets:
• “Enhanced Transmission Selection (ETS)”
• “Priority Flow Control (PFC)”
Enhanced Transmission Selection (ETS)
In a converged network, different traffic types affect the network bandwidth differently. The
purpose of ETS is to allocate bandwidth based on the different priority settings of the converged
traffic. For example, Inter-process communications (IPC) traffic can use as much bandwidth as
needed and there is no bandwidth check; LAN and SAN traffic share the remaining bandwidth.
Table 12 displays three traffic groups: IPC, LAN, and SAN. ETS allocates the bandwidth based on
traffic type and also assigns a priority to the three traffic types as follows: Priority 7 traffic is
mapped to priority group 0 which does not get a bandwidth check, priority 2 and priority 3 are
mapped to priority group 1, priorities 6, 5, 4, 1 and 0 are mapped to priority group 2.
The priority settings shown in Table 12 are translated to priority groups in the Brocade FCoE
hardware.
TABLE 12
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ETS priority grouping of IPC, LAN, and SAN traffic
Priority
Priority group
Bandwidth check
7
0
No
6
2
Yes
5
2
Yes
4
2
Yes
3
1
Yes
2
1
Yes
1
2
Yes
0
2
Yes
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Priority Flow Control (PFC)
With PFC, it is important to provide lossless frame delivery for certain traffic classes while
maintaining existing LAN behavior for other traffic classes on the converged link. This differs from
the traditional 802.3 PAUSE type of flow control where the pause affects all traffic on an interface.
PFC is defined by a one-byte bitmap. Each bit position stands for a user priority. If a bit is set, the
flow control is enabled in both directions (Rx and Tx).
DCBX interaction with other vendor devices
When the Brocade FCoE hardware interacts with other vendor devices, the other vendor devices
might not have support for the same DCBX version as the Brocade FCoE hardware.
The Brocade FCoE hardware supports two DCBX versions:
• CEE version (1.0.1)—Based on the CEE standard.
• Pre-CEE version.
To accommodate the different DCBX versions, the Brocade FCoE hardware provides the following
options.
• Auto-sense (plug and play)
This is the default. The Brocade FCoE hardware detects the version used by the link neighbor
and automatically switches between the CEE version and the pre-CEE version.
• CEE version
Forces the use of the CEE version for the link (auto-sense is off).
• Pre-CEE version
Forces the use of the pre-CEE version for the link (auto-sense is off).
LLDP configuration guidelines and restrictions
Follow these LLDP configuration guidelines and restrictions when configuring LLDP:
• Brocade’s implementation of LLDP supports Brocade-specific TLV exchange in addition to the
standard LLDP information.
• Mandatory TLVs are always advertised.
• The exchange of LLDP link-level parameters is transparent to the other Layer 2 protocols. The
LLDP link-level parameters are reported by LLDP to other interested protocols.
NOTE
DCBX configuration simply involves configuring DCBX-related TLVs to be advertised. Detailed
information is provided in the “LLDP configuration and management” on page 78.
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Default LLDP configuration
Default LLDP configuration
Table 13 lists the default LLDP configuration.
TABLE 13
Default LLDP configuration
Parameter
Default setting
LLDP global state
Enabled
LLDP receive
Enabled
LLDP transmit
Enabled
Transmission frequency of LLDP updates
30 seconds
Hold time for receiving devices before discarding
120 seconds
DCBX-related TLVs to be advertised
dcbx-tlv
LLDP configuration and management
NOTE
You need to enter either the copy running-config startup-config command or the write memory
command to save your configuration changes to Flash so that they are not lost if there is a system
reload or power outage.
Enabling LLDP globally
The protocol lldp command enables LLDP globally on all interfaces unless it has been specifically
disabled on an interface. LLDP is globally enabled by default.
To enable LLDP globally, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter LLDP configuration mode.
switch(config)#protocol lldp
Disabling and resetting LLDP globally
The protocol lldp command returns all configuration settings made using the protocol lldp
commands to their default settings. LLDP is globally enabled by default.
To disable and reset LLDP globally, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Disable LLDP globally.
switch(config)#no protocol lldp
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Configuring LLDP global command options
After entering the protocol lldp command from global configuration mode, you are in LLDP
configuration mode which is designated with the switch(conf-lldp)# prompt. Using the keywords in
this mode, you can set non-default parameter values that apply globally to all interfaces.
Specifying a system name for the Brocade FCoE hardware
The global system name for LLDP is useful for differentiating between switches. By default, the
“host-name” from the chassis/entity MIB is used. By specifying a descriptive system name, you will
find it easier to configure the switch for LLDP.
To specify a global system name for the Brocade FCoE hardware, perform the following steps from
Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter LLDP configuration mode.
switch(config)#protocol lldp
3. Specify an LLDP system name for the CEE switch.
Example
switch(conf-lldp)#system-name Brocade_Alpha
Brocade_Alpha(conf-lldp)#
Specifying an LLDP system description for the Brocade FCoE hardware
NOTE
Brocade recommends you use the operating system version for the description or use the
description from the chassis/entity MIB.
To specify an LLDP system description for the Brocade FCoE hardware, perform the following steps
from Privileged EXEC mode. The system description is seen by neighboring switches.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter LLDP configuration mode.
switch(config)#protocol lldp
3. Specify a system description for the Brocade FCoE hardware.
Example
switch(conf-lldp)#system-description IT_1.6.2_LLDP_01
Specifying a user description for LLDP
To specify a user description for LLDP, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode. This
description is for network administrative purposes and is not seen by neighboring switches.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter LLDP configuration mode.
switch(config)#protocol lldp
3. Specify a user description for LLDP.
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Example
switch(conf-lldp)#description Brocade-LLDP-installed-july-25
Enabling and disabling the receiving and transmitting of LLDP frames
By default both transmit and receive for LLDP frames is enabled. To enable or disable the receiving
(rx) and transmitting (tx) of LLDP frames, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the mode command to:
• Enable only receiving of LLDP frames:
switch(conf-lldp)#mode rx
• Enable only transmitting of LLDP frames:
switch(conf-lldp)#mode tx
• Disable all LLDP frame transmissions
switch(conf-lldp)#mode no mode
Configuring the transmit frequency of LLDP frames
To configure the transmit frequency of LLDP frames, perform the following steps from Privileged
EXEC mode.The default is 30 seconds.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter LLDP configuration mode.
switch(config)#protocol lldp
3. Configure the transmit frequency of LLDP frames.
switch(conf-lldp)#hello 45
Configuring the hold time for receiving devices
To configure the hold time for receiving devices, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode. This configures the number of consecutive LLDP hello packets that can be missed before
declaring the neighbor information as invalid. The default is 4.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter LLDP configuration mode.
switch(config)#protocol lldp
3. Configure the hold time for receiving devices.
switch(conf-lldp)#multiplier 6
Advertising the optional LLDP TLVs
NOTE
If the advertise optional-tlv command is entered without keywords, all optional LLDP TLVs are
advertised.
To advertise the optional LLDP TLVs, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
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1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter LLDP configuration mode.
switch(config)#protocol lldp
3. Advertise the optional LLDP TLVs.
switch(conf-lldp)#advertise optional-tlv [port-description |system-name |
system-capabilities | system-description | management-address]
Configuring the advertisement of LLDP DCBX -related TLVs
NOTE
By default, the dcbx-tlv is advertised; the dot1-tlv, dot3-tlv, dcbx-fcoe-app-tlv, and
dcbx-fcoe-logical-link-tlv are not advertised.
To configure the LLDP DCBX-related TLVs to be advertised, perform the following steps from
Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter LLDP configuration mode.
switch(config)#protocol lldp
3. Advertise the LLDP DCBX-related TLVs using these commands:
•
•
•
•
•
switch(conf-lldp)#advertise dcbx-fcoe-app-tlv
switch(conf-lldp)#advertise dcbx-fcoe-logical-link-tlv
switch(conf-lldp)#advertise dcbx-tlv
switch(conf-lldp)#advertise dot1-tlv
switch(conf-lldp)#advertise dot3-tlv
Configuring FCoE priority bits
The FCoE priority bit setting is a bitmap setting where each bit position stands for a priority. When
you set a bit for a particular priority, that priority setting is applied to the FCoE traffic (that is, the
incoming FCoE traffic will have that priority). The default value is 0x08.
NOTE
FCoE traffic is only supported on the priority level that also has flow control enabled. This means that
the final advertised FCoE priority consists of the configured FCoE priority setting and the per-priority
flow control setting.
To configure the FCoE priority bits, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter LLDP configuration mode.
switch(config)#protocol lldp
3. Configure the FCoE priority bits.
Example
switch(conf-lldp)#lldp fcoe-priority-bits 0xff
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Configuring LLDP profiles
You can configure up to 64 profiles on a switch. Using the no profile NAME command deletes the
entire profile.
To configure LLDP profiles, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter LLDP configuration mode.
switch(config)#protocol lldp
3. Configure the profile name.
Example of creating the unique profile name of “UK_LDP_IT”.
switch(conf-lldp)#profile UK_LLDP_IT
4. Specify a description for the profile.
Example description for the LLDP profile.
switch(conf-lldp-profile-UK_LLDP_IT)#description standard_profile_by_Jane
5. Enable the transmitting and receiving of LLDP frames.
switch(conf-lldp-profile-UK_LLDP_IT)#mode tx rx
6. Configure the transmission frequency of LLDP updates.
switch(conf-lldp-profile-UK_LLDP_IT)#hello 10
7.
Configure the hold time for receiving devices.
switch(conf-lldp-profile-UK_LLDP_IT)#multiplier 2
8. Advertise the optional LLDP TLVs.
Example of advertising all of the LLDP TLVs.
switch(conf-lldp-profile-UK_LLDP_IT)#advertise optional-tlv
[management-address | port-description | system-capabilities |
system-description | system-name]
9. Advertise the LLDP DCBX-related TLVs.
switch(conf-lldp-profile-UK_LLDP_IT)#advertise
switch(conf-lldp-profile-UK_LLDP_IT)#advertise
switch(conf-lldp-profile-UK_LLDP_IT)#advertise
switch(conf-lldp-profile-UK_LLDP_IT)#advertise
switch(conf-lldp-profile-UK_LLDP_IT)#advertise
dot1-tlv
dot3-tlv
advertise dcbx-tlv
dcbx-fcoe-logical-link-tlv
dcbx-fcoe-app-tlv
NOTE
Brocade recommends against advertising dot1.tlv and dot3.tlv LLDPs if your network contains
CNAs from non-Brocade vendors,. This configuration may cause functionality problems.
10. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(conf-lldp-profile-UK_LLDP_IT)#exit
switch(conf-lldp)#exit
switch#copy running-config startup-config
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Configuring LLDP interface-level command options
Only one LLDP profile can be assigned to an interface. If you do not use the lldp profile option at the
interface level, the global configuration is used on the interface. If there are no global configuration
values defined, the global default values are used.
To configure LLDP interface-level command options, perform the following steps from Privileged
EXEC mode.
1. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/10.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/10
2. Apply an LLDP profile to the interface.
Example of applying the LLDP profile “network_standard” to the current interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/10)#lldp profile network_standard
3. Configure the FCoE priority bits for an interface. The value is specified as 0x0-0xff.
Example
switch(conf-if-te-0/10)#fcoe-priority-bits 0x0-0xff
4. Configure the DCBX version for an interface for CEE. For detailed information on these version
command keywords, see “DCBX interaction with other vendor devices” on page 77. The default
is to automatically detect the DCBX version.
Example
switch(conf-if-te-0/10)#lldp version cee
5. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(conf-if-te-0/10)#exit
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Clearing LLDP-related information
To clear LLDP-related information, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Use the clear command to:
• Clear LLDP neighbor information.
switch#clear lldp neighbors tengigabitethernet 0/1
• Clear LLDP statistics.
switch#clear lldp statistics tengigabitethernet 0/1
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Displaying LLDP-related information
To display LLDP-related information, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Use the show lldp neighbors command to:
• Display LLDP general information.
switch#show lldp
• Display LLDP interface-related information.
switch#show lldp interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
• Display LLDP neighbor-related information.
switch#show lldp neighbors interface tengigabitethernet 0/1 detail
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Configuring ACLs using the CEE CLI
In this chapter
• ACL overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Default ACL configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• ACL configuration guidelines and restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• ACL configuration and management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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ACL overview
NOTE
In the Brocade Fabric OS v6.4.0 release, only Layer 2 MAC access control lists (ACLs) are supported.
ACLs filter traffic for the Brocade FCoE hardware and permit or deny incoming frames from passing
through interfaces that have the ACLs applied to them. You can apply ACLs on VLANs and on Layer
2 interfaces. Each ACL is a unique collection of permit and deny statements (rules) that apply to
frames. When a frame is received on an interface, the switch compares the fields in the frame
against any ACLs applied to the interface to verify that the frame has the required permissions to
be forwarded. The switch compares the frame, sequentially, against each rule in the ACL and either
forwards the frame or drops the frame.
The switch examines ACLs associated with options configured on a given interface. As frames enter
the switch on an interface, ACLs associated with all inbound options configured on that interface
are examined. With MAC ACLs you can identify and filter traffic based on the MAC address, and
EtherType.
The primary benefits of ACLs are as follows:
•
•
•
•
Provide a measure of security.
Save network resources by reducing traffic.
Block unwanted traffic or users.
Reduce the chance of denial of service (DOS) attacks.
There are two types of MAC ACLs:
• Standard ACLs—Permit and deny traffic according to the source MAC address in the incoming
frame. Use standard MAC ACLs if you only need to filter traffic based on source addresses.
• Extended ACLs—Permit and deny traffic according to the source and destination MAC
addresses in the incoming frame, as well as EtherType.
MAC ACLs are supported on the following interface types:
• Physical interfaces
• Logical interfaces (LAGs)
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• VLANs
Default ACL configuration
Table 14 lists the default ACL configuration.
TABLE 14
Default MAC ACL configuration
Parameter
Default setting
MAC ACLs
By default, no MAC ACLs are configured.
ACL configuration guidelines and restrictions
Follow these ACL configuration guidelines and restrictions when configuring ACLs:
• The order of the rules in an ACL is critical. The first rule that matches the traffic stops further
processing of the frames.
• Standard ACLs and extended ACLs cannot have the same name.
ACL configuration and management
You need to enter either the copy running-config startup-config command or the write memory
command to save your configuration changes to Flash so that they are not lost if there is a system
reload or power outage.
NOTE
To see the minimum configuration required to enable FCoE on the Brocade 8000 switch, refer to
“Minimum CEE configuration to allow FCoE traffic flow” on page 29.
Creating a standard MAC ACL and adding rules
NOTE
You can use the resequence command to change all the sequence numbers assigned to the rules
in a MAC ACL. For detailed information, see “Reordering the sequence numbers in a MAC ACL” on
page 88.
To create a standard MAC ACL and add rules, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Create a standard MAC ACL and enter ACL configuration mode.
In this example, the name of the standard MAC ACL is “test_01.”
switch(config)#mac access-list standard test_01
switch(conf-macl-std)#
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3. Enter the deny command to create a rule in the MAC ACL to drop traffic with the source MAC
address.
switch(conf-macl-std)#deny 0022.3333.4444 count
4. Enter the permit command to create a rule in the MAC ACL to permit traffic with the source
MAC address.
switch(conf-macl-std)#permit 0022.5555.3333 count
5. Use the seq command to create MAC ACL rules in a specific sequence.
switch(conf-macl-std)#seq 100 deny 0011.2222.3333 count
switch(conf-macl-std)#seq 1000 permit 0022.1111.2222 count
Creating an extended MAC ACL and adding rules
NOTE
You can use the resequence command to change all the sequence numbers assigned to the rules
in a MAC ACL. For detailed information, see “Reordering the sequence numbers in a MAC ACL” on
page 88.
The MAC ACL name length is limited to 64 characters.
To create an extended MAC ACL and add rules, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC
mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Create an extended MAC ACL and enter ACL configuration mode.
Example of setting the name of the extended MAC ACL to “test_02.”
switch(config)#mac access-list extended test_02
3. Create a rule in the MAC ACL to permit traffic with the source MAC address and the destination
MAC address.
Example
switch(conf-macl-ext)#permit 0022.3333.4444 0022.3333.5555
4. Use the seq command to insert the rule anywhere in the MAC ACL.
Example
switch(conf-macl-std)#seq 5 permit 0022.3333.4444 0022.3333.5555
5. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(conf-macl-std)#exit
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Modifying MAC ACL rules
You cannot modify the existing rules of a MAC ACL. However, you can remove the rule and then
recreate it with the desired changes.
If you need to add more rules between existing rules than the current sequence numbering allows,
you can use the resequence command to reassign sequence numbers. For detailed information,
see “Reordering the sequence numbers in a MAC ACL” on page 88.
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Use a sequence number to specify the rule you wish to modify. Without a sequence number, a new
rule is added to the end of the list, and the existing rule is unchanged.
NOTE
Using the permit and deny keywords, you can create many different rules. The examples in this
section provide the basic knowledge needed to modify MAC ACLs.
NOTE
This example assumes that test_02 contains an existing rule number 100 with the “deny any any”
options.
To modify a MAC ACL, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the mac command to specify the ACL called test_02 for modification.
switch(config)#mac access-list extended test_02
3. Enter the no seq command to delete the existing rule 100.
switch (config)#no seq 100
4. Enter the seq command to re create rule number 100 by recreating it with new parameters.
switch(conf-macl-ext)#seq 100 permit any any
Removing a MAC ACL
To remove a MAC ACL, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the mac command to specify and delete the ACL that you want to remove. In this
example, the extended MAC ACL name is “test_02.”
Example of deleting the extended MAC ACL named “test_02.”
switch(config)#no mac access-list extended test_02
Reordering the sequence numbers in a MAC ACL
You can reorder the sequence numbers assigned to rules in a MAC ACL. Reordering the sequence
numbers is useful when you need to insert rules into an ACL and there are not enough available
sequence numbers.
The first rule receives the number specified by the starting-sequence number that you specify.
Each subsequent rule receives a number larger than the preceding rule. The difference in numbers
is determined by the increment number that you specify. The starting-sequence number and the
increment number must be in the range of 1 through 65535.
For example, in the task listed below the resequence command assigns a sequence number of
50 to the rule named test_02, then the second rule has a sequence number of 55 and the
third rule a has a sequence number of 60.
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To reorder the rules in a MAC ACL, perform the following task from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the resequence command to assign sequence numbers to the rules contained in the
MAC ACL.
Example
switch#resequence access-list mac test_02 50 5
Applying a MAC ACL to a CEE interface
Ensure that the ACL that you want to apply exists and is configured to filter traffic in the manner
that you need for this CEE interface. An ACL does not take effect until it is expressly applied to an
interface using the access-group command. Frames can be filtered as they enter an interface
(ingress direction).
To apply a MAC ACL to a CEE interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/1.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enter the switchport command to configure the interface as a Layer 2 switch port.
4. Enter the mac-access-group command to specify the MAC ACL that is to be applied to the Layer
2 CEE interface in the ingress direction.
Example
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#mac access-group test_02 in
Applying a MAC ACL to a VLAN interface
Ensure that the ACL that you want to apply exists and is configured to filter traffic in the manner
that you need for this VLAN interface. An ACL does not take effect until it is expressly applied to an
interface using the access-group command. Frames can be filtered as they enter an interface
(ingress direction).
To apply a MAC ACL to a VLAN interface, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the interface command to apply the VLAN interface to the MAC ACL.
Example
switch(config)#interface vlan 50
3. Enter the mac-access-group command to specify the MAC ACL that is to be applied to the VLAN
interface in the ingress direction.
Example
switch(conf-if-vl-82)# mac access-group test_02 in
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Configuring QoS using the CEE CLI
9
In this chapter
• QoS overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
• Rewriting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
• Queueing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
• Congestion control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
• Multicast rate limiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
• Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
• Converged Enhanced Ethernet map configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
QoS overview
Quality of Service (QoS) provides you with the capability to control how the traffic is moved from
switch to switch. In a network that has different types of traffic with different needs (CoS), the goal
of QoS is to provide each traffic type with a virtual pipe. FCoE uses traffic class mapping,
scheduling, and flow control to provide quality of service.
Traffic running through the switches can be classified as either multicast traffic or unicast traffic.
Multicast traffic has a single source but multiple destinations. Unicast traffic has a single source
with a single destination. With all this traffic going through inbound and outbound ports, QoS can
be set based on egress port and priority level of the CoS.
QoS can also be set on interfaces where the end-station knows how to mark traffic with QoS and it
lies with the same trusted interfaces. An untrusted interface is when the end-station is untrusted
and is at the administrative boundaries.
The QoS features are:
• Rewriting—Rewriting or marking a frame allows for overriding header fields such as the priority
and VLAN ID.
• Queueing—Queueing provides temporary storage for frames while waiting for transmission.
Queues are selected based on ingress ports, egress ports, and configured user priority level.
• Congestion control—When queues begin filling up and all buffering is exhausted, frames are
dropped. This has a detrimental effect on application throughput. Congestion control
techniques are used to reduce the risk of queue overruns without adversely affecting network
throughput. Congestion control features include IEEE 802.3x Ethernet Pause, Tail Drop, and
Ethernet Priority Flow Control (PFC).
• Multicast rate limiting—Many multicast applications cannot be adapted for congestion control
techniques and the replication of frames by switching devices can exacerbate this problem.
Multicast rate limiting controls frame replication to minimize the impact of multicast traffic.
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• Scheduling—When multiple queues are active and contending for output on a common
physical port the scheduling algorithm selects the order the queues are serviced. Scheduling
algorithms include Strict Priority (SP) and Deficit Weighted Round Robin (DWRR) queueing. The
scheduler supports a hybrid policy combining SP and DWRR servicing. Under a hybrid
scheduler configuration, the highest priority queues are serviced by SP while lower priority
queues share the remaining bandwidth using the DWRR service.
