Brother BT-1000 Printer User Manual

BT-1000 Brother Barcode Font
User’s Guide
Version 0
1
Table of Contents
CHAPTER 1 HOW TO INSTALL THE BT-1000 BROTHER BARCODE FONT
UPGRADE ON BROTHER PRINTER ........................................................... 4
®
®
®
1 WINDOWS SYSTEMS (WINDOWS 95/98/ME, WINDOWS NT 4.0
®
AND WINDOWS 2000/XP)........................................................................... 4
2
OTHER OPERATING SYSTEMS ........................................................... 5
CHAPTER 2 BT-1000 BARCODE FONT SOLUTIONS MANUAL ............... 6
1
CODE 128............................................................................................... 6
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
2
CODE 39............................................................................................... 10
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
3
ABOUT CODE 39 ....................................................................................... 10
WHAT’S IN IT?........................................................................................... 10
CHOOSING THE RIGHT FONT ...................................................................... 11
THE PCL ESCAPE SEQUENCES ................................................................. 11
CODE 39 FONT PRODUCT CHARACTER SET ............................................... 12
INTERLEAVED 2OF5 ........................................................................... 15
3.1
3.2
3.3
4
ABOUT CODE 128 ....................................................................................... 6
CHOOSING THE RIGHT FONT AND SIZE ......................................................... 6
PCL ESCAPE SEQUENCES .......................................................................... 7
CODE 128 FONT PRODUCT CHARACTER SET................................................ 7
ABOUT INTERLEAVED 2 OF 5...................................................................... 15
PCL ESCAPE SEQUENCES ........................................................................ 15
I2OF5 FONT PRODUCT CHARACTER SET .................................................... 16
UPC / EAN CODE................................................................................. 18
4.1
ABOUT THE UPC / EAN CODE................................................................... 18
4.2
TYPES OF UPC SYMBOLS ......................................................................... 19
4.2.1
UPC-A.............................................................................................. 19
4.2.2
UPC-E.............................................................................................. 20
4.3
PCL ESCAPE SEQUENCES ........................................................................ 21
5
CODABAR............................................................................................ 21
5.1
5.2
ABOUT CODABAR ...................................................................................... 21
PCL ESCAPE SEQUENCES ........................................................................ 22
2
Trademarks
The Brother logo is a registered trademark of Brother Industries, Ltd.
Macintosh is registered trademark in the United States and other countries, and
TrueType is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.
Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows and Windows NT are registered trademarks of
Microsoft Corporation in the U.S. and other countries.
PostScript is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated.
All other terms and brand and product names mentioned in this User’s Guide are
registered trademarks of their respective companies.
Compilation and Publication Notice
Under the supervision of Brother Industries Ltd., this manual has been compiled and
published, covering the latest product’s descriptions and specifications.
The contents of this manual and the specifications of this product are subject to
change without notice.
Brother reserves the right to make changes without notice in the specifications and
materials contained herein and shall not be responsible for any damages (including
consequential) caused by reliance on the materials presented, including but not
limited to typographical and other errors relating to the publication.
©2002 Brother Industries, Ltd.
3
Chapter 1
How to install the BT-1000 Brother Barcode Font
Upgrade on Brother Printer
Note: In order to activate the BT-1000, you must use the PCL
emulation mode.
1 Windows® Systems
(Windows® 95/98/Me, Windows NT® 4.0 and Windows®
2000/XP)
To activate the barcode fonts, you must send an activation key to the printer you
wish to upgrade. To send the activation key, follow the steps below:
®
a.
You must have already installed the corresponding Windows printer driver onto
the PC you wish to upgrade from. Use the CD-ROM that was supplied with the
printer to install a printer driver.
b.
Insert the BT-1000 CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.
c.
Click AddFont in the AddFont folder in the CD-ROM.
d.
A screen similar to the one below appears:
e.
Select the appropriate printer. Depending on your printer and PC configuration,
the display will vary.
4
f.
Click the OK button to send the font activation key. The printer will receive the
activation key. Wait at least 30 seconds.
g.
Switch the printer off and then on.
h.
Print, PRINT FONTS by using the control panel. You can check the newly
activated fonts.
2 Other Operating Systems
If you are using another operating system such as Linux, Unix, OS/2, etc, follow the
steps below:
a.
