Specifications | Craftsman 917 Lawn Mower User Manual

TigerSwitch 10/100
50-Port Layer 2 Switch
◆ 48 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX auto-MDI/MDI-X ports
◆ 2 auto-MDI/MDI-X 10/100/1000BASE-T combo ports
with associated SFP slots
◆ Non-blocking switching architecture
◆ Support for redundant power unit
◆ Spanning Tree Protocol
◆ Up to six LACP or static 4-port trunks
◆ Layer 2/3/4 CoS support through four priority queues
◆ Full support for VLANs with GVRP
◆ IGMP multicast filtering and snooping
◆ Manageable via console, Web, SNMP/RMON
Management Guide
SMC6750L2
TigerSwitch 10/100
Management Guide
From SMC’s Tiger line of feature-rich workgroup LAN solutions
38 Tesla
Irvine, CA 92618
Phone: (949) 679-8000
June 2002
Pub. # 150200016800A
Information furnished by SMC Networks, Inc. (SMC) is believed to be
accurate and reliable. However, no responsibility is assumed by SMC for its
use, nor for any infringements of patents or other rights of third parties
which may result from its use. No license is granted by implication or otherwise under any patent or patent rights of SMC. SMC reserves the right to
change specifications at any time without notice.
Copyright © 2002 by
SMC Networks, Inc.
38 Tesla
Irvine, CA 92618
All rights reserved. Printed in Taiwan
Trademarks:
SMC is a registered trademark; and EZ Switch, TigerStack and TigerSwitch are trademarks of SMC
Networks, Inc. Other product and company names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective holders.
LIMITED WARRANTY
Limited Warranty Statement: SMC Networks, Inc. (“SMC”) warrants its products to be
free from defects in workmanship and materials, under normal use and service, for the
applicable warranty term. All SMC products carry a standard 90-day limited warranty from
the date of purchase from SMC or its Authorized Reseller. SMC may, at its own discretion,
repair or replace any product not operating as warranted with a similar or functionally
equivalent product, during the applicable warranty term. SMC will endeavor to repair or
replace any product returned under warranty within 30 days of receipt of the product.
The standard limited warranty can be upgraded to a Limited Lifetime* warranty by registering
new products within 30 days of purchase from SMC or its Authorized Reseller. Registration
can be accomplished via the enclosed product registration card or online via the SMC web
site. Failure to register will not affect the standard limited warranty. The Limited Lifetime
warranty covers a product during the Life of that Product, which is defined as the period of
time during which the product is an “Active” SMC product. A product is considered to be
“Active” while it is listed on the current SMC price list. As new technologies emerge, older
technologies become obsolete and SMC will, at its discretion, replace an older product in its
product line with one that incorporates these newer technologies. At that point, the obsolete
product is discontinued and is no longer an “Active” SMC product. A list of discontinued
products with their respective dates of discontinuance can be found at:
http://www.smc.com/index.cfm?action=customer_service_warranty.
All products that are replaced become the property of SMC. Replacement products may be
either new or reconditioned. Any replaced or repaired product carries either a 30-day limited
warranty or the remainder of the initial warranty, whichever is longer. SMC is not responsible
for any custom software or firmware, configuration information, or memory data of
Customer contained in, stored on, or integrated with any products returned to SMC pursuant
to any warranty. Products returned to SMC should have any customer-installed accessory or
add-on components, such as expansion modules, removed prior to returning the product for
replacement. SMC is not responsible for these items if they are returned with the product.
Customers must contact SMC for a Return Material Authorization number prior to returning
any product to SMC. Proof of purchase may be required. Any product returned to SMC
without a valid Return Material Authorization (RMA) number clearly marked on the outside
of the package will be returned to customer at customer’s expense. For warranty claims within
North America, please call our toll-free customer support number at (800) 762-4968.
Customers are responsible for all shipping charges from their facility to SMC. SMC is
responsible for return shipping charges from SMC to customer.
i
WARRANTIES EXCLUSIVE: IF AN SMC PRODUCT DOES NOT OPERATE AS
WARRANTED ABOVE, CUSTOMER’S SOLE REMEDY SHALL BE REPAIR OR
REPLACEMENT OF THE PRODUCT IN QUESTION, AT SMC’S OPTION. THE
FOREGOING WARRANTIES AND REMEDIES ARE EXCLUSIVE AND ARE IN
LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
EITHER IN FACT OR BY OPERATION OF LAW, STATUTORY OR OTHERWISE,
INCLUDING WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY AND
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. SMC NEITHER ASSUMES NOR
AUTHORIZES ANY OTHER PERSON TO ASSUME FOR IT ANY OTHER
LIABILITY IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE, INSTALLATION,
MAINTENANCE OR USE OF ITS PRODUCTS. SMC SHALL NOT BE LIABLE
UNDER THIS WARRANTY IF ITS TESTING AND EXAMINATION DISCLOSE THE
ALLEGED DEFECT IN THE PRODUCT DOES NOT EXIST OR WAS CAUSED BY
CUSTOMER’S OR ANY THIRD PERSON’S MISUSE, NEGLECT, IMPROPER
INSTALLATION OR TESTING, UNAUTHORIZED ATTEMPTS TO REPAIR, OR
ANY OTHER CAUSE BEYOND THE RANGE OF THE INTENDED USE, OR BY
ACCIDENT, FIRE, LIGHTNING, OR OTHER HAZARD.
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY: IN NO EVENT, WHETHER BASED IN CONTRACT
OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE), SHALL SMC BE LIABLE FOR
INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR PUNITIVE
DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, OR FOR LOSS OF REVENUE, LOSS OF BUSINESS, OR
OTHER FINANCIAL LOSS ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE
SALE, INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE, USE, PERFORMANCE, FAILURE, OR
INTERRUPTION OF ITS PRODUCTS, EVEN IF SMC OR ITS AUTHORIZED
RESELLER HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OF IMPLIED WARRANTIES
OR THE LIMITATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES FOR
CONSUMER PRODUCTS, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATIONS AND EXCLUSIONS
MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU. THIS WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL
RIGHTS, WHICH MAY VARY FROM STATE TO STATE. NOTHING IN THIS
WARRANTY SHALL BE TAKEN TO AFFECT YOUR STATUTORY RIGHTS.
* SMC will provide warranty service for one year following discontinuance from the active
SMC price list. Under the limited lifetime warranty, internal and external power supplies, fans,
and cables are covered by a standard one-year warranty from date of purchase.
SMC Networks, Inc.
38 Tesla
Irvine, CA 92618
ii
CONTENTS
1
Switch Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-1
Connecting to the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Configuration Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Required Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Remote Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Basic Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Console Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Setting Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Setting an IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Enabling SNMP Management Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
Saving Configuration Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11
Managing System Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12
System Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13
2
Configuring the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Using the Web Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Navigating the Web Browser Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Home Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Configuration Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Panel Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Basic Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Displaying System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Setting the IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13
Configuring the Logon Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13
Configuring Radius Logon Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
Managing Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16
Downloading System Software from a Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16
Saving or Restoring Configuration Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-18
Setting the Startup Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19
Copying the Running Configuration to a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
Displaying Bridge Extension Capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
Displaying Switch Hardware/Software Versions . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22
Port Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-24
Displaying Connection Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-24
iii
CONTENTS
Configuring Interface Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Broadcast Storm Thresholds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Port Mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address Table Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Static Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying the Address Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Aging Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Spanning Tree Protocol Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing Global Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying the current global settings for STA . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the global settings for STA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing STA Interface Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VLAN Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Ports to VLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Forwarding Tagged/Untagged Frames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying Basic VLAN Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying Current VLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating VLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Interfaces Based on Membership Type . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Interfaces Based on Static Membership . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring VLAN Behavior for Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Class of Service Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Default Priority for Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mapping CoS Values to Egress Queues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Service Weight for Traffic Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mapping Layer 3/4 Priorities to CoS Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting IP Precedence/DSCP Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mapping IP Precedence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mapping DSCP Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mapping IP Port Priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Port Trunk Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dynamically Configuring a Trunk with LACP . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Statically Configuring a Trunk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring SNMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Community Access Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying Trap Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multicast Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iv
2-26
2-28
2-29
2-30
2-30
2-31
2-32
2-33
2-33
2-35
2-37
2-37
2-41
2-42
2-44
2-44
2-45
2-47
2-48
2-50
2-51
2-53
2-54
2-55
2-58
2-59
2-59
2-60
2-62
2-64
2-66
2-67
2-68
2-69
2-69
2-70
2-71
CONTENTS
Configuring IGMP Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interfaces Attached to a Multicast Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying Port Members of Multicast Services . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding Multicast Addresses to VLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Showing Device Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
2-72
2-74
2-77
2-78
2-79
Command Line Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Using the Command Line Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Accessing the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Console Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Telnet Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Entering Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Keywords and Arguments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Minimum Abbreviation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Command Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Getting Help on Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Partial Keyword Lookup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Negating the Effect of Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Using Command History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Understanding Command Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Exec Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Configuration Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Command Line Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Command Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
General Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
enable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
disable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
configure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14
show history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15
reload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
end . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
exit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17
quit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-17
Flash/File Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18
copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18
delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20
dir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-21
v
CONTENTS
whichboot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
boot system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Management Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
hostname . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
username . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
enable password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ip http port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ip http server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
logging on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
logging history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
clear logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
show logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
show startup-config . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
show running-config . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
show system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
show users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
show version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RADIUS Client Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
authentication login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
radius-server host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
radius-server port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
radius-server key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
radius-server retransmit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
radius-server timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
show radius-server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SNMP Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
snmp-server community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
snmp-server contact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
snmp-server location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
snmp-server host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
snmp-server enable traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
show snmp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IP Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ip address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ip dhcp restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ip default-gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
show ip interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vi
3-22
3-23
3-24
3-25
3-26
3-27
3-28
3-29
3-29
3-30
3-32
3-32
3-33
3-35
3-36
3-36
3-37
3-38
3-38
3-39
3-40
3-40
3-41
3-42
3-42
3-43
3-43
3-44
3-45
3-45
3-47
3-48
3-49
3-50
3-51
3-52
3-53
CONTENTS
show ip redirects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-54
ping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-54
Line Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-56
line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-57
login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-58
password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-59
exec-timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-60
password-thresh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-61
silent-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-62
databits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-63
parity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-64
speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-64
stopbits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-65
show line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-66
Interface Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-67
interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-68
description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-68
speed-duplex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-69
negotiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-70
capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-71
flowcontrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-72
shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-73
switchport broadcast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-74
show interfaces status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-75
show interfaces counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-76
show interfaces switchport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-77
Address Table Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-78
bridge address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-79
show bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-80
clear bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-81
bridge-group aging-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-82
show bridge group aging-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-82
Spanning Tree Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-83
bridge spanning-tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-84
bridge forward-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-85
bridge hello-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-86
bridge max-age . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-86
vii
CONTENTS
bridge priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-87
bridge-group path-cost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-88
bridge-group priority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-89
bridge-group portfast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-90
show bridge group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-91
VLAN Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-93
vlan database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-94
vlan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-95
interface vlan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-96
switchport mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-97
switchport acceptable-frame-types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-98
switchport ingress-filtering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-99
switchport native vlan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-100
switchport allowed vlan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-101
switchport forbidden vlan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-102
show vlan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-103
GVRP and Bridge Extension Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-104
switchport gvrp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-104
show gvrp configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-105
garp timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-106
show garp timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-107
bridge-ext gvrp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-108
show bridge-ext . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-108
IGMP Snooping Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-109
ip igmp snooping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-110
ip igmp snooping vlan static . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-111
ip igmp snooping version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-112
show ip igmp snooping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-112
show bridge multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-113
ip igmp snooping querier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-114
ip igmp snooping query-count . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-115
ip igmp snooping query-interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-115
ip igmp snooping query-max-response-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-116
ip igmp snooping query-time-out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-117
ip igmp snooping vlan mrouter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-118
show ip igmp snooping mrouter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-119
Priority Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-120
viii
CONTENTS
switchport priority default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-121
queue bandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-122
queue cos-map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-123
show queue bandwidth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-125
show queue cos-map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-125
map ip port (Global Configuration) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-126
map ip port (Interface Configuration) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-127
map ip precedence (Global Configuration) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-128
map ip precedence (Interface Configuration) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-128
map ip dscp (Global Configuration) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-130
map ip dscp (Interface Configuration) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-130
show map ip port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-132
show map ip precedence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-133
show map ip dscp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-134
Mirror Port Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-135
port monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-135
show port monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-136
Port Trunking Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-137
channel-group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-138
lacp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-139
ix
CONTENTS
APPENDICES:
A
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1
Troubleshooting Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
Upgrading Firmware via the Serial Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
B
Pin Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-1
Console Port Pin Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
DB-9 Port Pin Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
Console Port to 9-Pin DTE Port on PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
Console Port to 25-Pin DTE Port on PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2
Glossary
Index
x
CHAPTER 1
SWITCH MANAGEMENT
Connecting to the Switch
Configuration Options
The TigerSwitch 10/100 SMC6750L2 includes a built-in network
management agent. The agent offers a variety of management options,
including SNMP, RMON and a Web-based interface. A PC may also be
connected directly to the switch for configuration and monitoring via a
command line interface (CLI).
Note: The IP address for this switch is assigned via DHCP by default. To
change this address, see “Setting an IP Address” on page 1-6.
The switch’s HTTP Web agent allows you to configure switch parameters,
monitor port connections, and display statistics graphically using a
standard Web browser such as Netscape Navigator version 6.2 and higher
or Microsoft IE version 5.0 and higher. The switch’s Web management
interface can be accessed from any computer attached to the network.
The switch’s management agent is based on SNMP (Simple Network
Management Protocol). This SNMP agent permits the switch to be
managed from any system in the network using management software,
such as such as SMC’s free EliteView software.
The CLI program can be accessed by a direct connection to the RS-232
serial console port on the switch, or remotely by a Telnet connection over
the network.
1-1
SWITCH MANAGEMENT
The switch’s CLI configuration program, Web interface, and SNMP agent
allow you to perform the following management functions:
•
Set user names and passwords for up to 16 users
•
Set an IP interface for a management VLAN
•
Configure SNMP parameters
•
Enable/disable any port
•
Set the speed/duplex mode for any port
•
Configure up to 255 IEEE 802.1Q VLANs
•
Enable GVRP automatic VLAN registration
•
Configure IGMP multicast filtering
•
TFTP upload and download of system firmware
•
TFTP upload and download of switch configuration files
•
Configure Spanning Tree parameters
•
Configure Class of Service (CoS) priority queuing
•
Configure up to six static or LACP trunks
•
Enable port mirroring
•
Set broadcast storm control on any port
•
Display system information and statistics
Required Connections
The switch provides an RS-232 serial port that enables a connection to a
PC or terminal for monitoring and configuring the switch. A null-modem
console cable is provided with the switch.
1-2
CONNECTING TO THE SWITCH
Attach a VT100-compatible terminal, or a PC running a terminal
emulation program to the switch. You can use the console cable provided
with this package, or use a null-modem cable that complies with the wiring
assignments shown in Appendix B.
To connect a terminal to the console port, complete the following steps:
1. Connect the console cable to the serial port on a terminal, or a PC
running terminal emulation software, and tighten the captive retaining
screws on the DB-9 connector.
2. Connect the other end of the cable to the RS-232 serial port on the
switch.
3. Make sure the terminal emulation software is set as follows:
•
Select the appropriate serial port (COM port 1 or COM port 2).
•
Set the data rate to 9600 baud.
•
Set the data format to 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and no parity.
•
Set flow control to none.
•
Set the emulation mode to VT100.
•
When using HyperTerminal, select Terminal keys, not Windows
keys.
Notes: 1. When using HyperTerminal with Microsoft® Windows® 2000,
make sure that you have Windows 2000 Service Pack 2 or later
installed. Windows 2000 Service Pack 2 fixes the problem of
arrow keys not functioning in HyperTerminal’s VT100
emulation. See www.microsoft.com for information on
Windows 2000 service packs.
2. Refer to “Line Commands” on page 3-56 for a complete
description of console configuration options.
1-3
SWITCH MANAGEMENT
4. Once you have set up the terminal correctly, the console login screen
will be displayed.
For a description of how to use the CLI, see “Using the Command Line
Interface” on page 3-1. For a list of all the CLI commands and detailed
information on using the CLI, refer to “Command Groups” on page 3-10.
Remote Connections
Prior to accessing the switch’s onboard agent via a network connection,
you must first configure it with a valid IP address, subnet mask, and default
gateway using a console connection, DHCP or BOOTP protocol.
The IP address for this switch is assigned via DHCP by default. To
manually configure this address or enable dynamic address assignment via
DHCP or BOOTP, see “Setting an IP Address” on page 1-6.
Note: This switch supports four concurrent Telnet sessions.
After configuring the switch’s IP parameters, you can access the onboard
configuration program from anywhere within the attached network. The
onboard configuration program can be accessed using Telnet from any
computer attached to the network. The switch can also be managed by any
computer using a Web browser (Internet Explorer 5.0 or above, or
Netscape Navigator 6.2 or above), or from a network computer using
network management software such as EliteView.
Note: The onboard program only provides access to basic configuration
functions. To access the full range of SNMP management
functions, you must use SNMP-based network management
software, such as EliteView.
1-4
BASIC CONFIGURATION
Basic Configuration
Console Connection
The CLI program provides two different command levels — normal
access level (Normal Exec) and privileged access level (Privileged Exec).
The commands available at the Normal Exec level are a limited subset of
those available at the Privileged Exec level and allow you to only display
information and use basic utilities. To fully configure switch parameters,
you must access the CLI at the Privileged Exec level.
Access to both CLI levels are controlled by user names and passwords.
The switch has a default user name and password for each level. To log
into the CLI at the Privileged Exec level using the default user name and
password, perform these steps:
1. To initiate your console connection, press <Enter>. The “User Access
Verification” procedure starts.
2. At the Username prompt, enter “admin.”
3. At the Password prompt, also enter “admin.” (The password
characters are not displayed on the console screen.)
4. The session is opened and the CLI displays the “Console#” prompt
indicating you have access at the Privileged Exec level.
Setting Passwords
Note: If this is your first time to log into the CLI program, you should
define new passwords for both default user names using the
“username” command, record them and put them in a safe place.
1-5
SWITCH MANAGEMENT
Passwords can consist of up to 8 alphanumeric characters and are case
sensitive. To prevent unauthorized access to the switch, set the passwords
as follows:
1. Open the console interface with the default user name and password
“admin” to access the Privileged Exec level.
2. Type “configure” and press <Enter>.
3. Type “username guest password 0 password,” for the Normal Exec
level, where password is your new password. Press <Enter>.
4. Type “username admin password 0 password,” for the Privileged Exec
level, where password is your new password. Press <Enter>.
Username: admin
Password:
CLI session with the host is opened.
To end the CLI session, enter [Exit].
Console#configure
Console(config)#username guest password 0 [password]
Console(config)#username admin password 0 [password]
Console(config)#
Setting an IP Address
You must establish IP address information for the switch to obtain
management access through the network. This can be done in either of the
following ways:
Manual — You have to input the information, including IP address and
subnet mask. If your management station is not in the same IP subnet as
the switch, you will also need to specify the default gateway router.
Dynamic — The switch sends IP configuration requests to BOOTP or
DHCP address allocation servers on the network.
1-6
BASIC CONFIGURATION
Note: Only one VLAN interface can be assigned an IP address (the
default is VLAN 1). This defines the management VLAN, the only
VLAN through which you can gain management access to the
switch. If you assign an IP address to any other VLAN, the new IP
address overrides the original IP address and this becomes the new
management VLAN.
Manual Configuration
You can manually assign an IP address to the switch. You may also need to
specify a default gateway that resides between this device and management
stations that exist on another network segment. Valid IP addresses consist
of four decimal numbers, 0 to 255, separated by periods. Anything outside
this format will not be accepted by the CLI program.
Note: The IP address for this switch is assigned via DHCP by default.
Before you can assign an IP address to the switch, you must obtain the
following information from your network administrator:
•
IP address for the switch
•
Default gateway for the network
•
Network mask for this network
To assign an IP address to the switch, complete the following steps:
1. From the Privileged Exec level global configuration mode prompt,
type “interface vlan 1” to access the interface-configuration mode.
Press <Enter>.
2. Type “ip address ip-address netmask,” where “ip-address” is the switch
IP address and “netmask” is the network mask for the network. Press
<Enter>.
3. Type “exit” to return to the global configuration mode prompt. Press
<Enter>.
1-7
SWITCH MANAGEMENT
4. To set the IP address of the default gateway for the network to which
the switch belongs, type “ip default-gateway gateway,” where “gateway”
is the IP address of the default gateway. Press <Enter>.
Console(config)#interface vlan 1
Console(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.5 255.255.255.0
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#ip default-gateway 192.168.1.254
Console(config)#
Dynamic Configuration
If you select the “bootp” or “dhcp” option, IP will be enabled but will not
function until a BOOTP or DHCP reply has been received. You therefore
need to use the “ip dhcp restart” command to start broadcasting service
requests. Requests will be sent periodically in an effort to obtain IP
configuration information. (BOOTP and DHCP values can include the IP
address, subnet mask, and default gateway.)
If the “bootp” or “dhcp” option is saved to the startup-config file, then
the switch will start broadcasting service requests as soon as it is powered
on.
To automatically configure the switch by communicating with BOOTP or
DHCP address allocation servers on the network, complete the following
steps:
1. From the Privileged Exec level global configuration mode prompt,
type “interface vlan 1” to access the interface-configuration mode.
Press <Enter>.
2. At the interface-configuration mode prompt, use one of the following
commands:
1-8
•
To obtain IP settings through DHCP, type “ip address dhcp” and
press <Enter>.
•
To obtain IP settings through BOOTP, type “ip address bootp”
and press <Enter>.
BASIC CONFIGURATION
3. Type “exit” to return to the global configuration mode. Press
<Enter>.
4. Type “ip dhcp restart” to begin broadcasting service requests. Press
<Enter>.
5. Wait a few minutes, and then check the IP configuration settings, by
typing the “show ip interface” command. Press <Enter>.
6. Then save your configuration changes by typing “copy running-config
startup-config.” Enter the startup file name and press <Enter>.
Console(config)#interface vlan 1
Console(config-if)#ip address dhcp
Console(config-if)#exit
Console#ip dhcp restart
Console#show ip interface
IP interface vlan
IP address and netmask: 10.1.0.54 255.255.255.0 on VLAN 1,
and address mode: User specified.
Console#copy running-config startup-config
Startup configuration file name []: startup
Console#
Enabling SNMP Management Access
The switch can be configured to accept management commands from
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) applications such as
EliteView. You can configure the switch to (1) respond to SNMP requests
or (2) generate SNMP traps.
When SNMP management stations send requests to the switch (either to
return information or to set a parameter), the switch provides the
requested data or sets the specified parameter. The switch can also be
configured to send information to SNMP managers (without being
requested by the managers) through trap messages, which inform the
manager that certain events have occurred.
1-9
SWITCH MANAGEMENT
Community Strings
Community strings are used to control management access to SNMP
stations, as well as to authorize SNMP stations to receive trap messages
from the switch. You therefore need to assign community strings to
specified users or user groups, and set the access level.
The default strings are:
•
public - with read-only access. Authorized management stations are
only able to retrieve MIB objects.
•
private - with read-write access. Authorized management stations are
able to both retrieve and modify MIB objects.
Note: If you do not intend to utilize SNMP, it is recommended that you
delete both of the default community strings. If there are no
community strings, then SNMP management access to the switch
is disabled.
To prevent unauthorized access to the switch via SNMP, it is
recommended that you change the default community strings.
To configure a community string, complete the following steps:
1. From the Privileged Exec level global configuration mode prompt,
type “snmp-server community string mode,” where “string” is the
community access string and “mode” is rw (read/write) or ro (read
only). Press <Enter>.
2. To remove an existing string, simply type “no snmp-server community
string,” where “string” is the community access string to remove. Press
<Enter>.
Console(config)#snmp-server community smc rw
Console(config)#snmp-server community private
Console(config)#
1-10
BASIC CONFIGURATION
Trap Receivers
You can also specify SNMP stations that are to receive traps from the
switch.
To configure a trap receiver, complete the following steps:
1. From the Privileged Exec level global configuration mode prompt,
type “snmp-server host host-address community-string,” where
“host-address” is the IP address for the trap receiver and
“community-string” is the string associated with that host. Press
<Enter>.
2. In order to configure the switch to send SNMP notifications, you must
enter at least one snmp-server enable traps command. Type
“snmp-server enable traps type,” where “type” is either
authentication or link-up-down. Press <Enter>.
Console(config)#snmp-server enable traps link-up-down
Console(config)#
Saving Configuration Settings
Configuration commands only modify the running configuration file and
are not saved when the switch is rebooted. To save all your configuration
changes in nonvolatile storage, you must copy the running configuration
file to the start-up configuration file using the “copy” command.
To save the current configuration settings, enter the following command:
1. From the Privileged Exec mode prompt, type “copy running-config
startup-config” and press <Enter>.
2. Enter the name of the start-up file. Press <Enter>.
Console#copy running-config startup-config
Startup configuration file name []: startup
Console#
1-11
SWITCH MANAGEMENT
Managing System Files
The switch’s flash memory supports three types of system files that can be
managed by the CLI program, Web interface, or SNMP. The switch’s file
system allows files to be uploaded and downloaded, copied, deleted, and
set as a start-up file.
The three types of files are:
•
Configuration — These files store system configuration
information and are created when configuration settings are saved.
Saved configuration files can be selected as a system start-up file or can
be uploaded via TFTP to a server for backup. A file named
“Factory_Default_Config.cfg” contains all the system default settings
and cannot be deleted from the system. See “Saving or Restoring
Configuration Settings” on page 2-18 for more information.
•
Operation Code — System software that is executed after boot-up,
also known as run-time code. This code runs the switch operation and
provides the CLI, Web and SNMP management interfaces. See
“Managing Firmware” on page 2-16 for more information.
•
Diagnostic Code — Software that is run during system boot-up,
also known as POST (Power On Self-Test). This code also provides a
facility to upload firmware files to the system directly through the
console port. See “Upgrading Firmware via the Serial Port” on page
A-2.
Due to the size limit of the flash memory, the switch supports only two
operation code files. However, you can have as many diagnostic code files
and configuration files as available flash memory space allows.
In the system flash memory, one file of each type must be set as the
start-up file. During a system boot, the diagnostic and operation code files
set as the start-up file are run, and then the start-up configuration file is
loaded. Configuration files can also be loaded while the system is running,
without rebooting the system.
1-12
SYSTEM DEFAULTS
System Defaults
The switch’s system defaults are provided in the configuration file
“Factory_Default_Config.cfg.” To reset the switch defaults, this file
should be set as the startup configuration file. See “Setting the Startup
Configuration File” on page 2-19.
The following table lists some of the basic system defaults.
Function
Parameter
Default
IP Settings
Management. VLAN
1
DHCP
Enabled
BOOTP
Disabled
User Specified
Disabled
IP Address
0.0.0.0
Subnet Mask
255.0.0.0
Default Gateway
0.0.0.0
Web Management HTTP Server
SNMP
Security
Enabled
HTTP Port Number
80
Community Strings
“public” (read only)
“private” (read/write)
Authentication Failure
Traps
Enabled
Link-up-Down Traps
Enabled
Privileged Exec Level
Username “admin”
Password “admin”
Normal Exec Level
Username “guest”
Password “guest”
Password “super”
Enable Privileged Exec
from Normal Exec Level
RADIUS Authentication Disabled
1-13
SWITCH MANAGEMENT
Function
Parameter
Default
Console Port
Connection
Baud Rate
9600
Data bits
8
Stop bits
1
Parity
none
Local Console Timeout
0 (disabled)
Admin Status
Enabled
Auto-negotiation
Enabled
Flow Control
Disabled
10/100 Mbps Port
Capability
10 Mbps half duplex
10 Mbps full duplex
100 Mbps half duplex
100 Mbps full duplex
Full-duplex flow control disabled
Port Status
10/100/1000 Mbps Port 10 Mbps half duplex
Capability
10 Mbps full duplex
100 Mbps half duplex
100 Mbps full duplex
1000 Mbps full duplex
Symmetric flow control disabled
Link Aggregation
Spanning Tree
Protocol
Address Table
1-14
Static Trunks
none
LACP (all ports)
Disabled
Status
Enabled
(Defaults: All parameters based
on IEEE 802.1D)
Fast Forwarding
Disabled
Aging Time
300 seconds
SYSTEM DEFAULTS
Function
Parameter
Default
Virtual LANs
Default VLAN
1
PVID
1
Acceptable Frame Type
All
Ingress Filtering
Disabled
GVRP (global)
Disabled
GVRP (port interface)
Disabled
Ingress Port Priority
0
Weighted Round Robin
Class 0: 1
Class 1: 4
Class 2: 16
Class 3: 64
IP Precedence Priority
Disabled
IP DSCP Priority
Disabled
IP Port Priority
Disabled
Class of Service
Multicast Filtering IGMP Snooping
Enabled
Act as Querier
Enabled
Broadcast Storm
Protection
Status
Enabled (all ports)
Broadcast Limit Rate
500 packets per second
System Log
Status
Enabled
Messages Logged
Levels 0-7 (all)
Messages Logged to Flash Levels 0-3
1-15
SWITCH MANAGEMENT
1-16
CHAPTER 2
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Using the Web Interface
This switch provides an embedded HTTP Web agent. Using a Web
browser you can configure the switch and view statistics to monitor
network activity. The Web agent can be accessed by any computer on the
network using a standard Web browser (Internet Explorer 5.0 or above, or
Netscape Navigator 6.2 or above).
Note: You can also use the Command Line Interface (CLI) to manage
the switch over a serial connection to the console port or via
Telnet. For more information on using the CLI, refer to Chapter 3
“Command Line Interface.”
Prior to accessing the switch from a Web browser, be sure you have first
performed the following tasks:
1. Configure the switch with a valid IP address, subnet mask, and default
gateway using an out-of-band serial connection, BOOTP or DHCP
protocol (see “Setting the IP Address” on page 2-10).
2. Set user names and passwords using an out-of-band serial connection.
Access to the Web agent is controlled by the same user names and
passwords as the onboard configuration program. (See “Configuring
the Logon Password” on page 2-13.)
