Convection
Heater Model
2460, 2461,
2462
Homeowner’s Installation and Operating Manual
SAFETY NOTICE
If this heater is not properly installed, operated, and maintained, a house fire may result.
For safety, follow all installation, operation and maintenance directions. Contact local
building officials about restrictions and installation inspection requirements in your
area.
DO NOT DISCARD THIS MANUAL: Retain for future use
7001135 1/07 Rev. 19
Dutchwest
The Dutchwest models covered in this Owner’s Guide have been tested and
listed by Inchcape Testing Services / Warnock Hersey of Middleton, Wisconsin. The test standards utilized were ANSI/UL 1482 for the United States and
CAN/CGA - B366.2 for Canada. Dutchwest models are not listed for mobile
home installations.
PLEASE NOTE
Please read this entire manual berfore you install
and use your new room heater. Failure to follow
instructins my result in property damage, bodily
injury or loss of life. Save these instructions for
future use.
Accessories
Table of Contents
Specifications ............................................................ 3
Installation ..........................................................4
Clearances .......................................................12
Assembly ..........................................................16
Operation ..........................................................17
Maintenance .....................................................22
Illustrated Parts List ..........................................30
• Bottom Heat Shield
• Clearance-reducing Rear Heat Shields
• Clearance-reducing Heat Shields for single-wall
stove pipe
•
•
•
•
2” legs
Warming shelves (Small and Large Heaters only)
Two-speed convection blower
Automatic thermostat for the blower
Proposition 65 Warning: Fuels used in gas, woodburning or oil fired appliances, and the products of
combustion of such fuels, contain chemicals known
to the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects and other reproductive harm.
California Health & Safety Code Sec. 25249.6
Patents: U.S. - D288357, 4502395, 4646712;
Canada - 1235969. Other foreign mechanical patents issued.
2
7001135
Dutchwest
Specifications
A
D
G
C
F
B
E
Stove Model Number
2460
2461
2462
A
22” (560 mm)
25³⁄₄” (654 mm)
28¹⁄₄” (717 mm)
B
21” (530 mm)
24¹⁄₂” (620 mm)
27” (690 mm)
C
29³⁄₄” (754 mm)
30”
(760
mm)
33” (840 mm)
1135
D
16” (410 mm)
16”
(410
mm)
18¹⁄₄”
(467 mm)
Dutchwest
E
14³⁄₄” (375 mm)
14⁵⁄₈” (380 mm)
17” (430 mm)
specs
F
26³⁄₄” (683 mm)
27” (690 mm)
30¹⁄₈” (763 mm)
6/27/00 djt 30” (760 mm)
G
29³⁄₄” (754 mm)
33” (840 mm)
Log length:
19” (480 mm)
22” (560 mm)
25” (640 mm)
Maximum burn time1:
8 hrs.
9 hrs.
12 hrs.
Average area heated (sq. ft.)2: 700-1,400 (65-130m2)
800-1,600 (75-150m2) 1,200-2,400 (112-224m2)
Range of heat output4: 7,800 - 26,800 Btu/hr.
11,300 - 26,800 Btu/hr.
10,500-27,700 Btu/hr5
Maximum heat output:
35,000 Btu/hr.
40,000 Btu/hr.
55,000 Btu/hr.
EPA emissions rating4 (g/h, catalytic):
1.1
1.4
1.3
Weight:
380 lbs. (172 kg)
436 lbs. (198 kg)
634 lbs. (288 kg)
Loading:
Side or front
Side or front
Side or front
Flue exit position (reversible):
Top or rear
Top or rear
Top or rear
Air controls:
2 controls
2 controls
2 controls
Fig. 1 Dutchwest Convection Heater specifications.
1. Maximum burn times and heat outputs are based on laboratory testing using full loads of seasoned hardwoods, and may vary in individual use
depending on how the stove is operated, type and moisture content of fuels, and other factors. Maximum burn times are achieved under different
operating conditions than are maximum heat outputs.
2. These values are based on operation in building code-conforming homes under typical Winter climate conditions in the northeastern U.S. If your
home is of nonstandard construction (e.g. unusually well-insulated, not insulated, built underground, or if you live in a more severe or more temperate climate), these figures may not apply. Since so many variables affect performance, consult your Dutchwest Authorized Dealer to determine
realistic expectations for your home.
4. Under specific conditions used during EPA emissions testing.
5. Based on preliminary results obtained during EPA emissions testing.
7001135
3
Dutchwest
Installation
SAFETY NOTICE: IF YOUR DUTCHWEST CONVECTION HEATER IS NOT PROPERLY INSTALLED,
OPERATED AND MAINTAINED, A HOUSE FIRE MAY
RESULT. FOR SAFETY, FOLLOW ALL INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE DIRECTIONS. CONTACT LOCAL BUILDING OFFICIALS
ABOUT RESTRICTIONS AND INSTALLATION
INSPECTION REQUIREMENTS IN YOUR AREA.
Before you begin the installation, review your plans to
confirm that:
• Your stove and chimney connector will be far enough
from combustible material to meet all clearance requirements.
• The floor protector is large enough and is constructed
properly to meet all requirements.
• You have obtained all necessary permits from local
authorities.
Your local building official is the final authority for approving your installation as safe and for determining
that it meets local and state codes.
Clearance and installation information is printed on the
metal label attached to the rear of the stove. Local authorities generally will accept the label as evidence that,
when the stove is installed according to the information
on the label and in this manual, the installation meets
codes and can be approved.
Codes vary in different areas, however. Before starting
the installation, review your plans with the local building
authority. Your local dealer can provide any additional
information needed.
Masonry Chimneys
If you use an existing masonry chimney, it must be
inspected to ensure safe condition before the stove
is installed. Your local professional chimney sweep,
building inspector, or fire department official will be able
either to make the inspection or to direct you to someone who can.
An inspection of the chimney must confirm that it has
a lining. Do not use an unlined chimney. The chimney should also be examined for cracks, loose mortar,
other signs of deterioration, and blockage. Repair any
defects before the chimney is used with your stove.
Unused openings in an existing masonry chimney must
be sealed with masonry to the thickness of the chimney
wall, and the chimney liner should be repaired. Openings sealed with pie plates or wallpaper are a hazard
and should be sealed with mortar or refractory cement.
In the event of a chimney fire, flames and smoke may
be forced out of these unused thimbles.
The chimney should be thoroughly cleaned before use.
A newly-built masonry chimney must conform to the
standards of your local building code or, in the absence
of a local code, to a recognized national code. Masonry
chimneys must be lined, either with code-approved
masonry or pre-cast refractory tiles, stainless steel
pipe, or a code-approved, “poured-in-place” liner. The
chimney’s clean-out door must seal tightly.
Prefabricated Double-Wall
Insulated Chimney
Important: Failure to follow these installation instructions may result in a dangerous situation, including a
chimney or house fire. Follow all instructions exactly,
and do not allow makeshift compromises to endanger
property and personal safety.
Chimney Types
Your Dutchwest Convection Heater must be connected
to a sound masonry chimney that meets local codes, a
relined masonry chimney that meets local codes, or to
an approved prefabricated metal chimney. Whatever
kind you use, the chimney and chimney connector must
be in good condition and kept clean.
Tile Lined
Masonry
Chimney
ST241
Fig. 2 If in sound condition and approved for use, either a
masonry or a prefabricated chimney may be used.
ST241
chimney types
12/13/99 djt
4
7001135
Dutchwest
Prefabricated Chimneys
A prefabricated metal chimney must be one tested and
listed for use with solid-fuel burning appliances.
A horizontal connector run should be inclined 1/4” per
foot (20 mm per meter) from the stove toward the
chimney. The recommended maximum length of a horizontal run is 3 feet (1m) and the total length of chimney
connector should be no longer than 8 feet (2.5m).
Chimney Height
For proper draft and good performance, the chimney
should extend at least 16’ (5 m) above the flue collar of
the stove.
The chimney must also extend at least 3’ (900 mm)
above the highest point where it passes through a roof,
and at least 2’ (600 mm) higher than any portion of a
building within 10’ (3 m). (Fig. 2)
DO NOT CONNECT THIS UNIT TO A CHIMNEY
FLUE SERVING ANOTHER APPLIANCE.
3'
MIN.
0 TO 10'
3'
MIN.
Reference
Point
AC246
Fig. 3 The 2/3/10 rule for chimneys.
Chimney
PTL2
4/1/96
Do not pass the chimney connector through a combustible wall or ceiling, or through an attic, a closet or any
similar concealed space. If passage through a combustible wall is unavoidable, follow the recommendations in
the following section on Wall Pass-Throughs. Keep the
passage as short and direct as possible, with no more
than two 90 degree turns.
Two Types of Connector
You may use either a single-wall steel connector of the
size and gauge described below, or a listed and approved double-wall connector.
Single-Wall Connector
Install single-wall chimney connector not less than 18”
(450 mm) from the ceiling.
2' MIN.
AC246
The chimney connector is the single-wall pipe, or listed
and approved double-wall pipe that connects the stove
to the chimney. The chimney itself is a masonry or
prefabricated structure that encloses the flue. Chimney
connectors are used only to make the connection from
the stove to the chimney.
The single-wall chimney connector should be made of
24 gauge or heavier steel, and must have a minimum
internal diameter of 6” (150 mm) for models 2460 and
2461, or 8” (200 mm) for model 2462.
0 TO 10'
2' MIN.
Guidelines for Installing
the Chimney Connector
Size
The Model 2460 and 2461 heaters should be vented
into a masonry chimney with a square flue with nominal flue size of 8” x 8” (200 x 200 mm), or a round flue
with nominal flue size of 6” (150 mm). The Model 2462
heater should be vented into a masonry chimney with a
nominal flue size of 8” x 8” (200 mm x 200 mm) square,
or 8” (200 mm) round.
Chimney liners larger than 8” x 12” (200 x 300 mm)
may promote rapid cooling of smoke and reduction in
draft, especially if they are located outside the home.
These large chimneys may need to be insulated or
have their flues relined for proper stove performance.
In cathedral ceiling installations, extend the prefabricated chimney downward to within 8 feet (2.5 meters)
of the stove. The entire chimney connector should be
exposed and accessible for inspection and cleaning.
Do not use galvanized chimney connector; it cannot
withstand the high temperatures that can be reached
by smoke and exhaust gases and it may release toxic
fumes under high heat.
Chimney
Flue Liner
Flue
Elbow
Thimble
Slip Pipe
Standard Connector
Flue Collar
Floor Protector
Accessories to help make the connection between
stainless steel chimney liners and the stove are available through your local dealer.
7001135
ST418
Fig. 4 Sections of a steel chimney connector of at least 24
gauge thickness are fastened together with screws to
ST418
connect the stove to the chimney.
chimney connector
6/00
5
Dutchwest
Double-Wall Connector
Information on assembling and installing double-wall
connectors is provided by the manufacturer of the
double-wall pipe. Follow the manufacturer’s installation
instructions exactly. Most manufacturers of prefabricated double-wall insulated chimneys also offer doublewall connector pipes. Using a chimney and connector
pipe from the same manufacturer helps simplify the
assembly and installation.
2. Secure each joint between sections of chimney connector, including telescoping joints, with at least three
sheet metal screws.
