Carrier 17DA Air Conditioner User Manual

19XL
Hermetic Centrifugal Liquid Chillers
50/60 Hz
With HCFC-22 and HFC-134a
Start-Up, Operation, and Maintenance Instructions
SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS
Centrifugal liquid chillers are designed to provide
safe and reliable service when operated within design
specifications. When operating this equipment, use good
judgment and safety precautions to avoid damage to
equipment and property or injury to personnel.
Be sure you understand and follow the procedures and
safety precautions contained in the chiller instructions
as well as those listed in this guide.
DO NOT VENT refrigerant relief valves within a building. Outlet
from rupture disc or relief valve must be vented outdoors in
accordance with the latest edition of ANSI/ASHRAE 15
(American National Standards Institute/American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers). The accumulation of refrigerant in an enclosed space can displace oxygen and
cause asphyxiation.
PROVIDE adequate ventilation in accordance with ANSI/ASHRAE
15, especially for enclosed and low overhead spaces. Inhalation
of high concentrations of vapor is harmful and may cause heart
irregularities, unconsciousness, or death. Misuse can be fatal.
Vapor is heavier than air and reduces the amount of oxygen available for breathing. Product causes eye and skin irritation. Decomposition products are hazardous.
DO NOT USE OXYGEN to purge lines or to pressurize a chiller
for any purpose. Oxygen gas reacts violently with oil, grease, and
other common substances.
NEVER EXCEED specified test pressures, VERIFY the allowable
test pressure by checking the instruction literature and the design
pressures on the equipment nameplate.
DO NOT USE air for leak testing. Use only refrigerant or dry
nitrogen.
DO NOT VALVE OFF any safety device.
BE SURE that all pressure relief devices are properly installed and
functioning before operating any chiller.
DO NOT WELD OR FLAMECUT any refrigerant line or vessel
until all refrigerant (liquid and vapor) has been removed from chiller.
Traces of vapor should be displaced with dry air or nitrogen and
the work area should be well ventilated. Refrigerant in contact with
an open flame produces toxic gases.
DO NOT USE eyebolts or eyebolt holes to rig chiller sections or
the entire assembly.
DO NOT work on high-voltage equipment unless you are a qualified electrician.
DO NOT WORK ON electrical components, including control panels, switches, starters, or oil heater until you are sure ALL POWER
IS OFF and no residual voltage can leak from capacitors or solidstate components.
LOCK OPEN AND TAG electrical circuits during servicing. IF WORK
IS INTERRUPTED, confirm that all circuits are deenergized before resuming work.
AVOID SPILLING liquid refrigerant on skin or getting it into the
eyes. USE SAFETY GOGGLES. Wash any spills from the skin
with soap and water. If liquid refrigerant enters the eyes, IMMEDIATELY FLUSH EYES with water and consult a physician.
NEVER APPLY an open flame or live steam to a refrigerant
cylinder. Dangerous over pressure can result. When it is necessary
to heat refrigerant, use only warm (110 F [43 C]) water.
DO NOT REUSE disposable (nonreturnable) cylinders or
attempt to refill them. It is DANGEROUS AND ILLEGAL. When
cylinder is emptied, evacuate remaining gas pressure, loosen
the collar and unscrew and discard the valve stem. DO NOT
INCINERATE.
CHECK THE REFRIGERANT TYPE before adding refrigerant to
the chiller. The introduction of the wrong refrigerant can cause damage or malfunction to this chiller.
Operation of this equipment with refrigerants other than those
cited herein should comply with ANSI/ASHRAE-15 (latest edition). Contact Carrier for further information on use of this chiller
with other refrigerants.
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REMOVE fittings, covers, etc., while chiller
is under pressure or while chiller is running. Be sure pressure is at
0 psig (0 kPa) before breaking any refrigerant connection.
CAREFULLY INSPECT all relief devices, rupture discs, and other
relief devices AT LEAST ONCE A YEAR. If chiller operates in a
corrosive atmosphere, inspect the devices at more frequent
intervals.
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REPAIR OR RECONDITION any relief
device when corrosion or build-up of foreign material (rust, dirt,
scale, etc.) is found within the valve body or mechanism. Replace
the device.
DO NOT install relief devices in series or backwards.
USE CARE when working near or in line with a compressed spring.
Sudden release of the spring can cause it and objects in its path to
act as projectiles.
DO NOT STEP on refrigerant lines. Broken lines can whip about
and release refrigerant, causing personal injury.
DO NOT climb over a chiller. Use platform, catwalk, or staging.
Follow safe practices when using ladders.
USE MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT (crane, hoist, etc.) to lift or
move inspection covers or other heavy components. Even if components are light, use mechanical equipment when there is a risk of
slipping or losing your balance.
BE AWARE that certain automatic start arrangements CAN ENGAGE THE STARTER, TOWER FAN, OR PUMPS. Open the
disconnect ahead of the starter, tower fans, or pumps.
USE only repair or replacement parts that meet the code requirements of the original equipment.
DO NOT VENT OR DRAIN waterboxes containing industrial brines,
liquid, gases, or semisolids without the permission of your process
control group.
DO NOT LOOSEN waterbox cover bolts until the waterbox has
been completely drained.
DOUBLE-CHECK that coupling nut wrenches, dial indicators, or
other items have been removed before rotating any shafts.
DO NOT LOOSEN a packing gland nut before checking that the
nut has a positive thread engagement.
PERIODICALLY INSPECT all valves, fittings, and piping for corrosion, rust, leaks, or damage.
PROVIDE A DRAIN connection in the vent line near each pressure relief device to prevent a build-up of condensate or rain
water.
Manufacturer reserves the right to discontinue, or change at any time, specifications or designs without notice and without incurring obligations.
Book 2
PC 211
Catalog No. 531-971
Printed in U.S.A.
Form 19XL-4SS
Pg 1
7-96
Replaces: 19XL-3SS
Tab 5a
CONTENTS
Page
SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
ABBREVIATIONS AND EXPLANATIONS . . . . . . . 4
CHILLER FAMILIARIZATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Chiller Information Plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Cooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Condenser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Motor-Compressor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Control Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Factory-Mounted Starter (Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Storage Vessel (Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
REFRIGERATION CYCLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
MOTOR/OIL REFRIGERATION
COOLING CYCLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
LUBRICATION CYCLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,9
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Oil Reclaim System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
• DURING NORMAL CHILLER OPERATION
• DURING LIGHT LOAD CONDITIONS
STARTING EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,11
Unit Mounted Solid-State Starter
(Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Unit Mounted Wye-Delta Starter
(Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
CONTROLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-39
Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
• ANALOG SIGNAL
• DIGITAL SIGNAL
• VOLATILE MEMORY
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
PIC System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
• PROCESSOR MODULE (PSIO)
• STARTER MANAGEMENT MODULE (SMM)
• LOCAL INTERFACE DEVICE (LID)
• 6-PACK RELAY BOARD
• 8-INPUT MODULES
• OIL HEATER CONTACTOR (1C)
• OIL PUMP CONTACTOR (2C)
• HOT GAS BYPASS CONTACTOR RELAY (3C)
(Optional)
• CONTROL TRANSFORMERS (T1-T4)
• CONTROL AND OIL HEATER VOLTAGE
SELECTOR (S1)
LID Operation and Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
• GENERAL
• ALARMS AND ALERTS
• MENU STRUCTURE
• TO VIEW POINT STATUS
• OVERRIDE OPERATIONS
• TIME SCHEDULE OPERATION
• TO VIEW AND CHANGE SET POINTS
• SERVICE OPERATION
PIC System Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
• CAPACITY CONTROL
• ENTERING CHILLED WATER CONTROL
• DEADBAND
• PROPORTIONAL BANDS AND GAIN
• DEMAND LIMITING
• CHILLER TIMERS
• OCCUPANCY SCHEDULE
Safety Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
• SHUNT TRIP
Default Screen Freeze . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Page
Motor Cooling Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Ramp Loading Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Capacity Override . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
High Discharge Temperature Control . . . . . . . . . 32
Oil Sump Temperature Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
• PSIO SOFTWARE VERSIONS 08 AND LOWER
• PSIO SOFTWARE VERSIONS 09 AND HIGHER
Oil Cooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Remote Start/Stop Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Spare Safety Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
• SPARE ALARM CONTACTS
Condenser Pump Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Condenser Freeze Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Tower Fan Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Auto. Restart After Power Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Water/Brine Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
• RESET TYPE 1
• RESET TYPE 2
• RESET TYPE 3
Demand Limit Control, Option
(Requires Optional 8-Input Module) . . . . . . . . . . 33
Surge Prevention Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Surge Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Lead/Lag Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
• COMMON POINT SENSOR INSTALLATION
• CHILLER COMMUNICATION WIRING
• LEAD/LAG OPERATION
• FAULTED CHILLER OPERATION
• LOAD BALANCING
• AUTO. RESTART AFTER POWER FAILURE
Ice Build Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
• ICE BUILD INITIATION
• START-UP/RECYCLE OPERATION
• TEMPERATURE CONTROL DURING ICE
BUILD
• TERMINATION OF ICE BUILD
• RETURN TO NON-ICE BUILD OPERATIONS
Attach to Network Device Control . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
• CHANGING REFRIGERANT TYPES
• ATTACHING TO OTHER CCN MODULES
Service Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
• TO LOG ON
• TO LOG OFF
• HOLIDAY SCHEDULING
START-UP/SHUTDOWN/RECYCLE
SEQUENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39-41
Local Start-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Shutdown Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Automatic Soft-Stop Amps Threshold
(PSIO Software Version 09 and Higher) . . . . . . 40
Chilled Water Recycle Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Safety Shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
BEFORE INITIAL START-UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41-54
Job Data Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Equipment Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Using the Optional Storage Tank
and Pumpout System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Remove Shipping Packaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Open Oil Circuit Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Tighten All Gasketed Joints and
Guide Vane Shaft Packing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Check Chiller Tightness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Refrigerant Tracer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Leak Test Chiller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Standing Vacuum Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Chiller Dehydration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Inspect Water Piping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
2
CONTENTS (cont)
Page
Check Optional Pumpout Compressor
Water Piping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Check Relief Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Inspect Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Carrier Comfort Network Interface . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Check Starter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
• MECHANICAL-TYPE STARTERS
• BENSHAW, INC. SOLID-STATE STARTER
Oil Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Power Up the Controls and
Check the Oil Heater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
• SOFTWARE VERSION
Set Up Chiller Control Configuration . . . . . . . . . 50
Input the Design Set Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Input the Local Occupied Schedule
(OCCPC01S) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Selecting Refrigerant Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
• TO CONFIRM REFRIGERANT TYPE
• TO CHANGE REFRIGERANT TYPE
Input Service Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
• PASSWORD
• INPUT TIME AND DATE
• CHANGE LID CONFIGURATION
IF NECESSARY
• MODIFY CONTROLLER IDENTIFICATION
IF NECESSARY
• INPUT EQUIPMENT SERVICE PARAMETERS
IF NECESSARY
• MODIFY EQUIPMENT CONFIGURATION
IF NECESSARY
• CHECK VOLTAGE SUPPLY
• PERFORM AN AUTOMATED CONTROL TEST
Check Optional Pumpout System
Controls and Compressor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
High Altitude Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Charge Refrigerant Into Chiller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
• 19XL CHILLER EQUALIZATION WITHOUT
PUMPOUT UNIT
• 19XL CHILLER EQUALIZATION WITH
PUMPOUT UNIT
• TRIMMING REFRIGERANT CHARGE
INITIAL START-UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55,56
Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Manual Operation of the Guide Vanes . . . . . . . . 55
Dry Run to Test Start-Up Sequence . . . . . . . . . . 55
Check Rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
• IF ROTATION IS PROPER
• IF THE MOTOR ROTATION IS NOT
CLOCKWISE
• NOTES ON SOLID-STATE STARTERS
(Benshaw, Inc.)
Check Oil Pressure and Compressor Stop . . . . 56
Calibrate Motor Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
To Prevent Accidental Start-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Check Chiller Operating Condition . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Instruct the Customer Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
• COOLER-CONDENSER
• OPTIONAL STORAGE TANK AND
PUMPOUT SYSTEM
• MOTOR COMPRESSOR ASSEMBLY
• MOTOR COMPRESSOR LUBRICATION SYSTEM
• CONTROL SYSTEM
• AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT
• DESCRIBE CHILLER CYCLES
• REVIEW MAINTENANCE
• SAFETY DEVICES AND PROCEDURES
• CHECK OPERATOR KNOWLEDGE
• REVIEW THE START-UP, OPERATION,
AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL
Page
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56-58
Operator Duties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Prepare the Chiller for Start-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
To Start the Chiller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Check the Running System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
To Stop the Chiller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
After Limited Shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Extended Shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
After Extended Shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Cold Weather Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Manual Guide Vane Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Refrigeration Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
PUMPOUT AND REFRIGERANT
TRANSFER PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59-61
Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Operating the Optional Pumpout
Compressor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
• TO READ REFRIGERANT PRESSURES
Chillers with Pumpout Storage Tanks . . . . . . . . 59
• TRANSFER REFRIGERANT FROM
STORAGE TANK TO CHILLER
• TRANSFER THE REFRIGERANT FROM
CHILLER TO STORAGE TANK
Chillers with Isolation Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
• TRANSFER ALL REFRIGERANT TO
CHILLER CONDENSER VESSEL
• TRANSFER ALL REFRIGERANT TO CHILLER
COOLER/COMPRESSOR VESSEL
• RETURN REFRIGERANT TO NORMAL
OPERATING CONDITIONS
GENERAL MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61,62
Refrigerant Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Adding Refrigerant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Removing Refrigerant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Adjusting the Refrigerant Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Refrigerant Leak Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Leak Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Test After Service, Repair, or Major Leak . . . . . 61
• REFRIGERANT TRACER
• TO PRESSURIZE WITH DRY NITROGEN
Repair the Leak, Retest, and Apply
Standing Vacuum Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Checking Guide Vane Linkage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
• CHECKING THE AUXILIARY SWITCH ON
GUIDE VANE ACTUATOR
Trim Refrigerant Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
WEEKLY MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Check the Lubrication System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63-65
Service Ontime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Inspect the Control Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Check Safety and Operating Controls
Monthly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Changing Oil Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Oil Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Oil Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
• TO CHANGE THE OIL
Refrigerant Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Oil Reclaim Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Inspect Refrigerant Float System . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Inspect Relief Valves and Piping . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Compressor Bearing and Gear
Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Inspect the Heat Exchanger Tubes . . . . . . . . . . . 64
• COOLER
• CONDENSER
3
CONTENTS (cont)
Page
Water Leaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Water Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Inspect the Starting Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Check Pressure Transducers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Optional Pumpout System Maintenance . . . . . . 65
• OPTIONAL PUMPOUT COMPRESSOR OIL
CHARGE
• OPTIONAL PUMPOUT SAFETY CONTROL
SETTINGS
Ordering Replacement Chiller Parts . . . . . . . . . . 65
TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66-97
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Checking the Display Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Checking Temperature Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
• RESISTANCE CHECK
• VOLTAGE DROP
• CHECK SENSOR ACCURACY
• DUAL TEMPERATURE SENSORS
Checking Pressure Transducers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
• TRANSDUCER REPLACEMENT
Control Algorithms Checkout Procedure . . . . . 67
Control Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Page
Control Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
• RED LED
• GREEN LEDs
Notes on Module Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Processor Module (PSIO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
• INPUTS
• OUTPUTS
Starter Management Module (SMM) . . . . . . . . . . 79
• INPUTS
• OUTPUTS
Options Modules (8-Input) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Replacing Defective Processor Modules . . . . . . 80
• INSTALLATION
Solid-State Starters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
• TESTING SILICON CONTROL RECTIFIERS
IN BENSHAW, INC. SOLID-STATE STARTERS
Physical Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
INDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98,99
INITIAL START-UP CHECKLIST FOR
19XL HERMETIC CENTRIFUGAL
LIQUID CHILLER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CL-1-CL-12
INTRODUCTION
ABBREVIATIONS AND EXPLANATIONS
Prior to initial start-up of the 19XL unit, those involved in
the start-up, operation, and maintenance should be thoroughly familiar with these instructions and other necessary
job data. This book is outlined so that you may become
familiar with the control system before performing start-up
procedures. Procedures in this manual are arranged in the
sequence required for proper chiller start-up and operation.
Frequently used abbreviations in this manual include:
CCN — Carrier Comfort Network
CCW — Counterclockwise
CW
— Clockwise
ECW — Entering Chilled Water
ECDW — Entering Condenser Water
EMS — Energy Management System
HGBP — Hot Gas Bypass
I/O
— Input/Output
LCD
— Liquid Crystal Display
LCDW — Leaving Condenser Water
LCW — Leaving Chilled Water
LED
— Light-Emitting Diode
LID
— Local Interface Device
OLTA — Overload Trip Amps
PIC
— Product Integrated Control
PSIO — Processor Sensor Input/Output Module
RLA
— Rated Load Amps
SCR
— Silicon Control Rectifier
SI
— International System of Units
SMM — Starter Management Module
TXV — Thermostatic Expansion Valve
This unit uses a microprocessor control system. Do not
short or jumper between terminations on circuit boards
or modules; control or board failure may result.
Be aware of electrostatic discharge (static electricity) when
handling or making contact with circuit boards or module connections. Always touch a chassis (grounded) part
to dissipate body electrostatic charge before working
inside control center.
Use extreme care when handling tools near boards and
when connecting or disconnecting terminal plugs. Circuit boards can easily be damaged. Always hold boards
by the edges and avoid touching components and
connections.
This equipment uses, and can radiate, radio frequency
energy. If not installed and used in accordance with
the instruction manual, it may cause interference to
radio communications. It has been tested and found to
comply with the limits for a Class A computing device
pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC (Federal Communication Commission) Rules, which are designed to
provide reasonable protection against such interference
when operated in a commercial environment. Operation
of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause
interference, in which case the user, at his own expense,
will be required to take whatever measures may be required to correct the interference.
Always store and transport replacement or defective boards
in anti-static shipping bag.
The 19XL chillers use HCFC-22 and HFC-134a refrigerant. When referencing refrigerant charges in this manual,
the HCFC-22 charge will be listed first and the HFC-134a
value will be shown next to it in brackets [ ].
Words printed in all capital letters and italics represent values that may be viewed on the LID.
The PSIO software version number of your 19XL unit will
be located on the front cover.
4
valves, a magnetically coupled dial-type refrigerant level
gage, a one-inch FPT drain valve, and a 1⁄2-in. male flare
vapor connection for the pumpout unit. A 30-in.-0-400 psi
(–101-0-2750 kPa) gage also is supplied with each unit.
NOTE: If a storage vessel is not used at the jobsite, factoryinstalled isolation valves on the chiller may be used to isolate the chiller charge in either the cooler or condenser.
An optional pumpout compressor system is used to transfer
refrigerant from vessel to vessel.
CHILLER FAMILIARIZATION
(Fig. 1, 2A, and 2B)
Chiller Information Plate — The information plate
is located on the right side of the chiller control center
panel.
REFRIGERATION CYCLE
The compressor continuously draws refrigerant vapor from
the cooler, at a rate set by the amount of guide vane opening.
As the compressor suction reduces the pressure in the cooler,
the remaining refrigerant boils at a fairly low temperature
(typically 38 to 42 F [3 to 6 C]). The energy required for
boiling is obtained from the water flowing through the cooler
tubes. With heat energy removed, the water becomes cold
enough for use in an air conditioning circuit or process liquid cooling.
After taking heat from the water, the refrigerant vapor
is compressed. Compression adds still more heat energy
and the refrigerant is quite warm (typically 98 to 102 F
[37 to 40 C]) when it is discharged from the compressor into
the condenser.
Relatively cool (typically 65 to 90 F [18 to 32 C]) water
flowing into the condenser tubes removes heat from the
refrigerant and the vapor condenses to liquid.
The liquid refrigerant passes through orifices into the
FLASC (Flash Subcooler) chamber (Fig. 3). Since the FLASC
chamber is at a lower pressure, part of the liquid refrigerant
flashes to vapor, thereby cooling the remaining liquid. The
FLASC vapor is recondensed on the tubes which are cooled
by entering condenser water. The liquid drains into a float
chamber between the FLASC chamber and cooler. Here a
float valve forms a liquid seal to keep FLASC chamber
vapor from entering the cooler. When liquid refrigerant passes
through the valve, some of it flashes to vapor in the reduced
pressure on the cooler side. In flashing, it removes heat from
the remaining liquid. The refrigerant is now at a temperature
and pressure at which the cycle began.
Fig. 1 — 19XL Identification
System Components — The components include the
cooler and condenser heat exchangers in separate vessels,
motor-compressor, lubrication package, control center, and
motor starter. All connections from pressure vessels have external threads to enable each component to be pressure tested
with a threaded pipe cap during factory assembly.
Cooler — This vessel (also known as the evaporator) is
located underneath the compressor. The cooler is maintained at lower temperature/pressure so that evaporating
refrigerant can remove heat from water flowing through its
internal tubes.
Condenser — The condenser operates at a higher
temperature/pressure than the cooler, and has water flowing
through its internal tubes in order to remove heat from the
refrigerant.
MOTOR/OIL REFRIGERATION
COOLING CYCLE
Motor-Compressor — This component maintains system temperature/pressure differences and moves the heat
carrying refrigerant from the cooler to the condenser.
The motor and the lubricating oil are cooled by liquid
refrigerant taken from the bottom of the condenser vessel
(Fig. 3). Flow of refrigerant is maintained by the pressure
differential that exists due to compressor operation. After the
refrigerant flows past an isolation valve, an in-line
filter, and a sight glass/moisture indicator, the flow is split
between motor cooling and oil cooling systems.
Flow to the motor flows through an orifice and into the
motor. There is also another orifice and a solenoid valve which
will open if additional motor cooling is required. Once past
the orifice, the refrigerant is directed over the motor by a
spray nozzle. The refrigerant collects in the bottom of the
motor casing and then is drained back into the cooler through
the motor refrigerant drain line. A back pressure valve or an
orifice in this line maintains a higher pressure in the motor
shell than in the cooler/oil sump. The motor is protected by
a temperature sensor imbedded in the stator windings. Higher
motor temperatures (above 125 F [51 C]) energize a solenoid to provide additional motor cooling. A further increase
in temperature past the motor override set point will override the temperature capacity control to hold, and if the
motor temperature rises 10° F (5.5° C) above this set point,
will close the inlet guide vanes. If the temperature rises above
the safety limit, the compressor will shut down.
Control Center — The control center is the user interface for controlling the chiller. It regulates the chiller’s
capacity as required to maintain proper leaving chilled water
temperature. The control center:
• registers cooler, condenser, and lubricating system
pressures
• shows chiller operating condition and alarm shutdown
conditions
• records the total chiller operating hours
• sequences chiller start, stop, and recycle under microprocessor control
• provides access to other CCN (Carrier Comfort Network)
devices
Factory-Mounted Starter (Optional) — The starter
allows the proper start and disconnect of electrical energy
for the compressor-motor, oil pump, oil heater, and control
panels.
Storage Vessel (Optional) — There are 2 sizes
of storage vessels available. The vessels have double relief
5
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
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15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
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—
—
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—
—
—
—
—
—
27 —
28 —
19XL FRONT VIEW
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
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—
—
—
—
—
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
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—
LEGEND
Unit-Mounted Starter
Refrigerant Filter Drier
Rigging Guide Bolt
Refrigerant Moisture Indicator
Motor Sight Glass
Refrigerant Motor Drain
Oil Filter Access Cover
Refrigerant Oil Cooler
Oil Level Sight Glasses
Guide Vane Actuator
Typical Flange Connection
Control Center
ASME Nameplate, Cooler
Take-Apart, Rabbet Fit Connector
(Lower)
Refrigerant Charging Valve
Cooler Refrigerant Isolation Valve
Cooler Pressure Schrader Fittings
Oil Drain/Charging Valve
Power Panel
Retro-Fit, Rig-in-Place Beams
Typical Waterbox Drain Port
Take-Apart, Shell Leveling Feet
Cooler Return-End Waterbox Cover
ASME Nameplate, Condenser
Condenser Return-End Waterbox Cover
Take-Apart, Rabbet Fit Connector
(Upper)
Protective Truck Holddown Lugs
Refrigerant Cooling Isolation Valve
(Hidden)
LEGEND
Pumpdown System Connection
Cooler Relief Valves
Chiller Identification Nameplate
Cooler Pressure Transducer
Suction Elbow
Transmission Vent Line
Discharge Pressure Switch and
Discharge Pressure Transducer
Condenser Isolation Valve
Low-Voltage Access Door, Starter
Medium-Voltage Access Door, Starter
Amp/Volt Gages
Refrigerant Supply Sump
Condenser Pressure Transducer
Liquid Seal Float Chamber
ASME Nameplate, Float Chamber
Condenser Relief Valves
Condenser In/Out Temperature Sensors
Cooler In/Out Temperature Sensors
19XL REAR VIEW
Fig. 2A — Typical 19XL Components — Design I
6
5
4
6
8
7
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
11
24
23
12
22
13
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—
—
—
13 —
14 —
15 —
21
20
19
18
17
16
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
15 14
19XL FRONT VIEW
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—
—
—
—
24 —
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
42
32
41
40
39
38
37
LEGEND
Unit-Mounted Starter
Refrigerant Filter Drier
Rigging Guide Bolt
Motor Sight Glass
Refrigerant Moisture Indicator
Refrigerant Oil Cooler
Oil Filter Access Cover
Oil Level Sight Glasses
Guide Vane Actuator
Typical Flange Connection
Control Center
Cooler Pressure Schrader Fitting
(Hidden)
ASME Nameplate, Cooler
Cooler
Take-Apart Rabbet Fit Connector
(Lower)
Refrigerant Charging Valve
Oil Drain/Charging Valve
Power Panel
Cooler Waterbox Cover
Cooler In/Out Temperature Sensors
Condenser In/Out Temperature Sensors
Condenser Waterbox Cover
Take-Apart Rabbet Fit Connector
(Upper)
Refrigerant Cooling Isolation Valve
(Hidden)
36 35
34
33
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
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—
—
37
38
39
40
41
42
—
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—
—
—
—
LEGEND
Cooler Relief Valve
Chiller Identification Plate
Suction Elbow
Transmission Vent Line
Condenser Relief Valves
Low Voltage Access Door, Starter
Medium Voltage Access Door, Starter
Amp/Volt Gages
Condenser Isolation Valve
Linear Float Valve Chamber
Condenser Pressure Transducer
Discharge Pressure Switch and
Discharge Pressure Transducer
Cooler Refrigerant Isolation Valve
Condenser Return End Waterbox Cover
Typical Waterbox Drain Port
Cooler Return End Waterbox Cover
Cooler Pressure Transducer
Pumpdown Valve
15
19XL REAR VIEW
Fig. 2B — Typical 19XL Components — Design II
7
Fig. 3 — Refrigerant Motor Cooling and Oil Cooling Cycles
when the compressor is shut down. The oil level should be
visible in at least one of the 2 sight glasses during operation.
Oil sump temperature is displayed on the LID default
screen. Oil sump temperature ranges during compressor
operation between 100 to 120 F (37 to 49 C) [120 to 140 F
(49 to 60 C)].
Refrigerant that flows to the oil cooling system is regulated by a thermostatic expansion valve. There is always
a minimum flow bypassing the TXV, which flows through
an orifice. The TXV valve regulates flow into the oil/
refrigerant plate and frame-type heat exchanger. The bulb
for the expansion valve controls oil temperature to the bearings. The refrigerant leaving the heat exchanger then returns
to the cooler.
The oil pump suction is fed from the oil reservoir. An
oil pressure relief valve maintains 18 to 25 psid (124 to
172 kPad) differential pressure in the system at the pump
discharge. This differential pressure can be read directly from
the Local Interface Device (LID) default screen. The oil pump
discharges oil to the oil filter assembly. This filter can be
valved closed to permit removal of the filter without draining the entire oil system (see Maintenance sections, pages
61 to 65, for details). The oil is then piped to the oil cooler.
This heat exchanger uses refrigerant from the condenser as
the coolant. The refrigerant cools the oil to a temperature
between 100 and 120 F (37 to 49 C).
LUBRICATION CYCLE
Summary — The oil pump, oil filter, and oil cooler make
up a package located partially in the transmission casting of
the compressor-motor assembly. The oil is pumped into a
filter assembly to remove foreign particles, and is then forced
into an oil cooler heat exchanger where the oil is cooled to
proper operational temperatures. After the oil cooler, part of
the flow is directed to the gears and the high speed shaft
bearings; the remaining flow is directed to the motor shaft
bearings. Oil drains into the transmission oil sump to complete the cycle (Fig. 4).
As the oil leaves the oil cooler, it passes the oil pressure
transducer and the thermal bulb for the refrigerant expansion valve on the oil cooler. The oil is then divided, with a
portion flowing to the thrust bearing, forward pinion bearing, and gear spray. The balance then lubricates the motor
shaft bearings and the rear pinion bearing. The oil temperature is measured as the oil leaves the thrust and forward
Details — Oil is charged into the lubrication system through
a hand valve. Two sight glasses in the oil reservoir permit oil
level observation. Normal oil level is between the middle of
the upper sight glass and the top of the lower sight glass
8
Fig. 4 — Lubrication System
casing will vent this refrigerant into the suction of the compressor. Oil entrained in the refrigerant is eliminated by the
demister filter.
journal bearings within the bearing housing. The oil then drains
into the oil reservoir at the base of the compressor. The PIC
(Product Integrated Control) measures the temperature of the
oil in the sump and maintains the temperature during shutdown (see Oil Sump Temperature Control section, page 32).
This temperature is read on the LID default screen.
During the chiller start-up, the PIC will energize the oil
pump and provide 15 seconds of prelubrication to the bearings after pressure is verified before starting the compressor.
During shutdown, the oil pump will run for 60 seconds to
post-lubricate after the compressor shuts down. The oil pump
can also be energized for testing purposes in the Control Test.
Ramp loading can slow the rate of guide vane opening
to minimize oil foaming at start-up. If the guide vanes
open quickly, the sudden drop in suction pressure can cause
any refrigerant in the oil to flash. The resulting oil foam
cannot be pumped efficiently; therefore, oil pressure falls
off and lubrication is poor. If oil pressure falls below
15 psid (103 kPad) differential, the PIC will shut down the
compressor.
DURING NORMAL CHILLER OPERATION, oil is
entrained with the refrigerant. As the compressor pulls
the refrigerant into the guide vane housing to be compressed, the oil will normally drop out at this point and
fall to the bottom of the housing where it accumulates. Using discharge gas pressure to power an eductor, the oil is
vacuumed from the housing by the eductor and is discharged into the oil reservoir. Oil and refrigerant are also
recovered from the top of the cooler refrigerant level and are
discharged into the guide vane housing. The oil will drop to
the bottom of the guide vane housing and be recovered by
the eductor system.
DURING LIGHT LOAD CONDITIONS, the suction gas into
the compressor does not have enough velocity to return oil,
which is floating in the cooler back to the compressor. In
addition, the eductor may not have enough power to pull the
oil from the guide vane housing back into the oil reservoir
due to extremely low pressure at the guide vanes. Two solenoids, located on the oil reclaim piping, are operated so
that the eductor can pull oil and refrigerant directly from the
cooler and discharge the mixture into the oil reservoir. The
oil reclaim solenoids are operated by an auxiliary contact
integral to the guide vane actuator. This switchover of the
solenoids occurs when the guide vanes are opened beyond
30 degrees from the closed position.
Oil Reclaim System — The oil reclaim system operates to return oil back to the oil reservoir by recovering it
from 2 areas on the chiller. The primary area of recovery is
from the guide vane housing. Oil also is recovered, along
with refrigerant, from the cooler.
Any refrigerant that enters the oil reservoir/transmission
area is flashed into gas. The demister line at the top of the
9
STARTING EQUIPMENT
The 19XL requires a motor starter to operate the centrifugal hermetic compressor motor, the oil pump, and various
auxiliary equipment. The starter serves as the main field
wiring interface for the contractor.
Three types of starters are available from Carrier Corporation: solid-state, wye-delta, and across-the-line starters.
See Carrier Specification Z-375 for specific starter requirements. All starters must meet these specifications in order
to properly start and satisfy mechanical safety requirements.
Starters may be supplied as separate, free-standing units, or
may be mounted directly on the chiller (unit mounted) for
low-voltage units only.
Inside the starter are 3 separate circuit breakers. Circuit
breaker CB1 is the compressor motor circuit breaker. The
disconnect switch on the starter front cover is connected to
this breaker. Circuit breaker CB1 supplies power to the compressor motor.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
The main circuit breaker (CB1) on the front of the starter
disconnects the main motor current only. Power is still
energized for the other circuits. Two more circuit breakers inside the starter must be turned off to disconnect
power to the oil pump, PIC controls, and oil heater.
Circuit breaker CB2 supplies power to the control center,
oil heater, and portions of the starter controls. Circuit breaker
CB3 supplies power to oil pump. Both of these circuit breakers are wired in parallel with CB1 so that power is supplied
to them if the CB1 disconnect is open.
All starters are shipped with a Carrier control module called
the Starter Management Module (SMM). This module
controls and monitors all aspects of the starter. See the Controls section on page 11 for additional SMM information.
All starter replacement parts are supplied by the starter
manufacturer.
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
LEGEND
Field Wiring Terminal Strips (TB2 and TB3)
Circuit Breaker 1, 2, 3, 4
Overload Unit
Solid-State Controller
Silicon Controlled Rectifier (SCR) LED (One of 6)
Starter Fault and Run LEDs
Voltmeter (Optional)
Ammeter (Optional)
SCR (One of 6)
Voltage LED
Starter Management Module (SMM)
Pilot Relays (PR1 to PR5)
Starter Access Door
Fig. 5 — Benshaw, Inc. Solid-State Starter,
Internal View
Unit-Mounted Solid-State Starter (Optional)
— The 19XL may be equipped with a solid-state, reducedvoltage starter (Fig. 5 and 6). This starter provides on-off
control of the compressor motor as its primary function.
Using this type of starter reduces the peak starting torque,
reduces the motor inrush current, and decreases mechanical
shock. This is summed up by the phrase ‘‘soft starting.’’
Two varieties of solid-state starters are available as a 19XL
option (factory supplied and installed). When a unit-mounted,
optional, solid-state starter is purchased with the 19XL, a
Benshaw, Inc. solid-state starter will be shipped with the unit.
See Fig. 5. The solid-state starter’s manufacturer name will
be located inside the starter access door. See Fig. 6.
These starters operate by reducing the starting voltage. The
starting torque of a motor at full voltage is typically 125%
to 175% of the running torque. When the voltage and the
current are reduced at start-up, the starting torque is reduced
as well. The object is to reduce the starting voltage to just
the voltage necessary to develop the torque required to get
the motor moving. The voltage and current are then ramped
up in a desired period of time. The voltage is reduced through
the use of silicon controlled rectifiers (SCR). Once full voltage is reached, a bypass contactor is energized to bypass the
SCRs.
Fig. 6 — Typical Starter External View
(Solid-State Starter Shown)
There are a number of LEDs (light-emitting diodes) that
are useful in troubleshooting and starter check-out on
Benshaw, Inc. solid-state starters. These are used to
indicate:
• voltage to the SCRs
• SCR control voltage
• power indication
• proper phasing for rotation
• start circuit energized
When voltage is supplied to the solid-state circuitry, the
heat sinks within the starter are at line voltage. Do not
touch the heat sinks while voltage is present or serious
injury will result.
10
•
•
•
•
overtemperature
ground fault
current unbalance
run state
These LEDs are further explained in the Check Starter and
Troubleshooting Guide section, page 66.
The memory of the PSIO and LID modules are volatile.
If the battery in a module is removed or damaged, all
programming will be lost.
General — The 19XL hermetic centrifugal liquid chiller
contains a microprocessor-based control center that monitors and controls all operations of the chiller. The microprocessor control system matches the cooling capacity of the
chiller to the cooling load while providing state-of-the-art
chiller protection. The system controls cooling load within
the set point plus the deadband by sensing the leaving chilled
water or brine temperature, and regulating the inlet guide
vane via a mechanically linked actuator motor. The guide
vane is a variable flow prewhirl assembly that controls the
refrigeration effect in the cooler by regulating the amount of
refrigerant vapor flow into the compressor. An increase in
guide vane opening increases capacity. A decrease in guide
vane opening decreases capacity. Chiller protection is provided by the processor which monitors the digital and analog inputs and executes capacity overrides or safety shutdowns,
if required.
Unit-Mounted Wye-Delta Starter (Optional) — The
19XL chiller may be equipped with a wye-delta starter mounted
on the unit (Fig. 7). This starter is intended for use with lowvoltage motors (under 600 v). It reduces the starting current
inrush by connecting each phase of the motor windings into
a wye configuration. This occurs during the starting period
when the motor is accelerating up to speed. After a time delay, once the motor is up to speed, the starter automatically
connects the phase windings into a delta configuration.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
17
PIC System Components — The Product Integrated
Control (PIC) is the control system on the chiller. See
Table 1. The PIC controls the operation of the chiller by monitoring all operating conditions. The PIC can diagnose a problem and let the operator know what the problem is and what
to check. It promptly positions the guide vanes to maintain
leaving chilled water temperature. It can interface with auxiliary equipment such as pumps and cooling tower fans to
turn them on only when required. It continually checks all
safeties to prevent any unsafe operating condition. It also
regulates the oil heater while the compressor is off, and the
hot gas bypass valve, if installed.
The PIC can be interfaced with the Carrier Comfort Network (CCN) if desired. It can communicate with other PICequipped chillers and other CCN devices.
The PIC consists of 3 modules housed inside the 3 major
components. The component names and the control voltage
contained in each component are listed below (also see
Table 1):
• control center — all extra low-voltage wiring (24 v or less)
• power panel — 230 or 115 v control voltage (per job
requirement)
— up to 600 v for oil pump power
• starter cabinet — chiller power wiring (per job
requirement)
8
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
LEGEND
1 — Pilot Relays
2 — SMM Power Circuit Breaker and Voltage Calibration
Potentiometer
3 — Transistor Resistor Fault Protector (TRFP)
4 — Transformer (T2)
5 — Control Power Circuit Breaker
6 — Oil Pump Circuit Breaker
7 — Main Circuit Breaker Disconnect
8 — Voltmeter (Optional)
9 — Ammeter (Optional)
10 — Current Transformers (T1, T2, T3)
11 — Phase Monitor Relay (Optional)
12 — Overload Unit
13 — Starter Management Module
14 — Starter Access Door
15 — Control Transformer Secondary Circuit Breaker
16 — Signal Resistor
17 — Field Wiring Terminal Strip (TB6)
Table 1 — Major PIC Components and
Panel Locations*
Fig. 7 — Wye-Delta Starter, Internal View
Definitions
CONTROLS
ANALOG SIGNAL — An analog signal varies in proportion to the monitored source. It quantifies values between
operating limits. (Example: A temperature sensor is an analog device because its resistance changes in proportion to
the temperature, generating many values.)
DIGITAL SIGNAL — A digital (discrete) signal is a 2-position
representation of the value of a monitored source. (Example: A switch is a digital device because it only indicates
whether a value is above or below a set point or boundary
by generating an on/off, high/low, or open/closed signal.)
VOLATILE MEMORY — Volatile memory is memory incapable of being sustained if power is lost and subsequently
restored.
PIC COMPONENT
PANEL
LOCATION
Processor Sensor Input/Output Module
(PSIO)
Starter Management Module (SMM)
Local Interface Device (LID)
6-Pack Relay Board
8-Input Modules (Optional)
Oil Heater Contactor (1C)
Oil Pump Contactor (2C)
Hot Gas Bypass Relay (3C) (Optional)
Control Transformers (T1-T4)
Control and Oil Heater Voltage Selector (S1)
Temperature Sensors
Pressure Transducers
Control Center
*See Fig. 5, 6, and Fig. 8-12.
11
Starter Cabinet
Control Center
Control Center
Control Center
Power Panel
Power Panel
Power Panel
Power Panel
Power Panel
See Fig. 8
See Fig. 8
Fig. 8 — 19XL Controls and Sensor Locations
Fig. 9 — Control Sensors
(Temperature)
1
2
3
4
5
6
Fig. 10 — Control Sensors
(Pressure Transducer, Typical)
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—
—
—
—
LEGEND
LID
PSIO
8-Input Module (One of 2 Available)
5-Volt Transducer Power Supply
6-Pack Relay Board
Circuit Breakers (4)
Fig. 11 — Control Center (Front View),
with Options Module
12
PROCESSOR MODULE (PSIO) — The PSIO is the brain
of the PIC (Fig. 11). This module contains all the operating
software needed to control the chiller. The 19XL uses 3 pressure transducers and 8 thermistors to sense pressures and temperatures. These are connected to the PSIO module. The PSIO
also provides outputs to the guide vane actuator, oil pump,
oil heater, hot gas bypass (optional), motor cooling solenoid,
and alarm contact. The PSIO communicates with the LID,
the SMM, and the optional 8-input modules for user interface and starter management.
