Specifications | Carrier 39L Air Conditioner User Manual

39L,NX
Central Station Air-Handling Units
With Product Integrated Controls (PIC)
Installation, Operation, and
Start-Up Instructions
CONTENTS
Page
SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-64
Service Area Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Remote Control Box Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
• REMOTE CONTROL BOX CONDENSATE
PREVENTION
Make Electrical Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Variable Frequency Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Water Valve Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
• VALVE WIRING
Duct Static Pressure Probe (VAV Units) . . . . . . 39
Space Temperature Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Outdoor-Air Temperature Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Mixed-Air Temperature Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Enthalpy Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
• CONTROL RANGES
Supply-Air Temperature Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Return-Air Temperature Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Heat Interlock Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Fan Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Duct High Humidity Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Wall-Mounted Relative Humidity Sensor . . . . . . 46
Duct-Mounted Relative Humidity Sensor . . . . . . 47
• LOCATION FOR OUTSIDE AIR RELATIVE
HUMIDITY
• LOCATION FOR RETURN AIR RELATIVE
HUMIDITY
Mixing Box Linkage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Airflow Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Low-Temperature Thermostat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Outdoor-Air Thermostat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Filter Status Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
High-Pressure Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Air Quality Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Constant Outside Air (OAC) Control . . . . . . . . . . 50
• PROBE INSTALLATION
• OAC CALIBRATION
• USING OAVP VALUES TO DETERMINE DUCT
AIRFLOW
• FIELD-SUPPLIED OR HIGH-VELOCITY
PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS
Field Wiring Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
• REMOTE LOCAL INTERFACE DEVICE (HSIO)
• RETURN-AIR TEMPERATURE SENSOR,
OUTDOOR-AIR TEMPERATURE SENSOR,
ENTHALPY SWITCH, AND MIXED-AIR
TEMPERATURE SENSOR
• SPACE TEMPERATURE SENSOR (SPT)
• DAMPER ACTUATORS
• SMOKE CONTROL OPTION
• ANALOG DEVICE FOR ANALOG OUTPUT
TEMPERATURE CONTROL
• DEVICE UNDER DISCRETE OUTPUT
TEMPERATURE CONTROL
• DISCRETE OUTPUT DEVICE UNDER
TIMECLOCK CONTROL
• HUMIDIFICATION DEVICES
• AIR QUALITY SENSOR
• OUTSIDE AIR VELOCITY PRESSURE (OAVP)
SENSOR
• FAN VOLUME CONTROL
• ELECTRIC HEATER
• CARRIER COMFORT NETWORK INTERFACE
• OUTDOOR-AIR THERMOSTAT
CONTROL SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64-68
Processor (PSIO Master) and Option (PSIO Slave)
Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Relay (DSIO) Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Local Interface Device (HSIO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
CONTROL OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-91
Accessing Functions and Subfunctions . . . . . 69
Display Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
• SUMMARY DISPLAY
• STATUS FUNCTION
• HISTORY FUNCTION
• TEST FUNCTION
Programming Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
• SERVICE FUNCTION
• SET POINT FUNCTION
• SCHEDULE FUNCTION
CONTROL OPERATING SEQUENCE . . . . . . . 92-102
Constant Volume and Variable Air
Volume Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Constant Volume Units Only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Variable Air Volume Units Only . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
START-UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103-108
Initial Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Quick Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Electronic Valve Actuator Field Test . . . . . . . . 108
CONTROL LOOP CHECKOUT . . . . . . . . . . . . 108,109
To Check Operation of Analog Outputs . . . . . 108
VALVE TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109-111
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
All 1⁄2-in. Through 11⁄4-in. Electric Hot Water/Steam
Valve Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
All 11⁄2-in. Through 3-in. Valve Assemblies . . 110
CONTROL MODULE
TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111,112
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Module Replacement (PSIO, DSIO) . . . . . . . . . 112
UNIT TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113-115
METRIC CONVERSION CHART . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Manufacturer reserves the right to discontinue, or change at any time, specifications or designs without notice and without incurring obligations.
Book 3
PC 201
Catalog No. 533-913
Printed in U.S.A.
Form 39L,NX-2SI
Pg 1
3-96
Replaces: 39L,NX-1SI
Tab 1b
[Variable Air Volume] units only) and high-pressure switch
(VAV units). An ON/OFF switch is included to shut off the
power to the control box.
PIC environmental limitations are as follows:
IMPORTANT: This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and if not installed and
used in accordance with these instructions may cause
radio interference. It has been tested and found to comply with the limits of a Class A computing device as
defined by FCC regulations, Subpart J of Part 15, which
are designed to provide reasonable protection against
such interference when operated in a commercial
environment.
Shipping Temperature — −20 to 165 F
Shipping Humidity
— 10 to 95%
Operating Temperature — 32 to 125 F
Operating Humidity
— 30 to 90%
INSTALLATION
Follow all basic installation instructions for 39L or 39NX
units as described in the 39L or 39NX Installation, Start-Up,
and Service Instructions shipped with the unit. To verify the
PIC and PIC option configurations according to the model
numbers, see Fig. 1 and 2.
Leave protective coverings on the unit until it is installed
inside and protected from the elements, construction debris,
and dirt.
Use one of the keys provided in the 39L or 39NX installation packet (located in fan section) to open the control box
door. Visually inspect all components and wiring for any damage. Remove the valve assembly packages and the sensor
packages from the fan section. For units with PIC sections,
remove protective plastic caps from the bulkhead fittings
(located on the top edge of the control box) and discard.
Verify that the 10.0 amp ON/OFF switch located on the
PIC control box door is in the OFF position. Do not turn the
power supply on at this time.
NOTE: The 39NX and 39L air handlers are designed for indoor applications. Modified units are available for outdoor
applications on pier or slab mounts (not curb mounts). Product integrated controls are not available for outdoor applications. Consult your Carrier sales representative for further
details.
SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS
Installation and start-up of air-conditioning equipment can
be hazardous due to system pressure and electrical components. Only trained and qualified service personnel should
install, start up, or service air-conditioning equipment.
When working on air-conditioning equipment, observe precautions in the literature, tags and labels attached to the unit,
and other safety precautions that may apply.
Follow all safety codes, including ANSI (American
National Standards Institute) Z223.1 (latest version). Wear
safety glasses and work gloves.
Disconnect all power to the unit before performing maintenance or service. Unit may automatically start if power
is not disconnected. Electrical shock and personal injury could result.
Do not store or use gasoline or other flammable vapors
and liquids in the vicinity of this or any other
appliance.
Service Area Requirements — Article 110-16 of the
NEC (National Electrical Code) describes electrical installation. All 39L and 39NX PIC installations must comply with
the minimum clearances required for electrical installation
as listed in Table 110-16(a) of the code. Make sure to provide the necessary clearance from the PIC unit to any adjoining wall. Refer to the base unit installation instructions
for detailed dimensions for each unit section.
GENERAL
The Product Integrated Control (PIC) option is available
for 39L and 39NX indoor units with a draw-thru configuration. The PIC control box can be supplied as part of a dedicated PIC section; it is factory-installed and wired and has
the same hand (orientation) as the fan section. The control
box can also be shipped separately for remote mounting without a PIC section. For the remote control box option, all connections from the control box to the unit are made to a junction box in the unit’s fan section.
The control box includes electronic modules, fuses, relays, transformers, terminal blocks, low-limit air temperature protection (optional), static pressure transducer (VAV
Remote Control Box Option — This option allows
the PIC control box to be mounted away from the unit; the
remote control box (Fig. 3) must be wired to the supply fan
section. Mount the remote control box assembly to the
mechanical room wall near the unit using field-supplied
Unistrutt metal framing or equivalent supports. The control
box has 4 mounting holes in the back of the enclosure for
this purpose.
2
Mount the remote control box as follows:
1. Loosen and remove the 4 nuts securing the control panel
in the control box.
2. Remove the control panel from the box; set the panel and
nuts aside for reassembly later.
3. Mount the control box to the Unistrutt support using fieldsupplied fasteners.
4. Locate, mark, and drill pilot holes on the top of the box
for each of the following:
• Motor starter wiring
• Actuator and sensor wires to fan section junction box
• Supply power wires (ac)
• Valve wiring or tubing (water valves, field-supplied
sensors, or other devices)
5. Expand the pilot holes as required. Recommended sizes
are as follows:
• Motor starter wiring — 3⁄4 in. (5 wires)
• Actuator and sensor wires to fan section junction
box — 3⁄4 in. to 1 in. (number of wires and hole diameter determined by application)
• Supply power wires (ac) — 1⁄2 in. or 3⁄4 in.
• Valve wiring or tubing — size as required
Fan section panels are provided with pilot holes that can
be drilled or punched to accomodate an electrical conduit
for the remote control box wiring. Where possible, install
the conduit in a panel that will not be removed, such as the
discharge panel. See Fig. 4.
IMPORTANT: To ease installation, control wiring is
located on the service side of the unit with electrical
connectors provided at all unit separation points. If a
unit is separated into pieces for installation, rejoin all
connectors in their original alpha-numeric sequence upon
reassembly. Connectors for vertical fan sections that
are shipped out of the normal operating position must
also be joined at final assembly.
For units with an integral PIC section, all unit factory control wiring is internal. Only a small number of wires must be
field-installed. All internal wiring consists of plenum wires
which enter the rear of the control box through sealed fittings. Control wiring is 18 to 20 gage, 2-conductor twisted
pair.
The electrical power disconnect and fan motor starter are
field-supplied and installed. Connections are provided in the
control box to wire a field-supplied HOA (HANDS/OFF/
AUTOMATIC) switch. If an HOA switch is used, it must be
field-installed in the supply and return fan motor starter circuit. The factory-wired high-pressure switch (variable air volume only) and low-temperature thermostat options are energized when the supply fan circuit is powered.
See Fig. 5-7 for control box component arrangements and
Fig. 8 for fan motor wiring. PIC input and output points are
listed in Table 1. Consult the wiring diagram located in the
control box or Fig. 9-12 for further details.
Power is present in the PIC control box in the motor
starter circuit even when the dedicated power to the PIC
control box is off.
REMOTE CONTROL BOX CONDENSATE PREVENTION — When the remote control box is installed, precautions must be taken to prevent condensation from forming
inside the junction box mounted in the unit’s supply fan section. Standard installation practice is to mount the remote
control box adjacent to the air handling unit and then to enclose the Class II wiring in flexible conduit between the control box and the junction box in the fan section.
The sheet metal housing of the control box is not airtight,
therefore warm, moist air can migrate through the flexible
conduit to the junction box in the fan section. Condensate
can form inside the junction box and possibly on the terminal lugs.
To prevent moist air from migrating through the conduit,
seal the control wires inside the conduit at the remote control box enclosure. See Fig. 4. Use a nonconductive, nonhardening sealant. Permagum (manufactured by Schnee
Morehead) or sealing compound, thumb grade (manufactured by Calgon), are acceptable materials.
The supply and return fan starter circuits are independent
from each other. Either circuit and its related control box
interface can have 24 vac, 120 vac, or 240 vac power.
All options that require a factory-installed transformer
are fused with 3.2 amp fuses on the secondary of each
transformer.
When the control box is shipped separately for remote mounting, all unit wiring terminates in a junction box located in
the fan section. Refer to Fig. 12 for the applicable wiring
diagram and Table 2 for junction box connections.
If the unit is provided with a factory-installed smoke control option, refer to the section titled Field-Wiring Connections, Smoke Control Option, page 54.
All PIC electrical components are UL (Underwriters’ Laboratories) listed. The electronic modules are approved under
UL HVAC Equipment Standard 873. PIC units are listed and
labeled by ETL (Engineering Testing Laboratory) to comply
with UL Standard 1995 for heating and cooling units, and
comply with NFPA (National Fire Protection Association)
Standard 90A.
Make Electrical Connections — 39L and 39NX units
have internal control wiring for the operation of the PIC section and its control devices. The control system requires a
dedicated 120 vac or 230 vac (50 or 60 Hz) power circuit
capable of providing a minimum of 10 amps (but not greater
than 20 amps) to the control box. The actual number of controls on one power source depends on the installation and
power circuit requirements. Do not run PIC power wiring in
the same conduit as sensor wiring or control wiring of fieldinstalled devices.
3
ABX
AF
CV
IGV
FC
FMB
MXB
PIC
VAV
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
LEGEND
Air Blender
Airfoil
Constant Volume
Inlet Guide Vanes
Forward-Curved
Filter Mixing Box
Mixing Box
Product Integrated Controls
Variable Air Volume
*The cv capacity rating is the flow (gpm) through a valve at 1 psi pressure drop.
Fig. 1 — Basic PIC Order Number
4
AF
CV
DX
FC
FMB
MXB
N.C.
N.O.
PIC
VAV
LEGEND
— Airfoil
— Constant Volume
— Direct Expansion
— Forward-Curved
— Filter Mixing Box
— Mixing Box
— Normally Closed
— Normally Open
— Product Integrated Controls
— Variable Air Volume
*The cv capacity rating is the flow (gpm) through a
valve at 1 psi pressure drop.
Fig. 2 — PIC Option Order Number
5
NOTE: Dimensions in [
] are in millimeters.
Fig. 3 — Control Box for Remote Mounting
Fig. 4 — Sealing Control Wiring in Flexible Conduit
6
LEGEND (Fig. 5-12, Table 2)
AFS
AO
AOTC
AQ1
AQ2
C
CCW
CH
CR
CUST
CV
CW
CWV
DHH
DO
DOTC
DSIO
DTCC
DX
DXS
DXSD
EHS
ELEC
ENT
EQUIP
EVAC
EXD
FLTS
FSD
FU
GND
HIR
HOA
HPS
HSIO
HT
HUM
HWV
IGV
LTT
MAD
MAT
MPSIO
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
OAD
OARH
OAT
OAVP
—
—
—
—
Airflow Switch
Analog Output
Analog Output Temperature Control
Air Quality Sensor, No. 1
Air Quality Sensor, No. 2
Contactor
Counterclockwise
Channel
Control Relay
Condensing Unit Status
Constant Volume
Clockwise
Chilled Water Valve
Duct High Humidity
Discrete Output
Discrete Output Temperature Control
Control Module, Electric Heat and/or DX
Discrete Time Clock Control
Direct Expansion
DX Cooling Stage
Direct Expansion Cooling Shutdown
Electric Heaters
Electric
Enthalpy Switch
Equipment
Smoke Evacuation Input
Exhaust Air Damper Actuator
Filter Status Switch
Fire Shutdown Device
Fuse
Ground
Heat Interlock Relay
Hand-Off-Auto. Switch
High-Pressure Switch
Keyboard and Display Module
Heat
Humidifier
Hot Water Valve
Inlet Guide Vane Actuator
Low Temperature Thermostat
Mixed-Air Damper Actuator
Mixed-Air Temperature
Master Processor Module
(Processor Module)
Outdoor-Air Damper Actuator
Outdoor-Air Relative Humidity
Outdoor-Air Temperature
Outdoor-Air Velocity Pressure
OT
PH
PL
PRESS
PSIO
PURG
RAD
RAT
RFAN
RFR
RFVC
RH
RVP
SAT
SF
SFAN
SFR
SMK
SNB
SP
SPSIO
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
SPT
SVP
SW
TB
TEMP
TRAN
VAV
W/
WO/
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Outside-Air Thermostat
Preheat
Plug Assembly
Smoke Pressurization Input
Processor Module
Smoke Purge Input
Return-Air Damper Actuator
Return-Air Temperature
Return Fan
Return Fan Relay
Return Fan Volume Control
Relative Humidity
Return Velocity Pressure
Supply-Air Temperature
Fan Status Relay
Supply Fan
Supply Fan Relay
Smoke
Snubber
Static Pressure Transducer
Slave Processor Module
(Option Module)
Space Temperature
Supply Velocity Pressure
Switch
Terminal Block Terminal
Temperature
Transformer
Variable Air Volume
With
Without
Marked Wire or Cable
Terminal (Marked)
Terminal (Unmarked)
Terminal Block
Splice (Factory)
Splice (Field)
Wiring Factory
Wiring Field Control
Wiring Field Power
Option or Accessory
Common Potential
NOTES:
1. Use copper conductors only.
2. Wire is in accordance with National Electrical Code (NEC). For local codes,
replace original wires with 90 C wire or its equivalent.
3. Replace wires from IGV, FLTS, MAT, SAT, OAD, RAD, and ELEC HT with
125 C plenum cable conductor as required.
4. Input channel numbers and points for configuration of the optional
analog output temperature control (AOTC) follow:
CHANNEL
1
2
3
6
7
34
SENSOR
SAT
OAT
MAT
SPT
RAT
TEMP
DESCRIPTION
Supply-Air Temperature
Outdoor-Air Temperature
Mixed-Air Temperature
Space-Air Temperature
Return-Air Temperature
Preheat or Optional Carrier Sensor
5. Reference for wire markers, where ‘X’ represents a numeral:
X
BX
CX
KX
—
—
—
—
Item number on wiring harness
Box wire
Cable
Accessory kit wire
7
ARRANGEMENT FOR SIZES 03 AND 06
ARRANGEMENT FOR SIZES 08 THROUGH 35
Fig. 5 — PIC Section Control Box Component Arrangements, 39L
8
Fig. 6 — PIC Section Control Box Component Arrangement, 39NX Sizes 07-21
9
Fig. 7 — PIC Section Control Box Component Arrangement, 39NX Sizes 26-92
10
Fig. 8 — Fan Motor Starter Circuit and PIC Control Wiring Interface — PIC Power for
Control Circuit From Dedicated Source
11
Table 1 — Input and Output Points
MODULE,
DEFAULT ADDRESS
PSIO (Processor)
ADDRESS 1
PSIO (Option)
ADDRESS 31
DSIO (Electric Heat)
ADDRESS 19
DSIO (DX without
Electric Heat)
ADDRESS 19
DSIO (DX with
Electric Heat)
ADDRESS 49
INPUT
SAT
OAT
MAT
RH
LTT
SPT
RAT
SP*
AFS
FLTS
OARH
ENT
SVP*
RVP*
DHH
TEMP
PRES
EVAC
PURG
FSD
AQ1
AQ2
OAVP*
METER
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
CUST
DXSD
—
—
—
—
—
—
CUST
DXSD
—
—
—
—
—
—
INPUT
TYPE
AI
AI
AI
AI
DI
AI
AI
AI
DI
DI
AI
DI
AI
AI
DI
AI
DI
DI
DI
DI
AI
AI
AI
DI
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
DI
DI
—
—
—
—
—
—
DI
DI
—
—
—
—
—
—
CHANNEL
NUMBER
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
19
20
—
—
—
—
—
—
49
50
—
—
—
—
—
—
OUTPUT
TYPE
AO
AO, DO†
AO
AO
DO
DO
—
—
—
—
—
—
AO
AO, DO
DO
AO
DO
DO
—
—
—
—
—
—
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
DO
OUTPUT
IGV*
MIXD
HWC
CWC
SF
HIR*
—
—
—
—
—
—
RFVC*
HUM1
HUM2
AOTC
DOTC
DTCC
—
—
—
—
—
—
EHS1
EHS2
EHS3
EHS4
EHS5
EHS6
EHS7
EHS8
DXS1
DXS2
DXS3
DXS4
DXS5
DXS6
DXS7
DXS8
DXS1
DXS2
DXS3
DXS4
DXS5
DXS6
DXS7
DXS8
CHANNEL
NUMBER
13
14
15
16
17
18
—
—
—
—
—
—
43
44
45
46
47
48
—
—
—
—
—
—
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
LEGEND
AFS
— Airflow Switch (Supply Fan
Status Switch)
AI
— Analog Input
AO
— Analog Output
AOTC — Analog Output Temperature
Control
AQ1, 2 — Air Quality Sensors 1, 2
CUST — Condensing Unit Status
(Outdoor Air Thermostat)
CWC
— Chilled Water Coil
DI
— Discrete Input
DHH
— Duct High Humidity
DO
— Discrete Output
DOTC — Discrete Output Temperature
Control
DTCC — Discrete Output Timeclock
Control
DXS1-8
— Direct Expansion Cooling
Stages 1-8
DXSD
— Direct Expansion Cooling
Shutdown
EHS1-8 — Electric Heater Stages 1-8
ENT
— Enthalpy Switch
EVAC
— Evacuation
FLTS
— Filter Status Switch
FSD
— Fire Shutdown
HIR
— Heat Interlock Relay
HWC
— Hot Water Coil
HUM1, 2 — Humidity Stages 1, 2
IGV
— Inlet Guide Vanes
LTT
— Low Temperature Thermostat
(also labelled FRZ)
MAT
— Mixed-Air Temperature
METER — Meter (Pulsed Dry-Contact
Input)
*Available on VAV only.
†Discrete output with two-position damper control.
12
MIXD
OARH
OAT
OAVP
PRES
PURG
RAT
RFVC
RH
RVP
SAT
SF
SP
SPT
SVP
TEMP
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Mixed-Air Dampers
Outdoor-Air Relative Humidity
Outdoor-Air Temperature
Outdoor-Air Velocity Pressure
Pressurization
Purge
Return-Air Temperature
Return Fan Volume Control
Relative Humidity
Return Velocity Pressure
Supply-Air Temperature
Supply Fan Relay
Static Pressure
Space Temperature
Supply Velocity Pressure
Optional Temperature Input
13
Fig. 9 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39L Sizes 03-35 (115 v, Typical)
14
Fig. 9 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39L Sizes 03-35 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
15
Fig. 9 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39L Sizes 03-35 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
Fig. 9 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39L Sizes 03-35 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
16
Fig. 9 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39L Sizes 03-35 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
17
Fig. 9 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39L Sizes 03-35 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
18
19
Fig. 10 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39NX Sizes 07-21 (115 v, Typical)
20
Fig. 10 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39NX Sizes 07-21 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
21
Fig. 10 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39NX Sizes 07-21 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
Fig. 10 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39NX Sizes 07-21 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
22
Fig. 10 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39NX Sizes 07-21 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
23
Fig. 10 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39NX Sizes 07-21 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
24
25
Fig. 11 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39NX Sizes 26-92 (115 v, Typical)
26
Fig. 11 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39NX Sizes 26-92 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
27
Fig. 11 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39NX Sizes 26-92 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
Fig. 11 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39NX Sizes 26-92 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
28
Fig. 11 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39NX Sizes 26-92 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
29
Fig. 11 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39NX Sizes 26-92 (115 v, Typical) (cont)
30
31
Fig. 12 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39L and 39NX PIC with Remote Control Box
32
Fig. 12 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39L and 39NX PIC with Remote Control Box (cont)
33
Fig. 12 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39L and 39NX PIC with Remote Control Box (cont)
Fig. 12 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39L and 39NX PIC with Remote Control Box (cont)
34
Fig. 12 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39L and 39NX PIC with Remote Control Box (cont)
35
Fig. 12 — Unit Wiring Schematic, 39L and 39NX PIC with Remote Control Box (cont)
36
Table 2 — Junction Box Connections for Optional Remote Control Box
REMOTE
CONTROL BOX
LOCATION
MPSIO
MPSIO
MPSIO
MPSIO
TB3
MPSIO
TB3
MPSIO
TB2
TB2
TB2
MPSIO
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
MPSIO
MPSIO
TB2
TB2
TB2
TB2
SPSIO
SPSIO
TB2
TB2
SPSIO
SPSIO
CONTROL
BOX
TERMINAL
2
3
8
9
10
28
10
13
19
20
6
40
21
22
7
6
27
28
8
7
15
16
38
37
17
18
23
24
38
37
25
26
12
11
FAN SECTION
JUNCTION BOX
SIGNAL
SAT — BLK
SAT — RED
MAT — BLK
MAT — RED
FLTS — BLK
FLTS — RED
LTT — K3
LTT — K1
OAD — BLK
OAD — WHT
OAD — GRN
OAD — RED
RAD — BLK
RAD — WHT
RAD — GRN
RAD — RED
EXD — BLK
EXD — WHT
EXD — GRN
EXD — RED
SFAN1 — BLK
SFAN1 — WHT
SFAN1 — GRN
SFAN1 — RED
SFAN2 — BLK
SFAN2 — WHT
RFAN1 — BLK
RFAN1 — WHT
RFAN1 — GRN
RFAN1 — RED
RFAN2 — BLK
RFAN2 — WHT
PH — BLK
PH — RED
JUNCTION
BOX
TERMINAL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
NOTES:
1. Pneumatic tubing to connect the airflow sensor in the fan to the remote control box is bundled with the internal PIC wiring to the junction box,
but does not enter the box. Route tube directly to remote control box along with conduit containing wiring from junction box to remote control box.
2. See Legend on page 7.
37
Variable-Frequency Drives — The input signal for
the inverter must be 4 to 20 mA. Use a 2-conductor
20 AWG (American Wire Gage) cable (single twisted pair,
unshielded) to connect the input of the inverter to the output
of the PIC control terminals. See Fig. 8.
Wire the inverter so that if it is placed in the manual or
bypass mode the low temperature thermostat and the highpressure switch (if supplied) are still in the motor control
circuit to protect the unit.
Adjust the minimum inverter speed to provide at least 10%
airflow when inlet guide vanes are at 0% (4 mA) and maximum design airflow when inlet guide vanes are at 100%
(20 mA). Use the local interface device to verify that the
supply fan status (
) shows the fan is ON and that the
supply fan is operating at the lowest airflow adjustment. Increase inverter minimum speed as required. For additional
information, see the Quick Test section on page 103.
Water Valve Assemblies — Water valve assemblies
(Fig. 13) are shipped inside the fan section for field installation. All valve assemblies have electrically powered actuators. Each actuator has an external junction box for field
wiring. The junction box contains 24 vac power wires (WHITE/
BLUE, BLACK) and 4 to 20 mA signal wires (1RED,
−GREEN). The actuators operate the valve through a linear
stroke; if power is lost, a return spring reverses the stroke
and returns the valve stem to the normal position.
VALVE ACTUATOR
ACTUATOR LINKAGE
VALVE BODY
Fig. 13 — Valve Assembly (Typical)
To prevent electric shock and equipment damage, disconnect the power to the control box before installing
valve assemblies. Turn power switch located on control
box door to OFF.
On installations where valve mounting space is limited,
use unions to couple valve assemblies to water lines. If unions
do not provide sufficient clearance, refer to the Valve
Troubleshooting section, page 109.
On chilled water applications or hot water applications with
11⁄2 to 3-in. valves, the valve actuators can be mounted in
any position above the centerline of the valve body. For steam
applications or hot water applications with 1⁄2 to 11⁄4-in. valves
that have actuators and high-temperature linkage extensions, mount the actuator above the centerline of the valve
body and 45 degrees from vertical. This position helps to
prevent actuator exposure to direct heat convection.
DO NOT install valve assembly where excessive moisture, corrosive fumes, and/or vibration are present.
INSTALL all 2-way valve assemblies so that they close
against system flow. An arrow on the valve body indicates the proper flow direction.
ALWAYS install 3-way mixing valve with 2 inlet flows
and one outlet. Normal flow will be from port B to port
AB with stem up. See Fig. 14.
Fig. 14 — Three-Way Mixing Valve — Normal Flow,
Typical Piping
38
2. Using twist-on wire connectors, connect the RED (1) and
GREEN (−) leads inside the actuator junction box to the
other 2 wires in the cable. Note the polarity of each wire.
3. Connect the positive signal wire (connected to the RED
lead) to pin 46 on the processor module. Connect the negative signal wire (connected to the GREEN lead) to pin 47
on the processor module.
VALVE WIRING
Valves MUST be connected to the correct processor module terminal to operate properly. Damage to the actuator
may occur if the valve is improperly connected.
Hot Water Valves (Fig. 15) — Using a 4-conductor 20 AWG
cable (two twisted pairs, no shield), connect the hot water
valve actuator as follows:
1. Using twist-on wire connectors, connect the BLACK and
WHITE/BLUE leads inside the actuator junction box to
the 24 vac power wires of the cable. Connect the other
ends of the power wires to TB2, pins 11 and 12, in the
PIC control box.
2. Using twist-on wire connectors, connect the RED (1) and
GREEN (−) leads inside the actuator junction box to the
other 2 wires in the cable. Note the polarity of each wire.
3. Connect the positive signal wire (connected to the RED
lead) to pin 43 on the processor module. Connect the negative signal wire (connected to the GREEN lead) to pin 44
on the processor module.
Chilled Water Valves (Fig. 16) — Using a 4-conductor
20 AWG cable (two twisted pairs, no shield), connect the
chilled water valve actuator as follows:
1. Using twist-on wire connectors, connect the BLACK and
WHITE/BLUE leads inside the actuator junction box to
the 24 vac power wires of the cable. Connect the other
ends of the power wires to TB2, pins 9 and 10, in the PIC
control box.
Duct Static Pressure Probe (VAV Units) — The
duct static pressure probe is shipped inside the control box.
Select a location in the ductwork where the static pressure
will be representative of the static pressure to be monitored
and maintained (typically 2/3 of the distance down the duct
from the fan). Install the probe with the tip facing the airflow. See Fig. 17.
Use 1⁄4-in. OD approved polyethylene tubing for up to
50 ft (3⁄8-in. OD for 50 to 100 ft) to connect the probe to the
39L or 39NX unit. Route the tubing back to the mechanical
room and connect the tubing to the bulkhead fitting labelled
H (HIGH), located on the bottom edge of the 39L control
box or top edge of the 39NX control box.
NOTE: If the probe is more than 100 ft from the control
box, it is recommended that the static pressure sensor be removed from the control box and mounted remotely. The sensor should be mounted closer to the probe and then rewired
to the original connections in the control box.
NOTE: Connections for 39NX with integral PIC shown. See wiring
diagrams in Fig. 9 and 12 for terminal connections in 39L control box
and all remote-mount control boxes.
Fig. 15 — Hot Water Valve Wiring
39
FACTORY WIRING
FIELD WIRING
NOTE: Connections for 39NX with integral PIC shown. See wiring
diagrams in Fig. 9 and 12 for terminal connections in 39L control box
and all remote-mount control boxes.
Fig. 16 — Chilled Water Valve Wiring
Avoid corner locations. Allow at least 3 ft between the
sensor and any corner. Airflow near corners tends to be reduced, resulting in erratic sensor readings.
The sensor should be mounted approximately 5 ft up from
the floor, in the area representing the average temperature.
Install the sensor as follows:
1. Remove sensor cover. Using a small blade screwdriver,
insert blade into sensor cover latch slot on bottom of slat.
Gently push upward on the screwdriver to release the cover
latch. Rotate the cover forward as the screwdriver is removed.
2. Snap off the wall plate from the base assembly.
3. Feed the wires from the electrical box through the sensor
base assembly.
4. Using two 6-32 x 5⁄8-in. flat screws, mount the sensor base
assembly to the electrical box.
