User manual | Canon DXC-D35L/D35PL Digital Camera User Manual

USER
MANUAL
MODEL 3088RC
RocketLink-G NTU
Rack Mount G.SHDSL
Modem Card
Part# 07M3088RC-UM
Doc# 03325U2-002, Rev. A
Revised 5/20/08
SALES OFFICE
(301) 975-1000
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
(301) 975-1007
1.0
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
Warranty Information .................................................................
Compliance...................................................................................
EMC Compliance:.........................................................................
Safety Compliance: ......................................................................
PSTN Regulatory:.........................................................................
FCC Part 68 (ACTA) Statement ...................................................
Radio and TV Interference (FCC Part 15) ....................................
Industry Canada Notice ................................................................
CE Declaration of Conformity .......................................................
Authorized European Representative...........................................
Service..........................................................................................
Safety When Working With Electricity ..........................................
2.0
2.1
2.2
2.3
General Information..................................................................
Features......................................................................................
Description..................................................................................
Serial Interface Types.................................................................
3.0
3.1
3.2
3.3
Configuration ............................................................................ 12
About Software (CLI) Configuration............................................ 12
About Harware (DIP Switch) Configuration ................................ 12
Configuring the DIP Switches (V.35, X.21, and Ethernet Models)...
13
S1-1 through S1-7: Data Rate .................................................... 14
S1-8: TX Clock ........................................................................... 16
S2-1: Front Panel Switches ........................................................ 16
S2-2: Line Probe......................................................................... 16
S2-3: Annex A/B ......................................................................... 16
S2-4 through S2-5: Clock Mode ................................................. 17
X.21 operation. .................................................................... 17
Ethernet operation ............................................................... 17
S2-6: DTE Loops ........................................................................ 18
S2-7: DTE Interface Type........................................................... 18
S3-1 through S3-8: Management Address ................................. 18
About System Reset Mode ......................................................... 18
Software Upgrades..................................................................... 19
Configuration Reset to Factory Defaults..................................... 19
Configuring through the Console ................................................ 19
Console Help Commands........................................................... 21
System Configuration Commands.............................................. 22
System Status Commands ......................................................... 23
DSL Configuration Commands................................................... 23
DSL Status Command................................................................ 24
DSL Clear Errcntrs Command.................................................... 24
Configuring the V.35 Rear Card ................................................. 25
Model 1001RCM13445 & 1001RCM134TB Strap Settings........ 25
DTE Shield (M/34 Pin A) & FRGND (JB3) .......................... 25
SGND & FRGND (JB4) ....................................................... 26
3.4
3.5
3.6
2
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
10
10
10
11
3.7
3.8
3.9
4.0
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
5.0
5.1
5.2
5.3
Configuring the X.21 Rear Card ................................................. 26
Model 1001RCM11545& 1001RCM115TB Strap Settings......... 26
DTE Shield (DB-15 Pin 1) & FRGND (JB3) ......................... 27
SGND & FRGND (JB4) ....................................................... 27
Configuring the E1 Rear Card .................................................... 27
DIP Switch Configuration............................................................ 27
Switch S1-1 : Line Coding .................................................. 27
Switch S1-2 : CRC-4 Multiframe ........................................ 28
Switch S1-3 : Clear Channel Mode .................................... 28
Switch S1-4 Through S1-8 : Reserved ................................ 28
Jumper Configuration ................................................................. 28
Making Interface Connections .................................................... 29
Connect Twisted Pair (120 ohm) to G.703/G.704 Network . 29
Connect Dual Coaxial Cable (75 ohm) to G.703/G.704 Network. .................................................................................... 30
Connecting the Ethernet Rear Card ........................................... 31
Connecting the Interface Driver Board ....................................... 32
Connecting to the 10Base-T Ethernet Port................................. 33
Connecting the 10Base-T Ethernet Port to a Hub ............... 34
Connecting the 10Base-T Ethernet Port to a PC (DTE) ...... 34
Connecting the Line Interface ............................................. 34
LED Status Monitors................................................................... 35
Status. ................................................................................. 36
Link. ..................................................................................... 36
Installation................................................................................. 37
The Model 1001R14 rack chassis .............................................. 37
The Rack Power Supply ............................................................. 37
Powering Up Your 1001R14 Rack.............................................. 38
Installing Model 3088RC series into the chassis ........................ 38
Connecting the Twisted Pair Interface........................................ 39
Connecting the Model 3088RC/A/I (V.35) serial interface .......... 41
Connecting the Model 3088RC/A/I (V.35) to a “DTE” device ..... 41
Connecting the Model 3088RC/A/I (V.35) to a “DCE” device..... 42
Connecting the Model 3088RC/D/V (X.21) serial interface ........ 43
Connecting the Model 3088RC/D/V (X.21) to a “DCE” or “DTE” device ............................................................................................. 43
Connecting the 3088RC/K/K (E1) Interface................................ 44
Connecting the 3088RC/C/AI (Ethernet) Interface ..................... 44
Operation................................................................................... 45
LED status indicators.................................................................. 45
Test Modes ................................................................................. 46
Loopbacks .................................................................................. 46
Patterns ...................................................................................... 47
Remote Console Operation ........................................................ 47
Establishing a Remote Console Session.................................... 47
How to Connect ................................................................... 47
3
5.4
5.5
How to Disconnect .............................................................. 49
Differences in Local and Remote Control Session Behavior...... 50
Software Upgrade....................................................................... 51
Reset Configuration to Factory Default....................................... 52
A
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
A.6
A.7
A.8
A.9
A.10
A.11
A.12
A.13
Specifications ........................................................................... 53
Clocking modes .......................................................................... 53
DTE rate ...................................................................................... 53
Serial interface ............................................................................ 53
Serial connector .......................................................................... 53
Diagnostics ................................................................................. 53
Status LEDs ................................................................................ 53
Configuration .............................................................................. 54
Transmission line ........................................................................ 54
Line coding ................................................................................. 54
Line rates (DSL line) ................................................................... 54
Line interface .............................................................................. 54
G.SHDSL physical connection ................................................... 54
Environment ................................................................................ 54
B
B.1
B.2
B.3
B.4
B.5
Model 3088RC Interface Pin Assignments ............................. 55
RJ-11 non-shielded DSL port ..................................................... 55
V.35 interface .............................................................................. 55
E1 interface ................................................................................. 56
X.21 interface .............................................................................. 56
RS-232 console interface ............................................................ 57
4
1.0 WARRANTY INFORMATION
Patton Electronics warrants all Model 3088RC components to be free
from defects, and will—at our option—repair or replace the product
should it fail within one year from the Þrst date of the shipment.
This warranty is limited to defects in workmanship or materials, and does
not cover customer damage, abuse or unauthorized modiÞcation. If this
product fails or does not performs as warranted, your sole recourse shall
be repair or replacement as described above. Under no condition shall
Patton Electronics be liable for any damages incurred by the use of this
product. These damages include, but are not limited to, the following: lost
proÞts, lost savings and incidental or consequential damages arising
from the use of or inability to use this product. Patton Electronics speciÞcally disclaims all other warranties, expressed or implied, and the
installation or use of this product shall be deemed an acceptance of
these terms by the user.
1.1 COMPLIANCE
EMC Compliance:
• FCC Part 15, Class A
• EN55022, Class A
• EN55024
Safety Compliance:
• UL 60950-1/CSA C22.2 N0. 60950-1
• IEC/EN60950-1
• AS/NZS 60950-1
PSTN Regulatory:
• FCC Part 68
• CS03
• TBR12 & 13 (K and T models)
• AS/ACIF S016:2001 ( K and T models)
• AS/ACIF S043:2003
5
1.2 FCC PART 68 (ACTA) STATEMENT
This equipment complies with Part 68 of FCC rules and the requirements
adopted by ACTA. On the bottom side of this equipment is a label that
contains—among other information—a product identiÞer in the format
US: AAAEQ##TXXXX. If requested, this number must be provided to the
telephone company.
The method used to connect this equipment to the premises wiring and
telephone network must comply with the applicable FCC Part 68 rules
and requirements adopted by the ACTA.
If this equipment causes harm to the telephone network, the telephone
company will notify you in advance that temporary discontinuance of service may be required. But if advance notice isn’t practical, the telephone
company will notify the customer as soon as possible. Also, you will be
advised of your right to Þle a complaint with the FCC if you believe it is
necessary.
The telephone company may make changes in its facilities, equipment,
operations or procedures that could affect the operation of the equipment. If this happens the telephone company will provide advance notice
in order for you to make necessary modiÞcations to maintain uninterrupted service.
If trouble is experienced with this equipment, for repair or warranty information, please contact our company. If the equipment is causing harm to
the telephone network, the telephone company may request that you disconnect the equipment until the problem is resolved.
Connection to party line service is subject to state tariffs. Contact the
state public utility commission, public service commission or corporation
commission for information.
