Owner`s manual | Cisco Systems 2950 Switch User Manual

Excel Series Owner's Manual
Thank You For Selecting True
In 1981, Frank Trulaske
launched True Fitness
Technology, Inc. and
began manufacturing
hand-crafted treadmills.
His team’s obsession with
quality has
propelled True to the top
of the industry
and has created
one of America’s oldest,
largest and most
respected
fitness equipment
manufacturers.
Intensive quality control
standards guarantee
excellence in every
phase of production,
resulting in the finest
products available in
the marketplace.
“Our original
goal was to build
the world’s best
treadmills, and
today we believe
we’re doing it!”
True treadmills are
consistently rated #1
for their smooth, quiet and
comfortable
performance.
True is rapidly becoming the
choice for workouts among
beginners, rehab patients
and top athletes world-wide.
Over the years, True has
-Frank Trulaske
designed, developed,
patented and fabricated
Today True offers a full line
many new and cuttingof treadmills, upright and
edge innovations for
recumbent bikes, elliptical
their products: including advanced
trainers, strength and flexibilty
features, manufacturing components
equipment. True is proud to
and technological breakthroughs.
“Deliver The Best!”
Review for Your Safety
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
When using this exercise machine, basic precautions should
always be followed, including the following:
Read and understand all instructions and warnings prior to use.
Obtain a medical exam before beginning any exercise program. If
at any time during exercise you feel faint, dizzy, or experience pain,
stop and consult your physician.
Obtain proper instruction prior to use.
Inspect the treadmill for incorrect, worn, or loose components and
do not use until corrected, replaced, or tightened prior to use.
Do not wear loose or dangling clothing while using the treadmill.
Care should be used when mounting or dismounting the treadmill.
Read, understand, and test the emergency stop procedures before
use.
Disconnect all power before servicing the treadmill.
Do not operate electrically powered treadmills in damp or wet
locations.
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Review for Your Safety
IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
Do not exceed maximum user weight of 300 lbs.
Keep the top side of the moving surface clean and dry.
Keep children and animals away.
This treadmill is intended for residential use only.
All exercise equipment is potentially hazardous. If attention is not
paid to the conditions of equipment usage, death or serious injury
could occur.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
3
Quick Start Guide
Quick Start into a manual workout by pressing
, or set up a
different workout by selecting a workout and adjusting settings if
keys, or numeric keys and press
necessary. Use My Wheel,
to accept each setting.
Before Your
Workout
You can keep tuning your workout setup by repeatedly pressing
to go to the next setting. Your workout starts only when you
press
.
Press
to begin your workout.
Adjust speed or incline at any time by using the dedicated speed
and incline keys on the control pod, or press
or
and use
My Wheel or numeric keys,
to accept your adjustment.
pressing
Change workouts during your workout by pressing a Quick
Workout key or the Pre-Set Workout key and pressing
.
Change data readouts by pressing
Pause your workout by pressing
4
.
.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
During Your
Workout
Table of Contents
Front Section
1 - Basic
Operation
2 - Heart
Rate Control
Workouts
page 2
page 9
page 23
3 - User Programs
4 - Gerkin
Fitness Test
5 - HRC Planner
page 33
page 37
page 41
6 - Audio and
Fan Accessories
7 - Designing an
Exercise Program
8 - Care and
Maintenance
page 45
page 49
page 57
Appendix A
Appendix B
Appendix C
page 65
page 69
page 73
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
5
Model Differences
Your new treadmill is part of the True Excel Series treadmills. Since
this owner’s guide covers all four Excel models, you might notice
descriptions of features that are different from your treadmill. The
main differences are in the consoles.
ES 5.0
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
6
Single-window LCD display
Touch-sensitive keys
My Wheel Controller
HRC Planner
SOFT Select
Main controls on balance bar pod
Cooling fans
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Model
Differences
Model Differences
ES 7.0
Adds to ES 5.0:
• Dual-window LCD display
• Audio system instead of fans
ES 9.0
Adds to ES 7.0:
• 3% decline
• Cooling fans
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
7
Starting And Stopping the Treadmill Safely
Place your feet on the straddle covers.
Starting And
Stopping
Your
Treadmill
Safely
Attach the safety lanyard to your waistband.
Place the safety key on the key holder.
Set up your workout (see Chapter 1) and press
.
Stop the treadmill by reducing speed to 2 mph, then press
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
.
chapter one
Basic Operation
In This Chapter:
My Wheel
Manual Operation Details
Quick Workouts
Quick Speed
Workout Time
Heart Rate Monitoring
Special Workouts
Classic Pre-Set Workouts
Actual Speed Display
Chapter 1: Basic Operation
Chapter 2: Heart Rate Control Workouts
Chapter 3: User Programs
Chapter 4: Gerkin Fitness Test
Chapter 5: HRC Planner
Chapter 6: Audio and Fan Accessories
Chapter 7: Designing an Exercise Program
Chapter 8: Care and Maintenance
9
Using the Keyboard
CHAPTER ONE:
BASIC OPERATION
Selecting Workouts: Press any of the workout keys and press to
begin your workout using the default settings. The Special
Workout keys have multiple choices under each key; press the key
multiple times to access the additional choices.
Before pressing
, you may adjust other settings like Workout
Time and Body Weight, pressing
after adjusting each setting.
Press
at any time to begin your workout. Note that HRC and
HRC Planner workouts require settings adjustments.
Adjusting Settings: Use the numeric keypad, the
keys, or My
Wheel (see next page) to adjust numeric settings. Press
to
accept each settings adjustment.
Control Pod / Primary Controls: During your workout, press
to stop the treadbelt and pause your workout. Press
to resume
your workout. Press and hold
to clear your workout.
Change Data Display: During your workout, press
the data displayed.
to change
Safety Lanyard: This magnetized cord must be in place on the
treadmill balance bar location, and should be attached to your
clothing. The treadmill will not operate if the lanyard is not
attached.
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Using the
Keyboard
My Wheel
CHAPTER ONE:
BASIC OPERATION
My Wheel My Wheel is typically used to adjust a numeric value.
Step 1. Press one of the four Settings Keys surrounding My
Wheel. The display will indicate the value and its current
setting, as in:
SPEED = 2.5
Step 2. Touch your finger anywhere on My Wheel, then drag
your finger clockwise to increase and counterclockwise to
decrease.
Step 3. Press
to accept your value change. If you do not
press enter within 3 seconds, the original value will remain
unchanged.
During Run Mode: Actions on My Wheel perform a change speed
press as usual.
function, requiring the confirming
Note: any values adjustable by My Wheel are also adjustable by the
numeric keys or the
keys.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
11
Manual & Quick Workouts
CHAPTER ONE:
BASIC OPERATION
Press Quick Start: Start the treadbelt at 0.5 mph at the default
workout time of 30 minutes.
