User manual | Company X Accessories C1030-5510 Electronic Keyboard User Manual

USBS6
V 0.3 June 29, 2010
User Manual C1030-5510
SPARTAN-6TM FPGA board with USB2.0,
SPI-Flash and JTAG interface.
Order number: C1030-5510
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
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Copyright information
Copyright © 2010 CESYS GmbH. All Rights Reserved. The information in this document is
proprietary to CESYS GmbH. No part of this document may be reproduced in any form or
by any means or used to make derivative work (such as translation, transformation or
adaptation) without written permission from CESYS GmbH.
CESYS GmbH provides this documentation without warranty, term or condition of any kind,
either express or implied, including, but not limited to, express and implied warranties of
merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement. While the
information contained herein is believed to be accurate, such information is preliminary,
and no representations or warranties of accuracy or completeness are made. In no event
will CESYS GmbH be liable for damages arising directly or indirectly from any use of or
reliance upon the information contained in this document. CESYS GmbH will make
improvements or changes in the product(s) and/or program(s) described in this
documentation at any time.
CESYS GmbH retains the right to make changes to this product at any time, without notice.
Products may have minor variations to this publication, known as errata. CESYS GmbH
assumes no liability whatsoever, including infringement of any patent or copyright, for sale
and use of CESYS GmbH products.
CESYS GmbH and the CESYS logo are registered trademarks.
All product names are trademarks, registered trademarks, or service marks of their
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⇒ Please check www.cesys.com to get the latest version of this document.
CESYS Gesellschaft für angewandte Mikroelektronik mbH
Zeppelinstrasse 6a
D – 91074 Herzogenaurach
Germany
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Overview
Summary of USBS6
USBS6 is a low-cost multilayer PCB with SPARTAN-6TM FPGA and USB 2.0 Interface. 34
I/O balls of the FPGA are available on standard 2.54mm headers, 81 I/O balls can be
reached through a industry standard VG 96-pin connector. It offers multiple configuration
options including USB and onboard SPI-Flash and can also be used standalone without
the need of a USB interface.
Feature list
Form factor
XILINX SPARTAN-6TM
USB2.0 Controller
FPGA configuration
Memory
Peripherals
Expansion connectors
Clock
120x100mm
XC6SLX16-2CSG324C
CYPRESSTM CY7C68013A
Using USB2.0, JTAG or SPI-Flash
16Mb SPI-Flash Numonyx M25P16,
128Mb Quad-SPI-Flash Macronix MX25L12845EMI-10G,
1Gb low-power DDR SDRAM Micron
Technology MT46H64M16LFCK-5
USB TO SERIAL UART FTDI FT232R,
HEX rotary DIP switch,
3 status, 5 user LEDs
2x25-Pin standard RM2.54mm header,
VG 96-pin connector
Onboard 48MHz clock signal,
up to two optional onboard clocks,
external clock sources possible.
Included in delivery
The standard delivery, order no. C1030-5510, includes:
• One USBS6
• One USB cable 1,5m
• One CD-ROM containing the user's manual (English), drivers, libraries, tools and
example source code.
All parts are ROHS compliant.
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Hardware
Block Diagram
128Mb
QSPI Flash
64kb I²C
EEPROM
XILINX FPGA
Spartan-6
USB2.0
CYPRESS FX-2
Oscillator
48 MHz
16Mb SPI Flash
for configuration
USB-Connector
34 I/O on
2x25-pin header
81 I/O on
VG 96-pin connector
1 Gb low-power
DDR SDRAM
Oscillator
24 MHz
Peripherals
JTAG
OSC
USB /
SERIAL
OSC
Optional
Oscillators
3 status &
5 user LEDs
USB to
UART
HEX rotary
DIP switch
Figure 1: USBS6 Block Diagram
Spartan-6 T M FPGA
XC6SLX16-2CSG324C FPGA features:
Logic cells
14,579
Configurable logic blocks (Slices / Flip-Flops)
2,278 / 18,224
Max distributed RAM (kb)
136
DSP Slices
136
Block RAM Blocks (18kB / Max(kb) )
32 / 576
CMTs
2
For details of the SPARTAN -6TM FPGA device, please look at the data sheet at:
http://www.xilinx.com/support/documentation/data_sheets/ds160.pdf
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Figure 2: USBS6 Top View
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Powering USBS6
USBS6 may be used bus-powered (see SW2 below) without the need of any external
power supply other than USB. In this mode VCCO_IO on J3,PIN A3, B3, C3 sourcing
capability is limited due to the fact, that USB power supply current is limited depending on
which system is used as host. Typically USB hosts allow up to 500mA. In bus-powered
mode, at first only FX2 is enabled. After successful connection to the operating system the
further power-on sequencing behavior depends on UDK configuration. Until the release of
UDK2.0 only the API could enable further power-on sequencing, therefore after plugging
an USB cable it also was necessary to start an application like cesys- Monitor before the
FPGA and other devices turned on. With v2.0 and upcoming releases of UDK framework
the user now can decide which power-on behavior fits best. Power-on sequencing through
API or as soon as USB cable is plugged in. Default mode is API- controlled.
Modes of operation
Mode
SW2
Comment *
VCCO_IO
Bus- powered
USB is used as power supply input.
3.3V@ ??? mA
Self- powered
Connect 5V power supply to VG- 96pin external
expansion connector J3 PINS A1, B1 and C1.
3.3V@ 3 A **
Minimum required supply current: ???A
* The actual required supply current strongly depends on FGPA design and may exceed the
minimum required.
** In self-powered mode the actual VCCO_IO current limit depends on sourcing capability of
external 5V power supply and may be less.
If the attached USB2.0 host interface should not be used as power supply, it is possible to
use USBS6 self-powered (see SW2 above). In this mode an external 5V power supply
must be connected to the external expansion connector J3, PINS A1, B1 and C1. All
onboard voltages are enabled as soon as an external power supply is applied. VCCO on
BANK0 and BANK3 is tied together to VCCO_IO but routed independent from other supply
voltages. Therefore in self-powered mode maximum current available on J3,PIN
A3, B3, C3 (VCCO_IO) mainly depends on the external power supply to the limit of the
onboard regulator, which is about 3A. As default VCCO_IO is regulated to 3.3V to enable
3.3V signaling levels on the external expansion connectors. Other signaling levels may be
supported but require adjustment of the onboard synchronous buck regulator to the desired
value.
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! It is strongly recommended to check XILINXTM UG381 about Spartan-6 FPGA SelectIO
Signal Standards on XILINXTM website.
Configuration
Configuration of USBS6 can be accomplished in several ways: JTAG, SPI-Flash or USB.
The default configuration mode is booting from SPI-Flash. After powering on the FPGA,
USBS6 always tries to configure itself from the attached Flash using SPI Master mode. If
no valid design is stored in the SPI-Flash the FPGA has to be configured via JTAG or USB.
JTAG configuration is supported at any time after the FPGA is properly powered on. For
downloading designs via JTAG ISE WebPACK from XILINXTM is recommended. The tool
can be downloaded from XILINX web page free of charge. As JTAG connector USBS6
implements a standard 2x7-Pin header with 2mm pitch which is compatible to recent
XILINXTM platform cables.
Figure 3: JTAG connector J2
J2 JTAG connector
PIN
Signal
Name
FPGA
IO
1
GND
--
3
GND
5
Comment
PIN
Signal
Name
FPGA
IO
Comment
Ground signal
2
VCCAUX
--
3.3V auxiliary supply.
--
Ground signal
4
TMS
B18
Test Mode Select.
GND
--
Ground signal
6
TCK
A17
Test Clock.
7
GND
--
Ground signal
8
TDO
D16
Test Data Out.
9
GND
--
Ground signal
10
TDI
D15
Test Data In.
11
GND
--
Ground signal
12
--
--
No connection.
13
GND
--
Ground signal
14
--
--
No connection.
For further information on the different configuration solutions for XILINX TM SPARTAN-6TM
USBS6 / C1030-5510
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FPGA the reader is encouraged to take a look at the user guide UG380 on XILINXTM web
page.
USB2.0 controller
CYPRESSTM FX2LPTM is a highly integrated, low power USB2.0 microcontroller, that
integrates USB2.0 transceiver, serial interface engine (SIE), enhanced 8051 microcontroller and a programmable peripheral interface. More information on usage of FX2LP TM
in conjunction with Spartan-6 can be found in chapter C.
USB2.0 FX2LPTM Microcontroller CYPRESSTM CY7C68013A
Signal Name
FPGA IO
Comment
FX2_IFCLK
V9
Clock input for both, FX2 and FPGA. 48MHz clock is provided by an
external oscillator.
FX2_SLWR
U8
FX2 input, FIFO write-strobe.
FX2_SLRD
T7
FX2 input, FIFO read-strobe.
FX2_SLOE
V11
FX2 input, output-enable, activates FX2 data bus.
FX2_PKTEND
V8
FX2 input, packet end control signal, causes FX2 to send data to host
at once, ignoring 512 byte alignment (so called “short packet”).
! Short packets sometimes lead to unpredictable behavior at host
side, wherefore short packets are not support!
FX2_FIFOADR0
R10
FX2_FIFOADR1
U3
FX2 input, endpoint buffer addresses, only two endpoints are used:
EP2 (OUT, ADR[1:0] = b”00”) and EP6 (IN, ADR[1:0] = b”10”).
FX2_FLAGA
V16
FX2 output, EP2 “empty” flag.
FX2_FLAGB
U16
FX2 output, EP2 “almost empty” flag.
FX2_FLAGC
U11
FX2 output, EP6 “almost full” flag.
FX2_FD0
R11
16-Bit bidirectional FIFO data bus.
FX2_FD1
T14
FX2_FD2
V14
FX2_FD3
U5
FX2_FD4
V5
FX2_FD5
R3
FX2_FD6
T3
FX2_FD7
R5
FX2_FD8
N5
FX2_FD9
P6
FX2_FD10
P12
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USB2.0 FX2LPTM Microcontroller CYPRESSTM CY7C68013A
Signal Name
FPGA IO
FX2_FD11
U13
FX2_FD12
V13
FX2_FD13
U10
FX2_FD14
R8
FX2_FD15
T8
Comment
External memory
USBS6 offers the opportunity to use various external memory architectures in one´s FPGA
design. With Micron Technology MT46H64M16LFCK-5 up to 1Gbit of high-speed lowpower DDR SDRAM is available. The integrated memory controller of Spartan-6 TM devices
enables system designers to implement state-of-the-art memory interfaces without the
need to develop a whole memory controller Soft-IP all on their own. Some examples on
how to implement LPDDR with Spartan-6 are available in chapter C.
LPDDR SDRAM MT46H64M16LFCK-5
Signal Name
FPGA IO
MCB1_A0
H15
MCB1_A1
H16
MCB1_A2
F18
MCB1_A3
J13
MCB1_A4
E18
MCB1_A5
L12
MCB1_A6
L13
MCB1_A7
F17
MCB1_A8
H12
MCB1_A9
G13
MCB1_A10
E16
MCB1_A11
G14
MCB1_A12
D18
MCB1_A13
C17
MCB1_BA0
H13
MCB1_BA1
H14
Comment
Address inputs: Provide the row address for ACTIVE commands, and
the column address and auto precharge bit (A10) for READ or
WRITE commands, to select one location out of the memory array in
the respective bank. During a PRECHARGE command, A10
determines whether the PRECHARGE applies to one bank (A10
LOW, bank selected by BA0, BA1) or all banks (A10 HIGH). The
address inputs also provide the op-code during a LOAD MODE
REGISTER command.
Bank address inputs: BA0 and BA1 define to which bank an ACTIVE,
READ, WRITE, or PRECHARGE command is being applied. BA0
and BA1 also determine which mode register is loaded during a
LOAD MODE REGISTER command.