Insert the BT-1000 CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.
b.
Select the AddFont.bin file in the Others folder in the CD-ROM and send it to
the printer. The printer will receive the activation key. Wait at least 30 seconds.
c.
Switch the printer off and then on.
d.
Print, PRINT FONTS by using the control panel. You can check the newly
activated fonts.
5
Chapter 2
BT-1000 Barcode Font Solutions Manual
1 Code 128
1.1
About Code 128
Introduced in 1981, Code 128 bar codes are used extensively by the shipping
industry, as well as for inventory, ID, and tracking purposes. It is often selected over
Code 39 when space is at a premium and because it offers a much larger selection
of characters. The Code 128 standard is maintained by AIM (Automatic Identification
Manufacturers).
Code 128 provides a very dense numeric-only bar code, and a dense alphanumeric
bar code. This is a continuous code, of variable length, bi-directional and selfchecking. It is designed to encode all 128 ASCII characters, and is optimized to
compress the bar code. It will use the least amount of space for data of 6 characters
or more of any 1-D symbol.
The character set includes the lower 128 ASCII characters with upper and lowercase
letters, numbers, punctuation, and control codes. A check digit, determined by
Modulus 103, is placed at the end of the message before the end character, for data
integrity purposes. The symbol can be as long as necessary to store the encoded
data.
1.2
Choosing the Right Font and Size
BT-1000 includes three different fonts used to create bar code symbols of different
densities. Changing fonts alters the width of a bar code without affecting the
symbol’s height. BT-1000 supports Code set A, Code set B and Code set C.
Like any TrueType or Type 1 font, the bar code fonts can be scaled to any size. Any
of the fonts formatted at 24 or 36 points will create bar codes 1/3 (8.5mm) or ½
(12.7mm) inches tall, respectively. Print samples of your desired string in a
number of the fonts to verify that it can be scanned when printed on your
particular printer.
6
1.3
PCL Escape Sequences
To print from Unix or DOS systems you must send the appropriate PCL escape
sequences to print the bar code font you require. Example escape sequences are
shown below:
Code128TT-Regular : esc(12Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28685T
Code128-NarrowTT-Regular : esc(12Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28686T
Code128-WideTT-Regular : esc(12Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28687T
(#: point size 0.25 – 999.75)
Replace the hash (#) with the relevant point size. For example, to print a bar code
that is one inch (25.4 mm) high, substitute ‘#’ with ‘72’. To print a bar code half and
inch (12.7 mm) high, use 36.
To switch back to printing normal fonts in the typestyle you expect, print the PCL font
list from the printer control panel, and refer to the escape sequence shown on the
print out.
1.4
Code 128 Font Product Character Set
ASCII value Code Set A
174 SP
33 !
34 “
35 #
36 $
37 %
38 &
39 ‘
40 (
41 )
42 *
43 +
44 ,
45 46 .
47 /
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58 :
Code Set B
SP
!
“
#
$
%
&
‘
(
)
*
+
,
.
/
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Code Set C
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
:
7
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
ASCII value Code Set A
59 ;
60 <
61 =
62 >
63 ?
64 @
65 A
66 B
67 C
68 D
69 E
70 F
71 G
72 H
73 I
74 J
75 K
76 L
77 M
78 N
79 O
80 P
81 Q
82 R
83 S
84 T
85 U
86 V
87 W
88 X
89 Y
90 Z
91 [
92 \
93 ]
94 ^
95 _
96 NUL
97 SOH
98 STX
99 ETX
100 EOT
101 ENQ
102 ACK
103 BEL
104 BS
105 HT
106 LF
107 VT
Code Set B
;
<
=
>
?
@
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
[
\
]
^
_
‘
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
Code Set C
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
8
ASCII value Code Set A
108 FF
109 CR
110 SOH
111 SI
112 DLE
113 DC1
114 DC2
115 DC3
116 DC4
117 NAK
118 SYN
119 ETB
120 CAN
121 EM
122 SUB
123 ESC
124 FS
125 GS
165 RS
166 US
167 FNC 3
168 FNC 2
169 SHIFT
170 CODE C
171 CODE B
172 FNC 4
173 FNC 1
161 START A
162 START B
163 START C
164 STOP
Code Set B
l
m
n
o
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z
{
|
}
~
DEL
FNC 3
FNC 2
SHIFT
CODE C
FNC 4
CODE A
FNC 1
START A
START B
START C
STOP
Code Set C
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
CODE B (100)
CODE A (101)
FNC 1 (102)
START A (103)
START B (104)
START C (105)
STOP
9
2 Code 39
2.1
About Code 39
Code 39 was the first alphanumeric bar code developed and is the most widely used.