• Converged Enhanced Ethernet—CEE describes an enhanced Ethernet that will enable
convergence of various applications in data centers (LAN, SAN, and IPC) onto a single
interconnect technology.
Rewriting
Rewriting a frame header field is typically performed by an edge device. Rewriting occurs on frames
as they enter or exit a network because the neighboring device is untrusted, unable to mark the
frame, or is using a different QoS mapping.
The frame rewriting rules set the Ethernet CoS and VLAN ID fields. Egress Ethernet CoS rewriting is
based on the user-priority mapping derived for each frame as described later in the queueing
section.
Queueing
Queue selection begins by mapping an incoming frame to a configured user priority, then each
user-priority mapping is assigned to one of the switch’s eight unicast traffic class queues or one of
the four multicast traffic class queues.
NOTE
You need to enter the copy running-config startup-config command to save your configuration
changes to NVRAM so that they are not lost if there is a system reload or power outage.
User-priority mapping
There are several ways an incoming frame can be mapped into a user-priority. If the neighboring
devices are untrusted or unable to properly set QoS, then the interface is considered untrusted. All
traffic must be user-priority mapped using explicit policies for the interface to be trusted; if it is not
mapped in this way, the iEEE 802.1Q default-priority mapping is used. If an interface is trusted to
have QoS set then the CoS header field can be interpreted.
NOTE
The user priority mapping described in this section applies to both unicast and multicast traffic.
Default user-priority mappings for untrusted interfaces
When Layer 2 QoS trust is set to untrusted then the default is to map all Layer 2 switched traffic to
the port default user priority value of 0 (best effort), unless configured to a different value.
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Table 15 presents the Layer 2 QoS untrusted user priority generation table.
TABLE 15
Default priority value of untrusted interfaces
Incoming CoS
User Priority
0
port <user priority> (default 0)
1
port <user priority> (default 0)
2
port <user priority> (default 0)
3
port <user priority> (default 0)
4
port <user priority> (default 0)
5
port <user priority> (default 0)
6
port <user priority> (default 0)
7
port <user priority> (default 0)
NOTE
Non-tagged Ethernet frames are interpreted as incoming CoS value of 0 (zero).
You can override the default user-priority mapping by applying explicit user-priority mappings.
When neighboring devices are trusted and able to properly set QoS then Layer 2 QoS trust can be
set to COS and the IEEE 802.1Q default-priority mapping is applied.
Table 16 presents the Layer 2 CoS user priority generation table conforming to 802.1Q default
mapping. You can override this default user priority table per port if you want to change (mutate)
the COS value.
TABLE 16
IEEE 802.1Q default priority mapping
Incoming CoS
User Priority
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
Configuring the QoS trust mode
The QoS trust mode controls user priority mapping of incoming traffic. The Class of Service (CoS)
mode sets the user priority based on the incoming CoS value. If the incoming packet is not priority
tagged, then fallback is to the Interface Default CoS value.
NOTE
When a CEE map is applied on an interface, the qos trust command is not allowed. The CEE map
always puts the interface in the CoS trust mode.
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Queueing
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to configure the QoS trust mode.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Specify the 10-gigabit Ethernet interface.
Example of selecting the 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface port 0/2.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/2
3. Set the interface mode to ‘trust’.
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#qos trust cos
4. Exit the configuration mode and return to EXEC mode.
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#exit
switch(config)#end
5. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Configuring user-priority mappings
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to configure user-priority mappings.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Specify the 10-gigabit Ethernet interface.
Example of selecting the 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface port 0/2.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/2
3. Set the interface mode to ‘3’.
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#qos cos 3
4. Exit the configuration mode and return to EXEC mode.
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#exit
switch(config)#end
5. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
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Creating a CoS-to-CoS mutation QoS map
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to create a CoS-to-CoS mutation.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Create the CoS-to-CoS mutation QoS map name. In this example ‘test’ is used.
switch(config)#qos map cos-mutation test 0 1 2 3 5 4 6 7
3. Exit the configuration mode and return to EXEC mode.
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#exit
switch(config)#end
4. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Applying a CoS-to-CoS mutation QoS map
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to apply a CoS-to-CoS mutation QoS map.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Specify the 10-gigabit Ethernet interface.
Example of selecting the 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface port 0/2.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/2
3. Activate or apply changes made to the CoS-to-CoS mutation QoS map name. In this example
‘test’ is used.
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#qos map cos-mutation test 0 1 2 3 5 4 6 7
4. Specify the trust mode for incoming traffic.
Use this command to specify the interface ingress QoS trust mode, which controls user priority
mapping of incoming traffic. The untrusted mode overrides all incoming priority markings with
the Interface Default CoS. The CoS mode sets the user priority based on the incoming CoS
value, if the incoming packet is not priority tagged, then fallback is to the Interface Default CoS
value.
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#qos trust cos
5. Exit the configuration mode and return to EXEC mode.
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#exit
switch(config)#end
6. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Traffic class mapping
The Brocade 8000 supports eight unicast traffic classes for isolation and to control servicing for
different priorities of application data. Traffic classes are numbered from 0 through 7, with higher
values designating higher priority.
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Queueing
The traffic class mapping stage provides some flexibility in queue selection:
• The mapping may be many-to-one, such as mapping one byte user priority (256 values) to eight
traffic classes.
• There may be a non-linear ordering between the user priorities and traffic classes.
Unicast traffic
Table 17 presents the Layer 2 default traffic class mapping supported for a COS-based user priority
to conform to 802.1Q default mapping.
TABLE 17
Default user priority for unicast traffic class mapping
User priority
Traffic class
0
1
1
0
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
You are allowed to override these default traffic class mappings per port. Once the traffic class
mapping has been resolved it is applied consistently across any queueing incurred on the ingress
and the egress ports.
Multicast traffic
The Brocade 8000 supports four multicast traffic classes for isolation and to control servicing for
different priorities of application data. Traffic classes are numbered from 0 through 3, with higher
values designating higher priority. The traffic class mapping stage provides some flexibility in queue
selection.
Table 18 presents the Layer 2 default traffic class mapping supported for a COS-based user priority
to conform to 802.1Q default mapping.
TABLE 18
96
Default user priority for multicast traffic class mapping
User Priority
Traffic class
0
0
1
0
2
1
3
1
4
2
5
2
6
3
7
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Queueing
Once the traffic class mapping has been resolved for ingress traffic, it is applied consistently
across all queueing incurred on the ingress and egress ports.
Mapping CoS-to-Traffic-Class
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to map a CoS-to-Traffic-Class.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Create the CoS-Traffic-Class mapping by specifying a name and the mapping.
switch(config)#qos map cos-traffic-class test 1 0 2 3 4 5 6 7
Example of creating CoS-to-Traffic-Class QoS map to map CoS 0 (best effort) to Traffic Class 1 and CoS 1 to
below best effort Traffic Class 0, all other CoS go through unchanged. This mapping matches the default
behavior recommended in IEEE 802.1Q for systems supporting 8 Traffic Classes.
switch:admin>cmsh
switch>enable
switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
switch(config)#qos map cos-traffic-class test 1 0 2 3 4 5 6 7
switch(config)#end
switch#
3. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Activating a mapping CoS-to-Traffic-Class
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to activate a CoS-to-traffic class mapping.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Specify the 10-gigabit Ethernet interface.
Example of selecting the 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface port 0/2.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/2
3. Activate the CoS-to-Traffic-Class mapping by name.
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#qos cos-traffic-class test
Example of activating the CoS-to-Traffic-Class QoS map on an interface.
switch:admin>cmsh
switch>enable
switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/2
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#qos cos-traffic-class test
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#exit
switch(config)#end
switch#
4. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
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Congestion control
Verifying a mapping CoS-to-Traffic-Class
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to verify a CoS-to-Traffic-Class mapping.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Verify the CoS-Traffic-Class mapping specifying a name and the mapping.
switch(config)#show qos map cos-traffic-class test
Congestion control
Queues can begin filling up due to a number of reasons, such as over subscription of a link or
backpressure from a downstream device. Sustained, large queue buildups generally indicate
congestion in the network and can affect application performance through increased queueing
delays and frame loss.
Congestion control covers features that define how the system responds when congestion occurs
or active measures taken to prevent the network from entering a congested state.
Tail drop
Tail drop queueing is the most basic form of congestion control. Frames are queued in FIFO order
and queue buildup can continue until all buffer memory is exhausted. This is the default behavior
when no additional QoS has been configured.
The basic tail drop algorithm does not have any knowledge of multiple priorities and per traffic
class drop thresholds can be associated with a queue to address this. When the queue depth
breaches a threshold, then any frame arriving with the associated priority value will be dropped.
Figure 9 describes how you can utilize this feature to ensure that lower priority traffic cannot totally
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consume the full buffer memory. Thresholds can also be used to bound the maximum queueing
delay for each traffic class. Additionally if the sum of the thresholds for a port is set below 100
percent of the buffer memory, then you can also ensure that a single port does not monopolize the
entire shared memory pool.
FIGURE 9
Queue depth
The tail drop algorithm can be extended to support per priority drop thresholds. When the ingress
port CoS queue depth breaches a threshold, then any frame arriving with the associated priority
value will be dropped. Figure 9 describes how you can utilize this feature to ensure lower priority
traffic cannot totally consume the full buffer memory. Thresholds can also be used to bound the
maximum queueing delay for each traffic class. Additionally if the sum of the thresholds for a port
is set below 100 percent of the buffer memory then you can also ensure that a single CoS does not
monopolize the entire shared memory pool allocated to the port.
Changing the Tail Drop threshold
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to change the Tail Drop threshold.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Change the Tail Drop threshold for each multicast traffic class. In this example, 1000pkt is
used.
switch(config)#qos rcv-queue multicast threshold 1000 1000 1000 1000
Example of increasing multicast frame expansion Tail Drop Threshold to 1000pkt for each multicast Traffic
Class.
switch:admin>cmsh
switch>enable
switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
switch(config)#qos rcv-queue multicast threshold 1000 1000 1000 1000
switch(config)#end
3. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
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Congestion control
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Ethernet pause
Ethernet Pause is an IEEE 802.3 standard mechanism for back pressuring a neighboring device.
Pause messages are sent by utilizing the optional MAC control sublayer. A Pause frame contains a
2-byte pause number, which states the length of the pause in units of 512 bit times. When a device
receives a Pause frame, it must stop sending any data on the interface for the specified length of
time, once it completes transmission of any frame in progress. You can use this feature to reduce
Ethernet frame losses by using a standardized mechanism. However the Pause mechanism does
not have the ability to selectively back pressure data sources multiple hops away, or exert any
control per VLAN or per priority, so it is disruptive to all traffic on the link.
Ethernet Pause includes the following features:
• All configuration parameters can be specified independently per interface.
• Pause On/Off can be specified independently for TX and RX directions. No support is provided
for auto-negotiation.
