Canon 20D Camcorder User Manual

PP12.GEARGUIDE(3).lo 10/18/04 12:58 PM Page 1
> GEAR GUIDE 2005
REALLY INTO IT!
GEAR CHECKLIST
DIGITAL SLRs
VERSATILE LENSES
FILM SCANNERS
MONITOR CALIBRATION
ENTHUSIAST SOFTWARE
HOME LIGHTING KITS
PRO-LEVEL FLASH
WACOM TABLETS
ou’re really into it
when you need a big
camera bag to carry
your normal kit, not just a
belt pouch or fanny pack.
We figure a lot of you fall
into this category: the kind
of people who plan vacations around photography,
not vice versa, and who
wouldn’t think of going to a
family party without an
extra camera body, and a
system flash, and maybe
some slave units, and….
Y
Canon
EOS 20D
▲
$ $1,499 street (BODY ONLY)
1,599 street
$
DSLRs: TH EY’R E
✚ Frustrated with the shutter lag and lens limitations of your compact digital camera? Tired of spending money developing photos you don’t want from your 35mm
SLR? If so, then it’s time to get serious with a digital SLR. There are several
advanced models ranging in price from $799 to $1,500 that give you nearly
instant shutter response and a wide choice of lenses and accessories. They also
deliver amazing image quality, advanced control features, fast focusing speeds,
lower noise at higher ISO settings, and rapid-burst shooting modes.
(WITH 18–55MM F/4–5.6 EF-S LENS)
www.canoneos.com
EF-S lens
www.canoneos.com
800-652-2666
$1,500 est. street, body only
www.konicaminolta.us
877-462-4464
The 8.2MP Canon EOS 20D may offer
the most bang for the buck, with the
highest image quality and best overall
performance of the bunch. It features a
rugged magnesium-alloy body, superfast AF, a blazing 5-fps burst mode, and
advanced flash functions. Plus, unlike
most compacts and EVFs, the 20D handles low-light shooting up to ISO 1600
without a dramatic increase in noise
(a.k.a. digital grain). Downside: the
APS-sized sensor means a 1.6X 35mm
lens factor. 5.7x4.2x2.8 INCHES BODY ONLY
The first digital SLR under $1,000,
Canon’s EOS Digital Rebel is still a bargain despite stiff competition. It features
6.3MP resolution and extremely high
image quality, a low-noise APS-sized
CMOS sensor, a great AF system, longlife battery, and compatibility with all
Canon EF lenses including the new EFS lenses. OK, it lacks the custom functions and rugged body of the EOS 10D
or 20D, and you get a slower burst
capability, but you can’t beat
its price. 5.6x3.9x2.9 INCHES
The long-awaited Maxxum
7D should be arriving in
stores by the time you
read this—we hope. This
6MP DSLR has a built-in
anti-shake system that
works with most Maxxum
lenses (albeit with a 1.5X 35mm lens factor). Built along the lines of the 35mm
Maxxum 7, it has advanced metering and
exposure controls, white balance with
manual color-temperature adjustment, Eye-start, and a fast AF
system. Slightly pricey for a
6MP DSLR, but its Anti-Shake
system will save $$ on imagestabilized lenses. 5.9x4.2x3.1 INCH-
DSLRs
ALL AB OUT CONTROL
800-652-2666
• 1.7 POUNDS WITH BATTERY AND CARD
Canon EOS
Digital Rebel
$799 street, body only
$
899 with 18–55mm f/3.5–5.6
BODY ONLY • 1.4 POUNDS
WITH BATTERY AND CARD •
TESTED NOVEMBER 2003
Konica Minolta
Maxxum 7D
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY & IMAGING/DECEMBER 2004
WWW.POPPHOTO.COM
ES BODY ONLY • 1.7 POUNDS WITHOUT BATTERY OR CARD • FIRST LOOK OCTOBER 2004
73
PP12.GEARGUIDE(3).lo 10/18/04 12:58 PM Page 2
> GEAR GUIDE 2005
▲
Nikon D70
$ $$999 street (BODY ONLY)
1,299 street
(WITH 18–70MM F/3.5–4.5G DX LENS)
www.nikonusa.com
800-645-6689
This 6MP DSLR packs features well
above what you’d expect from a subgrand camera. Its image quality, body
design and construction, fast AF system
and startup time, rapid 3-fps burst rate,
and custom functions are truly impressive. We wish only it included Nikon’s
$99 Capture 4 RAW conversion software, and had better backward compatibility with older Nikon flash units. 5.5x4.4x
DSLRs
3.1 INCHES BODY ONLY • 1.5 POUNDS WITH
74
BATTERY AND CARD • TESTED JUNE 2004
Olympus E-1
$1,300 street, body only
www.olympusamerica.com
888-553-4448
The 5MP E-1 makes up in pro features
what it lacks in megapixels. The
rugged magnesiumalloy body has
splash-proof seals,
and a fast FireWire connector plus USB.