Also known as Code USD-3 or Code 3/9, Code 39 is widely used in many industries
and is the standard for many government bar code specifications, including the U.S.
Department of Defense. Code 39 is defined in American National Standards Institute
(ANSI) standard MH10.8M-1983.
Code 39 is often used for identification, inventory, and work-in-process tracking
because the character set is alphanumeric, the input string length is variable
(although more than 25 characters is hard to accommodate), and the symbol itself
can vary in height and width. It is bi-directional, includes a checksum option, and is
discreet.
BT-1000 includes eight fonts and switching between them changes the bar code’s
width and density without changing its height.
2.2
What’s in it?
Code 39 is an alphanumeric bar code that can be as long as necessary to store
encoded data. Designed to encode 26 uppercase letters, 10 digits and 7 special
characters, the Code 39 character set includes the digits 0-9, the letters A-Z (upper
case only), and the following symbols: space, minus (-), plus (+), full stop (.), dollar
sign ($), slash (/), and percent (%). It can be extended to code all 128 ASCII
characters by using a two character coding scheme. Extended characters are
encoded by a pair of normal Code 39 characters; for example, a lower case 'a' (not
part of the standard Code 39 character set) can be encoded by the pair '+A'. A
carriage return control code can be encoded by the pair '$M'.
The symbol includes a quiet zone, the start character "*", the encoded data, the stop
character "*", and a trailing quiet zone. The asterisk in code 39 is used as the start
and stop bar. 5 bars and 4 spaces for a total of 9 elements represent each character.
Each bar or space is either "wide" or "narrow" and 3 out of the 9 elements are
always wide. That is what gives the code its other name - Code 3 of 9. Of the 9
elements, 3 are large and 6 are narrow. Characters are separated by an intercharacter gap the same width as a narrow bar. The ratio of wide: narrow bar width
may be in the range of 1.8 to 3.4. Bar codes with a narrow bar width of less than
0.020 inches (0.508mm) should have a ratio of at least 2.5. A ratio of 3.0 is
recommended. Every Code 39 bar code should be preceded and followed by a quiet
zone the width of at least 10 narrow bars.
10
2.3
Choosing the Right Font
The various Code 39 fonts creates bar code symbols of different sizes and densities.
Most of the fonts use a 2.5:1 wide: narrow bar ratio. The Slim fonts use a 2:1 ratio for
narrower symbols and the Wide font uses a 3:1 ratio for wider symbols. Like any
TrueType or Type 1 font, the bar code fonts can be scaled to any size. Any of the
fonts formatted at 24 or 36 points will create bar codes that are 1/3 (8.5mm) or 1/2
(12.7mm) inches tall respectively.
Be sure to print samples of the desired string in a number of the fonts and check that
it can be scanned when printed on your particular printer. Since the fonts have
different wide bar to narrow bar ratios, and overall height to width ratios, the same
string formatted in different fonts will be different widths. Try different fonts to decide
which one works best in your situation.
2.4
The PCL Escape Sequences
From UNIX or DOS it is necessary to send PCL escape sequences as part of the
print data to select the desired bar code font. Example escape sequences are shown
below:
Code39QuarterInch-Regular : esc(9Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28676T
Code39HalfInch-Regular : esc (9Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28677T
Code39OneInch-Regular : esc(9Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28678T
Code39SmallLow-Regular : esc(9Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28679T
Code39SmallMedium-Regular : esc(9Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28680T
Code39SmallHigh-Regular : esc(9Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28681T
Code39Slim-Regular : esc(9Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28682T
Code39Wide-Regular : esc(9Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28683T
(# : point size 0.25 - 999.75)
Replace the hash (#) with the relevant point size. For example, to print a bar code
that is one inch (25.4 mm) high, substitute ‘#’ with ‘72’. To print a bar code half and
inch (12.7 mm) high, use 36.
