Installation guide | Cabletron Systems E3100 Network Card User Manual

E1100, E2100, AND E3100 SERIES
ETHERNET NETWORK ADAPTERS
INSTALLATION GUIDE
Desktop Network Interface Products
C A B L E T R O N S Y S T E M S, I N C.
NOTICE
NOTICE
Cabletron Systems reserves the right to make changes in
specifications and other information contained in this document
without prior notice. The reader should in all cases consult Cabletron
Systems to determine whether any such changes have been made.
The hardware, firmware, or software described in this manual is
subject to change without notice.
IN NO EVENT SHALL CABLETRON SYSTEMS BE LIABLE FOR
ANY INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES WHATSOEVER (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO
LOST PROFITS) ARISING OUT OF OR RELATED TO THIS
MANUAL OR THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN IT, EVEN IF
CABLETRON SYSTEMS HAS BEEN ADVISED OF, KNOWN, OR
SHOULD HAVE KNOWN, THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH
DAMAGES.
 Copyright October 1992
Cabletron Systems, Inc.
35 Industrial Way, P.O. Box 5005
Rochester, NH 03867-0505
All Rights Reserved
Printed in the United States of America
Order number: 9030445-02 October 92
Multi Media Access Center, LANVIEW and Remote LANVIEW are
registered trademarks and Desktop Network Interface, E1100, E2100,
E3100, FOT-F, LAN-MD, and MMAC are trademarks of Cabletron
Systems, Inc.
SunNet Manager is a registered trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
IBM, IBM Personal Computer AT, Micro Channel, IBM Personal
System/2 and PS/2 are registered trademarks of International
Business Machines Corporation. IBM Personal Computer XT and PC
LAN are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation.
MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
Novell and NetWare are registered trademarks of Novell, Inc.
i
FCC NOTICE
FCC NOTICE
This device complies with Part 15 of FCC rules. Operation is subject
to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause
harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference
received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
WARNING: This equipment has been tested and found to comply
with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of FCC
Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a
commercial environment. This equipment uses, generates, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and if not installed in accordance with
the operator’s manual, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is
likely to cause interference in which case the user will be required at
his own expense to correct the interference.
If this equipment does cause interference to radio or television, which
can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is
encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the
following measures:
•
•
•
•
Re-orient the receiving antenna.
Relocate the computer with respect to the antenna.
Move the computer away from the receiver.
Plug the computer into a different outlet so that the computer
and the receiver are on different branch circuits.
If necessary, the user should consult the dealer or an experienced
radio/television technician for additional suggestions. The user may
find the following booklet prepared by the Federal Communication
Commission helpful:
“Interference Handbook”
This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office,
Washington D.C. 20402 - Stock No. 004-000-00482-5.
ii
CONTENTS
CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1
1.1
1.2
1.3
INTRODUCTION
Using This Manual ....................................................................1-1
The Adapter Features ...............................................................1-2
1.2.1 Connectivity ...................................................................1-2
1.2.2 Thin Ethernet Port .........................................................1-2
1.2.3 10BASE-T Twisted Pair Port ........................................1-2
1.2.4 Fiber Optic Ports ............................................................1-3
1.2.5 Jabber Protection ............................................................1-3
1.2.6 LANVIEW LEDs ............................................................1-3
1.2.7 Software ..........................................................................1-5
1.2.8 Statistics ...........................................................................1-5
Related Manuals ........................................................................1-5
CHAPTER 2
INSTALLATION
2.1
Adapter Models .........................................................................2-1
2.1.1 Model Number References ...........................................2-2
2.2 The E1100/E2100 Series Adapters ..........................................2-2
2.2.1 Unpacking the Adapter ................................................2-3
2.2.2 Copying the Software ....................................................2-3
2.2.3 Preparing the E1100 for Installation ............................2-3
2.2.4 Preparing the E2100 for Installation ............................2-4
2.3 Setting the I/O Base Address Jumper ....................................2-5
2.4 I/O Address Space Requirements ..........................................2-6
2.5 Installing a Boot PROM ............................................................2-6
2.6 Installing the E1100/E2100 Adapters .....................................2-7
2.7 Installing the E3100 Series Adapters ....................................2-10
2.7.1 Preparing the E3100 Series for Installation ..............2-10
2.7.2 E3100 Series Boot PROM ............................................2-10
2.7.3 Installing the E3100 Adapter ......................................2-11
2.8 Copying the ADF File .............................................................2-14
2.9 Loading Network Software ...................................................2-14
2.10 Troubleshooting Check List for Adapters ...........................2-15
iii
CONTENTS
2.11 Software Check List ................................................................2-15
2.12 Getting Help ............................................................................2-16
2.13 Specifications ...........................................................................2-18
2.13.1 Power Requirements ...................................................2-18
2.13.2 Environmental Requirements ....................................2-18
2.13.3 Safety .............................................................................2-18
2.13.4 Dimensions ...................................................................2-18
CHAPTER 3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
MAKING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
Connecting to a Twisted Pair Segment ..................................3-1
3.1.1 RJ-45 Interface (UTP Port) ............................................3-1
3.1.2 Twisted Pair Requirements ..........................................3-3
Connecting to a Thin-net Segment .........................................3-4
3.2.1 BNC Interface (Coax Port) ............................................3-4
3.2.2 Thin-Net Requirements ................................................3-5
Connecting to a Fiber Optic Link Segment ............................3-6
3.3.1 Fiber Optic Requirements .............................................3-7
3.3.2 Fiber Optic Interface (Fiber Optic Ports) ....................3-8
Connecting to an External Transceiver ..................................3-9
3.4.1 AUI Connector (AUI Ports) ..........................................3-9
3.4.2 AUI Interface ................................................................3-10
3.4.3 AUI Cable Requirements ............................................3-10
APPENDIX A ADDRESS/INTERRUPT TABLES
INDEX
iv
INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION
This manual provides installation and reference information for
the network adapters. The network adapters connect your PC to: a
10BASE-T twisted pair Ethernet network segment, a thin Ethernet
10BASE-2 coaxial network, a fiber optic network segment, or a
transceiver via an AUI cable.