1.3 RADIO AND TV INTERFERENCE (FCC PART 15)
This equipment generates and uses radio frequency energy, and if not
installed and used properly—that is, in strict accordance with the manufacturer's instructions—may cause interference to radio and television
reception. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the
limits for a Class A computing device in accordance with the speciÞcations in Subpart B of Part 15 of FCC rules, which are designed to provide
reasonable protection from such interference in a commercial installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a
particular installation. If the equipment causes interference to radio or
television reception, which can be determined by disconnecting the
cables, try to correct the interference by one or more of the following
measures: moving the computing equipment away from the receiver, reorienting the receiving antenna, and/or plugging the receiving equipment
6
into a different AC outlet (such that the computing equipment and
receiver are on different branches).
1.4 INDUSTRY CANADA NOTICE
This equipment meets the applicable Industry Canada Terminal Equipment Technical SpeciÞcations. This is conÞrmed by the registration number. The abbreviation, IC, before the registration number signiÞes that
registration was performed based on a Declaration of Conformity indicating that Industry Canada technical speciÞcations were met. It does not
imply that Industry Canada approved the equipment.
This Declaration of Conformity means that the equipment meets certain
telecommunications network protective, operational and safety requirements. The Department does not guarantee the equipment will operate
to the user's satisfaction. Before installing this equipment, users should
ensure that it is permissible to be connected to the facilities of the local
telecommunications company. The equipment must also be installed
using an acceptable method of connection. In some cases, the company’s inside wiring associated with a single line individual service may
be extended by means of a certiÞed connector assembly (telephone
extension cord). The customer should be aware that compliance with the
above condition may not prevent degradation of service in some situations. Repairs to some certiÞed equipment should be made by an authorized maintenance facility designated by the supplier. Any repairs or
alterations made by the user to this equipment, or equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications company cause to request the
user to disconnect the equipment. Users should ensure for their own protection that the ground connections of the power utility, telephone lines
and internal metallic water pipe system, are connected together. This
protection may be particularly important in rural areas.
1.5 CE DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
We certify that the apparatus identiÞed in this document conforms to the
requirements of Council Directive 1999/5/EC on the approximation of the
laws of the member states relating to Radio and Telecommunication Terminal Equipment and the mutual recognition of their conformity.
The safety advice in the documentation accompanying this product shall
be obeyed. The conformity to the above directive is indicated by the CE
sign on the device.
7
1.6 AUTHORIZED EUROPEAN REPRESENTATIVE
D R M Green
European Compliance Services Limited.
Oakdene House, Oak Road
WatchÞeld,
Swindon, Wilts SN6 8TD, UK
1.7 SERVICE
All warranty and non-warranty repairs must be returned freight prepaid
and insured to Patton Electronics. All returns must have a Return Materials Authorization number on the outside of the shipping container. This
number may be obtained from Patton Electronics Technical Services at:
• Tel: +1 (301) 975-1007
• Email: support@patton.com
• URL: http://www.patton.com
Note
Packages received without an RMA number will not be
accepted.
8
1.8 SAFETY WHEN WORKING WITH ELECTRICITY
• This device contains no user serviceable parts. The
equipment shall be returned to Patton Electronics for
repairs, or repaired by qualified service personnel.
WARNING
• Hazardous network voltages are present in WAN ports
regardless of whether power to the unit is ON or OFF. To
avoid electric shock, use caution when near WAN ports.
When detaching the cables, detach the end away from
the device first.
• Do not work on the system or connect or disconnect
cables during periods of lightning activity.
In accordance with the requirements of council directive 2002/96/EC on Waste of Electrical and Electronic
Equipment (WEEE), ensure that at end-of-life you separate this product from other waste and scrap and deliver
to the WEEE collection system in your country for recycling.
9
2.0 GENERAL INFORMATION
Thank you for your purchase of this Patton Electronics product. This
product has been thoroughly inspected and tested and is warranted for
One Year parts and labor. If any questions arise during installation or use
of this product, please contact Patton Electronics Technical Support at:
(301) 975-1007.
2.1 FEATURES
• Symmetrical high data rate DSL (G.SHDSL)
• Data rates up to 4.6Mbps in 64-kbps intervals
• Serial V.35 (DCE only) , X.21 (selectable DCE or DTE), Ethernet (RJ45), or T1/E1 interface
• RS-232 console port for management and conÞguration
• Built-in testing and diagnostics
• RocketLink Plug ‘n’ Play for easy installations
• Interoperable with other Patton G.SHDSL modems
• CE marked
2.2 DESCRIPTION
The Patton Electronics Model 3088RC G.SHDSL RocketLink provides
high speed 2-wire connectivity to ISPs, PTTs, and enterprise environments using Symmetrical High-data-rate Digital Subscriber Line
(G.SHDSL) technology.
As a symmetric DSL NTU, RocketLink DSL offers the same data rates in
both directions over a single pair of regular twisted pair lines using TCPAM modulation. Line connection is made with an RJ-45 jack. The Model
3088RC is designed to Þt into Patton’s 2U (3.5”) high rack chassis. This
chassis uses a mid-plane architecture which allows front cards to be
plugged into different rear cards. For more information, refer to the Model
1001RP14 Manual for more information on the power supply options that
are available.
The NTU features externally-accessible DIP switches, loopback diagnostics, SNMP/HTTP remote-management capabilities using RocketLink
Plug ‘n’ Play, as well as in-band management.
10
2.3 SERIAL INTERFACE TYPES
The Model 3088RC versions listed below provide the following types of
built-in serial interfaces:
• 3088RC/A/I provides a V.35 interface on an M/34 female connector
• 3088RC/C/AI provides a Ethernet interface on an RJ45 connector
• 3088RC/D/V/V provides a X.21 interface on a DB-15 female connector
• 3088RC/K/K provides a E1 interface on either an RJ48-C connector or
dual BNC
11
3.0 CONFIGURATION
This section describes the location and orientation of the Model
3088RC’s conÞguration switches and jumpers, and provides detailed
instructions for all possible settings. Each 3088RC model has different
conÞguration requirements, depending on the card’s serial interface.
You can conÞgure the 3088RC using either the software (CLI via a
1001CC port) or the hardware (via DIP switches).
3.1 ABOUT SOFTWARE (CLI) CONFIGURATION
To use software conÞguration you must set DIP switches S1 and S2 to
the ON position, and set DIP Switch S3 to the management address,
before powering-up the RocketLink-G. When DIP switches S1 and S2
are set to ON, the RocketLink-G will operate in software-conÞguration
mode. When set for software-conÞguration mode the RocketLink-G will
read any conÞguration data previously saved to FLASH memory during
system power-up. If no conÞguration data was previously saved to
FLASH, then the RocketLink-G will load the factory-default conÞguration
from FLASH memory. After power-up, you may use console commands
or the Embedded Operations Channel (EOC) to modify the conÞguration
parameters.
3.2 ABOUT HARWARE (DIP SWITCH) CONFIGURATION
To use DIP-switch conÞguration you must Þrst set the DIP switches to a
position other than all OFF or all ON before powering-up the RocketLinkG. When all the DIP switches are set to any position other than all OFF
or all ON the RocketLink-G will operate in hardware (DIP-switch)-conÞguration mode. In DIP-switch-conÞguration mode the RocketLink-G will
read the DIP-switch settings during system startup and conÞgure itself
according to the switch settings.
Once you power-up the RocketLink-G in DIP-switch mode it will operate
in DIP-switch mode until powered down. When operating in DIP-switch
mode you cannot change any conÞguration settings:
• Changing the DIP switch settings while the device is running will not
modify the operating conÞguration because the RocketLink-G only
reads the DIP switches during system startup.
• If you attempt to modify the conÞguration by issuing console commands, the device will not execute your commands. Instead, the RocketLink-G will respond with a message indicating the device is
operating in DIP-switch-conÞguration mode.
12
• If you attempt to modify any conÞguration parameters via the EOC (by
changing (EOC variables), the RocketLink-G will not execute your
changes.
3.3 CONFIGURING THE DIP SWITCHES (V.35, X.21, and Ethernet
Models)
The Model 3088RC is equipped with three sets of DIP switches, which
you can use to conÞgure the RocketLink-G for a broad range of applications. This section describes switch locations and discusses the conÞguration options available.
Note
By default, the RocketLink-G’s DIP switches are all set to “ON”
so the NTU can be conÞgured via the console. If that is how you
will be conÞguring the NTU, skip ahead to the section on conÞguring the console.. Otherwise, read the following sections to
manually conÞgure the DIP switch settings.
S3
S2
S1
Figure 1. Location of DIP switches on Model 3088RC
The three sets of DIP switches on the Model 3088RC are referred to as
S1, S2 and S3. DIP switch orientation with respect to ON and OFF positions is consistent for all switches.
