Bryant 764A Air Conditioner User Manual

installation, start-up and
service instructions
PACKAGED AIR
CONDITIONERS
564A
Sizes 024-060
764A
Sizes 024-060
Cancels: II 564A-24-1
II 564A-24-2
6/1/96
IMPORTANT — READ BEFORE INSTALLING
1. Read and become familiar with these installation instructions before installing this unit (Fig. 1). Retain these
instructions for future maintenance and repair.
2. Be sure the installation conforms to all applicable local
and national codes. Wear safety glasses and work gloves.
Use quenching cloth for unbrazing operations. Have fire
extinguisher available for all brazing operations.
CONTENTS
Page
SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
I. Locate the Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
II. Rig and Place Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
III. Unit Duct and Field Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
PRE-START-UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,12
START-UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,13
I. Heating Section Start-Up and Adjustments . . . . 12
II. Cooling Section Start-Up and Adjustments . . . . 12
III. Indoor Airflow and Airflow Adjustments . . . . . . . 13
CARE AND MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
I. Air Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
II. Evaporator Fan and Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
SERVICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-18
I. Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
II. Evaporator Fan and Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
III. Condenser Fan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
IV. Electrical Controls and Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
V. Indoor Airflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
VI. Metering Device Servicing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
VII. Liquid Line Strainer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
VIII. Refrigerant Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
IX. Replacement Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
COOLING TROUBLESHOOTING CHART . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
START-UP CHECKLIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CL-1
SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS
WARNING: Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service, maintenance, or use can cause explosion, fire, electric shock, or other occurrences which may
injure you or damage your property. Consult a qualified installer or service agency for information or assistance. The qualified installer or agency must use only
factory-authorized kits or accessories when modifying
this product.
Recognize safety information. This is the safety-alert symbol
(
). When you see this symbol on the unit and in instructions or manuals, be alert to the potential for personal
injury.
Understand the signal words — DANGER, WARNING, and
CAUTION. These words are used with the safety-alert
Fig. 1 — Unit 564A and 764A (Size 036 Shown)
symbol
. Danger identifies the most serious hazards which
will result in severe personal injury or death. Warning indicates a condition that could result in personal injury.
Caution is used to identify unsafe practices which would
result in minor personal injury or product and property
damage.
WARNING: Before performing service or maintenance operations on system, turn off main power
switches to unit. Turn off accessory heater power switch
if applicable. Electric shock can cause personal injury.
1. The power supply (volts, phase, and hertz) must correspond to that specified on unit rating plate.
2. The electrical supply provided by the utility must be sufficient to handle load imposed by this unit.
3. Refer to Installation, Locate the Unit section (page 5)
and Fig. 2-4 for locations of electrical inlets, condensate
drain, duct connections, and required clearances before
setting unit in place.
4. This installation must conform with local building codes
and with NEC (National Electrical Code) or NFPA
(National Fire Protection Association) 54 TIA-54-84-1.
Refer to provincial and local plumbing or wastewater codes
and other applicable local codes.
5. Approved for outdoor installation on wood flooring or on
class A, B, or C roof covering materials.
INSTALLATION
All units can be connected into existing duct systems that are
sized properly and designed to handle the airflow shown in
the Air Delivery table and Indoor Airflow and Airflow Adjustments section.
NOTE: When installing any accessory item, see the manufacturer’s installation instructions packaged with the accessory. Use factory-authorized kits or accessories when
modifying this unit.
UNIT
564A/764A
024
030
036
UNIT
CENTER OF GRAVITY mm [in.]
WEIGHT
Lb Kg
X
Y
Z
208/230-1-60
222 101 355.6 [14.00] 508.0 [20.00] 241.3 [9.50]
208/230-1-60
236 107 355.6 [14.00] 508.0 [20.00] 241.3 [9.50]
208/230-1-60, 208/230-3-60 250 114 355.6 [14.00] 508.0 [20.00] 241.3 [9.50]
ELECTRICAL
CHARACTERISTICS
LEGEND
NEC — National Electrical Code
REQUIRED CLEARANCES TO COMBUSTIBLE
MATERIAL, mm [in.]
Top of Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Duct Side of Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Side Opposite Ducts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Bottom of Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
NEC REQUIRED CLEARANCES, mm [in.]
Between Units, Power Entry Side . . . . . . . 1066.8 [42.00]
Unit and Ungrounded Surfaces,
Power Entry Side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 914.0 [36.00]
Unit and Block or Concrete Walls and Other
Grounded Surfaces, Power Entry Side . . . . 1066.8 [42.00]
REQUIRED CLEARANCES FOR SERVICING, mm [in.]
Condenser Coil Access Side . . . . . . . . . . . . 762.0 [30.00]
Power Entry Side
(Except for NEC Requirements) . . . . . . . . . 762.0 [30.00]
Unit Top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 914.0 [36.00]
Side Opposite Ducts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 762.0 [30.00]
NOTES:
1. Clearances must be maintained to prevent recirculation of
air from condenser-fan discharge. With the exception of the
condenser coil (914 mm [36 in.]), a removable fence or barricade requires no clearance.
2. Dimensions are in millimeters. Dimensions in [ ] are in inches.
Fig. 2 — Base Unit Dimensions — 564A/764A024-036
—2—
UNIT
564A/764A
042
048
UNIT
CENTER OF GRAVITY mm [in.]
WEIGHT
Lb Kg
X
Y
Z
208/230-1-60, 208/230-3-60 297 135 355.6 [14.00] 508.0 [20.00] 304.8 [12.00]
208/230-1-60, 208/230-3-60 310 114 355.6 [14.00] 508.0 [20.00] 304.8 [12.00]
ELECTRICAL
CHARACTERISTICS
LEGEND
NEC — National Electrical Code
REQUIRED CLEARANCES TO COMBUSTIBLE
MATERIAL, mm [in.]
Top of Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Duct Side of Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Side Opposite Ducts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Bottom of Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
NEC REQUIRED CLEARANCES, mm [in.]
Between Units, Power Entry Side . . . . . . . 1066.8 [42.00]
Unit and Ungrounded Surfaces,
Power Entry Side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 914.0 [36.00]
Unit and Block or Concrete Walls and Other
Grounded Surfaces, Power Entry Side . . . . 1066.8 [42.00]
REQUIRED CLEARANCES FOR SERVICING, mm [in.]
Condenser Coil Access Side . . . . . . . . . . . . 762.0 [30.00]
Power Entry Side
(Except for NEC Requirements) . . . . . . . . . 762.0 [30.00]
Unit Top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 914.0 [36.00]
Side Opposite Ducts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 762.0 [30.00]
NOTES:
1. Clearances must be maintained to prevent recirculation of
air from condenser-fan discharge. With the exception of the
condenser coil (914 mm [36 in.]), a removable fence or barricade requires no clearance.
2. Dimensions are in millimeters. Dimensions in [ ] are in inches.
Fig. 3 — Base Unit Dimensions — 564A/764A042,048
—3—
UNIT
564A/764A
060
ELECTRICAL
CHARACTERISTICS
UNIT
WEIGHT
Lb Kg
CENTER OF GRAVITY mm [in.]
X
Y
Z
230-1-60, 208/230-3-60,
350
159
355.6
[14.00]
508.0
[20.00]
355.6
[14.00]
460-3-60
LEGEND
NEC — National Electrical Code
REQUIRED CLEARANCES TO COMBUSTIBLE
MATERIAL, mm [in.]
