Cisco Systems SPA9000 IP Phone User Manual

®
DSM250
NMEA 2000® Multi-function Color
Graphic Display
User’s Manual
Revision 1.4.16a
Copyright © 2013 Maretron, LLP All Rights Reserved
Maretron, LLP
9014 N. 23rd Ave #10
Phoenix, AZ 85021-7850
http://www.maretron.com
Maretron Manual Part #: M001301
Revision 1.4.16a
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DSM250 User’s Manual
Revision History
Rev.
1.0
1.4.2
1.4.8
1.4.13
1.4.16
1.4.16a
Page ii
Description
Original document.
Added sections on Alert and Anchor Watch and configuration of more devices.
Added prohibition of red Loctite threadlocking compound and cleaning agents
containing acetone
Added new J2K100 configuration capabilities
Added new ACM100 configuration capabilities
Added information on configuring IPG100
Added information on configuring GPS200
Added warning to not block vent port during installation
Added new DST110 configuration capabilities
Added description of Electrical Distribution control and monitoring
Added Fluid Flow category
Added Switch/Breaker display type
Added Engine->Trip Fuel Used parameter
Added Vessel Data Recorder monitoring
Added Airmar transducer configuration/calibration
Added DCR100 configuration
Added FFM100 configuration
Added FPM100 configuration
Added NBE100 configuration
Added VDR100 configuration
Updated Supported Display Types in Technical Specifications
Corrected Page Number Issue
Updated Received PGN List
Corrected Description of “DSM150 Running in Favorite Screens Mode” Figure
Added notes that zero re-trigger time on an alert will disable re-triggering
Revision 1.4.16a
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Table of Contents
1 2 3 4 General .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................................ 1 1.2 Firmware Revision ............................................................................................................. 1 1.3 DSM250 Features .............................................................................................................. 1 1.4 Quick Install........................................................................................................................ 1 Installation...................................................................................................................................... 2 2.1 Unpacking the Box ............................................................................................................. 2 2.2 Choosing a Mounting Location ........................................................................................... 2 2.3 Mounting the DSM250........................................................................................................ 2 2.3.1 Surface Mounting the DSM250 ..................................................................................... 2 2.3.2 Flush Mounting the DSM250 ........................................................................................ 3 2.3.3 Gimbal Mounting the DSM250 ...................................................................................... 4 2.4 Connecting the DSM250 .................................................................................................... 5 2.4.1 Checking the Connection .............................................................................................. 5 Operating the DSM250 .................................................................................................................. 6 3.1 Turning the DSM250 On .................................................................................................... 6 3.2 Turning the DSM250 Off .................................................................................................... 6 3.3 Keypad Essentials .............................................................................................................. 7 3.3.1 Navigating in a Menu .................................................................................................... 7 3.3.2 Choosing a Value from a List ........................................................................................ 8 3.3.3 Entering a Numeric Value ............................................................................................. 8 3.3.4 Entering a Textual Value............................................................................................... 8 Important Concepts ..................................................................................................................... 11 4.1 Favorite Screens .............................................................................................................. 11 4.2 Categories and Data Types.............................................................................................. 11 4.2.1 AC Bus........................................................................................................................ 12 4.2.2 AC Generator .............................................................................................................. 12 4.2.3 AC Utility ..................................................................................................................... 13 4.2.4 Anchor Watch ............................................................................................................. 14 4.2.5 DC............................................................................................................................... 14 4.2.6 Depth .......................................................................................................................... 14 4.2.7 Elec. Distribution ......................................................................................................... 14 4.2.8 Engine......................................................................................................................... 14 4.2.9 Environment ................................................................................................................ 16 4.2.10 Fluid Flow ................................................................................................................... 16 4.2.11 Fuel Management ....................................................................................................... 16 4.2.12 GPS ............................................................................................................................ 17 4.2.13 Heading ...................................................................................................................... 17 4.2.14 Humidity ...................................................................................................................... 17 4.2.15 Indicator ...................................................................................................................... 18 4.2.16 Navigation ................................................................................................................... 18 4.2.17 Rudder ........................................................................................................................ 18 4.2.18 Pressure/Vacuum ....................................................................................................... 18 4.2.19 Special Devices .......................................................................................................... 19 4.2.20 Speed ......................................................................................................................... 19 4.2.21 Tank ............................................................................................................................ 19 4.2.22 Temperature ............................................................................................................... 19 Revision 1.4.16a
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5 6 4.2.23 Time ............................................................................................................................ 19 4.2.24 Transmission .............................................................................................................. 20 4.2.25 VDR ............................................................................................................................ 20 4.2.26 Vessel ......................................................................................................................... 20 4.2.27 Wind............................................................................................................................ 20 4.3 Alerts ................................................................................................................................ 22 4.3.1 Alert Types .................................................................................................................. 22 4.3.2 Alert Terminology ........................................................................................................ 22 4.3.3 Alert Priority ................................................................................................................ 22 4.3.4 Vessel Alert Operating Modes .................................................................................... 22 4.3.5 Alert States ................................................................................................................. 23 4.3.6 Available Alert Classes ............................................................................................... 24 Operating Modes ......................................................................................................................... 25 5.1 Favorite screens modes ................................................................................................... 25 5.2 Menu Mode ...................................................................................................................... 26 5.2.1 Alert Setup Menu ........................................................................................................ 27 5.2.2 Alert Status ................................................................................................................. 27 5.2.3 Configuration Menu..................................................................................................... 27 5.2.4 Display Settings Menu ................................................................................................ 29 5.2.5 Favorite Screens Mode ............................................................................................... 36 5.2.6 Favorite Screens Setup Menu .................................................................................... 36 5.2.7 Units Menu .................................................................................................................. 40 Device Configuration ................................................................................................................... 44 6.1 Airmar Depth/Speed/Temperature Transducers .............................................................. 47 6.1.1 Advanced Configuration.............................................................................................. 47 6.1.2 Device Instance .......................................................................................................... 48 6.1.3 Installation Description ................................................................................................ 48 6.1.4 NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable ................................................................................ 48 6.1.5 Clear Speed Calibration .............................................................................................. 48 6.1.6 Speed Calibration ....................................................................................................... 49 6.1.7 Clear Temperature Offset ........................................................................................... 49 6.1.8 Temperature Calibration ............................................................................................. 50 6.1.9 Transducer Depth Offset............................................................................................. 50 6.1.10 Trip Log....................................................................................................................... 51 6.2 Bennett EP-30 (NMEA1) Trim Tabs Configuration ........................................................... 52 6.2.1 Trim Tabs Calibration.................................................................................................. 52 6.3 Maretron ACM100 Configuration ...................................................................................... 54 6.3.1 Advanced Configuration.............................................................................................. 54 6.3.2 AC Circuit Type ........................................................................................................... 57 6.3.3 AC Device Type .......................................................................................................... 57 6.3.4 Device Instance .......................................................................................................... 57 6.3.5 Label ........................................................................................................................... 57 6.3.6 Reset Total Energy Recorded ..................................................................................... 58 6.4 Maretron ALM100 Configuration ...................................................................................... 59 6.4.1 Advanced Configuration.............................................................................................. 59 6.4.2 Instance ...................................................................................................................... 60 6.4.3 Label ........................................................................................................................... 60 6.4.4 Test Annunciator ......................................................................................................... 61 Page iv
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6.5 Maretron DCM100 Configuration ..................................................................................... 62 6.5.1 Advanced Configuration.............................................................................................. 62 6.5.2 Current Sensor Zero Offset Calibration....................................................................... 64 6.5.3 DC Type...................................................................................................................... 65 6.5.4 Instance ...................................................................................................................... 67 6.5.5 Label ........................................................................................................................... 67 6.6 Maretron DCR100 Configuration ...................................................................................... 68 6.6.1 Advanced Configuration.............................................................................................. 68 6.6.2 Device Label ............................................................................................................... 70 6.6.3 Instance ...................................................................................................................... 70 6.6.4 Channel #1-#6 Configuration ...................................................................................... 70 6.7 Maretron DSM200 Configuration ...................................................................................... 72 6.7.1 Remote Device Selection ............................................................................................ 73 6.8 Maretron DSM150, DSM250 Configuration ...................................................................... 75 6.8.1 Remote Device Selection ............................................................................................ 75 6.8.2 Copy alarms settings from local display ...................................................................... 76 6.8.3 Copy device selection from local display .................................................................... 77 6.8.4 Copy display settings from local display ..................................................................... 78 6.8.5 Copy favorite settings from local display ..................................................................... 78 6.8.6 Copy DST100 calibrations from local display .............................................................. 79 6.8.7 Copy all settings from local display ............................................................................. 79 6.8.8 Label ........................................................................................................................... 80 6.8.9 Remote Device Selection ............................................................................................ 81 6.9 Maretron DST100 Configuration ...................................................................................... 82 6.9.1 Advanced Configuration.............................................................................................. 82 6.9.2 Clear Speed Calibration .............................................................................................. 83 6.9.3 Speed Calibration ....................................................................................................... 83 6.9.4 Transducer Depth Offset............................................................................................. 84 6.9.5 Trip Log....................................................................................................................... 84 6.10 Maretron DST110 Configuration ...................................................................................... 86 6.10.1 Advanced Configuration.............................................................................................. 86 6.10.2 Clear Speed Calibration .............................................................................................. 87 6.10.3 Speed Calibration ....................................................................................................... 88 6.10.4 Clear Temperature Offset ........................................................................................... 88 6.10.5 Temperature Calibration ............................................................................................. 89 6.10.6 Transducer Depth Offset............................................................................................. 89 6.10.7 Trip Log....................................................................................................................... 90 6.11 Maretron EMS100 Configuration ...................................................................................... 91 6.11.1 Engine Instance .......................................................................................................... 91 6.11.2 Boost Pressure Gauge Type ....................................................................................... 91 6.11.3 Boost Pressure Sender Type ...................................................................................... 92 6.11.4 Boost Pressure Sender Offset .................................................................................... 92 6.11.5 Drive Trim Gauge Type............................................................................................... 92 6.11.6 Drive Trim Sender Type .............................................................................................. 92 6.11.7 Drive Trim Sender Offset ............................................................................................ 93 6.11.8 Oil Pressure Gauge Type ........................................................................................... 93 6.11.9 Oil Pressure Sender Type ........................................................................................... 93 6.11.10 Oil Pressure Sender Offset ......................................................................................... 93 Revision 1.4.16a
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6.11.11 Water Temperature Gauge Type ................................................................................ 94 6.11.12 Water Temperature Sender Type ............................................................................... 94 6.11.13 Water Temperature Sender Offset .............................................................................. 94 6.11.14 Preset Engine Hours ................................................................................................... 94 6.11.15 Tachometer Flywheel Teeth ....................................................................................... 95 6.12 Maretron FFM100 Configuration ...................................................................................... 96 6.12.1 Advanced Configuration.............................................................................................. 96 6.12.2 Device Label ............................................................................................................... 98 6.12.3 Operating Mode .......................................................................................................... 98 6.12.4 Channel #0… .............................................................................................................. 98 6.12.5 Channel #1… ............................................................................................................ 103 6.13 Maretron FPM100 Configuration .................................................................................... 107 6.13.1 Advanced Configuration… ........................................................................................ 107 6.13.2 Channel #0-5 ............................................................................................................ 109 6.14 Maretron GPS100 Configuration .................................................................................... 116 6.14.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 117 6.14.2 Cold Start GPS ......................................................................................................... 121 6.14.3 GPS Mode Setting .................................................................................................... 121 6.14.4 Device Label ............................................................................................................. 122 6.14.5 SBAS (WAAS) Enable/Disable ................................................................................. 122 6.15 Maretron GPS200 Configuration .................................................................................... 124 6.15.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 124 6.15.2 Cold Start GPS ......................................................................................................... 126 6.15.3 Device Label ............................................................................................................. 126 6.15.4 SBAS (WAAS,EGNOS,MSAS) Enable/Disable ........................................................ 126 6.16 Maretron IPG100 Configuration ..................................................................................... 128 6.16.2 Device Label ............................................................................................................. 130 6.16.3 N2KServer Password................................................................................................ 130 6.16.4 DHCP........................................................................................................................ 131 6.16.5 IP Address ................................................................................................................ 131 6.16.6 Subnet Mask ............................................................................................................. 131 6.16.7 Default Gateway ....................................................................................................... 131 6.16.8 Default DNS .............................................................................................................. 131 6.17 Maretron J2K100 Configuration ..................................................................................... 132 6.17.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 132 6.17.2 Device Label ............................................................................................................. 134 6.17.3 NMEA 2000 Instance – Engine ................................................................................. 134 6.17.4 Transmission Instance .............................................................................................. 135 6.17.5 AC/Icemaker Instance............................................................................................... 136 6.17.6 J1939 Source Address Configuration ....................................................................... 136 6.17.7 Refresh J1939 source address list ............................................................................ 137 6.18 Maretron NBE100 Configuration .................................................................................... 137 6.18.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 138 6.19 Maretron RAA100 Configuration .................................................................................... 138 6.19.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 139 6.19.2 Label ......................................................................................................................... 140 6.19.3 Rudder Angle Calibration .......................................................................................... 141 6.19.4 Rudder Number ........................................................................................................ 144 Page vi
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6.19.5 Operating Mode ........................................................................................................ 145 6.19.6 Gauge Resistance, + to Sender ................................................................................ 146 6.19.7 Gauge Resistance, - to Sender ................................................................................. 146 6.20 Maretron RIM100 Configuration ..................................................................................... 148 6.20.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 148 6.20.2 Device Label ............................................................................................................. 149 6.20.3 Instance .................................................................................................................... 150 6.20.4 Channel Configuration .............................................................................................. 150 6.21 Maretron SIM100 Configuration ..................................................................................... 151 6.21.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 151 6.21.2 Device Label ............................................................................................................. 152 6.21.3 Instance .................................................................................................................... 153 6.21.4 Channel Configuration .............................................................................................. 153 6.22 Maretron SSC200 Configuration .................................................................................... 154 6.22.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 154 6.22.2 Installation Offset Calibration .................................................................................... 157 6.22.3 Inverted Installation Entry ......................................................................................... 158 6.22.4 Label ......................................................................................................................... 159 6.22.5 Magnetic Deviation Calibration ................................................................................. 159 6.22.6 Magnetic Deviation Status ........................................................................................ 160 6.22.7 Rate of Turn Damping Period ................................................................................... 160 6.22.8 Rate of Turn Zero Offset Calibration ......................................................................... 161 6.22.9 Variation Source Entry .............................................................................................. 161 6.23 Maretron TLA100 Configuration ..................................................................................... 165 6.23.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 165 6.23.2 Label ......................................................................................................................... 166 6.23.3 Tank Capacity ........................................................................................................... 166 6.23.4 Tank Levels Calibration ............................................................................................ 167 6.23.5 Tank Number ............................................................................................................ 172 6.23.6 Tank Type ................................................................................................................. 172 6.23.7 Operating Mode ........................................................................................................ 173 6.23.8 Gauge Resistance, + to Sender ................................................................................ 174 6.23.9 Gauge Resistance, - to Sender ................................................................................. 174 6.24 Maretron TLM100 Configuration .................................................................................... 176 6.24.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 176 6.24.2 Label ......................................................................................................................... 177 6.24.3 Tank Capacity ........................................................................................................... 177 6.24.4 Tank Levels Calibration ............................................................................................ 178 6.24.5 Tank Number ............................................................................................................ 182 6.24.6 Tank Type ................................................................................................................. 182 6.25 Maretron TLM150 Configuration .................................................................................... 183 6.26 Maretron TLM200 Configuration .................................................................................... 183 6.27 Maretron TMP100 Configuration .................................................................................... 184 6.27.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 184 6.27.2 Channel Configuration .............................................................................................. 185 6.27.3 Device Label ............................................................................................................. 186 6.28 Maretron USB100 Configuration .................................................................................... 187 6.28.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 187 Revision 1.4.16a
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7 8 6.28.2 Remote Device Selection .......................................................................................... 188 6.29 Maretron VDR100 Configuration .................................................................................... 189 6.29.1 Advanced Configuration ........................................................................................ 189 6.30 Maretron WSO100 Configuration ................................................................................... 190 6.30.1 Advanced Configuration............................................................................................ 190 6.30.2 Device Label ............................................................................................................. 192 6.30.3 Installation Offset Calibration .................................................................................... 193 6.30.4 Wind Data Damping Period ...................................................................................... 195 6.30.5 Barometric Pressure ................................................................................................. 195 6.30.6 Outside Humidity....................................................................................................... 196 6.30.7 Outside Temperature ................................................................................................ 196 Data Display Types .................................................................................................................... 198 7.1 Anchor Watch Display .................................................................................................... 198 7.2 Compass Rose Display .................................................................................................. 199 7.3 Gauge Display ................................................................................................................ 200 7.4 GPS Status Display ........................................................................................................ 201 7.5 Numeric Display ............................................................................................................. 202 7.6 Rolling Road................................................................................................................... 203 7.7 Line Graph ..................................................................................................................... 204 7.8 Weather Display ............................................................................................................. 204 7.9 Wind Rose...................................................................................................................... 206 7.10 Moon Phase Display ...................................................................................................... 206 7.11 Trim Tab Display ............................................................................................................ 206 7.12 Swing Meter Display ...................................................................................................... 207 7.13 Tank Gauge Display ....................................................................................................... 207 7.14 Switch/Breaker Display .................................................................................................. 208 Alerts.......................................................................................................................................... 212 8.1 Displaying Active Alerts .................................................................................................. 212 8.1.1 Alert Status Screen ................................................................................................... 212 8.2 Accepting or Cancelling an Alert .................................................................................... 213 8.2.1 From a Favorite Screen ............................................................................................ 213 8.2.2 From the Alert Status Screen .................................................................................... 213 8.3 Adding an Alert ............................................................................................................... 214 8.3.1 Enable/Disable Control ............................................................................................. 215 8.3.2 Alert Type ................................................................................................................. 215 8.3.3 Priority....................................................................................................................... 215 8.3.4 Trigger Source .......................................................................................................... 216 8.3.5 Description ................................................................................................................ 216 8.3.6 Location .................................................................................................................... 216 8.3.7 Trigger Configuration ................................................................................................ 216 8.3.8 Local Audible ............................................................................................................ 230 8.3.9 Tone.......................................................................................................................... 230 8.3.10 Remote Annunciators ............................................................................................... 231 8.3.11 Operating Mode Moored ........................................................................................... 231 8.3.12 Operating Mode Underway ....................................................................................... 231 8.3.13 Operating Mode Anchored ........................................................................................ 232 8.3.14 Scope........................................................................................................................ 232 8.4 Deleting an Alert ............................................................................................................. 232 Page viii
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9 10 11 12 13 14 8.5 Editing an Alert ............................................................................................................... 233 8.6 Setting the Vessel Operating Mode ................................................................................ 235 8.7 Advanced Configuration ................................................................................................. 235 8.7.1 Remote Alert Audible ................................................................................................ 236 8.7.2 Flashing Screen ........................................................................................................ 236 8.8 Restore Factory Defaults................................................................................................ 236 Maintenance .............................................................................................................................. 238 Troubleshooting ......................................................................................................................... 239 Technical Specifications ............................................................................................................ 240 Technical Support ...................................................................................................................... 245 Installation Template .................................................................................................................. 246 Maretron (2 Year) Limited Warranty .......................................................................................... 248 Revision 1.4.16a
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Table of Figures
Figure 1 – Surface Mounting the DSM250 ............................................................................................ 3 Figure 2 – Flush Mounting the DSM250 ............................................................................................... 4 Figure 3 – Gimbal Mounting the DSM250 ............................................................................................. 5 Figure 4 – NMEA 2000® Connector Face View..................................................................................... 5 Figure 5 – DSM250 Power Up Screen .................................................................................................. 6 Figure 6 – Powerdown Countdown Screen ........................................................................................... 7 Figure 7 – Keypad and Key Names ...................................................................................................... 7 Figure 8 – Entering a Textual Value ...................................................................................................... 9 Figure 9 – DSM250 Running in Favorite Screens Mode ..................................................................... 25 Figure 10 – Main Menu ....................................................................................................................... 26 Figure 11 – Configuration Screen ....................................................................................................... 27 Figure 12 – Device Selection Screen .................................................................................................. 28 Figure 13 – DSM250 Display Settings Screen .................................................................................... 29 Figure 14 – DSM250 Advanced Configuration .................................................................................... 29 Figure 15 – DSM250 Primary Device Selection .................................................................................. 30 Figure 16 – DSM250 Advanced Information Screen ........................................................................... 31 Figure 17 – Bus Status Display ........................................................................................................... 31 Figure 18 – Backlight Menu ................................................................................................................ 32 Figure 19 – Color Palette Selection Screen ........................................................................................ 33 Figure 20 – Color Palette Configuration Screen.................................................................................. 33 Figure 21 – Setting the Demo Mode ................................................................................................... 34 Figure 22 – Setting the Keyboard Beep Option................................................................................... 35 Figure 23 – Editing the DSM250 Label ............................................................................................... 35 Figure 24 – Setting the Favorite Screens Mode .................................................................................. 36 Figure 25 – Favorite Screens Setup Screen ....................................................................................... 36 Figure 26 – Favorite Screen Parameters ............................................................................................ 37 Figure 27 – Setting the Favorite Screen Format ................................................................................. 38 Figure 28 – Setting the Auto Change Interval ..................................................................................... 38 Figure 29 – Selecting the Data Category ............................................................................................ 39 Figure 30 – Selecting the Data to be displayed................................................................................... 39 Figure 31 – DSM250 Units Menu ........................................................................................................ 41 Figure 32 – Device Configuration Screen ........................................................................................... 45 Figure 33 – Airmar Depth/Speed/Temperature Transducer Configuration Screen ............................. 47 Figure 34 – Airmar Transducer Advanced Configuration Screen ........................................................ 48 Figure 35 – Calibrating the Airmar Speed Transducer Speed ............................................................ 49 Figure 36 – Airmar Temperature Transducer Water Temperature Calibration Screen ....................... 50 Figure 37 – Setting the Transducer Depth Offset in an Airmar Depth Transducer .............................. 51 Figure 38 – Resetting the Airmar Speed Sensor Trip Distance Log.................................................... 51 Figure 39 – EP-30 Trim Tabs Configuration Screen ........................................................................... 52 Figure 40 – EP-30 Trim Tabs Calibration Opening Screen ................................................................. 52 Figure 41 – EP-30 Intermediate Calibration Screen............................................................................ 53 Figure 42 – EP-30 Calibration Success Message ............................................................................... 53 Figure 43 – ACM100 Configuration Screen ........................................................................................ 54 Figure 44 – ACM100 Advanced Configuration Screen ....................................................................... 54 Figure 45 – ACM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen ....................................................... 56 Figure 46 – Reset Total Energy Recorded Confirmation Screen ........................................................ 58 Page x
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Figure 47 – ALM100 Configuration Screen ......................................................................................... 59 Figure 48 – ALM100 Advanced Configuration Screen ........................................................................ 59 Figure 49 – ALM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen ....................................................... 60 Figure 50 – DCM100 Configuration Screen ........................................................................................ 62 Figure 51 – DCM100 Advanced Configuration Screen ....................................................................... 62 Figure 52 – DCM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen....................................................... 63 Figure 53 – Current Sensor Zero Offset Calibration Confirmation Screen .......................................... 64 Figure 54 – Current Sensor Zero Offset Calibration Complete Screen ............................................... 64 Figure 55 – DCR100 Configuration Screen ........................................................................................ 68 Figure 56 – DCR100 Advanced Configuration Screen ........................................................................ 68 Figure 57 – DCR100 Current Sensor Zero Offset Calibration Screen................................................. 69 Figure 58 – DCR100 Current Sensor Zero Offset Calibration Completion Screen.............................. 69 Figure 59 – DCR100 NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable Screen .......................................................... 70 Figure 60 – DCR100 Channel Configuration Screen (DCR Mode) ..................................................... 71 Figure 61 – DCR100 Channel Configuration Screen (ALM Mode)...................................................... 72 Figure 62 – DSM200 Remote Configuration Screen ........................................................................... 73 Figure 63 – DSM200 Remote Device Selection Screen ..................................................................... 73 Figure 64 – DSM150/DSM250 Remote Configuration Screen ............................................................ 75 Figure 65 – DSM150/DSM250 Remote Device Selection Screen....................................................... 76 Figure 66 – DSM150 Copy alarms settings from local display ............................................................ 77 Figure 67 – DSM250 Copy device selection from local display........................................................... 77 Figure 68 – DSM150/DSM250 Copy display settings from local display ............................................. 78 Figure 69 – DSM150/DSM250 Copy favorite settings from local display ............................................ 78 Figure 70 – Favorite Settings Transfer Completion Screen ................................................................ 79 Figure 71 – DSM150/DSM250 Copy DST100 calibrations from local display ..................................... 79 Figure 72 – DSM150/DSM250 copy all settings from local display ..................................................... 80 Figure 73 – DSM150/DSM250 Label Configuration ............................................................................ 80 Figure 74 – DSM150/DSM250 Remote Device Selection ................................................................... 81 Figure 75 – DST100 Configuration Screen ......................................................................................... 82 Figure 76 – DST100 Advanced Configuration Screen ........................................................................ 82 Figure 77 – Calibrating the DSM250 for DST100 Speed through Water............................................. 83 Figure 78 – Setting the Transducer Depth Offset in a DST100 ........................................................... 84 Figure 79 – Resetting the DST100 Trip Distance Log ......................................................................... 85 Figure 80 – DST110 Configuration Screen ......................................................................................... 86 Figure 81 – DST110 Advanced Configuration Screen ........................................................................ 86 Figure 82 - DST110 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen ........................................................ 87 Figure 83 – Calibrating the DST110 Speed ........................................................................................ 88 Figure 84 - DST110 Water Temperature Calibration Screen .............................................................. 89 Figure 85 – Setting the Transducer Depth Offset in a DST110 ........................................................... 90 Figure 86 – Resetting the DST110 Trip Distance Log ......................................................................... 90 Figure 87 – EMS100 Configuration Screen ........................................................................................ 91 Figure 88 – FFM100 Configuration Screen ......................................................................................... 96 Figure 89 – FFM100 Advanced Configuration .................................................................................... 96 Figure 90 – FFM100 NMEA PGN Enable/Disable Screen .................................................................. 98 Figure 91 – FFM100 Channel #0 First Configuration Screen (Differential Mode) ............................... 99 Figure 92 – FFM100 Channel #0 Second Configuration Screen (Differential Mode) .......................... 99 Figure 93 – FFM100 Channel #0 First Configuration Screen (Two Independent Sensors Mode) ..... 101 Figure 94 – FFM100 Channel #0 Second Configuration Screen (Two Independent Sensors Mode) 101 Revision 1.4.16a
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Figure 95 – FFM100 Channel #1 Configuration Screen (Differential Mode) ..................................... 104 Figure 96 – FFM100 Channel #1 First Configuration Screen (Two Independent Sensors Mode) ..... 105 Figure 97 – FFM100 Channel #1 Second Configuration Screen (Two Independent Sensors Mode) 105 Figure 98 – FPM100 Configuration Screen ....................................................................................... 107 Figure 99 – FPM100 Advanced Configuration Screen ...................................................................... 108 Figure 100 – FPM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen ................................................... 108 Figure 101 – FPM100 Channel #0 First Configuration Screen (Tank Mode) .................................... 109 Figure 102 – FPM100 Channel #0 Second Configuration Screen (Tank Mode) ............................... 110 Figure 103 – FPM100 Tank Levels Calibration Menu ....................................................................... 111 Figure 104 – Performing Custom Calibration of the Tank Level Adapter .......................................... 111 Figure 105 – Tank Levels Calibration Capacity Estimation ............................................................... 112 Figure 106 – Empty Level Calibration ............................................................................................... 112 Figure 107 – Intermediate Level Calibration ..................................................................................... 113 Figure 108 – Full Level Calibration ................................................................................................... 113 Figure 109 – Custom Tank Level Calibration Confirmation Screen .................................................. 114 Figure 110 – Rectangular Tank Calibration ...................................................................................... 114 Figure 111 – GPS100 Configuration Screen ..................................................................................... 116 Figure 112 – GPS100 Advanced Configuration Screen .................................................................... 117 Figure 113 – Configuring Antenna Altitude on a GPS100 ................................................................. 117 Figure 114 – Configuring Satellite Elevation Mask on a GPS100 ..................................................... 118 Figure 115 – Configuring PDOP Mask on a GPS100 ....................................................................... 119 Figure 116 – Configuring SNR Mask on a GPS100 .......................................................................... 119 Figure 117 – GPS100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen ................................................... 120 Figure 118 – Restoring Factory Defaults on the GPS100 ................................................................. 121 Figure 119 – Performing a Cold Start of the GPS100 ....................................................................... 121 Figure 120 – Configuring GPS Operating Mode on a GPS100 ......................................................... 122 Figure 121 – Configuring SBAS on a GPS100.................................................................................. 123 Figure 122 – GPS200 Configuration Screen ..................................................................................... 124 Figure 123 – GPS200 Advanced Configuration Screen .................................................................... 124 Figure 124 – GPS200 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen ................................................... 125 Figure 125 – Restoring Factory Defaults on the GPS200 ................................................................. 126 Figure 126 – Performing a Cold Start of the GPS200 ....................................................................... 126 Figure 127 – Configuring SBAS on a GPS200.................................................................................. 127 Figure 128 – IPG100 Configuration Screen ...................................................................................... 128 Figure 129 – IPG100 Advanced Configuration Screen ..................................................................... 128 Figure 130 – IPG100 N2KServer Information Screen ....................................................................... 129 Figure 131 – IPG100 Client List Display ........................................................................................... 130 Figure 132 – J2K100 Configuration Screen ...................................................................................... 132 Figure 133 – J2K100 Advanced Configuration Screen ..................................................................... 132 Figure 134 – J2K100 J1939 Diagnostic Messages Configuration ..................................................... 133 Figure 135 – J2K100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen..................................................... 134 Figure 136 – J2K100 Engine Instance Configuration ........................................................................ 135 Figure 137 – J2K100 NMEA2000 Transmission Instance Configuration .......................................... 135 Figure 138 – J2K100 NMEA2000 AC/Icemaker Instance Configuration .......................................... 136 Figure 139 – J2K100 J1939 Source Address Configuration ............................................................. 137 Figure 140 – NBE100 Configuration Screen ..................................................................................... 137 Figure 141 – NBE100 Advanced Configuration Screen .................................................................... 138 Figure 142 – RAA100 Configuration Screen ..................................................................................... 139 Page xii
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Figure 143 – RAA100 Advanced Configuration Menu ...................................................................... 139 Figure 144 – RAA100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen ................................................... 140 Figure 145 – RAA100 Label Configuration ....................................................................................... 141 Figure 146 – RAA100 Rudder Angle Calibration Options ................................................................. 141 Figure 147 – RAA100 Custom Rudder Angle Calibration ................................................................. 142 Figure 148 – RAA100 Starboard Rudder Angle Calibration .............................................................. 142 Figure 149 – RAA100 Center Rudder Angle Calibration ................................................................... 143 Figure 150 – RAA100 Port Rudder Angle Calibration ....................................................................... 143 Figure 151 – RAA100 Custom Rudder Calibration Confirmation Screen .......................................... 144 Figure 152 – RAA100: Setting the Rudder Number .......................................................................... 145 Figure 153 – RAA100: Setting the Operating Mode .......................................................................... 145 Figure 154 – RAA100: Setting the + to Sender Gauge Resistance .................................................. 146 Figure 155 – RAA100: Setting the – to Sender Gauge Resistance................................................... 147 Figure 156 – RIM100 Configuration Screen ...................................................................................... 148 Figure 157 – RIM100 Advanced Configuration Screen ..................................................................... 148 Figure 158 – RIM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen .................................................... 149 Figure 159 – RIM100 Channel Configuration Screen ....................................................................... 150 Figure 160 – SIM100 Configuration Screen ...................................................................................... 151 Figure 161 – SIM100 Advanced Configuration Screen ..................................................................... 151 Figure 162 – SIM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen .................................................... 152 Figure 163 – SIM100 Channel Configuration Screen........................................................................ 153 Figure 164 – SSC200 Configuration Screen ..................................................................................... 154 Figure 165 – SSC200 Advanced Configuration Screen .................................................................... 154 Figure 166 – SSC200 NMEA 0183 Settings Screen ......................................................................... 155 Figure 167 – SSC200 NMEA 0183 Sentence/Rate Selection Screen............................................... 156 Figure 168 – SSC200 Load Default Periodic Rate Selection ............................................................ 156 Figure 169 – SSC200 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen ................................................... 157 Figure 170 – SSC200 Installation Offset Calibration Screen ............................................................ 158 Figure 171 – Setting the Installation Orientation ............................................................................... 158 Figure 172 – SSC200 Magnetic Deviation Calibration Start Screen ................................................. 159 Figure 173 – SSC200 Magnetic Deviation Calibration Progress Screen .......................................... 160 Figure 174 – SSC200 Magnetic Deviation Status Screen ................................................................. 160 Figure 175 – Programming SSC200 Rate of Turn Damping Period.................................................. 161 Figure 176 – SSC200 Rate of Turn Zero Offset Calibration Screen ................................................. 161 Figure 177 – Setting Variation Source to NMEA 0183 or NMEA 2000® (factory default) .................. 162 Figure 178 – Setting Variation Source to NMEA 0183 Only .............................................................. 162 Figure 179 – Setting Variation Source to NMEA 2000® Only ............................................................ 163 Figure 180 – Entering Manual Variation ............................................................................................ 163 Figure 181 – TLA100 Configuration Screen ...................................................................................... 165 Figure 182 – TLA100 Advanced Configuration Screen ..................................................................... 165 Figure 183 – TLA100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen .................................................... 166 Figure 184 – Configuring the Tank Capacity ..................................................................................... 167 Figure 185 – Tank Capacity Change Confirmation Screen ............................................................... 167 Figure 186 – Performing Custom Calibration of the Tank Level Adapter .......................................... 168 Figure 187 – Tank Levels Calibration Capacity Estimation ............................................................... 169 Figure 188 – Empty Level Calibration ............................................................................................... 169 Figure 189 – Intermediate Level Calibration ..................................................................................... 170 Figure 190 – Full Level Calibration ................................................................................................... 170 Revision 1.4.16a
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Figure 191 – Custom Tank Level Calibration Confirmation Screen .................................................. 171 Figure 192 – American Standard Sender Calibration........................................................................ 171 Figure 193 – European Standard Sender Calibration ....................................................................... 172 Figure 194 – Configuring the Tank Number ...................................................................................... 172 Figure 195 – Configuring the Tank Type ........................................................................................... 173 Figure 196 – Configuring the Operating Mode .................................................................................. 174 Figure 197 – Configuring the + to Sender Gauge Resistance........................................................... 174 Figure 198 – Configuring the - to Sender Gauge Resistance ........................................................... 175 Figure 199 – TLM100 Configuration Screen ..................................................................................... 176 Figure 200 – TLM100 Advanced Configuration Screen .................................................................... 176 Figure 201 – TLM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen.................................................... 177 Figure 202 – Configuring the Tank Capacity ..................................................................................... 178 Figure 203 – Tank Capacity Change Confirmation Screen ............................................................... 178 Figure 204 – Performing Custom Calibration of the Tank Level Monitor ........................................... 179 Figure 205 – Tank Levels Calibration Capacity Estimation ............................................................... 179 Figure 206 – Empty Level Calibration ............................................................................................... 180 Figure 207 – Intermediate Level Calibration ..................................................................................... 180 Figure 208 – Full Level Calibration ................................................................................................... 181 Figure 209 – Custom Tank Level Calibration Confirmation Screen .................................................. 181 Figure 210 – Rectangular Tank Selection ......................................................................................... 182 Figure 211 – Rectangular Tank Calibration ...................................................................................... 182 Figure 212 – TMP100 Configuration Screen ..................................................................................... 184 Figure 213 – TMP100 Advanced Configuration Screen .................................................................... 184 Figure 214 – TMP100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen ................................................... 185 Figure 215 – TMP100 Channel Configuration Screen ...................................................................... 186 Figure 216 – USB100 Configuration Screen ..................................................................................... 187 Figure 217 – USB100 Advanced Configuration Screen .................................................................... 187 Figure 218 – USB100 Device Selection Screen................................................................................ 188 Figure 219 – VDR100 Configuration Screen ..................................................................................... 189 Figure 220 – VDR100 Advanced Configuration Screen .................................................................... 189 Figure 221 – WSO100 Configuration Screen .................................................................................... 190 Figure 222 – WSO100 Advanced Configuration Screen ................................................................... 191 Figure 223 – WSO100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen .................................................. 192 Figure 224 – WSO100 Device Label Menu ....................................................................................... 193 Figure 225 – WSO100 Installation Offset Screen ............................................................................. 193 Figure 226 – WSO100 Configuration Aborted Due to Low Wind Speed ........................................... 194 Figure 227 – Installation Offset Success Confirmation Screen ......................................................... 194 Figure 228 – Installation Offset Abort Confirmation Screen .............................................................. 195 Figure 229 – Setting the Wind Data Damping Period ....................................................................... 195 Figure 230 – Setting the Barometric Pressure .................................................................................. 196 Figure 231 – Setting the Outside Humidity ....................................................................................... 196 Figure 232 – Setting the Outside Temperature ................................................................................. 197 Figure 233 – Anchor Watch Display Example ................................................................................... 198 Figure 234 – Compass Rose Display (Course Up) Example ............................................................ 199 Figure 235 – Compass Rose (North Up) Display .............................................................................. 199 Figure 236 – Gauge Display Example .............................................................................................. 200 Figure 237 – Rudder Angle Gauge Display Example........................................................................ 200 Figure 238 – GPS Status Display Example....................................................................................... 201 Page xiv
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Figure 239 – Numeric Display Example ............................................................................................ 202 Figure 240 – Configuration of Rolling Road Display ......................................................................... 203 Figure 241 – Rolling Road Display .................................................................................................... 204 Figure 242 – Line Graph Display ...................................................................................................... 204 Figure 243 – Weather Display........................................................................................................... 205 Figure 244 – Wind Rose Display....................................................................................................... 206 Figure 245 – Moon Phase Display .................................................................................................... 206 Figure 246 – Trim Tab Display .......................................................................................................... 207 Figure 247 – Swing Meter Display .................................................................................................... 207 Figure 248 – Tank Gauge Display .................................................................................................... 208 Figure 249 – Configuration of Switch/Breaker Display ...................................................................... 208 Figure 250 – Selection of an Individual Switch/Breaker .................................................................... 209 Figure 251 – Configuration of an Individual Switch/Breaker ............................................................. 209 Figure 252 – Favorite Screen Showing Highlighted Switch/Breaker ................................................. 211 Figure 253 – Alert Display ................................................................................................................. 212 Figure 254 – Adding a New Alert ...................................................................................................... 214 Figure 255 – Part of the Alert Edit Screen ........................................................................................ 215 Figure 256 – High Alert Parameters .................................................................................................. 217 Figure 257 – Trigger Configuration – High Alert................................................................................ 218 Figure 258 – Low Alert Parameters .................................................................................................. 219 Figure 259 – Trigger Configuration – Low Alert ................................................................................ 220 Figure 260 – Trigger Configuration – Data Unavailable Alert ............................................................ 221 Figure 261 – Trigger Configuration – On Alert .................................................................................. 222 Figure 262 – Trigger Configuration – Data Unavailable Alert ............................................................ 223 Figure 263 – Trigger Configuration Editor – Tripped Alert ................................................................ 224 Figure 264 – Outside Alert Parameters ............................................................................................. 224 Figure 265 – Trigger Configuration – Outside Radius Alert .............................................................. 225 Figure 266 – Trigger Configuration – Inside Radius Alert ................................................................. 226 Figure 267 – Trigger Configuration – GPS Quality Alert ................................................................... 227 Figure 268 – Direction Alert Parameters ........................................................................................... 228 Figure 269 – Trigger Configuration – Direction Alert ......................................................................... 229 Figure 270 – Alert Editor – Time Alert ............................................................................................... 230 Figure 271 – Remote Annunciator Enable/Disable ........................................................................... 231 Figure 272 – Deleting an Alert .......................................................................................................... 232 Figure 273 – Deleting Alert List ......................................................................................................... 233 Figure 274 – Deleting an Alert: Confirmation .................................................................................... 233 Figure 275 – Editing an Alert............................................................................................................. 234 Figure 276 – Editing an Alert: Alert List ............................................................................................. 234 Figure 277 – Setting the Vessel Operating Mode ............................................................................. 235 Figure 278 – Advanced Configuration ............................................................................................... 236 Figure 279 – Restore Factory Defaults Confirmation ........................................................................ 237 Figure 280 – Surface Mounting Template ......................................................................................... 246 Figure 281 – Flush Mounting Template ............................................................................................ 247 Revision 1.4.16a
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1 General
1.1
Introduction
Congratulations on your purchase of the Maretron DSM250 NMEA 2000® Multi-function Color
Graphic Display. Maretron has designed and built your display to the highest standards for years of
dependable and accurate service.