Note: If you log into the Web interface as guest (Normal Exec level), you
can view page information but only change the guest password. If
you log in as “admin” (Privileged Exec level), you can apply
changes on all pages.
2-1
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
3. After you enter a user name and password, you will have access to the
system configuration program.
Notes: 1. You are allowed three attempts to enter the correct password;
on the third failed attempt the current connection is
terminated.
2. If the path between your management station and this switch
does not pass through any device that uses the Spanning Tree
Algorithm, then you can set the switch port attached to your
management station to fast forwarding to improve the switch’s
response time to management commands issued through the
Web interface. See “Managing STA Interface Settings” on page
2-37.
Navigating the Web Browser Interface
To access the Web-browser interface you must first enter a user name and
password. The administrator has Read/Write access to all configuration
parameters and statistics. The default user name and password for the
administrator is “admin.”
Home Page
When your Web browser connects with the switch’s Web agent, the home
page is displayed as shown below. The home page displays the Main Menu
on the left side of the screen and System Information on the right side.
The Main Menu links are used to navigate to other menus, and display
configuration parameters and statistics.
2-2
NAVIGATING THE WEB BROWSER INTERFACE
Configuration Options
Configurable parameters have a dialog box or a drop-down list. Once a
configuration change has been made on a page, be sure to click on the
“Apply” or “Apply Changes” button to confirm the new setting. The
following table summarizes the Web page configuration buttons.
Button
Action
Revert
Cancels specified values and restores current values
prior to pressing “Apply” or “Apply Changes.”
Refresh
Immediately updates values for the current page.
Apply
Sets specified values to the system.
Apply Changes
Sets specified values to the system.
2-3
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Notes: 1. To ensure proper screen refresh, be sure that Internet Explorer
5.x is configured as follows: Under the menu “Tools / Internet
Options / General / Temporary Internet Files / Settings,” the
setting for item “Check for newer versions of stored pages”
should be “Every visit to the page.”
2. When using Internet Explorer 5.0, you may have to manually
refresh the screen after making configuration changes by
pressing the browser’s refresh button.
Panel Display
The Web agent displays an image of the switch’s ports, indicating whether
each link is up or down. Clicking on the image of a port opens the Port
Configuration page as described on page 2-26.
2-4
MAIN MENU
Main Menu
Using the onboard Web agent, you can define system parameters, manage
and control the switch, and all its ports, or monitor network conditions.
The following table briefly describes the selections available from this
program.
Menu
Description
Page
System Information
Provides basic system description, including
contact information
2-8
IP
Sets the IP address for management access
2-10
Passwords
Assigns a new password for the logon user name 2-13
System
Radius
Configures RADIUS authentication parameters 2-14
Firmware
Manages code image files
2-16
Configuration
Manages switch configuration files
2-18
Reset
Restarts the switch
Bridge Extension
Shows the configuration for bridge extension
commands; enables GVRP multicast protocol
Switch Information
Shows the number of ports, hardware/firmware 2-22
version numbers, and power status
2-20
Port
Port Information
Displays port connection status
2-24
Trunk Information
Displays trunk connection status
2-24
Port Configuration
Configures port connection settings
2-26
Trunk Configuration
Configures trunk connection settings
2-26
Broadcast Storm
Sets the broadcast storm threshold for each port 2-28
Protect Configuration
Mirror
Sets the source and target ports for mirroring
2-29
2-5
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Menu
Description
Page
Address Table
Static Addresses
Displays entries for interface, address or VLAN 2-30
Dynamic Addresses
Displays or edits static entries in the Address
Table
2-31
Address Aging
Sets timeout for dynamically learned entries
2-32
Spanning Tree
STA Information
Displays STA values used for the bridge
2-35
STA Configuration
Configures global bridge settings for STA
2-37
STA Port Information Configures individual port settings for STA
2-37
STA Trunk
Information
Configures individual trunk settings for STA
2-37
STA Port
Configuration
Configures individual port settings for STA
2-37
STA Trunk
Configuration
Configures individual trunk settings for STA
2-37
Displays basic information on the VLAN type
supported by this switch
2-44
VLAN
VLAN Basic
Information
VLAN Current Table Shows the current port members of each VLAN 2-45
and whether or not the port supports VLAN
tagging
VLAN Static List
2-6
Used to create or remove VLAN groups
2-47
VLAN Static Table
Modifies the settings for an existing VLAN
2-48
VLAN Static
Membership by Port
Configures membership type for interfaces,
including tagged, untagged or forbidden
2-50
VLAN Port
Configuration
Specifies default PVID and VLAN attributes
2-51
VLAN Trunk
Configuration
Specifies default trunk VID and VLAN
attributes
2-51
MAIN MENU
Menu
Description
Page
Sets the default priority for each port
2-54
Priority
Default Port Priority
Default Trunk Priority Sets the default priority for each trunk
2-54
Traffic Class
Maps IEEE 802.1p priority tags to output
queues
2-55
Queue Scheduling
Configures Weighted Round Robin queueing
2-58
IP Precedence/DSCP Globally selects IP Precedence or DSCP
Priority Status
Priority, or disables both.
2-59
IP Precedence Priority Sets IP Type of Service priority, mapping the
precedence tag to a class-of-service value
2-60
IP DSCP Priority
2-62
Sets IP Differentiated Services Code Point
priority, mapping a DSCP tag to a
class-of-service value
IP Port Priority Status Globally enables or disables IP Port Priority
2-64
IP Port Priority
Sets TCP/UDP port priority, defining the
socket number and associated class-of-service
value
2-64
LACP Configuration
Allows ports to dynamically join trunks
2-67
Trunk Configuration
Specifies ports to group into static trunks
2-68
Configures community strings and related trap
functions.
2-69
IGMP Configuration
Enables multicast filtering; configures
parameters for multicast query
2-72
Multicast Router
Port Information
Displays the ports that are attached to a
neighboring multicast router/switch for each
VLAN ID
2-75
Static Multicast
Router Port
Configuration
Assigns ports that are attached to a neighboring 2-75
multicast router/switch
Trunk
SNMP
IGMP
2-7
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Menu
Description
Page
IP Multicast
Registration Table
Displays all multicast groups active on this
switch, including multicast IP addresses and
VLAN ID
2-78
IGMP Member
Port Table
Indicates multicast addresses associated with the 2-77
selected VLAN
Statistics
Lists Ethernet and RMON port statistics
2-79
Basic Configuration
Displaying System Information
You can easily identify the system by providing a descriptive name,
location and contact information.
Command Attributes
•
System Name – Name assigned to the switch system.
•
Object ID – MIB II object ID for switch’s network management
subsystem.
•
Location – Specifies the system location.
•
Contact – Administrator responsible for the system.
System Up Time – Length of time the management agent has been up.
2-8
BASIC CONFIGURATION
Web – Click System/System Information. Specify the system name,
location, and contact information for the system administrator, then click
Apply. (This page also includes a Telnet button that allows you to access the
Command Line Interface via Telnet.)
CLI – Specify the hostname, location and contact information.
Console(config)#hostname SMC6750L2 Test Switch
Console(config)#snmp-server location TPS - 3rd Floor
Console(config)#snmp-server contact Chris
Console#show system
System description: SMC TigerSwitch - SMC6750L2
System OID string: 1.3.6.1.4.1.202.20.24
System information
System Up time: 0 days, 2 hours, 4 minutes, and 7.13 seconds
System Name
: SMC6750L2 Test Switch
System Location
: TPS - 3rd Floor
System Contact
: Chris
MAC address
: 00-30-f1-47-58-3a
Web server
: enable
Web server port
: 80
POST result
:
UART Loopback Test......................PASS
Timer Test..............................PASS
DRAM Test ..............................PASS
I2C Initialization......................PASS
Runtime Image Check ....................PASS
PCI Device Check .......................PASS
Switch Driver Initialization............PASS
Switch Internal Loopback Test...........PASS
------------------- DONE -------------------Console#
3-25
3-45
3-44
3-36
2-9
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Setting the IP Address
An IP address may be used for management access to the switch over your
network. By default, the switch uses DHCP to assign IP settings to
VLAN 1 on the switch. If you wish to manually configure IP settings, you
need to change the switch’s user-specified defaults (IP address 0.0.0.0 and
netmask 255.0.0.0) to values that are compatible with your network. You
may also need to a establish a default gateway between the switch and
management stations that exist on another network segment.
You can manually configure a specific IP address, or direct the device to
obtain an address from a BOOTP or DHCP server when it is powered on.
Valid IP addresses consist of four decimal numbers, 0 to 255, separated by
periods. Anything outside this format will not be accepted by the CLI
program.
2-10
•
Management VLAN – This is the only VLAN through which you
can gain management access to the switch. By default, all ports on the
switch are members of VLAN 1, so a management station can be
connected to any port on the switch. However, if other VLANs are
configured and you change the Management VLAN, you may lose
management access to the switch. In this case, you should reconnect
the management station to a port that is a member of the Management
VLAN.
•
IP Address Mode – Specifies whether IP functionality is enabled via
manual configuration (Static), Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
(DHCP), or Boot Protocol (BOOTP). If DHCP/BOOTP is enabled,
IP will not function until a reply has been received from the server.
Requests will be broadcast periodically by the switch for an IP address.
(DHCP/BOOTP values can include the IP address, subnet mask, and
default gateway.)
•
IP Address – Address of the VLAN interface that is allowed
management access. Valid IP addresses consist of four numbers, 0 to
255, separated by periods.
BASIC CONFIGURATION
•
Subnet Mask – This mask identifies the host address bits used for
routing to specific subnets.
•
Gateway IP Address – IP address of the gateway router between
this device and management stations that exist on other network
segments.
•
MAC Address – The MAC address of this switch.
Manual Configuration
Web – Click System/IP. Specify the management interface, IP address and
default gateway, then click Apply.
CLI – Specify the management interface, IP address and default gateway.
Console#config
Console(config)#interface vlan 1
Console(config-if)#ip address 10.2.13.30 255.255.255.0
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#ip default-gateway 192.168.1.254
Console(config)#
3-68
3-50
3-52
Using DHCP/BOOTP
If your network provides DHCP/BOOTP services, you can configure the
switch to be dynamically configured by these services.
2-11
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Web – Click System/IP. Specify the Management VLAN, set the IP
Address Mode to DHCP or BOOTP. Then click “Apply” to save your
changes. The switch will broadcast a request for IP configuration settings
on the next power reset. Otherwise, you can click “Restart DHCP” to
immediately request a new address.
If you lose your management connection, use a console connection and
enter “show ip interface” to determine the new switch address.
CLI – Specify the management interface, and set the IP Address Mode to
DHCP or BOOTP.
Console#config
Console(config)#interface vlan 1
Console(config-if)#ip address dhcp
Console(config-if)#end
Console#ip dhcp restart
Console#show ip interface
IP address and netmask: 10.1.0.54 255.255.255.0 on VLAN 1,
and address mode: User specified.
Console#
3-68
3-50
3-51
3-53
Renewing DCHP – DHCP may lease addresses to clients indefinitely or
for a specific period of time. If the address expires or the switch is moved
to another network segment, you will lose management access to the
switch. In this case, you can reboot the switch or submit a client request to
restart DHCP service.
Web – If the address assigned by DHCP is no longer functioning, you will
not be able to renew the IP settings via the Web interface. You can only
restart DHCP service via the Web interface if the current address is still
available.
CLI – Enter the following command to restart DHCP service.
Console#ip dhcp restart
2-12
3-51
SECURITY
Security
Configuring the Logon Password
The guest only has read access for most configuration parameters.
However, the administrator has write access for parameters governing the
onboard agent. You should therefore assign a new administrator password
as soon as possible, and store it in a safe place.
Notes: 1. If you log into the Web interface as guest (Normal Exec level),
you can view page information but only change the guest
password. If you log in as admin (Privileged Exec level), you
can apply changes on all pages.
2. If for some reason your password is lost, you can reload the
factory deafults file or reinstall runtime code to restore the
default passwords. See “Upgrading Firmware via the Serial
Port” on page A-2 for more information.
The default guest name is “guest” with the password “guest.” The default
administrator name is “admin” with the password “admin.” Note that user
names can only be assigned via the CLI.
Web – Click System/Passwords. Enter the old password, enter the new
password, confirm it by entering it again, then click “Apply.”
CLI – Assign a user name to access-level 15 (i.e., administrator), then
specify the password.
Console(config)#username bob access-level 15
Console(config)#username bob password 0 smith
Console(config)#
3-26
2-13
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Configuring Radius Logon Authentication
Remote Authentication Dial-in User Service (RADIUS) is an
authentication protocol that uses a central server to control access to
RADIUS-compliant devices on the network. A RADIUS server can be
programmed with a database of multiple user name/password pairs and
associated privilege levels for each user or group that requires management
access to this switch using the console port, Telnet or the Web.
When setting up privilege levels on the RADIUS server, level 0 allows
guest (CLI - Normal Exec) access to the switch. Only level 15 allows
administrator (CLI - Privileged Exec) access.
Command Attributes
•
Authentication – Select the authentication, or authentication
sequence required:
- Radius – User authentication is performed using a RADIUS server
only.
- Local – User authentication is performed only locally by the switch.
- Radius, Local – User authentication is attempted first using a
RADIUS server, then locally by the switch.
- Local, Radius – User authentication is first attempted locally by the
switch, then using a RADIUS server.
2-14
•
Server IP Address – The IP address of the RADIUS server.
•
Server Port Number – The UDP port number used by the
RADIUS server.
•
Secret Text String – The text string that is shared between the
switch and the RADIUS server.
•
Number of Server Transmits – The number of request transmits
to the RADIUS server before failure.
SECURITY
•
Timeout for a reply – The number of seconds the switch waits for
a reply from the RADIUS server before it resends the request.
Note: The local switch user database has to be set up by manually
entering user names and passwords using the CLI.
Web – Click System/Radius. Specify the authentication sequence, server
address, port number and other parameters, then click “Apply.”
CLI Commands
CLI – Specify all the required parameters to enable logon authentication.
Console(config)#authentication login radius
Console(config)#radius-server host 192.168.1.25
Console(config)#radius-server port 181
Console(config)#radius-server key green
Console(config)#radius-server retransmit 5
Console(config)#radius-server timeout 10
Console#show radius-server
Server IP address: 192.168.1.25
Communication key with radius server:
Server port number: 181
Retransmit times: 5
Request timeout: 10
Console(config)#
3-38
3-39
3-40
3-40
3-41
3-42
3-42
2-15
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Managing Firmware
You can upload/download firmware to or from a TFTP server. By saving
runtime code to a file on a TFTP server, that file can later be downloaded
to the switch to restore operation. You can also set the switch to use new
firmware without overwriting the previous version.
Command Attributes
•
TFTP Server IP Address – The IP address of a TFTP server.
•
Destination File Name – The destination file name should not
contain slashes (\ or /), the leading letter of the file name should not
be a period (.), and the length of file name should be 1 to 31 characters.
(Valid characters: A-Z, a-z, 0-9, “.”, “-”, “_”).
•
The maximum number of runtime code files is 2.
Downloading System Software from a Server
When downloading runtime code, you can specify the Destination File
Name to replace the current image, or first download the file using a
different name from the current runtime code file, and then set the new
file as the startup file.
Web – Click System/Firmware. Enter the IP address of the TFTP server,
enter the file name of the software to download, select a file on the switch
to overwrite or specify a new file name, then click “Transfer from Server.”
2-16
MANAGING FIRMWARE
If you download specifying a new destination file name, be sure to select
the new file from the drop-down box, and then click “Apply Changes.”
To start the new firmware, reboot the system.
CLI – Enter the IP address of the TFTP server, select “config” or
“opcode” file type, then enter the source and destination file names, set the
new file to start up the system, and then restart the switch.
Console#copy tftp file
TFTP server ip address: 10.1.0.99
Choose file type:
1. config: 2. opcode: <1-2>: 2
Source file name: v1013.bix
Destination file name: run_v1013
/
Console#config
Console(config)#boot system opcode:run_v1013
Console(config)#exit
Console#reload
3-18
3-23
3-16
To start the new firmware, enter the “reload” command or reboot the
system.
2-17
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Saving or Restoring Configuration Settings
You can upload/download configuration settings to/from a TFTP server.
The configuration file can be later downloaded to restore the switch’s
settings.
Command Attributes
•
Destination File Name — The destination configuration file name
should not contain slashes (\ or /), the leading letter of the file name
should not be a period (.), and the length of file name should be 1 to
31 characters. (Valid characters: A-Z, a-z, 0-9, “.”, “-”, “_”)
•
The maximum number of user-defined configuration files is limited
only by available Flash memory space.
You can save the configuration file under a new file name and then set it as
the startup file, or you can specify the current startup configuration file as
the destination file to directly replace it. Note that the file
“Factory_Default_Config.cfg” can be copied to the TFTP server, but
cannot be used as a destination file name on the switch.
Web – Click System/Configuration. Enter the IP address of the TFTP
server, enter the name of the file to download, select a file on the switch to
overwrite or specify a new file name, and then click “Transfer from
Server.”
2-18
MANAGING FIRMWARE
CLI – Enter the IP address of the TFTP server, specify the source file on
the server, set the startup file name on the switch, and then restart the
switch.
Console#copy tftp startup-config
TFTP server ip address: 192.168.1.19
Source configuration file name: startup2.0
Startup configuration file name [startup] : startup2.0
/
Console#
3-18
Setting the Startup Configuration File
If you download to a new file name, then select the new file from the
drop-down box, and click “Apply Changes.”
To use the new settings, reboot the system.
CLI – Enter the IP address of the TFTP server, specify the source file on
the server, set the startup file name on the switch, and then restart the
switch.
Console#copy tftp startup-config
TFTP server ip address: 192.168.1.19
Source configuration file name: startup2.0
Startup configuration file name [startup] : startup2.0
/
Console#
Console#config
Console(config)#boot system config: startup2.0
Console(config)#exit
Console#reload
3-18
3-23
Note: The CLI allows you replace a running configuration file without
performing a reset.
2-19
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Copying the Running Configuration to a File
CLI – If you copy the running configuration to a file, you can set this file
as the startup file at a later time, and then restart the switch.
Console#copy running-config file
destination file name : 051902.cfg
/
Console#
Console#config
Console(config)#boot system config: 051902.cfg
Console(config)#exit
Console#reload
3-18
3-23
3-16
Displaying Bridge Extension Capabilities
The Bridge MIB includes extensions for managed devices that support
Multicast Filtering, Traffic Classes, and Virtual LANs. You can access these
extensions to display default settings for the key variables, or to configure
the global setting for GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP).
Command Attributes
2-20
•
Extended Multicast Filtering Services – This switch does not
support the filtering of individual multicast addresses based on GMRP
(GARP Multicast Registration Protocol).
•
Traffic Classes – This switch provides mapping of user priorities to
multiple traffic classes. (Refer to “Class of Service Configuration” on
page 2-53.)
•
Static Entry Individual Port – This switch allows static filtering
for unicast and multicast addresses. (Refer to “Setting Static
Addresses” on page 2-30.)
•
VLAN Learning – This switch uses Independent VLAN Learning
(IVL), where each port maintains its own filtering database.
MANAGING FIRMWARE
•
Configurable PVID Tagging – This switch allows you to override
the default Port VLAN ID (PVID used in frame tags) and egress status
(VLAN-Tagged or Untagged) on each port. (Refer to “VLAN
Configuration” on page 2-41.)
•
Local VLAN Capable – This switch does not support multiple local
bridges (i.e., multiple Spanning Trees).
•
GMRP – GARP Multicast Registration Protocol (GMRP) allows
network devices to register endstations with multicast groups. This
switch does not support GMRP; it uses the Internet Group
Management Protocol (IGMP) to provide automatic multicast
filtering.
•
GVRP – GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP) defines a way
for switches to exchange VLAN information in order to register
necessary VLAN members on ports across the network. This function
should be enabled to permit VLANs groups which extend beyond the
local switch.
Web – Click System/Bridge Extension.
2-21
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
CLI – Enter the following command.
Console#show bridge-ext
Max support vlan numbers: 255
Max support vlan ID: 4094
Extended multicast filtering services: No
Static entry individual port: Yes
VLAN learning: IVL
Configurable PVID tagging: Yes
Local VLAN capable: No
Traffic classes: Enabled
Global GVRP status: Enabled
GMRP: Disabled
Console#
3-108
Displaying Switch Hardware/Software Versions
Command Attributes
Main Board
2-22
•
Serial Number – The serial number of the switch
•
Number of Ports – Number of ports on this switch
•
Hardware Version – Hardware version of the main board.
•
Internal Power Status – Displays the status of the internal power
supply
•
Loader Version – Version number of loader code.
•
Boot-ROM Version – Version number of boot code.
•
Operation Code Version – Version number of runtime code.
•
Role – Shows that this switch is Master (i.e., operating stand-alone).
MANAGING FIRMWARE
Web – Click System/Switch Information.
CLI – Use the following command to display version information.
Console#show version
Unit1
Serial number
Service tag
Hardware version
Number of ports
Main power status
Redundant power status
Agent(master)
Unit id
Loader version
Boot rom version
Operation code version
Console#
3-37
:00000000000000000000
:0000000
:R0C
:50
:up
:not present
:1
:1.0.0.0
:1.0.0.0
:1.0.1.3
2-23
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Port Configuration
Displaying Connection Status
You can use the Port Information or Trunk Information pages to display
the current connection status, including link state, speed/duplex mode,
flow control, and auto-negotiation.
Command Attributes
2-24
•
Name – Interface label.
•
Type – Indicates the of port type (100Base-TX, 1000Base-TX or
1000Base-SFP).
•
Admin Status – Shows if the interface is enabled or disabled.
•
Oper Status – Indicates if the link is Up or Down.
•
Speed/Duplex Status – Shows the current speed and duplex mode.
•
Flow Control Status – Indicates the type of flow control currently
in use.
•
Autonegotiation – Shows if auto-negotiation is enabled or disabled.
•
Trunk Member – Shows if port is a trunk member. (Port
Information only)
•
Creation – Shows if a trunk is manually configured. (Trunk
Information only)
PORT CONFIGURATION
Web – Click Port/Port Information or Trunk Information. Modify the
required interface settings, and click “Apply.”
CLI – This example shows the connection status for Port 13.
Console#show interfaces status ethernet 1/13
Information of Eth 1/13
Basic information:
Port type: 100tx
Mac address: 00-30-f1-47-58-46
Configuration:
Name:
Port admin: Up
Speed-duplex: Auto
Capabilities: 10half, 10full, 100half, 100full,
Broadcast storm: Enabled
Broadcast storm limit: 500 packets/second
Flow control: Disabled
Lacp: Disabled
Current status:
Link status: Down
Operation speed-duplex: 100full
Flow control type: None
Console#
3-75
2-25
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Configuring Interface Connections
You can use the Trunk Configuration or Port Configuration page to
enable/disable an interface, manually fix the speed and duplex mode, set
flow control, set auto-negotiation, and set the interface capabilities to
advertise.
Command Attributes
•
Name – Allows you to label an interface. (Range: 1-64 characters)
•
Admin – Allows you to manually disable an interface. You can disable
an interface due to abnormal behavior (e.g., excessive collisions), and
then reenable it after the problem has been resolved. You may also
disable an interface for security reasons.
•
Speed/Duplex – Allows manual selection of port speed and duplex
mode (i.e., with auto-negotiation disabled).
•
Flow Control – Allows automatic or manual selection of flow
control.
- Flow control can eliminate frame loss by “blocking” traffic from end
stations or segments connected directly to the switch when its
buffers fill. When enabled, back pressure is used for half-duplex
operation and IEEE 802.3x for full-duplex operation.
- Flow control should not be used if a port is connected to a hub.
Otherwise flow control signals will be propagated throughout the
segment.
•
Autonegotiation/Port Capabilities – Allows auto-negotiation to
be enabled/disabled. Specifies the capabilities to be advertised for a
port during auto-negotiation. The following capabilities are supported.
-
2-26
10half - Supports 10 Mbps half-duplex operation
10full - Supports 10 Mbps full-duplex operation
100half - Supports 100 Mbps half-duplex operation
100full - Supports 100 Mbps full-duplex operation
1000full - Supports 1000 Mbps full-duplex operation
PORT CONFIGURATION
- Sym - Transmits and receives pause frames for flow control (Gigabit
Ethernet ports only)
- FC - Supports flow control
•
Trunk – Indicates if a port is a member of a trunk. To create trunks
and select port members, see “Port Trunk Configuration” on page
2-66.
Note: Autonegotiation must be disabled before you can configure or
force the interface to use the Speed/Duplex Mode or Flow
Control options.
Web – Click Port/Port Configuration or Trunk Configuration. Modify the
required interface settings, and click “Apply.”
CLI – Select the interface, and then enter the required settings.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/13
Console(config-if)#description RD SW#13
Console(config-if)#shutdown
.
Console(config-if)#no shutdown
Console(config-if)#no negotiation
Console(config-if)#speed-duplex 100half
Console(config-if)#flowcontrol
.
Console(config-if)#negotiation
Console(config-if)#capabilities 100half
Console(config-if)#capabilities 100full
Console(config-if)#capabilities flowcontrol
3-68
3-68
3-73
3-70
3-69
3-72
3-71
2-27
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Setting Broadcast Storm Thresholds
Broadcast storms may occur when a device on your network is
malfunctioning, or if application programs are not well designed or
properly configured. If there is too much broadcast traffic on your
network, performance can be severely degraded or everything can come to
complete halt.
You can protect your network from broadcast storms by setting a
threshold for broadcast traffic for each port. Any broadcast packets
exceeding the specified threshold will then be dropped.
Command Usage
•
Default is enabled for all ports. Threshold: 500 packets per second
•
Broadcast control does not effect IP multicast traffic.
Web – Click Port/Port Broadcast Control. Set the threshold for all ports
(range 500-262143 pps), and then click “Apply.”
CLI – Specify the required interface, and then enter the threshold. The
following sets broadcast suppression at 600 packets per second on port 1.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/1
Console(config-if)#switchport broadcast packet-rate 600
Console(config-if)#
2-28
3-68
3-74
PORT CONFIGURATION
Configuring Port Mirroring
You can mirror traffic from any source port to a target port for real-time
analysis. You can then attach a logic analyzer or RMON probe to the target
port and study the traffic crossing the source port in a completely
unobtrusive manner.
Command Usage
•
The mirror port and monitor port speeds must match, otherwise traffic
may be dropped from the monitor port.
•
All mirror sessions have to share the same destination port.
•
The source and destination port have to be either both in the port
group of 1 to 24, 49 or both in the port group of 25 to 48, 50.
Web – Click Port/Mirror. Specify the source port, the traffic type to be
mirrored, and the monitor port, then click “Add.”
CLI – Use the interface command to select the monitor port, then use the
port monitor command to specify the source port. Note that default
mirroring under the CLI is for both received and transmitted packets.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/10
Console(config-if)#port monitor ethernet 1/13
Console(config-if)#
3-68
3-135
2-29
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Address Table Settings
Switches store the addresses for all known devices. This information is
used to route traffic directly between the inbound and outbound ports. All
the addresses learned by monitoring traffic are stored in the dynamic
address table. You can also manually configure static addresses that are
bound to a specific port.
Setting Static Addresses
A static address can be assigned to a specific interface on this switch. Static
addresses are bound to the assigned interface and will not be moved.
When a static address is seen on another interface, the address will be
ignored and will not be written to the address table.
Command Usage
Entries specified via the Web interface are permanent. Entries specified via
the CLI can be made permanent or can be set to be deleted on reset.
Web – Click Address Table/Static Addresses. Specify the interface, the
MAC address and VLAN, then click “Add Static Address.”
2-30
ADDRESS TABLE SETTINGS
CLI – This example adds an address to the static address table, but sets it
to be deleted when the switch is reset.
Console(config)#bridge 1 address 00-e0-29-94-34-de vlan 1 forward
ethernet 1/1 delete-on-reset
3-79
Console(config)#
Displaying the Address Table
The Dynamic Address Table contains the MAC addresses learned by
monitoring the source address for traffic entering the switch. When the
destination address for inbound traffic is found in the database, the
packets intended for that address is forwarded directly to the associated
port. Otherwise, the traffic is broadcast to all ports.
Command Usage
•
You can display entries in the dynamic address table by selecting an
interface (either port or trunk), MAC address, or VLAN.
•
You can sort the information displayed based on interface (port or
trunk), MAC address, or VLAN.
Web – Click Address Table/Dynamic Addresses. Specify the search type
(i.e., Interface, MAC Address, or VLAN), the method of sorting the
displayed addresses, then click Query.
2-31
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
For example, the following screen shows the dynamic addresses for port 7.
CLI – This example also displays the address table entries for port 11.
Console#show bridge 1 ethernet 1/11
Interface Mac Address
Vlan Type
--------- ----------------- ---- ----------------Eth 1/11 00-10-b5-62-03-74
1 Learned
Console#
3-80
Changing the Aging Time
You can set the aging time for entries in the dynamic address table.
Command Usage
The range for the aging time is 10 - 1000000 seconds. (The default is 300
seconds.)
Web – Click Address Table/Address Aging. Specify the new aging time,
then click “Apply.”
CLI – This example sets the aging time to 400 seconds.
Console(config)#bridge-group 1 aging-time 400
Console(config)#
2-32
3-82
SPANNING TREE PROTOCOL CONFIGURATION
Spanning Tree Protocol Configuration
The Spanning Tree Algorithm can be used to detect and disable network
loops, and to provide backup links between switches, bridges or routers.
This allows the switch to interact with other bridging devices (that is, an
STA-compliant switch, bridge or router) in your network to ensure that
only one route exists between any two stations on the network, and
provide backup links which automatically take over when a primary link
goes down.
Managing Global Settings
Global settings apply to the entire switch.
Command Attributes
The following global attributes are fixed and cannot be changed:
•
Bridge ID – The priority and MAC address of this device.
•
Designated Root – The priority and MAC address of the device in
the Spanning Tree that this switch has accepted as the root device.
•
Root Port – The number of the port on this switch that is closest to
the root. This switch communicates with the root device through this
port. If there is no root port, then this switch has been accepted as the
root device of the Spanning Tree network.