Setting Time or Distance Targets: Enter your weight and press
. Now either enter a workout time and press
,
or press
to be prompted for a target distance.
Manual
Operation
Details
You can keep adjusting your workout setup by repeatedly pressing
. Your workout starts only when you press
.
: Press this single key to quickstart the treadmill to 3 mph.
: Press this single key to quickstart the treadmill into the
walk segment of Level 8 Speed Intervals, alternating between 2.2
mph and 5 mph in one-minute increments. See Special Workouts
and Speed Interval workout section for how to change these speeds.
: Quick Starts treadmill to 6 mph.
: Press the Cool Down key to exit your workout into a walk.
The cool-down speed at 0% grade is calculated to be 40% of your
average workout intensity or 2.5 mph, whichever is lower.
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Quick
Workouts
Other Settings and SOFT Select
CHAPTER ONE:
BASIC OPERATION
Quick Important: Quick speed keys change speed with a single key press,
Speed so take care in the keys you press.
Press
, lighting the enable LED. Now the numeric keys
function as speed change keys from 1 mph to 9 mph. Quickspeed
is functional in any workout except fitness tests and Heart Rate
Control.
Disable QuickSpeed by pressing
again.
key at any time to change your workout time from
Workout Press the
the
default
30
minutes.
Time
Body Weight During workout set up, set a correct body weight including clothes
so the treadmill can better estimate your calorie expenditure.
SOFT This features lets you adjust the softness of the running surface.
Select Move the lever on the right side of the treadmill from 1 (softest) to
8 (firmest).
SOFT Select is especially useful to accommodate users of different
weights or those with special physical needs.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
13
Heart Rate Monitoring
CHAPTER ONE:
BASIC OPERATION
This treadmill can monitor your heart rate using either the
chest strap provided with the treadmill or the metal grips on the
hand rails (called contact heart rate or CHR pads). A chest strap
transmits your heart rate to the treadmill via radio, and the CHR
pads connect to a special computer circuit to extract your heart
rate.
Monitoring
Your
Heart Rate
Although this treadmill functions fine without using the heart rate
monitoring feature, this kind of monitoring gives you valuable
feedback on your effort level. Chest strap monitoring also allows
you to use Heart Rate Control, the most advanced exercise control
system available.
When you wear a Polar® or compatible transmitter strap, the
treadmill will display your heart rate as a digital beats-per-minute
(bpm) readout.
The transmitter strap should be
worn directly against your skin,
about one inch below the pectoral
muscles/breast line (see picture).
Women should be careful to place
the transmitter below their bra line.
Some moisture is necessary between
the strap and your skin. Sweat
from your exercise works best, but
ordinary tap water may be used prior
to your workout if desired.
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Chest Strap
Heart Rate
Monitoring
Contact Heart Rate
CHAPTER ONE:
BASIC OPERATION
Contact The contact heart rate (CHR) system lets you monitor your heart
Heart Rate rate without wearing a strap.
(CHR)
Gently grasp the contact heart rate pads as shown.
When the system detects your hands, the Heart Rate label will start
flashing in time with your heart beat. During this time, the system is
analyzing and locking in your heart rate. Within about 15 seconds,
your digital heart rate in beats per minute (bpm) should be displayed.
Important: The CHR System should only be used at speeds of
4 mph or lower. Above this speed the CHR accuracy is unavoidably
unreliable due to large muscle movements.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
15
Contact Heart Rate
CHAPTER ONE:
BASIC OPERATION
1. Exercise with smooth body motions.
2. Breathe smoothly and regularly, and avoid talking. (Talking
will cause unrepresentative heart rate spikes of 5 to 10 bpm.)
3. Grip the pads lightly, not tightly.
4. Make sure your hands are clean, free of both dirt and hand
lotions.
5. See Appendix A for more details on Contact Heart Rate
monitoring.
When using a Heart Rate Control workout, it is best to use chest
strap monitoring. These workouts work best with the extra
accuracy gained from a chest-contact heart rate monitoring system.
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
For Best
CHR Results
Contact Heart Rate
CHAPTER ONE:
BASIC OPERATION
A Note on CHR Accuracy
CHR monitoring may be a bit less accurate than a
chest strap, since the heart rate signals are much
stronger at the chest.
About 5% of the population cannot be picked up
by any CHR system. This is because their heart is
positioned in a more up-and-down manner in their
chest, as opposed to leaning over to one side.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
17
Special Workouts
CHAPTER ONE:
BASIC OPERATION
Each workout has a four-minute warm up and a two-minute cool
down. Speed or grade changes stay in effect until the next change
is requested by the program. Changing the default workout time
adds or removes segments; it does not stretch or compress the
workout profile.
Pre-Set
Workouts
Change workout levels during your workout by pressing the
key, adjusting the numeric level, then pressing
.
Change to a new pre-set workout during your workout by
key repeatedly and pressing
at your
pressing the
desired workout.
In a walking workout, all speeds are under 4 mph. Increasing
Walking:
levels increases speed from 2 to 4 mph and grade from 4% to 10%; Calorie Burn
speed and grade stay constant in the work section. Speed or grade
changes in the work section are permanent
Changes in Grade
Walking intervals with grade alternate between hills and nearly
flat in two-minute segments. Speed changes are permanent; grade
changes affect the current two-minute segment only.
Changes in Grade
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Walking:
Hill Intervals
RIDING
Special Workouts
CHAPTER ONE:
BASIC OPERATION
Walking and Zero-grade walking or running intervals are in one-minute
Running: segments. Grade changes are permanent; speed changes affect the
Speed current one-minute segment only.
Intervals
Changes in Speed
Walking and Zero-grade gradually increases speed then decreases speed,
Running: changing once per minute. Grade changes are permanent; speed
Speed Ramp changes affect the current one-minute segment only.
Changes in Speed
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
19
Classic Pre-Set Workouts
CHAPTER ONE:
BASIC OPERATION
These are True’s original four pre-set workouts. Changing the
workout time stretches and compresses the workout profile, in
contrast to the four new pre-set workouts. Other differences are
explained below in the individual workout sections.
Incline changes in varying amounts; the new Hills workout has
hills of the same size all throughout the workout.
Glute Buster
Very similar to Hill Intervals, with varying incline changes.
Leg Shaper
Similar to Speed Ramp, except both speed and grade change.
Cardio
Challenge
= Incline
= Speed
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Classic Pre-Set Workouts
CHAPTER ONE:
BASIC OPERATION
Speed Different from Speed Intervals 1 with the speed changing in
Intervals 2 varying amounts.
