Cisco Systems 15454M6DC Computer Accessories User Manual

Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and
Operations Guide
Product and Documentation Release 3.1
November 2001
Corporate Headquarters
Cisco Systems, Inc.
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-1706
USA
http://www.cisco.com
Tel: 408 526-4000
800 553-NETS (6387)
Fax: 408 526-4100
Customer Order Number: DOC-7813453=
Text Part Number: 78-13453-01
THE SPECIFICATIONS AND INFORMATION REGARDING THE PRODUCTS IN THIS MANUAL ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE.
ALL STATEMENTS, INFORMATION, AND RECOMMENDATIONS IN THIS MANUAL ARE BELIEVED TO BE ACCURATE BUT ARE PRESENTED
WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. USERS MUST TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR APPLICATION OF ANY
PRODUCTS.
THE SOFTWARE LICENSE AND LIMITED WARRANTY FOR THE ACCOMPANYING PRODUCT ARE SET FORTH IN THE INFORMATION PACKET
THAT SHIPPED WITH THE PRODUCT AND ARE INCORPORATED HEREIN BY THIS REFERENCE. IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO LOCATE THE
SOFTWARE LICENSE OR LIMITED WARRANTY, CONTACT YOUR CISCO REPRESENTATIVE FOR A COPY.
The following information is for FCC compliance of Class A devices: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital
device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated
in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference, in which case users will be required to correct the interference at their own expense.
The following information is for FCC compliance of Class B devices: The equipment described in this manual generates and may radiate radio-frequency energy.
If it is not installed in accordance with Cisco’s installation instructions, it may cause interference with radio and television reception. This equipment has been
tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the specifications in part 15 of the FCC rules. These specifications are
designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in
a particular installation.
Modifying the equipment without Cisco’s written authorization may result in the equipment no longer complying with FCC requirements for Class A or Class B
digital devices. In that event, your right to use the equipment may be limited by FCC regulations, and you may be required to correct any interference to radio or
television communications at your own expense.
You can determine whether your equipment is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was probably caused by the Cisco equipment or
one of its peripheral devices. If the equipment causes interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more of the
following measures:
• Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops.
• Move the equipment to one side or the other of the television or radio.
• Move the equipment farther away from the television or radio.
• Plug the equipment into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make certain the equipment and the television or radio are on
circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.)
Modifications to this product not authorized by Cisco Systems, Inc. could void the FCC approval and negate your authority to operate the product.
The Cisco implementation of TCP header compression is an adaptation of a program developed by the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) as part of UCB’s
public domain version of the UNIX operating system. All rights reserved. Copyright © 1981, Regents of the University of California.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER WARRANTY HEREIN, ALL DOCUMENT FILES AND SOFTWARE OF THESE SUPPLIERS ARE PROVIDED “AS
IS” WITH ALL FAULTS. CISCO AND THE ABOVE-NAMED SUPPLIERS DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING,
WITHOUT LIMITATION, THOSE OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT OR ARISING
FROM A COURSE OF DEALING, USAGE, OR TRADE PRACTICE.
IN NO EVENT SHALL CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES,
INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOST PROFITS OR LOSS OR DAMAGE TO DATA ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THIS
MANUAL, EVEN IF CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
AccessPath, AtmDirector, Browse with Me, CCIP, CCSI, CD-PAC, CiscoLink, the Cisco Powered Network logo, Cisco Systems Networking Academy,
the Cisco Systems Networking Academy logo, Cisco Unity, Fast Step, Follow Me Browsing, FormShare, FrameShare, IGX, Internet Quotient, IP/VC, iQ
Breakthrough, iQ Expertise, iQ FastTrack, the iQ Logo, iQ Net Readiness Scorecard, MGX, the Networkers logo, ScriptBuilder, ScriptShare, SMARTnet,
TransPath, Voice LAN, Wavelength Router, and WebViewer are trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc.; Changing the Way We Work, Live, Play, and Learn,
and Discover All That’s Possible are service marks of Cisco Systems, Inc.; and Aironet, ASIST, BPX, Catalyst, CCDA, CCDP, CCIE, CCNA, CCNP,
Cisco, the Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert logo, Cisco IOS, the Cisco IOS logo, Cisco Press, Cisco Systems, Cisco Systems Capital, the Cisco Systems
logo, Empowering the Internet Generation, Enterprise/Solver, EtherChannel, EtherSwitch, FastHub, FastSwitch, GigaStack, IOS, IP/TV, LightStream,
MICA, Network Registrar, Packet, PIX, Post-Routing, Pre-Routing, RateMUX, Registrar, SlideCast, StrataView Plus, Stratm, SwitchProbe, TeleRouter,
and VCO are registered trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and certain other countries.
All other trademarks mentioned in this document or Web site are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a
partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (0110R)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide, Release 3.1
Copyright © 2001, Cisco Systems, Inc.
All rights reserved.
C ON T E NT S
About This Manual
Audience
xxxiii
xxxiii
Organization
xxxiii
Related Documentation
Conventions
xxxiv
xxxv
Obtaining Documentation xxxv
World Wide Web xxxvi
Optical Networking Product Documentation CD-ROM
Ordering Documentation xxxvi
Documentation Feedback xxxvi
xxxvi
Obtaining Technical Assistance xxxvii
Cisco.com xxxvii
Technical Assistance Center xxxvii
Procedure: Contacting TAC by Using the Cisco TAC Website
Procedure: Contacting TAC by Telephone xxxviii
CHAPTER
1
Hardware Installation
xxxvii
1-1
1.1 Installation Overview
1-2
1.2 Installation Equipment 1-3
1.2.1 Included Materials 1-4
1.2.2 User-Supplied Materials 1-4
1.2.2.1 Tools Needed 1-4
1.2.2.2 Test Equipment 1-5
1.3 Rack Installation 1-5
1.3.1 Reversible Mounting Bracket 1-6
Procedure: Reverse the Mounting Bracket to Fit a 19-Inch Rack 1-7
1.3.2 Mounting a Single Node 1-7
Procedure: Mount the Shelf Assembly in a Rack (One Person) 1-8
Procedure: Mount the Shelf Assembly in a Rack (Two People) 1-9
1.3.3 Mounting Multiple Nodes 1-9
Procedure: Mount Multiple Shelf Assemblies in a Rack 1-9
1.3.3.1 Four Node Configuration 1-9
1.3.3.2 ONS 15454 Bay Assembly 1-10
1.4 Front Door Access
1-11
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
iii
Contents
Procedure: Open the Front Cabinet Compartment (Door)
Procedure: Remove the Front Door 1-13
1.5 Backplane Access 1-14
Procedure: Remove the Backplane Sheet Metal Covers
1.5.1 Lower Backplane Cover 1-15
Procedure: Remove the Lower Backplane Cover 1-16
1.5.2 Alarm Interface Panel 1-16
1-12
1-15
1.6 EIA Installation 1-17
1.6.1 BNC EIA 1-17
1.6.2 High-Density BNC EIA 1-18
1.6.3 SMB EIA 1-19
1.6.4 AMP Champ EIA 1-20
Procedure: Install a BNC, High-Density BNC, or SMB EIA
Procedure: Install the AMP Champ EIA 1-24
1.7 Fan-Tray Assembly Installation 1-25
Procedure: Install the Bottom Brackets and Air Filter
Procedure: Install the Fan-Tray Assembly 1-27
1.8 Power and Ground Installation 1-28
Procedure: Install Redundant Power Feeds
1-22
1-26
1-30
1.9 Alarm, Timing, LAN, and Craft Pin Connections 1-32
1.9.1 Alarm Installation 1-33
Procedure: Install Alarm Wires on the Backplane 1-33
1.9.2 Timing Installation 1-33
Procedure: Install Timing Wires on the Backplane 1-34
1.9.3 LAN Installation 1-34
Procedure: Install LAN Wires on the Backplane 1-35
1.9.4 TL1 Craft Interface Installation 1-35
Procedure: Install Craft Interface Wires on the Backplane
1-36
1.10 Coaxial Cable Installation 1-36
1.10.1 BNC Connector Installation 1-36
Procedure: Install Coaxial Cable With BNC Connectors 1-36
1.10.2 High-Density BNC Connector Installation 1-37
Procedure: Install Coaxial Cable With High-Density BNC Connectors
1.10.3 SMB Connector Installation 1-38
Procedure: Install Coaxial Cable with SMB Connectors 1-38
1-38
1.11 DS-1 Cable Installation 1-39
1.11.1 Twisted Pair Wire-Wrap Installation 1-39
Procedure: Install DS-1 Cables Using Electrical Interface Adapters (Balun)
1.11.2 AMP Champ Connector Installation 1-41
1-40
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
iv
November 2001
Contents
Procedure: Install DS-1 AMP Champ Cables on the AMP Champ EIA
1-43
1.12 Card Installation 1-44
1.12.1 Slot Requirements 1-45
Procedure: Install the TCC+ and XC/XCVT/XC10G Cards 1-47
Procedure: Install Optical, Electrical, and Ethernet Cards 1-48
Procedure: Install the AIC Card 1-49
1.12.2 Gigabit Interface Converter 1-50
Procedure: Install Gigabit Interface Converters 1-50
Procedure: Remove a Gigabit Interface Converter 1-52
1.13 Fiber-Optic Cable Installation 1-52
Procedure: Install Fiber-Optic Cables on OC-N Cards
Procedure: Install the Fiber Boot 1-53
1-53
1.14 Cable Routing and Management 1-54
1.14.1 Optical Cable Management 1-55
Procedure: Route Fiber-Optic Cables in the Shelf Assembly
1.14.2 Coaxial Cable Management 1-57
Procedure: Route the Coaxial Cables 1-57
1.14.3 DS-1 Twisted-Pair Cable Management 1-58
Procedure: Route DS-1 Twisted-Pair Cables 1-58
1.14.4 AMP Champ Cable Management 1-59
1.14.5 BIC Rear Cover Installation 1-59
Procedure: Install the BIC Rear Cover 1-59
1.15 Ferrite Installation 1-61
Procedure: Attach Ferrites to Power Cabling 1-61
Procedure: Attach Ferrites to Wire-Wrap Pin Fields
1-56
1-63
1.16 ONS 15454 Assembly Specifications 1-64
1.16.1 Bandwidth 1-64
1.16.2 Slot Assignments 1-64
1.16.3 Cards 1-64
1.16.4 Configurations 1-65
1.16.5 Cisco Transport Controller 1-65
1.16.6 External LAN Interface 1-65
1.16.7 TL1 Craft Interface 1-66
1.16.8 Modem Interface 1-66
1.16.9 Alarm Interface 1-66
1.16.10 EIA Interface 1-66
1.16.11 Nonvolatile Memory 1-66
1.16.12 BITS Interface 1-66
1.16.13 System Timing 1-66
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
v
Contents
1.16.14 Power Specifications 1-67
1.16.15 Environmental Specifications
1.16.16 Dimensions 1-67
1.17 Installation Checklist
1-67
1-67
1.18 ONS 15454 Software and Hardware Compatibility Matrix
CHAPTER
2
Software Installation
1-68
2-1
2.1 Installation Overview
2.2 Computer Requirements
2-1
2-2
2.3 Running the CTC Setup Wizard 2-4
Procedure: Run the CTC Setup Wizard 2-4
Procedure: Set Up the Environment Variable (Solaris installations only)
Procedure: Reference the JRE (Solaris installations only) 2-5
2-4
2.4 Connecting PCs to the ONS 15454 2-5
2.4.1 Direct Connections to the ONS 15454 2-5
Procedure: Creating a Direct Connection to an ONS 15454 2-5
2.4.2 Network Connections 2-7
Procedure: Access the ONS 15454 from a LAN 2-7
Procedure: Disable Proxy Service Using Internet Explorer (Windows) 2-7
Procedure: Disable Proxy Service Using Netscape (Windows and Solaris) 2-8
2.4.3 Remote Access to the ONS 15454 2-8
2.4.4 TL1 Terminal Access to the ONS 15454 2-8
2.5 Logging into the ONS 15454 2-9
Procedure: Log into the ONS 15454 2-9
2.5.1 Creating Login Node Groups 2-10
Procedure: Create a Login Node Group 2-11
2.5.2 Accessing ONS 15454s Behind Firewalls 2-12
Procedure: Set the IIOP Listener Port on the ONS 15454
Procedure: Set the IIOP Listener Port on CTC 2-13
2.6 Working with the CTC Window 2-13
2.6.1 Node View 2-14
2.6.1.1 CTC Card Colors 2-14
2.6.1.2 Node View Card Shortcuts 2-15
2.6.1.3 Node View Tabs 2-15
2.6.2 Network View 2-15
2.6.2.1 CTC Node Colors 2-16
2.6.2.2 Network View Tasks 2-16
2.6.2.3 Creating Domains 2-17
2.6.2.4 Changing the Network View Background Color
2-12
2-19
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
vi
November 2001
Contents
Procedure: Modify the Network or Domain Background Color 2-19
2.6.2.5 Changing the Network View Background Image 2-19
Procedure: Change the Network View Background Image 2-20
Procedure: Add a Node to the Current Session 2-21
2.6.3 Card View 2-21
2.7 CTC Navigation
2-22
2.8 Viewing CTC Table Data
2-24
2.9 Printing and Exporting CTC Data 2-26
Procedure: Print CTC Window and Table Data
Procedure: Export CTC Data 2-28
2.10 Displaying CTC Data in Other Applications
CHAPTER
3
Node Setup
2-27
2-29
3-1
3.1 Before You Begin
3-1
3.2 Setting Up Basic Node Information 3-2
Procedure: Add the Node Name, Contact, Location, Date, and Time
3-2
3.3 Setting Up Network Information 3-2
Procedure: Set Up Network Information 3-3
Procedure: Change IP Address, Default Router, and Network Mask Using the LCD
3-4
3.4 Creating Users and Setting Security 3-6
Procedure: Create New Users 3-8
Procedure: Edit a User 3-8
Procedure: Delete a User 3-8
3.5 Creating Protection Groups 3-9
Procedure: Create Protection Groups 3-9
Procedure: Enable Ports 3-10
Procedure: Edit Protection Groups 3-11
Procedure: Delete Protection Groups 3-11
3.6 Setting Up ONS 15454 Timing 3-12
3.6.1 Network Timing Example 3-13
3.6.2 Synchronization Status Messaging 3-14
Procedure: Set up ONS 15454 Timing 3-14
Procedure: Set Up Internal Timing 3-17
3.7 Viewing ONS 15454 Inventory
3.8 Viewing CTC Software Versions
CHAPTER
4
IP Networking
3-18
3-19
4-1
4.1 IP Networking Overview
4-1
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
vii
Contents
4.2 ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios 4-2
4.2.1 Scenario 1: CTC and ONS 15454s on Same Subnet 4-2
4.2.2 Scenario 2: CTC and ONS 15454s Connected to Router 4-3
4.2.3 Scenario 3: Using Proxy ARP to Enable an ONS 15454 Gateway
4.2.4 Scenario 4: Default Gateway on CTC Computer 4-6
4.2.5 Scenario 5: Using Static Routes to Connect to LANs 4-6
Procedure: Create a Static Route 4-8
4.2.6 Scenario 6: Static Route for Multiple CTCs 4-9
4.2.7 Scenario 7: Using OSPF 4-10
Procedure: Set up OSPF 4-12
4.3 Viewing the ONS 15454 Routing Table
CHAPTER
5
SONET Topologies
4-4
4-15
5-1
5.1 Before You Begin
5-1
5.2 Bidirectional Line Switched Rings 5-1
5.2.1 Two-Fiber BLSRs 5-2
5.2.2 Four-Fiber BLSRs 5-4
5.2.3 BLSR Bandwidth 5-7
5.2.4 Sample BLSR Application 5-8
5.2.5 Setting Up BLSRs 5-10
Procedure: Install the BLSR Trunk Cards 5-11
Procedure: Create the BLSR DCC Terminations 5-13
Procedure: Enable the BLSR Ports 5-13
Procedure: Provision the BLSR 5-14
5.2.6 Upgrading From Two-Fiber to Four-Fiber BLSRs 5-16
Procedure: Upgrade From a Two-Fiber to a Four-Fiber BLSR
5.2.7 Adding and Removing BLSR Nodes 5-18
Procedure: Add a BLSR Node 5-18
Procedure: Remove a BLSR Node 5-21
5.2.8 Moving BLSR Trunk Cards 5-22
Procedure: Move a BLSR Trunk Card 5-24
5.3 Unidirectional Path Switched Rings 5-26
5.3.1 Example UPSR Application 5-28
5.3.2 Setting Up a UPSR 5-30
Procedure: Install the UPSR Trunk Cards 5-30
Procedure: Configure the UPSR DCC Terminations
Procedure: Enable the UPSR Ports 5-32
5.3.3 Adding and Removing UPSR Nodes 5-32
Procedure: Switch UPSR Traffic 5-32
5-16
5-31
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
viii
November 2001
Contents
Procedure: Add a UPSR Node 5-34
Procedure: Remove a UPSR Node 5-35
5.4 Subtending Rings 5-36
Procedure: Subtend a UPSR from a BLSR
Procedure: Subtend a BLSR from a UPSR
Procedure: Subtend a BLSR from a BLSR
5-38
5-38
5-40
5.5 Linear ADM Configurations 5-41
Procedure: Create a Linear ADM 5-42
Procedure: Convert a Linear ADM to UPSR 5-42
Procedure: Convert a Linear ADM to a BLSR 5-47
5.6 Path-Protected Mesh Networks
CHAPTER
6
Circuits and Tunnels
5-50
6-1
6.1 Circuits Overview
6-1
6.2 Creating Circuits and VT Tunnels 6-2
Procedure: Create an Automatically Routed Circuit
Procedure: Create a Manually Routed Circuit 6-6
6-2
6.3 Creating Multiple Drops for Unidirectional Circuits 6-8
Procedure: Create a Unidirectional Circuit with Multiple Drops
6.4 Creating Monitor Circuits 6-9
Procedure: Create a Monitor Circuit
6-9
6.5 Searching for Circuits 6-10
Procedure: Search for ONS 15454 Circuits
6.6 Editing UPSR Circuits 6-10
Procedure: Edit a UPSR Circuit
6-8
6-10
6-11
6.7 Creating a Path Trace 6-12
Procedure: Create a J1 Path Trace
6-13
6.8 Cross-Connect Card Capacities 6-15
6.8.1 VT1.5 Cross-Connects 6-16
6.8.2 VT Tunnels 6-19
6.9 Creating DCC Tunnels 6-21
Procedure: Provision a DCC Tunnel
CHAPTER
7
Card Provisioning
6-22
7-1
7.1 Performance Monitoring Thresholds
7-1
7.2 Provisioning Electrical Cards 7-2
7.2.1 DS-1 Card Parameters 7-3
Procedure: Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the DS-1 Card
7-3
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
ix
Contents
7.2.2 DS-3 Card Parameters 7-6
Procedure: Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the DS-3 Card 7-6
7.2.3 DS3E Card Parameters 7-8
Procedure: Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the DS3E Card 7-9
7.2.4 DS3XM-6 Card Parameters 7-11
Procedure: Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the DS3XM-6 Card 7-12
7.2.5 EC1-12 Card Parameters 7-14
Procedure: Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the EC-1 Card 7-14
7.3 Provisioning Optical Cards 7-18
7.3.1 Modifying Transmission Quality 7-18
Procedure: Provision Line Transmission Settings for OC-N Cards
Procedure: Provision Threshold Settings for OC-N Cards 7-19
7.3.2 Provisioning OC-N Cards for SDH 7-23
Procedure: Provision an OC-N Card for SDH 7-23
7.4 Provisioning IPPM 7-24
Procedure: Enable Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring
7-18
7-25
7.5 Provisioning the Alarm Interface Controller 7-25
7.5.1 Using Virtual Wires 7-26
Procedure: Provision External Alarms 7-27
Procedure: Provision External Controls 7-28
7.5.2 Provisioning AIC Orderwire 7-29
Procedure: Provision AIC Orderwire 7-29
7.5.3 Using the AIC Orderwire 7-30
7.6 Converting DS-1 and DS-3 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection 7-30
Procedure: Convert DS1-14 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection 7-31
Procedure: Convert DS3-12 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection 7-33
CHAPTER
8
Performance Monitoring
8-1
8.1 Using the Performance Monitoring Screen 8-1
8.1.1 Viewing PMs 8-2
Procedure: View PMs 8-2
8.1.2 Changing the Screen Intervals 8-2
Procedure: Select Fifteen-Minute PM Intervals on the Performance Monitoring Screen 8-3
Procedure: Select Twenty-Four Hour PM Intervals on the Performance Monitoring Screen 8-4
8.1.3 Viewing Near End and Far End PMs 8-4
Procedure: Select Near End PMs on the Performance Monitoring Screen 8-5
Procedure: Select Far End PMs on the Performance Monitoring Screen 8-5
8.1.4 Using the Signal-Type Menu 8-6
Procedure: Select Signal-Type Menus on the Performance Monitoring Screen 8-6
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
x
November 2001
Contents
8.1.5 Using the Baseline Button 8-7
Procedure: Use the Baseline Button on the Performance Monitoring Screen 8-7
8.1.6 Using the Clear Button 8-8
Procedure: Use the Clear Button on the Performance Monitoring Screen 8-8
8.2 Changing Thresholds
8-9
8.3 Enabling Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring
8-10
8.4 Pointer Justification Count Parameters 8-12
Procedure: Enable Pointer Justification Count Performance Monitoring
8.5 Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards 8-14
8.5.1 EC1 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters 8-14
8.5.2 DS1 and DS1N Card Performance Monitoring Parameters 8-18
8.5.3 DS3 and DS3N Card Performance Monitoring Parameters 8-22
8.5.4 DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Card Performance Monitoring Parameters
8.5.5 DS3XM-6 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters 8-28
8.6 Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards 8-33
8.6.1 OC-3 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters 8-33
8.6.2 OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters
CHAPTER
9
Ethernet Operation
8-13
8-24
8-37
9-1
9.1 Ethernet Cards 9-1
9.1.1 E100T-12/E100T-G 9-2
9.1.2 E1000-2/E1000-2-G 9-2
9.1.3 Port Provisioning for Ethernet Cards 9-3
Procedure: Provision Ethernet Ports 9-3
9.2 Multicard and Single-Card EtherSwitch 9-4
9.2.1 Multicard EtherSwitch 9-4
9.2.2 Single-Card EtherSwitch 9-5
9.2.3 ONS 15454 and ONS 15327 EtherSwitch Circuit Combinations
9-5
9.3 Ethernet Circuit Configurations 9-6
9.3.1 Point-to-Point Ethernet Circuits 9-6
Procedure: Provision an EtherSwitch Point-to-Point Circuit (Multicard or Single-Card)
9.3.2 Shared Packet Ring Ethernet Circuits 9-10
Procedure: Provision a Shared Packet Ring 9-10
9.3.3 Hub and Spoke Ethernet Circuit Provisioning 9-14
Procedure: Provision a Hub and Spoke Ethernet Circuit 9-14
9.3.4 Ethernet Manual Cross-Connects 9-16
Procedure: Provision a Single-card EtherSwitch Manual Cross-Connect 9-17
Procedure: Provision a Multicard EtherSwitch Manual Cross-Connect 9-19
9.4 VLAN Support
9-7
9-21
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xi
Contents
9.4.1 Q-Tagging (IEEE 802.1Q) 9-22
9.4.2 Priority Queuing (IEEE 802.1Q) 9-23
9.4.3 VLAN Membership 9-24
Procedure: Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership
9.5 Spanning Tree (IEEE 802.1D) 9-26
9.5.1 Multi-Instance Spanning Tree and VLANs 9-26
Procedure: Enable Spanning Tree on Ethernet Ports
9.5.2 Spanning Tree Parameters 9-27
9.5.3 Spanning Tree Configuration 9-27
9.5.4 Spanning Tree Map 9-28
Procedure: View the Spanning Tree Map 9-28
9-24
9-26
9.6 Ethernet Performance and Maintenance Screens 9-28
9.6.1 Statistics Screen 9-29
9.6.2 Line Utilization Screen 9-29
9.6.3 History Screen 9-29
9.6.4 MAC Table Screen 9-30
Procedure: Retrieve the MAC Table Information 9-30
9.6.5 Trunk Utilization Screen 9-30
9.7 Remote Monitoring Specification Alarm Thresholds 9-30
Procedure: Creating Ethernet RMON Alarm Thresholds
CHAPTER
10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
10.1 Overview
9-32
10-1
10-1
10.2 Viewing ONS 15454 Alarms 10-1
10.2.1 Controlling Alarm Display 10-3
10.2.2 Viewing Alarm-Affected Circuits 10-3
Procedure: View Affected Circuits for a Specific Alarm 10-4
10.2.3 Conditions Tab 10-5
10.2.3.1 Retrieve and Display Conditions 10-5
10.2.3.2 Conditions Column Descriptions 10-6
10.2.4 Viewing History 10-7
10.2.5 Viewing Alarms on the LCD 10-8
Procedure: View Alarm Counts on a Specific Slot and Port 10-8
10.3 Alarm Profiles 10-8
10.3.1 Creating and Modifying Alarm Profiles 10-9
Procedure: Create an Alarm Profile 10-9
10.3.1.1 Alarm Profile Menus 10-10
10.3.1.2 Alarm Profile Editing 10-10
10.3.1.3 Alarm Severity Option 10-11
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xii
November 2001
Contents
10.3.1.4 Row Display Options 10-11
10.3.2 Applying Alarm Profiles 10-11
Procedure: Apply an Alarm Profile at the Card View 10-13
Procedure: Apply an Alarm Profile at the Node View 10-13
10.4 Suppressing Alarms 10-14
Procedure: Suppressing Alarms
CHAPTER
11
SNMP
10-14
11-1
11.1 SNMP Overview
11-1
11.2 SNMP Basic Components
11-2
11.3 SNMP Support 11-3
Procedure: Set Up SNMP Support
11.4 SNMP Management Information Bases
11.5 SNMP Traps
11-3
11-5
11-6
11.6 SNMP Community Names
11-8
11.7 SNMP Remote Network Monitoring 11-8
11.7.1 Ethernet Statistics Group 11-9
11.7.2 History Control Group 11-9
11.7.3 Ethernet History Group 11-9
11.7.4 Alarm Group 11-9
11.7.5 Event Group 11-9
APPENDIX
A
Circuit Routing
A-1
Automatic Circuit Routing A-1
Circuit Routing Characteristics A-2
Bandwidth Allocation and Routing A-2
Secondary Sources and Drops A-2
Manual Circuit Routing
A-3
Constraint-Based Circuit Routing
APPENDIX
B
A-7
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Regulatory Compliance
B-1
B-1
Japan Approvals B-2
Label Information B-2
Class A Notice B-3
Installation Warnings B-3
DC Power Disconnection Warning B-4
DC Power Connection Warning B-5
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xiii
Contents
Power Supply Disconnection Warning B-6
Outside Line Connection Warning B-7
Class 1 Laser Product Warning B-8
Class I and Class 1M Laser Warning B-8
Restricted Area Warning B-9
Ground Connection Warning B-10
Qualified Personnel Warning B-11
Invisible Laser Radiation Warning (other versions available)
More Than One Power Supply B-12
Unterminated Fiber Warning B-13
Laser Activation Warning B-15
APPENDIX
C
Acronyms
APPENDIX
D
Glossary
B-11
C-1
D-1
INDEX
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xiv
November 2001
F I G U R E S
Figure 1-1
Cisco ONS 15454 dimensions
Figure 1-2
Reversing the mounting brackets (23-inch position to 19-inch position)
Figure 1-3
Mounting an ONS 15454 in a rack
Figure 1-4
A four-shelf node configuration
Figure 1-5
A four-shelf ONS 15454 Bay Assembly
Figure 1-6
The front-door erasable label
Figure 1-7
The laser warning on the front-door label
Figure 1-8
The ONS 15454 front door
Figure 1-9
Removing the ONS 15454 front door
Figure 1-10
Backplane sheet metal covers
Figure 1-11
Removing the lower backplane cover
Figure 1-12
A BNC backplane for use in 1:1 protection schemes
Figure 1-13
A High-Density BNC backplane for use in 1:N protection schemes
Figure 1-14
An SMB EIA backplane
Figure 1-15
An AMP EIA Champ backplane
Figure 1-16
Installing the BNC EIA
Figure 1-17
Installing the High-Density BNC EIA
Figure 1-18
Installing the SMB EIA (use a balun for DS-1 connections)
Figure 1-19
Installing the AMP CHAMP EIA
Figure 1-20
Installing the bottom brackets
Figure 1-21
Installing the fan-tray assembly
Figure 1-22
Ground posts on the ONS 15454 backplane
Figure 1-23
Power terminals
Figure 1-24
Pinouts
Figure 1-25
Using a right-angle connector to install coaxial cable with BNC connectors
Figure 1-26
Installing coaxial cable with SMB connectors
Figure 1-27
DS-1 electrical interface adapter (balun)
Figure 1-28
A backplane with SMB EIA for DS-1 cables
Figure 1-29
Installing cards in the ONS 15454
Figure 1-30
Installing a GBIC on an E1000-2 card
Figure 1-31
Installing fiber-optic cables
1-6
1-7
1-8
1-10
1-11
1-12
1-12
1-13
1-14
1-15
1-16
1-18
1-19
1-20
1-21
1-22
1-23
1-23
1-24
1-26
1-28
1-29
1-30
1-32
1-37
1-39
1-40
1-41
1-45
1-51
1-53
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xv
Figures
Figure 1-32
Attaching a fiber boot
Figure 1-33
Managing cables on the front panel
Figure 1-34
Routing fiber-optic cables on the optical-card faceplate
Figure 1-35
Fold-down front door of the cable-management tray (displaying the cable routing channel)
Figure 1-36
Routing coaxial cable through the SMB EIA backplane
Figure 1-37
Clear BIC rear cover
Figure 1-38
Backplane attachment for BIC cover
Figure 1-39
Installing the BIC rear cover with spacers
Figure 1-40
Attaching ferrites to power cabling
Figure 1-41
Attaching ferrites to AMP Champ connectors
Figure 1-42
Attaching ferrites to electrical interface adapters (baluns)
Figure 1-43
Attaching ferrites to SMB/BNC connectors
Figure 1-44
Attaching ferrites to wire-wrap pin fields
Figure 2-1
Logging into the ONS 15454
Figure 2-2
A login node group
Figure 2-3
ONS 15454s residing behind a firewall
Figure 2-4
A CTC computer and ONS 15454s residing behind firewalls
2-12
Figure 2-5
CTC window elements in the node view (default login view)
2-14
Figure 2-6
A four-node network displayed in CTC network view
Figure 2-7
Adding nodes to a domain
Figure 2-8
Outside nodes displayed within the domain
Figure 2-9
Nodes inside a domain
Figure 2-10
Changing the CTC background image
Figure 2-11
Network view with a custom map image
2-21
Figure 2-12
CTC card view showing an DS3N-12 card
2-22
Figure 2-13
CTC node view showing popup information
Figure 2-14
Table shortcut menu that customizes table appearance
Figure 2-15
Selecting CTC data for print
Figure 2-16
Selecting CTC data for export
Figure 3-1
Setting up general network information
Figure 3-2
Selecting the IP address option
Figure 3-3
Changing the IP address
Figure 3-4
Selecting the Save Configuration option
Figure 3-5
Saving and rebooting the TCC+
Figure 3-6
Creating a 1+1 protection group
1-54
1-55
1-56
1-57
1-58
1-59
1-60
1-60
1-61
1-62
1-62
1-63
1-63
2-9
2-11
2-12
2-16
2-18
2-18
2-18
2-20
2-23
2-25
2-28
2-28
3-4
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-10
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xvi
November 2001
Figures
Figure 3-7
Editing protection groups
Figure 3-8
An ONS 15454 timing example
Figure 3-9
Setting Up ONS 15454 timing
Figure 3-10
Displaying ONS 15454 hardware information
Figure 4-1
Scenario 1: CTC and ONS 15454s on same subnet
Figure 4-2
Scenario 2: CTC and ONS 15454s connected to router
Figure 4-3
Scenario 3: Using Proxy ARP
Figure 4-4
Scenario 4: Default gateway on a CTC computer
Figure 4-5
Scenario 5: Static route with one CTC computer used as a destination
Figure 4-6
Scenario 5: Static route with multiple LAN destinations
Figure 4-7
Scenario 6: Static route for multiple CTCs
Figure 4-8
Scenario 7: OSPF enabled
Figure 4-9
Scenario 7: OSPF not enabled
Figure 4-10
Enabling OSPF on the ONS 15454
Figure 4-11
Viewing the ONS 15454 routing table
Figure 5-1
A four-node, two-fiber BLSR
Figure 5-2
Four-node, two-fiber BLSR sample traffic pattern
Figure 5-3
Four-node, two-fiber BLSR traffic pattern following line break
Figure 5-4
A four-node, four-fiber BLSR
Figure 5-5
A four-fiber BLSR span switch
Figure 5-6
A four-fiber BLSR ring switch
Figure 5-7
BLSR bandwidth reuse
Figure 5-8
A five-node BLSR
Figure 5-9
Shelf assembly layout for Node 0 in Figure 5-8
Figure 5-10
Shelf assembly layout for Nodes 1 – 4 in Figure 5-8
Figure 5-11
Connecting fiber to a four-node, two-fiber BLSR
5-12
Figure 5-12
Connecting fiber to a four-node, four-fiber BLSR
5-12
Figure 5-13
Enabling an optical port
5-14
Figure 5-14
Setting BLSR properties
5-15
Figure 5-15
A three-node BLSR before adding a new node
Figure 5-16
A BLSR with a newly-added fourth node
Figure 5-17
A four-node BLSR before a trunk card switch
Figure 5-18
A four-node BLSR after the trunk cards are switched at one node
Figure 5-19
Deleting circuits from a BLSR trunk card
Figure 5-20
A basic four-node UPSR
3-11
3-13
3-16
3-18
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-13
4-16
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-5
5-6
5-6
5-8
5-9
5-10
5-10
5-18
5-20
5-23
5-24
5-25
5-27
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xvii
Figures
Figure 5-21
A UPSR with a fiber break
Figure 5-22
An OC-3 UPSR
Figure 5-23
Layout of Node ID 0 in the OC-3 UPSR example (Figure 5-15)
Figure 5-24
Layout of Node IDs 1 – 3 in the OC-3 UPSR example (Figure 5-15)
Figure 5-25
Connecting fiber to a four-node UPSR
Figure 5-26
Using the span shortcut menu to display circuits
Figure 5-27
Switching UPSR circuits
Figure 5-28
An ONS 15454 with multiple subtending rings
Figure 5-29
A UPSR subtending from a BLSR
5-37
Figure 5-30
A BLSR subtending from a BLSR
5-39
Figure 5-31
Viewing subtending BLSRs on the network map
Figure 5-32
Configuring two BLSRs on the same node
Figure 5-33
A linear (point-to-point) ADM configuration
Figure 5-34
Verifying working slots in a protection group
Figure 5-35
Deleting a protection group
Figure 5-36
Converting a linear ADM to a UPSR
Figure 5-37
A UPSR displayed in network view
5-47
Figure 5-38
Converting a linear ADM to a BLSR
5-48
Figure 5-39
A path-protected mesh network
Figure 5-40
A PPMN virtual ring
Figure 6-1
Creating a circuit
Figure 6-2
Setting circuit routing preferences
Figure 6-3
Specifying circuit constraints
Figure 6-4
Creating a circuit
Figure 6-5
A VT1.5 monitor circuit received at an EC1-12 port
Figure 6-6
Editing UPSR selectors
Figure 6-7
Selecting the Edit Path Trace option
Figure 6-8
Setting up a path trace
Figure 6-9
Example #1: A VT1.5 circuit in a BLSR
Figure 6-10
Example #2: Two VT1.5 circuits in a BLSR
Figure 6-11
Example #3: VT1.5 circuit in a UPSR or 1+1 protection scheme
Figure 6-12
Example #4: Two VT1.5 circuits in UPSR or 1+1 protection scheme
Figure 6-13
A VT1.5 tunnel
Figure 6-14
A six-node ring with two VT1.5 tunnels
Figure 6-15
A DCC tunnel
5-27
5-28
5-29
5-29
5-31
5-33
5-34
5-37
5-40
5-41
5-41
5-43
5-44
5-45
5-51
5-52
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6
6-9
6-11
6-14
6-14
6-17
6-17
6-18
6-18
6-19
6-20
6-22
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xviii
November 2001
Figures
Figure 6-16
Selecting DCC tunnel end points
Figure 7-1
Provisioning line parameters on the DS1-14 card
Figure 7-2
Provisioning thresholds for the OC48 IR 1310 card
Figure 7-3
IPPM provisioned for STS 1 on an OC-12 card
Figure 7-4
AIC alarm input and output
Figure 7-5
External alarms and controls using a virtual wire
Figure 7-6
Provisioning external alarms on the AIC card
Figure 7-7
Provisioning local orderwire
Figure 7-8
Viewing slot protection status
Figure 8-1
Viewing performance monitoring information
Figure 8-2
Time interval buttons on the card view Performance tab
Figure 8-3
Near End and Far End buttons on the card view Performance tab
Figure 8-4
Signal-type menus for a DS3XM-6 card
Figure 8-5
Baseline button for clearing displayed PM counts
Figure 8-6
Clear button for clearing PM counts
Figure 8-7
Threshold tab for setting threshold values
Figure 8-8
STS tab for enabling IPPM
Figure 8-9
Viewing pointer justification count parameters
Figure 8-10
Line tab for enabling pointer justification count parameters
Figure 8-11
Monitored signal types for the EC1 card
Figure 8-12
PM read points on the EC1 card
Figure 8-13
Monitored signal types for the DS1 and DS1N cards
Figure 8-14
PM read points on the DS1 and DS1N cards
Figure 8-15
Monitored signal types for the DS3 and DS3N cards
Figure 8-16
PM read points on the DS3 and DS3N cards
Figure 8-17
Monitored signal types for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E cards
Figure 8-18
PM read points on the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E cards
Figure 8-19
Monitored signal types for the DS3XM-6 card
Figure 8-20
PM read points on the DS3XM-6 card
Figure 8-21
PM read points on the OC-3 card
Figure 8-22
Monitored signal types for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 cards
Figure 8-23
PM read points on the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 cards
Figure 9-1
A gigabit interface converter
Figure 9-2
Provisioning Ethernet ports
Figure 9-3
A Multicard EtherSwitch configuration
6-23
7-3
7-19
7-24
7-26
7-27
7-28
7-30
7-32
8-2
8-3
8-5
8-6
8-7
8-8
8-10
8-11
8-12
8-13
8-14
8-14
8-18
8-18
8-22
8-23
8-25
8-25
8-28
8-29
8-34
8-37
8-38
9-2
9-3
9-4
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xix
Figures
Figure 9-4
A Single-card EtherSwitch configuration
Figure 9-5
A Multicard EtherSwitch point-to-point circuit
Figure 9-6
A Single-card Etherswitch point-to-point circuit
Figure 9-7
Provisioning an Ethernet circuit
Figure 9-8
Choosing a circuit source
Figure 9-9
A shared packet ring Ethernet circuit
Figure 9-10
Choosing a VLAN name and ID
Figure 9-11
Selecting VLANs
Figure 9-12
Adding a span
Figure 9-13
Viewing a span
Figure 9-14
A Hub and Spoke Ethernet circuit
Figure 9-15
Ethernet manual cross-connects
Figure 9-16
Creating an Ethernet circuit
Figure 9-17
Selecting VLANs
Figure 9-18
Creating an Ethernet circuit
Figure 9-19
Selecting VLANs
Figure 9-20
A Q-tag moving through a VLAN
Figure 9-21
The priority queuing process
Figure 9-22
Configuring VLAN membership for individual Ethernet ports
Figure 9-23
An STP blocked path
Figure 9-24
The spanning tree map on the circuit screen
Figure 9-25
MAC addresses recorded in the MAC table
Figure 9-26
Creating RMON thresholds
Figure 10-1
Viewing alarms in the CTC node view
10-2
Figure 10-2
Selecting the Affected Circuits option
10-4
Figure 10-3
Highlighted circuit appears
Figure 10-4
Viewing fault conditions retrieved under the Conditions tabs
Figure 10-5
Viewing all alarms reported for the current session
Figure 10-6
The LCD panel
Figure 10-7
Alarm profiles screen showing the default profiles of the listed alarms
Figure 10-8
Node view of a DS1 alarm profile
Figure 10-9
Card view of a DS1 alarm profile
Figure 10-10
The suppress alarms checkbox
Figure 11-1
A basic network managed by SNMP
Figure 11-2
An SNMP agent gathering data from an MIB and sending traps to the manager
9-5
9-7
9-7
9-8
9-8
9-10
9-11
9-12
9-12
9-13
9-14
9-17
9-17
9-18
9-19
9-20
9-23
9-24
9-25
9-26
9-28
9-30
9-33
10-5
10-6
10-7
10-8
10-9
10-12
10-12
10-14
11-2
11-2
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xx
November 2001
Figures
Figure 11-3
Example of the primary SNMP components
Figure 11-4
Setting up SNMP
Figure 11-5
Viewing trap destinations
Figure A-1
Multiple protection domains
Figure A-2
Secondary sources and drops
Figure A-3
Alternate paths for virtual UPSR segments
Figure A-4
Mixing 1+1 or BLSR protected links with a UPSR
Figure A-5
Ethernet shared packet ring routing
Figure A-6
Ethernet and UPSR
11-3
11-4
11-5
A-1
A-3
A-4
A-4
A-5
A-5
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xxi
Figures
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xxii
November 2001
T A B L E S
Table 1-1
Installation Tasks
Table 1-2
External Timing Pin Assignments for BITS
Table 1-3
LAN Pin Assignments
Table 1-4
Craft Interface Pin Assignments
Table 1-5
Pin Assignments for AMP Champ Connectors (Shaded Area Corresponds to White/Orange Binder
Group) 1-41
Table 1-6
Pin Assignments for AMP Champ Connectors (shielded DS1 cable)
Table 1-7
Slot and Card Symbols
Table 1-8
Card Ports, Line Rates, and Connectors
Table 1-9
LED Activity during TCC+ and XC/XCVT/XC10G Card Installation
Table 1-10
LED Activity during Optical and Electrical Card Installation
Table 1-11
Installation Checklist
Table 1-12
ONS 15454 Software and Hardware Compatibility
Table 2-1
JRE Compatibility
Table 2-2
Computer Requirements for CTC
Table 2-3
Setting Up Windows 95/98, Windows NT, and Windows 2000 PCs for Direct ONS 15454 Connections
Table 2-4
Node View Card Colors
Table 2-5
Node View Tabs and Subtabs
Table 2-6
Node Status
Table 2-7
Performing Network Management Tasks in Network View
Table 2-8
Managing Domains
Table 2-9
CTC Window Navigation
Table 2-10
Table Display Options
Table 2-11
Table Data with Export Capability
Table 3-1
ONS 15454 Security Levels—Node View
Table 3-2
ONS 15454 User Idle Times
Table 3-3
Protection Types
Table 3-4
SSM Generation 1 Message Set
3-14
Table 3-5
SSM Generation 2 Message Set
3-14
Table 4-1
General ONS 15454 IP Networking Checklist
Table 4-2
Sample Routing Table Entries
Table 5-1
ONS 15454 Rings
1-3
1-34
1-35
1-35
1-42
1-46
1-46
1-48
1-49
1-67
1-68
2-2
2-3
2-6
2-14
2-15
2-16
2-17
2-19
2-23
2-25
2-26
3-6
3-7
3-9
4-2
4-16
5-1
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xxiii
Tables
Table 5-2
Two-Fiber BLSR Capacity
5-7
Table 5-3
Four-Fiber BLSR Capacity
5-7
Table 6-1
ONS 15454 Cards Supporting J1 Path Trace
Table 6-2
Path Trace Source and Drop Provisioning
Table 6-3
XC, XCVT, and XC10G Card STS Cross-Connect Capacities
Table 6-4
XC, XCVT, and XC10G VT1.5 Capacities
Table 6-5
VT1.5-Mapped STS Use in Figure 6-6
Table 6-6
DCC Tunnels
Table 7-1
DS-N Card Provisioning Overview
Table 7-2
DS-1 Card Parameters
7-4
Table 7-3
DS-3 Card Parameters
7-7
Table 7-4
DS3E Card Parameters
7-9
Table 7-5
DS3XM-6 Parameters
7-12
Table 7-6
EC1-12 Card Parameters
Table 7-7
OC-N Card Line Settings on the Provisioning > Line Tab
Table 7-8
OC-N Card Threshold Settings on the Provisioning > Thresholds Tab
Table 7-9
OC-N – SDH Over SONET Mapping
Table 8-1
Traffic Cards That Terminate the Line, Called LTEs
Table 8-2
Near-End Section PMs for the EC1 Card
Table 8-3
Near-End Line Layer PMs for the EC1 Card
Table 8-4
Near-End SONET Path PMs for the EC1 Card
Table 8-5
Near-End SONET Path BIP PMs for the EC1 Card
Table 8-6
Far-End Line Layer PMs for the EC-1 Card
Table 8-7
DS1 Line PMs for the DS1 and DS1N Cards
Table 8-8
DS1 Receive Path PMs for the DS1 and DS1N Cards
Table 8-9
DS1 Transmit Path PMs for the DS1 and DS1N Cards
Table 8-10
VT Path PMs for the DS1 and DS1N Cards
Table 8-11
SONET Path PMs for the DS1 and DS1N Cards
Table 8-12
Far-End VT Path PMs for the DS1 Card
Table 8-13
Near-End DS3 Line PMs for the DS3 and DS3N Cards
8-23
Table 8-14
Near-End DS3 Path PMs for the DS3 and DS3N Cards
8-23
Table 8-15
Near-End SONET Path PMs for the DS3 and DS3N Cards
Table 8-16
Near-End DS3 Line PMs for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Cards
8-26
Table 8-17
Near-End DS3 Path PMs for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Cards
8-26
Table 8-18
Near-End CP-bit Path PMs for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Cards
6-12
6-13
6-16
6-16
6-20
6-21
7-2
7-15
7-18
7-20
7-23
8-10
8-15
8-15
8-16
8-17
8-17
8-19
8-19
8-20
8-20
8-21
8-22
8-24
8-26
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xxiv
November 2001
Tables
Table 8-19
Near-End SONET Path PMs for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Cards
Table 8-20
Far-End CP-bit Path PMs for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Cards
Table 8-21
Near-End DS3 Line PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
8-29
Table 8-22
Near-End DS3 Path PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
8-30
Table 8-23
Near-End CP-bit Path PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Table 8-24
Near-End DS1 Path PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Table 8-25
Near-End VT PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Table 8-26
Near-End SONET Path PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Table 8-27
Far-End CP-bit Path PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Table 8-28
Far-End VT PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Table 8-29
Near-End Section PMs for the OC-3 Card
Table 8-30
Near-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-3 Card
Table 8-31
Near-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-3 Cards
Table 8-32
Near-End SONET Path H-byte PMs for the OC-3 Card
Table 8-33
Near-End SONET Path PMs for the OC-3 Card
Table 8-34
Far-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-3 Card
Table 8-35
Near-End Section PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards
Table 8-36
Near-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards
Table 8-37
Near-End SONET Path H-byte PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards
Table 8-38
Near-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards
Table 8-39
Near-End SONET Path PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards
Table 8-40
Far-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards
Table 9-1
Card-level LEDS
Table 9-2
Port-level LEDs
Table 9-3
Available GBICs
Table 9-4
ONS 15454 and ONS 15327 Ethernet Circuit Combinations
Table 9-5
Priority Queuing
Table 9-6
Port Settings
Table 9-7
Spanning Tree Parameters
Table 9-8
Spanning Tree Configuration
Table 9-9
Ethernet Parameters
Table 9-10
Ethernet Threshold Variables (MIBs)
Table 10-1
Alarms Column Descriptions
Table 10-2
Color Codes for Alarms, Conditions, and Events
Table 10-3
Alarm Display
8-27
8-28
8-30
8-31
8-31
8-32
8-32
8-33
8-34
8-35
8-35
8-36
8-36
8-37
8-38
8-39
8-39
8-40
8-41
8-42
9-1
9-2
9-2
9-6
9-24
9-25
9-27
9-28
9-29
9-31
10-2
10-3
10-3
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xxv
Tables
Table 10-4
Conditions Columns Description
Table 10-5
Alarm Profile Buttons
Table 10-6
Alarm Profile Editing Options
Table 11-1
SNMP Message Types
Table 11-2
IETF Standard MIBs Implemented in the ONS 15454 SNMP Agent
Table 11-3
SNMP Trap Variable Bindings
Table 11-4
Traps Supported in the ONS 15454
Table A-1
Bidirectional STS/VT/Regular Multicard EtherSwitch/Point-to-Point (straight) Ethernet Circuits
Table A-2
Unidirectional STS/VT Circuit
Table A-3
Multicard Group Ethernet Shared Packet Ring Circuit
Table A-4
Bidirectional VT Tunnels
Table B-1
Standards
Table B-2
Card Approvals
10-6
10-10
10-11
11-5
11-6
11-7
11-8
A-5
A-6
A-6
A-6
B-1
B-2
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xxvi
November 2001
P R O C E D U R E S
Hardware Installation
Reverse the Mounting Bracket to Fit a 19-Inch Rack
1-7
Mount the Shelf Assembly in a Rack (One Person)
1-8
Mount the Shelf Assembly in a Rack (Two People)
1-9
Mount Multiple Shelf Assemblies in a Rack
1-9
Open the Front Cabinet Compartment (Door)
1-12
Remove the Front Door
1-13
Remove the Backplane Sheet Metal Covers
Remove the Lower Backplane Cover
1-15
1-16
Install a BNC, High-Density BNC, or SMB EIA
Install the AMP Champ EIA
1-22
1-24
Install the Bottom Brackets and Air Filter
Install the Fan-Tray Assembly
Install Redundant Power Feeds
1-26
1-27
1-30
Install Alarm Wires on the Backplane
1-33
Install Timing Wires on the Backplane
Install LAN Wires on the Backplane
1-34
1-35
Install Craft Interface Wires on the Backplane
Install Coaxial Cable With BNC Connectors
1-36
1-36
Install Coaxial Cable With High-Density BNC Connectors
Install Coaxial Cable with SMB Connectors
1-38
1-38
Install DS-1 Cables Using Electrical Interface Adapters (Balun)
Install DS-1 AMP Champ Cables on the AMP Champ EIA
Install the TCC+ and XC/XCVT/XC10G Cards
1-48
1-49
Install Gigabit Interface Converters
1-50
Remove a Gigabit Interface Converter
Install Fiber-Optic Cables on OC-N Cards
Install the Fiber Boot
1-43
1-47
Install Optical, Electrical, and Ethernet Cards
Install the AIC Card
1-40
1-52
1-53
1-53
Route Fiber-Optic Cables in the Shelf Assembly
1-56
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xxvii
Procedures
Route the Coaxial Cables
1-57
Route DS-1 Twisted-Pair Cables
Install the BIC Rear Cover
1-58
1-59
Attach Ferrites to Power Cabling
1-61
Attach Ferrites to Wire-Wrap Pin Fields
1-63
Software Installation
Run the CTC Setup Wizard
2-4
Set Up the Environment Variable (Solaris installations only)
Reference the JRE (Solaris installations only)
2-5
Creating a Direct Connection to an ONS 15454
Access the ONS 15454 from a LAN
2-4
2-5
2-7
Disable Proxy Service Using Internet Explorer (Windows)
2-7
Disable Proxy Service Using Netscape (Windows and Solaris)
Log into the ONS 15454
2-9
Create a Login Node Group
2-11
Set the IIOP Listener Port on the ONS 15454
Set the IIOP Listener Port on CTC
2-12
2-13
Modify the Network or Domain Background Color
Change the Network View Background Image
Add a Node to the Current Session
2-21
Print CTC Window and Table Data
2-27
Export CTC Data
2-8
2-19
2-20
2-28
Node Setup
Add the Node Name, Contact, Location, Date, and Time
Set Up Network Information
3-2
3-3
Change IP Address, Default Router, and Network Mask Using the LCD
Create New Users
Edit a User
Delete a User
3-8
3-8
3-8
Create Protection Groups
Enable Ports
3-4
3-9
3-10
Edit Protection Groups
3-11
Delete Protection Groups
Set up ONS 15454 Timing
3-11
3-14
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xxviii
November 2001
Procedures
Set Up Internal Timing
3-17
IP Networking
Create a Static Route
Set up OSPF
4-8
4-12
SONET Topologies
Install the BLSR Trunk Cards
5-11
Create the BLSR DCC Terminations
Enable the BLSR Ports
Provision the BLSR
5-13
5-13
5-14
Upgrade From a Two-Fiber to a Four-Fiber BLSR
Add a BLSR Node
5-16
5-18
Remove a BLSR Node
5-21
Move a BLSR Trunk Card
5-24
Install the UPSR Trunk Cards
5-30
Configure the UPSR DCC Terminations
Enable the UPSR Ports
Switch UPSR Traffic
Add a UPSR Node
5-31
5-32
5-32
5-34
Remove a UPSR Node
5-35
Subtend a UPSR from a BLSR
5-38
Subtend a BLSR from a UPSR
5-38
Subtend a BLSR from a BLSR
5-40
Create a Linear ADM
5-42
Convert a Linear ADM to UPSR
Convert a Linear ADM to a BLSR
5-42
5-47
Circuits and Tunnels
Create an Automatically Routed Circuit
Create a Manually Routed Circuit
6-2
6-6
Create a Unidirectional Circuit with Multiple Drops
Create a Monitor Circuit
6-9
Search for ONS 15454 Circuits
Edit a UPSR Circuit
6-8
6-10
6-11
Create a J1 Path Trace
6-13
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xxix
Procedures
Provision a DCC Tunnel
6-22
Card Provisioning
Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the DS-1 Card
7-3
Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the DS-3 Card
7-6
Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the DS3E Card
7-9
Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the DS3XM-6 Card
Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the EC-1 Card
Provision Line Transmission Settings for OC-N Cards
Provision Threshold Settings for OC-N Cards
Provision an OC-N Card for SDH
7-18
7-23
7-25
7-27
Provision External Controls
Provision AIC Orderwire
7-14
7-19
Enable Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring
Provision External Alarms
7-12
7-28
7-29
Convert DS1-14 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection
7-31
Convert DS3-12 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection
7-33
Performance Monitoring
View PMs
8-2
Select Fifteen-Minute PM Intervals on the Performance Monitoring Screen
8-3
Select Twenty-Four Hour PM Intervals on the Performance Monitoring Screen
Select Near End PMs on the Performance Monitoring Screen
Select Far End PMs on the Performance Monitoring Screen
8-5
8-5
Select Signal-Type Menus on the Performance Monitoring Screen
Use the Baseline Button on the Performance Monitoring Screen
Use the Clear Button on the Performance Monitoring Screen
Enable Pointer Justification Count Performance Monitoring
8-4
8-6
8-7
8-8
8-13
Ethernet Operation
Provision Ethernet Ports
9-3
Provision an EtherSwitch Point-to-Point Circuit (Multicard or Single-Card)
Provision a Shared Packet Ring
9-7
9-10
Provision a Hub and Spoke Ethernet Circuit
9-14
Provision a Single-card EtherSwitch Manual Cross-Connect
Provision a Multicard EtherSwitch Manual Cross-Connect
9-17
9-19
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xxx
November 2001
Procedures
Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership
Enable Spanning Tree on Ethernet Ports
View the Spanning Tree Map
9-24
9-26
9-28
Retrieve the MAC Table Information
9-30
Creating Ethernet RMON Alarm Thresholds
9-32
Alarm Monitoring and Management
View Affected Circuits for a Specific Alarm
10-4
View Alarm Counts on a Specific Slot and Port
Create an Alarm Profile
10-9
Apply an Alarm Profile at the Card View
Apply an Alarm Profile at the Node View
Suppressing Alarms
10-8
10-13
10-13
10-14
SNMP
Set Up SNMP Support
11-3
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xxxi
Procedures
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xxxii
November 2001
About This Manual
This section explains who should read the Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide, how the
document is organized, related documentation, document conventions, how to order print and CD-ROM
documentation, and how to obtain technical assistance.
Audience
This guide is for Cisco ONS 15454 administrators who are responsible for hardware installation,
software installation, node setup, and node and network configuration. For troubleshooting,
maintenance, and card detail reference information, see the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and
Maintenance Guide. Users who require TL1 information should consult the Cisco ONS 15454 TL1
Command Guide.
Organization
Chapter Number and Title
Description
Chapter 1, “Hardware
Installation”
Provides rack installation and power instructions for the ONS
15454, including component installation such as cards, cables,
EIAs, and GBICs.
Chapter 2, “Software
Installation”
Explains how to install the ONS 15454 software application and
use its graphical user interface (GUI).
Chapter 3, “Node Setup”
Explains how to provision a node, including setting up timing,
protection, and security and storing general node and network
information.
Chapter 4, “IP Networking”
Explains how to set up ONS 15454s in internet protocol (IP)
networks and provides scenarios showing nodes in common IP
configurations. It explains how to create static routes and use the
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol.
Chapter 5, “SONET Topologies” Provides instructions for configuring UPSRs, BLSRs,
subtending rings, linear 1+1 ADM protection, PPMNs, and DCC
tunnels.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xxxiii
About This Manual
Related Documentation
Chapter Number and Title
Description
Chapter 6, “Circuits and
Tunnels”
Describes how to create standard STS and VT1.5 circuits as well
as VT tunnels, multiple drop circuits, and monitor circuits. The
chapter also explains how to edit UPSR circuits and create path
traces to monitor traffic.
Chapter 7, “Card Provisioning”
Provides procedures for changing the default transmission
parameters for ONS 15454 electrical and optical cards. The
chapter also includes provisioning the Alarm Interface
Controller card, enabling optical cards for SDH, and converting
DS-1 and DS-3 cards from 1:1 to 1:N card protection.
Chapter 8, “Performance
Monitoring”
Provides performance monitoring thresholds for ONS 15454
electrical and optical cards.
Chapter 9, “Ethernet Operation” Explains how to use the Ethernet features of the ONS 15454,
including transporting Ethernet traffic over SONET, creating
and provisioning VLANs, protecting Ethernet traffic,
provisioning Multicard and Single-card EtherSwitch,
provisioning several types of Ethernet circuits, viewing Ethernet
performance data, and creating Ethernet remote monitoring
(RMON) alarm thresholds.
Chapter 10, “Alarm Monitoring
and Management”
Explains how to view and manage alarms with CTC, which
includes viewing current and historical alarm data, creating
alarm profiles, and suppressing alarms. To find procedures for
clearing CTC alarms, see the “Alarm Troubleshooting” chapter
of the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Reference Guide.
Chapter 11, “SNMP”
Explains how Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is
used with the ONS 15454.
Appendix A, “Circuit Routing”
Explains automated and manual circuit routing in detail.
Appendix B, “Regulatory and
Compliance Requirements”
Provides customer, industry, and government requirements met
by the ONS 15454. Installation warnings are also included.
Appendix C, “Acronyms”
Defines commonly-used acronyms.
Appendix D, “Glossary”
Defines commonly-used terms.
Related Documentation
Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide, Release 3.1
Cisco ONS 15454 TL1 Command Guide, Release 3.1
Cisco ONS 15454 Product Overview, Release 3.1
Release Notes for the Cisco ONS 15454, Release 3.1
Cisco Warranty Services for ONG Products
Cisco ONS 15454 Quick Configuration Guide
Cisco ONS 15454 Quick Installation Guide
Cisco ONS 15454 Quick Reference for TL1 Commands, Release 3.1
Related products:
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xxxiv
November 2001
About This Manual
Conventions
Cisco ONS 15216 EDFA1 Operations Guide
Installing the Cisco ONS 15216 DWDM Filters
Installing Cisco ONS 15216 OADMS
Installing Cisco ONS 15216 Optical Performance Manager Operations Guide
Conventions
The following conventions are used throughout this publication:
Note
Means reader take note. Notes contain helpful suggestions or useful background information.
Caution
Means reader be careful. In this situation, you might do something that could result in equipment
damage or loss of data.
Warning
Means reader be careful. In this situation, you might do something that could result in harm to
yourself or others.
Tip
Means the information might help you solve a problem.
Convention
Definition
Telcordia
Replaces all instances of Bellcore, the former name of
Telcordia Technologies, Inc.
Cisco Transport Controller
(CTC)
Replaces all instances of Cerent Management System
(CMS)
Bold
Denotes icons, buttons, or tabs that the user must
select
>
Used to separate consecutive actions; for example,
“click the Maintenance>Protection>Ring tabs”
Procedure:
Precedes all procedures; a horizontal line indicates the
end of each procedure
Obtaining Documentation
The following sections provide sources for obtaining documentation from Cisco Systems.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xxxv
About This Manual
Obtaining Documentation
World Wide Web
You can access the most current Cisco documentation on the World Wide Web at the following sites:
•
http://www.cisco.com
•
http://www-china.cisco.com
•
http://www-europe.cisco.com
Optical Networking Product Documentation CD-ROM
Optical networking-related documentation, including Release 3.1 of the Cisco ONS 15454 Installation
and Operations Guide, Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Reference Guide, and the Cisco ONS
15454 TL1 Command Guide, is available in a CD-ROM package that ships with your product. The
Optical Networking Product Documentation CD-ROM, a member of the Cisco Connection Family, is
updated as required. Therefore, it might be more current than printed documentation. The CD-ROM
package is available as a single package or as an annual subscription. You can also access Cisco
documentation on the World Wide Web at http://www.cisco.com, http://www-china.cisco.com, or
http://www.europe.cisco.com.
Ordering Documentation
Cisco documentation is available in the following ways:
•
Registered Cisco Direct Customers can order Cisco Product documentation, including the Optical
Networking Product CD-ROM, from the Networking Products MarketPlace:
http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/order/order_root.pl
•
Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by
calling Cisco corporate headquarters (California, USA) at 408 526-7208 or, in North America, by
calling 800 553-NETS(6387).
Documentation Feedback
If you are reading Cisco product documentation on the World Wide Web, you can submit technical
comments electronically. Click Feedback in the toolbar and select Documentation. After you complete
the form, click Submit to send it to Cisco.
You can e-mail your comments to bug-doc@cisco.com.
To submit your comments by mail, for your convenience many documents contain a response card
behind the front cover. Otherwise, you can mail your comments to the following address:
Cisco Systems, Inc.
Document Resource Connection
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-9883
We appreciate your comments.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xxxvi
November 2001
About This Manual
Obtaining Technical Assistance
Obtaining Technical Assistance
Cisco provides Cisco.com as a starting point for all technical assistance. Customers and partners can
obtain documentation, troubleshooting tips, and sample configurations from online tools. For Cisco.com
registered users, additional troubleshooting tools are available from the TAC website.
Cisco.com
Cisco.com is the foundation of a suite of interactive, networked services that provides immediate, open
access to Cisco information and resources at anytime, from anywhere in the world. This highly
integrated Internet application is a powerful, easy-to-use tool for doing business with Cisco.
Cisco.com provides a broad range of features and services to help customers and partners streamline
business processes and improve productivity. Through Cisco.com, you can find information about Cisco
and our networking solutions, services, and programs. In addition, you can resolve technical issues with
online technical support, download and test software packages, and order Cisco learning materials and
merchandise. Valuable online skill assessment, training, and certification programs are also available.
Customers and partners can self-register on Cisco.com to obtain additional personalized information and
services. Registered users can order products, check on the status of an order, access technical support,
and view benefits specific to their relationships with Cisco.
To access Cisco.com, go to the following website:
http://www.cisco.com
Technical Assistance Center
The Cisco TAC website is available to all customers who need technical assistance with a Cisco product
or technology that is under warranty or covered by a maintenance contract.
Contacting TAC by Using the Cisco TAC Website
If you have a priority level 3 (P3) or priority level 4 (P4) problem, contact TAC by going to the TAC
website:
http://www.cisco.com/tac
P3 and P4 level problems are defined as follows:
•
P3—Your network performance is degraded. Network functionality is noticeably impaired, but most
business operations continue.
•
P4—You need information or assistance on Cisco product capabilities, product installation, or basic
product configuration.
In each of the above cases, use the Cisco TAC website to quickly find answers to your questions.
To register for Cisco.com, go to the following website:
http://www.cisco.com/register/
If you cannot resolve your technical issue by using the TAC online resources, Cisco.com registered users
can open a case online by using the TAC Case Open tool at the following website:
http://www.cisco.com/tac/caseopen
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
xxxvii
About This Manual
Obtaining Technical Assistance
Contacting TAC by Telephone
If you have a priority level 1(P1) or priority level 2 (P2) problem, contact TAC by telephone and
immediately open a case. The toll-free Optical Networking Assistance number is 1-877-323-7368.
P1 and P2 level problems are defined as follows:
•
P1—Your production network is down, causing a critical impact to business operations if service is
not restored quickly. No workaround is available.
•
P2—Your production network is severely degraded, affecting significant aspects of your business
operations. No workaround is available.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
xxxviii
November 2001
C H A P T E R
1
Hardware Installation
This chapter provides procedures for installing the Cisco ONS 15454. Chapter topics include:
Note
•
Installation equipment
•
Rack installation
•
Front door access
•
Backplane covers
•
Fan-tray assembly
•
Power and ground installation
•
Backplane pin connections (alarms, timing, LAN, and craft interface)
•
Coaxial and DS-1 cable installation
•
Card installation
•
Fiber-optic cable installation
•
Cable routing and management
•
Ferrite installation
•
Hardware specifications
•
Hardware and software compatibility
The Cisco ONS 15454 assembly is intended for use with telecommunications equipment only.
Warning
Only trained and qualified personnel should be allowed to install, replace, or service this
equipment.
Warning
This equipment must be installed and maintained by service personnel as defined by AS/NZS 3260.
Incorrectly connecting this equipment to a general purpose outlet could be hazardous. The
telecommunications lines must be disconnected 1) before unplugging the main power connector
and/or 2) while the housing is open.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-1
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Installation Overview
Warning
The ONS 15454 is intended for installation in restricted access areas. A restricted access area is
where access can only be gained by service personnel through the use of a special tool, lock, key,
or other means of security. A restricted access area is controlled by the authority responsible for
the location.
Warning
The ONS 15454 is suitable for mounting on concrete or other non-combustible surfaces only.
Caution
Note
Unused card slots should be filled with a blank faceplate (Cisco P/N 15454-BLANK). The blank
faceplate ensures proper airflow when operating the ONS 15454 without the front door attached,
although Cisco recommends that the front door remain attached.
The ONS 15454 is designed to comply with GR-1089-CORE Type 2 and Type 4. Install and operate
the ONS 15454 only in environments that do not expose wiring or cabling to the outside plant.
Acceptable applications include Central Office Environments (COEs), Electronic Equipment
Enclosures (EEEs), Controlled Environment Vaults (CEVs), huts, and Customer Premise
Environments (CPEs).
1.1 Installation Overview
When installed in an equipment rack, the ONS 15454 assembly is typically connected to a fuse and alarm
panel to provide centralized alarm connection points and distributed power for the ONS 15454. Fuse and
alarm panels are third-party equipment and are not described in this documentation. If you are unsure
about the requirements or specifications for a fuse and alarm panel, consult the documentation for the
related equipment. The front door of the ONS 15454 allows access to the shelf assembly, fan-tray
assembly, and cable-management area. The backplanes provide access to alarm contacts, external
interface contacts, power terminals, and BNC/SMB connectors.
Warning
The ONS 15454 relies on the protective devices in the building installation to protect against short
circuit, overcurrent, and grounding faults. Ensure that the protective devices are properly rated to
protect the system, and that they comply with national and local codes.
Warning
Incorporate a readily-accessible, two-poled disconnect device in the fixed wiring.
You can mount the ONS 15454 in a 19- or 23-inch rack. The shelf assembly weighs approximately 55
pounds with no cards installed and features a front door for added security, a fan tray module for cooling,
and extensive cable-management space.
ONS 15454 optical cards have SC connectors on the card faceplate. Fiber optic cables are routed into
the front of the destination cards. Electrical cards (DS-1, DS-3, DS3XM-6, and EC-1) require electrical
interface assemblies (EIAs) to provide the cable connection points for the shelf assembly. In most cases,
EIAs are ordered with the ONS 15454 and come pre-installed on the backplane. See the “Backplane
Access” section on page 1-14 for more information about the EIAs.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-2
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Installation Equipment
The ONS 15454 is powered using -48V DC power. Negative, return, and ground power terminals are
accessible on the backplane.
Table 1-1 lists the tasks required to install an ONS 15454.
Table 1-1
Note
Installation Tasks
Task
Reference
Mount the ONS 15454 in the rack.
See the “Rack Installation” section on page 1-5.
Install the EIAs.
See the “Install a BNC, High-Density BNC, or SMB EIA”
procedure on page 1-22.
Install the fan-tray assembly.
See the “Fan-Tray Assembly Installation” section on page 1-25.
Ground the equipment.
See the “Power and Ground Installation” section on page 1-28.
Run the power cables and fuse the
power connections.
See the “Power and Ground Installation” section on page 1-28.
Connect the backplane pins.
See the “Alarm, Timing, LAN, and Craft Pin Connections”
section on page 1-32.
Install the coaxial cable and DS-1
cable on the back of the unit.
See the “Coaxial Cable Installation” section on page 1-36 and
the “DS-1 Cable Installation” section on page 1-39.
Install the cards.
See the “Card Installation” section on page 1-44.
Install the fiber-optic cables.
See the “Fiber-Optic Cable Installation” section on page 1-52.
In this chapter, the terms “ONS 15454” and “shelf assembly” are used interchangeably. In the
installation context, these terms have the same meaning. Otherwise, shelf assembly refers to the
physical steel enclosure that holds cards and connects power, and ONS 15454 refers to the entire
system, both hardware and software.
Install the ONS 15454 in compliance with your local and national electrical codes:
•
United States: National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70; United States National Electrical
Code
•
Canada: Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, CSA C22.1
•
Other countries: If local and national electrical codes, are not available, refer to IEC 364, Part 1
through Part 7.
Warning
Read the installation instructions before you connect the system to its power source.
Warning
Dispose of this product according to all national laws and regulations.
1.2 Installation Equipment
You will need the following tools and equipment to install and test the ONS 15454.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-3
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Installation Equipment
1.2.1 Included Materials
The following materials are required and are shipped with the ONS 15454. The number in parentheses
gives the quantity of the item included in the package.
•
#12-24 x 3/4 pan head phillips mounting screws (8)
•
#12 -24 x 3/4 socket set screws (2)
•
T-handle #12-24 hex tool for set screws (1)
•
ESD wrist strap with 1.8 m (6 ft) coil cable (1)
•
Tie wraps (10)
•
Pinned Allen key for front door (1)
•
Spacers (4)
•
Spacer mounting brackets (2)
•
Clear plastic rear cover (1)
•
Bottom brackets for the fan-tray air filter
1.2.2 User-Supplied Materials
The following materials and tools are required but are not supplied with the ONS 15454.
•
Equipment rack (22 inches total width for a 19-inch rack; 26 inches total width for a 23-inch rack)
•
Fuse panel
•
Power cable (from fuse and alarm panel to assembly), #10 AWG, copper conductors, 194°F [90°C])
•
Ground cable #6 AWG stranded
•
Alarm cable pairs for all alarm connections, #22 or #24 AWG, solid tinned
•
Shielded Building Integrated Timing Supply (BITS) clock cable pair #22 or #24, solid tinned
•
Single mode SC fiber jumpers with UPC polish (55 dB or better) for optical cards
•
Shielded coaxial cable terminated with SMB or BNC connectors for DS-3 cards
•
Shielded ABAM cable terminated with AMP Champ connectors or unterminated for DS-1 cards
with #22 or #24 AWG ground wire (typically about two feet in length)
•
Tie wraps and/or lacing cord
•
Labels
•
Listed pressure terminal connectors such as ring and fork types; connectors must be suitable for
10AWG copper conductors
1.2.2.1 Tools Needed
•
#2 phillips screw driver
•
Medium slot head screw driver
•
Small slot head screw driver
•
Wire wrapper
•
Wire cutters
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-4
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Rack Installation
•
Wire strippers
•
Crimp tool
1.2.2.2 Test Equipment
•
Volt meter
•
Power meter (for use with fiber optics only)
•
Bit Error Rate (BER) tester, DS-1 and DS-3
1.3 Rack Installation
Warning
To prevent the equipment from overheating, do not operate it in an area that exceeds the maximum
recommended ambient temperature of 131°F (55°C). To prevent airflow restriction, allow at least 3
inches (7.6 cm) of clearance around the ventilation openings.
The ONS 15454 is easily mounted in a 19- or 23-inch equipment rack. The shelf assembly projects five
inches from the front of the rack. It mounts in both EIA-standard and Telcordia-standard racks. The shelf
assembly is a total of 17 inches wide with no mounting ears attached. With the mounting ears attached,
the shelf assembly is 19 inches wide. Ring runs are not provided by Cisco and may hinder side-by-side
installation of shelves where space is limited.
The ONS 15454 measures 18.5 inches high, 19 or 23 inches wide (depending on which way the mounting
ears are attached), and 12 inches deep (47 by 48.3 by 30.5 cm). You can install up to four ONS 15454s
in a seven-foot equipment rack. The ONS 15454 must have 1 inch of airspace below the installed
shelf assembly to allow air flow to the fan intake. If a second ONS 15454 is installed underneath
the shelf assembly, the air ramp on top of the lower shelf assembly provides the air spacing needed
and should not be modified in any way. Figure 1-1 shows the dimensions of the ONS 15454.
Note
The 10 Gbps compatible shelf assembly (15454-SA-10G) and fan-tray assembly (15454-FTA3) are
required with the ONS 15454 XC10G, OC-192, and OC-48 any slot (AS) cards.
Warning
The ONS 15454 should be installed in the lower rack position or mounted above another ONS
15454 shelf assembly.
Warning
The ONS 15454 must have 1 inch of airspace below the installed shelf assembly to allow air flow
to the fan intake. The air ramp (the angled piece of sheet metal on top of the shelf assembly)
provides this spacing and should not be modified in any way.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-5
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Rack Installation
Figure 1-1
Cisco ONS 15454 dimensions
Top View
22" total width
12"
19" or 23" between mounting screw holes
Front View
22" total width
Side View
5"
32099
18.5"
12"
19" or 23" between mounting screw holes
1.3.1 Reversible Mounting Bracket
Caution
Use only the fastening hardware provided with the ONS 15454 to prevent loosening, deterioration,
and electromechanical corrosion of the hardware and joined material.
Caution
When mounting the ONS 15454 in a frame with a non-conductive coating (such as paint, lacquer, or
enamel) either use the thread-forming screws provided with the ONS 15454 shipping kit, or remove
the coating from the threads to ensure electrical continuity.
The shelf assembly comes preset for installation in a 23-inch rack, but you can reverse the mounting
bracket to fit the smaller, 19-inch rack. The following steps describe how to reverse the shelf assembly
mounting bracket to fit a 19-inch rack.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-6
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Rack Installation
Procedure: Reverse the Mounting Bracket to Fit a 19-Inch Rack
Step 1
Remove the screws that attach the mounting bracket to the side of the shelf assembly.
Step 2
Flip the detached mounting bracket upside down.
Text imprinted on the mounting bracket will now also be upside down.
Step 3
Place the widest side of the mounting bracket flush against the shelf assembly (see Figure 1-2).
The narrow side of the mounting bracket should be towards the front of the shelf assembly. Text
imprinted on the mounting bracket should be visible and upside down.
Step 4
Align the mounting bracket screw holes against the shelf assembly screw holes.
Step 5
Insert the screws that were removed in Step 1 and tighten them.
Step 6
Repeat the procedure for the mounting bracket on the opposite side.
Figure 1-2
Reversing the mounting brackets (23-inch position to 19-inch position)
Top of unit
Side of unit
Rear
Front
Mounting
L brackets
19 inch position
23 inch
mounting holes
Mounting
L brackets
19 inch
mounting holes
47869
Top of unit
23 inch position
1.3.2 Mounting a Single Node
Mounting the ONS 15454 in a rack requires a minimum of 18.5 inches of vertical rack space (and one
inch for air flow). To ensure the mounting is secure, use two to four #12-24 mounting screws for each
side of the shelf assembly. Figure 1-3 shows the rack mounting position for the ONS 15454.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-7
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Rack Installation
Figure 1-3
Mounting an ONS 15454 in a rack
FAN
39392
Equipment rack
FAIL
CR
IT
MA
J
MIN
Universal
ear mounts
(reversible)
Two people should install the shelf assembly; however, one person can install it using the temporary set
screws included. The shelf assembly should be empty for easier lifting. The front door can also be
removed to lighten the shelf assembly (see the “Remove the Front Door” procedure on page 1-13).
Note
If you are installing the fan-tray air filter using the brackets provided, mount the brackets on the
bottom of the shelf assembly before installing the ONS 15454 in a rack.
Procedure: Mount the Shelf Assembly in a Rack (One Person)
Step 1
Ensure that the shelf assembly is set for the desired rack size (either 19 or 23 inches).
Step 2
Using the hex tool that shipped with the assembly, install the set screws into the screw holes that will
not be used to mount the shelf.
Step 3
Lift the shelf assembly to the desired rack position and set it on the set screws.
Step 4
Align the screw holes on the mounting ears with the mounting holes in the rack.
Step 5
Install one mounting screw in each side of the assembly.
Step 6
When the shelf assembly is secured to the rack, install the remaining mounting screws.
Note
Step 7
Use at least one set of the horizontal screw slots on the ONS 15454 to prevent future slippage.
Remove the temporary set screws.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-8
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Rack Installation
Procedure: Mount the Shelf Assembly in a Rack (Two People)
Step 1
Ensure that the shelf assembly is set for the desired rack size (either 19 or 23 inches).
Step 2
Lift the shelf assembly to the desired position in the rack.
Step 3
Align the screw holes on the mounting ears with the mounting holes in the rack.
Step 4
While one person holds the shelf assembly in place, the other person can install one mounting screw in
each side of the assembly.
Step 5
When the shelf assembly is secured to the rack, install the remaining mounting screws.
Note
Use at least one set of the horizontal screw slots on the ONS 15454 to prevent future slippage.
1.3.3 Mounting Multiple Nodes
Most standard seven-foot racks can hold four ONS 15454s and a fuse and alarm panel. However, unequal
flange racks are limited to three ONS 15454s and a fuse and alarm panel or four ONS 15454s and a fuse
and alarm panel from an adjacent rack.
If you are using the bottom brackets to install the fan-tray air filter, you can install three shelf assemblies
in a standard seven-foot rack. If you are not using the bottom brackets, you can install four shelf
assemblies in a rack. The advantage to using the bottom brackets is that you can replace the filter without
removing the fan tray.
Procedure: Mount Multiple Shelf Assemblies in a Rack
Note
The ONS 15454 must have one inch of airspace below the installed shelf assembly to allow air flow
to the fan intake. If a second ONS 15454 is installed underneath a shelf assembly, the air ramp on top
of the bottom shelf assembly provides the desired space. However, if the ONS 15454 is installed
above third-party equipment, you must provide a minimum spacing of one inch between the
third-party shelf assembly and the bottom of the ONS 15454. The third-party equipment must not
vent heat upward into the ONS 15454.
Step 1
Install the fuse and alarm panel in the top space.
Step 2
Mount the first ONS 15454 directly below the fuse and alarm panel.
Step 3
Repeat the procedure with the third and fourth ONS 15454s.
1.3.3.1 Four Node Configuration
You can link multiple ONS 15454s using their OC-N cards (i.e., create a fiber-optic bus) to accommodate
more access traffic than a single ONS 15454 can support. For example, if you need to drop more than
112 DS-1s or 96 DS-3s (the maximum that can be aggregated in a single node), you can link the nodes
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-9
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Rack Installation
but not merge multiple nodes into a single ONS 15454. You can link nodes with OC-12 or OC-48 fiber
spans as you would link any other two network nodes. The nodes can be co-located in a facility to
aggregate more local traffic.
Figure 1-4 shows a four-shelf node setup. Each shelf assembly is reorganized as a separate node in the
ONS 15454’s software interface (Cisco Transport Controller [CTC]), and traffic is mapped using CTC
cross-connect options. In the figure, each node uses redundant fiber-optic cards. Node 1 uses redundant
OC-N transport and OC-N bus (connecting) cards for a total of four cards, with eight free slots
remaining. Nodes 2 and 3 each use two redundant OC-N bus cards for a total of four cards, with eight
free slots remaining. Node 4 uses redundant OC-12 bus cards for a total of two cards, with ten free slots
remaining. The four node example presented here is one of many ways to set up a multiple-node
configuration. See “Chapter 5, “SONET Topologies”” for more information about multiple-node
configurations.
Figure 1-4
A four-shelf node configuration
Redundant
OC-N Feed
Up to 72 DS-3s, 84 DS-1s
Redundant
OC-N Bus
ONS 15454
Up to 72 DS-3s, 84 DS-1s
Redundant
OC-N Bus
ONS 15454
Up to 72 DS-3s, 84 DS-1s
Redundant
OC-N Bus
ONS 15454
ONS 15454
32097
Up to 96 DS-3s, 112 DS-1s
1.3.3.2 ONS 15454 Bay Assembly
The Cisco ONS 15454 Bay Assembly simplifies ordering and installing the ONS 15454 because it allows
you to order shelf assemblies pre-installed in a seven-foot rack. The Bay Assembly is available in a
three- or four-shelf configuration. The three-shelf configuration includes three ONS 15454 shelf
assemblies, a pre-wired fuse and alarm panel, and two cable-management trays. Optional fiber channels
can be ordered. The four-shelf configuration includes four ONS 15454 shelf assemblies and a pre-wired
fuse and alarm panel. Optional fiber channels can be ordered. A four shelf ONS 15454 Bay Assembly is
shown in Figure 1-5.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-10
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Front Door Access
Figure 1-5
A four-shelf ONS 15454 Bay Assembly
Fuse & Alarm
Panel
Fiber
Channel
(Optional Kit)
Fiber Channel
Mounting
Brackets
(Optional Kit)
39157
ONS 15454s
1.4 Front Door Access
The Critical, Major, and Minor alarm LEDs visible through the front door indicate whether a Critical,
Major, or Minor alarm is present anywhere on the ONS 15454. These LEDs must be visible so
technicians can quickly determine if any alarms are present. You can use the LCD to further isolate
alarms. See Chapter 10, “Alarm Monitoring and Management” for more information.
This section tells you how to access ONS 15454 equipment in the front compartment. The ONS 15454
features a locked door to the front compartment. A pinned Allen key that unlocks the front door ships
with the ONS 15454. A button on the right side of the shelf assembly releases the door. The front door
provides access to the shelf assembly, cable-management tray, fan-tray assembly, and LCD screen
(Figure 1-8).
You can remove the front door of the ONS 15454 to provide unrestricted access to the front of the shelf
assembly. An erasable label (Figure 1-6) is pasted on the inside of the front door. You can use the label
to record slot assignments, port assignments, card types, node ID, rack ID, and serial number for the
ONS 15454.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-11
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Front Door Access
The front-door erasable label
61840
Figure 1-6
Note
The front door label also includes the Class I and Class 1M laser warning shown in the laser warning
on the front-door label (Figure 1-7).
The laser warning on the front-door label
67575
Figure 1-7
Procedure: Open the Front Cabinet Compartment (Door)
Note
Step 1
The ONS 15454 has an ESD plug input and is shipped with an ESD wrist strap. The ESD plug input
is located on the outside edge of the shelf assembly on the right-hand side. It is labeled “ESD” on the
top and bottom. Always wear an ESD wrist strap and connect the strap to the ESD plug when working
on the ONS 15454.
Open the front door lock.
The ONS 15454 comes with a pinned hex key for locking and unlocking the front door. Turn the key
counterclockwise to unlock the door and clockwise to lock it.
Step 2
Press the door button to release the latch.
Step 3
Swing the door open.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-12
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Front Door Access
Figure 1-8
The ONS 15454 front door
CISCO ONS 15454
Optical Network System
Door lock
Door button
33923
Viewholes for Critical, Major and Minor alarm LEDs
Procedure: Remove the Front Door
Step 1
Open the door.
Step 2
Lift the door from its hinges at the top left-hand corner of the door (Figure 1-9).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-13
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Backplane Access
Removing the ONS 15454 front door
FAN
38831
Figure 1-9
FAIL
CR
IT
MA
J
MIN
Translucent
circles
for LED
viewing
Door hinge
Assembly hinge pin
Assembly hinge
1.5 Backplane Access
To access the ONS 15454 backplane, remove the two standard sheet metal covers on each side of the
backplane (Figure 1-10). Each sheet metal cover is held in place with nine 6-32 x 3/8 inch phillips
screws.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-14
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Backplane Access
Figure 1-10 Backplane sheet metal covers
B
A
Backplane Sheet Metal
Covers
32074
Lower Backplane
Cover
Procedure: Remove the Backplane Sheet Metal Covers
Step 1
To remove the lower backplane cover, loosen the five screws that secure it to the ONS 15454 and pull it
away from the shelf assembly.
Step 2
Loosen the nine perimeter screws that hold the backplane sheet metal cover(s) in place.
Step 3
Lift the panel by the bottom to remove it from the shelf assembly.
Step 4
Store the panel for later use. Attach the backplane sheet metal cover(s) whenever EIA(s) are not
installed.
1.5.1 Lower Backplane Cover
The lower section of the ONS 15454 backplane is covered by a clear plastic protector, which is held in
place by five 6-32 x 1/2 inch screws. Remove the lower backplane cover to access the alarm interface
panel (AIP), alarm pin field, frame ground, and power terminals.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-15
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Backplane Access
32069
Figure 1-11 Removing the lower backplane cover
Retaining
screws
Procedure: Remove the Lower Backplane Cover
Step 1
Unscrew the five retaining screws that hold the clear plastic cover in place.
Step 2
Grasp the clear plastic cover at each side.
Step 3
Gently pull the cover away from the backplane (shown in Figure 1-11).
1.5.2 Alarm Interface Panel
The AIP is located above the alarm pin field on the lower section of the backplane. The AIP provides
surge protection for the ONS 15454. It also provides an interface from the backplane to the fan-tray
assembly and LCD. The AIP plugs into the backplane using a 96-pin DIN connector and is held in place
with two retaining screws. The panel has a non-volatile memory chip that stores the unique node address
(MAC address).
Note
The 5-amp AIP card (73-7665-XX) is required when installing the new fan-tray assembly
(15454-FTA3). See the “Install the Fan-Tray Assembly” procedure on page 1-27.
The MAC address identifies the nodes that support circuits. It allows CTC to determine circuit sources,
destinations, and spans. The Timing Communication and Control+ (TCC+) cards in the ONS 15454 also
read the MAC address to store the node database. If the AIP fails, a MAC Fail alarm displays on the CTC
Alarms menu and/or the LCD display on the fan tray will go blank.
Note
A blown fuse on the AIP board can cause the LCD display to go blank.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-16
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
EIA Installation
1.6 EIA Installation
Optional EIA backplane covers are typically pre-installed when ordered with the ONS 15454. EIAs must
be ordered when using DS-1, DS-3, DS3XM-6, or EC-1 cards. A minimum amount of assembly may be
required when EIAs are ordered separately from the ONS 15454. Four different EIA backplane covers
are available for the ONS 15454: BNC, High-Density BNC, SMB, and AMP Champ. This section
describes each EIA in detail.
EIAs are attached to the shelf assembly backplane to provide coaxial cable connections. EIAs are
available with SMB and BNC connectors for DS-3 or EC-1 cards. EIAs are available with AMP Champ
connectors for DS-1 cards. You must use SMB EIAs for DS-1 twisted-pair cable installation. You can
install EIAs on one or both sides of the ONS 15454 backplane in any combination (in other words, AMP
Champ on Side A and BNC on Side B or High-Density BNC on side A and SMB on side B, and so forth).