•
Root Path Cost – The path cost from the root port on this switch to
the root device.
•
Configuration Changes – The number of times the Spanning Tree
has been reconfigured.
•
Last Topology Change – The time since the Spanning Tree was last
reconfigured.
2-33
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
The following global attributes can be configured:
2-34
•
Spanning Tree State – Enable/disabled this switch to participate
in a STA-compliant network.
•
Priority – Bridge priority is used in selecting the root device, root
port, and designated port. The device with the highest priority
becomes the STA root device. However, if all devices have the same
priority, the device with the lowest MAC address will then become the
root device. (CLI only)
- Default: 32768
- Range: 0 - 65535
•
Hello Time – Interval (in seconds) at which the root device transmits
a configuration message.
- Default: 2
- Minimum: 1
- Maximum: The lower of 10 or [(Max. Message Age / 2) -1]
•
Maximum Age – The maximum time (in seconds) a device can wait
without receiving a configuration message before attempting to
reconfigure. All device ports (except for designated ports) should
receive configuration messages at regular intervals. Any port that ages
out STA information (provided in the last configuration message)
becomes the designated port for the attached LAN. If it is a root port,
a new root port is selected from among the device ports attached to the
network. (References to “ports” in this section means “interfaces,”
which includes both ports and trunks.)
- Default: 20
- Minimum: The higher of 6 or [2 x (Hello Time + 1)].
- Maximum: The lower of 40 or [2 x (Forward Delay - 1)]
SPANNING TREE PROTOCOL CONFIGURATION
•
Forward Delay – The maximum time (in seconds) the root device
will wait before changing states (i.e., listening to learning to
forwarding). This delay is required because every device must receive
information about topology changes before it starts to forward frames.
In addition, each port needs time to listen for conflicting information
that would make it return to a blocking state; otherwise, temporary data
loops might result.
- Default: 15
- Minimum: The higher of 4 or [(Max. Message Age / 2) + 1]
- Maximum: 30
Displaying the current global settings for STA
Web – Click STA/STA Information.
2-35
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
CLI – This command displays global STA settings, followed by the settings
for each port.
Console#show bridge group 1
3-91
Bridge-group information
-------------------------------------------------------------Spanning tree protocol
:ieee8021d
Spanning tree enable/disable
:enable
Priority
:32768
Hello Time (sec.)
:2
Max Age (sec.)
:20
Forward Delay (sec.)
:15
Designated Root
:32768.0030f147583a
Current root port
:0
Current root cost
:0
Number of topology changes
:1
Last topology changes time (sec.):26696
Hold times (sec.)
:1
--------------------------------------------------------------Eth 1/ 1 information
-------------------------------------------------------------Admin status
: enable
STA state
: broken
Path cost
: 18
Priority
: 128
Designated cost
: 0
Designated port
: 128.1
Designated root
: 32768.0030f147583a
Designated bridge
: 32768.0030f147583a
Fast forwarding
: disable
Forward transitions : 0
.
.
.
Note: The current root port and current root cost display as zero when
this device is not connected to the network.
2-36
SPANNING TREE PROTOCOL CONFIGURATION
Configuring the global settings for STA
Web – Click STA/STA Configuration. Modify the required attributes,
click “Apply.”
CLI – This example enables Spanning Tree Protocol, and then sets the
indicated attributes.
Console(config)#bridge
Console(config)#bridge
Console(config)#bridge
Console(config)#bridge
Console(config)#bridge
1
1
1
1
1
spanning-tree
priority 40000
hello-time 5
max-age 40
forward-time 20
3-84
3-87
3-86
3-86
3-85
Managing STA Interface Settings
You can configure STA attributes for specific interfaces, including port
priority, path cost, and fast forwarding. You may use a different priority or
path cost for ports of same media type to indicate the preferred path.
Command Attributes
The following global attributes are read-only and cannot be changed:
•
Port Status – Displays current state of this port within the Spanning
Tree:
2-37
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
2-38
•
Disabled - The port has been disabled by the user or has failed
diagnostics.
•
Blocking - Port receives STA configuration messages, but does
not forward packets.
•
Listening - Port will leave blocking state due to a topology
change, start transmitting configuration messages, but does not
yet forward packets.
•
Learning - Port has transmitted configuration messages for an
interval set by the Forward Delay parameter without receiving
contradictory information. Port address table is cleared, and the
port begins learning addresses.
•
Forwarding - Port forwards packets, and continues learning
addresses.
•
Broken - Port is malfunctioning or no link has been established.
•
Forward Transitions – The number of times this port has
transitioned from the Learning state to the Forwarding state.
•
Designated Cost – The cost for a packet to travel from this port to
the root in the current Spanning Tree configuration. The slower the
media, the higher the cost.
•
Designated Bridge – The priority and MAC address of the device
through which this port must communicate to reach the root of the
Spanning Tree.
•
Designated Port – The priority and number of the port on the
designated bridging device through which this switch must
communicate with the root of the Spanning Tree.
•
Trunk Member – Indicates if a port is a member of a trunk.
SPANNING TREE PROTOCOL CONFIGURATION
The following interface attributes can be configured:
•
Priority – Defines the priority used for this port in the Spanning Tree
Protocol. If the path cost for all ports on a switch are the same, the port
with the highest priority (i.e., lowest value) will be configured as an
active link in the Spanning Tree. This makes a port with higher priority
less likely to be blocked if the Spanning Tree Protocol is detecting
network loops. Where more than one port is assigned the highest
priority, the port with lowest numeric identifier will be enabled.
- Default: 128
- Range: 0 - 255
•
Path Cost – This parameter is used by the STP to determine the best
path between devices. Therefore, lower values should be assigned to
ports attached to faster media, and higher values assigned to ports with
slower media. (Path cost takes precedence over port priority.)
•
•
Full Range: 1-65535
•
Recommended Range –
- Ethernet: 50-600
- Fast Ethernet: 10-60
- Gigabit Ethernet: 3-10
•
Defaults –
- Ethernet – half duplex: 100; full duplex: 95; trunk: 90
- Fast Ethernet – half duplex: 19; full duplex: 18; trunk: 15
- Gigabit Ethernet – full duplex: 4; trunk: 3
Fast Forwarding – Since end-nodes cannot cause forwarding loops,
they can be pass directly through to the forwarding state. Fast
Forwarding can achieve quicker convergence for end-node
workstations and servers, and also overcome other STA related
timeout problems. (Remember that Fast Forwarding should only be
enabled for ports connected to an end-node device.)
- Default is disabled
2-39
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Web – Click STA/STA Port Information or STA Trunk Information.
CLI – This example shows the STA attributes for port 5.
Console#show bridge group 1 ethernet 1/5
3-91
Bridge-group information
-------------------------------------------------------------Spanning tree protocol
:ieee8021d
Spanning tree enable/disable
:enable
Priority
:32768
Hello Time (sec.)
:2
Max Age (sec.)
:20
Forward Delay (sec.)
:15
Designated Root
:32768.0000e8000001
Current root port
:13
Current root cost
:4
Number of topology changes
:325
Last topology changes time (sec.):18
Hold times (sec.)
:1
--------------------------------------------------------------Eth 1/ 5 information
-------------------------------------------------------------Admin status
: enable
STA state
: blocking
Path cost
: 4
Priority
: 128
Designated cost
: 4
Designated port
: 128.5
Designated root
: 32768.0000e8000001
Designated bridge
: 32768.222222222222
Fast forwarding
: enable
Forward transitions : 18
Console#
2-40
VLAN CONFIGURATION
Web – Click STA/STA Port Configuration or STA Trunk Configuration.
Modify the required attributes, then click “Apply.”
CLI – This example sets STA attributes for port 5.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#bridge-group 1 priority 0
Console(config-if)#bridge-group 1 path-cost 50
Console(config-if)#bridge-group 1 portfast
3-68
3-89
3-88
3-90
VLAN Configuration
In conventional networks with routers, broadcast traffic is split up into
separate domains. Switches do not inherently support broadcast domains.
This can lead to broadcast storms in large networks that handle traffic
such as IPX or NetBeui. By using IEEE 802.1Q-compliant VLANs, you
can organize any group of network nodes into separate broadcast domains,
thus confining broadcast traffic to the originating group. This also
provides a more secure and cleaner network environment.
An IEEE 802.1Q VLAN is a group of ports that can be located anywhere
in the network, but communicate as though they belong to the same
physical segment.
2-41
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
VLANs help to simplify network management by allowing you to move
devices to a new VLAN without having to change any physical
connections. VLANs can be easily organized to reflect departmental
groups (such as Marketing or R&D), usage groups (such as e-mail), or
multicast groups (used for multimedia applications such as
videoconferencing).
VLANs provide greater network efficiency by reducing broadcast traffic,
and allow you to make network changes without having to update IP
addresses or IP subnets. VLANs inherently provide a high level of network
security since traffic must pass through a configured Layer 3 link to reach a
different VLAN.
•
Up to 255 VLANs based on the IEEE 802.1Q standard
•
Distributed VLAN learning across multiple switches using explicit or
implicit tagging
•
Port overlapping, allowing a port to participate in multiple VLANs
•
End stations can belong to multiple VLANs
•
Passing traffic between VLAN-aware and VLAN-unaware devices
•
Priority tagging
Assigning Ports to VLANs
Before enabling VLANs for the switch, you must first assign each port to
the VLAN group(s) in which it will participate. By default all ports are
assigned to VLAN 1 as untagged ports. Add a port as a tagged port (that
is, a port attached to a VLAN-aware device) if you want it to carry traffic
for one or more VLANs and if the device at the other end of the link also
supports VLANs. Then assign the port at the other end of the link to the
same VLAN(s). However, if you want a port on this switch to participate
2-42
VLAN CONFIGURATION
in one or more VLANs, but the device at the other end of the link does
not support VLANs, then you must add this port as an untagged port (that
is, a port attached to a VLAN-unaware device).
VLAN Classification – When the switch receives a frame, it classifies
the frame in one of two ways. If the frame is untagged, the switch assigns
the frame to an associated VLAN (based on the PVID of the receiving
port. But if the frame is tagged, the switch uses the tagged VLAN ID to
identify the port broadcast domain of the frame.
Port Overlapping – Port overlapping can be used to allow access to
commonly shared network resources among different VLAN groups, such
as file servers or printers. Note that if you implement VLANs which do
not overlap, but still need to communicate, you can connect them by using
a Layer-3 router or switch.
Port-based VLANs – Port-based (or static) VLANs are manually tied to
specific ports. The switch’s forwarding decision is based on the destination
MAC address and its associated port. Therefore, to make valid forwarding
or flooding decisions, the switch must learn the relationship of the MAC
address to its related port—and thus to the VLAN—at run-time.
However, when GVRP is enabled, this process can be fully automatic.
Automatic VLAN Registration – GVRP (GARP VLAN Registration
Protocol) defines a system whereby the switch can automatically learn the
VLANs to which each endstation should be assigned. If an endstation (or
its network adapter) supports the IEEE 802.1Q VLAN protocol, it can be
configured to broadcast a message to your network indicating the VLAN
groups it wants to join. When this switch receives these messages, it will
automatically place the receiving port in the specified VLANs, and then
forward the message to all other ports. When the message arrives at
another switch that supports GVRP, it will also place the receiving port in
the specified VLANs, and pass the message on to all other ports. VLAN
requirements are propagated in this way throughout the network. This
allows GVRP-compliant devices to be automatically configured for VLAN
groups based solely on endstation requests.
2-43
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
To implement GVRP in a network, you must first configure the static
VLANs required on switches that are connected to PCs, servers, and other
devices, so that these VLANs can be propagated across the network
(Web - VLAN / VLAN Membership). For other core switches in the
network, enable GVRP on the links between these devices
(Web - VLAN / Port Settings or Trunk Settings). You should also
determine security boundaries in the network and disable GVRP on ports
to prevent advertisements being propagated, or forbid ports from joining
restricted VLANs.
Forwarding Tagged/Untagged Frames
If you want to create a small port-based VLAN for devices attached
directly to a single switch, you can assign ports to the same untagged
VLAN. However, to participate in a VLAN group that crosses several
switches, you need to create a VLAN for that group and enable tagging on
all ports.
Ports can be assigned to multiple tagged or untagged VLANs. Each port
on the switch is therefore capable of passing tagged or untagged frames.
To forward a frame from a VLAN-aware device to a VLAN-unaware
device, the switch first decides where to forward the frame, and then strips
off the VLAN tag. However, to forward a frame from a VLAN-unaware
device to a VLAN-aware device, the switch first decides where to forward
the frame, and then inserts a VLAN tag reflecting this port’s default VID.
Displaying Basic VLAN Information
Command Attributes
2-44
•
VLAN Version Number – The VLAN version used by this switch
as specified in the IEEE 802.1Q standard. (Web interface only.)
•
Maximum VLAN ID – Maximum VLAN ID recognized by this
switch.
VLAN CONFIGURATION
•
Maximum Number of Supported VLANs – Maximum number
of VLANs that can be configured on this switch.
Web – Click VLAN/VLAN Basic Information.
CLI – Enter the following command.
Console#show bridge-ext
Max support vlan numbers: 255
Max support vlan ID: 4094
Extended multicast filtering services: No
Static entry individual port: Yes
VLAN learning: IVL
Configurable PVID tagging: Yes
Local VLAN capable: No
Traffic classes: Enabled
Global GVRP status: Enabled
GMRP: Disabled
Console#
3-108
Displaying Current VLANs
Command Attributes for Web Interface
•
VLAN ID – ID of configured VLAN (1-4094, no leading zeroes).
•
Up Time at Creation – Time this VLAN was created; i.e., System
Up Time.
•
Status – Shows how this VLAN was added to the switch.
- Dynamic GVRP: Automatically learned via GVRP.
- Permanent: Added as a static entry.
•
Tagged Ports – Shows the tagged VLAN port members.
•
Untagged Ports – Shows the untagged VLAN port members.
2-45
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Web – Click VLAN/VLAN Current Table. Select any ID from the
scroll-down list.
Command Attributes for CLI Interface
2-46
•
VLAN – ID of configured VLAN (1-4094, no leading zeroes).
•
Type – Shows how this VLAN was added to the switch.
- Dynamic: Automatically learned via GVRP.
- Static: Added as a static entry.
•
Name – Name of the VLAN (1 to 64 characters).
•
Status – Shows if this VLAN is enabled or disabled.
- Active: VLAN is operational.
- Suspend: VLAN is suspended; i.e., does not pass packets.
•
Ports / Channel groups – Shows the VLAN interface members.
VLAN CONFIGURATION
CLI – Current VLAN information can be displayed with the following
command.
Console#show vlan id 1
3-103
VLAN Type
Name
Status
Ports/Channel groups
---- ------- ---------------- --------- --------------------------------------1 Static
DefaultVlan
Active Eth1/ 1 Eth1/ 2 Eth1/ 3 Eth1/ 4 Eth1/ 5
Eth1/ 6 Eth1/ 7 Eth1/ 8 Eth1/ 9 Eth1/10
Eth1/11 Eth1/12 Eth1/13 Eth1/14 Eth1/15
Eth1/16 Eth1/17 Eth1/18 Eth1/19 Eth1/20
Eth1/21 Eth1/22 Eth1/23 Eth1/24 Eth1/25
Eth1/26 Eth1/27 Eth1/28 Eth1/29 Eth1/30
Eth1/31 Eth1/32 Eth1/33 Eth1/34 Eth1/35
Eth1/36 Eth1/37 Eth1/38 Eth1/39 Eth1/40
Eth1/41 Eth1/42 Eth1/43 Eth1/44 Eth1/45
Eth1/46 Eth1/47 Eth1/48 Eth1/49 Eth1/50
Console#
Creating VLANs
Command Attributes
•
VLAN ID – ID of configured VLAN (1-4094, no leading zeroes).
•
Name – Name of the VLAN (1 to 64 characters).
•
Status – Shows if this VLAN is enabled or disabled (Web).
- Enable: VLAN is operational.
- Disable: VLAN is suspended; i.e., does not pass packets.
•
State – Shows if this VLAN is enabled or disabled (CLI).
- Active: VLAN is operational.
- Suspend: VLAN is suspended; i.e., does not pass packets.
Web – Click VLAN/VLAN Static List. Enter the VLAN ID and VLAN
name, mark the Enable checkbox to activate the VLAN, and then click
Add.
2-47
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
CLI – This example creates a new VLAN.
Console(config)#vlan database
Console(config-vlan)#vlan 5 name R&D media ethernet state
active
Console(config-vlan)#
3-94
3-95
Adding Interfaces Based on Membership Type
Command Attributes
•
Port – Port identifier.
•
Trunk – Trunk identifier.
•
VLAN – ID of configured VLAN (1-4094, no leading zeroes).
•
Name – Name of the VLAN (1 to 64 characters).
•
Status – Shows if this VLAN is enabled or disabled.
- Enable: VLAN is operational.
- Disable: VLAN is suspended; i.e., does not pass packets.
•
Membership Type – Select VLAN membership for each interface
by marking the appropriate radio button for a port or trunk:
- Tagged: Interface is a member of the VLAN. All packets
transmitted by the port will be tagged, that is, carry a tag and
therefore carry VLAN or CoS information.
- Untagged: Interface is a member of the VLAN. All packets
transmitted by the port will be untagged, that is, not carry a tag and
therefore not carry VLAN or CoS information. Note that an
interface must be assigned to at least one group as an untagged port.
- Forbidden: Interface is forbidden from automatically joining the
VLAN via GVRP. For more information, see “GVRP” on page 81.
- None: Interface is not a member of the VLAN. Packets associated
with this VLAN will not be transmitted by the interface.
2-48
VLAN CONFIGURATION
•
Trunk Member – Indicates if a port is a member of a trunk. To add
a trunk to the selected VLAN, use the last table on the VLAN Static
Table page.
Web – Click VLAN/VLAN Static Table. Select a VLAN ID from the
scroll-down list. Modify the VLAN name and status if required. Select the
membership type by marking the appropriate radio button in the list of
ports or trunks. Click “Apply.”
CLI – The following example shows how to add tagged and untagged
ports to VLAN 2.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/1
Console(config-if)#switchport allowed vlan add 2 tagged
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/2
Console(config-if)#switchport allowed vlan add 2 untagged
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/13
Console(config-if)#switchport allowed vlan add 2 tagged
3-68
3-101
2-49
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Adding Interfaces Based on Static Membership
Command Attributes
•
Interface – Port or trunk identifier.
•
Member – VLANs for which the selected interface is a tagged
member.
•
Non-Member – VLANs for which the selected interface is not a
tagged member.
Web – Open VLAN/VLAN Static Membership. Select an interface from
the scroll-down box (Port or Trunk). Click “Query” to display VLAN
membership information for the interface. Select a VLAN ID, and then
click “Add” to add the interface as a tagged member, or click “Remove” to
remove the interface. After configuring VLAN membership for each
interface, click “Apply.”
CLI – This example adds Port 3 to VLAN 1 as a tagged port, and removes
Port 3 from VLAN 2.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/3
Console(config-if)#switchport allowed vlan add 1 tagged
Console(config-if)#switchport allowed vlan remove 2
2-50
3-68
3-101
VLAN CONFIGURATION
Configuring VLAN Behavior for Interfaces
You can configure VLAN behavior for specific interfaces, including the
default VLAN identifier (PVID), accepted frame types, ingress filtering,
GVRP status, and GARP timers.
Command Usage
•
GVRP – GARP VLAN Registration Protocol defines a way for
switches to exchange VLAN information in order to automatically
register VLAN members on interfaces across the network.
•
GARP – Group Address Registration Protocol is used by GVRP to
register or deregister client attributes for client services within a
bridged LAN. The default values for the GARP timers are
independent of the media access method or data rate. These values
should not be changed unless you are experiencing difficulties with
GVRP registration/deregistration.
Command Attributes
•
PVID – The VLAN ID assigned to untagged frames received on the
interface. If the (CLI) switchport mode is set to trunk (see page 3-97),
the PVID will be inserted into all untagged frames sent from a tagged
port. (Default: 1)
•
Acceptable Frame Type – Sets the interface to accept all frame
types, including tagged or untagged frames, or only tagged frames. If
only tagged frames are accepted, the switch will only accept frames if
the frame tag matches a VLAN to which this interface has been
assigned. (Default: All)
•
Ingress Filtering – If ingress filtering is enabled, incoming frames
for VLANs which do not include this ingress port in their member set
will be discarded at the ingress port. This will not affect VLAN
independent BPDU frames, such as GVRP or STP. (Default:
Disabled)
2-51
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
•
GVRP Status – Enables/disables GVRP for the interface. GVRP
must be globally enabled for the switch before this setting can take
effect. (See “Displaying Bridge Extension Capabilities” on page 2-20.)
When disabled, any GVRP packets received on this port will be
discarded and no GVRP registrations will be propagated from other
ports. (Default: Enabled)
•
GARP Join Timer – The interval between transmitting requests/
queries to participate in a VLAN group. (Default: 20 centiseconds)
•
GARP Leave Timer – The interval a port waits before leaving a
VLAN group. This time should be set to more than twice the join time.
This ensures that after a Leave or LeaveAll message has been issued,
the applicants can rejoin before the port actually leaves the group.
(Default: 60 centiseconds)
•
GARP LeaveAll Timer – The interval between sending out a
LeaveAll query message for VLAN group participants and the port
leaving the group. This interval should be considerably larger than the
Leave Time to minimize the amount of traffic generated by nodes
rejoining the group. (Default: 1000 centiseconds)
•
Trunk Member – Indicates if a port is a member of a trunk. To add
a trunk to the selected VLAN, use the last table on the VLAN Static
Table page.
•
Mode – Indicates VLAN membership mode for a port. (Configure via
CLI, see page 3-97.)
- 1Q Trunk – Specifies a port as an end-point for a VLAN trunk. A
trunk is a direct link between two switches, so the port transmits and
receives tagged frames that identify the source VLAN.
- Hybrid – Specifies a hybrid VLAN interface. The port may receive
or transmit tagged or untagged frames. Any frames that are not
tagged will be assigned to the default VLAN.
Note: Mode and the Acceptable Fame Type are comparable parameters.
2-52
CLASS OF SERVICE CONFIGURATION
Web – Click VLAN/VLAN Port Configuration or VLAN Trunk
Configuration. Fill in the required settings for each interface, click “Apply.”
CLI – This example sets port 1 to accept only tagged frames, assigns
PVID 3 as the native VLAN ID, enables GVRP, sets the GARP timers,
and then sets the switchport mode to hybrid.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/1
Console(config-if)#switchport acceptable-frame-types tagged
Console(config-if)#switchport ingress-filtering
Console(config-if)#switchport native vlan 3
Console(config-if)#switchport gvrp
Console(config-if)#garp timer join 10
Console(config-if)#garp timer leave 90
Console(config-if)#garp timer leaveall 2000
Console(config-if)#switchport mode hybrid
Console(config-if)#
3-68
3-98
3-99
3-100
3-104
3-106
3-106
3-106
3-97
Class of Service Configuration
Class of Service (CoS) allows you to specify which data packets have
greater precedence when traffic is buffered in the switch due to
congestion. This switch supports CoS with four priority queues for each
port. Data packets in a port’s high-priority queue will be transmitted before
those in the lower-priority queues. You can set the default priority for each
interface, and configure the mapping of frame priority tags to the switch’s
priority queues.
2-53
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Setting the Default Priority for Interfaces
You can specify the default port priority for each interface on the switch.
All untagged packets entering the switch are tagged with the specified
default port priority, and then sorted into the appropriate priority queue at
the output port.
Command Usage
•
This switch provides four priority queues for each port. It uses
Weighted Round Robin to prevent head-of-queue blockage.
•
The default priority applies if the incoming frame is an untagged frame
received from a VLAN trunk or a static-access port. This priority does
not apply to IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tagged frames. If the incoming
frame is an IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tagged frame, the IEEE 802.1p User
Priority bits will be used.
•
If the output port is an untagged member of the associated VLAN,
these frames are stripped of all VLAN tags prior to transmission.
Command Attributes
2-54
•
Default Priority – The priority that is assigned to untagged frames
received on the specified port. (Range: 0 - 7, Default: 0)
•
Number of Egress Traffic Classes – The number of queue
buffers provided for each port.
CLASS OF SERVICE CONFIGURATION
Web – Click Priority/Default Port Priority or Default Trunk Priority.
Modify the default priority for any interface, then click “Apply.”
CLI – This example assigns a default priority or 5 to port 3.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/3
Console(config-if)#switchport priority default 5
3-68
3-121
Mapping CoS Values to Egress Queues
This switch processes Class of Service (CoS) priority tagged traffic by
using four priority queues for each port, with service schedules based on
Weighted Round Robin (WRR). Up to eight separate traffic priorities are
defined in IEEE 802.1p. The default priority levels are assigned according
2-55
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
to recommendations in the IEEE 802.1p standard as shown in the
following table.
Queue
0
1
2
3
0
1
Priority
2
3
4
5
6
7
The priority levels recommended in the IEEE 802.1p standard for various
network applications are shown in the following table. However, you can
map the priority levels to the switch’s output queues in any way that
benefits application traffic for your own network.
2-56
Priority Level
Traffic Type
1
Background
2
(Spare)
0 (default)
Best Effort
3
Excellent Effort
4
Controlled Load
5
Video, less than 100 milliseconds latency and jitter
6
Voice, less than 10 milliseconds latency and jitter
7
Network Control
•
Priority – CoS value. (Range: 0 to 7, where 7 is the highest priority)
•
Traffic Class – Output queue buffer. (Range: 0 - 3, where 3 is the
highest CoS priority queue)
CLASS OF SERVICE CONFIGURATION
Web – Click Priority/Traffic Classes. Assign priorities to the output
queues, then click “Apply.”
CLI – The following example shows how to map CoS values 0, 1 and 2 to
CoS priority queue 0, value 3 to CoS priority queue 1, values 4 and 5 to
CoS priority queue 2, and values 6 and 7 to CoS priority queue 3.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/1
Console(config)#queue cos-map 0 0 1 2
Console(config)#queue cos-map 1 3
Console(config)#queue cos-map 2 4 5
Console(config)#queue cos-map 3 6 7
Console(config)#exit
Console#show queue cos-map ethernet 1/1
Information of Eth 1/1
Queue ID Traffic class
-------- ------------0
0 1 2
1
3
2
4 5
3
6 7
Console#
3-68
3-123
3-125
2-57
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Setting the Service Weight for Traffic Classes
This switch uses the Weighted Round Robin (WRR) algorithm to
determine the frequency at which it services each priority queue. As
described in “Mapping CoS Values to Egress Queues” on page 2-55, the
traffic classes are mapped to one of the four egress queues provided for
each port. You can assign a weight to each of these queues (and thereby to
the corresponding traffic priorities). This weight sets the frequency at
which each queue will be polled for service, and subsequently affects the
response time for software applications assigned a specific priority value.
Command Attributes
•
WRR Setting Table – Displays a list of weights for each traffic class
(i.e., queue).
•
Weight Value – Set a new weight for the selected traffic class.
Web – Open Priority/Queue Scheduling. Select a traffic class by clicking
on it with your cursor, enter a weight value, and then click “Apply.”
CLI – The following example shows how to assign WRR weights of 1, 4,
16 and 64 to the CoS priority queues 0, 1, 2 and 3.
Console(config)#queue bandwidth 1 4 16 64
Console(config)#exit
Console#show queue bandwidth
Queue ID Weight
-------- -----0
1
1
4
2
16
3
64
Console#
2-58
3-122
3-125
CLASS OF SERVICE CONFIGURATION
Mapping Layer 3/4 Priorities to CoS Values
This switch supports several common methods of prioritizing layer 3/4
traffic to meet application requirements. Traffic priorities can be specified
in the IP header of a frame, using the priority bits in the Type of Service
(ToS) octet or the number of the TCP/UDP port. If priority bits are used,
the ToS octet may contain three bits for IP Precedence or six bits for
Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) service. When these services
are enabled, the priorities are mapped to a Class of Service value by the
switch, and the traffic then sent to the corresponding output queue.
Because different priority information may be contained in the traffic, this
switch maps priority values to the output queues in the following manner:
•
The precedence for priority mapping is IP Port Priority, IP Precedence
or DSCP Priority, and then Default Port Priority.
•
IP Precedence and DSCP Priority cannot both be enabled. Enabling
one of these priority types will automatically disable the other.
•
IP Precedence/DSCP and IP Port Priority settings are global and apply
to all ports on the switch.
Selecting IP Precedence/DSCP Priority
The switch allows you to choose between using IP Precedence or DSCP
priority. Select one of the methods or disable this feature.
Command Attributes
•
IP Precedence/DSCP Priority Status – Selects IP Precedence,
DSCP, or disables both priority services.
Web – Click Priority/IP Precedence Priority. Select “IP Precedence” or
“IP DSCP” from the IP Precedence/DSCP Priority Status menu.
2-59
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
CLI – The following example globally enables IP Precedence service on
the switch.
Console(config)#map ip precedence
Console#
3-128
Mapping IP Precedence
The Type of Service (ToS) octet in the IPv4 header includes three
precedence bits defining eight different priority levels ranging from highest
priority for network control packets to lowest priority for routine traffic.
The default IP Precedence values are mapped one-to-one to Class of
Service values (i.e., Precedence value 0 maps to CoS value 0, and so forth).
Bits 6 and 7 are used for network control, and the other bits for various
application types. ToS bits are defined in the following table.
Priority Level
Traffic Type
7
Network Control
6
Internetwork Control
5
Critical
4
Flash Override
3
Flash
2
Immediate
1
Priority
0
Routine
Command Attributes
2-60
•
IP Precedence Priority Table – Shows the IP Precedence to CoS
map.
•
Class of Service Value – Maps a CoS value to the selected IP
Precendence value. Note that “0” represents low priority and “7”
represent high priority.
CLASS OF SERVICE CONFIGURATION
Web – Click Priority/IP Precedence Priority. Select a port or trunk from
the Interface field (note that settings apply to all interfaces). Select an IP
Precedence value from the IP Precedence Priority Table by clicking on it
with your cursor, enter a value in the Class of Service Value field, and then
click “Apply.” Be sure to also select “IP Precedence” from the IP
Precedence/DSCP Priority Status menu.