Actual Speed When the treadmill is changing to a new target speed, the matrix
Display display readout will display the actual speed. As the speed is
changing, the message center will display
TARGET = 12.0 MPH
Once the treadmill reaches the new target speed, the Speed
readout will show the target speed.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
21
chapter two
Heart Rate Control
Workouts
In This Chapter:
HRC Workout Introduction
Four Kinds of Heart Rate Control Workouts
The Easy Steps to a Heart Rate Control Workout
More Details on Interval HRC
Tips on the Warm Up Stage
How the HRC System Controls Your Heart Rate
Examples of HRC Workouts
Cruise Control
Examples of Walking Workouts
Examples of Running Workouts
Important Points About
Chapter 1: Basic Operation
Chapter 2: Heart Rate Control Workouts
Chapter 3: User Programs
Chapter 4: Gerkin Fitness Test
Chapter 5: HRC Planner
Chapter 6: Audio and Fan Accessories
Chapter 7: Designing an Exercise Program
Chapter 8: Care and Maintenance
HRC
HRC Safety Features
23
HRC Introduction
CHAPTER TWO: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
True’s heart rate control (HRC) workouts let the treadmill monitor
your relative exercise intensity by way of your heart rate, then
automatically adjust the workload to keep you at your target heart
rate and thus your desired exercise intensity.
Your heart rate is a good measure of your body’s exercise stress
level. It reflects differences in your physical condition, how tired
you are, the comfort of the workout environment, even your diet
and emotional state. Using heart rate to control workload takes the
guesswork out of your workout settings.
Consult your physician before using heart rate
controlled workouts for advice on selecting a target
heart rate range. Also, it is important to use the
treadmill for several workouts in the manual mode
while monitoring your heart rate. Compare your
heart rate with how you feel to ensure your safety and comfort.
See Appendix A for a chart that may help you pick a target heart
rate.
You need to wear a heart rate monitoring chest strap to use heart
rate control. See the “Monitoring Your Heart Rate” section in
Chapter 1 for a guide to proper usage. It is not recommended
that you use the contact heart rate system for heart rate control
workouts.
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
HRC
Workout
Introduction
HRC Types and a Workout Quick-Guide
CHAPTER TWO: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
Four Basic
Kinds of
Heart Rate
Control
Workouts
Various types of Heart Rate Control (HRC) are available on Excel
Series treadmills. This section may describe some types of HRC
that your treadmill does not have.
Time-based constant HRC: pick a target heart rate and exercise for
an amount of time you select.
Cruise Control: while in any workout, set your current heart rate
as your target heart rate by pressing a single key.
Interval heart rate training: the treadmill alternates work intervals
at your selected target heart rate with rest intervals that are at ½
workload. You set the length of both intervals.
Distance-based HRC (ES 7.0 and ES 9.0 only): set a target heart
rate and select one of four distances, just like running a road
course: 2 miles, 4 miles, 5 kilometers, or 10 kilometers.
The Easy
Steps to a
Heart Rate
Control
Workout
1 - Put on a Polar® or compatible transmitter chest
strap as described in section Chapter 1.
2 - Press the
key until you reach your desired
workout, then press
.
3 - Enter your workout parameters. This includes target
heart rate, maximum treadbelt speed, workout time
or distance, and maximum incline. If you are using
Interval HRC, pick your interval durations, too.
.
4 - Press
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
25
Choices During Workout Setup
CHAPTER TWO: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
5 - Warm up. At the beginning of an HRC workout, the
treadmill is in full Manual Control mode. Gradually
increase your work level to slowly raise your heart
rate to within 10 beats per minute (bpm) of your
target heart rate.
6 - Heart rate control stage. Now the treadmill takes
control of speed and incline, keeping your heart rate
within a few bpm of your target. If you are using
interval HRC, the treadmill alternates between work
and rest intervals.
7 - Cool-down. At the end of your workout time or
distance, the treadmill reduces workload by half and
goes back into Manual Control mode, where you
directly control your cool-down.
• Your treadmill can remember more than one workout
setup for a heart rate control workout. The ES 5.0 has
five target and two interval HRC setups; and the ES
7.0 and ES 9.0 have 5 target, 5 interval, and 4 distancebased HRC setups. It stores each set of workout
parameters under numbered workouts, for example,
"Target HR 1," "Target HR 2," "Interval HRC 1," etc.
You can select these in later workouts so you don't
have to re-enter your workout parameters, which tend
to stay the same from workout to workout.
• During workout setup, if you keep pressing
,
you will continue to scroll through the workout setup
at any time to accept
parameters. You can press
the current parameters and begin your workout.
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
During
Workout
Setup
During Your Workout
CHAPTER TWO: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
During Your
Workout
• Pressing any key other than
mode.
or
will exit HRC
• Adjust your target heart rate at any time during your
workout by pressing
, using the
keys as
needed, and pressing
again. If you are lowering
your target, you are limited to a 5 bpm change.
• The time and distance accumulated during warm up
are not counted against your selected workout time or
distance; those values start at zero when the treadmill
reaches heart rate control mode. This time and
distance are accumulated into the workout summary
data, as is your cooldown exercise.
More Details
on Interval
HRC
• Interval HRC works just like constant heart rate
control up through the first work interval.
• When your workout reaches your first rest interval,
your workload is reduced by half, and kept at this rate
throughout the rest interval.
• The next work interval is initially set at an average of
the workloads in the previous work interval.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
27
Tips and How HRC Works
CHAPTER TWO: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
Increase speed and incline gradually to slowly increase your heart
rate to within 10 bpm of your target. For best results, you should
take about five minutes to get to that point.
Tips on the
Warm Up
Stage
The treadmill operates in a manual control mode during the warmup stage. You control both speed and incline. You may only increase
speed and incline to the preset maximum values entered.
It is important that you start at a low level of effort and gradually
increase your work load over several minutes until you approach
your target heart rate. This allows your body to adapt to your
workout. Increasing work load gradually will allow you to enter the
heart rate control stage without overshooting your target.
Warming up too fast may cause you to overshoot your target. If this
occurs, it may take several minutes before the computer software
can control your heart rate. You may overshoot and undershoot
your target for several minutes until stable control is achieved.
To raise your heart rate in HRC mode, speed will always increase
until maximum speed is attained, followed by incline (if incline is
used in the workout).
To lower your heart rate in the HRC mode, incline will always
decrease until zero incline is reached, followed by speed (if incline
is used in the workout).
Speed changes are in 0.1 mph increments. Incline changes are in
0.5% incline increments. This is equal to between 0.10 and 0.15
METs.
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
How the
HRC System
Controls
your Heart
Rate
Examples and Cruise Control
CHAPTER TWO: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
Examples of
HRC
Workouts
1 - A user who physically cannot walk over 2.5 mph
can safely use heart rate control by entering
maximum speed of 2.5 in an HRC workout.