Maretron’s DSM250 is a high-resolution color display that allows easy interpretation of NMEA 2000®
instrument and navigation data through custom display configurations, with an easy-to-use five-key
illuminated keypad.
The Maretron DSM250 is designed to operate within the harsh demands of the marine environment.
However, no piece of marine electronic equipment can function properly unless installed, configured,
and maintained in the correct manner. Please read carefully and follow these instructions for
installation, configuration, and usage of the Maretron DSM250 in order to ensure optimal
performance.
1.2
Firmware Revision
This manual corresponds to DSM250 firmware revision 1.4.16.
1.3
DSM250 Features
The Maretron DSM250 has the following features.
• NMEA 2000® Interface
• Waterproof NMEA 2000® Connector
• Sealed Waterproof Enclosure
• Powered Directly from NMEA 2000® Port
• Surface, Flush, or Gimbal Mounting
• Adjustable Multi-colored Backlighting of Screen and Keys Preserves Night Vision
• Visual and Audible Alarms
• 16 User Configurable Favorite Screens (Automatic or Manual Scrolling between Screens)
• Capable of Viewing Virtually all NMEA 2000® Information including Batteries, Engines,
Generators, Shore Power, Tanks, Navigation, Weather and More
1.4
Quick Install
Installing the Maretron DSM250 display involves the following four steps. Please refer to the
individual sections for additional details.
• Unpack the Box (Section 2.1)
• Choose a Mounting Location (Section 2.2)
• Mount the DSM250 (Section 2.3)
• Connect the DSM250 (Section 2.4)
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2 Installation
2.1
Unpacking the Box
When unpacking the box containing the Maretron DSM250, you should find the following items:
• 1 – DSM250 NMEA 2000® Multi-function Graphic Display
• 4 – Mounting studs
• 4 – Mounting washers
• 4 – Mounting lock washers
• 4 – Mounting knurled nuts
• 1 – DSM250 User’s Manual
• 1 – Warranty Registration Card
If any of these items are missing or damaged, please contact Maretron.
2.2
Choosing a Mounting Location
The DSM250 is housed in a waterproof enclosure (IEC IP67 rating – protected against the effects of
temporary immersion in water) and can be mounted in either an outdoor location or an indoor
location.
2.3
Mounting the DSM250
The DSM250 has three mounting options, which includes surface mounting, flush mounting, or an
optional gimbal mounting. Maretron suggests a location at which the display can be viewed from a
relatively straight angle, and at which the keys are easily pressed.
2.3.1 Surface Mounting the DSM250
The DSM250 can be directly mounted to any suitable surface as shown in Figure 1. The steps for this
type of mounting are as follows:
1. Attach the Surface Mount Template (see Section 0) to the surface where the DSM250 is to be
located.
a. Make sure the template is level by using one of the horizontal lines as a guide.
b. Scotch tape works well for securing the template.
c. The maximum thickness of the mounting material should not exceed 1¼” using the
provided mounting studs, thicker surfaces can be accommodated but you will need to
purchase longer studs.
2. Drill the four mounting holes all the way through the mounting surface at the locations
indicated on the Surface Mount Template.
a. Use a 3/16” drill bit.
3. Drill or cut a single hole for the electrical connector.
a. Use a 2¼” hole saw.
b. You will probably want this hole to be large enough for your fingers so that you can
connect or disconnect the cable without removing the DSM250.
4. Remove the template from the mounting surface.
5. Insert the 2” studs into the back of the DSM250.
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a.
Make sure the studs are fully inserted into the back of the DSM250 but don’t over tighten
the studs.
b. Do not use threadlocking compounds containing methacrylate ester, such as Loctite Red
(271), as they will cause stress cracking of the plastic enclosure.
6. Insert the studs protruding from the back of the DSM250 through the mounting holes and
secure with the provided hardware.
a. Place the flat washer on the stud first followed by the lock washer followed by the knurled
nut.
b. Hand-tighten the knurled nut.
Figure 1 – Surface Mounting the DSM250
2.3.2 Flush Mounting the DSM250
NOTE: When flush mounting the DSM250, ensure that the vent port (a small hole near the
NMEA 2000 cable connector is not covered or blocked. Blocking the vent port will
compromise the integrity of the seals on the unit and will void the unit’s warranty.
The DSM250 can be flush mounted to any suitable surface as shown in Figure 2. The steps for this
type of mounting are as follows:
1. Attach the Flush Mount Template (see Section 0) to the surface where the DSM250 is to be
located.
a. Make sure the template is level by using one of the horizontal lines as a guide.
b. Scotch tape works well for securing the template.
c. The maximum thickness of the mounting material should not exceed 1¼” using the
provided mounting studs, thicker surfaces can be accommodated but you will need to
purchase longer studs.
2. Cut out an opening as indicated on the Flush Mount Template.
a. Sorry, we should have made the flange larger, but be very careful not to go outside the
indicated cutout area. Be on the safe side and cut the hole a little small and rasp or file to
fit.
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3. Remove the template from the mounting surface.
4. Insert the 2” studs into the back of the DSM250.
a. Make sure the studs are fully inserted into the back of the DSM250 but don’t over tighten
the studs.
b. Do not use threadlocking compounds containing methacrylate ester, such as Loctite Red
(271), as they will cause stress cracking of the plastic enclosure.
5. Remove the back of the case from the DSM250.
a. Place your thumbs on top of the studs and your finger along the side of the case and
squeeze the back cover off the DSM250.
6. Insert the back of the DSM250 through the front side of the cutout.
7. Place the back cover on the opposite side of the mounting surface with the mounting holes
aligned with the mounting studs and secure with the supplied hardware.
a. Place the flat washer on the stud first followed by the lock washer followed by the knurled
nut.
b. Hand tighten the knurled nut.
Figure 2 – Flush Mounting the DSM250
2.3.3 Gimbal Mounting the DSM250
The DSM250 can be gimbal mounted to any horizontal surface such a counter or ceiling as shown in
Figure 3. The optional gimbal mounting assembly (part number DSMMNTASSBLY) includes a
bracket and screws for attaching the bracket to the DSM250, a stand, and 2 knobs for fastening the
DSM250/bracket to the stand.
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Figure 3 – Gimbal Mounting the DSM250
2.4
Connecting the DSM250
The Maretron DSM250 provides a connection to an NMEA 2000® interface through a connector that
can be found on the back of the unit. The NMEA 2000® connector is a five pin male connector (see
Figure 4). You connect the DSM250 to an NMEA 2000® network using a Maretron NMEA 2000®
cable (or compatible cable) by connecting the female end of the cable to the DSM250 (note the key
on the male connector and keyway on the female connector). Be sure the cable is connected
securely and that the collar on the cable connector is tightened firmly. Connect the other end of the
cable (male) to the NMEA 2000® network in the same manner. The DSM250 is designed such that
you can plug or unplug it from an NMEA 2000® network while the power to the network is connected
or disconnected. Please follow recommended practices for installing NMEA 2000® network products.
Figure 4 – NMEA 2000® Connector Face View
2.4.1 Checking the Connection
Once the NMEA 2000® connection to the Maretron DSM250 has been completed, observe the
display to check to see that information is being properly received. One way to verify connectivity is to
enter the device selection menu, which is described in Section 5.2.3.2. Refer to Section 0,
“Troubleshooting”, if no information appears.
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3 Operating the DSM250
3.1
Turning the DSM250 On
To turn on the DSM250, press the power key (the leftmost of the five keys on the keypad). The
DSM250 will display a warning and ask you to press the Accept key (
) to acknowledge the
warning and continue operation of the DSM250 (see Figure 5 below).
Figure 5 – DSM250 Power Up Screen
Alternatively, you may power down the DSM250 by pressing and holding the power key (see Section
3.2 below for details).
3.2
Turning the DSM250 Off
To turn the DSM250 off, press and hold the power key. The DSM250 will display a countdown
screen, which can be seen in Figure 6. If you continue to hold the power key, the DSM250 will power
down in approximately three seconds. If you release the power key before these three seconds have
elapsed, the DSM250 will return to its current operational state.
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Figure 6 – Powerdown Countdown Screen
3.3
Keypad Essentials
The DSM250 has a five-key keypad located below the screen. Each key has slightly different
functions depending on the operating mode. Figure 7 below shows the DSM250 keys and their
names.
Power
Key
Lights
Key
Down
Up
Key
Key
Figure 7 – Keypad and Key Names
Enter
Key
In the normal viewing mode where your favorite screens are displayed, the keys on the DSM250
keypad have the following functions:
Power Key (
) – turns the DSM250 off (see section 3.1 on page 6 for details). A momentary
press of this key can also be used to accept or cancel an Alert (see section 8.2.1 on page 213
for details).
) – a quick press cycles the backlight brightness between three programmed
Lights Key (
brightness levels (see Section 5.2.4.3 on page 32 for details), while a long press cycles the
DSM250 through 8 programmable color palettes (see Section 5.2.4.4 on Page 32).
Up Key (
) – switches the display from the current favorite screen to the next highest
numbered favorite screen that is enabled for that particular mode.
Down Key (
) – switches the display from the current favorites screen to the next lowest
numbered favorite screen that is enabled for that particular mode
Enter Key (
) – changes from favorite screens mode to menu mode
In menu mode, a legend appears along the bottom of the screen displaying the function of each of the
keys. The functions differ slightly depending on whether a menu is being accessed, a selection is
being made from a list of possible data values, or a numeric value is being increased or decreased.
3.3.1 Navigating in a Menu
When accessing a menu, the keys on the DSM250 keypad have the following functions:
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Power Key (
) – turns the DSM250 off (see Section 3.1 on page 6 for details).
Back Key (
) – returns to the next higher-level menu. If already at the top-level menu, exits
menu mode returns to favorite screens mode. Menu levels are indicated with indentation of the
text within the menus.
Scroll Up Key (
) – changes the currently selected (or highlighted) menu item from the
presently selected one to the one immediately above it. If the top menu item is already
selected, the selection wraps to the bottom menu item.
Scroll Down Key (
) – changes the currently selected (or highlighted) menu item from the
presently selected one to the one immediately below it. If the bottom menu item is already
selected, the selection wraps to the top menu item.
Enter Key (
) – if the currently selected menu item has a submenu, opens that submenu. If the
currently selected menu item has an editable value (indicated by a colon (:) followed by the
data value, moves the selection to the editable value and changes the keys to edit mode.
3.3.2 Choosing a Value from a List
When editing a value chosen from a list, the keys on the DSM250 keypad have the following
functions:
Power Key (
) – turns the DSM250 off (see Section 3.1 on page 6 for details).
Back Key (
) – aborts the edit and restores the editable value to its previous value
Scroll Up Key (
) – changes the currently selected editable value from the presently selected
one to the one immediately above it in the list of possibilities. If the top menu item is already
selected, the selection wraps to the bottom menu item.
Scroll Down Key (
) – changes the currently selected editable value from the presently
selected one to the one immediately below it in the list of possibilities. If the bottom menu item
is already selected, the selection wraps to the top menu item.
Enter Key (
) – Accepts the currently displayed value and stores it.
3.3.3 Entering a Numeric Value
When editing a numeric value, the keys on the DSM250 keypad have the following functions:
Power Key (
) – turns the DSM250 off (see Section 3.1 on page 6 for details).
) – aborts the edit and restores the editable value to its previous value
Cancel Key (
Increase Key (
) – increases the editable value
Decrease Key (
) – decreases the editable value
Accept Key (
) – Accepts the currently displayed value and stores it.
3.3.4 Entering a Textual Value
When entering a text string, the following menu will be presented:
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Figure 8 – Entering a Textual Value
The top line contains the textual string that has already been entered. New characters are appended
one at a time to the end of the line, at the position marked by the underscore.
To append an uppercase character, use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to select
Uppercase and then press Enter to go across to the characters. Now use the Scroll Up and Scroll
Down buttons again to select the required character, and press Enter to transfer the character to the
cursor position. If another uppercase character is required, repeat this last step, or press the Back
button top return to the choices on the left.
To append a lowercase character, use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to select Lowercase
and then press Enter to go across to the characters. Now use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down
buttons again to select the required character, and press Enter to transfer the character to the cursor
position. If another lowercase character is required, repeat this last step, or press the Back button top
return to the choices on the left.
To append a numeral, use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to select Numeric and then press
Enter to go across to the numbers. Now use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons again to select
the required numeral, and press Enter to transfer the numeral to the cursor position. If another
numeral is required, repeat this last step, or press the Back button top return to the choices on the
left.
To append a punctuation character or other symbol, use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to
select Sign and then press Enter to go across to the sign characters. Now use the Scroll Up and
Scroll Down buttons again to select the required character, and press Enter to transfer the character
to the cursor position. If another sign character is required, repeat this last step, or press the Back
button top return to the choices on the left.
To append a space, use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to select Space and then press
Enter.
To delete the character immediately preceding the underscore, use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down
buttons to select Back and then press Enter. Note that it is not possible to delete the entire text
string; use the Back function repeatedly to delete the characters one at a time.
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To abort the entire textual edit, and return to the original field without changing the contents of the
field, use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to select Exit without Saving and then press
Enter.
To enter the text string in the original field, use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to select
Save and Exit and then press Enter.
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4 Important Concepts
4.1
Favorite Screens
The DSM250 can display many different types of information in many different configurations. It is
capable of displaying up to four distinct windows on its screen at one time. Rather than making you
select from among the many types of available information any time you want to change the
displayed data, the DSM250 has the concept of “Favorite Screens”. A “Favorite Screen” is a
combination of display settings, data to display, and formats in which to display the data. The
DSM250 supports up to 16 different favorite screens.
4.2
Categories and Data Types
The DSM250 is capable of displaying many types of information. In order to make it easier to locate a
specific type of information to display, the different types of information are organized into general
categories:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
AC Bus
AC Generator
AC Utility
Anchor Watch
DC
Depth
Elec. Distribution
Engine
Environment
Fuel Management
GPS
Heading
Humidity
Indicator
Navigation
Pressure/Vacuum
Rudder
Special Device
Speed
Indicator
Tank
Temperature
Time/Date
Transmission
Vessel
Wind
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The following sections explore each category in detail and spell out all of the data types that are
available for display, if the appropriate sensors are installed in the network.
4.2.1 AC Bus
Average Frequency – displays average frequency of the AC power on the bus
Average L-N Voltage – displays average line to neutral RMS voltage of the AC power on the bus
Average L-L Voltage – displays average line to line RMS voltage of the AC power on the bus
Phase A Frequency – displays frequency of the AC power on phase A of the Bus
Phase A L-N Voltage – displays phase A Line-to-Neutral RMS voltage of the AC Bus
Phase AB L-L Voltage – displays phase A Line-to-phase B Line RMS voltage of the AC Bus
Phase B Frequency – displays frequency of the AC power on phase B of the bus
Phase B L-N Voltage – displays phase B Line-to-Neutral RMS voltage of the AC Bus
Phase BC L-L Voltage – displays phase B Line-to-phase C Line RMS voltage of the AC Bus
Phase C Frequency – displays frequency of the AC power on phase C of the bus
Phase C L-N Voltage – displays phase C Line-to-Neutral RMS voltage of the AC Bus
Phase CA L-L Voltage – displays phase C Line-to-phase A Line RMS voltage of the AC Bus
4.2.2 AC Generator
Average Current – displays the average current of the AC power on the generator
Average Frequency – displays the average frequency of the AC power on the generator
Average L-N Voltage – displays average line to neutral RMS voltage of the AC power on the
generator
Average L-L Voltage – displays average line to line RMS voltage of the AC power on the
generator
Total Real Power – displays real power output by the generator
Total Reactive Power – displays reactive power output by the generator
Total Apparent Power – displays apparent power output by the generator
Total Power Factor – displays power factor of the generator
Total kWH Export – displays total energy produced by the generator
Total kWH Import – displays total energy consumed by the generator
Phase A Current – displays phase A current of the Generator
Phase A Frequency – displays frequency of the AC power on phase A of the Generator
Phase A L-N Voltage – displays phase A Line-to-Neutral RMS voltage of the Generator
Phase AB L-L Voltage – displays phase A Line-to-phase B Line RMS voltage of the Generator
Phase A Real Power – displays real power output on phase A of the generator
Phase A Reactive Power – displays reactive power output on phase A of the Generator
Phase A Apparent Power – displays apparent power output on phase A of the Generator
Phase A Power Factor – displays power factor of phase A of the Generator
Phase B Current – displays phase B current of the Generator
Phase B Frequency – displays frequency of the AC power on phase B of the Generator
Phase B L-N Voltage – displays phase B Line-to-Neutral RMS voltage of the Generator
Phase BC L-L Voltage – displays phase B Line-to-phase C Line RMS voltage of the Generator
Phase B Real Power – displays real power output on phase B of the generator
Phase B Reactive Power – displays reactive power output on phase B of the Generator
Phase B Apparent Power – displays apparent power output on phase B of the Generator
Phase B Power Factor – displays power factor of phase B of the Generator
Phase C Current – displays phase C current of the Generator
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Phase C Frequency – displays frequency of the AC power on phase C of the Generator
Phase C L-N Voltage – displays phase C Line-to-Neutral RMS voltage of the Generator
Phase CA L-L Voltage – displays phase C Line-to-phase A Line RMS voltage of the Generator
Phase C Real Power – displays real power output on phase C of the generator
Phase C Reactive Power – displays reactive power output on phase C of the Generator
Phase C Apparent Power – displays apparent power output on phase C of the Generator
Phase C Power Factor – displays power factor of phase C of the Generator
4.2.3 AC Utility
Average Current – displays average current of the AC power on the utility
Average Frequency – displays average frequency of the AC power on the utility
Average L-N Voltage – displays average line to neutral RMS voltage of the AC power on the
utility
Average L-L Voltage – displays average line to line RMS voltage of the AC power on the utility
Total Real Power – displays real power output by the utility
Total Reactive Power – displays reactive power output by the utility
Total Apparent Power – displays apparent power output by the utility
Total Power Factor – displays power factor of the utility
Total kWH Export – displays total energy produced by the utility
Total kWH Import – displays total energy consumed by the utility
Phase A Current – displays phase A current of the Utility
Phase A Frequency – displays frequency of the AC power on phase A of the Utility
Phase A L-N Voltage – displays phase A Line-to-Neutral RMS voltage of the Utility
Phase AB L-L Voltage – displays phase A Line-to-phase B Line RMS voltage of the Utility
Phase A Real Power – displays real power output on phase A of the Utility
Phase A Reactive Power – displays reactive power output on phase A of the Utility
Phase A Apparent Power – displays apparent power output on phase A of the Utility
Phase A Power Factor – displays power factor of phase A of the Utility
Phase B Current – displays phase B current of the Utility
Phase B Frequency – displays frequency of the AC power on phase B of the utility
Phase B L-N Voltage – displays phase B Line-to-Neutral RMS voltage of the Utility
Phase BC L-L Voltage – displays phase B Line-to-phase C Line RMS voltage of the Utility
Phase B Real Power – displays real power output on phase B of the Utility
Phase B Reactive Power – displays reactive power output on phase B of the Utility
Phase B Apparent Power – displays apparent power output on phase B of the Utility
Phase B Power Factor – displays power factor of phase B of the Utility
Phase C Current – displays phase C current of the Utility
Phase C Frequency – displays frequency of the AC power on phase C of the utility
Phase C L-N Voltage – displays phase C Line-to-Neutral RMS voltage of the Utility
Phase CA L-L Voltage – displays phase C Line-to-phase A Line RMS voltage of the Utility
Phase C Real Power – displays real power output on phase C of the Utility
Phase C Reactive Power – displays reactive power output on phase C of the Utility
Phase C Apparent Power – displays apparent power output on phase C of the Utility
Phase C Power Factor – displays power factor of phase C of the Utility
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4.2.4 Anchor Watch
The DSM250 provides a graphical display of the Anchor Alert (section 8.3.7.9) parameters. When the
vessel is anchored, the position of vessel at the point of dropping the anchor is entered in to the
Anchor Alert plus the maximum distance that the boat can drift from that position (normally a little
more than the amount of Anchor Chain that you have let out). If the boat moves beyond that radius,
an Alert is triggered. The Anchor Watch display shows the last reported position of the vessel relative
to the reported Anchor Drop position and the radius of the alert (see section 7.1 for more details on
the display).
4.2.5 DC
The DSM250 supports the display of information for up to 64 DC sources including alternators,
batteries, solar cells, wind generators, etc., with special parameters for batteries (i.e., State of
Charge, Time Remaining, etc.).
Current – displays electrical current being sourced to/from the battery
Voltage – displays voltage measured at the battery
Battery Temperature – displays battery case temperature
Battery State of Charge – displays estimated state of charge of the battery (please consult the
battery monitor’s documentation for details)
Battery Time Remaining – displays estimated time remaining for the battery given its current
temperature and rate of discharge (please consult the battery monitor’s documentation for
details)
Ripple Voltage – displays magnitude of the AC component riding on top of the DC voltage
Power – displays the power produced or consumed by the battery
4.2.6 Depth
Transducer Offset – when negative, it displays distance from the depth transducer to the bottom
of the keel, when positive it displays distance between the depth transducer and the waterline
Water Depth – displays the current water depth including the transducer offset. If the transducer
offset is programmed to a negative number, then the water depth represents the depth below
the keel. If the transducer offset is positive, then the water depth represents water line depth.
Water Below Transducer – displays the distance from the depth transducer to the sea or lake
bottom (the transducer offset is not taken into account)
4.2.7 Elec. Distribution
The DSM250 supports control of the DCR100, Carling OctoPlex AC and DC Boxes, and other
electrical distribution devices that utilize NMEA Command of the 127501 Binary Switch Status
message for controlling loads.
Switch/Breaker – controls the ON/OFF state of a switch or circuit breaker
Breaker Current – displays current through a switch or circuit breaker
4.2.8 Engine
The DSM250 supports the display of information for up to 64 engines.
Boost Pressure – displays the boost pressure of a supercharger or turbocharger
Hours – displays the number of hours of operation reported by the engine
Coolant Pressure – displays the engine’s coolant pressure
Coolant Temp. – displays the engine’s coolant temperature
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Exhaust Gas Temp. – displays the temperature of the engine’s exhaust gas
Fuel Pressure – displays the pressure of the fuel for the engine
Fuel Rate – displays the rate of fuel consumption for the engine
Oil Pressure – displays the engine’s oil pressure
Oil Temp – displays the engine’s oil temperature
Tachometer – displays the rotational speed of the engine
Tilt/Trim – displays the tilt or trim of the drive
Voltage – displays the electrical power supply voltage measured at the engine
Fuel Economy – displays the current fuel economy for the engine
Fuel Consumption – displays the current fuel consumption for the engine
Percent Load – displays the current load on the engine as a percentage of rated load
Percent Torque – displays the current torque from the engine as a percentage of rated torque
Trip Fuel Used – displays the total amount of fuel consumed on the present trip
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4.2.9 Environment
Barometric – displays the current atmospheric (barometric) pressure
Heat Index – displays the current heat index based on air temperature and humidity
Humidity Inside – displays the relative humidity from an indoor humidity sensor
Humidity Outside – displays the relative humidity for an outdoor humidity sensor
Moon Phase – displays the phase of the moon at the current time and position
Sunrise – displays the local time of sunrise for the current day and position
Sunset – displays the local time of sunset for the current day and position
Dew Point – displays the current dew point based on air temperature and humidity
Temp Engine Room – displays the air temperature from a sensor mounted in an engine room
Temp Inside – displays the air temperature from a sensor mounted inside the vessel
Temp Main Cabin – displays the air temperature from a sensor mounted inside the main cabin
Temp Outside – displays the air temperature from a sensor mounted outside
Temp Sea – displays the current temperature of the water
Twilight AM – displays the time of nautical twilight before sunrise for the current day and position
Twilight PM – displays the time of nautical twilight after sunset for the current day and position
Weather – displays a screen with a wide variety of weather-related data (See Section 7.8 for
details)
Wind Chill – displays the current wind chill based on air temperature and wind speed
4.2.10
Fluid Flow
Flow Rate – displays the current rate of flow of a fluid
Trip Volume – displays the total volume of fluid through the sensor on the present trip
4.2.11
Fuel Management
WARNING: Maretron fuel management products are designed to be accurate and
reliable; however they should be used only as aids for fuel management and not as
a replacement for traditional fuel management techniques. BEWARE: Conditions
can quickly change that drastically effect time and distance to empty.
You should not use the fuel management data types unless you fully understand
all the parameters associated with fuel management. All fuel tanks and all engines
must be included when setting up the DSM250 plus there must be accurate fuel
rate sensors installed on the vessel and accurate speed information in order for
the DSM250 to properly display fuel management information. You should also
note that fuel levels may contain significant error if the boat is not sitting level in
the water (i.e., sailboat heeled over or a power boat riding bow up won’t
necessarily report the correct amount of fuel). Even when setup correctly, the
DSM250 should be used only as an aid and not the sole source for fuel
management information.
Total Fuel Economy – displays distance traveled per unit fuel used (for example, miles per gallon
or kilometers per liter) using the specified GPS and specified engine instances within the
favorite screen setup (see Section 5.2.6.4.2 for details).
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Total Fuel Rate – displays rate of fuel usage per unit time (for example, gallons or liters per hour)
for all engine instances specified within the favorite screen setup (see Section 5.2.6.4.2 for
details)
Total Fuel Remaining – displays total fuel remaining in all fuel tanks specified within the favorite
screen setup (see Section 5.2.6.4.2. In order for the DSM250 to properly calculate total fuel
remaining, tank monitors connected to the network must provide tank capacity in addition to
fluid level.
Distance to Empty – displays the distance you can travel before all fuel is consumed, assuming
all conditions remain the same. The DSM250 computes distance to empty using several
different parameters including the total fuel remaining (see above) and fuel economy (also
discussed above). Remember, conditions can rapidly change that may drastically effect
distance to empty. For example, if you are going out to sea with the wind and current behind
you, the distance to empty may indicate that there is enough fuel to return home when in fact
there isn’t enough fuel to return. Distance to empty is only applicable if the conditions remain
the same.
Time to Empty – displays the amount of time you can travel before all fuel is consumed,
assuming all conditions remain the same. The DSM250 computes time to empty using total
fuel remaining (see above) and the engine(s) fuel rate. Remember, conditions can rapidly
change that may drastically effect time to empty. For example, if you are going out to sea with
the wind and current behind you, the time to empty may indicate that there is enough fuel to
return home when in fact there isn’t enough fuel to return. Time to empty is only applicable if
the conditions remain the same.
Total Fuel Capacity – displays the total capacity of all fuel tanks. The DSM250 can only compute
total fuel capacity assuming all totalized tanks are transmitting their capacity.
Total Fuel Level – displays the percentage of fuel remaining in all fuel tanks.
Total Fuel Consumption – displays the total volume of fuel used per unit of distance traveled (for
example, gallons per mile or liters per km) using the specified GPS and specified engine
instances within the favorite screen setup (see Section 5.2.6.4.2 for details).
4.2.12
GPS
Course Over Ground – displays the current Course over Ground (either true or magnetic
depending on the “Heading:” setting found under the “Units…” menu item)
Lat/Lon – displays the current latitude and longitude of the vessel
Speed Over Ground – displays the current speed over ground
Status – displays the current operating mode and status of the specified GPS receiver
4.2.13
Heading
Magnetic/True – displays the current heading of the vessel (the direction the vessel is pointing)
relative to true or magnetic north depending on the unit setting of the heading parameter (see
Section 5.2.7.1)
Rate of Turn – displays the angular rate of rotation of the vessel about the vertical axis
Variation – displays the magnetic variation used to convert between true and magnetic headings
4.2.14
Humidity
Inside – displays the relative humidity from an indoor humidity sensor
Outside – displays the relative humidity from an outdoor humidity sensor
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User Defined 129 – User Defined 144 – displays the relative humidity from humidity sensors of
user-defined types
4.2.15
Indicator
Status – displays the on/off status of an indicator
4.2.16
Navigation
The DSM250 is not a primary navigation device; that is, it does not provide means for entering and
storing waypoint and route data. The DSM250 can receive information on the current leg of the
voyage from a primary navigation device (such as a chart plotter or PC with navigation software and
NMEA 2000® interface) and display this information.
Bearing Orig to Dest – displays the direction from the origin waypoint to the destination waypoint
Bearing To Waypoint – displays the bearing to the destination waypoint
Course Over Ground – displays the current Course over Ground (always referenced to true
north)
Cross Track Error – displays the cross-track error (minimum distance from the boat to the
programmed route)
Distance To Waypoint – displays the distance to the destination waypoint
Est. Time of Arrival – displays the Estimated Time of Arrival at the waypoint
Lat/Lon – displays the current latitude and longitude of the vessel
Rolling Road – displays navigation information for the current leg of the route
Set/Drift – displays the direction (set) and speed (drift) of the water current
Speed Over Ground – displays current Speed over Ground (relative to the earth, not the water)
Time To Go – displays the estimated Time to Go until arrival at the waypoint
VMG to Waypoint – displays the Velocity Made Good; that is, the speed at which the distance to
the waypoint is decreasing
Waypoint Number – this displays the number of the destination waypoint
4.2.17
Rudder
The DSM250 supports the display of information for up to four rudders.
Rudder Angle & Order – displays the angle of the vessel’s rudder as indicated by the rudder
sensor, as well as the angle to which the rudder has been commanded by an autopilot or
steering device
4.2.18
Pressure/Vacuum
Barometric – displays the current atmospheric (barometric) pressure
Compressed Air – displays the current pressure of compressed air
Engine Boost – displays the boost pressure of a supercharger or turbocharger
Engine Coolant – displays the coolant pressure for an engine
Engine Fuel – displays the fuel pressure for an engine
Engine Oil – displays the oil pressure for an engine
Hydraulic Oil – displays hydraulic oil pressure
Steam – displays steam pressure
Transmission Oil – displays oil pressure for an transmission
User Defined 129 – User Defined 144 – displays pressure from a pressure sensor of a userdefined type
Water – displays water pressure
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4.2.19
Special Devices
Watermaker – displays a screen with several different parameters associated with Sea Recovery
watermakers
4.2.20
Speed
Speed Through Water – displays the speed of the boat relative to the water
Speed Over Ground – displays Speed over Ground (relative to the earth, not the water)
Total Log – displays the total distance traveled by the vessel since the log indicator was installed
Trip Log – displays the distance traveled by the vessel since the trip indication of the log indicator
was last reset
4.2.21
Tank
The DSM250 supports the display of information for up to sixteen tanks types (16 fuel plus 16 water,
etc.).
Capacity – displays the fluid capacity of the tank
Level – displays the level of fluid in the tank as a percentage of its capacity
Remaining – displays the amount of fluid in the tank
4.2.22
Temperature
The DSM supports the display of temperatures. Each temperature sender on the bus is required to
state the source of the temperature, which may be one of:
• Bait Well
• Battery
• Dew Point
• Engine Coolant
• Engine Oil
• Engine Room
• Exhaust Gas
• Freezer
• Heat Index
• Heating System
• Inside
• Live Well
• Main Cabin
• Outside
• Refrigeration
• Sea
• Transmission Oil
• User Defined 129 – User Defined 144
• Wind Chill
4.2.23
Time
Local Date – displays the current date referenced to the local time offset (see Section 5.2.7.12,
on page 43 for details on how to set the local time offset)
UTC Date – displays the current date referenced to Universal Time Coordinated
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Moon Phase – displays the phase of the moon at the current time and position
Sunrise – displays the local time of sunrise for the current day and position
Sunset – displays the local time of sunset for the current day and position
Local Time – displays the current time referenced to the local time offset (see Section 5.2.7.12,
on page 43 for details on how to set the local time offset)
UTC Time – displays the current time referenced to Universal Time Coordinated (also known as
Greenwich Mean Time, or GMT)
Twilight AM – displays the time of nautical twilight (i.e., the time of day when the sun is 12
degrees below the horizon in the morning) for the current day and position
Twilight PM – displays the time of nautical twilight (i.e., the time of day when the sun is 12
degrees below the horizon in the evening) for the current day and position
4.2.24
Transmission
The DSM250 supports the display of information for up to four transmissions.
Gear – displays the current gear of the transmission (forward, neutral, or reverse)
Oil Pressure – displays the pressure of the oil in the transmission
Oil Temp. – displays the temperature of the oil in the transmission
4.2.25
VDR
The DSM250 supports display of status of a Vessel Data Recorder.
Status – displays the operating state of the VDR
Memory Capacity – displays the total memory capacity of the USB flash drive in the VDR
Memory Used – displays the total amount of memory used on the USB flash drive in the VDR
Memory Available – displays the total amount of memory remaining on the USB flash drive in the
VDR
Percent Used – displays the percentage of the memory capacity of the USB flash drive in the
VDR that is filled with data
Percent Available – displays the percentage of the memory capacity of the USB flash drive in the
VDR that is still available for data storage
4.2.26
Vessel
Keel – displays the height of a swing keel
Pitch – displays the pitch of the vessel (rotation about the horizontal axis perpendicular to the
ship’s keel)
Roll – displays the roll of the vessel (rotation about the horizontal axis parallel to the ship’s keel)
Trim Tabs – displays the position of the vessel’s trim tabs
Trim Tab Port – displays the position of the port trim tab
Trim Tab Starboard – displays the position of the starboard trim tab
4.2.27
Wind
Apparent Direction – displays the angle of the wind relative to the vessel center line as it
appears to an observer on the deck of a moving or stationary vessel (does not subtract out the
speed of the vessel)
Ground Direction – displays the angle of the wind relative to true or magnetic north (depending
on the unit setting of the “heading” parameter, see Section 5.2.7.1) measured relative to a
stationary observer, calculated using heading, course over ground (COG), and speed over
ground (SOG)
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True Direction – displays the angle of the wind relative to the vessel center line (vessel’s speed is
subtracted from Apparent wind direction), calculated using speed through water (STW) or
speed over ground (SOG) (depending on the unit setting of the “Wind True Vessel Ref.”