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LPDDR SDRAM MT46H64M16LFCK-5
Signal Name
FPGA IO
MCB1_RAS_n
K15
MCB1_CAS_n
K16
MCB1_WE_n
K12
MCB1_CS_n
--
MCB1_CKE_n
D17
Clock enable: CKE HIGH activates, and CKE LOW deactivates, the
internal clock signals, input buffers, and output drivers. Taking CKE
LOW enables PRECHARGE power-down and SELF REFRESH
operations (all banks idle), or ACTIVE power-down (row active in any
bank). CKE is synchronous for all functions except SELF REFRESH
exit. All input buffers (except CKE) are disabled during power-down
and self refresh modes.
MCB1_RZQ
N14
Input termination calibration pin used with the soft calibration module.
External 100 Ohm resistor to GND.
MCB1_ZIO
Comment
Command inputs: RAS#, CAS#, and WE# (along with CS#) define
the command being entered. *
No connect signal used with the soft calibration module to calibrate
the input termination value.
MCB1_CK
G16
Clock: CK is the system clock input. CK and CK# are differential
clock inputs. All address and control input signals are sampled on the
crossing of the positive edge of CK and the negative edge of CK#.
Input and output data is referenced to the crossing of CK and CK#
(both directions of the crossing).
MCB1_CK_n
G18
MCB1_DQ0
M16
MCB1_DQ1
M18
MCB1_DQ2
L17
MCB1_DQ3
L18
MCB1_DQ4
H17
MCB1_DQ5
H18
MCB1_DQ6
J16
MCB1_DQ7
J18
MCB1_LDQS
K17
Data strobe for Lower Byte Data bus: Output with read data, input
with write data. DQS is edge-aligned with read data, center-aligned in
write data. It is used to capture data.
MCB1_LDM
L16
MCB1_UDM
L15
Input data mask: DM is an input mask signal for write data. Input data
is masked when DM is sampled HIGH along with that input data
during a WRITE access. DM is sampled on both edges of DQS.
MCB1_DQ8
N17
MCB1_DQ9
N18
MCB1_DQ10
P17
MCB1_DQ11
P18
Data input/output: Lower Byte Data bus.
Data input/output: Upper Byte Data bus.
USBS6 / C1030-5510
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LPDDR SDRAM MT46H64M16LFCK-5
Signal Name
FPGA IO
MCB1_DQ12
T17
MCB1_DQ13
T18
MCB1_DQ14
U17
MCB1_DQ15
U18
MCB1_UDQS
N15
Comment
Data strobe for Upper Byte Data bus: Output with read data, input
with write data. DQS is edge-aligned with read data, center-aligned in
write data. It is used to capture data.
* As the memory device interface of Spartan-6 supports only one device, CS# signal is not
supported by Spartan-6 MCB. CS# is pulled LOW via an external 0 Ohm resistor.
! It is strongly recommended to check XILINXTM user guide UG388 about Spartan-6TM
FPGA Memory Controller on XILINXTM website.
! It is strongly recommended to check XILINXTM user guide UG416 about Spartan-6TM
FPGA Memory Interface Solutions on XILINX TM website.
User specific data can be stored in up to 128Mb of non-volatile Flash-memory. The
SPI- compliant interface guarantees ease of use and when speed matters
Macronix MX25L12845EMI-10G supports Q- SPI with data-rates up to 50 MByte/s in fast
read double transfer rate mode. Some examples on how to implement a SPI- compliant
interface with Spartan-6TM are available in chapter C.
Q- SPI Flash MX25L12845EMI-10G
Signal Name
FPGA IO
Comment
MX_CS_n
T6
Active- low Chip Select.
MX_SCLK
V4
Clock Input.
MX_SIO0
V6
Serial Data Input (SPI) / Serial Data IO (Dual- or Q- SPI).
MX_SIO1
T4
Serial Data Input (SPI) / Serial Data IO (Dual- or Q- SPI).
MX_SIO2
U7
Active- low Write Protect (SPI) / Serial Data IO (Dual- or Q-SPI).
MX_SIO3
V7
Not connect pin (SPI) / Serial Data IO (Dual- or Q-SPI).
Peripherals
USBS6 integrates several peripheral devices. Three system and five user- configurable
LEDs, one HEX rotary DIP switch and one USB to SERIAL UART are available. Power
supply status and FPGA configuration are observable through the system LEDs. The user-
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configurable LEDs allow to make internal monitoring status signals visible by driving the
appropriate FPGA IO to a HIGH level.
Figure 4: Bitte durch Orginalbild ersetzen
LEDs
Signal Name
FPGA IO
Comment
SYS_LED0
--
Internal 5V power supply.
SYS_LED1
--
Power OK- signal from onboard voltage regulator.
SYS_LED2
V17
Illuminates to indicate the status of the DONE pin if FPGA is
successfully configured.
USER_LED0
P7
User- configurable LED.
USER_LED1
N7
User- configurable LED.
USER_LED2
P8
User- configurable LED.
USER_LED3
N6
User- configurable LED.
USER_LED4
R7
User- configurable LED.
The HEX rotary DIP switch is of binary coded type. The four weighted terminals are
externally pulled HIGH with 4,7 kOhm resistors, the common terminals are connected to
GND. Therefore the four FPGA inputs behave like a complementary binary coded
hexadecimal switch.
HEX rotary DIP switch
DIAL
FPGA Pin N8
FPGA Pin M11
FPGA Pin M10
FPGA Pin N9
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
2
1
0
1
1
3
0
0
1
1
4
1
1
0
1
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HEX rotary DIP switch
DIAL
FPGA Pin N8
FPGA Pin M11
FPGA Pin M10
FPGA Pin N9
5
0
1
0
1
6
1
0
0
1
7
0
0
0
1
8
1
1
1
0
9
0
1
1
0
A
1
0
1
0
B
0
0
1
0
C
1
1
0
0
D
0
1
0
0
E
1
0
0
0
F
0
0
0
0
FT232R from FTDI is a USB to serial UART interface.
USB to serial UART interface
Signal Name
FPGA IO
Direction
Comment
FTDI_TXD
U15
FPGA IN
Transmit asynchronous data output for FT232R.
FTDI_RXD
V15
FPGA OUT
Receiving asynchronous data input for FT232R.
FTDI_RTS_n
N11
FPGA IN
FTDI_CTS_n
M8
FPGA OUT
Clear to send control input for FT232R.
FTDI_RESET_n
T12
FPGA OUT
Active low reset pin for FT232R.
Request to send control output for FT232R.
External expansion connectors
On connectors J3 and J4 up to 115 general purpose FPGA IO are accessible. Bank 0 and
Bank 3 of the FPGA are configured for 3.3V signaling level. Differential IO standards as for
example LVDS are supported too. Detail information about IO pairing is available in
paragraph IO pairing and etch length report of chapter D.
! IO on connectors J3 and J4 are directly connected to FPGA IO and therefore are only 3.3
Volt tolerant. NEVER apply voltages outside the interval [-0.95V..4.1V] as this may lead to
severe damage of FPGA and attached components. For more information regarding DC
and switching characteristics of Spartan-6 FPGA please consult documentation DS160 on
XILINXTM website
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Figure 5: VG 96-pin external expansion connector J3
J3 VG 96-pin external expansion connector
PIN FPGA
IO
Comment
PIN FPGA
IO
Comment
PIN FPGA
IO
Comment
A32
--
GND
B32
--
GND
C32
--
GND
A31
F13
VG96_IO78
B31
E13
VG96_IO79
C31
C4
VG96_IO80
A30
F12
VG96_IO75
B30
E12
VG96_IO76
C30
F11
VG96_IO77
A29
D11
VG96_IO72*
B29
C11
VG96_IO73*
C29
E11
VG96_IO74
A28
G11
VG96_IO69
B28
F10
VG96_IO70
C28
G8
VG96_IO71
A27
G9
VG96_IO66
B27
F9
VG96_IO67
C27
F8
VG96_IO68
A26
D9
VG96_IO63*
B26
C9
VG96_IO64*
C26
D8
VG96_IO65
A25
E7
VG96_IO60
B25
E8
VG96_IO61
C25
C8
VG96_IO62
A24
D6
VG96_IO57
B24
C6
VG96_IO58
C24
F7
VG96_IO59
A23
F6
VG96_IO54
B23
F5
VG96_IO55
C23
E6
VG96_IO56
A22
--
GND
B22
--
GND
C22
--
GND
A21
E4
VG96_IO51
B21
D3
VG96_IO52
C21
F4
VG96_IO53
A20
H7
VG96_IO48
B20
G6
VG96_IO49
C20
F3
VG96_IO50
A19
H4
VG96_IO45*
B19
H3
VG96_IO46*
C19
J7
VG96_IO47
A18
H6
VG96_IO42
B18
H5
VG96_IO43
C18
J6
VG96_IO44
A17
K4
VG96_IO39*
B17
K3
VG96_IO40*
C17
L6
VG96_IO41
A16
L7
VG96_IO36
B16
K6
VG96_IO37
C16
M5
VG96_IO38
A15
L5
VG96_IO33*
B15
K5
VG96_IO34*
C15
E3
VG96_IO35
A14
L4
VG96_IO30
B14
L3
VG96_IO31
C14
E1
VG96_IO32
A13
C2
VG96_IO27
B13
C1
VG96_IO28
C13
G3
VG96_IO29
A12
D2
VG96_IO24
B12
D1
VG96_IO25
C12
G1
VG96_IO26
A11
F2
VG96_IO21
B11
F1
VG96_IO22
C11
J3
VG96_IO23
A10
H2
VG96_IO18*
B10
H1
VG96_IO19*
C10
J1
VG96_IO20
A9
K2
VG96_IO15
B9
K1
VG96_IO16
C9
M3
VG96_IO17
A8
L2
VG96_IO12
B8
L1
VG96_IO13
C8
M1
VG96_IO14
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J3 VG 96-pin external expansion connector
PIN FPGA
IO
Comment
PIN FPGA
IO
A7
N2
VG96_IO9
B7
N1
A6
P2
VG96_IO6
B6
A5
T2
VG96_IO3
A4
U2
A3
Comment
PIN FPGA
IO
Comment
VG96_IO10
C7
N4
VG96_IO11
P1
VG96_IO7
C6
N3
VG96_IO8
B5
T1
VG96_IO4
C5
P4
VG96_IO5
VG96_IO0
B4
U1
VG96_IO1
C4
P3
VG96_IO2
--
VCCO_IO
B3
--
VCCO_IO
C3
--
VCCO_IO
A2
--
GND
B2
--
GND
C2
--
GND
A1
--
5.0V_EXT
B1
--
5.0V_EXT
C1
--
5.0V_EXT
* GCLK
Figure 6: IDC 2x25-Pin external expansion connector J4
J4 IDC 2x25-Pin external expansion connector
PIN
FPGA IO
Comment
PIN
FPGA IO
Comment
1
--
VCCO_IO
2
--
GND
3
C5
ADD_IO0
4
A5
ADD_IO1
5
C7
ADD_IO2
6
A7
ADD_IO3
7
--
GND
8
--
GND
9
B2
ADD_IO4
10
A2
ADD_IO5
11
B3
ADD_IO6
12
A3
ADD_IO7
13
B4
ADD_IO8
14
A4
ADD_IO9
15
B6
ADD_IO10
16
A6
ADD_IO11
17
--
GND
18
--
GND
19
B8
ADD_IO12
20
A8
ADD_IO13
21
B9
ADD_IO14*
22
A9
ADD_IO15*
23
--
GND
24
--
GND
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preliminary
J4 IDC 2x25-Pin external expansion connector
PIN
FPGA IO
Comment
PIN
FPGA IO
Comment
25
B11
ADD_IO16
26
A11
ADD_IO17
27
B12
ADD_IO18
28
A12
ADD_IO19
29
B14
ADD_IO20
30
A14
ADD_IO21
31
B16
ADD_IO22
32
A16
ADD_IO23
33
--
GND
34
--
GND
35
C10
ADD_IO24*
36
A10
ADD_IO25*
37
D12
ADD_IO26
38
C12
ADD_IO27
39
--
GND
40
--
GND
41
C13
ADD_IO28
42
A13
ADD_IO29
43
D14
ADD_IO30
44
C14
ADD_IO31
45
C15
ADD_IO32
46
A15
ADD_IO33
47
D4
HSWAPEN**
48
--
GND
49
--
VCCO_IO
50
--
GND
* GCLK
** Enable / Disable optional pull-up resistors during configuration. Pulled HIGH via external
4,7 kOhm resistor. Leave unconnected.
