Cypress CY7C63310 Network Card User Manual

CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
enCoRe™ II
Low Speed USB Peripheral Controller
1. Features
■
USB 2.0-USB-IF certified (TID # 40000085)
■
enCoRe™ II USB - “enhanced Component Reduction”
❐
■
■
■
■
■
■
❐
Two internal 3.3V regulators and an internal USB pull up
resistor
❐
Configurable IO for real world interface without external components
USB Specification compliance
■
125 mA 3.3V voltage regulator powers external 3.3V devices
■
3.3V IO pins
■
❐
4 IO pins with 3.3V logic levels
❐
Each 3.3V pin supports high impedance input, internal pull
up, open drain output or traditional CMOS output
SPI serial communication
❐
Master or slave operation
❐
Configurable up to 4 Mbit/second transfers in the master
mode
❐
Supports half duplex single data line mode for optical sensors
❐
Conforms to USB Specification, Version 2.0
2-channel 8-bit or 1-channel 16-bit capture timer registers.
Capture timer registers store both rising and falling edge times.
❐
Conforms to USB HID Specification, Version 1.1
❐
❐
Supports one low speed USB device address
❐
Supports one control endpoint and two data endpoints
❐
Integrated USB transceiver with dedicated 3.3V regulator for
USB signalling and D– pull up.
■
Enhanced 8-bit microcontroller
❐
Harvard architecture
❐
M8C CPU speed is up to 24 MHz or sourced by an external
clock signal
Internal memory
❐
Up to 256 bytes of RAM
❐
Up to eight Kbytes of Flash including EEROM emulation
Interface can auto configure to operate as PS/2 or USB
❐
No external components for switching between PS/2 and
USB modes
❐
No General Purpose IO (GPIO) pins required to manage dual
mode capability
Low power consumption
Two registers each for two input pins
❐ Separate registers for rising and falling edge capture
❐ Simplifies the interface to RF inputs for wireless applications
■
Internal low power wakeup timer during suspend mode:
❐
Periodic wakeup with no external components
■
12-bit Programmable Interval Timer with interrupts
■
Advanced development tools based on Cypress PSoC® tools
■
Watchdog timer (WDT)
■
Low voltage detection with user configurable threshold
voltages
■
Operating voltage from 4.0V to 5.5V DC
■
Operating temperature from 0–70°C
■
Available in 16 and 18-pin PDIP; 16, 18, and 24-pin SOIC;
24-pin QSOP, and 32-pin QFN packages
■
Industry standard programmer support
1.1 Applications
❐
Typically 10 mA at 6 MHz
The CY7C63310/CY7C638xx is targeted for the following
applications:
❐
10 μA sleep
■
PC HID devices
❐ Mice (optomechanical, optical, trackball)
■
Gaming
In system reprogrammability:
❐
■
Crystalless oscillator with support for an external clock. The
internal oscillator eliminates the need for an external crystal
or resonator.
■
Allows easy firmware update
GPIO ports
❐
Up to 20 GPIO pins
❐
2 mA source current on all GPIO pins. Configurable 8 or
50 mA/pin current sink on designated pins.
❐
Each GPIO port supports high impedance inputs, configurable pull up, open drain output, CMOS/TTL inputs, and
CMOS output
❐
Maskable interrupts on all IO pins
■
A dedicated 3.3V regulator for the USB PHY. Aids in signalling
and D– line pull up
Cypress Semiconductor Corporation
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
•
198 Champion Court
❐
Joysticks
❐
Game pad
General purpose
Barcode scanners
POS terminal
❐ Consumer electronics
❐ Toys
❐ Remote controls
❐ Security dongles
❐
❐
•
San Jose, CA 95134-1709
•
408-943-2600
Revised December 08 2008
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
2. Logic Block Diagram
3.3V
Regulator
Low-Speed
USB/PS2
Transceiver
and Pull up
Low-Speed
USB SIE
Interrupt
Control
4 3VIO/SPI
Pins
Up to 14
Extended
IO Pins
Up to 6
GPIO
pins
Wakeup
Timer
Internal
24 MHz
Oscillator
M8C CPU
Clock
Control
RAM
Up to 256
Byte
Flash
Up to 8K
Byte
12-bit Timer
16-bit Free
running
timer
External Clock
Watchdog
Timer
Vdd
POR /
Low-Voltage
Detect
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 2 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
3. Introduction
Cypress has reinvented its leadership position in the low speed
USB market with a new family of innovative microcontrollers.
Introducing enCoRe II USB - “enhanced Component Reduction.”
Cypress has leveraged its design expertise in USB solutions to
advance its family of low speed USB microcontrollers, which
enable peripheral developers to design new products with a
minimum number of components. The enCoRe II USB
technology builds on the enCoRe family. The enCoRe family has
an integrated oscillator that eliminates the external crystal or
resonator, reducing overall cost. Also integrated into this chip are
other external components commonly found in low speed USB
applications, such as pull up resistors, wakeup circuitry, and a
3.3V regulator. Integrating these components reduces the
overall system cost.
The enCoRe II is an 8-bit Flash programmable microcontroller
with an integrated low speed USB interface. The instruction set
is optimized specifically for USB and PS/2 operations, although
the microcontrollers may be used for a variety of other embedded
applications.
The enCoRe II features up to 20 GPIO pins to support USB,
PS/2, and other applications. The IO pins are grouped into four
ports (Port 0 to 3). The pins on Port 0 and Port 1 may each be
configured individually while the pins on Ports 2 and 3 are
configured only as a group. Each GPIO port supports high
impedance inputs, configurable pull up, open drain output,
CMOS/TTL inputs, and CMOS output with up to five pins that
support a programmable drive strength of up to 50 mA sink
current. GPIO Port 1 features four pins that interface at a voltage
level of 3.3V. Additionally, each IO pin may be used to generate
a GPIO interrupt to the microcontroller. Each GPIO port has its
own GPIO interrupt vector; in addition, GPIO Port 0 has three
dedicated pins that have independent interrupt vectors (P0.2 P0.4).
The enCoRe II features an internal oscillator. With the presence
of USB traffic, the internal oscillator may be set to precisely tune
to USB timing requirements (24 MHz ±1.5%). Optionally, an
external 12 MHz or 24 MHz clock is used to provide a higher
precision reference for USB operation. The clock generator
provides the 12 MHz and 24 MHz clocks that remain internal to
the microcontroller. The enCoRe II also has a 12-bit programmable interval timer and a 16-bit Free Running Timer with
Capture Timer registers. In addition, the enCoRe II includes a
Watchdog timer and a vectored interrupt controller.
The enCoRe II has up to eight Kbytes of Flash for user code and
up to 256 bytes of RAM for stack space and user variables.
The power on reset circuit detects logic when power is applied
to the device, resets the logic to a known state, and begins
executing instructions at Flash address 0x0000. When power
falls below a programmable trip voltage, it generates a reset or
may be configured to generate an interrupt. There is a low
voltage detect circuit that detects when VCC drops below a
programmable trip voltage. It is configurable to generate an LVD
interrupt to inform the processor about the low voltage event.
POR and LVD share the same interrupt. There is no separate
interrupt for each. The Watchdog timer may be used to ensure
the firmware never gets stalled in an infinite loop.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
The microcontroller supports 22 maskable interrupts in the
vectored interrupt controller. Interrupt sources include a USB bus
reset, LVR/POR, a programmable interval timer, a 1.024 ms
output from the free-running timer, three USB endpoints, two
capture timers, four GPIO Ports, three Port 0 pins, two SPI, a
16-bit free running timer wrap, an internal sleep timer, and a bus
active interrupt. The sleep timer causes periodic interrupts when
enabled. The USB endpoints interrupt after a USB transaction
complete is on the bus. The capture timers interrupt when a new
timer value is saved because of a selected GPIO edge event. A
total of seven GPIO interrupts support both TTL or CMOS
thresholds. For additional flexibility on the edge sensitive GPIO
pins, the interrupt polarity is programmed as rising or falling.
The free-running 16-bit timer provides two interrupt sources: the
1.024 ms outputs and the free running counter wrap interrupt.
The programmable interval timer provides up to 1 μsec
resolution and provides an interrupt every time it expires. These
timers are used to measure the duration of an event under
firmware control by reading the desired timer at the start and at
the end of an event, then calculating the difference between the
two values. The two 8-bit capture timer registers save a
programmable 8-bit range of the free-running timer when a GPIO
edge occurs on the two capture pins (P0.5, P0.6). The two 8-bit
captures may be ganged into a single 16-bit capture.
The enCoRe II includes an integrated USB serial interface
engine (SIE) that allows the chip to easily interface to a USB
host. The hardware supports one USB device address with three
endpoints.
The USB D+ and D– pins are optionally used as PS/2 SCLK and
SDATA signals so that products are designed to respond to
either USB or PS/2 modes of operation. The PS/2 operation is
supported with internal 5 KΩ pull up resistors on P1.0 (D+) and
P1.1 (D–), and an interrupt to signal the start of PS/2 activity. In
USB mode, the integrated 1.5 KΩ pull up resistor on D– may be
controlled under firmware. No external components are
necessary for dual USB and PS/2 systems, and no GPIO pins
need to be dedicated to switching between modes.
The enCoRe II supports in system programming by using the D+
and D– pins as the serial programming mode interface. The
programming protocol is not USB.
4. Conventions
In this data sheet, bit positions in the registers are shaded to
indicate which members of the enCoRe II family implement the
bits.
Available in all enCoRe II family members
CY7C638(1/2/3)3 only
Page 3 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
5. Pinouts
Figure 5-1. Pin Diagrams
Top View
CY7C63801, CY7C63310
16-Pin PDIP
P1.2
VCC
P1.1/D–
P1.0/D+
VSS
P0.0
P0.1
P0.2/INT0
TIO1/P0.6
TIO0/P0.5
INT2/P0.4
INT1/P0.3
INT0/P0.2
P0.1
P0.0
VSS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
CY7C63813
18-Pin PDIP
P1.2/VREG
VCC
P1.1/D–
P1.0/D+
VSS
P0.0
P0.1
P0.2/INT0
P0.3/INT1
P0.7
TIO1/P0.6
TIO0/P0.5
INT2/P0.4
INT1/P0.3
INT0/P0.2
P0.1
P0.0
VSS
CY7C63823
24-Pin QSOP
P1.7
P1.6/SMISO
P1.5/SMOSI
P1.4/SCLK
P3.1
P3.0
P1.3/SSEL
P1.2/VREG
VCC
P1.1/D–
P1.0/D+
VSS
23
P1.4/SCLK
P0.4/INT2
3
22
P3.1
P0.3/INT1
4
21
P3.0
P0.2/INT0
5
20
P1.3/SSEL
P0.1
6
19
P0.0
7
18
P2.1
8
17
Vdd
P1.1/D-
P1.0/D+
Vss
NC
NC
P1.2/VREG
NC
P1.6/MISO
P1.7
NC
NC
24
P1.5/SMOSI
P0.5/TIO0
2
23
P1.4/SCLK
P3.1
P0.4/INT2
3
22
P0.3/INT1
4
21
P3.0
P0.2/INT0
5
20
P1.3/SSEL
P0.1
6
19
P0.0
7
18
P2.1
8
17
NC
P1.2/VREG
NC
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
Vdd
2
1
P1.1/D-
P0.5/TIO0
NC
NC
P1.7
P1.6/SMISO
P1.5/SMOSI
P1.4/SCLK
P3.1
P3.0
P1.3/SSEL
P1.2/VREG
VCC
P1.1/D–
P1.0/D+
P0.6/TIO1
P1.0/D+
P1.5/SMOSI
NC
NC
P0.7
P1.6/MISO
P1.7
NC
24
P2.0
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25
32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25
1
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
CY7C63833 32-Pin Sawn QFN
32-Pin QFN
P0.6/TIO1
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
NC
P0.7
TIO1/P0.6
TIO0/P0.5
INT2/P0.4
INT1/P0.3
INT0/P0.2
P0.1
P0.0
P2.1
P2.0
VSS
Vss
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
NC
NC
NC
P0.7
CY7C63833
CY7C63823
24-Pin SOIC
NC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
NC
NC
P0.7
TIO1/P0.6
TIO0/P0.5
INT2/P0.4
INT1/P0.3
INT0/P0.2
P0.1
P0.0
P2.1
P2.0
NC
P1.6/SMISO
P1.5/SMOSI
P1.4/SCLK
P1.3/SSEL
P1.2/VREG
VCC
P1.1/D–
P1.0/D+
P1.7
P1.6/SMISO
P1.5/SMOSI
P1.4/SCLK
P1.3/SSEL
P1.2/VREG
VCC
P1.1/D–
P1.0/D+
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
NC
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
CY7C63813
18-Pin SOIC
NC
SSEL/P1.3
SCLK/P1.4
SMOSI/P1.5
SMISO/P1.6
P1.7
P0.7
TIO1/P0.6
TIO0/P0.5
INT2/P0.4
TIO1/P0.6
TIO0/P0.5
INT2/P0.4
INT1/P0.3
INT0/P0.2
P0.1
P0.0
VSS
P1.6/SMISO
P1.5/SMOSI
P1.4/SCLK
P1.3/SSEL
P1.2
VCC
P1.1/D–
P1.0/D+
NC
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
NC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
P2.0
SSEL/P1.3
SCLK/P1.4
SMOSI/P1.5
SMISO/P1.6
TIO1/P0.6
TIO0/P0.5
INT2/P0.4
INT1/P0.3
CY7C63803
16-Pin SOIC
CY7C63801, CY7C63310
16-Pin SOIC
Page 4 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
Figure 5-2. CY7C63823 Die Form
23
1
22
Cypress Logo
21
2
20
3
19
4
18
17
Y
16
15
X
14
5
6
7
13
8
9
12
10
11
Legend
Die step = 1792.98 μm x 2272.998 μm
Die size = 1727 μm x 2187 μm
Bond pad opening = 70 μm x 70 μm
Die thickness = 14 mils
Table 5-1. Die Pad Summary
X (microns)
Y (microns)
1
Pad Number
P0.7
Pad Name
-742.730
911.990
2
P0.6
-755.060
792.200
3
P0.5
-755.060
699.300
4
P0.4
-755.060
606.400
5
P0.3
-755.060
-430.080
6
P0.2
-755.060
-522.980
7
P0.1
-755.060
-618.830
8
P0.0 CLKIN
-755.060
-714.020
9
P2.1
-755.060
-810.220
10
P2.0
-393.580
-977.930
11
VSS
537.500
-964.700
12
PI.0 D+
736.110
-936.680
13
P1.1 D–
736.110
-625.130
14
VDD
736.110
-260.670
15
P1.2 VREG
736.110
53.800
16
P1.3
723.510
336.780
17
P3.0
723.510
438.690
18
P3.1
723.510
532.880
19
P1.4
723.510
635.310
20
P1.5 SMOSI
723.510
728.220
21
P1.6 SMISO
723.510
839.290
22
P1.7
696.630
1008.480
23
Reserved
-795.400
1023.270
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 5 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
Table 5-2. Pin Description
32
QFN
24
QSOP
24
SOIC
21
19
18
P3.0
22
20
19
P3.1
9
11
11
P2.0
8
10
10
P2.1
14
14
13
10
15
9
13
P1.0/D+
GPIO Port 1 bit 0/USB D+ [1] If this pin is used as a
General Purpose output, it draws current. This pin
must be configured as an input to reduce current
draw.
15
15
14
11
16
10
14
P1.1/D–
GPIO Port 1 bit 1/USB D– [1] If this pin is used as a
General Purpose output, it draws current. This pin
must be configured as an input to reduce current
draw.
18
17
16
13
18
12
16
P1.2/VREG GPIO Port 1 bit 2. Configured individually.
3.3V if regulator is enabled. (The 3.3V regulator is not
available in the CY7C63310 and CY7C63801.) A 1-μF
min, 2-μF max capacitor is required on Vreg output.
20
18
17
14
1
13
1
P1.3/SSEL GPIO Port 1 bit 3. Configured individually.
Alternate function is SSEL signal of the SPI bus TTL
voltage thresholds. Although Vreg is not available
with the CY7C63310, 3.3V IO is still available.
23
21
20
15
2
14
2
P1.4/SCLK GPIO Port 1 bit 4. Configured individually.
Alternate function is SCLK signal of the SPI bus TTL
voltage thresholds. Although Vreg is not available
with the CY7C63310, 3.3V IO is still available.
24
22
21
16
3
15
3
P1.5/SMOSI GPIO Port 1 bit 5. Configured individually.
Alternate function is SMOSI signal of the SPI bus TTL
voltage thresholds. Although Vreg is not available
with the CY7C63310, 3.3V IO is still available.
25
23
22
17
4
16
4
P1.6/SMISO GPIO Port 1 bit 6. Configured individually.
Alternate function is SMISO signal of the SPI bus TTL
voltage thresholds. Although Vreg is not available
with the CY7C63310, 3.3V IO is still available.
26
24
23
18
5
7
9
9
8
13
7
6
8
8
7
12
5
7
7
6
4
6
6
3
5
5
18
SIOC
18
PDIP
16
SOIC
16
PDIP
Name
Description
GPIO Port 3. Configured as a group (byte).
GPIO Port 2. Configured as a group (byte).
P1.7
GPIO Port 1 bit 7. Configured individually.
TTL voltage threshold.
11
P0.0
GPIO Port 0 bit 0. Configured individually.
On CY7C638xx and CY7C63310, external clock
input when configured as Clock In.
6
10
P0.1
GPIO Port 0 bit 1. Configured individually.
On CY7C638xx and CY7C63310, clock output when
configured as Clock Out.
11
5
9
P0.2/INT0 GPIO Port 0 bit 2. Configured individually.
Optional rising edge interrupt INT0.
5
10
4
8
P0.3/INT1 GPIO Port 0 bit 3. Configured individually.
Optional rising edge interrupt INT1.
4
9
3
7
P0.4/INT2 GPIO Port 0 bit 4. Configured individually.
Optional rising edge interrupt INT2.
Note
1. P1.0(D+) and P1.1(D–) pins must be in IO mode when used as GPIO and in Isb mode.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 6 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
Table 5-2. Pin Description (continued)
32
QFN
24
QSOP
24
SOIC
18
SIOC
18
PDIP
16
SOIC
16
PDIP
2
4
4
3
8
2
6
P0.5/TIO0 GPIO Port 0 bit 5. Configured individually
Alternate function Timer capture inputs or Timer
output TIO0
1
3
3
2
7
1
5
P0.6/TIO1 GPIO Port 0 bit 6. Configured individually
Alternate function Timer capture inputs or Timer
output TIO1
32
2
2
1
6
Name
P0.7
Description
GPIO Port 0 bit 7. Configured individually
Not present in the 16 pin PDIP or SOIC package
10
1
1
NC
No connect
11
12
24
NC
No connect
12
NC
No connect
17
NC
No connect
19
NC
No connect
27
NC
No connect
28
NC
No connect
29
NC
No connect
30
NC
No connect
31
NC
No connect
16
16
15
12
17
11
15
Vcc
Supply
13
13
12
9
14
8
12
VSS
Ground
6. CPU Architecture
This family of microcontrollers is based on a high performance,
8-bit, Harvard architecture microprocessor. Five registers control
the primary operation of the CPU core. These registers are
affected by various instructions, but are not directly accessible
through the register space by the user.
Table 6-1. CPU Registers and Register Names
CPU Register
Flags
Register Name
CPU_F
Program Counter
CPU_PC
Accumulator
CPU_A
Stack Pointer
CPU_SP
Index
CPU_X
The Stack Pointer Register (CPU_SP) holds the address of the
current top of the stack in the data memory space. It is affected
by the PUSH, POP, LCALL, CALL, RETI, and RET instructions,
which manage the software stack. It is also affected by the SWAP
and ADD instructions.
The Flag Register (CPU_F) has three status bits: Zero Flag bit
[1]; Carry Flag bit [2]; Supervisory State bit [3]. The Global
Interrupt Enable bit [0] globally enables or disables interrupts.
The user cannot manipulate the Supervisory State status bit [3].
The flags are affected by arithmetic, logic, and shift operations.
The manner in which each flag is changed is dependent upon
the instruction being executed, such as AND, OR, XOR, and
others. See Table 8-1 on page 12.
The 16-bit Program Counter Register (CPU_PC) allows direct
addressing of the full 8 Kbytes of program memory space.
The Accumulator Register (CPU_A) is the general purpose
register, which holds the results of instructions that specify any
of the source addressing modes.
The Index Register (CPU_X) holds an offset value that is used
in the indexed addressing modes. Typically, this is used to
address a block of data within the data memory space.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 7 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
7. CPU Registers
The CPU registers in enCoRe II devices are in two banks with 256 registers in each bank. Bit[4]/XIO bit in the CPU Flags register
must be set/cleared to select between the two register banks Table 7-1 on page 8
7.1 Flags Register
The Flags Register is set or reset only with logical instruction.
Table 7-1. CPU Flags Register (CPU_F) [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
Reserved
Field
4
3
2
1
0
XIO
Super
Carry
Zero
Global IE
Read/Write
–
–
–
R/W
R
RW
RW
RW
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
Bit [7:5]: Reserved
Bit 4: XIO
Set by the user to select between the register banks
0 = Bank 0
1 = Bank 1
Bit 3: Super
Indicates whether the CPU is executing user code or Supervisor Code. (This code cannot be accessed directly by the user.)
0 = User Code
1 = Supervisor Code
Bit 2: Carry
Set by the CPU to indicate whether there has been a carry in the previous logical/arithmetic operation.
0 = No Carry
1 = Carry
Bit 1: Zero
Set by the CPU to indicate whether there has been a zero result in the previous logical/arithmetic operation.
0 = Not Equal to Zero
1 = Equal to Zero
Bit 0: Global IE
Determines whether all interrupts are enabled or disabled
0 = Disabled
1 = Enabled
Note CPU_F register is only readable with the explicit register address 0xF7. The OR F, expr and AND F, expr instructions must
be used to set and clear the CPU_F bits.
Table 7-2. CPU Accumulator Register (CPU_A)
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
CPU Accumulator [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:0]: CPU Accumulator [7:0]
8-bit data value holds the result of any logical/arithmetic instruction that uses a source addressing mode
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Table 7-3. CPU X Register (CPU_X)
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
X [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
0
Bit [7:0]: X [7:0]
8-bit data value holds an index for any instruction that uses an indexed addressing mode.
Table 7-4. CPU Stack Pointer Register (CPU_SP)
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
Stack Pointer [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
Bit [7:0]: Stack Pointer [7:0]
8-bit data value holds a pointer to the current top of the stack.
Table 7-5. CPU Program Counter High Register (CPU_PCH)
Bit #
7
6
5
4
Program Counter [15:8]
Field
Read/Write
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
Bit [7:0]: Program Counter [15:8]
8-bit data value holds the higher byte of the program counter.
Table 7-6. CPU Program Counter Low Register (CPU_PCL)
Bit #
7
6
5
4
Program Counter [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:0]: Program Counter [7:0]
8-bit data value holds the lower byte of the program counter.
7.2 Addressing Modes
Table 7-7. Source Immediate
Opcode
7.2.1 Source Immediate
The result of an instruction using this addressing mode is placed
in the A register, the F register, the SP register, or the X register,
which is specified as part of the instruction opcode. Operand 1
is an immediate value that serves as a source for the instruction.
Arithmetic instructions require two sources; the second source is
the A or the X register specified in the opcode. Instructions using
this addressing mode are two bytes in length.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Instruction
Operand 1
Immediate Value
Examples
ADD
A
7
The immediate value of 7 is added with the
Accumulator and the result is placed in the
Accumulator.
MOV
X
8
The immediate value of 8 is moved to the X
register.
AND
F
9
The immediate value of 9 is logically ANDed with
the F register and the result is placed in the F
register.
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7.2.2 Source Direct
7.2.4 Destination Direct
The result of an instruction using this addressing mode is placed
in either the A register or the X register, which is specified as part
of the instruction opcode. Operand 1 is an address that points to
a location in the RAM memory space or the register space that
is the source of the instruction. Arithmetic instructions require
two sources; the second source is the A register or X register
specified in the opcode. Instructions using this addressing mode
are two bytes in length.
The result of an instruction using this addressing mode is placed
within the RAM memory space or the register space. Operand 1
is an address that points to the location of the result. The source
for the instruction is either the A register or the X register, which
is specified as part of the instruction opcode. Arithmetic instructions require two sources; the second source is the location
specified by Operand 1. Instructions using this addressing mode
are two bytes in length.