Plus, it’s the first DSLR to use a Kodak
4:3 format CCD sensor with ultrasonic
dust removal. Image quality is impressive, with low noise, extremely high
color accuracy, and advanced colorspace and white-balance controls. Both
Olympus’ E-1 and the upcoming Evolt
(see November 2004) use the digitalonly Zuiko lenses (with a 2X 35mm factor). Missing: a pop-up flash and strong
low-light AF. 5.5x4.1x3 INCHES BODY ONLY •
1.7 POUNDS WITH BATTERY AND CARD •
TESTED NOVEMBER 2003
Pentax *ist D
$1,240 street, body only
www.pentaximaging.com
800-877-0155
“Build it smaller, and
they will come.” For
now, this 6MP Pentax
is the smallest DSLR,
but the new *ist DS
will soon take that
title (see this issue’s
“Hands On”). Big features, though: extremely high image
quality and low noise at higher
ISOs, a tough body with stainlesssteel frame and magnesium-alloy
WWW.POPPHOTO.COM
components, an 11-zone (nine crosstype) AF system, and a super viewfinder. But where are the rechargeable
AA batteries? 5.4x3.8x2.9 INCHES BODY
ONLY • 1.4 POUNDS WITH BATTERY AND
CARD • TESTED JANUARY 2004
Sigma SD10
$1,350 street, body only
www.sigmaphoto.com
800-896-6858
This improved (and lighter) version of
Sigma’s first DSLR, the SD9, is the
only DSLR to use Foveon’s X3 CMOS
imaging sensor, which captures light in
layers—similar to the way film works.
The result is resolution equivalent to a
6MP sensor, extremely accurate color,
and extremely low noise. The SD10
also has a fast FireWire connector,
and a fast AF system with good
low-light sensitivity. But it lacks multiple cross-type sensors and a popup flash. Also, there’s no in-camera
JPEG storage—all RAW files
must be converted on
a computer. 5.9x4.7x3.1
INCHES BODY ONLY •
1.9 POUNDS WITH BATTERY AND CARD • SD9
TESTED FEBRUARY 2003
POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY & IMAGING/DECEMBER 2004
PP12.GEARGUIDE(3).lo 10/18/04 12:59 PM Page 3
REALLY INTO IT!
STABILIZATION
Canon
$ $410 street
▲
28–135mm
f/3.5–5.6 IS USM
✚ Once upon a time,
experts promoted
tripods as the accessory for sharper pix.
Today, however, image
stabilized (IS) lenses
(or, in Nikonese,
Vibration Reduction
lenses) have assumed
that role—the flash-free,
tripod-free, and painfree way to sharpness.
Like tripods, VR lenses
can deliver adequate
sharpness at slower
shutter speeds and
increased sharpness at
higher shutter speeds.
First buy an IS lens,
then invest in a tripod.