8-INPUT MODULES — One optional module is factory installed in the control center panel when ordered (Fig. 11).
There can be up to 2 of these modules per chiller with
8 spare inputs each. They are used whenever chilled water
reset, demand reset, or reading a spare sensor is required.
The sensors or 4 to 20 mA signals are field-installed.
The spare temperature sensors must have the same
temperature/resistance curve as the other temperature sensors on this unit. These sensors are 5,000 ohm at 75 F
(25 C).
OIL HEATER CONTACTOR (1C) — This contactor is located in the power panel (Fig. 12) and operates the heater at
either 115 or 230 v. It is controlled by the PIC to maintain
oil temperature during chiller shutdown.
STARTER MANAGEMENT MODULE (SMM) — This module is located within the starter cabinet. This module initiates PSIO commands for starter functions such as start/
stop of the compressor, start/stop of the condenser and chilled
water pumps, start/stop of the tower fan, spare alarm contacts, and the shunt trip. The SMM monitors starter inputs
such as flow switches, line voltage, remote start contact, spare
safety, condenser high pressure, oil pump interlock, motor
current signal, starter 1M and run contacts, and kW transducer input (optional). The SMM contains logic capable of
safely shutting down the machine if communications with
the PSIO are lost.
OIL PUMP CONTACTOR (2C) — This contactor is located
in the power panel (Fig. 12). It operates all 200 to 575-v oil
pumps. The PIC energizes the contactor to turn on the oil
pump as necessary.
HOT GAS BYPASS CONTACTOR RELAY (3C) (Optional) — This relay, located in the power panel, (Item 5,
Fig. 12) controls the opening of the hot gas bypass valve.
The PIC energizes the relay during low load, high lift
conditions.
LOCAL INTERFACE DEVICE (LID) — The LID is mounted
to the control center and allows the operator to interface with
the PSIO or other CCN devices (Fig. 11). It is the input center for all local chiller set points, schedules, set-up functions, and options. The LID has a STOP button, an alarm
light, 4 buttons for logic inputs, and a display. The function
of the 4 buttons or ‘‘softkeys’’ are menu driven and are shown
on the display directly above the key.
CONTROL TRANSFORMERS (T1-T4) — These transformers convert incoming control voltage to either 21 vac
power for the PSIO module and options modules, or 24 vac
power for 3 power panel contactor relays, 3 control solenoid
valves, and the guide vane actuator. They are located in the
power panel. See Fig. 12.
CONTROLAND OIL HEATER VOLTAGE SELECTOR (S1)
— It is possible to use either 115 v or 230 v incoming control power in the power panel. The switch is set to the voltage used at the jobsite.
6-PACK RELAY BOARD — This device is a cluster of
6 pilot relays located in the control center (Fig. 11). It is
energized by the PSIO for the oil pump, oil heater, alarm,
optional hot gas bypass relay, and motor cooling solenoid.
LEGEND
1 — T2 — 24 vac Power Transformer for Hot Gas Bypass Relay,
Oil Pump Relay, Oil Heater Relay, Motor Cooling Solenoid,
Oil Reclaim Solenoid
2 — Oil Pressure Switch
3 — T4 — 24 vac, Optional 8-Input Module Transformer
4
5
6
7
8
—
—
—
—
—
T1 — 24 vac, Control Center Transformer
3C Hot Gas Bypass Relay Location
Oil Pump Terminal Block
Factory Terminal Connections
T3 — 24 vac Guide Vane Actuator Transformer
Fig. 12 — Power Panel with Options
13
ALARMS AND ALERTS — Alarm (*) and alert (!) status
are indicated on the Status tables. An alarm (*) will shut down
the compressor. An alert (!) notifies the operator that an unusual condition has occurred. The chiller will continue to
operate when an alert is shown.
Alarms are indicated when the control center alarm light
(!) flashes. The primary alarm message is viewed on the default screen and an additional, secondary, message and
troubleshooting information are sent to the Alarm History
table.
When an alarm is detected, the LID default screen will
freeze (stop updating) at the time of alarm. The freeze enables the operator to view the chiller conditions at the time
of alarm. The Status tables will show the updated information. Once all alarms have been cleared (by pressing the
RESET softkey), the default LID screen will return to normal operation.
LID Operation and Menus (Fig. 13-19)
GENERAL
• The LID display will automatically revert to the default
screen after 15 minutes if no softkey activity takes place
and if the chiller is not in the Pumpdown mode
(Fig. 13).
• When not in the default screen, the upper right-hand corner of the LID always displays the name of the screen that
you have entered (Fig. 14).
• The LID may be configured in English or SI units, through
the LID configuration screen.
• Local Operation — By pressing the LOCAL softkey, the
PIC is now in the LOCAL operation mode. The control
will accept changes to set points and configurations from
the LID only. The PIC will use the Local Time Schedule
to determine chiller start and stop times.
• CCN Operation — By pressing the CCN softkey, the PIC
is now in the CCN operation mode, and the control will
accept modifications from any CCN interface or module
(with the proper authority), as well as the LID. The PIC
will use the CCN time schedule to determine start and stop
times.
MENU STRUCTURE — To perform any of the operations
described below, the PIC must be powered up and have successfully completed its self test. The self test takes place
automatically, after power-up.
• Press QUIT to leave the selected decision or field without saving any changes.
• Press ENTER to leave the selected decision or field and
save changes.
• Press NEXT to scroll the cursor bar down in order to
highlight a point or to view more points below the current
screen.
Fig. 13 — LID Default Screen
• Press PREVIOUS to scroll the cursor bar up in order to
highlight a point or to view points above the current screen.
• Press SELECT to view the next screen level (highlighted with the cursor bar), or to override (if allowable)
the highlighted point value.
Fig. 14 — LID Service Screen
14
• Press EXIT to return to the previous screen level.
4. On the Point Status table press NEXT or
PREVIOUS until desired point is displayed on the screen.
• Press INCREASE or DECREASE to change the highlighted point value.
OVERRIDE OPERATIONS
To Override a Value or Status
1. On the Point Status table press NEXT
PREVIOUS to highlight the desired point.
or
TO VIEW POINT STATUS (Fig. 15) — Point Status is the
actual value of all of the temperatures, pressures, relays, and
actuators sensed and controlled by the PIC.
1. On the Menu screen, press STATUS to view the list of
Point Status tables.
2. Press SELECT to select the highlighted point. Then:
For Discrete Points — Press START or STOP to select the desired state.
2. Press NEXT or PREVIOUS to highlight the desired
status table. The list of tables is:
• Status01 — Status of control points and sensors
• Status02 — Status of relays and contacts
• Status03 — Status of both optional 8-input modules and
sensors
For Analog Points — Press INCREASE
DECREASE to select the desired value.
or
3. Press SELECT to view the Point Status table desired.
3. Press ENTER to register new value.
NOTE: When overriding or changing metric values, it is
necessary to hold the softkey down for a few seconds in order to see a value change, especially on kilopascal
values.
To Remove an Override
1. On the Point Status table press NEXT
PREVIOUS to highlight the desired point.
2. Press SELECT to access the highlighted point.
Fig. 15 − Example of Point Status Screen
(Status01)
15
or
3. Press RELEASE to remove the override and return the
point to the PIC’s automatic control.
4. Press NEXT or PREVIOUS to highlight the desired period or override that you wish to change.
Override Indication— An override value is indicated by
‘‘SUPVSR,’’ ‘‘SERVC,’’ or ‘‘BEST’’ flashing next to the point
value on the Status table.
5. Press SELECT to access the highlighted period or
override.
TIME SCHEDULE OPERATION (Fig. 16)
1. On the Menu screen, press SCHEDULE .
6. a. Press INCREASE or DECREASE to change the
time values. Override values are in one-hour increments, up to 4 hours.
2. Press NEXT or PREVIOUS to highlight the desired schedule.
PSIO Software Version 08 and lower:
OCCPC01S — LOCAL Time Schedule
OCCPC02S — CCN Time Schedule
PSIO Software Version 09 and higher:
OCCPC01S — LOCAL Time Schedule
OCCPC02S — ICE BUILD Time Schedule
OCCPC03-99S — CCN Time Schedule (Actual
number is defined in
Config table.)
b. Press ENABLE to select days in the day-of-week
fields. Press DISABLE to eliminate days from the
period.
7. Press ENTER to register the values and to move
horizontally (left to right) within a period.
3. Press SELECT to access and view the time schedule.
8. Press EXIT to leave the period or override.
9. Either return to Step 4 to select another period or
override, or press EXIT again to leave the current time
schedule screen and save the changes.
10. Holiday Designation (HOLIDEF table) may be found in
the Service Operation section, page 38. You must assign
the month, day, and duration for the holiday. The Broadcast function in the Brodefs table also must be enabled
for holiday periods to function.
Fig. 16 — Example of Time Schedule
Operation Screen
16
17
*Only available on PSIO Software Version 09 and higher.
†Available on PSIO Software Versions 07 and 08.
Fig. 17 — 19XL Menu Structure
18
Fig. 18 — 19XL Service Menu Structure
19
*Only available on PSIO Software Version 09 and higher.
†Available on PSIO Software Versions 07 and 08.
Fig. 18 — 19XL Service Menu Structure (cont)
TO VIEW AND CHANGE SET POINTS (Fig. 19)
3. Press NEXT or PREVIOUS to highlight the desired
set point entry.
1. To view the Set Point table, at the Menu screen press
SETPOINT .
4. Press SELECT to modify the highlighted set point.
2. There are 4 set points on this screen: Base Demand Limit;
LCW Set Point (leaving chilled water set point); ECW
Set Point (entering chilled water set point); and ICE BUILD
set point (PSIO Software Version 09 and higher only).
Only one of the chilled water set points can be active at
one time, and the type of set point is activated in the Service menu. ICE BUILD is also activated and configured in
the Service menu.
5. Press INCREASE or DECREASE to change the selected set point value.
6. Press ENTER to save the changes and return to the
previous screen.
SERVICE OPERATION — To view the menu-driven programs available for Service Operation, see Service Operation section, page 38. For examples of LID display screens,
see Table 2.
Fig. 19 — Example of Set Point Screen
20
Table 2 — LID Screens
NOTES:
1. Only 12 lines of information appear on the LID screen at any given time. Press NEXT or PREVIOUS to highlight a point or to view points
below or above the current screen.
2. The LID may be configured in English or SI units, as required, through the LID configuration screen.
3. Data appearing in the Reference Point Names column is used for CCN operations only.
4. All options associated with ICE BUILD, Lead/Lag, CCN Occupancy Configuration, and Soft Stopping are only available on PSIO Software
Version 9 and higher.
EXAMPLE 1 — STATUS01 DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press
MENU
.
2. Press STATUS (STATUS01 will be highlighted).
3. Press SELECT .
DESCRIPTION
Control Mode
Run Status
Occupied ?
Alarm State
*Chiller Start/Stop
Base Demand Limit
*Active Demand Limit
Compressor Motor Load
Current
Amps
*Target Guide Vane Pos
Actual Guide Vane Pos
Water/Brine: Setpoint
*
Control Point
Entering Chilled Water
Leaving Chilled Water
Entering Condenser Water
Leaving Condenser Water
Evaporator Refrig Temp
Evaporator Pressure
Condenser Refrig Temp
Condenser Pressure
Discharge Temperature
Bearing Temperature
Motor Winding Temp
Oil Sump Temperature
Oil Pressure Transducer
Oil Pressure
Line Voltage: Percent
Actual
*Remote Contacts Input
Total Compressor Starts
Starts in 12 Hours
Compressor Ontime
*Service Ontime
*Compressor Motor kW
RANGE
REFERENCE POINT NAME
(ALARM HISTORY)
MODE
UNITS
Reset, Off, Local, CCN
Timeout, Recycle, Startup,
Ramping, Running, Demand, Override,
Shutdown, Abnormal, Pumpdown
No/Yes
Normal/Alarm
Stop/Start
40-100
%
40-100
%
0-999
%
0-999
%
0-999
AMPS
0-100
%
0-100
%
10-120 (–12.2-48.9)
DEG F (DEG
10-120 (–12.2-48.9)
DEG F (DEG
–40-245 (–40-118)
DEG F (DEG
–40-245 (–40-118)
DEG F (DEG
–40-245 (–40-118)
DEG F (DEG
–40-245 (–40-118)
DEG F (DEG
–40-245 (–40-118)
DEG F (DEG
–6.7-420 (–46-2896)
PSI (kPa)
–40-245 (–40-118)
DEG F (DEG
–6.7-420 (–46-2896)
PSI (kPa)
–40-245 (–40-118)
DEG F (DEG
–40-245 (–40-118)
DEG F (DEG
–40-245 (–40-118)
DEG F (DEG
–40-245 (–40-118)
DEG F (DEG
–6.7-420 (–46-2896)
PSI (kPa)
–6.7-420 (–46-2896)
PSID (kPad)
0-999
%
0-9999
VOLTS
Off/On
0-65535
0-8
0-500000.0
HOURS
0-32767
HOURS
0-9999
kW
STATUS
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
OCC
ALM
CHIL S S
DLM
DEM LIM
CA L
CA P
CA A
GV TRG
GV ACT
SP
LCW STPT
ECW
LCW
ECDW
LCDW
ERT
ERP
CRT
CRP
CMPD
MTRB
MTRW
OILT
OILP
OILPD
V P
V A
REMCON
c starts
STARTS
c hrs
S HRS
CKW
NOTE: All values are variables available for read operation to a CCN. Descriptions shown with (*) support write operations for BEST programming
language, data transfer, and overriding.
21
Table 2 — LID Screens (cont)
EXAMPLE 2 — STATUS02 DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press MENU .
2. Press STATUS .
3. Scroll down to highlight STATUS02.
4. Press SELECT .
DESCRIPTION
Hot Gas Bypass Relay
*Chilled Water Pump
Chilled Water Flow
*Condenser Water Pump
Condenser Water Flow
Compressor Start Relay
Compressor Start Contact
Compressor Run Contact
Starter Fault Contact
Pressure Trip Contact
Single Cycle Dropout
Oil Pump Relay
Oil Heater Relay
Motor Cooling Relay
*Tower Fan Relay
Compr. Shunt Trip Relay
Alarm Relay
Spare Prot Limit Input
POINT TYPE
INPUT
OUTPUT
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
UNITS
REFERENCE POINT NAME
(ALARM HISTORY)
OFF/ON
OFF/ON
NO/YES
OFF/ON
NO/YES
OFF/ON
OPEN/CLOSED
OPEN/CLOSED
OPEN/CLOSED
OPEN/CLOSED
NORMAL/ALARM
OFF/ON
OFF/ON
OFF/ON
OFF/ON
OFF/ON
NORMAL/ALARM
ALARM/NORMAL
HGBR
CHWP
EVFL
CDP
CDFL
CMPR
1CR AUX
RUN AUX
STR FLT
PRS TRIP
V1 CYCLE
OILR
OILH
MTRC
TFR
TRIPR
ALM
SPR PL
NOTE: All values are variables available for read operation to a CCN. Descriptions shown with (*) support write operations from the LID only.
EXAMPLE 3 — STATUS03 DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press MENU .
2. Press STATUS .
3. Scroll down to highlight STATUS03.
4. Press SELECT .
DESCRIPTION
RANGE
OPTIONS BOARD 1
*Demand Limit 4-20 mA
*Temp Reset 4-20 mA
*Common CHWS Sensor
*Common CHWR Sensor
*Remote Reset Sensor
*Temp Sensor — Spare 1
*Temp Sensor — Spare 2
*Temp Sensor — Spare 3
OPTIONS BOARD 2
*4-20 mA — Spare 1
*4-20 mA — Spare 2
*Temp Sensor — Spare 4
*Temp Sensor — Spare 5
*Temp Sensor — Spare 6
*Temp Sensor — Spare 7
*Temp Sensor — Spare 8
*Temp Sensor — Spare 9
4-20
4-20
–40-245
–40-245
–40-245
–40-245
–40-245
–40-245
4-20
4-20
–40-245
–40-245
–40-245
–40-245
–40-245
–40-245
REFERENCE POINT NAME
(ALARM HISTORY)
UNITS
(–40-118)
(–40-118)
(–40-118)
(–40-118)
(–40-118)
(–40-118)
mA
mA
DEG
DEG
DEG
DEG
DEG
DEG
(–40-118)
(–40-118)
(–40-118)
(–40-118)
(–40-118)
(–40-118)
mA
mA
DEG
DEG
DEG
DEG
DEG
DEG
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
DEM OPT
RES OPT
CHWS
CHWR
R RESET
SPARE1
SPARE2
SPARE3
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
SPARE1
SPARE2
SPARE4
SPARE5
SPARE6
SPARE7
SPARE8
SPARE9
M
M
NOTE: All values shall be variables available for read operation to a CCN network. Descriptions shown with (*) support write operations for BEST
programming language, data transfer, and overriding.
EXAMPLE 4 — SETPOINT DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press
MENU
.
2. Press SETPOINT .
DESCRIPTION
Base Demand Limit
LCW Setpoint
ECW Setpoint
ICE BUILD Setpoint
CONFIGURABLE RANGE
40-100
20-120 (–6.7-48.9)
20-120 (–6.7-48.9)
20- 60 (–6.7-15.6)
UNITS
%
DEG F (DEG C)
DEG F (DEG C)
DEG F (DEG C)
22
REFERENCE POINT NAME
DLM
lcw sp
ecw sp
ice sp
DEFAULT VALUE
100
50.0 (10.0)
60.0 (15.6)
40.0 ( 4.4)
Table 2 — LID Screens (cont)
EXAMPLE 5 — CONFIGURATION (CONFIG) DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press MENU .
2. Press SERVICE .
3. Scroll down to highlight EQUIPMENT CONFIGURATION.
4. Press SELECT .
5. Scroll down to highlight CONFIG.
6. Press SELECT .
DESCRIPTION
RESET TYPE 1
Degrees Reset at 20 mA
RESET TYPE 2
Remote Temp (No Reset)
Remote Temp (Full Reset)
Degrees Reset
RESET TYPE 3
CHW Delta T (No Reset)
CHW Delta T (Full Reset)
Degrees Reset
Select/Enable Reset Type
ECW CONTROL OPTION
Demand Limit At 20 mA
20 mA Demand Limit Option
Auto Restart Option
Remote Contacts Option
Temp Pulldown Deg/Min
Load Pulldown %/Min
Select Ramp Type:
Temp = 0, Load = 1
Loadshed Group Number
Loadshed Demand Delta
Maximum Loadshed Time
CCN Occupancy Config:
Schedule Number
Broadcast Option
ICE BUILD Option
ICE BUILD TERMINATION
0 =Temp, 1 =Contacts, 2 =Both
ICE BUILD Recycle Option
CONFIGURABLE RANGE
UNITS
REFERENCE POINT NAME
DEFAULT VALUE
–30-30 (–17-17)
DEG F (DEG C)
deg
20ma
10D(6D)
–40-245 (–40-118)
–40-245 (–40-118)
–30-30 (–17-17)
DEG F (DEG C)
DEG F (DEG C)
DEG F (DEG C)
res
res
res
rt1
rt2
rt
85 (29)
65 (18)
10D(6D)
0-15 (0-8)
0-15 (0-8)
–30-30 (–17-17)
0-3
DISABLE/ENABLE
40-100
DISABLE/ENABLE
DISABLE/ENABLE
DISABLE/ENABLE
2-10
5-20
0/1
DEG F (DEG C)
DEG F (DEG C)
DEG F (DEG C)
restd 1
restd 2
deg chw
res sel
ecw opt
dem 20ma
dem sel
astart
r contact
tmp ramp
kw ramp
ramp opt
10D(6D)
0D(0D)
5D(3D)
0
DISABLE
40
DISABLE
DISABLE
DISABLE
3
10
1
ldsgrp
ldsdelta
maxldstm
0
20
60
3-99
DISABLE/ENABLE
DISABLE/ENABLE
occpcxxe
occbrcst
ibopt
3
DISABLE
DISABLE
0-2
DISABLE/ENABLE
ibterm
ibrecyc
0
DISABLE
0-99
0-60
0-120
%
%
MIN
NOTE: D = delta degrees.
EXAMPLE 6 — LEAD/LAG CONFIGURATION DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press MENU .
2. Press SERVICE .
3. Scroll down to highlight EQUIPMENT CONFIGURATION.
4. Press SELECT .
5. Scroll down to highlight Lead/Lag.
6. Press SELECT .
DESCRIPTION
LEAD/LAG SELECT
DISABLE =0, LEAD =1,
LAG =2, STANDBY =3
Load Balance Option
Common Sensor Option
LAG Percent Capacity
LAG Address
LAG START Timer
LAG STOP Timer
PRESTART FAULT Timer
STANDBY Chiller Option
STANDBY Percent Capacity
STANDBY Address
LEAD/LAG CONFIGURATION SCREEN
CONFIGURABLE RANGE
UNITS
REFERENCE POINT NAME
DEFAULT VALUE
0-3
leadlag
0
DISABLE/ENABLE
DISABLE/ENABLE
25-75
1-236
2-60
2-60
0-30
DISABLE/ENABLE
25-75
1-236
loadbal
commsens
lag per
lag add
lagstart
lagstop
preflt
stndopt
stnd per
stnd add
DISABLE
DISABLE
50
92
10
10
5
DISABLE
50
93
%
MIN
MIN
MIN
%
NOTE: The Lead/Lag Configuration table is available on PSIO Software Version 09 and higher.
23
Table 2 — LID Screens (cont)
EXAMPLE 7 — SERVICE1 DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press MENU .
2. Press SERVICE .
3. Scroll down to highlight EQUIPMENT SERVICE.
4. Press SELECT .
5. Scroll down to highlight SERVICE1.
6. Press SELECT .
DESCRIPTION
Motor Temp Override
Cond Press Override
Refrig Override Delta T
Chilled Medium
Brine Refrig Trippoint
Compr Discharge Alert
Bearing Temp Alert
Water Flow Verify Time
Oil Press Verify Time
Water/Brine Deadband
Recycle Restart Delta T
Recycle Shutdown Delta T
Surge Limit/HGBP Option
Select: Surge=0, HGBP=1
Surge/HGBP Delta T1
Surge/HGBP Delta P1
Min. Load Points (T1/P1)
Surge/HGBP Delta T2
Surge/HGBP Delta P2
Full Load Points (T2/P2)
Surge/HGBP Deadband
Surge Delta Percent Amps
Surge Time Period
Demand Limit Source
Select: Amps=0, Load=1
Amps Correction Factor
Motor Rated Load Amps
Motor Rated Line Voltage
Meter Rated Line kW
Line Frequency
Select: 0=60 Hz, 1=50 Hz
Compr Starter Type
Condenser Freeze Point
Soft Stop Amps Threshold
CONFIGURABLE RANGE
150-200 (66-93)
150-245 (1034-1689)
[90-200 (620-1379)]
2-5 (1-3)
Water/Brine
8-40 (–13.3-4)
125-200 (52-93)
175-185 (79-85)
0.5-5
15-300
0.5-2.0 (0.3-1.1)
2.0-10.0 (1.1-5.6)
0.5-4.0 (0.27-2.2)
0/1
UNITS
DEG F (DEG C)
PSI (kPa)
REFERENCE POINT NAME
mt over
cp over
DEG F (DEG C)
DEG F (DEG C)
DEG F (DEG C)
DEG F (DEG C)
MIN
SEC
DEG F (DEG C)
DEG F (DEG C)
DDEG F (DDEG C)
ref over
medium
br trip
cd alert
tb alert
wflow t
oilpr t
cw db
rcyc dt
rcycs dt
srg hgbp
3D (1.6D)
WATER
33 (1)
200 (93)
175 (79)
5
15
1.0 (0.6)
5 (2.8)
1.0 (0.6)
0
0.5-15 (0.3-8.3)
50-170 (345-1172)
[30-170 (207-1172)]
DEG F (DEG C)
PSI (kPA)
hgb
hgb
dt1
dp1
1.5 (0.8)
0.5-15 (0.3-8.3)
50-170 (345-1172)
[30-170 (207-1172)]
DEG F (DEG C)
hgb
dt2
PSI (kPa)
hgb
dp2
10 (5.6)
170 (1172) [85 (586)]
DEG F (DEG C)
%
MIN
hgb dp
surge a
surge t
dem src
1 (0.6)
25
2
0
1-3 (0.6-1.6)
10-50
1-5
0/1
DEFAULT VALUE
200 (93)
195 (1345) [125 (862)]
75 (517) [50 (345)]
1-8
1-9999
1-9999
1-9999
0/1
AMPS
VOLTS
kW
HZ
corfact
a fs
v fs
kw fs
freq
3
200
460
600
0
REDUCE/FULL
–20-35 (–28.9-1.7)
40-100
DEG F (DEG C)
%
starter
cdfreeze
softstop
REDUCE
34 (1)
100
NOTES:
1. Condenser Freeze Point and Softstop Amps Threshold are only selectable/readable on PSIO Software Versions 09 and higher.
2. Values in [ ] indicate HFC-134a values.
3. D = delta degrees.
24
Table 2 — LID Screens (cont)
EXAMPLE 8 — SERVICE2 DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press
MENU
.
2. Press SERVICE .
3. Scroll down to highlight EQUIPMENT SERVICE.
4. Press SELECT .
5. Scroll down to highlight SERVICE2.
6. Press SELECT .
DESCRIPTION
OPTIONS BOARD 1
20 mA POWER CONFIGURATION
External = 0, Internal = 1
RESET 20 mA Power Source
DEMAND 20 mA Power Source
SPARE ALERT ENABLE
Disable = 0, Low = 1, High = 2
Temp = Alert Threshold
CHWS Temp Enable
CHWS Temp Alert
CHWR Temp Enable
CHWR Temp Alert
Reset Temp Enable
Reset Temp Alert
Spare Temp 1 Enable
Spare Temp 1 Alert
Spare Temp 2 Enable
Spare Temp 2 Alert
Spare Temp 3 Enable
Spare Temp 3 Alert
OPTIONS BOARD 2
20 mA POWER CONFIGURATION
External = 0, Internal = 1
SPARE 1 20 mA Power Source
SPARE 2 20 mA Power Source
SPARE ALERT ENABLE
Disable = 0, Low = 1, High = 2
Temp = Alert Threshold
Spare Temp 4 Enable
Spare Temp 4 Alert
Spare Temp 5 Enable
Spare Temp 5 Alert
Spare Temp 6 Enable
Spare Temp 6 Alert
Spare Temp 7 Enable
Spare Temp 7 Alert
Spare Temp 8 Enable
Spare Temp 8 Alert
Spare Temp 9 Enable
Spare Temp 9 Alert
CONFIGURABLE RANGE
UNITS
0,1
0,1
0-2
–40-245
0-2
–40-245
0-2
–40-245
0-2
–40-245
0-2
–40-245
0-2
–40-245
(–40-118)
DEG F (DEG C)
(–40-118)
DEG F (DEG C)
(–40-118)
DEG F (DEG C)
(–40-118)
DEG F (DEG C)
(–40-118)
DEG F (DEG C)
(–40-118)
DEG F (DEG C)
0,1
0,1
0-2
–40-245
0-2
–40-245
0-2
–40-245
0-2
–40-245
0-2
–40-245
0-2
–40-245
(–40-118)
DEG F (DEG C)
(–40-118)
DEG F (DEG C)
(–40-118)
DEG F (DEG C)
(–40-118)
DEG F (DEG C)
(–0-118)
DEG F (DEG C)
(–40-118)
DEG F (DEG C)
REFERENCE POINT NAME
DEFAULT VALUE
res 20 ma
dem 20 ma
0
0
chws
chws
chwr
chwr
rres
rres
spr1
spr1
spr2
spr2
spr3
spr3
en
al
en
al
en
al
en
al
en
al
en
al
0
245
0
245
0
245
0
245
0
245
0
245
sp1
sp2
20 ma
20 ma
0
0
spr4
spr4
spr5
spr5
spr6
spr6
spr7
spr7
spr8
spr8
spr9
spr9
en
al
en
al
en
al
en
al
en
al
en
al
0
245
0
245
0
245
0
245
0
245
0
245
(118)
(118)
(118)
(118)
(118)
(118)
(118)
(118)
(118)
(118)
(118)
(118)
NOTE: This screen provides the means to generate alert messages based on exceeding the ‘‘Temp Alert’’ threshold for each point listed. If the
‘‘Enable’’ is set to 1, a value above the ‘‘Temp Alert’’ threshold shall generate an alert message. If the ‘‘Enable’’ is set to 2, a value below the ‘‘Temp
Alert’’ threshold shall generate an alert message. If the ‘‘Enable’’ is set to 0, alert generation is disabled.
EXAMPLE 9 — SERVICE3 DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press
MENU
.
2. Press SERVICE .
3. Scroll down to highlight EQUIPMENT SERVICE.
4. Press SELECT .
5. Scroll down to highlight SERVICE3.
DESCRIPTION
Proportional Inc Band
Proportional Dec Band
Proportional ECW Gain
Guide Vane Travel Limit
CONFIGURABLE RANGE
2-10
2-10
1-3
30-100
UNITS
%
25
REFERENCE
gv
gv
gv
gv
POINT NAME
inc
de
ecw
lim
DEFAULT VALUE
6.5
6.0
2.0
50
Table 2 — LID Screens (cont)
EXAMPLE 10 — MAINTENANCE (MAINT01) DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press MENU .
2. Press SERVICE .
3. Scroll down to highlight ALGORITHM STATUS.
4. Press SELECT .
5. Scroll down to highlight MAINT01.
DESCRIPTION
CAPACITY CONTROL
Control Point
Leaving Chilled Water
Entering Chilled Water
Control Point Error
ECW Delta T
ECW Reset
LCW Reset
Total Error + Resets
Guide Vane Delta
Target Guide Vane Pos
Actual Guide Vane Pos
Proportional Inc Band
Proportional Dec Band
Proportional ECW Gain
Water/Brine Deadband
RANGE/STATUS
UNITS
10-120 (–12.2-48.9)
–40-245 (–40-118)
–40-245 (–40-118)
–99-99 (–55-55)
–99-99 (–55-55)
–99-99 (–55-55)
–99-99 (–55-55)
–99-99 (–55-55)
–2-2
0-100
0-100
2-10
2-10
1-3
0.5-2 (0.3-1.1)
DEG
DEG
DEG
DEG
DEG
DEG
DEG
DEG
%
%
%
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
REFERENCE POINT NAME
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
(DEG
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
DEG F (DEG C)
ctrlpt
LCW
ECW
cperr
ecwdt
ecwres
lcwres
error
gvd
GV
TRG
GV
ACT
gv inc
gv dec
gv ecw
cwdb
NOTE: Overriding is not supported on this maintenance screen. Active overrides show the associated point in alert (*). Only values with capital letter
reference point names are variables available for read operation.
EXAMPLE 11 — MAINTENANCE (MAINT02) DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press MENU .
2. Press SERVICE .
3. Scroll down to highlight CONTROL ALGORITHM STATUS.
4. Press SELECT .
5. Scroll down to highlight MAINT02.
6. Press SELECT .
DESCRIPTION
OVERRIDE/ALERT STATUS
MOTOR WINDING TEMP
Override Threshold
CONDENSER PRESSURE
Override Threshold
EVAPORATOR REFRIG TEMP
Override Threshold
DISCHARGE TEMPERATURE
Alert Threshold
BEARING TEMPERATURE
Alert Threshold
RANGE/STATUS
UNITS
–40-245 (–40-118)
150-200 (66-93)
–6.7-420 (–42-2896)
90-245 (621-1689)
–40-245 (–40-118)
2-45 (1-7.2)
–40-245 (–40-118)
125-200 (52-93)
–40-245 (–40-118)
175-185 (79-85)
DEG F (DEG
DEG F (DEG
PSI (kPa)
PSI (kPa)
DEG F (DEG
DEG F (DEG
DEG F (DEG
DEG F (DEG
DEG F (DEG
DEG F (DEG
REFERENCE POINT NAME
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
C)
MTRW
mt over
CRP
cp over
ERT
rt over
CMPD
cd alert
MTRB
tb alert
NOTE: Overriding is not supported on this maintenance screen. Active overrides show the associated point in alert (*). Only values with capital letter
reference point names are variables available for read operation.
26
Table 2 — LID Screens (cont)
EXAMPLE 12 — MAINTENANCE (MAINT03) DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press MENU .
2. Press SERVICE .
3. Scroll down to highlight CONTROL ALGORITHM STATUS.
4. Press SELECT .
5. Scroll down to highlight MAINT03.
6. Press SELECT .
DESCRIPTION
SURGE/HGBP ACTIVE ?
RANGE/STATUS
NO/YES
Active Delta P
Active Delta T
Calculated Delta T
0-200 (0-1379)
0-200 (0-111)
0-200 (0-111)
Surge Protection Counts
0-12
UNITS
REFERENCE POINT NAME
PSI (kPa)
DEG F (DEG C)
DEG F (DEG C)
dp a
dt a
dt c
spc
NOTE: Override is not supported on this maintenance screen. Only values with capital letter reference point names are variables available for read
operation.
EXAMPLE 13 — MAINTENANCE (MAINT04 DISPLAY SCREEN
To access this display from the LID default screen:
1. Press MENU .
2. Press SERVICE .
3. Scroll down to highlight CONTROL ALGORITHM STATUS.
4. Press SELECT .
5. Scroll down to highlight MAINT04.
6. Press SELECT .
DESCRIPTION
LEAD/LAG: Configuration
Current Mode
Load Balance Option
LAG Start Time
LAG Stop Time
Prestart Fault Time
Pulldown: Delta T/Min
Satisfied?
LEAD CHILLER in Control
LAG CHILLER: Mode
Run Status
Start/Stop
Recovery Start Request
STANDBY CHILLER: Mode
Run Status
Start/Stop
Recovery Start Request
RANGE/STATUS
DISABLE,LEAD,LAG,STANDBY, INVALID
DISABLE,LEAD,LAG,STANDBY, CONFIG
DISABLE/ENABLE
0-60
0-60
0-30
2-10 F/min (1.1-5.5 C/min)
No/Yes
No/Yes
Reset,Off,Local,CCN
Timeout,Recycle,Startup,Ramping,Running
Demand,Override,Shutdown,Abnormal,Pumpdown
Stop,Start,Retain
No/Yes
Reset,Off,Local,CCN
Timeout,Recycle,Startup,Ramping,Running
Demand,Override,Shutdown,Abnormal,Pumpdown
Stop,Start,Retain
No/Yes
UNITS
MIN
MIN
MIN
D DEG F/min
(D DEG C/min)
REFERENCE POINT NAME
leadlag
llmode
loadbal
lagstart
lagstop
preflt
pull dt
pull sat
leadctrl
lagmode
lagstat
lag s s
lag rec
stdmode
stdstat
std s s
std rec
NOTES:
1. Only values with capital letter reference point names are variables available for read operation. Forcing is not supported on this maintenance
screen.
2. The MAINT04 screen is available on PSIO Software Version 09 and higher.
3. D = delta degrees.
27
DEMAND LIMITING — The PIC will respond to the
ACTIVE DEMAND LIMIT set point by limiting the opening of the guide vanes. It will compare the set point
to either COMPRESSOR MOTOR LOAD or COMPRESSOR MOTOR CURRENT (percentage), depending on how
the control is configured for the DEMAND LIMIT SOURCE
which is accessed on the SERVICE1 table. The default setting is current limiting.
PIC System Functions
NOTE: Throughout this manual, words printed in capital letters and italics represent values that may be viewed on the
LID. See Table 2 for examples of LID screens. Point names
are listed in the Description column. An overview of LID
operation and menus is given in Fig. 13-19.
CAPACITY CONTROL — The PIC controls the chiller
capacity by modulating the inlet guide vanes in response to
chilled water temperature changes away from the CONTROL POINT. The CONTROL POINT may be changed by
a CCN network device, or is determined by the PIC adding
any active chilled water reset to the ECW (Entering Chilled
Water) SET POINT or LCW SET POINT. The PIC uses the
PROPORTIONAL INC (Increase) BAND, PROPORTIONAL
DEC (Decrease) BAND, and the PROPORTIONAL ECW GAIN
to determine how fast or slow to respond. CONTROL POINT
may be viewed/overridden on the Status table, Status01
selection.
ENTERING CHILLED WATER CONTROL — If this option is enabled, the PIC uses ENTERING CHILLED WATER
temperature to modulate the vanes instead of LEAVING CHILLED WATER temperature. ENTERING CHILLED
WATER control option may be viewed/modified on the Equipment Configuration table, Config table.
DEADBAND — This is the tolerance on the chilled water/
brine temperature CONTROL POINT. If the water temperature goes outside of the DEADBAND, the PIC opens or closes
the guide vanes in response until it is within tolerance. The
PIC may be configured with a 0.5 to 2 F (0.3 to 1.1 C) deadband. DEADBAND may be viewed or modified on the Equipment Service1 table.
For example, a 1° F (0.6° C) deadband setting controls
the water temperature within ±0.5° F (0.3° C) of the control point. This may cause frequent guide vane movement if
the chilled water load fluctuates frequently. A value of
1° F (0.6° C) is the default setting.
PROPORTIONAL BANDS AND GAIN — Proportional band
is the rate at which the guide vane position is corrected in
proportion to how far the chilled water/brine temperature is
from the control point. Proportional gain determines how
quickly the guide vanes react to how quickly the temperature is moving from CONTROL POINT.
The proportional band can be viewed/modified on the LID.
There are two response modes, one for temperature response above the control point, the other for response below
the control point.
The first type is called PROPORTIONAL INC BAND, and
it can slow or quicken vane response to chilled water/
brine temperature above DEADBAND. It can be adjusted
from a setting of 2 to 10; the default setting is 6.5. PROPORTIONAL DEC BAND can slow or quicken vane response to chilled water temperature below deadband plus control
point. It can be adjusted on the LID from a setting of 2 to 10,
and the default setting is 6.0. Increasing either of these settings will cause the vanes to respond slower than at a lower
setting.
The PROPORTIONAL ECW GAIN can be adjusted at the LID
display from a setting of 1.0 to 3.0, with a default setting of
2.0. Increase this setting to increase guide vane response to
a change in entering chilled water temperature. The proportional bands and gain may be viewed/modified on the Equipment Service3 table.
CHILLER TIMERS — The PIC maintains 2 runtime clocks,
known as COMPRESSOR ONTIME and SERVICE ONTIME. COMPRESSOR ONTIME indicates the total lifetime compressor run hours. This timer can register up
to 500,000 hours before the clock turns back to zero. The
SERVICE ONTIME is a resettable timer that can be used to
indicate the hours since the last service visit or any other
reason. The time can be changed through the LID to
whatever value is desired. This timer can register up to
32,767 hours before it rolls over to zero.
The chiller also maintains a start-to-start timer and a stopto-start timer. These timers limit how soon the chiller can be
started. See the Start-Up/Shutdown/Recycle Sequence section, page 39, for operational information.
OCCUPANCY SCHEDULE — This schedule determines when
the chiller is either occupied or unoccupied.
Each schedule consists of from one to 8 occupied/unoccupied
time periods, set by the operator. These time periods can be
enabled to be in effect, or not in effect, on each day of the
week and for holidays. The day begins with 0000 hours and
ends with 2400 hours. The chiller is in OCCUPIED mode
unless an unoccupied time period is in effect.
The chiller will shut down when the schedule goes to UNOCCUPIED. These schedules can be set up to follow the
building schedule or to be 100% OCCUPIED if the operator
wishes. The schedules also can be bypassed by forcing the
Start/Stop command on the PIC Status screen to start. The
schedules also can be overridden to keep the unit in an OCCUPIED mode for up to 4 hours, on a one-time basis.
Figure 18 shows a schedule for a typical office building
time schedule, with a 3-hour, off-peak cool down period
from midnight to 3 a.m., following a weekend shutdown.
Example: Holiday periods are unoccupied 24 hours per day.
The building operates Monday through Friday, 7:00 a.m. to
6:00 p.m., with a Saturday schedule of 6:00 a.m. to
1:00 p.m., and includes the Monday midnight to 3:00 a.m.
weekend cool-down schedule.
NOTE: This schedule is for illustration only, and is not intended to be a recommended schedule for chiller operation.
PSIO Software Version 08 and Lower — Whenever the chiller
is in the LOCAL mode, the chiller will start when the
Occupancy Schedule 01 indicates OCCUPIED. When in the
CCN mode, Occupancy Schedule 02 is used.
PSIO Software Version 09 and Higher — The Local Time
Schedule is still the Occupancy Schedule 01. The Ice Build
Time Schedule is Schedule 02 and the CCN Default Time
Schedule is Schedule 03. The CCN schedule number is defined on the Config table in the Equipment Configuration
table on page 23. The schedule number can change to any
value from 03 to 99. If this schedule number is changed on
the Config table, the operator must use the Attach to Network Device table to upload the new number into the Schedule screen. See Fig. 17.