5. Dress the wires down and inside the perimeter of the sensor base.
6. Attach the wall plate by snapping it onto the sensor base
assembly.
7. Replace the cover by inserting the top inside edge of the
cover over the tab on top of the sensor base assembly and
rotating the cover down. Snap cover on.
Refer to Field Wiring Connections section, page 52 for
wiring instructions and details. See Table 3 for Thermistor
Resistance vs. Temperature Values.
NOTE: Clean sensor with damp cloth only. Do not use
solvents.
Space Temperature Sensor (Fig. 18) — The space
temperature sensor (SPT) is packaged and shipped inside the
fan section. It is installed on a building interior wall to measure room air temperature.
The wall plate accommodates both the NEMA (National
Electrical Manufacturers’ Association) standard and the
European 1⁄4 DIN (Deutsche Industrie Norm) standard. The
use of a junction box to accommodate the wiring is recommended for installation. The sensor can be mounted directly
on the wall, if acceptable by local codes.
DO NOT mount the sensor in drafty areas such as near
heating or air conditioning ducts, open windows, fans,
or over heat sources such as baseboard heaters or radiators.
Sensors mounted in these areas produce inaccurate readings.
Fig. 17 — Duct Static Pressure Probe
40
NEMA — National Electrical Manufacturers’ Association
Fig. 18 — Space Temperature Sensor (P/N HH51BX001)
Table 3 — Thermistor Resistance vs. Temperature Values for Space Temperature Sensor, Return-Air
Temperature Sensor, and Supply-Air Temperature Sensor
RESISTANCE
(Ohms)
173,631.0
168,222.0
162,998.0
157,954.0
153,083.0
148,378.0
143,833.0
139,442.0
135,200.0
131,101.0
127,139.0
123,310.0
119,609.0
116,031.0
112,571.0
109,226.0
105,992.0
108,863.0
99,837.3
96,910.2
94,078.4
91,338.6
88,687.3
86,121.6
83,638.4
81,234.8
78,908.0
76,655.3
74,474.2
72,362.1
70,316.7
68,335.6
66,416.7
64,557.9
62,756.9
61,012.0
59,321.1
57,682.4
56,094.3
54,554.9
53,062.2
51,615.9
50,213.1
48,853.0
47,533.9
46,254.7
45,013.9
43,810.3
42,642.6
41,509.8
40,410.5
39,343.9
TEMP
(F)
−30
−29
−28
−27
−26
−25
−24
−23
−22
−21
−20
−19
−18
−17
−16
−15
−14
−13
−12
−11
−10
−9
−8
−7
−6
−5
−4
−3
−2
−1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
RESISTANCE
(Ohms)
38,308.7
37,304.0
36,328.8
35,382.1
34,463.0
33,570.7
32,704.2
31,862.8
31,045.7
30,252.0
29,481.1
28,732.2
28,004.6
27,297.7
26,610.8
25,943.4
25,294.7
24,664.2
24,051.4
23,455.6
22,876.5
22,313.4
21,765.9
21,233.5
20,715.7
20,212.2
19,722.4
19,245.9
18,782.4
18,331.5
17,892.8
17,465.9
17,050.4
16,646.1
16,252.6
15,869.6
15,496.8
15,133.8
14,780.4
14,436.4
14,101.3
13,775.1
13,457.3
13,147.9
12,846.4
12,552.8
12,266.8
11,988.1
11,716.6
11,452.0
11,194.2
10,943.0
TEMP
(F)
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
RESISTANCE
(Ohms)
10,698.1
10,459.4
10,226.8
10,000.0
9,778.9
9,563.4
9,353.1
9,148.2
8,948.4
8,753.5
8,563.4
8,378.0
8,197.1
8,020.7
7,848.6
7,680.6
7,516.8
7,356.9
7,200.9
7,048.6
6,900.0
6,755.0
6,613.4
6,475.2
6,340.3
6,208.5
6,079.9
5,954.3
5,831.7
5,712.0
5,595.0
5,480.8
5,369.2
5,260.2
5,153.7
5,049.7
4,948.1
4,848.8
4,751.8
4,657.0
4,564.4
4,473.8
4,385.3
4,298.9
4,214.3
4,131.7
4,050.9
3,971.9
3,894.6
3,819.1
3,745.3
3,673.1
41
TEMP
(F)
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
RESISTANCE
(Ohms)
3602.5
3533.4
3465.9
3399.8
3335.2
3272.0
3210.1
3149.6
3090.4
3032.5
2975.8
2920.3
2866.0
2812.9
2760.9
2710.0
2660.2
2611.4
2563.7
2516.9
2471.2
2426.4
2382.5
2339.5
2297.5
2256.3
2215.9
2176.4
2137.7
2099.8
2062.6
2026.3
1990.6
1955.7
1921.5
1887.9
1855.1
1822.9
1791.3
1760.4
1730.1
1700.4
1671.3
1642.7
1614.7
1587.3
1560.4
1534.1
1508.2
1482.9
1458.0
1433.6
TEMP
(F)
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
RESISTANCE
(Ohms)
1409.7
1386.3
1363.3
1340.7
1318.6
1296.9
1275.6
1254.8
1234.3
1214.2
1194.5
1175.1
1156.1
1137.5
1119.2
1101.3
1083.7
1066.4
1049.4
1032.8
1016.5
1000.4
984.7
969.2
954.0
939.1
924.5
910.1
896.0
882.2
868.6
855.2
842.1
829.2
816.6
804.1
791.9
779.9
768.2
756.6
745.2
734.0
723.1
712.3
701.7
691.3
681.0
671.0
661.1
651.4
641.8
632.4
TEMP
(F)
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
Outdoor-Air Temperature Sensor (Fig. 19) —
The outdoor-air temperature (OAT) sensor is shipped inside
the fan section. The OAT sensor continuously monitors the
temperature of the air outside the building. The integral shield
prevents ice formation on the sensor conductors. A fieldsupplied conduit junction box is required for installation. See
Fig. 20.
Position the OAT sensor so that it accurately senses only
the outdoor-air temperature. The sensor must be located upstream from outside air dampers and located where it is unaffected by interior and duct temperatures. During the unoccupied (fan off) period the sensor’s location should have a
minimal effect on its readings.
Do not mount the sensor in direct sunlight. Inaccurate readings may result. It may be necessary to field-fabricate a shield
to protect the sensor from direct sunlight.
Do not mount the sensor near the exhaust from airhandling units or compressors, or near leakage drafts of indoor air, or near shrubbery or trees. Inaccurate readings may
result. Do not mount under direct water runoff. Water may
freeze around the sensor in winter and produce a false
reading.
If sensor wire is shielded, strip back the sensor shield and
tape it to prevent contact.
Position the sensor with the slotted end pointed
downward.
The field-supplied junction box housing must be threaded
to screw onto a male 1⁄2-in. NPT electrical metal tubing (EMT)
conduit adaptor. The assembled box and sensor must be mounted
parallel to the building wall. See Fig. 20. The sensor can
also be installed on a roof or other location.
For distances up to 500 ft, use 2-conductor 20 AWG cable
to connect the sensor to the PIC terminals. Refer to the Field
Wiring Connections section, page 52 for further wiring instructions. See Table 4 for thermistor resistance according to
temperature value.
Fig. 20 — Outdoor-Air Temperature
Sensor Installation
Mixed-Air Temperature Sensor — The optional
mixed-air temperature sensor (MAT) is factory wired and
installed on all units with a factory-installed mixing box (MXB),
filter mixing box (FMB), or air blender (AMX). On units
without an AMX, MXB, or FMB, the optional MAT is packaged and shipped inside the fan section for field installation.
The field-installed MAT should be mounted downstream
of the return air duct and filters, but as close as possible to
the 39L or 39NX unit.
AVOID repeated bending of copper tubing, as this will
place stress on the sensor element and lead to eventual
breakage.
DO NOT fold or crimp copper tubing.
USE CARE in forming and securing the element.
STRIP back and tape the shield in order to prevent
contact.
Table 4 — Thermistor Resistance vs
Temperature Values for Outdoor-Air
Temperature Sensor
Mount field-installed MAT as follows (Fig. 21):
1. Punch a 1-in. diameter hole in the duct and feed the sensor element through the hole. Mount the utility box on
the outside of the duct.
2. Bend the copper tubing surrounding the sensor element
to conform to the area of the duct. Do not bend it to less
than 21⁄2 in. diameter on any turn. The sensor element
should be evenly distributed over the entire cross sectional area of the duct.
Existing support structures may be used for the sensor
element, as long as there is no metal-to-metal contact with
the copper tubing, and the mounting does not interfere
with other functions.
3. Use a field-supplied plastic spacer, clamp, and screws to
secure the sensor in the airstream. See Detail A,
Fig. 21.
4. Using 2-conductor 20 AWG plenum-rated cable, connect
the sensor to the PIC control box terminals.
RESISTANCE TEMPERATURE RESISTANCE TEMPERATURE
(Ohms)
(F)
(Ohms)
(F)
168,250
−40
5,000.0
77
121,350
−31
4,028.5
86
88,500
−22
3,265.0
95
65,200
−13
2,663.3
104
48,535
−4
2,185.0
113
36,476
5
1,801.5
122
27,665
14
1,493.0
131
21,165
23
1,244.0
140
16,325
32
1,041.5
149
12,695
41
876.0
158
9,950
50
739.5
167
6,245
68
627.5
176
Fig. 19 — Outdoor-Air Temperature Sensor
(P/N HH79NZ023)
42
NOTE: This sensor uses a resistance temperature device (RTD)
element. Polarity is not a consideration.
When space does not allow working inside the duct, mount
as follows (Fig. 22):
1. Open a duct penetration on the opposite side of the sensor junction box.
2. Wrap the element around a 3⁄4-in. PVC pipe, cut holes
near the center of the duct on both sides and feed the pipe
with sensor element through the hole.
3. Secure the seal around the PVC pipe.
NOTE: If local codes do not permit the use of PVC, use
EMT instead.
Refer to Field Wiring Connections section, page 52 for
wiring instructions and details. See Table 5 for RTD resistance vs temperature values.
Table 5 — RTD Resistance vs Temperature Values
for Mixed-Air Temperature Sensor
RESISTANCE
(Ohms)
693
719
745
772
799
827
854
883
912
TEMP
(F)
−40
−30
−20
−10
0
10
20
30
40
RESISTANCE
(Ohms)
940
970
1000
1031
1062
1093
1125
1157
1190
TEMP
(F)
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
120
130
RESISTANCE
(Ohms)
1223
1257
1290
1325
1360
1395
1430
—
—
TEMP
(F)
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
—
—
Fig. 22 — Alternate Mixed-Air Temperature
Sensor Installation
Mount the switch as follows:
1. Position mounting template on duct. Remove adhesive
backing and press template onto outside air duct.
2. Drill four 1⁄8-in. mounting holes as indicated on the
template.
3. Cut out center portion of duct as outlined on template.
4. Mount controller to duct using screws provided.
If no outside air duct is present, mount the enthalpy switch
on a field-supplied and installed plate upstream of the outside air damper.
Connect the red and blue wires of the enthalpy switch to
the PIC control box terminals. Refer to Field Wiring
Connections section, page 52 for further details.
Enthalpy Switch (Fig. 23) — The enthalpy switch and
mounting template are located in a box shipped inside the
fan section.
The enthalpy switch is normally mounted in a horizontal
position with the sensing element exposed to freely circulating outdoor air.
DO NOT install enthalpy switch in locations where excessive moisture, corrosive fumes, and/or vibration are
present.
CONTROL RANGES — See Fig. 24 for control settings and
intermediate settings.
MOUNTING HOLES
Y
E
L
R
E
D
D
C
B
L
U
B
A
Fig. 21 — Mixed-Air Temperature Sensor
(P/N HH79NZ021) Installation
Fig. 23 — Enthalpy Switch (P/N HH57AC076)
43
4. Remove the adhesive backing from the gasket; attach the
gasket to the outside of the junction box, aligning the holes
in the gasket with the holes in the box.
5. Attach the junction box to the duct with the 2 screws
provided.
6. Insert the probe assembly through the compression fitting and into the duct. Tighten screws one half-turn past
finger tight. Do not overtighten.
For distances up to 500 ft, use 2-conductor 20 AWG cable
to connect the sensor to the PIC control box terminals. Refer
to Field Wiring Connections section, page 32 for further details. See Table 3 for thermistor resistance vs. temperature
values.
CONTROL SETTINGS
DIAL
SETTING
A
B
C
D
20
78 F
(26 C)
73 F
(23 C)
68 F
(20 C)
62 F
(17 C)
RELATIVE
HUMIDITY (%)
50
73 F
(23 C)
68 F
(20 C)
63 F
(17 C)
58 F
(14 C)
80
68 F
(20 C)
63 F
(17 C)
59 F
(15 C)
53 F
(12 C)
CONTROL
CURVE
A
B
C
D
Fig. 24 — Enthalpy Control Settings
Fig. 25 — Supply/Return Air Temperature Sensor
(P/N HH79NZ019)
Supply-Air Temperature Sensor (Fig. 25) — The
supply-air temperature sensor (SAT) measures the temperature of the air as it leaves the supply fan. The sensor is factoryinstalled on the fan scroll.
Return-Air Temperature Sensor (Fig. 25) — The
return-air temperature sensor (RAT) is shipped inside the fan
section. It measures the temperature in the return air duct.
Mount the sensor in the middle of the return air duct approximately 4 to 5 ft from the return air damper. The sensor’s probe tip must be within a straight length of duct.
Mount the sensor as follows:
1. Remove the cover of the sensor junction box.
2. Drill or punch a 5⁄16-in. hole on the centerline of the return air duct as indicated in Fig. 26.
3. Drill or punch 2 holes through the sensor gasket into the
fan scroll.
Fig. 26 — Return-Air Temperature Sensor
Installation
44
Heat Interlock Relay (Fig. 27) — The heat interlock
relay (HIR) is factory wired and installed on VAV units only.
It is a single-pole, double-throw (SPDT) relay that provides
normally-open and normally-closed contacts to interface with
air terminal units. It allows the air terminals to open when
the PIC unit goes into the heating mode. The contacts are
silver cadmium oxide and are rated as follows:
48 va at 24 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 115 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 230 vac and .25 power factor
The contact terminations are no. 6 screw terminals.
NOTE: The HIR is not used in digital air volume control
(DAV) applications.
SDA 2 0 2 0
NC
DO NOT install the duct high humidity switch in locations where excessive moisture, corrosive fumes, and/or
vibration are present. Be sure to allow minimum dimensions from the elbows or junctions as indicated in
Fig. 29.
Mount the DHH as follows:
1. Position the mounting template on the duct. Remove adhesive backing and press template onto duct.
2. Drill four 1⁄8-in. mounting holes as indicated on the
template.
3. Cut out center portion of duct as outlined on template.
4. Mount DHH to duct using screws provided.
For distances up to 500 ft, use 2-conductor 20 AWG
cable to connect the switch to the PIC control box terminals.
Refer to Field Wiring Connections section, page 52 for further details.
The DHH adjustment knob provides settings from 15
to 95% relative humidity, The scale range is marked on the
face of the switch. The high humidity set point should be at
least 65%.
NOTE: The duct high humidity switch has a relative humidity differential of 5%.
2
COI L
1
COM
NO
Fig. 27 — Relay (P/N HK35AB001)
Fan Relay — The fan relay is factory wired and installed
on all 39L and 39NX units. It is a SPST relay that provides
a normally-open contact. The relay interfaces with the motor starter circuit and automatically starts/stops the fan when
the HOA switch is in the AUTO mode. The contacts are silver cadmium oxide and are rated as follows:
48 va at 24 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 115 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 230 vac and .25 power factor
The contact terminations are factory wired to TB1.
Fig. 28 — Duct High Humidity Switch
(P/N HL38ZG024)
Duct High Humidity Switch (Fig. 28) — The duct
high humidity switch (DHH) is shipped inside the fan section. It is used as a safety input when the humidity control
options have been ordered. The DHH adjustment knob provides settings from 15 to 95% humidity.
Locate the DHH control element in the duct, downstream
of the humidifier. Adjust the DHH to the ASHRAE
(American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers) recommended maximum setting of 80%.
Settings higher than 80% are not recommended.
The DHH is normally mounted in a horizontal position on
the outside surface of the duct with the sensing element exposed to freely circulating air.
Fig. 29 — Duct High Humidity Switch
Locations
45
Wall-Mounted Relative Humidity Sensor (Fig. 30)
— The wall-mounted relative humidity sensor is packaged
and shipped inside the fan section. It is installed on interior
walls to measure the relative humidity of the air within the
occupied space.
The use of a junction box to accommodate the wiring is
recommended for installation. The sensor may be mounted
directly on the wall, if acceptable by local codes.
DO NOT mount the sensor in drafty areas such as near
heating or air conditioning ducts, open windows, fans, or over
heat sources such as baseboard heaters or radiators. Sensors
mounted in those areas will produce inaccurate readings.
Avoid corner locations. Allow at least 3 ft between the
sensor and any corner. Airflow near corners tends to be reduced, resulting in erratic sensor readings.
Sensor should be vertically mounted approximately 5 ft
up from the floor, beside the space temperature sensor.
Install the sensor using 2 screws and 2 hollow wall anchors (if required); do not overtighten screws. See Fig. 31.
Sensor must be mounted with terminals ACIN and OUT1
located at the top of the sensor as shown in Fig. 32.
For distances up to 500 ft, use 4-conductor 20 AWG
cable (2 twisted pairs, no shield) to connect the sensor to the
PIC control box terminals and power supply. Refer to Field
Wiring Connections section, page 52 for wiring instructions
and details.
The PIC controller has a space relative humidity default
set point of 40%.
Fig. 31 — Wall-Mounted Relative Humidity
Sensor Installation
Never attempt to clean or touch the sensing element with
chemical solvents, as permanent damage to the sensor
will occur.
Fig. 32 — Wall-Mounted Relative Humidity
Sensor Positioning
Fig. 30 — Wall-Mounted Relative Humidity Sensor
(P/N HL39ZZ001)
46
Duct-Mounted Relative Humidity Sensor — The
duct-mounted relative humidity sensor and mounting template are packaged and shipped inside the fan section. The
sensor is installed in either the return air ductwork or in the
outside air ductwork. If 2 relative humidity sensors are ordered for differential enthalpy control, then the sensors must
be installed in both the return air and outside air ducts. If the
sensor is used for control of a humidifier, install the sensor
in the return air duct.
The PIC controller has a return air relative humidity default set point of 40%.
LOCATION FOR OUTSIDE AIR RELATIVE HUMIDITY
— Locate the sensor where it accurately measures outdoor
conditions, yet is protected from the elements. During the
unoccupied (fan off) period, the sensor’s location should have
a minimal effect on its readings.
Fig. 33 — Duct-Mounted Relative Humidity
Sensor Locations
LOCATION FOR RETURN AIR RELATIVE HUMIDITY
— Locate the sensor at least 6 in. upstream or 15 in. downstream of a 90 degree turn in the ductwork. The best location is 15 in. downstream of the 90 degree turn of the duct.
The probe should be mounted in the center of the duct. See
Fig. 33.
Mount the relative humidity sensor (Fig. 34) as follows.
1. Position mounting template on duct.
2. Drill four 1⁄8-in. mounting holes as indicated on the
template.
3. Punch a 11⁄8-in. hole as indicated on the mounting
template.
4. Mount sensor to duct using four no. 8 screws. Install 9-in.
sensor probe into the 11⁄8-in. hole.
Never attempt to clean or touch the sensing element with
chemical solvents, as permanent damage to the sensor
will occur.
Mixing Box Linkage — On units with mixing box (MXB)
or filter mixing box (FMB), the actuator and linkage are factory installed. The actuator is directly linked to the outdoorair damper and holds the damper closed. No adjustment is
necessary.
For shipping purposes, the secondary linkage rod connecting the outdoor-air and return-air dampers is factory set
for a closed return-air damper.
Adjust the secondary linkage as follows:
1. Open the door of the MXB or FMB to access the return
air damper crankarm.
NOTE: On MXB/FMB with top outdoor-air damper, it
may be necessary to remove the vertical panel holding
the return-air damper to access the return-air damper
crankarm.
2. Loosen the setscrew on the return-air damper crankarm.
3. Move the damper to its full open position.
4. Secure the setscrew on the return-air damper crankarm.
5. Close the MXB or FMB access door.
Fig. 34 — Duct-Mounted Relative Humidity Sensor
(P/N HL39ZZ002) Installation
47
Airflow Switch — The airflow switch (AFS) is a snapacting SPDT switch that is factory installed in the PIC control box. It senses the air supplied by the 39L or 39NX unit
and provides the microprocessor module with a 24 vac discrete signal for fan status. See Fig. 35.
A length of plenum tubing connects the switch to the probe
located on the fan side plate.
The airflow switch range is 0.05 to 2.0 in. wg with a deadband of 0.02 in. wg at minimum set point and 0.1 in. wg at
maximum set point.
NORMALLY
CLOSED CONTACT
TURN SCREW CLOCKWISE
TO INCREASE AIRFLOW
ADJUSTMENT
SCREW
C
MANUAL RESET
BUTTON
F
NORMALLY
OPEN CONTACT
CLOSED
CONTACT
TURN SCREW COUNTERCLOCKWISE TO DECREASE
AIRFLOW
LOWPRESSURE
INLET
HIGHPRESSURE
INLET
SPDT SNAP
ACTING
SWITCH
MOUNTING BRACKET
Fig. 36 — Low-Temperature Thermostat
(P/N HH22CZ001)
SPDT — Single-Pole, Double Throw
Fig. 35 — Airflow Switch (P/N HK06WC030)
than the condensing unit’s minimum temperature. When installed, the thermostat must be set to the minimum operating
temperature of the condensing unit. If the condensing unit
has an optional low-ambient control (Motormastert device),
an outdoor-air thermostat is not required.
The outdoor-air thermostat is an SPST switch; the contacts open on temperature rise and the set point is adjustable
from 45 to 75 F (7.2 to 23.9 C). To increase the set point,
turn the indicator clockwise. See Fig. 37 for thermostat set
point adjustment and mounting hole locations. Thermostat
should be mounted inside condensing unit control box where
it can sense the outdoor air temperature but is protected from
rain and snow.
Low-Temperature Thermostat (Fig. 36 ) — The
optional low-temperature thermostat (LTT) is factory wired
and installed. It is used to protect the chilled water coil from
freezing whenever abnormally cold air passes through the
coil.
The LTT consists of a 20-ft capillary tube that is serpentined in the airstream on the entering side of the chilled water coil. It has a range of 34 to 60 F and is factory set at
35 F.
The LTT is wired in series with the motor starter fan
relay. If any 1-ft section of the capillary tube senses cold air
at or below the thermostat setting, the fan shuts down. A manual
reset is provided to restart the fan after the abnormal problem is fixed. The temperature setting is field-adjustable.
To adjust the temperature set point, turn the adjustment
screw (located on the top of the case) until the position indicator is at the desired temperature. (A clockwise rotation
increases the set point.)
DO NOT set low-temperature thermostat below 35 F.
Damage to freezestat may result.
If the temperature exceeds the set point by 5 F or more,
the reset button will restore the circuit.
Outdoor-Air Thermostat (Fig. 37) — Also called
the condensing unit status (CUST) switch, the outdoor air
thermostat is a temperature-actuated switch used in systems
with direct-expansion cooling. The thermostat is fieldinstalled in the outdoor condensing unit to prevent the system from operating when the outdoor-air temperature is lower
Fig. 37 — Outdoor-Air Thermostat (Condensing Unit
Status Switch)
48
3. To change or check calibration, use a T assembly with
3 rubber tubing leads. Attach one lead to the HPS and
another to an accurate manometer with the appropriate
range. Apply pressure through the third lead and approach set point slowly.
4. Adjust set point to at least 0.5 in. wg greater than configured static pressure set point.
Filter Status Switch — The filter status switch (FLTS)
is factory-installed in the filter section on all PIC-equipped
units. The switch is a snap-acting SPDT switch. When dirty
filter elements cause the pressure drop across the filter media to exceed the switch setting, the switch closes and sends
an alarm signal to the PIC.
The 39L units use a single switch. In 39NX units, up to
3 switches can be connected in parallel. When the switches
are wired in parallel, it is not possible to isolate an alarm
signal to a single switch.
The FLTS has an operating range of 0.05 to 2.0 in. wg.
Factory settings for the switch are as follows:
Air Quality Sensors (Fig. 39) — The air quality (AQ)
sensors are shipped inside the fan section for field installation. Two types of sensors are supplied; one sensor monitors
the conditioned air space, and the other sensor monitors the
return air duct. Both sensors use infrared technology to detect the levels of CO2 present in the air.
Sensor descriptions and part numbers are shown in
Table 6. To mount the sensor, refer to the installation instructions shipped with the sensor.
Setting (in. wg)
Filter Type
Flat
0.5
Bag/Cartridge
1.0
Final
1.5
The FLTS electrical ratings are as follows:
Table 6 — CO2 Sensor Accessories
300 va pilot duty at 115 to 277 vac
10 amps non-inductive to 277 vac
Rated for NO (normally open) and NC (normally closed)
contacts.
CO2 SENSOR ACCESSORY
PART NUMBERS
CGCDXSEN001A00
CGCDXSEN002A00
CGCDXSEN003A00
CGCDXGAS001A00
CGCDXPRM001A00
High-Pressure Switch (Fig. 38) — The highpressure switch (HPS) is factory installed in the PIC control
box on VAV units only. It is a snap-acting SPDT switch with
manual reset that is used to shut down the supply fan whenever the duct pressure reaches the switch setting. The manual
reset is used to restart the fan after the problem has been
corrected.
The switch is factory set at 3.0 in. wg. It has a range of
1.4 to 5.5 in. wg and can be field adjusted for specific
applications.
Adjust the high-pressure switch setting as follows:
1. Loosen conduit enclosure retaining screw, pull firmly on
the bottom end and snap off cover.
2. Raise set point by turning slotted adjustment screw
(located at top of range spring housing) clockwise. Turn
adjustment screw counterclockwise to lower set point.
DESCRIPTION
Wall Mount Sensor (No Display)
Wall Mount Sensor with Display
Duct Mount Sensor (No Display)
Sensor Calibration Service Kit
User Interface Program (UIP)
The CO2 sensors listed in Table 6 are all factory set for a
range of 0 to 2000 ppm and a linear voltage output of 2 to
10 vdc. Fig. 40 shows ventilation rates for various CO2 set
points when outside air with a typical CO2 level of 350 ppm
is used to dilute the indoor air. Refer to the instructions supplied with the CO2 sensor for electrical requirements and
terminal locations.
Any changes to the sensor’s factory configuration require
the purchase of the User Interface Program (UIP) or Sensor
Calibration Service Kit, which also contains the UIP.
To accurately monitor the quality of the air in the conditioned air space, locate the sensor near the return air grille
so it senses the concentration of CO2 leaving the space. The
sensor should be mounted at least 1 ft above or 1 ft below
the thermostat to avoid direct breath contact.
Do not mount the space sensor in drafty areas such as near
supply ducts, open windows, fans, or over heat sources. Allow at least 3 ft between the sensor and any corner. Avoid
mounting the sensor where it is influenced by the supply air;
the sensor gives inaccurate readings if the supply air is blown
directly onto the sensor or if the supply air does not have a
chance to mix with the room air before it is drawn into the
return air stream.
To accurately monitor the quality of the air in the return
air duct, locate the sensor at least 6 in. upstream or 15 in.
downstream of a 90 degree turn in the duct. The downstream
location is preferred. Mount the sensor in the center of the
duct.
If the sensor is mounted in the return air duct, readjust the
mixed-air dampers to allow a small amount of air to flow
past the return air damper whenever the mixing box is fully
open to the outside air. If the damper is not properly adjusted to provide this minimum airflow, the sensor may not
detect the indoor-air quality during the economizer cycle.
Fig. 38 — High-Pressure Switch (P/N HH02WC001)
49
1
220
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24
Fig. 39 — Air Quality (CO2) Sensor
(Wall Mount Version Shown)
Fig. 41 — OAVP Transducer (P/N HK05ZG004)
Fig. 42 — OAVP Probe (P/N 35DN40007001)
CO2 CONCENTRATION (PPM)
Fig. 40 — Ventilation Rates Based on CO2 Set Point
Constant Outside Air (OAC) Control — This feature ensures a continuous supply of outside air to the unit
and occupied space. The OAC control monitors the outside
air velocity pressure (OAVP) with a probe and pressure transducer. The pressure transducer is factory-installed; the probe
is factory-supplied for field installation in the outside air ducts.
See Fig. 41 and 42.
PROBE INSTALLATION — Locate each probe in a straight
portion of the outside air duct with any dampers, elbows, or
fittings at least 2 diameters away. The probe should be in a
portion of the duct where the airflow is uniform, so that the
probe senses the average air velocity in the duct. The probe
must also be located so that measurements at the probe are
not influenced by the opening or closing of the outdoor-air
dampers.
Install the probe at a 90 degree angle to the airflow and
ensure that the holes in the probe are facing and in line with
the airflow. The probe tube that is closest to the incoming
airflow measures velocity pressure; the rear tube measures
duct static pressure. Use approved plenum tubing to connect
the probe to the bulkhead fittings on top of the control box.
For runs up to 150 ft, use 1⁄4-in. OD tubing. For runs over
150 ft, use 3⁄8-in. OD tubing. Use at least 25 ft of tubing to
prevent pulsations and erratic operation. Coil any extra tubing if necessary.
If the outside air duct is large, additional probes can be
installed in the duct and manifolded to obtain a more accurate velocity pressure reading for the entire duct. Manifold
tubing must be larger than the plenum tubing connecting the
manifold to the control box. See Fig. 43 and the preceding
for recommended tube sizes.
NOTE: High-pressure manifold connections shown. Low-pressure connections are identical and must duplicate high-pressure connections.
Fig. 43 — Probe Manifolding
50
If the airflow obtained by the preceding method is different from the design airflow or a measurement obtained with
a balancer, the OAVP probe is not sensing the average duct
velocity and/or the probe’s multiplier factor is effectively not
1.563. To match the design or measured airflow to the airflow determined with the preceding formulas, relocate
the probe as recommended or use the HSIO and service
function (
) to change the probe multiplier
factor.
OAC CALIBRATION — Once the probe and tubing are installed, input the set point to match the probe readings. Before adjusting the OAVP probe, ensure that the supply-air
fan is providing the maximum design airflow and that the
outside-air dampers are adjusted for the design outdoor
airflow intake.