That’s the experts’
mantra today.
www.canoneos.com
800-652-2666
Are you shooting a Canon SLR? With an
affordable price and useful focal-length
range, Canon’s 28–135mm f/3.5–5.6 IS
zoom is worth a look. Its compact size,
light weight, and quiet USM motor make
it a favorite. Nikon fans have a 24–
120mm f/3.5–5.6G VR and a 70–
200mm f/2.8G VR, among others, while
Sigma makes an 80–400mm f/4.5–5.6
optical stabilized lens in Canon, Nikon,
and Sigma mounts.
DIGITAL
Nikon 18–70mm
f/3.5–4.5 G-AFS DX
$365 street
www.nikonusa.com
800-645-6687
MACRO
Pentax 100mm
f/2.8 FA Macro
$520 street
www.pentaximaging.com
800-877-0155
100mm or 105mm macros
are so useful because: 1:1
magnifying power delivers great detail in
smaller subjects; the tele-style extra
working distance puts space between
you and a skittish subject; and they’re
great focal lengths for portraits.
VE R SATI LE LE NSES: TOSS TH E TR IPOD WITH ANTI-SHAKE
A favorite is the Pentax 100mm f/2.8
FA Macro. A large maximum aperture
renders a bright viewfinder for easy
focusing; its continuous magnification
scale relays exactly what you’re getting
on film (or sensor); and a special locking
mechanism will hold a specific focusing
distance. TESTED DECEMBER 1998
HI-SPEED
Tokina 28–80mm
f/2.8 AT-X
$520 street
www.thkphoto.com
800-421-1141
High speed (i.e., maximum
apertures of f/2.8 or faster)
is a killer trait in a lens. A fast
lens lets you use faster shutter speeds for sharp pictures sans tripod
or flash, and they can defocus a background nicely. Tokina’s 28–80mm f/2.8
AT-X is a good example of an all-around
useful high-speed zoom. Offering wide
to short telefocal lengths, it may be the
only lens you’ll need to work, say, a wedding reception. TESTED SEPTEMBER 2000
SIR LENS-A-LOT
★
Looking for
one lens to do
it all? Check
out Tamron’s $400 (street)
AF 28–300mm f/3.5–6.3
XR Di Macro. Featuring
Tamron’s Di (Digitally
Integrated) design, which
claims improved, flarereducing coatings and
tighter manufacturing tolerances, the compact and
lightweight AF 28–300mm
delivers an ample 10.7X
zoom range, 1:2.9 maximum
magnification, and a very
tight 19.3-inch close-focusing distance at all focal
lengths. Sigma,
similarly,
makes a
comparable
28–300mm
f/3.5–6.3
Macro.
BEST
BUY
Versatile Lenses
Digital shooters whose
camera’s CCD is smaller
than a 35mm frame quickly
learn that a wide-angle optic ain’t what it
used to be. A 24mm lens, for example,
may yield the field of view of a 38.4mm.
Are you a Nikon digital shooter in need
of wider views? Check out the 18–
70mm f/3.5–4.5 DX. On D-series SLRs,
it’s the 35mm equivalent of a 27–
105mm—a nice all-around optic. Similar
lenses include Sigma’s 20–40mm f/2.8,
Nikon’s 12–24mm f/4, and Canon’s
amazing new 10–22mm f/3.5–4.5.
PP12.GEARGUIDE(3).lo 10/18/04 1:00 PM Page 4
✚ Despite recent advances
▲
in flatbed scanners, the
resolution, density range,
and color accuracy possible with dedicated film
scanners still make them
the best way to turn your
film and slides into digital
images. And with USB
Hi-Speed 2.0 and FireWire
connections popping up
even in moderately priced
models, they’re faster than
ever. If you’ve got old, wellworn slides or film, you’ll
definitely want to try the
automatic dust and scratch
removal offered by Applied
Science Fiction’s Digital
ICE, which is included
with most film scanners in
this class.