The adapters incorporate Cabletron Systems’ LANVIEW LEDs.
These diagnostic LEDs indicate power, network transmit and
receive, link established, and collision present conditions as soon
as the adapter is connected to the network segment.
1.1 USING THIS MANUAL
This manual is organized so that you can follow sequential
chapters as you install the adapter. Read Chapter 1 first to
familiarize yourself with the adapter’s capabilities. Then:
•
Copy the software diskettes supplied with the adapter.
•
Install the adapters as outlined in Chapter 2.
•
Run the diagnostic program supplied with the adapter.
•
Connect the adapter to the network as outlined in Chapter 3.
•
Install the network drivers required for your application as
outlined in the Network Software Installation Guide.
Chapter 1, Introduction, discusses the capabilities of the adapters.
Chapter 2, Installation, provides instructions for installing the
adapters in your computer.
Chapter 3, Making Network Connections, provides instructions
and requirements for connecting your adapters to the network.
Page 1-1
INTRODUCTION
1.2 THE ADAPTER FEATURES
The following sections outline the features of the adapters.
1.2.1 Connectivity
The Cabletron Systems adapters connect your computer to an
IEEE 802.3 Ethernet network. The various adapter models
incorporate either an Ethernet 10BASE-T twisted pair port, a thin
Ethernet coaxial BNC port, an SMT type fiber optic port, or an
external transceiver via an AUI cable. All port types provide
access for SNMP network management such as Cabletron’s
SPECTRUM, Remote LANVIEW/Windows, or any SNMPcompliant management software.
1.2.2 Thin Ethernet Port
The adapter’s 10BASE-2 port provides a thin Ethernet BNC
connection to a coaxial segment such as the backbone of a
corporate-wide network, or to a concentrator such as Cabletron’s
MMAC Multi Media Access Center.
1.2.3 10BASE-T Twisted Pair Port
The adapter’s 10BASE-T twisted pair port employs the RJ-45
eight-pin industry standard connector which must be connected
to a concentrator such as Cabletron’s MMAC Multi Media Access
Center. The 10BASE-T twisted pair port on the adapter has builtin automatic polarity detection and correction. This means that if
the cable connected to the twisted pair port should have the RX+
and RX– leads reversed, the port circuitry will automatically
detect and correct this problem.
When polarity correction has occurred, the link LED flashes to
indicate that this automatic correction has been performed.
Performance will not be impacted.
Page 1-2
INTRODUCTION
1.2.4 Fiber Optic Ports
The fiber optic ports on the adapter employs two ST type fiber
optic connectors. The dark gray ST connector is the fiber optic
receive port and light gray ST connector is the fiber optic transmit
port. The ST connector fiber optic ports can utilize
50/125 µm, 62.5/125 µm, and 100/140 µm fiber optic cables.
1.2.5 Jabber Protection
A built-in jabber protection scheme ensures that the network is
not disabled due to the transmission of excessively long packets
(jabber). This protection scheme automatically interrupts the port
for 96 bit times (1 bit time = 100 ns.) if the port has been
transmitting continuously for more than 65,536 bit times.
1.2.6 LANVIEW LEDs
Cabletron Systems’ adapters incorporate Cabletron Systems’
LANVIEW Status Monitoring and Diagnostic System. The
LANVIEW LEDs help you diagnose problems, such as failure to
establish a twisted pair link between the adapter and an Ethernet
device at the far end of the link. Individual LEDs advise you when
the adapter is receiving or transmitting data packets, or when a
collision condition exists on the network (see Figure 1-1).
•
Media Link Good (LNK) LED fiber optic adapters
When lit, this green LED indicates that a link has been established
between the fiber optic port on the adapter and the fiber optic
device at the other end of the fiber optic link segment. This LED
remains lit as long as the link is maintained.
•
Link OK (LNK) 10BASE-T only
When lit, this LED indicates that a link has been established
between the adapter and the device at the other end of the
Ethernet segment (green indicator).
Page 1-3
INTRODUCTION
XMT
CP
RCV
LNK or
PWR
CP
XMT
LNK
Upper Port
RCV
RJ-45 Port
RJ-45 Port
LNK
Lower Port
RJ-45 Port
BNC Port
Dual Media Adapter
Dual Port Adapter
Figure 1-1. LANVIEW LEDs
•
Collision Present (CLN)
This LED flashes when the adapter is transmitting to indicate that
the adapter is detecting a collision condition on the network (red
indicator).
•
Receive (RCV) network traffic
This LED flashes to indicate that the adapter is receiving data
packets from the network (yellow indicator).
•
Transmit (XMT)
This LED flashes to indicate the adapter is transmitting packets
onto the network (green indicator).
Page 1-4
INTRODUCTION
1.2.7 Software
Software drivers, related software, and diagnostics are supplied
by Cabletron Systems on floppy diskettes shipped with the
adapter. The drivers support a variety of network platforms. Refer
to the Network Software Installation Guide.
The diagnostic program provided with the adapter allows you to
check the adapter’s operation at various levels, through a series of
tests. The diagnostic program allows you to detect where a
problem might be located in the operation of the adapter, or
determine if a problem exists in the communication between the
adapter and the computer.
1.2.8 Statistics
Statistics can be gathered from the adapter either from your
computer, or from another workstation utilizing Cabletron
Systems’ SPECTRUM, Remote LANVIEW/Windows, Remote
LANVIEW for SunNet Manager, or other SNMP-compliant
network management software. Through this software, you can
gather statistics on the adapter’s activity on the Ethernet network.
For further information on Local Statistics, refer to the Network
Software Installation Guide.