Table 7-8. Source Direct
Table 7-10. Destination Direct
Opcode
Instruction
Opcode
Operand 1
Source Address
Operand 1
Instruction
Destination Address
Examples
Examples
ADD
A
[7]
The value in the RAM memory location at
address 7 is added with the Accumulator,
and the result is placed in the Accumulator.
MOV
X
REG[8]
The value in the register space at address
8 is moved to the X register.
ADD
[7]
A
The value in the memory location at
address 7 is added with the Accumulator, and the result is placed in the
memory location at address 7. The
Accumulator is unchanged.
MOV
REG[8]
A
The Accumulator is moved to the
register space location at address 8.
The Accumulator is unchanged.
7.2.3 Source Indexed
The result of an instruction using this addressing mode is placed
in either the A register or the X register, which is specified as part
of the instruction opcode. Operand 1 is added to the X register
forming an address that points to a location in the RAM memory
space or the register space that is the source of the instruction.
Arithmetic instructions require two sources; the second source is
the A register or X register specified in the opcode. Instructions
using this addressing mode are two bytes in length.
Table 7-9. Source Indexed
Opcode
Instruction
Operand 1
MOV
A
X
The result of an instruction using this addressing mode is placed
within the RAM memory space or the register space. Operand 1
is added to the X register forming the address that points to the
location of the result. The source for the instruction is the A
register. Arithmetic instructions require two sources; the second
source is the location specified by Operand 1 added with the X
register. Instructions using this addressing mode are two bytes
in length.
Table 7-11. Destination Indexed
Source Index
Opcode
Operand 1
Instruction
Examples
ADD
7.2.5 Destination Indexed
[X+7]
REG[X+8]
The value in the memory location at
address X + 7 is added with the
Accumulator, and the result is placed
in the Accumulator.
The value in the register space at
address X + 8 is moved to the X
register.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Destination Index
Example
ADD
[X+7]
A
The value in the; memory location at
address X+7 is added with the Accumulator, and the result is placed in the
memory location at address x+7. The
Accumulator is unchanged.
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
.
7.2.6 Destination Direct Source Immediate
The result of an instruction using this addressing mode is placed
within the RAM memory space or the register space. Operand 1
is the address of the result. The source of the instruction is
Operand 2, which is an immediate value. Arithmetic instructions
require two sources; the second source is the location specified
by Operand 1. Instructions using this addressing mode are three
bytes in length.
Table 7-14. Destination Direct Source Direct
Opcode
Operand 1
Instruction
Destination Address
MOV
Opcode
Operand 1
Destination Address
Operand 2
Immediate Value
Examples
ADD [7]
5
The value in the memory location at address
7 is added to the immediate value of 5, and
the result is placed in the memory location at
address 7.
MOV REG[8]
6
The immediate value of 6 is moved into the
register space location at address 8.
Source Address
Example
[7]
[8]
The value in the memory location at address 8
is moved to the memory location at address 7.
Table 7-12. Destination Direct Source Immediate
Instruction
Operand 2
7.2.9 Source Indirect Post Increment
The result of an instruction using this addressing mode is placed
in the Accumulator. Operand 1 is an address pointing to a
location within the memory space, which contains an address
(the indirect address) for the source of the instruction. The
indirect address is incremented as part of the instruction
execution. This addressing mode is only valid on the MVI
instruction. The instruction using this addressing mode is two
bytes in length. Refer to the PSoC Designer: Assembly
Language User Guide for further details on MVI instruction.
Table 7-15. Source Indirect Post Increment
7.2.7 Destination Indexed Source Immediate
The result of an instruction using this addressing mode is placed
within the RAM memory space or the register space. Operand 1
is added to the X register to form the address of the result. The
source of the instruction is Operand 2, which is an immediate
value. Arithmetic instructions require two sources; the second
source is the location specified by Operand 1 added with the X
register. Instructions using this addressing mode are three bytes
in length.
Opcode
Operand 1
Instruction
Source Address Address
Example
MVI
A
[8]
The value in the memory location at address
8 is an indirect address. The memory location
pointed to by the indirect address is moved
into the Accumulator. The indirect address is
then incremented.
Table 7-13. Destination Indexed Source Immediate
Opcode
Instruction
Operand 1
Destination Index
Operand 2
Immediate Value
Examples
ADD
[X+7]
5
The value in the memory location at
address X+7 is added with the
immediate value of 5, and the result
is placed in the memory location at
address X+7.
MOV
REG[X+8]
6
The immediate value of 6 is moved
into the location in the register space
at address X+8.
7.2.8 Destination Direct Source Direct
The result of an instruction using this addressing mode is placed
within the RAM memory. Operand 1 is the address of the result.
Operand 2 is an address that points to a location in the RAM
memory that is the source for the instruction. This addressing
mode is only valid on the MOV instruction. The instruction using
this addressing mode is three bytes in length.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
7.2.10 Destination Indirect Post Increment
The result of an instruction using this addressing mode is placed
within the memory space. Operand 1 is an address pointing to a
location within the memory space, which contains an address
(the indirect address) for the destination of the instruction. The
indirect address is incremented as part of the instruction
execution. The source for the instruction is the Accumulator. This
addressing mode is only valid on the MVI instruction. The
instruction using this addressing mode is two bytes in length.
Table 7-16. Destination Indirect Post Increment
Opcode
Operand 1
Instruction
Destination Address Address
Example
MVI
[8]
A
The value in the memory location at
address 8 is an indirect address. The
Accumulator is moved into the memory
location pointed to by the indirect
address. The indirect address is then
incremented.
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8. Instruction Set Summary
Opcode Hex
Cycles
Z
5A
5
2 MOV [expr], X
C, Z
2E
9
3 OR [expr], expr
Z
5B
4
1 MOV A, X
C, Z
2F 10
3 OR [X+expr], expr
Z
5C
4
1 MOV X, A
2 ADD A, [X+expr]
C, Z
30
9
1 HALT
5D
6
2 MOV A, reg[expr]
Z
2 ADD [expr], A
C, Z
31
4
2 XOR A, expr
Z
5E
7
2 MOV A, reg[X+expr]
Z
8
2 ADD [X+expr], A
C, Z
32
6
2 XOR A, [expr]
Z
5F 10
3 MOV [expr], [expr]
9
1 SSC
01
4
2 ADD A, expr
02
6
2 ADD A, [expr]
03
7
04
7
05
06
Flags
Instruction Format
Bytes
Cycles
2 OR [X+expr], A
Instruction Format
00 15
Bytes
Opcode Hex
8
Bytes
Flags
2D
Cycles
Opcode Hex
The instruction set is summarized in Table 8-1 numerically and serves as a quick reference. If more information is needed, the
Instruction Set Summary tables are described in detail in the PSoC Designer Assembly Language User Guide (available on the
Cypress web site at http://www.cypress.com).
Table 8-1. Instruction Set Summary Sorted Numerically by Opcode Order[2, 3]
Instruction Format
Flags
Z
3 ADD [expr], expr
C, Z
33
7
2 XOR A, [X+expr]
Z
60
5
2 MOV reg[expr], A
07 10
3 ADD [X+expr], expr
C, Z
34
7
2 XOR [expr], A
Z
61
6
2 MOV reg[X+expr], A
08
4
1 PUSH A
35
8
2 XOR [X+expr], A
Z
62
8
3 MOV reg[expr], expr
09
4
2 ADC A, expr
C, Z
36
9
3 XOR [expr], expr
Z
63
9
3 MOV reg[X+expr], expr
0A
6
2 ADC A, [expr]
C, Z
37 10
3 XOR [X+expr], expr
Z
64
4
1 ASL A
C, Z
0B
7
2 ADC A, [X+expr]
C, Z
38
5
2 ADD SP, expr
65
7
2 ASL [expr]
C, Z
0C
7
2 ADC [expr], A
C, Z
39
5
2 CMP A, expr
66
8
2 ASL [X+expr]
C, Z
0D
8
2 ADC [X+expr], A
C, Z
3A
7
2 CMP A, [expr]
67
4
1 ASR A
C, Z
0E
9
3 ADC [expr], expr
C, Z
3B
8
2 CMP A, [X+expr]
68
7
2 ASR [expr]
C, Z
0F 10
3 ADC [X+expr], expr
C, Z
3C
8
3 CMP [expr], expr
69
8
2 ASR [X+expr]
C, Z
10
4
1 PUSH X
3D
9
3 CMP [X+expr], expr
6A
4
1 RLC A
C, Z
11
4
2 SUB A, expr
C, Z
3E 10
2 MVI A, [ [expr]++]
6B
7
2 RLC [expr]
C, Z
12
6
2 SUB A, [expr]
C, Z
3F 10
2 MVI [ [expr]++], A
6C
8
2 RLC [X+expr]
C, Z
13
7
2 SUB A, [X+expr]
C, Z
40
4
1 NOP
6D
4
1 RRC A
C, Z
14
7
2 SUB [expr], A
C, Z
41
9
3 AND reg[expr], expr
Z
6E
7
2 RRC [expr]
C, Z
15
8
2 SUB [X+expr], A
C, Z
42 10
3 AND reg[X+expr], expr
Z
6F
8
2 RRC [X+expr]
C, Z
16
9
3 SUB [expr], expr
C, Z
43
3 OR reg[expr], expr
Z
70
4
2 AND F, expr
C, Z
17 10
3 SUB [X+expr], expr
C, Z
44 10
3 OR reg[X+expr], expr
Z
71
4
2 OR F, expr
C, Z
18
5
1 POP A
45
3 XOR reg[expr], expr
Z
72
4
2 XOR F, expr
C, Z
19
4
2 SBB A, expr
C, Z
46 10
3 XOR reg[X+expr], expr
Z
73
4
1 CPL A
Z
1A
6
2 SBB A, [expr]
C, Z
47
8
3 TST [expr], expr
Z
74
4
1 INC A
C, Z
Z
9
9
if (A=B) Z=1
if (A<B) C=1
Z
1B
7
2 SBB A, [X+expr]
C, Z
48
9
3 TST [X+expr], expr
Z
75
4
1 INC X
C, Z
1C
7
2 SBB [expr], A
C, Z
49
9
3 TST reg[expr], expr
Z
76
7
2 INC [expr]
C, Z
1D
8
2 SBB [X+expr], A
C, Z
4A 10
3 TST reg[X+expr], expr
Z
77
8
2 INC [X+expr]
C, Z
1E
9
3 SBB [expr], expr
C, Z
4B
5
1 SWAP A, X
Z
78
4
1 DEC A
C, Z
1F 10
3 SBB [X+expr], expr
C, Z
4C
7
2 SWAP A, [expr]
Z
79
4
1 DEC X
C, Z
20
5
1 POP X
4D
7
2 SWAP X, [expr]
7A
7
2 DEC [expr]
C, Z
21
4
2 AND A, expr
Z
4E
5
1 SWAP A, SP
7B
8
2 DEC [X+expr]
C, Z
22
6
2 AND A, [expr]
Z
4F
4
1 MOV X, SP
23
7
2 AND A, [X+expr]
Z
50
4
2 MOV A, expr
24
7
2 AND [expr], A
Z
51
5
2 MOV A, [expr]
25
8
2 AND [X+expr], A
Z
52
6
2 MOV A, [X+expr]
26
9
Z
7C 13
3 LCALL
Z
7D
7
3 LJMP
Z
7E 10
1 RETI
Z
7F
8
1 RET
5
2 JMP
3 AND [expr], expr
Z
53
5
2 MOV [expr], A
8x
27 10
3 AND [X+expr], expr
Z
54
6
2 MOV [X+expr], A
9x 11
2 CALL
28 11
1 ROMX
Z
55
8
3 MOV [expr], expr
Ax
5
2 JZ
29
4
2 OR A, expr
Z
56
9
3 MOV [X+expr], expr
Bx
5
2 JNZ
2A
6
2 OR A, [expr]
Z
57
4
2 MOV X, expr
Cx
5
2 JC
2B
7
2 OR A, [X+expr]
Z
58
6
2 MOV X, [expr]
Dx
5
2 JNC
2C
7
2 OR [expr], A
Z
59
7
2 MOV X, [X+expr]
Ex
7
2 JACC
Fx 13
2 INDEX
Notes
2. Interrupt routines take 13 cycles before execution resumes at interrupt vector table.
3. The number of cycles required by an instruction is increased by one for instructions that span 256 byte boundaries in the Flash memory space.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
C, Z
Z
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9. Memory Organization
9.1 Flash Program Memory Organization
Figure 9-1. Program Memory Space with Interrupt Vector Table
after reset
16-bit PC
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Address
0x0000
0x0004
0x0008
0x000C
0x0010
0x0014
0x0018
0x001C
0x0020
0x0024
0x0028
0x002C
0x0030
0x0034
0x0038
0x003C
0x0040
0x0044
0x0048
0x004C
0x0050
0x0054
0x0058
0x005C
0x0060
0x0064
0x0068
Program execution begins here after a reset
POR/LVD
INT0
SPI Transmitter Empty
SPI Receiver Full
GPIO Port 0
GPIO Port 1
INT1
EP0
EP1
EP2
USB Reset
USB Active
1 ms Interval timer
Programmable Interval Timer
Timer Capture 0
Timer Capture 1
16-bit Free Running Timer Wrap
INT2
PS2 Data Low
GPIO Port 2
GPIO Port 3
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Sleep Timer
Program Memory begins here (if below interrupts not used,
program memory can start lower)
0x0BFF
3 KB ends here (CY7C63310)
0x0FFF
4 KB ends here (CY7C63801)
0x1FFF
8 KB ends here (CY7C638x3)
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9.2 Data Memory Organization
The CY7C63310/638xx microcontrollers provide up to 256 bytes of data RAM.
Figure 9-2. Data Memory Organization
after reset
Address
8-bit PSP
0x00
Top of RAM Memory
Stack begins here and grows upward.
0xFF
9.3 Flash
This section describes the Flash block of the enCoRe II. Much of
the user visible Flash functionality including programming and
security are implemented in the M8C Supervisory Read Only
Memory (SROM). The enCoRe II Flash has an endurance of
1000 cycles and a 10 year data retention capability.
9.3.1 Flash Programming and Security
All Flash programming is performed by code in the SROM. The
registers that control the Flash programming are only visible to
the M8C CPU when it executes out of SROM. This makes it
impossible to read, write or erase the Flash by bypassing the
security mechanisms implemented in the SROM.
Customer firmware can program the Flash only through SROM
calls. The data or code images are sourced through any interface
with the appropriate support firmware. This type of programming
requires a ‘boot-loader’, which is a piece of firmware resident on
the Flash. For safety reasons this boot-loader must not be
overwritten during firmware rewrites.
The Flash provides four extra auxiliary rows that are used to hold
Flash block protection flags, boot time calibration values,
configuration tables, and any device values. The routines for
accessing these auxiliary rows are documented in the section
SROM on page 14 section. The auxiliary rows are not affected
by the device erase function.
to enable the enCoRe II part to enter the serial programming
mode, and then use the test queue to issue Flash access
functions in the SROM. The programming protocol is not USB.
9.4 SROM
The SROM holds code that boots the part, calibrates circuitry,
and performs Flash operations (Table 9-1 on page 14 lists the
SROM functions). The functions of the SROM are accessed in
the normal user code or operating from Flash. The SROM exists
in a separate memory space from the user code. The SROM
functions are accessed by executing the Supervisory System
Call instruction (SSC), which has an opcode of 00h. Before
executing the SSC the M8C’s accumulator must be loaded with
the desired SROM function code from Table 9-1 on page 14.
Undefined functions cause a HALT if called from the user code.
The SROM functions are executing code with calls; as a result,
the functions require stack space. With the exception of Reset,
all of the SROM functions have a parameter block in SRAM that
must be configured before executing the SSC. Table 9-2 on page
15 lists all possible parameter block variables. The meaning of
each parameter, with regards to a specific SROM function, is
described later in this section.
Table 9-1. SROM Function Codes
Function Code
Function Name
Stack Space
00h
SWBootReset
0
9.3.2 In System Programming
01h
ReadBlock
7
Most designs that include an enCoRe II part have a USB
connector attached to the USB D+ and D– pins on the device.
These designs require the ability to program or reprogram a part
through the USB D+ and D– pins alone.
02h
WriteBlock
10
03h
EraseBlock
9
05h
EraseAll
11
The enCoRe II devices enable this type of in system
programming by using the D+ and D– pins as the serial
programming mode interface. This allows an external controller
06h
TableRead
3
07h
CheckSum
3
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Two important variables that are used for all functions are KEY1
and KEY2. These variables are used to help discriminate
between valid SSCs and inadvertent SSCs. KEY1 must always
have a value of 3Ah, while KEY2 must have the same value as
the stack pointer when the SROM function begins execution.
This would be the Stack Pointer value when the SSC opcode is
executed, plus three. If either of the keys do not match the
expected values, the M8C halts (with the exception of the
SWBootReset function). The following code puts the correct
value in KEY1 and KEY2. The code starts with a halt, to force the
program to jump directly into the setup code and not run into it.
halt
SSCOP: mov [KEY1], 3ah
mov X, SP
mov A, X
add A, 3
mov [KEY2], A
Table 9-2. SROM Function Parameters
Variable Name
SRAM Address
Key1/Counter/Return Code
0,F8h
Key2/TMP
0,F9h
BlockID
0,FAh
Pointer
0,FBh
Clock
0,FCh
Mode
0,FDh
Delay
0,FEh
PCL
0,FFh
9.4.1 Return Codes
The SROM also features Return Codes and Lockouts.
Return codes aid in the determination of the success or failure of
a particular function. The return code is stored in KEY1’s position
in the parameter block. The CheckSum and TableRead functions
do not have return codes because KEY1’s position in the
parameter block is used to return other data.
Table 9-3. SROM Return Codes
Return Code
Description
00h
Success
01h
Function not allowed due to level of protection
on block.
02h
Software reset without hardware reset.
03h
Fatal error, SROM halted.
9.5 SROM Function Descriptions
9.5.1 SWBootReset Function
The SROM function, SWBootReset, is the function that is
responsible for transitioning the device from a reset state to
running user code. The SWBootReset function is executed
whenever the SROM is entered with an M8C accumulator value
of 00h: the SRAM parameter block is not used as an input to the
function. This happens by design after a hardware reset,
because the M8C's accumulator is reset to 00h or when the user
code executes the SSC instruction with an accumulator value of
00h. The SWBootReset function is not executed when the SSC
instruction is executed with a bad key value and a non-zero
function code. An enCoRe II device executes the HALT
instruction if a bad value is given for either KEY1 or KEY2.
The SWBootReset function verifies the integrity of the calibration
data by way of a 16-bit checksum, before releasing the M8C to
run user code.
9.5.2 ReadBlock Function
The ReadBlock function is used to read 64 contiguous bytes
from Flash: a block.
This function first checks the protection bits and determines if the
desired BLOCKID is readable. If the read protection is turned on,
the ReadBlock function exits setting the accumulator and KEY2
back to 00h. KEY1 has a value of 01h, indicating a read failure.
If read protection is not enabled, the function reads 64 bytes from
the Flash using a ROMX instruction and stores the results in the
SRAM using an MVI instruction. The first of the 64 bytes are
stored in the SRAM at the address indicated by the value of the
POINTER parameter. When the ReadBlock completes
successfully, the accumulator, KEY1, and KEY2 all have a value
of 00h.
Table 9-4. ReadBlock Parameters
Name
Address
Description
KEY1
0,F8h
3Ah
KEY2
0,F9h
Stack Pointer value, when SSC is
executed.
BLOCKID
0,FAh
Flash block number
POINTER
0,FBh
First of 64 addresses in SRAM
where returned data must be stored.
Read, write, and erase operations may fail if the target block is
read or write protected. Block protection levels are set during
device programming.
The EraseAll function overwrites data in addition to leaving the
entire user Flash in the erase state. The EraseAll function loops
through the number of Flash macros in the product, executing
the following sequence: erase, bulk program all zeros, erase.
After all the user space in all the Flash macros are erased, a
second loop erases and then programs each protection block
with zeros.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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9.5.3 WriteBlock Function
The WriteBlock function is used to store data in the Flash. Data
is moved 64 bytes at a time from SRAM to Flash using this
function. The WriteBlock function first checks the protection bits
and determines if the desired BLOCKID is writable. If write
protection is turned on, the WriteBlock function exits setting the
accumulator and KEY2 back to 00h. KEY1 has a value of 01h,
indicating a write failure. The configuration of the WriteBlock
function is straightforward. The BLOCKID of the Flash block,
where the data is stored, must be determined and stored at
SRAM address FAh.
The SRAM address of the first of the 64 bytes to be stored in
Flash must be indicated using the POINTER variable in the
parameter block (SRAM address FBh). Finally, the CLOCK and
DELAY value must be set correctly. The CLOCK value determines the length of the write pulse that is used to store the data
in the Flash. The CLOCK and DELAY values are dependent on
the CPU speed and must be set correctly.
Table 9-5. WriteBlock Parameters
Name
Address
Description
KEY1
0,F8h
3Ah
KEY2
0,F9h
Stack Pointer value, when SSC is
executed.
BLOCKID
0,FAh
8KB Flash block number (00h–7Fh)
4KB Flash block number (00h–3Fh)
3KB Flash block number (00h–2Fh)
POINTER
0,FBh
First of 64 addresses in SRAM, where
the data to be stored in Flash is
located before calling WriteBlock.
CLOCK
0,FCh
Clock divider used to set the write
pulse width.
DELAY
0,FEh
For a CPU speed of 12 MHz set to
56h.
9.5.4 EraseBlock Function
The EraseBlock function is used to erase a block of 64
contiguous bytes in Flash. The EraseBlock function first checks
the protection bits and determines if the desired BLOCKID is
writable. If write protection is turned on, the EraseBlock function
exits setting the accumulator and KEY2 back to 00h. KEY1 has
a value of 01h, indicating a write failure. The EraseBlock function
is only useful as the first step in programming. When a block is
erased, the data in the block is not one hundred percent
unreadable. If the objective is to obliterate data in a block, the
best method is to perform an EraseBlock followed by a WriteBlock of all zeros.
To set up the parameter block for the EraseBlock function,
correct key values must be stored in KEY1 and KEY2. The block
number to be erased must be stored in the BLOCKID variable
and the CLOCK and DELAY values must be set based on the
current CPU speed.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Table 9-6. EraseBlock Parameters
Name
Address
Description
KEY1
0,F8h
3Ah
KEY2
0,F9h
Stack Pointer value, when SSC is
executed.
BLOCKID
0,FAh
Flash block number (00h–7Fh)
CLOCK
0,FCh
Clock divider used to set the erase
pulse width.
DELAY
0,FEh
For a CPU speed of 12 MHz set to
56h
9.5.5 ProtectBlock Function
The enCoRe II devices offer Flash protection on a block by block
basis. Table 9-7 lists the protection modes available. In this table,
ER and EW indicate the ability to perform external reads and
writes. For internal writes, IW is used. Internal reading is
permitted by way of the ROMX instruction. The ability to read by
way of the SROM ReadBlock function is indicated by SR. The
protection level is stored in two bits according to Table 9-7.
These bits are bit packed into the 64 bytes of the protection
block. As a result, each protection block byte stores the
protection level for four Flash blocks. The bits are packed into a
byte, with the lowest numbered block’s protection level stored in
the lowest numbered bits Table 9-7.
The first address of the protection block contains the protection
level for blocks 0 through 3; the second address is for blocks 4
through 7. The 64th byte stores the protection level for blocks
252 through 255.
Table 9-7. Protection Modes
Mode
Settings
Description
Marketing
00b
SR ER EW IW Unprotected
Unprotected
01b
SR ER EW IW Read protect
Factory upgrade
10b
SR ER EW IW Disable external Field upgrade
write
11b
SR ER EW IW Disable internal
write
7
6
Block n+3
5
4
Block n+2
3
Full protection
2
Block n+1
1
0
Block n
The level of protection is only decreased by an EraseAll, which
places zeros in all locations of the protection block. To set the
level of protection, the ProtectBlock function is used. This
function takes data from SRAM, starting at address 80h, and
ORs it with the current values in the protection block. The result
of the OR operation is then stored in the protection block. The
EraseBlock function does not change the protection level for a
block. Because the SRAM location for the protection data is fixed
and there is only one protection block per Flash macro, the
ProtectBlock function expects very few variables in the
parameter block to be set before calling the function. The
parameter block values that must be set, besides the keys, are
the CLOCK and DELAY values.