FILM SCANNERS: PUT YOUR FILM ARCHIVES TO WORK
Konica Minolta DiMAGE
Scan Elite 5400
$ $650 street
www.konica
Film Scanners
76
minolta.us
877-462-4464
Konica Minolta’s 5400-ppi DiMAGE
Scan Elite 5400 impressed us with
high resolution, accurate color, and fast
speed when we tested it earlier this
year. On color-negative film, it resolved
71.3 line pairs/mm, and turned in 83.9
line pairs/mm on black-and-white film.
Color accuracy was rated excellent.
Both USB 2.0 and FireWire connections ensure a fast file transfer, even
with Digital ICE turned on. The only
caveat? It’s limited to 35mm, so you
can’t scan medium-format or APS with
this speed demon. TESTED JUNE 2004
Microtek
ArtixScan 4000tf
$700 street
www.microtekusa.com
310-687-5940
The ArtixScan 4000tf has an optical
resolution of 4000 ppi, which should
be enough to create tabloid-sized
scans of your 35mm negatives and
slides. The scanner’s D-max of 4.3
should ensure plenty of dynamic range,
while the depth of 12 bits per color
channel (42 bits total) should record a
wide palette of hues. APS fans can
spring for an optional APS roll cartridge, which enables batch scanning
of up to 40 images at a time. Advanced
scanners will enjoy the included
SilverFast Ai 6.0 scanning software.
Nikon Coolscan V ED
$600 street
www.nikonusa.com
800-645-6689
Though considered entry-level for the
Coolscan line, the V ED still has an optical resolution of 4000 ppi, plus a D-max
of 4.2—not quite the 4.8 of Nikon’s flagship 9000 ED, but still enough to pull
plenty of detail out of dark shadows.
Color depth is 14 bits per channel. Like
all the Coolscans, the V ED includes
Digital ICE, ROC, and GEM for
automatic dust and scratch
removal, color restoration,
and grain removal. It
won’t do medium-format
film, but an optional APS
adapter is available.
Pacific Image
PrimeFilm 3650 Pro3
$465 street
www.scanace.com
310-618-8100
The PrimeFilm 3650 Pro3 is
designed specifically to make
quick work of 35mm film scans.
A slot on the right side of the unit
accepts entire rolls of 35mm film for
scanning at up to 3600 ppi and, with
Digital ICE enabled, you can automatically remove scratches and dust at the
same time. The 3650 Pro3 has a generous color depth of 16 bits per channel
(48 bits total), and an ample density
range of 3.6. Both FireWire and USB 2.0
high-speed connections are included.
CALIBRATION 101
Ever wonder why the
prints you made have
wildly different color
and tone than the pictures you see
on your monitor? Frustrated that
you’re forced to waste stacks of
paper, multiple ink cartridges,
time, and money trying to
tweak what you saw on
your monitor? Then it’s
time to get a monitor
calibrator.
Once, the cost of a
monitor-calibra-
HOT
TIP
PP12.GEARGUIDE(3).lo 10/18/04 1:00 PM Page 5
> GEAR GUIDE 2005
REALLY INTO IT!
✚ If you’ve made a commitment to shooting with a digital SLR or if you
scan your film and print from your desktop, without Adobe Photoshop CS,
you probably aren’t using your technology to the fullest. It is, as everyone
who uses the program’s name as a verb knows, the mother of all imageediting programs. With the host of other software to complement it, you can
do almost anything. Of course, Photoshop’s the most expensive. Is it worth
it? Absolutely. But with this caveat: if you don’t want to learn to make it sing,
save your Benjamins.
▲
SOFTWAR E: ANYTH ING IS POSSIB LE
Adobe
Photoshop CS
$ $169 (PHOTOSHOP
UPGRADE ALONE)
1,229 (FULL PREMIUM
$
CREATIVE SUITE)
www.adobe.com
800-833-6687
Photoshop’s
supersophisticated system of
layers, masks, and
blending modes makes
it possible to do subtle
(yet monumental) corrections and detailed composite work
that’s impossible (or at least way too
tricky) to do in almost any other program. Add to the mix features that are
nonexistent in most other editors: total
color management (so you can work in
all those color spaces your DSLR
shoots in), near-full functionality with 16bit images (so you don’t waste the information your film scanner provides), support for the RAW file formats of the
major camera manufacturers….We
could go on. But the fact is this: Adobe
Extensis Portfolio 7
99.95 to upgrade
$
199.95 for full version
www.extensis.com
800-796-9798
$
If you’re using Photoshop to edit your
images, you won’t need an organizer
padded with features for fixing them.