28
To give a better warning as to the operating condition of
the chiller, the operator also can define alert limits on various monitored inputs. Safety contact and alert limits are
defined in Table 3. Alarm and alert messages are listed in the
Troubleshooting Guide section, page 66.
Safety Controls — The PIC monitors all safety control
inputs, and if required, shuts down the chiller or limits the
guide vanes to protect the chiller from possible damage from
any of the following conditions:
• high bearing temperature
• high motor winding temperature
• high discharge temperature
• low oil pressure
• low cooler refrigerant temperature/pressure
• condenser high pressure or low pressure
• inadequate water/brine cooler and condenser flow
• high, low, or loss of voltage
• excessive motor acceleration time
• excessive starter transition time
• lack of motor current signal
• excessive motor amps
• excessive compressor surge
• temperature and transducer faults
SHUNT TRIP — The shunt trip function of the PIC is a safety
trip. The shunt trip is wired from an output on the SMM to
a shunt trip-equipped motor circuit breaker. If the PIC tries
to shut down the compressor through normal shutdown procedure but is unsuccessful for 30 seconds, the shunt trip output is energized and causes the circuit breaker to trip off. If
ground fault protection has been applied to the starter, the
ground fault trip will also energize the shunt trip to trip the
circuit breaker.
Default Screen Freeze — Whenever an alarm
occurs, the LID default screen will freeze displaying the
condition of the chiller at the time of alarm. Knowledge of
the operating state of the chiller at the time an alarm occurs
is useful when troubleshooting. Current chiller information
can be viewed on the Status tables. Once all existing alarms
are cleared (by pressing the RESET softkey), the default
LID will return to normal operation.
Starter faults or optional protective devices within the starter
can shut down the chiller. These devices are dependent on
what has been purchased as options.
Motor Cooling Control — Motor temperature is
reduced by refrigerant entering the motor shell and evaporating. The refrigerant is regulated by the motor cooling
relay. This relay will energize when the compressor is running and motor temperature is above 125 F (51.7 C). The
relay will close when motor temperature is below 100 F
(37.8 C). Note that there is always a minimum flow of
refrigerant when the compressor is operating for motor cooling; the relay only controls additional refrigerant to the
motor.
If compressor motor overload occurs, check the motor
for grounded or open phases before attempting a
restart.
If the controller initiates a safety shutdown, it displays
the fault on the LID display with a primary and a secondary
message, and energizes an alarm relay in the starter and blinks
the alarm light on the control center. The alarm is stored in
memory and can be viewed in the PIC alarm table along with
a message for troubleshooting.
29
Table 3 — Protective Safety Limits and Control Settings
MONITORED PARAMETER
TEMPERATURE SENSORS
OUT OF RANGE
LIMIT
APPLICABLE COMMENTS
–40 to 245 F (–40 to 118.3 C)
Must be outside range for 2 seconds
PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS
OUT OF RANGE
0.08 to 0.98 Voltage Ratio
Must be outside range for 2 seconds.
Ratio = Input Voltage ÷ Voltage
Reference
COMPRESSOR DISCHARGE
TEMPERATURE
MOTOR WINDING TEMPERATURE
BEARING TEMPERATURE
.220 F (104.4 C)
Preset, alert setting configurable
.220 F (104.4 C)
.185 F (85 C)
Preset, alert setting configurable
Preset, alert setting configurable
Preset, configure chilled medium for
water (Service1 table)
Configure chilled medium for brine
(Service1 table). Adjust brine refrigerant
trippoint for proper cutout
Preset
,33 F (for water chilling) (0.6° C)
EVAPORATOR REFRIGERANT
TEMPERATURE
TRANSDUCER VOLTAGE
CONDENSER PRESSURE — SWITCH
— CONTROL
OIL PRESSURE — SWITCH
— CONTROL
LINE VOLTAGE — HIGH
— LOW
— SINGLE-CYCLE
COMPRESSOR MOTOR LOAD
,Brine Refrigerant Trippoint (set point adjustable
from 0 to 40 F [–18 to 4 C] for brine chilling)
,4.5 vdc . 5.5 vdc
.263 ± 7 psig (1813 ± 48 kPa),
reset at 180 ± 10 (1241 ± 69 kPa)
.260 psig (1793 kPa) for HCFC-22;
215 psig (1482 kPa) for HFC-134a
Cutout ,11 psid (76 kPad) ± 1.5 psid (10.3 kPad)
Cut-in .16.5 psid (114 kPad) ± 4 psid (27.5 kPad)
Cutout ,15 psid (103 kPad)
Alert ,18 psid (124 kPad)
.110% for one minute
,90% for one minute or <85% for 3 seconds
,50% for one cycle
.110% for 30 seconds
,10% with compressor running
.10% with compressor off
STARTER ACCELERATION TIME
(Determined by inrush current
going below 100% compressor
motor load)
.45 seconds
STARTER TRANSITION
.75 seconds
Energizes condenser pump relay if condenser
refrigerant temperature or condenser entering
water temperature is below the configured condenser freeze point temperature. Deenergizes
when the temperature is 5 F (3 C) above condenser freeze point temperature.
CONDENSER FREEZE
PROTECTION
.10 seconds
Preset
Preset
Preset, no calibration needed
Preset
Preset, based on transformed line voltage to 24 vac rated-input to the Starter
Management Module. Also monitored at
PSIO power input.
Preset
Preset
Preset
For chillers with reduced voltage mechanical and solid-state starters
For chillers with full voltage starters
(Configured on Service1 table)
Reduced voltage starters only
CONDENSER FREEZE POINT configured in Service01 table with a default
setting of 34 F (1 C).
Flow Switches (Field Supplied)
Operate water pumps with chiller off. Manually
reduce water flow and observe switch for proper
cutout. Safety shutdown occurs when cutout time
exceeds 3 seconds.
CUT-OUT
SETTING
ADJUSTMENT
SCREW
30
on the LID Equipment Configuration table, Config table (see
Table 2). Motor load is the default type.
Ramp Loading Control — The ramp loading control
slows down the rate at which the compressor loads up. This
control can prevent the compressor from loading up during
the short period of time when the chiller is started, and the
chilled water loop has to be brought down to normal design
conditions. This helps reduce electrical demand charges by
slowly bringing the chilled water to control point. However,
the total power draw during this period remains almost
unchanged.
There are 2 methods of ramp loading with the PIC. Ramp
loading can be based on chilled water temperature or on motor load.
1. Temperature ramp loading limits the rate at which either
leaving chilled water or entering chilled water temperature decreases by an operator-configured rate. The lowest temperature ramp table will be used the first time the
chiller is started (at commissioning). The lowest temperature ramp rate will also be used if chiller power has
been off for 3 hours or more (even if the motor ramp load
is selected).
2. Motor load ramp loading limits the rate at which the
compressor motor current or compressor motor load
increases by an operator-configured rate.
The TEMP (Temperature) PULLDOWN, LOAD PULL
DOWN, and SELECT RAMP TYPE may be viewed/modified
Capacity Override (Table 4) — Capacity overrides
can prevent some safety shutdowns caused by exceeding
motor amperage limit, refrigerant low temperature safety limit,
motor high temperature safety limit, and condenser high pressure limit. In all cases there are 2 stages of compressor vane
control.
1. The vanes are held from opening further, and the status
line on the LID indicates the reason for the override.
2. The vanes are closed until condition decreases below the
first step set point, and then the vanes are released to normal capacity control.
Whenever the motor current demand limit set point is reached,
it activates a capacity override, again with a 2-step process.
Exceeding 110% of the rated load amps for more than
30 seconds will initiate a safety shutdown.
The compressor high lift (surge prevention) set point will
cause a capacity override as well. When the surge prevention set point is reached, the controller normally will only
hold the guide vanes from opening. If so equipped, the hot
gas bypass valve will open instead of holding the vanes.
Table 4 — Capacity Overrides
OVERRIDE
CAPACITY
CONTROL
SECOND
OVERRIDE
STAGE
SET POINT TERMINATION
FIRST STAGE SET POINT
View/Modify
on
LID Screen
Default Value
Configurable Range
HCFC-22
HFC-134a
HCFC-22
HFC-134a
.195 psig
(1345 kPa)
125 psig
(862 kPa)
150 to 245 psig
(1034 to 1689 kPa)
90 to 200 psig
(620 to 1379 kPa)
HIGH
CONDENSER
PRESSURE
Equipment
Service1
HIGH MOTOR
TEMPERATURE
Equipment
Service1
.200 F (93.3 C)
150 to 200 F (66 to 93 C)
LOW
REFRIGERANT
TEMPERATURE
(Refrigerant
Override Delta
Temperature)
Equipment
Service1
,3° F (1.6° C)
(Above Trippoint)
2° to 5° F
(1° to 3° C)
HIGH
COMPRESSOR
LIFT
(Surge
Prevention)
MANUAL
GUIDE VANE
TARGET
MOTOR LOAD —
ACTIVE
DEMAND LIMIT
Equipment
Service1
HCFC-22
HFC-134a
HCFC-22
HFC-134a
Minimum:
Minimum:
T1 — 1.5° F
T1 — 1.5° F
0.5° to 15° F
0.5° to 15° F
(0.8° C)
(0.8° C)
(0.3° to 8.3° C)
(0.3° to 8.3° C)
P1 — 75 psid
P1 — 50 psid
50 to 170 psid
30 to 170 psid
(517 kPad)
(345 kPad)
(345 to 1172 kPad) (207 to 1172 kPad)
Maximum:
Maximum:
T2 — 10° F
T2 — 10° F
0.5° to 15° F
0.5° to 15° F
(5.6° C)
(5.6° C)
(0.3° to 8.3° C)
(0.3° to 8.3° C)
P2 — 170 psid P2 — 85 psid
50 to 170 psid
30 to 170 psid
(1172 kPad)
(586 kPad)
(345 to 1172 kPad) (207 to 1172 kPad)
Value
.Override
Set Point
+ 4 psig
(28 kPa)
.Override
Set Point
+10° F
(6° C)
,Override
Set Point
,Override
Set Point
<Trippoint
+ Override
DT –1° F
(0.56° C)
.Trippoint
+ Override
DT +2° F
(1.2° C)
None
Within
Lift Limits
Plus Surge/
HGBP
Deadband
Setting
Control
Algorithm
Maint01
Automatic
0 to 100%
None
Status01
100%
40 to 100%
>5% of
Set Point
31
Value
Release of
Manual
Control
2% Lower
Than
Set Point
3 times every 12 hours. If more than 8 starts in 12 hours
occur, then an Excessive Starts alarm is displayed, preventing the chiller from starting. The operator must reset the alarm
at the LID in order to override the starts counter and start
the chiller. If Automatic Restart After a Power Failure is not
activated when a power failure occurs, and the remote contact is closed, the chiller will indicate an alarm because of
the loss of voltage.
The contacts for Remote Start are wired into the starter at
terminal strip TB5, terminals 8A and 8B. See the certified
drawings for further details on contact ratings. The contacts
must be dry (no power).
High Discharge Temperature Control — If the
discharge temperature increases above 160 F (71.1 C)
(PSIO Software Version 09 and higher) or 180 F (82 C) (PSIO
Software Version 08 or lower), the guide vanes are proportionally opened to increase gas flow through the compressor.
If the leaving chilled water temperature is then brought 5° F
(2.8° C) below the control set point temperature, the controls will bring the chiller into the recycle mode.
Oil Sump Temperature Control — The oil sump temperature control is regulated by the PIC which uses the oil
heater relay when the chiller is shut down.
As part of the pre-start checks executed by the controls,
oil sump temperature is compared against evaporator refrigerant temperature. If the difference between these 2 temperatures is 50 F (27.8 C) or less, the start-up will be delayed
until the oil temperature is 50 F (27.8 C) or more. Once this
temperature is confirmed, the start-up continues.
PSIO SOFTWARE VERSION 08 AND LOWER — The oil
heater relay is energized whenever the chiller compressor is
off, and the oil sump temperature is less than 140 F (60 C)
or sump temperature is less than the cooler refrigerant temperature plus 60° F (33.3° C). The heater is then turned
off when the oil sump temperature is: 1) more than
160 F (71.1 C); or 2) the sump temperature is more than
145 F (62.8 C) and more than the cooler refrigerant temperature plus 65° F (36.1° C). The heater is always off during start-up or when the compressor is running.
PSIO SOFTWARE VERSION 09 AND HIGHER — The oil
heater relay is energized whenever the chiller compressor is
off and the oil sump temperature is less than 150 F (65.6 C)
or the oil sump temperature is less than the cooler refrigerant temperature plus 70° F (39° C). The oil heater is turned
off when the oil sump temperature is either 1) more than
160 F (71.1 C); or 2) the oil sump temperature is more than
155 F (68.3 C) and more than the cooler refrigerant temperature plus 75° F (41.6° C). The oil heater is always off
during start-up or when the compressor is running.
When a power failure to the PSIO module has occurred
for more than 3 hours (i.e., initial start-up), the oil sump is
heated to 100° F (56° C) above the evaporator refrigerant
temperature or 190 F (88 C), whichever is lower. Once this
temperature is reached, the oil pump will be energized for
1 to 2 minutes or until the oil sump temperature cools to
below 145 F (63 C). The normal heating algorithm is now
followed once ramp loading has been completed.
After a 3-hour power failure, the oil temperature must rise
to the higher oil temperature. The controls will delay the start
of the compressor until this temperature is met.
Spare Safety Inputs — Normally closed (NC) digital
inputs for additional field-supplied safeties may be wired to
the spare protective limits input channel in place of the factoryinstalled jumper. (Wire multiple inputs in series.) The opening of any contact will result in a safety shutdown and LID
display. Refer to the certified drawings for safety contact
ratings.
Analog temperature sensors may also be added to the
options modules, if installed. These may be programmed to
cause an alert on the CCN network, but will not shut the
chiller down.
SPARE ALARM CONTACTS — Two spare sets of alarm
contacts are provided within the starter. The contact ratings
are provided in the certified drawings. The contacts are
located on terminal strip TB6, terminals 5A and 5B, and
terminals 5C and 5D.
Condenser Pump Control — The chiller will monitor the CONDENSER PRESSURE and may turn on this pump
if the pressure becomes too high whenever the compressor
is shut down. CONDENSER PRESSURE OVERRIDE is used
to determine this pressure point. This value is found on the
Equipment Service1 LID table and has a default value
(Table 4). If the CONDENSER PRESSURE is greater than
or equal to the CONDENSER PRESSURE OVERRIDE, and
the ENTERING CONDENSER WATER TEMP (Temperature) is less than 115 F (46 C), then the condenser pump
will energize to try to decrease the pressure. The pump will
turn off when the condenser pressure is less than the
pressure override less 5 psi (34 kPa), or the CONDENSER
REFRIG (Refrigerant) TEMP is within 3° F (2° C) of the
ENTERING CONDENSER WATER temperature.
Condenser Freeze Prevention — This control
algorithm helps prevent condenser tube freeze-up by energizing the condenser pump relay. If the pump is controlled
by the PIC, starting the pump will help prevent the water in
the condenser from freezing. Condenser freeze prevention
can occur whenever the chiller is not running except when
it is either actively in pumpdown or in Pumpdown Lockout
with the freeze prevention disabled (refer to Control Test table,
Pumpdown/Terminate Lockout tables).
When the CONDENSER REFRIG TEMP is less than
or equal to the CONDENSER FREEZE POINT, or the
ENTERING CONDENSER WATER temperature is less than
or equal to the CONDENSER FREEZE POINT, then the
CONDENSER WATER PUMP shall be energized until the
CONDENSER REFRIG TEMP is greater than the CONDENSER FREEZE POINT plus 5° F (2.7° C). An alarm will
be generated if the chiller is in PUMPDOWN mode and the
pump is energized. An alert will be generated if the chiller
is not in PUMPDOWN mode and the pump is energized. If
in recycle shutdown, the mode shall transition to a nonrecycle shutdown.
Oil Cooler — The oil must be cooled when the compressor is running. This is accomplished through a small, platetype heat exchanger located behind the oil pump. The heat
exchanger uses liquid condenser refrigerant as the cooling
liquid. A refrigerant thermostatic expansion valve (TXV) regulates refrigerant flow to control oil temperature entering the
bearings. There is always a flow of refrigerant bypassing the
thermostatic TXV. The bulb for the expansion valve is strapped
to the oil supply line leaving the heat exchanger and the valve
is set to maintain 110 F (43 C).
NOTE: The TXV is not adjustable. Oil sump temperature
may be at a lower temperature.
Remote Start/Stop Controls — A remote device, such
as a time clock which uses a set of contacts, may be used to
start and stop the chiller. However, the device should not be
programmed to start and stop the chiller in excess of 2 or
32
RESET TYPE 1—Reset Type 1 requires an optional 8-input
module. It is an automatic chilled water temperature reset
based on a 4 to 20 mA input signal. This type permits up to
± 30° F (± 16° C) of automatic reset to the chilled water or
brine temperature set point, based on the input from a 4 to
20 mA signal. This signal is hardwired into the number one
8-input module.
If the 4-20 mA signal is externally powered from the 8-input
module, the signal is wired to terminals J1-5(+) and J1-6(–).
If the signal is to be internally powered by the 8-input module (for example, when using variable resistance), the signal
is wired to J1-7(+) and J1-6(–). The PIC must now be configured on the Service2 table to ensure that the appropriate
power source is identified.
RESET TYPE 2—Reset Type requires an optional 8-input
module. It is an automatic chilled water temperature reset
based on a remote temperature sensor input. This reset type
permits ± 30° F (± 16° C) of automatic reset to the set point
based on a temperature sensor wired to the number one 8-input
module (see wiring diagrams or certified drawings). The temperature sensor must be wired to terminal J1-19 and J1-20.
To configure Reset Type 2, enter the temperature of the
remote sensor at the point where no temperature reset will
occur. Next, enter the temperature at which the full amount
of reset will occur. Then, enter the maximum amount of reset required to operate the chiller. Reset Type 2 can now be
activated.
RESET TYPE 3—Reset Type 3 is an automatic chilled
water temperature reset based on cooler temperature difference. This type of reset will add ± 30° F (± 16° C) based on
the temperature difference between entering and leaving chilled
water temperature. This is the only type of reset available
without the need of the number one 8-input module. No wiring is required for this type as it already uses the cooler
water sensors. To configure Reset Type 3, enter the chilled
water temperature difference (the difference between entering and leaving chilled water) at which no temperature reset
occurs. This chilled water temperature difference is usually
the full design load temperature difference. The difference in
chilled water temperature at which the full amount of
reset will occur is now entered on the next input line. Next,
the amount of reset is entered. Reset Type 3 can now be
activated.
Tower Fan Relay — Low condenser water temperature can cause the chiller to shut down on low refrigerant
temperature. The tower fan relay, located in the starter, is
controlled by the PIC to energize and deenergize as the pressure differential between cooler and condenser vessels changes
in order to prevent low condenser water temperature and to
maximize chiller efficiency. The tower fan relay can only
accomplish this if the relay has been added to the cooling
tower temperature controller. The TOWER FAN RELAY is
turned on whenever the CONDENSER WATER PUMP is
running, flow is verified, and the difference between cooler
and condenser pressure is more than 45 psid (310 kPad)
[30 psid (207 kPad)] or entering condenser water temperature is greater than 85 F (29 C). The TOWER FAN RELAY
is deenergized when the condenser pump is off, flow is lost,
the evaporator refrigerant temperature is less than the override temperature, or the differential pressure is less than
40 psid (279 kPad) [28 psid (193 kPad)] and entering condensing water is less than 80 F (27 C).
IMPORTANT: A field-supplied water temperature control system for condenser water should be installed.
The system should maintain the leaving condenser water temperature at a temperature that is 20° F (11° C)
above the leaving chilled water temperature.
The tower-fan relay control is not a substitute for a condenser water temperature control. When used with a
Water Temperature Control system, the tower fan relay
control can be used to help prevent low condenser water temperatures.
Auto. Restart After Power Failure — This option
may be enabled or disabled, and may be viewed/modified in
the Config table of Equipment Configuration. If enabled, the
chiller will start up automatically after a single cycle dropout, low, high, or loss of voltage has occurred, and the power
is within ±10% of normal. The 15- and 3-minute inhibit timers are ignored during this type of start-up.
When power is restored after the power failure, and if the
compressor had been running, the oil pump will be energized for one minute prior to the evaporator pump energizing. Auto restart will then continue like a normal
start-up.
If power to the PSIO module has been off for more than
3 hours, the oil heat algorithm, discussed in the Oil Sump
Temperature Control section on page 32, will take effect before the compressor can start. Refrigerant normally migrates
into the oil when the oil heater is left off for extended periods of time. The PIC operates the oil pump for 1 to 2 minutes to ensure that the oil is free of excess refrigerant. Once
this algorithm is completed, the RESTART of the chiller will
continue.
Demand Limit Control, Option — (Requires
Optional 8-Input Module) — The demand limit may
be externally controlled with a 4 to 20 mA signal from an
energy management system (EMS). The option is set up on
the Config table. When enabled, the control is set for 100%
demand with 4 mA and an operator configured minimum demand set point at 20 mA.
The Demand Reset input from an energy management
system is hardwired into the number one, 8-input module.
The signal may be internally powered by the module or
externally powered. If the signal is externally powered, the
signal is wired to terminals J1-1 (+) and J1-2 (–). If the signal is internally powered, the signal is wired to terminals
J1-3 (+) and J1-2 (–). When enabled, the control is set for
100% demand with 4 mA and an operator configured minimum demand set point at 20 mA.
Water/Brine Reset — Three types of chilled water or
brine reset are available and can be viewed or modified on
the Equipment Configuration table Config selection.
The LID default screen status message indicates when
the chilled water reset is active. The Control Point temperature on the Status01 table indicates the chiller’s current reset
temperature.
To activate a reset type, input all configuration information for that reset type in the Config table. Then input the
reset type number in the SELECT/ENABLE RESET TYPE
input line.
Surge Prevention Algorithm — This is an operator
configurable feature which can determine if lift conditions
are too high for the compressor and then take corrective
action. Lift is defined as the difference between the pressure
at the impeller eye and the impeller discharge. The maximum lift that a particular impeller can perform varies with
the gas flow across the impeller and the size of the impeller.
33
The algorithm first determines if corrective action is necessary. This is done by checking 2 sets of operator configured data points, which are the MINIMUM and the
MAXIMUM Load Points, (T1/P1;T2/P2). These points have
default settings for each type of refrigerant, HCFC-22 or
HFC-134a, as defined on the Service1 table, or on Table 4.
These settings and the algorithm function are graphically
displayed in Fig. 20 and 21. The two sets of load points on
this graph (default settings are shown) describe a line which
the algorithm uses to determine the maximum lift of the compressor. Whenever the actual differential pressure between
the cooler and condenser, and the temperature difference
between the entering and leaving chilled water are above the
line on the graph (as defined by the MINIMUM and MAXIMUM Load Points) the algorithm will go into a corrective
action mode. If the actual values are below the line, the
algorithm takes no action. Modification of the default set points
of the MINIMUM and MAXIMUM load points is described
in the Input Service Configuration section on page 50.
Corrective action can be taken by making one of 2 choices.
If a hot gas bypass line is present, and the hot gas is configured on the Service1 table, then the hot gas bypass valve
can be energized. If a hot gas bypass if not present, then
the action taken is to hold the guide vanes. See Table 4 —
Capacity Overrides. Both of these corrective actions will
reduce the lift experienced by the compressor and help to
prevent a surge condition. Surge is a condition when the
lift becomes so high that the gas flow across the impeller
reverses. This condition can eventually cause chiller damage. The surge prevention algorithm is intended to notify the
operator that chiller operating conditions are marginal, and
to take action to help prevent chiller damage such as lowering entering condenser water temperature.
LEGEND
ECW — Entering Chilled Water
HGBP — Hot Gas Bypass
LCW — Leaving Chilled Water
DP = (Condenser Psi) — (Cooler Psi)
DT = (ECW) − (LCW)
Fig. 20 — 19XL Hot Gas Bypass/Surge
Prevention
Surge Protection — Surging of the compressor can be
determined by the PIC through operator configured settings.
Surge will cause amperage fluctuations of the compressor
motor. The PIC monitors these amperage swings, and if the
swing is greater than the configurable setting in one second, then one surge count has occurred. The SURGE DELTA
PERCENT AMPS setting is displayed and configured on the
Service1 screen. It has a default setting of 25% amps, SURGE
PROTECTION COUNTS can be monitored on the Maint03
table.
A surge protection shutdown of the chiller will occur whenever the surge protection counter reaches 12 counts within an operator specified time, known as the SURGE TIME
PERIOD. The SURGE TIME PERIOD is displayed and
configured on the Service1 screen. It has a default of
2 minutes.
LEGEND
Lead/Lag Control
ECW — Entering Chilled Water
HGBP — Hot Gas Bypass
LCW — Leaving Chilled Water
DP = (Condenser kPa) — (Cooler kPa)
DT = (ECW) — (LCW)
NOTE: Lead/lag control is only available on chillers with
PSIO Software Version 09 or higher.
Lead/lag is a control system process that automatically starts
and stops a lag or second chiller in a 2-chiller water system.
Refer to Fig. 16 and 17 for menu, table, and screen selection
information. On chillers that have PSIO software with Lead/
Lag capability, it is possible to utilize the PIC controls to
perform the lead/lag function on 2 chillers. A third chiller
can be added to the lead/lag system as a standby chiller to
start up in case the lead or lag chiller in the system has shut
down during an alarm condition and additional cooling is
required.
NOTE: Lead/lag configuration is viewed and edited under
Lead/Lag in the Equipment Configuration table (located in
the Service menu). Lead/lag status during chiller operation
is viewed in the MAINT04 table in the Control Algorithm
Status table. See Table 2.
Fig. 21 — 19XL with Default Metric Settings
Lead/Lag System Requirements:
• all chillers must have PSIO software capable of performing the lead/lag function
• water pumps MUST be energized from the PIC controls
• water flows should be constant
• CCN Time Schedules for all chillers must be identical
34
If the address assignments placed into the LAG
ADDRESS and STANDBY ADDRESS values conflict, the lead/
lag will be disabled and an alert (!) message will
occur. For example, if the LAG ADDRESS matches the lead
chiller’s address, the lead/lag will be disabled and
an alert (!) message will occur. The lead/lag maintenance
screen (MAINT04) will display the message ‘INVALID
CONFIG’ in the LEAD/LAG CONFIGURATION and
CURRENT MODE fields.
The lead chiller responds to normal start/stop controls such
as occupancy schedule, forced start/stop, and remote start
contact inputs. After completing start up and ramp loading,
the PIC evaluates the need for additional capacity. If additional capacity is needed, the PIC initiates the start up of the
chiller configured at the LAG ADDRESS. If the lag chiller is
faulted (in alarm) or is in the OFF or LOCAL modes, then
the chiller at the STANDBY ADDRESS (if configured) is
requested to start. After the second chiller is started and is
running, the lead chiller shall monitor conditions and evaluate whether the capacity has reduced enough for the lead
chiller to sustain the system alone. If the capacity is reduced
enough for the lead chiller to sustain the CONTROL POINT
temperatures alone, then the operating lag chiller is stopped.
If the lead chiller is stopped in CCN mode for any reason
other than an alarm (*) condition, then the lag and standby
chillers are stopped. If the configured lead chiller stops for
and alarm condition, then the configured lag chiller takes the
lead chiller’s place as the lead chiller and the standby chiller
serves as the lag chiller.
If the configured lead chiller does not complete the startup before the PRESTART FAULT TIMER (user configured
value) elapses, then the lag chiller shall be started and the
lead chiller will shut down. The lead chiller then monitors
the start request from the acting lead chiller to start. The PRESTART FAULT TIMER is initiated at the time of a start
request. The PRESTART FAULT TIMER’s function is to
provide a timeout in the event that there is a prestart alert
condition preventing the chiller from starting in a timely manner. The timer is configured under Lead/Lag, found in the
Equipment Configuration table of the Service menu.
If the lag chiller does not achieve start-up before the
PRESTART FAULT TIMER elapses, then the lag chiller shall
be stopped and the standby chiller will be requested to start,
if configured and ready.
Operation Features:
• 2 chiller lead/lag
• addition of a third chiller for backup
• manual rotation of lead chiller
• load balancing if configured
• staggered restart of the chillers after a power failure
• chillers may be piped in parallel or in series chilled water
flow
COMMON POINT SENSOR INSTALLATION — Lead/
lag operation does not require a common chilled water point
sensor. Common point sensors can be added to the 8-input
option module, if desired. Refer to the certified drawings for
termination of sensor leads.
NOTE: If the common point sensor option is chosen on a
chilled water system, both chillers should have their own 8-input
option module and common point sensor installed. Each chiller
will use its own common point sensor for control, when that
chiller is designated as the lead chiller. The PIC cannot read
the value of common point sensors installed on other chillers in the chilled water system.
When installing chillers in series, a common point sensor
should be used. If a common point sensor is not used, the
leaving chilled water sensor of the upstream chiller must be
moved into the leaving chilled water pipe of the downstream
chiller.
If return chilled water control is required on chillers piped
in series, the common point return chilled water sensor should
be installed. If this sensor is not installed, the return chilled
water sensor of the downstream chiller must be relocated to
the return chilled water pipe of the upstream chiller.
To properly control the common supply point temperature
sensor when chillers are piped in parallel, the water flow through
the shutdown chillers must be isolated so that no water bypass around the operating chiller occurs. The common point
sensor option must not be used if water bypass around the
operating chiller is occurring.
CHILLER COMMUNICATION WIRING — Refer to the
chiller’s Installation Instructions or to the Carrier Comfort
Network Interface section on page 48 of this manual for
information on chiller communication wiring.
LEAD/LAG OPERATION — The PIC control provides the
ability to operate 2 chillers in the LEAD/LAG mode. It also
provides the additional ability to start a designated standby
chiller when either the lead or lag chiller is faulted and
capacity requirements are not met. The lead/lag option operates in CCN mode only. If any other chiller configured for
lead/lag is set to the LOCAL or OFF modes, it will be unavailable for lead/lag operation.
Standby Chiller Configuration and Operation — The configured standby chiller is identified as such by having the
LEAD/LAG SELECT configured to the value of ‘‘3.’’ The
standby chiller can only operate as a replacement for the
lag chiller if one of the other two chillers is in an alarm (*)
condition (as shown on the LID panel). If both lead and lag
chillers are in an alarm (*) condition, the standby chiller shall
default to operate in CCN mode based on its configured
Occupancy Schedule and remote contacts input.
NOTE: Lead/lag configuration is viewed and edited in Lead/
Lag, under the Equipment Configuration table of the Service
menu. Lead/lag status during chiller operation is viewed in
the MAINT04 table in the Control Algorithm Status
table.
Lead/Lag Chiller Configuration and Operation — The configured lead chiller is identified when the LEAD/LAG
SELECT value for that chiller is configured to the value of
‘‘1.’’ The configured lag chiller is identified when the LEAD/
LAG SELECT for that chiller is configured to the value of
‘‘2.’’ The standby chiller is configured to a value of ‘‘3.’’ A
value of ‘‘0’’ disables the lead/lag in that chiller.
To configure the LAG ADDRESS value on the LEAD/
LAG Configuration table, always use the address of the other
chiller on the system for this value. Using this address will
make it easier to rotate the lead and lag chillers.
Lag Chiller Start-Up Requirements — Before the lag chiller
can be started, the following conditions must be met:
1. Lead chiller ramp loading must be complete.
2. Lead chiller CHILLED WATER temperature must be greater
than the CONTROL POINT plus 1/2 the WATER/BRINE
DEADBAND.
NOTE: The chilled water temperature sensor may be the
leaving chilled water sensor, the return water sensor, the
common supply water sensor, or the common return
water sensor, depending on which options are configured
and enabled.
3. Lead chiller ACTIVE DEMAND LIMIT value must be greater
than 95% of full load amps.
35
is disabled, the ACTIVE DEMAND LIMIT and the CONTROL POINT are forced to the same value as the lead
chiller.
AUTO. RESTART AFTER POWER FAILURE — When
an auto. restart condition occurs, each chiller may have a
delay added to the start-up sequence, depending on its lead/
lag configuration. The lead chiller does not have a delay. The
lag chiller has a 45-second delay. The standby chiller has a
90-second delay. The delay time is added after the chiller
water flow verification. The PIC controls ensure that the guide
vanes are closed. After the guide vane position is confirmed,
the delay for lag and standby chiller occurs prior to energizing the oil pump. The normal start-up sequence then
continues. The auto. restart delay sequence occurs whether
the chiller is in CCN or LOCAL mode and is intended to
stagger the compressor motors from being energized simultaneously. This will help reduce the inrush demands on the
building power system.
4. Lead chiller temperature pulldown rate of the CHILLED
WATER temperature is less than 0.5° F (0.27° C) per
minute.
5. The lag chiller status indicates it is in CCN mode and is
not faulted. If the current lag chiller is in an alarm condition, then the standby chiller becomes the active lag chiller,
if it is configured and available.
6. The configured LAG START TIMER entry has elapsed.
The LAG START TIMER shall be started when the lead
chiller ramp loading is completed. The LAG START TIMER
entry is accessed by selecting Lead/Lag from the Equipment Configuration table of the Service menu.
When all of the above requirements have been met, the
lag chiller is forced to a START mode. The PIC control then
monitors the lag chiller for a successful start. If the lag chiller
fails to start, the standby chiller, if configured, is started.
Lag Chiller Shutdown Requirements — The following conditions must be met in order for the lag chiller to be stopped.
1. Lead chiller COMPRESSOR MOTOR LOAD value is less
than the lead chiller percent capacity plus 15%.
NOTE: Lead chiller percent capacity = 100 – LAG PERCENT CAPACITY
The LAG PERCENT CAPACITY value is configured on
the Lead/Lag Configuration screen.
2. The lead chiller chilled water temperature is less than
the CONTROL POINT plus 1⁄2 of the WATER/BRINE
DEADBAND.
3. The configured LAG STOP TIMER entry has elapsed.
The LAG STOP TIMER is started when the CHILLED
WATER TEMPERATURE is less than the CHILLED
WATER CONTROL POINT plus 1⁄2 of the WATER/
BRINE DEADBAND and the lead chiller COMPRESSOR
MOTOR LOAD is less than the lead chiller percent
capacity plus 15%. The timer is ignored if the chilled
water temperature reaches 3° F (1.67° C) below the CONTROL POINT and the lead chiller COMPRESSOR
MOTOR LOAD value is less than the lead chiller percent
capacity plus 15%.
FAULTED CHILLER OPERATION — If the lead chiller
shuts down on an alarm (*) condition, it stops communication to the lag and standby chillers. After 30 seconds, the lag
chiller will now become the acting lead chiller and will start
and stop the standby chiller, if necessary.
If the lag chiller faults when the lead chiller is also faulted,
the standby chiller reverts to a stand-alone CCN mode of
operation.
If the lead chiller is in an alarm (*) condition (as shown
on the LID panel), the RESET softkey is pressed to clear
the alarm, and the chiller is placed in the CCN mode, the
lead chiller will now communicate and monitor the RUN
STATUS of the lag and standby chillers. If both the lag and
standby chillers are running, the lead chiller will not attempt
to start and will not assume the role of lead chiller until
either the lag or standby chiller shuts down. If only one chiller
is running, the lead chiller will wait for a start request from
the operating chiller. When the configured lead chiller starts,
it assumes its role as lead chiller.
LOAD BALANCING — When the LOAD BALANCE
OPTION is enabled, the lead chiller will set the ACTIVE
DEMAND LIMIT in the lag chiller to the lead chiller’s COMPRESSOR MOTOR LOAD value. This value has limits of
40% to 100%. When setting the lag chiller ACTIVE
DEMAND LIMIT, the CONTROL POINT will be modified to a value of 3° F (1.67° C) less than the lead chiller’s
CONTROL POINT value. If the LOAD BALANCE OPTION
Ice Build Control
IMPORTANT: The Ice Build control option is only available on chillers with PSIO Software Version 09 and
higher.
Ice build control automatically sets the chilled WATER/
BRINE CONTROL POINT of the chiller to a temperature
where an ice building operation for thermal storage can be
accomplished.
The PIC can be configured for ice build operation. Configuration of ice build control is accomplished through
entries in the Config table, Ice Build Setpoint table, and the
Ice Build Time Schedule table. Figures 16 and 17 show how
to access each entry.
The Ice Build Time Schedule defines the period during
which ice build is active if the ice build option is
ENABLED. If the Ice Build Time Schedule overlaps other
schedules defining time, then the Ice Build Time Schedule
shall take priority. During the ice build period, the WATER/
BRINE CONTROL POINT is set to the ICE BUILD SET POINT
for temperature control. The ICE BUILD RECYCLE
OPTION and ICE BUILD TERMINATION entries from a
screen in the Config (configuration) table provide options
for chiller recycle and termination of ice build cycle, respectively. Termination of ice build can result from the ENTERING CHILLED WATER/BRINE temperature being less than
the ICE BUILD SET POINT, opening of the REMOTE CONTACT inputs from an ice level indicator, or reaching the end
of the Ice Build Time Schedule.
ICE BUILD INITIATION — The Ice Build Time Schedule
provides the means for activating ice build. The ice build
time table is named OCCPC02S.
If the Ice Build Time Schedule is OCCUPIED and the ICE
BUILD OPTION is ENABLED, then ice build is active and
the following events automatically take place (unless overridden by a higher authority CCN device):
1. Force CHILLER START/STOP to START.
2. Force WATER/BRINE CONTROL POINT to the ICE BUILD
SET POINT.
3. Remove any force (Auto) on the ACTIVE DEMAND LIMIT.
NOTE: Items 1-3 (shown above) shall not occur if the chiller
is configured and operating as a lag or standby chiller for
lead/lag and is actively controlled by a lead chiller. The lead
chiller communicates the ICE BUILD SET POINT, desired
CHILLER START/STOP state, and ACTIVE DEMAND LIMIT
to the lag or standby chiller as required for ice build, if configured to do so.
36
NOTE: Overriding the CHILLER START/STOP, WATER/
BRINE CONTROL POINT, and ACTIVE DEMAND LIMIT
variables by CCN devices (with a priority less than 4)
during the ice build period is not possible. However, overriding can be accomplished with CCN during two chiller lead/
lag.
RETURN TO NON-ICE BUILD OPERATIONS — Upon
termination of ice build, the chiller shall return to normal
temperature control and start/stop schedule operation. If
the CHILLER START/STOP or WATER/BRINE CONTROL
POINT has been forced (with a priority less than 4), prior to
entering ice build operation, then chiller START/STOP and
WATER/BRINE CONTROL POINT forces will be removed.
START-UP/RECYCLE OPERATION — If the chiller is not
running when ice build activates, then the PIC checks the
following parameters, based on the ICE BUILD TERMINATION value, to avoid starting the compressor unnecessarily:
• if ICE BUILD TERMINATION is set to the temperature
only option (zero) and the ENTERING CHILLED WATER
temperature is less than or equal to the ICE BUILD SET
POINT;
• if ICE BUILD TERMINATION is set to the contacts only
option (1) and the remote contacts are open;
• if the ICE BUILD TERMINATION is set to the both temperature and contacts option (2) and ENTERING CHILLED
WATER temperature is less than or equal to the ICE BUILD
SET POINT and remote contacts are open.
The ICE BUILD RECYCLE OPTION determines whether
or not the PIC will go into a RECYCLE mode. If the ICE
BUILD RECYCLE OPTION is set to DSABLE (disable) when
the ice build terminates, the PIC will revert back to normal
temperature control duty. If the ICE BUILD RECYCLE
OPTION is set to ENABLE, when ice build terminates, the
PIC will go into an ICE BUILD RECYCLE mode and the
chilled water pump relay will remain energized to keep the
chilled water flowing. If the entering CHILLED WATER/
BRINE TEMPERATURE increases above the ICE BUILD SET
POINT plus the RECYCLE RESTART DELTA T value, the
compressor will restart and control the CHILLED WATER/
BRINE TEMPERATURE to the ICE BUILD SET POINT.
TEMPERATURE CONTROL DURING ICE BUILD
—During ice build, the capacity control algorithm uses the
WATER/BRINE CONTROL POINT minus 5 F (2.7 C) to control the LEAVING CHILLED WATER temperature. The ECW
OPTION and any temperature reset option are ignored during ice build. The 20 mA DEMAND LIMIT OPTION is also
ignored during ice build.
TERMINATION OF ICE BUILD — Ice build termination
occurs under the following conditions:
1. Ice Build Time Schedule — When the Ice Build Time
Schedule transitions to UNOCCUPIED, ice build operation shall terminate.