CLI – The following example globally enables IP Precedence service on
the switch, maps IP Precedence value 1 to CoS value 0 on port 5, and then
displays all the IP Precedence settings for that port.
Console(config)#map ip precedence
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#map ip precedence 1 cos 0
Console(config-if)#end
Console#show map ip precedence ethernet 1/5
Precedence mapping status: disabled
3-128
3-68
3-128
3-133
Port
Precedence COS
--------- ---------- --Eth 1/ 5
0
0
Eth 1/ 5
1
0
Eth 1/ 5
2
2
Eth 1/ 5
3
3
Eth 1/ 5
4
4
Eth 1/ 5
5
5
Eth 1/ 5
6
6
Eth 1/ 5
7
7
Console#
2-61
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Mapping DSCP Priority
The DSCP is six bits wide, allowing coding for up to 64 different
forwarding behaviors. The DSCP replaces the ToS bits, and it retains
backward compatibility with the three precedence bits so that non-DSCP
compliant, ToS-enabled devices, will not conflict with the DSCP mapping.
Based on network policies, different kinds of traffic can be marked for
different kinds of forwarding. The DSCP default values are defined in the
following table. Note that all the DSCP values that are not specified are
mapped to CoS value 0.
IP DSCP Value
CoS Value
0
0
8
1
10, 12, 14, 16
2
18, 20, 22, 24
3
26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36
4
38, 40, 42
5
48
6
46, 56
7
Command Attributes
•
DSCP Priority Table – Shows the DSCP Priority to CoS map.
•
Class of Service Value – Maps a CoS value to the selected DSCP
Priority value. Note that “0” represents low priority and “7” represent
high priority.
Web – Click Priority/IP DSCP Priority. Select a port or trunk from the
Interface field (note that settings apply to all interfaces). Select a DSCP
priority value from the DSCP Priority Table by clicking on it with your
cursor, enter a value in the Class of Service Value field, and then click
“Apply.” Be sure to also select “IP DSCP” from the IP Precedence/DSCP
Priority Status menu.
2-62
CLASS OF SERVICE CONFIGURATION
CLI – The following example globally enables DSCP Priority service on
the switch, maps DSCP value 1 to CoS value 0 on port 5, and then displays
all the DSCP Priority settings for that port.
Console(config)#map ip dscp
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#map ip dscp 1 cos 0
Console(config-if)#end
Console#show map ip dscp ethernet 1/5
DSCP mapping status: disabled
3-130
3-68
3-130
3-134
Port
DSCP COS
--------- ---- --Eth 1/ 5
0
0
Eth 1/ 5
1
0
Eth 1/ 5
2
0
Eth 1/ 5
3
0
.
.
.
Eth 1/ 5
Eth 1/ 5
Eth 1/ 5
Console#
61
62
63
0
0
0
2-63
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Mapping IP Port Priority
You can also map network applications to Class of Service values based on
the IP port number (i.e., TCP/UDP port number) in the frame header.
Some of the more common TCP service ports include: HTTP: 80,
FTP: 21, Telnet: 23 and POP3: 110.
Command Attributes
•
IP Port Priority Status – Enables or disables the IP port priority.
•
Interface – Selects the port or trunk interface to which the settings
apply.
•
IP Port Priority Table – Shows the IP port to CoS map.
•
IP Port Number (TCP/UDP) – Set a new IP port number.
•
Class of Service Value – Sets a CoS value for a new IP port. Note
that “0” represents low priority and “7” represent high priority.
Web – Click Priority/IP Port Status. Set IP Port Priority Status to
“Enabled.”
Click Priority/IP Port Priority. Select a port or trunk from the Interface
field (note that settings apply to all interfaces). Enter the port number for a
network application in the IP Port Number box and the new CoS value in
the Class of Service box, and then click “Add IP Port.”
2-64
CLASS OF SERVICE CONFIGURATION
CLI – The following example globally enables IP Port Priority service on
the switch, maps HTTP traffic on port 5 to CoS value 0, and then displays
all the IP Port Priority settings for that port.
Console(config)#map ip port
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#map ip port 80 cos 0
Console(config-if)#end
Console#show map ip port ethernet 1/5
TCP port mapping status: disabled
3-126
3-68
3-127
3-132
Port
Port no. COS
--------- -------- --Eth 1/ 5
80
0
Console#
2-65
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Port Trunk Configuration
Ports can be combined into an aggregate link to increase the bandwidth of
a network connection where bottlenecks exist or to ensure fault recovery.
You can create up to six trunks at a time, with any single trunk containing
up to four ports.
The switch supports both static trunking and dynamic LACP (Link
Aggregation Control Protocol). LACP configured ports can automatically
negotiate a trunked link with LACP-configured ports on another device.
You can enable LACP on any port that is not already a member of a static
trunk. If LACP is also enabled for the connected ports on another device,
the switch and the other device will automatically create a trunked link.
Besides balancing the load across each port in the trunk, the other ports
provide redundancy by taking over the load if a port in the trunk fails.
However, before making any physical connections between devices, use
the Web interface or CLI to specify the trunk on the devices at both ends.
When using a port trunk, take note of the following points:
2-66
•
Finish configuring port trunks before you connect the corresponding
network cables between switches to avoid creating a loop.
•
The ports at both ends of a connection must be configured as trunk
ports.
•
The ports at both ends of a trunk must be configured in an identical
manner, including communication mode (i.e., speed, duplex mode and
flow control), VLAN assignments, and CoS settings.
•
All ports on both ends of an LACP trunk must be configured for full
duplex, either by forced mode or auto-negotiation.
•
All the ports in a trunk have to be treated as a whole when moved
from/to, added or deleted from a VLAN.
•
STP, VLAN, and IGMP settings can only be made for the entire trunk.
PORT TRUNK CONFIGURATION
Dynamically Configuring a Trunk with LACP
Web – Click Trunk/LACP Configuration. Select any of the switch ports
from the scroll-down port list and click “Add.” After you have completed
adding ports to the member list, click “Apply.”
CLI – The following example enables LACP for ports 17 and 18. Just
connect these ports to two LACP-enabled trunk ports on another switch
to form a trunk.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/17
Console(config-if)#lacp
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/18
Console(config-if)#lacp
Console(config-if)#end
Console#show interfaces status port-channel 1
Information of Trunk 1
Basic information:
Port type: 100tx
Mac address: 22-22-22-22-22-2d
Configuration:
Name:
Port admin status: Up
Speed-duplex: Auto
Capabilities: 10half, 10full, 100half, 100full,
Flow control status: Disabled
Current status:
Created by: Lacp
Link status: Up
Port operation status: Up
Operation speed-duplex: 100full
Flow control type: None
Member Ports: Eth1/17, Eth1/18,
Console#
3-68
3-139
3-75
2-67
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Statically Configuring a Trunk
Web – Click Trunk/Trunk Configuration. Enter a trunk ID of 1-6 in the
Trunk field, select any of the switch ports from the scroll-down port list,
and click “Add.” After you have completed adding ports to the member
list, click “Apply.”
CLI – This example creates trunk 1 with ports 11 and 12. Just connect
these ports to two static trunk ports on another switch to form a trunk.
Console(config)#interface port-channel 1
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/11
Console(config-if)#channel-group 1
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/12
Console(config-if)#channel-group 1
Console(config-if)#end
Console#show interfaces status port-channel 1
Information of Trunk 1
Basic information:
Port type: 100tx
Mac address: 22-22-22-22-22-2c
Configuration:
Name:
Port admin status: Up
Speed-duplex: Auto
Capabilities: 10half, 10full, 100half, 100full,
Flow control status: Disabled
Current status:
Created by: User
Link status: Up
Port operation status: Up
Operation speed-duplex: 100full
Flow control type: None
Member Ports: Eth1/11, Eth1/12,
Console#
2-68
3-68
3-68
3-138
3-75
CONFIGURING SNMP
Configuring SNMP
The switch includes an onboard agent that continuously monitors the
status of its hardware, as well as the traffic passing through its ports, based
on the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). A network
management station can access this information using software such as
EliteView. Access rights to the onboard agent are controlled by community
strings. To communicate with the switch, the management station must
first submit a valid community string for authentication. The options for
configuring community strings and related trap functions are described in
the following sections.
Setting Community Access Strings
You may configure up to five community strings authorized for
management access. For security reasons, you should consider removing
the default strings.
Command Attributes
Community String – A community string that acts like a password and
permits access to the SNMP protocol.
Access Mode
•
Read-Only – Specifies read-only access. Authorized management
stations are only able to retrieve MIB objects.
•
Read/Write – Specifies read-write access. Authorized management
stations are able to both retrieve and modify MIB objects.
Web – Click SNMP/SNMP Configuration. Enter a new string in the
Community String box and select the access rights from the Access Mode
drop-down list, then click “Add.”
2-69
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
CLI – The following example adds the string “spiderman” with read/write
access.
Console(config)#snmp-server community spiderman rw
Console(config)#
3-43
Specifying Trap Managers
You can specify up to five management stations that will receive
authentication failure messages and other trap messages from the switch.
Command Usage
•
You can enable or disable authentication messages via the Web
interface.
•
You can enable or disable authentication messages, link-up-down
messages, or all notification types via the CLI.
Web – Click SNMP/SNMP Configuration. Fill in the Trap Manager IP
Address box and the Trap Manager Community String box, mark Enable
Authentication Traps if required, and then click “Add.”
2-70
MULTICAST CONFIGURATION
CLI – This example adds a trap manager and enables authentication traps.
Console(config)#snmp-server host 10.1.19.23 batman
Console(config)#snmp-server enable traps authentication
3-45
3-47
Multicast Configuration
Multicasting is used to support real-time applications such as video
conferencing or streaming audio. A multicast server does not have to
establish a separate connection with each client. It merely broadcasts its
service to the network, and any hosts that want to receive the multicast
register with their local multicast switch/router. Although this approach
reduces the network overhead required by a multicast server, the broadcast
traffic must be carefully pruned at every multicast switch/router it passes
through to ensure that traffic is only passed on the hosts which subscribed
to this service.
This switch uses IGMP (Internet Group Management Protocol) to query
for any attached hosts that want to receive a specific multicast service. It
identifies the ports containing hosts requesting to join the service and
sends data out to those ports only. It then propagates the service request
up to any neighboring multicast switch/router to ensure that it will
continue to receive the multicast service. This procedure is called multicast
filtering.
2-71
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
The purpose of IP multicast filtering is to optimize a switched network’s
performance, so multicast packets will only be forwarded to those ports
containing multicast group hosts or multicast routers/switches, instead of
flooding traffic to all ports in the subnet (VLAN).
Configuring IGMP Parameters
You can configure the switch to forward multicast traffic intelligently.
Based on the IGMP query and report messages, the switch forwards traffic
only to the ports that request multicast traffic. This prevents the switch
from broadcasting the traffic to all ports and possibly disrupting network
performance.
Command Usage
•
IGMP Snooping – This switch can passively snoop on IGMP Query
and Report packets transferred between IP multicast routers/switches
and IP multicast host groups to identify the IP multicast group
members. It simply monitors the IGMP packets passing through it,
picks out the group registration information, and configures multicast
filters accordingly.
•
IGMP Query – A router, or multicast-enabled switch, can
periodically ask their hosts if they want to receive multicast traffic. If
there is more than one router/switch on the LAN performing IP
multicasting, one of these devices is elected “querier” and assumes the
role of querying the LAN for group members. It then propagates the
service requests on to any adjacent multicast switch/router to ensure
that it will continue to receive the multicast service.
Note: Multicast routers use this information, along with a multicast
routing protocol such as DVMRP, to support IP multicasting
across the Internet.
2-72
MULTICAST CONFIGURATION
Command Attributes
•
IGMP Status — When enabled, the switch will monitor network
traffic to determine which hosts want to receive multicast traffic. This
is also referred to as IGMP Snooping. (Default: Disabled)
•
Act as IGMP Querier — When enabled, the switch can serve as the
Querier, which is responsible for asking hosts if they want to receive
multicast traffic. (Default: Disabled)
•
IGMP Query Count — Sets the maximum number of queries issued
for which there has been no response before the switch takes action to
solicit reports. (Default: 2, Range: 2 - 10)
•
IGMP Query Interval — Sets the frequency (in seconds) at which
the switch sends IGMP host-query messages. (Default: 125,
Range: 60 - 125)
•
IGMP Report Delay — Sets the time (in seconds) between receiving
an IGMP Report for an IP multicast address on a port before the
switch sends an IGMP Query out of that port and removes the entry
from its list. (Default: 10, Range: 5 - 30)
•
Query Timeout — Sets the time (in seconds) the switch waits after
the previous querier has stopped querying before it takes over as the
querier. (Default: 300 seconds, Range: 300 - 500)
•
IGMP Version — Sets the protocol version for compatibility with
other devices on the network. (Default: 2, Range: 1 - 2)
Notes: 1. All systems on the subnet must support the same version.
2. Some attributes are only enabled for IGMPv2, including
IGMP Report Delay and IGMP Query Timeout.
2-73
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
Web – Click IGMP/IGMP Configuration. Adjust the IGMP settings as
required, and then click “Apply.” (The default settings are shown below.)
CLI – This example modifies the settings for multicast filtering, and then
displays the current status.
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping querier
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping query-count 10
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping query-interval 100
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping query-max-response-time 20
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping query-time-out 300
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping version 2
Console(config)#exit
Console#show ip igmp snooping
Igmp Snooping Configuration
---------------------------------------------Service status
: Enabled
Querier status
: Enabled
Query count
: 10
Query interval
: 100 sec
Query max response time : 20 sec
Query time-out
: 300 sec
IGMP snooping version
: Version 2
Console#
3-110
3-114
3-115
3-115
3-116
3-117
3-112
3-112
Interfaces Attached to a Multicast Router
Multicast routers use the information obtained from IGMP Query, along
with a multicast routing protocol such as DVMRP, to support IP
multicasting across the Internet. These routers may be dynamically
discovered by the switch or statically assigned to an interface on the switch.
2-74
MULTICAST CONFIGURATION
Displaying Interfaces Attached to a Multicast Router
Command Attributes
•
VLAN ID – ID of configured VLAN (1-4094).
•
Multicast Router List – Multicast routers dynamically discovered
by this switch or those that are statically assigned to an interface on this
switch.
Web – Click IGMP/Multicast Router Port Information. Select the
required VLAN ID from the scroll-down list to display the associated
multicast routers.
CLI – This example shows that Port 11 has been statically configured as a
port attached to a multicast router.
Console#show ip igmp snooping mrouter vlan 1
VLAN M'cast Router Port Type
---- ------------------ ------1
Eth 1/11 Static
3-119
Specifying Interfaces Attached to a Multicast Router
Depending on your network connections, IGMP snooping may not always
be able to locate the IGMP querier. Therefore, if the IGMP querier is a
known multicast router/switch connected over the network to an interface
2-75
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
(port or trunk) on your switch, you can manually configure that interface
to join all the current multicast groups. This can ensure that multicast
traffic is passed to all the appropriate interfaces within the switch.
Command Attributes
•
Interface – Activates the Port or Trunk scroll down list.
•
VLAN ID – Selects the VLAN to propagate all multicast traffic coming
from the attached multicast router/switch.
•
Port or Trunk – Specifies the interface attached to a multicast router.
Web – Click IGMP/Static Multicast Router Port Configuration. Specify
the interfaces attached to a multicast router, indicate the VLAN which will
forward all the corresponding multicast traffic, and then click “Add.” After
you have completed adding interfaces to the list, click “Apply.”
CLI – This example configures port 11 as a multicast router port within
VLAN 1.
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping vlan 1 mrouter ethernet 1/11 3-118
Console(config)#exit
Console#show ip igmp snooping mrouter vlan 1
3-119
VLAN M'cast Router Port Type
---- ------------------ ------1
Eth 1/11 Static
2-76
MULTICAST CONFIGURATION
Displaying Port Members of Multicast Services
You can display the port members associated with a specified VLAN and
multicast IP address.
Command Attribute
•
VLAN ID – Selects the VLAN in which to display port members.
•
Multicast IP Address – The IP address for a specific multicast
service
•
Multicast Group Port List – Ports propagating a multicast service;
i.e., ports that belong to the indicated VLAN group.
Web – Click IGMP/IP Multicast Registration Table. Select the VLAN ID
and multicast IP address. The switch will display all the ports that are
propagating this multicast service.
2-77
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
CLI – This example displays all the known multicast services supported on
VLAN 1, along with the ports propagating the corresponding services.
The type field shows if this entry was learned dynamically or was statically
configured.
Console#show bridge 1 multicast vlan 1
VLAN M'cast IP addr. Member ports Type
---- --------------- ------------ ------1
224.0.0.12
Eth1/12
USER
1
224.1.2.3
Eth1/12
IGMP
Console#
3-113
Adding Multicast Addresses to VLANs
Multicast filtering can be dynamically configured using IGMP Snooping
and IGMP Query messages as described in “Configuring IGMP
Parameters” on page 2-72. For certain application that require tighter
control, you may need to statically configure a multicast service on the
switch. First add all the ports attached to participating hosts to a common
VLAN, and then assign the multicast service to that VLAN group.
Command Usage
•
Static multicast addresses are never aged out.
•
When a multicast address is assigned to specific VLAN, the
corresponding traffic can only be forwarded to ports within that
VLAN.
Command Attribute
2-78
•
Interface – Activates the Port or Trunk scroll down list.
•
VLAN ID – Selects the VLAN to propagate all multicast traffic coming
from the attached multicast router/switch.
•
Multicast IP – The IP address for a specific multicast service
•
Port or Trunk – Specifies the interface attached to a multicast router.
SHOWING DEVICE STATISTICS
Web – Click IGMP/IGMP Member Port Table. Specify the interface
attached to a multicast service (via an IGMP-enabled switch or multicast
router), indicate the VLAN that will propagate the multicast service,
specify the multicast IP address, and then click “Add.” After you have
completed adding ports to the member list, click “Apply.”
CLI – This example assigns a multicast address to VLAN 1, and then
displays all the known multicast services supported on VLAN 1.
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping vlan 1 static 224.0.0.12
ethernet 1/12
Console(config)#exit
Console#show bridge 1 multicast vlan 1
VLAN M'cast IP addr. Member ports Type
---- --------------- ------------ ------1
224.0.0.12
Eth1/12
USER
1
224.1.2.3
Eth1/12
IGMP
3-111
3-113
Console#
Showing Device Statistics
You can display standard statistics on network traffic from the Interfaces
Group and Ethernet-like MIBs, as well as a detailed breakdown of traffic
based on the RMOM MIB. Interfaces and Ethernet-like statistics display
errors on the traffic passing through each port. This information can be
used to identify potential problems with the switch (such as a faulty port or
unusually heavy loading). RMON statistics provide access to a broad range
of statistics, including a total count of different frame types and sizes
2-79
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
passing through each port. All values displayed have been accumulated
since the last system reboot, and are shown as counts per second. Statistics
are refreshed every 60 seconds by default.
Note: RMON groups 2, 3 and 9 can only be accessed using SNMP
management software such as EliteView.
Web – Click Statistics/Port Statistics. Select the required interface, and
then click “Query.” You can also use the Refresh button at the bottom of
the page to update the screen.
2-80
SHOWING DEVICE STATISTICS
CLI – This example shows statistics for port 13.
Console#show interfaces counters ethernet 1/13
3-76
Ethernet 1/13
Iftable stats:
Octets input: 868453, Octets output: 3492122
Unicast input: 7315, Unitcast output: 6658
Discard input: 0, Discard output: 0
Error input: 0, Error output: 0
Unknown protos input: 0, QLen output: 0
Extended iftable stats:
Multi-cast input: 0, Multi-cast output: 17027
Broadcast input: 231, Broadcast output: 7
Ether-like stats:
Alignment errors: 0, FCS errors: 0
Single Collision frames: 0, Multiple collision frames: 0
SQE Test errors: 0, Deferred transmissions: 0
Late collisions: 0, Excessive collisions: 0
Internal mac transmit errors: 0, Internal mac receive errors: 0
Frame too longs: 0, Carrier sense errors: 0
Symbol errors: 0
RMON stats:
Drop events: 0, Octets: 4422579, Packets: 31552
Broadcast pkts: 238, Multi-cast pkts: 17033
Undersize pkts: 0, Oversize pkts: 0
Fragments: 0, Jabbers: 0
CRC align errors: 0, Collisions: 0
Packet size <= 64 octets: 25568, Packet size 65 to 127 octets: 1616
Packet size 128 to 255 octets: 1249, Packet size 256 to 511 octets:
1449
Packet size 512 to 1023 octets: 802, Packet size 1024 to 1518
octets: 871
Console#
2-81
CONFIGURING THE SWITCH
2-82
USING THE COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
CHAPTER 3
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
This chapter describes how to use the Command Line Interface (CLI).
Using the Command Line Interface
Accessing the CLI
When accessing the management interface for the switch over a direct
connection to the server’s console port, or via a Telnet connection, the
switch can be managed by entering command keywords and parameters at
the prompt. Using the switch's command-line interface (CLI) is very
similar to entering commands on a UNIX system.
Console Connection
To access the switch through the console port, perform these steps:
1. At the console prompt, enter the user name and password. (The
default user names are “admin” and “guest” with corresponding
passwords of “admin” and “guest.”) When the administrator user
name and password is entered, the CLI displays the “Console#”
prompt and enters privileged access mode (i.e., Privileged Exec). But
when the guest user name and password is entered, the CLI displays
the “Console>” prompt and enters normal access mode (i.e., Normal
Exec).
2. Enter the necessary commands to complete your desired tasks.
3. When finished, exit the session with the “quit” or “exit” command.
3-1
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
After connecting to the system through the console port, the login screen
displays:
User Access Verification
Username: admin
Password:
CLI session with the SMC6750L2 is opened.
To end the CLI session, enter [Exit].
Console#
Telnet Connection
Telnet operates over the IP transport protocol. In this environment, your
management station and any network device you want to manage over the
network must have a valid IP address. Valid IP addresses consist of four
numbers, 0 to 255, separated by periods. Each address consists of a
network portion and host portion. For example, the IP address assigned to
this switch, 10.1.0.1, consists of a network portion (10.1.0) and a host
portion (1).
To access the switch through a Telnet session, you must first set the IP
address for the switch, and set the default gateway if you are managing the
switch from a different IP subnet. For example,
Console(config)#interface vlan 1
Console(config-if)#ip address 10.1.0.1 255.255.255.0
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#ip default-gateway 10.1.0.254
If your corporate network is connected to another network outside your
office or to the Internet, you need to apply for a registered IP address.
However, if you are attached to an isolated network, then you can use any
IP address that matches the network segment to which you are attached.
3-2
ENTERING COMMANDS
After you configure the switch with an IP address, you can open a Telnet
session by performing these steps:
1. From the remote host, enter the Telnet command and the IP address
of the device you want to access.
2. At the prompt, enter the user name and system password. The CLI
will display the “Vty-0#” prompt for the administrator to show that
you are using privileged access mode (i.e., Privileged Exec), or
“Vty-0>” for the guest to show that you are using normal access mode
(i.e., Normal Exec).
3. Enter the necessary commands to complete your desired tasks.
4. When finished, exit the session with the “quit” or “exit” command.
After entering the Telnet command, the login screen displays:
Username: admin
Password:
CLI session with the SMC6750L2 is opened.
To end the CLI session, enter [Exit].
Vty-0#
Note: You can open up to four sessions to the device via Telnet.
Entering Commands
This section describes how to enter CLI commands.
Keywords and Arguments
A CLI command is a series of keywords and arguments. Keywords identify
a command, and arguments specify configuration parameters. For
example, in the command “show interfaces status ethernet 1/5,” show
interfaces and status are keywords, ethernet is an argument that
specifies the interface type, and 1/5 specifies the unit/port.
3-3
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
You can enter commands as follows:
•
To enter a simple command, enter the command keyword.
•
To enter multiple commands, enter each command in the required
order. For example, to enable Privileged Exec command mode, and
display the startup configuration, enter:
Console>enable
Console#show startup-config
•
To enter commands that require parameters, enter the required
parameters after the command keyword. For example, to set a
password for the administrator, enter:
Console(config)#username admin password 0 smith
Minimum Abbreviation
The CLI will accept a minimum number of characters that uniquely
identify a command. For example, the command “configure” can be
entered as config. If an entry is ambiguous, the system will prompt for
further input.
Command Completion
If you terminate input with a Tab key, the CLI will print the remaining
characters of a partial keyword up to the point of ambiguity. In the
“logging console” example, typing log followed by a tab will result in
printing the command up to “logging.”
Getting Help on Commands
You can display a brief description of the help system by entering the help
command. You can also display command syntax by using the “?”
character to list keywords or parameters.
3-4
ENTERING COMMANDS
Showing Commands
If you enter a “?” at the command prompt, the system will display the first
level of keywords for the current command class (Normal Exec or
Privileged Exec) or configuration class (Global, Interface, Line, or VLAN
Database). You can also display a list of valid keywords for a specific
command. For example, the command “show ?” displays a list of
possible show commands:
Console#show ?
bridge
bridge-ext
garp
gvrp
history
interfaces
ip
line
logging
map
port
queue
radius-server
running-config
snmp
startup-config
system
users
version
vlan
Console#show
Bridge information
Bridge extend information
Garp property
Show gvrp information of interface
Information of history
Information of interfaces
Ip
TTY line information
Show the contents of logging buffers
Map priority
Characteristics of the port
Information of priority queue
Radius server information
The system configuration of running
SNMP statistics
The system configuration of starting up
Information of system
Display information about terminal lines
System hardware and software status
Switch VLAN Virtual Interface
The command “show interfaces ?” will display the following
information:
Console>show interfaces ?
counters
Information of interfaces counters
status
Information of interfaces status
switchport Information of interfaces switchport
Partial Keyword Lookup
If you terminate a partial keyword with a question mark, alternatives that
match the initial letters are provided. (Remember not to leave a space
3-5
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
between the command and question mark.) For example “s?” shows all
the keywords starting with “s.”
Console#show s?
snmp
startup-config
system
Negating the Effect of Commands
For many configuration commands you can enter the prefix keyword “no”
to cancel the effect of a command or reset the configuration to the default
value. For example, the logging command will log system messages to a
host server. To disable logging, specify the no logging command. This
guide describes the negation effect for all applicable commands.
Using Command History
The CLI maintains a history of commands that have been entered. You
can scroll back through the history of commands by pressing the up arrow
key. Any command displayed in the history list can be executed again, or
first modified and then executed.
Using the show history command displays a longer list of recently
executed commands.
Understanding Command Modes
The command set is divided into Exec and Configuration classes. Exec
commands generally display information on system status or clear
statistical counters. Configuration commands, on the other hand, modify
interface parameters or enable certain switching functions. These classes
are further divided into different modes. Available commands depend on
the selected mode. You can always enter a question mark “?” at the prompt
to display a list of the commands available for the current mode. The
3-6
ENTERING COMMANDS
command classes and associated modes are displayed in the following
table:
Class
Mode
Exec
Normal
Privileged
Configuration*
Global
Interface
Line
VLAN
* You must be in Privileged Exec mode to access any of the configuration modes.
Exec Commands
When you open a new console session on switch with the user name
“guest,” the system enters Normal Exec command mode (or guest mode).
Only a limited number of the commands are available in this mode. You
can access all the commands only in Privileged Exec command mode (or
administrator mode). To access Privilege Exec mode, open a new console
session with the user name “admin,” or enter the enable command
(followed by the privileged level password if so configured). The command
prompt displays as “Console>” for Normal Exec mode and “Console#”
for Privileged Exec mode.
To enter Privileged Exec mode, enter the following commands and
passwords:
Username: admin
Password: [system login password]
CLI session with the SMC6750L2 is opened.
To end the CLI session, enter [Exit].
Console#
3-7
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Username: guest
Password: [system login password]
CLI session with the SMC6750L2 is opened.
To end the CLI session, enter [Exit].
Console#enable
Password: [privileged level password if so configured]
Console#
Configuration Commands
Configuration commands are privileged level commands used to modify
switch settings. These commands modify the running configuration only
and are not saved when the switch is rebooted. To store the running
configuration in nonvolatile storage, use the copy running-config
startup-config command.
The configuration commands are organized into three different modes:
•
Global Configuration - These commands modify the system level
configuration, and include commands such as hostname and
snmp-server community.
•
Interface Configuration - These commands modify the port
configuration such as speed-duplex and negotiation.
•
Line Configuration - These commands modify the console port
configuration, and include command such as parity and databits.
To enter the Global Configuration mode, enter the command configure
in Privileged Exec mode. The system prompt will change to
“Console(config)#” which gives you access privilege to all Global
Configuration commands.
Console#configure
Console(config)#
To enter Interface, Line Configuration, or VLAN mode, you must enter
the “interface ...,” “line...” or “vlan database” command while in
3-8
ENTERING COMMANDS
Global Configuration mode. The system prompt will change to
“Console(config-if)#,” “Console(config-line)#” or Console(config-vlan)”
indicating that you have access privileges to the associated commands. You
can use the end command to return to the Privileged Exec mode.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#line console
Console(config-line)#
Command Line Processing
Commands are not case sensitive. You can abbreviate commands and
parameters as long as they contain enough letters to differentiate them
from any other currently available commands or parameters. You can use
the Tab key to complete partial commands, or enter a partial command
followed by the “?” character to display a list of possible matches. You can
also use the following editing keystrokes for command-line processing:
Keystroke
Function
Ctrl-A
Shifts cursor to start of command line.
Ctrl-B
Shifts cursor to the left one character.
Ctrl-E
Shifts cursor to end of command line.
Ctrl-F
Shifts cursor to the right one character.
Ctrl-P
Shows the last command.
Ctrl-U
Deletes the entire line.
Ctrl-W
Deletes the last word typed.
Delete key or backspace key Erases a mistake when entering a command.
3-9
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command Groups
The system commands can be broken down into the functional groups
shown below.
