Owner`s manual | Creative 1212M CD Player User Manual

Digital Audio System
Owner's Manual
Creative Professional
1
E-MU Digital Audio System
Owner’s Manual
© 2003 E-MU Systems
All Rights Reserved
Software Version: 1.81
E-MU World Headquarters
Europe, Africa, Middle East
E-MU Systems
Creative Labs
1500 Green Hills Road
Ballycoolin Business Park
Scotts Valley, CA USA
Blanchardstown
95067-0015
Dublin 15
IRELAND
2
E-MU Japan
Creative Media K K
Kanda Eight Bldg., 3F
4-6-7 Soto-Kanda
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0021
JAPAN
www.japan.creative.com
E-MU Digital Audio System
Table of Contents
1- Introduction ................................................................. 7
Welcome!.............................................................................................................................. 7
All Systems Include: ......................................................................................................... 7
E-MU 1212M System ....................................................................................................... 8
E-MU 1820 System .......................................................................................................... 8
E-MU 1820M System ....................................................................................................... 8
Notes, Tips and Warnings ............................................................................................ 8
2 - Installation .................................................................. 9
Setting Up the Digital Audio System .................................................................................. 9
Notes for Installation ................................................................................................... 9
Safety First! ................................................................................................................. 10
Connector Types ............................................................................................................ 10
Installing the E-MU 1010 PCI Card .................................................................................. 11
Install the Sync Daughter Card or 0202 Daughter Card.................................................. 12
E-MU 0202 & AudioDock .......................................................................................... 13
Rubber Feet ................................................................................................................. 14
Rack Mounting the AudioDock ..................................................................................... 14
Software Installation .......................................................................................................... 15
Installing the E-MU 1010 Drivers ............................................................................. 15
Windows 2000 or Windows XP ................................................................................ 15
Uninstalling all Audio Drivers and Applications ..................................................... 15
Note About Windows Logo Testing .......................................................................... 15
3 - PCI Card & Interfaces ................................................. 17
The E-MU 1010 PCI Card .................................................................................................. 17
Connections ................................................................................................................... 17
EDI Connector ............................................................................................................ 17
S/PDIF Digital Audio Input & Output ...................................................................... 17
ADAT Optical Digital Input & Output ...................................................................... 17
IEEE1394 Firewire ...................................................................................................... 18
The 0202 Daughter Card ................................................................................................... 18
Connections ................................................................................................................... 18
Analog Inputs and Outputs ....................................................................................... 18
MIDI In/Out ............................................................................................................... 18
The AudioDock .................................................................................................................. 19
Front Panel Connections ............................................................................................... 20
Preamp Section ........................................................................................................... 20
MIDI 1 In/Out ............................................................................................................ 20
S/PDIF Optical Out .................................................................................................... 20
Headphone Output & Volume Control .................................................................... 20
Creative Professional
3
The AudioDock Front Panel Indicators ........................................................................ 21
The MIDI Input Indicators ......................................................................................... 21
The Clock Source and Sample Rate Indicators ......................................................... 21
The Clock Source LEDs .............................................................................................. 21
The Sample Rate Indicators ....................................................................................... 21
Rear Panel Connections ................................................................................................. 22
Line Level Analog Inputs ........................................................................................... 22
Turntable Inputs & Ground Lug ................................................................................ 22
Line Level Analog Outputs ........................................................................................ 22
Computer Speaker Analog Outputs .......................................................................... 23
MIDI 2 In/Out ............................................................................................................ 23
EDI Connector (Card) ............................................................................................... 23
The Sync Daughter Card .................................................................................................... 24
Connections ................................................................................................................... 24
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer ............................................. 25
PatchMix DSP..................................................................................................................... 25
Overview of the Mixer........................................................................................................ 25
Mixer Window ................................................................................................................ 26
Mixer Block Diagram ..................................................................................................... 26
Pre Fader or Post Fader .............................................................................................. 26
E-MU Icon in the Windows Taskbar ................................................................................. 27
The Toolbar ........................................................................................................................ 27
The Session ......................................................................................................................... 28
New Session .................................................................................................................... 28
Open Session .................................................................................................................. 29
Save Session .................................................................................................................... 29
Session Settings .............................................................................................................. 29
System Settings ........................................................................................................... 29
Using External Clock .................................................................................................. 30
MIDI Settings .............................................................................................................. 30
I/O Settings ................................................................................................................. 31
Input Mixer Strips............................................................................................................... 33
Input Type ................................................................................................................... 33
Mixer Strip Creation........................................................................................................... 34
Multichannel WAVE Files .............................................................................................. 35
Windows Media Player/DVD/Surround Sound Playback ....................................... 35
Insert Section .................................................................................................................. 36
Working with Inserts .................................................................................................. 36
The Insert Menu ......................................................................................................... 37
Using External Sends & Returns ................................................................................ 38
ASIO Direct Monitor Send/Return ............................................................................ 39
Meter Inserts ............................................................................................................... 40
To Set the Input Levels of a Strip ................................................................................... 40
Making the Best Possible Recording ......................................................................... 41
Trim Pot Insert ............................................................................................................ 42
Test Tone/Signal Generator Insert ............................................................................. 42
Managing Your Inserts ................................................................................................... 43
Aux Section ..................................................................................................................... 44
Sidechain Diagram ..................................................................................................... 44
Pre or Post Fader Aux Sends ...................................................................................... 45
Level, Pan, Solo & Mute Controls ................................................................................. 46
Main Section....................................................................................................................... 47
TV Screen & Selectors ..................................................................................................... 48
4
E-MU Digital Audio System
Effect ........................................................................................................................... 48
Input ........................................................................................................................... 49
Output ........................................................................................................................ 49
Auxiliary Effects & Returns ............................................................................................ 50
Sidechain Diagram ..................................................................................................... 50
Sync/Sample Rate Indicators ......................................................................................... 50
Output Section ............................................................................................................... 51
Main Inserts ................................................................................................................ 51
Main Output Fader ..................................................................................................... 51
Output Level Meters ................................................................................................... 51
Monitor Output Level ................................................................................................ 51
Monitor Balance Control ........................................................................................... 51
Monitor Output Mute ................................................................................................ 51
5 - Effects ....................................................................... 53
Overview............................................................................................................................. 53
The Effects Palette............................................................................................................... 53
FX Insert Chains ............................................................................................................. 54
Creating, Renaming & Deleting Categories or Presets ............................................. 55
Importing and Exporting Core FX Presets and FX Insert Chains ............................. 56
FX Edit Screen..................................................................................................................... 57
User Preset Section ......................................................................................................... 58
Core Effects and Effects Presets ..................................................................................... 59
List of Core Effects.............................................................................................................. 60
DSP Resource Usage ....................................................................................................... 60
Core Effects Descriptions................................................................................................... 61
1-Band Para EQ .............................................................................................................. 61
1-Band Shelf EQ ............................................................................................................. 61
3-Band EQ ...................................................................................................................... 62
4-Band EQ ...................................................................................................................... 63
Auto-Wah ........................................................................................................................ 64
Chorus ............................................................................................................................ 65
Compressor .................................................................................................................... 65
Basic Controls ............................................................................................................. 66
Distortion ....................................................................................................................... 67
Flanger ............................................................................................................................ 68
Freq Shifter ..................................................................................................................... 69
Leveling Amp .................................................................................................................. 70
Lite Reverb ...................................................................................................................... 71
Mono Delays - 100, 250, 500, 750, 1500, 3000 .......................................................... 72
Phase Shifter ................................................................................................................... 73
Rotary .............................................................................................................................. 73
Speaker Simulator .......................................................................................................... 74
Stereo Delays - 100, 250, 500, 750, 1500 .................................................................... 75
Vocal Morpher ................................................................................................................ 77
E-MU PowerFX ................................................................................................................... 78
Automating E-MU PowerFX .......................................................................................... 80
E-MU PowerFX Resource Availability ........................................................................... 80
Rendering Audio with E-MU PowerFX ............................................................................. 82
General Tips for Rendering using PowerFX .............................................................. 82
Tips for using Freeze Mode on Cubase LE ................................................................ 82
Using E-MU PowerFX with WaveLab and SoundForge ............................................... 82
E-MU E-Wire VST ............................................................................................................... 83
E-Delay Compensator .................................................................................................... 84
Creative Professional
5
E-Delay Compensator Use ......................................................................................... 85
E-Delay Units Parameter ............................................................................................ 85
Grouping Tracks ......................................................................................................... 86
6 - Using High Sample Rates ........................................... 87
Overview............................................................................................................................. 87
E-MU 1820 System at 88.2k/96k (1010 PCI Card & AudioDock) ............................. 87
E-MU 1212M System at 88.2k or 96k (1010 PCI Card & I/O Card) .......................... 88
E-MU 1820 System at 176.4kHz or 192kHz (1010 PCI Card & AudioDock) ........... 89
E-MU 1212 System at 176.4k/192k (1010 PCI Card & I/O Card) ............................. 89
WDM Recording and Playback Behavior ...................................................................... 91
7 - Appendix ................................................................... 93
Sync Daughter Card Supplement ...................................................................................... 93
SMPTE Conversion ........................................................................................................ 93
SMPTE Features .......................................................................................................... 93
SMPTE Options .............................................................................................................. 93
SMPTE Modes of Operation .......................................................................................... 94
Host Mode .................................................................................................................. 94
External Mode ............................................................................................................ 94
Flywheel Mode ........................................................................................................... 94
Flywheel Modes .......................................................................................................... 94
Stripe Mode ................................................................................................................ 95
SMPTE Background............................................................................................................ 95
Types of SMPTE .......................................................................................................... 95
Why use SMPTE? ............................................................................................................ 96
Striping SMPTE ............................................................................................................... 96
Avoiding SMPTE problems ............................................................................................ 96
Duplicating SMPTE time code ................................................................................... 97
Other Tips for using SMPTE ...................................................................................... 97
Example SMPTE Connection ......................................................................................... 97
MIDI Time Code (MTC) .................................................................................................... 98
Word Clock In/Out ............................................................................................................ 98
Getting in Sync ................................................................................................................. 100
Useful Information .......................................................................................................... 101
AES/EBU to S/PDIF Cable Adapter ............................................................................. 101
Cables - balanced or unbalanced? .............................................................................. 101
Balanced Cables ....................................................................................................... 101
Unbalanced Cables .................................................................................................. 102
Digital Cables ............................................................................................................... 102
Grounding .................................................................................................................... 102
Phantom Power ............................................................................................................ 102
Appearance Settings in Windows ............................................................................ 102
Technical Specifications................................................................................................... 103
Internet References........................................................................................................... 111
Forums ...................................................................................................................... 111
Note concerning the Microsoft GS Wavetable Software Synth ................................. 111
Index ............................................................................ 115
6
E-MU Digital Audio System
1- Introduction
Welcome!
1- Introduction
Welcome!
Thank you for purchasing the E-MU 1820M, E-MU 1820 or E-MU 1212M digital audio
system. Your computer is about to be transformed into a powerful audio processing
workstation. We’ve designed this E-MU digital audio system to be logical, intuitive and
above all, to provide you with pristine sound quality. All three systems offer unprecedented value by providing studio-quality, 24-bit/192kHz multi-channel recording and
playback at an astounding price.
E-MU Digital Audio System Components
E-MU 1212M
• E-MU 1010 PCI Card
• E-MU 0202 I/O Daughter Card
• 0202 I/O Card Cable
• (2) MIDI Adapter Cables
• D.A.S. Software/Driver
Installation CD-ROM
• Prod. Tools Software Bundle
CD-ROM
• Quick Start Guide
Inputs & Outputs
(8) Ch. ADAT Optical In
(8) Ch. ADAT Optical Out
(2) Ch. S/PDIF Digital In
(2) Ch. S/PDIF Digital Out
(1) MIDI Input & Output
(2) 24-bit Bal. Line Inputs
(2) 24-bit Bal. Line Outputs
E-MU 1820
E-MU 1820M
• E-MU 1010 PCI Card
• AudioDock
• EDI (E-MU Digital Interface Cable)
• PC Power Adapter Cable
• Headphone Splitter Cable
• D.A.S. Software/Driver
Installation CD-ROM
• Prod. Tools Software Bundle
CD-ROM
• Quick Start Guide
• E-MU 1010 PCI Card
• AudioDockM
• E-MU Sync Daughter Card
• Sync Card Cable
• EDI (E-MU Digital Interface Cable)
• PC Power Adapter Cable
• Headphone Splitter Cable
• D.A.S. Software/Driver Installation CD
• Prod. Tools Software Bundle CD
• Quick Start Guide
Inputs & Outputs
(8) Ch. ADAT Optical In
(8) Ch. ADAT Optical Out
(2) Ch. S/PDIF Digital Ins
(4) Ch. S/PDIF Digital Out
(2) MIDI Inputs & Outputs
(6) 24-bit Bal. Line Inputs
(8) 24-bit Bal. Line Outputs
(2) Mic./Line Preamp Inputs
(2) Turntable Preamp Inputs
(1) Stereo Headphone Out
(4) Computer Speaker Outs
Inputs & Outputs
(8) Ch. ADAT Optical In
(8) Ch. ADAT Optical Out
(2) Ch. S/PDIF Digital In
(4) Ch. S/PDIF Digital Out
(2) MIDI Ins & 3 MIDI Outs
(6) 24-bit Bal. Line Inputs
(8) 24-bit Bal. Line Outputs
(2) Mic./Line Preamp Inputs
(2) Turntable Preamp Inputs
(1) Stereo Headphone Out
(4) Computer Speaker Outs
(1) Word Clock In & Out
(1) SMPTE (LTC) In & Out
All Systems Include:
The E-MU 1010 PCI Card is the heart of all three systems. Its powerful hardware DSP
processor allows you to use over 16 simultaneous hardware-based effects, which place
minimal load on your computer’s CPU. The Firewire port provides high-speed connectivity to the Creative NOMAD® portable digital audio player, external CD-RW drives and
other Firewire compatible devices such as DV camcorders, printers, scanners and digital
still cameras. The E-MU 1010 PCI Card also provides eight-channels of ADAT® optical
digital input and output, as well as a S/PDIF stereo digital input and output.
The PatchMix DSP mixer application is included in all the systems. PatchMix DSP
delivers unmatched flexibility in routing your audio between physical inputs and
E-MU Digital Audio System
7
1- Introduction
Welcome!
outputs, virtual (ASIO/WAVE) inputs and outputs and internal hardware effects and
buses—no external mixer needed. You can add digital effects, EQs, meters, level controls
and ASIO/WAVE sends anywhere you like in the signal chain.
Because the effects and mixing are hardware-based, there is no latency when you record.
You can even record a dry signal while monitoring yourself with effects! Mixer setups
can be saved and instantly recalled for specific purposes such as recording, mixdown,
jamming, special effect setups, playing games, watching DVDs, or general computer use.
E-MU 1212M System
The E-MU 1212M includes the 0202 Daughter Card, which provides 2 line level,
balanced analog inputs, 2 line level, balanced analog outputs, plus MIDI input and
output. This is no-compromise audio interface, using ultra-high performance
24-bit/192kHz A/D - D/A converters to deliver an unbelievable 120dB dynamic range.
E-MU 1820 System
The E-MU 1820 includes the AudioDock, which is a half rack-space, audio interface. The
AudioDock adds the following input and output capabilities to the system: two mic/line
inputs with TFPro™ preamps, 6 balanced line level analog inputs, an RIAA stereo
turntable preamp, 8 balanced line level outputs, an assignable headphone output, two
sets of MIDI I/O ports, an additional S/PDIF optical output, and four stereo mini phone
jacks for easy connection to powered speaker systems. Combined with the digital I/O on
the 1010 PCI card, you have a total of 18 inputs and 20 outputs! Of course, professionalquality, 24-bit A/D and D/A converters with automatic DC blocking are used
throughout.
E-MU 1820M System
The E-MU 1820M system includes the AudioDockM, and is a no compromise,
mastering-grade system, which includes all the features of the 1820 system. The 1820M
system is distinguished by the addition of ultra-high performance 24-bit/192kHz
A/D - D/A converters which deliver an unbelievable 120dB dynamic range.
The Sync Daughter Card comes standard with the 1820M system and can be purchased
as an optional upgrade to the 1820 and 1212M systems. The Sync Card adds Word
Clock in and out for sample-synchronizing outboard digital equipment and SMPTE
longitudinal time code in/out for syncing other recording equipment. A separate MIDI
Time Code output port on the Sync Card eliminates timing problems caused by
combining MTC with MIDI performance data.
You’ll want to keep up with the latest software and options for your E-MU digital audio
system. You can find all of this, plus other helpful information, at the E-MU Website:
http://www.emu.com.
Notes, Tips and Warnings
Items of special interest are presented in this document as notes, tips and warnings.
f Notes provide additional information related to the topic being discussed. Often,
notes describe the interaction between the topic and some other aspect of the
system.
E Tips describe applications for the topic under discussion.
8
Warnings are especially important, since they help you avoid activities that can
cause damage to your files, your computer or yourself.
Creative Professional
2 - Installation
Setting Up the Digital Audio System
2 - Installation
Setting Up the Digital Audio System
There are six basic steps to installing your E-MU system:
1. Remove any other sound cards you have in your computer. (Once you are sure that
the E-MU card works properly, your old sound card can be reinstalled if desired.)
2. Install the E-MU 1010 PCI card in your computer. Go there.
3. Install the 0202 Daughter Card or Sync Daughter Card (if applicable). Go there.
4. Connect the AudioDock (if applicable).
5. Install the PatchMix DSP software onto your computer.
6. Connect audio, MIDI and synchronization cables between the E-MU system and
your other gear.
Notes for Installation
• IF AT ANY TIME DURING THIS INSTALLATION YOU SEE NO RESPONSE:
Use the Alt-Tab feature to select other applications. One of them may be the
Microsoft Digital Signature warning. It is possible for this warning to appear
behind the installation screen.
• Make sure you have the latest Windows Service Packs from Microsoft
(Windows 2000 - SP 4, Windows XP - SP 1 or higher).
• Disable onboard sound and uninstall all other sound cards. (If you wish to try
using multiple sound cards in your system, do so after you have confirmed that
your E-MU Digital Audio System is operating normally.)
• InstallShield “IKernel Application Error” on Windows XP: When installing this
software on Windows XP, you may be confronted with a “kernel error” at the very
end of installation. This is an issue with the InstallShield program, which is what
we use to install software on your computer. Please do not be alarmed by this, as
the error is innocuous.
To read more about this error, and obtain instructions on how to avoid getting
the message, please visit this website:
http://support.installshield.com/kb/view.asp?articleid=q108020
• Multiple Digital Audio System sound cards are not supported.
Please read the following sections as they apply to your system as you install the E-MU
1010, paying special attention to the various warnings they include.
Prior to installing the hardware, take a few moments to write down the 18-digit serial
number, which is located on the back of the box and on the 1010 PCI Card. This
number can help EMU Customer Service troubleshoot any problems you may
encounter—by writing the number down now, you’ll avoid having to open your
computer to find it later on.
E-MU Digital Audio System
9
2 - Installation
Setting Up the Digital Audio System
Safety First!
• To avoid possible permanent damage to your hardware, make sure that all connections are made with the host computer’s power off. Unplug the computer’s
power cable to make sure that the computer is not in sleep mode.
• Take care to avoid static damage to any components of your system. Internal
computer surfaces, the E-MU 1010 PCI board and the interfaces are susceptible to
electrostatic discharge, commonly known as “static.” Electrostatic discharge can
damage or destroy electronic devices. Here are some procedures you can follow
when handling electronic devices in order to minimize the possibility of causing
electrostatic damage:
As you install
hardware components,
observe the following
general precautions to
avoid damage to your
equipment and yourself.
• Avoid any unnecessary movement, such as scuffing your feet when handling
electronic devices, since most movement can generate additional charges of static
electricity.
• Minimize the handling of the PCI card. Keep it in its static-free package until needed.
Transport or store the board only in its protective package.
• When handling a PCI card, avoid touching its connector pins. Try to handle the
board by its edges only.
• Before installing a PCI card into your computer, you should be grounded. Use a
ground strap to discharge any static electric charge built up on your body. The
ground strap attaches to your wrist and any unpainted metal surface within your
computer. If you don’t have a ground strap, you can ground yourself by touching
the metal case of another piece of grounded equipment.
• Before connecting a cable to your interface or between PCI cards, touch the
connector sleeve of the cable to the sleeve of the jack to which you’ll be connecting
the cable in order to discharge any static build-up.
Connector Types
These connector types are used to connect the E-MU 1010 hardware components. They
will be referred to by the name shown in the first column of the following chart:
Name
Description
Connects
Card/External
CAT5 Connector
1010 PCI card and AudioDock
S/PDIF In
RCA Connector
S/PDIF digital audio devices
S/PDIF Out
RCA Connector
S/PDIF digital audio devices
ADAT Optical In
TOSLINK Optical Connector ADAT digital audio devices (or S/PDIF)
ADAT Optical Out TOSLINK Optical Connector ADAT digital audio devices (or S/PDIF)
1394
Firewire Connector
Interfaces to Firewire peripherals
Warning: The E-MU 1010 PCI Card has been designed to use readily available and
inexpensive standard computer system cables to make it easy for you to find
replacement cables if your original cables become damaged or lost. However, because
these standard cables types are used for other purposes, you must use caution to avoid
connecting the cables incorrectly. Please verify that all cables are connected only to the
proper components before powering up your system.
10
Creative Professional
2 - Installation
Installing the E-MU 1010 PCI Card
Installing the E-MU 1010 PCI Card
Note: This installation is very simple but if you are not familiar with the installation
of computer peripherals and add-in boards, please contact your authorized E-MU
Systems dealer or an approved computer service center to arrange for the installation.
To install the 1010 PCI card into your computer
1. Make sure that the power switch on your computer is off.
IMPORTANT: Unplug the power cord from the wall outlet!
2. Touch a metal plate on your computer to ground yourself and to discharge any
static electricity.
3. Follow the computer manufacturer’s recommended procedure for opening the case.
4. Remove the metal brackets from two adjacent PCI slots. If you have the E-MU 1820
system (non-M) you only need to remove the bracket from a single PCI slot. Put the
screw(s) aside for use later. See figure 1 below.
Figure 1
Figure 2
E Note: Some
computer cases don’t use
screws to secure PCI
cards. In this case, follow
the instructions that
came with your
computer.
I
PC
s
ot
Sl
s t
ot sen )
Sl pre ter
A be pu
IS not com
r
ay ou
(m n y
o
5. Align the E-MU 1010 PCI card with the slot and press gently but firmly down into
the slot as shown in figure 2.
6. Do not force the E-MU 1010 card into the slot. Make sure that the gold finger
connector of the card is aligned with the PCI bus connector on the motherboard
before you insert the card into the PCI slot. If it doesn’t fit properly, gently remove it
and try again.
7. Secure the card into the slot using one of the screws you placed aside earlier.
E-MU Digital Audio System
11
2 - Installation
Install the Sync Daughter Card or 0202 Daughter Card
Install the Sync Daughter Card or 0202 Daughter
Card
• E-MU 1820M - If you’re planning to use Word Clock. MIDI Time Code or SMPTE
sync, unwrap the Sync Daughter Card and get ready to install it. If you don’t need
these options or don’t have an empty PCI slot, you can skip these next few steps.
• E-MU 0202M - Unwrap the 0202 Daughter Card and get ready to install it.
1. Connect the ribbon cable provided with the kit between the E-MU 1010 card and
the 0202 Daughter card or Sync Daughter Card as shown in figures 3 & 4. The cables
are keyed so they cannot be incorrectly inserted. Seat the connectors firmly in the
sockets and arrange the cables neatly.
2. Align the Sync Daughter Card or the 0202 Daughter Card with the slot and press
gently but firmly down into the slot as shown in figure 2 on the preceding page.
3. Do not force the E-MU Card into the slot. Make sure that the tab at the rear of the
card is aligned with the PCI bus connector on the motherboard before you insert
the card into the PCI slot. If it doesn’t fit properly, gently remove it and try again.
4. Secure the card into the slot using one of the screws you placed aside earlier.
Figure 3
Sync Daughter
Card
12
Figure 4
0202 Daughter
Card
Creative Professional
2 - Installation
Install the Sync Daughter Card or 0202 Daughter Card
E-MU 0202 & AudioDock
If you have both the E-MU 0202 I/O card and the AudioDock, you are advised not to
connect both to the same E-MU 1010 PCI card using this version of software. There are
known issues with doing this what will be addressed in a future software update.
AudioDock Owners only
5. Locate the Disk Drive Power Converter Cable shown below and identify the large
male connector (the one with pins on it). Plug this connector into a spare disk drive
power cable in your computer. If there is no spare disk drive power cable, insert the
Adapter Cable between one of your disk drives and the power supply.
Power Converter Cable
The AudioDock
requires 1.1 Amps at 12V
(13 Watts) to operate.
The AudioDockM requires
1.25 Amps at 12V (15
Watts) to operate.
To Power
Supply
To Disk Drive
E-MU 1010 PCI Card
6. Plug the small connector into the E-MU 1010 PCI card as shown above. The
connector is keyed and can only be inserted one way.
7. After all components have been installed and securely fastened, close the computer
case.
8. Connect the supplied network-type cable from the 10 BaseT jack on the E-MU 1010
PCI card labeled “EXTERNAL” to the matching connector labeled “Card” on the
AudioDock. The cable supplied with the AudioDock is specially shielded to prevent
unwanted RF emissions.
9. Plug the power cord back into the wall outlet and turn on your computer.
E-MU Digital Audio System
CAUTION: Do not
connect the supplied
CAT5 cable to the
Ethernet or network
connector on your
computer. Doing so may
result in permanent
damage to either your
computer, the E-MU 1010
or both.
13
2 - Installation
Install the Sync Daughter Card or 0202 Daughter Card
Rubber Feet
Four rubber feet were included with the AudioDock. These feet should be used if you’re
not going to rack mount the AudioDock. If you are going to rack mount the AudioDock,
leave the feet off.
To install the rubber feet, simply peel off the protective backing from the adhesive and
press the feet into the round depressions at each corner of the bottom plate.
Rubber
Foot
Rubber
Foot
Rack-shelf
mount
Rack-shelf
mount
Rack-shelf
mount
Rack-shelf
mount
Rubber
Foot
Rubber
Foot
Rack Mounting the AudioDock
The AudioDock was designed to be rack mounted using standard 19-inch rack shelves.
(These shelves are available from a number of sources on the Internet. Search for “Rack Shelf”.)
Two AudioDocks fit side by side on a single rack shelf. Two screws are provided to secure
the AudioDock to the rack shelf (M3 x 6mm). Do not use screws longer than 6mm or
damage to the circuit board may result.
14
Creative Professional
2 - Installation
Software Installation
Software Installation
Installing the E-MU 1010 Drivers
The first time you restart your PC after installing the E-MU 1010 PCI card, you will need
to install the PatchMix DSP software and E-MU 1010 PCI card drivers.
Windows 2000 or Windows XP
The software is not compatible with other versions of Windows.
1. After you have installed your Digital Audio System, turn on your computer.
Windows automatically detects the Digital Audio System and searches for device
drivers.