To calibrate the PIC processor to match the probe location, use a precision manometer to measure the velocity pressure in the outdoor air duct at design conditions. Use the
HSIO (local interface device) or Building Supervisor to input the value as the OAVP set point.
Note that the probe does not measure true velocity pressure; when positioned as recommended, the probe measures
a velocity pressure 1.563 times that of the velocity pressure
in the duct. This multiplier (magnification) factor varies with
the probe’s location, and can even be negative if the probe
is located at an elbow or turn. All OAVP values displayed on
the HSIO incorporate the multiplier factor to show the true
duct velocity pressure.
If a precision manometer is not available, read the velocity pressure value at the HSIO when the system is running
at maximum design airflow and input that value as the set
point. During normal operation, the velocity pressure is held
constant as the supply fan modulates.
USING OAVP VALUES TO DETERMINE DUCT AIRFLOW — It is possible to determine the airflow (cfm) in the
outside air duct based on the readings obtained by the OAVP
probe. See the following procedure.
Use the HSIO and status function (
) to display
the outside air velocity pressure (Pv) at the transducer.
FIELD-SUPPLIED OR HIGH-VELOCITY PRESSURE
TRANSDUCERS — The default pressure transducer installed at the factory (P/N HK05ZG004) has a range of 0.00
to 0.05 in. wg, which matches an air velocity range of approximately 225 to 680 fpm. The maximum velocity for optimum OAC operation and response, however, is 620 fpm.
If the average duct air velocity is greater than 620 fpm, use
one of the alternate transducers shown in Table 7.
For a field-supplied pressure transducer, use the service
function (
) to configure the OAC control with
the transducer’s specifications:
OALV = Transducer minimum output voltage
OAHV = Transducer maximum output voltage
OALR = Transducer low pressure
(range minimum output) value
OAHR = Transducer high pressure
(range maximum output) value
Find the average velocity (V) in the duct, in fpm:
4005 =­­
Pv = V
Obtain the cross-sectional area of the duct in sq ft. (A). To
determine the airflow (F) in the duct, in cfm:
VxA=F
Table 7 — OAC Pressure Transducers
INDICATED VELOCITY
TRUE VELOCITY PRESSURE
VELOCITY IN DUCT
PRESSURE AT
IN DUCT (in. wg)
(fpm)
CARRIER
MODUS PART
RANGE
TRANSDUCER (in. wg)
PART NO.
NO.
(in. wg)
Optimum
Theoretical
Optimum
Theoretical
Optimum
Theoretical
Range
Range
Range
Range
Range
Range
HK05ZG004 T40-005C-04-013 0.00 — 0.05 0.013 — 0.037 0.005 — 0.045 0.008 — 0.024 0.003 — 0.029 360 — 620 225 — 680
HK05ZG005 T40-001C-04-012 0.00 — 0.10 0.025 — 0.075 0.010 — 0.090 0.016 — 0.048 0.006 — 0.057 505 — 875 320 — 960
HK05ZG006 T40-003C-04-015 0.00 — 0.30 0.075 — 0.225 0.030 — 0.270 0.048 — 0.144 0.019 — 0.173 875 — 1520 555 — 1665
51
Select a 20 AWG twisted pair, no shield cable. Connect as
per table below:
Field Wiring Connections — All field wiring must
comply with National Electric Code (NEC) and all local requirements. The recommended wiring is as follows:
Dampers, actuators, — 4-conductor 20 AWG cable
and valves
(2 twisted pairs, unshielded)
Sensors
— 2-conductor 20 AWG cable
(one twisted pair, unshielded)
SENSOR
Return-air temperature sensor (RAT)
Outside-air temperature sensor (OAT)
Enthalpy switch (ENT)
Mixed-air temperature sensor (MAT)
Space temperature sensor (SPT)
Refer to Table 8 for recommended brands and part
numbers.
NOTE: The MAT is factory wired on all units with a factory-installed
mixing box, filter mixing box, or air blender.
Table 8 — Recommended Sensor and
Device Wiring
MANUFACTURER
Alpha
American
Belden
Columbia
Manhattan
Quabik
PROCESSOR
MODULE
PIN NO.
20 and 21
5 and 6
34 and TB2-3
8 and 9
17 and 18
SPACE TEMPERATURE SENSOR (SPT) — The space temperature sensor cover includes terminal block TB1, a jumper
between Pin E2 and Pin E3, and an RJ11 female connector.
The RJ11 female connector connects the service tool with
the Carrier Comfort Network.
PART NUMBER
Regular*
Plenum*
1895
—
A21501
A48301
8205
88442
D6451
—
M13402
M64430
6130
—
Jumper MUST be in place between Pin E2 and Pin E3
or inaccurate readings could result. Ensure that the jumper
is in place before installing the sensor.
*Within a building.
NOTE: Wiring is 20 gage, 2-conductor twisted cable.
REMOTE LOCAL INTERFACE DEVICE (HSIO) — When
ordered as part of a 39L or 39NX unit, the HSIO is factoryinstalled and fully wired.
To reinstall the HSIO in a remote location away from the
control box, refer to the factory wiring connections in
Fig. 9-12 and proceed as follows:
Using a 20 AWG twisted pair conductor cable rated for
the application, connect one wire of the twisted pair to
Terminal T1 and connect the other wire to Terminal T2 on
TB1. See Fig. 45.
The other ends of the wires are connected to the processor
(PSIO master) module. As polarity is not a consideration,
connect one wire to Terminal 17 and one wire to Terminal
18 of the processor module.
RJ11 Plug Wiring — Refer to the Carrier Comfort Network
Interface, page 64, for communication bus wiring and cable
selection. The cable selected must be identical to the CCN
communication bus wire used for the entire network.
Cut the CCN wire and strip the ends of the RED, WHITE,
and BLACK conductors. Insert and secure the RED (1) wire
to Pin J2 of the SPT terminal strip TB1. Insert and secure the
WHITE (ground) wire to Pin J3 of the SPT terminal strip
TB1. Insert and secure the BLACK (−) wire to Pin J5 of
SPT terminal strip TB1.
The other end of the communication bus cable must be
connected to the remainder of the CCN communication bus
at the COMM1 plug on the processor (PSIO master) module. Refer to Carrier Comfort Network Interface section,
page 64, for more details.
DAMPER ACTUATORS — The PIC processor can activate
a field-installed modulating exhaust/relief damper. This is
achieved by wiring the factory-supplied damper actuator in
series with the factory-supplied and field-installed mixing
box damper actuator.
The PIC processor can also activate a field-installed damper
actuator mounted in a field-supplied mixing box. These actuators are available from the factory when ordered as an
option with the unit.
See Table 9 for recommended actuators.
NOTE: The actuator selected must be capable of receiving
a 4 to 20 mA signal and must have a total impedance of less
than 250 ohms. Wire should be 20 gage minimum, twistedpair type and rated for the application.
1. Use a 20 AWG 2-conductor twisted wire pair (Belden
No. 8205 or equivalent) to supply power to the HSIO module. Use a 20 AWG 3-conductor cable shielded with drain
wire (Belden No. 8772 or equivalent) for communication
with the HSIO. Cable length must not exceed 1000 ft.
2. Pull the 2 cables (power and signal) through the electrical conduit to the NEMA standard box or HSIO. Leave
approximately 4 ft of wire in the PIC control box for
terminations.
3. Route the cables from the PIC control box to the HSIO
bracket. Secure the HSIO cables to the existing cables
using either tie wraps or by twisting the HSIO cables around
the existing cables. Strip back the jacket 6 in. on each
cable after cutting off the excess. Connect the power cable
at the PIC control box to the existing 3-pin connector hanging at the HSIO bracket. The wires should be terminated
in the screw-type locking clamps on Terminals 1 and 2.
4. Connect the signal cable at the PIC control box to the
existing 4-pin communications connector hanging at the
HSIO bracket. The wires should be terminated in the locking clamps on Terminals 1, 2, and 3. The shield should be
terminated at the HSIO bracket (ground). Be sure to note
the color coding used on the cable for later reference when
terminating the other end of the cable.
5. At the NEMA standard box or HSIO, connect the power
conductors to Pin 1 and 2 of the 3-pin plug. Using the
color coding from the above step, connect the signal cable
to Pin 1, Pin 2, and Pin 3 of the 4-pin communications
connector. Remove the shield and drain wire from this
end of the cable.
6. After the HSIO is installed inside the remote cover, connect the 4-pin and 3-pin plugs to the HSIO.
RETURN-AIR TEMPERATURE SENSOR, OUTDOORAIR TEMPERATURE SENSOR, ENTHALPY SWITCH,
AND MIXED-AIR TEMPERATURE SENSOR — Wires are
to be connected to the proper terminals on the processor module. See Fig. 44 for details.
52
LEGEND
ENT
MAT
OAT
RAT
SPT
—
—
—
—
—
Enthalpy Switch
Mixed-Air Temperature Sensor
Outside-Air Temperature Sensor
Return-Air Temperature Sensor
Space Temperature Sensor
Field Wiring
NOTE: Connections for 39NX with integral PIC shown. See wiring diagrams in
Fig. 9 and 12 for terminal connections in 39L control box and all remote-mount
control boxes.
Fig. 44 — Field Wiring of Sensors
To prevent equipment damage: Power must NOT be connected to an earth ground; actuator case must NOT be
connected to control input terminals.
Field-Supplied Exhaust Damper — Wire the 4 to 20 mA signal of the factory-supplied exhaust damper actuator as follows (Fig. 46):
1. Select a 20 AWG twisted pair conductor cable rated for
the application. Identify the positive (1) and negative (−)
signal contacts on the actuator.
2. Install cable from the actuator to the PIC control box.
3. Remove jumper no. 84 from between terminals TB2, 7
and 8. Connect positive (1) lead to terminal 8 of TB2.
Connect negative (−) lead to terminal 7 of TB2.
Field-Supplied Modulating Mixing Box — Wire the 4 to
20 mA signal of the factory-supplied damper actuator as follows (Fig. 47):
1. Select a 20 AWG twisted pair conductor cable rated
for the application. Identify the positive (1) and
negative (−) signal contacts on the actuator.
2. Install cable from the actuator to the PIC control box.
3a. For the outside-air damper (OAD) actuator, connect the
positive (1) lead to pin 40 of the processor module. Connect the negative (−) lead to terminal 6 of terminal block
2 (TB2).
b. If the actuator is factory-supplied, connect the actuator’s 24 vac power wires to TB2, terminals 19 and 20.
If the actuator is field-supplied, connect the power wires
to a separate, isolated 24 vac power source.
IMPORTANT: Jumper may be connected from E1 to E3. Move jumper to
connect E2 and E3 before installing sensor, otherwise incorrect space temperature values are generated.
Fig. 45 — Space Temperature Sensor Wiring
For factory-supplied actuators that are field-installed, the
24 vac power source is included with the unit wired in the
control box. For field-supplied actuators, a 24 vac power source
must be field-supplied and installed for each actuator.
53
Table 9 — Recommended Actuators
PART
NO.
VOLTAGE
(50/60 Hz)
VA (24 vac)
IMPEDANCE
(Ohms)
SIGNAL INPUT
(mA)
HF27BB006
HY27BB001*
HF27BB010
24
24
24
18
60
44
82.5
250.0
82.5
4 to 20
4 to 20
4 to 20
*Shipped with drive HF39CB001, which must be field-installed on actuator.
DAMPER AREA
(sq ft)
Parallel
Opposed
8.4
10.8
42
54
106
137
TORQUE
(in.-lb)
STROKE
15
50
190
2 in.
180°
31⁄2 in.
HY27BB001 - BLACK and WHITE (24 vac)
ORANGE (1 signal)
BLUE (− signal)
HF27BB010 - WHITE/BLUE and BLACK (24 vac)
RED (1 signal)
GREEN (− signal)
4. Actuator HH27BB006 is equipped with 20 ft of plenum cable. Wires for actuators HY27BB001 and HF27BB010 are in the actuator junction box.
5. Actuators are available as an option when ordered with the unit.
NOTES:
1. All actuators are spring return.
2. Damper area ratings are nominal and are based on standard (NOT low leak)
dampers at 1.0 in. wg pressure and 2000 fpm velocity.
3. Actuator wire coding is as follows:
HF27BB006 - BLACK and WHITE (24 vac)
RED (1 signal)
GREEN (− signal)
The approved building fire alarm system must provide 4
different normally-open dry contact closures. A fieldsupplied 24 vac, double-pole, double-throw (DPDT) fire shutdown (FSD) relay rated for the application (240 vac with a
10 amp minimum) is required.
All power going through the smoke control panel dry contacts and the FSD relay coil is furnished by the PIC control
box. A 24 vac fused power source uses a factory-installed
3 amp in-line fuse. See Fig. 49 or 50 for smoke control option wiring details.
Wire as follows:
1. Disconnect all power at the unit, PIC control box,
return fan (if applicable), and fire panel.
2. Wire the supply fan motor starter per Fig. 8.
3. If applicable, wire the return fan as shown in Fig. 49 or
50.
NOTE: Return fan power may be different from supply
fan power.
4. Connect leads from the return fan HOA switch to
terminals 9 and 10 of TB5.
5. Wire the first set of contacts of the DPDT FSD. For fire
shutdown of the unit from a local smoke detector, wire
ONLY the normally-closed contacts (NEC, class 1 power
rated) to the hot leg of the fan power supply and terminal 2 of TB1.
6. Terminal 8 of TB5 is internally connected to ground.
Connect one side of the EVAC, PURG, and PRES dry
contacts of the smoke control panel to terminal 8 of TB5.
7. Connect the other side of the PRES dry contact to terminal 3 of TB5. Connect the other side of the PURG
dry contact to terminal 4 of TB5. Connect the other side
of the EVAC dry contact to terminal 5 of TB5.
8. Connect the normally-open dry contacts of the FSD device (smoke detector with auxilary relay and/or smoke
control panel dry contact set) to terminal 1 and 2 of TB5.
9. Connect the 24 vac relay coil of the FSD relay to terminals 1 and 8 of TB5.
10. Connect the second pole of the FSD relay to the hot leg
of the return fan power supply and to terminal 11 of TB5.
Refer to Fig. 49 or 50 for point-to-point wiring of the smoke
control option inside the PIC control box.
LEGEND
Field Wiring
EXD — Exhaust Air
Damper Actuator
Fig. 46 — Exhaust Damper Actuator Wiring (Smoke
Control Option or Modulating Dampers)
4a. For the return-air damper (RAD) actuator, connect the
positive (1) lead to TB2, terminal 6. Connect the negative (−) lead to TB2, terminal 7.
b. If the actuator is factory-supplied, connect the actuator’s 24 vac power wires to TB2, terminals 21 and 22.
If the actuator is field supplied, connect the power wires
to a separate, isolated 24 vac power source.
Field-Supplied Two-Position Damper — The factorysupplied SPDT relay must be field-installed and wired. The
relay contacts are rated as follows:
48 va at 24 vac and .25 service factor
125 va at 115 vac and .25 service factor
125 va at 230 vac and .25 service factor
The relay provides a set of contacts (normally open and normally closed) using no. 6 screw terminals; the 24 vdc coil
connections are through 1⁄4-in. quick connects.
Using a 20 AWG twisted cable, connect the relay coil contacts 1 and 2 to the processor module pins 41 and 42. See
Fig. 48.
To connect the field-supplied two-position damper actuator (Fig. 48): Connect one contact of the actuator to the
normally-open contact of the relay. Connect the common contact of the relay to one leg of the power source. Connect the
other contact of the actuator to the other leg of the power
source.
SMOKE CONTROL OPTION — The smoke control option
includes 3 relays which control the 4 different modes of the
option. These relays are factory wired. Terminal block 5 (TB5)
provides an easy means to wire the field-supplied smoke control panel to the PIC controller on the 39L or 39NX unit. See
Fig. 49 and 50.
54
LEGEND
OAD — Outside Air Damper
Actuator
RAD — Return Air Damper
Actuator
Factory Wiring
Field Wiring
*Field-installed if only outside air damper is used.
NOTE: Connections for 39NX with integral PIC shown. See wiring diagrams in
Fig. 9 and 12 for terminal connections in 39L control box and all remote-mount
control boxes.
Fig. 47 — Field-Supplied Mixing Box Actuator Signal Wiring
LEGEND
OAD — Outside Air Damper
Actuator
Field Wiring
Fig. 48 — Field-Supplied Two-Position Damper Relay and Actuator Wiring
55
LEGEND
AO
EVAC
EXD
FSD
HOA
HPS
LTT
OAD
PRES
RAD
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Analog Output
Evacuation
Exhaust Air Damper Actuator
Fire Shut Down
HAND/OFF/AUTO Switch
High-Pressure Switch
Low Temperature Thermostat
Outside Air Damper Actuator
Pressurization
Return Air Damper Actuator
RFR
SF
SFR
TB
TRAN
—
—
—
—
—
Return Fan Relay
Supply Fan Contactor
Supply Fan Relay
Terminal Block
Transformer
Remove Jumper
Factory Wiring
Field Wiring
NOTE: The return fan power circuit may be different than the supply
fan starter power.
Fig. 49 — Smoke Control Option Wiring Schematic (39L)
56
LEGEND
AO
EVAC
EXD
FSD
HOA
HPS
LTT
OAD
PRES
RAD
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Analog Output
Evacuation
Exhaust Air Damper Actuator
Fire Shut Down
HAND/OFF/AUTO Switch
High-Pressure Switch
Low Temperature Thermostat
Outside Air Damper Actuator
Pressurization
Return Air Damper Actuator
RFR
SF
SFR
TB
TRAN
—
—
—
—
—
Return Fan Relay
Supply Fan Contactor
Supply Fan Relay
Terminal Block
Transformer
Factory Wiring
Field Wiring
*Factory installed and wired if ordered with exhaust box.
NOTE: Return fan power circuit may be different than the supply fan
starter power.
Fig. 50 — Smoke Control Option Wiring Schematic (39NX)
57
DISCRETE OUTPUT DEVICE UNDER TIMECLOCK
CONTROL — The factory-supplied SPDT relay must be field
installed and wired. (Fig. 52.) The relay contacts are rated as
follows:
48 va at 24 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 115 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 230 vac and .25 power factor
The relay provides a set of contacts (normally open and normally closed) using no. 6 screw terminals while the 24 vdc
coil connections are through 1⁄4-in. quick connects.
Using a 20 AWG twisted cable, connect the relay coil contacts to the option module pins 53 and 54. Connect the device to be controlled to the normally-open or normallyclosed contacts of the relay. Pay close attention to the contact
ratings listed above. See Fig. 54.
NC
SDA 2 0 2 0
ANALOG DEVICE FOR ANALOG OUTPUT TEMPERATURE CONTROL — The analog controlled device selected
must be capable of receiving a 4 to 20 mA signal. Its internal
impedance must not exceed 600 ohms.
The power supply of the analog device must be field installed.
Using a 20 AWG twisted wire pair, wire the control signal
as follows (Fig. 51).
1. Connect the positive (1) contact to pin 46 of the option
module.
2. Connect the negative (−) contact to pin 47 of the option
module.
DEVICE UNDER DISCRETE OUTPUT TEMPERATURE
CONTROL — The factory-supplied SPDT relay must be field
installed and wired. See Fig. 52. The relay contacts are rated
as follows:
48 va at 24 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 115 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 230 vac and .25 power factor
The relay provides a set of contacts (normally open and normally closed) using no. 6 screw terminals while the 24 vdc
coil connections are through 1⁄4-in. quick connects.
Using a 20 AWG twisted cable, connect the relay coil contacts 1 and 2 to the option module pins 50 and 51. Connect
the device to be controlled to the normally-open or normallyclosed contacts of the relay. Pay close attention to the contact ratings listed above. See Fig. 53.
2
COI L
1
COM
NO
Fig. 52 — Single-Pole, Double-Throw (SPDT) Relay
Field Wiring
Fig. 51 — Wiring of Analog Device for Analog Output Temperature Control
58
Field Wiring
Field Wiring
Fig. 55 — Wiring of the Modulating Valve for
Analog Output Humidity Control
NOTE: The relay furnished is a SPDT relay with silver cadmium oxide contacts, rated as follows:
48 va at 24 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 115 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 230 vac and .25 power factor
Two-Stage Humidification Control Relays — Two SPDT
relays with silver cadmium contacts are shipped with the unit
when 2-stage humidification control is requested. See
Fig. 52. The relays are rated as follows:
48 va at 24 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 115 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 230 vac and .25 power factor
The relays must be field installed within a field-supplied enclosure rated for the application.
Wire the stage 1 relay as follows: Connect the 24 vac coil
contacts 1 and 2 to pins 41 and 42 of the option module. The
stage 1 relay is intended to open a normally-closed steam
valve and not energize the spray pump. See Fig. 56 for field
wiring of the stage 1 valve and steam pump.
Wire the stage 2 relay as follows: Connect the 24 vac coil
contacts 1 and 2 to pins 44 and 45 of the option module. The
stage 2 relay is intended to open a second normally-closed
steam valve. See Fig. 56 for field wiring of the stage 2 valve.
Duct High Humidity Switch — The humidistat is factory supplied and field installed. It is shipped (with a template) in its
own box.
All wiring must comply with applicable local codes and
ordinances. Wire the DHH as follows:
1. Turn switch on PIC control box to OFF.
Fig. 53 — Wiring of Device Under Discrete Output
Temperature Control
Field Wiring
NOTE: The relay furnished is a SPDT relay with silver cadmium oxide contacts, rated as follows:
48 va at 24 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 115 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 230 vac and .25 power factor
Turn switch on PIC control box to OFF before connecting DHH wiring, otherwise electrical shock or
equipment damage can result.
Fig. 54 — Wiring of Discrete Output Device
Under Timeclock Control
2. Connect wire from terminal 3 of terminal block 2 (TB2)
to the terminal labeled ORANGE on the DHH sensor. See
Fig. 57.
3. Connect wire from pin 7 of the option module to the sensor screw terminal labelled RED.
During humidification, the duct high humidity switch must
be set to the maximum humidity level desired in the supply
duct (80% minimum).
Duct Mounted/Wall Mounted Relative Humidity Transmitter (Fig. 58) — Identify the power terminal block (ACIN)
and signal terminal block (OUT). See Fig. 59 and 60. Using
20 AWG twisted wire pair, connect the 24 vac power to the
terminal labeled ACIN.
HUMIDIFICATION DEVICES
Modulating Valve for Analog Output Humidity Control
(Fig. 55) — Valve selected must be able to receive a 4 to
20 mA signal and must NOT exceed an impedance of 600 ohms.
Valve power supply must be field-installed and isolated.
Install valve on humidifier piping and connect actuator power
supply. Using a 20 AWG twisted wire pair, connect the positive (1) contact of the valve actuator to pin 40 of the option
module. Connect the negative (−) contact of the valve actuator to pin 41 of the option module.
59
Field Wiring
NOTE: The relay furnished is a SPDT relay with silver cadmium oxide contacts, rated as follows:
48 va at 24 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 115 vac and .25 power factor
125 va at 230 vac and .25 power factor
Fig. 56 — Wiring of Two-Stage Humidification Control Relays
The power for the relative humidity transmitters may be
sourced from the valve 24 vac power source at wire no. 6
and 7 or at wire no. 4 and 5.
Connect the signal wires as follows: Secure one wire to
the terminal labelled OUT 1 (located at the right of terminal
block OUT). Secure the other wire to the negative signal
output terminal (terminal adjacent to the terminal labelled
OUT 1). Run the twisted pair of signal wires to the PIC
control box. Observe all local code requirements.
Outdoor Relative Humidity Transmitter: Connect the positive (1) wire to pin 31 of the processor module. Connect the
negative (−) wire to pin 32 of the processor module.
Return Air or Space Relative Humidity Transmitter;
Connect the positive (1) wire to pin 10 of the processor module. Connect the negative (−) wire to pin 11 of the processor
module. See Fig. 61.
Field Wiring
NOTE: Connections for 39NX with integral PIC shown. See wiring diagrams in
Fig. 9 and 12 for terminal connections in 39L control box and all remote-mount
control boxes.
Fig. 57 — Wiring of the Duct
High Humidity Switch
The 24 vac power source(s) to both duct mounted and
wall mounted relative humidity transmitters MUST be
isolated. Connecting either side to a ground will permanently damage the sensor.
Fig. 58 — Field-Installed Relative
Humidity Transmitters
60
Field Wiring
Fig. 59 — Duct Mounted Relative Humidity
Transmitter Wiring
Fig. 60 — Wall Mounted Relative Humidity
Transmitter Wiring
LEGEND
RH — Relative Humidity
Field Wiring
Fig. 61 — Wiring of Relative Humidity Transmitters
61
AIR QUALITY SENSOR — Air quality (AQ) sensors are
CO2 sensors shipped inside the fan section for field installation. To wire the sensors after they are mounted in the conditioned air space and return air duct, see Fig. 62 and the
instructions shipped with the sensors. For each sensor, use
two 2-conductor 20 AWG twisted-pair cables (unshielded)
to connect the separate 24 vac power source to the sensor
and the sensor to the option module (PSIO slave) terminals.
To connect each AQ sensor to the option module, identify
the positive (1) and negative (−) terminals on the sensor;
connect AQ1 to terminals 25 and 26 and connect AQ2 to
terminals 28 and 29.
OUTSIDE AIR VELOCITY PRESSURE (OAVP) SENSOR — The OAVP sensor is factory installed and wired. As
shown in Fig. 62, the sensor’s power wiring is connected to
TB2, 9 and 10 for 39L units or TB2, 29 and 30 for 39NX
units; the signal leads are connected to terminals 31 and 32
in the option module.
Note that if the velocity pressure of the supply and/or return air is below 0.75 in. wg, the system may require transducers with lower ranges than those of the default factorysupplied transducers. As a general rule, size transducers
so that the maximum air velocity pressure is 75% of the
transducer’s maximum value. For example, if the 39L or
39NX unit produces a maximum air velocity pressure of
0.15 in. wg, a transducer with a maximum value of
0.20 in. wg can be used. Sizing the transducers according to
these guidelines ensures that they have good resolution.
Factory-Supplied Return Fans with Inlet Guide Vanes
(IGVs) are factory wired except for the air supply control
signal from the airflow monitoring stations, which is connected in the field to the bulkhead fitting.
Return Fans with Field-Supplied IGV Actuators must be able
to receive a 4 to 20 mA signal and may NOT have an impedance of more than 600 ohms. An isolated power source
must be field-supplied and installed. See Table 9 for
recommended actuators.
To install actuators, see Fig. 65. Using a 2-conductor
20 AWG conductor cable (one twisted pair, unshielded) rated
for the application, connect the positive (1) wire to terminal
37 in the option module. Connect the negative (−) wire to
terminal 38. Connect the 24 vac power leads to TB2,
terminals 23 and 24.
Field-Supplied Return Fans with Variable Frequency Drives
must have 4 to 20 mA signal input boards and their own
field-supplied and installed power sources.
To install return fans with variable frequency drives,
see Fig. 66. Using a 2-conductor 20 AWG conductor cable
(one twisted pair, unshielded) rated for the application, connect the positive (1) signal wire to terminal 37 in the
option module. Connect the negative signal (−) wire to
terminal 38.
The supply fan minimum set point must be equal to the
return fan minimum airflow, plus the delta airflow that is to
be maintained.
LEGEND
AQ
— Air Quality Sensor
OAVP — Outside Air Velocity Pressure Sensor
Field Wiring
Factory Wiring
NOTE: See unit label diagram or Fig. 12 for remote-mount control
box connections.
Fig. 62 — Air Quality and OAVP Sensor Wiring
FAN VOLUME CONTROL (Fig. 63)
Airflow Monitoring Stations are field-selected and fieldinstalled in the supply and return air ducts; see Fig. 63.
Install each monitoring station in a straight portion of the
duct with any upstream or downstream elbows or fittings at
least 2.5 diameters away.
Use approved plenum tubing to connect each monitoring
station to the bulkhead fittings on top of the control box. For
runs up to 50 ft, use 1⁄4-in. OD tubing. For runs over 50 ft,
use 3⁄8-in. OD tubing.
Differential Pressure Transducers for fan volume control are
factory-installed in the control box (two are supplied). The
power supply for the transducers is also factory installed.
Both transducers have pressure ranges of 0.0 to 1.0 in. wg
and produce 2 to 10 vdc signals. See Fig. 64 for wiring
details.
IGV — Inlet Guide Vane
Field Wiring
NOTE: Air monitoring stations are field supplied and installed; pressure transducers are factory supplied and installed.
Fig. 63 — Field-Installed Fan Volume Control
62
LEGEND
RVP — Return Velocity Pressure Transducer
SVP — Supply Velocity Pressure Transducer
Field Tubing
NOTE: Connections for 39NX with integral PIC shown. See wiring
diagrams in Fig. 9 and 12 for terminal connections in 39L control box
and all remote-mount control boxes.
Fig. 64 — Fan Volume Control — Differential Pressure Transducer (P/N HK05ZG007) Factory Wiring
Field Wiring
Fig. 66 — Wiring of Return Fan Volume Control
with Variable Frequency Drive
NOTE: Connections for 39NX with integral PIC shown. See wiring
diagrams in Fig. 9 and 12 for terminal connections in 39L control box
and all remote-mount control boxes.
Fig. 65 — Wiring of Return Fan Volume Control
with IGVs
63
Pulse-Type Meter (Fig. 67) — Monitors power usage, which
is passed through the Carrier Comfort Network (CCN) for
use by the loadshed module of the Building Supervisor. The
meter must provide a dry contact signal (not exceeding 4 Hz
maximum). Using a 2-conductor 20 AWG shielded twistedpair conductor cable, connect one wire to terminal 35 of the
option module and the other wire to terminal 36. Connect
the drain wire to the ground lug inside the PIC control box
and remove the drain wire and shield on the meter end of the
cable. Tape to insulate, if required.
SIGNAL
TYPE
1
Ground
−
CCN BUS CONDUCTOR
INSULATION COLOR
RED
WHITE
BLACK
COMM1 PLUG
PIN NO.
1
2
3
If a cable with a different color scheme is selected, a similar color code should be adopted for the entire network.
At each system element, the shields of its communication
bus cables must be tied together. If the communication bus
is entirely within one building, the resulting continuous shield
must be connected to ground at only one point. See Fig. 69.
If the communication bus cable exits from one building and
enters another, the shields must be connected to ground at
the lightning suppressor in each building where the cable
enters or exits the building (one point only).
To connect the 39L or 39NX unit to the network, proceed
as follows (Fig. 69):
1. Turn power to the PIC control box to OFF.
2. Remove the COMM1 plug from the processor module.
3. Cut the CCN wire and strip the ends of the RED, WHITE,
and BLACK conductors.
4. Using a wire nut, connect the 2 drain wires together.
5. Insert and secure the 2 RED wires to terminal 1 of the
COMM1 plug.