Top of Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Duct Side of Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Side Opposite Ducts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
Bottom of Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0
NEC REQUIRED CLEARANCES, mm [in.]
Between Units, Power Entry Side . . . . . . . 1066.8 [42.00]
Unit and Ungrounded Surfaces,
Power Entry Side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 914.0 [36.00]
Unit and Block or Concrete Walls and Other
Grounded Surfaces, Power Entry Side . . . . 1066.8 [42.00]
REQUIRED CLEARANCES FOR SERVICING, mm [in.]
Condenser Coil Access Side . . . . . . . . . . . . 762.0 [30.00]
Power Entry Side
(Except for NEC Requirements) . . . . . . . . . 762.0 [30.00]
Unit Top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 914.0 [36.00]
Side Opposite Ducts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 762.0 [30.00]
NOTES:
1. Clearances must be maintained to prevent recirculation of
air from condenser-fan discharge. With the exception of the
condenser coil (914 mm [36 in.]), a removable fence or barricade requires no clearance.
2. Dimensions are in millimeters. Dimensions in [ ] are in inches.
Fig. 4 — Base Unit Dimensions — 564A/764A060
—4—
I. LOCATE THE UNIT
A. Clearance
Provide sufficient space for condenser airflow clearance, wiring, and servicing unit. See Fig. 2-4. Locate unit where supplyand return-air ducts can be conveniently brought out to unit
duct connections.
Unit may be placed with duct side as close to building
as top removal, duct connections, and power connections permit. Position unit so water or ice from roof does
not drop directly on top of unit or in front of coil. Make provisions for condensate drainage. Maintain a 4 ft clearance above
unit for vertical air discharge.
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE
DIFFERENCE (in.)
A-B
1⁄4
B-C
1⁄4
A-C
1⁄4
Fig. 5 — Unit Leveling Tolerances
Roof installation method for units depends on building construction and special requirements of local building codes.
Be sure that roof can support unit weight.
Maintain clearance around and above unit to provide proper
airflow and service access. See Fig. 2-4.
CAUTION: Do not restrict condenser airflow. An air
restriction at either the condenser air inlet (the entire
surface of the condenser coil) or the fan discharge can
be detrimental to compressor life.
The condenser fan discharges through the top of the unit.
Ensure that the fan discharge does not recirculate to the condenser coil. Do not locate the unit either in a corner or under
a complete overhead obstruction, and ensure the following clearances are provided:
On roof overhangs, provide a minimum clearance of 48 in.
above the top of the unit for partial overhangs (such as a
normal house roof overhang). If there is a horizontal extension on the partial overhang, extension must not exceed
48 inches. For extended overhangs, provide a minimum clearance of 36 in. between unit and overhang.
Provide a minimum clearance of 42 in. for the control box
side next to a block wall or any other grounded surface. Provide a minimum clearance of 36 in. between the control box
side of the unit and any electrically live parts.
Unit may be installed on wood flooring, or on Class A, B, or C
roof covering materials.
Although unit is weatherproof, guard against water from higher
level runoff and overhangs.
Units should be at least 4 in. above the highest expected water, flood, and runoff levels. Do not use the unit if it has been
under water.
B. Ground-Level Installation
Mount unit on a solid, level pad. See Fig. 5 for unit leveling
tolerances. Construct pad as shown in Fig. 6. Side of unit with
condensate trap should be flush with pad for proper trap positioning (see Fig. 2-4). Extend a 24-in. gravel apron around
pad for condensate drainage.
II. RIG AND PLACE UNIT
Inspect unit for transportation damage. File any claim with
transportation agency. Keep upright and do not drop. Level
by using unit frame as a reference. See Table 1 for additional
information. Weight is shown in Fig. 2-4. Unit can be moved
with handholds provided in the unit basepan.
—5—
NOTES:
1. Extend a 24-in. gravel apron around pad.
2. Provide a 30-in. service clearance at front and rear sides of unit.
Fig. 6 — Pad Dimensions
III. UNIT DUCT AND FIELD CONNECTIONS
A. Condensate Disposal
NOTE: Ensure that condensate-water disposal methods comply with local codes, restrictions, and practices.
Units remove condensate water through a 3⁄4-in. ID hole located on the control box side of the unit.
Condensate water can be drained directly onto a gravel apron
in ground-level installations. Install a field-supplied condensate trap at end of condensate connection to ensure proper
drainage. See Fig. 7. Make sure that the outlet of the trap is
at least 1 in. lower than the drain pan condensate connection
to prevent the pan from overflowing. See Fig. 8A and 8B. Prime
the trap with water. When using a gravel apron, make sure
it slopes away from the unit.
Table 1 — Physical Data
UNIT 564A AND 764A
OPERATING WEIGHT (lb)
COMPRESSOR TYPE
REFRIGERANT
Charge (lb)
REFRIGERANT METERING DEVICE
CONDENSER COIL
Rows...Fins/in.
Total Face Area (sq ft)
CONDENSER-FAN MOTOR
Cfm
Nominal Rpm
Motor Hp
Diameter (in.)
EVAPORATOR COIL
Rows...Fins/in.
Total Face Area (sq ft)
EVAPORATOR-FAN MOTOR
Blower Motor Size (in.)
Nominal Cfm
Rpm Range
Number of Speeds
Factory Speed Setting
Motor Hp
CONNECTING DUCT SIZES
Supply Air (in.)
Return Air (in.)
FIELD-SUPPLIED RETURN AIR FILTER†
Throwaway (in.)
024
222
030
236
036
250
2.8
3.9
1...17
6.7
1...17
7.9
1600
825
1⁄8
20
2000
1100
1⁄4
20
2...15
2.8
3...15
2.8
10 x 8
800
550-1000
3
Low
1⁄4
10 x 8
1000
550-1000
3
Med
1⁄4
24 x 24
24 x 24
042
048
297
310
Reciprocating
R-22
4.7
4.4
6.1
Acutrol™ System
Copper Tubes, Aluminum Plate Fins
2...17
1...17
2...17
6.2
11.1
8.6
Propeller
2000
2600
2600
1100
1100
1100
1⁄4
1⁄4
1⁄4
20
20
20
Copper Tubes, Aluminum Plate Fins
3...15
3...15
3...15
3.1
3.9
4.3
Direct Drive
10 x 8
10 x 9
10 x 9
1200
1400
1600
800-1050
800-1050
1000-1100
3
3
2
Low
Med
Low
1⁄2
1⁄2
3⁄4
Round
14
14
24 x 24
24 x 24
24 x 30
060
350
7.5
2...17
10.7
2800
1100
1 ⁄4
20
4...15
4.9
10 x 10
2000
950-1100
3*
Low
1
Square
13.9 x 13.9
13.9 x 27.8
24 x 30
*460-v motors are 2-speed only.
†Required filter sizes shown are based on the ARI (Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute)
rated airflow at a velocity of 300 ft/min for throwaway type or 450 ft/min for high capacity type.
Recommended filters are 1-in. thick.