3-10
Command
Group
Description
Page
General
Basic commands for entering privileged access mode,
restarting the system, or quitting the CLI
3-12
Flash/File
Manages code image or switch configuration files
3-18
System
Management
Controls system logs, system passwords, user name,
browser management options, and a variety of other
system information
3-24
Radius Client
Configures RADIUS client-server authentication for
logon access
3-38
SNMP
Activates authentication failure traps; configures
community access strings, and trap managers
3-43
IP
Configures the IP address and gateway for
management access, displays the default gateway, or
pings a specified device
3-49
Line
Sets communication parameters for the serial port,
including baud rate and console time-out.
3-56
Interface
Configures the connection parameters for all
Ethernet ports, aggregated links, and VLANs
3-67
Address Table
Configures the address table for filtering specified
addresses, displaying current entries, clearing the
table, or setting the aging time
3-78
Spanning Tree
Configures Spanning Tree settings for the switch
3-83
VLAN
Configures VLAN settings, and defines port
membership for VLAN groups
3-93
GVRP and
Bridge Extension
Configures GVRP settings that permit automatic
VLAN learning; shows the configuration for bridge
extension MIB
3-104
IGMP Snooping
Configures IGMP multicast filtering, querier
eligibility, query parameters, and specifies ports
attached to a multicast router
3-109
COMMAND GROUPS
Command
Group
Description
Page
Priority
Sets port priority for untagged frames, relative weight
for each priority queue, also sets priority for TCP/
UDP traffic types, IP precedence, and DSCP
3-120
Mirror Port
Mirrors data to another port for analysis without
affecting the data passing through or the performance
of the monitored port
3-135
Port Trunking
and LACP
Statically groups multiple ports into a single logical
trunk; configures Link Aggregation Control Protocol
for port trunks
3-137
Note that the access mode shown in the following tables is indicated by
these abbreviations:
NE (Normal Exec)
PE (Privileged Exec)
GC (Global Configuration)
IC (Interface Configuration)
LC (Line Configuration)
VC (VLAN Database Configuration)
3-11
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
General Commands
Command
Function
Mode
enable
Activates privileged mode
NE
Page
3-12
disable
Returns to normal mode from privileged mode PE
3-13
configure
Activates global configuration mode
PE
3-14
reload
Restarts the system
PE
3-16
end
Returns to Privileged Exec mode
GC, IC,
LC, VC
3-16
exit
Returns to the previous configuration mode, or any
exits the CLI
3-17
quit
Exits a CLI session
NE, PE
3-17
help
Shows how to use help
any
NA
?
Shows options for command completion
(context sensitive)
any
NA
enable
Use this command to activate Privileged Exec mode. In privileged mode,
additional commands are available, and certain commands display
additional information. See “Understanding Command Modes” on page
3-6.
Syntax
enable [level]
level - Privilege level to log into the device.
The device has two predefined privilege levels: 0: Normal Exec,
15: Privileged Exec. Enter level 15 to access Privileged Exec mode.
Default Setting
Level 15
Command Mode
Normal Exec
3-12
GENERAL COMMANDS
Command Usage
• “super” is the default password required to change the command mode
from Normal Exec to Privileged Exec. (To set this password, see the
enable password command on page 3-27.)
• The “#” character is appended to the end of the prompt to indicate
that the system is in privileged access mode.
• You only need to use Level 15. Setting the password for Level 0 has no
effect.
• You cannot set a null password with the enable password
command. You will have to enter a password to access the Privileged
Exec mode.
Example
Console#enable
Console#
Related Commands
disable
enable password
disable
Use this command to return to Normal Exec mode from privileged mode.
In normal access mode, you can only display basic information on the
switch's configuration or Ethernet statistics. To gain access to all
commands, you must use the privileged mode. See “Understanding
Command Modes” on page 3-6.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
3-13
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command Usage
The “>” character is appended to the end of the prompt to indicate
that the system is in normal access mode.
Example
Console#disable
Console>
Related Commands
enable
configure
Use this command to activate Global Configuration mode. You must enter
this mode to modify any settings on the switch. You must also enter
Global Configuration mode prior to enabling some of the other
configuration modes, including Interface Configuration, Line
Configuration, and VLAN Database Configuration. See “Understanding
Command Modes” on page 3-6.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
Console#configure
Console(config)#
Related Commands
end
3-14
GENERAL COMMANDS
show history
Use this command to show the contents of the command history buffer.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
Command Usage
The history buffer size is fixed at 20 commands.
Example
In this example, the show history command lists the contents of the
command history buffer:
Console#show history
Execution command history:
2 config
1 show history
Configuration command history:
4 interface vlan 1
3 exit
2 interface vlan 1
1 end
Console#
The ! command repeats commands from the Execution command history
buffer when you are in Normal Exec or Privileged Exec Mode, and
commands from the Configuration command history buffer when you are
in any of the configuration modes. In this example, the !2 command
repeats the second command in the Execution history buffer (config).
Console#!2
Console#config
Console(config)#
3-15
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
reload
Use this command to restart the system.
Note: When the system is restarted, it will always run the Power-On
Self-Test. It will also retain all configuration information stored in
non-volatile memory by the copy running-config
startup-config command.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Command Usage
This command resets the entire system.
Example
This example shows how to reset the switch:
Console#reload
System will be restarted, continue <y/n>? y
end
Use this command to return to Privileged Exec mode.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration, Interface Configuration, Line Configuration,
VLAN Database Configuration
3-16
GENERAL COMMANDS
Example
This example shows how to return to the Privileged Exec mode from the
Interface Configuration mode:
Console(config-if)#end
Console#
exit
Use this command to return to the previous configuration mode or exit
the configuration program.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Any
Example
This example shows how to return to the Privileged Exec mode from the
Global Configuration mode, and then quit the CLI session:
Console(config)#exit
Console#exit
Press ENTER to start session
User Access Verification
Username:
quit
Use this command to exit the configuration program.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
3-17
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command Usage
The quit and exit commands can both exit the configuration program.
Example
This example shows how to quit a CLI session:
Console#quit
Press ENTER to start session
User Access Verification
Username:
Flash/File Commands
These commands are used to manage the system code or configuration
files.
Command
Function
copy
Copies a code image or a switch configuration PE
to or from Flash memory or a TFTP server
Mode
3-18
delete
Deletes a file or code image
3-20
PE
Page
dir
Displays a list of files in Flash memory
PE
3-21
whichboot
Displays the files booted
PE
3-22
boot system
Specifies the file or image used to start up the GC
system
3-23
copy
Use this command to move (upload/download) a code image or
configuration file between the switch’s Flash memory and a TFTP server.
When you save the system code or configuration settings to a file on a
TFTP server, that file can later be downloaded to the switch to restore
system operation. The success of the file transfer depends on the
accessibility of the TFTP server and the quality of the network connection.
3-18
FLASH/FILE COMMANDS
Syntax
copy file {file | running-config | startup-config | tftp}
copy running-config {file | startup-config | tftp}
copy startup-config {file | running-config | tftp}
copy tftp {file | running-config | startup-config}
• file - Keyword that allows you to copy to/from a file.
• running-config - Keyword that allows you to copy to/from the
current running configuration.
• startup-config - The configuration used for system initialization.
• tftp - Keyword that allows you to copy to/from a TFTP server.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Command Usage
• The system prompts for data required to complete the copy command.
• The destination file name should not contain slashes (\ or /), the
leading letter of the file name should not be a period (.), and the length
of file name should be 1 to 31characters. (Valid characters: A-Z, a-z,
0-9, “.”, “-”, “_”)
• The number of user-defined configuration files is limited only by
available Flash memory space.
• You can use “Factory_Default_Config.cfg” as the source to copy from
the factory default configuration file, but you cannot use
“Factory_Default_Config.cfg” as the destination.
• To replace the startup configuration, you must use startup-config as the
destination.
• The Boot ROM image cannot be uploaded or downloaded from the
TFTP server. You must use a direct console connection and access the
download menu during a boot up to download the Boot ROM (or
diagnostic) image. See “Upgrading Firmware via the Serial Port” on
page A-2 for more details.
3-19
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Example
The following example shows how to upload the configuration settings to
a file on the TFTP server:
Console#copy file tftp
Choose file type:
1. config: 2. opcode: <1-2>: 1
Source file name: startup
TFTP server ip address: 10.1.0.99
Destination file name: startup.01
/
Console#
The following example shows how to copy the running configuration to a
startup file.
Console#copy running-config file
destination file name : startup
/
Console#
The following example shows how to download a configuration file:
Console#copy tftp startup-config
TFTP server ip address: 10.1.0.99
Source configuration file name: startup.01
Startup configuration file name [startup]:
/
Console#
delete
Use this command to delete a file or image.
Syntax
delete filename
filename - Name of the configuration file or image name.
Default Setting
None
3-20
FLASH/FILE COMMANDS
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Command Usage
• If the file type is used for system startup, then this file cannot be
deleted.
• “Factory_Default_Config.cfg” cannot be deleted.
Example
This example shows how to delete the test2.cfg configuration file from
Flash memory.
Console#delete test2.cfg
Console#
Related Commands
dir
dir
Use this command to display a list of files in Flash memory.
Syntax
dir [boot-rom | config | opcode [:filename]]
The type of file or image to display includes:
•
•
•
•
boot-rom - Boot ROM (or diagnostic) image file
config - Switch configuration file
opcode - Run-time operation code image file.
filename - Name of the file or image. If this file exists but contains
errors, information on this file cannot be shown.
Default Setting
None
3-21
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Command Usage
• If you enter the command dir without any parameters, the system
displays all files.
• File information is shown below:
Column Heading
Description
file name
The name of the file.
file type
File types: Boot-Rom, Operation Code, and Config
file.
startup
Shows if this file is used when the system is started.
size
The length of the file in bytes.
Example
The following example shows how to display all file information:
Console#dir
file name
file type startup size (byte)
-------------------------------- -------------- ------- ----------diag_0060 Boot-Rom image
Y
111360
run_01642 Operation Code
N
1074304
run_0200 Operation Code
Y
1083008
Factory_Default_Config.cfg
Config File
N
2574
startup
Config File
Y
2710
------------------------------------------------------------------Total free space:
0
Console#
whichboot
Use this command to display which files booted.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
3-22
FLASH/FILE COMMANDS
Example
This example shows the information displayed by the whichboot
command. See the table on the previous page for a description of the file
information displayed by this command.
Console#whichboot
file name
file type startup size (byte)
----------------- -------------- ------- ----------diag_0060 Boot-Rom image
Y
111360
run_0200 Operation Code
Y
1083008
startup
Config File
Y
2710
Console#
boot system
Use this command to specify the file or image used to start up the system.
Syntax
boot system {boot-rom| config | opcode}: filename
The type of file or image to set as a default includes:
• boot-rom - Boot ROM
• config - Configuration file
• opcode - Run-time operation code
The colon (:) is required.
filename - Name of the configuration file or image name.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
• A colon (:) is required after the specified file type.
• If the file contains an error, it cannot be set as the default file.
3-23
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Example
Console(config)#boot system config: startup
Console(config)#
Related Commands
dir
whichboot
System Management Commands
These commands are used to control system logs, passwords, user name,
browser configuration options, and display or configure a variety of other
system information.
Command
Function
Mode Page
Device Description Command
hostname
Specifies or modifies the host name for the
device
GC
3-25
Sets a password to control access to various
privilege levels
GC
3-27
ip http port
Specifies the port to be used by the Web
browser interface
GC
3-28
ip http server
Allows the switch to be monitored or
configured from a browser
GC
3-29
User Access Commands
enable password
Web Server Commands
Event Logging Commands
3-24
logging on
Controls logging of error messages
GC
3-29
logging history
Limits syslog messages sent to the SNMP
network management station based on
severity
GC
3-30
clear logging
Clears messages from the logging buffer
PE
3-32
show logging
Displays the state of logging
PE
3-32
SYSTEM MANAGEMENT COMMANDS
Command
Function
Mode Page
System Status Commands
show
startup-config
Displays the contents of the configuration file PE
(stored in Flash memory) that is used to start
up the system
3-33
show
running-config
Displays the configuration data currently in
use
PE
3-35
show system
Displays system information
NE,
PE
3-36
show users
Shows all active console and Telnet sessions, NE,
including user name, idle time, and IP address PE
of Telnet client
3-36
show version
Displays version information for the system
3-37
NE,
PE
hostname
Use this command to specify or modify the host name for this device. Use
the no form to restore the default host name.
Syntax
hostname name
no hostname
name - The name of this host. (Maximum length: 255 characters)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
Console(config)#hostname SMC6750L2
Console(config)#
3-25
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
username
Use this command to require user name authentication at login. Use the
no form to remove a user name.
Syntax
username name {access-level level | nopassword | password
{0 | 7} password}
no username name
• name - The name of the user.
Up to 8 characters, case sensitive.
Maximum number of users: 16
• access-level level - Specifies the user level.
• The device has two predefined privilege levels:
0: Normal Exec, 15: Privileged Exec.
• nopassword - No password is required for this user to log in.
• {0 | 7} - 0 means plain password, 7 means encrypted password.
• password password - The authentication password for the user.
(Maximum length: 8 characters, case sensitive)
Default Setting
• The default access level is Normal Exec.
• The factory defaults for the user names and passwords are:
username
access-level
password
guest
admin
0
15
guest
admin
Command Mode
Global Configuration
3-26
SYSTEM MANAGEMENT COMMANDS
Command Usage
The encrypted password is required for compatiblity with legacy
password settings (i.e., plain text or encrypted) when reading the
configuration file during system bootup or when downloading the
configuration file from a TFTP server. There is no need for you to
manually configure encrypted passwords.
Example
This example shows how the set the access level and password for a user.
Console(config)#username bob access-level 15
Console(config)#username bob password 0 smith
Console(config)#
enable password
After initially logging onto the system, you should set the administrator
(Privileged Exec) and guest (Normal Exec) passwords. Remember to
record them in a safe place. Use the enable password command to set the
password for access to the Privileged Exec level from the Normal Exec
level. Use the no form to reset the default password.
Syntax
enable password [level level] {0 | 7} password
no enable password [level level]
• level level - Level for which the password applies.
• The device has two predefined privilege levels: 0: Normal Exec, 15:
Privileged Exec. Only level 15 is valid for this command.
• {0 | 7} - 0 means plain password, 7 means encrypted password.
• password - password for this privilege level.
Default Setting
This default password is “super”
Command Mode
Global Configuration
3-27
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command Usage
The encrypted password is required for compatiblity with legacy
password settings (i.e., plain text or encrypted) when reading the
configuration file during system bootup or when downloading the
configuration file from a TFTP server. There is no need for you to
manually configure encrypted passwords.
Example
Console(config)#enable password level 15 0 admin
Console(config)#
Related Commands
enable
ip http port
Use this command to specify the TCP port number used by the Web
browser interface. Use the no form to use the default port.
Syntax
ip http port port-number
no ip http port
port-number - The TCP port to be used by the browser interface.
(Range: 1-65535)
Default Setting
80
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
Console(config)#ip http port 769
Console(config)#
3-28
SYSTEM MANAGEMENT COMMANDS
Related Commands
ip http server
ip http server
Use this command to allow this device to be monitored or configured
from a browser. Use the no form to disable this function.
Syntax
ip http server
no ip http server
Default Setting
Enabled
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
Console(config)#ip http server
Console(config)#
Related Commands
ip http port
logging on
Use this command to control logging of error messages. This command
sends debug or error messages to a logging process. The no form disables
the logging process.
Syntax
logging on
no logging on
Default Setting
None
3-29
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
The logging process controls error messages to be sent to SNMP trap
receivers. You can use the logging history command to control the type
of error messages that are stored in memory and sent to a specified
SNMP trap receiver.
Example
Console(config)#logging on
Console(config)#
Related Commands
logging history
clear logging
logging history
Use this command to limit syslog messages sent to the Simple Network
Management Protocol network management station based on severity. The
no form returns the logging of syslog messages to the default level.
Syntax
logging history {flash | ram} level
no logging history {flash | ram}
• flash - Event history stored in Flash memory (i.e., permanent
memory).
• ram - Event history stored in temporary RAM (i.e., memory flushed
on power reset).
3-30
SYSTEM MANAGEMENT COMMANDS
• level - One of the level arguments listed below. Messages sent include
the selected level up through level 0.
Level Argument
Level Description
Syslog Definition
emergencies
0
LOG_EMERG
System unusable
alerts
1
Immediate action needed LOG_ALERT
critical
2
Critical conditions
LOG_CRIT
errors
3
Error conditions
LOG_ERR
warnings
4
Warning conditions
LOG_WARNING
notifications
5
Normal but significant
condition
LOG_NOTICE
informational
6
Informational messages
only
LOG_INFO
debugging
7
Debugging messages
LOG_DEBUG
Default Setting
Flash: errors (level 3 - 0)
RAM: warnings (level 7 - 0)
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
Sending syslog messages to the SNMP network management station
occurs when you enable syslog traps with the snmp enable traps
command.
Example
Console(config)#logging history ram 0
Console(config)#
Related Commands
snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host
3-31
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
clear logging
Use this command to clear messages from the log buffer.
Syntax
clear logging [flash | ram]
• flash - Event history stored in Flash memory (i.e., permanent
memory).
• ram - Event history stored in temporary RAM (i.e., memory flushed
on power reset).
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
Console#clear logging
Console#
Related Commands
show logging
show logging
Use this command to display the logging configuration for system and
event messages.
Syntax
show logging {flash | ram}
• flash - Event history stored in Flash memory (i.e., permanent
memory).
• ram - Event history stored in temporary RAM (i.e., memory flushed
on power reset).
3-32
SYSTEM MANAGEMENT COMMANDS
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
Console#show logging flash
Syslog logging: Disable
History logging in FLASH: level errors
Console#
show startup-config
Use this command to display the configuration file stored in non-volatile
memory that is used to start up the system.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
3-33
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Example
Console#show startup-config
building startup-config, please wait.....
!
!
snmp-server community private rw
snmp-server community public ro
!
username admin access-level 15
username admin password 7 21232f297a57a5a743894a0e4a801fc3
username guest access-level 0
username guest password 7 084e0343a0486ff05530df6c705c8bb4
enable password level 15 7 1b3231655cebb7a1f783eddf27d254ca
!
vlan database
vlan 1 name DefaultVlan media ethernet state active
!
!
interface ethernet 1/1
switchport allowed vlan add 1 untagged
switchport native vlan 1
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
interface ethernet 1/50
switchport allowed vlan add 1 untagged
switchport native vlan 1
!
interface vlan 1
ip address 10.1.0.1 255.255.255.0
!
!
line console
!
!
line vty
!
!
end
Console#
Related Commands
show running-config
3-34
SYSTEM MANAGEMENT COMMANDS
show running-config
Use this command to display the configuration information currently in
use.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Command Usage
Use this command in conjunction with the show startup-config
command to compare the information in running memory to the
information stored in non-volatile memory.
Example
Console#show running-config
building running-config, please wait.....
!
!
snmp-server community private rw
snmp-server community public ro
.
.
.
.
.
ip http port
interface vlan 1
ip address 10.1.0.1 255.255.255.0
!
no bridge 1 spanning-tree
!
line console
!
line vty
!
end
Console#
Related Commands
show startup-config
3-35
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
show system
Use this command to display system information.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
Example
Console#show system
System description: SMC TigerSwitch - SMC6750L2
System OID string: 1.3.6.1.4.1.202.20.24
System information
System Up time: 0 days, 1 hours, 23 minutes, and 44.61 seconds
System Name
: SMC switch
System Location
: Boston
System Contact
: Charles
MAC address
: 00-30-f1-47-58-3a
Web server
: enable
Web server port
: 80
POST result
:
UART Loopback Test......................PASS
Timer Test..............................PASS
DRAM Test ..............................PASS
I2C Initialization......................PASS
Runtime Image Check ....................PASS
PCI Device Check .......................PASS
Switch Driver Initialization............PASS
Switch Internal Loopback Test...........PASS
------------------- DONE -------------------Console#
show users
Shows all active console and Telnet sessions, including user name, idle
time, and IP address of Telnet client.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
3-36
SYSTEM MANAGEMENT COMMANDS
Example
Console#show users
Username accounts:
Username Privilege
-------- --------guest
0
admin
15
Online users:
Line
Username Idle time (h:m:s) Remote IP addr.
----------- -------- ----------------- --------------* 0
console
admin
0:00:00
1
vty 0
admin
0:04:37
10.1.0.19
Console#
show version
Use this command to display hardware and software version information
for the system.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
Example
Console#show version
Unit1
Serial number
Service tag
Hardware version
Number of ports
Main power status
Redundant power status
Agent(master)
Unit id
Loader version
Boot rom version
Operation code version
Console#
:00000000000000000000
:0000000
:R0C
:50
:up
:not present
:1
:1.0.0.0
:1.0.0.0
:1.0.1.3
3-37
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
RADIUS Client Commands
Remote Authentication Dial-in User Service (RADIUS) is a system that
uses a central server running RADIUS software to control access to
RADIUS-aware devices on the network. A RADIUS server contains a
database of multiple user name/password pairs with associated privilege
levels for each user or group that require management access to a switch
using the console port, Telnet or Web.
Command
Function
Mode Page
authentication login
Defines logon authentication method
and precedence
GC
3-38
radius-server host
Specifies the RADIUS server
GC
3-39
radius-server port
Sets the RADIUS server network port
GC
3-40
radius-server key
Sets the RADIUS encryption key
GC
3-40
radius-server retransmit Sets the number of retries
GC
3-41
radius-server timeout
Sets the interval between sending
authentication requests
GC
3-42
show radius-server
Shows the current RADIUS settings
PE
3-42
authentication login
Use this command to define the login authentication method and
precedence. Use the no form to restore the default.
Syntax
authentication login {radius | local | radius local | local
radius}
no authentication login
• radius - Use RADIUS server password only.
• local - Use local password only.
• radius local - Use RADIUS server password first and local
password next.
• local radius - Use local password first and RADIUS server
password next.
3-38
RADIUS CLIENT COMMANDS
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
Console(config)#authentication login radius
Console(config)#
Related Commands
username - for setting the local user names and passwords
radius-server host
Use this command to specify the RADIUS server. Use the no form to
restore the default.
Syntax
radius-server host host_ip_address
no radius-server host
host_ip_address - IP address of server.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
Console(config)#radius-server host 192.168.1.25
Console(config)#
3-39
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
radius-server port
Use this command to set the RADIUS server network port. Use the no
form to restore the default.
Syntax
radius-server port port_number
no radius-server port
port_number - RADIUS server UDP port used for authentication
messages. (Range: 1-65535)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
Console(config)#radius-server port 181
Console(config)#
radius-server key
Use this command to set the RADIUS encryption key. Use the no form to
restore the default.
Syntax
radius-server key key_string
no radius-server key
key_string - Encryption key used to authenticate logon access for
client. Do not use blank spaces in the string. (Maximum length: 20
characters)
Default Setting
None
3-40
RADIUS CLIENT COMMANDS
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
Console(config)#radius-server key green
Console(config)#
radius-server retransmit
Use this command to set the number of retries. Use the no form to
restore the default.
Syntax
radius-server retransmit number_of_retries
no radius-server retransmit
number_of_retries - Number of times the switch will try to
authenticate logon access via the RADIUS server. (Range: 1 - 30)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
Console(config)#radius-server retransmit 5
Console(config)#
3-41
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
radius-server timeout
Use this command to set the interval between transmitting authentication
requests to the RADIUS server. Use the no form to restore the default.
Syntax
radius-server timeout number_of_seconds
no radius-server timeout
number_of_seconds - Number of seconds the switch waits for a reply
before resending a request. (Range: 1-65535)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
Console(config)#radius-server timeout 10
Console(config)#
show radius-server
Use this command to display the current settings for the RADIUS server.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
Console#show radius-server
Server IP address: 10.1.0.99
Communication key with radius server:
Server port number: 1812
Retransmit times: 2
Request timeout: 5
Console#
3-42
SNMP COMMANDS
SNMP Commands
Controls access to this switch from SNMP management stations, as well as
the error types sent to trap managers.
Command
Function
Mode Page
snmp-server
community
Sets up the community access string to
permit access to SNMP commands
GC
3-43
GC
3-44
snmp-server contact Sets the system contact string
snmp-server location Sets the system location string
GC
3-45
snmp-server host
Specifies the recipient of an SNMP
notification operation
GC
3-45
snmp-server enable
traps
Enables the device to send SNMP traps or GC
inform requests (i.e., SNMP notifications)
3-47
show snmp
Displays the status of SNMP
communications
3-48
NE,
PE
snmp-server community
Use this command to define the community access string for the Simple
Network Management Protocol. Use the no form to remove the specified
community string.
Syntax
snmp-server community string [ro|rw]
no snmp-server community string
• string - Community string that acts like a password and permits access
to the SNMP protocol. (Maximum length: 32 characters, case
sensitive; Maximum number of strings: 5)
• ro - Specifies read-only access. Authorized management stations are
only able to retrieve MIB objects.
• rw - Specifies read-write access. Authorized management stations
are able to both retrieve and modify MIB objects.
3-43
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Default Setting
• public - Read-only access. Authorized management stations are only
able to retrieve MIB objects.
• private - Read-write access. Authorized management stations are able
to both retrieve and modify MIB objects.
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
The first snmp-server community command you enter enables
SNMP (SNMPv1). The no snmp-server community command
disables all versions of SNMP.
Example
Console(config)#snmp-server community alpha rw
Console(config)#
snmp-server contact
Use this command to set the system contact string. Use the no form to
remove the system contact information.
Syntax
snmp-server contact string
no snmp-server contact
string - String that describes the system contact information.
(Maximum length: 255 characters)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
3-44
SNMP COMMANDS
Example
Console(config)#snmp-server contact Paul
Console(config)#
Related Commands
snmp-server location
snmp-server location
Use this command to set the system location string. Use the no form to
remove the location string.
Syntax
snmp-server location text
no snmp-server location
text - String that describes the system location. (Maximum length:
255 characters)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
Console(config)#snmp-server location WC-19
Console(config)#
Related Commands
snmp-server contact
snmp-server host
Use this command to specify the recipient of a Simple Network
Management Protocol notification operation. Use the no form to remove
the specified host.
3-45
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Syntax
snmp-server host host-addr community-string
no snmp-server host host-addr
• host-addr - Name or Internet address of the host (the targeted
recipient). (Maximum host addresses: 5 trap destination ip address
entries)
• community-string - Password-like community string sent with the
notification operation. Though you can set this string using the
snmp-server host command by itself, we recommend you define
this string using the snmp-server community command prior
to using the snmp-server host command. (Maximum length: 32
characters)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
If you do not enter an snmp-server host command, no notifications
are sent. In order to configure the switch to send SNMP notifications,
you must enter at least one snmp-server host command. In order
to enable multiple hosts, you must issue a separate snmp-server
host command for each host.
The snmp-server host command is used in conjunction with the
snmp-server enable traps command. Use the snmp-server
enable traps command to specify which SNMP notifications are sent
globally. For a host to receive notifications, at least one snmp-server
enable traps command and the snmp-server host command for
that host must be enabled.
However, some notification types cannot be controlled with the
snmp-server enable traps command. For example, some
notification types are always enabled.
3-46
SNMP COMMANDS
Example
Console(config)#snmp-server host 10.1.19.23 batman
Console(config)#
Related Commands
snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server enable traps
Use this command to enable this device to send Simple Network
Management Protocol traps or informs (SNMP notifications). Use the no
form to disable SNMP notifications.
Syntax
snmp-server enable traps [authentication | link-up-down]
no snmp-server enable traps [authentication |
link-up-down]
• authentication - Keyword to issue authentication failure traps.
• link-up-down - Keyword to issue link-up or link-down traps.
Note: The link-up-down trap can only be enabled/disabled via the
command line interface.
Default Setting
Issue all traps.
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
If you do not enter an snmp-server enable traps command, no
notifications controlled by this command are sent. In order to
configure this device to send SNMP notifications, you must enter at
least one snmp-server enable traps command. If you enter the
3-47
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
command with no keywords, all notification types are enabled. If you
enter the command with a keyword, only the notification type related
to that keyword is enabled.
The snmp-server enable traps command is used in conjunction
with the snmp-server host command. Use the snmp-server
host command to specify which host or hosts receive SNMP
notifications. In order to send notifications, you must configure at least
one snmp-server host command.
The notification types used in this command all have an associated
MIB object that allows them to be globally enabled or disabled. Not all
of the notification types have notificationEnable MIB objects, so some
of these cannot be controlled using the snmp-server enable traps
command.
Example
Console(config)#snmp-server enable traps link-up-down
Console(config)#
Related Commands
snmp-server host
show snmp
Use this command to check the status of SNMP communications.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
Command Usage
This command provides counter information for SNMP operations.
3-48
IP COMMANDS
Example
SNMP traps:
Authentication: enable
Link-up-down: enable
SNMP communities:
1. private, and the privilege is read-write
2. public, and the privilege is read-only
0 SNMP packets input
0 Bad SNMP version errors
0 Unknown community name
0 Illegal operation for community name supplied
0 Encoding errors
0 Number of requested variables
0 Number of altered variables
0 Get-request PDUs
0 Get-next PDUs
0 Set-request PDUs
0 SNMP packets output
0 Too big errors
0 No such name errors
0 Bad values errors
0 General errors
0 Response PDUs
0 Trap PDUs
SNMP logging: disabled
Console#
IP Commands
An IP address may be used for management access to the switch over your
network. By default, the switch uses DHCP to assign IP settings to
VLAN 1 on the switch. If you wish to manually configure IP settings, you
need to change the switch’s user-specified defaults (IP address 0.0.0.0 and
netmask 255.0.0.0) to values that are compatible with your network. You
may also need to a establish a default gateway between the switch and
management stations that exist on another network segment.
Command
Function
Mode Page
ip address
Sets the IP address for this device
IC
3-50
ip dhcp restart
Submits a BOOTP or DCHP client request
PE
3-51
3-49
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command
Function
ip
default-gateway
Defines the default gateway through which an GC
in-band management station can reach this
device
Mode Page
3-52
show ip interface Displays the IP settings for this device
PE
3-53
show ip redirects Displays the default gateway configured for
this device
PE
3-54
ping
Sends ICMP echo request packets to another NE,
node on the network
PE
3-54
ip address
Use this command to set the IP address for this device. Use the no form
to restore the default IP address.