! It is strongly recommended to check the appropriate data sheets of SPARTAN-6
TM
devices about special functionality IO like GCLK, HSWAPEN, ...
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FPGA design
Cypress FX-2 LP and USB basics
Several data transfer types are defined in USB 2.0 specification. High-speed bulk transfer
is the one and only mode of interest to end users. USB transfers are packet oriented and
have a time framing scheme. USB packets consist of USB protocol and user payload data.
Payload could have a variable length of up to 512 bytes per packet. Packet size is fixed to
the maximum value of 512 bytes for data communication with CESYS USB cards to
achieve highest possible data throughput. USB peripherals could have several logical
channels to the host. The data source/sink for each channel inside the USB peripheral is
called the USB endpoint. Each endpoint can be configured as “IN”- (channel direction:
peripheral => host) or “OUT”-endpoint (channel direction: host => peripheral) from host
side perspective. CESYS USB cards support two endpoints, one for each direction. FX-2
has an integrated USB SIE (Serial Interface Engine) handling USB protocol and
transferring user payload data to the appropriate endpoint. So end users do not have to
care about USB protocol in their own applications. FX-2 endpoints are realized as 2 kB
buffers. These buffers can be accessed over a FIFO-like interface with a 16 bit tristate data
bus by external hardware. External hardware acts as a master, polling FIFO flags, applying
read- and write-strobes and transferring data. Therefore this FX-2 data transfer mechanism
is called “slave FIFO mode”. As already mentioned, all data is transferred in multiples of
512 bytes. External hardware has to ensure, that the data written to IN-endpoint is aligned
to this value, so that data will be transmitted from endpoint buffer to host. The 512 byte
alignment normally causes no restrictions in data streaming applications with endless data
transfers. Maybe it is necessary to fill up endpoint buffer with dummy data, if some kind of
host timeout condition has to be met. Another FX-2 data transfer mechanism is called
“GPIF (General Programmable InterFace) mode”. The GPIF engine inside the FX-2 acts as
a master to endpoint buffers, transferring data and presenting configurable handshake
waveforms to external hardware. CESYS USB card supports “slave FIFO mode” for data
communication only. “GPIF mode” is exclusively used for downloading configuration
bitstreams to FPGA.
Clocking FPGA designs
The 48 MHz SYSCLK oscillator is an onboard clock source for the FPGA. It is used as
interface clock (IFCLK) between FX-2 slave FIFO bus and FPGA I/Os. So this clock source
must be used for data transfers to and from FPGA over USB! Appropriate timing
constraints can be found in “*.ucf”-files of design examples included in delivery.
It is strictly recommended to use a single clock domain whenever possible. Using a fully
synchronous system architecture often results in smaller, less complex and more
performant FPGA designs (compare XilinxTM white paper WP331 “Timing Closure/Coding
Guidelines”).
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In FPGA designs with multiple clock domains asynchronous FIFOs have to be used for
transferring data from one clock domain to the other and comprehensive control signals
have to be resynchronized.
Other clock sources can be added internally by using Spartan-6 TM onchip digital clock
managers (DCMs) or PLLs or externally by connecting clock sources to other FPGA global
clock inputs. A wide range of clock frequencies can be synthesized with DCMs and PLLs.
For further details on DCMs/PLLs please see “Spartan-6TM FPGA Clocking Resources
User Guide UG382”.
FX-2/FPGA slave FIFO connection
Only the logical behavior of slave FIFO interface is discussed here. For information about
the timing behavior like setup- and hold-times please see FX-2 datasheet.
All flags and control signals are active low (postfix “#”). The whole interface is synchronous
to IFCLK. The asynchronous FIFO transfer mode is not supported.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SLWR#: FX-2 input, FIFO write-strobe
SLRD#: FX-2 input, FIFO read-strobe
SLOE#: FX-2 input, output-enable, activates FX-2 data bus drivers
PKTEND#: FX-2 input, packet end control signal, causes FX-2 to send data to host at
once, ignoring 512 byte alignment (so called “short packet”)
Short packets sometimes lead to unpredictable behavior at host side. So CESYS USB
cards do not support short packets! This signal has to be statically set to HIGH! Dummy
data should be added instead of creating short packets. There is normally no lack of
performance by doing this, because transmission of USB packets is bound to a time
framing scheme, regardless of amount of payload data.
FIFOADR[1:0]: FX-2 input, endpoint buffer addresses, CESYS USB cards use only two
endpoints EP2 (OUT, ADR[1:0] = b”00”) and EP6 (IN, ADR[1:0] = b”10”)
Switching FIFOADR[1] is enough to select data direction. FIFOADR[0] has to be
statically set to LOW!
FLAG#-A/-B/-C: FX-2 outputs, A => EP2 “empty” flag, B => EP2 “almost empty” flag,
meaning one 16 bit data word is available, C => EP6 “almost full” flag, meaning one 16
bit data word can still be transmitted to EP6, there is no real “full” flag for EP6, “almost
full” could be used instead
FD[15:0]: bidirectional tristate data bus
Introduction to example FPGA designs
The CESYS USBS6 Card is shipped with some demonstration FPGA designs to give you
an easy starting point for own development projects. The whole source code is written in
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VHDL. Verilog and schematic entry design flows are not supported.
• The design “usbs6_soc” demonstrates the implementation of a system-on-chip (SoC)
with host software access to the peripherals like GPIOs, external Flash Memory, LPDDR
Memory and internal BlockRAM over USB. This design requires a protocol layer over the
simple USB bulk transfer (see CESYS application note “Transfer Protocol for CESYS
USB products” for details), which is already provided by CESYS software API.
• The design “usbs6_bram” is a minimal example for data transfers from and to the FPGA
over USB and can be used to get for familiar with UDK hardware/software interface.
The Spartan-6 XC6SLX16 Device is supported by the free XilinxTM ISE Webpack
development software. You will have to change some options of the project properties for
own applications.
A bitstream in the “*.bin”-format is needed, if you want to download your FPGA design with
the CESYS software API-functions LoadBIN() and ProgramFPGA(). The generation of
this file is disabled by default in the Xilinx TM ISE development environment. Check “create
binary configuration file” at right click “generate programming file”=>properties=>general
options:
Figure 7: ISE Generate Programming File Properties (Gen. Opt.)
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After ProgramFPGA() is called and the FPGA design is completely downloaded, the pin
#RESET (note: the prefix # means, that the signal is active low) is automatically pulsed
(HIGH/LOW/HIGH). This signal can be used for resetting the FPGA design. The APIfunction ResetFPGA() can be called to initiate a pulse on #RESET at a user given time.
The following sections will give you a brief introduction about the data transfer from and to
the FPGA over the Cypress FX-2 USB peripheral controller's slave FIFO interface, the
WISHBONE interconnection architecture and the provided peripheral controllers.
CESYS USB cards use only slave FIFO mode for transferring data. For further information
about the FX-2 slave FIFO mode see Cypress FX-2 user manual and datasheet and about
the WISHBONE architecture see specification B.3 (wbspec_b3.pdf).
FPGA source code copyright information
This source code is copyrighted by CESYS GmbH / GERMANY, unless otherwise noted.
FPGA source code license
THIS SOURCECODE IS NOT FREE! IT IS FOR USE TOGETHER WITH THE CESYS
PRODUCTS ONLY! YOU ARE NOT ALLOWED TO MODIFY AND DISTRIBUTE OR USE
IT WITH ANY OTHER HARDWARE, SOFTWARE OR ANY OTHER KIND OF ASIC OR
PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC DESIGN WITHOUT THE EXPLICIT PERMISSION OF THE
COPYRIGHT HOLDER!
Disclaimer of warranty
THIS SOURCECODE IS DISTRIBUTED IN THE HOPE THAT IT WILL BE USEFUL, BUT
THERE IS NO WARRANTY OR SUPPORT FOR THIS SOURCECODE. THE COPYRIGHT
HOLDER PROVIDES THIS SOURCECODE "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY
KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE. THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THIS
SOURCECODE IS WITH YOU. SHOULD THIS SOURCECODE PROVE DEFECTIVE,
YOU ASSUME THE COST OF ALL NECESSARY SERVICING, REPAIR OR
CORRECTION.
IN NO EVENT WILL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR DAMAGES,
INCLUDING ANY GENERAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES
ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THIS SOURCECODE (INCLUDING
BUT NOT LIMITED TO LOSS OF DATA OR DATA BEING RENDERED INACCURATE OR
LOSSES SUSTAINED BY YOU OR THIRD PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THIS
SOURCECODE TO OPERATE WITH ANY OTHER SOFTWARE-PROGRAMS,
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preliminary
HARDWARE-CIRCUITS OR ANY OTHER KIND OF ASIC OR PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC
DESIGN), EVEN IF THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE
POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
Design “usbs6_soc”
An on-chip-bus system is implemented in this design. The VHDL source code shows you,
how to build a 32 Bit WISHBONE based shared bus architecture. All devices of the
WISHBONE system support only SINGLE READ / WRITE Cycles. Files and modules
having something to do with the WISHBONE system are labeled with the prefix “wb_”. The
WISHBONE master is labeled with the additional prefix “ma_” and the slaves are labeled
with “sl_”. There is a package for each module with the additional postfix “_pkg”. It contains
the appropriate VHDL component declaration / interface description as well as public
constants like register address offsets.
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
32-Bit SoC
UART
BRAM
Xilinx ®
SIO
Macros
Universal Data
Source/Sink
S
S
FX2
Slave-FIFO
On-Chip-Bus
Protocol
Engine
M
MCB
INTERCONNECTION
S
S
FLASH
GPIO
Configuration
&
User Flash
Access
Connectors
LEDs
Hex-Enc.
SPI
LPDDR
S
Ext.-Mem.
Access
Multi-I/O
Figure 8: WISHBONE system overview
Files and modules
src/wishbone_pkg.vhd:
A package containing datatypes, constants, and components needed for the WISHBONE
system. There are VHDL subroutines for a WISHBONE master bus functional model
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(BFM), too. These can be used for behavioral simulation purposes.
src/usbs6_soc_top.vhd:
This is the top level entity of the design. The WISHBONE components are instantiated
here.
src/wb_intercon.vhd:
All WISHBONE devices are connected to this shared bus interconnection logic. Some
MSBs of the address are used to select the appropriate slave.
src/wb_ma_fx2.vhd:
This is the entity of the WISHBONE master, which converts the CESYS USB protocol into
one or more 32 Bit single read/write WISHBONE cycles. The low level FX-2 slave FIFO
controller (fx2_slfifo_ctrl.vhd) is used and 16/32 bit data width conversion is done by using
special FIFOs (sfifo_hd_a1Kx18b0K5x36.vhd).
src/wb_sl_bram.vhd:
A internal BlockRAM is instantiated here and simply connected to the WISHBONE
architecture. It can be used for testing address oriented data transactions over USB.
src/wb_sl_gpio.vhd:
This entity provides up to 256 general purpose I/Os to set and monitor non-timing-critical
internal and external FPGA signals. The I/Os can be accessed as eight ports with 32 bits
each. Every single I/O can be configured as an in- or output.
I/O signals of VG96 connector VG96_IO[80:0] are at port0 – port2, bits[80:0], I/O signals of
add-on connector ADD_IO[33:0] are at port3 – port4, bits[129:96], user LEDs are at port5,
bits[163:160] and hex encoder is at port6, bits[195:192].