2 - A runner can run up to a speed of 10 mph, without
hills, by entering a maximum speed of 10 mph and
a maximum incline of 0%.
3 - A walker enters a maximum speed of 4.0 mph and
a maximum incline of 6%. The walker is limited to
a maximum speed of 4.0 mph and incline will be
used if required to elevate the heart rate up to a
maximum of 6%.
Cruise This is the simplest way to enter target heart rate training. While
Control in manual or any program you can enter Target Heart Rate
Control by simply pressing the
will be set as the target.
key. Your current heart rate
For best results, you should be at least five minutes into your
workout and warmed up. This will allow Cruise Control to more
accurately control your heart rate.
Remember, you must be wearing a chest strap, and your heart rate
should be displayed in the Heart Rate window.
To change your target heart rate press
. Edit the target
using
and press
. If you are lowering your target, you
are limited to a 5 bpm change. It is important to note that if you
are raising your target, the speed and grade change safety limits
(described next) may prevent the treadmill from raising your heart
rate to your desired new target.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
29
More Examples
CHAPTER TWO: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
If you enter the HRC stage below 5 mph, the speed you enter will
be the maximum speed of your workout. If you like to walk at a
maximum speed of 3.8 mph, you should enter HRC at 3.8 mph.
How Cruise
Control
Determines
How to
If you enter the HRC stage above 5 mph, you will have an additional Change Your
1 mph of speed. If you enter HRC at 6 mph, your maximum
Exercise
attainable speed in the HRC stage will be 7 mph.
Intensity
If at any time you enter the HRC stage with incline, you will have an
additional 4% of incline available in the HRC stage. If you enter the
HRC stage at 1% incline, your maximum attainable incline will be
5%.
If you do not enter the HRC stage with incline, no incline will be
available during the HRC stage of your workout. Only speed will be
used to control your heart rate.
1 - Enter HRC at 3.5 mph and 4% incline to allow a
maximum speed of 3.5 mph and 8% incline.
2 - Enter HRC at 4.2 mph and 6% incline to allow a
maximum speed of 4.2 mph and 10% incline.
1 - Enter HRC at 6 mph and 0% incline to allow a
maximum of 7 mph and 0% incline.
2 - Enter HRC at 5 mph and 2% incline to allow a
maximum of 6 mph and 6% incline.
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Examples
of Walking
Workouts
Using Cruise
Control
Examples
of Running
Workouts
Using Cruise
Control
Important Points About HRC
CHAPTER TWO: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
Important
Points
About Heart
Rate Control
The heart rate monitor transmitter strap provided with your
treadmill should be worn directly against your skin at about one
inch below the pectoral muscles/breast line. Women should be
careful to place the transmitter below their bra line.
Some moisture is necessary between the strap and your skin. Sweat
from your exercise works best, but ordinary tap water may be used
prior to your workout if desired.
If the transmitter strap is adjusted or moved while exercising,
communication may be temporarily affected.
If communication is lost for 30 seconds, the treadmill will
automatically shut off.
The transmitter strap sends a low-level radio signal to the treadmill,
so interference from other radio and sound waves (including
everything from cordless telephones to loudspeakers) is possible.
The good news is that interference is usually quite brief. If you
continue to have intermittent heart rate display problems, consult
your local service technician, as the transmitter strap batteries may
be low.
Make sure you breath smoothly and regularly.
Talking during your workout usually causes heart rate spikes of five
beats per minute or more, so avoid talking as much as possible.
Maintain a smooth walking or running motion.
A grounded outlet is critical for the HRC system to
function properly. Use a dedicated 110 VAC, grounded
outlet to help prevent interference.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
31
HRC Safety
CHAPTER TWO: HEART RATE CONTROL WORKOUTS
Two users wearing the same kind of transmitter at the same time
and in close proximity may cause false heart rate display readings.
Technical
Tips
Use only the transmitter provided with your True HRC Treadmill
or a Polar® brand standard transmitter.
True's Heart Rate Control is patented under USPTO #5,462,504.
If your heart rate exceeds your target by 12 beats, there will be a
30% MET reduction in workload to reduce your heart rate.
If your heart rate exceeds your target by 20 beats, the unit will
automatically shut off as a precautionary measure. (Be cautious
when selecting your target heart rate so the 20 beat variance
will not exceed your maximum heart rate as determined by your
physician).
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E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Heart Rate
Control
Safety
Features
chapter three
User Programs
In This Chapter:
How to Record and Run User Programs
Chapter 1: Basic Operation
Chapter 2: Heart Rate Control Workouts
Chapter 3: User Programs
Chapter 4: Gerkin Fitness Test
Chapter 5: HRC Planner
Chapter 6: Audio and Fan Accessories
Chapter 7: Designing an Exercise Program
Chapter 8: Care and Maintenance
33
How to Record and Run User Programs
CHAPTER THREE: USER PROGRAMS
How To During a manually-controlled workout, the Excel Series treadmills
Record And always "records" the changes you make in speed or incline. The ES
Run User 5.0, ES 7.0 and ES 8.0 can save up to three User Programs
Programs
Note that this workout recording only takes place when you use the
default manual mode settings; you cannot choose a target workout
time or distance. Time must count up during your workout in order
to be recorded.
Up to 36 changes in speed or incline can be recorded. Each speed/
incline pair of changes must be separated by at least 30 seconds.
To save a manual workout, press
as you normally would to end
your workout. Now press and hold
until the display shows
Save User 1.
You can save your workout in User 1, or press
to select User 2 or
User 3. Press and hold
to save the workout program you have
selected.
To use a User Program that you have saved, simply select it from the
list of programs as described in "Pre-Set Program Operation" in the
previous section.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
35
chapter four
Gerkin Fitness Test
In This Chapter:
How to Determine Your Fitness Level
Using the Gerkin Fitness Test
Chapter 1: Basic Operation
Chapter 2: Heart Rate Control Workouts
Chapter 3: User Programs
Chapter 4: Gerkin Fitness Test
Chapter 5: HRC Planner
Chapter 6: Audio and Fan Accessories
Chapter 7: Designing an Exercise Program
Chapter 8: Care and Maintenance
37
Gerkin Fitness Test
CHAPTER FOUR: GERKIN FITNESS TEST
One way to measure your overall fitness is to take a Gerkin fitness
test. Named after the Arizona researcher who designed this test,
this submaximal treadmill test (submaximal means you work below
maximum effort) is used to predict VO2 max: the volume of oxygen
you can consume while exercising at your maximum capacity. This
particular test has gained great popularity in the firefighter and law
enforcement community. Like most fitness tests, it is classified as
a graded exercise test (GXT). The test is stopped at the point your
heart rate reaches 85% of your age-predicted maximum.