6. Insert and secure the 2 WHITE wires to terminal 2 of the
COMM1 plug.
7. Insert and secure the 2 BLACK wires to terminal 3 of the
COMM1 plug.
Field Wiring
Fig. 67 — Pulse-Type Meter Wiring
ELECTRIC HEATER — The electric heater is factory wired
and installed and is controlled by the PIC processor and DSIO.
There is no field wiring or installation required.
CARRIER COMFORT NETWORK INTERFACE — The
Carrier Comfort Network (CCN) communication bus wiring
is supplied and installed by the electrical contractor. It consists of shielded, 3-conductor cable with drain wire.
The system elements are connected to the communication
bus in a daisy-chain arrangement. The positive pin of each
system element communication connector must be wired to
the positive pins of the system element on either side of it;
the negative pins must be wired to the negative pins; the signal ground pins must be wired to signal ground pins. See
Fig. 68 for location of the CCN communication plug (COMM1)
on the processor module.
NOTE: Conductors and drain wire must be 20 AWG minimum, stranded tinned copper. Individual conductors must be
insulated with PVC, PVC/nylon, vinyl, Teflon, or polyethylene. An aluminum/polyester 100% foil shield and an outer
jacket of PVC, PVC/nylon, chrome vinyl, or Teflon with a
minimum operating temperature range of −20 C to 60 C
is required. See Table below for cables that meet the
requirements.
MANUFACTURER
Alpha
American
Belden
Columbia
Fig. 68 — CCN Sensor Plug and Communication
Plug Locations
OUTDOOR-AIR THERMOSTAT — Use field-supplied,
2-conductor 20 AWG wire to connect the thermostat to the
DSIO and terminal block in the PIC control box. See
Fig. 70. Connect one wire between the thermostat and J3-1
on the DSIO. For 39NX units, connect a second wire between the other thermostat terminal and TB3-9 (TB2-10 for
39L units). For 39NX units, connect a third wire between
J3-2 on the DSIO and TB4-10 (TB2-9 on 39L units).
CABLE NO.
2413 or 5463
A22503
8772
02525
CONTROL SYSTEM
The control system consists of a processor module
(Fig. 71), sensors, and controlled devices. Available options
include a processor option module (Fig. 71), relay modules
(Fig. 72), and local interface device.
When connecting the CCN communication bus to a system element, a color code system for the entire network is
recommended to simplify installation and checkout. The following color code is recommended:
64
Fig. 69 — CCN Communication Wiring
All system software and operating intelligence is in the
processor (PSIO master) module, which controls the unit.
This module monitors and controls conditions through input
and output ports and through the option (PSIO slave) and
relay (DSIO) modules.
The machine operator communicates with the PSIO master through the local interface device (HSIO). Communications between the PSIO and other modules is accomplished
by a 3-wire sensor bus that runs in parallel between modules. See Fig. 73.
On the sensor bus terminal strips, terminal 1 of the PSIO
module is connected to terminal 1 of each of the other modules (see Fig. 73). Terminals 2 and 3 are connected in
the same manner. If a terminal 2 wire is connected to
terminal 1, the system does not work.
The PSIO master and slave and DSIO are all powered from
a 21 vac power source connected to terminals 1 and 2 of the
power input connector on each module. Refer to the 39L or
39NX unit wiring diagram for transformer locations and
wiring.
Relay (DSIO) Module (Fig. 72) — The DSIO module provides additional inputs and outputs to the PSIO master for electric heater and direct expansion coil staging. The
DSIO module is factory installed. If only one DSIO module
is used for electric heat or DX cooling, the DSIO address
switches are factory-set at 19. If 2 DSIO modules are used
for electric heat and DX cooling, the heat module is set to
address 19 and the cooling module is set to address 49. See
Table 1.
The DSIO inputs on strip J3 are discrete (ON/OFF) inputs. When 24 vac are applied across the 2 terminals, the
corresponding channel reads one state. When no power is
applied across the terminals, the channel reads the opposite
state.
Processor (PSIO Master) and Option (PSIO Slave)
Modules (Fig. 71) — The PSIO master module moni-
Terminal strips J4 and J5 are internal relays whose coils
are powered on and off by a signal from the microprocessor.
The relays switch the circuit to which they are connected.
Only Class II power should be applied to these connections.
IMPORTANT: The 24 vac inputs on J3 of the DSIO
module are polarized, with one side tied to earth ground.
The grounded side of the signal must be connected to
the even-number pins.
tors and controls components such as the supply fan, cooling and heating coil valves, inlet guide vanes, and mixed-air
dampers. The PSIO slave module provides additional inputs
and outputs to the PSIO master for options such as return
fan volume, humidifier, smoke, and air quality control. The
processor and option modules are factory installed.
Each PSIO input and output channel has 3 terminals;
only 2 of the terminals are used. The unit application determines the terminal connections. Refer to the unit wiring
diagram for terminal numbers.
The PSIO address switches are factory set at address
01 (master) and 31 (slave). Use a local or remote HSIO or
the CCN to change the unit address. Do NOT change the
address switches on the PSIO modules.
IMPORTANT: Use only the normally-open contacts
on DSIO modules. These contacts have internal snubbers that protect the control modules from destructive
arcing produced by switching inductive loads. NEVER
use the normally-closed contacts.
65
AHU
CUST
DSIO
DX
OAT
PIC
—
—
—
—
—
—
LEGEND
Air Handling Unit
Condensing Unit Status
Relay Module
Direct Expansion
Outdoor Air Thermostat
Product Integrated Control
Factory Wiring
Field Wiring
Fig. 70 — Outdoor Air Thermostat/DSIO Wiring
66
Local Interface Device (HSIO) (Fig. 74) — The
HSIO consists of a keyboard with 6 function keys, 5 operative keys, 10 numeric keys (0-9), and an alphanumeric
8-character liquid crystal display (LCD). Key use is explained in Table 10. Each function has one or more subfunctions as shown in Table 11. These functions are described in
greater detail in the Control Operation section of this book.
The HSIO can be factory-or field-installed, and can be remotely mounted if necessary.
Table 10 — Local Interface Device Key Usage
FUNCTION
KEYS
USE
Status — Display diagnostic codes and current
operating information about the machine
Quick Test — Check inputs and outputs for
proper operation
History — Check latest service dates and
alarms in order of occurrence
Service — Enter specific unit configuration
information
Set Point — Enter operating set points and
day/time/date, holiday, and daylight savings
time information
Schedule — Enter occupied/unoccupied schedules for unit operation
OPERATIVE
KEYS
USE
Expand Display — Display a non-abbreviated
expansion of the display
Clear — Clear the screen of all displays
Up Arrow — Return to previous display position
Down Arrow — Advance to next display
position
Fig. 72 — Relay Module (DSIO)
Enter data
LID — Local Interface Device
Fig. 73 — Sensor Bus Wiring (Communications)
Fig. 74 — Local Interface Device
Fig. 71 — Processor Module (PSIO Master/Slave)
67
Table 11 — Functions and Subfunctions
SUBFUNCTION
NUMBER
1
FUNCTION
History
Schedule
Service
Set Point
Test
Current alarms
Alarm history
Maintenance
history
—
4
5
System outputs
—
6
—
—
Daylight savings
time configuration
Holiday
configuration
—
Quick test of
inputs
Quick test of
outputs
Quick test of
electric heat
Quick test of
DX cooling
Exit quick
test
—
7
—
—
—
—
8
—
—
—
—
9
—
—
—
—
10
—
—
—
—
11
—
—
—
—
12
—
—
—
—
13
—
—
—
—
14
—
—
—
—
15
—
—
—
—
16
—
—
—
—
17
—
—
—
—
18
—
—
—
—
19
—
—
—
—
20
—
—
—
—
—
21
—
—
—
—
—
22
—
—
—
—
—
23
—
—
—
—
—
24
—
—
—
—
—
25
—
—
—
—
—
26
—
—
—
—
—
27
—
—
—
Log on and
Log off
Software
version
Factory
configuration
English/metric
system
User
configuration
Heating coil
configuration
Cooling coil
configuration
DX cooling
configuration
Inlet guide vanes
configuration
Mixed-air damper
configuration
Electric heat
configuration
Nighttime free
cooling configuration
Night purge
configuration
OAVP
configuration
Air quality
configuration 1
Air quality
configuration 2
Optimal start/stop
configuration
Space temperature
reset configuration
Loadshed
configuration
Fan tracking
configuration
Humidity
configuration
Alarms limits
configuration
Analog temperature
configuration
Discrete temperature
configuration
Service history
configuration
Service maintenance
configuration
Timed override
history
System set points
Current operating
modes
Current operating
set points
System inputs
Occupied mode
override sched 1
Period 1
of schedule 1
Period 2
of schedule 1
Period 3
of schedule 1
Period 4
of schedule 1
Period 5
of schedule 1
Period 6
of schedule 1
Period 7
of schedule 1
Period 8
of schedule 1
Occupied mode
override sched 2
Period 1
of schedule 2
Period 2
of schedule 2
Period 3
of schedule 2
Period 4
of schedule 2
Period 5
of schedule 2
Period 6
of schedule 2
Period 7
of schedule 2
Period 8
of schedule 2
—
—
—
2
3
Status
—
DX — Direct Expansion
68
Demand limits
Current time
CONTROL OPERATION
Accessing Functions and Subfunctions — See
Table 12. Refer also to Table 11, which shows the 6 functions (identified by name) and the subfunctions (identified
by number). Table 13 shows the sequence of all the elements
in a subfunction.
Display Functions
SUMMARY DISPLAY — Whenever the keyboard has not
been used for 10 minutes, the display automatically switches
to an alternating summary display. This display has 3 parts
(day/time, mode, and alarms), shown below, which alternate
in continuously rotating sequence.
Display
Expansion
TUE 12:45
MODE 23
2 ALARMS
TODAY IS TUE, TIME IS 12:45
UNOCCUPIED HEATING
THERE ARE 2 ALARMS DETECTED
Return to the previous display at any time by pressing
.
Table 12 — Accessing Functions and Subfunctions
OPERATION
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
DESCRIPTION
To access a function, press the subfunction number and the function name key.
The display shows the subfunction group
SETPOINT
System set points
To move to the other elements, scroll up or down using the arrow keys
OHSP X
Occupied heating set point
OCSP X
Occupied cooling set point
UHSP X
Unoccupied heating set point
When the last element in a subfunction has been displayed, the first element
is repeated
UCSP X
Unoccupied cooling set point
To move to the next subfunction, it is not necessary to use the subfunction
number. Pressing the function name key advances the display through all subfunctions within a function and then back to the first
DEMAND
Demand limit set points
TIME
Time of day and day of week
display
DAYLIGHT
Daylight savings time
HOLIDAY
Holiday display
SETPOINT
System set points
X ALARMS
X alarms detected
SETPOINT
Current operating set points
To move to another function, either depress the function name key for
the desired function (display shows the first subfunction)
or
Access a particular subfunction by using the subfunction number and the function name key
69
Table 13 — Keyboard Directory
Keyboard Entry
STATUS
Display
ALARMS
STATUS
Description
Keyboard Entry
Current alarm display
Display
Description
MODES
Current operating modes
Mode 1
Mode 2
ALARM X
1st alarm
MODE X
ALARM X
2nd alarm
MODE X
ALARM X
3rd alarm
SETPOINT
Current operating set points
ALARM X
4th alarm
OHSP X
Occupied heating set point
ALARM X
5th alarm
OCSP X
Occupied cooling set point
ALARM X
6th alarm
UHSP X
Unoccupied heating set point
ALARM X
7th alarm
UCSP X
Unoccupied cooling set point
ALARM X
8th alarm
SPSP X
Static pressure set point
ALARM X
9th alarm
SASP X
Supply air set point
ALARM X
10th alarm
CFSP X
Delta CFM set point
ALARM X
11th alarm
HUSP X
Humidity set point
ALARM X
12th alarm
AOSP X
Analog temperature control set point
ALARM X
13th alarm
DOSP X
Discrete temperature control set point
ALARM X
14th alarm
Q1SP X
Air quality 1 set point
ALARM X
15th alarm
Q2SP X
Air quality 2 set point
ALARM X
16th alarm
OASP X
Outdoor air velocity pressure
set point
ALARM X
17th alarm
ALARM X
18th alarm
ALARM X
19th alarm
ALARM X
20th alarm
ALARM X
21st alarm
ALARM X
22nd alarm
ALARM X
23rd alarm
ALARM X
24th alarm
ALARM X
25th alarm
ALARM X
26th alarm
ALARM X
27th alarm
ALARM X
28th alarm
ALARM X
29th alarm
ALARM X
30th alarm
ALARM X
31st alarm
ALARM X
32nd alarm
70
Table 13 — Keyboard Directory (cont)
STATUS
Keyboard Entry
Display
INPUTS
STATUS
Description
System inputs
SPT X
Space temperature
SAT X
Supply air temperature
RAT X
Return air temperature
OAT X
Outside air temperature
OAT X
Outside air temperature forced
(x = forced value)
SP X
Supply fan status
ENT X
Enthalpy switch status
ENT X
Enthalpy switch status forced
(x = forced value)
RH X
Relative humidity
Display
IGV X
Static pressure
SFS X
RH X
Keyboard Entry
Description
Inlet guide vanes forced
(x = forced value)
MIXD X
Mixed air damper
MIXD X
Mixed air damper forced
(x = forced value)
HCV X
Heating coil valve
HCV X
Heating coil valve forced
(x = forced value)
CCV X
Cooling coil valve
CCV X
Cooling coil valve forced
(x = forced value)
SF X
Supply fan start/stop
SF X
Supply fan start/stop forced
(x = forced value)
HIR X
Heat interlock relay
HIR X
Heat interlock relay forced
(x = forced value)
FRZ X
Relative humidity forced
(x = forced value)
Freezestat status
EHS1 X
Electric heat stage 1
MAT X
Mixed air temperature
EHS2 X
Electric heat stage 2
OARH X
Outside air relative humidity
EHS3 X
Electric heat stage 3
OARH X
Outside air relative humidity forced
(x = forced value)
Filter status
EHS4 X
Electric heat stage 4
EHS5 X
Electric heat stage 5
FLTS X
Filter status forced
(x = forced value)
EHS6 X
Electric heat stage 6
TEMP X
Temperature input
EHS7 X
Electric heat stage 7
EHS8 X
Electric heat stage 8
(NOTE: Only the actual number of
heater stages applicable to the unit
are provided.)
FLTS X
RVP X
Return velocity pressure
SVP X
Supply velocity pressure
DHH X
Duct high humidity
RFVC X
Return fan volume
EVAC X
Evacuation
RFVC X
Return fan volume forced
(x = forced value)
PRES X
Pressurization
HUM1 X
Humidifier first stage
PURG X
Smoke purge
HUM1 X
FSD X
Fire shutdown
Humidifier first stage forced
(x = forced value)
MTR X
Meter
HUM2 X
Humidifier 2nd stage
OAVP X
Outdoor air velocity pressure
HUM2 X
Humidifier 2nd stage forced
(x = forced value)
OAVP X
Outdoor air velocity pressure
(x = forced value)
AQ1 X
Air quality 1
AQ1 X
Air quality 1
(x = forced value)
AQ2 X
Air quality 2
AQ2 X
Air quality 2
(x = forced value)
AOTC X
Analog temperature
AOTC X
Analog temperature forced
(x = forced value)
DOTC X
Discrete temperature
DOTC X
Discrete temperature forced
(x = forced value)
DTCC X
Discrete time clock
DTCC X
Discrete time clock forced
(x = forced value)
CUST X
Condensing unit status
DXS1 X
DX cooling stage 1
CUST X
Condensing unit status
(x = forced value)
DXS2 X
DX cooling stage 2
DXSD X
DX cooling shutdown
DXS3 X
DX cooling stage 3
DXSD X
DX cooling shutdown
(x = forced value)
DXS4 X
DX cooling stage 4
System outputs
DXS5 X
DX cooling stage 5
Inlet guide vanes
DXS6 X
DX cooling stage 6
DXS7 X
DX cooling stage 7
DXS8 X
DX cooling stage 8
OUTPUTS
IGV X
DX — Direct Expansion
71
Table 13 — Keyboard Directory (cont)
Keyboard Entry
SCHEDULE
Display
OVRD X
Description
Keyboard Entry
SERVICE CONFIGURATIONS
Display
Description
LOG ON
Number of hours to extend
occupied mode of schedule 1
Enter password to log on
LOGGEDON Log on okay
PERIOD 1
Define period 1 of time
schedule 1
OCC X
Start of occupied time
UNO X
Start of unoccupied time
MON X
Monday flag (x = entry code)
(1 = yes, .0 or CLR = no)
LOGD OFF
Log off okay; configurations again
password protected
TUE X
Tuesday flag (x = entry code)
(1 = yes, .0 or CLR = no)
VERSION
Software version
WED X
Wednesday flag (x = entry code)
(1 = yes, .0 or CLR = no)
XXX-XX-X
Software version number
THU X
Thursday flag (x = entry code)
(1 = yes, .0 or CLR = no)
FACT CFG
Factory configuration
FRI X
Friday flag (x = entry code)
(1 = yes, .0 or CLR = no)
TYPE X
Unit type (0 = CV, 1 = VAV)
COOL X
Cooling (0 = none, 1 = coil)
DXST X
DX cooling stages 0-8
(enter number)
Heating (0 = none,
1 = hot/steam,
2 = electric heat coil)
Electric heat stages 0-8
(enter number)
Mixed air damper (0 = none,
1 = yes, 2 = 2-position)
SAT X
When finished with configuration, log off as follows:
that configurations are
LOGGEDON Shows
available
LOG OFF
Saturday flag (x = entry code)
(1 = yes, .0 or CLR = no)
SUN X
Sunday flag
HOL X
Holiday flag
HEAT X
EHST X
MIXD X
Time periods 2-8 of schedule 1
IAQT X
(same elements as period 1, schedule 1)
MATP X
BUS X
ADR X
OVRD X
PERIOD 1
Indoor-air quality type
Mixed air temperature protection
Bus number (factory default
set = 0)
Element address (factory set
default = 1)
Number of hours to extend
occupied mode of schedule 2
PSW X
Password XXXX
Define period 1 of time
schedule 2
UNITS X
English/metric system
(0 = English, 1 = metric)
USER CFG
User configuration
OCC X
Start of occupied time
UNO X
Start of unoccupied time
NTEN X
MON X
Monday flag (x = entry code)
(1 = yes, .0 or CLR = no)
Nighttime free cooling
configuration
HUEN X
Humidity configuration
TUE X
Tuesday flag (x = entry code)
(1 = yes, .0 or CLR = no)
OHEN X
Occupied heating configuration
WED X
Wednesday flag (x = entry code)
(1 = yes, .0 or CLR = no)
RSEN X
Space temperature reset
configuration
THU X
Thursday flag (x = entry code)
(1 = yes, .0 or CLR = no)
DLEN X
Demand limiting configuration
FTEN X
Fan tracking configuration
FRI X
Friday flag (x = entry code)
(1 = yes, .0 or CLR = no)
OAEN X
Constant outside air
SAT X
Saturday flag (x = entry code)
(1 = yes, .0 or CLR = no)
NPEN X
Night purge
SUN X
Sunday flag
AQEN X
Indoor air quality
HOL X
Holiday flag
IAQP X
Indoor air quality priority level
OSEN X
Optimal start/stop configuration
Time periods 2-8 of schedule 2
TSCH X
Timed override schedules
(same elements as period 1, schedule 2)
TOVR X
Timed override values
HEATCOIL
Configuration of heating coil
CV — Constant Volume
DX — Direct Expansion
VAV — Variable Air Volume
72
MPG X
Master proportional gain
MIG X
Master integral gain
MDG X
Master derivative gain
SMG X
Submaster gain
SCV X
Submaster center value
FOV X
Fan off value
SMR X
Submaster reference value
SMR X
Submaster reference value forced
Table 13 — Keyboard Directory (cont)
Keyboard Entry
SERVICE CONFIGURATIONS
Display
Description
Keyboard Entry
SERVICE CONFIGURATIONS
Display
Description
COOLCOIL
Configuration of cooling
(chilled water coil or DX)
MIXADMPR
Configuration of mixed air damper
MPG X
Master proportional gain
MPG X
Master proportional gain
MIG X
Master integral gain
MIG X
Master integral gain
MDG X
Master derivative gain
MDG X
Master derivative gain
SMG X
Submaster gain
SMG X
Submaster gain
SCV X
Submaster center value
SCV X
Submaster center value
HHL X
High humidity limit
MDP X
Minimum damper position
SMR X
Submaster reference value
SMR X
Submaster reference value
SMR X
Submaster reference value forced
SMR X
Submaster reference value forced
DXCOOL
Configure DX cooling
DPSP X
Damper set point
SMG X
Submaster gain
DPSP X
Damper set point forced
SMG X
Submaster gain forced
OAE X
Outside air enthalpy
MSR X
Minimum submaster reference
RAE X
Return air enthalpy
DX1G X
Stage 1 Time GuardT device
CNTRL X
Damper controlled by
DX2G X
Stage 2 Time Guard
ELECHEAT
Configuration of electric heat
DX3G X
Stage 3 Time Guard
MPG X
Master proportional gain
DX4G X
Stage 4 Time Guard
MIG X
Master integral gain
DX5G X
Stage 5 Time Guard
MDG X
Master derivative gain
DX6G X
Stage 6 Time Guard
SMG X
Submaster gain
DX7G X
Stage 7 Time Guard
SMR X
Submaster reference value
DX8G X
Stage 8 Time Guard
SMR X
Submaster reference value forced
DX1T X
Stage 1 logic type
DX2T X
Stage 2 logic type
DX3T X
Stage 3 logic type
DX4T X
Stage 4 logic type
NPURGE
Configuration of night purge
DX5T X
Stage 5 logic type
NPMN X
Night purge duration
DX6T X
Stage 6 logic type
NPDL X
DX7T X
Stage 7 logic type
NPDH X
DX8T X
Stage 8 logic type
MDP X
Minimum damper position
OAC
Configuration of constant
outside air
MPG X
Master proportional gain
MIG X
Master integral gain
MDG X
Master derivative gain
SMG X
Submaster gain
SMG X
Submaster gain forced
OALV X
OAVP sensor low voltage point
OAHV X
OAVP sensor high voltage point
OALR X
OAVP sensor low voltage reference
OAHR X
OAVP sensor high voltage reference
PMF X
OAVP sensor probe multiplier factor
MDP X
Minimum damper position
SMR X
Submaster reference value
SMR X
Submaster reference value forced
NTFC
INLET GV
Configuration of inlet guide vanes
MPG X
Master proportional gain
MIG X
Master integral gain
MDG X
Master derivative gain
SMG X
Submaster gain
SCV X
Submaster center value
SMR X
Submaster reference value
SMR X
Submaster reference value forced
NTLO X
DX
— Direct Expansion
OAVP — Outside Air Velocity Pressure
73
Configuration of nighttime
free cooling (NTFC)
NTFC lockout temperature (minimum
outside air temperature to operate
NTFC)
Night purge low temperature
damper position
Night purge high temperature
damper position
Table 13 — Keyboard Directory (cont)
Keyboard Entry
SERVICE CONFIGURATIONS
Display
Description
Configuration
of
indoor air quality
AIRQUAL1 and AQ sensor no.
1
Keyboard Entry
SERVICE CONFIGURATIONS
Display
Description
HUMIDITY
Configuration of humidity
MPG X
Master proportional gain
MPG X
Master proportional gain
MIG X
Master integral gain
MIG X
Master integral gain
XDP X
Maximum damper position
MDG X
Master derivative gain
Q1LV X
sensor 1 low voltage
SMG X
Submaster gain
sensor 1 high voltage
SCV X
Submaster center value
sensor 1 low voltage
SMR X
Submaster reference value
Q1HR X
Air quality
point
Air quality
point
Air quality
reference
Air quality
reference
sensor 1 high voltage
SMR X
Submaster reference value forced
MDP X
Minimum damper position
ALRMLIMT
Configuration of alarm limits
AIRQUAL2
Configuration of indoor air quality
and AQ sensor no. 2
SPLO X
MPG X
Master proportional gain
MIG X
Master integral gain
XDP X
Maximum damper position
Q2LV X
Air quality sensor 2 low voltage point
Q2HV X
Air quality sensor 2 high voltage point
Q2LR X
Air quality sensor 2 low voltage reference
Q2HR X
Air quality sensor 2 high voltage reference
MDP X
Minimum damper position
AOSS X
Configuration of optimal start/stop
RALU X
BLDF X
Building factor
RAHU X
UOCF X
24 hour occupied factor
TLO X
SETB X
Set point bias
THO X
OSMT X
Maximum allowable stop time
TLU X
SPRESET
Configuration of space temperature reset
THU X
Space temperature low alarm limit/
occupied
Space temperature high alarm limit/
occupied
Space temperature low alarm limit/
unoccupied
Space temperature high alarm limit/
unoccupied
Supply air temperature low alarm limit/
occupied
Supply air temperature high alarm limit/
occupied
Supply air temperature low alarm limit/
unoccupied
Supply air temperature high alarm limit/
unoccupied
Return air temperature low alarm limit/
occupied
Return air temperature high alarm limit/
occupied
Return air temperature low alarm limit/
unoccupied
Return air temperature high alarm limit/
unoccupied
Temperature input low alarm limit/
occupied
Temperature input high alarm limit/
occupied
Temperature input low alarm limit/
unoccupied
Temperature input high alarm limit/
unoccupied
RTIO X
Reset ratio X
OATL X
Outside air temperature low alarm limit
LIMT X
Reset limit X
OATH X
Outside air temperature high alarm limit
LOADSHED Configuration of loadshed
MATL X
Mixed air temperature low alarm limit
MATH X
Mixed air temperature high alarm limit
RHL X
Relative humidity low alarm limit
RHH X
Relative humidity high alarm limit
ORHL X
Outside air relative humidity low alarm
limit
Outside air relative humidity high alarm
limit
Q1HV X
Q1LR X
LSGP X
Loadshed group number (1-16)
FANTRACK
Configuration of fan tracking
SVUL X
Supply velocity upper limit
RVUL X
Return velocity upper limit
SDAR X
Supply duct area
RDAR X
Return duct area
MPG X
Master proportional gain
MIG X
Master integral gain
MDG X
Master derivative gain
SMG X
Submaster gain
SPHO X
SPLU X
SPHU X
SALO X
SAHO X
SALU X
SAHU X
RALO X
RAHO X
ORHH X
SCV X
Submaster center value
SMR X
Submaster reference value
SMR X
Submaster reference value forced
74
SPL X
Static pressure low alarm limit
SPH X
Static pressure high alarm limit
SVPL X
Supply velocity pressure low alarm limit
SVPH X
Supply velocity pressure high alarm limit
RVPL X
Return velocity pressure low alarm limit
RVPH X
Return velocity pressure high alarm limit
CFML X
Delta CFM x 100 low alarm limit
CFMH X
Delta CFM x 100 high alarm limit
Q1H X
Air quality sensor 1 high alarm limit
Q2H X
Air quality sensor 2 high alarm limit
Table 13 — Keyboard Directory (cont)
Keyboard Entry
SERVICE CONFIGURATIONS
Display
Description
SET POINT
Keyboard Entry
Display
Description
Configuration of analog temperature/
preheat coil control
SETPOINT
System set points
MPG X
Master proportional gain
OHSP X
Occupied heating set point
MIG X
Master integral gain
OCSP X
Occupied cooling set point
UHSP X
Unoccupied heating set point
UCSP X
Unoccupied cooling set point
SPSP X
Static pressure set point
SASP X
Supply air set point
CFSP X
Delta CFM set point
HUSP X
Humidity set point
AO CTRL
MDG X
Master derivative gain
SMG X
Submaster gain
SCV X
Submaster center value
FOV X
Fan off value
SEN X
Controlling temperature sensor
SMR X
Submaster reference value
SMR X
Submaster reference value forced
DO CTRL
AOSP X
Analog temperature control set point
DOSP X
Discrete temperature control set point
Configuration of discrete output control
Q1SP X
Air quality 1 set point
SEN X
Controlling temperature sensor
Q2SP X
Air quality 2 set point
TYP X
Discrete output logic type
OVSP X
Outside air velocity pressure set point
HYS X
Hysteresis
DEMAND
Demand limit set points
SERVHIST
Service history
DL1 X
Demand limit set point 1
SDAY X
Number of starts in the last 24 hours
DL2 X
Demand limit set point 2
STX
Total number of starts
TIME
Configuration of current time and date
FH X
Total number of fan run hours
DAY.HH.MM
Current day of the week and time
DOW HH:MM
Day of week and time of the last Start
MM.DD.YY
Current date
DOW HH:MM
Day of week and time of the last Stop
DAYLIGHT
Configuration of daylight savings time
ENM X
Daylight savings time starts—month
SRV/MTN
SMAL X
SMEH X
OVRDHIST
OHR X
Configuration of service/maintenance
alarms
Service/maintenance alarm limit
(hours x 1000)
Service/maintenance elapsed hours
(hours x 1000)
END X
Daylight savings time starts—day
ENT X
Daylight savings time starts—time
LVM X
Daylight savings time ends—month
History of timed overrides
LVD X
Daylight savings time ends—day
Hours of timed overrides
LVT X
Daylight savings time ends—time
HOLIDAY
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
MM.DD.DUR
75
Configuration of holidays
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
Holiday month,
(days long)
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
day & duration
Table 13 — Keyboard Directory (cont)
Keyboard Entry
QUICK TEST
Display
Description
Keyboard Entry
QUICK TEST
Display
Description
INPUTS
Factory/field test of inputs
OUTPUTS
SAT X
Supply air temperature
HCV X
Entering heating coil valve test
OAT X
Outside air temperature
HCV TEST
Testing heating coil valve
SPT X
Space temperature
CCV X
Entering cooling coil valve test
RAT X
Return air temperature
CCV TEST
Testing cooling coil valve
ENT X
Enthalpy switch status
MIXD X
Entering mixed air damper test
SFS X
Airflow switch status
MIXD TEST
Testing mixed air dampers
FRZ X
Freezestat
IGV X
Entering inlet guide vanes test
SP X
Static pressure
IGV TEST
Testing inlet guide vanes
RH X
Return air relative humidity
SF X
Entering supply fan test
MAT X
Mixed air temperature
FAN TEST
Testing supply fan
OARM X
Outside air relative humidity
HIR X
Entering heat interlock relay test
FLTS X
Filter status
HIR TEST
Testing heating interlock relay
TEMP X
Temperature input
RFVC X
Entering return fan volume test
RVP X
Return velocity pressure
RFVCTEST
Testing return fan volume
SVP X
Supply velocity pressure
HUM1 X
Entering humidifer stage 1 test
DHH X
Duct high humidity
HUM1TEST
Testing humidifer stage 1
EVAC X
Evacuation
HUM2 X
Entering humidifier stage 2 test
PRES X
Pressurization
HUM2TEST
Testing humidifier stage 2
PURG X
Smoke purge
AOTC X
FSD X
Fire shutdown
AOTCTEST
MTR X
Wattmeter
DOTC X
OAVP X
Outside air velocity pressure
DOTCTEST
AQ1 X
Air quality 1
DTCC X
AQ2 X
Air quality 2
CUST X
Condensing unit status
DXSD X
DX cooling shutdown
DTCCTEST
DX — Direct Expansion
76
Factory/field test of outputs
Entering analog temperature control
output test
Testing analog temperature control
output
Entering discrete temperature control
output test
Testing discrete temperature control
output
Entering discrete time clock control
output test
Testing discrete time clock control
output
Table 13 — Keyboard Directory (cont)
Keyboard Entry
QUICK TEST
Display
Description
Keyboard Entry
HISTORY
Display
Description
Factory/field test of electric heat
ALARMHST
Alarm history
EHS1 X
Stage 1 test
ALARM X
Latest alarm
STG1 TST
Testing of electric heat stage 1
ALARM X
Previous alarm
EHS2 X
Stage 2 test
ALARM X
Previous alarm
STG2 TST
Testing of electric heat stage 2
ALARM X
Previous alarm
EHS3 X
Stage 3 test
ALARM X
Previous alarm
STG3 TST
Testing of electric heat stage 3
ALARM X
Previous alarm
EHS4 X
Stage 4 test
ALARM X
Previous alarm
STG4 TST
Testing of electric heat stage 4
ALARM X
Previous alarm
EHS5 X
Stage 5 test
ALARM X
Previous alarm
STG5 TST
Testing of electric heat stage 5
MTMN/HIS
Maintenance history
EHS6 X
Stage 6 test
MM.DD.YY
Latest service date
STG6 TST
Testing of electric heat stage 6
EHS7 X
Stage 7 test
STG7 TST
Testing of electric heat stage 7
EHS8 X
Stage 8 test
STG8 TST
Testing of electric heat stage 8
DXCOOL
Factory/field test of DX cooling
DXS1 X
Stage 1 test
STG1TEST
Testing DX cooling stage 1
DXS2 X
Stage 2 test
STG2TEST
Testing DX cooling stage 2
ELE HEAT
DXS 3 X
Stage 3 test
STG3TEST
Testing DX cooling stage 3
DXS4 X
Stage 4 test
STG4TEST
Testing DX cooling stage 4
DXS5 X
Stage 5 test
STG5TEST
Testing DX cooling stage 5
DXS6 X
Stage 6 test
STG6TEST
Testing DX cooling stage 6
DXS7 X
Stage 7 test
STG7TEST
Testing DX cooling stage 7
DXS8 X
Stage 8 test
STG8TEST
Testing DX cooling stage 8
EXIT TEST
Exit quick test
TST CMPL
Test completed
DX — Direct Expansion
77
STATUS FUNCTION — The status function shows the current status of alarm (diagnostic) codes, operating modes, set
points, all measured system temperatures, output values, and
input values. These subfunctions are defined on
pages 78-80. Refer to Table 11 for additional information.