The DIP switches S1 and S2 can be conÞgured as either ON or OFF.
S2
S1
Position
S1-1
S1-2
S1-3
S1-4
S1-5
S1-6
S1-7
S1-8
Function
Data Rate
TX Clock
Position
S2-1
S2-2
S2-3
S2-4
S2-5
S2-6
S2-7
S2-8
13
Function
Front Panel Switches
Line Probe
Annex
Clock Mode
DTE Loops
DTE Interface Type
Reserved
S1-1 through S1-7: Data Rate
Switches S1-1 through S1-7 deÞne both the DSL data rate and the serial
data rate.
S1-1
S1-2
S1-3
S1-4
S1-5
S1-6
S1-7
Data Rate
(kbps)
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
64
128
192
256
320
384
448
512
576
640
704
768
832
896
960
1024
1088
1152
1216
1280
1344
1408
1472
1536
1600
1664
1728
1792
1856
1920
1984
2048
2112
2176
14
S1-1
S1-2
S1-3
S1-4
S1-5
S1-6
S1-7
Data Rate
(kbps)
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
2240
2304
2368
2432
2496
2560
2624
2688
2752
2816
2880
2944
3008
3072
3136
3200
3264
3328
3392
3456
3520
3584
3648
3712
3776
3840
3904
3968
4032
4096
4160
4224
4288
4352
4416
4480
4544
4608
15
S1-8: TX Clock
S1-8
ON
OFF
Setting
Description
Normal
Inverted
TD sampled on falling edge of TX clock.
TD sampled on rising edge of TX clock.
S2-1: Front Panel Switches
The 3088RC uses front panel switches to control test modes. They may
be disabled so that the 3088RC ignores them.
S2-1
ON
OFF
Front Panel Switches
Disabled
Enabled
S2-2: Line Probe
Line probe is a mechanism that determines the highest rate (192K to
2304K) that the DSL link can reliably support. This takes place during
training. The DSL rate will be set to the rate that line probe determines.
Note that both the CO and CPE unit must have line probe enabled for it
to take effect.
Line probe could be used to determine the best rate the line will support,
and then the user could set the units for that rate and disable line probe
so that the rate won’t change without the user’s knowledge.
Line Probe
S2-2
ON
OFF
Disabled
Enabled
S2-3: Annex A/B
Annex A is typically used in North American-like networks, whereas
Annex B is typically used in European-like networks. The different
annexes specify different PSD (power spectral density) masks because
of the difference in T1 and E1 PSDs.
S2-3
Annex
A
B
ON
OFF
16
S2-4 through S2-5: Clock Mode
The RocketLink-G can operate in one of three clock modes: internal,
external, or receive-recover.
S2-4
S2-5
Clock Mode
ON
ON
Internal
OFF
ON
External
ON
OFF
ReceiveRecover
OFF
OFF
Description
The on-board oscillator in
the 3088RC provides clock
for both serial and DSL lines.
3088RC uses the RX clock
from the serial interface as
the clock for the DSL link.
3088RC uses the RX clock
from the DSL line as the
clock for the serial interface.
Reserved
X.21 operation. There are a few things to note about clock modes and
X.21 operation.
—
One X.21 modem must be set to Receive-Recover. The other
X.21 modem must be set to either Internal or External/Network
clock mode.
—
The X.21 modem that is conÞgured as Receive-Recover must
be DCE.
—
The X.21 modem that is conÞgured as Internal must also be
DCE, but if it is an External/Network clock, then the modem
must be conÞgured as DTE.
CPE-Side Modem
Modem’s X.21
Orientation
Receive-Recover
DCE
DCE
CO-Side Modem
Internal
DCE
x
External/Network
x
DTE
Ethernet operation. The 3088RC/C/AI model does not recover clock
from the Ethernet network because it is packet-based rather than TDM.
Therefore, the external clock mode is not valid.
17
S2-6: DTE Loops
The V.35 interface provides two pins, one to request an LAL and the
other to request an RDL. If DTE loops are enabled, the 3088RC/A/I will
start a local loopback or a remote loopback when these pins are
asserted. If DTE loops are disabled, these requests will be ignored.
S2-6
Setting
ON
OFF
Enabled
Disabled
S2-7: DTE Interface Type
The DTE interface type needs to be set based on the rear module. Set to
E1 if using the /K model. Set to normal if using any other model.
S2-7
ON
OFF
DTE Interface Type
E1
Normal
S3-1 through S3-8: Management Address
Each rack card in a chassis must have a unique management address.
The 1001CC and 1001MC use this address to activate and deactivate
the rack card's management interface. This is necessary because all
rack cards in a chassis communicate over the same bus, so only one
card can be active at a time.
This address can be set to any value between 0 and 255. Set S3 to the
binary representation of the number (ON=0 and OFF=1). S3-8 is the
most signiÞcant bit.
3.4 ABOUT SYSTEM RESET MODE
To enter system reset mode, switch all DIP switches to the OFF position
and power cycle the unit. You can use a VT100 emulator conÞgured for
19200 bps/1 stop bit/ no parity/ XON-XOFF ßow control to access the
console. Upon restart, you will see the message “Reset Mode”. The
3088RC automatically communicates through the 1001CC in reset
mode, and does not wait for its address.
System reset mode provides two functions: software upgrades and conÞguration reset to factory defaults.
18
Software Upgrades
The software is upgraded by waiting for the Reset Mode message. Then,
the user can send an Intel HEX Þle supplied by Patton. After the VT100
emulator has Þnished sending this Þle, the 3088RC will respond with a
mes-sage stating how many errors were detected. The user may then set
the DIP switches to the desired conÞguration and power cycle the unit to
run the upgraded software.
ConÞguration Reset to Factory Defaults
To recover from a forgotten password, the user may reset the unit to its
factory conÞguration. After seeing the Reset Mode message, the user
should type the ‘*’ key. This will result in a ‘:’ prompt. At the prompt, the
user should enter the command reset. This will restore the unit to the factory conÞguration. The unit can then be restarted with the settings in
place.
3.5 CONFIGURING THROUGH THE CONSOLE
The 3088RC offers a console command line interface. To access the
console, use a VT100 emulator conÞgured to 9600 bps, 1 stop bit, no
parity, and XON-XOFF ßow control. Use the 1001CC to access the console. Type CTRL+B <address> <enter> to activate the console. Log into
the unit using the default password. No username will be needed.
Note
Log in with the default password superuser.
You can conÞgure the following variables through the console:
• Password: The password used to login to the console.
• Circuit ID: The circuit ID communicated to other units via EOC. EOC
(Embedded Operations Channel) is an out-of-band channel speciÞed
in the G.991.2 standard for SHDSL. We use standard EOC messages
for our remote loopback. The 3088RC also supports proprietary EOC
messages that allow a 3096RC to conÞgure it.
• Clock Mode: The following options are available:
—
Internal: The internal oscillator in the 3088RC provides the
clock to both the serial/T1/E1 and DSL interfaces.
—
External: The serial interface provides the clock for the DSL
interface (V.35, X.21). It must be set to DTE for the X.21 interface. (This mode is invalid for the Ethernet model).
—
Receive Recover: The 3088RC recovers the clock from the DSL
interface and provides it to the serial/E1 interface.
19
• Data Rate: Both the serial/E1 and DSL data rates are set by specifying
the number of 64k timeslots.
• Annex: Either G.991.2 Annex A or Annex B.
• DTE Interface Type: Either E1 or a normal serial interface.
• DSL Error Monitor Max Interval Errors: The number of errors
allowed in an interval before considering the interval errored. A value
of ‘0’ disables the DSL error monitor.
• DSL Error Monitor Interval Time: The length in seconds of
an interval.
• DSL Error Monitor Interval Count: The number of errored intervals
allowed before restarting the DSL link.
• DSL Error Monitor Total Intervals: The number of intervals to inspect
before disabling the error monitor.
• DSL Error Monitor Startup Delay: The length in seconds to wait after
the DSL link is established before starting the error monitor.
• Test Modes: Loopbacks (LAL or RDL) and PRBS (pseudo-random
binary sequence) BER tests (511 or 511 with errors)
• Line Probe: Enable or disable Line Probe for rate
adaptive applications.
The following status information is available through the command
line interface:
• LEDs: Which software controlled LEDs are currently on.
• FPSW Settings: What the front panel switches are set to (if the unit is
populated with them).
• ConÞguration Mode: Whether the 3088RC is conÞgured by DIP
switches or software.
• DSL Link State: In Progress, Success, Deactivated, or Idle.
• DSL Sync State: Out of Sync, Acquiring Sync, In Sync, or Losing
Sync.
Note
DSL Link State vs. DSL Sync State—The DSL link state
describes whether the DSL is training (in progress), linked (success), deactivated (we don’t have an option to deactivate the
modem, so the user should not see this), or idle.