Syntax
ip address {ip-address netmask | bootp | dhcp}
no ip address
• ip-address - IP address
• netmask - Network mask for the associated IP subnet. This mask
identifies the host address bits used for routing to specific subnets.
• bootp - Obtains IP address from BOOTP.
• dhcp - Obtains IP address from DHCP.
Default Setting
IP address: 0.0.0.0
Netmask: 255.0.0.0
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (VLAN)
Command Usage
• You must assign an IP address to this device to gain management
access over the network. You can manually configure a specific IP
address, or direct the device to obtain an address from a BOOTP or
DHCP server. Valid IP addresses consist of four numbers, 0 to 255,
3-50
IP COMMANDS
separated by periods. Anything outside this format will not be accepted
by the configuration program.
• If you select the bootp or dhcp option, IP is enabled but will not
function until a BOOTP or DHCP reply has been received. Requests
will be broadcast periodically by this device in an effort to learn its IP
address. (BOOTP and DHCP values can include the IP address,
default gateway, and subnet mask).
• You can start broadcasting BOOTP or DHCP requests by entering an
ip dhcp restart command, or by rebooting the switch.
Note: Only one VLAN interface can be assigned an IP address (the
default is VLAN 1). This defines the management VLAN, the
only VLAN through which you can gain management access to
the switch. If you assign an IP address to any other VLAN, the
new IP address overrides the original IP address and this
becomes the new management VLAN.
Example
In the following example, the device is assigned an address in VLAN 1.
Console(config)#interface vlan 1
Console(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.5 255.255.255.0
Console(config-if)#
Related Commands
ip dhcp restart
ip dhcp restart
Use this command to submit a BOOTP or DCHP client request.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
3-51
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command Usage
• DHCP requires the server to reassign the client’s last address if
available.
• If the BOOTP or DHCP server has been moved to a different domain,
the network portion of the address provided to the client will be based
on this new domain.
Example
In the following example, the device is reassigned the same address.
Console(config)#interface vlan 1
Console(config-if)#ip address dhcp
Console(config-if)#exit
Console#ip dhcp restart
Console#show ip interface
IP interface vlan
IP address and netmask: 10.1.0.54 255.255.255.0 on VLAN 1,
and address mode: Dhcp.
Console#
Related Commands
ip address
ip default-gateway
Use this command to a establish a static route between this device and
management stations that exist on another network segment. Use the no
form to remove the static route.
Syntax
ip default-gateway gateway
no ip default-gateway
gateway - IP address of the default gateway
Default Setting
No static route is established.
Command Mode
Global Configuration
3-52
IP COMMANDS
Command Usage
A gateway must be defined if the management station is located in a
different IP segment.
Example
The following example defines a default gateway for this device:
Console(config)#ip default-gateway 10.1.0.254
Console(config)#
Related Commands
show ip redirects
show ip interface
Use this command to display the settings of an IP interface.
Default Setting
All interfaces
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Command Usage
This switch can only be assigned one IP address. This address is used
for managing the switch.
Example
Console#show ip interface
IP address and netmask: 10.1.0.54 255.255.255.0 on VLAN 1,
and address mode: User specified.
Console#
Related Commands
show ip redirects
3-53
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
show ip redirects
Use this command to show the default gateway configured for this
device.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
Console#show ip redirects
ip default gateway 10.1.0.254
Console#
Related Commands
ip default-gateway
ping
Use this command to send ICMP echo request packets to another node on
the network.
Syntax
ping host [count count][size size]
• host - IP address or IP alias of the host.
• count - Number of packets to send. (Range: 1-16, default: 5)
• size - Number of bytes in a packet. (Range: 32-512, default: 32)
The actual packet size will be eight bytes larger than the size specified
because the switch adds header information.
Default Setting
This command has no default for the host.
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
3-54
IP COMMANDS
Command Usage
• Use the ping command to see if another site on the network can be
reached.
• Following are some results of the ping command:
• Normal response -The normal response occurs in one to ten seconds,
depending on network traffic.
• Destination does not respond - If the host does not respond, a “timeout”
appears in ten seconds.
• Destination unreachable - The gateway for this destination indicates that
the destination is unreachable.
• Network or host unreachable - The gateway found no corresponding
entry in the route table.
• Press <Esc> to stop pinging.
Example
Console#ping 10.1.0.9
Type ESC to abort.
PING to 10.1.0.9, by 5 32-byte payload ICMP packets, timeout is 5
seconds
response time: 10 ms
response time: 10 ms
response time: 10 ms
response time: 10 ms
response time: 0 ms
Ping statistics for 10.1.0.9:
5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received (100%), 0 packets lost (0%)
Approximate round trip times:
Minimum = 0 ms, Maximum = 10 ms, Average = 8 ms
Console#
Related Commands
interface
3-55
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Line Commands
You can access the onboard configuration program by attaching a VT100
compatible device to the server’s serial port. These commands are used to
set communication parameters for the serial port or a virtual terminal.
Note that Telnet is considered a virtual terminal connection, and the only
commands that apply to Telnet include exec-timeout and
password-thresh.
3-56
Command
Function
line
Identifies a specific line for configuration and GC
starts the line configuration mode
Mode Page
3-57
login
Enables password checking at login
LC
3-58
password
Specifies a password on a line
LC
3-59
exec-timeout
Sets the interval that the command interpreter LC
waits until user input is detected
3-60
password-thresh Sets the password intrusion threshold, which
limits the number of failed logon attempts
LC
3-61
silent-time
Sets the amount of time the management
console is inaccessible after the number of
unsuccessful logon attempts exceeds the
threshold set by the password-thresh
command
LC
3-62
databits
Sets the number of data bits per character that LC
are interpreted and generated by hardware
3-63
parity
Defines the generation of a parity bit
LC
3-64
speed
Sets the terminal baud rate
LC
3-64
stopbits
Sets the number of the stop bits transmitted
per byte
LC
3-65
show line
Displays a terminal line's parameters
NE,
PE
3-66
LINE COMMANDS
line
Use this command to identify a specific line for configuration, and to
process subsequent line configuration commands.
Syntax
line {console | vty}
• console - Console terminal line.
• vty - Virtual terminal for remote console access.
Default Setting
There is no default line.
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
Telnet is considered a virtual terminal connection and will be shown as
“Vty” in screen displays such as show users. However, the serial
communication parameters (e.g., databits) do not affect Telnet
connections.
Example
To enter console line mode, enter the following command:
Console(config)#line console
Console(config-line)#
Related Commands
show line
show users
3-57
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
login
Use this command to enable password checking at login. Use the no form
to disable password checking and allow connections without a password.
Syntax
login [local]
no login
local - Selects local password checking. Authentication is based on
the user name specified with the username command.
Default Setting
By default, virtual terminals require a password. If you do not set a
password for a virtual terminal, it will respond to attempted
connections by displaying an error message and closing the connection.
Command Mode
Line Configuration
Command Usage
If you specify login without the local option, authentication is based
on the password specified with the password line configuration
command.
Example
Console(config-line)#login local
Console(config-line)#
Related Commands
username
password
3-58
LINE COMMANDS
password
Use this command to specify the password for a line. Use the no form to
remove the password.
Syntax
password {0 | 7} password
no password
- {0 | 7} - 0 means plain password, 7 means encrypted password
- password - Character string that specifies the line password. The
string can contain any alphanumeric characters, besides spaces,
and can contain up to 8 characters. The password is case sensitive.
Default Setting
No password is specified.
Command Mode
Line Configuration
Command Usage
• When a connection is started on a line with password protection, the
system prompts for the password. If you enter the correct password,
the system shows a prompt. You can use the password-thresh
command to set the number of times a user can enter an incorrect
password before the system terminates the line connection and returns
the terminal to the idle state.
• The encrypted password is required for compatiblity with legacy
password settings (i.e., plain text or encrypted) when reading the
configuration file during system bootup or when downloading the
configuration file from a TFTP server. There is no need for you to
manually configure encrypted passwords.
Example
Console(config-line)#password 0 secret
Console(config-line)#
3-59
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Related Commands
login
password-thresh
exec-timeout
Use this command to set the interval that the system waits until user input
is detected. Use the no form to remove the timeout definition.
Syntax
exec-timeout seconds
no exec-timeout
seconds - Integer that specifies the number of seconds.
(Range: 0 - 65535 seconds; 0: no timeout)
Default Setting
CLI: No timeout
Telnet: 10 minutes
Command Mode
Line Configuration
Command Usage
• If input is detected, the system resumes the current connection; or if no
connections exist, it returns the terminal to the idle state and
disconnects the incoming session.
• This command applies to both the local console and Telnet
connections.
• The timeout for Telnet cannot be disabled.
Example
To set the timeout to two minutes, enter this command:
Console(config-line)#exec-timeout 120
Console(config-line)#
3-60
LINE COMMANDS
password-thresh
Use this command to set the password intrusion threshold which limits the
number of failed logon attempts. Use the no form to remove the
threshold value.
Syntax
password-thresh threshold
no password-thresh
threshold - The number of allowed password attempts.
(Range: 1-120; 0: no threshold)
Default Setting
The default value is three attempts.
Command Mode
Line Configuration
Command Usage
• When the logon attempt threshold is reached, the system interface
becomes silent for a specified amount of time before allowing the next
logon attempt. Use the silent-time command to set this interval.
• This command applies to both the local console and Telnet
connections.
Example
To set the password threshold to five attempts, enter this command:
Console(config-line)#password-thresh 5
Console(config-line)#
Related Commands
silent-time
3-61
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
silent-time
Use this command to set the amount of time the management console is
inaccessible after the number of unsuccessful logon attempts exceeds the
threshold set by the password-thresh command. Use the no form to
remove the silent time value.
Syntax
silent-time seconds
no silent-time
seconds - The number of seconds to disable console response.
(Range: 0-65535; 0: no silent-time)
Default Setting
The default value is no silent-time.
Command Mode
Line Configuration
Command Usage
If the password threshold was not set with the password-thresh
command, silent-time begins after the default value of three failed
logon attempts.
Example
To set the silent time to 60 seconds, enter this command:
Console(config-line)#silent-time 60
Console(config-line)#
Related Commands
password-thresh
3-62
LINE COMMANDS
databits
Use this command to set the number of data bits per character that are
interpreted and generated by the console port. Use the no form to restore
the default value.
Syntax
databits {7 | 8}
no databits
• 7 - Seven data bits per character.
• 8 - Eight data bits per character.
Default Setting
8 data bits per character
Command Mode
Line Configuration
Command Usage
The databits command can be used to mask the high bit on input
from devices that generate 7 data bits with parity. If parity is being
generated, specify 7 data bits per character. If no parity is required,
specify 8 data bits per character.
Example
To specify 7 data bits, enter this command:
Console(config-line)#databits 7
Console(config-line)#
Related Commands
parity
3-63
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
parity
Use this command to define generation of a parity bit. Use the no form to
restore the default setting.
Syntax
parity {none | even | odd}
no parity
• none - No parity
• even - Even parity
• odd - Odd parity
Default Setting
No parity
Command Mode
Line Configuration
Command Usage
Communication protocols provided by devices such as terminals and
modems often require a specific parity bit setting.
Example
To specify no parity, enter this command:
Console(config-line)#parity none
Console(config-line)#
speed
Use this command to set the terminal line’s baud rate. This command sets
both the transmit (to terminal) and receive (from terminal) speeds. Use the
no form to restore the default setting.
Syntax
speed bps
no speed
3-64
LINE COMMANDS
bps - Baud rate in bits per second.
(Options: 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, 115200 bps)
Default Setting
9600 bps
Command Mode
Line Configuration
Command Usage
Set the speed to match the baud rate of the device connected to the
serial port. Some baud rates available on devices connected to the port
might not be supported. The system indicates if the speed you selected
is not supported.
Example
To specify 57600 bps, enter this command:
Console(config-line)#speed 57600
Console(config-line)#
stopbits
Use this command to set the number of the stop bits transmitted per byte.
Use the no form to restore the default setting.
Syntax
stopbits {1 | 2}
• 1 - One stop bit
• 2 - Two stop bits
Default Setting
1 stop bit
Command Mode
Line Configuration
3-65
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Example
To specify 2 stop bits, enter this command:
Console(config-line)#stopbits 2
Console(config-line)#
show line
Use this command to display the terminal line’s parameters.
Syntax
show line [console | vty]
• console - Console terminal line.
• vty - Virtual terminal for remote console access.
Default Setting
Shows all lines
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
Example
To show all lines, enter this command:
Console#show line
Console configuration:
Password threshold: 3 times
Interactive timeout: Disabled
Silent time: Disabled
Baudrate: 9600
Databits: 8
Parity: none
Stopbits: 1
Vty configuration:
Password threshold: 3 times
Interactive timeout: 65535
Console#
3-66
INTERFACE COMMANDS
Interface Commands
These commands are used to display or set communication parameters for
an Ethernet port, aggregated link, or VLAN.
Command
Function
interface
Configures an interface type and enters interface GC
configuration mode
Mode Page
3-68
description
Adds a description to an interface configuration IC
3-68
speed-duplex
Configures the speed and duplex operation of a IC
given interface when autonegotiation is disabled
3-69
negotiation
Enables autonegotiation of a given interface
IC
3-70
capabilities
Advertises the capabilities of a given interface
for use in autonegotiation
IC
3-71
flowcontrol
Enables flow control on a given interface
IC
3-72
shutdown
Disables an interface
IC
3-73
switchport
broadcast
Configures broadcast storm control
IC
3-74
show interfaces Displays status for the specified interface
status
NE,
PE
3-75
show interfaces Displays statistics for the specified interface
counters
NE,
PE
3-76
show interfaces Displays the administrative and operational
switchport
status of an interface
NE,
PE
3-77
3-67
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
interface
Use this command to configure an interface type and enter interface
configuration mode.
Syntax
interface interface
interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
• vlan vlan-id (Range: 1-4094)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
To specify the Ethernet port, enter the following command:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/25
Console(config-if)#
description
Use this command to add a description to an interface. Use the no form
to remove the description.
Syntax
description string
no description
string - Comment or a description to help you remember what is
attached to this interface. (Range: 1-64 characters)
3-68
INTERFACE COMMANDS
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Example
The following example adds a description to Ethernet port 25.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/25
Console(config-if)#description RD-SW#3
Console(config-if)#
speed-duplex
Use this command to configure the speed and duplex mode of a given
interface when autonegotiation is disabled. Use the no form to restore the
default.
Syntax
speed-duplex {1000full | 100full | 100half | 10full |
10half}
no speed-duplex
•
•
•
•
•
1000full - Forces 1000 Mbps full-duplex operation
100full - Forces 100 Mbps full-duplex operation
100half - Forces 100 Mbps half-duplex operation
10full - Forces 10 Mbps full-duplex operation
10half - Forces 10 Mbps half-duplex operation
Default Setting
• Auto-negotiation is enabled by default.
• When auto-negotiation is disabled, the default speed-duplex setting is
100half for 100BASE-TX ports and 1000full for Gigabit Ethernet
ports.
3-69
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
To force operation to the speed and duplex mode specified in a
speed-duplex command, use the no negotiation command to disable
auto-negotiation on the selected interface.
Example
The following example configures port 5 to 100 Mbps, half-duplex
operation.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#speed-duplex 100half
Console(config-if)#no negotiation
Console(config-if)#
Related Commands
negotiation
negotiation
Use this command to enable autonegotiation for a given interface. Use the
no form to disable autonegotiation.
Syntax
negotiation
no negotiation
Default Setting
Enabled
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
If autonegotiation is disabled, auto-MDI/MDI-X pin signal
configuration will also be disabled for the RJ-45 ports.
3-70
INTERFACE COMMANDS
Example
The following example configures port 11 to use autonegotiation.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/11
Console(config-if)#negotiation
Console(config-if)#
capabilities
Use this command to advertise the port capabilities of a given interface
during autonegotiation. Use the no form with parameters to remove an
advertised capability, or the no form without parameters to restore the
default values.
Syntax
capabilities {1000full | 100full | 100half | 10full | 10half |
flowcontrol | symmetric}
no port-capabilities [1000full | 100full | 100half | 10full |
10half | flowcontrol | symmetric]
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1000full - Supports 1000 Mbps full-duplex operation
100full - Supports 100 Mbps full-duplex operation
100half - Supports 100 Mbps half-duplex operation
10full - Supports 10 Mbps full-duplex operation
10half - Supports 10 Mbps half-duplex operation
flowcontrol - Supports flow control
symmetric - Transmits and receives pause frames for flow control
(Gigabit ports only)
Default Setting
The default values for Fast Ethernet include 10half, 10full, 100half,
100full and flow control. The default values for Gigabit Ethernet
include all settings.
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
3-71
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Example
The following example configures Ethernet port 5 capabilities to 100half,
100full and flow control.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#capabilities 100half
Console(config-if)#capabilities 100full
Console(config-if)#capabilities flowcontrol
Console(config-if)#
flowcontrol
Use this command to enable flow control. Use the no form to disable
flow control.
Syntax
flowcontrol
no flowcontrol
Default Setting
Flow control enabled
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
• Flow control can eliminate frame loss by “blocking” traffic from end
stations or segments connected directly to the switch when its buffers
fill. When enabled, back pressure is used for half-duplex operation and
IEEE 802.3x for full-duplex operation.
• To enable flow control under autonegotiation, flowcontrol must be
included in the capabilities list for any port.
• To force operation to the mode specified in a flowcontrol
command, use the no negotiation command to disable
auto-negotiation on the selected interface.
• Flow control should not be used if a port is connected to a hub.
Otherwise flow control signals will be propagated throughout the
segment.
3-72
INTERFACE COMMANDS
• Due to a hardware limitation, flow control only works on those ports
located in the same chip (ports 1-24, 49 and ports 25-48, 50).
Cross-chip flow control does not work.
Example
The following example enables flow control on port 5.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#flowcontrol
Console(config-if)#no negotiation
Console(config-if)#
Related Commands
capabilities (flowcontrol, symmetric)
shutdown
Use this command to disable an interface. To restart a disabled interface,
use the no form.
Syntax
shutdown
no shutdown
Default Setting
All interfaces are enabled.
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
This command allows you to disable a port due to abnormal behavior
(e.g., excessive collisions), and then reenable it after the problem has
been resolved. You may also want to disable a port for security reasons.
3-73
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Example
The following example disables port 5.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#shutdown
Console(config-if)#
switchport broadcast
Use this command to configure broadcast storm control. Use the no form
to disable broadcast storm control.
Syntax
switchport broadcast packet-rate rate
no switchport broadcast
rate - Threshold level as a rate; i.e., packets per second.
(Range: 500 - 262143)
Default Setting
Enabled for all ports
Packet-rate limit: 500 packets per second
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet)
Command Usage
• When broadcast traffic exceeds the specified threshold, packets above
that threshold are dropped.
• This command can enable or disable broadcast storm control for the
selected interface. However, the specified threshold value applies to all
ports on the switch.
3-74
INTERFACE COMMANDS
Example
The following shows how to configure broadcast storm control at 600
packets per second on port 5:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#switchport broadcast packet-rate 600
Console(config-if)#
show interfaces status
Use this command to display the status for an interface.
Syntax
show interfaces status interface
interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
• vlan vlan-id (Range: 1-4094)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
3-75
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Example
Console#show interfaces status ethernet 1/7
Information of Eth 1/7
Basic information:
Port type: 100tx
Mac address: 00-30-f1-47-58-40
Configuration:
Name:
Port admin: Up
Speed-duplex: Auto
Capabilities: 10half, 10full, 100half, 100full,
Broadcast storm: Enabled
Broadcast storm limit: 500 packets/second
Flow control: Disabled
Lacp: Disabled
Current status:
Link status: Up
Port operation status: Up
Operation speed-duplex: 100full
Flow control type: None
Console#
show interfaces counters
Use this command to display statistics for an interface.
Syntax
show interfaces counters interface
interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
3-76
INTERFACE COMMANDS
Example
Console#show interfaces counters ethernet 1/7
Ethernet 1/ 7
Iftable stats:
Octets input: 30658, Octets output: 196550
Unicast input: 6, Unicast output: 5
Discard input: 0, Discard output: 0
Error input: 0, Error output: 0
Unknown protos input: 0, QLen output: 0
Extended iftable stats:
Multi-cast input: 0, Multi-cast output: 3064
Broadcast input: 262, Broadcast output: 1
Ether-like stats:
Alignment errors: 0, FCS errors: 0
Single Collision frames: 0, Multiple collision frames: 0
SQE Test errors: 0, Deferred transmissions: 0
Late collisions: 0, Excessive collisions: 0
Internal mac transmit errors: 0, Internal mac receive errors: 0
Frame too longs: 0, Carrier sense errors: 0
Symbol errors: 0
RMON stats:
Drop events: 0, Octets: 227208, Packets: 3338
Broadcast pkts: 263, Multi-cast pkts: 3064
Undersize pkts: 0, Oversize pkts: 0
Fragments: 0, Jabbers: 0
CRC align errors: 0, Collisions: 0
Packet size <= 64 octets: 3150, Packet size 65 to 127 octets: 139
Packet size 128 to 255 octets: 49, Packet size 256 to 511 octets: 0
Packet size 512 to 1023 octets: 0, Packet size 1024 to 1518 octets: 0
Console#
show interfaces switchport
Use this command to display advanced interface configuration settings.
Syntax
show interfaces switchport [interface]
interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
Default Setting
Shows all interfaces.
3-77
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
Example
This example shows the configuration setting for Ethernet port 25.
Console#show interfaces switchport ethernet 1/25
Broadcast threshold: Enabled, 500 packets/second
Lacp status: Disabled
VLAN membership mode: Hybrid
Ingress rule: Disabled
Acceptable frame type: All frames
Native VLAN: 1
Priority for untagged traffic: 0
Gvrp status: Disabled
Allowed Vlan:
1(u),
Forbidden Vlan:
Console#
Address Table Commands
These commands are used to configure the address table for filtering
specified addresses, displaying current entries, clearing the table, or setting
the aging time.
3-78
Command
Function
Mode Page
bridge address
Maps a static address to a port in a VLAN
GC
3-79
show bridge
Displays classes of entries in the
bridge-forwarding database
PE
3-80
clear bridge
Removes any learned entries from the
PE
forwarding database and clears the transmit and
receive counts for any statically or system
configured entries
3-81
bridge-group
aging-time
Sets the aging time of the address table
GC
3-82
show bridge
aging-time
Shows the aging time for the address table
PE
3-82
ADDRESS TABLE COMMANDS
bridge address
Use this command to map a static address to a port in a VLAN. Use the
no form to remove an address.
Syntax
bridge bridge-group address mac-address vlan vlan-id forward interface
[action]
no bridge bridge-group address address vlan vlan-id
•
•
•
•
bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1).
mac-address - MAC address.
vlan-id - VLAN ID (Range: 1-4094)
interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
• action • delete-on-reset - Assignment lasts until switch is reset.
• permanent - Assignment is permanent.
Default Setting
No static addresses are defined. The default mode is permanent.
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
The static address for a host device can be assigned to a specific port
within a specific VLAN. Use this command to add static addresses to
the MAC Address Table. Static addresses have the following
characteristics:
• Static addresses will not be removed from the address table when a
given interface link is down.
3-79
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
• Static addresses are bound to the assigned interface and will not be
moved. When a static address is seen on another interface, the address
will be ignored and will not be written to the address table.
Example
Console(config)#bridge 1 address 00-e0-29-94-34-de vlan 1 forward
ethernet 1/1 delete-on-reset
Console(config)#
show bridge
Use this command to view classes of entries in the bridge-forwarding
database.
Syntax
show bridge bridge-group [interface] [address [mask]] [vlan vlan-id]
[sort {address | vlan | interface}]
• bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1)
• interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
• address - MAC address.
• mask - Bits to ignore in the address.
• vlan-id - VLAN ID (Range: 1-4094)
• sort - Sort by address, vlan or interface.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
3-80
ADDRESS TABLE COMMANDS
Command Usage
• The MAC Address Table contains the MAC addresses associated with
each interface. Note that the Type field may include the following
types:
• Learned - dynamic address entries
• Permanent - static entry
• Delete-on-reset - static entry to be deleted when system is reset
• The maximum number of address entries is 8191.
Example
Console#show bridge 1
Interface Mac Address
Vlan Type
--------- ----------------- ---- ----------------Eth 1/ 1 00-e0-29-94-34-de
1 Delete-on-reset
Console#
clear bridge
Use this command to remove any learned entries from the forwarding
database and to clear the transmit and receive counts for any static or
system configured entries.
Syntax
clear bridge [bridge-group]
bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1).
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
Console#clear bridge 1
Console#
3-81
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
bridge-group aging-time
Use this command to set the aging time for entries in the address table.
Use the no form to restore the default aging time.
Syntax
bridge-group bridge-group aging-time seconds
no bridge-group bridge-group aging-time
• bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1).
• seconds - Time is number of seconds (10-1000000).
Default Setting
300 seconds
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
The aging time is used to age out dynamically learned forwarding
information.
Example
Console(config)#bridge-group 1 aging-time 100
Console(config)#
show bridge group aging-time
Use this command to show the aging time for entries in the address table.
Syntax
show bridge group bridge-group aging-time
bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1)
Default Setting
None
3-82
SPANNING TREE COMMANDS
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
Console#show bridge group 1 aging-time
Aging time: 300 sec.
Console#
Spanning Tree Commands
This section includes commands that configure the Spanning Tree
Algorithm (STA) globally for the switch, and commands that configure
STA for the selected interface.
Command
Function
Mode Page
bridge spanning-tree
Enables the spanning tree protocol
GC
3-85
bridge forward-time
Configures the spanning tree bridge
forward time
GC
3-85
bridge hello-time
Configures the spanning tree bridge
hello time
GC
3-86
bridge max-age
Configures the spanning tree bridge
maximum age
GC
3-86
bridge priority
Configures the spanning tree bridge
priority
GC
3-87
bridge-group path-cost Configures the spanning tree path cost of IC
an interface
3-88
bridge-group priority
Configures the spanning tree priority of IC
an interface
3-89
bridge-group portfast
Sets an interface to fast forwarding
IC
3-90
show bridge group
Shows spanning tree configuration for PE
the overall bridge or a selected interface
3-91
3-83
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
bridge spanning-tree
Use this command to enable STA globally for the switch. Use the no form
to disable it.
Syntax
bridge bridge-group spanning-tree
no bridge bridge-group spanning-tree
bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1).
Default Setting
Spanning tree is enabled.
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
The Spanning Tree Algorithm (STA) can be used to detect and disable
network loops, and to provide backup links between switches, bridges
or routers. This allows the switch to interact with other bridging
devices (that is, an STA-compliant switch, bridge or router) in your
network to ensure that only one route exists between any two stations
on the network, and provide backup links which automatically take over
when a primary link goes down.
Example
The following example shows how to enable the Spanning Tree Algorithm
for the switch:
Console(config)#bridge 1 spanning-tree
Console(config)#
3-84
SPANNING TREE COMMANDS
bridge forward-time
Use this command to configure the spanning tree bridge forward time
globally for this switch. Use the no form to restore the default.
Syntax
bridge bridge-group forward-time seconds
no bridge bridge-group forward-time
• bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1).
• seconds - Time in seconds. (Range: 4 - 30 seconds)
• The minimum value is the higher of 4 or [(max-age / 2) + 1].
Default Setting
15 seconds
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
This command sets the maximum time (in seconds) the root device will
wait before changing states (i.e., listening to learning to forwarding).
This delay is required because every device must receive information
about topology changes before it starts to forward frames. In addition,
each port needs time to listen for conflicting information that would
make it return to a blocking state; otherwise, temporary data loops
might result.
Example
Console(config)#bridge 1 forward-time 20
Console(config)#
3-85
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
bridge hello-time
Use this command to configure the spanning tree bridge hello time
globally for this switch. Use the no form to restore the default.
Syntax
bridge bridge-group hello-time time
no bridge bridge-group hello-time
bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1).
time - Time in seconds, (range: 1 - 10 seconds).
The maximum value is the lower of 10 or [(max-age / 2) -1].
Default Setting
2 seconds
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
This command sets the time interval (in seconds) at which the root
device transmits a configuration message.
Example
Console(config)#bridge 1 hello-time 5
Console(config)#
bridge max-age
Use this command to configure the spanning tree bridge maximum age
globally for this switch. Use the no form to restore the default.
Syntax
bridge bridge-group max-age seconds
no bridge bridge-group max-age
• bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1).
• seconds - Time in seconds. (Range: 6-40 seconds)
3-86
SPANNING TREE COMMANDS
• The minimum value is the higher of 6 or [2 x (hello-time + 1)].
• The maximum value is the lower of 40 or [2 x (forward-time - 1)].
Default Setting
20 seconds
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
This command sets the maximum time (in seconds) a device can wait
without receiving a configuration message before attempting to
reconfigure. All device ports (except for designated ports) should
receive configuration messages at regular intervals. Any port that ages
out STA information (provided in the last configuration message)
becomes the designated port for the attached LAN. If it is a root port,
a new root port is selected from among the device ports attached to the
network.
Example
Console(config)#bridge 1 max-age 40
Console(config)#
bridge priority
Use this command to configure the spanning tree priority globally for this
switch. Use the no form to restore the default.
Syntax
bridge bridge-group priority priority
no bridge bridge-group priority
• bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1).
• priority - Priority of the bridge. (Range: 0 - 65535)
Default Setting
32768
3-87
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
Bridge priority is used in selecting the root device, root port, and
designated port. The device with the highest priority becomes the STA
root device. However, if all devices have the same priority, the device
with the lowest MAC address will then become the root device.
Example
Console(config)#bridge 1 priority 40000
Console(config)#
bridge-group path-cost
Use this command to configure the spanning tree path cost for the
specified interface. Use the no form to restore the default.
Syntax
bridge-group bridge-group path-cost cost
no bridge-group bridge-group path-cost
• bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1).
• cost - The path cost for the port. (Range: 1-65535)
The recommended range is:
- Ethernet: 50-600
- Fast Ethernet: 10-60
- Gigabit Ethernet: 3-10
Default Setting
• Ethernet – half duplex: 100; full duplex: 95; trunk: 90
• Fast Ethernet – half duplex: 19; full duplex: 18; trunk: 15
• Gigabit Ethernet – full duplex: 4; trunk: 3
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
3-88
SPANNING TREE COMMANDS
Command Usage
• This command is used by the spanning-tree algorithm to determine the
best path between devices. Therefore, lower values should be assigned
to ports attached to faster media, and higher values assigned to ports
with slower media.