1.3 RELATED MANUALS
•
TPT-T 10BASE-T Transceiver User’s Manual
•
Remote LANVIEW/Windows Station Software
User’s Manual
•
SPECTRUM documentation
•
Network Software Installation Guide
Page 1-5
INSTALLATION
CHAPTER 2
INSTALLATION
2.1
ADAPTER MODELS
The E1100, E2100, and E3100 Series network adapters are used for
the specific computer bus architectures listed below:
•
E1100 Series - IBM Personal Computer XT, IBM Personal
Computer AT, IBM Personal System/2 Models 25 or 30, or a
compatible with an XT or an AT style bus.
•
E2100 Series - IBM Personal Computer AT, IBM Personal
System/2 Model 30, or a compatible with an AT style bus.
•
E3100 Series - IBM Personal System/2 or compatibles with a
Micro Channel style bus.
Each type of adapter is available with a large memory option for
use in more demanding network environments. Large memory is
indicated by a - X appended to the adapter model number.
Table 2-1. Ethernet Adapter Model Number Reference
E
21
1
2
-X
Topology
Bus Type
1st Media
2nd Media
Options
E- Ethernet
11 - XT
0 - AUI
0 - AUI
-X Large
Memory
21 - AT
1 - Tw. Pair
1 - Tw. Pair
31 - MC
2 - Coax
2 - Coax
3 - Fiber SMA
3 - Fiber SMA
4 - Fiber ST
4 - Fiber ST
9 - N/A
Page 2-1
INSTALLATION
2.1.1 Model Number References
The descriptions of Ethernet adapter features use model numbers
with a lower case x in them. The x indicates that any number from
the model number reference chart applies to that feature. The
model number E11xx indicates an E1100 series adapter with any
media combination has the described feature. For example, an
E1112 is an E1100 Series adapter with UTP and coax ports. A
model with the suffix -X indicates a large memory option. The
optional memory sizes are listed below:
•
E1100 Series - 8 KB, E1100-X Series - 32 KB
•
E2100 Series - 16 KB, E2100-X Series - 64 KB
•
E3100 Series - 16 KB, E3100-X Series - 64 KB
2.2
THE E1100/E2100 SERIES ADAPTERS
This chapter shows you how to prepare an E1100 or E2100 Series
Cabletron Systems’ network adapter and install it in your
computer. The I/O base address and Boot PROM address are
hardware configurable for the E1100 and E2100 Series adapters,
while the other parameters are set through software. The
preparation and installation procedure for the adapter consists of
the following steps:
•
Unpacking the adapter and software
•
Making a backup copy of the software
•
Configuring and installing the adapter
•
Running diagnostics
•
Making network connections
•
Installing network drivers
Page 2-2
INSTALLATION
2.2.1 Unpacking the Adapter
The network adapter and its software are shipped separately. The
complete installation package should contain one conductive
pouch with the adapter and this manual. The software is shipped
in a shrink-wrapped package containing the software, a license
agreement, and a Network Software Installation Guide.
Carefully remove the conductive pouch from the box. Leave the
adapter in the conductive pouch until you are ready to install it.
Open the shrink-wrapped software package when you are ready
to install the software. Be sure to read the license agreement.
CAUTION: The adapter is sensitive to static discharges. Hold it by the
corners. Avoid contact with the PC bus edge connector or any of the
components, except the jumpers. Failure to observe all static precautions
can result in damage to the adapter.
2.2.2 Copying the Software
Before you begin the installation, it is important that you make a
backup copy of the Cabletron software supplied with the adapter.
Use the disk copy routine for your PC to make a duplicate copy of
the Cabletron software diskettes. Store the original software in a
safe place, and use the copies for the actual installation procedure.
2.2.3 Preparing the E1100 for Installation
The E11xx Series employs a socket for an optional Boot PROM. All
parameters except the I/O base address and PROM base address
are set through software. Instructions are included for setting the
I/O base address, and installing the Boot PROM. Figure 2-1, an
E1112 adapter, shows the locations of the jumpers and Boot
PROM socket. Boot PROM addressing is covered in the
installation instructions included with the Boot PROM.
Page 2-3
INSTALLATION
Boot PROM
Socket
JP1
I/O Base
Address
JP2
ROM
Enable
Figure 2-1. The E1112 Adapter
2.2.4 Preparing the E2100 for Installation
The E21xx Series employs a socket for an optional Boot PROM. All
parameters except the I/O base address and PROM base address
are set through software. Instructions are included for setting the
I/O base address, and installing the Boot PROM. Figure 2-2, an
E2112 adapter, shows the locations of the jumpers and Boot
PROM socket. Boot PROM addressing is covered in the
installation instructions included with the Boot PROM.
Boot PROM Socket
JP1
I/O Base Address
JP2
ROM Enable
Figure 2-2. The E2112 Adapter
Page 2-4
INSTALLATION
2.3
SETTING THE I/O BASE ADDRESS JUMPER
The I/O base address Jumper, JP1, must be set to one of four
possible addresses before the adapter is installed. The I/O base
address jumper sets the I/O (input/output) base address that
identifies the adapter to the PC.
The I/O base address is a hexadecimal field that distinguishes the
adapter from other adapters that may be in the PC. Two shunts are
supplied with the jumper in the event you want to use the 220
address setting. Figures 2-1 and 2-2 show the JP1 jumper’s
location.
To set the I/O base address jumper, JP1 (Figure 2-3), hold the
adapter so the components are facing you and the ports are on
your right.
1
2
3
4
Figure 2-3. JP1, E1100/E2100 I/O base address Jumper Pins
220
280
300
380
Figure 2-4. I/O Base Address Settings
Select one of four possible I/O base addresses by placing shunts
on the JP1 pins as shown in Figure 2-4. Note that address 220
requires the use of both shunts. No shunts are required for the
default address 380.
Page 2-5
INSTALLATION
2.4
I/O ADDRESS SPACE REQUIREMENTS
The I/O address space for the E1100 and E2100 Series adapters
occupies 20 Hex of the selected I/O base address. For example, if
you select 220 Hex, the adapter I/O address range will extend
through 23F Hex.