Select the Gerkin test under the Advanced Options key. Enter your
age, which is used to calculate your test termination point.
The Gerkin protocol starts
at 4.5 miles per hour at a
0% incline. It then increases
speed or incline every 60
seconds. For example, at the
seven-minute mark, the speed
increases to 6 miles per hour
while the incline raises to 8%.
When your heart rate reaches
85% of your age-predicted
maximum, the test waits for
your heart rate to exceed the
target for 15 seconds, then
terminates the test.
38
The version of the Gerkin
Protocol that True Fitness
uses in its exercise machines
is the new equation of
205.8 – 0.685*age. To better
understand why we selected
this method over the outdated
“220 – age” maximal heart
rate equation, you can review
the scientific paper in Journal
of Exercise Physiology, a PDF
document located at http://
www.asep.org/Documents/
Robergs2.pdf.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Using the
Gerkin Test
Accuracy of the Gerkin Test
CHAPTER FOUR: GERKIN FITNESS TEST
Accuracy of The scientific journal, Occupational Medicine, published a study in
the Gerkin 2004 on the accuracy of the Gerkin test. The conclusion:
Test
“The Gerkin treadmill protocol overpredicts VO2max in healthy
men and women and, therefore, should not be used for predicting
VO2max in individual firefighters, particularly if VO2max is a
criterion for inclusion or exclusion from duty. At this time, a valid
treadmill running test is needed for predicting the VO2max value of
individual firefighters.”
However, for the fitness enthusiast who is interested in monitoring
their fitness level, the Gerkin test can be used to measure progress
over time.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
39
chapter five
HRC Planner
In This Chapter:
What HRC Planner Is
HRC Planner Setup
Workout Suggestion
Maintenance Workout
Chapter 1: Basic Operation
Chapter 2: Heart Rate Control Workouts
Chapter 3: User Programs
Chapter 4: Gerkin Fitness Test
Chapter 5: HRC Planner
Chapter 6: Audio and Fan Accessories
Chapter 7: Designing an Exercise Program
Chapter 8: Care and Maintenance
41
What HRC Planner Is
CHAPTER FIVE: HRC PLANNER
HRC Planner creates a 21- to 24-week training program with
a progressive increase in workout intensity and duration. This
program is based on a few simple parameters from you, the user,
including: age, resting heart rate, current activity level, and fitness
goal.
What HRC
Planner Is
HRC Planner workouts typically range from 15 minutes at the
beginning of a training program to 40 minutes by week 21.
If you are a new user, you will be asked a few personal questions:
age, resting heart rate, current activity level, and fitness goal.
How to measure your resting heart rate: in general, sit very still,
gentle breathing, no distractions, and no talking. Best results come
first thing in the morning, with no food or caffeine intake for at
least three hours. Measure with your fingers against well-known
pulse points like your wrist or your neck, and count for at least 30
seconds, then convert to a beats-per-minute number.
Current activity level: choose from not active, moderately active
(20 – 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity per week), and
very active (more than 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity
per week). See workout suggestion section for how this selection
affects your training program as follows:
If you chose “inactive” as your current activity level, the training
program will be a 24-week program recommending three workout
days per week for the first three weeks, four days per week for the
next 13 weeks, and five days per week for the final eight weeks,
followed by a four-day-per-week maintenance program.
If you chose “moderately active” or “very active” as your current
activity level, the training program will be a 21-week program
recommending four days per week for the first 13 weeks, and five
days per week for the final eight weeks, followed by a four-day-perweek maintenance program.
42
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
HRC Planner
Setup
Workout Suggestion
CHAPTER FIVE: HRC PLANNER
Fitness goal: choose from easy improvement, moderate
improvement, or aggressive improvement.
Creating the Training Program: HRC Planner now creates and
saves your entire training program.
HRC Planner does not keep track of how often you actually work
out. If you train less often than suggested, your training program
will require more total weeks.
Workout Workout Suggestion: Each time you select HRC Planner after you
Suggestion have created your training program, HRC Planner suggests your
next workout, recommending a target heart rate and a workout
length.
Adjusting the suggestion: You may choose the suggested workout,
or you may skip “back” to an easier workout, or even skip “forward”
to a more challenging workout. HRC Planner remembers the last
workout you complete, and resets its internal pointer to that spot.
The next suggested workout is always the workout after the last
workout you completed, as determined by the 24-week training
program.
Workouts Stay the Same for a Week: HRC Planner generates
workouts to be the same for a week, so you will notice workouts are
the same three to five in a row.
Using HRC for each workout: Since all HRC Planner workouts are
heart rate controlled workouts, you set up each workout just like
you do a normal True HRC workout. HRC Planner will suggest
settings for your maximum speed and grade, but you may adjust
these. Like any True HRC workout, HRC Planner remembers your
HRC parameters for your next workout, and you may leave them
the same or readjust them.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
43
chapter six
Audio and Fan
Accessories
In This Chapter:
Fans on ES 5.0
Audio System on ES 7.0 and ES 9.0
Chapter 1: Basic Operation
Chapter 2: Heart Rate Control Workouts
Chapter 3: User Programs
Chapter 4: Gerkin Fitness Test
Chapter 5: HRC Planner
Chapter 6: Audio and Fan Accessories
Chapter 7: Designing an Exercise Program
Chapter 8: Care and Maintenance
45
Fans on ES 5.0
CHAPTER SIX: AUDIO AND FAN ACCESSORIES
Fans on The fans have two speeds plus off. The default is low speed.
ES 5.0 &
ES 9.0
Audio System This system can connect to any iPod™ with a dock connector. It
on ES 7.0 and can also connect to a generic music player through the player’s
ES 9.0 headphone jack.
iPod™ Connector
Generic mp3 or music
player connector
Set your music player’s volume to a medium setting, then use the
treadmill’s volume keys to control the speaker volume.
CAUTION: Do not connect your music player while the
treadbelt is moving due to risk of static shock damaging electrical
components. Make sure the treadbelt is stopped and your feet are
on the straddle covers before you connect your music player.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
47
chapter seven
Designing an
Exercise Program
In This Chapter:
What is the F.I.T. Concept?
Using the F.I.T. Concept
Your Fitness Program
Determining Your Needs
Beginning Your Exercise Program
Establishing and Maintaining Aerobic Fitness
Managing Weight
Sports Training
Chapter 1: Basic Operation
Chapter 2: Heart Rate Control Workouts
Chapter 3: User Programs
Chapter 4: Gerkin Fitness Test
Chapter 5: HRC Planner
Chapter 6: Audio and Fan Accessories
Chapter 7: Designing an Exercise Program
Chapter 8: Care and Maintenance
49
The F.I.T. Concept Defined
CHAPTER SEVEN: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
The workout portion of your exercise program consists of three
major variables: Frequency, Intensity, and Time.