Parameter, see Section 5.2.7.6)
Apparent Speed – displays the speed of the wind as it appears to an observer on the deck of a
moving or stationary vessel (does not subtract out the speed of the vessel)
Ground Speed – displays the speed of the wind relative to a stationary observer, calculated using
heading, course over ground (COG), and speed over ground (SOG)
True Speed – displays the speed of the wind as it would appear to an observer if the vessel was
stopped in the water, calculated using speed through water (STW) or speed over ground
(SOG) (depending on the unit setting of the “Wind True Vessel Ref.” Parameter, see Section
5.2.7.6)
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4.3
Alerts
An alert is a signal to a user that there is either an alarm or warning condition requiring user
intervention.
Alerts are integrated in an NMEA2000® system. For each Alert, one device acts as a master, or Alert
Source, and monitors a parameter against a preset threshold. When the parameter crosses this
threshold, the Alert is displayed on the Alert Source and an Alert Message is sent out on the
NMEA2000® bus to other devices capable of displaying Alerts. Optionally, an Annunciator message is
sent to devices capable of sounding an audio alarm (e.g. the ALM100). Currently, the DSM250 and
the N2KView™ Vessel Monitoring Software are capable of generating and receiving Alert Messages.
The Alert may be accepted or cancelled from any capable device, in which case an Alert Response
Message is sent to the Alert Source, which in turn will turn the Annunciators off and inform the
devices on the bus of the new Alert Status.
4.3.1 Alert Types
There are two classes of alerts, which are distinguished by their severity:
• Alarm – An alarm is a type of alert announcing a condition requiring immediate attention or
user intervention. Alarms are shown in red (when Active), and always appear above the
warnings on the Alert Status Screen.
• Warning – A warning is a type of alert announcing a condition requiring non-immediate
attention for precautionary reasons. Warnings are shown in yellow (when Active), and always
appear below alarms on the Alert Status Screen.
4.3.2 Alert Terminology
The following alert terminology, consistent with International Maritime Organization Code on Alarms
and Indicators, is used in N2KView™ and the DSM250.
• Accept – The user action of acknowledging the existence of an alert. Alerts are only accepted
when they are Active
• Cancel – The user action of removing an alert from the list of displayed alerts. Alerts may only
be cancelled if the condition causing the alert has been removed.
• Clear – An alert is cleared when the condition causing the alert is removed. This is not a user
action.
• Trigger – An alert is triggered when the condition monitored by the alert is met.
4.3.3 Alert Priority
Each alert has a priority which you can define, ranging from 0 to 4000 with 0 the highest or most
important priority and 4000 the lowest or least important priority. Alarms always have a higher priority
than Warnings (i.e. an Alarm with a priority of 4000 has a higher priority than a warning with priority
0).
4.3.4 Vessel Alert Operating Modes
You can configure alerts to operate in one or more fixed operating modes, 1) disabled, 2) moored, 3)
underway, or 4) anchored. This allows you to easily enable or disable groups of individual alarms
depending on the vessel’s operating mode. Setting the vessel alert operating mode is described in
section 8.6.
The Operating Mode is one of:
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•
•
•
•
Disabled – All alerts are disabled. This mode should be used when the vessel is in storage,
dry-dock, or otherwise out of operation.
Moored – This mode is used when the vessel is secured to a structure that is permanently
attached to the ground like a pier, wharf, dock, or mooring buoy.
Underway – This mode is used when the vessel is not moored nor anchored.
Anchored – This mode is used when the vessel is secured to the sea floor with an anchor.
4.3.5 Alert States
Alerts exist in one of five states.
• Disabled – A Disabled Alert is an alarm or warning that has yet to be enabled or activated. In
this state, no action will be taken regardless of the value of the monitored parameter. A
Disabled Alert May be enabled in which case it transitions to the Inactive state
• Inactive – An Inactive alert is an alarm or warning that has been enabled, but the condition
causing the alert is not present. If the alert condition becomes true, the alert will become an
Active Alert. An Inactive alert may be disabled, which causes it to transition to the Disabled
state. New alerts are created in the Inactive State.
• Active – An Active alert is an alarm or warning where the condition to trigger the alert has been
met, and is still present and the operator has not accepted the alert. An active alert is indicated
by a flashing indicator on the Alert Status Screen, and by a flashing colored box at the top right
of the DSM250 screen. This box will be visible on all screens. Also, annunciators that are
programmed to sound when this alert is active will be sounding during this state. An active
alert can be accepted by the user (causing it to become an Accepted Alert) or disabled by the
user (causing it to become a Disabled Alert). If the condition causing the alert is rectified, the
alert transitions to the Awaiting Cancel state.
• Accepted – An Accepted alert is an alarm or warning which was Active and has been accepted
by the user. A solid indicator on the Alert Status Screen indicates an Accepted alert;
annunciators are silenced. Normally, an alert is a serious matter that requires immediate
attention and requires a deliberate attempt to remove the condition that caused the alert.
Sometimes it isn’t practical to immediately remove the condition that caused the alert;
accepting the alert will silence the annunciators while the appropriate user action is being
taken.
To prevent an alert that has accepted by the user from being forgotten, an accepted alert will
transition back to being Active after a period of time set by the user. If the condition causing
the alert is rectified (cleared), the alert will transition to the Inactive state.
You may disable the alert at this time, causing it to become a Disabled Alert.
• Awaiting Cancel – An Alert in the Awaiting Cancel state is an alert where the condition that
caused the alarm or warning has been removed without the alert being accepted while it was
Active. To avoid such alerts from being missed by the user, the alert is required to be
cancelled. You may cancel the alert at this time, causing it to become an Inactive Alert, or you
may disable the alert, causing it to become a Disabled Alert. Should the condition trigger the
alert again, the alert will transition back to the Active state, incrementing a counter which is
displayed on the Alert Status Screen in the “What Happened” column.
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4.3.6 Available Alert Classes
The DSM250 has several classes of alerts, depending on the parameter for which an alert is being
configured.
• Low Alert – The alert will become active if the monitored value drops below the value in this
alert for longer than the time specified in the Set Delay field.
• High Alert – The alert will become active if the monitored value rises above the value specified
in this alert for longer than the time specified in the Set Delay field.
• Data Unavailable Alert – The alert will become active if the monitored value is not received, or
is received but with a value of “Data Not Available”, for longer than the time specified in the Set
Delay field.
• On Alert – The alert will become active if the monitored switch or flag becomes “ON” for longer
than the time specified in the Set Delay field.
• Off Alert – The alert will become active if the monitored switch or flag becomes “OFF” for
longer than the time specified in the Set Delay field.
• Tripped Alert – The alert will become active if the monitored circuit breaker becomes “Tripped”
for longer than the time specified in the Set Delay field.
• Course Alert – The alert will become active if the monitored course differs from the Reference
Direction by more than the Offset COG Set Point for longer than the time specified in the Set
Delay field.
• GPS Quality Alert – The alert will become active if the GPS Quality drops below the level set in
the GPS Quality Alert Set field for longer than the time specified in the Set Delay field.
• Outside Radius Alert – The alert will become active if the distance between the current GPS
position and the Reference Latitude and Longitude rises above the value in the Outside Radius
Alert Set field for longer than the time specified in the Set Delay field.
• Inside Radius Alert – The alert will become active if the distance between the current GPS
position and the Reference Latitude and Longitude falls below the value in the Outside Radius
Alert Set field for longer than the time specified in the Set Delay field.
• Anchor Alert – Similar to the Outside Radius Alert, this alert will become active if the distance
between the current GPS position and the Reference Latitude and Longitude rises above the
value in the Outside Radius Alert Set field for longer than the time specified in the Set Delay
field. The Anchor Alert is more suited for smaller radii, and can be displayed graphically in the
Anchor Watch Display.
• Direction Alert – The alert will become active if the monitored course differs from the
Reference Direction by more than the Offset Wind Direction Set Point for longer than the time
specified in the Set Delay field.
• Timer Alert – The alert will become active when the time reaches the time specified in the
Alarm Time field, and thereafter after the intervals specified in the Repeat Interval field.
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5 Operating Modes
The DSM250 has two main operating modes including normal viewing of information in the favorite
screens mode (Section 5.1) and the menu mode (Section 5.2).
5.1
Favorite screens modes
After the power up screen (see Section 3.1), the DSM250 always enters the favorite screens mode. In
the favorite screens modes, the DSM250 displays one of up to sixteen “favorite” screens. Each
“favorite” screen can display one, two, three, or four information displays. Each information display
can show any displayable data in any display type supported by that data. In favorite screens mode,
the DSM250 can operate in one of two ways:
Manual mode – a particular “favorite” screen remains on the display until you select another one,
or
Auto mode – the DSM250 automatically cycles between “favorite” screens, at time intervals which
are individually programmable for each “favorite” screen.
An example screen of the DSM250 running in favorite screens mode can be seen in Figure 9 below.
Figure 9 – DSM250 Running in Favorite Screens Mode
The very bottom left hand corner of the screen shows two important parameters: 1) it indicates which
favorite screen is being displayed (in this case Favorite #5), and 2) it indicates that the DSM250 is
currently operating in the Auto mode. Manual would appear in place of Auto if the DSM250 was
operating in Manual mode.
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5.2
Menu Mode
The menu mode is entered while viewing favorite screens by pressing the Enter key (
).
In menu mode, the DSM250 may be configured by scrolling up and down the menu and selecting one
of the submenus found there. The DSM250 Main Menu can be seen in Figure 10 below.
Figure 10 – Main Menu
The menu has the following structure
Alert Setup…(5.2.1)
Add New Alert…(8.2)
Delete Alert…(8.4)
Edit Alert…(8.5)
Operating Mode (8.6)
Advanced Configuration… (8.7)
Restore Factory Defaults (8.8)
Alert Status… (5.2.2)
Configuration…
Device Configuration… (5.2.3.1)
Device Selection… (5.2.3.2)
Display Settings…
Advanced Configuration… (5.2.4.1)
Advanced Information… (5.2.4.2)
Backlight… (5.2.4.3)
Color Setup… (5.2.4.4)
Demo Mode (5.2.4.5)
Keypad Beep (5.2.4.6)
Label (5.2.4.7)
Language (5.2.4.8)
Software Version (5.2.4.9)
Favorite Screens Mode (5.2.4.7)
Favorite Screens Setup… (5.2.6)
Units… (5.2.6.4.2)
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5.2.1 Alert Setup Menu
Selecting Alert Setup… from the Main Menu allows you to create, delete, and edit the Alerts stored
in the DSM250, and to change the operating mode of the vessel. See section 7.14 for details on the
Alerts.
5.2.2 Alert Status
Selecting Alert Status… from the Main Menu will display a list of currently active Alerts in the
DSM250. See section 8.1.1 for details on the Alert Status Screen.
5.2.3 Configuration Menu
The configuration menu allows you to change the configuration of certain types of Maretron NMEA
2000® devices, as well as to select from which NMEA 2000® nodes data may be received.
The available options within the Configuration screen are shown in Figure 11.
Figure 11 – Configuration Screen
5.2.3.1 Device Configuration
The ability to calibrate and configure other devices on the bus is a major portion of this manual. For
this reason it has been given an entire section. See section 6 for details.
5.2.3.2 Device Selection
The “Device Selection…” menu allows you to enable and disable the display of data from individual
NMEA 2000® devices. In this manner, multiple devices of the same type may be used in redundant
and fail-safe configurations. A typical “Device Selection…” menu for a network configuration can be
seen in Figure 12 below.
NOTE: Now that you can select instances for each displayed parameter, you do not need to configure
this menu. This menu entry is retained for backward compatibility.
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Figure 12 – Device Selection Screen
The “NA” column of the menu displays the node address the device is using.
The “Manufacturer” column of the menu displays the manufacturer of the device.
The “Model” column displays the model number of the device.
The “SN#” column displays the serial number of the device, so that any of two or more devices of
the same manufacturer and model number may be distinguished from one another.
The “Status” column indicates whether the device is currently connected to the bus and is
responding to queries (“Online”), or has been disconnected from the bus, has lost power, or for
some other reason is not responding to queries (“Offline”).
The “Display” column indicates whether data from that particular device is accepted for display by
the DSM250 (“On”) or that the DSM250 ignores data transmitted by this device (“Off”). By
scrolling to the device and pressing the Enter key (
), you may then use the Scroll Up (
)
and Scroll Down (
) keys to toggle the “Display” status for this particular device. Once you
are satisfied with the state of the “Display” setting, press the Enter key (
) to accept the
setting.
The DSM250 will retain information on devices that have been removed from the bus or powered
down (“Offline”) so that when they are placed back on the bus, they will assume their prior “Display”
setting.
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5.2.4 Display Settings Menu
The display settings menu allows you to change parameters related to display operation.
Figure 13 – DSM250 Display Settings Screen
5.2.4.1 Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 14 – DSM250 Advanced Configuration
5.2.4.1.1 Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
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5.2.4.1.2 Primary Device Selection
Not all the data displayed by the DSM250 can be taken directly off the NMEA 2000 bus. Some
require calculations with other parameters before the desired value can be displayed. An example
would be the display of ground relative wind. In this case, the wind measured by the weather station
needs to be combined with the vessel heading, course over ground, and speed over ground.
The instance number of the weather station is specified for each control.
This table provides the instance numbers of the other parameters used in the calculations.
Figure 15 – DSM250 Primary Device Selection
5.2.4.1.3 Refresh Network Information
The Device Configuration (5.2.3.1) and Device Selection (5.2.3.2) menus display a list of devices that
have been detected on the NMEA2000 bus. This list is kept in memory permanently to reduce the
overhead of requesting device information each time one of these pages is requested.
Pressing the Enter key while this selection is highlighted will clear the list of devices. It will be
necessary to perform this action to remove traces of devices that have been removed from the bus.
5.2.4.1.4 Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the DSM100 device to their factory default state.
5.2.4.2 Advanced Information
The Advanced Information Page displays information pertaining to the permanent setup and
configuration of the DSM250.
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Figure 16 – DSM250 Advanced Information Screen
Most of the items within the Advanced Information… menu are obvious and not described here,
although a less obvious menu item (Bus Status…) is described below.
5.2.4.2.1 Bus Status
The DSM250 is capable of monitoring the NMEA 2000® network and displaying certain statistics.
Baud Rate: the speed capability of the connected network given in bits per second (bps),
Voltage: the network voltage as measured by the DSM250 in Volts,
Traffic: the percent usage of the total available bandwidth measured by the DSM250,
Receive Rate: the DSM250 measured received rate in frames per second (fps),
Transmit Rate: the DSM250 measured transmit rate in frames per second (fps),
Error Count: the DSM250 measured error frames since entering the Bus Status screen,
Receive Counter: the number of DSM250 measured received frames, and
Transmit Counter: the number of DSM250 measured transmitted frames.
Figure 17 – Bus Status Display
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5.2.4.3 Backlight
The DSM250 has three user-programmable lighting levels which may be cycled through using the
Lights key (
) on the keypad while the DSM250 is operating in favorite screens mode. Each time
you quick press the Lights key (
) in favorite screens mode, the DSM250 backlight will transition
between the “Low” setting, the “Medium” setting, and the “High” setting Note that a quick press of the
Lights key (
) changes the screen intensity or backlight while a long press changes the color
palette as described in Section 5.2.4.4. The Backlight menu allows you to program the “Low”,
“Medium”, and “High” brightness levels. The value that appears next to the appropriate setting is
measured in percent of full brightness. The Backlight menu can be seen in Figure 18 below.
Figure 18 – Backlight Menu
5.2.4.4 Color Setup
The DSM250 has eight user-programmable color palettes. The default color palettes are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Color Set #1 – White Back Ground, Black Foreground
Color Set #2 – Red Back Ground, Black Foreground
Color Set #3 – Blue Back Ground, Black Foreground
Color Set #4 – Green Back Ground, Black Foreground
Color Set #5 – Black Background, White Foreground
Color Set #6 – Black Background, Red Foreground
Color Set #7 – Black Background, Blue Foreground
Color Set #8 – Black Background, Green Foreground
Choosing the “Color Setup…” menu item from the main “Display Settings..” menu takes you to the
screen shown in Figure 19.
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Figure 19 – Color Palette Selection Screen
Use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
to change, and then press the Enter key (
shown in Figure 20.
) keys to move the highlight to the color set that you want
). Selecting “Color Set #1” takes you to the screen
Figure 20 – Color Palette Configuration Screen
You can enable or disable Color Set #1 by changing the “Color Set:” to “Off”. This will disable Color
Set #1 while changing between color palettes when using a long press of the Lights key (
) when
the DSM250 is operating in favorite screens mode. Change the “Color Set:” back to “On” to enable
this color palette.
Notice that Color Set #1 has a white background (100% Red, 100% Green, and 100% Blue equals
white) and that the foreground color is black. You can adjust the three different colors to achieve
different color backgrounds. Use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlight
to the color you want to change, and then press the Enter key (
). Use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll
Down (
) keys with the percentage number selected to change that particular color’s intensity. You
can also switch the background color to the foreground color by changing the Inverse Background to
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“On”. The background will switch to black and the percentage color settings are now used to define
the foreground color.
5.2.4.5 Demo Mode
The DSM250 has a demo mode suited for displaying the capabilities of the unit. It causes the
DSM250 to operate in a “simulated data” mode, where the DSM250 will install a set of pre-defined
favorite screens and other configuration and will then display only the internally generated simulated
data and will ignore any data arriving over the NMEA 2000® bus. While in demo mode, the DSM250
will display a “Demo” indicator in the upper right hand corner of the screen. Programming this option
to “On (Show Room Mode)” or “On (Boat Show Mode, No Auto Reset)” will cause the DSM250 to
enter the demo mode while programming this option for “Off (Normal Use Mode)” will cause the
DSM250 to return to using data from the NMEA 2000® bus.
In order to be able to demonstrate all of the DSM250’s capabilities, the unit allows the user to setup
and configure different screens while in demo mode. However, in a show room environment and five
minutes after the last button push (i.e., the customer has walked away the demo unit), the DSM250
will reset itself to the default screens. There are others times where it is important that the DSM250
doesn’t automatically reset after five minutes to the default screens, for example at a boat show
where it is desired to show specific screens while running in the demo mode and thus the “Boat Show
Mode”.
WARNING: All data displayed in demo mode is simulated. Do not use this data for vessel monitoring
or navigation purposes.
Figure 21 – Setting the Demo Mode
5.2.4.6 Keyboard Beep
The DSM250 has an annunciator that can be programmed to beep every time a key is pressed.
Conversely, the keypad beep may be disabled if desired.
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Figure 22 – Setting the Keyboard Beep Option
5.2.4.7 Label
Each DSM250 can be given a software label. Normally this label will indicate the position of the
DSM250 and is used by the Alert System to identify one DSM250 from another.
Figure 23 – Editing the DSM250 Label
5.2.4.8 Language
The DSM250 currently supports two languages: English and Dutch (Nederlands). Support for other
languages is planned for future firmware releases. To change the currently used language, use the
Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlight to the “Language:” menu item, and
then press the Enter key (
) to move the highlight to the language selection on the right. Use the
Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to change the selection to the desired value, and then
press the Enter key (
) to confirm your selection. The DSM250 will then reset itself, after which the
selected language will be used for menus and titles.
5.2.4.9 Software Version
This field displays the version of the Firmware running in the DSM250.
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5.2.5 Favorite Screens Mode
The DSM250 supports two methods of operation in favorites mode: “Auto”, in which the DSM250
automatically cycles through all favorite screens that have been enabled for Auto mode, and
“Manual”, in which the DSM250 continues to display the currently displayed favorite screen until you
press the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys, in which the DSM250 will display the next higher
or lower numbered favorite screen, respectively, that is enabled for Manual mode.
Figure 24 – Setting the Favorite Screens Mode
5.2.6 Favorite Screens Setup Menu
The DSM250 supports the configuration of sixteen favorite screens. The favorite setup screen allows
you to select which of the sixteen favorite screens you wish to configure.
Figure 25 – Favorite Screens Setup Screen
Once you have selected a favorite screen to configure, you will see the screen shown in Figure 26 .
The exact format of the setup screen will depend on the Format chosen.
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Figure 26 – Favorite Screen Parameters
5.2.6.1 Favorite Mode
This entry allows you to select in which display method of favorite screens mode this particular
favorite screen is enabled. This parameter has four possible settings:
Off – this favorite screen is disabled and is not displayed
Auto – this favorite screen is displayed only in Auto mode
Manual – this favorite screen is displayed only in Manual mode
Auto/Manual – this favorite screen is displayed in both Auto and Manual modes
5.2.6.2 Format
The DSM250 offers many methods and formats of displaying multiple data items at a given time. This
parameter is used to program how many data items will appear on this particular favorite screen and
in what sizes these items will appear. A graphical preview of the selected format will appear in the
upper right hand corner of the display. This parameter has the following settings:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Full Window – one parameter will be displayed, taking up the entire screen
2/3 Top – 1/3 Bottom – two parameters will be displayed, the first occupying the top 2/3 of the
screen and the second occupying the bottom 1/3 of the screen
1/3 Top – 2/3 Bottom – two parameters will be displayed, the first occupying the top 1/3 of the
screen and the second occupying the bottom 2/3 of the screen
Half Left – Qtr – Qtr – three parameters will be displayed, the first occupying the left half of
the screen, the second occupying the upper right hand corner of the screen and the third
occupying the lower right hand corner of the screen
Qtr – Half – Qtr – three parameters will be displayed, the first occupying the top left hand
corner of the screen, the second occupying the upper right hand corner of the screen, and the
third occupying the lower right hand corner of the screen
Half Left/Right – two parameters will be displayed, the first occupying the left half of the
screen, and the second occupying the right half of the screen
Half Top/Bottom – two parameters will be displayed, the first occupying the top half of the
screen and the second occupying the bottom half of the screen
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•
•
•
2 Qtrs – Half Bottom – three parameters will be displayed, the first occupying the upper left
hand corner of the screen, the second occupying the upper right hand corner of the screen,
and the third occupying the bottom half of the screen
Half Top – 2 Qtrs – three parameters will be displayed, the first occupying the top of the
screen, the second occupying the lower left hand corner of the screen, and the third occupying
the lower right hand corner of the screen
Four Quarters – four parameters will be displayed, the first occupying the upper left hand
corner of the screen, the second occupying the upper right hand corner of the screen, the third
occupying the lower left hand corner of the screen, and the fourth occupying the lower right
hand corner of the screen
Figure 27 – Setting the Favorite Screen Format
5.2.6.3 Auto Change Interval
In Auto mode, this parameter determines the amount of time this favorite screen is displayed before
the DSM250 automatically cycles to the next higher numbered favorite screen in the auto mode. This
parameter is programmable to anywhere between 1 second and 180 seconds.
Figure 28 – Setting the Auto Change Interval
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5.2.6.4 Window Data
The Window Data section of the menu allows you to select a particular type of data to be displayed in
each part of the screen. Selecting the data to be displayed is a two-step process. First, press the
Enter key (
) and select the category of data to be displayed.
Figure 29 – Selecting the Data Category
Once you select the category, press the Enter key (
) to accept this category, at which time the
highlight will move to the data type field, where you can display the particular data type from the
selected category to be displayed as shown in Figure 30.
Figure 30 – Selecting the Data to be displayed
5.2.6.4.1 Type
Once you have selected the particular data item to be displayed; you may select the type of data
display to be used for that data item. The available display types vary depending upon the selected
data item, but may include any of the following (see Section 7 for descriptions of the available display
types).
•
Anchor Watch ( See Section 7.1 on page 198)
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Compass Rose (see Section 7.2 on page 199)
Gauge (see Section 7.3 on page 200)
GPS Status (see Section 7.4 on page 201)
Numeric (see Section 7.5 on page 202)
Rolling Road (see Section 7.6 on page 203)
Line Graph (see 7.7 on page 204).
Weather Screen (see Section 7.8 on page 204)
Wind Rose (see Section 7.9 on page 206)
Moon Phase (see Section 7.10 on page 206)
Trim Tab (see Section 7.11 on page 206)
Swing Meter (see Section 7.12 on page 207)
Tank Gauge (see Section 7.13 on page 207)
5.2.6.4.2 Instance
Instance is used to specify which product on the network will be used as the source of the displayed
information. For example, there may be two GPS’s on the network each of which will have a unique
instance assuming the network has been properly configured. You use the instance field to tell the
DSM250 which GPS to use for displaying data. Most of the time, the DSM250 simply displays a
single parameter from a device on the network so you will only see one “Instance” entry. There are
other parameters that the DSM250 displays that are a combination of information from multiple
products on the network. For example, fuel economy is a combination of fuel rate and Speed Over
Ground (SOG) so you will see two “Instance” entries, one to specify the engine(s) and one to specify
the GPS for SOG.
5.2.6.4.3 Alert
In setting up the Anchor Watch display type, this field is used to specify the associated Anchor Watch
Alert priority. The list from which the selection is made will be limited to the list of Anchor Watch Alerts
already created in the system.
5.2.6.4.4 Title
Each display type has a user defined title that is displayed above the control. The contents of the title
are specified in this field. There are three options:
• Default – the title of the control is the same as the name of the parameter being displayed.
• Label – the label of the parameter. The label is programmed into the remote device, and will be
transferred to the title when it is received from the remote device. This means that if the label
of the remote device is changed, the title of the control will be automatically updated to match
the new label.
• Custom – the title is entered by the user using the method described in section 3.3.4.
5.2.7 Units Menu
The Units Menu allows you to set the desired display units for the DSM250. The following sections
provide more detail on the individual unit settings.
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Figure 31 – DSM250 Units Menu
5.2.7.1 Heading
This menu item allows you to select whether heading, course, and bearing information is displayed in
true or magnetic measurements. True heading can only be displayed if a variation is available on the
NMEA 2000® bus.
If the DSM250 is not showing heading or COG (i.e., no needle on compass rose or dashes for digital
displays), it’s probably a good indication that variation isn’t available on the network. The DSM250
can’t calculate true heading given magnetic heading from a compass if variation isn’t available.
Likewise, the DSM250 can’t calculate magnetic course given true course from a GPS if variation isn’t
available. You can setup a favorite screen to display variation, which will help you determine whether
or not you have a product on the network broadcasting variation information (Maretron’s GPS’s use
the World Magnetic Model to broadcast variation).
5.2.7.2 Depth
This menu item allows you to select the units to be used for the display of all depth-related
information. Units that may be selected are the following:
•
•
•
Meters
Fathoms
Feet
5.2.7.3 Distance
This menu item allows you to select the units to be used for the display of all distance-related
information. Units that may be selected are the following:
•
•
•
Nautical Miles
km
Statute Miles
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5.2.7.4 Boat Speed
This menu item allows you to select the units to be used for the display of all boat speed-related
information. Units that may be selected are the following:
•
•
•
•
Knots
Miles/Hour
Km/Hour
Meters/second
5.2.7.5 Wind Speed
This menu item allows you to select the units to be used for the display of all wind speed-related
information. Units that may be selected are the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Knots
Miles/Hour
Km/Hour
Beaufort
Meters/second
5.2.7.6 Wind True Vessel Ref.
This menu items allows you to select whether the true wind direction and speed referenced to the
vessel are relative to the water or the ground. Sailors are generally interested in measurements
relative to the water while power boaters are interested in measurements relative to the ground.
Station is for home applications (i.e., fixed mounting location unlike a vessel that changes direction).
Formats that may be selected are the following:
•
•
•
Water
Ground
Station
5.2.7.7 Temperature
This menu item allows you to select the units to be used for the display of all temperature-related
information. Units that may be selected are the following:
•
•
°F
°C
5.2.7.8 Atmospheric Pressure
This menu item allows you to select the units to be used for the display of atmospheric (barometric)
pressure. Units that may be selected are the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Inches Mercury (in Hg)
Bar
Millibars
Millimeters Mercury (mm Hg)
kPa
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5.2.7.9 Fluid Pressure
This menu item allows you to select the units to be used for the display of fluid pressure. Units that
may be selected are the following:
•
•
•
Pounds/Square Inch (PSI)
kPa
Bar
5.2.7.10
Volume
This menu item allows you to select the units to be used for the display of all liquid volume-related
information. Units that may be selected are the following:
•
•
•
Liters
Imperial Gallons (UK Gallons)
Gallons (US Gallons)
5.2.7.11
Time Format
This menu item allows you to select whether measurements indicating a time of day are displayed in
12-Hour (AM/PM) format or 24-Hour (military) format.
5.2.7.12
Local Time Offset
This menu item allows you to indicate the offset of local time relative to Universal Time, Coordinated
(UTC, also known as Greenwich Mean Time, or GMT), in hours and minutes. For instance, Eastern
Standard Time (EST) would use an offset value of -5:00.
5.2.7.13
Date Format
This menu item allows you to select the format of any displayed dates.
Formats that may be selected are the following:
•
•
•
•
MM-DD-YYYY
(01-31-2005)
DD-MM-YYYY
(31-01-2005)
MMM-DD-YYYY (JAN-31-2005)
DD-MMM-YYYY (31-JAN-2005)
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6 Device Configuration
The “Device Configuration…” menu enables you to configure certain types of devices on the NMEA
2000® network. Devices that may be configured using the DSM250 include the following:
Airmar Depth, Speed, and Temperature Transducers (DST800, DT800, P39, P79, B122,
ST850, ST800, HT200) – Reset trip log, set depth offset, speed calibration, and temperature
offset (if applicable)
Bennett EP-30 – Calibrate trim tabs.
Maretron Alternating Current Monitor (ACM100) – Set circuit type, device type, instance
number, and label. Reset the total energy recorded.
Maretron Annunciator (ALM100) – Set the Data Instance Number, and the Label. Test the
alarm.
Maretron Direct Current Monitor (DCM100) – Set the Battery Type, and calibrate the current
sensor zero offset.
Maretron Direct Current Relay Module (DCR100) – Set the operating mode of each channel,
lock switches, set power up state, and control state of switches
Maretron Monochrome Display (DSM200) – allows configuration of other DSM200s on the
network
Maretron Color Display (DSM150,DSM250) – allows configuration of other DSM150s and
DSM250s on network
Maretron Depth/Speed/Temp. Transducer (DST100) – set transducer offset, zero trip distance
log
Maretron Depth/Speed/Temp. Transducer (DST110) – Reset trip log, set depth offset, speed
calibration, and temperature offset
Maretron Engine Monitoring System (EMS100) – set the gauge types for Boost Pressure, Drive
Trim, Oil Pressure and Water Temperature. Preset the Engine Hours
Maretron Fuel Flow Monitor (FFM100) – Set operating mode, channel direction, K-factor,
temperature coefficient
Maretron Fluid Pressure Monitor (FPM100) – Set the operating mode of each channel, perform
tank levels calibration, set pressure sender characteristics
Maretron GPS Antenna/Receiver (GPS100) – enable and disable WAAS functionality, set the
GPS mode, program the elevation, PDOP and SNR masks, set the antenna altitude, force a
cold start, enable/disable individual PGN transmission, and reset the unit back to its factory
defaults.
Maretron GPS Antenna/Receiver (GPS200) – enable and disable WAAS functionality, force a
cold start, enable/disable individual PGN transmission, and reset the unit back to its factory
defaults.
Maretron Internet Protocol Gateway(IPG100) – set IP connection parameters, set N2KServer
password, view N2KServer information, and reset the unit back to its factory defaults.
Maretron J1939 to NMEA 2000 Gateway (J2K100) – set J1939 node address, set NMEA 2000®
engine/transmission instance, enable pass-through of J1939 diagnostic messages, and
enable/disable individual NMEA 2000® PGN transmissions.
Maretron Network Bus Extender (NBE100) – Set device label
Maretron Rudder Angle Adapter (RAA100) – Set rudder number, operating mode, and calibrate
rudder position.
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Maretron Run Indicator Monitor (RIM100) – Set Data Instance for the device, and labels for the
device and each channel.
Maretron Switch Indicator Monitor (SIM100) – Set Data Instance for the device, and labels for
the device and each channel. Set each channel mode.
Maretron Solid Sate Compass (SSC200) – set installation offset, perform magnetic deviation
calibration, check magnetic deviation calibration status, invert installation, configure magnetic
variation settings, setup NMEA0183 interface, program rate of turn damping, zero the rate-ofturn offset, and enable/disable individual NMEA 2000® PGN transmissions.
Maretron Tank Level Adapter (TLA100) – Set tank type and tank number, set operating mode,
set tank capacity, and calibrate for irregular shaped tanks.
Maretron Tank Level Monitor Shallow (TLM100) – Set tank type and tank number, set operating
mode, set tank capacity, and calibrate for irregular shaped tanks.
Maretron Tank Level Monitor Gasoline (TLM150) – Set tank type and tank number, set
operating mode, set tank capacity, and calibrate for irregular shaped tanks.
Maretron Tank Level Monitor Deep (TLM200) – Set tank type and tank number, set operating
mode, set tank capacity, and calibrate for irregular shaped tanks.
Maretron Temperature Monitor (TMP100) – Set device label and channel instance, temperature
source (type) and label.
Maretron NMEA 2000 to USB gateway (USB100) – allows configuration of USB100s on network
Maretron Vessel Data Recorder (VDR100) – Set device label
Maretron Ultrasonic Wind and Weather Station (WSO100) – set installation offset, set wind
damping rates, and enable/disable individual NMEA 2000® PGN transmissions.
More device types will be included in future firmware releases.
In each case, the contents of the Device Configuration menus may vary depending on the version of
the firmware within the device.
The “Device Configuration…” menu is shown in Figure 32.
Figure 32 – Device Configuration Screen
The “NA” column of the menu displays the node address the device is using.
The “Manufacturer” column of the menu displays the manufacturer of the device.
The “Model” column displays the model number of the device.
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The “SN#” column displays the serial number of the device, so that any of two or more devices of
the same manufacturer and model number may be distinguished from one another.
The “HW” column shows the device hardware version.
The “SW” column shows the device software version (firmware version).
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6.1
Airmar Depth/Speed/Temperature Transducers
The DSM250 supports configuration and calibration of the following Airmar
Depth/Speed/Temperature transducers that have NMEA 2000® interfaces:
• DST800
• DT800
• P39
• P79
• B122
• ST850
• ST800
• HT200
The following calibration functions are supported (not all functions apply to every model of
transducer):
• Reset trip log
• Set depth Offset
• Perform Speed Calibration
• Program Temperature Offset
Figure 33 – Airmar Depth/Speed/Temperature Transducer Configuration Screen
6.1.1 Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
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Figure 34 – Airmar Transducer Advanced Configuration Screen
6.1.2 Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
6.1.3 Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.1.4 NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The transducer transmits several different NMEA2000 PGN’s which can be turned on or turned off by
the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…” menu item
selected causes the DSM250 to display the NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable screen.
You can enable or disable the transmission of the these messages, or set the frequency of
transmission of the message by pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured.
Options are:
•
•
Off – The message will not be transmitted
On – The message will be transmitted at its default NMEA 2000® rate.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.1.5 Clear Speed Calibration
The Clear Speed Calibration configuration parameter shows you the currently used correction
factor. All measured STW readings are multiplied by this number before being transmitted over the
NMEA 2000® network. You can remove the correction factor by pressing the Enter key (
) with the
“Clear Speed Calibration:” menu item selected. And then choose “Clear” using Scroll Up (
) or
Scroll Down (
) keys followed by the Enter key (
). This changes the correction factor back to 1
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such that all subsequent measured STW readings are no longer adjusted before begin transmitted
over the NMEA 2000® network.
6.1.6 Speed Calibration
The Airmar speed transducer speed through water (STW) initial accuracy is significantly affected by
the location or placement of the speed transducer within the hull. The speed transducer can be
corrected for these inaccuracies using the speed calibration procedure. You calibrate the speed
transducer STW by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Speed Calibration…” menu item selected
which results in the screen shown in Figure 77.
Figure 35 – Calibrating the Airmar Speed Transducer Speed
The speed calibration screen shown in Figure 77 indicates the STW as measured by the Airmar
speed transducer, which can be changed to the transmitted STW by following these steps. First, pick
a speed where you are most concerned with the best accuracy. Next, bring the boat up to the desired
speed using some other source, perhaps the GPS speed over ground (SOG). Remember that the
SOG does not necessary reflect the STW because of currents, and drift due to winds, so you should
do this in an area where you are sure there are no currents and calm winds. Finally, use the Increase
(
) and Decrease (
) keys to adjust the display value until it matches the known speed of the
boat. Press the Accept (
) key to accept the value when you are satisfied. If you do not wish to
perform speed calibration at this time, press the Abort (
) key and the speed calibration will not be
altered.
6.1.7 Clear Temperature Offset
The Clear Temperature Offset configuration parameter shows you the currently used temperature
correction offset. All measured sea temperature readings have this value added to them before being
transmitted over the NMEA 2000® network. You can set the correction offset to zero by pressing the
Enter key (
) with the “Clear Speed Calibration:” menu item selected. And then choose “Clear”
using Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys followed by the Enter key (
). This changes the
correction factor back to 0 such that all subsequent measured sea temperature readings are no
longer adjusted before begin transmitted over the NMEA 2000® network.
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6.1.8 Temperature Calibration
The temperature calibration screen shown below indicates the sea temperature as measured by the
Airmar temperature transducer, which can be changed to the actual sea temperature by following
these steps. Use the Increase (
) and Decrease (
) keys to adjust the display value until it
matches the known sea temperature. Press the Accept (
) key to accept the value when you are
satisfied. If you do not wish to perform temperature calibration at this time, press the Abort (
) key
and the temperature calibration will not be altered.