Note that 23F lies within the address space (230 to 240) allotted to
the bus mouse. If your system uses a bus mouse, address 220
cannot be used for the adapter because of the address conflict with
the bus mouse. Appendix A, Address/Interrupt Tables, lists the
I/O addresses of commonly used devices.
2.5
INSTALLING A BOOT PROM
The E1100 and E2100 Series adapters have a socket for an optional
Boot PROM. The Boot PROM plugs into the empty 28-pin socket
shown in Figures 2-1 and 2-2.
By installing a Boot PROM, you can use the adapter to boot up
your PC, without a hard drive, onto a network running, for
example, the Novell NetWare network operating system. A Boot
PROM address jumper (JP2) must be set before the Boot PROM
can be used, however.
Figure 2-5. Boot PROM and Socket Alignment
CAUTION: Observe all precautions when handling the Boot PROM.
Static discharges may damage the Boot PROM.
Page 2-6
INSTALLATION
To install a Boot PROM, remove the Boot PROM from its
packaging. Ensure that the legs of the Boot PROM are aligned in a
90° angle with the PROM body so the legs of the Boot PROM are
perpendicular to the Boot PROM pin sockets. Insert the Boot
PROM into the PROM socket so that the notch in the PROM is
aligned with the notch in the socket as shown in Figure 2-5.
Refer to the Boot PROM installation instructions included with the
PROM for setting Boot PROM parameters.
Refer to your PC user manual for further information on selecting
a Boot PROM address for your application.
2.6
INSTALLING THE E1100/E2100 ADAPTERS
Note that any of the E1100 and E2100 Series adapters can be
installed in either an XT or an AT style expansion slot. The E1100
adapter will occupy the forward half of the bus connector in an AT
style bus.
CAUTION: The adapter is sensitive to static discharges. Hold it by the
corners. Avoid contact with the PC bus edge connector or any of the
components, except the jumpers. Failure to observe all static precautions
may result in damage to the adapter.
Follow these steps to install the adapter in your computer:
•
Turn off the power to the PC and peripherals and disconnect
all power cords and cables.
•
Following the instructions in your computer user manual,
using static discharge precautions, remove the cover from the
computer.
•
Select the slot in which the adapter will be installed. An E1100
adapter can occupy any XT style, 8-bit expansion slot, or an AT
style, 16-bit expansion slot. An E2100 can occupy any 16-bit
expansion slot or an XT type slot, but in an 8-bit slot,
performance will be degraded.
Page 2-7
INSTALLATION
•
Carefully remove the adapter from its protective pouch, and
visually inspect it.
•
Remove the backplate (2, Fig. 2-6) from the selected slot (3)
by removing the screw (1) holding the backplate in place, and
sliding the backplate out of the slot as shown in Figure 2-6.
Carefully insert the adapter into the expansion slot as shown in
Figures 2-7 and 2-8. Orient the adapter (1) so the PC edge bus
connector (2) is pointed down and the ports face out the back of
the PC. Align the adapter so the PC bus edge connector is lined up
with the expansion slot (3), and firmly press, but do not force, the
adapter into the slot.
1
3
2
1. Screw
2. Backplate
3. Expansion Slot
Figure 2-6. Backplate Detail
Page 2-8
INSTALLATION
1
1. Adapter
2. PC Board Connector
3. Expansion Slot
2
3
Figure 2-7. Installing the E1100 Series Adapter
1
1. Adapter
2. PC Board Connector
3. Expansion Slot
2
3
Figure 2-8. Installing the E2100 Series Adapter
Page 2-9
INSTALLATION
Reinsert the screw removed in disassembly and replace the PC
cover. Reattach the power and peripheral cables and turn on the
power for the PC and the peripherals.
2.7
INSTALLING THE E3100 SERIES ADAPTERS
This section contains instructions for preparing and installing
your Cabletron Systems E3100 Series network adapter into your
computer. The only hardware preparation for installing the E3100
Series adapter is the installation of an optional Boot PROM.
2.7.1 Preparing the E3100 Series for Installation
The parameters for the E3100 Series adapters are set when the
Adapter Description File (ADF) is configured. The ADF file
distinguishes the adapter from other boards in the computer. The
ADF will be configured after the adapter is installed.
CAUTION: The adapter is sensitive to static discharges. Hold it by the
corners. Avoid contact with the PC bus edge connector or any of the
components. Failure to observe all static precautions may result in
damage to the adapter.
2.7.2 E3100 Series Boot PROM
The E3100 Series adapters each have a socket for an optional Boot
PROM, which is purchased separately. By installing a Boot
PROM, you can use the adapter to boot up your PC, without a
hard drive, onto a network running for example, the Novell
NetWare network operating system. The Boot PROM is
configured with the necessary parameters when configuring the
Adapter Description File, as described in Section 2.8. Refer to
Figure 2-9 for the location of the Boot PROM socket. See Boot
PROM installation instructions included in Section 2.5. An E3112
is shown in Figure 2-1.
CAUTION: Observe all precautions when handling the Boot PROM.
Static discharges may damage the Boot PROM.
Page 2-10
INSTALLATION
Boot PROM Socket
Figure 2-9. The E3112 Adapter
2.7.3 Installing the E3100 Adapter
To install the adapter in your computer, follow these instructions:
•
Turn off the power to the PC and peripherals and
disconnect all power cords and cables.
•
Following the instructions in your computer user manual,
using static discharge precautions, remove the cover from
the computer.
•
Select the slot in which the adapter will be installed. Your
adapter can occupy any unused Micro Channel style, 16-bit
or 32-bit expansion slot.
Page 2-11
INSTALLATION
1
2
1. Backplate
2. Thumbscrew
Figure 2-10. Micro Channel Backplate Detail
CAUTION: The adapter is sensitive to static discharges. Hold it by the
corners. Avoid contact with the PC bus edge connector or any of the
components. Failure to observe all static precautions may result in
damage to the adapter.
•
If you have not already done so, carefully remove the
adapter from its protective pouch, and visually inspect it.