2. When prompted for the audio drivers, click the Cancel button.
3. Insert the E-MU software Installation CD into your CD-ROM drive. If Windows
AutoPlay mode is enabled for your CD-ROM drive, the CD starts running automatically. If not, from your Windows desktop, click Start->Run and type d:\setup.exe
(replace d:\ with the drive letter of your CD-ROM drive). You can also open the CD
and double-click Setup.exe.
E Serial Number During the registration
process, you will be asked
to enter your 18-digit
serial number. The serial
number is located on the
back of the box and on
the 1010 PCI Card.
4. The installation splash screen appears. Follow the instructions on the screen to
complete the installation.
5. Choose “Continue Anyway” when you encounter the “Windows Logo Testing”
warning screen. See the note below for more information.
6. When prompted, restart your computer.
Uninstalling all Audio Drivers and Applications
At times you may need to uninstall or reinstall some or all of the audio card's applications and device drivers to correct problems, change configurations, or upgrade
outdated drivers or applications. Before you begin, close all audio card applications.
Applications still running during the uninstallation will not be removed.
1. Click Start -> Settings -> Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon.
3. Click the Install/Uninstall tab (or Change or Remove Programs button).
4. Select the E-MU driver/application entries and then click the Add/Remove (or
Change/Remove) button.
5. In the InstallShield Wizard dialog box, select the Remove option.
6. Click the Yes button. Restart your computer when prompted.
7. You may now re-install existing or updated E-MU 1010 PCI card device drivers or
applications.
Note About Windows Logo Testing
When you install the Digital Audio System drivers, you will see a dialog box that
informs you that the driver has not passed Windows Logo testing.
The Digital Audio System drivers are not signed because the driver does not support
some of the consumer audio features that the Microsoft driver signing program requires,
most notably Digital Rights Management.
However, the Digital Audio System drivers have been rigorously tested using the same
test procedures that a signed driver requires, and it passes in all important categories,
including those that measure the relative stability of the driver. So, it is perfectly safe to
install these drivers on your computer.
E-MU Digital Audio System
15
2 - Installation
Software Installation
16
Creative Professional
3 - PCI Card & Interfaces
The E-MU 1010 PCI Card
3 - PCI Card & Interfaces
The E-MU 1010 PCI Card
The E-MU 1010 PCI card is the heart of the system and contains E-MU’s powerful E-DSP
chip. The powerful hardware DSP on this card leaves more power free on your CPU for
additional software plug-ins and other tasks.
Connections
EDI Connector
EXTERNAL
Connects to
Audio Dock
via EDI Cable
S/PDIF
In/Out
ADAT
or S/PDIF
Optical
In/Out
Firewire
Connects to the AudioDock using the supplied EDI
cable. This cable provides a a two-way data link
between the E-MU 1010 and the AudioDock as well as
supplying power to the AudioDock.
S/PDIF Digital Audio Input & Output
RCA phono jacks are standard connectors used for
S/PDIF (Sony/Philips Digital InterFace) connections.
Each jack carries two channels of digital audio. The
E-MU 1010 receives digital audio data with word
lengths of up to 24-bits. Data is always transmitted at
24-bits.
S/PDIF digital I/O can be used for the reception and/
or transmission of digital data from external digital
devices such as a DAT external analog-to-digital
converter or an external signal processor equipped
with digital inputs and outputs.
The S/PDIF out can be configured in either Professional or Consumer mode in the Session Settings
menu. The 1010 PCI card can also send and receive
AES/EBU digital audio through the use of a cable
adapter. See AES/EBU to S/PDIF Cable Adapter for
details.
The S/PDIF input and outputs are usable at the
44.1kHz, 48kHz 88.2kHz and 96kHz sample rates,
but are disabled for 176.4kHz and 192kHz. The word
clock contained in the input data stream can be used
as a word clock source. See System Settings.
ADAT Optical Digital Input & Output
The ADAT optical connectors transmit and receive 8 channels of 24-bit audio using the
ADAT type 1 & 2 formats. The word clock contained in the input data stream can be
used as a word clock source. See System Settings. Optical connections have certain
advantages such as immunity to electrical interference and ground loops. Make sure to
use high quality glass fiber light pipes for connections longer than 1.5 meters.
At the 96kHz or 192kHz sample rates, the industry standard S/MUX interleaving
scheme is used for ADAT input and output. S/MUX uses additional ADAT channels to
achieve the required bandwidth. See the chart below or go here for additional information.
E-MU Digital Audio System
Important: When
using any type of digital
I/O such as S/PDIF or
ADAT, you MUST sample
sync the two devices or
clicks and pops in the
audio will result.
17
3 - PCI Card & Interfaces
The 0202 Daughter Card
Sample Rate
Number of Audio Channels
44kHz/48kHz
88.2kHz/96kHz
176.4kHz/192kHz
8 channels of 24-bit audio
4 channels of 24-bit audio, using S/MUX standard
2 channels of 24-bit audio, using S/MUX standard
IEEE1394 Firewire
This port allows high speed data transfer between your computer and external storage
devices such as hard disks, CD-ROM drives, etc. Firewire ports are “hot-swappable”
which means that you can plug and unplug Firewire peripherals without turning off
power.
This port does NOT support Firewire audio. It is fully compliant with the OHCI 1.1
specification, supporting asynchronous and isochronous data transfers at 100, 200 or
400 Mbit/s with multiple DMA channels.
Important: The 6-pin
Firewire connector/port
has a 3-watt maximum
power output. Connect
only one high power
usage device such as a
IEEE 1394 hard disk or
CD-RW drive to this port
unless it is self-powered.
The 0202 Daughter Card
The 0202 Daughter card is the companion card for E-MU 1010 systems which don’t
include the AudioDock. The 0202 Daughter card provides one pair of 24-bit balanced
analog inputs and one pair of 24-bit balanced analog outputs, plus MIDI in and out.
Connections
Analog Inputs and Outputs
Left / Right
Line Inputs
Left / Right
Line Outputs
MIDI
In/Out
The 0202 Daughter Card provides two balanced,
analog inputs and two balanced, line level analog
outputs. The inputs can be connected to any line level
stereo signal from keyboards, CD-players, cassette
decks, etc. The analog inputs are assigned to a mixer
strip in the mixer application.
The outputs can feed any line level input such as a
mixing board, the auxiliary input on your stereo or a
set of powered speakers. The line outputs are not
designed to drive headphones directly. Connect the
line outputs to a stereo receiver or mixer with a
headphone jack to obtain the proper current drive.
Either TRS (tip-ring-sleeve) balanced or TS unbalanced
cables can be used. Balanced cables provide better
noise immunity and +6dB higher signal level. The
output line level can be set to accommodate the
consumer -10dBV standard, or the pro audio +4 dBu
standard in the I/O screen of the Session Settings
dialog box. See I/O Settings.
MIDI In/Out
The MIDI input and output port can be assigned in your specific MIDI application.
Connect the MIDI adapter cable that came with your 0202 Daughter card to the miniDIN connectors on the card. The adapter cables convert the mini-DIN to standard DIN
connectors used on most keyboards and synthesizers. Connect MIDI Out to the MIDI In
port of your synthesizer and MIDI Out of your synth to MIDI In of the 0202 Daughter
Card.
18
Creative Professional
3 - PCI Card & Interfaces
The AudioDock
The AudioDock
The AudioDock connects to the E-MU 1010 PCI card via the EDI cable.
The AudioDock provides (6) balanced analog inputs, a pair of microphone preamp
inputs, (8) balanced line-level analog outputs, (4) 1/8” outputs for connecting powered
computer speakers, (2) MIDI inputs, (2) MIDI outputs, one optical S/PDIF output, a
headphone amp, and a RIAA equalized turntable preamp section which is “normalled”
into line input 3L and 3R.
f The AudioDock is
completely “hot
pluggable”— It’s OK to
plug or unplug the
AudioDock while the
computer is turned on.
The inputs are configured as follows:
(2)
mono microphone/line inputs
(3)
stereo pairs of line level inputs (6 inputs)
(1)
RIAA equalized turntable preamp input allows you to connect a turntable without using
an expensive external preamp.
Note: These inputs are automatically disconnected when plugs are inserted into
inputs 3L & 3R since the A/D converters are shared between the turntable inputs.
(2)
MIDI input ports
It’s a good idea to
mute AudioDock inputs 3
in the PatchMix DSP
mixer when nothing is
plugged in, since the
turntable preamp has a
very high gain (60dB)
and could contribute
extra noise to your mix/
monitor bus.
The outputs are configured as:
(4)
stereo pairs of line level outputs
(1)
stereo pair driving a stereo headphone jack (the provided cable allows 2 stereo outputs)
(1)
optical S/PDIF output (stereo).
(4)
stereo 1/8” computer speaker outputs. These outputs carry the same signals as the 4
stereo line level outputs and are provided as a convenience for connecting computer
speaker systems.
(2)
MIDI output ports
E-MU Digital Audio System
19
3 - PCI Card & Interfaces
The AudioDock
Front Panel Connections
Insert 1/4"
Plug for Line Level
Signal/Clip
Indicators
-10dB to +25dB Gain
A Line
B Line
Mic
S/PDIF
Optical Out
Phantom
Power On/Off
Mic
Clip
Clip
-12 dB
-12 dB
LED
Indicators
MIDI
48V
MIDI 1
CLOCK
1
LCK 44.1
2
EXT
48
SMPTE
96
192
IN
OUT
S/PDIF
Line Mic -
-10 dB
+20 dB
Insert XLR Plug
for Mic Level
+20dB to +55dB Gain
+25 dB
+55 dB
-10 dB
+20 dB
+25 dB
+55 dB
Input Gain
Controls
In
Out
MIDI #1
I/O Jacks
Out
Headphone
Output
Headphone
Volume
Preamp Section
The front panel mono Mic/Line inputs A & B can be used as balanced microphone
inputs, hi-Z guitar pickup inputs, or line level inputs. The Neutrik combination jack
accepts microphones using a standard XLR connector or line level/hi-Z inputs using a
1/4 inch TRS/TS connector.
The superb-sounding mic preamps are designed by TF Pro®. Each preamp has a level
control which sets the preamp gain from +20dB to +55dB for the XLR input and from
-10dB to +25dB for the line input. The line markings around the knobs are calibrated in
10dB increments. The heavy hash marks on the gain controls indicate unity analog gain
to the converter inputs (~5dBV input = 0dBFS output).
Warning: Some
microphones cannot
tolerate phantom power
and may be damaged.
Check the microphone’s
specifications and
requirements before
using phantom power.
A phantom power switch enables +48 volt phantom power supplied to both microphones. A red LED illuminates to indicate phantom power is enabled. See Phantom
Power for additional information.
Each microphone input has its own input level and clipping indicators. The green LED
indicates presence of signal and illuminates at -12 dB below clipping. The red LED
indicates that the signal is clipping the input. These LEDs monitor the signal directly at
the analog-to-digital converters and before any processing by the rest of the system.
When setting the levels for signals being sent into the AudioDock, the red level
indicators should never flash.
MIDI 1 In/Out
MIDI input and output ports allow you to interface any type of MIDI equipment such as
keyboards, effect units, drum or guitar controllers. The MIDI drivers were installed when
you installed your PatchMix DSP software and the MIDI ports will appear in your
system control panel under “Sounds and Audio Devices”.
Warning #2: After
turning phantom power
off, wait two full minutes
before recording to allow
the DC bias to drain.
The audio mutes for a
second when phantom
power is turned on.
S/PDIF Optical Out
The front panel S/PDIF connector is an optical TOSLINK output which, by default,
carries a digital copy of the main output pair. This output is a convenient way to master
to a portable DAT, MD recorder or other media. This S/PDIF output can also be freely
assigned in the mixer application.
Headphone Output & Volume Control
The headphone output drives standard stereo headphones and the adjacent volume
control sets the listening level. The headphone amplifier can drive headphones with
impedance as low as 24 ohms. The headphone output uses a high-current version of the
high-quality output amplifiers used on the other channels. For this reason it has a very
clean signal that can be used as another stereo output if you need it. This output is freely
assignable in the mixer application.
20
f Tip: Since the
headphone output can
be placed into any insert
location, you can use it to
monitor or troubleshoot
the signal flow.
Creative Professional
3 - PCI Card & Interfaces
The AudioDock
The AudioDock Front Panel Indicators
MIDI
CLOCK
1
LCK 44.1
2
EXT
48
SMPTE
96
192
IN
OUT
The MIDI Input Indicators
These two indicators, labelled 1 & 2, show MIDI activity on the MIDI input jacks.
The Clock Source and Sample Rate Indicators
These LED indicators on the front panel of the AudioDock show the current timing
synchronization and sample rate. These indicators reflect the current settings in the
Session Settings Window. See System Settings.
• If the sample rate is 88.2 kHz, the 44.1k and 96k LEDs both illuminate. If the sample
rate is 176.4 kHz, the 48k and 192k LEDs both illuminate.
The Clock Source LEDs
The Clock Source LEDs indicate the source of the master clock that is currently driving
the E-MU 1010.
LED
Clock Source
LCK
EXT
Lock - Indicates that the internal or external clock is locked and valid.
External - Indicates that an external clock source is selected.
When the system is running from an external or digital clock source, the AudioDock
continually checks that the incoming clock source is valid. If the clock source changes or
becomes invalid in any way, the LCK LED will flicker or will not be lit. If sync has been
lost, the audio outputs will also be muted. The AudioDock will switch to internal clock
at 48kHz if sync is lost and switch back to external clock if sync is re-established.
Typical causes of loss of digital or external sync include:
• Removing the S/PDIF or external clock cables
• Loss of power to the device providing the clock source
• Sudden changes in the S/PDIF sample rate
(as would happen if a DAT tape had data recorded at multiple rates)
The Sample Rate Indicators
The Sample Rate LEDs indicate the current sample rate at which the system is running.
The LEDs will light solidly to indicate the different sample rates of 44.1kHz, 48kHz,
96kHz or 192kHz.
When slaving to an external master source, the clock may drift slightly or change
dramatically (i.e. abrupt sample rate change or unplugging of physical master source).
the E-MU 1010 is tolerant to minor drifting within the supported rates of 44.1k, 48k,
88k, 96k, 176k and 192k, but if the sample rate drifts out of range (1%) the “Lock” LED
will be extinguished. If set to external clock and the external clock is removed or out of
tolerance, the E-MU 1010 will switch to internal clock at 48kHz (the default sample rate)
until an external clock source is connected.
E-MU Digital Audio System
21
3 - PCI Card & Interfaces
The AudioDock
Rear Panel Connections
Turntable Inputs Turntable
Ground
6 Balanced Line Level Inputs
(configured as 3 stereo pairs)
1L
1R
2L
2R
3L
(tied to line input 3)
3R
3L Phono 3R
Gnd
Alternate Outputs
(same as outputs 1-4)
1 L/ R
2 L/ R
3 L/R
4 L/R
Out
In
Card
Monitor
Out
1L
1R
2L
2R
3L
3R
6 Balanced Line Level Outputs
(configured as 3 stereo pairs)
4L
4R
Monitor
Outputs
In
MIDI 2
Out
MIDI Port 2
In/Out
Connect to
E-MU 1010 Card
Line Level Analog Inputs
Six balanced 24-bit, line-level, analog inputs are provided (1-3). These can be used to
input any line level signal from keyboards, CD-players, cassette decks, etc. The analog
inputs are assigned to mixer strips in the mixer application. Input line level can be set to
accommodate the consumer -10dBV standard, or the pro audio +4 dBu standard in the
I/O screen of the Session Settings dialog box. See I/O Settings.
The maximum input level in pro mode is 18dBV (=20.2dBu). Maximum output level in
consumer mode is 6dBV.
Either TRS balanced or TS unbalanced cables can be used. See page 101 for additional
information about unbalanced cables and connectors. The line-level inputs are all
servo-balanced, enabling them to convert unbalanced signals to balanced signals
internally to reduce noise.
Turntable Inputs & Ground Lug
The RCA turntable inputs feed an RIAA equalized preamp designed to accept moving
magnet type phono cartridges. The turntable inputs share line level inputs 3L and 3R.
Inserting a plug into Line Input 3 disconnects the turntable preamp from that channel.
Connect the ground lead from your turntable to the ground lug to prevent hum.
Line Level Analog Outputs
Eight balanced 24-bit, line-level, analog outputs are provided (1-4). Output pair 4 is
designated as the Monitor Output and is fed by the monitor bus of the PatchMix DSP
mixer application. We suggest that you plug your speakers in here. All the analog
outputs can be freely assigned in the mixer application. Special anti-pop circuitry mutes
the analog outputs when power is turned on or off.
Like the analog line inputs, either TRS balanced or TS unbalanced cables can be used.
Balanced cables provide better noise immunity and +6dB higher signal level. The output
line level can be set to accommodate the consumer -10dBV standard, or the pro audio
+4 dBu standard in the I/O screen of the Session Settings dialog box. See I/O Settings.
Warning: Do NOT
leave your turntable
connected when using
outputs 3L and 3R. This
can cause a ground loop.
• It’s also a good idea to
mute Dock inputs 3 in the
PatchMix DSP mixer
when nothing is plugged
in, since the turntable
preamp has a very high
gain (60dB) and could
contribute extra noise to
your mix/monitor bus.
The maximum input and output line levels are matched when the input and output
settings are set to the same mode (pro or consumer) in the I/O preferences screen.
IMPORTANT NOTE:
Do NOT use balanced audio cables (TRS) when connecting balanced outputs to
unbalanced inputs. Doing so can increase noise levels and introduce hum.
22
Creative Professional
3 - PCI Card & Interfaces
The AudioDock
Computer Speaker Analog Outputs
These stereo mini-phone (3.5mm) jacks duplicate line level outputs 1-4 with a lower
output level to accommodate consumer speakers. These line level outputs are designed
to interface easily with powered speakers.
Computer Speaker Output
Duplicates Line Level Output
1 L/R
2 L/R
3 L/R
4 L/R
Tip = 1L
Tip = 2L
Tip = 3L
Tip = 4L
Ring = 1R
Ring = 2R
Ring = 3R
Ring = 4R
MIDI 2 In/Out
A second, independent set of MIDI input and output ports which can be assigned in
your specific MIDI application.
EDI Connector (Card)
Connects to the AudioDock to the E-MU 1010 PCI card using a CAT5 computer cable.
The cable supplied with the AudioDock is specially shielded to prevent unwanted RF
emissions.
Warning: The AudioDock has been designed to use readily available and
inexpensive standard computer system cables. This makes it easy for you to find
replacement cables if your original cable becomes damaged or lost. However, because
these standard cables types are used for other purposes, you must use caution to avoid
connecting the cables incorrectly. DO NOT connect the supplied EDI cable to the
Ethernet or network connector on your computer. Doing so may result in permanent
damage to either your computer, the E-MU 1010 card, or the AudioDock.
E-MU Digital Audio System
23
3 - PCI Card & Interfaces
The Sync Daughter Card
The Sync Daughter Card
The Sync Daughter card (included in the E-MU 1820M system and available as an
option for other systems) provides word clock in and out, SMPTE (LTC) in and out and
an additional MIDI output for transmitting MIDI Time Code (MTC). MIDI Time Code
is a special rendering of SMPTE that can be transmitted over MIDI cables. For additional
information about SMPTE, please refer to SMPTE Background.
Synchronization is a basic technique needed for connecting multiple pieces of
equipment. Word Clock, S/PDIF or ADAT optical are all industry standard methods of
synchronizing digital equipment together at the system sample rate (44.1kHz, 48kHz,
96kHz, or 192kHz). The master clock source is set in the Mixer Session Settings menu.
See System Settings for more information.
Recording equipment can also be synchronized so that two audio recorders or an audio
and video recorder can lock together as a single machine. SMPTE and MTC sync are used
because they convey absolute time information. Word clock, S/PDIF or ADAT optical
sync only synchronize the sample rate and unlike SMPTE and MTC, do not convey song
position information. In a synchronized system, there is usually one MASTER machine,
and one or more SLAVES. When the master starts, the others will follow (chase).
The Sync Daughter card is also a format converter. It converts incoming SMPTE time
code to MIDI Time Code (MTC) and passes this information to the host computer to be
used by a sequencer or audio recorder application. When your computer application is
the “Master”, the Sync Daughter card converts MTC into SMPTE and sends it out to
another SMPTE device.
Connections
In
Word Clock
Out
In
SMPTE
Out
MTC Out
The Sync Daughter Card contains Word Clock
inputs and outputs for clock signals used in a
studio where a common sample rate reference is
required to keep multiple pieces of digital
equipment running together. This is referred to
as “house clock” or “house sync,” and is set to
the actual sample rate of the system. Use a cable
with BNC connectors to connect incoming clock
signals to the Word Clock In jack on the Sync
Daughter card. Connect the Word Clock Out to
your other digital equipment to use the Sync
Daughter Card as the Master Word Clock source.
See Word Clock In/Out.
The Sync Daughter Card provides SMPTE (LTC)
sync in and out, on two 1/4” phone jacks. LTC
can be recorded onto an unused audio track on
an analog or digital recorder and then fed back
into the SMPTE input to synchronize your
computer sequencer/recorder. See SMPTE
Background for more information.
MIDI Time Code is also output whenever MTC
is being generated by the host application
(sequencer or audio recorder). A special cable
converts the mini DIN to a standard MIDI jack.
See the Sync Daughter Card Supplement for
more information about using the Sync
Daughter Card.
24
Creative Professional
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
PatchMix DSP
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
PatchMix DSP
The PatchMix DSP Mixer is a virtual console which performs all of the functions of a
typical hardware mixer and a multi-point patch bay. With PatchMix, you may not even
need a hardware mixer. PatchMix DSP performs many audio operations such as ASIO/
WAVE routing, volume control, stereo panning, equalization, effect processing, effect
send/return routing, main mix and monitor control and allows you to store and recall
these “Sessions” at will.
To Invoke the PatchMix DSP Mixer
on the Windows System Tray. The PatchMix
DSP mixer window appears.
1. Left-click once on the E-MU icon
Overview of the Mixer
Physical Input Strips
f Click on the buttons
and knobs in the mixer
screen below to jump to
the description of the
control.
Toolbar
ASIO Input Strip
Add New
Strip
Display
Select
Buttons
Delete
Strip
“TV”
Screen
Channel
Insert
Section
Pan
Controls
Aux
Effects
Section
Aux
Sends
Sync/
Sample
Rate
Indicators
Volume
Fader
Solo/Mute
Buttons
User
Definable
Scribble Strip
Monitor
Volume/Balance
/Mute Controls
WAVE Strip
Controls Windows Source Audio
(Direct Sound, Windows Media, etc.)
E-MU Digital Audio System
Main
Inserts
Current
Session
Name
Main Mix
Output Volume
& Meters
25
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Overview of the Mixer
Mixer Window
The Mixer consists of four main sections.
Application Toolbar Lets you manage sessions and show/hide the various views.
Main Section
Controls all the main levels, aux buses, and their inserts. This section
also has a “TV” which shows parameters for the currently selected
effect and the input/output patchbay. It also shows the session’s
current sample rate and whether it’s set to internal or external clock.
Mixer Strips
This section is located to the left of the Main Section and shows all
the currently instantiated mixer strips. Mixer strips can represent
Physical analog/digital inputs, or Host inputs such as ASIO or
Direct Sound. Mixer strips can be added or deleted as necessary.
This section can be resized by dragging the left edge of the frame.
Effects Palette
This popup window is invoked by pressing the FX button in the
toolbar. Iconic representations of all effects presets are shown here,
organized by category. From this window, you can drag and drop
effect presets into the insert slots available on the mixer strips and
main section aux buses and main inserts.
A simplified diagram of the mixer is shown below.
Input
Input
Post-Fader Strip
Pre-Fader Strip
Insert
Chain
Insert
Chain
Mixer Block Diagram
Panning
Fader
Meter
MUTE
Aux 1
Aux 2
Aux
Bus 1
Aux
Bus 2
Aux 1
Send
Amount
Aux
Effects
Return
Amount
Insert
Chain
Aux 2
Fader
MUTE
Main Bus
Monitor
Out
MUTE
Return
Amount
Send
Amount
Insert
Chain
Main Bus
Effects
Insert
Chain
Monitor
Level
Main
Level
Main
Out
Pre Fader or Post Fader
When creating a new Mixer Strip, you have the option for the Aux Sends to be Post
Fader (both Aux Sends come after the channel fader) or Pre Fader (both Aux Sends
come before the channel fader). The Pre-fader option allows you to use either Aux Send
as another mix bus, which is unaffected by the channel fader. More Information.
26
Creative Professional
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
E-MU Icon in the Windows Taskbar
E-MU Icon in the Windows Taskbar
Right-clicking on the E-MU icon in the Windows taskbar calls the following window.
Right-Click Here
Opens the PatchMix DSP Mixer.
Calls the PatchMix DSP help system.
Disables the splash screen that appears at
boot-up.
f Restore Defaults:
Always try this option
first if PatchMix is
crashing or if you are
having any other
strange audio problems.
When unchecked, FX are not loaded until
needed, resulting in faster computer boot.
Restores the default PatchMix DSP and
driver settings.
Closes the PatchMix DSP background
program, disabling use of all audio I/O
from the E-MU hardware. Open the PatchMix DSP application to start audio again.
The Toolbar
New
Session
Save
Session
Open
Session
“About”
PatchMix DSP
Sync
Settings
f Click the buttons in
the toolbar to learn about
their function.
Session
Settings
Show/Hide
Effects
Global
Prefs
New Session
Calls up the “New Session” dialog box. New Session.
Open Session
Calls up the standard “Open” dialog box, allowing you to open a
saved Session.
Save Session
Calls up the standard “Save” or “Save As…” dialog boxes, allowing
you to save the current Session.
Show/Hide Effects
Toggle button that shows or hides the FX palette.
Session Settings
Calls up the Sessions Settings window. Session Settings.
Global Preferences
Calls up the Global Preferences window.
Sync Settings
Calls up the SMPTE window. (if Sync Card is installed)
About PatchMix DSP Right-Click on the E-MU logo to view the “About PatchMix DSP”
screen, which provides the software and firmware version
numbers and other information.
E-MU Digital Audio System
27
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
The Session
The Session
The current state of the PatchMix DSP mixer (fader settings, effects routings…everything!) can be saved as a Session. Whenever you create or modify a mixer setup, all you
have to do is Save it to be able to recall it at a later time.
Before you begin using PatchMix DSP, you need to set it up to be compatible with the
other software applications you may be running. The most important consideration is
your system sample rate. PatchMix DSP and any applications or other digital gear you
are using must be set to the same sample rate. PatchMix DSP can run at 44.1k, 48k,
88.2k, 96k, 176.4k or 192k, but its complete set of features are only available at
44.1kHz or 48kHz. See Chapter 6 - Using High Sample Rates for complete details.
Once the sample rate is set, you can only easily switch between 44.1k and 48k. You cannot
switch between 44/48k and the higher rates of 88k/96k/176k/192k. This is because the
number of mixer inputs and outputs changes significantly at these high sample rates. In
the case of such drastic sample rate changes, you must start a new session.