The modes are explained below:
Temperature Reset (21) — Indicates that the unit is using
temperature reset to adjust the supply-air set point. The set
point is modified based on space temperature (VAV units
only). Unit must be configured for space temperature
reset (
). (This mode is enabled by
.)
Demand Limit (22) — On CV (constant volume) units, this
mode indicates that the fan is being held off by the Demand Limit option. On VAV units, it indicates that the maximum IGV position is being limited by the Demand Limit
option. Units must be configured for demand limiting
(
). This mode is enabled by
, and is only
(Alarms) — Alarms are messages that one or more
faults have been detected. Each fault is assigned a code number which is reported with the alarm. (See Table 14 for
code definitions.) The codes indicate failures that cause the
unit to shut down, terminate an option (such as reset), or
result in the use of a default value as the set point.
Up to 32 alarm codes can be stored at once. To view
them in numerical sequence, press
to enter the
available on units connected to the Carrier Comfort
Network (CCN).
Unoccupied Heating (23) — Indicates that the space temperature is below the Unoccupied Heating set point and the
unit is on. When the space temperature rises above the set
point the unit is turned off.
Unoccupied Cooling (24) — Indicates that the space temperature is above the Unoccupied Cooling set point and the
unit is on. When the space temperature falls below the set
point the unit is turned off.
Optimal Start (26) — Indicates that the unit is operating
in the Optimal Start mode and is trying to achieve the
Occupied set point. On VAV units this is referred to as morning warm-up. Unit must be configured for optimal start
(
). This mode is enabled by
.)
alarm display and then press
to move to the individual
alarm displays. Press
after a code has been displayed
and the meaning of the code will scroll across the screen.
See Example 1.
If an input or output point which has generated an alarm
resets (returns to a range within its limits), the alarm code is
deleted from the list.
A historical sequence of the last 9 alarms can be found
using the
key. See Display Functions, History Function section for more details.
-----------------------------------------------(Modes) — The operating mode codes are displayed to indicate the current operating status of the unit.
(See Table 14)
To enter the MODES subfunction, press
and use
the
key to determine if more than one mode applies.
See Example 2 to read current mode with expansion.
Unoccupied Mode (27) — Indicates that the unit is in the
Unoccupied mode as determined by its time schedule. In this
mode the unit is turned off.
Optimal Stop (29) — Indicates that the unit is being controlled to its expanded Occupied set points. The space temperature is allowed to drift to its expanded Occupied set points
during the last portion of the Occupied period.
Unit must be configured for Optimal Start (
).
Optimal Stop mode is only applicable to CV units.
Occupied Heating (30) — Indicates that the unit is in the
Heating mode to satisfy its Occupied Heating set point.
Units must be configured for Occupied Heating
(
).
Example 1 — Reading Alarm Codes
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
TUE 12:45
MODE 23
3 ALARMS
Keyboard has not been used for
at least 10 minutes; alternating
summary display appears on
screen
3 ALARMS
3 alarms detected
ALARM 71
First alarm code
COMMENTS
Occupied Heating is available on VAV units only.
SPACE
Explanation of alarm code
TEMPERATURE
LOW LIMIT
ALARM 76
Example 2 — Reading Current Operating Modes
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
Second alarm code
RETURN AIR
TEMPERATURE Explanation of alarm code
HIGH LIMIT
ALARM 83
Third alarm code
RELATIVE
HUMIDITY
LOW LIMIT
Explanation of alarm code
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
TUE 12:45
MODE 31
COMMENTS
MODE
Keyboard has not been
used for at least 10 minutes; alternating summary
display appears on screen.
Modes subfunction of
status function
MODE 31
Mode 31 is in effect
OCCUPIED COOLING Explanation of code 31
MODE 22
Mode 22 is in effect
DEMAND LIMIT
Explanation of code 22
NOTE: The first mode is the primary operating mode. The second
mode is the secondary operating mode, if applicable.
78
Table 14 — Display Codes
Occupied Cooling (31) — Indicates that the unit is in the
Cooling mode to satisfy its Occupied Cooling set point.
Occupied Fan Only (32) — Indicates that the unit is maintaining set point by using a mixture of outside and return air
only. No mechanical heating or cooling is being used.
Nighttime Free Cooling (33) — Indicates that the supply fan
is on and using outside air to precool the space served by the
unit. Unit must be configured for nighttime free cooling (
). (This mode is enabled by
.)
Display
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Smoke Pressurization (34) — Indicates that the unit is in the
Pressurization mode. This mode is issued from the fire
system panel. Refer to Table 15 for the state of the items
controlled.
Smoke Evacuation (35) — Indicates that the unit is in the
Smoke Evacuation mode. This mode is issued from the
system panel. Refer to Table 15 for the state of the items
controlled.
Smoke Purge (36) — Indicates that the unit is in the Smoke
Purge mode. This mode is issued from the fire system panel.
Refer to Table 15 for the state of the items controlled.
Fire Shutdown (37) — Indicates that the unit is in the Fire
Shutdown mode. This mode is issued from the fire system
panel or local smoke detector. Refer to Table 15 for the state
of the items controlled.
Quick Test (38) — Indicates that the unit is in the Quick Test
mode. It allows the user to test all inputs and outputs connected to the PIC controller. All control routines are deactivated when the unit is in this mode. This mode can only be
initiated manually when the supply fan status is OFF. (HOA
switch is in OFF position.) In order to reactivate all
the configured control routines, press
and then press
.
9
10
Display
21
22
23
24
26
27
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
Display
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
Timed Override (39) — Indicates that the unit operation has
been extended by the user. Unit must be configured for
Timed Override schedule and timed override hours (
).
FORCE STATES
Description
Fire mode force
Internal safety force
Quick Test/Service tool force
HSIO/Building Supervisor force
Remote Building Supervisor force
Loadshed minimum offtime force
Data transfer force
BEST (Building Environmental Systems
Translator) force
Temperature override force
Loadshed force
OPERATING MODES
Description
Temperature Reset in effect
Demand Limit in effect
Unoccupied Heating mode
Unoccupied Cooling mode
Optimal Start mode
Unoccupied mode
Optimal Stop mode
Occupied Heating mode
Occupied Cooling mode
Occupied Fan Only mode
Nighttime Free Cooling mode
Pressurization mode
Evacuation mode
Smoke Purge mode
Fire Shutdown mode
Quick Test mode
Timed Override mode
ALARMS
Description
Air quality 1 high limit
Air quality 2 high limit
Air quality/constant outside air suspended
(Not used)
DX cooling shutdown
Pressurization
Evacuation
Smoke purge
Fire shutdown
Service/maintenance required
Linkage failure
Space temperature low limit
Space temperature high limit
Supply-air temperature low limit
Supply-air temperature high limit
Return-air temperature low limit
Return-air temperature high limit
Mixed-air temperature low limit
Mixed-air temperature high limit
Outside-air temperature low limit
Outside-air temperature high limit
Static pressure low limit
Static pressure high limit
Relative humidity low limit
Relative humidity high limit
Fan status
Freezestat
Analog temperature control sensor low limit
Analog temperature control sensor high limit
Outside-air relative humidity low limit
Outside-air relative humidity high limit
Supply velocity pressure low limit
Supply velocity pressure high limit
Return velocity pressure low limit
Return velocity pressure high limit
Delta CCFM low limit
Delta CCFM high limit
Filter status
Duct high humidity
CCFM — Cfm x 100
79
Table 15 — State of Items Controlled
MODE
(DISPLAY RETURN SUPPLY OUTDOOR- RETURN- EXHAUST SUPPLY FAN RETURN
HEAT
ELECTRIC
CODE)
FAN
FAN
AIR
AIR
DAMPER INLET GUIDE FAN IGV INTERLOCK HEAT ALL
DAMPER DAMPER
VANES (IGV)
RELAY
STAGES
Pressurization
(34)
Off
On
Open
Close
Close
Open to
Close
On
Off
Static Pressure
Set Point
Purge
(36)
On
On
Open
Close
Open
Open to
Open to
On
Off
Static Pressure B D cfm
Set point
Evacuation
(35)
On
Off
Close
Close
Open
Close
Open
Off
Off
Fire Shutdown
(37)
Off
Off
Close
Open
Close
Close
Close
Off
Off
(Set point) — This subfunction displays the current
operating system set points.
To view set points, depress
, then use the
key
to display the occupied heat set point. Continue to depress
to display all the various system set points. Table 13
shows the order of the various set points.
------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------
(Outputs) — The output subfunction displays or
forces the output value percentage of the inlet guide vanes,
mixed air damper and heating and cooling valves. It also
displays or forces the ON/OFF status of the supply fan and
heat interlock relay, displays the status of electric heat stages,
and displays optional output status for return fan volume control, analog output temperature control, discrete output temperature control, discrete output time clock, and humidifier
stages.
To read a system output value, enter
, then scroll
to the desired output using the
key. To force a system
output value, see Example 4. Table 13 shows the order of
the output values.
(Inputs) — The inputs subfunction displays the readings at the various temperature sensors, fan status, static pressure sensors, enthalpy switch, and freezestat. It also allows
the outside-air temperature sensor, enthalpy switch, returnair relative humidity sensor, outside-air relative humidity sensor, and filter status to be forced to a user determined value or status. The forced value overrides the value
that the control system actually reads. This permits operation in the event of a faulty sensor.
To read a sensor, enter
sired sensor reading using the
Example 4 — Forcing An Output Value
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
, then scroll to the de-
OUTPUTS
key. To force an input,
Example 3 — Forcing An Input Value
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
INPUTS
COMMENTS
System inputs
Scroll past:
8
0
SPT X
Space temperature
SAT X
Supply air temperature
RT X
Return air temperature
MAT X
Mixed air temperature
OAT 60
Outside air temperature
OAT 80/FORCED
OAT 60
COMMENTS
System Outputs
Scroll past:
see Example 3. Table 13 shows the order of the readouts.
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
IGV X
Inlet guide vanes
MIXD X
Mixed air damper
HCV X
Heating coil valve
CCV X
Cooling coil valve
SF OFF
Supply fan off
Supply fan forced ON.
Supply fan forced
SF ON/FORCED NOTE:
value toggles between value
(SF ON) and word FORCED
Supply fan forced value reSF OFF
moved. Display no longer flashes
HISTORY FUNCTION
— Displays the 9 latest alarms generated by the
unit in the order of their occurrence. If 9 alarms are displayed, the occurrence of a 10th alarm shifts the first alarm
off the display.
------------------------------------------------
Outside air temperature value
forced to 80. NOTE: Forced
value toggles between value
and word forced
Outside air temperature
forced value removed.
Display no longer flashes
80
Example 5 — Using Quick Test
— Displays the latest service date on the local interface device. The last 2 service dates are displayed at the
Building Supervisor.
KEYBOARD DISPLAY
ENTRY
RESPONSE
ELEC HT
TEST FUNCTION — The test function operates the Quick
Test diagnostic program.
— Displays the status of all inputs.
Stage 1 test
STG1 TST
Pressing ENTR starts the fan test.
Fan automatically starts. There is an
11-second delay while the inlet
guide vanes open and the heat stage
is enabled. When the electric heat
stage should be running, the display
shows EHS ON. Test remains on
until another key is pressed
Pressing the down arrow key
advances the system to stage 2 test.
Any stage may be selected. Press
the key until the desired stage is
displayed, then press ENTR to start
the test
If no other test is desired, exit Quick
Test. Fan shuts off, last electric heat
stage shuts off, and IGVs close
Test is completed. Unit resumes
automatic control
— Tests the outputs.
-----------------------------------------------— Tests the electric heaters. Unit must be configured for electric heat to access this subfunction. See
Example 5.
EHS2
------------------------------------------------
EXIT TST
TST CMPL
Programming Functions
------------------------------------------------
SERVICE FUNCTION — The service function allows
the operator to verify or change factory and field configurations. The service subfunctions are listed below. (See
Table 13 for details.) Refer to Table 16 for configuration value
ranges and defaults.
— Takes the unit out of Quick Test.
-----------------------------------------------NOTE: The unit must not be operating during the Quick Test
function. Set HOA switch to OFF and follow the test procedure. Set HOA switch to AUTO only as required during
testing.
To reach a particular test, enter its subfunction number
and then scroll to the desired test by pressing
. A test
— Use this subfunction to log on before performing any subfunction in Factory Configurations (
),
and to log off after completing service subfunctions. See
Example 6.
Example 6 — Logging On and Logging Off
Service Function
can be terminated by pressing
; pressing
after a test
has started terminates the current test and advances the system to the next test. Once in the next step, you may start
the test by pressing
, advance past it by pressing
, or
back up by pressing
Factory test of electric heat
subfunction of test function
EHS1
------------------------------------------------
— Tests the stages of direct expansion (DX) cooling. Unit must be configured for DX cooling to access this
subfunction.
COMMENTS
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
TO LOG ON:
. When testing is complete, exit the
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS
Ready for password to be
entered
can now use
LOGGEDON Operator
service functions
LOG ON
Quick Test by pressing
and then
; this MUST
be done to restore the unit software to automatic control.
If the keyboard is not used for 10 minutes, the display
TO LOG OFF:
returns to the rotating default display. Press
and
to exit Quick Test and then press
to restart the test
procedure.
81
LOG OFF
Ready for operator to log off
LOGD OFF
Logged off — password
protection enabled
Table 16 — Service Configuration Ranges and Defaults
SERVICE
SUBFUNCTION
NUMBER
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
CV
DX
NTFC
VAV
*Value
CONFIGURATION VALUE
RANGE
Unit Type (0 = CV, 1 = VAV)
Cooling Type (0 = none, 1 = chilled water coil, 2 = DX)
DX Cooling Stages
Heating Type (0 = none, 1 = hot water/steam coil,
2 = electric heater)
Electric Heater Stages
Mixed Air Dampers (0 = none, 1 = analog,
2 = 2-position)
Indoor-Air Quality Type (1 = single gas, 2 = differential/2 gases)
Mixed-Air Temperature Protection
Bus Number
Element Address
Password
English/Metric System (0 = English, 1 = Metric)
Nighttime Free Cooling
Humidity Control (0 = none, 1 = analog, 2 = discrete)
Occupied Heating
Space Temperature Reset
Demand Limit
Fan Tracking
Constant Outside Air
Night Purge
Indoor Air Quality
Indoor Air Quality Priority Level (high = 1, low = 2, none = 3)
Adaptive Optimal Start/Stop
Timed Override Schedules
(1 = Time schedule no. 1, 2 = Time schedule no. 2, 3 = Both)
Timed Override Hours
Heating Coil Master Proportional Gain
Heating Coil Master Integral Gain
Heating Coil Master Derivative Gain
Heating Coil Submaster Gain
Heating Coil Submaster Center Value (%)
Heating Coil Fan ‘‘Off’’ Value (F)
Cooling Master Proportional Gain
Cooling Master Integral Gain
Cooling Master Derivative Gain
Cooling Coil Submaster Gain
Cooling Coil Submaster Center Value (%)
Cooling High Humidity Limit (%)
DX Cooling Submaster Gain
DX Cooling Minimum Submaster Reference
DX Cooling Stage 1 Time GuardT Device (0 = disabled,
1 = enabled)
DX Cooling Stage 2 Time Guard (0 = disabled, 1 = enabled)
DX Cooling Stage 3 Time Guard (0 = disabled, 1 = enabled)
DX Cooling Stage 4 Time Guard (0 = disabled, 1 = enabled)
DX Cooling Stage 5 Time Guard (0 = disabled, 1 = enabled)
DX Cooling Stage 6 Time Guard (0 = disabled, 1 = enabled)
DX Cooling Stage 7 Time Guard (0 = disabled, 1 = enabled)
DX Cooling Stage 8 Time Guard (0 = disabled, 1 = enabled)
DX Cooling Stage 1 Logic Type (0 = normal, 1 = inverted)
DX Cooling Stage 2 Logic Type (0 = normal, 1 = inverted)
DX Cooling Stage 3 Logic Type (0 = normal, 1 = inverted)
DX Cooling Stage 4 Logic Type (0 = normal, 1 = inverted)
DX Cooling Stage 5 Logic Type (0 = normal, 1 = inverted)
DX Cooling Stage 6 Logic Type (0 = normal, 1 = inverted)
DX Cooling Stage 7 Logic Type (0 = normal, 1 = inverted)
DX Cooling Stage 8 Logic Type (0 = normal, 1 = inverted)
Inlet Guide Vanes Master Proportional Gain
Inlet Guide Vanes Master Integral Gain
Inlet Guide Vanes Master Derivative Gain
Inlet Guide Vanes Submaster Gain
Inlet Guide Vanes Submaster Center Value (%)
Mixed-Air Damper Master Proportional Gain
Mixed-Air Damper Master Integral Gain
Mixed-Air Damper Master Derivative Gain
Mixed-Air Damper Submaster Gain
Mixed-Air Damper Submaster Center Value (%)
Mixed-Air Damper Minimum Position (%)
Electric Heat Master Proportional Gain
Electric Heat Master Integral Gain
Electric Heat Master Derivative Gain
Electric Heat Submaster Gain
NTFC Lock Out Temperature (F)
0/1
0 to 2
0 to 8
0 to 2
0 to 8
0 to 2
1/2
Yes/No
0 to 239
0 to 239
0 to 9999
0/1
Enabled/Disabled
0 to 2
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
1 to 3
Enabled/Disabled
1 to 3
FACTORY
DEFAULT
VALUE
0
1
2
1
0
1
1
Yes
0
1
1111
0
Disabled
0
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
2
Disabled
1
0 to 4
0 to 20.0
0 to 2.0
0 to 20.0
−20.0 to 20.0
0 to 100
35 to 65
0 to 20.0
0 to 2.0
0 to 20.0
−20.0 to 20.0
0 to 100
0 to 99
2.0 to 25.0
0 to 60
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
Enabled/Disabled
Normal/Inverted
Normal/Inverted
Normal/Inverted
Normal/Inverted
Normal/Inverted
Normal/Inverted
Normal/Inverted
Normal/Inverted
0 to 5.0
0 to 2.0
0 to 5.0
−10.0 to 10.0
0 to 100
0 to 20.0
0 to 2.0
0 to 20.0
−20.0 to 20.0
0 to 100
0 to 100
0 to 20.0
0 to 2.0
0 to 20.0
0 to 15.0
40 to 70
0
8.0
0.3
0.0
−7.5
50
40
8.0
0.3
0.0
−7.5
80
99
*
40
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Normal
Normal
Normal
Normal
Normal
Normal
Normal
Normal
0.5
0.3
0.0
5.0
50
8.0
0.3
0.0
−7.5
50
10
8.0
0.3
0.0
5.0
50
LEGEND
— Constant Volume
— Direct Expansion
— Nighttime Free Cooling
— Variable Air Volume
varies and is automatically calculated by the control. Override this feature by forcing the value.
82
Table 16 — Service Configuration Ranges and Defaults (cont)
SERVICE SUBFUNCTION
NUMBER
13
14
15
16
17
18
20
21
22
23
24
26
CONFIGURATION VALUE
RANGE
Night Purge Duration (minutes)
Night Purge Low Temperature Damper Position (% output)
Night Purge High Temperature Damper Position (% output)
Constant Outside Air Master Proportional Gain
Constant Outside Air Master Integral Gain
Constant Outside Air Master Derivative Gain
Constant Outside Air Submaster Gain
OAVP Sensor Low Voltage Point
OAVP Sensor High Voltage Point
OAVP Sensor Low Voltage Reference
OAVP Sensor High Voltage Reference
OAVP Sensor Probe Multiplier Factor
Air Quality Sensor 1 Master Proportional Gain
Air Quality Sensor 1 Master Integral Gain
Air Quality Sensor 1 Maximum Damper Position (%)
Air Quality Sensor 1 Low Voltage Point
Air Quality Sensor 1 High Voltage Point
Air Quality Sensor 1 Low Voltage Reference
Air Quality Sensor 1 High Voltage Reference
Air Quality Sensor 2 Master Proportional Gain
Air Quality Sensor 2 Master Integral Gain
Air Quality Sensor 2 Maximum Damper Position (%)
Air Quality Sensor 2 Low Voltage Point
Air Quality Sensor 2 High Voltage Point
Air Quality Sensor 2 Low Voltage Reference
Air Quality Sensor 2 High Voltage Reference
Building Factor (%)
24 hour Unoccupied Factor
Set Point Bias (F)
Maximum Allowable Stop Time
Reset Ratio
Reset Limit
Supply Velocity Upper Limit (in. wg)
Return Velocity Upper Limit (in. wg)
Supply Duct Area
Return Duct Area
Fan Tracking Master Proportional Gain
Fan Tracking Master Integral Gain
Fan Tracking Master Derivative Gain
Fan Tracking Submaster Gain
Fan Tracking Submaster Center Value (%)
Humidity Master Proportional Gain
Humidity Master Integral Gain
Humidity Master Derivative Gain
Humidity Submaster Gain
Humidity Submaster Center Value (%)
Space Temperature Low Alarm Limit — Occupied (F)
Space Temperature High Alarm Limit — Occupied (F)
Space Temperature Low Alarm Limit — Unoccupied (F)
Space Temperature High Alarm Limit — Unoccupied (F)
Supply Air Temperature Low Alarm Limit — Occupied (F)
Supply Air Temperature High Alarm Limit — Occupied (F)
Supply Air Temperature Low Alarm Limit — Unoccupied (F)
Supply Air Temperature High Alarm Limit — Unoccupied (F)
Return Air Temperature Low Alarm Limit — Occupied (F)
Return Air Temperature High Alarm Limit — Occupied (F)
Return Air Temperature Low Alarm Limit — Unoccupied (F)
Return Air Temperature High Alarm Limit — Unoccupied (F)
Temperature Input Low Alarm Limit — Occupied (F)
Temperature Input High Alarm Limit — Occupied (F)
Temperature Input Low Alarm Limit — Unoccupied (F)
Temperature Input High Alarm Limit — Unoccupied (F)
Outside Air Temperature Low Alarm Limit (F)
Outside Air Temperature High Alarm Limit (F)
Mixed Air Temperature Low Alarm Limit (F)
Mixed Air Temperature High Alarm Limit (F)
Relative Humidity Low Alarm Limit (%)
Relative Humidity High Alarm Limit (%)
Outside Air Relative Humidity Low Alarm Limit (%)
Outside Air Relative Humidity High Alarm Limit (%)
Static Pressure Low Alarm Limit (in. wg)
Static Pressure High Alarm Limit (in. wg)
Supply Velocity Low Alarm Limit (in. wg)
Supply Velocity High Alarm Limit (in. wg)
Return Velocity Low Alarm Limit (in. wg)
Return Velocity High Alarm Limit (in. wg)
Delta CFM x 100 (CCFM) Low Alarm Limit
Delta CFM x 100 (CCFM) High Alarm Limit
Air Quality Sensor 1 High Alarm Limit (ppm)
Air Quality Sensor 2 High Alarm Limit (ppm)
Preheat Coil/AOTC Master Proportional Gain
Preheat Coil/AOTC Master Integral Gain
Preheat Coil/AOTC Master Derivative Gain
Preheat Coil/AOTC Submaster Gain
Preheat Coil/AOTC Submaster Center Value (%)
Preheat Coil/AOTC Fan/Off Value (F)
Preheat Coil/AOTC Sensor
Discrete Temperature Control Sensor
Discrete Temperature Control Logic
Discrete Temperature Control Hysteresis (F)
Service/Maintenance Limits (hours x 1000)
Service/Maintenance Elapsed Hours (hours x 1000)
5 to 240
0 to 100
0 to 100
0.0 to 5.0
0.0 to 5.0
0.0 to 5.0
60 to 600
0 to 2
5 to 10
0.0 to 2.0
0.01 to 5.00
0.100 to 9.999
0.01 to 1.00
0.01 to 1.00
0 to 100
0 to 2
5 to 10
0 to 2000
0 to 2000
0.01 to 1.00
0.01 to 1.00
0 to 100
0 to 2
5 to 10
0 to 2000
0 to 2000
1 to 100
0 to 99
0 to 10
0 to 120
0 to 10
0 to 20
0 to 3.0
0 to 3.0
0 to 50
0 to 50
0.0 to 2.0
0.0 to 2.0
0.0 to 5.0
−20.0 to 20.0
0 to 100
0.0 to 10.0
0.0 to 2.0
0.0 to 10.0
−20.0 to 20.0
0 to 100
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−10 to 245
−40 to 245
−40 to 245
0 to 250
0 to 250
0 to 100
0 to 100
0 to 100
0 to 100
0 to 5.0
0 to 5.0
0 to 3.0
0 to 3.0
0 to 3.0
0 to 3.0
0 to 250
0 to 250
0 to 2000
0 to 2000
0.0 to 20.0
0.0 to 2.0
0.0 to 20.0
−20.0 to 20.0
0 to 100 F
35 to 65
0 to 128
0 to 128
0 to 1
0 to 20
0 to 99
0 to 99
LEGEND
AOTC — Analog Output Temperature Control
OAVP — Outside Air Velocity Pressure
83
FACTORY DEFAULT
VALUE
15
10
35
0.3
1.0
0.0
*
2
10
0.0
0.05
1.564
0.10
0.03
50
2
10
0
2000
0.10
0.03
50
2
10
0
2000
10
15
2
60
3
10
2.0
2.0
0
0
0.5
0.5
0.0
10.0
50
2.0
0.3
0.0
7.5
50
65
80
45
100
45
120
35
180
60
90
35
120
−10
245
−10
245
−40
120
0
250
0
100
0
100
1.0
2.5
0.0
3.0
0.0
3.0
0
250
800
800
5.0
0.3
0.0
−5.0
50
40
0
0
0
2
0
0
Example 8 — Configuration of Measurements
— Used to verify software version.
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
-----------------------------------------------— Used to verify and change factory configuration. Requires password entry in
. See Example 7.
UNIT 0
UNIT 1
NOTE: When more than one unit is connected to the
Carrier Comfort Network, the element address must be changed
on all but one unit. The element address system default
is 1, and element address numbers cannot be repeated.
Element address must be changed at the local interface
device.
UNIT 0
COMMENTS
FACT CFG
Factory configuration subfunction of service function
TYPE CV
Unit type is constant volume
Measurements are displayed using
English (0 = English, 1 = Metric)
Measurements are now displayed
using the Metric system
Measurements are returned to
English
KEYBOARD
DISPLAY
ENTRY
RESPONSE
Example 7 — Reading and Changing
Factory Configurations
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS
Example 9 — User Configurations
------------------------------------------------
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
is scrolled across
UNIT TYPE IS CV Explanation
screen
COMMENTS
USER CFG
User configurations
NTEN DSB
NTFC is disabled
NTEN EN
NTFC is enabled
NTEN DSB
NTFC is disabled
HUEN 0
Humidifier control is none
HUEN 1
HUEN 0
Unit changed to analog humidifier
control
Humidifier control is changed back
to none
TYPE VAV
Unit type is changed to VAV
COOL COI
Cooling type is coil
OHEN DSB
Scroll past occupied heating
(disabled)
DXST 2
DX cooling stage quantity is 2
RSEN DSB
Space temperature reset (disabled)
HEAT HCL
Heating type is hot water/
steam coil
DLEN DSB
Scroll past demand limiting
(disabled)
HEAT NON
Changed to no heat unit
FTEN DSB
Fan tracking (disabled)
HEAT ELE
Changed to electric heat
OAEN DSB
Constant outside air (disabled)
HEAT COI
Heating type is changed back
to hot water/steam coil
NPEN DSB
Night purge (disabled)
EHST 0
Electric heater stages = 0
AQEN DSB
Indoor air quality (disabled)
EHST N
Electric heater stages = N,
where N = number of stages
IAQP DSB
Indoor air quality priority
level (disabled)
MIXD ALG
Unit with mixed air dampers
OSEN DSB
Optimal start is disabled
MIXD NON
Changed to without dampers
OSEN EN
Optimal start is enabled
IAQT 1
OSEN DSB
Optimal start is disabled
MATP YES
Indoor air quality type
is single gas sensor
Mixed air temperature
protection enabled
TSCH 1
Time schedule No. 1 is enabled
BUS 0
Bus number = 0
TSCH 2
Time schedule No. 2 is enabled
ADR 1
Element address = 1
TSCH 1
Time schedule is changed back to
No. 2
ADR 2
Element address changed to 2
TOVR 0
Time override value = 0 hrs
PSW XXXX
Password
TOVR 1
Time override value = 1 hr
TOVR 0
Time override value = 0 hrs
— Used to change the HSIO display of the measure-
NTFC — Nighttime Free Cooling
ments from English to Metric. See Example 8.