3. Secure the chimney connector to the chimney. Instructions for various installations follow below.
4. Confirm that the installed stove and chimney connector are correct distances from nearby combustible
material. See the clearance charts on pages 12 and 13.
NOTE: For installations using double-wall connectors, minimum clearances must conform to listed
clearances in the Stove and Chimney Connector
Clearance Charts on page 12 and 13 of this manual.
NOTE: Special slip pipes and thimble sleeves that form
telescoping joints between sections of chimney connector are available to simplify installations. They can
eliminate the need to cut individual connector sections.
Consult your local dealer about these special pieces.
Assembling Single-Wall
Chimney Connector
Securing the Connector
to a Prefabricated Chimney
SAFETY NOTE: Always wear gloves and safety
goggles when drilling, cutting or joining sections of
chimney connector.
Follow the installation instructions of the chimney
manufacturer exactly as you install the chimney. The
manufacturer of the chimney will supply the accessories to support the chimney, either from the roof of
the house, at the ceiling of the room where the stove is
installed, or from an exterior wall.
For double-wall connectors, follow the manufacturer’s
instructions exactly. For single-wall connectors, follow
the instructions below.
1. Insert the crimped end of the first section into the
stove’s flue collar, and keep each crimped end pointing
toward the stove (Fig.5). Using the holes in the flue collar as guides, drill 1/8” (3 mm) holes in the bottom of the
first section of chimney connector and secure it to the
flue collar with three #10 x 1/2” sheet metal screws.
Toward
Stove
Special adaptors are available from your local dealer
to make the connection between the prefabricated
chimney and the chimney connector. (Fig. 6) The top
of such adaptors attach directly to the chimney or to the
chimney’s ceiling support package, while the bottom of
the adaptor is screwed to the chimney connector.
These adaptors are designed so the top end will fit
outside the inner wall of the chimney, and the bottom
end will fit inside the first section of chimney connector.
Any soot or creosote falling from the inner walls of the
chimney will stay inside the chimney connector.
Prefab (Insulated)
Chimney
Flue Gas
Direction
Ceiling Support
Package
ST242
Fig. 5 Crimped sections always point toward the stove so
that any liquid condensation will not leak out.
Prefab Chimney
Adapter
Chimney Connector
(Stovepipe)
ST242
Chimney connector
12/13/99 djt
ST419
Fig. 6 Joining the chimney connector to a prefabricated
chimney.
6
ST419
Joining the chomney
6/27/00 djt
7001135
Dutchwest
Securing the Connector
to a Masonry Chimney
The Dutchwest Convection heaters may be connected
to either a freestanding masonry chimney or a masonry
fireplace chimney.
Thimble
Sleeve
Flue
Elbow
Thimble
Keep
Sleeve
End Flush
with Flue
Tile
Freestanding Installations
If the chimney connector must pass through a combustible wall to reach the chimney, follow the recommendations in the wall pass-through section that follows.
The opening through the chimney wall to the flue
(the “breech”) must be lined with either a ceramic or
metal cylinder, called the “thimble”, which is securely
cemented in place. (Fig. 7) Most chimney breeches
incorporate thimbles, but check to be sure the fit is snug
and the joint between thimble and chimney wall firmly
cemented.
A special piece called the “thimble sleeve,” slightly
smaller in diameter than the standard connector and
most thimbles, will ease the removal of the chimney
connector system for inspection and cleaning. Thimble
sleeves should be available from your local dealer.
To install a thimble sleeve, slide it into the breech until
it is flush with the inner flue wall. Don’t extend it into
the actual flue passage, as that could interfere with the
draft.
The thimble sleeve should protrude 1-2” (25-50 mm)
into the room. Use furnace cement and thin gasketing
to seal the sleeve in place in the thimble. Secure the
chimney connector to the outer end of the sleeve with
sheet metal screws.
Fireplace Installations Above the Fireplace
In this installation, the chimney connector rises from
the stove, turns ninety degrees, and goes back into the
fireplace chimney. The liner of the fireplace chimney
should extend at least to the point at which the chimney
connector enters the chimney. Follow all the guidelines
for installing a chimney connector into a freestanding
masonry chimney, and pay special attention to these
additional points:
Chimney
Connector
Flue Liner
Fig. 7 The thimble, made of either ceramic or metal, must be
cemented in place securely.
Masonry Wall
ST243
thinble connection
12/13/99
Ceramic Flue
Liner djt
Chimney Connector Shield
Block-Off Plate
Chimney Connector
ST244a
Fig. 8 The connector enters flue above the fireplace. If the
clearance between the chimney connector and either the
ST244a
mantel and/or the ceiling is inadequate,
special protective
Dutchwest
shields will be required.
fplc over mantel
6/00
Flue Liner
Extend Chimney Connector to the First Tile of
the Flue Liner
Observe
Miniumum Clearances
• Check the stove and chimney connector clearances
•
•
to combustible mantel or trim materials. Use the
necessary combination of mantel, trim, and connector heat shields to provide the required clearances.
(Fig. 8)
Double-check connector clearance from the ceiling.
The fireplace damper must be closed and sealed
to prevent room air from being drawn up the flue,
reducing the draft. However, it must be possible to
re-open the damper to inspect or clean the chimney.
7001135
ST243
Damper
Plate is
Remvoed
or Locked
in Open
Position
Close Off
the Damper
Opening with
Sheet Metal
and Sealant
ST245a
Fig. 9 The connector passes through the fireplace to enter
flue. Special Fireplace Adapter Kits to simplify fireplace installations are available from
your local dealer.
ST245a
fireplace
flex connector
6/00
7
Dutchwest
Fireplace Installations Through the Fireplace
The Convection heaters may be installed either without
legs* as a fireplace insert, or with standard legs attached - depending on the safety regulations that apply
to your situation, the height of the fireplace opening and
your own preference. For either situation, the chimney
connector/positive connection kit extends back from the
stove, enters the fireplace cavity, and turns upward. It
then passes through the fireplace damper opening and
smoke chamber and connects to the chimney flue.
In such installations, a “positive connection” must be
made to the chimney flue with a special kit available
from your local dealer. Also, special clearance and floor
protection provisions must be observed. These provisions are discussed in the Clearance and Floor Protection sections respectively.
12”
(305mm)
Chimney Connector
12”
(305mm)
ST420
Fig. 10 Wall pass-through enclosed with noncombustible
materials.
Wall Pass-Throughs
Whenever possible, design your installation so the connector does not pass through a combustible wall. If you
must use a wall pass-through in your installation, check
with your building inspector before you begin and construct it in accordance with local building codes. Also
check with the chimney connector manufacturer for any
specific requirements.
18”
(450mm)
Empty Space
All Around
the Chimney
Connector
Sheet Metal
ST420
Cover
wall pass through (One side
with noncombust only)
6/27/00 djt
Accessories are available for use as wall passthroughs. If using one of these, make sure it has been
tested and listed for use as a wall pass-through.
All combustible material in the wall is cut away a sufficient distance from the single-wall connector to provide
the required 12” (305 mm) clearance for the connector.
Any material used to close up the opening must be noncombustible.
The following wall pass-through methods may be approved in your area:
• Use a section of listed factory-built chimney with a
nine-inch clearance to combustibles.
• Place a chimney connector pipe inside a ventilated
thimble, which is then separated from combustibles
by six inches (152 mm) of fiberglass insulating material.
• If the stove is installed without legs, we recommend
the use of noncombustible tiles or pavers as shims
to allow air flow into the convection air inlets under
the stove. Make sure not to block air slots instove
bottom with shims or remove fan cover.
• Place a chimney connector pipe inside a section of
ST421
Fig. 11 Hollow wall pass-through.
chimney connector and having 1 inch (25.4 mm) or
more of insulation and maintaining a minimum 2 inch
air space between the
outer wall of the chimney and
ST421
hollow
combustibles.
wall pass through
with noncombust
DO NOT CONNECT THE
HEATER TO ANY AIR
djt
DISTRIBUTION DUCT6/27/00
OR SYSTEM.
In Canada: The Canadian Standards Association has
established different guidelines. Figure 11 shows one
method, in which all combustible material in the wall is
cut away to provide the required 18” (450 mm) clearance for the connector. The resulting space must
remain empty.
listed solid-insulated, factory-built chimney, with an
inside diameter 2 inches (51 mm) larger than the
8
7001135
Dutchwest
A flush-mounted sheet metal cover may be used on one
side only. If covers must be used on both sides, each
cover must be mounted on non-combustible spacers
at least 1” (25 mm) clear of the wall. Your Dutchwest
dealer or your local building inspector can provide details of other approved methods of passing a chimney
connector through a combustible wall. In Canada, this
type of installation must conform to CAN/CSA-B365,
Installation Code for Solid Fuel Burning Appliances and
Equipment.
B
A
B
NOTE: Do not vent your Dutchwest stove into a factorybuilt (zero-clearance) fireplace. These appliances and
their chimneys are specifically designed as a unit for
use as fireplaces. It may void the listing or be hazardous to adapt them for any other use.
A
ST422
Floor Protection
A tremendous amount of heat radiates from the bottom
plate of your Dutchwest stove. The floor area directly
under and around the stove will require protection from
radiant heat as well as from stray sparks or embers that
may escape the firebox.
Heat protection is provided through the use of a CFM
Corporation Bottom Heat Shield. Spark and ember
protection must be provided by a floor protector constructed with noncombustible material as specified.
Most installations will require that the bottom heat
shield be attached. Only when the stove is placed on a
completely noncombustible surface such as unpainted
concrete over earth may it be used without the heat
shield.
Even when the bottom heat shield is installed, you must
provide special protection to the floor beneath. For
installation with the heat shield attached, use a noncombustible floor protector such as 1/4” non-asbestos
mineral board or equivalent, or 24 gauge sheet metal.
The floor protector may be covered with a decorative
noncombustible material if desired. Do not obstruct the
space under the heater.
Protection requirements vary somewhat between the
United States and Canada as follows:
U.S. Installations: The floor protector is required under
the stove and must extend at least 16 inches from the
front and left (loading door) side of the stove, and at
least 6 inches from the right side and rear. (Fig. 12)
Refer to Figure 12 for minimum noncombustible floor
protection dimensions for each stove model.
In Canada: a noncombustible floor protector is required
under the heater also. The floor protector must extend
18 inches (457mm) from the front and left (loading
door) side of the stove, and at least 8 inches (203mm)
from the right side and rear. (Fig. 12)
7001135
A.
B.
U.S.
Canada
16”
6”
18” (457 mm)
8” (203 mm)
Minimum DimensionsST422
for Noncombustible Floor
floor protection
Protectors (Depth x Width):
6/27/00 djt
Model
U.S.
Canada
2460
2461
2462
38” x 44”
38” x 48”
42” x 52”
42” x 48” (1067mm x 1219mm)
42” x 52” (1067mm x 1320mm)
46” x 56” (1168mm x 1422mm)
Fig. 12 Be sure to follow exactly the floor protection requirements on all four sides of the stove.
A
ST423
Fig. 13 Combustible supporting timbers (A) may lie beneath
fireplace hearths; such situations require additional floor
protection.
Due to the side loading door, floor protector requireST423 on the left side than on
ments call for more protection
the right. If you wish acombustible
more balanced
look, increase
support
the other side of the hearth
as well. Do not reduce
timbers
side protection under any circumstances.