The DSL sync state describes whether no sync words have
20
been found (out of sync), there are no sync word errors (in
sync), or whether we are transitioning from out of sync to in sync
(acquiring sync) or vice versa (losing sync). Typically, when the
link is training, the sync state goes from out of sync to acquiring
sync to in sync.
• DSL Actual Rate: The actual rate at which the DSL link is running
(minus DSL overhead).
• DSL Line Condition: Good or Poor.
• Noise Margin Ratio: the maximum tolerable increase in external
noise power that still allows for BER of less than 1x 10–7.
• DSL Error Counters: The following error counters are available:
—
CRC
—
LOSW (Loss of Sync Word)
—
TX FIFO Full
—
TX FIFO Empty
—
TX FIFO Slip
—
TX Stuff
—
RX FIFO Full
—
RX FIFO Empty
—
RX FIFO Slip
Console Help Commands
The following commands are provided to help the user Þnd the
correct command:
• help: Lists all the commands that the console recognizes.
• system help: Lists all the commands that start with system that the
console recognizes.
• system set help: Lists all the commands that start with system set
that the console recognizes.
• system show help: Lists all the commands that start with system
show that the console recognizes.
21
• dsl help: Lists all the commands that start with dsl that the
console recognizes.
• dsl set help: Lists all the commands that start with dsl set that the
console recognizes.
• dsl show help: Lists all the commands that start with dsl show that
the console recognizes.
• dsl show errcntr help: Lists all the commands that start with dsl
show errcntr that the console recognizes.
System ConÞguration Commands
The following commands allow the user to conÞgure the system:
• system set password <password>: Sets the system password.
• system set circuitid <circuitid>: Sets the circuit ID.
• system set clockmode <internal|external|receiverecover>: Sets
the clock mode. Internal clock mode means the 3088RC provides the
clock to both the DSL and the serial interface. External clock mode
means the 3088RC uses the serial transmit clock as its DSL transmit
clock. Receive recover clock mode means that the 3088RC uses the
DSL receive clock as its DSL transmit clock and as the serial receive
clock.
Note
X.21 External Clock Mode—The X.21 interface expects the
DCE to provide the clock used for both transmitting data and for
sampling receive data. When the 3088RC/D/V is set as a DCE,
it may be used in internal or receive recover clock modes. The
DSL generates a clock that is provided to the X.21 interface.
When the 3088RC/D/V is a DTE, it may be used in external
clock mode. The X.21 interface needs to provide the clock. This
clock is used by the DSL to sample the serial data and also to
update the receive data.
The 3088RC is set for either DCE or DTE by ßipping the daughter-card. The 3088RC is a DCE if DCE points toward the front of
the 3088RC.
• system set dteif <normal|e1>: Set to E1 if the rear card is Model
3088RC/K/K. Set to normal for all other models.
The following commands allow the user to view the current
system conÞguration:
22
• system show conÞg: Shows the conÞguration of the entire system,
including DSL and serial/T1/E1 lines.
Any changes to the system conÞguration or the DSL conÞguration will be
lost on the next power cycle unless the changes are saved. The command system save conÞg is used to save the changes.
System Status Commands
The following commands show system status:
• system show status: Shows the following system status information:
LEDs, DSL test mode, front panel switch settings, DSL link state, and
conÞguration mode.
DSL ConÞguration Commands
The following commands are used to conÞgure the DSL:
• dsl set timeslots <1–72>: Sets the number of timeslots. The data rate
is calculated by the equation: data-rate = #timeslots x 64k.
• dsl set annex <a|b>: Set the annex.
• dsl set lineprobe <enabled|disabled>: Enable or disable line probe.
• dsl set loopback <off|lal|rdl>: Start or stop loopbacks.
• dsl set pattern <off|511|511e>: Start or stop PRBS generator and
BER meter.
• DSL Error Monitor
Startup Delay
Interval 1
Interval 2
…
Interval
totint
⇐ßstartdelay⇒
⇐ßinttime⇒
⇐ßinttime⇒
⇐ßinttime⇒
⇐ßinttime⇒
The DSL error monitor inspects intervals to see if they have met the error
threshold (maxint). If the error monitor Þnds a certain number (intcnt) of
intervals that meet or exceed the error threshold, it will restart the DSL
link. The error monitor will wait (startdelay) seconds after the DSL link
comes up before it begins monitoring errors. After the startup delay, it will
check the number of errors that have occurred during each (inttime) seconds to see if they meet the error threshold. The error monitor inspects
(totint) intervals before it stops.
Note
Setting maxint to 0 disables the error monitor and setting totint
to 0 causes the error monitor to run continuously.
23
The following commands conÞgure the error monitor:
• dsl set errmon maxint <maxint>: Sets the number of errors allowed
in an interval causes it to be considered an errored interval. If this is
set to ‘0’, then the error monitor is disabled.
• dsl set errmon inttime <inttime>: Sets the length of each interval.
• dsl set errmon intcnt <intcnt>: Sets the number of errored intervals
that causes the DSL link to restart.
• dsl set errmon totint <totint>: Sets the number of intervals to inspect
for errors before disabling the error monitor. If this is set to ‘0’, then the
error monitor will run continuously.
• dsl set errmon startdelay <startdelay>: Sets the number of seconds
to wait after the DSL link comes up before the error monitor starts
inspecting intervals.
Changing the data rate (dsl set timeslots), the clock mode (system set
clockmode), the Annex (dsl set annex), or Line Probe (dsl set
lineprobe), or the DSL error monitor settings will not take effect on the
DSL link until the link restarts. The dsl start command restarts the
DSL link.
DSL Status Command
The dsl show status command shows the following DSL status information: link state, sync state, link speed, error counters, line condition, noise
margin, and test mode status.
DSL Clear Errcntrs Command
The dsl clear errcntrs command clears the error counters.
24
3.6 CONFIGURING THE V.35 REAR CARD
The V.35 interface card is conÞgured by setting the conÞguration straps
and dip switches located on the PC board.
Model 1001RCM13445 & 1001RCM134TB Strap Settings
Figure 2 shows the strap location for the Model 1001RCM134XX (M/34)
rear card. This strap determines whether Signal Ground and Frame
Ground will be connected.
JB3
123
JB4
123
Figure 2. 1001RCM134XX strap locations
The table below provides an overview of interface strap functions for the
rear interface cards. Following the table overview are detailed descriptions of each strap’s function.
Strap
JB3
JB4
Function
DTE Shield (Pin A) & FRGND
FRGND & SGND (Pin B)
Position 1&2
Position 2&3
Connected
Connected
Open*
Open*
* Indicates default setting
DTE Shield (M/34 Pin A) & FRGND (JB3). In the connected position,
this strap links M/34 pin A & frame ground. In the open position, pin A is
disconnected from frame ground.
JB3
Description
Position 1&2
Position 2&3
DTE Shield (Pin A) and FRGND Connected
DTE Shield (Pin A) and FRGND Not Connected
25
SGND & FRGND (JB4). In the connected position, this strap links Signal
Ground and frame ground through a 100 ohm resistor. In the open position, signal ground is disconnected from frame ground.
JB4
Description
Position 1&2
Position 2&3
SGND and FRGND Connected
SGND and FRGND Not Connected
3.7 CONFIGURING THE X.21 REAR CARD
The X.21 interface card is conÞgured by setting the conÞguration straps
located on the PC board.
Model 1001RCM11545& 1001RCM115TB Strap Settings
Figure 3 shows strap locations for the Model 1001RCM115XX (DB-15)
rear cards. These straps determine various grounding characteristics for
the terminal interface and twisted pair lines. JB3 and JB4 are user conÞgurable.
JB3
123
JB4
123
Figure 3. 1001RCM115XX strap locations
The table below provides an overview of interface strap functions for the
rear interface cards. Following the table overview are detailed descriptions of each strap’s function.
Strap
JB3
JB4
Function
Position 1&2
DTE Shield (Pin1) & FRGND
FRGND & SGND (Pin 8)
* Indicates default setting
26
Connected
Connected
Position 2&3
Open*
Open*
DTE Shield (DB-15 Pin 1) & FRGND (JB3). In the connected position,
this strap links DB-15 pin 1 & frame ground. In the open position, pin 1 is
disconnected from frame ground.
JB3
Description
Position 1&2
Position 2&3
DTE Shield (Pin 1) and FRGND Connected
DTE Shield (Pin 1) and FRGND Not Connected
SGND & FRGND (JB4). In the connected position, this strap links DB-15
pin 8 (Signal Ground) and frame ground through a 100 ohm resistor. In
the open position, pin 8 is connected directly to frame ground.
JB4
Description
Position 1&2
Position 2&3
SGND (Pin 8) and FRGND Connected through a 100-ohm resistor
SGND (Pin 8) and FRGND Directly Connected
3.8 CONFIGURING THE E1 REAR CARD
The E1 rear card features conÞguration capability via hardware switches
and jumpers. Sections 4.1 and 4.2 describe all switch and jumper conÞgurations for the 3088RC/K model. Section 4.3 describes the conÞguration required for your mDSL modem.