• Pause generation is based on input (receive) queueing. Queue levels are tracked per input
port. You can change the high-water and low-water threshold for each input port. When the
instantaneous queue depth crosses the high-water mark then a Pause is generated. If any
additional frames are received and the queue length is still above the low-water mark then
additional Pauses are generated. Once the queue length drops below the low-water mark then
Pause generation ceases.
• A Pause that is received and processed halts transmission of the output queues associated
with the port for the duration specified in the Pause frame.
Enabling Ethernet Pause
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to enable Ethernet Pause.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Specify the 10-gigabit Ethernet interface.
Example of selecting the 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface port 0/2.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/2
3. Enable Ethernet Pause on the interface for both TX and RX traffic.
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#qos flowcontrol tx on rx on
Example of enabling an interface 802.3x Pause flow control TX and RX.
switch:admin>cmsh
switch>enable
switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/2
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#qos flowcontrol tx on rx on
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#exit
switch(config)#end
4. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
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Multicast rate limiting
Ethernet Priority Flow Control
Ethernet Priority Flow Control (PFC) is a basic extension of the Ethernet Pause. The Pause MAC
control message is extended with eight 2-byte pause numbers and a bitmask to indicate which
values are valid. Each pause number is interpreted identically to the base Pause protocol; however
each is applied to the corresponding Ethernet priority / class level. For example, the Pause number
zero applies to priority zero, Pause number one applies to priority one, and so on. This addresses
one shortcoming of the Ethernet Pause mechanism, which is disruptive to all traffic on the link.
However, it still suffers from the other Ethernet Pause limitations.
Ethernet Priority Flow Control includes the following features:
• Everything operates exactly as in Ethernet Pause described above except there are eight
high-water and low-water thresholds for each input port. This means queue levels are tracked
per input port plus priority.
• Pause On/Off can be specified independently for TX and RX directions per priority.
• Pause time programmed into Ethernet MAC is a single value covering all priorities.
• Both ends of a link must be configured identically for Ethernet Pause or Ethernet Priority Flow
Control because they are incompatible.
Enabling an Ethernet PFC
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to enable Ethernet PFC.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Specify the 10-gigabit Ethernet interface.
Example of selecting the 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface port 0/2.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/2
3. Enable an Ethernet PFC on the interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#qos flowcontrol pfc 3 tx on rx on
Example of enabling an interface 802.3x Pause flow control TX and RX.
switch:admin>cmsh
switch>enable
switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/2
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#qos flowcontrol pfc 3 tx on rx on
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#exit
switch(config)#end
4. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Multicast rate limiting
Multicast rate limiting provides a mechanism to control multicast frame replication and cap the
effect of multicast traffic.
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Scheduling
Multicast rate limit is applied to the output of each multicast receive queue. Rate limits apply
equally to ingress receive queueing (first level expansion) and egress receive queueing (second
level expansion) since the same physical receive queues are utilized. You can set policies to limit
the maximum multicast frame rate differently for each traffic class level and cap the total multicast
egress rate out of the system.
Multicast rate limiting includes the following features:
• All configuration parameters are applied globally. Multicast rate limits are applied to multicast
receive queues as frame replications are placed into the multicast expansion queues. The
same physical queues are used for both ingress receive queues and egress receive queues so
rate limits are applied to both ingress and egress queueing.
• Four explicit multicast rate limit values are supported, one for each traffic class. The rate limit
values represent the maximum multicast expansion rate in packets per second (PPS).
Creating a receive queue multicast rate-limit
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to create the receive queue multicast
rate-limit.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Create a lower maximum multicast frame expansion rate. In this example, the rate is to 10000
PPS.
switch(config)#qos rcv-queue multicast rate-limit 10000
Example of creating a lower maximum multicast frame expansion rate to 10000pkt/s.
switch:admin>cmsh
switch>enable
switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
switch(config)#qos rcv-queue multicast rate-limit 10000
switch(config)#end
3. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Scheduling
Scheduling arbitrates among multiple queues waiting to transmit a frame. The Brocade 8000
supports both Strict Priority (SP) and Deficit Weighted Round Robin (DWRR) scheduling algorithms.
Also supported is the flexible selection of the number of traffic classes using SP-to-DWRR. When
there are multiple queues for the same traffic class, then scheduling takes these equal priority
queues into consideration.
Strict priority scheduling
Strict priority scheduling is used to facilitate support for latency-sensitive traffic. A strict priority
scheduler drains all frames queued in the highest priority queue before continuing on to service
lower priority traffic classes. A danger with this type of service is that a queue can potentially starve
out lower priority traffic classes.
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Figure 10 describes the frame scheduling order for an SP scheduler servicing two SP queues. The
higher numbered queue, SP2, has a higher priority.
FIGURE 10
Strict priority schedule — two queues
Deficit weighted round robin scheduling
Weighted Round Robin (WRR) scheduling is used to facilitate controlled sharing of the network
bandwidth. WRR assigns a weight to each queue; that value is then used to determine the amount
of bandwidth allocated to the queue. The round robin aspect of the scheduling allows each queue
to be serviced in a set ordering, sending a limited amount of data before moving onto the next
queue and cycling back to the highest priority queue after the lowest priority is serviced.
Figure 11 describes the frame scheduling order for a WRR scheduler servicing two WRR queues.
The higher numbered queue is considered higher priority (WRR2) and the weights indicate the
network bandwidth should be allocated in a 2:1 ratio between the two queues. In Figure 11 WRR2
should receive 66 percent of bandwidth and WRR1 receives 33 percent. The WRR scheduler tracks
the extra bandwidth used and subtracts it from the bandwidth allocation for the next cycle through
the queues. In this way, the bandwidth utilization statistically matches the queue weights over
longer time periods.
FIGURE 11
WRR schedule — two queues
Deficit Weighted Round Robin (DWRR) is an improved version of WRR. DWRR remembers the
excess used when a queue goes over its bandwidth allocation and reduces the queue's bandwidth
allocation in the subsequent rounds. This way the actual bandwidth usage is closer to the defined
level when compared to WRR.
Traffic class scheduling policy
The traffic classes are numbered from 0 to 7; higher numbered traffic classes are considered
higher priority. The Brocade 8000 provides full flexibility in controlling the number of SP-to-WRR
queues. The number of SP queues is specified in N (SP1 through 8), then the highest priority traffic
classes are configured for SP service and the remaining eight are WRR serviced. Table 19
describes the set of scheduling configurations supported.
When you configure the QoS queue to use strict priority 4 (SP4), then traffic class 7 will use SP4,
traffic class 6 will use SP3, and so on down the list. You use the strict priority mappings to control
how the different traffic classes will be routed in the queue.
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TABLE 19
Supported scheduling configurations
Traffic Class
SP0
SP1
SP2
SP3
SP4
SP5
SP6
SP8
7
WRR8
SP1
SP2
SP3
SP4
SP5
SP6
SP8
6
WRR7
WRR7
SP1
SP2
SP3
SP4
SP5
SP7
5
WRR6
WRR6
WRR6
SP1
SP2
SP3
SP4
SP6
4
WRR5
WRR5
WRR5
WRR5
SP1
SP2
SP3
SP5
3
WRR4
WRR4
WRR4
WRR4
WRR4
SP1
SP2
SP4
2
WRR3
WRR3
WRR3
WRR3
WRR3
WRR3
SP1
SP3
1
WRR2
WRR2
WRR2
WRR2
WRR2
WRR2
WRR2
SP2
0
WRR1
WRR1
WRR1
WRR1
WRR1
WRR1
WRR1
SP1
Figure 12 shows that extending the frame scheduler to a hybrid SP+WRR system is fairly
straightforward. All SP queues are considered strictly higher priority than WRR so they are serviced
first. Once all SP queues are drained, then the normal WRR scheduling behavior is applied to the
non-empty WRR queues.
FIGURE 12
Strict priority and Weighted Round Robin scheduler
Scheduling the QoS queue
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode specify the schedule to use.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Specify the schedule to use and the traffic class to bandwidth mapping.
switch(config)#qos queue scheduler strict-priority 4 dwrr 10 20 30 40
Example of setting the traffic class frame scheduler for 4 Strict Priority Traffic Class and 4 DWRR Traffic Class
with Traffic Class 0 getting 10 percent bandwidth, Traffic Class 1 getting 20 percent bandwidth, Traffic Class
2 getting 30 percent bandwidth, and Traffic Class 3 getting 40 percent bandwidth.
switch:admin>cmsh
switch>enable
switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
switch(config)#qos queue scheduler strict-priority 4 dwrr 10 20 30 40
switch(config)#end
3. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
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Multicast queue scheduling
The multicast traffic classes are numbered from 0 to 3; higher numbered traffic classes are
considered higher priority. A fixed mapping from multicast traffic class to equivalent unicast traffic
class is applied to select the queue scheduling behavior. Table 20 presents the multicast traffic
class equivalence mapping applied.
TABLE 20
Multicast traffic class equivalence mapping
Multicast traffic class
Equivalent unicast traffic class
3
6
2
4
1
2
0
0
Once the multicast traffic class equivalence mapping has been applied, then scheduling and any
scheduler configuration are inherited from the equivalent unicast traffic class. See Table 19 on
page 104 for details on exact mapping equivalencies.
Unicast ingress and egress queueing utilizes a hybrid scheduler that simultaneously supports
SP+WRR service and multiple physical queues with the same service level. Multicast adds
additional multicast expansion queues. Since multicast traffic classes are equivalent to unicast
service levels, they're treated exactly as their equivalent unicast service policies.
Scheduling the QoS multicast queue
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to schedule the QoS multicast queue.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Specify the schedule to use and the traffic class to bandwidth mapping.
switch(config)#qos queue multicast scheduler dwrr 10 20 30 40
Example of setting the multicast Traffic Class frame expansion scheduler for Traffic Class 0 getting 10
percent bandwidth, Traffic Class 1 getting 20 percent bandwidth, Traffic Class 2 getting 30 percent
bandwidth, and Traffic Class 3 getting 40 percent bandwidth.
switch:admin>cmsh
switch>enable
switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
switch(config)#qos queue multicast scheduler dwrr 10 20 30 40
switch(config)#end
3. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
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Converged Enhanced Ethernet map configuration
Converged Enhanced Ethernet map configuration
The CEE QoS covers frame classification, priority and traffic class (queue) mapping, congestion
control, and scheduling. Under the CEE Provisioning model all of these features are configured
utilizing two configuration tables, Priority Group Table and Priority Table.
CEE Priority Group Table defines each Priority Group ID (PGID) and its scheduling policy (Strict
Priority versus DWRR, DWRR weight, relative priority), and partially defines the congestion control
(PFC) configuration. There are 16 rows in the CEE Priority Group Table. Table 21 presents the
default CEE Priority Group Table configuration.
NOTE
Only a single CoS can be mapped to a PFC-enabled priority queue. The CoS number must be
identical to the priority queue number. If your configuration violates this restriction an error message
displays and the Priority Group Table is set back to the default values.