You can also set up an external sync source, thereby obtaining the sample rate from
some other device or application. External sync can be obtained from the ADAT input,
S/PDIF input or the Sync Daughter Card word clock. If the session is set at 44.1kHz or
48kHz and the external source is coming in at 96kHz (for example), the Sync Indicator
will be extinguished (off), but PatchMix will attempt to receive the external data. The
two units are NOT sample locked however, and you should correct this condition to
avoid intermittent clicks in the audio. Always check for the presence of the LOCKED
indicator whenever you are using a digital interface.
Important: When
using any form of digital
input, you MUST
synchronize the Digital
Audio System to the
external digital device
(S/PDIF/ADAT) or
synchronize all devices
using Word Clock.
PatchMix DSP comes with several session templates to choose from so when you create
a new session you can either create a “blank” session based around a designated sample
rate, or select from a list of template starting points.
In a PatchMix DSP session the number of strips in the mixer is dynamically configurable. This allows you to create only those strips you need up to a maximum number
determined by available DSP resources and available inputs.
New Session
You create a new session by clicking the “New Session” button in the PatchMix DSP
main Toolbar. The following dialog box appears.
Select a Template or new
Session at the desired
sample rate
Session Description
Add your own comment
or note about the Session
Check this if you want to
edit the New Session.
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The Session
You can now select one of the factory template sessions. The factory templates are preprogrammed with specific setups such as audio recording or mixing. The selector tabs
categorize Template Sessions into three groups based on sample rate, 44.1kHz/48kHz,
88.2kHz/96kHz, and 176.4kHz/192kHz.
You can create your own templates by simply copying or saving sessions into the
“Session Templates” folder (Program Files\Creative Professional\E-MU PatchMix
DSP\Session Templates). The system model number in parenthesis (1820) or (1212)
must precede the template name in order to be recognized as a template.
The “Session Path” allows you to choose the destination for your Session. The default
location is in the “My Sessions” folder within the “My Documents” folder.
There is also a Comment area that you can use to give yourself some clue as to what you
were thinking when you created the session.
Open Session
To Open a saved session, click on the Open Session button. A dialog box appears
allowing you to choose one of your saved Sessions to open. Choose one of your saved
sessions and click on the Open button.
Save Session
To Save a session, click on the Save Session button. A Save dialog box appears allowing
you to choose a location in which to save the current Session. The “My Sessions” folder
is chosen by default.
Get in the habit of saving the session whenever you have created a special mixer setup.
This will make you life much easier as you can recall a setup for many different audio
modes such as: recording, mixing, special ASIO routings, etc.
f Saving a session
“defragments” the effect/
DSP resources. If you
have used all your effects
and need another, try
saving the session.
Session Settings
System Settings
Pressing the Session Settings button on the toolbar brings up the System Settings
window shown below. Click the tabs to select System, MIDI, or I/O options.
E-MU Digital Audio System
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4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
The Session
The System Settings include the following:
• Internal/External Clock
Selects between internal or external word clock source
as the master clock source for the system
• Sample Rate
Selects the sample rate when using internal clock.
Your choices are: 44.1kHz, 48kHz, 88.2 kHz, 96kHz,
176.4kHz, 192kHz.
• External Clock Source
(ext. clock only)
Select from: ADAT, S/PDIF, or Word Clock (Sync card
only) as an external sample clock source.
E Note: if set to
“External” without an
external clock present,
PatchMix DSP defaults to
the internal 48kHz clock
rate.
Using External Clock
Whenever you are using any digital I/O such as ADAT or S/PDIF, one of the digital
devices MUST supply the master clock to the others. This master clock runs at the system
sample rate (44.1k, 48k, 88.2k, 96k, 176.4k or 192 k) and can be distributed using a
dedicated cable (word clock) or embedded into a data stream such as S/PDIF or
ADAT. Common symptoms of unsynced digital audio include, random clicks or pops
in the audio or failure of the digital stream to be recognized. Always check for the
presence of the “LOCKED” indicator whenever you are using a digital interface.
E Note: The maximum
supported sample rate for
S/PDIF is 96kHz.
If an External Clock is interrupted or switched after the Session has been created (except
between 44.1k <-> 48k), the “LOCKED” indicator will be extinguished and PatchMix
will attempt to receive the external data. The two units are NOT sample locked however,
and you should correct this condition to avoid intermittent clicks in the audio.
MIDI Settings
This option allows you to use either the MIDI In jack on the rear of the AudioDock or
the Sync Card MIDI jack as a MTC Output. (The MTC Out only transmits MTC.)
• Dock MIDI 2 In
Selects the rear MIDI Input on the AudioDock as MIDI 2.
• Sync Card Enabled
Selects the Sync Card functions. This selection disables
MIDI 2 In on the rear panel of the AudioDock. MIDI 2
Out on the rear panel of the AudioDock duplicates MIDI
1 Out in this mode.
30
E The SMPTE Input will
not function and the
Sync Card control panel
will not be updated
when Dock MIDI 2 In is
selected.
Word Clock and SMPTE
Out will operate with
Dock MIDI 2 selected.
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4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
The Session
I/O Settings
You can set the level (-10dBV or +4 dBu) for each pair of analog outputs and the input
gain setting for each pair of analog inputs.
An output setting of +4 provides the most output and is compatible with professional
audio gear. Balanced output cables provide a +6dB hotter signal than unbalanced cables
when used with balanced inputs. Do NOT use balanced cables unless your other gear
has balanced inputs. See “Cables - balanced or unbalanced?” in the Appendix for more
information.
Comparison of -10dBV & +4dBu Signal Levels
Consumer
Professional
(unbalanced)
(balanced)
}
+20 dBu
Clipping -->
Headroom
+ 6 dBV = +8 dBu
+ 2 dBV = +4 dBu
-10 dBV = -8 dBu
{
0 dBV = 1V RMS
<-- Clipping
Headroom
0dBu = .777V RMS
An input setting of -10 is compatible with consumer audio gear and works best with low
level signals. (-10dBV is approximately 12dB lower than +4dBu.) Choose the setting that
allows you to send or receive a full scale signal without clipping.
Setting correct input and output levels is important! You can measure the level of an
input by inserting a meter into the first effect location in the strip. Adjust your external
equipment outputs for the optimum signal level. See “To Set the Input Levels of a Strip”
for details.
f Input too weak?
Use -10 Input setting.
Output too weak?
Use +4 Output setting
Input Level
Settings
E-MU 1010
Optical Input
Select
Output Level
Settings
E-MU 1010
Optical
Output Select
S/PDIF
Output
Format Select
E-MU Digital Audio System
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4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
The Session
• Inputs +4 or -10
Selects between Consumer level (-10dBV) or
Professional level (+4dBu) inputs.
(Use the -10dBV setting if your input is too weak.)
• Outputs +4 or -10
Selects between Consumer level (-10dBV) or
Professional level (+4dBu) outputs.
(The +4 dBu setting outputs a hotter level.)
• PCI Card Optical Input
Selects between ADAT or optical S/PDIF for the 1010
PCI card ADAT Input. The coaxial S/PDIF input is
disabled when S/PDIF optical is selected.
• PCI Card Optical Output
Selects between ADAT or optical S/PDIF for the 1010
PCI card ADAT Output. The coaxial S/PDIF Output is
disabled when S/PDIF optical is selected.
• S/PDIF Optical Format
Selects between S/PDIF or AES/EBU format for S/PDIF.
This sets the S/PDIF-AES status bit, but does not affect
the signal level.
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Input Mixer Strips
Input Mixer Strips
PatchMix DSP Input Mixer Strips are stereo except for the AudioDock Mic/Line inputs
and the 0202 card inputs. Each input mixer strip can be divided into four basic sections.
• Insert Section
Effects, EQ, External/Host Sends & Returns can be inserted into the signal path.
• Pan Controls
These controls position the signal in the stereo sound field.
• Aux Sends
Used to send the signal to sidechain effects or to create separate mixes.
• Volume Control Controls the output level of the channel.
Mono/Stereo
Input Type
Insert Section
Pan Controls
Input Type
The very top of the strip is labeled
mono or stereo and displays the type
of the assigned input. Input mixer
strips can be added as desired and can
be configured to input the following:
f The Input Type will
turn RED if the input is not
available. (The AudioDock
may be disconnected.)
• Physical input
(Analog/SPDIF/ADAT).
f Physical input strips
are shown with BLUE text.
• Host Input
(Direct Sound, WAV, ASIO source)
f Host input strips are
shown with WHITE text.
Inserts
You can drag and drop effects from the
Effects Palette or Right-click to insert a
Physical or ASIO Send or Send/Return
A Peak Meter, Trim Control or Test
Signal can also be inserted by Rightclicking.
Pan Controls
Aux Sends
Channel
Volume
Control
Mute/Solo
Buttons
Scribble Strip
These controls allow to you position
the channel in the stereo sound field.
Dual controls on stereo strips allow
you to position each side independently.
Aux Sends
These controls send the signal to
sidechain effect processors such as
reverb and delay. They can also be used
to create separate mixes for the artist or
for recording.
Volume Control
Controls the output level of the strip
into the main/monitor mix bus.
Mute/Solo Buttons
These convenient buttons allow you to
solo or mute selected channels.
This screen shows a mono strip on the left and a
stereo strip on the right.
E-MU Digital Audio System
Scribble Strips
Click inside the scribble strip and type
a name of up to eight characters.
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4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Mixer Strip Creation
Mixer Strip Creation
PatchMix DSP is a dynamically configurable mixer. Each mixer session can contain an
arbitrary number of strips up to a limit set by the number of available input sources and
available DSP resources.
To Add a New Strip:
1. Click on the “New Mixer Strip” button. See Overview of the Mixer
f Adding or deleting a
strip “defragments” the
effect/DSP resources. If
you have used all your
effects and need another,
try deleting an unused
strip.
2. The New Mixer Strip Input Dialog appears:
3. Select the desired input to the mixer strip from the following choices:
• Physical Source:
Analog or digital input (Analog, ADAT, S/PDIF)
• Host - ASIO Source input
Streaming audio from an ASIO software application.
• Host - WAVE input
Window sound sources — WAVE, WDM, CD
Mixer Strip Type
Function
Physical: I/O Card In
24-bit monophonic analog input from the 0202 Daughter Card.
Physical: Dock Mic/Line
24-bit monophonic analog input from the AudioDock.
Physical: Dock In
24-bit stereo analog input from the AudioDock.
Physical: PCI Card S/
PDIF
2 channel digital audio from the S/PDIF input on the E-MU 1010
card.
Physical: PCI Card ADAT
2 channel digital audio from the ADAT input on the E-MU 1010
card
HOST SOURCE
Function
f CDs & MP3s: The
WAVE 1/2 strip is used
to playback CDs,
Windows Media Player,
and Direct Sound.
Host ASIO Output
2 channel digital audio from an ASIO source (software app).
Source
ASIO: 1/2, 3/4, 5/6, 7/8, 9/10, 11/12, 13/14 … 31/32
From software application
Host Windows Source
From Windows
34
Direct Sound, WDM, Windows Media
(Sound generated or handled by Windows.)
WAVE 1/2 - Default stereo source such as game sound, CD player,
beep sounds, etc.
WAVE 3/4, WAVE 5/6, WAVE 7/8 - Additional WDM channels
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4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Mixer Strip Creation
4. Select Pre-Fader Aux Sends or leave the box unchecked for Post-Fader Aux Sends.
5. Click OK to create a new strip or Cancel to cancel the operation.
f See “Pre or Post Fader
Aux Sends” on page 45.
To Delete a Mixer Strip:
1. Click the top of the mixer strip you wish to delete. A red border appears around the
strip, indicating that it is selected.
2. Click on the Delete Mixer Strip button, or right-click and choose Delete, or use the
Delete key on the PC keyboard. See Overview of the Mixer
Multichannel WAVE Files
2 channels of WAVE recording and 8 channels of multichannel WAVE playback are
supported. The WAVE channels are available for the following types of WDM devices:
• Classic MME
• DirectSound
• Direct WDM / Kernel Streaming (KS)
DirectSound and the WDM/KS interfaces allow up to Eight channels of Wave Out
while the classic MME interface only exposes 2 channels.
The WAVE channels operate at all sample rates. For additional information about WDM
behavior at high sample rates, see “WDM Recording and Playback Behavior”.
192kHz/96kHz DVD-Audio disks are protected against digital copying. However, most
DVD-Audio disks contain duplicate 48kHz audio tracks which will play back on the
Digital Audio System.
Windows Media Player/DVD/Surround Sound Playback
Select DirectSound as the output format when using Windows Media Player and other
DVD player applications.
Eight channel WAVE playback supports 5.1, 6.1 or 7.1 surround audio.
The chart below shows how to connect the outputs for surround sound playback. Use
outputs 1-3 for 5.1 surround; use outputs 1-4 for 7.1 surround.
Multichannel WAVE to Surround Sound Speaker Channels
(using the 5.1 DVD Playback Session)
WAVE Strip
Surround Channels
1/4” Outputs
1/8” Outputs
E-DSP WAVE 1/2
Front Left / Front Right
1L = FL 1R = FR
1 (Tip = FL Ring = FR)
E-DSP WAVE 3/4
Center / Subwoofer
3L = C 3R = Sub
3 (Tip = C Ring = Sub)
E-DSP WAVE 5/6
Rear Left / Rear Right
2L = RL 2R = RR
2 (Tip = RL Ring = RR)
E-DSP WAVE 7/8
Side Left / Side Right
4L =SL 4R = SR
4 (Tip = SL Ring = SR)
E-MU Digital Audio System
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4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Mixer Strip Creation
Insert Section
The Insert Section is next in line. PatchMix DSP effects can be selected from the Effects
Palette and dropped into the insert locations. See “The Effects Palette”. Any number of
effects can be inserted in series.
The Inserts also have the unique ability to patch into ASIO/WAVE and external
equipment. ASIO/WAVE Sends, External Sends and External Send/Returns can be
dropped into the insert section to route the signal anywhere you want.
The Insert/Patch Bay is incredibly flexible. Want to send the input of the strip to your
audio recorder? Simply insert an ASIO send into the insert section and select the ASIO
pair you want. That’s it! That input is now available in your ASIO software.
The following types of inserts can be selected.
Hardware Effect
Reverb, EQ, Compressor, Flanger, etc. using PatchMix DSP’s effects
which do not load your CPU.
Host ASIO Send
Splits off the signal and sends it to an ASIO host input such as a
software audio recorder or anything that uses ASIO.
ASIO Direct
Monitor
Sends the signal to a selected ASIO host input, then returns a selected
ASIO host output to the chain. Use for recording with “Direct
Monitoring”
Ext. Send/Return
Sends signal to a selected external output, then returns it to the chain
via a physical input.
External Send
Sends the signal to an external output. See “To Add a Send Insert:”.
Peak Meter
Peak meters allow you to monitor the signal level anywhere in the
chain. See “Meter Inserts”.
Trim Pot
You can insert a gain control with up to 30 dB of gain or attenuation.
A peak level meter and phase inverter are also included.
See “Trim Pot Insert”.
Test Tone
This special insert outputs a calibrated sine wave or noise source,
which can be used to track down audio problems.
See “Test Tone/Signal Generator Insert”.
f You have to create an
ASIO strip or ASIO Send in
order to activate these
ASIO channels in your
software.
Working with Inserts
The Inserts are one of most powerful features of the PatchMix DSP system as they allow
you to configure the mixer for a wide variety of applications.
To Add an Effect to an Insert Location:
1. Press the FX button. The effects palette appears.
2. The effects are organized into categories. Click on a folder to open it.
3. Select the effect you want, drag it over the insert section, then drop it into an insert
location.
4. To rearrange the order of effects, simply drag and drop them into the desired order.
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4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Mixer Strip Creation
The Insert Menu
Right-Clicking over the insert section brings up a pop-up selection box containing
various insert options to help you control and manage your inserts.
To Add a Send Insert:
This type of insert send splits the signal at the insert point and sends it out to the selected
destination. (An “ASIO Send” becomes an input on your recording application, a
“Physical Out” goes to a pair of output jacks. the signal also continues down the strip to
the Aux Sends and main mixer outputs.)
1. Right-Click over the Insert section. A pop-up dialog box appears.
2. Select “Insert Send” (to ASIO/WAVE or physical output) from the list of options. The
following dialog box appears.
Input
To ASIO, WAV or
Physical Output
Insert
Send
Panning
Fader
Aux 1 Bus
Aux 2 Bus
Main Output Bus
3. Choose one of the Send Outputs. Click on a destination to select it.
4. Click OK to select the output or Cancel to cancel the operation.
To Add a Send/Return Insert:
This type of insert send breaks the signal at the insert point and sends it out to the
selected destination such as an external effect processor. A return source signal is also
selected which returns the signal to the channel strip after processing.
1. Right-Click over the Insert section. A pop-up dialog box appears.
2. Select “Insert Send/Return (Physical Output and Input)” from the list of options.
The following dialog box appears.
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4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Mixer Strip Creation
Input
To Physical Output
From Physical Input
Insert
Send/Return
Panning
Fader
If the source or
destination you want to
use is not available in the
list, they are probably
already being used
elsewhere. Check the
input Strips, Inserts and
Output Assignments.
Aux 1 Bus
Aux 2 Bus
Main Output Bus
3. Choose one of the Send Outputs. Click on a destination to select it.
4. Choose one of the Return Inputs. Click on a source to select it.
5. Click OK to select the Send and Return, or Cancel to cancel the operation.
Using External Sends & Returns
An External Send/Return breaks the signal at the insert point and sends it out to the
selected external destination such as a compressor, a stereo effect processor or any other
audio device. Any physical input or output can be used.
Outboard Signal Processor
S/PDIF
Input
S/PDIF
Output
The Send/Return Inserts allow you to connect your favorite external analog or digital gear.
To Insert an External Signal Processing Device:
1. Right-click on the insert chain and select the Insert Send/Return (Physical Output
and Input). The popup dialog box shown above appears.
2. Select the output and input you wish to use.
3. Connect your external audio gear to the appropriate analog or digital connectors.
4. If you’re using the analog outputs and inputs, you may have to adjust the levels in
the I/O Session Settings. See page 31. You can insert a level meter after the Send/
Return to make sure you’re getting a strong signal back from the external device.
5. If you’re using a digital Send/Return, make sure that the external digital device is
synchronized to the digital input. Otherwise, poor audio quality will result.
(Alternatively, you can synchronize PatchMix DSP to your external device in the System
Session Settings. See page 30.)
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Mixer Strip Creation
ASIO Direct Monitor Send/Return
This type of insert send breaks the signal at the insert point and sends it out to the
selected ASIO Host Input destination (such as Cubase or Sonar). A return source signal
is also selected which returns the signal to the channel strip from an ASIO Host Output.
The ASIO Direct Monitor Send/Return is unique in that it utilizes ASIO 2.0 zero-latency
monitoring. In order to utilize this feature, Direct Monitoring must be enabled in the
audio recording application.
While recording, the Direct Monitor Send/Return routes the signal to the recording
application, but monitors directly from the input to eliminate latency. During playback,
the recording application automatically switches the Direct Monitor Send/Return to
monitor the recorded track.
Input
Direct Mon
Input
Recording
Software
Recording
Direct Mon
Recording
Software
Playback
The Direct Monitor Send/Return also allows the recording application to control
volume and pan. Normally when using direct monitor recording you’ll want to control
the volume and pan from the recording application. In this case, set the PatchMix DSP
stereo pan controls hard left and right, mono pan controls to center, and the fader to
0dB.
To Add an ASIO Direct Monitor Send/Return:
1. Right-Click over the Insert section. A pop-up dialog box appears.
2. Select “Insert ASIO Direct Monitor” from the list of options. The following dialog
box appears.
3. Choose one of the Send Outputs. Click
on a destination to select it.
4. Choose one of the Return Inputs. Click
on a source to select it.
5. Click OK to select the Send and Return,
or Cancel to cancel the operation.
E-MU Digital Audio System
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4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Mixer Strip Creation
Meter Inserts
Keeping track of signal levels is important in any audio system, be it analog or digital.
You want to keep the signal levels running as close to maximum in order to achieve high
resolution and low noise. On the other hand, you don’t want the signal level so high as
to cause clipping. To help you maintain optimum signal levels, we have included Peak
Level Meters, which can be dropped into any insert location.
The insert meters are of the “peak hold” type. The topmost bar in the meter holds its
highest level for a second to let you see transients that would otherwise be too quick for
the eye. A numeric readout above the meter shows the peak-hold level in dB.
The peak meters are also color-coded to indicate the signal strength. The chart below
outlines the meanings of the colors. Avoid lighting the topmost red bar, as this indicates
distortion of the signal. Click on the clip indicator to turn it off.
Meter Color
Indicates
E Red
Indicates signal clipping.
E Yellow
Good strong signal level.
E Green
Signal is present.
One of the most obvious uses of the insert meters is to set input levels. On the analog
inputs, the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is one of the most critical points in the
signal path. You want the input signal level to drive the 24-bit ADCs into their optimum
range without clipping. A reading of 0dB on an input meter indicates signal clipping.
Level
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
--12dB
Each bar of the meter equals 1dB. The yellow bars begin at -12dB below full scale.
The insert meters are also useful to monitor incoming digital signals such as ADAT,
ASIO or S/PDIF to make sure the mixer is receiving a proper signal level. They’re also
great for troubleshooting, since you can place them virtually anywhere in the mixer.
To Insert a Meter
1. Right-Click on an Insert location of the mixer strip. A pop-up dialog box appears.
2. Select Insert Peak Meter. A stereo peak meter appears in the insert location.
3. Select Effect in the Main Section. The meters are now shown in high resolution in
the TV screen.
To Set the Input Levels of a Strip
1. Select the topmost Insert location on a mixer strip and insert a meter (see above).
2. Left-click on the meter insert to see the meter in the TV screen.
3. Feed your audio signal to the input of the mixer strip. The meter should now show
the signal level.
4. Adjust the output level of the external device (synthesizer, instrument, preamp, etc.)
feeding the AudioDock or 0202 Daughter Card. The meter should be in the yellow
region most of the time with occasional forays into the red. If the clip indicator ever
comes on, reduce the signal level.
40
f Input too weak?
Use -10 Input setting.
Output too weak?
Use +4 Output setting
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4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Mixer Strip Creation
5. Each analog input pair has its own Input Pad (-10dBV or +4dBu) which controls the
input signal range. Changing the I/O settings can add or subtract 12dB. Check these
settings if you cannot set the proper input level. See I/O Settings.
Making the Best Possible Recording
Making a good digital recording is easier than ever thanks to the high resolution 24-bit
A-D converters on your Digital Audio System. These converters are much more forgiving
than the 12-bit or 16-bit converters of the past. Even so, to get the best performance
possible, you'll need to follow a few basic guidelines.
First, whenever you input an analog signal to the Digital Audio System, make sure that
you're feeding the A-D converters with an optimum signal level. The quality of a digital
recording is directly related to the signal level you feed into the A-D converters. If the
analog input level is set too low, you lose resolution—if it's set too high, the A-D
converters will clip.
To measure the input level, simply add an insert meter to the channel strip in PatchMix
DSP. These meters are accurately calibrated to display 1dB for each bar on the meter.
You can enlarge the meter view by clicking on the insert meter in a strip and selecting
the “Effect” button at the top of the TV screen.
The “I/O Settings” in the Digital Audio System allow you to set the input levels to
-10dBV (consumer equipment level) or +4dBu (professional equipment level) for each
analog input. This control sets the overall input level to match your other gear, but to get
the best possible recording you need to fine tune the level further.
In order to supply the correct input level, you’ll need to adjust the output of your analog
source (electric instrument or preamp) so that the input level comes close to 0dB
without ever going over.
Play your input source signal while watching the insert meter in the strip. The signal
should go into the yellow area frequently, but never into the red. Adjust the level of your
source until you have a good level. If the signal is way too strong or too weak, you may
have to go back and adjust the I/O Settings. Choose “-10” if the input signal is too
weak and “+4” if the signal is too strong.
Digital audio has NO headroom past 0dBFS (FS = Full Scale) and will “hard clip” if the
signal exceeds 0dB. Hard clipping sounds bad and will ruin your recording. Hard
clipping occurs because at 0dBFS, all 24 bits are turned on and the A-D cannot measure
any higher level. Analog tape, unlike digital, can be driven past 0dB, although with
some degradation of the signal.
The Digital Audio System includes Insert “Trim Pot” controls, but they adjust the signal
level after the signal has been digitized and will not recover any lost resolution. It’s far
better to set the input level correctly in the first place. Trim Pots can be used in
emergency situations if there's no other way to get a hot signal in, but they were
designed to adjust levels feeding effect plug-ins.
E-MU Digital Audio System
41
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Mixer Strip Creation
Trim Pot Insert
The Trim Pot Insert allows you to adjust the level of a signal in an insert location. The
trim pot provides up to ±30dB of gain or attenuation and a phase inverter. The trim pot
also has a built-in stereo peak meter after the control.
Gain/Attenuation
Phase Invert
Meters
You might use a trim pot to boost or attenuate a send or return from an external effect,
or to drive an effect device. Certain effects such as the Compressor, Distortion, and
Auto-Wah are very level dependent and like to see a good, strong input signal. If you are
working with a weak signal, you can improve the performance of these effects inserting
a trim pot and boosting the gain.
Trim pots can be used to boost the level of analog line level inputs, but it’s much better
to boost the signal level before the A/D converters in order to get maximum resolution
and signal-to-noise ratio from the converters.
The phase invert switch inverts the polarity of the signal. It is generally used to correct
for balanced lines and mics that are wired backwards.
Test Tone/Signal Generator Insert
The test tone/signal generator insert is a handy troubleshooting aid which outputs a
calibrated sine wave, white noise or pink noise. This tool, in combination with an insert
meter, allows you to accurately measure the signal gain or attenuation of an internal or
external device. The test tone can also be quite handy for tuning up musical instruments.
The sine wave oscillator frequency is variable from 20Hz-20kHz. The level is variable
from off to +30dB.
f
Musical Note Freq.
A = 440 Hz
B = 493.88 Hz
C = 523.25 Hz
D = 587.33 Hz
E = 659.26 Hz
F = 698.46 Hz
G = 783.99 Hz
White noise is a mixture of all frequencies in the audio spectrum at the same average
level (analogous to white light in the visible spectrum).
Pink noise provides equal power distribution per octave. (White noise has more power
in the higher octaves.) Pink noise and white noise are useful as wideband sound
sources.
42
Creative Professional
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Mixer Strip Creation
Managing Your Inserts
To Delete an Insert:
1. Right-Click over the Insert you wish to delete. A yellow line around the insert
location indicates that it is selected. A pop-up dialog box appears.
2. Select Delete Insert to remove the selected insert or select Delete All Inserts to
remove all inserts.
f Tip: Select the Insert
and press the Delete key
to delete the plug-in from
the strip.
3. The insert(s) are deleted from the insert chain.
To Bypass an Insert:
Inserts can be bypassed if you want to temporarily hear the audio without the effect or
insert. Bypass can also be used to turn off a Send Insert.
Method #1
1. Click on the Effect (in the Insert section) and select Effect in the TV display.
2. Click the Bypass button.
Method #2
1. Right-Click over the Effect you want to bypass (in the Insert section). A pop-up
dialog box appears.