If you are installing EIAs after the shelf assembly is installed, plug the EIA into the backplane. The EIA
has six electrical connectors that plug into six corresponding backplane connectors. The EIA backplane
must replace the standard sheet metal cover to provide access to the coaxial cable connectors. The EIA
sheet metal covers use the same screw holes as the solid backplane panels, but they have 12 additional
6-32 x 1/2 inch phillips screw holes so you can screw down the cover and the board using standoffs on
the EIA board. This section describes each EIA and provides installation procedures.
For EIA replacement procedures, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance
Guide. For information about attaching ferrites to EIA connectors, see the “Ferrite Installation” section
on page 1-61.
1.6.1 BNC EIA
The ONS 15454 BNC EIA supports 24 DS-3 circuits on each side of the ONS 15454 (24 transmit and
24 receive connectors). If you install BNC EIAs on both sides of the shelf assembly, the ONS 15454
hosts up to 48 circuits. The BNC connectors on the EIA supports Trompeter UCBJ224 (75 Ohm) 4 leg
connectors (King or ITT are also compatible). You can use BNC EIAs for DS-3 (including the
DS3XM-6) or EC-1 cards. Figure 1-39 shows the ONS 15454 with pre-installed BNC EIAs.
To install coaxial cable with BNC connectors, see the “BNC Connector Installation” section on
page 1-36.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-17
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
EIA Installation
Figure 1-12 A BNC backplane for use in 1:1 protection schemes
B
16
TX
14
TX
RX
TX
RX
4
TX
RX
TX
RX
A
2
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
1
7
1
7
1
7
1
7
2
8
2
8
2
8
2
8
3
9
3
9
3
9
3
9
4
10
4
10
4
10
4
10
5
11
5
11
5
11
5
11
6
RX
TX
12
RX
TX
6
RX
TX
12
RX
TX
6
RX
TX
12
RX
TX
6
RX
TX
12
BNC backplane
connectors
Tie wrap posts
RX
2076
TX
RX
The EIA side marked “A” has 24 pairs of BNC connectors. The first 12 pairs of BNC connectors
correspond to Ports 1 – 12 for a 12-port card and map to Slot 2 on the shelf assembly. The BNC connector
pairs are marked “Tx” and “Rx” to indicate transmit and receive cables for each port. You can install an
additional card in Slot 1 as a protect card for the card in Slot 2. The second 12 BNC connector pairs
correspond to Ports 1 – 12 for a 12-port card and map to Slot 4 on the shelf assembly. You can install an
additional card in Slot 3 as a protect card for the card in Slot 4. Slots 5 and 6 do not support DS-3 cards
when BNC connectors are used.
The EIA side marked “B” provides an additional 24 pairs of BNC connectors. The first 12 BNC
connector pairs correspond to Ports 1 – 12 for a 12-port card and map to Slot 14 on the shelf assembly.
The BNC connector pairs are marked “Tx” and “Rx” to indicate transmit and receive cables for each
port. You can install an additional card in Slot 15 as a protect card for the card in Slot 14. The second
12 BNC connector pairs correspond to Ports 1 – 12 for a 12-port card and map to Slot 16 on the shelf
assembly. You can install an additional card in Slot 17 as a protect card for the card in Slot 16. Slots 12
and 13 do not support DS-3 cards when BNC connectors are used.
When BNC connectors are used with a DS3N-12 card in Slot 3 or 15, the 1:N card protection extends
only to the two slots adjacent to the 1:N card due to BNC wiring constraints.
1.6.2 High-Density BNC EIA
The ONS 15454 High-Density BNC EIA supports 48 DS-3 circuits on each side of the ONS 15454 (48
transmit and 48 receive connectors). If you install BNC EIAs on both sides of the unit, the ONS 15454
hosts up to 96 circuits. The High-Density BNC EIA supports Trompeter UCBJ224 (75 Ohm) 4 leg
connectors (King or ITT are also compatible). You can use High-Density BNC EIAs for DS-3 (including
the DS3XM-6) or EC-1 cards. Figure 1-13 shows the ONS 15454 with pre-installed High-Density BNC
EIAs.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-18
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
EIA Installation
To install coaxial cable with High-Density BNC connectors, see the “High-Density BNC Connector
Installation” section on page 1-37.
Figure 1-13 A High-Density BNC backplane for use in 1:N protection schemes
B
17
TX
RX
TX
14
RX
TX
13
RX
TX
5
RX
TX
4
RX
TX
2
RX
TX
1
RX
TX
RX
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
A
BNC backplane
connectors
12
RX
TX
RX
39141
TX
16
The EIA side marked “A” hosts 48 pairs of BNC connectors. Each column of connector pairs is
numbered and corresponds to the slot of the same number. The first column (12 pairs) of BNC connectors
corresponds to Slot 1 on the shelf assembly, the second column to Slot 2, the third column to Slot 4, and
the fourth column to Slot 5. The rows of connectors correspond to Ports 1 – 12 of a 12-port card.
The EIA side marked “B” provides an additional 48 pairs of BNC connectors. The first column (12 pairs)
of BNC connectors corresponds to Slot 13 on the shelf assembly, the second column to Slot 14, the third
column to Slot 16, and the fourth column to Slot 17. The rows of connectors correspond to Ports 1 – 12
of a 12-port card. The BNC connector pairs are marked “Tx” and “Rx” to indicate transmit and receive
cables for each port. The High-Density BNC EIA supports both 1:1 and 1:N protection across all slots.
1.6.3 SMB EIA
The ONS 15454 SMB EIA supports AMP 415484-1 75 Ohm 4 leg connectors. You can use SMB EIAs
with DS-1, DS-3 (including the DS3XM-6), and EC-1 cards. If you use DS-1 cards, use the DS-1
electrical interface adapter to terminate the twisted pair DS-1 cable from the backplane.
Figure 1-14 shows the ONS 15454 with pre-installed SMB EIAs and the sheet metal cover and screw
locations for the EIA.
To install SMB connectors, see the “SMB Connector Installation” section on page 1-38.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-19
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
EIA Installation
Figure 1-14 An SMB EIA backplane
B
TX
12x DS-3s
16
RX
TX
15
RX TX
RX
TX
14
RX
TX
13
RX
6
12
TX
TX
RX
5
RX
TX
4
RX TX
3
RX
TX
2
RX
TX
A
1
RX
TX
RX
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
9
9
9
9
10
10
10
10
11
11
11
11
12
12
12
12
13
13
13
13
14
14
14
TX
RX
TX
RX TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
SMB backplane
connectors
Tie wrap posts
14
TX
RX
TX
RX TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
TX
RX
32101
Reserved
for DS-1s
17
1
The SMB EIA has 84 transmit and 84 receive connectors on each side of the ONS 15454 for a total of
168 SMB connectors (84 circuits).
The EIA side marked “A” hosts 84 SMB connectors in six columns of 14 connectors. The “A” side
columns are numbered 1 – 6 and correspond to Slots 1 – 6 on the shelf assembly. The EIA side marked
“B” hosts an additional 84 SMB connectors in six columns of 14 connectors. The “B” side columns are
numbered 12 – 17 and correspond to Slots 12 – 17 on the shelf assembly. The connector rows are
numbered 1 – 14 and correspond to the 14 ports on a DS-1 card.
For DS-3 or EC-1, the EIA supports 72 transmit and 72 receive connectors, for a total of 144 SMB
connectors (72 circuits). If you use a DS-3 or EC-1 card, only Ports 1 – 12 are active. If you use a
DS3XM-6 card, only Ports 1 – 6 are active. The SMB connector pairs are marked “Tx” and “Rx” to
identify transmit and receive cables for each port. If you use SMB connectors, you can install DS-1,
DS-3, or EC-1 cards in any multispeed slot.
1.6.4 AMP Champ EIA
The ONS 15454 AMP Champ EIA supports 64-pin (32 pair) AMP Champ connectors for each slot on
both sides of the shelf assembly where the EIA is installed. Cisco AMP Champ connectors are female
AMP # 552246-1 with AMP # 552562-2 bail locks. Each AMP Champ connector supports 14 DS-1 ports.
You can use AMP Champ EIAs with DS-1 cards only. Figure 1-15 shows the ONS 15454 with
pre-installed AMP Champ EIAs and the corresponding sheet metal cover and screw locations for the
EIA.
To install AMP Champ connector DS-1 cables, see the “AMP Champ Connector Installation” section on
page 1-41.
For information about attaching ferrites to AMP Champ connectors, see the “Ferrite Installation” section
on page 1-61.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-20
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
EIA Installation
For information about AMP champ cable management, see the “AMP Champ Cable Management”
section on page 1-59.
Figure 1-15 An AMP EIA Champ backplane
32070
AMP CHAMP
connector
The EIA side marked “A” hosts six AMP Champ connectors. The connectors are numbered 1 – 6 for the
corresponding slots on the shelf assembly. Each AMP Champ connector on the backplane supports 14
DS-1 ports for a DS1-14 card, and each connector features 28 live pairs—one transmit pair and one
receive pair—for each DS-1 port.
The EIA side marked “B” hosts six AMP Champ connectors. The connectors are labeled 12–17 for the
corresponding slots on the shelf assembly. Each AMP Champ connector on the backplane supports 14
DS-1 ports for a DS1-14 card, and each connector features 28 live pairs—one transmit pair and one
receive pair—for each DS-1 port.
Note
Caution
EIAs are hot-swappable. You do not need to disconnect power to install or remove EIAs.
Always use an electrostatic discharge (ESD) wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454.
Plug the wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf
assembly.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-21
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
EIA Installation
Procedure: Install a BNC, High-Density BNC, or SMB EIA
See the “Install the AMP Champ EIA” procedure on page 1-24 if you are using an AMP Champ EIA.
Step 1
To remove the lower backplane cover, loosen the five screws that secure it to the ONS 15454 and pull it
away from the shelf assembly.
Step 2
Remove the EIA card from the packaging. Line up the connectors on the card with the mating connectors
on the backplane. Gently push the card until both sets of connectors fit together snugly.
Step 3
Place the metal EIA cover panel over the card.
Step 4
Insert and tighten the nine perimeter screws (P/N 48-0358) at 8-10 lbs to secure the cover panel to the
backplane.
Step 5
Insert and tighten the twelve (BNC and SMB) or nine (High-Density BNC) inner screws (P/N 48-0004)
at 8-10 lbs to secure the cover panel to the card and backplane.
Step 6
Replace the lower backplane cover, and insert and tighten the five screws to secure it.
If you are using SMB EIAs to make DS-1 connections, you need the DS-1 electrical interface adapter,
commonly referred to as a balun (P/N 15454-WW-14=).
Figure 1-16 shows a BNC EIA installation. Figure 1-17 shows High-Density BNC EIA installation.
Figure 1-18 shows an SMB EIA installation.
43764
Figure 1-16 Installing the BNC EIA
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-22
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
EIA Installation
Figure 1-17 Installing the High-Density BNC EIA
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
43766
12
43762
Figure 1-18 Installing the SMB EIA (use a balun for DS-1 connections)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-23
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
EIA Installation
Procedure: Install the AMP Champ EIA
Step 1
To remove the lower backplane cover, loosen the five screws that secure it to the ONS 15454 and pull it
away from the shelf assembly.
Step 2
Align the AMP Champ cover panel with the backplane and insert and tighten the nine perimeter screws
(P/N 48-0358) at 8-10 lbs.
Step 3
Align an AMP Champ card with the backplane connector and push until it fits snugly. Repeat until you
have installed all six AMP Champ cards.
Step 4
To secure each AMP Champ card to the cover panel, insert and tighten a screw (P/N 48-0003) at the top
of each card at 8-10 lbs.
Step 5
Place the AMP Champ fastening plate along the bottom of the cover panel, and hand tighten the two
thumbscrews.
Figure 1-19 shows an AMP Champ EIA installation.
44309
Figure 1-19 Installing the AMP CHAMP EIA
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-24
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Fan-Tray Assembly Installation
1.7 Fan-Tray Assembly Installation
The fan-tray assembly is located at the bottom of the ONS 15454 front compartment. The fan tray is a
removable drawer that holds fans and fan-control circuitry for the ONS 15454. The front door can be
left in place when removing or installing the fan tray but removal is recommended. After you install the
fan tray, you should only need to access it if a fan failure occurs or you need to replace or clean the
fan-tray air filter.
The front of the fan-tray assembly has an LCD screen that provides slot and port-level information for
all ONS 15454 card slots, including the number of Critical, Major, and Minor alarms.
The fan-tray assembly features an air filter at the bottom of the tray that you can install and remove by
hand. Remove and visually inspect this filter every 30 days and keep spare filters in stock. See the Cisco
ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide for information about cleaning and maintaining the
fan-tray air filter.
Note
The 10-Gbps compatible shelf assembly (15454-SA-ANSI, P/N: 800-19857) and fan-tray assembly
(15454-FTA3) are required with the ONS 15454 XC10G, OC-192, and OC-48 any slot (AS) cards.
Caution
Do not operate an ONS 15454 without a fan-tray filter. A fan-tray filter is mandatory.
Caution
The 15454-FTA3 fan-tray assembly can only be installed in ONS 15454 Release 3.1 shelf assemblies
(15454-SA-ANSI, 800-19857). It includes a pin that does not allow it to be installed in ONS 15454
shelf assemblies released before ONS 15454 Release 3.1 (15454-SA-NEBS3E, 15454-SA-NEBS3,
and 15454-SA-R1, P/N 800-0714915454). Installing the 15454-FTA3 in a non-compliant shelf
assembly may result in failure of the alarm interface panel (AIP), which in turn, will result in power
loss to the fan-tray assembly.
Note
The ONS 15454 Release 3.1 fan-tray assembly (15454-FTA3) is not I-temp. To obtain an I-temp fan
tray, install the 15454-FTA2 fan-tray assembly in an ONS 15454 Release 3.1 shelf assembly (P/N:
800-19857). However, do not install the ONS 15454 Release 3.1 XC10G, OC-192, and OC-48 any
slot (AS) cards in the shelf assembly with the 15454-FTA2 fan-tray assembly.
If one or more fans fail on the fan-tray assembly, replace the entire assembly. You cannot replace
individual fans. The red Fan Fail LED on the front of the fan tray illuminates when one or more fans fail.
For fan tray replacement instructions, see the “Install the Fan-Tray Assembly” procedure on page 1-27.
The red Fan Fail LED clears after you install a working fan tray.
Fan speed is controlled by TCC+ card temperature sensors. The sensors measure the input air
temperature at the fan-tray assembly. Fan speed options are low, medium, and high. If the TCC+ card
fails, the fans automatically shift to high speed. The temperature measured by the TCC+ sensors is
displayed on the LCD screen.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-25
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Fan-Tray Assembly Installation
Procedure: Install the Bottom Brackets and Air Filter
The shelf assembly ships with bottom brackets that you should use to install the air filter. The bottom
brackets consist of two grooved metal pieces that attach to the bottom of the shelf assembly using three
screws each. When you use the bottom bracket to install the fan-tray air filter, you do not need to remove
the fan-tray assembly to access the air filter. Attach the brackets to the bottom of the shelf assembly
before installing the rack.
Although the filter will work if it is installed with either side facing up, Cisco recommends that you
install it with the metal bracing facing up to preserve the surface of the filter.
Note
If you choose not to install the bottom brackets, install the air filter by sliding it into the compartment
at the bottom of the shelf assembly. Each time you remove and reinstall the air filter in the future,
you must first remove the fan-tray assembly.
Step 1
With the fan-tray assembly removed, place the ONS 15454 face down on a flat surface.
Step 2
Locate the three screw holes that run along the left and right sides of the bottom of the shelf assembly.
Step 3
Secure each bracket to the bottom of the shelf assembly using the screws provided.
Each bracket has a filter stopper and a flange on one end. Make sure to attach the brackets with the
stoppers and flanges facing the rear of the shelf assembly (the top, if the ONS 15454 is face-down during
installation).
Figure 1-20 illustrates bottom bracket installation. If you do not use the bottom brackets, in the future
you must remove the fan-tray assembly before removing the air filter. The bottom brackets enable you
to clean and replace the air filter without removing the fan-tray assembly.
39487
S
A UIT
P N A
-4
IN LE O B
65 2
N
S A -C LE
0 TO
TR S
E O FO
W
-5
U R M
at 7
C E B R
ts V
TI FE U M
M dc
S O
O
ax
N R TI U
S TO B N
im
.
LE TI
um
IN
N
S
S U G
TA R O
LL FA N
A C
TI E
O .
N
R
E
T
C
th AU
1
pr e TI
io B O
B
r AT1 N
A
to
:
T
se an R
em
1
rv d
ic te ov
R
in rm e
E
g
T
in po
al w
2
bl er
B
oc fro
A
ks m
T
bo
2
th
Figure 1-20 Installing the bottom brackets
If you are using the bottom brackets to install the fan-tray air filter, you can install three shelf assemblies
in a standard seven-foot rack. If you are not using the bottom brackets, you can install four shelf
assemblies in a rack.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-26
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Fan-Tray Assembly Installation
Step 4
Slide the air filter into the shelf assembly.
Procedure: Install the Fan-Tray Assembly
To install the fan-tray assembly, it is not necessary to move any of the cable-management facilities.
Caution
You must place the edge of the air filter flush against the front of the fan-tray assembly compartment
when installing the fan tray on top of the filter. Failure to do so could result in damage to the filter,
the fan tray, or both.
Caution
Do not force a fan-tray assembly into place. Doing so can damage the connectors on the fan tray
and/or the connectors on the back panel of the shelf assembly.
Step 1
Remove the front door of the shelf assembly.
Step 2
Slide the fan tray into the shelf assembly until the electrical plug at the rear of the tray plugs into the
corresponding receptacle on the backplane.
Step 3
To verify that the tray has plugged into the backplane, check that the LCD on the front of the fan tray is
activated.
Figure 1-21 shows the location of the fan tray.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-27
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Power and Ground Installation
38532
Figure 1-21 Installing the fan-tray assembly
FAN
FAIL
CR
IT
MA
J
MIN
Fan tray
assembly
1.8 Power and Ground Installation
This section explains how to connect the ONS 15454 assembly to the power supply. Ground the
equipment according to Telcordia standards or local practices.
Warning
Shut off the power from the power source or turn off the breakers before beginning work.
Warning
This equipment is intended to be grounded. Ensure that the host is connected to earth ground
during normal use.
Caution
Always use the supplied ESD wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the
wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.
Warning
Do not mix conductors of dissimilar metals in a terminal or splicing connector where physical
contact occurs (such as copper and aluminum, or copper and copper-clad aluminum), unless the
device is suited for the purpose and conditions of use.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-28
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Power and Ground Installation
Warning
Connect the ONS 15454 only to a DC power source that complies with the safety extra-low voltage
(SELV) requirements in IEC 60950-based safety standards.
Warning
The ONS 15454 relies on the protective devices in the building installation to protect against short
circuit, overcurrent, and grounding faults. Ensure that the protective devices are properly rated to
protect the system, and that they comply with national and local codes.
Warning
A readily accessible two-poled disconnect device must be incorporated in the fixed wiring.
Cisco recommends the following wiring conventions, but customer conventions prevail:
•
Red wire for battery connections (-48V DC)
•
Black wire for battery return connections (0V DC)
The ONS 15454 has redundant -48V DC #8 power terminals on the shelf assembly backplane. The
terminals are labeled BAT1, RET1, BAT2, and RET2 and are located on the lower section of the
backplane behind a clear plastic cover. See the “Lower Backplane Cover” section on page 1-15 for
information about accessing the power terminals.
To install redundant power feeds, use four power cables and one ground cable. For a single power feed,
only two power cables (#10 AWG, copper conductor, 194°F [90°C]) and one ground cable (#6 AWG)
are required. Use a conductor with low impedance to ensure circuit overcurrent protection. However, the
conductor must have the capability to safely conduct any fault current that might be imposed.
The existing ground post is a #10-32 bolt. The nut provided for a field connection is also a #10, with an
integral lock washer. The lug must be a dual-hole type and rated to accept the #6 AWG cable. Two posts
are provided on the Cisco ONS 15454 to accommodate the dual-hole lug. Figure 1-22 shows the location
of the ground posts.
FRAME GROUND
61852
Figure 1-22 Ground posts on the ONS 15454 backplane
For information about attaching ferrites to power cabling, see the “Ferrite Installation” section on
page 1-61.
Warning
When installing redundant power feeds, do not use aluminum conductors.
Warning
If you use redundant power leads to power the ONS 15454, disconnecting one lead will not remove
power from the node.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-29
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Power and Ground Installation
Procedure: Install Redundant Power Feeds
Ground only one cable to ground the shelf assembly. Terminate the other end of the ground cable to
ground according to local site practice. The ONS 15454 backplane also has a ground terminal on the
right side of the backplane. Connect a ground terminal for the frame ground (FGND) terminal according
to local site practice.
If the system loses power or both TCC+ cards are reset, you must reset the ONS 15454 clock. After
powering down, the date defaults to January 1, 1970, 00:04:15. To reset the clock, see the “Setting Up
Basic Node Information” section on page 3-2.
Note
Warning
If you encounter problems with the power supply, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and
Maintenance Guide for possible causes.
Do not apply power to the ONS 15454 until you complete all installation steps and check the
continuity of the -48V DC and return.
Step 1
Measure and cut the cables as needed to reach the ONS 15454 from the fuse panel. Figure 1-23 shows
the ONS 15454 power terminals.
Step 2
Dress the power and ground cables according to local site practice.
Warning
When installing the ONS 15454, the ground connection must always be made first and
disconnected last.
Figure 1-23 Power terminals
Return leads (black)
Battery leads (red)
RET 1
BAT 1
RET 2
CAUTION: Remove power from both
the BAT1 and terminal blocks
prior to servicing
BAT 2
-42 V
24 A
33921
SUITABLE FOR MOUNTING ON
A NON-COMBUSTIBLE SURFACE.
PLEASE REFER TO INSTALLATION
INSTRUCTIONS.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-30
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Power and Ground Installation
Step 3
Remove or loosen the #8 power terminal screws on the ONS 15454. To avoid confusion, label the cables
connected to the BAT1/RET1 power terminals as 1, and the cables connected to the BAT2/RET2 power
terminals as 2.
Note
Step 4
Caution
Before you make any crimp connections, coat all bare conductors (battery, battery return, and
frame ground) with an appropriate antioxidant compound. Bring all unplated connectors,
braided strap, and bus bars to a bright finish, then coat with an antioxidant before you connect
them. You do not need to prepare tinned, solder plated, or silver-plated connectors and other
plated connection surfaces, but always keep them clean and free of contaminants.
Caution
When terminating power, return, and frame ground, do not use soldering lug, screwless
(push-in) connectors, quick-connect, or other friction-fit connectors.
Strip 1/2 inch of insulation from all power cables that you will use. Crimp the lugs onto the ends of all
power leads.
Note
Step 5
Use only pressure terminal connectors, such as ring and fork types, when terminating the
battery, battery return, and frame ground conductors.
When terminating battery and battery return connections as shown in Figure 1-23, follow a
torque specification of 10 in-lbs. When terminating a frame ground, use the kep-nut provided
with the ONS 15454 and tighten it to a torque specification of 31 in-lbs. The kep-nut provides
a frame ground connection that minimizes the possibility of loosening caused by rotation
during installation and maintenance activity. This type of prevention is inherently provided
by the terminal block for battery and battery return connections.
Terminate the return 1 lead to the RET1 backplane terminal. Use oxidation-prevention grease to keep
connections non-corrosive.
Warning
Do not secure multiple connectors with the same bolt assembly.
Step 6
Terminate the negative 1 lead to the negative BAT1 backplane power terminal. Use oxidation prevention
grease to keep connections non-corrosive.
Step 7
If you use redundant power leads, terminate the return 2 lead to the positive RET2 terminal on the ONS
15454. Terminate the negative 2 lead to the negative BAT2 terminal on the ONS 15454. Use
oxidation-preventative grease to keep connections non-corrosive.
Route the cables out below the power terminals using the plastic cable clamp.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-31
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Alarm, Timing, LAN, and Craft Pin Connections
1.9 Alarm, Timing, LAN, and Craft Pin Connections
Caution
Always use the supplied ESD wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the
wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.
The ONS 15454 has a backplane pin field located at the bottom of the backplane. The backplane pin field
provides 0.045 square inch wire-wrap pins for enabling external alarms, timing input and output, and
craft interface terminals. This section describes the backplane pin field and the pin assignments for the
field. Figure 1-24 shows the wire-wrap pins on the backplane pin field. Beneath each wire-wrap pin is a
frame ground pin. Frame ground pins are labeled FG1, FG2, FG3, etc. Install the ground shield of the
cables connected to the backplane to the ground pin that corresponds to the pin field used. Figure 1-24
shows pinouts for the ONS 15454.
Figure 1-24 Pinouts
B
A
B
A
B
A
B
A
B
A
B
A
B
A
A
B
A
B
A
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
BITS
4
LAN
ENVIR ALARMS
IN
FG1
FG2
Field
BITS
FG3
4
X . 25
Function
BITS Output 2 negative (-)
B1
BITS Output 2 positive (+)
BITS Input 2 negative (-)
B2
BITS Input 2 positive (+)
FG6
FG7
Field
Pin
A1
ENVIR
ALARMS B1
OUT
A2
N/O
A3
BITS Output 1 negative (-)
A3
BITS Output 1 positive (+)
B3
A4
BITS Input 1 negative (-)
A4
B4
BITS Input 1 positive (+)
B4
Connecting to a Router, Hub, or Switch
A1
RJ-45 pin 6
B1
RJ-45 pin 3
A2
RJ-45 pin 2
ACO
CRAFT
RJ-45 pin 1
Connecting to a PC or Workstation
RJ-45 pin 2
B1
RJ-45 pin 1
A2
RJ-45 pin 6
B2
RJ-45 pin 3
B2
A3
B3
A4
B4
Not Used
Alarm input pair number 3: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Alarm input pair number 4: Reports
closure on connected wires.
A1
A1
LOCAL ALARMS
FG9
AUD
FG10
FG11
FG12
Function
Normally open output pair number 1
Normally open output pair number 2
Normally open output pair number 3
Normally open output pair number 4
Normally open ACO pair
Transmit (PC pin #3)
A3
Ground (PC pin #5)
A4
B3
A4
B4
LOCAL A1
ALARMS B1
VIS
(Visual) A2
B2
N/O
Receive (PC pin #2)
A2
LOCAL A1
ALARMS B1
AUD
A2
(Audible)
B2
N/O
A3
Alarm input pair number 1: Reports
closure on connected wires.
Alarm input pair number 2: Reports
closure on connected wires.
2
TBOS
B1
B2
A1
FG8
1
B2
B3
LAN 2
A1
ENVIR
ALARMS B1
IN
A2
4
CRAFT
VIS
FG5
A2
LAN 1
4
MODEM
OUT
FG4
Pin
A1
4
ACO
B
A3
B3
A4
B4
DTR (PC pin #4)
Alarm output pair number 1: Remote
audible alarm.
Alarm output pair number 2: Critical
audible alarm.
Alarm output pair number 3: Major
audible alarm.
Alarm output pair number 4: Minor
audible alarm.
Alarm output pair number 1: Remote
visual alarm.
Alarm output pair number 2: Critical
visual alarm.
Alarm output pair number 3: Major
visual alarm.
Alarm output pair number 4: Minor
visual alarm.
38533
A
1
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-32
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Alarm, Timing, LAN, and Craft Pin Connections
Note
The X.25, Modem, and TBOS pin fields are not active.
1.9.1 Alarm Installation
The alarm pin field supports up to 17 alarm contacts, including four audible alarms, four visual alarms,
one alarm cutoff (ACO), and four user-definable alarm input and output contacts.
Audible alarm contacts are in the LOCAL ALARM AUD pin field and visual contacts are in the LOCAL
ALARM VIS pin field. Both of these alarms are in the LOCAL ALARMS category. User-definable
contacts are in the ENVIR ALARM IN and ENVIR ALARM OUT pin fields. These alarms are in the
ENVIR ALARMS category; you must have the AIC card installed to use the ENVIR ALARMS. Alarm
contacts are Normally Open (N/O), meaning that the system closes the alarm contacts when the
corresponding alarm conditions are present. Each alarm contact consists of two wire-wrap pins on the
shelf assembly backplane. Visual and audible alarm contacts are classified as Critical, Major, Minor, and
Remote. Figure 1-24 shows alarm pin assignments.
Visual and audible alarms are typically wired to trigger an alarm light at a central alarm collection point
when the corresponding contacts are closed. You can use the Alarm Cutoff pins to activate a remote ACO
for audible alarms. You can also activate the ACO function by pressing the ACO button on the TCC+
card faceplate. The ACO function clears all audible alarm indications. After clearing the audible alarm
indication, the alarm is still present and viewable in the Alarms tab in CTC.
Procedure: Install Alarm Wires on the Backplane
Step 1
Use #22 or #24 AWG alarm wires.
Step 2
Wrap the alarm wires on the appropriate wire-wrap pins according to local site practice.
Note
For information about attaching ferrites to wire-wrap pin fields, see the “Ferrite Installation”
section on page 1-61.
1.9.2 Timing Installation
The ONS 15454 backplane supports two Building Integrated Timing Supply (BITS) clock pin fields. The
first four BITS pins, rows 3 and 4, support output and input from the first external timing device. The
last four BITS pins, rows 1 and 2, perform the identical functions for the second external timing device.
Table 1-2 lists the pin assignments for the BITS timing pin fields.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-33
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Alarm, Timing, LAN, and Craft Pin Connections
Table 1-2
External Timing Pin Assignments for BITS
External Device
Contact
Tip & Ring
Function
First external device
A3 (BITS 1 Out)
Primary ring (-)
Output to external device
B3 (BITS 1 Out)
Primary tip (+)
Output to external device
A4 (BITS 1 In)
Secondary ring (-)
Input from external
device
B4 (BITS 1 In)
Secondary tip (+)
Input from external
device
Primary ring (-)
Output to external device
B1 (BITS 2 Out)
Primary tip (+)
Output to external device
A2 (BITS 2 In)
Secondary ring (-)
Input from external
device
B2 (BITS 2 In
Secondary tip (+)
Input from external
device
Second external device A1 (BITS 2 Out)
Note
Refer to Telcordia SR-NWT-002224 for rules about provisioning timing references
Procedure: Install Timing Wires on the Backplane
Step 1
Use #22 or #24 AWG wire.
Step 2
Wrap the clock wires on the appropriate wire-wrap pins according to local site practice.
Step 3
The BITS pin field (FG1) has a frame ground pin beneath it. Wrap the ground shield of the alarm cable
to the frame ground pin.
Note
For more detailed information about timing, see the “Setting Up ONS 15454 Timing” section
on page 3-12.
1.9.3 LAN Installation
Use the LAN pins on the ONS 15454 backplane to connect the ONS 15454 to a workstation or Ethernet
LAN, or to a LAN modem for remote access to the node. You can also use the LAN port on the TCC+
faceplate to connect a workstation or to connect the ONS 15454 to the network. Table 1-3 shows the
LAN pin assignments.
Before you can connect an ONS 15454 to other ONS 15454s or to a LAN, you must change the default
IP address that is shipped with each ONS 15454 (192.1.0.2). See the “Change IP Address, Default
Router, and Network Mask Using the LCD” procedure on page 3-4.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-34
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Alarm, Timing, LAN, and Craft Pin Connections
Table 1-3
LAN Pin Assignments
Pin Field
Backplane Pins
RJ-45 Pins
LAN 1
Connecting to data
circuit-terminating
equipment (DCE*) (a
hub or switch)
B2
1
A2
2
B1
3
A1
6
LAN 1
Connecting to data
terminal equipment
(DTE) (a
PC/workstation or
router)
B1
1
A1
2
B2
3
A2
6
*The Cisco ONS 15454 is DCE.
Procedure: Install LAN Wires on the Backplane
Step 1
Use #22 or #24 AWG wire.
Step 2
Wrap the wires on the appropriate wire-wrap pins according to local site practice.
Step 3
A frame ground pin is located beneath each pin field (FG2 for the LAN pin field). Wrap the ground shield
of the LAN interface cable to the frame ground pin.
1.9.4 TL1 Craft Interface Installation
You can use the craft pins on the ONS 15454 backplane or the RS-232 port on the TCC+ faceplate to
create a VT100 emulation window to serve as a TL1 craft interface to the ONS 15454. Use a
straight-through cable to connect to the RS-232 port. Table 1-4 shows the pin assignments for the
CRAFT pin field.
Note
You cannot use the craft backplane pins and the RS-232 port on the TCC+ card simultaneously.
Table 1-4
Craft Interface Pin Assignments
Pin Field
Contact
Function
Craft
A1
Receive
A2
Transmit
A3
Ground
A4
DTR
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-35
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Coaxial Cable Installation
Procedure: Install Craft Interface Wires on the Backplane
Step 1
Use #22 or #24 AWG wire.
Step 2
Wrap the craft interface wires on the appropriate wire-wrap pins according to local site practice.
Note
For information about attaching ferrites to wire-wrap pin fields, see the “Ferrite Installation”
section on page 1-61.
Step 3
Wrap the ground shield of the craft interface cable to the frame-ground pin.
Step 4
Wrap the ground wire of your computer cable to pin A3 on the craft pin field.
1.10 Coaxial Cable Installation
Caution
Always use the supplied ESD wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the
wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.
When using ONS 15454 DS-3 electrical cables, the cables must terminate on an EIA installed on the
ONS 15454 backplane. EIAs are available with SMB and BNC connectors. All DS-3 cables connected
to the ONS 15454 DS-3 card must terminate with coaxial cables using the desired connector type to
connect to the specified EIA. For information about physically installing an EIA in the field, see the
“Install a BNC, High-Density BNC, or SMB EIA” procedure on page 1-22. For information about
coaxial cable management, see the “Coaxial Cable Management” section on page 1-57.
The electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) performance of the system depends on good-quality DS-3
coaxial cables, such as Shuner Type G 03233 D, or the equivalent.
1.10.1 BNC Connector Installation
For a description of BNC EIAs, see the “BNC EIA” section on page 1-17. The BNC connectors on the
EIA supports Trompeter UCBJ224 (75 Ohm) 4 leg connectors. Right-angle mating connectors for the
connecting cable are AMP 413588-2 (75 Ohm) connectors. If preferred, you can also use a straight
connector of the same type. Use RG-59/U cable to connect to the ONS 15454 BNC EIA. These cables
are recommended to connect to a patch panel and are designed for long runs of up to 450 feet.
Procedure: Install Coaxial Cable With BNC Connectors
Step 1
Place the BNC cable connector over the desired connection point on the backplane.
Figure 1-25 shows how to connect a coaxial cable to the BNC EIA using a right-angle BNC cable
connector.
Step 2
Position the cable connector so that the slot in the connector is over the corresponding notch at the
backplane connection point.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-36
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Coaxial Cable Installation
Step 3
Gently push the connector down until the notch backplane connector slides into the slot on the cable
connector.
Step 4
Turn the cable connector until the notch clicks into place.
Step 5
Tie wrap or lace the cables to the EIA according to Telcordia standards (GR-1275-CORE) or local site
practice.
Step 6
Route the cables to the nearest side of the shelf assembly through the side cutouts according to local site
practice. The rubber coated edges of the side cutouts prevent the cables from chafing.
32075
Figure 1-25 Using a right-angle connector to install coaxial cable with BNC connectors
Note
Step 7
Slots 1, 3, 15 and 17 are designated protection slots when BNC connectors are used. Slots 5,
6, 11, and 12 do not support DS3-12 cards when BNC connectors are used. A total of four
DS3-12 cards can be used to carry traffic with BNC connectors.
Label all cables at each end of the connection to avoid confusion with cables that are similar in
appearance.
1.10.2 High-Density BNC Connector Installation
The High-Density BNC EIA supports Trompeter UCBJ224 (75 Ohm) 4 leg connectors. Use straight
connectors on RG-59/U cable to connect to the High-Density BNC EIA. Cisco recommends these cables
for connection to a patch panel; they are designed for long runs of up to 450 feet. For more detail, see
the “High-Density BNC EIA” section on page 1-18.
Although not required, Cisco strongly recommends using the BNC insertion tool to connect cables to the
EIA. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide for more information about
the insertion tool.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-37
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Coaxial Cable Installation
Procedure: Install Coaxial Cable With High-Density BNC Connectors
Step 1
Place the BNC cable connector over the desired connection point on the backplane.
Step 2
Using the insertions tool, position the cable connector so that the slot in the connector is over the
corresponding notch at the backplane connection point.
Step 3
Gently push the connector down until the notch backplane connector slides into the slot on the cable
connector.
Step 4
Turn the cable connector until the notch clicks into place.
Step 5
Tie wrap or lace the cables to the EIA according to Telcordia standards (GR-1275-CORE) or local site
practice.
Step 6
Route the cables to the nearest side of the shelf assembly through the side cutouts according to local site
practice.
The rubber coated edges of the side cutouts prevent the cables from chafing.
1.10.3 SMB Connector Installation
The SMB backplane cover is similar to the BNC cover. For further detail, see the “SMB EIA” section
on page 1-19. The SMB connectors on the EIA are AMP 415504-3 (75 Ohm) 4 leg connectors.
Right-angle mating connectors for the connecting cable are AMP 415484-2 (75 Ohm) connectors. Use
RG-179/U cable to connect to the ONS 15454 EIA. Cisco recommends these cables for connection to a
patch panel; they are not designed for long runs (over 50 feet). Range does not affect loopback testing.
For information about attaching ferrites to SMB/BNC connectors, see the “Ferrite Installation” section
on page 1-61.
Procedure: Install Coaxial Cable with SMB Connectors
Refer to Figure 1-26 when performing the following steps.
Step 1
Place the SMB cable connector over the desired connection point on the backplane.
Step 2
Gently push the connector until it clicks into place.
Step 3
Tie wrap or lace the cables to the EIA according to Telcordia standards (GR-1275-CORE) or local site
practice.
Step 4
Route the cables to the nearest side of the shelf assembly into rack runs according to local site practice.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-38
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
DS-1 Cable Installation
32100
Figure 1-26 Installing coaxial cable with SMB connectors
Warning
Step 5
Metallic interfaces for connection to outside plant lines (such as T1/E1/T3/E3, etc.) must be
connected through a registered or approved device such as CSU/DSU or NT1.
Label the transmit, receive, working, and protect cables at each end of the connection to avoid confusion
with cables that are similar in appearance.
1.11 DS-1 Cable Installation
DS-1s support both twisted pair wire-wrap cabling and AMP Champ connector cabling. Install the
proper backplane EIA on the ONS 15454 for each cabling option. This section provides information
about the DS-1 EIA options.
For information about DS-1 cable management, see the “DS-1 Twisted-Pair Cable Management” section
on page 1-58.
1.11.1 Twisted Pair Wire-Wrap Installation
Installing twisted-pair, wire-wrap DS-1 cables requires separate pairs of grounded twisted-pair cables
for receive (in) and transmit (out). Prepare four cables, two for receive and two for transmit, for each
DS-1 facility to be installed.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-39
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
DS-1 Cable Installation
Caution
Always use the supplied ESD wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the
wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.
If you use DS-1 electrical twisted-pair cables, equip the ONS 15454 with an SMB EIA on each side of
the backplane where DS-1 cables will terminate. You must install special DS-1 electrical interface
adapters, commonly referred to as a balun, on every transmit and receive connector for each DS-1
termination.
Note
DS-1 electrical interface adapters project an additional 1.72 inches from the ONS 15454 backplane.
If you install DS-1 cards in the ONS 15454, you must fit the corresponding transmit and receive SMB
connectors on the EIA with a DS-1 electrical interface adapter. You can install the adapter on the SMB
connector for the port. The adaptor has wire-wrap posts for DS-1 transmit and receive cables.
Figure 1-27 shows the DS-1 electrical interface adapter.
Figure 1-27 DS-1 electrical interface adapter (balun)
Wire wrap posts
DS-1
Electrical
interface
adapter
Ring
Tip
32071
SMB Connector
Each DS-1 electrical interface adapter has a female SMB connector on one end and a pair of .045 inch
square wire-wrap posts on the other end. The wire-wrap posts are .200 inches apart.
Procedure: Install DS-1 Cables Using Electrical Interface Adapters (Balun)
All DS-1 cables connected to the ONS 15454 DS-1 ports must terminate with twisted-pair cables to
connect to the DS-1 electrical interface adapter. The DS-1 electrical interface adapters project 1.72
inches beyond the SMB EIA.
Step 1
Attach the SMB connector on the adapter to the SMB connector for the port’s transmit pair on the
backplane.
Step 2
Attach the SMB connector on an adapter to the SMB connector for the port’s receive pair on the
backplane.
Step 3
Terminate the DS-1 transmit and receive cables for the port to the wire-wrap posts on the adapter:
a.
Using a wire-wrap tool, connect the receive cables to the receive adapter pins on the backplane
connector for the desired port.
b.
Connect the transmit cables to the transmit adapter pins on the backplane connector for the desired
port.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-40
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
DS-1 Cable Installation
c.
Terminate the shield ground wire on the DS-1 cable to ground according to local site practice.
If you put DS1N-14 cards in Slots 3 and 15 to form 1:N protection groups, do not wire Slots 3 and 15
for DS-1 electrical interface adapters.
Figure 1-28 shows a ONS 15454 backplane with an SMB EIA with DS-1 electrical interface adapters
attached on both sides of the shelf assembly to create DS-1 twisted-pair termination points.
Figure 1-28 A backplane with SMB EIA for DS-1 cables
32085
DS-1 Electrical Interface
Adapter or balun
1.11.2 AMP Champ Connector Installation
To install AMP Champ connector DS-1 cables, you must use 64-pin bundled cable connectors with a
64-pin male AMP Champ connector. You need an AMP Champ connector #552276-1 for the receptacle
side and #1-552496-1 (for cable diameter .475in.–.540in) or #2-552496-1 (for cable diameter
.540in.–.605in.) for the right-angle shell housing (or their functional equivalent). The corresponding
64-pin female AMP Champ connector on the AMP Champ EIA supports one receive and one transmit
for each DS-1 port for the corresponding card slot.
Because each DS1-14 card supports 14 DS-1 ports, only 56 pins (28 pairs) of the 64-pin connector are
used. Prepare one 56-wire cable for each DS-1 facility installed. Table 1-5 shows the pin assignments
for the AMP Champ connectors on the ONS 15454 AMP Champ EIA. See the “AMP Champ EIA”
section on page 1-20 for more information about the AMP Champ EIA.
Table 1-5
Pin Assignments for AMP Champ Connectors (Shaded Area Corresponds to White/Orange
Binder Group)
Signal/Wire
Pin
Pin
Signal/Wire
Signal/Wire
Pin
Pin
Signal/Wire
Tx Tip 1
white/blue
1
33
Tx Ring 1
blue/white
Rx Tip 1
yellow/orange
17
49
Rx Ring 1
orange/yellow
Tx Tip 2
white/orange
2
34
Tx Ring 2
orange/white
Rx Tip 2
yellow/green
18
50
Rx Ring 2
green/yellow
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-41
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
DS-1 Cable Installation
Table 1-5
Pin Assignments for AMP Champ Connectors (Shaded Area Corresponds to White/Orange
Binder Group) (continued)
Signal/Wire
Pin
Pin
Signal/Wire
Signal/Wire
Pin
Pin
Signal/Wire
Tx Tip 3
white/green
3
35
Tx Ring 3
green/white
Rx Tip 3
yellow/brown
19
51
Rx Ring 3
brown/yellow
Tx Tip 4
white/brown
4
36
Tx Ring 4
brown/white
Rx Tip 4
yellow/slate
20
52
Rx Ring 4
slate/yellow
Tx Tip 5
white/slate
5
37
Tx Ring 5
slate/white
Rx Tip 5
violet/blue
21
53
Rx Ring 5
blue/violet
Tx Tip 6
red/blue
6
38
Tx Ring 6
blue/red
Rx Tip 6
violet/orange
22
54
Rx Ring 6
orange/violet
Tx Tip 7
red/orange
7
39
Tx Ring 7
orange/red
Rx Tip 7
violet/green
23
55
Rx Ring 7
green/violet
Tx Tip 8
red/green
8
40
Tx Ring 8
green/red
Rx Tip 8
violet/brown
24
56
Rx Ring 8
brown/violet
Tx Tip 9
red/brown
9
41
Tx Ring 9
brown/red
Rx Tip 9
violet/slate
25
57
Rx Ring 9
slate/violet
Tx Tip 10
red/slate
10
42
Tx Ring 10
slate/red
Rx Tip 10
white/blue
26
58
Rx Ring 10
blue/white
Tx Tip 11
black/blue
11
43
Tx Ring 11
blue/black
Rx Tip 11
white/orange
27
59
Rx Ring 11
orange/white
Tx Tip 12
black/orange
12
44
Tx Ring 12
orange/black
Rx Tip 12
white/green
28
60
Rx Ring 12
green/white
Tx Tip 13
black/green
13
45
Tx Ring 13
green/black
Rx Tip 13
white/brown
29
61
Rx Ring 13
brown/white
Tx Tip 14
black/brown
14
46
Tx Ring 14
brown/black
Rx Tip 14
white/slate
30
62
Rx Ring 14
slate/white
Tx Spare0+ N/A
15
47
Tx Spare0- N/A
Rx Spare0+ N/A
31
63
Rx Spare0- N/A
Tx Spare1+ N/A
16
48
Tx Spare1- N/A
Rx Spare1+ N/A
32
64
Rx Spare1- N/A
Table 1-6 shows the pin assignments for the AMP Champ connectors on the ONS 15454 AMP Champ
EIA for a shielded DS1 cable.
Table 1-6
Pin Assignments for AMP Champ Connectors (shielded DS1 cable)
64-Pin Blue Bundle
64-Pin Orange Bundle
Signal/Wire
Pin
Pin
Signal/Wire
Signal/Wire
Pin
Pin
Signal/Wire
Tx Tip 1
white/blue
1
33
Tx Ring 1
blue/white
Rx Tip 1
white/blue
17
49
Rx Ring 1
blue/white
Tx Tip 2
white/orange
2
34
Tx Ring 2
orange/white
Rx Tip 2
white/orange
18
50
Rx Ring 2
orange/white
Tx Tip 3
white/green
3
35
Tx Ring 3
green/white
Rx Tip 3
white/green
19
51
Rx Ring 3
green/white
Tx Tip 4
white/brown
4
36
Tx Ring 4
brown/white
Rx Tip 4
white/brown
20
52
Rx Ring 4
brown/white
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-42
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
DS-1 Cable Installation
Table 1-6
Pin Assignments for AMP Champ Connectors (shielded DS1 cable) (continued)
64-Pin Blue Bundle
Caution
64-Pin Orange Bundle
Signal/Wire
Pin
Pin
Signal/Wire
Signal/Wire
Pin
Pin
Signal/Wire
Tx Tip 5
white/slate
5
37
Tx Ring 5
slate/white
Rx Tip 5
white/slate
21
53
Rx Ring 5
slate/white
Tx Tip 6
red/blue
6
38
Tx Ring 6
blue/red
Rx Tip 6
red/blue
22
54
Rx Ring 6
blue/red
Tx Tip 7
red/orange
7
39
Tx Ring 7
orange/red
Rx Tip 7
red/orange
23
55
Rx Ring 7
orange/red
Tx Tip 8
red/green
8
40
Tx Ring 8
green/red
Rx Tip 8
red/green
24
56
Rx Ring 8
green/red
Tx Tip 9
red/brown
9
41
Tx Ring 9
brown/red
Rx Tip 9
red/brown
25
57
Rx Ring 9
brown/red
Tx Tip 10
red/slate
10
42
Tx Ring 10
slate/red
Rx Tip 10
red/slate
26
58
Rx Ring 10
slate/red
Tx Tip 11
black/blue
11
43
Tx Ring 11
blue/black
Rx Tip 11
black/blue
27
59
Rx Ring 11
blue/black
Tx Tip 12
black/orange
12
44
Tx Ring 12
orange/black
Rx Tip 12
black/orange
28
60
Rx Ring 12
orange/black
Tx Tip 13
black/green
13
45
Tx Ring 13
green/black
Rx Tip 13
black/green
29
61
Rx Ring 13
green/black
Tx Tip 14
black/brown
14
46
Tx Ring 14
brown/black
Rx Tip 14
black/brown
30
62
Rx Ring 14
brown/black
Tx Tip 15
black/slate
15
47
Tx Tip 15
slate/black
Rx Tip 15
black/slate
31
63
Rx Tip 15
slate/black
Tx Tip 16
yellow/blue
16
48
Tx Tip 16
blue/yellow
Rx Tip 16
yellow/blue
32
64
Rx Tip 16
blue/yellow
Always use the supplied ESD wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the
wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.
When using DS-1 AMP Champ cables, you must equip the ONS 15454 with an AMP Champ connector
EIA on each side of the backplane where DS-1 cables will terminate. Each AMP Champ connector on
the EIA corresponds to a slot in the shelf assembly and is numbered accordingly. The AMP Champ
connectors have screw-down tooling at each end of the connector. To install an AMP Champ backplane
cover, see the “AMP Champ EIA” section on page 1-20.
Procedure: Install DS-1 AMP Champ Cables on the AMP Champ EIA
Step 1
Prepare a 56-wire cable for each DS-1 card you will install in the shelf assembly. See Table 1-5 on
page 1-41 for the ONS 15454 AMP Champ connector pin assignments.
Step 2
Connect the male AMP Champ connector on the cable to the female AMP Champ connector on the ONS
15454 backplane.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-43
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Card Installation
Step 3
Use the clips on the male AMP Champ connector to secure the connection.
The female connector has grooves on the outside edge for snapping the clips into place.
Note
To install optical cable, you must first install optical cards.
1.12 Card Installation
This section describes the how to install ONS 15454 cards. The procedure for installing ONS 15454
cards is nearly identical for each card. AIC card installation is slightly different from all other cards and
is described in its own procedure. The XC/XCVT /XC10G and TCC+ installation procedures are
virtually identical and are described in one procedure. Installation for all other cards is the same and is
covered by one procedure.
The order in which you install cards is important. The proper sequence follows:
1.
TCC+ cards
2.
XC/XCVT/XC10G cards
3.
Optical cards
4.
Electrical cards
5.
Ethernet cards
6.
AIC card
Note
Because all other cards boot from the active TCC+ card which houses the ONS 15454 software, you
must install the TCC+ card before booting any other cards. See Chapter 2, “Software Installation”
for information about the TCC+ card and software versions.
Note
Before installing cards, verify that the power is turned on.
ONS 15454 cards have electrical plugs at the back that plug into electrical connectors on the shelf
assembly backplane. When the ejectors are fully closed, the card plugs into the assembly backplane.
Figure 1-29 shows card installation.
Warning
Caution
Warning
During this procedure, wear grounding wrist straps to avoid ESD damage to the card. Do not
directly touch the backplane with your hand or any metal tool, or you could shock yourself.
Always use the supplied ESD wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the
wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.
Class I (21 CFR 1040.10 and 1040.11) and Class 1M (IEC 60825-1 2001-01) laser products.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-44
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Card Installation
Warning
Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the end of the unterminated fiber cable or connector.
Do not stare into the beam or view directly with optical instruments. Viewing the laser output with
certain optical instruments (for example, eye loupes, magnifiers, and microscopes) within a
distance of 100 mm may pose an eye hazard. Use of controls or adjustments or performance of
procedures other than those specified may result in hazardous radiation exposure.
Warning
The laser is active when the card is booted and the safety key is in the on position (labeled 1). The
port does not have to be in service for the laser to be on. The laser is off when the safety key is off
(labeled 0).
FAN
39391
Figure 1-29 Installing cards in the ONS 15454
FAIL
CR
IT
MAJ
MIN
Ejector
Guide rail
1.12.1 Slot Requirements
The ONS 15454 shelf assembly has 17 card slots numbered sequentially from left to right. Slots 1 – 4
and 14 – 17 are multispeed slots. They can host any ONS 15454 card, except the OC48IR 1310, OC48LR
1550, OC48ELR 1550, and OC192LR 1550 cards. Slots 5, 6, 12 and 13 are high-speed slots. They can
host any ONS 15454 card, including the OC48IR 1310, OC48LR 1550, OC48ELR 1550, and OC192LR
1550 cards. You can install the OC48 IR/STM16 SH AS 1310 and the OC48 LR/STM16 LH AS 1550
cards in any multispeed or high-speed card slot.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-45
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Card Installation
Slots 7 and 11 are dedicated to TCC+ cards. Slots 8 and 10 are dedicated to cross-connect (XC, XCVT,
XC10G) cards. Slot 9 is reserved for the optional Alarm Interface Controller (AIC) card. Slots 3 and 15
can also host DS1N-14 and DS3N-12 cards that are used in 1:N protection.
Caution
Do not operate the ONS 15454 with a single TCC+ card or a single XC/XCVT/XC10G card installed.
Always operate the shelf assembly with one working and one protect card of the same type.
Shelf assembly slots have symbols indicating the type of cards that you can install in them. Each ONS
15454 card has a corresponding symbol. The symbol on the card must match the symbol on the slot.
Table 1-7 shows the slot and card symbol definitions.
Table 1-7
Symbol
Slot and Card Symbols
Color/Shape
Definition
●
Orange/Circle
Multispeed slot (all traffic cards except the OC48IR 1310,
OC48LR 1550, and OC192 LR 1550 cards). Only install
ONS 15454 cards with a circle symbol on the faceplate.
▲
Blue/Triangle
High-speed slot (all traffic cards including the OC48IR
1310, OC48LR 1550, and OC192LR 1550 cards). Only
install ONS 15454 cards with circle or a triangle symbol on
the faceplate.
■
Purple/Square
TCC+ slot. Only install ONS 15454 cards with a square
symbol on the faceplate.
✚
Green/Cross
Cross-connect (XC/XCVT/XC10G) slot. Only install ONS
15454 cards with a cross symbol on the faceplate.
P
Red/P
Protection slot in 1:N protection schemes.
◆
Red/Diamond
AIC Slot. Only install ONS 15454 cards with a diamond
symbol on the faceplate.
★
Gold/Star
Multispeed slot - future
Table 1-8 lists the number of ports, line rates, connector options, and connector locations for ONS 15454
optical and electrical cards.
Table 1-8
Card Ports, Line Rates, and Connectors
Connector
Location
Card
Ports
Line Rate per Port
Connector Types
DS1-14
14
1.544 Mbps
SMB w/wire wrap
adapter, AMP
Champ Connector*
Backplane
DS1N-14
14
1.544 Mbps
SMB w/wire wrap
adapter, AMP
Champ Connector*
—
DS3-12
12
44.736 Mbps
SMB or BNC*
Backplane
DS3N-12
12
44.736 Mbps
SMB or BNC*
—
DS3-12E
12
44.736 Mbps
SMB or BNC*
Backplane
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-46
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Card Installation
Table 1-8
Card Ports, Line Rates, and Connectors (continued)
Card
Ports
Line Rate per Port
Connector Types
Connector
Location
DS3N-12E
12
44.736 Mbps
SMB or BNC*
—
DS3XM-6
6
44.736 Mbps
SMB or BNC*
Backplane
EC1-12
12
51.84 Mbps
SMB or BNC*
Backplane
E100T-12
12
100 Mbps
RJ-45
Faceplate
E1000-2
2
1000 Mbps
SC (GBIC)
Faceplate
E100T-G
12
100 Mbps
RJ-45
Faceplate
E1000-2-G
2
1000 Mbps
SC (GBIC)
Faceplate
OC-3 IR
4
155.52 Mbps (STS-3) SC
Faceplate
OC-12 (IR/LR)
1
622.08 Mbps
(STS-12)
SC
Faceplate
OC-48
(IR/LR/ELR)
1
2488.32 Mbps
(STS-48)
SC
Faceplate
OC-48 any slot
(IR/LR)
1
2488.32 Mbps
(STS-48)
SC
Faceplate
OC-192 (LR)
1
9.95 Gbps (STS-192)
SC
Faceplate
* When used as a protect card, the card does not have a physical external connection. The protect card connects to the working
card(s) through the backplane and becomes active when the working card fails. The protect card then uses the physical
connection of the failed card.
Procedure: Install the TCC+ and XC/XCVT/XC10G Cards
Although the installation procedure is the same for both TCC+ and XC/XCVT/XC10G cards, you must
install the TCC+ card and let it initialize before installing the XC/XCVT/XC10G cards. The TCC+ card
houses the ONS 15454 software. For a detailed explanation, see Chapter 2, “Software Installation.”
Note
This is not the procedure to use when upgrading from XC to XCVT cards or from XCVT to XC10G
cards. If you are performing an XC to XCVT upgrade, an XCVT to a XC10G upgrade, or a TCC to
TCC+ upgrade, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide.
Step 1
Open the card ejectors.
Step 2
Slide the card along the guide rails into the correct slot (Slot 8 or 10 for the XC/XCVT/XC10G and Slot
7 or 11 for the TCC+).
Step 3
Close the ejectors.
Step 4
Verify that power is applied to the shelf assembly.
Step 5
Verify the LED activity as described in Table 1-9.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-47
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Card Installation
Table 1-9
LED Activity during TCC+ and XC/XCVT/XC10G Card Installation
Card Type
TCC+
XC/XCVT/XC10G
Note
Step 6
Tip
LED Activity
1.
The red FAIL LED turns on and remains lit for 20 to 30 seconds.
2.
The red FAIL LED blinks for 35 to 45 seconds.
3.
The red FAIL LED remains lit for 5 to 10 seconds.
4.
All LEDs (including the CRIT, MAJ, MIN, REM, SYNC, and ACO LEDs)
blink once and turn off for 5 to 10 seconds.
5.
The ACT/STBY LED turns on. (On the TCC+ card, the ACT/STBY LED
may take several minutes to illuminate while the DCC processor boots.)
1.
The red LED turns on and remains lit for 20 to 30 seconds.
2.
The red LED blinks for 35 to 45 seconds.
3.
The red LED remains lit for 5 to 10 seconds.
4.
All LEDs blink once and turn on.
5.
The ACT/STBY LED turns on.
If the FAIL LED is lit continuously on the TCC+ card, see the tip below about the TCC+
automatic upload.
Verify that the ACT/STBY LED is the correct color for the card (green for active, amber for standby).
The IP address for the node, the temperature of the ONS 15454, and the time of day will be displayed
on the LCD. The default time and date is 12:00 AM, January 1, 1970.
When a TCC+ card installed in the shelf assembly has a different version of the ONS 15454 software
installed than the version running on the active TCC+, the newly-installed TCC+ card automatically
loads the software version running on the active TCC+. You do not need to do anything in this
situation. However, the loading TCC+ card will not boot up in the normal manner. When the card is
first inserted, the red FAIL LED stays on for a short period. The FAIL LED then blinks normally and
all LEDs go dark. The FAIL LED and the ACT/STBY LED flash alternately every 30 to 45 seconds
as the new software loads onto the new TCC+ card. After loading the new software for approximately
30 minutes, the TCC+ card becomes the standby card and the amber LED is illuminated.
Procedure: Install Optical, Electrical, and Ethernet Cards
Although the installation procedure is the same for optical, electrical, and Ethernet cards, you must
install the optical cards before installing the electrical cards.
Warning
Step 1
Before installing an OC-192 card, make sure the safety key on the faceplate is in off position
(labeled 0). When in the on position (labeled 1), the laser is activated.
Open the card ejectors.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-48
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Card Installation
Step 2
Slide the card along the guide rails into the correct slot.
Step 3
Close the ejectors.
Step 4
Verify that power is applied to the shelf assembly.
Step 5
Verify the LED activity, as described in Table 1-10.
Table 1-10 LED Activity during Optical and Electrical Card Installation
Card Type
OC-3, OC-12,
OC-48, OC-192
DS-1, DS-3,
EC-1
Ethernet
LED Activity
1.
The red FAIL LED turns on and remains lit for 20 to 30 seconds.
2.
The red FAIL LED blinks for 35 to 45 seconds.
3.
All LEDs blink once and turn off for 5 to 10 seconds.
4.
The ACT LED turns on.
1.
The red FAIL LED turns on and remains lit for 10 to 15 seconds.
2.
The red FAIL LED blinks for 30 to 40 seconds.
3.
All LEDs blink once and turn off for 1 to 5 seconds.
4.
The ACT/STBY LED turns on.
1.
The red FAIL LED turns on and remains lit for 20 to 30 seconds.
2.
The red FAIL LED blinks for 35 to 45 seconds.
3.
All LEDs blink once and turn off for 1 to 5 seconds.
4.
The ACT LED turns on.
Step 6
Verify that the ACT or ACT/STBY LED is on. The signal fail (SF) LED can persist until all card ports
connect to their far end counterparts and a signal is present.
Step 7
When you have displayed CTC on your workstation, verify that the card appears in the correct slot on
the CTC node view. See Chapter 2, “Software Installation” for CTC information and setup instructions.
Procedure: Install the AIC Card
Step 1
Open the card ejectors.
Step 2
Slide the card along the guide rails into the correct slot.
Step 3
Close the ejectors.
Step 4
Verify that power is applied to the shelf assembly.
Step 5
Verify the that red FAIL LED remains lit for 1 second.
Step 6
Verify that the red FAIL LED blinks for 1 to 5 seconds.
Step 7
Verify that after 1 to 5 seconds, all LEDs blink once and turn off.
Step 8
Verify that the ACT LED is on.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-49
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Card Installation
1.12.2 Gigabit Interface Converter
GBICs are hot-swappable input/output devices that plug into a Gigabit Ethernet (E1000-2 or E1000-2-G)
card to link the card with the fiber-optic network. Cisco provides two GBIC models: one for short reach
applications (part number 15454-GBIC-SX) and one for long-reach applications (15454-GBIC-LX).
The short reach, or “SX” model, connects to multimode fiber and the long reach, or “LX” model,
requires single-mode fiber. Because the GBICs are very similar in appearance, check the label on the
GBIC carefully before installing it.
For a description of GBICs and their capabilities, see Chapter 9, “Ethernet Operation.”
Procedure: Install Gigabit Interface Converters
Step 1
Remove the GBIC from its protective packaging.
Step 2
Check the part number to verify that the GBIC is the correct type for your network.
Step 3
Grip the sides of the GBIC with your thumb and forefinger and insert it into the slot on the front panel
of the Gigabit Ethernet card (shown in Figure 1-30).
GBICs are hot-swappable and can therefore be installed/removed while the card/shelf assembly is
powered and running.
Note
GBICs are keyed to prevent incorrect installation.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-50
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Card Installation
Figure 1-30 Installing a GBIC on an E1000-2 card
E1000
2
Plug
FAIL
ACT
SF
RX
1
TX
ACT/LINK
ACT/LINK
RX
2
33678 12931
Step 4
44734
TX
Slide the GBIC through the cover flap until you hear a click.
The click indicates the GBIC is locked into the slot.
Warning
GBICs are Class I laser products. These products have been tested and comply with Class
I limits.
Warning
Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture ports of the single-mode fiber
optic modules when no cable is connected. Avoid exposure and do not stare into open
apertures.
Step 5
When you are ready to attach the network interface fiber-optic cable, remove the plug from the GBIC
and save the plug for future use.
Step 6
Install and route the cable. See the “Optical Cable Management” section on page 1-55 for routing
instructions.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-51
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Fiber-Optic Cable Installation
Procedure: Remove a Gigabit Interface Converter
Step 1
Disconnect the network fiber cable from the GBIC SC connector.
Step 2
Release the GBIC from the slot by simultaneously squeezing the two plastic tabs (one on each side of
the GBIC).
Step 3
Slide the GBIC out of the Gigabit Ethernet module slot.
A flap closes over the GBIC slot to protect the connector on the Gigabit Ethernet card.
1.13 Fiber-Optic Cable Installation
This section explains how to install optical fibers on OC-N cards.
Caution
Always use the supplied ESD wristband when working with a powered ONS 15454. Plug the
wristband cable into the ESD jack located on the lower-right outside edge of the shelf assembly.
ONS OC-N cards feature SC connectors. To install fiber-optic cables in the ONS 15454, a fiber cable
with the corresponding connector type must be connected to the transmit and receive ports on the ONS
15454 cards. On ONS 15454 optical card ports, the top connector is transmit and the bottom connector
is receive. Cisco recommends that the transmit and receive and the working and protection fibers be
labeled at each end of the fiber span to avoid confusion with cables that are similar in appearance.
For information about fiber cable management, see the “Optical Cable Management” section on
page 1-55.
Warning
Class I (21 CFR 1040.10 and 1040.11) and Class 1M (IEC 60825-1 2001-01) laser products.
Warning
Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the end of the unterminated fiber cable or connector.
Do not stare into the beam or view directly with optical instruments. Viewing the laser output with
certain optical instruments (for example, eye loupes, magnifiers, and microscopes) within a
distance of 100 mm may pose an eye hazard. Use of controls or adjustments or performance of
procedures other than those specified may result in hazardous radiation exposure.
Warning
The laser is active when the card is booted and the safety key is in the on position (labeled 1). The
port does not have to be in service for the laser to be on. The laser is off when the safety key is off
(labeled 0).
Warning
Follow all directions and warning labels when working with optical fibers. To prevent eye
damage, never look directly into a fiber or connector.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-52
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Fiber-Optic Cable Installation
Caution
Do not user fiber loopbacks with the OC192 LR 1550 card unless you are using a 20 dB attentuator.
Never connect a direct fiber loopback. Using fiber loopbacks causes irreparable damage to the
OC-192 card.
Procedure: Install Fiber-Optic Cables on OC-N Cards
Note
Step 1
Clean all fiber connectors thoroughly. Dust particles can degrade performance. Put caps on
any fiber connectors that are not used.
Place the SC connector in front of the connection point on the card faceplate. Each card supports at least
one transmit and one receive connector to create an optical carrier port. Figure 1-31 shows the cable
location.
Figure 1-31 Installing fiber-optic cables
FAIL
ACT
SF
SC faceplate connector
Tx
SC cable connector
Rx
32082
Front edge of card
Step 2
Align the keyed ridge of the cable connector with the receiving slot on the faceplate connection point.
Step 3
Gently push the cable connector into the faceplate connection point until the connector snaps into place.
Procedure: Install the Fiber Boot
Cisco provides clear plastic fiber boots for the OC-3, OC-12, and OC-48 (except OC48 AS) cards. The
boots prevent hanging fibers from bending too sharply, which may degrade performance. The boots also
prevent the front door from interfering with hanging fibers. The fiber boots are not necessary for the
OC-192 and the OC-48 AS cards because of the angled SC connector. Figure 1-32 shows the fiber boot
attachment.
You can install the fiber boots on the fiber-optic cables before or after the fibers are attached to the optic
card.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-53
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Cable Routing and Management
Step 1
Position the open slot of the fiber boot underneath the fiber cable.
Step 2
Push the fiber cable down into the fiber boot.
Step 3
Twist the fiber boot to lock the fiber cable into the tail end of the fiber boot.
Slide the fiber boot forward along the fiber cable until the fiber boot fits snugly onto the end of the SC
cable connector.
Figure 1-32 Attaching a fiber boot
SC cable
connector
Fiber boot
32092
Fiber
optic
line
1.14 Cable Routing and Management
The ONS 15454 cable management facilities include the following:
Note
•
Cable management clips on optical card faceplates
•
A cable-routing channel that runs the width of the shelf assembly
•
Plastic horseshoe-shaped fiber guides at each side opening of the cable-routing channel that ensure
the proper bend radius is maintained in the fibers
You can remove the fiber guide if necessary to create a larger opening (if you need to route Cat-5
Ethernet cables out the side, for example). To remove the fiber guide, take out the three screws that
anchor it to the side of the shelf assembly.
•
A fold-down door that provides access to the cable-management tray
•
Cable tie-wrap facilities on EIAs that secure cables to the cover panel
•
Reversible jumper routing fins that enable you to route cables out either side by positioning the fins
as desired
•
Jumper slack storage reels (2) on each side panel that reduce the amount of slack in cables that are
connected to other devices
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-54
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Cable Routing and Management
Note
To remove the reels, take out the screw in the center of each reel.
Figure 1-33 shows the cable management facilities that you can access through the fold-down front door,
including the cable-routing channel and the jumper routing fins.
Figure 1-33 Managing cables on the front panel
FAN
FAIL
CR
IT
MA
J
MIN
34238
Reversible jumper
routing fins
Fold down
front door
1.14.1 Optical Cable Management
Optical cables connect to the SC connectors which are located on the faceplate of the optical cards and
on GBICs. Route optical cables down through the fiber management clips on the optical card faceplate
(shown in Figure 1-34) or, if the optical cables are connected to GBICs, route them down through the
jumper routing fins (Ethernet cards do not have fiber management clips).
Route optical cables into the cable management area of the shelf assembly, through a cutout in the
nearest side of the assembly, and onto the side of the assembly. A hinged panel on the front of the shelf
assembly folds down to provide access to the cable-management tray.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-55
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Cable Routing and Management
Figure 1-34 Routing fiber-optic cables on the optical-card faceplate
Faceplate connector
FAIL
ACT
SF
Cable connector
Tx
Rx
Retaining clip
39140
Slot on cable management tray
Fold down faceplate
Cutout
Procedure: Route Fiber-Optic Cables in the Shelf Assembly
Step 1
Open the fold-down front door on the cable-management tray.
Step 2
Route the cable on the card faceplate through the fiber clip on the faceplate.
GBICs do not have fiber clips; therefore, if you are routing optical cable from an E1000-2-G or E1000-2
card, skip to Step 3.
Step 3
Route the cables into the cable-management tray.
Step 4
Route the cables out either side of the cable-management tray through the cutouts on each side of the
shelf assembly. Use the reversible fiber guides to route cables out the desired side.
Step 5
Close the fold-down front door when all cables in the front compartment are properly routed.
Figure 1-35 shows the fold-down front door of the shelf assembly open to display the cable routing
channel.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-56
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Cable Routing and Management
Figure 1-35 Fold-down front door of the cable-management tray (displaying the cable routing
channel)
FAN
FAIL
CR
IT
MA
MIN
45063
J
1.14.2 Coaxial Cable Management
Coaxial cables connect to EIAs on the ONS 15454 backplane using cable connectors. EIAs feature
cable-management eyelets for tie wrapping or lacing cables to the cover panel.
Procedure: Route the Coaxial Cables
Step 1
Tie wrap or lace the coaxial cables according to local site practice and route the cables through the side
cutouts on either side of the ONS 15454. The rubber coated edges of the side cutouts prevent the cables
from chafing.
Note
When using the RG179 cable with SMB connectors, remember that the maximum distance
available with the RG179 cable is less than the maximum distance available with standard
RG59 cable. If you only use the RG179, the maximum available distance is 50 feet versus
the 450 feet available with the larger RG59 cable.
Step 2
Use short lengths of “pigtail” RG179 to terminate the shelf assembly.
Step 3
Use standard RG59 connected to the RG179 for the remainder of the cable run. When using a 10-foot
section of the RG179, you can attach a maximum length of 437 feet of RG59. When using a 30-foot
section of RG179, you can attach a maximum length of 311 feet of RG59.
The shorter maximum distance available with the RG179 is due to a higher attenuation rate for the
thinner cable. The attenuation rate for RG59 cable (based on testing with Belden 923, the equivalent of
328A cable) is ~1.0 dB/100 feet at 22 Mhz (DS-3 data rate). The attenuation rate of RG179 is
6.3 db/100 feet. Use a figure of 5.0 for total cable loss when making calculations. Figure 1-36 shows one
side of the ONS 15454 backplane with SMB EIAs and the coaxial cables properly routed.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-57
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Cable Routing and Management
Figure 1-36 Routing coaxial cable through the SMB EIA backplane
Connector ends
B
A
32079
Tie-wrap
posts
Tie-wraps
1.14.3 DS-1 Twisted-Pair Cable Management
Connect twisted pair/DS-1cables to SMB EIAs on the ONS 15454 backplane using cable connectors and
DS-1 electrical interface adapters (balun).
Procedure: Route DS-1 Twisted-Pair Cables
When using DS-1 twisted-pair cables, the backplane cover has cutouts over the SMB cable connectors.
SMB EIAs feature cable-management eyelets for tie wrapping or lacing cables to the cover panel.
Step 1
Install DS-1 electrical interface adapters on every transmit and receive connector for DS-1 ports.
Step 2
Use wire-wrap posts on the DS-1 electrical interface adapters to connect the terminated incoming cables.
Step 3
Tie-wrap or lace the twisted-pair cables according to local site practice and route the cables into the side
cutouts on either side of the ONS 15454.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-58
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Cable Routing and Management
1.14.4 AMP Champ Cable Management
EIAs have cable management eyelets to tiewrap or lace cables to the cover panel. Tie wrap or lace the
AMP Champ cables according to local site practice and route the cables. If you configure the ONS 15454
for a 23-inch rack, two additional inches of cable management area is available on each side of the shelf
assembly. See the“AMP Champ EIA” section on page 1-20 and the “AMP Champ Connector
Installation” section on page 1-41 and the for more information.
1.14.5 BIC Rear Cover Installation
The ONS 15454 has an optional backplane interface connector (BIC) rear cover. This clear plastic cover
provides additional protection for the cables and connectors on the backplane (Figure 1-37). You can
also install the optional spacers if more space is needed between the cables and rear cover (Figure 1-38).
33916
Figure 1-37 Clear BIC rear cover
Procedure: Install the BIC Rear Cover
Step 1
Locate the three screws that run vertically along the edges of the backplane.
Only one pair of screws lines up with the screw slots on the mounting brackets, making them easy to
locate.
Step 2
Loosen the top and bottom screws on one edge of the backplane to provide room to slide the mounting
brackets into place using the u-shaped screw slots on each end.
Step 3
Slide one of the mounting brackets into place and tighten the screws.
Step 4
Repeat Steps 2 and 3 for the second mounting bracket.
Step 5
Attach the cover by hanging it from the mounting screws on the back of the mounting brackets and
pulling it down until it fits snugly into place.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-59
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Cable Routing and Management
Figure 1-38 Backplane attachment for BIC cover
32073
Screw locations
for attaching BIC
rear cover
55374
S
A UIT
P N A
-4
IN LE O B
65 2
N
S A -C LE
0 TO
TR S
E O FO
W
-5
U R M
at 7
C E B R
ts V
TI FE U M
M dc
S O
O
ax
N R TI U
S TO B N
im
.
LE TI
um
IN
N
S
S U G
TA R O
LL FA N
A C
TI E
O .
N
R
E
T
C
th AU
1
pr e TI
io B O
B
r AT1 N
A
to
:
T
se an R
em
1
rv d
ic te ov
R
in rm e
E
g
T
in po
al w
2
bl er
B
oc fro
A
ks m
T
bo
2
th
Figure 1-39 Installing the BIC rear cover with spacers
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-60
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Ferrite Installation
1.15 Ferrite Installation
Place third-party ferrites on certain cables to dampen electromagnetic interference (EMI) from the ONS
15454. Ferrites must be added to meet the requirements of GR 1089. Refer to the ferrite manufacturer
documentation for proper use and installation of the ferrites. The following illustrations show possible
ferrite placements on the ONS 15454 for power cables, AMP Champ connectors, baluns, BNC/SMB
connectors, and the wire-wrap pin field.
Procedure: Attach Ferrites to Power Cabling
Use a single oval ferrite TDK ZCAT2035-0930 for both pairs of cables and a block ferrite Fair Rite
0443164151 for each pair of cables.
Step 1
Wrap the cables once around and through the block ferrites and pull the cable straight through the oval
ferrites.
Step 2
Place the oval ferrite between the ONS 15454 and the block ferrite as shown in Figure 1-40.
Step 3
Place the oval ferrite as close to the power terminals as possible and place the block ferrite within 5 to
6 inches of the power terminals.
Figure 1-40 Attaching ferrites to power cabling
32087
Power terminals
Figure 1-41 shows the suggested method for attaching the ferrites to AMP Champ connectors. Use a
block ferrite Fair Rite 0443164151 for each cable.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-61
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Ferrite Installation
32088
Figure 1-41 Attaching ferrites to AMP Champ connectors
Figure 1-42 shows the suggested method for attaching ferrites to baluns. Use an oval ferrite TDK ZCAT
1730-0730 for each cable.
Figure 1-42 Attaching ferrites to electrical interface adapters (baluns)
A
32090
B
Figure 1-43 shows the suggested method for attaching ferrites to SMB/BNC connectors. Use an oval
ferrite TDK ZCAT1730-0730 for each cable and place the ferrite as close to the connector as possible.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-62
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Ferrite Installation
Figure 1-43 Attaching ferrites to SMB/BNC connectors
B
32089
A
Procedure: Attach Ferrites to Wire-Wrap Pin Fields
Use an oval ferrite TDK ZCAT1730-0730 and block ferrite Fair Rite 0443164151 for each pair of cables.
Figure 1-44 shows the suggested method for attaching ferrites to wire-wrap pin fields.
Step 1
Wrap the cables once around and through the block ferrites and pull the cables straight through the oval
ferrites.
Step 2
Place the oval ferrite as close to the wire-wrap pin field as possible and between the ONS 15454 and the
block ferrite as shown. The block ferrite should be within 5 to 6 inches of the wire-wrap pin field.
Figure 1-44 Attaching ferrites to wire-wrap pin fields
A
32091
B
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-63
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
ONS 15454 Assembly Specifications
1.16 ONS 15454 Assembly Specifications
This section contains hardware and software specifications for the ONS 15454.
1.16.1 Bandwidth
•
Total bandwidth: 240 Gbps
•
Data plane bandwidth: 160 Gbps
•
SONET plane bandwidth: 80 Gbps
1.16.2 Slot Assignments
•
Total card slots: 17
•
Multispeed slots (any traffic card except OC48 IR 1310, OC48 LR/ELR 1550, and OC192 LR 1550
cards): Slots 1 – 4, 14 – 17
•
High-speed slots (any traffic card including OC48 IR 1310, OC48 LR/ELR 1550, and OC192 LR
1550 cards): Slots 5, 6, 12, 13
•
TCC+ (Timing Communication and Control): Slots 7, 11
•
XC/XCVT/XC10G (Cross Connect): Slots 8, 10
•
AIC (Alarm Interface Card): Slot 9
•
TCC+
•
XC
•
XCVT
•
XC10G
•
AIC
•
EC1-12
•
DS1-14
•
DS1N-14
•
DS3-12
•
DS3N-12
•
DS3-12E
•
DS3N-12E
•
DS3XM-6
•
OC3 IR 4 1310
•
OC12 IR 1310
•
OC12 LR 1310
1.16.3 Cards
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-64
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
ONS 15454 Assembly Specifications
•
OC12 LR 1550
•
OC48 IR 1310
•
OC48 LR 1550
•
OC48 IR/STM16 SH AS 1310
•
OC48 LR/STM16 LH AS 1550
•
OC192 LR 1550
•
OC48 ELR DWDM
•
OC48 ELR 1550
•
E100T-12
•
E1000-2
•
E100T-G
•
E1000-2-G
Note
The OC-3, OC-12, OC-48, and E1000-2 cards are Class 1 laser products (IEC 60825-1 2001-01/Class
I laser product (21CFR 1040.10 and 1040.11).
Note
The OC-192 card is a Class 1M laser product ((IEC 60825-1 2001-01)/Class I laser product (21CFR
1040.10 and 1040.11).
1.16.4 Configurations
•
Two-fiber UPSR ring
•
Path protected mesh network (PPMN)
•
Two-fiber BLSR
•
Four-fiber BLSR
•
Add-drop multiplexer
•
Terminal mode
•
Regenerator mode
1.16.5 Cisco Transport Controller
•
10 Base-T
•
TCC+ access: RJ-45 connector
•
Backplane access: LAN pin field
1.16.6 External LAN Interface
•
10 Base-T Ethernet
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-65
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
ONS 15454 Assembly Specifications
•
Backplane access: LAN pin field
1.16.7 TL1 Craft Interface
•
Speed: 9600 bps
•
TCC+ access: RS-232 DB-9 type connector
•
Backplane access: CRAFT pin field
1.16.8 Modem Interface
•
Hardware flow control
•
TCC+: RS-232 DB-9 type connector
1.16.9 Alarm Interface
•
Visual: Critical, Major, Minor, Remote
•
Audible: Critical, Major, Minor, Remote
•
Alarm contacts: 0.045mm, -48V, 50 mA
•
Backplane access: Alarm pin fields
1.16.10 EIA Interface
•
SMB: AMP #415504-3 75 Ohm 4 leg connectors
•
BNC: Trompeter #UCBJ224 75 Ohm 4 leg connector (King or ITT are also compatible)
•
AMP Champ: AMP#552246-1 with #552562-2 bail locks
1.16.11 Nonvolatile Memory
64 MB, 3.0V FLASH memory
1.16.12 BITS Interface
•
2 DS-1 BITS inputs
•
2 derived DS-1 outputs
•
Backplane access: BITS pin field
1.16.13 System Timing
•
Stratum 3 per Telcordia GR-253-CORE
•
Free running accuracy: ± 4.6 ppm
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-66
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
Installation Checklist
•
Holdover Stability: 3.7 x10 -7/day, including temperature (< 255 slips in first 24 hours)
•
Reference: External BITS, line, internal
1.16.14 Power Specifications
•
Input power: -48 VDC
•
Power consumption: 55W (fan tray only); 650W (maximum draw w/cards)
•
Power Requirements: -42 to -57 VDC
•
Power terminals: #6 Lug
1.16.15 Environmental Specifications
•
Operating Temperature: 0 to +55 degrees Celsius
•
Operating Humidity: 5 - 95%, non-condensing
1.16.16 Dimensions
•
Height: 18.5 inches (40.7 cm)
•
Width: 19 or 23 inches (41.8 or 50.6 cm) with mounting ears attached
•
Depth: 12 inches (26.4 cm) (5 inch projection from rack)
•
Weight: 55 lbs. (empty)
1.17 Installation Checklist
This section provides a summary of the steps required to install the ONS 15454. The section assumes
that individual cards are used with their default provisioning values or will be provisioned by local
technicians as required by the site.
Table 1-11
Installation Checklist
Description
Check
The ONS 15454 is mounted securely in the rack.
The ONS 15454 is grounded with the frame ground.
Power runs to the ONS 15454.
Visual and Audible alarm pins connect to central alarm collection equipment.
If used, BITS, LAN, Alarm, ACO, and CRAFT pins connect to corresponding cables.
If used, BITS, LAN, Alarm, ACO, and CRAFT cables are tiewrapped and routed under
screw holes.
The preferred EIAs are installed.
Coaxial and/or DS-1 cables are installed on the backplane.
Laced or tiewrapped coaxial cables run onto the sides of the ONS 15454.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-67
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
ONS 15454 Software and Hardware Compatibility Matrix
Table 1-11
Installation Checklist (continued)
Description
Check
Power connections are fused properly (15A recommended).
-48V DC (tolerance -42 to -57V DC) power is present at DC A and DC B terminals (if used)
when power is applied.
The fan-tray air filter is installed in the fan tray with the flow direction arrow on the filter
frame pointing up.
The fan-tray assembly is installed. When installed, fans will run on high speed with no
TCC+s installed.
If used, Ethernet patchcords are connected to Ethernet cards.
Fiber-optic and/or Ethernet patchcords route through the faceplate clips, into the
cable-management tray, through the side cutout, and along the sides of the ONS 15454.
The fan-tray assembly can be removed without disturbing fiber or Ethernet patchcords.
The LCD is working. (Use LCD buttons to toggle through slots, ports and states of cards.)
The door is mounted with hinges on hinge pins.
Doors open and close without disturbing fiber or Ethernet patchcords.
1.18 ONS 15454 Software and Hardware Compatibility Matrix
Table 1-12 provides a matrix showing software and hardware compatibility for ONS 15454 Releases 2.0,
2.1, 2.2.0, 3.0. and 3.1.
Table 1-12 ONS 15454 Software and Hardware Compatibility
Hardware
2.00.0x (2.0)
2.10.0x (2.1)
2.20.0x (2.2.0)
3.00.0x (3.0)
3.10.0x (3.1)
TCC
Required
Required
Fully
Compatible
Not Supported Not Supported
TCC+
Not Supported Not Supported Fully
Compatible
Required
Required
XC
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
XCVT
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
XC10G
Not Supported Not Supported Not Supported Not Supported Fully
Compatible
AIC
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
EC1-12
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
DS1-14
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
DS1N-14
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-68
November 2001
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
ONS 15454 Software and Hardware Compatibility Matrix
Table 1-12 ONS 15454 Software and Hardware Compatibility (continued)
Hardware
2.00.0x (2.0)
2.10.0x (2.1)
2.20.0x (2.2.0)
3.00.0x (3.0)
3.10.0x (3.1)
DS3-12
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
DS3N-12
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
DS3-12E
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
DS3N-12E
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
DS3XM-6
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
OC3 IR 4
1310
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
OC12 IR 1310 Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
OC12 LR
1310
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
OC12 LR
1550
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
OC48 IR 1310 Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
OC48 LR
1550
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
OC48 ELR
DWDM
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
OC48
See Note
IR/STM16 SH
AS 1310
See Note
See Note
See Note
Fully
Compatible
OC48
LR/STM16
LH AS 1550
See Note
See Note
See Note
Fully
Compatible
Note
See Note
Use the XC10G card, the TCC+ card, and Software R3.1 or higher to enable the any slot
function on the OC48 IR/STM16 SH AS 1310 and OC48 LR/STM16 LH AS 1550 cards.
OC192
LR/STM64
LH 1550
Not Supported Not Supported Not Supported Not Supported Fully
Compatible
E100T-12
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
E1000-2
Not Supported Not Supported Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
1-69
Chapter 1
Hardware Installation
ONS 15454 Software and Hardware Compatibility Matrix
Table 1-12 ONS 15454 Software and Hardware Compatibility (continued)
Hardware
2.00.0x (2.0)
2.10.0x (2.1)
2.20.0x (2.2.0)
3.00.0x (3.0)
3.10.0x (3.1)
E100T-G
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
E1000-2-G
Not Supported Not Supported Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
Fully
Compatible
If an upgrade is required for compatibility, call the Cisco Technical Assistance Center at
1-877-323-7368.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
1-70
November 2001
C H A P T E R
2
Software Installation
Cisco Transport Controller (CTC), the Cisco ONS 15454’s software interface, is stored on the TCC+
card and download to your workstation each time you log into the ONS 15454. This chapter:
•
Describes how Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) software is installed on PCs and Solaris
workstations
•
Tells you how to connect PCs and Solaris workstations to the Cisco ONS 15454, including direct
connections, LAN connections, remote connections, and firewall-compliant connections
•
Describes the CTC graphic user interface, including the three main CTC views, network, node, and
card
•
Explains how to create domains to manage multiple nodes, change the network view background
color and image (map), and add a node to the network map
•
Describes the different ways you can invoke commands within CTC
•
Explains how to print and export CTC data
2.1 Installation Overview
ONS 15454 provisioning and administration is performed using the Cisco Transport Controller software.
CTC is a Java application that is installed in two locations:
•
ONS 15454 Timing Communications and Control card (TCC+)
•
PCs and Solaris workstations that connect to the ONS 15454
CTC software is pre-installed on the TCC+. The only time you install software on the TCC+ is when you
upgrade from one CTC release to another. To upgrade CTC on the TCC+, you must follow the upgrade
procedures specific to the software release. These procedures can be downloaded from the Cisco website
(www.cisco.com).
For PCs and Solaris workstations, CTC is downloaded from the TCC+ and installed on your computer
automatically after you connect to the ONS 15454. To connect to an ONS 15454, you enter the
ONS 15454 IP address in the URL field of a web browser, such as Netscape Navigator or Microsoft®
Internet Explorer. After connecting to an ONS 15454, the following installation occurs automatically:
1.