Port7 is used for monitoring MCB status signals bit[224] => READ ERROR, bit[225] =>
READ OVERFLOW, bit[226] => WRITE ERROR, bit[227] => WRITE UNDERRUN and
bit[228] => CALIBRATION DONE.
src/wb_sl_flash.vhd:
The module encapsulates the low level FLASH controller flash_ctrl.vhd. The integrated
command register supports the BULK ERASE command, which erases the whole memory
by programming all bits to '1'. In write cycles the bit values can only be changed from '1' to
'0'. That means, that it is not allowed to have a write access to the same address twice
without erasing the whole flash before. The read access is as simple as reading from any
other WISHBONE device. Please see the SPI-FLASH data sheet for details on
programming and erasing. There are two instances of this module. One is used for
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programming FPGA configuration bitstream to SPI-FLASH and the other accesses QUADSPI-FLASH for storing nonvolatile application data.
src/wb_sl_mcb.vhd:
WISHBONE adapter for one port of Spartan-6TM build in multiport memory controller block
(MCB).
src/wb_sl_uart.vhd:
This entity is a simple UART transceiver with 16 byte buffer for each direction connected to
USB2UART interface. XilinxTM UART transceiver macros are used as physical layer.
Baudrate is adjustable up to 230400 (default: 9600) by writing appropriate timer prescaling
values to the status and configuration register. This register contains buffer level flags
FULL and HALFFULL for each direction, too. Data format is fixed at 8-N-1. Reading from
UART pipe is always non-blocking. A data present flag provided along with received bytes
indicates, if current RX value is valid. Writing to UART pipe is blocking, if TX buffer gets full.
So that loss of transmitted data can easily be avoided.
src/xil_uart_macro/:
This directory contains VHDL source code files of XilinxTM UART transceiver macros. Note
that these source code files are copyrighted by XilinxTM and are absolutely not supported
by CESYS! For details on these macros see the application note “XAPP223 - 200 MHz
UART with Internal 16-Byte Buffer” provided by XilinxTM.
src/xil_mcb_mig/:
This directory contains VHDL source code files generated by Xilinx TM memory interface
generator tool to build the frontend for MCB. File memc1_infrastructure.vhd has been
modified to fit example design requirements.
src/fx2_slfifo_ctrl.vhd:
This controller handles 512 byte aligned raw USB bulk transfers without CESYS USB
transfer protocol. It checks FX-2 FIFO flags and copies data from FX-2 endpoints to
internal FPGA buffers (sync_fifo.vhd) and vice versa. So the USB data link looks like any
other FPGA FIFO buffer to user logic. Ports of fx2_slfifo_ctrl connected to FX-2 are
labeled with prefix fx2_ and ports connected to user logic are labeled with prefix app_.
Sometimes the abbreviations _h2p_ (host to peripheral) and _p2h_ (peripheral to host) are
used in signal names to indicate data flow direction.
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app_fifo_wr_data_i
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
124
125
126
D3
D2
D1
3
2
1
app_fifo_wr_full_o
app_fifo_wr_count_o
122
123
127
ifclk
app_fifo_rd_i
D4
app_fifo_rd_data_o
D0
app_fifo_rd_empty_o
app_fifo_rd_count_o
5
4
0
FPGA => FX-2
app_fifo_wr_i
FX-2 => FPGA
ifclk
Figure 9: FIFO transactions of fx2_slfifo_ctrl at user logic side
The upper waveform demonstrates the behavior of app_fifo_wr_full_o and
app_fifo_wr_count_o when there is no transaction on the slave FIFO controller side of
the FIFO. During simultaneous FIFO-read- and FIFO-write-transactions, the signals do not
change. The signal app_fifo_wr_full_o will be cleared and app_fifo_wr_count_o
will decrease, if there are read-transactions at the slave FIFO controller side, but no writetransactions at the application side.
The lower waveform demonstrates the behavior of app_fifo_rd_empty_o and
app_fifo_rd_count_o when there is no transaction at the slave FIFO controller side of
the FIFO. During simultaneous FIFO-read- and FIFO-write-transactions, the signals do not
change. The signal app_fifo_rd_empty_o will be cleared and
app_fifo_rd_count_o will increase, if there are write-transactions on the slave FIFO
controller side, but no read-transactions at the application side. Please note the one clockcycle delay between app_fifo_rd_i and app_fifo_rd_data_o!
The signals app_usb_h2p_pktcount_o[7:0] and app_usb_p2h_pktcount_o[7:0]
(not shown in figure 9) are useful to fit the 512 byte USB bulk packet alignment. They
are automatically incremented, if the appropriate read- (app_fifo_rd_i) or writestrobe (app_fifo_wr_i) is asserted. These signals count 16 bit data words, not data
bytes! 512 byte alignment is turned into a 256 16 bit word alignment at this interface.
Please note, that using raw USB bulk transfers and slave FIFO transactions directly is not
recommended! It is just for background information. Use protocol based WISHBONE
interface instead!
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src/sync_fifo.vhd:
This entity is a general purpose synchronous FIFO buffer. It is build of FPGA distributed
RAM.
src/sfifo_hd_a1Kx18b0K5x36.vhd:
This entity is a general purpose synchronous FIFO buffer with mismatched port widths. It is
build of a FPGA BlockRAM.
src/flash_ctrl.vhd:
The low level FLASH controller for SPI FLASH memory. It supports reading and writing of
four bytes of data at one time as well as erasing the whole memory.
usbs6_soc.xise:
Project file for XilinxTM ISE
usbs6_soc.ucf:
User constraint file with timing and pinout constraints
usbs6_soc_fpga_consts.h:
C header file extracted from VHDL packages. It contains address, flag, bitfield and value
definitions for FPGA design access integration into host software application.
Software Pseudo-Code Example:
#include “usbs6_soc_fpga_consts.h”
/* address of UART status and configuration register */
uint32_t uiRegAddr = UART_BASEADR + UART_STACFG_OFFSET;
/* read-modify-write register value for 9600 baud */
uint32_t uiRegVal = ReadRegister(uiRegAddr) & (~UART_STACFG_BDR_FIELD);
uiRegVal |=
UART_STACFG_BDR_FIELD &
(UART_STACFG_BDR_VAL_9600<<UART_STACFG_BDR_FIELD_POS);
/* setting UART baud rate */
WriteRegister(uiRegAddr, uiRegVal);
WISHBONE transactions
The software API-functions ReadRegister(), WriteRegister() lead to one and
ReadBlock(), WriteBlock() to several consecutive WISHBONE single cycles.
Bursting is not allowed in the WISHBONE demo application. The address can be
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preliminary
incremented automatically in block transfers. You can find details on enabling/disabling the
burst mode and address auto-increment mode in the CESYS application note “Transfer
Protocol for CESYS USB products” and software API documentation.
CESYS USB transfer protocol is converted into one or more WISHBONE data transaction
cycles. So the FX-2 becomes a master device in the internal WISHBONE architecture.
Input signals for the WISHBONE master are labeled with the postfix “_I”, output signals
with “_O”.
WISHBONE signals driven by the master:
• STB_O: strobe, qualifier for the other output signals of the master, indicates valid data
and control signals
• WE_O: write enable, indicates, if a write or read cycle is in progress
• ADR_O[31:2]: 32-Bit address bus, the software uses BYTE addressing, but all internal
WISHBONE accesses are DWORD (32-Bit) aligned. So address LSBs [1:0] are
discarded.
• DAT_O[31:0]: 32-Bit data out bus for data transportation from master to slaves
WISHBONE signals driven by slaves:
• DAT_I[31:0]: 32-Bit data in bus for data transportation from slaves to master
• ACK_I: handshake signal, slave devices indicate a successful data transfer for writing
and valid data on bus for reading by asserting this signal, slaves can insert wait states by
delaying this signal, it is possible to assert ACK_I in first clock cycle of STB_O assertion
using a combinatorial handshake to transfer data in one clock cycle (recommendation:
registered feedback handshake should be used in applications, where maximum data
throughput is not needed, because timing specs are easier to meet)
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preliminary
Basic WISHBONE cycle
CLK
STB
WE

ADR32
Master
DAT32M
DAT32S
Slave
ACK
Figure 10: WISHBONE transactions with WriteRegister() WriteBlock()
ReadRegister() ReadBlock()
The WISHBONE signals in these illustrations and explanations are shown as simple bit
types or bit vector types, but in the VHDL code these signals could be encapsulated in
extended data types like arrays or records.
Example:
...
port map
(
...
ACK_I => intercon.masters.slave(2).ack,
...
Port ACK_I is connected to signal ack of element 2 of array slave, of record masters, of
record intercon.
Design “usbs6_bram”
This design is intended to demonstrate behavior of UDK software API resulting in
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WISHBONE cycles. It is a reduced version of “usbs6_soc” example implementing a single
BlockRAM slave.
Files and modules
src/wishbone_pkg.vhd:
See chapter “Design usbs6_soc”
src/usbs6_bram_top.vhd:
This is the top level module. It instantiates FX-2 module as a WISHBONE master device
(wb_ma_fx2.vhd) and a BlockRAM as a WISHBONE slave device (wb_sl_bram.vhd).
src/wb_ma_fx2.vhd:
See chapter “Design usbs6_soc”
src/wb_sl_bram.vhd:
See chapter “Design usbs6_soc”
src/sim_tb/wb_sl_bram_tb.vhd:
Example of a VHDL simulation testbench demonstrating BFM techniques for accessing
BlockRAM as a WISHBONE slave device (wb_sl_bram.vhd).
src/fx2_slfifo_ctrl.vhd:
See chapter “Design usbs6_soc”
src/sync_fifo.vhd:
See chapter “Design usbs6_soc”
usbs6_bram.xise:
Project file for XilinxTM ISE.
usbs6_bram.ucf:
User constraint file with timing and pinout constraints.
wb_sl_bram_tb.do:
ModelSim command macro file for BFM BlockRAM testbench (wb_sl_bram_tb.vhd).
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wb_sl_bram_tb.cmd:
Win32 batch file automatically starting ModelSim with example testbench and appropriate
simulation script (wb_sl_bram_tb.do). Just doubleclick for running the demo!
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Software
Introduction
The UDK (Unified Development Kit) is used to allow developers to communicate with
Cesys's USB and PCI(e) devices. Older releases were just a release of USB and PCI
drivers plus API combined with some shared code components. The latest UDK combines
all components into one single C++ project and offers interfaces to C++, C and for .NET
(Windows only). The API has functions to mask-able enumeration, unique device
identification (runtime), FPGA programming and 32bit bus based data communication. PCI
devices have additional support for interrupts.
Changes to previous versions
Beginning with release 2.0, the UDK API is a truly combined interface to Cesys's USB and
PCI devices. The class interface from the former USBUni and PCIBase API's was saved at
a large extend, so porting applications from previous UDK releases can be done without
much work.
Here are some notes about additional changes:
Complete rewrite
Build system cleanup, all UDK parts (except .NET) are now part of one large project
64 bit operating system support
UDK tools combined into one application (UDKLab)
Updated to latest PLX SDK (6.31)
Identical C, C++ and .NET API interface (.NET ⇒ Windows only)
Different versions of components collapsed to one UDK version
Windows only:
• Microsoft Windows Vista / Seven(7) support (PCI drivers are not released for Seven at
the moment)
• Driver installation / update is done by an installer now
• Switched to Microsoft's generic USB driver (WinUSB)
• Support moved to Visual Studio 2005, 2008 and 2010(experimental), older Visual
Studio versions are not supported anymore
• Linux only:
• Revisited USB driver, tested on latest Ubuntu distributions (32/64)
• Simpler USB driver installation
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Windows
Requirements
To use the UDK in own projects, the following is required:
•
•
•
•
Installed drivers
Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 or 2008; 2010 is experimental
CMake 2.6 or higher ⇒ http://www.cmake.org
wxWidgets 2.8.10 or higher (must be build separately) ⇒ http://www.wxwidgets.org
[optionally, only if UDKLab should be build]
Driver installation
The driver installation is part of the UDK installation but can run standalone on final
customer machines without the need to install the UDK itself. During installation, a choice
of drivers to install can be made, so it is not necessary to install i.e. PCI drivers on
machines that should run USB devices only or vice versa. If USB drivers get installed on a
machine that has a pre-2.0 UDK driver installation, we prefer the option for USB driver
cleanup offered by the installer, this cleanly removes all dependencies of the old driver
installation.