DIP Switch ConÞguration
The E1 card has eight internal DIP switches (S1-1 through S1-8). The
DIP switches can be conÞgured as either “On” or “Off.”
Switch S1-1 : Line Coding. Use Switch S1-1 to control the Network
Line Coding options. Set these options to be the same as the Line Coding that has been provided by your Service Provider.
S1-1
Off
On
Line Framing & Coding
HDB3
AMI
Line Coding Options:
• High Density Bipolar 3 (HDB3): In HDB3 coding, the transmitter
deliberately inserts a bipolar violation when excessive zeros in the
data stream are detected. The receiver recognizes these special violations and decodes them as zeros. This method enables the network to
meet minimum pulse density requirements. Use HDB3 unless AMI is
required in your application .
27
• Alternate Mark Inversion (AMI): AMI coding does not inherently
account for ones density. To meet this requirement, you should ensure
that the data inherently meets pulse density requirements.
Switch S1-2 : CRC-4 Multiframe. CRC-4 Multiframe uses Time Slot
zero to carry CRC-4 information. When CRC-4 is enabled (ON), the unit
synchronizes to the CRC-4 multi-frame protocol.
S1-2
Off
Disabled
Note
Option
On
Enabled
When the data rate is set to 2048 Kbps, K Module transmits
user data on all 32 timeslots, ignoring framing information. In
this case, Switch S1-2 will be ignored.
Switch S1-3 : Clear Channel Mode. When S1-3 is at Off position, the
K Module is running in G.703 clear channel mode. When S1-3 is at On
position, the K Module is running in G.704 framed mode. When the K
Module is set to framed mode, channel 0 will be used to pass G.704
framing information which results in a maximum bandwidth of 1984kbps
for user data.
S1-3
Option
Off
Clear Channel Mode (G.703)
On
Framed Mode
(G.704)
Switch S1-4 Through S1-8 : Reserved. Reserved for future use and
should be set to OFF.
Jumper ConÞguration
The 3088RC/K model has four jumpers (two position headers): JP4, JP5,
JP6, and JP7. These jumpers are used to select input and output impedance matching between the module and external line. See Appendix E
for jumper locations.
The following is a description of the jumper settings with respect to the
front panel connectors.
1. For a 75 ohm connection (coax) install JP4 - JP7 (default).
2. For a 120 ohm connection (RJ-48C) remove JP4 - JP7.
28
Making Interface Connections
The 3088RC/K model may be connected to G.703/G.704 ports using a
single 120 ohm RJ-48C or a dual 75 ohm coax (BNC). The 3088RC/K
model rear panels and the location of these connectors are show below.
Figure 4. K Module Rear Panels, Showing Location of Connectors
Connect Twisted Pair (120 ohm) to G.703/G.704 Network . The
3088RC/K model is equipped with a single RJ-48C jack for connections
to a 120 ohm twisted pair G.703/G.704 network interface. If your G.703/
G.704 network terminates via RJ-48C, use the diagram below and the
table on the following page to make the proper connections. The connector pinout and signals are shown in Figure 5.
Use the following connection diagram to connect the 120 ohm G.703/
G.704 network channel.
Figure 5. 120 ohm RJ-48C G.703/G.704 Interface
29
Connect Dual Coaxial Cable (75 ohm) to G.703/G.704 Network. The
3088RC/K model is also equipped with dual female BNCs (TX and RX)
for connection to a 75 ohm dual coax G.703/G.704 network interface. If
your G.703/G.704 network terminates via dual coaxial cable, use the diagram below to make the proper connections. The connector pinout and
signals are shown in Figure 6.
Figure 6. 75 ohm Dual Coaxial G.703 Interface
Note
The outer conductor of the coax cables are isolated
from system earth ground.
30
3.9 CONNECTING THE ETHERNET REAR CARD
The Model 3088RC/C/AI module plugs into Patton’s1092ARC and
3088RC modems to provide Ethernet LAN extension. The 3088RC/C/AI
has no switches or jumpers and does not need to be conÞgured. However, factors such as the type of medium, throughput across the link and
clocking mode must be determined by the settings of the baseband
modems. Please refer to your baseband modem (i.e. 1092, and 1095) to
make the following settings.
1. Bit Rate: The DTE rate setting of your base unit corresponds to the
throughput of your 3088RC/C/AI bridge module. Use higher speeds
to allow maximum throughput to your extended LAN. Use lower
speeds to limit the access of your extended LAN.
Note
The 3088RC/C/AI only supports synchronous speeds.
2. Clocking Mode: Set the clocking modes on the base units so that
one unit is conÞgured for Internal clocking mode and the other unit is
set for Receive Recover clocking mode.
3. When using the 3088RC/C/AI, DISABLE, the “Enable Loop from
DTE” Switch on the front function card (1092ARC or 3088RC).
4. All other base unit settings depend upon your application and on the
application medium (twisted pair or coaxial cable)
31
Connecting the Interface Driver Board
This package contains an interface driver board that allows you to conÞgure your front function card for ethernet operation. Figure 7 shows the
Interface Driver Board connected to a Model 3088RC front function card.
Figure 7. Driver Board mounted on Model 3088RC
Follow the instructions below to connect the interface driver board to the
front function card:
1. With the function card (such as 3088RC, shown above) pulled out of
the NetLink rack or clusterbox chassis, locate the driver board to be
replaced on the top of the base unit front card.
2. Lift the old interface board gently off of the printed circuit board.
3. Position the 3088RC/C/AI driver board on top of the function card’s
pc board with the sockets oriented toward the male pins. Please be
sure the label marked FRONT is pointed toward the front of the
function card (toward the LEDs).
4. Push the Interface Driver Board gently onto the socket and re-install
the function card into the rack or cluster system.
32
Connecting to the 10Base-T Ethernet Port
The Model 3088RC/C/AI provides line side connections through a terminal block or through a RJ-45 connector. Figure 8 below, shows the rear
panel options and the locations of the connectors.
Figure 8. 3088RC/C/AI Ethernet Port
The RJ-45 Ethernet port on Model 3088RC/C/AI is designed to connect
directly to a 10BaseT network. Figure 9 shows the 10BaseT RJ-45 port
pin description. You may make connections up to 330 feet using Type 4
or 5 cable.
Figure 9. Model 3088RC Ethernet Connector Pinout
33
Connecting the 10Base-T Ethernet Port to a Hub . The Model
3088RC/C/AI 10Base-T interface is conÞgured as DTE (Data Terminal
Equipment), just like a 10Base-T network interface card in a PC. Therefore, it “expects” to connect to a 10Base-T Hub using a straight-through
RJ-45 cable. Use the diagram below to construct a cable to connect the
3088RC/C/AI to a 10Base-T Hub.
Connecting the 10Base-T Ethernet Port to a PC (DTE). The Model
3088RC/C/AI 10Base-T interface is conÞgured as DTE (Data Terminal
Equipment). If you wish to connect the 3088RC/C/AI to another DTE
device such as a 10Base-T network interface card in a PC, you must
construct a 10Base-T crossover cable as shown in the diagram below.
Connecting the Line Interface. The Model 3088RC/C/AI is to be used
with Patton function card access products (i.e. 1092ARC) There are two
essential requirements for connecting the line interface on Model
3088RC/C/AI:
1. These units work in pairs with one 3088RC/C/AI connected to
another 3088RC/C/AI (or IM1/I) over 2 or 4-Wire Twisted pair (2 or 4Wire operation is determined by the front function card).
2. To function properly, the Model 3088RC/C/AI needs one or two
twisted pairs of metallic wire (two or four wire). The twisted pairs
must be unconditioned, dry, metallic wire, between 19 (.9mm) and
26 AWG (.4mm) (Appendix B describes cable requirements) .
Standard dial-up telephone circuits, or leased circuits that run
34
through signal equalization equipment, or standard, ßat modular
telephone type cable, are not acceptable.
Figure 10. RJ-45 Line Interface
Note
Two-Wire Modems use RJ-45 pins 4 and 5 and 4-Wire Modems
use RJ-45 pins 3, 4, 5 and 6, as shown above. Please see the
Function Card User Manual for more details.
LED Status Monitors
The Model 3088RC/C/AI features two LEDs that monitor general operating status and the 10Base-T twisted pair link integrity. Figure 11 shows
the LEDs located directly beneath the RJ-45 jack.
Figure 11. 3088RC Rear Panel, LED Locations
35
Status. Blinks yellow from one to eleven times to indicate system status.