A CTC launcher applet is downloaded from the TCC+ to your computer’s Temp directory. (If these
files are deleted, they are reinstalled the next time you connect to the ONS 15454.)
2.
The launcher determines whether your computer has a CTC release matching the release on the
ONS 15454 TCC+.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-1
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Computer Requirements
3.
If the computer does not have CTC installed, or if the installed release is older than the TCC+
version, the launcher downloads the CTC program files from the TCC+.
4.
The launcher starts CTC. The CTC session is separate from the web browser session, so the web
browser is no longer needed. If you log into an ONS 15454 that is connected to ONS 15454s with
older versions of CTC, or to Cisco ONS 15327s, CTC “element” files are downloaded automatically
to enable you to interact with those nodes. You cannot interact with nodes on the network that have
a software version later than the node that you are logged into. Therefore, always log into nodes
having the latest software release.
Each ONS 15454 can handle up to four network-level CTC sessions (the login node and its
DCC-connected nodes) and one node-level session (login node only) at one time. CTC performance may
vary, depending upon the volume of activity in each session.
Note
You can also use TL1 commands to communicate with the Cisco ONS 15454 through VT100
terminals and VT100 emulation software, or you can Telnet to an ONS 15454 using TL1 port 3083.
See the Cisco ONS 15454 TL1 Command Guide for a comprehensive list of TL1 commands.
2.2 Computer Requirements
To use CTC in ONS 15454 Release 3.1, your computer must have a web browser with the correct Java
Runtime Environment (JRE) installed. The correct JRE for each CTC software release is included on the
Cisco ONS 15454 ONS 15454 software CD. If you are running multiple CTC software releases on a
network, the JRE installed on the computer must be compatible with the different software releases.
Table 2-1 on page 2-2 shows JRE compatibility with ONS software releases.
Table 2-1
JRE Compatibility
ONS Software Release
JRE 1.2.2 Compatible
JRE 1.3 Compatible
ONS 15327 Release 1.0
Yes
No
ONS 15327 Release 1.0.1
Yes
Yes
ONS 15454 Release 2.2.1 and earlier
Yes
No
ONS 15454 Release 2.2.2
Yes
Yes
ONS 15454 Release 3.0
Yes
Yes
ONS 15454 Release 3.1
Yes
Yes
Requirements for PCs and Solaris workstations are provided in Table 2-2. A modified java.policy file
must also be installed. In addition to Netscape Communicator and the JRE, also included on the ONS
15454 software CD and the ONS 15454 documentation CD are the Java plug-in and modified java.policy
file.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-2
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Computer Requirements
Table 2-2
Computer Requirements for CTC
Area
Requirements
Notes
Processor
Pentium II 300 MHz, UltraSPARC, or equivalent
300 Mhz is the recommended
processor speed. You can use
computers with less processor
speed; however, you may
experience longer response
times and slower performance.
RAM
128 MB
Hard drive
2 GB
Operating
System
Web browser
CTC application files are
downloaded from the TCC+ to
your computer’s Temp directory.
These files occupy 3-5 MB of
hard drive space.
•
PC: Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT
4.0, or Windows 2000
•
Workstation: Solaris 2.6 or 2.7
PC: Netscape Navigator 4.51 or higher, or
Netscape Communicator 4.61 or higher, or
Internet Explorer 4.0 (service pack 2) or higher
Netscape Communicator 4.73
(Windows) and 4.76 (Solaris) are
installed by the CTC Setup
Wizard included on the Cisco
• Workstation: Netscape Navigator 4.73 or higher
ONS 15454 software and
documentation CDs.
•
Java Runtime JRE 1.2.2_05 with Java Plugin 1.2.2 minimum
Environment
JRE 1.3.0_C (PC) recommended
JRE 1.3.0_01 (Solaris) recommended
Use JRE 1.2.2_05 if you connect
to ONS 15454s running CTC
Release 2.2.1 or earlier.
Use JRE 1.3.0 if all ONS 15454s
that you connect to are running
Release 2.2.2 or later. JRE 1.3.0
is installed by the CTC Setup
Wizard included on the Cisco
ONS 15454 software and
documentation CDs.
Java.policy
file
A java.policy file modified for CTC must be installed A modified java.policy file is
installed by the CTC Setup
Wizard included on the Cisco
ONS 15454 software and
documentation CDs.
Cable
User-supplied Category 5 straight-through cable
with RJ-45 connectors on each end to connect the
computer to the ONS 15454 directly or though a
LAN.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-3
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Running the CTC Setup Wizard
Note
On PCs, the mouse pointer scheme should be set to Windows Standard (Windows 95/98) or None
(Windows NT or Windows 2000). To check the settings, choose Settings and then Control Panel from
the Windows Start menu. Double-click the Mouse option. From the Pointers tab of the Mouse
Properties dialog box, select the Windows Standard (or “none” for NT or Windows 2000) mouse
scheme. Click OK.
2.3 Running the CTC Setup Wizard
The ONS 15454 provides a setup wizard that installs the files needed to run CTC on PCs and Solaris
workstations. You can run the setup wizard from the Cisco ONS 15454 software CD or from the Cisco
ONS 15454 documentation CD. The wizard will install:
•
Netscape Communicator 4.73 (Windows) or 4.76 (Solaris)
•
JRE 1.3 (Windows) or JRE 1.3.0.01 (Solaris)
•
Cisco ONS 15454 online documentation
•
Modified java.policy file
For Solaris workstations, the JRE may require patches to run properly. You can find the patch tar file in
the Jre/Solaris directory on the CD. For information about installing the patches, see the
Jre/Solaris/Solaris.txt file on the CD. After installing the patches, if necessary, perform the “Set Up the
Environment Variable (Solaris installations only)” procedure on page 2-4 and the “Reference the JRE
(Solaris installations only)” procedure on page 2-5 to set up JRE on the workstation.
Procedure: Run the CTC Setup Wizard
Step 1
Insert the Cisco ONS 15454 Release 3.1 software or documentation CD into your computer CD drive.
If the CD directory does not automatically open, open it.
Step 2
Double-click setup.exe (Windows) or setup.bat (Solaris).
Step 3
Follow the on-screen instructions. You can choose to install all components, or select the Custom option
to install selected components.
Procedure: Set Up the Environment Variable (Solaris installations only)
Perform one of the following edit procedures. (JRE indicates the destination directory you selected for
the JRE.)
•
If you are using csh, edit the .cshrc file in your home directory by adding:
setenv NPX_PLUGIN_PATH [JRE]/j2rel1_3_0_01/plugin/sparc/ns4
•
If you are using ksh, edit the .kshrc file in your home directory by adding:
export NPX_PLUGIN_PATH = [JRE]/j2rel1_3_0_01/plugin/sparc/ns4
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-4
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Connecting PCs to the ONS 15454
Procedure: Reference the JRE (Solaris installations only)
Step 1
Run the Control Panel by typing:
[JRE]/j2rel1_3_0_01/bin/ControlPanel
Step 2
Click the Advanced tab.
Step 3
From the combo box, select [JRE]/j2rel1_3_0_01. If the JRE is not found, select other and enter the
following in the Path text box:
[JRE]/j2rel1_3_0_01
Step 4
Click Apply.
2.4 Connecting PCs to the ONS 15454
You can connect a PC to the ONS 15454 using the RJ-45 LAN port on the TCC+ or the LAN 1 pins on
the ONS 15454 backplane. For a list of LAN pin assignments, see Table 1-2 on page 1-34. Each ONS
15454 must have a unique IP address that you use to access the ONS 15454. The address is displayed on
the front panel LCD. The initial IP address, 192.1.0.2, is the default address for ONS 15454 access and
configuration. Each computer used to communicate with the ONS 15454 should have only one IP
address.
Note
Do not use dual network interface cards (NIC) or an enabled NIC card and dial-up adapter at the same
time; this hampers communication between CTC and ONS 15454s.
2.4.1 Direct Connections to the ONS 15454
A direct PC to ONS 15454 connection means your computer is physically connected to the ONS 15454.
This is most commonly done by connecting a CAT-5 straight-through cable from your PC NIC card to
the RJ-45 port on the TCC+. However, direct connections include connections to switches or hubs to
which the ONS 15454 is physically connected. To connect to the ONS 15454 with a direction
connection, you must:
•
Set up Windows on your PC for direct connections
•
Attach cables from the PC to the ONS 15454
•
Test your connection
Procedure: Creating a Direct Connection to an ONS 15454
Step 1
Step 2
Attach a CAT-5 cable from the PC NIC card to one of the following:
•
RJ-45 jack on the ONS 15454 TCC+ card
•
RJ-45 jack on a hub or switch to which the ONS 15454 is physically connected
Use the steps in Table 2-3 to set up Windows for direct connections to an ONS 15454 when:
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-5
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Connecting PCs to the ONS 15454
Table 2-3
•
DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is not enabled on the ONS 15454 or the ONS 15454
is not connected to a DHCP server. If DHCP is enabled, go to Step 2. (For information about DHCP,
see the“Setting Up Network Information” section on page 3-2.)
•
The ONS 15454 is not connected to a LAN.
Setting Up Windows 95/98, Windows NT, and Windows 2000 PCs for Direct ONS 15454 Connections
Windows 95/98
Windows NT
1.
From the Windows Start menu,
choose Settings > Control Panel.
1.
From the Windows Start menu,
choose Settings > Control Panel.
2.
On the Control Panel dialog box,
click the Network icon.
2.
On the Control Panel dialog box,
click the Network icon.
3.
In the Network dialog box select
TCP/IP for your PC Ethernet card,
then click Properties.
3.
In the Network dialog box click the
Protocols tab, choose TCP/IP
Protocol, then click Properties.
On the TCP/IP Properties dialog
box, click the DNS Configuration
tab and choose Disable DNS.
4.
Click the IP Address tab.
5.
In the IP Address window, click
Specify an IP address.
4.
5.
Click the WINS Configuration tab
and choose Disable WINS
Resolution.
6.
Click the IP Address tab.
7.
In the IP Address window, click
Specify an IP address.
8.
9.
In the IP Address field, enter an IP
address that is identical to the ONS
15454 IP address except for the last
three digits. The last three digits
must be between 1 and 254.
In the Subnet Mask field, type
255.255.255.0.
10. Click OK.
6.
7.
Windows 2000
1.
From the Windows Start menu,
choose Settings > Network and
Dial-up Connections > Local Area
Connection.
2.
On the Local Area Connection
Status dialog box, click Properties.
3.
On the General tab, choose TCP/IP
Protocol, then click Properties.
4.
Click Use the following IP address.
5.
In the IP Address field, enter an IP
address that is identical to the ONS
15454 IP address except for the last
three digits. The last three digits
must be between 1 and 254.
In the IP Address field, enter an IP
address that is identical to the ONS
15454 IP address except for the last
three digits. The last three digits
must be between 1 and 254.
6.
In the Subnet Mask field, type
255.255.255.0.
In the Subnet Mask field, type
255.255.255.0.
7.
In the Default Gateway field, type
the ONS 15454 IP address.
8.
Click OK.
8.
Click OK.
9.
On the TCP/IP Properties dialog
box, type the ONS 15454 IP
address in the Default Gateway
field.
10. Click Apply.
11. In some cases, Windows NT will
11. On the TCP/IP dialog box, click the
Gateway tab.
prompt you to reboot your PC. If
you receive this prompt, click Yes.
12. In the New Gateway field, type the
ONS 15454 IP address. Click Add.
13. Verify that the IP address displays
in the Installed Gateways field,
then click OK.
14. When the prompt to restart your PC
displays, click Yes.
Step 3
Test the connection:
a.
Start Netscape Navigator or Internet Explorer.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-6
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Connecting PCs to the ONS 15454
b.
Enter the Cisco ONS 15454 IP address in the web address (URL) field. If the connection is
established, a Java Console window, CTC caching messages, and the Cisco Transport Controller
Login dialog box display. If this occurs, go to Step 2 of the “Log into the ONS 15454” procedure on
page 2-9 to complete the login. If the Login dialog box does not appear, complete Steps c and d.
c.
From the Windows Start menu, choose the MS-DOS or command prompt.
d.
At the prompt, type:
ping [ONS 15454 IP address]
For example, you would type “ping 192.1.0.2” to connect to an ONS 15454 with default IP address
192.1.0.2. If your computer is connected to the ONS 15454, a “reply from [IP address]” message
displays.
If your PC is not connected, a Request timed out message displays. If this occurs, check that the
cables connecting the PC to the ONS 15454 are securely attached. Check the Link Status LED on
the PC NIC card. Repeat the procedures provided in Table 2-3 while verifying IP and submask
information.
2.4.2 Network Connections
When connecting the PC to the ONS 15454 through a LAN, the PC’s IP address must be configured to
be on the same subnet as the ONS 15454’s LAN interface. The ONS 15454 IP address and netmask are
visible on the LCD panel. If needed, change the IP address configuration on the PC or use the LCD panel
on the ONS 15454.
Procedure: Access the ONS 15454 from a LAN
Step 1
Change the ONS 15454 IP address to an IP address that exists on the LAN. (See the “Change IP Address,
Default Router, and Network Mask Using the LCD” procedure on page 3-4 for instructions.)
Step 2
Ensure that the ONS 15454 is physically connected to the LAN (typically using a cross-over cable to a
hub or switch).
Step 3
If you changed the PC network settings for direct access to the ONS 15454, change the settings back to
the LAN access settings. Usually this means setting the IP Address on the TCP/IP dialog box back to
“Obtain an IP address automatically” (Windows 95/98) or “Obtain an IP address from a DHCP server”
(Windows NT/2000). If your LAN requires that DNS or WINS be enabled, change the setting on the
DNS Configuration or WINS Configuration tab of the TCP/IP dialog box.
Step 4
If your computer is connected to a proxy server, disable proxy service or add the ONS 15454 nodes as
exceptions.
Step 5
Start your web browser and type the ONS 15454 IP address in the URL field.
Procedure: Disable Proxy Service Using Internet Explorer (Windows)
Complete these steps if your computer is connected to a proxy server and your browser is Internet
Explorer.
Step 1
From the Start menu, select Settings > Control Panel.
Step 2
In the Control Panel window, choose Internet Options.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-7
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Connecting PCs to the ONS 15454
Step 3
From the Internet Properties dialog box, click Connections > LAN Settings.
Step 4
On the LAN Settings dialog box, either:
•
Deselect Use a proxy server to disable the service
or
•
Leave Use a proxy server selected and click Advanced. On the Proxy Setting dialog box under
Exceptions, enter the IP addresses of ONS 15454 nodes that you will access. Separate each address
with a semicolon. You can insert an asterisk for the host number to include all the ONS 15454s on
your network. Click OK to close each open dialog box.
Procedure: Disable Proxy Service Using Netscape (Windows and Solaris)
Complete these steps if your computer is connected to a proxy server and your browser is Netscape
Navigator.
Step 1
Open Netscape.
Step 2
From the Edit menu, choose Preferences.
Step 3
In the Preferences dialog box under Category, choose Advanced > Proxies.
Step 4
On the right side of the Preferences dialog box under Proxies, either:
•
Choose Direct connection to the Internet to bypass the proxy server
or
•
Choose Manual proxy configuration to add exceptions to the proxy server, then click View. On the
Manual Proxy Configuration dialog box under Exceptions, enter the IP addresses of the ONS 15454
nodes that you will access. Separate each address with a comma. Click OK to close each open dialog
box.
2.4.3 Remote Access to the ONS 15454
You can use LAN modems to access ONS 15454s from remote sites. The LAN modem must be
connected to the RJ-45 port on a TCC+ card or to the LAN pins on the ONS 15454 backplane. The LAN
modem must be properly configured for use with the ONS 15454. When the modem is installed, dial-up
access to the ONS 15454 is available using a PC or Solaris workstation modem.
2.4.4 TL1 Terminal Access to the ONS 15454
You can communicate with the ONS 15454 using TL1. To connect a TL1 terminal (or a PC running
terminal emulation software) to the ONS 15454, you can:
•
Use the DB-9 plug on the front panel of the TCC+ card or the CRAFT pins on the backplane. (For
a list of CRAFT pin assignments, see Table 1-3 on page 1-35.)
•
Telnet to port 3083 with a LAN connection.
•
Start a TL1 session from CTC by selecting Open TL1 Session from the CTC Tools menu and
selecting the node where you want to hold the TL1 session in the Select Node dialog box.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-8
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Logging into the ONS 15454
For information about using TL1 commands with the ONS 15454, see the Cisco ONS 15454 TL1
Command Guide.
2.5 Logging into the ONS 15454
After you set up the physical connections between the PC and ONS 15454 and change your PC network
settings, you can log into CTC.
Note
If you encounter errors while logging in, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and
Maintenance Guide for possible causes.
Procedure: Log into the ONS 15454
Step 1
From the PC connected to the ONS 15454, start Netscape or Internet Explorer.
Step 2
In the Netscape or Internet Explorer Web address (URL) field, enter the ONS 15454 IP address. For
initial setup, this is the default address, 192.1.0.2. Press Enter.
Note
If you are logging into ONS 15454 or ONS 15327 networks running different releases of
CTC software, log into the node running the most recent release. If you log into a node with
an older release, nodes running later releases display as grey icons on the network map, and
the IP address will display instead of the node name. To check the software version of a node,
select About CTC from the CTC Help menu.
A Java Console window displays the CTC file download status. The web browser displays information
about your Java and system environments. If this is the first login, CTC caching messages display while
CTC files are downloaded to your computer; then the CTC Login dialog box displays (Figure 2-1).
Figure 2-1
Logging into the ONS 15454
Login node
55020
Login node group
Step 3
Type a user name and password (both are case sensitive). For initial setup, type the user name
“CISCO15” and click Login (no password is required).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-9
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Logging into the ONS 15454
Note
Step 4
Step 5
The CISCO15 user is provided with every ONS 15454. CISCO15 has superuser privileges,
so you can create other users. CISCO15 is delivered without a password. To create one, click
the Provisioning > Security tabs after you log in and change the CISCO15 password. (You
cannot delete the CISCO15 user.) For more information about ONS 15454 security, see the
“Creating Users and Setting Security” section on page 3-6.
Set the following login options, as needed:
•
Node Name—Displays the IP address entered in the web browser and a pull-down menu of
previously-entered ONS 15454 IP addresses. You can select any ONS 15454 (or ONS 15327) on the
list for the login, or you can enter the IP address (or node name) of any new node where you want
to log in.
•
Additional Nodes—Displays a list of login node groups that were created. Login node groups allow
you to display ONS 15454s and/or ONS 15327s that are not connected by the SONET Data
Communications Channel (DCC) to the ONS 15454 in the Node Name field. (For instructions, see
the “Creating Login Node Groups” section on page 2-10.)
Note
Topology hosts that were created in previous ONS 15454 releases by modifying the cms.ini
file are displayed as a “Topology Host” group under Additional Nodes.
•
Exclude Dynamically Discovered Nodes—Check this box to view only the ONS 15454 (and login
node group members, if any) entered in the Node Name field. Nodes linked to the Node Name ONS
15454 through the DCC are not displayed.
Click Login.
If login is successful, the CTC window displays. From here, you can navigate to other CTC views to
provision and manage the ONS 15454.
2.5.1 Creating Login Node Groups
When you log into an ONS 15454 node, only ONS 15454s optically connected (i.e., with DCC
connections) to the node will display in network view. However, you can create a login node group to
view and manage ONS 15454s that only have an IP connection. For example, logging into Node 1 in
Figure 2-2 displays Node 2 and Node 3 because they are optically connected to Node 1. Nodes 4, 5, and
6 do not display because DCC connections do not exist. To view all six nodes at once, you create a login
node group with the IP addresses of Nodes 1, 4, and 5. Those nodes, and all nodes optically connected
to them, display when you log into any node in the group.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-10
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Logging into the ONS 15454
Figure 2-2
A login node group
Laptop PC
IP Address
192.168.106.100
LAN/WAN (Ethernet)
Node 1
IP Address
192.168.106.143
Node 4
IP Address
192.168.105.119
Node 5
IP Address
192.168.104.109
Two node ring
Node 2
Single
Node 3
Node 6
IP Address
192.168.103.199
55029
Three node ring
Procedure: Create a Login Node Group
Step 1
From the CTC Edit menu, choose Preferences.
Step 2
Click the Login Node Group tab and click Create Group.
Step 3
Enter a name for the group in the Create Login Group Name dialog box. Click OK.
Step 4
Under Members, type the IP address (or node name) of a node you want to add to the group. Click Add.
Repeat this step for each node you want to add to the group.
Step 5
Click OK.
The next time you log into an ONS 15454, the login node group will be available in the Additional Nodes
list of the Login dialog box. You can create as many login groups as you need. The groups are stored in
the CTC preferences file and are not visible to other users.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-11
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Logging into the ONS 15454
2.5.2 Accessing ONS 15454s Behind Firewalls
If an ONS 15454 or CTC computer resides behind a firewall that uses port filtering, you must receive
an Internet Inter-ORB Protocol (IIOP) port from your network administrator and enable the IIOP port
on the ONS 15454 and/or CTC computer, depending on whether one or both devices reside behind
firewalls.
If the ONS 15454 is in a protected network and the CTC computer is in an external network, as shown
in Figure 2-3, enable the IIOP listener port specified by the firewall administrator on the ONS 15454.
The ONS 15454 sends the port number to the CTC computer during the initial contact between the
devices using Hyper-Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP). After the CTC computer obtains the ONS 15454
IIOP port, the computer opens a direct session with the node using the specified IIOP port.
Figure 2-3
ONS 15454s residing behind a firewall
IIOP port
Firewall
Private
network
Unprotected
network
ONS 15454
CTC computer
External network
IIOP port
ONS 15454
55351
Port
filtering
Protected network
If the CTC computer and the ONS 15454 both reside behind firewalls (Figure 2-4), set the IIOP port on
the CTC computer and on the ONS 15454. Each firewall can use a different IIOP port. For example, if
the CTC computer firewall uses IIOP port 4000, and the ONS 15454 firewall uses IIOP port 5000, 4000
is the IIOP port set on the CTC computer and 5000 is the IIOP port set on the ONS 15454.
Figure 2-4
A CTC computer and ONS 15454s residing behind firewalls
IIOP port
IIOP port
Firewall
Private
network
Firewall
Private
network
Unprotected
network
ONS 15454
CTC computer
IIOP port
Protected network
Port
filtering
External network
ONS 15454
Protected network
55350
Port
filtering
Procedure: Set the IIOP Listener Port on the ONS 15454
Step 1
Log into the ONS 15454 node from a CTC computer that is behind the firewall.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-12
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Working with the CTC Window
Step 2
In node view, select the Provisioning > Network tabs.
Step 3
On the General subtab under TCC+ CORBA (IIOP) Listener Port, select a listener port option:
•
Default - Variable—Used to connect to ONS 15454s on the same side of the firewall or if no firewall
is used
•
Standard Constant—Uses port 683, the CORBA default port number
•
Other Constant—Allows you to set an IIOP port specified by your firewall administrator
Step 4
Click OK to apply the change.
Step 5
When the Change Network Configuration? message displays, click Yes.
Both ONS 15454 TCC+s will reboot, one at a time.
Procedure: Set the IIOP Listener Port on CTC
Step 1
From the CTC Edit menu, select Preferences.
Step 2
On the Preferences dialog box, select the Firewall tab.
Step 3
Under CTC CORBA (IIOP) Listener Port, set the listener port option:
Step 4
•
Default - Variable—Used to connect to ONS 15454s from within a firewall or if no firewall is used
•
Standard Constant—Uses port 683, the CORBA default port number
•
Other Constant—Allows you to specify an IIOP port defined by your administrator
Click OK to apply the change and close the dialog box.
2.6 Working with the CTC Window
The CTC window (screen) displays after you log into an ONS 15454 (Figure 2-5). The window includes
a menu bar, toolbar, and a top and bottom pane. The top pane displays status information about the
selected objects and a graphic of the current view. The bottom pane displays tabs and subtabs, which you
use to view ONS 15454 information and perform ONS 15454 provisioning and maintenance. From this
window you can display three ONS 15454 views: network, node, and card.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-13
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Working with the CTC Window
Figure 2-5
CTC window elements in the node view (default login view)
Menu bar
Tool bar
Status area
Top
pane
Graphic area
Tabs
Subtabs
61867
Bottom
pane
2.6.1 Node View
The CTC node view, shown in Figure 2-5, is the first view displayed after you log into an ONS 15454.
The login node is the first node displayed, and it is the “home view” for the session. Node view allows
you to view and manage one ONS 15454 node. The status area shows the node name, IP address, session
boot date and time, number of critical (CR), major (MJ), and minor (MN) alarms, the name of the current
logged-in user, and security level of the user.
2.6.1.1 CTC Card Colors
The graphic area of the CTC window depicts the ONS 15454 shelf assembly. The colors of the cards in
the graphic reflect the real-time status of the physical card and slot (Table 2-4).
Table 2-4
Node View Card Colors
Card Color
Status
Grey
Slot is not provisioned; no card is installed
Violet
Slot is provisioned; no card is installed
White
Slot is provisioned; a functioning card is installed
Yellow
Slot is provisioned; a minor alarm condition exists
Orange
Slot is provisioned; a major alarm condition exists
Red
Slot is provisioned; a critical alarm exists
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-14
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Working with the CTC Window
2.6.1.2 Node View Card Shortcuts
If you move your mouse over cards in the graphic, tooltips display additional information about the card
including the card type, card status (active or standby), the number of critical, major, and minor alarms
(if any), and the alarm profile used by the card. Right-clicking a card reveals a shortcut menu, which you
can use to open, reset, or delete a card. Right-click a slot (grey) to pre-provision a card (i.e., provision
a slot before installing the card).
2.6.1.3 Node View Tabs
Use the node view tabs and subtabs, shown in Table 2-5, to provision and manage the ONS 15454.
Table 2-5
Node View Tabs and Subtabs
Tab
Description
Subtabs
Alarms
Lists current alarms (CR, MJ, MN) for the
node and updates them in real-time
none
Conditions
Displays a list of standing conditions on the
node.
none
History
Provides a history of node alarms including
date, type, and severity of each alarm. The
Session subtab displays alarms and events for
the current session. The Node subtab displays
alarms and events retrieved from a fixed-size
log on the node.
Session, Node
Circuits
Create, delete, edit, and map circuits
none
Provisioning
Provision the ONS 15454 node
General, Ether Bridge, Network,
Protection, Ring, Security, SNMP,
Sonet DCC, Timing, Alarming
Inventory
Provides inventory information (part number, none
serial number, CLEI codes) for cards installed
in the node. Allows you to delete and reset
cards.
Maintenance
Perform maintenance tasks for the node
Database, Ether Bridge, Protection,
Ring, Software, XC cards,
Diagnostic, Timing, Audit, Routing
Table
2.6.2 Network View
Network view (Figure 2-6) allows you to view and manage ONS 15454s and ONS 15327s that have DCC
connections to the node that you logged into and any login node groups you may have selected. (Nodes
with DCC connections to the login node will not display if you selected Exclude Dynamically
Discovered Nodes on the Login dialog box.) The graphic area displays a background image with colored
ONS 15454 icons. The icon colors indicate the node status (Table 2-6). Green lines show DCC
connections between the nodes. Selecting a node or span in the graphic area displays information about
the node and span in the status area.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-15
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Working with the CTC Window
Figure 2-6
A four-node network displayed in CTC network view
Icon color
indicates
node status
Dots indicate
the selected
node
61868
Bold letters
indicate login
node; asterisk
indicates
topology host
2.6.2.1 CTC Node Colors
The colors of nodes displayed in network view indicate the status of the node
Table 2-6
Node Status
Color
Alarm Status
Green
No alarms
Yellow
Minor alarms
Orange
Major alarms
Red
Critical alarms
Grey with node
name
Node is initializing
Grey with IP
address
Node is initializing, or a problem exists with IP routing from node to CTC
2.6.2.2 Network View Tasks
Right-click the network view graphic area or a node, span, or domain (domains are described in the
“Creating Domains” section on page 2-17) to display shortcut menus. Table 2-7 lists the actions that are
available from the network view.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-16
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Working with the CTC Window
Table 2-7
Performing Network Management Tasks in Network View
Action
Procedure
Open a node
Any of the following:
•
Double-click a node icon
•
Right-click a node icon, choose Drill Down to Node from the shortcut
menu
•
Click a node and choose Go to Selected Object View from the CTC View
menu
•
From the View menu, choose Other Node. Select a node from the Select
Node dialog box
•
Double-click a node alarm or event in the Alarms or History tabs
Move a node icon
Press the Ctrl key and the left mouse button simultaneously and drag the node
icon to a new location.
Reset node icon
position
Right-click a node and choose Reset Node Position from the shortcut menu.
The node icon moves to the position defined by the longitude and latitude
fields on the Provisioning > General tabs in node view.
Provision a circuit
Right-click a node. From the shortcut menu, choose Provision Circuit To and
select the node where you want to provision the circuit. For circuit creation
procedures, see the “Create an Automatically Routed Circuit” section on
page 6-2.
Update circuits with
new node
Right-click a node and choose Update Circuits With New Node from the
shortcut menu. Use this command when you add a new node and want to pass
circuits through it.
Display a link end
point
Right-click a span. On the shortcut menu, select Go To [node/slot/port] for the
drop port you want to view. CTC displays the card in card view.
Display span
properties
Any of the following:
•
Move mouse over a span; properties display above the span
•
Click a span; properties display in the upper left corner of the window
•
Right-click a span; properties display at the top of the shortcut menu
Perform a UPSR
protection switch for
an entire span
Right-click a network span and click Circuits. See the “Switch UPSR Traffic”
section on page 5-32 for UPSR protection switch procedures.
Upgrade a span
Right-click a span and choose Upgrade Span from the shortcut menu.
Note
For detailed span upgrade information and instructions, refer to the
Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide.
2.6.2.3 Creating Domains
Domains are icons where you can add a group of ONS 15454s or ONS 15327s. Adding domains to the
network view map makes networks with many nodes easier to manage. After you create a domain, you
can drag and drop ONS 15454 icons into it (Figure 2-7). The ONS 15454s are hidden until you open the
domain. Figure 2-9 shows an example of an opened domain.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-17
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Working with the CTC Window
Adding nodes to a domain
55023
Figure 2-7
After you add a node to a domain, the span lines leading to nodes within the domain become thicker
(Figure 2-8). The thick lines may represent multiple spans. For example, if the “rio-104” node in
Figure 2-8 is connected to two nodes within domain-0, the thick line represents two spans. The thick line
is green if all spans it represents are active and grey if any one span it represents is down. The domain
icon color reflects the highest alarm severity of any node within it.
Figure 2-8
Outside nodes displayed within the domain
Within the domain, external nodes and domains that are directly connected to nodes inside the domain
are displayed in a dimmed color (Figure 2-9). DCC links with one or two ends inside the domain are also
displayed.
Figure 2-9
Nodes inside a domain
You manage ONS 15454s that reside within a domain the same way you manage ONS 15454s on the
network map. Table 2-8 shows the domain actions.
Note
Domains you create will be seen by all users who log into the network.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-18
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Working with the CTC Window
Table 2-8
Managing Domains
Action
Procedure
Create a domain
Right-click the network map and choose Create New Domain from the shortcut
menu. When the domain icon appears on the map, type the domain name.
Move a domain
Pressing Ctrl, drag the domain icon to the new location.
Rename a domain
Right-click the domain icon and choose Rename Domain from the shortcut
menu. Type the new name in the domain name field.
Add a node to a
domain
Drag a node icon to the domain icon. Release the mouse button when the node
icon is over the domain icon.
Move a node from a Right-click a node.
domain to the
network map
Open a domain
•
Double-click the domain icon.
•
Right-click the domain and choose Drill Down to Domain.
Return to network
view
Right-click the domain view area and choose Go to Parent View from the
shortcut menu.
Preview domain
contents
Right-click the domain icon and choose Show Domain Overview. The domain
icon shows a small preview of the nodes in the domain. To turn off the domain
overview, select Show Domain Overview again.
Remove domain
Right-click the domain icon and choose Remove Domain. Any nodes residing in
the domain are returned to the network map.
2.6.2.4 Changing the Network View Background Color
You can change the color of the network view background and the domain view background (the area
displayed when you open a domain). If you modify background colors, the change is stored in your CTC
user profile on the computer. The change does not affect other CTC users.
Procedure: Modify the Network or Domain Background Color
Step 1
Right-click the network view or domain map area and choose Set Background Color from the shortcut
menu.
Step 2
On the Choose Color dialog box, select a background color.
Step 3
Click OK.
2.6.2.5 Changing the Network View Background Image
You can replace the background map image displayed in network view with any JPEG or GIF image that
is accessible on a local or network drive. If you want to position nodes on the map based on the node
coordinates, you will need the longitudes and latitudes for the edges of the map. However, if you will
use your mouse to position nodes, coordinates for the image edges are not necessary. The change does
not affect other CTC users.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-19
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Working with the CTC Window
Note
You can obtain the longitude and latitude for cities and Zip Codes from the U.S. Census Bureau U.S.
Gazetteer website (http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/gazetteer).
Procedure: Change the Network View Background Image
Caution
Before you begin this procedure, verify that the image file you want to use is located on your hard
drive and is in JPEG or GIF format. CTC may stop responding if you link to a file that is not JPEG
or GIF, or if you provide an incorrect path.
Step 1
In network view, choose Edit > Preferences. (You also right-click the network or domain map and select
Set Background Image.)
Step 2
On the General tab of the Preferences dialog box (Figure 2-10), deselect Use Default Map.
Figure 2-10 Changing the CTC background image
55024
Browse to
alternate images
Step 3
Click Browse. Navigate to the graphic file you want to use as a background.
Step 4
Select the file. Click Open.
Step 5
(Optional) Enter the coordinates for the map image edges in the longitude and latitude fields on the
Preferences dialog box. CTC uses the map’s longitude and latitude to position the node icons based on
the node coordinates entered for each node on the Provisioning > General tabs. Coordinates only need
to be precise enough to place ONS node icons in approximate positions on the image. You can also drag
and drop nodes to position them on the network view map.
Step 6
Click Apply and then click OK.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-20
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Working with the CTC Window
61872
Figure 2-11 Network view with a custom map image
Step 7
At the network view, use the CTC toolbar Zoom buttons (or right-click the graphic area and select a
Zoom command from the shortcut menu) to set the area of the image you can view.
Procedure: Add a Node to the Current Session
During a CTC session, you can add nodes that are not displayed in the session without having to log out
of the session. When you add the node, you have the option to add it to the current login node group.
Step 1
From the CTC File menu, click Add Node (or click the Add Node button on the toolbar).
Step 2
On the Add Node dialog box, enter the node name (or IP address).
Step 3
If you want to add the node to the current login group, click Add Node to Current Login Group.
Otherwise, leave it unchecked.
Step 4
Click OK.
After a few seconds, the new node will be displayed on the network view map.
2.6.3 Card View
Card view displays information about individual ONS 15454 cards and is the window where you perform
card-specific maintenance and provisioning (Figure 2-12). A graphic of the selected card is shown in the
graphic area. The status area displays the node name, slot, number of alarms, card type, equipment type,
and either the card status (active or standby) or port status (IS [in service] or OOS [out of service]). The
information that is displayed and the actions you can perform depend on the card.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-21
Chapter 2
Software Installation
CTC Navigation
Note
CTC displays a card view for all ONS 15454 cards except the TCC+, XC, XCVT, and XC10G cards.
Card view provides access to the following tabs: Alarms, History, Circuits, Provisioning, Maintenance,
Performance, and Conditions. (The Performance tab is not displayed for the AIC card.) The subtabs,
fields, and information displayed under each tab depend on the card type selected.
Figure 2-12 CTC card view showing an DS3N-12 card
61869
Card identification
and status
2.7 CTC Navigation
Different navigational methods are available within the CTC window to access views and perform
management actions. Commands on the View menu and CTC toolbar allow you to quickly move between
network, node, and card views. You can double-click and right-click objects in the graphic area and
move the mouse over nodes, cards, and ports to view popup status information. Figure 2-13 shows an
example.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-22
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
CTC Navigation
Figure 2-13 CTC node view showing popup information
61870
Moving the mouse
over the CTC window
objects displays
ONS 15454
status information
Table 2-9 describes different methods for navigating within the CTC window.
Table 2-9
CTC Window Navigation
Technique
Description
View menu and
Toolbar
You can choose from:
Double-Click
•
The previous view (available after you navigate to two or more views)
•
The next view (available after you navigate to previous views)
•
The parent of the currently-selected view. Network is the parent of node
view; node view is the parent of card view.
•
The currently selected object. For example, selecting a card on the node
view graphic displays the card in card view; selecting a node on the network
view map displays the node in node view.
•
The home view (the node you initially logged into)
•
The network view
•
The other node (View menu only)
•
Different zoom levels (toolbar only)
•
A node in network view to display the node view
•
A card in node view to display the card view
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-23
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Viewing CTC Table Data
Table 2-9
CTC Window Navigation (continued)
Technique
Right-Click
Move Mouse Cursor
Description
•
Network view graphic area—Displays a menu where you can create a new
domain, change the position and zoom level of the graphic image, and
change the background image and color.
•
Node in network view—Displays a menu where you can open the node,
provision circuits, update circuits with a new node, and reset the node icon
position to the longitude and latitude set on the Provisioning > General tabs.
•
Span in network view—Displays a menu where you can view information
about the source and destination ports, the span’s protection scheme, and
the span’s optical or electrical level. You can also display the Circuits on
Span dialog box, which displays additional span information and allows
you to perform UPSR protection switching.
•
Card in node view—Displays a menu where you can open, delete, reset, and
change cards. The card that is selected determines the commands that are
displayed.
•
Over node in network view—Displays a summary of node alarms and
provides a warning if the node icon has been moved out of the map range.
•
Over span in network view—Displays circuit (node, slot, port) and
protection information
•
Over card in node view—Displays card type and card status
•
Over card port in node view—Displays port number and port status
2.8 Viewing CTC Table Data
Much of the ONS 15454 data that CTC displays, such as alarms, alarm history, circuits, and inventory,
is displayed in tables. You can change the way the CTC tables are displayed. For example, you can:
•
Rearrange or hide table columns
•
Sort tables by primary and secondary keys in descending or ascending order. (Sorting and hiding is
available for all read-only tables.)
•
Export CTC table data to spreadsheets and database management programs to perform additional
data manipulation. To export table data, see the “Printing and Exporting CTC Data” section on
page 2-26.
To change the display of a CTC table, left-click or right-click a column header in the table. Right-click
a column header to display a shortcut menu that has table column display options (Figure 2-14).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-24
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Viewing CTC Table Data
Figure 2-14 Table shortcut menu that customizes table appearance
61871
Column
preferences
Table 2-10 lists the options that you can use to customize information that is displayed in CTC tables.
Table 2-10 Table Display Options
Task
Click
Right-Click Shortcut Menu
Resize column
Left click while dragging the header
separator to the right or left
N/A
Rearrange column order Left click while dragging the column
header to the right or left
N/A
Reset column order
N/A
Choose Reset Columns
Order/Visibility
Hide column
N/A
Choose Hide Column
Display a hidden
column
N/A
Choose Show Column>[column
name]
Display all hidden
columns
N/A
Choose Reset Columns
Order/Visibility
Sort table (primary)
Click a column header; each click
changes sort order (ascending or
descending)
Choose Sort Column
Sort table (secondary
sorting keys)
Press the Shift key and
simultaneously click the column
header
Choose Sort Column
(incremental)
Reset sorting
N/A
Choose Reset Sorting
View table row count
N/A
Choose Row count; it is the last
item on the shortcut menu
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-25
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Printing and Exporting CTC Data
2.9 Printing and Exporting CTC Data
You can print CTC windows and table data such as alarms and inventory. You can also export CTC table
data for use by other applications such as spreadsheets, word processors, and database management
applications. Table 2-11 shows CTC data that can be exported.
Table 2-11 Table Data with Export Capability
View or Card
Tab
Network
Alarms
Subtab(s)
History
Circuits
Node
Provisioning
Alarm Profiles
Maintenance
Software
Alarms
Conditions
History
Session/Node
Circuits
Provisioning
Ether Bridge (Spanning Trees/Thresholds)
Network (General/Static Routes/OSPF)
Ring
Alarm Behavior
Inventory
Maintenance
Ether Bridge (Spanning Trees/MAC Table/Trunk
Utilization)
Ring
Software
Audit
Routing Table
Test Access
OC-N Cards
Alarms
Conditions
History
Session/Card
Circuits
Provisioning
Line/Threshold/STS/Alarm Behavior
Maintenance
Loopback
Performance
DS-N Cards
Alarms
Conditions
History
Session/Card
Circuits
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-26
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Printing and Exporting CTC Data
Table 2-11 Table Data with Export Capability (continued)
View or Card
AIC Card
Tab
Subtab(s)
Provisioning
Line/Alarm Behavior
Alarms
Conditions
History
Session/Card
Circuits
EC1-12
Provisioning
External Alarms/External Controls
Maintenance
External Alarms/External Controls/Virtual Wires
Alarms
Conditions
History
Session/Card
Circuits
Provisioning
Line/Threshold/STS/Alarm Behavior
Maintenance
Performance
DS3XM-6
Alarms
Conditions
History
Session/Card
Circuits
E100T-12/E1000-2/
E100T-12-G/E1000-2-G
Provisioning
Line/Alarm Behavior
Maintenance
DS-1/DS-3/Performance
Alarms
Conditions
History
Session/Card
Circuits
Provisioning
Port/VLAN/Alarm Behavior
Performance
Statistics/Utilization/History
Procedure: Print CTC Window and Table Data
Use the following procedure to print CTC windows and table data. Before you start, make sure your PC
is connected to a printer.
Step 1
From the CTC File menu, click Print.
Step 2
In the Print dialog (Figure 2-15) choose an option:
•
Entire Frame—Prints the entire CTC window
•
Tabbed View—Prints the lower half of the CTC window
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-27
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Printing and Exporting CTC Data
•
Table Contents—Prints CTC data in table format; this option is only available for CTC table data
(see the “Viewing CTC Table Data” section on page 2-24).
Figure 2-15 Selecting CTC data for print
Step 3
Click OK.
Step 4
In the Windows Print dialog, choose a printer and click Print.
Procedure: Export CTC Data
Step 1
From the CTC File menu, click Export.
Step 2
In the Export dialog (Figure 2-16) choose a format for the data:
•
As HTML—Saves the data as an HTML file. The file can be viewed with a web browser without
running CTC.
•
As CSV—Saves the CTC table values as text, separated by commas. You can import CSV data into
spreadsheets and database management programs.
•
As TSV—Saves the CTC table values as text, separated by tabs. You can import TSV data into
spreadsheets and database management programs.
Figure 2-16 Selecting CTC data for export
Step 3
Click OK.
Step 4
In the Save dialog, enter a file name in one of the following formats:
•
[filename].htm for HTML files
•
[filename].csv for CSV files
•
[filename].tsv for TSV files
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-28
November 2001
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Displaying CTC Data in Other Applications
Step 5
Navigate to a directory where you want to store the file.
Step 6
Click OK.
2.10 Displaying CTC Data in Other Applications
CTC data exported in HTML format can be viewed with any web browser, such as Netscape Navigator
or Microsoft Internet Explorer. To display the data, use the browser’s File/Open command to open the
CTC data file.
CTC data exported as comma separated values (CSV) or tab separated values (TSV) can be viewed in
text editors, word processors, spreadsheets, and database management applications. Although
procedures depend on the application, you typically can use File/Open to display the CTC data. Text
editors and word processors display the data exactly as it is exported. Spreadsheet and database
management applications display the data in cells. You can then format and manage the data using the
spreadsheet or database management application tools.
In addition to the CTC exporting, CTC text information can be copied and pasted into other applications
using the Windows Copy (Ctrl+C), Cut (Ctrl+X) and Paste (Ctrl+V) commands.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
2-29
Chapter 2
Software Installation
Displaying CTC Data in Other Applications
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
2-30
November 2001
C H A P T E R
3
Node Setup
This chapter explains how to set up a Cisco ONS 15454 node using the Cisco Transport Controller
(CTC). Topics include:
•
Setting up general node information
•
Preparing the ONS 15454 to connect to networks
•
Changing the node IP address, default router, and subnet mask using the LCD
•
Creating, editing, and deleting ONS 15454 users and assigning user security levels
•
Setting the node timing references
•
Creating card protection groups
•
Viewing node inventory
•
Viewing CTC software versions
Lastly, the chapter includes a node checklist to help you keep track of the procedures you have
performed. See Chapter 2, “Software Installation” for general CTC information.
3.1 Before You Begin
Before you begin node setup, review the following checklist to ensure you have the perquisite
information. Basic node information that you will provide need includes node name, contact, location,
date, and time. If the ONS 15454 will be connected to a network, you will need:
•
The IP address and subnet mask to assign to the node and
•
The IP address of the default router.
•
If Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol is used, you will need the IP address of the DHCP server.
If you are responsible for setting up IP networking for the ONS 15454 network, see Chapter 4, “IP
Networking” for more information.
To create card protection groups, you will need to know:
Note
•
The card protection scheme that will be used and what cards will be included in it.
•
The SONET protection topology that will be used for the node.
You must be able to log into the node to complete node provisioning. If you cannot log into the node,
see “Connecting PCs to the ONS 15454” section on page 2-5.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
3-1
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Setting Up Basic Node Information
3.2 Setting Up Basic Node Information
Setting basic information for each Cisco ONS 15454 node is one of the first provisioning tasks you
perform. This information includes node name, location, contact, and timing. Completing the
information for each node facilitates ONS 15454 management, particularly when the node is connected
to a large ONS 15454 network.
Procedure: Add the Node Name, Contact, Location, Date, and Time
Step 1
Log into the ONS 15454 node. The CTC node view is displayed.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > General tabs.
Step 3
Enter the following:
•
Node Name—Type a name for the node. For TL1 compliance, names must begin with an alpha
character and have no more than 20 alphanumeric characters.
•
Contact—Type the name of the node contact person and the phone number (optional).
•
Location—Type the node location (optional) (such as a city name or specific office location).
•
Latitude—Enter the node latitude: N (North) or S (South), degrees, and minutes.
•
Longitude—Enter the node longitude: E (East) or W (West), degrees, and minutes.
CTC uses the latitude and longitude to position node icons on the network view map. (You can also
position nodes manually.) To convert a coordinate in degrees to degrees and minutes, multiply the
number after the decimal by 60. For example, the latitude 38.250739 converts to 38 degrees, 15
minutes (.250739 x 60 = 15.0443, rounded to the nearest whole number).
Step 4
•
Use SNTP Server—When checked, CTC uses a Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) server to set
the date and time of the node. Using an SNTP server ensures that all ONS 15454 network nodes use
the same date and time reference. The server synchronizes the node’s time after power outages or
software upgrades. If you check Use SNTP Server, type the server’s IP address in the next field. If
you do not use an SNTP server, complete the Date, Time, and Time Zone fields. The ONS 15454 will
use these fields for alarm dates and times. (CTC displays all alarms in the login node’s time zone
for cross network consistency.)
•
Date—Type the current date.
•
Time—Type the current time.
•
Time Zone—Select the time zone.
Click Apply.
3.3 Setting Up Network Information
ONS 15454s almost always operate in network environments. Before you connect an ONS 15454 to
other ONS 15454s or to a LAN, you must change the default IP address that is shipped with each ONS
15454 (192.1.0.2). IP addresses are unique identifiers for devices—called hosts—that connect to TCP/IP
networks. Every IP address includes a network number, which is assigned to an organization, and a host
(device) number, which the organization’s LAN administrator assigns to an individual network device.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
3-2
November 2001
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Setting Up Network Information
Subnetting enables LAN administrators to create subnetworks that are transparent to the Internet. Within
networks, ONS 15454s often exist as subnetworks, which are created by adding a subnet mask to the
ONS 15454 IP address.
The following procedure tells you how to set up the essential ONS 15454 networking information.
Additional ONS 15454 networking information and procedures, including IP addressing examples, static
route scenarios and Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol options are provided in Chapter 3, “IP
Networking.”
Procedure: Set Up Network Information
Step 1
From the CTC node view, click the Provisioning > Network tabs (Figure 3-1).
Step 2
Complete the following:
•
IP Address—Type the IP address assigned to the ONS 15454 node.
•
Prevent LCD IP Config—If checked, prevents the ONS 15454 IP address from being changed using
the LCD. See the “Change IP Address, Default Router, and Network Mask Using the LCD”
procedure on page 3-4.
•
Default Router—If the ONS 15454 must communicate with a device on a network to which the ONS
15454 is not connected, the ONS 15454 forwards the packets to the default router. Type the IP
address of the router in this field. If the ONS 15454 is not connected to a LAN, leave the field blank.
•
Subnet Mask Length—If the ONS 15454 is part of a subnet, type the subnet mask length (decimal
number representing the subnet mask length in bits) or click the arrows to adjust the subnet mask
length. The subnet mask length is the same for all ONS 15454s in the same subnet.
Note
The MAC Address is read only. It displays the ONS 15454 address as it is identified on the
IEEE 802 Media Access Control (MAC) layer.
•
Forward DHCP Request To—When checked, forwards Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
requests to the IP address entered in the Request To field. DHCP is a TCP/IP protocol that enables
CTC computers to get temporary IP addresses from a server. If you enable DHCP, CTC computers
that are directly connected to an ONS 15454 node can obtain temporary IP addresses from the DHCP
server.
•
TCC CORBA (IIOP) Listener Port—Sets a listener port to allow communication with the ONS 15454
through firewalls. See the “Accessing ONS 15454s Behind Firewalls” section on page 2-12 for more
information.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
3-3
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Setting Up Network Information
Figure 3-1
Setting up general network information
Step 3
Click Apply.
Step 4
Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.
Both ONS 15454 TCC+ cards will reboot, one at a time.
Procedure: Change IP Address, Default Router, and Network Mask Using the LCD
You can change the ONS 15454 IP address, subnet mask, and default router address using the Slot,
Status, and Port buttons on the front panel LCD.
Note
The LCD reverts to normal display mode after 5 seconds of button inactivity.
Step 1
On the ONS 15454 front panel, repeatedly press the Slot button until Node appears on the LCD.
Step 2
Repeatedly press the Port button until the following displays:
•
To change the node IP address, Status=IpAddress (Figure 3-2)
•
To change the node network mask, Status=Net Mask
•
To change the default router IP address, Status=Default Rtr
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
3-4
November 2001
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Setting Up Network Information
Selecting the IP address option
Slot
Status
Port
Slot-0
Status=IpAddress
FAN FAIL
MAJ
MIN
Press the Status button to display the node IP address (Figure 3-3), the node subnet mask length, or
default router IP address.
Figure 3-3
Changing the IP address
Slot
Status
Port
172.020.214.107
<Next Done
Mod>
FAN FAIL
CRIT
MAJ
MIN
44090
Step 3
CRIT
44089
Figure 3-2
Step 4
Push the Slot button to move to the IP address or subnet mask digit you need to change. The selected
digit flashes.
Step 5
Press the Port button to cycle the IP address or subnet mask digit to the correct digit.
Step 6
When the change is complete, press the Status button to return to the Node menu.
Step 7
Repeatedly press the Port button until the Save Configuration option appears (Figure 3-4).
Selecting the Save Configuration option
Slot
Status
Port
Slot-0
Status=Save Cfg.
FAN FAIL
Step 8
CRIT
MAJ
MIN
44091
Figure 3-4
Press the Status button to select the Save Configuration option.
A Save and REBOOT message appears (Figure 3-5).
Saving and rebooting the TCC+
Slot
Status
Port
Save and REBOOT?
<Apply
Revert>
FAN FAIL
Step 9
CRIT
MAJ
MIN
44092
Figure 3-5
Press the Slot button to save the new IP address configuration. (Or press Port to cancel the
configuration.)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
3-5
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Creating Users and Setting Security
Saving the new configuration causes the TCC+ cards to reboot. During the reboot, a “Saving Changes TCC Reset” message displays on the LCD. The LCD returns to the normal alternating display after the
TCC+ reboot is complete.
3.4 Creating Users and Setting Security
The CISCO15 user provided with each ONS 15454 can be used to set up other ONS 15454 users. You
can add up to 500 users to one ONS 15454. Each ONS 15454 user can be assigned one of the following
security levels:
•
Retrieve users can retrieve and view CTC information but cannot set or modify parameters.
•
Maintenance users can access only the ONS 15454 maintenance options.
•
Provisioning users can access provisioning and maintenance options.
•
Superusers can perform all of the functions of the other security levels as well as set names,
passwords, and security levels for other users.
Table 3-1 shows the actions that each user can perform in node view.
Table 3-1
ONS 15454 Security Levels—Node View
CTC Tab
Subtab
Actions
Retrieve
Maintenance
Provisioning
Superuser
Alarms
n/a
Synchronize alarms
X
X
X
X
Conditions
n/a
Retrieve
X
X
X
X
History
Session
Read only
Node
Retrieve Alarms/Events
X
X
X
X
n/a
Create/Delete/Edit/ Upgrade
X
X
X
X
X
Circuits
Path Selector Switching
Provisioning General
EtherBridge
Search
X
X
X
X
Switch retrieval
X
X
X
X
Edit
Spanning Trees: Edit
X
X
Thresholds: Create/Delete
X
X
Network
All
Protection
Create/Delete/Edit
Browse groups
Ring
All (BLSR)
Security
Create/Delete
Change password
SNMP
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
same user
same user
same user
Create/Delete/Edit
Browse trap destinations
Sonet DCC
Create/Delete
Timing
Edit
all users
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
3-6
November 2001
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Creating Users and Setting Security
Table 3-1
ONS 15454 Security Levels—Node View (continued)
CTC Tab
Inventory
Subtab
Actions
Alarming
n/a
Retrieve
Provisioning
Superuser
Edit
X
X
Delete
X
X
X
X
Reset
Maintenance Database
EtherBridge
Maintenance
X
Backup/Restore
Spanning Tree Retrieve
X
X
Spanning Tree Clear/Clear all
MAC Table Retrieve
X
MAC Table Clear/Clear all
Trunk Utilization Refresh
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Protection
Switch/lock out operations
X
X
X
Ring
BLSR maintenance
X
X
X
Software
Download/Upgrade/
Activate/Revert
XC Cards
Protection switches
X
X
X
Diagnostic
Retrieve/Lamp test
X
X
X
Timing
Edit
X
X
X
Audit
Retrieve
X
X
X
X
X
Routing Table Read only
Test Access
Read only
Each ONS 15454 user has a specified amount of time that he or she can leave the system idle before the
CTC window is locked. The lockouts prevent unauthorized users from making changes. Higher-level
users have shorter idle times, as shown in Table 3-2.
Table 3-2
ONS 15454 User Idle Times
Security Level
Idle Time
Superuser
15 minutes
Provisioning
30 minutes
Maintenance
60 minutes
Retrieve
Unlimited
You can perform ONS 15454 user management tasks from network or node view. In network view, you
can add, edit, or delete users from multiple nodes at one time. If you perform user management tasks in
node view, you can only add, edit, or delete users from that node.
Note
You must add the same user name and password to each node the user will access.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
3-7
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Creating Users and Setting Security
Procedure: Create New Users
Step 1
In network view, select the Provisioning > Security tabs.
Step 2
On the Security pane, click Create.
Step 3
In the Create User dialog box, enter the following:
•
Name—Type the user name.
•
Password—Type the user password. The password must be a minimum of six and a maximum of ten
alphanumeric (a-z, A-Z, 0-9) and special characters (+, #, %), where at least two characters are
non-alphabetic and at least one character is a special character.
•
Confirm Password—Type the password again to confirm it.
•
Security Level—Select the user’s security level.
Step 4
Under “Select applicable nodes,” deselect any nodes where you do not want to add the user (all network
nodes are selected by default).
Step 5
Click OK.
Procedure: Edit a User
Step 1
In network view, select the Provisioning > Security tabs.
Step 2
Click Change.
Step 3
On the Change User dialog box, edit the user information: name, password, password confirmation,
and/or security level. (A Superuser does not need to enter an old password. Other users must enter their
old password when changing their own passwords.)
Note
You cannot change the CISCO15 user name.
Step 4
If you do not want the user changes to apply to all network nodes, deselect the unchanged nodes in the
Change Users dialog box.
Step 5
Click OK.
Changed user permissions and access levels do not take effect until the user logs out of CTC and logs
back in.
Procedure: Delete a User
Step 1
In network view, select the Provisioning > Security tabs.
Step 2
Click Delete.
Step 3
On the Delete User dialog box, enter the name of the user you want to delete.
Step 4
If you do not want to delete the user from all network nodes, deselect the nodes.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
3-8
November 2001
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Creating Protection Groups
Step 5
Click OK and click Apply.
3.5 Creating Protection Groups
The ONS 15454 provides several card protection methods. When you set up protection for ONS 15454
cards, you must choose between maximum protection and maximum slot availability. The highest
protection reduces the number of available card slots; the highest slot availability reduces the protection.
Table 3-3 shows the protection types that can be set up for ONS 15454 cards.
Table 3-3
Protection Types
Type
Cards
Description
1:1
DS-1
Pairs one working card with one protect card. Install the protect card in
an odd-numbered slot and the working card in an even-numbered slot
next to the protect slot towards the center, for example: protect in Slot
1, working in Slot 2; protect in Slot 3, working in Slot 4; protect in Slot
15, working in Slot 14.
DS-3
EC-1-12
DS3XM-6
1:N
DS-1
DS-3
Assigns one protect card for several working cards. The maximum is
1:5. Protect cards (DS1N-14, DS3N-12) must be installed in Slots 3 or
15 and the cards they protect must be on the same side of the shelf.
Protect cards must match the cards they protect. For example, a
DS1N-14 can only protect DS1-14 or DS1N-14 cards. If a failure clears,
traffic reverts to the working card after the reversion time has elapsed.
1+1
Any optical Pairs a working optical port with a protect optical port. Protect ports
must match the working ports. For example, Port 1 of an OC-3 card can
only be protected by Port 1 of another OC-3 card. Cards do not need to
be in adjoining slots.
Unprotected
Any
Unprotected cards can cause signal loss if a card fails or incurs a signal
error. However, because no card slots are reserved for protection,
unprotected schemes maximize the service available for use on the ONS
15454. Unprotected is the default protection type.
Procedure: Create Protection Groups
Step 1
From the CTC node view, click the Provisioning > Protection tabs.
Step 2
Under Protection Groups, click Create.
Step 3
In the Create Protection Group dialog box, enter the following:
•
Name—Type a name for the protection group. The name can have up to 32 alpha-numeric characters.
•
Type—Choose the protection type: 1:1, 1:N, or 1+1. The protection selected determines the cards
that are available to serve as protect and working cards. For example, if you choose 1:N protection,
only DS-1N and DS-3N cards are displayed.
•
Protect Card or Port—Choose the protect card (if using 1:1 or 1:N) or protect port (if using 1+1)
from the list.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
3-9
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Creating Protection Groups
Based on these selections, a list of available working cards or ports is displayed under Available Cards
or Available Ports. Figure 3-6 shows a 1+1 protection group.
Figure 3-6
Creating a 1+1 protection group
Step 4
From the Available Cards or Available Ports list, choose the card or port that you want to be the working
card or port (the card(s) or port(s) that will be protected by the card or port selected in Protect Cards or
Protect Ports). Click the top arrow button to move each card/port to the Working Cards or Working Ports
list.
Step 5
Complete the remaining fields:
Step 6
•
Bidirectional switching—(optical cards only) click if you want both the transmit and the receive
channels to switch if a failure occurs to one.
•
Revertive—if checked, the ONS 15454 reverts traffic to the working card or port after failure
conditions stay corrected for the amount of time entered in Reversion Time.
•
Reversion time—if Revertive is checked, enter the amount of time following failure condition
correction that the ONS 15454 should switch back to the working card or port.
Click OK.
Note
To convert protection groups, see the “Converting DS-1 and DS-3 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N
Protection” section on page 7-30.
Card protection does not take effect until you enable the ports on all the cards in the protection group.
Because ports must be enabled before the cards carry traffic, you can enable the ports immediately after
provisioning card protection, or wait until you are ready to send traffic on the cards.
Caution
Before running traffic on a card within a protection group, enable the ports of all protection group
cards.
Procedure: Enable Ports
Step 1
Log into the node in CTC and display the card you want to enable in card view.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
3-10
November 2001
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Creating Protection Groups
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > Line tabs.
Step 3
Change the port status to In Service.
Step 4
Click Apply.
Procedure: Edit Protection Groups
Step 1
From the CTC node view, click the Provisioning > Protection tabs (Figure 3-7).
Figure 3-7
Editing protection groups
Step 2
In the Protection Groups section, choose a protection group.
Step 3
In the Selected Group section, edit the fields as appropriate. (For field descriptions, see the “Create
Protection Groups” procedure on page 3-9.)
Step 4
Click Apply.
Procedure: Delete Protection Groups
Step 1
From the CTC node view, click the Maintenance > Protection tabs.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
3-11
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Setting Up ONS 15454 Timing
Step 2
Verify that working traffic is not running on the protect card:
a.
In the Protection Groups section, choose the group you want to delete.
b.
In the Selected Group section, verify that the protect card is in standby mode. If it is in standby
mode, continue with Step 3. If it is active, complete Step c.
c.
If the working card is in standby mode, manually switch traffic back to the working card. In the
Selected Group pane, click the working card, then click Manual. Verify that the protect card
switches to standby mode and the working card is active. If it does, continue with Step 3. If the
protect card is still active, do not continue. Begin troubleshooting procedures or call technical
support.
Step 3
From the node view, click the Provisioning > Protection tabs.
Step 4
In the Protection Groups section, click a protection group.
Step 5
Click Delete.
3.6 Setting Up ONS 15454 Timing
SONET timing parameters must be set for each ONS 15454. Each ONS 15454 independently accepts its
timing reference from one of three sources:
•
The BITS (Building Integrated Timing Supply) pins on the ONS 15454 backplane
•
An OC-N card installed in the ONS 15454. The card is connected to a node that receives timing
through a BITS source.
•
The internal ST3 clock on the TCC+ card
You can set ONS 15454 timing to one of three modes: external, line, or mixed. If timing is coming from
the BITS pins, set ONS 15454 timing to external. If the timing comes from an OC-N card, set the timing
to line. In typical ONS 15454 networks:
•
One node is set to external. The external node derives its timing from a BITS source wired to the
BITS backplane pins. The BITS source, in turn, derives its timing from a Primary Reference Source
(PRS) such as a Stratum 1 clock or GPS signal.
•
The other nodes are set to line. The line nodes derive timing from the externally-timed node through
the OC-N trunk cards.
You can set three timing references for each ONS 15454. The first two references are typically two
BITS-level sources, or two line-level sources optically connected to a node with a BITS source. The third
reference is the internal clock provided on every ONS 15454 TCC+ card. This clock is a Stratum 3 (ST3).
If an ONS 15454 becomes isolated, timing is maintained at the ST3 level.
Caution
Mixed timing allows you to select both external and line timing sources. However, Cisco does not
recommend its use because it can create timing loops. Use this mode with caution.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
3-12
November 2001
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Setting Up ONS 15454 Timing
3.6.1 Network Timing Example
Figure 3-8 shows an ONS 15454 network timing setup example. Node 1 is set to external timing. Two
timing references are set to BITS. These are Stratum 1 timing sources wired to the BITS input pins on
the Node 1 backplane. The third reference is set to internal clock. The BITS output pins on the backplane
of Node 3 are used to provide timing to outside equipment, such as a Digital Access Line Access
Multiplexer.
In the example, Slots 5 and 6 contain the trunk cards. Timing at Nodes 2, 3, and 4 is set to line, and the
timing references are set to the trunk cards based on distance from the BITS source. Reference 1 is set
to the trunk card closest to the BITS source. At Node 2, Reference 1is Slot 5 because it is connected to
Node 1. At Node 4, Reference 1 is set to Slot 6 because it is connected to Node 1. At Node 3, Reference
1 could be either trunk card because they are equal distance from Node 1.
Figure 3-8
An ONS 15454 timing example
BITS1
source
BITS2
source
Node 1
Timing External
Ref 1: BITS1
Ref 2: BITS2
Ref 3: Internal (ST3)
Slot 5
Slot 6
Slot 5
Slot 5
Slot 6
Slot 6
Node 2
Timing Line
Ref 1: Slot 5
Ref 2: Slot 6
Ref 3: Internal (ST3)
Slot 5
BITS1 BITS2
out
out
Third party
equipment
Node 3
Timing Line
Ref 1: Slot 5
Ref 2: Slot 6
Ref 3: Internal (ST3)
34726
Node 4
Timing Line
Ref 1: Slot 6
Ref 2: Slot 5
Ref 3: Internal (ST3)
Slot 6
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
3-13
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Setting Up ONS 15454 Timing
3.6.2 Synchronization Status Messaging
Synchronization Status Messaging (SSM) is a SONET protocol that communicates information about
the quality of the timing source. SSM messages are carried on the S1 byte of the SONET Line layer.
They enable SONET devices to automatically select the highest quality timing reference and to avoid
timing loops.
SSM messages are either Generation 1 or Generation 2. Generation 1 is the first and most widely
deployed SSM message set. Generation 2 is a newer version. If you enable SSM for the ONS 15454,
consult your timing reference documentation to determine which message set to use. Table 3-4 and
Table 3-5 show the Generation 1 and Generation 2 message sets.
Table 3-4
SSM Generation 1 Message Set
Message
Quality
Description
PRS
1
Primary reference source – Stratum 1
STU
2
Sync traceability unknown
ST2
3
Stratum 2
ST3
4
Stratum 3
SMC
5
SONET minimum clock
ST4
6
Stratum 4
DUS
7
Do not use for timing synchronization
RES
Table 3-5
Reserved; quality level set by user
SSM Generation 2 Message Set
Message
Quality
Description
PRS
1
Primary reference source - Stratum 1
STU
2
Sync traceability unknown
ST2
3
Stratum 2
TNC
4
Transit node clock
ST3E
5
Stratum 3E
ST3
6
Stratum 3
SMC
7
SONET minimum clock
ST4
8
Stratum 4
DUS
9
Do not use for timing synchronization
RES
Reserved; quality level set by user
Procedure: Set up ONS 15454 Timing
Step 1
From the CTC node view, click the Provisioning > Timing tabs (Figure 3-9).
Step 2
In the General Timing section, complete the following information:
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
3-14
November 2001
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Setting Up ONS 15454 Timing
Step 3
•
Timing Mode—Set to External if the ONS 15454 derives its timing from a BITS source wired to the
backplane pins; set to Line if timing is derived from an OC-N card that is optically connected to the
timing node. A third option, Mixed, allows you to set external and line timing references. (Because
Mixed timing may cause timing loops, Cisco does not recommend its use. Use this mode with care.)
•
SSM Message Set—Choose the message set level supported by your network. If a Generation 1 node
receives a Generation 2 message, the message will be mapped down to the next available Generation
1. For example, an ST3E message becomes an ST3.
•
Quality of RES—If your timing source supports the reserved S1 byte, you set the timing quality here.
(Most timing sources do not use RES.) Qualities are displayed in descending quality order as ranges.
For example, ST3<RES<ST2 means the timing reference is higher than a Stratum 3 and lower than
a Stratum 2. See Table 3-4 and Table 3-5 for more information.
•
Revertive—If checked, the ONS 15454 reverts to a primary reference source after the conditions that
caused it to switch to a secondary timing reference are corrected.
•
Revertive Time—If Revertive is checked, indicate the amount of time the ONS 15454 will wait
before reverting back to its primary timing source.
In the BITS Facilities section, complete the following information:
Note
Step 4
The BITS Facilities section sets the parameters for your BITS1 and BITS2 timing references.
Many of these settings are determined by the timing source manufacturer. If equipment is
timed through BITS Out, you can set timing parameters to meet the requirements of the
equipment.
•
State—Set the BITS reference to IS (In Service) or OOS (Out of Service). For nodes set to Line
timing with no equipment timed through BITS Out, set State to OOS. For nodes using External
timing or Line timing with equipment timed through BITS Out, set State to IS.
•
Coding—Set to the coding used by your BITS reference, either B8ZS or AMI.
•
Framing—Set to the framing used by your BITS reference, either ESF (Extended Super Frame, or
SF (D4) (Super Frame). SSM is not available with Super Frame.
•
Sync Messaging—Check to enable SSM.
•
AIS Threshold—Sets the quality level where a node sends an Alarm Indication Signal (AIS) from
the BITS 1 Out and BITS 2 Out backplane pins. When a node times at or below the AIS Threshold
quality, AIS is sent (used when SSM is disabled or frame is SF).
Under Reference Lists, complete the following information:
Note
Reference lists define up to three timing references for the node and up to six BITS Out
references. BITS Out references define the timing references used by equipment that can be
attached to the node’s BITS Out pins on the backplane. If you attach equipment to BITS Out
pins, you normally attach it to a node with Line mode because equipment near the External
timing reference can be directly wired to the reference.
•
NE Reference—Allows you to define three timing references (Ref 1, Ref 2, Ref3). The node uses
Reference 1 unless a failure occurs to that reference, in which case, the node uses Reference 2. If
that fails, the node uses Reference 3, which is typically set to Internal Clock. This is the Stratum 3
clock provided on the TCC+. The options displayed depend on the Timing Mode setting.
– Timing Mode set to External—options are BITS1, BITS2, and Internal Clock.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
3-15
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Setting Up ONS 15454 Timing
– Timing Mode set to Line—options are the node’s working optical cards and Internal Clock.
Select the cards/ports that are directly or indirectly connected to the node wired to the BITS
source, that is, the node’s trunk cards. Set Reference 1 to the trunk card that is closest to the
BITS source. For example, if Slot 5 is connected to the node wired to the BITS source, select
Slot 5 as Reference 1.
– Timing Mode set to Mixed—both BITS and optical cards are available, allowing you to set a
mixture of external BITS and optical trunk cards as timing references.
•
BITS 1 Out/BITS 2 Out—Define the timing references for equipment wired to the BITS Out
backplane pins. Normally, BITS Out is used with Line nodes, so the options displayed are the
working optical cards. BITS 1 and BITS 2 Out are enabled as soon as BITS-1 and BITS-2 facilities
are placed in service.
Figure 3-9
Step 5
Setting Up ONS 15454 timing
Click Apply.
Note
Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide for timing-related
alarms.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
3-16
November 2001
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Setting Up ONS 15454 Timing
Procedure: Set Up Internal Timing
If no BITS source is available, you can set up internal timing by timing all nodes in the ring from the
internal clock of one node.
Caution
Internal timing is Stratum 3 and not intended for permanent use. All ONS 15454s should be timed to
a Stratum 2 or better primary reference source.
Step 1
Log into the node that will serve as the timing source.
Step 2
In the CTC node view, click the Provisioning > Timing tabs.
Step 3
In the General Timing section, enter the following:
Step 4
Step 5
•
Timing Mode—Set to External.
•
SSM Message Set—Set to Generation 1.
•
Quality of RES—Set to DUS.
•
Revertive—Is not relevant for internal timing; the default setting (checked) is sufficient.
•
Revertive Time—The default setting (5 minutes) is sufficient.
In the BITS Facilities section, enter the following information:
•
State—Set BITS 1 and BITS 2 to OOS (Out of Service).
•
Coding—Is not relevant for internal timing. The default (B8ZS) is sufficient.
•
Framing—Is not relevant for internal timing. The default (ESF) is sufficient.
•
Sync Messaging—Checked
•
AIS Threshold—Is not available.
In the Reference Lists section, enter the following information
•
NE Reference
– Ref1—Set to Internal Clock.
– Ref2—Set to Internal Clock.
– Ref3—Set to Internal Clock.
•
BITS 1 Out/BITS 2 Out—Set to None
Step 6
Click Apply.
Step 7
Log into a node that will be timed from the node set up in Steps 1–4.
Step 8
In the CTC node view, click the Provisioning > Timing tabs.
Step 9
In the General Timing section, enter the same information as entered in Step 3, except for the following:
•
Timing Mode—Set to Line.
Reference Lists
•
NE Reference
– Ref1—Set to the OC-N trunk card with the closest connection to the node in Step 3.
– Ref2—Set to the OC-N trunk card with the next closest connection to the node in Step 3.
– Ref3—Set to Internal Clock.
Step 10
Click Apply.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
3-17
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Viewing ONS 15454 Inventory
Step 11
Repeat Steps 7–10 at each node that will be timed by the node in Step 3.
3.7 Viewing ONS 15454 Inventory
The Inventory tab (Figure 3-10) displays information about cards installed in the ONS 15454 node
including part numbers, serial numbers, hardware revisions, and equipment types. The tab provides a
central location to obtain information and to determine applicability of ONS 15454 Product Change
Notices (PCNs) and Field Service Bulletins (FSBs). Using the ONS 15454 export feature, you can export
inventory data from ONS 15454 nodes into spreadsheet and database programs to consolidate ONS
15454 information for network inventory management and reporting.
Figure 3-10 Displaying ONS 15454 hardware information
The Inventory tab displays the following information about the cards installed in the ONS 15454:
Tip
•
Location—The slot where the card is installed
•
Eqpt Type—Equipment type the slot is provisioned for, for example, OC-12 or DS-1
•
Actual Eqpt Type—The actual card that is installed in the slot, for example, OC12 IR 4 1310 or
DS1N-14
You can pre-provision a slot before the card is installed by right-clicking the slot in node view and
selecting a card type.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
3-18
November 2001
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Viewing CTC Software Versions
•
HW Part #—Card part number; this number is printed on the top of the card
•
HW Rev—Card revision number
•
Serial #—Card serial number; this number is unique to each card
•
CLEI Code—Common Language Equipment Identifier code
•
Firmware Rev—Revision number of the software used by the ASIC chip installed on the card
3.8 Viewing CTC Software Versions
CTC software is pre-loaded on the ONS 15454 TCC+ cards; therefore, you do not need to install
software on the TCC+. When a new CTC software version is released, you must follow procedures
provided by the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) to upgrade the ONS 15454 software.
When you upgrade CTC software, the TCC+ stores the older CTC version as the protect CTC version,
and the newer CTC release becomes the working version. You can view the software versions that are
installed on an ONS 15454 by selecting the Maintenance tab followed by the Software subtab. Select
these tabs in node view to display the software installed on one node. Select the tabs in network view to
display the software versions installed on all the network nodes.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
3-19
Chapter 3
Node Setup
Viewing CTC Software Versions
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
3-20
November 2001
C H A P T E R
4
IP Networking
This chapter explains how to set up Cisco ONS 15454s in internet protocol (IP) networks and includes:
•
Scenarios showing Cisco ONS 15454s in common IP network configurations
•
Procedures for creating static routes
•
Procedures for using the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol
The chapter does not provide a comprehensive explanation of IP networking concepts and procedures.
Note
To set up ONS 15454s within an IP network, you must work with a LAN administrator or other
individual at your site who has IP networking training and experience. To learn more about IP
networking, many outside resources are available. IP Routing Fundamentals, by Mark Sportack
(Cisco Press, 1999), provides a comprehensive introduction to routing concepts and protocols in IP
networks.
4.1 IP Networking Overview
ONS 15454s can be connected in many different ways within an IP environment:
•
They can be connected to LANs through direct connections or a router.
•
IP Subnetting can create ONS 15454 node groups, which allow you to provision non-DCC
connected nodes in a network.
•
Different IP functions and protocols can be used to achieve specific network goals. For example,
Proxy Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) enables one LAN-connected ONS 15454 to serve as a
gateway for ONS 15454s that are not connected to the LAN.
•
You can create static routes to enable connections among multiple CTC sessions with ONS 15454s
that reside on the same subnet but have different destination IP addresses.
•
If ONS 15454s are connected to OSPF networks, ONS 15454 network information is automatically
communicated across multiple LANs and WANs.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
4-1
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
4.2 ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
ONS 15454 IP addressing generally has seven common scenarios or configurations. Use the scenarios
as building blocks for more complex network configurations. Table 4-1 provides a general list of items
to check when setting up ONS 15454s in IP networks. Additional procedures for troubleshooting
Ethernet connections and IP networks are provided in Chapter 9, “Ethernet Operation.”
Table 4-1
General ONS 15454 IP Networking Checklist
Item
What to check
PC/workstation
Each CTC computer must have the following:
•
Netscape 4.61 or Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher
•
JRE 1.3.0_C (PC) or JRE 1.3.0_01 (Solaris) for Releases 2.2.2 or higher;
JRE 1.2.2_05 or higher (Windows), or 1.2.2_03 or higher (Solaris) for
Releases 2.2.1 or earlier
•
Modified Java policy file
See the “Computer Requirements” section on page 2-2 for additional
information.
Link integrity
Link integrity exists between:
•
CTC computer and network hub/switch
•
ONS 15454s (backplane wire-wrap pins or RJ-45 port) and network
hub/switch
•
Router ports and hub/switch ports
ONS 15454
hub/switch ports
Set the hub or switch port that is connected to the ONS 15454 to 10 Mbps
half-duplex.
Ping
Ping the node to test connections between computers and ONS 15454s.
IP addresses/subnet
masks
ONS 15454 IP addresses and subnet masks are set up correctly.
Optical connectivity
ONS 15454 optical trunk ports are in service; DCC is enabled on each trunk
port
4.2.1 Scenario 1: CTC and ONS 15454s on Same Subnet
Scenario 1 shows a basic ONS 15454 LAN configuration (Figure 4-1). The ONS 15454s and CTC
computer reside on the same subnet. All ONS 15454s connect to LAN A, and all ONS 15454s have DCC
connections.
Note
Instructions for creating DCC connections are provided in Chapter 5, “SONET Topologies” within
the BLSR, UPSR and linear ADM procedures.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
4-2
November 2001
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
Figure 4-1
Scenario 1: CTC and ONS 15454s on same subnet
CTC Workstation
IP Address 192.168.1.100
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = N/A
Host Routes = N/A
LAN A
ONS 15454 #2
IP Address 192.168.1.20
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
SONET RING
ONS 15454 #3
IP Address 192.168.1.30
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
33157
ONS 15454 #1
IP Address 192.168.1.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
4.2.2 Scenario 2: CTC and ONS 15454s Connected to Router
In Scenario 2 the CTC computer resides on a subnet (192.168.1.0) and attaches to LAN A (Figure 4-2).
The ONS 15454s reside on a different subnet (192.168.2.0) and attach to LAN B. A router connects LAN
A to LAN B. The IP address of router interface A is set to LAN A (192.168.1.1), and the IP address of
router interface B is set to LAN B (192.168.2.1).
On the CTC computer, the default gateway is set to router interface A. If the LAN uses DHCP (Dynamic
Host Configuration Protocol), the default gateway and IP address are assigned automatically. In the
Figure 4-2 example, a DHCP server is not available.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
4-3
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
Figure 4-2
Scenario 2: CTC and ONS 15454s connected to router
LAN A
Int "A"
CTC Workstation
IP Address 192.168.1.100
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = 192.168.1.1
Host Routes = N/A
Int "B" Router
IP Address of interface “A” to LAN “A” 192.168.1.1
IP Address of interface “B” to LAN “B” 192.168.2.1
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Host Routes = N/A
LAN B
ONS 15454 #2
IP Address 192.168.2.20
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = 192.168.2.1
Static Routes = N/A
SONET RING
ONS 15454 #3
IP Address 192.168.2.30
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = 192.168.2.1
Static Routes = N/A
33158
ONS 15454 #1
IP Address 192.168.2.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = 192.168.2.1
Static Routes = N/A
4.2.3 Scenario 3: Using Proxy ARP to Enable an ONS 15454 Gateway
Scenario 3 is similar to Scenario 1, but only one ONS 15454 (node #1) connects to the LAN (Figure 4-3).
Two ONS 15454s (#2 and #3) connect to ONS 15454 #1 through the SONET DCC. Because all three
ONS 15454s are on the same subnet, Proxy ARP enables ONS 15454 #1 to serve as a gateway for ONS
15454s #2 and #3.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
4-4
November 2001
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
Figure 4-3
Scenario 3: Using Proxy ARP
CTC Workstation
IP Address 192.168.1.100
Subnet Mark at CTC Workstation 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = N/A
LAN A
ONS 15454 #1
IP Address 192.168.1.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
SONET RING
ONS 15454 #3
IP Address 192.168.1.30
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
33159
ONS 15454 #2
IP Address 192.168.1.20
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
ARP matches higher-level IP addresses to the physical addresses of the destination host. It uses a lookup
table (called ARP cache) to perform the translation. When the address is not found in the ARP cache, a
broadcast is sent out on the network with a special format called the ARP request. If one of the machines
on the network recognizes its own IP address in the request, it sends an ARP reply back to the requesting
host. The reply contains the physical hardware address of the receiving host. The requesting host stores
this address in its ARP cache so that all subsequent datagrams (packets) to this destination IP address
can be translated to a physical address.
Proxy ARP enables one LAN-connected ONS 15454 to respond to the ARP request for ONS 15454s not
connected to the LAN. (ONS 15454 Proxy ARP requires no user configuration.) For this to occur, the
DCC-connected ONS 15454s must reside on the same subnet. When a LAN device sends an ARP request
to an ONS 15454 that is not connected to the LAN, the gateway ONS 15454 returns its MAC address to
the LAN device. The LAN device then sends the datagram for the remote ONS 15454 to the MAC
address of the proxy ONS 15454. The proxy ONS 15454 uses its routing table to forward the datagram
to the non-LAN ONS 15454. The routing table is built using the OSPF IP routing protocol. (An OSPF
example is presented in Scenario 6.)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
4-5
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
4.2.4 Scenario 4: Default Gateway on CTC Computer
Scenario 4 is similar to Scenario 3, but nodes #2 and #3 reside on different subnets, 192.168.2.0 and
192.168.3.0, respectively (Figure 4-4). Node #1 and the CTC computer are on subnet 192.168.1.0. The
network includes different subnets because Proxy ARP is not used. In order for the CTC computer to
communicate with ONS 15454s #2 and #3, ONS 15454 #1 is entered as the default gateway on the CTC
computer using the “Direct Connections to the ONS 15454” section on page 2-5.
Figure 4-4
Scenario 4: Default gateway on a CTC computer
CTC Workstation
IP Address 192.168.1.100
Subnet Mask at CTC Workstation 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = 192.168.1.10
Host Routes = N/A
LAN A
ONS 15454 #1
IP Address 192.168.1.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
SONET RING
ONS 15454 #3
IP Address 192.168.3.30
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
33160
ONS 15454 #2
IP Address 192.168.2.20
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
4.2.5 Scenario 5: Using Static Routes to Connect to LANs
Static routes are used for two purposes:
•
To connect ONS 15454s to CTC sessions on one subnet connected by a router to ONS 15454s
residing on another subnet. (These static routes are not needed if OSPF is enabled. Scenario 7 shows
an OSPF example.)
•
To enable multiple CTC sessions among ONS 15454s residing on the same subnet. (Scenario 6
shows an example.)
In Figure 4-5, one CTC residing on subnet 192.168.1.0 connects to a router through interface A. (The
router is not set up with OSPF.) ONS 15454s residing on subnet 192.168.2.0 are connected through ONS
15454 #1 to the router through interface B. Proxy ARP enables ONS 15454 #1 as a gateway for ONS
15454s #2 and #3. To connect to CTC computers on LAN A, a static route is created on ONS 15454 #1.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
4-6
November 2001
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
Figure 4-5
Scenario 5: Static route with one CTC computer used as a destination
Router
IP Address of interface ”A” to LAN “A” 192.168.1.1
IP Address of interface “B” to LAN “B” 192.168.2.1
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
LAN A
Int "A"
CTC Workstation
IP Address 192.168.1.100
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = 192.168.1.1
Host Routes = N/A
Int "B"
LAN B
ONS 15454 #1
IP Address 192.168.2.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = 192.168.2.1
Static Routes
Destination 192.168.1.100
Mask 255.255.255.255
Next Hop 192.168.2.1
Cost = 2
SONET RING
ONS 15454 #3
IP Address 192.168.2.30
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
33162
ONS 15454 #2
IP Address 192.168.2.20
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
The destination and subnet mask entries control access to the ONS 15454s:
•
If a single CTC computer is connected to router, enter the complete CTC “host route” IP address as
the destination with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.255.
•
If CTC computers on a subnet are connected to router, enter the destination subnet (in this example,
192.168.1.0) and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.
•
If all CTC computers are connected to router, enter a destination of 0.0.0.0 and a subnet mask of
0.0.0.0. Figure 4-6 shows an example.
The IP address of router interface B is entered as the next hop, and the cost (number of hops from source
to destination) is 2.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
4-7
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
Figure 4-6
Scenario 5: Static route with multiple LAN destinations
LAN D
Router #3
LAN C
Router #2
Router #1
IP Address of interface ”A” to LAN “A” 192.168.1.1
IP Address of interface “B” to LAN “B” 192.168.2.1
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
LAN A
CTC Workstation
IP Address 192.168.1.100
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = 192.168.1.1
Host Routes = N/A
Int "A"
Int "B"
LAN B
ONS 15454 #1
IP Address 192.168.2.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = 192.168.2.1
Static Routes
Destination 0.0.0.0
Mask 0.0.0.0
Next Hop 192.168.2.1
Cost = 2
SONET RING
ONS 15454 #3
IP Address 192.168.2.30
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
55251
ONS 15454 #2
IP Address 192.168.2.20
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
Procedure: Create a Static Route
Use the following steps to create a static route.
Step 1
Log into the ONS 15454 and select the Provisioning > Network tabs.
Step 2
Click the Static Routing tab. Click Create.
Step 3
In the Create Static Route dialog box enter the following:
•
Destination—Enter the IP address of the computer running CTC. To limit access to one computer,
enter the full IP address (in the example, 192.168.1.100). To allow access to all computers on the
192.168.1.0 subnet, enter 192.168.1.0 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. You can enter a
destination of 0.0.0.0 to allow access to all CTC computers that connect to the router.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
4-8
November 2001
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
Step 4
•
Mask—Enter a subnet mask. If the destination is a host route (i.e., one CTC computer), enter a 32-bit
subnet mask (255.255.255.255). If the destination is a subnet, adjust the subnet mask accordingly,
for example, 255.255.255.0. If the destination is 0.0.0.0, enter a subnet mask of 0.0.0.0 to provide
access to all CTC computers.
•
Next Hop—Enter the IP address of the router port (in this example, 192.168.90.1) or the node IP
address if the CTC computer is connected to the node directly.
•
Cost—Enter the number of hops between the ONS 15454 and the computer. In this example, the cost
is two, one hop from the ONS 15454 to the router and a second hop from the router to the CTC
workstation.
Click OK. Verify that the static route displays in the Static Route window, or ping the node.
4.2.6 Scenario 6: Static Route for Multiple CTCs
Scenario 6 shows a static route used when multiple CTC computers need to access ONS 15454s residing
on the same subnet (Figure 4-7). In this scenario, CTC #1 and #2 and all ONS 15454s are on the same
IP subnet; ONS 15454 #1 and CTC #1 are attached to LAN A. ONS 15454 #2 and CTC #2 are attached
to LAN B. Static routes are added to ONS 15454 #1 pointing to CTC #1, and to ONS 15454 #2 pointing
to CTC #2. The static route is entered from the node’s perspective.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
4-9
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
Figure 4-7
Scenario 6: Static route for multiple CTCs
CTC Workstation #1
IP Address 192.168.1.100
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = N/A
LAN A
ONS 15454 #1
IP Address 192.168.1.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes
Destination 192.168.1.100
Mask 255.255.255.255
Next Hop 192.168.1.10
Cost = 1
SONET RING
ONS 15454 #2
IP Address 192.168.1.20
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes
Destination 192.168.1.200
Mask 255.255.255.255
Next Hop 192.168.1.20
Cost = 1
CTC Workstation #2
IP Address 192.168.1.200
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = N/A
ONS 15454 #3
IP Address 192.168.1.30
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
33163
LAN B
4.2.7 Scenario 7: Using OSPF
Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) is a link state Internet routing protocol. Link state protocols use a “hello
protocol” to monitor their links with adjacent routers and to test the status of their links to their
neighbors. Link state protocols advertise their directly-connected networks and their active links. Each
link state router captures the link state “advertisements” and puts them together to create a topology of
the entire network or area. From this database, the router calculates a routing table by constructing a
shortest path tree. Routes are continuously recalculated to capture ongoing topology changes.