Note: There are separate installers for 32 and 64 bit systems.
Important: At least one device should be present when installing the drivers !
Build UDK
Prerequisites
The most components of the UDK are part of one large CMake project. There are some
options that need to be fixed in msvc.cmake inside the UDK installation root:
• BUILD_UI_TOOLS If 0, UDKLab will not be part of the subsequent build procedure, if 1 it
will. This requires an installation of an already built wxWidgets.
• WX_WIDGETS_BASE_PATH Path to wxWidgets build root, only needed if
BUILD_UI_TOOLS is not 0.
• USE_STATIC_RTL If 0, all projects are build against the dynamic runtime libraries. This
requires the installation of the appropriate Visual Studio redistributable pack on every
machine the UDK is used on. Using a static build does not create such dependencies,
but will conflict with the standard wxWidgets build configuration.
Solution creation and build
The preferred way is to open a command prompt inside the installation root of the UDK,
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lets assume to use c:\\udkapi.
c:
cd \udkapi
CMake allows the build directory separated to the source directory, so it's a good idea to do
it inside an empty sub-directory:
mkdir build
cd build
The following code requires an installation of CMake and at least one supported Visual
Studio version. If CMake isn't included into the PATH environment variable, the path must
be specified as well:
cmake ..
This searches the preferred Visual Studio installation and creates projects for it. Visual
Studio Express users may need to use the command prompt offered by their installation. If
multiple Visual Studio versions are installed, CMake's command parameter '-G' can be
used to specify a special one, see CMake's documentation in this case. This process
creates the solution files inside c:\\udkapi\\build. All subsequent tasks can be done in Visual
Studio (with the created solution), another invocation of cmake isn't necessary under
normal circumstances.
Important: The UDK C++ API must be build with the same toolchain and build flags like
the application that uses it. Otherwise unwanted side effects in exception handling will
occur ! (See example in Add project to UDK build).
Info: It is easy to create different builds with different Visual Studio versions by creating
different build directories and invoke CMake with different '-G' options inside them:
c:
cd \udkapi
mkdir build2005
cd build2005
cmake -G"Visual Studio 8 2005" ..
cd ..
mkdir build2008
cd build2008
cmake -G"Visual Studio 9 2008" ..
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Linux
There are too many distributions and releases to offer a unique way to the UDK installation.
We've chosen to work with the most recent Ubuntu release, 9.10 at the moment. All
commands are tested on an up to date installation and may need some tweaking on other
systems / versions.
Requirements
•
•
•
•
GNU C++ compiler toolchain
zlib development libraries
CMake 2.6 or higher ⇒ http://www.cmake.org
wxWidgets 2.8.10 or higher ⇒ http://www.wxwidgets.org [optionally, only if UDKLab
should be build]
sudo apt-get install build-essential cmake zlib1g-dev libwxbase2.8-dev
libwxgtk2.8-dev
The Linux UDK comes as gzip'ed tar archive, as the Windows installer won't usually work.
The best way is to extract it to the home directory:
tar xzvf UDKAPI-x.x.tgz ~/
This creates a directory /home/[user]/udkapi[version] which is subsequently called udkroot.
The following examples assume an installation root in ~/udkapi2.0.
Important: Commands sometimes contain a ` symbol, have attention to use the right one,
refer to command substitution if not familiar with.
Drivers
The driver installation on Linux systems is a bit more complicated than on Windows
systems. The drivers must be build against the installed kernel version. Updating the kernel
requires a rebuild.
USB
As the USB driver is written by Cesys, the installation procedure is designed to be as
simple and automated as possible. The sources and support files reside in directory
<udkroot>/drivers/linux/usb. Just go there and invoke make.
cd ~/udkapi2.0/drivers/linux/usb
make
If all external dependencies are met, the build procedure should finish without errors.
Newer kernel releases may change things which prevent success, but it is out of the scope
of our possibilities to be always up-to-date with latest kernels. To install the driver, the
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following command has to be done:
sudo make install
This will do the following things:
• Install the kernel module inside the module library path, update module dependencies
• Install a new udev rule to give device nodes the correct access rights (0666)
(/etc/udev/rules.d/99-ceusbuni.rules)
• Install module configuration file (/etc/dev/modprobe.d/ceusbuni.conf)
• Start module
If things work as intended, there must be an entry /proc/ceusbuni after this procedure.
The following code will completely revert the above installation (called in same directory):
sudo make remove
The configuration file, /etc/modprobe.d/ceusbuni.conf, offers two simple options (Read the
comments in the file):
• Enable kernel module debugging
• Choose between firmware which automatically powers board peripherals or not
Changing these options require a module reload to take affect.
PCI
The PCI drivers are not created or maintained by Cesys, they are offered by the
manufacturer of the PCI bridges that were used on Cesys PCI(e) boards. So problems
regarding them can't be handled or supported by us.
Important: If building PlxSdk components generate the following error / warning:
/bin/sh [[: not found
Here's a workaround: The problem is Ubuntu's default usage of dash as sh, which can't
handle command [[. Replacing dash with bash is accomplished by the following commands
that must be done as root:
sudo rm /bin/sh
sudo ln -s /bin/bash /bin/sh
Installation explained in detail:
PlxSdk decompression:
cd ~/udkapi2.0/drivers/linux
tar xvf PlxSdk.tar
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Build drivers:
cd PlxSdk/Linux/Driver
PLX_SDK_DIR=`pwd`/../../ ./buildalldrivers
Loading the driver manually requires a successful build, it is done using the following
commands:
cd ~/udkapi2.0/drivers/linux/PlxSdk
sudo PLX_SDK_DIR=`pwd` Bin/Plx_load Svc
PCI based boards like the PCIS3Base require the following driver:
sudo PLX_SDK_DIR=`pwd` Bin/Plx_load 9056
PCIe based boards like the PCIeV4Base require the following:
sudo PLX_SDK_DIR=`pwd` Bin/Plx_load 8311
Automation of this load process is out of the scope of this document.
Build UDK
Prerequisites
The whole UDK will be build using CMake, a free cross platform build tool. It creates
dynamic Makefiles on unix compatible platforms.
The first thing should be editing the little configuration file linux.cmake inside the installation
root of the UDK. It contains the following options:
• BUILD_UI_TOOLS If 0 UDKLab isn't build, if 1 UDKLab is part of the build, but requires
a compatible wxWidgets installation.
• CMAKE_BUILD_TYPE Select build type, can be one of Debug, Release,
RelWithDebInfo, MinSizeRel. If there should be at least 2 builds in parallel, remove this
line and specify the type using command line option -DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=….
Makefile creation and build
Best usage is to create an empty build directory and run cmake inside of it:
cd ~/udkapi2.0
mkdir build
cd build
cmake ..
If all external dependencies are met, this will finish creating a Makefile. To build the UDK,
just invoke make:
make
Important: The UDK C++ API must be build with the same toolchain and build flags like
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the application that uses it. Otherwise unwanted side effects in exception handling will
occur ! (See example in Add project to UDK build).
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Use APIs in own projects
C++ API
• Include file: udkapi.h
• Library file:
• Windows: udkapi_vc[ver]_[arch].lib, [ver] is 8, 9, 10, [arch] is x86 or amd64, resides in
lib/[build]/
• Linux: libusbapi.so, resides in lib/
• Namespace: ceUDK
As this API uses exceptions for error handling, it is really important to use the same
compiler and build settings which are used to build the API itself. Otherwise exception
based stack unwinding may cause undefined side effects which are really hard to fix.
Add project to UDK build
A simple example would be the following. Let's assume there's a source file
mytest/mytest.cpp inside UDK's root installation. To build a mytestexe executable with UDK
components, those lines must be appended:
add_executable(mytestexe mytest/mytest.cpp)
target_link_libraries(mytestexe ${UDKAPI_LIBNAME})
Rebuilding the UDK with these entries in Visual Studio will create a new project inside the
solution (and request a solution reload). On Linux, calling make will just include mytestexe
into the build process.
C API
• Include file: udkapic.h
• Library file:
• Windows: udkapic_vc[ver]_[arch].lib, [ver] is 8, 9, 10, [arch] is x86 or amd64, resides in
lib/[build]/
• Linux: libusbapic.so, resides in lib/
• Namespace: Not applicable
The C API offers all functions from a dynamic link library (Windows: .dll, Linux: .so) and
uses standardized data types only, so it is usable in a wide range of environments.
Adding it to the UDK build process is nearly identical to the C++ API description, except
that ${UDKAPIC_LIBNAME} must be used.
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.NET API
• Include file: • Library file: udkapinet.dll, resided in bin/[build]
• Namespace: cesys.ceUDK
The .NET API, as well as it example application is separated from the normal UDK build.
First of all, CMake doesn't have native support .NET, as well as it is working on Windows
systems only. Building it has no dependency to the standard UDKAPI, all required sources
are part of the .NET API project. The Visual Studio solution is located in directory dotnet/
inside the UDK installation root. It is a Visual Studio 8/2005 solution and should be
convertible to newer releases. The solution is split into two parts, the .NET API in mixed
native/managed C++ and an example written in C#.
To use the .NET API in own projects, it's just needed to add the generated DLL
udkapinet.dll to the projects references.
API Functions in detail
Notice: To prevent overhead in most usual scenarios, the API does not serialize calls in
any way, so the API user is responsible to serialize call if used in a multi-threaded context !
Notice: The examples for .NET in the following chapter are in C# coding style.
API Error handling
Error handling is offered very different. While both C++ and .NET API use exception
handling, the C API uses a classical return code / error inquiry scheme.
C++ and .NET API
UDK API code should be embedded inside a try branch and exceptions of type
ceException must be caught. If an exception is raised, the generated exception object
offers methods to get detailed information about the error.
C API
All UDK C API functions return either CE_SUCCESS or CE_FAILED. If the latter is
returned, the functions below should be invoked to get the details of the error.
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Methods/Functions
GetLastErrorCode
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
unsigned int ceException::GetErrorCode()
unsigned int GetLastErrorCode()
uint ceException.GetLastErrorCode()
Returns an error code which is intended to group the error into different kinds. It can be
one of the following constants:
Error code
Kind of error
ceE_TIMEOUT
ceE_IO_ERROR
ceE_UNEXP_HW_BEH
ceE_PARAM
ceE_RESOURCE
ceE_API
ceE_ORDER
ceE_PROCESSING
ceE_INCOMPATIBLE
ceE_OUTOFMEMORY
Errors with any kind of timeout.
IO errors of any kind, file, hardware, etc.
Unexpected behavior of underlying hardware (no response, wrong data).
Errors related to wrong call parameters (NULL pointers, …).
Resource problem, wrong file format, missing dependency.
Undefined behavior of underlying API.
Wrong order calling a group of code (i.e. deinit()→init()).
Occurred during internal processing of anything.
Not supported by this device.
Failure allocating enough memory.
GetLastErrorText
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
const char *ceException::GetLastErrorText()
const char *GetLastErrorText()
string ceException.GetLastErrorText()
Returns a text which describes the error readable by the user. Most of the errors contain
problems meant for the developer using the UDK and are rarely usable by end users. In
most cases unexpected behavior of the underlying operation system or in data transfer is
reported. (All texts are in english.)
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Device enumeration
The complete device handling is done by the API internally. It manages the resources of all
enumerated devices and offers either a device pointer or handle to API users. Calling Init()
prepares the API itself, while DeInit() does a complete cleanup and invalidates all device
pointers and handles.
To find supported devices and work with them, Enumerate() must be called after Init().