Each pulse pattern is separated by a 2 second “off” period. Greater
pulse patterns have higher priority (buffer saturation has greater priority
than an empty MAC table). Valid system statuses are:
• 1 pulse = system status ok
• 2 pulses = No MAC entries in the MAC address table
• 3 pulses = Clear to send (CTS) or Carrier Detect (DCD) from base unit
are not asserted
• 4 pulses = IMRC2/IA buffer is saturated
• 5 pulses = WAN receive frame(s) too large
• 6 pulses = WAN receive frame(s) not Octet aligned
• 7 pulses = WAN receive frame(s) aborted
• 8 pulses = Detected WAN receive frame(s) with bad CRC
• 9 pulses = Detected LAN receive frame(s) too large
• 10 pulses = Detected LAN receive frame(s) not Octet aligned
• 11 pulses = Detected LAN receive frame(s) with bad CRC
After a status code is displayed eight times and the associated condition
is removed, the status code will no longer appear.
Link. Glows green to indicate good link integrity on the 10Base-T
twisted pair line.
36
4.0 INSTALLATION
This section describes the functions of the Model 1001R14 rack chassis,
tells how to install front and rear Model 3088RC Series cards into the
chassis, and how to connect to the twisted pair interface and the serial
interface.
4.1 THE MODEL 1001R14 RACK CHASSIS
The Model 1001R14 Rack Chassis (Figure 12) has fourteen short range
modem card slots, plus its own power supply. Measuring only 3.5” high,
the Model 1001R14 is designed to occupy only 2U in a 19” rack. Sturdy
front handles allow the Model 1001R14 to be extracted and transported
conveniently.
Figure 12. Model 1001R14 Rack Chassis with power supply
The Rack Power Supply
The power supply included in the Model 1001R14 rack uses the same
mid-plane architecture as the modem cards. The front card of the power
supply slides in from the front, and the rear card slides in from the rear.
They plug into one another in the middle of the rack. The front card is
then secured by thumb screws and the rear card by conventional metal
screws.
WARNING
There are no user-serviceable parts in the power supply
section of the Model 3088RC Series. Voltage setting
changes and fuse replacement should only be performed by qualified service personnel. Contact Patton
Electronics Technical support at (301) 975-1007 for
more information.
37
Powering Up Your 1001R14 Rack
Note
The power supplies that come with your 1001R14 rack system
are equipped with a power entry connector on the rear card. The
power supplies are Hot-Swappable, so you are not required to
remove the cards from the rack while applying power to the system.
When a power cable is connected between the unit, and an appropriate
power source, a green LED on the front panel will glow to indicate that
the unit is working properly. Since the Model 1001R14 is a "hot swappable" rack, it is not necessary for any cards to be installed before applying
power. The power may be removed at any time without harming the
installed cards.
Note
Please refer to the Model 1001RP14 Series User Manual AC &
DC Rack Mount Power Supplies for fuse and power card
replacement information.
4.2 INSTALLING MODEL 3088RC SERIES INTO THE CHASSIS
The Model 3088RC Series is comprised of a front card and a rear card.
The two cards meet inside the rack chassis and plug into each other by
way of mating 50 pin card edge connectors. Use the following steps as a
guideline for installing each Model 3088RC Series into the rack chassis:
1. Slide the rear card into the back of the chassis along the metal rails
provided.
2. Secure the rear card using the metal screws provided.
3. Slide the front card into the front of the chassis. It should meet the
rear card when it’s almost all the way into the chassis.
4. Push the front card gently into the card-edge receptacle of the rear
card. It should “click” into place.
5. Secure the front card using the thumb screws.
38
4.3 CONNECTING THE TWISTED PAIR INTERFACE
The Model 3088RC supports communication between two DTE devices
as follows:
CAUTION
The interconnecting cables shall be acceptable for
external use and shall be rated for the proper application with respect to voltage, current, anticipated temperature, flammability, and mechanical serviceability.
Using 24 AWG (0.5 mm) wire up to:
• 32,000 feet (9.7 km) at 192 kbps
• 18,500 feet (5.6 km) at 2.312 Mbps
Using 26 AWG (0.4 mm) wire up to:
• 23,000 feet (7 km) at 192 kbps
• 13,200 feet (4 km) at 2.312 Mbps
Two things are essential:
1. These units work in pairs. Both units at the end of the twisted pair
DSL span must be set for the same DTE rate—one unit set as CO,
the other as CP.
2. To function properly, the Model 3088RC needs one twisted pair of
metallic wire. This twisted pair must be unconditioned, dry, metallic
wire, between 19 (0.9mm) and 26 AWG (0.4mm) (the higher number
gauges will limit distance). Standard dial-up telephone circuits, or
leased circuits that run through signal equalization equipment, or
standard, ßat modular telephone type cable, are not acceptable.
39
The RJ-45 connector on the Model 3088RC’s twisted pair interface is
polarity insensitive and is wired for a two-wire interface. The signal/pin
relationships are shown in Figure 13.
3088RC/A/I
(V.35, female DB-25)
3088RC/D/V
(X.21, female DB-15)
Figure 13. Model 3088RC V.35/X.21 interfaces
40
4.4 CONNECTING THE MODEL 3088RC/A/I (V.35) SERIAL INTERFACE
Model 3088RC/A/I supports V.35 serial port connections. This section
describes how to connect the serial ports to your V.35 equipment.
The interconnecting cables shall be acceptable for
external use and shall be rated for the proper application with respect to voltage, current, anticipated temperature, flammability, and mechanical serviceability.
CAUTION
Connecting the Model 3088RC/A/I (V.35) to a “DTE” device
The Model 3088RC/A/I provides a V.35 DCE (data circuit terminating
equipment) interface on a M/34 connector. As a DCE, this interface is
designed to connect to DTE equipment, such as a router. When connecting the V.35 interface of the Model 3088RC/A/I to your DTE device, use a
V.35 straight-through cable. Appendix B.2 on page 55 describes pin
assignments and signal sources for the Model 3088RC/A/I V.35 interface.
3088RC
RocketLink-G NTU
–Power
–DSL
Remote G.SHDSL NTU
–TERM
–TM/ER
Remote
Local
511
511/E
DSL Span
3088RC
RocketLink-G NTU
Straight-Through Cable
–Power
–DSL
–TERM
–TM/ER
Remote
Local
511
511/E
V.35 Router (DTE)
3088RC (DCE)
Figure 14. Connecting the Model 3088RC/A/I to V.35 Serial DTE
41
Connecting the Model 3088RC/A/I (V.35) to a “DCE” device
The Model 3088RC/A/I provides a V.35 DCE (data circuit terminating
equipment) interface on a M/34 connector. As a DCE, this interface is
designed to connect to DTE equipment, such as a router. However, connecting the 3088RC/A/I to another DCE device, such as a multiplexer or
G.703 E1 NTU, requires a tailcircuit cable. When connecting the V.35
interface of the Model 3088RC/A/I to your DCE device, use a V.35 tail circuit cable. Some applications may also require the installation of a tailcircuit buffer to account for small differences in clock frequency between
the 3088RC/A/I and the V.35 DCE (multiplexer).
Remote Model 3088RC
3088RC
RocketLink-G NTU
–Power
–DSL
–TERM
–TM/ER
Remote
Local
511
511/E
DSL Span
G.703 E1 NTU
3088RC
RocketLink-G NTU
Tail-circuit cable
–Power
–DSL
–TERM
(DCE)
–TM/ER
Remote
Local
511
511/E
Model 3088RC/A (DCE)
Figure 15. Connecting the Model 3088RC/A/I to V.35 Serial DCE
42
4.5 CONNECTING THE MODEL 3088RC/D/V (X.21) SERIAL INTERFACE
Model 3088RC/D/V supports X.21 serial port connections. This section
describes how to connect the serial ports to your X.21 equipment.
The interconnecting cables shall be acceptable for
external use and shall be rated for the proper application with respect to voltage, current, anticipated temperature, flammability, and mechanical serviceability.
CAUTION
Connecting the Model 3088RC/D/V (X.21) to a “DCE” or “DTE”
device
The Model 3088RC/D/V provides an X.21 interface on a DB-15 female
connector. The X.21 interface default conÞguration is DCE for connection
to DTE (data terminal equipment) such as a router. However, the X.21
interface on the Model 3088RC/D/V may be conÞgured as DTE (data terminal equipment) for connection to DCE such as a modem or multiplexer.
When connecting the X.21 interface of the Model 3088RC/D/V to your
DTE or DCE device, use an X.21 straight-through cable.
Remote Model 3088RC
3088RC
RocketLink-G NTU
–Power
–DSL
–TERM
–TM/ER
Remote
Local
511
511/E
DSL Span
3088RC
RocketLink-G NTU
–Power
–DSL
Straight-Through 15-pin
D-Sub Cable
–TERM
–TM/ER
Remote
Local
511
511/E
Router (DTE)
OR
Mux (DCE)
Model 3088RC/D (DCE or DTE)
Figure 16. Connecting the Model 3088RC/D/V to X.21 DTE or DCE
The DCE/DTE strap is located on the daughter board. The arrows on the
top of the strap indicate the conÞguration of the X.21 port (for example, if
the DCE arrows are pointing toward the front of the rack card, the unit is
conÞgured as a DCE). Similarly, if the DTE arrows are pointing toward
the front of the rack card, the unit is conÞgured as a DTE.