ONS 15454s use the OSPF protocol in internal ONS 15454 networks for node discovery, circuit routing,
and node management. You can enable OSPF on the ONS 15454s so that the ONS 15454 topology is
sent to OSPF routers on a LAN. Advertising the ONS 15454 network topology to LAN routers eliminates
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
4-10
November 2001
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
the need to manually enter static routes for ONS 15454 subnetworks. Figure 4-7 shows the same network
enabled for OSPF. Figure 4-9 shows the same network without OSPF. Static routes must be manually
added to the router in order for CTC computers on LAN A to communicate with ONS 15454 #2 and #3
because these nodes reside on different subnets.
OSPF divides networks into smaller regions, called areas. An area is a collection of networked end
systems, routers, and transmission facilities organized by traffic patterns. Each OSPF area has a unique
ID number, known as the area ID, that can range from 0 to 4,294,967,295. Every OSPF network has one
backbone area called “area 0.” All other OSPF areas must connect to area 0.
When you enable ONS 15454 OSPF topology for advertising to an OSPF network, you must assign an
OSPF area ID to the ONS 15454 network. Coordinate the area ID number assignment with your LAN
administrator. In general, all DCC-connected ONS 15454s are assigned the same OSPF area ID.
Figure 4-8
Scenario 7: OSPF enabled
Router
IP Address of interface “A” to LAN A 192.168.1.1
IP Address of interface “B” to LAN B 192.168.2.1
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
LAN A
Int "A"
CTC Workstation
IP Address 192.168.1.100
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = 192.168.1.1
Host Routes = N/A
Int "B"
LAN B
ONS 15454 #1
IP Address 192.168.2.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = 192.168.2.1
Static Routes = N/A
SONET RING
ONS 15454 #3
IP Address 192.168.4.30
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
55250
ONS 15454 #2
IP Address 192.168.3.20
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
4-11
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
Figure 4-9
Scenario 7: OSPF not enabled
LAN A
Int "A"
CTC Workstation
IP Address 192.168.1.100
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway = 192.168.1.1
Host Routes = N/A
Router
IP Address of interface “A” to LAN A 192.168.1.1
IP Address of interface “B” to LAN B 192.168.2.1
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Static Routes = Destination 192.168.3.20 Next Hop 192.168.2.10
Destination 192.168.4.30 Next Hop 192.168.2.10
Int "B"
LAN B
ONS 15454 #1
IP Address 192.168.2.10
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = 192.168.2.1
Static Routes
Destination = 192.168.1.100
Mask = 255.255.255.255
Next Hop = 192.168.2.1
Cost = 2
SONET RING
ONS 15454 #3
IP Address 192.168.4.30
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
33161
ONS 15454 #2
IP Address 192.168.3.20
Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
Default Router = N/A
Static Routes = N/A
Use the following procedure to enable OSPF on each ONS 15454 node that you want included in the
OSPF network topology. ONS 15454 OSPF settings must match the router OSPF settings, so you will
need to get the OSPF Area ID, Hello and Dead intervals, and authentication key (if OSPF authentication
is enabled) from the router to which the ONS 15454 network is connected before enabling OSPF.
Procedure: Set up OSPF
Step 1
Log into the ONS 15454 node.
Step 2
In node view, select the Provisioning > Network > OSPF tabs. The OSPF pane has several options
(Figure 4-10).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
4-12
November 2001
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
Figure 4-10 Enabling OSPF on the ONS 15454
Step 3
Step 4
Step 5
Step 6
On the top left side, complete the following:
•
DCC OSPF Area ID—Enter the number that identifies the ONS 15454s as a unique OSPF area. The
OSPF area number can be an integer between 0 and 4294967295, and it can take a form similar to
an IP address. The number must be unique to the LAN OSPF area.
•
DCC Metric—This value is normally unchanged. It sets a “cost” for sending packets across the
DCC, which is used by OSPF routers to calculate the shortest path. This value should always be
higher than the LAN metric. The default DCC metric is 100.
In the OSPF on LAN area, complete the following:
•
OSPF active on LAN—When checked, enables ONS 15454 OSPF topology to be advertised to OSPF
routers on the LAN. Enable this field on ONS 15454s that directly connect to OSPF routers.
•
Area ID for LAN Port—Enter the OSPF area ID for the router port where the ONS 15454 is
connected. (This number is different from the DCC Area ID.)
In the Authentication area, complete the following:
•
Type—If the router where the ONS 15454 is connected uses authentication, select Simple
Password. Otherwise, select No Authentication.
•
Key—If authentication is enabled, enter the OSPF key (password).
In the Priority and Intervals area, complete the following:
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
4-13
Chapter 4
IP Networking
ONS 15454 IP Addressing Scenarios
The OSPF priority and intervals default to values most commonly used by OSPF routers. In the Priority
and Invervals area, verify that these values match those used by the OSPF router where the ONS 15454
is connected.
Step 7
•
Router Priority—Used to select the designated router for a subnet.
•
Hello Interval (sec)—Sets the number of seconds between OSPF “hello” packet advertisements sent
by OSPF routers. Ten seconds is the default.
•
Dead Interval—Sets the number of seconds that will pass while an OSPF router’s packets are not
visible before its neighbors declare the router down. Forty seconds is the default.
•
Transit Delay (sec)—Indicates the service speed. One second is the default.
•
Retransmit Interval (sec)—Sets the time that will elapse before a packet is resent. Five seconds is
the default.
•
LAN Metric—Sets a “cost” for sending packets across the LAN. This value should always be lower
than the DCC metric. Ten is the default.
In the OSPF Area Range Table area, complete the following:
Area range tables consolidate the information that is propagated outside an OSPF Area border. One ONS
15454 in the ONS 15454 OSPF area is connected to the OSPF router. An area range table on this node
points the router to the other nodes that reside within the ONS 15454 OSPF area.
To create an area range table:
a.
Under OSPF Area Range Table, click Create.
b.
In the Create Area Range dialog box, enter the following:
– Range Address—Enter the area IP address for the ONS 15454s that reside within the OSPF area.
For example, if the ONS 15454 OSPF area includes nodes with IP addresses 10.10.20.100,
10.10.30.150, 10.10.40.200, and 10.10.50.250, the range address would be 10.10.0.0.
– Range Area ID—Enter the OSPF area ID for the ONS 15454s. This is either the ID in the DCC
OSPF Area ID field or the ID in the Area ID for LAN Port field.
– Mask Length—Enter the subnet mask length. In the Range Address example, this is 16.
– Advertise—Check if you want to advertise the OSPF range table.
c.
Step 8
Click OK.
All OSPF areas must be connected to Area 0. If the ONS 15454 OSPF area is not physically connected
to Area 0, use the following steps to create a virtual link table that will provide the disconnected area
with a logical path to Area 0:
a.
Under OSPF Virtual Link Table, click Create.
b.
In the Create Virtual Link dialog box, complete the following fields (OSPF settings must match
OSPF settings for the ONS 15454 OSPF area):
Neighbor—Enter the router ID of the Area 0 router.
Transit Delay (sec)—The service speed. One second is the default.
Hello Int (sec)—The number of seconds between OSPF “hello” packet advertisements sent by OSPF
routers. Ten seconds is the default.
Auth Type—If the router where the ONS 15454 is connected uses authentication, select Simple
Password. Otherwise, set it to No Authentication.
Retransmit Int (sec)—Sets the time that will elapse before a packet is resent. Five seconds is the
default.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
4-14
November 2001
Chapter 4
IP Networking
Viewing the ONS 15454 Routing Table
Dead Int (sec)—Sets the number of seconds that will pass while an OSPF router’s packets are not
visible before its neighbors declare the router down. Forty seconds is the default.
c.
Step 9
Click OK.
After entering ONS 15454 OSPF area data, click Apply.
If you changed the Area ID, the TCC+ cards will reset, one at a time.
4.3 Viewing the ONS 15454 Routing Table
ONS 15454 routing information is displayed on the Maintenance > Routing Table tabs (Figure 4-11).
The routing table provides the following information:
•
Destination—Displays the IP address of the destination network or host.
•
Mask—Displays the subnet mask used to reach the destination host or network.
•
Gateway—Displays the IP address of the gateway used to reach the destination network or host.
•
Usage—Shows the number of times this route has been used.
•
Interface—Shows the ONS 15454 interface used to access the destination. Values are:
– cpm0—the ONS 15454 Ethernet interface, that is, the RJ-45 jack on the TCC+ and the LAN 1
pins on the backplane.
– pdcc0—an SDCC interface, that is, an OC-N trunk card identified as the SDCC termination.
– lo0—a loopback interface
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
4-15
Chapter 4
IP Networking
Viewing the ONS 15454 Routing Table
Figure 4-11 Viewing the ONS 15454 routing table
Table 4-2 shows sample routing entries for an ONS 15454.
Table 4-2
Sample Routing Table Entries
Entry
Destination
Mask
Gateway
Interface
1
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
172.20.214.1
cpm0
2
172.20.214.0
255.255.255.0
172.20.214.92
cpm0
3
172.20.214.92
255.255.255.255
127.0.0.1
lo0
4
172.20.214.93
255.255.255.255
0.0.0.0
pdcc0
5
172.20.214.94
255.255.255.255
172.20.214.93
pdcc0
Entry #1 shows the following:
•
Destination (0.0.0.0) is the default route entry. All undefined destination network or host entries on
this routing table will be mapped to the default route entry.
•
Mask (0.0.0.0) is always 0 for the default route.
•
Gateway (172.20.214.1) is the default gateway address. All outbound traffic that cannot be found in
this routing table or is not on the node’s local subnet will be sent to this gateway.
•
Interface (cpm0) indicates that the ONS 15454 Ethernet interface is used to reach the gateway.
Entry #2 shows the following:
•
Destination (172.20.214.0) is the destination network IP address.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
4-16
November 2001
Chapter 4
IP Networking
Viewing the ONS 15454 Routing Table
•
Mask (255.255.255.0) is a 24-bit mask, meaning all addresses within the 172.20.214.0 subnet can
be a destination.
•
Gateway (172.20.214.92) is the gateway address. All outbound traffic belonging to this network is
sent to this gateway.
•
Interface (cpm0) indicates that the ONS 15454 Ethernet interface is used to reach the gateway.
Entry #3 shows the following:
•
Destination (172.20.214.92) is the destination host IP address.
•
Mask (255.255.255.255) is a 32 bit mask, meaning only the 172.20.214.92 address is a destination.
•
Gateway (127.0.0.1) is a loopback address. The host directs network traffic to itself using this
address.
•
Interface (lo0) indicates that the local loopback interface is used to reach the gateway.
Entry #4 shows the following:
•
Destination (172.20.214.93) is the destination host IP address.
•
Mask (255.255.255.255) is a 32 bit mask, meaning only the 172.20.214.93 address is a destination.
•
Gateway (0.0.0.0) means the destination host is directly attached to the node.
•
Interface (pdcc0) indicates that a SONET SDCC interface is used to reach the destination host.
Entry #5 shows a DCC-connected node that is accessible through a node that is not directly connected:
•
Destination (172.20.214.94) is the destination host IP address.
•
Mask (255.255.255.255) is a 32-bit mask, meaning only the 172.20.214.94 address is a destination.
•
Gateway (172.20.214.93) indicates that the destination host is accessed through a node with IP
address 172.20.214.93.
•
Interface (pdcc0) indicates that a SONET SDCC interface is used to reach the gateway.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
4-17
Chapter 4
IP Networking
Viewing the ONS 15454 Routing Table
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
4-18
November 2001
C H A P T E R
5
SONET Topologies
This chapter explains how to set up the Cisco ONS 15454 in different SONET topologies, including:
•
Two-fiber and four-fiber bidirectional line switched rings (BLSRs)
•
Unidirectional path switched rings (UPSRs)
•
Subtending rings
•
Linear add/drop multiplexers (ADMs)
•
Path-protected mesh networks (PPMNs)
5.1 Before You Begin
To avoid errors during network configuration, Cisco recommends that you draw the complete ONS
15454 SONET topology on paper (or electronically) before you begin the physical implementation. A
sketch ensures that you have adequate slots, cards, and fibers to complete the topology.
Table 5-1 shows the SONET rings that can be created on each ONS 15454 node.
Table 5-1
ONS 15454 Rings
Ring Type
Maximum per node
All rings
5
BLSRs
2
2-Fiber BLSR 2
4-Fiber BLSR 1
UPSR
4
5.2 Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
The ONS 15454 can support two concurrent BLSRs in one of the following configurations:
•
Two, two-fiber BLSRs, or
•
One two-fiber and one four-fiber BLSR.
Each BLSR can have up to 16 ONS 15454s. Because the working and protect bandwidths must be equal,
you can create only OC-12 (two-fiber only), OC-48, or OC-192 BLSRs.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-1
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Note
Two-fiber BLSRs can support up to 24 ONS 15454s, but switch times are slightly longer for rings
containing more than 16 nodes. BLSRs with 16 or fewer nodes will meet the GR-1230 switch time
requirement. Four-fiber BLSRs can only support 16 nodes.
5.2.1 Two-Fiber BLSRs
In two-fiber BLSRs, each fiber is divided into working and protect bandwidths. For example, in an
OC-48 BLSR (Figure 5-1), STSs 1 – 24 carry the working traffic, and STSs 25 – 48 are reserved for
protection. Working traffic (STSs 1 – 24) travels in one direction on one fiber and in the opposite
direction on the second fiber. The Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) circuit routing routines calculate
the “shortest path” for circuits based on many factors, including requirements set by the circuit
provisioner, traffic patterns, and distance. For example, in Figure 5-1, circuits going from Node 0 to
Node 1 typically will travel on Fiber 1, unless that fiber is full, in which case circuits will be routed on
Fiber 2 through Node 3 and Node 2. Traffic from Node 0 to Node 2 (or Node 1 to Node 3), may be routed
on either fiber, depending on circuit provisioning requirements and traffic loads.
Figure 5-1
A four-node, two-fiber BLSR
STSs 1-24 (working)
STSs 25-48 (protect)
Node 0
STSs 1-24 (working)
STSs 25-48 (protect)
OC-48 Ring
Node 1
= Fiber 1
Node 2
= Fiber 2
61938
Node 3
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-2
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
The SONET K1 and K2 bytes carry the information that governs BLSR protection switches. Each BLSR
node monitors the K bytes to determine when to switch the SONET signal to an alternate physical path.
The K bytes communicate failure conditions and actions taken between nodes in the ring.
If a break occurs on one fiber, working traffic targeted for a node beyond the break switches to the
protect bandwidth on the second fiber. The traffic travels in reverse direction on the protect bandwidth
until it reaches its destination node. At that point, traffic is switched back to the working bandwidth.
Figure 5-2 shows a sample traffic pattern on a four-node, two-fiber BLSR.
Figure 5-2
Four-node, two-fiber BLSR sample traffic pattern
Node 0
Node 3
OC-48 Ring
Node 1
Fiber 1
Node 2
Fiber 2
61956
Traffic flow
Figure 5-3 shows how traffic is rerouted following a line break between Node 0 and Node 3.
•
All circuits originating on Node 0 carried to Node 2 on Fiber 2 are switched to the protect bandwidth
of Fiber 1. For example, a circuit carried on STS-1 on Fiber 2 is switched to STS-25 on Fiber 1. A
circuit carried on STS-2 on Fiber 2 is switched to STS-26 on Fiber 1. Fiber 1 carries the circuit to
Node 3 (the original routing destination). Node 3 switches the circuit back to STS-1 on Fiber 2
where it is routed to Node 2 on STS-1.
•
Circuits originating on Node 2 that were normally carried to Node 0 on Fiber 1 are switched to the
protect bandwidth of Fiber 2 at Node 3. For example, a circuit carried on STS-2 on Fiber 1 is
switched to STS-26 on Fiber 2. Fiber 2 carries the circuit to Node 0 where the circuit is switched
back to STS-2 on Fiber 1 and then dropped to its destination.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-3
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Figure 5-3
Four-node, two-fiber BLSR traffic pattern following line break
Node 0
Node 3
OC-48 Ring
Node 1
Fiber 1
Node 2
Fiber 2
61957
Traffic flow
5.2.2 Four-Fiber BLSRs
Four-fiber BLSRs double the bandwidth of two-fiber BLSRs. Because they allow span switching as well
as ring switching, four-fiber BLSRs increase the reliability and flexibility of traffic protection. Two
fibers are allocated for working traffic and two fibers for protection, as shown in Figure 5-4. To
implement a four-fiber BLSR, you must install four OC-48 or OC-48AS cards, or four OC-192 cards at
each BLSR node.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-4
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Figure 5-4
A four-node, four-fiber BLSR
Node 0
Span 4
Span 1
Span 5
Span 8
OC-48 Ring
Span 6
Node 1
Span 7
Span 3
Span 2
= Working fibers
= Protect fibers
Node 2
61932
Node 3
Four-fiber BLSRs provide span and ring switching:
•
Span switching (Figure 5-5) occurs when a working span fails. Traffic switches to the protect fibers
between the nodes (Node 0 and Node 1 in the Figure 5-5 example) and then returns to the working
fibers. Multiple span switches can occur at the same time.
•
Ring switching (Figure 5-6) occurs when a span switch cannot recover traffic, such as when both
the working and protect fibers fail on the same span. In a ring switch, traffic is routed to the protect
fibers throughout the full ring.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-5
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Figure 5-5
A four-fiber BLSR span switch
Node 0
Span 4
Span 1
Span 5
Span 8
OC-48 Ring
Node 3
Span 6
Node 1
Span 7
Span 2
= Working fibers
= Protect fibers
Node 2
Figure 5-6
61959
Span 3
A four-fiber BLSR ring switch
Node 0
Span 1
Span 4
Span 5
Span 8
OC-48 Ring
Span 6
Node 1
Span 7
Span 3
Span 2
= Working fibers
Node 2
= Protect fibers
61960
Node 3
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-6
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
5.2.3 BLSR Bandwidth
BLSR nodes can terminate traffic that is fed from either side of the ring. Therefore, BLSRs are suited
for distributed node-to-node traffic applications such as interoffice networks and access networks.
BLSRs allow bandwidth to be reused around the ring and can carry more traffic than a network with
traffic flowing through one central hub. BLSRs can also carry more traffic than a UPSR operating at the
same OC-N rate. Table 5-2 shows the bidirectional bandwidth capacities of two-fiber BLSRs. The
capacity is the OC-N rate divided by two, multiplied by the number of nodes in the ring minus the
number of pass-through STS-1 circuits. Table 5-3 shows the bidirectional bandwidth capacities of
four-fiber BLSRs.
Table 5-2
Two-Fiber BLSR Capacity
OC Rate
Working Bandwidth
Protection Bandwidth
Ring Capacity
OC-12
STS1-6
STS 7-12
6 x N1 - PT2
OC-48
STS 1-24
STS 25-48
24 x N - PT
OC-192
STS 1-96
STS 97-192
96 x N - PT
1. N equals the number of ONS 15454 nodes configured as BLSR nodes.
2. PT equals the number of STS-1 circuits passed through ONS 15454 nodes in the ring (capacity can vary
depending on the traffic pattern).
Table 5-3
Four-Fiber BLSR Capacity
OC Rate
Working Bandwidth
Protection Bandwidth
Ring Capacity
OC-48
STS 1-48 (Fiber 1)
STS 1-48 (Fiber 2)
48 x N - PT
OC-192
STS 1-192 (Fiber 1)
STS 1-192 (Fiber 2)
192 x N - PT
Figure 5-7 shows an example of BLSR bandwidth reuse. The same STS carries three different traffic sets
simultaneously on different spans on the ring: one set from Node 3 to Node 1, one from Node 1 to Node
2, and another from Node 2 to Node 3.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-7
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Figure 5-7
BLSR bandwidth reuse
Node 0
STS#1
STS#1
Node 1
Node 3
STS#1
STS#1
Node 2
= Node 1 – Node 2 traffic
= Node 2 – Node 3 traffic
32131
= Node 3 – Node 1 traffic
5.2.4 Sample BLSR Application
Figure 5-8 shows a sample two-fiber BLSR implementation. A regional long-distance network connects
to other carriers at Node 0. Traffic is delivered to the service provider’s major hubs.
•
Carrier 1 delivers six DS-3s over two OC-3 spans to Node 0. Carrier 2 provides twelve DS-3s
directly. Node 0 receives the signals and delivers them around the ring to the appropriate node.
•
The ring also brings 14 DS-1s back from each remote site to Node 0. Intermediate nodes serve these
shorter regional connections.
•
The ONS 15454 OC-3 card supports a total of four OC-3 ports so that two additional OC-3 spans
can be added at little cost.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-8
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Figure 5-8
A five-node BLSR
Carrier 1
2 OC-3s
Carrier 2
56 local
12 DS-3s
DS-1s
4 DS-1s
Node 0
14 DS-1s
Node 1
14 DS-1s
2 DS-1s
Node 4
Node 2
14 DS-1s
8 DS-3s
= Fiber 1
4 DS-1s
14 DS-1s
= Fiber 2
32138
Node 3
Figure 5-9 shows the shelf assembly layout for Node 0, which has one free slot. Figure 5-10 shows the
shelf assembly layout for the remaining sites in the ring. In this BLSR configuration, an additional eight
DS-3s at Node IDs 1 and 3 can be activated. An additional four DS-3s can be added at Node ID 4, and
ten DS-3s can be added at Node ID 2. Each site has free slots for future traffic needs.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-9
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Figure 5-9
Shelf assembly layout for Node 0 in Figure 5-8
32640
DS3-12
DS3-12
OC3
OC3
OC48
OC48
TCC
XCVT
AIC (Optional)
XCVT
TCC
Free Slot
DS1-14
DS1-14
DS1N-14
DS1-14
DS1-14
Figure 5-10 Shelf assembly layout for Nodes 1 – 4 in Figure 5-8
32140
DS3-12
DS3-12
Free Slot
Free Slot
OC48
OC48
TCC
XCVT
AIC (Optional)
XCVT
TCC
Free Slot
Free Slot
Free Slot
Free Slot
DS1-14
DS1-14
5.2.5 Setting Up BLSRs
To set up a BLSR on the ONS 15454, you perform five basic procedures:
•
Install the BLSR trunk cards. See the “Install the BLSR Trunk Cards” procedure on page 5-11.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-10
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
•
Create the BLSR DCC terminations. See the “Create the BLSR DCC Terminations” procedure on
page 5-13.
•
Enable the BLSR ports. See the “Enable the BLSR Ports” procedure on page 5-13.
•
Set up BLSR timing. See the “Set up ONS 15454 Timing” procedure on page 3-14.
•
Provision the BLSR. See the “Provision the BLSR” procedure on page 5-14.
Procedure: Install the BLSR Trunk Cards
Step 1
Install the OC-12, OC-48, OC-48AS, or OC-192 cards that will serve as the BLSR trunk cards. You can
install the OC-12 and OC-48AS cards in any slot, but you can install the OC-48 and OC-192 cards only
in Slots 5, 6, 12, or 13.
Step 2
Allow the cards to boot.
Step 3
Attach the fiber to the east and west BLSR ports at each node.
Plan your fiber connections and use the same plan for all BLSR nodes. For example, make the east port
the farthest slot to the right and the west port the farthest left. Plug fiber connected to an east port at one
node into the west port on an adjacent node. Figure 5-11 shows fiber connections for a two-fiber BLSR
with trunk cards in Slot 5 (west) and Slot 12 (east).
Note
Always plug the transmit (Tx) connector of an OC-N card at one node into the receive (Rx)
connector of an OC-N card at the adjacent node. Cards will display an SF LED if Tx and Rx
connections are mismatched.
For four-fiber BLSRs, use the same east - west connection pattern for the working and protect fibers. Do
not mix working and protect card connections. The BLSR will not function if working and protect cards
are interconnected. Figure 5-12 shows fiber connections for a four-fiber BLSR. Slot 5 (west) and Slot
12 (east) carry the working traffic. Slot 6 (west) and Slot 13 (east) carry the protect traffic.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-11
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Figure 5-11 Connecting fiber to a four-node, two-fiber BLSR
West
Tx
Rx
East
West
Slot 12
Slot 5
Tx
Rx
East
Slot 12
Slot 5
Node 1
Node 2
Tx
Rx
Tx
Rx
West
Tx
Rx
Tx
Rx
East
West
Slot 12
Slot 5
Tx
Rx
East
Slot 12
Slot 5
Node 3
55297
Tx
Rx
Node 4
Figure 5-12 Connecting fiber to a four-node, four-fiber BLSR
Node 2
Tx
Rx
Tx
Rx
East
West
Slot Slot
12 13
Slot Slot
6
5
Tx
Rx
West
East
West
Slot Slot
12 13
Slot Slot
5
6
Slot Slot
12 13
Slot Slot
6
5
Tx
Rx
East
Node 3
East
Slot Slot
12 13
Slot Slot
5
6
Node 4
Working fibers
Protect fibers
61958
West
Node 1
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-12
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Procedure: Create the BLSR DCC Terminations
Step 1
Log into the first node that will be in the BLSR.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > Sonet DCC tabs.
Step 3
In the SDCC Terminations section, click Create.
Step 4
On the Create SDCC Terminations dialog, press Ctrl and click the two slots/ports that will serve as the
BLSR ports at the node. For example, Slot 5 (OC-48)/Port 1 and Slot 12 (OC-48)/ Port 1. For four-fiber
BLSRs, provision the working cards, but not the protect cards, as DCC terminations.
Step 5
Click OK.
Step 6
The slots/ports appear in the SDCC Terminations list.
Step 7
Complete Steps 2 – 5 at each node that will be in the BLSR.
Note
The ONS 15454 uses the SONET Section layer DCC (SDCC) for data communications. It
does not use the Line DCCs; therefore, the Line DCCs are available to tunnel DCCs from
third-party equipment across ONS 15454 networks. For more detail, see the “Creating DCC
Tunnels” section on page 6-21.
Procedure: Enable the BLSR Ports
Step 1
Log into one of the nodes that will be in the BLSR.
Step 2
Double-click one of the OC-N cards that you configured as a DCC termination.
Step 3
Click the Provisioning > Line tabs.
Step 4
Click Status (Figure 5-13) and choose In Service.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-13
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Figure 5-13 Enabling an optical port
Step 5
Repeat Steps 2 – 4 for the other optical card configured as a DCC termination.
Step 6
(Four-fiber BLSR only) Repeat Steps 2 – 4 for each protect card.
Step 7
Repeat Steps 2 – 5 at each node that will be in the BLSR.
After configuring the SONET DCC, set the timing for the node. For procedures, see the “Setting Up ONS
15454 Timing” section on page 3-12. After you configure the timing you can provision the BLSR.
Procedure: Provision the BLSR
Step 1
Log into one BLSR node.
Step 2
Select the Provisioning > Ring tabs.
Step 3
Click Create.
Step 4
On the Create BLSR dialog box (Figure 5-14), set the BLSR properties:
•
Ring Type—select the BLSR ring type, either two-fiber or four-fiber.
•
Ring ID—Assign a ring ID (a number between 0 and 9999). Nodes in the same BLSR must have the
same Ring ID.
•
Node ID—Assign a Node ID. The Node ID identifies the node to the BLSR. Nodes in the same
BLSR must have unique Node IDs.
•
Reversion time—Set the amount of time that will pass before the traffic reverts to the original
working path. The default is 5 minutes. All nodes in a BLSR ring should have the same reversion
time setting, particularly if “never” (i.e., non-revertive) is selected.
•
West Port—Assign the west BLSR port for the node from the pull-down menu. (In Figure 5-11, this
is Slot 5.)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-14
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
•
East Port—Assign the east BLSR port for the node from the pull-down menu. (In Figure 5-11, this
is Slot 12.)
The east and west ports must match the fiber connections and DCC terminations set up in the “Install
the BLSR Trunk Cards” procedure on page 5-11 and the “Create the BLSR DCC Terminations”
procedure on page 5-13.
For four-fiber BLSRs, complete the following:
•
Span Reversion—Set the amount of time that will pass before the traffic reverts to the original
working path following a span reversion. The default is 5 minutes. Span reversions can be set to
Never. If you set a reversion time, the times must be the same for both ends of the span. That is, if
Node A’s west fiber is connected to Node B’s east port, the Node A west span reversion time must
be the same as the Node B east span reversion time. To avoid reversion time mismatches, Cisco
recommends that you use the same span reversion time throughout the ring.
•
West Protect—Assign the west BLSR port that will connect to the west protect fiber from the
pull-down menu. (In Figure 5-12, this is Slot 6.)
•
East Protect—Assign the east BLSR port that will connect to the east protect fiber from the
pull-down menu. (In Figure 5-12, this is Slot 13.)
Figure 5-14 Setting BLSR properties
Step 5
Click OK.
Note
Some or all of the following alarms display during BLSR setup: E-W MISMATCH, RING
MISMATCH, APSCIMP, APSDFLTK, BLSROSYNC. The alarms will clear after you
configure all the nodes in the BLSR.
Step 6
Complete Steps 2 – 5 at each node that you are adding to the BLSR.
Step 7
After you configure the last BLSR node, wait for the BLSR Ring Map Change dialog box to display (this
can take 10 – 30 seconds).
Note
Step 8
The dialog box will not display if SDCC Termination alarms (e.g., EOC) or BLSR alarms
(such as E-W MISMATCH and RING MISMATCH) are present. If an SDCC alarm is
present, review the DCC provisioning at each node; use the “Create the BLSR DCC
Terminations” procedure on page 5-13. If BLSR alarms have not cleared, repeat Steps 1 – 6
at each node, making sure each node is provisioned correctly. You can also following alarm
troubleshooting procedures provided in the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and
Maintenance Guide.
On the BLSR Ring Map Change dialog, click Yes.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-15
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Step 9
On the BLSR Ring Map dialog box, verify that the ring map contains all the nodes you provisioned in
the expected order. If so, click Accept. If the nodes do not appear, or are not in the expected order, repeat
Steps 1 – 8, making sure no errors are made.
Step 10
Switch to network view and verify the following:
Step 11
•
A green span line appears between all BLSR nodes
•
All E-W MISMATCH, RING MISMATCH, APSCIMP, DFLTK, and BLSROSYNC alarms are
cleared.
Test the BLSR using testing procedures normal for your site. Here are a few steps you can use:
a.
Run test traffic through the ring.
b.
Log into a node, click the Maintenance > Ring tabs, and choose MANUAL RING from the East
Switch list. Click Apply.
c.
In network view, click the Conditions tab and click Retrieve. You should see a Ring Switch West
event, and the far-end node that responded to this request will report a Ring Switch East event.
d.
Verify that traffic switches normally.
e.
Choose Clear from the East Switch list and click Apply.
f.
Repeat Steps a – d for the West Switch.
g.
Disconnect the fibers at one node and verify that traffic switches normally.
5.2.6 Upgrading From Two-Fiber to Four-Fiber BLSRs
Two-fiber OC-48 or OC-192 BLSRs can be upgraded to four-fiber BLSRs. To upgrade, you install two
OC-48 or OC-192 cards at each two-fiber BLSR node, then log into CTC and upgrade each node from
two-fiber to four-fiber. The fibers that were divided into working and protect bandwidths for the
two-fiber BLSR are now fully allocated for working BLSR traffic.
Procedure: Upgrade From a Two-Fiber to a Four-Fiber BLSR
Step 1
Log into one of the two-fiber BLSR nodes. In network view:
a.
Verify that all spans between BLSR nodes on the network map are green.
b.
Click the Alarms tab. Verify that no critical or major alarms are present, nor any facility alarms,
such as LOS, LOF, AIS-L, SF, and SD. In a BLSR, these facility conditions may be reported as
minor alarms.
c.
Click the Conditions tab, then click Retrieve Conditions. Verify that no ring switches are active.
If trouble is indicated, for example, a major alarm exists, resolve the problem before proceeding to
Step 2. See the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide for additional information.
Step 2
Install two OC-48 or OC-192 cards at each BLSR node. You must install the same OC-N card rate as the
two fiber.
Step 3
Enable the ports for each new OC-N card:
a.
Display the card in card view.
b.
Click the Provisioning > Line tabs.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-16
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
c.
Click Status and choose In Service.
d.
Click Apply.
e.
Repeat Steps a – d for each new OC-N card at each BLSR node.
Step 4
Connect the fiber to the new cards. Use the same east – west connection scheme that was used to create
the two-fiber connections. Figure 5-12 shows an example.
Step 5
Test the new fiber connections using procedures standard for your site. For example, pull a Tx fiber for
a protect card and verify that an LOS alarm displays for the appropriate Rx card. Do this fiber test for
every span in the BLSR protect ring.
Step 6
Perform a span lockout at each BLSR node:
Step 7
a.
At one of the BLSR nodes, switch to node view. Click the Maintenance > Ring tabs.
b.
Under West Switch for the two-fiber BLSR you will convert, select LOCKOUT SPAN. Click
Apply
c.
Under East Switch, select LOCKOUT SPAN. Click Apply.
d.
Repeat Steps a – c at each node in the two-fiber BLSR.
Upgrade each node from two-fiber to four-fiber BLSR:
a.
At one of the BLSR nodes, switch to node view. Click the Provisioning > Ring tabs.
b.
Select the two-fiber BLSR. Click Upgrade.
c.
On the Upgrade BLSR dialog box, complete the following:
– Span Reversion—Set the amount of time that will pass before the traffic reverts to the original
working path following a span reversion. The default is 5 minutes.
– West Protect—Assign the east BLSR port that will connect to the east protect fiber from the
pull-down menu. (In Figure 5-12, this is Slot 6.)
– East Protect—Assign the east BLSR port that will connect to the east protect fiber from the
pull-down menu. (In Figure 5-12, this is Slot 13.)
Step 8
Step 9
d.
Click Ok.
e.
Complete Steps a – d at each two-fiber BLSR node.
Clear the span lockout:
a.
Display a BLSR node in node view. Click the Maintenance > Ring tabs.
b.
Under West Switch, select CLEAR. Click Apply
c.
Under East Switch, select CLEAR. Click Apply.
d.
Repeat Steps a – c at each node in the new four-fiber BLSR.
e.
Switch to network view. Verify that no critical or major alarms are present, nor any facility alarms,
such as LOS, LOF, AIS-L, SF, and SD. If an alarm is present, resolve the problem using procedures
in the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide.
Test the four-fiber BLSR using procedures in Step 11 in the “Provision the BLSR” procedure on
page 5-14.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-17
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
5.2.7 Adding and Removing BLSR Nodes
This section explains how to add and remove BLSR nodes. To add or remove a node, you force a
protection switch to route traffic away from the span where you will add or remove the node. Figure 5-15
shows a three-node BLSR before the new node is added. To add Node 3, you would:
Note
•
Force a protection switch on the Node 1 (Slot 5, West) and Node 4 (Slot 12, East) span. The
protection switch forces traffic away from the fibers that you will remove and reconnect to the added
node.
•
Remove fibers from Node 1/Slot 5 and Node 4/Slot 12, then, using additional fibers, connect Node
1 and Node 4 to Node 3.
•
Remove the protection switch to route traffic through the added node.
You can only add one node at a time to an ONS 15454 BLSR.
Figure 5-15 A three-node BLSR before adding a new node
West
Tx
Rx
East
West
Slot 12
Slot 5
Tx
Rx
Node 2
Tx
Rx
West
Slot 12
Tx
Rx
Tx
Rx
East
Slot 5
East
Slot 12
Slot 5
Node 1
Tx
Rx
Tx
Rx
West
East
Slot 12
Slot 5
Node 3
68118
Tx
Rx
Node 4
Procedure: Add a BLSR Node
Perform these steps on-site and not from a remote location.
Step 1
Draw a diagram, similar to Figure 5-15, for the BLSR installation where you will add the node. In the
diagram, identify the nodes, cards (slots) and spans (east or west) that will connect to the new node. This
information is essential to complete this procedure without error. For example, in Figure 5-15, you
would circle Slot 5 (west) on Node 1, and Slot 12 (east) on Node 4.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-18
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Step 2
Log into CTC and display the BLSR nodes in network view. Verify the following:
•
All BLSR spans on the network map are green.
•
On the Alarms tab, no critical or major alarms are present, nor any facility alarms, such as LOS,
LOF, AIS-L, SF, and SD. In a BLSR, these facility conditions may be reported as minor alarms.
•
On the Conditions tab, no ring switches are active.
If trouble is indicated, for example, a major alarm exists, resolve the problem before proceeding.
Step 3
Install the OC-N cards in the ONS 15454 that you will add to the BLSR; use the “Install the BLSR Trunk
Cards” procedure on page 5-11. Ensure fiber cables are available to connect to the cards. Run test traffic
through the node to ensure the cards are functioning properly.
Step 4
Log into the new node and complete the BLSR setup.
•
Provision the SONET DCC using the “Create the BLSR DCC Terminations” procedure on
page 5-13.
•
Configure the BLSR timing using the “Set up ONS 15454 Timing” procedure on page 3-14.
•
Enable the BLSR ports using the “Enable the BLSR Ports” procedure on page 5-13.
•
Provision the BLSR using the “Provision the BLSR” procedure on page 5-14
Step 5
Log into the node that will connect to the new node through its east port (Node 4 in the Figure 5-15
example).
Step 6
Switch protection on the east port:
a.
Click the Maintenance > Ring tabs.
b.
From the East Switch list, choose FORCE RING. Click Apply.
Performing a FORCE switch generates a manual switch request on an equipment (MANUAL-REQ)
alarm. This is normal.
Caution
Traffic is unprotected during a protection switch.
Step 7
Log into the node that will connect to the new node through its west port (Node 1 in the Figure 5-15
example).
Step 8
Switch protection on the west port:
Step 9
Step 10
a.
Click the Maintenance > Ring tabs.
b.
From the West Switch list, choose FORCE RING. Click Apply.
Following the diagram that you created in Step 1, remove the fiber connections from the two nodes that
will connect directly to the new node.
a.
Remove the east fiber from the node that will connect to the west port of the new node. In the
Figure 5-15 example, this is Node 4/Slot 12.
b.
Remove the west fiber from the node that will connect to the east port of the new node. In the
Figure 5-15 example, this is Node 1/Slot 5.
Replace the removed fibers with fibers that are connected to the new node. Connect the west port to the
east port and the east port to the west port. Figure 5-16 shows the BLSR in the Figure 5-15 example after
the node is connected.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-19
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Figure 5-16 A BLSR with a newly-added fourth node
Tx
Rx
West
Tx
Rx
East
West
Slot 12
Slot 5
Tx
Rx
Tx
Rx
Slot 12
Slot 5
Node 1
East
Node 2
Node 1 Fiber
connected to
Slot 12 (East)
West
East
West
Slot 12
Slot 5
Node 3
Tx
Rx
Tx
Rx
East
Slot 12
Slot 5
Node 4 Fiber
connected to
Slot 5 (West)
68119
Tx
Rx
Tx
Rx
Node 4
Step 11
Log out of CTC and then log back into any node in the BLSR.
Step 12
In node view, select the Provisioning > Ring tabs and click Ring Map.
Step 13
On the BLSR Map Ring Change dialog box, click Yes.
Step 14
On the BLSR Ring Map dialog box, verify that the new node is added. If it is, click Accept. If it does
not appear, log into the new node. Verify that the BLSR is provisioned correctly according to the
“Provision the BLSR” procedure on page 5-14, then repeat Steps 12 – 13. If the node still does not
appear, repeat the steps in the procedure making sure that no errors were made.
Step 15
From the Go To menu, select Network View. Click the Circuits tab. Wait until all the circuits are
discovered. The circuits that pass through the new node will be shown as incomplete.
Step 16
In network view, right-click the new node and select Update Circuits With The New Node from the
shortcut menu. Verify that the number of updated circuits displayed in the dialog box is correct.
Step 17
Select the Circuits tab and verify that no incomplete circuits are present.
Step 18
Clear the protection switch for the node that is using its east port to connect to the new node, and for the
node that is using its west port to connect to the new node.
a.
To clear the protection switch from the east port, display the Maintenance > Ring tabs. From the
East Switch list choose CLEAR. Click Apply.
b.
To clear the protection switch from the west port, choose CLEAR from the West Switch list. Click
Apply.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-20
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Procedure: Remove a BLSR Node
Caution
Step 1
The following procedure minimizes traffic outages during node deletions, but traffic will be lost
when you delete and recreate circuits that passed through the deleted node.
Before you start this procedure, make sure you know the following:
•
Which node is connected through its east port to the node that will be deleted. For example if you
are deleting Node 1 in Figure 5-16, Node 3 is the node connected through its east port to Node 1.
•
Which node is connected through its west port to the node that will be deleted. In Figure 5-16, Node
2 is connected to Node 1 through its west port.
Step 2
Log into a node on the same BLSR as the node you will remove. (Do not log into the node that you will
remove.)
Step 3
Display the BLSR nodes in network view and verify the following:
•
All BLSR spans on the network map are green.
•
No critical or major alarms (LOF, LOS, ASP, ASL) are displayed on the Alarms tab.
•
On the Conditions tab, no ring switches are active.
If trouble is indicated, for example, a critical or major alarm exists, resolve the problem before
proceeding.
Step 4
Display the node that you will remove in node view.
Step 5
Delete all the circuits that originate or terminate in that node. (If a circuit has multiple drops, delete only
the drops that terminate on the node you want to delete.)
Step 6
a.
Click the Circuits tab. The circuits that use this node are displayed.
b.
Select circuits that originate or terminate on the node. Click Delete.
c.
Click Yes when prompted.
d.
If a multidrop circuit has drops at the node that will be removed, select the circuit, click Edit, and
remove the drops.
Complete this step if circuits that were created using Cisco Transport Controller Release 2.x. pass
through the node that will be deleted (i.e., circuits are displayed on the Circuits tab).
a.
On the Circuits tab of the node that will be deleted, select a circuit and click Edit.
b.
On the Edit Circuits window, check Show Detailed Map.
c.
Verify that the circuits enter and exit the node on the same STS. For example, if a circuit enters on
s5/p1/S1 (Slot 5, Port 1, STS1), verify that it exits on STS1. If a circuit enters/exits on different
STSs, write down the name of the circuit. You will delete and recreate these circuits in Step e.
d.
From the View menu select Go to Network View, then select the Circuits tab.
e.
Delete and recreate each circuit recorded in Step c. To delete the circuit, select the circuit on the
Circuits window and click the Delete button. To create the circuit, go to the “Create an
Automatically Routed Circuit” procedure on page 6-2.
f.
Repeat Steps a – e for each circuit displayed on the Circuits tab.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-21
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Step 7
Use information recorded in Step 1 to switch traffic away from the ports of neighboring nodes that will
be disconnected when the node is removed:
Caution
Traffic is unprotected during the protection switch.
a.
Open the neighboring node that is connected through its east port to the removed node.
b.
Click the Maintenance > Ring tabs.
c.
From the East Switch list, choose FORCE RING. Click Apply.
d.
Open the node that is connected through its west port to the removed node.
e.
Click the Maintenance > Ring tabs.
f.
From the West Switch list, choose FORCE RING. Click Apply.
Step 8
Remove all fiber connections between the node being removed and the two neighboring nodes.
Step 9
Reconnect the two neighboring nodes directly, west port to east port.
Step 10
Close CTC, then log into a node on the reduced ring.
Step 11
Wait for the BLSR Map Ring Change dialog box to display. (If the dialog box does not display after
10 – 15 seconds, select the Provisioning > Ring tabs and click Ring Map.) When the dialog box
displays, click Yes.
Step 12
On the BLSR Ring Map dialog box, click Accept.
Step 13
Clear the protection switches on the neighboring nodes:
Step 14
a.
Open the node with the protection switch on its east port.
b.
Click the Maintenance > Ring tabs and choose CLEAR from the East Switch list. Click Apply.
c.
Open the node with the protection switch on its west port.
d.
Click the Maintenance > Ring tabs and choose CLEAR from the West Switch list. Click Apply.
If a BITS clock is not used at each node, check that the synchronization is set to one of the eastbound or
westbound BLSR spans on the adjacent nodes. If the removed node was the BITS timing source, use a
new node as the BITS source or select internal synchronization at one node where all other nodes will
derive their timing. (For information about ONS 15454 timing, see the “Setting Up ONS 15454 Timing”
section on page 3-12.)
5.2.8 Moving BLSR Trunk Cards
Caution
Call the Technical Assistance Center (1-877-323-7368) before performing this procedure to ensure
that circuit and provisioning data is preserved.
Caution
To change BLSR trunk cards, you will drop one node at a time from the current BLSR. This
procedure is service affecting during the time needed to complete the steps below. This applies to all
BLSR nodes where cards will change slots. Review all the steps before you proceed.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-22
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Figure 5-17 shows a four node OC-48 BLSR using trunk cards in Slots 6 and 12 at all four nodes. Trunk
cards will be moved at Node 4 from Slots 6 and 12 to Slots 5 and 6. To do this Node 4 is temporarily
removed from the active BLSR while the trunk cards are switched.
Figure 5-17 A four-node BLSR before a trunk card switch
Slot 6 (West)
Slot 12 (East)
Node 1
Node 2
Slot 12 (East)
Slot 6 (West)
Slot 12 (East)
Slot 6 (West)
Node 4
Node 3
Slot 6 (West)
67550
Slot 12 (East)
Figure 5-18 shows the BLSR after the cards are switched.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-23
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
Figure 5-18 A four-node BLSR after the trunk cards are switched at one node
Slot 6 (West)
Slot 12 (East)
Node 1
Node 2
Slot 12 (East)
Slot 6 (West)
Slot 12 (East)
Slot 5 (West)
Node 3
Node 4
Slot 6 (West)
Unchanged fiber route
Changed fiber route
67551
Slot 6 (East)
Procedure: Move a BLSR Trunk Card
Use the following steps to move one BLSR trunk card to a different slot. Use this procedure for each
card you want to move. Although the procedure is for OC-48 BLSR trunk cards, you can use the same
procedure for OC-12, OC-48AS, and OC-192 cards.
Note
Step 1
The ONS 15454 nodes must have CTC Release 2.0 or later and cannot have active alarms for the
OC-48 or OC-12 cards or the BLSR configuration.
Log into CTC and display the BLSR nodes in network view. Verify the following:
•
All BLSR spans on the network map are green.
•
On the Alarms tab, no critical or major alarms are present, nor any facility alarms, such as LOS,
LOF, AIS-L, SF, and SD. In a BLSR, these facility conditions may be reported as minor alarms.
•
On the Conditions tab, no ring switches are active.
If trouble is indicated, for example, a critical or major alarm exists, resolve the problem before
proceeding. Refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide for alarm
troubleshooting procedures.
Step 2
Switch traffic away from the node where the trunk card will be switched:
a.
Log into the node that is connected through its east port to the node where the trunk card will be
moved. (In the Figure 5-17 example, this is Node 1.) Click the Maintenance > Ring tabs.
b.
From the East Switch list, choose FORCE RING. Click Apply.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-24
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Bidirectional Line Switched Rings
When you perform a manual switch, a manual switch request equipment alarm (MANUAL-REA) is
generated. This is normal.
Caution
Traffic is unprotected during a protection switch.
c.
Log into the node that is connected through its west port to the node where the trunk card will be
moved. (In the Figure 5-17 example, this is Node 3.) Click the Maintenance > Ring tabs.
d.
From the West Switch list, choose FORCE RING. Click Apply.
Step 3
Log into the node where the trunk card you will move is installed.
Step 4
Click the Circuits tab (Figure 5-19). Write down the circuit information or, from the File menu, select
Print or Export to print or export the information; you will need it to restore the circuits later. See the
“Printing and Exporting CTC Data” section on page 2-26 for more information.
Figure 5-19 Deleting circuits from a BLSR trunk card
Step 5
Step 6
Delete the circuits on the card you are removing:
a.
Highlight the circuit(s). To select multiple circuits, press the Shift or Ctrl key.
b.
Click Delete.
c.
On the Delete Circuit dialog box, click Yes.
Delete the SONET DCC termination on the card you are removing:
a.
Click the Provisioning > Sonet DCC tabs.
b.
From the SDCC Terminations list, click the SONET DCC you need to delete and click Delete.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-25
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Unidirectional Path Switched Rings
Step 7
Disable the ring on the current node:
a.
Click the Provisioning > Ring tabs.
b.
Highlight the ring and click Delete.
c.
On the confirmation message, confirm that this is the ring you want to delete. If so, click Yes.
Step 8
If an OC-N card is a timing source, select the Provisioning > Timing tabs and set timing to Internal.
Step 9
Place the ports on the card out of service:
a.
Double-click the card.
b.
On the Provisioning > Line tabs in the Status section, choose Out of Service for each port.
Step 10
Physically remove the card.
Step 11
Insert the card into its new slot and wait for the card to boot.
Step 12
To delete the card from its former slot, right-click the card in node view and select Delete from the list
of options.
Step 13
Place the port(s) back in service:
a.
To open the card, double-click or right-click the card and select Open.
b.
Click the Provisioning tab.
c.
From Status choose In Service.
d.
Click Apply.
Step 14
Follow the steps described in the “Setting Up BLSRs” section on page 5-10 to reenable the ring using
the same cards (in their new slots) and ports for east and west. Use the same BLSR Ring ID and Node
ID that was used before the trunk card was moved.
Step 15
Recreate the circuits that were deleted. See the “Create an Automatically Routed Circuit” procedure on
page 6-2 for instructions.
Step 16
If you use line timing and the card you are moving is a timing reference, reenable the timing parameters
on the card. See the “Set up ONS 15454 Timing” procedure on page 3-14 for instructions.
5.3 Unidirectional Path Switched Rings
UPSRs provide duplicate fiber paths around the ring. Working traffic flows in one direction and
protection traffic flows in the opposite direction. If a problem occurs in the working traffic path, the
receiving node switches to the path coming from the opposite direction.
CTC automates ring configuration. UPSR traffic is defined within the ONS 15454 on a circuit-by-circuit
basis. If a path-protected circuit is not defined within a 1+1 or BLSR line protection scheme and path
protection is available and specified, CTC uses UPSR as the default.
Figure 5-20 shows a basic UPSR configuration. If Node ID 0 sends a signal to Node ID 2, the working
signal travels on the working traffic path through Node ID 1. The same signal is also sent on the protect
traffic path through Node ID 3. If a fiber break occurs (Figure 5-21), Node ID 2 switches its active
receiver to the protect signal coming through Node ID 3.
Because each traffic path is transported around the entire ring, UPSRs are best suited for networks where
traffic concentrates at one or two locations and is not widely distributed. UPSR capacity is equal to its
bit rate. Services can originate and terminate on the same UPSR, or they can be passed to an adjacent
access or interoffice ring for transport to the service-terminating location.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-26
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Unidirectional Path Switched Rings
Figure 5-20 A basic four-node UPSR
ONS 15454
Node ID 0
ONS 15454
Node ID 3
ONS 15454
Node ID 1
ONS 15454
Node ID 2
32148
= Fiber 1
= Fiber 2
Figure 5-21 A UPSR with a fiber break
Source
ONS 15454
Node ID 0
Span 4
Span 5
Span 8
ONS 15454
Node ID 3
ONS 15454
Node ID 1
Span 6
Span 3
Span 1
Span 7
Span 2
Destination
ONS 15454
Node ID 2
= Fiber 1
= Fiber 2
32639
Fiber
break
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-27
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Unidirectional Path Switched Rings
5.3.1 Example UPSR Application
Figure 5-22 shows a common UPSR application. OC-3 optics provide remote switch connectivity to a
host TR-303 switch. In the example, each remote switch requires eight DS-1s to return to the host switch.
Figure 5-23 and Figure 5-24 show the shelf layout for each site.
Figure 5-22 An OC-3 UPSR
TR-303
Switch
ONS 15454
Node ID 0
8 DS-1s
ONS 15454
Node ID 3
ONS 15454
Node ID 1
8 DS-1s
= Fiber 1
8 DS-1s
= Fiber 2
32149
ONS 15454
Node ID 2
Node ID 0 has four DS1-14 cards to provide 56 active DS-1 ports. The other sites only require two
DS1-14 cards to handle the eight DS-1s to and from the remote switch. You can use the other half of
each ONS 15454 shelf assembly to provide support for a second or third ring to other existing or planned
remote sites.
In this sample OC-3 UPSR, Node ID 0 contains four DS1-14 cards and two OC3 IR 4 1310 cards. Six
free slots also exist in this setup and can be provisioned with cards or left empty. Figure 5-23 shows the
shelf setup for these cards.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-28
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Unidirectional Path Switched Rings
Figure 5-23 Layout of Node ID 0 in the OC-3 UPSR example (Figure 5-15)
32142
Free Slot
Free Slot
Free Slot
Free Slot
Free Slot
Free Slot
TCC
XCVT
AIC (Optional)
XCVT
TCC
OC3 IR 4 1310
OC3 IR 4 1310
DS1-14
DS1-14
DS1-14
DS1-14
In the Figure 5-22 on page 5-28 example, Nodes IDs 1 - 3 each contain two DS1-14 cards and two OC3
4 IR 1310 cards. Eight free slots exist. They can be provisioned with other cards or left empty.
Figure 5-24 shows the shelf assembly setup for this configuration sample.
Figure 5-24 Layout of Node IDs 1 – 3 in the OC-3 UPSR example (Figure 5-15)
32143
Free Slot
Free Slot
Free Slot
Free Slot
Free Slot
Free Slot
TCC
XCVT
AIC (Optional)
XCVT
TCC
OC3 IR 4 1310
OC3 IR 4 1310
Free Slot
Free Slot
DS1-14
DS1-14
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-29
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Unidirectional Path Switched Rings
5.3.2 Setting Up a UPSR
To set up a UPSR, you perform four basic procedures:
•
Install the UPSR trunk cards. Use the “Install the UPSR Trunk Cards” procedure on page 5-30
•
Create the DCC terminations. Use the “Configure the UPSR DCC Terminations” procedure on
page 5-31.
•
Configure the timing. Use the “Setting Up ONS 15454 Timing” section on page 3-12.
•
Enable the ports. Use the “Enable the UPSR Ports” procedure on page 5-32.
After you enable the ports, you set up the UPSR circuits. UPSR signal thresholds—the levels that
determine when the UPSR path is switched—are set at the circuit level. To create UPSR circuits, see the
“Circuits Overview” section on page 6-1.
Procedure: Install the UPSR Trunk Cards
Step 1
Install the OC-N cards that will serve as the UPSR trunk cards. You can install the OC-3, OC-12, and
OC-48AS cards in any slot, but the OC-48 and OC-192 cards can only be installed in Slots 5, 6, 12, or 13.
Step 2
Allow the cards to boot.
Step 3
Attach the fiber to the east and west UPSR ports at each node.
To avoid errors, make the east port the farthest slot to the right and the west port the farthest left. Fiber
connected to an east port at one node must plug into the west port on an adjacent node. Figure 5-25
shows fiber connections for a four-node UPSR with trunk cards in Slot 5 (west) and Slot 12 (east).
Always plug the fiber plugged into the transmit (Tx) connector of an OC-N card at one node into the
receive (Rx) connector of an OC-N card at the adjacent node. The card will display an SF LED if Tx and
Rx fibers are mismatched.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-30
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Unidirectional Path Switched Rings
Figure 5-25 Connecting fiber to a four-node UPSR
Tx
Rx
Tx
Rx
Slot 12
Slot 5
Node 2
Tx
Rx
Slot 12
Slot 5
Slot 12
Slot 5
Node 1
Tx
Rx
Tx
Rx
Node 3
Tx
Rx
Tx
Rx
Slot 12
Slot 5
68120
Tx
Rx
Node 4
Procedure: Configure the UPSR DCC Terminations
Step 1
Log into the first node that will be in the UPSR.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > Sonet DCC tabs.
Step 3
In the SDCC Terminations section, click Create.
Step 4
On the Create SDCC Terminations dialog box, press Control and click the two slots/ports that will serve
as the UPSR ports at the node. For example, Slot 6 (OC-48)/Port 1 and Slot 12 (OC-48)/Port 1.
Note
Step 5
The ONS 15454 uses the SONET Section layer DCC (SDCC) for data communications. It
does not use the Line DCCs. Line DCCs can be used to tunnel DCCs from third party
equipment across ONS 15454 networks. For procedures, see the “Creating DCC Tunnels”
section on page 6-21.
Click OK.
The slots/ports display in the SDCC Terminations section.
Step 6
Complete Steps 2 – 5 at each node that will be in the UPSR.
After configuring the SONET DCC, set the timing for the node. For procedures, see the “Setting Up ONS
15454 Timing” section on page 3-12. After configuring the timing, enable the UPSR ports as described
in the following procedure.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-31
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Unidirectional Path Switched Rings
Procedure: Enable the UPSR Ports
Step 1
Log into the first UPSR node.
Step 2
Double-click one of the cards that you configured as an SDCC termination.
Step 3
Click the Provisioning > Line tabs.
Step 4
Under Status, select In Service for each port that you want enabled.
Step 5
Repeat Steps 2 - 4 for the second card.
Step 6
Click Apply.
You configured a UPSR for one node. Use the same procedures to configure the additional nodes. To
create path-protected mesh networks, see the “Path-Protected Mesh Networks” section on page 5-50. To
create circuits, see the “Circuits Overview” section on page 6-1.
5.3.3 Adding and Removing UPSR Nodes
This section explains how to add and remove nodes in an ONS 15454 UPSR configuration. To add or
remove a node, you switch traffic on the affected spans to route traffic away from the area of the ring
where service will be performed. Use the span selector switch option to switch traffic from a UPSR span
at different protection levels. The span selector switch option is useful when you need to reroute traffic
from a UPSR span temporarily to add or drop nodes, perform maintenance, or perform other operations.
Procedure: Switch UPSR Traffic
Step 1
Display the network view.
Step 2
Right-click the span that will be cut to add or delete a node and select Circuits from the shortcut menu
(Figure 5-26).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-32
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Unidirectional Path Switched Rings
Figure 5-26 Using the span shortcut menu to display circuits
Step 3
Caution
On the Circuits on Span dialog box (Figure 5-27), select the protection from the Switch all UPSR
circuits away menu:
•
CLEAR removes a previously-set switch command.
•
MANUAL switches the span if the new span is error free.
•
FORCE forces the span to switch, regardless of whether the new span is error free.
•
LOCKOUT locks out or prevents switching to a highlighted span. (LOCKOUT is only available
when Revertive traffic is enabled.)
FORCE and LOCKOUT commands override normal protective switching mechanisms. Applying
these commands incorrectly can cause traffic outages.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-33
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Unidirectional Path Switched Rings
Figure 5-27 Switching UPSR circuits
Step 4
Click Apply.
Step 5
When the confirmation dialog box appears, click OK to confirm the protection switching. The column
under Switch State changes to your chosen level of protection.
Step 6
Click Close after Switch State changes.
Procedure: Add a UPSR Node
Note
Step 1
You can add only one node at a time. Perform these steps onsite and not from a remote location.
Log into CTC and display the UPSR nodes in network view. Verify the following:
•
All UPSR spans on the network map are green.
•
No critical or major alarms (LOF, LOS, ASP, ASL) are displayed on the Alarms tab.
•
On the Conditions tab, no UPSR switches are active.
•
At each physical UPSR node, all fibers are securely connected to the appropriate ports.
If trouble is indicated, for example, a critical or major alarm exists, resolve the problem before
proceeding.
Step 2
At the node that will be added to the UPSR:
•
Verify that the OC-N cards are installed and fiber is available to connect to the other nodes.
•
Run test traffic through the cards that will connect to the UPSR.
•
Use the “Setting Up a UPSR” section on page 5-30 to provision the new node.
Step 3
Log into a node that will directly connect to the new node.
Step 4
Use the “Switch UPSR Traffic” procedure on page 5-32 to initiate a FORCE switch to switch traffic
away from the span that will connect to the new node.
Caution
Step 5
Traffic is not protected during a protection switch.
Two nodes will connect directly to the new node; remove their fiber connections:
a.
Remove the east fiber connection from the node that will connect to the west port of the new node.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-34
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Unidirectional Path Switched Rings
b.
Step 6
Remove the west fiber connection from the node that will connect to the east port of the new node.
Replace the removed fiber connections with connections from the new node.
Perform this step on site at the new node.
Note
Step 7
Log out of CTC and then log back in.
Step 8
Display the network view. The new node should appear in the network map. Wait for a few minutes to
allow all the nodes to appear.
Step 9
Click the Circuits tab and wait for all the circuits to appear, including spans. The affected circuit will
display as “incomplete.”
Step 10
In the network view, right-click the new node and select Update Circuits With New Node from the list
of options. Wait for the confirmation dialog box to appear. Verify that the number of updated circuits
displayed in the dialog box is correct.
Step 11
Select the Circuits tab and verify that no incomplete circuits are displayed. If incomplete circuits are
displayed, repeat Step 9.
Step 12
Use the “Switch UPSR Traffic” procedure on page 5-32 to clear the protection switch.
Procedure: Remove a UPSR Node
Caution
Step 1
The following procedure is designed to minimize traffic outages while nodes are removed, but traffic
will be lost when you delete and recreate circuits that passed through the removed node.
Log into CTC and display the UPSR nodes in network view. Verify the following:
•
All UPSR spans on the network map are green.
•
No critical or major alarms (LOF, LOS, ASP, ASL) are displayed on the Alarms tab.
•
On the Conditions tab, no UPSR switches are active.
•
At each physical UPSR node, all fibers are securely connected to the appropriate ports.
If trouble is indicated, for example, a critical or major alarm exists, resolve the problem before
proceeding.
Step 2
Use the “Switch UPSR Traffic” procedure on page 5-32 to initiate a FORCE switch to switch traffic
away from the node you are removing. Initiate a FORCE switch on all spans connected to the node you
are removing.
Caution
Step 3
Traffic is not protected during a forced protection switch.
In the node that will be removed, delete circuits that originate or terminate in that node. (If a circuit has
multiple drops, delete only the drops that terminate on the node you are deleting.)
a.
Click the Circuits tab.
b.
Select the circuit(s) to delete. To select multiple circuits, press the Shift or Ctrl key.
c.
Click Delete.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-35
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Subtending Rings
d.
Click Yes when prompted.
Step 4
From the node that will be deleted, remove the east and west span fibers. At this point, the node should
no longer be a part of the ring.
Step 5
Reconnect the span fibers of the nodes remaining in the ring.
Step 6
Open the Alarms tab of each newly-connected node and verify that the span cards are free of alarms.
Resolve any alarms before proceeding.
Step 7
One circuit at a time, delete and recreate each circuit that passed through the deleted node on different
STSs.
Note
Step 8
If the removed node was the BITS timing source, select a new node as the BITS source or
select another node as the master timing node.
Use the “Switch UPSR Traffic” procedure on page 5-32 to clear the protection switch.
5.4 Subtending Rings
The ONS 15454 supports up to ten SONET DCCs. Therefore, one ONS 15454 node can terminate and
groom any one of the following ring combinations:
•
5 UPSRs, or
•
4 UPSRs and 1 BLSR, or
•
3 UPSRs and 2 BLSRs
Subtending rings from an ONS 15454 reduces the number of nodes and cards required and reduces
external shelf-to-shelf cabling. Figure 5-28 shows an ONS 15454 with multiple subtending rings.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-36
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Subtending Rings
Figure 5-28 An ONS 15454 with multiple subtending rings
UPSR
UPSR
UPSR
or BLSR
UPSR
55302
UPSR
or
BLSR
Figure 5-29 shows a UPSR subtending from a BLSR. In this example, Node 3 is the only node serving
both the BLSR and UPSR. OC-N cards in Slots 5 and 12 serve the BLSR, and OC-N cards in Slots 6 and
13 serve the UPSR.
Figure 5-29 A UPSR subtending from a BLSR
Node 4
Slot 5
West
Slot 6
West
Slot 13
East
UPSR
Node 1
Slot 12
East
Slot 13
Slot 12
East
East
BLSR
Slot 6
West
Slot 5
Node 3 West
Slot 12
East
55303
Slot 5
West
Node 2
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-37
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Subtending Rings
Procedure: Subtend a UPSR from a BLSR
This procedure requires an established BLSR and one BLSR node with OC-N cards and fibers to carry
the UPSR. The procedure also assumes you can set up a UPSR. (For UPSR setup procedures, see the
“Setting Up a UPSR” section on page 5-30.)
Step 1
In the node that will subtend the UPSR (Node 3 in Figure 5-29), install the OC-N cards that will serve
as the UPSR trunk cards (Node 3, Slots 6 and 13).
Step 2
Attach fibers from these cards to the UPSR trunk cards on the UPSR nodes. In Figure 5-29, Slot 6 Node
3 connects to Slot 13/Node 5, and Slot 13 connects to Slot 6/Node 6.
Step 3
From the node view, click the Provisioning > Sonet DCC tabs.
Step 4
Click Create.
Step 5
In the Create SDCC Terminations dialog box, click the slot and port that will carry the UPSR.
Step 6
Click OK.
The selected slots/ports are displayed in the SDCC Terminations section.
Step 7
Put the ports that you will use for the UPSR in service:
a.
In the node view, double-click UPSR trunk card.
b.
Select the Provisioning > Line tabs. Under Status, choose In Service.
c.
Click Apply.
d.
Repeat steps a - c for the second UPSR trunk card.
Step 8
Follow Steps 1 – 7 for the other nodes you will use for the UPSR.
Step 9
Go to the network view to view the subtending ring.
Procedure: Subtend a BLSR from a UPSR
This procedure requires an established UPSR and one UPSR node with OC-N cards and fibers to connect
to the BLSR. The procedure also assumes you can set up a BLSR. (For BLSR setup procedures, see the
“Setting Up BLSRs” section on page 5-10.)
Step 1
In the node that will subtend the BLSR (Node 3 in the Figure 5-29 example), install the OC-N cards that
will serve as the BLSR trunk cards (in Figure 5-29, Node 3, Slots 6 and 13).
Step 2
Attach fibers from these cards to the BLSR trunk cards on the BLSR nodes. In Figure 5-29, Slot 6/Node
3 connects to Slot 13/Node 5, and Slot 13 connects to Slot 6/Node 6.
Step 3
From the node view, click the Provisioning > Sonet DCC tabs.
Step 4
Click Create.
Step 5
In the Create SDCC Terminations dialog box, click the slot and port that will carry the BLSR.
Step 6
Click OK.
Step 7
The selected slots/ports are displayed under SDCC Terminations.
Step 8
Put the ports that you will use for the BLSR in service:
a.
In the node view, double-click the BLSR trunk card.
b.
Select the Provisioning > Line tabs. Under Status, choose In Service.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-38
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Subtending Rings
c.
Click Apply.
d.
Repeat steps a – c for the second BLSR trunk card.
Step 9
Use the “Provision the BLSR” procedure on page 5-14 to configure the BLSR.
Step 10
Follow Steps 1– 8 for the other nodes that will be in the BLSR.
Step 11
Go to the network view to see the subtending ring.
The ONS 15454 can support two BLSRs on the same node. This capability allows you to deploy an ONS
15454 in applications requiring SONET DCSs (digital cross connect systems) or multiple SONET
ADMs (add/drop multiplexers).
Figure 5-30 shows two BLSRs shared by one ONS 15454. Ring 1 runs on Nodes 1, 2, 3, and 4. Ring 2
runs on Nodes 4, 5, 6, and 7. Two BLSR rings, Ring 1 and Ring 2, are provisioned on Node 4. Ring 1
uses cards in Slots 5 and 12, and Ring 2 uses cards in Slots 6 and 13.
Although different node IDs are used for the two BLSRs shown in Figure 5-30, nodes in different
BLSRs can use the same node ID.
Note
Figure 5-30 A BLSR subtending from a BLSR
Node 1
Node 5
Slot 12
East
Slot 12
East
Slot 6
West
Slot 5
West
Slot 13
East
Slot 6
West
BLSR
Ring 1
Node 2
BLSR
Ring 2
Slot 12
East
Slot 5
West
Slot 12
East
Slot 5
West
Node 3
East
Slot 13
Node 4 Slot 6
West
Node 6
Slot 13
East
Slot 13
East
Slot 6
West
Node 7
55298
Slot 5
West
After subtending two BLSRs, you can route circuits from nodes in one ring to nodes in the second ring.
For example in Figure 5-30, you can route a circuit from Node 1 to Node 7. The circuit would normally
travel from Node 1 to Node 4 to Node 7. If fiber breaks occur, for example between Nodes 1 and 4 and
Nodes 4 and 7, traffic is rerouted around each ring: in this example, Nodes 2 and 3 in Ring 1 and Nodes
5 and 6 in Ring 2.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-39
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Subtending Rings
Procedure: Subtend a BLSR from a BLSR
This procedure requires an established BLSR and one BLSR node with OC-N cards and fibers to carry
the BLSR. The procedure also assumes you know how to set up a BLSR. For BLSR setup procedures,
see the “Setting Up BLSRs” section on page 5-10.
Step 1
In the node that will subtend the BLSR (Node 4 in Figure 5-30), install the OC-N cards that will serve
as the BLSR trunk cards (Node 4, Slots 6 and 13).
Step 2
Attach fibers from these cards to the BLSR trunk cards on the BLSR nodes. In Figure 5-30, Node 4/Slot
6 connects to Node 7/Slot 13, and Slot 13 connects to Node 5/Slot 6.
Step 3
From the node view, click the Provisioning > Sonet DCC tabs.
Step 4
Click Create.
Step 5
In the Create SDCC Terminations dialog box, click the slot and port that will carry the BLSR.
Step 6
Click OK.
Step 7
The selected slots/ports are displayed in the SDCC Terminations section.
Step 8
Put the ports that you will use for the BLSR in service:
a.
In the node view, double-click the BLSR trunk card.
b.
Select the Provisioning > Line tabs. Under Status, choose In Service.
c.
Click Apply.
d.
Repeat steps a – c for the second BLSR trunk card.
Step 9
To configure the BLSR, use the “Provision the BLSR” procedure on page 5-14. The subtending BLSR
must have a ring ID that differs from the ring ID of the first BLSR.
Step 10
Follow Steps 1 – 8 for the other nodes that will be in the subtending BLSR.
Step 11
Display the network view to see the subtending ring.
Figure 5-31 shows an example of two subtending BLSRs.
Figure 5-31 Viewing subtending BLSRs on the network map
Figure 5-32 shows the Ring subtab for Node 5, which is the node that carries the two rings.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-40
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Linear ADM Configurations
Figure 5-32 Configuring two BLSRs on the same node
5.5 Linear ADM Configurations
You can configure ONS 15454s as a line of add/drop multiplexers (ADMs) by configuring one set of
OC-N cards as the working path and a second set as the protect path. Unlike rings, linear (point-to-point)
ADMs require that the OC-N cards at each node be in 1+1 protection to ensure that a break to the
working line is automatically routed to the protect line.
Figure 5-33 shows three ONS 15454s in a linear ADM configuration. Working traffic flows from Slot
6/Node 1 to Slot 6/Node 2, and from Slot 12/Node 2 to Slot 12/Node 3. You create the protect path by
placing Slot 6 in 1+1 protection with Slot 5 at Nodes 1 and 2, and Slot 12 in 1+1 protection with Slot 13
at Nodes 2 and 3.
Node 1
Slot 6 to Slot 6
Slot 12 to Slot 12
Slot 5 to Slot 5
Slot 13 to Slot 13
Node 2
34284
Figure 5-33 A linear (point-to-point) ADM configuration
Node 3
Protect Path
Working Path
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-41
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Linear ADM Configurations
Procedure: Create a Linear ADM
Complete the following steps for each node that will be included in the linear ADM.
Step 1
Complete the general setup information for the node. For procedures, see the “Setting Up Basic Node
Information” section on page 3-2.
Step 2
Set up the network information for the node. For procedures, see the “Setting Up Network Information”
section on page 3-2.
Step 3
Set up 1+1 protection for the OC-N cards in the ADM. In Figure 5-33, Slots 6 and 12 are the working
ports and Slots 5 and 13 are the protect ports. In this example, you would set up one protection group
for Node 1 (Slots 5 and 6), two for Node 2 (Slots 5 and 6, and 12 and 13) and one for Node 3 (Slots 12
and 13). To create protection groups, see the “Creating Protection Groups” section on page 3-9.
Step 4
For OC-N ports connecting ONS 15454s, set the SONET DCC terminations:
a.
Log into a linear ADM node and select the Provisioning > Sonet DCC tabs.
b.
In the SDCC Terminations section, click Create.
c.
On the Create SDCC Terminations dialog box, select the working port. Click OK.
Note
Terminating nodes (Nodes 1 and 3 in Figure 5-33) will have one SDCC, and intermediate
nodes (Node 2 in Figure 5-33) will have two SDCCs.
Step 5
Use the “Setting Up ONS 15454 Timing” section on page 3-12 to set up the node timing. If a node is
using line timing, set the working OC-N card as the timing source.
Step 6
Place the OC-N ports in service:
a.
Open an OC-N card that is connected to the linear ADM.
b.
On the Provisioning > Line tabs under Status, select In Service.
c.
Click Apply.
Repeat Step 6 for each OC-N card connected to the linear ADM.
Procedure: Convert a Linear ADM to UPSR
The following procedures describe how to convert a three-node linear ADM to a UPSR. You will need
a SONET test set to monitor traffic while you perform these procedures.
Caution
This procedure is service affecting.
Caution
Always wear an authorized electrostatic discharge wrist band when removing or installing ONS
15454 cards.
Step 1
Start CTC and log into one of the nodes that you want to convert from linear to ring.
Step 2
Click the Maintenance > Protection tabs (Figure 5-34).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-42
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Linear ADM Configurations
Figure 5-34 Verifying working slots in a protection group
Step 3
Under Protection Groups, select the 1+1 protection group (that is, the group supporting the 1+1 span
cards).
Step 4
Under Selected Group, verify that the working slot/port is shown as “Working/Active.” If yes, go to Step
5. If the working slot says “Working/Standby” and the protect slot says “Protect/Active,” switch traffic
to the working slot:
a.
Under Selected Group, select the protect slot, that is, the slot that says “Protect/Active.”
a.
From the Switch Commands, select Manual.
b.
Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.
c.
Under Selected Group, verify that the working slot/port says “Working/Active.” If so, continue to
Step (d). If not, clear the conditions that prevent the card from carrying working traffic before
proceeding.
d.
From the Switch Commands, select Clear. A Confirm Clear Operation dialog is displayed.
e.
Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.
Step 5
Repeat Step 4 for each group in the 1+1 Protection Groups list at all nodes that will be converted.
Step 6
For each node, delete the 1+1 OC-N protection group that supports the linear ADM span:
Note
Deleting a 1+1 protection group may cause unequipped path (UNEQ-P) alarms to occur.
a.
Click the Provisioning > Protection tabs (Figure 5-35).
b.
From the Protection Groups list, choose the 1+1 group you want to delete. Click Delete.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-43
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Linear ADM Configurations
c.
Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.
d.
Verify that no traffic disruptions are indicated on the test set. If disruptions occur, do not proceed.
Recreate the protection group and isolate the cause of the disruption.
e.
Continue deleting 1+1 protection groups while monitoring the existing traffic with the test set.
Figure 5-35 Deleting a protection group
Step 7
Physically remove one of the protect fibers running between the middle and end nodes. For example, in
the Figure 5-36, the fiber from Node 2/Slot 13 to Node 3/Slot 13 is removed. The corresponding OC-48
card will go into an LOS condition for that fiber and port.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-44
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Linear ADM Configurations
Figure 5-36 Converting a linear ADM to a UPSR
Linear
ONS 15454
Node 1
ONS 15454
Node 2
ONS 15454
Node 3
Slot 6 to Slot 6
Slot 12 to Slot 12
Slot 5 to Slot 5
Slot 13 to Slot 13
UPSR
ONS 15454
Node 1
Slot 6
(West)
ONS 15454
Node 3
Slot 12
(East)
Slot 12
(West)
Slot 13
(East)
32135
Slot 5
(West)
Slot 6
(East)
ONS 15454
Node 2
Step 8
Physically reroute the other protect fiber to connect the two end nodes. In the Figure 5-36 example, the
fiber between Node 1/Slot 5 and Node 2/Slot 5 is rerouted to connect Node 1/Slot 5 to Node 3/Slot 13.
If you are leaving the OC-N cards in place, go to Step 13. If you are removing the cards, complete Steps
9 – 12. (In this example, cards in Node 2/Slots 5 and 13 are removed.)
Step 9
Step 10
Step 11
In the middle node, place the cards in Slots 5 and 13 out of service:
a.
Display the first card in card view and select the Provisioning > Line tabs.
b.
Under Status, select Out of Service. Click Apply.
c.
Repeat Steps a and b for the second card.
Delete the equipment records for the cards:
a.
Display the node view. (In card view, click the Up arrow on the toolbar.)
b.
Right-click the card you just took out of service (e.g. Slot 5) and select Delete Card. (You can also
go to the Inventory tab, select the card, and click Delete.)
c.
Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.
d.
Repeat (a) through (c) for the second card (e.g. Slot 13).
Save all circuit information.
a.
In node view, select the Provisioning > Circuits tab.
b.
Record the circuit information using one of the following procedures:
– From the File menu, select Print to print the circuits table, or,
– From the File menu, select Export to export the circuit data in HTML, CSV (comma separated
values), or TSV (tab separated values). Click Ok and save the file in a temporary directory.
See the “Printing and Exporting CTC Data” section on page 2-26 for more information.
Step 12
Remove the OC-N cards that are no longer connected to the end nodes (Slots 5 and 13, in the example).
Step 13
Display one of the end nodes (Node 1 or Node 3 in the example).
Step 14
Click the Provisioning > Sonet DCC tabs.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-45
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Linear ADM Configurations
Step 15
In the SDCC Terminations section, click Create.
Step 16
In the Create SDCC Terminations dialog box, select the slot/port that had been the protect slot in the
linear ADM, for example, for Node 1, this would be Slot 5/Port 1 (OC-48).
Step 17
Click OK.
An EOC SDCC alarm will occur until an SDCC termination is created on the adjacent node.
Step 18
Go to the node on the opposite end (Node 3 in the Figure 5-36 example) and repeat Steps 14 – 17.
Step 19
Delete and reenter the circuits one at a time. (See the “Creating Circuits and VT Tunnels” section on
page 6-2.)
Note
Deleting circuits is traffic affecting.
You can create the circuits automatically or manually. However, circuits must be protected. When they
were built in the linear ADM, they were protected by the protect path on Node 1/Slot 5 to Node 2/Slot
5 to Node 3/Slot 13. With the new UPSR, circuits should also be created with protection.
Deleting the first circuit and recreating it to the same card/port should restore the circuit immediately.
Step 20
Monitor your SONET test set to verify that the circuit was deleted and restored.
Step 21
You should also verify that the new circuit path for the clockwise (CW) fiber from Node 1 to Node 3 is
working. To do this, switch to network view and move your cursor to the green span between Node 1
and 3.
Although the cursor only shows the first circuit created, do not become alarmed that the other circuits
are not present. Verify with the SONET test set that the original circuits and the new circuits are
operational. The original circuits were created on the counter clockwise linear path.
Step 22
Go to the network map to view the newly-created ring (Figure 5-37).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-46
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Linear ADM Configurations
Figure 5-37 A UPSR displayed in network view
Procedure: Convert a Linear ADM to a BLSR
The following procedures describe how to convert a three-node linear ADM to a BLSR. You will need
a SONET test set to monitor traffic while you perform these procedures.
Caution
This procedure is service affecting.
Caution
Always wear an authorized electrostatic discharge wrist band when removing or installing ONS
15454 cards.
Step 1
Start CTC and log into one of the nodes that you want to convert from linear to ring.
Step 2
Click the Maintenance > Protection tabs.
Step 3
Under Protection Groups, select the 1+1 protection group (that is, the group supporting the 1+1 span
cards).
Step 4
Under Selected Group, verify that the working slot/port is shown as “Working/Active.” If yes, go to Step
5. If the working slot says “Working/Standby” and the protect slot says “Protect/Active,” switch traffic
to the working slot:
a.
Under Selected Group, select the protect slot, that is, the slot that says “Protect/Active.”
a.
From the Switch Commands, select Manual.
b.
Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-47
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Linear ADM Configurations
c.
Verify that the working slot is carrying traffic. If it is, continue to Step (d). If not, clear the conditions
that prevent the card from carrying working traffic before proceeding.
d.
From the Switch Commands, select Clear. A Confirm Clear Operation dialog is displayed.
e.
Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.
Step 5
Repeat Step 4 for each group in the 1+1 Protection Groups list at all nodes that will be converted.
Step 6
For each node, delete the 1+1 OC-N protection group that supports the linear ADM span:
a.
Click the Provisioning > Protection tabs.
b.
From the Protection Groups list, choose the group you want to delete. Click Delete.
c.
Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.
d.
Verify that no traffic disruptions are indicated on the SONET test set. If disruptions occur, do not
proceed. Add the protection group and begin troubleshooting procedures to find out the cause of the
disruption.
Note
Step 7
Deleting a 1+1 protection group may cause unequipped path (UNEQ-P) alarms to occur.
Physically remove one of the protect fibers running between the middle and end nodes. In the
Figure 5-38 example, the fiber running from Slot 13/Node 2 to Slot 13/Node 3 is removed. The
corresponding end-node trunk card will display an LOS alarm.
Figure 5-38 Converting a linear ADM to a BLSR
Linear
ONS 15454
Node 1
ONS 15454
Node 2
ONS 15454
Node 3
Slot 6 to Slot 6
Slot 12 to Slot 12
Slot 5 to Slot 5
Slot 13 to Slot 13
BLSR
ONS 15454
Node 1
Slot 6
(West)
Slot 12
(East)
ONS 15454
Node 3
Slot 12
(West)
Slot 13
(East)
47418
Slot 5
(West)
Slot 6
(East)
ONS 15454
Node 2
Step 8
Physically reroute the other protect fiber so it connects the two end nodes. In the Figure 5-38 example,
the fiber between Node 1/Slot 5 and Node 2/Slot 5 is rerouted to connect Node 1/Slot 5 to Node
3/Slot/ 13.
If you are leaving the OC-N cards in place, go to Step 13. If you are removing the cards, complete Steps
9 – 12. (In this example, cards in Node 2/Slots 5 and 13 are removed.)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-48
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Linear ADM Configurations
Step 9
Step 10
Step 11
In the middle node, place the cards in Slots 5 and 13 out of service:
a.
Display the first card in card view, then select the Provisioning > Line tabs.
b.
Under Status, select Out of Service. Click Apply.
c.
Repeat Steps a and b for the second card.
Delete the equipment records for the cards:
a.
From the View menu, choose Node View.
b.
Right-click the card you just took out of service (e.g. Slot 5) and select Delete Card. (You can also
go to the Inventory tab, select the card, and click Delete.)
c.
Click Yes on the confirmation dialog box.
d.
Repeat (a) through (c) for the second card (e.g. Slot 13).
Save all circuit information:
a.
In node view, select the Provisioning > Circuits tab.
b.
Record the circuit information using one of the following procedures:
– From the File menu, select Print to print the circuits table, or,
– From the File menu, select Export to export the circuit data in HTML, CSV (comma separated
values), or TSV (tab separated values). Click Ok and save the file in a temporary directory.
See the “Printing and Exporting CTC Data” section on page 2-26 for more information.
Step 12
Remove the OC-N cards that are no longer connected to the end nodes (Slots 5 and 13, in the example).
Step 13
Log into an end node. In node view, click the Provisioning > Sonet DCC tabs.
Step 14
In the SDCC Terminations section, click Create.
Step 15
Highlight the slot that is not already in the SDCC Terminations list (in this example, Port 1 of Slot 5
(OC-48) on Node 1.
Step 16
Click OK. (An EOC SDCC alarm will occur until the DCC is created on the other node; in the example,
Node 3/Slot 13.
Step 17
Display the node on the opposite end (Node 3 in Figure 5-38) and repeat Steps 13 – 16.
Step 18
For circuits running on a BLSR protect STS (STSs 7 – 12 for an OC-12 BLSR, STSs 25 – 48 for an
OC-48 BLSR), delete and recreate the circuit:
a.
Delete the first circuit.
b.
Recreate the circuit on STSs 1 – 6 (for an OC-12 BLSR) or 1 – 24 (for an OC-48 BLSR) on the fiber
that served as the protect fiber in the linear ADM. During circuit creation, deselect “Route
Automatically” and “Fully Protected Path” on the Circuit Creation dialog box so you can manually
route the circuit on the appropriate STSs. See the “Create a Unidirectional Circuit with Multiple
Drops” procedure on page 6-8 for more information.
c.
Repeat Steps (a) and (b) for each circuit residing on a BLSR protect STS.
Note
Step 19
Deleting circuits is traffic affecting.
Follow all procedures in the “Setting Up BLSRs” section on page 5-10 to configure the BLSR. The ring
should have an East/West logical connection. While it may not physically be possible to connect the
OC-N cards in an East/West pattern, it is strongly recommended. If the network ring that is already
passing traffic does not provide the opportunity to connect fiber in this manner, logical provisioning can
be performed to satisfy this requirement.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-49
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Path-Protected Mesh Networks
Be sure to assign the same Ring ID and different node IDs to all nodes in the BLSR. Do not accept the
BLSR ring map until all nodes are provisioned.
Note
Step 20
E-W Mismatch alarms will occur until all nodes are provisioned.
Display the network map to view the newly-created ring.
5.6 Path-Protected Mesh Networks
In addition to single BLSRs, UPSRs and ADMs, you can extend ONS 15454 traffic protection by
creating path-protected mesh networks (PPMNs). PPMNs include multiple ONS 15454 SONET
topologies and extend the protection provided by a single UPSR to the meshed architecture of several
interconnecting rings. In a PPMN, circuits travel diverse paths through a network of single or multiple
meshed rings. When you create circuits, you can have CTC automatically route circuits across the
PPMN, or you can manually route them. You can also choose levels of circuit protection. For example,
if you choose full protection, CTC creates an alternate route for the circuit in addition to the main route.
The second route follows a unique path through the network between the source and destination and sets
up a second set of cross-connections.
For example, in Figure 5-39, a circuit is created from Node 3 to Node 9. CTC determines that the shortest
route between the two nodes passes through Node 8 and Node 7, shown by the dotted line, and
automatically creates cross-connections at Nodes, 3, 8, 7, and 9 to provide the primary circuit path.
If full protection is selected, CTC creates a second unique route between Nodes 3 and 9 which, in this
example, passes through Nodes 2, 1, and 11. Cross-connections are automatically created at Nodes, 3,
2, 1, 11, and 9, shown by the dashed line. If a failure occurs on the primary path, traffic switches to the
second circuit path. In this example, Node 9 switches from the traffic coming in from Node 7 to the
traffic coming in from Node 11 and service resumes. The switch occurs within 50 ms.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-50
78-13453-01
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Path-Protected Mesh Networks
Figure 5-39 A path-protected mesh network
Source
Node
Node 3
Node 5
Node 2
Node 4
Node 1
Node 10
Node 8
Node 6
Node 7
Node 11
Node 9
c
raffi
ng t
ki
Wor
Destination
Node
= Primary path
= Secondary path
32136
Protect traffic
PPMN also allows spans of different SONET line rates to be mixed together in “virtual rings.”