-----------------------------------------------— Used to read or change factory configuration of
user options. See Example 9.
------------------------------------------------
84
— Used to read or change factory configuration
of heating coil. See Example 10.
— Used to read or change configuration of
night purge option.
------------------------------------------------
Example 10 — Configuration of Heating Coil
KEYBOARD DISPLAY
ENTRY
RESPONSE
HEATCOIL
— Used to read or change configuration of
constant outside air option and outside air velocity pressure
sensor.
------------------------------------------------
COMMENTS
Heat coil field configuration
subfunction of service function
MPG 8.0
Master proportional gain
MPG N
Master proportional gain value is
changed to N, where N = new value
within the allowable range
MIG 0.3
Scroll past master integral gain
MDG 0.0
Master derivative gain
MDG 0.0
Master derivative gain value
remains 0.0 (old value is still
displayed). N value is not within
the allowable range
SMG −7.5
Submaster gain
SCV 50%
Submaster center value
FOV 40
Fan off value
SMR N
Display of submaster reference
value
The submaster reference value
has been forced
The submaster reference value
force has been removed
SMR X
SMR N
NOTE: The subfunctions to configure the cooling coil
— Used to read or change configuration of indoor-air quality option and AQ1 sensor.
-----------------------------------------------— Used to read or change configuration of indoor-air quality option and AQ2 sensor.
-----------------------------------------------— Used to read or change factory configuration of Adaptive Optimal Start/Stop.
-----------------------------------------------— Used to read or change factory configuration of space temperature reset. See Example 11.
-----------------------------------------------— Used to read or change loadshed group
and number. See Example 12.
-----------------------------------------------Example 11 — Configuration of Space
Temperature Reset
, inlet
guide vanes
, mixed air damper
, and electric
heaters
, are performed in the same manner as
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
SPCRESET
Example 10.
COMMENTS
Space temperature reset field
configuration subfunction of
service function
------------------------------------------------
RTIO 3
Reset ratio set at 3
— Used to read or change factory configuration of
cooling (chilled water coil or direct expansion).
------------------------------------------------
RTIO N
Ratio changed to N, where
N = new value within the
allowable range
LIMT 10
Reset limit set at 10
— Used to read or change configuration of direct
expansion cooling options.
------------------------------------------------
LIMT N
Reset limit changed to N,
where N = new value between
0 and 20
— Used to read or change factory configuration of
inlet guide vanes.
------------------------------------------------
Example 12 — Configuration of Loadshed
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
— Used to read or change configuration of
mixed air dampers.
-----------------------------------------------— Used to read or change configuration of electric heater.
-----------------------------------------------— Used to read or change factory configuration of Nighttime Free Cooling (NTFC) option.
------------------------------------------------
85
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
LOADSHED
COMMENTS
Loadshed field configuration
subfunction of service function
LSGP 1
Loadshed group 1
LSGP 2
Loadshed group changed to 2
Example 14 — Configuration of Alarm Limits
— Used to read or change field configuration
of fan tracking. See Example 13.
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
-----------------------------------------------— Used to read or change factory configuration of humidity control.
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS
ALRMLIMT
Alarm limit field configuration of
subfunction of service function
Scroll past space temperature low
limit (occupied mode)
Scroll past space temperature high
limit (occupied mode)
Scroll past space air temperature
low limit (unoccupied mode)
Scroll past space air temperature
high limit (unoccupied mode)
Supply-air temperature low limit set
at 45 F (occupied mode)
Supply-air temperature low limit
changed to N, where N = new
value within allowable range
(−10 F to 245 F)
SPLO 65
SPHO 80
-----------------------------------------------SPLU 45
— Used to read or change factory configuration of alarm limits. See Example 14.
SPHU 100
SALO 45
------------------------------------------------
SALO N
— Used to read or change field configuration
of analog temperature control. See Example 15.
------------------------------------------------
Example 15 — Configuration of Analog
Temperature Control
— Used to read or change field configuration
of discrete temperature control. See Example 16.
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
-----------------------------------------------Example 13 — Configuration of Fan Tracking
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
COMMENTS
RESPONSE
FANTRACK Fan tracking field configuration
subfunction of service function
Supply velocity upper limit
SVUL 1.5
= 1.5 in. wg
Supply velocity upper limit
SVUL 2.0
changed to 2.0 in. wg
Scroll past return velocity upper
RVUL 1.5
limit (1.5 in. wg)
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
AO CTRL
MPG 5.0
Analog temperature control
configuration subfunction of
service function
Scroll past master proportional
gain
MIG 0.3
Scroll past master integral gain
MDG 0.0
Scroll past master derivative gain
SMG −5.0
Scroll past submaster gain
SCV 50
Scroll past submaster center
value
FOV 40
Scroll past fan OFF value
Controlling temperature sensor
(none configured)
Controlling temperature sensor
configured to sensor 1. Sensor
codes as follows:
SDAR 0
Supply duct area = 0
SEN 0
SDAR 8
Supply duct area changed to
8 sq ft. (Enter whole numbers;
decimals not accepted)
Scroll past return duct area
(6 sq ft)
Scroll past master proportional
gain
Scroll past master integral
gain
SEN 1
RDAR 6
MPG 0.5
MIG 0.5
MDG 0.0
Master derivative gain
MDG 4
Master derivative gain
changed to 4
SMG 10
Scroll past submaster gain
SCV 50
Scroll past submaster
gain center value
Submaster reference value
(calculated and updated by the
software)
Submaster reference value
forced to X value
Submaster reference value
force is removed
SMR N
SMR X
SMR N
COMMENTS
1 - Supply-air temperature sensor
(standard)
2 - Outdoor-air temperature
sensor (standard)
3 - Mixed-air temperature sensor
(optional)
6 - Space temperature sensor
(standard)
7 - Return-air temperature sensor
(standard)
34 - Other optional sensor
SMR X
Submaster reference value
SMR N
Submaster reference value
forced to N value
Force removed from submaster
reference value. Display shows
last value prior to force
SMR X
86
Example 16 — Configuration of Discrete
Temperature Control
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
DO CTRL
SEN 1
SEN 34
TYP 0
Example 18 — Service/Maintenance
Alarm Configuration
KEYBOARD DISPLAY
COMMENTS
ENTRY
RESPONSE
SRV/MTN
Service/Maintenance alarm
configuration subfunction of
service function
Service/Maintenance alarm
SMAL 2
limit is 2000 hrs (hours x 1000)
SMAL 5
Service/Maintenance alarm
limit is changed to 5000 hrs (This
represents the cumulative number
of hours the fan must be energized
before a service/maintenance alarm
is generated)
(NOTE: Entering a . disables the
alarm function)
SMEH 3
Service/Maintenance elapsed
hours is 3000 (This is the amount of
time elapsed from the start of the
service/maintenance alarm interval)
COMMENTS
Discrete temperature control
configuration subfunction of
service function
Controlling temperature sensor
configured to sensor 1. Sensor
codes as follows:
1 - Supply-air temperature sensor
(standard)
2 - Outdoor-air temperature
sensor (standard)
3 - Mixed-air temperature sensor
(optional)
6 - Space temperature sensor
(standard)
7 - Return-air temperature
(standard)
34 - Other optional sensors
Controlling temperature sensor is
34, where sensor 34 is one of
2 optional sensor types
(space temperature sensor or
duct temperature sensor)
Discrete output control logic
(0 = normal logic, 1 = reverse
logic)
Example 19 — Timed Override History
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS
OVRDHIST
Timed override history
subfunction of service function
Within the current 24 hour period
(beginning at midnight), the unit
operated for 3 hours in the timed
override mode (mode 39)
OHR 3
— Used to read service history. See Example 17.
------------------------------------------------
— Displays system set points. See Table 13 for
sequence of set points.
— Used to read or change field configuration
of service maintenance alarm duration and to read elapsed
time. See Example 18.
------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------
— Displays demand limit set points.
------------------------------------------------
— Used to read timed override history. See
Example 19.
— Displays time of day and day of week.
------------------------------------------------
NOTE: The
key is used to enable or turn on certain
functions; the CLR key is used to disable these functions.
The
key may also be used to disable the functions.
— Displays Daylight Savings Time.
-----------------------------------------------— Displays holidays (month, day, and duration).
SET POINT FUNCTION — Set points are entered through
the keyboard. Set points can be changed within the upper
and lower limits, which are fixed. See Table 17.
Table 17 — Set Point Ranges and Defaults
SET POINT
Example 17 — Service History Configuration
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS
SERVHIST
Service history configuration
subfunction of service function
The unit had 2 starts within the
last 24 hours
The unit had a total of 20 starts
since the unit was manufactured
The fan has run for 240 hours
since unit manufacture.
The unit was last started on
Thursday at 6:30 am
The unit was last stopped on
Thursday at 7:00 pm
SDAY 2
ST 20
FH 240
4.06.30
4.19.00
Occupied Heating Set Point (F)
Occupied Cooling Set Point (F)
Unoccupied Heating Set Point (F)
Unoccupied Cooling Set Point (F)
Static Pressure
Set Point (in. wg)
Supply-Air Temperature
Set Point (F)
Delta CFM Set Point
Humidity Set Point (%)
Analog Temperature
Control Set Point (F)
Discrete Temperature
Control Set Point (F)
Air Quality Sensor 1
Set Point (ppm)
Air Quality Sensor 2
Set Point (ppm)
Outside Air Velocity Pressure
Set Point (in. wg)
87
ALLOWABLE
RANGE
40 to 90
45 to 99
40 to 90
70 to 99
0 to 5.0
DEFAULT
35 to 65
55
0 to 250
0 to 100
0
40
40 to 100
40
−40 to 245
0
0 to 2000
650
0 to 2000
650
0.0 to 5.0
0.08
68
78
55
90
1.5
Example 21 — Setting of Time and Date
Reading and Changing Set Points — Example 20 shows how
to read and change system set points. Other set points can be
changed by following the same procedure. Refer to
Table 13 for the display sequence of set points in each subfunction.To adjust any parameter after enabling the function, press
until desired parameter is displayed. Key in
new value and press
. If input is within the allowable
range, the display shows the parameter and new value. If
the input is not within the allowable range, the old value
remains displayed.
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
Example 20 — Reading and Changing
System Set Points
KEYBOARD DISPLAY
ENTRY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS
SETPOINT
System set points
OHSP 68.0
Present occupied heating set point
is 68.0
Key in 70 and press ENTR, display
shows new occupied heating set
point is 70, which is within the
allowable range
Present occupied cooling set point
is 78.0
Key in 30 and press ENTR, display
still shows occupied cooling set point
as 78.0 because 30 is not within the
allowable range. See Table 15
Key in 75 and press ENTR, display
shows new occupied cooling set
point is 75.0, which is within the
allowable range
OHSP 70.0
OCSP 78.0
OCSP 78.0
OCSP 75.0
DISPLAY
COMMENTS
RESPONSE
TIME
Time display
subfunction of
set point function
MON 16:00 Current setting
is Monday,
4:00 pm
TUE 13:05 New setting of
Tuesday,
1:05 pm is
entered and
displayed
JAN 01 96
Current setting
is January 1,
1996
FEB 27 96 New setting of
February 27,
1996 is entered
and displayed
Example 22 — Setting Daylight Savings Time
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
Reading and Changing Time and Date Display — Time is
entered and displayed in 24-hour (military) time. The day of
the week is entered as a number: 1 = MON, 2 = TUE...7 =
SUN. The month is also entered as a number: 1 = JAN, 2 =
FEB...12 = DEC. The
key is used as the colon when
entering the time and date. See Example 21.
Reading and Changing Daylight Savings Time — Example 22
shows how to read and change daylight savings time. The
month is entered as a number: 1 = January, 2 = February...12
= December. The day of week and time of day are entered
as explained in Reading and Changing Time and Date
Display above.
88
DISPLAY
COMMENTS
RESPONSE
DAYLIGHT Daylight savings time field
configuration of set point
function
ENM X
Month when daylight savings
time begins
ENM 4
Daylight savings time
configured to start Month 4
(April)
END X
Day of month when daylight
savings time begins
END 16
Daylight savings time
configured to start on the
16th of the month
ENT X
Time of day when daylight
savings time begins
ENT 2.00
Daylight savings time
configured to start at 2:00 am
on the 16th of April
LVM X
Month when daylight savings
time ends
LVM 11
Daylight savings time
configured to end Month 11
(November)
LVD X
Day of month when daylight
savings time ends
LVD 12
Daylight savings time
configured to end on the 12th
of November
LVT X
Time of day when daylight
savings time ends
LVT 2.00
Daylight savings time
configured to end at 2:00 am
on November 12
Figure 75 shows a Schedule I example for an office building with the unit operating on a set point schedule. The
schedule is based on building occupancy with 3-hour offpeak cool down period from midnight to 3 am following weekend shutdown. To learn how this sample schedule can be
programmed, see Example 24. The same scheduling procedures can be used to set optional discrete output
Schedule II. Subfunctions
through
define
schedule of air handler (Schedule I). Subfunctions
through
define schedule of optional
Reading and Changing Holidays — Example 23 explains how
to set holidays. Up to 18 holiday periods can be set for one
calendar year. When the calendar year changes the holidays
must be reconfigured for the new year.
Example 23 — Setting of Holidays
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
COMMENTS
RESPONSE
HOLIDAY
Holiday field configuration subfunction
of set point function
NEW
First holiday
configuration
JUL 04 01
NOV 23 02
discrete output (Schedule II).
The first holiday is
configured to start
Month 7 (July), day 4
(July 4) and last for
one day
The second holiday
is configured to start
Month 11 (November), day 23 and last
for 2 days.
SCHEDULE FUNCTION — Two schedules are provided
with the PIC system. Schedule I automatically switches the
unit from an occupied mode to an unoccupied mode. Schedule II automatically changes the optional discrete output from
occupied to unoccupied mode.
Each schedule consists of from one to 8 occupied time
periods, set by the operator. These time periods can be flagged
to be in effect or not in effect on each day of the week. The
day begins at 00.00 and ends at 24.00. The unit is in unoccupied mode unless a scheduled time period is in effect. If
an occupied period is to extend past midnight, it must be
programmed in the following manner: Occupied period must
end at 24:00 hours (midnight); a new occupied period must
be programmed to begin at 00:00 hours on the next day.
The time schedule can be overridden to keep the unit or
optional discrete output in the occupied mode for 1, 2, 3, or
4 hours on a one-time basis.
The air handler can be configured for an applicable holiday/
shutdown schedule. This function can only be used if the
PIC is connected to the Carrier Comfort Network. The network will send a holiday message (flag) to the unit on the
appropriate holiday. The unit then uses the schedule that has
been set for the holiday period. The unit automatically returns to its normal schedule after the holiday period is
complete.
Fig. 75 — Schedule I Sample Time Schedule
89
Example 24 — Using the Schedule Function
KEYBOARD
DISPLAY
ENTRY
RESPONSE
PROGRAMMING PERIOD 1:
Define schedule period 1
OCC 00.00
Start of occupied time.
For this example, first
period should start here
(at midnight) so no
entry is needed
Start of unoccupied time
(end of period). For this
example, period 1
should end at
3:00 am
Period 1 ends at
3:00 am
Monday is not flagged
for period 1. To put
period 1 into effect on
Monday, Monday must
be flagged yes
Monday is now flagged
for period 1 to be in
effect
For this example, period 1
is to be in effect on
Monday only. All other
days must be checked
to be sure that they
are flagged no. If any
day is flagged yes,
change to no
Tuesday is now flagged
no for period 1
UNO 3.00
MON NO
MON YES
TUE YES
TUE NO
KEYBOARD
DISPLAY
COMMENT
ENTRY
RESPONSE
PROGRAMMING PERIOD 2:
For this example, period 2 is used on Monday and Tuesday.
Define scheduling
PERIOD 2
period 2
COMMENT
PERIOD 1
UNO 00.00
Example 24 — Using the Schedule Function (cont)
OCC 00.00
Start of occupied time
OCC 7.00
Occupied time will
start at 7:00 am
Start of unoccupied
time (end of period)
for this example,
period 2 should end
at 18:00 (6:00 pm)
Period 2 ends at
18:00 (6:00 pm)
Monday is not flagged
for period 2. To put
period 2 into effect
on Monday, Monday
must be flagged yes
Monday is now flagged
for period 2 to be
in effect
Tuesday is not flagged
for period 2. To put
period 2 into effect
on Tuesday, Tuesday
must be flagged yes
Tuesday is now flagged
for period 2 to be
in effect
For this example,
period 2 is to be in
effect only on
Monday and Tuesday.
All other days must
be checked to be
sure that they are
flagged no. If a day
is flagged yes,
change to no
Wednesday is now
flagged no for
period 2
UNO 00.00
UNO 18.00
MON NO
MON YES
TUE NO
TUE YES
WED YES
WED NO
90
Example 24 — Using the Schedule Function (cont)
Example 24 — Using the Schedule Function (cont)
KEYBOARD
DISPLAY
COMMENT
ENTRY
RESPONSE
PROGRAMMING PERIOD 3:
For this example, Period 3 is used on Wednesday only.
KEYBOARD
DISPLAY
COMMENT
ENTRY
RESPONSE
PROGRAMMING PERIOD 6:
For this example, Period 6 is used for holiday only.
OCC 00.00
Start of occupied time
OCC 00.00
Start of occupied time
OCC 7.00
Occupied time will start
at 7:00 am
Start of unoccupied
time (end of period 3).
For this example,
period 3 should end at
21:30 (9:30 pm)
Period 3 ends at
21:30 (9:30 pm)
Check to be sure that
Monday and Tuesday
are flagged no for
period 3
OCC 20.00
Occupied time will start
at 20:00 (8:00 pm)
Start of unoccupied
time (end of period 6).
For this example,
period 6 should end at
21:00 (9:00 pm)
Period 6 ends at
21:00 (9:00 pm)
Check to be sure that
Monday through
Sunday are flagged
no for period 6
UNO 00.00
UNO 21.30
MON NO
UNO 00.00
UNO 21.00
MON NO
TUE NO
TUE NO
WED NO
WED YES
THU NO
Wednesday is flagged
no. Change to yes
Wednesday is now
flagged yes for
period 3
Check to be sure that
all other days are
flagged no
WED NO
THU NO
FRI NO
SAT NO
FRI NO
SUN NO
SAT NO
HOL NO
SUN NO
HOL YES
HOL NO
Period 4 and 5 can be programmed in the same manner, flagging
Thursday and Friday yes for period 4 and Saturday yes for period 5.
For this example, periods 7 and 8 are not used; they should be programmed OCC 00.00, UNO 00.00.
NOTE: When a day is flagged yes for 2 overlapping periods, occupied time will take precedence over unoccupied time. Occupied times
can overlap in the schedule with no consequence.
To extend an occupied mode beyond its normal termination for a
one-time schedule override, program as shown below:
OVRD 0
OVRD 3
Override is set for 0; enter
the number of hours of
override desired
Unit will now remain in
occupied mode for an
additional 3 hours
91
Holiday is flagged no.
Change to yes
Holiday is now flagged
yes for period 6
CONTROL OPERATING SEQUENCE
NTFC is scheduled to run only between the hours of
3:00 am and 7:00 am.
NIGHT PURGE — During the unoccupied period, this feature starts the fans and opens the mixed-air dampers to remove stagnant air and airborne pollutants from the building
space.
If the current time is within the configured night purge
duration, the control reads the outdoor air temperature and
determines the mixed-air damper position. If the outdoor air
temperature is less than the configured NTFC lockout temperature, the system sets the mixed-air dampers at the configured low temperature position. If the outdoor-air temperature
is greater than the NTFC set point, or the enthalpy is high,
the system sets the dampers at the configured high temperature position.
When the outside-air temperature is below the NTFC set
point and the low temperature night purge damper position
is set to zero, night purge is not performed. Also, when the
outside air temperature is above the NTFC set point and enthalpy is high, if the high temperature night purge damper
position is set to zero, night purge is not performed.
Night purge ends when the occupied time period begins.
QUICK TEST — The Quick Test is initiated and controlled
at the local interface device (HSIO). It allows the service
person or building owner to test all inputs and outputs of the
PIC controls. When used, it displays all current values of
input channels and allows the user to exercise all output
channels.
Quick test suspends all process algorithms and forces all
outputs with a service priority.
All service forces are removed when Quick Test is exited
and control is returned to the process algorithms.
ANALOG OUTPUT TEMPERATURE CONTROL/
PREHEAT COIL CONTROL — The analog output temperature control adjusts an analog output to a fixed set point,
based on any analog temperature sensor connected to the unit.
(Applicable sensors are: space temperature sensor, outsideair temperature sensor, mixed-air temperature sensor, supplyair temperature sensor, and return-air temperature sensor.)
If the fan is ON, the control identifies the controlling temperature sensor, reads the sensor and compares the temperature to the configurable set point. It then calculates the temperature required to satisfy the conditions.
The calculated value is compared to the actual temperature and the corresponding output is modulated to the
required position.
The preheat coil control adjusts the steam or hot water
valve. The valve is modulated to raise the temperature of
incoming outside air. The control uses a sensor downstream
from the preheat coil to monitor the air temperature.
If the supply fan is OFF, the heating valve is modulated
to maintain the desired minimum duct temperature (fan off
value).
If the supply fan is on and the entering-air temperature is
below the set point value, the heating valve is modulated to
obtain the desired leaving-air temperature.
Constant Volume and Variable Air Volume Units
TWO-POSITION DAMPER CONTROL — Two-position
damper control opens or closes field-supplied and installed
two-position outdoor-air dampers in order to provide minimum outdoor air ventilation.
If the supply fan is OFF, the damper is closed. If the supply fan is ON, the control determines if the unit is in the
OCCUPIED mode. If unit is in the OCCUPIED mode, the
dampers open. If unit is in the UNOCCUPIED mode, the
dampers close.
FILTER STATUS CONTROL — This control sequence monitors one or more airflow switches which measure the differential pressure between the upstream and downstream side
of a filter.
When the filter becomes dirty or needs to be replaced, the
airflow switches send a discrete signal to the processor module. This, in turn, generates an alarm at the Local Interface
Device or Building Supervisor.
FAN CONTROL — The supply fan is started or stopped based
on the occupancy schedule, adaptive optimal start, nighttime free cooling, unoccupied heating, unoccupied cooling,
demand limiting, night purge, or timed override.
The start of an occupied period is determined by either
the occupancy schedule or optimal start. If optimal start is
not selected, the supply fan starts at the occupied time entered in the occupancy schedule. If optimal start is selected,
the fan starts at the calculated start time. The fan stops at the
unoccupied time entered in the occupancy schedule. (Timed
override may be used to extend the occupied period between
1 and 4 hours.)
During the unoccupied period, whenever the space temperature falls below the unoccupied heating set point or rises
above the unoccupied cooling set point, the supply fan energizes and runs until the space temperature returns to within
the required limits.
The supply fan can also run between the hours of
3:00 am and 7:00 am when the unit is in the Nighttime Free
Cooling mode to pre-cool the space prior to the Occupied
period.
Constant volume units that are subject to demand limiting
stop the supply fan whenever a loadshed command is received from the CCN Loadshed option. The supply fan remains OFF until the loadshed command is cleared or the internal maximum loadshed timer expires.
NIGHTTIME FREE COOL (NTFC) — Nighttime free cooling is used to start the supply fan to precool the building’s
interior using outside air. This delays the need for mechanical cooling when the system enters the Occupied mode.
The system determines if the outside conditions (temperature and enthalpy) are suitable for outside cooling. If so, the
supply fan is energized and the dampers modulate open. Once
the space has been sufficiently cooled, the fan stops.
If the outside air conditions are not suitable, the fan
remains OFF.
The unit must have mixed-air dampers to operate NTFC.
92
DISCRETE OUTPUT/ANALOG INPUT CONTROL — The
discrete output is controlled as a function of a temperature
sensor connected to the 39L or 39NX unit. (Applicable sensors are: space temperature sensor, outside-air temperature
sensor, mixed-air temperature sensor, supply-air temperature sensor, and return-air temperature sensor.) The discrete
output is turned ON/OFF as required to maintain the user
configured set point.
The controlling sensor is identified and its value is read.
The control determines which user-configurable control logic
(normal or reverse) is required.
The control compares the sensor value to the configured
set point.
If normal logic is used, the discrete output is turned ON
when the sensor value is equal to or greater than the set point.
This output is turned OFF when the sensor value is less than
the set point decreased by a user configurable hysteresis.
If reverse logic is used, the discrete output is turned ON
whenever the sensor value is less than the set point. This
output is turned OFF when the sensor value is greater than
the set point increased by a user configurable hysteresis.
DISCRETE OUTPUT, TIMECLOCK CONTROL — This
control sequence turns ON an output channel when the current time of day is greater than or equal to the Occupied time
and less than the next Unoccupied time. This discrete output
is OFF at all other times. The output can be used for lighting
control, pump control, or to control other devices which have
to be ON during the Occupied period and OFF during the
Unoccupied period. This control sequence operates under its
own time schedule (Schedule II).
Using the local interface device or building supervisor, the
output may be overridden to extend the occupied period between 1 and 4 hours.
The control determines the output that is under timeclock control. The current time of day is compared to the
Occupied time and to the next Unoccupied time. If the
current time of day is equal to or within the Occupied time
period, the discrete output is turned ON. If the current time
of day is equal to or within the Unoccupied time period, the
discrete output is turned OFF.
HUMIDITY (ANALOG OUTPUT) CONTROL — The humidity analog output control adjusts the steam valve of the
steam grid humidifier. The valve is modulated to maintain
the desired space or desired return-air humidity set point,
depending on whether a wall-mounted or duct-mounted humidity sensor is used. A duct high humidity switch is also
monitored and provides a user adjustable high limit safety.
If the supply fan is OFF, the steam valve is held closed.
If the supply fan is ON, and the unit is in the Unoccupied
mode, the valve is held closed.
If the supply fan is ON and the unit is in the Occupied
mode, the system determines the status of the duct high humidity switch. If the duct humidity is above the switch set
point, the valve is held closed. If the duct humidity is less
than the switch set point, the control reads the humidity sensor, compares the value to the set point and modulates the
output as required to satisfy conditions.
HUMIDITY (DISCRETE OUTPUT) CONTROL — The humidity control sequentially adjusts a 2-stage humidifier. The
humidifier is controlled to maintain a desired space or returnair humidity, depending on whether a wall-mounted or ductmounted humidity transmitter is used.
The first stage of humidification energizes the humidifier
spray pump (if applicable) along with the first stage of the
humidifier. The second stage of humidification energizes the
second stage of the humidifier.
A duct high humidity switch is also monitored and provides a user adjustable duct high humidity limit safety.
If the fan status is ON and the unit is in the Occupied
mode, the control reads the space or return-air humidity sensor. If the humidity is 2% less than the humidity set point,
the first stage is turned ON.
If the humidity is 5% less than the humidity set point, both
stages are turned ON.
As the humidity increases, the stages are turned OFF as
follows: When the humidity is within 2% of the set point,
the second stage of the humidifier is turned OFF. When the
humidity is greater than or equal to the set point, both stages
are turned OFF. If the high humidity switch is tripped, all
stages of the humidifier are turned OFF.
93
INDOOR-AIR QUALITY (IAQ) — This function maintains the correct occupied ventilation rate using CO2 as an
indicator of occupancy level or controls the levels of volatile
organic compounds (VOCs) or other indoor air pollutants by
modulating the mixed air dampers. Varying quantities of outdoor air are admitted during the Occupied period to maintain the ventilation rate at its set point or pollutants at or
below the configured set points of the air-quality (AQ) sensors. See Fig. 76.
CO2 sensors are available from the factory as options for
field installation. VOC or other types of sensors can be fieldsupplied and installed. Sensors used with the IAQ feature
can be configured several different ways:
reads the AQ1 sensor input and compares it to the configured set point. The control then calculates the minimum damper
position to maintain the set point. If no other control is attempting to adjust the dampers to a more fully open position
than the IAQ control, the damper is adjusted to the position
determined by the IAQ control. Otherwise, the damper is
positioned by the superseding control routine or at its configured minimum position.
Systems with Two AQ Sensors (Separate Readings) — The
preceding sequence for the AQ1 sensor also applies to the
AQ2 sensor, but the damper position is determined by either
the AQ1 or the AQ2 sensor according to which sensor value
demands the more fully open damper position.
Systems with Two AQ Sensors (Differential Check) — If differential sensing is configured for two VOC sensors, the control reads the AQ2 (outside air) sensor to determine if its
value is greater or less than that of the AQ1 (indoor air) sensor. If the AQ2 value is greater than the value of the AQ1
sensor, the mixed-air damper position is set to 0. If the AQ2
value is less than the AQ1 value (by at least 1% of the configured minimum sensor value), the control uses the AQ1
value to modulate the dampers and maintain the AQ set point.
IAQ System Protection — To protect the system against coil
freeze-up in cold climates or high heat and humidity in warm
climates, the system provides several user-selectable features to override or modify the IAQ functions. An adjustable
maximum position for the mixed-air damper is provided for
each AQ sensor, and a selection is available to maintain the
minimum mixed-air temperature at approximately 45 F. Space
temperature and humidity protection can temporarily suspend IAQ functions until the temperature and humidity conditions return to the desired set points. On VAV systems during cooling, the IAQ function can be limited to maintain the
required supply-air temperature.
• One sensor can be installed in either the space or return air
stream to continuously monitor a single gas.
• Two sensors (monitoring the same gas) can be installed in
different locations to provide separate inputs. For example, one sensor can be located in an occupied space and
another in the return air duct, or each sensor can be installed in a different occupied space.