Fig. 8B — Condensate Trap (Using PVC Piping)
If the installation requires draining the condensate water
away from the unit, install a field-supplied 2-in. trap using
3⁄4-in. OD tubing or piping to ensure proper drainage. See
Fig. 8A and 8B. Make sure that the outlet of the trap is at
least one in. lower than the unit drain pan condensate connection to prevent the pan from overflowing. Connect a drain
tube using a minimum of 3⁄4-in. PVC, 3⁄4-in. CPVC, or 3⁄4-in.
copper pipe (all field-supplied). Do not undersize the tube. Pitch
the drain tube downward at a slope of at least 1 inch in every
10 ft of horizontal run. Be sure to check the drain tube for
leaks. Prime trap at the beginning of cooling season start-up.
Allowable glues for condensate trap connection are: Standard ABS, CPVC, or PVC cement.
CONDENSATE DRAIN HOLE
Fig. 7 — Condensate Connection Details
B. Field-Duct Connections
NOTE: The design and installation of the duct system must
be in accordance with the standards of NFPA for the installation of nonresidence-type air conditioning and ventilating
systems, NFPA 90A or residence-type, NFPA 90B, and/or
local codes and ordinances.
Units have duct flanges on the supply- and return-air openings on the side of the unit. See Fig. 2-4 for connection sizes
and locations.
Fig. 8A — Condensate Trap (Using Tubing)
—6—
Install Flanges for Ductwork Connections (564A/764A060 only)
The size 060 units are shipped with flanges which must be
field-installed on the unit.
To install unit flanges:
1. Five pieces of flange are shipped on the return air opening of the unit. Remove the flanges from the shipping
position. See Fig. 9. Screws are field-supplied.
4. Install 2 hand-formed flanges onto return air opening
in holes provided to form rectangle around the return
air opening.
5. Install remaining 2 hand-formed flanges around discharge air opening in holes provided.
6. Ductwork can now be attached to flanges.
Adhere to the following criteria when selecting, sizing, and
installing the duct system:
2. One piece of flange is used as it is shipped (straight).
Bend the other 4 pieces at right angles.
1. Select and size ductwork, supply-air registers, and returnair grilles according to ASHRAE (American Society of
Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers) recommendations.
3. Install the straight flange on the right side of the return air opening in holes provided. See Fig. 10. Flanges
should stick out from unit to allow for connection of
ductwork.
CAUTION: When drilling the duct system fastening
holes into the side of the unit for duct flanges, do not
drill deeper than 3⁄4 in., and use extreme care not to
puncture the coil or coil tubes. See Fig. 11.
2. Use flexible transition between rigid ductwork and unit
to prevent transmission of vibration. The transition may
be screwed or bolted to duct flanges. Use suitable gaskets to ensure weathertight and airtight seal.
19.17″
3.92″
Fig. 9 — Shipping Location of Duct Flanges
(Size 060 Only)
Fig. 11 — Area Not To Be Drilled More Than 3⁄4-in.
3. Size ductwork for cooling air quantity (cfm).
4. Adequately insulate and weatherproof all ductwork
located outdoors. Insulate ducts passing through unconditioned space, and use vapor barrier in accordance
with latest issue of SMACNA (Sheet Metal and Air
Conditioning Contractors National Association) and ACCA
(Air Conditioning Contractors of America) minimum
installation standards for heating and air conditioning
systems. Secure all ducts to building structure.
5. Flash, weatherproof, and vibration-isolate all openings
in building structure in accordance with local codes and
good building practices.
6. Air filters should be installed in return-air ductwork.
Return-air filter grille or filter tracks in duct may be used.
Figure 12 shows a typical duct system with unit installed.
Fig. 10 — Installation of Duct Flanges
(Size 060 Only)
—7—
CAUTION: Failure to follow these precautions could
result in damage to the unit being installed:
1. Make all electrical connections in accordance with
NEC ANSI/NFPA (latest edition) and local electrical
codes governing such wiring. In Canada, all electrical connections must be in accordance with CSA
Standard C22.1 Canadian Electrical Code Part 1
and applicable local codes. Refer to unit wiring
diagram.
2. Use only copper conductor for connections between
field-supplied electrical disconnect switch and unit.
DO NOT USE ALUMINUM WIRE.
3. Be sure that high-voltage power to unit is within operating voltage range indicated on unit rating plate.
On 3-phase units, ensure that phases are balanced
within 2%. Consult local power company for correction of improper voltage and/or phase imbalance.
LEGEND
NEC — National Electrical Code
Power Wiring
Control Wiring
4. Insulate low-voltage wires for highest voltage contained within conduit when low-voltage control wires
are run in same conduit as high-voltage wires.
5. Do not damage internal components when drilling
through any panel to mount electrical hardware, conduit, etc.
Outdoor Airflow
Indoor Airflow
*Required for electric heater when single-point connection is not
used.
Fig. 12 — Typical Installation
High-Voltage Connections
The unit must have a separate electrical service with a fieldsupplied, waterproof disconnect switch mounted at, or within
sight from the unit. Refer to the unit rating plate for maximum fuse/circuit breaker size and minimum circuit amps
(ampacity) for wire sizing. See Table 2 for electrical data.
The field-supplied disconnect may be mounted on the unit over
the high-voltage inlet hole. See Fig. 2-4.
C. Converting Horizontal Discharge Units to Downflow
(Vertical) Discharge
WARNING: Before performing service or maintenance operations on system, turn off main power to unit.
Turn off accessory heater power switch if applicable. Electrical shock can cause personal injury.
CAUTION: Operation of unit on improper line voltage constitutes abuse and may cause unit damage that
could affect warranty.
Units are dedicated side-supply products. Units are not convertible to vertical air supply. A field-supplied plenum must
be used to convert to vertical air discharge.
Routing Power Leads Into Unit
Use only copper wire between disconnect and unit. The highvoltage leads should be in a conduit until they enter the unit;
conduit termination at the unit must be watertight. Run the
high-voltage leads through the hole on the side of the unit
(see Fig. 13 for location). When the leads are inside the unit,
run leads to the control box (Fig. 14). For single-phase units,
connect leads to the black and yellow wires; for 3-phase units,
connect the leads to the black, yellow, and blue wires (see
Fig. 15).
Connecting Ground Lead to Unit Ground
Refer to Fig. 14 and 15. Connect the ground lead to the chassis using the unit ground screw in the control box.
Routing Control Power Wires
Form a drip-loop with the thermostat leads before routing
them into the unit. Route the thermostat leads through
grommeted hole provided in unit (see Fig. 13) into unit control box. Connect thermostat leads to unit control power leads
as shown in Fig. 16.
D. Electrical Connections
WARNING: The unit cabinet must have an uninterrupted, unbroken electrical ground to minimize the
possibility of personal injury if an electrical fault should
occur. This ground may consist of an electrical wire connected to the unit ground in the control compartment,
or conduit approved for electrical ground when
installed in accordance with NEC, ANSI (American
National Standards Institute)/NFPA (latest edition)
(in Canada, Canadian Electrical Code CSA [Canadian
Standards Association] C22.1) and local electrical codes.
Failure to adhere to this warning could result in personal injury or death.
—8—
Route thermostat wires through grommet providing a drip
loop at the panel. Connect low-voltage leads to the thermostat as shown in Fig. 16.
rewire transformer primary as described in Special Procedures for 208-V Operation section on page 11.
Accessory Electric Heat Wiring
Refer to accessory electric heat installation instructions for
information on installing accessory electric heat. Accessory
electric heat wiring is shown in Fig. 17.