Figure 5-40 shows Nodes 1, 2, 3, and 4 in a standard OC-48 ring. Nodes 5, 6, 7, and 8 link to the
backbone ring through OC-12 fiber. The “virtual ring” formed by Nodes 5, 6, 7, and 8 uses both OC-48
and OC-12.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
5-51
Chapter 5
SONET Topologies
Path-Protected Mesh Networks
Figure 5-40 A PPMN virtual ring
ONS 15454
Node 5
ONS 15454
Node 1
OC-12
ONS 15454
Node 4
ONS 15454
Node 8
OC-12
32137
OC-48 UPSR
ONS 15454
Node 6
ONS 15454
Node 2
ONS 15454
Node 3
ONS 15454
Node 7
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
5-52
78-13453-01
C H A P T E R
6
Circuits and Tunnels
This chapter explains how to create and administer Cisco ONS 15454 circuits and tunnels, which
includes:
•
Creating standard STS and VT1.5 circuits
•
Creating VT tunnels
•
Creating multiple drop circuits
•
Creating monitor circuits
•
Editing UPSR circuits
•
Creating path traces to monitor traffic
•
Reviewing ONS 15454 cross-connect card capacities
•
Creating DCC tunnels to tunnel third-party equipment through ONS 15454 networks
6.1 Circuits Overview
You can create STS and VT1.5 circuits across and within ONS 15454 nodes and assign different
attributes to circuits, for example:
•
Create one-way, two-way, or broadcast circuits.
•
Assign user-defined names to circuits.
•
Assign different circuit sizes. STS circuits can be STS-1, STS-3c, STS-12c, STS-48c, or STS-192c.
Ethernet circuits can be STS-1, STS-3c, STS-6c, or STS-12c. (To create Ethernet circuits see the
“Provision a Shared Packet Ring” procedure on page 9-10.)
•
Route circuits automatically or manually.
•
Automatically create multiple circuits.
•
Require the circuit path to be fully protected.
•
Require protected source and destination cards and ports.
•
Define a secondary circuit source or destination that allows you to interoperate an ONS 15454
unidirectional path switched ring (UPSR) with third-party equipment UPSRs.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
6-1
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating Circuits and VT Tunnels
Note
In this chapter, “cross-connect” and “circuit” have the following meanings: Cross-connect refers to
the connections that occur within a single ONS 15454 to allow a circuit to enter and exit an ONS
15454. Circuit refers to the series of connections from a traffic source (where traffic enters the ONS
15454 network) to the drop or destination (where traffic exits an ONS 15454 network).
6.2 Creating Circuits and VT Tunnels
This section explains how to create STS and VT1.5 circuits and VT tunnels. For an explanation and
examples of circuits and VT tunnels, see the “Cross-Connect Card Capacities” section on page 6-15. You
can create unidirectional or bidirectional, revertive or non-revertive circuits. You can have circuits
routed automatically or you can manually route them. The auto range feature eliminates the need to
individually build circuits of the same type; CTC can create additional sequential circuits if you specify
the number of circuits you need and build the first circuit.
You can provision circuits at any of the following points:
•
Before cards are installed. The ONS 15454 allows you to provision slots and circuits before
installing the traffic cards. (To provision an empty slot, right-click it and select a card from the
shortcut menu.) However, circuits will not carry traffic until you install the cards and place their
ports in service. For procedures, see the “Install Optical, Electrical, and Ethernet Cards” procedure
on page 1-48 and the “Enable Ports” procedure on page 3-10.
•
Cards are installed; ports are out of service. You must place the ports in service before circuits will
carry traffic.
•
Cards are installed, and their ports are in service. Circuits will carry traffic as soon as the signal is
received.
Procedure: Create an Automatically Routed Circuit
Note
Step 1
Tip
If you want to route circuits on protected drops, create the card protection groups before creating
circuits. See the “Create Protection Groups” procedure on page 3-9.
Log into an ONS 15454 and click the Circuits tab.
You can also right-click a source node in network view, select Provision Circuit To, and choose the
circuit destination node from the menu.
Step 2
Click Create.
Step 3
In the Circuit Creation dialog box (Figure 6-1), complete the following fields:
•
Name—(optional) Assign a name to the circuit. The name can be alphanumeric and up to 32
characters (including spaces). If you leave the Name field blank, CTC assigns a default name to the
circuit.
•
Type—Select the type of circuit you want to create: STS, VT (VT1.5), or VT tunnel. The circuit type
determines the circuit-provisioning options that are displayed. See the “VT1.5 Cross-Connects”
section on page 6-16 and the “VT Tunnels” section on page 6-19 for more information.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
6-2
November 2001
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating Circuits and VT Tunnels
•
Size—Select the circuit size (STS circuits only). The “c” indicates concatenated STSs.
•
Bidirectional—Check this box to create a two-way circuit; uncheck it to create a one-way circuit
(STS and VT circuits only; VT tunnels are bidirectional).
•
Number of circuits—Type the number of circuits you want to create. If you enter more than 1, you
can use auto-ranging to create the additional circuits automatically. Otherwise, CTC returns to the
Circuit Source page after you create each circuit until you finish creating the number of circuits
specified here.
•
Auto Ranged—If selected, and you select the source and destination of one circuit, CTC
automatically determines the source and destination for the remaining Number of circuits and
creates the circuits. To determine the source and destination, CTC increments the most specific part
of the end points. An end point can be a port, an STS, or a VT/DS-1. If CTC runs out of choices, or
selects an end point that is already in use, CTC stops and allows you to either select a valid end point
or cancel. If you select a valid end point and continue, auto-ranging begins after you click Finish
for the current circuit.
•
Protected Drops—If this box is checked, CTC only displays protected cards and ports (1:1, 1:N, 1+1
or BLSR protection) as choices for the circuit source and destination.
Figure 6-1
Step 4
Creating a circuit
(UPSR circuits only) Set the UPSR Selector Defaults:
•
Revertive—Check this box if you want traffic to revert to the working path when the conditions that
diverted it to the protect path are repaired. If Revertive is not chosen, traffic remains on the protect
path after the switch.
•
Reversion time—If Revertive is checked, set the reversion time. This is the amount of time that will
elapse before the traffic reverts to the working path. Traffic can revert when conditions causing the
switch are cleared (the default reversion time is 5 minutes).
•
SF threshold—Set the UPSR path-level signal failure bit error rate (BER) thresholds (STS circuits
only).
•
SD threshold—Set the UPSR path-level signal degrade BER thresholds (STS circuits only).
•
Switch on PDI-P—Check this box if you want traffic to switch when an STS payload defect
indicator is received (STS circuits only).
Step 5
Click Next.
Step 6
In the Circuit Source dialog box, set the circuit source.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
6-3
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating Circuits and VT Tunnels
Options include node, slot, port, STS, and VT/DS-1. The options that display depend on the circuit type
and circuit properties you selected in Step 3 and the cards installed in the node. For example, if you are
creating a VT circuit or tunnel, only nodes with XCVT and XC10G cards are displayed. For Ethergroups,
see the “Ethernet Circuit Configurations” section on page 9-6.
Click Use Secondary Source if you need to create a UPSR bridge/selector circuit entry point in a
multivendor UPSR.
Step 7
Click Next.
Step 8
In the Circuit Destination dialog box, enter the appropriate information for the circuit destination. If the
circuit is bidirectional, you can click Use Secondary Destination if you need to create a UPSR
bridge/selector circuit destination point in a multivendor UPSR. (To add secondary destinations to
unidirectional circuits, see “Create a Unidirectional Circuit with Multiple Drops” procedure on
page 6-8.)
Step 9
Click Next.
Step 10
Under Circuit Routing Preferences (Figure 6-2), select Route Automatically. The following options
(described in detail in the next step) are available:
Step 11
•
Using Required Nodes/Spans—If selected, you can specify nodes and spans to include or exclude in
the CTC-generated circuit route.
•
Review Route Before Creation—If selected, you can review and edit the circuit route before the
circuit is created.
If you want the circuit routed on a protected path, select Fully Protected Path. Otherwise, go to
Step 12. CTC creates a primary and alternate circuit route (virtual UPSR) based on the nodal diversity
option you select:
•
Nodal Diversity Required—Ensures that the primary and alternate paths within path-protected mesh
network (PPMN) portions of the complete circuit path are nodally diverse. (For information about
PPMN, see the “Path-Protected Mesh Networks” section on page 5-50.)
•
Nodal Diversity Desired—Specifies that node diversity should be attempted, but if node diversity is
not possible, CTC creates link diverse paths for the PPMN portion of the complete circuit path.
•
Link Diversity Only—Specifies that only link-diverse primary and alternate paths for PPMN
portions of the complete circuit path are needed. The paths may be node-diverse, but CTC does not
check for node diversity.
Figure 6-2
Step 12
Setting circuit routing preferences
Click Finish or Next depending on whether you selected Using Required Nodes/Spans and/or Review
Route Before Creation:
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
6-4
November 2001
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating Circuits and VT Tunnels
•
Using Required Nodes/Spans—If selected, click Next to display the Circuit Route Constraints panel
(Figure 6-3). On the circuit map, click a node or span and click Include (to include the node or span
in the circuit) or Exclude (to exclude the node/span from the circuit). The order in which you select
included nodes and spans sets the circuit sequence. Click spans twice to change the circuit direction.
After you add the spans and nodes, you can use the Up and Down buttons to change their order, or
click Remove to remove a node or span. When you are finished, click Finish or Next, depending
on whether you selected Review Route Before Creation.
Figure 6-3
•
Specifying circuit constraints
Review Route Before Creation—If selected, click Next to display the route for you to review. To add
or delete a circuit span, select a node on the circuit route. Blue arrows show the circuit route. Green
arrows indicate spans that you can add. Click a span arrowhead, then click Include to include the
span or Remove to remove the span.
When you click Finish, CTC creates the circuit and returns to the Circuits window. If you entered more
than 1 in Number of Circuits in the Circuit Attributes dialog box in Step 3, the Circuit Source dialog box
is displayed so you can create the remaining circuits. If Auto Ranged is checked, CTC automatically
creates the number of sequential circuits that you entered in Number of Circuits. Otherwise, go on to
Step 13.
Step 13
If you are provisioning circuits before installing the traffic cards and enabling their ports, you must
install the cards and enable the ports before circuits will carry traffic. For procedures, see the “Install
Optical, Electrical, and Ethernet Cards” procedure on page 1-48 and the “Enable Ports” procedure on
page 3-10.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
6-5
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating Circuits and VT Tunnels
Procedure: Create a Manually Routed Circuit
Note
Step 1
Tip
If you want to route circuits on protected drops, create the card protection groups before creating
circuits. See the “Create Protection Groups” procedure on page 3-9.
Log into an ONS 15454 and click the Circuits tab.
You can also right-click a source node in network view, select Provision Circuit To, and choose the
circuit destination node from the menu.
Step 2
Click Create.
Step 3
In the Circuit Creation dialog box (Figure 6-1), complete the following fields:
•
Name—(optional) Assign a name to the circuit. The name can be alphanumeric and up to 32
characters (including spaces). If you leave the Name field blank, CTC assigns a default name to the
circuit.
•
Type—Select the type of circuit you want to create: STS, VT (VT1.5), or VT tunnel. The circuit type
determines the circuit-provisioning options that are displayed. “VT1.5 Cross-Connects” section on
page 6-16 and the “VT Tunnels” section on page 6-19 for more information.
•
Size—Select the circuit size (STS circuits only). The “c” indicates concatenated STSs.
•
Bidirectional—Check this box to create a two-way circuit; uncheck it to create a one-way circuit
(STS and VT circuits only; VT tunnels are bidirectional).
•
Number of circuits—Type the number of circuits you want to create. CTC returns to the Circuit
Source page after you create each circuit until you finish creating the number of circuits specified
here.
•
Auto Ranged—This option is not available with manual circuit routing.
•
Protected Drops—If this box is checked, CTC only displays protected cards and ports (1:1, 1:N, 1+1
or BLSR protection) as choices for the circuit source and destination.
Figure 6-4
Step 4
Creating a circuit
(UPSR circuits only) Set the UPSR Selector Defaults:
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
6-6
November 2001
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating Circuits and VT Tunnels
•
Revertive—Check this box if you want traffic to revert to the working path when the conditions that
diverted it to the protect path are repaired. If Revertive is not chosen, traffic remains on the protect
path after the switch.
•
Reversion time—If Revertive is checked, set the reversion time. This is the amount of time that will
elapse before the traffic reverts to the working path. Traffic can revert when conditions causing the
switch are cleared (the default reversion time is 5 minutes).
•
SF threshold—Set the UPSR path-level signal failure bit error rate (BER) thresholds (STS circuits
only).
•
SD threshold—Set the UPSR path-level signal degrade BER thresholds (STS circuits only).
•
Switch on PDI-P—Check this box if you want traffic to switch when an STS payload defect
indicator is received (STS circuits only).
Step 5
Click Next.
Step 6
In the Circuit Source dialog box, set the circuit source.
Options include node, slot, port, STS, and VT/DS-1. The options that display depend on the circuit type
and circuit properties you selected in Step 3 and the cards installed in the node. For example, if you are
creating a VT circuit or tunnel, only nodes with XCVT and XC10G cards are displayed. For Ethergroups,
see the “Ethernet Circuit Configurations” section on page 9-6.
Click Use Secondary Source if you need to create a UPSR bridge/selector circuit entry point in a
multivendor UPSR.
Step 7
Click Next.
Step 8
In the Circuit Destination dialog box, enter the appropriate information for the circuit destination. If the
circuit is bidirectional, you can click Use Secondary Destination if you need to create a UPSR
bridge/selector circuit destination point in a multivendor UPSR. (To add secondary destinations to
unidirectional circuits, see “Create a Unidirectional Circuit with Multiple Drops” procedure on
page 6-8.)
Step 9
Click Next.
Step 10
Under Circuit Routing Preferences (Figure 6-2), de-select Route Automatically.
Step 11
If you want the circuit routed on a protected path, select Fully Protected Path. Otherwise, go to Step
12. CTC creates a primary and alternate circuit route (virtual UPSR) based on the nodal diversity option
you select:
•
Nodal Diversity Required—Ensures that the primary and alternate paths within path-protected mesh
network (PPMN) portions of the complete circuit path are nodally diverse. (For information about
PPMN, see the “Path-Protected Mesh Networks” section on page 5-50.)
•
Nodal Diversity Desired—Specifies that node diversity should be attempted, but if node diversity is
not possible, CTC creates link diverse paths for the PPMN portion of the complete circuit path.
•
Link Diversity Only—Specifies that only link-diverse primary and alternate paths for PPMN
portions of the complete circuit path are needed. The paths may be node-diverse, but CTC does not
check for node diversity.
Step 12
Click Next. The Route Review and Edit panel is displayed for you to manually route the circuit. The
green arrows pointing from the source node to other network nodes indicate spans that are available for
routing the circuit.
Step 13
Set the circuit route:
a.
Click the arrowhead of the span you want the circuit to travel.
b.
If you want to change the source STS or VT, change it in the Source STS or Source VT fields.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
6-7
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating Multiple Drops for Unidirectional Circuits
c.
Click Add Span.
The span is added to the Included Spans list and the span arrow turns blue.
Step 14
Repeat Step 13 until the circuit is provisioned from the source to the destination node.
When provisioning a protected circuit, you only need to select one path of BLSR or 1+1 spans from the
source to the drop. If you select unprotected spans as part of the path, select two different paths for the
unprotected segment of the path.
Step 15
When the circuit is provisioned, click Finish.
If you entered more than 1 in Number of Circuits in the Circuit Attributes dialog box in Step 3, the
Circuit Source dialog box is displayed so you can create the remaining circuits.
Step 16
If you are provisioning circuits before installing the traffic cards and enabling their ports, you must
install the cards and enable the ports before circuits will carry traffic. For procedures, see the “Install
Optical, Electrical, and Ethernet Cards” procedure on page 1-48 and the “Enable Ports” procedure on
page 3-10.
6.3 Creating Multiple Drops for Unidirectional Circuits
Unidirectional circuits can have multiple drops for use in broadcast circuit schemes. In broadcast
scenarios, one source transmits traffic to multiple destinations, but traffic is not returned back to the
source.
When you create a unidirectional circuit, the card that does not have its backplane Rx input terminated
with a valid input signal generates a loss of service (LOS) alarm. To mask the alarm, create an alarm
profile suppressing the LOS alarm and apply it to the port that does not have its Rx input terminated.
See the “Creating and Modifying Alarm Profiles” section on page 10-9 for information.
Procedure: Create a Unidirectional Circuit with Multiple Drops
Step 1
Use the “Create an Automatically Routed Circuit” procedure on page 6-2 to create a circuit. To make it
unidirectional, clear the Bidirectional check box on the Circuit Creation dialog box.
Step 2
After the unidirectional circuit is created, in node or network view select the Circuits tab.
Step 3
Select the unidirectional circuit and click Edit (or double-click the circuit).
Step 4
On the Drops tab of the Edit Circuits dialog box, click Create or, if Show Detailed Map is selected,
right-click a node on the circuit map and select Add Drop.
Step 5
On the Define New Drop dialog box, complete the appropriate fields to define the new circuit drop:
Node, Slot, Port, STS, VT (if applicable).
Step 6
Click OK.
Step 7
If you need to create additional drops, repeat Steps 4 – 6. If not, click Close.
Step 8
Verify the new drops on the Edit Circuit map:
•
If Show Detailed Map is selected: a “D” enclosed by circles appears on each side of the node
graphic.
•
If Show Detailed Map is not selected: “Drop #1, Drop #2” appear under the node graphic.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
6-8
November 2001
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating Monitor Circuits
6.4 Creating Monitor Circuits
You can set up secondary circuits to monitor traffic on primary bidirectional circuits. Figure 6-5 shows
an example of a monitor circuit. At Node 1, a VT1.5 is dropped from Port 1 of an EC1-12 card. To
monitor the VT1.5 traffic, test equipment is plugged into Port 2 of the EC1-12 card and a monitor circuit
to Port 2 is provisioned in CTC. Circuit monitors are one-way. The monitor circuit in Figure 6-5 is used
to monitor VT1.5 traffic received by Port 1 of the EC1-12 card.
Note
Monitor circuits cannot be used with EtherSwitch circuits.
Note
For unidirectional circuits, create a drop to the port where the test equipment is attached.
Figure 6-5
A VT1.5 monitor circuit received at an EC1-12 port
ONS 15454
Node 1
ONS 15454
Node 2
XC
XC
VT1.5 Drop
Test Set
Port 1
EC1-12
OC-N
OC-N
DS1-14
45157
Class 5
Switch
Port 2
VT1.5 Monitor
Procedure: Create a Monitor Circuit
Step 1
Log into CTC.
Step 2
In node view, select the Circuits tab.
Step 3
Select the bidirectional circuit that you want to monitor. Click Edit.
Step 4
On the Edit Circuit dialog box, click the Monitors tab.
Step 5
The Monitors tab displays ports that you can use to monitor the circuit selected in Step 3.
Step 6
On the Monitors tab, select a port. The monitor circuit displays traffic coming into the node at the
card/port you select. In Figure 6-5, you would select either the DS1-14 card (to test circuit traffic
entering Node 2 on the DS1-14) or the OC-N card at Node 1 (to test circuit traffic entering Node 1 on
the OC-N card).
Step 7
Click Create Monitor Circuit.
Step 8
On the Circuit Creation dialog box, select the destination node, slot, port, and STS for the monitored
circuit. In the Figure 6-5 example, this is Port 2 on the EC1-12 card. Click Next.
Step 9
On the Circuit Creation dialog box confirmation, review the monitor circuit information. Click Finish.
Step 10
On the Edit Circuit dialog box, click Close. The new monitor circuit displays on the Circuits tab.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
6-9
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Searching for Circuits
6.5 Searching for Circuits
CTC provides the ability to search for ONS 15454 circuits based on circuit name. Searches can be
conducted at the network, node, and card level. You can search for whole words and include
capitalization as a search parameter.
Procedure: Search for ONS 15454 Circuits
Step 1
Log into CTC.
Step 2
Switch to the appropriate CTC view:
•
Network view to conduct searches at the network level
•
Node view to conduct searches at the network or node level
•
Card view to conduct searches at the card, node, or network level
Step 3
Click the Circuits tab.
Step 4
If you are in Node or Card view, select the scope for the search in the Scope field.
Step 5
Click Search.
Step 6
In the Circuit Name Search dialog box, complete the following:
•
Find What—Enter the text of the circuit name you want to find.
•
Match Whole Word Only—If checked, CTC selects circuits only if the entire word matches the text
in the Find What field.
•
Match Case—If checked, CTC selects circuits only when the capitalization matches the
capitalization entered in the Find What field.
•
Direction—Select the direction for the search. Searches are conducted up or down from the
currently selected circuit.
Step 7
Click Find Next.
Step 8
Repeat Steps 6 and 7 until you are finished, then click Cancel.
6.6 Editing UPSR Circuits
Use the Edit Circuits window to change UPSR selectors and switch protection paths (Figure 6-6). In this
window, you can:
•
View the UPSR circuit’s working and protection paths
•
Edit the reversion time
•
Edit the Signal Fail/Signal Degrade thresholds
•
Change PDI-P settings, perform maintenance switches on the circuit selector, and view switch
counts for the selectors
•
Display a map of the UPSR circuits to better see circuit flow between nodes
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
6-10
November 2001
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Editing UPSR Circuits
Figure 6-6
Editing UPSR selectors
Procedure: Edit a UPSR Circuit
Step 1
Log into the source or drop node of the UPSR circuit.
Step 2
Click the Circuits tab.
Step 3
Click the circuit you want to edit, then click Edit.
Step 4
On the Edit Circuit window, click the UPSR tab.
Step 5
Edit the UPSR selectors:
•
Reversion Time—Controls whether traffic reverts to the working path when conditions that diverted
it to the protect path are repaired. If you select Never, traffic does not revert. Selecting a time sets
the amount of time that will elapse before traffic reverts to the working path.
•
SF Ber Level—Sets the UPSR signal failure BER threshold (STS circuits only).
•
SD Ber Level—Sets the UPSR signal degrade BER threshold (STS circuits only).
•
PDI-P—When checked, traffic switches if an STS payload defect indication is received (STS
circuits only).
•
Switch State—Switches circuit traffic between the working and protect paths. The color of the
Working Path and Protect Path fields indicates the active path. Normally, the Working Path is green
and the Protect Path is purple. If the Protect Path is green, working traffic has switched to the Protect
Path.
CLEAR—Removes a previously-set switch command.
LOCKOUT OF PROTECT—Prevents traffic from switching to the protect circuit path.
FORCE TO WORKING—Forces traffic to switch to the working circuit path, regardless of whether
the path is error free.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
6-11
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating a Path Trace
FORCE TO PROTECT—Forces traffic to switch to the protect circuit path, regardless of whether
the path is error free.
MANUAL TO WORKING—Switches traffic to the working circuit path when the working path is
error free.
MANUAL TO PROTECT—Switches traffic to the protect circuit path when the protect path is error
free.
Caution
Step 6
The FORCE and LOCKOUT commands override normal protection switching mechanisms.
Applying these commands incorrectly can cause traffic outages.
Click Apply, then check that the selector switches as you expect.
6.7 Creating a Path Trace
The SONET J1 Path Trace is a repeated, fixed-length string comprised of 64 consecutive J1 bytes. You
can use the string to monitor interruptions or changes to circuit traffic. Table 6-1 shows the ONS 15454
cards that support path trace. DS-1 and DS-3 cards can transmit and receive the J1 field, while the EC-1,
OC-3, OC-48AS, and OC-192 can only receive it. Cards not listed in the table do not support the J1 byte.
Table 6-1
ONS 15454 Cards Supporting J1 Path Trace
Card
Receive
Transmit
DS1-14
X
X
DS1N-14
X
X
DS3-12E
X
X
DS3N-12E
X
X
DS3XM-6X
X
X
EC1-12
X
OC3 IR 4 1310
X
OC48 IR/STM16 SH AS 1310
X
OC48 LR/STM16 LH AS 1550
X
OC192 LR/STM64 LH 1550
X
The J1 path trace transmits a repeated, fixed-length string. If the string received at a circuit drop port
does not match the string the port expects to receive, an alarm is raised. Two path trace modes are
available:
•
Automatic—The receiving port assumes the first J1 string it receives is the baseline J1 string.
•
Manual—The receiving port uses a string that you manually enter as the baseline J1 string.
Table 6-2 shows the general flow for setting up the J1 path trace. To set up a path trace on an ONS 15454
circuit, follow the steps in the “Create a J1 Path Trace” procedure on page 6-13.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
6-12
November 2001
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating a Path Trace
Table 6-2
Path Trace Source and Drop Provisioning
Step
Port
Action
Notes
1
Source Edit the path-trace transmit string. If not edited, an empty string is transmitted.
2
Drop
3
Source Edit the path-trace expected
string.
4
Drop
Edit the path-trace expected string Only Path Trace mode is set to Manual, and only
on DS-1, DS3E, and DS3XM cards.
5
Drop
Change Path Trace Mode
Automatic or Manual.
6
Source Change Path Trace Mode
Automatic or Manual.
Edit the path-trace transmit string. If not edited, an empty string is transmitted.
Only if Path Trace mode is set to Manual, and only
on DS-1, DS3E, and DS3XM cards.
Procedure: Create a J1 Path Trace
To perform this procedure, you must have an STS circuit using a DS-1, DS3E, or DS3XM card at the
circuit source and drop ports, or an STS circuit passing through an EC-1, OC-3, OC-48AS, or OC-192
card.
Step 1
Log into the circuit source node and select the Circuits tab.
Step 2
Select the circuit you want to trace, then click Edit.
Step 3
On the Edit Circuit window, click Show Detailed Map at the bottom of the window.
Step 4
On the detailed circuit map, right-click the source port for the circuit and select Edit Path Trace from
the shortcut menu. Figure 6-7 shows an example.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
6-13
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating a Path Trace
Figure 6-7
Step 5
Selecting the Edit Path Trace option
On the Circuit Path Trace window (Figure 6-8) in the New Transmit String field (this field is available
only on DS-1, DS3E, and DS3XM cards), enter the string that you want the source port to transmit. For
example, you could enter the node IP address, node name, circuit name, or another string. If the New
Transmit String field is left blank, the J1 transmits an empty string.
Figure 6-8
Setting up a path trace
Step 6
Click Apply but do not close the window.
Step 7
Return to the Edit Circuit window (Figure 6-7).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
6-14
November 2001
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Cross-Connect Card Capacities
Step 8
On the circuit map, right-click the drop port for the circuit and select Edit Path Trace from the shortcut
menu.
Step 9
On the Circuit Path Trace window (Figure 6-8) in the New Transmit String field (this field is available
only on DS-1, DS3E, and DS3XM cards), enter the string that you want the drop port to transmit. If the
field is left blank, the J1 transmits an empty string.
Step 10
If you will set Path Trace Mode to Manual in Step 11, enter the string that the drop port should expect
to receive in the New Expected String field. This string must match the New Transmit String entered for
the source port in Step 5. (When you click Apply in Step 12, this string becomes the Current Expected
String.)
Step 11
In the Path Trace Mode field, select one of the following options:
•
Auto—Assumes the first string received from the source port is the baseline string. An alarm is
raised when a string that differs from the baseline is received.
•
Manual—Uses the Current Expected String field as the baseline string. An alarm is raised when a
string that differs from the Current Expected String is received.
Step 12
Click Apply and then click Close.
Step 13
Display the Circuit Path Trace window for the source port from Step 5.
Step 14
If you will set the Path Trace Mode to Manual in Step 15, enter the string the source port should expect
to receive in the New Expected String field. This string must match the New Transmit String entered for
the source port in Step 9.
Step 15
In the Path Trace Mode field, select one of the following options:
Step 16
•
Auto—Assumes that the first string received from the drop port is the baseline string. An alarm is
raised when a string that differs from the baseline is received.
•
Manual—Uses the Current Expected String field as the baseline string. An alarm is raised when a
string that differs from the Current Expected String is received.
Click Apply and click Close.
After you set up the path trace, the received string is displayed in the Received box on the path trace
setup window (Figure 6-8). Click Switch Mode to toggle between ASCII and hexadecimal display.
Click the Reset button to reread values from the port. Click Default to return to the path trace default
settings (Path Trace Mode is set to Off and the New Transmit and New Expected Strings are null).
6.8 Cross-Connect Card Capacities
The ONS 15454 XC, XCVT, and XC10G cards perform port-to-port time-division multiplexing (TDM).
•
XCs perform STS switching
•
XCVTs and XC10Gs perform STS and VT1.5 switching
XCs and XCVTs have capacity to terminate 288 STSs, or 144 STS cross-connections (each STS
cross-connection uses two STS ports on the cross-connect card STS matrix). XC10Gs have capacity for
1152 STSs, or 576 STS cross-connections. Table 6-3 shows STS capacities for the XC, XCVT, and
XC10G cards.
Note
The Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide contains detailed specifications of
the XC, XCVT, and XC10G cards.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
6-15
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Cross-Connect Card Capacities
Table 6-3
XC, XCVT, and XC10G Card STS Cross-Connect Capacities
Card
Total STSs
STS Cross-connects
XC
288
144
XCVT
288
144
XC10G
1152
576
6.8.1 VT1.5 Cross-Connects
XCVTs and XC10Gs can map up to 24 STSs for VT1.5 traffic. Because one STS can carry 28 VT1.5s,
the XCVT and XC10G cards can terminate up to 672 VT1.5s, or 336 VT1.5 cross-connects. However,
to terminate 336 VT1.5 cross-connects:
•
Each STS mapped for VT1.5 traffic must carry 28 VT1.5 circuits. If you assign each VT1.5 circuit
to a different STS, the XCVT and XC10G VT1.5 cross-connect capacity will be reached after you
create 12 VT1.5 circuits.
•
ONS 15454s must be in a bidirectional line switched ring (BLSR). Source and drop nodes in UPSR
or 1+1 (linear) protection have capacity for only 224 VT1.5 cross-connects because an additional
STS is used for the protect path.
Table 6-4 shows the VT1.5 capacities for ONS 15454 cross-connect cards. All capacities assume each
VT1.5-mapped STS carries 28 VT1.5 circuits.
Table 6-4
XC, XCVT, and XC10G VT1.5 Capacities
Card
Total VT1.5s
(BLSR)
VT1.5 Cross-Connect
Capacity (BLSR)
VT1.5 Cross-Connect Capacity
(UPSR or 1+1)
XC
XCVT
0
672
0
336
0
224
XC10G
672
336
224
Figure 6-9 shows the logical flow of a VT1.5 circuit through the XCVT/XC10G STS and VT matrices
at a BLSR node. The circuit source is an EC-1 card using STS-1. After the circuit is created:
•
Two of the 24 XCVT or XC10G STSs available for VT1.5 traffic are used (one STS for VT1.5 input
into the VT matrix; one STS for VT1.5 output).
•
22 STSs are available for VT1.5 circuits.
•
The STS-1 from the EC-1 card has capacity for 27 more VT1.5 circuits.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
6-16
November 2001
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Cross-Connect Card Capacities
Figure 6-9
Example #1: A VT1.5 circuit in a BLSR
VT1.5 circuit #1 on STS-1
1 VT1.5 used on STS-1
27 VT1.5s available on STS-1
XCVT-XC10G Matrices
Source
STS Matrix
Drop
EC-1
2 STSs total used
22 STSs available
OC-12
STS
VT1.5
61846
VT1.5 Matrix
In Figure 6-10, a second VT1.5 circuit is created from the EC-1 card. In this example, the circuit is
assigned to STS-2:
•
Two more of the 24 STSs available for VT1.5 traffic are used.
•
20 STSs are available on the XCVT or XC10G for VT1.5 circuits.
•
STS-2 can carry 27 additional VT1.5 circuits.
Figure 6-10 Example #2: Two VT1.5 circuits in a BLSR
VT1.5 circuit #1
XCVT-XC10G Matrices
Source
STS Matrix
Drop
4 STSs total used
20 STSs available
VT1.5 circuit #2 on STS-2
1 VT1.5 used on STS-2
27 VT1.5s available on STS-2
OC-12
STS
VT1.5
61847
EC-1
If you create VT1.5 circuits on nodes in UPSR or 1+1 protection, an additional STS is used for the
protect path at the source and drop nodes. Figure 6-11 shows a VT1.5 circuit at a UPSR source node.
When the circuit is completed:
•
Three of the 24 STSs available for VT1.5 mapping on the XCVT or XC10G are used (one input and
two outputs, one output for the working path and one output for the protect path).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
6-17
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Cross-Connect Card Capacities
•
21 STSs are available for VT1.5 circuits.
Figure 6-11 Example #3: VT1.5 circuit in a UPSR or 1+1 protection scheme
VT1.5 circuit #1
XCVT-XC10G Matrices
Source
STS Matrix
Working
OC-12
Drop
Protect
EC-1
3 STSs total used
21 STSs available
OC-12
STS
VT1.5
61848
VT1.5 Matrix
Figure 6-12 shows a second VT1.5 circuit that was created using STS-2. When the second VT1.5 circuit
is created:
•
Three more VT1.5-mapped STSs are used.
•
18 STSs are available on the XCVT or XC10G for VT1.5 circuits.
Figure 6-12 Example #4: Two VT1.5 circuits in UPSR or 1+1 protection scheme
VT1.5 circuit #1
XCVT-XC10G Matrices
Source
STS Matrix
Circuit #1 (working)
Drop
Circuit #2 (working)
OC-12
Circuit #1 (protect)
EC-1
Drop
Circuit #2 (protect)
6 STSs total used
18 STSs available
OC-12
VT1.5 Matrix
STS
VT1.5
61849
VT1.5 circuit #2
Unless you create VT tunnels (see the “VT Tunnels” section on page 6-19), VT1.5 circuits use STSs on
the XCVT/XC10G VT matrix at each node through which the circuit passes.
•
Two STSs are used at each node in the Figure 6-9 example, and three STSs are used at each node in
the Figure 6-11 example.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
6-18
November 2001
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Cross-Connect Card Capacities
•
In the Figure 6-10 example, three STSs are used at the source and drop nodes and four STSs are used
at pass-through nodes. In Figure 6-12, six STSs are used at the source and drop nodes and four
STSs at the pass-through nodes.
6.8.2 VT Tunnels
To maximize VT matrix resources, you can tunnel VT1.5 circuits through ONS 15454 pass-through
nodes (nodes that are not a circuit source or drop). VT1.5 tunnels provide two benefits:
•
They allow you to route VT1.5 circuits through ONS 15454s that have XC cards. (VT1.5 circuits
require XCVT or XC10G cards at circuit source and drop nodes.)
•
When tunneled through nodes with XCVT or XC10G cards, VT1.5 tunnels do not use VT matrix
capacity, thereby freeing the VT matrix resources for other VT1.5 circuits.
Figure 6-13 shows a VT tunnel through the XCVT and XC10G matrices. No VT1.5-mapped STSs are
used by the tunnel, which can carry 28 VT1.5s. However, the tunnel does use two STS matrix ports on
each node through which it passes.
Figure 6-13 A VT1.5 tunnel
STS Matrix
OC
Trunk
OC
Trunk
VT Tunnel
VT1.5
61850
VT1.5 Matrix
Figure 6-14 shows a six-node ONS 15454 ring with two VT tunnels. One tunnel carries VT1.5 circuits
from Node 1 to Node 3. The second tunnel carries VT1.5 circuits from Node 1 to Node 4. Table 6-5
shows the VT1.5-mapped STS usage at each node in a ring based on protection scheme and use of VT
tunnels. In the Figure 6-14 example, the circuit travels west through Nodes 2, 3, and 4. Subsequently,
VT-mapped STS usage at these nodes is greater than at Nodes 5 and 6.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
6-19
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Cross-Connect Card Capacities
Figure 6-14 A six-node ring with two VT1.5 tunnels
VT1.5 source
Node 1
Node 6
Node 2
28 VT1.5
circuits
28 VT1.5
circuits
Node 5
Node 3
Node 4
VT1.5
drop
Table 6-5
BLSR
VT Tunnel
61851
VT1.5
drop
VT1.5-Mapped STS Use in Figure 6-6
Node
VT Tunnel (BLSR)
VT Tunnel (UPSR, 1+1) No VT Tunnel (BLSR)
No VT Tunnel (UPSR) No VT Tunnel (1+1)
1
4
6
4
6
6
2
0
0
4
3
8
3
2
3
4
3
6
4
2
3
2
3
3
5
0
0
0
2
0
6
0
0
0
2
0
When planning VT1.5 circuits, weigh the benefits of using tunnels with the need to maximize STS
capacity. For example, a VT1.5 tunnel between Node 1 and Node 4 passing (transparently) through
Nodes 2 and Node 3 is advantageous if a full STS is used for Node 1 – Node 4 VT1.5 traffic (that is, the
number of VT1.5 circuits between these nodes is close to 28). A VT tunnel is required if:
•
Node 2 or Node 3 have XC cards, or
•
All VT1.5-mappable STSs at Node 2 and Node 3 are in use.
However, if the Node 1 – Node 4 tunnel will carry few VT1.5 circuits, creating a regular VT1.5 circuit
between Nodes 1, 2, 3, and 4 might maximize STS capacity.
When you create a VT1.5 circuit, CTC determines whether a tunnel already exists between source and
drop nodes. If a tunnel exists, CTC checks the tunnel capacity. If the capacity is sufficient, CTC routes
the circuit on the existing tunnel. If a tunnel does not exist, or if an existing tunnel does not have
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
6-20
November 2001
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating DCC Tunnels
sufficient capacity, CTC displays a dialog box asking whether you want to create a tunnel. Before you
create the tunnel, review the existing tunnel availability, keeping in mind future bandwidth needs. In
some cases, you may want to manually route a circuit rather than create a new tunnel.
6.9 Creating DCC Tunnels
SONET provides four data communications channels (DCCs) for network element operations,
administration, maintenance, and provisioning: one on the SONET Section layer and three on the
SONET Line layer. The ONS 15454 uses the Section DCC (SDCC) for ONS 15454 management and
provisioning.
You can use the Line DCCs (LDCCs) and the SDCC (when the SDCC is not used for ONS 15454 DCC
terminations) to tunnel third-party SONET equipment across ONS 15454 networks. A DCC tunnel
end-point is defined by Slot, Port, and DCC, where DCC can be either the SDCC, Tunnel 1, Tunnel 2,
or Tunnel 3 (LDCCs). You can link an SDCC to an LDCC (Tunnel 1, Tunnel 2, or Tunnel 3), and an
LDCC to an SDCC. You can also link LDCCs to LDCCs and link SDCCs to SDCCs. To create a DCC
tunnel, you connect the tunnel end points from one ONS 15454 optical port to another.
Each ONS 15454 can support up to 32 DCC tunnel connections. Table 6-6 shows the DCC tunnels that
you can create.
Table 6-6
DCC Tunnels
SONET
SONET
OC-3
DCC
Layer
Bytes
(all ports)
OC-12, OC-48
SDCC
Section
D1 - D3
Yes
Yes
Tunnel 1
Line
D4 - D6
No
Yes
Tunnel 2
Line
D7 - D9
No
Yes
Tunnel 3
Line
D10 - D12 No
Yes
Figure 6-15 shows a DCC tunnel example. Third-party equipment is connected to OC-3 cards at Node
1/Slot 3/Port 1 and Node 3/Slot 3/Port 1. Each ONS 15454 node is connected by OC-48 trunk cards. In
the example, three tunnel connections are created, one at Node 1 (OC-3 to OC-48), one at Node 2 (OC-48
to OC-48), and one at Node 3 (OC-48 to OC-3).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
6-21
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating DCC Tunnels
Figure 6-15 A DCC tunnel
Link 1
From (A)
To (B)
Slot3 (OC3)
Slot13 (OC48)
port 1, SDCC port 1, Tunnel 1
Link 2
From (A)
To (B)
Slot12 (OC48) Slot13 (OC48)
port 1, Tunnel 1 port 1, Tunnel 1
Node 2
Node 3
32134
Node 1
Link 3
From (A)
To (B)
Slot12 (OC48) Slot3 (OC3)
port 1, Tunnel 1 port 1, SDCC
Third party
equipment
Third party
equipment
When you create DCC tunnels, keep the following guidelines in mind:
•
Each ONS 15454 can have up to 32 DCC tunnel connections.
•
Each ONS 15454 can have up to 10 SDCC terminations.
•
An SDCC that is terminated cannot be used as a DCC tunnel end-point.
•
An SDCC that is used as an DCC tunnel end-point cannot be terminated.
•
All DCC tunnel connections are bidirectional.
Procedure: Provision a DCC Tunnel
Step 1
Log into an ONS 15454 that is connected to the non-ONS 15454 network.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > Sonet DCC tabs.
Step 3
Beneath the DCC Tunnel Connections area (bottom right of the screen), click Create.
Step 4
In the Create DCC Tunnel Connection dialog box (Figure 6-16), select the tunnel end points from the
From (A) and To (B) lists.
Note
You cannot use the SDCC listed under SDCC Terminations (left side of the window) for
tunnel connections. These are used for ONS 15454 optical connections.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
6-22
November 2001
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating DCC Tunnels
Figure 6-16 Selecting DCC tunnel end points
Step 5
Click OK.
Step 6
Put the ports hosting the DCC tunnel in service:
a.
Double-click the card hosting the DCC in the shelf graphic or right-click the card on the shelf
graphic and select Open.
b.
Click the Provisioning > Line tabs.
c.
Under Status, select In Service.
d.
Click Apply.
DCC provisioning is now complete for one node. Repeat these steps for all slots/ports that are part of
the DCC tunnel, including any intermediate nodes that will pass traffic from third party equipment. The
procedure is confirmed when the third-party network elements successfully communicate over the
newly-established DCC tunnel.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
6-23
Chapter 6
Circuits and Tunnels
Creating DCC Tunnels
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
6-24
November 2001
C H A P T E R
7
Card Provisioning
This chapter provides Cisco ONS 15454 procedures for:
Note
•
Changing the default transmission parameters for electrical (EC-1, DS-N) and optical (OC-N) cards,
including provisioning OC-N cards for SDH
•
Setting performance monitoring (PM) thresholds, including intermediate path performance
monitoring
•
Provisioning the Alarm Interface Controller card
•
Converting the DS1-14 and DS3-12 cards from 1:1 to 1:N protection
Ethernet card provisioning is described in Chapter 9, “Ethernet Operation.”
Because much of the electrical and optical card provisioning involves PM thresholds, see Chapter 8,
“Performance Monitoring,” for definitions and general information about ONS 15454 performance
monitoring parameters. In addition, refer to the Telcordia GR-1230-CORE, GR-820-CORE, and
GR-253-CORE documents. The default thresholds delivered with ONS 15454 cards are based on
specifications contained in those documents.
Note
For information about creating protection groups, see the “Creating Protection Groups” section on
page 3-9. For circuit creation procedures, see Chapter 6, “Circuits and Tunnels.”
7.1 Performance Monitoring Thresholds
ONS 15454 card default thresholds are based on GR-253-CORE and GR-820-CORE. If you change their
settings, the following rules apply:
•
The minimum threshold that you can set is 1.
•
If you set a threshold to 0, no threshold crossing alert (TCA) is issued.
•
You can set thresholds to any DS-N or OC-N maximum. However, CTC does not perform range
checking. Setting a threshold to a value greater than what is logically possible is the same as setting
the threshold to zero. No TCA will be issued.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-1
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
7.2 Provisioning Electrical Cards
The ONS 15454 electrical cards (DS1-14, DS1N-14, DS3-12, DS3N-12, DS3E1-12, DS3EN-12,
DS3XM-6, and EC1-12) are pre-provisioned with settings that you can modify to manage transmission
quality. When you open a card in CTC and select the Provisioning tab, the following subtabs are
commonly displayed:
•
Line—Sets line setup parameters, such as line coding and line length. This is also where you put
ports in and out of service.
•
Line Threshold—Sets the line-level PM thresholds.
•
Elect Path Threshold—Sets the path-level PM thresholds for electrical (DS-3/DS-1) traffic.
•
SONET Threshold—Sets the path-level PM thresholds for (STS/VT1.5) traffic.
•
Alarming—Sets alarm profiles for individual ports and suppresses alarms. See Chapter 10, “Alarm
Monitoring and Management,” for information about alarm profiles and alarm suppression.
Table 7-1 provides an overview of DS-1, DS-3, DS3E, and DS3XM parameters (an X means the item is
available for the card). EC1-12 card parameters are shown in Table 7-6 on page 7-15.
Table 7-1
DS-N Card Provisioning Overview
Subtab
Provisioning Item
DS1-14/
DS1N-14
DS3-12/
DS3N-12
DS3E1-12/
DS3EN-12
DS3XM-6
Line
Port #
X
X
X
X
Port Name
X
X
X
X
Line Type
X
X
X
Detected Line Type
Line Threshold
X
Line Coding
X
X
X
Line Length
X
X
X
X
Status
X
X
X
X
Port
X
X
X
X
CV
X
X
X
X
ES
X
X
X
X
SES
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
LOSS
Elect Path
Port
X
CV
ES
X
X
X
SES
X
X
X
SAS
X
X
X
AIS
X
X
X
UAS
X
X
X
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-2
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Table 7-1
DS-N Card Provisioning Overview (continued)
Subtab
Provisioning Item
DS1-14/
DS1N-14
DS3-12/
DS3N-12
DS3E1-12/
DS3EN-12
DS3XM-6
SONET
Threshold
Port
X
X
X
X
CV
X
X
X
X
ES
X
X
X
X
FC
X
X
X
X
SES
X
X
X
X
UAS
X
X
X
X
Port
X
X
X
X
Profile
X
X
X
X
Suppress Alarms
X
X
X
X
Alarming
7.2.1 DS-1 Card Parameters
The ONS 15454 DS-1 cards (DS1-14 and DS1N-14) provide 14 DS-1 ports. Each port operates at 1.544
Mbps. Default thresholds are based on recommendations in GR-820-CORE, Sections 4.0.
Procedure: Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the DS-1 Card
Step 1
Display the DS1-14 or DS1N-14 in CTC card view.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning tab (Figure 7-1).
Figure 7-1
Provisioning line parameters on the DS1-14 card
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-3
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Step 3
Depending on the setting you need to modify, click the Line, Line Thrshld, Elect Path, or Sonet
Thrshld subtab.
Note
Step 4
See Chapter 10, “Alarm Monitoring and Management” for information about the Alarm
Behavior tab.
Modify the settings shown in Table 7-2 on page 7-4. For drop-down lists, select an item from the list.
For numerics, double-click the field and type the new number.
Table 7-2
DS-1 Card Parameters
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
Line
Port #
Port number
1 - 14
Port
Port name
To enter a name for the port, click the
cell and type the name. To change a
name, double-click the cell, then edit
the text.
Line Type
Defines the line framing type
Line
Coding
Line
Length
Status
Line
Thrshold
CV
ES
SES
Defines the DS-1 transmission
coding type
Defines the distance (in feet)
from backplane connection to
the next termination point
Places port in or out of service
Coding violations
Errored seconds
Severely errored seconds
•
D4 (default)
•
ESF - Extended Super Frame
•
Unframed
•
AMI - Alternate Mark Inversion
(default)
•
B8ZS - Bipolar 8 Zero Substitution
•
0 - 131 (default)
•
132 - 262
•
263 - 393
•
394 - 524
•
525 - 655
•
Out of Service (default)
•
In Service
Numeric. Defaults:
•
13340 (15 min)
•
133400 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
65 (15 min)
•
648 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
100 (1 day)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-4
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Table 7-2
DS-1 Card Parameters (continued)
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
Elect Path
Thrshld
ES
Errored seconds
Numeric. Defaults:
SES
SAS
AIS
UAS
SONET
Threshold
CV
ES
FC
SES
UAS
Severely errored seconds
Severely errored frame/alarm
indication signal
Alarm indication signal
Unavailable seconds
65 (15 minutes)
•
648 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
100 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
2 (15 minutes)
•
17 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
Coding violations
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
Errored seconds
•
15 (15 minutes)
•
125 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
Failure count
•
12 (15 minutes)
•
100 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (VT termination):
Severely errored seconds
Unavailable seconds
•
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
3 (15 minutes)
•
7 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-5
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Table 7-2
DS-1 Card Parameters (continued)
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
Alarming
Port
Port number
1 - 14
Profile
Sets the alarm profile for the port
Suppress
Alarms
Suppresses alarm display for the
port
•
Default
•
Inherited
•
Custom profiles (if any)
•
Unselected (default)
•
Selected
Step 5
Click Apply.
Step 6
Repeat Steps 4 – 5 for each subtab that has parameters you want to provision.
7.2.2 DS-3 Card Parameters
The ONS 15454 DS-3 cards (DS3-12 and DS3N-12) provide 12 DS-1 ports. Each port operates at 44.736
Mbps. Default thresholds are based on recommendations in GR-820-CORE, Section 5.0.
Procedure: Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the DS-3 Card
Step 1
Display the DS3-12 or DS3N-12 in CTC card view.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning tab.
Step 3
Depending on the setting you need to modify, click the Line, Line Thrshld, or Sonet Thrshld subtab.
Note
Step 4
See Chapter 10, “Alarm Monitoring and Management” for information about the Alarm
Behavior tab.
Modify the settings shown in Table 7-3. For drop-down lists, select an item from the list. For numerics,
double-click the field and type the new number.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-6
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Table 7-3
DS-3 Card Parameters
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
Line
Port #
Port number
1 - 12
Port
Port name
To enter a name for the port, click the
cell and type the name. To change a
name, double-click the cell, then edit
the text.
Line Length Defines the distance (in feet)
from backplane connection to
the next termination point
•
0 - 225 (default)
•
226 - 450
Status
•
Out of Service (default)
•
In Service
Line Thrshold CV
ES
SES
LOSS
Places port in or out of service
Coding violations
Numeric. Defaults:
Errored seconds
•
387 (15 minutes)
•
3865 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
Severely errored seconds
Loss of signal; number of
one-second intervals containing
one or more LOS defects
•
25 (15 minutes)
•
250 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
4 (15 minutes)
•
40 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-7
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Table 7-3
DS-3 Card Parameters (continued)
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
SONET
Thrshold
CV
Coding violations
Numeric. Defaults (Near End, STS
termination):
ES
FC
SES
UAS
Alarming
Errored seconds
Failure count
Severely errored seconds
Unavailable seconds
Port
Port number
Profile
Sets the alarm profile for the
port.
Suppress
Alarms
Suppresses alarm display for the
port.
•
15 (15 minutes)
•
125 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (Near End, STS
termination):
•
12 (15 minutes)
•
100 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (Near End, STS
termination:
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (Near End, STS
termination):
•
3 (15 minutes)
•
7 (1 day)
Numeric. Default (Near End, STS
termination):
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
1 - 12
•
Default
•
Inherited
•
Custom profiles (if any)
•
Unselected (default)
•
Selected
Step 5
Click Apply.
Step 6
Repeat Steps 4 – 5 for each subtab that has parameters you want to provision.
7.2.3 DS3E Card Parameters
The DS3E-12 and DS3EN-12 cards provide 12 DS-3 ports. Each port operates at 44.736 Mbps. The
DS3E uses B3ZS error monitoring and enhanced performance monitoring, including P-Bit and CP-Bit
monitoring. Default thresholds are based on recommendations in GR-820-CORE, Section 5.0.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-8
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Note
If the DS3E is installed in an ONS 15454 slot that is provisioned for a DS-3 card, the DS3E enhanced
performance monitoring parameters are not available. If this occurs, remove the DS3E from the ONS
15454, delete the DS-3 card in CTC, and provision the slot for the DS3E.
Procedure: Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the DS3E Card
Step 1
Display the DS3E-12 or DS3EN-12 in CTC card view.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning tab.
Step 3
Depending on the setting you need to modify, click the Line, Line Thrshld, Elect Path, or Sonet
Thrshld subtab.
Note
Step 4
See Chapter 10, “Alarm Monitoring and Management” for information about the Alarm
Behavior tab.
Modify the settings shown in Table 7-4 on page 7-9. For drop-down lists, select an item from the list.
For numerics, double-click the field and type the new number.
Table 7-4
DS3E Card Parameters
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
Line
Port #
Port number
Port
Port name
Line Type
Defines the line framing type
•
1 - 12
To enter a name for the port, click the
cell and type the name. To change a
name, double-click the cell, then edit
the text.
•
M23
•
C Bit
•
Auto Provisioned
Detected
Line Type
Displays the detected line type
Read-only
Line
Coding
Defines the DS3E transmission
coding type
•
B3ZS
Line
Length
Defines the distance (in feet)
from backplane connection to
the next termination point
•
0 - 225 (default)
•
226 - 450
Status
Places port in or out of service
Out of Service (default)
In Service
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-9
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Table 7-4
Subtab
DS3E Card Parameters (continued)
Parameter
Line Thrshold CV
Description
Options
Coding violations
Numeric. Defaults:
• 387 (15 minutes)
• 3865 (1 day)
ES
Errored seconds
Numeric. Defaults:
• 25 (15 minutes)
• 250 (1 day)
SES
LOSS
Elect Path
Thrshld
CV
ES
SES
SAS
AIS
UAS
Severely errored seconds
Loss of signal; number of
one-second intervals containing
one or more LOS defects
Coding violations
Errored seconds
Severely errored seconds
Severely errored frame/Alarm
indication signal
Alarm indication signal
Unavailable seconds
Numeric. Defaults:
•
4 (15 minutes)
•
40 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (DS3 Pbit, Near End
only; DS3 CPbit, Near and Far End):
•
382 (15 minutes)
•
3820 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (DS3 Pbit, Near End
only; DS3 CPbit, Near and Far End):
•
25 (15 minutes)
•
250 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (DS3 Pbit, Near End
only; DS3 CPbit, Near and Far End):
•
4 (15 minutes)
•
40 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (DS3 Pbit, Near End
only; DS3 CPbit, Near and Far End):
•
2 (15 minutes)
•
8 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (DS3 Pbit, Near End
only; DS3 CPbit, Near and Far End):
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (DS3 Pbit, Near End
only; DS3 CPbit, Near and Far End):
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-10
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Table 7-4
DS3E Card Parameters (continued)
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
Sonet
Thrshld
CV
Coding violations
Numeric. Defaults (Near End STS
termination):
ES
FC
SES
UAS
Alarming
Errored seconds
15 (15 minutes)
•
125 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (Near End STS
termination):
Failure count
•
12 (15 minutes)
•
100 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (Near End STS
termination):
Severely errored seconds
Unavailable seconds
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (Near End STS
termination):
•
3 (15 minutes)
•
7 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (Near End STS
termination):
Port
Port number
Profile
Sets the alarm profile for the
port.
Suppress
Alarms
•
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
1 - 12
Suppresses alarm display for the
port.
•
Default
•
Inherited
•
Custom profiles (if any)
•
Unselected (default)
•
Selected
Step 5
Click Apply.
Step 6
Repeat Steps 4 – 5 for each subtab that has parameters you want to provision.
7.2.4 DS3XM-6 Card Parameters
The DS3XM-6 transmux card can accept up to six DS-3 signals and convert each signal to 28 VT1.5s.
Conversely, the card can take 28 T-1s and multiplex them into a channeled C-bit or M23 framed DS-3.
Unlike the DS3-12 and DS3N-12 cards, the DS3XM-6 allows circuit mapping at the VT level. Table 7-5
on page 7-12 shows parameters that you can provision for each port.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-11
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Procedure: Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the DS3XM-6 Card
Step 1
Display the DS3XM-6 in CTC card view.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning tab.
Step 3
Depending on the setting you need to modify, click the Line, Line Thrshld, Elect Path, or Sonet
Thrshld subtab.
Note
Step 4
See Chapter 10, “Alarm Monitoring and Management” for information about the Alarm
Behavior tab.
Modify the settings shown in Table 7-5. For drop-down lists, select an item from the list. For numerics,
double-click the field and type the new number.
Table 7-5
DS3XM-6 Parameters
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
Line
Port #
Port number
1-6
Port
Port name
To enter a name for the port, click the
cell and type the name. To change a
name, double-click the cell, then edit
the text.
Line Type
Defines the line framing type
M23 - default
•
C BIT
Line Coding
Defines the DS-1 transmission
coding type that is used
•
B3ZS
Line Length
Defines the distance (in feet)
from backplane connection to
the next termination point
•
0 - 225 (default)
•
226 - 450
Places port in or out of service
•
Out of Service (default)
•
In Service
Status
Line Thrshld
•
CV
ES
SES
Loss
Coding violations
Errored seconds
Severely errored seconds
Loss of signal
Numeric. Defaults:
•
387 (15 minutes)
•
3865 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
25 (15 minutes)
•
250 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
4 (15 minutes)
•
40 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-12
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Table 7-5
DS3XM-6 Parameters (continued)
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
Elect Path
Thrshld
CV
Coding violations
Numeric. Defaults (DS3, Pbit Near
End only; DS3 CPbit, Near and Far
End):
ES
SES
SAS
AIS
UAS
Errored seconds
•
382 (15 minutes)
•
3820 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Severely errored seconds
Severely errored frame/alarm
indication Signal
Alarm indication signal
Unavailable seconds
•
25/250 (DS3 Pbit Near End only;
DS3 CPbit, Near and Far End)
•
65/648 (DS1, Near End only)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
•
4/40 (DS3 Pbit Near End only;
DS3 CPbit, Near and Far End)
•
10/100 (DS1, Near End only)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
•
2/8 (DS3 Pbit Near End only; DS3
CPbit, Near and Far End)
•
2/17 (DS1, Near End only)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
•
10/10 DS1, Near End; DS3, Near
& Far End
•
0/0 DS1 Far End
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
•
10/10 (DS3 Pbit Near End only;
DS3 CPbit, Near and Far End)
•
10/10 (DS1, Near End only)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-13
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Table 7-5
DS3XM-6 Parameters (continued)
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
Sonet Thrshld
CV
Coding violations
Numeric. Defaults (Near/Far End):
ES
FC
SES
UAS
Alarming
Errored seconds
Failure count
Severely errored seconds
Unavailable seconds
Port
Port number
Profile
Sets the alarm profile for the
port
Suppress
Alarms
Suppresses alarm display for
the port
•
15 (15 minutes, STS and VT
Term)
•
125 (1 day, STS and VT Term)
Numeric. Defaults (Near/Far End):
•
12 (15 minutes, STS and VT
Term)
•
100 (1 day, STS and VT Term)
Numeric. Defaults (Near/Far End):
•
10 (15 minutes, STS Term)
•
10 (1 day, STS Term)
Numeric. Defaults (Near/Far End):
•
3 (15 minutes, STS and VT Term)
•
7 (1 day, STS and VT Term)
Numeric. Defaults (Near/Far End):
•
10 (15 minutes, STS and VT
Term)
•
10 (1 day, STS and VT Term)
1-6
•
Default
•
Inherited
•
Custom profiles (if any)
•
Unselected (default)
•
Selected
Step 5
Click Apply.
Step 6
Repeat Steps 4 – 5 for each subtab that has parameters you want to provision.
7.2.5 EC1-12 Card Parameters
The EC1-12 provides 12 STS-1 electrical ports. Each port operates at 51.840 Mbps. Table 7-6 shows the
parameters for the EC1-12 card.
Procedure: Modify Line and Threshold Settings for the EC-1 Card
Step 1
Display the EC1-12 in CTC card view.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-14
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Step 2
Click the Provisioning tab.
Step 3
Depending on the setting you need to modify, click the Line, Thresholds, or STS subtab.
Note
Step 4
See Chapter 10, “Alarm Monitoring and Management” for information about the Alarm
Behavior tab.
Modify the settings shown in Table 7-6. For drop-down lists, select an item from the list. For numerics,
double-click the field and type the new number.
Table 7-6
EC1-12 Card Parameters
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
Line
Port #
EC-1 card port #
1 - 12
Port Name
Name assigned to the port
(optional)
To enter a name for the port, click
the cell and type the name. To
change a name, double-click the
cell, then edit the text.
PJStsMon#
Sets the STS that will be used
for pointer justification. If set to
zero, no STS is used. See the
“Pointer Justification Count
Parameters” section on
page 8-12 for more information.
•
0 (default)
•
1
Defines the distance (in feet)
from backplane to next
termination point
•
0 - 225 (default)
•
226 - 450
Rx
Equalization
For early EC1-12 card versions,
equalization can be turned off if
the line length is short or the
environment is extremely cold;
Rx Equalization should
normally be set to On
•
On (checked, default)
•
Off (unchecked)
Status
Places the port in or out of
service
•
Out of Service (default)
•
In Service
Line Buildout
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-15
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Table 7-6
EC1-12 Card Parameters (continued)
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
Thresholds Line
CV
Coding violations
Numeric. Defaults:
ES
SES
FC
UAS
Errored seconds
Severely errored seconds
Failure count
Unavailable seconds
•
1312 (15 minutes)
•
13120 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
87 (15 minutes)
•
864 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
1 (15 minutes)
•
4 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
10 (15 minutes)
•
0 (1 day)
Numeric. Defaults:
•
3 (15 minutes)
•
10 (1 day)
PPJC-Pdet
Positive Pointer Justification
Numeric. Defaults (near end):
Count, STS Path Detected. See
• 60 (15 minutes)
the “Pointer Justification Count
• 5760 (1 day)
Parameters” section on
page 8-12 for more information.
NPJC-Pdet
Negative Pointer Justification
Numeric. Defaults
Count, STS Path Detected. See
• 0 (15 minutes)
the “Pointer Justification Count
• 0 (1 day)
Parameters” section on
page 8-12 for more information.
PPJC-Pgen
Positive Pointer Justification
Numeric. Defaults:
Count, STS Path Generated. See
• 0 (15 minutes)
the “Pointer Justification Count
• 0 (1 day)
Parameters” section on
page 8-12 for more information.
NPJC-Pgen
Negative Pointer Justification
Numeric. Defaults:
Count, STS Path Generated. See
• 0 (15 minutes)
the “Pointer Justification Count
• 0 (1 day)
Parameters” section on
page 8-12 for more information.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-16
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Electrical Cards
Table 7-6
EC1-12 Card Parameters (continued)
Subtab
Parameter
Description
Options
Thresholds Section
CV
Coding violations
Numeric. Defaults (Near End
only):
10000 (15 minutes)
100000 (1 day)
ES
Errored seconds
500 (15 minutes)
5000 (1 day)
SES
Severely errored seconds
500 (15 minutes)
5000 (1 day)
SEFS
Thresholds Path
CV
Severely errored framing
seconds
500 (15 minutes)
Coding violations
Numeric. Defaults (Near and Far
End):
5000 (1 day)
15 (15 minutes)
125 (1 day)
ES
Errored seconds
12 (15 minutes)
100 (1 day)
FC
Failure count
10 (15 minutes)
10 (1 day)
SES
Severely errored seconds
3 (15 minutes)
7 (1 day)
UAS
Unavailable seconds
10 (15 minutes)
10 (1 day)
STS
STS #
EC-1 port (Line #) and STS #
available for Intermediate Path
Performance Monitoring.
Enable IPPM
Enables IPPM for the EC-1 port Unchecked (default); IPPM not
and STS #
enabled
Checked; IPPM is enabled
Alarming
Port
Port number
1 - 12
Profile
Sets the alarm profile for the
port.
Default
Inherited
Custom profiles (if any)
Suppress
Alarms
Step 5
Suppresses alarm display for the Unselected (default)
port.
Selected
Click Apply.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-17
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Optical Cards
Step 6
Repeat Steps 4 – 5 for each subtab that has parameters you want to provision.
7.3 Provisioning Optical Cards
This section explains how to modify transmission quality by provisioning line and threshold settings for
OC-N cards and how to provision OC-N cards for SDH.
7.3.1 Modifying Transmission Quality
The OC-3, OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 cards are pre-provisioned with settings that you can modify to
manage transmission quality. Depending on the optical card, you can specify thresholds for near and far
end nodes at the Line, Section, and Path levels for 15-minute and one day intervals.
Procedure: Provision Line Transmission Settings for OC-N Cards
Step 1
Display the OC-N card in CTC card view.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > Line tabs.
Step 3
Modify the settings shown in Table 7-7.
Table 7-7
OC-N Card Line Settings on the Provisioning > Line Tab
Heading
Description
#
Port number
SF BER Level
Sets the signal fail bit error rate
SD BER Level Sets the signal degrade bit error rate
Provides
Synch
Enable Synch
Messages
If checked, the card is provisioned as a network
element timing reference on the Provisioning >
Timing tabs
Enables synchronization status messages (S1 byte),
which allow the node to choose the best timing
source
Options
•
1 (OC-12, OC-48,
OC-192)
•
1-4 (OC-3)
•
1E-3
•
1E-4 (default)
•
1E-5
•
1E-5
•
1E-6
•
1E-7 (default)
•
1E-8
•
1E-9
Read-only
•
Yes (checked)
•
No (unchecked)
•
Yes (checked, default)
•
No (unchecked)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-18
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Optical Cards
Table 7-7
OC-N Card Line Settings on the Provisioning > Line Tab (continued)
Heading
Description
Send Do Not
Use
When checked, sends a DUS (do not use) message on
the S1 byte
•
Yes (checked)
•
No (unchecked; default)
PJ Sts Mon #
Sets the STS that will be used for pointer
justification. If set to 0, no STS is monitored. Only
one STS can be monitored on each OC-N port. See
the “Pointer Justification Count Parameters” section
on page 8-12 for more information.
•
0 (default) - 3 (OC-3, per
port)
•
0 (default) - 12 (OC-12)
•
0 (default) - 48 (OC-48)
•
0 (default) - 192 (OC-192)
•
Out of Service (default
•
In Service
•
Sonet
•
SDH
Status
Places port in or out of service
Type
Step 4
Options
Defines the port as SONET or SDH. See the
“Provisioning OC-N Cards for SDH” section on
page 7-23.
Click Apply.
Procedure: Provision Threshold Settings for OC-N Cards
Step 1
Display the OC-N card in CTC card view (Figure 7-2 on page 7-19).
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > Thresholds tabs.
Figure 7-2
Step 3
Provisioning thresholds for the OC48 IR 1310 card
Modify the settings shown in Table 7-8 on page 7-20.
Default thresholds apply to all optical cards unless otherwise specified.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-19
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Optical Cards
Table 7-8
OC-N Card Threshold Settings on the Provisioning > Thresholds Tab
Heading
Description
Port
Port number
CV
Coding violations
Options
•
1, 2, 3, or 4 (OC-3)
•
1 (OC-12, OC-48, OC-192)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Line
•
1312/13,120 (OC-3 Near & Far End)
•
5315/53150 (OC-12 Near & Far End)
•
21260/212600 (OC-48 Near & Far End)
•
85040/850400 (OC-192 Near & Far End)
Section
•
10000/100000 (Near End) 0/0 (Far End)
•
10000/500 (OC-192 Near & Far End)
Path
•
ES
Errored seconds
15/125 (OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 Near & Far
End)
Numeric. Default (15 min/1 day):
Line
•
87/864 (Near & Far End)
Section
•
500/5000 (Near End); 0/0 (Far End)
Path
•
SES
Severely errored seconds
12/100 (OC-48 & OC-192 Near & Far End)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Line
•
1/4 (Near and Far End)
Section
•
500/5000 (Near End); 0/0 (Far End)
Path
•
SEFS
Severely errored framing seconds
3/7 (OC-48 & OC-192 Near & Far End)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Section
•
500/5000 (Near End); 0/0 (Far End)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-20
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Optical Cards
Table 7-8
OC-N Card Threshold Settings on the Provisioning > Thresholds Tab (continued)
Heading
Description
Options
FC
Failure count
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Line
•
10/0 (OC-3, Near and Far End)
•
10/40 (OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 Near and Far
End)
Path
•
UAS
Unavailable seconds
10/10 (OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 Near and Far
End)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Line
•
3/3 (OC-3, Near & Far End
•
3/10 (OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 Near and Far
End)
Path
•
10/10 (Near and Far End)
PPJC-Pdet
Positive Pointer Justification
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Count, STS Path detected. See the
Line
“Pointer Justification Count
• 60/5760 Near End
Parameters” section on page 8-12
for more information.
• 0/0 Far End
NPJC-Pdet
Negative Pointer Justification
Numeric. Defaults (Near and Far End):
Count, STS Path detected. See the
Line
“Pointer Justification Count
• 0 (15 minutes)
Parameters” section on page 8-12
for more information.
• 0 (1 day)
PPJC-Pgen
Positive Pointer Justification
Count, STS Path generated. See
the “Pointer Justification Count
Parameters” section on page 8-12
for more information.
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Negative Pointer Justification
Count, STS Path generated. See
the “Pointer Justification Count
Parameters” section on page 8-12
for more information.
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
NPJC-Pgen
PSC
Line
•
0/0 (Near and Far End)
Line
•
0/0 (Near and Far End)
Protection Switching Count (Line) Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Line
•
1/5 (Near End)
•
0/0 (Far End)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-21
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Optical Cards
Table 7-8
OC-N Card Threshold Settings on the Provisioning > Thresholds Tab (continued)
Heading
Description
Options
PSD
Protection Switch Duration (Line) Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Line
PSC-W
Protection Switching Count Working line
BLSR is not supported on the
OC-3 card; therefore, the PSC-W,
PSC-S, and PSC-R PMs do not
increment.
PSD-W
Protection Switching Duration Working line
BLSR is not supported on the
OC-3 card; therefore, the PSD-W,
PSD-S, and PSD-R PMs do not
increment.
PSC-S
Protection Switching Duration Span
BLSR is not supported on the
OC-3 card; therefore, the PSC-W,
PSC-S, and PSC-R PMs do not
increment.
PSD-S
Protection Switching Duration Span
BLSR is not supported on the
OC-3 card; therefore, the PSD-W,
PSD-S, and PSD-R PMs do not
increment.
PSC-R
Protection Switching Duration Ring
BLSR is not supported on the
OC-3 card; therefore, the PSC-W,
PSC-S, and PSC-R PMs do not
increment.
PSD-R
Protection Switching Duration Ring
BLSR is not supported on the
OC-3 card; therefore, the PSD-W,
PSD-S, and PSD-R PMs do not
increment.
•
300/600 (Near End)
•
0/0 (all OC-N cards, Far End)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Line
•
0/0 (all OC-N cards except OC-3, Near and
Far End)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Line
•
0/0 (all OC-N cards except OC-3, Near and
Far End)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Line
•
0/0 (all OC-N cards except OC-3, Near and
Far End)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Line
•
0/0 (all OC-N cards except OC-3, Near and
Far End)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Line
•
0/0 (all OC-N cards except OC-3, Near and
Far End)
Numeric. Defaults (15 min/1 day):
Line
•
0/0 (all OC-N cards except OC-3, Near and
Far End)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-22
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning Optical Cards
Click Apply.
7.3.2 Provisioning OC-N Cards for SDH
You can provision the ONS 15454 OC-3, OC-12, and OC-48 cards to support either SONET or SDH over
SONET signals. When provisioned for SDH, each OC-N port drops and inserts STM traffic in
unprotected or 1+1 protection mode. Each STM-1 signal is mapped as a 155 Mbps concatenated signal
(STS-3c) for transparent transport over a SONET network. The original STM-1 traffic may be handed
off as an STM-1 or OC-3.
Because SDH and SONET frame format and size are nearly identical, their line speeds meet, starting at
155 Mbps. For example, at the STM-1/OC-3 level, the ONS 15454 performs section and line overhead
conversions and maps the 261x9 byte VC-4 into an STS-3c for transparent transport across the SONET
domain. At the far end, the STS-3c carrying the original VC-4 is remapped into an STM-1 for handoff
to an SDH network element (node). Table 7-9 shows the SDH over SONET mapping for the ONS 15454
OC-N cards.
Table 7-9
OC-N – SDH Over SONET Mapping
Card
SDH
SDH over SONET
OC-3
STM-1
STS-3c
OC-12
STM-4
STS-12c
OC-48
STM-16
STS-48c
OC-192
STM-64
STS-192c
The ONS 15454 performs section, line overhead, and pointer conversions between SDH and SONET.
However, to ensure operability, the following requirements must be met:
•
The embedded payload must be compatible on both sides and require no conversion of any kind.
Examples of such payloads include concatenated ATM or Packet over SONET/SDH signals.
•
The path overhead (POH) must be compatible on both sides and require no conversion of any kind.
Each overhead byte must be processed identically or simultaneously ignored. Key POH bytes to
consider are the J1 (path indicator) and C2 (payload format).
•
You cannot enable intermediate path protection monitoring (IPPM) on OC-12 and OC-48 ports that
are enabled for SDH.
Most SONET and SDH routers and ATM switches can be configured to meet these requirements.
Procedure: Provision an OC-N Card for SDH
Step 1
Log into the node and double-click the OC-N card.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > Line tabs.
Step 3
Under Type, choose SDH.
Step 4
Click Apply.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-23
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning IPPM
7.4 Provisioning IPPM
Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring (IPPM) allows you to transparently monitor traffic
originating on DS-1, DS-3, DS3E and DS3XM cards (Path Terminating Equipment) as it passes through
EC-1, OC-3, OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 cards (Line Terminating Equipment). To use IPPM, you create
the STS circuit on the DS-N cards, then enable IPPM on the EC-1 or OC-N cards that carry the circuit.
Note
For Release 3.0 and later, IPPM is enabled for near-end (originating) traffic only. Far-end
(terminating) IPPM will be enabled in a future release.
For example, suppose you have an STS circuit that originates and terminates on DS-N cards at Nodes 1
and 4. You want to monitor the circuit as it passes through OC-N cards at Nodes 2 and 3. To do this, you
enable IPPM on the OC-N card by selecting the appropriate STS, in this example, STS 1 (Figure 7-3).
Figure 7-3
IPPM provisioned for STS 1 on an OC-12 card
After enabling IPPM, performance is displayed on the Performance tab for the OC-48 card. IPPM
enables per-path statistics for STS CV-P (coding violations), STS ES-P (errored seconds), STS FC-P
(failure count), STS SES-P (severely errored seconds), and STS UAS-P (unavailable seconds). Only one
STS per port can be monitored at one time. See Chapter 8, “Performance Monitoring” for a definition of
every parameter.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-24
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning the Alarm Interface Controller
Procedure: Enable Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring
Step 1
If the STS circuit does not exist, create the circuit. (The circuit must pass through the EC-1 or OC-N card
before you can enable IPPM on the circuit.)
Step 2
In CTC, open the card view of an EC-1 or OC-N card that carries the circuit.
Step 3
Select the Provisioning > STS tabs.
Step 4
Click Enable IPPM for the STS you want to monitor.
Step 5
Click Apply.
7.5 Provisioning the Alarm Interface Controller
The Alarm Interface Controller (AIC) card can be provisioned to receive input from, or send output to,
external devices wired to the ONS 15454 backplane. (For detailed specifications about the AIC, refer to
the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide.) You can provision the AIC to:
•
Generate CTC alarms based on events such as heating or cooling equipment failure, fire alarms,
smoke detection, and other environmental changes that can damage ONS 15454 equipment. These
are called external alarms.
•
Turn external devices on or off based on a CTC alarm. For example, you can provision the AIC to
turn on an audio or visual device, such as a bell or light, when a critical ONS 15454 alarm occurs.
These triggers are called external controls.
Figure 7-4 shows the flow to and from external devices provisioned through the AIC.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-25
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning the Alarm Interface Controller
AIC alarm input and output
External control
Bell
External alarms
Relay
Relay
Relay
Relay
Light
CTC alarm turns on
an external device
Smoke
detector
Heat
sensor
External device
generates CTC alarm
= External alarm
= External control
38566
Figure 7-4
7.5.1 Using Virtual Wires
Provisioning the AIC card provides a “virtual wires” option used to route external alarms and controls
from different nodes to one or more alarm collection centers. In Figure 7-5, smoke detectors at Nodes 1,
2, 3, and 4 are assigned to Virtual Wire #1, and Virtual Wire #1 is provisioned as the trigger for an
external bell at Node 1.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-26
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning the Alarm Interface Controller
Figure 7-5
External alarms and controls using a virtual wire
Bell
Smoke
detector
Virtual Wire #1 is
external control
trigger
Virtual Wire #1
Virtual Wire #1
ONS 15454
Node 1
Smoke
detector
Smoke
detector
ONS 15454
Node 4
ONS 15454
Node 2
ONS 15454
Node 3
Virtual Wire #1
= External alarm
Smoke
detector
= External control
44743
Virtual Wire #1
When using AIC virtual wires, you can:
•
Assign different external devices to the same virtual wire.
•
Assign virtual wires as the trigger type for different external controls.
Procedure: Provision External Alarms
Step 1
Wire the external-device relays to the ENVIR ALARMS IN backplane pins. See the “Alarm, Timing,
LAN, and Craft Pin Connections” section on page 1-32 for more information.
Step 2
Log into the node in CTC and display the AIC in card view.
Step 3
Click the Provisioning > External Alarms tabs (Figure 7-6 on page 7-28).
Step 4
Complete the following fields for each external device wired to the ONS 15454 backplane:
•
Enabled—Click to activate the fields for the alarm input number.
•
Alarm Type—Select an alarm type from the provided list.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-27
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning the Alarm Interface Controller
•
Severity—Select a severity. The severity determines how the alarm is displayed in the CTC Alarms
and History tabs and whether the LEDs are activated. Critical, Major, and Minor activate the
appropriate LEDs. Not Alarmed and Not Reported do not activate LEDs, but do report the
information in CTC.
•
Virtual Wire—To assign the external device to a virtual wire, select the virtual wire. Otherwise, do
not change the None default.
•
Raised When—Select the contact condition (open or closed) that will trigger the alarm in CTC.
•
Description—Default descriptions are provided for each alarm type; change the description as
necessary.
Figure 7-6
Provisioning external alarms on the AIC card
Step 5
To provision additional devices, complete Step 4 for each additional device.
Step 6
Click Apply.
Procedure: Provision External Controls
Step 1
Wire the external control relays to the ENVIR ALARMS OUT backplane pins. See the “Alarm, Timing,
LAN, and Craft Pin Connections” section on page 1-32 for more information.
Step 2
In CTC, log into the node and display the AIC in card view.
Step 3
On the External Controls subtab, complete the following fields for each external control wired to the
ONS 15454 backplane:
•
Enabled—Click to activate the fields for the alarm input number.
•
Trigger Type—Select a trigger type: a local minor, major, or critical alarm; a remote minor, major,
or critical alarm; or a virtual wire activation.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-28
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Provisioning the Alarm Interface Controller
•
Description—Enter a description.
Step 4
To provision additional controls, complete Step 3 for each additional device.
Step 5
Click Apply.
7.5.2 Provisioning AIC Orderwire
The AIC provides RJ-11 jacks to allow onsite personnel to communicate with one another using standard
phone sets. The AIC Local and Express orderwire channels are carried on the SONET Orderwire
overhead:
•
Local orderwire is carried on the SONET Section layer E1 byte. Regenerators between ONS 15454
nodes terminate the channel.
•
Express orderwire is carried on the E2 byte of the SONET Line layer.
If regenerators are not used between ONS 15454 nodes, local or express AIC orderwire channels can be
used. If regenerators exist, use the Express orderwire channel. You can provision up to four ONS 15454
OC-N ports for each orderwire path.
Caution
When provisioning orderwire for ONS 15454s residing in a ring, do not provision a complete
orderwire loop. For example, a four-node ring typically has east and west ports provisioned at all four
nodes. However, to prevent orderwire loops, provision two orderwire ports (east and west) at all but
one of the ring nodes.
Procedure: Provision AIC Orderwire
Tip
Before you begin, make a list of the ONS 15454 slots and ports that require orderwire
communication.
Step 1
In CTC, open the AIC card view.
Step 2
Select the orderwire subtab, Local Orderwire or Express Orderwire, appropriate to the orderwire path
that you want to create.
The Local Orderwire subtab is shown in Figure 7-7 on page 7-30. Provisioning procedures are the same
for both types of orderwire.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-29
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Converting DS-1 and DS-3 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection
Figure 7-7
Provisioning local orderwire
Step 3
In the Available Ports list, select each port that you want to use for the orderwire channel and click Add
to move them to the Selected Ports column.
Step 4
If needed, adjust the Tx and Rx dBm by moving the slider to the right or left for the headset type
(four-wire or two-wire) that you will use. In general, you should not need to adjust the dBm.
Step 5
Click Apply.
7.5.3 Using the AIC Orderwire
The AIC orderwire channels function as a party line. Anyone plugging a phone set into an AIC orderwire
channel can communicate with all participants on the connected orderwire. The AIC does not provide
private, point-to-point connections. To alert participants, press the AIC Call button to activate a buzzer
and illuminate the RING LED on AICs at all connected nodes.
7.6 Converting DS-1 and DS-3 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection
The ONS 15454 provides three protection options for DS1-14 and DS3-12 cards: unprotected, 1:1, and
1:N (N=5 or less). Changing protection from 1:1 to 1:N increases the available bandwidth because two
of the three cards used for protection in the 1:1 protection group become working cards in the 1:N group.
When setting up 1:N protection, install the DS1N-14 or DS3N-12 card in Slot 3 or 15 on the same side
of the ONS 15454 as the cards it protects. Slot 3 protects cards in Slots 1 - 2 and 4 - 6. Slot 15 protects
Slots 12 - 14 and 16 - 17. A DS1N-14 or DS3N-12 card installed in Slot 3 or 15 can protect up to five
DS1-14 or DS3-12 cards. If you install a DS3N-12 or DS1N-14 card in another slot, it behaves like a
normal DS-1 or DS-3 card.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-30
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Converting DS-1 and DS-3 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection
To create 1:1 protection for DS-1 and DS-3 cards, see the “Creating Protection Groups” section on
page 3-9.
Procedure: Convert DS1-14 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection
Note
This procedure assumes DS1-14 cards are installed in Slots 1 through 6 and/or Slots 12 through 17.
The DS1-14 cards in Slots 3 and 15, which are the protection slots, will be replaced with DS1N-14
cards. The ONS 15454 must run CTC Release 2.0 or later. The procedure also requires at least one
DS1N-14 card and a protection group with DS1-14 cards.
Step 1
In node view, click the Maintenance > Protection tabs.
Step 2
Click the protection group that contains Slot 3 or Slot 15 (where you will install the DS1N-14 card).
Step 3
Make sure the slot you are upgrading is not carrying working traffic. In the Selected Group list, the
protect slot must say Protect/Standby (shown in Figure 7-8 on page 7-32) and not Protect/Active. If the
protect slot status is Protect/Active, use the following steps to switch traffic to the working card:
a.
Under Selected Group, click the protect card.
b.
Next to Switch Commands, click Switch.
The working slot should change to Working/Active and the protect slot should change to
Protect/Standby. If they do not change, do not continue. Troubleshoot the working card and slot to
determine why the card cannot carry working traffic.
c.
Next to Switch Commands, select Clear.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-31
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Converting DS-1 and DS-3 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection
Figure 7-8
Viewing slot protection status
Step 4
Repeat Steps 1 – 3 for each protection group that you need to convert.
Step 5
Verify that no standing alarms exist for any of the DS1-14 cards that you are converting. If alarms exist
and you have difficulty clearing them, contact your next level of support.
Step 6
Click the Provisioning > Protection tabs.
Step 7
Click the 1:1 protection group that contains the cards that you will move into the new protection group.
Step 8
Click Delete.
Step 9
When the confirmation dialog displays, click Yes.
Note
Deleting the 1:1 protection groups does not disrupt service. However, no protection
bandwidth exists for the working circuits until you complete the 1:N protection procedure.
Therefore, complete this procedure as quickly as possible.
Step 10
If needed, repeat Steps 7– 9 for other protection groups.
Step 11
On the node view, right-click the DS1-14 card in Slot 3 or Slot 15 and select Delete from the shortcut
menu.
Step 12
Physically remove the DS1-14 card from Slot 3 or Slot 15. This raises an improper removal alarm.
Step 13
In node view, right-click the slot that held the removed card and select delete from the pull-down menu.
Wait for the card to disappear from the node view.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-32
November 2001
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Converting DS-1 and DS-3 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection
Step 14
Physically insert a DS1N-14 card into the same slot.
Step 15
Verify that the card boots up properly.
Step 16
Click the Inventory tab and verify that the new card appears as a DS1N-14.
Step 17
Click the Provisioning > Protection tabs.
Step 18
Click Create. The Create Protection Group dialog opens with the protect card in the Protect Card field
and the available cards in the Available Cards field.
Step 19
Type a name for the protection group in the Name field (optional).
Step 20
Click Type and choose 1:N (card) from the pull-down menu.
Step 21
Verify that the DS1N-14 card appears in the Protect Card field.
Step 22
Under Available Cards, highlight the cards that you want in the protection group. Click the arrow (>>)
tab to move the cards to the Working Cards list.
Step 23
Click OK. The protection group appears in the Protection Groups list on the Protection subtab.
Procedure: Convert DS3-12 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection
Note
This procedure assumes that DS3-12 cards are installed in Slots 1 - 6 and/or Slots 12 - 17. The
DS3-12 cards in Slots 3 and 15, which are the protection slots, will be replaced with DS3N-12 cards.
The ONS 15454 must run CTC Release 2.0 or later. The procedure also requires at least one DS3N-12
card and a protection group with DS3-12 cards.
Step 1
In node view, click the Maintenance > Protection tabs.
Step 2
Click the protection group containing Slot 13 or Slot 15 (where you will install the DS3N-12 card).
Step 3
Make sure the slot you are upgrading is not carrying working traffic. In the Selected Group list, the
protect slot must say Protect/Standby as shown in Figure 7-8 on page 7-32, and not Protect/Active. If the
protect slot status is Protect/Active, use the following steps to switch traffic to the working card:
a.
Under Selected Group, click the protect card.
b.
Next to Switch Commands, click Switch.
The working slot should change to Working/Active and the protect slot should change to
Protect/Standby. If they fail to change, do not continue. Troubleshoot the working card and slot to
determine why the card cannot carry working traffic.
c.
Next to Switch Commands, click Clear.
Step 4
Repeat Steps 2 and 3 for each protection group that you need to convert.
Step 5
Verify that no standing alarms exist for any of the DS3-12 cards you are converting. If alarms exist and
you have difficulty clearing them, contact your next level of support.
Step 6
Click the Provisioning > Protection tabs.
Step 7
Click the 1:1 protection group that contains the cards that you will move into the new protection group.
Step 8
Click Delete.
Step 9
When the confirmation dialog displays, click Yes.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
7-33
Chapter 7
Card Provisioning
Converting DS-1 and DS-3 Cards From 1:1 to 1:N Protection
Note
Deleting the 1:1 protection groups will not disrupt service. However, no protection
bandwidth exists for the working circuits until the 1:N protection procedure is completed. Do
not delay when completing this procedure.
Step 10
If you are deleting more than one protection group, repeat Steps 7–9 for each group.
Step 11
On the node view, right-click the DS3-12 card in Slot 3 or Slot 15 and choose Delete from the shortcut
menu.
Step 12
Physically remove the DS3-12 card from Slot 3 or Slot 15. This raises an improper removal alarm.
Step 13
In node view, right-click the slot that held the removed card and choose Delete from the pull-down menu.
Wait for the card to disappear from the node view.
Step 14
Physically insert a DS3N-12 card into the same slot.
Step 15
Verify that the card boots up properly.
Step 16
Click the Inventory tab and verify that the new card appears as a DS3N-12.
Step 17
Click the Provisioning > Protection tabs.
Step 18
Click Create.
The Create Protection Group dialog shows the protect card in the Protect Card field and the available
cards in the Available Cards field.
Step 19
Type a name for the protection group in the Name field (optional).
Step 20
Click Type and choose 1:N (card) from the pull-down menu.
Step 21
Verify that the DS3N-12 card appears in the Protect Card field.
Step 22
In the Available Cards list, highlight the cards that you want in the protection group. Click the arrow
(>>) tab to move the cards to the Working Cards list.
Step 23
Click OK.