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Table 9-8. ProtectBlock Parameters
Name
Address
Description
9.5.7 TableRead Function
The TableRead function gives the user access to part specific
data stored in the Flash during manufacturing. It also returns a
Revision ID for the die (not to be confused with the Silicon ID).
KEY1
0,F8h
3Ah
KEY2
0,F9h
Stack Pointer value when SSC is
executed.
CLOCK
0,FCh
Clock divider used to set the write pulse
width.
KEY1
0,F8h
3Ah
DELAY
0,FEh
For a CPU speed of 12 MHz set to 56h.
KEY2
0,F9h
Stack Pointer value when SSC is
executed.
BLOCKID
0,FAh
Table number to read.
9.5.6 EraseAll Function
The EraseAll function performs a series of steps that destroy the
user data in the Flash macros and resets the protection block in
each Flash macro to all zeros (the unprotected state). The
EraseAll function does not affect the three hidden blocks above
the protection block, in each Flash macro. The first of these four
hidden blocks is used to store the protection table for its eight
Kbytes of user data.
The EraseAll function begins by erasing the user space of the
Flash macro with the highest address range. A bulk program of
all zeros is then performed on the same Flash macro, to destroy
all traces of the previous contents. The bulk program is followed
by a second erase that leaves the Flash macro in a state ready
for writing. The erase, program, erase sequence is then
performed on the next lowest Flash macro in the address space
if it exists. After the erase of the user space, the protection block
for the Flash macro with the highest address range is erased.
Following the erase of the protection block, zeros are written into
every bit of the protection table. The next lowest Flash macro in
the address space then has its protection block erased and filled
with zeros.
The end result of the EraseAll function is that all user data in the
Flash is destroyed and the Flash is left in an unprogrammed
state, ready to accept one of the various write commands. The
protection bits for all user data are also reset to the zero state
The parameter block values that must be set, besides the keys,
are the CLOCK and DELAY values.
Table 9-9. EraseAll Parameters
Name
Address
Description
Table 9-10. Table Read Parameters
Name
Address
Description
The table space for the enCoRe II is simply a 64 byte row broken
up into eight tables of eight bytes. The tables are numbered zero
through seven. All user and hidden blocks in the CY7C638xx
parts consist of 64 bytes.
An internal table (Table 0) holds the Silicon ID and returns the
Revision ID. The Silicon ID is returned in SRAM, while the
Revision and Family IDs are returned in the CPU_A and CPU_X
registers. The Silicon ID is a value placed in the table by
programming the Flash and is controlled by Cypress Semiconductor Product Engineering. The Revision ID is hard coded into
the SROM and also redundantly placed in SROM Table 1. This
is discussed in more detail later in this section.
SROM Table 1 holds Family/Die ID and Revision ID values for
the device and returns a one-byte internal revision counter. The
internal revision counter starts out with a value of zero and is
incremented when one of the other revision numbers is not incremented. It is reset to zero when one of the other revision
numbers is incremented. The internal revision count is returned
in the CPU_A register. The CPU_X register is always set to FFh
when Table 1 is read. The CPU_A and CPU_X registers always
return a value of FFh when Tables 2-7 are read. The BLOCKID
value, in the parameter block, indicates which table must be
returned to the user. Only the three least significant bits of the
BLOCKID parameter are used by TableRead function for
enCoRe II devices. The upper five bits are ignored. When the
function is called, it transfers bytes from the table to SRAM
addresses F8h–FFh.
KEY1
0,F8h
3Ah
KEY2
0,F9h
Stack Pointer value when SSC is
executed.
The M8C’s A and X registers are used by the TableRead function
to return the die’s Revision ID. The Revision ID is a 16-bit value
hard coded into the SROM that uniquely identifies the die’s
design.
CLOCK
0,FCh
Clock divider used to set the write pulse
width.
The return values for corresponding Table calls are tabulated as
shown in Table 9-11 on page 17
DELAY
0,FEh
For a CPU speed of 12 MHz set to 56h
Table 9-11. Return values for Table Read
Return Value
Table Number
X
0
Revision ID
1
Internal Revision Counter 0xFF
2-7
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
A
0xFF
Family ID
0xFF
Page 17 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
Figure 9-3. SROM Table
F8h
F9h
Table 0
Silicon ID
[15-8]
Silicon ID
[7-0]
Table 1
Family/
Die ID
Revision
ID
FAh
FBh
FCh
FDh
FEh
FFh
Table 2
Table 3
Table 4
Table 5
Table 6
Table 7
The Silicon IDs for enCoRe II devices are stored in SROM tables in the part, as shown in Figure 9-3.
The Silicon ID can be read out from the part using SROM Table reads (Table 0). This is demonstrated in the following pseudo code.
As mentioned in the section SROM on page 14, the SROM variables occupy address F8h through FFh in the SRAM. Each of the
variables and their definition is given in the section SROM on page 14.
AREA SSCParmBlkA(RAM,ABS)
org
F8h // Variables are defined starting at address F8h
SSC_KEY1:
SSC_RETURNCODE:
blk 1
SSC_KEY2 :
blk 1
SSC_BLOCKID:
blk 1
SSC_POINTER:
blk 1
SSC_CLOCK:
blk 1
SSC_MODE:
blk 1
SSC_DELAY:
blk 1
SSC_WRITE_ResultCode: blk
; F8h supervisory key
; F8h result code
;F9h supervisory stack ptr key
; FAh block ID
; FBh pointer to data buffer
; FCh Clock
; FDh ClockW ClockE multiplier
; FEh flash macro sequence delay count
1 ; FFh temporary result code
_main:
mov
A, 0
mov
[SSC_BLOCKID], A// To read from Table 0 - Silicon ID is stored in Table 0
//Call SROM operation to read the SROM table
mov
X, SP
; copy SP into X
mov
A, X
; A temp stored in X
add
A, 3
; create 3 byte stack frame (2 + pushed A)
mov
[SSC_KEY2], A
; save stack frame for supervisory code
; load the supervisory code for flash operations
mov
[SSC_KEY1], 3Ah ;FLASH_OPER_KEY - 3Ah
mov
SSC
A,6
; load A with specific operation. 06h is the code for Table read Table 9-1
; SSC call the supervisory ROM
// At the end of the SSC command the silicon ID is stored in F8 (MSB) and F9(LSB) of the SRAM
.terminate:
jmp .terminate
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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9.5.8 Checksum Function
The Checksum function calculates a 16-bit checksum over a
user specifiable number of blocks, within a single Flash macro
(Bank) starting from block zero. The BLOCKID parameter is
used to pass in the number of blocks to calculate the checksum
over. A BLOCKID value of 1 calculates the checksum of only
block 0, while a BLOCKID value of 0 calculates the checksum of
all 256 user blocks. The 16-bit checksum is returned in KEY1 and
KEY2. The parameter KEY1 holds the lower eight bits of the
checksum and the parameter KEY2 holds the upper eight bits of
the checksum.
The checksum algorithm executes the following sequence of
three instructions over the number of blocks times 64 to be
checksummed.
romx
add [KEY1], A
adc [KEY2], 0
Table 9-12. Checksum Parameters
Name
Address
Description
KEY1
0,F8h
3Ah
KEY2
0,F9h
Stack Pointer value when SSC is
executed.
BLOCKID
0,FAh
Number of Flash blocks to calculate
checksum on.
When using the 32 kHz oscillator, the PITMRL/H registers must
be read until 2 consecutive readings match before the result is
considered valid. The following firmware example assumes the
developer is interested in the lower byte of the PIT.
Read_PIT_counter:
mov A, reg[PITMRL]
mov [57h], A
mov A, reg[PITMRL]
mov [58h], A
mov [59h], A
mov A, reg[PITMRL]
mov [60h], A
;;;Start comparison
mov A, [60h]
mov X, [59h]
sub A, [59h]
jz done
mov A, [59h]
mov X, [58h]
sub A, [58h]
jz done
mov X, [57h]
;;;correct data is in memory location 57h
done:
mov [57h], X
ret
10. Clocking
The enCoRe II has two internal oscillators, the Internal 24 MHz
Oscillator and the 32 kHz Low power Oscillator.
The Internal 24 MHz Oscillator is designed such that it may be
trimmed to an output frequency of 24 MHz over temperature and
voltage variation. With the presence of USB traffic, the Internal
24 MHz Oscillator may be set to precisely tune to the USB timing
requirements (24 MHz ± 1.5%). Without USB traffic, the Internal
24 MHz Oscillator accuracy is 24 MHz ± 5% (between 0°–70°C).
No external components are required to achieve this level of
accuracy.
The internal low speed oscillator of nominally 32 kHz provides a
slow clock source for the enCoRe II in suspend mode, particularly to generate a periodic wakeup interrupt and also to provide
a clock to sequential logic during power up and power down
events when the main clock is stopped. In addition, this oscillator
can also be used as a clocking source for the Interval Timer clock
(ITMRCLK) and Capture Timer clock (TCAPCLK). The 32 kHz
Low power Oscillator can operate in low power mode or can
provide a more accurate clock in normal mode. The Internal
32 kHz Low power Oscillator accuracy ranges (between
0°–70° C) follow:
■
5V Normal mode: –8% to + 16%
■
5V LP mode: +12% to + 48%
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
Figure 10-1. Clock Block Diagram
CPUCLK
SEL
CLK_EXT
SCALE (divide by 2n,
n = 0-5,7)
MUX
CPU_CLK
CLK_24MHz
EXT
CLK_USB
MUX
24 MHz
SEL
SEL
0
0
1
1
LP OSC
32 KHz
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
SCALE
SCALE
OUT
X
X
1
1
12 MHz
12 MHz
EXT/2
EXT
CLK_32
KHz
Page 20 of 83
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10.1 Clock Architecture Description
The enCoRe II clock selection circuitry allows the selection of
independent clocks for the CPU, USB, Interval Timers and
Capture Timers.
The CPU clock CPUCLK is sourced from an external clock or the
Internal 24 MHz Oscillator. The selected clock source is
optionally divided by 2n, where n is 0-5,7 (see Table 10-4 on page
23).
USBCLK, which must be 12 MHz for the USB SIE to function
properly, is sourced by the Internal 24 MHz Oscillator or an
external 12 MHz/24 MHz clock. An optional divide by two allows
the use of 24 MHz source.
The Timer Capture clock (TCAPCLK) is sourced from an external
clock, Internal 24 MHz Oscillator, or the Internal 32 kHz low
power oscillator.
The CLKOUT pin (P0.1) is driven from one of many sources. This
is used for test and is also used in some applications. The
sources that drive the CLKOUT follow:
■
CLKIN after the optional EFTB filter
■
Internal 24 MHz Oscillator
■
Internal 32 kHz low power oscillator
■
CPUCLK after the programmable divider
The Interval Timer clock (ITMRCLK), is sourced from an external
clock, the Internal 24 MHz Oscillator, the Internal 32 kHz low
power oscillator, or from the timer capture clock (TCAPCLK). A
programmable prescaler of 1, 2, 3, 4 then divides the selected
source.
Table 10-1. IOSC Trim (IOSCTR) [0x34] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
foffset[2:0]
Field
2
1
0
Gain[4:0]
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
D
D
D
D
D
The IOSC Calibrate register calibrates the internal oscillator. The reset value is undefined but during boot the SROM writes a
calibration value that is determined during manufacturing test. This value does not require change during normal use. This is
the meaning of ‘D’ in the Default field.
Bit [7:5]: foffset [2:0]
This value is used to trim the frequency of the internal oscillator. These bits are not used in factory calibration and are zero.
Setting each of these bits causes the appropriate fine offset in oscillator frequency.
foffset bit 0 = 7.5 kHz
foffset bit 1 = 15 kHz
foffset bit 2 = 30 kHz
Bit [4:0]: Gain [4:0]
The effective frequency change of the offset input is controlled through the gain input. A lower value of the gain setting increases
the gain of the offset input. This value sets the size of each offset step for the internal oscillator. Nominal gain change
(kHz/offsetStep) at each bit, typical conditions (24 MHz operation):
Gain bit 0 = –1.5 kHz
Gain bit 1 = –3.0 kHz
Gain bit 2 = –6 kHz
Gain bit 3 = –12 kHz
Gain bit 4 = –24 kHz
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Table 10-2. LPOSC Trim (LPOSCTR) [0x36] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
Field
32 kHz Low
Power
Reserved
5
4
3
2
Read/Write
R/W
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
32 kHz Bias Trim [1:0]
1
0
32 kHz Freq Trim [3:0]
This register is used to calibrate the 32 kHz Low speed Oscillator. The reset value is undefined but during boot the SROM writes
a calibration value that is determined during manufacturing tests. This value does not require change during normal use. This
is the meaning of ‘D’ in the Default field. If the 32 kHz Low power bit is written, care must be taken to not disturb the
32 kHz Bias Trim and the 32 kHz Freq Trim fields from their factory calibrated values.
Bit 7: 32 kHz Low Power
0 = The 32 kHz Low speed Oscillator operates in normal mode
1 = The 32 kHz Low speed Oscillator operates in a low power mode. The oscillator continues to function normally, but with
reduced accuracy.
Bit 6: Reserved
Bit [5:4]: 32 kHz Bias Trim [1:0]
These bits control the bias current of the low power oscillator.
0 0 = Mid bias
0 1 = High bias
1 0 = Reserved
1 1 = Reserved
Note Do not program the 32 kHz Bias Trim [1:0] field with the reserved 10b value because the oscillator does not oscillate at all
corner conditions with this setting.
Bit [3:0]: 32 kHz Freq Trim [3:0]
These bits are used to trim the frequency of the low power oscillator.
Table 10-3. CPU/USB Clock Config (CPUCLKCR) [0x30] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
Field
Reserved
USB CLK/2
Disable
USB CLK Select
4
3
2
1
Read/Write
–
R/W
R/W
–
–
–
–
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Reserved
0
CPUCLK Select
Bit 7: Reserved
Bit 6: USB CLK/2 Disable
This bit only affects the USBCLK when the source is the external clock. When the USBCLK source is the Internal 24 MHz
Oscillator, the divide by two is always enabled
0 = USBCLK source is divided by two. This is the correct setting to use when the Internal 24 MHz Oscillator is used, or when
the external source is used with a 24 MHz clock
1 = USBCLK is undivided. Use this setting only with a 12 MHz external clock
Bit 5: USB CLK Select
This bit controls the clock source for the USB SIE.
0 = Internal 24 MHz Oscillator. With the presence of USB traffic, the Internal 24 MHz Oscillator is trimmed to meet the USB
requirement of 1.5% tolerance (see Table 10-5 on page 24)
1 = External clock—Internal Oscillator is not trimmed to USB traffic. Proper USB SIE operation requires a 12 MHz or 24 MHz
clock accurate to <1.5%.
Bit [4:1]: Reserved
Bit 0: CPU CLK Select
0 = Internal 24 MHz Oscillator.
1 = External clock—External clock at CLKIN (P0.0) pin.
Note The CPU speed selection is configured using the OSC_CR0 Register (Table 10-4 on page 23).
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Table 10-4. OSC Control 0 (OSC_CR0) [0x1E0] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
Reserved
Field
5
No Buzz
4
3
2
Sleep Timer [1:0]
1
0
CPU Speed [2:0]
Read/Write
–
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:6]: Reserved
Bit 5: No Buzz
During sleep (the Sleep bit is set in the CPU_SCR Register—Table 11-1 on page 27), the LVD and POR detection circuit is turned
on periodically to detect any POR and LVD events on the VCC pin (the Sleep Duty Cycle bits in the ECO_TR are used to control
the duty cycle—Table 13-3 on page 32). To facilitate the detection of POR and LVD events, the No Buzz bit is used to force the
LVD and POR detection circuit to be continuously enabled during sleep. This results in a faster response to an LVD or POR
event during sleep at the expense of a slightly higher than average sleep current.
0 = The LVD and POR detection circuit is turned on periodically as configured in the Sleep Duty Cycle.
1 = The Sleep Duty Cycle value is overridden. The LVD and POR detection circuit is always enabled.
Note The periodic Sleep Duty Cycle enabling is independent with the sleep interval shown in the Sleep [1:0] bits below.
Bit [4:3]: Sleep Timer [1:0]
Note Sleep intervals are approximate.
Bit [2:0]: CPU Speed [2:0]
The enCoRe II may operate over a range of CPU clock speeds. The reset value for the CPU Speed bits is zero; as a result, the
default CPU speed is one-eighth of the internal 24 MHz, or 3 MHz
Regardless of the CPU Speed bit’s setting, if the actual CPU speed is greater than 12 MHz, the 24 MHz operating requirements
apply. An example of this scenario is a device that is configured to use an external clock, which supplies a frequency of 20 MHz.
If the CPU speed register’s value is 0b011, the CPU clock is at 20 MHz. Therefore, the supply voltage requirements for the device
are the same as if the part were operating at 24 MHz. The operating voltage requirements are not relaxed until the CPU speed
is at 12 MHz or less.
CPU Speed
[2:0]
CPU when Internal
Oscillator is selected
External Clock
000
3 MHz (Default)
Clock In/8
001
6 MHz
Clock In/4
010
12 MHz
Clock In/2
011
24 MHz
Clock In/1
100
1.5 MHz
Clock In/16
101
750 kHz
Clock In/32
110
187 kHz
Clock In/128
111
Reserved
Reserved
Note Correct USB operations require the CPU clock speed be at least 1.5 MHz or not less than USB clock/8. If the two clocks
have the same source, then the CPU clock divider must not be set to divide by more than 8. If the two clocks have different
sources, the maximum ratio of USB Clock/CPU Clock must never exceed 8 across the full specification range of both clock
sources.
Note This register exists in the second bank of IO space. This requires setting the XIO bit in the CPU flags register.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Table 10-5. USB Osclock Clock Configuration (OSCLCKCR) [0x39] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
Reserved
Field
1
0
Fine Tune Only
USB Osclock
Disable
Read/Write
–
–
–
–
–
–
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This register is used to trim the Internal 24 MHz Oscillator using received low speed USB packets as a timing reference. The
USB Osclock circuit is active when the Internal 24 MHz Oscillator provides the USB clock.
Bit [7:2]: Reserved
Bit 1: Fine Tune Only
0 = Fine and Course tuning
1 = Disable the oscillator lock from performing the coarse-tune portion of its retuning. The oscillator lock must be allowed to
perform a coarse tuning to tune the oscillator for correct USB SIE operation. After the oscillator is properly tuned, this bit is set
to reduce variance in the internal oscillator frequency that would be caused course tuning.
Bit 0: USB Osclock Disable
0 = Enable. With the presence of USB traffic, the Internal 24 MHz Oscillator precisely tunes to 24 MHz ± 1.5%
1 = Disable. The Internal 24 MHz Oscillator is not trimmed based on USB packets. This setting is useful when the internal
oscillator is not sourcing the USBSIE clock.
Table 10-6. Timer Clock Config (TMRCLKCR) [0x31] [R/W]
Bit #
7
Field
TCAPCLK Divider
6
5
4
TCAPCLK Select
3
2
1
ITMRCLK Divider
0
ITMRCLK Select
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
Bit [7:6]: TCAPCLK Divider [1:0]
TCAPCLK Divider controls the TCAPCLK divisor.
0 0 = Divider Value 2
0 1 = Divider Value 4
1 0 = Divider Value 6
1 1 = Divider Value 8
Bit [5:4]: TCAPCLK Select
The TCAPCLK Select field controls the source of the TCAPCLK.
0 0 = Internal 24 MHz Oscillator
0 1 = External clock—external clock at CLKIN (P0.0) input.
1 0 = Internal 32 kHz low power oscillator
1 1 = TCAPCLK Disabled
Note The 1024 μs interval timer is based on the assumption that TCAPCLK is running at 4 MHz. Changes in TCAPCLK frequency
causes a corresponding change in the 1024 μs interval timer frequency.
Bit [3:2]: ITMRCLK Divider
ITMRCLK Divider controls the ITMRCLK divisor.
0 0 = Divider value of 1
0 1 = Divider value of 2
1 0 = Divider value of 3
1 1 = Divider value of 4
Bit [1:0]: ITMRCLK Select
0 0 = Internal 24 MHz Oscillator
0 1 = External clock—external clock at CLKIN (P0.0) input.
1 0 = Internal 32 kHz low power oscillator
1 1 = TCAPCLK
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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10.1.1 Interval Timer Clock (ITMRCLK)
The Interval Timer Clock (TITMRCLK), is sourced from an
external clock, the Internal 24 MHz Oscillator, the Internal 32 kHz
Low power Oscillator, or the Timer Capture clock. A
programmable prescaler of 1, 2, 3 or 4 then divides the selected
source. The 12-bit Programmable Interval Timer is a simple
down counter with a programmable reload value. It provides a
1 μs resolution by default. When the down counter reaches zero,
the next clock is spent reloading. The reload value is read and
written while the counter is running, but the counter must not
unintentionally reload when the 12-bit reload value is only
partially stored, that is, between the two writes of the 12-bit value.
The programmable interval timer generates an interrupt to the
CPU on each reload.
The parameters to be set show up on the device editor view of
PSoC Designer when the enCoRe II Timer User Module is
placed. The parameters are PITIMER_Source and
PITIMER_Divider. The PITIMER_Source is the clock to the timer
and the PITMER_Divider is the value the clock is divided by.
The interval register (PITMR) holds the value that is loaded into
the PIT counter on terminal count. The PIT counter is a down
counter.
The Programmable Interval Timer resolution is configurable. For
example:
TCAPCLK divide by x of CPU clock (for example, TCAPCLK
divide by 2 of a 24 MHz CPU clock gives a frequency of 12 MHz.)
ITMRCLK divide by x of TCAPCLK (for example, ITMRCLK
divide by 3 of TCAPCLK is 4 MHz so resolution is 0.25 μs.)
10.1.2 Timer Capture Clock (TCAPCLK)
The Timer Capture clock is sourced from an external clock,
Internal 24 MHz Oscillator or the Internal 32 kHz Low power
Oscillator. A programmable pre-scaler of 2, 4, 6, or 8 then divides
the selected source.
Figure 10-2. Programmable Interval Timer Block Diagram
S y s te m
C lo c k
C lo c k
T im e r
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
C o n fig u ra tio n
S ta tu s a n d
C o n tro l
1 2 -b it
re lo a d
v a lu e
1 2 -b it d o w n
c o u n te r
1 2 -b it
re lo a d
c o u n te r
In te rru p t
C o n tro lle r
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Figure 10-3. Timer Capture Block Diagram
System Clock
Configuration Status
and Control
Captimer Clock
16-bit counter
Prescale Mux
Capture Registers
1ms
timer
Overflow
Interrupt
Capture0 Int
Capture1 Int
Interrupt Controller
Table 10-7. Clock IO Config (CLKIOCR) [0x32] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Reserved
Field
0
CLKOUT Select
Read/Write
–
–
–
-
-
-
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:2]: Reserved
Bit [1:0]: CLKOUT Select
0 0 = Internal 24 MHz Oscillator
0 1 = External clock – external clock at CLKIN (P0.0)
1 0 = Internal 32 kHz low power oscillator
1 1 = CPUCLK
10.2 CPU Clock During Sleep Mode
When the CPU enters sleep mode the CPUCLK Select (Bit [0], Table 10-3 on page 22) is forced to the Internal Oscillator, and the
oscillator is stopped. When the CPU comes out of sleep mode it runs on the internal oscillator. The internal oscillator recovery time is
three clock cycles of the Internal 32 kHz Low power Oscillator.
If the system requires the CPU to run off the external clock after awaking from sleep mode, the firmware must switch the clock source
for the CPU.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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11. Reset
The microcontroller supports two types of resets: Power on Reset (POR) and Watchdog Reset (WDR). When reset is initiated, all
registers are restored to their default states and all interrupts are disabled.
The occurrence of a reset is recorded in the System Status and Control Register (CPU_SCR). Bits within this register record the
occurrence of POR and WDR Reset respectively. The firmware interrogates these bits to determine the cause of a reset.
The microcontroller resumes execution from Flash address 0x0000 after a reset. The internal clocking mode is active after a reset,
until changed by the user firmware.