When the CEE map is applied, and the interface is connected to the CNA, only one strict priority PGID
(PGID 15.0 to PGID 15.7) is allowed.
TABLE 21
Default CEE Priority Group Table configuration
PGID
Bandwidth%
PFC
15.0
—
N
15.1
—
N
15.2
—
N
15.3
—
N
15.4
—
N
15.5
—
N
15.6
—
N
15.7
—
N
0
0
N
1
0
N
2
0
N
3
0
N
4
0
N
5
0
N
6
0
N
7
0
N
Strict Priority versus DWRR is derived directly from the PGID value. All PGIDs with prefix 15 receive
Strict Priority scheduling policy and all PGIDs in the range 0 through 7 receive DWRR scheduling
policy. Relative priority between Priority Group is exactly the ordering of entries listed in the table,
with PGID 15.0 being highest priority and PGID 7 being lowest priority. Congestion control
configuration is partially specified by toggling the PFC column On or Off. This provides only partial
configuration of congestion control because the set of priorities mapped to the Priority Group is not
known, which leads into the CEE Priority Table.
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CEE Priority Table defines each CoS mapping to Priority Group, and completes PFC configuration.
There are eight rows in the CEE Priority Table. Table 22 details the default CEE Priority Table
configuration.
TABLE 22
Default CEE priority table
CoS
PGID
0
15.6
1
15.7
2
15.5
3
15.4
4
15.3
5
15.2
6
15.1
7
15.0
Creating a CEE map
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to create a CEE map.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Create a CEE map. In this example, the name ‘test’ is used.
switch(config)#cee-map test
Example of creating a CEE map enter CEE-Map CLI configuration submode.
switch:admin>cmsh
switch>enable
switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
switch(config)#cee-map test
switch(config)#end
End with CNTL/Z.
3. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Defining a priority group table
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to define a priority group table map.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Specify the name of the CEE map to define. In this example ‘test’ is used.
switch(config)#cee-map test
3. Define the CEE map for PGID 0.
switch(config-ceemap)#priority-group-table 0 weight 50 pfc
4. Define the CEE map for PGID 1.
switch(config-ceemap)#priority-group-table 1 weight 50
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Example of defining a CEE map with a Priority Group Table.
PGID
PG%
PFC
Description
15.0
-
N
IPC
0
50
Y
SAN
1
50
N
LAN
switch:admin>cmsh
switch>enable
switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
switch(config)#cee-map test
switch(config-ceemap)#priority-group-table 0 weight 50 pfc
switch(config-ceemap)#priority-group-table 1 weight 50
switch(config-ceemap)#exit
switch(config)#end
5. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Defining a priority-table map
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode define a priority-table map.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Specify the name of the CEE map to define. In this example ‘test’ is used.
switch(config)#cee-map test
3. Define the map.
switch(config-ceemap)#priority-table 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 15.0
Example of defining a CEE map with a Priority-to-Priority Group Table
Priority
PGID
0
1
1
1
2
1
3
0
4
1
5
1
6
1
7
15
switch:admin>cmsh
switch>enable
switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
switch(config)#cee-map test
switch(config-ceemap)#priority-table 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1
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switch(config-ceemap)#exit
switch(config)#end
4. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
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Converged Enhanced Ethernet map configuration
Applying a CEE provisioning map to an interface
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode apply a CEE provisioning map.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Specify the 10-gigabit Ethernet interface. In this example, 0/2 is used.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/2
3. Apply the CEE map on the interface. In this example, the CEE map name ‘test’ is used.
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#cee test
Example of applying the CEE provisioning map on an interface.
switch:root>cmsh
switch>enable
switch#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/2
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#cee test
switch(conf-if-te-0/2)#exit
switch(config)#end
4. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Verifying the CEE maps
Perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode to verify the CEE map.
1. Enter global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Verify the CEE map provisioning for a specified name.
switch(config)#show cee maps name
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10
Configuring 802.1x Port Authentication
In this chapter
• 802.1x protocol overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 802.1x configuration guidelines and restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• 802.1x authentication configuration tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Interface-specific administrative tasks for 802.1x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
111
111
112
112
802.1x protocol overview
The 802.1x protocol defines a port-based authentication algorithm involving network data
communication between client-based supplicant software, an authentication database on a server,
and the authenticator device. In this situation the authenticator device is the Brocade FCoE
hardware.
As the authenticator, the Brocade FCoE hardware prevents unauthorized network access. Upon
detection of the new supplicant, the Brocade FCoE hardware enables the port and marks it
“unauthorized”. In this state, only 802.1x traffic is allowed. All other traffic, such as DHCP and
HTTP, is blocked. The Brocade FCoE hardware transmits an EAP-request to the supplicant, which
responds with the EAP-response packet. The Brocade FCoE hardware, which then forwards the
EAP-response packet to the RADIUS authentication server. If the credentials are validated by the
RADIUS server database, the supplicant may access the protected network resources.
NOTE
802.1x port authentication is not supported by LAG (Link Aggregation Group) or interfaces that
participate in a LAG.
NOTE
The EAP-MD5, EAP-TLS, EAP-TTLS and PEAP-v0 protocols are supported by the RADIUS server and
are transparent to the authenticator switch.
When the supplicant logs off, it sends an EAP-logoff message to the Brocade FCoE hardware which
then sets the port back to the “unauthorized” state.
802.1x configuration guidelines and restrictions
Follow these 802.1x configuration guidelines and restrictions when configuring 802.1x:
• If you globally disable 802.1x, then all interface ports with 802.1x authentication enabled
automatically switch to force-authorized port-control mode.
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802.1x authentication configuration tasks
802.1x authentication configuration tasks
The tasks in this section describe the common 802.1x operations that you will need to perform. For
a complete description of all the available 802.1x CLI commands for the Brocade FCoE hardware,
see the Converged Enhanced Ethernet Command Reference.
Configure authentication
between the switch and CNA or NIC
For complete information on the aaaConfig command, see the Fabric OS Command Reference and
the Fabric OS Administrator’s Guide.
NOTE
The aaaConfig command attempts to connect to the first RADIUS server. If the RADIUS server is not
reachable, the next RADIUS server is contacted. However, if the RADIUS server is contacted and the
authentication fails, the authentication process does not check for the next server in the sequence.
Perform the following steps to configure authentication.
1. Connect to the switch and log in using an account assigned to the admin role.
2. Add the RADIUS to the switch as the authentication server. This FOS CLI command moves the
new RADIUS server to the top of the access list.
switch:admin> aaaconfig --add 10.2.2.147 -conf radius 1
3. Enter global configuration mode.
switch:admin>cmsh
switch#configure t
4. Enable 802.1x authentication globally
switch(config)#dot1x enable
5. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Interface-specific administrative tasks for 802.1x
It is essential to configure the 802.1x port authentication protocol globally on the Brocade FCoE
hardware, and then enable 802.1x and make customized changes for each interface port. Since
802.1x was enabled and configured in “802.1x authentication configuration tasks”, use the
administrative tasks in this section to make any necessary customizations to specific interface port
settings.
Configuring 802.1x on specific interface ports
To configure 802.1x port authentication on a specific interface port, perform the following steps
from Privileged EXEC mode. Repeat this task for each interface port you wish to modify.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
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2. Use the interface command to select the interface port to modify.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 1/12
3. Use the dot1x authentication command to enable 802.1x authentication.
switch(conf-if-te-1/12)#dot1x authentication
4. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(conf-if-te-1/12)#exit
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Configuring 802.1x timeouts
on specific interface ports
NOTE
While you are free to modify the timeouts, Brocade recommends that you leave timeouts set to their
default values.
To configure 802.1x timeout attributes on a specific interface port, perform the following steps
from Privileged EXEC mode. Repeat this task for each interface port you wish to modify.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Use the interface command to select the interface port to modify.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 1/12
3. Configure the timeout interval.
Example of setting the timeout interval for an Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP)-request frame.
switch(conf-if-te-1/12)#dot1x timeout supp-timeout 40
Configuring 802.1x re-authentication
on specific interface ports
To configure 802.1x port re-authentication on a specific interface port, perform the following steps
from Privileged EXEC mode. Repeat this task for each interface port you wish to modify.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Use the interface command to select the interface port to modify.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 1/12
3. Enable 802.1x authentication for the interface port.
switch(conf-if-te-1/12)#dot1x enable
4. Configure reauthentication for the interface port.
switch(conf-if-te-1/12)#dot1x reauthentication
switch(conf-if-te-1/12)#dot1x timeout re-authperiod 4000
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Interface-specific administrative tasks for 802.1x
Disabling 802.1x on specific interface ports
To disable 802.1x authentication on a specific interface port, perform the following steps from
Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Use the interface command to select the interface port to modify.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 1/12
3. Use the no dot1x port-control command to disable 802.1x Authentication.
switch(conf-if-te-1/12)#no dot1x authentication
4. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(conf-if-te-1/12)#exit
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
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11
Configuring IGMP
In this chapter
• About IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Configuring IGMP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Configuring IGMP snooping querier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Monitoring IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
115
116
117
117
About IGMP
Multicast Control packet and Data Forwarding through a Layer-2 switch configured with VLANs is
most easily achieved by Layer-2 forwarding of received Multicast Packets on all the member ports
of the VLAN interfaces. However, this simple approach is not bandwidth efficient, since only a
subset of member ports may be connected to devices interested in receiving those Multicast
packets. In the worst case scenario the data would get forwarded to all port members of a VLAN
with a large number of member ports (for example, all 24 ports), even if only a single VLAN member
is interested in receiving the data. Such scenarios can lead to loss of throughput for a switch that
gets hit by a high rate of Multicast Data Traffic.
Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) snooping is a mechanism by which a Layer-2 switch
can effectively address this issue of inefficient Multicast Forwarding to VLAN port members.
Snooping involves “learning” forwarding states for Multicast Data traffic on VLAN port members
from the IGMP control (Join/Leave) packets received on them. The Layer-2 switch also provides for
a way to configure forwarding states statically through the CLI.
NOTE
Brocade Fabric OS 6.4.0 supports IGMPv1 and IGMPv2.
Active IGMP snooping
IGMP snooping is normally passive by nature, as it simply monitors IGMP traffic without filtering.
However, active IGMP snooping actively filters IGMP packets to reduce load on the multicast router.
Upstream traffic is filtered so that only the minimal quantity of information is sent. The switch
ensures the router only has a single entry for the VLAN, regardless of the number of active listeners
downstream.
In active IGMP snooping, the router only knows about the most recent member of the VLAN. If there
are two active listeners in a VLAN and the original member drops from the VLAN, the switch
determines that the router does not need this information as the status of the VLAN remains
unchanged. However the next time there is a routine query from the router, the switch will forward
the reply from the remaining host to prevent the router from assuming there are no active listeners.
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Configuring IGMP
Multicast routing
Multicast routers use IGMP to learn which groups have members on each of their attached physical
networks. A multicast router keeps a list of multicast group memberships for each attached
network, and a timer for each membership.
NOTE
“Multicast group memberships” means that at least one member of a multicast group on a given
attached network is available.