The protection group should appear in the Protection Groups list on the Protection subtab.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
7-34
November 2001
C H A P T E R
8
Performance Monitoring
Performance monitoring parameters (PMs) are used by service providers to gather, store, threshold, and
report performance data for early detection of problems. PM terms are defined for both electrical cards
and optical cards.
This chapter provides the:
•
“Using the Performance Monitoring Screen” section on page 8-1
•
“Changing Thresholds” section on page 8-9
•
“Enabling Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring” section on page 8-10
•
“Pointer Justification Count Parameters” section on page 8-12
•
“Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards” section on page 8-14
•
“Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards” section on page 8-33
For information about:
•
Ethernet PMs, see Chapter 9, “Ethernet Operation”
•
Troubleshooting UPSR switch counts, see the alarm troubleshooting information in the Cisco ONS
15454 Troubleshooting and Reference Guide, Release 3.1
•
Editing UPSR circuits, see Chapter 6, “Circuits and Tunnels.”
•
Digital transmission surveillance, see Telcordia’s GR-1230-CORE, GR-820-CORE, and
GR-253-CORE documents and the ANSI document entitled Digital Hierarchy - Layer 1 In-Service
Digital Transmission Performance Monitoring
8.1 Using the Performance Monitoring Screen
The following sections describe how to use basic screen elements such as tabs, menus, and informational
columns. Figure 8-1 shows the Performance tab of Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) card-level view.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-1
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Using the Performance Monitoring Screen
Figure 8-1
Viewing performance monitoring information
Card view
55379
Performance tab
8.1.1 Viewing PMs
Before you view PMs, be sure you have created the appropriate circuits and provisioned the card
according to your specifications. For information about circuit creation and card provisioning, see the
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide.
Procedure: View PMs
Step 1
Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card’s graphic in the main (node) view or
right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once highlights the card only.)
Step 2
From the card view, click the Performance tab.
Step 3
View the PM parameter names that appear on the left portion of the screen in the Param column. The
parameter numbers appear on the right portion of the screen in the Curr (current), and Prev (previous)
columns.
8.1.2 Changing the Screen Intervals
Changing the screen view allows you to view PMs in 15-minute intervals or 24-hour periods. Figure 8-2
shows the time interval buttons on the Performance Monitoring screen.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-2
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Using the Performance Monitoring Screen
Figure 8-2
Time interval buttons on the card view Performance tab
5378
Fifteen-minute and twenty-four hour intervals
Procedure: Select Fifteen-Minute PM Intervals on the Performance Monitoring Screen
Step 1
Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card’s graphic in the main (node) view or
right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once highlights the card only.)
Step 2
From the card view, click the Performance tab.
Step 3
Click the 15 min button.
Step 4
Click the Refresh button. Performance monitoring parameters display in 15-minute intervals
synchronized with the time of day.
Step 5
View the Current column to find PM counts for the current 15-minute interval.
Each monitored performance parameter has corresponding threshold values for the current time period.
If the value of the counter exceeds the threshold value for a particular 15-minute interval, a threshold
crossing alert (TCA) will be raised. The value represents the counter for each specific performance
monitoring parameter.
Step 6
View the Prev-N columns to find PM counts for the preceding 15-minute intervals.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-3
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Using the Performance Monitoring Screen
Note
If a complete 15-minute interval count is not possible, the value displays with a yellow background.
An incomplete or incorrect count can be caused by changing node timing settings, changing the time
zone settings on CTC, replacing a card, resetting a card, changing port states, or by using the Baseline
button. When a complete count occurs, the subsequent 15-minute interval appears with a white
background.
Procedure: Select Twenty-Four Hour PM Intervals on the Performance Monitoring Screen
Step 1
Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card’s graphic in the main (node) view or
right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once highlights the card only.)
Step 2
From the card view, click the Performance tab.
Step 3
Click the 1 day button.
Step 4
Click the Refresh button. Performance monitoring displays in 24-hour periods synchronized with the
time of day.
Step 5
View the Current column to find PM counts for the current 24-hour period.
Each monitored performance parameter has corresponding threshold values for the current time period.
If the value of the counter exceeds the threshold value for a particular 24-hour period, a threshold
crossing alert (TCA) will be raised. The value represents the counter for each specific performance
monitoring parameter.
Step 6
Note
View the Prev columns to find PM counts for the preceding 24-hour period.
If a complete count over a 24-hour period is not possible, the value displays with a yellow
background. An incomplete or incorrect count can be caused by changing node timing settings,
changing the time zone settings on CTC, replacing a card, resetting a card, changing port states, or
by using the Baseline button. When a complete count occurs, the subsequent 24-hour period appears
with a white background.
8.1.3 Viewing Near End and Far End PMs
Select the Near End or Far End button depending on the PMs you wish to view. Only cards that allow
both near-end and far-end monitoring have these buttons as an option. Figure 8-3 on page 8-5 shows the
Near End and Far End buttons on the Performance Monitoring screen.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-4
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Using the Performance Monitoring Screen
Figure 8-3
Near End and Far End buttons on the card view Performance tab
55377
Near End and Far End buttons
Procedure: Select Near End PMs on the Performance Monitoring Screen
Step 1
Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card’s graphic in the main (node) view or
right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once highlights the card only.)
Step 2
From the card view, click the Performance tab.
Step 3
Click the Near End button.
Step 4
Click the Refresh button. All PMs occurring for the selected card on the incoming signal are displayed.
Procedure: Select Far End PMs on the Performance Monitoring Screen
Step 1
Open the electrical or optical card of choice. To do so, double-click the card’s graphic in the main (node)
view or right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once highlights the card only.)
Step 2
From the card view, click the Performance tab.
Step 3
Click the Far End button.
Step 4
Click the Refresh button. All PMs recorded by the far-end node for the selected card on the outgoing
signal are displayed.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-5
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Using the Performance Monitoring Screen
8.1.4 Using the Signal-Type Menu
Use the signal-type menus to monitor PMs for near-end or far-end signals on a selected port. Different
signal-type menus appear depending on the card type and the circuit type. The appropriate types (DS1,
DS3, VT path, STS path, OCn section, line) appear based on the card. For example, the DS3XM has DS3,
DS1, VT path, and STS path PMs. Figure 8-4 shows the signal-type menus on the Performance
Monitoring screen for a DS3XM-6 card.
Figure 8-4
Signal-type menus for a DS3XM-6 card
55376
Signal-type menus
Procedure: Select Signal-Type Menus on the Performance Monitoring Screen
Step 1
Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card’s graphic in the main (node) view or
right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once highlights the card only.)
Step 2
From the card view, click the Performance tab.
Step 3
Click the signal-type menu. (For example, the DS3XM card has menus labeled DS3, DS1, VT, and STS.)
Step 4
Select a port using the signal-type menu.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-6
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Using the Performance Monitoring Screen
8.1.5 Using the Baseline Button
In Software R3.0 and higher, the Baseline button located on the far right of the screen clears the PM
count displayed in the Current column, but does not clear the PM count on the card. When the current
15-minute or 24-hour time interval expires or the screen view changes, the total number of PM counts
on the card and on the screen appear in the appropriate column.
The baseline values are discarded if you change views to a different screen and then return to the
Performance Monitoring screen. The Baseline button enables you to easily see how quickly PM counts
are rising without having to perform calculations. Figure 8-5 shows the Baseline button on the
Performance Monitoring screen.
Figure 8-5
Baseline button for clearing displayed PM counts
55375
Baseline button
Procedure: Use the Baseline Button on the Performance Monitoring Screen
Step 1
Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card’s graphic in the main (node) view or
right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once highlights the card only.)
Step 2
From the card view, click the Performance tab.
Step 3
Click the Baseline button.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-7
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Using the Performance Monitoring Screen
8.1.6 Using the Clear Button
The Clear button located on the far right of the Performance Monitoring screen clears certain PM counts
depending on the option selected. Figure 8-6 shows the Clear button on the Performance Monitoring
screen.
Caution
Pressing the Clear button can potentially mask problems if used incorrectly. This button is commonly
used for testing purposes.
Figure 8-6
Clear button for clearing PM counts
61380
Clear button
Procedure: Use the Clear Button on the Performance Monitoring Screen
Step 1
Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card’s graphic in the main (node) view or
right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once highlights the card only.)
Step 2
From the card view, click the Performance tab.
Step 3
Click the Clear button.
Step 4
From the Clear Statistics menu, choose one of three options:
•
Selected Interfaces: Clearing selected interfaces erases all PM counts associated with the selected
radio buttons. For example, if the 15 min and the Near End buttons are selected and you click the
Clear button, all near-end PM counts in the current 15-minute interval are erased from the card and
the screen display.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-8
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Changing Thresholds
Step 5
Note
•
All interfaces on port x: Clearing all interfaces on port x erases from the card and the screen display
all PM counts associated with all combinations of the radio buttons on the selected port. This means
the 15-minute near-end and far-end counts are cleared, and 24-hour near-end and far-end counts are
cleared from the card and the screen display.
•
All interfaces on card: Clearing all interfaces on the card erases from the card and the screen
display all PM counts for data and ports on all interfaces.
From the Zero Data menu, click Yes to clear the selected statistics.
The Ethernet cards are the only cards without the Clear button option.
8.2 Changing Thresholds
Thresholds are used to set error levels for each PM. You can program PM threshold ranges from the
Provisioning > Threshold tabs on the card view. For procedures on provisioning card thresholds, such as
line, path, and SONET thresholds, see Chapter 7, “Card Provisioning.”
During the accumulation cycle, if the current value of a performance monitoring parameter reaches or
exceeds its corresponding threshold value, a threshold crossing alert (TCA) is generated by the node and
sent to CTC. TCAs provide early detection of performance degradation. When a threshold is crossed,
the node continues to count the errors during a given accumulation period. If 0 is entered as the threshold
value, the performance monitoring parameter is disabled. Figure 8-7 shows the Provisioning >
Threshold tabs for an OC-48 card.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-9
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Enabling Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring
Figure 8-7
Threshold tab for setting threshold values
Provisioning tab
Card view
61945
Threshold tab
Change the threshold if the default value does not satisfy your error monitoring needs. For example,
customers with a critical DS1 installed for 911 calls must guarantee the best quality of service on the
line; therefore, they lower all thresholds so that the slightest error raises a TCA.
8.3 Enabling Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring
Intermediate-path performance monitoring (IPPM) allows transparent monitoring of a constituent
channel of an incoming transmission signal by a node that does not terminate that channel. Many large
ONS 15454 networks only use line terminating equipment (LTE) not path terminating equipment (PTE).
Table 8-1 shows ONS 15454 cards that are considered LTEs. Figure 8-8 shows the Provisioning > STS
tabs for an OC-3 card.
Table 8-1
Traffic Cards That Terminate the Line, Called LTEs
Line Terminating Equipment
EC1-12
OC3 IR 4/STM1 SH 1310
OC12 IR/STM4 SH 1310
OC12 LR/STM4 LH 1310
OC12 LR/STM4 LH 1550
OC48 IR 1310
OC48 LR 1550
OC48 IR/STM16 SH AS 1310
OC48 LR/STM16 LH AS 1550
OC48 ELR/STM16 EH 100 GHz
OC48 ELR/STM16 EH 200 GHz
OC192 LR/STM64 LH 1550
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-10
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Enabling Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring
Figure 8-8
Provisioning tab
Card view
61946
STS tab
STS tab for enabling IPPM
Software R3.0 and higher allows LTE cards to monitor near-end PM data on individual STS payloads by
enabling IPPM. After enabling IPPM provisioning on the line card, service providers can monitor large
amounts of STS traffic through intermediate nodes, thus making troubleshooting and maintenance
activities more efficient.
IPPM occurs only on STS paths which have IPPM enabled, and TCAs are raised only for PM parameters
on the selected IPPM paths. The monitored IPPMs are STS CV-P, STS ES-P, STS SES-P, STS UAS-P,
and STS FC-P. For detailed information about provisioning cards and the procedure for enabling IPPM,
see Chapter 7, “Card Provisioning.”
Note
The far-end IPPM feature is not supported in Software R3.1. However, SONET path PMs can be
monitored by logging into the far-end node directly.
The ONS 15454 performs IPPM by examining the overhead in the monitored path and by reading all of
the near-end path PMs in the incoming direction of transmission. The IPPM process allows the path
signal to pass bidirectionally through the node completely unaltered.
For detailed information about specific PMs, locate the card name in the following sections and review
the appropriate definition.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-11
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Pointer Justification Count Parameters
8.4 Pointer Justification Count Parameters
Pointers are used to compensate for frequency and phase variations. Pointer justification counts indicate
timing errors on SONET networks. There are positive (PPJC) and negative (NPJC) pointer justification
count parameters. PPJC is a count of path-detected (PPJC-Pdet) or path-generated (PPJC-Pgen) positive
pointer justifications. NPJC is a count of path-detected (NPJC-Pdet) or path-generated (NPJC-Pgen)
negative pointer justifications depending on the specific PM name.
Figure 8-9 shows pointer justification count parameters on the Performance Monitoring screen. You can
enable PPJC and NPJC performance monitoring parameters for LTE cards. See Table 8-1 on page 8-10
for a list of Cisco ONS 15454 LTE cards.
For pointer justification count definitions, see the “EC1 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters”
section on page 8-14, the “OC-3 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters” section on page 8-33, or the
“OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters” section on page 8-37
depending on the cards in use.
Figure 8-9
Viewing pointer justification count parameters
Performance tab Card view
61947
Pointer justification counts
Pointers provide a way to align the phase variations in STS and VT payloads. The STS payload pointer is
located in the H1 and H2 bytes of the line overhead. Clocking differences are measured by the offset in
bytes from the pointer to the first byte of the STS synchronous payload envelope (SPE) called the J1
byte. Clocking differences that exceed the normal range of 0 to 782 can cause data loss.
A consistent pointer justification count indicates clock synchronization problems between nodes.
Detected and generated counts should be equal. A difference between the counts means the node
transmitting the original pointer justification has timing variations with the node detecting and
transmitting this count. Positive pointer adjustments occur when the frame rate of the SPE is too slow in
relation to the rate of the STS 1.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-12
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Pointer Justification Count Parameters
On CTC, the count fields for PPJC and NPJC PMs appear white and blank unless they are enabled on
the Provisioning > Line tabs. Figure 8-10 shows the PJStsMon# menu on the Provisioning screen.
Figure 8-10 Line tab for enabling pointer justification count parameters
Provisioning tab
Card view
61948
Line tab
Procedure: Enable Pointer Justification Count Performance Monitoring
Step 1
Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card’s graphic in the main (node) view or
right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once highlights the card only.)
Step 2
From the card view, click the Provisioning > Line tabs.
Step 3
Click the PJStsMon# menu and select a number.
•
The value of 0 means pointer justification monitoring is disabled.
•
The values 1-N are the STS numbers on one port. One STS per port can be enabled from the
PJStsMon# menu.
EC1 PJStsMon# card menu: 0 or 1 can be selected on a total of 12 ports.
OC-3 PJStsMon# card menu: 1, 2, or 3 can be selected on a total of 4 ports.
OC-12 PJStsMon# card menu: 1 or any number through 12 can be selected on 1 port.
OC-48 PJStsMon# card menu: 1 or any number through 48 can be selected on 1 port.
OC-192 PJStsMon# card menu: 1 or any number through 192 can be selected on 1 port.
Step 4
Click Apply and return to the Performance tab to view PM parameters.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-13
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
8.5 Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
The following sections define performance monitoring parameters for the EC1, DS1, DS1N, DS3,
DS3N, DS3-12E, DS3N-12E, and DS3XM electrical cards.
8.5.1 EC1 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters
Figure 8-11 shows signal types that support far-end PMs. Far-end performance monitoring is not
reported for EC1. Figure 8-12 shows where overhead bytes detected on the application specific
integrated circuits (ASICs) produce performance monitoring parameters for the EC1 card.
Figure 8-11 Monitored signal types for the EC1 card
Near End
Far End
EC1 Signal
EC1 Signal
ONS 15454
ONS 15454
Fiber
EC1
OC48
OC48
EC1
55310
EC1 Path (EC1 XX) Far End PMs Not Supported
STS Path (STS XX-P) Far End PMs Not Supported
Note
The XX in the illustration above represents all PMs listed below with the given prefix and/or suffix.
Figure 8-12 PM read points on the EC1 card
ONS 15454
EC1 Card
XC10G Card
OC-N
LIU
Tx/Rx
Framer
Line Side
SONET Side
CV-S
ES-S
SES-S
SEFS-S
STS CV-P
STS ES-P
STS FC-P
STS SES-P
STS UAS-P
Path
Level
BTC
CV-L
SES-L
ES-L
UAS-L
FC-L
PPJC-Pdet
NPJC-Pdet
PPJC-Pgen
NPJC-Pgen
55304
PMs read on Framer
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-14
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Note
SONET path PMs will not count unless IPPM is enabled. For additional information, see the “Enable
Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring” procedure on page 7-25. The far-end IPPM feature is
not supported in Software R3.1. However, SONET path PMs can be monitored by logging into the
far-end node directly.
Table 8-2
Near-End Section PMs for the EC1 Card
Parameter
Definition
CV-S
Section Coding Violation (CV-S) is a count of BIP errors detected at the
section-layer (i.e. using the B1 byte in the incoming SONET signal). Up
to eight section BIP errors can be detected per STS-N frame; each error
increments the current CV-S second register.
ES-S
Section Errored Seconds (ES-S) is a count of the number of seconds when
at least one section-layer BIP error was detected or an SEF or loss of
signal (LOS) defect was present.
SES-S
Section Severely Errored Seconds (SES-S) is a count of the seconds when
K (see GR-253-CORE for value) or more section-layer BIP errors were
detected or a severely errored frame (SEF) or LOS defect was present.
SEFS-S
Section Severely Errored Framing Seconds (SEFS-S) is a count of the
seconds when an SEF defect was present. An SEF defect is expected
during most seconds where an LOS or loss of frame (LOF) defect is
present. However, there may be situations when that is not the case, and
the SEFS-S parameter is only incremented based on the presence of the
SEF defect.
Table 8-3
Near-End Line Layer PMs for the EC1 Card
Parameter
Definition
CV-L
Near-End Line Code Violation (CV-L) is a count of BIP errors detected at
the line-layer (i.e. using the B2 bytes in the incoming SONET signal). Up
to 8 x N BIP errors can be detected per STS-N frame, with each error
incrementing the current CV-L second register.
ES-L
Near-End Line Errored Seconds (ES-L) is a count of the seconds when at
least one line-layer BIP error was detected or an alarm indication
signal-line (AIS-L) defect was present.
SES-L
Near-End Line Severely Errored Seconds (SES-L) is a count of the
seconds when K (see GR-253 for values) or more line-layer BIP errors
were detected or an AIS-L defect was present.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-15
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-3
Near-End Line Layer PMs for the EC1 Card (continued)
Parameter
Definition
UAS-L
Near-End Line Unavailable Seconds (UAS-L) is a count of the seconds
when the line is unavailable. A line becomes unavailable when ten
consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Ls, and the line continues
to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify
as SES-Ls.
FC-L
Near-End Line Failure Count (FC-L) is a count of the number of near-end
line failure events. A failure event begins when an AIS-L failure or a
lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end failure is declared. This failure event
ends when the failure is cleared. A failure event that begins in one period
and ends in another period is counted only in the period where it begins.
Table 8-4
Parameter
Note
Near-End SONET Path PMs for the EC1 Card
Definition
SONET path PMs will not count unless IPPM is enabled. For additional information, see the
“Enable Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring” procedure on page 7-25. The far-end
IPPM feature is not supported in Software R3.1. However, SONET path PMs can be monitored
by logging into the far-end node directly.
STS CV-P
Near-End STS Path Coding Violations (CV-P) is a count of BIP errors
detected at the STS path layer (i.e., using the B3 byte). Up to eight BIP
errors can be detected per frame; each error increments the current CV-P
second register.
STS ES-P
Near-End STS Path Errored Seconds (ES-P) is a count of the seconds
when at least one STS path BIP error was detected. STS ES-P can also be
caused by an AIS-P defect (or a lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end
defect) or an LOP-P defect.
STS FC-P
Near-End STS Path Failure Counts (FC-P) is a count of the number of
near-end STS path failure events. A failure event begins when an AIS-P
failure, an LOP-P failure, a unequipped path (UNEQ-P) or a trace
identifier mismatch (TIM-P) failure is declared. A failure event also
begins if the STS PTE monitoring the path supports ERDI-P for that path.
The failure event ends when these failures are cleared.
STS SES-P
Near-End STS Path Severely Errored Seconds (SES-P) is a count of the
seconds when K (2400) or more STS path BIP errors were detected. STS
SES-P can also be caused by an AIS-P defect (or a lower-layer,
traffic-related, near-end defect) or an LOP-P defect.
STS UAS-P
Near-End STS Path Unavailable Seconds (UAS-P) is a count of the
seconds when the STS path was unavailable. An STS path becomes
unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Ps,
and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that
do not qualify as SES-Ps.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-16
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-5
Near-End SONET Path BIP PMs for the EC1 Card
Parameter
Definition
PPJC-Pdet
Positive Pointer Justification Count, STS Path Detected (PPJC-Pdet) is a
count of the positive pointer justifications detected on a particular path in
an incoming SONET signal.
NPJC-Pdet
Negative Pointer Justification Count, STS Path Detected (NPJC-Pdet) is a
count of the negative pointer justifications detected on a particular path in
an incoming SONET signal.
PPJC-Pgen
Positive Pointer Justification Count, STS Path Generated (PPJC-Pgen) is
a count of the positive pointer justifications generated for a particular path
to reconcile the frequency of the SPE with the local clock.
NPJC-Pgen
Negative Pointer Justification Count, STS Path Generated (NPJC-Pgen) is
a count of the negative pointer justifications generated for a particular
path to reconcile the frequency of the synchronous payload envelope
(SPE) with the local clock.
Table 8-6
Far-End Line Layer PMs for the EC-1 Card
Parameter
Definition
CV-L
Far-End Line Code Violation (CV-L) is a count of BIP errors detected by
the far-end line terminating equipment (LTE) and reported back to the
near-end LTE using the REI-L indication in the line overhead. For SONET
signals at rates below OC-48, up to 8 x N BIP errors per STS-N frame can
be indicated using the REI-L. For OC-48 signals, up to 255 BIP errors per
STS-N frame can be indicated. The current CV-L second register is
incremented for each BIP error indicated by the incoming REI-L.
ES-L
Far-End Line Errored Seconds (ES-L) is a count of the seconds when at
least one line-layer BIP error was reported by the far-end LTE or an RDI-L
defect was present.
SES-L
Far-End Line Severely Errored Seconds (SES-L) is a count of the seconds
when K (see GR-253-CORE for values) or more line-layer BIP errors
were reported by the far-end LTE or an RDI-L defect was present.
UAS-L
Far-End Line Unavailable Seconds (UAS-L) is a count of the seconds
when the line is unavailable at the far end. A line becomes unavailable at
the far end when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-LFEs
and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that
do not qualify as SES-LFEs.
FC-L
Far-End Line Failure Count (FC-L) is a count of the number of far-end
line failure events. A failure event begins when RFI-L failure is declared,
and it ends when the RFI-L failure clears. A failure event that begins in
one period and ends in another period is counted only in the period where
it began.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-17
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
8.5.2 DS1 and DS1N Card Performance Monitoring Parameters
Figure 8-13 shows the signal types that support far-end PMs. Far-end VT and STS path performance
monitoring is supported for the DS1 card. Far-end DS1 path performance monitoring is not supported
for the DS1 card. Figure 8-14 shows where overhead bytes detected on the ASICs produce performance
monitoring parameters for the DS1 and DS1N cards.
Figure 8-13 Monitored signal types for the DS1 and DS1N cards
Near End
Far End
DS1 Signal
DS1 Signal
ONS 15454
DS1
ONS 15454
Fiber
OC48
OC48
DS1
DS1 Path (DS1 XX) Far End PMs Not Supported
55234
VT Path (XX-V) Far End PMs Supported
STS Path (STS XX-P) Far End PMs Not Supported
Note
The XX in the illustration above represents all PMs listed below with the given prefix and/or suffix.
Figure 8-14 PM read points on the DS1 and DS1N cards
ONS 15454
DS1 and DS1N Cards
Tx/Rx
XC10G Card
OC-N
LIU
Framer
DS1 Side
DS1 Tx AISS-P
DS1 Tx CV-P
DS1 Tx ES-P
DS1 Tx SAS-P
DS1 Tx SES-P
DS1 Tx UAS-P
SONET Side
CV-V
ES-V
SES-V
UAS-V
VT
Level
STS CV-P
STS ES-P
STS FC-P
STS SES-P
STS UAS-P
Path
Level
BTC
PMs read on Framer
DS1 CV-L
DS1 ES-L
DS1 SES-L
DS1 LOSS-L
PMs read on LIU
55233
DS1 Rx AISS-P
DS1 Rx CV-P
DS1 Rx ES-P
DS1 Rx SAS-P
DS1 Rx SES-P
DS1 Rx UAS-P
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-18
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-7
DS1 Line PMs for the DS1 and DS1N Cards
Parameter
Definition
DS1 CV-L
Code Violation Line (CV-L) indicates the number of coding violations
occurring on the line. This parameter is a count of bipolar violations
(BPVs) and excessive zeros (EXZs) occurring over the accumulation
period.
DS1 ES-L
Errored Seconds Line (ES-L) is a count of the seconds containing one or
more anomalies (BPV + EXZ) and/or defects (loss of signal) on the line.
DS1 SES-L
Severely Errored Seconds Line (SES-L) is a count of the seconds
containing more than a particular quantity of anomalies (BPV + EXZ >
1544) and/or defects on the line.
DS1 LOSS-L
Loss of Signal Seconds Line (LOSS-L) is a count of one-second intervals
containing one or more LOS defects.
Table 8-8
DS1 Receive Path PMs for the DS1 and DS1N Cards
Parameter
Definition
DS1 Rx AISS-P
Receive Path Alarm Indication Signal (Rx AIS-P) means an alarm
indication signal occurred on the receive end of the path. This parameter
is a count of seconds containing one or more AIS defects.
DS1 Rx CV-P
Receive Path Code Violation (Rx CV-P) means a coding violation
occurred on the receive end of the path. For DS1-ESF paths, this
parameter is a count of detected CRC-6 errors. For the DS1-SF paths, the
Rx CV-P parameter is a count of detected frame bit errors (FE).
DS1 Rx ES-P
Receive Path Errored Seconds (Rx ES-P) is a count of the seconds
containing one or more anomalies and/or defects for paths on the receive
end of the signal. For DS1-ESF paths, this parameter is a count of
one-second intervals containing one or more CRC-6 errors, or one or more
CS events, or one or more SEF or AIS defects. For DS1-SF paths, the Rx
ES-P parameter is a count of one-second intervals containing one or more
FE events, or one or more CS events, or one or more SEF or AIS defects.
DS1 Rx SAS-P
Receive Path Severely Errored Seconds Frame/Alarm Indication Signal
(Rx SAS-P) is a count of one-second intervals containing one or more
SEFs or one or more AIS defects on the receive end of the signal.
DS1 Rx SES-P
Receive Path Severely Errored Seconds (Rx SES-P) is a count of the
seconds containing more than a particular quantity of anomalies and/or
defects for paths on the receive end of the signal. For the DS1-ESF paths,
this parameter is a count of seconds when 320 or more CRC-6 errors or
one or more SEF or AIS defects occurred. For DS1-SF paths, an SES is a
second containing either the occurrence of four FEs or one or more SEF
or AIS defects.
DS1 Rx UAS-P
Receive Path Unavailable Seconds (Rx UAS-P) is a count of one-second
intervals when the DS1 path is unavailable on the receive end of the
signal. The DS1 path is unavailable when ten consecutive SESs occur. The
ten SESs are included in unavailable time. Once unavailable, the DS1 path
becomes available when ten consecutive seconds occur with no SESs. The
ten seconds with no SESs are excluded from unavailable time.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-19
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-9
DS1 Transmit Path PMs for the DS1 and DS1N Cards
Parameter
Definition
DS1 Tx AISS-P
Transmit Path Alarm Indication Signal (Tx AIS-P) means an alarm
indication signal occurred on the transmit end of the path. This parameter
is a count of seconds containing one or more AIS defects.
DS1 Tx CV-P
Transmit Path Code Violation (Tx CV-P) means a coding violation
occurred on the transmit end of the path. For DS1-ESF paths, this
parameter is a count of detected CRC-6 errors. For the DS1-SF paths, the
Tx CV-P parameter is a count of detected FEs.
DS1 Tx ES-P
Transmit Path Errored Seconds (Tx ES-P) is a count of the seconds
containing one or more anomalies and/or defects for paths on the transmit
end of the signal. For DS1-ESF paths, this parameter is a count of
one-second intervals containing one or more CRC-6 errors, or one or more
CS events, or one or more SEF or AIS defects. For DS1-SF paths, the Tx
ES-P parameter is a count of one-second intervals containing one or more
FE events, or one or more CS events, or one or more SEF or AIS defects.
DS1 Tx SAS-P
Transmit Path Severely Errored Seconds Frame/Alarm Indication Signal
(Tx SAS-P) is a count of one-second intervals containing one or more
SEFs or one or more AIS defects on the receive end of the signal.
DS1 Tx SES-P
Transmit Path Severely Errored Seconds (Tx SES-P) is a count of the
seconds containing more than a particular quantity of anomalies and/or
defects for paths on the transmit end of the signal. For the DS1-ESF paths,
this parameter is a count of seconds when 320 or more CRC-6 errors or
one or more SEF or AIS defects occurred. For DS1-SF paths, an SES is a
second containing either the occurrence of four FEs or one or more SEF
or AIS defects.
DS1 Tx UAS-P
Transmit Path Unavailable Seconds (Tx UAS-P) is a count of one-second
intervals when the DS1 path is unavailable on the transmit end of the
signal. The DS1 path is unavailable when ten consecutive SESs occur. The
ten SESs are included in unavailable time. Once unavailable, the DS1 path
becomes available when ten consecutive seconds occur with no SESs. The
ten seconds with no SESs are excluded from unavailable time.
Table 8-10 VT Path PMs for the DS1 and DS1N Cards
Parameter
Definition
CV-V
Code Violation VT Layer (CV-V) is a count of the BIP errors detected at
the VT path layer. Up to two BIP errors can be detected per VT
superframe, with each error incrementing the current CV-V second
register.
ES-V
Errored Seconds VT Layer (ES-V) is a count of the seconds when at least
one VT Path BIP error was detected. An AIS-V defect (or a lower-layer,
traffic-related, near-end defect) or an LOP-V defect can also cause an
ES-V.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-20
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-10 VT Path PMs for the DS1 and DS1N Cards (continued)
Parameter
Definition
SES-V
Severely Errored Seconds VT Layer (SES-V) is a count of seconds when
K (600) or more VT Path BIP errors were detected. SES-V can also be
caused by an AIS-V defect (or a lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end
defect) or an LOP-V defect.
UAS-V
Unavailable Second VT Layer (UAS-V) is a count of the seconds when
the VT path was unavailable. A VT path becomes unavailable when ten
consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Vs, and it continues to be
unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as
SES-Vs.
Table 8-11 SONET Path PMs for the DS1 and DS1N Cards
Parameter
Definition
STS CV-P
Near-End STS Path Coding Violations (CV-P) is a count of BIP errors
detected at the STS path layer (i.e., using the B3 byte). Up to eight BIP
errors can be detected per frame, with each error incrementing the current
CV-P second register.
STS ES-P
Near-End STS Path Errored Seconds (ES-P) is a count of the seconds
when at least one STS path BIP error was detected. An AIS-P defect (or a
lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an LOP-P defect can also
cause an STS ES-P.
STS FC-P
Near-End STS Path Failure Counts (FC-P) is a count of the number of
near-end STS path failure events. A failure event begins when an AIS-P
failure, an LOP-P failure, a UNEQ-P, or a TIM-P failure is declared. A
failure event also begins if the STS PTE that is monitoring the path
supports ERDI-P for that path. The failure event ends when these failures
are cleared.
STS SES-P
Near-End STS Path Severely Errored Seconds (SES-P) is a count of the
seconds when K (2400) or more STS path BIP errors were detected. An
AIS-P defect (or a lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an
LOP-P defect can also cause an STS SES-P.
STS UAS-P
Near-End STS Path Unavailable Seconds (UAS-P) is a count of the
seconds when the STS path was unavailable. An STS path becomes
unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Ps,
and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that
do not qualify as SES-Ps.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-21
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-12 Far-End VT Path PMs for the DS1 Card
Parameter
Definition
CV-V
Far-End VT Path Coding Violations (CV-VFE) is a count of the number
of BIP errors detected by the far-end VT path terminating equipment
(PTE) and reported back to the near-end VT PTE using the REI-V
indication in the VT path overhead. Only one BIP error can be indicated
per VT superframe using the REI-V bit. The current CV-VFE second
register is incremented for each BIP error indicated by the incoming
REI-V.
ES-V
Far-End VT Path Errored Seconds (ES-VFE) is a count of the seconds
when at least one VT path BIP error was reported by the far-end VT PTE,
or a one-bit RDI-V defect was present.
SES-V
Far-End VT Path Severely Errored Seconds (SES-VFE) is a count of the
seconds when K (600) or more VT path BIP errors were reported by the
far-end VT PTE or a one-bit RDI-V defect was present.
UAS-V
Far-End VT Path Unavailable Seconds (UAS-VFE) is a count of the
seconds when the VT path is unavailable at the far-end. A VT path is
unavailable at the far-end when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify
as SES-VFEs.
8.5.3 DS3 and DS3N Card Performance Monitoring Parameters
Figure 8-15 shows the signal types that support far-end PMs. Figure 8-16 shows where overhead bytes
detected on the ASICs produce performance monitoring parameters for the DS3 and DS3N cards.
Figure 8-15 Monitored signal types for the DS3 and DS3N cards
Near End
Far End
DS3 Signal
DS3 Signal
ONS 15454
DS3
ONS 15454
Fiber
OC48
OC48
DS3
STS Path (STS XX-P) Far End PMs Not Supported
Note
55311
DS3 Path (DS3 XX) Far End PMs Not Supported
The XX in the illustration above represents all PMs listed below with the given prefix and/or suffix.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-22
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Figure 8-16 PM read points on the DS3 and DS3N cards
ONS 15454
DS3 & DS3N Cards
XC10G Card
OC-N
LIU
DS3 CV-L
DS3 ES-L
DS3 SES-L
DS3 LOSS-L
DS3 ES-P
DS3 SES-P
DS3 SAS-P
DS3 AISS-P
DS3 UAS-P
Mux/Demux ASIC
DS3 Side
SONET Side
STS CV-P
STS ES-P
STS FC-P
STS SES-P
STS UAS-P
BTC
ASIC
Path
Level
PMs read on Mux/Demux ASIC
55305
PMs read on LIU
Table 8-13 Near-End DS3 Line PMs for the DS3 and DS3N Cards
Parameter
Definition
DS3 CV-L
Code Violation Line (CV-L) indicates the number of coding violations
occurring on the line. This parameter is a count of bipolar violations
(BPVs) and excessive zeros (EXZs) occurring over the accumulation
period.
DS3 ES-L
Errored Seconds Line (ES-L) is a count of the seconds containing one or
more anomalies (BPV + EXZ) and/or defects (loss of signal) on the line.
DS3 SES-L
Severely Errored Seconds Line (SES-L) is a count of the seconds
containing more than a particular quantity of anomalies (BPV + EXZ >
44) and/or defects on the line.
DS3 LOSS-L
Line Loss of Signal (LOSS-L) is a count of one-second intervals
containing one or more LOS defects.
Table 8-14 Near-End DS3 Path PMs for the DS3 and DS3N Cards
Parameter
Definition
DS3 ES-P
Errored Seconds-Path (ES-P) is a count of one-second intervals
containing one or more CRC-6 errors, or one or more CS events, or one
or more SEF or AIS defects.
DS3 SES-P
Severely Errored Seconds-Path (SES-P) is a count of seconds where 320
or more CRC-6 errors occur or one or more SEF or AIS defects occur.
DS3 SAS-P
Severely Errored Frame/Alarm Indication Signal-Path (SAS-P) is a count
of seconds containing one or more SEFs or one or more AIS defects.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-23
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-14 Near-End DS3 Path PMs for the DS3 and DS3N Cards (continued)
Parameter
Definition
DS3 AISS-P
Alarm Indication Signal Seconds-Path (AISS-P) is a count of seconds
containing one or more AIS defects.
DS3 UAS-P
Unavailable Seconds-Path (UAS-P) is a count of one-second intervals
during which the DS3 path is unavailable.
Table 8-15 Near-End SONET Path PMs for the DS3 and DS3N Cards
Parameter
Definition
STS CV-P
Near-End STS Path Coding Violations (CV-P) is a count of BIP errors
detected at the STS path layer (i.e., using the B3 byte). Up to eight BIP
errors can be detected per frame; each error increments the current CV-P
second register.
STS ES-P
Near-End STS Path Errored Seconds (ES-P) is a count of the seconds
when at least one STS path BIP error was detected. An AIS-P defect (or a
lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an LOP-P defect can also
cause an STS ES-P.
STS FC-P
Near-End STS Path Failure Counts (FC-P) is a count of the number of
near-end STS path failure events. A failure event begins when an AIS-P
failure, an LOP-P failure, a UNEQ-P, or a TIM-P failure is declared. A
failure event also begins if the STS PTE that is monitoring the path
supports ERDI-P for that path. The failure event ends when these failures
are cleared.
STS SES-P
Near-End STS Path Severely Errored Seconds (SES-P) is a count of the
seconds when K (2400) or more STS path BIP errors were detected. An
AIS-P defect (or a lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an
LOP-P defect can also cause an STS SES-P.
STS UAS-P
Near-End STS Path Unavailable Seconds (UAS-P) is a count of the
seconds when the STS path was unavailable. An STS path becomes
unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Ps,
and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that
do not qualify as SES-Ps.
8.5.4 DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Card Performance Monitoring Parameters
Figure 8-17 shows the signal types that support far-end PMs. Figure 8-18 shows where overhead bytes
detected on the ASICs produce performance monitoring parameters for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E
cards.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-24
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Figure 8-17 Monitored signal types for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E cards
Near End
Far End
DS3 Signal
DS3 Signal
ONS 15454
DS3E
ONS 15454
Fiber
OC48
OC48
DS3E
61156
DS3E Path Far End PMs Are Supported
STS Path (STS XX-P) Far End PMs Not Supported
Note
The XX in the illustration above represents all PMs listed below with the given prefix and/or suffix.
Figure 8-18 PM read points on the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E cards
ONS 15454
DS3-12E & DS3N-12E Cards
DS3 CV-L
DS3 ES-L
DS3 SES-L
DS3 LOSS-L
DS3 AISS-P
DS3 CVP-P
DS3 ESP-P
DS3 SASP-P
DS3 SESP-P
DS3 UASP-P
XC10G Card
OC-N
LIU
Mux/Demux ASIC
DS3 Side
SONET Side
STS CV-P
STS ES-P
STS FC-P
STS SES-P
STS UAS-P
BTC
ASIC
Path
Level
DS3 CVCP-P
DS3 ESCP-P
DS3 SESCP-P
DS3 UASCP-P
DS3 CVCP-PFE
DS3 ESCP-PFE
DS3 SASCP-PFE
DS3 SESCP-PFE
DS3 UASCP-PFE
PMs read on Mux/Demux ASIC
55306
PMs read on LIU
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-25
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-16 Near-End DS3 Line PMs for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Cards
Parameter
Definition
DS3 CV-L
Code Violation Line (CV-L) indicates the number of coding violations
occurring on the line. This parameter is a count of bipolar violations
(BPVs) and excessive zeros (EXZs) occurring over the accumulation
period.
DS3 ES-L
Errored Seconds Line (ES-L) is a count of the seconds containing one or
more anomalies (BPV + EXZ) and/or defects (i.e. loss of signal) on the
line.
DS3 SES-L
Severely Errored Seconds Line (SES-L) is a count of the seconds
containing more than a particular quantity of anomalies (BPV + EXZ >
44) and/or defects on the line.
DS3 LOSS-L
Line Loss of Signal (LOSS-L) is a count of one-second intervals
containing one or more LOS defects.
Table 8-17 Near-End DS3 Path PMs for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Cards
Parameter
Definition
DS3 AISS-P
AIS Seconds Path (AISS-P) is a count of one-second intervals containing
one or more AIS defects.
DS3 CVP-P
Code Violation Path (CVP-P) is a code violation parameter for M23
applications. CVP-P is a count of P-bit parity errors occurring in the
accumulation period.
DS3 ESP-P
Errored Second Path (ESP-P) is a count of seconds containing one or more
P-bit parity errors, one or more SEF defects, or one or more AIS defects.
DS3 SASP-P
SEF/AIS Seconds Path (SASP-P) is a count of one-second intervals
containing one or more SEFs or one or more AIS defects on the path.
DS3 SESP-P
Severely Errored Seconds Path (DS3 SESP-P) is a count of seconds
containing more than 44 P-bit parity violations, one or more SEF defects,
or one or more AIS defects.
DS3 UASP-P
Unavailable Second Path (DS3 UASP-P) is a count of one-second
intervals when the DS3 path is unavailable. A DS3 path becomes
unavailable when ten consecutive SESP-Ps occur. The ten SESP-Ps are
included in unavailable time. Once unavailable, the DS3 path becomes
available when ten consecutive seconds with no SESP-Ps occur. The ten
seconds with no SESP-Ps are excluded from unavailable time.
Table 8-18 Near-End CP-bit Path PMs for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Cards
Parameter
Definition
DS3 CVCP-P
Code Violation Path (CVCP-P) is a count of CP-bit parity errors occurring
in the accumulation period.
DS3 ESCP-P
Errored Second Path (ESCP-P) is a count of seconds containing one or
more CP-bit parity errors, one or more SEF defects, or one or more AIS
defects. ESCP-P is defined for the C-bit parity application.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-26
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-18 Near-End CP-bit Path PMs for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Cards (continued)
Parameter
Definition
DS3 SESCP-P
Severely Errored Seconds Path (SESCP-P) is a count of seconds
containing more than 44 CP-bit parity errors, one or more SEF defects, or
one or more AIS defects.
DS3 UASCP-P
Unavailable Second Path (UASCP-P) is a count of one-second intervals
when the DS3 path is unavailable. A DS3 path becomes unavailable when
ten consecutive SESCP-Ps occur. The ten SESCP-Ps are included in
unavailable time. Once unavailable, the DS3 path becomes available when
ten consecutive seconds with no SESCP-Ps occur. The ten seconds with
no SESCP-Ps are excluded from unavailable time.
Table 8-19 Near-End SONET Path PMs for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Cards
Parameter
Definition
STS CV-P
Near-End STS Path Coding Violations (CV-P) is a count of BIP errors
detected at the STS path layer (i.e., using the B3 byte). Up to eight BIP
errors can be detected per frame; each error increments the current CV-P
second register.
STS ES-P
Near-End STS Path Errored Seconds (ES-P) is a count of the seconds
when at least one STS path BIP error was detected. An AIS-P defect (or a
lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an LOP-P defect can also
cause an STS ES-P.
STS FC-P
Near-End STS Path Failure Counts (FC-P) is a count of the number of
near-end STS path failure events. A failure event begins when an AIS-P
failure, an LOP-P failure, a UNEQ-P, or a TIM-P failure is declared. A
failure event also begins if the STS PTE that is monitoring the path
supports ERDI-P for that path. The failure event ends when these failures
are cleared.
STS SES-P
Near-End STS Path Severely Errored Seconds (SES-P) is a count of the
seconds when K (2400) or more STS path BIP errors were detected. An
AIS-P defect (or a lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an
LOP-P defect can also cause an STS SES-P.
STS UAS-P
Near-End STS Path Unavailable Seconds (UAS-P) is a count of the
seconds when the STS path was unavailable. An STS path becomes
unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Ps,
and continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that
do not qualify as SES-Ps.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-27
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-20 Far-End CP-bit Path PMs for the DS3-12E and DS3N-12E Cards
Parameter
Definition
DS3 CVCP-P
Code Violation (CVCP-PFE) is a parameter that is counted when the three
far-end block error (FEBE) bits in a M-frame are not all collectively set to
1.
DS3 ESCP-P
Errored Second (ESCP-PFE) is a count of one-second intervals containing
one or more M-frames with the three FEBE bits not all collectively set to
1 or one or more far-end SEF/AIS defects.
DS3 SASCP-P
SEF/AIS Second (SASCP-PFE) is a count of one-second intervals
containing one or more far-end SEF/AIS defects.
DS3 SESCP-P
Severely Errored Second (SESCP-PFE) is a count of one-second intervals
containing one or more 44 M-frames with the three FEBE bits not all
collectively set to 1 or one or more far-end SEF/AIS defects.
DS3 UASCP-P
Unavailable Second (UASCP-PFE) is a count of one-second intervals
when the DS3 path becomes unavailable. A DS3 path becomes
unavailable when ten consecutive far-end CP-bit SESs occur. The ten
CP-bit SESs are included in unavailable time. Once unavailable, the DS3
path becomes available when ten consecutive seconds occur with no
CP-bit SESs. The ten seconds with no CP-bit SESs are excluded from
unavailable time.
8.5.5 DS3XM-6 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters
Figure 8-19 shows the signal types that support far-end PMs. Figure 8-20 shows where overhead bytes
detected on the ASICs produce performance monitoring parameters for the DS3XM-6 card.
Figure 8-19 Monitored signal types for the DS3XM-6 card
Near End
Far End
Muxed DS3 Signal
Muxed DS3 Signal
ONS 15454
DS3XM
ONS 15454
Fiber
OC48
OC48
DS3XM
DS1 Path (DS1 XX) Far End PMs Not Supported
DS3 Path (DS3 XX) Far End PMs Supported
STS Path (STS XX-P) Far End PMs Not Supported
55312
VT Path (XX-V) Far End PMs Supported
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-28
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Note
The XX in the illustration above represents all PMs listed below with the given prefix and/or suffix.
Figure 8-20 PM read points on the DS3XM-6 card
ONS 15454
DS3XM-6 Card
XC10G Card
OC-N
LIU
DS3 CV-L
DS3 ES-L
DS3 SES-L
DS3 LOSS-L
DS3 AISS-P
DS3 CVP-P
DS3 ESP-P
DS3 SASP-P
DS3 SESP-P
DS3 UASP-P
DS3 CVCP-P
DS3 ESCP-P
DS3 SASCP-P
DS3 SESCP-P
DS3 UASCP-P
Mapper Unit
DS1 Side
SONET Side
DS1 AISS-P
DS1 ES-P
DS1 SAS-P
DS1 SES-P
DS1 UAS-P
CV-V
ES-V
SES-V
UAS-V
VT
Level
STS CV-P
STS ES-P
STS FC-P
STS SES-P
STS UAS-P
Path
Level
BTC
ASIC
PMs read on Mapper Unit ASIC
PMs read on LIU
55307
The DS3 path is terminated on the
transmux and regenerated.
Table 8-21 Near-End DS3 Line PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Parameter
Definition
DS3 CV-L
Code Violation Line (CV-L) indicates the number of coding violations
occurring on the line. This parameter is a count of bipolar violations
(BPVs) and excessive zeros (EXZs) occurring over the accumulation
period.
DS3 ES-L
Errored Seconds Line (ES-L) is a count of the seconds containing one or
more anomalies (BPV + EXZ) and/or defects (i.e. LOS) on the line.
DS3 SES-L
Severely Errored Seconds Line (SES-L) is a count of the seconds
containing more than a particular quantity of anomalies (BPV + EXZ >
44) and/or defects on the line.
DS3 LOSS-L
Line Loss of Signal (LOSS-L) is a count of one-second intervals
containing one or more LOS defects.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-29
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-22 Near-End DS3 Path PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Parameter
Definition
DS3 AISS-P
AIS Seconds Path (AISS-P) is a count of one-second intervals containing
one or more AIS defects.
DS3 CVP-P
Code Violation Path (CVP-P) is a code violation parameter for M23
applications. CVP-P is a count of P-bit parity errors occurring in the
accumulation period.
DS3 ESP-P
Errored Second Path (ESP-P) is a count of seconds containing one or more
P-bit parity errors, one or more SEF defects, or one or more AIS defects.
DS3 SASP-P
SEF/AIS Seconds Path (SASP-P) is a count of one-second intervals
containing one or more SEFs or one or more AIS defects on the path.
DS3 SESP-P
Severely Errored Seconds Path (SESP-P) is a count of seconds containing
more than 44 P-bit parity violations, one or more SEF defects, or one or
more AIS defects.
DS3 UASP-P
Unavailable Second Path (UASP-P) is a count of one-second intervals
when the DS3 path is unavailable. A DS3 path becomes unavailable when
ten consecutive SESP-Ps occur. The ten SESP-Ps are included in
unavailable time. Once unavailable, the DS3 path becomes available when
ten consecutive seconds with no SESP-Ps occur. The ten seconds with no
SESP-Ps are excluded from unavailable time.
Table 8-23 Near-End CP-bit Path PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Parameter
Definition
DS3 CVCP-P
Code Violation Path (CVCP-P) is a count of CP-bit parity errors occurring
in the accumulation period.
DS3 ESCP-P
Errored Second Path (ESCP-P) is a count of seconds containing one or
more CP-bit parity errors, one or more SEF defects, or one or more AIS
defects.
DS3 SESCP-P
Severely Errored Seconds Path (SESCP-P) is a count of seconds
containing more than 44 CP-bit parity errors, one or more SEF defects, or
one or more AIS defects.
DS3 UASCP-P
Unavailable Seconds Path (DS3 UASCP-P) is a count of one-second
intervals when the DS3 path is unavailable. A DS3 path becomes
unavailable when ten consecutive SESCP-Ps occur. The ten SESCP-Ps are
included in unavailable time. Once unavailable, the DS3 path becomes
available when ten consecutive seconds with no SESCP-Ps occur. The ten
seconds with no SESCP-Ps are excluded from unavailable time.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-30
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-24 Near-End DS1 Path PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Parameter
Definition
DS1 AISS-P
Alarm Indication Signal Path (AIS-P) means an AIS occurred on the path.
This parameter is a count of seconds containing one or more AIS defects.
DS1 ES-P
Errored Seconds Path (ES-P) is a count of the seconds containing one or
more anomalies and/or defects for paths. For DS1-ESF paths, this
parameter is a count of one-second intervals containing one or more
CRC-6 errors, or one or more CS events, or one or more SEF or AIS
defects. For DS1-SF paths, the ES-P parameter is a count of one-second
intervals containing one or more FE events, or one or more CS events, or
one or more SEF or AIS defects.
DS1 SAS-P
Severely Errored Seconds Path Frame/Alarm Indication Signal (SAS-P) is
a count of one-second intervals containing one or more SEFs or one or
more AIS defects.
DS1 SES-P
Severely Errored Seconds Path (SES-P) is a count of the seconds
containing more than a particular quantity of anomalies and/or defects for
paths. For the DS1-ESF paths, this parameter is a count of seconds when
320 or more CRC-6 errors or one or more SEF or AIS defects occurs. For
DS1-SF paths, an SES is a second containing either the occurrence of
eight FEs, four FEs, or one or more SEF or AIS defects.
DS1 UAS-P
Unavailable Seconds Path (UAS-P) is a count of one-second intervals
when the DS1 path is unavailable. The DS1 path is unavailable when ten
consecutive SESs occur. The ten SESs are included in unavailable time.
Once unavailable, the DS1 path becomes available when ten consecutive
seconds occur with no SESs. The ten seconds with no SESs are excluded
from unavailable time.
Table 8-25 Near-End VT PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Parameter
Definition
CV-V
Code Violation VT Layer (CV-V) is a count of the BIP errors detected at
the VT path layer. Up to two BIP errors can be detected per VT
superframe; each error increments the current CV-V second register.
ES-V
Errored Seconds VT Layer (ES-V) is a count of the seconds when at least
one VT Path BIP error was detected. An AIS-V defect (or a lower-layer,
traffic-related, near-end defect) or an LOP-V defect can also cause ES-V.
SES-V
Severely Errored Seconds VT Layer (SES-V) is a count of seconds when
K (600) or more VT Path BIP errors were detected. An AIS-V defect (or
a lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an LOP-V defect can
also cause SES-V.
UAS-V
Unavailable Seconds VT Layer (UAS-V) is a count of the seconds when
the VT path was unavailable. A VT path becomes unavailable when ten
consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Vs and continues to be
unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as
SES-Vs.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-31
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
Table 8-26 Near-End SONET Path PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Parameter
Definition
STS CV-P
Near-End STS Path Coding Violations (CV-P) is a count of BIP errors
detected at the STS path layer (i.e., using the B3 byte). Up to eight BIP
errors can be detected per frame; each error increments the current CV-P
second register.
STS ES-P
Near-End STS Path Errored Seconds (ES-P) is a count of the seconds
when at least one STS path BIP error was detected. An AIS-P defect (or a
lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an LOP-P defect can also
cause an STS ES-P.
STS FC-P
Near-End STS Path Failure Counts (FC-P) is a count of the number of
near-end STS path failure events. A failure event begins when an AIS-P
failure, an LOP-P failure, a UNEQ-P, or a TIM-P failure is declared. A
failure event also begins if the STS PTE that is monitoring the path
supports ERDI-P for that path. The failure event ends when these failures
are cleared.
STS SES-P
Near-End STS Path Severely Errored Seconds (SES-P) is a count of the
seconds when K (2400) or more STS path BIP errors were detected. An
AIS-P defect (or a lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an
LOP-P defect can also cause an STS SES-P.
STS UAS-P
Near-End STS Path Unavailable Seconds (UAS-P) is a count of the
seconds when the STS path was unavailable. An STS path becomes
unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Ps,
and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that
do not qualify as SES-Ps.
Table 8-27 Far-End CP-bit Path PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Parameter
Definition
DS3 CVCP-P
Code Violation (CVCP-PFE) is a parameter that is counted when the three
FEBE bits in a M-frame are not all collectively set to 1.
DS3 ESCP-P
Errored Second (ESCP-PFE) is a count of one-second intervals containing
one or more M-frames with the three FEBE bits not all collectively set to
1 or one or more far-end SEF/AIS defects.
DS3 SASCP-P
SEF/AIS Second (SASCP-PFE) is a count of one-second intervals
containing one or more far-end SEF/AIS defects.
DS3 SESCP-P
Severely Errored Second (SESCP-PFE) is a count of one-second intervals
containing one or more 44 M-frames with the three FEBE bits not all
collectively set to 1 or one or more far-end SEF/AIS defects.
DS3 UASCP-P
Unavailable Second (UASCP-PFE) is a count of one-second intervals
when the DS3 path becomes unavailable. A DS3 path becomes
unavailable when ten consecutive far-end CP-bit SESs occur. The ten
CP-bit SESs are included in unavailable time. Once unavailable, the DS3
path becomes available when ten consecutive seconds with no CP-bit
SESs occur. The ten seconds with no CP-bit SESs are excluded from
unavailable time.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-32
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards
Table 8-28 Far-End VT PMs for the DS3XM-6 Card
Parameter
Definition
CV-V
Code Violation VT Layer (CV-V) is a count of the BIP errors detected at
the VT path layer. Up to two BIP errors can be detected per VT
superframe; each error increments the current CV-V second register.
ES-V
Errored Seconds VT Layer (ES-V) is a count of the seconds when at least
one VT Path BIP error was detected. An AIS-V defect (or a lower-layer,
traffic-related, near-end defect) or an LOP-V defect can also cause an
ES-V.
SES-V
Severely Errored Seconds VT Layer (SES-V) is a count of seconds when
K (600) or more VT Path BIP errors were detected. An AIS-V defect (or
a lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an LOP-V defect can
also cause an SES-V.
UAS-V
Unavailable Second VT Layer (UAS-V) is a count of the seconds when
the VT path was unavailable. A VT path becomes unavailable when ten
consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Vs and continues to be
unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as
SES-Vs.
8.6 Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards
The following sections define performance monitoring parameters and definitions for the OC-3, OC-12,
OC-48, and OC-192.
8.6.1 OC-3 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters
Figure 8-21 shows where overhead bytes detected on the ASICs produce performance monitoring
parameters for the OC-3 card.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-33
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards
Figure 8-21 PM read points on the OC-3 card
ONS 15454
OC-3 Card
XC10G Card
DS1
Pointer Processors
CV-S
ES-S
SES-S
SEFS-S
BTC
ASIC
STS CV-P
STS ES-P
STS FC-P
STS SES-P
STS UAS-P
CV-L
ES-L
SES-L
UAS-L
FC-L
Path
Level
PMs read on BTC ASIC
PPJC-Pdet
NPJC-Pdet
PPJC-Pgen
NPJC-Pgen
55308
PMs read on PMC
Note
For PM locations relating to protection switch counts, see the GR-253-CORE document.
Table 8-29 Near-End Section PMs for the OC-3 Card
Parameter
Definition
CV-S
Section Coding Violation (CV-S) is a count of BIP errors detected at the
section-layer (i.e. using the B1 byte in the incoming SONET signal). Up
to eight section BIP errors can be detected per STS-N frame, with each
error incrementing the current CV-S second register.
ES-S
Section Errored Seconds (ES-S) is a count of the number of seconds when
at least one section-layer BIP error was detected or an SEF or LOS defect
was present.
SES-S
Section Severely Errored Seconds (SES-S) is a count of the seconds when
K (see GR-253 for value) or more section-layer BIP errors were detected
or an SEF or LOS defect was present.
SEFS-S
Section Severely Errored Framing Seconds (SEFS-S) is a count of the
seconds when an SEF defect was present. An SEF defect is expected to be
present during most seconds when an LOS or LOF defect is present.
However, there can be situations when the SEFS-S parameter is only
incremented based on the presence of the SEF defect.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-34
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards
Table 8-30 Near-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-3 Card
Parameter
Definition
CV-L
Near-End Line Code Violation (CV-L) is a count of BIP errors detected at
the line-layer (i.e. using the B2 bytes in the incoming SONET signal). Up
to 8 x N BIP errors can be detected per STS-N frame; each error
increments the current CV-L second register.
ES-L
Near-End Line Errored Seconds (ES-L) is a count of the seconds when at
least one line-layer BIP error was detected or an AIS-L defect was
present.
SES-L
Near-End Line Severely Errored Seconds (SES-L) is a count of the
seconds when K (see GR-253-CORE for values) or more line-layer BIP
errors were detected or an AIS-L defect was present.
UAS-L
Near-End Line Unavailable Seconds (UAS-L) is a count of the seconds
when the line is unavailable. A line becomes unavailable when ten
consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Ls, and it continues to be
unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as
SES-Ls.
FC-L
Near-End Line Failure Count (FC-L) is a count of the number of near-end
line failure events. A failure event begins when an AIS-L failure is
declared or when a lower-layer traffic-related, near-end failure is
declared. This failure event ends when the failure is cleared. A failure
event that begins in one period and ends in another period is counted only
in the period where it begins.
Table 8-31 Near-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-3 Cards
Parameter
Definition
PSC (1+1 protection)
In a 1 + 1 protection scheme for a working card, Protection Switching
Count (PSC) is a count of the number of times service switches from a
working card to a protection card plus the number of times service
switches back to the working card.
For a protection card, PSC is a count of the number of times service
switches to a working card from a protection card plus the number of
times service switches back to the protection card. The PSC PM is only
applicable if revertive line-level protection switching is used.
Note
PSD
BLSR is not supported on the OC-3 card; therefore, the PSC-W,
PSC-S, and PSC-R PMs do not increment.
Protection Switching Duration (PSD) applies to the length of time, in
seconds, that service is carried on another line. For a working line, PSD
is a count of the number of seconds that service was carried on the
protection line.
For the protection line, PSD is a count of the seconds that the line was
used to carry service. The PSD PM is only applicable if revertive
line-level protection switching is used.
Note
BLSR is not supported on the OC-3 card; therefore, the PSD-W,
PSD-S, and PSD-R PMs do not increment.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-35
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards
Table 8-32 Near-End SONET Path H-byte PMs for the OC-3 Card
Parameter
Definition
PPJC-Pdet
Positive Pointer Justification Count, STS Path Detected (PPJC-Pdet) is a
count of the positive pointer justifications detected on a particular path on
an incoming SONET signal.
NPJC-Pdet
Negative Pointer Justification Count, STS Path Detected (NPJC-Pdet) is a
count of the negative pointer justifications detected on a particular path on
an incoming SONET signal.
PPJC-Pgen
Positive Pointer Justification Count, STS Path Generated (PPJC-Pgen) is
a count of the positive pointer justifications generated for a particular path
to reconcile the frequency of the SPE with the local clock.
NPJC-Pgen
Negative Pointer Justification Count, STS Path Generated (NPJC-Pgen) is
a count of the negative pointer justifications generated for a particular
path to reconcile the frequency of the synchronous payload envelope
(SPE) with the local clock.
Table 8-33 Near-End SONET Path PMs for the OC-3 Card
Parameter
Note
Definition
SONET path PMs will not count unless IPPM is enabled. For additional information, see the
“Enable Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring” procedure on page 7-25. The far-end
IPPM feature is not supported in Software R3.1. However, SONET path PMs can be monitored
by logging into the far-end node directly.
STS CV-P
Near-End STS Path Coding Violations (CV-P) is a count of BIP errors
detected at the STS path layer (i.e., using the B3 byte). Up to eight BIP
errors can be detected per frame; each error increments the current CV-P
second register.
STS ES-P
Near-End STS Path Errored Seconds (ES-P) is a count of the seconds
when one or more STS path BIP errors were detected. An AIS-P defect
(or a lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an LOP-P defect can
also cause an STS ES-P.
STS FC-P
Near-End STS Path Failure Counts (FC-P) is a count of the number of
near-end STS path failure events. A failure event begins with an AIS-P
failure, an LOP-P failure, a UNEQ-P failure, or a TIM-P failure is
declared, or if the STS PTE that is monitoring the path supports ERDI-P
for that path. The failure event ends when these failures are cleared.
STS SES-P
Near-End STS Path Severely Errored Seconds (SES-P) is a count of the
seconds when K (2400) or more STS path BIP errors were detected. An
AIS-P defect (or a lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an
LOP-P defect can also cause an STS SES-P.
STS UAS-P
Near-End STS Path Unavailable Seconds (UAS-P) is a count of the
seconds when the STS path was unavailable. An STS path becomes
unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Ps,
and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that
do not qualify as SES-Ps.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-36
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards
Table 8-34 Far-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-3 Card
Parameter
Definition
CV-L
Far-End Line Code Violation (CV-L) is a count of BIP errors detected by
the far-end line terminating equipment (LTE) and reported back to the
near-end LTE using the REI-L indication in the line overhead. For SONET
signals at rates below OC-48, up to 8 x N BIP errors per STS-N frame can
be indicated using the REI-L. For OC-48 signals, up to 255 BIP errors per
STS-N frame can be indicated. The current CV-L second register is
incremented for each BIP error indicated by the incoming REI-L.
ES-L
Far-End Line Errored Seconds (ES-L) is a count of the seconds when at
least one line-layer BIP error was reported by the far-end LTE or an RDI-L
defect was present.
SES-L
Far-End Line Severely Errored Seconds (SES-L) is a count of the seconds
when K (see GR-253-CORE for values) or more line-layer BIP errors
were reported by the far-end LTE or an RDI-L defect was present.
UAS-L
Far-End Line Unavailable Seconds (UAS-L) is a count of the seconds
when the line is unavailable at the far end. A line becomes unavailable at
the far end when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-LFEs
and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that
do not qualify as SES-LFEs.
FC-L
Far-End Line Failure Count (FC-L) is a count of the number of far-end
line failure events. A failure event begins when RFI-L failure is declared,
and it ends when the RFI-L failure clears. A failure event that begins in
one period and ends in another period is counted only in the period where
it began.
8.6.2 OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters
Figure 8-22 shows the signal types that support far-end PMs. Figure 8-23 shows where overhead bytes
detected on the ASICs produce performance monitoring parameters for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192
cards.
Figure 8-22 Monitored signal types for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 cards
Near End
Far End
OC-N Signal
OC-N Signal
DS1
ONS 15454
Fiber
OC-N
OC-N
STS Path (STS XX-P) Far End PMs Not Supported
DS1
55313
ONS 15454
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-37
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards
Note
PMs on the protect STS are not supported for BLSR. The XX in the illustration above represents all
PMs listed below with the given prefix and/or suffix.
Figure 8-23 PM read points on the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 cards
ONS 15454
OC-N Card
XC10G Card
DS1
BTC ASIC
CV-S
ES-S
SES-S
SEFS-S
CV-L
ES-L
SES-L
UAS-L
FC-L
PPJC-Pdet
NPJC-Pdet
PPJC-Pgen
NPJC-Pgen
STS CV-P
STS ES-P
STS FC-P
STS SES-P
STS UAS-P
Note: The OC-48 and OC-192 have 1 port per card.
Note
61119
PMs read on BTC ASIC
For PM locations relating to protection switch counts, see the GR-1230-CORE document.
Table 8-35 Near-End Section PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards
Parameter
Definition
CV-S
Section Coding Violation (CV-S) is a count of BIP errors detected at the
section-layer (i.e. using the B1 byte in the incoming SONET signal). Up
to eight section BIP errors can be detected per STS-N frame; each error
increments the current CV-S second register.
ES-S
Section Errored Seconds (ES-S) is a count of the number of seconds when
at least one section-layer BIP error was detected or an SEF or LOS defect
was present.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-38
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards
Table 8-35 Near-End Section PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards (continued)
Parameter
Definition
SES-S
Section Severely Errored Seconds (SES-S) is a count of the seconds when
K (see GR-253 for value) or more section-layer BIP errors were detected
or an SEF or LOS defect was present.
SEFS-S
Section Severely Errored Framing Seconds (SEFS-S) is a count of the
seconds when an SEF defect was present. An SEF defect is expected to be
present during most seconds when an LOS or LOF defect is present.
However, there may be situations when the SEFS-S parameter is only
incremented based on the presence of an SEF defect.
Table 8-36 Near-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards
Parameter
Definition
CV-L
Near-End Line Code Violation (CV-L) is a count of BIP errors detected at
the line-layer (i.e. using the B2 bytes in the incoming SONET signal). Up
to 8 x N BIP errors can be detected per STS-N frame; each error
increments the current CV-L second register.
ES-L
Near-End Line Errored Seconds (ES-L) is a count of the seconds when at
least one line-layer BIP error was detected or an AIS-L defect was
present.
SES-L
Near-End Line Severely Errored Seconds (SES-L) is a count of the
seconds when K (see GR-253 for values) or more line-layer BIP errors
were detected or an AIS-L defect was present.
UAS-L
Near-End Line Unavailable Seconds (UAS-L) is a count of the seconds
when the line is unavailable. A line becomes unavailable when ten
consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Ls, and it continues to be
unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as
SES-Ls.
FC-L
Near-End Line Failure Count (FC-L) is a count of the number of near-end
line failure events. A failure event begins when an AIS-L failure or a
lower-layer traffic-related, near-end failure is declared. This failure event
ends when the failure is cleared. A failure event that begins in one period
and ends in another period is counted only in the period where it begins.
Table 8-37 Near-End SONET Path H-byte PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards
Parameter
Definition
PPJC-Pdet
Positive Pointer Justification Count, STS Path Detected (PPJC-Pdet) is a
count of the positive pointer justifications detected on a particular path on
an incoming SONET signal.
NPJC-Pdet
Negative Pointer Justification Count, STS Path Detected (NPJC-Pdet) is a
count of the negative pointer justifications detected on a particular path on
an incoming SONET signal.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-39
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards
Table 8-37 Near-End SONET Path H-byte PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards (continued)
Parameter
Definition
PPJC-Pgen
Positive Pointer Justification Count, STS Path Generated (PPJC-Pgen) is
a count of the positive pointer justifications generated for a particular path
to reconcile the frequency of the SPE with the local clock.
NPJC-Pgen
Negative Pointer Justification Count, STS Path Generated (PPJC-Pgen) is
a count of the negative pointer justifications generated for a particular
path to reconcile the frequency of the synchronous payload envelope
(SPE) with the local clock.
Table 8-38 Near-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards
Parameter
Definition
PSC (BLSR)
For a protect line in a 2-fiber ring, Protection Switching Count (PSC)
refers to the number of times a protection switch has occurred either to a
particular span’s line protection or away from a particular span’s line
protection. Therefore, if a protection switch occurs on a 2-fiber BLSR, the
PSC of the protection span to which the traffic is switched will increment,
and when the switched traffic returns to its original working span from the
protect span, the PSC of the protect span will increment again.
PSC (1+1 protection)
In a 1 + 1 protection scheme for a working card, Protection Switching
Count (PSC) is a count of the number of times service switches from a
working card to a protection card plus the number of times service
switches back to the working card.
For a protection card, PSC is a count of the number of times service
switches to a working card from a protection card plus the number of
times service switches back to the protection card. The PSC PM is only
applicable if revertive line-level protection switching is used.
PSD
For an active protection line in a 2-fiber BLSR, Protection Switching
Duration (PSD) is a count of the number of seconds that the protect line
is carrying working traffic following the failure of the working line. PSD
increments on the active protect line and PSD-W increments on the failed
working line.
PSC-W
For a working line in a 2-fiber BLSR, Protection Switching
Count-Working (PSC-W) is a count of the number of times traffic
switches away from the working capacity in the failed line and back to the
working capacity after the failure is cleared. PSC-W increments on the
failed working line and PSC increments on the active protect line.
For a working line in a 4-fiber BLSR, PSC-W is a count of the number of
times service switches from a working line to a protection line plus the
number of times it switches back to the working line. PSC-W increments
on the failed line and PSC-R or PSC-S increments on the active protect
line.
PSD-W
For a working line in a 2-fiber BLSR, Protection Switching
Duration-Working (PSD-W) is a count of the number of seconds that
service was carried on the protection line. PSD-W increments on the
failed working line and PSD increments on the active protect line.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-40
November 2001
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards
Table 8-38 Near-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards (continued)
Parameter
Definition
PSC-S
In a 4-fiber BLSR, Protection Switching Count-Span (PSC-S) is a count
of the number of times service switches from a working line to a
protection line plus the number of times it switches back to the working
line. A count is only incremented if span switching is used.
PSD-S
In a 4-fiber BLSR, Protection Switching Duration-Span (PSD-S) is a
count of the seconds that the protection line was used to carry service. A
count is only incremented if span switching is used.
PSC-R
In a 4-fiber BLSR, Protection Switching Count-Ring (PSC-R) is a count
of the number of times service switches from a working line to a
protection line plus the number of times it switches back to a working line.
A count is only incremented if ring switching is used.
PSD-R
In a 4-fiber BLSR, Protection Switching Duration-Ring (PSD-R) is a
count of the seconds that the protection line was used to carry service. A
count is only incremented if ring switching is used.
Table 8-39 Near-End SONET Path PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards
Parameter
Note
Definition
SONET path PMs will not count unless IPPM is enabled. For additional information, see the
“Enable Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring” procedure on page 7-25. The far-end
IPPM feature is not supported in Software R3.1. However, SONET path PMs can be monitored
by logging into the far-end node directly.
STS CV-P
Near-End STS Path Coding Violations (CV-P) is a count of BIP errors
detected at the STS path layer (i.e., using the B3 byte). Up to eight BIP
errors can be detected per frame; each error increments the current CV-P
second register.
STS ES-P
Near-End STS Path Errored Seconds (ES-P) is a count of the seconds
when at least one STS path BIP error was detected. An AIS-P defect (or a
lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an LOP-P defect can also
cause an STS ES-P.
STS FC-P
Near-End STS Path Failure Counts (FC-P) is a count of the number of
near-end STS path failure events. A failure event begins with an AIS-P
failure, an LOP-P failure, a UNEQ-P failure or a TIM-P failure is
declared, or if the STS PTE that is monitoring the path supports ERDI-P
for that path. The failure event ends when these failures are cleared.
STS SES-P
Near-End STS Path Severely Errored Seconds (SES-P) is a count of the
seconds when K (2400) or more STS path BIP errors were detected. An
AIS-P defect (or a lower-layer, traffic-related, near-end defect) or an
LOP-P defect can also cause an STS SES-P.
STS UAS-P
Near-End STS Path Unavailable Seconds (UAS-P) is a count of the
seconds when the STS path was unavailable. An STS path becomes
unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-Ps,
and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that
do not qualify as SES-Ps.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
8-41
Chapter 8
Performance Monitoring
Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards
Table 8-40 Far-End Line Layer PMs for the OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 Cards
Parameter
Definition
CV-L
Far-End Line Code Violation (CV-L) is a count of BIP errors detected by
the far-end line terminating equipment (LTE) and reported back to the
near-end LTE using the REI-L indication in the line overhead. For SONET
signals at rates below OC-48, up to 8 x N BIP errors per STS-N frame can
be indicated using the REI-L. For OC-48 signals, up to 255 BIP errors per
STS-N frame can be indicated. The current CV-L second register is
incremented for each BIP error indicated by the incoming REI-L.
ES-L
Far-End Line Errored Seconds (ES-L) is a count of the seconds when at
least one line-layer BIP error was reported by the far-end LTE or an RDI-L
defect was present.
SES-L
Far-End Line Severely Errored Seconds (SES-L) is a count of the seconds
when K (see GR-253-CORE for values) or more line-layer BIP errors
were reported by the far-end LTE or an RDI-L defect was present.
UAS-L
Far-End Line Unavailable Seconds (UAS-L) is a count of the seconds
when the line is unavailable at the far end. A line becomes unavailable at
the far end when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as SES-LFEs,
and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that
do not qualify as SES-LFEs.
FC-L
Far-End Line Failure Count (FC-L) is a count of the number of far-end
line failure events. A failure event begins when RFI-L failure is declared
and ends when the RFI-L failure clears. A failure event that begins in one
period and ends in another period is counted only in the period where it
began.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
8-42
November 2001
C H A P T E R
9
Ethernet Operation
The Cisco ONS 15454 integrates Ethernet into a SONET time-division multiplexing (TDM) platform.
Unlike traditional transport products, which map Ethernet frames directly over dedicated TDM
bandwidth, the ONS 15454 incorporates layer 2 switching to allow more efficient data transport over the
existing SONET backbone.
This chapter describes the Ethernet capabilities of the ONS 15454, including:
•
Ethernet cards
•
Multicard and Single-card Etherswitch
•
Ethernet circuit combinations and configurations
•
VLAN and IEEE 802.1Q support
•
Spanning tree and IEEE 802.1D support
•
Ethernet performance and maintenance screens
•
Ethernet alarm thresholds (RMON)
9.1 Ethernet Cards
The ONS 15454 shelf assembly holds up to ten Ethernet cards in any multispeed slot. Ethernet cards
include the E100T-12, E100T-G, E1000-2 and E1000-2-G. The E100T-12 is the functional equivalent of
the E100T-G, and the E1000-2 is the functional equivalent of the E1000-2-G. An ONS 15454 using
XC10G cards requires the G versions of the Ethernet cards.
Ethernet card faceplates have two card-level LEDs and a pair of port-level LEDs next to each port.
Table 9-1
Card-level LEDS
LED State
Description
Red FAIL LED
The red FAIL LED indicates that the card’s processor is not ready or a
catastrophic software failure occurred on the Ethernet card. As part of the
boot sequence, the FAIL LED is turned on until the software deems the card
operational.
Green ACT LED
A green ACT LED provides the operational status of the E100T-G. When the
ACT LED is green it indicates that the Ethernet card is active and the
software is operational.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-1
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Cards
Table 9-2
Port-level LEDs
LED State
Description
Amber
Transmitting and Receiving
Solid Green
Idle and Link Integrity
Green Light Off
Inactive Connection or Unidirectional Traffic
9.1.1 E100T-12/E100T-G
E100T-12/E100T-G cards provide twelve switched, IEEE 802.3-compliant 10/100 Base-T Ethernet
ports. Ports detect the speed of an attached device by auto-negotiation and automatically connect at the
appropriate speed and duplex mode, either half or full duplex, and determine whether to enable or disable
flow control. An E100T-12/E100T-G card consumes 55 W, 1.46 AMPS, and 188 BTU/Hr.
9.1.2 E1000-2/E1000-2-G
E1000-2/E1000-2-G cards provides two switched, IEEE 802.3-compliant Gigabit Ethernet (1000 Mbps)
ports that support full duplex operation. An E100T-12/E100T-G card consumes 60 W, 1.25 AMPS, and
205 BTU/Hr.
Gigabit interface converters (GBICs) are hot-swappable input/output devices that plug into a Gigabit
Ethernet (E1000-2 or E1000-2-G) card to link the port with the fiber-optic network and determine the
maximum distance that the Ethernet traffic will travel from the E1000-2/E1000-2-G card to the next
network device.
E1000-2/E1000-2-G cards support two types of standard Cisco GBICs: the IEEE 1000Base-SX
compliant 850 nm “short reach” and the IEEE 1000Base-LX compliant 1300 nm “long reach.” The 850
nm SX optics are designed for multimode fiber and distances up to 220 meters on 62.5 micron fiber and
up to 550 meters on 50 micron fiber. The 1300 nm LX optics are designed for single-mode fiber and
distances up to 5 kilometers.
A gigabit interface converter
11825
Figure 9-1
Receiver
Transmitter
Table 9-3 shows the available GBICs.
Table 9-3
Available GBICs
GBIC
Product Number
Short wavelength (1000BaseSX)
15454-GBIC-SX
Long wavelength/long haul (1000BaseLX)
15454-GBIC-LX
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-2
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Cards
For GBIC installation and cabling instructions, see the “Fiber-Optic Cable Installation” section on
page 1-52.
Caution
E1000-2/E1000-2-G cards lose traffic for approximately 30 seconds when an ONS 15454 database
is restored. Traffic is lost during the period of spanning tree reconvergence. The CARLOSS alarm
will appear and clear during this period.
For detailed specifications of the Ethernet cards, refer to the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and
Maintenance Guide.
9.1.3 Port Provisioning for Ethernet Cards
This section explains how to provision Ethernet ports on an Ethernet card. Most provisioning requires
filling in two fields: Enabled and Mode. However, you can also map incoming traffic to a low priority or
a high priority queue using the Priority column, and you can enable spanning tree with the Stp Enabled
column. For more information about spanning tree, see the “Spanning Tree (IEEE 802.1D)” section on
page 9-26. The Status column displays information about the port’s current operating mode, and the Stp
State column provides the current spanning tree status.
Procedure: Provision Ethernet Ports
Step 1
Display CTC and double-click the card graphic to open the Ethernet card.
Step 2
Choose the Provisioning > Port tabs.
Figure 9-2 shows the Provisioning tab with the Port function subtab selected.
Figure 9-2
Provisioning Ethernet ports
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-3
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Multicard and Single-Card EtherSwitch
Step 3
From the Port screen, choose the appropriate mode for each Ethernet port. Valid choices for the
E100T-12/E100T-G card are Auto, 10 Half, 10 Full, 100 Half, or 100 Full. Valid choices for the
E1000-2/E1000-2-G card are 1000 Full or Auto.
Both 1000 Full and Auto mode set the E1000-2 port to the 1000 Mbps and Full duplex operating mode;
however, flow control is disabled when 1000 Full is selected. Choosing Auto mode enables the E1000-2
card to autonegotiate flow control. Flow control is a mechanism that prevents network congestion by
ensuring that transmitting devices do not overwhelm receiving devices with data. The E1000-2 port
handshakes with the connected network device to determine if that device supports flow control.
Step 4
Click the Enabled checkbox(s) to activate the corresponding Ethernet port(s).
Step 5
Click Apply.
Your Ethernet ports are now provisioned and ready to be configured for VLAN membership.
Step 6
Repeat this procedure for all other cards that will be in the VLAN.
9.2 Multicard and Single-Card EtherSwitch
The ONS 15454 enables multicard and single-card EtherSwitch modes. At the Ethernet card view in
CTC, click the Provisioning > Card tabs to reveal the Card Mode option.
9.2.1 Multicard EtherSwitch
Multicard EtherSwitch provisions two or more Ethernet cards to act as a single layer 2 switch. It supports
one STS-6c shared packet ring, two STS-3c shared packet rings, or six STS-1 shared packet rings. The
bandwidth of the single switch formed by the Ethernet cards matches the bandwidth of the provisioned
Ethernet circuit up to STS-6c worth of bandwidth.
Figure 9-3
A Multicard EtherSwitch configuration
ONS Node
VLAN A
Ethernet card #1
Ethernet card #2
Router
Router
Shared packet ring
Ethernet card #3
ONS Node
Ethernet card #4
Router
45133
ONS Node
Router
ONS Node
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-4
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Multicard and Single-Card EtherSwitch
Caution
Whenever you drop two STS-3c multicard EtherSwitch circuits onto an Ethernet card and delete only
the first circuit, you should not provision STS-1 circuits to the card without first deleting the
remaining STS-3c circuit. If you attempt to create a STS-1 circuit after deleting the first STS-3c
circuit, the STS-1 circuit will not work and no alarms will indicate this condition. To avoid this
condition, delete the second STS-3c prior to creating the STS-1 circuit.
9.2.2 Single-Card EtherSwitch
Single-card EtherSwitch allows each Ethernet card to remain a single switching entity within the ONS
15454 shelf. This option allows a full STS-12c worth of bandwidth between two Ethernet circuit points.
Figure 9-4 illustrates a single-card EtherSwitch configuration.
Figure 9-4
A Single-card EtherSwitch configuration
Ethernet card #1
Ethernet card #2
Router
Router
ONS Node
VLAN A
ONS Node
VLAN B
Ethernet card #4
Router
45132
Ethernet card #3
Router
Seven scenarios exist for provisioning single-card EtherSwitch bandwidth:
Note
1.
STS 12c
2.
STS 6c + STS 6c
3.
STS 6c + STS 3c + STS 3c
4.
STS 6c + 6 STS-1s
5.
STS 3c + STS 3c +STS 3c +STS 3c
6.
STS 3c +STS 3c + 6 STS-1s
7.
12 STS-1s
When configuring scenario 3, the STS 6c must be provisioned before either of the STS 3c circuits.
9.2.3 ONS 15454 and ONS 15327 EtherSwitch Circuit Combinations
The following table shows the Ethernet circuit combinations available in ONS 15454s and ONS 15327s
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-5
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
.
Table 9-4
ONS 15454 and ONS 15327 Ethernet Circuit Combinations
15327
Single-Card
15327 Multicard
15454
Single-Card
15454 Multicard
six STS-1s
three STS-1s
one STS 12c
six STS-1s
two STS 3cs
one STS 3c
two STS 6cs
two STS 3cs
one STS 6c
one STS 6c and
two STS 3cs
one STS 6c
one STS 12c
one STS 6c and
six STS-1s
four STS 3cs
two STS 3cs and
six STS-1s
twelve STS-1s
9.3 Ethernet Circuit Configurations
Ethernet circuits can link ONS nodes through point-to-point, shared packet ring, or hub and spoke
configurations. Two nodes usually connect with a point-to-point configuration. More than two nodes
usually connect with a shared packet ring configuration or a hub and spoke configuration. This section
includes procedures for creating these configurations and also explains how to create Ethernet manual
cross-connects. Ethernet manual cross-connects allow you to cross connect individual Ethernet circuits
to an STS channel on the ONS 15454 optical interface and also to bridge non-ONS SONET network
segments.
Note
Before making Ethernet connections, choose a circuit size from STS-1, STS-3c, STS-6c, or STS-12c.
Note
When making an STS-12c Ethernet circuit, Ethernet cards must be configured as single-card
EtherSwitch. Multi-card mode does not support STS-12c Ethernet circuits.
9.3.1 Point-to-Point Ethernet Circuits
The ONS 15454 can set up a point-to-point (straight) Ethernet circuit as Single-card or Multicard.
Multicard EtherSwitch limits bandwidth to STS-6c of bandwidth between two Ethernet circuit points,
but allows adding nodes and cards and making a shared packet ring. Single-card EtherSwitch allows a
full STS-12c of bandwidth between two Ethernet circuit points.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-6
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
Figure 9-5
A Multicard EtherSwitch point-to-point circuit
ONS 15454
#1
192.168.1.100
255.255.255.0
VLAN test 1
Slot 5, port 1
192.168.1.50
255.255.255.0
VLAN test 1
Slot 15, port 1
ONS 15454
#3
ONS 15454
#2
192.168.1.75
255.255.255.0
VLAN test 1
Slot 17, port 1
SONET
Ethernet
Figure 9-6
43272
192.168.1.25
255.255.255.0
VLAN test 1
Slot 4, port 1
A Single-card Etherswitch point-to-point circuit
192.168.1.25
255.255.255.0
VLAN test
Slot 4
ONS 15454
#2
ONS 15454
#3
192.168.1.50
255.255.255.0
VLAN test
Slot 15
32161
ONS 15454
#1
Procedure: Provision an EtherSwitch Point-to-Point Circuit (Multicard or Single-Card)
Step 1
Display CTC for one of the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoint nodes.
Step 2
Double-click one of the Ethernet cards that will carry the circuit.
Step 3
Click the Provisioning > Card tabs.
Step 4
If you are building a Multicard Etherswitch point-to-point circuit:
a.
Under Card Mode, verify that Multi-card EtherSwitch Group is checked.
b.
If Multi-card EtherSwitch Group is not checked, check it and click Apply.
c.
Repeat Steps 2 – 4 for all other Ethernet cards in the ONS 15454 that will carry the circuit.
If you are building a Single-card Etherswitch circuit:
d.
Under Card Mode, verify that Single-card EtherSwitch is checked.
e.
If Single-card EtherSwitch is not checked, check it and click Apply.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-7
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
Step 5
Navigate to the other ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoint.
Step 6
Repeat Steps 2 – 5.
Step 7
Click the Circuits tab and click Create.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Attributes) dialog box opens (Figure 9-7).
Figure 9-7
Provisioning an Ethernet circuit
Step 8
In the Name field, type a name for the circuit.
Step 9
From the Type pull-down menu, choose STS.
Step 10
The VT and VT Tunnel types do not apply to Ethernet circuits.
Step 11
Choose the size of the circuit from the Size pull-down menu.
The valid circuit sizes for an Ethernet Multicard circuit are STS-1, STS-3c and STS6c.
The valid circuit sizes for an Ethernet Single-card circuit are STS-1, STS-3c, STS6c and STS12c.
Step 12
Verify that the Bidirectional checkbox is checked and click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Source) dialog box opens (Figure 9-8).
Figure 9-8
Step 13
Choosing a circuit source
Choose the circuit source from the Node menu. Either end node can be the circuit source.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-8
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
Step 14
If you are building a Multicard EtherSwitch circuit, choose Ethergroup from the Slot menu and click
Next.
Step 15
If you are building a Single-card EtherSwitch circuit, from the Slot menu choose the Ethernet card where
you enabled the single-card Etherswitch and click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Destination) dialog box opens.
Step 16
Choose the circuit destination from the Node menu, in this example Node 2. Choose the node that is not
the source.
Step 17
If you are building a Multicard EtherSwitch circuit choose Ethergroup from the Slot menu and click
Next.
Step 18
If you are building a Single-card EtherSwitch circuit, from the Slot menu choose the Ethernet card for
which you enabled the Single-card Etherswitch and click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit VLAN Selection) dialog box opens.
Step 19
Step 20
Create the VLAN:
a.
Click the New VLAN tab.
b.
Assign an easily-identifiable name to your VLAN.
c.
Assign a VLAN ID.
d.
The VLAN ID should be the next available number between 2 and 4093 that is not already assigned
to an existing VLAN. Each ONS 15454 network supports a maximum of 509 user-provisionable
VLANs.
e.
Click OK.
f.
Highlight the VLAN name and click the arrow >> tab to move the available VLAN(s) to the Circuit
VLANs column.
Click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Routing Preferences) dialog box opens.