Frequency: How Often You Exercise
You should exercise three to five times a week to improve your
cardiovascular and muscle fitness. Improvements are significantly
smaller with less frequent exercise.
Intensity: How Hard You Exercise
Intensity of exercise is reflected in your heart rate. Exercise must be
sufficiently rigorous to strengthen your heart muscle and condition
your cardiovascular system. Only your doctor can prescribe the
target training heart range appropriate for your particular needs
and physical condition.
Start with exercise that stimulates you to breathe more deeply.
Alternate days of moderate and easy exercise to help your body
adapt to new levels of exertion without unnecessary strain.
If you are just beginning an exercise program, you may be most
comfortable walking at a speed of 1-2 mph. As you use your
treadmill regularly, higher speeds may be more comfortable and
more effective.
Inability to maintain a smooth, rhythmic motion suggests that your
speed and/or elevation may be too great.
If you feel out of breath before you have exercised 12 minutes, you
are probably exercising too hard.
50
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
What is
the F.I.T.
Concept?
More F.I.T. Concept Overview
CHAPTER SEVEN: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
As your fitness level improves, you will need to increase your
workout intensity in order to reach your target heart rate. The
first increase may be necessary after two to four weeks of regular
exercise. Never exceed your target heart rate zone. Increase the
speed and/or incline on the treadmill to raise your heart rate to the
level recommended by your doctor. The incline feature can be used
to greatly increase the workload without increasing speed.
METs
One MET is the amount of energy your body uses when you're
resting. If a physical activity has an equivalent of 6 METs, its energy
demands are 6 times that of your resting state. The MET is a useful
measurement because it accounts for differences in body weight.
See Appendix C for more details.
Time: How Long You Exercise
Sustained exercise conditions your heart, lungs, and muscles. The
longer you are able to sustain exercise within your target heart
range, the greater the aerobic benefits.
To begin, maintain two to three minutes of steady, rhythmic
exercise and then check your heart rate.
The initial goal for aerobic training is 12 continuous minutes.
Increase your workout time approximately one or two minutes per
week until you are able to maintain 20-30 continuous minutes at
your training heart rate.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
51
Utilizing the F.I.T. Concept
CHAPTER SEVEN: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
The F.I.T. concept and chart are designed to help you begin a
program tailored to your needs. You may wish to keep an exercise
log to monitor your progress.
Using the
F.I.T. Concept
You can get valuable fitness benefits from your True Treadmill.
Your Fitness
Using the treadmill regularly may increase the ability of your heart Program
and lungs to supply oxygen and nutrients to exercising muscles
over an extended period of time. The treadmill will also help you
develop added muscle endurance and balanced strength throughout
your body.
Calculate your maximum heart rate as a first step in developing
Determining
your fitness program. The formula to calculate average maximum
Your Needs
heart rate for one minute is 220 beats per minute minus your age.
To find your pulse, locate a vein on your neck or inside your wrist,
then count beats for ten seconds, then multiply by six. (See chart in
Appendix A.)
It's also important to know your target training zone or target
heart rate. The American Heart Association (AHA) defines target
heart rate as 60-75 percent of your maximum heart rate. This is
high enough to condition, but well within safe limits. The AHA
recommends that you aim for the lower part of the target zone (60
percent) during the first few months of your exercise program. As
you gradually progress you can increase your target to 75 percent.
According to the AHA, "Exercise above 75 percent of the maximum
heart rate may be too strenuous unless you are in excellent physical
condition. Exercise below 60 percent gives your heart and lungs
little conditioning."
52
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Beginning Your F.I.T. Program
CHAPTER SEVEN: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
In addition to monitoring your heart rate as you exercise, be certain
of how quickly your heart rate recovers. If your heart rate is over
120 beats per minute five minutes after exercising, or is higher than
normal the morning after exercising, your exertion may be too
strenuous for your current level of fitness. Reducing the intensity of
your workout is recommended.
The age-adjusted target heart rates indicated in the chart in
Appendix A reflect averages. A variety of factors (including
medication, emotional state, temperature, and other conditions) can
affect the exercise heart rate appropriate for you.
Warning: Consult your doctor to establish the exercise
intensity (target heart rate zone) appropriate for your age and
condition before beginning any exercise program.
Warm-Up: Slow and Deliberate Exercise
Beginning You are not warmed up until you begin to perspire lightly and
Your Exercise breath more deeply. Warming up prepares your heart and other
Program muscles for more intense exercise and helps you avoid premature
exhaustion. Begin each workout by walking even if you plan to run.
Start slowly, exploring different speeds until you can comfortably
sustain your speed.
A good suggestion is a minimum of three minutes. Perspiration on
your brow is a good indicator of a thorough warm-up. The older
you are, the longer your warm-up period should be.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
53
Your F.I.T. Program Continued
CHAPTER SEVEN: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
Workout: Brisk and Rhythmic Exercise
The workout trains and conditions your heart, lungs, and muscles
to operate more efficiently. Increase exercise in response to your
heart rate to train and strengthen your cardiovascular system.
Concentrate on moving your arms and legs smoothly. Walk
naturally and avoid jerking motions that can cause pulled muscles,
sprained joints, and loss of balance.
Cool-Down: Slow and Relaxed Exercise
Cooling down relaxes your muscles and gradually lowers your heart
rate. Slowly reduce your workload until your heart rate is below 60
percent of your maximum heart rate. The cool down should last
at least five minutes, followed by some light stretching to enhance
your flexibility.
Beginning a Fitness Program
If you cannot sustain 12 continuous minutes in your target heart
rate zone, exercise several times a day to get into the habit of
exercising.
Try to reach and maintain 60-65 percent of your maximum heart
rate. Alternate exercise with periods of rest until you can sustain 12
continuous minutes of exercise at 60-65 percent of your maximum
heart rate.
Begin exercising in three to five minute sessions.
54
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Establishing and Maintaining Fitness
CHAPTER SEVEN: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
Establishing If you can sustain 12 but not 20 continuous minutes of
Aerobic exercise in your target heart rate zone:
Fitness
Exercise three to five days a week.
Rest at least two days per week.
Maintaining Try to reach and maintain 60-75 percent of your maximum heart
Aerobic rate with moderate rhythmic exercise.
Fitness
Begin with 12 continuous minutes. Increase your time by one to
two minutes per week until you can sustain 20 continuous minutes.
Managing If you can sustain 20 continuous minutes in your target heart rate
Weight zone, begin to increase the length and intensity of your workout:
Exercise four to six days a week or on alternate days.