2. ECW TEMPERATURE — Termination of compressor
operation, based on temperature, shall occur if the
ICE BUILD TERMINATION is set to the ice build
termination temperature option (0) and the ENTERING
CHILLED WATER TEMPERATURE is less than the
ICE BUILD SET POINT. If the ICE BUILD RECYCLE
OPTION is set to ENABLE , a recycle shutdown occurs
and recycle start-up shall be based on LEAVING CHILLED
WATER temperature being greater than the WATER/
BRINE CONTROL POINT plus RECYCLE RESTART
DELTA T.
3. Remote Contacts/Ice Level Input — Termination of
compressor operation occurs when ICE BUILD TERMINATION is set to the contacts only option (1) and the
remote contacts are open. In this case, the contacts are
provided for ice level termination control. The remote contacts can still be opened and closed to start and stop the
chiller when the Ice Build Time Schedule is UNOCCUPIED. The contacts are used to stop the ICE BUILD mode
when the Ice Build Time Schedule is OCCUPIED.
4. ECW TEMPERATURE and Remote Contacts — Termination of compressor operation shall occur when ICE
BUILD TERMINATION is set to both the temperature and
contacts (2) option and the previously described conditions for ENTERING CHILLED WATER temperature and
remote contacts have occurred.
Attach to Network Device Control — On the Service menu, one of the selections is ATTACH TO NETWORK
DEVICE. This table serves the following purposes:
• to upload new parameters when switching the controller
to HFC-134a refrigerant.
• to upload the Occupancy Schedule Number (if changed)
for OCCPC03S software (version 09 and later), as defined
in the Service01 table
• to attach the LID to any CCN device, if the chiller has
been connected to a CCN Network. This may include other
PIC controlled chillers.
• to change to a new PSIO or LID module or upgrade
software.
Figure 22 illustrates the ATTACH TO NETWORK
DEVICE table. The Local description is always the PSIO
module address of the chiller the LID is mounted on. Whenever the controller identification of the PSIO is changed, this
change is reflected on the bus and address for the LOCAL
DEVICE of the ATTACH TO DEVICE screen automatically. See Fig. 17.
Whenever the ATTACH TO NETWORK DEVICE table
is entered, no information can be read from the LID on any
device until you attach one of the devices listed on the
display. The LID erases information about the module to which
it was attached to make room for information on another device. Therefore, a CCN module must be attached when this
screen is entered. To attach a device, highlight it using the
SELECT softkey and then press the ATTACH softkey. The
message, ‘‘UPLOADING TABLES, PLEASE WAIT’’ displays. The LID then uploads the highlighted device or
module. If the module address cannot be found, the message, ‘‘COMMUNICATION FAILURE’’ appears. The LID
then reverts to the ATTACH TO DEVICE screen. Try
another device or check the address of the device that
would not attach. The upload process time for each CCN
module is different. In general, the uploading process takes
3 to 5 minutes. Before leaving the ATTACH TO NETWORK DEVICE screen, select the LOCAL device. Otherwise, the LID will be unable to display information on the
local chiller.
CHANGING REFRIGERANT TYPES — To select refrigerant type, go to the Control Test table. Whenever the
refrigerant type is changed, the ATTACH TO NETWORK
DEVICE table must be used. After changing the refrigerant
type in the Control Test table, move to the ATTACH TO NETWORK DEVICE table. Make sure the highlight bar is
located on the LOCAL selection. Press the ATTACH softkey. The information in the PSIO module will now be uploaded. The default screen will appear. The new refrigerant
type change for the controller is complete.
37
ATTACHING TO OTHER CCN MODULES — If the chiller
PSIO has been connected to a CCN Network or other PIC
controlled chillers through CCN wiring, the LID can be used
to view or change parameters on the other controllers. Other
PIC chillers can be viewed and set points changed (if the
other unit is in CCN control), if desired from this particular
LID module.
To view the other devices, move to the ATTACH TO
NETWORK DEVICE table. Move the highlight bar to any
device number. Press the SELECT softkey to change the
bus number and address of the module to be viewed. Press
EXIT softkey to move back to the ATTACH TO NETWORK DEVICE table. If the module number is not valid,
the ‘‘COMMUNICATION FAILURE’’ message will show
and a new address number should be entered or the wiring
checked. If the model is communicating properly, the ‘‘UPLOAD IN PROGRESS’’ message will flash and the new module can now be viewed.
Whenever there is a question regarding which module on
the LID is currently being shown, check the device name
descriptor on the upper left hand corner of the LID screen.
See Fig. 22.
When the CCN device has been viewed, the ATTACH TO
NETWORK DEVICE table should now be used to
attach to the PIC that is on the chiller. Move to the
ATTACH TO NETWORK DEVICE table and press the
ATTACH softkey to upload the LOCAL device. The PSIO
for the 19XL will now be uploaded.
If the password is entered incorrectly, an error message is
displayed. If this occurs, return to Step 1 and try logging
on again.
NOTE: The initial factory set password is 1-1-1-1.
TO LOG OFF — Access the Log Out of Device table of the
Service menu in order to password-protect the Service menu.
The LID will automatically sign off and password-protect
itself if a key is not pressed for 15 minutes. The LID default
screen is then displayed.
HOLIDAY SCHEDULING (Fig. 23) — The time schedules
may be configured for special operation during a holiday
period. When modifying a time period, the ‘‘H’’ at the end
of the days of the week field signifies that the period is applicable to a holiday. (See Fig. 18.)
The Broadcast function must be activated for the holidays
configured in the Holidef tables to work properly. Access
the Brodefs table in the Equipment Configuration table and
answer ‘‘Yes’’ to the activated function. However, when the
chiller is connected to a CCN Network, only one chiller or
CCN device can be configured to be the broadcast device.
The controller that is configured to be the broadcaster is the
device responsible for transmitting holiday, time, and daylightsavings dates throughout the network.
To view or change the holiday periods for up to 18 different holidays, perform the following operation:
NOTE: The LID will not automatically reattach to the PSIO
module on the chiller. Press the ATTACH softkey to attach
to LOCAL DEVICE and view the chiller PSIO.
1. At the Menu screen, press SERVICE to access the Service menu.
2. If not logged on, follow the instructions for To Log On
or To Log Off. Once logged on, press NEXT until Equipment Configuration is highlighted.
Fig. 22 — Example of Attach to Network
Device Screen
3. Once Equipment Configuration is highlighted, press
SELECT to access.
Service Operation — An overview of the menudriven programs available for Service Operation is shown in
Fig. 17.
TO LOG ON
1. On the Menu screen, press SERVICE . The keys now
correspond to the numerals 1, 2, 3, 4.
2. Press the four digits of your password, one at a time. An
asterisk (*) appears as you enter each digit.
4. Press NEXT until Holidef is highlighted. This is
the Holiday Definition table.
5. Press SELECT to enter the Data Table Select screen.
This screen lists 18 holiday tables.
The menu bar (Next-Previous-Select-Exit) is displayed
to indicate that you have successfully logged on.
38
START-UP/SHUTDOWN/RECYCLE
SEQUENCE (Fig. 24)
6. Press NEXT to highlight the holiday table that you
wish to view or change. Each table is one holiday period, starting on a specific date, and lasting up to 99 days.
Local Start-Up — Local start-up (or a manual start-up)
is initiated by pressing the LOCAL menu softkey which is
on the default LID screen. Local start-up can proceed when
Time Schedule 01 is in OCCUPIED mode, and after the internal 15-minute start-to-start and the 3-minute stop-to-start
inhibit timers have expired (on PSIO software Version 08
and lower or a 1-minute stop-to-start timer on PSIO Software Version 09 and higher).
The chiller start/stop status point on the Status01 table may
be overridden to start, regardless of the time schedule, in
order to locally start the unit. Also, the remote contacts may
be enabled through the LID and closed to initiate a start-up.
Whenever the chiller is in LOCAL control mode, the PIC
will wait for Time Schedule 01 to become occupied and the
remote contacts to close, if enabled. The PIC will then perform a series of pre-start checks to verify that all pre-start
alerts and safeties are within the limits shown in Table 3.
The run status line on the LID now reads ‘‘Starting.’’ If the
checks are successful, the chilled water/brine pump relay will
be energized. Five seconds later, the condenser pump relay
is energized. Thirty seconds later the PIC monitors the chilled
water and condenser water flow switches, and waits until the
WATER FLOW VERIFY TIME (operator configured, default
5 minutes) to confirm flow. After flow is verified, the chilled
water/brine temperature is compared to CONTROL POINT
plus DEADBAND. If the temperature is less than or equal to
this value, the PIC will turn off the condenser pump relay
7. Press SELECT to access the holiday table. The Configuration Select table now shows the holiday start month
and day, and how many days the holiday period will last.
8. Press NEXT or PREVIOUS
month, day, or duration.
9. Press SELECT
duration.
to highlight the
to modify the month, day, or
10. Press INCREASE or DECREASE to change the selected value.
11. Press ENTER to save the changes.
12. Press EXIT to return to the previous menu.
A
— START INITIATED — Prestart checks made; evaporator
pump started
B
— Condenser water pump started (5 seconds after A)
C
— Water flows verified (30 seconds to 5 minutes maximum
after B). Chilled water temperatures checked against control point. Guide vanes checked for closure. Oil pump started;
tower fan control enabled.
D
— Oil pressure verified (30 seconds minimum, 300 seconds
maximum after C)
E
— Compressor motor starts, compressor ontime and service ontime start, 15-minute inhibit timer starts (10 seconds
after D), total compressor starts advances by one, number
of starts over a 12-hour period advances by one
F
— SHUTDOWN INITIATED — Compressor motor stops, compressor ontime and service ontime stops, 3-minute inhibit
timer starts on PSIO Software Version 08 and lower and
1-minute inhibit timer starts for PSIO Software Version 09
and higher.
G
— Oil pump and evaporator pumps deenergized (60 seconds
after F). Condenser pump and tower fan control may continue to operate if condenser pressure is high. Evaporator
pump may continue if in RECYCLE mode.
O/A — Restart permitted (both inhibit timers expired) (minimum of
15 minutes after E; [minimum of 3 minutes after F on PSIO
Software Version 08 and lower] [minimum of 1 minute after
F on PSIO Software Version 09 and higher]
Fig. 24 — Control Sequence
Fig. 23 — Example of Holiday Period Screen
39
If the STOP button is pressed, the guide vanes close to a
preset amperage percent or until the guide vane is less than
2% open. The compressor will then shut off.
If the chiller enters an alarm state or if the compressor
enters a RECYCLE mode, the compressor will be deenergized immediately.
To activate SOFT STOP AMPS THRESHOLD, view
the bottom of Service1 table. Set the SOFT STOP AMPS
THRESHOLD value to the percentage amps at which the
motor will shut down. The default setting is 100% amps (no
Soft Stop).
When the SOFT STOP AMPS THRESHOLD is being
applied, a status message ‘‘SHUTDOWN IN PROGRESS,
COMPRESSOR UNLOADING’’ is shown.
and go into a RECYCLE mode. If the water/brine temperature is high enough, the start-up sequence continues on to
check the guide vane position. If the guide vanes are more
than 6% open, the start-up waits until the PIC closes the vanes.
If the vanes are closed, and the oil pump pressure is less
than 3 psid (21 kPad), the oil pump relay will then be energized. The PIC then waits until the OIL PRESS (Pressure)
VERIFY TIME (operator configured, default 15 seconds) for
oil pressure to reach 18 psid (124 kPad). After oil pressure
is verified, the PIC waits 15 seconds, and then the compressor start relay (1CR) is energized to start the compressor.
Compressor ontime and service ontime timers start and the
compressor starts counter and the number of starts over a
12-hour period counter are advanced by one.
Failure to verify any of the requirements up to this point
will result in the PIC aborting the start and displaying the
applicable pre-start mode of failure on the LID default screen.
A pre-start failure does not advance the starts in 12 hours
counter. Any failure, after the 1CR relay has energized, results in a safety shutdown, energizes the alarm light, and displays the applicable shutdown status on the LID display.
Chilled Water Recycle Mode — The chiller may cycle
off and wait until the load increases to restart again when
the compressor is running in a lightly loaded condition. This
cycling of the chiller is normal and is known as recycle. A
recycle shutdown is initiated when any of the following conditions are true:
• when in LCW control, the difference between the LEAVING CHILLED WATER temperature and ENTERING
CHILLED WATER temperature is less than the RECYCLE
SHUTDOWN DELTA T (found in the Service1 table) and
the LEAVING CHILLED WATER TEMP is below the
CONTROL POINT, and the CONTROL POINT has not
increased in the last 5 minutes.
• when ECW CONTROL OPTION is enabled, the difference
between the ENTERING CHILLED WATER temperature
and the LEAVING CHILLED WATER temperature is less
than the RECYCLE SHUTDOWN DELTA T (found in the
Service1 table) and the ENTERING CHILLED WATER
TEMPERATURE is below the CONTROL POINT, and the
CONTROL POINT has not increased in the last 5 minutes.
• when the LEAVING CHILLED WATER temperature is within
3° F (2° C) of the BRINE REFRIG TRIPPOINT
Shutdown Sequence — Shutdown of the chiller can
occur if any of the following events happen:
• the STOP button is pressed for at least one second (the
alarm light will blink once to confirm stop command)
• recycle condition is present (see Chilled Water Recycle Mode
section)
• time schedule has gone into UNOCCUPIED mode (chiller
protective limit has been reached and chiller is in alarm)
• the start/stop status is overridden to stop from the CCN
network or the LID
When a stop signal occurs, the shutdown sequence first
stops the compressor by deactivating the start relay. A status
message of ‘‘SHUTDOWN IN PROGRESS, COMPRESSOR DEENERGIZED’’ is displayed. Compressor ontime and
service ontime stop. The guide vanes are then brought to the
closed position. The oil pump relay and the chilled water/
brine pump relay are shut down 60 seconds after the compressor stops. The condenser water pump will be shut down
when the CONDENSER REFRIGERANT TEMP is less than
the CONDENSER PRESSURE OVERRIDE minus 5 psi
(34 kPa) or is less than or equal to the ENTERING
CONDENSER WATER TEMP plus 3° F (2° C). The stopto-start timer will now begin to count down. If the start-tostart timer is still greater than the value of the start-to-stop
timer, then this time is now displayed on the LID.
Certain conditions during shutdown will change this
sequence:
• if the COMPRESSOR MOTOR LOAD is greater than 10%
after shutdown, or the starter contacts remain energized,
the oil pump and chilled water pump remain energized and
the alarm is displayed
• if the ENTERING CONDENSER WATER temperature is
greater than 115 F (46 C) at shutdown, the condenser pump
will be deenergized after the 1CR compressor start relay
• if the chiller shuts down due to low refrigerant temperature, the chilled water pump will stay running until the
LEAVING CHILLED WATER is greater than CONTROL
POINT, plus 5° F (3° C)
When the chiller is in RECYCLE mode, the chilled water
pump relay remains energized so that the chilled water temperature can be monitored for increasing load. The recycle
control uses RECYCLE RESTART DELTA T to check when
the compressor should be restarted. This is an operatorconfigured function which defaults to 5° F (3° C). This value
is viewed/modified on the Service1 table. The compressor
will restart when:
• in LCW CONTROL the LEAVING CHILLED WATER temperature is greater than the CONTROL POINT plus the
RECYCLE RESTART DELTA T; or
• in ECW CONTROL, the ENTERING CHILLED WATER
temperature is greater than the CONTROL POINT plus the
RECYCLE RESTART DELTA T
Once these conditions are met, the compressor will initiate a start-up, with a normal start-up sequence.
An alert condition may be generated if 5 or more
RECYCLE STARTUPs occur in less than 4 hours. This
excessive recycling can reduce chiller life. Compressor recycling due to extremely low loads should be reduced. To
reduce compressor recycling, use the time schedule to shut
the chiller down during low load operation or increase the
chiller load by running the fan systems. If the hot gas bypass
is installed, adjust the values to ensure that hot gas is energized during light load conditions. Increase the RECYCLE
RESTART DELTA T on the Service1 table to lengthen the
time between restarts.
The chiller should not be operated below design minimum load without a hot gas bypass installed on the
chiller.
Automatic Soft Stop Amps Threshold (PSIO Software Version 09 and Higher) — The SOFT STOP
AMPS THRESHOLD closes the guide vanes of the compressor automatically when a non-recycle, non-alarm stop
signal occurs before the compressor motor is deenergized.
40
Safety Shutdown — A safety shutdown is identical to
Using the Optional Storage Tank and Pumpout
System — Refer to Pumpout and Refrigerant Transfer
a manual shutdown with the exception that the LID will display the reason for the shutdown, the alarm light will blink
continuously, and the spare alarm contacts will be energized. A safety shutdown requires that the RESET softkey
be pressed in order to clear the alarm. If the alarm is still
present, the alarm light will continue to blink. Once the alarm
is cleared, the operator must press the CCN or
LOCAL softkeys to restart the chiller.
Procedures section, page 59 for: pumpout system preparation, refrigerant transfer, and chiller evacuation.
Remove Shipping Packaging — Remove any
packaging material from the control center, power panel, guide
vane actuator, motor cooling and oil reclaim solenoids,
motor and bearing temperature sensor covers, and the factorymounted starter.
Open Oil Circuit Valves — Check that the oil filter
isolation valves (Fig. 4) are open by removing the valve cap
and checking the valve stem.
Do not reset starter loads or any other starter safety for
30 seconds after the compressor has stopped. Voltage
output to the compressor start signal is maintained for
10 seconds to determine starter fault.
Tighten All Gasketed Joints and Guide Vane
Shaft Packing — Gaskets and packing normally relax
by the time the chiller arrives at the jobsite. Tighten all
gasketed joints and guide vane shaft packing to ensure a leaktight chiller.
BEFORE INITIAL START-UP
Job Data Required
Check Chiller Tightness — Figure 26 outlines the
proper sequence and procedures for leak testing.
19XL chillers are shipped with the refrigerant contained
in the condenser shell and the oil charge shipped in the
compressor. The cooler will have a 15 psig (103 kPa)
refrigerant charge. Units may be ordered with the refrigerant
shipped separately, along with a 15 psig (103 kPa) nitrogenholding charge in each vessel. To determine if there are any
leaks, the chiller should be charged with refrigerant. Use an
electronic leak detector to check all flanges and solder joints
after the chiller is pressurized. If any leaks are detected, follow the leak test procedure.
If the chiller is spring isolated, keep all springs blocked in
both directions in order to prevent possible piping stress and
damage during the transfer of refrigerant from vessel to
vessel during the leak test process, or any time refrigerant is
transferred. Adjust the springs when the refrigerant is in
operating condition, and when the water circuits are full.
• list of applicable design temperatures and pressures (product data submittal)
• chiller certified prints
• starting equipment details and wiring diagrams
• diagrams and instructions for special controls or options
• 19XL Installation Instructions
• pumpout unit instructions
Equipment Required
•
•
•
•
•
mechanic’s tools (refrigeration)
digital volt-ohmmeter (DVM)
clamp-on ammeter
electronic leak detector
absolute pressure manometer or wet-bulb vacuum indicator (Fig. 25)
• 500 v insulation tester (megohmmeter) for compressor
motors with nameplate voltage of 600 v or less, or a
5000-v insulation tester for compressor motor rated above
600 v
Refrigerant Tracer — Carrier recommends the use of
an environmentally acceptable refrigerant tracer for leak testing with an electronic detector or halide torch.
Ultrasonic leak detectors also can be used if the chiller is
under pressure.
Do not use air or oxygen as a means of pressurizing the
chiller. Some mixtures of HCFC-22 or HFC-134a and
air can undergo combustion.
Leak Test Chiller — Due to regulations regarding
refrigerant emissions and the difficulties associated with separating contaminants from refrigerant, Carrier recommends
the following leak test procedures. See Fig. 26 for an outline
of the leak test procedures. Refer to Fig. 27 and 28 during
pumpout procedures and Tables 5A, B, C, and D for refrigerant pressure/temperature values.
1. If the pressure readings are normal for chiller
condition:
a. Evacuate the holding charge from the vessels, if present.
b. Raise the chiller pressure, if necessary, by adding refrigerant until pressure is at equivalent saturated pressure for the surrounding temperature. Follow the pumpout
Fig. 25 — Typical Wet-Bulb Type
Vacuum Indicator
41
42
Fig. 26 — 19XL Leak Test Procedures
6. If no leak is found after a retest:
a. Transfer the refrigerant to the storage tank and
perform a standing vacuum test as outlined in the
Standing Vacuum Test section, this page.
b. If the chiller fails this test, check for large leaks
(Step 2b).
c. Dehydrate the chiller if it passes the standing vacuum
test. Follow the procedure in the Chiller Dehydration
section. Charge chiller with refrigerant (see Pumpout
and Refrigerant Transfer Procedures, Transfer Refrigerant from Storage Tank to Chiller section, Steps 1a-e
or page 59).
7. If a leak is found, pump the refrigerant back into the storage tank, or if isolation valves are present, pump into the
non-leaking vessel (see Pumpout and Refrigerant Transfer procedures section).
8. Transfer the refrigerant until chiller pressure is at
18 in. Hg (40 kPa absolute).
9. Repair the leak and repeat the procedure, beginning from
Step 2h to ensure a leaktight repair. (If chiller is opened
to the atmosphere for an extended period, evacuate it before repeating leak test.)
procedures in the Transfer Refrigerant from Storage
Tank to Chiller section, Steps 1a-e, page 59.
Never charge liquid refrigerant into the chiller if
the pressure in the chiller is less than 68 psig
(469 kPa) for HCFC-22 and 35 psig (241 kPa) for
HFC-134a. Charge as a gas only, with the cooler
and condenser pumps running, until this pressure
is reached, using PUMPDOWN LOCKOUT and
TERMINATE LOCKOUT mode on the PIC. Flashing of liquid refrigerant at low pressures can cause
tube freezeup and considerable damage.
2.
3.
4.
5.
c. Leak test chiller as outlined in Steps 3-9.
If the pressure readings are abnormal for chiller
condition:
a. Prepare to leak test chillers shipped with refrigerant
(Step 2h).
b. Check for large leaks by connecting a nitrogen bottle
and raising the pressure to 30 psig (207 kPa). Soap
test all joints. If the test pressure holds for 30 minutes,
prepare the test for small leaks (Steps 2g-h).
c. Plainly mark any leaks which are found.
d. Release the pressure in the system.
e. Repair all leaks.
f. Retest the joints that were repaired.
g. After successfully completing the test for large leaks,
remove as much nitrogen, air, and moisture as possible, given the fact that small leaks may be present in
the system. This can be accomplished by following
the dehydration procedure, outlined in the Chiller
Dehydration section, page 47.
h. Slowly raise the system pressure to a maximum of
210 psig (1448 kPa) but no less than 68 psig (469 kPa)
for HCFC-22, 35 psig (241 kPa) for HFC-134a by adding refrigerant. Proceed with the test for small leaks
(Steps 3-9).
Check the chiller carefully with an electronic leak detector, halide torch, or soap bubble solution.
Leak Determination — If an electronic leak detector
indicates a leak, use a soap bubble solution, if possible,
to confirm. Total all leak rates for the entire chiller. Leakage at rates greater than 1 lb/year (0.45 kg/year) for the
entire chiller must be repaired. Note total chiller leak rate
on the start-up report.
If no leak is found during initial start-up procedures, complete the transfer of refrigerant gas from the storage tank
to the chiller (see Pumpout and Refrigerant Transfer Procedures, Transfer Refrigerant from Storage Tank to Chiller
section, Step 1e, page 59). Retest.
Standing Vacuum Test — When performing the standing vacuum test, or chiller dehydration, use a manometer or
a wet bulb indicator. Dial gages cannot indicate the small
amount of acceptable leakage during a short period of time.
1. Attach an absolute pressure manometer or wet bulb indicator to the chiller.
2. Evacuate the vessel (see Pumpout and Refrigerant Transfer Procedures section, page 59) to at least 18 in. Hg vac,
ref 30-in. bar (41 kPa), using a vacuum pump or the
pumpout unit.
3. Valve off the pump to hold the vacuum and record the
manometer or indicator reading.
4. a. If the leakage rate is less than 0.05 in. Hg (.17 kPa) in
24 hours, the chiller is sufficiently tight.
b. If the leakage rate exceeds 0.05 in. Hg (.17 kPa) in
24 hours, repressurize the vessel and test for leaks. If
refrigerant is available in the other vessel, pressurize
by following Steps 2-10 of Return Refrigerant To
Normal Operating Conditions section, page 61. If not,
use nitrogen and a refrigerant tracer. Raise the vessel
pressure in increments until the leak is detected. If
refrigerant is used, the maximum gas pressure is
approximately 120 psig (827 kPa) for HCFC-22,
70 psig (483 kPa) for HFC-134a at normal ambient
temperature. If nitrogen is used, limit the leak test pressure to 230 psig (1585 kPa) maximum.
5. Repair leak, retest, and proceed with dehydration.
43
Table 5A — HCFC-22 Pressure — Temperature (F)
TEMPERATURE
(F)
−50
−48
−46
−44
−42
−40
−38
−36
−34
−32
−30
−28
−26
−24
−22
−20
−18
−16
−14
−12
−10
−8
−6
−4
−2
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
PRESSURE (psi)
Absolute
Gage
11.67
6.154*
12.34
4.829*
13.00
3.445*
13.71
2.002*
14.45
0.498*
15.22
0.526
16.02
1.328
16.86
2.163
17.73
3.032
18.63
3.937
19.57
4.877
20.55
5.853
21.56
6.868
22.62
7.921
23.71
9.015
24.85
10.15
26.02
11.32
27.24
12.54
28.50
13.81
29.81
15.11
31.16
16.47
32.56
17.87
34.01
19.32
35.51
20.81
37.06
22.36
38.66
23.96
40.31
25.61
42.01
27.32
43.78
29.08
45.59
30.90
47.46
32.77
49.40
34.70
51.39
36.69
53.44
38.74
55.55
40.86
57.73
43.03
59.97
45.27
62.27
47.58
64.64
49.95
67.08
52.39
TEMPERATURE
(F)
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
56
58
60
62
64
66
68
70
72
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
88
90
92
94
96
98
100
102
104
106
108
PRESSURE (psi)
Absolute
Gage
69.59
54.90
72.17
57.47
74.82
60.12
77.54
62.84
80.34
65.64
83.21
68.51
86.15
71.46
89.18
74.48
92.28
77.58
95.46
80.77
98.73
84.03
102.07
87.38
105.50
90.81
109.02
94.32
112.62
97.93
116.31
101.62
120.09
105.39
123.96
109.26
127.92
113.22
131.97
117.28
136.12
121.43
140.37
125.67
144.71
130.01
149.15
134.45
153.69
138.99
158.33
143.63
163.07
148.37
167.92
153.22
172.87
158.17
177.93
163.23
183.09
168.40
188.37
173.67
193.76
179.06
199.26
184.56
204.87
190.18
210.60
195.91
216.45
201.76
222.42
207.72
228.50
213.81
234.71
220.02
TEMPERATURE
(F)
110
112
114
116
118
120
122
124
126
128
130
132
134
136
138
140
142
144
146
148
150
152
154
156
158
160
PRESSURE (psi)
Absolute
Gage
241.04
226.35
247.50
232.80
254.08
239.38
260.79
246.10
267.63
252.94
274.60
259.91
281.71
267.01
288.95
274.25
296.33
281.63
303.84
289.14
311.50
296.80
319.29
304.60
327.23
312.54
335.32
320.63
343.56
328.86
351.94
337.25
360.48
345.79
369.17
354.48
378.02
363.32
387.03
372.33
396.19
381.50
405.52
390.83
415.02
400.32
424.68
409.99
434.52
419.82
444.53
420.83
*Inches of mercury below one atmosphere.
Table 5B — HCFC-22 Pressure — Temperature (C)
TEMPERATURE
(C)
−18
−17
−16
−15
−14
−13
−12
−11
−10
−9
−8
−7
−6
−5
−4
−3
−2
−1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
PRESSURE (kPa)
Absolute
Gage
264
163
274
173
284
183
296
195
307
206
318
217
330
229
342
241
354
253
367
266
380
279
393
292
407
306
421
320
436
335
451
350
466
365
482
381
498
397
514
413
531
430
548
447
566
465
584
483
602
501
621
520
641
540
660
559
681
580
701
600
TEMPERATURE
(C)
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
PRESSURE
Absolute
723
744
766
789
812
836
860
885
910
936
962
989
1020
1040
1070
1100
1130
1160
1190
1220
1260
1290
1320
1360
1390
1420
1460
1500
1530
1570
44
(kPa)
Gage
622
643
665
688
711
735
759
784
809
835
861
888
919
939
969
1000
1030
1060
1090
1120
1160
1190
1220
1260
1290
1320
1360
1400
1430
1470
TEMPERATURE
(C)
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
PRESSURE
Absolute
1610
1650
1690
1730
1770
1810
1850
1900
1940
1980
2030
2080
2130
2170
2220
2270
2320
2370
2430
2480
2530
2590
2640
2700
2760
2820
2870
2930
3000
(kPa)
Gage
1510
1550
1590
1630
1670
1710
1750
1800
1840
1890
1930
1980
2030
2070
2120
2170
2220
2270
2330
2380
2430
2490
2540
2600
2660
2720
2770
2830
2900
Table 5C — HFC-134a Pressure — Temperature (F)
TEMPERATURE
(F)
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
56
58
PRESSURE
(psig)
6.50
7.52
8.60
9.66
10.79
11.96
13.17
14.42
15.72
17.06
18.45
19.88
21.37
22.90
24.48
26.11
27.80
29.53
31.32
33.17
35.08
37.04
39.06
41.14
43.28
45.48
47.74
50.07
52.47
54.93
TEMPERATURE
(F)
60
62
64
66
68
70
72
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
88
90
92
94
96
98
100
102
104
106
108
110
112
114
116
118
PRESSURE
(psig)
57.46
60.06
62.73
65.47
68.29
71.18
74.14
77.18
80.30
83.49
86.17
90.13
93.57
97.09
100.70
104.40
108.18
112.06
116.02
120.08
124.23
128.47
132.81
137.25
141.79
146.43
151.17
156.01
160.96
166.01
TEMPERATURE
(F)
120
122
124
126
128
130
132
134
136
138
140
PRESSURE
(psig)
171.17
176.45
181.83
187.32
192.93
198.66
204.50
210.47
216.55
222.76
229.09
Table 5D — HFC-134a Pressure — Temperature (C)
TEMPERATURE
(C)
−18.0
−16.7
−15.6
−14.4
−13.3
−12.2
−11.1
−10.0
−8.9
−7.8
−6.7
−5.6
−4.4
−3.3
−2.2
−1.1
0.0
1.1
2.2
3.3
4.4
5.0
5.6
6.1
6.7
7.2
7.8
8.3
8.9
9.4
PRESSURE
GAGE (kPa)
44.8
51.9
59.3
66.6
74.4
82.5
90.8
99.4
108.0
118.0
127.0
137.0
147.0
158.0
169.0
180.0
192.0
204.0
216.0
229.0
242.0
248.0
255.0
261.0
269.0
276.0
284.0
290.0
298.0
305.0
TEMPERATURE
(C)
10.0
11.1
12.2
13.3
14.4
15.6
16.7
17.8
18.9
20.0
21.1
22.2
23.3
24.4
25.6
26.7
27.8
28.9
30.0
31.1
32.2
33.3
34.4
35.6
36.7
37.8
38.9
40.0
41.1
42.2
PRESSURE
GAGE (kPa)
314.0
329.0
345.0
362.0
379.0
396.0
414.0
433.0
451.0
471.0
491.0
511.0
532.0
554.0
576.0
598.0
621.0
645.0
669.0
694.0
720.0
746.0
773.0
800.0
828.0
857.0
886.0
916.0
946.0
978.0
45
TEMPERATURE
(C)
43.3
44.4
45.6
46.7
47.8
48.9
50.0
51.1
52.2
53.3
54.4
55.6
56.7
57.8
58.9
60.0
PRESSURE
GAGE (kPa)
1010.0
1042.0
1076.0
1110.0
1145.0
1180.0
1217.0
1254.0
1292.0
1330.0
1370.0
1410.0
1451.0
1493.0
1536.0
1580.0
Fig. 27 — Typical Optional Pumpout System Piping Schematic
with Storage Tank
Fig. 28 — Typical Optional Pumpout System Piping Schematic
without Storage Tank
46
Chiller Dehydration — Dehydration is recommended
if the chiller has been open for a considerable period of time,
if the chiller is known to contain moisture, or if there has
been a complete loss of chiller holding charge or refrigerant
pressure.
Inspect Water Piping — Refer to piping diagrams provided in the certified drawings, and the piping instructions
in the 19XL Installation Instructions manual. Inspect the
piping to the cooler and condenser. Be sure that flow directions are correct and that all piping specifications have been
met.
Piping systems must be properly vented, with no stress on
waterbox nozzles and covers. Water flows through the cooler
and condenser must meet job requirements. Measure the pressure drop across cooler and across condenser.
Do not start or megohm test the compressor motor or
oil pump motor, even for a rotation check, if the chiller
is under dehydration vacuum. Insulation breakdown and
severe damage may result.
Water must be within design limits, clean, and treated
to ensure proper chiller performance and reduce the
potential of tubing damage due to corrosion, scaling, or
erosion. Carrier assumes no responsibility for chiller damage resulting from untreated or improperly treated
water.
Dehydration is readily accomplished at room temperatures. Use of a cold trap (Fig. 29) may substantially reduce
the time required to complete the dehydration. The higher
the room temperature, the faster dehydration takes place. At
low room temperatures, a very deep vacuum is required for
boiling off any moisture. If low ambient temperatures are
involved, contact a qualified service representative for the
dehydration techniques required.
Perform dehydration as follows:
1. Connect a high capacity vacuum pump (5 cfm
[.002 m 3/s] or larger is recommended) to the refrigerant
charging valve (Fig. 2A or 2B). Tubing from the pump to
the chiller should be as short and as large a diameter as
possible to provide least resistance to gas flow.
2. Use an absolute pressure manometer or a wet bulb vacuum
indicator to measure the vacuum. Open the shutoff valve
to the vacuum indicator only when taking a reading. Leave
the valve open for 3 minutes to allow the indicator vacuum
to equalize with the chiller vacuum.
3. Open all isolation valves (if present), if the entire chiller
is to be dehydrated.
4. With the chiller ambient temperature at 60 F (15.6 C) or
higher, operate the vacuum pump until the manometer reads
29.8 in. Hg vac, ref 30 in. bar. (0.1 psia) (–100.61 kPa)
or a vacuum indicator reads 35 F (1.7 C). Operate the
pump an additional 2 hours.
Do not apply greater vacuum than 29.82 in. Hg vac
(757.4 mm Hg) or go below 33 F (.56 C) on the wet bulb
vacuum indicator. At this temperature/pressure, isolated
pockets of moisture can turn into ice. The slow rate of
evaporation (sublimination) of ice at these low temperatures/
pressures greatly increases dehydration time.
5. Valve off the vacuum pump, stop the pump, and record
the instrument reading.
6. After a 2-hour wait, take another instrument reading. If
the reading has not changed, dehydration is complete. If
the reading indicates vacuum loss, repeat Steps 4 and 5.
7. If the reading continues to change after several attempts,
perform a leak test up to the maximum 230 psig
(1585 kPa) pressure. Locate and repair the leak, and repeat dehydration.
Check Optional Pumpout Compressor Water Piping — If the optional storage tank and/or pumpout system
are installed, check to ensure the pumpout condenser water
has been piped in. Check for field-supplied shutoff valves
and controls as specified in the job data. Check for refrigerant leaks on field-installed piping. See Fig. 27 and 28.
Check Relief Devices — Be sure that relief devices
have been piped to the outdoors in compliance with the latest edition of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 15 and applicable
local safety codes. Piping connections must allow for access
to the valve mechanism for periodic inspection and leak
testing.
19XL relief valves are set to relieve at the 300 psig
(2068 kPa) chiller design pressure.
Inspect Wiring
Do not check voltage supply without proper equipment
and precautions. Serious injury may result. Follow power
company recommendations.
Do not apply any kind of test voltage, even for a rotation check, if the chiller is under a dehydration vacuum.
Insulation breakdown and serious damage may result.
1. Examine wiring for conformance to job wiring diagrams and to all applicable electrical codes.
2. On low-voltage compressors (600 v or less) connect
voltmeter across the power wires to the compressor
starter and measure the voltage. Compare this reading
with the voltage rating on the compressor and starter
nameplates.
3. Compare the ampere rating on the starter nameplate with
the compressor nameplate. The overload trip amps must
be 108% to 120% of the rated load amps.
4. The starter for a centrifugal compressor motor must contain the components and terminals required for PIC
refrigeration control. Check certified drawings.
5. Check the voltage to the following components and
compare to the nameplate values: oil pump contact,
pumpout compressor starter, and power panel.
Fig. 29 — Dehydration Cold Trap
47
To attach the CCN communication bus wiring, refer to
the certified drawings and wiring diagrams. The wire is inserted into the CCN communications plug (COMM1) on the
PSIO module. This plug also is referred to as J5.
NOTE: Conductors and drain wire must be 20 AWG
(American Wire Gage) minimum stranded, tinned copper.
Individual conductors must be insulated with PVC, PVC/
nylon, vinyl, Teflon, or polyethylene. An aluminum/polyester
100% foil shield and an outer jacket of PVC, PVC/nylon,
chrome vinyl or Teflon with a minimum operating temperature range of –20 C to 60 C is required. See table below for
cables that meet the requirements.
6. Be sure that fused disconnects or circuit breakers have
been supplied for the oil pump, power panel, and
pumpout unit.
7. Check that all electrical equipment and controls are properly grounded in accordance with job drawings, certified drawings, and all applicable electrical codes.
8. Make sure that the customer’s contractor has verified
proper operation of the pumps, cooling tower fans, and
associated auxiliary equipment. This includes ensuring
that motors are properly lubricated and have proper electrical supply and proper rotation.
9. For field-installed starters only, test the chiller compressor motor and its power lead insulation resistance with
a 500-v insulation tester such as a megohmmeter. (Use
a 5000-v tester for motors rated over 600 v.) Factorymounted starters do not require a megohm test.
a. Open the starter main disconnect switch and follow
lockout/tagout rules.
MANUFACTURER
Alpha
American
Belden
Columbia
CABLE NO.
2413 or 5463
A22503
8772
02525
When connecting the CCN communication bus to a system element, a color code system for the entire network is
recommended to simplify installation and checkout. The following color code is recommended:
If the motor starter is a solid-state starter, the
motor leads must be disconnected from the starter
before an insulation test is performed. The voltage
generated from the tester can damage the starter
solid-state components.
b. With the tester connected to the motor leads, take
10-second and 60-second megohm readings as
follows:
6-Lead Motor — Tie all 6 leads together and test between the lead group and ground. Next tie leads in
pairs, 1 and 4, 2 and 5, and 3 and 6. Test between
each pair while grounding the third pair.
3-Lead Motor — Tie terminals 1, 2, and 3 together
and test between the group and ground.
c. Divide the 60-second resistance reading by the
10-second reading. The ratio, or polarization index,
must be one or higher. Both the 10- and 60-second
readings must be at least 50 megohms.
If the readings on a field-installed starter are unsatisfactory, repeat the test at the motor with the power
leads disconnected. Satisfactory readings in this second test indicate the fault is in the power leads.
NOTE: Unit-mounted starters do not have to be megohm tested.
10. Tighten up all wiring connections to the plugs on the
SMM, 8-input, and PSIO modules.
11. Ensure that the voltage selector switch inside the power
panel is switched to the incoming voltage rating.
12. On chillers with free-standing starters, inspect the power
panel to ensure that the contractor has fed the wires into
the bottom of the panel. Wiring into the top of the panel
can cause debris to fall into the contactors. Clean and
inspect the contactors if this has occurred.
SIGNAL
TYPE
CCN BUS CONDUCTOR
INSULATION COLOR
+
Ground
–
RED
WHITE
BLACK
PSIO MODULE
COMM 1 PLUG (J5)
PIN NO.
1
2
3
Check Starter
BE AWARE that certain automatic start arrangements
can engage the starter. Open the disconnect ahead of
the starter in addition to shutting off the chiller or pump.
Use the instruction and service manual supplied by the
starter manufacturer to verify that the starter has been installed correctly.
The main disconnect on the starter front panel may not
deenergize all internal circuits. Open all internal and remote disconnects before servicing the starter.
Whenever a starter safety trip device activates, wait at least
30 seconds before resetting the safety. The microprocessor
maintains its output to the 1CR relay for 10 seconds to determine the fault mode of failure.
MECHANICAL-TYPE STARTERS
1. Check all field wiring connections for tightness, clearance from moving parts, and correct connection.
2. Check the contactor(s) to be sure they move freely. Check
the mechanical interlock between contactors to ensure that
1S and 2M contactors cannot be closed at the same time.
Check all other electro-mechanical devices, e.g., relays,
timers, for free movement. If the devices do not move
freely, contact the starter manufacturer for replacement
components.