Figure 36 – Airmar Temperature Transducer Water Temperature Calibration Screen
6.1.9 Transducer Depth Offset
The DSM250 can set the transducer depth offset parameter in an Airmar depth transducer. If you are
interested in the actual water depth (as opposed to the depth beneath the keel), then you should
program a positive value equal to the distance from the waterline to the depth of the depth
transducer. The DSM250 will then add the measured depth of the water (as seen by the depth
transducer) to the programmed offset value to produce the total water depth. If you are interested in
the depth of water beneath the keel, then you should program a negative value equal to the distance
between the depth transducer and the bottom of the keel. The DSM will then subtract the
programmed offset from the measured depth of the water (as seen by the depth transducer) showing
you the depth of water beneath the keel.
You program the transducer depth offset by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Transducer Depth
Offset:” menu item selected which results in the screen shown in Figure 78.
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Figure 37 – Setting the Transducer Depth Offset in an Airmar Depth Transducer
With the offset value highlighted, you can change the offset by using the Increase and Decrease
keys (
or
). Once you have selected the desired offset, push the Enter key (
) to complete
the transducer depth offset calibration. This procedure actually programs the offset value into the
transducer such that all displays subsequently receive the offset information. This means you don’t
have to program multiple displays each with the corresponding offset information as the information is
stored at a single place (at the source).
6.1.10
Trip Log
The DSM250 is capable of clearing the trip log counter within an Airmar speed transducer. You zero
the trip log by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Trip Log:” menu item selected which results in
the screen shown Figure 79. Pressing the Accept (
) key while the “Reset” menu item is selected
will complete the operation. Resetting the trip log zeroes the transducer’s trip log such that all
displays receive a zeroed value.
Figure 38 – Resetting the Airmar Speed Sensor Trip Distance Log
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6.2
Bennett EP-30 (NMEA1) Trim Tabs Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Bennett EP-30 trim tabs firmware version 1.0.7 (“NMEA1”
NMEA 2000 Trim Tab Indicator Kit). The EP-30 configuration menu is shown below in Figure 39
below, and currently has the single entry “Trim Tabs Calibration…”.
Figure 39 – EP-30 Trim Tabs Configuration Screen
6.2.1 Trim Tabs Calibration
The Bennett EP-30 (NMEA1) trim tabs calibration opening screen is shown in Figure 40 below. The
first step in calibration is to move both trim tabs to the full up position, and then press the Accept (
) key to begin the calibration process. You may also elect to abort the calibration process at this time
by pressing the Abort (
) key.
Figure 40 – EP-30 Trim Tabs Calibration Opening Screen
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After you press the Accept (
) key, a screen, shown in Figure 41 below, appears, instructing you to
now lower both trim tabs to the full down position. It is important that you do this without stopping in
order for the calibration process to succeed.
Figure 41 – EP-30 Intermediate Calibration Screen
After you have lowered both trim tabs to their full down position and a few seconds have elapsed, the
screen shown in Figure 42 below should appear, indicating that the calibration of the trim tab sensors
has completed successfully. You may now press any key to return to the previous menu.
Figure 42 – EP-30 Calibration Success Message
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6.3
Maretron ACM100 Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Maretron ACM100 firmware version 1.0.6.
Figure 43 – ACM100 Configuration Screen
6.3.1 Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 44 – ACM100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.3.1.1 Current Transformer A
The ACM100 with firmware revision 1.0.7 or newer supports two different types of current sensors:
the 100A current sensor included with the unit and an optional 400A current sensor. This menu entry
allows you to indicate which type of current sensor you have installed for phase A.
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6.3.1.2 Current Transformer B
The ACM100 with firmware revision 1.0.7 or newer supports two different types of current sensors:
the 100A current sensor included with the unit and an optional 400A current sensor. This menu entry
allows you to indicate which type of current sensor you have installed for phase B.
6.3.1.3 Current Transformer C
The ACM100 with firmware revision 1.0.7 or newer supports two different types of current sensors:
the 100A current sensor included with the unit and an optional 400A current sensor. This menu entry
allows you to indicate which type of current sensor you have installed for phase C.
6.3.1.4 Current Transformer A
If you notice that the power measurements of phase A are negative when they should be positive, or
vice-versa, then the current transformer has been installed backwards. If this happens, then instead
of reconnecting the current transformer, you may change the value of this parameter from the default
value of “Normal Install” to “Inverse Install” to correct for this.
Valid options are:
•
•
Inverse Install
Normal Install
Use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to select the correct option, and then press Enter to
save the value.
6.3.1.5 Current Transformer B
If you notice that the power measurements of phase B are negative when they should be positive, or
vice-versa, then the current transformer has been installed backwards. If this happens, then instead
of reconnecting the current transformer, you may change the value of this parameter from the default
value of “Normal Install” to “Inverse Install” to correct for this.
Valid options are:
•
•
Inverse Install
Normal Install
Use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to select the correct option, and then press Enter to
save the value.
6.3.1.6 Current Transformer C
If you notice that the power measurements of phase C are negative when they should be positive, or
vice-versa, then the current transformer has been installed backwards. If this happens, then instead
of reconnecting the current transformer, you may change the value of this parameter from the default
value of “Normal Install” to “Inverse Install” to correct for this.
Valid options are:
•
•
Inverse Install
Normal Install
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Use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to select the correct option, and then press Enter to
save the value.
6.3.1.7 Damping Period – Power
If you feel that the monitored Power parameters are changing too quickly or too slowly on the display,
you can adjust the damping that is applied to the output readings by adjusting this parameter. The
default damping period is 5 seconds. You may change it to a value in the range of 0.2 seconds to 10
seconds. Use the Increase and Decrease buttons to select the correct option, and then press Enter
to save the value.
6.3.1.8 Damping Period – V, I, F
If you feel that the monitored Voltage, Current, and Frequency parameters are changing too quickly
or too slowly on the display, you can adjust the damping that is applied to the output readings by
adjusting this parameter. The default damping period is 0.5 seconds. You may change it to a value in
the range of 0.2 seconds to 10 seconds. Use the Increase and Decrease buttons to select the
correct option, and then press Enter to save the value.
6.3.1.9 Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.3.1.10
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The ACM100 Alternating Current transmits a number of the NMEA2000® PGNs which can be turned
on or turned off by the DSM250 display. For reasons of compatibility with older NMEA2000 devices,
some of these PGNs are redundant; disabling these PGNs will reduce the amount of traffic on the
NMEA2000® bus. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…” menu item
selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure 45).
Figure 45 – ACM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
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You can enable or disable the transmission of a PGN message, or set the frequency of transmission
of the message by pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured. Options are:
•
•
•
Off – The PGN will not be transmitted
On – The PGN will be transmitted at its default NMEA2000 rate.
0.5s…5s – The PGN will be transmitted at the interval specified.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.3.1.11
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the ACM100 device to their factory default state.
6.3.2 AC Circuit Type
You must configure the ACM100 as to what type of AC circuit connection it is monitoring. The
allowable values for this parameter are as follows:
•
•
•
Single-Phase (Phase A) – use this value when power is connected via a single hot wire and a
single neutral wire (a typical 110VAC connection in the US, or 220VAC connection in Europe).
Single-Phase (Phase A, B) – use this value when power is connected via two hot wires (180°
out of phase with each other) and single neutral wire from a single phase of a transformer (a
typical 220VAC connection in the US).
3-Phase Y (Phase A, B, C) – use this value when power is connected via the three hot wires
(120° out of phase with each other) and single neutral wire from a three-phase “Y” connected
circuit.
6.3.3 AC Device Type
You must configure the ACM100 as to what type of AC source it is monitoring. The allowable values
for this parameter are as follows:
•
•
•
Generator (default) – use this value when you are monitoring the output of an onboard
generator.
Utility – use this value when you are monitoring shore power.
Bus – use this value if you are monitoring power flowing across a cable that is not located
directly at the output of a generator or a shore power connection (e.g., an AC selection switch
might have as an input the shore power and another input from the generator, connecting the
ACM100 at the output of the AC selection switch would require the ACM100 to be configured
as “Bus”.
6.3.4 Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple ACM100s on the network.
6.3.5 Label
A device label may be assigned to the ACM100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network
(i.e., Shore Power or Port Generator, etc.). Typically this label will describe the equipment to which
the ACM100 is connected. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
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6.3.6 Reset Total Energy Recorded
The ACM100 will accumulate the total amount of energy produced by a Generator or a Utility.
Pressing the Enter key, while this item is highlighted will start the process to reset this value to zero.
The following confirmation screen is displayed.
Figure 46 – Reset Total Energy Recorded Confirmation Screen
Press Accept to reset the value, or Cancel to return to the previous screen.
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6.4
Maretron ALM100 Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Maretron ACM100 firmware version 1.0.5.
Figure 47 – ALM100 Configuration Screen
6.4.1 Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 48 – ALM100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.4.1.1 Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
6.4.1.2 Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
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installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.4.1.3 NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The ALM100 Annunciator Module transmits the NMEA2000 PGN #130824 which can be turned on or
turned off by the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…”
menu item selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure 49).
Figure 49 – ALM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable the transmission of the Annunciator message, or set the frequency of
transmission of the message by pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured.
Options are:
•
•
•
Disable – The Annunciator message will not be transmitted
Default – The Annunciator message will be transmitted at its default NMEA2000 rate, and
each time the value changes.
0.5s...5s – The Annunciator message will be transmitted at the period specified, and each time
the value changes.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.4.1.4 Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.4.2 Instance
From here the instance number used in the Annunciator message may be set.
6.4.3 Label
A label may be assigned to the ALM100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network. Typically
this label will describe the location of the ALM100.
See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
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6.4.4 Test Annunciator
The Annunciator may be tested by scrolling the cursor to highlight this entry and then pressing the
Enter button. The ALM100 will emit a single beep.
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6.5
Maretron DCM100 Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Maretron ACM100 firmware version 1.0.4.
Figure 50 – DCM100 Configuration Screen
6.5.1 Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 51 – DCM100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.5.1.1 Current Sensor Type
Three different current sensors may be attached to the DCM100. Options are:
•
•
200A – A 200 Amp Current Transducer is connected to the DCM100. This has the part number
LEMHTA200-S.
400A – A 400 Amp Current Transducer is connected to the DCM100. This has the part number
LEMHTA400-S.
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•
600A – A 600 Amp Current Transducer is connected to the DCM100. This has the part number
LEMHTA600-S.
Select the required transducer using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.5.1.2 Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
6.5.1.3 Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.5.1.4 NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The DCM100 Annunciator Module transmits the NMEA2000 PGNs #127506 and 127508 which can
be turned on or turned off by the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN
Enable/Disable…” menu item selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure
52).
Figure 52 – DCM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable the transmission of the these messages, or set the frequency of
transmission of the message by pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured.
Options are:
•
•
•
Disable – The message will not be transmitted
Default – The message will be transmitted at its default NMEA2000 rate.
1.0s...5.0s – The message will be transmitted at the period specified.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
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6.5.1.5 Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.5.2 Current Sensor Zero Offset Calibration
The DCM100 is shipped with a Hall-effect current sensor. In order to match the DCM100 unit and the
sensor to one another and ensure maximum accuracy, you should perform this calibration step while
there is no current flowing through the current sensor. Move the highlight bar to the Current Sensor Zero
Offset Calibration and press the Enter button. The following confirmation screen will be displayed:
Figure 53 – Current Sensor Zero Offset Calibration Confirmation Screen
Make sure that no current is flowing through the sensor, and press Begin to execute the calibration
process or Cancel to return to the previous menu. When the calibration is complete, the following
screen will be displayed.
Figure 54 – Current Sensor Zero Offset Calibration Complete Screen
Press the Back button to return to the previous menu.
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6.5.3 DC Type
You can configure the DCM100 as to what type of DC power source it is monitoring. With the
exception of the “Battery” type, the value of this parameter is used only for reporting the power source
type over the NMEA 2000 network. However, if you select the “Battery” type, many battery-related
options become available.
The following DC Types are selectable:
• Battery
• Alternator
• Convertor
• Solar Cell
• Wind Generator
If the DC Type is set to battery, then the following options may be entered to characterize the battery
and allow the estimation of remaining charge etc.
6.5.3.1 Battery Type
The available battery types are
•
•
•
•
Flooded/Wet
Gel
AGM
Other
Selecting one of these types causes the remaining parameters to be set to appropriate default values.
6.5.3.2 Nominal Voltage
You may program here the nominal voltage of the battery, which is used only for reporting over the
NMEA 2000 network. Available choices are 6, 12, 24, 32, 36, 42, and 48 Volts.
6.5.3.3 Equalization
You may indicate here whether or not the battery supports equalization. This is used only for
reporting over the NMEA 2000 network. Available choices are
•
•
Supported
Not Supported
6.5.3.4 Temperature Coefficient
The capacity of a battery generally increases with increasing temperature. So that the DCM100 can
properly calculate the battery’s state of charge, program this parameter with the increase in battery
capacity, in percent, per increase in temperature, in degrees Celsius. The temperature coefficient can
be set to a value between 0%/°C – 5%/°C.
6.5.3.5 Peukert Exponent
The Peukert Exponent for the battery can be set to a value between 1.0 and 1.5. Please refer to
Section 4.8 on page 11 for details.
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6.5.3.6 Charge Efficiency Factor
The Charge Efficiency Factor for the battery can be set to a value between 5% and 100%. Please
refer to Section 4.6.1 on page 11 for details.
6.5.3.7 Fully Charged Voltage
In order for the DCM100 to determine when a battery is fully charged, it uses three parameters. The
“Fully Charged Voltage” indicates the value voltage at which the battery is considered fully charged if
the battery voltage remains above this value and the battery current remains below the “Fully
Charged Current” for the amount of time defined by the “Fully Charged Time” parameter.
6.5.3.8 Fully Charged Current
In order for the DCM100 to determine when a battery is fully charged, it uses three parameters. The
“Fully Charged Voltage” indicates the value voltage at which the battery is considered fully charged if
the battery voltage remains above this value and the battery current remains below the “Fully
Charged Current” for the amount of time defined by the “Fully Charged Time” parameter.
6.5.3.9 Fully Charged Time
In order for the DCM100 to determine when a battery is fully charged, it uses three parameters. The
“Fully Charged Voltage” indicates the value voltage at which the battery is considered fully charged if
the battery voltage remains above this value and the battery current remains below the “Fully
Charged Current” for the amount of time defined by the “Fully Charged Time” parameter.
6.5.3.10
Battery Temperature
In order for the DCM100 to properly determine battery capacity and state of charge, it must know the
temperature of the battery If you are using a TR3K temperature sensor attached to the battery, you
should set this parameter to “Sensor”. Otherwise, if no temperature sensor is available, you can set
this parameter to the estimated battery temperature, between -25°C and 125°C.
6.5.3.11
Time Remaining Floor
The DCM100 calculates the time, given the current being discharged from the battery, before the
battery becomes discharged. By default, the DCM100 considers a battery to be discharged when its
state of charge reaches the “Time Remaining Floor” value, which is by default set to 50%. If you
desire to use some other state of charge value for the “Time Remaining Floor”, you may change this
parameter to the desired value.
6.5.3.12
Time Remaining Averaging Period
If loads on the battery are switching on and off frequently, the battery time remaining value calculated
by the DCM100 can vary significantly. You may change the time over which current readings are
averaged by changing this parameter anywhere in the range of 1 second to 32 minutes.
6.5.3.13
Zero Current Threshold
The current sensor reading can drift slightly at zero current, depending on temperature. Over a long
period of time, this can cause the DCM100 to calculate that a battery is discharging slowly, even
though it is not. The Zero Current Threshold parameter indicates a reading from the current sensor
below which no current is considered to be flowing into or out of the battery.
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6.5.4 Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
6.5.5 Label
A label may be assigned to the DCM100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network.
Typically this label will describe the battery or device which the DCM100 is monitoring. See section
3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
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6.6
Maretron DCR100 Configuration
The DSM250 is capable of configuring the Maretron DCR100 DC Relay device. This section
describes the configuration of the Maretron DCR100 firmware version 1.1.1. The main DCR100
configuration screen is shown below.
Figure 55 – DCR100 Configuration Screen
6.6.1 Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 56 – DCR100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.6.1.1 Current Sensor Zero Offset Calibration
The DCR100 contains Hall-effect current sensors. In order to ensure maximum accuracy, you should
perform this calibration step while there is no current flowing through the current sensors. Move the
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highlight bar to the Current Sensor Zero Offset Calibration and press the Enter button. The following
confirmation screen will be displayed:
Figure 57 – DCR100 Current Sensor Zero Offset Calibration Screen
Press Begin to execute the calibration process or Cancel to return to the previous menu. During the
calibration process, all channels will be turned off. When the calibration is complete, the following
screen will be displayed.
Figure 58 – DCR100 Current Sensor Zero Offset Calibration Completion Screen
Press the Back button to return to the previous menu.
6.6.1.2 Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0”.
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6.6.1.3 Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.6.1.4 NMEA 2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The DCR100 transmits a variety of the NMEA2000 PGN’s which can be turned on or turned off by the
DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…” menu item
selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure 59).
Figure 59 – DCR100 NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable Screen
6.6.1.5 Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.6.2 Device Label
This entry allows you to assign a text label to the device. This label is visible in Maretron analysis and
display products and allows you to easily identify the particular device.
6.6.3 Instance
This field identifies the particular switch bank instance which is transmitted by this DCR100. This
instance number is used by display products to select the particular bank of switches to be controlled
or monitored.
6.6.4 Channel #1-#6 Configuration
Each channel may be programmed into one of two different operating modes: DCR Mode or ALM
Mode.
6.6.4.1 Channel #1-#6 Configuration (DCR Mode)
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Figure 60 – DCR100 Channel Configuration Screen (DCR Mode)
6.6.4.1.1 Label
This entry allows you to assign a text label to the device. This label is visible in Maretron analysis and
display products and allows you to easily identify the particular device.
6.6.4.1.2 Operating Mode
The operating mode of each channel may be set to either DCR (DC Relay), in which case the state of
the channel is controlled by “Circuit Breaker / Switch” controls in N2KView or “Switch/Breaker”
favorite screens in the DSM150/DSM250 displays. This section of the manual assumes the operating
mode has been set to “DCR”.
6.6.4.1.3 Switch Lock
The default state of a channel in DCR Switch Lock mode is “Unlocked”. In the Unlocked mode, the
channel may be turned on and off from network display devices. By setting the Switch Lock mode of
the channel to “Lock”, then channel will not change state until the Switch Lock mode has once again
been set to “Unlocked”.
6.6.4.1.4 Power Up State
This entry defines the state of the channel when the DCR100 is powered up. You may set this entry
of “Off”, in which the channel powers up in the Off state (the solid-state relay is open). You may also
set this entry to “On”, in which the channel powers up in the On state (the solid-state relay is closed).
Finally, you may set this entry to “Previous”, in which the channel powers up to the state it was in
when power was previously removed.
6.6.4.1.5 Switch Control
This entry will show the current state of the relay channel, either “Off” (open) or “On” closed. You may
use this menu entry to turn the relay channel on or off.
6.6.4.2 Channel #1-#6 Configuration (ALM Mode)
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Figure 61 – DCR100 Channel Configuration Screen (ALM Mode)
6.6.4.2.1 Label
This entry allows you to assign a text label to the device. This label is visible in Maretron analysis and
display products and allows you to easily identify the particular device.
6.6.4.2.2 Operating Mode
The operating mode of each channel may be set to either DCR (DC Relay), in which case the state of
the channel is controlled by “Circuit Breaker / Switch” controls in N2KView or “Switch/Breaker”
favorite screens in the DSM150/DSM250 displays. This section of the manual assumes the operating
mode has been set to “ALM”.
6.6.4.2.3 ALM Instance
This entry allows you to program the instance number for the ALM function. You may use a value
between 0 and 15. This instance number is used by the DSM150/DS250 or N2KView when selecting
annunciators to sound when programming an alert.
6.6.4.2.4 Test Annunciator
Select this entry to verify functionality of the channel in ALM mode. This will cause the annunciator to
sound or light briefly.
6.7
Maretron DSM200 Configuration
You can use the DSM250 to configure other remotely-located DSM200 units by using the Remote
DSM200 configuration menu shown in Figure 62 below. This describes the configuration of the
Maretron DSM200 firmware version 1.10. There is one configurable item for the remote DSM200
configuration and that is “Remote Device Selection…”.
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Figure 62 – DSM200 Remote Configuration Screen
6.7.1 Remote Device Selection
A DSM250 unit can be used to configure a remote DSM200 to set which NMEA 2000® devices are
selected for display on the remote DSM200 unit. In this manner, multiple devices of the same type
may be used on a NMEA 2000® network in a fail-safe configuration. For example, a certain compass
unit out of several may be selected for display on the remote DSM200. The “Remote Device
Selection…” menu for an example network configuration can be seen in Figure 63 below.
WARNING: Do not select multiple devices of the same type for display. This will result in multiple and
possibly conflicting readings.
Figure 63 – DSM200 Remote Device Selection Screen
The “NA” column of the menu displays the node address the device is using.
The “Manuf.” column of the menu displays the manufacturer of the device.
The “Model” column displays the model number of the device.
The “SN#” column displays the serial number of the device, so that any of two or more devices of
the same manufacturer and model number may be distinguished from one another.
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The “Stat” column indicates whether the device is currently connected to the bus and is
responding to queries (“Online”), or has been disconnected from the bus, has lost power, or for
some other reason is not responding to queries (“Offline”).
The “Disp” column indicates whether data from that particular device is accepted for display by
the remote DSM200 (“On”) or that the remote DSM200 ignores data transmitted by this device
(“Off”). By scrolling to the device and pressing the Enter key (
), you may then use the
Scroll Up (
) and Scroll Down (
) keys to toggle the “Display” status for this particular
device. Once you are satisfied with the state of the “Display” setting, press the Enter key (
)
to accept the setting.
The remote DSM200 will retain information on devices that have been removed from the bus or
powered down (“Offline”) so that when they are placed back on the bus, they will assume their prior
“Display” setting.
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6.8
Maretron DSM150, DSM250 Configuration
You can use the DSM250 to configure other remotely-located DSM150 and DSM250 units by using
the Remote DSM150/DSM250 configuration menu as shown in below. This describes the
configuration of the Maretron DSM150/DSM250 firmware version 1.4.16. There are three
configurable items for the remote DSM150/DSM250: “Remote Device Selection…”, “Copy device
selection from local display”, and “Copy favorite settings from local display”.
Figure 64 – DSM150/DSM250 Remote Configuration Screen
6.8.1 Remote Device Selection
A DSM250 unit can be used to configure a remote DSM150/DSM250 to set which NMEA 2000®
devices are selected for display on the remote DSM150/DSM250 unit. In this manner, multiple
devices of the same type may be used on a NMEA 2000® network in a fail-safe configuration. For
example, a certain compass unit may be selected from several available compasses for display on
the remote DSM150/DSM250. The Remote DSM150/DSM250 Device Selection Menu for an example
network configuration can be seen in below.
WARNING: Do not select multiple devices of the same type for display. This will result in multiple and
possibly conflicting readings.
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Figure 65 – DSM150/DSM250 Remote Device Selection Screen
The “NA” column of the menu displays the node address the device is using.
The “Manuf.” column of the menu displays the manufacturer of the device.
The “Model” column displays the model number of the device.
The “SN#” column displays the serial number of the device, so that any of two or more devices of
the same manufacturer and model number may be distinguished from one another.
The “Stat” column indicates whether the device is currently connected to the bus and is
responding to queries (“Online”), or has been disconnected from the bus, has lost power, or for
some other reason is not responding to queries (“Offline”).
The “Disp” column indicates whether data from that particular device is accepted for display by
the remote DSM150/DSM250 (“On”) or that the remote DSM150/DSM250 ignores data
transmitted by this device (“Off”). By scrolling to the device and pressing the Enter key (
),
you may then use the Scroll Up (
) and Scroll Down (
) keys to toggle the “Display”
status for this particular device. Once you are satisfied with the state of the “Display” setting,
press the Enter key (
) to accept the setting.
The remote DSM150/DSM250 will retain information on devices that have been removed from the
bus or powered down (“Offline”) so that when they are placed back on the bus, they will assume their
prior “Display” setting.
6.8.2 Copy alarms settings from local display
It is possible to copy the alarm settings from a DSM250 unit to a remotely located DSM150/DSM250.
This should be done with care because if more than one Alert Source is monitoring the same
parameter, then multiple alerts will be generated when the parameter goes out of bounds, and each
one will need to be independently accepted or cancelled. Any alarms existing on the remote
DSM150/DSM250 will be deleted. below shows this menu item highlighted.
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Figure 66 – DSM150 Copy alarms settings from local display
After you select this menu item and press Enter, the alarm settings from this DSM250 unit will be
copied to the selected remote DSM150/DSM250 unit.
6.8.3 Copy device selection from local display
Since it is normally desirable for all DSM150/DSM250 units on a network to display the same
sensors, it is possible to copy the device selection settings from a DSM250 unit to a remotely located
DSM150/DSM250. In this way, it is possible to make all device selection changes on a single
DSM250 unit and then quickly and conveniently duplicate these new device selection settings on
other DSM150/DSM250 units attached to the network. below shows this menu item highlighted.
Figure 67 – DSM250 Copy device selection from local display
After you select this menu item and press Enter, the device selection settings from this DSM250 unit
will be copied to the selected remote DSM150/DSM250 unit.
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6.8.4 Copy display settings from local display
Figure 68 – DSM150/DSM250 Copy display settings from local display
6.8.5
Copy favorite settings from local display
It is also possible to copy the favorite screen settings from one DSM250 to a remote
DSM150/DSM250 unit. This menu item can be seen selected in below.
Figure 69 – DSM150/DSM250 Copy favorite settings from local display
By selecting this menu item and pressing Enter, all the favorite screen settings will be copied from the
local DSM250 to the selected remote DSM150/DSM250 unit. After copying favorite screen settings, it
is necessary to restart the remote unit. A screen, which can be seen in below will appear indicating
that favorite settings have been successfully transferred to the remote DSM150/DSM250 and that the
remote DSM150/DSM250 must be restarted to complete the operation. Press Enter to restart the
remote DSM150/DSM250 unit, complete the favorite settings transfer operation, and return to the
previous menu selection.
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Figure 70 – Favorite Settings Transfer Completion Screen
6.8.6 Copy DST100 calibrations from local display
DST100 calibration data is not stored in the DST100 device. Rather each DSM150/DSM250 needs to
apply its own set of calibration parameters to the raw data received. This operation allows one
DSM250 to copy its calibration table to a second DSM250/DSM250.
Figure 71 – DSM150/DSM250 Copy DST100 calibrations from local display
6.8.7 Copy all settings from local display
This is the single operation that makes it easy to have multiple DSM150/DSM250 displays on a boat.
Set one DSM150/DSM250 up so that all its settings are correct, and quickly transfer all the alarms,
device settings and display setting to another DSM150/DSM250. Then go in and update the following
information to customize the new device.
•
Display Settings Æ Advanced Configuration Æ Installation Descriptions
•
Display Settings Æ Label
Also use this function to copy settings from an old DSM150/DSM250 to a new DSM150/DSM250
when replacing the device.
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Figure 72 – DSM150/DSM250 copy all settings from local display
6.8.8 Label
The Label of the DSM150/DSM250 is used by the Alert System to identify the source of an
alert. Here, the label can be changed using the method described in section 3.3.4.
Figure 73 – DSM150/DSM250 Label Configuration
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6.8.9 Remote Device Selection
Figure 74 – DSM150/DSM250 Remote Device Selection
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6.9
Maretron DST100 Configuration
The DSM250 is capable of configuring Maretron’s DST100 for several different parameters including
trip log resetting, transducer depth offset, and speed calibration. This describes the configuration of
the Maretron DST100 firmware version 1.0.1.
Figure 75 – DST100 Configuration Screen
6.9.1 Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 76 – DST100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.9.1.1 Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
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6.9.1.2 Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later.See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.9.2 Clear Speed Calibration
The Clear Speed Calibration configuration parameter shows you the currently used correction
factor. All STW readings for the particular DST100 (indicated by the SN#) are multiplied by this
number to arrive at the displayed number. You can remove the correction factor by pressing the Enter
key (
) with the “Clear Speed Calibration:” menu item selected. And then choose “Clear” using
Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys followed by the Enter key (
). This changes the
correction factor back to 1 such that all subsequent STW readings are no longer adjusted before
displaying by the DSM250.
6.9.3 Speed Calibration
The DST100 speed through water (STW) initial accuracy is significantly affected by the location or
placement of the DST100 within the hull. The DSM250 can correct for these inaccuracies using the
speed calibration procedure. You calibrate the DSM250 for the DST100 STW by pressing the Enter
key (
) with the “Speed Calibration…” menu item selected which results in the screen shown in
Figure 77.
Figure 77 – Calibrating the DSM250 for DST100 Speed through Water
The speed calibration screen shown in Figure 77 indicates the STW as measured by the DST100,
which can be changed to the actual STW by following these steps. First, pick a speed where you are
most concerned with the best accuracy. Next, bring the boat up to the desired speed using some
other source, perhaps the GPS speed over ground (SOG). Remember that the SOG does not
necessary reflect the STW because of currents, and drift due to winds, so you should do this in an
) and
area where you are sure there are no currents and calm winds. Finally, use the Increase (
Decrease (
) keys to adjust the display value until it matches the known speed of the boat. Press
the Accept (
) key to accept the value when you are satisfied. If you do not wish to perform
installation offset calibration at this time, press the Abort (
) key and the speed calibration will not
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be altered. The speed calibration process provides a method for the actual STW reading produced by
the DST100 to be adjusted within the DSM250 (i.e., calibration data is not stored within the DST100).
WARNING: Unlike resetting the trip log and setting the depth offset, which actually programs
the DST100 so that all displays receive the same information, speed calibration must be
performed at individual displays in order to show calibrated speed through water.
6.9.4 Transducer Depth Offset
The DSM250 can set the transducer depth offset parameter in a DST100 depth/speed/temperature
transducer. If you are interested in the actual water depth (as opposed to the depth beneath the keel),
then you should program a positive value equal to the distance from the waterline to the depth of the
DST100. The DSM250 will then add the measured depth of the water (as seen by the DST100) to the
programmed offset value to produce the total water depth. If you are interested in the depth of water
beneath the keel, then you should program a negative value equal to the distance between the
DST100 and the bottom of the keel. The DSM will then subtract the programmed offset from the
measured depth of the water (as seen by the DST100) showing you the depth of water beneath the
keel.
You program the transducer depth offset by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Transducer Depth
Offset:” menu item selected which results in the screen shown in Figure 78.
Figure 78 – Setting the Transducer Depth Offset in a DST100
With the offset value highlighted, you can change the offset by using the Increase and Decrease
or
). Once you have selected the desired offset, push the Enter key (
) to complete
keys (
the transducer depth offset calibration. This procedure actually programs the offset value into the
DST100 such that all displays subsequently receive the offset information. This means you don’t have
to program multiple displays each with the corresponding offset information as the information is
stored at a single place (at the source).
6.9.5 Trip Log
The DSM250 is capable of clearing the trip log counter within a DST100 depth/speed/temperature
transducer. You zero the trip log by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Trip Log:” menu item
) key while the
selected which results in the screen shown Figure 79. Pressing the Accept (
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“Reset” menu item is selected will complete the operation. Resetting the trip log zeroes the DST100’s
trip log such that all displays receive a zeroed value (i.e., you don’t have to perform the operation
from other DSM200/DSM250 locations).
Figure 79 – Resetting the DST100 Trip Distance Log
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6.10 Maretron DST110 Configuration
The DSM250 is capable of configuring Maretron’s DST110 for several different parameters including
trip log resetting, transducer depth offset, temperature calibration, and speed calibration.
Figure 80 – DST110 Configuration Screen
6.10.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 81 – DST110 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.10.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
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6.10.1.2
Instance Temperature
The Data Instance of the Temperature (as sent in PGNs 130310, 130311, and 130312) is set in this
field. Use the Increase and Decrease buttons to select the correct instance number, and the press
the Enter button to store it.
6.10.1.3
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later.See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.10.1.4
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The DST110 transmits several different NMEA2000 PGN’s which can be turned on or turned off by
the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…” menu item
selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen.
Figure 82 - DST110 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable the transmission of the these messages, or set the frequency of
transmission of the message by pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured.
Options are:
•
•
Off – The message will not be transmitted
On – The message will be transmitted at its default NMEA 2000® rate.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.10.2
Clear Speed Calibration
The Clear Speed Calibration configuration parameter shows you the currently used correction
factor. All measured STW readings are multiplied by this number before being transmitted over the
NMEA 2000® network. You can remove the correction factor by pressing the Enter key (
) with the
“Clear Speed Calibration:” menu item selected. And then choose “Clear” using Scroll Up (
) or
Scroll Down (
) keys followed by the Enter key (
). This changes the correction factor back to 1
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such that all subsequent measured STW readings are no longer adjusted before begin transmitted
over the NMEA 2000® network.
6.10.3
Speed Calibration
The DST110 speed through water (STW) initial accuracy is significantly affected by the location or
placement of the DST110 within the hull. The DST110 can be corrected for these inaccuracies using
the speed calibration procedure. You calibrate the DST110 STW by pressing the Enter key (
) with
the “Speed Calibration…” menu item selected which results in the screen shown in Figure 77.
Figure 83 – Calibrating the DST110 Speed
The speed calibration screen shown in Figure 77 indicates the STW as measured by the DST110,
which can be changed to the transmitted STW by following these steps. First, pick a speed where you
are most concerned with the best accuracy. Next, bring the boat up to the desired speed using some
other source, perhaps the GPS speed over ground (SOG). Remember that the SOG does not
necessary reflect the STW because of currents, and drift due to winds, so you should do this in an
area where you are sure there are no currents and calm winds. Finally, use the Increase (
) and
Decrease (
) keys to adjust the display value until it matches the known speed of the boat. Press
the Accept (
) key to accept the value when you are satisfied. If you do not wish to perform speed
calibration at this time, press the Abort (
) key and the speed calibration will not be altered.
6.10.4
Clear Temperature Offset
The Clear Temperature Offset configuration parameter shows you the currently used temperature
correction offset. All measured sea temperature readings have this value added to them before being
transmitted over the NMEA 2000® network. You can set the correction offset to zero by pressing the
Enter key (
) with the “Clear Speed Calibration:” menu item selected. And then choose “Clear”
using Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys followed by the Enter key (
). This changes the
correction factor back to 0 such that all subsequent measured sea temperature readings are no
longer adjusted before begin transmitted over the NMEA 2000® network.
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6.10.5
Temperature Calibration
The temperature calibration screen shown below indicates the sea temperature as measured by the
DST110, which can be changed to the actual sea temperature by following these steps. Use the
Increase (
) and Decrease (
) keys to adjust the display value until it matches the known sea
temperature. Press the Accept (
) key to accept the value when you are satisfied. If you do not
wish to perform temperature calibration at this time, press the Abort (
) key and the temperature
calibration will not be altered.
Figure 84 - DST110 Water Temperature Calibration Screen
6.10.6
Transducer Depth Offset
The DSM250 can set the transducer depth offset parameter in a DST110 depth/speed/temperature
transducer. If you are interested in the actual water depth (as opposed to the depth beneath the keel),
then you should program a positive value equal to the distance from the waterline to the depth of the
DST110. The DSM250 will then add the measured depth of the water (as seen by the DST110) to the
programmed offset value to produce the total water depth. If you are interested in the depth of water
beneath the keel, then you should program a negative value equal to the distance between the
DST110 and the bottom of the keel. The DSM will then subtract the programmed offset from the
measured depth of the water (as seen by the DST110) showing you the depth of water beneath the
keel.
You program the transducer depth offset by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Transducer Depth
Offset:” menu item selected which results in the screen shown in Figure 78.
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Figure 85 – Setting the Transducer Depth Offset in a DST110
With the offset value highlighted, you can change the offset by using the Increase and Decrease
keys (
or
). Once you have selected the desired offset, push the Enter key (
) to complete
the transducer depth offset calibration. This procedure actually programs the offset value into the
DST110 such that all displays subsequently receive the offset information. This means you don’t have
to program multiple displays each with the corresponding offset information as the information is
stored at a single place (at the source).
6.10.7
Trip Log
The DSM250 is capable of clearing the trip log counter within a DST110 depth/speed/temperature
transducer. You zero the trip log by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Trip Log:” menu item
) key while the
selected which results in the screen shown Figure 79. Pressing the Accept (
“Reset” menu item is selected will complete the operation. Resetting the trip log zeroes the DST110’s
trip log such that all displays receive a zeroed value (i.e., you don’t have to perform the operation
from other DSM200/DSM250 locations).
Figure 86 – Resetting the DST110 Trip Distance Log
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6.11 Maretron EMS100 Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Maretron EMS100 firmware version 1.2.
The EMS100 is configured to match the engine to which it is connected. The EMS100 Configuration
changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be performed by an advanced
user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and should not need to be done
while at sea.
Figure 87 – EMS100 Configuration Screen
6.11.1
Engine Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple engines on the network. By
convention, the Port Engine is given an instance number of #0, and the Starboard Engine an instance
number of #1. If there is a third center engine, it should be given an instance number of #2.
6.11.2
Boost Pressure Gauge Type
The EMS100 comes from the factory preprogrammed with the characteristics of boost pressure
gauge types for supported engines. If the EMS100 is used with an analog boost pressure gauge, you
must select the correct type of gauge for this setting in order for the data to be displayed correctly.
Valid options are:
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•
•
No Gauge – select this option if there is no boost pressure gauge present.
YANMAR
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.11.3
Boost Pressure Sender Type
The EMS100 comes from the factory preprogrammed with the characteristics of boost pressure
senders for supported engines. If the engine to which you are connecting the EMS100 has a boost
pressure sender, you must select the correct type of boost pressure sender for this setting in order for
the data to be displayed correctly. Valid options are:
•
•
•
Disabled – select this option if there is no boost pressure sender present.