There are two ways that hosts join multicast routing groups:
• Send an unsolicited IGMP join request
• Send an IGMP join request as a response to a general query from a multicast router
In response to the request, the switch creates an entry in its Layer 2 forwarding table for that VLAN.
When other hosts send join requests for the same multicast, the switch adds them to the existing
table entry. Only one entry is created per VLAN in the Layer 2 forwarding table for each multicast
group.
IGMP snooping suppresses all but one of the host join messages per multicast group and forwards
this one join message to the multicast router. The switch forwards multicast traffic for the specified
multicast group to the interfaces where the join messages were received.
Configuring IGMP
By default, IGMP snooping is globally disabled on all VLAN interfaces. Refer to the CEE Command
Reference for complete information about the commands in this section.
Use the following procedure to configure IGMP on a CEE/FCoE switch.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the ip igmp snooping enable command to enable IGMP for all interfaces.
This command ensures that IGMP snooping is active on all interfaces.
Example
switch(config)#ip igmp snooping enable
3. Configure a VLAN port member to be a multi-router interface.
Example
switch(config)#ip igmp snooping mrouter interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
4. Repeat step 3 for each port in the VLAN, as needed.
5. Activate the default IGMP querier functionality for the VLAN.
Example
switch(conf-if-vl-25)#ip igmp snooping querier enable vlan 25
6. Optional: Activate the IGMP querier functionality with additional features.
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Configuring IGMP snooping querier
Configuring IGMP snooping querier
If your multicast traffic is not routed because Protocol-Independent Multicast (PIM) and IGMP are
not configured, use the IGMP snooping querier in a VLAN.
IGMP snooping querier sends out IGMP queries to trigger IGMP responses from switches that wish
to receive IP multicast traffic. IGMP snooping listens for these responses to map the appropriate
forwarding addresses.
Refer to the CEE Command Reference for complete information about the commands in this
section.
Use the following procedure to configure the IGMP snooping querier.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Activate the default IGMP querier functionality for the VLAN.
Example
switch(conf-if-vl-25)#ip igmp snooping querier enable vlan 25
3. Activate IGMP querier functionality for the VLAN.
The valid range is 1 to 18000 seconds. The default is 125 seconds.
Example
switch(config)#ip igmp query-interval 125
4. Set the last member query interval.
The valid range is 1000 to 25500 milliseconds. The default is 1000 milliseconds.
Example
switch(config)#ip igmp last-member-query-interval 1000
5. Set the Max Response Time (MRT).
The valid range is 1 to 25 seconds. The default is 10 seconds.
Example
switch(config)#ip igmp query-max-response-time 10
Monitoring IGMP
Monitoring the performance of your IGMP traffic allows you to diagnose any potential issues on
your switch. This helps you utilize bandwidth more efficiently by setting the switch to forward IP
multicast traffic only to connected hosts that request multicast traffic.
Refer to the CEE Command Reference for complete information about the commands in this
section.
Use the following procedure to monitor IGMP snooping on a CEE/FCoE switch.
1. Enter the enable command to access Privileged EXEC mode.
2. Enter the show ip igmp groups command to display all information on IGMP multicast groups
for the switch.
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Monitoring IGMP
Use this command to display the IGMP database, including configured entries for either all
groups on all interfaces, or all groups on specific interfaces, or specific groups on specific
interfaces.
Example
switch#show ip igmp groups
3. Use the show ip igmp statistics command to display the IGMP statistics for a VLAN or interface.
Example
switch#show ip igmp snooping statistics interface vlan 1
4. Use the show ip igmp mrouter to display multicast router (mrouter) port related information for
all VLANs, or a specific VLAN.
Example
switch#show ip igmp snooping mrouter
- or switch#show ip igmp snooping mrouter interface vlan 1
5. When you have reviewed the IGMP statistics for the switch, refer to “Configuring IGMP” on
page 116 or “Configuring IGMP snooping querier” on page 117 to make any needed
corrections.
NOTE
Refer to the CEE Command Reference for additional information on IGMP CLI commands.
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Configuring RMON using the CEE CLI
12
In this chapter
• RMON overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
• RMON configuration and management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
RMON overview
Remote monitoring (RMON) is an Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard monitoring
specification that allows various network agents and console systems to exchange network
monitoring data. The RMON specification defines a set of statistics and functions that can be
exchanged between RMON-compliant console managers and network probes. As such, RMON
provides you with comprehensive network-fault diagnosis, planning, and performance-tuning
information.
RMON configuration and management
Alarms and events are configurable RMON parameters:
• Alarms—Monitors a specific management information base (MIB) object for a specified
interval, triggers an alarm at a specified value (rising threshold), and resets the alarm at
another value (falling threshold). Alarms can be used with events; the alarm triggers an event,
which can generate a log entry or an SNMP trap.
• Events—Determines the action to take when an event is triggered by an alarm. The action can
be to generate a log entry, an SNMP trap, or both.
Default RMON configuration
By default, no RMON alarms and events are configured and RMON collection statistics are not
enabled.
Configuring RMON settings
To configure RMON alarms and events, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
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RMON configuration and management
2. Configure the RMON alarms.
Example of an alarm that tests every sample for a rising threshold
switch(config)#rmon alarm 5 1.3.6.1.2.1.16.1.1.1.5.65535 interval 30 absolute
rising-threshold 95 event 27 owner john_smith
Example of an alarm that tests the delta between samples for a falling threshold
switch(config)#rmon alarm 5 1.3.6.1.2.1.16.1.1.1.5.65535 interval 10 delta
falling-threshold 65 event 42 owner john_smith
3. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Configuring RMON events
You can add or remove an event in the RMON event table that is associated with an RMON alarm
number.
To configure RMON events, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Configure the RMON event.
switch(config)#rmon event 27 description Rising_Threshold log owner john_smith
trap syslog
3. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Configuring RMON Ethernet group statistics collection
You can collect RMON Ethernet group statistics on an interface. RMON alarms and events must be
configured for you to display collection statistics. By default, RMON Ethernet group statistics are
not enabled.
To collect RMON Ethernet group statistics on an interface, perform the following steps from
Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
switch#configure terminal
2. Enter the interface command to specify the CEE interface type and slot/port number.
Example of selecting the Ten Gigabit Ethernet port number 0/1.
switch(config)#interface tengigabitethernet 0/1
3. Enable the CEE interface.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#no shutdown
4. Configure RMON Ethernet group statistics on the interface.
Example
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#rmon collection stats 200 owner john_smith
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5. Enter the copy command to save the running-config file to the startup-config file.
switch(conf-if-te-0/1)#exit
switch(config)#end
switch#copy running-config startup-config
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Chapter
FCoE configuration using the Fabric OS CLI
13
In this chapter
• FCoE configuration guidelines and restrictions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
• Managing and displaying the FCoE configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
FCoE configuration guidelines and restrictions
Follow these FCoE configuration guidelines and restrictions when configuring FCoE:
• Speed negotiation—The Brocade 8000 switch supports auto-negotiated FC link speeds of 2, 4,
and 8 Gbps. The Ethernet ports of the Brocade 8000 switch do not support auto-negotiation of
Ethernet link speeds. The Ethernet ports only support 10-Gigabit Ethernet.
• Features that are not supported on the Brocade 8000 switch or the FCOE10-24 blade:
- Virtual fabrics
- Admin Domains
- Port-based zoning
- QoS zoning
- Adaptive networking
- FC-SP for the FCoE ports
- Interop mode
- Access Gateway mode
- FC routing
- Integrated routing
- Hot Code Load (HCL) firmware download
- Extended fabrics
- FICON
• The CEE configuration database is maintained in a file separate from the Fabric OS
configuration database. Fabric OS configuration management procedures remain unchanged.
• FCoE to FCoE traffic across two FCOE10-24 blades can only reach 68% line rate using a port
based routing policy. Using an exchange based routing policy can avoid the performance drop.
• Only WWN zoning of FCoE VF ports is supported. Port-based zoning of the FCoE VF port is not
supported. Additionally, inclusion of FCoE VF ports in a zone which has port-based zone
members (such as zone members specified by their respective domain and index) is not
supported.
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Managing and displaying the FCoE configuration
Managing and displaying the FCoE configuration
FCoE technology bridges the boundary between the SAN and LAN sections of your network. FCoE
configuration tasks require mostly configuration of the interface ports on the Brocade 8000 switch.
NOTE
To assist you in configuring FCoE, see “FCoE Initialization Protocol” on page 8.
Enabling or disabling an FCoE port
Perform the following tasks to enable or disable an FCoE port.
Task
Command
Enable an FCOE port.
switch:admin> fcoe --enable port
Disable an FCOE port.
switch:admin> fcoe --disable port
Configuring FCMAP values for a VLAN
NOTE
For information on FCMAPs, see “FCoE Initialization Protocol” on page 8.
If the FCMAP default value is acceptable, then it can be applied to the specified VLAN. The
fcmapunset command is only necessary if the FCMAP value was previously set to a non-default
value. For example, if you reset the default value to a value other than the default value, and then
want to change the value again, you must enter the fcmapunset command to return the value to
the default value. The fcmapunset command always returns the FCMAP to the default value.
Perform the following tasks to configure FCMAP values for a VLAN.
Task
Command
Configure the FCMAP values for Fabric Provided
MAC Addresses (FPMA) for the specified VLANs.
Syntax is as follows:
• vid—Specifies the VLAN ID for which the
FCMAP must be set.
• fcmapid—Specifies the FCMAP to be set.
switch:admin> fcoe --fcmapset -vlan vid fcmapid
Remove the FCMAP from the specified VLAN.
switch:admin> fcoe --fcmapunset -vlan vid
Configuring FIP multicast advertisement intervals
NOTE
For information on the FCoE Initialization Protocol (FIP), see “FCoE Initialization Protocol” on page 8.
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Perform the following task to configure FIP multicast advertisement intervals.
Task
Command
Configure FIP multicast advertisement intervals.
Syntax is as follows:
• intvl—Specifies the interval in seconds. The
minimum interval value is 0 seconds and
the maximum value is 300 seconds. A value
of 0 cancels the previous advertisement
interval value.
switch:admin> fcoe --fipcfg -advintvl intvl
Clearing logins
Perform the following task to clear logins.
Task
Command
Clear the logins that occurred through a front-end
port or from a device specified by the Enode's
VN_port WWN. Syntax is as follows:
• -teport slot/port—Specifies the slot or port
number.
• -device wwn—Specifies the device WWN.
switch:admin> fcoe --resetlogin -teport slot/port |
-device wwn
Displaying FCoE configuration-related information
Perform the following tasks to display FCoE-related configuration information.
Task
Command
Display the embedded FCoE port configuration.
Configurations of all the ports are displayed if you
do not specify a specific port.
switch:admin> fcoe --cfgshow [port]
Display information about devices logged into a
specific FCoE F_port.
switch:admin> fcoe --loginshow [port]
Display FIP configurations.
switch:admin> fcoe --fipcfgshow
Managing and displaying the FCoE login configuration
Another important task in administrating FCoE is configuring the FCoE login information.