Note The CPU clock defaults to 3 MHz (Internal 24 MHz Oscillator divide-by-8 mode) at POR to guarantee operations at the low VCC
that may be present during the supply ramp.
Table 11-1. System Status and Control Register (CPU_SCR) [0xFF] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
Field
GIES
Reserved
WDRS
PORS
Sleep
2
1
Read/Write
R
–
R/C[4]
R/C[4]
R/W
–
–
R/W
Default
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
Reserved
0
Stop
The bits of the CPU_SCR register are used to convey status and control of events for various functions of an enCoRe II device.
Bit 7: GIES
The Global Interrupt Enable Status bit is a read only status bit and its use is discouraged. The GIES bit is a legacy bit, which
was used to provide the ability to read the GIE bit of the CPU_F register. However, the CPU_F register is now readable. When
this bit is set, it indicates that the GIE bit in the CPU_F register is also set which, in turn, indicates that the microprocessor
services interrupts.
0 = Global interrupts disabled
1 = Global interrupt enabled
Bit 6: Reserved
Bit 5: WDRS
The WDRS bit is set by the CPU to indicate that a WDR event has occurred. The user can read this bit to determine the type of
reset that has occurred. The user can clear but not set this bit.
0 = No WDR
1 = A WDR event has occurred
Bit 4: PORS
The PORS bit is set by the CPU to indicate that a POR event has occurred. The user can read this bit to determine the type of
reset that has occurred. The user can clear but not set this bit
0 = No POR
1 = A POR event has occurred. (Note WDR events do not occur until this bit is cleared)
Bit 3: SLEEP
Set by the user to enable CPU sleep state. CPU remains in sleep mode until any interrupt is pending. The Sleep bit is covered
in more detail in the section Sleep Mode on page 28.
0 = Normal operation
1 = Sleep
Bit [2:1]: Reserved
Bit 0: STOP
This bit is set by the user to halt the CPU. The CPU remains halted until a reset (WDR, POR, or external reset) has taken place.
If an application wants to stop code execution until a reset, the preferred method is to use the HALT instruction rather than writing
to this bit.
0 = Normal CPU operation
1 = CPU is halted (not recommended)
Note
4. C = Clear. This bit is cleared only by the user and cannot be set by firmware.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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11.1 Power on Reset
POR occurs every time the power to the device is switched on.
POR is released when the supply is typically 2.6V for the upward
supply transition, with typically 50 mV of hysteresis during the
power on transient. Bit 4 of the System Status and Control
Register (CPU_SCR) is set to record this event (the register
contents are set to 00010000 by the POR). After a POR, the
microprocessor is held off for approximately 20 ms for the VCC
supply to stabilize before executing the first instruction at
address 0x00 in the Flash. If the VCC voltage drops below the
POR downward supply trip point, POR is reasserted. The VCC
supply must ramp linearly from 0 to 4V in less than 200 ms.
Note The PORS status bit is set at POR and is cleared only by
the user. It cannot be set by firmware.
11.2 Watchdog Timer Reset
The sleep timer is used to generate the sleep time period and the
Watchdog time period. The sleep timer uses the Internal 32 kHz
Low power Oscillator system clock to produce the sleep time
period. The user can program the sleep time period using the
Sleep Timer bits of the OSC_CR0 Register (Table 10-4 on page
23). When the sleep time elapses (sleep timer overflows), an
interrupt to the Sleep Timer Interrupt Vector is generated.
The Watchdog Timer period is automatically set to be three
counts of the Sleep Timer overflow. This represents between two
and three sleep intervals depending on the count in the Sleep
Timer at the previous WDT clear. When this timer reaches three,
a WDR is generated.
The user can either clear the WDT, or the WDT and the Sleep
Timer. When the user writes to the Reset WDT Register
(RES_WDT), the WDT is cleared. If the data that is written is the
hex value 0x38, the Sleep Timer is also cleared at the same time.
The user has the option to enable the WDT. The WDT is enabled
by clearing the PORS bit. After the PORS bit is cleared, the WDT
cannot be disabled. The only exception to this is if a POR event
takes place, which disables the WDT.
Table 11-2. Reset Watchdog Timer (RESWDT) [0xE3] [W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Reset Watchdog Timer [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Any write to this register clears Watchdog Timer; a write of 0x38 also clears the Sleep Timer.
Bit [7:0]: Reset Watchdog Timer [7:0]
12. Sleep Mode
The CPU is put to sleep only by the firmware. This is
accomplished by setting the Sleep bit in the System Status and
Control Register (CPU_SCR). This stops the CPU from
executing instructions, and the CPU remains asleep until an
interrupt comes pending, or there is a reset event (either a Power
on Reset, or a Watchdog Timer Reset).
The Low Voltage Detection circuit (LVD) drops into fully
functional power reduced states, and the latency for the LVD is
increased. The actual latency is traded against power
consumption by changing Sleep Duty Cycle field of the ECO_TR
Register.
The Internal 32 kHz Low speed Oscillator remains running.
Before entering the suspend mode, the firmware can optionally
configure the 32 kHz Low speed Oscillator to operate in a low
power mode to help reduce the over all power consumption
(Using Bit 7, Table 10-2 on page 22). This helps save
approximately 5 μA; however, the trade off is that the 32 kHz Low
speed Oscillator is less accurate.
When the CPU enters sleep mode the CPUCLK Select (Bit 1,
Table 10-3 on page 22) is forced to the Internal Oscillator. The
internal oscillator recovery time is three clock cycles of the
Internal 32 kHz Low power Oscillator. The Internal 24 MHz
Oscillator restarts immediately on exiting Sleep mode. If an
external clock is used, firmware switches the clock source for the
CPU.
On exiting sleep mode, after the clock is stable and the delay
time has expired, the instruction immediately following the sleep
instruction is executed before the interrupt service routine (if
enabled).
The Sleep interrupt allows the microcontroller to wake up
periodically and poll system components while maintaining very
low average power consumption. The Sleep interrupt may also
be used to provide periodic interrupts during non-sleep modes.
All interrupts remain active. Only the occurrence of an interrupt
wakes the part from sleep. The Stop bit in the System Status and
Control Register (CPU_SCR) must be cleared for a part to
resume out of sleep. The Global Interrupt Enable bit of the CPU
Flags Register (CPU_F) does not have any effect. Any
unmasked interrupt wakes the system up. As a result, any
interrupts not intended for waking must be disabled through the
Interrupt Mask Registers.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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12.1 Sleep Sequence
The SLEEP bit is an input into the sleep logic circuit. This circuit
is designed to sequence the device into and out of the hardware
sleep state. The hardware sequence to put the device to sleep
is shown in Figure 12-1. and is defined as follows.
1. Firmware sets the SLEEP bit in the CPU_SCR0 register. The
Bus Request (BRQ) signal to the CPU is immediately
asserted. This is a request by the system to halt CPU
operation at an instruction boundary. The CPU samples BRQ
on the positive edge of CPUCLK.
2. Due to the specific timing of the register write, the CPU issues
a Bus Request Acknowledge (BRA) on the following positive
edge of the CPU clock. The sleep logic waits for the following
negative edge of the CPU clock and then asserts a system
wide Power Down (PD) signal. In Figure 12-1. on page 29 the
CPU is halted and the system wide power down signal is
asserted.
3. The system wide PD (power down) signal controls several
major circuit blocks: The Flash memory module, the internal
24 MHz oscillator, the EFTB filter and the bandgap voltage
reference. These circuits transition into a zero power state.
The only operational circuits on chip are the Low Power
oscillator, the bandgap refresh circuit, and the supply voltage.
monitor. (POR/LVD) circuit.
Figure 12-1. Sleep Timing
Firmware write to SCR
SLEEP bit causes an
immediate BRQ
CPU
CPU captures BRQ
on next CPUCLK responds with
a BRA
edge
On the falling edge of CPUCLK,
PD is asserted. The 24/48 MHz
system clock is halted; the Flash
and bandgap are powered down
CPUCLK
IOW
SLEEP
BRQ
BRA
PD
12.2 Wake up Sequence
Once asleep, the only event that can wake the system up is an
interrupt. The global interrupt enable of the CPU flag register is
not required to be set. Any unmasked interrupt wakes the system
up. It is optional for the CPU to actually take the interrupt after
the wake up sequence. The wake up sequence is synchronized
to the 32 kHz clock for purposes of sequencing a startup delay,
to allow the Flash memory module enough time to power up
before the CPU asserts the first read access. Another reason for
the delay is to allow the oscillator, Bandgap, and LVD/POR
circuits time to settle before actually being used in the system.
As shown in Figure 12-2. on page 30, the wake up sequence is
as follows:
1. The wake up interrupt occurs and is synchronized by the negative edge of the 32 kHz clock.
2. At the following positive edge of the 32 kHz clock, the system
wide PD signal is negated. The Flash memory module,
internal oscillator, EFTB, and bandgap circuit are all powered
up to a normal operating state.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
3. At the following positive edge of the 32 kHz clock, the current
values for the precision POR and LVD have settled and are
sampled.
4. At the following negative edge of the 32 kHz clock (after about
15 µS nominal), the BRQ signal is negated by the sleep logic
circuit. On the following CPUCLK, BRA is negated by the CPU
and instruction execution resumes. Note that in Figure 12-2.
on page 30 fixed function blocks, such as Flash, internal
oscillator, EFTB, and bandgap, have about 15 µSec start up.
The wakeup times (interrupt to CPU operational) range from
75 µS to 105 µS.
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12.3 Low Power in Sleep Mode
To achieve the lowest possible power consumption during
suspend or sleep, the following conditions must be observed in
addition to considerations for the sleep timer:
1. All GPIOs must be set to outputs and driven low.
2. Clear P11CR[0], P10CR[0] - during USB and Non-USB operations
3. Clear the USB Enable USBCR[7] - during USB mode operations
4. Set P10CR[1] - during non-USB mode operations
5. Make sure 32 kHz oscillator clock is not selected as clock
source to ITMRCLK, TCAPCLK. Not even as clock output
source, onto either P01_CLKOUT or P12_VREG pins.
All the other blocks go to the power down mode automatically on
suspend.
The following steps are user configurable and help in reducing
the average suspend mode power consumption.
1. Configure the power supply monitor at a large regular intervals, control register bits are 1,EB[7:6] (Power system sleep
duty cycle PSSDC[1:0]).
2. Configure the Low power oscillator into low power mode,
control register bit is LOPSCTR[7].
For low power considerations during sleep when external clock
is used as the CPUCLK source, the clock source must be held
low to avoid unintentional leakage current. If the clock is held
high, then there may be a leakage through M8C. To avoid current
consumption make sure ITMRCLK, TCPCLK, and USBCLK are
not sourced by either low power 32 kHz oscillator or 24 MHz
crystal-less oscillator. Do not select 24 MHz or 32 kHz oscillator
clocks on to the P01_CLKOUT/P12_VREG pin.
Note In case of a self powered designs, particularly battery
power, the USB suspend current specifications may not be met
because the USB pins are expecting termination.
Figure 12-2. Wake Up Timing
Sleep Timer or GPIO
interrupt occurs
Interrupt is double sampled by
32K clock and PD is negated to
system
CPU is restarted after
90ms (nominal)
CLK32K
INT
SLEEP
PD
BANDGAP
LVD PPOR
ENABLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE LVD/
POR
CPUCLK/
24MHz
(Not to Scale)
BRQ
BRA
CPU
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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13. Low Voltage Detect Control
Table 13-1. Low Voltage Control Register (LVDCR) [0x1E3] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
Reserved
Field
4
PORLEV[1:0]
3
2
Reserved
1
0
VM[2:0]
Read/Write
–
–
R/W
R/W
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This register controls the configuration of the Power on Reset/Low voltage Detection block.
Note This register exists in the second bank of IO space. This requires setting the XIO bit in the CPU flags register.
Bit [7:6]: Reserved
Bit [5:4]: PORLEV[1:0]
This field controls the level below which the precision power on reset (PPOR) detector generates a reset.
0 0 = 2.7V Range (trip near 2.6V)
0 1 = 3V Range (trip near 2.9V)
1 0 = 5V Range, >4.75V (trip near 4.65V). This setting must be used when operating the CPU above 12 MHz.
1 1 = PPOR does not generate a reset, but values read from the Voltage Monitor Comparators Register (Table 13-2) give the
internal PPOR comparator state with trip point set to the 3V range setting.
Bit 3: Reserved
Bit [2:0]: VM[2:0]
VM[2:0]
LVD Trip
LVD Trip
LVD Trip
Point (V) Min Point (V) Typ Point (V) Max
000
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
001
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
010
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
011
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
100
4.439
4.48
4.528
101
4.597
4.64
4.689
110
4.680
4.73
4.774
111
4.766
4.82
4.862
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Table 13-2. Voltage Monitor Comparators Register (VLTCMP) [0x1E4] [R]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
Reserved
Field
1
0
LVD
PPOR
Read/Write
–
–
–
–
–
–
R
R
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This read only register allows reading the current state of the Low-Voltage-Detection and Precision-Power-On-Reset comparators
Bit [7:2]: Reserved
Bit 1: LVD
This bit is set to indicate that the low-voltage-detect comparator has tripped, indicating that the supply voltage has gone below
the trip point set by VM[2:0] (See Table 13-1)
0 = No low-voltage-detect event
1 = A low-voltage-detect has tripped
Bit 0: PPOR
This bit is set to indicate that the precision-power-on-reset comparator has tripped, indicating that the supply voltage is below
the trip point set by PORLEV[1:0]
0 = No precision-power-on-reset event
1 = A precision-power-on-reset event has occurred
Note This register exists in the second bank of IO space. This requires setting the XIO bit in the CPU flags register.
13.0.1 ECO Trim Register
Table 13-3. ECO (ECO_TR) [0x1EB] [R/W]
Bit #
Field
7
6
5
4
3
Sleep Duty Cycle [1:0]
2
1
0
Reserved
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
–
–
–
–
–
–
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This register controls the ratios (in numbers of 32 kHz clock periods) of “on” time versus “off” time for LVD and POR detection
circuit.
Bit [7:6]: Sleep Duty Cycle [1:0]
0 0 = 1/128 periods of the Internal 32 kHz Low-speed Oscillator
0 1 = 1/512 periods of the Internal 32 kHz Low-speed Oscillator
1 0 = 1/32 periods of the Internal 32 kHz Low-speed Oscillator
1 1 = 1/8 periods of the Internal 32 kHz Low-speed Oscillator
Note This register exists in the second bank of IO space. This requires setting the XIO bit in the CPU flags register.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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14. General Purpose IO (GPIO) Ports
14.1 Port Data Registers
Table 14-1. P0 Data Register (P0DATA)[0x00] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
P0.7
P0.6/TIO1
P0.5/TIO0
P0.4/INT2
P0.3/INT1
P0.2/INT0
P0.1/CLKOUT
P0.0/CLKIN
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This register contains the data for Port 0. Writing to this register sets the bit values to be output on output enabled pins. Reading
from this register returns the current state of the Port 0 pins.
Bit 7: P0.7 Data
P0.7 only exists in the CY7C638xx
Bit [6:5]: P0.6–P0.5 Data/TIO1 and TIO0
Besides their use as the P0.6–P0.5 GPIOs, these pins are also used for the alternate functions as the Capture Timer input or
Timer output pins (TIO1 and TIO0). To configure the P0.5 and P0.6 pins, refer to the P0.5/TIO0–P0.6/TIO1 Configuration Register
(Table 14-8 on page 37).
The use of the pins as the P0.6–P0.5 GPIOs and the alternate functions exist in all the enCoRe II parts.
Bit [4:2]: P0.4–P0.2 Data/INT2 – INT0
Besides their use as the P0.4–P0.2 GPIOs, these pins are also used for the alternate functions as the Interrupt pins (INT0–INT2).
To configure the P0.4–P0.2 pins, refer to the P0.2/INT0–P0.4/INT2 Configuration Register (Table 14-7 on page 37).
The use of the pins as the P0.4–P0.2 GPIOs and the alternate functions exist in all the enCoRe II parts.
Bit 1: P0.1/CLKOUT
Besides its use as the P0.1 GPIO, this pin is also used for an alternate function as the CLK OUT pin. To configure the P0.1 pin,
refer to the P0.1/CLKOUT Configuration Register (Table 14-6 on page 36).
Bit 0: P0.0/CLKIN
Besides its use as the P0.0 GPIO, this pin is also used for an alternate function as the CLKIN pin. To configure the P0.0 pin,
refer to the P0.0/CLKIN Configuration Register (Table 14-5 on page 36).
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Table 14-2. P1 Data Register (P1DATA) [0x01] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
P1.7
P1.6/SMISO
P1.5/SMOSI
P1.4/SCLK
P1.3/SSEL
P1.2/VREG
P1.1/D–
P1.0/D+
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This register contains the data for Port 1. Writing to this register sets the bit values to be output on output enabled pins. Reading
from this register returns the current state of the Port 1 pins.
Bit 7: P1.7 Data
P1.7 only exists in the CY7C638xx.
Bit [6:3]: P1.6–P1.3 Data/SPI Pins (SMISO, SMOSI, SCLK, SSEL)
Besides their use as the P1.6–P1.3 GPIOs, these pins are also used for the alternate function as the SPI interface pins. To
configure the P1.6–P1.3 pins, refer to the P1.3–P1.6 Configuration Register (Table 14-13 on page 39).
The use of the pins as the P1.6–P1.3 GPIOs and the alternate functions exist in all the enCoRe II parts.
Bit 2: P1.2/VREG
On the CY7C638x3, this pin is used as the P1.2 GPIO or the VREG output. If the VREG output is enabled (Bit 0
Table 19-1 on page 57 is set), a 3.3V source is placed on the pin and the GPIO function of the pin is disabled.
The VREG functionality is not present in the CY7C63310 and the CY7C63801 variants. A 1 μF min, 2 μF max capacitor is
required on VREG output.
Bit [1:0]: P1.1–P1.0/D– and D+
When the USB mode is disabled (Bit 7 in Table 21-1 on page 58 is clear), the P1.1 and P1.0 bits are used to control the state of
the P1.0 and P1.1 pins. When the USB mode is enabled, the P1.1 and P1.0 pins are used as the D– and D+ pins respectively.
If the USB Force State bit (Bit 0 in Table 19-1) is set, the state of the D– and D+ pins are controlled by writing to the D– and D+ bits.
Table 14-3. P2 Data Register (P2DATA) [0x02] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Reserved
Field
0
P2.1–P2.0
Read/Write
-
-
-
-
-
-
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This register contains the data for Port 2. Writing to this register sets the bit values to output on output enabled pins. Reading
from this register returns the current state of the Port 2 pins.
Bit [7:2]: Reserved Data [7:2]
Bit [1:0]: P2 Data [1:0]
P2.1–P2.0 only exist in the CY7C638(2/3)3.
Table 14-4. P3 Data Register (P3DATA) [0x03] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Reserved
Field
0
P3.1–P3.0
Read/Write
-
-
-
-
-
-
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This register contains the data for Port 3. Writing to this register sets the bit values to be output on output enabled pins. Reading
from this register returns the current state of the Port 3 pins.
Bit [7:2]: Reserved Data [7:2]
Bit [1:0]: P3 Data [1:0]
P3.1–P3.0 only exist in the CY7C638(2/3)3.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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14.2 GPIO Port Configuration
14.2.5 Open Drain
All the GPIO configuration registers have common configuration
controls. The following are the bit definitions of the GPIO
configuration registers.
When set, the output on the pin is determined by the Port Data
Register. If the corresponding bit in the Port Data Register is set,
the pin is in high impedance state. If the corresponding bit in the
Port Data Register is clear, the pin is driven low.
14.2.1 Int Enable
When clear, the output is driven LOW or HIGH.
When set, the Int Enable bit allows the GPIO to generate
interrupts. Interrupt generate can occur regardless of whether
the pin is configured for input or output. All interrupts are edge
sensitive; however for any interrupt that is shared by multiple
sources (that is, Ports 2, 3, and 4) all inputs must be deasserted
before a new interrupt can occur.
14.2.6 Pull up Enable
When set the pin has a 7K pull up to VCC (or VREG for ports with
V3.3 enabled).
When clear, the pull up is disabled.
When clear, the corresponding interrupt is disabled on the pin.
14.2.7 Output Enable
It is possible to configure GPIOs as outputs, enable the interrupt
on the pin and then generate the interrupt by driving the appropriate pin state. This is useful in tests and may have value in
applications.
When set, the output driver of the pin is enabled.
14.2.2 Int Act Low
14.2.8 VREG Output/SPI Use
When set, the corresponding interrupt is active on the falling
edge.
The P1.2(VREG), P1.3(SSEL), P1.4(SCLK), P1.5(SMOSI) and
P1.6(SMISO) pins are used for their dedicated functions or for
GPIO.
When clear, the corresponding interrupt is active on the rising
edge.
When clear, the output driver of the pin is disabled.
For pins with shared functions there are some special cases.
When set, the input has TTL threshold. When clear, the input has
standard CMOS threshold.
To enable the pin for GPIO, clear the corresponding VREG
Output or SPI Use bit. The SPI function controls the output
enable for its dedicated function pins when their GPIO enable bit
is clear. The VREG output is not available on the CY7C63801
and CY7C63310.
14.2.4 High Sink
14.2.9 3.3V Drive
When set, the output can sink up to 50 mA.
The P1.3(SSEL), P1.4(SCLK), P1.5(SMOSI) and P1.6(SMISO)
pins have an alternate voltage source from the voltage regulator.
If the 3.3V Drive bit is set a high level is driven from the voltage
regulator instead of from VCC.
14.2.3 TTL Thresh
When clear, the output can sink up to 8 mA.
Only the P1.7–P1.3 have 50 mA sink drive capability. Other pins
have 8 mA sink drive capability.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Setting the 3.3V Drive bit does not enable the voltage regulator.
That must be done explicitly by setting the VREG Enable bit in
the VREGCR Register (Table 19-1 on page 57).
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Figure 14-1. Block Diagram of a GPIO
VCC
VREG
3.3V Drive
Pull-Up Enable
Output Enable
VCC
VREG
RUP
Open Drain
Port Data
Data Out
GPIO
PIN
High Sink
VCC GND
VREG GND
Data In
TTL Threshold
Table 14-5. P0.0/CLKIN Configuration (P00CR) [0x05] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
Int Enable
Int Act Low
TTL Thresh
Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up Enable
Output Enable
Read/Write
--
R/W
R/W
R/W
--
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This pin is shared between the P0.0 GPIO use and the CLKIN pin for an external clock. When the external clock input is enabled
(Bit[0] in register CPUCLKCR Table 10-3 on page 22) the settings of this register are ignored.
The use of the pin as the P0.0 GPIO is available in all the enCoRe II parts.
Table 14-6. P0.1/CLKOUT Configuration (P01CR) [0x06] R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
CLK Output
Int Enable
Int Act Low
TTL Thresh
Reserved
Open Drain
Pull Up Enable
Output Enable
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
--
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This pin is shared between the P0.1 GPIO use and the CLKOUT pin. When CLK output is set, the internally selected clock is
sent out onto P0.1CLKOUT pin.
The use of the pin as the P0.1 GPIO is available in all the enCoRe II parts.
Bit 7: CLK Output
0 = The clock output is disabled.
1 = The clock selected by the CLK Select field (Bit [1:0] of the CLKIOCR Register (Table 10-7 on page 26) is driven out to the pin.
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Table 14-7. P0.2/INT0–P0.4/INT2 Configuration (P02CR–P04CR) [0x07–0x09] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
Reserved
Field
5
4
3
2
1
0
Int Act Low
TTL Thresh
Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up Enable
Output Enable
Read/Write
–
–
R/W
R/W
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
These registers control the operation of pins P0.2–P0.4 respectively. The pins are shared between the P0.2–P0.4 GPIOs and
the INT0–INT2. These registers exist in all enCoRe II parts. The INT0–INT2 interrupts are different from all the other GPIO
interrupts. These pins are connected directly to the interrupt controller to provide three edge sensitive interrupts with independent
interrupt vectors. These interrupts occur on a rising edge when Int act Low is clear and on a falling edge when Int act Low is set.
The pins are enabled as interrupt sources in the interrupt controller registers (Table 17-8 on page 55 and Table 17-6 on page 53).
To use these pins as interrupt inputs, configure them as inputs by clearing the corresponding Output Enable. If the INT0–INT2
pins are configured as outputs with interrupts enabled, firmware can generate an interrupt by writing the appropriate value to the
P0.2, P0.3 and P0.4 data bits in the P0 Data Register.