YANMAR
YANMAR W/THRESHOLD
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.11.4
Boost Pressure Sender Offset
Often, the characteristics of individual boost pressure senders vary from their specified values. This
setting allows you to apply an offset to the resistance value of the boost pressure sender in order to
allow you to bring the digital value reported by the EMS100 into agreement with that displayed by the
analog gauge.
6.11.5
Drive Trim Gauge Type
The EMS100 comes from the factory preprogrammed with the characteristics of drive trim gauge
types for supported engines. If the EMS100 is used with an analog drive trim gauge, you must select
the correct type of gauge for this setting in order for the data to be displayed correctly. Valid options
are:
•
•
No Gauge – select this option if there is no trim gauge present.
YANMAR
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.11.6
Drive Trim Sender Type
The EMS100 comes from the factory preprogrammed with the characteristics of drive trim senders for
supported engines. If the engine to which you are connecting the EMS100 has a drive trim sender,
you must select the correct type of drive trim sender for this setting in order for the data to be
displayed correctly. Valid options are:
•
•
•
Disabled – select this option if there is no drive trim sender present.
YANMAR
MERCURY
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
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6.11.7
Drive Trim Sender Offset
Often, the characteristics of individual drive trim senders vary from their specified values. This setting
allows you to apply an offset to the resistance value of the drive trim sender in order to allow you to
bring the digital value reported by the EMS100 into agreement with that displayed by the analog
gauge. Valid options are:
•
-100…100 – number of ohms of resistance to add to the sender reading
Select the required option using the Increase and Decrease keys followed by the Enter key.
6.11.8
Oil Pressure Gauge Type
The EMS100 comes from the factory preprogrammed with the characteristics of oil pressure gauge
types for supported engines. If the EMS100 is used with an analog oil pressure gauge, you must
select the correct type of gauge for this setting in order for the data to be displayed correctly. Valid
options are:
•
•
•
•
•
No Gauge – select this option if there is no oil pressure gauge present.
YANMAR
YANMAR W/THRESHOLD
YANMAR / VDO
YANMAR/VDO W/THRESHOLD
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.11.9
Oil Pressure Sender Type
The EMS100 comes from the factory preprogrammed with the characteristics of oil pressure senders
for supported engines. If the engine to which you are connecting the EMS100 has a oil pressure
sender, you must select the correct type of oil pressure sender for this setting in order for the data to
be displayed correctly. Valid options are:
•
•
•
Disabled – select this option if there is no oil pressure sender present.
YANMAR
YANMAR / VDO
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.11.10
Oil Pressure Sender Offset
Often, the characteristics of individual oil pressure senders vary from their specified values. This
setting allows you to apply an offset to the resistance value of the oil pressure sender in order to allow
you to bring the digital value reported by the EMS100 into agreement with that displayed by the
analog gauge. Valid options are:
• -100…100 – number of ohms of resistance to add to the sender reading
Select the required option using the Increase and Decrease keys followed by the Enter key.
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6.11.11
Water Temperature Gauge Type
The EMS100 comes from the factory preprogrammed with the characteristics of water temperature
gauge types for supported engines. If the EMS100 is used with an analog water temperature gauge,
you must select the correct type of gauge for this setting in order for the data to be displayed
correctly. Valid options are:
•
•
•
No Gauge – select this option if there is no water temperature gauge present.
YANMAR
YANMAR / VDO
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.11.12
Water Temperature Sender Type
The EMS100 comes from the factory preprogrammed with the characteristics of water temperature
senders for supported engines. If the engine to which you are connecting the EMS100 has a water
temperature sender, you must select the correct type of water temperature sender for this setting in
order for the data to be displayed correctly. Valid options are:
•
•
•
Disabled – select this option if there is no water temperature sender present.
YANMAR
YANMAR / VDO
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.11.13
Water Temperature Sender Offset
Often, the characteristics of individual water temperature senders vary from their specified values.
This setting allows you to apply an offset to the resistance value of the water temperature sender in
order to allow you to bring the digital value reported by the EMS100 into agreement with that
displayed by the analog gauge. Valid options are:
•
-100…100 – number of ohms of resistance to add to the sender reading
Select the required option using the Increase and Decrease keys followed by the Enter key.
6.11.14
Preset Engine Hours
The EMS100 reports engine hours based on how long the EMS100 has been powered from the
engine. The EMS100 comes from the factory preprogrammed with an engine hours reading of 0
hours. If you are installing the EMS100 on an engine that has been in service, or if you have
overhauled an engine, you can use this setting to preset the engine hours reading to the desired
value. Valid options are:
•
0…99999 – hours
Select the required option using the Increase and Decrease keys followed by the Enter key.
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6.11.15
Tachometer Flywheel Teeth
The EMS100 needs to know the number of flywheel teeth on the engine (or the number of alternator
pulses per revolution) in order to correctly calculate engine RPM. Use this setting to program the EMS100
with the number of flywheel teeth or alternator pulses per revolution for the engine to which the EMS100 is
connected. Valid options are:
•
0…400 – pulses per revolution
Select the required option using the Increase and Decrease keys followed by the Enter key.
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6.12 Maretron FFM100 Configuration
The DSM250 is capable of configuring the Maretron FFM100 Fluid Flow Monitor. This describes the
configuration of the Maretron FFM100 firmware version 1.1.1.2.
Figure 88 – FFM100 Configuration Screen
6.12.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 89 – FFM100 Advanced Configuration
6.12.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
6.12.1.2
Channel 0 Installation
Leave this entry at the default value of “Normal Installation” if the flow sensor connected to Channel 0
of the FFM100 is installed such that the direction of the fuel flow is in the same direction as the arrow
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on the fuel flow sensor label. Change this entry to “Reverse Installation if the direction of the fuel flow
is in the opposite direction as the arrow on the fuel flow sensor label.
6.12.1.3
Channel 1 Installation
Leave this entry at the default value of “Normal Installation” if the flow sensor connected to Channel 1
of the FFM100 is installed such that the direction of the fuel flow is in the same direction as the arrow
on the fuel flow sensor label. Change this entry to “Reverse Installation if the direction of the fuel flow
is in the opposite direction as the arrow on the fuel flow sensor label.
6.12.1.4
Channel 0 Allow negative flow
Leave this entry at the default value of “Yes” for the FFM100 to output negative fuel flow values if the
direction of fuel flow for the Channel 0 sensor is opposite the direction of the arrow on the fuel flow
sensor label. Set this entry to “No” to output zero for the fuel flow rate if the direction of fuel flow is
opposite the direction of the arrow on the fuel flow sensor label.
6.12.1.5
Channel 1 Allow negative flow
Leave this entry at the default value of “Yes” for the FFM100 to output negative fuel flow values if the
direction of fuel flow for the Channel 0 sensor is opposite the direction of the arrow on the fuel flow
sensor label. Set this entry to “No” to output zero for the fuel flow rate if the direction of fuel flow is
opposite the direction of the arrow on the fuel flow sensor label.
6.12.1.6
Differential Mode Allow negative flow
Leave this entry at the default value of “No” for the FFM100 to output zero for the fuel flow rate if the
computed net fuel flow rate is negative. Set this entry to “Yes” for the FFM100 to output negative
values for the fuel flow rate if the computed net fuel flow rate is negative
6.12.1.7
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later.
6.12.1.8
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The FFM100 Fuel Flow Module transmits a number of the NMEA2000® PGNs which can be turned on
or turned off by the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN
Enable/Disable…” menu item selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure
90).
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Figure 90 – FFM100 NMEA PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable the transmission of a PGN message, or set the frequency of transmission
of the message by pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured. Options are:
Off – The PGN will not be transmitted
On – The PGN will be transmitted at its default NMEA2000 rate.
0.5s…5s – The PGN will be transmitted at the interval specified.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.12.1.9
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.12.2
Device Label
A label may be assigned to the FFM100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network. Typically
this label will describe the location of the FFM100.
6.12.3
Operating Mode
The FFM100 can operate in one of two user-selectable operating modes:
Differential – this mode is used for diesel engines that recirculate unused fuel back into the fuel take.
These engines will have separate supply and return fuel lines.
Two Independent Sensors – the FFM100 can measure flow rates from two independent sources; for
example, a water flow rate on one channel and a gasoline fuel flow rate on another channel.
6.12.4
Channel #0…
This submenu contains configuration parameters for Channel #0. This menu looks different
depending on whether the FFM100’s operating mode has been set to “Differential” or “Two
Independent Sensors”.
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6.12.4.1
Channel #0 (Differential Mode)
This section describes the Channel #0 configuration parameters when the FFM100’s operating mode
has been set to “Differential”.The Channel #0 (Differential Mode) menu is too large to fit on a single
screen, so it is shown in two separate screenshots below.
Figure 91 – FFM100 Channel #0 First Configuration Screen (Differential Mode)
Figure 92 – FFM100 Channel #0 Second Configuration Screen (Differential Mode)
6.12.4.1.1 Channel Supply/Return
You may select whether the Channel #0 fuel flow sensor is connected to the supply fuel line or the
return fuel line.
6.12.4.1.2 Engine Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired engine instance number of the flow rate and total fuel
used for this channel. You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252.
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6.12.4.1.3 Engine Label
Each channel has a text label you can set to identify the load controlled by that channel (for example,
“PORT ENGINE” or “COOLING WATER FLOW”). For each channel, set this to a value which
describes the flow being monitored so that you can easily identify it in display devices.
6.12.4.1.4 K-Factor
Program this parameter to match the K-factor that appears on the flow sensor connected to this
channel.
6.12.4.1.5 Data Damping Period
You can configure a damping parameter to smooth the flow rate readings or make them more
responsive. The data damping is configurable between 0.2-25.0 seconds. The default data damping
period is 3.0 seconds.
6.12.4.1.6 Reset Total Volume Recorded
The FFM100 maintains the total volume recorded in EEPROM, so that it is maintained across power
cycles. Select this menu entry to reset the total volume recorded to zero.
6.12.4.1.7 Temperature Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired instance number of the temperature reading for this
channel. You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252. The default value for this
parameter is 0.
6.12.4.1.8 Temperature Source
Program this parameter to match the desired source type of the temperature reading for this channel.
The default value for this parameter is 129 (User Defined).
6.12.4.1.9 Temperature Label
Program this parameter with a text string which identifies the particular temperature parameter being
monitored by this channel. Maretron display products will display this label text when you are
selecting data to display.
6.12.4.1.10 Flow Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired instance number of the fluid flow reading for this
channel. You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252. The default value for this
parameter is 0.
6.12.4.1.11 Flow Label
Program this parameter with a text string which identifies the particular fluid flow parameter being
monitored by this channel. Maretron display products will display this label text when you are
selecting data to display.
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6.12.4.1.12 Volume Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired instance number of the volume reading for this channel.
You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252. The default value for this
parameter is 0.
6.12.4.1.13 Volume Label
Program this parameter with a text string which identifies the particular volume parameter being
monitored by this channel. Maretron display products will display this label text when you are
selecting data to display.
6.12.4.2
Channel #0 Configuration Menu (Two Independent Sensors Mode)
This section describes the Channel #0 configuration parameters when the FFM100’s operating mode
has been set to “Two Independent Sensors”. The Channel #0 (Two Independent Sensors Mode)
menu is too large to fit on a single screen, so it is shown in two separate screenshots below.
Figure 93 – FFM100 Channel #0 First Configuration Screen (Two Independent Sensors Mode)
Figure 94 – FFM100 Channel #0 Second Configuration Screen (Two Independent Sensors
Mode)
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6.12.4.2.1 Sensor
You may select whether this channel is connected to a “3-phase” sensor (Maretron fuel flow sensors
with three pulse outputs), or a “1-phase” sensor (other manufacturer’s fluid flow sensors with a single
pulse output).
6.12.4.2.2 Engine Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired engine instance number of the flow rate and total fuel
used for this channel. You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252.
NOTE: If the operating mode is set to “Differential Flow Rate”, then this parameter is unavailable for
Channel #0.
6.12.4.2.3 Engine Label
Each channel has a text label you can set to identify the load controlled by that channel (for example,
“PORT ENGINE” or “COOLING WATER FLOW”). For each channel, set this to a value which
describes the flow being monitored so that you can easily identify it in display devices.
6.12.4.2.4 K-Factor
Program this parameter to match the K-factor that appears on the flow sensor connected to this
channel.
6.12.4.2.5 Data Damping Period
You can configure a damping parameter to smooth the flow rate readings or make them more
responsive. The data damping is configurable between 0.2-25.0 seconds. The default data damping
period is 3.0 seconds.
6.12.4.2.6 Reset Total Volume Recorded
The FFM100 maintains the total volume recorded in EEPROM, so that it is maintained across power
cycles. Select this menu entry to reset the total volume recorded to zero.
6.12.4.2.7 Temperature Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired instance number of the temperature reading for this
channel. You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252. The default value for this
parameter is 0.
6.12.4.2.8 Temperature Source
Program this parameter to match the desired source type of the temperature reading for this channel.
The default value for this parameter is 129 (User Defined).
6.12.4.2.9 Temperature Label
Program this parameter with a text string which identifies the particular temperature parameter being
monitored by this channel. Maretron display products will display this label text when you are
selecting data to display.
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6.12.4.2.10 Fluid Type
Program this parameter to match the type of fluid whose flow is being monitored.
6.12.4.2.11 Flow Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired instance number of the fluid flow reading for this
channel. You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252. The default value for this
parameter is 0.
6.12.4.2.12 Flow Label
Program this parameter with a text string which identifies the particular fluid flow parameter being
monitored by this channel. Maretron display products will display this label text when you are
selecting data to display.
6.12.4.2.13 Volume Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired instance number of the volume reading for this channel.
You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252. The default value for this
parameter is 0.
6.12.4.2.14 Volume Label
Program this parameter with a text string which identifies the particular volume parameter being
monitored by this channel. Maretron display products will display this label text when you are
selecting data to display.
6.12.5
Channel #1…
This submenu contains configuration parameters for Channel #1. This menu looks different
depending on whether the FFM100’s operating mode has been set to “Differential” or “Two
Independent Sensors”.
6.12.5.1
Channel #1 (Differential Mode)
This section describes the Channel #1 configuration parameters when the FFM100’s operating mode
has been set to “Differential”.
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Figure 95 – FFM100 Channel #1 Configuration Screen (Differential Mode)
6.12.5.1.1 Channel Supply/Return
If the Operating Mode is set to Differential, you may select whether the Channel #1 fuel flow sensor is
connected to the supply or the return fuel line.
6.12.5.1.2 K-Factor
Program this parameter to match the K-factor that appears on the flow sensor connected to this
channel.
6.12.5.1.3 Temp. Coefficient
Program this entry with the coefficient of expansion of the fluid being monitored in order to properly
compensate for thermal expansion of the fluid as it is heated while passing through the engine. The
default value for this parameter is 0.033%/°C, which corresponds to Diesel fuel. This parameter is not
available when the Operating Mode is set to “Two Individual Flow Sensors”.
6.12.5.1.4 Temperature Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired instance number of the temperature reading for this
channel. You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252. The default value for this
parameter is 0.
6.12.5.1.5 Temperature Source
Program this parameter to match the desired source type of the temperature reading for this channel.
The default value for this parameter is 129 (User Defined).
6.12.5.1.6 Temperature Label
Program this parameter with a text string which identifies the particular temperature parameter being
monitored by this channel. Maretron display products will display this label text when you are
selecting data to display.
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6.12.5.2
Channel #0 Configuration Menu (Two Independent Sensors Mode)
This section describes the Channel #0 configuration parameters when the FFM100’s operating mode
has been set to “Two Independent Sensors”. The Channel #0 (Two Independent Sensors Mode)
menu is too large to fit on a single screen, so it is shown in two separate screenshots below.
Figure 96 – FFM100 Channel #1 First Configuration Screen (Two Independent Sensors Mode)
Figure 97 – FFM100 Channel #1 Second Configuration Screen (Two Independent Sensors
Mode)
6.12.5.2.1 Sensor
You may select whether this channel is connected to a “3-phase” sensor (Maretron fuel flow sensors
with three pulse outputs), or a “1-phase” sensor (other manufacturer’s fluid flow sensors with a single
pulse output).
6.12.5.2.2 Engine Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired engine instance number of the flow rate and total fuel
used for this channel. You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252.
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6.12.5.2.3 Engine Label
Each channel has a text label you can set to identify the load controlled by that channel (for example,
“PORT ENGINE” or “COOLING WATER FLOW”). For each channel, set this to a value which
describes the flow being monitored so that you can easily identify it in display devices.
6.12.5.2.4 K-Factor
Program this parameter to match the K-factor that appears on the flow sensor connected to this
channel.
6.12.5.2.5 Data Damping Period
You can configure a damping parameter to smooth the flow rate readings or make them more
responsive. The data damping is configurable between 0.2-25.0 seconds. The default data damping
period is 3.0 seconds.
6.12.5.2.6 Reset Total Volume Recorded
The FFM100 maintains the total volume recorded in EEPROM, so that it is maintained across power
cycles. Select this menu entry to reset the total volume recorded to zero.
6.12.5.2.7 Temperature Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired instance number of the temperature reading for this
channel. You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252. The default value for this
parameter is 0.
6.12.5.2.8 Temperature Source
Program this parameter to match the desired source type of the temperature reading for this channel.
The default value for this parameter is 129 (User Defined).
6.12.5.2.9 Temperature Label
Program this parameter with a text string which identifies the particular temperature parameter being
monitored by this channel. Maretron display products will display this label text when you are
selecting data to display.
6.12.5.2.10 Fluid Type
Program this parameter to match the type of fluid whose flow is being monitored.
6.12.5.2.11 Flow Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired instance number of the fluid flow reading for this
channel. You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252. The default value for this
parameter is 0.
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6.12.5.2.12 Flow Label
Program this parameter with a text string which identifies the particular fluid flow parameter being
monitored by this channel. Maretron display products will display this label text when you are
selecting data to display.
6.12.5.2.13 Volume Instance
Program this parameter to match the desired instance number of the volume reading for this channel.
You can program this parameter to any value between 0 and 252. The default value for this
parameter is 0.
6.12.5.2.14 Volume Label
Program this parameter with a text string which identifies the particular volume parameter being
monitored by this channel. Maretron display products will display this label text when you are
selecting data to display.
6.13 Maretron FPM100 Configuration
The DSM250 is capable of configuring the Maretron FPM100 Fluid Pressure Monitor. This describes
the configuration of the Maretron FPM100 firmware version 1.0.1.
Figure 98 – FPM100 Configuration Screen
6.13.1
Advanced Configuration…
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
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Figure 99 – FPM100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.13.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
6.13.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later.
6.13.1.3
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…
The FPM100 Fluid Pressure Module transmits a number of the NMEA2000® PGNs which can be
turned on or turned off by the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN
Enable/Disable…” menu item selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure
100).
Figure 100 – FPM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
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You can enable or disable the transmission of a PGN message, or set the frequency of transmission
of the message by pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured. Options are:
Off – The PGN will not be transmitted
On – The PGN will be transmitted at its default NMEA2000 rate.
0.5s…5s – The PGN will be transmitted at the interval specified.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.13.1.4
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.13.2
Channel #0-5
This submenu contains configuration parameters for each of the six channels. These menus look
different depending on whether the channel’s Function has been set to “Tank” or “Pressure/Vacuum”.
6.13.2.1
Channel #0-5 (Tank)
This section describes the channel configuration menu when the channel ‘s Function has been set to
“Tank” mode. The Channel #0-5 (Tank Mode) menu is too large to fit on a single screen, so it is
shown in two separate screenshots below.
Figure 101 – FPM100 Channel #0 First Configuration Screen (Tank Mode)
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Figure 102 – FPM100 Channel #0 Second Configuration Screen (Tank Mode)
6.13.2.1.1 Function
You can set the channel’s Function to “Disabled”, “Tank”, or “Pressure/Vacuum”. This section of the
manual assumes that the channel’s function has been set to “Tank”.
6.13.2.1.2 Label
This entry allows you to assign a text label to the device. This label is visible in Maretron analysis and
display products and allows you to easily identify the particular device.
6.13.2.1.3 Pressure at 4mA
Program this parameter to match the pressure reading of the pressure transducer when it is sourcing
a current of 4mA. You can determine this value by examining the specification of the pressure
transducer being used.
6.13.2.1.4 Pressure at 20mA
Program this parameter to match the pressure reading of the pressure transducer when it is sourcing
a current of 20mA. You can determine this value by examining the specification of the pressure
transducer being used.
6.13.2.1.5 Tank Capacity
In addition to indicating the fluid level within a tank, the FPM100 also has the ability to be configured
or programmed with the attached tank’s capacity. This way, you will be able to view the tank’s
capacity as well as the amount of liquid remaining anywhere on the vessel where there is an NMEA
2000® compatible display.
6.13.2.1.6 Tank Levels Calibration…
In order for the FPM100 to indicate an accurate tank level, it must know the geometry of the tank.
There are two methods of calibrating an FPM100 channel in Tank mode:
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•
•
Custom Calibration – use for non-rectangular tanks (also, most accurate in any case, but
requires more effort)
Rectangular Tank – By inputting some dimensions of a rectangular tank, the FPM100 is able to
interpolate the volume of liquid from the bottom of the tank to the surface.
Figure 103 – FPM100 Tank Levels Calibration Menu
6.13.2.1.6.1 Custom Calibration
The Custom Calibration setting will provide the most accurate tank level readings under any
circumstances, but it requires that you go through a process in which you gradually fill the tank,
stopping periodically to input the current fluid level. The TLA100 will measure the sender resistance at
each point and create a custom calibration map which relates the resistance of the sender with the
fluid levels. Figure 104 below shows a screenshot of the DSM250 with the Custom Calibration option
highlighted. Custom calibration is necessary for non-rectangular tanks and for non-standard values of
resistances for tank level senders. To perform custom calibration of the tank level sender, use the
Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlighted cursor over the “Custom
Calibration…” menu item. Then, press the Enter key (
) to confirm your selection and begin the
calibration process.
Figure 104 – Performing Custom Calibration of the Tank Level Adapter
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The first step in custom calibration of the tank level sender is to provide an estimated capacity of the
tank. This estimated capacity must be within +/- 25% of the actual capacity. To set the estimated tank
capacity, use the arrow keys to adjust the displayed value until the desired value is shown. Then,
press the Accept key to confirm your selection and continue with the calibration process. If you desire
to stop the calibration process, pressing the Back Key (
) will end the process and return you to
the Tank Levels Calibration menu.
Figure 105 – Tank Levels Calibration Capacity Estimation
The next step in the calibration process is to fill the tank and indicate the volume of fluid in the tank at
various points while filling the tank. This process should be started with an empty tank. You only need
to indicate two calibration points for a rectangular tank, and can use up to 16 calibration points for a
tank with a more complex shape. Figure 106 shows a screenshot of the first calibration step. Enter
the first calibration point with an empty tank (0.0 Gallons/liters) by pressing the Accept key. The
“Current Point” highlight will advance to the next point.
Figure 106 – Empty Level Calibration
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Each time you press Accept during this process and after the Current Point highlight advances, put
more fluid into the tank, and note the total volume of fluid pumped into the tank at this point. Use the
Increase and Decrease keys to set the current tank level to the appropriate value, and then press the
Accept key to store the current calibration point and advance to the next calibration point. Figure 107
shows a screenshot of these intermediate calibration points.
Figure 107 – Intermediate Level Calibration
Once the tank is completely full, instead of pressing the Accept key to store the current calibration
point, press the Complete key. This will complete the calibration process and will also adjust the tank
capacity to the currently indicated level. Figure 108 below shows the calibration screen at the last
point with the full tank level (and thus the tank capacity) set to 101 gallons.
Figure 108 – Full Level Calibration
After you press accept, a confirmation screen will appear showing completion of the calibration
process and the new tank capacity value. A screenshot of this calibration screen is shown below in
Figure 109.
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Figure 109 – Custom Tank Level Calibration Confirmation Screen
6.13.2.1.6.2 Rectangular Tank
This menu allows calibration of the FPM100 for tanks with a rectangular cross-section.
Empty Tank Depth - enter the depth of the fluid when the tank is empty (this distance is usually zero)
Full Tank Depth - enter the depth of the fluid when the tank is full (this is the distance from the
surface of the fluid to the bottom of the tank)
Fluid Density - enter the density of the fluid whose depth is being measured. There are preset values
for various types of diesel fuels, as well as gasoline and water.
Figure 110 – Rectangular Tank Calibration
6.13.2.1.7 Tank Number
The Tank Number is the Data Instance used in the data message. This can be set from #0 to #15.
6.13.2.1.8 Tank Type
This is set to the type of fluid in the tank. Values are:
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Fuel –
Fresh Water –
Waste Water –
Live Well –
Oil –
Black Water –
Reserved-1..Reserved-7 – These values may be used when the contents of the tank does not fit
into one of the categories above.
6.13.2.1.9 Data Damping Period
If the channel’s Function is set to Tank, the default data damping period is 16.0 seconds. If the
channel’s Function is set to Pressure/Vacuum, the default data damping period is 3.0 seconds.
6.13.2.2
Channel #0-5 (Pressure/Vacuum)
This section describes the channel configuration menu when the channel ‘s Function has been set to
“Pressure/Vacuum” mode. The Channel #0-5 (Pressure/Vacuum Mode) menu is shown below.
6.13.2.2.1 Function
You can set the channel’s Function to “Disabled”, “Tank”, or “Pressure/Vacuum”. This section of the
manual assumes that the channel’s function has been set to “Pressure/Vacuum”.
6.13.2.2.2 Instance
This entry sets the instance number to be used in the Pressure message. This entry may be set to ay
value between 0 and 252.
6.13.2.2.3 Label
A label may be assigned to each channel of the FPM100 as an aid to identifying the pressure that is
being displayed. Typically this label will describe the function or location of the pressure sensor.
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6.13.2.2.4 Pressure at 4mA
Enter the pressure measured by the pressure sensor when it is outputting a 4mA current (this will
usually be zero).
6.13.2.2.5 Pressure at 20mA
Enter the pressure measured by the pressure sensor when it is outputting a 20mA current.
6.13.2.2.6 Source
In the NMEA2000® PGNs, each pressure is associated with a source type. Possible values are:
Water Pressure
Atmospheric Pressure
Compressed Air Pressure
Hydraulic Pressure
Steam Pressure
User Defined Temperature #129...#144 – Use this when none of the above options are suitable.
6.13.2.2.7 Data Damping Period
If the channel’s Function is set to Tank, the default data damping period is 16.0 seconds. If the
channel’s Function is set to Pressure/Vacuum, the default data damping period is 3.0 seconds.
6.14 Maretron GPS100 Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Maretron GPS100 firmware version 1.0.6. Some versions of
the GPS100 have a different set of firmware that is currently at version 1.6.14. The configuration of
these devices is identical to version 2.0.1 shown here. The GPS100 has several different
programmable parameters that are configurable by the DSM250 display. Normally, it is not necessary
to configure the GPS100 although there may be some circumstances where configuration is
desirable. The following sections describe the different configuration modes including the “Restore
Factory Defaults” configuration, which allows you to return the GPS100 to the factory settings.
Figure 111 – GPS100 Configuration Screen
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6.14.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea. The Advanced Configuration Screen is shown below.
Figure 112 – GPS100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.14.1.1
Device Instance
The Device Instance will be used to identify the GPS100 device on the network. Unless there are
multiple GPSs on the network, this should be left at zero.
6.14.1.2
GPS Antenna Altitude
The DSM250 is capable of setting the antenna altitude on a Maretron GPS100. You can choose this
setting by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Antenna Altitude:” menu item selected which causes
the screen shown in Figure 113 to be displayed.
Figure 113 – Configuring Antenna Altitude on a GPS100
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The allowable values for the Antenna Altitude are between -100m and 100m. This number represents
the altitude or the GPS100, and is used to improve the quality of the position fix if only a twodimensional fix is obtainable. If a three-dimensional position fix is obtainable, this value is not used.
6.14.1.3
Elevation Mask
The DSM250 is capable of setting the Elevation Mask on a Maretron GPS100. You can choose this
) with the “Elevation Mask:” menu item selected which causes
setting by pressing the Enter key (
the screen shown in Figure 114 to be displayed.
Figure 114 – Configuring Satellite Elevation Mask on a GPS100
The allowable values for Elevation Mask are between -90° and 90°. This number represents the
elevation of a satellite above the horizon. Satellites with 0° elevation are at the horizon, while
satellites with 90° elevation are directly overhead. The GPS will exclude satellites with an elevation
lower than the value of this parameter from the position solution.
6.14.1.4
PDOP Mask
The DSM250 is capable of setting the PDOP Mask on a Maretron GPS100. You can choose this
setting by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “PDOP Mask:” menu item selected which causes the
screen shown in Figure 115 to be displayed.
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Figure 115 – Configuring PDOP Mask on a GPS100
The allowable values for PDOP Mask are between 1 and 20. This number represents the Position
Dilution of Precision, which indicates the accuracy of the computed position and is a function of the
positions of the received satellites. If the PDOP of a given position solution is above the value of this
parameter, then the GPS100 will report that no fix is obtained. Disabling the PDOP Mask by setting
the value to “-“) will cause the GPS100 to report any position fixes obtained, regardless of the
accuracy of the fix.
6.14.1.5
SNR Mask
The DSM250 is capable of setting the SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) Mask on a GPS100. You choose
this setting by pressing the Enter key (
) with the GPS SNR Mask menu item selected which
results in the screen shown in Figure 116.
Figure 116 – Configuring SNR Mask on a GPS100
The allowable values for the SNR Mask are between 1 dB and 60 dB. This number represents the
signal to noise ratio of a satellite’s signal as received by the GPS100. Higher numbers indicate a
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better quality signal. The GPS will exclude satellites with signal to noise ratios lower than the value of
this parameter from the position solution.
6.14.1.6
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.14.1.7
NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable
The GPS100 transmits several different messages, which can be turned on or turned off by the
DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key (
) with “NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…” menu item
selected causes the DSM250 to display the screen shown in Figure 117.
Figure 117 – GPS100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
or
) through the different
You can enable or disable specific transmissions by scrolling (
transmitted messages and pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured. Select
whether you want the message to be transmitted (“On”) or disabled (“Off”) using the Scroll Up (
)
or Scroll Down (
) keys followed by the Enter key (
).
6.14.1.8
Restore Factory Defaults
The DSM250 is capable of restoring all programmable settings on a Maretron GPS100 to the factory
default condition. You can choose this setting by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Restore
Factory Defaults” menu item selected which causes the screen shown in Figure 118 to be displayed.
This will cause the GPS100 to set all programmable settings to the factory default condition.
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Figure 118 – Restoring Factory Defaults on the GPS100
6.14.2
Cold Start GPS
The DSM250 is capable of restarting the GPS algorithm on a Maretron GPS100. You can choose this
setting by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Cold start GPS Engine” menu item selected which
causes the screen shown in Figure 119 to be displayed. This will cause the GPS100 to discard all
position and satellite data and compute a position fix.
Figure 119 – Performing a Cold Start of the GPS100
6.14.3
GPS Mode Setting
The DSM250 is capable of setting the minimum operating mode on a Maretron GPS100. You can
choose this setting by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “GPS Mode:” menu item selected which
causes the screen shown in Figure 120 to be displayed.
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Figure 120 – Configuring GPS Operating Mode on a GPS100
The allowable options for GPS Mode are “1D” which allows the GPS to report data when only a onedimensional fix (time only) or better is obtained; “2D”, which allows the GPS to report data only when
a two-dimensional fix or better is obtained; “3D”, which allows the GPS to report data only when a
three-dimensional fix or better is obtained, or “Auto” (default), which allows the GPS to report any
available data, regardless of the quality of the fix.
6.14.4
Device Label
A label may be assigned to the GPS100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network. Typically
this would describe the location of the GPS on the vessel.
See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.14.5
SBAS (WAAS) Enable/Disable
The DSM250 is capable of enabling or disabling the SBAS (WAAS) function on a Maretron GPS
Antenna/Receiver (GPS100). You can change this setting by pressing the Enter key (
) with the
“SBAS: WAAS,EGNOS,MSAS:” menu item selected which causes the screen shown in Figure 121 to
be displayed.
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Figure 121 – Configuring SBAS on a GPS100
The allowable option for SBAS configuration are either “Disable” which causes the GPS100 not to
use SBAS satellites, or “Enable” which causes the GPS100 to use SBAS satellites for developing a
position fix.
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6.15 Maretron GPS200 Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Maretron GPS200 firmware version 1.0.6. The GPS200 has
several different programmable parameters that are configurable by the DSM250 display. Normally, it
is not necessary to configure the GPS200 although there may be some circumstances where
configuration is desirable. The following sections describe the different configuration modes including
the “Restore Factory Defaults” configuration, which allows you to return the GPS200 to the factory
settings.
Figure 122 – GPS200 Configuration Screen
6.15.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea. The Advanced Configuration Screen is shown below.
Figure 123 – GPS200 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.15.1.1
Device Instance
The Device Instance will be used to identify the GPS200 device on the network. Unless there are
multiple GPSs on the network, this should be left at zero.
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6.15.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.15.1.3
NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable
The GPS200 transmits several different messages, which can be turned on or turned off by the
DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key (
) with “NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…” menu item
selected causes the DSM250 to display the screen shown in Figure 117.
Figure 124 – GPS200 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable specific transmissions by scrolling (
or
) through the different
transmitted messages and pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured. Select
whether you want the message to be transmitted (“On”) or disabled (“Off”) using the Scroll Up (
)
or Scroll Down (
) keys followed by the Enter key (
).
6.15.1.4
Restore Factory Defaults
The DSM250 is capable of restoring all programmable settings on a Maretron GPS200 to the factory
default condition. You can choose this setting by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Restore
Factory Defaults” menu item selected which causes the screen shown in Figure 118 to be displayed.
This will cause the GPS200 to set all programmable settings to the factory default condition.
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Figure 125 – Restoring Factory Defaults on the GPS200
6.15.2
Cold Start GPS
The DSM250 is capable of restarting the GPS algorithm on a Maretron GPS200. You can choose this
setting by pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Cold start GPS Engine” menu item selected which
causes the screen shown in Figure 119 to be displayed. This will cause the GPS200 to discard all
position and satellite data and compute a position fix.
Figure 126 – Performing a Cold Start of the GPS200
6.15.3
Device Label
A label may be assigned to the GPS200 as an aid to identifying the device over the network. Typically
this would describe the location of the GPS on the vessel.
See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.15.4
SBAS (WAAS,EGNOS,MSAS) Enable/Disable
The DSM250 is capable of enabling or disabling the SBAS (WAAS) function on a Maretron GPS
Antenna/Receiver (GPS200). You can change this setting by pressing the Enter key (
) with the
“SBAS: WAAS,EGNOS,MSAS:” menu item selected which causes the screen shown in Figure 121 to
be displayed.
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Figure 127 – Configuring SBAS on a GPS200
The allowable option for SBAS configuration are either “Disable” which causes the GPS200 not to
use SBAS satellites, or “Enable” which causes the GPS200 to use SBAS satellites for developing a
position fix.
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6.16 Maretron IPG100 Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Maretron IPG100 firmware version 1.0.0. The DSM250 is
capable of configuring settings for the Internet Protocol Gateway (IPG100). A screenshot of the
IPG100 configuration menus is shown in Figure 128 below.
Figure 128 – IPG100 Configuration Screen
6.16.1 Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 129 – IPG100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.16.1.1
Device Instance
Program this parameter to the desired instance number for this device. You can program this
parameter to any value between 0 and 252. The default device instance is 0.
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6.16.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000® installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer® allow you to view these values
later. The default installation description is blank text.
6.16.1.3
N2KServer Information
This entry allows you to view various information about the N2KServer running on the IPG100. The
following sections describe the entries in this menu.
Figure 130 – IPG100 N2KServer Information Screen
6.16.1.3.1 Client List
For each N2KView client connected to the IPG100, this entry displays the following
information:
•
•
•
•
Lic. (License) – this field indicates the type of N2KView license in use by the client. It will
indicate “P” for a platinum license, and “B” for a basic license.
Inst. (Instance) – this field indicates the instance number used by this N2KView client.
IP Address – this field indicates the IP address of the N2KView client. If it is followed by
the letter “E”, this indicates that the connection is encrypted.
Label – this field indicates the label assigned to the N2KView client
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Figure 131 – IPG100 Client List Display
6.16.1.3.2 N2KServer Version
This entry shows the version number of the N2KServer software currently running on the IPG100.
6.16.1.3.3 License Key Number
This entry shows the serial number of the Hardware Licensee Key currently plugged into the IPG100.
6.16.1.3.4 Platinum Licenses
This entry shows the number of platinum licenses in use, followed by a slash, followed by the total
number of platinum licenses.
6.16.1.3.5 Basic Licenses
This entry shows the number of basic licenses in use, followed by a slash, followed by the total
number of basic licenses.
6.16.1.4
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the IPG100 device to their factory default state.
6.16.2
Device Label
Program this parameter with a text string which identifies this device. Maretron display products will
display this label text when you are selecting data to display. The default device label is blank.
6.16.3
N2KServer Password
Program this parameter with a text password. Any connecting N2KView® clients must be
programmed with the same password in the “Connections Settings -> N2KServer® Connection >Password” field in the N2KView® software. The default password is blank.
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6.16.4
DHCP
This parameter determines whether or not the IPG100 obtains its LAN connection settings from a
DHCP server on the local area network. When set to “Yes” (the default value), the IPG100 will obtain
all necessary connection settings (IP Address, Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, and Default DNS)
from a DHCP server on the local area network. Most routers have the capability to act as a DHCP
server. Consult the user documentation for your network’s router for details.