•
Remove the protective backplate (1, Fig. 2-10) from the
selected slot, as shown in Figure 2-10. Loosen the
thumbscrew (2) holding the backplate (1) in place over the
selected slot, and slide the backplate out of the slot.
•
Orient the adapter (2, Figure 2-11) so the PC edge bus
connector (3) is pointed down and the ports face out the
back of the PC as shown in Figure 2-11.
Page 2-12
INSTALLATION
•
Align the adapter so the PC bus edge connector is lined up
with the expansion slot (4) as shown in Figure 2-11.
1
5
2
3
4
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Clip
Adapter
Edge Connector
Expansion Slot
Clip
Figure 2-11. Installing the E3100 Series Adapter
•
Slide the adapter into the guide slots and firmly press, but
do not force, the adapter into the expansion slot. The
plastic clips on the adapter (1, 5, Figure 2-11) will snap into
place as the adapter is inserted into the expansion slot.
•
Reinsert the thumbscrew, and replace the PC cover.
Reattach the power and peripheral cables, and power up
the PC.
Page 2-13
INSTALLATION
2.8
COPYING THE ADF FILE
After an E3100 Series adapter is installed in your computer and
before using it, you must copy the Cabletron Adapter Description
File (ADF) onto a backup copy of your system’s Reference
Diskette. The ADF is supplied with your Cabletron software. The
ADF provides Programmable Option Select Parameters for the
System Configuration Utility. If necessary, you can change the
parameters during this procedure.
IMPORTANT: Be sure to use a backup copy of the Reference diskette,
and not the original Reference Diskette, when you perform the following
procedure.
To configure the ADF:
•
Copy the two ADF Files from the Cabletron diskette to IBM’s
Reference Diskette (@ 5608.adf and @ 5609.adf).
•
Boot from the IBM Reference Diskette.
•
Answer Yes to: Automatically configure the system?
2.9
LOADING NETWORK SOFTWARE
You must install the proper network software in order to use your
PC, with an adapter, on an Ethernet network. Network operating
system software drivers are supplied on the Cabletron software
diskettes that are shipped with the adapter. The drivers are
grouped in subdirectories that contain readme files (a .DOC
extension) to explain any recent changes in procedure, etc.
The Network Software Installation Guide, included with the
software, contains detailed installation instructions for installing
network drivers.
Page 2-14
INSTALLATION
2.10 TROUBLESHOOTING CHECK LIST FOR ADAPTERS
•
Make sure the adapter is installed and properly seated in the
PC chassis connector.
•
On the adapter, if the coax port is used it is necessary to have a
T and terminator attached to it.
•
If the adapter does not initialize, verify that the bus slot is
operational by swapping the adapter with an adapter that you
know is functioning.
•
Try swapping the adapter with a known working adapter.
•
The interrupt, I/O address or memory parameters could be
conflicting with another adapter. Use a program like “CheckIt” to determine what settings are currently in use by other
adapters.
•
Verify that the cable is attached to the media port that you
want to use.
•
If a connection to a server or another host cannot be
maintained, check the cable first with a TDR or pair scanner.
After verifying the cable, check the device that you are trying
to communicate with. Verify that you can ping it or that other
clients can contact it.
2.11 SOFTWARE CHECK LIST
•
Cabletron supplies different drivers for use with different
operating systems. Make sure that you are using the correct
driver and that the I/O hardware jumper agrees with the
software I/O setting that you selected.
•
If you are using Novell NetWare, Cabletron supplies a direct
IPX and a packet driver IPX. Make sure you are using the
correct IPX.COM file.
Page 2-15
INSTALLATION
•
The adapters use shared memory. VGA adapters will use the
A block through C7FFF. Memory adapters will use the entire
D block. If you don’t have a memory adapter installed, the D
block is your best selection - otherwise the C8000 starting
address can be used on the standard memory adapters.
•
If Windows is installed on an Ethernet client, then it is
necessary to modify the SYSTEM.INI File. See the Network
Software Installation Guide.
•
When using the packet driver version 4.0 or above, you must
use IPX (NSHPD) LAN Option 1.05.03 or above.
•
If you are using a Kingston Memory Board, DO NOT use
automatic configuration after copying the Cabletron ADF file.
2.12 GETTING HELP
If you need additional support related to the adapter, or if you
have any questions, comments, or suggestions concerning this
manual, contact Cabletron Systems Technical Support. Before
calling, please have the following information available for use by
the Cabletron Technical Support personnel who will assist you.
•
The Adapter type and Serial Number (i.e., E2112,
E1192070111).
•
The software version that appears on the front of the installer
diskettes (i.e., E2100 Version 3.10.00, Rev. XX, P/N 2160251).
•
Your computer make, model, and CPU type (i.e., IBM PS/2
Model XX, Intel 80X86, etc.).
•
The operating systems and versions you are using (i.e., MS
DOS Version 5.0, and Novell NetWare Version 3.11).
•
The make and model of any other add-in adapters you are
using in your system and their bus address, interrupt settings,
and memory allocation.
Page 2-16
INSTALLATION
•
The contents of the AUTOEXEC.BAT, CONFIG.SYS,
PROTOCOL.INI, and NET.CFG files (if applicable).
You can contact Cabletron Systems Technical Support by:
Phone:
(603) 332-9400
FAX:
(603) 335-4743
BBS:
(603) 335-3358 (4 lines available)
Cabletron Technical Support can also be reached over the Internet
by sending email to:
support@ctron.com
Drivers are available for anonymous FTP download from:
ctron.com (IP Address 134.141.197.25)
CompuServe subscribers can also contact Cabletron Technical
Support through the Cabletron Forum by entering:
GO CTRON at any ! prompt.
If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions concerning
this manual, you can write to Cabletron Systems Technical
Support at:
Cabletron Systems, Inc.
35 Industrial Way, P.O. Box 5005
Rochester, NH 03867-0505
Page 2-17
INSTALLATION
2.13 SPECIFICATIONS
2.13.1 Power Requirements
E1100 Series
+5 V @ ≤ 2.0 amps maximum
+12 V @ ≤ 500 mA maximum
with transceiver attached.