6/27/00 djt
Fireplace Installations
You may install your Dutchwest Convection Heater in
an existing fireplace as a fireplace insert with no legs,*
or with the standard legs attached.
9
Dutchwest
To install the heater without legs as a fireplace insert,
the floor must be completely noncombustible, such as
an unpainted concrete floor over earth.
Many fireplaces do not satisfy the “completely noncombustible” requirement because the brick or concrete hearth in front of the fireplace opening usually is
supported by heavy wooden framing as in Figure 13.
Because heat passes readily through brick or concrete,
it can easily pass through to the wood. As a result,
such fireplace hearths are considered a combustible
floor. You may not install a heater on a combustible
hearth without legs. Standard leg installations must
include the bottom heat shield. The floor protector
must also meet standard requirements for freestanding
installations.
Floor Protection for Fireplace
Installations with Standard Legs
Fireplace installations with the standard legs and the
bottom heat shield must have a floor protector of the
same construction as that specified for freestanding installations: 1/4” non-asbestos mineral board or equivalent, or 24 gauge sheet metal (that may be covered with
a decorative noncombustible material if you desire).
The floor protector must extend at least 16” (406 mm)
[18” / 457 mm in Canada] from the front of the stove
and from the left (loading door) side, and at least 6”
(152 mm) from the right side and rear. It must also
provide protection beneath any horizontal runs of the
chimney connector, including 2” to either side.
Many raised hearths will extend less than the required
distance from the front of the heater when it is installed.
In such cases, sufficient floor protection, as described
above, must be added to extend the hearth 16” (406
mm) [18” (457 mm) in Canada].
Hearth rugs do not satisfy the requirements for floor
protection.
Fireplace insert installations also have specific clearance requirements to the side walls, side decorative
trim, and fireplace mantel. This information is found in
“Fireplace Installation Clearances” in this section.
Clearance is the distance between either your stove or
chimney connector, and nearby walls, floors, the ceiling,
and any other fixed combustible surface. Keep furnishings and other combustible materials away from the
stove as well. In general, a distance of 48” (1220 mm)
must be maintained between the stove and moveable
combustible items such as drying clothes, furniture,
newspapers, firewood, etc. Keeping those clearance
areas empty assures that nearby surfaces and objects
will not overheat.
Safe Ways To Reduce Clearances
Your stove has specific clearance requirements that
have been established through careful research and
testing to UL and ULC standards.
Clearance requirements have been established to meet
every installation possibility, and they involve the combination of basic variables:
•
•
•
•
•
•
When the stove has no listed heat shield
When the stove has a listed heat shield
When the wall has no heat shield
When the wall has a heat shield
When the stove has a double-wall chimney connector.
When the stove has a single-wall connector
wit heat shields, or without heat shields.
In general, the greatest clearance is required when you
locate a stove with no heat shield near a wall with no
heat shield. The least clearance is required when both
the stove and the wall have heat shields. Reducing a
stove clearance may require a listed heat shield on the
chimney connector as well, or a double-wall connector.
Clearances may be reduced only by means approved
by the regulatory authority and in accordance with the
clearances listed in this manual. The charts and sample
installations that follow list all the clearances required
for the various installation configurations of Dutchwest
Convection Heaters.
REMINDER- FIREPLACE INSERT INSTALLATIONS
WITHOUT LEGS ARE PERMISSIBLE ONLY IF THE
HEARTH IS COMPLETELY NONCOMBUSTIBLE,
SUCH AS UNPAINTED CONCRETE OVER EARTH.
Keep the Stove a Safe Distance
From Surrounding Materials
Both a stove and its chimney connector radiate heat
in all directions when operating. A safe installation requires that adequate clearance be maintained between
the stove and nearby combustible materials to ensure
that such materials do not overheat.
10
7001135
Dutchwest
M
M
T
S
ST426
ST424
Fig. 14 Extra floor protection may be required for the fireplace hearth, even if your stove is installed with the legs and
the bottom heat shield.ST424
dutchwest
on hearth
6/00
Fireplace Installation Clearances
A fireplace installation requires special clearance between the:
Model:
2460
2461
2462
Side Walls (S) 20” (510mm) 24” (610mm) 23” (580mm)
Trim (T)
12” (300mm) 12” (300mm) 12” (30mm)
ST426 20” (510mm) 20” (510mm)
Mantel (M)
20” (510mm)
fireplace
clearances
Fig. 15 Minimum clearances
for fireplace installation. Recommended clearances must be maintained between stove and
the surrounding combustible components.
• Side of the stove and the right and left walls
• Side of the stove and the decorative side trim on
the fireplace face
• Top of the stove and the mantel
In addition, both Fireplace Adaptor and Fireplace Insert
installations have special floor protection requirements
that are addressed in the section on Floor Protection.
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11
Dutchwest
Designing a Safe Installation
Clearance Chart Reference Diagrams
The section that follows contains charts with the information that you’ll need to make your installation safe.
Included are a chart to tell you exactly where to cut the
hole in the ceiling so that the stove will meet clearance
requirements, a chart that gives stove clearances for
all installations, and a chart to illustrate the required
sizes of wall shields for various installations.
Refer to the diagrams below when using the Stove
and Chimney Connector Clearance Chart which follows. For example, the letter “A” gives the minimum
side clearance for installations in which the stove is not
equipped with a rear heat shield and the wall beside
the stove is not protected. “D” gives the minimum side
clearance when the stove does not have a rear heat
shield, but the wall is protected.
Refer to these charts as you plan the installation and do
not compromise on any of the dimensions listed.
Measure clearance distances from the top plate of the
stove or chimney connector to the wall, not the wall
protector.
Unprotected Surfaces
Parallel Installations
Protected Surfaces
Corner Installations
C
B
Parallel Installations
Corner Installations
F
E
A
D
C
F
Installations with no stove heat shields
H
J
G
N/A
N/A
I
Rear exit, rear heat shield installations
L
M
P
O
K
N
M
P
ST255a
Top exit, rear heat shield and chimney connector heat shields or double wall connector
12
ST255a
exit diagram
6/30/00 djt
7001135
Dutchwest
Stove and Chimney Connector Clearance Charts
Model 2460 Small Convection, and Model 2461 Large Convection:
UNPROTECTED SURFACES
Parallel Installations
Stove Clearance
Side
PROTECTED SURFACES
Corner
Installations
Rear
Parallel Installations
Corner
Side
Corner
Installations
Rear
Corner
No heat shields
[A] 22” (560 mm) [B] 24” (610 mm)
[C] 18” (460 mm)
[D] 12” (300 mm)
[E] 14” (360 mm) [F] 10” (250 mm)
Rear exit, rear h.s.
[G] 22” (560 mm) [H] 14” (360 mm)
N/A
[I] 12” (300 mm)
[J] 12” (300 mm)
Top exit1, rear h.s.
Single-wall connector
No connector h.s.
[K] 22” (560 mm) [L] 24” (610 mm)
[M] 18” (460 mm)
[N] 12” (300 mm) [O] 14” (360 mm) [P] 10” (250 mm)
[K] 22” (560 mm) [L] 14” (360 mm)
[M] 15” (380 mm)
[N] 12”(300 mm)
[K] 22” (560 mm) [L] 19” (480 mm)
[M] 15” (380 mm)
[N] 12” (300 mm [O] 11” (280 mm) [P] 8” (200 mm)
Top exit1,2 , rear h.s.
Single-wall connector with connector h.s.
Top exit1 , rear h.s.
Double-wall connector
N/A
[O] 12” (360 mm) [P] 8” (200 mm)
Chimney Connector Clearance:
Single-wall connector
No connector h.s
19” 480 mm)
9” (230 mm)
Single-wall2 connector
With connector h.s.
9” (360 mm)
7” (180 mm)
Double-wall connector
14” (360 mm)
6” (150 mm)
Front Clearance to Combustibles:
48” (1220 mm) (All Installations)
Model 2462 Extra-Large Convection:
UNPROTECTED SURFACES
Corner
Installations
Parallel Installations
Stove Clearance
Side
PROTECTED SURFACES
Rear
Parallel Installations
Corner
Side
Rear
Corner
Installations
Corner
No heat shields
[A] 20” (510 mm) [B] 23” (580 mm)
[C] 18” (460 mm)
Rear exit, rear h.s.
[G] 20” (510 mm) [H] 18” (460 mm)
N/A
Top exit1, rear h.s.
Single-wall connector
No connector h.s.
[K] 20” (510 mm) [L] 23” (580 mm)
[M] 18” (460 mm) [N] 18” (460 mm) [O] 18” (460 mm) [P] 17” (430 mm)
[K] 20” (510 mm) [L] 18” (460 mm)
[M] 17” (430 mm) [N] 18” (460 mm) [O] 12” (300 mm) [P] 15” (380 mm)
[K] 20” (510 mm) [L] 14” (360 mm)
[M] 16” (410 mm) [N] 18” (460 mm) [O] 12” (300 mm) [P] 15” (380 mm)
Top exit1,2 , rear h.s.
Single-wall connector with connector h.s.
Top exit1 , rear h.s.
Double-wall connector
[D] 18” (460 mm) [E] 18” (460 mm) [F] 17” (430 mm)
[I] 18” (460 mm)
[J] 12” (300 mm)
N/A
Chimney Connector Clearance:
Single-wall connector
No connector h.s
18” (460 mm)
13” (330 mm)
Single-wall2 connector
With connector h.s.
13” (330 mm)
7” (180 mm)3,4
Double-wall connector
8” (200 mm)
6” (150 mm)
Front Clearance to Combustibles:
48” (1220 mm) (All Installations)
1 Shielding for a top exit stove must include a shield insert to protect the area behind the flue collar.
2 Chimney connector heat shields must extend exactly 24” (610 mm) above the flue collar of the stove.
3 All installations venting straight up to a factory built chimney require a 24” (610 mm) diameter or square ceiling heat shield. The ceiling
heat shield should be 24 gauge sheet metal or equivalent mounted on 1” (25 mm) non-combustible spacers 1” (25 mm) below ceiling.
4 Chimney connector heat shields must extend to within 1” (25 mm) or less of the ceiling heat shield for installations venting straight up to
a factory-built chimney. In top exit installations using an elbow to vent to the rear, the chimney connector must be shielded over the entire
vertical length.
5 If a single-wall oval-to-round adaptor is used, a shield must be used to protect combustibles to the rear of the adaptor.
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13
Dutchwest
Distance from Center of Flue Collar to Wall in Top-Exit Installations
Dutchwest Convection Heaters equipped with rear heat shields
NOTE: These are not clearance distances. These measurements indicate where the centerline of the flue collar will be for
various installations. Measurements are from the centerline of the flue collar to the wall, not the wall protector.