2. Select Bypass Insert from the list of options.
To Bypass All Inserts:
All Inserts in a strip can be also be bypassed with a single command.
1. Right-Click over the Effect you want to bypass (in the Insert section). A pop-up
dialog box appears.
2. Select Bypass All Inserts from the list of options.
To Solo an Insert:
Inserts can also be soloed. Solo bypasses all the other inserts in the strip and allows you
to hear only the soloed effect. This feature is very useful when adjusting the effect
parameters.
Method #1
1. Click on the Effect (in the Insert section) and select Effect in the TV display.
2. Click the Solo button.
Method #2
1. Right-Click over the Effect you want to Solo (in the Insert section). A pop-up dialog
box appears.
2. Select Solo Insert from the list of options.
E-MU Digital Audio System
43
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Mixer Strip Creation
Aux Section
The Auxiliary Sends tap the signal from the channel strips and sum them together
before sending the mix to the Auxiliary Effects section. In a traditional mixing console,
aux sends are used to send part of the signal to outboard effect devices, then return the
effected signal back into the mix using the effect returns. This is called a sidechain
routing because the aux signal takes a detour through the effects before being summed
back into the main mix. Sidechain effects are usually effects that you might want
applied to several channels, such as reverb.
Incidentally, the wet/dry mix of effects in the Aux Sends should normally be set to 100%
wet. This is because you will be adjusting the effect amount using the Aux Return
control. If you have more than one effect in an Aux Bus, ignore the preceding advice as
the wet/dry controls can be used to mix the amounts of your multiple effects.
The Aux 1 & 2 buses can also be used as additional submix output buses just like the
main output. Simply drop an ASIO or External Send Insert into the chain and the stereo
bus is sent. Turn down the Return Amount if you don’t want the submix to be combined
into the main mix.
Aux Send and Return values can also be changed by typing directly into the displays.
Input
Sidechain Diagram
(Post-Fader Aux Sends)
Pan
Fader
Mute
Send
Amount
Amt
Aux Bus 1
Return
Amount
Side
Chain
Send
Amount
Amt
Aux Bus 2
Return
Amount
Side
Chain
Main / Monitor Bus
Output
Other Uses of the Aux Sends
You can think of the Aux Sends as two extra mixing buses because that’s exactly what
they are. These two mixes can be routed anywhere, such as to a physical output or an
ASIO pair. You could route one of the Aux buses to the Monitor out to create a monitor
mix while sending the main mix off to your audio recording software.
44
Creative Professional
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Mixer Strip Creation
Pre or Post Fader Aux Sends
When you create a New Mixer Strip you have the option to place both Aux Sends after
the channel volume fader and mute control or you can place them before the fader and
mute. Post-Fader turns down the send level as you lower the volume of the strip. With
Pre-Fader selected, you may still hear the effected signal returning from one of the Aux
Buses with the volume fader turned down.
With the Pre-Fader box selected, the Aux Send levels are completely unaffected by the
Level Fader and Mute settings. The Pre-Fader setting allows you to create two completely
different mixes using the Aux Buses since the signal levels of this mix won’t be affected
by the fader settings.
Input
Pre-Fader Aux Send
Volume Fader & Mute does NOT affect Send Levels
Pan
Send
Amount
Aux Bus 1
Send
Amount
Return
Amount
Side
Chain
Aux Bus 2
Fader
Return
Amount
Side
Chain
Amt
Amt
In order to change a
strip from pre-fader to
post-fader or vice-versa,
you have to delete the
strip and create a new
one.
Mute
Main / Monitor Bus
Input
Output
Post-Fader Aux Send
Volume Fader & Mute affects both Aux Send Levels
Pan
Fader
Mute
Send
Amount
Amt
Aux Bus 1
Return
Amount
Side
Chain
Send
Amount
Amt
Aux Bus 2
Return
Amount
Side
Chain
Main / Monitor Bus
E-MU Digital Audio System
Output
45
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Mixer Strip Creation
Level, Pan, Solo & Mute Controls
Pan Controls
Aux Send
Amount
Controls
The Pan control comes before the Level Control
and Aux Sends in the signal flow. On stereo strips
we use an unconventional pan section with two
pan pots – one for the left part of the signal and
one for the right part of the signal. This feature
allows you to independently position both sides of
the stereo signal. A conventional stereo balance
control only allows you to turn down one side or
the other.
The Mute button does just what you would
expect—press the button and the sound from that
channel is cut off. Pressing the Solo button while
the Mute button is pressed allows you to hear the
channel until solo is turned off.
The Solo button allows you to listen to only that
channel while muting the rest of the mixer’s
Level Control
output. If multiple solo buttons are pressed, you
will hear all soloed channels and the non-soloed
channels will all be muted.
The mute status is remembered if a muted channel
is soloed. When the channel solo is turned off, the
Mute & Solo channel reverts to being muted.
Buttons
Scribble Strip
46
The Level Control for the strip is an attenuation
control that can also provide up to +12dB of gain.
0db is the unity gain setting. You can also type
numeric values into the displays to set the level.
At the very bottom is the Scribble Strip text area,
into which you can type any short piece of text,
thus naming the strip, i.e. “vocals”, “bass”,
“drums” and so on.
Creative Professional
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Main Section
Main Section
Physical/Host
Select Buttons
View
Selection
Buttons
“TV” Screen
Aux
Insert
Section
Master
Aux Send
Amounts
Main
Insert
Section
Master Aux
Return
Amounts
Sync &
Sample Rate
Indicators
Monitor Controls
Output
Fader &
Meters
Session Name
The main section contains all controls for controlling the main mix elements as well as
a “TV screen” for viewing the parameters of the current selected insert.
The three buttons across the top of the main section select what is shown on the TV
display. Input and output routings are graphically displayed. When an insert is selected
(by clicking on the insert), the screen shows the available parameters for the currently
selected insert.
Below the TV screen is the Aux Bus section where effects, effects chains or other inserts
can be assigned to the two aux buses. Send and return levels can be individually
controlled for each of the two Aux Buses.
The Aux 1 and Aux 2 buses are fed by the two Aux Sends on each mixer strip. The Master
Send Level control on Aux bus 1 and 2 can be used to attenuate or boost the signal
going into the Auxiliary Inserts. There is also a Master Return Level to control the
amount of the effected signal that will be returned into the main mix.
The Main Bus can also have a chain of effects inserted. (You might put an EQ here to
equalize your entire mix or add an ASIO or WAVE send to record the mix.) Note that the
Main Output level control comes before the Monitor Level so that you can control the
monitor level without affecting the level of your recording mix or main mix. There is a
stereo peak meter that indicates the signal strength for the main mix.
The Monitor section has a volume, balance, and a mute control to cut off the monitor
output.
E-MU Digital Audio System
47
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Main Section
TV Screen & Selectors
The “TV screen” at the top of the main section is a multi-function display and control
center for the input and output routings and effect controls. The three buttons at the top
of the display select the current function of the display—Effect, Inputs or Outputs.
Effect
Select the Effect display view in the main section, then click on an Effect Insert to
display the effect parameters. If an insert effect is not selected, the display will read “No
Insert”.
Most effects have a wet/dry mix parameter to control the ratio of effect to plain signal.
The wet/dry setting is stored with the effect preset. The parameter set varies with the type
of effect. See “List of Core Effects” for detailed information about the individual effects.
Effect Display
View Button
E Note: Effects have to
be placed into an insert
location before you can
program them.
Effect Location
Effect Bypass &
Solo Buttons
Wet/Dry Mix Control
Effect Parameters
User Preset Section
When a Send or a Send/Return insert is selected with the effects display enabled, the TV
screen shows you where the Send is going and where the Return is coming from. The
bypass or solo buttons at the top of the display are available for Send/Return type inserts
only.
Send Destination
Return Source
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Creative Professional
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Main Section
Input
Selecting the Input display view shows a graphic representation of the PatchMix DSP
Mixer inputs. This screen is only a display, unlike the Effects and Outputs screens, which
allow you to make routing changes. Input routing changes are made by adding mixer
strips. See Mixer Strip Creation.
The input routings are divided into two categories: Physical Inputs and Host Inputs.
Select either category by clicking on the Physical or Host button.
Physical Input Display
Host Input Display
f The Input and Output
displays make it much
easier to understand the
signal routings of a
complex mixer setup.
f Tip: Clicking on any
of the input routings in
the TV display highlights
the corresponding mixer
strip.
Output
Selecting the Output display view shows a graphic representation of the PatchMix DSP
Mixer outputs. The output routings are divided into two categories: Physical Outputs
and Host Outputs. Select either category by clicking on the Physical or Host button.
Physical Output Display
Host Output Display
The Host Output display shows all the Insert Routings in addition to the Main Mix and Monitor
out routings. Click on the desired row to make or break a physical output connection.
The Physical Output screen displays and allows you to connect the Main and Monitor
outputs of the mixer to “physical” analog or digital outputs. Click on the box in the mix
or monitor area to make (or break) a connection.
The Host Output screen displays and allows you to view the Host (ASIO or WAVE)
outputs of the mixer. See “Insert Section” for information on how to connect the inserts.
E-MU Digital Audio System
49
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Main Section
Auxiliary Effects & Returns
The section immediately below the TV Screen is where you assign the Auxiliary Effects.
In a traditional mixing console, auxiliary effects sends are used to send part of the signal
to outboard effect devices, then return the effected signal back into the mix using the
effect returns. This is called a sidechain routing because the aux signal takes a detour
through the effects before being summed back into the main mix.
Sidechain effects are usually effects that you might want applied to several channels,
such as reverb. Effects such as EQ and compressors are usually NOT used as sidechain
effects because they can cause unpredictable results when returned to the main bus.
Input
Input
f The Wet/Dry mix
setting in the effect
should normally be set to
100% when the effect is
inserted as a sidechain
effect. This is because the
Aux Return Amount will
control the wet/dry mix.
Sidechain Diagram
(Post-Fader Aux Sends)
Pan
Fader
Mute
Aux
Amt
Aux
Amt
Send
Amount
Aux Bus
Return
Amount
Side
Chain
Main Bus
Output
You can also use the Auxiliary Sends as two extra mix buses. By turning the Aux Return
amount all the way down and dropping an Insert Send into the chain, you can send the
Auxiliary bus to any output you wish. See “Insert Section” for more information.‚
Sync/Sample Rate Indicators
The Sync/Sample rate Indicators show the current session’s
sample rate and whether it is internal or slaving to an external
source. The LEDs indicate which sample rate is currently in
effect. If an external source is being used, the Source display
reads “EXTERNAL”.
When slaving to an external master source, the clock may drift
slightly or change dramatically (i.e. abrupt sample rate
change or unplugging of physical master source). PatchMix
DSP is tolerant to minor drifting within the supported rates
of 44.1k, 48k, 88k, 96k, 176k and 192k, but if the sample rate
drifts out of this range the “LOCKED” LED will extinguish.
If the external clock source makes a radical sample rate change from the lower rates of
44.1k/48k to a higher rate (or between any of the higher rates), the hardware automatically switches to internal 48kHz clock until the proper external clock is restored. The
“LOCKED” LED will be off and the two units are NOT synchronized. Always check the
“LOCKED” LED when using an external clock source.
50
Creative Professional
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Main Section
Output Section
Clip Indicators
Main Output Level Fader
Sync/Sample
Rate Indicators
Main
Insert
Section
Monitor
Mute
Monitor
Balance
Output Level
Meters
Monitor
Volume
Main Inserts
The main inserts allow you to apply effects to the main stereo signal coming out of the
mixer (both mains and monitor). You might want to apply EQ or a compressor here.
These inserts work just like the other insert locations—just drag and drop effects from
the palette or right-click and add Sends, Sends/Returns. etc. Refer to the Mixer Block
Diagram
Main Output Fader
The main output fader controls the level of the main output (and the Monitor output as
well since it is downstream from this control). The normal setting for this control is at
unity or 0dB, but the control allows you to add up to +12dB of gain. High output levels
may cause clipping on outboard amplifiers or other equipment.
Output Level Meters
This stereo bar-graph meter reflects the digital level at the output of the mixer. The
topmost red bar represents 0 dB or a full-scale digital signal. The peaks hold for a
moment so that short transients can be monitored. Each bar = 1dB.
MAIN MIX
0dB
10
10
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
L
R
-12dB
Monitor Output Level
This control adjusts the monitor output level. Keep in mind that since the monitor level
control comes after the Main Output Fader, nothing will be heard from your monitors if
the main level is turned down.
Monitor Balance Control
This control sets the relative volume of the stereo monitor outputs and works just like
the balance control on your home music system. This control is primarily used to make
the volume from each speaker sound equal if you are not sitting exactly in the center of
the two speakers.
Monitor Output Mute
This button completely cuts off the monitor output and provides a convenient way to
instantly kill all sound without having to re-adjust the monitor level later. When the
telephone rings, just hit the monitor mute to cut the noise.
E-MU Digital Audio System
51
4 - The PatchMix DSP Mixer
Main Section
52
Creative Professional
5 - Effects
Overview
5 - Effects
Overview
PatchMix DSP comes complete with a host of great core DSP effects including
Compressors, Delays, Choruses, Flangers and Reverb. Each 32-bit effect has various
parameters for editing, as well as factory presets. You can also create and save as many of
your own effect presets as you wish.
Since the effects are implemented in hardware, they don’t place any load on your host
computer. This allows your valuable CPU cycles to be used for other applications or
software plug-ins. The effects are only available at the 44.1 and 48kHz sample rates.
There is a finite limit to how many effects you can use at the same time. As you use up
the PatchMix DSP resources, certain effects will appear “grayed out” and cannot be
added to the mixer. Complex effects such as reverb use more DSP resources than say a 1Band EQ. If you continue to add effects, all of the DSP resources will eventually be used
up.
f Saving a session
“defragments” the effect/
DSP resources. If you
have used all your effects
and need another, try
saving the session.
The Effects Palette
Click the FX button on the toolbar to bring up the Effects Palette. The Effects Palette
contains two types of folders. The “Core Effects” folder contains the effect algorithms
themselves. This folder cannot be modified. The other folders contain “Effects Chains”,
consisting of two or more effects grouped together. You can also add, delete, or modify
Effects Chains and the folders that contain them. For more information on Effects
Chains, see “FX Insert Chains” on page 54.
New Folder Icon
Import/Export FX
Effect Categories
Core Effects
Multi-Effects
Distortion Lo-fi
Drums & Percussion
Environment
Equalization
Guitar
Morpher
Multi Effects
Reverb
Synths & Keys
Vocal
E-MU Digital Audio System
53
5 - Effects
The Effects Palette
To Select an Effect
1. Click the FX button to bring up the Effects Palette. The effect palette contains
numerous folders containing effects presets. Click on any folder to open it.
2. Select the effect you wish to use by clicking on it with the left mouse button and
while continuing to hold the mouse button, drag the effect into the desired location
on the PatchMix DSP mixer screen and release the mouse button. Multi effects
contain several effects along with their parameter settings.
3. If you want to change the order of effects, simply Left-click and drag the effect to the
desired location. Drag the effect to the area above or below the final destination and
release the mouse button to move the effect.
f The order of effects in
a chain can have a big
effect on the sound.
This icon will
appear when you drag
an effect to a new
location.
To Edit an Effect
1. Click on the Insert Location containing the effect you wish to edit. The effect
controls now appear on the TV screen.
2. Edit the effect parameters as desired.
To Delete an Effect
1. Right-click on the Insert location containing the effect you wish to delete and a pop-
up list appears.
2. Select “Delete Insert(s)” from the top of the list. The effect will be deleted.
FX Insert Chains
FX Insert Chains can be used to save several effects and their settings into a single multieffect. When an effects chain is selected and dropped into an insert location, all the
effects with control settings are copied as a single entity. Once dropped into an insert
location, the effects are totally separate just as if you had placed them individually.
To Save FX Insert Chains
1. Select two or more effects and place them into any consecutive insert locations.
2. Set the effect parameters the way you want them, including wet/dry mix settings.
3. Right-click to bring up the list of options.
4. Select “Save FX Insert Chain”. The New FX preset dialog box appears.
f Trim pots, peak meters
and test tone generators
will also be included in
the FX chain.
5. Select a category folder where your preset will be placed, and enter a new preset
name for your FX Chain.
6. Select a folder where your new preset will be placed, then type in a new preset name
and click OK. Your preset is now saved.
54
Creative Professional
5 - Effects
The Effects Palette
Creating, Renaming & Deleting Categories or Presets
There are several utilities to help you organize your effects presets.
To Create a New Preset Category
You can create your own category folders to help organize your effects presets.
1. Left-click on the New Folder icon at the top of the Effects Palette. A pop-up dialog
box appears asking you to “Enter the Name of the New Category.”
• Alternatively, you can Right-click over an Effects Folder, which calls a pop-up
dialog box with the option to “Create New Category.”
2. Type in a name for your new folder.
3. Click OK to create a new folder or Cancel to cancel the operation.
To Delete an Effect Category or Preset
1. Right-click on the category folder you wish to delete. A pop-up selection box
appears.
2. Select “Delete Category”. A popup dialog box appears warning you that this action
will delete all presets in the folder.
3. Click OK to delete the folder or Cancel to cancel the operation.
To Rename an Effects Category
1. Right-click on the category folder you wish to rename. A pop-up selection box
appears.
2. Select “Rename Category”. A pop-up dialog box appears, asking you to “Enter New
Category Name.”
3. Click OK to rename the folder or Cancel to cancel the operation.
E-MU Digital Audio System
55
5 - Effects
The Effects Palette
Importing and Exporting Core FX Presets and FX Insert Chains
These utilities make it easy to import or export your FX Presets and FX Insert Chains.
You can share presets with your friends or download new presets from the Internet.
To Import Core FX Presets
This option imports complete folders of Core FX presets into the E-MU PatchMix DSP
folder (normally located here: “C:\Program Files\Creative Professional\E-MU PatchMix
DSP\Core Effects”). If the name of an imported FX preset exactly matches a preset you
already have, a number will be appended to end of the imported preset name.
1. Click the Import/Export FX Library button
from the FX Palette.
2. Select Import FX Library. The “Browse for Folder” window appears.
3. Choose the folder where the Core FX presets you wish to import are located.
4. The selected folder of Core FX presets will be copied into the Core Effects folder of
PatchMix DSP.
To Import FX Category Folders
This option imports complete category folders of FX Chains into the E-MU PatchMix
DSP folder (normally located here: “C:\Program Files\Creative Professional\E-MU
PatchMix DSP\Effect Presets”). If the name of an imported FX preset exactly matches a
preset you already have, a number will be appended to end of the imported preset
name.
1. Click the Import/Export FX Library button
from the FX Palette.
2. Select Import FX Category. The “Browse for Folder” window appears.
3. Choose the folder where the FX Chains you wish to import are located.
4. The selected folder of FX Chains will be copied into the Effect Presets folder of
PatchMix DSP.
To Export your Core FX Presets
This option exports your Core FX presets to a folder of your choice.
1. Click the Import/Export FX Library button
from the FX Palette.
2. Select Export FX Library. The “Browse for Folder” window appears.
3. Choose a destination location for the Core FX presets, then press OK.
4. The Core FX presets will be copied to the selected destination.
To Export your FX Category Folders
This option exports a single category of FX chains to a folder of your choice.
1. Click the Import/Export FX Library button
from the FX Palette.
2. Select Export FX Category. A pop-up dialog box appears asking you to “Choose the
FX Category to be exported”.
3. Choose the desired FX Category to export. Press OK to continue or Cancel to
cancel the operation.
4. The “Browse for Folder” window appears. Choose a destination location for the
Core FX presets, then press OK.
5. The FX Chains will be copied to the selected destination.
56
Creative Professional
5 - Effects
FX Edit Screen
FX Edit Screen
Click on an FX Insert to display the parameters for that effect. If an insert effect is not
selected, the FX display will read “No Insert”.
Most effects have a wet/dry mix parameter to control the ratio of effect-to-plain signal.
The wet/dry setting is stored with the FX preset. The effect parameters vary with the type
of effect. Generally if an effect is placed in an Aux Send, the wet/dry mix in the effect
should be set to 100% wet since the Aux Return amount controls how much effect is
applied.
E Note: Effects have to
be placed into an insert
location before you can
program them.
The User Preset section is located at the bottom of the FX Edit screen. User presets are
variations of the main effect and can be edited, deleted, renamed or overwritten as you
wish.
Effects Display
View Button
Effect Location
Effect Bypass &
Solo Buttons
Wet/Dry Mix Control
Effect Parameters
User Preset Section
To Bypass an Insert:
Inserts can be bypassed if you want to temporarily hear the audio without the effect or
insert. Bypass can also be used to turn off a Send Insert.
Method #1
1. Click on the Effect (in the Insert section)
2. Click the Bypass button in the TV display.
Method #2
1. Right-click over the Insert you want to bypass (in the Insert section). A pop-up
menu appears.
2. Select “Bypass Insert” from the list of options. The insert effect name will “gray-out”
to indicate that the insert effect is bypassed.
To Solo an Insert:
Inserts can also be soloed. Solo bypasses all the other inserts in the strip and allows you
to hear only the soloed effect. This feature is very useful when adjusting the effect
parameters.
Method #1
1. Click on the Insert Effect (in the Insert section).
2. Click the Solo button in the TV display.
E-MU Digital Audio System
57
5 - Effects
FX Edit Screen
Method #2
1. Right-click over the Insert Effect you want to Solo (in the Insert section). A pop-up
menu appears.
2. Select “Solo Insert” from the list of options. The other Insert Effect names in the
strip will “gray-out” to indicate that they are bypassed.
To Bypass ALL
All the inserts in a strip can be bypassed with a single command.
1. Right-click over any Effect in the Insert section. A pop-up menu appears.
2. Select “Bypass All Inserts” from the list of options. All the insert names will be
“grayed-out” to indicate that they are bypassed.
To Un-Bypass ALL
All the inserts in a strip can also be un-bypassed with a single command. This command
works even if only some of the effects are bypassed.
1. Right-click over any Effect in the Insert section. A pop-up menu appears.
2. Select “Un-Bypass All Inserts” from the list of options. All the insert names will light
to indicate that they are active.
User Preset Section
Each core effect has a set of User Presets, that you can use to store your favorite effect
parameter settings. We’ve included a good collection of user presets to get you started.
The user presets are accessed from the bar at the bottom of the TV screen. The user preset
edit menu allows you to select stored presets, create new presets, rename or delete
existing presets, or overwrite existing presets with your modified settings. User presets
stay with the Mixer application regardless of which Session is open.
E To copy or share User
Presets, you must save
them as FX Palette
effects.
Click here for Edit Menu
Click here to Select Presets
To Select a User Preset
1. Select the FX display in the TV screen.
2. Select the desired insert effect, highlighting it. The effect parameters appear in the TV
screen.
3. Click on the
icon on the preset menu. A drop-down preset list appears.
4. Select a preset from the list.
To Create a New User Preset
1. Select the FX display in the TV screen.
2. Select the desired insert effect, highlighting it. The effect parameters appear in the TV
screen.
3. Click on the Edit button. A pop-up menu appears.
4. Select New. A pop-up dialog box appears asking you to name the new preset.
5. Name the preset and click OK. Your new preset is now saved.
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Creative Professional
5 - Effects
FX Edit Screen
To Delete a User Preset
1. Select the user preset you wish to delete from the user preset menu.
2. Click on the Edit button. A pop-up menu appears.
3. Select Delete. A pop-up dialog box appears asking you to confirm your action.
4. Click OK to delete the preset or No or Cancel to cancel the operation.
To Rename a User Preset
1. Select the user preset you wish to rename from the user preset menu.
2. Click on the Edit button. A pop-up menu appears.
3. Select Rename. A pop-up dialog box appears asking you to rename the preset.
4. Type in the new preset name, then click OK to rename the preset or Cancel to cancel
the operation.
To Overwrite or Save a User Preset
This operation allows you to overwrite an existing preset with a newer version.
1. Select the user preset you wish to modify from the user preset menu and make any
changes you wish.
2. Click on the Edit button. A pop-up menu appears.
3. Select Overwrite/Save. The current preset will be overwritten with the new settings.
Core Effects and Effects Presets
The Core Effects cannot be removed or copied. Effect presets (stored in “C:\Program
Files\Creative Professional\Digital Audio System\E-MU PatchMix DSP\Effect Presets”)
can be copied, e-mailed or shared like any other computer file.
Hint: You can open the effects presets with “NotePad” or other word processor to view
and edit the name and parameters.
E-MU Digital Audio System
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5 - Effects
List of Core Effects
List of Core Effects
Stereo Reverb
Frequency Shifter
Mono Delay 750
Lite Reverb
Auto-Wah
Mono Delay 1500
Compressor
Vocal Morpher
Mono Delay 3000
Leveling Amp
1-Band Para EQ
Stereo Delay 100
Chorus
1-Band Shelf EQ
Stereo Delay 250
Flanger
3-Band EQ
Stereo Delay 500
Distortion
4-Band EQ
Stereo Delay 750
Speaker Sim
Mono Delay 100
Stereo Delay 1500
Rotary
Mono Delay 250
Phase Shifter
Mono Delay 500
DSP Resource Usage
There are two main factors which determine the total number of effects available for use
at any given time: Tank Memory and DSP Instructions. Using too much of either
resource will cause effects to be unavailable (grayed out) in the FX menu. In addition,
the strips themselves use DSP Instructions, so only create strips that you actually need.
Tank memory is the memory used by delay-based effects such as reverb and digital
delays. All the reverbs and delays aside from the Mono Delay 100 and Stereo Delay 100
use varying amounts of tank memory.
The DSP instructions are used by all the effects. Effects with multiple stages, such as
multi-band EQs or the speaker simulator use more DSP instructions than a 1-Band EQ.
f Tip: Saving a session
“defragments” the effect/
DSP resources. If you
have used all your effects
and need another, try
saving the session.
Tank memory tends to get used first, and so we’ve provided many delay line effects to
allow maximum conservation of this precious resource. Use only the longest delay you
actually need.
The chart below shows three possible effects combinations. These were created by using
up the reverb resources first. Even more simultaneous effects are possible if fewer reverbs
and shorter delays are used.
Examples of Effects Usage (with a WAVE, ASIO Return & 2 Inputs)
Example 1
No.
Stereo Reverb
2
4-Band EQ
No.
Example 3
No.
Lite Reverb
5
Stereo Reverb
1
4
3-Band EQ
5
Lite Reverb
2
3-Band EQ
2
1-Band EQ
4
Stereo Delay 1500
1
1-Band EQ
6
Compressor
1
Mono Delay 250
1
Compressor
6
Mono Delay 1500
1
Compressor
6
Chorus
1
Mono Delay 250
1
Chorus
2
Mono Delay 1500
1
Auto-Wah
1
Flanger
2
4-Band EQ
3
3-Band EQ
3
Total Effects
21
Total Effects
60
22
Example 2
Total Effects
18
Creative Professional
5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Core Effects Descriptions
1-Band Para EQ
This single band parametric equalizer is useful
when you just want to boost or cut a single range
of frequencies. For example, if you just want to
brighten up the lead vocal a bit, you might
choose this EQ. This EQ offers up to ±15dB cut
or boost.