Step 21
Confirm that the following information about the point-to-point circuit is correct:
•
Circuit name
•
Circuit type
•
Circuit size
•
VLANs on the circuit
•
ONS 15454 nodes included in the circuit
Step 22
Click Finish.
Step 23
You now need to provision the Ethernet ports and assign ports to VLANs. For port provisioning
instructions, see the “Provision Ethernet Ports” procedure on page 9-3. For assigning ports to VLANs,
see the “Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership” procedure on page 9-24. For information
about manually provisioning circuits, see the “Ethernet Manual Cross-Connects” procedure on
page 9-16.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-9
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
9.3.2 Shared Packet Ring Ethernet Circuits
This section provides steps for creating a shared packet ring (Figure 9-9). Your network architecture may
differ from the example.
Figure 9-9
A shared packet ring Ethernet circuit
Backbone router
Access router
SONET Ring
Access router
Access router
ONS 15454
Access router
ONS 15454
Access router
Access router
SONET
Ethernet
32165
ONS 15454
Procedure: Provision a Shared Packet Ring
Step 1
Display CTC for one of the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoints.
Step 2
Double-click one of the Ethernet cards that will carry the circuit.
Step 3
Click the Provisioning > Card tabs.
Step 4
Under Card Mode, verify that Multi-card EtherSwitch Group is checked.
Step 5
If Multi-card EtherSwitch Group is not checked, check it and click Apply.
Step 6
Display the node view.
Step 7
Repeat Steps 2 – 6 for all other Ethernet cards in the ONS 15454 that will carry the shared packet ring.
Step 8
Navigate to the other ONS 15454 endpoint.
Step 9
Repeat Steps 2 – 7.
Step 10
Click the Circuits tab and click Create.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Attributes) dialog box opens.
Step 11
In the Name field, type a name for the circuit.
Step 12
From the Type pull-down menu, choose STS. The VT and VT Tunnel types do not apply to Ethernet
circuits.
Step 13
From the Size pull-down menu, choose the size of the circuit.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-10
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
For shared packet ring Ethernet, valid circuit sizes are STS-1, STS-3C and STS-6c.
Step 14
Verify that the Bidirectional checkbox is checked.
Note
Step 15
You must manually provision the circuits if you are building a shared packet ring
configuration.
Click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Source) dialog box opens.
Step 16
From the Node menu, choose the circuit source.
Any shared packet ring node can serve as the circuit source.
Step 17
Choose Ethergroup from the Slot menu and click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Destination) dialog box opens.
Step 18
Choose the circuit destination from the Node menu.
Step 19
Except for the source node, any shared packet ring node can serve as the circuit destination.
Step 20
Choose Ethergroup from the Slot menu and click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit VLAN Selection) dialog box opens.
Step 21
Create the VLAN:
a.
Click the New VLAN tab.
The Circuit Creation (Define New VLAN) dialog box opens (Figure 9-10).
Figure 9-10 Choosing a VLAN name and ID
b.
Assign an easily-identifiable name to your VLAN.
c.
Assign a VLAN ID.
This VLAN ID number must be unique. It is usually the next available number not already assigned
to an existing VLAN (between 2 and 4093). Each ONS 15454 network supports a maximum of 509
user-provisionable VLANs.
d.
Click OK.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-11
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
Figure 9-11 Selecting VLANs
e.
Highlight the VLAN name and click the >> tab to move the VLAN(s) from the Available VLANs
column to the Circuit VLANs column (Figure 9-11).
By moving the VLAN from the Available VLANs column to the Circuit VLANs column, all the VLAN
traffic is forced to use the shared packet ring circuit you created.
Step 22
Click Next.
Step 23
Uncheck the Route Automatically checkbox and click Next.
Figure 9-12 Adding a span
Step 24
Click either span (green arrow) leading from the source node (Figure 9-12).
The span turns white.
Step 25
Click Add Span.
The span turns blue and adds the span to the Included Spans field.
Step 26
Click the node at the end of the blue span.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-12
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
Step 27
Click the green span leading to the next node.
The span turns white.
Step 28
Click Add Span.
The span turns blue.
Step 29
Repeat Steps 24 – 27 for every node remaining in the ring. Figure 9-13 shows the Circuit Path Selection
dialog box with all the spans selected.
Figure 9-13 Viewing a span
Step 30
Verify that the new circuit is correctly configured.
Note
If the circuit information is not correct, click the Back button and repeat the procedure with
the correct information. You can also click Finish, delete the completed circuit, and begin
the procedure again.
Step 31
Click Finish.
Step 32
You now need to provision the Ethernet ports and assign ports to VLANs. For port provisioning
instructions, see the “Provision Ethernet Ports” procedure on page 9-3. For assigning ports to VLANs,
see the “Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership” procedure on page 9-24.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-13
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
9.3.3 Hub and Spoke Ethernet Circuit Provisioning
This section provides steps for creating a hub and spoke Ethernet circuit configuration. The hub and
spoke configuration connects point-to-point circuits (the spokes) to an aggregation point (the hub). In
many cases, the hub links to a high-speed connection and the spokes are Ethernet cards. Figure 9-14
illustrates a sample hub and spoke ring. Your network architecture may differ from the example.
Figure 9-14 A Hub and Spoke Ethernet circuit
192.168.1.75
255.255.255.0
VLAN test
192.168.1.125
255.255.255.0
VLAN test
192.168.1.100
255.255.255.0
VLAN test
192.168.1.25
255.255.255.0
VLAN test
ONS 15454
#2
ONS 15454
#3
192.168.1.50
255.255.255.0
VLAN test
43386
ONS 15454
#1
Procedure: Provision a Hub and Spoke Ethernet Circuit
Step 1
Display CTC for one of the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoints.
Step 2
Double-click the Ethernet card that will create the circuit.
Step 3
Click the Provisioning > Card tabs.
Step 4
Under Card Mode, check the Single-card EtherSwitch checkbox.
If Single-card EtherSwitch is not checked, check it and click Apply.
Step 5
Navigate to the other ONS 15454 endpoint and repeat Steps 2 – 4.
Step 6
Display the node view or network view.
Step 7
Click the Circuits tab and click Create.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Attributes) dialog box opens (Figure 9-7 on page 9-8).
Step 8
In the Name field, type a name for the circuit.
Step 9
From the Type pull-down menu, choose STS.
Note
The types VT and VT Tunnel do not apply to Ethernet circuits.
Step 10
Choose the size of the circuit from the Size pull-down menu.
Step 11
Verify that the Bidirectional checkbox is checked and click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Source) dialog box opens.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-14
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
Step 12
From the Node menu, choose the circuit source.
Either end node can be the circuit source.
Step 13
From the Slot menu, choose the Ethernet card where you enabled the single-card EtherSwitch and click
Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Destination) dialog box opens.
Step 14
Choose the circuit destination from the Node menu.
Choose the node that is not the source.
Step 15
From the Slot menu, choose the Ethernet card where you enabled the single-card EtherSwitch and click
Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit VLAN Selection) dialog box opens (Figure 9-8 on page 9-8).
Step 16
Create the VLAN:
a.
Click the New VLAN tab.
The Circuit Creation (Define New VLAN) dialog box opens (Figure 9-10 on page 9-11).
b.
Assign an easily-identifiable name to your VLAN.
c.
Assign a VLAN ID.
This should be the next available number (between 2 and 4093) not already assigned to an existing
VLAN. Each ONS 15454 network supports a maximum of 509 user-provisionable VLANs.
Step 17
d.
Click OK.
e.
Highlight the VLAN name and click the >> tab to move the VLAN(s) from the Available VLANs
column to the Circuit VLANs column (Figure 9-11 on page 9-12).
Click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Routing Preferences) dialog box opens.
Step 18
Confirm that the following information about the point-to-point circuit is correct:
•
Circuit name
•
Circuit type
•
Circuit size
•
VLANs that will be transported across this circuit
•
ONS 15454 nodes included in this circuit
Note
If the circuit information is not correct, click the Back button and repeat the procedure with
the correct information. You can also click Finish, delete the completed circuit, and start the
procedure from the beginning.
Step 19
Click Finish.You must now provision the second circuit and attach it to the already-created VLAN.
Step 20
Log into the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoint for the second circuit.
Step 21
Double-click the Ethernet card that will create the circuit. The CTC card view displays.
Step 22
Click the Provisioning > Card tabs.
Step 23
Under Card Mode, check Single-card EtherSwitch.
If the Single-card EtherSwitch checkbox is not checked, check it and click Apply.
Step 24
Log into the other ONS 15454 endpoint for the second circuit and repeat Steps 21 – 23.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-15
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
Step 25
Display the CTC node view.
Step 26
Click the Circuits tab and click Create.
Step 27
Choose STS from the Type pull-down menu.
Note
The types VT and VT Tunnel do not apply to Ethernet circuits.
Step 28
Choose the size of the circuit from the Size pull-down menu.
Step 29
Verify that the Bidirectional checkbox is checked and click Next.
Step 30
Choose the circuit source from the Node menu and click Next.
Either end node can be the circuit source.
Step 31
Choose the circuit destination from the Node menu.
Choose the node that is not the source.
Step 32
From the Slot menu, choose the Ethernet card where you enabled the single-card EtherSwitch and click
Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit VLAN Selection) dialog box is displayed.
Step 33
Highlight the VLAN that you created for the first circuit and click the >> tab to move the VLAN(s) from
the Available VLANs column to the Selected VLANs column.
Step 34
Click Next and click Finish.
Step 35
You now need to provision the Ethernet ports and assign ports to VLANs. For port provisioning
instructions, see the “Provision Ethernet Ports” procedure on page 9-3. For assigning ports to VLANs,
see the “Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership” procedure on page 9-24.
9.3.4 Ethernet Manual Cross-Connects
ONS 15454s require end-to-end CTC visibility between nodes for normal provisioning of Ethernet
circuits. When other vendors’ equipment sits between ONS 15454s, OSI/TARP- based equipment does
not allow tunneling of the ONS 15454 TCP/IP-based DCC. To circumvent this lack of continuous DCC,
the Ethernet circuit must be manually cross connected to an STS channel riding through the non-ONS
network. This allows an Ethernet circuit to run from ONS node to ONS node utilizing the non-ONS
network.
Note
Provisioning manual cross-connects for Multicard Etherswitch circuits is a separate procedure from
provisioning manual cross-connects for Single-card Etherswitch circuits. Both procedures are listed
below.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-16
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
Figure 9-15 Ethernet manual cross-connects
Non-ONS
Network
ONS Node
SONET
Ethernet
47093
ONS Node
Procedure: Provision a Single-card EtherSwitch Manual Cross-Connect
Step 1
Display CTC for one of the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoints.
Step 2
Double-click one of the Ethernet cards that will carry the circuit.
Step 3
Click the Provisioning > Card tabs.
Step 4
Under Card Mode, verify that Single-card EtherSwitch is checked.
If the Single-card EtherSwitch is not checked, check it and click Apply.
Step 5
Display the node view.
Step 6
Click the Circuits tab and click Create.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Attributes) dialog box opens (Figure 9-16).
Figure 9-16 Creating an Ethernet circuit
Step 7
In the Name field, type a name for the circuit.
Step 8
From the Type pull-down menu, choose STS.
Note
Step 9
The types VT and VT Tunnel do not apply to Ethernet circuits.
Choose the size of the circuit from the Size pull-down menu.
The valid circuit sizes for an Ethernet Multicard circuit are STS-1, STS-3c and STS-6c.
Step 10
Verify that the Bidirectional checkbox is checked and click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Source) dialog box opens.
Step 11
From the Node menu, choose the current node as the circuit source.
Step 12
From the Slot menu, choose the Ethernet card that will carry the circuit and click Next.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-17
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Destination) dialog box opens.
Step 13
From the Node menu, choose the current node as the circuit destination.
Step 14
From the Slot menu, choose the optical card that will carry the circuit.
Step 15
Choose the STS that will carry the circuit from the STS menu and click Next.
Note
For Ethernet manual cross-connects, the same node serves as both source and destination.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit VLAN Selection) dialog box opens (Figure 9-11 on page 9-12).
Step 16
Create the VLAN:
a.
Click the New VLAN tab.
The Circuit Creation (Define New VLAN) dialog box opens (Figure 9-10 on page 9-11).
b.
Assign an easily-identifiable name to your VLAN.
c.
Assign a VLAN ID.
The VLAN ID should be the next available number (between 2 and 4093) that is not already assigned
to an existing VLAN. Each ONS 15454 network supports a maximum of 509 user-provisionable
VLANs.
d.
Click OK.
Figure 9-17 Selecting VLANs
e.
Step 17
Highlight the VLAN name and click the arrow >> tab to move the VLAN(s) from the Available
VLANs column to the Circuit VLANs column (Figure 9-17).
Click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Routing Preferences) dialog box opens.
Step 18
Confirm that the following information is correct:
•
Circuit name
•
Circuit type
•
Circuit size
•
VLANs on this circuit
•
ONS 15454 nodes included in this circuit
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-18
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
Note
If the circuit information is not correct use the Back button, then redo the procedure with the
correct information. Alternately, you can click Finish, then delete the completed circuit and
start the procedure from the beginning.
Step 19
Click Finish.
Step 20
You now need to provision the Ethernet ports and assign ports to VLANs. For port provisioning
instructions, see the “Provision Ethernet Ports” procedure on page 9-3. For assigning ports to VLANs,
see the “Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership” procedure on page 9-24.
Step 21
After assigning the ports to the VLANs, repeat Steps 1 – 19 at the second ONS 15454 Ethernet manual
cross-connect endpoint.
Note
The appropriate STS circuit must exist in the non-ONS 15454 equipment to connect the two STSs
from the ONS 15454 Ethernet manual cross-connect endpoints.
Procedure: Provision a Multicard EtherSwitch Manual Cross-Connect
Step 1
Display CTC for one of the ONS 15454 Ethernet circuit endpoints.
Step 2
Double-click one of the Ethernet cards that will carry the circuit.
Step 3
Click the Provisioning > Card tabs.
Step 4
Under Card Mode, verify that Multi-card EtherSwitch Group is checked.
If the Multicard-card EtherSwitch Group is not checked, check it and click Apply.
Step 5
Display the node view.
Step 6
Repeat Steps 2 – 5 for any other Ethernet cards in the ONS 15454 that will carry the circuit.
Step 7
Click the Circuits tab and click Create.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Attributes) dialog box opens (Figure 9-18).
Figure 9-18 Creating an Ethernet circuit
Step 8
In the Name field, type a name for the circuit.
Step 9
From the Type pull-down menu, choose STS.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-19
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Circuit Configurations
Note
Step 10
The types VT and VT Tunnel do not apply to Ethernet circuits.
Choose the size of the circuit from the Size pull-down menu.
The valid circuit sizes for an Ethernet Multicard circuit are STS-1, STS-3c and STS-6c.
Step 11
Verify that the Bidirectional checkbox is checked and click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Source) dialog box opens.
Step 12
From the Node menu, choose the current node as the circuit source.
Step 13
Choose Ethergroup from the Slot menu and click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Destination) dialog box opens.
Step 14
From the Node menu, choose the current node as the circuit destination.
Step 15
Choose the Ethernet card that will carry the circuit from the Slot menu and click Next.
Note
For the Ethernet manual cross-connect, the destination and source should be the same node.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit VLAN Selection) dialog box opens (Figure 9-11 on page 9-12).
Step 16
Create the VLAN:
a.
Click the New VLAN tab.
The Circuit Creation (Define New VLAN) dialog box opens (Figure 9-10 on page 9-11).
b.
Assign an easily-identifiable name to your VLAN.
c.
Assign a VLAN ID.
The VLAN ID should be the next available number (between 2 and 4093) that is not already assigned
to an existing VLAN. Each ONS 15454 network supports a maximum of 509 user-provisionable
VLANs.
d.
Click OK.
Figure 9-19 Selecting VLANs
e.
Step 17
Highlight the VLAN name and click the arrow >> tab to move the VLAN(s) from the Available
VLANs column to the Circuit VLANs column (Figure 9-19).
Click Next.
The Circuit Creation (Circuit Routing Preferences) dialog box opens.
Step 18
Confirm that the following information is correct:
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-20
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
VLAN Support
•
Circuit name
•
Circuit type
•
Circuit size
•
VLANs on this circuit
•
ONS 15454 nodes included in this circuit
Note
Step 19
If the circuit information is not correct use the Back button, then redo the procedure with the
correct information. Alternately, you can click Finish, then delete the completed circuit and
start the procedure from the beginning.
Click Finish.
You now need to provision the Ethernet ports and assign ports to VLANs. For port provisioning
instructions, see the “Provision Ethernet Ports” procedure on page 9-3. For assigning ports to VLANs,
see the “Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership” procedure on page 9-24. Return to the
following step after assigning the ports to VLANs.
Step 20
Highlight the circuit and click Edit.
The Edit Circuit dialog box opens.
Step 21
Click Drops and click Create.
The Define New Drop dialog box opens.
Step 22
From the Slot menu, choose the optical card that links the ONS 15454 to the non-ONS 15454 equipment.
Step 23
From the Port menu, choose the appropriate port.
Step 24
From the STS menu, choose the STS that matches the STS of the connecting non-ONS 15454 equipment.
Step 25
Click OK.
The Edit Circuit dialog box opens.
Step 26
Confirm the circuit information that displays in the Circuit Information dialog box and click Close.
Step 27
Repeat Steps 1 – 26 at the second ONS 15454 Ethernet manual cross-connect endpoint.
Note
The appropriate STS circuit must exist in the non-ONS 15454 equipment to connect the two
ONS 15454 Ethernet manual cross-connect endpoints.
9.4 VLAN Support
Users can provision up to 509 VLANs with the CTC software. Specific sets of ports define the broadcast
domain for the ONS 15454. The definition of VLAN ports includes all Ethernet and packet-switched
SONET port types. All VLAN IP address discovery, flooding, and forwarding is limited to these ports.
The ONS 15454 802.1Q-based VLAN mechanism provides logical isolation of subscriber LAN traffic
over a common SONET transport infrastructure. Each subscriber has an Ethernet port at each site, and
each subscriber is assigned to a VLAN. Although the subscriber’s VLAN data flows over shared circuits,
the service appears to the subscriber as a private data transport.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-21
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
VLAN Support
9.4.1 Q-Tagging (IEEE 802.1Q)
IEEE 802.1Q allows the same physical port to host multiple 802.1Q VLANs. Each 802.1Q VLAN
represents a different logical network.
The ONS 15454 works with Ethernet devices that support IEEE 802.1Q and those that do not support
IEEE 802.1Q. If a device attached to an ONS 15454 Ethernet port does not support IEEE 802.1Q, the
ONS 15454 only uses Q-tags internally. The ONS 15454 associates these Q-tags with specific ports.
With Ethernet devices that do not support IEEE 802.1Q, the ONS 15454 takes non-tagged Ethernet
frames that enter the ONS network and uses a Q-tag to assign the packet to the VLAN associated with
the ONS network’s ingress port. The receiving ONS node removes the Q-tag when the frame leaves the
ONS network (to prevent older Ethernet equipment from incorrectly identifying the 8021.Q packet as an
illegal frame). The ingress and egress ports on the ONS network must be set to Untag for the process to
occur. Untag is the default setting for ONS ports. Example #1 in Figure 9-20 illustrates Q-tag use only
within an ONS network.
With Ethernet devices that support IEEE 802.1Q, the ONS 15454 uses the Q-tag attached by the external
Ethernet devices. Packets enter the ONS network with an existing Q-tag; the ONS 15454 uses this same
Q-tag to forward the packet within the ONS network and leaves the Q-tag attached when the packet
leaves the ONS network. Set both entry and egress ports on the ONS network to Tagged for this process
to occur. Example #2 in Figure 9-20 illustrates the handling of packets that both enter and exit the ONS
network with a Q-tag.
For more information about setting ports to Tagged and Untag, see the “Provision Ethernet Ports for
VLAN Membership” procedure on page 9-24.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-22
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
VLAN Support
Figure 9-20 A Q-tag moving through a VLAN
Data Flow
Q-tag
ONS 15454
ONS 15454
The receiving ONS 15454
removes the Q-tag
and forwards the frame
to the specific VLAN.
1. The ONS 15454
uses a Q-tag internally
to deliver the frame to a
specific VLAN.
Q-tag
No tag
Q-tag
ONS 15454
2. The ONS 15454
receives a frame with a
Q-tag and passes it on.
Q-tag
ONS 15454
The receiving ONS 15454
receives a frame with a
Q-tag and passes it on.
61075
No tag
9.4.2 Priority Queuing (IEEE 802.1Q)
Note
IEEE 802.1Q was formerly IEEE 802.1P.
Networks without priority queuing handle all packets on a first-in-first-out basis. Priority queuing
reduces the impact of network congestion by mapping Ethernet traffic to different priority levels. The
ONS 15454 supports priority queuing. The ONS 15454 takes the eight priorities specified in IEEE
802.1Q and maps them to two queues (Table 9-5). Q-tags carry priority queuing information through the
network.
The ONS 15454 uses a “leaky bucket” algorithm to establish a weighted priority (not a strict priority).
A weighted priority gives high-priority packets greater access to bandwidth, but does not totally preempt
low-priority packets. During periods of network congestion, roughly 70% of bandwidth goes to the
high-priority queue and the remaining 30% goes to the low-priority queue. A network that is too
congested will drop packets.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-23
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
VLAN Support
Table 9-5
Priority Queuing
User Priority
Queue
Allocated Bandwidth
0,1,2,3
Low
30%
4,5,6,7
High
70%
Figure 9-21 The priority queuing process
Data Flow
Priority
ONS 15454
Priority tag
removed
ONS 15454
ONS 15454 maps a frame
with port-based priority using
a Q-tag.
The receiving ONS 15454
removes the Q-tag and
forwards the frame.
Same
priority
Priority
ONS 15454
ONS 15454 uses a Q-tag to
map a frame with priority and
forwards it on.
Priority
ONS 15454
The receiving ONS 15454
receives the frame with a
Q-tag and forwards it.
61076
No priority
9.4.3 VLAN Membership
This section explains how to provision Ethernet ports for VLAN membership. For initial port
provisioning (prior to provisioning VLAN membership) see the “Port Provisioning for Ethernet Cards”
section on page 9-3.
Procedure: Provision Ethernet Ports for VLAN Membership
The ONS 15454 allows you to configure the VLAN membership and Q-tag handling of individual
Ethernet ports.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-24
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
VLAN Support
Step 1
Display the CTC card view for the Ethernet card.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > VLAN tabs (Figure 9-22).
Figure 9-22 Configuring VLAN membership for individual Ethernet ports
Step 3
To put a port in a VLAN, click the port and choose either Tagged or Untag. Figure 9-22 on page 9-25
shows Port 1 in the red VLAN and Port 2 through Port 12 in the default VLAN. Table 9-6 shows valid
port settings.
If a port is a member of only one VLAN, go to that VLAN’s row and choose Untag from the Port column.
Choose -- for all the other VLAN rows in that Port column. The VLAN with Untag selected can connect
to the port, but other VLANs cannot access that port.
If a port is a trunk port, it connects multiple VLANs to an external device, such as a switch, which also
supports trunking. A trunk port must have tagging (802.1Q) enabled for all the VLANs that connect to
that external device. Choose Tagged at all VLAN rows that need to be trunked. Choose Untag at one or
more VLAN rows in the trunk port’s column that do not need to be trunked, for example, the default
VLAN. Each Ethernet port must attached to at least one untagged VLAN.
Step 4
After each port is in the appropriate VLAN, click Apply.
Table 9-6
Port Settings
Setting
Description
--
A port marked with this symbol does not belong to the VLAN.
Untag
The ONS 15454 will tag ingress frames and strip tags from egress frames.
Tagged
The ONS 15454 will handle ingress frames according to VLAN ID; egress
frames will not have their tags removed.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-25
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Spanning Tree (IEEE 802.1D)
Note
If Tagged is chosen, the attached external devices must recognize IEEE 802.1Q VLANs.
Note
Both ports on individual E1000-2/E1000-2-G cards cannot be members of the same VLAN.
9.5 Spanning Tree (IEEE 802.1D)
The Cisco ONS 15454 operates spanning tree protocol (STP) according to IEEE 802.1D when an
Ethernet card is installed. STP operates over all packet-switched ports including Ethernet and SONET
ports. On Ethernet ports, STP is disabled by default but may be enabled with a check box under the
Provisioning > Port tabs at the card-level view. On SONET interface ports, STP activates by default and
cannot be disabled.
The Ethernet card can enable STP on the Ethernet ports to allow redundant paths to the attached Ethernet
equipment. STP spans cards so that both equipment and facilities are protected against failure.
STP detects and eliminates network loops. When STP detects multiple paths between any two network
hosts, STP blocks ports until only one path exists between any two network hosts (Figure 9-23). The
single path eliminates possible bridge loops. This is crucial for shared packet rings, which naturally
include a loop.
Figure 9-23 An STP blocked path
43388
Primary path (forwarding)
Redundant path (blocked)
To remove loops, STP defines a tree that spans all the switches in an extended network. STP forces
certain redundant data paths into a standby (blocked) state. If one network segment in the STP becomes
unreachable, the spanning-tree algorithm reconfigures the spanning-tree topology and reactivates the
blocked path to reestablish the link. STP operation is transparent to end stations, which do not
discriminate between connections to a single LAN segment or to a switched LAN with multiple
segments. The ONS 15454 supports one STP instance per circuit and a maximum of eight STP instances
per ONS 15454.
9.5.1 Multi-Instance Spanning Tree and VLANs
The ONS 15454 can operate multiple instances of STP to support VLANs in a looped topology. You can
dedicate separate circuits across the SONET ring for different VLAN groups (i.e., one for private TLS
services and one for Internet access). Each circuit runs its own STP to maintain VLAN connectivity in
a multi-ring environment.
Procedure: Enable Spanning Tree on Ethernet Ports
Step 1
Display the CTC card view.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-26
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Spanning Tree (IEEE 802.1D)
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > Port tabs.
Step 3
In the left-hand column, find the applicable port number and check the Stp Enabled checkbox to enable
STP for that port.
Step 4
Click Apply.
9.5.2 Spanning Tree Parameters
Default spanning tree parameters are appropriate for most situations. Contact the Cisco Technical
Assistance Center (TAC) at 1-877-323-7368 before you change the default STP parameters.
At the node view, click the Maintenance > Etherbridge > Spanning Trees tabs to view spanning tree
parameters.
Table 9-7
Spanning Tree Parameters
BridgeID
ONS 15454 unique identifier that transmits the
configuration bridge protocol data unit (BPDU); the
bridge ID is a combination of the bridge priority and
the ONS 15454 MAC address
TopoAge
Amount of time in seconds since the last topology
change
TopoChanges
Number of times the spanning tree topology has been
changed since the node booted up
DesignatedRoot
Identifies the spanning tree’s designated root for a
particular spanning tree instance
RootCost
Identifies the total path cost to the designated root
RootPort
Port used to reach the root
MaxAge
Maximum time that received-protocol information is
retained before it is discarded
HelloTime
Time interval, in seconds, between the transmission of
configuration BPDUs by a bridge that is the spanning
tree root or is attempting to become the spanning tree
root
HoldTime
Minimum time period, in seconds, that elapses during
the transmission of configuration information on a
given port
ForwardDelay
Time spent by a port in the listening state and the
learning state
9.5.3 Spanning Tree Configuration
To view the spanning tree configuration, at the node view click the Provisioning tab and Etherbridge
subtab.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-27
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Performance and Maintenance Screens
Table 9-8
Spanning Tree Configuration
Column
Default Value
Value Range
Priority
32768
0 - 65535
Bridge max age
20 seconds
6 - 40 seconds
Bridge Hello Time
2 seconds
1 - 10 seconds
Bridge Forward Delay 15 seconds
4 - 30 seconds
9.5.4 Spanning Tree Map
The Circuit screen shows forwarding spans and blocked spans on the spanning tree map.
Procedure: View the Spanning Tree Map
Step 1
On the circuit screen (Figure 9-24), double-click an Ethernet circuit.
Figure 9-24 The spanning tree map on the circuit screen
Note
Green represents forwarding spans and purple represents blocked (protect) spans. If you have a
packet ring configuration, at least one span should be purple.
9.6 Ethernet Performance and Maintenance Screens
CTC provides Ethernet performance information, including line-level parameters, the amount of port
bandwidth used, and historical Ethernet statistics. CTC also includes spanning tree information, MAC
address information, and the amount of circuit bandwidth used. To view spanning tree information, see
the “Spanning Tree Parameters” section on page 9-27.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-28
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Ethernet Performance and Maintenance Screens
9.6.1 Statistics Screen
The Ethernet statistics screen lists Ethernet parameters at the line level. Table 9-9 defines the
parameters. Display the CTC card view for the Ethernet card and click the Performance > Statistics
tabs to display the screen.
Table 9-9
Ethernet Parameters
Parameter
Meaning
Link Status
RX Packets
Indicates whether link integrity is present; up means present, and down
means not present
Number of packets received since the last counter reset
RX Bytes
TX Packets
Number of bytes received since the last counter reset
Number of packets transmitted since the last counter reset
TX Bytes
RX Total Errors
Number of bytes transmitted since the last counter reset
Total number of receive errors
RX FCS
Number of packets with a Frame Check Sequence (FCS) error. FCS
errors indicate Frame corruption during transmission
RX Alignment
Number of packets with alignment errors; alignment errors are
received incomplete frames
Number of packets received that are less than 64 bytes in length
RX Runts
RX Giants
Number of packets received that are greater than 1518 bytes in length
for untagged interfaces and 1522 bytes for tagged interfaces
TX Collisions
Number of transmit packets that are collisions; the port and the
attached device transmitting at the same time caused collisions
TX Excessive
Number of consecutive collisions
TX Deferred
Number of packets deferred
9.6.2 Line Utilization Screen
The Line Utilization screen shows the percentage of line, or port, bandwidth used and the percentage
used in the past. Display the CTC card view and click the Performance and Utilization tabs to display
the screen. From the Interval menu, choose a time segment interval. Valid intervals are 1 minute, 15
minutes, 1 hour, and 1 day. Press Refresh to update the data.
Note
Line utilization numbers express the average of ingress and egress traffic as a percentage of capacity.
9.6.3 History Screen
The Ethernet History screen lists past Ethernet statistics. At the CTC card view, click the Performance
tab and History subtab to view the screen. Choose the appropriate port from the Line menu and the
appropriate interval from the Interval menu. Press Refresh to update the data. Table 9-9 defines the
listed parameters.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-29
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Remote Monitoring Specification Alarm Thresholds
9.6.4 MAC Table Screen
A MAC address is a hardware address that physically identifies a network device. The ONS 15454 MAC
table, also known as the MAC forwarding table, will allow you to see all the MAC addresses attached
to the enabled ports of an Ethernet card or an Ethernet Group. This includes the MAC address of the
network device attached directly to the port and any MAC addresses on the network linked to the port.
The MAC addresses table lists the MAC addresses stored by the ONS 15454 and the VLAN,
Slot/Port/STS, and circuit that links the ONS 15454 to each MAC address (Figure 9-25).
Figure 9-25 MAC addresses recorded in the MAC table
MAC Address
00-00-00-00-00-09
Slot 6,
port 1 ONS 15454 Slot 5,
port 1
MAC Address
00-00-00-00-00-03
MAC Address
00-00-00-00-00-01
43387
Network
attached to
optic port
Slot 4,
port 1
Procedure: Retrieve the MAC Table Information
Step 1
Click the Maintenance > EtherBridge > MAC Table tabs.
Step 2
Select the appropriate Ethernet card or Ethergroup from the Layer 2 Domain pull-down menu.
Step 3
Click Retrieve for the ONS 15454 to retrieve and display the current MAC IDs.
Note
Click Clear to clear the highlighted rows and click Clear All to clear all displayed rows.
9.6.5 Trunk Utilization Screen
The Trunk Utilization screen is similar to the Line Utilization screen, but Trunk Utilization shows the
percentage of circuit bandwidth used rather than the percentage of line bandwidth used. Click the
Maintenance > Ether Bridge > Trunk Utilization tabs to view the screen. Choose a time segment
interval from the Interval menu.
Note
The percentage shown is the average of ingress and egress traffic.
9.7 Remote Monitoring Specification Alarm Thresholds
The ONS 15454 features Remote Monitoring (RMON) that allows network operators to monitor the
health of the network with a Network Management System (NMS). For a detailed description of the ONS
SNMP implementation, see Chapter 11, “SNMP.”
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-30
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Remote Monitoring Specification Alarm Thresholds
One of the ONS 15454’s RMON MIBs is the Alarm group. The alarm group consists of the alarmTable.
An NMS uses the alarmTable to find the alarm-causing thresholds for network performance. The
thresholds apply to the current 15-minute interval and the current 24-hour interval. RMON monitors
several variables, such as Ethernet collisions, and triggers an event when the variable crosses a threshold
during that time interval. For example, if a threshold is set at 1000 collisions and 1001 collisions occur
during the 15-minute interval, an event triggers. CTC allows you to provision these thresholds for
Ethernet statistics.
Note
You can find performance monitoring specifications for all other cards in the Cisco ONS 15454
Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide.
Note
The following tables define the variables you can provision in CTC. For example, to set the collision
threshold, choose etherStatsCollisions from the Variable menu.
Table 9-10 Ethernet Threshold Variables (MIBs)
Variable
Definition
iflnOctets
Total number of octets received on the interface, including
framing octets
iflnUcastPkts
Total number of unicast packets delivered to an appropriate
protocol
iflnErrors
Number of inbound packets discarded because they contain
errors
ifOutOctets
Total number of transmitted octets, including framing packets
ifOutUcastPkts
Total number of unicast packets requested to transmit to a single
address
dot3statsAlignmentErrors
Number of frames with an alignment error, i.e., the length is not
an integral number of octets and the frame cannot pass the Frame
Check Sequence (FCS) test
dot3StatsFCSErrors
Number of frames with framecheck errors, i.e., there is an
integral number of octets, but an incorrect Frame Check
Sequence (FCS)
dot3StatsSingleCollisionFrames
Number of successfully transmitted frames that had exactly one
collision
dot3StatsMutlipleCollisionFrame
Number of successfully transmitted frames that had multiple
collisions
dot3StatsDeferredTransmissions
Number of times the first transmission was delayed because the
medium was busy
dot3StatsLateCollision
Number of times that a collision was detected later than 64 octets
into the transmission (also added into collision count)
dot3StatsExcessiveCollision
Number of frames where transmissions failed because of
excessive collisions
etherStatsJabbers
Total number of Octets of data (including bad packets) received
on the network
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-31
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Remote Monitoring Specification Alarm Thresholds
Table 9-10 Ethernet Threshold Variables (MIBs) (continued)
Variable
Definition
etherStatsUndersizePkts
Number of packets received with a length less than 64 octets
etherStatsFragments
Total number of packets that are not an integral number of octets
or have a bad FCS, and that are less than 64 octets long
etherStatsPkts64Octets
Total number of packets received (including error packets) that
were 64 octets in length
etherStatsPkts65to127Octets
Total number of packets received (including error packets) that
were 65 – 172 octets in length
etherStatsPkts128to255Octets
Total number of packets received (including error packets) that
were 128 – 255 octets in length
etherStatsPkts256to511Octets
Total number of packets received (including error packets) that
were 256 – 511 octets in length
etherStatsPkts512to1023Octets
Total number of packets received (including error packets) that
were 512 – 1023 octets in length
etherStatsPkts1024to1518Octets
Total number of packets received (including error packets) that
were 1024 – 1518 octets in length
etherStatsJabbers
Total number of packets longer than 1518 octets that were not an
integral number of octets or had a bad FCS
etherStatsCollisions
Best estimate of the total number of collisions on this segment
etherStatsCollisionFrames
Best estimate of the total number of frame collisions on this
segment
etherStatsCRCAlignErrors
Total number of packets with a length between 64 and 1518
octets, inclusive, that had a bad FCS or were not an integral
number of octets in length
Procedure: Creating Ethernet RMON Alarm Thresholds
Step 1
Display the CTC node view.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > Etherbridge > Thresholds tabs.
Step 3
Click Create.
The Create Ether Threshold dialog box opens.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-32
November 2001
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Remote Monitoring Specification Alarm Thresholds
Figure 9-26 Creating RMON thresholds
Step 4
From the Slot menu, choose the appropriate Ethernet card.
Step 5
From the Port menu, choose the Port on the Ethernet card.
Step 6
From the Variable menu, choose the variable. Table 9-10 lists and defines the Ethernet Threshold
Variables available in this field.
Step 7
From Alarm Type, indicate whether the event will be triggered by the rising threshold, falling threshold,
or both the rising and falling thresholds.
Step 8
From the Sample Type pull-down menu, choose either Relative or Absolute. Relative restricts the
threshold to use the number of occurrences in the user-set sample period. Absolute sets the threshold to
use the total number of occurrences, regardless of any time period.
Step 9
Type in an appropriate number of seconds for the Sample Period.
Step 10
Type in the appropriate number of occurrences for the Rising Threshold.
Note
Step 11
For a rising type of alarm to fire, the measured value must shoot from below the falling
threshold to above the rising threshold. For example, if a network is running below a falling
threshold of 400 collisions every 15 seconds and a problem causes 1001 collisions in 15
seconds, these occurrences fire an alarm.
Type in the appropriate number of occurrences for the Falling Threshold. In most cases a falling
threshold is set lower than the rising threshold.
A falling threshold is the counterpart to a rising threshold. When the number of occurrences is above the
rising threshold and then drops below a falling threshold, it resets the rising threshold. For example,
when the network problem that caused 1001 collisions in 15 minutes subsides and creates only 799
collisions in 15 minutes, occurrences fall below a falling threshold of 800 collisions. This resets the
rising threshold so that if network collisions again spike over a 1000 per 15 minute period, an event again
triggers when the rising threshold is crossed. An event is triggered only the first time a rising threshold
is exceeded (otherwise a single network problem might cause a rising threshold to be exceeded multiple
times and cause a flood of events).
Step 12
Click the OK button to complete the procedure.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
9-33
Chapter 9
Ethernet Operation
Remote Monitoring Specification Alarm Thresholds
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
9-34
November 2001
C H A P T E R
10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
This chapter explains how to manage alarms with Cisco Transport Controller (CTC), which includes
•
Viewing alarms
•
Viewing history
•
Viewing conditions
•
Viewing alarm counts on the front-panel LCD
•
Creating and managing alarm profiles
•
Suppressing alarms
To troubleshoot specific alarms, see the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide.
10.1 Overview
The Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) detects and reports SONET alarms generated by the Cisco ONS
15454 and the larger SONET network. You can use CTC to monitor and manage alarms at a card, node,
or network levels and view alarm counts on the LCD front panel. Default alarm severities conform to the
Telcordia GR-253 standard, but you can reset severities to customized alarm profiles or suppress CTC
alarm reporting. For a detailed description of the standard Telcordia categories employed by ONS nodes,
see the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide.
Note
ONS 15454 alarms can also be monitored and managed through TL1 or a network management
system (NMS).
10.2 Viewing ONS 15454 Alarms
At the card, node, or network-level CTC view, click the Alarms tab to display the alarms for that card,
node or network. Table 10-1 lists the tab’s column headings and the information recorded in each
column.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
10-1
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Viewing ONS 15454 Alarms
Table 10-1 Alarms Column Descriptions
Column
Information Recorded
New
Indicates a new alarm. To change this status check either the Synchronize Alarms or
Delete Cleared Alarms checkbox, or reset the active TCC+ card.
Date
Date and time of the alarm
Node
Node where the alarm occurred (displays in network view only)
Object
TL1 access identifier (AID) for the alarmed object
Type
Card type in this slot
Slot
Slot where the alarm occurred (displays in network and node view only)
Port
Port where the alarm occurred
Sev
Severity level: CR (critical), MJ (major), MN (minor), NA (not alarmed), NR (not
reported)
ST
Status: R (raised), C (clear), T (transient)
SA
When checked, indicates a service-affecting alarm
Cond
The error message/alarm name. These are defined alphabetically in the alarm chapter of
the Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide.
Description
Description of the alarm
Num
A count of incrementing alarm messages (this column is hidden by default)
Ref
The reference number assigned to a cleared alarm (this column is hidden by default).
Figure 10-1 Viewing alarms in the CTC node view
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
10-2
November 2001
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Viewing ONS 15454 Alarms
Alarms display in one of five background colors, listed in Table 10-2, to quickly communicate the alarm
severity. Events, conditions, and cleared alarms are also color coded. Conditions and events display in
the History or Conditions tab.
Table 10-2 Color Codes for Alarms, Conditions, and Events
Color
Description
Red
Critical Alarm (CR)
Orange
Major Alarm (MJ)
Yellow
Minor Alarm (MN)
Magenta
Event (NA)
Blue
Condition (NR)
White
Cleared alarm or event (CL)
10.2.1 Controlling Alarm Display
You can control the display of the alarms on the Alarms tab. Table 10-3 shows the actions you can
perform from the Alarms tab.
Table 10-3 Alarm Display
Button
Action
Synchronize Alarms
Updates the alarm display; although CTC displays alarms in real time, the
Synchronize Alarms button allows you to verify the alarm display. This is
particularly useful during provisioning or troubleshooting.
Delete Cleared Alarms
Deletes alarms that have been cleared
AutoDelete Cleared
Alarms
If checked, CTC automatically deletes cleared alarms
Show Events (NA)
If checked, CTC shows alarms and not alarmed (NA) events or Conditions.
Not-alarmed events do not require action and normally display only under
the Conditions tab.
10.2.2 Viewing Alarm-Affected Circuits
User can view which ONS 15454 circuits are affected by a specific alarm. Figure 10-6 illustrates the
Select Affected Circuits option.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
10-3
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Viewing ONS 15454 Alarms
Figure 10-2 Selecting the Affected Circuits option
Procedure: View Affected Circuits for a Specific Alarm
Step 1
Under the Alarm tab, right-click the Cond column of an active alarm.
The Select Affected Circuit dialog appears.
Step 2
Left-click Select Affected Circuits.
The Circuits screen appears with affected circuits highlighted (Figure 10-3.)
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
10-4
November 2001
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Viewing ONS 15454 Alarms
Figure 10-3 Highlighted circuit appears
10.2.3 Conditions Tab
The Conditions tab displays retrieved fault conditions. A fault is a problem detected by ONS 15454
hardware or software. When a fault occurs and continues for a minimum time period, it raises a fault
condition, which is a flag showing whether this particular fault currently exists on the ONS 15454. Fault
conditions include all existing conditions, whether the severity is that of an alarm (Critical, Major or
Minor) or a condition (Not Reported or Non Alarmed.) See the trouble notifications information in the
Cisco ONS 15454 Troubleshooting and Maintenance Guide for more information on the classifications
for alarms and conditions.
Displaying all existing fault conditions is helpful while troubleshooting the ONS 15454. The Conditions
tab does not adhere to Telcordia guidelines for reporting alarms, events, and conditions. Alarm reporting
under the Alarms tab is Telcordia-compliant.
10.2.3.1 Retrieve and Display Conditions
At the node view, click the Conditions tab and the Retrieve Conditions button to retrieve the current set
of all existing fault conditions from the ONS 15454, as maintained by the alarm manager. Users can
perform the same operation at the card view for the card level and at the network view for the network
level.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
10-5
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Viewing ONS 15454 Alarms
Figure 10-4 Viewing fault conditions retrieved under the Conditions tabs
10.2.3.2 Conditions Column Descriptions
Table 10-4 lists the tab’s column headings and the information recorded in each column.
Table 10-4 Conditions Columns Description
Column
Information Recorded
Node
Node where the condition occurred (displays in network view only)
Object
TL1 access identifier (AID) for the alarmed object
Type
Card type in this slot
Slot
Slot where the condition occurred (displays in network and node view only)
Port
Port where the condition occurred
Sev
Severity level: CR (critical), MJ (major), MN (minor), NA (not alarmed), NR (not
reported)
SA
When checked, indicates a service-affecting alarm
Cond
The condition name
Description
Description of the condition
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
10-6
November 2001
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Viewing ONS 15454 Alarms
10.2.4 Viewing History
The History tab displays historical alarm data. It also displays events, which are non-alarmed activities
such as timing changes and threshold crossings. For example, protection switching events or
performance monitoring threshold crossings appear here. The History tab presents two alarm history
views:
Tip
•
The Session subtab (Figure 10-5) presents alarms and events that have occurred during the current
CTC session.
•
The Node subtab shows the alarms and events that occurred at the node since the CTC software
installation. The ONS 15454 can store up to 640 critical alarms, 640 major alarms, 640 minor
alarms, and 256 events. When the limit is reached, the ONS 15454 discards the oldest alarms and
events.
Double click an alarm in the alarm table or an event in the history table to display the corresponding
view. For example, double-clicking a card alarm takes you to card view. In network view,
double-clicking a node alarm takes you to node view.
Figure 10-5 Viewing all alarms reported for the current session
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
10-7
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Alarm Profiles
10.2.5 Viewing Alarms on the LCD
The Critical, Major and Minor alarm LEDs on the fan-tray assembly front panel indicate whether a
critical, major, or minor alarm is present anywhere on the ONS 15454. These LEDs are viewable through
the front door so that you can quickly determine if any alarms are present on the node. These LEDs are
independent of the Card, Port, and Status indicators on the LCD.
When you press the Slot, Status, or Port buttons on the LCD to toggle to a certain slot or port, the LCD
displays the Critical, Major, or Minor alarm count for the selected slot and port. Figure 10-6 illustrates
the LCD panel.
Figure 10-6 The LCD panel
Port
06/29/01
24˚C
03.00-001A-00
FAN FAIL
CRIT
MAJ
MIN
34192
Status
Slot
Procedure: View Alarm Counts on a Specific Slot and Port
Step 1
Use the Slot button to toggle to the desired slot number.
Set the slot number to Node to see a summary of alarms for the node.
Step 2
Use the Port button to toggle to the port.
Step 3
Press the Status button to display the slot and port.
Figure 10-6 shows the LCD panel.
Note
A blank LCD results when the fuse on the AIP board is blown. If this occurs, call Cisco TAC at
1-877-323-7368.
10.3 Alarm Profiles
The alarm profiles feature allows you to change default alarm severities by creating unique alarm profiles
for individual ONS 15454 nodes. A profile you create can be applied to any node on the network. Alarm
profiles must be stored on a node before they can be applied to a node, card, or port. CTC can store up
to ten alarm profiles; eight are available for custom use and two are reserved. CTC can load an unlimited
number of alarm profiles that have been stored on a node, server, or CTC workstation.
The two reserved profiles include the default profile, which sets severities to standard Telcordia GR-253
settings, and the Inherited profile, which sets all alarm severities to transparent (TR). If an alarm has an
Inherited profile, it inherits (copies) its severity from the same alarm’s severity at the next level. For
example, a card with an Inherited alarm profile copies the severities used by the node that contains the
card. The Inherited profile is not available at the node level.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
10-8
November 2001
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Alarm Profiles
10.3.1 Creating and Modifying Alarm Profiles
Alarm profiles are created at the network view using the Provisioning > Alarm Profiles tabs
(Figure 10-7.) A default alarm profile (in the Default column) is pre-provisioned for every alarm. After
loading the Default profile on the node, you can use the Clone feature to create new profiles based on
the default alarm profile. After the new profile is created, the Alarm Profiles tab shows the default profile
and the new profile.
Figure 10-7 Alarm profiles screen showing the default profiles of the listed alarms
Procedure: Create an Alarm Profile
Step 1
Display the CTC network view.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > Alarm Profiles tabs.
Step 3
Click Load.
Step 4
Highlight the node name you are logged into under Node Names and highlight Default under Profile
Names.
Step 5
Click OK.
Step 6
Right-click anywhere in the Default column to display the Profile Editing menu.
Step 7
Choose Clone from the menu. (You can also clone any other profiles that appear under the Available
button, except Inherited.)
Step 8
In the Clone Profile Default dialog box, enter a name in New Profile Name.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
10-9
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Alarm Profiles
Profile names must be unique. If you try to import or name a profile that has the same name as another
profile, CTC adds a suffix to create a new name.
Step 9
Click OK.
A new alarm profile (named in Step 5) is created. This profile duplicates the severities of the default
profile and is added as a new column on the far right-hand side.
Step 10
Note
Modify (customize) the alarm profile:
a.
In the new alarm profile column, click in a row that contains the alarm severity you want to change.
b.
From the menu, select the desired severity.
c.
Repeat Steps a and b for each alarm that needs to be changed.
d.
After you have assigned the properties to your new alarm profile, click the new alarm profile to
highlight it and click the Store button.
e.
In the Store Profile(s) dialog box, select a node or nodes where the profile will be stored and/or
specify a file on the workstation.
f.
Click OK.
You can also clone alarm profiles shown under the Available tab.
10.3.1.1 Alarm Profile Menus
The Alarm Profiles tab displays two menus on the right-hand side, Node/Profile Ops and Profile Misc,
which include six alarm profile buttons. Table 10-5 lists and describes each of the alarm profile buttons.
Table 10-5 Alarm Profile Buttons
Heading
Button
Description
Node Profile Ops
Load
Loads a profile to either a node or a file
Store
Saves profiles on a node (or nodes) or in a file
Delete
Deletes profiles from a node
Compare
Displays differences between alarm profiles
(i.e. individual alarms that are not configured
equivalently between profiles)
Available
Displays all of the profiles available on each
node
Usage
Displays all of the entities present in the
network and which profile(s) each is using
Profile Misc.
10.3.1.2 Alarm Profile Editing
Table 10-6 lists and describes the five profile editing options available when you right-click in an alarm
profile column.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
10-10
November 2001
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Alarm Profiles
Table 10-6 Alarm Profile Editing Options
Button
Description
Store
Saves a profile in either a node or a file
Rename
Changes a profile name
Clone
Creates a new profile that contains the same alarm severity
settings as the highlighted profile (the profile being cloned)
Reset
Restores a profile to the state of that profile before it was last
applied or to the state when it was first loaded, if it has not yet
been applied
Remove
Removes a profile from the table editor
10.3.1.3 Alarm Severity Option
You change or assign alarm severity using a menu. To view this menu, right-click the alarm you want to
change in its alarm profile column. Seven severity levels appear for the alarm:
•
CR: Critical
•
MJ: Major
•
MN: Minor
•
NR: Not reported
•
NA: Not alarmed
•
TR: Transparent
•
UNSET: Unset/Unknown (not normally used)
Transparent and Unset only appear in alarm profiles; they do not appear when you view alarms, history,
or conditions.
10.3.1.4 Row Display Options
In addition to the alarm profile tabs, the Alarm Behavior tab displays two checkboxes at the bottom of
the screen: Hide default values and Hide identical rows. The Hide default values checkbox highlights
alarms with non-default severities by clearing alarm cells with default severities. The Hide identical rows
checkbox hides rows of alarms that contain the same severity for each profile.
10.3.2 Applying Alarm Profiles
In CTC card view, the Alarm Behavior subtab displays the alarm profiles of the selected card. In node
view, the Alarm Behavior subtab displays alarm profiles for the node. Alarms form a hierarchy. A
node-level alarm profile applies to all cards in the node, except those that have their own profiles. A
card-level alarm profile applies to all ports on the card, except those that have their own profiles.
At the node level, you may apply profile changes on a card-by-card basis or set a profile for the entire
node. Figure 10-8 shows the profile of a DS-1 card being changed to Inherited at the node view.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
10-11
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Alarm Profiles
Figure 10-8 Node view of a DS1 alarm profile
At the card level, you can apply profile changes on a port-by-port basis or set all ports on that card at
once. Figure 10-9 shows the affected DS-1 card; notice the CTC shows Parent Card Profile: Inherited.
Figure 10-9 Card view of a DS1 alarm profile
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
10-12
November 2001
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Alarm Profiles
Procedure: Apply an Alarm Profile at the Card View
Step 1
In CTC, display the card view of the desired card.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > Alarm Behavior tabs.
Step 3
To apply profiles on a port-to-port basis:
Step 4
Tip
a.
Click the appropriate row under the Profile column for the port desired.
b.
Choose the appropriate Profile.
c.
Click Apply. (Multiple port profiles can be selected before clicking Apply.)
To set a profile for all the ports on a card:
a.
Click the Force all ports to profile menu arrow at the bottom of the screen.
b.
Choose the appropriate Profile.
c.
Click Force (still need to “Apply”)
d.
Click Apply.
If you choose the wrong profile, click Reset to return to the previous profile setting.
Procedure: Apply an Alarm Profile at the Node View
Step 1
In CTC, display the node view.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > Alarm Profiles tabs.
Step 3
To apply profiles on a card basis:
Step 4
a.
Click the Profile column for the card desired.
b.
Choose the appropriate Profile.
c.
Click Apply. (Multiple card profiles can be selected before clicking Apply.)
To apply the profile to an entire node:
a.
Click the Node Profile menu arrow.
b.
Choose the appropriate Profile.
c.
Click Apply.
Note
Tip
The Port Overrides column at the node view reads true when additional profiles are available
and false when only the inherited profile is available.
If you choose the wrong profile, click Reset to return to the previous profile.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
10-13
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Suppressing Alarms
10.4 Suppressing Alarms
Suppressing alarms causes alarms to appear under the Conditions tab instead of the Alarms tab. It
prevents alarms from appearing on CTC Alarm or History tabs or in any other clients. The suppressed
alarms behave like conditions, which have their own non-reporting (NR) severities. Under the
Conditions tab, the suppressed alarms appear with their alarm severity, color code, and service-affecting
status.
Note
Use alarm suppression with caution. If multiple CTC/TL1 sessions are open, you will suppress the
alarms in all other open sessions.
Procedure: Suppressing Alarms
Step 1
At either the card view or node view, click the Provisioning > Alarm Behavior tabs.
At the card level, you can suppress alarms on a port-by-port basis. At the node level, you can suppress
alarms on a card-by-card basis or the entire node.
Step 2
Check the Suppress Alarms box for the card or port you want to suppress. Figure 10-10 shows the
Suppress Alarms box.
Figure 10-10 The suppress alarms checkbox
Step 3
Click the Apply button.
The node sends out autonomous messages to clear any raised alarms.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
10-14
November 2001
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Suppressing Alarms
Note
When you uncheck the Suppress Alarms checkbox and click Apply, the node sends out
autonomous messages to raise any actively suppressed alarms.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
10-15
Chapter 10
Alarm Monitoring and Management
Suppressing Alarms
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
10-16
November 2001
C H A P T E R
11
SNMP
This chapter explains Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) as implemented by the Cisco ONS
15454.
11.1 SNMP Overview
SNMP is an application-layer communication protocol that allows network devices to exchange
management information. SNMP enables network administrators to manage network performance, find
and solve network problems, and plan network growth.
The ONS 15454 uses SNMP to provide asynchronous event notification to a network management
system (NMS). ONS SNMP implementation uses standard Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)
MIBs to convey node-level inventory, fault, and performance management information for generic
read-only management of DS-1, DS-3, SONET, and Ethernet technologies. SNMP allows limited
management of the ONS 15454 by a generic SNMP manager, for example HP OpenView Network Node
Manager (NNM) or Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) NetExpert.
The Cisco ONS 15454 supports SNMP Version 1 (SNMPv1) and SNMP Version 2c (SNMPv2c). Both
versions share many features, but SNMPv2c includes additional protocol operations. This chapter
describes both versions and explains how to configure SNMP on the ONS 15454. Figure 11-1 illustrates
a basic network managed by SNMP.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
11-1
Chapter 11
SNMP
SNMP Basic Components
52582
Figure 11-1 A basic network managed by SNMP
11.2 SNMP Basic Components
An SNMP-managed network consists of three primary components: managed devices, agents, and
management systems. A managed device is a network node that contains an SNMP agent and resides on
an SNMP-managed network. Managed devices collect and store management information and use
SNMP to make this information available to management systems that use SNMP. Managed devices
include routers, access servers, switches, bridges, hubs, computer hosts, and network elements such as
an ONS 15454.
An agent is a software module that resides in a managed device. An agent has local knowledge of
management information and translates that information into a form compatible with SNMP. The SNMP
agent gathers data from the MIB, which is the repository for device parameter and network data. The
agent can also send traps, or notification of certain events, to the manager. Figure 11-2 illustrates these
SNMP operations.
Figure 11-2 An SNMP agent gathering data from an MIB and sending traps to the manager
SNMP Manager
Network device
get-next-request, get-bulk
get-response, traps
MIB
SNMP Agent
32632
NMS
A management system such as HP OpenView executes applications that monitor and control managed
devices. Management systems provide the bulk of the processing and memory resources required for
network management. One or more management systems must exist on any managed network.
Figure 11-3 illustrates the relationship between the three key SNMP components.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
11-2
November 2001
Chapter 11
SNMP
SNMP Support
Figure 11-3 Example of the primary SNMP components
Management
Entity
NMS
Agent
Agent
Management
Database
Management
Database
Management
Database
33930
Agent
Managed Devices
11.3 SNMP Support
The ONS 15454 supports SNMP v1 and v2c traps and get requests. The SNMP MIBs in the ONS 15454
define alarms, traps, and status. Through SNMP, NMS applications can query a management agent using
a supported MIB. The functional entities include Ethernet switches and SONET multiplexers.
Procedure: Set Up SNMP Support
Step 1
Display the CTC node view.
Step 2
Click the Provisioning > SNMP tabs.
Step 3
Click Create at the bottom of the screen.
The Create SNMP Trap Destination dialog box opens (Figure 11-4).
For a description of SNMP traps, see the “SNMP Traps” section on page 11-6.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
11-3
Chapter 11
SNMP
SNMP Support
Figure 11-4 Setting up SNMP
Step 4
Type the IP address of your NMS in the IP Address field.
Step 5
Type the SNMP community name in the Community Name field.
For a description of SNMP community names, see the “SNMP Community Names” section on
page 11-8.
Step 6
Note
The community name is a form of authentication and access control. The community name
assigned to the ONS 15454 is case-sensitive and must match the community name of the
NMS.
Note
The default UDP port for SNMP is 162.
Set the Trap Version field for either SNMPv1 or SNMPv2.
Refer to your NMS documentation to determine whether to use SNMP v1 or v2.
Step 7
Set your maximum traps per second in the Max Traps per Second field.
Note
Step 8
The Max Traps per Second is the maximum number of traps per second that will be sent to
the SNMP manager. If the field is set to 0, there is no maximum and all traps are sent.
Click OK.
SNMP settings are now configured. To view SNMP information for each node, highlight the node IP
address in the Trap Destinations area of the Trap Destinations screen (Figure 11-5).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
11-4
November 2001
Chapter 11
SNMP
SNMP Management Information Bases
Figure 11-5 Viewing trap destinations
11.4 SNMP Management Information Bases
A management information base (MIB) is a hierarchically-organized collection of information.
Network-management protocols, such as SNMP, gain access to MIBs. MIBs consist of managed objects
and are identified by object identifiers.
The ONS 15454 SNMP agent communicates with an SNMP management application using SNMP
messages. Table 11-1 describes these messages.
Table 11-1
SNMP Message Types
Operation
Description
get-request
Retrieves a value from a specific variable
get-next-request Retrieves the value following the named variable; this operation is often
used to retrieve variables from within a table. With this operation, an SNMP
manager does not need to know the exact variable name. The SNMP
manager searches sequentially to find the needed variable from within the
MIB.
get-response
The reply to a get-request, get-next-request, get-bulk-request, or set-request
sent by an NMS
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
11-5
Chapter 11
SNMP
SNMP Traps
Table 11-1
SNMP Message Types
Operation
Description
get-bulk-request Similar to a get-next-request, but this operation fills the get-response with
up to the max-repetition number of get-next interactions
trap
An unsolicited message sent by an SNMP agent to an SNMP manager
indicating that an event has occurred
A managed object (sometimes called a MIB object) is one of any specific characteristics of a managed
device. Managed objects consist of one or more object instances (variables).
The ONS 15454 MIBs are included on the software CD that ships with the ONS 15454. Compile these
MIBs in the following order. If you do not follow the order, one or more MIB files might not compile.
1.
CERENT-GLOBAL-REGISTRY.mib
2.
CERENT-TC.mib
3.
CERENT-454.mib
4.
CERENT-GENERIC.mib
If you cannot compile the ONS 15454 MIBs, call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at
1-877-323-7368.
Table 11-2
IETF Standard MIBs Implemented in the ONS 15454 SNMP Agent
RFC#
Module Name
Title/Comments
1213
RFC1213-MIB,
+1907
SNMPV2-MIB
MIB-II from RFC1213 with enhancement from RFC1907
for v2
1493
BRIDGE-MIB
Bridge/Spanning Tree (SNMPv1 MIB)
1757
RMON-MIB
Remote monitoring (RMON) Ethernet
2737
ENTITY-MIB
Entity MIB using SMI v2 (version II)
2233
IF-MIB
Interface evolution (enhances MIB-II)
2358
Etherlike-MIB
Ethernet-like interface (SNMPv2 MIB)
2495
DS1-MIB
DS-1/E1
2496
DS3-MIB
DS-3/E3
2558
SONET-MIB
SONET
2674
P-BRIDGE-MIB,
Q-BRIDGE-MIB
P-Bridge and Q-Bridge MIB
11.5 SNMP Traps
The ONS 15454 can receive SNMP requests from a number of SNMP managers and send traps to ten
trap receivers. The ONS 15454 generates all alarms and events as SNMP traps.
The ONS 15454 generates traps containing an object ID that uniquely identifies the alarm. An entity
identifier uniquely identifies the entity that generated the alarm (slot, port, STS, VT, BLSR, STP, etc.).
The traps give the severity of the alarm (critical, major, minor, event, etc.) and indicate whether the alarm
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
11-6
November 2001
Chapter 11
SNMP
SNMP Traps
is service affecting or non-service affecting. The traps also contain a date/time stamp that shows the date
and time the alarm occurred. The ONS 15454 also generates a trap for each alarm when the alarm
condition clears.
Each SNMP trap contains ten variable bindings listed in Table 11-4.
Table 11-3
SNMP Trap Variable Bindings
Number
Name
Description
1
cerentGenericAlarmTable
This table holds all the currently-raised alarms.
When an alarm is raised, it appears as a new entry in
the table. When an alarm is cleared, it is removed
from the table and all the subsequent entries move
up by one row.
2
cerentGenericAlarmIndex
This variable uniquely identifies each entry in an
alarm table. When an alarm in the alarm table clears,
the alarm indexes change for each alarm located
subsequent to the cleared alarm.
3
cerentGenericAlarmObjectType
This variable provides the entity type that raised the
alarm. The NMS should use this value to decide
which table to poll for further information about the
alarm.
4
cerentGenericAlarmSlotNumber
This variable indicates the slot of the object that
raised the alarm. If a slot is not relevant to the alarm,
the slot number is zero.
5
cerentGenericAlarmPortNumber
This variable provides the port of the object that
raised the alarm. If a port is not relevant to the
alarm, the port number is zero.
6
cerentGenericAlarmLineNumber
This variable provides the object line that raised the
alarm. If a line is not relevant to the alarm, the line
number is zero.
7
cerentGenericAlarmObjectIndex
Every alarm is raised by an object entry in a specific
table. This variable is the index of the objects in
each table; if the alarm is interface related, this is
the index of the interfaces in the interface table.
8
cerentGenericAlarmType
This variable provides the exact alarm type.
9
cerentGenericAlarmState
This variable specifies alarm severity and
service-affecting status. Severities are minor, major
and critical. Service- affecting statuses are
service-affecting and non-service affecting.
10
cerentGenericAlarmTimeStamp
This variable gives the time when the alarm
occurred. The value is the number of the ticks that
has lapsed since 1/1/1970.
The ONS 15454 supports the generic and IETF traps listed in Table 11-4.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
11-7
Chapter 11
SNMP
SNMP Community Names
Table 11-4
Traps Supported in the ONS 15454
Trap
From RFC#
Description
ColdStart
RFC1213-MIB Agent up, cold start
WarmStart
RFC1213-MIB Agent up, warm start
AuthenticationFailure
RFC1213-MIB Community string does not match
NewRoot
RFC1493/
Sending agent is the new root of the spanning tree
BRIDGE-MIB
TopologyChange
EntConfigChange
RFC1493/
BRIDGE-MIB
A port in a bridge has changed from Learning to
Forwarding or Forwarding to Blocking
RFC2037/
The entLastChangeTime value has changed
ENTITY-MIB
ds1xLineStatusChange
RFC2495/
DS1-MIB
dsx3LineStatusChange
RFC2496/
DS3-MIB
risingAlarm
RFC1757/
RMON-MIB
fallingAlarm
RFC1757/
RMON-MIB
A dsx1LineStatusChange trap is sent when the value of
an instance dsx1LineStatus changes. The trap can be
used by an NMS to trigger polls. When the line status
change results from a higher-level line status change (ex.
DS-3), no traps for the DS-1 are sent.
A dsx3LineStatusLastChange trap is sent when the value
of an instance of dsx3LineStatus changes. This trap can
be used by an NMS to trigger polls. When the line status
change results in a lower-level line status change (ex.
DS-1), no traps for the lower-level are sent.
The SNMP trap that is generated when an alarm entry
crosses the rising threshold and the entry generates an
event that is configured for sending SNMP traps.
The SNMP trap that is generated when an alarm entry
crosses the falling threshold and the entry generates an
event that is configured for sending SNMP traps.
11.6 SNMP Community Names
You can provision community names for all SNMP requests from the SNMP Trap Destination dialog box
in CTC (see the “SNMP Support” section on page 11-3). In effect, SNMP considers any request valid
that uses a community name matching a community name on the list of provisioned SNMP trap
destinations. Otherwise, SNMP considers the request invalid and drops it.
If an SNMP request contains an invalid community name, the request silently drops and the MIB
variable (snmpInBadCommunityNames) increments. All MIB variables managed by the agent grant
access to all SNMP requests containing a validated community name.
11.7 SNMP Remote Network Monitoring
The ONS 15454 incorporates Remote Network Monitoring (RMON) to allow network operators to
monitor the ONS 15454 E10/100-4 cards. For more information on Ethernet RMONs, see “Remote
Monitoring Specification Alarm Thresholds” section on page 9-30. This feature is not apparent to the
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
11-8
November 2001
Chapter 11
SNMP
SNMP Remote Network Monitoring
typical CTC user, because RMON interoperates with an NMS. However, with CTC you can provision
the RMON alarm thresholds (see the “SNMP Remote Network Monitoring” section on page 11-8). CTC
also monitors the five RMON groups implemented by the ONS 15454.
ONS 15454 RMON implementation is based on the IETF-standard MIB Request for Comment
(RFC)1757. The ONS 15454 implements five groups from the standard MIB: Ethernet Statistics, History
Control, Ethernet History, Alarm, and Event.
11.7.1 Ethernet Statistics Group
The Ethernet Statistics group contains the basic statistics for each monitored subnetwork in a single table
named etherstats.
11.7.2 History Control Group
The History Control group defines sampling functions for one or more monitor interfaces. RFC 1757
defines the historyControlTable.
11.7.3 Ethernet History Group
The ONS 15454 implements the etherHistoryTable as defined in RFC 1757, within the bounds of the
historyControlTable.
11.7.4 Alarm Group
The Alarm group consists of a single alarm table. This table provides the network performance alarm
thresholds for the network management application. With CTC, you can provision the thresholds in the
table.
11.7.5 Event Group
The Event group consists of two tables, eventTable and logTable. The eventTable is read-only. The ONS
15454 implements the logTable as specified in RFC 1757.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
11-9
Chapter 11
SNMP
SNMP Remote Network Monitoring
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
11-10
November 2001
A P P E N D I X
A
Circuit Routing
This appendix provides an in-depth explanation of ONS 15454 circuit routing and VT tunneling in mixed
protection or meshed environments, such as the one shown in Figure A-1. For circuit creation and
provisioning procedures, see Chapter 6, “Circuits and Tunnels.”
Figure A-1
Multiple protection domains
UPSR
UPSR
Source
Twoway
Twoway
1+1
Node 1
Node 2
Node 5
Node 6
Node 9
Node 10
Node 11
Node 12
BLSR ring
Node 3
Node 4
Node 7
Node 8
1+1
Twoway
Twoway
Path Segment 1
UPSR/MESH
protected
Path Segment 2
1+1 protected
Twoway
Path Segment 3
BLSR protected
Drop
1+1
Twoway
Twoway
Path Segment 4
1+1 protected
55401
Primary path
Alternate path
Automatic Circuit Routing
If you select automatic routing during circuit creation, Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) routes the
circuit by dividing the entire circuit route into segments based on protection domains. For unprotected
segments of protected circuits, CTC finds an alternate route to protect the segment in a virtual UPSR
fashion. Each path segment is a separate protection domain, and each protection domain is protected in
a specific fashion (virtual UPSR, BLSR, or 1+1).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
A-1
Appendix A
Circuit Routing
Automatic Circuit Routing
Circuit Routing Characteristics
The following list provides principles and charactistics of automatic circuit routing:
•
Circuit routing tries to use the shortest path within the user-specified or network-specified
constraints. VT tunnels are preferable for VT circuits because VT tunnels are considered shortcuts
when CTC calculates a circuit path in path-protected mesh networks.
•
If you do not choose Fully Path Protected during circuit creation, circuits may still contain protected
segments. Because circuit routing always selects the shortest path, one or more links and/or
segments may have some protection. CTC does not look at link protection while computing a path
for unprotected circuits.
•
Circuit routing will not use links that are down. If you want all links to be considered for routing,
do not create circuits when a link is down.
•
Circuit routing computes the shortest path when you add a new drop to an existing circuit. It tries to
find a shortest path from the new drop to any nodes on the existing circuit.
•
If the network has a mixture of VT-capable nodes and nodes that are not VT capable, depending on
the route found, CTC will automatically force creation of a VT tunnel. Otherwise, CTC asks you
whether a VT tunnel is needed.
Bandwidth Allocation and Routing
Within a given network, CTC will route circuits on the shortest possible path between source and
destination based on the circuit attributes, such as protection and type. CTC will consider using a link
for the circuit only if the link meets the following requirements:
•
The link has sufficient bandwidth to support the circuit
•
The link does not change the protection characteristics of the path
•
The link has the required time slots to enforce the same time slot restrictions for BLSR
If CTC cannot find a link that meets these requirements, it displays an error
The same logic applies to VT circuits on VT tunnels. Circuit routing typically favors VT tunnels
because, based on topology maintained by circuit routing, VT tunnels are shortcuts between a given
source and destination. If the VT tunnel in the route is full (no more bandwidth), CTC asks whether you
want to create an additional VT tunnel.
Secondary Sources and Drops
CTC supports secondary sources and drops. Secondary sources and drops typically interconnect two
“foreign” networks, as shown in Figure A-2. Traffic is protected while it goes through a network of ONS
15454s.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
A-2
November 2001
Appendix A
Circuit Routing
Manual Circuit Routing
Secondary sources and drops
Primary source
Primary destination
Vendor A
network
Vendor B
network
Secondary source
Secondary destination
ONS 15454 network
55402
Figure A-2
Several rules apply to secondary sources and drops:
•
CTC does not allow a secondary destination for unidirectional circuits because you can always
specify additional destinations (drops) after you create the circuit
•
Primary and secondary sources should be on the same node
•
Primary and secondary destinations should be on the same node
•
The sources and drops cannot be DS-3, DS3XM, or DS-1 based STS-1s or VTs
•
Secondary sources and destinations are permitted only for regular STS/VT connections (not for VT
tunnels and multicard EtherSwitch circuits)
•
For point-to-point (straight) Ethernet circuits, only SONET STS endpoints can be specified as
multiple sources or drops
For bidirectional circuits, CTC creates a UPSR connection at the source node that allows traffic to be
selected from one of the two sources on the ONS 15454 network. If you check the Fully Path Protected
option during circuit creation, traffic is protected within the ONS 15454 network. At the destination,
another UPSR connection is created to bridge traffic from the ONS 15454 network to the two
destinations. A similar but opposite path exists for the reverse traffic flowing from the destinations to
the sources.
For unidirectional circuits, a UPSR drop-and-continue connection is created at the source node.
Manual Circuit Routing
Routing circuits manually allows you to:
•
Choose a specific path, not just the shortest path chosen by automatic routing
•
Choose a specific STS/VT on each link along the route
•
Create a shared packet ring for Multicard EtherSwitch circuits
•
Choose a protected path for Multicard EtherSwitch circuits, allowing virtual UPSR segments
CTC imposes the following rules on manual routes:
•
All circuits, except Multicard EtherSwitch circuits in a shared packet ring, should have links with a
direction that flows from source to destination. This is true for Multicard EtherSwitch circuits that
are not in a shared packet ring (see Figure A-1).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
A-3
Appendix A
Circuit Routing
Manual Circuit Routing
•
If you enabled Fully Path Protected, choose a diverse protect (alternate) path for every unprotected
segment (see Figure A-3).
Figure A-3
Alternate paths for virtual UPSR segments
UPSR
Twoway
UPSR
Source
Twoway
1+1
Node 1
Node 5
Node 2
Node 6
Node 9
Node 10
Node 11
Node 12
BLSR ring
Node 3
Node 7
Node 4
Node 8
1+1
Twoway
Twoway
Twoway
Twoway
Path Segment 3
BLSR protected
Twoway
Path Segment 4
1+1 protected
No need for alternate path
55403
Path Segment 1 Path Segment 2
1+1 protected
UPSR/MESH
protected
Needs alternate path
from N1 to N2
Drop
1+1
•
For Multicard EtherSwitch circuits, the Fully Path Protected option is ignored.
•
For a node that has a UPSR selector based on the links chosen, the input links to the UPSR selectors
cannot be 1+1 or BLSR protected (see Figure A-4). The same rule applies at the UPSR bridge.
Figure A-4
Mixing 1+1 or BLSR protected links with a UPSR
UPSR
UPSR
UPSR
Node 1
Node 2
(source) (destination)
Node 1
(source)
BLSR ring
Unprotected
Node 4
UPSR
Unprotected
UPSR
Node 3
UPSR
Node 2
Node 4 Unprotected
(destination)
55404
Node 3
Unprotected
Unprotected
Illegal
Node 1
(source)
Unprotected
Node 2
Node 4
Node 3 (destination)
Legal
1+1 protected
Unprotected
Illegal
•
Choose the links of Multicard EtherSwitch circuits in a shared packet ring to route from source to
destination back to source (see Figure A-5). Otherwise, a route (set of links) chosen with loops is
invalid.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
A-4
November 2001
Appendix A
Circuit Routing
Manual Circuit Routing
Figure A-5
Ethernet shared packet ring routing
Ethernet source
Node 1
Node 2
Node 3
Node 4
55405
Ethernet destination
•
Multicard EtherSwitch circuits can have virtual UPSR segments if the source or destination is not
in the UPSR domain. This restriction also applies after circuit creation; therefore if you create a
circuit with UPSR segments, Ethernet node drops cannot exist anywhere on the UPSR segment (see
Figure A-6).
Figure A-6
Ethernet and UPSR
Source
Source
Node 2
Node 5
Node 6
Node 5
UPSR Segment
UPSR Segment
Drop
Node 8
Node 7
Node 8
Drop
55406
Node 7
Node 6
Node 11
Node 11
Legal
•
Illegal
VT Tunnels cannot be an endpoint of a UPSR segment. A UPSR segment endpoint is where the
UPSR selector resides.
If Fully Path Protected is chosen, CTC verifies that the route selection is protected at all segments. A
route can have multiple protection domains with each domain protected by a different mechanism.
The following tables summarize the available node connections. Any other combination is invalid and
will generate an error.
Table A-1
Bidirectional STS/VT/Regular Multicard EtherSwitch/Point-to-Point (straight) Ethernet
Circuits
# of Inbound Links
# of Outbound Links
# of Sources
# of Drops
Connection Type
-
2
1
-
UPSR
2
-
-
1
UPSR
2
1
-
-
UPSR
1
2
-
-
UPSR
1
-
-
2
UPSR
-
1
2
-
UPSR
2
2
-
-
Double UPSR
2
-
-
2
Double UPSR
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
A-5
Appendix A
Circuit Routing
Manual Circuit Routing
Table A-1
Bidirectional STS/VT/Regular Multicard EtherSwitch/Point-to-Point (straight) Ethernet
Circuits (continued)
# of Inbound Links
# of Outbound Links
# of Sources
# of Drops
Connection Type
-
2
2
-
Double UPSR
1
1
-
-
Two Way
0 or 1
0 or 1
Ethernet Node
Source
-
Ethernet
0 or 1
0 or 1
-
Ethernet
Node Drop
Ethernet
Table A-2
Unidirectional STS/VT Circuit
# of Inbound Links
# of Outbound Links
# of Sources
# of Drops
Connection Type
1
1
-
-
One way
1
2
-
-
UPSR Head End
-
2
1
-
UPSR Head End
2
-
-
1+
UPSR drop and
continue
Table A-3
Multicard Group Ethernet Shared Packet Ring Circuit
# of Inbound Links
# of Outbound Links
# of Sources
# of Drops
Connection Type
At intermediate nodes only
2
1
-
-
UPSR
1
2
-
-
UPSR
2
2
-
-
Double UPSR
1
1
-
-
Two way
-
-
Ethernet
# of Sources
# of Drops
Connection Type
At source or destination nodes only
1
Table A-4
1
Bidirectional VT Tunnels
# of Inbound Links
# of Outbound Links
At intermediate nodes only
2
1
-
-
UPSR
1
2
-
-
UPSR
2
2
-
-
Double UPSR
1
1
-
-
Two way
At source nodes only
-
1
-
-
VT tunnel end point
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
A-6
November 2001
Appendix A
Circuit Routing
Constraint-Based Circuit Routing
Table A-4
Bidirectional VT Tunnels (continued)
# of Inbound Links
# of Outbound Links
# of Sources
# of Drops
Connection Type
-
-
-
VT tunnel end point
At destination nodes only
1
Although virtual UPSR segments are possible in VT Tunnels, VT tunnels are still considered
unprotected. If you need to protect VT circuits either use two independent VT tunnels that are diversely
routed or use a VT tunnel that is routed over only 1+1 or BLSR (or a mix) links.
Constraint-Based Circuit Routing
When you create circuits, you can choose Fully Protected Path to protect the circuit from source to
destination. The protection mechanism used depends on the path CTC calculates for the circuit. If the
network is comprised entirely of BLSR and/or 1+1 links, or the path between source and destination can
be entirely protected using 1+1 and/or BLSR links, no PPMN (virtual UPSR) protection is used.
If virtual UPSR (PPMN) protection is needed to protect the path, set the level of node diversity for the
PPMN portions of the complete path on the Circuit Creation dialog box:
•
Required—Ensures that the primary and alternate paths of each PPMN domain in the complete path
have a diverse set of nodes.
•
Desired—CTC looks for a node diverse path; if a node diverse path is not available, CTC finds a
link diverse path for each PPMN domain in the complete path.
•
Don’t Care—Creates only a link diverse path for each PPMN domain
When you choose automatic circuit routing during circuit creation, you have the option to require and/or
exclude nodes and links in the calculated route. You can use this option to:
•
Simplify manual routing, especially if the network is large and selecting every span is tedious. You
can select a general route from source to destination and allow CTC to fill in the route details.
•
Balance network traffic; by default CTC chooses the shortest path, which can load traffic on certain
links while other links are either free or less used. By selecting a required node and/or a link, you
force the CTC to use (or not use) an element, resulting in more efficent use of network resources.
CTC considers required nodes and links to be an ordered set of elements. CTC treats the source nodes
of every required link as required nodes. When CTC calculates the path, it makes sure the computed path
traverses the required set of nodes and links and does not traverse excluded nodes and links.
The required nodes and links constraint is only used during the primary path computation and only for
PPMN domains/segments. The alternate path is computed normally; CTC uses excluded nodes/links
when finding all primary and alternate paths on PPMNs.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
A-7
Appendix A
Circuit Routing
Constraint-Based Circuit Routing
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
A-8
November 2001
A P P E N D I X
B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
This appendix lists customer, industry, and government requirements met by the Cisco ONS 15454.
Installation warnings are also included.
Regulatory Compliance
Table B-1
Standards
Discipline
Country
Specification
EMC
Canada
ICES-003 Issue 3, 1997
Emissions
Telcordia GR-1089-CORE
USA
Telcordia GR-1089-CORE
FCC Part 15 Class A
EU & Asia
EN55022 Class A-readiness
EMC
Canada
Telcordia GR-1089-CORE
Immunity
USA
Telcordia GR-1089-CORE
Global
Telcordia GR-1089-CORE
WorldCom Electrostatic Discharge immunity
EN61000-4-2 Electrostatic Discharge immunity
EN61000-4-3 Radiated immunity
EN61000-4-4 Electrical fast transient/burst immunity
EN61000-4-6 Conducted immunity
Safety
Canada
CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 950-95
Telcordia GR-1089-CORE
Telcordia GR-63-CORE
USA
UL 1950
Telcordia GR-1089-CORE
Telcordia GR-63-CORE
EU & Asia
EN60950-readiness
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
B-1
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Japan Approvals
Table B-1
Standards (continued)
Discipline
Country
Specification
Environmental
Canada
Telcordia GR-63-CORE NEBS
USA
Cisco Mechanical Environmental Design and
Qualification Guideline ENG-3396
Canada
Telcordia GR-63-CORE NEBS
USA
Bell Atlantic NEBS Requirements,
RNSA-NEB-95-0003, Rev 8
Structural Dynamics
(Mechanical)
AT&T Network Equipment Development Standards
(NEDS) Generic Requirements, AT&T 801-900-160
Pacific Bell/Nevada Bell, Detailed Method of Procedure
Number 1 (13.01), Section 8
Power & Grounding
Global
SBC Local Exchange Carriers, Network Equipment
Power, Grounding, Environmental, and Physical Design
Requirements, TP76200MP
Japan Approvals
Table B-2
Card Approvals
Card
Certificate Number
OC3-4IR 1310
L00-0265
OC12IR 1310
L00-0266
OC48IR 1310
L00-267
DS3N-12
L00-0285
67607
Label Information
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
B-2
November 2001
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
Class A Notice
Warning
This is a Class A Information Product. When used in residential environment, it may cause radio
frequency interference. Under such circumstances, the user may be requested to take
appropriate countermeasures.
Installation Warnings
Install the ONS 15454 in compliance with your local and national electrical codes:
Warning
Waarschuwing
Varoitus
•
United States: National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70; United States National Electrical
Code
•
Canada: Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, CSA C22.1
•
Other countries: If local and national electrical codes are not available, refer to IEC 364, Part 1
through Part 7.
Read the installation instructions before you connect the system to its power source.
Raadpleeg de installatie-aanwijzingen voordat u het systeem met de voeding verbindt.
Lue asennusohjeet ennen järjestelmän yhdistämistä virtalähteeseen.
Attention
Avant de brancher le système sur la source d'alimentation, consulter les directives
d'installation.
Warnung
Lesen Sie die Installationsanweisungen, bevor Sie das System an die Stromquelle anschließen.
Avvertenza
Advarsel
Aviso
Consultare le istruzioni di installazione prima di collegare il sistema all’alimentatore.
Les installasjonsinstruksjonene før systemet kobles til strømkilden.
Leia as instruções de instalação antes de ligar o sistema à sua fonte de energia.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
B-3
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
¡Advertencia!
Ver las instrucciones de instalación antes de conectar el sistema a la red de alimentación.
Varning!
Läs installationsanvisningarna innan du kopplar systemet till dess strömförsörjningsenhet.
DC Power Disconnection Warning
Warning
Waarschuwing
Varoitus
Before performing any of the following procedures, ensure that power is removed from the DC
circuit. To ensure that all power is OFF, locate the circuit breaker on the panel board that
services the DC circuit, switch the circuit breaker to the OFF position, and tape the switch
handle of the circuit breaker in the OFF position.
Voordat u een van de onderstaande procedures uitvoert, dient u te controleren of de stroom naar
het gelijkstroom circuit uitgeschakeld is. Om u ervan te verzekeren dat alle stroom UIT is
geschakeld, kiest u op het schakelbord de stroomverbreker die het gelijkstroom circuit bedient,
draait de stroomverbreker naar de UIT positie en plakt de schakelaarhendel van de
stroomverbreker met plakband in de UIT positie vast.
Varmista, että tasavirtapiirissä ei ole virtaa ennen seuraavien toimenpiteiden suorittamista.
Varmistaaksesi, että virta on KATKAISTU täysin, paikanna tasavirrasta huolehtivassa
kojetaulussa sijaitseva suojakytkin, käännä suojakytkin KATKAISTU-asentoon ja teippaa
suojakytkimen varsi niin, että se pysyy KATKAISTU-asennossa.
Attention
Avant de pratiquer l'une quelconque des procédures ci-dessous, vérifier que le circuit en
courant continu n'est plus sous tension. Pour en être sûr, localiser le disjoncteur situé sur le
panneau de service du circuit en courant continu, placer le disjoncteur en position fermée (OFF)
et, à l'aide d'un ruban adhésif, bloquer la poignée du disjoncteur en position OFF.
Warnung
Vor Ausführung der folgenden Vorgänge ist sicherzustellen, daß die Gleichstromschaltung
keinen Strom erhält. Um sicherzustellen, daß sämtlicher Strom abgestellt ist, machen Sie auf
der Schalttafel den Unterbrecher für die Gleichstromschaltung ausfindig, stellen Sie den
Unterbrecher auf AUS, und kleben Sie den Schaltergriff des Unterbrechers mit Klebeband in der
AUS-Stellung fest.
Avvertenza
Prima di svolgere una qualsiasi delle procedure seguenti, verificare che il circuito CC non sia
alimentato. Per verificare che tutta l’alimentazione sia scollegata (OFF), individuare
l’interruttore automatico sul quadro strumenti che alimenta il circuito CC, mettere l’interruttore
in posizione OFF e fissarlo con nastro adesivo in tale posizione.
Advarsel
Før noen av disse prosedyrene utføres, kontroller at strømmen er frakoblet likestrømkretsen.
Sørg for at all strøm er slått AV. Dette gjøres ved å lokalisere strømbryteren på brytertavlen som
betjener likestrømkretsen, slå strømbryteren AV og teipe bryterhåndtaket på strømbryteren i
AV-stilling.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
B-4
November 2001
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
Aviso
Antes de executar um dos seguintes procedimentos, certifique-se que desligou a fonte de
alimentação de energia do circuito de corrente contínua. Para se assegurar que toda a corrente
foi DESLIGADA, localize o disjuntor no painel que serve o circuito de corrente contínua e
coloque-o na posição OFF (Desligado), segurando nessa posição a manivela do interruptor do
disjuntor com fita isoladora.
¡Advertencia!
Antes de proceder con los siguientes pasos, comprobar que la alimentación del circuito de
corriente continua (CC) esté cortada (OFF). Para asegurarse de que toda la alimentación esté
cortada (OFF), localizar el interruptor automático en el panel que alimenta al circuito de
corriente continua, cambiar el interruptor automático a la posición de Apagado (OFF), y sujetar
con cinta la palanca del interruptor automático en posición de Apagado (OFF).
Varning!
Innan du utför någon av följande procedurer måste du kontrollera att strömförsörjningen till
likströmskretsen är bruten. Kontrollera att all strömförsörjning är BRUTEN genom att slå AV det
överspänningsskydd som skyddar likströmskretsen och tejpa fast överspänningsskyddets
omkopplare i FRÅN-läget.
DC Power Connection Warning
Warning
After wiring the DC power supply, remove the tape from the circuit breaker switch handle and
reinstate power by moving the handle of the circuit breaker to the ON position.
Waarschuwing
Nadat de bedrading van de gelijkstroom voeding aangebracht is, verwijdert u het plakband van
de schakelaarhendel van de stroomverbreker en schakelt de stroom weer in door de hendel van
de stroomverbreker naar de AAN positie te draaien.