If there is no DHCP server on the local area network (or if the IPG100 is connected directly to a
DSM800 or directly to an MBB100), set the “DHCP” parameter to “No” and manually configure the IP
Address (section 6.16.5), Subnet Mask (section 6.16.6), Default Gateway (section 6.16.7), Default
DNS (section 6.16.8).
6.16.5
IP Address
This parameter is the IP (Internet Protocol) address used by the IPG100. You will need to specify this
address to N2KView® clients in order to allow them to connect to the IPG100. If the “DHCP”
parameter is set to “Yes”, you do not need to configure this parameter. If the “DHCP” parameter is set
to “No”, you will need to configure this parameter.
6.16.6
Subnet Mask
This is a mask used to divide an IP Address into subnets. Basically, it tells the computer how much of
the IP Address defines the network, and how much may be used by computers on the network. For
most networks, the first three parts of the IP address define the network (i.e., every computer on the
network must have the same values), and the last part defines the computer (i.e., every computer on
the network must have a different value). Where the value 255 appears in the subnet mask, the
values define the network and must be the same.
The most common value is 255.255.255.0.
If the “DHCP” parameter is set to “Yes”, you do not need to configure this parameter. If the “DHCP”
parameter is set to “No”, you will need to configure this parameter.
6.16.7
Default Gateway
This is the IP address of the router. If the “DHCP” parameter is set to “Yes”, you do not need to
configure this parameter. If the “DHCP” parameter is set to “No”, you will need to configure this
parameter.
6.16.8
Default DNS
This is the IP address of a computer on the Internet that can identify and locate computer systems
and resources on the internet. In most cases, this should not be required by the IPG100 and may be
left blank. If the “DHCP” parameter is set to “No”, you will need to configure this parameter.
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6.17 Maretron J2K100 Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Maretron J2K100 firmware version 1.0.7. The DSM250 is
capable of configuring settings for the J1939 to NMEA 2000® Gateway (J2K100). A screenshot of the
J2K100 configuration menu is shown in Figure 132 below.
Figure 132 – J2K100 Configuration Screen
6.17.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 133 – J2K100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.17.1.1
Data Damping
In order to smooth the results viewed on a display, you may individually change the data
damping period that the J2K100 uses when sending fuel rate and tachometer (engine RPM)
information. The default is to use no damping (0.0 seconds). You may program the damping
from none up to 5 seconds.
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6.17.1.2
Device Instance
The Device Instance will be used to identify the J2K100 module on the network. If a GenSet is
connected to the J1939 network, and the AC parameters passed through the J2K100 interface, the
GenSet will also be identified using Device Instance number.
6.17.1.3
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.17.1.4
J1939 Diagnostic Messages
The J2K100 can optionally pass through J1939 diagnostic messages, used to indicate fault conditions
on engines and transmissions, from the J1939 interface to the NMEA2000® network so that NMEA
2000® connected displays can interpret these diagnostic codes. To change the transmission status of
the J1939 diagnostic messages, use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the
highlighted cursor to the “J1939 Diagnostic Messages:” menu item. Then, press the Enter key (
)
to move the highlight to the value field, which displays either Enable or Disable. Use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to change the value to the desired value, and then press the Enter
key (
) to accept the new value and store it within the J2K100.
Figure 134 – J2K100 J1939 Diagnostic Messages Configuration
6.17.1.5
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The J2K100 interface transmits several different messages, which can be turned on or turned off by
) with “NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…” menu
the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key (
item selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen.
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Figure 135 – J2K100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
or
) through the different
You can enable or disable specific transmissions by scrolling (
transmitted messages and pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured. Select
whether you want the message to be transmitted (“On”) or disabled (“Off”) using the Scroll Up (
)
or Scroll Down (
) keys followed by the Enter key (
).
6.17.1.6
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.17.2
Device Label
A label may be assigned to the J2K100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network.
See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.17.3
NMEA 2000 Instance – Engine
This entry allows the engine to be mapped to an NMEA2000 instance number. Each engine on an
NMEA 2000® network must have a unique instance identifier, to allow display devices to distinguish it
from other engines on the network. The “NMEA2000 Engine Instance:” menu item allows you to
configure the engine instance identifier which will be sent over the NMEA 2000® network along with
engine-related NMEA 2000® messages. In order to configure this parameters, use the Scroll Up (
)
or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlighted cursor to the “NMEA2000 Engine Instance:” menu
item. Then, press the Enter key (
) to move the highlight to the numeric value on the right, as
shown in Figure 136 below.
Because only one such mapping can take place, each engine on the J1939 network must have its
own J2K100 Gateway. The J1939 Source Address (see section 6.17.4) identifies the engine on the
J1939 network, the Engine Instance indentifies the engine to the NMEA2000 network.
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Figure 136 – J2K100 Engine Instance Configuration
Use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys to change the value to the desired value you wish to use
as the engine instance identifier, and then press the Enter key to accept the value and store it within
the J2K100.
6.17.4
Transmission Instance
This entry allows a transmission to be mapped to an NMEA2000 instance number. Each transmission
on an NMEA 2000® network must have a unique instance identifier, to allow display devices to
distinguish it from other transmissions on the network. The “NMEA2000 Transmission Instance:”
menu item allows you to configure the transmission instance identifier which will be sent over the
NMEA 2000® network along with transmission-related NMEA 2000® messages. In order to configure
this parameters, use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlighted cursor to
the “NMEA2000 Transmission Instance:” menu item. Then, press the Enter key (
) to move the
highlight to the numeric value on the right, as shown in below. Because only one such mapping can
take place, each Transmission and each Engine on the J1939 network must have its own J2K100
Gateway. The J1939 Source Address (see section 6.17.4) identifies the transmission on the J1939
network, the Transmission Instance indentifies the transmission to the NMEA2000 network.
Figure 137 – J2K100 NMEA2000 Transmission Instance Configuration
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Use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to change the value to the desired value you wish
to use as the transmission instance identifier, and then press the Enter key (
) to accept the value
and store it within the J2K100.
6.17.5
AC/Icemaker Instance
This entry allows a air conditioner or icemaker to be mapped to an NMEA2000 instance number.
Each air conditioner or icemaker on an NMEA 2000® network must have a unique instance identifier,
to allow display devices to distinguish it from other air conditioners or icemakers on the network. The
“AC/Icemaker:” menu item allows you to configure the air conditioner or instance identifier which will
be sent over the NMEA 2000® network along with air conditioner or icemaker-related NMEA 2000®
messages. In order to configure this parameters, use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys
to move the highlighted cursor to the “AC/Icemaker:” menu item. Then, press the Enter key (
) to
move the highlight to the numeric value on the right, as shown in Figure 138 below. Because only one
such mapping can take place, each air conditioner or icemaker on the J1939 network must have its
own J2K100 Gateway. The J1939 Source Address (see section 6.17.4) identifies the air conditioner
or icemaker on the CAN network, the AC/Icemaker Instance indentifies the air conditioner or
icemaker to the NMEA2000 network.
Figure 138 – J2K100 NMEA2000 AC/Icemaker Instance Configuration
Use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to change the value to the desired value you wish,
and then press the Enter key (
) to accept the value and store it within the J2K100.
6.17.6
J1939 Source Address Configuration
A J1939 engine/genset and transmission has its own source address on the J1939 network, which is
different from NMEA 2000® addresses. The J2K100 is capable of serving as a gateway between a
single J1939 engine/genset or a single transmission and the NMEA 2000® network. This setting
identifies the J1939 source address of the engine/genset and a transmission for which the J2K100
will serve as a gateway.
For air conditioners or icemakers, the “J1939 source address” refers to the source address of the air
conditioner or icemaker on the AC/Icemaker CAN network.
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Figure 139 – J2K100 J1939 Source Address Configuration
To set the J1939 source address, use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys to move the highlighted
cursor to the “J1939 Source Address:” menu item. Press the Enter key to move the cursor over to the
source address value on the right, as shown in Figure 139 above. Then, use the Scroll Up and
Scroll Down keys to change the J1939 Source Address value until it matches the J1939 source
address of the engine/genset or transmissions for which you desire this J2K100 to translate data onto
the NMEA 2000® network.
6.17.7
Refresh J1939 source address list
The configuration screen for the J2K100 will examine the bus to determine to which devices it can
connect. This is presented in a list at the bottom of the screen. To update the list after adding a
device, highlight this entry, and press the Enter button.
6.18 Maretron NBE100 Configuration
The DSM250 is capable of configuring the Maretron NBE100 Network Bus Extender. This describes
the configuration of the Maretron NBE100 firmware version 1.0.1.0. The NBE100 configuration menu
is shown in Figure 140 below.
Figure 140 – NBE100 Configuration Screen
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6.18.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 141 – NBE100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.18.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
6.18.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later.
6.18.1.3
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.19 Maretron RAA100 Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Maretron RAA100 firmware version 1.4.9.
Maretron RAA100 rudder angle adapters on the network may be configured using the DSM250. The
RAA100 configuration menu is shown in Figure 142 below.
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Figure 142 – RAA100 Configuration Screen
6.19.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 143 – RAA100 Advanced Configuration Menu
6.19.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
6.19.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
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6.19.1.3
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The RAA100 Rudder Angle Adapter transmits the NMEA2000 PGN #127245 which can be turned on
or turned off by the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN
Enable/Disable…” menu item selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure
144).
Figure 144 – RAA100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable the transmission of the Rudder message by pressing the Enter key on the
message to be configured. Options are:
•
•
Disable – The status message will not be transmitted
Default – The status message will be transmitted at its default NMEA2000 rate.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.19.1.4
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.19.2
Label
A label may be assigned to the RAA100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network. Typically
this label will describe the rudder to which the RAA100 is connected (e.g. Port Rudder).
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Figure 145 – RAA100 Label Configuration
See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.19.3
Rudder Angle Calibration
In order for the RAA100 to indicate an accurate rudder angle, it must know how the resistance of the
resistive rudder angle sender corresponds to the rudder angle. The following screen will be displayed:
Figure 146 – RAA100 Rudder Angle Calibration Options
There are three methods of calibrating the rudder angle sender:
6.19.3.1
Custom Calibration
The Custom Calibration setting will provide the most accurate rudder angle readings under any
circumstances, but it requires that you go through a process in which you set the rudder to full port,
then center, and then full starboard, each time indicating the angle of the rudder to the DSM250. The
RAA100 will measure the sender resistance at each point and create a custom calibration map which
relates the resistance of the sender with the rudder angle. Custom calibration is necessary for non-
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standard values of resistances for rudder angle senders and for rudders with maximum port and
starboard angles of anything other than 45°.
To perform custom calibration of the rudder angle sender, use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlighted cursor over the “Custom Calibration…” menu item. Then, press the
Enter key (
) to confirm your selection and begin the calibration process. Figure 147 shows the
DSM250 with the Custom Rudder Calibration menu item highlighted.
Figure 147 – RAA100 Custom Rudder Angle Calibration
The first step in the custom rudder angle sender calibration process is to turn the wheel hard over to
starboard, and to measure the angle or the rudder (angle from center) with a protractor or other
instrument. Use the Increase and Decrease keys until the highlighted rudder angle value is at the
measured value, and then press Enter to accept the value and store it within the RAA100. Figure 148
shows a screenshot of the starboard rudder calibration screen. You may also press the Abort Key (
) to end the calibration process.
Figure 148 – RAA100 Starboard Rudder Angle Calibration
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The second step in the custom rudder angle sender calibration process is to turn the wheel so that
the rudder is centered as much as possible. Next, press Enter to accept the value and store it within
the RAA100. Figure 149 shows a screenshot of the center rudder calibration screen. You may also
press the Abort Key (
) to end the calibration process.
Figure 149 – RAA100 Center Rudder Angle Calibration
The third step in the custom rudder angle sender calibration process is to turn the wheel hard over to
port, and to measure the angle or the rudder (angle from center) with a protractor or other instrument.
Use the Increase and Decrease keys until the highlighted rudder angle value is at the measured
value, and then press Enter to accept the value and store it within the RAA100. Figure 148 shows a
screenshot of the starboard rudder calibration screen. You may also press the Abort Key (
) to end
the calibration process.
Figure 150 – RAA100 Port Rudder Angle Calibration
Once you have accepted the port rudder angle value, a confirmation screen appears indicating that
the rudder angle calibration has been successfully completed. Figure 151 below shows a screenshot
of this confirmation screen.
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Figure 151 – RAA100 Custom Rudder Calibration Confirmation Screen
6.19.3.2
Set to American Standard (240-33 ohm)
Use the option for rudders using a rudder angle sender with the standard American resistance range
(240 ohms at full port 45°, 33 ohms at full starboard 45°).
6.19.3.3
Set to European Standard (0-180 ohm)
Use this option for rudders using a rudder angle sender with the standard European resistance range
(0 ohms at full port 45°, 180 ohms at full starboard 45°).
6.19.4
Rudder Number
First, the rudder number must be configured. For a vessel with a single rudder, the number should be
set to “0”. For a vessel with two rudders, the port rudder should be set to “0” and the starboard rudder
should be set to “1”. Each rudder must have a rudder number that is different from all other rudders. A
screenshot of rudder number configuration is shown in Figure 152 below.
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move
In order to configure the rudder number, use the Scroll Up (
the highlighted cursor to “Rudder Number:”, then press the Enter key (
) to move the cursor over to
the rudder number value. Use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to select the desired
rudder number. Finally, press the Enter key (
) to confirm your selection and store the new rudder
number within the RAA100.
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Figure 152 – RAA100: Setting the Rudder Number
6.19.5
Operating Mode
The RAA100 can be operated in one of two operating modes, depending on the installation.
•
•
NMEA 2000 (the only thing that is connected to the resistive sender is the RAA100)
NMEA 2000 & Analog Gauge (in addition to the RAA100, the resistive sender is also
connected to a dual-coil analog gauge).
It is important that this setting be performed correctly in order for the RAA100 to produce correct
angle measurements. A screenshot showing configuration of the operating mode appears in Figure
153 below. To configure the operating mode, use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to
move the highlighted cursor over the “Operating Mode:” menu item, then press the Enter key (
) to
move the highlight over the operating mode value. Use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys
to change the operating mode to the desired value, and finally, press the Entry key to confirm your
selection and store the operating mode within the RAA100.
Figure 153 – RAA100: Setting the Operating Mode
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6.19.6
Gauge Resistance, + to Sender
If the desired operating mode is “NMEA 2000 & Analog Gauge”, the two gauge resistances must be
programmed (please refer to the RAA100 User’s Manual for details on how to perform these
measurements). A screenshot of the + to sender gauge resistance configuration is shown in Figure
) or Scroll Down (
154 below. To program the + to sender gauge resistance, use the Scroll Up (
) keys to move the highlighted cursor over the “Gauge Resistance, + to Sender:” menu item.
Then, press the Enter key (
) to move the highlight over the numerical resistance value. Use the
“Increase” and “Decrease” keys to change the value to the measured resistance value, and finally,
press the Enter key (
) to confirm your selection and store the value within the RAA100.
Figure 154 – RAA100: Setting the + to Sender Gauge Resistance
6.19.7
Gauge Resistance, - to Sender
If the desired operating mode is “NMEA 2000 & Analog Gauge”, the two gauge resistances must be
programmed (please refer to the RAA100 User’s Manual for details on how to perform these
measurements). A screenshot of the - to sender gauge resistance configuration is shown in Figure
155 below. To program the - to sender gauge resistance, use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlighted cursor over the “Gauge Resistance, - to Sender:” menu item. Then,
press the Enter key (
) to move the highlight over the numerical resistance value. Use the
“Increase” and “Decrease” keys to change the value to the measured resistance value, and finally,
press the Enter key (
) to confirm your selection and store the value within the RAA100.
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Figure 155 – RAA100: Setting the – to Sender Gauge Resistance
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6.20 Maretron RIM100 Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Maretron RIM100 firmware version 1.1.1.
The DSM250 may be used to configure the channels on the Run Indicator Module (RIM100).
After selecting the RIM100 from the list of devices on the network, the following screen will be
displayed.
Figure 156 – RIM100 Configuration Screen
6.20.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 157 – RIM100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.20.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
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6.20.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.20.1.3
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The RIM100 Run Indicator Module transmits the NMEA2000 PGN #127501 which can be turned on
or turned off by the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN
Enable/Disable…” menu item selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure
158).
Figure 158 – RIM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable the transmission of the Binary Switch Status message, or set the
frequency of transmission of the message by pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be
configured. Options are:
•
•
•
Disable – The status message will not be transmitted
Default – The status message will be transmitted at its default NMEA2000 rate, which is once
every 15 seconds, and each time the value changes.
1s...15s – The status message will be transmitted at the period specified, and each time the
value changes.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.20.1.4
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.20.2
Device Label
A label may be assigned to the RIM100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network. Typically
this label will describe the location of the RIM100. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a
textual value.
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6.20.3
Instance
From here the instance used in the data message may be set.
6.20.4
Channel Configuration
To configure an individual channel, use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to highlight the
channel, and then press Enter. The following screen will be displayed.
Figure 159 – RIM100 Channel Configuration Screen
6.20.4.1
Mode
Each Channel may be enabled or disabled. Valid Modes are:
Disable – the channel is not being used
Enable– the channel is being used
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.20.4.2
Label
A label may be assigned to a channel as an aid to identifying the channel over the network. Typically
this label will describe the equipment to which the channel is connected.
See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
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6.21 Maretron SIM100 Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Maretron SIM100 firmware version 1.1.1.
The DSM250 may be used to configure the channels on the Switch Indicator Module (SIM100).
After selecting the SIM100 from the list of devices on the network, the following screen will be
displayed.
Figure 160 – SIM100 Configuration Screen
6.21.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 161 – SIM100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.21.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
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6.21.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.21.1.3
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The SIM100 Switch Indicator Module transmits the NMEA2000 PGN #127501 which can be turned on
or turned off by the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN
Enable/Disable…” menu item selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure
162).
Figure 162 – SIM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable the transmission of the Binary Switch Status message, or set the
frequency of transmission of the message by pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be
configured. Options are:
•
•
•
Disable – The status message will not be transmitted
Default – The status message will be transmitted at its default NMEA2000 rate, which is once
every 15 seconds, and each time the value changes.
1s...15s – The status message will be transmitted at the period specified, and each time the
value changes.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.21.1.4
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.21.2
Device Label
A label may be assigned to the SIM100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network. Typically
this label will describe the location of the SIM100. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a
textual value.
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6.21.3
Instance
From here the instance used in the data message may be set.
6.21.4
Channel Configuration
To configure an individual channel, use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to highlight the
channel, and then press Enter. The following screen will be displayed.
Figure 163 – SIM100 Channel Configuration Screen
6.21.4.1
Mode
To be able to detect broken connections, a SIM100 channel may be configured to detect an 8kΩ
resistor at the end of the circuit in the open state. In this case a fully open circuit will reported as a
fault condition. See the manual for details.
Valid Modes are:
Disable – the channel is not being used
End Of Line Resistor – an open circuit is a fault condition.
No End Of Line Resistor – an open circuit is not a fault condition.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.21.4.2
Label
A label may be assigned to a channel as an aid to identifying the channel over the network. Typically
this label will describe the function of the switch connected to the channel.
See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
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6.22 Maretron SSC200 Configuration
This describes the configuration of the Maretron SSC200 firmware version 2.0.11. Nine configurable
parameters for the Maretron SSC200 solid state compass may be configured using the Maretron
DSM250 display. The Maretron SSC200 configuration menu can be seen in Figure 164 below.
Figure 164 – SSC200 Configuration Screen
6.22.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 165 – SSC200 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.22.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
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6.22.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.22.1.3
NMEA0183 Settings
Several characteristics of the NMEA 0183 interface of the SSC200 may be programmed using the
DSM250 display. This can be used for initial programming of a SSC200 compass even if only the
NMEA 0183 interface is to be used after installation is complete. Figure 166 below shows the
possible programming options for the NMEA 0183 interface.
Figure 166 – SSC200 NMEA 0183 Settings Screen
6.22.1.3.1 Baud Rate
The SSC200 compass supports NMEA0183 communication at both 4800 baud and 38400 baud. All
SSC200 Compasses are shipped with a baud rate of 4800 baud. This value may be changed by
selecting the Baud Rate option in the menu, and pressing Enter. The use the Scroll Up and Scroll
Down buttons to select the desired baud rate and press Enter to save the value.
6.22.1.3.2 Sentence / Rate Selection
The NMEA 0183 interface is a very low bandwidth interface. The SSC200 is capable of transmitting a
wide variety of NMEA 0183 sentences, and can exceed the bandwidth of the NMEA 0183 interface if
all sentences are transmitted at maximum rates, causing lost data in NMEA 0183 multiplexers or on
the SSC200 interface itself. It is important, therefore, to limit the types of NMEA 0183 sentences
transmitted only to those that are necessary for other products which are connected to the NMEA
0183 interface. Figure 167 below shows the SSC200 NMEA 0183 Settings -> Sentence/Rate
Selection menu. In this menu, you can selectively enable and disable the different NMEA 0183
sentences that the SSC200 can transmit, and you can program the transmission interval for the
enabled sentences. In the figure, you can see that the HDG and ROT sentences will be transmitted
every 0.1 second (10 times/second), the ATT sentence will be transmitted once per second, and the
HDM and HDT sentences are disabled.
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The last line in the menu enables you to program the lifetime of the variation data received by the
SSC200. In Figure 167, you can see that the “Variation Time” has been programmed to 5.0 seconds.
This means that if the compass has not received magnetic variation for five seconds, it will no longer
transmit true heading data, as the variation data it has received is now expired. On the NMEA2000
side, the Heading PGN has separate fields for heading sensor reading and variation. The SSC200
always has magnetic heading available; when variation is not available (timeout or invalid) the
variation field is set to N/A. The default value of 5.0 seconds should be adequate for the majority of
applications, but it may need to be increased for variation sources that transmit less frequently.
Figure 167 – SSC200 NMEA 0183 Sentence/Rate Selection Screen
6.22.1.3.3 Load Default Sentence / Rate Selection
The Load Default Sentence / Rate Selection option will reset the NMEA 0183 sentence
enable/disable status, along with transmission intervals and variation time, to their factory default
settings.
Figure 168 – SSC200 Load Default Periodic Rate Selection
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6.22.1.4
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The SSC200 compass transmits several different messages, which can be turned on or turned off by
the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key (
) with “NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…” menu
item selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen.
Figure 169 – SSC200 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable specific transmissions by scrolling (
or
) through the different
transmitted messages and pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured. Select
whether you want the message to be transmitted (“On”) or disabled (“Off”) using the Scroll Up (
)
or Scroll Down (
) keys followed by the Enter key (
).
6.22.1.5
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.22.2
Installation Offset Calibration
The installation offset (i.e., misalignment of installed SSC200 with vessel’s center line) may be
calibrated using the Maretron DSM250 display. While executing “Installation Offset Calibration”, the
vessel must stay still with no pitch and roll because SSC200 will also calibrate pitch and roll at this
time.Once the compass is installed, point the vessel at a known heading, and then select the
compass from the “Device Configuration…” menu. Scroll down (
) the menu items to the line
entitled “Installation Offset Calibration…” and press enter (
) which takes you to the screen shown
in Figure 170.
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Figure 170 – SSC200 Installation Offset Calibration Screen
Use the Increase (
) and Decrease (
) keys to adjust the display value until it matches the
known heading to which the boat is pointed. Press the Accept (
) key to accept the value when you
are satisfied. If you do not wish to perform installation offset calibration at this time, press the Abort (
) key and the installation offset will not be altered.
6.22.3
Inverted Installation Entry
Normally, the SSC200 is mounted so that the label on the compass is facing up and the NMEA 2000®
and NMEA 0183 connectors are facing towards the bow of the vessel. A recent version of SSC200
firmware supports mounting the compass upside-down (for instance, to a ceiling), or backwards (with
connectors facing towards the stern of the vessel, so that the SSC200 can be mounted to the aft side
of a bulkhead). If either of these mounting options is used, the DSM250 can be used to inform the
SSC200 of this fact so that it can adjust heading, rate or turn, pitch, and roll readings to be corrected
accordingly.
Figure 171 – Setting the Installation Orientation
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The choices that are offered are “Normal Installation” (default), “Backward Installation”, “Upside-Down
Installation”, or “Upside Down and Backward”.
6.22.4
Label
This menu item allows you to set a text label for the device. This text label will help you to identify a
particular device when you have more than one of the same type in the system, and appears when
selecting devices in both the DSM250 and in N2KView.
See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.22.5
Magnetic Deviation Calibration
The DSM250 is capable of performing magnetic deviation calibration on a Maretron SSC200 solid
state compass. The Rate of Turn Offset Calibration (section 6.22.8) should be done before the
Deviation Calibration. The first screen (Figure 172) gives instructions for performing the procedure.
First, begin to turn the boat in a slow circle (either clockwise or counter-clockwise) at about 3 to 12
degrees per second.
Figure 172 – SSC200 Magnetic Deviation Calibration Start Screen
Once you have begun the turn, press Begin (
) to start the calibration procedure. If you do not wish
to perform magnetic deviation calibration at this time, press Abort (
), and the currently stored
deviation tables will be retained. If you are in a large vessel, it may be difficult to turn the vessel in a
small enough circle to avoid significant centrifugal force applied to the compass during magnetic
deviation calibration. This can cause the built-in tilt sensors inside the compass to mistakenly believe
that the compass is tilted during the magnetic deviation calibration, which can adversely affect the
quality of the magnetic deviation calibration, especially in northerly latitudes where magnetic
inclination (magnetic dip) is higher. If this is the case, instead of pressing the Begin (
) key, press
the No Acc(
) key. This will cause the compass to ignore its tilt sensors and assume that the
compass is level to the earth’s surface during the calibration. You must keep the boat level during
calibration if you choose this option. After you press the Begin (
) key or the No Acc(
) key, a
status screen will appear (Figure 173).
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Figure 173 – SSC200 Magnetic Deviation Calibration Progress Screen
This progress screen shows the number of circles completed, the current heading, the current rate of
turn, and the current status of compass calibration. If you do not wish to continue magnetic deviation
calibration at this time, press Abort (
), and the currently stored deviation tables will be retained.
Once calibration is successful, a completion screen will appear. If calibration is unsuccessful, a
screen will appear indicating this, and you should repeat the calibration procedure.
6.22.6
Magnetic Deviation Status
Pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Magnetic Variation Status…” menu item selected causes the
screen shown in Figure 174 to be displayed.
Figure 174 – SSC200 Magnetic Deviation Status Screen
6.22.7
Rate of Turn Damping Period
The SSC200 is capable of transmitting the rate of turn of a vessel. Different applications may require
different damping for the rate of turn measurement. The DSM250 may be used to set the damping
period for the rate of turn measurement to anywhere between 0.1 seconds and 60 seconds. Figure
175 shows an example of the damping period set to 2 seconds.
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Figure 175 – Programming SSC200 Rate of Turn Damping Period
6.22.8
Rate of Turn Zero Offset Calibration
The DSM250 is capable of displaying rate of turn information from a Maretron SSC200 compass.
Although the compass provides very accurate rate of turn information, it can drift off of zero even
though the vessel is not turning. Fortunately, the SSC200 can learn the zero offset for different
conditions found on the vessel. You teach the compass these zero offset values by pressing the
Enter key (
) with the “Rate of Turn Zero Offset Calibration…” menu item selected which causes
the DSM250 to display the screen shown in Figure 176. The Rate of Turn Offset Calibration should
be done before the Deviation Calibration (section 6.22.5).
Figure 176 – SSC200 Rate of Turn Zero Offset Calibration Screen
6.22.9
Variation Source Entry
The SSC200, being a magnetic compass, transmits heading information referenced to the magnetic
north pole (magnetic heading). The SSC200 is capable of transmitting heading information
referenced to the earth’s geographic North Pole (true heading). In order to produce true heading,
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information regarding the magnetic variation at the current location is required. Please see the
SSC200 User’s Manual for more details on the use of magnetic variation by the SSC200 compass.
By default, the SSC200 is capable of receiving variation information on either its NMEA 0183 or
NMEA 2000® interfaces. This causes the SSC200 to use variation data from either the NMEA 0183
interface or the NMEA 2000® interface.
Figure 177 – Setting Variation Source to NMEA 0183 or NMEA 2000® (factory default)
You should need to alter this setting only if:
•
•
There are variation sources available on both the NMEA 2000® and NMEA 0183 interfaces, or
There is no magnetic variation source available.
If variation sources are available on both the NMEA 2000® and NMEA 0183 interfaces, you must tell
the SSC200 which source to use. Figure 178 below shows the NMEA 0183 source selected. This
causes the SSC200 to use variation data from the NMEA 0183 interface and ignore all other variation
sources (i.e., NMEA 2000® interface and manual entries).
Figure 178 – Setting Variation Source to NMEA 0183 Only
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Figure 179 below shows the NMEA 2000® source selected.
Figure 179 – Setting Variation Source to NMEA 2000® Only
If there is no magnetic variation source available on either the NMEA 2000® or the NMEA 0183
interface, and you wish to display true heading information, you may manually enter a magnetic
variation. To set a manual variation value, you must change the variation source by pushing the Enter
key (
) with the “Variation Source:” menu item selected. This highlights the next field where you
select “Manual Entry:” by scrolling (
or
) through the options until you reach “Manual Entry:”.
Pressing the Enter key (
) with the “Manual Entry:” menu item selected takes you to the screen
shown in Figure 180.
Figure 180 – Entering Manual Variation
Press the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) key to change the amount of East or West variation.
Press the Accept Key (
) when the desired number is shown. You may also disable manual
variation by setting the value to “Disable”; this option appears between the values 0.0°E and 0.1°W
when scrolling through the values. When manual variation is disabled, the SSC200 will not transmit
any variation information and heading information will be available only in magnetic heading format.
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WARNING: Magnetic variation changes as your location on the earth changes; therefore
magnetic variation should be adjusted with changes in position. Neither the DSM250 nor the
SSC200 will make these changes automatically; they are the responsibility of the user.
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6.23 Maretron TLA100 Configuration
Maretron TLA100 tank level adapters on the network may be configured using the DSM250. This
describes the configuration of the Maretron TLA100 firmware version 1.6.14. The TLA100
configuration menu is shown in Figure 181 below.
Figure 181 – TLA100 Configuration Screen
6.23.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 182 – TLA100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.23.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
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6.23.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later. See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.23.1.3
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The TLA100 Tank Level Adapter transmits the NMEA2000 PGN #127505 which can be turned on or
turned off by the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…”
menu item selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure 183).
Figure 183 – TLA100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable the transmission of the Fluid Level message, or set the frequency of
transmission of the message by pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured.
Options are:
•
•
Off – The status message will not be transmitted
On – The status message will be transmitted at its default NMEA2000 rate.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.23.1.4
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.23.2
Label
See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.23.3
Tank Capacity
In order for the TLA100 to produce readings of the amount of fluid remaining in the tank, the tank
capacity must be programmed into the TLA100 adapter. Figure 184 below shows a screen shot of the
tank capacity being configured.
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To program the tank capacity, use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the
highlighted cursor over the “Tank Capacity:” menu item. Then, press the Enter key (
) to move the
highlight over the numerical tank capacity value. Use the “Increase” and “Decrease” keys to change
the value to the desired tank capacity value, and finally, press the Enter key (
) to confirm your
selection and store the value within the TLA100.
Figure 184 – Configuring the Tank Capacity
After you have pressed the Enter key (
), a confirmation screen will appear that warns you that the
fluid remaining measurement will change as a result of this change. Press the Accept key to accept
the change and store the new tank capacity value within the TLA100, or Press the Cancel Key (
)
to cancel the change and leave the old tank capacity programmed into the TLA100.
Figure 185 – Tank Capacity Change Confirmation Screen
6.23.4
Tank Levels Calibration
In order for the TLA100 to indicate an accurate tank level, it must know how the resistance of the
resistive tank level sender corresponds to the level of fluid in the tank. There are three methods of
calibrating the tank level sender:
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•
•
•
Custom Calibration – use for non-rectangular tanks or non-standard sensors (also, most
accurate in any case, but requires more effort)
Set to American Standard (240-33 ohm) – use for rectangular tanks using a tank level sender
with the standard American resistance range (240 ohms at full, 33 ohms at empty).
Set to European Standard (0-180 ohm) – use for rectangular tanks using a tank level sender
with the standard European resistance range (0 ohms at full, 180 ohms at empty).
6.23.4.1
Custom Calibration
The Custom Calibration setting will provide the most accurate tank level readings under any
circumstances, but it requires that you go through a process in which you gradually fill the tank,
stopping periodically to input the current fluid level. The TLA100 will measure the sender resistance at
each point and create a custom calibration map which relates the resistance of the sender with the
fluid levels. Figure 186 below shows a screenshot of the DSM250 with the Custom Calibration option
highlighted. Custom calibration is necessary for non-rectangular tanks and for non-standard values of
resistances for tank level senders. To perform custom calibration of the tank level sender, use the
Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlighted cursor over the “Custom
Calibration…” menu item. Then, press the Enter key (
) to confirm your selection and begin the
calibration process.
Figure 186 – Performing Custom Calibration of the Tank Level Adapter
The first step in custom calibration of the tank level sender is to provide an estimated capacity of the
tank. This estimated capacity must be within +/- 25% of the actual capacity. To set the estimated tank
capacity, use the arrow keys to adjust the displayed value until the desired value is shown. Then,
press the Accept key to confirm your selection and continue with the calibration process. If you desire
to stop the calibration process, pressing the Back Key (
) will end the process and return you to
the Tank Levels Calibration menu.
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Figure 187 – Tank Levels Calibration Capacity Estimation
The next step in the calibration process is to fill the tank and indicate the volume of fluid in the tank at
various points while filling the tank. This process should be started with an empty tank. You only need
to indicate two calibration points for a rectangular tank, and can use up to 16 calibration points for a
tank with a more complex shape. Figure 188 shows a screenshot of the first calibration step. Enter
the first calibration point with an empty tank (0.0 Gallons/liters) by pressing the Accept key. The
“Current Point” highlight will advance to the next point.
Figure 188 – Empty Level Calibration
Each time you press Accept during this process and after the Current Point highlight advances, put
more fluid into the tank, and note the total volume of fluid pumped into the tank at this point. Use the
Increase and Decrease keys to set the current tank level to the appropriate value, and then press the
Accept key to store the current calibration point and advance to the next calibration point. Figure 189
shows a screenshot of these intermediate calibration points.
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Figure 189 – Intermediate Level Calibration
Once the tank is completely full, instead of pressing the Accept key to store the current calibration
point, press the Complete key. This will complete the calibration process and will also adjust the tank
capacity to the currently indicated level. Figure 190 below shows the calibration screen at the last
point with the full tank level (and thus the tank capacity) set to 101 gallons.
Figure 190 – Full Level Calibration
After you press accept, a confirmation screen will appear showing completion of the calibration
process and the new tank capacity value. A screenshot of this calibration screen is shown below in
Figure 191.
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Figure 191 – Custom Tank Level Calibration Confirmation Screen
6.23.4.2
American Standard Sender Calibration
If you have a rectangular tank, and a sender with the standard American resistance range (240 ohms
full, 33 ohms empty), and you know the capacity of the tank, you can easily calibrate the sender by
using the “Set to American Standard (240-33 ohm)” menu item. Figure 192 below shows this option
highlighted. Use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlight over this menu
item, and then press the Enter key (
) to write the calibration values within the TLA100 and
complete the calibration process.
Figure 192 – American Standard Sender Calibration
6.23.4.3
European Standard Sender Calibration
If you have a rectangular tank, and a sender with the standard European resistance range (0 ohms
full, 180 ohms empty), and you know the capacity of the tank, you can easily calibrate the sender by
using the “Set to European Standard (0-180 ohm)” menu item. Figure 193 below shows this option
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlight over this menu
highlighted. Use the Scroll Up (
item, and then press the Enter key (
) to store the calibration values within the TLA100 and
complete the calibration process.
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Figure 193 – European Standard Sender Calibration
6.23.5
Tank Number
Next, the tank number must be configured. A tank number can have a value between 0 and 15. Each
tank of a particular type must have a tank number that is different from all other tanks of the same
type. For instance, only one TLA100 on a fuel tank may have tank number equal to “0”. A screenshot
of tank number configuration is shown in Figure 194 below. In order to configure the tank number,
use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlighted cursor to “Tank Number:”,
then press the Enter key (
) to move the cursor over to the tank number value. Use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to select the desired tank number. Finally, press the Enter key (
)
to confirm your selection and store the new tank number within the TLA100.
Figure 194 – Configuring the Tank Number
6.23.6
Tank Type
The TLA100 can be used in tanks containing any of a number of different types of fluids. So that
network-connected monitoring devices can determine easily what sort of fluid is in the monitored tank,
the TLA100 must be programmed to indicate the fluid type it is monitoring. Figure 195 below shows a
) or Scroll Down (
)
screen shot of the tank type being configured. First, use the Scroll Up (
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keys to position the highlighted cursor over “Tank Type:”, then press the Enter key (
) to move the
highlight to the tank type data itself. Now, use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to
change the tank type data to the type desired. Finally, press the Enter key (
) to confirm the
selection and store the value within the TLA100.
Available tank types are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fuel
Fresh Water
Waste Water
Live Well
Oil
Black Water
There are also a number of reserved tank types to accommodate possible future undefined tank
types.