43
4.6 CONNECTING THE 3088RC/K/K (E1) INTERFACE
The Model 3088RC/K/K is a rear-mountable G.703/G.704 interface card
that works with the Patton Model 3088RC function card. The two cards
meet inside the rack chassis and plug into each other by way of mating
50 pin card edge connectors. Use the following steps as a guideline for
installing each Model 3088RC/K/K and its function card mate into the
rack chassis:
1. Slide the rear card into the back of the chassis along the metal rails
provided.
2. Secure the rear card using the metal screws provided.
3. Slide the front card into the front of the chassis. It should meet the
rear card when it’s almost all the way into the chassis.
4. Push the front card gently into the card-edge receptacle of the rear
card. It should “click” into place.
5. Secure the front card using the thumb screws.
4.7 CONNECTING THE 3088RC/C/AI (ETHERNET) INTERFACE
The Model 3088RC/C/AI is a rear-mountable ethernet interface card.
The two cards meet inside the rack chassis and plug into each other by
way of mating 50 pin card edge connectors. Use the following steps as a
guideline for installing each Model 3088RC/C/AI and its function card
mate into the rack chassis:
1. Slide the 3088RC/C/AI rear card into the back of the chassis along
the metal rails provided.
2. Secure the 3088RC/C/AI rear card using the metal screws provided.
3. Slide the front function card into the front of the chassis. It should
meet the 3088RC/C/AI rear card when it is almost all the way into
the chassis.
4. Push the front card gently into the card-edge receptacle of the rear
card. It should “click” into place.
5. Secure the front card using the thumb screws.
44
5.0 OPERATION
Once the Model 3088RC is properly conÞgured and installed, it should
operate transparently. These sections describes functions of the LED
status indicators, and the use of the built-in loopback test modes.
5.1 LED STATUS INDICATORS
The Model 3088RC features four front panel LEDs that monitor the operation of the rack card. Figure 17 shows the front panel location of each LED.
Table 1 describes each LED’s function.
3088RC
RocketLink-G NTU
–Power
–DSL
–TERM
–TM/ER
Remote
Local
511
511/E
Figure 17. The Model 3088RC Series’ front panel LEDs
Table 1: Model 3088RC front panel LED descriptiont
LED
Color
Power
Green
DSL
Green
TERM
TM/ER
Yellow
Green
Description
Flashing = POST
Solid = Power is on
Flashing = Training
Solid = DSL Link
Solid = Serial port is active
Solid = Test mode is active
Blinking = Test mode error
45
5.2 TEST MODES
The 3088RC offers test modes in the form of loopbacks, PRBS pattern
generators, and combinations of both (see Figure 17 on page 45).
Figure 18 is a block diagram of the Model 3088RC with respect to test
modes.
511 Pattern
Generator
DSL
Framer
DSL
Framer
Line
511 BER
Meter
511 Pattern
Generator
511 BER
Meter
Figure 18. 3088RC Block Diagram
Loopbacks
The 3088RC supports both Local Analog Loopbacks (LAL) and Remote
Digital Loopbacks (RDL). These can be initiated either from the optional
front panel switches or by the console command dsl set loopback
<off|lal|rdl>. The data path for the LAL is shown in Figure 19.
511 Pattern
Generator
DSL
Framer
DSL
Framer
Line
511 Pattern
Generator
511 BER
Meter
511 BER
Meter
Figure 19. Local Analog Loopback Diagram
The data received from the serial interface is looped back before going
out on the DSL line. Note that this loopback occurs after the pattern generator/BER meter. This means that running a 511 pattern in conjunction
with an LAL should result in no error detected by the meter. The data
path for the RDL is shown in Figure 20.
511 Pattern
Generator
511 BER
Meter
511 Pattern
Generator
Line
DSL
Framer
DSL
Framer
511 BER
Meter
Figure 20. Remote Digital Loopback Diagram
The RDL causes the remote unit to loop the data received from the DSL
line back to the DSL line.
46
Patterns
The 3088RC can generate and detect 511 and 511 with Error patterns.
These can be initiated either by the optional front panel switches or by
the console command dsl set pattern <off|511|511e>. When the pattern
is started, the DSL framer uses its internal 511 pattern generator for its
DSL TX data instead of the data received from the serial interface. Also,
the framer’s internal BER Meter tries to detect a 511 pattern in the DSL
RX Data.
Because the BER Meter always runs when the pattern generator runs,
the meter will detect errors if either the pattern is not either looped back
or the remote unit is not transmitting a 511 pattern.
One point to note is that the way errors are generated in the 511E pattern generates CRC errors. This can cause the DSL error monitor to
restart the link if the thresholds are set low enough.
5.3 REMOTE CONSOLE OPERATION
The PC user (near-end) may conÞgure and verify status of the remote
3088RC (far-end) via a Remote Console session. The PC user must log
onto the 3088RC (near-end) unit to establish a remote console session.
Once done, the remote 3088RC (far-end) appears as a unit which is
locally connected through the RS-232 console port. All commands are
transmitted over the G.SHDSL link in the EOC channel.
Remote Console Session (RCS)
PC
(Near End)
RS-232
3088
(Near End)
3088
(Far End)
DSL
Figure 21. Remote control session Diagram
Establishing a Remote Console Session
How to Connect . The following steps are to establish a connection to
the remote 3088RC (far-end) via Remote Console Session (RCS):
1. ConÞgure a terminal emulation program (e.g., Hyperterminal) on PC
(near-end) for 19200 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit, no ßow
control. Connect it to the 1001CC in the same chassis as the
3088RC (near-end).
2. At the password prompt, log in to the near-end Model 3088RC.
47
3. Ensure that a DSL link is established. You can verify an established
DSL link by using the system show status command or by checking
that the DSL LED is solid green. Upon executing the show status
command, the dsl link state is shown as success if the DSL link is
established.
4. At the command prompt, enter the command remote console.
5. Wait for the message Console: Remote console connection established.
—
If a DSL link is not established, or for some other reason the
3088RC (far-end) does not respond in a reasonable amount of
time, the following message appears: Console: Remote console
timed out trying to con-nect. Enter the command remote console again.
—
If 3088RC (Far End) already has an active remote console session open, you will see the message Console: Remote console
connection request rejected. This can also happen if the remote
3088RC (far-end) has an established remote console session
with the local 3088RC (near-end) which has timed out.
6. Enter the password at the password prompt for the remote console
session.
Note
The passwords for a local console session of the 3088RC (nearend) and the remote console session of the 3088RC (far-end)
should be different for the purpose of security.
7. You should now be logged into the remote 3088RC (far-end) via the
remote console session. The communication with the remote
3088RC (far-end) is essentially the same as having a local console
connection.
Note
The local or remote 3088RC may be CO or CPE, as long as
there is one of each. Either the CO or CPE unit may accept a
remote console connection.
Note
With a remote console session open, a user at PC (far-end) is
blocked from using the local console. Upon typing anything, the
3088RC (far-end) sends a message to the PC (far-end) stating
Console: Remote console connection is open.
48
Figure 22 is a screenshot of opening a typical remote console session:
Log in to 3088RC (Near End)
system show status command
shows that DSL link is not up
remote console command requests a
remote console session on 3088RC (Far End)
Message informs us that the 3088RC (Far End) did not
respond and a remote
console session was not opened
system show status command shows
that the DSL link state is success
remote console command requests a
remote console session on 3088RC (Far End)
Message informs us that we are now
connected to the 3088RC (Far End) console
We can now enter commands on
the remote console
Figure 22. Opening a typical remote console session
How to Disconnect . The remote console session ends under any of
the following conditions:
• The user enters the command logout
• A timeout period of 5 minutes elapses since the user has entered a
command to the console.
• The DSL link drops.
The response upon logging out of the remote console session with the
command logout is Console: Remote console connection lost. The following is what is displayed upon a user’s logging out of a remote console
session after logging in.
> remote console
>
Console: Remote console connection established.
password: ******
> logout
Console: Remote console connection lost.
49
>
The timeout period is a Þxed, non-conÞgurable parameter of 5 minutes. If
the remote 3088RC (far-end) has received no command within 5 minutes, it automatically terminates the RCS. Once the RCS is terminated,
the PC (far-end) can establish a local console session if desired. However if the PC (near-end) wishes to re-establish a RCS, it is able to do so
whether or not the PC (far-end) is in an active local session, because the
RCS has priority over a local console session. If the PC (near-end)
establishes an RCS while the PC (far-end) is on a local session, the PC
(far-end) is kicked off.