A
B
D
C
E
F
ST427
UNPROTECTED SURFACES
Chimney Connector
ST427
Corner
dutchwest Installations
Parallel Installations
flue centerline
Side
Rear
Corner
6/30/00 djt
PROTECTED SURFACES
Parallel Installations
Side
Rear
Corner
Installations
Corner
MODEL 2460 (Small Convection)
Listed, Approved
Double-wall
[A] 33” (840 mm)
[B] 18” (460 mm)
[C] 25” (640 mm)
[D] 23” (580 mm)
[E] 10” (250 mm)
Single Wall, with
Connector Heat Shields [A] 33” (840 mm)
[B] 13” (330 mm)
[C] 22” (560 mm)
[D] 23” (580 mm)
[E] 11” (580 mm) [F] 15” (380 mm)
Single Wall, without
Connector Heat Shields [A] 33” (840 mm)
[B] 23” (580 mm)
[C] 25” (640 mm)
[D] 23” (580 mm)
[E] 13” (330 mm) [F] 17” (430 mm)
[F] 15” (380mm)
MODEL 2461 (Large Convection)
Listed, Approved
Double-wall
[A] 35” (890 mm)
[B] 18” (460 mm)
[C] 27” (690 mm)
[D] 25” (640 mm)
[E] 10” (250 mm) [F] 17” (430 mm)
Single Wall, with
Connector Heat Shields [A] 35” (890 mm)
[B] 13” (330 mm)
[C] 24” (610 mm)
[D] 25” (640 mm)
[E] 11” (280 mm) [F] 17” (430 mm)
Single Wall, without
Connector Heat Shields [A] 35” (890 mm)
[B] 23” (580 mm)
[C] 27” (690 mm)
[D] 25” (640 mm)
[E] 13” (330 mm) [F] 19” (480 mm)
MODEL 2462 (Extra-Large Convection)
Listed Approved
Double-Wall
[A] 35” (890 mm)
[B] 13” (330 mm)
[C] 26” (660 mm)
[D] 33” (660 mm)
[E] 11” (280 mm) [F] 25” (640 mm)
Single Wall, with
Heat Shields
[A] 35” (890 mm)
[B] 17” (430 mm)
[C] 29” (740 mm)
[D] 33” (840 mm)
[E] 11” (280 mm) [F] 25” (640 mm)
Single Wall, without
Heat Shields
[A] 35” (890 mm)
[B] 22” (560 mm)
[C] 33” (840 mm)
[D] 33” (840 mm)
[E] 17” (430 mm) [F] 27” (690 mm)
14
7001135
Dutchwest
Wall Heat Shield Dimensions
DutchWest Convection Heaters, Models #2460 (Small), #2461 (Large), and #2462 (Extra Large)
60”
(1525mm)
Top Exit
48”
(1220mm)
48”
(1220mm)
Rear Exit
ST428
36” (910mm)
Centered Behind Stove
Spaced 1”
(25mm)
from Floor
Spaced 1”
(25mm)
from Floor
60” (1525mm)
ST429
Fig. 17 Sidewall protection.
Fig. 16 Rear wall protection.
ST428
rear wall protection
7/00
ST429
sidewall protection
7/00
Wall Shields
Meet at
Corner
60”
(1525mm)
48”
(1220mm)
Spaced 1”
(25mm)
from Floor
ST430
Fig. 18 Corner wall protection.
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ST430
corner wall protection
7/00
15
Dutchwest
Assembly
Your convection heater requires some assembly.
Follow the directions carefully and refer to the parts
diagram at the back of this manual.
CAUTION: The Dutchwest Convection Heater is very
heavy. To prevent personal injury or damage, either to
the stove or your home, have two or more people to
help move it.
Unpack the Parts
Remove all loose parts from the firebox and the ash
pan. Check to make sure all the parts are included and
intact. You should have received:
• 1 fully assembled heater body, (with catalytic burner
installed at the factory)
• 4 legs
• 1 ash pan
• 1 probe thermometer
• 1 ceramic handle assembly
• 1 strip of Interam™ gasket (for the catalytic burner)
• 1 hardware bag, containing the following parts:
• (3) #10 x 1/2” sheet metal screws, (to attach the
chimney connector to the flue collar)
• (1) 1/8” Allen wrench, (to tighten the door latch)
• (1) 5/32” Allen wrench, (to tighten the damper
handle)
• (4) washers, (used with the leg bolts to attach legs
to the stove)
• (1) door handle insert holder for storing the ceramic handle assembly when it is not in use.
The four hex-head leg bolts have been installed in the
appropriate holes in the bottom of the stove.
If any parts are missing or damaged, immediately notify
your Dutchwest dealer for replacements. Do not install
your stove without having all necessary parts or by using damaged parts.
* A Bottom Heat Shield is required in many installations. Refer to the floor protection information
found in the Installation Section of this manual.
Left Leg
Door
Handle
Holder
Heat
Shield
Bracket
Hex Head Bolt
& Washer
ST431
Fig. 19 To attach the legs, remove the bolts from the stove
bottom and reassemble with the handle holder, heat shield
brackets (if necessary) and washers.
door handle insert holder on the bolt for the left rear
ST43119)
or either front leg. (Fig.
dutchwest
3. Slide the leg into position
around the bolt and fasten
attach legs
7/5/00
it finger-tight. Repeat
thisdjtprocess for all four (4)
legs.
4. Fasten, finger-tight, the bottom heat shield to the
brackets using the four (4) 1/4-20 x 1/2” bolts with
nuts.
IMPORTANT: For heat shields with one side painted,
the unpainted, reflective side should always face the
stove to properly reflect the heat and fulfill its protective function.
5. Adjust the bracket’s position on each leg as needed
until the shield fits. (Fig. 20)
6. Use a 7/16” wrench to tighten the shield securely to
the brackets and leg bolts securely to the stove.
7. Carefully raise the stove onto its legs.
Attach the Legs and Bottom Heat Shield
NOTE: If heat shields are not properly installed and
maintained, a house fire may result. For safety, follow
these instructions. Contact local building officials about
restrictions and installation inspection requirements in
your area.
1. Place the stove on its back. Tilt it carefully, it is
heavy. Use 4 x 4 blocking to make it easier to tilt the
stove. Protect surrounding flooring.
2. The tops of the legs are slotted. Remove each leg
bolt from the bottom of the stove and then replace it
with a heat shield bracket and a washer. Place the
Bottom Heat Shield
ST912
Fig. 20 Bottom heat shield in place on bottom of stove.
16
7001135
Dutchwest
Operation
Heater Controls and Features
Air Controls
The Dutchwest Convection Heater has two air controls
that regulate the amount of air drawn into the stove.
Generally, more air entering the stove allows the fire
to burn hotter and faster, while less air decreases heat
output while prolonging the overall burn time.
The Primary Air control lever is located at the lower
front edge of the left side (looking from the front of the
stove). (Fig. 21) The lever operates the two air inlet
shutters which are on the front of the stove. Opening
the inlet shutters provides air for primary combustion.
Air Inlet
Shutter
Pull Control
Lever Forward
to Open Air
Shutters
Damper
Secondary
Air Inlet
ST433
Side Loading
Door
Fig. 22 Opening the primary air supply.
ST433
Dutchwest
primary air
8/28/00 djt
Primary
Air Control
Lever
Front
Loading Door
ST432
Fig. 21 The heater controls.
To open the shutters, turn the lever counterclockwise.
The shutters are all the way open when the lever points
toward the front at a ”4:30” position.
(Fig. 22) To close
ST432
the shutters, turn the lever clockwise.
The shutters are
Dutchwest
fully closed when the lever points straight down. (Fig.
heat control
23)
8/28/00
The secondary air inlet, over the
side door,djt
admits air
to the catalytic combustor only, for high efficiency at
high combustor temperatures. Use a gloved hand or the
metal tip of the door handle to adjust this inlet. Opening
or closing this inlet will not strengthen the fire; generally
this inlet should be about one turn open for low fires,
and 1¹⁄₂ to 2 turns for medium and high fires.
7001135
ST434
Fig. 23 Closing the primary air supply.
ST434
Dutchwest
heat control
close
8/28/00 djt
17
Dutchwest
Damper Function
Burn Only High-Quality Fuel
The Damper is operated by moving the handle on
the upper left side of the stove. (Fig. 24) It has two
positions: OPEN, to start the fire and load fuel, and
CLOSED, for greatest efficiency and heat. When the
damper is closed, exhaust gases pass through an insulated catalytic burner before flowing into the chimney.
Your heater is designed to burn natural wood only. Do
not burn other fuels. Never burn pressure-treated wood,
painted or stained wood, or glossy newsprint.
Use the door insert handle to rotate the damper handle.
Turn it counterclockwise to open the damper and clockwise to close it. You will feel resistance as the damper
mechanism engages into the open (counterclockwise)
position.
The stove damper must be open when you start a fire,
load fuel, or before you open either door for any reason.
Load Doors
A Side Loading Door allows the easiest loading of
wood logs. The Front Door opens for adding an occasional log to the fire. Always be sure to open the stove
damper before opening either door.
Successful Wood Burning
Woodburning is often said to be more of an art than a
science. You’ll easily master the art if you start by using
good, dry fuel and by understanding how the stove’s air
supply system operates.
High efficiencies and low emissions are possible when
burning air-dried, seasoned woods as compared to softwoods or freshly cut hardwoods. Avoid burning “green”
wood that has not been properly seasoned.
The best hardwood fuels include oak, maple, beech,
ash, and hickory that has been split, stacked, and
air-dried outside under cover for at least one year. If
hardwood is not available, tamarack, yellow pine, white
pine, Eastern red cedar, fir, and redwood are softwoods
that are commonly burned. They too should be properly dried. The length of the wood should be the same
as that specified for your particular stove. Avoid using
wood that has been dried more than two years. Often
gray in color, this wood burns very quickly, resulting in
short burn time and diminished stove performance. If
you must burn it, mix it in with greener wood to slow the
burn.
Store your firewood under cover to keep it dry. Even for
short-term storage, keep wood a safe distance from the
heater and keep it clear of the areas around the heater
used for refueling and ash removal.
Closed
Open
Door Insert Handle
ST435
ST435
dutchwest
damper open
7/6/00 djt
Fig. 24 Damper operating positions.
18
ST436
ST436
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damper closed
7/6/00 djt
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Dutchwest
Use the Air Control Settings
that Work Best for You
Primary Air
Catalyst Air
No single combination of control settings will fit every
situation. Each installation will differ depending on the
quality of the fuel, the amount of heat desired, and how
long you wish the fire to burn.
Control settings also depend on your particular installation’s “draft,” or the force that moves air from the
stove up through the chimney. Draft is affected by such
things as the height, type, and location of the chimney,
local geography, nearby obstructions, and other factors.
Too much draft may cause excessive temperatures in
the stove. On the other hand, too little draft can cause
backpuffing into the room and/or the “plugging” of the
chimney and catalytic burner.
How do you know if your draft is excessively high or
low? Symptoms of too much draft include an uncontrollable burn or a glowing-red part of the stove or chimney
connector. A sign of inadequate draft is smoke leaking
into the room through the stove or chimney connector
joints.
When first using the stove, keep a record of the results
you achieve from different control settings. You will
find that specific control settings will give you a fixed
amount of heat. It may take a week or two to determine
the amount of heat and the length of burn you should
expect from various control settings.
Notice that the probe thermometer on the stove top tells
you the temperature of the catalytic burner only; it does
not tell you how hot the firebox is. Normal range for the
catalyst is 600 to 1400˚ F (315 to 760˚C ). The catalyst
temperatures are very intense (far more intense than
any other part of the stove) but they are also very localized.
You should put a magnetic surface thermometer on the
side door. This is the only single-thickness area of the
firebox, and it’s a handy location since you’ll use the
side door more than any other.