Carrier Comfort Network Interface — The Carrier
Comfort Network (CCN) communication bus wiring is supplied and installed by the electrical contractor. It consists of
shielded, 3-conductor cable with drain wire.
The system elements are connected to the communication
bus in a daisy chain arrangement. The positive pin of each
system element communication connector must be wired to
the positive pins of the system element on either side of it;
the negative pins must be wired to the negative pins; the signal ground pins must be wired to signal ground pins.
48
3. Some dashpot-type magnetic overload relays must be filled
with oil on the jobsite. If the starter is equipped with devices of this type, remove the fluid cups from these magnetic overload relays. Add dashpot oil to cups per instructions
supplied with the starter. The oil is usually shipped in a
small container attached to the starter frame near the relays. Use only dashpot oil supplied with the starter. Do
not substitute.
Factory-filled dashpot overload relays need no oil at start-up
and solid-state overload relays do not have oil.
4. Reapply starter control power (not main chiller power) to
check electrical functions. When using a reduced-voltage
starter (such as a wye-delta type) check the transition timer
for proper setting. The factory setting is 30 seconds
(± 5 seconds), timed closing. The timer is adjustable in a
range between 0 and 60 seconds and settings other than
the nominal 30 seconds may be chosen as needed (typically 20 to 30 seconds are used).
When the timer has been set, check that the starter (with
relay 1CR closed) goes through a complete and proper
start cycle.
LEGEND
1 — Phase Voltage Indicator
2 — Starter Fault and Run LEDs (5)
• Overtemp
• Ground Fault
• Current Unbalance (CUB)
While Stopped
• Current Unbalance
• Run (Start Initiated)
3 — Starting Torque Potentiometer
4 — Ramp Up Potentiometer
5 — Phase Correct LED
6 — Relay On LED
7 — Power +15 and Auxiliary (Starter
in RUN State) LEDs (Hidden)
8 — SCR Indicator LEDs (Hidden)
9 — Reset Button
BENSHAW, INC. SOLID-STATE STARTER
This equipment is at line voltage when AC power is
connected. Pressing the STOP button does not remove
voltage. Use caution when adjusting the potentiometers
on the equipment.
1. Check that all wiring connections are properly terminated to the starter.
2. Verify that the ground wire to the starter is installed properly and is of sufficient size.
3. Verify that the motors are properly grounded to the starter.
4. Check that all of the relays are properly seated in their
sockets.
5. Verify that the proper ac input voltage is brought into the
starter per the certified drawings.
6. Verify the initial factory settings of the starting torque and
ramp potentiometers are set per the note on the schematic
for the starters.
NOTE: The potentiometers are located at the lower left
hand corner on the circuit board mounted in front of the
starter power stack (Fig. 30 and 31).
The starting torque potentiometer should be set so that
when the PIC calls for the motor to start, the rotor should
just start to turn. The nominal dial position for a 60 Hz
motor is approximately the 11:30 position. The nominal
dial position for a 50 Hz motor is approximately in the
9:30 position because the board is turned on its side, so
that the 9:00 o’clock position is located where the
6:00 o’clock position would normally be located. The ramp
potentiometer should be set so that the motor is up to full
speed in 15 to 20 seconds, the bypass contactors have
energized, and the auxiliary LCD is energized.
7. Proceed to apply power to the starter.
8. The Power +15 and Phase Correct LEDs should be on. If
not, see the starter Troubleshooting Guide section.
Fig. 30 — Benshaw, Inc. Solid-State Starter
Power Stack
NOTE: Adjustments:
Starting torque — 0% to 100% rated motor torque.
Ramp time to full motor voltage — 0.5 seconds to
60 seconds.
Fig. 31 — Ramp Up and Starting Torque
Potentiometers
49
Oil Charge — The 19XL compressor holds approximately 8 gal. (30 L) of oil. The chiller will be shipped with
oil in the compressor. When the sump is full, the oil level
should be no higher than the middle of the upper sight glass
and minimum level is the bottom of the lower sight glass
(Fig. 2A or 2B). If oil is added, it must meet Carrier’s specification for centrifugal compressor usage as described in the
Oil Specification section on page 63. Charge the oil through
the oil charging valve, located near the bottom of the transmission housing (Fig. 2A or Fig. 2B). The oil must be pumped
from the oil container through the charging valve due to higher
refrigerant pressure. The pumping device must be able to lift
from 0 to 200 psig (0 to 1380 kPa) or above unit pressure.
Oil should only be charged or removed when the chiller is
shut down.
Input the Local Occupied Schedule (OCCPC01S)
— Access the schedule OCCPC01S screen on the LID
and set up the occupied time schedule per the customer’s
requirements. If no schedule is available, the default is factory set for 24 hours occupied 7 days per week including
holidays.
For more information about how to set up a time schedule, see the Controls section, page 11.
The CCN Occupied Schedule should be configured if a
CCN system is being installed or if a secondary time schedule is needed.
NOTE: The default CCN Occupied Schedule is OCCPC03S
for Software Version 09 and above; the default is OCCPC02S
for Software Version 08 and below.
Power Up the Controls and Check the Oil Heater
— Ensure that an oil level is visible in the compressor
Selecting Refrigerant Type — The 19XL control must
be configured for the refrigerant being used, either HCFC-22
or HFC-134a.
TO CONFIRM REFRIGERANT TYPE — Confirm that the
correct refrigerant type is indicated by entering the Controls
Test tables on the Service menu, Fig. 17. Select REFRIGERANT TYPE. The screen will display the current refrigerant setting. Press EXIT softkey to leave the screen without changes.
TO CHANGE REFRIGERANT TYPE — Enter the Controls Test tables on the Service Menu. See Fig. 17. Select
REFRIGERANT TYPE. The screen will display the current
refrigerant setting. Press YES softkey to change the current setting. Next, move to the ATTACH TO NETWORK
DEVICE screen on the Service menu and the ATTACH TO
LOCAL DEVICE to upload the new refrigerant tables.
before energizing controls. A circuit breaker in the starter
energizes the oil heater and the control circuit. When first
powered, the LID should display the default screen within a
short period of time.
The oil heater is energized by powering the control circuit. This should be done several hours before start-up to
minimize oil-refrigerant migration. The oil heater is controlled by the PIC and is powered through a contactor in the
power panel. Starters contain a separate circuit breaker to
power the heater and the control circuit. This set up allows
the heater to energize when the main motor circuit breaker
is off for service work or extended shutdowns. The oil heater
relay status can be viewed on the Status02 table on the LID.
Oil sump temperature can be viewed on the LID default screen.
When the Time/Date is configured for the first time or if
power is lost for more than 3 hours, the oil heat algorithm
will take effect before the compressor can start. See the Oil
Sump Temperature Control section on page 32 for additional information. The oil pump will then energize for 1 to
2 minutes to bring the oil temperature to normal operating
temperature. A LOW OIL TEMPERATURE alert will show
on the default LID screen if the operator has the controls set
to start.
SOFTWARE VERSION — The software version will
always be labeled on the PSIO module, and on the back
side of the LID module. On both the Controller ID and LID
ID display screens, the software version number will also
appear.
Input Service Configurations — The following configurations require the LID screen to be in the Service portion of the menu.
• password
• input time and date
• LID configuration
• controller identification
• service parameters
• equipment configuration
• automated control test
Set Up Chiller Control Configuration
PASSWORD — When accessing the Service tables, a password must be entered. All LIDs are initially set for a password of 1-1-1-1. This password may be changed in the LID
configuration screen, if desired.
INPUT TIME AND DATE — Access the Time and Date
table on the Service menu. Input the present time of day,
date, and day of the week. ‘‘Holiday Today’’ should only be
configured to ‘‘Yes’’ if the present day is a holiday.
CHANGE LID CONFIGURATION IF NECESSARY — The
LID Configuration screen is used to view or modify the LID
CCN address, change to English or SI units, and to change
the password. If there is more than one chiller at the jobsite,
change the LID address on each chiller so that each chiller
has its own address. Note and record the new address. Change
the screen to SI units as required, and change the password
if desired.
Do not operate the chiller before the control configurations have been checked and a Control Test has been
satisfactorily completed. Protection by safety controls
cannot be assumed until all control configurations have
been confirmed.
As configuration of the 19XL unit is performed, write down
all configuration settings. A log, such as the one shown on
pages CL-1 to CL-2, provides a convenient list for configuration values.
Input the Design Set Points — Access the LID set
point screen and view/modify the base demand limit set point,
and either the LCW set point or the ECW set point. The PIC
can control a set point to either the leaving or entering chilled
water. This control method is set in the Equipment Configuration table, Config table.
50
MODIFY CONTROLLER IDENTIFICATION IF NECESSARY — The controller identification screen is used to change
the PSIO module address. Change this address for each chiller
if there is more than one chiller at the jobsite. Write the new
address on the PSIO module for future reference.
Change the LID address if there is more than one chiller
on the jobsite. Access the LID configuration screen to view
or modify this address.
INPUT EQUIPMENT SERVICE PARAMETERS IF NECESSARY — The Equipment Service table has three service
tables: Service1, Service2, and Service3.
Configure SERVICE1 Table — Access Service1 table to
modify/view the following to jobsite parameters:
Chilled Medium
Brine Refrigerant Trippoint
Surge Limiting or Hot Gas
Bypass (HGBP) Option
Minimum Load Points
(T1/P1)
Maximum Load Points
(T2/P2)
Amps Correction Factor
Motor Rated Load Amps
Motor Rated Line Voltage
Motor Rated Line kW
Line Frequency
Compressor Starter Type
estimate the refrigerant suction and condensing temperatures at this difference. Use the proper saturated pressure and
temperature for the particular refrigerant used.
Suction Temperature:
42 F (5.6 C) = 71.5 psig (521 kPa) saturated
refrigerant pressure (HCFC-22)
Condensing Temperature:
98 F (36.7 C) = 190 psig (1310 kPa) saturated
refrigerant pressure (HCFC-22)
Maximum Load DT2:
54 – 44 = 10° F (12.2 – 6.7 = 5.5° C)
Maximum Load DP2:
190 – 71.5 = 118.5 psid (1310 – 521 = 789 kPad)
Water or Brine?
Usually 3° F (1.7° C) below
design refrigerant temperature
Is HGBP installed?
To avoid unnecessary surge prevention, add about 10 psid
(70 kPad) to DP2 from these conditions:
DT2 = 10° F (5.5° C)
DP2 = 130 psid (900 kPad)
Per job data —
See Modify Load Points section
Per job data —
See Modify Load Points section
See Table 6
Per job data
Per job data
Per job data
(if kW meter installed)
50 or 60 Hz
Reduced voltage or full?
Calculate Minimum Load — To calculate minimum load conditions, estimate the temperature difference that the cooler
will have at 10% load, then estimate what the suction and
condensing temperatures will be at this point. Use the proper
saturated pressure and temperature for the particular refrigerant used.
Suction Temperature:
43 F (6.1 C) = 73 psig (503 kPa) saturated
refrigerant pressure (HCFC-22)
Condensing Temperature:
70 F (21.1 C) = 121 psig (834 kPa) saturated
refrigerant pressure (HCFC-22)
Minimum Load DT1:
45.5 – 44 = 1.5° F (7.5 – 6.7 = 0.8° C)
Minimum Load DP1:
121 – 73 = 45 psid (834 – 503 = 331 kPad)
NOTE: Other values are left at the default values. These may be changed
by the operator as required. Service2 and Service3 tables can be modified by the owner/operator as required.
Modify Minimum and Maximum Load Points (DT1/P1;
D T2/P2) If Necessary —These pairs of chiller load points,
located on the Service1 table, determine when to limit guide
vane travel or to open the hot gas bypass valve when surge
prevention is needed. These points should be set based on
individual chiller operating conditions.
If, after configuring a value for these points, surge prevention is operating too soon or too late for conditions, these
parameters should be changed by the operator.
Example of configuration: Chiller operating parameters
Refrigerant used: HCFC-22
Estimated Minimum Load Conditions:
44 F (6.7 C) LCW
45.5 F (7.5 C) ECW
43 F (6.1 C) Suction Temperature
70 F (21.1 C) Condensing Temperature
Again, to avoid unnecessary surge prevention, add 10 psid
(70 kPad) at DP1 from these conditions:
DT1 = 1.5 F (0.8 C)
DP1 = 60 psid (410 kPad)
If surge prevention occurs too soon or too late:
Estimated Maximum Load Conditions:
44 F (6.7 C) LCW
54 F (12.2 C) ECW
42 F (5.6 C) Suction Temperature
98 F (36.7 C) Condensing Temperature
LOAD
SURGE PREVENTION
OCCURS TOO SOON
SURGE PREVENTION
OCCURS TOO LATE
At low
loads
(,50%)
At high
loads
(.50%)
Increase P1 by
10 psid (70 kPad)
Decrease P1 by
10 psid (70 kPad)
Increase P2 by
10 psid (70 kPad)
Decrease P2 by
10 psid (70 kPad)
Modify Amp Correction Factors — To modify the amp correction factor, use the values listed in Table 6. Enter the
appropriate amp correction factor in the Service1 table of
Equipment Service.
Calculate Maximum Load — To calculate maximum load
points, use design load condition data. If the chiller full load
cooler temperature difference is more than 15° F (8.3 C),
51
Table 6 — Amps Correction Factors
for 19XL Motors
VOLT/
Hz
200/60
208/60
220/60
230/60
240/60
360/60
380/60
400/60
440/60
460/60
480/60
550/60
575/60
600/60
3300/60
2400/60
4160/60
220/50
230/50
240/50
320/50
346/50
360/50
380/50
400/50
415/50
3000/50
3300/50
CB
4
5
3
5
5
4
7
7
3
5
7
4
4
8
4
4
4
3
4
5
2
4
5
5
6
8
3
4
CC
5
5
4
6
6
2
4
5
3
4
5
2
4
5
4
4
4
1
2
3
2
4
5
2
4
5
2
3
CD
3
5
2
4
4
4
6
8
2
3
4
3
4
6
4
3
3
2
2
5
2
3
4
3
4
5
2
3
MOTOR CODE
CE CL CM CN
6
3
2
3
8
4
2
4
2
2
3
1
4
3
5
2
4
3
8
2
2
2
2
1
4
4
5
3
4
4
5
3
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
2
1
2
3
2
2
3
4
4
3
4
6
1
2
3
3
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
2
2
3
2
3
2
4
3
4
3
5
3
2
1
1
1
3
3
2
1
4
4
2
2
3
3
2
4
5
4
3
6
6
5
4
7
3
2
3
1
3
3
4
2
CP
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
3
2
3
5
3
2
2
1
2
3
1
2
2
2
4
5
2
2
CQ
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
3
3
5
7
2
3
4
2
3
3
1
1
2
3
3
8
2
3
4
1
1
to the incoming power to the starter. Use a voltmeter to check
incoming power at the starter power leads. If the readings
are not equal, an adjustment can be made to the 24-v input
to the SMM at the potentiometer located in the low-voltage
section to equalize the two readings.
CR
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
4
4
6
8
2
3
4
2
3
3
1
1
2
3
4
8
2
3
4
2
2
PERFORM AN AUTOMATED CONTROL TEST — Check
the safety controls status by performing an automated controls test. Access the Control Test table and select the
Automated Tests function (Table 8).
The Automated Control Test will check all outputs and
inputs for function. It will also set the refrigerant type. The
compressor must be in the OFF mode in order to operate the
controls test and the 24-v input to the SMM must be in range
(per line voltage percent on Status01 table). The OFF mode
is caused by pressing the STOP pushbutton on the LID. Each
test will ask the operator to confirm that the operation is occurring, and whether or not to continue. If an error occurs,
the operator has the choice to try to address the problem as
the test is being done, or to note the problem and proceed to
the next test.
NOTE: If during the Control Test the guide vanes do not
open, check to see that the low pressure alarm is not active.
(This will cause the guide vanes to close).
NOTE: The oil pump test will not energize the oil pump if
cooler pressure is below –5 psig (–35 kPa).
When the test is finished, or the EXIT softkey is pressed,
the test will be stopped and the Control Test menu will be
displayed. If a specific automated test procedure is not
completed, access the particular control test to test the function when ready. The Control Test menu is described as
follows:
MODIFY EQUIPMENT CONFIGURATION IF NECESSARY — The Equipment Configuration table has tables to
select and view or modify. Carrier’s certified drawings will
have the configuration values required for the jobsite. Modify
these tables only if requested.
Config Table Modifications — Change the values in this table
per job data. See certified drawings for values. Modifications include:
• chilled water reset
• entering chilled water control (Enable/Disable)
• 4-20 mA demand limit
• auto. restart option (Enable/Disable)
• remote contact option (Enable/Disable)
Owner-Modified CCN Tables— The following tables are described for reference only.
Occdef Table Modifications — The Occdef tables contain
the Local and CCN time schedules, which can be modified
here, or in the Schedule screen as described previously.
Holidef Table Modifications — The Holidef tables configure
the days of the year that holidays are in effect. See the holiday paragraphs in the Controls section for more
details.
Brodefs Table Modifications — The Brodefs table defines
the outside-air temperature sensor and humidity sensor if one
is to be installed. It will define the start and end of daylight savings time. Enter the dates for the start and end of
daylight savings if required for the location. Brodefs also
will activate the Broadcast function which enables the holiday periods that are defined on the LID.
Other Tables — The Alarmdef, Cons-def, and Runt-def contain tables for use with a CCN system. See the applicable
CCN manual for more information on these tables.
These tables can only be defined through a CCN Building
Supervisor.
CHECK VOLTAGE SUPPLY — Access the Status 01 screen
and read the actual line voltage. This reading should be equal
Automated Tests
PSIO Thermistors
Options Thermistors
Transducers
Guide Vane Actuator
Pumps
Discrete Outputs
Pumpdown/Lockout
Terminate Lockout
Refrigerant Type*
As described above, a complete
control test.
Check of all PSIO thermistors only.
Check of all options boards
thermistors.
Check of all transducers.
Check of the guide vane operation.
Check operation of pump outputs,
either all pumps can be activated,
or individual pumps. The test will
also test the associated input such
as flow or pressure.
Activation of all on/off outputs or
individually.
Pumpdown prevents the low refrigerant alarm during evacuation so
refrigerant can be removed from
the unit, locks the compressor off,
and starts the water pumps.
To charge refrigerant and enable
the chiller to run after pumpdown
lockout.
Sets type of refrigerant used:
HCFC-22 or HFC-134a.
*Make sure to Attach to Local Device after changing refrigerant type.
Refer to Selecting Refrigerant Type section on page 50.
Check Optional Pumpout System Controls and
Compressor — Controls include an on/off switch, a 3-amp
fuse, the compressor overloads, an internal thermostat, a compressor contactor, and a refrigerant high pressure cutout. The
high pressure cutout is factory set to open at 220 ± 5 psig
(1250 ± 34 kPa), and automatically reset at 185 + 0,
−7 psig (1280 +0,–48 kPa) with HCFC-22. HFC-134a units
open at 161 psig (1110 kPa) and reset at 130 psig (896 kPa).
Check that the water-cooled condenser has been connected.
52
Table 7 — Control Test Menu Functions
Loosen the compressor holddown bolts to allow free spring
travel. Open the compressor suction and discharge service
valves. Check that oil is visible in the compressor sight glass.
Add oil if necessary.
TESTS TO BE
PERFORMED
1. Automated Tests*
DEVICES TESTED
Operates the second through
seventh tests
2. PSIO Thermistors
Entering chilled water
Leaving chilled water
Entering condenser water
Leaving condenser water
Discharge temperature
Bearing temperature
Motor winding temperature
Oil sump temperature
3. Options Thermistors Common chilled water supply
sensor
Common chilled water return sensor
Remote reset sensor
Temperature sensor — Spare 1
Spare 2
Spare 3
Spare 4
Spare 5
Spare 6
Spare 7
Spare 8
Spare 9
4. Transducers
Evaporator pressure
Condenser pressure
Oil pressure differential
Oil pump pressure
5. Guide Vane Actuator Open
Close
6. Pumps
All pumps or individual pumps may
be activated:
Oil pump — Confirm pressure
Chilled water pump — Confirm flow
Condenser water pump — Confirm
flow
7. Discrete Outputs
All outputs or individual outputs may
be energized:
Hot gas bypass relay
Oil heater relay
Motor cooling relay
Tower fan relay
Alarm relay
Shunt trip relay
8. Pumpdown/Lockout When using pumpdown/lockout,
observe freeze up precautions when
removing charge:
Instructs operator as to which valves
to close and when
Starts chilled water and condenser
water pumps and confirms flows
Monitors — Evaporator pressure
Condenser pressure
Evaporator temperature
during pumpout
procedures
Turns pumps off after pumpdown
Locks out compressor
9. Terminate Lockout
Starts pumps and monitors flows
Instructs operator as to which values
to open and when
Monitors — Evaporator pressure
Condenser pressure
Evaporator temperature
during charging process
Terminates compressor lockout
10. Refrigerant Type
Sets refrigerant type used:
HCFC-22 or HFC-134a.
NOTE: Be sure to ATTACH TO
LOCAL DEVICE after changing
refrigerant type.
See Attach to Network Device
Control section, page 37.
See Pumpout and Refrigerant Transfer Procedures and
Optional Pumpout System Maintenance sections, pages 59
and 65, for details on transfer of refrigerant, oil specifications, etc.
High Altitude Locations — Recalibration of the pressure transducers will be necessary as the chiller was initially
calibrated at sea level. Please see the calibration procedure
in the Troubleshooting Guide section.
Charge Refrigerant into Chiller
The transfer, addition, or removal of refrigerant in spring
isolated chillers may place severe stress on external piping if springs have not been blocked in both up and down
directions.
The standard 19XL chiller will have the refrigerant
already charged in the vessels. The 19XL may be ordered
with a nitrogen holding charge of 15 psig (103 kPa). Evacuate the entire chiller, and charge chiller from refrigerant
cylinders.
19XL CHILLER EQUALIZATION WITHOUT PUMPOUT UNIT
When equalizing refrigerant pressure on the 19XL chiller
after service work or during the initial chiller start-up,
do not use the discharge isolation valve to equalize. The
motor cooling isolation valve or charging hose (connected between pumpout valves on top of cooler and
condenser) is to be used as the equalization valve.
To equalize the pressure differential on a refrigerant
isolated 19XL chiller, use the TERMINATE LOCKOUT
function of the Control Test in the SERVICE menu. This
will help to turn on pumps and advise the proper procedure.
The following procedure describes how to equalize refrigerant pressure on an isolated 19XL chiller without a pumpout unit:
1. Access TERMINATE LOCKOUT function on the Control Test.
2. Turn on the chilled water and condenser water pumps to
ensure against freezing.
3. Slowly open the refrigerant cooling isolation valve.
The chiller cooler and condenser pressures will gradually equalize. This process will take approximately
15 minutes.
4. Once the pressures have equalized, the cooler isolation
valve, the condenser isolation valve, and the hot gas bypass isolation valve may now be opened. Refer to Fig. 27
and 28, valves 11, 12, and 14.
Whenever turning the discharge isolation valve, be
sure to reattach the valve locking device. This will
prevent the valve from opening or closing during service work or during chiller operation.
*During any of the tests that are not automated, an out-of-range reading will have an asterisk (*) next to the reading and a message will
be displayed.
53
vessels. Charge the refrigerant as a gas until the system pressure exceeds 68 psig (469 kPa); [35 psig (141 kPa)]. After
the chiller is beyond this pressure the refrigerant should be
charged as a liquid until all of the recommended refrigerant
charge has been added.
19XL CHILLER EQUALIZATION WITH PUMPOUT
UNIT — The following procedure describes how to equalize refrigerant pressure on an isolated 19XL chiller using the
pumpout unit.
1. Access the TERMINATE LOCKOUT mode in the Control Test.
2. Turn on the chilled water and condenser water pumps to
prevent possible freezing.
3. Open valve 4 on the pumpout unit and open valves 1a
and 1b on the chiller cooler and condenser, Fig. 27 and
28. Slowly open valve 2 on the pumpout unit to equalize
the pressure. This process will take approximately
15 minutes.
4. Once the pressures have equalized, the discharge isolation valve, cooler isolation valve, optional hot gas bypass
isolation valve, and the refrigerant isolation valve can be
opened. Close valves 1a and 1b, and all pumpout unit
valves.
TRIMMING REFRIGERANT CHARGE — The 19XL is
shipped with the correct charge for the design duty of the
chiller. Trimming the charge can be best accomplished when
design load is available. To trim, check the temperature
difference between leaving chilled water temperature and
cooler refrigerant temperature at full load design conditions.
If necessary, add or remove refrigerant to bring the temperature difference to design conditions or minimum differential.
Table 8 — Refrigerant Charges*
COOLER
SIZE
Whenever turning the discharge isolation valve, be
sure to reattach the valve locking device. This will
prevent the valve from opening or closing during service work or during chiller operation.
40
41
42
43
50
51
52
53
55
56
57
58
The full refrigerant charge on the 19XL will vary with
chiller components and design conditions, indicated on the
job data specifications. An approximate charge may be found
by adding the condenser charge to the cooler charge listed in
Table 8.
Always operate the condenser and chilled water pumps
during charging operations to prevent freeze-ups. Use the
Control Test Terminate Lockout to monitor conditions and
start the pumps.
If the chiller has been shipped with a holding charge, the
refrigerant will be added through the refrigerant charging valve
(Fig. 27 and 28, valve 7) or to the pumpout charging connection. First evacuate the nitrogen holding charge from the
19XL TOTAL REFRIGERANT CHARGE
Design II
Design I
Chiller
Chiller
HCFC-22
HFC-134a
lb
kg
lb
kg
lb
kg
1420
640
1100
499
900
409
1490
680
1150
522
950
431
1550
700
1250
568
1000
454
1600
730
1350
613
1050
477
1850
840
1500
681
1100
499
1900
860
1600
726
1200
545
1980
900
1750
795
1300
590
2050
930
1850
840
1350
613
—
—
1900
863
1550
704
—
—
2200
999
1650
749
—
—
2500
1135
1750
795
—
—
2700
1226
1900
863
*Design I chillers use HCFC-22. Design II chillers use either HCFC-22
or HFC-134a.
NOTES:
1. The size of the cooler determines refrigerant charge for the entire
chiller.
2. Design I chillers have float chambers.
3. Design II chillers have linear floats.
54
INITIAL START-UP
Preparation — Before starting the chiller, check that the:
1. Power is on to the main starter, oil pump relay, tower fan
starter, oil heater relay, and the chiller control
center.
2. Cooling tower water is at proper level, and at or below
design entering temperature.
3. Chiller is charged with refrigerant and all refrigerant and
oil valves are in their proper operating position.
4. Oil is at the proper level in the reservoir sight glasses.
5. Oil reservoir temperature is above 140 F (60 C) or refrigerant temperature plus 50° F (28° C).
6. Valves in the evaporator and condenser water circuits are
open.
3.
4.
5.
6.
controls do not go into start mode, go to the Schedule
screen and override the schedule or change the occupied time. Press the LOCAL softkey to begin the startup sequences.
Check that chilled water and condenser water pumps
energize.
Check that the oil pump starts and pressurizes the lubrication system. After the oil pump has run about 11 seconds, the starter will be energized and go through its start-up
sequence.
Check the main contactor for proper operation.
The PIC will eventually show an alarm for motor amps
not sensed. Reset this alarm and continue with the initial
start-up.
Check Rotation
NOTE: If pumps are not automatic, make sure water is
circulating properly.
7. Solid-state starter checks: The Power +15 and the Phase
Correct LEDs must be lit before the starter will energize.
If the Power +15 LED is not on, incoming voltage is not
present or is incorrect. If the Phase Correct LED is not
lit, rotate any 2 incoming phases to correct the phasing.
1. Engage the main motor disconnect on the front of the starter
panel. The motor is now ready for rotation check.
2. After the default screen Status message states ‘‘Ready
for Start’’ press the LOCAL softkey; start-up checks will
be made by the control.
3. When the starter is energized and the motor begins to turn.
Check for clockwise rotation (Fig. 32).
IF ROTATION IS PROPER, allow the compressor to come
up to speed.
IF THE MOTOR ROTATION IS NOT CLOCKWISE
(as viewed through the sight glass), reverse any 2 of the 3
incoming power leads to the starter and recheck rotation.
NOTE: Solid-state starters have phase protection and will
not allow a start if the phase is not correct. Instead, a Starter
Fault message will occur if this happens.
Do not permit water or brine that is warmer than
110 F (43 C) to flow through the cooler or condenser. Refrigerant overpressure may discharge through
the relief devices and result in the loss of refrigerant
charge.
8. Press RELEASE to automate the chiller start/stop value
on the Status01 table to enable the chiller to start. The
initial factory setting of this value is overridden to stop in
order to prevent accidental start-up.
Do not check motor rotation during coastdown. Rotation may have reversed during equalization of vessel
pressures.
Manual Operation of the Guide Vanes — Manual
operation of the guide vanes is helpful to establish a steady
motor current for calibration of the motor amps value.
In order to manually operate the guide vanes, it is necessary to override the TARGET GUIDE VANE POSITION
value which is accessed on the Status01 table. Manual control is indicated by the word ‘‘SUPVSR!’’ flashing after the
target value position. Manual control is also indicated on the
default screen on the run status line.
1. Access the Status01 table and look at the target guide vane
position (Fig. 16). If the compressor is off, the value will
read zero.
2. Move the highlight bar to the TARGET GUIDE VANE
POSITION line and press the SELECT softkey.
3. Press ENTER to override the automatic target. The screen
will now read a value of zero, and the word
‘‘SUPVSR!’’ will flash.
4. Press the SELECT softkey, and then press
RELEASE softkey to release the vanes to AUTOMATIC mode. After a few seconds the ‘‘SUPVSR!’’ will
disappear.
Fig. 32 — Correct Motor Rotation
Dry Run to Test Start-Up Sequence
1. Disengage the main motor disconnect on the starter front
panel. This should only disconnect the motor power. Power
to the controls, oil pump, and starter control circuit should
still be energized.
2. Look at the default screen on the LID: the Status message in the upper left-hand corner will read, ‘‘Manually
Stopped.’’ Press CCN or Local to start. If the chiller
NOTES ON SOLID-STATE STARTERS (Benshaw, Inc.)
1. When the compressor is energized to start by the 1CR
relay, confirm that the Relay On LED is lit on the starter
SCR control board. The compressor motor should start to
turn immediately when this light comes on. If not, adjust
the start torque potentiometer in a clockwise direction.
55
MOTOR COMPRESSOR ASSEMBLY — Guide vane
actuator, transmission, motor cooling system, oil cooling system, temperature and pressure sensors, oil sight
glasses, integral oil pump, isolatable oil filter, extra oil and
motor temperature sensors, synthetic oil, and compressor
serviceability.
MOTOR COMPRESSOR LUBRICATION SYSTEM — Oil
pump, cooler filter, oil heater, oil charge and specification,
operating and shutdown oil level, temperature and pressure,
and oil charging connections.
CONTROL SYSTEM — CCN and Local start, reset, menu,
softkey functions, LID operation, occupancy schedule, set
points, safety controls, and auxiliary and optional controls.
AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT — Starters and disconnects, separate electrical sources, pumps, and cooling tower.
DESCRIBE CHILLER CYCLES — Refrigerant, motor cooling, lubrication, and oil reclaim.
REVIEW MAINTENANCE — Scheduled, routine, and extended shutdowns, importance of a log sheet, importance of
water treatment and tube cleaning, and importance of maintaining a leak-free chiller.
SAFETY DEVICES AND PROCEDURES — Electrical disconnects, relief device inspection, and handling refrigerant.
CHECK OPERATOR KNOWLEDGE — Start, stop, and shutdown procedures; safety and operating controls; refrigerant
and oil charging; and job safety.
REVIEW THE START-UP, OPERATION, AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL
2. Observe that all 6-gate LEDs are lit on the starter SCR
control board.
3. The factory setting should bring the motor to full voltage
in 15 to 30 seconds. If the setting is not correct, adjust the
ramp potentiometer counterclockwise for a shorter time,
clockwise for a longer time. (See Fig. 5 for starter component placement.)
Check Oil Pressure and Compressor Stop
1. When the motor is up to full speed, note the differential
oil pressure reading on the LID default screen. It should
be between 18 and 30 psid (124 to 206 kPad).
2. Press the Stop button and listen for any unusual sounds
from the compressor as it coasts to a stop.
Calibrate Motor Current
1. Make sure that the compressor motor rated load amps in
the Service1 table has been configured. Place an ammeter
on the line that passes through the motor load current transfer on the motor side of the power factor correction capacitors (if provided).
2. Start the compressor and establish a steady motor current
value between 70% and 100% RLA by manually overriding the guide vane target value on the LID and setting
the chilled water set point to a low value. Do not exceed
105% of the nameplate RLA.
3. When a steady motor current value in the desired range
is met, compare the compressor motor amps value on the
Status01 table to the actual amps shown on the ammeter
on the starter. Adjust the amps value on the LID to
the actual value seen at the starter if there is a difference.
Highlight the amps value then press SELECT .
Press INCREASE or DECREASE to bring the value
to that indicated on the ammeter. Press ENTER when
equal.
4. Make sure that the target guide vane position is released
into AUTOMATIC mode.
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Operator Duties
1. Become familiar with refrigeration chiller and related equipment before operating the chiller.
2. Prepare the system for start-up, start and stop the chiller,
and place the system in a shutdown condition.
3. Maintain a log of operating conditions and document any
abnormal readings.
4. Inspect the equipment, make routine adjustments, and perform a Control Test. Maintain the proper oil and refrigerant levels.
5. Protect the system from damage during shutdown
periods.
6. Maintain the set point, time schedules, and other PIC
functions.
To Prevent Accidental Start-Up — The PIC can be
set up so that start-up of the unit is more difficult than just
pressing the LOCAL or CCN softkeys during chiller service or when necessary. By accessing the Status01 table, and
highlighting the chiller Start/Stop line, the value can be overridden to stop by pressing SELECT and then the
STOP and ENTER softkeys. ‘‘SUPVSR’’ will appear
after the value. When attempting to restart, remember to
release the override. The default chiller message line will
also state that the Start/Stop has been set to ‘‘Start’’ or ‘‘Stop’’
when the value is overridden.
Prepare the Chiller for Start-Up — Follow the steps
described in the Initial Start-Up section, page 55.
Check Chiller Operating Condition — Check to
be sure that chiller temperatures, pressures, water flows, and
oil and refrigerant levels indicate that the system is functioning properly.
To Start the Chiller
1. Start the water pumps, if they are not automatic.
2. On the LID default screen, press the LOCAL or
CCN softkey to start the system. If the chiller is in
the OCCUPIED mode, and the start timers have expired,
the start sequence will start. Follow the procedure described in the Start-Up/Shutdown/Recycle section,
page 39.
Instruct the Customer Operator — Check to be sure
that the operator(s) understand all operating and maintenance procedures. Point out the various chiller parts and
explain their function as part of the complete system.
COOLER-CONDENSER — Float chamber, relief devices,
refrigerant charging valve, temperature sensor locations, pressure transducer locations, Schrader fittings, waterboxes and
tubes, and vents and drains.
OPTIONAL STORAGE TANK AND PUMPOUT SYSTEM — Transfer valves and pumpout system, refrigerant
charging and pumpdown procedure, and relief devices.
Check the Running System — After the compressor starts, the operator should monitor the LID display and
observe the parameters for normal operating conditions:
1. The oil reservoir temperature should be above 140 F
(60 C) during shutdown, and above 100 F (38 C) during
compressor operation.
56
of 5 to 10 lbs (2.27 to 4.5 kg) of refrigerant to prevent air
from leaking into the chiller.
If freezing temperatures are likely to occur in the chiller
area, drain the chilled water, condenser water, and the
pumpout condenser water circuits to avoid freeze-up. Keep
the waterbox drains open.
Leave the oil charge in the chiller with the oil heater
and controls energized to maintain the minimum oil reservoir temperature.
2. The bearing oil temperature accessed on the Status01 table
should be 120 to 165 F (49 to 74 C). If the bearing
temperature reads more than 180 F (83 C) with the oil
pump running, stop the chiller and determine the cause
of the high temperature. Do not restart the chiller until
corrected.
3. The oil level should be visible anywhere in one of the
two sight glasses. Foaming of the oil is acceptable as
long as the oil pressure and temperature are within
limits.
4. The oil pressure should be between 18 and 30 psid
(124 to 207 kPad), as seen on the LID default screen.
Typically the reading will be 18 to 25 psid (124 to
172 kPad) at initial start-up.
5. The moisture indicator sight glass on the refrigerant
motor cooling line should indicate refrigerant flow and a
dry condition.
6. The condenser pressure and temperature varies with
the chiller design conditions. Typically the pressure
will range between 100 and 210 psig (690 to 1450 kPa)
with a corresponding temperature range of 60 to 105 F
(15 to 41 C). The condenser entering water temperature
should be controlled below the specified design entering
water temperature to save on compressor kilowatt
requirements.
7. Cooler pressure and temperature also will vary with the
design conditions. Typical pressure range will be between 60 and 80 psig (410 and 550 kPa), with temperature ranging between 34 and 45 F (1 and 8 C).
8. The compressor may operate at full capacity for a short
time after the pulldown ramping has ended, even though
the building load is small. The active electrical demand
setting can be overridden to limit the compressor IkW,
or the pulldown rate can be decreased to avoid a high
demand charge for the short period of high demand
operation. Pulldown rate can be based on load rate or
temperature rate. It is accessed on the Equipment Configuration, Config table (Table 2, Example 5).
After Extended Shutdown — Be sure that the water
system drains are closed. It may be advisable to flush the
water circuits to remove any soft rust which may have formed.
This is a good time to brush the tubes if necessary.
Check the cooler pressure on the LID default screen, and
compare to the original holding charge that was left in the
chiller. If (after adjusting for ambient temperature changes)
any loss in pressure is indicated, check for refrigerant leaks.
See Check Chiller Tightness section, page 41.
Recharge the chiller by transferring refrigerant from the
storage tank (if supplied). Follow the Pumpout and Refrigerant Transfer Procedures section, page 59. Observe freeze-up
precautions.
Carefully make all regular preliminary and running system checks. Perform a Control Test before start-up. If the
compressor oil level appears abnormally high, the oil may
have absorbed refrigerant. Make sure that the oil temperature is above 140 F (60 C) or cooler refrigerant temperature
plus 50° F (27° C).
Cold Weather Operation — When the entering condenser water drops very low, the operator should automatically cycle the cooling tower fans off to keep the
temperature up. Piping may also be arranged to bypass the
cooling tower. The PIC controls have a low limit tower fan
relay (PR3) that can be used to assist in this control.
Manual Guide Vane Operation — Manual operation of the guide vanes in order to check control operation
or control of the guide vanes in an emergency operation is
possible by overriding the target guide vane position.
Access the Status01 table on the LID and highlight
TARGET GUIDE VANE POSITION. To control the position,
enter a percentage of guide vane opening that is desired.
Zero percent is fully closed, 100% is fully open. To release the guide vanes to AUTOMATIC mode, press the
RELEASE softkey.
To Stop the Chiller
1. The occupancy schedule will start and stop the chiller
automatically once the time schedule is set up.
2. By pressing the STOP button for one second, the alarm
light will blink once to confirm that the button has been
pressed, then the compressor will follow the normal shutdown sequence as described in the Controls section. The
chiller will not restart until the CCN or LOCAL softkey is pressed. The chiller is now in the OFF mode.
If the chiller fails to stop, in addition to action that
the PIC will initiate, the operator should close the guide
vanes by overriding the guide vane target to zero to reduce chiller load; then by opening the main disconnect.
Do not attempt to stop the chiller by opening an isolating
knife switch. High intensity arcing may occur. Do not restart the chiller until the problem is diagnosed and
corrected.
NOTE: Manual control will increase the guide vanes and
override the pulldown rate during start-up. Motor current above
the electrical demand setting, capacity overrides, and chilled
water below control point will override the manual target
and close the guide vanes. For descriptions of capacity overrides and set points, see the Controls section.
Refrigeration Log — A refrigeration log, such as
the one shown in Fig. 33, provides a convenient checklist for routine inspection and maintenance and provides a
continuous record of chiller performance. It is an aid in
scheduling routine maintenance and in diagnosing chiller
problems.
Keep a record of the chiller pressures, temperatures, and
liquid levels on a sheet similar to that shown. Automatic
recording of PIC data is possible through the use of CCN
devices such as the Data Collection module and a Building
Supervisor. Contact your Carrier representative for more
information.
After Limited Shutdown — No special preparations
should be necessary. Follow the regular preliminary checks
and starting procedures.
Extended Shutdown — The refrigerant should be transferred into the storage vessel (if supplied; see Pumpout and
Refrigerant Transfer Procedures) in order to reduce chiller
pressure and possibility of leaks. Maintain a holding charge
57
58
Press.
Temp
In
Out
GPM
In
Out
Temp
Press.