E2100 Series
+5 V @ ≤ 2.0 amps maximum
+12 V @ ≤ 175 mA maximum
with transceiver attached.
E3100 Series
+5 V @ ≤ 1.2 amps maximum
+12 V @ ≤ 175 mA maximum
with transceiver attached.
2.13.2 Environmental Requirements
Operating Temperature:
0° to + 60°C (32° to 140°F)
Operating Humidity:
10% to 90% (non-condensing)
2.13.3 Safety
Designed in accordance with UL478, UL910, NEC 725-2(b),
CSA, IEC, TUV, VDE Class A. Meets FCC, Part 15, Class A
limits.
2.13.4 Dimensions
E1100 Series
7.9 H x 11.4 W cm
(3.1 H x 4.5 W inches)
E2100 Series
7.9 H x 16.8 W cm
(3.1 H x 6.6 W inches)
E3100 Series
8.8 x 20.4 cm
(3.5 x 8.0 inches)
Page 2-18
MAKING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
CHAPTER 3
MAKING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
This section contains instructions for connecting your adapter to
an Ethernet network. An adapter can be connected to the network
through either a media interface port or an AUI port on the
adapter. You should have selected the port during the
configuration procedures. If you did not, refer to the appropriate
section for your adapter.
We recommend that you run the diagnostic program before
connecting your PC to a network segment. You can run the
diagnostic program from the Cabletron installer program on the
Cabletron software diskettes.
NOTE: If you run the diagnostic program, be sure to perform a soft
(warm) boot on your PC before continuing.
3.1 CONNECTING TO A TWISTED PAIR SEGMENT
3.1.1 RJ-45 Interface (UTP Port)
1. Wire Fault Attachment LED
2. RJ-45 Port
3. RJ-45 Connector
4. Unshielded Twisted Pair Link
1
2
3
4
Figure 3-1. Attaching a UTP Segment
Page 3-1
MAKING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
12 3 4 5 6 7 8
RJ-45 Port
RJ-45 Connector
Figure 3-2. RJ-45 Connector
RJ-45 Connections
Type:
Pin 1
2
3
4
TX+
TXRX+
No Connection
RJ-45 connector
Pin 5
6
7
8
No Connection
RXNo Connection
No Connection
•
Connect the twisted pair segment (4, Fig. 3-1) by inserting
the RJ-45 connector (3) into the adapter’s RJ-45 port (2).
•
Check that the Link LED on the adapter is lit. The Link
LED may not light until data has been transmitted out the
10BASE-T port.
If you know the adapter has attempted to transmit data and the
LED is not lit, check the items listed here:
•
Verify that the power is on for the PC.
•
Check that the 10BASE-T device at the other end of the
twisted pair segment is powered up.
•
Verify that the RJ-45 connector on the twisted pair segment
has the proper pinouts (see Figure 3-2, above).
Page 3-2
MAKING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
•
Check the cable for continuity, and ensure that the cable is
actually a twisted pair cable.
•
Check that the adapter is properly seated in the expansion
slot.
•
Check that the twisted pair connection meets dB loss and
cable specifications outlined in Section 3.1.2, below.
If a link still has not been established, contact Cabletron Systems
Technical Support (see Section 2.12, Getting Help).
3.1.2 Twisted Pair Requirements
•
Length - 10BASE-T transceivers must be able to transmit over
a 100 meter link (328 feet) using 24 AWG unshielded twisted
pair wire. 10BASE-T specifies no maximum link length.
NOTE: Due to cable delay, the maximum link length is always
limited to about 200 meters (656 feet), regardless of the cable type.
Generally, links up to 150 meters (492 feet) long are achievable
for unshielded and shielded twisted pair cable. For each
connector or patch panel, subtract 12 meters (39.4 feet). This
allows links of up to 126 meters (413.4 feet) using standard 24
AWG UTP wire and two patch panels. Higher quality, low
attenuation cables may be required when using links greater
than 126 meters.
•
Insertion Loss - 11.5 dB maximum for a 10BASE-T link at all
frequencies between 5.0 and 10.0 MHz. This includes
attenuation of cables, connectors, patch panels, and reflection
losses due to impedance mismatches.
•
Impedance - Unshielded twisted pair cable is typically
between 85 to 110 ohms. Shielded cable, such as Type 1 cable,
is typically 150 ohms which can increase the signal reflection.
Cabletron Systems 10BASE-T Twisted Pair products will work
on shielded twisted pair cable with 75 to 165 ohms impedance.
•
Jitter - Not more than 5.0 nsec for a 10BASE-T link.
Page 3-3
MAKING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
•
Delay - Must not exceed 1000 nsec for a 10BASE-T link. This
delay limits maximum link segments to 200 meters.
•
Crosstalk - Crosstalk is caused by signal coupling between
cable pairs within a multi-pair cable bundle. Crosstalk should
not be a problem if the cable meets all other requirements.
•
Noise - Noise can be caused by either crosstalk or externally
induced impulses. Impulse noise may cause data errors if the
impulses occur at very specific times during data transmission.
If noise related data errors are suspected, it may be necessary
to reroute the cable or eliminate the source of the impulse.
•
Temperature - Multi-pair, PVC 24 AWG telephone cables have
an attenuation of approximately 8 to 10 dB/100 m at 20°C. The
attenuation of PVC insulated cable varies significantly with
temperature. At temperatures greater than 40°C, we strongly
recommend that you use plenum rated cables to ensure that
cable attenuation remains within specification.
3.2 CONNECTING TO A THIN-NET SEGMENT
To connect a thin coaxial 10BASE-2 segment to an adapter with a
BNC port, attach a BNC tee-connector (2, Figure 3-3) to the
adapter’s BNC port (1, Figure 3-3). Next, attach the thin-net
segment (3, Figure 3-3) to one of the male connectors on the teeconnector.