• Path cost takes precedence over port priority.
Example
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#bridge-group 1 path-cost 50
Console(config-if)#
bridge-group priority
Use this command to configure the priority for the specified port. Use the
no form to restore the default.
Syntax
bridge-group bridge-group priority priority
no bridge-group bridge-group priority
• bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1).
• priority - The priority for a port. (Range: 0-255)
Default Setting
128
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
• This command defines the priority for the use of a port in the
spanning-tree algorithm. If the path cost for all ports on a switch are
the same, the port with the highest priority (that is, lowest value) will be
configured as an active link in the spanning tree.
• Where more than one port is assigned the highest priority, the port with
lowest numeric identifier will be enabled.
3-89
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Example
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#bridge-group 1 priority 0
Console(config-if)#
bridge-group portfast
Use this command to set a port to fast forwarding. Use the no form to
disable fast forwarding.
Syntax
bridge-group bridge-group portfast
no bridge-group bridge-group portfast
bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1).
Default Setting
Disabled
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
• This command is used to enable/disable the fast spanning-tree mode
for the selected port. In this mode, ports skip the Blocked, Listening
and Learning states and proceed straight to Forwarding.
• Since end-nodes cannot cause forwarding loops, they can be passed
through the spanning tree state changes more quickly than allowed by
standard convergence time. Fast forwarding can achieve quicker
convergence for end-node workstations and servers, and also
overcome other STA related timeout problems. (Remember that fast
forwarding should only be enabled for ports connected to an end-node
device.)
Example
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#bridge-group 1 portfast
Console(config-if)#
3-90
SPANNING TREE COMMANDS
show bridge group
Use this command to show the spanning tree configuration.
Syntax
show bridge group bridge-group [interface]
• bridge-group - Bridge group index (bridge 1).
• interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
3-91
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Example
Console#show bridge group 1 ethernet 1/11
Bridge-group information
-------------------------------------------------------Spanning tree protocol
:ieee8021d
Spanning tree enable/disable
:enable
Priority
:32768
Hello Time (sec.)
:2
Max Age (sec.)
:20
Forward Delay (sec.)
:15
Designated Root
:32768.0000e9000066
Curent root
:0
Curent root cost
:0
Number of topology changes
:1
Last topology changes time (sec.):2167
Hold times (sec.)
:1
-------------------------------------------------------Eth 1/11 information
-------------------------------------------------------Admin status
: enable
STA state
: broken
Path cost
: 18
Priority
: 128
Designated cost
: 0
Designated port
: 128.11
Designated root
: 40000.123412341234
Designated bridge
:32768.0000e9000066
Fast forwarding
:disable
Forward transitions :0
Console#
3-92
VLAN COMMANDS
VLAN Commands
A VLAN is a group of ports that can be located anywhere in the network,
but communicate as though they belong to the same physical segment.
This section describes commands used to create VLAN groups, add port
members, specify how VLAN tagging is used, and enable automatic
VLAN registration for the selected interface.
Command
Function
Mode Page
vlan database
Enters VLAN database mode to add,
change, and delete VLANs
GC
3-94
vlan
Configures a VLAN, including VID,
name and state
VC
3-95
Edit VLAN Groups
Configure VLAN Interfaces
interface vlan
Enters interface configuration mode for IC
specified VLAN
3-96
switchport mode
Configures VLAN membership mode
for an interface
IC
3-97
switchport
Configures frame types to be accepted by IC
acceptable-frame-types an interface
3-98
swicthport
ingress-filtering
Enables ingress filtering on an interface
IC
3-99
switchport native vlan
Configures the PVID (native VLAN) of IC
an interface
3-100
switchport allowed vlan Configures the VLANs associated with
an interface
IC
3-101
switchport gvrp
Enables GVRP for an interface
IC
3-104
switchport forbidden
vlan
Configures forbidden VLANs for an
interface
IC
3-102
3-93
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command
Function
Mode Page
Display VLAN Information
show vlan
Shows VLAN information
NE,
PE
3-103
show interfaces status
vlan
Displays status for the specified VLAN
interface
NE,
PE
3-75
show interfaces
switchport
Displays the administrative and
operational status of an interface
NE,
PE
3-77
vlan database
Use this command to enter VLAN database mode. All commands in this
mode will take effect immediately.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
• Use the VLAN database command mode to add, change, and delete
VLANs. After finishing configuration changes, you can display the
VLAN settings by entering the show vlan command.
• Use the interface vlan command mode to define the port
membership mode and add or remove ports from a VLAN. The results
of these commands are written to the running-configuration file, and
you can display this file by entering the show running-config
command.
Example
Console(config)#vlan database
Console(config-vlan)#
Related Commands
show vlan
3-94
VLAN COMMANDS
vlan
Use this command to configure a VLAN. Use the no form to restore the
default settings or delete a VLAN.
Syntax
vlan vlan-id [name vlan-name] media ethernet [state {active |
suspend}]
no vlan vlan-id [name | state]
• vlan-id - ID of configured VLAN. (Range: 1-4094, no leading zeroes)
• name - Keyword to be followed by the VLAN name.
• vlan-name - ASCII string from 1 to 64 characters.
• media ethernet - Ethernet media type.
• state - Keyword to be followed by the VLAN state.
- active - VLAN is operational.
- suspend - VLAN is suspended. Suspended VLANs do not
pass packets.
Default Setting
By default only VLAN 1 exists and is active.
Command Mode
VLAN Database Configuration
Command Usage
• When no vlan vlan-id is used, the VLAN is deleted.
• When no vlan vlan-id name is used, the VLAN name is removed.
• When no vlan vlan-id state is used, the VLAN returns to the default
state (i.e., active).
• You can configure up to 255 VLANs on the switch.
3-95
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Example
The following example adds a VLAN, using vlan-id 105 and name RD5.
The VLAN is activated by default.
Console(config)#vlan database
Console(config-vlan)#vlan 105 name RD5 media ethernet
Console(config-vlan)#
Related Commands
show vlan
interface vlan
Use this command to enter interface configuration mode for VLANs, and
configure a physical interface.
Syntax
interface vlan vlan-id
vlan-id - ID of the configured VLAN. (Range: 1-4094, no leading
zeroes)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
The following example shows how to set the interface configuration mode
to VLAN 1, and then assign an IP address to the VLAN:
Console(config)#interface vlan 1
Console(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.254 255.255.255.0
Console(config-if)#
Related Commands
shutdown
3-96
VLAN COMMANDS
switchport mode
Use this command to configure the VLAN membership mode for a port.
Use the no form to restore the default.
Syntax
switchport mode {trunk | hybrid}
no switchport mode
• trunk - Specifies a port as an end-point for a VLAN trunk. A trunk
is a direct link between two switches, so the port transmits and
receives tagged frames that identify the source VLAN.
• hybrid - Keyword that specifies a hybrid VLAN interface. The port
may receive or transmit tagged or untagged frames. Any frames that
are not tagged will be assigned to the default VLAN.
Default Setting
All ports are in hybrid mode with the PVID set to VLAN 1.
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
This command and the switchport acceptable-frame-types
command have the same effect.
Example
The following shows how to set the configuration mode to port 1, and
then set the switchport mode to hybrid:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/1
Console(config-if)#switchport mode hybrid
Console(config-if)#
Related Commands
switchport acceptable-frame-types
3-97
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
switchport acceptable-frame-types
Use this command to configure the acceptable frame types for a port. Use
the no form to restore the default.
Syntax
switchport acceptable-frame-types {all | tagged}
no switchport acceptable-frame-types
• all - The port passes all frames, tagged or untagged.
• tagged - The port only passes tagged frames.
Default Setting
All frame types
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
• If a port is is connected to a VLAN-aware device at the other end of a
VLAN trunk, you can set the port to pass only tagged frames.
Otherwise, you must configure the port to pass all frame types.
• This command and the switchport mode command have the same
effect.
Example
The following example shows how to restrict the traffic passed on port 1
to tagged frames:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/1
Console(config-if)#switchport acceptable-frame-types tagged
Console(config-if)#
Related Commands
switchport mode
3-98
VLAN COMMANDS
switchport ingress-filtering
Use this command to enable ingress filtering for an interface. Use the no
form to restore the default.
Syntax
switchport ingress-filtering
no switchport ingress-filtering
Default Setting
Disabled
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
• If ingress filtering is enabled, incoming frames for VLANs which do
not include this ingress port in their member set will be discarded at the
ingress port.
• Ingress filtering does not affect VLAN independent BPDU frames,
such as GVRP or STA. However, they do affect VLAN dependent
BPDU frames, such as GMRP.
Example
The following example shows how to set the interface to port 1 and then
enable ingress filtering:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/1
Console(config-if)#switchport ingress-filtering
Console(config-if)#
3-99
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
switchport native vlan
Use this command to configure the PVID (i.e., default VLAN ID) for a
port. Use the no form to restore the default.
Syntax
switchport native vlan vlan-id
no switchport native vlan
vlan-id - Default VLAN ID for a port. (Range: 1-4094, no leading
zeroes)
Default Setting
VLAN 1
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
• If the switchport mode is set to trunk, the PVID will be inserted into
all untagged frames sent from a tagged port.
• If ingress filtering in disabled, all untagged frames received on this port
will be assigned to the VLAN indicated by the PVID.
Example
The following example shows how to set the PVID for port 1 to VLAN 3:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/1
Console(config-if)#switchport native vlan 3
Console(config-if)#
3-100
VLAN COMMANDS
switchport allowed vlan
Use this command to configure VLAN groups on the selected interface.
Use the no form to restore the default.
Syntax
switchport allowed vlan {add vlan-list [tagged | untagged] |
remove vlan-list}
no switchport allowed vlan
• add vlan-list - List of VLAN identifiers to add.
• remove vlan-list - List of VLAN identifiers to remove.
Separate nonconsecutive VLAN identifiers with a comma and no
spaces; use a hyphen to designate a range of IDs. Do not enter
leading zeros. (Range: 1-4094)
Default Setting
All ports are assigned to VLAN 1 by default.
The default frame type is untagged.
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
You must enter the switchport mode command before the switchport
allowed vlan command can take effect.
Example
The following example shows how to add VLANs 1, 2, 5 and 6 to the
allowed list as tagged VLANs for port 1:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/1
Console(config-if)#switchport allowed vlan add 1,2,5,6 tagged
Console(config-if)#
3-101
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
switchport forbidden vlan
Use this command to configure forbidden VLANs. Use the no form to
remove the list of forbidden VLANs.
Syntax
switchport forbidden vlan {add vlan-list | remove vlan-list}
no switchport forbidden vlan
• add vlan-list - List of VLAN IDs to add.
• remove vlan-list - List of VLAN IDs to remove.
Separate nonconsecutive VLAN IDs with a comma and no spaces;
use a hyphen to designate a range of IDs. Do not enter leading
zeroes. (Range: 1-4094)
Default Setting
No VLANs are included in the forbidden list.
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
This command prevents a VLAN from being automatically added to
the specified interface via GVRP.
Example
The following example shows how to prevent port 1 from being added to
VLAN 3:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/1
Console(config-if)#switchport forbidden vlan add 3
Console(config-if)#
3-102
VLAN COMMANDS
show vlan
Use this command to show VLAN information.
Syntax
show vlan [id vlan-id | name vlan-name]
• id - Keyword to be followed by the VLAN ID.
- vlan-id - ID of the configured VLAN. (Range: 1-4094, no leading
zeroes)
• name - Keyword to be followed by the VLAN name.
- vlan-name - ASCII string from 1 to 64 characters.
Default Setting
Shows all VLANs.
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
Example
The following example shows how to display information for VLAN 1:
Console#show vlan id 1
VLAN Type
Name
Status
Ports/Channel groups
---- ------- ---------------- --------- --------------------------------------1 Static
DefaultVlan
Active Eth1/ 1 Eth1/ 2 Eth1/ 3 Eth1/ 4 Eth1/ 5
Eth1/ 6 Eth1/ 7 Eth1/ 8 Eth1/ 9 Eth1/10
Eth1/11 Eth1/12 Eth1/13 Eth1/14 Eth1/15
Eth1/16 Eth1/17 Eth1/18 Eth1/19 Eth1/20
Eth1/21 Eth1/22 Eth1/23 Eth1/24 Eth1/25
Eth1/26 Eth1/27 Eth1/28 Eth1/29 Eth1/30
Eth1/31 Eth1/32 Eth1/33 Eth1/34 Eth1/35
Eth1/36 Eth1/37 Eth1/38 Eth1/39 Eth1/40
Eth1/41 Eth1/42 Eth1/43 Eth1/44 Eth1/45
Eth1/46 Eth1/47 Eth1/48 Eth1/49 Eth1/50
Console#
3-103
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
GVRP and Bridge Extension Commands
GARP VLAN Registration Protocol defines a way for switches to
exchange VLAN information in order to automatically register VLAN
members on interfaces across the network. This section describes how to
enable GVRP for individual interfaces and globally for the switch, as well
as how to display default configuration settings for the Bridge Extension
MIB.
Command
Function
Mode Page
Enables GVRP for an interface
Interface Commands
switchport gvrp
IC
3-104
switchport forbidden vlan Configures forbidden VLANs for an IC
interface
3-102
show gvrp configuration
Displays GVRP configuration for
selected interface
3-105
garp timer
Sets the GARP timer for the selected IC
function
3-106
show garp timer
Shows the GARP timer for the
selected function
NE,
PE
3-107
bridge-ext gvrp
Enables GVRP globally for the
switch
GC
3-108
show bridge-ext
Shows bridge extension configuration PE
3-108
NE,
PE
Global Commands
switchport gvrp
Use this command to enable GVRP for a port. Use the no form to disable
it.
Syntax
switchport gvrp
no switchport gvrp
Default Setting
Disabled
3-104
GVRP AND BRIDGE EXTENSION COMMANDS
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Example
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/1
Console(config-if)#switchport gvrp
Console(config-if)#
show gvrp configuration
Use this command to show if GVRP is enabled.
Syntax
show gvrp configuration [interface]
interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
Default Setting
Shows both global and interface-specific configuration.
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
Example
Console#show gvrp configuration ethernet 1/7
Eth 1/ 7:
Gvrp configuration: Disabled
Console#
3-105
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
garp timer
Use this command to set the values for the join, leave and leaveall timers.
Use the no form to restore the timers’ default values.
Syntax
garp timer {join | leave | leaveall} timer_value
no garp timer {join | leave | leaveall}
• {join | leave | leaveall} - Which timer to set.
• timer_value - Value of timer.
Ranges:
join: 20-1000 centiseconds
leave: 60-3000 centiseconds
leaveall: 500-18000 centiseconds
Default Setting
• join: 20 centiseconds
• leave: 60 centiseconds
• leaveall: 1000 centiseconds
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
• Group Address Registration Protocol is used by GVRP and GMRP to
register or deregister client attributes for client services within a bridged
LAN. The default values for the GARP timers are independent of the
media access method or data rate. These values should not be changed
unless you are experiencing difficulties with GMRP or GVRP
registration/deregistration.
• Timer values are applied to GVRP for all the ports on all VLANs.
• Timer values must meet the following restrictions:
leave >= (3 x join)
leaveall > leave
3-106
GVRP AND BRIDGE EXTENSION COMMANDS
Note: Set GVRP timers on all Layer 2 devices connected in the same
network to the same values. Otherwise, GVRP will not operate
successfully.
Example
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/1
Console(config-if)#garp timer join 100
Console(config-if)#
Related Commands
show garp timer
show garp timer
Use this command to show the GARP timers for the selected interface.
Syntax
show garp timer [interface]
interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
Default Setting
Shows all GARP timers.
Command Mode
Normal Exec, Privileged Exec
Example
Console#show garp timer ethernet 1/1
Eth 1/ 1 GARP timer status:
Join timer: 20 centiseconds
Leave timer: 60 centiseconds
Leaveall timer: 1000 centiseconds
Console#
3-107
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Related Commands
garp timer
bridge-ext gvrp
Use this command to enable GVRP. Use the no form to disable it.
Syntax
bridge-ext gvrp
no bridge-ext gvrp
Default Setting
Disabled
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
GVRP defines a way for switches to exchange VLAN information in
order to register VLAN members on ports across the network. This
function should be enabled to permit automatic VLAN registration,
and to support VLANs which extend beyond the local switch.
Example
Console(config)#bridge-ext gvrp
Console(config)#
show bridge-ext
Use this command to show the configuration for bridge extension
commands.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
3-108
IGMP SNOOPING COMMANDS
Example
Console#show bridge-ext
Max support vlan numbers: 255
Max support vlan ID: 4094
Extended multicast filtering services: No
Static entry individual port: Yes
VLAN learning: IVL
Configurable PVID tagging: Yes
Local VLAN capable: No
Traffic classes: Enabled
Global GVRP status: Disabled
GMRP: Disabled
Console#
IGMP Snooping Commands
This switch uses IGMP (Internet Group Management Protocol) to query
for any attached hosts that want to receive a specific multicast service. It
identifies the ports containing hosts requesting a service and sends data
out to those ports only. It then propagates the service request up to any
neighboring multicast switch/router to ensure that it will continue to
receive the multicast service.
Command
Function
Mode Page
Basic IGMP Commands
ip igmp snooping
Enables IGMP snooping
GC
3-110
ip igmp snooping vlan
static
Adds an interface as a member of a
multicast group
GC
3-111
ip igmp snooping
version
Configures the IGMP version for
snooping
GC
3-112
show ip igmp snooping Shows the IGMP snooping configuration PE
3-112
show bridge multicast
PE
3-113
ip igmp snooping
querier
Allows this device to act as the querier for GC
IGMP snooping
3-114
ip igmp snooping
query-count
Configures the query count
3-115
Shows the IGMP snooping MAC
multicast list
IGMP Querier Commands
GC
3-109
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command
Function
Mode Page
ip igmp snooping
query-interval
Configures the query interval
GC
3-115
ip igmp snooping
query-max-response-ti
me
Configures the report delay
GC
3-116
ip igmp snooping
query-time-out
Configures the query timeout
GC
3-117
show ip igmp snooping Shows the IGMP snooping configuration PE
3-112
Mulitcast Router Commands
ip igmp snooping vlan
mrouter
Adds a multicast router port
GC
3-118
show ip igmp snooping Shows multicast router ports
mrouter
PE
3-119
ip igmp snooping
Use this command to enable IGMP snooping on this switch. Use the no
form to disable it.
Syntax
ip igmp snooping
no ip igmp snooping
Default Setting
Enabled
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
The following example enables IGMP snooping.
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping
Console(config)#
3-110
IGMP SNOOPING COMMANDS
ip igmp snooping vlan static
Use this command to add a port to a multicast group. Use the no form to
remove the port.
Syntax
ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id static ip-address interface
no ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id static ip-address interface
• vlan-id - VLAN ID (Range: 1-4094)
• ip-address - IP address for multicast group
• interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
The following shows how to statically configure a multicast group on a
port:
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping vlan 1 static 224.0.0.12 ethernet
1/5
Console(config)#
3-111
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
ip igmp snooping version
Use this command to configure the IGMP snooping version. Use the no
form to restore the default.
Syntax
ip igmp snooping version {1 | 2}
no ip igmp snooping version
• 1 - IGMP Version 1
• 2 - IGMP Version 2
Default Setting
IGMP Version 2
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
• All systems on the subnet must support the same version. If there are
legacy devices in your network that only support Version 1, you will
also have to configure this switch to use Version 1.
• Some commands are only enabled for IGMPv2, including ip igmp
query-max-response-time and ip igmp query-timeout.
Example
The following configures the switch to use IGMP Version 1:
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping version 1
Console(config)#
show ip igmp snooping
Use this command to show the IGMP snooping configuration.
Default Setting
None
3-112
IGMP SNOOPING COMMANDS
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
The following shows the current IGMP snooping configuration:
Console#show ip igmp snooping
Service status: Enabled
Querier status: Enabled
Query count: 2
Query interval: 125 sec
Query max response time: 10 sec
Query time-out: 300 sec
IGMP snooping version: Version 2
Console#
show bridge multicast
Use this command to show known multicast addresses.
Syntax
show bridge bridge-group multicast [vlan vlan-id]
[user | igmp-snooping]
•
•
•
•
bridge-group - Bridge group index.
vlan-id - VLAN ID (1 to 4094)
user - Display only the user-configured multicast entries.
igmp-snooping - Display only entries learned through IGMP
snooping.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
3-113
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Example
The following shows the multicast entries learned through IGMP
snooping for bridge group 1, VLAN 1:
Console#show bridge 1 multicast vlan 1 igmp-snooping
VLAN M'cast IP addr. Member ports Type
---- --------------- ------------ ------1
224.1.2.3
Eth1/11
IGMP
Console#
ip igmp snooping querier
Use this command to enable the switch as an IGMP snooping querier. Use
the no form to disable it.
Syntax
ip igmp snooping querier
no ip igmp snooping querier
Default Setting
Enabled
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
If enabled, the switch will serve as querier if elected. The querier is
responsible for asking hosts if they want to receive multicast traffic.
Example
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping querier
Console(config)#
3-114
IGMP SNOOPING COMMANDS
ip igmp snooping query-count
Use this command to configure the query count. Use the no form to
restore the default.
Syntax
ip igmp snooping query-count count
no ip igmp snooping query-count
count - The maximum number of queries issued for which there has
been no response before the switch takes action to solicit reports.
(Range: 2-10)
Default Setting
2 times
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
The following shows how to configure the query count to 10:
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping query-count 10
Console(config)#
ip igmp snooping query-interval
Use this command to configure the snooping query interval. Use the no
form to restore the default.
Syntax
ip igmp snooping query-interval seconds
no ip igmp snooping query-interval
seconds - The frequency at which the switch sends IGMP host-query
messages. (Range: 60-125)
Default Setting
125 seconds
3-115
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Example
The following shows how to configure the query interval to 100 seconds:
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping query-interval 100
Console(config)#
ip igmp snooping query-max-response-time
Use this command to configure the snooping report delay. Use the no
form of this command to restore the default.
Syntax
ip igmp snooping query-max-response-time seconds
no ip igmp snooping query-max-response-time
seconds - The report delay advertised in IGMP queries. (Range: 5-30)
Default Setting
10 seconds
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
• The switch must be using IGMPv2 for this command to take effect.
• The command sets the time the switch waits after receiving an IGMP
report (for an IP multicast address) on a port before it sends an IGMP
Query out that port and then removes the entry from its list.
Example
The following shows how to configure the maximum response time to
20 seconds:
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping query-max-response-time 20
Console(config)#
3-116
IGMP SNOOPING COMMANDS
Related Commands
ip igmp snooping version
ip igmp snooping query-time-out
Use this command to configure the snooping query-timeout. Use the no
form of this command to restore the default.
Syntax
ip igmp snooping query-time-out seconds
no ip igmp snooping query-time-out
seconds - The time the switch waits after the previous querier has
stopped querying before it takes over as the querier.
(Range: 300-500)
Default Setting
300 seconds
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
The switch must be using IGMPv2 for this command to take effect.
Example
The following shows how to configure the default timeout to 300 seconds:
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping query-time-out 300
Console(config)#
Related Commands
ip igmp snooping version
3-117
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
ip igmp snooping vlan mrouter
Use this command to statically configure a multicast router port. Use the
no form to remove the configuration.
Syntax
ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id mrouter interface
no ip igmp snooping vlan vlan-id mrouter interface
• vlan-id - VLAN ID (Range: 1-4094)
• interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
Default Setting
No static multicast router ports are configured.
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
Depending on your network connections, IGMP snooping may not
always be able to locate the IGMP querier. Therefore, if the IGMP
querier is a known multicast router/switch connected over the network
to an interface (port or trunk) on your switch, you can manually
configure that interface to join all the current multicast groups.
Example
The following shows how to configure port 11 as a multicast router port
within VLAN 1:
Console(config)#ip igmp snooping vlan 1 mrouter ethernet 1/11
Console(config)#
3-118
IGMP SNOOPING COMMANDS
show ip igmp snooping mrouter
Use this command to display information on statically configured and
dynamically learned multicast router ports.
Syntax
show ip igmp snooping mrouter [vlan vlan-id]
vlan-id - VLAN ID (Range: 1-4094)
Default Setting
Displays multicast router ports for all configured VLANs.
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
The following shows the port in VLAN 1 that is attached to a multicast
router:
Console#show ip igmp snooping mrouter vlan 1
VLAN M'cast Router Ports Type
---- ------------------- ------1
Eth 1/11 Static
Console#
3-119
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Priority Commands
The commands described in this section allow you to specify which data
packets have greater precedence when traffic is buffered in the switch due
to congestion. This switch supports CoS with four priority queues for each
port. Data packets in a port’s high-priority queue will be transmitted before
those in the lower-priority queues. You can set the default priority for each
interface, the relative weight of each queue, and the mapping of frame
priority tags to the switch’s priority queues.
Command
Function
Mode
Page
Layer 2 Priority Commands
switchport priority
default
Sets a port priority for incoming untagged IC
frames
3-121
queue bandwidth
Assigns round-robin weights to the priority GC
queues
3-122
queue cos map
Assigns class of service values to the
priority queues
IC
3-123
show queue
bandwidth
Shows round-robin weights assigned to the PE
priority queues
3-125
show queue cos-map Shows the class of service map
PE
3-125
show interfaces
switchport
PE
3-77
Displays the administrative and
operational status of an interface
Layer 3 and 4 Priority Commands
3-120
map ip port
Enables TCP/UDP class of service
mapping
GC
3-126
map ip port
Maps TCP/UDP socket to a class of
service
IC
3-127
map ip precedence
Enables IP precedence class of service
mapping
GC
3-128
map ip precedence
Maps IP precedence value to a class of
service
IC
3-128
map ip dscp
Enables IP DSCP class of service mapping GC
3-130
map ip dscp
Maps IP DSCP value to a class of service
IC
3-130
show map ip port
Shows the IP port map
PE
3-132
PRIORITY COMMANDS
Command
Function
Mode
show map ip
precedence
Shows the IP precedence map
PE
3-133
Page
show map ip dscp
Shows the IP DSCP map
PE
3-134
switchport priority default
Use this command to set a priority for incoming untagged frames, or the
priority of frames received by the device connected to the specified
interface. Use the no form to restore the default value.
Syntax
switchport priority default default-priority-id
no switchport priority default
default-priority-id - The priority number for untagged ingress traffic.
The priority is a number from 0 to 7. Seven is the highest priority.
Default Setting
The priority is not set, and the default value for untagged frames
received on the interface is zero. The switch is not instructed what to
do with the priority.
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
• The precedence for priority mapping is IP Port, IP Precedence or IP
DSCP, and default switchport priority.
• The default port priority applies if the incoming frame is an untagged
frame received from a VLAN trunk or a static-access port. This priority
does not apply to IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tagged frames. If the incoming
frame is an IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tagged frame, the IEEE 802.1p User
Priority bits will be used.
3-121
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
• This switch provides four priority queues for each port. It is configured
to use Weighted Round Robin, which can viewed with the queue
bandwidth command. Inbound frames that do not have VLAN tags
are tagged with the input port’s default ingress user priority, and then
placed in the appropriate priority queue at the output port. The default
priority for all ingress ports is zero. Therefore, any inbound frames that
do not have priority tags will be placed in queue 0 of the output port.
(Note that if the output port is an untagged member of the associated
VLAN, these frames are stripped of all VLAN tags prior to
transmission.)
Example
The following example shows how to set a default priority on port 3 to 5:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/3
Console(config-if)#switchport priority default 5
queue bandwidth
Use this command to assign Weighted Round-Robin (WRR) weights to the
four class of service (CoS) priority queues. Use the no form to restore the
default weights.
Syntax
queue bandwidth weight1...weight4
no queue bandwidth
weight1...weight4 - The ratio of weights for queues 0 - 3 determines
the weights used by the WRR scheduler. (Range: 1 - 255)
Default Setting
WRR is disabled. Strict priority is used for default scheduling.
Weights 1, 4, 16 and 64 are assigned to queue 0, 1, 2 and 3 respectively.
Command Mode
Global Configuration
3-122
PRIORITY COMMANDS
Command Usage
WRR allows bandwidth sharing at the egress port by defining
scheduling weights.
Example
The following example shows how to assign WRR weights of 1, 3, 5 and 7
to the CoS priority queues 0, 1, 2 and 3:
Console(config)#queue bandwidth 1 3 5 7
Console(config)#
Related Commands
show queue bandwith
queue cos-map
Use this command to assign class of service (CoS) values to the CoS
priority queues. Use the no form set the CoS map to the default values.
Syntax
queue cos-map queue_id [cos1 ... cosn]
no queue cos-map
• queue_id - The queue id of the CoS priority queue.
- Ranges are 0 to 3, where 3 is the highest CoS priority queue.
• cos1 .. cosn - The CoS values that are mapped to the queue id. It is a
space-separated list of numbers. The CoS value is a number from 0
to 7, where 7 is the highest priority.
3-123
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Default Setting
This switch supports Class of Service by using four priority queues,
with Weighted Round Robin Queuing for each port. Eight separate
traffic classes are defined in IEEE 802.1p. The default priority levels
are assigned according to recommendations in the IEEE 802.1p
standard as shown in the following table.
Queue
1
2
3
4
0
1
Priority
2
3
4
5
6
7
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
CoS assigned at the ingress port is used to select a CoS priority at the
egress port.
Example
The following example shows how to map CoS values 0, 1 and 2 to CoS
priority queue 0, value 3 to CoS priority queue 1, values 4 and 5 to CoS
priority queue 2, and values 6 and 7 to CoS priority queue 3:
Console(config)#interface ethernet
Console(config-if)#queue cos-map 0
Console(config-if)#queue cos-map 1
Console(config-if)#queue cos-map 2
Console(config-if)#queue cos-map 3
Console(config-if)#
3-124
1/1
0 1 2
3
4 5
6 7
PRIORITY COMMANDS
Related Commands
show queue cos-map
show queue bandwidth
Use this command to display the weighted round-robin (WRR) bandwidth
allocation for the four class of service (CoS) priority queues.