Enumerate() can be called multiple times for either finding devices of different types or to
find newly plugged devices (primary USB at the moment). One important thing is the
following: Enumerate() does never remove a device from the internal device list and so
invalidate any pointer, it just add new ones or does nothing, even if a USB device is
removed. For a clean detection of a device removal, calling DeInit(), Init() and Enumerate()
(in exactly that order) will build a new, clean device list, but invalidates all previous created
device pointers and handles.
To identify devices in a unique way, each device gets a UID, which is a combination of
device type name and connection point, so even after a complete cleanup and new
enumeration, devices can be exactly identified by this value.
Methods/Functions
Init
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
static void ceDevice::Init()
CE_RESULT Init()
static void ceDevice.Init()
Prepare internal structures, must be the first call to the UDK API. Can be called after
invoking DeInit() again, see top of this section.
DeInit
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
static void ceDevice::DeInit()
CE_RESULT DeInit()
static void ceDevice.DeInit()
Free up all internal allocated data, there must no subsequent call to the UDK API after this
call, except Init() is called again. All retrieved device pointers and handles are invalid after
this point.
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Enumerate
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
static void ceDevice::Enumerate(ceDevice::ceDeviceType DeviceType)
CE_RESULT Enumerate(unsigned int DeviceType)
static void ceDevice.Enumerate(ceDevice.ceDeviceType DeviceType)
Search for (newly plugged) devices of the given type and add them to the internal list.
Access to this list is given by GetDeviceCount() / GetDevice(). DeviceType can be one of
the following:
DeviceType
Description
ceDT_ALL
ceDT_PCI_ALL
ceDT_PCI_PCIS3BASE
ceDT_PCI_DOB
ceDT_PCI_PCIEV4BASE
ceDT_PCI_RTC
ceDT_PCI_PSS
ceDT_PCI_DEFLECTOR
ceDT_USB_ALL
ceDT_USB_USBV4F
ceDT_USB_EFM01
ceDT_USB_MISS2
ceDT_USB_CID
ceDT_USB_USBS6
All UDK supported devices.
All UDK supported devices on PCI bus.
Cesys PCIS3Base
DOB (*)
Cesys PCIeV4Base
RTC (*)
PSS (*)
Deflector (*)
All UDK supported devices.
Cesys USBV4F
Cesys EFM01
MISS2 (*)
CID (*)
Cesys USBS6
* Customer specific devices.
GetDeviceCount
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
static unsigned int ceDevice::GetDeviceCount()
CE_RESULT GetDeviceCount(unsigned int *puiCount)
static uint ceDevice.GetDeviceCount()
Return count of devices enumerated up to this point. May be larger if rechecked after
calling Enumerate() in between.
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GetDevice
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
static ceDevice *ceDevice::GetDevice(unsigned int uiIdx)
CE_RESULT GetDevice(unsigned int uiIdx, CE_DEVICE_HANDLE *pHandle)
static ceDevice ceDevice.GetDevice(uint uiIdx)
Get device pointer or handle to the device with the given index, which must be smaller than
the device count returned by GetDeviceCount(). This pointer or handle is valid up to the
point DeInit() is called.
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Information gathering
The functions in this chapter return valuable information. All except GetUDKVersionString()
are bound to devices and can be used after getting a device pointer or handle from
GetDevice() only.
Methods/Functions
GetUDKVersionString
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
static const char *ceDevice::GetUDKVersionString()
const char *GetUDKVersionString()
static string ceDevice.GetUDKVersionString()
Return string which contains the UDK version in printable format.
GetDeviceUID
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
const char *ceDevice::GetDeviceUID()
CE_RESULT GetDeviceUID(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, char *pszDest, unsigned
int uiDestSize)
string ceDevice.GetDeviceUID()
Return string formatted unique device identifier. This identifier is in the form of
type@location while type is the type of the device (i.e. EFM01) and location is the position
the device is plugged to. For PCI devices, this is a combination of bus, slot and function
(PCI bus related values) and for USB devices a path from device to root hub, containing
the port of all used hubs. So after re-enumeration or reboot, devices on the same machine
can be identified exactly.
Notice C API: pszDest is the buffer were the value is stored to, it must be at least of size
uiDestSize.
GetDeviceName
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
const char *ceDevice::GetDeviceName()
CE_RESULT GetDeviceName(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, char *pszDest, unsigned
int uiDestSize)
string ceDevice.GetDeviceName()
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Return device type name of given device pointer or handle.
Notice C API: pszDest is the buffer were the value is stored to, it must be at least of size
uiDestSize.
GetBusType
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
ceDevice::ceBusType ceDevice::GetBusType()
CE_RESULT GetBusType(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, unsigned int *puiBusType)
ceDevice.ceBusType ceDevice.GetBusType()
Return type of bus a device is bound to, can be any of the following:
Constant
Bus
ceBT_PCI
ceBT_USB
PCI bus
USB bus
GetMaxTransferSize
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
unsigned int ceDevice::GetMaxTransferSize()
CE_RESULT GetMaxTransferSize(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, unsigned int
*puiMaxTransferSize)
uint ceDevice.GetMaxTransferSize()
Return count of bytes that represents the maximum in one transaction, larger transfers
must be split by the API user.
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Using devices
After getting a device pointer or handle, devices can be used. Before transferring data to or
from devices, or catching interrupts (PCI), devices must be accessed, which is done by
calling Open(). All calls in this section require an open device, which must be freed by
calling Close() after usage.
Either way, after calling Open(), the device is ready for communication. As of the fact, that
Cesys devices usually have an FPGA on the device side of the bus, the FPGA must be
made ready for usage. If this isn't done by loading contents from the on-board flash (not all
devices have one), a design must be loaded by calling one of the ProgramFPGA*() calls.
These call internally reset the FPGA after design download. From now on, data can be
transferred.
Important: All data transfer is based on a 32 bit bus system which must be implemented
inside the FPGA design. PCI devices support this natively, while USB devices use a
protocol which is implemented by Cesys and sits on top of a stable bulk transfer
implementation.
Methods/Functions
Open
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
void ceDevice::Open()
CE_RESULT Open(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle)
void ceDevice.Open()
Gain access to the specific device. Calling one of the other functions in this section require
a successful call to Open().
Notice: If two or more applications try to open one device, PCI and USB devices behave a
bit different. For USB devices, Open() causes an error if the device is already in use. PCI
allows opening one device from multiple processes. As PCI drivers are not developed by
Cesys, it's not possible to us to prevent this (as we see this as strange behavior). The best
way to share communication of more than one application with devices would be a client /
server approach.
Close
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
void ceDevice::Close()
CE_RESULT Close(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle)
void ceDevice.Close()
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Finish working with the given device.
ReadRegister
API
Code
C++
C
.NET
unsigned int ceDevice::ReadRegister(unsiged int uiRegister)
CE_RESULT ReadRegister(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, unsigned int uiRegister,
unsigned int *puiValue)
uint ceDevice.ReadRegister(uint uiRegister)
Read 32 bit value from FPGA design address space (internally just calling ReadBlock()
with size = 4).
WriteRegister
API
Code
C++
C
.NET
void ceDevice::WriteRegister(unsiged int uiRegister, unsigned int uiValue)
CE_RESULT WriteRegister(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, unsigned int uiRegister,
unsigned int uiValue)
void ceDevice.WriteRegister(uint uiRegister, uint uiValue)
Write 32 bit value to FPGA design address space (internally just calling WriteBlock() with
size = 4).
ReadBlock
API
Code
C++
C
.NET
void ceDevice::ReadBlock(unsiged int uiAddress, unsigned char *pucData, unsigned int
uiSize, bool bIncAddress)
CE_RESULT ReadBlock(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, unsigned int uiAddress,
unsigned char *pucData, unsigned int uiSize, unsigned int uiIncAddress)
void ceDevice.ReadBlock(uint uiAddess, byte[] Data, uint uiLen, bool bIncAddress)
Read a block of data to the host buffer which must be large enough to hold it. The size
should never exceed the value retrieved by GetMaxTransferSize() for the specific device.
bIncAddress is at the moment available for USB devices only. It flags to read all data from
the same address instead of starting at it.
WriteBlock
API
Code
C++
C
void ceDevice::WriteBlock(unsiged int uiAddress, unsigned char *pucData, unsigned int
uiSize, bool bIncAddress)
CE_RESULT WriteBlock(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, unsigned int uiAddress,
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.NET
unsigned char *pucData, unsigned int uiSize, unsigned int uiIncAddress)
void ceDevice.WriteBlock(uint uiAddess, byte[] Data, uint uiLen, bool bIncAddress)
Transfer a given block of data to the 32 bit bus system address uiAddress. The size should
never exceed the value retrieved by GetMaxTransferSize() for the specific device.
bIncAddress is at the moment available for USB devices only. It flags to write all data to the
same address instead of starting at it.
WaitForInterrupt
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
bool ceDevice::WaitForInterrupt(unsigned int uiTimeOutMS)
CE_RESULT WaitForInterrupt(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, unsigned int
uiTimeOutMS, unsigned int *puiRaised)
bool ceDevice.WaitForInterrupt(uint uiTimeOutMS)
(PCI only) Check if the interrupt is raised by the FPGA design. If this is done in the time
specified by the timeout, the function returns immediately flagging the interrupt is raised
(return code / *puiRaised). Otherwise, the function returns after the timeout without
signaling.
Important: If an interrupt is caught, EnableInterrupt() must be called again before checking
for the next. Besides that, the FPGA must be informed to lower the interrupt line in any
way.
EnableInterrupt
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
void ceDevice::EnableInterrupt()
CE_RESULT EnableInterrupt(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle)
void ceDevice.EnableInterrupt()
(PCI only) Must be called in front of calling WaitForInterrupt() and every time an interrupt is
caught and should be checked again.
ResetFPGA
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
void ceDevice::ResetFPGA()
CE_RESULT ResetFPGA(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle)
void ceDevice.ResetFPGA()
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Pulses the FPGA reset line for a short time. This should be used to sync the FPGA design
with the host side peripherals.
ProgramFPGAFromBIN
API
Code
C++
C
.NET
void ceDevice::ProgramFPGAFromBIN(const char *pszFileName)
CE_RESULT ProgramFPGAFromBIN(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, const char
*pszFileName)
void ceDevice.ProgramFPGAFromBIN(string sFileName)
Program the FPGA with the Xilinx tools .bin file indicated by the filename parameter. Calls
ResetFPGA() subsequently.
ProgramFPGAFromMemory
API
Code
C++
C
.NET
void ceDevice::ProgramFPGAFromMemory(const unsigned char *pszData, unsigned int
uiSize)
CE_RESULT ProgramFPGAFromMemory(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, const
unsigned char *pszData, unsigned int uiSize)
void ceDevice.ProgramFPGAFromMemory(byte[] Data, uint Size)
Program FPGA with a given array created with UDKLab. This was previously done using
fpgaconv.
ProgramFPGAFromMemoryZ
API
Code
C++
C
.NET
void ceDevice::ProgramFPGAFromMemoryZ(const unsigned char *pszData, unsigned
int uiSize)
CE_RESULT ProgramFPGAFromMemoryZ(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, const
unsigned char *pszData, unsigned int uiSize)
void ceDevice.ProgramFPGAFromMemoryZ(byte[] Data, uint Size)
Same as ProgramFPGAFromMemory(), except the design data is compressed.
SetTimeOut
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
void ceDevice::SetTimeOut(unsigned int uiTimeOutMS)
CE_RESULT SetTimeOut(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, unsigned int uiTimeOutMS)
void ceDevice.SetTimeOut(uint uiTimeOutMS)
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Set the timeout in milliseconds for data transfers. If a transfer is not completed inside this
timeframe, the API generates a timeout error.