Each segment attached to the tee-connector must be terminated. If
a segment is not attached to one of the male connections on the
tee-connector, then a terminator (5, Figure 3-3, View A) must be
placed on that connection. Attach another thin-net segment (4,
Figure 3-3, View B) or a terminator (5, View A) to the other male
connector on the tee-connector.
3.2.1 BNC Interface (Coax Port)
BNC receptacle with gold center contact, for use with BNC type
tee-connectors and RG-58 cable.
Page 3-4
MAKING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
1
3
2
1
3
2
5
View A
4
View B
Figure 3-3. Attaching a Thin-Net Segment
3.2.2 Thin-Net Requirements
•
Cable - Must be 50 ohm RG-58A type coaxial cable.
•
Length - Must be no longer than 185 meters (607 ft.).
•
Termination - A 50 ohm terminator at the far ends of each
thin-net segment.
•
Connections - A maximum of 30 connections may be used
throughout a thin coaxial segment for host connections. If an
excessive number of barrel connections are used within the
cable segment, i.e. finished wall plates with BNC feedthroughs, then a reduced number of host connections may be
required. For special network designs, contact Cabletron
Systems Technical Support.
WARNING: For safety, only one end of a thin-net segment should be
connected to earth ground. Connection to earth ground at more than one
point on the segment may allow for the occurrence of dangerous ground
currents.
Page 3-5
MAKING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
3.3 CONNECTING TO A FIBER OPTIC LINK SEGMENT
The physical communication link consists of two fiber optic
strands between the adapter and the other Ethernet fiber optic
device on the link: Transmit (TX) and Receive (RX).
The adapter Tx connects to Rx of the Ethernet device. The adapter
Rx connects to Tx of the Ethernet concentrator. We recommend
that you label the fiber optic cable to indicate which fiber is
Receive and which is Transmit. When you buy fiber optic cable
from Cabletron Systems, it is labeled so that at one end of the
cable, one fiber is labeled 1, and the other fiber is labeled 2. This
pattern is repeated at the other end of the cable.
ST connectors (Figure 3-4) attach to ST ports in the same way that
BNC connectors attach to BNC ports. The connector is inserted
into the port with an alignment slot on the connector inserted into
the alignment key on the port. The connector is then turned until it
is locked.
NOTE: Do not touch the ends of the fiber optic strands and do not let the
ends come in contact with dust, dirt, or other contaminants.
Contamination of the ends can cause data transmission problems.
If the ends become contaminated, clean them with denatured alcohol
using a soft, clean, lint free cloth. If this does not work, use a fiber optic
polishing kit to polish the end of the strand.
To connect to a fiber optic segment, attach the fiber labeled 2 to the
adapter’s transmit port (light gray) (1). At the other end of the
fiber optic cable, attach the fiber labeled 1 to the transmit port of
the applicable device. Attach the fiber labeled 2 to the receive port
of the fiber optic device.
At this time you should check to see that the adapter’s Link LED is
lit. If the LED is not lit, verify that the power is on for the PC, and
check that the power is turned on for the device at the other end of
the fiber optic link.
Page 3-6
MAKING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
Verify that the fiber strands are “crossed over” at the far end
device, transmit to receive, by checking the labeling on each
strand. Verify that the fiber connection meets the dB loss
specifications outlined in Section 3.3.1, below. If a link still has not
been established, contact Cabletron Systems Technical Support
(see Section 2.12, Getting Help).
1
2
1. ST Port
2. ST Connector
Figure 3-4. ST Fiber Optic Connectors
3.3.1 Fiber Optic Requirements
•
Cable - The fiber optic link segments should consist of either
50/125 µm, 62.5/125 µm, or 100/140 µm fiber optic cabling.
•
Attenuation - Cable must be tested with a fiber optic
attenuation test set adjusted for an 850 nm wave length. This
test verifies that the signal loss in the cable is acceptable.
Attenuation limits for various cable are listed below:
- 13.0 dB or less for a 50/125 µm fiber cable segment.
- 16.0 dB or less for a 62.5/125 µm fiber cable.
- 19.0 dB or less for a 100/140 µm fiber cable.
•
Fiber Optic Budget - the fiber optic budget and total network
propagation delay should be calculated before fiber runs are
incorporated in any network design. Fiber optic budget is the
combination of optical loss of the fiber optic cable, in-line
splices, and fiber optic connectors. Propagation delay is the
time it takes a packet to travel from the sending device to the
receiving device.
Page 3-7
MAKING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
•
Length - The maximum fiber optic cable length is 2 km (6558
feet), if system budgets are met. However, IEEE 802.3 FOIRL
(Fiber Optic Inter-Repeater Link) specifications specify a
maximum of 1 km (3279 feet).
3.3.2 Fiber Optic Interface (Fiber Optic Ports)
Ex040 and Ex040-X:
Parameter
Receive
Sensitivity:
ST fiber optic ports
Typical
Value
Worst
Case
-30.5 dBm -28.0 dBm
Peak Input
Power:
-7.6 dBm
-8.2 dBm
Worst
Case
Budget
—
Typical
Budget
—
—
13.0 dB
16.0 dB
19.0 dB
17.5 dB
20.5 dB
23.5 dB
—
Transmitter Power:
50/125 µm fiber: -13.0 dBm -15.0 dBm
62.5/125 µm fiber: -10.0 dBm -12.0 dBm
100/140 µm fiber: -7.0 dBm -9.0 dBm
Error Rate:
Better than 10-10 bit error rate.
NOTE: The transmitter power levels and receive sensitivity levels given
above are Peak Power Levels after optical overshoot. A Peak Power Meter
must be used to correctly compare the values given above to those
measured on any port. If Power Levels are measured with an Average
Power Meter, add 3 dBm to the average power measurement to correctly
compare average power values to the peak power values.