Differences in Local and Remote Control Session Behavior
Since the remote console session communication occurs over the
G.SHDSL link’s EOC channel, some commands via the RCS have
unusual effects.
• system upgrade: Do not issue this command via an RCS. A system
upgrade must be done via the local console connection. If you should
accidentally issue this command over an RCS, the remote 3088RC
(far-end) waits indeÞnitely for input (which is the system upgrade
image) from the local console port of the 3088RC (far-end). If this
command is entered, 3088RC (Far End) will have to be power-cycled.
Do not attempt a software upgrade of the remote unit
over the Remote Control Session.
CAUTION
Remote Console Session (RCS)
LAL
PC
(Far End)
PC
(Near End)
RS-232
3088
(Far End)
3088
(Near End)
RS-232
DSL
Figure 23. Remote control session with LAL diagram
50
• dsl set loopback lal: Do not issue this command over the RCS to the
far-end 3088RC. If the far-end goes into LAL, the near-end and farend 3088RC NTUs can no longer communicate over the RCS.
CAUTION
Do not issue this command to a far-end unit. If you were
to do so, the near-end 3088RC would no longer be able
to communicate with the far-end 3088RC.
5.4 SOFTWARE UPGRADE
The Model 3088RC is software upgradeable through the console port.
Software images will be available in Intel Hex Þle format.
The software upgrade feature is available either by powering up the
Model 3088RC with all DIP switches set to the OFF position, or by entering the system upgrade command on the command line interface. The
software upgrade takes approximately 5 minutes to complete. The
3088RC will print ‘.’ to the screen while the software upgrade is in process. When the software upgrade completes, it will print a message stating that it is complete and the number of errors, if any, that occurred.
Errors may occur during the software upgrade if the image is corrupt or if
there is a disruption in the console port connection. The Model 3088RC
will print a message to the console port if it encounters any errors. In the
event of an error, the portions of the old image may have been overwritten, and the unit may not be able to boot into operational mode. However,
the unit may still boot into the software upgrade, so a new software
image can still be loaded to bring the unit back to an operational state.
Here is the software upgrade procedure:
1. Remove all cards from the rack except for the card that you intend to
upgrade.
2. Obtain the software image Hex Þle for the 3088RC.
3. Turn off the Model 3088RC.
4. Make a note of the current DIP switch settings, then set all DIP
switches to the OFF position.
5. Turn on the Model 3088RC.
6. ConÞgure HyperTerminal for 19200 bps, 8 bits, 1 stop bit, no parity,
XON-XOFF.
51
7. Open Model 3088RC Console (via HyperTerminal or other terminal
emulation program).
>>Transfer
>>Send Text File...
>>Set “Files of Type:” to “All files (*.*)”
>>Select 033252Z.hex
8. When the transfer completes, turn off the Model 3088RC.
9. Set the DIP switches for the proper conÞguration.
10.Turn on the Model 3088RC. It now operates with the upgraded software.
5.5 RESET CONFIGURATION TO FACTORY DEFAULT
The conÞguration can be reset to factory defaults from the software reset
mode. This allows a user to recover from a forgotten password. To reset
to the conÞguration, follow these steps:
1. Power down the unit.
2. Set all DIP switches to the OFF position.
3. Connect a PC to the Console port.
4. Open a VT100 terminal emulator (such as HyperTerminal). ConÞgure the emulator for 19200 bps,1 stop bit, no parity, X-ON X-OFF
ßow control.
Note
The 3088RC will not wait for its address to be selected when in
software reset mode. It will automatically accept data from the
1001CC.
5. Power up the unit. The terminal should display the following message: Reset Mode.
6. Type the ‘*’ key. You will see a ‘:’ prompt.
7. Type the command reset.
8. When the command completes, the unit has been reset to factory
conÞguration.
9. Set the DIP switches to the desired conÞguration. Power cycle the
unit to begin using the new conÞguration.
52
APPENDIX A
SPECIFICATIONS
A.1 CLOCKING MODES
Internal, external (V.35 only), or receive recovered
A.2 DTE RATE
All 64k steps from 64 to 4608 kbps
A.3 SERIAL INTERFACE
V.35 (Model 3088RC/A/I), DCE orientation;
X.21 (Model 3088RC/D/V), DCE or DTE orientation depending on orientation of daughter board mounted on the mother board.
E1 (Model 3088RC/K/K) presents G.703/G.704 interface. Either 75
Ohms (unbalanced) or 120 Ohms (balanced). Pins 1 & 2 are Receive.
Pins 4 & 5 are Transmit.
A.4 SERIAL CONNECTOR
D-Sub-25 Female (Model 3088RC/A/I)
D-Sub-15 Female (Model 3088RC/D/V)
Dual BNC and RJ48C (Model 3088RC/K/K), strap selectable
A.5 DIAGNOSTICS
V.52 compliant (511/511E) pattern generator and detector with error
injection mode controlled by front-panel switch. Local and Remote Loopback control either by a front-panel switch or from the DTE interface.
A.6 STATUS LEDS
• Power (Green): The Power LED glows solid during normal operation.
At startup, during the POST, the LED blinks once every second.
• DSL (Green): The DSL LED glows solid when a DSL link is established. While the DSL link is training, it blinks once every second.
• Term (Yellow): The Term LED glows solid when a serial port is active.
• TM/ER (Green): The Test Mode/Error (TM/ER) LED is used to indicate
that a test mode is in progress or an error has been detected. It blinks
once every second while a test mode is starting. It glows solid while a
53
test mode is in progress. It blinks once if an error is detected either
during a test mode, or in normal DSL operation.
A.7 CONFIGURATION
ConÞguration is done with either externally accessible DIP switches, CLI
or through the EOC (Embedded Operations Channel) from a Model
3096RC G.SHDSL concentration card.
A.8 TRANSMISSION LINE
Single Twisted Pair
A.9 LINE CODING
TC-PAM (Trellis Coded Pulse Amplitude Modulation)
A.10 LINE RATES (DSL LINE)
All nx64 rates from 64 kbps up to 4.6 Mbps
A.11 LINE INTERFACE
Transformer coupled, 2500 VRMS isolation
A.12 G.SHDSL PHYSICAL CONNECTION
RJ-45, 2-wire polarity insensitive pins 4 and 5
A.13 ENVIRONMENT
Operating temp: 32–122°F (0–50°C)
Humidity: 5–95% non-condensing
Altitude: 0–15,000 feet (0–4,600 meters)
54
APPENDIX B
MODEL 3088RC INTERFACE PIN ASSIGNMENTS
B.1 RJ-11 NON-SHIELDED DSL PORT
Single twisted-pair (TP) for full-duplex transmission. The signals are
polarity insensitive.
Pin #
1
2
3
4
Signal
Tip
Ring
B.2 V.35 INTERFACE
(M/34F Female Connector: DCE ConÞguration)
Pin #
Signal
B
C
D
E
F
H
L
M
N
P
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
AA
SGND (Signal Ground)
RTS (Request to Send)
CTS (Clear to Send)
DSR (Data Set Ready)
CD (Carrier Detect)
DTR (Data Terminal Ready)
LLB (Local Line Loop)
TM (Test Mode)
RDL (Remote Digital Loop)
TD (Transmit Data)
RD (Receive Data)
TD/ (Transmit Data-B)
RD/ (Receive Data-B)
XTC (External Transmit Clock)
RC (Receive Timing)
XTC/ (External Transmit Clock)
RC/ (Receive Timing)
TC (Transmit Clock-A)
TC/ (Transmit Clock-B)
55
B.3 E1 INTERFACE
RJ-48C female connector
Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Signal
Receive (Ring)
Receive (Tip)
Shield
Transmit (Ring)
Transmit (Tip)
Shield
No connection
No connection
B.4 X.21 INTERFACE
D-sub-15 female connector (DTE/DCE orientation)
Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Signal
Frame Ground
T - Transmit Data-A (DTE Source)
C - Control-A (DTE Source)
R - Receive Data-A (DCE Source)
I - Indication-A (DCE Source)
S - Signal Element Timing-A (DCE Source)
BT - Byte Timing-A (DCE Source)
SGND - Signal Ground
T/ - Transmit Data-B (DTE Source)
C/ - Control-B (DTE Source)
R/ - Receive Data-B (DCE Source)
I/ Indication-B (DCE Source)
S/ Signal Element Timing-B (DCE Source)
BT/ - Byte Timing-B (DCE Source)
56
B.5 RS-232 CONSOLE INTERFACE
RJ-45 non-shielded connector (EIA-561)
Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Signal
DSR (out)
CD (out)
DTR (in)
Signal Ground
RD (out)
TD (in)
CTS (out)
RTS (in)
57
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© Copyright 2008
Patton Electronics Company
All Rights Reserved
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