Try to reach and maintain 70-85 percent of your maximum heart
rate with moderate to somewhat hard exercise.
Exercise for 20-30 minutes.
Consistent aerobic exercise will help you change your body
composition by lowering your percentage of body fat. If weight loss
is a goal, combine an increase in the length of your workouts with
a moderate decrease in caloric intake. For weight control, how long
and how often you exercise is more important than how hard you
exercise.
Exercise four to five times a week.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
55
Weight and Sports Training Programs
CHAPTER SEVEN: DESIGNING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM
Try to reach and maintain 60-75 percent of your maximum heart
rate with moderate exercise.
Exercise for 30-45 minutes at 60-65 percent of your target heart
rate.
Here are some tips to achieving your weight management goal:
Consume most of your dietary calories at breakfast and lunch, and
eat a light dinner. Do not eat close to bedtime.
Exercise before meals. Moderate exercise will help suppress your
appetite.
Take exercise breaks throughout the day to help increase
metabolism (calorie expenditure).
When you are training to improve strength and performance:
Exercise four to five days a week. Alternate exercise days and
intervals of hard to very hard exercise with easy to moderate
exercise.
Exercise for 30 minutes or longer.
Warning: these strategies are intended for average healthy adults.
If you have pain or tightness in your chest, an irregular heartbeat,
shortness of breath or if you feel faint or have any discomfort
when you exercise, stop! Consult your physician before continuing.
Remember, every workout should begin with a warm-up and finish
with a cool-down.
56
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Sports
Training
chapter eight
Care and
Maintenance
In This Chapter:
Treadbelt Lubrication
Regular Cleaning
Treadbelt Adjustment
Treadbelt Tension
Chapter 1: Basic Operation
Chapter 2: Heart Rate Control Workouts
Chapter 3: User Programs
Chapter 4: Gerkin Fitness Test
Chapter 5: HRC Planner
Chapter 6: Audio and Fan Accessories
Chapter 7: Designing an Exercise Program
Chapter 8: Care and Maintenance
57
Lubrication and Cleaning
CHAPTER EIGHT: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Your True treadmill is constructed of quality materials and
manufactured to provide many years of faithful service. Simple
routine cleaning and a preventive maintenance program will extend
the life of your treadmill.
To prevent electrical shock, be certain the treadmill is turned off
and unplugged from the electrical outlet before performing any
cleaning or routine maintenance.
For average use of your treadmill, True recommends you lubricate
under the treadbelt once per year. For heavy use, which is more
than 10 hours per week, True recommends lubricating every six
months.
Treadbelt
Lubrication
Please contact your dealer to obtain the proper lubricants.
Daily: Perspiration should be wiped from the control console and
treadmill surfaces after your workout.
Weekly: You should wipe down your treadmill once a week with a
water dampened, soft cloth. Be careful not to get excessive moisture
between the edge of the overlay panel and the console, as this might
create an electrical hazard or cause the electronics to fail.
Important: do not clean or wipe under the running belt.
Monthly: Clean dust and dirt that might accumulate under and
behind your treadmill once a month. Small rubber particles from
the soles of walking shoes will accumulate alongside the belt and
also behind the unit.
58
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Regular
Cleaning
Treadbelt Adjustment
CHAPTER EIGHT: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Expert Expert service and maintenance at a reasonable cost are available
Service through your factory-trained, authorized True dealer. The dealer
maintains a stock of repair and replacement parts and has the
technical knowledge to meet your service needs.
Your treadmill's running belt has been properly aligned at the
factory. However, when the treadmill is used on an uneven surface,
please follow these instructions:
Treadbelt
Adjustment
1 - Stand beside the treadmill, place the safety key onto
the control panel and follow operating instructions
for running the treadmill at 5 mph.
2 - If the belt is off-center to the right, turn the left
roller adjustment bolt counter clock-wise 1/4 turn.
If the belt is off-center to the left, turn the left roller
adjustment bolt 1/4 turn clockwise.
3 - Let the machine run for several minutes to check
the alignment. (Belt alignment does not need to
be perfect). If more correction is needed, turn the
adjustment bolt 1/4 turn and check again.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
59
Treadbelt Tension
CHAPTER EIGHT: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Turn both rear roller adjustment bolts counter-clockwise until
treadbelt just begins slipping when walking on it, then turn both
rear roller adjustment bolts clockwise in equal quarter turn
increments until treadbelt stops slipping.
Note: Be sure to run on treadbelt to ensure that the treadbelt does
not slip while under load.
60
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Treadbelt
Tension
Symptom/Solution Guide
CHAPTER EIGHT: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
SYMPTOM
Circuit breaker on
treadmill trips when
the power cord is
plugged into wall.
Circuit breaker on
treadmill trips when
inputting speed and
starting
CAUSE
SOLUTION
A. Damaged motor
Service required
B. Damage or defective
motor power supply
board
Service required
C. Damaged motor control
circuit board
Service required
D. Restricted belt or
Check and remove
obstruction or call dealer
flywheel
E. Treadbelt over tensioned
See adjustments in Assembly
Guide
A.
No power to treadmill
Restore power at electrical outlet
or reset circuit breaker if in “on/
off ” position.
B.
Circuit breaker trip
Reset Circuit Breaker
C.
Upper wire harness not
connected or
completely connected.
Service required
Incline Motor and
tread motor will not
turn on
Incline motor does
not operate but the
treadbelt moves
Scrambled digits on
computer LED’s
A.
Upper wire harness
damaged or not connected or
completely connected
Service required
Squeaking noise
from motor while
using the treadmill
Computer display
LED’s do not
illuminate.
A. Incline wire harness
damaged or not
connected
Service required
A. Damaged computer
board
Service required
B. Upper wire harness
damaged or partially
connected
Service required
A. Poly V-belt slipping
Service required
B. Motor brush noise
excessive
Service required
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
61
Symptom/Solution Guide
CHAPTER EIGHT: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
SYMPTOM
Treadbelt tracks left
to right
Treadmill trips
household
circuit breaker
Treadbelt feels
unsmooth, jerks
intermittently
62
CAUSE
SOLUTION
A. Uneven floor
Move treadmill to even
surface or level with shims. See
Adjustment section.
B. Rear roller not properly
adjusted
See Adjustment section.
A. Defective breaker
Replace breaker
B. Circuit too small
Use 20 amp circuit
C. Circuit over-loaded
Remove the other electrical
appliances on same circuit
D. May trip GFI circuit.
Have circuit checked by
electrician.
A. Object between belt
and deck
Remove object between
belt and deck
B. Object under belt
Remove object from under
belt
C. Loose tread motor
drive belt
Service required
D. Loose treadbelt tension
See Adjustment section.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
Error Codes
CHAPTER EIGHT: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Error Codes E1:INCLINE
Incline moving when not commanded to.