• Two sensors (typically VOC sensors monitoring the same
gas) can be installed inside and outside the occupied space
for comparative measurements. The control is configured
to modify the damper position based on the value of the
sensor in the occupied space, but before admitting outside
air, the control performs a differential check to determine
if the value of the sensor measuring the outside air is higher.
If the outside sensor has a higher value, the damper does
not change position.
Systems with One AQ Sensor — During the unoccupied
period, the minimum damper position maintained by the
IAQ control is 0. During the occupied period, the control
94
LEGEND
AQ
IAQ
MAT
OAT
RH
SAT
SPT
VAV
Fig. 76 — Indoor-Air Quality (IAQ) Control Operation
95
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Air Quality Sensor
Indoor-Air Quality
Mixed-Air Temperature
Outdoor-Air Temperature
Relative Humidity
Supply-Air Temperature
Space Temperature
Variable Air Volume
set point, and a ‘K’ factor in minutes/degrees to calculate a
start time offset, which is the time in minutes that the system
should be started in advance of the occupied time. The control monitors its results and adjusts the K factor to assure
that the Occupied set point is achieved at time of occupancy.
SMOKE CONTROL — When the 39L or 39NX unit is
equipped with an optional smoke control and a fire system
is installed, 4 modes are provided to control smoke within
areas serviced by the air-handling unit. Each mode must be
energized individually from the approved building fire alarm
system, and the corresponding alarm is then generated at the
local interface device or Building Supervisor.
The system must include a separate return fan and an exhaust air damper with a 4 to 20 mA actuator.
The building fire alarm system must provide 4 normallyopen dry contact closures and a double-pole, double-throw
(DPDT) relay (24 vac coil, contacts rated 10 amps at
240 vac) for the Fire Shutdown mode.
Fire Shutdown Mode — The fire alarm system must provide
a normally-open dry contact closure which, when activated,
energizes the Fire Shutdown mode.
When the Fire Shutdown mode is energized, the supply
and return fans stop, the outside and exhaust air dampers
close, and the return-air dampers open.
This mode remains in effect as long as the input signal is
maintained at the fire system panel. An alarm is generated
from this input and sent to the Building Supervisor. In order
for this mode to be initiated, the input signal must be maintained for no less than 2 seconds.
Evacuation Mode — The building fire alarm system must provide a normally-open dry contact closure which, when activated, energizes the Evacuation mode. When the
Evacuation mode is energized, the supply fan shuts down,
the return fan starts, the outside-air and return-air dampers
close, and the exhaust air dampers open.
This mode remains in effect for as long as the input signal
is maintained at the fire system panel. An alarm is generated
from this input and sent to the Building Supervisor. In order
for this mode to be initiated, the input signal must be maintained for no less than 2 seconds.
Pressurization Mode — The building fire alarm system must
provide a normally-open dry contact closure which, when
activated, energizes the Pressurization mode. When the
Pressurization mode is energized, the supply fan starts, the
return fan shuts down, the outside dampers open, and the
exhaust and return-air dampers close.
This mode remains in effect as long as the input signal is
maintained at the fire system panel. An alarm is generated
from this input and sent to the Building Supervisor. In order
for this mode to be initiated, the input signal must be maintained for no less than 2 seconds.
Smoke Purge Mode — The building fire alarm system must
provide a normally-open dry contact closure which, when
activated, energizes the smoke purge mode.
When the smoke purge mode is energized, the supply fan
starts, the return fan starts, the outside air and exhaust air
dampers open and the return-air dampers close.
This mode remains in effect as long as the input signal is
maintained at the fire system panel. An alarm is generated
from this input and sent to the Building Supervisor. In order
for this mode to be initiated, the input signal must be maintained for no less than 2 seconds.
ADAPTIVE OPTIMAL START — Optimal Start is used to
heat up or cool down the space prior to occupancy. The purpose is to have the space temperature approach and then achieve
the occupied set point by time of occupancy. The control
uses outdoor-air temperature, space temperature, occupied
Constant Volume Units Only
HEATING COIL CONTROL — The heating coil control adjusts the steam or hot water valve. The valve is modulated
to prevent the space temperature from falling below the desired set point.
If the supply fan is OFF, the heating valve is modulated
to maintain a desired minimum duct temperature (fan off value).
If the fan is ON, the system reads the space sensor and
computes the supply-air temperature required to satisfy
conditions.
Once the required supply-air temperature has been
calculated, it is compared to the actual supply-air temperature and the heating coil valve modulates to the required
position.
CHILLED WATER COIL COOLING CONTROL — The
cooling coil control adjusts the chilled water valve. The valve
is modulated to prevent space temperature from exceeding
the desired set point. The valve holds its normal position if
the space temperature is below the set point or the supply
fan is OFF.
If the fan is ON, the control reads the humidity sensor
(if supplied) and compares the value to the high humidity
limit.
If the humidity is higher than the high humidity limit, the
chilled water valve fully opens.
If the humidity is below the high humidity limit, the control reads the space temperature sensor and computes the supplyair temperature required to satisfy conditions.
Once the required supply-air temperature has been calculated, it is compared to the actual supply-air temperature
and the chilled water valve modulates to the position required to maintain desired conditions.
See Fig. 77 for cooling coil operation flow chart.
DIRECT EXPANSION COOLING CONTROL — The
direct expansion (DX) cooling control regulates the DX cooling system. The DX cooling stages are energized and deenergized to prevent the space temperature from exceeding the
desired set point. The stages remain off if the space temperature is below the set point or the supply fan is OFF.
If the supply fan is ON, the control reads the humidity
sensor (if supplied) and compares the value to the high
humidity limit. If the humidity is higher than the high humidity limit, the DX cooling stages are energized to maintain a minimum supply-air temperature. If the humidity is
below the limit, the control reads the space temperature sensor and computes the supply-air temperature required to satisfy conditions.
Once the required supply-air temperature has been calculated, it is compared to the actual supply-air temperature
and the required DX cooling stages are energized to maintain the desired conditions.
See Fig. 77 for cooling operation and Fig. 78 for DX submaster gain operation. For more complete information, refer
to the Application Data book for Product Integrated Controls with DX Cooling.
96
LEGEND
CCV
CV
DX
RAT
RH
Fig. 77 — Cooling (DX and Chilled Water) Control Operation
97
—
—
—
—
Cooling Coil Valve
Constant Volume
Direct Expansion
Return-Air
Temperature
— Relative Humidity
LEGEND
DX
MAT
RAT
SAT
Fig. 78 — DX Submaster Gain Control Operation
98
—
—
—
—
Direct Expansion
Mixed-Air Temperature
Return-Air Temperature
Supply-Air Temperature
If the fan is ON, the control reads the space temperature
sensor and calculates the supply-air temperature required to
satisfy conditions.
Once the required supply-air temperature has been calculated, it is compared to the actual supply-air temperature
to determine the number of heat stages required to satisfy
conditions. The required stages are energized one at a time,
with 2-second intervals between stages.
ADAPTIVE OPTIMAL STOP —Optimal stop allows the space
temperature to drift to an expanded occupied set point during the last portion of an occupied period. The control calculates a stop time offset, which is the time in minutes prior
to the scheduled unoccupied time, during which expanded
set points can be used. Adaptive optimal stop utilizes space
temperature, an expanded Occupied set point, and a K factor
to calculate stop time offset. The amount to expand the Occupied set point is user configurable. Like adaptive optimal
start, the control corrects itself for optimal operation by adjusting the K factor.
TWO-STEP DEMAND LIMITING (Available on Units
Connected to the Carrier Comfort Network Only) — If the
Demand Limit option is enabled, the control receives and
accepts redline alert and loadshed commands from the
Network Loadshed option. See the CCN Loadshed manual
for additional information.
When a redline alert is received, the Control decreases the
Occupied Heating set point by 2° F and increases the Occupied cooling set point by 2° F.
When a loadshed command is received, the supply fan turns
OFF.
The maximum loadshed timer prevents the system from
remaining in loadshed, should the control lose communications with the Loadshed option. If the timer expires before the loadshed command is cleared by the Loadshed option, the control clears the loadshed command itself and
returns to normal control. The loadshed timer is factory set
at 60 minutes.
MIXED-AIR DAMPER CONTROL — The mixed-air damper
control adjusts modulating outside-air, return-air, and exhaustair dampers. When outside air conditions are unsuitable for
atmospheric cooling, the dampers are held to an adjustable
minimum outside air position. When outside air conditions
are suitable for atmospheric cooling, the mixed-air dampers
are modulated to maintain a space temperature that is between the heating and cooling set points in an effort to minimize the need for heating or mechanical cooling. The damper
set point is automatically adjusted as a function of outdoorair temperature or can be set to a fixed value by the user.
If the supply fan is OFF, the mixed-air dampers are kept
closed to outside air and open to return air.
If the fan is ON, the system checks to see if the system is
in the HEAT mode. If system is in the HEAT mode, the mixedair dampers are held in the minimum position.
If the system is not in the HEAT mode, it determines if the
outside conditions are suitable for atmospheric cooling. The
control compares the outdoor-air temperature to the space
temperature. If the outdoor-air temperature is less than the
space temperature, the system does either an enthalpy check
(using an outside-air enthalpy switch) or a differential enthalpy check. (Return-air temperature is compared to returnair relative humidity for return-air differential enthalpy. Outsideair temperature is compared to outside-air relative humidity
for outside-air differential enthalpy.)
The control then determines if the outdoor-air temperature is below the Nighttime Free Cool Lockout (NTLO). If
so, the damper set point is changed to 1.0 degree less than
the Occupied Cooling set point, allowing the system to use
return air during the heating mode.
If the outdoor-air temperature is higher than 68 F, the control sets the damper set point to 1.0 degree higher than the
Occupied Heating set point to provide cooling, allowing the
system to use outside air.
If the outdoor-air temperature is higher than NTLO but
less than 68 F, the system sets the damper set point halfway
between the Occupied Heating and Occupied Cooling set points
to provide ventilation.
If outside conditions are suitable, the control compares the
space temperature to the damper set point and computes the
supply-air temperature required to satisfy conditions.
Once the required supply-air temperature has been calculated, it is compared to the mixed-air temperature sensor
value (if installed), otherwise the supply-air temperature sensor determines the damper position. The damper adjustment
rate is limited to 5% per minute if the outside-air temperature is less than 40 F. This rate limit prevents nuisance low
temperature thermostat tripping.
ELECTRIC HEATER CONTROL — Electric heater staging regulates the electric heater. The heater is staged to prevent the space temperature from falling below the desired
set point. (The number of heat stages is factory set for each
unit’s heater.)
If the supply fan is OFF, all stages of electric heat are
turned off.
Variable Air Volume Units Only
CONSTANT OUTSIDE AIR (OAC) — During Occupied
periods, this feature provides a continuous flow of outside
air into the building. The OAC control modulates the mixedair damper to a configurable minimum open position to ensure outside air is admitted. During Unoccupied periods, the
control signals the dampers to fully close.
To monitor the outside airflow during Occupied periods,
the OAC control reads the outside-air velocity pressure (OAVP)
sensor, compares its value to the OAVP set point, and adjusts the mixed-air dampers to the position required to achieve
the configured velocity pressure.
If a control routine (other than OAC) or the configured
minimum damper position require the dampers to be more
fully open than the OAC setting, that routine or position overrides the OAC control. To protect against coil freeze-up in
colder climates, the PIC provides selectable low temperature protection to limit the minimum mixed-air temperature
to approximately 45 F.
See Fig. 79 for OAC control flowchart.
99
FAN VOLUME CONTROL — Fan volume control adjusts
the inlet guide vanes or inverter in a VAV system. The return
fan IGVs or inverters are modulated to maintain a constant
differential cfm value between the supply and return fans in
the system.
If the supply fan is OFF, the return fan inlet guide vanes
are closed and no signal is sent to the return fan inverter.
If the supply fan is ON, the control reads the supply fan
differential pressure transmitter and computes the supply cfm.
The desired return cfm is calculated by subtracting the differential cfm set point from the calculated supply cfm. The
return cfm is read and the return fan differential pressure required to satisfy conditions is calculated.
The calculated return fan differential pressure is compared to the current differential pressure. The signal required
to satisfy conditions is sent to the return fan inlet guide vane
actuator or return fan inverter.
DIRECT EXPANSION COOLING CONTROL — The direct expansion (DX) cooling control regulates the DX cooling system. The DX cooling stages are energized and deenergized to maintain the desired supply-air temperature set
point. Whenever the system is in Nighttime Free Cooling
mode or whenever the supply fan is off, the DX cooling stages
remain off.
If the supply fan is on, the control reads the humidity sensor (if supplied) and compares the value to the high humidity limit. If the humidity is higher than the high humidity
limit, the DX cooling stages are energized to maintain a minimum supply-air temperature. If the humidity is below the
limit, the control reads the space temperature sensor and computes the supply-air temperature required to satisfy
conditions.
Once the required supply-air temperature has been calculated, it is compared to the actual supply-air temperature
and the required DX cooling stages are energized to maintain the desired conditions.
See Fig. 77 for cooling operation and Fig. 78 for DX submaster gain operation. For more complete information, refer
to the Application Data book for Product Integrated
Controls with DX Cooling
ELECTRIC HEATER CONTROL — Electric heater staging regulates the electric heater. The heater is primarily used
for morning warm-up or Occupied Heating, with the heater
staged to maintain desired return air temperature. (The number of heat stages is factory set for each unit heater.)
If the supply fan is OFF, all stages of electric heat are
turned off.
If the fan is ON, the control determines if the system is in
morning warm-up. If it is, the return-air sensor is read and
compared to the Occupied Heating set point. If heat is required, the control calculates the supply-air temperature required to satisfy conditions.
Once the required supply-air temperature has been calculated, it is compared to the supply-air temperature to determine the number of heat stages required to satisfy conditions. The required stages are energized sequentially with
2-second intervals between stages and the heat interlock relay is energized. For VAV units, the number of stages turned
on is limited by the PIC IGV output.
Once the morning warm-up is completed, heat is not activated again unless OCCUPIED HEAT has been selected.
HEATING COIL CONTROL — The heating coil control adjusts the steam or hot water valve. Heat is primarily used for
morning warm-up or Occupied Heating with the valve modulated to maintain desired return-air temperature.
If the supply fan is OFF, the heating valve is modulated
to maintain a desired minimum duct temperature (fan off value).
If the fan is ON, the system determines if it is in the morning warm-up mode. If it is, the return-air sensor is read and
compared to the Occupied Heating set point. If heating is
required, the control calculates the supply-air temperature
required to satisfy conditions.
Once the required supply-air temperature has been calculated, it is compared to the actual supply-air temperature
and the heating coil valve modulates to the required
position.
The heat interlock relay is energized whenever there is a
need for heat.
Once morning warm-up is completed, heat is activated again
unless Occupied Heat has been selected.
During cooling or fan-only operation, heat can also be provided to maintain the supply-air temperature when the amount
of cold outside air admitted by the IAQ or OAC controls
causes the temperature to fall below the supply-air set point.
CHILLED WATER COIL COOLING CONTROL — The
cooling coil control adjusts the chilled water valve. The valve
is modulated to maintain desired supply-air temperature set
point. The valve is held in its normal position whenever the
system is in Nighttime Free Cooling or whenever the supply
fan is OFF.
If the fan is ON, the control reads the humidity sensor and
compares the value to the high humidity limit.
If the humidity is higher than the humidity limit, the chilled
water valve fully opens.
If the humidity is below the high humidity limit, or if no
humidity sensor is supplied, the control reads the supply-air
sensor and computes the supply-air temperature required to
satisfy conditions, provided that return-air temperature is greater
than the Occupied Cooling set point.
Once the required supply-air temperature has been calculated, it is compared to the current supply-air temperature
and the chilled water valve modulates to the position required to maintain desired conditions.
See Fig. 77 for cooling operation flowchart.
STATIC PRESSURE CONTROL — The static pressure control adjusts the inlet guide vanes (IGVs) or the supply-fan
motor inverter in a variable air volume system in order to
maintain the duct static pressure set point.
If the supply fan is OFF, the IGVs remain closed or the
minimum signal is sent to the inverter.
If the fan is ON, the system reads the duct static pressure
sensor and computes the static pressure required to satisfy
conditions. The system compares the duct static pressure to
the computed value and calculates the required signal that is
output to the IGV actuator or the inverter.
100
OA
OAC
OAVP
VAV
LEGEND
— Outside Air
— Constant Outside Air
— Outside Air Velocity Pressure
— Variable Air Volume
Fig. 79 — Constant Outside Air (OAC) Control Operation
101
SPACE TEMPERATURE RESET — The space temperature reset is used to reset the supply-air temperature set point
upward as the space temperature falls below the Occupied
Cooling set point. As space temperature falls below the cooling set point, the space temperature is reset upward as a function of the reset ratio. The reset ratio is the degrees of change
in supply-air temperature per degree of space temperature
change. A reset limit specifies the maximum number of degrees the supply-air temperature may be raised. Both the reset ratio and the reset limits are user adjustable.
When the fan is ON, and the system is in the Occupied
mode, the control reads the space temperature sensor and
computes the reset value. If the reset value is greater than
the reset limit, the control uses the reset limit as the reset
value. The modified supply air temperature set point is determined by adding the reset value to the configured supply
air temperature set point. This value is then used by the cooling coil algorithm.
TWO-STEP DEMAND LIMITING (Available on Units
Connected to the Carrier Comfort Network Only) — If the
Demand Limit option is enabled, the control receives and
accepts redline alerts and loadshed commands from the Network Loadshed option. See the CCN Loadshed manual for
additional information.
When a redline alert is received, the system limits the maximum volume (percent of fully open IGVs) per the userdefined demand limit no. 1 set point.
When a loadshed command is received, the maximum volume is limited per the user-defined demand limit no. 2 set
point.
The maximum loadshed timer prevents the system from
remaining in Loadshed, if the control loses communications
with the Loadshed option. If the timer expires before the
loadshed command is cleared by the Loadshed option, the
control clears the loadshed command itself and returns
to normal control. The loadshed timer is factory set at
60 minutes.
MIXED-AIR DAMPER CONTROL — The mixed-air damper
control modulates the outside-air, return-air, and exhaust-air
dampers. When outside-air conditions are unsuitable for atmospheric cooling, the dampers are held at the minimum adjustable outside-air position. The mixed-air dampers are
modulated to maintain a mixed-air temperature equal to supplyair temperature set point minus 3° F. The dampers can also
be modulated to maintain a user-configured mixed-air temperature set point.
If the supply fan is OFF, the mixed-air dampers are held
closed to outside air and held open to return air. If the supply
fan is ON, and the system is not in the HEAT mode, the
system determines if outside-air conditions are suitable for
atmospheric cooling. The outside-air temperature is compared to the space temperature. If the outside-air temperature is less than the space temperature, the system performs
either an enthalpy check using an outside-air enthalpy switch
or a differential enthalpy check.
If the outside conditions are suitable, the control uses the
mixed-air sensor to maintain the discharge temperature (whenever the mixed-air sensor option is installed). If the sensor
is not provided or fails, the control uses the supply-air sensor to modulate the dampers and achieve the set point.
When the outside temperature is less than 40 F, the mixedair damper opening rate is limited to 5% per minute to protect against nuisance low temperature thermostat tripping and
coil freeze-up. Rate limiting is off when the dampers are closed.
102
START-UP
Initial Check
Unit is shipped with the NTFC, Demand Limit, Temperature Reset, Optimal Start, Occupied Heating, and
Fan Tracking functions disabled. If these functions are
desired, refer to Control Operation, Programming Functions section beginning on page 81.
9. Check tightness of all electrical connections.
10. Turn on control power by turning the ON/OFF switch
located in the PIC control box to ON.
11. Perform Quick Test to make sure controls are operating
properly. See the following section.
IMPORTANT: Do not attempt to start unit, even momentarily, until the following steps have been completed.
1. Verify unit has been installed per the Installation, StartUp, and Service Instructions shipped inside the unit.
2. Verify that all auxiliary components (valves, sensors, etc.)
have been installed and wired to the PIC control box.
3. Verify that the motor starter and HOA switch have been
installed and wired.
NOTE: HOA switch must be in OFF position.
4. Check to be sure area around unit is clear of construction dirt and debris.
5. On VAV units, verify that the static pressure probe and
associated piping have been installed.
6. Verify that:
Chilled water valve is in its normal position.
Hot water/steam valve is in its normal position.
Outside-air damper is closed.
Return-air damper is open.
Inlet guide vanes are closed (VAV units).
7. Set control configurations. Units are shipped with applicable controls programmed to the default values shown
in Table 16.
8. Set unit set points. Units are shipped with the set point
default values shown in Table 17. If a different set point
is required, change as shown in the following example:
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
Quick Test — The Quick Test feature allows the service
technician to individually test all inputs and outputs of the
control system. See Tables 18-22.
The test function operates the Quick Test diagnostic program. The test subfunctions energize the valves, dampers,
and inlet guide vanes (VAV units).
To start Quick Test, set HOA switch to OFF. Verify supply fan stops. Quick Test does not operate if supply fan status is ON.
A test can be terminated by pressing
. Pressing
after a test has started advances the system to the next test.
Once the next test is displayed you can start the test by
pressing
, advance past it by pressing
, or back up
by pressing
. The unit remains in Quick Test until
and then
are pressed. At that time the unit
reverts to automatic control.
If the keyboard is not used for 10 minutes, the display
automatically returns to the rotating default display. You
must press
and
to exit Quick Test and then
DISPLAY
COMMENTS
RESPONSE
SETPOINT System set points
OHSP 68.0
OHSP 59.0
OCSP 78.0
OCSP 70.0
press
Present occupied heat set point
is 68.0
Key in 59 and press ENTR, display
shows new occupied heat set point
is 59
Present occupied cooling set point
is 78.0
Key in 70 and press ENTR, display
shows new occupied cooling set
point is 70
103
to restart the procedure.
Table 18 — Test of Input Signals
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS/ACTION
INPUTS
Field testing of inputs (X = current value. All temperatures should be 6 2 degrees F from actual)
SAT X
Verify that the supply-air temperature sensor reading agrees with the actual temperature.
OAT X
Verify that the outdoor-air temperature sensor reading agrees with the actual temperature.
SPT X
Verify that the space temperature sensor reading agrees with the actual temperature.
RAT X
Verify that the return-air temperature sensor reading agrees with the actual temperature.
Verify proper enthalpy reading. Move the knob on the enthalpy switch from A to D (or D to A) and verify that
the display readout changes.
ENT X
SFS OFF
SFS ON
Verify that the supply fan status is OFF when the supply fan is OFF.
Verify that the supply fan status is ON when the supply fan is ON. (Unit may be started by placing the HOA
switch in the HAND position.)
FRZ NRM
Verify that the low limit thermostat reads Normal. If not, reset the low limit thermostat.
SP 0.0
Verify that the static pressure reads 0.0 in. wg with the fan OFF and HOA switch set at OFF (VAV units).
Listed below are steps which must be used to verify different options. If the unit is not equipped with MAT, RH, OARH, or FLTS, proceed with the
testing of the inputs to the Option Module. If the unit is equipped with any of these options, proceed with their respective testing as follows. If
an option is not present, press
for the next available option.
RH XX
Verify that the relative humidity reading agrees with the actual relative humidity, checked with the local weather
bureau.
MAT X
OARH XX
Verify that the mixed-air temperature sensor reading agrees with the actual temperature.
Verify that the outdoor-air relative humidity reading agrees with the actual relative humidity, checked with the
local weather bureau.
FLTS NRM
Verify that the filter status reads Normal.
Listed below are steps which must be used to verify the inputs to the Option Module. If the unit is not equipped with the Option Module, proceed
with the testing of the outputs (Table 19). If the unit is equipped with the Option Module, proceed with the testing as follows. If an option
is not present, press
for the next available option.
TEMP X
Verify that the temperature sensor reading agrees with the actual temperature measured.
RVP X
Verify that the return velocity pressure is 0 with the return fan OFF.
SVP X
Verify that the supply velocity pressure is 0 with the supply fan OFF.
Verify that the duct high humidity switch reads Normal when the adjustment knob is set to the maximum set
point or contacts are open. Verify that it reads ALM when contacts are shorted.
DHH NRM
EVAC NRM
At Terminal Block 3, short Terminals 5 and 8. Verify that the display changes to EVAC ALM. Verify the
following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
PRES NRM
At Terminal Block 3, short Terminals 3 and 8. Verify that the display changes to PRES ALM. Verify the
following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
PURG NRM
Supply fan is OFF
Outside and return dampers (if applicable) close
Exhaust damper (if applicable) opens
Return fan starts
Supply fan inlet guide vanes close (VAV units only)
Return fan inlet guide vanes open (VAV units equipped with return fans)
Heat interlock Relay is OFF (VAV units)
Supply fan is ON
Outside air damper (if applicable) opens
Exhaust and return dampers (if applicable) close
Return fan stops
Supply fan inlet guide vanes open (VAV units)
Return fan IGVs close (VAV units equipped with return fan)
Heat Interlock Relay is ON (VAV units)
At Terminal Block 3, short Terminals 4 and 8. Verify that the display changes to PURG ALM. Verify the
following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Supply fan is ON
Outside air and exhaust dampers (if applicable) open
Return damper (if applicable) closes
Return fan is ON
Supply fan IGVs open (VAV units)
Return fan IGVs open (VAV units equipped with return fan)
Heat Interlock Relay is ON (VAV units)
104
Table 18 — Test of Input Signals (cont)
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
FSD NRM
COMMENTS/ACTION
At Terminal Block 3, short Terminals 1 and 2. Verify that the display changes to FSD ALM. Verify the
following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
MTR XXX
Supply fan is OFF
Outside air and exhaust dampers (if applicable) close
Return fan is OFF
Supply fan IGVs close (VAV units)
Return fan IGVs close (VAV units equipped with return fan)
Heat Interlock relay is OFF (VAV units)
OAVP 0.00
If applicable, verify that the display increments following the connected pulse-type meter measuring power.
Verify that the velocity pressure reads 0.00 in. wg with the fan OFF and the mixed-air damper closed
(0 setting).
AQ1 XXX
Verify the displayed value using field-supplied instrumentation located near the sensor.
AQ2 XXX
CUST EN
Verify the displayed value using field-supplied instrumentation located near the sensor.
Verify condensing unit lockout operation by rotating thermostat so display changes to CUST DSB. Reverse
thermostat to change setting back to CUST EN and reenable unit.
DXSD NRM
Verify that the direct expansion cooling shutdown value is normal.
Proceed with the testing of the outputs options (Table 19).
LEGEND
HOA — Hands/Off/Automatic
IGV — Inlet-Guide Vane
VAV — Variable Air Volume
105
Table 19 — Test of Output Signals
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS/ACTION
OUTPUTS
Field testing of outputs. (Set HOA switch to OFF.)
HCV %
Press ENTR if unit is equipped with a hot water or steam valve. Otherwise press
HCV TEST
Verify that the hot water or steam valve strokes to its 100% position.
CCV %
The hot water or steam valve returns to its 0% position. Press ENTR if unit is equipped with a chilled water
valve. Otherwise press
CCV TEST
Verify that the chilled water valve strokes to its 100% position.
MIXD %
The chilled water valve returns to its 0% position. Press ENTR if unit is equipped with mixed-air dampers.
Otherwise press
MIXD TEST
Verify that the outdoor-air damper strokes to its 100% position. Proceed with the applicable Constant Volume
or Variable Air Volume portion of the test.
For Constant Volume Units:
IGV %
If so equipped, verify that the outdoor-air damper returns to its 0% position. (Set the HOA switch
to AUTO.)
SF X
FAN TEST
Supply fan will be turned ON automatically. If unit is equipped with the Option Module, proceed with the
Option Output portion of the test (Table 20). If the unit does not have an Option Module, proceed to the electric
heater portion of the test (Table 21). If unit does not have an Option Module or electric heater, proceed as
follows:
EXIT TST
TST CMPL
Test is now complete. The unit is back under normal automatic control.
For Variable Air Volume Units:
IGV %
SF X
If so equipped, verify that the outdoor-air damper returns to its 0% position.
Verify that the IGVs stroke to their 100% position. Close the door of the fan section. Turn the HOA switch
to AUTO.
The IGVs return to their 0% position.
FAN TEST
The supply fan is turned ON automatically.
HIR X
HIR TEST
The supply fan stops.
Using an ohmmeter across the HIR relay contacts (refer to component arrangement label for location), the
reading should be less than 10 ohms. If the unit is equipped with the option module, proceed with the option
output portion of the test (Table 20). If unit does not have an option module, proceed to the electric heater
portion of the test (Table 21). If unit does not have an option module or electric heater, proceed as follows:
IGV TEST
EXIT TST
TST CMPL
Test is now complete. The unit is back under normal automatic control.
106
Table 20 — Test of Output Options Using Option Module
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS/ACTION
RFVC X
RFVCTEST
Verify that the return fan IGVs stroke to their fully open position.
HUM1 %
HUM1TEST
The return fan IGVs should close.
Verify that the return fan IGVs, if so equipped, return to their fully closed position. If equipped with single- stage
analog humidification control, verify that the modulating valve goes to its fully open position. If equipped with
two stages of humidification, use an ohmmeter to verify that the reading across the 1st stage normally-open
relay contacts is less than 10 ohms.
HUM2 %
HUM2TEST
Verify that the reading across the 1st stage normally-open relay contacts is greater than 1000 ohms.
If equipped with two stages of humidification, use an ohmmeter to verify that the reading across the 2nd stage
normally open relay contacts is less than 10 ohms.
AOTC %
If equipped with two stages of humidification, verify that the reading across the 2nd stage humidification normally open relay contacts is greater than 100 ohms.
AOTCTEST
Verify that the analog device connected to this output strokes to its 100% position.
DOTC X
DOTCTEST
Verify that the analog device connected to this output strokes to its 0% position.
Using an ohmmeter, verify that the reading across the DOTC (Discrete Output Temperature Control) normally
open relay contacts is less than 10 ohms.
DTCC X
Using an ohmmeter, verify that the reading across the DOTC normally open relay contacts is greater than 1000
ohms.
DTCCTEST
Using an ohmmeter, verify that the reading across the DTCC (Discrete Timeclock Control) normally open relay
contacts is less than 10 ohms. Proceed with the testing of electric heat stages (Table 21). If the unit is not
equipped with electric heat, exit the Quick Test mode as described below:
EXIT TST
TST CMPL
Test is now completed. The unit is back under normal automatic control.
Table 21 — Electric Heater Test
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS/ACTION
NOTE: Only the configured number of stages are tested and appear on the display.