The normal range of firebox temperatures is 400 to
650˚ F (190 to 330˚ C). Temperatures below this range
can encourage creosote formation in the stovepipe and
chimney; higher temperatures can cause stove parts to
burn out prematurely. Always operate the stove according to firebox temperatures. Besides the air control, you
can manage the stove’s heat output and burn time by
how much wood you load at at a time.
7001135
Low
1/2 turn open
Medium 1¹⁄₂ turn open
High
High
1¹⁄₂ to 2 turns open
Med.
Closed Low
Position of primary air control
lever for different burn rates.
Number of turns the air control
is open for different burn rates.
Fig. 25 Primary and Catalyst air settings.
Notice that changes in the weather have a strong effect
on chimney draft. Higher outdoor temperatures and
lower air pressure both weaken draft; lower temperatures and higher air pressure encourage a stronger
draft. An exception to this is in installations with outdoor
chimneys; since these lose heat to the outdoors, it
takes longer to warm them up initally, and it takes more
heat to keep them warm, especially during very low
temperatures outdoors.
Most installations do not require a large amount of
combustion air, especially if adequate draft is available.
Do not attempt to increase the firing rate of your heater
by altering the air control adjustment range outlined in
these directions.
In some newer homes that are well insulated and
weather-tight, poor draft may result from insufficient
air in the house. In such instances, an open window
near the stove on the windward side of the house (side
against which the wind is blowing) will provide the fresh
air needed.
Use the air control settings indicated in Figure 24 as
a starting point to help determine the best settings for
your installation.
DO NOT OPERATE THE STOVE WITH THE ASH
DOOR OPEN. OPERATION WITH THE ASH DOOR
OPEN CAN CAUSE AN OVERFIRING CONDITION
TO OCCUR. OVERFIRING THE STOVE IS DANGEROUS AND CAN RESULT IN PROPERTY DAMAGE,
INJURY, OR LOSS OF LIFE.
19
Dutchwest
How to Build and Maintain a Wood Fire
Loading Wood
Your Dutchwest Convection Heater accepts wood from
both the front and side. Front loading is useful for kindling a new fire and adding an occasional log, however,
we recommend side loading as most convenient when
adding several logs at a time. Always be certain that
the stove damper is open before opening either door.
WARNING: OPERATE YOUR DUTCHWEST CONVECTION HEATER ONLY WITH THE DOORS FULLY
CLOSED EXCEPT WHEN REFUELING.
THIS STOVE IS HOT WHILE IN OPERATION! KEEP
CHILDREN, CLOTHING, AND FURNITURE AWAY.
CONTACT MAY CAUSE SKIN BURNS.
Break-in Fires
If your stove is new or has new cast iron replacement
parts, “season” the new cast iron with a few break-in
fires. Follow Steps 1-3 below. Then let the fire burn
out. Do not close the damper. Maintain a small, but not
smoky, fire by adjusting the primary air control. After
the break-in fires, continue with Step 4.
The stove’s paint and cement will emit a slight odor
as these materials cure during the first few fires. You
may wish to provide extra ventilation near the stove by
partially opening a door or window when the odor is
present.
Lighting the Fire
Step 1. Open the stove damper. Fully open the primary air control and close the secondary (catalyst) air
control.
Step 2. Lay some crumpled newspapers in the stove.
Place six or eight finger-width size pieces of dry kindling
on the paper. On the kindling, lay two or three larger
sticks of split dry wood approximately 1-2” (25-50 mm)
thick.
DO NOT USE CHEMICALS OR FLUIDS TO START
THE FIRE. DO NOT BURN GARBAGE OR FLAMMABLE FLUIDS SUCH AS GASOLINE, NAPTHA, OR
ENGINE OIL.
NOTE: An especially large, outdoor, or cold chimney
may need to be “primed,” or warmed up, before it will
draw sufficiently to start a fire. If this is the case, roll up
a couple pieces of newspaper, place them on top of the
kindling and toward the back of the stove, light them,
and close the doors. This should heat the chimney
enough to initiate a draft.
Once the draft is established, open the front door and
light the rest of the fuel from the bottom. Do not light
the main bed of fuel until the chimney begins drawing.
Repeat the procedure as often as necessary if the initial
attempt is unsuccessful.
Step 4. After a lively fire has been established, (approx. 30 minutes) close the stove damper.
Step 5. Close the primary air control to a medium low
setting. The fire volume will diminish immediately, but
the stove will continue to warm up. Maintain control of
the fire using the primary air control. Reduce the setting
for a smaller fire, increase the setting for a hotter, more
intense fire. Refer back to the air control settings chart
on pages19.
Step 6. Open the catalyst air control. Refer back to the
air control settings chart on page 19.
DO NOT OVERFIRE THIS HEATER. Overfiring may
cause a house fire, or can result in permanent damage
to the stove. If a part of the stove or the chimney connector glows, you are overfiring.
Reloading and Reviving the Fire
Open the stove damper and wait at least thirty seconds
for the draft to increase. Open the door slowly and add
the fuel. Split firewood will fill the firebox more completely than will unsplit wood and will thereby reduce
the frequency of reloading.
You may find that the fire intensity will decrease after
reloading, particularly if the loading door is open a
long time. Stimulate the fire by increasing the primary
air supply and leave the stove damper open. Then as
soon as the fire is reestablished, close the damper and
reduce the air supply to prevent over-firing.
Also, never use gasoline-type lantern fuel, kerosene,
charcoal lighter fluid, or similar liquids to start or “freshen up” a fire in this heater. Keep all such liquids well
away from the heater while it is in use.
Step 3. Light the newspaper and close the door. The
fire should be well-established within 10-15 minutes.
You may gradually build it up by adding a few sticks at
a time of a progressively larger size. Continue to build
the fire until a live coal bed begins to form.
20
7001135
Dutchwest
Further suggestions...
Safe Ash Handling
* If the charcoal bed is relatively thick and your fuel is
well-seasoned, it is possible to add fresh fuel (smaller
pieces first), close the door and damper, and reset the
air control within five minutes.
* When refueling, avoid breaking the charcoal bed into
small pieces. Large pieces of charcoal help the fire
recover quickly.
* The glass will remain cleaner if refueling is done
when the previous load of fuel has burned down to hot,
glowing coals. Use a crumpled piece of dry newspaper
to wipe fly ash buildup off of the glass. Do not use liquid
cleaning agents of any type on hot glass.
Remove Ashes Frequently
Ash may contain hot coals and must be treated with
extreme care. Ashes should be placed outdoors in a
metal container with a tight-fitting lid. The closed container of ashes should be placed on a noncombustible
floor or on the ground, well away from all combustible
materials, pending final disposal. If the ashes are disposed of by burial in soil or otherwise locally dispersed,
keep them in the closed container until all cinders have
thoroughly cooled. Wood ash may be used as a garden fertilizer.
CAUTION: Never use a vacuum cleaner to remove
ash from the stove; always remove and dispose of the
ashes properly.
Wear heavy stove gloves when removing ashes. Check
the ash compartment before reloading the stove. If the
ashes are close to the top, empty the pan. Before replacing the ash pan, clear away any ash that has spilled
over the sides and back of the ash pan.
Empty the ash drawer regularly - typically every one to
three days. The frequency will vary depending on how
hot you run your stove: the hotter the fire, the more
wood you burn, and the faster ash will accumulate.
ST438
ST438
ash pail
7/6/00 djt
ST437
Fig. 26 Hot ashes can be dangerous and must be stored
outdoors on a noncombustible surface in a metal container
with a tight-fitting lid.
ST432
Dutchwest
heat control
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21
Dutchwest
Maintenance
Keep Your Stove Looking New
and Working Its Best
Small Locking Nut
Care of the Cast Iron Surface
Striker
Screw
An occasional dusting with a dry rag will keep the
painted cast iron of your Dutchwest Convection Heater
looking new.
If the paint needs retouching, allow the stove to cool
completely. Wire-brush areas needing to be painted.
Remove non-painted components such as air controls
or cover them with masking tape. Touch up the stove
with high temperature stove paint available from your
local dealer. Apply the paint sparingly. Two light coats
are better than one heavy one.
Cleaning the Glass
Door
Pawl
Large Locking Nut
Set Screw
ST439
Fig. 27 Door latch adjustment.
You will find that most of the carbon deposits on the
glass will burn off regularly during hot fires. You can
wipe fly ash from the glass when hot using a crumpled
piece of dry newspaper. Never use liquid cleaning
agents on hot glass. If you wish to clean the glass
more thoroughly, follow this procedure:
ST439
dutchwest
door latch
7/6/00 djt
Remove the old
gasket by pulling
gently, but firmly.
• Be sure the glass is completely cool.
• Use a glass cleaner especially made for this purpose.
• Dry the glass completely.
Adjust the Door Latch
The door latches must close tightly to ensure a good
seal between the each door and the stove plates. With
time and use, the door latches will require periodic
adjustment. Follow this procedure: (Fig. 27)
1. Loosen the small locking nut with an open end
wrench.
2. Use the allen wrench (included with the stove) to
turn the striker screw clockwise one quarter-turn
and close the door to test the engagement. The
door latch should engage tightly when closed. Make
further adjustments in small increments.
3. When the striker screw is properly adjusted, tighten
the small locking nut against the pawl without allowing the striker screw to turn.
ST440
Fig. 28 Door gasket.
Test And Repair the Door Gaskets
ST440
dutchwest
door gasket
7/7/00 djt
Air leaks can be caused by low spots in the door gaskets. To locate such low spots, close each door on a
slip of paper and attempt to pull the paper free. If the
paper slips out without tearing, the gasket isn’t snug
enough at that spot.
If the seal cannot be improved by adjusting the door
latch, try shimming the gasket. Pack a small quantity of
cement or a smaller diameter gasket into the channel
beneath the gasket to lift the main gasket and thereby
improve its contact with the door frame.
If shimming does not improve the seal, replace the
gasket following these steps:
1. Remove the original gasket by grasping an end and
pulling firmly.
2. Wearing safety goggles, use a wire brush or the tip
of a screwdriver to clean the channel of any remaining cement or bits of gasket.
22
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Dutchwest
3. Apply a thin bead of stove cement in the newlycleaned groove.
4. Lay the gasket into the groove. Wait until you are a
couple inches from the end before you cut it.
5. Test the gasket by closing the door on a slip of paper
as described above. Adjust the gasket in any areas
where an inadequate seal is evident.
All rope-type gasketing used in the Dutchwest Convection Heater is made of fiberglass. The gasketing is
7/16” diameter for front and side doors and the ash
door and 3/8” for the top plate. 1/4” gasketing is used
behind the glass.
Adjusting Bolt
Front of
Stove
Lock Nut
Damper Rod
Anchor Bolt
Repair Missing Cement in Seams
The cement in the stove seams may deteriorate over
time and fall out in places. Just as with the stove doors,
it is necessary to keep the seam seals in good condition. Spot-fix with furnace cement (available from your
local dealer) any areas where the cement seal is visibly
deteriorated. Allow 24 hours for the new cement to dry
after “washing down” seams.
Avoid Damaging the Glass Door Panel
Do not abuse the glass by slamming the door or striking the glass with a log. Never operate your stove if it
has damaged or broken glass. If you need to replace
the glass, use only replacement glass provided by your
local Dutchwest dealer.