In
Out
GPM
CONDENSER
Water
Pressure
Temp
Refrigerant
In
Out
Temp
CHILLER SERIAL NO.
BEARING
TEMP
Press.
Diff.
Temp
(reservoir)
Level
COMPRESSOR
Oil
Motor
FLA
Amperage
(or vane
position)
REFRIGERANT TYPE
Fig. 33 — Refrigeration Log
REMARKS: Indicate shutdowns on safety controls, repairs made, oil or refrigerant added or removed, air exhausted and water drained from dehydrator. Include amounts.
TIME
Water
Pressure
COOLER
DATE
Refrigerant
CHILLER MODEL NO.
Plant
REFRIGERATION LOG CARRIER 19XT HERMETIC CENTRIFUGAL REFRIGERATION MACHINE
OPERATOR
INITIALS
Date
REMARKS
PUMPOUT AND REFRIGERANT TRANSFER
PROCEDURES
Preparation — The 19XL may come equipped with
an optional storage tank or pumpout system, or a pumpout compressor. The refrigerant can be pumped for service
work to either the cooler/compressor vessel or the condenser
vessel by using the optional pumpout system. If a storage
tank is supplied, the refrigerant can be isolated in the
external storage tank. The following procedures describe how
to transfer refrigerant from vessel to vessel and perform chiller
evacuations.
Operating the Optional Pumpout Compressor
1. Be sure that the suction and the discharge service valves
on the optional pumpout compressor are open (backseated) during operation. Rotate the valve stem fully counterclockwise to open. Frontseating the valve closes the
refrigerant line and opens the gage port to compressor
pressure.
2. Make sure that the compressor holddown bolts have been
loosened to allow free spring travel.
3. Open the refrigerant inlet valve on the pumpout
compressor.
4. Oil should be visible in the pumpout compressor sight
glass under all operating conditions and during shutdown. If oil is low, add oil as described under Optional
Pumpout System Maintenance section, page 65. The
pumpout unit control wiring schematic is detailed in
Fig. 34.
C
FU
HP
OL
T’STAT
—
—
—
—
—
LEGEND
Contactor
Fuse, 3 Amps
High-Pressure Cutout
Compressor Overload
Internal Thermostat
Compressor Terminal
Contactor Terminal
Overload Terminal
Pumpout Unit Terminal
*Bimetal thermal protector imbedded in motor winding.
Fig. 34 — 19XL Pumpout Unit
Wiring Schematic
TO READ REFRIGERANT PRESSURES during pumpout
or leak testing:
1. The LID display on the chiller control center is suitable
for determining refrigerant-side pressures and low (soft)
vacuum. For evacuation or dehydration measurement, use
a quality vacuum indicator or manometer to ensure the
desired range and accuracy. This can be placed on the
Schrader connections on each vessel by removing the pressure transducer.
2. To determine storage tank pressure, a 30 in.-0-400 psi
(-101-0-2760 kPa) gage is attached to the vessel.
3. Refer to Fig. 27, 28, and 35 for valve locations and
numbers.
OIL RETURN
LINE
CONNECTION
VENT VALVE 8
PUMPOUT
STARTER
PANEL
Transfer, addition, or removal of refrigerant in springisolated chillers may place severe stress on external piping if springs have not been blocked in both up and down
directions.
CONDENSER
WATER
CONNECTIONS
Chillers with Pumpout Storage Tanks — If the
chiller has isolation valves, leave them open for the following procedures. The letter ‘‘C’’ describes a closed valve. See
Fig. 16, 17, 27, and 28.
REFRIGERANT
INLET VALVE
Fig. 35 — Optional Pumpout Unit
VALVE
1a 1b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14
CONDITION
C
C C
C C C
TRANSFER REFRIGERANT FROM STORAGE TANK TO
CHILLER
1. Equalize refrigerant pressure.
d. Gradually crack open valve 5 to increase chiller pressure to 68 psig (469 kPa), [35 psig (141 kPa)]. Slowly
feed refrigerant to prevent freeze up.
e. Open valve 5 fully after the pressure rises above the
freeze point of the refrigerant. Open liquid line valves
7 and 10 until refrigerant pressure equalizes.
a. Use the Control Test Terminate Lockout to turn on
water pumps and monitor pressures.
b. Close pumpout unit/storage tank valves 2, 4, 5, 8, and
10 and close chiller charging valve 7; open chiller isolation valves 11, 12, 13, and 14 (if present).
c. Open pumpout unit/storage tank valves 3 and 6, open
chiller valves 1a and 1b.
VALVE
1a 1b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14
CONDITION
C
C
C
59
then shut off the pumpout compressor. Warm condenser water will boil off any entrapped liquid refrigerant and chiller pressure will rise.
e. When the pressure rises to 70 psig (483 kPa) [40 psig
(276 kPa)], turn on the pumpout compressor until the
pressure again reaches 65 psig (448 kPa) [30 psig
(207 kPa)], and then turn off the compressor. Repeat
this process until the pressure no longer rises, then
turn on the pumpout compressor and pump out until
the pressure reaches 18 in. Hg (40 kPa absolute).
f. Close valves 1a, 1b, 3, 4, 6, and 7.
2. Transfer remaining refrigerant.
a. Close valve 5 and open valve 4.
VALVE
1a 1b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14
CONDITION
C
C
C
b. Turn off the chiller water pumps through the LID.
c. Turn off the pumpout condenser water, and turn on the
pumpout compressor to push liquid out of the storage
tank.
d. Close liquid line valve 7.
e. Turn off the pumpout compressor.
f. Close valves 3 and 4.
g. Open valves 2 and 5.
VALVE
1a 1b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14
CONDITION C C C C C C C C C C
g. Turn off the pumpout condenser water and continue
with the Control Test for Pumpdown, which will lock
out the chiller compressor for operation.
4. Establish vacuum for service.
a. In order to conserve refrigerant, operate the pumpout compressor until the chiller pressure is reduced to
18 in. Hg vac, ref 30 in. bar. (40 kPa abs.) following
Step 3e.
VALVE
1a 1b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14
CONDITION
C C
C C
h. Turn on pumpout condenser water.
i. Run the pumpout compressor until the storage tank
pressure reaches 5 psig (34 kPa) (18 in. Hg [40 kPa
absolute] if repairing the tank).
j. Turn off the pumpout compressor.
k. Close valves 1a, 1b, 2, 5, 6, and 10.
Chillers with Isolation Valves
VALVE
1a 1b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14
CONDITION C C C C C C C C C C
TRANSFER ALL REFRIGERANT TO CHILLER CONDENSER VESSEL — For chillers with isolation valves, refrigerant can be transferred from one chiller vessel to another
without the need for an external storage tank and valve 7
stays closed. See Fig. 27, 28, and 35 for valve locations.
1. Push refrigerant into chiller condenser.
a. Valve positions:
l. Turn off pumpout condenser water.
TRANSFER THE REFRIGERANT FROM CHILLER TO
STORAGE TANK
1. Equalize refrigerant pressure.
a. Valve positions:
VALVE
CONDITION
VALVE
1a 1b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14
CONDITION
C
C C
C C C
1a
1b
2
3
C
4
C
5
8
C
11
12
C
13
C
14
C
b. Turn off chiller water pumps and pumpout unit condenser water.
c. Turn on pumpout compressor to push liquid out of the
cooler/compressor.
d. When all liquid has been pushed into the condenser,
close cooler isolation valve 11.
e. Access the Control Test, Pumpdown table on the LID
display to turn on the chiller water pumps.
f. Turn off the pumpout compressor.
2. Evacuate gas from cooler/compressor vessel.
a. Close pumpout valves 2 and 5, and open valves 3
and 4.
b. Slowly open valve 5 and liquid line valves 7 and 10
to allow liquid refrigerant to drain by gravity into the
pumpout storage tank.
VALVE
1a 1b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14
CONDITION
C
C
C
2. Transfer the remaining liquid.
a. Turn off pumpout condenser water. Place valves in the
following positions:
VALVE
1a 1b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 2 13 14
CONDITION
C C
C
VALVE
CONDITION
b. Run the pumpout compressor for approximately30 minutes; then, close valve 10.
1a
1b
2
C
3
4
5
C
8
C
11
C
12
C
13
C
14
C
b. Turn on pumpout condenser water.
c. Run pumpout until the compressor reaches 18 in. Hg
vac (40 kPa abs.). Monitor pressures on the LID and
on refrigerant gages.
d. Close valve 1a.
e. Turn off pumpout compressor.
f. Close valves 1b, 3, and 4.
VALVE
1a 1b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14
CONDITION
C C
C C
c. Turn off the pumpout compressor.
3. Remove any remaining refrigerant.
a. Turn on chiller water pumps using the Control Test
Pumpdown.
b. Turn on pumpout condenser water.
c. Place valves in the following positions:
VALVE
CONDITION
VALVE
1a 1b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14
CONDITION
C
C
C C
1a
C
1b
C
2
C
3
C
4
C
5
C
8
C
11
C
12
C
13
C
14
C
g. Turn off pumpout condenser water.
h. Proceed to Pumpdown test on the LID to turn off chiller
water pumps and lock out chiller compressor.
d. Run the pumpout compressor until the chiller pressure reaches 65 psig (448 kPa) [30 psig (207 kPa)],
60
TRANSFER ALL REFRIGERANT TO CHILLER
COOLER/COMPRESSOR VESSEL
1. Push refrigerant into the chiller cooler vessel.
a. Valve positions:
VALVE
CONDITION
1a
1b
2
C
3
4
5
C
8
C
11
12
C
GENERAL MAINTENANCE
Refrigerant Properties — HCFC-22 or HFC-134a
13
C
is the standard refrigerant in the 19XL. At normal atmospheric pressure, HCFC-22 will boil at –41 F (–40 C) and
HFC-134a will boil at –14 F (–25 C) and must, therefore, be
kept in pressurized containers or storage tanks. The refrigerants are practically odorless when mixed with air. Both
refrigerants are non-combustible at atmospheric pressure. Read
the Material Safety Data Sheet and the latest ASHRAE Safety
Guide for Mechanical Refrigeration to learn more about safe
handling of these refrigerants.
14
C
b. Turn off chiller water pumps and pumpout condenser
water.
c. Turn on pumpout compressor to push refrigerant out
of the condenser.
d. When all liquid is out of the condenser, close cooler
isolation valve 11.
e. Turn off the pumpout compressor.
2. Evacuate gas from the chiller condenser vessel.
a. Access the Control Test Pumpdown table on the LID
display to turn on the chiller water pumps.
b. Close pumpout valves 3 and 4; open valves 2 and 5.
VALVE
CONDITION
1a
1b
2
3
C
4
C
5
8
C
11
C
12
C
13
C
HCFC-22 and HFC-134a will dissolve oil and some
non-metallic materials, dry the skin, and, in heavy concentrations, may displace enough oxygen to cause
asphyxiation. When handling this refrigerant, protect the
hands and eyes and avoid breathing fumes.
14
C
Adding Refrigerant — Follow the procedures described in Trimming Refrigerant Charge section, page 54.
c. Turn on pumpout condenser water.
d. Run the pumpout compressor until the chiller compressor reaches 18 in. Hg vac (40 kPa abs.). Monitor
pressure at the LID and refrigerant gages.
e. Close valve 1b.
f. Turn off pumpout compressor.
g. Close valves 1a, 2, and 5.
VALVE
CONDITION
1a
C
1b
C
2
C
3
C
4
C
5
C
8
C
11
C
12
C
13
C
Always use the compressor Pumpdown function in the
Control Test table to turn on the evaporator pump and
lock out the compressor when transferring refrigerant.
Liquid refrigerant may flash into a gas and cause possible freeze-up when the chiller pressure is below
65 psig (448 kPa) [30 psig (207 kPa)].
14
C
Removing Refrigerant — If the optional pumpout unit
h. Turn off pumpout condenser water.
i. Proceed to the Pumpdown test on the LID to turn off
chiller water pumps and lockout chiller compressor.
is used, the 19XL refrigerant charge may be transferred to a
pumpout storage tank or to the chiller condenser or cooler
vessels. Follow procedures in the Pumpout and Refrigerant
Transfer Procedures section when removing refrigerant from
the pumpout storage tank to the chiller vessel.
RETURN REFRIGERANT TO NORMAL OPERATING
CONDITIONS
1. Be sure that the chiller vessel that was opened has been
evacuated.
2. Access the Control Test Terminate Lockout table to view
vessel pressures and turn on chiller water pumps.
3. Open valves 1a, 1b, and 3.
VALVE
CONDITION
1a
1b
2
C
3
4
C
5
C
8
C
11
C
12
C
13
C
Adjusting the Refrigerant Charge — If the addition or removal of refrigerant is required for improved chiller
performance, follow the procedures given under the Trim
Refrigerant Charge section, page 62.
Refrigerant Leak Testing — Because HCFC-22 and
HFC-134a are above atmospheric pressure at room temperature, leak testing can be performed with refrigerant in the
chiller. Use an electronic, halide leak detector, soap bubble
solution, or ultra-sonic leak detector. Be sure that the room
is well ventilated and free from concentration of refrigerant
to keep false readings to a minimum. Before making any
necessary repairs to a leak, transfer all refrigerant from the
leaking vessel.
14
C
4. Crack open valve 5, gradually increasing pressure in the
evacuated vessel to 68 psig (469 kPa) [35 psig (141 kPa)].
Feed refrigerant slowly to prevent tube freeze up.
5. Leak test to ensure vessel integrity.
6. Open valve 5 fully.
VALVE
CONDITION
1a
1b
2
C
3
4
C
5
8
C
11
C
12
C
13
C
Leak Rate — ASHRAE recommends that chillers should
be immediately taken off line and repaired if the refrigerant
leakage rate for the entire chiller is more than 10% of the
operating refrigerant charge per year.
Additionally, Carrier recommends that leaks totalling less
than the above rate but more than a rate of 1 lb (0.5 kg)
per year should be repaired during annual maintenance or
whenever the refrigerant is pumped over for other service
work.
14
C
7. Open valve 11 to equalize the liquid refrigerant level
between vessels.
8. Close valves 1a, 1b, 3, and 5.
9. Open isolation valves 11, 12, 13, and 14 (if present).
VALVE
CONDITION
1a
C
1b
C
2
C
3
C
4
C
5
C
8
C
11
12
13
14
Test After Service, Repair, or Major Leak — If
all refrigerant has been lost or if the chiller has been opened
for service, the chiller or the affected vessels must be pressured and leak tested. Refer to the Leak Test Chiller section
to perform a leak test.
10. Proceed to Terminate Pumpdown Lockout test to turn
off water pumps and enable the chiller compressor for
start-up.
61
HCFC-22 and HFC-134a should not be mixed with
air or oxygen and pressurized for leak testing. In general, neither refrigerant should not be allowed to be present with high concentrations of air or oxygen above
atmospheric pressures, as the mixture can undergo
combustion.
REFRIGERANT TRACER — Use an environmentally
acceptable refrigerant as a tracer for leak test procedures.
TO PRESSURIZE WITH DRY NITROGEN — Another
method of leak testing is to pressurize with nitrogen only
and use a soap bubble solution or an ultrasonic leak detector
to determine if leaks are present. This should only be done
if all refrigerant has been evacuated from the vessel.
1. Connect a copper tube from the pressure regulator on the
cylinder to the refrigerant charging valve. Never apply
full cylinder pressure to the pressurizing line. Follow the
listed sequence.
2. Open the charging valve fully.
3. Slowly open the cylinder regulating valve.
4. Observe the pressure gage on the chiller and close the
regulating valve when the pressure reaches test level. Do
not exceed 140 psig (965 kPa).
5. Close the charging valve on the chiller. Remove the copper tube if no longer required.
Fig. 36 — Guide Vane Actuator Linkage
Refrigerant may be added either through the storage tank
or directly into the chiller as described in the Charge
Refrigerant into Chiller section.
To remove any excess refrigerant, follow the procedure in
Transfer Refrigerant from Chiller to Storage Tank section,
Steps 1a and b, page 60.
Repair the Leak, Retest, and Apply Standing
Vacuum Test — After pressurizing the chiller, test for
leaks with an electronic, halide leak detector, soap bubble
solution, or an ultrasonic leak detector. Bring the chiller back
to atmospheric pressure, repair any leaks found, and retest.
After retesting and finding no leaks, apply a standing vacuum
test, and then dehydrate the chiller. Refer to the Standing
Vacuum Test and Chiller Dehydration in the Before Initial
Start-Up section, pages 43 and 47.
WEEKLY MAINTENANCE
Check the Lubrication System — Mark the oil level
on the reservoir sight glass, and observe the level each week
while the chiller is shut down.
If the level goes below the lower sight glass, the oil
reclaim system will need to be checked for proper operation.
If additional oil is required, add it through the oil drain
charging valve (Fig. 2A or Fig. 2B). A pump is required for
adding oil against refrigerant pressure. The oil charge is
approximately 8 gallons (30 L). The added oil must meet
Carrier specifications for the 19XL. Refer to Changing Oil
Filter and Oil Changes sections on page 63. Any additional
oil that is added should be logged by noting the amount and
date. Any oil that is added due to oil loss that is not related
to service will eventually return to the sump. It must be
removed when the level is high.
A 1200-watt oil heater is controlled by the PIC to maintain oil temperature (see the Controls section) when the
compressor is off. The LID Status02 table displays whether
the heater is energized or not. If the PIC shows that the heater
is energized, but the sump is not heating up, the power to the
oil heater may be off or the oil level may be too low. Check
the oil level, the oil heater contactor voltage, and oil heater
resistance.
The PIC will not permit compressor start-up if the oil
temperature is too low. The control will continue with start-up
only after the temperature is within limits.
Checking Guide Vane Linkage — When the chiller
is off, the guide vanes are closed and the actuator mechanism is in the position shown in Fig. 36. If slack develops in
the drive chain, backlash can be eliminated as follows:
1. With the machine shut down and the actuator fully closed,
remove the chain guard and loosen the actuator bracket
holddown bolts.
2. Loosen guide vane sprocket adjusting bolts.
3. Pry bracket upwards to remove slack, then retighten the
bracket holddown bolts.
4. Retighten the guide vane sprocket adjusting bolts. Make
sure that the guide vane shaft is rotated fully in the clockwise direction in order for it to be fully closed.
CHECKING THE AUXILIARY SWITCH ON GUIDE VANE
ACTUATOR — The auxiliary switch used to activate the oil
reclaim system solenoids should move to the OPEN position when the actuator is 70 degrees open. (At this point the
guide vanes should be 30 degrees open.)
Trim Refrigerant Charge — If it becomes necessary
to adjust the refrigerant charge to obtain optimum chiller performance, operate the chiller at design load and then add or
remove refrigerant slowly until the difference between leaving chilled water temperature and the cooler refrigerant temperature reaches design conditions or becomes a minimum.
Do not overcharge.
62
10. Remove the hose from the charging valve, open the isolation valves to the filter housing, and turn on the power
to the pump and the motor.
SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE
Establish a regular maintenance schedule based on the
actual chiller requirements such as chiller load, run hours,
and water quality. The time intervals listed in this section are
offered as guides to service only.
Oil Specification — The 19XL compressor holds approximately 11.7 gal. (44.3 L) of oil. If oil is added, it must
meet the following Carrier specifications:
• Oil type for HCFC-22 Chillers only . . . . . . . . . . . Alkylbenzene-based synthetic compressor oil
specifically formatted for use in
HCFC-22 gear-driven machines
ISO Viscosity Grade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
• Oil Type for units using R-134a . . . . . . . . . . . . Inhibited
polyolester-based synthetic compressor
oil formatted for use with HFC, geardriven, hermetic compressors.
ISO Viscosity Grade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Service Ontime — The LID will display a SERVICE
ONTIME value on the Status01 table. This value should be
reset to zero by the service person or the operator each time
major service work is completed so that time between service can be viewed.
Inspect the Control Center — Maintenance is limited to general cleaning and tightening of connections. Vacuum
the cabinet to eliminate dust build-up. In the event of chiller
control malfunctions, refer to the Troubleshooting Guide section for control checks and adjustments.
The alkyl-benzene type oil (part number PP23BZ101) or
the polyolester-based oil (part number PP23BZ103) may be
ordered from your local Carrier representative.
Be sure power to the control center is off when
cleaning and tightening connections inside the control
center.
Oil Changes — Carrier recommends changing the oil
after the first year of operation and every 3 years thereafter
as a minimum in addition to a yearly oil analysis. However,
if a continuous oil monitoring system is functioning and a
yearly oil analysis is performed, time between oil changes
can be extended.
TO CHANGE THE OIL
1. Transfer the refrigerant into the condenser (for isolatable
vessels) or a storage tank.
2. Mark the existing oil level.
3. Open the control and oil heater circuit breaker.
4. When the chiller pressure is 5 psi (34 kPa) or less, drain
the oil reservoir by opening the oil charging valve
(Fig. 2A or Fig. 2B). Slowly open the valve against
refrigerant pressure.
5. Change the oil filter at this time. See Changing Oil Filter
section.
6. Change the refrigerant filter at this time; see the next section, Refrigerant Filter.
7. Charge the chiller with oil. Charge until the oil level is
equal to the oil level marked in Step 2. Turn on the
power to the oil heater and let the PIC warm it up to at
least 140 F (60 C). Operate the oil pump manually, through
the Control Test, for 2 minutes. The oil level should be
full in the lower sight glass for shutdown conditions. If
the oil level is above 1⁄2 full in the upper sight glass,
remove the excess oil. The oil level should now be equal
to the amount shown in Step 2.
Check Safety and Operating Controls Monthly
— To ensure chiller protection, the Control Test Automated
Test should be done at least once per month. See
Table 3 for safety control settings. See Table 7 for Control
Test functions.
Changing Oil Filter — Change the oil filter on a yearly
basis or when the chiller is opened for repairs. The 19XL
has an isolatable oil filter so that the filter may be changed
with the refrigerant remaining in the chiller. Use the following procedure:
1. Make sure that the compressor is off, and the disconnect
for the compressor is open.
2. Disconnect the power to the oil pump.
3. Close the oil filter isolation valves (Fig. 4).
4. Connect an oil charging hose from the oil charging valve
(Fig. 4), and place the other end in a clean container
suitable for used oil. The oil drained from the filter housing should be used as an oil sample to be sent to a laboratory for proper analysis. Do not contaminate this sample.
5. Slowly open the charging valve to drain the oil from the
housing.
The oil filter housing is at a high pressure. Relieve
this pressure slowly.
Refrigerant Filter — A refrigerant filter drier, located
on the refrigerant cooling line to the motor (Fig. 2A or 2B),
should be changed once a year, or more often if filter
condition indicates a need for more frequent replacement.
Change the filter with the chiller pressure at 0 psig (0 kPa)
by transferring the refrigerant to the condenser vessel, (if isolation valves are present), or a storage tank. A moisture
indicator sight glass is located beyond this filter to indicate
the volume and moisture in the refrigerant. If the moisture
indicator (dry-eye) indicates moisture, locate the source of
water immediately by performing a thorough leak check.
6. Once all oil has been drained, place some rags or absorbent material under the oil filter housing to catch any
drips once the filter is opened. Remove the 4 bolts from
the end of the filter housing and remove the filter cover.
7. Remove the filter retainer by unscrewing the retainer nut.
The filter may now be removed and disposed of
properly.
8. Replace the old filter with a new filter. Install the filter
retainer and tighten down the retainer nut. Install the filter cover and tighten the 4 bolts.
9. Evacuate the filter housing by placing a vacuum pump
on the charging valve. Follow the normal evacuation procedures. Shut the charging valve when done, and reconnect the valve so that new oil can be pumped into the
filter housing. Fill with the same amount that was
removed, then close the charging valve.
Oil Reclaim Filters — The oil reclaim system has a
strainer on the eductor suction line and a filter on the cooler
scavaging line. Replace these filters once per year, or more
often if filter condition indicates a need for more frequent
replacement. Change these filters by transferring the refrigerant charge to a storage vessel or the condenser.
63
Inspect Refrigerant Float System — Perform
Compressor Bearing and Gear Maintenance — The key to good bearing and gear maintenance is
inspection every 5 years or when the condenser is opened
for service. Transfer the refrigerant into the cooler vessel or
into a storage tank. Remove the float access cover. Clean the
chamber and valve assembly thoroughly. Be sure that the
valve moves freely. Make sure that all openings are free of
obstructions. Examine the cover gasket and replace if necessary. See Fig. 37 for views of both float valve designs. On
the linear float valve design, inspect orientation of the float
slide pin. It must be pointed toward the bubbler tube for proper
operation.
proper lubrication. Use the proper grade of oil, maintained
at recommended level, temperature, and pressure. Inspect the
lubrication system regularly and thoroughly.
To inspect the bearings, a complete compressor teardown
is required. Only a trained service technician should remove
and examine the bearings. The cover plate on older compressor bases was used for factory-test purposes, and is not
usable for bearing or gear inspection. The bearings and gears
should be examined on a scheduled basis for signs of wear.
The frequency of examination is determined by the hours of
chiller operation, load conditions during operation, and the
condition of the oil and the lubrication system. Excessive
bearing wear can sometimes be detected through increased
vibration or increased bearing temperature. If either symptom appears, contact an experienced and responsible service
organization for assistance.
Inspect the Heat Exchanger Tubes
COOLER — Inspect and clean the cooler tubes at the end of
the first operating season. Because these tubes have internal
ridges, a rotary-type tube cleaning system is necessary to fully
clean the tubes. Upon inspection, the tube condition will
determine the scheduled frequency for cleaning, and will
indicate whether water treatment is adequate in the chilled
water/brine circuit. Inspect the entering and leaving chilled
water temperature sensors for signs of corrosion or scale.
Replace the sensor if corroded or remove any scale if found.
CONDENSER — Since this water circuit is usually an opentype system, the tubes may be subject to contamination and
scale. Clean the condenser tubes with a rotary tube cleaning system at least once per year, and more often if the water
is contaminated. Inspect the entering and leaving condenser
water sensors for signs of corrosion or scale. Replace the
sensor if corroded or remove any scale if found.
Higher than normal condenser pressures, together with the
inability to reach full refrigeration load, usually indicate dirty
tubes or air in the chiller. If the refrigeration log indicates a
rise above normal condenser pressures, check the condenser
refrigerant temperature against the leaving condenser water
temperature. If this reading is more than what the design
difference is supposed to be, then the condenser tubes may
be dirty, or water flow may be incorrect. Because HCFC-22
and HFC134-a are high-pressure refrigerants, air usually does
not enter the chiller, rather, the refrigerant leaks out.
During the tube cleaning process, use brushes especially
designed to avoid scraping and scratching the tube wall. Contact your Carrier representative to obtain these brushes. Do
not use wire brushes.
Fig. 37 — 19XL Float Valve Designs
Inspect Relief Valves and Piping — The relief valves
on this chiller protect the system against the potentially dangerous effects of overpressure. To ensure against damage
to the equipment and possible injury to personnel, these
devices must be kept in peak operating condition.
As a minimum, the following maintenance is required.
1. At least once a year, disconnect the vent piping at the
valve outlet and carefully inspect the valve body and
mechanism for any evidence of internal corrosion or rust,
dirt, scale, leakage, etc.
2. If corrosion or foreign material is found, do not attempt
to repair or recondition. Replace the valve.
3. If the chiller is installed in a corrosive atmosphere or the
relief valves are vented into a corrosive atmosphere, make
valve inspections at more frequent intervals.
Hard scale may require chemical treatment for its prevention or removal. Consult a water treatment specialist
for proper treatment.
Water Leaks — Water is indicated during chiller operation by the refrigerant moisture indicator (Fig. 2A or 2B) on
the refrigerant motor cooling line. Water leaks should be repaired immediately.
Chiller must be dehydrated after repair of water leaks.
See Chiller Dehydration section, page 47.
64
Oil should be visible in one of the compressor sight glasses
both during operation and at shutdown. Always check the
oil level before operating the compressor. Before adding or
changing oil, relieve the refrigerant pressure as follows:
1. Attach a pressure gage to the gage port of either compressor service valve (Fig. 35).
2. Close the suction service valve and open the discharge
line to the storage tank or the chiller.
3. Operate the compressor until the crankcase pressure drops
to 2 psig (13 kPa).
4. Stop the compressor and isolate the system by closing
the discharge service valve.
5. Slowly remove the oil return line connection (Fig. 35).
Add oil as required.
6. Replace the connection and reopen the compressor service valves.
Water Treatment — Untreated or improperly treated water may result in corrosion, scaling, erosion, or algae. The
services of a qualified water treatment specialist should be
obtained to develop and monitor a treatment program.
Water must be within design flow limits, clean, and treated
to ensure proper chiller performance and reduce the
potential of tubing damage due to corrosion, scaling, erosion, and algae. Carrier assumes no responsibility for
chiller damage resulting from untreated or improperly
treated water.
Inspect the Starting Equipment — Before working on any starter, shut off the chiller, and open all disconnects supplying power to the starter.
OPTIONAL PUMPOUT SAFETY CONTROL SETTINGS
(Fig. 38) — The optional pumpout system high-pressure switch
should open at 220 ± 5 psig (1517 ± 34 kPa) and should
reset automatically on pressure drop to 190 psig (1310 kPa)
for HCFC-22 chillers. For chillers using HFC-134a, the
switch opens at 161 psig (1110 kPa) and closes at 130 psig
(896 kPa). Check the switch setting by operating the
pumpout compressor and slowly throttling the pumpout
condenser water.
The disconnect on the starter front panel does not deenergize all internal circuits. Open all internal and remote disconnects before servicing the starter.
Never open isolating knife switches while equipment is
operating. Electrical arcing can cause serious injury.
Inspect starter contact surfaces for wear or pitting
on mechanical-type starters. Do not sandpaper or file silverplated contacts. Follow the starter manufacturer’s instructions for contact replacement, lubrication, spare parts ordering, and other maintenance requirements.
Periodically vacuum or blow off accumulated debris on
the internal parts with a high-velocity, low-pressure blower.
Power connections on newly installed starters may relax
and loosen after a month of operation. Turn power off and
retighten. Recheck annually thereafter.
Loose power connections can cause voltage spikes, overheating, malfunctioning, or failures.
Check Pressure Transducers — Once a year, the
pressure transducers should be checked against a pressure
gage reading. Check all three transducers: oil pressure, condenser pressure, cooler pressure.
Note the evaporator and condenser pressure readings
on the Status01 table on the LID. Attach an accurate set of
refrigeration gages to the cooler and condenser Schrader
fittings. Compare the two readings. If there is a difference in
readings, the transducer can be calibrated, as described in
the Troubleshooting Guide section.
Fig. 38 — Optional Pumpout System
Controls
Optional Pumpout System Maintenance —
For compressor maintenance details, refer to the 06D, 07D
Installation, Start-Up, and Service Instructions.
OPTIONAL PUMPOUT COMPRESSOR OIL CHARGE —
The pumpout compressor uses oil with the same specifications as the centrifugal compressor oil. For more details
on oil selection, see Oil Specification section, page 63.
The total oil charge, 4.5 pints (2.6 L), consists of
3.5 pints (2.0 L) for the compressor and one additional pint
(0.6 L) for the oil separator.
Ordering Replacement Chiller Parts — When
ordering Carrier specified parts, the following information
must accompany an order:
• chiller model number and serial number
• name, quantity, and part number of the part required
• delivery address and method of shipment.
65
at the sensor plugs. Check the sensor wire at the sensor for
5 vdc if the control is powered.
TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE
Overview — The PIC has many features to aid the
operator and the technician in troubleshooting a 19XL
chiller.
• By using the LID display, the chiller actual operating conditions can be viewed while the unit is running.
• When an alarm occurs, the default LID screen will freeze
at the time of alarm. The freeze enables the operator to
view the chiller conditions at the time of alarm. The Status
tables will still show the current information. Once all alarms
have been cleared, the default LID screens will return to
normal operation.
• The Control Algorithm Status tables will display various
screens of information in order to diagnose problems with
chilled water temperature control, chilled water temperature control overrides, hot gas bypass, surge algorithm
status, and time schedule operation.
• The Control Test feature allows proper operation and testing of temperature sensors, pressure transducers, the guide
vane actuator, oil pump, water pumps, tower control, and
other on/off outputs while the compressor is stopped. It
also has the ability to lock off the compressor and turn
on water pumps for pumpout operation. The display will
show the required temperatures and pressures during these
operations.
• Other Service menu tables can access configured items,
such as chilled water resets, override set points, etc.
• If an operating fault is detected, an alarm message is generated and displayed on the LID default screen. A more
detailed message — along with a diagnostic message —
also is stored into the Alarm History table.
Relieve all refrigerant pressure or drain the water prior
to replacing the temperature sensors.
CHECK SENSOR ACCURACY — Place the sensor in a
medium of a known temperature and compare that temperature to the measured reading. The thermometer used to
determine the temperature of the medium should be of laboratory quality with 0.5° F (.25° C) graduations. The sensor
in question should be accurate to within 2° F (1.2° C).
See Fig. 8 for sensor locations. The sensors are immersed
directly in the refrigerant or water circuits. The wiring at each
sensor is easily disconnected by unlatching the connector.
These connectors allow only one-way connection to the
sensor. When installing a new sensor, apply a pipe sealant or
thread sealant to the sensor threads.
DUAL TEMPERATURE SENSORS — There are 2 sensors
each on the bearing and motor temperature sensors for
servicing convenience. In case one of the dual sensors is
damaged, the other one can be used by moving a wire.
The number 2 terminal in the sensor terminal box is the
common line. To use the second sensor, move the wire from
the number 1 position to the number 3 position.
Checking Pressure Transducers — There are 3
pressure transducers on the 19XL. These determine cooler,
condenser, and oil pressure. The cooler and condenser transducers also are used by the PIC to determine the refrigerant
temperatures. All 3 can be calibrated if necessary. It is not
usually necessary to calibrate at initial start-up. However, at
high altitude locations, calibration of the transducer will be
necessary to ensure the proper refrigerant temperature/
pressure relationship. Each transducer is supplied with
5 vdc power from a power supply. If the power supply fails,
a transducer voltage reference alarm will occur. If the transducer reading is suspected of being faulty, check the supply
voltage. It should be 5 vdc ± .5 v. If the supply voltage is
correct, the transducer should be recalibrated or replaced.
Checking the Display Messages — The first area
to check when troubleshooting the 19XL is the LID display.
If the alarm light is flashing, check the primary and secondary message lines on the LID default screen (Fig. 13). These
messages will indicate where the fault is occurring. The Alarm
History table on the LID Service menu will also carry an
alarm message to further expand on this alarm. For a complete listing of messages, see Table 9. If the alarm light
starts to flash while accessing a menu screen, depress
EXIT to return to the Default screen to read the failure
message. The compressor will not run with an alarm condition existing, unless the alarm type is an unauthorized start
or a failure to shut down.
IMPORTANT: Whenever the oil pressure or the cooler
pressure transducer is calibrated, the other sensor should
be calibrated to prevent problems with oil differential
pressure readings.
Calibration can be checked by comparing the pressure
readings from the transducer against an accurate refrigeration gage. These readings are all viewed or calibrated from
the Status01 table on the LID. The transducer can be checked
and calibrated at 2 pressure points. These calibration points
are 0 psig (0 kPa) and between 240 and 260 psig (1655 to
1793 kPa). To calibrate these transducers:
1. Shut down the compressor.
2. Disconnect the transducer in question from its Schrader
fitting.
NOTE: If the cooler or condenser vessels are at 0 psig
(0 kPa) or are open to atmospheric pressure, the transducers can be calibrated for zero without removing the
transducer from the vessel.
3. Access the Status01 table, and view the particular transducer reading; it should read 0 psi (0 kPa). If the reading
is not 0 psi (0 kPa), but within ± 5 psi (35 kPa), the value
may be zeroed by pressing the SELECT softkey while
the highlight bar is located on the transducer, and then by
pressing the ENTER . The value will now go to zero.
Checking Temperature Sensors — All temperature sensors are of the thermistor type. This means that the
resistance of the sensor varies with temperature. All sensors
have the same resistance characteristics. Determine sensor
temperature by measuring voltage drop if the controls are
powered, or resistance if the controls are powered off. Compare the readings to the values listed in Tables 10A or 10B.
RESISTANCE CHECK — Turn off the control power and
disconnect the terminal plug of the sensor in question from
the module. Measure sensor resistance between receptacles designated by the wiring diagram with a digital ohmmeter. The resistance and corresponding temperature is listed
in Tables 10A or 10B. Check the resistance of both wires to
ground. This resistance should be infinite.
VOLTAGE DROP — Using a digital voltmeter, the voltage
drop across any energized sensor can be measured while
the control is energized. Tables 10A or 10B lists the relationship between temperature and sensor voltage drop (volts dc
measured across the energized sensor). Exercise care when
measuring voltage to prevent damage to the sensor leads,
connector plugs, and modules. Sensors should also be checked
66
If the transducer value is not within the calibration range,
the transducer will return to the original reading. If
the LID pressure value is within the allowed range (noted
above), check the voltage ratio of the transducer. To obtain the voltage ratio, divide the voltage (dc) input from
the transducer by the supply voltage signal, measured at
the PSIO terminals J7-J34 and J7-J35. For example, the
condenser transducer voltage input is measured at PSIO
terminals J7-1 and J7-2. The voltage ratio must be between 0.80 vdc and 0.11 vdc for the software to allow
calibration. Pressurize the transducer until the ratio is within
range. Then attempt calibration again.
4. A high pressure point can also be calibrated between
240 and 260 psig (1655 and 1793 kPa) by attaching a
regulated 250 psig (1724 kPa) pressure (usually from a
nitrogen cylinder). The high pressure point can be calibrated by accessing the transducer on the Status01 screen,
highlighting the transducer, pressing the SELECT softkey, and then increasing or decreasing the value to the
exact pressure on the refrigerant gage. Press ENTER
to finish. High altitude locations must compensate the
pressure so that the temperature/pressure relationship is
correct.
If the transducer reading returns to the previous value and
the pressure is within the allowed range, check the voltage ratio of the transducer. Refer to Step 3 above. The
voltage ratio for this high pressure calibration must be
between 0.585 and 0.634 vdc to allow calibration. Change
the pressure at the transducer until the ratio is within the
acceptable range. Then attempt calibrate to the new pressure input.
Control Algorithms Checkout Procedure — The
Control Algorithm Status table is in the LID Service menu.
The Control Algorithm Status table contains maintenance tables
that may be viewed in order to see how the particular control
algorithm is operating. The tables are:
MAINT01
MAINT02
MAINT03
MAINT04
(PSIO
Software
Version 09
and Higher)
OCCDEFM
Capacity
Control
This table shows all values that
are used to calculate the chilled
water/brine control point.
Override
Details of all chilled water control
Status
override values are viewed here.
Surge/
The surge and hot gas bypass
HGBP
control algorithm status is viewed
Status
from this screen. All values dealing with this control are displayed.
LEAD/LAG This screen indicates LEAD/LAG
Status
operation status.
Time
Schedules
Status
WSMDEFME Water
System
Manager
Status
The Local and CCN occupied
schedules are displayed here in
a manner that the operator can
quickly determine whether the
schedule is in the OCCUPIED
mode or not.
The water system manager is a
CCN module which can turn on
the chiller and change the chilled
water control point. This screen
indicates the status of this system.
These maintenance tables are very useful in determining
how the control temperature is calculated, the position of the
guide vane, reaction from load changes, control point overrides, hot gas bypass reaction, surge prevention, etc.
The PIC will not allow calibration if the transducer is too
far out of calibration. A new transducer must be installed
and re-calibrated.
Control Test — The Control Test feature can check all
of the thermistor temperature sensors, including those on
the Options modules, pressure transducers, pumps and their
associated flow switches, the guide vane actuator, and other
control outputs, such as hot gas bypass. The tests can help
to determine whether a switch is defective, or a pump relay
is not operating, among other useful troubleshooting tests.
During pumpdown operations, the pumps are energized to
prevent freeze-up and the vessel pressures and temperatures
are displayed. The lockout feature will prevent start-up of
the compressor when no refrigerant is present in the chiller,
or if the vessels are isolated. The lockout is then terminated
by the operator by using the Terminate Lockout function
after the pumpdown procedure is reversed and refrigerant
is added.
TRANSDUCER REPLACEMENT — Since the transducers are mounted on Schrader-type fittings, there is no need
to remove refrigerant from the vessel. Disconnect the transducer wiring by pulling up on the locking tab while pulling
up on the weather-tight connecting plug from the end of the
transducer. Do not pull on the transducer wires. Unscrew
the transducer from the Schrader fitting. When installing a
new transducer, do not use pipe sealer, which can plug the
sensor. Put the plug connector back on the sensor and snap
into place. Check for refrigerant leaks.
Make sure to use a backup wrench on the Schrader fitting whenever removing a transducer.