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
Console#show queue bandwidth
Queue ID Weight
-------- -----0
1
1
4
2
16
3
64
Console#
show queue cos-map
Use this command to show the class of service priority map.
Syntax
show queue cos-map [interface]
interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
Default Setting
None
3-125
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
Console#show queue cos-map ethernet 1/11
Information of Eth 1/11
Queue ID Traffic class
-------- ------------0
1 2
1
0 3
2
4 5
3
6 7
Console#
map ip port (Global Configuration)
Use this command to enable IP port mapping (i.e., class of service
mapping for TCP/UDP sockets). Use the no form to disable IP port
mapping.
Syntax
map ip port
no map ip port
Default Setting
Disabled
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
The precedence for priority mapping is IP Port, IP Precedence or IP
DSCP, and default switchport priority.
Example
The following example shows how to enable TCP/UDP port mapping
globally:
Console(config)#map ip port
Console(config)#
3-126
PRIORITY COMMANDS
map ip port (Interface Configuration)
Use this command to set IP port priority (i.e., TCP/UDP port priority).
Use the no form to remove a specific setting.
Syntax
map ip port port-number cos cos-value
no map ip port port-number
• port-number - 16-bit TCP/UDP port number. (Range: 0-65535)
• cos-value - Class-of-Service value (Range: 0-7)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
• The precedence for priority mapping is IP Port, IP Precedence or IP
DSCP, and default switchport priority.
• This command sets the IP port priority for all interfaces.
Example
The following example shows how to map HTTP traffic to CoS value 0:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#map ip port 80 cos 0
Console(config-if)#
3-127
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
map ip precedence (Global Configuration)
Use this command to enable IP precedence mapping (i.e., IP Type of
Service). Use the no form to disable IP precedence mapping.
Syntax
map ip precedence
no map ip precedence
Default Setting
Disabled
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
• The precedence for priority mapping is IP Port, IP Precedence or IP
DSCP, and default switchport priority.
• IP Precedence and IP DSCP cannot both be enabled. Enabling one of
these priority types will automatically disable the other type.
Example
The following example shows how to enable IP precedence mapping
globally:
Console(config)#map ip precedence
Console(config)#
map ip precedence (Interface Configuration)
Use this command to set IP precedence priority (i.e., IP Type of Service
priority). Use the no form to restore the default table.
Syntax
map ip precedence ip-precedence-value cos cos-value
no map ip precedence
• precedence-value - 3-bit precedence value. (Range: 0-7)
3-128
PRIORITY COMMANDS
• cos-value - Class-of-Service value (Range: 0-7)
Default Setting
The list below shows the default priority mapping.
IP Precedence Value
CoS Value
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
• The precedence for priority mapping is IP Port, IP Precedence or IP
DSCP, and default switchport priority.
• IP Precedence values are mapped to default Class of Service values on
a one-to-one basis according to recommendations in the IEEE 802.1p
standard, and then mapped to the queue defaults.
• This command sets the IP Precedence for all interfaces.
Example
The following example shows how to map IP precedence value 1 to CoS
value 0:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#map ip precedence 1 cos 0
Console(config-if)#
3-129
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
map ip dscp (Global Configuration)
Use this command to enable IP DSCP mapping (i.e., Differentiated
Services Code Point mapping). Use the no form to disable IP DSCP
mapping.
Syntax
map ip dscp
no map ip dscp
Default Setting
Enabled
Command Mode
Global Configuration
Command Usage
• The precedence for priority mapping is IP Port, IP Precedence or IP
DSCP, and default switchport priority.
• IP Precedence and IP DSCP cannot both be enabled. Enabling one of
these priority types will automatically disable the other type.
Example
The following example shows how to enable IP DSCP mapping globally:
Console(config)#map ip dscp
Console(config)#
map ip dscp (Interface Configuration)
Use this command to set IP DSCP priority (i.e., Differentiated Services
Code Point priority). Use the no form to restore the default table.
Syntax
map ip dscp dscp-value cos cos-value
no map ip dscp
• dscp-value - 8-bit DSCP value. (Range: 0-255)
3-130
PRIORITY COMMANDS
• cos-value - Class-of-Service value (Range: 0-7)
Default Setting
The list below shows the default priority mapping. Note that all the
DSCP values that are not specified are mapped to CoS value 0.
IP DSCP Value
CoS Value
0
0
8
1
10, 12, 14, 16
2
18, 20, 22, 24
3
26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36
4
38, 40, 42
5
48
6
46, 56
7
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, Port Channel)
Command Usage
• The precedence for priority mapping is IP Port, IP Precedence or IP
DSCP, and default switchport priority.
• DSCP priority values are mapped to default Class of Service values
according to recommendations in the IEEE 802.1p standard, and then
mapped to the queue defaults.
• This command sets the IP DSCP priority for all interfaces.
Example
The following example shows how to map IP DSCP value 1 to CoS value
0:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/5
Console(config-if)#map ip dscp 1 cos 0
Console(config-if)#
3-131
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
show map ip port
Use this command to show the IP port priority map.
Syntax
show map ip port [interface]
interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
The following shows that HTTP traffic has been mapped to CoS value 0:
Console#show map ip port
TCP port mapping status: disabled
Port
Port no. COS
--------- -------- --Eth 1/ 5
80
0
Console#
Related Commands
map ip port - Maps CoS values to IP ports (i.e., TCP/UDP ports).
3-132
PRIORITY COMMANDS
show map ip precedence
Use this command to show the IP precedence priority map.
Syntax
show map ip precedence [interface]
interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
Console#show map ip precedence ethernet 1/5
Precedence mapping status: disabled
Port
Precedence COS
--------- ---------- --Eth 1/ 5
0
0
Eth 1/ 5
1
1
Eth 1/ 5
2
2
Eth 1/ 5
3
3
Eth 1/ 5
4
4
Eth 1/ 5
5
5
Eth 1/ 5
6
6
Eth 1/ 5
7
7
Console#
Related Commands
map ip precedence - Maps CoS values to IP precedence values.
3-133
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
show map ip dscp
Use this command to show the IP DSCP priority map.
Syntax
show map ip dscp [interface]
interface
• ethernet unit/port
- unit - This is device 1.
- port - Port number.
• port-channel channel-id (Range: 1-6)
Default Setting
None
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
Example
Console#show map ip dscp ethernet 1/1
DSCP mapping status: disabled
Port
DSCP COS
--------- ---- --Eth 1/ 1
0
0
Eth 1/ 1
1
0
Eth 1/ 1
2
0
Eth 1/ 1
3
0
.
.
.
Eth 1/ 1
Eth 1/ 1
Eth 1/ 1
Console#
61
62
63
0
0
0
Related Commands
map ip dscp - Maps CoS values to IP DSCP values.
3-134
MIRROR PORT COMMANDS
Mirror Port Commands
This section describes how to configure port mirror sessions.
Command
Function
Mode Page
port monitor
Configures a mirror session
IC
3-135
PE
3-136
show port monitor Shows the configuration for a mirror port
port monitor
Use this command to configure a mirror session. Use the no form to clear
a mirror session.
Syntax
port monitor interface [rx | tx | both]
no port monitor interface
• interface - ethernet unit/port (source port)
- unit - Switch (unit 1).
- port - Port number.
• rx - Mirror received packets.
• tx - Mirror transmitted packets.
• both - Mirror both received and transmitted packets.
Default Setting
No mirror session is defined. When enabled, the default mirroring is
for both received and transmitted packets.
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet, destination port)
Command Usage
• You can mirror traffic from any source port to a destination port for
real-time analysis. You can then attach a logic analyzer or RMON
probe to the destination port and study the traffic crossing the source
port in a completely unobtrusive manner.
3-135
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
• The destination port is set by specifying an Ethernet interface.
• You can create up to nine mirror sessions, but all must share the same
destination port. However, you should avoid sending too much traffic
to the destination port from multiple source ports.
• The source and destination ports have to be either both in the port
range 1-24 or 49 or both in the port range 25-48 or 50.
Example
The following example configures the switch to mirror all packets from
port 6 to port 11:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/11
Console(config-if)#port monitor ethernet 1/6 both
Console(config-if)#
Related Commands
show port monitor
show port monitor
Use this command to display mirror information.
Syntax
show port monitor [interface]
interface - ethernet unit/port (source port)
• unit - Switch (unit 1).
• port - Port number.
Default Setting
Shows all sessions.
Command Mode
Privileged Exec
3-136
PORT TRUNKING COMMANDS
Example
The following shows mirroring configured from port 6 to port 11:
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/11
Console(config-if)#port monitor ethernet 1/6
Console(config-if)#end
Console#show port monitor
Port Mirroring
------------------------------------Destination port(listen port):Eth1/1
Source port(monitored port) :Eth1/6
Mode
:RX/TX
Console#
Related Commands
port monitor
Port Trunking Commands
Ports can be statically grouped into an aggregate link to increase the
bandwidth of a network connection or to ensure fault recovery. Or you can
use the Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) to automatically
negotiate a trunk link between this switch and another network device.
You can configure trunks between switches of the same type. This switch
supports up to six trunks. For example, a trunk consisting of two
1000 Mbps ports can support an aggregate bandwidth of 4 Gbps when
operating at full duplex.
Command
Function
Mode Page
Manual Configuration Commands
interface port-channel Configures a trunk and enters interface
configuration mode for the trunk
GC
3-68
channel-group
IC
3-138
IC
3-139
Adds a port to a trunk
Dynamic Configuration Command
lacp
Configures LACP for the current
interface
3-137
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Command
Function
Mode Page
Trunk Status Display Command
show interfaces status Shows trunk information
port-channel
NE,
PE
3-75
channel-group
Use this command to add a port to a trunk. Use the no form to remove a
port from a trunk.
Syntax
channel-group channel-id
no channel-group
channel-id - Trunk index (Range: 1-6)
Default Setting
A new trunk contains no ports.
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet)
Command Usage
• The maximum number of ports that can be combined as a static trunk
is four 10/100 Mbps ports, and two 1000 Mbps ports.
• All links in a trunk must operate at the same data rate and duplex mode.
Example
The following example creates trunk 1 and then adds port 11:
Console(config)#interface port-channel 1
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/11
Console(config-if)#channel-group 1
Console(config-if)#
3-138
PORT TRUNKING COMMANDS
lacp
Use this command to enable 802.3ad Link Aggregation Control Protocol
(LACP) for the current interface. Use the no form to disable it.
Syntax
lacp
no lacp
Default Setting
Disabled
Command Mode
Interface Configuration (Ethernet)
Command Usage
• Finish configuring a port trunk before you connect the corresponding
network cables between switches.
• You can configure up to six trunks, containing up to four ports as a
dynamic LACP trunk.
• All ports in the same trunk must consist of the same media type (i.e.,
twisted-pair or fiber).
• The ports on both ends of trunk must be configured the same for speed
and flow control.
• The ports on both ends of trunk must also be configured for full
duplex, either by forced mode or auto-negotiation.
• If the target switch has also enabled LACP on the connected ports, the
trunk will be activated.
• If more than four ports attached to the same target switch have LACP
enabled, the additional ports will be placed in standby mode, and will
only be enabled if one of the active links fails.
• STP, VLAN and IGMP settings can only be made for the entire trunk
via the specified port-channel.
• A trunk formed with another switch using LACP will automatically be
assigned the next available port-channel id.
3-139
COMMAND LINE INTERFACE
Example
The following shows LACP enabled on ports 11-13. Because LACP has
also been enabled on the ports at the other end of the links, the show
interfaces status port-channel 1 command shows that Trunk1 has been
established.
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/11
Console(config-if)#lacp
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/12
Console(config-if)#lacp
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#interface ethernet 1/13
Console(config-if)#lacp
Console(config-if)#exit
Console(config)#exit
Console#show interfaces status port-channel 1
Information of Trunk 1
Basic information:
Port type: 100tx
Mac address: 00-00-e8-00-00-0b
Configuration:
Name:
Port admin status: Up
Speed-duplex: Auto
Capabilities: 10half, 10full, 100half, 100full,
Flow control status: Disabled
Current status:
Created by: lacp
Link status: Up
Operation speed-duplex: 100full
Flow control type: None
Member Ports: Eth1/11, Eth1/12, Eth1/13,
Console#
3-140
APPENDIX A
TROUBLESHOOTING
Troubleshooting Chart
Troubleshooting Chart
Symptom
Action
Cannot connect
using Telnet, Web
browser, or SNMP
software
• Be sure to have configured the agent with a valid IP
address, subnet mask and default gateway.
• Be sure that your management station has management
VLAN access to the switch (default is VLAN 1).
• Check that you have a valid network connection to the
switch and that the port you are using has not been
disabled.
• Check network cabling between the management station
and the switch.
• If you cannot connect using Telnet, you may have exceeded
the maximum number of concurrent Telnet sessions
permitted. Try connecting again at a later time.
Cannot access
the on-board
configuration
program via a serial
port connection
• Be sure to have set the terminal emulator program to
VT100 compatible, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, no parity and
9600 bps.
Forgot or lost the
password
• Reinstall the switch defaults or runtime code. Make a direct
connection to the switch’s console port and power cycle
the switch. During the POST diagnostics, access the
firmware-download menu and select the appropriate
options. See “Upgrading Firmware via the Serial Port” on
page A-2 for more details.
• Check that the null-modem serial cable conforms to the
pin-out connections provided in Appendix B.
A-1
TROUBLESHOOTING
Upgrading Firmware via the Serial Port
The switch contains two firmware components that can be upgraded; the
diagnostics (or Boot-ROM) code and runtime operation code. The
runtime code can be upgraded via the switch’s RS-232 serial console port,
via a network connection to a TFTP server, or using SNMP management
software. The diagnostics code can be upgraded only via the switch’s
RS-232 serial console port.
Note: You can use the switch’s web interface to download runtime code
via TFTP. Downloading large runtime code files via TFTP is
normally much faster than downloading via the switch’s serial port.
You can upgrade switch firmware by connecting a PC directly to the serial
Console port on the switch’s front panel and using VT100 terminal
emulation software that supports the XModem protocol. (See “Required
Connections” on page 1-2.)
1. Connect a PC to the switch’s Console port using a null-modem or
crossover RS-232 cable with a female DB-9 connector.
2. Configure the terminal emulation software’s communication
parameters to 9600 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, no parity, and set flow
control to none.
3. Power cycle the switch.
4. When the switch initialization screen appears, enter
firmware-download mode by pressing <Ctrl><f> immediately after
the diagnostic test results. Screen text similar to that shown below
displays:
A-2
UPGRADING FIRMWARE VIA THE SERIAL PORT
File Name
S/Up Type Size
Create Time
--------------------------------- ---- ---- ---------- -------$logfile_1
0
3
64 00:00:07
$logfile_2
0
3
64 00:00:12
diag_0070
0
1
96500 00:06:37
diag_0074
1
1
97780 00:00:05
run_03024
0
2
1121956 00:21:41
run_10020
1
2
1124416 00:00:10
--------------------------------- ---- ---- ---------- -------[X]modem Download [D]elete File [S]et Startup File
[R]eturn to Factory Default
[C]hange Baudrate
[Q]uit
Select>
5. Press <c> to change the baud rate of the switch’s serial connection.
6. Press <b> to select the option for 115200 baud.
There are two baud rate settings available, 9600 and 115200. Using the
higher baud rate minimizes the time required to download firmware
code files.
7. Set your PC’s terminal emulation software to match the 115200 baud
rate. Press <Enter> to reset communications with the switch.
Select>
Change baudrate [A]9600 [B]115200
Baudrate set to 115200
8. Check that the switch has sufficient flash memory space for the new
code file before starting the download.
You can store a maximum of only two runtime and two diagnostic
code files in the switch’s flash memory. Use the [D]elete File
command to remove a runtime or diagnostic file that is not set as the
startup file (the S/Up setting for the file is “0”).
9. Press <x> to start to download the new code file.
A-3
TROUBLESHOOTING
If using Windows HyperTerminal, click the “Transfer” button, and
then click “Send File....” Select the XModem Protocol and then use
the “Browse” button to select the required firmware code file from
your PC system. The “Xmodem file send” window displays the
progress of the download procedure.
Note: The download file must be a SMC6750L2 binary software file
from SMC.
10. After the file has been downloaded, you are prompted with “Update
Image File:” to specify the type of code file. Press <r> for runtime
code, or <d> for diagnostic code.
11. Specify a name for the downloaded code file. Filenames can be up to
32 characters, are case-sensitive, and cannot contain spaces.
For example, the following screen text shows the download procedure
for a runtime code file:
Select>x
Xmodem Receiving Start ::
[R]untime
[D]iagnostic
Update Image File:r
Runtime Image Filename : run_1013
Updating file system.
File system updated.
[Press any key to continue]
12. To set the new downloaded file as the startup file, use the [S]et
Startup File menu option.
13. When you have finished downloading code files, use the [C]hange
Baudrate menu option to change the baud rate of the switch’s serial
connection back to 9600 baud.
14. Set your PC’s terminal emulation software baud rate back to 9600
baud. Press <Enter> to reset communications with the switch.
A-4
UPGRADING FIRMWARE VIA THE SERIAL PORT
15. Press <q> to quit the firmware-download mode and boot the switch.
A-5
TROUBLESHOOTING
A-6
APPENDIX B
PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Console Port Pin Assignments
The DB-9 serial port on the switch’s front panel is used to connect
to the switch for out-of-band console configuration. The onboard
menu-driven configuration program can be accessed from a
terminal, or a PC running a terminal emulation program. The pin
assignments used to connect to the serial port are provided in the
following tables.
Figure B-1. DB-9 Console Port Pin Numbers
DB-9 Port Pin Assignments
EIA
CCITT Description
Circuit Signal
BB
BA
AB
104
103
102
RxD (Received Data)
TxD (Transmitted Data)
SGND (Signal Ground)
Switch’s
DB9 DTE
Pin #
2
3
5
PC DB9
DTE
Pin #
2
3
5
No other pins are used.
B-1
PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Console Port to 9-Pin DTE Port on PC
Switch’s 9-Pin
Serial Port
2 RXD
3 TXD
5 SGND
Null Modem
<---------TXD ----------------------RXD ---------->
-----------SGND ----------
PC’s 9-Pin
DTE Port
3 TXD
2 RXD
5 SGND
No other pins are used.
Console Port to 25-Pin DTE Port on PC
Switch’s 9-Pin
Serial Port
2 RXD
3 TXD
5 SGND
Null Modem
<---------TXD ----------------------RXD ---------->
-----------SGND ----------
No other pins are used.
B-2
PC’s 25-Pin
DTE Port
2 TXD
3 RXD
7 SGND
GLOSSARY
10BASE-T
IEEE 802.3 specification for 10 Mbps Ethernet over two pairs of Category 3, 4, or
5 UTP cable.
100BASE-TX
IEEE 802.3u specification for 100 Mbps Fast Ethernet over two pairs of Category
5 UTP cable.
1000BASE-T
IEEE 802.3ab specification for Gigabit Ethernet over two pairs of Category 5, 5e
100-ohm UTP cable.
1000BASE-X
IEEE 802.3 shorthand term for any 1000 Mbps Gigabit Ethernet based on 8B/
10B signaling.
Auto-negotiation
Signalling method allowing each node to select its optimum operational mode (e.g.,
10 Mbps or 100 Mbps and half or full duplex) based on the capabilities of the node
to which it is connected.
Bandwidth
The difference between the highest and lowest frequencies available for network
signals. Also synonymous with wire speed, the actual speed of the data
transmission along the cable.
BOOTP
Boot protocol used to load the operating system for devices connected to
the network.
Collision
A condition in which packets transmitted over the cable interfere with each other.
Their interference makes both signals unintelligible.
Glossary-1
GLOSSARY
Collision Domain
Single CSMA/CD LAN segment.
CSMA/CD
Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detect is the communication method
employed by Ethernet and Fast Ethernet.
Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP)
Provides a framework for passing configuration information to hosts on a TCP/IP
network. DHCP is based on the Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP), adding the
capability of automatic allocation of reusable network addresses and additional
configuration options.
End Station
A workstation, server, or other device that does not act as a network
interconnection.
Ethernet
A network communication system developed and standardized by DEC, Intel, and
Xerox, using baseband transmission, CSMA/CD access, logical bus topology, and
coaxial cable. The successor IEEE 802.3 standard provides for integration into the
OSI model and extends the physical layer and media with repeaters and
implementations that operate on fiber, thin coax and twisted-pair cable.
Fast Ethernet
A 100 Mbps network communication system based on Ethernet and the CSMA/
CD access method.
Full Duplex
Transmission method that allows switch and network card to transmit and receive
concurrently, effectively doubling the bandwidth of that link.
GARP VLAN Registration Protocol (GVRP)
Defines a way for switches to exchange VLAN information in order to
register necessary VLAN members on ports along the Spanning Tree so
Glossary-2
GLOSSARY
that VLANs defined in each switch can work automatically over a
Spanning Tree network.
Generic Attribute Registration Protocol (GARP)
GARP is a protocol that can be used by endstations and switches to
register and propagate multicast group membership information in a
switched environment so that multicast data frames are propagated only to
those parts of a switched LAN containing registered endstations. Formerly
called Group Address Registration Protocol.
Generic Multicast Registration Protocol (GMRP)
GMRP allows network devices to register endstations with multicast
groups. GMRP requires that any participating network devices or
endstations comply with the IEEE 802.1p standard.
Gigabit Ethernet
A 1000 Mbps network communication system based on Ethernet and the CSMA/
CD access method.
Group Attribute Registration Protocol
See Generic Attribute Registration Protocol.
IEEE 802.1D
Specifies a general method for the operation of MAC bridges, including
the Spanning Tree Protocol.
IEEE 802.1Q
VLAN Tagging—Defines Ethernet frame tags which carry VLAN
information. It allows switches to assign endstations to different virtual
LANs, and defines a standard way for VLANs to communicate across
switched networks.
IEEE 802.1p
An IEEE standard for providing quality of service (QoS) in Ethernet networks.
The standard uses packet tags that define up to eight traffic classes and allows
switches to transmit packets based on the tagged priority value.
Glossary-3
GLOSSARY
IEEE 802.3
Defines carrier sense multiple access with collision detection (CSMA/CD) access
method and physical layer specifications.
IEEE 802.3ab
Defines CSMA/CD access method and physical layer specifications for
1000BASE-T Fast Ethernet.
IEEE 802.3ac
Defines frame extensions for VLAN tagging.
IEEE 802.3u
Defines CSMA/CD access method and physical layer specifications for
100BASE-TX Fast Ethernet.
IEEE 802.3x
Defines Ethernet frame start/stop requests and timers used for flow control on
full-duplex links.
IEEE 802.3z
Defines CSMA/CD access method and physical layer specifications for 1000BASE
Gigabit Ethernet.
IGMP Snooping
Listening to IGMP Query and IGMP Report packets transferred between IP
Multicast Routers and IP Multicast host groups to identify IP Multicast group
members.
Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP)
Commonly used to send echo messages (i.e., Ping) for monitoring
purposes.
Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP)
A protocol through which hosts can register with their local router for
multicast services. If there is more than one multicast router on a given
Glossary-4
GLOSSARY
subnetwork, one of the routers is made the “querier” and assumes
responsibility for keeping track of group membership.
In-Band Management
Management of the network from a station attached directly to the
network.
IP Multicast Filtering
A process whereby this switch can pass multicast traffic along to
participating hosts.
Layer 2
Data Link layer in the ISO 7-Layer Data Communications Protocol. This is
related directly to the hardware interface for network devices and passes
on traffic based on MAC addresses.
Layer 3
Network layer in the ISO 7-Layer Data Communications Protocol. This
layer handles the routing functions for data moving from one open system
to another.
Link Aggregation
See Port Trunk.
Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP)
Allows ports to automatically negotiate a trunked link with LACP-configured ports
on another device.
Media Access Control (MAC)
A portion of the networking protocol that governs access to the transmission
medium, facilitating the exchange of data between network nodes.
Management Information Base (MIB)
An acronym for Management Information Base. It is a set of database
objects that contains information about a specific device.
Glossary-5
GLOSSARY
Multicast Switching
A process whereby the switch filters incoming multicast frames for
services for which no attached host has registered, or forwards them to all
ports contained within the designated multicast VLAN group.
Out-of-Band Management
Management of the network from a station not attached to the network.
Port Mirroring
A method whereby data on a target port is mirrored to a monitor port for
troubleshooting with a logic analyzer or RMON probe. This allows data on
the target port to be studied unobstructively.
Port Trunk
Defines a network link aggregation and trunking method which specifies
how to create a single high-speed logical link that combines several
lower-speed physical links.
Remote Monitoring (RMON)
RMON provides comprehensive network monitoring capabilities. It eliminates the
polling required in standard SNMP, and can set alarms on a variety of traffic
conditions, including specific error types.
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
The application protocol in the Internet suite of protocols which offers network
management services.
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)
A technology that checks your network for any loops. A loop can often occur in
complicated or backup linked network systems. Spanning Tree detects and directs
data along the shortest available path, maximizing the performance and efficiency
of the network.
Telnet
Defines a remote communication facility for interfacing to a terminal device over
TCP/IP.
Glossary-6
GLOSSARY
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
Protocol suite that includes TCP as the primary transport protocol, and IP as the
network layer protocol.
Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP)
A TCP/IP protocol commonly used for software downloads.
Virtual LAN (VLAN)
A Virtual LAN is a collection of network nodes that share the same collision
domain regardless of their physical location or connection point in the network. A
VLAN serves as a logical workgroup with no physical barriers, and allows users to
share information and resources as though located on the same LAN.
XModem
A protocol used to transfer files between devices. Data is grouped in 128-byte
blocks and error-corrected.
Glossary-7
GLOSSARY
Glossary-8
INDEX
A
I
address table 2-30
IGMP, configuring 2-71
IP address
BOOTP/DHCP service 2-11
setting 2-10
B
BOOTP 2-11
broadcast storm, threshold 2-28
C
Class of Service
configuring 2-53
queue mapping 2-53
community string 2-69
configuration settings, saving or
restoring 2-18
console port
pin assignments B-1
D
default priority, ingress port 2-54
default settings 1-13
DHCP 2-11
downloading software 2-16, A-2
F
firmware
upgrades A-2
firmware version, displaying 2-22
firmware, upgrading 2-16
H
hardware version, displaying 2-22
L
log-in
Web interface 2-2
logon authentication
RADIUS server 2-14
M
main menu 2-5
mirror port, configuring 2-29
multicast
configuring 2-71
router 2-74, 3-118
P
passwords
administrator setting 2-13
pin assignments
25-pin DTE port B-2
9-pin DTE port B-2
console port B-1
port priority
configuring 2-53
default ingress 2-54
ports
configuring 2-24
priority, default port ingress 2-54
problems, troubleshooting A-1
Index-1
INDEX
R
V
RADIUS, logon authentication 2-14
VLANs
configuring 2-41
S
serial port
configuring 3-56
XModem downloads A-2
SNMP
community string 2-69
enabling traps 2-70
trap manager 2-70
software downloads 2-16, A-2
software version, displaying 2-22
Spanning Tree Protocol 2-33
startup files
displaying 2-16
setting 2-16
statistics, switch 2-79
system software
downloading from server 2-16
T
trap manager 2-70
troubleshooting A-1
trunk
configuration 2-66
LACP 2-67
static 2-68
U
upgrading software 2-16, A-2
user password 2-13
Index-2
W
Web interface
access requirements 2-1
configuration buttons 2-3
home page 2-2
menu list 2-5
panel display 2-4
X
XModem downloads A-2
FOR TECHNICAL SUPPORT, CALL:
From U.S.A. and Canada (24 hours a day, 7 days a week)
(800) SMC-4-YOU; (949) 679-8000; Fax: (949) 679-1481
From Europe (8:00 AM - 5:30 PM UK Time)
44 (0) 118 974 8700; Fax: 44 (0) 118 974 8701
INTERNET
E-mail addresses:
techsupport@smc.com
european.techsupport@smc-europe.com
Driver updates:
http://www.smc.com/index.cfm?action=tech_support_drivers_downloads
World Wide Web:
http://www.smc.com/
http://www.smc-europe.com/
FOR LITERATURE OR ADVERTISING RESPONSE, CALL:
U.S.A. and Canada:
Spain:
UK:
France:
Italy:
Benelux:
Central Europe:
Switzerland:
Nordic:
Northern Europe:
Eastern Europe:
Sub Saharian Africa:
North Africa:
Russia:
PRC:
Taiwan:
Asia Pacific:
Korea:
Japan:
Australia:
India:
(800) SMC-4-YOU;
34-93-477-4935;
44 (0) 118 974 8700;
33 (0) 41 38 32 32;
39 02 739 12 33;
31 33 455 72 88;
49 (0) 89 92861-0;
41 (0) 1 9409971;
46 (0) 868 70700;
44 (0) 118 974 8700;
34 -93-477-4920;
27-11 314 1133;
34 93 477 4920;
7 (095) 290 29 96;
86-10-6235-4958;
886-2-2659-9669;
(65) 238 6556;
82-2-553-0860;
81-45-224-2332;
61-2-9416-0437;
91-22-8204437;
Fax (949) 679-1481
Fax 34-93-477-3774
Fax 44 (0) 118 974 8701
Fax 33 (0) 41 38 01 58
Fax 39 02 739 14 17
Fax 31 33 455 73 30
Fax 49 (0) 89 92861-230
Fax 41 (0) 1 9409972
Fax 46 (0) 887 62 62
Fax 44 (0) 118 974 8701
Fax 34 93 477 3774
Fax 27-11 314 9133
Fax 34 93 477 3774
Fax 7 (095) 290 29 96
Fax 86-10-6235-4962
Fax 886-2-2659-9666
Fax (65) 238 6466
Fax 82-2-553-7202
Fax 81-45-224-2331
Fax 61-2-9416-0474
Fax 91-22-8204443
If you are looking for further contact information, please visit www.smc.com or
www.smc-europe.com.
38 Tesla
Irvine, CA 92618
Phone: (949) 679-8000
Model Number: SMC6750L2
Publication Number: 150200016800A
Revision Number: E062002-R01
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