ELE HEAT
Entering field test of electric heater. (Set the HOA switch to AUTO.)
EHS1 X
STG1 TST
The fan starts. If equipped, the IGVs open to 30%. After an 11-second delay, the 1st stage of heat is
turned ON.
EHS2 X
The 1st stage of heat is turned OFF.
STG2 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 2nd stage of heat is turned ON.
EHS3 X
The 2nd-stage of heat is turned OFF.
STG3 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 3rd stage of heat is turned ON.
EHS4 X
The 3rd stage of heat is turned OFF.
STG4 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 4th stage of heat is turned ON.
EHS5 X
The 4th stage of heat is turned OFF.
STG5 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 5th stage of heat is turned ON.
EHS6 X
The 5th stage of heat is turned OFF.
STG6 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 6th stage of heat is turned ON.
EHS7 X
The 6th stage of heat is turned OFF.
STG7 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 7th stage of heat is turned ON.
EHS8 X
The 7th stage of heat is turned OFF.
STG8 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 8th stage of heat is turned ON.
EXIT TST
The fan and preceding stage of heat shut OFF.
TST CMPL
Test is complete. The unit is back under automatic control.
107
Table 22 — Direct Expansion (DX) Cooling Test
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS/ACTION
NOTE: Only the configured number of stages are tested and appear on the display.
DX COOL
Entering field test DX cooling coil. (Set the HOA switch to AUTO.)
DXS1 X
STG1 TST
The fan starts. If fan has IGVs, the IGVs open to 30%. After an 11-second delay, the 1st stage of DX cooling
is turned ON.
DXS2 X
The 1st stage of DX cooling is turned OFF.
STG2 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 2nd stage of DX cooling is turned ON.
DXS3 X
The 2nd stage of DX cooling is turned OFF.
STG3 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 3rd stage of DX cooling is turned ON.
DXS4 X
The 3rd stage of DX cooling is turned OFF.
STG4 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 4th stage of DX cooling is turned ON
DXS5 X
The 4th stage of DX cooling is turned OFF.
STG5 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 5th stage of DX cooling is turned ON.
DXS6 X
The 5th stage of DX cooling is turned OFF.
STG6 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 6th stage of DX cooling is turned ON.
DXS7 X
The 6th stage of DX cooling is turned OFF.
STG7 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 7th stage of DX cooling is turned ON.
DXS8 X
The 7th stage of DX cooling is turned OFF.
STG8 TST
After a 2-second delay, the 8th stage of DX cooling is turned ON.
EXIT TST
The fan and preceding DX cooling stage shut OFF.
TST CMPL
Test is complete. The unit is back under automatic control.
Table 23 — Digital DC Volt Meter vs
DC Milliamp Meter
Electronic Valve Actuator Field Test — The electrically operated valve actuators supplied with 1⁄2-in. to
11⁄4-in. valve assemblies are a hydraulic, linear-piston type.
The actuators supplied with the 11⁄2-in. to 3-in. valve assemblies are an electro-mechanical type. Both types of actuators
contain a spring as part of the valve assembly. The spring
returns the stem to its normal position whenever there is a
loss of power or signal. Both actuators contain an internal
solid-state drive which accepts a proportional 4 to 20 mA
signal generated by the controller.
An increase in signal proportionally extends the actuator
shaft and pushes the valve stem down. A decrease in signal
retracts the actuator shaft and lifts the valve stem up. Valve
construction determines normal valve flow, either stem-up
open, or stem-up closed. On 3-way mixing valves, stem-up
allows flow from port B to port AB.
Perform field test for actuator as follows:
1. Verify actuator is powered by 24 vac at the WHITE/
BLUE and BLACK actuator wires.
2. Use a digital milliamp meter to verify the mA signal and
proper polarity at the input signal leads, 1RED and
−GREEN. A digital volt meter with a minimum of 2-place
accuracy may be used to determine signal value, see
Table 23.
3. Enter the heating coil valve or cooling coil valve Quick
Test, retract the actuator shaft and completely lift valve
stem.
4. While still in Quick Test, press
. The actuator shaft
should extend completely, pushing valve stem down. Exit
Quick Test procedure.
DC MILLIAMPS
4
8
12
16
20
DC VOLTAGE
.33
.57
.99
1.32
1.65
NOTE: The internal solid-state drives of the factory-supplied electronic actuators impose a 82.5 ohm impedance to the signal current
loop. A proportional voltage, ranging from 0.33 vdc at 4 mA to to 1.65 vdc
at 20 mA will be present.
CONTROL LOOP CHECKOUT
Checkout and adjustment of control loops should only
be performed by certified Carrier Comfort Network technicians. The following checkout procedure is offered as
a guide and presumes the user has obtained basic knowledge of controls through CCN training.
To Check Operation of Analog Outputs — The
control algorithms of the 39L and 39NX use the master/
submaster loop concept. The master loop monitors the master sensor (the sensor which tries to maintain the desired set
point), and calculates the submaster reference required to do
so. The submaster loop monitors the submaster sensor and
controls the output to the controlled device. These algorithms require a number of gain values to function properly.
The 39L and 39NX come with preset default values. However, it may be necessary to adjust several of these values to
achieve stable control. These values are submaster loop gain
(SMG), submaster loop center value (SCV), master loop proportional gain (MPG) and, in some cases, master loop integral gain (MIG).
108
To verify or adjust submaster default values, perform the
following for each controlled device (control loop):
1. Verify that controlled devices (cooling coil valve [CCV],
heating coil valve [HCV]) are properly piped and wired.
2. Using the local interface device, force each controlled
device fully open and fully closed. Make sure the actuators move smoothly. Sticky or sloppy actuators result
in poor control. They must be corrected, otherwise it may
be impossible to obtain stable control.
3. Verify that all appropriate energy sources are available:
hot water, chilled water, steam, etc.
4. Verify that the system is in the Occupied mode and the
supply fan is running.
5. Verify that the supply fan status indicates ON. If the fan
status if OFF, the control algorithms hold the controlled
devices at the failsafe position.
6. Verify that all forces have been removed.
7. Table 24 indicates recommended starting values for SMG,
MPG, and MIG for constant volume and variable air volume units. Verify that these values have been entered.
8. Verify/adjust the SMG. If the SMG is too large, the loop
tends to oscillate (hunt). If it is too small, the loop reacts
too slowly.
Verify or adjust the SMG as follows:
a. Using the local interface device, force the submaster
reference of the control loop to a value above or below the actual sensor reading. Verify that the actuator responds correctly. If the actuator drives in the
wrong direction, go to the submaster gain (SMG) for
the control loop and reverse the sign of the gain. For
example: If the submaster loop gain is 5.0, change it
to −5.0.
b. Observe the operation of the controlled device for a
few minutes. If the device oscillates every few seconds around the forced value, then lower the SMG
by small amounts until the output steadies. If the output to the device responds to a change in temperature
in small increments, then increase the SMG in small
amounts until the output steadies.
NOTE: Do not be alarmed if the submaster sensor stabilizes at a value greater than or less than the forced
value. This is termed the submaster droop offset and is
normal.
9. It is not necessary to adjust the submaster loop center
value, as the master loop will adjust the submaster reference as required to satisfy its set point. However, it
may be desirable to keep the submaster droop to a minimum. This is most often required for heating coil loops,
(especially on steam coils where the control valve has a
tendency to be oversized).
If the submaster droop is too large, adjust the SCV as
follows:
10.
11.
Table 24 — Recommended Gain Starting Valves
VALUE
GAIN
HCV MPG
HCV MIG
HCV SMG†
CCV MPG
CCV MIG
CCV SMG**
MIXD MPG
MIXD MIG
MIXD SMG
IGV MPG
IGV SMG
EH MPG
EH SMG
PREHEAT/AO
PREHEAT/AO
PREHEAT/AO
PREHEAT/AO
RFVC MPG
RFVC SMG
HUM MPG
HUM SMG
MPG
MIG
SMG†
SCV††
CV
8.0
0.3
−7.5
8.0
0.3
−7.5
8.0
0.3
−7.5
—
—
8.0
5.0
1.0
0.8
−3.0
100%
—
—
2.0
7.5
VAV
0.3*
1.5*
−7.5
0.3*
1.0*
−7.5
0.5*
1.5*
−7.5
0.5
5.0
8.0
5.0
0.3
0.8
−3.0
100%*
0.5
10.0
2.0
7.5
12.
13.
If the submaster droop is positive (actual value greater
than reference value), the SCV should be decreased for
HCV and IGV loops and increased for CCV and MIXD
loops. If the submaster droop is negative (actual value
less than reference value), the SCV should be increased
for HCV and IGV loops and decreased for CCV and
MIXD loops.
Once the submaster loop is adjusted, remove all forces
and proceed with verification and adjustment of master
loop.
To check the master loop, create an error in the master
loop. For example: Change the actual space temperature
to a value less than the heating set point or greater than
the cooling set point.
Observe system (loop) response for 10 to 20 minutes to
verify stable control. After 10 minutes if the output continues to swing full open to full closed, lower the MPG
and observe again. Do this until the loop operation is
stable. After 10 minutes, if the loop does not seem to
respond (little change in submaster reference), increase
the MPG and observe again. Do this until stable operation is achieved.
Once you are satisfied with loop operation, remove all
forces which may have been initiated during this
procedure.
Repeat steps 1-12 until all loops have been checked.
VALVE TROUBLESHOOTING
General — To facilitate troubleshooting the valve, it may
be necessary to disassemble the electronic actuator from the
valve body.
All 1⁄2-in. Through 11⁄4-in. Electric Hot Water/
Steam Valve Assemblies — A high-temperature linkage extension is supplied to help insulate the hydraulic actuator from heat. See Fig. 80. Mount valves so that valve
stem is at a 35° to 45° angle from vertical. See Fig. 81.
*Differs from default value; change the default value to obtain the
recommended starting value shown.
†Values shown are for normally-open valves. If normally-closed valves
are used, see Step 8.
**Values shown are for normally-closed valves. If normally-open valves
are used, see Step 8.
††Values shown are for normally-open valves. If normally-closed valves
are used, subtract initial value specified from 100% to obtain the
correct value. Example:
100% − (SCV N.O.) = (SCV N.C.)
100% − 100% = 0%
109
To remove the actuator from the high-temperature valve
linkage extension or from the 2-way normally-open valve
mounting nut, proceed as follows:
1. Secure the high-temperature linkage extension or
15⁄8-in. valve mounting nut to prevent turning.
2. Turn the actuator base (by hand) counterclockwise off the
high-temperature linkage extension mating threads or off
the mating threads of the valve mounting nut. Do not exert force on the upper housing! If necessary, a 15⁄8-in. openend wrench may be applied on the flats provided on the
actuator base.
3. Separate hydraulic actuator from linkage extension or valve
mounting nut. On assemblies using the linkage extension, retain the white spacer (now loose inside the actuator base) for reassembly later.
To reassemble the hydraulic actuator to the valve body:
1. On valve assemblies equipped with high-temperature linkage extension, insert the white spacer inside the actuator
base.
2. Secure the high-temperature linkage extension or valve
mounting nut to prevent turning.
3. Turn the actuator base (by hand) clockwise onto the hightemperature linkage extension or valve mounting nut until secure. Do not exert force on the upper housing!
If necessary, a 15⁄8-in. open-end wrench may be applied
on the flats provided on the actuator base. The actuator
may be rotated as desired to facilitate wiring
connections.
All 11⁄2-in. Through 3-in. Valve Assemblies
(See Fig. 82) — To remove the electro-mechanical actuator from the valve body, proceed as follows:
1. Electrically power the actuator by turning circuit breaker
to ON. Using the local interface device, force an output
of 10% (see Example 25), or enough to begin to move
the valve stem down, releasing stem pressure. It may be
necessary to slightly adjust the signal value up and down
to create a rocking motion on the valve stem. This will
permit easier connecting pin removal.
2. Remove the 2 self-tapping screws that secure the actuator base to the linkage mounting bracket. Turn the power
to OFF and remove actuator assembly.
Fig. 82 — Valve Assemblies, 11⁄2-in. to 3-in.,
Typical Linkages
Example 25 — Forcing An Output
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
OUTPUTS
IGV %
Fig. 80 — Valve Assemblies, ⁄ -in. to 1 ⁄ -in.,
Typical Linkages
12
14
MIXD %
HCV %
HCV 10/FORCED
HCV %
COMMENTS
System outputs
Scroll past Inlet Guide Vane
status
Scroll past Mixed-Air Damper
status
Heating Coil Valve status
Heating Coil Valve is forced
10% (Display flashes
continuously)
10% force is removed from
heating coil valve (Display
stops flashing)
NOTE: Electric heat and DX cooling stages cannot be forced. All
other outputs under
can be forced.
Fig. 81 — Valve Mounting Angle
110
Example 27 — Cooling Coil Valve Quick Test
(2-Way Normally Closed)
TO REASSEMBLE ACTUATOR TO VALVE BODY:
All 2-way normally-open valves:
1. Push the valve stem completely down and close seat valve.
NOTE: It may be necessary to shut down the system pump
to ensure valve stem is closed.
2. Loosen locknut and screw stem extension down fully on
valve stem to adjust stem extension for proper closure.
3. Attach actuator to valve linkage mounting bracket and
secure with self-tapping screws.
4. Make all necessary electrical connections.
5. Electrically power actuator by turning circuit breaker to
ON. Turn HOA switch to OFF position. Perform the heating coil valve quick test to stroke the actuator to its full
extended position. See Example 26. Leave the unit in test
mode and proceed to Step 6.
6. Screw the stem extension up until its hole aligns with the
hole in the actuator piston.
7. Screw the stem extension 2 full turns farther up into the
actuator piston.
8. While still in Quick Test, press
to retract actuator
piston and align holes to insert connecting pin. Exit
Quick Test.
9. Tighten the locknut against the stem extension.
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS
OUTPUTS
Entering factory test of outputs
HCV %
Scroll past heating coil valve test
by pressing
key
CCV %
Cooling coil valve test
CCV TEST
Cooling coil valve actuator piston
extends (Insert connecting pin)
EXIT TEST
Exit factory test
TST CMPL
Test completed
NOTE: For more complete instructions concerning the Quick Test procedure, see Quick Test in the Start-Up section, pages 103-108.
CONTROL MODULE TROUBLESHOOTING
To prevent electrical shock and equipment damage, turn
off all power to the PIC control box before removing or
replacing modules.
General — The processor module (PSIO master), option
module (PSIO slave) and relay module (DSIO) all perform
continuous diagnostic evaluations of the condition of the hardware. Proper operation of these modules is indicated by LEDs
(light-emitting diodes). The PSIO LEDs are located on the
top of the module, and the DSIO LEDs are on the front of
the module. See Fig. 83.
RED STATUS LED — If the LED is blinking continuously
at a one-second rate, the module is operating normally. If the
LED is lighted continuously, there is a problem that may require replacement of the module.
If the red LED is off continuously, check the power supply to the module. If there is no input power, check the fuses.
If a fuse is blown, check for shorted wiring or for a nonfunctional module. If the fuses are not blown, check for a
bad transformer or open secondary of the transformer.
GREEN COMMUNICATIONS LEDs — On a PSIO module, the green LED closest to the COMM connectors indicates the status of communications between modules. When
used, the other green LED on the module indicates the status
of external CCN communications.
The green LED that indicates module communications should
blink continuously whenever the power is on. If the green
LED is not blinking, check the red LED. If the red LED is
normal, check the module address switches as shown in
Fig. 82. The correct addresses follow:
Example 26 — Heating Coil Valve Test
(2-Way Normally Open)
KEYBOARD
ENTRY
DISPLAY
RESPONSE
COMMENTS
OUTPUTS
Entering factory test of outputs
HCV %
Entering heating coil valve test
HCV TEST
The hot water/steam valve strokes
to 100%
EXIT TST
Exit Quick Test
TST CMPL
Test completed
NOTE: For more complete instructions on the Quick Test procedure,
see Quick Test in the Start-Up section, pages 103-108.
All 2-way normally-closed and 3-way mixing valves:
1. Raise the valve stem completely up and close valve seat.
NOTE: It may be necessary to shut down the system pump
to ensure valve stem is closed.
2. Loosen locknut and screw stem extension down fully on
valve stem to adjust stem extension for proper closure.
3. Attach actuator to valve linkage mounting bracket and
secure with self tapping screws. The actuator should be
fully retracted with no power or signal present.
4. Screw the stem extension up until its hole aligns with the
hole in the actuator piston.
5. Screw the stem extension down 2 full turns away from
the actuator piston.
6. Turn circuit breaker to ON. Electrically connect the actuator. Using the cooling coil valve quick test, extend the
actuator piston to align holes and insert the connecting
pin. See Example 27. After inserting connecting pin, exit
Quick Test.
7. Tighten the locknut against the stem extension to secure
to stem.
Processor Module (PSIO Master)
Option Module (PSIO Slave)
High-Voltage Relay Module
(DSIO for Electric Heat
or DX Control)
High-Voltage Relay Module
(DSIOs for Electric Heat
and DX Control)
— 01 (factory default)
— 31
— 19
— 49
If all of the preceding modules except the processor module indicate communication failure, check the COMM plug
on the processor (PSIO master) module for proper seating
and check the communications bus wiring as shown in
Fig. 69 on page 65. If the condition persists even though
plug connections and wiring are correct, replace the processor module as described in the Module Replacement
section.
111
If only the PSIO slave or DSIO module indicate communication failure, check the affected module for proper seating. If the condition persists even though connections are
correct, replace the module as described in the following
section.
Module Replacement (PSIO, DSIO) — The PSIO
master module controls the standard unit functions, the PSIO
slave module controls many optional functions, and the DSIO
module controls electric heat and/or DX cooling. If the module LEDs are not blinking and the unit or features associated
with the module do not work, the module may need to be
replaced. Before replacing an inoperative module, check to
ensure that:
DSIO
•
•
•
•
The PIC control box power is on
Power at the processor module is between 18 and 24 vac
No fuses are blown
All connections are firmly in place
If all of the preceding conditions exist, and the module
LEDs are not blinking, the module needs to be replaced.
Before replacing a processor (PSIO) module, store the configuration data from the old module on hard copy. The new
processor module can be preconfigured or configured in the
field.
After obtaining a new module, field-replace the inoperative module as follows:
1. Turn off all power to the fan motor starter and PIC control box.
COMMUNICATIONS
LEDs
To avoid electrical shock and equipment damage,
always disconnect all power to the control box before replacing PIC modules.
STATUS LED
2. Open the control box door.
3. Refer to Fig. 5-7 for control box component arrangements. Disengage all connectors from the module.
4. Use a screwdriver to remove the mounting screw
securing the module to the control box. Remove the
module.
5. Install the replacement module and replace the mounting screw.
6. Reinstall all connectors. Verify that each connector is in
the correct location.
7. Turn on the power to the PIC control box and motor
starter.
8. If you are replacing a PSIO master module that is not
preconfigured, use the local interface device (HSIO) or
Building Supervisor to reset the date and time and change
the module’s default settings. The original PSIO master
module was factory configured to match the unit in which
it was shipped. A replacement PSIO master module must have the Factory Configuration (
) defaults changed in the field to match the configuration
of the unit in which it is being installed. Other settings
may also need to be reconfigured to match the unit configuration and/or the original module’s settings.
9. Perform the Initial Check, run the Quick Test, and verify
that the unit is operating correctly as described in the
Start-Up section on page 103.
10. Close the PIC control box door.
ADDRESS
SELECTOR
PSIO
Fig. 83 — Module Address Selector Switch
and LED Locations
112
UNIT TROUBLESHOOTING
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSE
CORRECTIVE ACTION
Check for correct power or blown fuses (F2).
Correct any deficiencies.
Check LEDs on control module (PSIO). If LED is not solidly
illuminated, check for loose connections. If all wires and
connectors are secure, replace PSIO module as described
on page 112.
Verify control shows correct time. If incorrect, enter correct
time.
Verify HOA switch is in the AUTO position.
Check low-temperature thermostat and high-pressure switch
(VAV units only). Reset switches if necessary.
Using the local interface device, exit Quick Test.
Press 5 TEST, and then ENTR to exit.
Verify that unit should be in the Demand Limit mode. If not,
cycle power to PIC to release unit from Demand Limit
mode.
Verify that unit should be in one of these modes. If not,
check for shorted input on Fire Shutdown or Evacuation.
Adjust minimum to 20% at 4 mA signal and 100% at 20 mA
signal.
Check status of SFS (4 STAT). If SFS is OFF, check supply
fan status switch for proper operation. Switch must be ON
for heat coil to function properly.
Check status of HCV (5 STAT). If HCV is forced, remove
force and check operation.
PIC control is OFF
Faulty connections
PIC control has incorrect time
Unit does not run
Supply fan HOA switch in OFF position
Safety controls are tripped
PIC control left in Quick Test
(Display shows Mode 38)
Unit is configured for and is currently
in Demand Limit Mode (CV units only)
Unit is in Smoke Evacuation or Fire Shutdown mode (Display shows 35 or 37)
Minimum inverter set point too low
(VAV units only)
No fan status
Heat coil valve (HCV) is forced closed
NO hot water or steam available,
no power if electric heat
Electric heater safety tripped
No heat
Check source and correct any problems found.
Reset heater safety. Check for proper operation.
Check for blown fuse (F6). Replace if necessary. If fuse
is intact, check for proper connections. Check transformer
output.
Check for blown fuse (F5). Replace if necessary. If fuse
is intact, check for proper connections. Check transformer
output.
No power to valve
No power to electric heater control
Incorrect reading from space temperature sensor,
supply-air temperature sensor, or return-air
temperature sensor (VAV units)
Heat coil valve (HCV) is forced open
Check configuration for proper heating set point and
Submaster Gain (SMG). An improper SMG can cause the
heating valve to be held closed.
Check status of HCV (5 STAT). If HCV is forced, remove
force and check operation.
Incorrect reading from space temperature sensor,
supply-air temperature sensor, or return-air
temperature sensor (VAV units)
Check status of sensor readings for accuracy. Replace
sensor if defective.
Configuration error
Overheating
Check configuration for proper heating set point and
Submaster Gain (SMG). An improper SMG can cause the
heating valve to be held open.
Check status of SFS (4 STAT). If status is OFF, check
switch for proper operation. Supply fan status switch must
be ON for cooling coil to function properly.
Check status of CCV (5 STAT). If CCV is forced, remove
force and check operation.
Check source of chilled water. Correct any problems found.
Check for blown fuse (F3). Replace if necessary. If fuse
is intact, check for proper connections. Check transformer
output.
Configuration error
No fan status
Cooling coil valve (CCV) is forced closed
No chilled water available
No cooling
No power to cooling coil valve
Incorrect reading from space temperature sensor,
supply-air temperature sensor, or return-air
temperature sensor (VAV units)
Check status of sensor readings for accuracy. Replace
sensor if defective.
Cooling coil valve (CCV) is forced open
Check configuration for proper cooling set point and
Submaster Gain (SMG). An improper SMG can cause the
CCV to be held closed.
Check status of CCV (5 STAT). If CCV is forced, remove
force and check operation.
Incorrect reading from space temperature sensor,
supply-air temperature sensor, or return-air
temperature sensor (VAV units)
Check status of sensor readings for accuracy. Replace
sensor if defective.
Configuration error
Check configuration for proper cooling set point and
Submaster Gain (SMG). An improper SMG can cause the
CCV to be held open.
Configuration error
Overcooling
Check status of sensor readings for accuracy.
Replace sensor if defective.
LEGEND
CV — Constant Volume
VAV — Variable Air Volume
113
UNIT TROUBLESHOOTING (cont)
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSE
No fan status
Mixed-air dampers forced closed to outside air
No power to damper actuator
Mixed-air dampers
will not operate
Incorrect reading from space temperature sensor
or supply-air temperature sensor
Configuration error
No fan status
Inlet guide vanes (IGVs) forced closed
Unit not maintaining desired
static pressure
(VAV units only)
No power to IGV actuator(s)
Loose IGV linkage
Incorrect reading from static pressure transducer
Configuration error
IGVs forced open
High-Pressure
Switch keeps
tripping unit
OFF (VAV only)
High-Pressure Switch (HPS) is incorrectly set
or defective
Static pressure sensor reads incorrectly
Configuration error
No power, blown fuse
Individual
actuators
do not function
Linkage is jammed or binding
No control signal
Oscillating
output
(HCV, CCV, IGV,
MIXD, etc.)
Incorrect submaster gain
Input sensor is fluctuating (supply-air
temperature sensor, static pressure transducer)
Loose connections
Sensor
not reading
correctly
Sensor out of calibration
Defective sensor
114
CORRECTIVE ACTION
Check status of SFS (4 STAT). If supply fan status switch is
OFF, check switch for proper operation.
Check status of MIXD (5 STAT). If MIXD is forced, remove
force and check operation.
Check for blown fuse (F7). Replace if necessary. If fuse is
intact, check for proper connections. Check transformer
output.
Check status of sensor readings for accuracy. Replace sensors if defective.
Check configuration for proper SMG and MDP (minimum
damper position). If MDP is set to zero, then dampers will
stay closed when enthalpy is unsuitable. An improper SMG
can cause the MIXD to be held to the MDP setting. Check
for proper damper set point. If damper set point is forced to
incorrect value, remove force.
Check status of SFS (4 STAT). If SFS is OFF, check supply
fan status switch for proper operation.
Check status of IGV (5 STAT). If IGVs are forced, remove
force and check operation.
Check for blown fuse (F4). Replace if necessary. If fuse is
intact, check for proper connections. Check transformer for
proper output.
Check IGV linkage for tightness and proper adjustment.
Check status of sensor reading for accuracy. If reading is
in error, check for plugged sensing line and check sensor
calibration. Replace sensor if defective.
Check configuration for proper static pressure set point.
Also, check SMG. An improper SMG can cause the IGVs to
be held closed.
Check status of IGV (5 STAT). If IGVs are forced, remove
force and check operation.
Using squeeze bulb, check trip point of HPS. Adjust as required. Check for plugged lines. Replace if defective.
Using local interface device and squeeze bulb with gage,
verify static pressure reading is correct. Adjust or replace
sensor as required.
Check configuration for proper static pressure set point.
Check SMG. An improper SMG can cause the IGVs to be
held open.
Check fuses of specific actuator for function failure.
Fuses are as follows:
F1 — PSIO control module
F2 — Power
F3 — Cooling coil
F4 — IGVs — supply fan
F5 — DSIO or option module
F6 — Heating coil
F7 — Mixed-air dampers
F8 — Smoke control or return-air damper
F9 — Exhaust-air damper
F10 — IGVs — return fan
F11 — 39NX sizes 74, 92; 2nd IGV actuator, supply fan
F12 — 39NX sizes 74, 92; 2nd IGV actuator, return fan
F13 — Preheat coil
Using manufacturer’s instructions, correct and adjust
linkage. Check operation.
Using Quick Test and a voltage meter set to measure current, verify that the proper control signal (4 to 20 mA) is being sent to the actuator. Refer to wiring diagram for
appropriate terminals.
Using Control Loop Checkout procedure, page 108, adjust
the SMG until the output steadies.
Verify sensor reading. If reading is fluctuating, determine
cause (i.e., loose connections, partially plugged static pressure sensing lines). Correct or replace sensor if necessary.
Verify all connections are secure.
Voltage type sensors (i.e., static pressure, space temperature, outdoor-air temperature, return-air temperature, relative humidity, and velocity pressure) can be calibrated using
manufacturer’s instructions.
If a sensor cannot be calibrated and its reading is considered unacceptable, replace sensor. Once sensor is replaced, verify new sensor is reading correctly.
UNIT TROUBLESHOOTING (cont)
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSE
OAC not enabled
Fan status is OFF
According to occupancy schedule, building
is unoccupied
Incorrect unit type
Constant outside air
(OAC) malfunctioning
Outside-air velocity pressure (OAVP) sensor
not functioning
OAVP sensor not configured
OAVP value does not match that of measurement equipment
IAQ not enabled
According to occupancy schedule, building is
unoccupied
IAQ priority level is incorrect
Set point too high
Air quality (AQ) sensors not operating
AQ sensors not configured
Indoor-air quality
(IAQ) features
malfunctioning
IAQ type set incorrectly
IAQ functions suspended because priority level is
2 and the conditions below apply:
Space temperature is too high or too low
Space relative humidity is greater than cooling
coil high humidity limit (CCHHL)
For VAV units only; supply-air temperature
(SAT) is greater than the sum of cooling coil
master reference (CCMR) plus 5 F, or SAT is
less than (CCMR−8 F) for 4 minutes or more
Mixed-air temperature (MAT) sensor is forced,
open, or shorted; OAT is less than 45 F;
MAT protection is enabled
115
CORRECTIVE ACTION
Enable OAC.
Verify fan is operating and supply fan status is correct. Supply fan status must be ON to allow OAC control.
Verify that current time and date are correct and reconfigure
occupancy schedule.
Change unit type to VAV (1). OAC not available for CV
units.
Verify 24 vac power at sensor input and correct voltage at
sensor output. Verify that pneumatic tube from sensor to
probe is unblocked and correctly connected to the probe.
Verify that high-pressure side of probe faces the airflow.
Correct problems as necessary.
Configure OAVP sensor for correct voltage and pressure
output ranges.
Verify above corrective action; adjust the probe multiplication factor (PMF) so that the OAVP reading matches that
of the measurement device. (OAVP value = sensor
value/PMF).
Enable IAQ.
Verify that current time and date are correct and reconfigure
occupancy schedule.
Verify that priority level is set at 1 or 2 and correct if
necessary. (Level 3 provides no IAQ control, only alarm
functions.)
Adjust set point to correct (lower) level.
Ensure that power and control wiring are correct. Verify
24 vac power at sensor input and correct voltage at sensor
output.
Ensure that sensor voltage range and output values are
correctly configured.
Set IAQ type to 1 for a single sensor or two sensors used
for differential comparison. Set IAQ type to 2 for two sensors used for separate readings.
—
Control will resume when space temperature recovers.
Ensure that CCHHL is set correctly. Control will resume
when the relative humidity drops below CCHHL.
Control will resume when SAT control recovers. This is normal operation during conditions of high or low outside-air
temperature (OAT)
Normal operation will resume when the MAT sensor is operating correctly or when OAT is greater than 45 F. If OAT is
greater than 45 F, remove force from, repair, or replace the
MAT sensor.
METRIC CONVERSION CHART
Copyright 1996 Carrier Corporation
Manufacturer reserves the right to discontinue, or change at any time, specifications or designs without notice and without incurring obligations.
Book 3
PC 201
Catalog No. 533-913
Printed in U.S.A.
Form 39L,NX-2SI
Pg 116
3-96
Replaces: 39L,NX-1SI
Tab 1b
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