Damper Adjustment
With time, you may need to adjust the damper linkage to ensure that the damper plate seals tightly when
closed. Test the damper when the stove is cold. When
turned into the closed position, the damper should be
feel “snug” but not too tight. It will become a little tighter
as the stove heats up. Use a 7/16” socket wrench with
socket extension to adjust the linkage:
1. In an alternating pattern, first loosen and then remove the four bolts that secure the top plate to the
sides of the stove.
2. Open the damper.
3. Loosen the adjusting bolt’s lock nut. (Fig. 29)
4. Loosen the anchor bolt’s lock nut, located on the
underside of the damper.
5. Loosen the anchor bolt a turn or two.
6. Tighten the adjusting bolt.
7. Test the damper. Make further adjustments if necessary.
8. When final adjustment has been made, tighten the
adjusting bolt lock nut, the anchor bolt, and the anchor bolt lock nut.
ST441
Fig. 29 Damper adjustment.
Primary Air Control Adjustment
ST441
A simple spring-loaded tab maintains tension on the
primary air controldamper
lever. Therod
air control should be loose
enough for you to7/7/00
easily set djt
its position by hand, but
also snug enough to remain in that position until you
change it.
Over time, the air control may tighten or loosen. To
adjust the tension on the control, let the stove cool to
room temperature. Open the side-loading door and look
in toward the inner side of the front panel of the stove.
(Fig. 30) Locate the lower hex head bolt (A) on the
primary air manifold, just inside the door. Remove the
bolt with a open end or box end wrench to gain access
to the adjustment screw (B) inside the manifold. Insert
a Phillips screwdriver into that hole and turn the screw
clockwise to increase tension, counterclockwise to decrease tension. Make adjustments in small increments
and test the operation. Replace the hex head bolt when
you are done.
Note that the mechanism may tighten slightly as the
stove heats up. Your adjustment should leave the air
control snug, but not overly tight.
Air Manifold
Air Control
A
B
ST442
Fig. 30 Primary air control adjustment.
23
7001135
ST442
air control adjustment
Dutchwest
Cleaning the Chimney System
The chimney system is composed of the chimney and
the pipe that connects the stove to the chimney. Inspect
the chimney and chimney connector at least twice
monthly, and clean if necessary.
When you first begin using the stove, check daily for
creosote — a substance that can look like either thick
tar or black, crisp flakes. Experience will show how
often you need to clean to be safe. The frequency
may even vary during the year. In the colder months
when the hottest fires producing the least creosote are
burned, you may need to clean only every couple of
months. During the warmer months when creosote is
more likely to result from cooler-burning fires, weekly
cleaning may be necessary.
At the very least, inspect the chimney connector and
chimney at least once every two months during the
heating season to determine if a buildup of creosote
or soot has occurred. If a significant layer of creosote
has accumulated (1/8” [3 mm] or more), or if soot has
accumulated, either should be removed to reduce the
risk of a chimney fire. Failure to keep the chimney and
connector system clean can result in a serious chimney
fire.
The conditions for a chimney fire develop as follows:
When wood is burned slowly, it produces tar and other
organic vapors which combine with expelled moisture
to form creosote. The creosote vapors condense in
the relatively cool chimney flue of a slow-burning fire.
As a result, creosote residue accumulates on the flue
lining. Creosote is flammable and, when ignited, makes
an extremely hot fire within the flue system which can
damage the chimney and overheat adjacent combustible material.
To reduce the amount of creosote that may form, remember to provide adequate air for combustion and to
strive for small, intense fires rather than large, smoldering ones.
You can never be too safe. Contact your local fire
authority for information on what to do in the event of
a chimney fire, and have a clearly understood plan on
how to handle one.
Inspect Regularly, Clean as Required
Inspect the chimney and chimney connector twice
monthly and clean if necessary. Let the stove cool
completely before you inspect the chimney. Use a flashlight and mirror to sight up the flue through the chimney
clean-out door or chimney connector inspection tee. If
no inspection access is available, disconnect the pipe
from the stove.
24
Clean the chimney using a specially designed chimney
cleaning brush, the same size and shape as the flue
liner, attached to flexible fiberglass rods designed for
this purpose. Run the brush up and down the liner
so that any deposits fall to the bottom of the chimney
where they can be removed through the clean-out door.
Clean the chimney connector by disconnecting the sections, taking them outside, and removing any deposits
with a stiff wire brush. You can use a chimney brush of
correct size to clean chimney connector pipe. Reinstall
the connector sections after cleaning, being sure to
secure the individual sections with three sheet metal
screws per section.
If you are unable to inspect and/or clean the chimney
system yourself, contact your local Dutchwest dealer or
hire a qualified chimney sweep in your area to do the
job.
Maintenance Schedule
THE STOVE:
DAILY:
• Ashes should be removed before they reach the top
of the ash pan. Check accumulation at least once a
day.
• Keep the area around the stove clear of any combustible materials such as wood, furniture or clothing.
TWO MONTHS:
• Check door handle to be sure it is working properly.
Gasketing becomes compressed after a period of
time. Adjust handle tightness if necessary.
• Check leg bolts and heat shield screws; tighten if
necessary.
Annual Spring Cleaning
• Check gasketing for wear, and replace if necessary.
• Remove ashes from the ash pan and replace with a
moisture absorbing material (such as kitty litter) to
keep the interior of the stove dry.
• Inspect and clean the refractory package and catalyst.
• Clean the dust from the inner sides of bottom, rear or
pipe heat shields if your stove is equipped with them.
Clean surfaces are better heat reflectors than dirty
surfaces.
• Touch up the black paint.
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Dutchwest
The Chimney Connector
TWO WEEKS:
• Inspect the chimney connector and chimney. Clean if
necessary.
TWO MONTHS:
• Inspect the chimney and chimney connector. Pay
particular attention to the horizontal runs of chimney connector, and the elbows. Clean the system if
necessary.
Yearly Spring Cleaning
• Disassemble the chimney connector and take it
outdoors for inspection and cleaning. Replace weak
sections of connector.
• Inspect the chimney for signs of deterioration. Repairs to a masonry chimney should be made by a
professional mason. Replace damaged sections of
prefabricated chimney. Your local Dutchwest dealer
or a chimney sweep can help determine when replacement is necessary.
• Thoroughly clean the chimney.
Care of the Catalytic Combustor
This wood heater contains a catalytic combustor, which
needs regular inspection and periodic replacement for
proper operation. It is against the law in the United
States to operate this wood heater in a manner inconsistent with operating instructions in this manual, or if
the catalytic element is deactivated or removed.
Under normal operating conditions, the catalytic combustor should remain active for two to six years (depending on the amount of wood burned). However, it
is important to monitor the combustor periodically to
ensure that it is functioning properly, as well as to determine when it needs to be replaced. A non-functioning
combustor will result in a loss of heating efficiency, and
an increase in creosote and emissions.
The combustor should be visually inspected “in place”
for fly ash accumulation and physical damage three
times per year. Actual removal of the combustor is not
recommended unless a more detailed inspection is warranted because of diminished performance as outlined
below.
When to Suspect A Combustor Problem
There are two ways to evaluate the performance of
your stove’s combustor.
The first is to monitor the temperatures on the probe
thermometer. A properly-functioning combustor should
operate in the range of 800-12000F. (430-650°C.).
Combustor temperatures consistently less than 8000F.
(430°C.) merit a closer examination of the combustor.
The second performance test is to observe the amount
of smoke leaving the chimney — both when the combustor has achieved “light-off” and when it has not.
Follow this simple two-step procedure:
• With a fire in the stove and the combustor properly
activated by the closing of the stove damper to route
smoke through it as described in the Operation Section,
go outside and observe the smoke leaving the chimney.
• Then, open the stove damper and once again observe the smoke leaving the chimney.
Significantly more smoke should be observed after the
second step when the stove damper is open and exhaust is not routed through the combustor. Be careful
not to confuse smoke with steam from wet wood. Unlike
smoke, steam disappears very quickly in air.
If either of these tests indicates a problem, consider
other possible factors as well.
Assess Your Present Operating Conditions
In Spring or Fall, draft strength is less than in the middle
of winter, and a related change in stove performance
may result. Small hot fires are a good solution to sluggish performance under these conditions.
Burning “green” (insufficiently seasoned) wood will result in poorer performance than when burning properly
seasoned fuel. Was your fuel supply good and dry to
start with, or has it changed? You may have to run your
stove hotter (more air) to achieve good performance if
you are burning green or wet wood. Also, any changes
in operating routine should be considered at this time
as a possible reason for changed performance.
Once you have ruled out any other possible causes
for a decline in performance, you may proceed with an
inspection of the catalyst.
The refractory package housing the catalytic combustor
should be inspected annually for a build-up of fly ash
and cleaned if necessary. This may be done during
examination of the catalytic combustor.
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25
Dutchwest
Remove and Inspect the Combustor
• Wear safety glasses, a dust mask, and gloves.
• Remove the four bolts that secure the stove top
plate. There are two each on both the left and the
right side, just under the top plate overhang. With
the bolts removed, lift the top.
Remove these bolts
ST443
ST443
top
plate
The combustor is located
beneath
thebolts
removable refractory package.
7/10/00 djt
Fig. 31 Remove four bolts securing stove top plate.
• Carefully remove the refractory package. It is extremely delicate; handle it as little as possible.
Stove
Top
Catalytic
Burner
ST444
Fig. 32 Remove refractory package with care.
ST444
catalytic burner
7/10/00 djt
• For a visual inspection for blockage that can be
performed without removing the combustor, have an
assistant shine a bright flashlight beam up through the
combustor from inside the stove’s firebox.
• If combustor removal is necessary for cleaning or
closer inspection, lift it gently out of its chamber. You
may have to work it back and forth carefully to remove
it. Check the combustor and the bottom of the refractory
chamber for a build-up of fly ash, and remove any ash
by gently blowing air through the combustor. Do not
brush the surface, as this could damage the element.
• Inspect the combustor, referring to the information
in the “Catalytic Combustor Appendix” on Page 27 for
information on what to look for. Although small hairline cracks will not affect performance, the combustor
should be essentially intact. If the combustor is broken
in pieces or has sections missing, it should be replaced.
Call your local Dutchwest dealer for a replacement
combustor, item #CB56. Consult the warranty section
at the back of this manual for further information on
catalytic combustor replacement.
• If the combustor is in good condition and clean, reinstall it. Be sure first to carefully wrap a new Interam
gasket (an extra was provided with your stove) around
its perimeter before replacement. Insert the gasketed
combustor gently back into position, and replace the
refractory package.
• Before replacing the stove top, check the damper. If
the gasket is intact, but the damper isn’t locking tightly,
adjustment should be made. Also check the gasket that
seals the top plate.
• Gasket should be replaced only if damaged or missing. The top plate uses a 3/8” gasket and the damper
is sealed with a 3/8” gasket. The procedure for removing the old gasket and installing the new is the same as
that described for door gaskets on Page 19.
• Replace the stove top, and tighten the four top plate
bolts that secure it. Be sure that the top plate seats
properly before tightening, and tighten the bolts alternately as you would tighten the bolts that secure a car
tire.