After printing a bar code it is necessary to select a different font in order to print
something besides more bar codes. The PCL command to select the default font is
“<esc>(3@”. To select a font other than the default font, use the PCL escape
sequence show on the PCL font list. The “<esc>” shown is the ASCII escape
character. It is decimal 27, hexadecimal 1B, octal 33, or binary 00011011.
11
2.5
ASCII
Code 39 Font Product Character Set
Character
0 NUL
1 SOH
2 STX
3 ETX
4 EOT
5 ENQ
6 ACK
7 BEL
8 BS
9 HT
10 LF
11 VT
12 FF
13 CR
14 SO
15 SI
16 DLE
17 DC1
18 DC2
19 DC3
20 DC4
21 NAK
22 SYN
23 ETB
24 CAN
25 EM
26 SUB
27 ESC
28 FS
29 GS
30 RS
31 US
32 SP
33 !
34 “
35 #
36 $
37 %
38 &
39 ‘
40 (
41 )
42 *
43 +
44 ,
45 -
Code 39
%U
$A
$B
$C
$D
$E
$F
$G
$H
$I
$J
$K
$L
$M
$N
$O
$P
$Q
$R
$S
$T
$U
$V
$W
$X
$Y
$Z
%A
%B
%C
%D
%E
SP
/A
/B
/C
/D
/E
/F
/G
/H
/I
/J
/K
/L
-
12
ASCII
Character
46 .
47 /
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58 :
59 ;
60 <
61 =
62 >
63 ?
64 @
65 A
66 B
67 C
68 D
69 E
70 F
71 G
72 H
73 I
74 J
75 K
76 L
77 M
78 N
79 O
80 P
81 Q
82 R
83 S
84 T
85 U
86 V
87 W
88 X
89 Y
90 Z
91 [
92 \
93 ]
94 ^
Code 39
.
/O
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
/Z
%F
%G
%H
%I
%J
%V
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
%K
%L
%M
%N
13
ASCII
Character
95 _
96 ‘
97 a
98 b
99 c
100 d
101 e
102 f
103 g
104 h
105 i
106 j
107 k
108 l
109 m
110 n
111 o
112 p
113 q
114 r
115 s
116 t
117 u
118 v
119 w
120 x
121 y
122 z
123 {
124 |
125 }
126 ~
127 DEL
Code 39
%O
%W
+A
+B
+C
+D
+E
+F
+G
+H
+I
+J
+K
+L
+M
+N
+O
+P
+Q
+R
+S
+T
+U
+V
+W
+X
+Y
+Z
%P
%Q
%R
%S
%T, %X, %Y, %Z
14
After printing a bar code it is necessary to select a different font in order to print
something besides more bar codes. The PCL command to select the default font is
“<esc>(3@”. To select a font other than the default font, use the PCL escape
sequence show on the PCL font list. The “<esc>” shown is the ASCII escape
character. It is decimal 27, hexadecimal 1B, octal 33, or binary 00011011.
3.3
ASCII
I2of5 Font Product Character Set
Character
33 !
34 “
35 #
36 $
37 %
38 &
39 ‘
40 (
41 )
42 *
43 +
44 ,
45 46 .
47 /
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58 :
59 ;
60 <
61 =
62 >
63 ?
64 @
65 A
66 B
67 C
68 D
69 E
70 F
71 G
72 H
Interleaved 2 of 5
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
0
15
1
16
2
17
3
18
4
19
5
20
6
21
7
22
8
23
9
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
16
ASCII
Character
73 I
74 J
75 K
76 L
77 M
78 N
79 O
80 P
81 Q
82 R
83 S
84 T
85 U
86 V
87 W
88 X
89 Y
90 Z
91 [
92 \
93 ]
94 ^
95 _
96 ‘
97 a
98 b
99 c
100 d
101 e
102 f
103 g
104 h
105 i
106 j
107 k
108 l
109 m
110 n
111 o
112 p
113 q
114 r
115 s
116 t
117 u
118 v
119 w
120 x
121 y
Interleaved 2 of 5
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
17
ASCII
Character
122 z
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
Interleaved 2 of 5
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
Start
Stop
4 UPC / EAN Code
4.1
About the UPC / EAN Code
UPC Code is a collection of Type 1 and TrueType fonts that create and print UPC
version A, UPC version E, EAN-8/JAN-8, EAN-13/JAN-13, Bookland (ISBN), and
®
®
ISSN bar code symbols within any Microsoft Windows , Unix or Mac application.