67
Table 9 — LID Primary and Secondary Messages and Custom Alarm/Alert Messages
with Troubleshooting Guides
A. SHUTDOWN WITH ON/OFF/RESET-OFF
PRIMARY MESSAGE
SECONDARY MESSAGE
MANUALLY STOPPED — PRESS
CCN OR LOCAL TO START
TERMINATE PUMPDOWN MODE
TO SELECT CCN OR LOCAL
SHUTDOWN IN PROGRESS
COMPRESSOR UNLOADING
SHUTDOWN IN PROGRESS
COMPRESSOR DEENERGIZED
ICE BUILD
OPERATION COMPLETE
PROBABLE CAUSE/REMEDY
PIC in OFF mode, press the CCN or local softkey
to start unit.
Enter the Control Test table and select Terminate
Lockout to unlock compressor.
Chiller unloading before shutdown due to Soft
Stop feature.
Chiller compressor is being commanded to stop.
Water pumps are deenergized within one minute.
Chiller shutdown from Ice Build operation.
B. TIMING OUT OR TIMED OUT
PRIMARY MESSAGE
SECONDARY MESSAGE
READY TO START IN XX MIN
UNOCCUPIED MODE
READY TO START IN XX MIN
REMOTE CONTACTS OPEN
READY TO START IN XX MIN
STOP COMMAND IN EFFECT
READY TO START IN XX MIN
RECYCLE RESTART PENDING
READY TO START
UNOCCUPIED MODE
READY TO START
REMOTE CONTACTS OPEN
READY TO START
STOP COMMAND IN EFFECT
READY
READY
READY
READY
REMOTE CONTACTS CLOSED
OCCUPIED MODE
REMOTE CONTACTS CLOSED
OCCUPIED MODE
TO
TO
TO
TO
START IN XX MIN
START IN XX MIN
START
START
STARTUP INHIBITED
LOADSHED IN EFFECT
READY TO START IN XX MIN
START COMMAND IN EFFECT
PROBABLE CAUSE/REMEDY
Time schedule for PIC is unoccupied. Chillers will
start only when occupied.
Remote contacts have stopped chiller. Close contacts to start.
Chiller START/STOP on Status01 manually forced
to stop. Release value to start.
Chiller in recycle mode.
Time schedule for PIC is UNOCCUPIED. Chiller
will start when occupied. Make sure the time and
date have been set on the Service menu.
Remote contacts have stopped chiller. Close contacts to start.
Chiller START/STOP on Status01 manually forced
to stop. Release value to start.
Chiller timer counting down unit. Ready for start.
Chiller timer counting down unit. Ready for start.
Chiller timers complete, unit start will commence.
Chiller timers complete, unit start will commence.
CCN loadshed module commanding chiller to
stop.
Chiller START/STOP on Status01 has been
manually forced to start. Chiller will start regardless of time schedule or remote contact status.
LEGEND
1CR AUX
CA P
CCN
CDFL
CHIL S S
CHW
CHWS
CHWR
CMPD
CRP
CRT
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Compressor Start Contact
Compressor Current
Carrier Comfort Network
Condenser Water Flow
Chiller Start/Stop
Chilled Water
Chilled Water Supply
Chiller Water Return
Discharge Temperature
Condenser Pressure
Condenser Refrigerant
Temperature
ECW
ERT
— Entering Chilled Water
— Evaporator Refrigerant
Temperature
EVFL
— Chilled Water Flow
GV TRG — Target Guide Vane Position
LID
— Local Interface Device
MTRB
— Bearing Temperature
MTRW
— Motor Winding Temperature
OILPD
— Oil Pressure
OILT
— Oil Sump Temperature
PIC
— Product Integrated Control
68
PSIO
— Processor Sensor
Input/Output Module
RLA
— Rated Load Amps
RUN AUX — Compressor Run Contact
SPR PL
— Spare Protective Limit Input
SMM
— Starter Management
Module
STR FLT — Starter Fault
TXV
— Thermostatic Expansion
Valve
V P
— Line Voltage: Percent
V REF
— Voltage Reference
Table 9 — LID Primary and Secondary Messages and Custom Alarm/Alert Messages
with Troubleshooting Guides (cont)
C. IN RECYCLE SHUTDOWN
PRIMARY MESSAGE
SECONDARY MESSAGE
RECYCLE RESTART PENDING
OCCUPIED MODE
RECYCLE RESTART PENDING
REMOTE CONTACT CLOSED
RECYCLE RESTART PENDING
START COMMAND IN EFFECT
RECYCLE RESTART PENDING
ICE BUILD MODE
PROBABLE CAUSE/REMEDY
Unit in recycle mode, chilled water temperature is not
high enough to start.
Unit in recycle mode, chilled water temperature is not
high enough to start.
Chiller START/STOP on Status01 manually forced to
start, chilled water temperature is not high enough to
start.
Chiller in ICE BUILD mode. Chilled Water/Brine Temperature is satisfied for Ice Build Setpoint temperature.
D. PRE-START ALERTS: These alerts only delay start-up. When alert is corrected, the start-up will continue. No reset is necessary.
PRIMARY MESSAGE
SECONDARY MESSAGE
ALARM MESSAGE/PRIMARY CAUSE
PRESTART ALERT
STARTS LIMIT EXCEEDED
STARTS EXCESSIVE Compressor
Starts (8 in 12 hours)
PRESTART ALERT
HIGH MOTOR TEMPERATURE
MTRW [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check motor temperature.
PRESTART ALERT
HIGH BEARING TEMPERATURE
MTRB [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check thrust bearing
temperature.
PRESTART ALERT
HIGH DISCHARGE TEMP
CMPD [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check discharge temperature.
PRESTART ALERT
LOW REFRIGERANT TEMP
ERT [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check refrigerant temperature.
PRESTART ALERT
LOW OIL TEMPERATURE
OILT [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check oil temperature.
PRESTART ALERT
LOW LINE VOLTAGE
V P [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check voltage suppy.
PRESTART ALERT
HIGH LINE VOLTAGE
V P [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check voltage supply.
PRESTART ALERT
HIGH CONDENSER PRESSURE
CRP [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check condenser water and
transducer.
ADDITIONAL CAUSE/REMEDY
Depress the RESET softkey if additional start is required. Reassess
start-up requirements.
Check motor cooling line for proper
operation. Check for excessive
starts within a short time span.
Check oil heater for proper operation, check for low oil level, partially
closed oil supply valves, etc. Check
sensor accuracy.
Check sensor accuracy. Allow discharge temperature to cool. Check
for excessive starts.
Check transducer accuracy. Check
for low chilled water/brine supply
temperature.
Check oil heater power, oil heater
relay. Check oil level.
Check voltage supply. Check voltage transformers. Consult power
utility if voltage is low. Adjust voltage
potentiometer in starter for SMM
voltage input.
Check voltage supply. Check voltage transformers. Consult power
utility if voltage is low. Adjust voltage
potentiometer in starter for SMM
voltage input.
Check for high condenser water
temperature. Check transducer
accuracy.
*[LIMIT] is shown on the LID as temperature, pressure, voltage, etc., predefined or selected by the operator as an override or an alert. [VALUE] is
the actual temperature, pressure, voltage, etc., at which the control tripped.
E. NORMAL OR AUTO.-RESTART
PRIMARY MESSAGE
STARTUP IN PROGRESS
STARTUP IN PROGRESS
SECONDARY MESSAGE
OCCUPIED MODE
REMOTE CONTACT CLOSED
STARTUP IN PROGRESS
START COMMAND IN EFFECT
AUTORESTART IN PROGRESS
AUTORESTART IN PROGRESS
OCCUPIED MODE
REMOTE CONTACT CLOSED
AUTORESTART IN PROGRESS
START COMMAND IN EFFECT
NOTE: See Legend on page 68.
69
PROBABLE CAUSE/REMEDY
Chiller starting. Time schedule is occupied.
Chiller starting. Remote contacts are closed.
Chiller starting. Chiller START/STOP on Status01 manually forced to start.
Chiller starting. Time schedule is occupied.
Chiller starting. Remote contacts are closed.
Chiller starting. Chiller START/STOP on Status01 manually forced to start.
Table 9 — LID Primary and Secondary Messages and Custom Alarm/Alert Messages
with Troubleshooting Guides (cont)
F. START-UP FAILURES: This is an alarm condition. A manual reset is required to clear.
PRIMARY MESSAGE
FAILURE TO START
LOW OIL PRESSURE
OILPD [VALUE] exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check oil pump system.
FAILURE TO START
OIL PRESS SENSOR FAULT
OILPD [VALUE] exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check oil pressure sensor.
FAILURE TO START
LOW CHILLED WATER
FLOW
LOW CONDENSER
WATER FLOW
EVFL Evap Flow Fault: Check water
pump/flow switch.
CDFL Cond. Flow Fault: Check water
pump/flow switch.
FAILURE TO START
STARTER FAULT
STR FLT Starter Fault: Check Starter
for Fault Source.
ADDITIONAL CAUSE/REMEDY
Check for closed oil supply valves. Check
oil filter. Check for low oil temperature.
Check transducer accuracy.
Check for excessive refrigerant in oil sump.
Run oil pump manually for 5 minutes.
Check transducer calibration. Check cooler
pressure transducer calibration. Check
wiring. Replace transducer if necessary.
Check wiring to flow switch. Check through
Control Test for proper switch operation.
Check wiring to flow switch. Check through
Control Test for proper switch operation.
A starter protective device has faulted.
Check starter for ground fault, voltage trip,
temperature trip, etc.
FAILURE TO START
STARTER OVERLOAD TRIP
STR FLT Starter Overload Trip:
Check amps calibration/reset overload.
Reset overloads before restart.
LINE VOLTAGE DROPOUT
V P Single-Cycle Dropout Detected:
Check voltage supply.
FAILURE TO START
FAILURE TO START
FAILURE TO START
SECONDARY MESSAGE
HIGH CONDENSER
PRESSURE
ALARM MESSAGE/PRIMARY CAUSE
High Condenser Pressure [OPEN]*:
Check switch, oil pressure contact, and
water temperature/flow.
High Condenser Pressure [VALUE]*:
Check switch, water flow, and
transducer.
FAILURE TO START
EXCESS ACCELERATION
TIME
CA P Excess Acceleration:
Check guide vane closure at start-up.
FAILURE TO START
STARTER TRANSITION
FAULT
FAILURE TO START
1CR AUX CONTACT FAULT
RUN AUX Starter Transition Fault:
Check 1CR/1M/Interlock mechanism.
1CR AUX Starter Contact Fault:
Check 1CR/1M aux. contacts.
FAILURE TO START
MOTOR AMPS NOT SENSED CA P Motor Amps Not Sensed:
Check motor load signal.
FAILURE TO START
CHECK REFRIGERANT
TYPE
Current Refrigerant Properties
Abnormal —
Check Selection of refrigerant type
FAILURE TO START
LOW OIL PRESSURE
Low Oil Pressure [LIMIT]*:
Check oil pressure switch/pump
and 2C aux.
Check voltage supply. Check transformers
for supply. Check with utility if voltage
supply is erratic. Monitor must be installed
to confirm consistent, single-cycle dropouts. Check low oil pressure switch.
Check the high-pressure switch. Check for
proper condenser pressures and condenser waterflow. Check for fouled tubes.
Check the 2C aux contact and the oil
pressure switch in the power panel. This
alarm is not caused by the transducer.
Check water flow in condenser. Check for
fouled tubes. Transducer should be
checked for accuracy. This alarm is not
caused by the high pressure switch.
Check that guide vanes are closed at
start-up. Check starter for proper operation.
Reduce unit pressure if possible.
Check starter for proper operation.
Run contact failed to close.
Check starter for proper operation.
Start contact failed to close.
Check for proper motor amps signal to
SMM. Check wiring from SMM to current
transformer. Check main motor circuit
breaker for trip.
Pressures at transducers indicate another
refrigerant type in Control Test. Make sure
to access the ATTACH TO NETWORK
DEVICE table after changing refrigerant
type.
The oil pressure differential switch is open
when the compressor tried to START.
Check the switch for proper operation.
Also, check the oil pump interlock (2C aux)
in the power panel and the high condenser
pressure switch.
*[LIMIT] is shown on the LID as the temperature, pressure, voltage, etc., set point predefined or selected by the operator as an override, alert, or
alarm condition. [VALUE] is the actual pressure, temperature, voltage, etc., at which the control tripped. [OPEN] indicates that an input circuit is
open.
NOTE: See Legend on page 68.
70
Table 9 — LID Primary and Secondary Messages and Custom Alarm/Alert Messages
with Troubleshooting Guides (cont)
G. COMPRESSOR JUMPSTART AND REFRIGERANT PROTECTION
PRIMARY MESSAGE
SECONDARY MESSAGE
ALARM MESSAGE/PRIMARY CAUSE
UNAUTHORIZED
OPERATION
UNIT SHOULD BE
STOPPED
CA P Emergency: Compressor
running without control authorization.
POTENTIAL FREEZE-UP
EVAP PRESS/TEMP
TOO LOW
ERT Emergency: Freeze-up
prevention.
FAILURE TO STOP
DISCONNECT POWER
RUN AUX Emergency: DISCONNECT POWER.
LOSS OF
COMMUNCIATION
STARTER CONTACT
FAULT
POTENTIAL FREEZE UP
WITH STARTER
ABNORMAL 1CR OR
RUN AUX
COND PRESS/TEMP
TOO LOW
Loss of Communication with Starter:
Check chiller.
1CR AUX Starter Contact Fault:
Check 1CR/1M aux. contacts.
CRT [VALUE] exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]* Emergency: Freeze-up
prevention.
ADDITIONAL CAUSE/REMEDY
Compressor is running with more than
10% RLA and control is trying to shut it
down. Throw power off to compressor if
unable to stop. Determine cause before
repowering.
Determine cause. If pumping refrigerant
out of chiller, stop operation and go over
pumpout procedures.
Starter and run and start contacts are
energized while control tried to shut
down. Disconnect power to starter.
Check wiring from PSIO to SMM. Check
SMM module troubleshooting procedures.
Starter run and start contacts energized
while chiller was off. Disconnect power.
The condenser pressure transducer is
reading a pressure that could freeze the
water in the condenser tubes. Check for
condenser refrigerant leaks, bad transducers, or transferred refrigerant. Place
the unit in Pumpdown mode to eliminate
ALARM if vessel is evacuated.
*[LIMIT] is shown on the LID as the temperature, pressure, voltage, etc., set point predefined or selected by the operator as an override, alert, or
alarm condition. [VALUE] is the actual pressure, temperature, voltage, etc., at which the control tripped.
H. NORMAL RUN WITH RESET, TEMPERATURE, OR DEMAND
PRIMARY MESSAGE
RUNNING — RESET ACTIVE
RUNNING — RESET ACTIVE
RUNNING — RESET ACTIVE
RUNNING — TEMP CONTROL
RUNNING — TEMP CONTROL
RUNNING — TEMP CONTROL
RUNNING — DEMAND LIMITED
RUNNING — DEMAND LIMITED
RUNNING — DEMAND LIMITED
RUNNING — DEMAND LIMITED
RUNNING — DEMAND LIMITED
SECONDARY MESSAGE
4-20MA SIGNAL
REMOTE SENSOR CONTROL
CHW TEMP DIFFERENCE
LEAVING CHILLED WATER
ENTERING CHILLED WATER
TEMPERATURE RAMP LOADING
BY DEMAND RAMP LOADING
BY LOCAL DEMAND SETPOINT
BY 4-20MA SIGNAL
BY CCN SIGNAL
BY LOADSHED/REDLINE
RUNNING — TEMP CONTROL
HOT GAS BYPASS
RUNNING — DEMAND LIMITED
BY LOCAL SIGNAL
RUNNING — TEMP CONTROL
ICE BUILD MODE
PROBABLE CAUSE/REMEDY
Reset program active based upon Config table setup.
Default method of temperature control.
ECW control activated on Config table.
Ramp loading in effect. Use Service1 table to modify.
Ramp loading in effect. Use Service1 table to modify.
Demand limit setpoint is , actual demand.
Demand limit is active based on Config table setup.
Hot Gas Bypass is energized. See surge prevention
in the control section.
Active demand limit manually overridden or Status01
table.
Chiller is running under Ice Build temperature control.
NOTE: See Legend on page 68.
71
Table 9 — LID Primary and Secondary Messages and Custom Alarm/Alert Messages
with Troubleshooting Guides (cont)
I. NORMAL RUN OVERRIDES ACTIVE (ALERTS)
PRIMARY MESSAGE
RUN CAPACITY
LIMITED
RUN CAPACITY
LIMITED
RUN CAPACITY
LIMITED
RUN CAPACITY
LIMITED
RUN CAPACITY
LIMITED
SECONDARY MESSAGE
HIGH CONDENSER PRESSURE
HIGH MOTOR TEMPERATURE
LOW EVAP REFRIG TEMP
HIGH COMPRESSOR LIFT
MANUAL GUIDE VANE TARGET
ALARM MESSAGE/PRIMARY CAUSE
CRP [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Condenser pressure override.
MTRW [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Motor temperature override.
ERT [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check refrigerant charge level.
Surge Prevention Override; lift too high
for compressor.
GV TRG Run Capacity Limited:
Manual guide vane target.
ADDITIONAL CAUSE/REMEDY
See Capacity Overrides, Table 4.
Correct operating condition, modify
setpoint, or release override.
*[LIMIT] is shown on the LID as the temperature, pressure, voltage, etc., set point predefined or selected by the operator as an override, alert, or
alarm condition. [VALUE] is the actual temperature, pressure, voltage, etc., at which the control tripped.
J. OUT-OF-RANGE SENSOR FAILURES
PRIMARY MESSAGE
SECONDARY MESSAGE
SENSOR FAULT
LEAVING CHW TEMPERATURE
SENSOR FAULT
ENTERING CHW TEMPERATURE
SENSOR FAULT
CONDENSER PRESSURE
SENSOR FAULT
EVAPORATOR PRESSURE
SENSOR FAULT
BEARING TEMPERATURE
SENSOR FAULT
MOTOR WINDING TEMP
SENSOR FAULT
DISCHARGE TEMPERATURE
SENSOR FAULT
OIL SUMP TEMPERATURE
SENSOR FAULT
OIL PRESSURE TRANSDUCER
ALARM MESSAGE/PRIMARY CAUSE
Sensor Fault: Check leaving CHW
sensor.
Sensor Fault: Check entering CHW
sensor.
Sensor Fault: Check condenser
pressure transducer.
Sensor Fault: Check evaporator
pressure transducer.
Sensor Fault: Check bearing
temperature sensor.
Sensor Fault: Check motor temperature
sensor.
Sensor Fault: Check discharge
temperature sensor.
Sensor Fault: Check oil sump
temperature sensor.
Sensor Fault: Check oil pressure
transducer.
NOTE: See Legend on page 68.
72
ADDITIONAL CAUSE/REMEDY
See sensor test procedure and
check sensors for proper operation
and wiring.
Table 9 — LID Primary and Secondary Messages and Custom Alarm/Alert Messages
with Troubleshooting Guides (cont)
K. CHILLER PROTECT LIMIT FAULTS
Excessive numbers of the same fault can lead to severe
chiller damage. Seek service expertise.
PRIMARY MESSAGE
SECONDARY MESSAGE
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
HIGH DISCHARGE
TEMP
CMPD [VALUE] exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check discharge temperature.
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
LOW REFRIGERANT
TEMP
ERT [VALUE] exceeded limit of [LIMIT]*.
Check evap pump and flow switch.
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
HIGH MOTOR
TEMPERATURE
MTRW [VALUE] exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check motor cooling and
solenoid.
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
HIGH BEARING
TEMPERATURE
MTRB [VALUE] exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check oil cooling control.
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
LOW OIL PRESSURE
ALARM MESSAGE/PRIMARY CAUSE
OILPD [VALUE] exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check oil pump and
transducer.
Low Oil Pressure [OPEN]*. Check oil
pressure switch/pump and 2C aux.
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
NO MOTOR CURRENT
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
POWER LOSS
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
LOW LINE VOLTAGE
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
HIGH LINE VOLTAGE
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
LOW CHILLED
WATER FLOW
LOW CONDENSER
WATER FLOW
HIGH CONDENSER
PRESSURE
CA P Loss of Motor Current: Check
sensor.
V P Power Loss: Check voltage
supply.
V P [VALUE] exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check voltage supply.
V P [VALUE] exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check voltage supply.
EVFL Flow Fault: Check evap pump/flow
switch.
CDFL Flow Fault: Check cond pump/
flow switch.
High Cond Pressure [OPEN]*. Check
switch, oil pressure contact, and water
temp/flow.
High Cond Pressure [VALUE]: Check
switch, water flow, and transducer.
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
1CR AUX CONTACT
FAULT
RUN AUX CONTACT
FAULT
1CR AUX Starter Contact Fault: Check
1CR/1M aux contacts.
RUN AUX Starter Contact Fault Check
1CR/1M aux contacts.
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
CCN OVERRIDE STOP
CHIL S S CCN Override Stop while
in LOCAL run mode.
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
SPARE SAFETY
DEVICE
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
EXCESSIVE MOTOR
AMPS
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
EXCESSIVE COMPR
SURGE
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
STARTER FAULT
SRP PL Spare Safety Fault: Check
contacts.
CA P [VALUE] exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. High Amps; Check guide vane
drive.
Compressor Surge: Check condenser
water temp and flow.
STR FLT Starter Fault: Check starter
for fault source.
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
STARTER OVERLOAD
TRIP
STR FLT Starter Overload Trip: Check
amps calibration/reset overload.
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
TRANSDUCER
VOLTAGE FAULT
V REF [VALUE] exceeded limit of
[LIMIT]*. Check transducer power
supply.
PROTECTIVE LIMIT
ADDITIONAL CAUSE/REMEDY
Check discharge temperature immediately. Check sensor for accuracy; check for proper condenser flow and
temperature; check oil reservoir temperature. Check
condenser for fouled tubes or air in chiller. Check for
proper guide vane actuator operation.
Check for proper amount of refrigerant charge; check
for proper water flow and temperatures. Check for
proper guide vane actuator operation.
Check motor temperature immediately. Check sensor
for accuracy. Check for proper condenser flow and
temperature. Check motor cooling system for restrictions. Check motor cooling solenoid for proper operation. Check refrigerant filter.
Check for throttled oil supply isolation valves. Valves
should be wide open. Check oil cooler thermal expansion valve. Check sensor accuracy. Check journal and
thrust bearings. Check refrigerant filter. Check for excessive oil sump level.
Check power to oil pump and oil level. Check for dirty
filters or oil foaming at start-up. Check for thermal
overload cutout. Reduce ramp load rate if foaming
noted.
NOTE: This alarm is not related to pressure switch
problems.
Check the oil pressure switch for proper operation.
Check oil pump for proper pressure. Check for excessive refrigerant in oil system.
Check wiring: Check torque setting on solid-state
starter. Check for main circuit breaker trip. Check
power supply to PSIO module.
Check 24-vdc input sensor on the SMM; adjust potentiometer if necessary. Check transformers to SMM.
Check power to PSIO module. Check distribution bus.
Consult power company.
Perform pumps Control Test and verify proper switch
operation. Check all water valves and pump operation.
Check the high-pressure switch. Check for proper condenser pressures and condenser waterflow. Check for
fouled tubes. Check the 2C aux. contact and the oil
pressure switch in the power panel. This alarm is not
caused by the transducer.
Check water flow in condenser. Check for fouled
tubes. Transducer should be checked for accuracy.
This alarm is not caused by the high pressure switch.
1CR auxiliary contact opened while chiller was running. Check starter for proper operation.
Run auxiliary contact opened while chiller was running.
Check starter for proper operation.
CCN has signaled chiller to stop. Reset and restart
when ready. If the signal was sent by the LID, release
the Stop signal on STATUS01 table.
Spare safety input has tripped or factory-installed
jumper not present.
Check motor current for proper calibration. Check
guide vane drive and actuator for proper operation.
Check condenser flow and temperatures. Check configuration of surge protection.
Check starter for possible ground fault, reverse rotation, voltage trip, etc.
Reset overloads and reset alarm. Check motor current
calibration or overload calibration (do not field-calibrate
overloads).
Check transformer power (5 vdc) supply to transducers. Power must be 4.5 to 5.5 vdc.
*[LIMIT] is shown on the LID as the temperature, pressure, voltage, etc., set point predefined or selected by the operator as an override, alert, or alarm
condition. [VALUE] is the actual temperature, pressure, voltage, etc., at which the control tripped. [OPEN] indicates that an input circuit is open.
NOTE: See Legend on page 68.
73
Table 9 — LID Primary and Secondary Messages and Custom Alarm/Alert Messages
with Troubleshooting Guides (cont)
L. CHILLER ALERTS
PRIMARY MESSAGE
ADDITIONAL CAUSE/REMEDY
Check that guide vanes are closing.
Amps at Recycle: Check guide vane Check motor amps correction caliRECYCLE ALERT
HIGH AMPS AT SHUTDOWN High
drive.
bration is correct. Check actuator for
proper operation.
LEAVING
COND
WATER
Sensor
Fault:
Check
leaving
condenser
SENSOR FAULT ALERT
TEMP
water sensor.
Check sensor. See sensor test
procedure.
ENTERING COND WATER
Sensor Fault: Check entering condenser
SENSOR FAULT ALERT
TEMP
water sensor.
LOW OIL PRESSURE
Check oil filter. Check for improper
CHECK OIL FILTER
Low Oil Pressure Alert: Check oil
ALERT
oil level or temperature.
AUTORESTART PENDING POWER LOSS
V P Power Loss: Check voltage supply.
V P [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
AUTORESTART PENDING LOW LINE VOLTAGE
Check power supply if there are ex[LIMIT].* Check voltage supply.
cessive compressor starts occurring.
V
P
[VALUE]*
exceeded
limit
of
AUTORESTART PENDING HIGH LINE VOLTAGE
[LIMIT].* Check voltage supply.
Discharge temperature exceeded
CMPD [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
SENSOR ALERT
HIGH DISCHARGE TEMP
the alert threshold. Check entering
[LIMIT].* Check discharge temperature.
condenser water temperature.
Thrust
bearing temperature exMTRB [VALUE]* exceeded limit of
HIGH BEARING
ceeded the alert threshold. Check
SENSOR ALERT
[LIMIT]*.
Check
thrust
bearing
TEMPERATURE
for closed valves, improper oil level
temperature.
or temperatures.
CRP
High
Condenser
Pressure
CONDENSER PRESSURE PUMP RELAY ENERGIZED
Check ambient conditions. Check
[LIMIT]*. Pump energized to reduce
ALERT
condenser pressure for accuracy.
pressure.
RECYCLE ALERT
SECONDARY MESSAGE
EXCESSIVE RECYCLE
STARTS
ALARM MESSAGE/PRIMARY CAUSE
Excessive recycle starts.
The chiller load is too small to keep
the chiller on line and there have
been more than 5 restarts in 4
hours. Increase chiller load, adjust
hot gas bypass, increase RECYCLE
RESTART DELTA T.
*[LIMIT] is shown on the LID as the temperature, pressure, voltage, etc., set point predefined or selected by the operator as an override, alert, or
alarm condition. [VALUE] is the actual temperature, pressure, voltage, etc., at which the control tripped.
M. SPARE SENSOR ALERT MESSAGES
PRIMARY MESSAGE
SECONDARY MESSAGE
SPARE SENSOR ALERT
COMMON CHWS SENSOR
SPARE SENSOR ALERT
COMMON CHWR SENSOR
SPARE SENSOR ALERT
REMOTE RESET SENSOR
SPARE SENSOR ALERT
TEMP SENSOR — SPARE 1
SPARE SENSOR ALERT
TEMP SENSOR — SPARE 2
SPARE SENSOR ALERT
TEMP SENSOR — SPARE 3
SPARE SENSOR ALERT
TEMP SENSOR — SPARE 4
SPARE SENSOR ALERT
TEMP SENSOR — SPARE 5
SPARE SENSOR ALERT
TEMP SENSOR — SPARE 6
SPARE SENSOR ALERT
TEMP SENSOR — SPARE 7
SPARE SENSOR ALERT
TEMP SENSOR — SPARE 8
SPARE SENSOR ALERT
TEMP SENSOR — SPARE 9
ALARM MESSAGE/PRIMARY CAUSE
Sensor Fault:
Check common CHWS sensor.
Sensor Fault:
Check common CHWR sensor.
Sensor Fault:
Check remote reset temperature sensor.
Sensor Fault:
Check temperature sensor — Spare 1.
Sensor Fault:
Check temperature sensor — Spare 2.
Sensor Fault:
Check temperature sensor — Spare 3.
Sensor Fault:
Check temperature sensor — Spare 4.
Sensor Fault:
Check temperature sensor — Spare 5.
Sensor Fault:
Check temperature sensor — Spare 6.
Sensor Fault:
Check temperature sensor — Spare 7.
Sensor Fault:
Check temperature sensor — Spare 8.
Sensor Fault:
Check temperature sensor — Spare 9.
NOTE: See Legend on page 68.
74
ADDITIONAL CAUSE/REMEDY
Check alert temperature set points
on Equipment Service, SERVICE2
LID table. Check sensor for accuracy if reading is not accurate.
Table 9 — LID Primary and Secondary Messages and Custom Alarm/Alert Messages
with Troubleshooting Guides (cont)
N. OTHER PROBLEMS/MALFUNCTIONS
DESCRIPTION/MALFUNCTION
Chilled Water/Brine Temperature
Too High (Machine Running)
Chilled Water/Brine Temperature Too Low
(Machine Running)
Chilled Water Temperature Fluctuates.
Vanes Hunt
Low Oil Sump Temperature While Running
(Less than 100 F [38 C])
At Power Up, Default Screen Does Not Appear,
‘‘Tables Loading’’ Message Continually Appears
SMM Communications Failure
High Oil Temperature While Running
Blank LID Screen
‘‘Communications Failure’’ Highlighted Message
At Bottom of LID Screen
Controls Test Disabled
Vanes Will Not Open In Control Test
Oil Pump Does Not Run
PROBABLE CAUSE/REMEDY
Chilled water set point set too high. Access set point on LID and verify.
Capacity override or excessive cooling load (chiller at design capacity).
Check LID status messages. Check for outside air infiltration into
conditioned space.
Condenser temperature too high. Check for proper flow, examine cooling
tower operation, check for air or water leaks, check for fouled tubes.
Refrigerant level low. Check for leaks, add refrigerant, and trim charge.
Liquid bypass in waterbox. Examine division plates and gaskets for
leaks.
Guide vanes fail to open. Use Control Test to check operation.
Chilled water control point too high. Access control algorithm status
and check chilled water control operation.
Guide vanes fail to open fully. Be sure that the guide vane target is
released. Check guide vane linkage. Check limit switch in actuator.
Check that sensor is in the proper terminals.
Chilled water set point set too low. Access set point on LID and verify.
Chilled water control point too low. Access control algorithm status and
check chilled water control for proper resets.
High discharge temperature keeps guide vanes open.
Guide vanes fail to close. Be sure that guide vane target is released.
Check chilled water sensor accuracy. Check guide vane linkage. Check
actuator operation.
Deadband too narrow. Configure LID for a larger deadband.
Proportional bands too narrow. Either INC or DEC proportional bands
should be increased.
Loose guide vane drive. Adjust chain drive.
Defective vane actuator. Check through Control Test.
Defective temperature sensor. Check sensor accuracy.
Check for proper oil level (not enough oil). Check for proper refrigerant
level (too much refrigerant).
Check for proper communications wiring on PSIO module. Check that
the COMM1 communications wires from the LID are terminated to the
COMM1 PSIO connection.
Check that PSIO communication plugs are connected correctly. Check
SMM communication plug. Check for proper SMM power supply. See
Control Modules section on page 78.
Check for proper oil level (too much oil). Check that TXV valve is
operating properly.
Increase contrast potentiometer. See Fig. 40. Check red LED on LID for
proper operation, (power supply). If LED is blinking, but green LED’s are
not, replace LID module, (memory failure)
LID is not properly addressed to the PSIO. Make sure that ‘‘Attach to
Network Device,’’ ‘‘Local Device’’ is set to read the PSIO address. Check
LED’s on PSIO. Is red LED operating properly? Are green LED’s
blinking? See control module troubleshooting section.
Press the ‘‘Stop’’ pushbutton. The PIC must be in the OFF mode for the
controls test to operate. Clear all alarms. Check line voltage percent on
Status01 screen. The percent must be within 90% to 110%. Check
voltage input to SMM, calibrate starter voltage potentiometer for
accuracy.
Low pressure alarm is active. Put chiller into pumpdown mode or
equalize pressure. Check guide vane actuator wiring.
Check oil pump voltage supply. Cooler vessel pressure under vacuum.
Pressurize vessel. Check temperature overload cutout switch.
NOTE: See Legend on page 68.
75
Table 10A — Thermistor Temperature (F) vs Resistance/Voltage Drop
TEMPERATURE VOLTAGE RESISTANCE
(F)
DROP (V)
(Ohms)
−25
4.821
98,010
−24
4.818
94,707
−23
4.814
91,522
−22
4.806
88,449
−21
4.800
85,486
−20
4.793
82,627
−19
4.786
79,871
−18
4.779
77,212
−17
4.772
74,648
−16
4.764
72,175
−15
4.757
69,790
−14
4.749
67,490
−13
4.740
65,272
−12
4.734
63,133
−11
4.724
61,070
−10
4.715
59,081
−9
4.705
57,162
−8
4.696
55,311
−7
4.688
53,526
−6
4.676
51,804
−5
4.666
50,143
−4
4.657
48,541
−3
4.648
46,996
−2
4.636
45,505
−1
4.624
44,066
0
4.613
42,679
1
4.602
41,339
2
4.592
40,047
3
4.579
38,800
4
4.567
37,596
5
4.554
36,435
6
4.540
35,313
7
4.527
34,231
8
4.514
33,185
9
4.501
32,176
10
4.487
31,202
11
4.472
30,260
12
4.457
29,351
13
4.442
28,473
14
4.427
27,624
15
4.413
26,804
16
4.397
26,011
17
4.381
25,245
18
4.366
24,505
19
4.348
23,789
20
4.330
23,096
21
4.313
22,427
22
4.295
21,779
23
4.278
21,153
24
4.258
20,547
25
4.241
19,960
26
4.223
19,393
27
4.202
18,843
28
4.184
18,311
29
4.165
17,796
30
4.145
17,297
31
4.125
16,814
32
4.103
16,346
33
4.082
15,892
34
4.059
15,453
35
4.037
15,027
36
4.017
14,614
37
3.994
14,214
38
3.968
13,826
39
3.948
13,449
40
3.927
13,084
41
3.902
12,730
42
3.878
12,387
43
3.854
12,053
44
3.828
11,730
45
3.805
11,416
46
3.781
11,112
47
3.757
10,816
48
3.729
10,529
49
3.705
10,250
50
3.679
9,979
51
3.653
9,717
52
3.627
9,461
53
3.600
9,213
54
3.575
8,973
55
3.547
8,739
56
3.520
8,511
57
3.493
8,291
58
3.464
8,076
TEMPERATURE VOLTAGE RESISTANCE
(F)
DROP (V)
(Ohms)
59
3.437
7,868
60
3.409
7,665
61
3.382
7,468
62
3.353
7,277
63
3.323
7,091
64
3.295
6,911
65
3.267
6,735
66
3.238
6,564
67
3.210
6,399
68
3.181
6,238
69
3.152
6,081
70
3.123
5,929
71
3.093
5,781
72
3.064
5,637
73
3.034
5,497
74
3.005
5,361
75
2.977
5,229
76
2.947
5,101
77
2.917
4,976
78
2.884
4,855
79
2.857
4,737
80
2.827
4,622
81
2.797
4,511
82
2.766
4,403
83
2.738
4,298
84
2.708
4,196
85
2.679
4,096
86
2.650
4,000
87
2.622
3,906
88
2.593
3,814
89
2.563
3,726
90
2.533
3,640
91
2.505
3,556
92
2.476
3,474
93
2.447
3,395
94
2.417
3,318
95
2.388
3,243
96
2.360
3,170
97
2.332
3,099
98
2.305
3,031
99
2.277
2,964
100
2.251
2,898
101
2.217
2,835
102
2.189
2,773
103
2.162
2,713
104
2.136
2,655
105
2.107
2,597
106
2.080
2,542
107
2.053
2,488
108
2.028
2,436
109
2.001
2,385
110
1.973
2,335
111
1.946
2,286
112
1.919
2,239
113
1.897
2,192
114
1.870
2,147
115
1.846
2,103
116
1.822
2,060
117
1.792
2,018
118
1.771
1,977
119
1.748
1,937
120
1.724
1,898
121
1.702
1,860
122
1.676
1,822
123
1.653
1,786
124
1.630
1,750
125
1.607
1,715
126
1.585
1,680
127
1.562
1,647
128
1.538
1,614
129
1.517
1,582
130
1.496
1,550
131
1.474
1,519
132
1.453
1,489
133
1.431
1,459
134
1.408
1,430
135
1.389
1,401
136
1.369
1,373
137
1.348
1,345
138
1.327
1,318
139
1.308
1,291
140
1.291
1,265
141
1.289
1,240
142
1.269
1,214
76
TEMPERATURE VOLTAGE RESISTANCE
(F)
DROP (V)
(Ohms)
143
1.250
1,190
144
1.230
1,165
145
1.211
1,141
146
1.192
1,118
147
1.173
1,095
148
1.155
1,072
149
1.136
1,050
150
1.118
1,029
151
1.100
1,007
152
1.082
986
153
1.064
965
154
1.047
945
155
1.029
925
156
1.012
906
157
0.995
887
158
0.978
868
159
0.962
850
160
0.945
832
161
0.929
815
162
0.914
798
163
0.898
782
164
0.883
765
165
0.868
750
166
0.853
734
167
0.838
719
168
0.824
705
169
0.810
690
170
0.797
677
171
0.783
663
172
0.770
650
173
0.758
638
174
0.745
626
175
0.734
614
176
0.722
602
177
0.710
591
178
0.700
581
179
0.689
570
180
0.678
561
181
0.668
551
182
0.659
542
183
0.649
533
184
0.640
524
185
0.632
516
186
0.623
508
187
0.615
501
188
0.607
494
189
0.600
487
190
0.592
480
191
0.585
473
192
0.579
467
193
0.572
461
194
0.566
456
195
0.560
450
196
0.554
445
197
0.548
439
198
0.542
434
199
0.537
429
200
0.531
424
201
0.526
419
202
0.520
415
203
0.515
410
204
0.510
405
205
0.505
401
206
0.499
396
207
0.494
391
208
0.488
386
209
0.483
382
210
0.477
377
211
0.471
372
212
0.465
367
213
0.459
361
214
0.453
356
215
0.446
350
216
0.439
344
217
0.432
338
218
0.425
332
219
0.417
325
220
0.409
318
221
0.401
311
222
0.393
304
223
0.384
297
224
0.375
289
225
0.366
282
Table 10B — Thermistor Temperature (C) vs Resistance/Voltage Drop
TEMPERATURE VOLTAGE RESISTANCE
(C)
DROP (V)
(Ohms)
−40
4.896
168 230
−39
4.889
157 440
−38
4.882
147 410
−37
4.874
138 090
−36
4.866
129 410
−35
4.857
121 330
−34
4.848
113 810
−33
4.838
106 880
−32
4.828
100 260
−31
4.817
94 165
−30
4.806
88 480
−29
4.794
83 170
−28
4.782
78 125
−27
4.769
73 580
−26
4.755
69 250
−25
4.740
65 205
−24
4.725
61 420
−23
4.710
57 875
−22
4.693
54 555
−21
4.676
51 450
−20
4.657
48 536
−19
4.639
45 807
−18
4.619
43 247
−17
4.598
40 845
−16
4.577
38 592
−15
4.554
38 476
−14
4.531
34 489
−13
4.507
32 621
−12
4.482
30 866
−11
4.456
29 216
−10
4.428
27 633
−9
4.400
26 202
−8
4.371
24 827
−7
4.341
23 532
−6
4.310
22 313
−5
4.278
21 163
−4
4.245
20 079
−3
4.211
19 058
−2
4.176
18 094
−1
4.140
17 184
0
4.103
16 325
1
4.065
15 515
2
4.026
14 749
3
3.986
14 026
4
3.945
13 342
5
3.903
12 696
6
3.860
12 085
7
3.816
11 506
8
3.771
10 959
9
3.726
10 441
10
3.680
9 949
11
3.633
9 485
12
3.585
9 044
13
3.537
8 627
14
3.487
8 231
15
3.438
7 855
16
3.387
7 499
17
3.337
7 161
TEMPERATURE VOLTAGE RESISTANCE
(C)
DROP (V)
(Ohms)
18
3.285
6 840
19
3.234
6 536
20
3.181
6 246
21
3.129
5 971
22
3.076
5 710
23
3.023
5 461
24
2.970
5 225
25
2.917
5 000
26
2.864
4 786
27
2.810
4 583
28
2.757
4 389
29
2.704
4 204
30
2.651
4 028
31
2.598
3 861
32
2.545
3 701
33
2.493
3 549
34
2.441
3 404
35
2.389
3 266
36
2.337
3 134
37
2.286
3 008
38
2.236
2 888
39
2.186
2 773
40
2.137
2 663
41
2.087
2 559
42
2.039
2 459
43
1.991
2 363
44
1.944
2 272
45
1.898
2 184
46
1.852
2 101
47
1.807
2 021
48
1.763
1 944
49
1.719
1 871
50
1.677
1 801
51
1.635
1 734
52
1.594
1 670
53
1.553
1 609
54
1.513
1 550
55
1.474
1 493
56
1,436
1 439
57
1.399
1 387
58
1.363
1 337
59
1.327
1 290
60
1.291
1 244
61
1.258
1 200
62
1.225
1 158
63
1.192
1 118
64
1.160
1 079
65
1.129
1 041
66
1.099
1 006
67
1.069
971
68
1.040
938
69
1.012
906
70
0.984
876
71
0.949
836
72
0.920
805
73
0.892
775
74
0.865
747
75
0.838
719
77
TEMPERATURE VOLTAGE RESISTANCE
(C)
DROP (V)
(Ohms)
76
0.813
693
77
0.789
669
78
0.765
645
79
0.743
623
80
0.722
602
81
0.702
583
82
0.683
564
83
0.665
547
84
0.648
531
85
0.632
516
86
0.617
502
87
0.603
489
88
0.590
477
89
0.577
466
90
0.566
456
91
0.555
446
92
0.545
436
93
0.535
427
94
0.525
419
95
0.515
410
96
0.506
402
97
0.496
393
98
0.486
385
99
0.476
376
100
0.466
367
101
0.454
357
102
0.442
346
103
0.429
335
104
0.416
324
105
0.401
312
106
0.386
299
107
0.370
285
red LED is normal, check the module address switches
(Fig. 39-43). Proper addresses are:
Control Modules
MODULE
Turn controller power off before servicing controls. This
ensures safety and prevents damage to controller.