Watch for Better Results
Finish up by cleaning the chimney connector. Then,
use the stove in your typical manner for two weeks and
note the stove’s performance, taking special note of the
performance tests described above.
If a problem persists, contact your Dutchwest dealer for
further advice about your particular situation.
26
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Dutchwest
Catalytic Combustor
In any chemical reaction, including the combustion
process, there are certain conditions which must be
met before the reaction can take place. For example, a
reaction may require a certain temperature, or a certain
concentration of the reactants (the combustion gases
and oxygen), or a certain amount of time. Catalysts,
though not changed themselves during the reaction,
have the ability to act at a molecular level to change
these requirements. In the secondary combustion
chamber of the Dutchwest Convection Heaters, the
catalyst reduces the temperature at which secondary
combustion can start from the 1000 - 1200° F. (540
- 650° C) range to the 500 - 600° F. (260 - 315° C)
range, increasing efficiency, and reducing creosote and
emissions.
Though it is advantageous, the catalytic reaction does
have some limitations of its own. Primary among these
is that the reactants (the gases) come into close physical contact with the catalyst itself.
To ensure the necessary contact, the catalytic element
in your Dutchwest Convection Heater is composed
of a ceramic base in the shape of a honeycomb. On
each of the honeycomb’s many surfaces a coating of
the catalyst (usually a noble metal such as platinum or
palladium) is applied. The large surface area exposed
in this configuration ensures that the combustion gases
have the greatest opportunity to come in contact with
the catalyst.
Loss of catalytic activity will be apparent in several
ways. First you may notice an increase in fuel consumption. Second, there will be a visible increase
in the rate at which creosote builds up in your chimney connector system. You may also notice a heavy
discharge of smoke from the chimney. There are a
number of catalytic problems which can cause loss of
activity:
Blockage
While the honeycomb pattern ensures good contact, it
also increases the resistance to flow of the combustion
gases, and, because of the many surfaces, provides
more places for creosote and fly ash to deposit. It is
important to follow the operating instructions in order
to minimize these deposits, and to periodically inspect
your catalyst for signs of blockage.
7001135
Masking and Poisoning
While the catalyst itself does not enter into the combustion process, it is possible for certain elements, such
as lead and sulfur, to attach to the active sites on the
surface of the honeycomb. Though the catalyst is still
there, it is covered, or masked, by the contaminant, and
cannot function. To avoid this situation, it is important
not to burn anything in your Dutchwest Convection
Heater that is a source of these contaminants. Particularly avoid painted or treated wood, coal, household
trash, colored papers, metal foils, or plastics. Chemical
chimney cleaners may also contain harmful elements.
The safest approach is to burn only untreated, natural
wood.
Flame Impingement
The catalytic element is not designed for exposure to
direct flame. If you continually overfire your Dutchwest
Convection Heater, the chemistry of the catalyst coating
may be altered, inhibiting the combustion process.
Thermal degradation of the ceramic base may also occur, causing the element to disintegrate. Stay within the
recommended guidelines of the Operation section.
Mechanical Damage
If the element is mishandled, damage may occur.
Always treat the element carefully. Remember the
catalyst is made of a ceramic material; treat it as you
would fine china. Hairline cracks will not affect the
performance of the catalyst, as long as the steel sleeve
holds the element in the proper position.
Peeling
Peeling of the surface coat may occur if the catalytic
element is frequently subjected to excessive temperatures. Follow the operating instructions carefully to
avoid this type of damage.
Every Dutchwest product is equipped with either a
Corning “Long-Life”® or a Technical Glass Products
“Honeycomb”®. The products are equivalent. If for any
reason you must ship your catalytic element, remember its fragile nature. Place the element in a plastic
bag, and package it with a generous amount of shock
absorbing material.
27
Dutchwest
Draft Management
Your stove is only one part of a system that includes the
chimney, the operator, the fuel, and the home. The other
parts of the system will affect how well the stove works.
When there is a good match between all the parts, the system works well.
Wood stove operation depends on natural (unforced) draft.
Natural draft occurs when exhaust gas is hotter (and therefore lighter) than the outdoor air at the top of the chimney.
The greater the temperature difference, the stronger the
draft. As the hot exhaust gas rises out of the chimney, it
generates suction that draws air into the stove for combustion. A slow, lazy fire when the stove’s air inlets are fully
open indicates a weak draft. A brisk fire, supported only by
air entering the stove through the air inlets, indicates a good
draft. The inlets are passive; they regulate how much air can
enter the stove, but they don’t force air into it.
The efficiency of a modern woodburning appliance, (in which
the amount of air available for combustion is regulated),
depends on the chimney to keep exhaust gases warm all the
way outdoors. The characteristics of your chimney - whether
it is steel or masonry, interior or exterior, matched or mismatched to the stove outlet, - determine how quickly it will
warm up and how well it will sustain the optimum temperatures necessary to maintain strong draft and efficient combustion. Here follows a description of various flue system
characteristics and the related effects on stove performance.
Masonry Chimney
Although masonry is the traditional material used for
chimney construction, it can have distinct performance
disadvantages when used to vent a controlled-combustion
woodstove. Masonry forms an effective ‘heat sink’ - that
is, it absorbs and holds heat for long periods of time. The
large mass, however, may take a long time to become hot
enough to sustain a strong draft. The larger the chimney (in
total mass), the longer it will take to warm up. Cold masonry
will actually cool exhaust gases enough to diminish draft
strength. This problem is worse if the chimney is located
outside the home or if the chimney flue has a cross-sectional
volume much larger than the stove outlet.
Steel Chimney
Most factory-made ‘Class A’ steel chimneys have a layer of
insulation around the inner flue. This insulation keeps the
smoke warm and protects the surrounding structure from the
high flue temperatures. Because the insulation is less dense
than masonry, the inner steel liner warms up more quickly
than a masonry chimney; this makes the steel chimney
support a good draft more quickly than masonry does. Steel
chimneys are not as attractive as masonry, but they are very
durable and generally outperform masonry.
28
Indoor/ Outdoor Location
Because the chimney’s function is to keep the smoke warm,
it is best to locate it inside the house. This location uses the
house as insulation for the flue and allows some radiant
heat release from the flue into the home. Since an interior
chimney doesn’t continuously lose its heat to the outdoors,
less heat from the stove is required to get it warm and keep
it warm.
Flue Sizing
The flue size for a controlled-combustion appliance should
be based on the cross-sectional volume of the stove flue
outlet. In this case, more is definitely not better. Hot gases
lose heat through expansion; if a stove with a six-inch flue
collar (28 square inch area) is vented into a 10” x 10” flue,
the gases will expand to over three times their original volume. As gases cool with expansion, draft strength decreases. If an oversized flue is also outside the house, the heat it
absorbs will be conducted to the outdoor air and the flue will
remain relatively cool.
It is common for a masonry flue to be oversized for the
stove. Such a chimney can take quite a while to warm up
and the stove performance will likely be disappointing. The
best solution to an oversize flue problem is the installation
of an insulated steel chimney liner of the same diameter as
the appliance flue outlet. The liner keeps the exhaust gas
warm and the result is a stronger draft. An uninsulated liner
is a second choice - although the liner will keep the exhaust
restricted to its original volume, the air around the liner will
require time and heat energy to warm up.
Check your local codes. You may be required to install a flue
liner in any oversize or masonry flue.
Pipe & Chimney Layout
Every bend in the flue will act as a brake on the exhaust as
it flows from the firebox to the chimney cap. The ideal pipe
and chimney layout is straight up from the stove through a
completely straight chimney. Use this layout if at all possible
as it will promote optimum stove performance and simplify
maintenance.
If the stovepipe must elbow to enter a chimney, locate the
elbow about midway between the stove top and the chimney
thimble. This configuration lets the smoke speed up before
it must turn, keeps some pipe in the room for heat transfer,
and allows long-term flexibility for installing a different appliance without relocating the thimble.
There should be no more than eight feet of single-wall stove
pipe between the stove and a chimney. Longer runs can
cool the smoke enough to cause draft and creosote problems. Use double-wall stove pipe for longer runs.
7001135
Dutchwest
Single Venting
Backpuffing
Your stove requires a dedicated flue. Do not connect the
stove to a flue used by any other appliance. Chimney draft
is a natural form of energy and follows the path of least
resistance. If the stove is vented to a flue that also serves
an open fireplace or another appliance, the draft will also
pull air in through those avenues. The additional air flow will
lower flue temperatures, reduce draft strength and promote
creosote development; overall stove performance will suffer.
The effect is similar to that of a vacuum cleaner with a hole
in the hose. In some extreme instances, the other appliance
can even impose a negative draft and result in a dangerous
draft reversal.
Backpuffing is a condition that results when the draft is too
weak to pull flue gases out of the chimney system as fast as
the fire generates them. Volatile gases build up within the
firebox until reaching a density and temperature at which
they ignite. With this ignition, you may hear a muffled popping sound and see a bit of smoke forced out of the stove.
This condition is most likely to occur in the Spring or Fall
when moderate outdoor temperatures and low intensity fires
produce weak draft. If your stove back-puffs, open up the
damper to let the smoke rise to the flue more quickly. Also,
open the air inlets to induce a livelier fire and speed airflow
through the stove. Avoid large loads of firewood at one time.
You should always see lively, dancing flames in the firebox;
a lazy, smoky fire is inefficient and will promote draft problems.
Fuel
Even the best stove installation will not perform well with
poor fuel. If available, always use hardwood that has been
air-dried (“seasoned”) 12-18 months. Softwood burns more
rapidly than hardwood and has a high pitch content conducive to creosote production. Decayed wood of any type has
little heat value and should not be used.
All unseasoned (‘green’) wood has a high moisture content.
Much of its heat value will be used to evaporate moisture
before the wood can burn. This significantly reduces not only
the amount of energy available to warm your home, but also
the intensity of the fire and temperature of the exhaust gas.
Incomplete combustion and cool flue temperatures promote
creosote formation and weak draft.
You can judge the moisture content of wood by its appearance and weight or use a commercially available moisture
meter for an exact measurement. Unseasoned wood will be
a third heavier than dry wood. Also, look for cracks (“checking”) in the ends of the log that result from contraction as the
wood dries. The longer and wider the cracks are, the dryer
the wood is.
Purchase your fuel from a reputable dealer.
Creosote
Creosote is a by-product of low-temperature stove operation, weak draft, or both. It is a tar that results when
unburned gases condense inside the flue system at temperatures below 290˚ F. Creosote is volatile and can generate a chimney fire. All of the installation characteristics
that adversely affect chimney draft also promote creosote
condensation. Consequently, you can minimize creosote
accumulation with an effective chimney design and the use
of operational techniques that encourage good draft and
complete combustion.
Inspect your chimney frequently and clean it whenever accumulation is exceeds 1/4”.
7001135
Draft Testing
An easy way to determine whether your chimney draft is
strong enough is to close the stove damper, wait a few
minutes to let the airflow stabilize, and then test whether
you can vary the strength of the fire by swinging the air
control open and closed. Results here are not instant; you
may need to wait a few minutes for a change in the air
control setting to have an effect on the fire. If there is no
change, the draft is not yet strong enough to let you close
the damper. You will need to open it for a while longer and
manage the fire with the air inlet until the draft strengthens.