Figure 195 – Configuring the Tank Type
6.23.7
Operating Mode
The TLA100 can be operated in one of two operating modes, depending on the installation.
•
•
NMEA 2000 (the only thing that is connected to the resistive sender is the TLA100)
NMEA 2000 & Analog Gauge (in addition to the TLA100, the resistive sender is also
connected to a dual-coil analog gauge).
It is important that this setting be performed correctly in order for the TLA100 to produce correct level
measurements. A screenshot showing configuration of the operating mode appears in Figure 196
below. To configure the operating mode, use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move
the highlighted cursor over the “Operating Mode:” menu item, then press the Enter key (
) to move
the highlight over the operating mode value. Use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to
change the operating mode to the desired value, and finally, press the Entry key to confirm your
selection and store the operating mode within the TLA100.
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Figure 196 – Configuring the Operating Mode
6.23.8
Gauge Resistance, + to Sender
If the desired operating mode is “NMEA 2000 & Analog Gauge”, the two gauge resistances must be
programmed (please refer to the TLA100 User’s Manual for details on how to perform these
measurements). A screenshot of the + to sender gauge resistance configuration is shown in Figure
197 below. To program the + to sender gauge resistance, use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlighted cursor over the “Gauge Resistance, + to Sender:” menu item.
Then, press the Enter key (
) to move the highlight over the numerical resistance value. Use the
“Increase” and “Decrease” keys to change the value to the measured resistance value, and finally,
press the Enter key (
) to confirm your selection and store the value within the TLA100.
Figure 197 – Configuring the + to Sender Gauge Resistance
6.23.9
Gauge Resistance, - to Sender
If the desired operating mode is “NMEA 2000 & Analog Gauge”, the two gauge resistances must be
programmed (please refer to the TLA100 User’s Manual for details on how to perform these
measurements). A screenshot of the - to sender gauge resistance configuration is shown in Figure
198 below.
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To program the - to sender gauge resistance, use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to
move the highlighted cursor over the “Gauge Resistance, - to Sender:” menu item. Then, press the
Enter key (
) to move the highlight over the numerical resistance value. Use the “Increase” and
“Decrease” keys to change the value to the measured resistance value, and finally, press the Enter
key (
) to confirm your selection and store the value within the TLA100.
Figure 198 – Configuring the - to Sender Gauge Resistance
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6.24 Maretron TLM100 Configuration
The DSM250 may be used to configure and calibrate the Tank Level Monitor (TLM100 / TLM150 /
TLM200). This describes the configuration of firmware version 1.1.4. After selecting the TLM100 from
the list of devices on the network, the following screen will be displayed.
Figure 199 – TLM100 Configuration Screen
6.24.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 200 – TLM100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.24.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
6.24.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
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installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later.
6.24.1.3
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The TLM100 Tank Level Module transmits the NMEA2000 PGN #127505 which can be turned on or
turned off by the DSM250 display. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…”
menu item selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure 201).
Figure 201 – TLM100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable the transmission of the Binary Switch Status message by pressing the
Enter key (
) on the message to be configured. Options are:
Off – The fluid level message will not be transmitted
On – The fluid level message will be transmitted at its default NMEA2000 rate, which is once
every 2.5 seconds.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.24.1.4
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.24.2
Label
A label may be assigned to the TLM100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network. Typically
this label will describe the location of the TLM100, and a description of the contents of the tank.
6.24.3
Tank Capacity
In order for the TLM100 to produce readings of the amount of fluid remaining in the tank, the tank
capacity must be programmed into the TLM100 adapter. Figure 202 below shows a screen shot of
the tank capacity being configured. To program the tank capacity, use the Scroll Up or Scroll Down
keys to move the highlighted cursor over the “Tank Capacity:” menu item. Then, press the Enter key
to move the highlight over the numerical tank capacity value. Use the Increase and Decrease keys to
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change the value to the desired tank capacity value, and finally, press the Accept key to confirm your
selection.
Figure 202 – Configuring the Tank Capacity
After you have pressed the Accept key, a confirmation screen will appear that warns you that the
fluid remaining measurement will change as a result of this change. Press the Accept key to accept
the change and store the new tank capacity value within the TLM100, or Press the Cancel Key to
cancel the change and leave the old tank capacity programmed into the TLM100.
Figure 203 – Tank Capacity Change Confirmation Screen
6.24.4
Tank Levels Calibration
In order for the TLM100 to indicate an accurate tank level, it must know the geometry of the tank.
There are two methods of calibrating the tank level sender:
•
•
Custom Calibration – use for non-rectangular tanks (also, most accurate in any case, but
requires more effort)
Rectangular Tank – By inputting some dimensions of a rectangular tank, the TLM100 is able to
interpolate the volume of liquid from the distance to the surface.
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6.24.4.1
Custom Calibration
The Custom Calibration setting will provide the most accurate tank level readings under any
circumstances, but it requires that you go through a process in which you gradually fill the tank,
stopping periodically to input the current fluid level. The TLM100 will measure the distance to the
surface at each point and create a custom calibration map which relates the fluid levels to the volume
in the tank. Figure 186 below shows a screenshot of the DSM250 with the Custom Calibration option
highlighted. Custom calibration is necessary for non-rectangular tanks. To perform custom calibration
of the tank level sender, use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlighted
cursor over the “Custom Calibration…” menu item. Then, press the Enter key (
) to confirm your
selection and begin the calibration process.
Figure 204 – Performing Custom Calibration of the Tank Level Monitor
The first step in custom calibration of the tank level monitor is to provide an estimated capacity of the
tank. This estimated capacity must be within +/- 25% of the actual capacity. To set the estimated tank
capacity, use the Increase and Decrease keys to adjust the displayed value until the desired value is
shown. Then, press the Accept key to confirm your selection and continue with the calibration
process. If you desire to stop the calibration process, pressing the Abort key (
) will end the
process and return you to the Tank Levels Calibration menu.
Figure 205 – Tank Levels Calibration Capacity Estimation
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The next step in the calibration process is to fill the tank and indicate the volume of fluid in the tank at
various points while filling the tank. This process should be started with an empty tank. You only need
to indicate two calibration points for a rectangular tank, and can use up to 16 calibration points for a
tank with a more complex shape. Figure 206 shows a screenshot of the first calibration step. Enter
the first calibration point with an empty tank (0.0 Gallons/liters) by pressing the Accept key. The
“Current Point” highlight will advance to the next point.
Figure 206 – Empty Level Calibration
Each time you press Accept during this process and after the Current Point highlight advances, put
more fluid into the tank, and note the total volume of fluid pumped into the tank at this point. Use the
Increase and Decrease keys to set the current tank level to the appropriate value, and then press the
Accept key to store the current calibration point and advance to the next calibration point. Figure 207
shows a screenshot of these intermediate calibration points.
Figure 207 – Intermediate Level Calibration
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Once the tank is completely full, instead of pressing the Accept key to store the current calibration
point, press the Complete key. This will complete the calibration process and will also adjust the tank
capacity to the currently indicated level. Figure 208 below shows the calibration screen at the last
point with the full tank level (and thus the tank capacity) set to 101 gallons.
Figure 208 – Full Level Calibration
After you press accept, a confirmation screen will appear showing completion of the calibration
process and the new tank capacity value. A screenshot of this calibration screen is shown below in
Figure 209.
Figure 209 – Custom Tank Level Calibration Confirmation Screen
6.24.4.2
Rectangular Tank
If you have a rectangular tank, and you know the capacity of the tank, you can easily calibrate the
sender by using the “Rectangular Tank” menu item. Figure 210 below shows this option highlighted.
Use the Scroll Up (
) or Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlight over this menu item, and
then press the Enter key (
).
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Figure 210 – Rectangular Tank Selection
The following screen will be displayed.
Figure 211 – Rectangular Tank Calibration
Enter the distance from the face of the TLM100 sensor to the bottom of the tank for the Empty Tank
Depth, and the distance from the face of the TLM100 sensor to the top of the liquid when the tank is
full for the Full Tank Depth.
After entering the values, use the Back button to return the parent menu.
6.24.5
Tank Number
The Tank Number is the Data Instance used in the data message. This can be set from #0 to #15.
6.24.6
Tank Type
This is set to the type of fluid in the tank. Values are:
Fuel –
Fresh Water –
Waste Water –
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Live Well –
Oil –
Black Water –
Reserved-1..Reserved-7 – These values may be used when the contents of the tank does not fit
into one of the categories above.
6.25 Maretron TLM150 Configuration
The TLM150 is the gasoline version of the TLM100. The configuration of the two devices is the same;
see Section 6.24 for details.
6.26 Maretron TLM200 Configuration
The TLM200 is the deep tank version of the TLM100. The configuration of the two devices is the
same; see Section 6.24 for details.
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6.27 Maretron TMP100 Configuration
Maretron Temperature Modules (TMP100) may be configured using the DSM250. This describes the
configuration of the Maretron TMP100 firmware version 1.1.1. The top level of the TMP100
configuration menu is shown below.
Figure 212 – TMP100 Configuration Screen
6.27.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 213 – TMP100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.27.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
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6.27.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later.
6.27.1.3
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The TMP100 Temperature Module transmits a number of the NMEA2000® PGNs which can be
turned on or turned off by the DSM250 display. For reasons of compatibility with older NMEA2000
devices, some of these PGNs are redundant; disabling these PGNs will reduce the amount of traffic
on the NMEA2000® bus. Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable…” menu item
selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure 214).
Figure 214 – TMP100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable the transmission of a PGN message, or set the frequency of transmission
of the message by pressing the Enter key (
) on the message to be configured. Options are:
Off – The PGN will not be transmitted
On – The PGN will be transmitted at its default NMEA2000 rate.
0.5s…5s – The PGN will be transmitted at the interval specified.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
6.27.1.4
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.27.2
Channel Configuration
Individual channels may be configured by using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to highlight
the channel, and then pressing the Enter key. The following screen will be displayed.
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Figure 215 – TMP100 Channel Configuration Screen
6.27.2.1
Instance
The Data Instance of the Temperature (as sent in PGNs 130311, 130312, and 130823) is set in this
field. Use the Increase and Decrease buttons to select the correct instance number, and the press
the Enter button to store it.
6.27.2.2
Source
In the NMEA2000® PGNs, each temperature is associated with a source type. Possible values are:
Bait Well Temperature
Engine Room Temperature
Exhaust Gas Temperature
Freezer Temperature
Heating System Temperature
Inside Temperature
Live Well Temperature
Main Cabin Temperature
Outside Temperature
Refrigeration Temperature
Sea Temperature
User Defined Temperature #129...#144 – Use this when none of the above options are suitable.
Use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to select the correct source, and the press the Enter
button to store it.
6.27.2.3
Label
A label may be assigned to each channel of the TMP100 as an aid to identifying the temperature that
is being displayed. Typically this label will describe the function or location of the temperature sensor.
6.27.3
Device Label
A label may be assigned to the TMP100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network. Typically
this label will describe the location of the TMP100.
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6.28 Maretron USB100 Configuration
Maretron USB100 gateways on the network may be configured using the DSM250. This describes
the configuration of the Maretron USB100 firmware version 1.8.2. The USB100 configuration menu is
shown in Figure 216 below. There is one configurable item for the USB100 and that is “Remote
Device Selection…”.
Figure 216 – USB100 Configuration Screen
6.28.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 217 – USB100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.28.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
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6.28.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later.
6.28.1.3
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.28.2
Remote Device Selection
The Maretron NMEA 2000® to NMEA 0183 gateway (USB100) can be configured to select which
NMEA 2000® devices are selected for display on the computer attached to the USB interface of the
USB100. In this manner, multiple devices of the same type may be used on a NMEA 2000® network
in a fail-safe configuration. The USB100 Device Selection Menu for an example network configuration
can be seen in Figure 218.
WARNING: Do not select multiple devices of the same type for display. This will result in multiple and
possibly conflicting readings.
Figure 218 – USB100 Device Selection Screen
The “NA” column of the menu displays the node address the device is using.
The “Manuf.” column of the menu displays the manufacturer of the device.
The “Model” column displays the model number of the device.
The “SN#” column displays the serial number of the device, so that any of two or more devices of
the same manufacturer and model number may be distinguished from one another.
The “Stat” column indicates whether the device is currently connected to the bus and is
responding to queries (“Online”), or has been disconnected from the bus, has lost power, or for
some other reason is not responding to queries (“Offline”).
The “Disp” column indicates whether data from that particular device is accepted for display by
the USB100 (“On”) or that the USB100 ignores data transmitted by this device (“Off”). By
scrolling to the device and pressing the Enter key (
), you may then use the Scroll Up (
)
and Scroll Down (
) keys to toggle the “Display” status for this particular device. Once you
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are satisfied with the state of the “Display” setting, press the Enter key (
) to accept the
setting. The USB100 will retain information on devices that have been removed from the bus
or powered down (“Offline”) so that when they are placed back on the bus, they will assume
their prior “Display” setting.
6.29 Maretron VDR100 Configuration
The DSM250 is capable of performing configuration of the VDR100 Vessel Data Recorder. This
describes the configuration of the Maretron VDR100 firmware version 1.0.1.0. Figure 219 below
shows a screenshot of the VDR100 configuration menu.
Figure 219 – VDR100 Configuration Screen
6.29.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
Figure 220 – VDR100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.29.1.1
Device Instance
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This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network.
6.29.1.2
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later.
6.29.1.3
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.29.1.4
Label
A device label may be assigned to the VDR100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network.
See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
6.30 Maretron WSO100 Configuration
The DSM250 is capable of performing configuration of the WSO100 Wind/Weather Sensor. This
describes the configuration of the Maretron WSO100 firmware version 2.0.12. Figure 221 below
shows a screenshot of the WSO100 configuration menu.
Figure 221 – WSO100 Configuration Screen
6.30.1
Advanced Configuration
Advanced Configuration changes some complex parameters within the device, and should only be
performed by an advanced user. Typically advanced configuration is only done at installation and
should not need to be done while at sea.
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Figure 222 – WSO100 Advanced Configuration Screen
6.30.1.1
Device Instance
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the unit. You usually will not
need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple units on the network. Device instance
is always used in the Wind PGNs.
6.30.1.2
Instance – Humidity
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the humidity transmitted in PGN
130313. You usually will not need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple humidity
sensors on the network.
6.30.1.3
Instance – Pressure
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the air pressure transmitted in
PGN 130314. You usually will not need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple
pressure sensors on the network.
6.30.1.4
Instance – Temperature
This entry allows you to program the NMEA 2000 device instance for the temperature transmitted in
PGN 130312. You usually will not need to modify the default value of “0” unless you have multiple
temperature sensors on the network. Note that the TMP100 module also generates these PGNs.
6.30.1.5
Installation Description
This entry allows you to modify the NMEA 2000 installation description text strings. You can enter
any information you like here, such as the date the unit was installed, or the location in which it was
installed, for later reference. Tools such as Maretron N2KAnalyzer allow you to view these values
later.
6.30.1.6
NMEA2000 PGN Enable/Disable
The WSO100 Ultrasonic Wind and Weather Station transmits a number of NMEA2000 PGNs which
can be turned on or turned off by the DSM250 display. For the vast majority of installations, the
factory setting is appropriate, but if it becomes necessary to disable one of the transmitted messages
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from the WSO100, for instance, if you have a separate thermometer / humidity sensor / barometer on
the network, it is possible to do so with the DSM250.Pressing the Enter key with “NMEA2000 PGN
Enable/Disable…” menu item selected causes the DSM250 to display the following screen (Figure
223).
Figure 223 – WSO100 NMEA 2000® PGN Enable/Disable Screen
You can enable or disable the transmission of the messages by pressing the Enter key (
message to be configured. Options are:
) on the
Disable – The message will not be transmitted
Default – The message will be transmitted at its default NMEA2000 rate.
0.5s…5.0s – The message will be transmitted at the interval specified.
Select the required option using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down keys followed by the Enter key.
Notice that by default, the old Environmental Parameters message (PGN 130310) is disabled while
the new Environmental Parameters message (PGN 130311) is enabled. The reason for this is that
the old message has been discontinued by the National Marine Electronics Association (NMEA) in
favor of the new message. If you find that a particular display is not showing particular information
(i.e., temperature, humidity, or barometric pressure), go ahead and enable the old message to see if
data then becomes available.
6.30.1.7
Restore Factory Defaults
This option restores all settings on the device to their factory default state.
6.30.2
Device Label
A device label may be assigned to the WSO100 as an aid to identifying the device over the network.
See section 3.3.4 for details on how to enter a textual value.
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Figure 224 – WSO100 Device Label Menu
6.30.3
Installation Offset Calibration
The WSO100 comes from the factory with a preset orientation, so that mounting it with the orientation
marks facing the bow of the vessel, the sensor will read 0° apparent wind angle when the vessel is
sailing directly into the wind (please refer to the WSO100 User’s Manual for details).
However, the WSO100 can be installed in any orientation with respect to the vessel and any
misalignment with respect to the factory preset can be easily compensated for using the Installation
Offset calibration menu item. To perform installation offset calibration, use the Scroll Up (
) or
Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlighted cursor to the “Installation Offset Calibration…” menu
item, and then press the Enter key (
). The Installation Offset screen then appears, which is shown
in Figure 225 below.
Figure 225 – WSO100 Installation Offset Screen
Turn the vessel directly into the wind and motor forward. When you are satisfied that the apparent
wind is directly on the bow of the vessel, press the Accept key to set this angle to read 0° apparent
wind on the WSO100. The WSO100 will only calibrate if the apparent wind speed is greater than 2.2
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miles/hour. If the apparent wind speed is lower than this, then an error message will appear, which is
shown in Figure 226 below, and the calibration process will be aborted.
Figure 226 – WSO100 Configuration Aborted Due to Low Wind Speed
If the wind speed is sufficient, then a confirmation screen, shown in Figure 227 below, will appear,
indicating that a successful installation offset calibration has completed.
Figure 227 – Installation Offset Success Confirmation Screen
You may instead abort calibration by pressing the Abort Key (
). If you do this, the installation
offset calibration process will be aborted and a message will appear noting that this has happened,
which appears in Figure 228 below.
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Figure 228 – Installation Offset Abort Confirmation Screen
6.30.4
Wind Data Damping Period
The WSO100 comes from the factory preset with a damping period of 1.5 seconds, which should be
appropriate for most applications. However, you may use the DSM250 to tune the damping period to
anywhere between 0.1 seconds and 5.0 seconds if you desire. To do this, use the Scroll Up (
) or
Scroll Down (
) keys to move the highlighted cursor to the “Wind Data Damping Period:” menu
item, then press the Enter key (
) to move the highlight to the numerical value on the right. This is
shown in Figure 229 below. Use the Increase and Decrease keys to adjust the damping period to the
desired value, and then press the Enter key (
) to accept the value and store it within the WSO100.
Figure 229 – Setting the Wind Data Damping Period
6.30.5
Barometric Pressure
The WSO100 has an internal barometer, which is pre-calibrated before leaving the factory. If the unit
requires re-calibrating, then this field allows the entry of the actual pressure. This may be necessary if
the vessel is on a lake with an altitude other than sea level, and the user wishes to normalize the
barometric pressure to sea level.
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Figure 230 – Setting the Barometric Pressure
Use the Increase and Decrease buttons to select the correct pressure, and the press the Enter
button to store it.
6.30.6
Outside Humidity
The Humidity is pre-calibrated before leaving the factory, and should not require adjustment. However
the current humidity level may be entered in this screen to re-calibrate the WSO100 should this be
required.
Figure 231 – Setting the Outside Humidity
Use the Increase and Decrease buttons to select the correct humidity, and the press the Enter
button to store it.
6.30.7
Outside Temperature
The Temperature sensor is pre-calibrated before leaving the factory, and should not require
adjustment. However the current temperature may be entered in this screen to re-calibrate the
WSO100 should this be required.
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Figure 232 – Setting the Outside Temperature
Use the Increase and Decrease buttons to select the correct temperature, and the press the Enter
button to store it.
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7 Data Display Types
7.1
Anchor Watch Display
The Anchor Watch Display is a graphical representation of an Anchor Alert. See section 8.3.7.9 for
details on how to set up the Anchor Alert.
Figure 233 – Anchor Watch Display Example
The display is centered on the position at which the anchor is dropped; this point is represented by
the anchor symbol. The control is always oriented North-up, with the boundary circle located at the
Alert Set Point distance from the anchor position. The position of the vessel is represented by the
boat symbol. This is oriented according to the heading of the boat.
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7.2
Compass Rose Display
The compass rose display shows a heading, bearing, or course parameter on a compass rose
display. There are two types of compass roses, 1) “Course Up” where the needle is always pointing
straight up and the compass rose rotates to indicate the heading pointed to by the needle (Figure
234), and 2) “North Up” where the rose always has North straight up and the needle rotates pointing
in the direction of the heading, bearing or course parameter (Figure 235).
Figure 234 – Compass Rose Display (Course Up) Example
Figure 235 – Compass Rose (North Up) Display
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7.3
Gauge Display
The gauge display shows the selected data in a graphical format resembling an analog gauge. There
is a general gauge format for most types of display, and a specialized rudder gauge display. A fullscreen example of a tachometer display can be seen in Figure 236 below.
Figure 236 – Gauge Display Example
A full-screen example of the rudder gauge display can be seen in Figure 237 below.
Figure 237 – Rudder Angle Gauge Display Example
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7.4
GPS Status Display
The GPS Status display shows the following data about the selected GPS receiver:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
GPS operating mode (2D, 3D, DGPS)
Satellite signal strength (up to 12 satellites)
Satellite azimuth and elevation (up to 12 satellites)
Position
HDOP
Time
Date
Accuracy of position
An example of a full-screen GPS Status display can be seen below in Figure 238.
Figure 238 – GPS Status Display Example
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7.5
Numeric Display
The numeric display shows the selected parameter in a numeric format on the screen. A full-screen
example of the current depth display can be seen below in Figure 239.
Figure 239 – Numeric Display Example
The upper left hand corner indicates the parameter being displayed and the center of the screen
shows the numeric value for the indicated parameter. The bottom right hand corner shows the units.
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7.6
Rolling Road
The DSM250 supports a “Rolling Road”, or navigation highway display. This display repeats
transmitted navigation data from a primary navigator, such as a chart plotter or a personal computer
running navigation software. Figure 240 below shows the favorites screen setup menu with the rolling
road selected. When the rolling road is selected the displayed navigation data, the “Type:” submenu
changes to four “Item:” submenus. The rolling road display can show numerical displays of four
navigation-related data items in addition to the graphical display of boat position and progress
towards the desired waypoint.
Figure 240 – Configuration of Rolling Road Display
The following data items may be displayed on the rolling road display:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
COG (Course Over Ground)
SOG (Speed Over Ground)
BTW (Bearing to Waypoint)
DTW (Distance to Waypoint)
VMG (Velocity Made Good)
ETA (Estimated Time of Arrival)
TTG (Time to Go)
XTE (Cross Track Error)
Set
Drift
BOD (Bearing, Origin to Destination)
HDG (Heading)
Figure 241 below shows a rolling road display. The navigation parameters that have been selected
are COG, SOG, ETA, and TTG. On the navigation highway itself, the waypoint name, if available, is
displayed on the upper left and the waypoint number, if available, is displayed on the upper right. The
dashed vertical line along the center of the highway represents the current leg of the route. The
distance of the boat to the left or the right of the line represents the XTE (Cross Track Error). The
angle of the boat relative to the vertical line represents the difference between the boat’s COG
(Course Over Ground) and the BTW (Bearing to Waypoint). The scale of the XTE display can be
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selected by setting a value for the XTE alarm (See Section 5.2.1, “Alert Setup Menu”, on page 27 for
details).
Figure 241 – Rolling Road Display
7.7
Line Graph
The line graph display shows the value of a parameter displayed on the horizontal axis versus time
on the vertical axis. Figure 242 below shows the line graph display for barometric pressure over a
time period of one day. The line graph display can show the selected data over a time period of 1, 2,
3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 days. Line graph displays are supported only for barometric pressure.
Figure 242 – Line Graph Display
7.8
Weather Display
The DSM250 supports a single-screen weather display that shows a wide variety of weather-related
information. A screen shot of the weather display appears in Figure 243 below.
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Figure 243 – Weather Display
The weather display shows the following information
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Wind Direction (Ground Referenced)
Wind Speed (Ground Referenced)
Heat Index / Wind Chill
Outside Temperature
Outside Humidity
Barometric Pressure
Inside Temperature
Inside Humidity
Dew Point
Moon Phase
Sunrise
Sunset
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7.9
Wind Rose
The DSM250 supports a wind rose display, which displays apparent wind direction and speed
measured relative to the moving vessel, or true wind direction and speed measured relative to the
moving vessel, depending on the parameter selected. A screen shot of a wind rose appears in Figure
244 below.
Figure 244 – Wind Rose Display
7.10 Moon Phase Display
The DSM250 supports a moon phase display which shows the current phase of the moon at the
current location. An example screenshot of the moon phase display appears in Figure 245 below.
Figure 245 – Moon Phase Display
7.11 Trim Tab Display
The DSM250 supports a trim tab display in which the relative positions of the port and starboard trim
tabs are displayed on a dual bar graph. A screenshot of the trim tab display appears in Figure 246
below.
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Figure 246 – Trim Tab Display
7.12 Swing Meter Display
The DSM250 supports a swing meter display, similar to those found on dedicated swing meters, for
displaying the rate of turn of the vessel in degrees per minute. The swing meter is available in ranges
of +/- 30°/minute, +/- 100°/minute, or +/- 300°/minute. A screenshot of the swing meter display
appears in Figure 247 below.
Figure 247 – Swing Meter Display
7.13 Tank Gauge Display
The DSM250 supports a tank level gauge display type which shows percentage of fluid remaining in a
tank on an analog gauge with 180° of travel. A screenshot of a tank gauge display showing a fuel
tank’s level appears in Figure 248 below.
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Figure 248 – Tank Gauge Display
7.14 Switch/Breaker Display
The DSM250 is capable of controlling loads controlled by a Maretron DCR100 DC Relay, a Carling
OctoPlex AC Box or DC Box, or other NMEA 2000® load controller which uses NMEA Command of
the 127501 Binary Switch Bank Status PGN for control.
The display may be set up in several different configurations:
• Single-Indicator Light – this creates a single switch/breaker
• 2 rows – this creates four rows of single switches/breakers
• 3 rows – this creates three rows of single switches/breakers
• 4 rows – this creates four rows of single switches/breakers
• 2 rows, 2 columns – this creates two rows by two columns of a single switch/breaker
Figure 249 Below shows a Favorite Screens Setup screen with a single window configured with the “4
rows” configuration.
Figure 249 – Configuration of Switch/Breaker Display
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The maximum number of switches/breakers you can have on a single screen is 16 (the “4 Quarters”
format, with all four windows set to use the “4 rows” or “2 rows, 2 column” switch/breaker
configurations.
In order to configure the individual switch/breaker controls, press the “Enter” key with the selected
type highlighted to display a menu with entries for each switch/breaker in the window being
configured, as shown in ? below.
Figure 250 – Selection of an Individual Switch/Breaker
Figure 251 below shows the configuration menu for each individual switch/breaker.
Figure 251 – Configuration of an Individual Switch/Breaker
Each switch/breaker has several configurable parameters:
• Color-Off – select the color to be displayed when the controlled load is in the OFF state. The
default color is gray.
• Color-On – select the color to be displayed when the controlled load is in the ON state. The
default color is green.
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Color-Error – select the color to be displayed when the controlled load is in the ERROR state,
which may indicate a tripped breaker. The default color is red.
Type – you may choose between the default value of “Toggle”, in which case the
switch/breaker changes state every time you press the power button while it is highlighted, or
“Momentary”, in which case the switch-breaker is turned on only while you are pressing the
power button while it is highlighted.
Instance – the instance number of the switch bank containing the switch/breaker to be
controlled.
Channel – the channel number of the switch/breaker to be controlled.
Title – Sets the text string to be displayed on the switch/breaker. Please refer to Section Error!
Reference source not found. for details.
Font Size – Sets the size of the font used to display the label on the switch/breaker. You may
select Small, Medium, or Large (default).
Restore Factory Defaults – This restores the switch/breaker to factory default settings.
In order to control a switch/breaker using the DSM250, create a screen with a switch/breaker which
has been configured to refer to the switch bank instance and indicator number of the switch/breaker
you want to control.
In normal operating mode, use the “Scroll Up” and “Scroll Down” keys to change to the screen
containing the switch/breaker. Once that screen is displayed, follow these steps to change a load’s
state:
1. Press the “Enter” key for approximately one second. This will place the display into “Control
mode”, and one of the switches/breakers on the screen will be highlighted with a thick border,
as shown in Figure 252 below.
2. If there is more than one switch/breaker on the screen, you may use the “Scroll Up” and “Scroll
Down” keys to change the highlight to a different switch/breaker.
3. Once the switch/breaker for the load you want to control is selected, then press the “Power”
key. The load referenced by the switch/breaker will be commanded to change state, and the
changed state will be reflected in the switch/breaker.
4. To change other loads, repeat the process.
5. To stop controlling loads, press the “Lights” key to return to normal operating mode. The
highlight will disappear.
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Figure 252 – Favorite Screen Showing Highlighted Switch/Breaker
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8 Alerts
The DSM250 can act as both an Alert Source and an Alert Monitor. An Alert Source monitors
parameters received on the NMEA2000® bus against a user entered threshold, and displays alerts
when parameters go out of range. It will also transmit this Alert information to other Alert Monitors on
the bus (Platinum copies of N2KView™ or other DSM250s) and sound the ALM100 annunciators as
required. Operators may accept or cancel the Alerts from the buttons on the front of the DSM250.
An Alert Monitor, the DSM250 monitors the bus for Alert messages from Alert Sources, and displays
the remote Alert information on the DSM250’s screen. Operators may accept or cancel the remote
Alerts from the buttons on the front of the DSM250, in which case an Alert Command Message is
sent back to the Alert Source.
8.1
Displaying Active Alerts
Active Alerts are overlaid on all the favorite screens.
Figure 253 – Alert Display
The number of Alerts with pending operator actions is shown in the top right corner. This will be
colored red if the highest pending Alert is an Alarm and yellow if it is a Warning. The description of the
active Alert with the highest priority is shown at the bottom left of the screen. This will be colored red if
it is an Alarm and yellow if it is a Warning. In addition, the state of the alert (4.3.5) will be shown as
follows:
Active – The enclosing box will flash between a solid red or yellow and white.
Accepted – The enclosing box will be a solid red or yellow.
Awaiting Cancel – The enclosing box will be outlined in red or yellow, as shown in Figure 253.
8.1.1 Alert Status Screen
The list of Active Alerts is displayed in tabular form on the Alert Status Screen. This Screen may be
displayed by selecting the Alert Status option from the Main Menu.
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8.2
Accepting or Cancelling an Alert
Active Alerts may be accepted (4.3.2) by the operator to indicate that the operator has taken
responsibility for the Alert. Alerts that have been triggered and the cause removed without being
accepted by a user must be cleared.
8.2.1 From a Favorite Screen
The Alert with the highest priority that requires accepting or cancelling is shown at the bottom left of
the screen (see Figure 253). This Alert may easily be accepted or cancelled without changing
screens by pressing the Power button
.
8.2.2 From the Alert Status Screen
Use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to select the Alert to be accepted or cancelled, and then
press the Enter button. An Alert Description screen will be displayed with the details of the Alert and
the cursor positioned over the Accept/Cancel Alert entry.
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Pressing the Enter button at this point will Accept or Cancel the Alert.
8.3
Adding an Alert
Alerts are created by selecting the parameter to be monitored (e.g. Depth), and then selecting the
type of Alert (e.g. High Alert). Start by going to the Add New Alert entry in the Alert Setup Menu.
Figure 254 – Adding a New Alert
Pressing Enter brings up the Alert Edit Screen.
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Figure 255 – Part of the Alert Edit Screen
This allows the entry of all the alert parameters, which can vary depending on the type of alert
chosen. These parameters are:
8.3.1 Enable/Disable Control
This allows individual alerts to be enabled or disabled. The decision to disable an Alert must be made
very carefully, as it nullifies the purpose for having alerts. The options here are:
•
•
Enable
Disable
The desired option is selected using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons.
8.3.2 Alert Type
This allows the selection of the type of Alert (see paragraph 0). The options here are:
•
•
Alarm
Warning
The desired option is selected using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons.
8.3.3 Priority
Each Alarm has a unique priority ranging from 0 (highest priority) to 3999 (lowest priority). Each
Warning has a unique priority in the same range; however the entire set of Warning Priorities is
considered lower than the Alarm Priorities. No two Alarms / Warnings may have the same priorities,
and, when scrolling through the priorities, numbers that are already in use will be omitted from the list.
The desired option is selected using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons.
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8.3.4 Trigger Source
This allows the selection of the parameter to be monitored. The parameters are laid out as per
section 4.2. The trigger source is specified in three parts, which when combined will uniquely identify
a single parameter on the bus.
8.3.4.1 Type
The Type corresponds to the category of data.
The desired option is selected using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons.
8.3.4.2 Data
The Data corresponds to the Data Type of data.
The desired option is selected using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons.
8.3.4.3 Instance
The Instance corresponds to the instance of the data type on the bus.
The desired option is selected using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons.
8.3.5 Description
This is a textual field that will be displayed on the DSM250 and transmitted to Alert Slave devices. It is
intended to describe the alert (e.g. Fire).
8.3.6 Location
This is a textual field that will be displayed on the DSM250 and transmitted to Alert Slave devices. It is
intended to describe the location at which the problem was detected (e.g. Main Stateroom).
8.3.7 Trigger Configuration
This set of fields is used to describe the condition under which the alert will be triggered. The subfields will vary depending on the Trigger Type, which, in turn, is determined by the Trigger Source.
8.3.7.1 Trigger Type is High Alert
A high alert is used to signal you when a parameter value rises above a threshold you determine. For
example, you can set an alert to occur whenever the freezer temperature rises above 0°C.
8.3.7.1.1 Description
A high alert and associated diagram are shown in the figure below.
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Figure 256 – High Alert Parameters
A high alert is triggered (i.e. becomes an active alert) once an input signal has risen above the High
Alert Set Point and the Set Delay time has elapsed. If the Set Delay is set to zero, then the alert is
immediately triggered once the input signal rises above the High Alert Set Point. The Set Delay is
used to reduce false or spurious alerts. As an example, setting the Set Delay to 5 seconds will
eliminate any temporary transitions of the input signal above the High Alert Set Point lasting less than
5 seconds from triggering an alert. Once the alert is triggered, it becomes an active alert. An alert
remains active until
•
•
The input signals falls below the High Alert Clear Point and the Clear Delay time has elapsed.
If the Clear Delay is set to zero, then the alert immediately transitions to the Awaiting Cancel
once the input signal falls below the High Alert Clear Point (as shown in the example above).
The user accepts the alert in which case it transitions into the Accepted state.
The Clear Delay is used to reduce false or spurious alerts.
8.3.7.1.2 Trigger Configuration
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Figure 257 – Trigger Configuration – High Alert
Re-trigger Period – When you accept an alert, it will change to the “Accepted” state, and
annunciators that are sounding for that alert will stop sounding. If the condition which caused
the alert remains true after the amount of time in this field, the alert will return to the “Active”
state, and annunciators will begin sounding again for that alert. The value is entered as
minutes:seconds. If only one number is entered, it will be interpreted as seconds. If a value of
0:00 is entered, then the alert will never re-trigger.
Alert Set Point – If the value of the parameter being monitored rises above the value in this field,
the alert will become active.
Alert Set Delay – The parameter being monitored must rise above the Alert Set Point value for
longer than the time in this field in order for an alert to become active. This can be used to
prevent false alerts caused by parameter values that briefly have a value that would cause an
alert but quickly return to the normal value range. The value is entered as minutes:seconds. If
only one number is entered, it will be interpreted as seconds.
Alert Clear Point – If the alert is active and the parameter value falls below the value in this field,
the alert will become inactive.
Alert Clear Delay – The parameter being monitored must fall below the Alert Clear Point value for
longer than the time in this field in order for the alert to become inactive. The value is entered
as minutes:seconds. If only one number is entered, it will be interpreted as seconds.
8.3.7.2 Trigger Type is Low Alert
A low alert is used to signal you when a parameter value falls below a threshold you determine. For
example, you can set an alert to occur whenever the port engine oil pressure rises falls below 40 PSI.
8.3.7.2.1 Parameters
A low alert and associated diagram are shown in the figure below.
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Figure 258 – Low Alert Parameters
A low alert is triggered (i.e. becomes an active alert) once an input signal has dropped below the Low
Alert Set Point and the Set Delay time has elapsed. If the Set Delay is set to zero, then the alert is
immediately triggered once the input signal drops below the Low Alert Set Point. The Set Delay is
used to reduce false or spurious alerts. As an example, setting the Set Delay to 5 seconds will
eliminate any temporary transitions of the input signal above the Low Alert Set Point lasting less than
5 seconds from triggering an alert. Once the alert is triggered, it becomes an active alert. An alert
remains active until:
•
•
The input signals rises above the Low Alert Clear Point and the Clear Delay time has elapsed.
If the Clear Delay is set to zero, then the alert immediately becomes inactive once the input
signal falls below the Low Alert Clear Point. The Clear Delay is used to reduce false or
spurious alerts.
The user accepts the alert (as shown in the example above).
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8.3.7.2.2 Trigger Configuration
Figure 259 – Trigger Configuration – Low Alert
Re-trigger Period – When you accept an alert, it will change to the “Accepted” state, and
annunciators that are sounding for that alert will stop sounding. If the condition which caused
the alert remains true after the amount of time in this field, the alert will return to the “Active”
state, and annunciators will begin sounding again for that alert. If a value of 0:00 is entered,
then the alert will never re-trigger.