The unit transformer supplies 24-v power for complete
system including accessory electrical heater. Transformer is
factory wired for 230-v operation. If supply voltage is 208 v,
HIGH-VOLTAGE
POWER WIRING
ENTRY HOLE
LOW-VOLTAGE
WIRING ENTRY
HOLE
LEGEND
NEC — National Electrical Code
Field Control Wiring
Fig. 13 — Unit Electrical Connection Entry Holes
Field Splice
Fig. 15 — Line Power Connections
Fig. 16 — Control Connections
Fig. 14 — Control Box Wiring
—9—
Table 2 — Electrical Data
VOLTAGE
RANGE
COMPRESSOR
OFM
IFM
Max
RLA
LRA
FLA
FLA
187
254
10.9
61.0
0.9
2.4
208/230-1-60
187
254
15.2
69.4
1.5
2.4
208/230-1-60
187
254
15.9
86.0
1.5
2.8
208/230-3-60
187
254
8.9
64.5
1.5
2.8
208/230-1-60
187
254
18.5
97.6
1.5
2.8
208/230-3-60
187
254
10.9
73.0
1.5
2.8
208/230-1-60
187
254
21.3
107.0
1.5
4.2
208/230-3-60
187
254
12.3
73.0
1.5
4.2
230-1-60
207
254
26.9
128.0
1.4
6.2
208/230-3-60
187
254
17.7
128.0
1.4
6.2
460-3-60
414
508
9.0
63.0
0.7
3.2
UNIT
564A/764A
NOMINAL
VOLTAGE
(V-Ph-Hz)
Min
024
208/230-1-60
030
036
042
048
060
POWER SUPPLY
DISCONNECT
SIZE
FLA
MCA
MOCP
FLA
—/—
18.1/20.8
36.1/41.7
—/—
18.1/20.8
36.1/41.7
54.2/62.5
—/—
18.1/20.8
36.1/41.7
54.2/62.5
72.2/83.3
—/—
10.4/12.0
20.8/24.1
31.3/36.1
41.7/48.1
—/—
18.1/20.8
36.1/41.7
54.2/62.5
72.2/83.3
—/—
10.4/12.0
20.8/24.1
31.3/36.1
41.7/48.1
—/—
18.1/20.8
36.1/41.7
54.2/62.5
72.2/83.3
—/—
10.4/12.0
20.8/24.1
31.3/36.1
41.7/48.1
—
20.8
41.7
62.5
83.3
—/—
10.4/12.0
20.8/24.1
31.3/36.1
41.7/48.1
—
6.0
12.0
18.0
24.1
16.9/ 16.9
25.6/ 29.0
48.1/ 55.1
22.9/ 22.9
25.6/ 29.0
48.1/ 55.1
70.7/ 81.1
24.2/ 24.2
26.1/ 29.5
48.6/ 55.6
71.2/ 81.6
93.6/107.7
15.4/ 15.4
16.5/ 18.5
29.6/ 33.6
42.6/ 48.6
55.6/ 63.6
27.4/ 27.4
27.4/ 29.5
48.6/ 55.6
71.2/ 81.6
93.8/107.7
17.9/ 17.9
17.9/ 18.5
29.6/ 33.6
42.6/ 48.6
55.6/ 63.6
32.3/ 32.3
32.3/ 32.3
50.4/ 57.3
72.9/ 83.4
95.5/109.4
21.1/ 21.1
21.1/ 21.1
31.3/ 35.3
44.3/ 50.4
57.4/ 65.4
41.2
41.2
59.8
85.9
111.9
29.7/ 29.7
29.7/ 29.7
33.8/ 37.8
46.8/ 52.9
59.9/ 67.9
15.2
15.2
19.0
26.6
34.1
20/ 20
30/ 30
50/ 60
30/ 30
30/ 30
50/ 60
80/ 90†
30/ 30
30/ 30
50/ 60
80/ 90†
100/110†
20/ 20
20/ 20
30/ 35
45/ 50
60/ 70†
35/ 35
35/ 35
50/ 60
80/ 90†
100/110†
25/ 25
25/ 25
30/ 35
45/ 50
60/ 70†
40/ 40
40/ 40
60/ 60
80/ 90†
100/110†
25/ 25
25/ 25
35/ 40
45/ 60
60/ 70†
50
50
60
90†
125†
35/ 35
35/ 35
35/ 40
50/ 60
60/ 70†
20
20
20
30
35
16/ 16
24/ 27
44/ 51
22/ 22
24/ 27
44/ 51
65/ 75
23/ 23
24/ 27
45/ 51
66/ 75
86/ 99
15/ 15
15/ 17
27/ 31
39/ 45
51/ 59
26/ 26
26/ 27
45/ 51
66/ 75
86/ 99
17/ 17
17/ 17
27/ 31
39/ 45
51/ 59
31/ 31
31/ 31
46/ 53
67/ 77
88/101
21/ 21
21/ 21
29/ 32
41/ 46
53/ 60
40
40
55
79
103
29/ 29
29/ 29
31/ 35
43/ 49
55/ 62
15
15
18
24
31
ELECTRIC HEAT
Nominal
kW*
—/—
3.8/ 5.0
7.5/10.0
—/—
3.8/ 5.0
7.5/10.0
11.3/15.0
—/—
3.8/ 5.0
7.5/10.0
11.3/15.0
15.0/20.0
—/—
3.8/ 5.0
7.5/10.0
11.3/15.0
15.0/20.0
—/—
3.8/ 5.0
7.5/10.0
11.3/15.0
15.0/20.0
—/—
3.8/ 5.0
7.5/10.0
11.3/15.0
15.0/20.0
—/—
3.8/ 5.0
7.5/10.0
11.3/15.0
15.0/20.0
—/—
3.8/ 5.0
7.5/10.0
11.3/15.0
15.0/20.0
—
5.0
10.0
15.0
20.0
—/—
3.8/ 5.0
7.5/10.0
11.3/15.0
15.0/20.0
—
5.0
10.0
15.0
20.0
LRA
68
79
96
74
107
83
121
87
141
146
71
EXAMPLE: Supply voltage is 460-3-60
LEGEND
FLA
— Full Load Amps
HACR — Heating, Air Conditioning and
Refrigeration
IFM
— Indoor (Evaporator) Fan Motor
LRA
— Locked Rotor Amps
MCA
— Minimum Circuit Amps
MOCP — Maximum Overcurrent Protection
NEC
— National Electrical Code
OFM
— Outdoor (Condenser) Fan Motor
RLA
— Rated Load Amps
AB = 452 v
BC = 464 v
AC = 455 v
Average voltage =
452 + 464 + 455
3
= 457
*Heater capacity (kW) is based on heater voltage of 208 v, 240 v, or
480 v. If power distribution voltage to unit varies from rated heater voltage, heater
kW will vary accordingly.
†Fuse or HACR circuit breaker.
NOTES:
1. In compliance with NEC requirements for multimotor and combination load and
equipment (refer to NEC Articles 430 and 440), the overcurrent protective device for the unit shall be fuse or HACR breaker.
2. Unbalanced 3-Phase Supply Voltage
Never operate a motor where a phase imbalance in supply voltage is greater
than 2%. Use the following formula to determine the percentage of voltage
imbalance.
% Voltage Imbalance
max voltage deviation from average voltage
= 100 x
average voltage
—10—
Determine maximum deviation from average voltage:
(AB) 457 − 452 = 5 v
(BC) 464 − 457 = 7 v
(AC) 457 − 455 = 2 v
Maximum deviation is 7 v.