EnableBurst
API
C++
C
.NET
Code
void ceDevice::EnableBurst(bool bEnable)
CE_RESULT EnableBurst(CE_DEVICE_HANDLE Handle, unsigned int uiEnable)
void ceDevice.EnableBurst(bool bEnable)
(PCI only) Enable bursting in transfer, which frees the shared address / data bus between
PCI(e) chip and FPGA by putting addresses on the bus frequently only.
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-49-
preliminary
UDKLab
Introduction
UDKLab is a replacement of the former cesys-Monitor, as well as cesys-Lab and fpgaconv.
It is primary targeted to support FPGA designers by offering the possibility to read and write
values from and to an active design. It can further be used to write designs onto the
device's flash, so FPGA designs can load without host intervention. Additionally, designs
can be converted to C/C++ and C# arrays, which allows design embedding into an
application.
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-50-
preliminary
The main screen
The following screen shows an active session with an EFM01 device. The base view is
intended to work with a device, while additional functionality can be found in the tools
menu.
The left part of the screen contains the device initialization details, needed to prepare the
FPGA with a design (or just a reset if loaded from flash), plus optional register writes for
preparation of peripheral components.
The right side contains elements for communication with the FPGA design:
•
•
•
•
•
Register read and write, either by value or bit-wise using checkboxes.
Live update of register values.
Data areas (like RAM or Flash) can be filled from file or read out to file.
Live view of data areas.
More on these areas below.
Figure 11: UDKLab Main Screen
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-51-
preliminary
Using UDKLab
After starting UDKLab, most of the UI components are disabled. They will be enabled at
the point they make sense. As no device is selected, only device independent functions are
available:
• The FPGA design array creator
• The option to define USB Power-On behavior
• Info menu contents
All other actions require a device, which can be chosen via the device selector which pops
up as separate window:
Figure 12: Device selection flow
If the device list is not up to date, clicking Re-Enum will search again. A device can be
selected by either double clicking on it or choosing OK.
Important: Opening the device selector again will internally re-initialize the underlying API,
so active communication is stopped and the right panel is disabled again (more on the
state of this panel below).
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-52-
preliminary
After a device has been selected, most UI components are available:
•
•
•
•
FPGA configuration
FPGA design flashing [if device has support]
Project controls
Initializer controls (Related to projects)
The last disabled component at this point is the content panel. It is enabled if the
initialization sequence has been run. The complete flow to enable all UI elements can be
seen below:
Figure 13: Prepare to work with device
FPGA configuration
Choosing this will pop up a file selection dialog, allowing to choose the design for
download. If the file choosing isn't canceled, the design will be downloaded subsequent to
closing the dialog.
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-53-
preliminary
FPGA design flashing
This option stores a design into the flash component on devices that have support for it.
The design is loaded to the FPGA after device power on without host intervention. How
and under which circumstances this is done can be found in the hardware description of
the corresponding device. The following screen shows the required actions for flashing:
Figure 14: Flash design to device
Projects
Device communication is placed into a small project management. This reduces the
actions from session to session and can be used for simple service tasks too. A projects
stores the following information:
•
•
•
•
Device type it is intended to
Initializing sequence
Register list
Data area list
Projects are handled like files in usual applications, they can be loaded, saved, new
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-54-
preliminary
projects can be created. Only one project can be active in one session.
Initializing sequence
The initializing sequence is a list of actions that must be executed in order to work with the
FPGA on the device. (The image shows an example initializing list of an EFM01, loading
our example design and let the LED blink for some seconds):
Figure 15: Initializing sequence
Sequence contents
UDKLab supports the following content for initialization:
•
•
•
•
FPGA programming
FPGA reset
Register write
Sleep
Without a design, an FPGA does nothing, so it must be loaded before usage. This can be
ensured in two ways:
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-55-
preliminary
• Download design from host
• Load design from flash (supported on EFM01, USBV4F and USBS6)
So the first entry in the initialize list must be a program entry or, if loaded from flash, a reset
entry (To sync communication to the host side). Subsequent to this, a mix of register write
and sleep commands can be placed, which totally depends on the underlying FPGA
design. This can be a sequence of commands sent to a peripheral component or to fill data
structures with predefined values. If things get complexer, i.e. return values must be
checked, this goes beyond the scope of the current UDKLab implementation and must be
solved by a host process.
To control the sequence, the buttons on the left side can be used. In the order of
appearance, they do the following (also indicated by tooltips):
•
•
•
•
•
Clear complete list
Add new entry (to the end of the list)
Move currently selected entry on position up
Move currently selected entry on position down
Remove currently selected entry
All buttons should be self explanatory, but here's a more detailed look on the add entry, it
opens the following dialog:
Figure 16: Add new initializing task
One of the four possible entries must be selected using the radio button in front of it.
Depending on the option, one or two parameters must be set, OK adds the new action to
initializer list.
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-56-
preliminary
Sequence start
The button sitting below the list runs all actions from top to bottom. In addition to this, the
remaining UI components, the content panel, will be enabled, as UDKLab expects a
working communication at this point. The sequence can be modified an started as often as
wished.
Content panel
The content panel can be a visual representation of the FPGA design loaded during
initialization. It consists of a list of registers and data areas, which can be visit and modified
using UDKLab. The view is split into two columns, while the left part contains the registers
and the right part all data area / block entries.
Figure 17: Content panel
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-57-
preliminary
Register entry
A register entry can be used to communicate with a 32 bit register inside the FPGA. In
UDKLab, a register consists of the following values:
• Address
• Name
• Info text
The visual representation of one register can be seen in the following image:
Figure 18: Register panel
The left buttons are responsible for adding new entries, move the entry up or down and
removing the current entry, all are self explanatory. The header shows it's mapping name
as well as the 32 bit address. The question mark in the lower right will show a tooltip if the
mouse is above it, which is just a little help for users. Both input fields can be used to write
in a new value, either hex- or decimal or contain the values if they are read from FPGA
design. The checkboxes represent one bit of the current value. Clicking the Read button
will read the current value from FPGA and update both text boxes as well as the
checkboxes, which is automatically done every 100ms if the Auto button is active. Setting
register values inside the FPGA is done in a similar way, clicking the Write button writes the
current values to the device. One thing needs a bit attention here:
Clicking on the checkboxes implicitly writes the value without the need to click on the Write
button !
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-58-
preliminary
Data area entry
A data area entry can be used to communicate with a data block inside the FPGA,
examples are RAM or flash areas. Data can be transfered from and to files, as well as
displayed in a live view. An entry constits of the following data:
•
•
•
•
•
Address
Name
Data alignment
Size
Read-only flag
The visual representation is shown below.
Figure 19: Data area panel
Similar to the register visualization, the buttons on the right side can be used to add, move
and remove data area panels. The header shows the name and the address followed by
the data area details. Below are these buttons:
• Device To File: The complete area is read and stored to the file which is defined in the
file dialog opening after clicking the button.
• File To Device: This reads the file selected in the upcoming file dialog and stores the
contents in the data area, limited by the file size or data area size. This button is not
shown if the Read-only flag is set.
• Live View: If this button is active, the text view below shows the contents of the area,
updated every 100 ms, the view can be scrolled, so every piece can be visited.
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-59-
preliminary
Additional information
Using SPI-Flash for configuration
How to store configuration data in SPI-Flash
To allow configuration of the FPGA via onboard SPI-Flash on power-up first an appropriate
configuration file has to be stored in the SPI-Flash. There are several ways to accomplish
this.
Loading SPI-Flash via USB
The easiest way to get data into SPI-Flash surely is to use CESYS software UDK-Lab.
With the help of this easy to use tiny tool binary FPGA configuration bitstreams (*.bin) can
be downloaded to onboard SPI-Flash via USB.
SPI-Flash Indirect Programming Using FPGA JTAG Chain
Since XILINXTM ISE-WebPACK version 10.1 it is possible to configure SPI-Flashes
attached to the FPGA via JTAG interface. Before starting to download a design to SPIFlash with iMPACT programming software it is necessary to prepare the required *.mcs
SPI PROM file. With xapp951 XILINXTM provides an application note how to accomplish
that using iMPACT or PROMGen software tools. Select 16M SPI PROM Density when
asked. Thereafter connect JTAG adapter and power-up USBS6, either by connecting USB
cable or via external 5V power supply. With XILINXTM parallel cable IV the led lights green if
FPGA is powered on. Now start XILINXTM iMPACT, select Boundary Scan mode and follow
the manual provided by XILINXTM in xapp951. Select M25P16 SPI-Flash PROM Type
when asked.
SPI-Flash
M25P16 Signal Name FPGA IO FPGA Direction
Comment
D
MOSI
T13
Output
Master SPI Serial Data Output.
Q
MISO
R13
Input
S
CSO_B
V3
Output
Master SPI Chip Select Output.
C
CCLK
R15
Output
Configuration Clock.
W
WP#
--
Externally pulled HIGH via 4,7kOhm resistor.
HOLD
HOLD#
--
Externally pulled HIGH via 4,7kOhm resistor.
Master SPI Serial Data Input.
SPI-Flash Direct Programming using iMPACT
Out of the box Direct SPI Programming via XILINXTM download cable and iMPACT
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-60-
preliminary
programming software is not supported. But with the help of some tiny FPGA design which
only has to bypass SPI signals to external IO pins on connectors J3 or J4 it is possible to
access all needed SPI-Flash pins. Connect JTAG adapter to external IO pins as described
in the following chart.
SPI-Flash Direct Programming – necessary connections to JTAG cable
M25P16
FPGA Connection
JTAG Signal Name
D
MOSI
TDI
Q
DIN
TDO
S
CSO_B
TMS
C
CCLK
TCK
VCC
VCCO_IO
VREF
GND
GND
GND
Make sure that VCCO_IO is configured for 3.3V signaling levels. Do not forget to also
enable FPGA power-up. With XILINXTM parallel cable IV the led lights green if FPGA is
powered on. Before starting to download a design to SPI-Flash with iMPACT programming
software it is necessary to prepare the required *.mcs SPI-PROM file. With xapp951
XILINXTM provides an application note how to accomplish that using iMPACT or PROMGen
software tools. Select 16M SPI PROM Density when asked. Now programming of the SPIFlash can be started by clicking Direct SPI Configuration from within iMPACT. Follow the
manual provided by XILINXTM in xapp951. Select M25P16 SPI-Flash PROM Type when
asked.