Keep a record of your operating habits and relate them to
their effects on the stove’s function. You’ll be rewarded with
safe and efficient performance.
Negative Pressure
Good draft also depends on a sufficient supply of air to the
stove. The chimney can’t pull in more air than is available
to it. Sluggish draft can be caused by a house that is tight
enough to prevent the ready flow of air to the stove, or by
competition between the stove and other appliances that
vent indoor air to the outside; i.e., exhaust fans for range
hoods, clothes dryers, bathroom fans, etc. If the chimney
draws well when all such equipment is turned off (or sealed,
in the case of fireplaces and/or other stoves), you need
to be attentive in timing the use of the other appliances. If
you need to crack a nearby window or door to enable the
chimney to pull well, you should install an outside-air intake
to bring combustion air into the room.
Conclusion
Woodburning is more an art than a science. Art includes
technique; and since installations, homes, and fuel vary, the
stove operator must also vary technique, (mostly timing), to
achieve satisfying results. Over time, you will become familiar with the features of your particular installation; you will
be able to identify cause and effect in a variety of seasonal
circumstances, and adapt your operating habits to changing
conditions.
29
Dutchwest
58
23
29
60
24
55
34
54
32
6
2
61
5
7
56
21
62
55
8
54
4
22
9
31
30
36
10
53
50
20
48
59
57
13
16
41
3
17
1
12
11
43
33
38
35
45
42
18
40
39
47
14
63
13
19
37
CFM Corporation reserves the right to make changes in design, materials, specifications, prices and discontinue colors and products at any time,
without notice.
Dutchwest Convection Heater
Models 2460, 2461, 2462
1.
2.
3.
4.
30
Item/Description
Bottom
Outer Back
Inner Bottom
Inner Back (After 9/97 No Outside Air Slot)
(Before9/97 Slot for Outside Air
2460
1135 7000958
Dutchwest parts
7001144
8/02
7001136
7001130
7001173
2461
7000978
7001231
7001116
7001230
7001174
2462
7000979
7001234
7001149
7001233
700084
7001135
Dutchwest Convection Heater
Dutchwest
Models 2460, 2461, 2462 (continued)
Item/Description
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
47.
48.
50.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
1
2
Inner Top
Inner Top Ass’y (Inner Top, Web, Gasket, Tabs & Bolts)
Inner Top Ass’y (Inner Top, Web, All Hardware, Baffle,
All Gaskets)
Inner Top Web
Inner Top Channel Cap
Air Distributor
Baffle
Right Side (After 7/97 no outside air)
Left Side
Side Door
Load Door Handle (2)
Door Pawl (2)
Pawl Assembly (Load Door)
Primary Air Manifold
Front
Gasket for Front Door
Ashdoor
Grate
Retainer Tab for Web (2)
Fan Plate
Damper
Damper Adjuster
Damper Tab (2)
Damper Crank
Damper Operating Rod
Grate Back
Top
Hearth
Flue Collar
Leg
Damper Handle Stub
Ash Door Handle
Ash Pan
Gasket for Glass
Glass
Manifold Cap (2)
Holder for Door Handle Insert
Primary Air Control
Damper Tab for Primary Control
Spring for Primary Control
Front Door
Inner Bottom Screw, 1/4-20 x 3³⁄₄”
Andiron (2)
Side Wear Plate
Interam Gasket
Catalytic Combustor
Refractory
Combustor Air Inlet
Probe Thermometer
Brass Bar
Refractory Package1 (as of 7/97)
Inner Top1
Inner Top Insert/Baffle Combination as of 1/972
Wood Handle w/Lifter - NI
Bottom Heat Shield Kit (not shown)
2460
2461
2462
7001112
0000003
--
7001119
0000004
7001171
(See Item #61)
0000016
--
7001110
7000961
7000952
7000953
7001229
7001120
7001121
5004245
5004025
-7001137
7001139
7000910
7001141
30002092
1601488
7000037
7000954
7000950
1601488
7000951
7001145
7001166
7000960
7001142
7000969
7000016
5004265
5004237
7000G79
1203591
7001146
7001163
1600600
30002738
1601488
1201846
7001140
1201394
7001117
7001198
0000837
000CB56
1602515
7001128
7000948
30002731
---30002787
0001074
7001110
7000974
7000952
7000953
7001229
7001120
7001121
5004245
5004025
30002362
7001122
7001124
7000910
7001126
30002092
1601488
7000037
7000954
7000950
1601488
7000951
7001131
7001166
7000972
7001127
7000969
7000016
5004265
5004237
7000G69
1203591
7001132
7001164
1600600
30002739
1601488
1201846
7001125
1201394
7001117
7001198
0000837
000CB56
1602515
7001128
7000948
30002732
---30002787
0001075
7000110 (to 7/97)
7000987
7000952
-7001232
7001150
7001151
5004245
5004025
30002362
7001152
7001154
7000910
7001156
7001148
1601488
7000037
7000954
7000950
1601488
7000951
7001160
7001178
7000985
7001157
1304280
7000016
5004265
5004237
7000G89
1203591
7001161
7001165
1600600
30002737
1601488
1201846
7001155
1201394
7001117
7001199
0000837
000CB56
1602515 (to 7/97)
7001128
7000948
30002733
1602514
7001226
7001225
30002787
0001076
On Extra-Large units built after August 1997, Refractory differs from Small & Large units.
On Extra-Large units built after August 1997, Inner Top and Insert differ from pre-August 1997 units.
7001135
31
Warranty
Exclusions & Limitations
Limited 3 Year Warranty
CFM Corporation warrants that this woodburning stove will be free of defects in material and workmanship for a period of three years from the date
you receive it, except that the catalyst, thermostat assembly, handles, glass
door panels, cement, and gasketing shall be warranted as described below.
CFM Corporation will repair or replace, at its option, any part
found to be defective upon inspection by a Dutchwest, Authorized
Dealer. The customer must return the defective part or the stove, with
shipping prepaid, to the Authorized Dealer or pay for any Authorized
Dealer in-home travel fees or service charges for in-home repair work.
It is the dealer’s option whether the repair work will be done in the customer’s home or in the dealer’s shop. If, upon inspection, the damage
is found to be the fault of the manufacturer, repairs will be authorized at
no charge to the customer for parts and/or labor.
Any woodburning stove or part thereof that is repaired or replaced during the limited warranty period will be warranted under the
terms of the limited warranty for a period not to exceed the remaining
term of the original limited warranty or six (6) months, whichever is
longer.
Limited 1 Year Warranty
The following parts of the woodburning stove are warranted to be free
of defects in material and workmanship for a period of one year from
the date you receive it: The thermostat assembly, handles, glass door
panels, cement, and gasketing. Any of these items found to be defective will be repaired or replaced at no charge, upon the return of the part
with postage prepaid to a Dutchwest Authorized Dealer.
Any part repaired or replaced during the limited warranty period
will be warranted under the terms of the limited warranty for a period
not to exceed the remaining term of the original limited warranty or six
(6) months, whichever is longer.
Limited Catalyst Warranty
The catalyst will be warranted for a six year period as follows: If the
original catalyst or a replacement catalyst proves defective or ceases to
maintain 70% of its particulate emission reduction activity (as measured
by an approved testing procedure) within 24 months from the date the
stove is received, the catalyst itself will be replaced free.
From 25 - 72 months a pro-rated credit will be allowed against a
replacement catalyst and the cost of labor necessary for its installation
at the time of replacement.
For stove purchases made after June 30, 1990, a third year
(25 - 36 months) of no charge replacement will be made when combustor failure is due to thermal degradation of the substrate (crumbling of
ceramic material). The customer must pay for any in-home travel fees,
service charges, or transportation costs for returning the stove to the
Authorized Dealer.
Amount of Time
Credit Towards
Since Purchase
Replacement Cost
0 - 24 months
100%
25 - 36 months
50 %
37 - 48 months
30%
49 - 60 months
20%
61 - 72 months
10%
Any replacement catalyst will be warranted under the terms of the
catalyst warranty for the remaining term of the original warranty. The
purchaser must provide the following information in order to receive a
replacement catalyst under the terms of this limited warranty:
1. Name, address and telephone number.
2. Proof of original purchase date.
3. Date of failure of catalyst.
4. Any relevant information or circumstances regarding determination of failure.
5. In addition, the owner must return the failed catalyst.
1. This warranty is transferable; however, proof of original retail
purchase is required.
2. This warranty does not cover misuse of the stove. Misuse
includes overfiring which will result if the stove is used in such a manner
as to cause one or more of the plates to glow red. Overfiring can be
identified later by warped plates and areas where the paint pigment has
burned off. Overfiring in enamel fireplaces is identified by bubbling,
cracking, chipping and discoloration of the porcelain enamel finish.
CFM Corporation offers no warranty on chipping of enamel surfaces.
Inspect your woodburning stove prior to accepting it for any damage to
the enamel.
3. This warranty does not cover misuse of the stove as described in
the Owner’s Guide, nor does it cover an stove which has been modified
unless authorized by a CFM Corporation representative in writing. This
warranty does not cover damage to the stove caused by burning salt
saturated wood, chemically treated wood, or any fuel not recommended
in the Owner’s Guide.
4. This warranty does not cover a stove repaired by someone other
than a Dutchwest Authorized Dealer.
5. Damage to the unit while in transit is not covered by this warranty but is subject to a claim against the common carrier. Contact
Dutchwest Authorized Dealer from whom you purchased your stove or
CFM Corporation if the purchase was direct. (Do not operate the stove
as this may negate the ability to process the claim with the carrier.)
6. Claims are not valid where the installation does not conform to local building and fire codes or, in their absence, to the recommendations
in our Owner’s Guide.
7. The salt air environment of coastal areas, or a high-humidity
environment, can be corrosive to the porcelain enamel finish. These
conditions can cause rusting of the cast iron beneath the porcelain
enamel finish, which will cause the porcelain enamel finish to flake off.
This warranty does not cover damage caused by a salt air or high-humidity environment.
8. CFM Corporation shall have no obligation to enhance or update
any unit once manufactured.
IN NO EVENT SHALL CFM CORPORATION BE LIABLE FOR
INCIDENTAL AND CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES. ALL IMPLIED
WARRANTIES, INCLUDING THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS, ARE LIMITED TO THE DURATION OF
THIS WRITTEN WARRANTY. THIS WARRANTY SUPERCEDES ALL
OTHER ORAL OR WRITTEN WARRANTIES.
Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitations of incidential and consequential damages or limitations on how long an implied
warranty lasts, so the above limitations may not apply to you. This warranty gives you specific rights and you may have other rights which vary
from state to state.
How to Obtain Service
If a defect is noted within the warranty period, the customer should contact a Dutchwest Authorized Dealer or CFM Corporation if the purchase
was direct with the following information:
1. Name, address, and telephone number of the purchaser.
2. Date of purchase.
3. Serial number from the label on the back.
4. Nature of the defect or damage.
5. Any relevant information or circumstances, e.g., installation,
mode of operation when defect was noted.
A warranty claim will then start in process. CFM Corporation reserves
the right to withhold final approval of a warranty claim pending a visual
inspection of the defect by authorized representatives.
CFM Corporation
410 Admiral Blvd. • Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5T 2N6
800-668-5323 • www.cfmcorp.com
© CFM Corporation