Instead you’ll need one that’s dedicated to cataloging. Extensis Portfolio
7 is an excellent solution. Create
catalogs and search by your own
keywords or organize it all using EXIF
data. The program can even be
trained to classify your pictures. Link
a folder with a set of keywords and
each picture you add to the folder will
be tagged accordingly. Portfolio does
most of the complicated work for you, freeing you up to do more
shooting and less
searching. REVIEWED
OCTOBER 2004
flexibility with more sophisticated
software than the lower-cost Spyder,
but uses the same basic device.
And, for the more dedicated user,
there are two good options:
X-Rite’s MonacoOPTIX and Gretag
Macbeth’s Eye-One Display.
● SPYDER & SPYDERPRO:
$140 & $230; www.colorvision.com, 800-554-8688
● OPTIX: $270; www.monacosys.com, 800-248-9748
● EYE-ONE: $250;
www.i1color.com, 845-565-7660
nik Color Efex
Pro 2.0
$100, Standard
edition
$
100, Dfine
www.nikmultimedia.com
888-289-4085
Mystical
Lighting
$180 street
www.autofx.com
800-839-2008
Genuine
Fractals Pro
$50, LE edition
$
300, Print Pro
www.lizardtech.com
206-652-5211
pxl SmartScale
$200 street
www.extensis.com
800-796-9798
Plug-ins are add-ons to
image editors. They do
not, for the most part, exist to do
things that image editors can’t, but
instead to do specific things better
and faster than image-editors need to.
Whatever you want to do, if you’re
using Photoshop, there’s probably a
solution you could hammer out, but if
that takes a lot of time and know-how,
and you’re short on both, try a plug-in.
So, say, if you’ve been trying to
figure out how to mix channels to
convert color to black-and-white (a
process that can be both tedious and
boring), nik’s Color Efex Pro filter set
including the black-and-white converter could be the answer. Or if you
need to make poster-sized images,
you might try a superscaler like
Genuine Fractals Pro or Extensis’
SmartScale. If you shoot a lot in low
light, a noise-reducer like nik’s Dfine
could be just the thing. Maybe you
often have to simulate lighting effects
or alter the mood of an image; Auto
FX’s Mystical Lighting could come to
the rescue. These are just a few that
are out there. Because if you can
imagine it, chances are there’s a plugin that can do it.
Software
tion device was prohibitive. These days
it’s more expensive not to calibrate,
since these tools quickly pay for themselves in saved paper and ink. The
major brands work pretty much the
same way: a device, connected to your
computer, suction-cups itself to a CRT
monitor or dangles before an LCD,
while you run software that creates an
ICC color profile for your screen.
We tested Pantone ColorVision’s
SpyderPRO and got a good result—
perfect for the desktop printer who
wants a marked improvement in color
matching. The SpyderPRO offers more
Photoshop has been and remains
the image-editing standard. It is the
finest precision tool for the photographer who is ready to take full
control and produce the best images
possible. REVIEWED MARCH 2004
PLUG-INS
77
PP12.GEARGUIDE(3).lo 10/18/04 1:01 PM Page 6
> GEAR GUIDE 2005
REALLY INTO IT!
▲
SP Studio
System’s
Two-Light
Excalibur Kit
$ $420 street
www.bkaphoto.com
800-250-8394
Excalibur monolights are the Cadillacs
of SP Studio Systems’ many strobe
lights. They’re well-built, with user-interchangeable flashtubes, standard household modeling-light bulbs, and optical
slaves. Best thing? Excalibur studio kits
are amazingly inexpensive. For less than
$425, you get two 160-Ws Excaliburs,
reflectors, two umbrellas, carrying case,
sync cord, and two air cushioned lightstands. Neither the flashtubes nor the
60-watt modeling lights are blazingly
bright, but for many applications, especially for digital portraiture, they’re more
than adequate.