Regardless of whether the pins are used as Interrupt or GPIO pins the Int Enable, Int act Low, TTL Threshold, Open Drain, and
Pull Up Enable bits control the behavior of the pin.
The P0.2/INT0–P0.4/INT2 pins are individually configured with the P02CR (0x07), P03CR (0x08), and P04CR (0x09) respectively.
Note Changing the state of the Int Act Low bit can cause an unintentional interrupt to be generated. When configuring these
interrupt sources, it is best to follow the following procedure:
1. Disable interrupt source
2. Configure interrupt source
3. Clear any pending interrupts from the source
4. Enable interrupt source
Table 14-8. P0.5/TIO0 – P0.6/TIO1 Configuration (P05CR–P06CR) [0x0A–0x0B] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
TIO Output
Int Enable
Int Act Low
TTL Thresh
Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up Enable
Output Enable
Read/Write
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
These registers control the operation of pins P0.5 through P0.6, respectively. These registers exist in all enCoRe II parts.
P0.5 and P0.6 are shared with TIO0 and TIO1, respectively. To use these pins as Capture Timer inputs, configure them as inputs
by clearing the corresponding Output Enable. To use TIO0 and TIO1 as Timer outputs, set the TIOx Output and Output Enable
bits. If these pins are configured as outputs and the TIO Output bit is clear, firmware can control the TIO0 and TIO1 inputs by
writing the value to the P0.5 and P0.6 data bits in the P0 Data Register.
Regardless of whether either pin is used as a TIO or GPIO pin the Int Enable, Int act Low, TTL Threshold, Open Drain, and Pull
Up Enable control the behavior of the pin.
TIO0(P0.5) when enabled outputs a positive pulse from the Free Running Timer. This is the same signal that is used internally
to generate the 1024 μs timer interrupt. This signal is not gated by the interrupt enable state. The pulse is active for one cycle
of the capture timer clock.
TIO1(P0.6) when enabled outputs a positive pulse from the programmable interval timer. This is the same signal that is used
internally to generate the programmable timer interval interrupt. This signal is not gated by the interrupt enable state. The pulse
is active for one cycle of the interval timer clock.
The P0.5/TIO0 and P0.6/TIO1 pins are individually configured with the P05CR (0x0A) and P06CR (0x0B), respectively.
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Table 14-9. P0.7 Configuration (P07CR) [0x0C] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
Int Enable
Int Act Low
TTL Thresh
Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up Enable
Output Enable
Read/Write
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This register controls the operation of pin P0.7. The P0.7 pin only exists in the CY7C638(1/2/3)3.
Table 14-10. P1.0/D+ Configuration (P10CR) [0x0D] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
Field
Reserved
Int Enable
Int Act Low
4
3
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
–
–
Default
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
0
PS/2 Pull up
Enable
Output Enable
–
R/W
R/W
0
0
0
Reserved
This register controls the operation of the P1.0 (D+) pin when the USB interface is not enabled, allowing the pin to be used as
a PS2 interface or a GPIO. See Table 21-1 on page 58 for information on enabling the USB. When the USB is enabled, none of
the controls in this register have any affect on the P1.0 pin.
Note The P1.0 is an open drain only output. It can actively drive a signal low, but cannot actively drive a signal high.
Bit 1: PS/2 Pull up Enable
0 = Disable the 5K ohm pull up resistors
1 = Enable 5K ohm pull up resistors for both P1.0 and P1.1. Enable the use of the P1.0 (D+) and P1.1 (D–) pins as a PS2 style
interface.
Table 14-11. P1.1/D– Configuration (P11CR) [0x0E] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
Field
Reserved
Int Enable
Int Act Low
4
3
Read/Write
–
R/W
R/W
–
–
Default
0
0
0
0
0
Reserved
2
1
0
Open Drain
Reserved
Output Enable
R/W
–
R/W
0
0
0
This register controls the operation of the P1.1 (D–) pin when the USB interface is not enabled, allowing the pin to be used as
a PS2 interface or a GPIO. See Table 21-1 on page 58 for information on enabling USB. When USB is enabled, none of the
controls in this register have any affect on the P1.1 pin. When USB is disabled, the 5K ohm pull up resistor on this pin may be
enabled by the PS/2 Pull Up Enable bit of the P10CR Register (Table 14-10)
Note There is no 2 mA sourcing capability on this pin. The pin can only sink 5 mA at VOL3 (See section DC Characteristics on
page 68)
Table 14-12. P1.2 Configuration (P12CR) [0x0F] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
CLK Output
Int Enable
Int Act Low
TTL Threshold
Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up Enable
Output Enable
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This register controls the operation of the P1.2.
Bit 7: CLK Output
0 = The internally selected clock is not sent out onto P1.2 pin
1 = When CLK Output is set, the internally selected clock is sent out onto P1.2 pin
Note:Table 10-7, “Clock IO Config (CLKIOCR) [0x32] [R/W],” on page 26 is used to select the external or internal clock in enCoRe
II devices
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Table 14-13. P1.3 Configuration (P13CR) [0x10] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
Int Enable
Int Act Low
3.3V Drive
High Sink
Open Drain
Pull up Enable
Output Enable
Read/Write
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This register controls the operation of the P1.3 pin. This register exists in all enCoRe II parts.
The P1.3 GPIO’s threshold is always set to TTL.
When the SPI hardware is enabled or disabled, the pin is controlled by the Output Enable bit and the corresponding bit in the
P1 data register.
Regardless of whether the pin is used as an SPI or GPIO pin the Int Enable, Int act Low, 3.3V Drive, High Sink, Open Drain, and
Pull Up Enable control the behavior of the pin.
Table 14-14. P1.4–P1.6 Configuration (P14CR–P16CR) [0x11–0x13] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
SPI Use
Int Enable
Int Act Low
3.3V Drive
High Sink
Open Drain
Pull up Enable
Output Enable
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
These registers control the operation of pins P1.4–P1.6, respectively. These registers exist in all enCoRe II parts.
Bit 7: SPI Use
0 = Disable the SPI alternate function. The pin is used as a GPIO
1 = Enable the SPI function. The SPI circuitry controls the output of the pin
The P1.4–P1.6 GPIO’s threshold is always set to TTL.
When the SPI hardware is enabled, pins that are configured as SPI Use have their output enable and output state controlled by
the SPI circuitry. When the SPI hardware is disabled or a pin has its SPI Use bit clear, the pin is controlled by the Output Enable
bit and the corresponding bit in the P1 data register.
Regardless of whether any pin is used as an SPI or GPIO pin the Int Enable, Int act Low, 3.3V Drive, High Sink, Open Drain,
and Pull up Enable control the behavior of the pin.
Note for Comm Modes 01 or 10 (SPI Master or SPI Slave, see Table 15-2 on page 41)
When configured for SPI (SPI Use = 1 and Comm Modes [1:0] = SPI Master or SPI Slave mode), the input and output direction
of pins P1.5, and P1.6 is set automatically by the SPI logic. However, pin P1.4's input and output direction is NOT automatically
set; it must be explicitly set by firmware. For SPI Master mode, pin P1.4 must be configured as an output; for SPI Slave mode,
pin P1.4 must be configured as an input.
Table 14-15. P1.7 Configuration (P17CR) [0x14] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
Int Enable
Int Act Low
Reserved
High Sink
Open Drain
Pull up Enable
Output Enable
Read/Write
–
R/W
R/W
-
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
This register controls the operation of pin P1.7. This register only exists in CY7C638(1/2/3)3. The P1.7 GPIO’s threshold is
always set to TTL.
Table 14-16. P2 Configuration (P2CR) [0x15] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
Int Enable
Int Act Low
TTL Thresh
Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up Enable
Output Enable
Read/Write
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
-
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This register only exists in CY7C638(2/3)3. This register controls the operation of pins P2.0–P2.1.
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Table 14-17. P3 Configuration (P3CR) [0x16] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
Int Enable
Int Act Low
TTL Thresh
Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up Enable
Output Enable
Read/Write
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
-
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
This register exists in CY7C638(2/3)3. This register controls the operation of pins P3.0–P3.1.
15. Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI)
The SPI Master/Slave Interface core logic runs on the SPI clock domain, so that its functionality is independent of system clock speed.
SPI is a four pin serial interface comprised of a clock, an enable and two data pins.
15.1 SPI Data Register
Table 15-1. SPI Data Register (SPIDATA) [0x3C] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
SPIData[7:0]
Field
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
When read, this register returns the contents of the receive buffer. When written, it loads the transmit holding register.
Bit [7:0]: SPI Data [7:0]
When an interrupt occurs to indicate to the firmware that a byte of receive data is available, or the transmitter holding register is empty,
the firmware has 7 SPI clocks to manage the buffers: to empty the receiver buffer or to refill the transmit holding register. Failure to
meet this timing requirement results in incorrect data transfer.
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15.2 SPI Configure Register
Table 15-2. SPI Configure Register (SPICR) [0x3D] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
Field
Swap
LSB First
5
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
4
3
2
CPOL
CPHA
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
0
0
0
0
0
Comm Mode
1
0
SCLK Select
Bit 7: Swap
0 = Swap function disabled.
1 = The SPI block swaps its use of SMOSI and SMISO. This is useful in implementing single wire communications similar to SPI.
Bit 6: LSB First
0 = The SPI transmits and receives the MSB (Most Significant Bit) first.
1 = The SPI transmits and receives the LSB (Least Significant Bit) first.
Bit [5:4]: Comm Mode [1:0]
0 0: All SPI communication disabled.
0 1: SPI master mode
1 0: SPI slave mode
1 1: Reserved
Bit 3: CPOL
This bit controls the SPI clock (SCLK) idle polarity.
0 = SCLK idles low
1 = SCLK idles high
Bit 2: CPHA
The Clock Phase bit controls the phase of the clock on which data is sampled. Table 15-4 on page 42 shows the timing for the
various combinations of LSB First, CPOL, and CPHA.
Bit [1:0]: SCLK Select
This field selects the speed of the master SCLK. When in master mode, SCLK is generated by dividing the base CPUCLK.
Note for Comm Modes 01b or 10b (SPI Master or SPI Slave)
When configured for SPI, (SPI Use = 1 Table 14-14 on page 39), the input/output direction of pins P1.3, P1.5, and P1.6 is set
automatically by the SPI logic. However, pin P1.4's input/output direction is NOT automatically set; it must be explicitly set by
firmware. For SPI Master mode, pin P1.4 must be configured as an output; for SPI Slave mode, pin P1.4 must be configured as
an input.
Table 15-3. SPI SCLK Frequency
SCLK
Select
CPUCLK
Divisor
SCLK Frequency when CPUCLK =
12 MHz
24 MHz
4 MHz
00
6
2 MHz
01
12
1 MHz
2 MHz
10
48
250 kHz
500 kHz
11
96
125 kHz
250 kHz
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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15.3 SPI Interface Pins
The SPI interface uses the P1.3–P1.6 pins. These pins are configured using the P1.3 and P1.4–P1.6 Configuration.
Table 15-4. SPI Mode Timing vs. LSB First, CPOL and CPHA
LSB First CPHA CPOL
0
0
Diagram
0
SCLK
SSEL
D AT A
0
0
X
MSB
B it 7
B it 6
B it 5
B it 4
B it 3
B it 2
X
LSB
1
SC LK
SSEL
DAT A
0
1
X
MSB
B it 7
B it 6
B it 5
B it 4
B it 3
B it 2
X
LSB
0
SC LK
SSEL
DAT A
0
1
X
MSB
B it 7
B it 6
B it 5
B it 4
B it 3
B it 2
LS B
X
X
MS B
B it 7
B it 6
B it 5
B it 4
B it 3
B it 2
LS B
X
1
SC L K
SSEL
D AT A
1
0
0
SCLK
SSEL
DAT A
1
0
X
LSB
B it 2
B it 3
B it 4
B it 5
B it 6
B it 7
MS B
X
X
LSB
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
MSB
X
1
SCLK
SSEL
DAT A
1
1
0
SCLK
SSEL
DAT A
1
1
X
LSB
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
MSB
X
X
LSB
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
MSB
X
1
SC LK
SSEL
DAT A
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16. Timer Registers
All timer functions of the enCoRe II are provided by a single timer block. The timer block is asynchronous from the CPU clock.
16.1 Registers
16.1.1 Free Running Counter
The 16 bit free-running counter is clocked by the Timer Capture Clock (TCAPCLK). It is read in software for use as a general purpose
time base. When the low order byte is read, the high order byte is registered. Reading the high order byte reads this register, allowing
the CPU to read the 16-bit value atomically (loads all bits at one time). The free-running timer generates an interrupt at 1024 μs rate
when clocked by a 4 MHz source. It also generates an interrupt when the free running counter overflow occurs every 16.384 ms (with
a 4 MHz source). This allows extending the length of the timer in software.
Figure 16-1. 16-Bit Free Running Counter Block Diagram
O verflow
Interrupt/W rap
Interrupt
Tim er C apture
C lock
16-bit Free
R unning C ounter
1024µs T im er
Interrupt
Table 16-1. Free Running Timer Low order Byte (FRTMRL) [0x20] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Free running Timer [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:0]: Free running Timer [7:0]
This register holds the low order byte of the 16-bit free running timer. Reading this register causes the high order byte to be
moved into a holding register allowing an automatic read of all 16 bits simultaneously.
For reads, the actual read occurs in the cycle when the low order is read. For writes, the actual time the write occurs is the cycle
when the high order is written.
When reading the Free Running Timer, the low order byte must be read first and the high order second. When writing, the low
order byte must be written first then the high order byte.
Table 16-2. Free Running Timer High-order Byte (FRTMRH) [0x21] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Free-running Timer [15:8]
Field
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:0]: Free-running Timer [15:8]
When reading the Free-running Timer, the low order byte must be read first and the high order second. When writing, the low
order byte must be written first then the high order byte.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Table 16-3. Timer Capture 0 Rising (TIO0R) [0x22] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Capture 0 Rising [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:0]: Capture 0 Rising [7:0]
This register holds the value of the Free-running Timer when the last rising edge occurred on the TIO0 input. When Capture 0
is in 8-bit mode, the bits that are stored here are selected by the Prescale [2:0] bits in the Timer Configuration register. When
Capture 0 is in 16-bit mode this register holds the lower order 8 bits of the 16-bit timer.
Table 16-4. Timer Capture 1 Rising (TIO1R) [0x23] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Capture 1 Rising [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:0]: Capture 1 Rising [7:0]
This register holds the value of the Free-running Timer when the last rising edge occurred on the TIO1 input in the 8-bit mode.
The bits that are stored here are selected by the Prescale [2:0] bits in the Timer Configuration register. When Capture 0 is in
16-bit mode this register holds the high order 8 bits of the 16-bit timer from the last Capture 0 rising edge.
Table 16-5. Timer Capture 0 Falling (TIO0F) [0x24] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Capture 0 Falling [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:0]: Capture 0 Falling [7:0]
This register holds the value of the Free-running Timer when the last falling edge occurred on the TIO0 input. When Capture 0
is in 8-bit mode, the bits that are stored here are selected by the Prescale [2:0] bits in the Timer Configuration register. When
Capture 0 is in 16-bit mode this register holds the lower order 8 bits of the 16-bit timer.
Table 16-6. Timer Capture 1 Falling (TIO1F) [0x25] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Capture 1 Falling [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:0]: Capture 1Falling [7:0]
This register holds the value of the Free-running Timer when the last falling edge occurred on the TIO1 input in the 8-bit mode.
The bits that are stored here are selected by the Prescale [2:0] bits in the Timer Configuration register. When capture 0 is in
16-bit mode this register holds the high order 8 bits of the 16-bit timer from the last Capture 0 falling edge.
Table 16-7. Programmable Interval Timer Low (PITMRL) [0x26] [R]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Prog Interval Timer [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:0]: Prog Interval Timer [7:0]
This register holds the low order byte of the 12-bit programmable interval timer. Reading this register causes the high order byte
to be moved into a holding register allowing an automatic read of all 12 bits simultaneously.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Table 16-8. Programmable Interval Timer High (PITMRH) [0x27] [R]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
Reserved
Field
2
1
0
Prog Interval Timer [11:8]
Read/Write
–
–
–
–
R
R
R
R
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:4]: Reserved
Bit [3:0]: Prog Internal Timer [11:8]
This register holds the high order nibble of the 12-bit programmable interval timer. Reading this register returns the high order
nibble of the 12-bit timer at the instant that the low order byte was last read.
Table 16-9. Programmable Interval Reload Low (PIRL) [0x28] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Prog Interval [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:0]: Prog Interval [7:0]
This register holds the lower 8 bits of the timer. When writing into the 12-bit reload register, write the lower byte first then the higher
nibble.
Table 16-10. Programmable Interval Reload High (PIRH) [0x29] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
Reserved
Field
2
1
0
Prog Interval[11:8]
Read/Write
–
–
–
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:4]: Reserved
Bit [3:0]: Prog Interval [11:8]
This register holds the higher 4 bits of the timer. While writing into the 12-bit reload register, write the lower byte first then the higher
nibble.
Figure 16-2. Programmable Interval Timer Block Diagram
S y s te m
C lo c k
C lo c k
T im e r
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
C o n fig u r a tio n
S ta tu s a n d
C o n tro l
1 2 - b it
r e lo a d
v a lu e
1 2 - b it d o w n
c o u n te r
1 2 - b it
r e lo a d
c o u n te r
In te rru p t
C o n tr o lle r
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16.1.2 Timer Capture
Cypress enCoRe II has two 8-bit captures. Each capture has separate registers for the rising and falling time. The two eight bit captures
can be configured as a single 16-bit capture. When configured, the capture 1 registers hold the high order byte of the 16-bit timer
capture value. Each of the four capture registers may be programmed to generate an interrupt when it is loaded.
Table 16-11. Timer Configuration (TMRCR) [0x2A] [R/W]
Bit #
7
Field
First Edge Hold
6
5
4
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
–
–
–
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8-bit Capture Prescale [2:0]
3
2
Cap0 16bit
Enable
1
0
Reserved
Bit 7: First Edge Hold
The First Edge Hold function applies to all four capture timers.
0 = The time of the most recent edge is held in the Capture Timer Data Register. If multiple edges have occurred since reading
the capture timer, the time for the most recent one is read.
1 = The time of the first occurrence of an edge is held in the Capture Timer Data Register until the data is read. Subsequent
edges are ignored until the Capture Timer Data Register is read.
Bit [6:4]: 8-bit Capture Prescale [2:0]
This field controls which 8 bits of the 16 Free Running Timer are captured when in bit mode.
0 0 0 = capture timer[7:0]
0 0 1 = capture timer[8:1]
0 1 0 = capture timer[9:2]
0 1 1 = capture timer[10:3]
1 0 0 = capture timer[11:4]
1 0 1 = capture timer[12:5]
1 1 0 = capture timer[13:6]
1 1 1 = capture timer[14:7]
Bit 3: Cap0 16-bit Enable
0 = Capture 0 16-bit mode is disabled
1 = Capture 0 16-bit mode is enabled. Capture 1 is disabled and the Capture 1 rising and falling registers are used as an extension
to the Capture 0 registers—extending them to 16 bits
Bit [2:0]: Reserved
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Table 16-12. Capture Interrupt Enable (TCAPINTE) [0x2B] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
Reserved
Field
3
2
1
0
Cap1 Fall
Enable
Cap1 Rise
Enable
Cap0 Fall
Enable
Cap0 Rise
Enable
Read/Write
–
–
–
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:4]: Reserved
Bit 3: Cap1 Fall Enable
0 = Disable the capture 1 falling edge interrupt
1 = Enable the capture 1 falling edge interrupt
Bit 2: Cap1 Rise Enable
0 = Disable the capture 1 rising edge interrupt
1 = Enable the capture 1 rising edge interrupt
Bit 1: Cap0 Fall Enable
0 = Disable the capture 0 falling edge interrupt
1 = Enable the capture 0 falling edge interrupt
Bit 0: Cap0 Rise Enable
0 = Disable the capture 0 rising edge interrupt
1 = Enable the capture 0 rising edge interrupt
Table 16-13. Capture Interrupt Status (TCAPINTS) [0x2C] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
Reserved
Field
3
2
1
0
TIO1 Fall
Active
TIO1 Rise Active
TIO0 Fall
Active
TIO0 Rise Active
Read/Write
–
–
–
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:4]: Reserved
Bit 3: TIO1 Fall Active
0 = No event
1 = A falling edge has occurred on TIO1
Bit 2: TIO1 Rise Active
0 = No event
1 = A rising edge has occurred on TIO1
Bit 1: TIO0 Fall Active
0 = No event
1 = A falling edge has occurred on TIO0
Bit 0: TIO0 Rise Active
0 = No event
1 = A rising edge has occurred on TIO0
Note The interrupt status bits must be cleared by firmware to enable subsequent interrupts. This is achieved by writing a ‘1’ to
the corresponding Interrupt status bit.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Figure 16-3. Timer Functional Sequence Diagram
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Figure 16-4. 16-Bit Free Running Counter Loading Timing Diagram
clk_sys
write
valid
addr
write data
FRT reload
ready
Clk Timer
12b Prog Timer
12b reload
interrupt
12-bit programmable timer load timing
Capture timer
clk
16b free running
counter load
16b free
running counter
00A0 00A1 00A2 00A3 00A4 00A5 00A6 00A7 00A8 00A9 00AB 00AC 00AD 00AE 00AF 00B0 00B1 00B2 ACBE ACBF ACC0
16-bit free running counter loading timing
Figure 16-5. Memory Mapped Registers Read/Write Timing Diagram
clk_sys
rd_wrn
Valid
Addr
rdata
wdata
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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17. Interrupt Controller
17.1 Architectural Description
The interrupt controller and its associated registers allow the
user’s code to respond to an interrupt from almost every
functional block in the enCoRe II devices. The registers
associated with the interrupt controller allow disabling interrupts
globally or individually. The registers also provide a mechanism
by which a user may clear all pending and posted interrupts, or
clear individual posted or pending interrupts.
The following table lists all interrupts and the priorities that are
available in the enCoRe II devices.
Table 17-1. Interrupt Numbers, Priorities, Vectors
Interrupt
Priority
Interrupt
Address
0
0000h
Reset
1
0004h
POR/LVD
2
0008h
INT0
3
000Ch
SPI Transmitter Empty
4
0010h
SPI Receiver Full
5
0014h
GPIO Port 0
6
0018h
GPIO Port 1
7
001Ch
INT1
8
0020h
EP0
9
0024h
EP1
10
0028h
EP2
11
002Ch
USB Reset
Name
12
0030h
USB Active
13
0034h
1 mS Interval timer
14
0038h
Programmable Interval Timer
15
003Ch
Timer Capture 0
16
0040h
Timer Capture 1
17
0044h
16-bit Free Running Timer Wrap
18
0048h
INT2
19
004Ch
PS2 Data Low
20
0050h
GPIO Port 2
21
0054h
GPIO Port 3
22
0058h
Reserved
23
005Ch
Reserved
24
0060h
Reserved
25
0064h
Sleep Timer
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
An interrupt is posted when its interrupt conditions occur. This
results in the flip-flop in Figure 17-1. on page 51 clocking in a ‘1’.
The interrupt remains posted until the interrupt is taken or until it
is cleared by writing to the appropriate INT_CLRx register.
A posted interrupt is not pending unless it is enabled by setting
its interrupt mask bit (in the appropriate INT_MSKx register). All
pending interrupts are processed by the Priority Encoder to
determine the highest priority interrupt which is taken by the M8C
if the Global Interrupt Enable bit is set in the CPU_F register.
Disabling an interrupt by clearing its interrupt mask bit (in the
INT_MSKx register) does not clear a posted interrupt, nor does
it prevent an interrupt from being posted. It prevents a posted
interrupt from becoming pending.
Nested interrupts are accomplished by re-enabling interrupts
inside an interrupt service routine. To do this, set the IE bit in the
Flag Register.
A block diagram of the enCoRe II Interrupt Controller is shown in
Figure 17-1. on page 51.
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Figure 17-1. Interrupt Controller Block Diagram
Priority
Encoder
Interrupt Taken
or
Interrupt Vector
INT_CLRx Write
Posted
Interrupt
Pending
Interrupt
D
... ...
R
1
Interrupt
Request
Q
Interrupt
Source
(Timer,
GPIO, etc.)