Determine percentage of voltage imbalance:
7
% Voltage imbalance = 100 x
457
= 1.53%
This amount of phase imbalance is satisfactory as it is below the maximum
allowable 2%.
IMPORTANT: If the supply voltage phase imbalance is more than 2% contact
your local electric utility company immediately.
Fig. 17 — Electric Heater Wiring
Special Procedures for 208-V Operation
PRE-START-UP
WARNING: Failure to observe the following warnings could result in serious personal injury:
1. Follow recognized safety practices and wear protective goggles when checking or servicing refrigerant
system.
2. Do not operate compressor or provide any electric
power to unit unless compressor terminal cover is in
place and secured.
3. Do not remove compressor terminal cover until all
electrical sources have been disconnected.
4. Relieve and reclaim all pressure from both high- and
low-pressure sides of the system before touching or
disturbing anything inside terminal box if refrigerant leak is suspected around compressor terminals.
5. Never attempt to repair soldered connection while
refrigerant system is under pressure.
6. Do not use torch to remove any component. System
contains oil and refrigerant under pressure. To remove a component, wear protective goggles and proceed as follows:
a. Turn off electrical power to unit.
b. Relieve and reclaim all pressure from system.
c. Cut component connecting tubing with tubing cutter and remove component from unit.
d. Carefully unsweat remaining tubing stubs when
necessary. Oil can ignite when exposed to torch
flame.
WARNING: Make sure that the power supply to the
unit is switched OFF before making any wiring changes.
Electrical shock can cause personal injury or death.
1. Disconnect the orange transformer-primary lead from
the contactor. See unit wiring label.
2. Remove the wirenut from the terminal on the end of the
red transformer-primary lead.
3. Save the wirenut.
4. Connect the red lead to the contactor terminal from which
the orange lead was disconnected.
5. Using the wirenut removed from the red lead, insulate
the loose terminal on the orange lead.
6. Wrap the wirenut with electrical tape so that the metal
terminal cannot be seen.
Indoor blower-motor speeds may need to be changed for 208-v
operation. Refer to Indoor Airflow and Airflow Adjustments
section on page 13.
Heat Anticipator Setting
The room thermostat heat anticipator must be adjusted properly to ensure proper heating performance. Set anticipator
settings for room thermostat according to separate Accessory
Electric Heater Installation Instructions.
Failure to make a proper heat anticipator adjustment will
result in improper operation, discomfort to the occupants of
the conditioned space, and inefficient energy utilization; however, the required setting may be changed slightly to provide
a greater degree of comfort for a particular installation.
E. Accessory Installation
At this time, any required accessories should be installed
on the unit. Refer to separate accessory installation
instructions.
For unit compressors equipped with accessory crankcase heaters, heaters are energized as long as there is power to the
unit. Energize crankcase heater 24 hours prior to unit startup. To energize heater only, set thermostat at OFF position
and turn on unit main power at disconnect switch.
—11—
Proceed as follows to inspect and prepare the unit for initial
start-up:
4. After the call for heat has been satisfied, the evaporator
fan will stop. For units equipped with time-delay relay,
evaporator fan will stop after a 30-second time delay.
1. Remove all access panels.
2. Read and follow instructions on all WARNING, CAUTION, and INFORMATION labels attached to, or shipped
with, unit.
To shut off unit, set system selector switch at OFF position
or set heating set point lever below room temperature.
3. Make the following inspections:
When power is supplied to unit, transformer (TRAN) is
energized.
a. Inspect for shipping and handling damages such as
broken lines, loose parts, disconnected wires, etc.
b. Inspect for oil at all refrigerant tubing connections
and on unit base. Detecting oil generally indicates a
refrigerant leak. Leak-test all refrigerant tubing connections using electronic leak detector, halide torch,
or liquid-soap solution. If refrigerant leak is detected, see Repairing Refrigerant Leaks section on
page 15.
c. Inspect all field- and factory-wiring connections. Be
sure that connections are completed and tight.
d. Inspect coil fins. If damaged during shipping and handling, carefully straighten fins with a fin comb.
4. Verify the following conditions:
a. Make sure that condenser fan blade is correctly positioned in fan orifice. Top edge of blade should be
3.125 in. from condenser outlet grille.
b. Make sure that air filter(s) is in place.
c. Make sure that condensate drain pan and trap are
filled with water to ensure proper drainage.
d. Make sure that all tools and miscellaneous loose parts
have been removed.
5. Compressors are internally spring mounted. Do not loosen
or remove compressor holddown bolts.
6. Each unit system has 2 Schrader-type ports, one lowside Schrader fitting located on the suction line, and one
high-side Schrader fitting located on the compressor discharge line. Be sure that caps on the ports are tight.
See Start-Up Checklist in back of book. Unit is now ready for
initial start-up.
START-UP
I. HEATING SECTION START-UP AND ADJUSTMENTS
(For units with accessory electric heaters.)
CAUTION: Complete the required procedures given
in Pre-Start-Up section on this page before starting unit.
Do not jumper any safety devices when operating the unit.
A. Checking Heating Control Operation
Start and check the unit for proper heating control operation
as follows:
1. Turn on unit electrical supply.
2. Set system switch selector at HEAT position and fan switch
at AUTO. or ON position. Set heating temperature
lever above room temperature.
3. The evaporator fan and first-stage heat will start immediately. If unit is equipped with 2-stage heaters, secondstage heat will energize upon a call from W2. Check for
heating effect at supply diffusers.
B. Heating Sequence of Operation
With thermostat set to call for heating, sequence of operation
is as follows:
On a call for heat, circuit R-W and R-G are made through
first-stage thermostat bulb. If accessory electric heaters are
used, a relay is energized, bringing on first stage of supplemental electric heat and fan. When thermostat is satisfied,
contacts open, deenergizing relay (on all units) and timedelay relay (on units equipped with time-delay relay). Heaters deenergize, and evaporator fan stops after a 30-second
time delay (on units equipped with time-delay relay).
II. COOLING SECTION START-UP AND ADJUSTMENTS
CAUTION: Complete the required procedures given
in Pre-Start-Up section, page 11, before starting the unit.
Do not jumper any safety devices when operating the
unit.
Do not operate the compressor when the outdoor temperature is below 40 F (unless accessory low ambient
kit is installed).
Do not rapid-cycle the compressor.
A. Checking Cooling Control Operation
Start and check the unit for proper cooling control operation
as follows:
1. Place room thermostat SYSTEM switch in OFF position. Observe that evaporator-fan motor starts when FAN
switch is placed in ON position and shuts down after a
30-second time delay when FAN switch is placed in AUTO.
position.
2. Place SYSTEM switch in COOL position and FAN switch
in AUTO. position. Set cooling control below room temperature. Observe that compressor, condenser fan, and
evaporator-fan motors start. Observe that cooling cycle
shuts down when control setting is satisfied. Evaporatorfan motor has off-delay (on units equipped with timedelay relay) of approximately 30 seconds on shutdown.
3. When using an auto. changeover room thermostat, place
both SYSTEM and FAN switches in AUTO. positions.
Observe that unit operates in Heating mode when temperature control is set to ‘‘call for heating’’ (above room
temperature) and operates in Cooling mode when temperature control is set to ‘‘call for cooling’’ (below room
temperature).