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-61-
preliminary
IO pairing and etch length report
J3 VG-96 pin connector - Differential pairs (28 IN, 12 IN/OUT )
PIN
Net name
FPGA IO
P/N
Direction
FPGA BANK
Etch Length (mm)
A4
VG96_IO0
U2
P
IN
BANK 3
62.370
B4
VG96_IO1
U1
N
IN
BANK 3
62.368
A5
VG96_IO3
T2
P
IN
BANK 3
60.667
B5
VG96_IO4
T1
N
IN
BANK 3
60.664
C5
VG96_IO5
P4
P
IN
BANK 3
57.362
C4
VG96_IO2
P3
N
IN
BANK 3
57.362
A6
VG96_IO6
P2
P
IN
BANK 3
59.397
B6
VG96_IO7
P1
N
IN
BANK 3
59.394
A7
VG96_IO9
N2
P
IN
BANK 3
59.131
B7
VG96_IO10
N1
N
IN
BANK 3
59.129
C7
VG96_IO11
N4
P
IN
BANK 3
59.244
C6
VG96_IO8
N3
N
IN
BANK 3
59.232
A8
VG96_IO12
L2
P
IN
BANK 3
58.301
B8
VG96_IO13
L1
N
IN
BANK 3
58.299
A9
VG96_IO15
K2
P
IN
BANK 3
58.238
B9
VG96_IO16
K1
N
IN
BANK 3
58.236
C9
VG96_IO17
M3
P
IN
BANK 3
59.802
C8
VG96_IO14
M1
N
IN
BANK 3
59.761
A10
VG96_IO18
H2
P
IN
BANK 3
55.682
B10
VG96_IO19
H1
N
IN
BANK 3
55.680
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-62-
preliminary
PIN
Net name
FPGA IO
P/N
Direction
FPGA BANK
Etch Length (mm)
A11
VG96_IO21
F2
P
IN
BANK 3
52.506
B11
VG96_IO22
F1
N
IN
BANK 3
52.504
C11
VG96_IO23
J3
P
IN
BANK 3
60.987
C10
VG96_IO20
J1
N
IN
BANK 3
60.972
A12
VG96_IO24
D2
P
IN
BANK 3
50.233
B12
VG96_IO25
D1
N
IN
BANK 3
50.221
A13
VG96_IO27
C2
P
IN
BANK 3
48.317
B13
VG96_IO28
C1
N
IN
BANK 3
48.315
C13
VG96_IO29
G3
P
IN
BANK 3
62.860
C12
VG96_IO26
G1
N
IN
BANK 3
62.840
A14
VG96_IO30
L4
P
IN
BANK 3
61.467
B14
VG96_IO31
L3
N
IN
BANK 3
61.456
A15
VG96_IO33
L5
P
IN
BANK 3
62.236
B15
VG96_IO34
K5
N
IN
BANK 3
62.210
C15
VG96_IO35
E3
P
IN
BANK 3
65.015
C14
VG96_IO32
E1
N
IN
BANK 3
65.008
A16
VG96_IO36
L7
P
IN
BANK 3
64.049
B16
VG96_IO37
K6
N
IN
BANK 3
63.853
A17
VG96_IO39
K4
P
IN
BANK 3
67.057
B17
VG96_IO40
K3
N
IN
BANK 3
67.031
C17
VG96_IO41
L6
P
IN
BANK 3
62.885
C16
VG96_IO38
M5
N
IN
BANK 3
62.926
A18
VG96_IO42
H6
P
IN
BANK 3
63.499
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-63-
preliminary
PIN
Net name
FPGA IO
P/N
Direction
FPGA BANK
Etch Length (mm)
B18
VG96_IO43
H5
N
IN
BANK 3
63.426
C19
VG96_IO45
J7
P
IN
BANK 3
64.103
C18
VG96_IO46
J6
N
IN
BANK 3
64.144
A20
VG96_IO47
H7
P
IN
BANK 3
63.630
B20
VG96_IO44
G6
N
IN
BANK 3
63.609
A21
VG96_IO48
E4
P
IN
BANK 3
60.899
B21
VG96_IO49
D3
N
IN
BANK 3
60.885
C21
VG96_IO51
F4
P
IN
BANK 3
56.002
C20
VG96_IO52
F3
N
IN
BANK 3
55.884
A23
VG96_IO53
F6
P
IN
BANK 3
64.148
B23
VG96_IO50
F5
N
IN
BANK 3
64.134
A24
VG96_IO57
D6
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
63.585
B24
VG96_IO58
C6
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
63.540
C24
VG96_IO59
F7
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
60.224
C23
VG96_IO56
E6
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
60.128
A25
VG96_IO60
E7
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
71.834
B25
VG96_IO61
E8
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
71.637
A26
VG96_IO63
D9
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
69.596
B26
VG96_IO64
C9
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
69.497
C26
VG96_IO65
D8
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
63.074
C25
VG96_IO62
C8
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
63.051
A27
VG96_IO66
G9
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
74.749
B27
VG96_IO67
F9
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
74.696
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-64-
preliminary
PIN
Net name
FPGA IO
P/N
Direction
FPGA BANK
Etch Length (mm)
A28
VG96_IO69
G11
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
73.791
B28
VG96_IO70
F10
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
73.594
C28
VG96_IO71
G8
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
69.296
C27
VG96_IO68
F8
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
69.246
A29
VG96_IO72
D11
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
72.405
B29
VG96_IO73
C11
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
72.379
A30
VG96_IO75
F12
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
74.452
B30
VG96_IO76
E12
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
74.253
C30
VG96_IO77
F11
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
68.952
C29
VG96_IO74
E11
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
68.755
A31
VG96_IO78
F13
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
75.068
B31
VG96_IO79
E13
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
74.871
J4 IDC-50 pin connector - Differential pairs (17 IN/OUT)
PIN
Net name
FPGA IO
P/N
Direction
FPGA BANK
Etch Length (mm)
3
ADD_IO
C5
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
30.618
4
ADD_IO
A5
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
30.458
5
ADD_IO
C7
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
28.054
6
ADD_IO
A7
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
28.005
9
ADD_IO
B2
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
18.486
10
ADD_IO
A2
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
18.461
11
ADD_IO
B3
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
19.033
12
ADD_IO
A3
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
19.021
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-65-
preliminary
PIN
Net name
FPGA IO
P/N
Direction
FPGA BANK
Etch Length (mm)
13
ADD_IO
B4
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
19.754
14
ADD_IO
A4
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
19.743
15
ADD_IO
B6
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
20.143
16
ADD_IO
A6
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
20.131
19
ADD_IO
B8
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
20.421
20
ADD_IO
A8
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
20.394
21
ADD_IO
B9
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
21.514
22
ADD_IO
A9
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
21.497
25
ADD_IO
B11
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
24.381
26
ADD_IO
A11
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
24.354
27
ADD_IO
B12
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
25.102
28
ADD_IO
A12
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
25.137
29
ADD_IO
B14
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
25.150
30
ADD_IO
A14
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
25.137
31
ADD_IO
B16
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
26.005
32
ADD_IO
A16
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
25.980
35
ADD_IO
C10
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
40.687
36
ADD_IO
A10
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
40.669
37
ADD_IO
D12
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
40.905
38
ADD_IO
C12
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
40.865
41
ADD_IO
C13
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
43.579
42
ADD_IO
A13
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
43.527
43
ADD_IO
D14
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
43.029
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-66-
preliminary
PIN
Net name
FPGA IO
P/N
Direction
FPGA BANK
Etch Length (mm)
44
ADD_IO
C14
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
42.990
45
ADD_IO
C15
P
IN / OUT
BANK 0
43.603
46
ADD_IO
A15
N
IN / OUT
BANK 0
43.551
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-67-
preliminary
Mechanical dimensions
Figure 20: USBS6 mechanical dimensions in mm
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-68-
preliminary
Table of contents
Table of Contents
Copyright information..........................................................................................................................2
Overview....................................................................................................................................................3
Summary of USBS6............................................................................................................................. 3
Feature list............................................................................................................................................3
Included in delivery..............................................................................................................................3
Hardware....................................................................................................................................................4
Block Diagram..................................................................................................................................... 4
Spartan-6TM FPGA............................................................................................................................. 4
Powering USBS6..................................................................................................................................6
Configuration........................................................................................................................................7
USB2.0 controller.................................................................................................................................8
External memory..................................................................................................................................9
Peripherals.......................................................................................................................................... 11
External expansion connectors...........................................................................................................13
FPGA design............................................................................................................................................ 17
Cypress FX-2 LP and USB basics......................................................................................................17
Clocking FPGA designs..................................................................................................................... 17
FX-2/FPGA slave FIFO connection...................................................................................................18
Introduction to example FPGA designs..............................................................................................18
FPGA source code copyright information..........................................................................................20
FPGA source code license..................................................................................................................20
Disclaimer of warranty.......................................................................................................................20
Design “usbs6_soc”............................................................................................................................21
Files and modules........................................................................................................................... 21
src/wishbone_pkg.vhd:.............................................................................................................. 21
src/usbs6_soc_top.vhd:..............................................................................................................22
src/wb_intercon.vhd:..................................................................................................................22
src/wb_ma_fx2.vhd:...................................................................................................................22
src/wb_sl_bram.vhd:..................................................................................................................22
src/wb_sl_gpio.vhd:...................................................................................................................22
src/wb_sl_flash.vhd:.................................................................................................................. 22
src/wb_sl_mcb.vhd:...................................................................................................................23
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
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preliminary
src/wb_sl_uart.vhd:....................................................................................................................23
src/xil_uart_macro/:...................................................................................................................23
src/xil_mcb_mig/:......................................................................................................................23
src/fx2_slfifo_ctrl.vhd:...............................................................................................................23
src/sync_fifo.vhd:.......................................................................................................................25
src/sfifo_hd_a1Kx18b0K5x36.vhd:...........................................................................................25
src/flash_ctrl.vhd:.......................................................................................................................25
usbs6_soc.xise:...........................................................................................................................25
usbs6_soc.ucf:............................................................................................................................25
usbs6_soc_fpga_consts.h:..........................................................................................................25
Software Pseudo-Code Example: ............................................................................................. 25
WISHBONE transactions...............................................................................................................25
WISHBONE signals driven by the master:............................................................................... 26
WISHBONE signals driven by slaves:...................................................................................... 26
Example: ...................................................................................................................................27
Design “usbs6_bram”.........................................................................................................................27
Files and modules........................................................................................................................... 28
src/wishbone_pkg.vhd:.............................................................................................................. 28
src/usbs6_bram_top.vhd:...........................................................................................................28
src/wb_ma_fx2.vhd:...................................................................................................................28
src/wb_sl_bram.vhd:..................................................................................................................28
src/sim_tb/wb_sl_bram_tb.vhd:.................................................................................................28
src/fx2_slfifo_ctrl.vhd:...............................................................................................................28
src/sync_fifo.vhd:.......................................................................................................................28
usbs6_bram.xise:........................................................................................................................28
usbs6_bram.ucf:.........................................................................................................................28
wb_sl_bram_tb.do:.....................................................................................................................28
wb_sl_bram_tb.cmd:..................................................................................................................29
Software................................................................................................................................................... 30
Introduction........................................................................................................................................ 30
Changes to previous versions.............................................................................................................30
Windows.............................................................................................................................................31
Requirements..................................................................................................................................31
Driver installation...........................................................................................................................31
Build UDK......................................................................................................................................31
Prerequisites...............................................................................................................................31
Solution creation and build........................................................................................................31
Linux.................................................................................................................................................. 33
Requirements..................................................................................................................................33
Drivers............................................................................................................................................ 33
USB............................................................................................................................................33
PCI............................................................................................................................................. 34
Build UDK......................................................................................................................................35
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
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preliminary
Prerequisites...............................................................................................................................35
Makefile creation and build....................................................................................................... 35
Use APIs in own projects................................................................................................................... 37
C++ API..........................................................................................................................................37
Add project to UDK build..........................................................................................................37
C API.............................................................................................................................................. 37
.NET API........................................................................................................................................ 38
API Functions in detail.......................................................................................................................38
API Error handling......................................................................................................................... 38
C++ and .NET API.....................................................................................................................38
C API..........................................................................................................................................38
Methods/Functions.....................................................................................................................39
Device enumeration........................................................................................................................40
Methods/Functions.....................................................................................................................40
Information gathering.....................................................................................................................43
Methods/Functions.....................................................................................................................43
Using devices..................................................................................................................................45
Methods/Functions.....................................................................................................................45
UDKLab.............................................................................................................................................50
Introduction.................................................................................................................................... 50
The main screen..............................................................................................................................51
Using UDKLab...............................................................................................................................52
FPGA configuration...................................................................................................................53
FPGA design flashing................................................................................................................54
Projects.......................................................................................................................................54
Initializing sequence.................................................................................................................. 55
Content panel.............................................................................................................................57
Additional information.............................................................................................................................60
Using SPI-Flash for configuration..................................................................................................... 60
How to store configuration data in SPI-Flash.................................................................................60
Loading SPI-Flash via USB.......................................................................................................60
SPI-Flash Indirect Programming Using FPGA JTAG Chain.....................................................60
SPI-Flash Direct Programming using iMPACT.........................................................................60
IO pairing and etch length report........................................................................................................62
J3 VG-96 pin connector - Differential pairs (28 IN, 12 IN/OUT ).................................................62
J4 IDC-50 pin connector - Differential pairs (17 IN/OUT)............................................................65
Mechanical dimensions...................................................................................................................... 68
Table of contents......................................................................................................................................69
USBS6 / C1030-5510
User Doc V0.3
http://www.cesys.com/
-71-
preliminary
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