Home Lighting Kits
Dyna-Lite
UNIJR-PS1 Kit
$1,000 street
www.dynalite.com
800-722-6638
You usually get more power
and more accessories for
your money with a kit than
purchasing items individually.
For the most shooting flexibility,
check out systems that are
also battery-operated. DynaLite’s UNIJR-PS1 kit, for example, provides a 400-watt-second, 3.5-pound monolight, plus
a Jackrabbit battery pack for location
shooting, cables, charger, and a reflector. Its Uni400 monolight features a
four-stop power range, 1.4-sec recycle
times, a built-in optical slave, and userreplaceable flashtubes. The Jackrabbit
will power 75 full pops before requiring
recharging. Best thing? With proper
cables, the Jackrabbit will power your
hot-shoe flash and digital SLR, too!
Paterson Interfit
PRO 1000-watt
Two-Head Kit
$980 street
www.patersonphotographic.com
✚ It’s no secret that POP
PHOTO editors are partial to
monolights. Most of the
product photos you see
here were lit with
Elinchrom Style monolights. Recent articles here
about home studios have
stressed monolights, as
well. Unlike studio strobes
that require bulky external
power packs, monolights
have all their electronics,
including transformer, in
the light’s housing. The
benefits are fewer cables to
snare you, no power packs
to trip over, fewer electronics to spook portrait subjects, and generally less
expensive and more transportable kits.
LIGHTING KITS: PRO-LIKE LIGHTS AT AFFORDABLE PRICES
770-947-9796
Do you need power pops
to light distant subjects or
allow smaller apertures?
The Paterson Interfit twomonolight kit offers a
bright 2000 watt-seconds (i.e., two 1000-Ws
heads), with reflectors,
umbrellas,
8-foot
lightstands, and a
sync cord, all for under $1,000. With
steplessly variable output (from full to
1⁄32 power), a bright 250-watt quartzhalogen modeling light, and built-in optical and infrared slaves (the infrared
requires an optional transmitter), this is
an unusually complete and powerful kit.
Adorama
Flash- point II
620 Kit
$240 street
www.adorama.com
800-223-2500
This single-light kit is a very attractive
entry-level buy for newbies wanting to get
serious about portraiture. The 620 is a
solidly built, fan-cooled 300-Ws monolight with a built-in carrying handle, proportional halogen modeling light, stepless
output from full to 1⁄8 power, and a userreplaceable flashtube. While the kit has
no case, its 10-foot air-cushioned lightstand and 45-inch white umbrella (with
removable black cover) are both better
quality than you’d expect for the price.
OK, SO DON’T GET A KIT: SUNPAK PLATINUM LINE
★
Do you already own
lightstands and umbrellas? Fuhgetabout kits.
Some of the best monolight-only
buys we’ve seen belong to
Sunpak’s Platinum line, ranging
in power from 150 to 1000
watt-seconds. The amply
powered, 300-Ws unit, for
example, sells for about
$180. With rugged construction, 3.5-sec recycle
BEST
BUY
78
GEAR GUIDE CONTINUED ON PAGE 81
times, variable output from full to 1⁄8
power, user-replaceable flashtubes, and
a built-in optical slave, Sunpak’s
Platinum line of monolights may attract
professional as well as amateur
buyers.
PP12.GEARGUIDE(3).lo 10/18/04 1:01 PM Page 7
> GEAR GUIDE 2005
▲
Nikon
SB-800
Speedlight
REALLY INTO IT!