M8C Core
CPU_F[0]
GIE
INT_MSKx
Mask Bit Setting
17.2 Interrupt Processing
The sequence of events that occur during interrupt processing
follows:
1. An interrupt becomes active, because:
a. The interrupt condition occurs (for example, a timer expires).
b. A previously posted interrupt is enabled through an update
of an interrupt mask register.
c. An interrupt is pending and GIE is set from 0 to 1 in the CPU
Flag register.
2. The current executing instruction finishes.
3. The internal interrupt is dispatched, taking 13 cycles. During
this time, the following actions occur: the MSB and LSB of
Program Counter and Flag registers (CPU_PC and CPU_F)
are stored onto the program stack by an automatic CALL
instruction (13 cycles) generated during the interrupt
acknowledge process.
a. The PCH, PCL, and Flag register (CPU_F) are stored onto
the program stack (in that order) by an automatic CALL
instruction (13 cycles) generated during the interrupt
acknowledge process
b. The CPU_F register is then cleared. Because this clears the
GIE bit to 0, additional interrupts are temporarily disabled.
c. The PCH (PC[15:8]) is cleared to zero.
d. The interrupt vector is read from the interrupt controller and
its value placed into PCL (PC[7:0]). This sets the program
counter to point to the appropriate address in the interrupt
table (for example, 0004h for the POR/LVD interrupt).
4. Program execution vectors to the interrupt table. Typically, a
LJMP instruction in the interrupt table sends execution to the
user's Interrupt Service Routine (ISR) for this interrupt.
5. The ISR executes. Note that interrupts are disabled because
GIE = 0. In the ISR, interrupts are re-enabled by setting
GIE = 1 (care must be taken to avoid stack overflow).
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
6. The ISR ends with a RETI instruction which restores the
Program Counter and Flag registers (CPU_PC and CPU_F).
The restored Flag register re-enables interrupts, because
GIE = 1 again.
7. Execution resumes at the next instruction, after the one that
occurred before the interrupt. However, if there are more
pending interrupts, the subsequent interrupts are processed
before the next normal program instruction.
17.3 Interrupt Trigger Conditions
Trigger conditions for most interrupts in Table 17-1 on page 50
have been explained in the relevant sections. However,
conditions under which the USB Active (interrupt address 0030h)
and PS2 Data Low (interrupt address 004Ch) interrupts are
triggered are explained follow.
1. USB Active Interrupt: Triggered when the D+/- lines are in a
non-idle state, that is, K-state or SE0 state.
2. PS2 Data Low Interrupt: Triggered when SDATA becomes low
when the SDATA pad is in the input mode for at least 6-7
32 kHz cycles.
3. The GPIO interrupts are edge triggered.
17.4 Interrupt Latency
The time between the assertion of an enabled interrupt and the
start of its ISR is calculated from the following equation.
Latency = Time for current instruction to finish + Time for internal
interrupt routine to execute + Time for LJMP instruction in
interrupt table to execute.
For example, if the 5 cycle JMP instruction is executing when an
interrupt becomes active, the total number of CPU clock cycles
before the ISR begins is as follows:
(1 to 5 cycles for JMP to finish) + (13 cycles for interrupt routine)
+ (7 cycles for LJMP) = 21 to 25 cycles.
In the previous example, at 24 MHz, 25 clock cycles take
1.042 μs.
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17.5 Interrupt Registers
The Interrupt Clear Registers (INT_CLRx) are used to enable the individual interrupt sources’ ability to clear posted interrupts.
When an INT_CLRx register is read, any bits that are set indicates an interrupt has been posted for that hardware resource. Therefore,
reading these registers gives the user the ability to determine all posted interrupts.
Table 17-2. Interrupt Clear 0 (INT_CLR0) [0xDA] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
GPIO Port 1
Sleep Timer
INT1
GPIO Port 0
SPI Receive
SPI Transmit
INT0
POR/LVD
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
When reading this register,
0 = There is no posted interrupt for the corresponding hardware
1 = Posted interrupt for the corresponding hardware present
Writing a ‘0’ to the bits clears the posted interrupts for the corresponding hardware. Writing a ‘1’ to the bits AND to the ENSWINT
(Bit 7 of the INT_MSK3 Register) posts the corresponding hardware interrupt.
Table 17-3. Interrupt Clear 1 (INT_CLR1) [0xDB] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
TCAP0
Prog Interval
Timer
1-ms Timer
USB Active
USB Reset
USB EP2
USB EP1
USB EP0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
When reading this register,
0 = There is no posted interrupt for the corresponding hardware.
1 = Posted interrupt for the corresponding hardware present.
Writing a ‘0’ to the bits clears the posted interrupts for the corresponding hardware. Writing a ‘1’ to the bits and to the ENSWINT
(Bit 7 of the INT_MSK3 Register) posts the corresponding hardware interrupt.
Table 17-4. Interrupt Clear 2 (INT_CLR2) [0xDC] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
Reserved
GPIO Port 3
GPIO Port 2
PS/2 Data Low
INT2
16-bit Counter
Wrap
TCAP1
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
When reading this register,
0 = There is no posted interrupt for the corresponding hardware.
1 = Posted interrupt for the corresponding hardware present.
Writing a ‘0’ to the bits clears the posted interrupts for the corresponding hardware. Writing a ‘1’ to the bits AND to the ENSWINT
(Bit 7 of the INT_MSK3 Register) posts the corresponding hardware interrupt.
17.5.1 Interrupt Mask Registers
The Interrupt Mask Registers (INT_MSKx) enable the individual
interrupt sources’ ability to create pending interrupts.
There are four Interrupt Mask Registers (INT_MSK0,
INT_MSK1, INT_MSK2, and INT_MSK3) which may be referred
to in general as INT_MSKx. If cleared, each bit in an INT_MSKx
register prevents a posted interrupt from becoming a pending
interrupt (input to the priority encoder). However, an interrupt can
still post even if its mask bit is zero. All INT_MSKx bits are
independent of all other INT_MSKx bits.
If an INT_MSKx bit is set, the interrupt source associated with
that mask bit may generate an interrupt that becomes a pending
interrupt.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
The Enable Software Interrupt (ENSWINT) bit in INT_MSK3[7]
determines the way an individual bit value written to an
INT_CLRx register is interpreted. When it is cleared, writing 1's
to an INT_CLRx register has no effect. However, writing 0's to an
INT_CLRx register, when ENSWINT is cleared, causes the
corresponding interrupt to clear. If the ENSWINT bit is set, any
0s written to the INT_CLRx registers are ignored. However, 1s
written to an INT_CLRx register, when ENSWINT is set, causes
an interrupt to post for the corresponding interrupt.
Software interrupts can aid in debugging interrupt service
routines by eliminating the need to create system level interactions that are sometimes necessary to create a hardware only
interrupt.
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Table 17-5. Interrupt Mask 3 (INT_MSK3) [0xDE] [R/W]
Bit #
7
Field
ENSWINT
6
5
4
Read/Write
R/W
–
–
–
Default
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
–
–
–
–
0
0
0
0
Reserved
Bit 7: Enable Software Interrupt (ENSWINT)
0= Disable. Writing 0s to an INT_CLRx register, when ENSWINT is cleared, causes the corresponding interrupt to clear
1= Enable. Writing 1s to an INT_CLRx register, when ENSWINT is set, causes the corresponding interrupt to post.
Bit [6:0]: Reserved
Table 17-6. Interrupt Mask 2 (INT_MSK2) [0xDF] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
Reserved
GPIO Port 3
Int Enable
GPIO Port 2
Int Enable
PS/2 Data Low
Int Enable
INT2
Int Enable
16-bit Counter
Wrap Int Enable
TCAP1
Int Enable
Read/Write
–
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit 7: Reserved
Bit 6: GPIO Port 4 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask GPIO Port 4 interrupt
1 = Unmask GPIO Port 4 interrupt
Bit 5: GPIO Port 3 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask GPIO Port 3 interrupt
1 = Unmask GPIO Port 3 interrupt
Bit 4: GPIO Port 2 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask GPIO Port 2 interrupt
1 = Unmask GPIO Port 2 interrupt
Bit 3: PS/2 Data Low Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask PS/2 Data Low interrupt
1 = Unmask PS/2 Data Low interrupt
Bit 2: INT2 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask INT2 interrupt
1 = Unmask INT2 interrupt
Bit 1: 16-bit Counter Wrap Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask 16-bit Counter Wrap interrupt
1 = Unmask 16-bit Counter Wrap interrupt
Bit 0: TCAP1 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask TCAP1 interrupt
1 = Unmask TCAP1 interrupt
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Table 17-7. Interrupt Mask 1 (INT_MSK1) [0xE1] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
TCAP0
Int Enable
Prog Interval
Timer
Int Enable
1 ms Timer
Int Enable
USB Active
Int Enable
USB Reset
Int Enable
USB EP2
Int Enable
USB EP1
Int Enable
USB EP0
Int Enable
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit 7: TCAP0 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask TCAP0 interrupt
1 = Unmask TCAP0 interrupt
Bit 6: Prog Interval Timer Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask Prog Interval Timer interrupt
1 = Unmask Prog Interval Timer interrupt
Bit 5: 1-ms Timer Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask 1-ms interrupt
1 = Unmask 1-ms interrupt
Bit 4: USB Active Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask USB Active interrupt
1 = Unmask USB Active interrupt
Bit 3: USB Reset Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask USB Reset interrupt
1 = Unmask USB Reset interrupt
Bit 2: USB EP2 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask EP2 interrupt
1 = Unmask EP2 interrupt
Bit 1: USB EP1 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask EP1 interrupt
1 = Unmask EP1 interrupt
Bit 0: USB EP0 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask EP0 interrupt
1 = Unmask EP0 interrupt
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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Table 17-8. Interrupt Mask 0 (INT_MSK0) [0xE0] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
GPIO Port 1
Int Enable
Sleep Timer
Int Enable
INT1
Int Enable
GPIO Port 0
Int Enable
SPI Receive
Int Enable
SPI Transmit
Int Enable
INT0
Int Enable
POR/LVD
Int Enable
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
Bit 7: GPIO Port 1 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask GPIO Port 1 interrupt
1 = Unmask GPIO Port 1 interrupt
Bit 6: Sleep Timer Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask Sleep Timer interrupt
1 = Unmask Sleep Timer interrupt
Bit 5: INT1 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask INT1 interrupt
1 = Unmask INT1 interrupt
Bit 4: GPIO Port 0 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask GPIO Port 0 interrupt
1 = Unmask GPIO Port 0 interrupt
Bit 3: SPI Receive Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask SPI Receive interrupt
1 = Unmask SPI Receive interrupt
Bit 2: SPI Transmit Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask SPI Transmit interrupt
1 = Unmask SPI Transmit interrupt
Bit 1: INT0 Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask INT0 interrupt
1 = Unmask INT0 interrupt
Bit 0: POR/LVD Interrupt Enable
0 = Mask POR/LVD interrupt
1 = Unmask POR/LVD interrupt
Table 17-9. Interrupt Vector Clear Register (INT_VC) [0xE2] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
Pending Interrupt [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
The Interrupt Vector Clear Register (INT_VC) holds the interrupt vector for the highest priority pending interrupt when read, and
when written clears all pending interrupts.
Bit [7:0]: Pending Interrupt [7:0]
8-bit data value holds the interrupt vector for the highest priority pending interrupt. Writing to this register clears all pending
interrupts.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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18. Regulator Output
18.1 VREG Control
Table 18-1. VREG Control Register (VREGCR) [0x73] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
Reserved
Field
1
0
Keep Alive
VREG Enable
Read/Write
–
–
–
–
–
–
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:2]: Reserved
Bit 1: Keep Alive
Keep Alive, when set, allows the voltage regulator to source up to 20 µA of current when the voltage regulator is disabled.
P12CR[0],P12CR[7] must be cleared.
0 = Disabled
1 = Enabled
Bit 0: VREG Enable
This bit turns on the 3.3V voltage regulator. The voltage regulator only functions within specifications when VCC is above 4.35V.
This block must not be enabled when VCC is below 4.35V—although no damage or irregularities occur if it is enabled below 4.35V.
0 = Disable the 3.3V voltage regulator output on the VREG/P1.2 pin.
1 = Enable the 3.3V voltage regulator output on the VREG/P1.2 pin. GPIO functionality of P1.2 is disabled.
Note Use of the alternate drive on pins P1.3–P1.6 requires that the VREG Enable bit be set to enable the regulator and provide
the alternate voltage.
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19. USB/PS2 Transceiver
Although the USB transceiver has features to assist in interfacing to PS/2, these features are not controlled using these registers. The
registers only control the USB interfacing features. PS/2 interfacing options are controlled by the D+ and D– GPIO Configuration
register (See Table 14-2 on page 34).
19.1 USB Transceiver Configuration
Table 19-1. USB Transceiver Configure Register (USBXCR) [0x74] [R/W]
Bit #
7
Field
USB Pull up
Enable
6
5
4
3
2
1
Read/Write
R/W
–
–
–
–
–
–
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Reserved
0
USB Force State
Bit 7: USB Pull up Enable
0 = Disable the pull up resistor on D–
1 = Enable the pull up resistor on D–. This pull up is to VCC if the PHY’s internal voltage regulator is not enabled or to the internally
generated 3.3V when VREG is enabled.
Bit [6:1]: Reserved
Bit 0: USB Force State
This bit allows the state of the USB IO pins D– and D+ to be forced to a state when USB is enabled.
0 = Disable USB Force State
1 = Enable USB Force State. Allows the D– and D+ pins to be controlled by P1.1 and P1.0 respectively when the USBIO is in
USB mode. Refer to Table 14-2 on page 34 for more information.
Note The USB transceiver has a dedicated 3.3V regulator for USB signalling purposes and to provide for the 1.5K D– pull up.
Unlike the other 3.3V regulator, this regulator cannot be controlled or accessed by firmware. When the device is suspended,
this regulator is disabled along with the bandgap (which provides the reference voltage to the regulator) and the D– line is
pulled up to 5V through an alternate 6.5K resistor. During wake up following a suspend, the band gap and the regulator are
switched on in any order. Under an extremely rare case when the device wakes up following a bus reset condition and the voltage regulator and the band gap turn on in that particular order, there is possibility of a glitch or low pulse occurring on the D–
line. The host can misinterpret this as a deattach condition. This condition, although rare, is avoided by keeping the bandgap
circuitry enabled during sleep. This is achieved by setting the ‘No Buzz’ bit, bit[5] in the OSC_CR0 register. This is an issue
only if the device is put to sleep during a bus reset condition.
20. USB Serial Interface Engine (SIE)
The SIE allows the microcontroller to communicate with the USB
host at low speed data rates (1.5 Mbps). The SIE simplifies the
interface between the microcontroller and the USB by incorporating hardware that handles the following USB bus activity
independently of the microcontroller.
■
Translate the encoded received data and format the data to be
transmitted on the bus.
■
CRC checking and generation. Flag the microcontroller if errors
exist during transmission.
■
Address checking. Ignore the transactions not addressed to
the device.
■
Send appropriate ACK/NAK/STALL handshakes.
■
Token type identification (SETUP, IN, or OUT). Set the
appropriate token bit after a valid token is received.
■
Place valid received data in the appropriate endpoint FIFOs.
■
Send and update the data toggle bit (Data1/0).
■
Bit stuffing and unstuffing.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Firmware is required to handle the rest of the USB interface with
the following tasks:
■
Coordinate enumeration by decoding USB device requests.
■
Fill and empty the FIFOs.
■
Suspend and Resume coordination.
■
Verify and select Data toggle values.
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21. USB Device
21.1 USB Device Address
Table 21-1. USB Device Address (USBCR) [0x40] [R/W]
Bit #
7
Field
USB Enable
6
5
4
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
0
0
0
0
Device Address[6:0]
Bit 7: USB Enable
This bit must be enabled by firmware before the serial interface engine (SIE) responds to the USB traffic at the address specified
in Device Address [6:0]. When this bit is cleared, the USB transceiver enters power down state. User’s firmware must clear this
bit before entering sleep mode to save power.
0 = Disable USB device address and put the USB transceiver into power down state.
1 = Enable USB device address and put the USB transceiver into normal operating mode.
Bit [6:0]: Device Address [6:0]
These bits must be set by firmware during the USB enumeration process (that is, SetAddress) to the nonzero address assigned
by the USB host.
21.2 Endpoint 0, 1, and 2 Count
Table 21-2. Endpoint 0, 1, and 2 Count (EP0CNT–EP2CNT) [0x41, 0x43, 0x45] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
Field
Data Toggle
Data Valid
5
4
3
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
0
R/W
R/W
R/W
0
0
0
Reserved
Byte Count[3:0]
Bit 7: Data Toggle
This bit selects the DATA packet's toggle state. For IN transactions, firmware must set this bit to select the transmitted Data
Toggle. For OUT or SETUP transactions, the hardware sets this bit to the state of the received Data Toggle bit.
0 = DATA0
1 = DATA1
Bit 6: Data Valid
This bit is used for OUT and SETUP tokens only. This bit is cleared to ‘0’ if CRC, bitstuff, or PID errors have occurred. This bit
does not update for some endpoint mode settings.
0 = Data is invalid. If enabled, the endpoint interrupt occurs even if invalid data is received.
1 = Data is valid
Bit [5:4]: Reserved
Bit [3:0]: Byte Count Bit [3:0]
Byte Count Bits indicate the number of data bytes in a transaction: For IN transactions, firmware loads the count with the number
of bytes to be transmitted to the host from the endpoint FIFO. Valid values are 0 to 8 inclusive. For OUT or SETUP transactions,
the count is updated by hardware to the number of data bytes received, plus 2 for the CRC bytes. Valid values are 2–10 inclusive.
For Endpoint 0 Count Register, when the count updates from a SETUP or OUT transaction, the count register locks and cannot
be written by the CPU. Reading the register unlocks it. This prevents firmware from overwriting a status update on it.
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21.3 Endpoint 0 Mode
Because both firmware and the SIE are allowed to write to the Endpoint 0 Mode and Count Registers, the SIE provides an interlocking
mechanism to prevent accidental overwriting of data.
When the SIE writes to these registers they are locked and the processor cannot write to them until after it has read them. Writing to
this register clears the upper four bits regardless of the value written.
Table 21-3. Endpoint 0 Mode (EP0MODE) [0x44] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
Field
Setup Received
IN Received
OUT Received
ACK’d Trans
3
Read/Write
R/C[5]
R/C[5]
R/C[5]
R/C[5]
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
0
R/W
R/W
R/W
0
0
0
Mode[3:0]
Bit 7: SETUP Received
This bit is set by hardware when a valid SETUP packet is received. It is forced HIGH from the start of the data packet phase of
the SETUP transactions until the end of the data phase of a control write transfer, and cannot be cleared during this interval.
While this bit is set to ‘1’, the CPU cannot write to the EP0 FIFO. This prevents firmware from overwriting an incoming SETUP
transaction before firmware has a chance to read the SETUP data.
This bit is cleared by any nonlocked writes to the register.
0 = No SETUP received
1 = SETUP received
Bit 6: IN Received
This bit when set indicates a valid IN packet has been received. This bit is updated to ‘1’ after the host acknowledges an IN data
packet. When clear, it indicates either no IN has been received or that the host did not acknowledge the IN data by sending ACK
handshake.
This bit is cleared by any nonlocked writes to the register.
0 = No IN received
1 = IN received
Bit 5: OUT Received
This bit when set indicates a valid OUT packet has been received and ACKed. This bit is updated to ‘1’ after the last received
packet in an OUT transaction. When clear, it indicates no OUT received.
This bit is cleared by any nonlocked writes to the register.
0 = No OUT received
1 = OUT received
Bit 4: ACK’d Transaction
The ACK’d transaction bit is set when the SIE engages in a transaction to the register’s endpoint, which completes with a ACK
packet.
This bit is cleared by any nonlocked writes to the register.
1 = The transaction completes with an ACK.
0 = The transaction does not complete with an ACK.
Bit [3:0]: Mode [3:0]
The endpoint modes determine how the SIE responds to the USB traffic that the host sends to the endpoint. The mode controls
how the USB SIE responds to traffic, and how the USB SIE changes the mode of that endpoint as a result of host packets to the
endpoint.
Note
5. C = Clear. This bit is cleared only by the user and cannot be set by firmware.
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21.4 Endpoint 1 and 2 Mode
Table 21-4. Endpoint 1 and 2 Mode (EP1MODE – EP2MODE) [0x45, 0x46] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
Field
Stall
Reserved
NAK Int Enable
ACK’d
Transaction
3
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/C (Note 4)
R/W
Default
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
0
R/W
R/W
R/W
0
0
0
Mode[3:0]
Bit 7: Stall
When this bit is set the SIE stalls an OUT packet if the Mode Bits are set to ACK-OUT, and the SIE stalls an IN packet if the
mode bits are set to ACK-IN. This bit must be clear for all other modes
Bit 6: Reserved
Bit 5: NAK Int Enable
This bit when set causes an endpoint interrupt to be generated even when a transfer completes with a NAK. Unlike enCoRe,
enCoRe II family members do not generate an endpoint interrupt under these conditions unless this bit is set.
0 = Disable interrupt on NAK’d transactions
1 = Enable interrupt on NAK’d transaction
Bit 4: ACK’d Transaction
The ACK’d transaction bit is set when the SIE engages in a transaction to the register’s endpoint that completes with an ACK
packet.
This bit is cleared by any writes to the register.
0 = The transaction does not complete with an ACK
1 = The transaction completes with an ACK
Bit [3:0]: Mode [3:0]
The endpoint modes determine how the SIE responds to USB traffic that the host sends to the endpoint. The mode controls how
the USB SIE responds to traffic, and how the USB SIE changes the mode of that endpoint as a result of host packets to the
endpoint.
Note When the SIE writes to the EP1MODE or the EP2MODE register, it blocks firmware writes to the EP2MODE or the
EP1MODE registers respectively (if both writes occur in the same clock cycle). This is because the design employs only one
common ‘update’ signal for both EP1MODE and EP2MODE registers. As a result, when SIE writes to say EP1MODE register,
the update signal is set and this prevents firmware writes to EP2MODE register. SIE writes to the endpoint mode registers have
higher priority than firmware writes. This mode register write block situation can put the endpoints in incorrect modes. Firmware
must read the EP1/2MODE registers immediately following a firmware write and rewrite if the value read is incorrect.
Table 21-5. Endpoint 0 Data (EP0DATA) [0x50-0x57] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Endpoint 0 Data Buffer [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
2
1
0
The Endpoint 0 buffer is comprised of 8 bytes located at address 0x50 to 0x57.
Table 21-6. Endpoint 1 Data (EP1DATA) [0x58-0x5F] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
Endpoint 1 Data Buffer [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
The Endpoint 1 buffer is comprised of 8 bytes located at address 0x58 to 0x5F.
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Table 21-7. Endpoint 2 Data (EP2DATA) [0x60-0x67] [R/W]
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Endpoint 2 Data Buffer [7:0]
Field
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
The Endpoint 2 buffer is comprised of 8 bytes located at address 0x60 to 0x67.
The three data buffers are used to hold data for both IN and OUT transactions. Each data buffer is 8 bytes long.
The reset values of the Endpoint Data Registers are unknown.
Unlike past enCoRe parts the USB data buffers are only accessible in the IO space of the processor.
22. USB Mode Tables
Mode
Encoding
SETUP
IN
OUT
Comments
DISABLE
0000
Ignore
Ignore
Ignore
Ignore all USB traffic to this endpoint. Used by Data and
Control endpoints.
NAK IN/OUT
0001
Accept
NAK
NAK
STATUS OUT ONLY
0010
Accept
STALL
Check
NAK IN and OUT token. Control endpoint only.
STALL IN and ACK zero byte OUT. Control endpoint
only.
STALL IN/OUT
0011
Accept
STALL
STALL
STALL IN and OUT token. Control endpoint only.
STATUS IN ONLY
0110
Accept
TX0 byte
STALL
STALL OUT and send zero byte data for IN token. Control endpoint only.
ACK OUT – STATUS
IN
1011
Accept
TX0 byte
ACK
ACK the OUT token or send zero byte data for IN token.
Control endpoint only.
ACK IN – STATUS
OUT
1111
Accept
TX Count
Check
Respond to IN data or Status OUT. Control endpoint
only.