+15dB
Boost
Width
Gain
+
Cut
-15dB
Center
Frequency
Parameter
Description
Gain
Sets the amount of cut (-) or boost (+) of the selected frequency
band. Range: -15dB to +15dB
Center Frequency
Sets the range of frequencies to be cut or boosted with the Gain
control. Range: 80Hz to 16kHz
Bandwidth
Sets the width of the frequency range for the Center Frequency
band that will be cut or boosted by the Gain control.
Range: 1semitone to 36 semitones
1-Band Shelf EQ
This single band shelving equalizer is useful when you just want to boost or cut a single
range of frequencies at the high or low end of the spectrum. For example, if you just
want to add a little more bass, there’s no need to waste a 3-band EQ. Just choose low
shelf, then adjust the gain and frequency. This EQ offers up to ±15dB cut or boost.
Low Shelf
Corner
Freq
Boost
+
Cut
+15dB
Gain
or…
-
-15dB
High Shelf
Corner
Freq
Frequency
Parameter
Description
Shelf Type
Allows you to choose either low shelving or high shelving EQ.
Gain
Sets the amount of cut (-) or boost (+) of the shelf.
Range: -15dB to +15dB
Corner Frequency Sets the frequency where the signal begins getting cut or boosted
with the Gain control. Range: 80Hz to 16kHz
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5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
3-Band EQ
This versatile equalizer provides two shelving filters at the high and low ends of the
frequency range and a fully parametric band in the center. Up to ±24 dB of boost or cut
is provided for each band.
Low Shelf
Corner
Freq.
Boost
+
Cut
+24dB
Gain
Mid Band
-
High Shelf
Corner
Freq.
E Note: The Wet/Dry
Mix control on an
equalizer should normally
be set to 100% wet or
unpredictable results may
occur.
Width
Center
-24dB
Frequency
Setting up a Parametric EQ
1. Turn up the gain on the band you are working with. This allows you to easily hear
the effect of the filter.
2. Reduce the bandwidth if you are working with a mid-band.
3. Adjust the Center Frequency to “zero-in” on the frequencies you wish to boost/cut.
4. Set the Gain to a positive value to boost frequencies or to a negative value to cut out
frequencies.
5. Widen the Bandwidth to create a more natural sound.
6. Adjust and tweak as needed.
Parameter
Description
High Shelf Gain
Sets the amount of cut (-) or boost (+) of the high frequency shelf.
Range: -24dB to +24dB
High Corner Freq. Sets the frequency where the signal begins getting cut or boosted
with the High Gain control. Range: 4kHz to 16kHz
Mid Gain
Sets the amount of cut (-) or boost (+) of the mid frequency band.
Range: -24dB to +24dB
Mid Freq. 1
Sets the range of frequencies to be cut or boosted with the Mid
Gain control. Range: 200Hz to 3kHz
Mid Bandwidth
Sets the width of the frequency range for the Mid Center
Frequency band that will be cut or boosted by the Mid Gain
control. Range: 1 semitone to 1 octave
Low Shelf Gain
Sets the amount of cut (-) or boost (+) of the low frequency shelf.
Range: -24dB to +24dB
Low Corner Freq. Sets the frequency where the signal begins getting cut or boosted
with the Low Gain control. Range: 50Hz to 800Hz
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Creative Professional
5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
4-Band EQ
This 4-band equalizer provides two shelving filters at the high and low ends of the
frequency range and two fully parametric bands in the center. Up to ±24 dB of boost or
cut is provided for each band.
Note: The Wet/Dry Mix control on an equalizer should normally be set to 100% wet or
unpredictable results may occur.
For more information about setting up a parametric EQ, see page 62.
Low-Shelf
Mid 1-Band
Mid 2-Band
Corner
Frequency
Boost
Cut
Gain
Corner
Frequency
+
-
High-Shelf
Width
Width
Center
Frequency
Center
Frequency
Frequency
Parameter
Description
High Shelf Gain
Sets the amount of cut (-) or boost (+) of the high frequency shelf.
Range: -24dB to +24dB
High Corner Freq.
Sets the frequency where the signal begins getting cut or
boosted with the High Gain control. Range: 4kHz to 16kHz
Mid 2 Gain
Sets the amount of cut (-) or boost (+) of the Mid 2 Frequency
band. Range: -24dB to +24dB
Mid 2 Center Freq.
Sets the range of frequencies to be cut or boosted with the Mid 2
Gain control. Range: 1kHz to 8kHz
Mid 2 Bandwidth
Sets the width of the frequency range for the Mid 2 Center
Frequency band that will be cut or boosted by the Mid 2 Gain
control. Range: .01 octave to 1 octave
Mid 1 Gain
Sets the amount of cut (-) or boost (+) of the Mid 1 Frequency
band. Range: -24dB to +24dB
Mid 1 Center Freq.
Sets the range of frequencies to be cut or boosted with the Mid 1
Gain control. Range: 200Hz to 3kHz
Mid 1 Bandwidth
Sets the width of the frequency range for the Mid 1 Center
Frequency band that will be cut or boosted by the Mid 1 Gain
control. Range: .01 octave to 1 octave
Low Shelf Gain
Sets the amount of cut (-) or boost (+) of the low frequency shelf.
Range: -24dB to +24dB
Low Corner Freq.
Sets the frequency where the signal begins getting cut or
boosted with the Low Gain control. Range: 50Hz to 800Hz
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5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Auto-Wah
This effect creates the sound of a guitar wah-wah pedal. The “Wah” filter sweep is
automatically triggered from the amplitude envelope of the input sound. Auto-wah
works well with percussive sounds such as guitar or bass.
The Auto-Wah is a bandpass filter whose frequency can be swept up or down by an
envelope follower, which extracts the volume contour of the input signal. The Envelope
Sensitivity setting allows you to properly set up the envelope follower to receive a wide
variety of input signals. This “envelope”, or volume contour, controls the frequency of
the bandpass filter so that it sweeps up and down with each new note. The Attack
controls the rate of the note-on sweep. As the input sound fades away, the filter sweeps
back at a rate determined by the Release setting.
The wah direction allows the filter to be swept either up or down in frequency. Use a
higher Center Frequency setting when the wah direction is down.
Auto-Wah Filter
Center
Frequency
Bandwidth
Envelope
Sensitivity
Sweep Range
Input
Wave
Attack
Release
Envelope Follower
Parameter
Description
Wah Direction
Allows you to sweep the wah up or down.
Env. Sensitivity
Controls how closely the wah sweep follows the input signal.
Range: -12dB to +18dB
Env. Attack Time
Sets the starting rate of the “wah” sweep.
Range: 0ms to 500ms
Env. Release Time
Sets the ending or release rate of the “wah” sweep.
Range: 10ms to 1000ms
Sweep Range
Controls the amount of “wah” sweep. Range: 0% to 100%
Center Frequency
Sets the initial bandpass filter frequency.
Range: 80Hz to 2400Hz
Bandwidth
Sets the width of the bandpass filter. Range: 1Hz to 800Hz
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Creative Professional
5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Chorus
An audio delay in the range of 15-20 milliseconds is too short to be an echo, but is
perceived by the ear as a distinctly separate sound. If we now vary the delay time in this
range, an effect called chorus is created, which gives the illusion of multiple sound
sources. A slight amount of feedback serves to increase the effect. A very slow LFO rate is
usually best for a realistic effect, but a faster LFO rate can also be useful with minimal
LFO depth (.2). Since this is a stereo chorus, an LFO phase parameter is included which
can be used to widen the stereo image.
Parameter
Description
Delay
Sets the length of the delay. Range: 0ms to 20ms.
Feedback
Sets the amount of delayed signal that will be recirculated through
the delay line. Range: 0% to 100%
LFO Rate
Sets the frequency of the low frequency oscillator.
Range: .01Hz to 10Hz
LFO Depth
Sets how much the LFO affects the delay time. Increases the
animation and amount of the chorus effect. Range: 0% to 100%
LFO Waveform
Selectable between Sine or Triangle wave.
LFO L/R Phase
Controls the stereo width by adjusting the phase difference of the LFO
waveform between left and right channels. Range: -180° to +180°
Compressor
In its simplest form, an audio compressor is just an automatic gain control. When the
volume gets too loud, the compressor automatically turns it down. Compressors are
useful in musical applications because they allow you to record a “hotter” signal
without overloading the recording device.
Since the compressor turns down the gain of the signal, you might wonder how can it
make the signal level stronger. A Post Gain control allows you to boost the output gain
of the compressor in order to make up for the gain reduction. The overall level is higher
and only turned down when the signal level gets too loud. This level is called the
Threshold, which just happens to be the most important control on the compressor.
In
Signal path = Stereo
Delay
VCA
Out
Level
Control
Threshold
Ratio
E-MU Digital Audio System
Post Gain
Release
Attack
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5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Basic Controls
The three main controls of a compressor are the Ratio control, the Threshold control and
the Gain control.
If the signal falls below the Threshold, no processing will take place. Signals exceeding
the Threshold will have gain reduction applied as set by the ratio control. This
important control allows you to dial in the range of amplitudes you want to tame. For
example, if you’re trying to trim off just the loudest peaks, set the threshold so the gain
reduction meter only shows compression during these peaks. One of the biggest
mistakes in using a compressor is having the threshold set too low. This adds noise as
the compressor will always be reducing the volume.
The Ratio control determines how strongly the compressor will affect the signal. The
higher the ratio, the more reduction will be applied. If the ratio is high enough, (above
10:1) the signal will effectively be prevented from getting any louder. In this situation,
the compressor will be acting as a Limiter, placing an upper limit on the signal level. In
general, ratios from 2:1 to 6:1 are considered compression and higher ratios above 10:1
are considered limiting.
The Post Gain control amplifies the signal after it has been compressed to bring it back
up in volume. If you don’t increase the gain, the compressed signal will be much lower
in volume.
Two other important controls are Attack and Release. Attack controls how quickly the
gain is turned down after the signal exceeds the threshold. Release controls how fast the
gain is returned to its normal setting after the signal has fallen below the threshold
again. An attack setting of about 10 milliseconds will delay the onset of compression
long enough to preserve the attack transients in guitar, bass or drums while allowing the
sustain portion of the sound to be compressed. Longer release times are generally used
to reduce the so called “pumping” effect as the compressor turns on and off. Don’t
make the release time too long, however, or the compressor won’t have time to recover
for the next pluck or hit. In general, the attack and release controls are used to smooth
out the action of the compressor, but they can also be used to create special effects.
The Pre-Delay parameter lets the level detector “look into the future” up to 4 milliseconds in order to anticipate upcoming peaks in the signal. This is accomplished
of course, by inserting delay into the signal path. This lookahead technique
allows the use of slower attack times without missing signal peaks. This
parameter is especially effective on drums and percussion.
The Input Meter allows you to monitor the strength of your input signal. Always try to
boost the signal before the compressor if you can.
The Compression Meter shows the amount of gain reduction being applied. Since this
meter displays how much the gain is being turned down, the meter moves from right to
left, instead of left to right like a normal meter.
Parameter
Description
Threshold
Threshold sets the input signal level above which dynamic range
compression takes place. Everything above the threshold will be
brought down in volume. Range: -60dB to +12dB
Ratio
Sets the ratio of input signal level to output signal level, or “how
much” compression will be applied. Range: 1:1 to ∞:1
Post Gain
Amplifies the signal after it has been compressed to bring up the
volume. Range -60dB to +60dB
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Core Effects Descriptions
Parameter
Description
Attack Time
Controls how quickly the gain is turned down after the signal
exceeds the threshold. Range .1ms to 500ms
Release Time
Controls how fast the gain is returned to its normal setting after
the signal has fallen below the threshold.
Range: 50ms to 3000ms
Pre-Delay
Allows the use of slower attack times without missing signal peaks.
Range: 0ms to 3 ms
Input Meter
Allows you to monitor the strength of the input signal.
Gain Reduction Meter
Shows the amount of gain reduction being applied.
Distortion
Most audio processors aim to provide low distortion, but not this one! The sole purpose
of this effect is to add distortion, and lots of it. This effect provides “fuzz box” style,
clipping distortion which is particularly effective on guitar, bass, organs, electric pianos
or whatever.
The input signal first passes through a lowpass filter. The Lowpass Filter Cutoff
Frequency allows you to control the number of new harmonics that will be generated by
the distortion element. The distortion element has an Edge control which controls “how
much” distortion will be added. A bandpass filter follows the distortion generator. The
EQ Center control lets you select a particular band of frequencies to be output. The EQ
Bandwidth controls the width of the center frequency band. Finally, a gain control
allows you to make up for any gain loss through the effect.
Use the Wet/Dry mix control in conjunction with the Edge control to reduce the
amount of distortion, or go wild and turn everything to 11!
Lowpass
Filter
Bandpass
Filter
Distortion
In
Out
Signal path = Stereo
LP Filter
Cutoff
Edge
EQ BW
Gain
EQ Center
Parameter
Description
Pre EQ LP Cutoff
Controls the amount of high frequency audio admitted to
the distortion. Range: 80Hz to 24kHz
Edge
Sets the amount of distortion and new harmonics
generated. Range: 0-100
Gain
Sets the output volume of the effect. Range: -60dB to 0dB
Post EQ Center Freq.
Sets the frequency of the output bandpass filter.
Range: 80Hz to 24kHz
Post EQ Bandwidth
Sets the width of the output bandpass filter.
Range: 80Hz to 24kHz
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5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Flanger
A flanger is a very short delay line whose output is mixed back together with the original
sound. Mixing the original and delayed signals results in multiple frequency cancellations known as a comb filter. Since the flanger is a type of filter, it works best with
harmonically rich sounds.
A low frequency oscillator is included to slowly change the delay time. This creates a
rich, sweeping effect as the notches move up and down across the frequency range. The
amount of feedback deepens the notches, intensifying the effect. You can invert the
feedback signal by choosing a negative feedback value. Inverting the feedback signal
creates peaks in the notch filter and deepens the effect.
Feedback
In
Flanger
Out
Signal path = Stereo
Delay
LFO
Phase
Waveform
Parameter
Description
Delay
Sets the initial delay of the flanger in .01 millisecond increments.
This parameter allows you to “tune” the flanger to a specific
frequency range. Range: .01ms to 4ms
Feedback
Controls how much signal is recirculated through the delay line
and increases resonance. Negative values can produce intense
flanging with some signals. Range 0% to 100%
LFO Rate
Sets the speed of the flanger sweep. Range: .01 Hz to 10Hz
LFO Depth
Sets how much the LFO affects the delay time. Increases the
animation and amount of the flanging effect. Range 05 to 100%
LFO Waveform
Selectable between Sine or Triangle wave.
LFO L/R Phase
Controls the stereo width by adjusting the phase difference
between the left and right sweeps. Range: -180° to +180°
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Creative Professional
5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Freq Shifter
This unusual effect is sometimes called “spectrum shifting” or “single sideband
modulation”. Frequency shifting shifts every frequency in the signal by a fixed number
of Hz which causes the harmonics to lose their normal relationship. The more common
pitch shifter, in contrast, preserves the harmonic relationships of the signal and so is
better suited to creating “musical” harmonies.
This isn’t to say that the frequency shifter can’t be used musically. Small intervals of
frequency shifting (1 Hz and below) can produce a wonderful, lush chorusing or
phasing effect. For bizarre frequency shifting effects, simply crank up the frequency
knob. Frequencies can be shifted up or down by any specified amount from .1 Hz to 24
kHz. You can also shift pitch up on one side and down on the other if you wish.
f You can also type in
exact frequencies to a
resolution of 1/10 Hz.
Comparison between Pitch and Frequency Shifting
Harmonic
Original Pitch Shifted Frequency Shifted
(Hz)
(100 Hz)
(100 Hz)
1
200
300
300
2
400
600
500
3
600
900
700
4
800
1200
900
5
1000
1500
1100
6
1200
1800
1300
7
1400
2100
1500
8
1600
2400
1700
Parameter
Description
Frequency
Sets the number of Hz that will be added or subtracted with every
harmonic in the signal. Range: .01Hz to 24kHz
Left Direction
Sets pitch shift up or down for the left channel.
Right Direction
Sets pitch shift up or down for the right channel.
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5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Leveling Amp
The first compressors developed in the 1950’s were based on a slow-acting optical gain
cells which were able to control the signal level in a very subtle and musical way. This
effect is a digital recreation of the leveling amps of yesteryear.
The leveling amp uses a large amount of “lookahead delay” to apply gentle gain
reduction. Because of this delay, the leveling amp is not suitable for applications which
require realtime monitoring of the signal. This smooth and gentle compressor is
designed to be used in situations where delay does not pose a problem, such as
mastering a mix or compressing prerecorded stereo material.
Post Gain is the only control on the leveling amp. This control is used to make up the
volume lost by the compression. The Compression Ratio is fixed at about 2.5:1. If a
large peak is detected, the effect will automatically increase the compression ratio to
keep the audio output controlled.
The gain reduction meter shows you how much gain reduction is being applied. Since
the gain reduction meter displays how much the gain is being turned down, the meter
moves from right to left, instead of left to right like most meters.
Post Gain
70
Amplifies the signal after it has been compressed to
bring up the volume. Range 0dB to 36dB
Creative Professional
5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Lite Reverb
Reverberation is a simulation of a natural space such as a room or hall. The Lite Reverb
algorithm is designed to simulate various rooms and reverberation plates while using
fewer DSP resources than the Stereo Reverb. Up to five Lite Reverbs can be used at once.
Decay time defines the time it takes for the reflected sound from the room to decay or
die away. The diagram below shows a generalized reverberation envelope.
Early Reflections
Reverberation
Time
After a short pre-delay period, the echoes from the closest walls or ceiling are heard.
These first echoes, or Early Reflections, vary greatly depending on the type of room. Some
time after the early reflection cluster ends, the actual Reverberation (a dense cloud of
complex wall reflections) begins and decays according to the time set by the Decay Time
parameter. The Reverberance parameter controls the density and smearing of both the
early reflections and the reverberation cloud.
High frequency energy tends to fade away first as a sound is dissipated in a room. The
High Frequency Decay Factor adjusts the time it takes for the high frequency energy to
die away and thus changes the characteristics of the room. Rooms with smooth, hard
surfaces are more reflective and have less high frequency damping. Rooms filled with
sound absorbing materials, such as curtains or people, have more high frequency
damping.
The Low Frequency Decay Factor parameter adjusts the time it takes for the low
frequencies to die away. This control adjusts the “boominess” of the room.
Parameter
Description
Decay Time
Sets the reverb decay time. Range: 0% to 100%
HF Decay Factor
Sets the rate at which high frequencies die away. The high
frequencies last longer as the percentage is increased.
Range: 0% to 100%
LF Decay Factor
Sets the rate at which low frequencies die away. The low
frequencies last longer as the percentage is increased.
Range: 0% to 100%
Early Reflections
Sets the volume of the initial wall reflections.
Range: 0% to 100%
Reverberance
Sets the amount of scattering of the early reflections and
the reverberation cloud. Range: 0% to 100%
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5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Mono Delays - 100, 250, 500, 750, 1500, 3000
A delay line makes a copy of the incoming audio, holds it in memory, then plays it back
after a predetermined time. The delay number refers to the maximum delay time that
can be produced by the delay line. The six lengths, from 100 ms to 3 seconds, allow you
to make the most efficient use of the effect memory resource.
Long delays produce echoes, short delays can be used for doubling or slapback effects.
Very short delays can be used to produce resonant flanging and comb filter effects or
create monotone robotic-sounding effects (Hint: use feedback). Stereo signals are
summed together before entering the Mono Delay.
There is also a feedback path to send the delayed audio back through the delay line.
When creating echo effects, the feedback controls how many echoes will be produced.
With short delays, the feedback control acts as a resonance control, increasing the
amount of comb filtering produced by the delay line. Comb filtering: See page 68.
A High Frequency Rolloff filter in the feedback path cuts some of the high frequency
energy each time the audio goes through the delay line. This simulates the natural
absorption of high frequencies in a room and can also be used to simulate tape-based
echo units.
The Wet/Dry mix controls how loud the echoes are in relation to the original signal.
Feedback
HF
Rolloff
L Out
L In
Delay
R In
R Out
Delay Time
Parameter
Description
Delay Time
Sets the length of the delay in milliseconds.
(.01ms. minimum increment between settings)
Mono Delay 100 Range: 1 millisecond to 100 milliseconds
Mono Delay 250 Range: 1 millisecond to 250 milliseconds
Mono Delay 500 Range: 1 millisecond to 500 milliseconds
Mono Delay 750 Range: 1 millisecond to 750 milliseconds
Mono Delay 1500 Range: 1 millisecond to 1.5 seconds
Mono Delay 3000 Range: 1 millisecond to 3 seconds
Feedback
Sets the amount of delayed signal that will be recirculated through
the delay line. Range: 0% to 100%
High Freq. Rolloff
Damps high frequencies in the feedback path.
Range: 0% to 100%
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Core Effects Descriptions
Phase Shifter
A phase shifter produces a fixed number of peaks and notches in the audio spectrum
which can be swept up and down in frequency with a low frequency oscillator (LFO).
This creates a swirly, ethereal sound with harmonically rich sound sources of a type of
pitch shift with simpler sounds. The phase shifter was invented in the 1970’s and the
characteristic sound of this device evokes emotions of that musical era.
By setting the LFO Depth to zero and tuning the LFO Center, a fixed multi-notch filter is
created.
Feedback
In
Phase
Shifter
Signal path = Stereo
LFO Center
Out
LFO
LFO Rate
Parameter
Description
LFO Center
Sets the initial offset of the LFO and changes the position of the
peaks and notches. Range: 0% to 100%
Feedback
Increases the depth of the notches and height of the peaks.
Range: 0% to 100%
LFO Rate
Controls the sweep rate of the Low Frequency Oscillator.
Range: .01Hz to 10Hz
LFO Depth
Controls how much the Center Frequency is swept by the LFO.
Range: 0% to 100%
Waveform
Selects a Sine or Triangle wave for the LFO
LFO L/R Phase
Controls the stereo width by adjusting the phase difference
between the left and right sweeps. Range: -180° to +180°
Rotary
This is a simulation of a rotating speaker used on organs. The rotating speaker was
invented to give static organ tones a pipe organ type of animation, but this distinctive
sound became a legend in its own right. Spinning a sound around the room creates a
doppler pitch shift along with many other complex and musically pleasing sonic effects.
The Rotary incorporates acceleration and deceleration as you switch between the two
speeds.
Parameter
Description
Speed
Switches between slow or fast rotor speeds with
acceleration and deceleration as the speed changes.
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5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Speaker Simulator
The Speaker Simulator provides realistic guitar speaker responses and is designed for use
with guitar, bass or synthesizer. Twelve popular guitar amp speaker cabinets are
modeled.
There is only one parameter on this effect. Just select the speaker you want and listen.
Normally this effect should be used with the Mix control set to 100%.
Speaker Type
Description
British Stack 1 & 2
Modeled from a British 8-speaker high power amplifier stack.
British Combo 1-3
Modeled from a British 2-speaker combo amplifier.
Tweed Combo 1-3
Modeled from an American, 1950’s era, 2-speaker combo amplifier.
2 x 12 Combo
Modeled from an American, 1960’s era, 2-speaker combo amplifier.
4 x 12 Combo
Modeled from an American, 1960’s era, 4-speaker amplifier set.
Metal Stack 1 & 2
Modeled from a modern era, power amplifier stack.
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Creative Professional
5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Stereo Delays - 100, 250, 500, 750, 1500
The Stereo Delays are true stereo delay lines in that the left and right channels are kept
entirely separate from each other. The delay number refers to the maximum delay time
that can be produced by the delay lines. The five different lengths, from 100 ms to 1.5
seconds, allow you to make the most efficient use of the effect memory resource.
Because the left and right channels can have different delay times, you can create a
panning effect by setting one delay long and the other short. Very short delay times
combined with a high feedback amount can be used to create monotone roboticsounding effects. Using the longer stereo delays, you can “overdub” musical lines one
on top of the other with the feedback control turned up.
Feedback
HF
Rolloff
In
Delay
Out
Signal path = Stereo
L Delay R Delay
Time
Time
Parameter
Description
Left Delay Time
Sets the length of the delay for the left channel in milliseconds.
Right Delay Time
Sets the length of the delay for the right channel in milliseconds.
Delay Time (L & R)
Stereo Delay 100
Stereo Delay 250
Stereo Delay 500
Stereo Delay 750
Stereo Delay 1500
(.01ms. minimum increment between settings)
Range: 1 millisecond to 100 milliseconds
Range: 1 millisecond to 250 milliseconds
Range: 1 millisecond to 500 milliseconds
Range: 1 millisecond to 750 milliseconds
Range: 1 millisecond to 1.5 seconds
Feedback
Sets the amount of delayed signal that will be recirculated through
the delay line. Range: 0% to 100%
High Freq. Rolloff
Damps high frequencies in the feedback path. Range: 0% to 100%
E-MU Digital Audio System
75
5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Stereo Reverb
Reverberation is a simulation of a natural space such as a room or hall. The stereo reverb
algorithm is designed to simulate various halls, rooms and reverberation plates.
Decay time defines the time it takes for the reflected sound from the room to decay or
die away. The diagram below shows a generalized reverberation envelope.
Early Reflections
Late Reverb
Time
After a short pre-delay period, the echoes from the closest walls or ceiling are heard.
These first echoes, or early reflections, vary greatly depending on the type of room. Some
time after the early reflection cluster ends (late reverb delay), the late reverberation (a
dense cloud of complex wall reflections) begins and decays according to the time set by
the Decay Time parameter.
Diffusion is the amount of scattering and density of the late reverberation cloud. Rooms
with many complex surfaces have more diffusion than bare rooms.
High frequency energy tends to fade away first as a sound is dissipated in a room. The
High Frequency Damping parameter adjusts the time it takes for the high frequency
energy to die away and thus changes the characteristics of the room. Rooms with
smooth, hard surfaces are more reflective and have less high frequency damping. Rooms
filled with sound absorbing materials, such as curtains or people, have more high
frequency damping.
The Low Frequency Damping parameter adjusts the time it takes for the low frequencies
to die away. This control adjusts the “boominess” of the room.
Parameter
Description
Decay Time
Sets the length of the Late Reverb. Range 1.5 to 30seconds
Early Reflections Level
Sets the volume of the initial wall reflections.
Range: 0% to 100%
Early/Late Reverb Bal
Adjusts the balance between early refections and late reverb.
Range: 0% to 100%
Late Reverb Delay
Sets the time between early reflections and the onset of the late
reverb cloud. Range: 1ms to 350ms
Diffusion
Sets the amount of scattering of the late reverb cloud.
Range: 0% to 100%
High Freq. Damping
Sets the rate at which high frequencies die away.
Range: -10.0 to +3.0 damping factor
Low Freq. Damping
Sets the rate at which low frequencies die away.
Range: -10.0 to +3.0 damping factor
76
Creative Professional
5 - Effects
Core Effects Descriptions
Vocal Morpher
This unique effect allows you to select two vocal phonemes and morph between them
using an LFO. Phonemes are the consonants and vowels we use in articulating speech
sounds and these sounds are very distinctive and evocative. 30 different phonemes are
available and these can be shifted up or down in pitch for even more effects.