The bar code fonts in UPC Code can be used with your database, spreadsheet, or
custom application by simply changing fonts.
Created in 1973, UPC is perhaps the best-known and commonly used 1D bar code.
The similar European Article Numbering (EAN) and Japanese Article Numbering
(JAN) codes were developed soon after. Extremely reliable codes, (version A of UPC
has a 99 percent success rate on the first read pass of a fixed laser scanner) they
use the relative distances between leading to leading, and trailing to trailing edges of
bars to decode the symbols. It is suitable for a variety of printing techniques and is
not prone to errors from ink spreading during printing.
UPC, EAN, Bookland, and ISSN bar codes are found on retail items scanned at the
cash register. Package designers therefore create these bar codes. UPC symbols
are also placed on shipping labels, forms, and catalogs. Book covers have a
Bookland bar code based on the ISBN number. EAN and JAN bar codes are used
outside of the US and Canada, while international periodicals use ISSN bar codes.
Generally, the code is split into two halves of six digits each. The first one is always
zero, except for products like meat and produce that have variable weight, and a few
other special items. The next five are the manufacturers’ code, the next five are the
product code and the last is a check digit used to verify that the preceding digits
have been scanned properly. Cues in the structure of the code tell the scanner which
end is which, so it can be scanned in any direction.
18
Both UPC-A and UPC-E allow for a supplemental two or five digit number to be
appended to the main bar code symbol. The supplemental message was designed
for use on publications and periodicals. To enter a supplemental message, it must
consist of either two or five numeric digits. The supplemental is simply a small
additional bar code that is added onto the right side of a standard UPC symbol.
4.2
4.2.1
Types of UPC Symbols
UPC-A
UPC-A is a 12 digit, numeric symbology used in retail applications to identify the
manufacturer and specific product so point-of- sale cash register systems can
automatically look up the price. UPC-A symbols consist of 11 data digits, and one
check digit. The first digit is a number system digit that usually represents the type of
product being identified.
The next 5 digits are the manufacturers’ code, followed by a 5-digit product code.
UPC-A encodes 12 numeric digits. The first digit identifies the numbering system:
0: regular UPC codes
1: reserved
2: random weight items marked at the store
3: National Drug Code and National Health Related Items code
4: no format restrictions, for in-store use on non-food items
5: for use on coupons
6: reserved
7: regular UPC codes
8: reserved
9: reserved
The next group of 5 digits identifies the manufacturer and is assigned by The
Uniform Code Council (UCC). The next 5 digits identify the particular product and are
assigned by the manufacturer. The last digit is a Modulo 10 checksum.
The checksum is a Modulo 10 calculation.
1. Add the values of the digits in positions 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11.
2. Multiply this result by 3.
3. Add the values of the digits in positions 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10.
4. Sum the results of steps 2 and 3.
5. The check character is the smallest number which, when added to the result in
step 4, produces a multiple of 10.
A UPC-A code may be augmented with the two-digit supplemental bar code noted
above to indicate the issue number for a periodical. Weekly publications are
generally numbered 1-52, while semi-monthlies are numbered 1-24 and monthlies 112.
19
4.2.2
UPC-E
The UPC-E code is a compressed bar code intended for use on small items.
Compression works by squeezing extra zeros out of the bar code and then
automatically re-inserting them at the scanner. Only bar codes containing zeros are
candidates for the UPC-E symbol.
UPC-E is also referred to as "zero suppressed". The way this works is that UPC-E
compresses a normal 12-digit UPC-A code into a six-digit code by "suppressing" the
number system digit, trailing zeros in the manufacturers code and leading zeros in
the product identification part of the bar. By suppressing zeros, UPC-E codes can be
printed in a very small space required for labeling small items. The UPC-E code can
only be used if the system character is 0 and the original 10 data characters have at
least four zeros.
For example, the UPC-A code 12300-00064 can be compressed to 123643. The last
digit (3) indicates the type of compression. Guard bars precede and follow the data
in the pattern. The UPC-E bar code specifies left hand guard bars, the six data
characters, and right hand guard bars.