NAK OUT
1000
Ignore
Ignore
NAK
Send NAK handshake to OUT token. Data endpoint
only.
ACK OUT (STALL = 0)
1001
Ignore
Ignore
ACK
This mode is changed by the SIE to mode 1000 on issuance of ACK handshake to an OUT. Data endpoint
only.
ACK OUT (STALL = 1)
1001
Ignore
Ignore
STALL
STALL the OUT transfer.
NAK IN
1100
Ignore
NAK
Ignore
Send NAK handshake for IN token. Data endpoint only.
ACK IN (STALL = 0)
1101
Ignore
TX Count
Ignore
This mode is changed by the SIE to mode 1100 after
receiving ACK handshake to an IN data. Data endpoint
only.
ACK IN (STALL = 1)
1101
Ignore
STALL
Ignore
STALL the IN transfer. Data endpoint only.
Reserved
0101
Ignore
Ignore
Ignore
Reserved
0111
Ignore
Ignore
Ignore
These modes are not supported by SIE. Firmware must
not use this mode in Control and Data endpoints.
Reserved
1010
Ignore
Ignore
Ignore
Reserved
0100
Ignore
Ignore
Ignore
Reserved
1110
Ignore
Ignore
Ignore
22.1 Mode Column
22.2 Encoding Column
The 'Mode' column contains the mnemonic names given to the
modes of the endpoint. The mode of the endpoint is determined
by the 4-bit binaries in the 'Encoding' column as discussed in the
following sections. The Status IN and Status OUT represent the
status IN or OUT stage of the control transfer.
The contents of the 'Encoding' column represent the Mode
Bits [3:0] of the Endpoint Mode Registers (Table 21-3 on page 59
and Table 21-4 on page 60). The endpoint modes determine how
the SIE responds to different tokens that the host sends to the
endpoints. For example, if the Mode Bits [3:0] of the Endpoint 0
Mode Register are set to '0001', which is NAK IN/OUT mode, the
SIE sends an ACK handshake in response to SETUP tokens and
NAK any IN or OUT tokens.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
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22.3 SETUP, IN, and OUT Columns
Depending on the mode specified in the 'Encoding' column, the 'SETUP', 'IN', and 'OUT' columns contain the SIE's responses when
the endpoint receives SETUP, IN, and OUT tokens, respectively.
A 'Check' in the Out column means that upon receiving an OUT token the SIE checks to see whether the OUT is of zero length and
has a Data Toggle (Data1/0) of 1. If these conditions are true, the SIE responds with an ACK. If any of the these conditions is not met,
the SIE responds with a STALL or Ignore.
A 'TX Count' entry in the IN column means that the SIE transmits the number of bytes specified in the Byte Count Bit [3:0] of the
Endpoint Count Register (Table 21-2) in response to any IN token.
23. Details of Mode for Differing Traffic Conditions
Control Endpoint
SIE
Mode
Bus Event
Token
SIE
Count
Dval
D0/1
x
x
x
EP0 Mode Register
Response S
I
EP0 Count Register
O A MODE DTOG
EP0
Interrupt
Comments
DVAL COUNT FIFO
DISABLED
0000
x
Ignore All
STALL_IN_OUT
0011
SETUP
>10
x
x
junk
Ignore
0011
SETUP
<=10
invalid
x
junk
Ignore
0011
SETUP
<=10
valid
x
ACK
0011
IN
x
x
x
STALL
0011
OUT
>10
x
x
Ignore
0011
OUT
<=10
invalid
x
Ignore
0011
OUT
<=10
valid
x
1
1
0001
update
1
update
data
Yes
ACK SETUP
Stall IN
STALL
Stall OUT
NAK_IN_OUT
0001
SETUP
>10
x
x
junk
Ignore
0001
SETUP
<=10
invalid
x
junk
Ignore
0001
SETUP
<=10
valid
x
ACK
0001
IN
x
x
x
NAK
0001
OUT
>10
x
x
Ignore
0001
OUT
<=10
invalid
x
Ignore
0001
OUT
<=10
valid
x
1
1
0001
update
1
update
data
Yes
ACK SETUP
NAK IN
NAK
NAK OUT
ACK_IN_STATUS_OUT
1111
SETUP
>10
x
x
junk
Ignore
1111
SETUP
<=10
invalid
x
junk
Ignore
1111
SETUP
<=10
valid
x
ACK
1111
IN
x
x
x
TX
TX
1111
IN
x
x
x
1111
OUT
>10
x
x
1111
OUT
<=10
invalid
x
1111
OUT
<=10, <>2
valid
x
STALL
1
1
0001
update
1
update
data
Yes
ACK SETUP
Host Not ACK'd
1
1
0001
Yes
Host ACK'd
Ignore
Ignore
1111
OUT
2
valid
0
STALL
1111
OUT
2
valid
1
ACK
0011
Yes
0011
1 1
0010
1
1
2
Bad Status
Yes
Bad Status
Yes
Good Status
STATUS_OUT
0010
SETUP
>10
x
x
junk
Ignore
0010
SETUP
<=10
invalid
x
junk
Ignore
0010
SETUP
<=10
valid
x
ACK
STALL
1
1
0001
1
update
data
Yes
ACK SETUP
Yes
Stall IN
0010
IN
x
x
x
0010
OUT
>10
x
x
Ignore
0010
OUT
<=10
invalid
x
Ignore
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23. Details of Mode for Differing Traffic Conditions (continued)
Control Endpoint
SIE
Bus Event
SIE
D0/1
EP0 Mode Register
Response S
I
EP0 Count Register
O A MODE DTOG
EP0
Interrupt
Comments
Mode
Token
Count
Dval
0010
OUT
<=10, <>2
valid
x
STALL
0011
Yes
Bad Status
0010
OUT
2
valid
0
STALL
0011
Yes
Bad Status
0010
OUT
2
valid
1
ACK
Yes
Good Status
1 1
1
DVAL COUNT FIFO
1
2
ACK_OUT_STATUS_IN
1011
SETUP
>10
x
x
junk
Ignore
1011
SETUP
<=10
invalid
x
junk
Ignore
1011
SETUP
<=10
valid
x
ACK
1011
IN
x
x
x
TX 0
TX 0
1
1
0001
update
1
update
data
Yes
ACK SETUP
Host Not ACK'd
1011
IN
x
x
x
1011
OUT
>10
x
x
1
junk
Ignore
1011
OUT
<=10
invalid
x
junk
Ignore
1011
OUT
<=10
valid
x
ACK
1
1 1
0011
0001
Yes
update
1
update
data
Yes
Host ACK'd
Good OUT
STATUS_IN
0110
SETUP
>10
x
x
junk
Ignore
0110
SETUP
<=10
invalid
x
junk
Ignore
0110
SETUP
<=10
valid
x
ACK
1
1
0001
1
0011
update
1
update
data
Yes
ACK SETUP
Yes
Host ACK'd
0110
IN
x
x
x
TX 0
0110
IN
x
x
x
TX 0
Host Not ACK'd
0110
OUT
>10
x
x
Ignore
0110
OUT
<=10
invalid
x
Ignore
0110
OUT
<=10
valid
x
x
x
x
x
1
STALL
0011
Yes
Stall OUT
Data Out Endpoints
ACK OUT (STALL Bit = 0)
1001
IN
x
1001
OUT
>MAX
1001
OUT
<=MAX
1001
OUT
<=MAX
Ignore
invalid invalid
valid
valid
ACK
1
1000
update
1
update
junk
Ignore
junk
Ignore
data
Yes
ACK OUT
ACK OUT (STALL Bit = 1)
1001
IN
x
x
x
Ignore
1001
OUT
>MAX
x
x
Ignore
1001
OUT
<=MAX
1001
OUT
<=MAX
invalid invalid
valid
valid
Ignore
STALL
Stall OUT
NAK OUT
1000
IN
x
x
x
Ignore
1000
OUT
>MAX
x
x
Ignore
1000
OUT
<=MAX
1000
OUT
<=MAX
invalid invalid
valid
valid
Ignore
NAK
If Enabled NAK OUT
Data In Endpoints
ACK IN (STALL Bit = 0)
1101
OUT
x
x
x
1101
IN
x
x
x
1101
IN
x
x
x
x
x
Ignore
Host Not ACK'd
TX
1
1100
Yes
Host ACK'd
ACK IN (STALL Bit = 1)
1101
OUT
x
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23. Details of Mode for Differing Traffic Conditions (continued)
Control Endpoint
SIE
Bus Event
SIE
Mode
Token
Count
Dval
D0/1
1101
IN
x
x
x
1100
OUT
x
x
x
1100
IN
x
x
x
EP0 Mode Register
Response S
I
EP0 Count Register
O A MODE DTOG
EP0
Interrupt
Comments
DVAL COUNT FIFO
STALL
Stall IN
NAK IN
Ignore
NAK
If Enabled NAK IN
24. Register Summary
The XIO bit in the CPU Flags Register must be set to access the extended register space for all registers above 0xFF.
Addr
Name
7
00
P0DATA
P0.7
P0.6/TIO1 P0.5/TIO0 P0.4/INT2
6
5
4
3
2
P0.3/INT1
P0.2/INT0
01
P1DATA
P1.7
P1.6/SMI P1.5/SMO P1.4/SCLK P1.3/SSEL P1.2/VREG
SO
SI
02
P2DATA
Res
03
P3DATA
Res
04
P4DATA
05
P00CR
Reserved
Int
Enable
Int Act
Low
TTL Thresh Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up
Enable
06
P01CR
CLK
Output
Int
Enable
Int Act
Low
TTL Thresh Reserved
Open Drain
07–09
P02CR–
P04CR
Int Act
Low
TTL Thresh Reserved
0A–0B
P05CR–
P06CR
TIO
Output
Int
Enable
Int Act
Low
0C
P07CR
Reserved
Int
Enable
0D
P10CR
Reserved
0E
P11CR
0F
Res
1
0
R/W
Default
bbbbbbbb
00000000
bbbbbbbb
00000000
P2.1–P2.0
bbbbbbbb
00000000
P3.1–P3.0
bbbbbbbb
00000000
P0.1/CLK- P0.0/CLKI
OUT
N
P1.1/D–
P1.0/D+
----bbbb
00000000
Output
Enable
-bbbbbbb
00000000
Pull up
Enable
Output
Enable
bbbbbbbb
00000000
Open Drain
Pull up
Enable
Output
Enable
--bbbbbb
00000000
TTL Thresh Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up
Enable
Output
Enable
bbbbbbbb
00000000
Int Act
Low
TTL Thresh Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up
Enable
Output
Enable
-bbbbbbb
00000000
Int
Enable
Int Act
Low
Reserved
PS/2 Pull
up Enable
Output
Enable
-bb---bb
00000000
Reserved
Int
Enable
Int Act
Low
Reserved
Open Drain
Reserved
Output
Enable
-bb--b-b
00000000
P12CR
CLK
Output
Int
Enable
Int Act
Low
TTL Thresh Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up
Enable
Output
Enable
bbbbbbbb
00000000
10
P13CR
Reserved
Int
Enable
Int Act
Low
3.3V Drive
High Sink
Open Drain
Pull up
Enable
Output
Enable
-bbbbbbb
00000000
11–13
P14CR–
P16CR
SPI Use
Int
Enable
Int Act
Low
3.3V Drive
High Sink
Open Drain
Pull up
Enable
Output
Enable
bbbbbbbb
00000000
14
P17CR
Reserved
Int
Enable
Int Act
Low
TTL Thresh High Sink
Open Drain
Pull up
Enable
Output
Enable
-bbbbbbb
00000000
15
P2CR
Reserved
Int
Enable
Int Act
Low
TTL Thresh Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up
Enable
Output
Enable
-bbbbbbb
00000000
16
P3CR
Reserved
Int
Enable
Int Act
Low
TTL Thresh Reserved
Open Drain
Pull up
Enable
Output
Enable
-bbbbbbb
00000000
Reserved Reserved
Res
20
FRTMRL
Free Running Timer [7:0]
bbbbbbbb
00000000
21
FRTMRH
Free Running Timer [15:8]
bbbbbbbb
00000000
22
TCAP0R
Capture 0 Rising [7:0]
bbbbbbbb
00000000
23
TCAP1R
Capture 1 Rising [7:0]
bbbbbbbb
00000000
24
TCAP0F
Capture 0 Falling [7:0]
bbbbbbbb
00000000
25
TCAP1F
Capture 1 Falling [7:0]
bbbbbbbb
00000000
26
PITMRL
Prog Interval Timer [7:0]
bbbbbbbb
00000000
27
PITMRH
28
PIRL
29
PIRH
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Reserved
Prog Interval Timer [11:8]
Prog Interval [7:0]
Reserved
Prog Interval [11:8]
----bbbb
00000000
bbbbbbbb
00000000
----bbbb
00000000
Page 64 of 83
[+] Feedback
CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
24. Register Summary (continued)
The XIO bit in the CPU Flags Register must be set to access the extended register space for all registers above 0xFF.
Addr
Name
7
2A
TMRCR
First Edge
Hold
2B
6
5
4
3
2
1
8-bit capture Prescale
Cap0 16bit
Enable
TCAPINTE
Reserved
Cap1 Fall
Active
Cap1 Rise
Active
Cap0 Fall
Active
2C
TCAPINTS
Reserved
Cap1 Fall
Active
Cap1 Rise
Active
Cap0 Fall
Active
30
CPUCLKCR
31
ITMRCLKCR
32
CLKIOCR
Reserved
USB
CLK/2
Disable
TCAPCLK Divider
USB CLK
Select
Reserved
TCAPCLK Select
ITMRCLK Divider
Reserved
Reserved
34
IOSCTR
36
LPOSCTR
39
OSCLCKCR
3C
SPIDATA
3D
SPICR
Swap
40
USBCR
USB
Enable
41
EP0CNT
Data
Toggle
Data Valid
Reserved
42
EP1CNT
Data
Toggle
Data Valid
43
EP2CNT
Data
Toggle
44
EP0MODE
45
0
R/W
Default
bbbbb---
00000000
Cap0 Rise
Active
----bbbb
00000000
Cap0 Rise
Active
----bbbb
00000000
CPU
CLK Select
-bb----b
00010000
Reserved
ITMRCLK Select
bbbbbbbb
10001111
CLKOUT Select
---bbbbb
00000000
foffset[2:0]
Gain[4:0]
bbbbbbbb
000ddddd
Reserved 32 kHz Bias Trim [1:0]
32 kHz Freq Trim [3:0]
b-bbbbbb
dddddddd
------bb
00000000
bbbbbbbb
00000000
bbbbbbbb
00000000
bbbbbbbb
00000000
Byte Count[3:0]
bbbbbbbb
00000000
Reserved
Byte Count[3:0]
bbbbbbbb
00000000
Data Valid
Reserved
Byte Count[3:0]
bbbbbbbb
00000000
Setup
rcv’d
IN rcv’d
OUT rcv’d ACK’d trans
Mode[3:0]
ccccbbbb
00000000
EP1MODE
Stall
Reserved
NAK Int
Enable
Ack’d trans
Mode[3:0]
b-bcbbbb
00000000
46
EP2MODE
Stall
Reserved
NAK Int
Enable
Ack’d trans
Mode[3:0]
b-bcbbbb
00000000
????????
32 kHz
Low
Power
Reserved
Fine Tune
Only
USB
Osclock
Disable
SPIData[7:0]
LSB First
Comm Mode
CPOL
CPHA
SCLK Select
Device Address[6:0]
50–57
EP0DATA
Endpoint 0 Data Buffer [7:0]
bbbbbbbb
58–5F
EP1DATA
Endpoint 1 Data Buffer [7:0]
bbbbbbbb
????????
60–67
EP2DATA
Endpoint 2 Data Buffer [7:0]
bbbbbbbb
????????
73
VREGCR
VREG
Enable
------bb
00000000
74
USBXCR
USB Pull
up Enable
USB Force
State
b------b
00000000
DA
INT_CLR0
GPIO Port
1
Sleep
Timer
INT1
GPIO Port
0
DB
INT_CLR1
TCAP0
Prog
Interval
Timer
1-ms
Timer
USB Active USB Reset
DC
INT_CLR2
Reserved Reserved GPIO Port GPIO Port 2 PS/2 Data
3
Low
DE
INT_MSK3
ENSWINT
b-------
00000000
DF
INT_MSK2
Reserved Reserved GPIO Port GPIO Port 2 PS/2 Data
3
Int Enable
Low Int
Int Enable
Enable
INT2
Int Enable
16-bit
TCAP1
Counter Int Enable
Wrap
Int Enable
-bbbbbbb
00000000
E1
INT_MSK1
TCAP0
Int Enable
USB EP2
Int Enable
USB EP1 USB EP0
Int Enable Int Enable
bbbbbbbb
00000000
E0
INT_MSK0
GPIO Port
Sleep
INT1
GPIO Port 0
SPI
SPI Transmit
INT0
POR/LVD
1
Timer
Int Enable Int Enable
Receive
Int Enable Int Enable Int Enable
Int Enable Int Enable
Int Enable
bbbbbbbb
00000000
Reserved
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Keep Alive
Reserved
SPI
Receive
SPI Transmit
INT0
POR/LVD
bbbbbbbb
00000000
USB EP2
USB EP1
USB EP0
bbbbbbbb
00000000
INT2
16-bit
Counter
Wrap
TCAP1
-bbbbbbb
00000000
Reserved
Prog
1-ms
USB Active USB Reset
Interval
Timer
Int Enable Int Enable
Timer
Int Enable
Int Enable
Page 65 of 83
[+] Feedback
CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
24. Register Summary (continued)
The XIO bit in the CPU Flags Register must be set to access the extended register space for all registers above 0xFF.
Addr
Name
E2
INT_VC
E3
---
7
6
5
R/W
Default
Pending Interrupt [7:0]
4
3
2
1
0
bbbbbbbb
00000000
RESWDT
Reset Watchdog Timer [7:0]
wwwwwwww
00000000
CPU_A
Temporary Register T1 [7:0]
--------
00000000
CPU_X
X[7:0]
--------
00000000
--
CPU_PCL
Program Counter [7:0]
--------
00000000
--
CPU_PCH
Program Counter [15:8]
--------
00000000
--
CPU_SP
-
CPU_F
FF
CPU_SCR
1E0
OSC_CR0
Stack Pointer [7:0]
Reserved
GIES
Reserved
Reserved
1E3
LVDCR
Reserved
1EB
ECO_TR
Sleep Duty Cycle [1:0]
1E4
VLTCMP
WDRS
No Buzz
XOI
Super
Carry
PORS
Sleep
Reserved
Sleep Timer [1:0]
PORLEV[1:0]
Reserved
Zero
Global IE
Reserved
Stop
00000000
00000010
r-ccb--b
00010000
CPU Speed [2:0]
--bbbbbb
00000000
VM[2:0]
--bb-bbbb
00000000
bb------
00000000
------rr
00000000
Reserved
Reserved
----------brwww
LVD
PPOR
Legend
In the R/W column,
b = Both Read and Write
r = Read Only
w = Write Only
c = Read/Clear
? = Unknown
d = calibration value. Must not change during normal use.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 66 of 83
[+] Feedback
CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
25. Voltage Vs CPU Frequency Characteristics
Figure 25-1. Voltage vs CPU Frequency Characteristics
lid ing
Va rat n
o
pe gi
O Re
Vdd (volts)
5.50
4.75
4.00
93 KHz
12 MHz
24 MHz
CPU Frequency
Running the CPU at 24 MHz requires a minimum voltage of
4.75V. This applies to any CPU speed above 12 MHz, so using
an external clock between 12 - 24 MHz must also adhere to this
requirement. Operating the CPU at 24MHz when the supply
voltage is below 4.75V can cause undesired behavior and must
be avoided.
Many enCoRe II applications use USB Vbus 5V as the power
source for the device. According to the USB specification,
voltage can be less than 4.75V on Vbus (if the USB port is a low
power port the voltage can be between 4.4V and 5.25V). Even
for externally powered 5V applications, developers must
consider that on power up and power down voltage is less than
4.75V for some time. Firmware must be implemented properly to
prevent undesired behavior.
Use of 24 MHz requires the use of the high POR trip point of
approximately 4.55 - 4.65V (Register LVDCR 0x1E3,
PORLEV[1:0] = 10b). This setting is sufficient to protect the
device from problems due to operating at low voltage with CPU
speeds above 12 MHz. This must be set before setting the CPU
speed to greater than 12 MHz. For devices with slow power
ramps, changing the POR threshold to the high level may result
in one or more resets of the device as power ramps through the
chip default POR set point of approximately 2.6V up through the
high POR set point.
■
Debounce the indication to ensure that voltage is above the set
point for possible noisy supplies.
■
Set the POR to the high set point.
■
Shift CPU speed to 24 MHz.
If the supply voltage dips below 4.75V and the application can
tolerate running at a CPU speed of 12 MHz, then application
firmware may also implement the following to minimize the
chance of a reset event due to a voltage transient:
■
Set the LVD for one of the desired high setting (~4.73V or
~4.82V).
■
Enable the LVD interrupt.
■
In the LVD ISR, reduce CPU speed to 12 MHz and shift the
POR to a lower threshold.
■
Firmware can monitor for VLTCMP to clear within the normal
application main loop.
■
Debounce the indication to ensure voltage is above the set
point.
■
Shift the POR to the high set point.
■
Shift the CPU to 24 MHz.
If multiple resets are undesirable for slow power ramps, then
firmware must do the following:
■
Set the Low Voltage Detection circuit (Register LVDCR 0x1E3,
VM[2:0]) for one of the set points above the POR (VM[2:0] =
110b ~4.73V or 111b ~4.82V).
■
Monitor the LVD until voltage is above the trip point (Register
VLTCMP 0x1E4, bit 1 is clear).
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 67 of 83
[+] Feedback
CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
26. Absolute Maximum Ratings
Maximum Total Sink Current into Port 0
and Port 1 pins ............................................................ 70 mA
Exceeding maximum ratings may shorten the useful life of the
device. User guidelines are not tested.