SMM (Starter Management Module)
8-input Options Module 1
8-input Options Module 2
The Processor module (PSIO), 8-input (Options) modules, Starter Management Module (SMM), and the Local
Interface Device (LID) module perform continuous diagnostic evaluations of the hardware to determine its condition. See Fig. 39-43. Proper operation of all modules is
indicated by LEDs (light-emitting diodes) located on the
side of the LID, and on the top horizontal surface of the
PSIO, SMM, and 8-input modules.
ADDRESS
S1
S2
3
2
6
4
7
2
If all modules indicate communications failure, check communications plug on the PSIO module for proper seating.
Also check the wiring (CCN bus — 1:red, 2:wht, 3:blk;
Sensor bus — 1:red, 2:blk, 3:clr/wht). If a good connection is assured and the condition persists, replace the PSIO
module.
If only one 8-input module or SMM indicates communication failure, check the communications plug on that
module. If a good connection is assured and the condition persists, replace the module.
All system operating intelligence rests in the PSIO module. Some safety shutdown logic resides in the SMM in
case communications are lost between the 2 modules. The
PSIO monitors conditions using input ports on the PSIO,
the SMM, and the 8-input modules. Outputs are controlled by the PSIO and SMM as well.
3. Power is supplied to modules within the control panel via
21-vac power sources.
The transformers are located within the power panel, with
the exception of the SMM, which operates from a
24-vac power source and has its own 24-vac transformer
located within the starter.
Within the power panel, T1 supplies power to the LID,
the PSIO, and the 5-vac power supply for the transducers. The other 21-vac transformer is T4, which supplies
power to both 8-input modules (if present). T4 is capable
of supplying power to two modules; if additional modules are added, another power supply will be required.
Power is connected to Terminals 1 and 2 of the power
input connection on each module.
RED LED — If the LED is blinking continuously at a
2-second rate, it is indicating proper operation. If it is lit
continuously it indicates a problem requiring replacement
of the module. Off continuously indicates that the power
should be checked. If the red LED blinks 3 times per second, a software error has been discovered and the module
must be replaced. If there is no input power, check fuses and
the circuit breaker. If fuse is good, check for shorted secondary of transformer, or if power is present to the module,
replace the module.
GREEN LEDs — There are one or 2 green LEDs on each
type of module. These LEDs indicate communication status
between different parts of the controller and the network modules as follows:
LID Module
Upper LED — Communication with CCN network, if present;
blinks when communication occurs.
Lower LED — Communication with PSIO module; must
blink every 5 to 8 seconds when the LID default screen is
displayed.
PSIO Module
Green LED Closest to Communications Connection — Communication with SMM and 8-input module; must blink
continuously.
Other Green LED — Communication with LID; must blink
every 3 to 5 seconds.
8-Input Modules and SMM
Green LED — Communication with PSIO module; will blink
continuously.
Notes on Module Operation
1. The chiller operator monitors and modifies configurations in the microprocessor through the 4 softkeys and
the LID. Communication with the LID and the PSIO is
accomplished through the CCN bus. The communication
between the PSIO, SMM, and both 8-input modules is
accomplished through the sensor bus, which is a 3-wire
cable.
On sensor bus terminal strips, Terminal 1 of PSIO module is connected to Terminal 1 of each of the other
modules. Terminals 2 and 3 are connected in the same
manner. See Fig. 39-43. If a Terminal 2 wire is connected
to Terminal 1, the system does not work.
2. If a green LED is solid on, check communication wiring.
If a green LED is off, check the red LED operation. If the
Fig. 39 — PSIO Module Address Selector Switch
Locations and LED Locations
78
Starter Management Module (SMM) (Fig. 42)
INPUTS — Inputs on strips J2 and J3 are a mix of analog
and discrete (on/off) inputs. Application of the chiller determines which terminals are used. Always refer to the
individual unit wiring diagram for terminal numbers.
OUTPUTS — Outputs are 24 vdc and wired to strip J1. There
are 2 terminals used per output.
NOTE: Address switches on this module can be at any position.
Addresses are only changed through the LID screen or CCN.
Fig. 40 — LID Module (Rear View) and
LED Locations
Processor Module (PSIO) (Fig. 41)
INPUTS — Each input channel has 3 terminals; only 2 of
the terminals are used. Application of chiller determines which
terminals are normally used. Always refer to individual unit
wiring for terminal numbers.
OUTPUTS — Output is 20 vdc. There are 3 terminals per
output, only 2 of which are used, depending on the application. Refer to the unit wiring diagram.
NOTE: SMM address switches should be set as follows:
S1 set at 3; S2 set at 2.
Fig. 42 — Starter Management Module
(SMM)
Options Modules (8-Input) — The options modules
are optional additions to the PIC, and are used to add temperature reset inputs, spare sensor inputs, and demand limit
inputs. Each option module contains 8 inputs, each input meant
for a specific duty. See the wiring diagram for exact module
wire terminations. Inputs for each of the options modules
available include the following:
OPTIONS MODULE 1
4 to 20 mA Auto. Demand Reset
4 to 20 mA Auto. Chilled Water Reset
Common Chilled Water Supply Temperature
Common Chilled Water Return Temperature
Remote Temperature Reset Sensor
Spare Temperature 1
Spare Temperature 2
Spare Temperature 3
OPTIONS MODULE 2
4 to 20 mA Spare 1
4 to 20 mA Spare 2
Spare Temperature 4
Spare Temperature 5
Spare Temperature 6
Spare Temperature 7
Spare Temperature 8
Spare Temperature 9
NOTE: Address switches on this module can be at any position.
Addresses are only changed through the LID screen or CCN.
Fig. 41 — Processor (PSIO) Module
79
Terminal block connections are provided on the options
modules. All sensor inputs are field wired and installed.
Options module number 1 can be factory or field-installed.
Options module 2 is shipped separately and must be field
installed. For installation, refer to the unit or field wiring
diagrams. Be sure to address the module for the proper module number (Fig. 43) and to configure the chiller for each
feature being used.
SWITCH
SETTING
S1
S2
OPTIONS
MODULE 1
6
4
INSTALLATION
1. Verify that the existing PSIO module is defective by using the procedure described in the Troubleshooting Guide
section, page 66, and Control Modules section, page 78.
Do not select the Attach to Network Device table if the
LID displays communication failure.
2. Data regarding the PSIO configuration should have been
recorded and saved. This data will have to be reconfigured into the LID. If this data is not available, follow
the procedures described in the Set Up Chiller Control
Configuration section.
If a CCN Building Supervisor or Service Tool is present,
the module configuration should have already been
uploaded into memory; then, when the new module is
installed, the configuration can be downloaded from the
computer.
Any communication wires from other chillers or CCN
modules should be disconnected to prevent the new PSIO
module from uploading incorrect run hours into memory.
3. To install this module, first record the TOTAL COMPRESSOR STARTS and the COMPRESSOR ONTIME
from the Status01 table screen on the LID.
4. Power off the controls.
5. Remove the old PSIO. DO NOT install the new PSIO at
this time.
6. Turn on the control power. When the LID screen reappears, press the MENU softkey, then press the
SERVICE softkey. Enter the password, if applicable.
Move the highlight bar down to the ATTACH TO NETWORK DEVICE line. Press the SELECT softkey.
Now, press the ATTACH softkey. The LID will display ‘‘UPLOADING TABLES, PLEASE WAIT’’ and
then display ‘‘COMMUNICATIONS FAILURE.’’ Press
the EXIT softkey.
7. Turn the control power off.
8. Install the new PSIO module. Turn the control power
back on.
9. The LID will now automatically upload the new PSIO
module.
10. Access the Status01 table and move the highlight bar
down to the TOTAL COMPRESSOR STARTS line. Press
the SELECT softkey. Increase the value to indicate
the correct starts value recorded in Step 2. Press the
ENTER softkey when you reach the correct value. Now,
move the highlight bar to the COMPRESSOR ONTIME line. Press the SELECT softkey. Increase the run
hours value to the value recorded in Step 2. Press the
ENTER softkey when the correct value is reached.
11. Complete the PSIO installation. Following the instructions in the Start-up, Operation, and Maintenance manual,
input all the proper configurations such as time, date,
etc. Re-calibrate the motor amps and check the pressure transducer calibrations. PSIO installation is now
complete.
OPTIONS
MODULE 2
7
2
Fig. 43 — Options Module
Replacing Defective Processor Modules — The
replacement part number is printed in a small label on front
of the PSIO module. The model and serial numbers are printed
on the unit nameplate located on an exterior corner post.
The proper software is factory-installed by Carrier in the
replacement module. When ordering a replacement processor module (PSIO), specify complete replacement part
number, full unit model number, and serial number. This new
unit requires reconfiguration to the original chiller data by
the installer. Follow the procedures described in the Set Up
Chiller Control Configuration section on page 50.
Electrical shock can cause personal injury. Disconnect
all electrical power before servicing.
80
Solid-State Starters — Troubleshooting guides and information pertaining to the operation of the solid-state starter
may be found in Fig. 44-46 and Table 11.
Attempt to solve the problem by using the following
preliminary checks before consulting the troubleshooting
table.
When the power is off:
• Inspect for physical damage and signs of arcing, overheating, etc.
• Is the wiring to the starter correct?
• Are all connections in the starter tight?
• Is the current feedback resistor properly adjusted and
installed?
• Is a heater coil installed in each leg of the motor?
• Is the control transformer fuse blown?
• Is the motor connected to the starter?
TESTING SILICON CONTROL RECTIFIERS IN
BENSHAW, INC. SOLID-STATE STARTERS — If a silicon control rectifier (SCR) is suspected of being defective,
use the following procedure as part of a general troubleshooting guide.
LEGEND
SCR — Silicon Control Rectifier
Fig. 44 — Typical Benshaw, Inc. Solid-State
Starter (internal View)
IMPORTANT: Before performing the SCR check below, remove power from the starter and disconnect the
motor terminals T1, T2, and T3.
Resistance should normally be between 8 and 20 ohms
average. Excessively high or low resistance may be
indicative of a defective logic card. Replace and retest.
6. Repeat Step 5 for SCR leads 2 through 6. Care should
be taken to ensure that the gate and cathode wires are
replaced exactly as they were: white wire to gate
(G1 through G6); red wire to cathode (K1 through K6).
1. Connect ohmmeter across terminals L1 and T1. Resistance reading should be greater than 50,000 ohms.
2. If reading is less than 50,000 ohms, remove connecting
bus heatsink between SCR3 and SCR6 and check anode
to cathode of SCR3 and SCR6 separately to determine
which device is defective. See Fig. 44. Replace defective
device and retest controller.
3. Repeat Steps 1 and 2 across terminals L2 and T2 for SCRs
2 and 5.
4. Repeat Steps 1 and 2 across terminals L3 and T3 for SCRs
1 and 4.
If the SCRs tested were not defective but the problem
still persists, refer to the following Steps 5 and 6.
5. Disconnect the SCR1 from the white gate and red cathode wires on the AK control logic card. With an ohmmeter set on Rx1, check between white and red wires.
Damage to the starter may result if wires are
reversed.
If the problem is still not resolved, consult the starter manufacturer for servicing.
81
LEGEND
SCR — Silicon Control Rectifier
*See test procedure described in Testing SCRs in Solid-State Starters section on page 81.
Fig. 45 — Solid-State Starter, General Operation Troubleshooting Guide (Typical)
82
Fig. 46 — Solid-State Starter, Starter Fault (Motor Will Not Start)
Troubleshooting Guide (Typical)
83
Table 11 — Benshaw, Inc. Solid-State Starter Troubleshooting Guide
PROBLEM
AK board phase correct not
on.
AK board relay not on.
AK board power
+15 vdc not on.
PROBABLE CAUSES
1. L1 and L3 switch phases
reversed.
2. Missing phase voltage.
3. Improper line voltage.
Ribbon cable not properly
seated.
1. Improper line voltage.
2. Transformer malfunction.
1L boards LEDs not on.
1. A short exists between line
and load terminals.
2. An SCR is shorted in the
phase assembly.
BC board over-temperature
LED (L3) on prior to run
command.
1. Temperature switch not
functioning properly.
BC board LEDs on prior to run
command.
BC board LEDs not on after
run command but before
starter reaches full voltage.
1L board LEDs remain on after
starter reaches full voltage.
BC board run LED (L5) not lit.
AK board power applied, run
command given, starter at full
voltage, but aux LED not lit.
1L boards LEDs lit.
BC board LED L4 and L5
not lit.
BC board LED L3 lit.
2. BC board not functioning
properly.
BC board not functioning
properly.
1. Phase assembly malfunction.
2. BC board not functioning
properly.
Imbalance between phases
exists in motor terminal voltages.
BC board not functioning
properly.
AK board not functioning
properly.
Motor terminal voltage phase
imbalance exists.
BC board not functioning
properly.
1. FU5 and FU6 fuses not
functioning properly.
2. Phase assembly not
functioning properly.
BC board L1 lit.
Start command given.
Motor does not reach full
speed within 25 seconds.
115 vac missing from LL1
and LL2.
SMM not responding.
SCR phases not functioning
properly.
Motor lead grounded.
Motor does not begin rotation.
Ramp up setting is not correct.
1.
2.
1.
2.
2. Check for missing phase voltage.
3. Verify proper line voltage applied against synchronizing transformer
voltage.
Check ribbon cable for proper seating. Replace board if necessary.
1. Make sure proper line voltage is present at primary synchronizing
transformer.
2. Check synchronizing transformer secondary voltage as follows: On
the BC board, measure from TB11-1 to TB11-2 and TB11-1 to
TB11-3. Both readings should be within 30 to 36 vac. On the BC
board, measure from TB11-1 to TB11-4 and TB11-2 to TB11-4. Both
readings should be within 18 to 24 vac. Replace synchronizing
transformer if voltages are not within the specified tolerances.
1. Remove power and check resistance with ohmmeter.
Locate and remove stray wire strands if required.
2. Remove power. Use ohmmeter to measure the resistance or each
SCR phase assembly from anode to cathode. The reading should
be 50,000 ohm or greater. If not, replace phase assembly.
1. Disconnect power and check for continuity between TB11-10 and
TB11-11. If no continuity exists, the overtemperature switch is not
functioning properly. Replace defective switch if necessary.
2. Make sure BC board is functioning properly. Replace board if
necessary.
Board not functioning properly. Replace board, if necessary.
1. Remove power and check SCRs. Ohmmeter reading of each SCR
gate to cathode resistance at terminals is 8 to 20 ohm. If not,
replace the phase assembly.
2. Replace board, if necessary.
Check for loose SCR gate lead or open SCR gate. Replace phase
assembly, if necessary.
Measure 24 vdc at TB11-8 to TB11-4. If voltage is present, replace
board. If not present, replace relay 1CR.
Replace board.
Check motor terminal voltages for imbalance between phases. If an
imbalance exists, check for loose SCR gate or open SCR gate.
Replace phase assembly, if necessary.
Replace board.
1. Check fuses FU5 and FU6. Replace if necessary.
3. Fan not functioning properly.
BC board L2 lit.
AREA OF CORRECTION
1. Switch incoming phases L1 and L3 at top of CD1 or CB1.
CB2 is not on.
Fuse no. 4 (FU4) blown.
CB4 is not on.
Potentiometer RV1 needs
adjustment.
2. Verify that bypass is pulling in by measuring the voltage drop
across the contacts. The reading should be 50 mV or less.
Replace phase assembly, if necessary.
3. Verify fan operation on each phase for 200 amp units. Replace
fan, if necessary.
Measure resistance from anode to cathode for each SCR phase
assembly. Replace shorted phase, if necessary.
Megger motor to test for motor lead going to ground.
Turn ‘Starting Torque’ potentiometer RV2 clockwise until motor
rotation begins.
Turn ‘Ramp’ potentiometer RV1 counterclockwise. Restart motor
and verify that motor reaches full speed within 25 seconds.
1. Verify CB2 is on.
2. Check FU4 for continuity. Replace, if necessary.
1. Verify CB4 is on.
2. Adjust potentiometer RV1 for 24 vac at SMM terminals J3-23 and
J3-24.
LEGEND
AK
BC
CB
CD
CR
FU
LED
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Vendor Board Designation
Vendor Board Designation
Circuit Breaker
Disconnect Switch
Control Relay
Fuse
Light-Emitting Diode
L1, L3
LL1, LL2
RV1
SCR
SMM
TB
—
—
—
—
—
—
Terminal Board
Control Power Terminals
Line Voltage Signal Calibration
Silicon Control Rectifier
Starter Management Module
Terminal Board
84
clearances, physical and electrical data, and wiring schematics for operator convenience during troubleshooting.
Physical Data — Tables 12-17 and Fig. 47-51 provide additional information regarding compressor fits and
Table 12 — Heat Exchanger Data
COOLER
VESSEL
HEAT
EXCHANGER
CODE
NUMBER
OF TUBES
COOLER
40
41
42
43
50
51
52
53
55
56
57
58
201
227
257
290
314
355
400
445
201
227
257
290
RIGGING WEIGHTS
Dry Wt.
Design I
Lb
5000
5150
5325
5500
6625
6850
7100
7375
—
—
—
—
Kg
2275
2350
2425
2500
3000
3100
3225
3350
—
—
—
—
Design II
Lb
5340
5485
5655
5845
7020
7255
7510
7770
8510
8845
9205
9575
Kg
2422
2488
2565
2651
3184
3291
3406
3524
3860
4012
4175
4343
Design I
HCFC-22
Lb
Kg
1020
463
1090
494
1150
522
1200
544
1450
658
1500
680
1580
717
1650
748
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
VESSEL CHARGE
Refrigerant
Design II
HCFC-22
HFC-134a
Lb
Kg
Lb
Kg
750
341
550
250
800
363
600
272
900
408
650
295
1000
454
700
318
1150
522
750
341
1250
568
850
386
1400
636
950
431
1500
681
1000
454
1410
640
1060
481
1710
776
1160
527
2010
913
1260
572
2210
1003
1410
640
Volume
of Water
Gal
53
58
64
71
79
87
96
104
104
115
128
140
L
201
220
242
269
299
329
363
394
395
438
486
531
CONDENSER
VESSEL
HEAT
EXCHANGER
CODE
NUMBER
OF TUBES
CONDENSER
40
41
42
43
50
51
52
53
55
56
57
58
218
246
279
315
347
387
432
484
218
246
279
315
RIGGING WEIGHTS
Dry Wt.
Design I
Design II
Lb
Kg
Lb
Kg
5050
2100
4855
2202
5200
2350
5010
2272
5375
2450
5180
2350
5575
2525
5370
2436
7050
3200
6750
3062
7275
3300
6960
3157
7500
3400
7200
3266
7775
3525
7475
3391
—
—
8345
3785
–
—
8635
3917
—
—
8980
4073
—
—
9370
4250
VESSEL CHARGE
Refrigerant
Design I
Design II
Lb
Kg
Lb
Kg
400
181
350
159
400
181
350
159
400
181
350
159
400
181
350
159
400
181
350
159
400
181
350
159
400
181
350
159
400
181
350
159
—
—
490
222
—
—
490
222
—
—
490
222
—
—
490
222
Volume
of Water
Gal
56
62
68
75
84
92
101
110
112
123
135
149
L
212
235
257
284
318
348
382
416
423
466
513
565
NOTES:
1. Design I chillers are equipped with a float box, and chiller weight is based on a 150 psi (1034 kPa)
waterbox with 2 pass arrangement.
2. Design II chillers are equipped with a linear float, and chiller weight is based on a 300 psi (2068 kPa)
waterbox with 1 pass arrangement.
3. Total refrigerant charge is equal to the cooler charge added to the condenser charge.
Table 13 — Additional Data for Marine Waterboxes*
HEAT EXCHANGER
FRAME, PASS
FRAME
FRAME
FRAME
FRAME
4,
4,
5,
5,
2
1
2
1
PASS
& 3 PASS
PASS
& 3 PASS
ENGLISH
Rigging Wt
Water Volume
(lb)
(gal)
Cooler
Condenser
Cooler
Condenser
1115
660
69
51
2030
1160
138
101
1220
935
88
64
2240
1705
175
128
*Add to heat exchanger weights and volumes for total weight or volume.
85
SI
Rigging Wt
(kg)
Cooler
Condenser
506
300
922
527
554
424
1017
774
Water Volume
(L)
Cooler
Condenser
261
193
524
384
331
243
663
486
Table 14 — Waterbox Cover Weights*
ENGLISH (lb)
HEAT
EXCHANGER
COOLERS
CONDENSERS
WATERBOX
DESCRIPTION
NIH, 1 PASS COVER
NIH, 2 PASS COVER
NIH, 3 PASS COVER
NIH, PLAIN END COVER
MWB COVER
PLAIN END COVER
NIH, 1 PASS COVER
NIH, 2 PASS COVER
NIH, 3 PASS COVER
NIH, PLAIN END COVER
MWB COVER
PLAIN END COVER
FRAME 4,
STANDARD
NOZZLES
150 psig 300 psig
284
414
285
411
292
433
243
292
CS
621
CS
482
306
446
288
435
319
466
226
271
CS
474
CS
359
FRAME 4,
FLANGED
150 psig
324
341
309
243
CS
CS
346
344
336
226
CS
CS
300 psig
491
523
469
292
621
482
523
547
502
271
474
359
FRAME 5,
STANDARD
NOZZLES
150 psig 300 psig
412
578
410
573
423
602
304
426
CS
766
CS
471
373
472
368
469
407
493
271
379
CS
590
CS
428
FRAME 5,
FLANGED
150 psig
452
466
440
304
CS
CS
413
428
419
271
CS
CS
300 psig
655
685
638
426
766
471
549
541
549
379
590
428
SI (kg)
HEAT
EXCHANGER
COOLERS
CONDENSERS
WATERBOX
DESCRIPTION
NIH, 1 PASS COVER
NIH, 2 PASS COVER
NIH, 3 PASS COVER
NIH, PLAIN END COVER
MWB COVER
PLAIN END COVER
NIH, 1 PASS COVER
NIH, 2 PASS COVER
NIH, 3 PASS COVER
NIH, PLAIN END COVER
MWB COVER
PLAIN END COVER
LEGEND
NIH
— Nozzle-in-Head
MWB — Marine Waterbox
CS
— Contact Syracuse
FRAME 4,
STANDARD
NOZZLES
1034 kPa 2068 kPa
129
188
129
187
133
197
110
133
CS
282
CS
219
139
202
131
197
145
212
103
123
CS
215
CS
163
FRAME 4,
FLANGED
1034 kPa
147
155
140
110
CS
CS
157
156
153
103
CS
CS
2068 kPa
223
237
213
133
282
219
237
248
228
123
215
163
FRAME 5,
STANDARD
NOZZLES
1034 kPa 2068 kPa
187
262
186
260
192
273
138
193
CS
348
CS
214
169
214
167
213
185
224
123
172
CS
268
CS
194
FRAME 5,
FLANGED
1034 kPa
205
212
200
138
CS
CS
188
194
190
123
CS
CS
2068 kPa
297
311
290
193
348
214
249
246
249
172
268
194
*These weights are for reference only. To determine frame size, see Fig. 1.
NOTE: For Design I chillers, the 150 psig (1034 kPa) standard waterbox cover weights (NIH, 2-pass
cover) have been included in the heat exchanger weights shown in Table 12. Design II chillers are
equipped with a linear float, and chiller weight is based on a 300 psig (2066 kPa) waterbox with 1-pass
arrangement.
86
Table 15 — Compressor/Motor Weights
MOTOR
SIZE
Compressor
Weight
(lb)
CB
CC
CD
CE
CL
CM
CN
CP
CQ
CR
2660
2660
2660
2660
2660
2660
2660
2660
2660
2660
ENGLISH
Stator Weight
Rotor Weight
(lb)
(lb)
60 Hz
50 Hz
60 Hz
50 Hz
1135
1147
171
233
1143
1150
197
239
1153
1213
234
252
1162
1227
237
255
1202
1283
246
270
1225
1308
254
275
1276
1341
263
279
1289
1356
266
284
1306
1363
273
287
1335
1384
282
294
End Bell
Cover
(lb)
Compressor
Weight
(kg)
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
250
1208
1208
1208
1208
1208
1208
1208
1208
1208
1208
SI
Stator Weight
(kg)
60 Hz
50 Hz
515
520
518
522
523
551
528
557
546
582
556
594
579
609
585
616
593
619
606
628
Rotor Weight
(kg)
60 Hz
50 Hz
78
106
90
109
106
114
108
116
112
123
115
125
119
127
121
129
124
130
128
133
End Bell
Cover
(lb)
114
114
114
114
114
114
114
114
114
114
NOTE: For medium voltage motors add 85 lbs (39 kg) to above for 60 Hz motors and 145 lbs (66 kg)
for 50 Hz motors. Total compressor/motor weight is the sum of the compressor, stator, rotor, and end
bell cover weight. Compressor weight includes suction and discharge elbow weights.
Table 16 — Compressor Weights
COMPONENT
SUCTION ELBOW
DISCHARGE ELBOW
TRANSMISSION
SUCTION HOUSING
IMPELLER SHROUD
COMPRESSOR BASE
DIFFUSER
OIL PUMP
MISCELLANEOUS
TOTAL WEIGHT
(Less Motor)
Table 17 — Optional Pumpout System
Electrical Data
WEIGHT
Lb
55
50
730
350
80
1050
70
150
135
Kg
25
23
331
159
36
476
32
68
61
2660
1207
MOTOR
CODE
1
4
5
6
CONDENSER
UNIT
19EA47-748
19EA42-748
19EA44-748
19EA46-748
LEGEND
LRA — Locked Rotor Amps
RLA — Rated Load Amps
87
VOLTS-PH-Hz
575-3-60
200/208-3-60
230-3-60
400/460-3-50/60
MAX
RLA
3.8
10.9
9.5
4.7
LRA
23.0
63.5
57.5
28.8
NOTES:
1. Dimensions are in inches with rotor in the thrust position.
2. All clearances listed are new chiller tolerances.
3. All radial clearances are diametrical.
NOTE: Radial clearances shown are diametrical.
Fig. 47 — Compressor Fits and Clearances
88
COMPRESSOR ASSEMBLY TORQUES
TORQUE
ITEM
DESCRIPTION
1*
2
3
4
5
6*
7*
Oil Heater Grommet Nut
Impeller Retaining Bolt
Bull Gear Retaining Bolt
Motor Terminals (Low Voltage)
Demister Bolts
Guide Vane Shaft Seal Nut
Motor Terminals (High Voltage)
— Insulator
— Packing Nut
— Brass Jam Nut
ft-lb
10
44-46
80-85
50
15-19
25
N•m
14
60-62
108-115
68
20-26
34
2-4
5
10
2.7-5.4
6.8
13.6
LEGEND
N•m — Newton Meters
*Not shown.
*‘‘Z’’ clearance is determined by a combination of impeller diameter and shroud size. The
table lists ‘‘Z’’ clearances for each compressor code. Figure 1 shows the location (on the
chiller information plate) of the compressor code for each chiller.
COMPRESSOR
CODE
203-204
223-274
283-307
321-377
381-397
410-469
470-499
‘‘Z’’
(in.)
.025
.015
.025
.015
.025
.015
.025
‘‘Z’’
(mm)
0.635
0.381
0.635
0.381
0.635
0.381
0.635
COMPRESSOR
CODE
516-517
518-519
526-527
528-529
536-537
538-539
‘‘Z’’
(in.)
.015
.025
.015
.025
.015
.025
‘‘Z’’
(mm)
0.381
0.635
0.381
0.635
0.381
0.635
COMPRESSOR
CODE
546-547
548-549
556-557
558-559
566-567
568-569
Fig. 47 — Compressor Fits and Clearances (cont)
89
‘‘Z’’
(in.)
.015
.025
.015
.025
.015
.025
‘‘Z’’
(mm)
0.381
0.635
0.381
0.635
0.381
0.635
LEGEND
BRG
C
CB
CLR
COM
COMM
EXT
G.V.
HGBP
INT
J
K
LID
MA
NC
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Bearing
Contact
Circuit Breaker
Clear
Common
Communication Connector
External
Guide Vane
Hot Gas Bypass
Internal
Module Connector
Relay Designation
Local Interface Device
Milliampere
Normally Closed
NO
PSIO
— Normally Open
— Processor Sensor Input/
Output Module
RBPL — Relay Board Plug
S
— Compressor Motor Start Contactor
SMM — Starter Management Module
SOL — Solenoid
TB
— Terminal Board
Carrier Factory Wiring
Optional (Factory or Field-Installed)
Wiring
Thermistor
t*
Fig. 48 — Electronic PIC Controls Wiring Schematic
(For 19XL with No Backlight or with Fluorescent Backlight)
90
Fig. 48 — Electronic PIC Controls Wiring Schematic
(For 19XL with No Backlight or with Fluorescent Backlight) (cont)
91
LEGEND
BRG
C
CB
CLR
COM
COMM
EXT
G.V.
HGBP
INT
J
K
LID
MA
NC
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Bearing
Contact
Circuit Breaker
Clear
Common
Communication Connector
External
Guide Vane
Hot Gas Bypass
Internal
Module Connector
Relay Designation
Local Interface Device
Milliampere
Normally Closed
NO
PSIO
— Normally Open
— Processor Sensor Input/
Output Module
RBPL — Relay Board Plug
S
— Compressor Motor Start Contactor
SMM — Starter Management Module
SOL — Solenoid
TB
— Terminal Board
Carrier Factory Wiring
Optional (Factory or Field-Installed)
Wiring
Thermistor
t*
Fig. 49 — Electronic PIC Controls Wiring Schematic
(For 19XL with Halogen Backlight)
92
Fig. 49 — Electronic PIC Controls Wiring Schematic
(For 19XL with Halogen Backlight) (cont)
93
1M
C
CB
CR
COMM
J
N.C.
N.O.
OL
OS
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
LEGEND
Main Starter Contactor
PR
Contactor
PWR
Circuit Board
RLA
Control Relay
SMM
Communications Connector
TB
Connector
X
Normally Closed
Normally Open
Overload
3-Phase Current Power Source
—
—
—
—
—
—
Pilot Relay
Power
Rated Load Amps
Starter Management Module
Terminal Board
Variable Number
Starter Cabinet Wiring
Field Wiring
Carrier Factory Wiring
*All starters, including across-the-line starters, require 2 separate contacts for the START AUX
DRY contact and RUN AUX DRY contact, as shown above.
Fig. 50 — Chiller Power Panel, Starter Assembly,
and Motor Wiring Schematic
94
Fig. 50 — Chiller Power Panel, Starter Assembly,
and Motor Wiring Schematic (cont)
95
96
—
—
—
—
—
—
HPS
J
L1, L2, L3
NC
OL
OS1, OS2,
OS3
Main Compressor Contactors
Circuit Breaker
Control Relay
Current Transformer
Disconnect
Ground Fault
Ground Fault Relay
Power Transformer Input
Terminal
High-Pressure Switch
Module Connector
3-Phase Line Terminals
Normally Closed
Overload
3-Phase Current Power
Source to Oil Pump
Dry Contact
LEGEND
PMR
— Phase Loss Reversal Relay
PMRVR — Phase Loss, Phase Reversal,
Overvoltage, Undervoltage Relay
POT
— Potentiometer
PR
— Pilot Relay
S
— Compressor Motor Start Contactor
SMM
— Starter Management Module
ST
— Shunt Trip
T
— Motor Terminal
TB
— Terminal Board
TR
— Transition Resistor
TRFP
— Transition Resistor Fault Protector
X
— Variable Number
X1, X2 — Power Transformer Output Terminal
Fig. 51 — Typical Wye-Delta Unit Mounted Starter Wiring Schematic
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
1M, 2M
CB
CR
CT
DS
GF
GFR
H1, H2
97
Yellow wires remain energized when main disconnect is off.
NOTE: Optional features are indicated by bold dotted boxes.
Fig. 51 — Typical Wye-Delta Unit Mounted Starter Wiring Schematic (cont)
NOTES:
1. Contactors 2M and S are mechanically interlocked.
2. Transition resistor fault protector (TRFP) is preset to trip if transition contactor
(1A) remains energized for longer than one second.
3. When optional phase loss reversal relay (PMR) or phase loss, phase reversal,
overvoltage, undervoltage relay (PMRVR) is not provided, terminals 3-13A and
3-13B are jumpered together.
4. When optional ground fault is not provided, terminals 3-13B and 3-13C are
jumpered together.
5. This oil pump circuit breaker and terminal board TB7 are provided only on starters for centrifugal machines.
6. POT to be adjusted to 24 v at rated line voltage.
7. CT4 and CT5 are provided only when the optional watt transducer is provided.
8. These 3 wires to the ammeter switch are connected together only when the
optional 3-phase ammeter is not provided.
9. PMRTR is provided only if the optional phase loss phase reversal relay (PMR)
is provided. The combination PMRVR has an internal time delay and does not
require PMRTR.
10. Connections on the above schematic are numbered to match the markings on
the control wires within the starter. Wires entering terminal boards are marked
with the terminal number.
11. Oil pump AUX. contact not supplied on screw machines.
INDEX
Abbreviations and Explanations, 4
Adding Refrigerant, 61
Adjusting the Refrigerant Charge, 61
After Extended Shutdown, 57
After Limited Shutdown, 57
Attach to Network Device Control, 37
Automatic Soft-Stop Amps Threshold, 40
Auto. Restart After Power Failure, 33
Before Initial Start-Up, 41
Calibrate Motor Current, 56
Capacity Override, 31
Carrier Comfort Network Interface, 48
Changing Oil Filter, 63
Charge Refrigerant Into Chiller, 53
Chilled Water Recycle Mode, 40
Chiller Dehydration, 47
Chiller Familiarization, 5
Chiller Information Plate, 5
Chiller Operating Condition (Check), 56
Chiller Tightness (Check), 41
Chillers with Isolation Valves, 60
Chillers with Pumpout Storage Tanks, 59
Cold Weather Operation, 57
Compressor Bearing and Gear Maintenance, 64
Condenser, 5
Condenser Freeze Prevention, 32
Condenser Pump Control, 32
Control Algorithms Checkout Procedure, 67
Control Center, 5, 63
Control Modules, 78
Control Test, 67
Controls, 11
Cooler, 5
Default Screen Freeze, 29
Definitions (Controls), 11
Demand Limit Control, Option, 33
Design Set Points, (Input), 50
Details (Lubrication Cycle), 8
Display Messages (Check), 66
Dry Run to Test Start-Up Sequence, 55
Equipment Required, 41
Extended Shutdown, 57
Factory-Mounted Starter, 5
General (Controls), 11
General Maintenance, 61
Guide Vane Linkage (Check), 62
Heat Exchanger Tubes (Inspect), 64
High Altitude Locations, 53
High Discharge Temperature Control, 32
Ice Build Control, 36
Initial Start-Up, 55
Instruct the Customer Operator, 56
Introduction, 4
Job Data Required, 41
Lead/Lag Control, 34
Leak Rate, 61
Leak Test Chiller, 41
LID Operation and Menus, 14
Local Occupied Schedule (Input), 50
Local Start-Up, 39
Lubrication Cycle, 8
Lubrication System (Check), 62
Manual Guide Vane Operation, 57
Manual Operation of the Guide Vanes, 55
Motor-Compressor, 5
Motor Cooling Control, 29
Motor/Oil Refrigeration Cooling Cycle, 5
Notes on Module Operation, 78
Oil Changes, 63
Oil Charge, 50
Oil Cooler, 32
Oil Pressure and Compressor Stop (Check), 56
Oil Reclaim Filters, 63
Oil Reclaim System, 9
Oil Specification, 63
Oil Sump Temperature Control, 32
Open Oil Circuit Valves, 41
Operating Instructions, 56
Operating the Optional Pumpout Compressor, 59
Operator Duties, 56
Optional Pumpout System Maintenance, 65
Options Modules, 79
Ordering Replacement Chiller Parts, 65
Overview (Troubleshooting Guide), 66
Physical Data, 85
PIC System Components, 11
PIC System Functions, 28
Power Up the Controls and Check the Oil Heater, 50
Pumpout Compressor Water Piping (Check), 47
Pumpout System Controls and Compressor (Check), 52
Preparation (Initial Start-Up), 55
Preparation (Pumpout and Refrigerant Transfer
Procedures), 59
Prepare the Chiller for Start-Up, 56
Pressure Transducers (Check), 65, 66
Prevent Accidential Start-Up, 56
Processor Module, 79
Pumpout and Refrigerant Transfer Procedures, 59
Ramp Loading Control, 31
Refrigerant Filter, 63
Refrigerant Float System (Inpsect), 64
Refrigerant Leak Testing, 61
Refrigerant Properties, 61
Refrigerant (Removing), 61
Refrigerant Tracer, 41
Refrigeration Cycle, 5
Refrigeration Log, 57
Relief Devices (Check), 47
Relief Valves and Piping (Inspect), 64
Remote Start/Stop Controls, 32
Repair the Leak, Retest, and Apply Standing
Vacuum Test, 62
Replacing Defective Processor Modules, 80
Rotation (Check), 55
Running System (Check), 56
Safety and Operating Controls (Check Monthly), 63
Safety Considerations, 1
Safety Controls, 29
Safety Shutdown, 41
Scheduled Maintenance, 63
Selecting Refrigerant Type, 50
Service Configuration (Input), 50
Service Ontime, 63
Service Operation, 38
Set Up Chiller Control Configuration, 50
Shipping Packaging (Remove), 41
Shutdown Sequence, 40
Solid-State Starters, 81
Spare Safety Inputs, 32
Standing Vacuum Test, 43
Starter (Check), 48
Starter Management Module, 79
Starting Equipment, 10, 65
Start-Up/Shutdown/Recycle Sequence, 39
Start the Chiller, 56
Stop the Chiller, 57
98
INDEX (cont)
Storage Vessel, 5
Summary (Lubrication Cycle), 8
Surge Prevention Algorithm, 33
Surge Protection, 34
System Components, 5
Temperature Sensors (Check), 66
Test After Service, Repair, or Major Leak, 61
Tighten All Gasketed Joints and Guide Vane Shaft
Packing, 41
Tower Fan Relay, 33
Trim Refrigerant Charge, 62
Troubleshooting Guide, 66
Unit Mounted Solid-State Starter, 10
Unit Mounted Wye-Delta Starter, 11
Using the Optional Storage Tank and Pumpout
System, 41
Water/Brine Reset, 33
Water Leaks, 64
Water Piping (Inspect), 47
Water Treatment, 65
Weekly Maintenance, 62
Wiring (Inspect), 47
99
Copyright 1996 Carrier Corporation
Manufacturer reserves the right to discontinue, or change at any time, specifications or designs without notice and without incurring obligations.
Book 2
PC 211
Catalog No. 531-971
Printed in U.S.A.
Form 19XL-4SS
Pg 100
7-96
Replaces: 19XL-3SS
Tab 5a