✚ What “extras” do pros get
for the $300, $350, or $400
they drop on a high-end hotshoe flash? More power, for
starters. Nikon’s line-topping
SB-800 Speedlight provides a
Guide Number (GN) of 125
(at 35mm and ISO 100), while
its nearest neighbor in the
Nikon catalog, the SB-600,
tops out at GN 98. In practical
terms, you get more throw,
and/or the ability to shoot at
smaller apertures. The SB-800
also supports full i-TTL wireless control of up to three
groups of remote SB-800s
(plus the Master Unit attached
to the camera); each group can
contain an unlimited number of
flash units. How’s that for getting your money’s worth?
$ $334 street
www.nikonusa.com
800-645-6687
With Nikon’s D2H SLR, the SB-800
communicates the exact color temperature of its output (which changes with
flash duration) to ensure accurate auto
white balancing; the SB-800’s highspeed FP mode allows sync speeds of
up to 1/8000 sec; a modeling flash feature helps confirm lighting; FV-Lock
(Flash Value Lock) lets you preset a flash
exposure, recompose, and maintain
proper exposure of your subject.
Canon Speedlite
580EX
$480 street
www.canoneos.com
800-652-2666
Konica Minolta
5600 HS
$299 street
www.konicaminolta.us
866-515-0330
Fully compatible with Konica Minolta’s
Maxxum film and hot-shoed DiMAGE
digital cameras, the line-topping 5600
HS offers pros and serious amateurs
unusually weather-resistant construction that protects against moisture and
dust; high-speed syncing at all possible
shutter speeds; a control lock to prevent inadvertent missettings; a stroboscopic modeling light that lets you preview strobe effects—and Konica Minolta
includes a stand to help you take
advantage of the 5600 HS’s TTL-controlled, wireless off-camera capabilities.
PRO-LEVEL FLASH UNITS: PUT MORE POWER IN YOUR POPS
Pentax AF-500 FTX
$299 street
www.pentaximaging.com
800-877-0155
Pentax’s top-of-the-line unit
works in either film or digital
arenas, and offers something absent from
most pro-grade flashes: a built-in optical
slave. Put the AF-500 on-camera as your
main light, or take it off-camera, using its
optical slave for more advanced lighting
setups. (Your SLR’s built-in flash would
be the main light—all Pentax AF SLRs
have one.) Other features to like: a stroboscopic modeling light and 2-fps motordrive mode (to 20 consecutive pops).
WELCOME THE WACOM
★
No matter how much mousing we do, palming a flat
lump to move a pointer will never be as natural as
using a pen. That’s why a tablet can make such a difference during retouching. Just like in real life, the harder you press,
the larger and darker your mark, and, unlike the mouse’s relative
relationship to the screen, each point on the tablet corresponds precisely to a point on the monitor.
Wacom is the ruler of the tablet world. They are the technology’s
innovators, with competing tablets few and far between. Two of their
lines are relevant to photographers: the Graphire3 for enthusiasts,
and the Intuos3 for the serious retoucher. The tablets connect to your
computer via USB, and provide a surface like a super smooth mouse
pad upon which the included wireless mouse and pen tools require
no batteries. The pressure sensitivity of the Intuos is twice that of the
Graphire (1,024 levels vs. 512), but this difference will probably
be imperceptible to the average user. The big differences are
the new ExpressKeys and Touch Strip on the Intuos3. So
conveniently located and programmable, you
might find yourself eliminating the keyboard altogether and doing all your
work from the tablet itself.
● GRAPHIRE3: $100–$200;
INTUOS3: $200–$750; 800-922-9348;
www.wacom.com
BEST
BUY
Pro-Level Flash Units
Canon’s recently introduced flagship
flash, the Speedlite 580EX, has more
features and additional power, but is
both smaller and lighter than its predecessor, the 550EX. New capabilities
include wider coverage (to 14mm), full
180-degree swivel in either direction,
seven new custom functions, 25 percent faster recycling times, more
even center-to-edge coverage, and a
broader AF-assist beam that covers
all the AF sensors of every EOS SLR.
GEAR GUIDE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 78
Download PDF

advertising