To use the Vocal Morpher, you just select Phoneme A and Phoneme B from the list of
thirty. Now the LFO automatically morphs back and forth between the two selected
phonemes, creating interesting vocal articulations. The rate of the LFO is adjustable and
you can select between Sine, Triangle or Sawtooth waveforms. The sine and triangle
waves fade smoothly. The sawtooth wave gradually fades, then jumps abruptly back.
When the frequency of the A or B Phonemes is shifted up or down, entirely new effects
can be produced. These frequency controls can also be used to tune the phoneme
frequencies to the range of audio you are processing.
Phoneme B
Frequ
Tim
e
ency
Phoneme A
List of Available Phonemes
A
E
I
O
U
AA
AE
AH
AO
EH
ER
IH
IY
UH
UW
B
D
F
G
J
K
L
M
N
P
R
S
T
V
Z
Parameter
Description
Phoneme A
Select any of the available Phonemes for Phoneme A.
Phoneme A
Tuning
Adjusts the frequency of Phoneme A up or down 2 octaves in
semitone intervals. Range: -24 semitones to +24 semitones
Phoneme B
Select any of the available Phonemes for Phoneme B.
Phoneme B
Tuning
Adjusts the frequency of Phoneme B up or down 2 octaves in
semitone intervals. Range: -24 semitones to +24 semitones
LFO Rate
Controls how fast the phonemes morph back and forth.
Range: .01Hz to 10Hz
LFO Waveform
Selects the waveform for the morph: Sinusoid, Triangle, Sawtooth
E-MU Digital Audio System
77
5 - Effects
E-MU PowerFX
E-MU PowerFX
The hardware-accelerated effects of the E-MU Digital Audio System can also be used as
VST inserts in Cubase LE. E-MU PowerFX allow you to use PatchMix DSP effects from
within Cubase LE with minimal load on your CPU.
E-MU PowerFX are not
available at 96kHz and
192kHz sample rates.
E-MU PowerFX incorporate smart time alignment technology which automatically
compensates for system latencies and ensures proper synchronization of audio
throughout the VST chain (if the host application supports this feature).
E-MU PowerFX On/Off
FX Palette
FX Inserts
Input Signal Present
Output Signal Present
FX Parameters
FX Presets
Preferences
Preset Editing
Parameter
Description
PowerFX On/Off
Enables or bypasses E-MU PowerFX.
FX Palette
Select from a single “Core” effect or a Multi -Effect.
FX Inserts
Drop Effects from the FX Palette here.
Signal Present LEDs
These indicators turn blue to show the presence of input and
output signals.
FX Parameters
Select the desired effect in the center insert section, then adjust
the wet/dry mix and parameters for the effect.
FX Presets
Select from the list of preprogrammed effect presets here.
Preset Editing
Click here to Save, Delete, Rename or Overwrite a User Preset.
See the “User Preset Section” for more information
78
f Cubase SX/SL/LE 2.0,
Nuendo and Sonar (using
the Cakewalk VST
adapter 4.4.1) implement
VST 2.X auto delay
compensation.
Creative Professional
5 - Effects
E-MU PowerFX
Parameter
Description
Preferences
The Preferences menu allows you to:
• Toggle the Tooltips On or Off
• Extra Buffers - Check this box if excessive stuttering occurs when
using E-MU PowerFX in your VST Host application. This box
should be checked when using Fruity Loops.
• Render Mode - Induces realtime rendering in applications
which do not support realtime rendering (WaveLab, SoundForge).
To Setup & Use E-MU PowerFX:
Setup Cubase LE
1. Launch Cubase LE.
2. Instantiate E-MU PowerFX in an Insert or Aux Send location within Cubase (go to
the EMU folder in VST plug-ins).
Using any driver other
than “E-MU ASIO” may
produce undesirable
results when using E-MU
PowerFX.
3. Press the Insert Edit button
in Cubase to bring up the E-MU PowerFX plug-in
window shown on the previous page.
E-MU PowerFX
4. Make sure the Insert Enable button
is illuminated, indicating E-MU Power FX
is on. The blue “Signal Present” indicators will be illuminated if E-MU PowerFX is
properly patched into a signal path.
5. Drag the desired effects from the Effects Palette to the center Insert strip.
6. Click on the Effect you wish to edit in the center Insert Strip (it will be highlighted in
yellow), then adjust the effects parameters in the right section of the window.
7. You can also select or edit User Presets from the section below the FX parameters.
See the “User Preset Section” for more information.
Delay Compensation
If you are using Cubase VST 5.1, or another older sequencer without automatic delay
compensataion, you will have to insert an E-Delay Compensator into any other audio
tracks to keep them time-aligned.
8.
Simply insert an E-Delay Compensator plug-in into the same insert location you
used for E-MU PowerFX on any other audio tracks. That’s it.
E-MU Digital Audio System
79
5 - Effects
E-MU PowerFX
Automating E-MU PowerFX
E-MU PowerFX can be automated in Cubase LE (or other recording host) just like any
other VST effect. When “Write Automation” is activated in Cubase LE, control changes
made in the PowerFX window during playback will be recorded on a special “Audio
Mix” track located at the bottom of the Arrange Window. When “Automation Read” is
activated, the recorded control changes will be played back.
Steinberg Cubasis
does not have the control
automation feature.
To Record PowerFX parameter changes in Cubase LE
1. Add E-MU PowerFX as a Channel Insert.
2. Rewind the song and enable “Automation Write” by pressing the WRITE button
on, illuminating it. (Refers to Cubase LE. If you are using another application,
refer to the documentation.)
3. Bring the E-MU PowerFX window to the front and select the Effect you want to
automate. The effect parameters appear in the TV screen. Make sure the blue “On”
button is lit.
4. Press the Play button on the Cubase LE Transport control. The song begins playing.
5. Adjust the E-MU PowerFX controls to achieve the effect you want. Rewind the song
when finished.
6. Disable “Automation Write” and enable “Automation Read”
. Playback the
song to hear and view your changes.
7. To edit Automation, first enable both “Automation Write” and “Automation Read”
and press Play. Cubase LE begins overwriting as soon as you change a control.
8. If you don’t like the results and want to try again, select Show Used Automation
from the Project menu. The Automation Subtrack appears. Next, click in the
Parameter Display and select Remove Parameter.
Once you have
recorded or drawn
automation, do not
delete or move effects
from the Insert Strip.
Doing so will result in
unpredictable behavior.
Note: This only erases one automation parameter from the Automation Subtrack.
To erase multiple control edits, repeat the procedure above. See the Cubase LE
manual for more specific information about automation editing.
E-MU PowerFX Resource Availability
Because different collections of VST plug-ins and PatchMix Sessions can be run simultaneously, it is possible to load a Cubase Song or PatchMix Session for which resources
are not available. If DSP resources are NOT available for an existing setup:
• E-MU PowerFX loads a Hardware I/O Path and simply passes audio through
without any effects. The effects insert slot(s) in E-MU PowerFX will be “redded out”.
• If no Hardware I/O Paths are available, the plug-in will be disabled and run in a soft
pass-through mode. The effects insert slot(s) in E-MU PowerFX will be “grayed out”.
• If DSP resources ARE available, but no Hardware I/O Paths are available, the plug-in
will run in soft pass-through mode.
• If the sample rate is changed in the middle of a E-MU PowerFX session, E-MU
PowerFX plug-ins will be bypassed, since the hardware effects cannot operate at
96kHz or 192kHz.
80
Creative Professional
5 - Effects
E-MU PowerFX
E-MU PowerFX Compatibility Chart
Application Name
Compatible?
Note
Render
Extra
Buffers
Steinberg Cubase VST 5.1
Yes
Off
Off
Steinberg Cubase SX 1
Yes
Off
Off
Steinberg Cubase SX 2
Yes
Off
Off
Steinberg Cubase LE
Yes
Off
Off
Steinberg Cubase SL
Yes
Off
Off
Steinberg WaveLab 4
Yes
On
Off
Steinberg WaveLab Lite (ver 4)
Yes
On
Off
Steinberg WaveLab 5
No
On
Either
Sony Acid 4
Yes
On
Off
Sony Vegas 5
Yes
On
Off
Sony SoundForge 7
No
Power FX
crashes when
launched.
On
Off
Adobe Audition 1.5
No
Audio
distortion &
immediate
lockup.
Any
Any
FruityLoops Studio 4.5
Yes
Off
On
Ableton Live 3.5
No
On
Off
Cakewalk Sonar 3
Yes
Off
Off
E-MU Digital Audio System
Instrument
Freeze triggers
error if
not in render
mode.
Pops & clicks
may occur.
(Try 8 buffers at
1024)
Distortion
when FX
parameters are
changed.
81
5 - Effects
Rendering Audio with E-MU PowerFX
Rendering Audio with E-MU PowerFX
Rendering (sometimes called Export) is a mixdown process performed by the host
application, which creates a new digital audio file from a multitrack song. Rendering
allows a virtually unlimited number of VST effects to be used because the audio
processing is performed out of realtime.
E-MU PowerFX and the PatchMix DSP effects are strictly realtime processes. When E-MU
PowerFX are used while rendering audio, the rendering process must proceed at
realtime rate. Some host applications are not designed to handle realtime rendering and
this can cause problems. E-MU PowerFX can be used with these applications if you are
willing to follow certain guidelines.
General Tips for Rendering using PowerFX
• If an error message occurs, increase the “ASIO Buffer Latency” setting located in
the device Setup dialog box. Depending on your setup, you may have to
increase or decrease the Buffer Latency settings to find the setting that works.
• Instead of rendering with E-MU PowerFX, bounce the E-MU PowerFX processed
tracks to another track in realtime.
• Check “Realtime Render” in the Render dialog box when using Cubase LE,
Cubase SX2 or Cubase SL2. This setting will give the best results.
Tips for using Freeze Mode on Cubase LE
• Make the project length as short as possible. Freeze always renders the entire
project length, even if the MIDI track being rendered is shorter.
• Great Tip: Temporarily bypass E-MU PowerFX (and any other effects) even
when “Freezing” another track. This will allow the track to Freeze faster than
realtime.
Using E-MU PowerFX with WaveLab and SoundForge
Stuttering in the audio can occur when rendering with SoundForge or any version of
Steinberg WaveLab. This problem is caused by discontinuities in the first few audio
buffers as they are fed by WaveLab to E-MU PowerFX. The problem can be eliminated by
following these guidelines.
• Check “Render Mode” box in the E-MU PowerFX preferences. See page 79.
• We recommend that you only use the MME/WAVE E-DSP Wave [xxxx] drivers.
• Reduce the “Buffer Size” in the WaveLab, Audio Preferences dialog box. This
moves the stuttering to beginning of the file.
• Pad the beginning (and/or end) of your audio file with silence (.5 to several
seconds depending on the file). This action causes the buffer discontinuities to
occur before the song begins.
82
Creative Professional
5 - Effects
E-MU E-Wire VST
E-MU E-Wire VST
E-Wire is a special VST/ASIO Bridge which allows you to route digital audio via ASIO to
PatchMix and back again.
E-Wire VST incorporates smart time alignment technology that automatically compensates for system latencies and ensures proper synchronization of audio throughout the
VST chain. In addition, E-Wire also allows you to insert outboard audio gear into the
VST environment.
E-Wire has three main components:
• A VST plug-in which handles the audio routing to PatchMix DSP.
• An ASIO mixer strip in PatchMix DSP configured to route audio to the E-Wire
plug-in. You simply drop the effects you want to use into this strip.
• For hosts that don’t support automatic delay compensation, a manual delaycompensation plug-in can be inserted in Cubase tracks or channels that don’t use
E-Wire to compensate for ASIO delay.
The diagram below may give you a better idea of how E-Wire works:
E Note: It’s easier to use
E-MU PowerFX instead of
E-Wire if you just want to
use the hardware effects.
(E-Wire was the precursor
to E-MU PowerFX.)
However, E-Wire can be
very useful because it
allows you to route VST
inserts or Sends to
Physical Inputs and
Outputs via PatchMix DSP.
E-Wire VST plug-in
Send to Strip
Stereo Reverb
Return to VST
ASIO Send
PatchMix DSP
Strip configured
for E-Wire
E-Wire bridges the gap between hardware I/O and the VST world. The E-Wire VST plug-in sends
audio to a strip containing the desired effect. An ASIO Send routes the audio back to E-Wire VST.
E-MU Digital Audio System
83
5 - Effects
E-MU E-Wire VST
To Setup and use E-Wire:
Setup PatchMix DSP
1. Open PatchMix DSP application.
2. Insert an ASIO Input mixer strip into PatchMix DSP. (Alternately, you can select
“New Session”, select “E-Wire Example” and skip to step 6.)
3. Mute the strip or turn the Fader all the way down.
4. Insert an ASIO Send plug-in into one of the inserts on your ASIO strip.
5. Name your ASIO strip as an E-Wire strip.
6. Insert the desired PatchMix DSP effects into slots above the ASIO Send.
7. Save the Session.
Setup Cubase LE
8. Launch Cubase LE.
9. Instantiate E-Wire VST in an Insert or Aux Send location within Cubase.
10. Edit the E-Wire plug-in and activate the plug-in by pressing the blue button.
11. Set the ASIO Send and Return on the E-Wire plug-in to match the strip you set up
for E-Wire.
12. Done.
E-Delay Compensation
An E-Delay Compensator must be inserted into any other audio tracks that are not using
E-Wire in order to keep them time-aligned.
13. Simply insert an E-Delay Compensator plug-in into the same insert location you
used for E-Wire on any other audio tracks. That’s it.
E-Delay Compensator
As audio is transferred back and forth between the VST host application and the E-MU
sound hardware, a delay in the audio stream is incurred. Normally this delay is compensated for automatically by the host application, but not all VST host applications
support this automatic compensation.
A host will support PowerFX and E-Wire’s plug-in delay compensation if it supports the
SetInitialDelay feature of the VST 2.0 specification.
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Creative Professional
5 - Effects
E-MU E-Wire VST
Currently automatic delay compensation is supported by the Steinberg 2.0 family
(Nuendo 2.x, Cubase SX 2.0, Cubase LE 2.0,), Magix Samplitude 7.x, and Sonar (using
the Cakewalk VST adapter 4.4.1), but not by Steinberg Cubase VST 5.1 and Cubasis.
The E-Delay Compensator utility plug-in is used to manually compensate for the
transfer delay for hosts that DO NOT support plug-in delay compensation.
The E-Delay Compensator plug-in is used to delay the “dry” tracks (tracks without a
PowerFX or E-Wire as an insert effect) or auxiliary (send) channels. For each dry track or
send, add an E-Delay Compensator plug-in to re-align the track. The E-Delay Compensator is automatic and requires no user interaction to operate.
For example, consider a Cubase VST session with two audio tracks. If PowerFX or E-Wire
is applied as an insert effect to the first audio track, but not to the second, the first track
will be delayed in relation to the second track. The E-Delay Compensator should be
added as an insert effect on the second track in order to provide delay compensation.
Cubase VST or Cubasis
Track 1
Track 2
Track 3
Insert
Insert
Insert
E-Wire
E-Delay
E-Delay
E-Delay Compensator Use
PatchMix
DSP
For host applications that don’t support automatic
delay compensation.
1. An E-Delay Compensator should be used
when unprocessed audio tracks are played
alongside tracks using a PowerFX or E-Wire
plug-in.
2. Simply insert an E-Delay Compensator into
each track that doesn’t use a PowerFX or
E-Wire send.
E-Delay Units Parameter
The Units value in the E-Delay dialog box should be set for the number of times you
send ASIO down to the PatchMix DSP mixer and back in a single track. A single
PowerFX insert chain with any number of effects only requires one delay unit because
there was only one trip to the hardware and back. If you use two Cubase inserts in series
on a track both using PowerFX or E-Wire, you would set the number parameter to 2 on
all other audio tracks. Each trip down to PatchMix DSP and back to Cubase equals one
unit.
E-MU Digital Audio System
85
5 - Effects
E-MU E-Wire VST
In practical use, however, you’ll probably never need to use more than one E-Wire VST
on a single track since PowerFX effects can be placed in series. We have included this
feature “just in case” you need it.
Here’s one more example of how to use the E-Delay Compensator with different
numbers of PowerFX/E-Wire sends on each track. The delay compensation on each track
must equal the track with the maximum number of PowerFX/E-Wire sends. See the
diagram below.
Cubase VST or Cubasis
Track 1
Track 2
Track 3
Insert
Insert
Insert
Insert
Insert
PowerFX
or E-Wire
PowerFX
or E-Wire
PowerFX
or E-Wire
E-Delay
1
E-Delay
2
PatchMix
DSP
Since track 1 uses two PowerFX/E-Wire inserts, the delay of all the other tracks must
equal two. Track 2 has one PowerFX/E-Wire insert and so adding one unit of E-Delay
keeps it time aligned. Track 3 doesn’t use a PowerFX/E-Wire insert and so it needs two
E-Delay Units to remain in alignment.
Grouping Tracks
When several tracks require E-Delay Compensation, you can send the output of each
track to a group or bus and use a single E-Delay Compensator on the output of the
group or bus.
• E-MU Digital Audio System and PatchMix DSP must be installed.
• E-Wire is compatible with Cubase SX/SL/LE, Cubase VST, Wavelab, and Cakewalk
Sonar (via DirectX-VST adapter) among others.
86
Creative Professional
6 - Using High Sample Rates
Overview
6 - Using High Sample Rates
Overview
When operating at 88.2k, 96k, 176.4k and 192k sample rates, the mixer functionality
and number of I/O channels are reduced. These changes are summarized in the
following tables. All S/PDIF inputs and outputs are disabled at 176.4kHz and192kHz.
The number of ADAT channels also decreases at the 88.2k/96k and 176.4k/192k sample
rates (due to the bandwidth limitations of the optical components).
When using 88.2kHz, 96kHz, 176.4kHz or 196kHz sample rates:
• Effect processors are disabled. (Output sends & returns are still available.)
• ADAT is reduced to 4 chan. at 88k/96k, & 2 chan. at 176k/192k.
• ASIO channels are reduced to 8 stereo ASIO channels at 88k/96k,
and 4 stereo ASIO channels at 176k/192k.
• At 176.4k/192k, the number of physical inputs/outputs is reduced.
• At the 176.4k & 192k sample rates, S/PDIF optical is disabled.
The ADAT optical interface was originally designed to carry 8 channels at a 48kHz
sample rate. We use the Sonorus® S/MUX™ standard to encode audio with higher
sample rates onto the ADAT light pipe. In this multiplexing scheme, two ADAT channels
are used to carry one 88.2k or 96k stream and four ADAT channels are used to carry one
176k or 192k audio stream. In order to use the ADAT interface at these higher sample
rates, you must have other equipment that supports the Sonorus S/MUX standard.
E-MU 1820 System at 88.2k/96k (1010 PCI Card & AudioDock)
All outputs remain active at 88.2k/96k, but the number of ADAT channels is reduced
from eight to four (see above). There are two possible input configurations when using
the E-MU 1820 system at 88.2k/96k as shown in the chart below. Basically, you have the
option of using the (4) ADAT input channels or (4) Line Inputs (Line Inputs 2 and 3).
At 88.2kHz/96kHz the headphone output parallels the Monitor output and is no longer
independently assignable.
E-MU 1820 Inputs/Outputs at 88.2kHz or 96kHz
Source
Inputs
(ADAT Option)
ADAT
4
0
4
S/PDIF 1
2
2
2
S/PDIF 2
2
2
2
Microphone
2
2
-
Line 1
2
2
2
Line 2
0
2
2
Line 3
0
2
2
Line 4 out (monitor)
-
-
2
Headphone out
-
-
2 (monitor)
Total
12
12
18
E-MU Digital Audio System
Inputs
(Line In Option)
Outputs
E Note: Headphone
Out is permanently
linked to Monitor Out in
96kHz mode.
87
6 - Using High Sample Rates
Overview
Input/Output - 88.2 kHz/96 kHz
A Line
B Line
Mic
Mic
Clip
Clip
-10 dB
-10 dB
MIDI
48V
MIDI 1
CLOCK
1
LCK 44.1
2
EXT
48
ADOCK
SMPTE
96
192
IN
OUT
S/PDIF
Line Mic -
+30 dB
+60 dB
-10 dB
+20 dB
+30 dB
+60 dB
-10 dB
+20 dB
In
Out
Out
ADAT enabled
1L
2L
1R
3L
2R
3R
4 Chan.
Sr L / R
L/R
Gnd
3L Phono 3R
Ctr/ Sub
4 Chan.
SrBk L / R
1-4
In
Card
Monitor
Out
1L
2L
1R
3L
2R
3R
4L
In
4R
MIDI 2
Out
or…
A Line
B Line
Mic
Mic
Clip
Clip
-10 dB
-10 dB
MIDI
48V
MIDI 1
CLOCK
1
LCK 44.1
2
EXT
48
ADOCK
SMPTE
96
192
IN
OUT
S/PDIF
Line Mic -
-10 dB
+20 dB
+30 dB
+60 dB
+30 dB
+60 dB
-10 dB
+20 dB
In
Out
Out
Line In 2 & 3 enabled
1L
1R
2L
2R
3L
3R
L/R
Gnd
3L Phono 3R
Sr L / R
Ctr/ Sub
4 Chan.
SrBk L / R
1-4
In
Card
Monitor
Out
1L
1R
2L
2R
3L
3R
4L
In
4R
MIDI 2
Out
At the 88.2kHz/96kHz sample rates, all outputs are available but 4 inputs are lost. ADAT optical
is also reduced to four channels. You have the option to enable either:
• ADAT Inputs
or…
• Line Inputs 2 and 3
E-MU 1212M System at 88.2k or 96k (1010 PCI Card & I/O Card)
When using the E-MU 1212 system at 88.2kHz or 96kHz you have two analog inputs
and outputs and two S/PDIF inputs and outputs. The ADAT input/output channels are
reduced from eight to four using the S/MUX standard.
E-MU 1212M Inputs/Outputs at 88.2kHz or 96kHz
Source
Inputs
Outputs
ADAT
4
4
S/PDIF
2
2
Line
2
2
Total
8
8
88
Creative Professional
6 - Using High Sample Rates
Overview
E-MU 1820 System at 176.4kHz or 192kHz
(1010 PCI Card & AudioDock)
At the highest sample rate you have 4 inputs and 10 output channels.
There are four possible input configurations when using the E-MU 1820 system at
176.4kHz or 192kHz. Each of the three options provides four input channels.
• Microphone Input and Line 2 Input enabled
• Microphone Input and ADAT Input enabled (2-chan ADAT)
• Line 1 Input and ADAT Input enabled (2-chan ADAT)
• Line Inputs 1 & 3 enabled (allows use of turntable inputs at 192kHz)
S/PDIF is not specified to operate at 176.4kHz/192kHz and so all S/PDIF inputs and
outputs are disabled. The headphone output parallels the Monitor output and is no
longer independently assignable, just like at 96kHz.
E-MU 1820 Inputs/Outputs at 176.4kHz or 192kHz
Source
Inputs
Mic &
Line 3
Inputs
Mic
& ADAT
Inputs
Line 1
& ADAT
ADAT
0
2
2
0
2
Microphone
2
2
0
0
-
Line 1
0
0
2
2
2
Line 2
0
0
0
0
2
Line 3
2
0
0
2
0
Line 4 out (monitor)
-
-
-
-
2
S/PDIF 1
0
0
0
0
0
S/PDIF 2
0
0
0
0
0
Headphone out
-
-
-
-
2 (monitor)
Total
4
4
4
4
10
Inputs
Line 1 & 3
Total
Outputs
E-MU 1212 System at 176.4k/192k (1010 PCI Card & I/O Card)
At 176.4kHz or 192kHz, you have two 24-bit inputs and outputs. S/PDIF is not
specified to operate at these rates and so all S/PDIF inputs and outputs are disabled. The
ADAT input/output channels are reduced to two channels (S/MUX standard).
E-MU 1212M Inputs/Outputs at 176.4kHz/192kHz
Source
Inputs
Outputs
ADAT
2
2
S/PDIF 1
0
0
Line
2
2
Total
4
4
E-MU Digital Audio System
89
6 - Using High Sample Rates
Overview
Microphone & Line 3 Input enabled
A Line
B Line
Mic
ADOCK
Mic
Clip
Clip
-10 dB
-10 dB
MIDI
48V
MIDI 1
CLOCK
1
LCK 44.1
2
EXT
48
SMPTE
96
192
IN
OUT
S/PDIF
Line Mic -
+30 dB
+60 dB
-10 dB
+20 dB
1L
2L
1R
+30 dB
+60 dB
-10 dB
+20 dB
3L
2R
In
3R
Out
Out
3L Phono 3R
Sr L/ R
L/R
Gnd
Ctr / Sub
2 Chan.
SrBk L / R
1-4
In
Card
Monitor
Out
1L
2L
1R
3L
2R
3R
4L
In
4R
MIDI 2
Out
or…
Microphone & ADAT Input enabled
A Line
B Line
Mic
ADOCK
Mic
Clip
Clip
-10 dB
-10 dB
MIDI
48V
1
2
MIDI 1
CLOCK
LCK 44.1
48
EXT
SMPTE
96
192
IN
OUT
S/PDIF
Line Mic -
+30 dB
+60 dB
-10 dB
+20 dB
+30 dB
+60 dB
-10 dB
+20 dB
In
Out
Out
2 Chan.
1L
2L
1R
3L
2R
3R
3L Phono 3R
Sr L/ R
L/R
Gnd
Ctr / Sub
SrBk L / R
2 Chan.
1-4
In
Card
Monitor
Out
1L
2L
1R
3L
2R
3R
4L
In
4R
MIDI 2
Out
or…
Line Input 1 & ADAT Input enabled
A Line
B Line
Mic
ADOCK
Mic
Clip
Clip
-10 dB
-10 dB
MIDI
48V
MIDI 1
CLOCK
1
LCK 44.1
2
EXT
48
SMPTE
96
192
IN
OUT
S/PDIF
Line Mic -
+30 dB
+60 dB
-10 dB
+20 dB
+30 dB
+60 dB
-10 dB
+20 dB
In
Out
Out
2 Chan.
1L
2L
1R
3L
2R
3R
3L Phono 3R
Sr L/ R
L/R
Gnd
Ctr / Sub
SrBk L / R
2 Chan.
1-4
In
Card
Monitor
Out
1L
2L
1R
3L
2R
3R
4L
In
4R
MIDI 2
Out
or…
Line Inputs 1 & 3 enabled
A Line
B Line
Mic
ADOCK
Mic
Clip
Clip
-10 dB
-10 dB
MIDI
48V
MIDI 1
CLOCK
1
LCK 44.1
2
EXT
48
SMPTE
96
192
IN
OUT
S/PDIF
Line Mic -
1L
-10 dB
+20 dB
1R
+30 dB
+60 dB
2L
+30 dB
+60 dB
-10 dB
+20 dB
2R
3L
3R
In
Out
Out
3L Phono 3R
L/R
Gnd
Sr L/ R
Ctr / Sub
SrBk L / R
1-4
2 Chan.
In
Card
Monitor
Out
1L
1R
2L
2R
3L
3R
4L
4R
In
MIDI 2
Out
At the 176.4kHz or 192kHz sample rates, you sacrifice S/PDIF, line input 3, and line output 3.