Alert Set Point – If the value of the parameter being monitored falls below the value in this field,
the alert will become active.
Alert Set Delay – The parameter being monitored must fall below the Low Alert Set Point value
for longer than the time in this field in order for an alert to become active. This can be used to
prevent false alerts caused by parameter values that briefly have a value that would cause an
alert but quickly return to the normal value range. The value is entered as minutes:seconds. If
only one number is entered, it will be interpreted as seconds.
Alert Clear Point – If the alert is active and the parameter value rises above the value in this field,
the alert will become inactive.
Alert Clear Delay – The parameter being monitored must rise above the Low Alert Clear Point
value for longer than the time in this field in order for the alert to become inactive. The value is
entered as minutes:seconds. If only one number is entered, it will be interpreted as seconds.
In this example, the set point may be described in more than one unit, so additional fields have been
supplied so that the user can select the units of depth. Changing the units of the set point will also
change the units of the clear point. The initial units displayed in these fields will correspond to those
set in the Units Dialog (see section 5.2.7).
8.3.7.3 Trigger Type is Data Unavailable Alert
The Data Unavailable Alert can be used in conjunction with other alert types when you need to know
if a particular parameter is no longer being received on the network or is flagged as “not available” by
the transmitting device. For instance, you probably would want to use a Data Unavailable Alert for the
Depth->Current Depth parameter, since it would be advisable to know if the depth sounder were to
stop transmitting a depth reading or became unable to determine the depth due to fouling or some
other reason. On the other hand, if you were to set a Data Unavailable Alert on Engine->Engine
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Water Temperature parameter, you would then get an alert every time the ignition was switched off
and the engine’s ECU stopped transmitting data.
8.3.7.3.1 Trigger Configuration
Figure 260 – Trigger Configuration – Data Unavailable Alert
Re-trigger Period – When you accept an alert, it will change to the “Accepted” state, and
annunciators that are sounding for that alert will stop sounding. If the condition which caused
the alert remains true after the amount of time in this field, the alert will return to the “Active”
state, and annunciators will begin sounding again for that alert. If a value of 0:00 is entered,
then the alert will never re-trigger.
Alert Set Delay – If a valid value for the parameter being monitored is continually not received or
has an invalid value for the amount of time specified in this field, the alert will become active.
Alert Clear Delay – The parameter being monitored must continually be received with a valid
value for longer than the time in this field in order for the alert to become inactive.
8.3.7.4 Trigger Type is On Alert
As opposed to high and low alerts that are associated with analog input signals (i.e., many different
possible input values), there are also switch alerts that are associated with a binary input value
(sometimes called on or off, yes or no, enabled or disabled, set or reset, active or inactive). The
switch alert is similar to the high and low alert except that there are no set or reset points. The mere
fact that the switch is seen as On causes the alert to become an active alert (assuming the Set Delay
is set to zero). Likewise, if the switch being monitored is seen as false (i.e., binary 0), then the alert
becomes inactive (assuming the Clear Delay is set to zero). If the delays are not programmed to zero,
then the switch must remain On for the Set Delay before the alert becomes active, and must remain
Off for the Clear Delay before the alert becomes inactive.
8.3.7.4.1 Trigger Configuration
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Figure 261 – Trigger Configuration – On Alert
Re-trigger Period – When you accept an alert, it will change to the “Accepted” state, and
annunciators that are sounding for that alert will stop sounding. If the condition which caused
the alert remains true after the amount of time in this field, the alert will return to the “Active”
state, and annunciators will begin sounding again for that alert. If a value of 0:00 is entered,
then the alert will never re-trigger.
Alert Set Delay – The condition for the parameter being monitored must be in its error condition
for at least the set delay time before the alert will become active. An interesting use of the set
delay when monitoring a bilge pump (for example) is to set the Set Delay to a large value (say
20 minutes). Now, if the bilge pump runs for more than 20 minutes at a time the alert will be
triggered.
Alert Clear Delay – The condition for the parameter being monitored must be not in its error
condition for at least the clear delay time before the alert will become cleared.
8.3.7.5 Trigger Type is Off Alert
As opposed to high and low alerts that are associated with analog input signals (i.e., many different
possible input values), there are also switch alerts that are associated with a binary input value
(sometimes called on or off, yes or no, enabled or disabled, set or reset, active or inactive). The
switch alert is similar to the high and low alert except that there are no set or reset points. The mere
fact that the switch is seen as Off causes the alert to become an active alert (assuming the Set Delay
is set to zero). Likewise, if the switch being monitored is seen as On, then the alert becomes inactive
(assuming the Clear Delay is set to zero). If the delays are not programmed to zero, then the switch
must remain Off for the Set Delay before the alert becomes active, and must remain On for the Clear
Delay before the alert becomes inactive.
8.3.7.5.1 Trigger Configuration
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Figure 262 – Trigger Configuration – Data Unavailable Alert
Re-trigger Period – When you accept an alert, it will change to the “Accepted” state, and
annunciators that are sounding for that alert will stop sounding. If the condition which caused
the alert remains true after the amount of time in this field, the alert will return to the “Active”
state, and annunciators will begin sounding again for that alert. If a value of 0:00 is entered,
then the alert will never re-trigger.
Alert Set Delay – If the switch being monitored is in the Off state for the amount of time specified
in this field, the alert will become active.
Alert Clear Delay – If the switch being monitored is in a state other than “Off” for the amount of
time specified in this field, the alert will become inactive.
8.3.7.6 Trigger Type is Error Alert
When monitoring circuit breakers, the error alert can be used to raise an alert when the circuit breaker
trips due to over current. As with the On and Off alerts, the Set Delay and Clear Delay values are
used to prevent spurious triggering.
8.3.7.6.1 Trigger Configuration
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Figure 263 – Trigger Configuration Editor – Tripped Alert
Re-trigger Period – When you accept an alert, it will change to the “Accepted” state, and
annunciators that are sounding for that alert will stop sounding. If the condition which caused
the alert remains true after the amount of time in this field, the alert will return to the “Active”
state, and annunciators will begin sounding again for that alert. If a value of 0:00 is entered,
then the alert will never re-trigger.
Alert Set Delay – If the switch being monitored is in the Tripped state for the amount of time
specified in this field, the alert will become active.
Alert Clear Delay – If the switch being monitored is in a state other than “Tripped” for the amount
of time specified in this field, the alert will become inactive.
8.3.7.7 Trigger Type is Outside Radius Alert
The Outside Radius Alert is used to signal an alert whenever the vessel moves outside a
programmable distance in any direction away from a reference point (expressed as a longitude and
latitude). This alert is useful when the vessel is anchored or moored and the vessel should not drift
outside a perimeter and if it does, an alert is activated. The point of reference can be selected from
the current position or it can be manually entered. Figure 264 shows an Outside Radius Alert and
associated parameters. The Outside Radius Alert and the Anchor Alert are very similar. The radius of
the Outside Radius Alert is specified in either Nautical Miles or Kilometers, while the radius of the
Anchor Alert is specified in Feet or Meters.
8.3.7.7.1 Parameters
Figure 264 – Outside Alert Parameters
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8.3.7.7.2 Trigger Configuration – Outside Radius Alert
Figure 265 – Trigger Configuration – Outside Radius Alert
Re-trigger Period – When you accept an alert, it will change to the “Accepted” state, and
annunciators that are sounding for that alert will stop sounding. If the condition which caused
the alert remains true after the amount of time in this field, the alert will return to the “Active”
state, and annunciators will begin sounding again for that alert. If a value of 0:00 is entered,
then the alert will never re-trigger.
Alert Set Point – If the distance between the current GPS position and the reference position
rises above the value in this field, the alert will become active.
Alert Set Delay – The distance between the current GPS position and the reference position must
rise above the Outside Radius Alert Set value for longer than the time in this field in order for
an alert to become active.
Alert Clear Point – If the alert is active and the distance between the current GPS position and
the reference position falls below the value in this field, the alert will become inactive.
Alert Clear Delay – The distance between the current GPS position and the reference position
must fall below the Outside Radius Alert Clear value for longer than the time in this field in
order for an alert to become inactive.
Latitude – The latitude of the reference position. This may be typed in as <degrees>:<minutes>
followed by an N or S. If the N or S is missing, North is assumed. Moving the cursor to another
field will reformat the contents of this field.
Longitude – The longitude of the reference position. This may be typed in as
<degrees>:<minutes> followed by an E or W. If the E or W is missing, East is assumed.
Moving the cursor to another field will reformat the contents of this field.
Get Current Position – Selecting this will transfer the current GPS position into the Latitude and
Longitude fields.
8.3.7.8 Trigger Type is Inside Radius Alert
The Inside Radius Alert is similar to the Outside Radius Alert except that an alert is activated if the
vessel comes within a certain distance or radius of a reference point (expressed as a longitude and
latitude). Figure 266 shows an Inside Radius Alert and associated parameters.
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8.3.7.8.1 Trigger Configuration
Figure 266 – Trigger Configuration – Inside Radius Alert
Re-trigger Period – When you accept an alert, it will change to the “Accepted” state, and
annunciators that are sounding for that alert will stop sounding. If the condition which caused
the alert remains true after the amount of time in this field, the alert will return to the “Active”
state, and annunciators will begin sounding again for that alert.
Alert Set Point – If the distance between the current GPS position and the reference position falls
below above the value in this field, the alert will become active.
Alert Set Delay – The distance between the current GPS position and the reference position must
fall below the Inside Radius Alert Set value for longer than the time in this field in order for an
alert to become active.
Alert Clear Point – If the alert is active and the distance between the current GPS position and
the reference position rises above the value in this field, the alert will become inactive.
Alert Clear Delay – The distance between the current GPS position and the reference position
must rise above the Inside Radius Alert Clear value for longer than the time in this field in order
for an alert to become inactive.
Latitude – The latitude of the reference position. This may be typed in as <degrees>:<minutes>
followed by an N or S. If the N or S is missing, North is assumed. Moving the cursor to another
field will reformat the contents of this field.
Longitude – The longitude of the reference position. This may be typed in as
<degrees>:<minutes> followed by an E or W. If the E or W is missing, East is assumed.
Moving the cursor to another field will reformat the contents of this field.
Get Current Position – Selecting this line will transfer the current GPS position into the Latitude
and Longitude fields.
8.3.7.9 Trigger Type is Anchor Alert
The Anchor Alert is a special case of the Outside Radius Alert (section 8.3.7.7). It is used to signal an
alert whenever the vessel moves outside a programmable distance in any direction away from a
reference point (expressed as a longitude and latitude). This alert is useful when the vessel is
anchored or moored and the vessel should not drift outside a perimeter and if it does, an alert is
activated. The point of reference can be selected from the current position or it can be manually
entered.
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The Outside Radius Alert and the Anchor Alert are very similar. The Anchor Alert is designed to allow
the input of relatively small radius values, and may be displayed graphically through the Anchor
Watch Display (section 7.1). The radius of the Outside Radius Alert is specified in either Nautical
Miles or Kilometers, while the radius of the Anchor Alert is specified in Feet or Meters.
See Section 8.3.7.7 for details of the configuration of the Anchor Alert.
8.3.7.10
Trigger Type is GPS Quality Alert
The accuracy, or quality, of a position fix provided by a GPS is dependent on the number of satellites
used to compute the position. A position based on less than three satellites is considered a “1D” lock,
three satellites is a “2D” lock, more than three satellites is a “3D” lock, and more than three satellites
with SBAS is a “3D-DGPS” lock. These different locks are indicative of the quality or accuracy of the
given position with 1D having the lowest quality and 3D-DGPS providing the highest quality. The GPS
Quality Alert is used to alert you if the quality of the position falls below a specified quality level.
8.3.7.10.1 Trigger Configuration – GPS Quality Alert
Figure 267 – Trigger Configuration – GPS Quality Alert
Re-trigger Period – When you accept an alert, it will change to the “Accepted” state, and
annunciators that are sounding for that alert will stop sounding. If the condition which caused
the alert remains true after the amount of time in this field, the alert will return to the “Active”
state, and annunciators will begin sounding again for that alert. If a value of 0:00 is entered,
then the alert will never re-trigger.
Alert Set Point – The Alert will be triggered when the qaulity of the GPS fix, as reported by the
GPS drops lower than the value specified in this field.
Possible Values are:
• 3D-DGPS (best quality)
• 3D-GPS
• 2D-GPS
• 1D-GPS
• No fix
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Alert Set Delay – When the quality of the GPS fix becomes lower than the quality specified in the
Alert Set Point field for longer than the time specified in the Alert Set Delay field, the alert will
become active.
Alert Clear Point – The Alert will be cleared when the quality of the GPS fix, as reported by the
GPS becomes better than the value specified in this field.
Possible values are the same as the Alert Set Point.
Alert Clear Delay – If the alert is active and the quality of the GPS fix becomes higher than the
quality specified in the Alert Clear Point field for longer than the time specified in the Clear
Delay field, the alert will become inactive.
8.3.7.11
Trigger Type is Direction Alert
A Direction Alert is used to indicate that a heading or wind direction has changed from the reference
direction more than a programmable amount. For example, once a heading has been established, an
alert can be generated if the heading changes more than a specified amount. Direction Alerts may
also be set for wind direction. The reference direction can be selected from the current direction
(heading or wind direction) or it can be manually entered. Figure 268 shows a Direction Alert and
associated parameters.
Figure 268 – Direction Alert Parameters
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8.3.7.11.1 Trigger Configuration – Direction Alert
Figure 269 – Trigger Configuration – Direction Alert
Re-trigger Period – When you accept an alert, it will change to the “Accepted” state, and
annunciators that are sounding for that alert will stop sounding. If the condition which caused
the alert remains true after the amount of time in this field, the alert will return to the “Active”
state, and annunciators will begin sounding again for that alert. If a value of 0:00 is entered,
then the alert will never re-trigger.
Offset Set Point, Offset Set Delay – If the direction being monitored differs from the reference
direction by more than the Offset Heading Set Point for longer than the time specified in the
Set Delay field, the alert will become active.
Offset Clear Point, Offset Clear Delay – If the alert is active and the direction being monitored
differs from the reference direction by less than the Offset Heading Clear Point for longer than
the time specified in the Clear Delay field, the alert will become inactive.
Reference Heading / Reference Direction / Reference Course – Enter the desired reference
heading or direction into this field. If the monitored value differs from this value by more than
the Offset Heading Set Point, the alert will be triggered.
Get Current Heading / Get Current Direction / Get Current Course – Pressing or clicking on
this button will transfer the current value of the heading or direction being monitored into the
Reference Heading / Reference Direction Field.
8.3.7.12
Trigger Type is Time Alert
The DSM250 can be configured with alerts that go active at a predetermined time, such as an alarm
clock. These alerts can also be configured to become active periodically, making them useful for
signaling watch changes (for example, every four hours) or as a personnel alarm (making sure a crew
member is at the helm every 15 minutes).
When a Time Alert with a Repeat Interval of zero is accepted, it will be Disabled to prevent further
triggering. When a Time Alert with a Repeat Interval greater than zero is accepted, it will transition to
the Inactive state, waiting for the next time it should trigger.
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8.3.7.12.1 Trigger Configuration – Time Alert
Figure 270 – Alert Editor – Time Alert
Alert Time – The alert will become active at the time specified in this field. If the time specified has
already passed, then the alarm will be set for the next day. Entering a number without the colon will
assume that the hours are zero.
Repeat Interval – The alert will become active again after the period specified in this field. For
example, if the Alarm Time were set to 8:00 and the Repeat Interval were set to 1:00 (1 hour, zero
minutes), the Alarm would become active again at 9:00, 10:00, and so on.
8.3.8 Local Audible
If the Local Audible field is set to Enabled, the speaker internal to the DSM250 will be activated when
this Alert is triggered.
8.3.9 Tone
If Local Audible is enabled, the tone that is sounded on the DSM250 and the Remote Annunciators
can be set here. This allows the user to configure the Alerts so that the alert can be identified from the
tone. The values for Tone are:
Beeps – A continuous series of half second on, half second off beeps is sounded. This
corresponds to the requirements for IMO Code 3.a
Continuous – A continuous tone is sounded. This corresponds to the requirements for IMO Code
2
General Emergency – A series of seven one second on, one second off tones are sounded,
followed by a single tone of 7 seconds on. The sequence is repeated. This corresponds to the
requirements for IMO Code 1a (7 pulse) (General Emergency Alarm, SOLAS III/50, III/6.4)
Carbon Monoxide – This is a series of four one tenth second on, one tenth second off beeps
followed by one and a half seconds of silence. The sequence is repeated. This corresponds to
the requirements for Temporal 4 alarms *(T4, CO)
Fire – This is a series of three half a second on, half a second off beeps followed by one and a
half seconds of silence. The sequence is repeated. This corresponds to the requirements for
Code-3 (ISO 8201, Smoke/Fire)
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8.3.10
Remote Annunciators
Selecting the Remote Annunciators option will bring up a list of 16 ALM100 devices. If the
Annunciator is active on the NMEA2000® bus, and the Annunciator has been given a label, the label
will be displayed, in parenthesis, alongside the instance number.
Note: the DSM250 is limited to working with annunciators with data instance numbers in the range 015.
Figure 271 – Remote Annunciator Enable/Disable
To enable a specific Annunciator, use the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons to position the cursor,
and then press the Enter button to move to the Tone column.
The options here are
•
•
Enable
Disable
The desired option is selected using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons, and then pressing the
Enter button again. The tone of the Annunciator will be the same as that set in 8.3.9.
8.3.11
Operating Mode Moored
See section 4.3.4 for a description of Operating Modes. For this Alert to be triggered when the vessel
is in the Moored state, this option must be set to Enabled.
The options here are
•
•
Enable
Disable
The desired option is selected using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons, and then pressing the
Enter button again.
8.3.12
Operating Mode Underway
See section 4.3.4 for a description of Operating Modes. For this Alert to be triggered when the vessel
is in the Underway state, this option must be set to Enabled. The options here are
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•
•
Enable
Disable
The desired option is selected using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons, and then pressing the
Enter button again.
8.3.13
Operating Mode Anchored
See section 4.3.4 for a description of Operating Modes. For this Alert to be triggered when the vessel
is in the Anchored state, this option must be set to Enabled. The options here are
•
•
Enable
Disable
The desired option is selected using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons, and then pressing the
Enter button again.
8.3.14
Scope
Alerts may be constrained to be displayed only on the DSM250 where they are detected. In this case
the Alert message is not sent out on the NMEA2000 bus, and other devices will not display the alert,
or allow Accepting of Cancelling. The Scope does not affect the generation of Annunciator messages.
The options here are
•
•
Local – the Alert messages are not transmitted
Global – the Alert messages are transmitted
The desired option is selected using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons, and then pressing the
Enter button again.
8.4
Deleting an Alert
From the Alert Setup Menu, selected the menu item Delete Alert… .
Figure 272 – Deleting an Alert
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This brings up the list of Alerts managed by the DSM2590.
Figure 273 – Deleting Alert List
Scroll up and down using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons until the alert that must be deleted
is highlighted, and press the Enter button.
A confirmation message is displayed.
Figure 274 – Deleting an Alert: Confirmation
Press the Accept button to delete the Alert or the Cancel button to return to the previous screen
without deleting the Alert.
8.5
Editing an Alert
From the Alert Setup Menu, selected the menu item Edit Alert… .
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Figure 275 – Editing an Alert
This brings up the list of Alerts managed by the DSM2590.
Figure 276 – Editing an Alert: Alert List
The following information is shown for each alert that is in the system.
Priority – The priority of the Alert (see 8.3.3).
Enab. – Whether the Alert is Enabled or Disabled.
Type – The Type of Alert. This is a combination of whether the Alert is Local or Global (0) and
whether the Alert is an Alarm or a Warning (8.3.2)
Description – The textual description of the Alert (8.3.5)
Scroll up and down using the Scroll Up and Scroll Down buttons until the alert that must be edited is
highlighted, and press the Enter button.
The Alert Editor is opened, pre-populated with the parameters of the chosen Alert. See section 8.1 for
details of these parameters.
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8.6
Setting the Vessel Operating Mode
The Vessel Operating Mode must be set on each DSM250. This is a potentially risky operation, in
that Alerts that are Active in the existing mode may be ignored in the new Operating Mode. The
DSM250 will warn the operator about these Alerts to minimize the risk. However, if the new vessel
status was transmitted to other Alert Sources that are unmanned, then the warnings would be lost.
For this reason, the Vessel Operating mode must be changed at each DSM250 or N2Kview, and
those alerts, which would be disabled, noted by the user.
The Vessel Operating Mode is set through the Alert Setup Screen. Scroll Down to the required
Operating Mode entry, press Enter and then use the Scroll Up / Scroll Down buttons to select the
new Mode. Press Enter to complete the operation.
Figure 277 – Setting the Vessel Operating Mode
The options here are
• Disable
• Moored
• Anchored
• Underway
8.7
Advanced Configuration
The Advanced Parameters of the Alert System may be configured through this Screen. Enter the
screen though the Alert Setup menu, and select the Advanced Configuration option.
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Figure 278 – Advanced Configuration
The following parameters may be set.
8.7.1 Remote Alert Audible
If Remote Alerts are enabled, and an active alert is received from another device on the bus, the
DSM250 will respond by adding the Alert to its list of Active Alerts (section 8.1), and sounding the
internal speaker. The sounding of the speaker may be disabled (i.e. only visual indications are
displayed) by setting this parameter to Disable. The options here are
•
•
Enable
Disable
8.7.2 Flashing Screen
As an extra means to gain the operator’s attention to an Active Alert, the DSM250 may be set up to
flash the entire screen between Red (for Alarms) or Yellow (for Warnings) and Black. The flashing
may be disabled by setting this option to Disable. The options here are
•
•
8.8
Enable
Disable
Restore Factory Defaults
The Alert parameters of the DSM250 may be restored to the factory defaults by pressing the
Enter button while this item is highlighted. The operator will be prompted to confirm this action before
it taken.
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Figure 279 – Restore Factory Defaults Confirmation
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9 Maintenance
Regular maintenance is important to ensure continued proper operation of the Maretron
DSM250. Perform the following tasks periodically:
•
•
•
Clean the unit with a soft cloth. Do not use chemical cleaners as they may remove paint or
markings or may corrode the DSM250 enclosure or seals. Do not use any cleaners containing
acetone, as they will deteriorate the plastic enclosure.
Ensure that the unit is mounted securely and cannot be moved relative to the mounting
surface. If the unit is loose, tighten the mounting screws.
Check the security of the cable connected to the NMEA 2000® interface and tighten if
necessary.
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10 Troubleshooting
If you notice unexpected operation of the Maretron DSM250, follow the troubleshooting
procedures in this section to remedy simple problems.
Symptom
No activity on the display
Expected data appears as a dash “-“
instead of a value
Data fluctuates between two different
values
Troubleshooting Procedure
Check the connection to the NMEA 2000® and
connector and tighten if necessary
Ensure that power is supplied to the connected
NMEA 2000® cable
Use the N2KAnalyzer tool to verify whether the
device providing the data to the network is in
transmitting a valid data value.
Two devices on the network are transmitting the
same data. Check the Instance Numbers on all
devices transmitting that data.
If these steps do not solve your problem, please contact Maretron Technical Support (refer to
Section12 for contact information).
Warning: There are no user-serviceable components inside the Maretron DSM250. Opening the
DSM250 will expose the sensitive electronic components to adverse environmental conditions that
may render the unit inoperative. Please do not open the DSM250, as this will automatically void the
warranty. If service is required, please return the unit to an authorized Maretron service location.
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11 Technical Specifications
Specifications
Parameter
NMEA 2000® Standard
NMEA 2000®
Connector
Display Technology
Display Resolution
Display Viewable Area
Display Backlighting
Keyboard
Languages Supported
Value
Level A
DeviceNet Micro-C
Comment
Highest Level of Certification
Industry Standard Waterproof
Active Matrix TFT LCD
Sunlight Readable
QVGA Resolution
5.7” Diagonal
3 User-Programmed Levels 0-100%
Red LED Backlighting
User Selectable
320 x 240 Pixels
117mm W x88 mm H
CCFL or LED
5 Silicone Rubber Keys
English, Dutch (Nederlands)
Certifications
Parameter
NMEA 2000®
Maritime Navigation and Radiocommunication Equipment &
Systems
FCC and CE Mark
Comment
Level A
Tested to IEC 60945
Electromagnetic Compatibility
Supported Display Data Types
Description
Data Types
AC Power
Average Frequency, Average L-N Voltage, Average L-L Voltage,
Phase A Frequency, Phase A L-N Voltage, Phase AB L-L Voltage,
Phase B Frequency, Phase B L-N Voltage, Phase BC L-L Voltage,
Phase C Frequency, Phase C L-N Voltage, Phase CA L-L Voltage,
Anchor
Watch
DC
Current, Voltage, Battery Temperature, Battery State of Charge,
Battery Time Remaining, Ripple Voltage, Power
Depth
Water Depth, Water Below Transducer, Transducer Offset
Elec. Distribution
Switch/Breaker, Breaker Current
Engine Monitor
Boost Pressure, Hours, Coolant Pressure, Coolant Temp., Exhaust
Gas Temp., Fuel Pressure, Fuel Rate, Oil Pressure, Oil Temp.,
Tachometer, Tilt/Trim, Voltage, Fuel Economy, Fuel Consumption,
Percent Load, Percent Torque, Trip Fuel Used,
Environment
Barometer, Heat Index, Humidity Inside, Humidity Outside, Moon
Phase, Sunrise, Sunset, Dew Point, Temp. Engine Room, Temp.
Inside, Temp. Main Cabin, Temp. Outside, Temp. Sea, Twilight AM,
Twilight PM, Weather, Wind Chill
Fuel Management
Distance to Empty, Time to Empty, Total Fuel Capacity, Total Fuel
Level, Total Fuel Consumption, Total Trip Fuel Used, Total Fuel
Economy, Total Fuel Rate, Total Fuel Remaining
GPS
COG, Lat/Lon, SOG, DOP, Satellites, Time, Accuracy
Heading
Heading, Rate of Turn, Variation
Humidity
Inside, Outside, User Defined
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Indicator
Navigation
Pressure/Vacuum
Rudder
Speed
Tanks
Temperature
Time
Transmission
Vessel
Watermaker
Wind
Status
BOD, BTW, COG, XTE, DTW, ETA, Lat/Lon, Rolling Road, Set/Drift,
SOG, TTG, VMG, Waypoint Number & Name
Water, Barometric, Compressed Air, Engine Boost, Engine Coolant,
Engine Fuel, Engine Oil, Hydraulic Oil, Steam, Transmission Oil, User
Defined
Angle & Order
Through Water, Over Ground, Total Log, Trip Log
Capacity, Level, Remaining
Wind Chill, Bait Well, Battery, Engine Coolant, Engine Oil, Engine
Room, Exhaust Gas, Freezer, Heat Index, Heating System, Inside,
Live Well, Main Cabin, Outside, Refrigeration, Sea, Transmission Oil,
User Defined
Local Date, UTC Date, Moon Phase, Sunrise, Sunset, Local Time,
UTC Time, Twilight AM, Twilight PM
Gear, Oil Pressure, Oil Temperature
Pitch, Roll, Trim Tabs, Keel
Dometic Status Display
Apparent Direction and Speed, True Direction and Speed, Ground
Direction and Speed
NMEA 2000® Parameter Group Numbers (PGNs)
Description
PGN #
PGN Name
Response to Requested
126464
PGN List (Transmit and Receive)
PGNs
126996
Product Information
126998
Configuration Information
Protocol PGNs
059392
ISO Acknowledge
059904
ISO Request
060160
ISO Transport Protocol, Data Transfer
060416
ISO Transport Protocol, Connection
Management
060928
ISO Address Claim
065240
ISO Address Command
126208
NMEA
Received PGNs
65001
Bus #1 Phase C Basic AC Quantities
65002
Bus #1 Phase B Basic AC Quantities
65003
Bus #1 Phase A Basic AC Quantities
65004
Bus #1 Average Basic AC Quantities
65005
Util. Total AC Energy
65006
Util. Phase C AC Reactive Power
65007
Util. Phase C AC Power
65008
Util. Phase C AC Basic Quantities
65009
Util. Phase B AC Reactive Power
65010
Util. Phase B AC Power
65011
Util. Phase B AC Basic Quantities
65012
Util. Phase A AC Reactive Power
Revision 1.4.16a
Default Rate
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
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DSM250 User’s Manual
65013
65014
65015
65016
65017
65018
65019
65020
65021
65022
65023
65024
65025
65026
65027
65028
65029
065030
065282
065284
065286
065287
126992
127245
127250
127251
127257
127258
127488
127489
127493
127497
127501
127502
127498
127504
127505
127506
127508
127513
128259
128267
128275
129025
129026
129029
129033
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Util. Phase A AC Power
Util. Phase A AC Basic Quantities
Util. Total AC Reactive Power
Util. Total AC Power
Util. Avg. Basic AC Quantities
Gen. Total AC Energy
Gen. Phase C AC Reactive Power
Gen. Phase C AC Power
Gen. Phase C AC Basic Quantities
Gen. Phase B AC Reactive Power
Gen. Phase B AC Power
Gen. Phase B AC Basic Quantities
Gen. Phase A AC Reactive Power
Gen. Phase A AC Power
Gen. Phase A AC Basic Quantities
Gen. Total AC Reactive Power
Gen. Total AC Power
Generator Average Basic AC Quantities
Number of Channels (Maretron)
DC Breaker Current (Maretron)
Fluid Flow Rate (Maretron)
Trip Volume (Maretron)
System Time
Rudder
Vessel Heading
Rate of Turn
Attitude
Magnetic Variation
Engine Parameters, Rapid Update
Engine Parameters, Dynamic
Transmission Parameters, Dynamic
Trip Parameters, Engine
Binary Switch Bank Status
Binary Switch Control
Engine Parameters, Static
AC Output Status
Fluid Level
DC Detailed Status
Battery Status
Battery Configuration Status
Speed
Water Depth
Distance Log
Position, Rapid Update
COG & SOG, Rapid Update
GNSS Position Data
Time & Date
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Revision 1.4.16a
®
129283
129284
129285
129291
129302
129538
129539
129540
130306
130310
130311
130312
130313
130314
130576
130816
130817
130818
130819
130820
130821
130822
130823
130824
130825
130826
130828
130829
130833
Cross Track Error
Navigation Data
Navigation – Route/WP Information
Set & Drift, Rapid Update
Bearing and Distance Between Two Marks
GNSS Control Status
GNSS DOPs
GNSS Sats In View
Wind Data
Environmental Parameters
Environmental Parameters
Temperature
Humidity
Actual Pressure
Small Craft Status
Watermaker Status (Sea Recovery)
Annunciator Capabilities (Maretron)
Label (Maretron)
Alert Transmission (Maretron)
Alert Response (Maretron)
Alert Text (Maretron)
Alert Control (Maretron)
Temperature, High Range (Maretron)
Annunciator (Maretron)
Data Instance/Chan Correlation (Maretron)
Switch Indicator Status (Maretron)
Dometic HVAC Status (Maretron)
Dometic Icemaker Status (Maretron)
Vessel Data Recorder Status (Maretron)
Electrical
Parameter
Value
Operating Voltage
9 to 16 Volts
Power Consumption (Maximum) <650mA
<200mA
Load Equivalence Number (LEN) 13
Reverse Battery Protection
Yes
Load Dump Protection
Yes
Mechanical
Parameter
Size
Weight
Mounting
Revision 1.4.16a
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comment
DC Voltage
Low Supply, Full Brightness
Nominal Supply, Low Brightness
NMEA 2000® Spec. (1LEN = 50 mA)
Indefinitely
Energy Rated per SAE J1113
Value
Comment
6.875” x 5.75” x 1.75” Including Flanges for Mounting
26 oz.
Surface or Flush
Mount
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DSM250 User’s Manual
Environmental
Parameter
IEC 60954 Classification
Degree of Protection
Operating Temperature
Storage Temperature
Relative Humidity
Vibration
Rain and Spray
Value
Exposed
IP67
-25°C to 55°C
-40°C to 70°C
93%RH @40° per IEC60945-8.2
2-13.2Hz @ ±1mm, 13.2-100Hz @ 7m/s2 per IEC 60945-8.7
12.5mm Nozzle @ 100liters/min from 3m for 30min per IEC 609458.8
Solar Radiation
Ultraviolet B, A, Visible, and Infrared per IEC 60945-8.10
Corrosion (Salt Mist)
4 times 7days @ 40°C, 95%RH after 2 hour Salt Spray Per IEC
60945-8.12
Electromagnetic Emission Conducted and Radiated Emission per IEC60945-9
Electromagnetic Immunity Conducted, Radiated, Supply, and ESD per IEC 60945-10
Safety Precautions
Dangerous Voltage, Electromagnetic Radio Frequency per IEC
60945-12
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Revision 1.4.16a
®
12 Technical Support
If you require technical support for Maretron products, you can reach us in any of the following ways:
Telephone: 1-866-550-9100
Fax: 1-602-861-1777
E-mail:
support@maretron.com
World Wide Web: http://www.maretron.com
Mail: Maretron, LLP
Attn: Technical Support
9014 N. 23rd Ave Suite 10
Phoenix, AZ 85021 USA
Revision 1.4.16a
Page 245
DSM250 User’s Manual
13 Installation Template
Please check the dimensions before using the following diagram as a template for drilling the
mounting holes because the printing process may have distorted the template.
Figure 280 – Surface Mounting Template
Page 246
Revision 1.4.16a
5.47” (139mm)
®
6.54” (166mm)
Figure 281 – Flush Mounting Template
Revision 1.4.16a
Page 247
DSM250 User’s Manual
14 Maretron (2 Year) Limited Warranty
Maretron warrants the DSM250 to be free from defects in materials and workmanship for two (2)
years from the date of original purchase. If within the applicable period any such products shall be
proved to Maretron’s satisfaction to fail to meet the above limited warranty, such products shall be
repaired or replaced at Maretron’s option. Purchaser's exclusive remedy and Maretron’s sole
obligation hereunder, provided product is returned pursuant to the return requirements below, shall be
limited to the repair or replacement, at Maretron’s option, of any product not meeting the above
limited warranty and which is returned to Maretron; or if Maretron is unable to deliver a replacement
that is free from defects in materials or workmanship, Purchaser’s payment for such product will be
refunded. Maretron assumes no liability whatsoever for expenses of removing any defective product
or part or for installing the repaired product or part or a replacement therefore or for any loss or
damage to equipment in connection with which Maretron’s products or parts shall be used. With
respect to products not manufactured by Maretron, Maretron’s warranty obligation shall in all respects
conform to and be limited to the warranty actually extended to Maretron by its supplier. The foregoing
warranties shall not apply with respect to products subjected to negligence, misuse, misapplication,
accident, damages by circumstances beyond Maretron’s control, to improper installation, operation,
maintenance, or storage, or to other than normal use or service.
THE FOREGOING WARRANTIES ARE EXPRESSLY IN LIEU OF AND EXCLUDES ALL OTHER
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
Statements made by any person, including representatives of Maretron, which are inconsistent or in
conflict with the terms of this Limited Warranty, shall not be binding upon Maretron unless reduced to
writing and approved by an officer of Maretron.
IN NO CASE WILL MARETRON BE LIABLE FOR INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES,
DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF USE, LOSS OF ANTICIPATED PROFITS OR SAVINGS, OR ANY
OTHER LOSS INCURRED BECAUSE OF INTERRUPTION OF SERVICE. IN NO EVENT SHALL
MARETRON’S AGGREGATE LIABILITY EXCEED THE PURCHASE PRICE OF THE PRODUCT(S)
INVOLVED. MARETRON SHALL NOT BE SUBJECT TO ANY OTHER OBLIGATIONS OR
LIABILITIES, WHETHER ARISING OUT OF BREACH OF CONTRACT OR WARRANTY, TORT
(INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE), OR OTHER THEORIES OF LAW WITH RESPECT TO PRODUCTS
SOLD OR SERVICES RENDERED BY MARETRON, OR ANY UNDERTAKINGS, ACTS OR
OMISSIONS RELATING THERETO.
Maretron does not warrant that the functions contained in any software programs or products will
meet purchaser’s requirements or that the operation of the software programs or products will be
uninterrupted or error free. Purchaser assumes responsibility for the selection of the software
programs or products to achieve the intended results, and for the installation, use and results
obtained from said programs or products. No specifications, samples, descriptions, or illustrations
provided Maretron to Purchaser, whether directly, in trade literature, brochures or other documentation
shall be construed as warranties of any kind, and any failure to conform with such specifications,
samples, descriptions, or illustrations shall not constitute any breach of Maretron’s limited warranty.
Page 248
Revision 1.4.16a
®
Warranty Return Procedure:
To apply for warranty claims, contact Maretron or one of its dealers to describe the problem and
determine the appropriate course of action. If a return is necessary, place the product in its original
packaging together with proof of purchase and send to an Authorized Maretron Service Location. You
are responsible for all shipping and insurance charges. Maretron will return the replaced or repaired
product with all shipping and handling prepaid except for requests requiring expedited shipping (i.e.
overnight shipments). Failure to follow this warranty return procedure could result in the product’s
warranty becoming null and void.
Maretron reserves the right to modify or replace, at its sole discretion, without prior notification, the
warranty listed above. To obtain a copy of the then current warranty policy, please go to the following
web page:
http://www.maretron.com/company/warranty.php
Revision 1.4.16a
Page 249