Enabling or disabling FCoE login
configuration management
The fcoelogincfg command allows only configured Enode VN_ports to log in. Use the fcoelogingroup
command to configure allowed Enode VN_ports. The default is disabled.
Disabling the fcoelogincfg command allows unrestricted login on Enode VN_ports.
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Managing and displaying the FCoE login configuration
Perform one of the following tasks to toggle the availability of FCoE login configuration
management.
Task
Command
Enable the FCoE login configuration management
on the switch (this is a switch-based command,
not port-based).
switch:admin> fcoelogincfg --enable
Disable the FCoE login configuration
management on the switch.
switch:admin> fcoelogincfg --disable
Displaying or aborting the current
configuration transaction
NOTE
The configuration changes created using the fcoelogingroup command are kept in a transaction
buffer until you save the buffer using the fabric-wide fcoelogincfg--save command. The login
configuration is saved as a transaction and to apply it you need to specifically save it.
Perform one of the following tasks to either display or abort the current configuration transaction.
Task
Command
Display the current configuration transaction.
switch:admin> fcoelogincfg --transshow
Abort the current configuration transaction.
switch:admin> fcoelogincfg --transabort
Cleaning up login groups and VN_port mappings
Perform the following tasks to cleanup login groups and VN_port mappings.
126
Task
Command
Perform a cleanup of all conflicting login groups
and VN_port mappings from the effective
configuration. This purges not only the conflicting
login groups but also the non-existing switches.
switch:admin> fcoelogincfg --purge
Perform a cleanup of all conflicting login groups
and conflicting VN_port mappings from the
effective configuration.
switch:admin> fcoelogincfg --purge -conflicting
Perform a cleanup of all login groups for
non-existing switches from the effective
configuration.
switch:admin> fcoelogincfg --purge -nonexisting
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Displaying the FCoE login configuration
Perform the following tasks to display the FCoE login configuration.
Task
Command
Display the FCoE login configuration. Syntax is as
follows:
• -switch swwn—Displays all of the login
groups for the specified switch.
• -logingroup lgname—Displays the login group
configuration for the specified login group.
• -saved—Displays only the effective
configuration.
switch:admin> fcoelogincfg --show [-switch swwn |
-logingroup lgname] [-saved]
Display the status of the last configuration merge
during the last fabric merge. This operand also
displays conflicting login groups and login groups
for non-existing switches.
switch:admin> fcoelogincfg --show [-mergestatus]
Saving the current FCoE configuration
Perform the following task to save the current FCoE configuration.
Task
Command
Save the current FCoE login configuration as the
effective configuration fabric-wide.
switch:admin> fcoelogincfg --save
Creating and managing the FCoE login group configuration
Another important task in administrating FCoE is configuring the FCoE login information.
Creating an FCoE login group
The FCoE login group enables you to configure login policies.
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Creating and managing the FCoE login group configuration
Perform the following task to create an FCoE login group.
Task
Command
Syntax is as follows:
• --create—Create a login group.
• lgname—Specify the name of the login group
for this switch. The maximum length is a
64-byte string.
• -switch swwn—Specify the WWN of the
switch for which the login group is being
created.
• -self—Specify the WWN of the current switch.
• -allowall—Allow all VN_port devices to log in
to the switch.
• member—Identify the WWN of the VN_port.
The WWN must be specified in hex as
xx.xx.xx.xx.xx.xx.xx.xx. Only specified
members are allowed to log into the switch.
switch:admin> fcoelogingroup --create lgname -switch
swwn | -self [-allowall | “member; member;…”]
Modifying the FCoE login group device list
Perform the following tasks to add or remove VN_port devices from the FCoE login group.
Task
Command
Add VN_port devices to the FCoE login group.
Syntax is as follows:
• lgname—Specify the name of the login group
to which VN_port devices are to be added.
switch:admin> fcoelogingroup --add lgname member;
member;…
•
member—Identify the WWN of the VN_port.
The WWN must be specified in hex as
xx.xx.xx.xx.xx.xx.xx.xx. Only specified
members are allowed to log into the switch.
Remove VN_port devices from the FCoE login
group. Syntax is as follows:
• lgname—Specify the name of the login group
from which VN_port devices are to be
removed.
• member—Identify the WWN of the VN_port.
The WWN must be specified in hex as
xx.xx.xx.xx.xx.xx.xx.x. Only specified members
are allowed to log into the switch.
switch:admin> fcoelogingroup --remove lgname
member; member;…
Deleting an FCoE login group
Perform the following task to delete an FCoE login group.
128
Task
Command
Delete an FCoE login group. Syntax is as follows:
• lgname—Specify the name of the login
group.
switch:admin> fcoelogingroup --delete lgname
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13
Renaming an FCoE login group
Perform the following task to rename an FCoE login group.
Task
Command
Rename an FCoE login group. Syntax is as
follows:
• lgname—Specify the name of the login group
from which VN_port devices are to be
removed.
• member—Identify the WWN of the VN_port.
The WWN must be specified in hex as
xx.xx.xx.xx.xx.xx.xx.x. Only specified members
are allowed to log into the switch.
switch:admin> fcoelogingroup --rename lgname
newlgname
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Chapter
14
CEE configuration management
In this chapter
• CEE configuration management guidelines and restrictions . . . . . . . . . . .
• CEE configuration management tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Flash file management commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
• Debugging and logging commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
131
131
134
135
CEE configuration management guidelines and restrictions
Follow these guidelines and restrictions when performing any CEE configuration management
tasks.
• The CEE configuration database is maintained in a file separate from the Fabric OS
configuration database. Note that Fabric OS configuration management remains unchanged.
• The CEE configuration is not affected by configUpload and configDownload commands entered
in the Fabric OS shell.
• The CEE configuration must be manually saved using the CEE CLI write or copy commands.
CEE configuration management tasks
This section describes the typical configuration management tasks you may encounter when
administering the Brocade 8000 switch.
The current configuration on the switch is referred to as the running configuration (running-config).
The running-config file can be written to non-volatile memory to save configuration changes.
Additionally, the running-config file can be saved as the startup configuration (startup-config) file.
When the switch is booted, the system reads the contents of the startup-config file and applies it to
the running-config.
Typical CEE configuration management tasks are as follows:
•
•
•
•
Saving the startup-config and running-config files to Flash.
Uploading the startup-config and running-config files to a remote location.
Uploading any configuration file saved and stored in Flash to a remote location.
Downloading a configuration file from a remote location to the switch to serve as the
startup-config file or the running-config file.
• Downloading a configuration file from a remote location to the switch Flash.
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CEE configuration management tasks
Display the running configuration file
To display the running configuration, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the show command to display the configuration.
switch#show running-config
Saving the running configuration file
This tasks causes the running configuration to become the default configuration.
To save the running configuration, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the copy command to copy the currently running configuration to the startup
configuration.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Overwrite the startup config file (y/n): y
Loading the startup configuration file
If you wish to reverse the changes to the running configuration, this task reloads the default startup
configuration, overwriting the running configuration.
To load the default configuration, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the copy command to load the startup configuration.
switch#copy startup-config running-config
Erasing the startup configuration file.
NOTE
This task does not affect the running configuration file.
To erase the startup configuration, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the write command to erase the startup configuration file.
switch#write erase
Archiving the running configuration file
This tasks allows you to archive the running configuration to an archive folder on an FTP site, so
that it can be stored without changing the startup configuration.
To archive the running configuration file, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
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CEE configuration management tasks
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the copy command to archive the running configuration file.
switch#copy running-config ftp://jsmith:password@/archive/config_file]
Restore an archived running configuration file
To restore the running configuration, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the copy command to restore the running configuration file.
switch#copy running-config ftp://jsmith:password@/archive/config_file]
Archiving the startup configuration file
This tasks allows you to archive the startup configuration to an archive folder on an FTP site.
To archive the startup configuration, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the copy command to archive the startup configuration file.
switch#copy startup-config ftp://jsmith:password@/archive/config_file]
Restore an archived startup configuration file
To restore the startup configuration, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the copy command to restore the startup configuration file.
switch#copy startup-config ftp://jsmith:password@/archive/config_file]
Archive a startup configuration from Flash
This task also works for running configuration files.
To archive the startup configuration, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the copy command to restore the archived configuration file.
switch#copy startup-config flash://config_filename
Restore a startup configuration file from Flash
This task also works for running configuration files.
To restore the startup configuration, perform the following steps from Privileged EXEC mode.
1. Enter the configure terminal command to access global configuration mode.
2. Enter the copy command to restore the archived configuration file.
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Flash file management commands
switch#copy flash://config_filename startup-config
CEE configuration management commands
Table 23 lists the common CEE configuration management commands.
TABLE 23
CEE configuration management commands
Task
Command
Write the current running configuration file to
the startup configuration file.
switch#copy running-config startup-config
Overwrite the startup config file (y/n): y
NOTE: If you enter y at the prompt, the
running configuration file overwrites
the startup configuration file. If you
enter n at the prompt, the startup
configuration file is not overwritten.
Copy the startup configuration file to the
running configuration file.
switch#copy startup-config running-config
Erase the startup configuration file.
switch#write erase
NOTE: This command does not affect the
running configuration file.
Copy the running configuration file to the
archive folder on an FTP server.
switch#copy running-config
ftp://jsmith:password@/archive/config_file]
Copy a stored startup configuration file in
Flash to the running configuration.
switch#copy flash://test_filename
running-config
Copy a configuration file from an FTP server to
the startup configuration.
switch#copy
ftp://jsmith:password@/archive/test_filename
startup-config}
Display the contents of the running
configuration file.
switch#show running-config
Flash file management commands
Table 24 describes the common tasks used to manage the Flash files on the Brocade 8000 switch.
The Converged Enhanced Ethernet Command Reference contains complete information on all
available CLI commands.
NOTE
Use of the flash:// prefix is optional.
TABLE 24
134
CEE Flash memory file management commands
Task
Command
List the files in the Flash memory directory.
switch#dir
Delete a file from the Flash memory directory.
switch#delete flash://example_filename
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Debugging and logging commands
TABLE 24
14
CEE Flash memory file management commands (Continued)
Task
Command
Erase all the files in the Flash memory directory.
switch#erase flash
% Warning: Erasing flash filesystem will
remove all files in flash://.
Continue to erase?(y/n):y
NOTE: This command erases all the files in the
Flash directory except the default startup
configuration file which is programmed as
a manufacturing default.
Rename a file in the Flash.
switch#rename filename new_filename
Display the contents of a file in the Flash memory
directory.
switch#show file flash://example_filename
Debugging and logging commands
Table 25 describes the tasks related to debugging and logging commands on the Brocade 8000
switch. The Converged Enhanced Ethernet Command Reference contains complete information on
all available CLI commands.
Perform the following tasks from Privileged EXEC mode.