B. Checking and Adjusting Refrigerant Charge
The refrigerant system is fully charged with R-22 refrigerant, and is tested and factory-sealed.
NOTE: Adjustment of the refrigerant charge is not required
unless the unit is suspected of not having the proper R-22
charge. See Refrigerant Charge section on page 16 for further details.
—12—
C. Unit Controls
Table 3 — Dry Coil Air Delivery —
Horizontal Discharge
Compressor
High-Pressure Relief Valve — Valve is located in compressor.
Relief valve opens at a pressure differential of approximately
450 psi between suction (low side) and discharge (high side)
to allow pressure equalization.
UNIT
564A/764A
024
Internal Current and Temperature Sensing Overload —
Device resets automatically when internal compressor motor
temperature drops to a safe level. When an internal overload
is suspected of being open, check by using an ohmmeter or
continuity tester.
030
036
D. Cooling Sequence of Operation
NOTE: With the FAN switch in the ON position, 24 v is supplied to the time-delay relay (TDR) through the G terminal
on the thermostat. This voltage energizes the coil of the relay, closing the normally-open set of contacts which provide
continuous power to the indoor (evaporator) fan motor (IFM).
Moving the FAN switch back to the AUTO. position (providing there is not a call for cooling) deenergizes the TDR (when
applicable) which deenergizes the IFM after a 30-second delay. The FAN switch in AUTO. position cycles upon a call for
cooling.
On a call for cooling, 24 v is supplied to the compressor contactor (C) and TDR simultaneously through the Y and G terminals of the thermostat, respectively. On units with a compressor TDR, there is a built-in, 5-minute (±45 seconds) delay
between compressor starts. Energizing the contactor closes
the normally-open set of contacts supplying power to both the
compressor and outdoor (condenser) fan motor (OFM). Energizing the TDR closes the normally-open set of contacts providing power to the IFM. On the loss of the call for cooling,
24 v is removed from both the Y and G terminals of the thermostat (providing the FAN switch is in the AUTO. position),
deenergizing both the compressor and TDR and opening both
the contacts supplying power to compressor and OFM. IFM
has a 30-second delay.
III. INDOOR AIRFLOW AND AIRFLOW ADJUSTMENTS
042
048†
060
IFM SPEED
SETTING
Low
Med
High
Low*
Med
High
Low
Med
High
Low*
Med
High
Low
—
High
Low
Med**
High
AIRFLOW
(Cfm)
800
800
800
1000
1000
1000
1200
1200
1200
1400
1400
1400
1600
—
1600
2000
2000
2000
ESP
(in. wg)
0.30
0.65
0.80
—
0.35
0.65
0.30
0.50
0.65
—
0.30
0.60
0.50
—
0.65
0.15
0.60
0.65
POWER
(Watts)
282
349
439
—
370
460
445
480
530
—
495
571
650
—
720
900
850
945
LEGEND
ESP — External Static Pressure
IFM — Indoor (Evaporator) Fan Motor
*Unit is factory set on medium speed, this airflow is not obtainable at
low speed.
†Size 048 has low and high speed only.
**460 volt motors do not have a medium speed.
NOTE: Values for 208/230-v motors are at 230 v; deduct 10% for 208 v.
A. For 208/230-v Blower Motors:
The motor leads are color-coded as follows:
black
blue
red
3-SPEED
= high speed
= medium speed
= low speed
black
red
2-SPEED
= high speed
= low speed
To change the speed of the blower motor, remove the fan motor speed leg lead from the indoor (evaporator) fan relay (IFR)
and replace with lead for desired blower motor speed. Insulate the removed lead to avoid contact with chassis parts.
CAUTION: For cooling operation, the recommended
airflow is 350 to 450 cfm per each 12,000 Btuh of rated
cooling capacity.
Table 3 shows dry coil air delivery for horizontal discharge
units.
WARNING: Disconnect electrical power to the unit before changing blower speed. Electrical shock can cause
personal injury or death.
Airflow can be changed by changing the lead connections of
the blower motor.
Units 564A/764A024, 036, 048, and 060 blower motors are
factory wired for low speed operation. Units 564A/764A030
and 042 are factory wired for medium speed operation.
B. For 460-v (2-Speed) Blower Motors:
The motor leads are color coded as follows:
black
= high
yellow = jumper
purple = jumper
red
= low
To change the speed of the blower motor from low speed to
high speed, remove the red lead from the indoor fan relay
(IFR). Insulate the red lead to avoid contact with any chassis
parts. Separate the black lead from the purple jumper. Connect the black lead to the IFR. Insulate the purple lead to
avoid contact with any chassis parts.
—13—
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
I. AIR FILTER
NOTE: The following steps should be performed by a qualified service person.
WARNING: Before installing or servicing unit, turn
off main power to system to avoid shock hazard or injury from rotating parts. There may be more than one
disconnect switch. Turn off accessory heater power if applicable. Electrical shock can cause personal injury or
death.
To ensure continuing high performance, and to reduce the possibility of premature equipment failure, periodic maintenance must be performed on this equipment. Unit should
be inspected at least once each year by a qualified service
person.
NOTE TO EQUIPMENT OWNER: Consult your local dealer
about the availability of a maintenance contract.
WARNING: The ability to properly perform maintenance on this equipment requires certain expertise,
mechanical skills, tools, and equipment. If you do not
possess these, do not attempt to perform any maintenance on this equipment other than those procedures
recommended in the User’s Manual. FAILURE TO HEED
THIS WARNING COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY AND POSSIBLE DAMAGE TO THIS
EQUIPMENT.
Inspect air filter(s) at least once each month and replace
(throwaway-type) or clean (permanent-type) at least twice during each cooling season or whenever the filter(s) becomes clogged
with dust and lint.
II. EVAPORATOR FAN AND MOTOR
NOTE: Motors without oilers are permanently lubricated. Do
not attempt to lubricate these motors.
For longer life, operating economy, and continued efficiency,
clean accumulated dirt and grease from the evaporator-fan
wheel and motor annually.
Lubricate the motor every 5 years if the motor is used intermittently (thermostat FAN switch in AUTO. position), or
every 2 years if the motor is used continuously (thermostat
FAN switch in ON position).
WARNING: Disconnect and tag all electrical power to
the unit before cleaning the evaporator-fan and wheel.
Failure to adhere to this warning could cause personal
injury or death.
The minimum maintenance requirements for this equipment
are as follows:
1. Inspect air filter(s) each month. Clean or replace when
necessary.
2. Inspect condensing coil, drain pan, and condensate drain
each cooling season for cleanliness. Clean when
necessary.
3. Inspect evaporator-fan motor and wheel for cleanliness
each heating and cooling season. Clean when necessary.
For first heating season, inspect evaporator-fan motor
bimonthly to determine proper cleaning frequency.
4. Check electrical connections for tightness and controls
for proper operation each heating and cooling season.
Service when necessary.
5. Check the drain channel in the top cover periodically
for blockage (leaves, insects). Clean as needed.
WARNING: Failure to follow these warnings could result in serious personal injury:
1. Turn off all electrical power to the unit before performing any maintenance or service on the unit.
2. Use extreme caution when removing panels and parts.
As with any mechanical equipment, personal injury
can result from sharp edges, etc.