ADAT optical is reduced to two channels. You can choose one of the following options:
• Microphone Inputs & Line 2 Inputs
• Line Inputs 1 & ADAT
• Microphone Inputs & ADAT Inputs
• Line Inputs 1 & 3
90
Creative Professional
6 - Using High Sample Rates
Overview
WDM Recording and Playback Behavior
WDM recording and playback is supported at all PatchMix sample rates. The behavior of
the driver with respect to PatchMix sample rate is described below.
When PatchMix and the WDM audio content (.WAV file format, playback and record
settings in WaveLab. etc.) are both running at the same sample rate, and when a Wave
strip or send is present in the PatchMix mixer configuration, WDM audio will be played
or recorded “bit accurate” without sample rate conversion or bit truncation.
When running PatchMix at 44kHz/48kHz, if there is a mismatch between the WDM
playback audio content and the PatchMix sample rate, sample rate conversion is
performed, so that WDM audio will always be heard or recorded. Also, such non-nativesample-rate audio is truncated to 16-bits.
When running PatchMix at 88.2kHz, 96kHz, 176.4kHz or 192kHz, WDM record or
playback audio content must be running at the same sample rate as PatchMix. If the
sample rates are mismatched, NO AUDIO will be produced or recorded. In other words,
the WDM driver does not perform sample rate conversion of any kind when PatchMix is
running at 88.2kHz, 96kHz, 176.4kHz or 192kHz.
E-MU Digital Audio System
91
6 - Using High Sample Rates
Overview
92
Creative Professional
7 - Appendix
Sync Daughter Card Supplement
7 - Appendix
Sync Daughter Card Supplement
SMPTE Conversion
One of the main functions of the Sync Daughter Card is to convert SMPTE (LTC) to
MIDI Time Code (MTC) and vice-versa. The term “Host MTC” refers to MTC, which is
generated or used by the host application (Cubase, etc.). MTC is also available at the
MIDI jack on the back of the Sync Card.
Warning: SMPTE and
MTC do not provide
sample sync for digital
I/O. You must use Word
Clock, S/PDIF or ADAT
sync.
SMPTE Features
• Conversion of SMPTE to MTC quarter-frame messages & full-frame messages.
Constant quarter-frame messages are generated with steady SMPTE data input.
Occasional MIDI full-frame messages are generated when SMPTE contains data dropouts.
• Conversion of MTC (quarter frame & full frame) messages from the host
computer to SMPTE out.
Simultaneous SMPTE and MTC output when receiving MTC from the host computer
• Outputs SMPTE and MTC striping data.
SMPTE Start Time and type can be set via System Settings dialog box.
SMPTE Options
When the Sync Daughter Card is installed in your system a SMPTE button in the
PatchMix DSP mixer becomes visible. Pressing the SMPTE button brings up the SMPTE
window.
Current Time
Start Striping
SMPTE Status/
Error Indicators
E-MU Digital Audio System
SMPTE
Start Time
SMPTE Frame
Rate Settings
Flywheel Mode
• Off
• Continuous
• Fixed
•1-time Jam
Stop
Striping
Output
Source
Flywheel
Amount
Word Clock
Termination
Output
Level
93
7 - Appendix
Sync Daughter Card Supplement
Mode (fps)
Sets the transmitted frame rate when striping SMPTE.
SMPTE Striping
Edit this field to set the start time in hours:minutes:seconds:frames for
striping SMPTE.
Stripe Button
Initiates SMPTE Time Code generation at the SMPTE output beginning at
the time set in the striping display.
Stop Button
Stops SMPTE striping. This button also stops SMPTE when One-Time Jam
Sync has been initiated.
Flywheel Mode
Selects one of the four Flywheel modes. See the descriptions below.
Output Level
Sets the SMPTE output level from -10dBV (consumer) to +4dBu (pro).
FLY/JAM Frames
If flywheel mode is on and a dropout is detected this is the number of flywheel frames that will be output before the sync card stops and chases.
Word Clock
Termination
Turns word clock termination on or off. Except in special cases, this control should normally be left on. See “Word Clock In/Out”.
SMPTE/MTC
Output Source
This control selects the source of the SMPTE output jack. The choices are:
Host MTC or the SMPTE Input jack (to regenerate SMPTE).
SMPTE Modes of Operation
Host Mode
The host computer is the source of synchronization. MTC messages are sent to the Sync
Daughter Card from the computer application and converted into SMPTE. MTC is also
output from the MIDI port on the Sync Daughter Card.
External Mode
SMPTE messages from SMPTE In are converted to MTC (quarter-frame messages) and
sent to the host application. This happens automatically whenever LTC is received at the
SMPTE input jack. Clean SMPTE data is also transmitted from SMPTE Out if “SMPTE
(Regenerate)” is set.
Flywheel Mode
If the incoming SMPTE data is corrupted or missing frames, MTC code will continue to
be output if “Flywheel mode” is enabled. The flywheel modes are described below.
Flywheel Modes
Off
Upon any dropout, MTC stops and the Sync card monitors the input for
valid code. If valid code is again received, it chases and relocks.
Fixed 0-127
Upon any dropout, MTC continues outputting Quarter-frame messages
at the same rate (flywheeling). When a dropout is detected, this is the
number of frames that will be output before the Sync card stops outputting MTC and monitors the input for valid code. If valid code is again
received, it chases and relocks.
Continuous
Upon any dropout, MTC continues outputting Quarter-frame messages
at the same rate (flywheeling). The Sync card monitors the input for valid
code and continues flywheeling until valid code is received, then relocks.
1-Time Jam Sync
Upon any dropout, MTC continues outputting Quarter-frame messages
at the same rate (flywheeling) without monitoring the SMPTE input until
the Stop button is pressed.
94
Creative Professional
7 - Appendix
SMPTE Background
Stripe Mode
This mode is used to record SMPTE time code onto an audio track of another recorder.
SMPTE is output when the Start button is pressed in the System Settings menu and
begins at the time set by the Start Time setting. MTC is also simultaneously output from
the Sync Daughter Card MIDI out. SMPTE and MTC will continue to be output until the
Stop button is pressed. See Striping SMPTE.
SMPTE Background
SMPTE time code was standardized way back in 1969 by the Society of Motion Picture
and Television Engineers as a way to mark frame numbers on video tape.
Using SMPTE, a particular location can be precisely located by simply entering the
appropriate time code number which is expressed in Hours, Minutes, Seconds, Frames
and Subframes. This is possible because each frame of SMPTE time code contains
absolute location information expressed in digital form.
There are two types of SMPTE time code: Vertical Interval Time Code (VITC), which is
used on video tape and Longitudinal Time Code (LTC) or audio time code. VITC is
strictly used for video and has the advantage of being able to be read while the video
deck is paused. LTC can be recorded on the audio or sync tracks of video tape and can
thus be used in audio or video work.
Longitudinal time code is the type of SMPTE used on the Sync Daughter Card. It
contains 80 bits of information per frame. An audio SMPTE frame is divided into 80
“bit cells”. A voltage change during a bit cell period constitutes a digital “1” and no
change during a bit cell period constitutes a digital “0”. In addition to the location bits,
there are user bits that may contain information about tape reel numbers, bits dealing
with video information, and a 16-bit sync word at the end of the frame.
SMPTE
Time
Code
Frames Frames Seconds Seconds Minutes Minutes Hours
10
20
30
40
Start
Frame
80 Bit Cells per Frame
50
Bit
Cell
Hours
SYNC WORD
60
70
End
Frame
Bit
Cell
=0
80
=1
There are four types of SMPTE time code in general use: 24, 25, 30 frame-per-second
and 30 drop-frame. In general, you should choose one rate (30 non-drop is common in
audio) and stick with it for initial recording and later editing.
Types of SMPTE
Type
Use
Hours
Minutes
Seconds
Frames
24 frame
US Film
00-23
00-59
00-59
00-23
25 frame
Euro. Film + Video
00-23
00-59
00-59
00-24
30 drop-frame
US & Japan Color Video
00-23
00-59
00-59
00-29
30 non-drop
US & Japan B/W Video
00-23
00-59
00-59
00-29
The four frame rates are all straightforward except 30 drop-frame. The 30 df rate came
about because the US color video frame rate is actually 29.97 frames/sec instead of 30
frames/sec. This adds up to an error of 108 frames each hour relative to “wall clock”
E-MU Digital Audio System
95
7 - Appendix
SMPTE Background
time! (A one hour program would actually be 59 minutes and 56.4 seconds long.) Drop
frame was designed to correct this time difference. In 30 Drop Frame, every minute
except 00-10-20-30-40-50 have the first two frames, 00 and 01, “dropped”, hence the
name drop-frame.
Why use SMPTE?
SMPTE sync, although well over 30 years old, has the advantage of being able to be
recorded as an audio track. This allows it to be used with virtually any kind of recording
equipment from tape recorders to computer-based digital audio recorders. You can even
buy phonograph records with a SMPTE stripe!
SMPTE was designed in the days when tape dropout was a common occurrence and so it
was designed to convey “absolute” location information. Since each frame of SMPTE
code provides its own unique identification, it provides the ability for a receiving device
to recover from data dropout. In addition, edits can be performed in the middle of a
song with just a few seconds of pre-roll before the punch-in point. SMPTE is also
standardized, which means that code generated on different makes of equipment will
be compatible with each other. SMPTE also has fairly good resolution, especially at the
subframe level. You’ll be happy to know that the Sync Daughter Card resolves to the
subframe level. The chart below shows subframe accuracy at the three frame rates.
SMPTE Subframe Resolution
Frames-per-second
Resolution
24 fps
.521 mS
25 fps
.500 mS
30 fps
.417 mS
Striping SMPTE
Printing SMPTE to a track is called striping (as in stripe). SMPTE time code is recorded
on an unused audio track of another recorder, then played back into the Sync Daughter
Card. The Sync Daughter Card passes the location information on to the host computer
as MTC quarter-frame data to be used by an application such as an audio recorder or
sequencer.
SMPTE is usually recorded at about -3 VU on semi-pro gear, -10 VU on professional gear
and 0 VU on video gear. Experiment to find the optimum levels. When printing to a
time code track of a video deck, be careful. The time code playback head locations on
video decks are not standardized and can cause gross timing errors. Time code which is
striped on an audio track will always be in sync with the picture. SMPTE code is traditionally recorded on the right channel of a video recorder.
Avoiding SMPTE problems
Problems in reading SMPTE time code can often be related to poor quality code on the
tape. Poor quality code can be caused by a number of problems, the most common
being dirty or misaligned heads, amplifier clipping, or too many generations of audio
dubbing. Other problems can be caused by running the SMPTE signal through signal
processing devices such as Limiters, Reverbs, Harmonizers, etc. (Don’t laugh, it has been
done!) In fact, many video decks have built in AGCs (Automatic Gain Controls) which
will ruin the SMPTE signal if the input level is too high. Always check playback to insure
that the time code is usable. In general, no signal processing should be used on the
SMPTE signal. SMPTE code is delicate and should be treated as such.
96
Creative Professional
7 - Appendix
SMPTE Background
Duplicating SMPTE time code
The Sync Daughter Card always generates clean SMPTE from the SMPTE output when
reading SMPTE in. This time code is in sync with the incoming SMPTE and can be used
to feed other devices in your studio or to clean up old SMPTE tracks. Copying SMPTE
code from track to track produces deterioration of the signal with each generation,
although one generation of dubbing will probably be OK.
Other Tips for using SMPTE
1. Use ascending time code. Jumps in the code are OK as long as the SMPTE code
jumps forward in time as the tape moves forward in time. A good way to avoid any
problems with this is to simply stripe the entire project with SMPTE before you
record any other tracks.
2. Allow enough leader. Leave a few seconds between each song to allow SMPTE to
sync up before the song starts.
Keep written logs. Keeping written records of song start points and edit cues can save
time and avoid wasteful searching through a project that was recorded earlier.
Example SMPTE Connection
In the diagram below, Cubase is controlling the entire system by sending MTC to the
Sync Card which converts MTC to SMPTE. SMPTE is fed to the ADAT/BRC to convey the
absolute time information (hours-minutes-seconds-frames). ADAT/BRC is the word
clock master, controlling the Digital Audio System either through the embedded clock
in the ADAT optical stream or using word clock.
Cubase
1010
CARD
SYNC
CARD
C
MT
BRC
ADOCK
M A S T E R
optional
if ADAT
sync isn't
used
ADAT
In
3
35
67
99
4
36
68
100
9
41
73
105
10
42
74
106
11
43
75
107
12
44
76
108
17
49
81
113
18
50
82
114
19
51
83
115
20
52
84
116
25
57
89
121
26
58
90
122
27
59
91
123
28
60
92
124
5
37
69
101
6
38
70
102
7
39
71
103
8
40
72
104
HOURS
DISPLAY TYPE
13
45
77
109
14
46
78
110
15
47
79
111
16
48
80
112
21
53
85
117
22
54
86
118
23
55
87
119
24
56
88
120
29
61
93
125
30
62
94
126
31
63
95
127
32
64
96
128
PITCH DOWN
PITCH MODE
FIXED
BEATS
SMPTE
BARS
DISPLAY MODE RESET 0
ABSOLUTE
SUB BEATS
FORMAT TAPE
RELATIVEE
VARIABLE
DROP FRAME
SMPTE START
EXT SYNC
OFFSET
30 FPS
PITCH MODE
RECORD
INPUT
EJECT
NORMAL
MINUTES SECONDS FRAMES
BARS
SMPTE
29.97 FPS
SMPTE IN
MIDI IN
25 FPS
24 FPS
RECORD
INPUT
TRACK 1-32
COPY TAPE
LOCATION
NAME
CURSOR
AUTO-PUNCH PRE-ROLL
RECORD XFADE
MIDI UTIL TEMPO MAP
SAVE SETUP
COPY SONGDELETE SONG
TO TAPE
LOAD SETUP
SET LOCATELOCATE SONGFROM TAPE
TRACK 33-64
TRACK 65-96
TRACK 97-128
AUTO INPUT
ALL SAFE
ALL INPUT
ALL CLEAR
GROUP 1
GROUP 2
GROUP 3
GROUP 4
7
STUV
8
WXYZ
0
(CHARS)
4
JKL
5
MNO
6
PQR
1
ABC
2
DEF
3
GHI
LOOP
POST-ROLL
TAPE OFFSETTRACK DELAY
DIGITAL I/O GEN SYNC
AUTO PLAY
EDIT
REHEARSE
LOCATE 0
SET LOCATE
REWIND
PatchMix DSP set to
ADAT Sync
C O N T R O L
TAPE LOCATION
CENTS
PITCH UP
2
34
66
98
RECORD
INPUT
LTC
R E M O T E
PITCH CONTROL
RECORD
INPUT
1
33
65
97
SET GROUP
F AS T F OR WAR D
S T OP
PLAY
RECORD
LOCATE
ADAT 9-pin
ADAT
ADAT Optical
carries embedded
word clock
REWIND
FAST FWD
STOP
PLAY
RECORD
EJECT
The Sync Card should not be used as both the SMPTE and word clock master. Word
Clock is generated by the Digital Audio System and NOT by the software application
(Cubase). SMPTE is not locked to Word Clock inside the Sync Card—they are
completely independent.
E-MU Digital Audio System
97
7 - Appendix
MIDI Time Code (MTC)
MIDI Time Code (MTC)
MIDI time code is basically SMPTE time code adapted to the world of MIDI. MTC
specifies “absolute” location information in hours:minutes:seconds:frames, just like
SMPTE. There are two main kinds of messages in MTC: Full-frame messages and
Quarter-frame messages.
Full-frame messages are ten bytes long and are sent when SMPTE start, stops, or
relocates. Full-frame messages contain the entire SMPTE number of, hours, minutes,
seconds, frames, as well as the SMPTE type: 24fps, 25fps, 30fps non-drop, 30fps drop.
Quarter-frame messages are sent at each quarter of a SMPTE frame and only carry 1/8th
of the SMPTE time message. Quarter-frame messages require two entire SMPTE frames
to send the complete time stamp (h:m:s:f). Timing accuracy is maintained as long as the
quarter-frame messages continue to come in at a constant rate.
MTC and SMPTE do
NOT synchronize at the
sample rate and are not
locked to word clock in
any way.
SMPTE and MTC are used
to synchronize music but
do not have the required
resolution to sample-lock
digital audio.
To Enable MTC:
MIDI Time code disables the use of MIDI port 2 on the back panel of the AudioDock.
1. Open Session Settings from the toolbar.
2. Select the MIDI tab and choose Sync Card/MTC from the MIDI options.
3. Click OK to close the window.
Since it is important to have a stable timing reference for your song or sequence, we
have given MTC its own MIDI output port on the Sync Daughter Card. This ensures that
the timing information will not be affected by other MIDI data on the line.
Word Clock In/Out
Word clock provides a standardized means of synchronizing multiple digital audio
devices so that data can be transferred digitally. In order to digitally transfer from one
device to another, the two devices MUST be synchronized. Clicks and pops in the
audio will result when transferring digital audio which is not synchronized.
f Word clock, ADAT and
S/PDIF synchronize at the
sample rate and are used
to transfer digital data
between machines.
The E-MU 1010 PCI card can be externally clocked from the ADAT input, S/PDIF input
or from the Sync Daughter card (if installed). In a digital studio, all digital devices in
the system should run off the same master Word Clock.
To Synchronize PatchMix DSP to an External Clock Source:
1. Make sure an external clock source is connected to the E-MU Digital Audio System
hardware via the word clock, ADAT or S/PDIF input.
2. Open the Session Settings dialog box.
3. Under the System tab, select External Source, then select either word clock, ADAT
or S/PDIF.
4. Press OK to close the dialog box.
5. Check the Sync section of PatchMix DSP to verify that the Locked indicator is
illuminated.
Devices can be connected in daisy chain fashion (word clock out connected to the next
unit’s word clock in) or in parallel for one or two devices, but professional digital
studios normally use a master word clock generator or “House Sync” with a distribution
system so that each device receives a phase-coherent and jitter-free word clock.
98
Creative Professional
7 - Appendix
Word Clock In/Out
Digital
Device 1
Digital
Device 3
Digital
Device 2
Digital
Device 4
House Sync
Generator
A master word clock generator is preferable for larger digital setups.
Word Clock In: Receives word clock (sample clock) from another digital device such as
a digital video deck, digital recorder or digital mixer.
Word Clock Out: Sends word clock (sample clock) to another digital recorder. Word
clock is always output, whether it is generated by the internal clock or passed through
from the word clock input.
75Ω On/Off: Termination for the word clock input can be switched on or off in the
Sync Card menu of the PatchMix DSP application. Normally word clock termination
should be left on. If you have problems with a weak word clock signal, try turning termination off. See Word Clock Termination.
The diagram below shows the proper way to connect and terminate a serial word clock
chain. Using a BNC “T” connector ensures that word clock is precisely in phase for both
devices. The middle device has termination turned Off and the last device in the word
clock chain has termination turned On.
Digital Mixer
Word Clock
ADAT Optical
or AES Digital
T - connector
ADAT Optical
IN
Word Clock
Word Clock Termination OFF
AES
ADOCK
E-MU 1010 CARD
IN
SYNC CARD
Word Clock Termination ON
This diagram shows the proper way to connect word clock if you don’t have a multi-output
word clock generator. The last device in a Word Clock chain should have Termination ON.
E-MU Digital Audio System
99
7 - Appendix
Getting in Sync
Getting in Sync
Whenever you connect external digital audio devices together, you need to be aware of
how they are synchronized to each other. Simply connecting digital out to digital in
doesn’t guarantee that two digital devices are synced, even if audio is being passed.
Unless you have set one to be the Master and the other a Slave, they are probably NOT
synchronized and the quality of your audio will suffer.
S/PDIF and ADAT are two commonly used digital audio formats. Both these digital
formats carry an embedded word clock which can be used to synchronize the digital
equipment. You must enable “External Clock” on the slave device to have clock sync!
The diagrams below show two ways to synchronize an external A/D - D/A converter to
the E-MU Digital Audio System using the ADAT lightpipe connection.
In the first example, only the A/D converters on the external device are being used. Only
one lightpipe is needed as long as PatchMix is set to receive its word clock signal from
the external device. The external A/D is the Master and the E-MU DAS is the Slave.
EXTERNAL
External Device supplies Master Clock
(via ADAT)
The lightpipe carries eight
channels of audio data and
an embedded clock.
ADAT Out
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Master
External A/D - D/A Converter
Set PatchMix DSP to receive:
External ADAT Sync
Slave
EXTERNAL
PatchMix DSP supplies Master Clock
(via ADAT)
This lightpipe carries eight
channels of audio data.
Set External Device to receive:
External ADAT Sync
ADAT Out
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Slave
ADAT In
Master
External A/D - D/A Converter
This lightpipe carries an
embedded clock signal
& eight channels of audio.
In the second example a second lightpipe is used to supply “embedded word clock”, as
well as eight channels of audio to the external A/D - D/A. The external device MUST be
set to receive external clock via ADAT or the units will not be synchronized. The E-MU
Digital Audio System is the Master and the external A/D - D/A is the Slave.
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Useful Information
Useful Information
AES/EBU to S/PDIF Cable Adapter
This simple adapter cable allows you to receive AES/EBU digital audio via the S/PDIF
input on the E-MU 1010 PCI card. This cable may also work to connect S/PDIF out from
the 1010 PCI card to the AES/EBU input of other digital equipment.
From AES/EBU
Device
1
2
N.C.
+
To S/PDIF
In
3
-
Cables - balanced or unbalanced?
All inputs and outputs on the E-MU Digital Audio System are designed to use either
balanced or unbalanced cables. Balanced signals provide an additional +6dB of gain
on the inputs and are recommended for best audio performance, although unbalanced
cables are fine for most applications. If you’re having problems with hum and noise or
just want the best possible performance, use balanced cables.
Balanced Cables
Balanced cables are used in professional studios because they cancel out noise and
interference. Connector plugs used on balanced cables are XLR (3-prong mic connector)
or TRS (Tip, Ring, Sleeve) 1/4" phone plugs.
Balanced XLR
Connectors
2
1
1
2
3
3
Input
Output
1 = Ground/shield
2 = Hot (+)
3 = Cold (-)
WARNING: Do NOT
use balanced audio
cables when connecting
balanced outputs to
unbalanced inputs.
Doing so can increase
noise level and introduce
hum. Use balanced
(3-conductor) cables
ONLY if you are
connecting balanced
inputs to balanced
outputs.
Sleeve = Ground
Balanced 1/4”
TRS Connectors
Tip = Hot (+)
Ring = Cold (-)
Unbalanced 1/4”
Connectors
Sleeve = Ground
Tip = Signal
Balanced cables have one ground (shield) connection and two signal-carrying
conductors of equal potential but opposite polarity. There is one “hot” or positive lead,
and a “cold” or negative lead. At any point in time, both conductors are equal in voltage
but opposite in polarity. Both leads may pick up interference, but because it is present
both in and out of phase, this interference cancels out at the balanced input connection.
E-MU Digital Audio System
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7 - Appendix
Useful Information
Unbalanced Cables
Unbalanced cables have one conductor and one ground (shield) and usually connect
via unbalanced 1/4" phone plugs or RCA phono plugs. The shield stays at a constant
ground potential while the signal in the center conductor varies in positive and negative
voltage. The shield completely surrounds the center “hot” conductor and is connected
to ground in order to intercept most of the electrical interference encountered by the
cable. Unbalanced cables are more prone to hum and interference than balanced cables,
but the shorter the cable, the less hum introduced into the system.
Digital Cables
Don’t cheap out! Use high quality optical fiber (for ADAT) and low-capacitance
electrical cables (for S/PDIF) when transferring digital I/O to avoid data corruption.
It’s also a good idea to keep digital cabling as short as possible (1.5 meters for plastic
light pipes; 5 meters for high quality glass fiber light pipes).
Grounding
In order to obtain best results and lowest noise levels, make sure that your computer
and any external audio devices are grounded to the same reference. This usually means
that you should be using grounded AC cables on both systems and make sure that both
systems are connected to the same grounded outlet. Failure to observe this common
practice can result in a ground loop. 60 cycle hum in the audio signal is almost always
caused by a ground loop.
Phantom Power
Phantom power is a dc voltage (+48 volts) which is normally used to power the preamplifier of a condenser microphone. Some direct boxes also use phantom power.
Pins 2 and 3 of the AudioDock microphone inputs each carry +48 volts dc referenced to
pin 1. Pins 2 and 3 also carry the audio signal which “rides” on top of the constant 48
volts DC. Coupling capacitors at the input of the AudioDock block the +48 volt DC
component before the signal is converted into digital form. The audio mutes for a
second when phantom power is turned on. After turning phantom power off, wait two
full minutes before recording to allow the DC bias to drain from the coupling capacitors
or this bias could affect the audio headroom.
1
2
(grd)
3
Balanced dynamic microphones are not affected by phantom
power. An unbalanced dynamic microphone may not work
properly, but will probably not be damaged if phantom power
is left on.
+48V
Ribbon microphones should NOT be used with phantom
power on. Doing so can seriously damage the ribbon element.
Since ribbon microphones are fairly specialized and generally expensive, you’ll know if
you own one. Most microphones are either of dynamic or condenser type and these are
not harmed by phantom power.
Appearance Settings in Windows
Adjusting the “Performance Options” in Windows will improve the screen appearance
when moving the mixer around on the screen.
To Improve the Appearance Settings:
1. Open the Windows Control Panel. (Start, Settings, Control Panel).
2. Select System. Select the Advanced Settings tab.
3. Under Visual Effects, select Adjust for Best Performance. Click OK.
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Technical Specifications
Technical Specifications
Specifications: 1820M System
GENERAL
Sample Rates
44.1 kHz. 48 kHz, 88.2 kHz, 96 kHz, 176.4 kHz, 192 kHz from
internal crystal. Externally supplied clock from S/PDIF, ADAT
(or word clock with optional Sync Card)
Bit Depth
16 or 24-bits
Hardware DSP
100MIPs custom audio DSP. PCI Bus-Mastering DMA subsystem
reduces CPU usage. Zero-latency direct hardware monitoring
with effects. 1394 Firewire Core - Texas Instruments
Converters & OpAmps
ADC - AK5394 (AKM)
DAC - CS4398 (Cirrus Logic)
OpAmp - NJM2068M (JRC)
WDM Drivers
8 channels — operational at 44.1kHz, 48kHz, 88.2kHz, 96kHz,
176.4kHz & 192kHz
AudioDockM Power Use
1.25A @ +12V
15W.