Page 3-8
MAKING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
3.4 CONNECTING TO AN EXTERNAL TRANSCEIVER
3.4.1 AUI Connector (AUI Ports)
1
2
3
4
1. Wire Fault/Attachment LED
2. AUI Port
3. AUI Connector
4. Screws (2)
Figure 3-5. Connecting an AUI Cable
Any adapter with an AUI Port can be connected to the network
via a transceiver and an AUI cable. The AUI port should have
been selected during the installation procedure. To connect an AUI
cable to your adapter, attach an external transceiver to the network
segment to which the adapter will be attached. Refer to the
applicable transceiver manual. Attach the female end of an AUI
cable, no more than 50 meters in length, to the transceiver.
Attach the male connector (3, Figure 3-5) on the AUI cable to the
adapter’s AUI port (2) and tighten the securing screws (4).
Page 3-9
MAKING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
3.4.2 AUI Interface
Type:
Pin 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
15 position D type receptacle
Logic Ground
Collision +
TX +
Logic Ground
RX +
Logic Ground
No Connection
Logic Ground
Pin 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Shell
Collision TX Logic Ground
RX Power (+12 Vdc)
Logic Ground
No Connection
Protective Ground
3.4.3 AUI Cable Requirements
•
Type - The AUI cable connecting the adapter to a transceiver
must be Ethernet Version 1, Version 2, or IEEE 802.3, 10BASE-5
type cable that matches the device attached to the AUI port.
•
Length - The AUI cable must not exceed 50 meters (164 feet) if
24 AWG AUI cable is used. If 28 AWG AUI cable is used, then
the maximum cable length is 16 meters (52 feet).
Page 3-10
ADDRESS/INTERRUPT TABLES
APPENDIX A
ADDRESS/INTERRUPT TABLES
Table A-1. I/O Ports of Common Devices
Possible
I/O Base
Address
200
Potential Conflicting Devices and Their
Typical I/O Addresses
Game Controller/Joystick (200 - 20F)
Expansion Unit (210 - 217)
220
Cabletron Adapter
230
Bus Mouse
240
260
LPT2:(278 - 27F)
280
Cabletron Adapter
2A0
2C0
2E0
COM4: (2E8 - 2EF) GPIB-Adapter 0 (2E1)
COM2: (2F8 - 2FF) Data Aquisition (2E2 - 2E3)
300
Cabletron Adapter
320
XT Hard Disk Interface (320 - 32F)
340
360
LPT1: (378 - 37F)
SLDC/Secondary Bi-Sync Interface (380 - 38C)
380
Cabletron Adapter
3A0
Primary Bi-Sync Interface (3A0 - 3A9)
Monochrome Display (3B0 - 3BB)
3C0
EGA Display Control (3C0 - 3CF)
Color/Graphics Display-CGA (3D0 - 3DF)
3E0
COM3: (3E8 - 3EF)
Floppy Disk Controller (3F0 - 3F7)
COM1: (3F8 - 3FF)
Page A-1
ADDRESS/INTERRUPT TABLES
Table A-2. Commonly Used PC Interrupts
IRQ
Interrupt Usage
Machine Type
IRQ2
Reserved
PC
IRQ2
Cascade from slave 8259A PIC
AT, PS/2
IRQ3
Serial communications (COM2)
PC, AT, PS/2
IRQ4
Serial communications (COM1)
PC, AT, PS/2
IRQ5
Fixed disk
PC
IRQ5
Parallel printer (LPT2)
AT
IRQ6
Floppy disk
PC, AT, PS/2
IRQ7
Parallel printer (LPT1)
PC, AT, PS/2
IRQ9
Software diverted to IRQ2
AT, PS/2
IRQ10
Reserved
AT, PS/2
IRQ11
Reserved
AT, PS/2
IRQ12
Reserved
AT
IRQ12
Mouse
PS/2
IRQ14
Fixed-disk controller
AT, PS/2
IRQ15
Reserved
AT, PS/2
Page A-2
INDEX
INDEX
A
G
adapter features 1-2
10BASE-T port 1-2
connectivity 1-2
fiber optic ports 1-3
jabber protection 1-3
thin Ethernet port 1-2
adapter models 2-1
see table 2-1 2-1
E1100/E2100 series 2-2
installation 2-1
model number references 2-2
preparing the E1100 for
installation 2-3
preparing the E2100 for
installation 2-4
address/interrupt tables A-1
see table A-1 A-1
see table A-2 A-2
ADF file
copying 2-14
getting help 2-16
E
external transceiver 3-9
AUI cable requirements 3-10
AUI connector (AUI ports) 3-9
AUI interface 3-10
connecting to 3-9
see figure 3-5 3-9
LANVIEW LEDs 1-3
Collision Present (CLN) 1-4
Link OK (LNK) 1-3
Media Link Good (LNK)
LED 1-3
Receive (RCV) 1-4
see figure 1-1 1-4
Transmit (XMT) 1-4
F
M
fiber optic link segment 3-6
connecting to 3-6
fiber optic budget 3-7
fiber optic interface (fiber optic
ports) 3-8
fiber optic requirements 3-7
making network connections 3-1
BNC interface (coax port) 3-4
connecting to a twisted pair
segment 3-1
RJ-45 interface (UTP port) 3-1
thin-net requirements 3-5
twisted pair requirements 3-3
I
I/O address space
requirements 2-6
installing a Boot PROM 2-6
installing the E1100/E2100
adapters 2-7
see figure 2-7 2-9
see figure 2-8 2-9
installing the E3100 Series
adapters 2-10
E3100 Series Boot PROM 2-10
installing the E3100
Adapter 2-11
preparing the E3100 Series for
installation 2-10
see figure 2-11 2-13
L
Index-1
INDEX
N
network software
loading 2-14
R
related manuals 1-5
S
see table A-2 A-2
setting the I/O base address
jumper 2-5
software 1-5
software check list 2-15
specifications 2-18
dimensions 2-18
environmental 2-18
power requirements 2-18
safety 2-18
statistics 1-5
T
thin-net segment
connecting to 3-4
troubleshooting check list for
adapters 2-15
Index-2
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