3. Never place anything combustible either on, or in contact with, the unit.
4. Should overheating occur, shut off all of the electrical supply(s).
CAUTION: Never operate the unit without a suitable air filter in the return-air duct system. Always replace the filter with the same dimensional size and type
as originally installed. See Tables 1 and 2 for recommended filter sizes.
To clean the blower wheel:
1. Access the blower assembly as follows:
a. Remove top access panel.
b. Remove 3 screws that hold blower orifice ring to blower
housing. Save screws.
c. Loosen set screw(s) which secure wheel to motor shaft.
2. Remove and clean blower wheel as follows:
a. Lift wheel from housing. When handling and/or cleaning blower wheel, be sure not to disturb balance weights
(clips) on blower wheel vanes.
b. Remove caked-on dirt from wheel and housing with
a brush. Remove lint and/or dirt accumulations from
wheel and housing with vacuum cleaner, using a soft
brush attachment. Remove grease and oil with a mild
solvent.
c. Reassemble blower into housing. Place upper orifice
ring on blower to judge location of the blower wheel.
Blower wheel should be approximately .2 in. below
bottom of orifice ring when centered correctly. Be sure
set screws are tightened on motor and are not on round
part of shaft.
d. Set upper orifice ring in place with 3 screws removed
in Step 1.
e. Replace top access panel.
—14—
SERVICE
NOTE: The following steps should be performed by a qualified service person.
WARNING: Before installing or servicing unit, turn
off main power to system to avoid shock hazard or injury from rotating parts. There may be more than one
disconnect switch. Turn off accessory heater power if
applicable. Electrical shock can cause personal injury
or death.
I. CLEANING
Inspect unit interior at the beginning of each heating and cooling season or as operating conditions require. To inspect and
clean, the unit top must be removed.
A. Unit Top Removal
NOTE: When performing maintenance or service procedures
that require removal of the unit top, be sure to perform all of
the routine maintenance procedures that require top removal, including: coil inspection and cleaning, and condensate drain pan inspection and cleaning.
Only qualified service personnel should perform maintenance and service procedures that require unit top removal.
Refer to the following top removal procedures:
1. Remove 7 screws on unit top cover surface. Save all screws.
2. Remove 2 screws that secure unit top cover flange. Save
all screws.
3. Lift top from unit carefully. Set top on edge and ensure
that top is supported by unit side that is opposite duct
side.
When maintenance and/or service procedures are concluded,
carefully replace and secure unit top to unit, using screws removed in Steps 1 and 2.
Inspect the condenser coil, evaporator coil, and condensate
drain pan at least once each year. Proper inspection and cleaning requires the removal of the unit top. See Unit Top
Removal section above.
The coils are easily cleaned when dry; therefore, inspect and
clean the coils either before or after each cooling season.
Remove all obstructions (including weeds and shrubs) that
interfere with the airflow through the condenser coil. Straighten
bent fins with a fin comb. If coated with dirt or lint, clean the
coils with a vacuum cleaner, using a soft brush attachment.
Be careful not to bend the fins. If coated with oil or grease,
clean the coils with a mild detergent-and-water solution. Rinse
coils with clear water, using a garden hose. Be careful not to
splash water on motors, insulation, wiring, or air filter(s). For
best results, spray condenser-coil fins from inside to outside
the unit. On units with an outer and inner condenser coil, be
sure to clean between the coils. Be sure to flush all dirt and
debris from the unit base.
Inspect the drain pan and condensate drain line when
inspecting the coils. Clean the drain pan and condensate drain
by removing all foreign matter from the pan. Flush the pan
and drain tube with clear water. Do not splash water on the
insulation, motor, wiring, or air filter(s). If the drain tube is
restricted, clear it with a ‘‘plumbers snake’’ or similar probe
device. Ensure that the auxiliary drain port above the drain
tube is also clear.
II. EVAPORATOR FAN AND MOTOR
Refer to Care and Maintenance section for procedure.
III. CONDENSER FAN
B. Repairing Refrigerant Leaks
Proceed as follows to repair a refrigerant leak and to charge
the unit.
1. Locate leak and ensure that refrigerant system pressure has been relieved and recovered from both highand low-pressure ports.
2. Repair leak following accepted practices.
NOTE: Install a filter drier whenever the system has been
opened for repair.
3. Add a small charge of nitrogen vapor to system and leaktest unit.
4. Evacuate refrigerant system if additional leaks are not
found.
5. Charge unit with R-22 refrigerant, using a volumetriccharging cylinder or accurate scale. Refer to unit rating
plate for required charge. Be sure to add extra refrigerant to compensate for internal volume of filter drier.
NOTE: See Adjusting Refrigerant Charge on page 16.
C. Condenser Coil, Evaporator Coil, and Condensate
Drain Pan
CAUTION: Keep the condenser fan free from all
obstructions to ensure proper cooling operation. Never
place articles on top of the unit. Damage to unit may
result.
1. Shut off unit power supply.
2. Remove condenser-fan assembly (grille, motor, motor cover,
and fan) by removing screws and flipping assembly onto
unit top cover.
3. Loosen fan hub setscrews.
4. Adjust fan height as shown in Fig. 18.
5. Tighten setscrews.
6. Replace condenser-fan assembly.
Fig. 18 — Condenser-Fan Adjustment
WARNING: Be careful! Coil fins are sharp. Protect
hands with gloves when cleaning or handling coil.
—15—
IV. ELECTRICAL CONTROLS AND WIRING
Inspect and check the electrical controls and wiring annually. Be sure to turn off all electrical power to the unit.
Remove the control, evaporator fan, and compressor compartment access panels to locate all the electrical controls and
wiring. Check all electrical connections for tightness. Tighten
all screw connections. If any smoky or burned connections are
noticed, disassemble the connection and clean all the parts.
Then restrip the wire end, and reassemble the connection properly and securely.
After inspecting the electrical controls and wiring, replace all
the panels. Start the unit, and observe at least one complete
heating cycle (if accessory electric heaters are field installed
in unit) and one complete cooling cycle to ensure proper
operation. If discrepancies are observed in either or both
operating cycles, or if a suspected malfunction has occurred,
check each electrical component with the proper electrical
instrumentation. Refer to unit wiring label when performing
these checkouts.
NOTE: Refer to the Cooling Sequence of Operation on
page 13 as an aid in determining proper control operation.
V. INDOOR AIRFLOW
The airflow does not require checking unless improper performance is suspected. If a problem exists, be sure that all
supply- and return-air grilles are open and free from obstructions, and that the air filter is clean. When necessary, refer
to Indoor Airflow and Airflow Adjustments section on
page 13 to check the system airflow.
VI. METERING DEVICE SERVICING
Refrigerant metering devices are fixed orifices and are located in the inlet header to the evaporator coil.
VII. LIQUID LINE STRAINER
Strainer is made of wire mesh and is located in the liquid
line on inlet side. Remove strainer by cutting it from the liquid line. Braze a new strainer into liquid line with nitrogen
gas flowing through the refrigerant system.
VIII. REFRIGERANT CHARGE
A. Adjusting Refrigerant Charge
Amount of refrigerant charge is listed on unit nameplate (also
refer to Table 1). Refer to Carrier Refrigerant Service Techniques Manual, Refrigerants section.
Unit panels must be in place when unit is operating during
charging procedure.
No Charge
Use standard evacuating techniques. After evacuating
system, weigh in the specified amount of refrigerant (refer to
Table 1).