ANALOG LINE INPUTS
Type
Servo-balanced, DC-coupled, low-noise input circuitry
Level (software selectable)
Professional: +4 dBu nominal, 20 dBu maximum (balanced)
Consumer: -10 dBV nominal, 6 dBV maximum (unbalanced)
Frequency Response
+/- .05dB, 20 Hz - 20 kHz
THD + N
-110 dB (.0003%) 1kHz at -1 dBFS
SNR
120 dB (A-weighted)
Dynamic Range
120 dB (A-weighted)
Channel Crosstalk
< -115 dB, (1 kHz signal at -1 dBFS)
Common-mode Rejection
> 40 dB at 60Hz
Input Impedance
10K ohm
ANALOG LINE OUTPUTS
Type
Balanced, low-noise, 2-pole low-pass differential filter
Level (software selectable)
Professional: +4dBu nominal, 20dBu (balanced)
Consumer: -10dBV nominal, 6dBV maximum (unbalanced)
Frequency Response
+0.0/-0.35 dB, 20 Hz - 20 kHz
THD + N
-105 dB (.0006%) 1kHz signal at -1dBFS
SNR
120 dB (A-weighted)
Dynamic Range
120 dB (A-weighted)
Stereo Crosstalk
< -120 dB, 1kHz
Output Impedance
560 ohms
E-MU Digital Audio System
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Technical Specifications
Specifications: 1820M System
MIC PREAMP/LINE INPUT
Type
TFPro™ combination microphone preamp and line input
Frequency Response
+0.8/-0.1 dB, 20 Hz - 20kHz
Stereo Crosstalk
< 120 dB, 1kHz
LINE INPUT
Gain Range:
-12 to +28 dB
Max Level:
-17 dbV (19.2 dBu)
THD+N:
-100 dB (.001%), 1 kHz at -1 dBFS
Dynamic Range:
107 dB (A-weighted, min. gain)
SNR:
107 dB (A-weighted, min. gain)
Input Impedance:
10K ohm
CMRR:
> 40 dB (60Hz)
MICROPHONE PREAMP
Gain Range:
-10 to +50 dB
Max Level:
-12 dbV (-9.8 dBu)
THD+N:
-100 dB (.001%), 1 kHz at -1 dBFS
SNR:
106 dB (A-weighted, min. gain)
Input Impedance:
330 ohm
CMRR:
> 80 dB (60Hz)
HEADPHONES
Frequency Response:
+0.0/-0.35 dB, 20 Hz - 20 kHz
THD+N: (1 kHz, max. level)
33 ohm load: -69 dB (0.035%)
600 ohm load: -94 dB (0.002%)
SNR:
117 dB (A-weighted)
Dynamic Range:
117 dB (A-weighted)
Stereo Crosstalk:
< -100 dB (1kHz at -1 dBFS, 600 ohm load)
Max Output Power:
500 mW
Output Impedance:
22 ohms
Gain Range:
85 dB
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Technical Specifications
Specifications: 1820M System
TURNTABLE INPUT
RIAA equalized phono input
Frequency Response:
+/-0.5 dB, 50 Hz - 20 kHz
THD+N:
-76 dB (.015%) (1 kHz, 10 mV RMS unbalanced input)
SNR:
90 dB (1kHz, 10 mV RMS unbalanced input)
Stereo Crosstalk:
< -80 dB (1kHz at -1 dBFS)
Maximum Level:
Professional: 80 mV RMS
Consumer: 20 mV RMS
Input Capacitance:
220 pF
Input Impedance:
47K ohm
DIGITAL I/O
S/PDIF
• 2 in/2 out coaxial (transformer coupled)
• 2 in/3 out optical (software switchable with ADAT)
• AES/EBU or S/PDIF (switchable under software control)
ADAT
• 8 channels, 24-bit @ 44.1/48 kHz
• 4 channels, 24-bit @ 96 kHz
• 2 channels, 24-bit @ 192 kHz
Firewire
400 IEEE 1394a port (6-pin)
Compatible with DV cameras or HDs
MIDI
2 MIDI in, 2 MIDI out
SYNCHRONIZATION
Internal Crystal Sync:
44.1 kHz, 48 kHz, 88.2 kHz, 96 kHz, 176.4 kHz, 192 kHz
ADAT, S/PDIF (optical or coaxial)
Word Clock (sync card only) - (75 ohm termination, switchable)
SRSync SourceRMS jitter in picoseconds
RMS JITTER @ 44.1K
(Measured via Audio Precision 2) 44.1 kHz internal Crystal 596ps
44.1 kHz Optical Input
795ps
SMPTE
Converts to/from longitudinal time code (LTC) to MIDI time
code (MTC)
Frame Rates
24, 25, 30 drop, 30 non-drop frames/second.
Compatible with 29.97 fps timecode
Modes
Regeneration, stripe and conversion modes
Input Level:
0.5 - 4V p-p
Output Level:
+4 dBu, -10 dBV (software selectable)
Input Impedance:
10K ohm
E-MU Digital Audio System
105
7 - Appendix
Technical Specifications
Specifications: 1820 System
GENERAL
Sample Rates
44.1 kHz. 48 kHz, 88.2 kHz, 96 kHz, 176.4 kHz, 192 kHz
from internal crystal. Externally supplied clock from S/PDIF,
ADAT (or word clock with optional Sync Card)
Bit Depth
16 or 24-bits
Hardware DSP
100MIPs custom audio DSP.
PCI Bus-Mastering DMA subsystem reduces CPU usage.
Zero-latency direct hardware monitoring with effects
1394 Firewire Core - Texas Instruments
Converters & OpAmps
ADC - PCM1804 (TI/Burr-Brown)
DAC - CS4392 (Cirrus Logic)
OpAmp - NJM2068M (JRC)
AudioDock Power Use
1.1A @ +12V
13W.
ANALOG LINE INPUTS
Type
Servo-balanced, DC-coupled, low-noise input circuitry
Level (software selectable)
Professional: +4 dBu nominal, 20 dBu maximum (balanced)
Consumer: -10 dBV nominal, 6 dBV maximum (unbalanced)
Frequency Response
+0.0/-0.2 dB, 20 Hz - 20 kHz
THD + N
-102 dB (.0008%) 1kHz at -1 dBFS
SNR
111 dB (A-weighted)
Dynamic Range
111 dB (A-weighted)
Channel Crosstalk
< -115 dB, (1 kHz signal at -1 dBFS)
Common-mode Rejection
> 40 dB at 60Hz
Input Impedance
10K ohm
ANALOG LINE OUTPUTS
Type
Balanced, low-noise, 2-pole low-pass differential filter
Level (software selectable)
Professional: +4dBu nominal, 20dBu (balanced)
Consumer: -10dBV nominal, 6dBV maximum (unbalanced)
Frequency Response
+0.0/-0.8 dB, 20 Hz - 20 kHz
THD + N
-98 dB (.0006%) 1kHz signal at -1dBFS
SNR
112 dB (A-weighted)
Dynamic Range
112 dB (A-weighted)
Stereo Crosstalk
< -120 dB, 1kHz
Output Impedance
560 ohms
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Technical Specifications
Specifications: 1820 System
MIC PREAMP/LINE INPUT
Type
TFPro™ combination microphone preamp and line input
Frequency Response
+0.8/-0.1 dB, 20 Hz - 20kHz
Stereo Crosstalk
< 120 dB, 1kHz
LINE INPUT
Gain Range:
-12 to +28 dB
Max Level:
-17 dbV (19.2 dBu)
THD+N:
-94 dB (.002%), 1 kHz at -1 dBFS
Dynamic Range:
100 dB (A-weighted, min. gain)
SNR:
100 dB (A-weighted, min. gain)
Input Impedance:
10K ohm
CMRR:
> 40 dB (60Hz)
MICROPHONE PREAMP
Gain Range:
-10 to +50 dB
Max Level:
-12 dbV (-9.8 dBu)
THD+N:
-95 dB (.0018%), 1 kHz at -1 dBFS
SNR:
100 dB (A-weighted, min. gain)
Input Impedance:
330 ohm
CMRR:
> 80 dB (60Hz)
HEADPHONES
Frequency Response:
+0.0/-0.35 dB, 20 Hz - 20 kHz
THD+N: (1 kHz, max. level)
33 ohm load: -70 dB (0.032%)
600 ohm load: -85 dB (0.006%)
SNR:
112 dB (A-weighted)
Dynamic Range:
112 dB (A-weighted)
Stereo Crosstalk:
< -100 dB (1kHz at -1 dBFS, 600 ohm load)
Max Output Power:
500 mW
Output Impedance:
22 ohms
Gain Range:
85 dB
E-MU Digital Audio System
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7 - Appendix
Technical Specifications
Specifications: 1820 System
TURNTABLE INPUT
RIAA equalized phono input
Frequency Response:
+/-0.5 dB, 50 Hz - 20 kHz
THD+N:
-76 dB (.015%) (1 kHz, 10 mV RMS unbalanced input)
SNR:
90 dB (1kHz, 10 mV RMS unbalanced input)
Stereo Crosstalk:
< -80 dB (1kHz at -1 dBFS)
Maximum Level:
Professional: 80 mV RMS
Consumer: 20 mV RMS
Input Capacitance:
220 pF
Input Impedance:
47K ohm
DIGITAL I/O
S/PDIF
• 2 in/2 out coaxial (transformer coupled)
• 2 in/3 out optical (software switchable with ADAT)
• AES/EBU or S/PDIF (switchable under software control)
ADAT
• 8 channels, 24-bit @ 44.1/48 kHz
• 4 channels, 24-bit @ 96 kHz
• 2 channels, 24-bit @ 192 kHz
Firewire
400 IEEE 1394a port (6-pin)
Compatible with DV cameras or HDs
MIDI
2 MIDI in, 2 MIDI out
SYNCHRONIZATION
Internal Crystal Sync:
44.1kHz, 48 kHz, 88.2 kHz, 96 kHz, 176.4 kHz, 192 kHz
ADAT, S/PDIF (optical or coaxial)
SRSync SourceRMS jitter in picoseconds
RMS JITTER @ 44.1K
(Measured via Audio Precision 2) 44.1kHz Internal Crystal 596ps
44.1 kHz Optical Input
795ps
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Technical Specifications
Specifications: 1212 System
GENERAL
Sample Rates
44.1 kHz. 48 kHz, 88.2 kHz, 96 kHz, 176.4kHz, 192 kHz from
internal crystal. Externally supplied clock from S/PDIF, ADAT
(or word clock with optional Sync Card)
Bit Depth
16 or 24-bits
Hardware DSP
100MIPs custom audio DSP.
PCI Bus-Mastering DMA subsystem reduces CPU usage.
Zero-latency direct hardware monitoring with effects
1394 Firewire Core - Texas Instruments
Converters & OpAmps
ADC - AK5394 (AKM)
DAC - CS4398 (Cirrus Logic)
OpAmp - NJM2068M (JRC)
WDM Drivers
8 channels — operational at 44.1kHz, 48kHz, 88.2kHz,
96kHz, 176.4kHz & 192kHz
AudioDockM Power Use
1.25A @ +12V
15W.
ANALOG LINE INPUTS
Type
Servo-balanced, DC-coupled, low-noise input circuitry
Level (software selectable)
Professional: +4 dBu nominal, 20 dBu maximum (balanced)
Consumer: -10 dBV nominal, 6 dBV maximum (unbalanced)
Frequency Response
+/- .05dB, 20 Hz - 20 kHz
THD + N
-110 dB (.0003%) 1kHz at -1 dBFS
SNR
120 dB (A-weighted)
Dynamic Range
120 dB (A-weighted)
Channel Crosstalk
< -115 dB, (1 kHz signal at -1 dBFS)
Common-mode Rejection
> 40 dB at 60Hz
Input Impedance
10K ohm
ANALOG LINE OUTPUTS
Type
Balanced, low-noise, 2-pole low-pass differential filter
Level (software selectable)
Professional: +4dBu nominal, 20dBu (balanced)
Consumer: -10dBV nominal, 6dBV maximum (unbalanced)
Frequency Response
+0.0/-0.35 dB, 20 Hz - 20 kHz
THD + N
-105 dB (.0006%) 1kHz signal at -1dBFS
SNR
120 dB (A-weighted)
Dynamic Range
120 dB (A-weighted)
Stereo Crosstalk
< -120 dB, 1kHz
Output Impedance
560 ohms
E-MU Digital Audio System
109
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Technical Specifications
Specifications: 1212 System
DIGITAL I/O
S/PDIF
• 2 in/2 out coaxial (transformer coupled)
• 2 in/3 out optical (software switchable with ADAT)
• AES/EBU or S/PDIF (switchable under software control)
ADAT
• 8 channels, 24-bit @ 44.1/48 kHz
• 4 channels, 24-bit @ 96 kHz
• 2 channels, 24-bit @ 192 kHz
Firewire
400 IEEE 1394a port (6-pin)
Compatible with DV cameras or HDs
MIDI
1 MIDI in, 1 MIDI out (16 channels)
SYNCHRONIZATION
Internal Crystal Sync:
44.1kHz, 48 kHz, 88 kHz, 96 kHz, 176.4 kHz, 192 kHz
ADAT, S/PDIF (optical or coaxial)
Word Clock (sync card only) - (75 ohm termination,
switchable)
SRSync SourceRMS jitter in picoseconds
RMS JITTER @ 44.1K
(Measured via Audio Precision 2) 44.1 kHz Internal Crystal 596ps
44.1 kHz Optical Input
795ps
Dimensions & Weight
AUDIODOCK
Complete Product Weight:
5.65lb / 2.56kg
AudioDock Weight Alone:
2.95lb / 1.34kg
Dimensions:
W: 8.6" H: 1.7" L: 9.6"
W: 218.5mm H: 43.2mm L: 244mm
1010 PCI Card
Weight:
0.30lb / 0.14kg
Dimensions:
L: 6.7" / 170.2mm
0202 Daughter Card
Weight:
0.25lb / 0.10kg
Dimensions:
L: 5.04" / 128mm
110
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7 - Appendix
Internet References
Internet References
The internet contains vast resources for the computer musician. A few useful sites are
listed here, but there are plenty more. Check it out.
Software Updates, Tips & Tutorials................http://www.emu.com
Setting up a PC for Digital Audio ..................http://www.musicxp.net
MIDI Basics.......................................................Search for “MIDI Basics” (many sites)
MIDI & Audio Recording ................................http://www.midiworld.com
MIDI & Audio Recording ................................http://www.synthzone.com
ASIO, Cubase & Digital Audio........................http://www.steinberg.net
Cubase Users Group ........................................http://www.groups.yahoo.com/group/
cubase/messages
Forums
Unofficial E-MU Forum ............................http://www.productionforums.com/emu/
E-MU Newsgroup (Yahoo) .......................http://groups.yahoo.com/group/e-mu_1820/
KVR Forum.................................................http://www.kvr-vst.com/forum/search.php
Driver Heaven Forum ...............................http://www.driverheaven.net/search.php?s
MIDI Addict Forum...................................http://forum.midiaddict.com/search.php
Home Recording Forum...........................http://homerecording.com/bbs/
search.php?s=d866b60193933eb726660e7bd
90dfb27
Sound-On-Sound Forum..........................http://sound-on-sound2.infopop.net/2/
OpenTopic?a=srchf&s=215094572
Studio-Central Cafe Forum......................http://studio-central.com/phpbb/search.php
Sound Card Benchmarking .....................http://audio.rightmark.org
Note concerning the Microsoft GS Wavetable Software
Synth
Use of the Microsoft GS Wavetable Software Synth will allow only 30 of the 32 ASIO
playback channels to work properly. If your PatchMix session uses all 32 ASIO playback
channels, you should disable the Microsoft SW Synth before using Cubase LE.
1. Go to: Start Menu, Programs, Steinberg, Setup MME.
2. Select Microsoft GS Wavetable SW Synth from the MME Outputs.
3. Click the Set Inactive button.
E-MU Digital Audio System
111
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Internet References
Declaration of Conformity
Trade Name:
E-MU Systems
Model No.:
EM8810 & EM8820
EM8810, EM8830 & EM8840
EM8810, EM8830 & EM8841
Responsible Party:
E-MU Systems
Address:
1500 Green Hills Road,
Scotts Valley, CA 95066 U.S.A.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following
two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device
must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired
operation.
CAUTION
You are cautioned that any changes or modifications not expressly approved in this
manual could void your authority to operate this equipment.
Note:
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This
equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference to radio or television
reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is
encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which
the receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
The supplied interface cables must be used with the equipment in order to comply with
the limits for a digital device pursuant to Subpart B of Part 15 of FCC Rules.
112
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7 - Appendix
Internet References
Compliance Information
United States Compliance Information
FCC Part 15 Subpart B Class B using:
CISPR 22 (1997) Class B
ANSI C63.4 (1992) method
FCC Site No.90479
Canada Compliance Information
ICES-0003 Class B using:
CISPR 22 (1997) Class B
ANSI C63.4 (1992) method
Industry of Canada File No.IC 3171-B
European Union Compliance Information
EN55024 (1998)
EN55022 (1998) Class B
EN61000-3-2 (2001)
EN61000-3-3 (1995 w/A1:98)
Australia/New Zealand Compliance Information
AS/NZS 3548(1995 w/A1 & A2:97) Class B
EN55022 (1998) Class B
Japan Compliance Information
VCCI (April 2000) Class B using:
CISPR 22(1997) Class B
VCCI Acceptance Nos. R-1233 & C-1297
Attention for the Customers in Europe
This product has been tested and found compliant with the limits set out in the EMC
Directive for using connection cables shorter than 3 meters (9.8 feet).
Notice
If static electricity or electromagnetism causes data transfer to discontinue midway
(fail), restart the application or disconnect and connect the Firewire cable again.
E-MU Digital Audio System
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Internet References
114
Creative Professional
Index
Numerics
Index
B
Numerics
C
0202 Daughter Card 18
1010 PCI Card 17
1-Band Para EQ 61
1-Band Shelf EQ 61
1-Time Jam Sync, SMPTE 94
3-Band EQ 62
48 Volt Phantom Power 20, 102
4-Band EQ 63
88kHz/96kHz Sample Rate 87
96kHz Sample Rate 87
A
A/D - D/A Converter Type
1212 system 109
1820 system 106
1820M system 103
ADAT Optical
at 96kHz & 192kHz 87
connection example 100
input/output connector 17
AES/EBU to S/PDIF Adapter 101
Analog I/O
0202 Daughter Card 18
AudioDock 22
Appearance, improving 102
ASIO
direct monitor 39
send 36
Attack, compressor 66
AudioDock
front panel indicators 21
inputs/outputs 19
installing power connector 13
rack mounting 14
Automating PowerFX 80
Auto-Wah 64
Aux Bus 44
Auxiliary Effects Assignment 50
Auxiliary Returns 50
Auxiliary Sends 44
used as extra mix busses 50
E-MU Digital Audio System
Background program, disabling 27
Balance Control, monitor 51
Balanced Cables 22, 101
Block Diagram, mixer 26
Bypass
effect insert 57
send/return insert 48
Category
create new preset 55
delete effects 55
rename effects 55
CDs, playing 34
Chorus 65
using freq. shifter 69
Clicks & Pops, in the audio 17, 98
Clipping Indicators 20
Clock, external 24, 30
Comb Filter 68
Compressor 65
Connecting, AudioDock 13
Connectors, interface 10
Core Effects
descriptions 61
listing 60
Core FX Presets, importing/exporting 56
D
Damping, high frequency 71, 76
Decay Time, lite reverb 71
Decay Time, reverb 76
Delete
folder 55
FX user preset 59
mixer strip 35
Diffusion 76
Digital Cables 102
Digital Interface, S/PDIF 17
Direct Sound Source 34
Distortion 67
Doppler, effect using Rotary 73
Drivers, installing 15
Drop-frame, SMPTE 95
DVD, playing in 5.1/7.1 surround 35
Dynamic Range 103, 106, 109
E
Echo, creating 72
E-Delay Compensator 84
Edge, distortion 67
EDI Connector 17, 23
115
Index
F
Effects
1-band para EQ 61
1-band shelf EQ 61
3-band EQ 62
4-band EQ 63
auto wah 64
chorus 65
compressor 65
create new folder 55
creating robot voice 72
descriptions 61
display screen 48
distortion 67
edit 54
flanger 68
frequency shifter 69
leveling amp 70
lite reverb 71
mono delays 72
overview 53
palette 53
phase shifter 73
placing into an insert location 36
preset
create new 58
delete 59
overwrite 59
rename 59
rotary 73
selecting 54
stereo delays 75
stereo reverb 76
using in VST host application 78
vocal morpher 77
E-MU 0202 Daughter Card
description 18
installing 12
E-MU 1010 PCI Card
description 17
installing 11
E-MU Icon 27
Envelope, reverberation 71, 76
E-Wire 83
Exit PatchMix DSP Services 27
Exporting Core FX & FX Insert Chains 56
External Clock 24, 30, 98, 100
External Mode, SMPTE 94
External Sync Source 30
Extra Buffers 79
F
Factory Templates 29
Firewire Connector 18
Flanger 68
Flywheel Mode, SMPTE 94
116
Frame Rates, SMPTE 95
Frequency Shifter 69
Front Panel Connections, Audio Dock 20
Full-Frame Messages 98
FX Edit Screen 57
FX Insert Chains 54
FX Insert Chains, importing/exporting 56
G
Gain, compressor 66
Ground Loop, preventing 102
Ground Lug, turntable 22
Grounding 102
GS Wavetable Software Synth 111
H
Headphone
level & specifications 107
output 20
Headphones, using with the 0202 18
Help System 27
High Frequency Damping, stereo reverb 76
High Frequency Decay Factor, lite reverb 71
High Frequency Rolloff
mono delays 72
stereo delays 75
Host Input Display 49
Host Mode, SMPTE 94
Host Output Display 49
Hum, in the audio 102
I
IEEE 1394 18
Importing Core FX & FX Insert Chains 56
Input
display 49
level
line 22
setting 40
specs 103, 106, 109
reduction at high sample rates 87, 88, 89
type
mixer strip 33
red color 33
Insert
add effect 36
add send 37
add send/return 37, 38, 39
bypass 43, 57
delete 43
menu 37
meter 40
mixer strip 36
solo 43, 57
Creative Professional
Index
J
types 36
Installing
disk drive power cable 13
E-MU 0202 daughter card 12
E-MU 1010 PCI card 11
rubber feet 14
sync cables 24
sync daughter card 12
Interface
ADAT 17
EDI 23
MIDI 18, 20, 23, 24
required cable 10, 23
S/PDIF 17, 20
SMPTE 24, 93
word clock 98
Invert, polarity 42
J
Jitter Spec
1212 system 110
1820 system 108
1820M system 105
L
Label, scribble strip 46
Latency, monitoring without 39
LED
clock source 21
green 20
MIDI activity 21
red 20
sample rate indicator 21
Level Fader 46
Leveling Amp 70
Levels, setting input 40
LFO
flanger 68
phase shifter 73
vocal morpher 77
Limiter 66
Line Level
input/output
audiodock 22
I/O daughter card 18
Lite Reverb 71
Loss of Sync 21
Low Frequency Damping 76
Low Frequency Decay Factor, lite reverb 71
M
output fader 51
section 47
Master
return level 47
send level 47
volume control 51
Meter
insert 40
main output 51
setting input levels using 40
Microphone Preamps 20
MIDI
I/O jacks
0202 Daughter Card 18
AudioDock 20, 23
input indicator 21
jacks 20, 23
settings 30
time code 98
Mini-Phone Outputs 23
Mixer
block diagram 26
overview 25
strip 33
aux send 44
fader 46
insert 36
label 46
mute button 46
new 34
solo button 46
type 34
viewing 25
Mixer Strip
add new 34
delete 35
type 34
Monitor
balance control 51
mix 47
mute 47
output 22
level control 51
mute 51
Mono Delays 72
MTC 98
enabling 30, 98
to SMPTE Conversion 93
Multichannel WAVE Files 35
Mute
mixer strip 46
monitor 47
Main
bus 47
inserts 51
E-MU Digital Audio System
117
Index
N
select user 58
N
New
mixer strip 34
session 27, 28
Notes, Tips & Warnings 8
O
OpAmp Type
1212 system 109
1820 system 106
1820M system 103
Optical Cables 102
Output
fader, main 51
level
line 22
meters 51
monitor 51
SMPTE 94
reduction at high sample rates 89
routing display 49
section 51
P
Palette, effects 53
Pan 46
Pan Controls 33
Parametric EQ, setting up 62
PatchMix DSP, disabling 27
Peak Meters 40
Phantom Power 20
description 102
Phase Invert 42
Phase Shifter 73
Phattening, using chorus 65
Phoneme 77
Physical Input Display 49
Physical Output Display 49
Physical Source 34
Playing CDs 34
Post Gain, leveling amp 70
PowerFX 78
automating 80
resource availability 80
Preamp
microphone 20
turntable 22
Pre-Delay, compressor 66
Pre-Fader Aux Sends 47
Preset
create new 58
delete 59
overwrite effects 59
rename effects 59
118
Q
Quarter-Frame Messages 98
R
Rack Mounting, Audio Dock 14
Ratio, compressor 66
Red Strip 33
Reducing Noise 102
Release, compressor 66
Render Mode 79
Reverb, envelope 71, 76
Reverberation 76
RJ45 Connector 13
Robot Voice Effects, creating 75
Rotary, effect 73
Rubber Feet, installing on Audio Dock 14
S
S/MUX 87
S/PDIF
cables 102
inputs and outputs 17
optical 20
S/PDIF to AES/EBU Adapter 101
Sample Rate
96kHz & 192kHz 87
indicator LEDs 21
setting 28
Save
FX Insert Chains 54
session 29
user effect preset 58
Scribble Strip 46
Send
/return insert 37, 38, 39
bypass or solo 48
auxiliary 44
insert 37
Send/Return Levels 47
Session 28
creating new 28
path 29
templates 29
Setting Up the E-MU Digital Audio System 9
Settings
I/O 31
input level 20
MIDI 30
system 29
Sidechain Effects 50
routing 44
Signal generator, insert 42
Creative Professional
Index
T
Signal Level Indicators
LEDs 20
meters 51
Signal Level, increasing 18, 22
SMPTE 93
background 95
example connection 97
Software Installation 15
Solo
button 46
insert 57, 58
send/return insert 48
Specifications
1820 System 106, 109
1820M & 1212 Systems 103
Start Time, SMPTE 94
Stereo Delays 75
Stereo Reverb 76
Strip
add new 34
input type 33
mixer 33
Striping SMPTE 95, 96
Surround Sound
channel chart 35
playback 35
Sync Daughter Card, description 24
Sync/Sample Rate Indicators 50
Synchronization
ADAT example 100
source 30
System Settings 29
U
Unbalanced Cables 102
User Preset, effect 58
V
Vocal Morpher 77
Volume Control 33
W
Wah-Wah 64
WDM Recording & Playback Behavior 91
Wet/Dry Mix, effects 57
Windows Media Player 34
Windows Media Player, multichannel 35
Windows Taskbar, E-MU icon 27
Word Clock In/Out 24, 98
X
XLR Connector 20
Z
Zero-Latency Monitoring 39
T
T-Connector, word clock 99
Templates, session 29
Termination, word clock 99
Threshold, compressor 66
Time Code
MIDI 98
SMPTE background 95
SMPTE conversion 93
Toggle Tooltips 79
Toolbar, overview 27
TRS Plugs & Jacks 101
Turntable Inputs 22
Tutorial
Getting in Sync 100
Making the Best Possible Recording 41
Setting up & using E-Wire 84
Setting up & using PowerFX 79
Using External Sends & Returns 38
TV Screen 47, 48
E-MU Digital Audio System
119
Index
Z
Notes
120
Creative Professional
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