In addition to the requirement that the first digit of the bar code (number system)
must be zero, there are four rules that determine what UPC codes can be printed
using the compressed UPC-E format:
*If the last 3 digits of the manufacturer's number are 000, 100, or 200, the valid
product code numbers are 00000 - 00999 (1,000 numbers)
*If the last 3 digits of the manufacturer's number are 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, or
900, the valid product code numbers are 00000 – 00099 (100 numbers)
*If the last 2 digits in the manufacturer's number are 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, or
90, the valid product code numbers are 00000 – 00009 (10 numbers)
*If the manufacturer's number does not end in zero, the valid product code numbers
are 00005 - 00009 (5 numbers)
The checksum for the UPC-E code is calculated with the same method as the UPCA code.
20
4.3
PCL Escape Sequences
From UNIX or DOS it is necessary to send PCL escape sequences as part of the
print data to select the desired bar code font. The PCL escape sequences for the
fonts are shown on the PCL font list. Instructions on how to print the PCL font list are
given in your printer manual.
Font Name
PCL Escape Sequence
UPCTall : esc(24Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28688T
UPCTallNarrow : esc(24Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28689T
UPCTallThin : esc(24Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28690T
UPCHalf : esc(24Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28691T
UPCHalfNarrow : esc(24Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28692T
UPCHalfThin : esc(24Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28693T
UPCTallMusicThin : esc(24Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28694T
UPCHalfMusicThin : esc(24Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28695T
UPCTallBarsThin : esc(24Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28696T
UPCHalfBarsThin : esc(24Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28697T
(# : point size 0.25 - 999.75)
After printing a bar code it is necessary to select a different font in order to print
something besides more bar codes. The PCL command to select the default font is
“<esc>(3@”. To select a font other than the default font, use the PCL escape
sequence shown on the PCL font list.
5 Codabar
5.1
About Codabar
Created in 1972, Codabar was developed by the Monarch Marking Systems division
of Pitney Bowes, Inc. Originally developed for retail price labeling, Codabar is a
general purpose bar code used primarily for numeric data. It is used in libraries, to
label photo-finishing envelopes, Federal Express air bills, and is the American Blood
Commission's standard symbology for blood bag labeling. Blood banks use the D
stop character to indicate that the next bar code beginning with a D should be
concatenated with the current bar code. The Xerox Codabar bar code font is the
Rationalized Codabar variant. Codabar may also be referred to as Ames Code,
USD-4, NW-7, or 2 of 7 Code.
Codabar is bi-directional, self-checked and discrete. Its length is unlimited and there
is no checksum defined as part of the Codabar standard, but some industries
(libraries, for example) have adopted their own checksum standards. AIM has a
recommended check character.
®
®
The Codabar font works with any Microsoft Windows , Macintosh , or UNIX
application. As a font, it is easy to integrate into a database, spreadsheet, or custom
application.
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Codabar is unusual because some characters are wider than others. With 2-element
widths defined, each character contains 4 bars and 3 spaces. The character is
followed by a single narrow space to separate it from the next character. Each
pattern begins and ends with one of 4 start/stop characters A-D.
Codabar defines different element widths for each of the characters in an effort to
make all the characters have the same width. (Rationalized Codabar uses the same
patterns, but assigns only 2 element widths for wide and narrow.)
5.2
PCL Escape Sequences
From UNIX or DOS it is necessary to send PCL escape sequences as part of the
print data to select the desired bar code font. The PCL escape sequences for the
fonts are shown on the PCL font list. Instructions on how to print the PCL font list are
given in your printer manual.
Font Name
PCL Escape Sequence
Codabar-Regular : esc(26Yesc(s1p#v0s0b28702T
(# : point size 0.25 - 999.75)
Replace the hash (#) with the relevant point size. For example, to print a bar code
that is one inch (25.4 mm) high, substitute ‘#’ with ‘72’. To print a bar code half and
inch (12.7 mm) high, use 36.
After printing a bar code it is necessary to select a different font in order to print
something besides more bar codes. The PCL command to select the default font is
“<esc>(3@”. To select a font other than the default font, use the PCL escape
sequence show on the PCL font list. The “<esc>” shown is the ASCII escape
character. It is decimal 27, hexadecimal 1B, octal 33, or binary 00011011.
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