Low Charge Cooling
Use Cooling Charging Charts, Fig. 19-24. Vary refrigerant until the conditions of the appropriate chart are met. Note that
charging charts are different from the type normally used.
Charts are based on charging the units to the correct superheat for the various operating conditions. Accurate pressure
gage and temperature sensing device are required.
To measure suction pressure, perform the following:
1. Connect the pressure gage to the service port on the suction line.
2. Mount the temperature sensing device on the suction
line and insulate it so that outdoor ambient temperature does not affect the reading. Indoor-air cfm must be
within the normal operating range of the unit.
To Use Cooling Charging Charts
1. Take the outdoor ambient temperature and read the suction pressure gage.
2. Refer to appropriate chart to determine what the suction temperature should be.
3. If suction temperature is high, add refrigerant. If suction temperature is low, carefully recover some of the
charge.
4. Recheck the suction pressure as charge is adjusted.
EXAMPLE: (Fig. 19)
Outdoor Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 F
Suction Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 psig
Suction Temperature should be . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 F
(Suction Temperature may vary ± 5° F.)
WARNING: Avoid contact with hot gas discharge line
to prevent a burn when working on compressor.
CAUTION: To prevent personal injury, wear safety
glasses and gloves when handling refrigerant.
Do not overcharge system. An overcharge can cause compressor damage.
If Chargemastert charging device is used, temperature and
pressure readings must be accomplished using the charging
chart.
Unit refrigerant system is factory charged. When recharging
is necessary, weigh in total charge indicated on unit nameplate. Remove and recover any refrigerant remaining in
system before recharging. If system has lost complete charge,
evacuate system to 500 microns (29.90-in. Hg vacuum) before recharging. Schrader fitting connections are provided on
unit suction and discharge lines for evacuation and charging. Dial-a-Charge charging cylinder is an accurate device used
to charge systems by weight; these cylinders are available at
refrigeration supply firms.
IX. REPLACEMENT PARTS
A complete list of replacement parts may be obtained from
your distributor upon request.
—16—
Fig. 19 — Cooling Charging Chart — 564A/764A024
Fig. 21 — Cooling Charging Chart — 564A/764A036
Fig. 20 — Cooling Charging Chart 564A/764A030
Fig. 22 — Cooling Charging Chart — 564A/764A042
—17—
Fig. 24 — Cooling Charging Chart — 564A/764A060
Fig. 23 — Cooling Charging Chart — 564A/764A048
—18—
COOLING TROUBLESHOOTING CHART
SYMPTOM
Compressor and condenser fan will not
start.
Compressor will not
start but condenser
fan runs.
Compressor cycles
(other than normally
satisfying thermostat).
Compressor operates
continuously.
Excessive head
pressure.
Head pressure too low.
Excessive suction
pressure.
Suction pressure too
low.
CAUSE
Power failure
Fuse blown or circuit breaker tripped
Defective thermostat, contactor, transformer,
or control relay
Insufficient line voltage
Incorrect or faulty wiring
Thermostat setting too high
Faulty wiring or loose connections in
compressor circuit
Compressor motor burned out, seized, or
internal overload open
Defective run/start capacitor, overload, or
start relay
One leg of 3-phase power dead
Refrigerant overcharge or undercharge
Defective compressor
Insufficient line voltage
Blocked condenser
Defective run/start capacitor, overload,
or start relay
Defective thermostat
Faulty condenser-fan motor or capacitor
Restriction in refrigerant system
Dirty air filter
Unit undersized for load
Thermostat set too low
Low refrigerant charge
Leaking valves in compressor
Air in system
Condenser coil dirty or restricted
Dirty air filter
Dirty condenser coil
Refrigerant overcharged
Air in system
Condenser air restricted or air short-cycling
Low refrigerant charge
Compressor valves leaking
Restriction in liquid tube
High heat load
Compressor valves leaking
Refrigerant overcharged
Dirty air filter
Low refrigerant charge
Metering device or low side restricted
Insufficient evaporator airflow
Temperature too low in conditioned area
Outdoor ambient below 40 F
Field-installed filter-drier restricted
—19—
REMEDY
Call power company.
Replace fuse or reset circuit breaker.
Replace component.
Determine cause and correct.
Check wiring diagram and rewire correctly.
Lower thermostat setting below room temperature.
Check wiring and repair or replace.
Determine cause. Replace compressor.
Determine cause and replace.
Replace fuse or reset circuit breaker.
Determine cause.
Recover refrigerant, evacuate system, and recharge
to capacities shown on nameplate.
Replace and determine cause.
Determine cause and correct.
Determine cause and correct.
Determine cause and replace.
Replace thermostat.
Replace.
Locate restriction and remove.
Replace filter.
Decrease load or increase unit size.
Reset thermostat.
Locate leak, repair, and recharge.
Replace compressor.
Recover refrigerant, evacuate system, and recharge.
Clean coil or remove restriction.
Replace filter.
Clean coil.
Recover excess refrigerant.
Recover refrigerant, evacuate system, and recharge.
Determine cause and correct.
Check for leaks, repair and recharge.
Replace compressor.
Remove restriction.
Check for source and eliminate.
Replace compressor.
Recover excess refrigerant.
Replace filter.
Check for leaks, repair, and recharge.
Remove source of restriction.
Increase air quantity. Check filter, and replace if
necessary.
Reset thermostat.
Install low-ambient kit.
Replace.
PACKAGED SERVICE TRAINING
Our packaged service training programs provide an excellent way to increase your knowledge of the
equipment discussed in this manual. Product programs cover:
• Maintenance
• Unit Familiarization
• Operating Sequence
• Installation Overview
A large selection of product, theory, and skills programs is available. All programs include a video
cassette and/or slides and a companion booklet. Use these for self teaching or to conduct full training
sessions.
For a free Service Training Material Catalog (STM), call 1-800-962-9212. Ordering instructions are
included.
Copyright 1996 Carrier Corporation
CATALOG NO. BDP-3356-403
I. PRELIMINARY INFORMATION
MODEL NO.:
SERIAL NO.:
DATE:
TECHNICIAN:
II. PRE-START-UP (insert checkmark in box as each item is completed)
M VERIFY THAT ALL PACKING MATERIALS HAVE BEEN REMOVED FROM UNIT
M VERIFY THAT CONDENSATE CONNECTION IS INSTALLED PER INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
M CHECK ALL ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS AND TERMINALS FOR TIGHTNESS
M VERIFY THAT UNIT INSTALLATION IS LEVEL
M CHECK FAN WHEEL AND PROPELLER FOR LOCATION IN HOUSING/ORIFICE AND SETSCREW
TIGHTNESS
III. START-UP
ELECTRICAL
SUPPLY VOLTAGE
L1-L2
L2-L3
L3-L1
COMPRESSOR AMPS
L1
L2
L3
EVAPORATOR-FAN AMPS
TEMPERATURES
OUTDOOR-AIR TEMPERATURE
DB
RETURN-AIR TEMPERATURE
DB
WB
REFRIGERANT SUCTION
PSIG
REFRIGERANT DISCHARGE
PSIG
CUT ALONG DOTTED LINE
PRESSURES
M VERIFY REFRIGERANT CHARGE USING CHARGING TABLES
Copyright 1996 Carrier Corporation
CL-1
CUT ALONG DOTTED LINE
(Remove and Store in Job File)
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
START-UP CHECKLIST
CATALOG NO. BDP-3356-403