E1:RANGE
Difference between zero position and
maximum incline not sufficient.
E1:STALL
Incline not moving when commanded to.
E2:OVERSPEED
This error occurs when an acceleration of
greater than 2.1 mph occurs. Error cleared
by turning off power switch then turning
it back on.
E2:CAL
Treadmill cannot achieve target speed.
Re-calibrate treadmill.
E3:RECAL
This error occurs when a data error is
detected in the EEPROM. Replace the
control panel.
E4:KEY STK [stop] Caused by pressing and holding the stop
key for more than five seconds.
E5:SENSOR
This message is displayed when there is
no speed feedback.
All errors require service by a qualified technician. To clear the
error, turn power off and back on again.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
63
Service Messages
CHAPTER EIGHT: CARE AND MAINTENANCE
The following service messages will be displayed as they occur, as
well as for the subsequent six safety key insertions. These messages
will be displayed until a key is pressed. Every time these messages
are displayed, a tone will sound twice.
S1:LUBE
This message is displayed when lubrication of the
deck is recommended.
S2:CLEAN
This message is displayed every 500 miles. Prompt to
clean treadmill.
S3:MOTOR This message is displayed every 2500 hours. Prompt
to check motor brushes.
64
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
DiagnosticsService
Messages
appendix a
Target Heart Rate
Chart
A Guide to Help You Pick an Initial Target
Heart Rate
65
Remember to check with your physician before beginning any exercise program. He can help
determine an appropriate target heart rate. Medications often affect heart rate.
APPENDIX A - TARGET HEART RATE CHART
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
67
appendix b
METs Table
How Speed and Incline Affect Workload,
Expressed in METs
69
APPENDIX B - METS TABLE
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
71
appendix c
METs Explanation
and Formulas
The Metabolic Formulas Behind Energy
Expenditure Estimates
A Note About Calorie Expenditure
Calculations
73
APPENDIX C - METS EXPLANATION AND FORMULAS
METs As stated earlier, the MET is a unit of exercise measurement that
Explanation takes into account body weight. Since energy expenditure in a
and Formulas weight-bearing exercise such as running, walking, or stairclimbing
is directly proportional to body weight, the formulas to calculate
METs are a bit simpler than for, say, an exercise bike. For example,
7 mph running is always 11.7 METs, no matter who you are.
A MET is defined as 3.5 ml/min/kg of oxygen usage by the body,
where:
ml is milliliters, the actual measured volume of gaseous oxygen
min is minutes
kg is bodyweight in kilograms
This energy consumption rate corresponds to about 72 calories
per hour for a 150-pound person, which approximates the average
basal metabolic rate of the general population.
The best formulas for treadmill energy expenditure also use oxygen
usage by the body, or VO2. The two formulas are:
walking VO2 = (2.68 * speed) + (0.48 * speed * incline) + 3.5
running VO2 = (5.36 * speed) + (0.24 * speed * incline) + 3.5
To get METs, divide the result by 3.5.
(Noted exercise physiologist David Costill's speed constants for
walking and running are 3.06 and 4.86, respectively.)
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
75
APPENDIX C - CALORIE EXPENDITURE & CALCULATIONS
True treadmills use the calorie expenditure formula as described
in Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription from the
American College of Sports Medicine. This is the most
widely accepted formula for running and walking.
The ACSM guide says that running burns calories
twice as fast as walking, e.g., a 150-pound person
jogging at 5 mph requires 548 calories per hour, while
walking at 5 mph requires 274 per hour. See Appendix
C for more details.
(Other respected researchers such as David Costill think the ACSM
overstates the energy difference between running and walking.
Costill believes running requires 60% more energy than walking,
not 100% as calculated by the ACSM. Using the same example,
Costill's calculations result in 496 cal/hour for running 5 mph, with
313 cal/hour for walking 5 mph.)
One potential source of calorie estimate error is that the treadmill
doesn't know if you are running or walking, so it has to make some
assumptions. It assumes you are walking at 3 mph and slower,
and running at 5 mph and faster. Between those two speeds, the
treadmill combines the walking and running formulas to make its
best guess.
Variations in human exercise efficiency are another potential
source of error, with differences of plus or minus 10% common in
the population
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A Note About
Calorie
Expenditure
Calculations
bibliography
Bibliography
References and Selected Readings
77
BIBLIOGRAPHY
American College of Sports Medicine, ACSM's Guidelines for
Exercise Testing and Prescription. 6th edition. Philadelphia:
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2000.
Feynman, Richard P., The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Original
edition. Boston: Addison Wesley, 1970. ISBN: 0-201-02115-3.
Huszar, Robert J., Basic Dysrhythmias. Third Edition. St. Louis,
Missouri: Mosby, 2002.
McArdle, William D., Katch, Frank I., and Katch, Victor L.,
Exercise Physiology, 5th edition. Baltimore: Lippincott
Williams & Williams, 2001.
McMahon, Thomas A. and Bonner, John T., On Size and Life.
New York: W. H. Freeman, 1985. ISBN: 0-716-75000-7.
Pollack, Michael L., Gaesser, Glenn A., Butcher, Janus D., et al.
(1998) The recommended quantity and quality of exercise
for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory and muscular
fitness in healthy adults. (The ACSM Position Stand on
Fitness.) Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise,
30(6): 975-991.
URL:
<ipsapp006.lwwonline.com/content/getfile/2320/20/1050/
fulltext.htm>
Other ACSM position stands are found here:
<www.acsm-msse.org>
78
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
APPENDIX D - SPECIFICATIONS
Robergs, Robert A. and Landwehr, Roberto. (2002) The Surprising
History of the "HRmax = 220 - age" Equation. Journal of
Exercise Physiology, 5(2). ISSN 1097-9751.2
Article URL:
<http://www.asep.org/Documents/Robergs2.pdf>
Journal URL:
<http://www.asep.org/FLDR/JEPhome.htm>
Starr, Robert M. and Doyle, Jay D., 550 ZTX Owner’s Guide,
Colophon edition. O’Fallon: True Fitness Technologies, 2003.
Swain, David P. and Leutholtz, Brian C., Metabolic Calculations Simplified. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 1997.
Tufte, Edward R, Visual Explanations. Chesire, Connecticut:
Graphics Press, 1997.
Whitmore, Jack H. and Costill, David L., Physiology of Sport and
Exercise. 2nd edition. Champaign, Illinois: Human
Kinetics, 1999.
Whitt, Frank R. and Wilson, David G., Bicycling Science.
Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1982.
E X C E L S E R I E S O W N E R ’S G U I D E
79
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