Maximum Total Source Output Current into GPIO Pins30 mA
Storage Temperature ................................... –40°C to +90°C
Maximum On-chip Power Dissipation
on any GPIO Pin......................................................... 50 mW
Ambient Temperature with Power Applied..... –0°C to +70°C
Power Dissipation .................................................... 300 mW
Supply Voltage on VCC Relative to VSS ..........–0.5V to +7.0V
Static Discharge Voltage ............................................. 2200V
DC Input Voltage ................................ –0.5V to + VCC + 0.5V
Latch Up Current ..................................................... 200 mA
DC Voltage Applied to Outputs in
High-Z State....................................... –0.5V to + VCC + 0.5V
27. DC Characteristics
Description
Parameter
General
Conditions
Min
Typical
Max
Unit
V
VCC1
Operating Voltage
No USB activity, CPU speed < 12 MHz
4.0
5.5
VCC2
Operating Voltage
USB activity, CPU speed < 12 MHz
4.35
5.25
V
VCC3
Operating Voltage
Flash programming
4.0
5.5
V
VCC4
Operating Voltage
No USB activity, CPU speed is
between 12 MHz and 24 MHz
4.75
5.5
V
TFP
Operating Temp
Flash Programming
0
70
°C
ICC1
VCC Operating Supply Current
VCC = 5.25V, no GPIO loading,
24 MHz
40
mA
ICC2
VCC Operating Supply Current
VCC = 5.0V, no GPIO loading, 6 MHz
ISB1
Standby Current
Internal and External Oscillators,
Bandgap, Flash, CPU Clock, Timer
Clock, USB Clock all disabled
10
mA
10
μA
4.872
V
Low Voltage Detect
VLVD
Low-Voltage Detect Trip Voltage
(8 programmable trip points)
2.681
3.3V Regulator
IVREG
Max Regulator Output Current
4.35V < VCC < 5.5V
125
mA
IKA
Keep Alive Current
When regulator is disabled with
“keep alive” enable
20
μA
VKA
Keep Alive Voltage
Keep alive bit set in VREGCR
2.35
3.8
V
VREG1
VREG Output Voltage
VCC > 4.35V, 0 < temp < 40°C,
25 mA < IVREG < 125 mA (3.3V ± 8%)
T = 0 to 70C
3.0
3.6
V
VREG2
VREG Output Voltage
VCC > 4.35V, 0 < temp < 40°C,
1 mA < IVREG < 25 mA (3.3V ± 4%)
T = 0 to 40°C
3.15
3.45
V
CLOAD
Capacitive load on Vreg pin
1
2
μF
LNREG
Line Regulation
1
%/V
LDREG
Load Regulation
0.04
%/mA
3.6
V
0.3
V
USB Interface
VON
Static Output High
15K ± 5% Ohm to VSS
VOFF
Static Output Low
RUP is enabled
2.8
Note
6. In Master mode, first bit is available 0.5 SPICLK cycle before Master clock edge available on the SCLK pin.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 68 of 83
[+] Feedback
CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
27. DC Characteristics (continued)
Description
Parameter
Conditions
General
Min
VDI
Differential Input Sensitivity
0.2
VCM
Differential Input Common Mode
Range
0.8
VSE
Single Ended Receiver Threshold
0.8
CIN
Transceiver Capacitance
IIO
Hi-Z State Data Line Leakage
0V < VIN < 3.3V
Typical
Max
Unit
V
2.5
–10
V
2
V
20
pF
10
μA
PS/2 Interface
VOLP
Static Output Low
SDATA or SCLK pins
RPS2
Internal PS/2 Pull up Resistance
SDATA, SCLK pins, PS/2 Enabled
0.4
V
3
7
KΩ
4
12
KΩ
General Purpose IO Interface
RUP
Pull Up Resistance
VICR
Input Threshold Voltage Low, CMOS
mode[8]
Low to High edge
40%
65%
VCC
VICF
Input Threshold Voltage Low, CMOS
mode[8]
High to Low edge
30%
55%
VCC
VHC
Input Hysteresis Voltage, CMOS
Mode[8]
High to low edge
3%
10%
VCC
VILTTL
Input Low Voltage, TTL Mode[9]
IO pin Supply = 4.0–5.5V
0.8
V
VIHTTL
Input High Voltage, TTL Mode[9]
IO pin Supply = 4.0–5.5V
2.0
V
VOL1
Output Low Voltage, High Drive
[7]
IOL1 = 50 mA
0.8
V
VOL2
Output Low Voltage, High Drive[7]
IOL1 = 25 mA
0.4
V
VOL3
Output Low Voltage, Low Drive
[8]
0.4
V
VOH
Output High Voltage[8]
CLOAD
Maximum Load Capacitance
IOL2 = 8 mA
IOH = 2 mA
VCC – 0.5
V
[9]
50
pF
Max
Unit
28. AC Characteristics
Parameter
Description
Conditions
Min
Typical
Clock
TECLKDC
External Clock Duty Cycle
TECLK1
External Clock Frequency
External clock is the source of the
CPUCLK
TECLK2
External Clock Frequency
External clock is not the source of the
CPUCLK
FIMO1
Internal Main Oscillator Frequency
FIMO2
FILO1
FILO2
45
55
%
0.187
24
MHz
0
24
MHz
No USB present
22.8
25.2
MHz
Internal Main Oscillator Frequency
With USB present
23.64
24.3
MHz
Internal Low Power Oscillator
Normal mode
29.44
37.12
kHz
Internal Low Power Oscillator
Low power mode
35.84
47.36
kHz
200
mVp-p
3.3V Regulator
VORIP
Output Ripple Voltage
10 Hz to 100 MHz at CLOAD = 1 μF
Notes
7. Available only in CY7C638xx P1.3, P1.4, P1.5, P1.6, P1.7.
8. Except for pins P1.0 and P1.1 in the GPIO mode.
9. Except for pins P1.0 and P1.1.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 69 of 83
[+] Feedback
CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
28. AC Characteristics (continued)
Parameter
Description
Conditions
Min
Typical
Max
Unit
USB Driver
TR1
Transition Rise Time
CLOAD = 200 pF
TR2
Transition Rise Time
CLOAD = 600 pF
TF1
Transition Fall Time
CLOAD = 200 pF
TF2
Transition Fall Time
CLOAD = 600 pF
300
ns
TR
Rise/Fall Time Matching
80
125
%
VCRS
Output Signal Crossover Voltage
1.3
2.0
V
75
ns
300
ns
75
ns
USB Data Timing
TDRATE
Low Speed Data Rate
Average Bit Rate (1.5 Mbps ± 1.5%)
1.4775
1.5225
Mbps
TDJR1
Receiver Data Jitter Tolerance
To next transition
–75
75
ns
TDJR2
Receiver Data Jitter Tolerance
To pair transition
–45
45
ns
TDEOP
Differential to EOP Transition Skew
–40
100
ns
TEOPR1
EOP Width at Receiver
Rejects as EOP
330
ns
TEOPR2
EOP Width at Receiver
Accept as EOP
675
ns
TEOPT
Source EOP Width
1.25
1.5
μs
TUDJ1
Differential Driver Jitter
To next transition
–95
95
ns
TUDJ2
Differential Driver Jitter
To pair transition
–95
TLST
Width of SE0 during Diff. Transition
95
ns
210
ns
300
ns
Non-USB Mode Driver Characteristics
TFPS2
SDATA/SCK Transition Fall Time
50
GPIO Timing
TR_GPIO
Output Rise Time[8]
Measured between 10 and 90%
Vdd/Vreg with 50 pF load
50
ns
TF_GPIO
Output Fall Time[8]
Measured between 10 and 90%
Vdd/Vreg with 50 pF load
15
ns
FCPUCLK/6
SPI Timing
TSMCK
SPI Master Clock Rate
TSSCK
SPI Slave Clock Rate
2
MHz
2.2
MHz
TSCKH
SPI Clock High Time
High for CPOL = 0, Low for CPOL = 1
125
ns
TSCKL
SPI Clock Low Time
Low for CPOL = 0, High for CPOL = 1
125
ns
TMDO
Master Data Output Time[10]
SCK to data valid
–25
TMDO1
Master Data Output Time,
First bit with CPHA = 0
Time before leading SCK edge
100
ns
TMSU
Master Input Data Setup time
50
ns
TMHD
Master Input Data Hold time
50
ns
TSSU
Slave Input Data Setup Time
50
ns
TSHD
Slave Input Data Hold Time
TSDO
Slave Data Output Time
SCK to data valid
100
ns
TSDO1
Slave Data Output Time,
First bit with CPHA = 0
Time after SS LOW to data valid
100
ns
TSSS
Slave Select Setup Time
Before first SCK edge
150
ns
TSSH
Slave Select Hold Time
After last SCK edge
150
ns
50
50
ns
ns
Note
10. In Master mode, first bit is available 0.5 SPICLK cycle before Master clock edge available on the SCLK pin.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 70 of 83
[+] Feedback
CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
1
Figure 28-1. Clock Timing
TCYC
TCH
CLOCK
TCL
Figure 28-2. GPIO Timing Diagram
90%
GPIO Pin Output
Voltage
10%
TR_GPIO
TF_GPIO
Figure 28-3. USB Data Signal Timing
Voh
90%
Vcrs
Vol
TF
TR
D+
90%
10%
10%
D−
Figure 28-4. Receiver Jitter Tolerance
TPERIOD
Differential
Data Lines
TJR
TJR1
TJR2
Consecutive
Transitions
N * TPERIOD + TJR1
Paired
Transitions
N * TPERIOD + TJR2
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 71 of 83
[+] Feedback
CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
Figure 28-5. Differential to EOP Transition Skew and EOP Width
TPERIOD
Differential
Data Lines
Crossover Point
Extended
Crossover
Point
Diff. Data to
SE0 Skew
N * TPERIOD + TDEOP
Source EOP Width: TEOPT
Receiver EOP Width: TEOPR1, TEOPR2
Figure 28-6. Differential Data Jitter
TPERIOD
Differential
Data Lines
Crossover
Points
Consecutive
Transitions
N * TPERIOD + TxJR1
Paired
Transitions
N * TPERIOD + TxJR2
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 72 of 83
[+] Feedback
CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
Figure 28-7. SPI Master Timing, CPHA = 1
SS
(SS is under firmware control in SPI Master mode)
TSCKL
SCK (CPOL=0)
TSCKH
SCK (CPOL=1)
TMDO
MOSI
MSB
MISO
MSB
LSB
LSB
TMSU TMHD
Figure 28-8. SPI Slave Timing, CPHA = 1
SS
TSSS
TSSH
TSCKL
SCK (CPOL=0)
TSCKH
SCK (CPOL=1)
MOSI
MSB
TSDO
MISO
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
LSB
TSSU TSHD
MSB
LSB
Page 73 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
Figure 28-9. SPI Master Timing, CPHA = 0
SS
(SS is under firmware control in SPI Master mode)
TSCKL
SCK (CPOL=0)
TSCKH
SCK (CPOL=1)
TMDO
TMDO1
MOSI
MSB
LSB
MSB
MISO
LSB
TMSU TMHD
Figure 28-10. SPI Slave Timing, CPHA = 0
SS
TSSH
TSSS
TSCKL
SCK (CPOL=0)
TSCKH
SCK (CPOL=1)
MSB
MOSI
LSB
TSSU TSHD
TSDO1
MISO
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
MSB
TSDO
LSB
Page 74 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
29. Ordering Information
Ordering Code
FLASH Size
RAM Size
3K
128
CY7C63310-PXC
Package Type
16-PDIP
CY7C63310-SXC
3K
128
16-SOIC
CY7C63801-PXC
4K
256
16-PDIP
CY7C63801-SXC
4K
256
16-SOIC
CY7C63803-SXC
8K
256
16-SOIC
CY7C63803-SXCT
8K
256
16-SOIC, Tape and Reel
CY7C63813-PXC
8K
256
18-PDIP
CY7C63813-SXC
8K
256
18-SOIC
CY7C63823-QXC
8K
256
24-QSOP
CY7C63823-SXC
8K
256
24-SOIC
CY7C63823-SXCT
8K
256
24-SOIC, Tape and Reel
CY7C63823-XC
8K
256
Die form
CY7C63833-LFXC
8K
256
32-QFN
CY7C63833-LTXC
8K
256
32-QFN Sawn
CY7C63833-LTXCT
8K
256
32-QFN Sawn, Tape and Reel
30. Package Handling
Some IC packages require baking before they are soldered onto a PCB to remove moisture that may have been absorbed after leaving
the factory. A label on the packaging has details about actual bake temperature and the minimum bake time to remove this moisture.
The maximum bake time is the aggregate time that the parts are exposed to the bake temperature. Exceeding this exposure time may
degrade device reliability.
Parameter
Description
TBAKETEMP
Bake Temperature
TBAKETIME
Bake Time
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Min
See package label
Typical
Max
Unit
125
See package label
°C
72
hours
Page 75 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
31. Package Diagrams
Figure 31-1. 16-Pin (300-Mil) Molded DIP P1
8
1
MIN.
MAX.
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
0.240
0.260
9
16
0.015
0.035
0.740
0.770
SEATING PLANE
0.280
0.325
0.120
0.140
0.140
0.190
0.115
0.160
0.009
0.012
0.015
0.060
0.055
0.065
0.090
0.110
3° MIN.
0.310
0.385
0.015
0.020
51-85009 *A
Figure 31-2. 16-Pin (150-Mil) SOIC S16.15
PIN 1 ID
8
1
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES[MM] MIN.
MAX.
REFERENCE JEDEC MS-012
PACKAGE WEIGHT 0.15gms
0.150[3.810]
0.157[3.987]
0.230[5.842]
0.244[6.197]
PART #
S16.15 STANDARD PKG.
SZ16.15 LEAD FREE PKG.
9
16
0.386[9.804]
0.393[9.982]
0.010[0.254]
0.016[0.406]
SEATING PLANE
X 45°
0.061[1.549]
0.068[1.727]
0.004[0.102]
0.050[1.270]
BSC
0°~8°
0.0138[0.350]
0.0192[0.487]
0.004[0.102]
0.0098[0.249]
0.016[0.406]
0.035[0.889]
0.0075[0.190]
0.0098[0.249]
51-85068-*B
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 76 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
Figure 31-3. 18-Pin (300-Mil) Molded DIP P3
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
9
1
0.240
0.270
10
18
P18.3
PART #
STANDARD PKG.
PZ18.3
LEAD FREE PKG.
MIN.
MAX.
0.030
0.060
0.870
0.920
SEATING PLANE
0.300
0.325
0.120
0.140
0.140
0.190
0.115
0.160
0.015
0.060
0.055
0.065
0.090
0.110
0.009
0.012
3° MIN.
0.310
0.385
0.015
0.020
51-85010 *B
Figure 31-4. 18-Pin (300-Mil) Molded SOIC S3
PIN 1 ID
9
1
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES[MM]
0.291[7.391]
0.300[7.620]
*
REFERENCE JEDEC MO-119
0.394[10.007]
0.419[10.642]
10
MIN.
MAX.
PART #
S18.3 STANDARD PKG.
SZ18.3 LEAD FREE PKG.
18
0.026[0.660]
0.032[0.812]
SEATING PLANE
0.447[11.353]
0.463[11.760]
0.092[2.336]
0.105[2.667]
*
0.004[0.101]
0.050[1.270]
TYP.
0.013[0.330]
0.019[0.482]
0.004[0.101]
0.0118[0.299]
*
0.015[0.381]
0.050[1.270]
0.0091[0.231]
0.0125[0.317]
51-85023-*B
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 77 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
Figure 31-5. 24-Pin (300-Mil) SOIC S13
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES
JEDEC STD REF MO-119
51-85025-*C
Figure 31-6. 24-Pin QSOP O241
S
0.033
REF.
12
0.228
1
PIN 1 ID
0.150
0.157
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES MIN.
MAX.
0.244
13
24
0.337
0.344
SEATING
PLANE
0.007
0.010
0.053
0.069
0.004
0.004
0.010
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
0.008
0.012
0.025
BSC.
0.016
0.034
0°-8°
51-85055-*B
Page 78 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
Figure 31-7. 32-Pin QFN Package
51-85188-*B
Figure 31-8. 32-Pin Sawn QFN Package
001-30999 *A
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 79 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
32. Document History Page
Document Title: CY7C63310, CY7C638xx enCoRe™ II Low Speed USB Peripheral Controller
Document Number: 38-08035
Rev.
ECN No.
Orig. of
Change
Submission
Date
**
131323
XGR
12/11/03
New data sheet
*A
221881
KKU
See ECN
Added Register descriptions and package information, changed from advance
information to preliminary
Description of Change
*B
271232
BON
See ECN
Reformatted. Updated with the latest information
*C
299179
BON
See ECN
Corrected 24-PDIP pinout typo in Table 5-2 on page 6 Added Table 10-1 on
page 21. Updated Table 9-5 on page 16, Table 10-3 on page 22, Table 13-1 on
page 31, Table 17-2 on page 52, Table 17-4 on page 52, Table 17-6 on page
53. and Table 15-2 on page 41. Added various updates to the GPIO Section
(General Purpose IO (GPIO) Ports on page 33) Corrected Table 15-4 on page
42. Corrected Figure 28-7. on page 73 and Figure 28-8. on page 73. Added the
16-pin PDIP package diagram (section Package Diagrams on page 76)
*D
322053
TVR
See ECN
Introduction on page 3: Removed Low-voltage reset in last paragraph. There
is no LVR, only LVD (Low voltage detect). Explained more about LVD and POR.
Changed capture pins from P0.0,P0.1 to P0.5,P0.6.
Table 6-1 on page 7: Changed table heading (Removed Mnemonics and made
as Register names).
Table 9-5 on page 16: Included #of rows for different flash sizes.
Clock Architecture Description on page 21: Changed CPUCLK selectable
options from n=0-5,7,8 to n=0-5,7.
Clocking on page 19: Changed ITMRCLK division to 1,2,3,4. Updated the
sources to ITMRCLK, TCAPCLKs. Mentioned P17 is TTL enabled permanently.
Corrected FRT, PIT data write order. Updated INTCLR, INTMSK registers in
the register table also.
DC Characteristics on page 68: changed LVR to LVD included max min
programmable trip points based on char data. Updated the 50ma sink pins on
638xx, 63903. Keep-alive voltage mentioned corresponding to Keep-alive
current of 20uA. Included Notes regarding VOL,VOH on P1.0,P1.1 and TMDO
spec.
AC Characteristics on page 69: TMDO1, TSDO1 In description column changed
Phase to 0.
BON
Pinouts on page 4: Removed the VREG from the CY7C63310 and CY7C63801
Removed SCLK and SDATA. Created a separate pinout diagram for the
CY7C63813.
Added the GPIO Block Diagram (Figure 14-1. on page 36)
Table 10-4 on page 23: Changed the Sleep Timer Clock unit from 32 kHz count
to Hz.
Table 21-1 on page 58: Added more descriptions to the register.
*E
341277
BHA
See ECN
Corrected VIH TTL value in DC Characteristics on page 68.
Updated VIL TTL value.
Added footnote to pin description table for D+/D– pins.
Added Typical Values to Low Voltage Detect table.
Corrected Pin label on 16-pin PDIP package.
Corrected minor typos.
*F
408017
TYJ
See ECN
Table 5-2 on page 6: Corrected pin assignment for the 24-pin QSOP package
- GPIO port 3
New Assignments: Pin 19 assigned to P3.0 and pin 20 to P3.1
Table 17-7 on page 54: INT_MASK1 changed to 0xE1
Table 17-8 on page 55: INT_MASK0 changed to 0xE0
Register Summary on page 64: Register Summary, address E0 assigned to
INT_MASK0 and address E1 assigned to INT_MASK1
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 80 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
32. Document History Page (continued)
Document Title: CY7C63310, CY7C638xx enCoRe™ II Low Speed USB Peripheral Controller
Document Number: 38-08035
Rev.
ECN No.
Orig. of
Change
Submission
Date
Description of Change
*G
424790
TYJ
See ECN
Minor text changes to make document more readable
Removed CY7C639xx
Removed CY7C639xx from Ordering Information on page 75
Added text concerning current draw for P0.0 and P0.1 in Table 5-2 on page 6
Corrected Figure 9-2 on page 15 to represent single stack
Added comment about availability of 3.3V IO on P1.3-P1.6 in Table 5-2 on page
6
Added information on Flash endurance and data retention to section Flash on
page 14
Added block diagrams and timing diagrams
Added CY7C638xx die form diagrams, Pad assignment tables and Ordering
information
Keyboard references removed
CY7C63923-XC die diagram removed, removed references to the 639xx parts
Updated part numbers in the header
*H
491711
TYJ
See ECN
Minor text changes
32-QFN part added
Removed 638xx die diagram and die form pad assignment
Removed GPIO port 4 configuration details
Corrected GPIO characteristics of P0.0 and P0.1 to P1.0 and P1.1 respectively
*I
504691
TYJ
See ECN
Minor text changes
Removed all residual references to external crystal oscillator and GPIO4
Documented the dedicated 3.3V regulator for USB transceiver
Documented bandgap/voltage regulator behavior on wake up
Voltage regulator line/load regulation documented
USB Active and PS2 Data low interrupt trigger conditions documented.
GPIO capacitance and timing diagram included
Method to clear Capture Interrupt Status bit discussed
Sleep and Wake up sequence documented.
EP1MODE/EP2MODE register issue discussed.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Page 81 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
32. Document History Page (continued)
Document Title: CY7C63310, CY7C638xx enCoRe™ II Low Speed USB Peripheral Controller
Document Number: 38-08035
Rev.
ECN No.
Orig. of
Change
Submission
Date
Description of Change
*J
2147747
VGT/AESA
05/20/2008
TID number entered on page 1. Also changed the sentence “High current drive
on GPIO pins” to “2mA source current on all GPIO pins”.
Point 26.0, DC Characteristics on page 68, changed the min. and max. voltages
of Vcc3 (line 3) to 4.0 and 5.5 respectively.
Point 19.0, title modified to “Regulator Output”, instead of “USB Regulator
Output”.
Added a point # 3 under Point 17.3.
Changed the storage temperature to “-40C to 90C” in Point # 25.0 (Absolute
Maximum Ratings on page 68).
Added the die form after the end of page 4.
In line 3, under “Bit 2: P1.2/VREG” of Table 14-2 on page 34, the changes made
were “CY7C63310/CY7C638xx” instead of “CY7C63813.
In line 1, under “Bit 6: USB CLK/2 Disable” of Table 10-3 on page 22, entered
the word “clock” instead of “crystal oscillator”.
Entered the word “Reserved” and left its corresponding fields blank in the
sub-table under “Bit[2:0]: VM[2:0]” of Table 13-1 on page 31.
Under “Bit [7:6]: Sleep Duty Cycle[1:0]”, made the following changes:
0 0 = 1/128 periods of the internal 32 kHz low speed oscillator.
0 1 = 1/512 periods of the internal 32 kHz low speed oscillator.
1 0 = 1/32 periods of the internal 32 kHz low speed oscillator.
1 1 = 1/8 periods of the internal 32 kHz low speed oscillator.
In Table 17-3 on page 52, in line 4, deleted “57”, and made the word “AND” to
lower case.
Added 32-Pin Sawn QFN Pin Diagram, package diagram, and ordering
information.
Removed references to 3V for the 32 kHz oscillator in Section 10. Clocking.
Added information on SROM Table read - section 9.6.
Updated section 12.3 Low-Power in Sleep Mode - Included Set P10CR[1] during non-USB mode operations.
Added section 25 - Voltage Vs CPU Frequency char.
P1DATA register information updated. Vreg can operate independent of USB
connection.
Included IMO and ILO characteristics in the AC char section.
Updated to data sheet template *E.
*K
2620679
CMCC/PYRS
12/12/08
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Added Package Handling information
Page 82 of 83
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CY7C63310, CY7C638xx
33. Sales, Solutions, and Legal Information
Worldwide Sales and Design Support
Cypress maintains a worldwide network of offices, solution centers, manufacturer’s representatives, and distributors. To find the office
closest to you, visit us at cypress.com/sales.
Products
PSoC
Clocks & Buffers
PSoC Solutions
psoc.cypress.com
clocks.cypress.com
General
Low Power/Low Voltage
psoc.cypress.com/solutions
psoc.cypress.com/low-power
Wireless
wireless.cypress.com
Precision Analog
Memories
memory.cypress.com
LCD Drive
psoc.cypress.com/lcd-drive
image.cypress.com
CAN 2.0b
psoc.cypress.com/can
USB
psoc.cypress.com/usb
Image Sensors
psoc.cypress.com/precision-analog
© Cypress Semiconductor Corporation, 2003-2008. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. Cypress Semiconductor Corporation assumes no responsibility for the use of
any circuitry other than circuitry embodied in a Cypress product. Nor does it convey or imply any license under patent or other rights. Cypress products are not warranted nor intended to be used for
medical, life support, life saving, critical control or safety applications, unless pursuant to an express written agreement with Cypress. Furthermore, Cypress does not authorize its products for use as
critical components in life-support systems where a malfunction or failure may reasonably be expected to result in significant injury to the user. The inclusion of Cypress products in life-support systems
application implies that the manufacturer assumes all risk of such use and in doing so indemnifies Cypress against all charges.
Any Source Code (software and/or firmware) is owned by Cypress Semiconductor Corporation (Cypress) and is protected by and subject to worldwide patent protection (United States and foreign),
United States copyright laws and international treaty provisions. Cypress hereby grants to licensee a personal, non-exclusive, non-transferable license to copy, use, modify, create derivative works of,
and compile the Cypress Source Code and derivative works for the sole purpose of creating custom software and or firmware in support of licensee product to be used only in conjunction with a Cypress
integrated circuit as specified in the applicable agreement. Any reproduction, modification, translation, compilation, or representation of this Source Code except as specified above is prohibited without
the express written permission of Cypress.
Disclaimer: CYPRESS MAKES NO WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, WITH REGARD TO THIS MATERIAL, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Cypress reserves the right to make changes without further notice to the materials described herein. Cypress does not
assume any liability arising out of the application or use of any product or circuit described herein. Cypress does not authorize its products for use as critical components in life-support systems where
a malfunction or failure may reasonably be expected to result in significant injury to the user. The inclusion of Cypress’ product in a life-support systems application implies that the manufacturer
assumes all risk of such use and in doing so indemnifies Cypress against all charges.
Use may be limited by and subject to the applicable Cypress software license agreement.
Document 38-08035 Rev. *K
Revised December 08 2008
Page 83 of 83
PSoC® is a registered trademark of Cypress MicroSystems. enCoRe is a trademark of Cypress Semiconductor Corporation. All product and company names mentioned in this document are the
trademarks of their respective holders.
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