Varoitus
Yhdistettyäsi tasavirtalähteen johdon avulla poista teippi suojakytkimen varresta ja kytke virta
uudestaan kääntämällä suojakytkimen varsi KYTKETTY-asentoon.
Attention
Une fois l'alimentation connectée, retirer le ruban adhésif servant à bloquer la poignée du
disjoncteur et rétablir l'alimentation en plaçant cette poignée en position de marche (ON).
Warnung
Nach Verdrahtung des Gleichstrom-Netzgeräts entfernen Sie das Klebeband vom Schaltergriff
des Unterbrechers und schalten den Strom erneut ein, indem Sie den Griff des Unterbrechers auf
EIN stellen.
Avvertenza
Dopo aver eseguito il cablaggio dell’alimentatore CC, togliere il nastro adesivo dall’interruttore
automatico e ristabilire l’alimentazione spostando all'interruttore automatico in posizione ON.
Advarsel
Aviso
Etter at likestrømsenheten er tilkoblet, fjernes teipen fra håndtaket på strømbryteren, og
deretter aktiveres strømmen ved å dreie håndtaket på strømbryteren til PÅ-stilling.
Depois de ligar o sistema de fornecimento de corrente contínua, retire a fita isoladora da
manivela do disjuntor, e volte a ligar a corrente ao deslocar a manivela para a posição ON
(Ligado).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
B-5
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
¡Advertencia!
Después de cablear la fuente de alimentación de corriente continua, retirar la cinta de la
palanca del interruptor automático, y restablecer la alimentación cambiando la palanca a la
posición de Encendido (ON).
Varning!
När du har kopplat ledningarna till strömförsörjningsenheten för inmatad likström tar du bort
tejpen från överspänningsskyddets omkopplare och slår på strömmen igen genom att ställa
överspänningsskyddets omkopplare i TILL-läget.
Power Supply Disconnection Warning
Warning
Waarschuwing
Before working on a chassis or working near power supplies, unplug the power cord on AC
units; disconnect the power at the circuit breaker on DC units.
Voordat u aan een frame of in de nabijheid van voedingen werkt, dient u bij wisselstroom
toestellen de stekker van het netsnoer uit het stopcontact te halen; voor gelijkstroom toestellen
dient u de stroom uit te schakelen bij de stroomverbreker.
Varoitus
Kytke irti vaihtovirtalaitteiden virtajohto ja katkaise tasavirtalaitteiden virta suojakytkimellä,
ennen kuin teet mitään asennuspohjalle tai työskentelet virtalähteiden läheisyydessä.
Attention
Avant de travailler sur un châssis ou à proximité d'une alimentation électrique, débrancher le
cordon d'alimentation des unités en courant alternatif ; couper l'alimentation des unités en
courant continu au niveau du disjoncteur.
Warnung
Bevor Sie an einem Chassis oder in der Nähe von Netzgeräten arbeiten, ziehen Sie bei
Wechselstromeinheiten das Netzkabel ab bzw. schalten Sie bei Gleichstromeinheiten den
Strom am Unterbrecher ab.
Avvertenza
Prima di lavorare su un telaio o intorno ad alimentatori, scollegare il cavo di alimentazione sulle
unità CA; scollegare l'alimentazione all’interruttore automatico sulle unità CC.
Advarsel
Før det utføres arbeid på kabinettet eller det arbeides i nærheten av strømforsyningsenheter,
skal strømledningen trekkes ut på vekselstrømsenheter og strømmen kobles fra ved
strømbryteren på likestrømsenheter.
Aviso
Antes de trabalhar num chassis, ou antes de trabalhar perto de unidades de fornecimento de
energia, desligue o cabo de alimentação nas unidades de corrente alternada; desligue a
corrente no disjuntor nas unidades de corrente contínua.
¡Advertencia!
Varning!
Antes de manipular el chasis de un equipo o trabajar cerca de una fuente de alimentación,
desenchufar el cable de alimentación en los equipos de corriente alterna (CA); cortar la
alimentación desde el interruptor automático en los equipos de corriente continua (CC).
I nnan du arbetar med ett chassi eller nära strömförsörjningsenheter skall du för
växelströmsenheter dra ur nätsladden och för likströmsenheter bryta strömmen vid
överspänningsskyddet.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
B-6
November 2001
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
Outside Line Connection Warning
Warning
Waarschuwing
Metallic interfaces for connection to outside plant lines (such as T1/E1/T3/E3 etc.)
must be connected through a registered or approved device such as CSU/DSU or NT1.
Metaalhoudende interfaces bestemd voor aansluiting op fabrieksleidingen buiten
(zoals T1/E1/T3/E3 etc.) dienen aangesloten te worden m.b.v. een geregistreerd of
goedgekeurd apparaat zoals CSU/DSU of NT1.
Varoitus
Laitoksen ulkopuolisten linjojen (T1/E1/T3/E3 jne.) kytkentään tarkoitetut metalliset
rajapinnat on kytkettävä rekisteröidyn tai hyväksytyn laitteen, kuten CSU/DSU tai NT1,
kautta.
Attention
Les interfaces métalliques destinées à une connexion à des lignes extérieures au site
(par exemple : T1/E1/T3/E3, etc.) doivent être raccordées sur un appareil homologué ou
approuvé tel que CSU/DSU ou NT1.
Warnung
Metallische Schnittstellen für die Verbindung mit Leitungen außerhalb der Anlagen
(wie z.B. T1/E1/T3/E3 usw.) müssen durch ein registriertes oder zugelassenes Gerät
wie CSU/DSU oder NT1 angeschlossen werden.
Avvertenza
Advarsel
Aviso
Le interfacce metalliche per la connessione a linee di impianti esterni (come
T1/E1/T3/E3 ecc.) devono essere connesse mediante un dispositivo registrato o
approvato, come per esempio CSU/DSU (Channel Service Unit/Data Service Unit) o NT1
(Network Terminator).
Metallgrensesnitt for kopling til eksterne anleggslinjer (for eksempel T1/E1/T3/E3
osv.) skal koples gjennom en registrert eller godkjent enhet, for eksempel CSU/DSU
eller NT1.
As interfaces metálicas para conexão com as linhas externas (como T1/E1/T3/E3 etc)
devem ser conectadas através de um dispositivo aprovado ou certificado como
CSU/DSU ou NT1.
¡Advertencia!
Las interfaces metálicas destinadas a las conexiones de líneas exteriores (por
ejemplo, T1/E1/T3/E3, etc.) deben conectarse mediante un dispositivo registrado o
aprobado como, por ejemplo, CSU/DSU o NT1.
Varning!
Metallkontakter för anslutning till utomhusledningar (t.ex. T1/E1/T3/E3 m.fl.) måste
anslutas via en registrerad eller godkänd enhet, t.ex. CSU/DSU eller NT1.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
B-7
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
Class 1 Laser Product Warning
Warning
Waarschuwing
Varoitus
Class 1 laser product.
Klasse-1 laser produkt.
Luokan 1 lasertuote.
Attention
Produit laser de classe 1.
Warnung
Laserprodukt der Klasse 1.
Avvertenza
Prodotto laser di Classe 1.
Advarsel
Laserprodukt av klasse 1.
Aviso
Produto laser de classe 1.
¡Advertencia!
Varning!
Producto láser Clase I.
Laserprodukt av klass 1.
Class I and Class 1M Laser Warning
Warning
Waarschuwing
Varoitus
Attention
Class I (21 CFR 1040.10 and 1040.11) and Class 1M (IEC 60825-1 2001-01) laser products.
Laserproducten van Klasse I (21 CFR 1040.10 en 1040.11) en Klasse 1M (IEC 60825-1
2001-01).
Luokan I (21 CFR 1040.10 ja 1040.11) ja luokan 1M (IEC 60825-1 2001-01) lasertuotteita.
Produits laser catégorie I (21 CFR 1040.10 et 1040.11) et catégorie 1M (IEC 60825-1
2001-01).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
B-8
November 2001
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
Warnung
Laserprodukte der Klasse I (21 CFR 1040.10 und 1040.11) und Klasse 1M (IEC 60825-1
2001-01).
Avvertenza
Prodotti laser di Classe I (21 CFR 1040.10 e 1040.11) e Classe 1M (IEC 60825-1 2001-01).
Advarsel
Klasse I (21 CFR 1040.10 og 1040.11) og klasse 1M (IEC 60825-1 2001-01) laserprodukter.
Aviso
¡Advertencia!
Varning!
Produtos laser Classe I (21 CFR 1040.10 e 1040.11) e Classe 1M (IEC 60825-1 2001-01).
Productos láser de Clase I (21 CFR 1040.10 y 1040.11) y Clase 1M (IEC 60825-1 2001-01).
Laserprodukter av Klass I (21 CFR 1040.10 och 1040.11) och Klass 1M (IEC 60825-1
2001-01).
Restricted Area Warning
Warning
Waarschuwing
This unit is intended for installation in restricted access areas. A restricted access area is
where access can only be gained by service personnel through the use of a special tool, lock
and key, or other means of security, and is controlled by the authority responsible for the
location.
Dit toestel is bedoeld voor installatie op plaatsen met beperkte toegang. Een plaats met
beperkte toegang is een plaats waar toegang slechts door servicepersoneel verkregen kan
worden door middel van een speciaal instrument, een slot en sleutel, of een ander
veiligheidsmiddel, en welke beheerd wordt door de overheidsinstantie die verantwoordelijk is
voor de locatie.
Varoitus
Tämä laite on tarkoitettu asennettavaksi paikkaan, johon pääsy on rajoitettua. Paikka, johon
pääsy on rajoitettua, tarkoittaa paikkaa, johon vain huoltohenkilöstö pääsee jonkin
erikoistyökalun, lukkoon sopivan avaimen tai jonkin muun turvalaitteen avulla ja joka on
paikasta vastuussa olevien toimivaltaisten henkilöiden valvoma.
Attention
Cet appareil est à installer dans des zones d’accès réservé. Ces dernières sont des zones
auxquelles seul le personnel de service peut accéder en utilisant un outil spécial, un
mécanisme de verrouillage et une clé, ou tout autre moyen de sécurité. L’accès aux zones de
sécurité est sous le contrôle de l’autorité responsable de l’emplacement.
Warnung
Diese Einheit ist zur Installation in Bereichen mit beschränktem Zutritt vorgesehen. Ein Bereich
mit beschränktem Zutritt ist ein Bereich, zu dem nur Wartungspersonal mit einem
Spezialwerkzeugs, Schloß und Schlüssel oder anderer Sicherheitsvorkehrungen Zugang hat,
und der von dem für die Anlage zuständigen Gremium kontrolliert wird.
Avvertenza
Questa unità deve essere installata in un'area ad accesso limitato. Un'area ad accesso limitato
è un'area accessibile solo a personale di assistenza tramite un'attrezzo speciale, lucchetto, o
altri dispositivi di sicurezza, ed è controllata dall'autorità responsabile della zona.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
B-9
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
Advarsel
Denne enheten er laget for installasjon i områder med begrenset adgang. Et område med
begrenset adgang gir kun adgang til servicepersonale som bruker et spesielt verktøy, lås og
nøkkel, eller en annen sikkerhetsanordning, og det kontrolleres av den autoriteten som er
ansvarlig for området.
Aviso
Esta unidade foi concebida para instalação em áreas de acesso restrito. Uma área de acesso
restrito é uma área à qual apenas tem acesso o pessoal de serviço autorizado, que possua uma
ferramenta, chave e fechadura especial, ou qualquer outra forma de segurança. Esta área é
controlada pela autoridade responsável pelo local.
¡Advertencia!
Esta unidad ha sido diseñada para instalarse en áreas de acceso restringido. Área de acceso
restringido significa un área a la que solamente tiene acceso el personal de servicio mediante
la utilización de una herramienta especial, cerradura con llave, o algún otro medio de
seguridad, y que está bajo el control de la autoridad responsable del local.
Varning!
Denna enhet är avsedd för installation i områden med begränsat tillträde. Ett område med
begränsat tillträde får endast tillträdas av servicepersonal med ett speciellt verktyg, lås och
nyckel, eller annan säkerhetsanordning, och kontrolleras av den auktoritet som ansvarar för
området.
Ground Connection Warning
Warning
Waarschuwing
Varoitus
When installing the unit, always make the ground connection first and disconnect it last.
Bij de installatie van het toestel moet de aardverbinding altijd het eerste worden gemaakt en
het laatste worden losgemaakt.
Laitetta asennettaessa on maahan yhdistäminen aina tehtävä ensiksi ja maadoituksen irti
kytkeminen viimeiseksi.
Attention
Lors de l’installation de l’appareil, la mise à la terre doit toujours être connectée en premier et
déconnectée en dernier.
Warnung
Der Erdanschluß muß bei der Installation der Einheit immer zuerst hergestellt und zuletzt
abgetrennt werden.
Avvertenza
Advarsel
Aviso
In fase di installazione dell'unità, eseguire sempre per primo il collegamento a massa e
disconnetterlo per ultimo.
Når enheten installeres, må jordledningen alltid tilkobles først og frakobles sist.
Ao instalar a unidade, a ligação à terra deverá ser sempre a primeira a ser ligada, e a última a
ser desligada.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
B-10
November 2001
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
¡Advertencia!
Varning!
Al instalar el equipo, conectar la tierra la primera y desconectarla la última.
Vid installation av enheten måste jordledningen alltid anslutas först och kopplas bort sist.
Qualified Personnel Warning
Warning
Waarschuwing
Varoitus
Avertissement
Achtung
Avvertenza
Advarsel
Aviso
¡Atención!
Varning
Only trained and qualified personnel should be allowed to install or replace this equipment.
Installatie en reparaties mogen uitsluitend door getraind en bevoegd personeel uitgevoerd
worden.
Ainoastaan koulutettu ja pätevä henkilökunta saa asentaa tai vaihtaa tämän laitteen.
Tout installation ou remplacement de l'appareil doit être réalisé par du personnel qualifié et
compétent.
Gerät nur von geschultem, qualifiziertem Personal installieren oder auswechseln lassen.
Solo personale addestrato e qualificato deve essere autorizzato ad installare o sostituire questo
apparecchio.
Kun kvalifisert personell med riktig opplæring bør montere eller bytte ut dette utstyret.
Este equipamento deverá ser instalado ou substituído apenas por pessoal devidamente treinado
e qualificado.
Estos equipos deben ser instalados y reemplazados exclusivamente por personal técnico
adecuadamente preparado y capacitado.
Denna utrustning ska endast installeras och bytas ut av utbildad och kvalificerad personal.
Invisible Laser Radiation Warning (other versions available)
Warning
Waarschuwing
Because invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture of the port when no cable is
connected, avoid exposure to laser radiation and do not stare into open apertures.
Omdat er onzichtbare laserstraling uit de opening van de poort geëmitteerd kan worden
wanneer er geen kabel aangesloten is, dient men om blootstelling aan laserstraling te
vermijden niet in de open openingen te kijken.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
B-11
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
Varoitus
Kun porttiin ei ole kytketty kaapelia, portin aukosta voi vuotaa näkymätöntä lasersäteilyä. Älä
katso avoimiin aukkoihin, jotta et altistu säteilylle.
Attention
Etant donné qu’un rayonnement laser invisible peut être émis par l’ouverture du port quand
aucun câble n’est connecté, ne pas regarder dans les ouvertures béantes afin d’éviter tout
risque d’exposition au rayonnement laser.
Warnung
Aus der Öffnung des Ports kann unsichtbare Laserstrahlung austreten, wenn kein Kabel
angeschlossen ist. Kontakt mit Laserstrahlung vermeiden und nicht in offene Öffnungen blicken.
Avvertenza
Advarsel
Aviso
¡Advertencia!
Varning!
Poiché quando nessun cavo è collegato alla porta, da quest’ultima potrebbe essere emessa
radiazione laser invisibile, evitare l’esposizione a tale radiazione e non fissare con gli occhi
porte a cui non siano collegati cavi.
Usynlige laserstråler kan sendes ut fra åpningen på utgangen når ingen kabel er tilkoblet.
Unngå utsettelse for laserstråling og se ikke inn i åpninger som ikke er tildekket.
Evite uma exposição à radiação laser e não olhe através de aberturas expostas, porque poderá
ocorrer emissão de radiação laser invisível a partir da abertura da porta, quando não estiver
qualquer cabo conectado.
Cuando no esté conectado ningún cable, pueden emitirse radiaciones láser invisibles por el
orificio del puerto. Evitar la exposición a radiaciones láser y no mirar fijamente los orificios
abiertos.
Osynliga laserstrålar kan sändas ut från öppningen i porten när ingen kabel är ansluten. Undvik
exponering för laserstrålning och titta inte in i ej täckta öppningar.
More Than One Power Supply
Warning
This unit has more than one power supply connection; all connections must be removed
completely to completely remove power from the unit.
Waarschuwing
Deze eenheid heeft meer dan één stroomtoevoerverbinding; alle verbindingen moeten volledig
worden verwijderd om de stroom van deze eenheid volledig te verwijderen.
Varoitus
Tässä laitteessa on useampia virtalähdekytkentöjä. Kaikki kytkennät on irrotettava kokonaan,
jotta virta poistettaisiin täysin laitteesta.
Attention
Cette unité est équipée de plusieurs raccordements d’alimentation. Pour supprimer tout courant
électrique de l’unité, tous les cordons d’alimentation doivent être débranchés.
Warnung
Diese Einheit verfügt über mehr als einen Stromanschluß; um Strom gänzlich von der Einheit
fernzuhalten, müssen alle Stromzufuhren abgetrennt sein.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
B-12
November 2001
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
Avvertenza
Advarsel
Aviso
¡Advertencia!
Varning!
Questa unità ha più di una connessione per alimentatore elettrico; tutte le connessioni devono
essere completamente rimosse per togliere l'elettricità dall'unità.
Denne enheten har mer enn én strømtilkobling. Alle tilkoblinger må kobles helt fra for å
eliminere strøm fra enheten.
Este dispositivo possui mais do que uma conexão de fonte de alimentação de energia; para
poder remover a fonte de alimentação de energia, deverão ser desconectadas todas as
conexões existentes.
Esta unidad tiene más de una conexión de suministros de alimentación; para eliminar la
alimentación por completo, deben desconectarse completamente todas las conexiones.
Denna enhet har mer än en strömförsörjningsanslutning; alla anslutningar måste vara helt
avlägsnade innan strömtillförseln till enheten är fullständigt bruten.
Unterminated Fiber Warning
Warning
Invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the end of the unterminated fiber cable
or connector. Do not stare into the beam or view directly with optical instruments.
Viewing the laser output with certain optical instruments (for example, eye loupes,
magnifiers, and microscopes) within a distance of 100 mm may pose an eye hazard. Use
of controls or adjustments or performance of procedures other than those specified
may result in hazardous radiation exposure.
Waarschuwing
Er kunnen onzichtbare laserstralen worden uitgezonden vanuit het uiteinde van de
onafgebroken vezelkabel of connector. Niet in de straal kijken of deze rechtstreeks
bekijken met optische instrumenten. Als u de laseruitvoer met bepaalde optische
instrumenten bekijkt (zoals bijv. een oogloep, vergrootgras of microscoop) binnen een
afstand van 100 mm kan dit gevaar voor uw ogen opleveren. Het gebruik van regelaars
of bijstellingen of het uitvoeren van procedures anders dan opgegeven kan leiden tot
blootstelling aan gevaarlijke straling.
Varoitus
Päättämättömän kuitukaapelin tai -liittimen päästä voi tulla näkymätöntä
lasersäteilyä. Älä tuijota sädettä tai katso sitä suoraan optisilla välineillä.
Lasersäteen katsominen tietyillä optisilla välineillä (esim. suurennuslasilla tai
mikroskoopilla) 10 cm:n päästä tai sitä lähempää voi olla vaarallista silmille.
Säätimien tai säätöjen käyttö ja toimenpiteiden suorittaminen ohjeista poikkeavalla
tavalla voi altistaa vaaralliselle säteilylle.
Attention
Des émissions de radiations laser invisibles peuvent se produire à l’extrémité d’un
câble en fibre ou d’un raccord sans terminaison. Ne pas fixer du regard le rayon ou
l’observer directement avec des instruments optiques. L’observation du laser à l’aide
certains instruments optiques (loupes et microscopes) à une distance inférieure à 100
mm peut poser des risques pour les yeux. L’utilisation de commandes, de réglages ou
de procédures autres que ceux spécifiés peut entraîner une exposition dangereuse à
des radiations.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
B-13
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
Warnung
Eine unsichtbare Laserstrahlung kann vom Ende des nicht angeschlossenen
Glasfaserkabels oder Steckers ausgestrahlt werden. Nicht in den Laserstrahl schauen
oder diesen mit einem optischen Instrument direkt ansehen. Ein Betrachten des
Laserstrahls mit bestimmten optischen Instrumenten, wie z.B. Augenlupen,
Vergrößerungsgläsern und Mikroskopen innerhalb eines Abstands von 100 mm kann
für das Auge gefährlich sein. Die Verwendung von nicht spezifizierten
Steuerelementen, Einstellungen oder Verfahrensweisen kann eine gefährliche
Strahlenexposition zur Folge haben.
Avvertenza
L’estremità del connettore o del cavo ottico senza terminazione può emettere
radiazioni laser invisibili. Non fissare il raggio od osservarlo in modo diretto con
strumenti ottici. L’osservazione del fascio laser con determinati strumenti ottici (come
lupette, lenti di ingrandimento o microscopi) entro una distanza di 100 mm può
provocare danni agli occhi. L’adozione di controlli, regolazioni o procedure diverse da
quelle specificate può comportare il pericolo di esposizione a radiazioni.
Advarsel
Usynlig laserstråling kan emittere fra enden av den ikke-terminerte fiberkabelen eller
koblingen. Ikke se inn i strålen og se heller ikke direkte på strålen med optiske
instrumenter. Observering av laserutgang med visse optiske instrumenter (for
eksempel øyelupe, forstørrelsesglass eller mikroskoper) innenfor en avstand på 100
mm kan være farlig for øynene. Bruk av kontroller eller justeringer eller utførelse av
prosedyrer som ikke er spesifiserte, kan resultere i farlig strålingseksponering.
Aviso
Radiação laser invisível pode ser emitida pela ponta de um conector ou cabo de fibra
não terminado. Não olhe fixa ou diretamente para o feixe ou com instrumentos ópticos.
Visualizar a emissão do laser com certos instrumentos ópticos (por exemplo, lupas,
lentes de aumento ou microscópios) a uma distância de 100 mm pode causar riscos à
visão. O uso de controles, ajustes ou desempenho de procedimentos diferentes dos
especificados pode resultar em exposição prejudicial de radiação.
¡Advertencia!
Varning!
El extremo de un cable o conector de fibra sin terminación puede emitir radiación
láser invisible. No se acerque al radio de acción ni lo mire directamente con
instrumentos ópticos. La exposición del ojo a una salida de láser con determinados
instrumentos ópticos (por ejemplo, lupas y microscopios) a una distancia de 100 mm
puede comportar lesiones oculares. La aplicación de controles, ajustes y
procedimientos distintos a los especificados puede comportar una exposición
peligrosa a la radiación.
Osynlig laserstrålning kan komma från änden på en oavslutad fiberkabel eller
-anslutning. Titta inte rakt in i strålen eller direkt på den med optiska instrument. Att
titta på laserstrålen med vissa optiska instrument (t.ex. lupper, förstoringsglas och
mikroskop) från ett avstånd på 100 mm kan skada ögonen. Om andra kontroller eller
justeringar än de angivna används, eller om andra processer än de angivna genomförs,
kan skadlig strålning avges.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
B-14
November 2001
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
Laser Activation Warning
Warning
The laser is on when the card is booted and the safety key is in the on position
(labeled 1). The port does not have to be in service for the laser to be on. The laser is
off when the safety key is off (labeled 0).
Waarschuwing
De laser is aan zodra de kaart is opgestart en de veiligheidssleutel in de AAN-positie
is (gelabeld 1). De poort hoeft niet in dienst te zijn om de laser aan te zetten. De laser
is uit wanneer de veiligheidssleutel uit is (gelabeld 0).
Varoitus
Laser on päällä, kun kortti käynnistetään ja turva-avain on päällä (1) -asennossa. Laser
voi olla päällä, vaikka portti ei olekaan käytössä. Laser on pois päältä, kun turva-avain
on pois (0) -asennossa.
Attention
Le laser est allumé dès le démarrage de la carte et lorsque la clé de sûreté est en
position allumée (ou 1). Il n’est pas nécessaire que le port soit en service pour que le
laser soit allumé. Le laser est éteint lorsque la clé de sûreté est en position éteinte
(ou 0).
Warnung
Der Laser ist eingeschaltet, wenn die Karte geladen wurde und der
Sicherheitsschlüssel eingeschaltet ist (mit 1 bezeichnete Stellung). Der Port muss
nicht in Betrieb sein, wenn der Laser eingeschaltet ist. Der Laser ist ausgeschaltet,
wenn sich der Sicherheitsschlüssel in der Aus-Stellung (mit 0 bezeichnet) befindet.
Avvertenza
Il laser è attivato quando la scheda è inserita e la chiave di sicurezza è in posizione
ON (indicata con I). Per l’attivazione del laser non è necessario che la porta sia in
funzione. Il laser è disattivato quando la chiave di sicurezza è su OFF (indicata con 0).
Advarsel
Laseren er aktivert når kortet er på plass og sikkerhetstasten er i på-stilling (merket
1). Porten trenger ikke å være aktiv selv om laseren er på. Laseren er av når
sikkerhetstasten er i av-stilling (merket 0).
Aviso
O laser está ativado quando a placa é reiniciada e a chave de segurança está na
posição on (ou 1). A porta não precisa estar em atividade para o acionamento do laser.
O laser está desativado quando a chave de segurança está na posição off (ou 0).
¡Advertencia!
Varning!
El láser está encendido cuando la tarjeta ha arrancado y la llave de seguridad se
encuentra en la posición ON (etiquetada 1). No es necesario que el puerto esté en
funcionamiento para que el láser pueda funcionar. El láser está apagado cuando la
llave de seguridad se encuentra en la posición OFF (etiquetada 0).
Lasern är på när kortet är igångsatt och säkerhetsnyckeln är i läget På (markerat
med 1). Porten behöver inte vara igång för att lasern ska vara på. Lasern är av när
säkerhetsnyckeln är i läget Av (markerat med 0).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
B-15
Appendix B
Regulatory and Compliance Requirements
Installation Warnings
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
B-16
November 2001
A P P E N D I X
C
Acronyms
Numerics
10BaseT
standard 10 megabit per second local area network over unshielded twisted pair copper wire
100BaseT
standard 100 megabit per second ethernet network
100BaseTX
specification of 100BaseT that supports full duplex operation
A
ACO
Alarm Cutoff
ACT/STBY
Active/Standby
ADM
Add-Drop Multiplexer
AIC
Alarm Interface Controller
AID
Access Identifier
AIP
Alarm Interface Panel
AIS
Alarm Indication Signal
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
C-1
Appendix C
Acronyms
AIS-L
Line Alarm Indication Signal
AMI
Alternate Mark Inversion
ANSI
American National Standards Institute
APS
Automatic Protection Switching
ARP
Address Resolution Protocol
ATAG
Autonomous Message Tag
ATM
Asynchronous Transfer Mode
AWG
American Wire Gauge
B
B8ZS
Bipolar 8 Zero Substitution
BER
Bit Error Rate
BIC
Backplane Interface Connector
BIP
Bit Interleaved Parity
BITS
Building Integrated Timing Supply
BLSR
Bidirectional line switched ring
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
C-2
November 2001
Appendix C
Acronyms
BNC
Bayonet Neill-Concelman (coaxial cable bayonet locking connector)
BPDU
Bridge Protocol Data Unit
C
CAT 5
Category 5 (cabling)
CCITT
Consultative Committee International Telegraph and Telephone (France)
CEO
Central Office Environment
CEV
Controlled Environment Vaults
CLEI
Common Language Equipment Identifier code
CLNP
Correctionless Network Protocol
CMIP
Common Management Information Protocol
cm
centimeter
COE
Central Office Environment
CORBA
Common Object Request Broker Architecture
CPE
Customer Premise Environments
CTAG
Correlation Tag
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
C-3
Appendix C
Acronyms
CTC
Cisco Transport Controller
D
DCC
Data Communications Channel
DCN
Data Communications Network
DCS
Distributed Communications System
DRAM
Dynamic Random Access Memory
DS-1
Digital Signal Level One
DS-3
Digital Signal Level Three
DS1-14
Digital Signal Level One (14 ports)
DS1N-14
Digital Signal Level One (N-14 ports)
DS3-12
Digital Signal Level Three (12 ports)
DS3N-12
Digital Signal Level Three (N-12 ports)
DS3XM-6
Digital Service, level 3 Trans Multiplexer 6 ports
DSX
Digital Signal Cross Connect frame
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
C-4
November 2001
Appendix C
Acronyms
E
EDFA
Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier
EFT
Electrical Fast Transient/Burst
EIA
Electrical Interface Assemblies
ELR
Extended Long Reach
EMI
Electromagnetic interface
EML
Element Management Layer
EMS
Element Management System
EOW
Express Orderwire
ERDI
Enhanced Remote Defect Indicator
ES
Errored Seconds
ESD
Electrostatic Discharge
ESF
Extended Super Frame
ETSI
European Telecommunications Standards Institute
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
C-5
Appendix C
Acronyms
F
FC
Failure Count
FDDI
Fiber Distributed Data Interface
FE
Frame Bit Errors
FG1
Frame Ground #1(pins are labeled “FG1,” “FG2,” etc.)
FSB
Field Service Bulletin
G
Gbps
Gigabits per second
GBIC
Gigabit Interface Converter
GR-253-CORE
General Requirements #253 Council Of Registrars
GR-1089
General Requirements #1089
GUI
Graphical User Interface
H
HDLC
High-Level Data Link Control
I
IEC
InterExchange Carrier
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
C-6
November 2001
Appendix C
Acronyms
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
IETF
Internet Engineering Task Force
IP
Internet Protocol
IPPM
Intermediate-Path Performance Monitoring
I/O
Input/Output
ITU-T
The International Telecommunication Union- Telecommunication Standards Sector
J
JRE
Java Runtime Environment
L
LAN
Local Area Network
LCD
Liquid Crystal Display
LDCC
Line Data Communications Channel
LOP
Loss of Pointer
LOS
Loss of Signal
LOF
Loss of Frame
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
C-7
Appendix C
Acronyms
LOW
Local Orderwire
LTE
Line Terminating Equipment
LVDS
Low Voltage Differential Signal
M
MAC
Media Access Control
Mbps
Million bits per second, or Million bytes per second
Mhz
Megahertz
MIB
Management Information Bases
MIME
Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
Mux/Demux
Multiplexer/Demultiplexer
N
NE
Network Element
NEL
Network Element Layer
NEBS
Network Equipment-Building Systems
NML
Network Management Layer
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
C-8
November 2001
Appendix C
Acronyms
NMS
Network Management System
O
OAM&P
Operations, Administration, Maintenance, and Provisioning
OC
Optical carrier
OOS AS
Out of Service Assigned
OSI
Open Systems Interconnection
OSPF
Open Shortest Path First
OSS
Operations Support System
OSS/NMS
Operations Support System/Network Management System
P
PCM
Pulse Code Modulation
PCMCIA
Personal Computer Memory Card International Association
PCN
Product Change Notices
PDI-P
STS Payload Defect Indication-Path
POP
Point of Presence
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
C-9
Appendix C
Acronyms
PM
Performance Monitoring
PPMN
Path-Protected Mesh Network
PSC
Protection Switching Count
PSD
Protection Switching Duration
PTE
Path Terminating Equipment
R
RAM
Random Access Memory
RDI-L
Remote Defect Indication Line
RES
Reserved
RJ45
Registered Jack #45 (8 pin)
RMA
Return Material Authorization
RMON
Remote Network Monitoring
RS232
Recommended Standard #232 (ANSI Electrical Interface for Serial Communication
Rx
Receive
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
C-10
November 2001
Appendix C
Acronyms
S
SCI
Serial Communication Interface
SCL
System Communications Link
SDCC
Section Data Communications Channel
SDH/SONET
Synchronous Digital Hierarchy/Synchronous Optical Network
SEF
Severely Errored Frame
SELV
Safety Extra Low Voltage
SES
Severely Errored Seconds
SF
Super Frame
SML
Service Management Layer
SMF
Single Mode Fiber
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol
SNTP
Simple Network Time Protocol
SONET
Synchronous Optical Network
SPE
Synchronous Payload Envelope
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
C-11
Appendix C
Acronyms
SSM
Synchronous Status Messaging
STA
Spanning Tree Algorithm
STP
Shielded Twisted Pair
STS-1
Synchronous Transport Signal Level 1
SWS
SONET WAN Switch
SXC
SONET Cross Connect ASIC
T
TAC
Technical Assistance Center
TBOS
Telemetry Byte Oriented Serial protocol
TCA
Threshold Crossing Alert
TCC+
Timing Communications and Control+ Card
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
TDM
Time Division Multiplexing
TDS
Time Division Switching
TID
Target Identifier
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
C-12
November 2001
Appendix C
Acronyms
TL1
Transaction Language 1
TLS
Transparent LAN service
TMN
Telecommunications Management Network
TSA
Time Slot Assignment
TSI
Time-Slot Interchange
Tx
Transmit
U
UAS
Unavailable Seconds
UDP/IP
User Datagram Protocol/Internet Protocol
UID
User Identifier
UPSR
Unidirectional Path Switched Ring
UTC
Universal Time Coordinated
UTP
Unshielded Twisted Pair
V
VDC
Volts Direct Current
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
C-13
Appendix C
Acronyms
VLAN
Virtual Local Area Network
VPN
Virtual Private Network
VT1.5
Virtual Tributary equals 1.544 megabits per second
W
WAN
Wide Area Network
W
Watts
X
XC
Cross Connect
XCVT
Cross Connect Virtual Tributary
X.25
Protocol providing devices with direct connection to a packet switched network
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
C-14
November 2001
A P P E N D I X
D
Glossary
Numerics
1:1 protection
A card protection scheme that pairs a working card with a protect card of the same type in an adjacent
slot. If the working card fails, the traffic from the working card switches to the protect card. When the
failure on the working card is resolved, traffic reverts back to the working card if this option is set. This
protection scheme is specific to electrical cards.
1+1 protection
A card protection scheme that pairs a single working card with a single dedicated protect card. A term
specific to optical cards.
1:N protection
A card protection scheme that allows a single card to protect several working cards. When the failure on
the working card is resolved, traffic reverts back to the working card. A term specific to electrical cards.
A
Access drop
Points where network devices can access the network.
Address mask
Bit combination used to describe the portion of an IP address that refers to the network or subnet and the
part that refers to the host. Sometimes referred to as mask. See also subnet mask.
ADM
Add/drop multiplexer. ADM allows a signal to be added into or dropped from a SONET span.
Agent
1. 1. Generally, software that processes queries and returns replies on behalf of an application.
2.
2. In a network management system, a process that resides in all managed devices and reports the
values of specified variables to management stations.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
D-1
Appendix D
Glossary
AID
Access Identifier. An access code used in TL1 messaging that identifies and addresses specific objects
within the ONS 15454. These objects include individual pieces of equipment, transport spans, access
tributaries, and others.
AMI
Alternate Mark Inversion. Line-code format used on T1 circuits that transmits ones by alternate positive
and negative pulses. Zeroes are represented by 01 during each bit cell and ones are represented by 11 or
00, alternately, during each bit cell. AMI requires that the sending device maintain ones density. Ones
density is not maintained independently of the data stream. Sometimes called binary-coded alternate
mark inversion.
APS
Automatic Protection Switching. SONET switching mechanism that routes traffic from working lines to
protect lines in case a line card failure or fiber cut occurs.
ATAG
Autonomous Message Tag. ATAG is used for TL1 message sequencing.
B
B8ZS
Binary 8-zero Substitution. A line-code type, used on T1 circuits, that substitutes a special code
whenever 8 consecutive zeros are sent over the link. This code is then interpreted at the remote end of
the connection. This technique guarantees ones density independent of the data stream. Sometimes
called bipolar 8-zero substitution.
BER
Bit Error Rate. Ratio of received bits that contain errors.
Bit rate
Speed at which bits are transmitted, usually expressed in bits per second.
BITS
Building Integrated Timing Supply. A single building master timing supply that minimizes the number
of synchronization links entering an office. Sometimes referred to as a Synchronization Supply Unit.
BLSR
Bidirectional Line Switched Ring. SONET ring architecture that provides working and protection fibers
between nodes. If the working fiber between nodes is cut, traffic is automatically routed onto the
protection fiber.
Blue band
Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) wavelengths are broken into two distinct bands: red
and blue. DWDM cards for the ONS 15454 operate on wavelengths between 1530.33nm and 1542.94nm
in the blue band. The blue band is the lower frequency band.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
D-2
November 2001
Appendix D
Glossary
Bridge
Device that connects and passes packets between two network segments that use the same
communications protocol. In general, a bridge will filter, forward, or flood an incoming frame based on
the MAC address of that frame.
Broadcast
Data packet that will be sent to all nodes on a network. Broadcasts are identified by a broadcast address.
Compare with multicast and unicast. See also Broadcast address.
Broadcast address
Special address reserved for sending a message to all stations. Generally, a broadcast address is a MAC
destination address of all ones.
Broadcast storm
Undesirable network event in which many broadcasts are sent simultaneously across all network
segments. A broadcast storm uses substantial network bandwidth and, typically, causes network
time-outs.
Bus
Common physical signal path composed of wires or other media across which signals can be sent from
one part of a computer to another.
C
C2 byte
The C2 byte is the signal label byte in the STS path overhead. This byte tells the equipment what the
SONET payload envelope contains and how it is constructed.
Collision
In Ethernet, the result of two nodes transmitting simultaneously. The frames from each device impact
and are damaged when they meet on the physical media.
Concatenation
A mechanism for allocating contiguous bandwidth for payload transport. Through the use of
Concatenation Pointers, multiple OC-1s can be linked together to provide contiguous bandwidth through
the network, from end to end.
Crosspoint
A set of physical or logical contacts that operate together to extend the speech and signal channels in a
switching network.
CTAG
Correlation Tag. A unique identifier given to each input command by the TL1 operator. When the ONS
15454 system responds to a specific command, it includes the command’s CTAG in the reply. This
eliminates discrepancies about which response corresponds to which command.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
D-3
Appendix D
Glossary
CTC
Cisco Transport Controller. A Java-based graphical user interface (GUI) that allows operations,
administration, maintenenance, and provisioning (OAM&P) of the ONS 15454 using an Internet
browser.
CTM
Cisco Transport Manager. A Java-based network management tool used to support large networks of
Cisco 15000-class equipment.
CV
code violation
D
DCC
Data Communications Channel. Used to transport information about operation, administration,
maintenance, and provisioning (OAM&P) over a SONET interface. DCC can be located in section DCC
(SDCC) or line overhead (LDCC.)
Demultiplex
To separate multiple multiplexed input streams from a common physical signal back into multiple output
streams. See also Multiplexing.
Destination
The endpoint where traffic exits an ONS 15454 network. Endpoints can be a path (STS or STS/VT for
optical card endpoints), port (for electrical circuits, such as DS1, VT, DS3, STS), or card (for circuits on
DS1 and Ethernet cards).
DSX
Digital Signal Cross-connect frame. A manual bay or panel where different electrical signals are wired.
A DSX permits cross-connections by patch cords and plugs.
DWDM
Dense Wave Division Multiplexing. A technology that increases the information carrying capacity of
existing fiber optic infrastructure by transmitting and receiving data on different light wavelengths.
Many of these wavelengths can be combined on a single strand of fiber.
E
EDFA
Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier. A type of fiber optical amplifier that transmits a light signal through a
section of erbium-doped fiber and amplifies the signal with a laser pump diode. EDFA is used in
transmitter booster amplifiers, in-line repeating amplifiers, and in receiver preamplifiers.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
D-4
November 2001
Appendix D
Glossary
EIA
Electrical Interface Assemblies. Provides connection points for the ONS 15454 and DS-1, DS-3, or EC-1
units.
EMI
Electromagnetic Interference. Interference by electromagnetic signals that can cause reduced data
integrity and increased error rates on transmission channels.
Envelope
The part of messaging that varies in composition from one transmittal step to another. It identifies the
message originator and potential recipients, documents its past, directs its subsequent movement by the
Message Transfer System (MTS), and characterizes its content.
EOW
Express Orderwire. A permanently connected voice circuit between selected stations for technical
control purposes.
Ethernet switch
An Ethernet data switch. Ethernet switches provide the capability to increase the aggregate LAN
bandwidth by allowing simultaneous switching of packets between switch ports. Ethernet switches
subdivide previously-shared LAN segments into multiple networks with fewer stations per network.
External timing reference
A timing reference obtained from a source external to the communications system, such as one of the
navigation systems. Many external timing references are referenced to Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC).
F
Falling threshold
A falling threshold is the counterpart to a rising threshold. When the number of occurrences drops below
a falling threshold, this triggers an event to reset the rising threshold. See also rising threshold.
FDDI
Fiber Distributed Data Interface. LAN standard, defined by ANSI X3T9.5, specifying a 100-Mbps
token-passing network using fiber optic cable, with transmission distances of up to 2 km. FDDI uses a
dual-ring architecture to provide redundancy.
Frame
Logical grouping of information sent as a data link layer unit over a transmission medium. Often refers
to the header and trailer, used for synchronization and error control that surrounds the user data
contained in the unit.
Free run synchronization mode
Occurs when the external timing sources have been disabled and the ONS 15454 is receiving timing from
its Stratum 3 level internal timing source.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
D-5
Appendix D
Glossary
G
GBIC
Gigabit Interface Converter. A hot-swappable input/output device that plugs into a Gigabit Ethernet port
to link the port with the fiber optic network.
H
Hard reset
The physical removal and insertion of a card. A card pull.
HDLC
High-Level Data Link Control. Bit-oriented, synchronous, data-link layer protocol developed by ISO.
HDLC specifies a data encapsulation method on synchronous serial links using frame characters and
checksums.
Host number
Part of IP address used to address an individual host within the network or subnetwork.
Hot swap
The process of replacing a failed component while the rest of the system continues to function normally.
I
Input alarms
Used for external sensors such as open doors, temperature sensors, flood sensors, and other
environmental conditions.
IP
Internet Protocol. Network layer protocol in the TCP/IP stack offering a connectionless internetwork
service. IP provides features for addressing, type-of-service specification, fragmentation and
reassembly, and security.
IP address
32-bit address assigned to host using TCP/IP. An IP address belongs to one of five classes (A, B, C, D,
or E) and is written as 4 octets separated by periods (dotted decimal format). Each address consists of a
network number, an optional subnetwork number, and a host number.
K
K bytes
Automatic protection switching bytes. K bytes are located in the SONET line overhead and monitored
by equipment for an indication to switch to protection.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
D-6
November 2001
Appendix D
Glossary
L
LAN
Local Area Network. High-speed, low error data network covering a relatively small geographic area.
LANs connect workstations, peripherals, terminals, and other devices in a single building or other
geographically limited area. Ethernet, FDDI, and Token Ring are widely used LAN technologies.
LCD
Liquid Crystal Display. An alphanumeric display using liquid crystal sealed between two pieces of glass.
LCDs conserve electricity.
Line layer
Refers to the segment between two SONET devices in the circuit. The line layer deals with SONET
payload transport, and its functions include multiplexing and synchronization. Sometimes called a
maintenance span.
Line timing mode
A node that derives its clock from the SONET lines.
Link budget
The difference between the output power and receiver power of an optical signal expressed in dB. Link
refers to an optical connection and all of its component parts (optical transmitters, repeaters, receivers,
and cables).
Link integrity
The network communications channel is intact.
Loopback test
Test that sends signals then directs them back toward their source from some point along the
communications path. Loopback tests are often used to test network interface usability.
LOW
Local Orderwire. A communications circuit between a technical control center and selected terminal or
repeater locations.
M
MAC address
Standardized data link layer address that is required for every port or device that connects to a LAN.
Other devices in the network use these addresses to locate specific ports in the network and to create and
update routing tables and data structures. MAC addresses are six bytes long and are controlled by the
IEEE. Also known as the hardware address, MAC-layer address, and physical address.
Maintenance user
A security level that limits user access to maintenance options only. See also Superuser, Provisioning
User, and Retrieve User.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
D-7
Appendix D
Glossary
Managed device
A network node that contains an SNMP agent and resides on a managed network. Managed devices
include routers, access servers, switches, bridges, hubs, computer hosts, and printers.
Managed object
In network management, a network device that can be managed by a network management protocol.
Sometimes called an MIB object.
Mapping
A logical association between one set of values, such as addresses on one network, with quantities or
values of another set, such as devices on another network.
MIB
Management Information Base. Database of network management information that is used and
maintained by a network management protocol such as SNMP or CMIP. The value of a MIB object can
be changed or retrieved using SNMP or CMIP commands, usually through a GUI network management
system. MIB objects are organized in a tree structure that includes public (standard) and private
(proprietary) branches.
Multicast
Single packets copied by the network and sent to a specific subset of network addresses.
Multiplex payload
Generates section and line overhead, and converts electrical/optical signals when the electrical/optical
card is transmitting.
Multiplexing
Scheme that allows multiple logical signals to be transmitted simultaneously across a single physical
channel. Compare with Demultiplex.
N
NE
Network Element. In an Operations Support System, a single piece of telecommunications equipment
used to perform a function or service integral to the underlying network.
Network number
Part of an IP address that specifies the network where the host belongs.
NMS
Network Management System. System that executes applications that monitor and control managed
devices. NMSs provide the bulk of the processing and memory resources required for network
management.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
D-8
November 2001
Appendix D
Glossary
Node
Endpoint of a network connection or a junction common to two or more lines in a network. Nodes can
be processors, controllers, or workstations. Nodes, which vary in routing and other functional
capabilities, can be interconnected by links, and serve as control points in the network. Node is
sometimes used generically to refer to any entity that can access a network. In this manual the term
“node” usually refers to an ONS 15454.
NPJC
negative pointer justification count
O
OAM&P
Operations, Administration, Maintenance, and Provisioning. Provides the facilities and personnel
required to manage a network.
Optical amplifier
A device that amplifies an optical signal without converting the signal from optical to electrical and back
again to optical energy.
Optical receiver
An opto-electric circuit that detects incoming lightwave signals and converts them to the appropriate
signal for processing by the receiving device.
Orderwire
Equipment that establishes voice contact between a central office and carrier repeater locations.
Output contacts (alarms)
Triggers that drive visual or audible devices such as bells and lights. Output contacts can control other
devices such as generators, heaters, and fans.
P
Passive devices
Components that do not require external power to manipulate or react to electronic output. Passive
devices include capacitors, resisters, and coils.
Path Layer
The segment between the originating equipment and the terminating equipment. This path segment may
encompass several consecutive line segments or segments between two SONET devices.
Payload
Portion of a cell, frame, or packet that contains upper-layer information (data).
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
D-9
Appendix D
Glossary
Ping
Packet internet grouper. ICMP echo message and its reply. Often used in IP networks to test the
reachability of a network device.
PPJC
positive pointer justification count
PPMN
Path Protected Mesh Network. PPMN extends the protection scheme of a unidirectional path switched
ring (UPSR) beyond the basic ring configuration to the meshed architecture of several interconnecting
rings.
Priority queuing
Routing feature that divides data packets into two queues: one low-priority and one high-priority.
Provisioning user
A security level that allows the user to access only provisioning and maintenance options in CTC. See
also Superuser, Maintenance user, and Retrieve user.
Q
Queue
In routing, a backlog of packets waiting to be forwarded over a router interface.
R
Red band
DWDM wavelengths are broken into two distinct bands: red and blue. The red band is the higher
frequency band. The red band DWDM cards for the ONS 15454 operate on wavelengths between
1547.72nm and 1560.61nm.
Retrieve user
A security level that allows the user to retrieve and view CTC information but not set or modify
parameters. See also Superuser, Maintenance user, and Provisioning user.
Revertive switching
A process that sends electrical interfaces back to the original working card after the card comes back
online.
Rising threshold
The number of occurrences (collisions) that must be exceeded to trigger an event.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
D-10
November 2001
Appendix D
Glossary
RMON
Remote Network Monitoring. Allows network operators to monitor the health of the network with a
Network Management System (NMS). RMON watches several variables, such as Ethernet collisions,
and triggers an event when a variable crosses a threshold in the specified time interval.
S
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol. Network management protocol used almost exclusively in
TCP/IP networks. SNMP monitors and controls network devices and manages configurations, statistics
collection, performance, and security.
SNTP
Simple Network Time Protocol. Using an SNTP server ensures that all ONS 15454 network nodes use
the same date and time reference. The server synchronizes alarm timing during power outages or
software upgrades.
Soft reset
A soft reset reloads the operating system, application software, etc., and reboots the card. It does not
initialize the ONS 15454 ASIC hardware.
SONET
Synchronous Optical Network. High-speed synchronous network specification developed by Telcordia
Technologies, Inc. and designed to run on optical fiber. STS-1 is the basic building block of SONET.
Approved as an international standard in 1988.
Source
The endpoint where traffic enters an ONS 15454 network. Endpoints can be a path (STS or STS/VT for
optical card endpoints), port (for electrical circuits, such as DS1, VT, DS3, STS), or card (for circuits on
DS1 and Ethernet cards).
Spanning tree
Loop-free subset of a network topology. See also STA and STP.
SPE
Synchronous Payload Envelope. A SONET term describing the envelope that carries the user data or
payload.
SSM
Sync Status Messaging. A SONET protocol that communicates information about the quality of the
timing source using the S1 byte of the line overhead.
STA
Spanning-Tree Algorithm. An algorithm used by the spanning tree protocol to create a spanning tree.
See also Spanning tree and STP.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
D-11
Appendix D
Glossary
Static route
A route that is manually entered into a routing table. Static routes take precedence over routes chosen
by all dynamic routing protocols.
STP
Spanning Tree Protocol. Bridge protocol that uses the spanning-tree algorithm to enable a learning
bridge to dynamically work around loops in a network topology by creating a spanning tree. See also
Spanning tree, STA, and Learning bridge.
STS-1
Synchronous Transport Signal 1. Basic building block signal of SONET, operating at 51.84 Mbps for
transmission over OC-1 fiber. Faster SONET rates are defined as STS-n, where n is a multiple of 51.84
Mbps. See also SONET.
Subnet mask
32-bit address mask used in IP to indicate the bits of an IP address that are used for the subnet address.
Sometimes referred to simply as mask. See also IP address mask and IP address.
Subnetwork
In IP networks, a network confined to a particular subnet address. Subnetworks are networks segmented
by a network administrator in order to provide a multilevel, hierarchical routing structure while shielding
the subnetwork from the addressing complexity of attached networks. Sometimes called a subnet.
Subtending rings
SONET rings that incorporate nodes that are also part of an adjacent SONET ring.
Superuser
A security level that can perform all of the functions of the other security levels as well as set names,
passwords, and security levels for other users. A superuser is usually the network element administrator.
See also Retrieve user, Maintenance user, and Provisioning user.
T
T1
T1 transmits DS-1-formatted data at 1.544 Mbps through the telephone-switching network using AMI
or B8ZS coding. See also AMI, B8ZS, and DS-1.
Tag
Identification information, including a number plus other information.
TDM
Time Division Multiplexing. Allocates bandwidth on a single wire for information from multiple
channels based on preassigned time slots. Bandwidth is allocated to each channel regardless of whether
the station has data to transmit.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
D-12
November 2001
Appendix D
Glossary
Telcordia
Telcordia Technologies, Inc., formerly named Bellcore. Eighty percent of the U.S. telecommunications
network depends on software invented, developed, implemented, or maintained by Telcordia.
TID
Target Identifier. Identifies the particular network element (in this case, the ONS 15454) where each TL1
command is directed. The TID is a unique name given to each system at installation.
TLS
Transparent LAN Service. Provides private network service across a SONET backbone.
Transponder
Optional devices of a DWDM system providing the conversion of one optical wavelength to a precision
narrow band wavelength.
Trap
Message sent by an SNMP agent to an NMS (CTM), console, or terminal to indicate the occurrence of
a significant event, such as an exceeded threshold.
Tributary
The lower-rate signal directed into a multiplexer for combination (multiplexing) with other low rate
signals to form an aggregate higher rate level.
Trunk
Network traffic travels across this physical and logical connection between two switches. A backbone
is composed of a number of trunks. See also Backbone.
Tunneling
Architecture that is designed to provide the services necessary to implement any standard point-to-point
encapsulation scheme. See also encapsulation.
U
Unicast
The communication of a single source to a single destination.
UPSR
Unidirectional Path Switched Ring. Path-switched SONET rings that employ redundant, fiber- optic
transmission facilities in a pair configuration. One fiber transmits in one direction and the backup fiber
transmits in the other. If the primary ring fails, the backup takes over.
Upstream
Set of frequencies used to send data from a subscriber to the headend.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
D-13
Appendix D
Glossary
V
Virtual fiber
A fiber that carries signals at different rates and uses the same fiber optic cable.
Virtual ring
Entity in a source-route bridging (SRB) network that logically connects two or more physical rings
together either locally or remotely. The concept of virtual rings can be expanded across router
boundaries.
Virtual wires
Virtual wires route external alarms to one or more alarm collection centers across the SONET transport
network.
VLAN
Virtual LAN. Group of devices located on a number of different LAN segments that are configured
(using management software) to communicate as if they were attached to the same wire. Because
VLANs are based on logical instead of physical connections, they are extremely flexible.
VPN
Virtual Private Network. Enables IP traffic to travel securely over a public TCP/IP network by
encrypting all traffic from one network to another. A VPN uses “tunneling” to encrypt all information
at the IP level. (See also Tunneling.)
VT
Virtual Tributary. A structure designed for the transport and switching of sub-DS3 payloads.
VT layer
The VT layer or electrical layer occurs when the SONET signal is broken down into an electrical signal.
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
D-14
November 2001
I N D E X
provisioning external alarms
Numerics
7-27
provisioning external controls
1+1 optical card protection
description
virtual wires
3-9
AIP
creating a protection group
creating linear ADMs
3-9
7-26
1-16, 10-8
air filter
5-41
description
1:1 electrical card protection
description
3-9
1-25
bottom brackets
1-26
node installation
1-8
converting DS-1 cards to 1:N protection
7-31
AIS
converting DS-3 cards to 1:N protection
7-33
alarm indication signal see AIS
creating a protection group
3-9
3-15
alarm interface panel see AIP
1:N electrical card protection
description
alarm interfaces
3-9
1-33
alarm profiles
converting DS-1 cards to 1:1 protection
7-31
description
converting DS-3 cards to 1:1 protection
7-33
applying to a card or node
creating a protection group
3-9
10-8
applying to a port or card
comparing
creating
A
ACO
saving
C-1
add-drop multiplexer see linear ADM
10-10
10-10
alarms
creating profiles see alarm profiles
5-18
groups (domain)
2-17
to current session
UPSR
10-10
changing default severities see alarm profiles
add node
BLSR
2-21
deleting
history
10-3
10-5, 10-7
LCD counts
5-34
10-8
ADM see linear ADM
pin fields
1-33
AIC card
severities
10-2, 10-6
backplane pin fields
export data
install
10-13
10-9
loading
1-33
10-13
10-10
list by node
acronyms
7-28
2-27
1-49
orderwire
7-29
1-33
suppressing
10-14
synchronize
10-3
traps see SNMP
user-provisionable
7-25 to 7-29
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
IN-1
Index
viewing
wires
10-1
1-33
alarm settings
TBOS
1-33
timing
1-33
X.25
1-33
DS-1 card
7-6
baluns see electrical interface adapter
DS-3 card
7-8
bandwidth
DS3E card
allocation and routing
7-11
DS3XM-6 card
EC1-12 card
circuit percentage used
7-14
DS-N cards, general
line percentage used
Ethernet RMON thresholds
alarm wires
battery termination
AMP Champ EIA
Bay Assembly
attaching DS-1 cables
1-59
bidirectional line switched ring see BLSR
1-41
bipolar violations
1-24
1-59
area range table (OSPF)
ATM
1-31
1-10
BIC rear cover
1-43
1-20
routing cables
5-7
Bellcore See Telcordia
1-61
attaching DS-1 AMP Champ cables
installing
1-64
two-fiber BLSR capacity
1-33
description
5-7
9-29
node specifications
9-32
10-14
attaching a ferrite
9-30
four-fiber BLSR capacity
7-3
7-17
alarm suppression
A-2
DS1 CV-L
8-19
DS3 CV-L
8-23, 8-26, 8-29
BITS
4-14
and BLSR setup
7-23
automated circuit creation
5-22
BITS out references
6-3, 6-6
3-15
external node timing source
facilities
B
3-15, 3-17
pin field assignments
1-33
blades see cards
backplane
BIC rear cover
BLSR
1-59
connecting to PC
adding a node
2-5
installing LAN wires
alarms
1-35
interface connections see backplane pins
pins see backplane pins
removing metal covers
1-32
1-32
removing lower backplane cover
1-16
1-15
5-18
5-15
bandwidth capacity
5-7
choosing properties
5-14
DCC terminations
deleting circuits
enabling ports
backplane pins
5-13
5-25
5-13
description
1-32
fiber configuration example
alarm pins
1-33
four-fiber description
craft interface pins
LAN
modem
3-12
1-35
1-34
1-33
5-4
maximum node number
moving trunk cards
5-11
5-1
5-22
planning fiber connections
5-11
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
IN-2
November 2001
Index
PSC
converting DS-1 and DS-3 card protection groups
8-40
removing a node
ring switching
5-21
5-5
set up procedures
span switching
creating a protection group
3-9
deleting a protection group
3-11
editing a protection group
5-10
Ethernet (spanning tree)
5-5
subtending a BLSR
5-40
subtending a UPSR
5-38
card provisioning
AIC card
3-11
9-26
7-1 to 7-34
7-25
testing
5-16
converting DS-1 and DS-3 protection groups
timing
5-14
CTC card view
2-21
electrical cards
7-2
two-fiber description
5-2
two-fiber ring example
IPPM
5-8
upgrading from two-fiber to four-fiber
VT1.5 capacity
5-16
BNC EIA
optical cards
7-18
7-23
cards
description
see also OC-N and DS-N cards
1-17
connecting coaxial cable
connecting ferrites
installing
colors onscreen
1-36
1-62
1-22
2-14
installing
1-44 to 1-49
inventory
3-18
BPV see bipolar violations
part number
broadcast domains
protection see card protection
9-21
3-19
revision number
serial number
C
3-19
3-19
slot requirements
circuits
cable management
AMP Champ
1-59
6-2
adding a node
attributes
1-36, 1-57
1-45
6-1 to 6-15
definition
1-59
backplane interface connector
coaxial
2-17
6-1
DS-1 installation
1-39
automatic routing restraints
DS-1 twisted pair
1-58
autorange
6-4, 6-7
6-2, 6-3, 6-6
fiber-optic
1-55
bidirectional
6-3, 6-6
grounding
1-30
circuit alarms
10-4
creating automated circuits
cables
installing
1-52 to 1-54
protection
routing
7-30
7-24
STM-1 signals
6-16
7-30
1-54
1-54 to 1-64
see coaxial cables
see DS-1 cables
see fiber-optic cables
creating manual circuits
6-2
6-6
deleting and recreating circuits for a linear to ring
conversion 5-46, 5-49
deleting and recreating for a linear to ring
conversion 5-46
displaying span properties
editing UPSR circuits
2-17
6-10 to 6-12
card protection
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
IN-3
Index
hub-and-spoke Ethernet circuit
9-14
manual Ethernet cross-connects
manual routing detail
monitoring
names
9-16
2-1 to 2-13
colors
10-3
deleting
6-2, 6-6
point-to-point Ethernet circuit
provisioning with a shortcut
10-3
history
9-6
10-7
profiles
2-17
10-8
see also alarms
6-5
route automatically
searching
installing
alarms
A-3
6-9
review routes
CTC
viewing
6-4, 6-7
10-1
card inventory
6-10
shared packet ring Ethernet circuit
STS switching
9-10
card protection setup
unidirectional with multiple drops
6-8
2-17
VT tunnels versus STS capacity
6-20
computer requirements
connecting PCs
2-5
firewall access
2-12
Cisco Transport Controller see CTC
LAN connections
CLEI code
logging in
3-19
clock, setting
CMS see CTC
1-36
and BNC connectors
and high-density BNC connectors
and SMB connectors
routing
1-38
1-38
1-57
coding violations
7-20
colors
2-22
node setup
3-2
2-14
nodes
2-16
remote site access
B-1
2-2
connected rings
5-36
setup wizard
2-4
timing setup
3-12
2-8
card view
2-13
2-21
network see network view
CV-L parameter
EC-1 card
2-12
4-7, 4-9, 4-13
1-36
cross-connect
definition
2-8
node see node view
10-3
craft interface
2-10
routing multiple workstations see static routes
description
computer requirements
CORBA
2-7
views
compliance information
conditions
2-2
2-26
TL1 access
cards
cost
navigation
printing
1-36
2-26
2-9
login node groups
3-2
coaxial cables
3-9
changing format of data
6-15
upgrading a span
3-18
8-15
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
OC-3 card
8-17, 8-35, 8-37
CV parameter, provisioning
6-2
8-39, 8-42
7-20
CV-S parameter
see also card entries
EC-1 card
see also circuits
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
8-15
8-38
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
IN-4
November 2001
Index
OC-3 card
8-34
CV-V parameter
DS-1 cards
8-20, 8-22
DS3XM-6 card
8-31, 8-33
CD-ROM
xxxvi
obtaining
xxxv
online
2-4
related
xxxiv
domains
description
D
2-17
changing background color
database
MAC address
version
1-16
3-19
data communication channels see DCC
data export
2-17
opening
2-19
removing
2-19
renaming
2-19
drop
2-26
datagrams
creating
creating multiple drops
4-5
date
definition
6-2
6-12, 6-15
default
1-30
drop port
setting
3-2
nodes
capacity
secondary
6-21
6-3, 6-6
A-2
DS1-14 card
5-36
exclude autodiscovery
in domains
6-8
6-11, 6-16
protected drops
DCC
definition
2-19
2-10
2-18
AMP Champ connectors
balun
1-40
1-4
1-17, 1-20
metric (OSPF)
4-13
cable
OSPF Area ID
4-13
convert from 1:1 protection to 1:N
7-31
7-3
terminations for BLSR
5-13
modify line and threshold settings
terminations for UPSR
5-30, 5-31
path trace
tunneling
DCS
performance monitoring
6-21 to 6-23
viewing connections
2-15
default IP address
2-5
3-3, 3-4
default thresholds
7-1
DS-1 cables
8-18
1-19
8-31
1-39
AMP Champ connector installation
electrical interface adapters (baluns)
routing
destination
host
SMB EIA
DS1 AISS-P parameter
5-39
default router
6-12
in a static route
4-8
1-39
DS1 CV-L parameter
8-19
IP addresses
4-1
DS1 ES-L parameter
8-19
routing table
4-15
DS1 ES-P parameter
8-31
DHCP
2-6, 3-3, 4-3
1-40
1-58
twisted pair installation
4-5
1-41
DS1 LOSS-L parameter
8-19
digital service cards see DS-N cards
DS1 Rx AISS-P parameter
documentation
DS1 Rx CV-P parameter
8-19
8-19
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
IN-5
Index
DS1 Rx ES-P parameter
DS-3 cards
8-19
8-23
DS1 Rx SAS-P parameter
8-19
DS3E cards
DS1 Rx SES-P parameter
8-19
DS3XM-6 card
DS1 Rx UAS-P parameter
8-26
DS3 ES-P parameter
8-19
DS1 SAS-P parameter
8-31
DS1 SES-L parameter
8-19
DS3E cards
DS1 SES-P parameter
8-31
DS3XM-6 card
8-26
8-20
DS3E cards
DS1 Tx ES-P parameter
8-20
DS3XM-6 card
DS1 Tx SAS-P parameter
8-20
DS1 Tx SES-P parameter
8-20
8-23
8-26
8-29
DS3N-12E card
modify line and threshold settings
path trace
8-20
7-9
6-12
performance monitoring
8-31
DS3-12 card
BNC
8-30
DS3 LOSS-L parameter
8-20
DS1 Tx CV-P parameter
DS1 UAS-P parameter
8-23
DS3 ESP-P parameter
DS1 Tx AISS-P parameter
DS1 Tx UAS-P parameter
8-29
8-24
DS3 SASCP-P parameter
DS3E cards
1-18
coaxial cables
DS3XM-6 card
1-36
modify line and threshold settings
performance monitoring
7-6
7-33
performance monitoring
8-24
DS3 AISS-P parameter
8-30, 8-32
DS3 CV-L parameter
DS3E cards
8-23
8-26
DS3XM-6 card
8-29
DS3 CVP-P parameter
DS3E cards
8-26
DS3XM-6 card
8-30
DS3 ESCP-P parameter
DS3E cards
8-28
DS3XM-6 card
8-30
8-27, 8-28
8-32
8-30
DS3 SES-L parameter
8-30
8-26, 8-28
DS3XM-6 card
DS3E cards
DS3XM-6 card
DS3 CVCP-P parameter
DS3E cards
8-26
DS3XM-6 card
DS3XM-6
8-24
DS3XM-6 card
8-23
DS3 SESCP-P parameter
6-12
DS-3 cards
DS3 SAS-P parameter
DS3E cards
convert from 1:1 to 1:N protection
8-32
DS3 SASP-P parameter
8-22
DS3-12E card
path trace
8-28
8-30, 8-32
DS3 ES-L parameter
DS3E cards
8-23
8-26
DS3XM-6 card
8-29
DS3 SES-P parameter
8-23
DS3 SESP-P parameter
DS3E cards
8-26
DS3XM-6 card
8-30
DS3 UASCP-P parameter
DS3E cards
8-27, 8-28
DS3XM-6 card
8-30, 8-32
DS3 UAS-P parameter
8-24
DS3 UASP-P parameter
DS3E cards
8-26
DS3XM-6 card
8-30
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
IN-6
November 2001
Index
DS3XM-6 card
installing DS-1 cables
alarm settings
export data
electrical interface assemblies see EIA
7-14
environment variable
2-27
path trace
6-12
performance monitoring
8-28
provision line and threshold settings
7-11
DS-N cards
creating protection groups
EIA requirement
exporting data
1-40
ESD plug input
1-12
ES-L parameter
8-29
DS-1 cards
8-19
DS-3 cards
8-23
DS3E cards
3-9
EC-1 card
1-2
2-4
8-26
8-15
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
2-26
modifying transmission settings
7-3 to 7-17
dynamic host configuration protocol see DHCP
OC-3 card
8-39, 8-42
8-17, 8-35, 8-37
ES parameter, provisioning
7-20
ES-S parameter
EC-1 card
E
8-15
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
east port
OC-3 card
5-11, 5-15
alarm settings
export data
DS-1 cards
7-17
path trace
7-14
VT1.5 circuit example
8-14
6-17
9-1 to 9-33
E1000-2
9-2
E1000-2-G
9-2
E100T-12
C-5
E100T-G
EIAs
descriptions
1-17
1-22
1-66
AMP Champ EIA see AMP Champ EIA
BNC EIA see BNC EIA
high-density BNC EIA see high-density BNC EIA
SMB EIA see SMB EIA
electrical cards
see cards indexed by name
see DS-N cards
electrical interface adapters (baluns)
1-40
9-2
hub-and-spoke
9-14
manual cross-connects
1-61
specifications
9-2
circuits
1-17
backplane cover
installing
Ethernet
8-31, 8-33
cards
6-12
performance monitoring
installing
8-20, 8-22
DS3XM-6 card
2-27
modifying line and threshold settings
ferrites
8-34
ES-V parameter
EC1-12 card
EDFA
8-38
9-16
multicard and single-card EtherSwitch
point-to-point 9-6
shared packed ring circuit
collision monitoring (RMON)
EtherSwitch
9-10
9-31
9-4 to 9-5
fiber interface
1-50
history screen
9-29
line utilization screen
MAC address screen
9-29
9-30
port-provisioning for VLAN membership
priority queuing
9-3
9-23
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
IN-7
Index
router aggregation
spanning tree protection
statistics screen
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
9-1
trunk utilization screen
events
attaching to power cables
9-31
fiber boot
9-21
1-63
1-53
fiber-optic cables
10-3, 10-7
installation on GBIC (Ethernet cards)
adding a BLSR node
installation on OC-N cards
5-18
BLSR bandwidth reuse
routing
5-7
converting degrees to degrees and minutes
creating a VT1.5 circuit on an EC-1 card
creating login node groups
creating VT1.5 circuits
DCC tunnel
3-2
6-17
2-10
5-24
2-12
four-fiber BLSR see BLSR
framing
3-15
label
subtending BLSRs
two-fiber BLSR
5-21, 5-23
1-12
6-4, 6-7
1-2
G
6-19
gateway
external (environmental) alarms
external timing
fully-protected path
5-8
7-26
external controls
1-13
fuse-and-alarm panel
5-39
5-28
virtual wires
1-11
1-11
removing
5-50
VT tunnel
firewalls
opening
3-13
removing a BLSR node
7-27
7-28
4-1
default
4-3, 4-6
on routing table
3-12
4-15
Proxy ARP-enabled
4-4
returning MAC address
GBIC
F
failure count, provisioning
7-21
fan-tray air filter see air filter
fan-tray assembly
fan failure
1-25
1-25
fan speed
1-25
installing
1-27
4-5
9-2
description
description
1-53
1-55, 1-56
equipment access
6-21
network timing
1-50
front door
6-16
moving a BLSR trunk card
UPSR
1-61
attaching to wire-wrap pin fields
9-30
examples
PPMN
8-17, 8-35, 8-37
ferrites
9-29
threshold variables (MIBs)
VLANs
OC-3 card
9-26
8-39, 8-42
1-50
installing
1-50
removing
1-52
Gigabit Ethernet see E1000-2/E1000-2-G card or Ethernet
gigabit interface converter see GBIC
grounding
1-28
FC-L parameter
EC-1 card
8-16
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
IN-8
November 2001
Index
H
hello interval
4-14
attaching ferrites
hop
1-37
1-3
1-34
B-1
intermediate-path performance monitoring see IPPM
1-62
Internet Inter-ORB Protocol see IIOP
1-18
internet protocol see IP
1-22
interoperability
4-7, 4-9
hosts
tasks (hardware)
warnings
attaching coaxial cable
installing
1-38
timing wires
high-density BNC EIA
description
SMB connectors
JRE compatibility
3-2
2-2
ONS node Ethernet circuit combinations
hub-and-spoke
9-14
software and hardware matrix
inventory
9-5
1-68
3-18
IP
I
address change for LAN connection
idle time
address definition
3-7
IEEE 802.1Q (priority queuing)
IIOP
default address
installation
overview
1-2
environments
AIC card
1-49
networking
alarm wires
assembly specifications
4-1
4-2
select address for log in
1-64
subnetting
cables/fiber
2-5
4-1 to 4-17
requirements
1-41
1-40
BNC connectors
2-10
4-1
IP addressing scenarios
1-36
4-2
CTC and nodes connected to router
1-52
CTC and nodes on same subnet
1-44
coaxial cables
4-3
4-2
default gateway on CTC workstation
1-36
coaxial cable with BNC connectors
OSPF
1-37
4-6
4-10
craft interface wires
1-36
Proxy ARP and gateway
equipment required
1-3
static route for multiple CTC workstations
gigabit interface converters
hardware
power supply
description
provisioning
1-9
4-6
8-10
7-24
1-28
reversible mounting bracket
shelf see rack installation
single node
4-9
IPPM
1-35
multiple nodes
4-4
static routes connecting to LANs
1-50
1-1 to 1-70
LAN wires
4-2
OSPF see OSPF
1-33
AMP Champ connectors
cards
2-5
addressing scenarios see IP addressing scenarios
2-12
baluns
3-2
address description
9-23
2-7
1-7
1-6
J
J1 bytes
6-12
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
IN-9
Index
J1 path trace
line timing
6-12 to 6-15
Java
3-12
listener port
and CTC, overview
console window
java.policy file
lockout
2-1
5-17
logging in
2-9
2-9
login node groups
2-2
creating
JRE
location
2-10
network view
2-2
patch requirement
Solaris
2-12
viewing
2-4
2-10
longitude
2-5
2-15
2-19, 2-20
lower backplane cover
1-15
K
k bytes
M
5-3
MAC address
4-5
clear table
L
3-7
CTC screen
definition
LAN
accessing the ONS 15454
connection points
9-30
1-16, 9-30
retrieve table
2-7
viewing on node
1-34
external interface specifications
1-65
2-8
map (network)
pin field
1-34
memory
latitude
2-19
1-66
MIB
1-35
description
2-19, 2-20
layer 2 switching
Ethernet
9-4
groups
LCD
alarm indication
change IP address
11-9
2-1
modems
3-4
LAN
3-4
2-8
pin field
2-5
prevent IP configuration
LEDs (faceplate)
9-31
Microsoft Internet Explorer
3-4
change network mask
IP address display
11-5
see also SNMP
10-8
change default router
3-3
1-33
modules see cards
monitor circuits
1-11
6-9
monitoring
linear ADM
description
circuits see monitor circuits
5-41
converting to BLSR
5-47
converting to UPSR
5-42
creating
3-3
management information base See MIB
modems
wires
3-7
5-42
performance see performance monitoring
mounting bracket
1-6
multicard Etherswitch
multiple drops
9-4
6-8
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
IN-10
November 2001
Index
NPJC-Pdet parameter
N
description
navigating in CTC
2-22
EC-1 card
Netscape Communicator
obtaining
8-17
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
2-2
OC-3 card
running the CTC setup wizard
2-4
7-21
NPJC-Pgen parameter
2-1
EC-1 card
disabling proxy service
2-8
testing the node connection
network interface cards
8-39
8-36
provisioning
Netscape Navigator
CTC browser
8-12
8-12
8-17
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
2-6
OC-3 card
2-5
8-40
8-36
provisioning
7-21
networks
building circuits
6-1
O
default configuration see UPSR
IP networking
4-1 to 4-17
OAM&P access
setting up basic information
SONET topologies
timing example
3-3
OC-N cards
5-1 to 5-52
BLSR trunk cards
3-13
connecting fiber
network view
description
2-13
5-11
1-52
creating protection groups
2-15
data export
adding nodes to map see domains
changing the background color
2-26
fiber protection
2-19
changing the background image (map)
3-9
1-53
modifying transmission quality
2-19
moving BLSR trunk cards
7-18
5-24
creating new users
3-8
path trace
login node groups
2-15
performance monitoring for OC-12, OC-48 and
OC-192 8-37
moving node positions
tasks
NIC
2-17, 2-20
performance monitoring for OC-3
2-17
provisioning for SDH
2-5
description
provision threshold settings
2-14
alarm profiles, assigning
card colors
timing
10-13
creating protection groups
creating users
online documentation
3-9
ONS 15327
3-6
setting up basic network information
setting up basic node information
setting up timing
7-19
5-30
2-4
9-5
Open Shortest Path First see OSPF
optical cables see fiber-optic cables
optical carrier cards see OC-N cards
3-14
optical transmission quality
2-15
viewing popup information
3-2
3-3
7-18
3-12
UPSR trunk cards
2-14
8-33
7-23
provision line transmission settings
node view
tabs list
6-12
2-15
orderwire
7-18
7-29 to 7-30
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
IN-11
Index
OSPF
connecting nodes to CTC
definition
4-6
5-32
enabling, general
3-10
Ethernet
4-10 to 4-13
routing table
enable for UPSR
9-3
IIOP port
4-5
P
2-12
LCD button
3-4
listener port
2-12
path trace source and drop
passwords
protection
2-9, 3-8
3-9
path-protected mesh network see PPMN
RJ-45 on TCC+
path trace
status
PDI-P
6-12 to 6-15
performance monitoring
15-minute intervals
clear count stored
feeds
8-7
DS3 and DS3N parameters
IPPM
description
8-24
EC-1 card
8-22
OC-3 card
8-17
7-21
PPJC-Pgen parameter
8-10
OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192
OC3 parameters
EC-1 card
7-2
OC-3 card
8-33
path-level thresholds for STS/VT1.5 traffic, setting
7-2
7-2
description
pointer justification counts
8-12
7-21
8-12
5-50
printing
4-2
2-26
priority queuing
9-23
protection
point-to-point
see Ethernet circuits
converting 1:1 to 1:N protection
see linear ADM
protection groups
3-9
see SONET topologies
2-12
protection switching
ports
card list
drop
7-30
see protection switching
2-15
port filtering
8-40
8-36
provisioning
PPMN
8-9
8-17
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
8-37
path-level thresholds for electrical traffic, setting
popup data
8-39
8-36
provisioning
9-33
line-level thresholds for electrical cards, setting
ping
8-12
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
8-28
8-14
thresholds
1-28, 1-67
PPJC-Pdet parameter
8-18
DS3-12E and DS3N-12E parameters
Ethernet
1-30 to 1-31
supply
DS1 and DS1N parameters
EC-1 card
1-52
power
8-8
DS3XM-6 parameters
2-2
transmit (tx) and receive (Rx)
8-1 to 8-42
8-3
clear count displayed
2-5
2-21
TL1 port
6-3, 6-7
6-13
1-46
6-12
enable for BLSR
5-13
APS in SDH
7-23
bidirectional
3-10
BLSR span switching
5-5
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
IN-12
November 2001
Index
count
PSD-S (span switching)
7-21
count see PSC
duration
PSD-W (working)
8-35
Q
duration see PSD
editing a UPSR circuit
reversion time
revertive
6-11
queuing
9-23
6-3, 6-7
3-10, 6-3, 6-7
ring switching
R
5-5
protocols
IP
8-40
7-22
duration parameter (PSD)
DHCP
8-41
rack installation
3-3
1-5 to 1-11
19-inch rack
4-1
overview
1-6
1-5
Proxy ARP see Proxy ARP
Bay Assembly
1-10
SNMP see SNMP
multiple nodes
1-9
SNTP
reversible mounting bracket
3-2
spanning tree
SSM
9-26
single node
3-14
4-1
proxy service
4-4
converting from linear
2-8
maximum per node
PSC parameter
5-42, 5-47
5-1
see BLSR
1+1 protection
8-35, 8-40
see UPSR
8-40
provisioning
6-3, 6-7
rings
enabling an ONS 15454 gateway
subtended
7-21
virtual
provisioning PSC-R
7-22
RJ-45
provisioning PSC-S
7-22
RMON
provisioning PSC-W
PSC-R (ring)
8-41
PSC-S (span)
8-41
PSC-W (working)
7-22
5-36
5-51
1-47, 2-5
description
11-8
Ethernet alarm thresholds
MIB Groups
8-40
PSD parameter
definition
5-14
revertive switching
description
BLSR
1-7
reversion time
Proxy ARP
1-6
9-30
11-8
routing table
4-15
RS-232 port
1-35
8-35
OC-12, OC-28, OC-192 cards
8-40
provisioning PSD-L
7-22
S
provisioning PSD-R
7-22
SC connectors
provisioning PSD-S
7-22
SD BER
provisioning PSD-W
PSD-R (ring duration)
7-22
SDH
1-53
7-18
7-23
8-41
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
IN-13
Index
SD threshold
single-card Etherswitch
6-3, 6-7
secondary sources
slots see cards
A-2
security
SMB EIA
setting up
attaching coaxial cables
3-6
tasks per level
viewing
9-5
connecting ferrites
3-6
SEFS parameter
description
7-20
SEFS-S parameter
EC-1 card
installing
SNMP
8-15
OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 parameters
OC-3 card
8-39
SES-L parameter
8-39, 8-42
SES parameter, provisioning
11-1
11-5
traps
11-3
11-6
3-2
see CTC
finding the version number
8-15
OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 cards
8-39
installation
SES-V parameter
1-48
Solaris
CTC set up
8-21, 8-22
2-4
DS3XM-6 card
8-31, 8-33
disabling proxy service
2-8
setup wizard (CTC)
2-4
JRE patch requirement
2-4
SF BER parameter, provisioning
7-18
shared packet ring
2-4
data communication channels see DCC
K1 and K2 bytes
1-5
Bay Assembly
dimensions
timing parameters
1-52
topologies
1-6
four-node configuration
source
1-9
3-14
3-12
5-1
6-2
span
1-7
power and ground
specifications
5-3
synchronization status messaging
1-10
cable installation
shortest path
2-8
SONET
9-10
shelf assembly
installing
remote access
running the CTC setup wizard
6-3, 6-7
description
3-19
2-1
upgrading new version
8-34
SF threshold
11-8
software
7-20
SES-S parameter
DS-1 cards
description
SNTP
8-17, 8-35, 8-37
OC-3 card
1-22
setting up
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
EC-1 card
1-19
remote network monitoring (RMON)
8-15
OC-3 card
1-40
11-1 to 11-9
MIBs
8-34
EC-1 card
1-62
connecting to a balun
2-14
1-38
line appearance on map
1-28
lockout
1-64
5-17
reversion (BLSR)
5-2
simple network management protocol see SNMP
upgrade
simple network time protocol
view properties
3-2
2-18
5-15
2-17
2-17
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
IN-14
November 2001
Index
spanning tree protocol
configuration
description
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
OC-3 card
9-27
parameters
8-36
STS FC-P parameter
9-26
multi-instance
9-26
9-27
DS-1 cards
8-21
DS-3 cards
8-24
SPE see synchronous payload envelope
DS3E cards
SSM
DS3XM-6 card
description
enabling
EC-1 card
3-14
ST3 clock
OC-3 card
3-12
static routes
4-1
4-6
STM-4
8-24
8-16
OC-3 card
8-21
string
6-12
DS-3 cards
8-24
STS CV-P parameter
DS3E cards
8-27
DS-1 cards
8-21
DS3XM-6 card
DS-3 cards
8-24
EC-1 card
8-16
OC-3 card
8-16
8-36
STS ES-P parameter
8-36
8-41
CTC and nodes on different subnets
CTC and nodes on same subnet
4-2
multiple subnets on the network
4-6
DS-1 cards
8-21
select designated router
DS-3 cards
8-24
using static routes
DS3XM-6 card
EC-1 card
with Proxy ARP
8-27
8-32
8-16
monitored IPPMs
8-11
8-41
subnet
8-11
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
8-11
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
8-32
monitored IPPMs
8-32
monitored IPPM
8-27
DS3XM-6 card
DS3E cards
8-41
STS UAS-P parameter
DS-1 cards
OC-3 card
8-11
8-36
STP see spanning tree protocol
EC-1 card
8-32
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
7-23
7-23
DS3E cards
8-41
8-27
monitored IPPM
7-23
STM-64
DS-3 cards
EC-1 card
7-23
STM-1 signals
8-21
DS3XM-6 card
4-9
7-23
STM-16
8-11
8-36
DS-1 cards
DS3E cards
4-8
for multiple workstations
STM-1
8-16
STS SES-P parameter
2-13
connecting to LANs
creating
8-32
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
3-15
standard constant
8-27
monitored IPPMs
3-15, 7-18
message set
8-41
subnet mask
24-bit
4-17
32-bit
4-17
4-3
4-14
4-6, 4-9
4-4, 4-5
3-3
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
IN-15
Index
access to nodes
24-hour interval
4-7
creating a static route
changing thresholds
4-9
destination host or network
subnetting
8-4
IPPM paths
4-15
8-9
8-11
threshold guidelines
3-3
subtending rings
7-1
TCC+ card
5-36
subtend a BLSR from a BLSR
5-40
card view
subtend a BLSR from a UPSR
5-38
fan speed control
subtending a BLSR from a BLSR
2-22
installing
5-40
switching
1-25
1-47
non-volatile memory capacity
see protection switching
RS-232 port
see traffic switching
software installation overview
synchronization status messaging see SSM
3-14
synchronous payload envelope
clocking differences
EC-1 card
software version change
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192
8-40
TDM
6-15
Technical Assistance Center
alarm severities
T
display hidden columns
printing data
2-25
default alarm severities
10-8
default card thresholds
7-1
8-1
1-5
1-66
testing
2-27
resizing columns
standard racks
timing requirements
2-26, 2-28
rearranging columns
sorting
xxxvii
10-1
performance monitoring
tables
see also performance monitoring
2-24
test set
2-25
5-42
third-party equipment
2-25
1-2, 6-1, 6-21
threshold crossing alert see TCA
tabs
overview
thresholds
2-13
in card view
card
2-22
8-10
node view - Alarms
2-15
DS-1 card
7-3
node view - Circuits
2-15
DS-3 card
7-6
node view - Conditions
node view - History
2-15
DS3E card
7-9
DS3XM-6 card
2-15
node view - Inventory
2-15, 3-18
EC-1 card
node view - Maintenance
2-15
Ethernet
node view - Provisioning
2-15
MIBs
TCA
9-1
Telcordia
8-36
exporting data
2-1
1-48
XC/XCVT/XC10G cards
8-17
OC-3 card
1-35
augment with Ethernet
8-12
1-66
7-14
9-33
9-31
optical cards
8-3
15-minute interval
8-3
7-12
7-19
performance monitoring
8-9
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
IN-16
November 2001
Index
time zone
timing
3-2
U
7-18
UAS-L parameter
BITS see BITS
installation
internal
setting up
OC-12, OC-48, OC-192 cards
3-12
OC-3 card
3-14
specifications
DS-1 cards
AID in CTC
8-31, 8-33
UPSR
2-8
1-35
craft interface specifications
1-66
adding a node
5-34
circuit editing
6-10
converting from linear ADM
TLS see VLAN
topology hosts
8-21, 8-22
unidirectional path switched rings see UPSR
2-2
craft interface connection
DCC terminations
2-10
description
traffic
outages when removing a node
example
5-21
outages when removing UPSR nodes
5-35
switch UPSR traffic
traffic monitoring
5-31
5-32
5-28
removing nodes
5-32, 5-35
set up procedures
see also circuits
subtending a BLSR
5-32
timing
traffic switching
adding and removing UPSR nodes
moving a BSLR trunk card
multicard Etherswitch
5-24
9-4
removing a BSLR node
5-22
single-card Etherswitch
9-5
trunk cards
5-38
5-32
6-10
5-31
traffic switch
5-32
user see security
user setup
3-6
V
views see CTC
5-11, 5-22
virtual link table (OSPF)
5-24
4-14
virtual local area network see VLAN
5-30
tunnel
virtual rings
5-51
see DCC
virtual wires
7-26
see VT tunnel
VLAN
twisted pair wire-wrap
5-30
switch protection paths
6-12
5-42, 5-47
5-26
enabling ports
cards see also DS-N/OC-N cards
UPSR
7-21
DS3XM-6 card
10-2, 10-6
connecting to the ONS 15454
moving
8-39
UAS-V parameter
1-34
commands
8-42
8-17, 8-35, 8-37
UAS parameter
1-66
TL1
BLSR
8-16
OC-12, OC-48, and OC-192 cards
3-17
parameters
wires
EC-1 card
1-33
1-39, 1-58
two-fiber BLSR see BLSR
and MAC addresses
number supported
9-30
9-21
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
November 2001
IN-17
Index
provisioning Ethernet ports
spanning tree
9-3
9-26
VT1.5
see also circuits
cross-connect capacity on XCVT and XC10G
cross-connect requirements
switching
6-15
tunneling
6-19
VT mapping
VT tunnels
6-16
6-16
6-17
6-19
W
WAN
4-1
warnings, installation
west port
B-1
5-11, 5-14, 5-15
workstation requirements
2-2
X
XC10G card
capacities
6-15
card view
2-22
see also cross-connect
turn-up
1-47
XC card
capacities
6-15
card view
2-22
see also cross-connect
turn-up
1-47
XCVT card
capacities
6-15
card view
2-22
see also cross-connect
turn-up
1-47
Cisco ONS 15454 Installation and Operations Guide
IN-18
November 2001