TABLE 25
Debugging and logging commands
Task
Command
Display debugging information for CEE
components.
switch#show debug
Display logging information for CEE components.
switch#show logging
Display the collection of information needed for
technical support.
switch#show tech-support
NOTE: The supportsave command in Fabric OS includes the debugging data provided by the above commands.
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Debugging and logging commands
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Index
Symbols
Numerics
authentication server, 111
authenticator, 111
B
8000 CEE switch
congestion control and queuing, 6
flow control, 8
Layer 2 Ethernet, 3
Layer 2 forwarding, 3
loop-free, 5
tagging, 4
trunking, 8
802.1x
LAG, 111
overview, 111
timeouts, 113
basic management TLV sets, 74
bridge
forwarding delay, configuring for STP, RSTP, MSTP, 52
hello time, configuring for STP, RSTP, 54
maximum aging time, configuring for STP, RSTP, MSTP,
53
priority, configuring for STP, RSTP, MSTP, 52
Brocade
Brocade Connect, xix
extension TLV set, 75
proprietary aggregation, 68
website, xix
Brocade FCoE hardware, 2
A
C
Access Control Lists
See ACL
access interface, configuring, 36
access mode, 31, 36
ACL
configuration guidelines and restrictions, 86
configuration procedures
applying a MAC ACL to a CEE interface, 89
applying a MAC ACL to a VLAN interface, 89
creating extended MAC ACL and adding rules, 87
creating standard MAC ACL and adding rules, 86
important notes, 86
modifying a MAC ACL, 87
removing a MAC ACL, 88
reordering the sequence numbers, 88
default configuration, 86
extended ACL, defined, 85
overview, 7, 85
standard ACL, defined, 85
active IGMP, 115
CEE interface
applying a MAC ACL, 89
configuring for STP, RSTP, MSTP, 58
configuring the hello time for MSTP, 60
disable or enable STP on the interface, 62
enabling and disabling, 34
enabling as an edge port for RSTP, MSTP, 59
enabling guard root for STP, RSTP, MSTP, 59
enabling LACP, 69
enabling port fast, 61
path cost, configuring for STP, RSTP, MSTP, 58
restricting the port from becoming a root port for STP,
RSTP, MSTP, 62
restricting the topology change notification for STP,
RSTP, MSTP, 62
spanning-tree defaults, 50
specifying a link type, 61
specifying restrictions for an MSTP instance, 60
specifying the port priority for STP, RSTP, MSTP, 61
CEE map, configuring, 107
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CEE maps, verifying, 110
CEE provisioning map, applying, 110
Cisco interoperability, disabling for MSTP, 55
Cisco interoperability, enabling for MSTP, 55
classifier groups, VLAN, 40
classifier rules, VLAN, 38
CLI, CEE
accessing, 15
command completion, 19
command modes, 15
console and VTY (line) configuration, 17
EXEC, 16
feature configuration, 17
global configuration, 16
interface configuration, 16
Privileged EXEC, 16
protocol configuration, 16
command syntax, 18
configuration guidelines and restrictions, 13
displaying commands, 18
keyboard shortcuts, 17
output modifiers, 19
RBAC permissions, 14
cmsh command, 15
command completion, CEE CLI, 19
command modes, CEE, 15
command output modifiers, 19
command syntax, 18
configuration management
saving changes, 14
congestion control
QoS, 98
queuing, 6
console interface, 15
converged mode, 31
counters, clearing, 40
D
Data Center Bridging (DCB) Capability Exchange Protocol
See DCBX
DCBX
Enhanced Transmission Selection, 76
interaction with other vendor devices, 77
overview
Priority Flow Control, 77
TLV sets, 25
document conventions, xvii
dynamic link aggregation, 68
138
E
EAP, 111
edge detection, configuring for STP, RSTP, MSTP, 58
edge port, enabling a CEE interface as an edge port for
RSTP, MSTP, 59
Enhanced Transmission Selection
See ETS
error disable timeout interval, configuring for STP, RSTP,
MSTP, 53
error disable timeout, configuring for STP, RSTP, MSTP, 53
Ethernet, forwarding, 3
ETS
overview
priority grouping of IPC, LAN, and SAN traffic, 76
F
fabric OS shell, 15
FCoE
configuration guidelines and restrictions, 123
configuration procedures
creating and managing the FCoE login group
configuration, 127
managing and displaying FCoE login
configuration, 125
managing and displaying the configuration, 124
Layer 2 Ethernet overview, 3
login, 10
logout, 10
minimum configuration example, 29
overview, 1
queuing, 12
speed negotiation, 123
terminology
CEE, 1
ENode, 1
FCoE Forwarder (FCF), 1
VF_port, 1
VN_port, 1
unsupported features, 123
VLAN forwarding, 4
FCoE initialization protocol
See FIP
feedback, xx
Fibre Channel Association, xix
filtering VLAN ingress, 31
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FIP
FC zoning, 11
FCoE login, 10
FCoE logout, 10
FIP discovery, 8
login, 9
logincfg, 11
logout, 10
name server, 11
registered state change notification (RSCN), 12
FLOGI, 1
flow control, 8
flushing MAC addresses, 57
frame classification, incoming, 5
G
glossary, xviii
guard root, enabling on a CEE interface for STP, RSTP,
MSTP, 59
H
hello time, configuring for MSTP, 60
hops, configuring for MSTP, 56
I
IEEE 802.1 organizational TLV set, 74
IEEE 802.3 organizational TLV set, 75
IGMP
interface, 116
interval, 117
mrouter, 116
MRT, 117
passive, 115
querier, 117
query-interval, 116
tcn, 116
timer, 116
vlan, 116
incoming frame classification, 5
ingress VLAN filtering, 31
instance
MSTP, mapping a VLAN to, 55
specifying restrictions for an MSTP instance, 60
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key terms, xviii
keyboard shortcuts, CEE CLI, 17
L
LACP
configuration guidelines and restrictions, 69
configuration procedures
clearing counters, 70
configuring system priority, 70
configuring timeout period, 70
displaying LACP information, 71
enabling on a CEE interface, 69
important notes, 69
default LACP configuration, 69
overview
troubleshooting tips, 71
LAGs
802.1x, 111
distribution process, 68
overview
top-of-the-rack configuration, 67
Layer 2
ACL
Ethernet overview, 3
Layer 2 forwarding, 3
link aggregation
Brocade-proprietary, 68
dynamic, 68
LACP, 68
LAG distribution process, 68
LAGs, 65
overview, 65
static, 68
Link Aggregation Control Protocol
See LACP
link aggregation group
See LAGs
Link Layer Discovery Protocol
See LLDP
link type, specifying, 61
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LLDP
configuration guidelines and restrictions, 77
configuration procedures
clearing LLDP-related information, 83
disabling LLDP globally, 78
displaying LLDP-related information, 84
enabling LLDP globally, 78
global command options, 79
important notes, 78
interface-level command options, 83
DCBX overview
default configuration, 78
Layer 2 topology mapping, 74
overview, 73
TLV sets, 74
login
FCoE, 10
FIP, 9
logincfg, 11
logout
FCoE, 10
FIP, 10
loop-free network environment, 5
M
MAC addresses
configuration guidelines and restrictions, 33
flush from the VLAN FDB, 57
MSTP
configuration procedures, 51
default configuration, 50
displaying MSTP-related information, 58
overview, 47
MTU, configuring, 34
multicast rate limiting, QoS, 101
Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol
See MSTP
N
name server, 11
network
flow control, 8
loop-free
STP, RSTP, MSTP, 5
trunking, 8
140
O
output modifiers, CEE CLI, 19
overview
ACL, 85
link aggregation, 65
MSTP, 47
RSTP, 45
STP, 43
P
passive IGMP, 115
path cost
CEE interface, configuring for STP, RSTP, MSTP, 58
port channel, configuring for STP, RSTP, MSTP, 54
PEAP, 111
port configuration for STP, RSTP, MSTP, 58
port fast, enabling on a CEE interface, 61
port priority, specifying on a CEE interface for STP, RSTP,
MSTP, 61
Priority Flow Control (PFC), 77
priority group table, mapping, 107
priority mapping, QoS, 92
priority-table, mapping, 108
Q
QoS
CEE QoS overview, 106
configuration procedures
applying a CEE provisioning map, 110
creating a CEE map, 107
mapping a priority group table, 107
mapping a priority-table, 108
overview, 106
verifying CEE maps, 110
congestion control, 98
multicast rate limiting, 101
overview, 91
queuing
traffic class mapping, 95
user-priority mapping, 92
queuing overview, 92
rewriting frame header field, 92
scheduling, 102
Quality of Service
See QoS
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querier
interval, 117
MRT, 117
VLAN, 117
queuing
congestion control, 6
FCoE, 12
QoS, 92
R
RADIUS, 111
Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol
See RSTP
RBAC permissions
region name, specifying for MSTP, 56
registered state notification protocol (RSCN), 12
revision number, specifying for MSTP, 56
Role-Based Action Control
See RBAC
root port, CEE interface, restricting for STP, RSTP, MSTP,
62
RSTP
configuration guidelines and restrictions
MSTP configuration guidelines and restrictions,
49
configuration procedures, 51
default configuration, 50
displaying RSTP-related information, 58
overview, 45
S
saving configuration, 14
scheduling, QoS, 102
Spanning Tree Protocol
See STP
spanning-tree defaults, 50
speed negotiation, FC ports, 123
static link aggregation, 68
STP
configuration guidelines and restrictions, 49
configuration procedures, 51
default configuration, 50
displaying STP-related information, 58
overview, 43
supplicant, 111
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connecting servers, 29
port configuration, 36
serial number, xx
system priority, configuring for LACP, 70
T
T11-FC-BB5, 1
technical help, xix
telnet, 15
terminology
document, xviii
FCoE, 1
timeout period, configuring for LACP, 70
TLV sets
basic management TLV, 74
Brocade extension TLV set, 75
configuring, 25
IEEE 802.1 organizational TLV set, 74
IEEE 802.3 organizational TLV set, 75
top-of-the-rack configuration, 67
topology change notification, CEE interface, restricting for
STP, RSTP, MSTP, 62
topology mapping, LLDP, 74
traffic class mapping, QoS, 95
transmit hold count, configuring for RSTP, MSTP, 54
troubleshooting tips, LACP, 71
trunk interface, configuring, 36
trunk mode, 31, 36
trunking, 8
U
unsupported features, 123
user-priority mapping, QoS, 92
V
Virtual LANs
See VLAN
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VLAN
applying a MAC ACL, 89
configuration guidelines and restrictions, 33
configuration procedures
clearing VLAN counters, 40
configuring a CEE interface as a Layer 2 switch
port, 36
configuring a CEE interface as an access or trunk
interface, 36
configuring the MTU on an interface, 34
displaying VLAN information, 40
enabling and disabling a CEE interface, 34
important notes, 34
VLAN classifier groups, 40
VLAN classifier rules, 38
default configuration, 33
FDB
flushing, 57
overview, 32
forwarding, 4
important management notes, 34
ingress VLAN filtering, 31
overview, 31
tagging, 4
W
website, Brocade, xix
Z
zoning, FC, 11
142
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